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Sample records for guided multibeam radiotherapy

  1. [Task sharing with radiotherapy technicians in image-guided radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Diaz, O; Lorchel, F; Revault, C; Mornex, F

    2013-10-01

    The development of accelerators with on-board imaging systems now allows better target volumes reset at the time of irradiation (image-guided radiotherapy [IGRT]). However, these technological advances in the control of repositioning led to a multiplication of tasks for each actor in radiotherapy and increase the time available for the treatment, whether for radiotherapy technicians or radiation oncologists. As there is currently no explicit regulatory framework governing the use of IGRT, some institutional experiments show that a transfer is possible between radiation oncologists and radiotherapy technicians for on-line verification of image positioning. Initial training for every technical and drafting procedures within institutions will improve audit quality by reducing interindividual variability.

  2. [Adaptative radiotherapy: The case for MRI-guided radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Maingon, P

    2016-10-01

    The concept of image-guided radiotherapy benefits from the development of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) associated with different capacities of tissue analyses such as spectroscopy or diffusion analysis. The production of devices allowing the repositioning of patients through MRI represents a strong added value without delivering any additional dose to the patient while the optimization of the adaptative strategies are facilitated by a better contrast of the soft tissues compared to the scanner. The advantages of MRI are well demonstrated for brain tumours, head and neck carcinomas, pelvic tumors, mediastinal malignancies, gastrointestinal tract diseases. Adaptative radiotherapy inaugurates a new area of radiotherapy with different modalities. Several technological solutions are provided or discussed allowing the patients to benefit from thses new technologies as soon as possible.

  3. [Good practice of image-guided radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    de Crevoisier, R; Créhange, G; Castelli, J; Lafond, C; Delpon, G

    2015-10-01

    Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) aims to take into account the anatomical variations occurring during the course of radiotherapy, by direct or indirect visualization of the target volume followed by a corrective action. The movements of the target, or at least the set-up errors are corrected by moving the treatment table, corresponding to the simplest and most validated IGRT modality in a standard practice. The deformations of the target volume and organs at risk are however much more common, and unfortunately much more complicated to consider, requiring multiple planning before or during the treatment, corresponding to the adaptive radiotherapy strategies. The planning target volume must be carefully chosen according to these anatomic variations. This article reviews the modalities of IGRT, standard or under evaluation, according to the different tumour sites. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  4. Fiducial marker guided prostate radiotherapy: a review.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Angela G M; Jain, Suneil; Hounsell, Alan R; O'Sullivan, Joe M

    2016-12-01

    Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) is an essential tool in the accurate delivery of modern radiotherapy techniques. Prostate radiotherapy positioned using skin marks or bony anatomy may be adequate for delivering a relatively homogeneous whole-pelvic radiotherapy dose, but these surrogates are not reliable when using reduced margins, dose escalation or hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy. Fiducial markers (FMs) for prostate IGRT have been in use since the 1990s. They require surgical implantation and provide a surrogate for the position of the prostate gland. A variety of FMs are available and they can be used in a number of ways. This review aimed to establish the evidence for using prostate FMs in terms of feasibility, implantation procedures, types of FMs used, FM migration, imaging modalities used and the clinical impact of FMs. A search strategy was defined and a literature search was carried out in Medline. Inclusion and exclusion criteria were applied, which resulted in 50 articles being included in this review. The evidence demonstrates that FMs provide a more accurate surrogate for the position of the prostate than either external skin marks or bony anatomy. A combination of FM alignment and soft-tissue analysis is currently the most effective and widely available approach to ensuring accuracy in prostate IGRT. FM implantation is safe and well tolerated. FM migration is possible but minimal. Standardization of all techniques and procedures in relation to the use of prostate FMs is required. Finally, a clinical trial investigating a non-surgical alternative to prostate FMs is introduced.

  5. Dynamic targeting image-guided radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Huntzinger, Calvin; Munro, Peter; Johnson, Scott; Miettinen, Mika; Zankowski, Corey; Ahlstrom, Greg; Glettig, Reto; Filliberti, Reto; Kaissl, Wolfgang; Kamber, Martin; Amstutz, Martin; Bouchet, Lionel; Klebanov, Dan; Mostafavi, Hassan; Stark, Richard

    2006-07-01

    Volumetric imaging and planning for 3-dimensional (3D) conformal radiotherapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) have highlighted the need to the oncology community to better understand the geometric uncertainties inherent in the radiotherapy delivery process, including setup error (interfraction) as well as organ motion during treatment (intrafraction). This has ushered in the development of emerging technologies and clinical processes, collectively referred to as image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT). The goal of IGRT is to provide the tools needed to manage both inter- and intrafraction motion to improve the accuracy of treatment delivery. Like IMRT, IGRT is a process involving all steps in the radiotherapy treatment process, including patient immobilization, computed tomogaphy (CT) simulation, treatment planning, plan verification, patient setup verification and correction, delivery, and quality assurance. The technology and capability of the Dynamic Targeting{sup TM} IGRT system developed by Varian Medical Systems is presented. The core of this system is a Clinac (registered) or Trilogy{sup TM} accelerator equipped with a gantry-mounted imaging system known as the On-Board Imager{sup TM} (OBI). This includes a kilovoltage (kV) x-ray source, an amorphous silicon kV digital image detector, and 2 robotic arms that independently position the kV source and imager orthogonal to the treatment beam. A similar robotic arm positions the PortalVision{sup TM} megavoltage (MV) portal digital image detector, allowing both to be used in concert. The system is designed to support a variety of imaging modalities. The following applications and how they fit in the overall clinical process are described: kV and MV planar radiographic imaging for patient repositioning, kV volumetric cone beam CT imaging for patient repositioning, and kV planar fluoroscopic imaging for gating verification. Achieving image-guided motion management throughout the radiation oncology process

  6. Image-Guided Radiotherapy and -Brachytherapy for Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Suresh; Nguyen, Nam Phong; Vock, Jacqueline; Kerr, Christine; Godinez, Juan; Bose, Satya; Jang, Siyoung; Chi, Alexander; Almeida, Fabio; Woods, William; Desai, Anand; David, Rick; Karlsson, Ulf Lennart; Altdorfer, Gabor

    2015-01-01

    Conventional radiotherapy for cervical cancer relies on clinical examination, 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), and 2-dimensional intracavitary brachytherapy. Excellent local control and survival have been obtained for small early stage cervical cancer with definitive radiotherapy. For bulky and locally advanced disease, the addition of chemotherapy has improved the prognosis but toxicity remains significant. New imaging technology such as positron-emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging has improved tumor delineation for radiotherapy planning. Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) may decrease treatment toxicity of whole pelvic radiation because of its potential for bone marrow, bowel, and bladder sparring. Tumor shrinkage during whole pelvic IGRT may optimize image-guided brachytherapy (IGBT), allowing for better local control and reduced toxicity for patients with cervical cancer. IGRT and IGBT should be integrated in future prospective studies for cervical cancer. PMID:25853092

  7. Image-guided radiotherapy and -brachytherapy for cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Suresh; Nguyen, Nam Phong; Vock, Jacqueline; Kerr, Christine; Godinez, Juan; Bose, Satya; Jang, Siyoung; Chi, Alexander; Almeida, Fabio; Woods, William; Desai, Anand; David, Rick; Karlsson, Ulf Lennart; Altdorfer, Gabor

    2015-01-01

    Conventional radiotherapy for cervical cancer relies on clinical examination, 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), and 2-dimensional intracavitary brachytherapy. Excellent local control and survival have been obtained for small early stage cervical cancer with definitive radiotherapy. For bulky and locally advanced disease, the addition of chemotherapy has improved the prognosis but toxicity remains significant. New imaging technology such as positron-emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging has improved tumor delineation for radiotherapy planning. Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) may decrease treatment toxicity of whole pelvic radiation because of its potential for bone marrow, bowel, and bladder sparring. Tumor shrinkage during whole pelvic IGRT may optimize image-guided brachytherapy (IGBT), allowing for better local control and reduced toxicity for patients with cervical cancer. IGRT and IGBT should be integrated in future prospective studies for cervical cancer.

  8. Image-guided radiotherapy: from current concept to future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Jaffray, David A

    2012-12-01

    Radiotherapy is a highly effective, targeted therapy for the management of cancer. Technological innovations have enabled the direct integration of imaging technology into the radiation treatment device to increase the precision and accuracy of radiation delivery. As well as addressing a clinical need to better control the placement of the dose within the body, image-guided radiotherapy has enabled innovators in the field to accelerate their exploration of a number of different paradigms of radiation delivery, including toxicity reduction, dose escalation, hypofractionation, voxelization, and adaptation. Although these approaches are already innovative trends in radiation oncology, it is anticipated that they will work synergistically with other innovations in cancer management (including biomarker strategies, novel systemic and local therapies) as part of the broader goal of personalized cancer medicine. This Review discusses the rationale for adopting image-guidance approaches in radiotherapy, and the technology for achieving precision and accuracy in the context of different paradigms within the evolving radiation oncology practice. It also examines exciting advances in radiotherapy technology that suggest a convergence of radiotherapy practice in which patient-specific radiotherapy treatment courses are one of the most personalized forms of intervention in cancer medicine.

  9. Whole breast radiotherapy in prone and supine position: is there a place for multi-beam IMRT?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Early stage breast cancer patients are long-term survivors and finding techniques that may lower acute and late radiotherapy-induced toxicity is crucial. We compared dosimetry of wedged tangential fields (W-TF), tangential field intensity-modulated radiotherapy (TF-IMRT) and multi-beam IMRT (MB-IMRT) in prone and supine positions for whole-breast irradiation (WBI). Methods MB-IMRT, TF-IMRT and W-TF treatment plans in prone and supine positions were generated for 18 unselected breast cancer patients. The median prescription dose to the optimized planning target volume (PTVoptim) was 50 Gy in 25 fractions. Dose-volume parameters and indices of conformity were calculated for the PTVoptim and organs-at-risk. Results Prone MB-IMRT achieved (p<0.01) the best dose homogeneity compared to WTF in the prone position and WTF and MB-IMRT in the supine position. Prone IMRT scored better for all dose indices. MB-IMRT lowered lung and heart dose (p<0.05) in supine position, however the lowest ipsilateral lung doses (p<0.001) were in prone position. In left-sided breast cancer patients population averages for heart sparing by radiation dose was better in prone position; though non-significant. For patients with a PTVoptim volume ≥600 cc heart dose was consistently lower in prone position; while for patients with smaller breasts heart dose metrics were comparable or worse compared to supine MB-IMRT. Doses to the contralateral breast were similar regardless of position or technique. Dosimetry of prone MB-IMRT and prone TF-IMRT differed slightly. Conclusions MB-IMRT is the treatment of choice in supine position. Prone IMRT is superior to any supine treatment for right-sided breast cancer patients and left-sided breast cancer patients with larger breasts by obtaining better conformity indices, target dose distribution and sparing of the organs-at-risk. The influence of treatment techniques in prone position is less pronounced; moreover dosimetric differences between TF

  10. Whole breast radiotherapy in prone and supine position: is there a place for multi-beam IMRT?

    PubMed

    Mulliez, Thomas; Speleers, Bruno; Madani, Indira; De Gersem, Werner; Veldeman, Liv; De Neve, Wilfried

    2013-06-24

    Early stage breast cancer patients are long-term survivors and finding techniques that may lower acute and late radiotherapy-induced toxicity is crucial. We compared dosimetry of wedged tangential fields (W-TF), tangential field intensity-modulated radiotherapy (TF-IMRT) and multi-beam IMRT (MB-IMRT) in prone and supine positions for whole-breast irradiation (WBI). MB-IMRT, TF-IMRT and W-TF treatment plans in prone and supine positions were generated for 18 unselected breast cancer patients. The median prescription dose to the optimized planning target volume (PTVoptim) was 50 Gy in 25 fractions. Dose-volume parameters and indices of conformity were calculated for the PTVoptim and organs-at-risk. Prone MB-IMRT achieved (p<0.01) the best dose homogeneity compared to WTF in the prone position and WTF and MB-IMRT in the supine position. Prone IMRT scored better for all dose indices. MB-IMRT lowered lung and heart dose (p<0.05) in supine position, however the lowest ipsilateral lung doses (p<0.001) were in prone position. In left-sided breast cancer patients population averages for heart sparing by radiation dose was better in prone position; though non-significant. For patients with a PTVoptim volume ≥600 cc heart dose was consistently lower in prone position; while for patients with smaller breasts heart dose metrics were comparable or worse compared to supine MB-IMRT. Doses to the contralateral breast were similar regardless of position or technique. Dosimetry of prone MB-IMRT and prone TF-IMRT differed slightly. MB-IMRT is the treatment of choice in supine position. Prone IMRT is superior to any supine treatment for right-sided breast cancer patients and left-sided breast cancer patients with larger breasts by obtaining better conformity indices, target dose distribution and sparing of the organs-at-risk. The influence of treatment techniques in prone position is less pronounced; moreover dosimetric differences between TF-IMRT and MB-IMRT are rather small.

  11. Dosimetry characterization of a multibeam radiotherapy treatment for age-related macular degeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Choonsik; Chell, Erik; Gertner, Michael; Hansen, Steven; Howell, Roger W.; Hanlon, Justin; Bolch, Wesley E.

    2008-11-15

    Age-related macular degeneration (ARMD) is a major health problem worldwide. Advanced ARMD, which ultimately leads to profound vision loss, has dry and wet forms, which account for 20% and 80% of cases involving severe vision loss, respectively. A new device and approach for radiation treatment of ARMD has been recently developed by Oraya Therapeutics, Inc. (Newark, CA). The goal of the present study is to provide a initial dosimetry characterization of the proposed radiotherapy treatment via Monte Carlo radiation transport simulation. A 3D eye model including cornea, anterior chamber, lens, orbit, fat, sclera, choroid, retina, vitreous, macula, and optic nerve was carefully designed. The eye model was imported into the MCNPX2.5 Monte Carlo code and radiation transport simulations were undertaken to obtain absorbed doses and dose volume histograms (DVH) to targeted and nontargeted structures within the eye. Three different studies were undertaken to investigate (1) available beam angles that maximized the dose to the macula target tissue, simultaneously minimizing dose to normal tissues, (2) the energy dependency of the DVH for different x-ray energies (80, 100, and 120 kVp), and (3) the optimal focal spot size among options of 0.0, 0.4, 1.0, and 5.5 mm. All results were scaled to give 8 Gy to the macula volume, which is the current treatment requirement. Eight beam treatment angles are currently under investigation. In all eight beam angles, the source-to-target distance is 13 cm, and the polar angle of entry is 30 degree sign from the geometric axis of the eye. The azimuthal angle changes in eight increments of 45 degree sign in a clockwise fashion, such that an azimuthal angle of 0 degree sign corresponds to the 12 o'clock position when viewing the treated eye. Based on considerations of nontarget tissue avoidance, as well as facial-anatomical restrictions on beam delivery, treatment azimuthal angles between 135 degree sign and 225 degree sign would be available

  12. Comparison of image-guided radiotherapy technologies for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Das, Satya; Liu, Tian; Jani, Ashesh B; Rossi, Peter; Shelton, Joseph; Shi, Zheng; Khan, Mohammad K

    2014-12-01

    Radiation oncology has seen a rapid increase in the use of image-guided radiotherapy technology (IGRT) for prostate cancer patients over the past decade. The increase in the use of IGRT is largely driven by the fact that these technologies have been approved by the Food and Drug Administration and are now readily reimbursed by many insurance companies. Prostate cancer patients undergoing intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) now have access to a wide variety of IGRTs that can cost anywhere from $500,000 or more in upfront costs, and can add anywhere from 10 to 15 thousand dollars to a course of IMRT. Some of the IGRT options include daily cone beam computed tomography, ultrasound, orthogonal x-ray units using implanted fiducial markers, implanted radiofrequency markers with the ability to localize and track prostate motion during radiotherapy (Calypso 4D), and cine magnetic resonance imaging. Although these technologies add to the cost of IMRT, there is little direct comparative effectiveness data to help patients, physicians, and policy makers decide if one technology is better than another. In our critical review, the first of its kind, we summarize the advantages, disadvantages, and the limitations of each technology. We also provide an overview of existing literature as it pertains to the comparison of existing IGRTs. Lastly, we provide insights about the need for future outcomes research that may have a significant impact on health policies as it comes to reimbursement in the modern era.

  13. Characterizing geometric accuracy and precision in image guided gated radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenn, Stephen Edward

    Gated radiotherapy combined with intensity modulated or three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for tumors in the thorax and abdomen can deliver dose distributions which conform closely to tumor shapes allowing increased tumor dose while sparing healthy tissues. These conformal fields require more accurate and precise placement than traditional fields or tumors may receive suboptimal dose thereby reducing tumor control probability. Image guidance based on four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) provides a means to improve accuracy and precision in radiotherapy. The ability of 4DCT to accurately reproduce patient geometry and the ability of image guided gating equipment to position tumors and place fields around them must be characterized in order to determine treatment parameters such as tumor margins. Fiducial based methods of characterizing accuracy and precision of equipment for 4DCT planning and image guided gated radiotherapy (IGGRT) are presented with results for specific equipment. Fiducial markers of known geometric orientation are used to characterize 4DCT image reconstruction accuracy. Accuracy is determined under different acquisition protocols, reconstruction phases, and phantom trajectories. Targeting accuracy of fiducial based image guided gating is assessed by measuring in-phantom field positions for different motions, gating levels and target rotations. Synchronization parameters for gating equipment are also determined. Finally, end-to-end testing is performed to assess overall accuracy and precision of the equipment under controlled conditions. 4DCT limits fiducial geometric distance errors to 2 mm for repeatable target trajectories and to 5 mm for a pseudo-random trajectory. Largest offsets were in the longitudinal direction. If correctly calibrated and synchronized, the IGGRT system tested here can target reproducibly moving tumors with accuracy better than 1.2 mm. Gating level can affect accuracy if target motion is asymmetric about the

  14. Concept for quantifying the dose from image guided radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Uwe; Hälg, Roger; Besserer, Jürgen

    2015-09-17

    Radiographic image guidance is routinely used for patient positioning in radiotherapy. All radiographic guidance techniques can give a significant radiation dose to the patient. The dose from diagnostic imaging is usually managed by using effective dose minimization. In contrast, image-guided radiotherapy adds the imaging dose to an already high level of therapeutic radiation which cannot be easily managed using effective dose. The purpose of this work is the development of a concept of IGRT dose quantification which allows a comparison of imaging dose with commonly accepted variations of therapeutic dose. It is assumed that dose variations of the treatment beam which are accepted in the spirit of the ALARA convention can also be applied to the additional imaging dose. Therefore we propose three dose categories: Category I: The imaging dose is lower than a 2% variation of the therapy dose. Category II: The imaging dose is larger than in category I, but lower than the therapy dose variations between different treatment techniques. Category III: The imaging dose is larger than in Category II. For various treatment techniques dose measurements are used to define the dose categories. The imaging devices were categorized according to the measured dose. Planar kV-kV imaging is a category I imaging procedure. kV-MV imaging is located at the edge between category I and II and is for increasing fraction size safely a category I imaging technique. MV-MV imaging is for all imaging technologies a category II procedure. MV fan beam CT for localization is a category I technology. Low dose protocols for kV CBCT are located between category I and II and are for increasing fraction size a category I imaging technique. All other investigated Pelvis-CBCT protocols are category II procedures. Fan beam CT scout views are category I technology. Live imaging modalities are category III for conventional fractionation, but category II for stereotactic treatments. Dose from radiotherapy

  15. [Image-guided radiotherapy: rational, modalities and results].

    PubMed

    de Crevoisier, R; Louvel, G; Cazoulat, G; Leseur, J; Lafond, C; Lahbabi, K; Chira, C; Lagrange, J-L

    2009-01-01

    The objective of Image-Guided Radiotherapy (IGRT) is to take in account the inter- or/and intrafraction anatomic variations (organ motion and deformations) in order to improve treatment accuracy. The IGRT should therefore translate in a clinical benefit the recent advances in both tumor definition thanks to functional imaging, and dose distribution thanks to intensity modulated radiotherapy. The IGRT enables direct or indirect tumor visualization during radiation delivery. If the tumor position does not correspond with the theoretical location of target derived from planning system, the table is moved. In case of important uncertainties related to target deformation, a new planning can be discussed. IGRT is realized by different types of devices which can vary in principle and as well as in their implementation: from LINAC-integrated-kV (or MV)-Cone Beam CTs to helicoidal tomotherapy, Cyberknife and Novalis low-energy stereoscopic imaging system. These techniques led to a more rational choice of Planning Target Volume. Being recently introduced in practice, the clinical results of this technique are still limited. Nevertheless, until so far, IGRT has showed promising results with reports of minimal acute toxicity. This review describes IGRT for various tumor localizations. The dose delivered by on board imaging should be taken in account. A strong quality control is required for safety and proper prospective evaluation of the clinical benefit of IGRT.

  16. An image guided small animal stereotactic radiotherapy system

    PubMed Central

    Sha, Hao; Udayakumar, Thirupandiyur S.; Johnson, Perry B.; Dogan, Nesrin; Pollack, Alan; Yang, Yidong

    2016-01-01

    Small animal radiotherapy studies should be performed preferably on irradiators capable of focal tumor irradiation and healthy tissue sparing. In this study, an image guided small animal arc radiation treatment system (iSMAART) was developed which can achieve highly precise radiation targeting through the utilization of onboard cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) guidance. The iSMAART employs a unique imaging and radiation geometry where animals are positioned upright. It consists of a stationary x-ray tube, a stationary flat panel detector, and a rotatable and translational animal stage. System performance was evaluated in regards to imaging, image guidance, animal positioning, and radiation targeting using phantoms and tumor bearing animals. The onboard CBCT achieved good signal, contrast, and sub-millimeter spatial resolution. The iodine contrast CBCT accurately delineated orthotopic prostate tumors. Animal positioning was evaluated with ∼0.3 mm vertical displacement along superior-inferior direction. The overall targeting precision was within 0.4 mm. Stereotactic radiation beams conformal to tumor targets can be precisely delivered from multiple angles surrounding the animal. The iSMAART allows radiobiology labs to utilize an image guided precision radiation technique that can focally irradiate tumors while sparing healthy tissues at an affordable cost. PMID:26958942

  17. Image-Guided Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Pancreatic Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Fuss, Martin; Wong, Adrian; Fuller, Clifton D.; Salter, Bill J.; Fuss, Cristina; Thomas, Charles R.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose To present the techniques and preliminary outcomes of ultrasound-based image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT) for pancreatic cancer. Materials and Methods Retrospective analysis of 41 patients treated between November 2000 and March 2005 with IG-IMRT to mean total doses of 55 Gy (range, 45–64 Gy). We analyzed the clinical feasibility of IG-IMRT, dosimetric parameters, and outcomes, including acute gastrointestinal toxicity (RTOG grading). Survival was assessed for adenocarcinoma (n = 35) and other histologies. Results Mean daily image-guidance corrective shifts were 4.8 ± 4.3 mm, 7.5 ± 7.2 mm, and 4.6 ± 5.9 mm along the x-, y-, and z-axes, respectively (mean 3D correction vector, 11.7 ± 8.4 mm). Acute upper gastrointestinal toxicity was grade 0–1 in 22 patients (53.7%), grade 2 in 16 patients (39%), and grade 3 in 3 patients (7.3%). Lower gastrointestinal toxicity was grade 0–1 in 32 patients (78%), grade 2 in 7 patients (17.1%), and grade 4 in 2 patients (4.9%). Treatment was stopped early in 4 patients following administration of 30 to 54 Gy. Median survival for adenocarcinoma histology was 10.3 months (18.6 months in patients alive at analysis; n = 8) with actuarial 1- and 2-year survivals of 38% and 25%, respectively. Conclusion Daily image-guidance during delivery of IMRT for pancreatic carcinoma is clinically feasible. The data presented support the conclusion that safety margin reduction and moderate dose escalation afforded by implementation of these new radiotherapy technologies yields preliminary outcomes at least comparable with published survival data. PMID:19262697

  18. Fluoroscopic tumor tracking for image-guided lung cancer radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Tong; Cerviño, Laura I.; Tang, Xiaoli; Vasconcelos, Nuno; Jiang, Steve B.

    2009-02-01

    Accurate lung tumor tracking in real time is a keystone to image-guided radiotherapy of lung cancers. Existing lung tumor tracking approaches can be roughly grouped into three categories: (1) deriving tumor position from external surrogates; (2) tracking implanted fiducial markers fluoroscopically or electromagnetically; (3) fluoroscopically tracking lung tumor without implanted fiducial markers. The first approach suffers from insufficient accuracy, while the second may not be widely accepted due to the risk of pneumothorax. Previous studies in fluoroscopic markerless tracking are mainly based on template matching methods, which may fail when the tumor boundary is unclear in fluoroscopic images. In this paper we propose a novel markerless tumor tracking algorithm, which employs the correlation between the tumor position and surrogate anatomic features in the image. The positions of the surrogate features are not directly tracked; instead, we use principal component analysis of regions of interest containing them to obtain parametric representations of their motion patterns. Then, the tumor position can be predicted from the parametric representations of surrogates through regression. Four regression methods were tested in this study: linear and two-degree polynomial regression, artificial neural network (ANN) and support vector machine (SVM). The experimental results based on fluoroscopic sequences of ten lung cancer patients demonstrate a mean tracking error of 2.1 pixels and a maximum error at a 95% confidence level of 4.6 pixels (pixel size is about 0.5 mm) for the proposed tracking algorithm.

  19. Clinical results of a pilot study on stereovision-guided stereotactic radiotherapy and intensity modulated radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Shidong; Kleinberg, Lawrence R; Rigamonti, Daniele; Wharam, Moody D; Rashid, Abdul; Jackson, Juan; Djajaputra, David; He, Shenjen; Creasey, Tunisia; DeWeese, Theodore L

    2010-12-01

    Real-time stereovision-guidance has been introduced for efficient and convenient fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSR) and image-guided intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). This first pilot study is to clinically evaluate its accuracy and precision as well as impact on treatment doses. Sixty-one FSR patients wearing stereotactic masks (SMs) and nine IMRT patients wearing flexible masks (FMs), were accrued. Daily target reposition was initially based-on biplane-radiographs and then adjusted in six degrees of freedom under real-time stereovision guidance. Mean and standard deviation of the head displacements measured the accuracy and precision. Head positions during beam-on times were measured with real-time stereovisions and used for determination of delivered doses. Accuracy ± ± precision in direction with the largest errors shows improvement from 0.4 ± 2.3 mm to 0.0 ± 1.0 mm in the inferior-to-superior direction for patients wearing SM or from 0.8 ± 4.3 mm to 0.4 ± 1.7 mm in the posterior-to-anterior direction for patients wearing FM. The image-guidance increases target volume coverage by >30% for small lesions. Over half of head position errors could be removed from the stereovision-guidance. Importantly, the technique allows us to check head position during beam-on time and makes it possible for having frameless head refixation without tight masks.

  20. Clinical Results of a Pilot Study on Stereovision-Guided Stereotactic Radiotherapy and Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shidong; Kleinberg, Lawrence R.; Rigamonti, Daniele; Wharam, Moody D.; Rashid, Abdul; Jackson, Juan; Djajaputra, David; He, Shenjen; Creasey, Tunisia; DeWeese, Theodore L.

    2011-01-01

    Real-time stereovision-guidance has been introduced for efficient and convenient fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSR) and image-guided intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). This first pilot study is to clinically evaluate its accuracy and precision as well as impact on treatment doses. Sixty-one FSR patients wearing stereotactic masks (SMs) and nine IMRT patients wearing flexible masks (FMs), were accrued. Daily target reposition was initially based-on biplane-radiographs and then adjusted in six degrees of freedom under real-time stereovision guidance. Mean and standard deviation of the head displacements measured the accuracy and precision. Head positions during beam-on times were measured with real-time stereovisions and used for determination of delivered doses. Accuracy ± precision in direction with the largest errors shows improvement from 0.4 ± 2.3 mm to 0.0 ± 1.0 mm in the inferior-to-superior direction for patients wearing SM or from 0.8 ± 4.3 mm to 0.4 ± 1.7 mm in the posterior-to-anterior direction for patients wearing FM. The image-guidance increases target volume coverage by >30% for small lesions. Over half of head position errors could be removed from the stereovision-guidance. Importantly, the technique allows us to check head position during beam-on time and makes it possible for having frameless head refixation without tight masks. PMID:21070083

  1. Image guided dose escalated prostate radiotherapy: still room to improve

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Jarad M; Bayley, Andrew; Bristow, Robert; Chung, Peter; Gospodarowicz, Mary; Menard, Cynthia; Milosevic, Michael; Rosewall, Tara; Warde, Padraig R; Catton, Charles N

    2009-01-01

    Background Prostate radiotherapy (RT) dose escalation has been reported to result in improved biochemical control at the cost of greater late toxicity. We report on the application of 79.8 Gy in 42 fractions of prostate image guided RT (IGRT). The primary objective was to assess 5-year biochemical control and potential prognostic factors by the Phoenix definition. Secondary endpoints included acute and late toxicity by the Radiotherapy Oncology Group (RTOG) scoring scales. Methods From October/2001 and June/2003, 259 men were treated with at least 2-years follow-up. 59 patients had low, 163 intermediate and 37 high risk disease. 43 had adjuvant hormonal therapy (HT), mostly for high- or multiple risk factor intermediate-risk disease (n = 25). They received either 3-dimensional conformal RT (3DCRT, n = 226) or intensity modulated RT (IMRT) including daily on-line IGRT with intraprostatic fiducial markers. Results Median follow-up was 67.8 months (range 24.4-84.7). There was no severe (grade 3-4) acute toxicity, and grade 2 acute gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity was unusual (10.1%). The 5-year incidence of grade 2-3 late GI and genitourinary (GU) toxicity was 13.7% and 12.1%, with corresponding grade 3 figures of 3.5% and 2.0% respectively. HT had an association with an increased risk of grade 2-3 late GI toxicity (11% v 21%, p = 0.018). Using the Phoenix definition for biochemical failure, the 5 year-bNED is 88.4%, 76.5% and 77.9% for low, intermediate and high risk patients respectively. On univariate analysis, T-category and Gleason grade correlated with Phoenix bNED (p = 0.006 and 0.039 respectively). Hormonal therapy was not a significant prognostic factor on uni- or multi-variate analysis. Men with positive prostate biopsies following RT had a lower chance of bNED at 5 years (34.4% v 64.3%; p = 0.147). Conclusion IGRT to 79.8 Gy results in favourable rates of late toxicity compared with published non-IGRT treated cohorts. Future avenues of investigation for

  2. Clinical Experience With Image-Guided Radiotherapy in an Accelerated Partial Breast Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Protocol

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard, Charles E.; Tallhamer, Michael M.S.; Johnson, Tim; Hunter, Kari C.M.D.; Howell, Kathryn; Kercher, Jane; Widener, Jodi; Kaske, Terese; Paul, Devchand; Sedlacek, Scot; Carter, Dennis L.

    2010-02-01

    Purpose: To explore the feasibility of fiducial markers for the use of image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) in an accelerated partial breast intensity modulated radiotherapy protocol. Methods and Materials: Nineteen patients consented to an institutional review board approved protocol of accelerated partial breast intensity-modulated radiotherapy with fiducial marker placement and treatment with IGRT. Patients (1 patient with bilateral breast cancer; 20 total breasts) underwent ultrasound guided implantation of three 1.2- x 3-mm gold markers placed around the surgical cavity. For each patient, table shifts (inferior/superior, right/left lateral, and anterior/posterior) and minimum, maximum, mean error with standard deviation were recorded for each of the 10 BID treatments. The dose contribution of daily orthogonal films was also examined. Results: All IGRT patients underwent successful marker placement. In all, 200 IGRT treatment sessions were performed. The average vector displacement was 4 mm (range, 2-7 mm). The average superior/inferior shift was 2 mm (range, 0-5 mm), the average lateral shift was 2 mm (range, 1-4 mm), and the average anterior/posterior shift was 3 mm (range, 1 5 mm). Conclusions: This study shows that the use of IGRT can be successfully used in an accelerated partial breast intensity-modulated radiotherapy protocol. The authors believe that this technique has increased daily treatment accuracy and permitted reduction in the margin added to the clinical target volume to form the planning target volume.

  3. Post-Prostatectomy Image-Guided Radiotherapy: The Invisible Target Concept.

    PubMed

    Vilotte, Florent; Antoine, Mickael; Bobin, Maxime; Latorzeff, Igor; Supiot, Stéphane; Richaud, Pierre; Thomas, Laurence; Leduc, Nicolas; Guérif, Stephane; Iriondo-Alberdi, Jone; de Crevoisier, Renaud; Sargos, Paul

    2017-01-01

    In the era of intensity-modulated radiation therapy, image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) appears crucial to control dose delivery and to promote dose escalation while allowing healthy tissue sparing. The place of IGRT following radical prostatectomy is poorly described in the literature. This review aims to highlight some key points on the different IGRT techniques applicable to prostatic bed radiotherapy. Furthermore, methods used to evaluate target motion and to reduce planning target volume margins will also be explored.

  4. Post-Prostatectomy Image-Guided Radiotherapy: The Invisible Target Concept

    PubMed Central

    Vilotte, Florent; Antoine, Mickael; Bobin, Maxime; Latorzeff, Igor; Supiot, Stéphane; Richaud, Pierre; Thomas, Laurence; Leduc, Nicolas; Guérif, Stephane; Iriondo-Alberdi, Jone; de Crevoisier, Renaud; Sargos, Paul

    2017-01-01

    In the era of intensity-modulated radiation therapy, image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) appears crucial to control dose delivery and to promote dose escalation while allowing healthy tissue sparing. The place of IGRT following radical prostatectomy is poorly described in the literature. This review aims to highlight some key points on the different IGRT techniques applicable to prostatic bed radiotherapy. Furthermore, methods used to evaluate target motion and to reduce planning target volume margins will also be explored. PMID:28337425

  5. Monte Carlo modeling of ultrasound probes for image guided radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Bazalova-Carter, Magdalena; Schlosser, Jeffrey; Chen, Josephine; Hristov, Dimitre

    2015-10-15

    X6-1 probe in vertical orientation caused the highest attenuation of the 6 and 15 MV beams, which at 10 cm depth accounted for 33% and 43% decrease compared to the respective (15 × 15) cm{sup 2} open fields. The C5-2 probe in horizontal orientation, on the other hand, caused a dose increase of 10% and 53% for the 6 and 15 MV beams, respectively, in the buildup region at 0.5 cm depth. For the X6-1 probe in vertical orientation, the dose at 5 cm depth for the 3-cm diameter 6 MV and 5-cm diameter 15 MV beams was attenuated compared to the corresponding open fields to a greater degree by 65% and 43%, respectively. Conclusions: MC models of two US probes used for real-time image guidance during radiotherapy have been built. Due to the high beam attenuation of the US probes, the authors generally recommend avoiding delivery of treatment beams that intersect the probe. However, the presented MC models can be effectively integrated into US-guided radiotherapy treatment planning in cases for which beam avoidance is not practical due to anatomy geometry.

  6. Monte Carlo modeling of ultrasound probes for image guided radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Bazalova-Carter, Magdalena; Schlosser, Jeffrey; Chen, Josephine; Hristov, Dimitre

    2015-01-01

    orientation caused the highest attenuation of the 6 and 15 MV beams, which at 10 cm depth accounted for 33% and 43% decrease compared to the respective (15 × 15) cm2 open fields. The C5-2 probe in horizontal orientation, on the other hand, caused a dose increase of 10% and 53% for the 6 and 15 MV beams, respectively, in the buildup region at 0.5 cm depth. For the X6-1 probe in vertical orientation, the dose at 5 cm depth for the 3-cm diameter 6 MV and 5-cm diameter 15 MV beams was attenuated compared to the corresponding open fields to a greater degree by 65% and 43%, respectively. Conclusions: MC models of two US probes used for real-time image guidance during radiotherapy have been built. Due to the high beam attenuation of the US probes, the authors generally recommend avoiding delivery of treatment beams that intersect the probe. However, the presented MC models can be effectively integrated into US-guided radiotherapy treatment planning in cases for which beam avoidance is not practical due to anatomy geometry. PMID:26429248

  7. Effect of image-guided hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy on peripheral non-small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shu-wen; Ren, Juan; Yan, Yan-li; Xue, Chao-fan; Tan, Li; Ma, Xiao-wei

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the effects of image-guided hypofractionated radiotherapy and conventional fractionated radiotherapy on non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Fifty stage- and age-matched cases with NSCLC were randomly divided into two groups (A and B). There were 23 cases in group A and 27 cases in group B. Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) and stereotactic radiotherapy were conjugately applied to the patients in group A. Group A patients underwent hypofractionated radiotherapy (6–8 Gy/time) three times per week, with a total dose of 64–66 Gy; group B received conventional fractionated radiotherapy, with a total dose of 68–70 Gy five times per week. In group A, 1-year and 2-year local failure survival rate and 1-year local failure-free survival rate were significantly higher than in group B (P<0.05). The local failure rate (P<0.05) and distant metastasis rate (P>0.05) were lower in group A than in group B. The overall survival rate of group A was significantly higher than that of group B (P=0.03), and the survival rate at 1 year was 87% vs 63%, (P<0.05). The median survival time of group A was longer than that of group B. There was no significant difference in the incidence of complications between the two groups (P>0.05). Compared with conventional fractionated radiation therapy, image-guided hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy in NSCLC received better treatment efficacy and showed good tolerability. PMID:27574441

  8. Image-guided radiotherapy and motion management in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In this review, image guidance and motion management in radiotherapy for lung cancer is discussed. Motion characteristics of lung tumours and image guidance techniques to obtain motion information are elaborated. Possibilities for management of image guidance and motion in the various steps of the treatment chain are explained, including imaging techniques and beam delivery techniques. Clinical studies using different motion management techniques are reviewed, and finally future directions for image guidance and motion management are outlined. PMID:25955231

  9. [Clinical implementation of dose reconstruction and dose-guided intensity modulated radiotherapy for helical tomotherapy].

    PubMed

    Yao, Weirong; Xu, Shouping; Du Lei; Xie, Chuanbin; Ma, Lin

    2012-09-01

    To implement dose reconstruction and dose-guided intensity modulated radiotherapy for helical tomotherapy. Dose reconstruction was implemented on adaptive helical tomotherapy with the online megavoltage CT (MVCT) imaging from a patient with nasopharyngeal cancer. The differences of isodose line between actual and planned deposition were analysis in 3D distribution, on which the hot spot and cold spot were lined. The dose delivered to these areas was modulated in later fractions to keep the planned requirement. The differences between actual and planned isodose line were shown on the image visually. The modulation to the hot spot and cold spot in later fraction corrected the incorrectly delivered dose to achieve the requirement of primary plan. The dose reconstruction and dose-guided intensity modulated radiotherapy can be implemented in adaptive helical tomotherapy.

  10. Quantitative Assessment of Image-Guided Radiotherapy for Paraspinal Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Stoiber, Eva M.; Lechsel, Gerhard; Giske, Kristina; Muenter, Marc W.; Hoess, Angelika; Bendl, Rolf; Debus, Juergen; Huber, Peter E.; Thieke, Christian

    2009-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate stereotactic positioning uncertainties of patients with paraspinal tumors treated with fractionated intensity-modulated radiotherapy; and to determine whether target-point correction via rigid registration is sufficient for daily patient positioning. Patients and Methods: Forty-five patients with tumors at the cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spine received regular control computed-tomography (CT) scans using an in-room CT scanner. All patients were immobilized with the combination of Scotch cast torso and head masks. The positioning was evaluated regarding translational and rotational errors by applying a rigid registration algorithm based on mutual information. The registration box was fitted to the target volume for optimal registration in the high-dose area. To evaluate the suitability of the rigid registration result for correcting the target volume position we subsequently registered three small subsections of the upper, middle, and lower target volume. The resulting residual deviations reflect the extent of the elastic deformations, which cannot be covered by the rigid-body registration procedure. Results: A total of 321 control CT scans were evaluated. The rotational errors were negligible. Translational errors were smallest for cervical tumors (-0.1 +- 1.1, 0.3 +- 0.8, and 0.1 +- 0.9 mm along left-right, anterior-posterior, and superior-inferior axes), followed by thoracic (0.8 +- 1.1, 0.3 +- 0.8, and 1.1 +- 1.3 mm) and lumbar tumors (-0.7 +- 1.3, 0.0 +- 0.9, and 0.5 +- 1.6 mm). The residual deviations of the three subsections were <1 mm. Conclusions: The applied stereotactic patient setup resulted in small rotational errors. However, considerable translational positioning errors may occur; thus, on the basis of these data daily control CT scans are recommended. Rigid transformation is adequate for correcting the target volume position.

  11. Development of a MicroCT-Based Image-Guided Conformal Radiotherapy System for Small Animals

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hu; Rodriguez, Manuel; van den Haak, Fred; Nelson, Geoffrey; Jogani, Rahil; Xu, Jiali; Zhu, Xinzhi; Xian, Yongjiang; Tran, Phuoc T.; Felsher, Dean W.; Keall, Paul J.; Graves, Edward E.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose The need for clinically-relevant radiation therapy technology for the treatment of preclinical models of disease has spurred the development of a variety of dedicated platforms for small animal irradiation. Our group has taken the approach of adding the ability to deliver conformal radiotherapy to an existing 120 kVp micro-computed tomography (microCT) scanner. Methods A GE eXplore RS120 microCT scanner was modified by the addition of a two-dimensional subject translation stage and a variable aperture collimator. Quality assurance protocols for these devices, including measurement of translation stage positioning accuracy, collimator aperture accuracy, and collimator alignment with the x-ray beam, were devised. Use of this system for image-guided radiotherapy was assessed by irradiation of a solid water phantom as well as of two mice bearing spontaneous MYC-induced lung tumors. Radiation damage was assessed ex vivo by immunohistochemical detection of γH2AX foci. Results The positioning error of the translation stage was found to be less than 0.05 mm, while after alignment of the collimator with the x-ray axis through adjustment of its displacement and rotation, the collimator aperture error was less than 0.1 mm measured at isocenter. CT image-guided treatment of a solid water phantom demonstrated target localization accuracy to within 0.1 mm. γH2AX foci were detected within irradiated lung tumors in mice, with contralateral lung tissue displaying background staining. Conclusions Addition of radiotherapy functionality to a microCT scanner is an effective means of introducing image-guided radiation treatments into the preclinical setting. This approach has been shown to facilitate small animal conformal radiotherapy while leveraging existing technology. PMID:20395069

  12. Characterization of spatial distortion in a 0.35 T MRI-guided radiotherapy system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginn, John S.; Agazaryan, Nzhde; Cao, Minsong; Baharom, Umar; Low, Daniel A.; Yang, Yingli; Gao, Yu; Hu, Peng; Lee, Percy; Lamb, James M.

    2017-06-01

    Spatial distortion results in image deformation that can degrade accurate targeting and dose calculations in MRI-guided adaptive radiotherapy. The authors present a comprehensive assessment of a 0.35 T MRI-guided radiotherapy system’s spatial distortion using two commercially-available phantoms with regularly spaced markers. Images of the spatial integrity phantoms were acquired using five clinical protocols on the MRI-guided radiotherapy machine with the radiotherapy gantry positioned at various angles. Software was developed to identify and localize all phantom markers using a template matching approach. Rotational and translational corrections were implemented to account for imperfect phantom alignment. Measurements were made to assess uncertainties arising from susceptibility artifacts, image noise, and phantom construction accuracy. For a clinical 3D imaging protocol with a 1.5 mm reconstructed slice thickness, 100% of spheres within a 50 mm radius of isocenter had a 3D deviation of 1 mm or less. Of the spheres within 100 mm of isocenter, 99.9% had a 3D deviation less than 1 mm. 94.8% and 100% of the spheres within 175 mm were found to be within 1 mm and 2 mm of the expected positions in 3D respectively. Maximum 3D distortions within 50 mm, 100 mm and 175 mm of isocenter were 0.76 mm, 1.15 mm and 1.88 mm respectively. Distortions present in images acquired using the real-time imaging sequence were less than 1 mm for 98.1% and 95.0% of the cylinders within 50 mm and 100 mm of isocenter. The corresponding maximum distortion in these regions was 1.10 mm and 1.67 mm. These results may be used to inform appropriate planning target volume (PTV) margins for 0.35 T MRI-guided radiotherapy. Observed levels of spatial distortion should be explicitly considered when using PTV margins of 3 mm or less or in the case of targets displaced from isocenter by more than 50 mm.

  13. Computed tomography imaging-guided radiotherapy by targeting upconversion nanocubes with significant imaging and radiosensitization enhancements

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Huaiyong; Zheng, Xiangpeng; Ren, Qingguo; Bu, Wenbo; Ge, Weiqiang; Xiao, Qingfeng; Zhang, Shengjian; Wei, Chenyang; Qu, Haiyun; Wang, Zheng; Hua, Yanqing; Zhou, Liangping; Peng, Weijun; Zhao, Kuaile; Shi, Jianlin

    2013-01-01

    The clinical potentials of radiotherapy could not be achieved completely because of the inaccurate positioning and inherent radioresistance of tumours. In this study, a novel active-targeting upconversion theranostic agent (arginine-glycine-aspartic acid-labelled BaYbF5: 2% Er3+ nanocube) was developed for the first time to address these clinical demands. Heavy metal-based nanocubes (~10 nm) are potential theranostic agents with bifunctional features: computed tomography (CT) contrast agents for targeted tumour imaging and irradiation dose enhancers in tumours during radiotherapy. Remarkably, they showed low toxicity and excellent performance in active-targeting CT imaging and CT imaging-guided radiosensitizing therapy, which could greatly concentrate and enlarge the irradiation dose deposition in tumours to enhance therapeutic efficacy and minimize the damage to surrounding tissues. PMID:23624542

  14. Stereotactic Image-Guided Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy Using the HI-ART II Helical Tomotherapy System

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, Timothy W. Hudes, Richard; Dziuba, Sylwester; Kazi, Abdul; Hall, Mark; Dawson, Dana

    2008-07-01

    The highly integrated adaptive radiation therapy (HI-ART II) helical tomotherapy unit is a new radiotherapy machine designed to achieve highly precise and accurate treatments at all body sites. The precision and accuracy of the HI-ART II is similar to that provided by stereotactic radiosurgery systems, hence the historical distinction between external beam radiotherapy and stereotactic procedures based on differing precision requirements is removed for this device. The objectives of this work are: (1) to describe stereotactic helical tomotherapy processes (SRS, SBRT); (2) to show that the precision and accuracy of the HI-ART meet the requirements defined for SRS and SBRT; and (3) to describe the clinical implementation of a stereotactic image-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy (IG-IMRT) system that incorporates optical motion management.

  15. Quality of life in patients with prostate cancer treated with radical image-guided radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Tabor, Kamil; Prokop, Elżbieta; Kulik, Roland

    2014-01-01

    Aim of the study The evaluation of quality of life during image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) in patients with prostate cancer. Materials and methods The study consisted of 180 prostate cancer patients treated with radical radiotherapy (IGRT). The patients were irradiated using conformal or dynamic techniques with 2 Gy fractionation doses to a total dose of 76 Gy. Patients in the high-risk group (41%) were also irradiated to the pelvic lymph nodes. Quality of life was assessed with EORTC questionnaires: general QLQ-C30 and prostate-specific module QLQ-PR25, which were filled in by patients before and upon completion of radiotherapy. A change of ≥ 10 points in a linearised scale (0–100) was considered clinically significant. Results Global quality of life decreased slightly during radiotherapy (from 61 to 57 points), but from the clinical point of view, likewise most of the other quality of life parameters remained stable. In the general module (QLQ-C30) only diarrhoea changed in a clinically relevant way, i.e. by 10 points (from 10 to 20 points), which was mainly observed in patients with elective pelvic irradiation (increase of 18 points, from 10 to 28 points). In the prostate-specific module (QLQ-PR25) only urinary symptoms changed significantly, i.e. by 13 points (from 24 to 37 points). Conclusions The quality of life in patients with prostate cancer does not change in a clinically significant way during radiotherapy, which corroborates good treatment tolerance. Increased urinary symptoms and, in the case of pelvic irradiation, also increased diarrhoea have a negative impact on symptom-related quality of life. PMID:25258588

  16. MRI-guided tumor tracking in lung cancer radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerviño, Laura I.; Du, Jiang; Jiang, Steve B.

    2011-07-01

    Precise tracking of lung tumor motion during treatment delivery still represents a challenge in radiation therapy. Prototypes of MRI-linac hybrid systems are being created which have the potential of ionization-free real-time imaging of the tumor. This study evaluates the performance of lung tumor tracking algorithms in cine-MRI sagittal images from five healthy volunteers. Visible vascular structures were used as targets. Volunteers performed several series of regular and irregular breathing. Two tracking algorithms were implemented and evaluated: a template matching (TM) algorithm in combination with surrogate tracking using the diaphragm (surrogate was used when the maximum correlation between the template and the image in the search window was less than specified), and an artificial neural network (ANN) model based on the principal components of a region of interest that encompasses the target motion. The mean tracking error ē and the error at 95% confidence level e95 were evaluated for each model. The ANN model led to ē = 1.5 mm and e95 = 4.2 mm, while TM led to ē = 0.6 mm and e95 = 1.0 mm. An extra series was considered separately to evaluate the benefit of using surrogate tracking in combination with TM when target out-of-plane motion occurs. For this series, the mean error was 7.2 mm using only TM and 1.7 mm when the surrogate was used in combination with TM. Results show that, as opposed to tracking with other imaging modalities, ANN does not perform well in MR-guided tracking. TM, however, leads to highly accurate tracking. Out-of-plane motion could be addressed by surrogate tracking using the diaphragm, which can be easily identified in the images.

  17. MRI-guided tumor tracking in lung cancer radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Cerviño, Laura I; Du, Jiang; Jiang, Steve B

    2011-07-07

    Precise tracking of lung tumor motion during treatment delivery still represents a challenge in radiation therapy. Prototypes of MRI-linac hybrid systems are being created which have the potential of ionization-free real-time imaging of the tumor. This study evaluates the performance of lung tumor tracking algorithms in cine-MRI sagittal images from five healthy volunteers. Visible vascular structures were used as targets. Volunteers performed several series of regular and irregular breathing. Two tracking algorithms were implemented and evaluated: a template matching (TM) algorithm in combination with surrogate tracking using the diaphragm (surrogate was used when the maximum correlation between the template and the image in the search window was less than specified), and an artificial neural network (ANN) model based on the principal components of a region of interest that encompasses the target motion. The mean tracking error ē and the error at 95% confidence level e(95) were evaluated for each model. The ANN model led to ē = 1.5 mm and e(95) = 4.2 mm, while TM led to ē = 0.6 mm and e(95) = 1.0 mm. An extra series was considered separately to evaluate the benefit of using surrogate tracking in combination with TM when target out-of-plane motion occurs. For this series, the mean error was 7.2 mm using only TM and 1.7 mm when the surrogate was used in combination with TM. Results show that, as opposed to tracking with other imaging modalities, ANN does not perform well in MR-guided tracking. TM, however, leads to highly accurate tracking. Out-of-plane motion could be addressed by surrogate tracking using the diaphragm, which can be easily identified in the images.

  18. Comparison of daily versus nondaily image-guided radiotherapy protocols for patients treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy for head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yao; Michaud, Anthony L; Sreeraman, Radhika; Liu, Tianxiao; Purdy, James A; Chen, Allen M

    2014-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility of nondaily image-guided radiotherapy (RT) strategies with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for head and neck cancer. Alignment data was analyzed from 103 consecutive patients treated by IMRT for head and neck cancer who had undergone daily imaging with onboard mega-voltage CT (MVCT), resulting in 3275 images. Geometric setup errors that would have occurred using less-than-daily imaging were hypothetically estimated for 4 temporal less-than-daily image-guided RT protocols. For image-guided RT on the first fraction, weekly image-guided RT, first 5 + weekly image-guided RT, and alternating day image-guided RT, the respective incidences of geometric miss were 50.5%, 33.8%, 30.1%, and 15.7% assuming 3-mm uncertainty margins; and 18.7%, 11.7%, 10.3%, and 4.1% with 5-mm margins. Less-than-daily image-guided RT strategies result in a high incidence of potential miss when 3-mm uncertainty margins are utilized. Less-than-daily image-guided RT strategies should incorporate margins of at least 5 mm. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Long-term decision regret after post-prostatectomy image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Shakespeare, Thomas P; Chin, Stephen; Manuel, Lucy; Wen, Shelly; Hoffman, Matthew; Wilcox, Shea W; Aherne, Noel J

    2017-02-01

    Decision regret (DR) may occur when a patient believes their outcome would have been better if they had decided differently about their management. Although some studies investigate DR after treatment for localised prostate cancer, none report DR in patients undergoing surgery and post-prostatectomy radiotherapy. We evaluated DR in this group of patients overall, and for specific components of therapy. We surveyed 83 patients, with minimum 5 years follow-up, treated with radical prostatectomy (RP) and post-prostatectomy image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT) to 64-66 Gy following www.EviQ.org.au protocols. A validated questionnaire identified DR if men either indicated that they would have been better off had they chosen another treatment, or they wished they could change their mind about treatment. There was an 85.5% response rate, with median follow-up post-IMRT 78 months. Adjuvant IG-IMRT was used in 28% of patients, salvage in 72% and ADT in 48%. A total of 70% of patients remained disease-free. Overall, 16.9% of patients expressed DR for treatment, with fourfold more regret for the RP component of treatment compared to radiotherapy (16.9% vs 4.2%, P = 0.01). DR for androgen deprivation was 14.3%. Patients were regretful of surgery due to toxicity, not being adequately informed about radiotherapy as an alternative, positive margins and surgery costs (83%, 33%, 25% and 8% of regretful patients respectively). Toxicity caused DR in the three radiotherapy-regretful and four ADT-regretful patients. Patients were twice as regretful overall, and of surgery, for salvage vs adjuvant approaches (both 19.6% vs 10.0%). Decision regret after RP and post-prostatectomy IG-IMRT is uncommon, although patients regret RP more than post-operative IG-IMRT. This should reassure urologists referring patients for post-prostatectomy IG-IMRT, particularly in the immediate adjuvant setting. Other implications include appropriate patient selection for RP (and

  20. Constructing a clinical decision-making framework for image-guided radiotherapy using a Bayesian Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hargrave, C.; Moores, M.; Deegan, T.; Gibbs, A.; Poulsen, M.; Harden, F.; Mengersen, K.

    2014-03-01

    A decision-making framework for image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) is being developed using a Bayesian Network (BN) to graphically describe, and probabilistically quantify, the many interacting factors that are involved in this complex clinical process. Outputs of the BN will provide decision-support for radiation therapists to assist them to make correct inferences relating to the likelihood of treatment delivery accuracy for a given image-guided set-up correction. The framework is being developed as a dynamic object-oriented BN, allowing for complex modelling with specific subregions, as well as representation of the sequential decision-making and belief updating associated with IGRT. A prototype graphic structure for the BN was developed by analysing IGRT practices at a local radiotherapy department and incorporating results obtained from a literature review. Clinical stakeholders reviewed the BN to validate its structure. The BN consists of a sub-network for evaluating the accuracy of IGRT practices and technology. The directed acyclic graph (DAG) contains nodes and directional arcs representing the causal relationship between the many interacting factors such as tumour site and its associated critical organs, technology and technique, and inter-user variability. The BN was extended to support on-line and off-line decision-making with respect to treatment plan compliance. Following conceptualisation of the framework, the BN will be quantified. It is anticipated that the finalised decision-making framework will provide a foundation to develop better decision-support strategies and automated correction algorithms for IGRT.

  1. Impact of field number and beam angle on functional image-guided lung cancer radiotherapy planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahir, Bilal A.; Bragg, Chris M.; Wild, Jim M.; Swinscoe, James A.; Lawless, Sarah E.; Hart, Kerry A.; Hatton, Matthew Q.; Ireland, Rob H.

    2017-09-01

    To investigate the effect of beam angles and field number on functionally-guided intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) normal lung avoidance treatment plans that incorporate hyperpolarised helium-3 magnetic resonance imaging (3He MRI) ventilation data. Eight non-small cell lung cancer patients had pre-treatment 3He MRI that was registered to inspiration breath-hold radiotherapy planning computed tomography. IMRT plans that minimised the volume of total lung receiving  ⩾20 Gy (V20) were compared with plans that minimised 3He MRI defined functional lung receiving  ⩾20 Gy (fV20). Coplanar IMRT plans using 5-field manually optimised beam angles and 9-field equidistant plans were also evaluated. For each pair of plans, the Wilcoxon signed ranks test was used to compare fV20 and the percentage of planning target volume (PTV) receiving 90% of the prescription dose (PTV90). Incorporation of 3He MRI led to median reductions in fV20 of 1.3% (range: 0.2-9.3% p  =  0.04) and 0.2% (range: 0 to 4.1%; p  =  0.012) for 5- and 9-field arrangements, respectively. There was no clinically significant difference in target coverage. Functionally-guided IMRT plans incorporating hyperpolarised 3He MRI information can reduce the dose received by ventilated lung without comprising PTV coverage. The effect was greater for optimised beam angles rather than uniformly spaced fields.

  2. The treatment of intraperitoneal malignant disease with monoclonal antibody guided 131I radiotherapy.

    PubMed Central

    Ward, B.; Mather, S.; Shepherd, J.; Crowther, M.; Hawkins, L.; Britton, K.; Slevin, M. L.

    1988-01-01

    Seven patients with small volume ovarian carcinoma, remaining after conventional therapy with surgery and a platinum containing chemotherapy regimen, were treated with intraperitoneal monoclonal antibody guided radiotherapy. 100 mCi131I conjugated to 10 mg of monoclonal antibody were injected i.p. in 2,000 ml peritoneal dialysis fluid. Patients were evaluated 3 months later; 3 had clinical progressive disease while third look laparotomy demonstrated progressive disease in 3 of the remaining 4 patients. The seventh patient did not have a third look laparotomy and is currently inevaluable for response. Five patients with recurrent malignant ascites not controlled by diuretics or repeated paracentesis were similarly treated with 75-170 mCi131I conjugated to 10 mg monoclonal antibody. In three patients the ascites was controlled for a mean of 4 months. One patient died too early to assess the control of his ascites but tumour cells disappeared from the ascitic fluid after therapy. In the patient whose ascites were not controlled, a subpopulation of antigen-negative tumour cells was demonstrated. This study was unable to demonstrate a therapeutic benefit for i.p. injected monoclonal antibody guided radiotherapy for solid intraperitoneal tumour but suggests that it may be capable of controlling the accumulation of antigen positive malignant ascites. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:3219277

  3. Accurate calibration of a stereo-vision system in image-guided radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Dezhi; Li Shidong

    2006-11-15

    Image-guided radiotherapy using a three-dimensional (3D) camera as the on-board surface imaging system requires precise and accurate registration of the 3D surface images in the treatment machine coordinate system. Two simple calibration methods, an analytical solution as three-point matching and a least-squares estimation method as multipoint registration, were introduced to correlate the stereo-vision surface imaging frame with the machine coordinate system. Both types of calibrations utilized 3D surface images of a calibration template placed on the top of the treatment couch. Image transformational parameters were derived from corresponding 3D marked points on the surface images to their given coordinates in the treatment room coordinate system. Our experimental results demonstrated that both methods had provided the desired calibration accuracy of 0.5 mm. The multipoint registration method is more robust particularly for noisy 3D surface images. Both calibration methods have been used as our weekly QA tools for a 3D image-guided radiotherapy system.

  4. WE-EF-BRD-01: Past, Present and Future: MRI-Guided Radiotherapy From 2005 to 2025

    SciTech Connect

    Lagendijk, J.

    2015-06-15

    MRI-guided treatment is a growing area of medicine, particularly in radiotherapy and surgery. The exquisite soft tissue anatomic contrast offered by MRI, along with functional imaging, makes the use of MRI during therapeutic procedures very attractive. Challenging the utility of MRI in the therapy room are many issues including the physics of MRI and the impact on the environment and therapeutic instruments, the impact of the room and instruments on the MRI; safety, space, design and cost. In this session, the applications and challenges of MRI-guided treatment will be described. The session format is: Past, present and future: MRI-guided radiotherapy from 2005 to 2025: Jan Lagendijk Battling Maxwell’s equations: Physics challenges and solutions for hybrid MRI systems: Paul Keall I want it now!: Advances in MRI acquisition, reconstruction and the use of priors to enable fast anatomic and physiologic imaging to inform guidance and adaptation decisions: Yanle Hu MR in the OR: The growth and applications of MRI for interventional radiology and surgery: Rebecca Fahrig Learning Objectives: To understand the history and trajectory of MRI-guided radiotherapy To understand the challenges of integrating MR imaging systems with linear accelerators To understand the latest in fast MRI methods to enable the visualisation of anatomy and physiology on radiotherapy treatment timescales To understand the growing role and challenges of MRI for image-guided surgical procedures My disclosures are publicly available and updated at: http://sydney.edu.au/medicine/radiation-physics/about-us/disclosures.php.

  5. Fluoroscopically guided balloon dilation for benign bronchial stricture occurring after radiotherapy in patients with lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Cho, Young Chul; Kim, Jin Hyoung; Park, Jung-Hoon; Shin, Ji Hoon; Ko, Heung Kyu; Song, Ho-Young

    2014-06-01

    To evaluate the safety and clinical effectiveness of fluoroscopically guided balloon dilation in patients with benign bronchial stricture occurring after radiotherapy (RT). From March 2002 to January 2013, ten patients with benign bronchial stricture occurring after RT underwent fluoroscopically guided balloon dilation as their initial treatment. Technical success, primary and secondary clinical success, improvement in respiratory status, and complications were evaluated. The symptomatic improvement period was calculated. A total of 15 balloon dilation sessions were performed in ten patients, with a range of 1-4 sessions per patient (mean 1.5 sessions). Technical success was achieved in 100 %. Six of the ten patients exhibited no symptom recurrence and required no further treatment until the end of follow-up (range 4-105 months). Four patients (40 %) experienced recurrent symptom, and two of four patients underwent repeat balloon dilations. The remaining two patients underwent cutting balloon dilation and temporary stent placement, respectively, and they exhibited symptom improvement after adjuvant treatment until the end of our study. Finally, primary clinical success was achieved in six of ten patients (60 %) and secondary clinical success was achieved in eight of ten patients (80 %). The mean symptom improvement period was 61.9 ± 16 months (95 % confidence interval 30.6-93.3). Fluoroscopically guided balloon dilation seems to be safe and clinically effective for the treatment of RT-induced benign bronchial stricture. Temporary stent placement or cutting balloon dilation could be considered in patients with benign bronchial strictures resistant to fluoroscopically guided balloon dilation.

  6. Five-year follow-up using a prostate stent as fiducial in image-guided radiotherapy of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Carl, Jesper; Sander, Lotte

    2015-06-01

    To report results from the five-year follow-up on a previously reported study using image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) of localized or locally advanced prostate cancer (PC) and a removable prostate stent as fiducial. Patients with local or locally advanced PC were treated using five-field 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DRT). The clinical target volumes (CTV) were treated to 78 Gy in 39 fractions using daily on-line image guidance (IG). Late genito-urinary (GU) and gastro-intestinal (GI) toxicities were scored using the radiotherapy oncology group (RTOG) score and the common toxicity score of adverse events (CTC) score. Urinary symptoms were also scored using the international prostate symptom score (IPSS). Median observation time was 5.4 year. Sixty-two of the 90 patients from the original study cohort were eligible for toxicity assessment. Overall survival, cancer-specific survival and biochemical freedom from failure were 85%, 96% and 80%, respectively at five years after radiotherapy. Late toxicity GU and GI RTOG scores≥2 were 5% and 0%. Comparing pre- and post-radiotherapy IPSS scores indicate that development in urinary symptoms after radiotherapy may be complex. Prostate image-guided radiotherapy using a prostate stent demonstrated survival data comparable with recently published data. GU and GI toxicities at five-year follow-up were low and comparable to the lowest toxicity rates reported. These findings support that the precision of the prostate stent technique is at least as good as other techniques. IPSS revealed a complex development in urinary symptoms after radiotherapy.

  7. Development of an integral system test for image-guided radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Rowbottom, Carl G.; Jaffray, David A.

    2004-12-01

    An integral system test was developed to determine the precision and accuracy of an image-guided radiotherapy system involving an x-ray volumetric imaging device mounted onto the gantry of a medical linear accelerator. The test was designed to interrogate the system components as a whole without deconstructing the individual sources of error. The integral system test was based on the imaging of an unambiguous stationary object in the treatment position and so took no account of patient related errors. An array of micromosfets interspersed within slices of a tissue equivalent phantom was developed as an imaging test object. It has previously been demonstrated that micromosfets have a very small active volume, are clearly visible on CT images, and produce no significant artifacts. In addition, the active volume of the micromosfets can be accurately inferred radiographically via the use of x-ray volumetric imaging. X-ray volumetric imaging was performed with the object in the treatment position, then reconstructed and transferred to a treatment planning system. With the phantom remaining undisturbed in the treatment position a series of treatment fields were designed to produce a series of fields with the leaf edge sweeping across active volume of the micromosfets. The fields were delivered with a micro-MLC to dosimetrically verify the position of the mosfets and compare with dose values produced by the treatment planning system. It was demonstrated that the systematic gantry flex could be accounted for by the imaging and delivery systems. For the delivery system small changes in leaf positions of the micro-MLC were required to account for gantry flex. The position of the micromosfets determined by the 50% dose position was on average (0.15{+-}0.13) mm away from the position determined radiographically for the x and y axes, and (1.0{+-}0.14) mm for the z axis. This implies that a margin of approximately 0.2 mm in the axial plane and 1.0 mm in the superior

  8. NBN gain is predictive for adverse outcome following image-guided radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sykes, Jenna; Zafarana, Gaetano; Chu, Kenneth C.; Ramnarine, Varune R.; Ishkanian, Adrian; Sendorek, Dorota H.S.; Pasic, Ivan; Lam, Wan L.; Jurisica, Igor; van der Kwast, Theo; Milosevic, Michael; Boutros, Paul C.; Bristow, Robert G.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the use of clinical prognostic factors (PSA, T-category and Gleason score), 20-60% of localized prostate cancers (PCa) fail primary local treatment. Herein, we determined the prognostic importance of main sensors of the DNA damage response (DDR): MRE11A, RAD50, NBN, ATM, ATR and PRKDC. We studied copy number alterations in DDR genes in localized PCa treated with image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT; n=139) versus radical prostatectomy (RadP; n=154). In both cohorts, NBN gains were the most frequent genomic alteration (14.4 and 11% of cases, respectively), and were associated with overall tumour genomic instability (p<0.0001). NBN gains were the only significant predictor of 5yrs biochemical relapse-free rate (bRFR) following IGRT (46% versus 77%; p=0.00067). On multivariate analysis, NBN gain remained a significant independent predictor of bRFR after adjusting for known clinical prognostic variables (HR=3.28, 95% CI 1.56–6.89, Wald p-value=0.0017). No DDR-sensing gene was prognostic in the RadP cohort. In vitro studies correlated NBN gene overexpression with PCa cells radioresistance. In conclusion, NBN gain predicts for decreased bRFR in IGRT, but not in RadP patients. If validated independently, Nibrin gains may be the first PCa predictive biomarker to facilitate local treatment decisions using precision medicine approaches with surgery or radiotherapy. PMID:25415046

  9. The value of image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy in challenging clinical settings

    PubMed Central

    Treece, S J; Mukesh, M; Rimmer, Y L; Tudor, S J; Dean, J C; Benson, R J; Gregory, D L; Horan, G; Jefferies, S J; Russell, S G; Williams, M V; Wilson, C B; Burnet, N G

    2013-01-01

    Objective To illustrate the wider potential scope of image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT), outside of the “standard” indications for IMRT. Methods Nine challenging clinical cases were selected. All were treated with radical intent, although it was accepted that in several of the cases the probability of cure was low. IMRT alone was not adequate owing to the close proximity of the target to organs at risk, the risk of geographical miss, or the need to tighten planning margins, making image-guided radiotherapy an essential integral part of the treatment. Discrepancies between the initial planning scan and the daily on-treatment megavoltage CT were recorded for each case. The three-dimensional displacement was compared with the margin used to create the planning target volume (PTV). Results All but one patient achieved local control. Three patients developed metastatic disease but benefited from good local palliation; two have since died. A further patient died of an unrelated condition. Four patients are alive and well. Toxicity was low in all cases. Without daily image guidance, the PTV margin would have been insufficient to ensure complete coverage in 49% of fractions. It was inadequate by >3 mm in 19% of fractions, and by >5 mm in 9%. Conclusion IG-IMRT ensures accurate dose delivery to treat the target and avoid critical structures, acting as daily quality assurance for the delivery of complex IMRT plans. These patients could not have been adequately treated without image guidance. Advances in knowledge IG-IMRT can offer improved outcomes in less common clinical situations, where conventional techniques would provide suboptimal treatment. PMID:23255544

  10. SU-E-J-191: Motion Prediction Using Extreme Learning Machine in Image Guided Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, J; Cao, R; Pei, X; Wang, H; Hu, L

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Real-time motion tracking is a critical issue in image guided radiotherapy due to the time latency caused by image processing and system response. It is of great necessity to fast and accurately predict the future position of the respiratory motion and the tumor location. Methods: The prediction of respiratory position was done based on the positioning and tracking module in ARTS-IGRT system which was developed by FDS Team (www.fds.org.cn). An approach involving with the extreme learning machine (ELM) was adopted to predict the future respiratory position as well as the tumor’s location by training the past trajectories. For the training process, a feed-forward neural network with one single hidden layer was used for the learning. First, the number of hidden nodes was figured out for the single layered feed forward network (SLFN). Then the input weights and hidden layer biases of the SLFN were randomly assigned to calculate the hidden neuron output matrix. Finally, the predicted movement were obtained by applying the output weights and compared with the actual movement. Breathing movement acquired from the external infrared markers was used to test the prediction accuracy. And the implanted marker movement for the prostate cancer was used to test the implementation of the tumor motion prediction. Results: The accuracy of the predicted motion and the actual motion was tested. Five volunteers with different breathing patterns were tested. The average prediction time was 0.281s. And the standard deviation of prediction accuracy was 0.002 for the respiratory motion and 0.001 for the tumor motion. Conclusion: The extreme learning machine method can provide an accurate and fast prediction of the respiratory motion and the tumor location and therefore can meet the requirements of real-time tumor-tracking in image guided radiotherapy.

  11. Incremental learning with selective memory (ILSM): towards fast prostate localization for image guided radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yaozong; Zhan, Yiqiang; Shen, Dinggang

    2014-02-01

    Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) requires fast and accurate localization of the prostate in 3-D treatment-guided radiotherapy, which is challenging due to low tissue contrast and large anatomical variation across patients. On the other hand, the IGRT workflow involves collecting a series of computed tomography (CT) images from the same patient under treatment. These images contain valuable patient-specific information yet are often neglected by previous works. In this paper, we propose a novel learning framework, namely incremental learning with selective memory (ILSM), to effectively learn the patient-specific appearance characteristics from these patient-specific images. Specifically, starting with a population-based discriminative appearance model, ILSM aims to "personalize" the model to fit patient-specific appearance characteristics. The model is personalized with two steps: backward pruning that discards obsolete population-based knowledge and forward learning that incorporates patient-specific characteristics. By effectively combining the patient-specific characteristics with the general population statistics, the incrementally learned appearance model can localize the prostate of a specific patient much more accurately. This work has three contributions: 1) the proposed incremental learning framework can capture patient-specific characteristics more effectively, compared to traditional learning schemes, such as pure patient-specific learning, population-based learning, and mixture learning with patient-specific and population data; 2) this learning framework does not have any parametric model assumption, hence, allowing the adoption of any discriminative classifier; and 3) using ILSM, we can localize the prostate in treatment CTs accurately (DSC  ∼ 0.89 ) and fast (  ∼ 4 s), which satisfies the real-world clinical requirements of IGRT.

  12. Incremental Learning With Selective Memory (ILSM): Towards Fast Prostate Localization for Image Guided Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yaozong; Zhan, Yiqiang

    2015-01-01

    Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) requires fast and accurate localization of the prostate in 3-D treatment-guided radiotherapy, which is challenging due to low tissue contrast and large anatomical variation across patients. On the other hand, the IGRT workflow involves collecting a series of computed tomography (CT) images from the same patient under treatment. These images contain valuable patient-specific information yet are often neglected by previous works. In this paper, we propose a novel learning framework, namely incremental learning with selective memory (ILSM), to effectively learn the patient-specific appearance characteristics from these patient-specific images. Specifically, starting with a population-based discriminative appearance model, ILSM aims to “personalize” the model to fit patient-specific appearance characteristics. The model is personalized with two steps: backward pruning that discards obsolete population-based knowledge and forward learning that incorporates patient-specific characteristics. By effectively combining the patient-specific characteristics with the general population statistics, the incrementally learned appearance model can localize the prostate of a specific patient much more accurately. This work has three contributions: 1) the proposed incremental learning framework can capture patient-specific characteristics more effectively, compared to traditional learning schemes, such as pure patient-specific learning, population-based learning, and mixture learning with patient-specific and population data; 2) this learning framework does not have any parametric model assumption, hence, allowing the adoption of any discriminative classifier; and 3) using ILSM, we can localize the prostate in treatment CTs accurately (DSC ∼0.89) and fast (∼4 s), which satisfies the real-world clinical requirements of IGRT. PMID:24495983

  13. The first patient treatment of electromagnetic-guided real time adaptive radiotherapy using MLC tracking for lung SABR.

    PubMed

    Booth, Jeremy T; Caillet, Vincent; Hardcastle, Nicholas; O'Brien, Ricky; Szymura, Kathryn; Crasta, Charlene; Harris, Benjamin; Haddad, Carol; Eade, Thomas; Keall, Paul J

    2016-10-01

    Real time adaptive radiotherapy that enables smaller irradiated volumes may reduce pulmonary toxicity. We report on the first patient treatment of electromagnetic-guided real time adaptive radiotherapy delivered with MLC tracking for lung stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy. A clinical trial was developed to investigate the safety and feasibility of MLC tracking in lung. The first patient was an 80-year old man with a single left lower lobe lung metastasis to be treated with SABR to 48Gy in 4 fractions. In-house software was integrated with a standard linear accelerator to adapt the treatment beam shape and position based on electromagnetic transponders implanted in the lung. MLC tracking plans were compared against standard ITV-based treatment planning. MLC tracking plan delivery was reconstructed in the patient to confirm safe delivery. Real time adaptive radiotherapy delivered with MLC tracking compared to standard ITV-based planning reduced the PTV by 41% (18.7-11cm(3)) and the mean lung dose by 30% (202-140cGy), V20 by 35% (2.6-1.5%) and V5 by 9% (8.9-8%). An emerging technology, MLC tracking, has been translated into the clinic and used to treat lung SABR patients for the first time. This milestone represents an important first step for clinical real-time adaptive radiotherapy that could reduce pulmonary toxicity in lung radiotherapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Integration between in vivo dosimetry and image guided radiotherapy for lung tumors.

    PubMed

    Piermattei, Angelo; Cilla, Savino; Grimaldi, Luca; Sabatino, Domenico; Fidanzio, Andrea; Greco, Francesca; Mameli, Alessandra; Balducci, Mario; Mattiucci, Gian Carlo; Frascino, Vincenzo; Stimato, Gerardina; Gaudino, Diego; Ramella, Sara; Trodella, Lucio; D'Onofrio, Guido; Zini, Giampaolo; Macchia, Gabriella; Digesu', Cinzia; Morganti, Alessio G; Clemente, Stefania; Cozzolino, Mariella; Pedicini, Piernicola; Fusco, Vincenzo

    2009-06-01

    The article reports a feasibility study about the potentiality of an in vivo dosimetry method for the adaptive radiotherapy of the lung tumors treated by 3D conformal radiotherapy techniques (3D CRTs). At the moment image guided radiotherapy (IGRT) has been used for this aim, but it requires taking many periodic radiological images during the treatment that increase workload and patient dose. In vivo dosimetry reported here can reduce the above efforts, alerting the medical staff for the commissioning of new radiological images for an eventual adaptive plan. The in vivo dosimetry method applied on 20 patients makes use of the transit signal St on the beam central axis measured by a small ion chamber positioned on an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) or by the EPID itself. The reconstructed in vivo dosimetry at the isocenter point Diso requires a convolution between the transit signal St and a dose reconstruction factor C that essentially depends on (i) tissue inhomogeneities along the beam central axis and (ii) the in-patient isocenter depth. The C factors, one for every gantry angle, are obtained by processing the patient's computed tomography scan. The method has been recently applied in some Italian centers to check the radiotherapy of pelvis, breast, head, and thorax treatments. In this work the dose reconstruction was carried out in five centers to check the Diso in the lung tumor during the 3D CRT, and the results have been used to detect the interfraction tumor anatomy variations that can require new CT imaging and an adaptive plan. In particular, in three centers a small ion chamber was positioned below the patient and used for the St measurement. In two centers, the St signal was obtained directly by 25 central pixels of an a-Si EPID, equipped with commercial software that enabled its use as a stable detector. A tolerance action level of +/- 6% for every checked beam was assumed. This means that when a difference greater than 6% between the predicted

  15. Reliability of the Bony Anatomy in Image-Guided Stereotactic Radiotherapy of Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Guckenberger, Matthias Baier, Kurt; Guenther, Iris; Richter, Anne; Wilbert, Juergen; Sauer, Otto; Vordermark, Dirk; Flentje, Michael

    2007-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate whether the position of brain metastases remains stable between planning and treatment in cranial stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT). Methods and Materials: Eighteen patients with 20 brain metastases were treated with single-fraction (17 lesions) or hypofractionated (3 lesions) image-guided SRT. Median time interval between planning and treatment was 8 days. Before treatment a cone-beam CT (CBCT) and a conventional CT after application of i.v. contrast were acquired. Setup errors using automatic bone registration (CBCT) and manual soft-tissue registration of the brain metastases (conventional CT) were compared. Results: Tumor size was not significantly different between planning and treatment. The three-dimensional setup error (mean {+-} SD) was 4.0 {+-} 2.1 mm and 3.5 {+-} 2.2 mm according to the bony anatomy and the lesion itself, respectively. A highly significant correlation between automatic bone match and soft-tissue registration was seen in all three directions (r {>=} 0.88). The three-dimensional distance between the isocenter according to bone match and soft-tissue registration was 1.7 {+-} 0.7 mm, maximum 2.8 mm. Treatment of intracranial pressure with steroids did not influence the position of the lesion relative to the bony anatomy. Conclusion: With a time interval of approximately 1 week between planning and treatment, the bony anatomy of the skull proved to be an excellent surrogate for the target position in image-guided SRT.

  16. Towards inherently distortion-free MR images for image-guided radiotherapy on an MRI accelerator.

    PubMed

    Crijns, S P M; Bakker, C J G; Seevinck, P R; de Leeuw, H; Lagendijk, J J W; Raaymakers, B W

    2012-03-07

    In MR-guided interventions, it is mandatory to establish a solid relationship between the imaging coordinate system and world coordinates. This is particularly important in image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) on an MRI accelerator, as the interaction of matter with γ-radiation cannot be visualized. In conventional acquisitions, off-resonance effects cause discrepancies between coordinate systems. We propose to mitigate this by using only phase encoding and to reduce the longer acquisitions by under-sampling and regularized reconstruction. To illustrate the performance of this acquisition in the presence of off-resonance phenomena, phantom and in vivo images are acquired using spin-echo (SE) and purely phase-encoded sequences. Data are retrospectively under-sampled and reconstructed iteratively. We observe accurate geometries in purely phase-encoded images for all cases, whereas SE images of the same phantoms display image distortions. Regularized reconstruction yields accurate phantom images under high acceleration factors. In vivo images were reconstructed faithfully while using acceleration factors up to 4. With the proposed technique, inherently undistorted images with one-to-one correspondence to world coordinates can be obtained. It is a valuable tool in geometry quality assurance, treatment planning and online image guidance. Under-sampled acquisition combined with regularized reconstruction can be used to accelerate the acquisition while retaining geometrical accuracy.

  17. Dual source and dual detector arrays tetrahedron beam computed tomography for image guided radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joshua; Lu, Weiguo; Zhang, Tiezhi

    2014-02-07

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is an important online imaging modality for image guided radiotherapy. But suboptimal image quality and the lack of a real-time stereoscopic imaging function limit its implementation in advanced treatment techniques, such as online adaptive and 4D radiotherapy. Tetrahedron beam computed tomography (TBCT) is a novel online imaging modality designed to improve on the image quality provided by CBCT. TBCT geometry is flexible, and multiple detector and source arrays can be used for different applications. In this paper, we describe a novel dual source-dual detector TBCT system that is specially designed for LINAC radiation treatment machines. The imaging system is positioned in-line with the MV beam and is composed of two linear array x-ray sources mounted aside the electrical portal imaging device and two linear arrays of x-ray detectors mounted below the machine head. The detector and x-ray source arrays are orthogonal to each other, and each pair of source and detector arrays forms a tetrahedral volume. Four planer images can be obtained from different view angles at each gantry position at a frame rate as high as 20 frames per second. The overlapped regions provide a stereoscopic field of view of approximately 10-15 cm. With a half gantry rotation, a volumetric CT image can be reconstructed having a 45 cm field of view. Due to the scatter rejecting design of the TBCT geometry, the system can potentially produce high quality 2D and 3D images with less radiation exposure. The design of the dual source-dual detector system is described, and preliminary results of studies performed on numerical phantoms and simulated patient data are presented.

  18. Magnetization curves of sintered heavy tungsten alloys for applications in MRI-guided radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kolling, Stefan; Oborn, Bradley M.; Keall, Paul J.; Horvat, Joseph

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Due to the current interest in MRI-guided radiotherapy, the magnetic properties of the materials commonly used in radiotherapy are becoming increasingly important. In this paper, measurement results for the magnetization (BH) curves of a range of sintered heavy tungsten alloys used in radiation shielding and collimation are presented. Methods: Sintered heavy tungsten alloys typically contain >90 % tungsten and <10 % of a combination of iron, nickel, and copper binders. Samples of eight different grades of sintered heavy tungsten alloys with varying binder content were investigated. Using a superconducting quantum interference detector magnetometer, the induced magnetic momentm was measured for each sample as a function of applied external field H{sub 0} and the BH curve derived. Results: The iron content of the alloys was found to play a dominant role, directly influencing the magnetizationM and thus the nonlinearity of the BH curve. Generally, the saturation magnetization increased with increasing iron content of the alloy. Furthermore, no measurable magnetization was found for all alloys without iron content, despite containing up to 6% of nickel. For two samples from different manufacturers but with identical quoted nominal elemental composition (95% W, 3.5% Ni, 1.5% Fe), a relative difference in the magnetization of 11%–16% was measured. Conclusions: The measured curves show that the magnetic properties of sintered heavy tungsten alloys strongly depend on the iron content, whereas the addition of nickel in the absence of iron led to no measurable effect. Since a difference in the BH curves for two samples with identical quoted nominal composition from different manufacturers was observed, measuring of the BH curve for each individual batch of heavy tungsten alloys is advisable whenever accurate knowledge of the magnetic properties is crucial. The obtained BH curves can be used in FEM simulations to predict the magnetic impact of sintered heavy

  19. Biological Image-Guided Radiotherapy in Rectal Cancer: Challenges and Pitfalls

    SciTech Connect

    Roels, Sarah; Slagmolen, Pieter; Lee, John A.; Loeckx, Dirk; Maes, Frederik; Stroobants, Sigrid; Ectors, Nadine; Penninckx, Freddy; Haustermans, Karin

    2009-11-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of integrating multiple imaging modalities for image-guided radiotherapy in rectal cancer. Patients and Methods: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) were performed before, during, and after preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in patients with resectable rectal cancer. The FDG-PET signals were segmented with an adaptive threshold-based and a gradient-based method. Magnetic resonance tumor volumes (TVs) were manually delineated. A nonrigid registration algorithm was applied to register the images, and mismatch analyses were carried out between MR and FDG-PET TVs and between TVs over time. Tumor volumes delineated on the images after CRT were compared with the pathologic TV. Results: Forty-five FDG-PET/CT and 45 MR images were analyzed from 15 patients. The mean MRI and FDG-PET TVs showed a tendency to shrink during and after CRT. In general, MRI showed larger TVs than FDG-PET. There was an approximately 50% mismatch between the FDG-PET TV and the MRI TV at baseline and during CRT. Sixty-one percent of the FDG-PET TV and 76% of the MRI TV obtained after 10 fractions of CRT remained inside the corresponding baseline TV. On MRI, residual tumor was still suspected in all 6 patients with a pathologic complete response, whereas FDG-PET showed a metabolic complete response in 3 of them. The FDG-PET TVs delineated with the gradient-based method matched closest with pathologic findings. Conclusions: Integration of MRI and FDG-PET into radiotherapy seems feasible. Gradient-based segmentation is recommended for FDG-PET. Spatial variance between MRI and FDG-PET TVs should be taken into account for target definition.

  20. Image-driven, model-based 3D abdominal motion estimation for MR-guided radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stemkens, Bjorn; Tijssen, Rob H. N.; de Senneville, Baudouin Denis; Lagendijk, Jan J. W.; van den Berg, Cornelis A. T.

    2016-07-01

    Respiratory motion introduces substantial uncertainties in abdominal radiotherapy for which traditionally large margins are used. The MR-Linac will open up the opportunity to acquire high resolution MR images just prior to radiation and during treatment. However, volumetric MRI time series are not able to characterize 3D tumor and organ-at-risk motion with sufficient temporal resolution. In this study we propose a method to estimate 3D deformation vector fields (DVFs) with high spatial and temporal resolution based on fast 2D imaging and a subject-specific motion model based on respiratory correlated MRI. In a pre-beam phase, a retrospectively sorted 4D-MRI is acquired, from which the motion is parameterized using a principal component analysis. This motion model is used in combination with fast 2D cine-MR images, which are acquired during radiation, to generate full field-of-view 3D DVFs with a temporal resolution of 476 ms. The geometrical accuracies of the input data (4D-MRI and 2D multi-slice acquisitions) and the fitting procedure were determined using an MR-compatible motion phantom and found to be 1.0-1.5 mm on average. The framework was tested on seven healthy volunteers for both the pancreas and the kidney. The calculated motion was independently validated using one of the 2D slices, with an average error of 1.45 mm. The calculated 3D DVFs can be used retrospectively for treatment simulations, plan evaluations, or to determine the accumulated dose for both the tumor and organs-at-risk on a subject-specific basis in MR-guided radiotherapy.

  1. Dual source and dual detector arrays tetrahedron beam computed tomography for image guided radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Joshua; Lu, Weiguo; Zhang, Tiezhi

    2014-02-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is an important online imaging modality for image guided radiotherapy. But suboptimal image quality and the lack of a real-time stereoscopic imaging function limit its implementation in advanced treatment techniques, such as online adaptive and 4D radiotherapy. Tetrahedron beam computed tomography (TBCT) is a novel online imaging modality designed to improve on the image quality provided by CBCT. TBCT geometry is flexible, and multiple detector and source arrays can be used for different applications. In this paper, we describe a novel dual source-dual detector TBCT system that is specially designed for LINAC radiation treatment machines. The imaging system is positioned in-line with the MV beam and is composed of two linear array x-ray sources mounted aside the electrical portal imaging device and two linear arrays of x-ray detectors mounted below the machine head. The detector and x-ray source arrays are orthogonal to each other, and each pair of source and detector arrays forms a tetrahedral volume. Four planer images can be obtained from different view angles at each gantry position at a frame rate as high as 20 frames per second. The overlapped regions provide a stereoscopic field of view of approximately 10-15 cm. With a half gantry rotation, a volumetric CT image can be reconstructed having a 45 cm field of view. Due to the scatter rejecting design of the TBCT geometry, the system can potentially produce high quality 2D and 3D images with less radiation exposure. The design of the dual source-dual detector system is described, and preliminary results of studies performed on numerical phantoms and simulated patient data are presented.

  2. Automatic block-matching registration to improve lung tumor localization during image-guided radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Scott Patrick

    To improve relatively poor outcomes for locally-advanced lung cancer patients, many current efforts are dedicated to minimizing uncertainties in radiotherapy. This enables the isotoxic delivery of escalated tumor doses, leading to better local tumor control. The current dissertation specifically addresses inter-fractional uncertainties resulting from patient setup variability. An automatic block-matching registration (BMR) algorithm is implemented and evaluated for the purpose of directly localizing advanced-stage lung tumors during image-guided radiation therapy. In this algorithm, small image sub-volumes, termed "blocks", are automatically identified on the tumor surface in an initial planning computed tomography (CT) image. Each block is independently and automatically registered to daily images acquired immediately prior to each treatment fraction. To improve the accuracy and robustness of BMR, this algorithm incorporates multi-resolution pyramid registration, regularization with a median filter, and a new multiple-candidate-registrations technique. The result of block-matching is a sparse displacement vector field that models local tissue deformations near the tumor surface. The distribution of displacement vectors is aggregated to obtain the final tumor registration, corresponding to the treatment couch shift for patient setup correction. Compared to existing rigid and deformable registration algorithms, the final BMR algorithm significantly improves the overlap between target volumes from the planning CT and registered daily images. Furthermore, BMR results in the smallest treatment margins for the given study population. However, despite these improvements, large residual target localization errors were noted, indicating that purely rigid couch shifts cannot correct for all sources of inter-fractional variability. Further reductions in treatment uncertainties may require the combination of high-quality target localization and adaptive radiotherapy.

  3. Inter- and Intrafraction Uncertainty in Prostate Bed Image-Guided Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Kitty; Palma, David A.; Scott, Danielle; McGregor, Danielle; Gaede, Stewart; Yartsev, Slav; Bauman, Glenn; Louie, Alexander V.; Rodrigues, George

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: The goals of this study were to measure inter- and intrafraction setup error and prostate bed motion (PBM) in patients undergoing post-prostatectomy image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) and to propose appropriate population-based three-dimensional clinical target volume to planning target volume (CTV-PTV) margins in both non-IGRT and IGRT scenarios. Methods and Materials: In this prospective study, 14 patients underwent adjuvant or salvage radiotherapy to the prostate bed under image guidance using linac-based kilovoltage cone-beam CT (kV-CBCT). Inter- and intrafraction uncertainty/motion was assessed by offline analysis of three consecutive daily kV-CBCT images of each patient: (1) after initial setup to skin marks, (2) after correction for positional error/immediately before radiation treatment, and (3) immediately after treatment. Results: The magnitude of interfraction PBM was 2.1 mm, and intrafraction PBM was 0.4 mm. The maximum inter- and intrafraction prostate bed motion was primarily in the anterior-posterior direction. Margins of at least 3-5 mm with IGRT and 4-7 mm without IGRT (aligning to skin marks) will ensure 95% of the prescribed dose to the clinical target volume in 90% of patients. Conclusions: PBM is a predominant source of intrafraction error compared with setup error and has implications for appropriate PTV margins. Based on inter- and estimated intrafraction motion of the prostate bed using pre- and post-kV-CBCT images, CBCT IGRT to correct for day-to-day variances can potentially reduce CTV-PTV margins by 1-2 mm. CTV-PTV margins for prostate bed treatment in the IGRT and non-IGRT scenarios are proposed; however, in cases with more uncertainty of target delineation and image guidance accuracy, larger margins are recommended.

  4. Calcifications Are Potential Surrogates for Prostate Localization in Image-Guided Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Grace G. McGowan, Tom S.; Larsen, Tessa M.; Bruce, Lisa M.; Moran, Natasha K.; Tsao, Jonathan R.; MacPherson, Miller S.

    2008-11-15

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of using calcifications as surrogates for the prostate position during cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) image-guided radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: The twice-weekly CBCT images taken during the treatment course of 4 patients were retrospectively studied for the stability of the calcifications. The geometric center of three fiducial markers was used as the reference. The planning CT images of 131 prostate patients recently treated with external beam radiotherapy at our center were reviewed to estimate the calcification occurrence rate. Analysis was conducted using the Varian Eclipse treatment planning system. Two patients were treated using prostate calcifications as the landmark in on-line registration. Both the Varian standard and the low-dose CBCT modes were used for imaging. Results: The calcifications were found to be stable during the treatment course. At the 95% confidence interval, the difference between the distance from an identified calcification to the fiducial markers on CBCT and the distance on the planning CT scans was 0.2 {+-} 2.0 mm, 0.8 {+-} 2.2 mm, and 0.4 {+-} 2.4 mm in the left-right, anteroposterior, and superoinferior direction, respectively. Of the 131 patients, 46 (35%) had well-defined calcifications either inside the prostate or near the borders. Our experience in treating the first 2 patients demonstrated that the calcifications are easily distinguished on low-dose scans and that calcification registration can be precisely performed. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that calcifications can be reliable markers of prostate position and allow for precise image guidance with a low-imaging dose. With this approach, potentially about one-third of prostate patients could benefit from precise image guidance without the invasive use of markers.

  5. Magnetization curves of sintered heavy tungsten alloys for applications in MRI-guided radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Kolling, Stefan; Oborn, Bradley M; Keall, Paul J; Horvat, Joseph

    2014-06-01

    Due to the current interest in MRI-guided radiotherapy, the magnetic properties of the materials commonly used in radiotherapy are becoming increasingly important. In this paper, measurement results for the magnetization (BH) curves of a range of sintered heavy tungsten alloys used in radiation shielding and collimation are presented. Sintered heavy tungsten alloys typically contain >90% tungsten and <10% of a combination of iron, nickel, and copper binders. Samples of eight different grades of sintered heavy tungsten alloys with varying binder content were investigated. Using a superconducting quantum interference detector magnetometer, the induced magnetic moment m was measured for each sample as a function of applied external field H0 and the BH curve derived. The iron content of the alloys was found to play a dominant role, directly influencing the magnetization M and thus the nonlinearity of the BH curve. Generally, the saturation magnetization increased with increasing iron content of the alloy. Furthermore, no measurable magnetization was found for all alloys without iron content, despite containing up to 6% of nickel. For two samples from different manufacturers but with identical quoted nominal elemental composition (95% W, 3.5% Ni, 1.5% Fe), a relative difference in the magnetization of 11%-16% was measured. The measured curves show that the magnetic properties of sintered heavy tungsten alloys strongly depend on the iron content, whereas the addition of nickel in the absence of iron led to no measurable effect. Since a difference in the BH curves for two samples with identical quoted nominal composition from different manufacturers was observed, measuring of the BH curve for each individual batch of heavy tungsten alloys is advisable whenever accurate knowledge of the magnetic properties is crucial. The obtained BH curves can be used in FEM simulations to predict the magnetic impact of sintered heavy tungsten alloys.

  6. Inverse Relationship Between Biochemical Outcome and Acute Toxicity After Image-Guided Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Vesprini, Danny; Catton, Charles; Jacks, Lindsay; Lockwood, Gina; Rosewall, Tara; Bayley, Andrew; Chung, Peter; Gospodarowicz, Mary; Menard, Cynthia; Milosevic, Michael; Nichol, Alan; Skala, Marketa; Warde, Padraig; Bristow, Robert G.

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: Prostate cancer patients exhibit variability in normal tissue reactions and biochemical failure. With the use of image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT), there is a greater likelihood that the differences in normal tissue and tumor response are due to biological rather than physical factors. We tested the hypothesis that prospectively scored acute toxicity is associated with biochemical failure-free rate (BFFR) in prostate cancer patients treated with IGRT. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively analyzed BFFR in 362 patients with localized prostate cancer treated with IGRT. We compared BFFR with prospectively collected Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) maximum acute gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) toxicity scores. Median follow-up for all patients was 58.3 months after total radiotherapy doses of 75.6-79.8 Gy. Results: Patients reporting RTOG acute GU or GI toxicity scores of {>=}2 were considered 'sensitive' (n = 141, 39%) and patients reporting scores <2 were considered 'nonsensitive' (n = 221, 61%). When calculating biochemical failure (BF) using the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology definition at 5 years, 76% (CI 70-82%) of the 'nonsensitive' patients were failure free, compared with only 53% (CI 43-62%) of the 'sensitive' patients (log-rank test, p < 0.0001). This difference was also observed using the Phoenix definition; 'nonsensitive' 5-year BFFR was 81% (CI 74-86%) vs. 'sensitive' BFFR was 68% (CI 58-76%; log-rank test p = 0.0012). The difference in BF between cohorts remained significant when controlled for radiation dose (75.6 vs. 79.8 Gy), prognostic stratification (T category, prostate-specific antigen, and Gleason score), and prostate volume. Conclusions: This study unexpectedly shows that prostate cancer patients who develop {>=}Grade 2 RTOG acute toxicity during radiotherapy are less likely to remain BFF at 5 years. These results deserve further study and, if validated in other large IGRT cohorts

  7. Image-guided adaptive gating of lung cancer radiotherapy: a computer simulation study.

    PubMed

    Aristophanous, Michalis; Rottmann, Joerg; Park, Sang-June; Nishioka, Seiko; Shirato, Hiroki; Berbeco, Ross I

    2010-08-07

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect that image-guided adaptation of the gating window during treatment could have on the residual tumor motion, by simulating different gated radiotherapy techniques. There are three separate components of this simulation: (1) the 'Hokkaido Data', which are previously measured 3D data of lung tumor motion tracks and the corresponding 1D respiratory signals obtained during the entire ungated radiotherapy treatments of eight patients, (2) the respiratory gating protocol at our institution and the imaging performed under that protocol and (3) the actual simulation in which the Hokkaido Data are used to select tumor position information that could have been collected based on the imaging performed under our gating protocol. We simulated treatments with a fixed gating window and a gating window that is updated during treatment. The patient data were divided into different fractions, each with continuous acquisitions longer than 2 min. In accordance to the imaging performed under our gating protocol, we assume that we have tumor position information for the first 15 s of treatment, obtained from kV fluoroscopy, and for the rest of the fractions the tumor position is only available during the beam-on time from MV imaging. The gating window was set according to the information obtained from the first 15 s such that the residual motion was less than 3 mm. For the fixed gating window technique the gate remained the same for the entire treatment, while for the adaptive technique the range of the tumor motion during beam-on time was measured and used to adapt the gating window to keep the residual motion below 3 mm. The algorithm used to adapt the gating window is described. The residual tumor motion inside the gating window was reduced on average by 24% for the patients with regular breathing patterns and the difference was statistically significant (p-value = 0.01). The magnitude of the residual tumor motion depended on the

  8. Image-guided adaptive gating of lung cancer radiotherapy: a computer simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aristophanous, Michalis; Rottmann, Joerg; Park, Sang-June; Nishioka, Seiko; Shirato, Hiroki; Berbeco, Ross I.

    2010-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect that image-guided adaptation of the gating window during treatment could have on the residual tumor motion, by simulating different gated radiotherapy techniques. There are three separate components of this simulation: (1) the 'Hokkaido Data', which are previously measured 3D data of lung tumor motion tracks and the corresponding 1D respiratory signals obtained during the entire ungated radiotherapy treatments of eight patients, (2) the respiratory gating protocol at our institution and the imaging performed under that protocol and (3) the actual simulation in which the Hokkaido Data are used to select tumor position information that could have been collected based on the imaging performed under our gating protocol. We simulated treatments with a fixed gating window and a gating window that is updated during treatment. The patient data were divided into different fractions, each with continuous acquisitions longer than 2 min. In accordance to the imaging performed under our gating protocol, we assume that we have tumor position information for the first 15 s of treatment, obtained from kV fluoroscopy, and for the rest of the fractions the tumor position is only available during the beam-on time from MV imaging. The gating window was set according to the information obtained from the first 15 s such that the residual motion was less than 3 mm. For the fixed gating window technique the gate remained the same for the entire treatment, while for the adaptive technique the range of the tumor motion during beam-on time was measured and used to adapt the gating window to keep the residual motion below 3 mm. The algorithm used to adapt the gating window is described. The residual tumor motion inside the gating window was reduced on average by 24% for the patients with regular breathing patterns and the difference was statistically significant (p-value = 0.01). The magnitude of the residual tumor motion depended on the

  9. Integral test phantom for dosimetric quality assurance of image guided and intensity modulated stereotactic radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Letourneau, Daniel; Keller, Harald; Sharpe, Michael B.; Jaffray, David A.

    2007-05-15

    The objective of this work is to develop a dosimetric phantom quality assurance (QA) of linear accelerators capable of cone-beam CT (CBCT) image guided and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT). This phantom is to be used in an integral test to quantify in real-time both the performance of the image guidance and the dose delivery systems in terms of dose localization. The prototype IG-IMRT QA phantom consisted of a cylindrical imaging phantom (CatPhan) combined with an array of 11 radiation diodes mounted on a 10 cm diameter disk, oriented perpendicular to the phantom axis. Basic diode response characterization was performed for 6 and 18 MV photons. The diode response was compared to planning system calculations in the open and penumbrae regions of simple and complex beam arrangements. The clinical use of the QA phantom was illustrated in an integral test of an IG-IMRT treatment designed for a clinical spinal radiosurgery case. The sensitivity of the phantom to multileaf collimator (MLC) calibration and setup errors in the clinical setting was assessed by introducing errors in the IMRT plan or by displacing the phantom. The diodes offered good response linearity and long-term reproducibility for both 6 and 18 MV. Axial dosimetry of coplanar beams (in a plane containing the beam axes) was made possible with the nearly isoplanatic response of the diodes over 360 deg. of gantry (usually within {+-}1%). For single beam geometry, errors in phantom placement as small as 0.5 mm could be accurately detected (in gradient {>=}1%/mm). In clinical setting, MLC systematic errors of 1 mm on a single MLC bank introduced in the IMRT plan were easily detectable with the QA phantom. The QA phantom demonstrated also sufficient sensitivity for the detection of setup errors as small as 1 mm for the IMRT delivery. These results demonstrated that the prototype can accurately and efficiently verify the entire IG-IMRT process. This tool, in conjunction with image guidance capabilities

  10. SU-E-T-59: A Novel Multi-Beam Dynamic IMRT with Fixed-Jaw Technique for Left Breast Cancer Patients with Regional Lymph Nodes Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J; Yang, Z; Hu, W

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: This study was to investigate the dosimetric benefit of a novel intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) technique for irradiating the left breast and regional lymph node (RLN). Methods: The breast and RLN (internal mammary node and periclavicular node) and normal tissue were contoured for 16 consecutive left-sided breast cancer patients previously treated with RT after lumpectomy. Nine equi-spaced fields IMRT (9 -field IMRT), tangential multi-beam IMRT (tangential-IMRT) and IMRT with fixed-jaw technique (FJT-IMRT) were developed and compared with three-dimensional conformal RT (3DCRT). Prescribed dose was 50 Gy in 25 fractions. Dose distributions and dose volume histograms were used to evaluate plans. Results: All IMRTs achieved similar target coverage and substantially reduced heart V30 and V20 compared to the 3DCRT. The average heart mean dose had different changes, which were 9.0Gy for 9-field IMRT, 5.7Gy for tangential-IMRT and 4.2Gy for FJT-IMRT. For the contralateral lung and breast, the 9-field IMRT has the highest mean dose; and the FJT-IMRT and tangential-IMRT had similar lower value. For the thyroid, both 9-field IMRT and FJT-IMRT had similar V30 (20% and 22%) and were significantly lower than that of 3DCRT (34%) and tangential-IMRT (46%). Moreover, the thyroid mean dose of FJT-IMRT is the lowest. For cervical esophagus and humeral head, the FJT-IMRT also had the best sparing. Conclusion: All 9-field IMRT, tangential-IMRT and FJT-IMRT had superiority for targets coverage and substantially reduced the heart volume of high dose irradiation. The FJT-IMRT showed advantages of avoiding the contralateral breast and lung irradiation and decreasing the thyroid, humeral head and cervical esophagus radiation dose at the expense of a slight monitor units (MUs) increasing.

  11. Real-time 3D surface-image-guided beam setup in radiotherapy of breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Djajaputra, David; Li Shidong

    2005-01-01

    We describe an approach for external beam radiotherapy of breast cancer that utilizes the three-dimensional (3D) surface information of the breast. The surface data of the breast are obtained from a 3D optical camera that is rigidly mounted on the ceiling of the treatment vault. This 3D camera utilizes light in the visible range therefore it introduces no ionization radiation to the patient. In addition to the surface topographical information of the treated area, the camera also captures gray-scale information that is overlaid on the 3D surface image. This allows us to visualize the skin markers and automatically determine the isocenter position and the beam angles in the breast tangential fields. The field sizes and shapes of the tangential, supraclavicular, and internal mammary gland fields can all be determined according to the 3D surface image of the target. A least-squares method is first introduced for the tangential-field setup that is useful for compensation of the target shape changes. The entire process of capturing the 3D surface data and subsequent calculation of beam parameters typically requires less than 1 min. Our tests on phantom experiments and patient images have achieved the accuracy of 1 mm in shift and 0.5 deg. in rotation. Importantly, the target shape and position changes in each treatment session can both be corrected through this real-time image-guided system.

  12. MR-guided breast radiotherapy: feasibility and magnetic-field impact on skin dose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Heijst, Tristan C. F.; den Hartogh, Mariska D.; Lagendijk, Jan J. W.; Desirée van den Bongard, H. J. G.; van Asselen, Bram

    2013-09-01

    The UMC Utrecht MRI/linac (MRL) design provides image guidance with high soft-tissue contrast, directly during radiotherapy (RT). Breast cancer patients are a potential group to benefit from better guidance in the MRL. However, due to the electron return effect, the skin dose can be increased in presence of a magnetic field. Since large skin areas are generally involved in breast RT, the purpose of this study is to investigate the effects on the skin dose, for whole-breast irradiation (WBI) and accelerated partial-breast irradiation (APBI). In ten patients with early-stage breast cancer, targets and organs at risk (OARs) were delineated on postoperative CT scans co-registered with MRI. The OARs included the skin, comprising the first 5 mm of ipsilateral-breast tissue, plus extensions. Three intensity-modulated RT techniques were considered (2× WBI, 1× APBI). Individual beam geometries were used for all patients. Specially developed MRL treatment-planning software was used. Acceptable plans were generated for 0 T, 0.35 T and 1.5 T, using a class solution. The skin dose was augmented in WBI in the presence of a magnetic field, which is a potential drawback, whereas in APBI the induced effects were negligible. This opens possibilities for developing MR-guided partial-breast treatments in the MRL.

  13. Real-time 3D-surface-guided head refixation useful for fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Li Shidong; Liu Dezhi; Yin Gongjie; Zhuang Ping; Geng, Jason

    2006-02-15

    Accurate and precise head refixation in fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy has been achieved through alignment of real-time 3D-surface images with a reference surface image. The reference surface image is either a 3D optical surface image taken at simulation with the desired treatment position, or a CT/MRI-surface rendering in the treatment plan with corrections for patient motion during CT/MRI scans and partial volume effects. The real-time 3D surface images are rapidly captured by using a 3D video camera mounted on the ceiling of the treatment vault. Any facial expression such as mouth opening that affects surface shape and location can be avoided using a new facial monitoring technique. The image artifacts on the real-time surface can generally be removed by setting a threshold of jumps at the neighboring points while preserving detailed features of the surface of interest. Such a real-time surface image, registered in the treatment machine coordinate system, provides a reliable representation of the patient head position during the treatment. A fast automatic alignment between the real-time surface and the reference surface using a modified iterative-closest-point method leads to an efficient and robust surface-guided target refixation. Experimental and clinical results demonstrate the excellent efficacy of <2 min set-up time, the desired accuracy and precision of <1 mm in isocenter shifts, and <1 deg. in rotation.

  14. Incremental learning with selective memory (ILSM): towards fast prostate localization for image guided radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yaozong; Zhan, Yiqiang; Shen, Dinggang

    2013-01-01

    Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) requires fast and accurate localization of prostate in treatment CTs, which is challenging due to low tissue contrast and large anatomical variations across patients. On the other hand, in IGRT workflow, a series of CT images is acquired from the same patient under treatment, which contains valuable patient-specific information yet is often neglected by previous works. In this paper, we propose a novel learning framework, namely incremental learning with selective memory (ILSM), to effectively learn the patient-specific appearance characteristics from these patient-specific images. Specifically, starting with a population-based discriminative appearance model, ILSM aims to "personalize" the model to fit patient-specific appearance characteristics. Particularly, the model is personalized with two steps, backward pruning that discards obsolete population-based knowledge, and forward learning that incorporates patient-specific characteristics. By effectively combining the patient-specific characteristics with the general population statistics, the incrementally learned appearance model can localize the prostate of the specific patient much more accurately. Validated on a large dataset (349 CT scans), our method achieved high localization accuracy (DSC approximately 0.87) in 4 seconds.

  15. Image-Guided Hypofractionated Radiotherapy in Low-Risk Prostate Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Valeriani, Maurizio; Carnevale, Alessia; Bonome, Paolo; Montalto, Adelaide; Nicosia, Luca; Osti, Mattia F.; De Sanctis, Vitaliana; Minniti, Giuseppe; Maurizi Enrici, Riccardo

    2014-01-01

    Aim. To evaluate efficacy and toxicity of image-guided hypofractionated radiotherapy (HFRT) in the treatment of low-risk prostate cancer. Outcomes and toxicities of this series of patients were compared to another group of 32 low-risk patients treated with conventional fractionation (CFRT). Methods. Fifty-nine patients with low-risk prostate cancer were analysed. Total dose for the prostate and proximal seminal vesicles was 60 Gy delivered in 20 fractions. Results. The median follow-up was 30 months. The actuarial 4-year overall survival, biochemical free survival, and disease specific survival were 100%, 97.4%, and 97.4%, respectively. Acute grade 1-2 gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) toxicity rates were 11.9% and 40.7%, respectively. Grade 1 GI and GU late toxicity rates were 8.5% and 13.6%, respectively. No grade ≥2 late toxicities were recorded. Acute grade 2-3 GU toxicity resulted significantly lower (P = 0.04) in HFRT group compared to the CFRT group. The cumulative 4-year incidence of grade 1-2 GU toxicity was significantly higher (P < 0.001) for HFRT patients. Conclusions. Our study demonstrated that hypofractionated regimen provided excellent biochemical control in favorable risk prostate cancer patients. The incidence of GI and GU toxicity was low. However, HFRT presented higher cumulative incidence of low-grade late GU toxicity than CFRT. PMID:24864248

  16. Image guided, adaptive, accelerated, high dose brachytherapy as model for advanced small volume radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Haie-Meder, Christine; Siebert, Frank-André; Pötter, Richard

    2011-09-01

    Brachytherapy has consistently provided a very conformal radiation therapy modality. Over the last two decades this has been associated with significant improvements in imaging for brachytherapy applications (prostate, gynecology), resulting in many positive advances in treatment planning, application techniques and clinical outcome. This is emphasized by the increased use of brachytherapy in Europe with gynecology as continuous basis and prostate and breast as more recently growing fields. Image guidance enables exact knowledge of the applicator together with improved visualization of tumor and target volumes as well as of organs at risk providing the basis for very individualized 3D and 4D treatment planning. In this commentary the most important recent developments in prostate, gynecological and breast brachytherapy are reviewed, with a focus on European recent and current research aiming at the definition of areas for important future research. Moreover the positive impact of GEC-ESTRO recommendations and the highlights of brachytherapy physics are discussed what altogether presents a full overview of modern image guided brachytherapy. An overview is finally provided on past and current international brachytherapy publications focusing on "Radiotherapy and Oncology". These data show tremendous increase in almost all research areas over the last three decades strongly influenced recently by translational research in regard to imaging and technology. In order to provide high level clinical evidence for future brachytherapy practice the strong need for comprehensive prospective clinical research addressing brachytherapy issues is high-lighted. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Image-Guided Radiotherapy via Daily Online Cone-Beam CT Substantially Reduces Margin Requirements for Stereotactic Lung Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Grills, Inga S. Hugo, Geoffrey; Kestin, Larry L.; Galerani, Ana Paula; Chao, K. Kenneth; Wloch, Jennifer; Yan Di

    2008-03-15

    Purpose: To determine treatment accuracy and margins for stereotactic lung radiotherapy with and without cone-beam CT (CBCT) image guidance. Methods and Materials: Acquired for the study were 308 CBCT of 24 patients with solitary peripheral lung tumors treated with stereotactic radiotherapy. Patients were immobilized in a stereotactic body frame (SBF) or alpha-cradle and treated with image guidance using daily CBCT. Four (T1) or five (T2/metastatic) 12-Gy fractions were prescribed to the planning target volume (PTV) edge. The PTV margin was {>=}5 mm depending on a pretreatment estimate of tumor excursion. Initial daily setup was according to SBF coordinates or tattoos for alpha-cradle cases. A CBCT was performed and registered to the planning CT using soft tissue registration of the target. The initial setup error/precorrection position, was recorded for the superior-inferior, anterior-posterior, and medial-lateral directions. The couch was adjusted to correct the tumor positional error. A second CBCT verified tumor position after correction. Patients were treated in the corrected position after the residual errors were {<=}2 mm. A final CBCT after treatment assessed intrafraction tumor displacement. Results: The precorrection systematic ({sigma}) and random errors ({sigma}) for the population ranged from 2-3 mm for SBF and 2-6 mm for alpha-cradle patients; postcorrection errors ranged from 0.4-1.0 mm. Calculated population margins were 9 to 13 mm (SBF) and 10-14 mm (cradle) precorrection, 1-2 mm (SBF), and 2-3 mm (cradle) postcorrection, and 2-4 mm (SBF) and 2-5 mm (cradle) posttreatment. Conclusions: Setup for stereotactic lung radiotherapy using a SBF or alpha-cradle alone is suboptimal. CBCT image guidance significantly improves target positioning and substantially reduces required target margins and normal tissue irradiation.

  18. Intensity-Modulated and Image-Guided Radiotherapy in Patients with Locally Advanced Inoperable Pancreatic Cancer after Preradiation Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Sinn, M.; Ganeshan, R.; Graf, R.; Pelzer, U.; Stieler, J. M.; Striefler, J. K.; Bahra, M.; Wust, P.; Riess, H.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Radiotherapy (RT) in patients with pancreatic cancer is still a controversial subject and its benefit in inoperable stages of locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC), even after induction chemotherapy, remains unclear. Modern radiation techniques such as image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) may improve effectiveness and reduce radiotherapy-related toxicities. Methods. Patients with LAPC who underwent radiotherapy after chemotherapy between 09/2004 and 05/2013 were retrospectively analyzed with regard to preradiation chemotherapy (PRCT), modalities of radiotherapy, and toxicities. Progression-free (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were estimated by Kaplan-Meier curves. Results. 15 (68%) women and 7 men (median age 64 years; range 40–77) were identified. Median duration of PRCT was 11.1 months (range 4.3–33.0). Six patients (27%) underwent conventional RT and 16 patients (73%) advanced IMRT and IGRT; median dosage was 50.4 (range 9–54) Gray. No grade III or IV toxicities occurred. Median PFS (estimated from the beginning of RT) was 5.8 months, 2.6 months in the conventional RT group (conv-RT), and 7.1 months in the IMRT/IGRT group (P = 0.029); median OS was 11.0 months, 4.2 months (conv-RT), and 14.0 months (IMRT/IGRT); P = 0.141. Median RT-specific PFS for patients with prolonged PRCT > 9 months was 8.5 months compared to 5.6 months for PRCT < 9 months (P = 0.293). This effect was translated into a significantly better median RT-specific overall survival of patients in the PRCT > 9 months group, with 19.0 months compared to 8.5 months in the PRCT  <  9 months group (P = 0.049). Conclusions. IGRT and IMRT after PRCT are feasible and effective options for patients with LAPC after prolonged preradiation chemotherapy. PMID:25401140

  19. Improvement in toxicity in high risk prostate cancer patients treated with image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy compared to 3D conformal radiotherapy without daily image guidance

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) facilitates the delivery of a very precise radiation dose. In this study we compare the toxicity and biochemical progression-free survival between patients treated with daily image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT) and 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) without daily image guidance for high risk prostate cancer (PCa). Methods A total of 503 high risk PCa patients treated with radiotherapy (RT) and endocrine treatment between 2000 and 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. 115 patients were treated with 3DCRT, and 388 patients were treated with IG-IMRT. 3DCRT patients were treated to 76 Gy and without daily image guidance and with 1–2 cm PTV margins. IG-IMRT patients were treated to 78 Gy based on daily image guidance of fiducial markers, and the PTV margins were 5–7 mm. Furthermore, the dose-volume constraints to both the rectum and bladder were changed with the introduction of IG-IMRT. Results The 2-year actuarial likelihood of developing grade > = 2 GI toxicity following RT was 57.3% in 3DCRT patients and 5.8% in IG-IMRT patients (p < 0.001). For GU toxicity the numbers were 41.8% and 29.7%, respectively (p = 0.011). On multivariate analysis, 3DCRT was associated with a significantly increased risk of developing grade > = 2 GI toxicity compared to IG-IMRT (p < 0.001, HR = 11.59 [CI: 6.67-20.14]). 3DCRT was also associated with an increased risk of developing GU toxicity compared to IG-IMRT. The 3-year actuarial biochemical progression-free survival probability was 86.0% for 3DCRT and 90.3% for IG-IMRT (p = 0.386). On multivariate analysis there was no difference in biochemical progression-free survival between 3DCRT and IG-IMRT. Conclusion The difference in toxicity can be attributed to the combination of the IMRT technique with reduced dose to organs-at-risk, daily image guidance and margin reduction. PMID:24495815

  20. Image-Guided Intensity-Modulated Photon Radiotherapy Using Multifractionated Regimen to Paraspinal Chordomas and Rare Sarcomas

    SciTech Connect

    Terezakis, Stephanie A. Lovelock, D. Michael; Bilsky, Mark H.; Hunt, Margaret A.; Zatcky, Joan N.P.; Yamada, Yoshiya

    2007-12-01

    Purpose: Image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy enables delivery of high-dose radiation to tumors close to the spinal cord. We report our experience with multifractionated regimens using image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy to treat gross paraspinal disease to doses beyond cord tolerance. Methods and Materials: We performed a retrospective review of 27 consecutive patients with partially resected or unresectable paraspinal tumors irradiated to >5,300 cGy in standard fractionation. Results: The median follow-up was 17.4 months (range, 2.1-47.3). Eighteen sarcomas, seven chordomas, and two ependymomas were treated. The median dose to the planning target volume was 6,600 cGy (range, 5,396-7,080) in 180- or 200-cGy fractions. The median planning target volume was 164 cm{sup 3} (range, 29-1,116). Seven patients developed recurrence at the treatment site (26%), and 6 of these patients had high-grade tumors. Three patients with recurrence had metastatic disease at the time of radiotherapy. The 2-year local control rate was 65%, and the 2-year overall survival rate was 79%. Of the 5 patients who died, 4 had metastatic disease at death. Twenty-three patients (84%) reported either no pain or improved pain at the last follow-up visit. Sixteen patients discontinued narcotic use after treatment (62.5%). Twenty-three patients (89%) had a stable or improved American Spine Injury Association score at the last follow-up visit. No patient experienced radiation-induced myelopathy. Conclusions: The dose to paraspinal tumors has traditionally been limited to respect cord tolerance. With image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy, greater doses of radiation delivered in multiple fractions can be prescribed with excellent target coverage, effective palliation, and acceptable toxicity and local control.

  1. Temporary organ displacement coupled with image-guided, intensity-modulated radiotherapy for paraspinal tumors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To investigate the feasibility and dosimetric improvements of a novel technique to temporarily displace critical structures in the pelvis and abdomen from tumor during high-dose radiotherapy. Methods Between 2010 and 2012, 11 patients received high-dose image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy with temporary organ displacement (TOD) at our institution. In all cases, imaging revealed tumor abutting critical structures. An all-purpose drainage catheter was introduced between the gross tumor volume (GTV) and critical organs at risk (OAR) and infused with normal saline (NS) containing 5-10% iohexol. Radiation planning was performed with the displaced OARs and positional reproducibility was confirmed with cone-beam CT (CBCT). Patients were treated within 36 hours of catheter placement. Radiation plans were re-optimized using pre-TOD OARs to the same prescription and dosimetrically compared with post-TOD plans. A two-tailed permutation test was performed on each dosimetric measure. Results The bowel/rectum was displaced in six patients and kidney in four patients. One patient was excluded due to poor visualization of the OAR; thus 10 patients were analyzed. A mean of 229 ml (range, 80–1000) of NS 5-10% iohexol infusion resulted in OAR mean displacement of 17.5 mm (range, 7–32). The median dose prescribed was 2400 cGy in one fraction (range, 2100–3000 in 3 fractions). The mean GTV Dmin and PTV Dmin pre- and post-bowel TOD IG-IMRT dosimetry significantly increased from 1473 cGy to 2086 cGy (p=0.015) and 714 cGy to 1214 cGy (p=0.021), respectively. TOD increased mean PTV D95 by 27.14% of prescription (p=0.014) while the PTV D05 decreased by 9.2% (p=0.011). TOD of the bowel resulted in a 39% decrease in mean bowel Dmax (p=0.008) confirmed by CBCT. TOD of the kidney significantly decreased mean kidney dose and Dmax by 25% (0.022). Conclusions TOD was well tolerated, reproducible, and facilitated dose escalation to previously radioresistant tumors

  2. Acute Toxicity in Definitive Versus Postprostatectomy Image-Guided Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Jonathan C.; Schultheiss, Timothy E. Nguyen, Khanh H.; Wong, Jeffrey Y.C.

    2008-06-01

    Purpose: To assess the incidence of acute gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) injury and the dose-volume response in patients with clinically localized prostate cancer treated with image-guided radiotherapy using helical tomotherapy. Methods and Materials: Between November 2004 and March 2007, 146 consecutive patients with localized prostate cancer were treated with helical tomotherapy at the City of Hope Medical Center. Of the 146 patients, 70 had undergone prostatectomy. Acute GI and GU toxicities were evaluated using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Cancer of Medical scoring system. Events were scored for patients developing Grade 2 or greater morbidity within 90 days after the end of radiotherapy (RT). The dosimetric parameters included the minimal dose received by the highest 10%, 20%, 50%, 80%, and 90% of the target volume, the mean rectal dose, minimal rectal dose, maximal rectal dose, and the volume receiving {>=}45, {>=}65, and {>=}70 Gy. These variables, plus the status of radical prostatectomy, hormonal therapy, RT techniques, and medical conditions, were included in a multivariate logistic regression analysis. A goodness-of-fit evaluation was done using the Hosmer-Lemeshow statistic. Results: A dose-response function for acute GI toxicity was elicited. The acute GI Grade 2 or greater toxicity was lower in the definitive RT group than in the postoperative RT group (25% vs. 41%, p <0.05). Acute GU Grade 2 or greater toxicity was comparable between the two groups. No grade 3 or greater complications were observed. No dosimetric variable was significant for GU toxicity. For acute GI toxicity, the significant dosimetric parameters were the minimal dose received by 10%, 20%, and 50% of the target volume and the mean rectal dose; the most predictive parameter was the minimal dose received by 10% of the target volume. The dose-modifying factor was 1.2 for radical prostatectomy. Conclusion: The results of our

  3. Image-guided radiotherapy using a mobile kilovoltage x-ray device.

    PubMed

    Sorensen, Stephen P; Chow, Phillip E; Kriminski, Sergey; Medin, Paul M; Solberg, Timothy D

    2006-01-01

    A mobile isocentric C-arm kilovoltage imager has been evaluated as a potential tool for image-guided radiotherapy. The C-arm is equipped with an amorphous silicon flat panel for high-quality image acquisition. Additionally, the device is capable of cone beam computed tomography (CT) and volumetric reconstruction. This is achieved through the application of a modified Feldkamp algorithm with acquisition over a 180 degrees scan arc. The number of projections can be varied from 100 to 1000, resulting in a reconstructed volume 20 cm in diameter by 15-cm long. While acquisition time depends upon number of projections, acceptable quality images can be obtained in less than 60 seconds. Image resolution and contrast of cone-beam phantom images have been compared with images from a conventional CT scanner. The system has a spatial resolution of > or = 10 lp/cm and resolution is approximately equal in all 3 dimensions. Conversely, subject contrast is poorer than conventional CT, compromised by the increased scatter and underlying noise inherent in cone beam reconstruction, as well as the absence of filtering prior to reconstruction. The mobility of the C-arm makes it necessary to determine the C-arm position relative to the linear accelerator isocenter. Two solutions have been investigated: (1) the use of fiducial markers, embedded in the linac couch, that can subsequently be registered in the image sets; and (2), a navigation approach for infrared tracking of the C-arm relative to the linac isocenter. Observed accuracy in phantom positioning ranged from 1.0 to 1.5 mm using the navigation approach and 1.5 to 2.5 mm using the fiducial-based approach. As part of this work, the impact of respiratory motion on cone-beam image quality was evaluated, and a scheme for retrospective gating was devised. Results demonstrated that kilovoltage cone beam CT provides spatial integrity and resolution comparable to conventional CT. Cone-beam CT studies of patients undergoing radiotherapy

  4. Comparison of intensity-modulated tomotherapy with stereotactically guided conformal radiotherapy for brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Khoo, V S; Oldham, M; Adams, E J; Bedford, J L; Webb, S; Brada, M

    1999-09-01

    Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) offers the potential to more closely conform dose distributions to the target, and spare organs at risk (OAR). Its clinical value is still being defined. The present study aims to compare IMRT with stereotactically guided conformal radiotherapy (SCRT) for patients with medium size convex-shaped brain tumors. Five patients planned with SCRT were replanned with the IMRT-tomotherapy method using the Peacock system (Nomos Corporation). The planning target volume (PTV) and relevant OAR were assessed, and compared relative to SCRT plans using dose statistics, dose-volume histograms (DVH), and the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) stereotactic radiosurgery criteria. The median and mean PTV were 78 cm3 and 85 cm3 respectively (range 62-119 cm3). The differences in PTV doses for the whole group (Peacock-SCRT +/-1 SD) were 2%+/-1.8 (minimum PTV), and 0.1%+/-1.9 (maximum PTV). The PTV homogeneity achieved by Peacock was 12.1%+/-1.7 compared to 13.9%+/-1.3 with SCRT. Using RTOG guidelines, Peacock plans provided acceptable PTV coverage for all 5/5 plans compared to minor coverage deviations in 4/5 SCRT plans; acceptable homogeneity index for both plans (Peacock = 1.1 vs. SCRT = 1.2); and comparable conformity index (1.4 each). As a consequence of the transaxial method of arc delivery, the optic nerves received mean and maximum doses that were 11.1 to 11.6%, and 10.3 to 15.2% higher respectively with Peacock plan. The maximum optic lens, and brainstem dose were 3.1 to 4.8% higher, and 0.6% lower respectively with Peacock plan. However, all doses remained below the tolerance threshold (5 Gy for lens, and 50 Gy for optic nerves) and were clinically acceptable. The Peacock method provided improved PTV coverage, albeit small, in this group of convex tumors. Although the OAR doses were higher using the Peacock plans, all doses remained within the clinically defined threshold and were clinically acceptable. Further improvements may be

  5. Specific recommendations for accurate and direct use of PET-CT in PET guided radiotherapy for head and neck sites

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, C. M. Convery, D. J.; Greener, A. G.; Pike, L. C.; Baker, S.; Woods, E.; Hartill, C. E.

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: To provide specific experience-based guidance and recommendations for centers wishing to develop, validate, and implement an accurate and efficient process for directly using positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) for the radiotherapy planning of head and neck cancer patients. Methods: A PET-CT system was modified with hard-top couch, external lasers and radiotherapy immobilization and indexing devices and was subject to a commissioning and quality assurance program. PET-CT imaging protocols were developed specifically for radiotherapy planning and the image quality and pathway tested using phantoms and five patients recruited into an in-house study. Security and accuracy of data transfer was tested throughout the whole data pathway. The patient pathway was fully established and tested ready for implementation in a PET-guided dose-escalation trial for head and neck cancer patients. Results: Couch deflection was greater than for departmental CT simulator machines. An area of high attenuation in the couch generated image artifacts and adjustments were made accordingly. Using newly developed protocols CT image quality was suitable to maintain delineation and treatment accuracy. Upon transfer of data to the treatment planning system a half pixel offset between PET and CT was observed and corrected. By taking this into account, PET to CT alignment accuracy was maintained below 1 mm in all systems in the data pathway. Transfer of structures delineated in the PET fusion software to the radiotherapy treatment planning system was validated. Conclusions: A method to perform direct PET-guided radiotherapy planning was successfully validated and specific recommendations were developed to assist other centers. Of major concern is ensuring that the quality of PET and CT data is appropriate for radiotherapy treatment planning and on-treatment verification. Couch movements can be compromised, bore-size can be a limitation for certain immobilization

  6. On the significance of density-induced speed of sound variations on US-guided radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Fontanarosa, Davide; van der Meer, Skadi; Verhaegen, Frank

    2012-10-01

    To show the effect of speed of sound (SOS) aberration on ultrasound guided radiotherapy (US-gRT) as a function of implemented workflow. US systems assume that SOS is constant in human soft tissues (at a value of 1540 m∕s), while its actual nonuniform distribution produces small but systematic errors of up to a few millimeters in the positions of scanned structures. When a coregistered computerized tomography (CT) scan is available, the US image can be corrected for SOS aberration. Typically, image guided radiotherapy workflows implementing US systems only provide a CT scan at the simulation (SIM) stage. If changes occur in geometry or density distribution between SIM and treatment (TX) stage, SOS aberration can change accordingly, with a final impact on the measured position of structures which is dependent on the workflow adopted. Four basic scenarios were considered of possible changes between SIM and TX: (1) No changes, (2) only patient position changes (rigid rotation-translation), (3) only US transducer position changes (constrained on patient's surface), and (4) patient tissues thickness changes. Different SOS aberrations may arise from the different scenarios, according to the specific US-gRT workflow used: intermodality (INTER) where TX US scans are compared to SIM CT scans; intramodality (INTRA) where TX US scans are compared to SIM US scans; and INTERc and INTRAc where all US images are corrected for SOS aberration (using density information provided by SIM CT). For an experimental proof of principle, the effect of tissues thickness change was simulated in the different workflows: a dual layered phantom was filled with layers of sunflower oil (SOS 1478 m∕s), water (SOS 1482 m∕s), and 20% saline solution (SOS 1700 m∕s). The phantom was US scanned, the layer thicknesses were increased and the US scans were repeated. The errors resulting from the different workflows were compared. Theoretical considerations show that workflows implementing SOS

  7. On the significance of density-induced speed of sound variations on US-guided radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Fontanarosa, Davide; Meer, Skadi van der; Verhaegen, Frank

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: To show the effect of speed of sound (SOS) aberration on ultrasound guided radiotherapy (US-gRT) as a function of implemented workflow. US systems assume that SOS is constant in human soft tissues (at a value of 1540 m/s), while its actual nonuniform distribution produces small but systematic errors of up to a few millimeters in the positions of scanned structures. When a coregistered computerized tomography (CT) scan is available, the US image can be corrected for SOS aberration. Typically, image guided radiotherapy workflows implementing US systems only provide a CT scan at the simulation (SIM) stage. If changes occur in geometry or density distribution between SIM and treatment (TX) stage, SOS aberration can change accordingly, with a final impact on the measured position of structures which is dependent on the workflow adopted. Methods: Four basic scenarios were considered of possible changes between SIM and TX: (1) No changes, (2) only patient position changes (rigid rotation-translation), (3) only US transducer position changes (constrained on patient's surface), and (4) patient tissues thickness changes. Different SOS aberrations may arise from the different scenarios, according to the specific US-gRT workflow used: intermodality (INTER) where TX US scans are compared to SIM CT scans; intramodality (INTRA) where TX US scans are compared to SIM US scans; and INTERc and INTRAc where all US images are corrected for SOS aberration (using density information provided by SIM CT). For an experimental proof of principle, the effect of tissues thickness change was simulated in the different workflows: a dual layered phantom was filled with layers of sunflower oil (SOS 1478 m/s), water (SOS 1482 m/s), and 20% saline solution (SOS 1700 m/s). The phantom was US scanned, the layer thicknesses were increased and the US scans were repeated. The errors resulting from the different workflows were compared. Results: Theoretical considerations show that workflows

  8. Toxicity after post-prostatectomy image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy using Australian guidelines.

    PubMed

    Chin, Stephen; Aherne, Noel J; Last, Andrew; Assareh, Hassan; Shakespeare, Thomas P

    2017-06-17

    We evaluated single institution toxicity outcomes after post-prostatectomy radiotherapy (PPRT) via image-guided intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IG-IMRT) with implanted fiducial markers following national eviQ guidelines, for which late toxicity outcomes have not been published. Prospectively collected toxicity data were retrospectively reviewed for 293 men who underwent 64-66 Gy IG-IMRT to the prostate bed between 2007 and 2015. Median follow-up after PPRT was 39 months. Baseline grade ≥2 genitourinary (GU), gastrointestinal (GI) and sexual toxicities were 20.5%, 2.7% and 43.7%, respectively, reflecting ongoing toxicity after radical prostatectomy. Incidence of new (compared to baseline) acute grade ≥2 GU and GI toxicity was 5.8% and 10.6%, respectively. New late grade ≥2 GU, GI and sexual toxicity occurred in 19.1%, 4.7% and 20.2%, respectively. However, many patients also experienced improvements in toxicities. For this reason, prevalence of grade ≥2 GU, GI and sexual toxicities 4 years after PPRT was similar to or lower than baseline (21.7%, 2.6% and 17.4%, respectively). There were no grade ≥4 toxicities. Post-prostatectomy IG-IMRT using Australian contouring guidelines appears to have tolerable acute and late toxicity. The 4-year prevalence of grade ≥2 GU and GI toxicity was virtually unchanged compared to baseline, and sexual toxicity improved over baseline. This should reassure radiation oncologists following these guidelines. Late toxicity rates of surgery and PPRT are higher than following definitive IG-IMRT, and this should be taken into account if patients are considering surgery and likely to require PPRT. © 2017 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  9. Towards efficient biomechanical based deformable image registration of lungs for image guided radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Al-Mayah, Adil; Moseley, Joanne; Velec, Mike; Brock, Kristy

    2011-01-01

    Both accuracy and efficiency are critical for the implementation of biomechanical model-based deformable registration into clinical practice. The focus of this investigation is to evaluate the potential of improving the efficiency of the deformable image registration of the human lungs without loss of accuracy. Three dimensional finite element models have been developed using image data of fourteen lung cancer patients. Each model consists of two lungs, tumor, and external body. Sliding of the lungs inside the chest cavity is modeled using a frictionless surface based contact model. The effect of type of element, finite deformation and elasticity on the accuracy and computing time are investigated. Linear and quadrilateral tetrahedral elements are used with linear and nonlinear geometric analysis. Two types of material properties are applied namely: elastic and hyperelastic. The accuracy of each of the four models is examined using a number of anatomical landmarks representing the vessels bifurcation points distributed across the lungs. The registration error is not significantly affected by element type or linearity of analysis with an average vector error of around 2.8 mm. The displacement differences between linear and nonlinear analysis methods are calculated for all lungs nodes and a maximum value of 3.6 mm is found in one of the nodes near the entrance of the bronchial tree into the lungs. The 95 percentile of displacement difference ranges between 0.4 and 0.8 mm. However, the time required for the analysis is reduced from 95 min in the quadratic elements nonlinear geometry model to 3.4 min in the linear element linear geometry model. Therefore using linear tetrahedral elements with linear elastic materials and linear geometry is preferable for modeling the breathing motion of lungs for image guided radiotherapy applications. PMID:21734336

  10. Toward efficient biomechanical-based deformable image registration of lungs for image-guided radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Al-Mayah, Adil; Moseley, Joanne; Velec, Mike; Brock, Kristy

    2011-08-07

    Both accuracy and efficiency are critical for the implementation of biomechanical model-based deformable registration in clinical practice. The focus of this investigation is to evaluate the potential of improving the efficiency of the deformable image registration of the human lungs without loss of accuracy. Three-dimensional finite element models have been developed using image data of 14 lung cancer patients. Each model consists of two lungs, tumor and external body. Sliding of the lungs inside the chest cavity is modeled using a frictionless surface-based contact model. The effect of the type of element, finite deformation and elasticity on the accuracy and computing time is investigated. Linear and quadrilateral tetrahedral elements are used with linear and nonlinear geometric analysis. Two types of material properties are applied namely: elastic and hyperelastic. The accuracy of each of the four models is examined using a number of anatomical landmarks representing the vessels bifurcation points distributed across the lungs. The registration error is not significantly affected by the element type or linearity of analysis, with an average vector error of around 2.8 mm. The displacement differences between linear and nonlinear analysis methods are calculated for all lungs nodes and a maximum value of 3.6 mm is found in one of the nodes near the entrance of the bronchial tree into the lungs. The 95 percentile of displacement difference ranges between 0.4 and 0.8 mm. However, the time required for the analysis is reduced from 95 min in the quadratic elements nonlinear geometry model to 3.4 min in the linear element linear geometry model. Therefore using linear tetrahedral elements with linear elastic materials and linear geometry is preferable for modeling the breathing motion of lungs for image-guided radiotherapy applications.

  11. A DVH-guided IMRT optimization algorithm for automatic treatment planning and adaptive radiotherapy replanning

    SciTech Connect

    Zarepisheh, Masoud; Li, Nan; Long, Troy; Romeijn, H. Edwin; Tian, Zhen; Jia, Xun; Jiang, Steve B.

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a novel algorithm that incorporates prior treatment knowledge into intensity modulated radiation therapy optimization to facilitate automatic treatment planning and adaptive radiotherapy (ART) replanning. Methods: The algorithm automatically creates a treatment plan guided by the DVH curves of a reference plan that contains information on the clinician-approved dose-volume trade-offs among different targets/organs and among different portions of a DVH curve for an organ. In ART, the reference plan is the initial plan for the same patient, while for automatic treatment planning the reference plan is selected from a library of clinically approved and delivered plans of previously treated patients with similar medical conditions and geometry. The proposed algorithm employs a voxel-based optimization model and navigates the large voxel-based Pareto surface. The voxel weights are iteratively adjusted to approach a plan that is similar to the reference plan in terms of the DVHs. If the reference plan is feasible but not Pareto optimal, the algorithm generates a Pareto optimal plan with the DVHs better than the reference ones. If the reference plan is too restricting for the new geometry, the algorithm generates a Pareto plan with DVHs close to the reference ones. In both cases, the new plans have similar DVH trade-offs as the reference plans. Results: The algorithm was tested using three patient cases and found to be able to automatically adjust the voxel-weighting factors in order to generate a Pareto plan with similar DVH trade-offs as the reference plan. The algorithm has also been implemented on a GPU for high efficiency. Conclusions: A novel prior-knowledge-based optimization algorithm has been developed that automatically adjust the voxel weights and generate a clinical optimal plan at high efficiency. It is found that the new algorithm can significantly improve the plan quality and planning efficiency in ART replanning and automatic treatment

  12. Radiation Dose From Kilovoltage Cone Beam Computed Tomography in an Image-Guided Radiotherapy Procedure

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, George X. Coffey, Charles W.

    2009-02-01

    Purpose: Image-guided radiation therapy has emerged as the new paradigm in radiotherapy. This work is to provide detailed information concerning the additional imaging doses to patients' radiosensitive organs from a kilovoltage cone beam computed tomography (kV CBCT) scan procedure. Methods and Materials: The Vanderbilt-Monte-Carlo-Beam-Calibration (VMCBC; Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN) algorithm was used to calculate radiation dose to organs resulting from a kV CBCT imaging guidance procedure. Eight patients, including 3 pediatric and 5 adult patients, were investigated. The CBCT scans in both full- and half-fan modes were studied. Results: For a head-and-neck scan in half-fan mode, dose-volume histogram analyses show mean doses of 7 and 8 cGy to the eyes, 5 and 6 cGy to the spinal cord, 5 and 6 cGy to the brain, and 18 and 23 cGy to the cervical vertebrae for an adult and a 29-month-old child, respectively. The dose from a scan in full-fan mode is 10-20% lower than that in half-fan mode. For an abdominal scan, mean doses are 3 and 7 cGy to prostate and 7 and 17 cGy to femoral heads for a large adult patient and a 31-month-old pediatric patient, respectively. Conclusions: Doses to radiosensitive organs can total 300 cGy accrued over an entire treatment course if kV CBCT scans are acquired daily. These findings provide needed data for clinicians to make informed decisions concerning additional imaging doses. The dose to bone is two to four times greater than dose to soft tissue for kV x-rays, which should be considered, especially for pediatric patients.

  13. Development of the DVH management software for the biologically-guided evaluation of radiotherapy plan

    PubMed Central

    Kim, BoKyong; Park, Hee Chul; Oh, Dongryul; Shin, Eun Hyuk; Ahn, Yong Chan; Kim, Jinsung

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To develop the dose volume histogram (DVH) management software which guides the evaluation of radiotherapy (RT) plan of a new case according to the biological consequences of the DVHs from the previously treated patients. Materials and Methods We determined the radiation pneumonitis (RP) as an biological response parameter in order to develop DVH management software. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of lung cancer patients treated with curative 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT). The biological event was defined as RP of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) grade III or more. Results The DVH management software consisted of three parts (pre-existing DVH database, graphical tool, and Pinnacle3 script). The pre-existing DVH data were retrieved from 128 patients. RP events were tagged to the specific DVH data through retrospective review of patients' medical records. The graphical tool was developed to present the complication histogram derived from the pre-existing database (DVH and RP) and was implemented into the radiation treatment planning (RTP) system, Pinnacle3 v8.0 (Phillips Healthcare). The software was designed for the pre-existing database to be updated easily by tagging the specific DVH data with the new incidence of RP events at the time of patients' follow-up. Conclusion We developed the DVH management software as an effective tool to incorporate the phenomenological consequences derived from the pre-existing database in the evaluation of a new RT plan. It can be used not only for lung cancer patients but also for the other disease site with different toxicity parameters. PMID:23120743

  14. Deep architecture neural network-based real-time image processing for image-guided radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Mori, Shinichiro

    2017-08-01

    To develop real-time image processing for image-guided radiotherapy, we evaluated several neural network models for use with different imaging modalities, including X-ray fluoroscopic image denoising. Setup images of prostate cancer patients were acquired with two oblique X-ray fluoroscopic units. Two types of residual network were designed: a convolutional autoencoder (rCAE) and a convolutional neural network (rCNN). We changed the convolutional kernel size and number of convolutional layers for both networks, and the number of pooling and upsampling layers for rCAE. The ground-truth image was applied to the contrast-limited adaptive histogram equalization (CLAHE) method of image processing. Network models were trained to keep the quality of the output image close to that of the ground-truth image from the input image without image processing. For image denoising evaluation, noisy input images were used for the training. More than 6 convolutional layers with convolutional kernels >5×5 improved image quality. However, this did not allow real-time imaging. After applying a pair of pooling and upsampling layers to both networks, rCAEs with >3 convolutions each and rCNNs with >12 convolutions with a pair of pooling and upsampling layers achieved real-time processing at 30 frames per second (fps) with acceptable image quality. Use of our suggested network achieved real-time image processing for contrast enhancement and image denoising by the use of a conventional modern personal computer. Copyright © 2017 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Markerless tumor tracking using short kilovoltage imaging arcs for lung image-guided radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shieh, Chun-Chien; Keall, Paul J.; Kuncic, Zdenka; Huang, Chen-Yu; Feain, Ilana

    2015-12-01

    The ability to monitor tumor motion without implanted markers is clinically advantageous for lung image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT). Existing markerless tracking methods often suffer from overlapping structures and low visibility of tumors on kV projection images. We introduce the short arc tumor tracking (SATT) method to overcome these issues. The proposed method utilizes multiple kV projection images selected from a nine-degree imaging arc to improve tumor localization, and respiratory-correlated 4D cone-beam CT (CBCT) prior knowledge to minimize the effects of overlapping anatomies. The 3D tumor position is solved as an optimization problem with prior knowledge incorporated via regularization. We retrospectively validated SATT on 11 clinical scans from four patients with central tumors. These patients represent challenging scenarios for markerless tumor tracking due to the inferior adjacent contrast. The 3D trajectories of implanted fiducial markers were used as the ground truth for tracking accuracy evaluation. In all cases, the tumors were successfully tracked at all gantry angles. Compared to standard pre-treatment CBCT guidance alone, trajectory errors were significantly smaller with tracking in all cases, and the improvements were the most prominent in the superior-inferior direction. The mean 3D tracking error ranged from 2.2-9.9 mm, which was 0.4-2.6 mm smaller compared to pre-treatment CBCT. In conclusion, we were able to directly track tumors with inferior visibility on kV projection images using SATT. Tumor localization accuracies are significantly better with tracking compared to the current standard of care of lung IGRT. Future work involves the prospective evaluation and clinical implementation of SATT.

  16. Investigation of Linac-Based Image-Guided Hypofractionated Prostate Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Pawlicki, Todd . E-mail: tpaw@stanford.edu; Kim, Gwe-Ya; Hsu, Annie; Cotrutz, Cristian; Boyer, Arthur L.; Xing Lei; King, Christopher R.; Luxton, Gary

    2007-07-01

    A hypofractionation treatment protocol for prostate cancer was initiated in our department in December 2003. The treatment regimen consists of a total dose of 36.25 Gy delivered at 7.25 Gy per fraction over 10 days. We discuss the rationale for such a prostate hypofractionation protocol and the need for frequent prostate imaging during treatment. The CyberKnife (Accuray Inc., Sunnyvale, CA), a linear accelerator mounted on a robotic arm, is currently being used as the radiation delivery device for this protocol, due to its incorporation of near real-time kV imaging of the prostate via 3 gold fiducial seeds. Recently introduced conventional linac kV imaging with intensity modulated planning and delivery may add a new option for these hypofractionated treatments. The purpose of this work is to investigate the use of intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and the Varian Trilogy Accelerator with on-board kV imaging (Varian Medical Systems Inc., Palo Alto, CA) for treatment of our hypofractionated prostate patients. The dose-volume histograms and dose statistics of 2 patients previously treated on the CyberKnife were compared to 7-field IMRT plans. A process of acquiring images to observe intrafraction prostate motion was achieved in an average time of about 1 minute and 40 seconds, and IMRT beam delivery takes about 40 seconds per field. A complete 7-field IMRT plan can therefore be imaged and delivered in 10 to 17 minutes. The Varian Trilogy Accelerator with on-board imaging and IMRT is well suited for image-guided hypofractionated prostate treatments. During this study, we have also uncovered opportunities for improvement of the on-board imaging hardware/software implementation that would further enhance performance in this regard.

  17. Kidney motion during free breathing and breath hold for MR-guided radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stam, Mette K.; van Vulpen, Marco; Barendrecht, Maurits M.; Zonnenberg, Bernard A.; Intven, Martijn; Crijns, Sjoerd P. M.; Lagendijk, Jan J. W.; Raaymakers, Bas W.

    2013-04-01

    Current treatments for renal cell carcinoma have a high complication rate due to the invasiveness of the treatment. With the MRI-linac it may be possible to treat renal tumours non-invasively with high-precision radiotherapy. This is expected to reduce complications. To deliver a static dose distribution, radiation gating will be used. In this study the reproducibility and efficiency of free breathing gating and a breath hold treatment of the kidney was investigated. For 15 patients with a renal lesion the kidney motion during 2 min of free breathing and 10 consecutive expiration breath holds was studied with 2D cine MRI. The variability in kidney expiration position and treatment efficiency for gating windows of 1 to 20 mm was measured for both breathing patterns. Additionally the time trend in free breathing and the variation in expiration breath hold kidney position with baseline shift correction was determined. In 80% of the patients the variation in expiration position during free breathing is smaller than 2 mm. No clinically relevant time trends were detected. The variation in expiration breath hold is for all patients larger than the free breathing expiration variation. Gating on free breathing is, for gating windows of 1 to 5 mm more efficient than breath hold without baseline correction. When applying a baseline correction to the breath hold it increases the treatment efficiency. The kidney position is more reproducible in expiration free breathing than non-guided expiration breath hold. For small gating windows it is also more time efficient. Since free breathing also seems more comfortable for the patients it is the preferred breathing pattern for MRI-Linac treatments of the kidney.

  18. Markerless tumor tracking using short kilovoltage imaging arcs for lung image-guided radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Shieh, Chun-Chien; Keall, Paul J.; Kuncic, Zdenka; Huang, Chen-Yu; Feain, Ilana

    2015-01-01

    The ability to monitor tumor motion without implanted markers is clinically advantageous for lung image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT). Existing markerless tracking methods often suffer from overlapping structures and low visibility of tumors on kV projection images. We introduce the short arc tumor tracking (SATT) method to overcome these issues. The proposed method utilizes multiple kV projection images selected from a nine-degree imaging arc to improve tumor localization, and respiratory-correlated 4D cone-beam CT (CBCT) prior knowledge to minimize the effects of overlapping anatomies. The 3D tumor position is solved as an optimization problem with prior knowledge incorporated via regularization. We retrospectively validated SATT on 11 clinical scans from four patients with central tumors. These patients represent challenging scenarios for markerless tumor tracking due to the inferior adjacent contrast. The 3D trajectories of implanted fiducial markers were used as the ground truth for tracking accuracy evaluation. In all cases, the tumors were successfully tracked at all gantry angles. Compared to standard pre-treatment CBCT guidance alone, trajectory errors were significantly smaller with tracking in all cases, and the improvements were the most prominent in the superior-inferior (SI) direction. The mean 3D tracking error ranged from 2.2–9.9 mm, which was 0.4–2.6 mm smaller compared to pre-treatment CBCT. In conclusion, we were able to directly track tumors with inferior visibility on kV projection images using SATT. Tumor localization accuracies are significantly better with tracking compared to the current standard of care of lung IGRT. Future work involves the prospective evaluation and clinical implementation of SATT. PMID:26583772

  19. Multi-System Verification of Registrations for Image-Guided Radiotherapy in Clinical Trials

    SciTech Connect

    Cui Yunfeng; Galvin, James M.; Straube, William L.; Bosch, Walter R.; Purdy, James A.; Li, X. Allen; Xiao Ying

    2011-09-01

    Purpose: To provide quantitative information on the image registration differences from multiple systems for image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) credentialing and margin reduction in clinical trials. Methods and Materials: Images and IGRT shift results from three different treatment systems (Tomotherapy Hi-Art, Elekta Synergy, Varian Trilogy) have been sent from various institutions to the Image-Guided Therapy QA Center (ITC) for evaluation for the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) trials. Nine patient datasets (five head-and-neck and four prostate) were included in the comparison, with each patient having 1-4 daily individual IGRT studies. In all cases, daily shifts were re-calculated by re-registration of the planning CT with the daily IGRT data using three independent software systems (MIMvista, FocalSim, VelocityAI). Automatic fusion was used in all calculations. The results were compared with those submitted from institutions. Similar regions of interest (ROIs) and same initial positions were used in registrations for inter-system comparison. Different slice spacings for CBCT sampling and different ROIs for registration were used in some cases to observe the variation of registration due to these factors. Results: For the 54 comparisons with head-and-neck datasets, the absolute values of differences of the registration results between different systems were 2.6 {+-} 2.1 mm (mean {+-} SD; range 0.1-8.6 mm, left-right [LR]), 1.7 {+-} 1.3 mm (0.0-4.9 mm, superior-inferior [SI]), and 1.8 {+-} 1.1 mm (0.1-4.0 mm, anterior-posterior [AP]). For the 66 comparisons in prostate cases, the differences were 1.1 {+-} 1.0 mm (0.0-4.6 mm, LR), 2.1 {+-} 1.7 mm (0.0-6.6 mm, SI), and 2.0 {+-} 1.8 mm (0.1-6.9 mm, AP). The differences caused by the slice spacing variation were relatively small, and the different ROI selections in FocalSim and MIMvista also had limited impact. Conclusion: The extent of differences was reported when different systems were used for image

  20. The management of imaging dose during image-guided radiotherapy: Report of the AAPM Task Group 75

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, Martin J.; Balter, James; Balter, Stephen; BenComo, Jose A. Jr.; Das, Indra J.; Jiang, Steve B.; Ma, C.-M.; Olivera, Gustavo H.; Rodebaugh, Raymond F.; Ruchala, Kenneth J.; Shirato, Hiroki; Yin, Fang-Fang

    2007-10-15

    Radiographic image guidance has emerged as the new paradigm for patient positioning, target localization, and external beam alignment in radiotherapy. Although widely varied in modality and method, all radiographic guidance techniques have one thing in common--they can give a significant radiation dose to the patient. As with all medical uses of ionizing radiation, the general view is that this exposure should be carefully managed. The philosophy for dose management adopted by the diagnostic imaging community is summarized by the acronym ALARA, i.e., as low as reasonably achievable. But unlike the general situation with diagnostic imaging and image-guided surgery, image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) adds the imaging dose to an already high level of therapeutic radiation. There is furthermore an interplay between increased imaging and improved therapeutic dose conformity that suggests the possibility of optimizing rather than simply minimizing the imaging dose. For this reason, the management of imaging dose during radiotherapy is a different problem than its management during routine diagnostic or image-guided surgical procedures. The imaging dose received as part of a radiotherapy treatment has long been regarded as negligible and thus has been quantified in a fairly loose manner. On the other hand, radiation oncologists examine the therapy dose distribution in minute detail. The introduction of more intensive imaging procedures for IGRT now obligates the clinician to evaluate therapeutic and imaging doses in a more balanced manner. This task group is charged with addressing the issue of radiation dose delivered via image guidance techniques during radiotherapy. The group has developed this charge into three objectives: (1) Compile an overview of image-guidance techniques and their associated radiation dose levels, to provide the clinician using a particular set of image guidance techniques with enough data to estimate the total diagnostic dose for a specific

  1. Evaluation of volume change in rectum and bladder during application of image-guided radiotherapy for prostate carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Luna, J. A.; Rojas, J. I.

    2016-07-07

    All prostate cancer patients from Centro Médico Radioterapia Siglo XXI receive Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT). This therapy uses image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) with the Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT). This study compares the planned dose in the reference CT image against the delivered dose recalculate in the CBCT image. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the anatomic changes and related dosimetric effect based on weekly CBCT directly for patients with prostate cancer undergoing volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatment. The collected data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA.

  2. Evaluation of volume change in rectum and bladder during application of image-guided radiotherapy for prostate carcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luna, J. A.; Rojas, J. I.

    2016-07-01

    All prostate cancer patients from Centro Médico Radioterapia Siglo XXI receive Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT). This therapy uses image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) with the Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT). This study compares the planned dose in the reference CT image against the delivered dose recalculate in the CBCT image. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the anatomic changes and related dosimetric effect based on weekly CBCT directly for patients with prostate cancer undergoing volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatment. The collected data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA.

  3. Quality assurance of U.S.-guided external beam radiotherapy for prostate cancer: report of AAPM Task Group 154.

    PubMed

    Molloy, Janelle A; Chan, Gordon; Markovic, Alexander; McNeeley, Shawn; Pfeiffer, Doug; Salter, Bill; Tome, Wolfgang A

    2011-02-01

    Task Group 154 (TG154) of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) was created to produce a guidance document for clinical medical physicists describing recommended quality assurance (QA) procedures for ultrasound (U.S.)-guided external beam radiotherapy localization. This report describes the relevant literature, state of the art, and briefly summarizes U.S. imaging physics. Simulation, treatment planning and treatment delivery considerations are presented in order to improve consistency and accuracy. User training is emphasized in the report and recommendations regarding peer review are included. A set of thorough, yet practical, QA procedures, frequencies, and tolerances are recommended. These encompass recommendations to ensure both spatial accuracy and image quality.

  4. Functional Image-Guided Radiotherapy Planning in Respiratory-Gated Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Lung Cancer Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, Tomoki; Nishibuchi, Ikuno; Murakami, Yuji; Kenjo, Masahiro; Kaneyasu, Yuko; Nagata, Yasushi

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate the incorporation of functional lung image-derived low attenuation area (LAA) based on four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) into respiratory-gated intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) or volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) in treatment planning for lung cancer patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Methods and Materials: Eight lung cancer patients with COPD were the subjects of this study. LAA was generated from 4D-CT data sets according to CT values of less than than -860 Hounsfield units (HU) as a threshold. The functional lung image was defined as the area where LAA was excluded from the image of the total lung. Two respiratory-gated radiotherapy plans (70 Gy/35 fractions) were designed and compared in each patient as follows: Plan A was an anatomical IMRT or VMAT plan based on the total lung; Plan F was a functional IMRT or VMAT plan based on the functional lung. Dosimetric parameters (percentage of total lung volume irradiated with {>=}20 Gy [V20], and mean dose of total lung [MLD]) of the two plans were compared. Results: V20 was lower in Plan F than in Plan A (mean 1.5%, p = 0.025 in IMRT, mean 1.6%, p = 0.044 in VMAT) achieved by a reduction in MLD (mean 0.23 Gy, p = 0.083 in IMRT, mean 0.5 Gy, p = 0.042 in VMAT). No differences were noted in target volume coverage and organ-at-risk doses. Conclusions: Functional IGRT planning based on LAA in respiratory-guided IMRT or VMAT appears to be effective in preserving a functional lung in lung cancer patients with COPD.

  5. Molecular PET imaging for biology-guided adaptive radiotherapy of head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Hoeben, Bianca A W; Bussink, Johan; Troost, Esther G C; Oyen, Wim J G; Kaanders, Johannes H A M

    2013-10-01

    Integration of molecular imaging PET techniques into therapy selection strategies and radiation treatment planning for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) can serve several purposes. First, pre-treatment assessments can steer decisions about radiotherapy modifications or combinations with other modalities. Second, biology-based objective functions can be introduced to the radiation treatment planning process by co-registration of molecular imaging with planning computed tomography (CT) scans. Thus, customized heterogeneous dose distributions can be generated with escalated doses to tumor areas where radiotherapy resistance mechanisms are most prevalent. Third, monitoring of temporal and spatial variations in these radiotherapy resistance mechanisms early during the course of treatment can discriminate responders from non-responders. With such information available shortly after the start of treatment, modifications can be implemented or the radiation treatment plan can be adapted tailing the biological response pattern. Currently, these strategies are in various phases of clinical testing, mostly in single-center studies. Further validation in multicenter set-up is needed. Ultimately, this should result in availability for routine clinical practice requiring stable production and accessibility of tracers, reproducibility and standardization of imaging and analysis methods, as well as general availability of knowledge and expertise. Small studies employing adaptive radiotherapy based on functional dynamics and early response mechanisms demonstrate promising results. In this context, we focus this review on the widely used PET tracer (18)F-FDG and PET tracers depicting hypoxia and proliferation; two well-known radiation resistance mechanisms.

  6. Image-guided stereotactic radiotherapy in 4 dogs with intracranial neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Moon, Alaina Burkard; Heller, Heidi Barnes; Forrest, Lisa

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the use, and side effects, of a novel stereotactic radiotherapy protocol using TomoTherapy(®) in 4 dogs with confirmed or suspected primary extra-axial intracranial neoplasia. Three fractions of 8 Gy were prescribed. Acute side effects were noted in 1 dog; no late effects were noted.

  7. An efficient and robust MRI-guided radiotherapy planning approach for targeting abdominal organs and tumours in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Bird, Luke; Tullis, Iain D. C.; Newman, Robert G.; Corroyer-Dulmont, Aurelien; Falzone, Nadia; Azad, Abul; Vallis, Katherine A.; Sansom, Owen J.; Muschel, Ruth J.; Vojnovic, Borivoj; Hill, Mark A.; Fokas, Emmanouil; Smart, Sean C.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Preclinical CT-guided radiotherapy platforms are increasingly used but the CT images are characterized by poor soft tissue contrast. The aim of this study was to develop a robust and accurate method of MRI-guided radiotherapy (MR-IGRT) delivery to abdominal targets in the mouse. Methods A multimodality cradle was developed for providing subject immobilisation and its performance was evaluated. Whilst CT was still used for dose calculations, target identification was based on MRI. Each step of the radiotherapy planning procedure was validated initially in vitro using BANG gel dosimeters. Subsequently, MR-IGRT of normal adrenal glands with a size-matched collimated beam was performed. Additionally, the SK-N-SH neuroblastoma xenograft model and the transgenic KPC model of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma were used to demonstrate the applicability of our methods for the accurate delivery of radiation to CT-invisible abdominal tumours. Results The BANG gel phantoms demonstrated a targeting efficiency error of 0.56 ± 0.18 mm. The in vivo stability tests of body motion during MR-IGRT and the associated cradle transfer showed that the residual body movements are within this MR-IGRT targeting error. Accurate MR-IGRT of the normal adrenal glands with a size-matched collimated beam was confirmed by γH2AX staining. Regression in tumour volume was observed almost immediately post MR-IGRT in the neuroblastoma model, further demonstrating accuracy of x-ray delivery. Finally, MR-IGRT in the KPC model facilitated precise contouring and comparison of different treatment plans and radiotherapy dose distributions not only to the intra-abdominal tumour but also to the organs at risk. Conclusion This is, to our knowledge, the first study to demonstrate preclinical MR-IGRT in intra-abdominal organs. The proposed MR-IGRT method presents a state-of-the-art solution to enabling robust, accurate and efficient targeting of extracranial organs in the mouse and can operate with a

  8. Development of an ultrasmall C-band linear accelerator guide for a four-dimensional image-guided radiotherapy system with a gimbaled x-ray head.

    PubMed

    Kamino, Yuichiro; Miura, Sadao; Kokubo, Masaki; Yamashita, Ichiro; Hirai, Etsuro; Hiraoka, Masahiro; Ishikawa, Junzo

    2007-05-01

    We are developing a four-dimensional image-guided radiotherapy system with a gimbaled x-ray head. It is capable of pursuing irradiation and delivering irradiation precisely with the help of an agile moving x-ray head on the gimbals. Requirements for the accelerator guide were established, system design was developed, and detailed design was conducted. An accelerator guide was manufactured and basic beam performance and leakage radiation from the accelerator guide were evaluated at a low pulse repetition rate. The accelerator guide including the electron gun is 38 cm long and weighs about 10 kg. The length of the accelerating structure is 24.4 cm. The accelerating structure is a standing wave type and is composed of the axial-coupled injector section and the side-coupled acceleration cavity section. The injector section is composed of one prebuncher cavity, one buncher cavity, one side-coupled half cavity, and two axial coupling cavities. The acceleration cavity section is composed of eight side-coupled nose reentrant cavities and eight coupling cavities. The electron gun is a diode-type gun with a cerium hexaboride (CeB6) direct heating cathode. The accelerator guide can be operated without any magnetic focusing device. Output beam current was 75 mA with a transmission efficiency of 58%, and the average energy was 5.24 MeV. Beam energy was distributed from 4.95 to 5.6 MeV. The beam profile, measured 88 mm from the beam output hole on the axis of the accelerator guide, was 0.7 mm X 0.9 mm full width at half maximum (FWHM) width. The beam loading line was 5.925 (MeV)-Ib (mA) X 0.00808 (MeV/mA), where Ib is output beam current. The maximum radiation leakage of the accelerator guide at 100 cm from the axis of the accelerator guide was calculated as 0.33 cGy/min at the rated x-ray output of 500 cGy/min from the measured value. This leakage requires no radiation shielding for the accelerator guide itself per IEC 60601-2-1.

  9. Implementation of an image guided intensity-modulated protocol for post-prostatectomy radiotherapy: planning data and acute toxicity outcomes.

    PubMed

    Chua, Benjamin; Min, Myo; Wood, Maree; Edwards, Sarah; Hoffmann, Matthew; Greenham, Stuart; Kovendy, Andrew; McKay, Michael J; Shakespeare, Thomas P

    2013-08-01

    There is substantial interest in implementation of image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT) in the post-prostatectomy setting. We describe our implementation of IG-IMRT, and examine how often published organ-at-risk (OAR) constraints were met. Furthermore, we evaluate the incidence of acute genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicities when patients were treated according to our protocol. Patients were eligible if they received post-prostatectomy radiotherapy (PPRT). Planning data were collected prospectively, and toxicity assessments were collected before, during and after treatment. Seventy-five eligible patients received either 64 Gy (19%) or 66 Gy (81%) in a single phase to the prostate bed. Suggested rectal dose-constraints of V40Gy < 60% and V60Gy < 40% were met in 64 (85%) and 75 (100%) patients, respectively. IMRT-specific rectal dose-constraints of V40Gy < 35% and V65Gy < 17% were achieved in 5 (7%) and 57 (76%) of patients. Bladder dose-constraint (V50Gy < 50%) was met in 58 (77%) patients. Two patients (3%) experienced new grade 3 genitourinary toxicity and one patient (1%) experienced new grade 3 gastroinestinal toxicity. All grade 3 toxicities had improved by 3-month review. Overall deterioration in urinary and gastrointestinal symptoms occurred in 33 (44%) and 35 (47%) of patients respectively. We report on our implementation of PPRT which takes into account nationally adopted guidelines, with a margin reduction supported by use of daily image guidance. Non-IMRT OAR constraints were met in most cases. IMRT-specific constraints were less often achieved despite margin reductions, suggesting the need for review of guidelines. Severe toxicity was rare, and most patients did not experience deterioration in urinary or bowel function attributable to radiotherapy. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Medical Imaging and Radiation Oncology © 2013 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  10. Functional Imaging Biomarkers: Potential to Guide an Individualised Approach to Radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Prestwich, R J D; Vaidyanathan, S; Scarsbrook, A F

    2015-10-01

    The identification of robust prognostic and predictive biomarkers would transform the ability to implement an individualised approach to radiotherapy. In this regard, there has been a surge of interest in the use of functional imaging to assess key underlying biological processes within tumours and their response to therapy. Importantly, functional imaging biomarkers hold the potential to evaluate tumour heterogeneity/biology both spatially and temporally. An ever-increasing range of functional imaging techniques is now available primarily involving positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Small-scale studies across multiple tumour types have consistently been able to correlate changes in functional imaging parameters during radiotherapy with disease outcomes. Considerable challenges remain before the implementation of functional imaging biomarkers into routine clinical practice, including the inherent temporal variability of biological processes within tumours, reproducibility of imaging, determination of optimal imaging technique/combinations, timing during treatment and design of appropriate validation studies.

  11. [Prostate cancer external beam radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    de Crevoisier, R; Pommier, P; Latorzeff, I; Chapet, O; Chauvet, B; Hennequin, C

    2016-09-01

    The prostate external beam radiotherapy techniques are described, when irradiating the prostate or after prostatectomy, with and without pelvic lymph nodes. The following parts are presented: indications of radiotherapy, total dose and fractionation, planning CT image acquisition, volume of interest delineation (target volumes and organs at risk) and margins, Intensity modulated radiotherapy planning and corresponding dose-volume constraints, and finally Image guided radiotherapy.

  12. MR-guidance – a clinical study to evaluate a shuttle- based MR-linac connection to provide MR-guided radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The purpose of this clinical study is to investigate the clinical feasibility and safety of a shuttle-based MR-linac connection to provide MR-guided radiotherapy. Methods/Design A total of 40 patients with an indication for a neoadjuvant, adjuvant or definitive radiation treatment will be recruited including tumors of the head and neck region, thorax, upper gastrointestinal tract and pelvic region. All study patients will receive standard therapy, i.e. highly conformal radiation techniques like CT-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with or without concomitant chemotherapy or other antitumor medication, and additionally daily short MR scans in treatment position with the same immobilisation equipment used for irradiation for position verification and imaging of the anatomical and functional changes during the course of radiotherapy. For daily position control, skin marks and a stereotactic frame will be used for both imaging modalities. Patient transfer between the MR device and the linear accelerator will be performed with a shuttle system which uses an air-bearing patient platform for both procedures. The daily acquired MR and CT data sets will be digitally registrated, correlated with the planning CT and compared with each other regarding translational and rotational errors. Aim of this clinical study is to establish a shuttle-based approach for realising MR-guided radiotherapy for certain clinical situations. Second objectives are to compare MR-guided radiotherapy with the gold standard of CT image guidance for quality assurance of radiotherapy, to establish an appropiate MR protocol therefore, and to assess the possibility of using MR-based image guidance not only for position verification but also for adaptive strategies in radiotherapy. Discussion Compared to CT, MRI might offer the advantage of providing IGRT without delivering an additional radiation dose to the patients and the possibility of optimisation of adaptive therapy

  13. Evaluation of Imaging Dose From Different Image Guided Systems During Head and Neck Radiotherapy: A Phantom Study.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chun Shing; Jong, Wei Loong; Ung, Ngie Min; Wong, Jeannie Hsiu Ding

    2016-12-09

    This work evaluated and compared the absorbed doses to selected organs in the head and neck region from the three image guided radiotherapy systems: cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and kilovoltage (kV) planar imaging using the On-board Imager(®) (OBI) as well as the ExacTrac(®) X-ray system, all available on the Varian Novalis TX linear accelerator. The head and neck region of an anthropomorphic phantom was used to simulate patients' head within the imaging field. Nanodots optically stimulated luminescent dosemeters were positioned at selected sites to measure the absorbed doses. CBCT was found to be delivering the highest dose to internal organs while OBI-2D gave the highest doses to the eye lenses. The setting of half-rotation in CBCT effectively reduces the dose to the eye lenses. Daily high-quality CBCT verification was found to increase the secondary cancer risk by 0.79%.

  14. Positron Emission Tomography-Guided, Focal-Dose Escalation Using Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Head and Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Madani, Indira . E-mail: indira@krtkg1.ugent.be; Duthoy, Wim; Derie, Cristina R.N.; De Gersem, Werner Ir.; Boterberg, Tom; Saerens, Micky; Jacobs, Filip Ir.; Gregoire, Vincent; Lonneux, Max; Vakaet, Luc; Vanderstraeten, Barbara; Bauters, Wouter; Bonte, Katrien; Thierens, Hubert; Neve, Wilfried de

    2007-05-01

    Purpose: To assess the feasibility of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) using positron emission tomography (PET)-guided dose escalation, and to determine the maximum tolerated dose in head and neck cancer. Methods and Materials: A Phase I clinical trial was designed to escalate the dose limited to the [{sup 18}-F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography ({sup 18}F-FDG-PET)-delineated subvolume within the gross tumor volume. Positron emission tomography scanning was performed in the treatment position. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy with an upfront simultaneously integrated boost was employed. Two dose levels were planned: 25 Gy (level I) and 30 Gy (level II), delivered in 10 fractions. Standard IMRT was applied for the remaining 22 fractions of 2.16 Gy. Results: Between 2003 and 2005, 41 patients were enrolled, with 23 at dose level I, and 18 at dose level II; 39 patients completed the planned therapy. The median follow-up for surviving patients was 14 months. Two cases of dose-limiting toxicity occurred at dose level I (Grade 4 dermitis and Grade 4 dysphagia). One treatment-related death at dose level II halted the study. Complete response was observed in 18 of 21 (86%) and 13 of 16 (81%) evaluated patients at dose levels I and II (p < 0.7), respectively, with actuarial 1-year local control at 85% and 87% (p n.s.), and 1-year overall survival at 82% and 54% (p = 0.06), at dose levels I and II, respectively. In 4 of 9 patients, the site of relapse was in the boosted {sup 18}F-FDG-PET-delineated region. Conclusions: For head and neck cancer, PET-guided dose escalation appears to be well-tolerated. The maximum tolerated dose was not reached at the investigated dose levels.

  15. The feasibility of using a conventional flexible RF coil for an online MR-guided radiotherapy treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoogcarspel, Stan J.; Crijns, Sjoerd P. M.; Lagendijk, Jan J. W.; van Vulpen, Marco; Raaymakers, Bas W.

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the impact of a flexible radiofrequency coil on the treatment delivery of an online MR-guided radiotherapy treatment. For this study, we used a Synergy MR body coil (Philips, Best) in combination with the current MRL prototype of the UMC Utrecht. The compatibility of the coil is evaluated in two steps. First, we evaluated the dosimetric impact of the MR coil on both a simple and a complex irradiation strategy for treating spinal bone metastases. This tumor site will likely be chosen for the first in-man treatments with the UMC Utrecht MRL system. Second, we investigated the impact of the treatment beam on the MRI performance of the body coil. In case a single posterior-anterior rectangular field was applied, dose to the target volume was underestimated up to 2.2% as a result of beam attenuation in the MR coil. This underestimation however, decreased to 1% when a stereotactic treatment strategy was employed. The presence of the MR coil in or near the distal site of the treatment beam decreased the exit dose when a magnetic field was present. The MRI performance of the coil was unaffected as the result of the radiation. It is feasible to use the Synergy MR body coil for an online MR-guided radiotherapy treatment without any modification to the coil or attenuation correction methods in the planning stage. The effect of the MRI coil on the dose delivery is minimal and there is no effect of the treatment beam on the SNR of the acquired MRI data.

  16. Automated Patient Positioning Guided by Cone-Beam CT for Prostate Radiotherapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    motion model from multiple respiratory cycles for use in lung radiotherapy,” Med. Phys. 33, 3348–3358 2006. 26D. C. Liu and J. Nocedal , “On the limited...Liu and J. Nocedal , “On the limited memory BFGS method for large scale optimization,” Math. Program. 45, 503–528 1989. 31E. Schreibmann and L. Xing...2003;22:986–1004. 27. Liu DC, Nocedal J. On the limited memory BFGS method for large scale optimization. Math Program 1989;45:503–528. 28. Schreibmann

  17. Automated Patient Positioning Guided by Cone-Beam CT for Prostate Radiotherapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    radiotherapy,” Med. Phys. 33, 3348–3358 2006. 26D. C. Liu and J. Nocedal , “On the limited memory BFGS method for large scale optimization,” Math. Program. 45...647–656 1970. 30D. C. Liu and J. Nocedal , “On the limited memory BFGS method for large scale optimization,” Math. Program. 45, 503–528 1989. 31E...IEEE Trans Med Imaging 2003;22:986–1004. 27. Liu DC, Nocedal J. On the limited memory BFGS method for large scale optimization. Math Program 1989;45

  18. Medical applications of fast 3D cameras in real-time image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) of cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shidong; Li, Tuotuo; Geng, Jason

    2013-03-01

    Dynamic volumetric medical imaging (4DMI) has reduced motion artifacts, increased early diagnosis of small mobile tumors, and improved target definition for treatment planning. High speed cameras for video, X-ray, or other forms of sequential imaging allow a live tracking of external or internal movement useful for real-time image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT). However, none of 4DMI can track real-time organ motion and no camera has correlated with 4DMI to show volumetric changes. With a brief review of various IGRT techniques, we propose a fast 3D camera for live-video stereovision, an automatic surface-motion identifier to classify body or respiratory motion, a mechanical model for synchronizing the external surface movement with the internal target displacement by combination use of the real-time stereovision and pre-treatment 4DMI, and dynamic multi-leaf collimation for adaptive aiming the moving target. Our preliminary results demonstrate that the technique is feasible and efficient in IGRT of mobile targets. A clinical trial has been initiated for validation of its spatial and temporal accuracies and dosimetric impact for intensity-modulated RT (IMRT), volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT), and stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) of any mobile tumors. The technique can be extended for surface-guided stereotactic needle insertion in biopsy of small lung nodules.

  19. CT-Guided 125I Seed Interstitial Brachytherapy as a Salvage Treatment for Recurrent Spinal Metastases after External Beam Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Lihong; Cao, Qianqian; Yang, Jiwen; Meng, Na; Guo, Fuxin; Jiang, Yuliang; Tian, Suqing; Sun, Haitao

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the feasibility, safety, and clinical efficacy of CT-guided 125I seed interstitial brachytherapy in patients with recurrent spinal metastases after external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). Between August 2003 and September 2015, 26 spinal metastatic lesions (24 patients) were reirradiated by this salvage therapy modality. Treatment for all patients was preplanned using a three-dimensional treatment planning system 3–5 days before 125I seed interstitial brachytherapy; dosimetry verification was performed immediately after seed implantation. Median actual D90 was 99 Gy (range, 90–176), and spinal cord median Dmax was 39 Gy (range, 6–110). Median local control (LC) was 12 months (95% CI: 7.0–17.0). The 6- and 12-month LC rates were 52% and 40%, respectively. Median overall survival (OS) was 11 months (95% CI: 7.7–14.3); 6-month and 1-, 2-, and 3-year OS rates were 65%, 37%, 14%, and 9%, respectively. Pain-free survival ranged from 2 to 42 months (median, 6; 95% CI: 4.6–7.4). Treatment was well-tolerated, with no radiation-induced vertebral compression fractures or myelopathy reported. Reirradiation with CT-guided 125I seed interstitial brachytherapy appears to be feasible, safe, and effective as pain relief or salvage treatment for patients with recurrent spinal metastases after EBRT. PMID:28105434

  20. Potential Applications of Image-Guided Radiotherapy for Radiation Dose Escalation in Patients with Early Stage High-Risk Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Nam P.; Davis, Rick; Bose, Satya R.; Dutta, Suresh; Vinh-Hung, Vincent; Chi, Alexander; Godinez, Juan; Desai, Anand; Woods, William; Altdorfer, Gabor; D’Andrea, Mark; Karlsson, Ulf; Vo, Richard A.; Sroka, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Patients with early stage high-risk prostate cancer (prostate specific antigen > 20, Gleason score > 7) are at high risk of recurrence following prostate cancer irradiation. Radiation dose escalation to the prostate may improve biochemical-free survival for these patients. However, high rectal and bladder dose with conventional three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy may lead to excessive gastrointestinal and genitourinary toxicity. Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT), by virtue of combining the steep dose gradient of intensity-modulated radiotherapy and daily pretreatment imaging, may allow for radiation dose escalation and decreased treatment morbidity. Reduced treatment time is feasible with hypo-fractionated IGRT and it may improve patient quality of life. PMID:25699239

  1. Robotic image-guided stereotactic radiotherapy, for isolated recurrent primary, lymph node or metastatic prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Jereczek-Fossa, Barbara Alicja; Beltramo, Giancarlo; Fariselli, Laura; Fodor, Cristiana; Santoro, Luigi; Vavassori, Andrea; Zerini, Dario; Gherardi, Federica; Ascione, Carmen; Bossi-Zanetti, Isa; Mauro, Roberta; Bregantin, Achille; Bianchi, Livia Corinna; De Cobelli, Ottavio; Orecchia, Roberto

    2012-02-01

    To evaluate the outcome of robotic CyberKnife (Accuray, Sunnyvale, CA)-based stereotactic radiotherapy (CBK-SRT) for isolated recurrent primary, lymph node, or metastatic prostate cancer. Between May 2007 and December 2009, 34 consecutive patients/38 lesions were treated (15 patients reirradiated for local recurrence [P], 4 patients reirradiated for anastomosis recurrence [A], 16 patients treated for single lymph node recurrence [LN], and 3 patients treated for single metastasis [M]). In all but 4 patients, [(11)C]choline positron emission tomography/computed tomography was performed. CBK-SRT consisted of reirradiation and first radiotherapy in 27 and 11 lesions, respectively. The median CBK-SRT dose was 30 Gy in 4.5 fractions (P, 30 Gy in 5 fractions; A, 30 Gy in 5 fractions; LN, 33 Gy in 3 fractions; and M, 36 Gy in 3 fractions). In 18 patients (21 lesions) androgen deprivation was added to CBK-SRT (median duration, 16.6 months). The median follow-up was 16.9 months. Acute toxicity included urinary events (3 Grade 1, 2 Grade 2, and 2 Grade 3 events) and rectal events (1 Grade 1 event). Late toxicity included urinary events (3 Grade 1, 2 Grade 2, and 2 Grade 3 events) and rectal events (1 Grade 1 event and 1 Grade 2 event). Biochemical response was observed in 32 of 38 evaluable lesions. Prostate-specific antigen stabilization was seen for 4 lesions, and in 2 cases prostate-specific antigen progression was reported. The 30-month progression-free survival rate was 42.6%. Disease progression was observed for 14 lesions (5, 2, 5, and 2 in Groups P, A, LN, and M respectively). In only 3 cases, in-field progression was seen. At the time of analysis (May 2010), 19 patients are alive with no evidence of disease and 15 are alive with disease. CyberKnife-based stereotactic radiotherapy is a feasible approach for isolated recurrent primary, lymph node, or metastatic prostate cancer, offering excellent in-field tumor control and a low toxicity profile. Further investigation

  2. Robotic Image-Guided Stereotactic Radiotherapy, for Isolated Recurrent Primary, Lymph Node or Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Jereczek-Fossa, Barbara Alicja; Beltramo, Giancarlo; Fariselli, Laura; Fodor, Cristiana; Santoro, Luigi; Vavassori, Andrea; Zerini, Dario; Gherardi, Federica; Ascione, Carmen; Bossi-Zanetti, Isa; Mauro, Roberta; Bregantin, Achille; Bianchi, Livia Corinna; De Cobelli, Ottavio; Orecchia, Roberto

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcome of robotic CyberKnife (Accuray, Sunnyvale, CA)-based stereotactic radiotherapy (CBK-SRT) for isolated recurrent primary, lymph node, or metastatic prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between May 2007 and December 2009, 34 consecutive patients/38 lesions were treated (15 patients reirradiated for local recurrence [P], 4 patients reirradiated for anastomosis recurrence [A], 16 patients treated for single lymph node recurrence [LN], and 3 patients treated for single metastasis [M]). In all but 4 patients, [{sup 11}C]choline positron emission tomography/computed tomography was performed. CBK-SRT consisted of reirradiation and first radiotherapy in 27 and 11 lesions, respectively. The median CBK-SRT dose was 30 Gy in 4.5 fractions (P, 30 Gy in 5 fractions; A, 30 Gy in 5 fractions; LN, 33 Gy in 3 fractions; and M, 36 Gy in 3 fractions). In 18 patients (21 lesions) androgen deprivation was added to CBK-SRT (median duration, 16.6 months). Results: The median follow-up was 16.9 months. Acute toxicity included urinary events (3 Grade 1, 2 Grade 2, and 2 Grade 3 events) and rectal events (1 Grade 1 event). Late toxicity included urinary events (3 Grade 1, 2 Grade 2, and 2 Grade 3 events) and rectal events (1 Grade 1 event and 1 Grade 2 event). Biochemical response was observed in 32 of 38 evaluable lesions. Prostate-specific antigen stabilization was seen for 4 lesions, and in 2 cases prostate-specific antigen progression was reported. The 30-month progression-free survival rate was 42.6%. Disease progression was observed for 14 lesions (5, 2, 5, and 2 in Groups P, A, LN, and M respectively). In only 3 cases, in-field progression was seen. At the time of analysis (May 2010), 19 patients are alive with no evidence of disease and 15 are alive with disease. Conclusions: CyberKnife-based stereotactic radiotherapy is a feasible approach for isolated recurrent primary, lymph node, or metastatic prostate cancer, offering excellent in-field tumor

  3. Learning image context for segmentation of prostate in CT-guided radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Liao, Shu; Feng, Qianjin; Chen, Wufan; Shen, Dinggang

    2011-01-01

    Segmentation of prostate is highly important in the external beam radiotherapy of prostate cancer. However, it is challenging to localize prostate in the CT images due to low image contrast, prostate motion, and both intensity and shape changes of bladder and rectum around the prostate. In this paper, an online learning and patient-specific classification method based on location-adaptive image context is proposed to precisely segment prostate in the CT image. Specifically, two sets of position-adaptive classifiers are respectively placed along the two coordinate directions, and further trained with the previous segmented treatment images to jointly perform the prostate segmentation. In particular, each location-adaptive classifier is recursively trained with different image context collected at different scales and orientations for better identification of each prostate region. The proposed learning-based prostate segmentation method has been extensively evaluated on a large set of patients, achieving very promising results.

  4. Statistical Determination of the Gating Windows for Respiratory-Gated Radiotherapy Using a Visible Guiding System

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Se An; Yea, Ji Woon

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory-gated radiation therapy (RGRT) is used to minimize the radiation dose to normal tissue in lung-cancer patients. Although determining the gating window in the respiratory phase of patients is important in RGRT, it is not easy. Our aim was to determine the optimal gating window when using a visible guiding system for RGRT. Between April and October 2014, the breathing signals of 23 lung-cancer patients were recorded with a real-time position management (RPM) respiratory gating system (Varian, USA). We performed statistical analysis with breathing signals to find the optimal gating window for guided breathing in RGRT. When we compared breathing signals before and after the breathing training, 19 of the 23 patients showed statistically significant differences (p < 0.05). The standard deviation of the respiration signals after breathing training was lowest for phases of 30%–70%. The results showed that the optimal gating window in RGRT is 40% (30%–70%) with respect to repeatability for breathing after respiration training with the visible guiding system. RGRT was performed with the RPM system to confirm the usefulness of the visible guiding system. The RPM system and our visible guiding system improve the respiratory regularity, which in turn should improve the accuracy and efficiency of RGRT. PMID:27228097

  5. Statistical Determination of the Gating Windows for Respiratory-Gated Radiotherapy Using a Visible Guiding System.

    PubMed

    Oh, Se An; Yea, Ji Woon; Kim, Sung Kyu

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory-gated radiation therapy (RGRT) is used to minimize the radiation dose to normal tissue in lung-cancer patients. Although determining the gating window in the respiratory phase of patients is important in RGRT, it is not easy. Our aim was to determine the optimal gating window when using a visible guiding system for RGRT. Between April and October 2014, the breathing signals of 23 lung-cancer patients were recorded with a real-time position management (RPM) respiratory gating system (Varian, USA). We performed statistical analysis with breathing signals to find the optimal gating window for guided breathing in RGRT. When we compared breathing signals before and after the breathing training, 19 of the 23 patients showed statistically significant differences (p < 0.05). The standard deviation of the respiration signals after breathing training was lowest for phases of 30%-70%. The results showed that the optimal gating window in RGRT is 40% (30%-70%) with respect to repeatability for breathing after respiration training with the visible guiding system. RGRT was performed with the RPM system to confirm the usefulness of the visible guiding system. The RPM system and our visible guiding system improve the respiratory regularity, which in turn should improve the accuracy and efficiency of RGRT.

  6. Automatic transperineal ultrasound probe positioning based on CT scan for image guided radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camps, S. M.; Verhaegen, F.; Paiva Fonesca, G.; de With, P. H. N.; Fontanarosa, D.

    2017-03-01

    Image interpretation is crucial during ultrasound image acquisition. A skilled operator is typically needed to verify if the correct anatomical structures are all visualized and with sufficient quality. The need for this operator is one of the major reasons why presently ultrasound is not widely used in radiotherapy workflows. To solve this issue, we introduce an algorithm that uses anatomical information derived from a CT scan to automatically provide the operator with a patient-specific ultrasound probe setup. The first application we investigated, for its relevance to radiotherapy, is 4D transperineal ultrasound image acquisition for prostate cancer patients. As initial test, the algorithm was applied on a CIRS multi-modality pelvic phantom. Probe setups were calculated in order to allow visualization of the prostate and adjacent edges of bladder and rectum, as clinically required. Five of the proposed setups were reproduced using a precision robotic arm and ultrasound volumes were acquired. A gel-filled probe cover was used to ensure proper acoustic coupling, while taking into account possible tilted positions of the probe with respect to the flat phantom surface. Visual inspection of the acquired volumes revealed that clinical requirements were fulfilled. Preliminary quantitative evaluation was also performed. The mean absolute distance (MAD) was calculated between actual anatomical structure positions and positions predicted by the CT-based algorithm. This resulted in a MAD of (2.8±0.4) mm for prostate, (2.5±0.6) mm for bladder and (2.8±0.6) mm for rectum. These results show that no significant systematic errors due to e.g. probe misplacement were introduced.

  7. Performance characteristics of mobile MOSFET dosimeter for kilovoltage X-rays used in image guided radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, A. Sathish; Singh, I. Rabi Raja; Sharma, S. D.; Ravindran, B. Paul

    2015-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to investigate the characteristics of metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) dosimeter for kilovoltage (kV) X-ray beams in order to perform the in vivo dosimetry during image guidance in radiotherapy. The performance characteristics of high sensitivity MOSFET dosimeters were investigated for 80, 90, 100, 110, 120, and 125 kV X-ray beams used for imaging in radiotherapy. This study was performed using Clinac 2100 C/D medical electron linear accelerator with on-board imaging and kV cone beam computed tomography system. The characteristics studied in this work include energy dependence, angular dependence, and linearity. The X-ray beam outputs were measured as per American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) TG 61 recommendations using PTW parallel plate (PP) ionization chamber, which was calibrated in terms of air kerma (Nk) by the National Standard Laboratory. The MOSFET dosimeters were calibrated against the PP ionization chamber for all the kV X-ray beams and the calibration coefficient was found to be 0.11 cGy/mV with a standard deviation of about ±1%. The response of MOSFET was found to be energy independent for the kV X-ray energies used in this study. The response of the MOSFET dosimeter was also found independent of angle of incidence for the gantry angles in the range of 0° to 360° in-air as well as at 3 cm depth in tissue equivalent phantom. PMID:26500397

  8. Phase II Trial of Hypofractionated Image-Guided Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Localized Prostate Adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Jarad M.; Rosewall, Tara; Bayley, Andrew; Bristow, Robert; Chung, Peter; Crook, Juanita; Gospodarowicz, Mary; McLean, Michael; Menard, Cynthia; Milosevic, Michael; Warde, Padraig; Catton, Charles

    2007-11-15

    Purpose: To assess in a prospective trial the feasibility and late toxicity of hypofractionated radiotherapy (RT) for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients had clinical stage T1c-2cNXM0 disease. They received 60 Gy in 20 fractions over 4 weeks with intensity-modulated radiotherapy including daily on-line image guidance with intraprostatic fiducial markers. Results: Between June 2001 and March 2004, 92 patients were treated with hypofractionated RT. The cohort had a median prostate-specific antigen value of 7.06 ng/mL. The majority had Gleason grade 5-6 (38%) or 7 (59%) disease, and 82 patients had T1c-T2a clinical staging. Overall, 29 patients had low-risk, 56 intermediate-risk, and 7 high-risk disease. Severe acute toxicity (Grade 3-4) was rare, occurring in only 1 patient. Median follow-up was 38 months. According to the Phoenix definition for biochemical failure, the rate of biochemical control at 14 months was 97%. According to the previous American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology definition, biochemical control at 3 years was 76%. The incidence of late toxicity was low, with no severe (Grade {>=}3) toxicity at the most recent assessment. Conclusions: Hypofractionated RT using 60 Gy in 20 fractions over 4 weeks with image guidance is feasible and is associated with low rates of late bladder and rectal toxicity. At early follow-up, biochemical outcome is comparable to that reported for conventionally fractionated controls. The findings are being tested in an ongoing, multicenter, Phase III trial.

  9. Development of a four-dimensional image-guided radiotherapy system with a gimbaled X-ray head

    SciTech Connect

    Kamino, Yuichiro . E-mail: daisaku_horiuchi@mhi.co.jp; Takayama, Kenji; Kokubo, Masaki; Narita, Yuichiro; Hirai, Etsuro; Kawawda, Noriyuki; Mizowaki, Takashi; Nagata, Yasushi; Nishidai, Takehiro; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2006-09-01

    Purpose: To develop and evaluate a new four-dimensional image-guided radiotherapy system, which enables precise setup, real-time tumor tracking, and pursuit irradiation. Methods and Materials: The system has an innovative gimbaled X-ray head that enables small-angle ({+-}2.4{sup o}) rotations (pan and tilt) along the two orthogonal gimbals. This design provides for both accurate beam positioning at the isocenter by actively compensating for mechanical distortion and quick pursuit of the target. The X-ray head is composed of an ultralight C-band linear accelerator and a multileaf collimator. The gimbaled X-ray head is mounted on a rigid O-ring structure with an on-board imaging subsystem composed of two sets of kilovoltage X-ray tubes and flat panel detectors, which provides a pair of radiographs, cone beam computed tomography images useful for image guided setup, and real-time fluoroscopic monitoring for pursuit irradiation. Results: The root mean square accuracy of the static beam positioning was 0.1 mm for 360{sup o} of O-ring rotation. The dynamic beam response and positioning accuracy was {+-}0.6 mm for a 0.75 Hz, 40-mm stroke and {+-}0.4 mm for a 2.0 Hz, 8-mm stroke. The quality of the images was encouraging for using the tomography-based setup. Fluoroscopic images were sufficient for monitoring and tracking lung tumors. Conclusions: Key functions and capabilities of our new system are very promising for precise image-guided setup and for tracking and pursuit irradiation of a moving target.

  10. High-Dose, Single-Fraction Image-Guided Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Metastatic Spinal Lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, Yoshiya Bilsky, Mark H.; Lovelock, D. Michael; Venkatraman, Ennapadam S.; Toner, Sean; Johnson, Jared; Zatcky, Joan N.P.; Zelefsky, Michael J.; Fuks, Zvi

    2008-06-01

    Purpose: To report tumor control and toxicity for patients treated with image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (RT) for spinal metastases with high-dose single-fraction RT. Methods and Materials: A total of 103 consecutive spinal metastases in 93 patients without high-grade epidural spinal cord compression were treated with image-guided intensity-modulated RT to doses of 18-24 Gy (median, 24 Gy) in a single fraction between 2003 and 2006. The spinal cord dose was limited to a 14-Gy maximal dose. The patients were prospectively examined every 3-4 months with clinical assessment and cross-sectional imaging. Results: The overall actuarial local control rate was 90% (local failure developed in 7 patients) at a median follow-up of 15 months (range, 2-45 months). The median time to local failure was 9 months (range, 2-15 months) from the time of treatment. Of the 93 patients, 37 died. The median overall survival was 15 months. In all cases, death was from progression of systemic disease and not local failure. The histologic type was not a statistically significant predictor of survival or local control. The radiation dose was a significant predictor of local control (p = 0.03). All patients without local failure also reported durable symptom palliation. Acute toxicity was mild (Grade 1-2). No case of radiculopathy or myelopathy has developed. Conclusion: High-dose, single-fraction image-guided intensity-modulated RT is a noninvasive intervention that appears to be safe and very effective palliation for patients with spinal metastases, with minimal negative effects on quality of life and a high probability of tumor control.

  11. Optimization and quality assurance of an image-guided radiation therapy system for intensity-modulated radiation therapy radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Jen-San; Micaily, Bizhan; Miyamoto, Curtis

    2012-01-01

    To develop a quality assurance (QA) of XVI cone beam system (XVIcbs) for its optimal imaging-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) implementation, and to construe prostate tumor margin required for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) if IGRT is unavailable. XVIcbs spatial accuracy was explored with a humanoid phantom; isodose conformity to lesion target with a rice phantom housing a soap as target; image resolution with a diagnostic phantom; and exposure validation with a Radcal ion chamber. To optimize XVIcbs, rotation flexmap on coincidency between gantry rotational axis and that of XVI cone beam scan was investigated. Theoretic correlation to image quality of XVIcbs rotational axis stability was elaborately studied. Comprehensive QA of IGRT using XVIcbs has initially been explored and then implemented on our general IMRT treatments, and on special IMRT radiotherapies such as head and neck (H and N), stereotactic radiation therapy (SRT), stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), and stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Fifteen examples of prostate setup accounted for 350 IGRT cone beam system were analyzed. IGRT accuracy results were in agreement ± 1 mm. Flexmap 0.25 mm met the manufacturer's specification. Films confirmed isodose coincidence with target (soap) via XVIcbs, otherwise not. Superficial doses were measured from 7.2-2.5 cGy for anatomic diameters 15-33 cm, respectively. Image quality was susceptible to rotational stability or patient movement. IGRT using XVIcbs on general IMRT treatments such as prostate, SRT, SRS, and SBRT for setup accuracy were verified; and subsequently coordinate shifts corrections were recorded. The 350 prostate IGRT coordinate shifts modeled to Gaussian distributions show central peaks deviated off the isocenter by 0.6 ± 3.0 mm, 0.5 ± 4.5 mm in the X(RL)- and Z(SI)-coordinates, respectively; and 2.0 ± 3.0 mm in the Y(AP)-coordinate as a result of belly and bladder capacity variations. Sixty-eight percent of confidence was within

  12. Optimization and quality assurance of an image-guided radiation therapy system for intensity-modulated radiation therapy radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, Jen-San; Micaily, Bizhan; Miyamoto, Curtis

    2012-10-01

    To develop a quality assurance (QA) of XVI cone beam system (XVIcbs) for its optimal imaging-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) implementation, and to construe prostate tumor margin required for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) if IGRT is unavailable. XVIcbs spatial accuracy was explored with a humanoid phantom; isodose conformity to lesion target with a rice phantom housing a soap as target; image resolution with a diagnostic phantom; and exposure validation with a Radcal ion chamber. To optimize XVIcbs, rotation flexmap on coincidency between gantry rotational axis and that of XVI cone beam scan was investigated. Theoretic correlation to image quality of XVIcbs rotational axis stability was elaborately studied. Comprehensive QA of IGRT using XVIcbs has initially been explored and then implemented on our general IMRT treatments, and on special IMRT radiotherapies such as head and neck (H and N), stereotactic radiation therapy (SRT), stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), and stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Fifteen examples of prostate setup accounted for 350 IGRT cone beam system were analyzed. IGRT accuracy results were in agreement {+-} 1 mm. Flexmap 0.25 mm met the manufacturer's specification. Films confirmed isodose coincidence with target (soap) via XVIcbs, otherwise not. Superficial doses were measured from 7.2-2.5 cGy for anatomic diameters 15-33 cm, respectively. Image quality was susceptible to rotational stability or patient movement. IGRT using XVIcbs on general IMRT treatments such as prostate, SRT, SRS, and SBRT for setup accuracy were verified; and subsequently coordinate shifts corrections were recorded. The 350 prostate IGRT coordinate shifts modeled to Gaussian distributions show central peaks deviated off the isocenter by 0.6 {+-} 3.0 mm, 0.5 {+-} 4.5 mm in the X(RL)- and Z(SI)-coordinates, respectively; and 2.0 {+-} 3.0 mm in the Y(AP)-coordinate as a result of belly and bladder capacity variations. Sixty-eight percent of confidence was

  13. SU-E-J-205: Monte Carlo Modeling of Ultrasound Probes for Real-Time Ultrasound Image-Guided Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Hristov, D; Schlosser, J; Bazalova, M; Chen, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To quantify the effect of ultrasound (US) probe beam attenuation for radiation therapy delivered under real-time US image guidance by means of Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. Methods: MC models of two Philips US probes, an X6-1 matrix-array transducer and a C5-2 curved-array transducer, were built based on their CT images in the EGSnrc BEAMnrc and DOSXYZnrc codes. Due to the metal parts, the probes were scanned in a Tomotherapy machine with a 3.5 MV beam. Mass densities in the probes were assigned based on an electron density calibration phantom consisting of cylinders with mass densities between 0.2–8.0 g/cm{sup 3}. Beam attenuation due to the probes was measured in a solid water phantom for a 6 MV and 15 MV 15x15 cm{sup 2} beam delivered on a Varian Trilogy linear accelerator. The dose was measured with the PTW-729 ionization chamber array at two depths and compared to MC simulations. The extreme case beam attenuation expected in robotic US image guided radiotherapy for probes in upright position was quantified by means of MC simulations. Results: The 3.5 MV CT number to mass density calibration curve was found to be linear with R{sup 2} > 0.99. The maximum mass densities were 4.6 and 4.2 g/cm{sup 3} in the C5-2 and X6-1 probe, respectively. Gamma analysis of the simulated and measured doses revealed that over 98% of measurement points passed the 3%/3mm criteria for both probes and measurement depths. The extreme attenuation for probes in upright position was found to be 25% and 31% for the C5-2 and X6-1 probe, respectively, for both 6 and 15 MV beams at 10 cm depth. Conclusion: MC models of two US probes used for real-time image guidance during radiotherapy have been built. As a Result, radiotherapy treatment planning with the imaging probes in place can now be performed. J Schlosser is an employee of SoniTrack Systems, Inc. D Hristov has financial interest in SoniTrack Systems, Inc.

  14. SU-E-J-144: MRI Visualization of a Metallic Fiducial Marker Used for Image Guided Prostate Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yee, S; Krauss, D; Yan, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Unlike on the daily CBCT used for the image-guided radiation therapy, the visualization of an implantable metallic fiducial marker on the planning MRI images has been a challenge due to the inherent insensitivity of metal in MRI, and very thin (∼ 1 mm or less) diameter. Here, an MRI technique to visualize a marker used for prostate cancer radiotherapy is reported. Methods: During the MRI acquisitions, a multi-shot turbo spin echo (TSE) technique (TR=3500 ms, TE=8.6 ms, ETL=17, recon voxel=0.42x0.42x3.5 mm3) was acquired in Philips 3T Ingenia together with a T2-weighted multi-shot TSE (TR=5381 ms, TE=110 ms, ETL=17, recon voxel=0.47×0.47×3 mm3) and a balanced turbo field echo (bTFE, flip angle 60, TR=2.76 ms, TE=1.3 ms, 0.85×0.85×3 mm3, NSA=4). In acquiring the MRI to visualize the fiducial marker, a particular emphasis was made to improve the spatial resolution and visibility in the generally dark, inhomogeneous prostate area by adjusting the slice profile ordering and TE values of TSE acquisition (in general, the lower value of TE in TSE acquisition generates a brighter signal but at the cost of high spatial resolution since the k-space, responsible for high spatial resolution, is filled with noisier data). Results: While clearly visible in CT, the marker was not visible in either T2-weighted TSE or bTFE, although the image qualities of both images were superior. In the new TSE acquisition (∼ a proton-density weighted image) adjusted by changing the profile ordering and the TE value, the marker was visible as a negative (but clear) contrast in the magnitude MRI, and as a positive contrast in the imaginary image of the phase-sensitive MRI. Conclusion: A metallic fiducial marker used for image guidance before prostate cancer radiotherapy can be made visible in MRI, which may facilitate more use of MRI in planning and guiding such radiation therapy.

  15. [Small animal image-guided radiotherapy: A new era for preclinical studies].

    PubMed

    Delpon, G; Frelin-Labalme, A-M; Heinrich, S; Beaudouin, V; Noblet, C; Begue, M; Le Deroff, C; Pouzoulet, F; Chiavassa, S

    2016-02-01

    Preclinical external beam radiotherapy irradiations used to be delivered with a static broad beam. To promote the transfer from animal to man, the preclinical treatment techniques dedicated to the animal have been optimized to be similar to those delivered to patients in clinical practice. In this context, preclinical irradiators have been developed. Due to the small sizes of the animals, and the irradiation beams, the scaling to the small animal dimensions involves specific problems. Reducing the size and energy of the irradiation beams require very high technical performance, especially for the mechanical stability of the irradiator and the spatial resolution of the imaging system. In addition, the determination of the reference absorbed dose rate must be conducted with a specific methodology and suitable detectors. To date, three systems are used for preclinical studies in France. The aim of this article is to present these new irradiators dedicated to small animals from a physicist point of view, including the commissioning and the quality control. Copyright © 2016 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Motion prediction in MRI-guided radiotherapy based on interleaved orthogonal cine-MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seregni, M.; Paganelli, C.; Lee, D.; Greer, P. B.; Baroni, G.; Keall, P. J.; Riboldi, M.

    2016-01-01

    In-room cine-MRI guidance can provide non-invasive target localization during radiotherapy treatment. However, in order to cope with finite imaging frequency and system latencies between target localization and dose delivery, tumour motion prediction is required. This work proposes a framework for motion prediction dedicated to cine-MRI guidance, aiming at quantifying the geometric uncertainties introduced by this process for both tumour tracking and beam gating. The tumour position, identified through scale invariant features detected in cine-MRI slices, is estimated at high-frequency (25 Hz) using three independent predictors, one for each anatomical coordinate. Linear extrapolation, auto-regressive and support vector machine algorithms are compared against systems that use no prediction or surrogate-based motion estimation. Geometric uncertainties are reported as a function of image acquisition period and system latency. Average results show that the tracking error RMS can be decreased down to a [0.2; 1.2] mm range, for acquisition periods between 250 and 750 ms and system latencies between 50 and 300 ms. Except for the linear extrapolator, tracking and gating prediction errors were, on average, lower than those measured for surrogate-based motion estimation. This finding suggests that cine-MRI guidance, combined with appropriate prediction algorithms, could relevantly decrease geometric uncertainties in motion compensated treatments.

  17. Motion prediction in MRI-guided radiotherapy based on interleaved orthogonal cine-MRI.

    PubMed

    Seregni, M; Paganelli, C; Lee, D; Greer, P B; Baroni, G; Keall, P J; Riboldi, M

    2016-01-21

    In-room cine-MRI guidance can provide non-invasive target localization during radiotherapy treatment. However, in order to cope with finite imaging frequency and system latencies between target localization and dose delivery, tumour motion prediction is required. This work proposes a framework for motion prediction dedicated to cine-MRI guidance, aiming at quantifying the geometric uncertainties introduced by this process for both tumour tracking and beam gating. The tumour position, identified through scale invariant features detected in cine-MRI slices, is estimated at high-frequency (25 Hz) using three independent predictors, one for each anatomical coordinate. Linear extrapolation, auto-regressive and support vector machine algorithms are compared against systems that use no prediction or surrogate-based motion estimation. Geometric uncertainties are reported as a function of image acquisition period and system latency. Average results show that the tracking error RMS can be decreased down to a [0.2; 1.2] mm range, for acquisition periods between 250 and 750 ms and system latencies between 50 and 300 ms. Except for the linear extrapolator, tracking and gating prediction errors were, on average, lower than those measured for surrogate-based motion estimation. This finding suggests that cine-MRI guidance, combined with appropriate prediction algorithms, could relevantly decrease geometric uncertainties in motion compensated treatments.

  18. Patient Selection and Activity Planning Guide for Selective Internal Radiotherapy With Yttrium-90 Resin Microspheres

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, Wan-Yee; Kennedy, Andrew S.; Kim, Yun Hwan; Lai, Hee Kit; Lee, Rheun-Chuan; Leung, Thomas W.T.; Liu, Ching-Sheng; Salem, Riad; Sangro, Bruno; Shuter, Borys; Wang, Shih-Chang

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Selective internal radiotherapy (SIRT) with yttrium-90 ({sup 90}Y) resin microspheres can improve the clinical outcomes for selected patients with inoperable liver cancer. This technique involves intra-arterial delivery of {beta}-emitting microspheres into hepatocellular carcinomas or liver metastases while sparing uninvolved structures. Its unique mode of action, including both {sup 90}Y brachytherapy and embolization of neoplastic microvasculature, necessitates activity planning methods specific to SIRT. Methods and Materials: A panel of clinicians experienced in {sup 90}Y resin microsphere SIRT was convened to integrate clinical experience with the published data to propose an activity planning pathway for radioembolization. Results: Accurate planning is essential to minimize potentially fatal sequelae such as radiation-induced liver disease while delivering tumoricidal {sup 90}Y activity. Planning methods have included empiric dosing according to degree of tumor involvement, empiric dosing adjusted for the body surface area, and partition model calculations using Medical Internal Radiation Dose principles. It has been recommended that at least two of these methods be compared when calculating the microsphere activity for each patient. Conclusions: Many factors inform {sup 90}Y resin microsphere SIRT activity planning, including the therapeutic intent, tissue and vasculature imaging, tumor and uninvolved liver characteristics, previous therapies, and localization of the microsphere infusion. The influence of each of these factors has been discussed.

  19. [Assessment of overall spatial accuracy in image guided stereotactic body radiotherapy using a spine registration method].

    PubMed

    Nakazawa, Hisato; Uchiyama, Yukio; Komori, Masataka; Hayashi, Naoki

    2014-06-01

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for lung and liver tumors is always performed under image guidance, a technique used to confirm the accuracy of setup positioning by fusing planning digitally reconstructed radiographs with X-ray, fluoroscopic, or computed tomography (CT) images, using bony structures, tumor shadows, or metallic markers as landmarks. The Japanese SBRT guidelines state that bony spinal structures should be used as the main landmarks for patient setup. In this study, we used the Novalis system as a linear accelerator for SBRT of lung and liver tumors. The current study compared the differences between spine registration and target registration and calculated total spatial accuracy including setup uncertainty derived from our image registration results and the geometric uncertainty of the Novalis system. We were able to evaluate clearly whether overall spatial accuracy is achieved within a setup margin (SM) for planning target volume (PTV) in treatment planning. After being granted approval by the Hospital and University Ethics Committee, we retrospectively analyzed eleven patients with lung tumor and seven patients with liver tumor. The results showed the total spatial accuracy to be within a tolerable range for SM of treatment planning. We therefore regard our method to be suitable for image fusion involving 2-dimensional X-ray images during the treatment planning stage of SBRT for lung and liver tumors.

  20. A rapid and robust iterative closest point algorithm for image guided radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbiere, Joseph; Hanley, Joseph

    2008-03-01

    Our work presents a rapid and robust process that can analytically evaluate and correct patient setup error for head and neck radiotherapy by comparing orthogonal megavoltage portal images with digitally reconstructed radiographs. For robust data Photoshop is used to interactively segment images and registering reference contours to the transformed PI. MatLab is used for matrix computations and image analysis. The closest point distance for each PI point to a DRR point forms a set of homologous points. The translation that aligns the PI to the DRR is equal to the difference in centers of mass. The original PI points are transformed and the process repeated with an Iterative Closest Point algorithm until the transformation change becomes negligible. Using a 3.00 GHz processor the calculation of the 2500x1750 CPD matrix takes about 150 sec per iteration. Standard down sampling to about 1000 DRR and 250 PI points significantly reduces that time. We introduce a local neighborhood matrix consisting of a small subset of the DRR points in the vicinity of each PI point to further reduce the CPD matrix size. Our results demonstrate the effects of down sampling on accuracy. For validation, analytical detailed results are displayed as a histogram.

  1. Tumor Control Outcomes After Hypofractionated and Single-Dose Stereotactic Image-Guided Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Extracranial Metastases From Renal Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Zelefsky, Michael J.; Greco, Carlo; Motzer, Robert; Magsanoc, Juan Martin; Pei Xin; Lovelock, Michael; Mechalakos, Jim; Zatcky, Joan; Fuks, Zvi; Yamada, Yoshiya

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To report tumor local progression-free outcomes after treatment with single-dose, image-guided, intensity-modulated radiotherapy and hypofractionated regimens for extracranial metastases from renal cell primary tumors. Patients and Methods: Between 2004 and 2010, 105 lesions from renal cell carcinoma were treated with either single-dose, image-guided, intensity-modulated radiotherapy to a prescription dose of 18-24 Gy (median, 24) or hypofractionation (three or five fractions) with a prescription dose of 20-30 Gy. The median follow-up was 12 months (range, 1-48). Results: The overall 3-year actuarial local progression-free survival for all lesions was 44%. The 3-year local progression-free survival for those who received a high single-dose (24 Gy; n = 45), a low single-dose (<24 Gy; n = 14), or hypofractionation regimens (n = 46) was 88%, 21%, and 17%, respectively (high single dose vs. low single dose, p = .001; high single dose vs. hypofractionation, p < .001). Multivariate analysis revealed the following variables were significant predictors of improved local progression-free survival: 24 Gy dose compared with a lower dose (p = .009) and a single dose vs. hypofractionation (p = .008). Conclusion: High single-dose, image-guided, intensity-modulated radiotherapy is a noninvasive procedure resulting in high probability of local tumor control for metastatic renal cell cancer generally considered radioresistant according to the classic radiobiologic ranking.

  2. Use of the BrainLAB ExacTrac X-Ray 6D System in Image-Guided Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, J.-Y. Yin Fangfang; Tenn, Stephen E.; Medin, Paul M.; Solberg, Timothy D.

    2008-07-01

    The ExacTrac X-Ray 6D image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) system will be described and its performance evaluated. The system is mainly an integration of 2 subsystems: (1) an infrared (IR)-based optical positioning system (ExacTrac) and (2) a radiographic kV x-ray imaging system (X-Ray 6D). The infrared system consists of 2 IR cameras, which are used to monitor reflective body markers placed on the patient's skin to assist in patient initial setup, and an IR reflective reference star, which is attached to the treatment couch and can assist in couch movement with spatial resolution to better than 0.3 mm. The radiographic kV devices consist of 2 oblique x-ray imagers to obtain high-quality radiographs for patient position verification and adjustment. The position verification is made by fusing the radiographs with the simulation CT images using either 3 degree-of-freedom (3D) or 6 degree-of-freedom (6D) fusion algorithms. The position adjustment is performed using the infrared system according to the verification results. The reliability of the fusion algorithm will be described based on phantom and patient studies. The results indicated that the 6D fusion method is better compared to the 3D method if there are rotational deviations between the simulation and setup positions. Recently, the system has been augmented with the capabilities for image-guided positioning of targets in motion due to respiration and for gated treatment of those targets. The infrared markers provide a respiratory signal for tracking and gating of the treatment beam, with the x-ray system providing periodic confirmation of patient position relative to the gating window throughout the duration of the gated delivery.

  3. Use of the BrainLAB ExacTrac X-Ray 6D system in image-guided radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Jin, Jian-Yue; Yin, Fang-Fang; Tenn, Stephen E; Medin, Paul M; Solberg, Timothy D

    2008-01-01

    The ExacTrac X-Ray 6D image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) system will be described and its performance evaluated. The system is mainly an integration of 2 subsystems: (1) an infrared (IR)-based optical positioning system (ExacTrac) and (2) a radiographic kV x-ray imaging system (X-Ray 6D). The infrared system consists of 2 IR cameras, which are used to monitor reflective body markers placed on the patient's skin to assist in patient initial setup, and an IR reflective reference star, which is attached to the treatment couch and can assist in couch movement with spatial resolution to better than 0.3 mm. The radiographic kV devices consist of 2 oblique x-ray imagers to obtain high-quality radiographs for patient position verification and adjustment. The position verification is made by fusing the radiographs with the simulation CT images using either 3 degree-of-freedom (3D) or 6 degree-of-freedom (6D) fusion algorithms. The position adjustment is performed using the infrared system according to the verification results. The reliability of the fusion algorithm will be described based on phantom and patient studies. The results indicated that the 6D fusion method is better compared to the 3D method if there are rotational deviations between the simulation and setup positions. Recently, the system has been augmented with the capabilities for image-guided positioning of targets in motion due to respiration and for gated treatment of those targets. The infrared markers provide a respiratory signal for tracking and gating of the treatment beam, with the x-ray system providing periodic confirmation of patient position relative to the gating window throughout the duration of the gated delivery.

  4. MR-CT registration using a Ni-Ti prostate stent in image-guided radiotherapy of prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Korsager, Anne Sofie; Ostergaard, Lasse Riis; Carl, Jesper

    2013-06-15

    Purpose: In image-guided radiotherapy of prostate cancer defining the clinical target volume often relies on magnetic resonance (MR). The task of transferring the clinical target volume from MR to standard planning computed tomography (CT) is not trivial due to prostate mobility. In this paper, an automatic local registration approach is proposed based on a newly developed removable Ni-Ti prostate stent.Methods: The registration uses the voxel similarity measure mutual information in a two-step approach where the pelvic bones are used to establish an initial registration for the local registration.Results: In a phantom study, the accuracy was measured to 0.97 mm and visual inspection showed accurate registration of all 30 data sets. The consistency of the registration was examined where translation and rotation displacements yield a rotation error of 0.41 Degree-Sign {+-} 0.45 Degree-Sign and a translation error of 1.67 {+-} 2.24 mm.Conclusions: This study demonstrated the feasibility for an automatic local MR-CT registration using the prostate stent.

  5. Magnitude of speed of sound aberration corrections for ultrasound image guided radiotherapy for prostate and other anatomical sites

    SciTech Connect

    Fontanarosa, Davide; Meer, Skadi van der; Bloemen-van Gurp, Esther; Stroian, Gabriela; Verhaegen, Frank

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this work is to assess the magnitude of speed of sound (SOS) aberrations in three-dimensional ultrasound (US) imaging systems in image guided radiotherapy. The discrepancy between the fixed SOS value of 1540 m/s assumed by US systems in human soft tissues and its actual nonhomogeneous distribution in patients produces small but systematic errors of up to a few millimeters in the positions of scanned structures. Methods: A correction, provided by a previously published density-based algorithm, was applied to a set of five prostate, five liver, and five breast cancer patients. The shifts of the centroids of target structures and the change in shape were evaluated. Results: After the correction the prostate cases showed shifts up to 3.6 mm toward the US probe, which may explain largely the reported positioning discrepancies in the literature on US systems versus other imaging modalities. Liver cases showed the largest changes in volume of the organ, up to almost 9%, and shifts of the centroids up to more than 6 mm either away or toward the US probe. Breast images showed systematic small shifts of the centroids toward the US probe with a maximum magnitude of 1.3 mm. Conclusions: The applied correction in prostate and liver cancer patients shows positioning errors of several mm due to SOS aberration; the errors are smaller in breast cancer cases, but possibly becoming more important when breast tissue thickness increases.

  6. Learning Image Context for Segmentation of Prostate in CT-Guided Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Liao, Shu; Feng, Qianjin; Chen, Wufan; Shen, Dinggang

    2012-01-01

    Accurate segmentation of prostate is the key to the success of external beam radiotherapy of prostate cancer. However, accurate segmentation of prostate in computer tomography (CT) images remains challenging mainly due to three factors: (1) low image contrast between the prostate and its surrounding tissues, (2) unpredictable prostate motion across different treatment days, and (3) large variations of intensities and shapes of bladder and rectum around the prostate. In this paper, an online-learning and patient-specific classification method based on the location-adaptive image context is presented to deal with all these challenging issues and achieve the precise segmentation of prostate in CT images. Specifically, two sets of location-adaptive classifiers are placed, respectively, along the two coordinate directions of the planning image space of a patient, and further trained with the planning image and also the previous-segmented treatment images of the same patient to jointly perform prostate segmentation for a new treatment image (of the same patient). In particular, each location-adaptive classifier, which itself consists of a set of sequential sub-classifiers, is recursively trained with both the static image appearance features and the iteratively-updated image context features (extracted at different scales and orientations) for better identification of each prostate region. The proposed learning-based prostate segmentation method has been extensively evaluated on 161 images of 11 patients, each with more than 9 daily treatment 3D CT images. Our method achieves the mean Dice value 0.908 and the mean ± SD of average surface distance (ASD) value 1.40 ± 0.57 mm. Its performance is also compared with three prostate segmentation methods, indicating the best segmentation accuracy by the proposed method among all methods under comparison. PMID:22343071

  7. Localization Accuracy of the Clinical Target Volume During Image-Guided Radiotherapy of Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Hugo, Geoffrey D.; Weiss, Elisabeth; Badawi, Ahmed; Orton, Matthew

    2011-10-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the position and shape of the originally defined clinical target volume (CTV) over the treatment course, and to assess the impact of gross tumor volume (GTV)-based online computed tomography (CT) guidance on CTV localization accuracy. Methods and Materials: Weekly breath-hold CT scans were acquired in 17 patients undergoing radiotherapy. Deformable registration was used to propagate the GTV and CTV from the first weekly CT image to all other weekly CT images. The on-treatment CT scans were registered rigidly to the planning CT scan based on the GTV location to simulate online guidance, and residual error in the CTV centroids and borders was calculated. Results: The mean GTV after 5 weeks relative to volume at the beginning of treatment was 77% {+-} 20%, whereas for the prescribed CTV, it was 92% {+-} 10%. The mean absolute residual error magnitude in the CTV centroid position after a GTV-based localization was 2.9 {+-} 3.0 mm, and it varied from 0.3 to 20.0 mm over all patients. Residual error of the CTV centroid was associated with GTV regression and anisotropy of regression during treatment (p = 0.02 and p = 0.03, respectively; Spearman rank correlation). A residual error in CTV border position greater than 2 mm was present in 77% of patients and 50% of fractions. Among these fractions, residual error of the CTV borders was 3.5 {+-} 1.6 mm (left-right), 3.1 {+-} 0.9 mm (anterior-posterior), and 6.4 {+-} 7.5 mm (superior-inferior). Conclusions: Online guidance based on the visible GTV produces substantial error in CTV localization, particularly for highly regressing tumors. The results of this study will be useful in designing margins for CTV localization or for developing new online CTV localization strategies.

  8. Variation of neck position with image-guided radiotherapy for head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Ove, Roger; Cavalieri, Ronaldo; Noble, Darin; Russo, Suzanne M

    2012-02-01

    An understanding of the setup variation of the low neck in relation to the upper neck is necessary to define appropriate planning margins, while treating the full neck with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) technique. The setup of 20 sequential head and neck cancer patients was studied. Daily position verification was performed with a computed tomography (CT) on rails. An upper neck point was defined as the anterior-most portion of the cervical spine on the lowest CT cut on which both styloid processes are visible. A low neck point was defined as the anterior-most portion of the cervical spine on the lowest CT cut on which the thyroid gland was visible bilaterally. This procedure was carried out on the planning CT and on each daily treatment CT. The variation of the low neck was analyzed, assuming perfect alignment of the upper neck anatomy. Daily treatment CT of upper neck anterior cervical spine points were normalized to the planning CT. Relative to this coordinate system, the low neck cervical spine point was displaced an average of 3.08 mm anteriorly, ±0.17 mm. There was no systematic lateral or craniocaudal displacement. Random setup errors resulted in low neck standard deviations of 3.9 mm (anteroposterior), 3.3 mm (lateral), and 2.6 mm (craniocaudal). Position variation in the low neck varied in excess of the planning margins. There was a systematic anterior displacement. Random setup error was greater than expected. The results suggest that the neck volumes located distant from the region of fusion should be drawn with larger planning margins.

  9. Learning image context for segmentation of the prostate in CT-guided radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Liao, Shu; Feng, Qianjin; Chen, Wufan; Shen, Dinggang

    2012-03-07

    Accurate segmentation of the prostate is the key to the success of external beam radiotherapy of prostate cancer. However, accurate segmentation of the prostate in computer tomography (CT) images remains challenging mainly due to three factors: (1) low image contrast between the prostate and its surrounding tissues, (2) unpredictable prostate motion across different treatment days and (3) large variations of intensities and shapes of the bladder and rectum around the prostate. In this paper, an online-learning and patient-specific classification method based on the location-adaptive image context is presented to deal with all these challenging issues and achieve the precise segmentation of the prostate in CT images. Specifically, two sets of location-adaptive classifiers are placed, respectively, along the two coordinate directions of the planning image space of a patient, and further trained with the planning image and also the previous-segmented treatment images of the same patient to jointly perform prostate segmentation for a new treatment image (of the same patient). In particular, each location-adaptive classifier, which itself consists of a set of sequential sub-classifiers, is recursively trained with both the static image appearance features and the iteratively updated image context features (extracted at different scales and orientations) for better identification of each prostate region. The proposed learning-based prostate segmentation method has been extensively evaluated on 161 images of 11 patients, each with more than nine daily treatment three-dimensional CT images. Our method achieves the mean Dice value 0.908 and the mean ± SD of average surface distance value 1.40 ± 0.57 mm. Its performance is also compared with three prostate segmentation methods, indicating the best segmentation accuracy by the proposed method among all methods under comparison.

  10. PET guidance in prostate cancer radiotherapy: Quantitative imaging to predict response and guide treatment.

    PubMed

    Cattaneo, G M; Bettinardi, V; Mapelli, P; Picchio, M

    2016-03-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) allows a monitoring and recording of the spatial and temporal distribution of molecular/cellular processes for diagnostic and therapeutic applications. The aim of this review is to describe the current applications and to explore the role of PET in prostate cancer management, mainly in the radiation therapy (RT) scenario. The state-of-the art of PET for prostate cancer will be presented together with the impact of new specific PET tracers and technological developments aiming at obtaining better imaging quality, increased tumor detectability and more accurate volume delineation. An increased number of studies have been focusing on PET quantification methods as predictive biomarkers capable of guiding individualized treatment and improving patient outcome; the sophisticated advanced intensity modulated and imaged guided radiation therapy techniques (IMRT/IGRT) are capable of boosting more radioresistant tumor (sub)volumes. The use of advanced feature analyses of PET images is an approach that holds great promise with regard to several oncological diseases, but needs further validation in managing prostate diseases. Copyright © 2016 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. SU-D-9A-07: Imaging Dose and Cancer Risk in Image-Guided Radiotherapy of Cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, L; Bai, S; Zhang, Y; Ming, X; Zhang, Y; Deng, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To systematically evaluate the imaging doses and cancer risks associated with various imaging procedures involving ionizing radiation during image-guided radiotherapy of an increasingly large number of cancer patients. Methods: 141 patients (52 brain cases, 47 thoracic cases, 42 abdominal cases, aged 3 to 91 years old) treated between October 2009 and March 2010 were included in this IRB-approved retrospective study. During the whole radiotherapy course, each patient underwent at least one type of imaging procedures, i.e., kV portal, MV portal and kVCBCT, besides CT simulations. Based on Monte Carlo modeling and particle transport in human anatomy of various dimensions, the correlations between the radiation doses to the various organs-at-risk (OARs) at the head, the thoracic and the abdominal regions and one's weight, circumference, scan mAs and kVp have been obtained and used to estimate the radiation dose from a specific imaging procedure. The radiation-induced excess relative risk (ERR) was then estimated with BEIR VII formulism based on one's gender, age and radiation dose. 1+ ERR was reported in this study as relative cancer risk. Results: For the whole cohort of 141 patients, the mean imaging doses from various imaging procedures were 8.3 cGy to the brain, 10.5 cGy to the lungs and 19.2 cGy to the red bone marrow, respectively. Accordingly, the cancer risks were 1.140, 1.369 and 2.671, respectively. In comparison, MV portal deposited largest doses to the lungs while kVCBCT delivered the highest doses to the red bone marrow. Conclusion: The compiled imaging doses to a patient during his/her treatment course were patient-specific and site-dependent, varying from 1.2 to 263.5 cGy on average, which were clinically significant and should be included in the treatment planning and overall decision-making. Our results indicated the necessity of personalized imaging to maximize its clinical benefits while reducing the associated cancer risks. Sichuan

  12. Magnetic-field-induced dose effects in MR-guided radiotherapy systems: dependence on the magnetic field strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raaijmakers, A. J. E.; Raaymakers, B. W.; Lagendijk, J. J. W.

    2008-02-01

    Several institutes are currently working on the development of a radiotherapy treatment system with online MR imaging (MRI) modality. The main difference between their designs is the magnetic field strength of the MRI system. While we have chosen a 1.5 Tesla (T) magnetic field strength, the Cross Cancer Institute in Edmonton will be using a 0.2 T MRI scanner and the company Viewray aims to use 0.3 T. The magnetic field strength will affect the severity of magnetic field dose effects, such as the electron return effect (ERE): considerable dose increase at tissue air boundaries due to returning electrons. This paper has investigated how the ERE dose increase depends on the magnetic field strength. Therefore, four situations where the ERE occurs have been simulated: ERE at the distal side of the beam, the lateral ERE, ERE in cylindrical air cavities and ERE in the lungs. The magnetic field comparison values were 0.2, 0.75, 1.5 and 3 T. Results show that, in general, magnetic field dose effects are reduced at lower magnetic field strengths. At the distal side, the ERE dose increase is largest for B = 0.75 T and depends on the irradiation field size for B = 0.2 T. The lateral ERE is strongest for B = 3 T but shows no effect for B = 0.2 T. Around cylindrical air cavities, dose inhomogeneities disappear if the radius of the cavity becomes small relative to the in-air radius of the secondary electron trajectories. At larger cavities (r > 1 cm), dose inhomogeneities exist for all magnetic field strengths. In water-lung-water phantoms, the ERE dose increase takes place at the water-lung transition and the dose decreases at the lung-water transition, but these effects are minimal for B = 0.2 T. These results will contribute to evaluating the trade-off between magnetic field dose effects and image quality of MR-guided radiotherapy systems.

  13. Image-Guided Radiotherapy Using a Modified Industrial Micro-CT for Preclinical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Felix, Manuela C.; Fleckenstein, Jens; Kirschner, Stefanie; Hartmann, Linda; Wenz, Frederik; Brockmann, Marc A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose/Objective Although radiotherapy is a key component of cancer treatment, its implementation into pre-clinical in vivo models with relatively small target volumes is frequently omitted either due to technical complexity or expected side effects hampering long-term observational studies. We here demonstrate how an affordable industrial micro-CT can be converted into a small animal IGRT device at very low costs. We also demonstrate the proof of principle for the case of partial brain irradiation of mice carrying orthotopic glioblastoma implants. Methods/Materials A commercially available micro-CT originally designed for non-destructive material analysis was used. It consists of a CNC manipulator, a transmission X-ray tube (10–160 kV) and a flat-panel detector, which was used together with custom-made steel collimators (1–5 mm aperture size). For radiation field characterization, an ionization chamber, water-equivalent slab phantoms and radiochromic films were used. A treatment planning tool was implemented using a C++ application. For proof of principle, NOD/SCID/γc−/− mice were orthotopically implanted with U87MG high-grade glioma cells and irradiated using the novel setup. Results The overall symmetry of the radiation field at 150 kV was 1.04±0.02%. The flatness was 4.99±0.63% and the penumbra widths were between 0.14 mm and 0.51 mm. The full width at half maximum (FWHM) ranged from 1.97 to 9.99 mm depending on the collimator aperture size. The dose depth curve along the central axis followed a typical shape of keV photons. Dose rates measured were 10.7 mGy/s in 1 mm and 7.6 mGy/s in 5 mm depth (5 mm collimator aperture size). Treatment of mice with a single dose of 10 Gy was tolerated well and resulted in central tumor necrosis consistent with therapeutic efficacy. Conclusion A conventional industrial micro-CT can be easily modified to allow effective small animal IGRT even of critical target volumes such as the brain. PMID:25993010

  14. Image-Guided Radiotherapy for Left-Sided Breast Cancer Patients: Geometrical Uncertainty of the Heart

    SciTech Connect

    Topolnjak, Rajko; Borst, Gerben R.; Nijkamp, Jasper

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To quantify the geometrical uncertainties for the heart during radiotherapy treatment of left-sided breast cancer patients and to determine and validate planning organ at risk volume (PRV) margins. Methods and Materials: Twenty-two patients treated in supine position in 28 fractions with regularly acquired cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans for offline setup correction were included. Retrospectively, the CBCT scans were reconstructed into 10-phase respiration correlated four-dimensional scans. The heart was registered in each breathing phase to the planning CT scan to establish the respiratory heart motion during the CBCT scan ({sigma}{sub resp}). The average of the respiratory motion was calculated as the heart displacement error for a fraction. Subsequently, the systematic ({Sigma}), random ({sigma}), and total random ({sigma}{sub tot}={radical}({sigma}{sup 2}+{sigma}{sub resp}{sup 2})) errors of the heart position were calculated. Based on the errors a PRV margin for the heart was calculated to ensure that the maximum heart dose (D{sub max}) is not underestimated in at least 90% of the cases (M{sub heart} = 1.3{Sigma}-0.5{sigma}{sub tot}). All analysis were performed in left-right (LR), craniocaudal (CC), and anteroposterior (AP) directions with respect to both online and offline bony anatomy setup corrections. The PRV margin was validated by accumulating the dose to the heart based on the heart registrations and comparing the planned PRV D{sub max} to the accumulated heart D{sub max}. Results: For online setup correction, the cardiac geometrical uncertainties and PRV margins were N-Ary-Summation = 2.2/3.2/2.1 mm, {sigma} = 2.1/2.9/1.4 mm, and M{sub heart} = 1.6/2.3/1.3 mm for LR/CC/AP, respectively. For offline setup correction these were N-Ary-Summation = 2.4/3.7/2.2 mm, {sigma} = 2.9/4.1/2.7 mm, and M{sub heart} = 1.6/2.1/1.4 mm. Cardiac motion induced by breathing was {sigma}{sub resp} = 1.4/2.9/1.4 mm for LR/CC/AP. The PRV D{sub max

  15. TH-A-BRF-05: MRI of Individual Lymph Nodes to Guide Regional Breast Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Heijst, T van; Asselen, B van; Lagendijk, J; Bongard, D van den; Philippens, M

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: In regional radiotherapy (RT) for breast-cancer patients, direct visualization of individual lymph nodes (LNs) may reduce target volumes and Result in lower toxicity (i.e. reduced radiation pneumonitis, arm edema, arm morbidity), relative to standard CT-based delineations. To this end, newly designed magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences were optimized and assessed qualitatively and quantitatively. Methods: In ten healthy female volunteers, a scanning protocol was developed and optimized. Coronal images were acquired in supine RT position positioned on a wedge board on a 1.5 T Ingenia (Philips) wide-bore MRI. In four volunteers the optimized MRI protocol was applied, including a 3-dimensional (3D) T1-weighted (T1w) fast-field-echo (FFE). T2w sequences, including 3D FFE, 3D and 2D fast spin echo (FSE), and diffusion-weighted single-shot echo-planar imaging (DWI) were also performed. Several fatsuppression techniques were used. Qualitative evaluation parameters included LN contrast, motion susceptibility, visibility of anatomical structures, and fat suppression. The number of visible axillary and supraclavicular LNs was also determined. Results: T1 FFE, insensitive to motion, lacked contrast of LNs, which often blended in with soft tissue and blood. T2 FFE showed high contrast, but some LNs were obscured due to motion. Both 2D and 3D FSE were motion-insensitive having high contrast, although some blood remained visible. 2D FSE showed more anatomical details, while in 3D FSE, some blurring occurred. DWI showed high LN contrast, but suffered from geometric distortions and low resolution. Fat suppression by mDixon was the most reliable in regions with magnetic-field inhomogeneities. The FSE sequences showed the highest sensitivity for LN detection. Conclusion: MRI of regional LNs was achieved in volunteers. The FSE techniques were robust and the most sensitive. Our optimized MRI sequences can facilitate direct delineation of individual LNs. This can Result

  16. Multibeam Phased Array Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Popovic, Zoya; Romisch, Stefania; Rondineau, Sebastien

    2004-01-01

    In this study, a new architecture for Ka-band multi-beam arrays was developed and demonstrated experimentally. The goal of the investigation was to demonstrate a new architecture that has the potential of reducing the cost as compared to standard expensive phased array technology. The goals of this specific part of the project, as stated in the yearly statement of work in the original proposal are: 1. Investigate bounds on performance of multi-beam lens arrays in terms of beamwidths, volume (size), isolation between beams, number of simultaneous beams, etc. 2. Design a small-scale array to demonstrate the principle. The array will be designed for operation around 3OGHz (Ka-band), with two 10-degree beamwidth beams. 3. Investigate most appropriate way to accomplish fine-tuning of the beam pointing within 5 degrees around the main beam pointing angle.

  17. On-Board Imaging Validation of Optically Guided Stereotactic Radiosurgery Positioning System for Conventionally Fractionated Radiotherapy for Paranasal Sinus and Skull Base Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Maxim, Peter G.; Loo, Billy W.; Murphy, James D.; Chu, Karen P.M.; Hsu, Annie; Le, Quynh-Thu

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the positioning accuracy of an optical positioning system for stereotactic radiosurgery in a pilot experience of optically guided, conventionally fractionated, radiotherapy for paranasal sinus and skull base tumors. Methods and Materials: Before each daily radiotherapy session, the positioning of 28 patients was set up using an optical positioning system. After this initial setup, the patients underwent standard on-board imaging that included daily orthogonal kilovoltage images and weekly cone beam computed tomography scans. Daily translational shifts were made after comparing the on-board images with the treatment planning computed tomography scans. These daily translational shifts represented the daily positional error in the optical tracking system and were recorded during the treatment course. For 13 patients treated with smaller fields, a three-degree of freedom (3DOF) head positioner was used for more accurate setup. Results: The mean positional error for the optically guided system in patients with and without the 3DOF head positioner was 1.4 {+-} 1.1 mm and 3.9 {+-} 1.6 mm, respectively (p <.0001). The mean positional error drifted 0.11 mm/wk upward during the treatment course for patients using the 3DOF head positioner (p = .057). No positional drift was observed in the patients without the 3DOF head positioner. Conclusion: Our initial clinical experience with optically guided head-and-neck fractionated radiotherapy was promising and demonstrated clinical feasibility. The optically guided setup was especially useful when used in conjunction with the 3DOF head positioner and when it was recalibrated to the shifts using the weekly portal images.

  18. Dosimetric impact of setup errors in head and neck cancer patients treated by image-guided radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Inderjit; Rawat, Sheh; Ahlawat, Parveen; Kakria, Anjali; Gupta, Gourav; Saxena, Upasna; Mishra, Manindra Bhushan

    2016-01-01

    To assess and analyze the impact of setup uncertainties on target volume coverage and doses to organs at risk (OAR) in head and neck cancer (HNC) patients treated by image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT). Translational setup errors in 25 HNC patients were observed by kilovoltage cone beam computed tomography (kV CBCT). Two plans were generated. Plan one – the original plan which was the initially optimized and approved plan of the patient. All patients were treated according to their respective approved plans at a defined isocenter. Plan two – the plan sum which was the sum of all plans recalculated at a different isocenter according to setup errors in x, y, and z-direction. Plan sum was created to evaluate doses that would have been received by planning target volume (PTV) and OARs if setup errors were not corrected. These 2 plans were analyzed and compared in terms of target volume coverage and doses to OARs. A total 503 kV CBCT images were acquired for evaluation of setup errors in 25 HNC patients. The systematic (mean) and random errors (standard deviation) combined for 25 patients in x, y, and z directions were 0.15 cm, 0.21 cm, and 0.19 cm and 0.09 cm, 0.12 cm, and 0.09 cm, respectively. The study showed that there was a significant difference in PTV coverage between 2 plans. The doses to various OARs showed a nonsignificant increase in the plan sum. The correction of translational setup errors is essential for IGRT treatment in terms of delivery of planned optimal doses to target volume. PMID:27217627

  19. Establishment of linear accelerator-based image guided radiotherapy for orthotopic 4T1 mouse mammary tumor model

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung-Heon; Kim, Ji-Young; Nam, Jeong-Seok; Choi, Jinho; Lee, Seok-Ho; Sung, Ki-Hoon; Ahn, So-Hyun

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to assess the feasibility of image guided radiotherapy (IGRT) for orthotopic 4T1 mouse mammary tumor using linear accelerator (LINAC). Eighteen Balb/C mice were inoculated with 4T1 cells on left mammary fat pad and nine of them were irradiated using LINAC. Tumors, planning target volumes (PTV), bowels adjacent to tumors, bones and lungs were delineated on planning CT images. IGRT plans were generated to irradiate prescription dose to at least 90% of the PTV and then compared with conventional 2-dimensional plans with anterior-posterior and posterior-anterior beams with 5 mm margins (2D AP/PA plan). Homemade dose-build-up-cradle was designed to encompass mouse bed for homogeneous dose build up. To confirm the irradiated dose, tumor doses were measured using diode detector placed on the surface of tumors. Plan comparison demonstrated equivalent doses to PTV while sparing more doses to normal tissues including bowel (from 90.9% to 40.5%, median value of mean doses) and bone marrow (from 12.9% to 4.7%, median value of mean doses) than 2D AP/PA plan. Quality assurance using diode detector confirmed that IGRT could deliver 95.3-105.3% of the planned doses to PTV. Tumors grew 505.2-1185.8% (mean 873.3%) in the control group and 436.1-771.8% (mean 615.5%) in the irradiated group. These results demonstrate that LINAC-based IGRT provides a reliable approach with accurate dose delivery in the radiobiological study for orthotropic tumor model maintaining tumor microenvironment. PMID:24999360

  20. Internal target volume for post-hysterectomy vaginal recurrences of cervical cancers during image-guided radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Upasani, Maheshkumar N; Chopra, Supriya; Engineer, Reena; Mahantshetty, Umesh; Medhi, Seema; Mehta, Zubin; Shrivastava, Shyam K

    2015-10-01

    The outcome of post-surgical recurrences of cervical cancer may be improved through radiation dose escalation, which hinges on accurate identification and treatment of the target. The present study quantifies target motion during course of image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) for vault cancers. All patients underwent planning CT simulation after bladder-filling protocol. A daily pre-treatment megavoltage CT was performed. All translations and rotations were recorded. Post-registration displacement of gross tumour volume (GTV) and centre of mass (COM) of GTV was independently recorded by two observers for fractions one to seven. Day 1 image sets served as reference images against which the displacements of COM were measured. We calculated the displacements of common volume (CV) and encompassing volume (EV) of GTV for both the observers. A total of 90 image data sets of 15 patients were available for evaluation. Individual patient GTV and average GTV by both the observers were comparable. The average shifts for EV were 2.4 mm [standard deviation (SD) ±1.2] in the mediolateral, 4.2 mm (SD ±2.8) in the anteroposterior and 4.0 mm (SD ±2.1) in superoinferior directions. Similarly, the average shifts for CV were 1.9 mm (SD ±0.6) in the mediolateral, 3.7 mm (SD ±2.7) in the anteroposterior and 4.4 mm (SD ±2.7) in superoinferior directions. Using Stroom's/van Herk's formula, the minimum recommended margins would be 4.5/5.2, 8.2/9.4 and 7.3/8.3 mm, respectively, for lateral, anteroposterior and superoinferior directions. Differential directional internal margin is recommended in patients undergoing IGRT for post-surgical recurrence of cervical cancers. Internal organ motion of vault cancers can be accounted for by a directional margin to the gross tumour.

  1. Predictors of Local Control After Single-Dose Stereotactic Image-Guided Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Extracranial Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Greco, Carlo; Zelefsky, Michael J.; Lovelock, Michael; Fuks, Zvi; Hunt, Margie; Rosenzweig, Kenneth; Zatcky, Joan; Kim, Balem; Yamada, Yoshiya

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: To report tumor local control after treatment with single-dose image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (SD-IGRT) to extracranial metastatic sites. Methods and Materials: A total of 126 metastases in 103 patients were treated with SD-IGRT to prescription doses of 18-24 Gy (median, 24 Gy) between 2004 and 2007. Results: The overall actuarial local relapse-free survival (LRFS) rate was 64% at a median follow-up of 18 months (range, 2-45 months). The median time to failure was 9.6 months (range, 1-23 months). On univariate analysis, LRFS was significantly correlated with prescription dose (p = 0.029). Stratification by dose into high (23 to 24 Gy), intermediate (21 to 22 Gy), and low (18 to 20 Gy) dose levels revealed highly significant differences in LRFS between high (82%) and low doses (25%) (p < 0.0001). Overall, histology had no significant effect on LRFS (p = 0.16). Renal cell histology displayed a profound dose-response effect, with 80% LRFS at the high dose level (23 to 24 Gy) vs. 37% with low doses ({<=}22 Gy) (p = 0.04). However, for patients who received the high dose level, histology was not a statistically significant predictor of LRFS (p = 0.90). Target organ (bone vs. lymph node vs. soft tissues) (p = 0.5) and planning target volume size (p = 0.55) were not found to be associated with long-term LRFS probability. Multivariate Cox regression analysis confirmed prescription dose to be a significant predictor of LRFS (p = 0.003). Conclusion: High-dose SD-IGRT is a noninvasive procedure resulting in high probability of local tumor control. Single-dose IGRT may be effectively used to locally control metastatic deposits regardless of histology and target organ, provided sufficiently high doses (> 22 Gy) of radiation are delivered.

  2. Computerized triplet beam orientation optimization for MRI-guided Co-60 radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Dan; Thomas, David; Cao, Minsong; O'Connor, Daniel; Lamb, James; Sheng, Ke

    2016-10-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided Co-60 provides daily and intrafractional MRI soft tissue imaging for improved target and critical organ tracking. To increase delivery efficiency, the system uses three Co-60 sources at 120° apart, allowing up to 600 cGy combined dose rate at isocenter. Despite the potential tripling in output, creating a delivery plan that uses all three sources is considerably unintuitive. Here, the authors computerize the triplet orientation optimization using column generation, an approach that was demonstrated effective in integrated beam orientation and fluence optimization for noncoplanar therapies. To achieve a better plan quality without increasing the treatment time, the authors then solve a fluence map optimization (FMO) problem while regularizing the fluence maps to reduce the number of deliverable MLC segments. Three patients-one prostate, one lung, and one head and neck boost plan (H&NBoost)-were evaluated in this study. For each patient, the beamlet doses were calculated using Monte Carlo, under a 0.35 T magnetic field, for 180 equally spaced coplanar beams grouped into 60 triplets. The beamlet size is 1.05 × 0.5 cm determined by the MLC leaf thickness and step size. The triplets were selected using the column generation algorithm. The FMO problem was formulated using an L2-norm dose fidelity term and an L1-norm anisotropic total variation regularization term, which allows controlling the number of MLC segments, and hence the treatment time, with minimal degradation to the dose. The authors' Fluence Regularization and Optimized Selection of Triplets (FROST) plans were compared against the clinical treatment plans (CLNs) produced by an experienced dosimetrist. PTV homogeneity, max dose, mean dose, D95, D98, and D99 were evaluated. OAR max and mean doses, as well as R50, defined as the ratio of the 50% isodose volume over the planning target volume were investigated. The mean PTV D95, D98, and D99 differ by +0.04%, +0.07%, and

  3. Comparison of Spine, Carina, and Tumor as Registration Landmarks for Volumetric Image-Guided Lung Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Higgins, Jane Bezjak, Andrea; Franks, Kevin; Le, Lisa W.; Cho, B.C.; Payne, David; Bissonnette, Jean-Pierre

    2009-04-01

    Purpose: To assess the feasibility, reproducibility, and accuracy of volumetric lung image guidance using different thoracic landmarks for image registration. Methods and Materials: In 30 lung patients, four independent observers conducted automated and manual image registrations on Day 1 cone-beam computed tomography data sets using the spine, carina, and tumor (720 image registrations). The image registration was timed, and the couch displacements were recorded. The intraclass correlation was used to assess reproducibility, and the Bland-Altman analysis was used to compare the automatic and manual matching methods. Tumor coverage (accuracy) was assessed through grading the tumor position after image matching against the internal target volume and planning target volume. Results: The image-guided process took an average of 1 min for all techniques, with the exception of manual tumor matching, which took 4 min. Reproducibility was greatest for automatic carina matching (intraclass correlation, 0.90-0.93) and lowest for manual tumor matching (intraclass correlation, 0.07-0.43) in the left-right, superoinferior, and anteroposterior directions, respectively. The Bland-Altman analysis showed no significant difference between the automatic and manual registration methods. The tumor was within the internal target volume 62% and 60% of the time and was outside the internal target volume, but within the planning target volume, 38% and 40% of the time after automatic spine and automatic carina matching, respectively. Conclusion: For advanced lung cancer, the spine or carina can be used equally for cone-beam computed tomography image registration without compromising target coverage. The carina was more reproducible than the spine, but additional analysis is required to confirm its validation as a tumor surrogate. Soft-tissue registration is unsuitable at present, given the limitations in contrast resolution and the high interobserver variability.

  4. Prospective Study of Cone-Beam Computed Tomography Image-Guided Radiotherapy for Prone Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Jozsef, Gabor; DeWyngaert, J. Keith; Becker, Stewart J.; Lymberis, Stella; Formenti, Silvia C.

    2011-10-01

    Purpose: To report setup variations during prone accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI). Methods: New York University (NYU) 07-582 is an institutional review board-approved protocol of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) to deliver image-guided ABPI in the prone position. Eligible are postmenopausal women with pT1 breast cancer excised with negative margins and no nodal involvement. A total dose of 30 Gy in five daily fractions of 6 Gy are delivered to the planning target volume (the tumor cavity with 1.5-cm margin) by image-guided radiotherapy. Patients are set up prone, on a dedicated mattress, used for both simulation and treatment. After positioning with skin marks and lasers, CBCTs are performed and the images are registered to the planning CT. The resulting shifts (setup corrections) are recorded in the three principal directions and applied. Portal images are taken for verification. If they differ from the planning digital reconstructed radiographs, the patient is reset, and a new CBCT is taken. Results: 70 consecutive patients have undergone a total of 343 CBCTs: 7 patients had four of five planned CBCTs performed. Seven CBCTs (2%) required to be repeated because of misalignment in the comparison between portal and digital reconstructed radiograph image after the first CBCT. The mean shifts and standard deviations in the anterior-posterior (AP), superior-inferior (SI), and medial-lateral (ML) directions were -0.19 (0.54), -0.02 (0.33), and -0.02 (0.43) cm, respectively. The average root mean squares of the daily shifts were 0.50 (0.28), 0.29 (0.17), and 0.38 (0.20). A conservative margin formula resulted in a recommended margin of 1.26, 0.73, 0.96 cm in the AP, SI, and ML directions. Conclusion: CBCTs confirmed that the NYU prone APBI setup and treatment technique are reproducible, with interfraction variation comparable to those reported for supine setup. The currently applied margin (1.5 cm) adequately compensates for the setup variation detected.

  5. Image-guided adaptive radiotherapy for prostate and head-and-neck cancers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Daniel, Jennifer C.

    In the current practice of radiation therapy, daily patient alignments have been based on external skin marks or on bone. However, internal organ variation (both motion and volumetric changes) between treatment fractions can displace the treatment target, causing target underdosage and normal tissue overdosage. In order to deliver the radiation treatment as planned, more accurate knowledge of the daily internal anatomy was needed. Additionally, treatments needed to adapt to these variations by either shifting the patient to account for the daily target position or by altering the treatment plan. In this dissertation, the question of whether inter-fractional variations in internal patient anatomy combined with external set-up uncertainties produced measurable differences between planned and delivered doses for prostate and head-and-neck cancer patients was investigated. Image-guided adaptive treatment strategies to improve tumor coverage and/or reduce normal tissue dose were examined. Treatment deliveries utilizing various alignment procedures for ten prostate cancer patients and eleven head-and-neck cancer patients, each of whom received multiple CT scans over the course of treatment, were simulated. The largest prostate dose losses between planning and delivery were correlated with anterior/posterior and superior/inferior prostate displacement. Daily bone alignment sufficiently maintained target coverage for 70% of patients, ultrasound for 90%, and CT for 100%. A no-action-level correction protocol, which corrected the daily bone alignment for the systematic internal displacement of the prostate based on a pre-determined number of CT image sets, successfully improved the prostate and seminal vesicle dosimetric coverage. Three CT image sets were sufficient to accurately correct the bone alignment scheme for the prostate internal systematic shifts. For head-and-neck cancer patient treatment, setup uncertainties and internal organ variations did not greatly affect

  6. An Adaptive MR-CT Registration Method for MRI-guided Prostate Cancer Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Hualiang; Wen, Ning; Gordon, James; Elshaikh, Mohamed A; Movsas, Benjamin; Chetty, Indrin J.

    2015-01-01

    the transformation between the MR and CT images and improves the accuracy of the B-spline registrations in the prostate region. The approach will be valuable for development of high-quality MRI-guided radiation therapy. PMID:25775937

  7. An adaptive MR-CT registration method for MRI-guided prostate cancer radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Hualiang; Wen, Ning; Gordon, James J.; Elshaikh, Mohamed A.; Movsas, Benjamin; Chetty, Indrin J.

    2015-04-01

    during the transformation between the MR and CT images and improves the accuracy of the B-spline registrations in the prostate region. The approach will be valuable for the development of high-quality MRI-guided radiation therapy.

  8. Reductions in the variations of respiration signals for respiratory-gated radiotherapy when using the video-coaching respiration guiding system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyun Jeong; Yea, Ji Woon; Oh, Se An

    2015-07-01

    Respiratory-gated radiation therapy (RGRT) has been used to minimize the dose to normal tissue in lung-cancer radiotherapy. The present research aims to improve the regularity of respiration in RGRT by using a video-coached respiration guiding system. In the study, 16 patients with lung cancer were evaluated. The respiration signals of the patients were measured by using a realtime position management (RPM) respiratory gating system (Varian, USA), and the patients were trained using the video-coaching respiration guiding system. The patients performed free breathing and guided breathing, and the respiratory cycles were acquired for ~5 min. Then, Microsoft Excel 2010 software was used to calculate the mean and the standard deviation for each phase. The standard deviation was computed in order to analyze the improvement in the respiratory regularity with respect to the period and the displacement. The standard deviation of the guided breathing decreased to 48.8% in the inhale peak and 24.2% in the exhale peak compared with the values for the free breathing of patient 6. The standard deviation of the respiratory cycle was found to be decreased when using the respiratory guiding system. The respiratory regularity was significantly improved when using the video-coaching respiration guiding system. Therefore, the system is useful for improving the accuracy and the efficiency of RGRT.

  9. [Comparison of vacuum bag fixation and Orfit rack with thermoplastic membrane fixation for image-guided cervical cancer radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Li, Y B; Wang, Y L; Zhuo, Y H

    2017-06-23

    the vacuum bag fixation and the Orfit rack with thermoplastic membrane fixation are suitable for the cone-beam CT image-guided radiotherapy of cervical cancer patients. However, the displacement in the left and right directions of the vacuum bag fixation is smaller than the Orfit rack with thermoplastic membrane fixation. During the period of treatment, the mean value of the difference of displacement in the anterior and posterior directions of the Orfit rack with thermoplastic membrane fixation is mild, which can be used individually by the patients with a flexible body and good tolerance.

  10. SU-E-J-10: Imaging Dose and Cancer Risk in Image-Guided Radiotherapy of Cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, L; Bai, S; Zhang, Y; Deng, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To systematically evaluate imaging doses and cancer risks to organs-at-risk as a Result of cumulative doses from various radiological imaging procedures in image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) in a large cohort of cancer patients. Methods: With IRB approval, imaging procedures (computed tomography, kilo-voltage portal imaging, megavoltage portal imaging and kilo-voltage cone-beam computed tomography) of 4832 cancer patients treated during 4.5 years were collected with their gender, age and circumference. Correlations between patient’s circumference and Monte Carlo simulated-organ dose were applied to estimate organ doses while the cancer risks were reported as 1+ERR using BEIR VII models. Results: 80 cGy or more doses were deposited to brain, lungs and RBM in 273 patients (maximum 136, 278 and 267 cGy, respectively), due largely to repetitive imaging procedures and non-personalized imaging settings. Regardless of gender, relative cancer risk estimates for brain, lungs, and RBM were 3.4 (n = 55), 2.6 (n = 49), 1.8 (n = 25) for age group of 0–19; 1.2 (n = 87), 1.4 (n = 98), 1.3 (n = 51) for age group of 20–39; 1.0 (n = 457), 1.1 (n = 880), 1.8 (n=360) for age group of 40–59; 1.0 (n = 646), 1.1 (n = 1400), 2.3 (n = 716) for age group of 60–79 and 1.0 (n = 108),1.1 (n = 305),1.6 (n = 147) for age group of 80–99. Conclusion: The cumulative imaging doses and associated cancer risks from multi-imaging procedures were patient-specific and site-dependent, with up to 2.7 Gy imaging dose deposited to critical structures in some pediatric patients. The associated cancer risks in brain and lungs for children of age 0 to 19 were 2–3 times larger than those for adults. This study indicated a pressing need for personalized imaging protocol to maximize its clinical benefits while reducing associated cancer risks. Sichuan University Scholarship.

  11. Personalized Assessment of kV Cone Beam Computed Tomography Doses in Image-guided Radiotherapy of Pediatric Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Yibao; Yan Yulong; Nath, Ravinder; Bao Shanglian; Deng Jun

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To develop a quantitative method for the estimation of kV cone beam computed tomography (kVCBCT) doses in pediatric patients undergoing image-guided radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Forty-two children were retrospectively analyzed in subgroups of different scanned regions: one group in the head-and-neck and the other group in the pelvis. Critical structures in planning CT images were delineated on an Eclipse treatment planning system before being converted into CT phantoms for Monte Carlo simulations. A benchmarked EGS4 Monte Carlo code was used to calculate three-dimensional dose distributions of kVCBCT scans with full-fan high-quality head or half-fan pelvis protocols predefined by the manufacturer. Based on planning CT images and structures exported in DICOM RT format, occipital-frontal circumferences (OFC) were calculated for head-and-neck patients using DICOMan software. Similarly, hip circumferences (HIP) were acquired for the pelvic group. Correlations between mean organ doses and age, weight, OFC, and HIP values were analyzed with SigmaPlot software suite, where regression performances were analyzed with relative dose differences (RDD) and coefficients of determination (R{sup 2}). Results: kVCBCT-contributed mean doses to all critical structures decreased monotonically with studied parameters, with a steeper decrease in the pelvis than in the head. Empirical functions have been developed for a dose estimation of the major organs at risk in the head and pelvis, respectively. If evaluated with physical parameters other than age, a mean RDD of up to 7.9% was observed for all the structures in our population of 42 patients. Conclusions: kVCBCT doses are highly correlated with patient size. According to this study, weight can be used as a primary index for dose assessment in both head and pelvis scans, while OFC and HIP may serve as secondary indices for dose estimation in corresponding regions. With the proposed empirical functions, it is possible

  12. Internal target volume for post-hysterectomy vaginal recurrences of cervical cancers during image-guided radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Upasani, Maheshkumar N; Engineer, Reena; Mahantshetty, Umesh; Medhi, Seema; Mehta, Zubin; Shrivastava, Shyam K

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The outcome of post-surgical recurrences of cervical cancer may be improved through radiation dose escalation, which hinges on accurate identification and treatment of the target. The present study quantifies target motion during course of image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) for vault cancers. Methods: All patients underwent planning CT simulation after bladder-filling protocol. A daily pre-treatment megavoltage CT was performed. All translations and rotations were recorded. Post-registration displacement of gross tumour volume (GTV) and centre of mass (COM) of GTV was independently recorded by two observers for fractions one to seven. Day 1 image sets served as reference images against which the displacements of COM were measured. We calculated the displacements of common volume (CV) and encompassing volume (EV) of GTV for both the observers. Results: A total of 90 image data sets of 15 patients were available for evaluation. Individual patient GTV and average GTV by both the observers were comparable. The average shifts for EV were 2.4 mm [standard deviation (SD) ±1.2] in the mediolateral, 4.2 mm (SD ±2.8) in the anteroposterior and 4.0 mm (SD ±2.1) in superoinferior directions. Similarly, the average shifts for CV were 1.9 mm (SD ±0.6) in the mediolateral, 3.7 mm (SD ±2.7) in the anteroposterior and 4.4 mm (SD ±2.7) in superoinferior directions. Using Stroom's/van Herk's formula, the minimum recommended margins would be 4.5/5.2, 8.2/9.4 and 7.3/8.3 mm, respectively, for lateral, anteroposterior and superoinferior directions. Conclusion: Differential directional internal margin is recommended in patients undergoing IGRT for post-surgical recurrence of cervical cancers. Advances in knowledge: Internal organ motion of vault cancers can be accounted for by a directional margin to the gross tumour. PMID:26248870

  13. Implementation of Feedback-Guided Voluntary Breath-Hold Gating for Cone Beam CT-Based Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Peng Yong; Vedam, Sastry; Chang, Joe Y.; Gao Song; Sadagopan, Ramaswamy; Bues, Martin; Balter, Peter

    2011-07-01

    Purpose: To analyze tumor position reproducibility of feedback-guided voluntary deep inspiration breath-hold (FGBH) gating for cone beam computed tomography (CBCT)-based stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Methods and materials: Thirteen early-stage lung cancer patients eligible for SBRT with tumor motion of >1cm were evaluated for FGBH-gated treatment. Multiple FGBH CTs were acquired at simulation, and single FGBH CBCTs were also acquired prior to each treatment. Simulation CTs and treatment CBCTs were analyzed to quantify reproducibility of tumor positions during FGBH. Benefits of FGBH gating compared to treatment during free breathing, as well treatment with gating at exhalation, were examined for lung sparing, motion margins, and reproducibility of gross tumor volume (GTV) position relative to nonmoving anatomy. Results: FGBH increased total lung volumes by 1.5 times compared to free breathing, resulting in a proportional drop in total lung volume receiving 10 Gy or more. Intra- and inter-FGBH reproducibility of GTV centroid positions at simulation were 1.0 {+-} 0.5 mm, 1.3 {+-} 1.0 mm, and 0.6 {+-} 0.4 mm in the anterior-posterior (AP), superior-inferior (SI), and left-right lateral (LR) directions, respectively, compared to more than 1 cm of tumor motion at free breathing. During treatment, inter-FGBH reproducibility of the GTV centroid with respect to bony anatomy was 1.2 {+-} 0.7 mm, 1.5 {+-} 0.8 mm, and 1.0 {+-} 0.4 mm in the AP, SI, and LR directions. In addition, the quality of CBCTs was improved due to elimination of motion artifacts, making this technique attractive for poorly visualized tumors, even with small motion. Conclusions: The extent of tumor motion at normal respiration does not influence the reproducibility of the tumor position under breath hold conditions. FGBH-gated SBRT with CBCT can improve the reproducibility of GTV centroids, reduce required margins, and minimize dose to normal tissues in the treatment of mobile tumors.

  14. Patient-Specific Three-Dimensional Concomitant Dose From Cone Beam Computed Tomography Exposure in Image-Guided Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Spezi, Emiliano; Downes, Patrick; Jarvis, Richard; Radu, Emil; Staffurth, John

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the present study was to quantify the concomitant dose received by patients undergoing cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scanning in different clinical scenarios as a part of image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) procedures. Methods and Materials: We calculated the three-dimensional concomitant dose received as a result of CBCT scans in 6 patients representing different clinical scenarios: two pelvis, two head and neck, and two chest. We assessed the effect that a daily on-line IGRT strategy would have on the patient dose distribution, assuming 40 CBCT scans throughout the treatment course. The additional dose to the planning target volume margin region was also estimated. Results: In the pelvis, a single CBCT scan delivered a mean dose to the femoral heads of 2-6 cGy and the rectum of 1-2 cGy. An additional dose to the planning target volume was within 1-3 cGy. In the chest, the mean dose to the planning target volume varied from 2.5 to 5 cGy. The lung and spinal cord planning organ at risk volume received {<=}4 cGy and {<=}5 cGy, respectively. In the head and neck, a single CBCT scan delivered a mean dose of 0.3 cGy, with bony structures receiving 0.5-0.8 cGy. The femoral heads received an additional dose of 1.5-2.5 Gy. A reduction of 20-30% in the mean dose to the organs at risk was achieved using bowtie filtration. In the head and neck, the dose to the eyes and brainstem was eliminated by decreasing the craniocaudal field size. Conclusions: The additional dose from on-line IGRT procedures can be clinically relevant. The organ dose can be significantly reduced with the use of appropriate patient-specific settings. The concomitant dose from CBCT should be accounted for and the acquisition settings optimized for optimal IGRT strategies on a patient basis.

  15. Intrafraction Variation of Mean Tumor Position During Image-Guided Hypofractionated Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, Chirag; Grills, Inga S.; Kestin, Larry L.; McGrath, Samuel; Ye Hong; Martin, Shannon K.; Yan Di

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: Prolonged delivery times during daily cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT)-guided lung stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) introduce concerns regarding intrafraction variation (IFV) of the mean target position (MTP). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the magnitude of the IFV-MTP and to assess target margins required to compensate for IFV and postonline CBCT correction residuals. Patient, treatment, and tumor characteristics were analyzed with respect to their impact on IFV-MTP. Methods and Materials: A total of 126 patients with 140 tumors underwent 659 fractions of lung SBRT. Dose prescribed was 48 or 60 Gy in 12 Gy fractions. Translational target position correction of the MTP was performed via onboard CBCT. IFV-MTP was measured as the difference in MTP between the postcorrection CBCT and the posttreatment CBCT excluding residual error. Results: IFV-MTP was 0.2 {+-} 1.8 mm, 0.1 {+-} 1.9 mm, and 0.01 {+-} 1.5 mm in the craniocaudal, anteroposterior, and mediolateral dimensions and the IFV-MTP vector was 2.3 {+-} 2.1 mm. Treatment time and excursion were found to be significant predictors of IFV-MTP. An IFV-MTP vector greater than 2 and 5 mm was seen in 40.8% and 7.2% of fractions, respectively. IFV-MTP greater than 2 mm was seen in heavier patients with larger excursions and longer treatment times. Significant differences in IFV-MTP were seen between immobilization devices. The stereotactic frame immobilization device was found to be significantly less likely to have an IFV-MTP vector greater than 2 mm compared with the alpha cradle, BodyFIX, and hybrid immobilization devices. Conclusions: Treatment time and respiratory excursion are significantly associated with IFV-MTP. Significant differences in IFV-MTP were found between immobilization devices. Target margins for IFV-MTP plus post-correction residuals are dependent on immobilization device with 5-mm uniform margins being acceptable for the frame immobilization device.

  16. Reduced rectal toxicity with ultrasound-based image guided radiotherapy using BAT (B-mode acquisition and targeting system) for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Bohrer, Markus; Schröder, Peter; Welzel, Grit; Wertz, Hansjörg; Lohr, Frank; Wenz, Frederik; Mai, Sabine Kathrin

    2008-12-01

    To evaluate the effect of image guided radiotherapy with stereotactic ultrasound BAT (B-mode acquisition and targeting system) on rectal toxicity in conformal radiotherapy of prostate cancer. 42 sequential patients with prostate cancer undergoing radiotherapy before and after the introduction of BAT were included. Planning computed tomography (CT) was performed with empty rectum and moderately filled bladder. The planning target volume (PTV) included the prostate and seminal vesicles with a safety margin of 1.5 cm in anterior and lateral direction. In posterior direction the anterior 1/3 of the rectum circumference were included. Total dose was 66 Gy and a boost of 4 Gy excluding the seminal vesicles. 22 patients (BAT group) were treated with daily stereotactic ultrasound positioning, for the other 20 patients (NoBAT group) an EPID (electronic portal imaging device) was performed once a week. Acute and late genito-urinary (GU) and rectal toxicity and PSA values were evaluated after 1.5, 3, 6, 9 and 12 months. The total median follow up of toxicity was 3 years in the BAT group and 4 years in the NoBAT group. In the NoBAT group significant more rectal toxicity occurred, while in GU toxicity no difference was seen. Two patients in the NoBAT group showed late rectal toxicity grade 3, no toxicity>grade 2 occurred in the BAT group. There was no significant difference in PSA reduction between the groups. Without BAT significant more acute and a trend to more late rectal toxicity was found. With regard to dose escalation this aspect is currently evaluated with a larger number of patients using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT).

  17. Intermediate-term outcome after PSMA-PET guided high-dose radiotherapy of recurrent high-risk prostate cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Zschaeck, Sebastian; Wust, Peter; Beck, Marcus; Wlodarczyk, Waldemar; Kaul, David; Rogasch, Julian; Budach, Volker; Furth, Christian; Ghadjar, Pirus

    2017-08-23

    By the use of PSMA positron emission tomography (PET) detection of prostate cancer lesions with a high sensitivity and specificity combined with a favorable lesion to background contrast is feasible. Therefore, PSMA-PET is increasingly used for planning of radiotherapy treatment; however, any data on intermediate-term outcome is missing so far. Patients with high-risk or very high risk prostate cancer, referred for salvage radiotherapy (SRT, n = 22) between 2013 and 2015, underwent PSMA-PET prior to therapy. Irradiation was planned on PET data with boost to macroscopic tumors/metastases. Treatment related toxicity was measured using Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE, v4.0). Findings in PSMA-PET led to treatment modifications in 77% of SRT patients compared to available CT information. One patient did not receive irradiation due to disseminated disease, the other patients received increased boost doses to macroscopic disease and/or inclusion of additional target volumes. Toxicity was low as only 2 patients reported toxicities > grade 1. With a Median follow-up time of 29 in patients that were not lost to follow-up, prolonged PSA responses below baseline were observed in the majority of patients (14 of 20). In hormone-naïve SRT patients (n = 11), radiotherapy led to prolonged PSA decrease in 8/11 patients, however with 3 of these 8 patients receiving repeated PSMA based irradiation of novel lesions during follow-up. PSMA-PET guided planning of radiotherapy led to change of treatment in the majority of patients. Treatment related toxicity was well tolerated and promising results regarding intermediate-term PSA decrease were observed. No trial registration was performed due to retrospective evaluation.

  18. [Clinical experience in image-guided ultra-conformal hypofractionated radiotherapy in case of metastatic diseases at the University of Pécs].

    PubMed

    László, Zoltán; Boronkai, Árpád; Lõcsei, Zoltán; Kalincsák, Judit; Szappanos, Szabolcs; Farkas, Róbert; Al Farhat, Yousuf; Sebestyén, Zsolt; Sebestyén, Klára; Kovács, Péter; Csapó, László; Mangel, László

    2015-06-01

    With the development of radiation therapy technology, the utilization of more accurate patient fixation, inclusion of PET/CT image fusion into treatment planning, 3D image-guided radiotherapy, and intensity-modulated dynamic arc irradiation, the application of hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy can be extended to specified extracranial target volumes, and so even to the treatment of various metastases. Between October 2012 and August 2014 in our institute we performed extracranial, hypofractionated, image-többguided radiotherapy with RapidArc system for six cases, and 3D conformal multifield technique for one patient with Novalis TX system in case of different few-numbered and slow-growing metastases. For the precise definition of the target volumes we employed PET/CT during the treatment planning procedure. Octreotid scan was applied in one carcinoid tumour patient. Considering the localisation of the metastases and the predictable motion of the organs, we applied 5 to 20 mm safety margin during the contouring procedure. The average treatment volume was 312 cm3. With 2.5-3 Gy fraction doses we delivered 39-45 Gy total dose, and the treatment duration was 2.5 to 3 weeks. The image guidance was carried out via ExacTrac, and kV-Cone Beam CT equipment based on an online protocol, therefore localisation differences were corrected before every single treatment. The patients tolerated the treatments well without major (Gr>2) side effects. Total or near total regression of the metastases was observed at subsequent control examinations in all cases (the median follow-up time was 5 months). According to our first experience, extracranial, imageguided hypofractionated radiotherapy is well-tolerated by patients and can be effectively applied in the treatment of slow-growing and few-numbered metastases.

  19. Evaluation of inter- and intrafractional motion of liver tumors using interstitial markers and implantable electromagnetic radiotransmitters in the context of image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) - the ESMERALDA trial.

    PubMed

    Habermehl, Daniel; Naumann, Patrick; Bendl, Rolf; Oelfke, Uwe; Nill, Simeon; Debus, Jürgen; Combs, Stephanie E

    2015-07-14

    With the development of more conformal and precise radiation techniques such as Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT), Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT) and Image-Guided Radiotherapy (IGRT), patients with hepatic tumors could be treated with high local doses by sparing normal liver tissue. However, frequently occurring large HCC tumors are still a dosimetric challenge in spite of modern high sophisticated RT modalities. This interventional clinical study has been set up to evaluate the value of different fiducial markers, and to use the modern imaging methods for further treatment optimization using physical and informatics approaches. Surgically implanted radioopaque or electromagnetic markers are used to detect tumor local-ization during radiotherapy. The required markers for targeting and observation during RT can be implanted in a previously defined optimal position during the oncologically indicated operation. If there is no indication for a surgical resection or open biopsy, markers may be inserted into the liver or tumor tissue by using ultrasound-guidance. Primary study aim is the detection of the patients' anatomy at the time of RT by observation of the marker position during the indicated irradiation (IGRT). Secondary study aims comprise detection and recording of 3D liver and tumor motion during RT. Furthermore, the study will help to develop technical strategies and mechanisms based on the recorded information on organ motion to avoid inaccurate dose application resulting from fast organ motion and deformation. This is an open monocentric non-randomized, prospective study for the evaluation of organ motion using interstitial markers or implantable radiotransmitter. The trial will evaluate the full potential of different fiducial markers to further optimize treatment of moving targets, with a special focus on liver lesions.

  20. WE-G-BRF-06: Positron Emission Tomography (PET)-Guided Dynamic Lung Tumor Tracking for Cancer Radiotherapy: First Patient Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, J; Loo, B; Graves, E; Yamamoto, T; Keall, P

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: PET-guided dynamic tumor tracking is a novel concept of biologically targeted image guidance for radiotherapy. A dynamic tumor tracking algorithm based on list-mode PET data has been developed and previously tested on dynamic phantom data. In this study, we investigate if dynamic tumor tracking is clinically feasible by applying the method to lung cancer patient PET data. Methods: PET-guided tumor tracking estimates the target position of a segmented volume in PET images reconstructed continuously from accumulated coincidence events correlated with external respiratory motion, simulating real-time applications, i.e., only data up to the current time point is used to estimate the target position. A target volume is segmented with a 50% threshold, consistently, of the maximum intensity in the predetermined volume of interest. Through this algorithm, the PET-estimated trajectories are quantified from four lung cancer patients who have distinct tumor location and size. The accuracy of the PET-estimated trajectories is evaluated by comparing to external respiratory motion because the ground-truth of tumor motion is not known in patients; however, previous phantom studies demonstrated sub-2mm accuracy using clinically derived 3D tumor motion. Results: The overall similarity of motion patterns between the PET-estimated trajectories and the external respiratory traces implies that the PET-guided tracking algorithm can provide an acceptable level of targeting accuracy. However, there are variations in the tracking accuracy between tumors due to the quality of the segmentation which depends on target-to-background ratio, tumor location and size. Conclusion: For the first time, a dynamic tumor tracking algorithm has been applied to lung cancer patient PET data, demonstrating clinical feasibility of real-time tumor tracking for integrated PET-linacs. The target-to-background ratio is a significant factor determining accuracy: screening during treatment planning would

  1. Discontinuous finite element space-angle treatment of the first order linear Boltzmann transport equation with magnetic fields: Application to MRI-guided radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    St Aubin, J; Keyvanloo, A; Fallone, B G

    2016-01-01

    The advent of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) guided radiotherapy systems demands the incorporation of the magnetic field into dose calculation algorithms of treatment planning systems. This is due to the fact that the Lorentz force of the magnetic field perturbs the path of the relativistic electrons, hence altering the dose deposited by them. Building on the previous work, the authors have developed a discontinuous finite element space-angle treatment of the linear Boltzmann transport equation to accurately account for the effects of magnetic fields on radiotherapy doses. The authors present a detailed description of their new formalism and compare its accuracy to geant4 Monte Carlo calculations for magnetic fields parallel and perpendicular to the radiation beam at field strengths of 0.5 and 3 T for an inhomogeneous 3D slab geometry phantom comprising water, bone, and air or lung. The accuracy of the authors' new formalism was determined using a gamma analysis with a 2%/2 mm criterion. Greater than 98.9% of all points analyzed passed the 2%/2 mm gamma criterion for the field strengths and orientations tested. The authors have benchmarked their new formalism against Monte Carlo in a challenging radiation transport problem with a high density material (bone) directly adjacent to a very low density material (dry air at STP) where the effects of the magnetic field dominate collisions. A discontinuous finite element space-angle approach has been proven to be an accurate method for solving the linear Boltzmann transport equation with magnetic fields for cases relevant to MRI guided radiotherapy. The authors have validated the accuracy of this novel technique against geant4, even in cases of strong magnetic field strengths and low density air.

  2. Comparison of Effects Between Central and Peripheral Stage I Lung Cancer Using Image-Guided Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy via Helical Tomotherapy.

    PubMed

    He, Jian; Huang, Yan; Shi, Shiming; Hu, Yong; Zeng, Zhaochong

    2015-12-01

    Lung cancer is a common malignant tumor with high morbidity and mortality. Here we compared the effects and outcome between central and peripheral stage I lung cancer using image-guided stereotactic body radiotherapy. From June 2011 to July 2013, a total of 33 patients with stage I lung cancer were enrolled. A total of 50 Gy in 10 fractions or 60 Gy in 10 fractions was delivered in the central arm (n = 18), while 50 Gy in 5 fractions in the peripheral arm (n = 15). Statistical analyses were performed using logistic regression analysis and Kaplan-Meier method. The mean follow-up time was 38.1 months. Three-month, 1-, 2-, and 3-year overall response rates were 66.7%, 83.3%, 61.1%, and 72.2% and 66.7%, 80%, 80%, and 80% in the central and peripheral arms, respectively. Three-year local control rates (94.4% vs 93.3%, P = .854), regional control rates (94.4% vs 86.7%, P = .412), and distant control rates (64.2% vs 61.7%, P = .509) had no differences between the central and the peripheral arms. Grade 2 radiation pneumonitis was observed in 6 of 18 patients in the central arm and in 1 of 15 patients in the peripheral arm (P = .92). Grade 2 radiation esophagitis was 5.7% in the central arm, while none occurred in the peripheral arm (P = .008). Five (15.1%) of all patients felt slight fatigue during radiotherapy. Other major complications were not observed. In conclusion, helical image-guided stereotactic body radiotherapy for central stage I lung cancer is safe and effective compared to peripheral stage I lung cancer.

  3. SU-E-J-198: Out-Of-Field Dose and Surface Dose Measurements of MRI-Guided Cobalt-60 Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Lamb, J; Agazaryan, N; Cao, M; Low, D; Thomas, D; Yang, Y

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To measure quantities of dosimetric interest in an MRI-guided cobalt radiotherapy machine that was recently introduced to clinical use. Methods: Out-of-field dose due to photon scatter and leakage was measured using an ion chamber and solid water slabs mimicking a human body. Surface dose was measured by irradiating stacks of radiochromic film and extrapolating to zero thickness. Electron out-of-field dose was characterized using solid water slabs and radiochromic film. Results: For some phantom geometries, up to 50% of Dmax was observed up to 10 cm laterally from the edge of the beam. The maximum penetration was between 1 and 2 mm in solid water, indicating an electron energy not greater than approximately 0.4 MeV. Out-of-field dose from photon scatter measured at 1 cm depth in solid water was found to fall to less than 10% of Dmax at a distance of 1.2 cm from the edge of a 10.5 × 10.5 cm field, and less that 1% of Dmax at a distance of 10 cm from field edge. Surface dose was measured to be 8% of Dmax. Conclusion: Surface dose and out-of-field dose from the MRIguided cobalt radiotherapy machine was measured and found to be within acceptable limits. Electron out-of-field dose, an effect unique to MRI-guided radiotherapy and presumed to arise from low-energy electrons trapped by the Lorentz force, was quantified. Dr. Low is a member of the scientific advisory board of ViewRay, Inc.

  4. Discontinuous finite element space-angle treatment of the first order linear Boltzmann transport equation with magnetic fields: Application to MRI-guided radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    St Aubin, J.; Keyvanloo, A.; Fallone, B. G.

    2016-01-15

    Purpose: The advent of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) guided radiotherapy systems demands the incorporation of the magnetic field into dose calculation algorithms of treatment planning systems. This is due to the fact that the Lorentz force of the magnetic field perturbs the path of the relativistic electrons, hence altering the dose deposited by them. Building on the previous work, the authors have developed a discontinuous finite element space-angle treatment of the linear Boltzmann transport equation to accurately account for the effects of magnetic fields on radiotherapy doses. Methods: The authors present a detailed description of their new formalism and compare its accuracy to GEANT4 Monte Carlo calculations for magnetic fields parallel and perpendicular to the radiation beam at field strengths of 0.5 and 3 T for an inhomogeneous 3D slab geometry phantom comprising water, bone, and air or lung. The accuracy of the authors’ new formalism was determined using a gamma analysis with a 2%/2 mm criterion. Results: Greater than 98.9% of all points analyzed passed the 2%/2 mm gamma criterion for the field strengths and orientations tested. The authors have benchmarked their new formalism against Monte Carlo in a challenging radiation transport problem with a high density material (bone) directly adjacent to a very low density material (dry air at STP) where the effects of the magnetic field dominate collisions. Conclusions: A discontinuous finite element space-angle approach has been proven to be an accurate method for solving the linear Boltzmann transport equation with magnetic fields for cases relevant to MRI guided radiotherapy. The authors have validated the accuracy of this novel technique against GEANT4, even in cases of strong magnetic field strengths and low density air.

  5. [Image-guided radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    de Crevoisier, R; Chauvet, B; Barillot, I; Lafond, C; Mahé, M; Delpon, G

    2016-09-01

    The IGRT is described in its various equipment and implementation. IGRT can be based either on ionizing radiation generating 2D imaging (MV or kV) or 3D imaging (CBCT or MV-CT) or on non-ionizing radiation (ultrasound, optical imaging, MRI or radiofrequency). Adaptive radiation therapy is then presented in its principles of implementation. The function of the technicians for IGRT is then presented and the possible dose delivered by the on-board imaging is discussed. The quality control of IGRT devices is finally described.

  6. The Methanol Multibeam Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, James A.; Cohen, R. J.; Caswell, J. L.; Fuller, G. A.; Brooks, K.; Burton, M. G.; Chrysostomou, A.; Diamond, P. J.; Ellingsen, S. P.; Gray, M. D.; Hoare, M. G.; Masheder, M. R. W.; McClure-Griffiths, N.; Pestalozzi, M.; Phillips, C.; Quinn, L.; Thompson, M. A.; Voronkov, M.; Walsh, A.; Ward-Thompson, D.; Wong-McSweeney, D.; Yates, J. A.; Cox, J.

    2007-03-01

    A new 7-beam methanol multibeam receiver is being used to survey the Galaxy for newly forming massive stars, that are pinpointed by strong methanol maser emission at 6.668 GHz. The receiver, jointly constructed by Jodrell Bank Observatory (JBO) and the Australia Telescope National Facility (ATNF), was successfully commissioned at Parkes in January 2006. The Parkes-Jodrell survey of the Milky Way for methanol masers is two orders of magnitude faster than previous systematic surveys using 30-m class dishes, and is the first systematic survey of the entire Galactic plane. The first 53 days of observations with the Parkes telescope have yielded 518 methanol sources, of which 218 are new discoveries. We present the survey methodology as well as preliminary results and analysis.

  7. The ACTS multibeam antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Regier, Frank A.

    1992-01-01

    The Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) to be launched in 1993 is briefly introduced. Its multibeam antenna, consisting of electrically similar 30 GHz receive and 20 GHz transmit offset Cassegrain systems, both utilizing orthogonal polarizations, is described. Dual polarization is achieved by using one feed assembly for each polarization in conjunction with nested front and back subreflectors, the gridded front subreflector acting as a window for one polarization and a reflector for the other. The antennas produce spot beams with approximately 0.3 degree beamwidth and gains of approximately 50 dbi. High surface accuracy and high edge taper produce low sidelobe levels and high cross-polarization isolation. A brief description is given of several Ka-band components fabricated for ACTS. These include multiflare antenna feedhorns, beam-forming networks utilizing latching ferrite waveguide switches, a 30 GHz HEMT low-noise amplifier and a 20 GHz TWT power amplifier.

  8. The ACTS multibeam antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regier, Frank A.

    1992-06-01

    The Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) to be launched in 1993 is briefly introduced. Its multibeam antenna, consisting of electrically similar 30 GHz receive and 20 GHz transmit offset Cassegrain systems, both utilizing orthogonal polarizations, is described. Dual polarization is achieved by using one feed assembly for each polarization in conjunction with nested front and back subreflectors, the gridded front subreflector acting as a window for one polarization and a reflector for the other. The antennas produce spot beams with approximately 0.3 degree beamwidth and gains of approximately 50 dbi. High surface accuracy and high edge taper produce low sidelobe levels and high cross-polarization isolation. A brief description is given of several Ka-band components fabricated for ACTS. These include multiflare antenna feedhorns, beam-forming networks utilizing latching ferrite waveguide switches, a 30 GHz HEMT low-noise amplifier and a 20 GHz TWT power amplifier.

  9. T2-Weighted 4D Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Application in Magnetic Resonance-Guided Radiotherapy Treatment Planning.

    PubMed

    Freedman, Joshua N; Collins, David J; Bainbridge, Hannah; Rank, Christopher M; Nill, Simeon; Kachelrieß, Marc; Oelfke, Uwe; Leach, Martin O; Wetscherek, Andreas

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this study was to develop and verify a method to obtain good temporal resolution T2-weighted 4-dimensional (4D-T2w) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) by using motion information from T1-weighted 4D (4D-T1w) MRI, to support treatment planning in MR-guided radiotherapy. Ten patients with primary non-small cell lung cancer were scanned at 1.5 T axially with a volumetric T2-weighted turbo spin echo sequence gated to exhalation and a volumetric T1-weighted stack-of-stars spoiled gradient echo sequence with golden angle spacing acquired in free breathing. From the latter, 20 respiratory phases were reconstructed using the recently developed 4D joint MoCo-HDTV algorithm based on the self-gating signal obtained from the k-space center. Motion vector fields describing the respiratory cycle were obtained by deformable image registration between the respiratory phases and projected onto the T2-weighted image volume. The resulting 4D-T2w volumes were verified against the 4D-T1w volumes: an edge-detection method was used to measure the diaphragm positions; the locations of anatomical landmarks delineated by a radiation oncologist were compared and normalized mutual information was calculated to evaluate volumetric image similarity. High-resolution 4D-T2w MRI was obtained. Respiratory motion was preserved on calculated 4D-T2w MRI, with median diaphragm positions being consistent with less than 6.6 mm (2 voxels) for all patients and less than 3.3 mm (1 voxel) for 9 of 10 patients. Geometrical positions were coherent between 4D-T1w and 4D-T2w MRI as Euclidean distances between all corresponding anatomical landmarks agreed to within 7.6 mm (Euclidean distance of 2 voxels) and were below 3.8 mm (Euclidean distance of 1 voxel) for 355 of 470 pairs of anatomical landmarks. Volumetric image similarity was commensurate between 4D-T1w and 4D-T2w MRI, as mean percentage differences in normalized mutual information (calculated over all respiratory phases and patients), between

  10. Automatic localization of the prostate for on-line or off-line image-guided radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Smitsmans, Monique H.P.; Wolthaus, Jochem W.H.; Artignan, Xavier; Bois, Josien de; Jaffray, David A.; Lebesque, Joos V.; Herk, Marcel van . E-mail: portal@nki.nl

    2004-10-01

    Purpose: With higher radiation dose, higher cure rates have been reported in prostate cancer patients. The extra margin needed to account for prostate motion, however, limits the level of dose escalation, because of the presence of surrounding organs at risk. Knowledge of the precise position of the prostate would allow significant reduction of the treatment field. Better localization of the prostate at the time of treatment is therefore needed, e.g. using a cone-beam computed tomography (CT) system integrated with the linear accelerator. Localization of the prostate relies upon manual delineation of contours in successive axial CT slices or interactive alignment and is fairly time-consuming. A faster method is required for on-line or off-line image-guided radiotherapy, because of prostate motion, for patient throughput and efficiency. Therefore, we developed an automatic method to localize the prostate, based on 3D gray value registration. Methods and materials: A study was performed on conventional repeat CT scans of 19 prostate cancer patients to develop the methodology to localize the prostate. For each patient, 8-13 repeat CT scans were made during the course of treatment. First, the planning CT scan and the repeat CT scan were registered onto the rigid bony structures. Then, the delineated prostate in the planning CT scan was enlarged by an optimum margin of 5 mm to define a region of interest in the planning CT scan that contained enough gray value information for registration. Subsequently, this region was automatically registered to a repeat CT scan using 3D gray value registration to localize the prostate. The performance of automatic prostate localization was compared to prostate localization using contours. Therefore, a reference set was generated by registering the delineated contours of the prostates in all scans of all patients. Gray value registrations that showed large differences with respect to contour registrations were detected with a {chi

  11. [Patient positioning using in-room kV CT for image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) of prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Kliton, Jorgo; Agoston, Péter; Major, Tibor; Polgár, Csaba

    2012-09-01

    automatic and manual image registrations were 0.31 cm and 0.26 cm in LAT, 0.27 cm and 0.27 cm in LONG and 0.24 cm and 0.33 cm in VERT directions, respectively. In case of manual image co-registration, the required PTV to CTV margins to cover at least 95% of the CTVs with at least 95% percent of the prescribed dose were calculated to 0.93 cm in LAT, 0.65 cm in LONG, and 0.89 cm in VERT directions. Patients set up can be verified with manual image co-registration based on soft tissues around the prostate using a kV CT-on-rails system installed in the treatment room. The difference between automatic and manual image co-registration was significant in LAT direction. A PTV to CTV margin <1 cm seems to be appropriate to cover the CTVs in image-guided prostate radiotherapy. These findings support our recent clinical protocol.

  12. Evaluations of an adaptive planning technique incorporating dose feedback in image-guided radiotherapy of prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Han; Wu Qiuwen

    2011-12-15

    treatment course, then 11 patients fail. If the same criteria is assessed at the end of each week (every five fractions), then 14 patients fail, with three patients failing the 1st or 2nd week but passing at the end. The average dose deficit from these 14 patients was 4.4%. They improved to 2% after the weekly compensation. Out of these 14 patients who needed dose compensation, ten passed the dose criterion after weekly dose compensation, three patients failed marginally, and one patient still failed the criterion significantly (10% deficit), representing 3.6% of the patient population. A more aggressive compensation frequency (every three fractions) could successfully reduce the dose deficit to the acceptable level for this patient. The average number of required dose compensation re-planning per patient was 0.82 (0.79) per patient for schedule A (B) delivery strategy. The doses to OARs were not significantly different from the online IG only plans without dose compensation. Conclusions: We have demonstrated the effectiveness of offline dose compensation technique in image-guided radiotherapy for prostate cancer. It can effectively account for residual uncertainties which cannot be corrected through online IG. Dose compensation allows further margin reduction and critical organs sparing.

  13. Patterns of failure for patients with glioblastoma following O-(2-[(18)F]fluoroethyl)-L-tyrosine PET- and MRI-guided radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Lundemann, Michael; Costa, Junia Cardoso; Law, Ian; Engelholm, Svend Aage; Muhic, Aida; Poulsen, Hans Skovgaard; Munck Af Rosenschold, Per

    2017-03-01

    To evaluate the patterns of failure following clinical introduction of amino-acid O-(2-[(18)F]fluoroethyl)-L-tyrosine (FET)-PET-guided target definition for radiotherapy (RT) of glioblastoma patients. The first 66 consecutive patients with confirmed histology, scanned using FET-PET/CT and MRI were selected for evaluation. Chemo-radiotherapy was delivered to a volume based on both MRI and FET-PET (PETvol). The volume of recurrence (RV) was defined on MRI data collected at the time of progression according to RANO criteria. Fifty patients were evaluable, with median follow-up of 45months. Central, in-field, marginal and distant recurrences were observed for 82%, 10%, 2%, and 6% of the patients, respectively. We found a volumetric overlap of 26%, 31% and 39% of the RV with the contrast-enhancing MR volume, PETvol and the composite MRPETvol, respectively. MGMT-methylation (p=0.03), larger PETvol (p<0.001), and less extensive surgery (p<0.001), were associated with larger PETvol overlap. The combined MRPETvol had a stronger association with the recurrence volume than either of the modalities alone. Larger overlap of PETvol and RV was observed for patients with MGMT-methylation, less extensive surgery, and large PETvol on the RT-planning scans. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. [Image guided radiotherapy with the Cone Beam CT kV (Elekta): experience of the Léon Bérard centre].

    PubMed

    Pommier, P; Gassa, F; Lafay, F; Claude, L

    2009-09-01

    Image guide radiotherapy with the Cone Beam CT kV (CBCT-kV) developed by Elekta has been implemented at the centre Léon Bérard in November 2006. The treatment procedure is presented and detailed for prostate cancer IGRT and non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT). CBCT-kV is routinely used for SRT, selected paediatric cancers, all prostate carcinomas, primitive brain tumours and head and neck cancers that do not require nodes irradiation. Thirty-five to 40 patients are treated within a daily 11-hours period. The general procedure for 3D images acquisition and their analysis is described. The CBCT-kV permitted to identify about 10% of prostate cancer patients for whom a positioning with bone-based 2D images only would have led to an unacceptable dose distribution for at least one session. SRT is now used routinely for inoperable NSCLC. The easiness of implementing CBCT-kV imaging and its expected medical benefit should lead to a rapid diffusion of this technology that is also submitted to prospective and multicentric medico-economical evaluations.

  15. Precision radiotherapy for brain tumors

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Ying; Guo, Zhanwen; Zhang, Haibo; Wang, Ning; Xu, Ying

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Precision radiotherapy plays an important role in the management of brain tumors. This study aimed to identify global research trends in precision radiotherapy for brain tumors using a bibliometric analysis of the Web of Science. DATA RETRIEVAL: We performed a bibliometric analysis of data retrievals for precision radiotherapy for brain tumors containing the key words cerebral tumor, brain tumor, intensity-modulated radiotherapy, stereotactic body radiation therapy, stereotactic ablative radiotherapy, imaging-guided radiotherapy, dose-guided radiotherapy, stereotactic brachytherapy, and stereotactic radiotherapy using the Web of Science. SELECTION CRITERIA: Inclusion criteria: (a) peer-reviewed articles on precision radiotherapy for brain tumors which were published and indexed in the Web of Science; (b) type of articles: original research articles and reviews; (c) year of publication: 2002-2011. Exclusion criteria: (a) articles that required manual searching or telephone access; (b) Corrected papers or book chapters. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: (1) Annual publication output; (2) distribution according to country; (3) distribution according to institution; (4) top cited publications; (5) distribution according to journals; and (6) comparison of study results on precision radiotherapy for brain tumors. RESULTS: The stereotactic radiotherapy, intensity-modulated radiotherapy, and imaging-guided radiotherapy are three major methods of precision radiotherapy for brain tumors. There were 260 research articles addressing precision radiotherapy for brain tumors found within the Web of Science. The USA published the most papers on precision radiotherapy for brain tumors, followed by Germany and France. European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, German Cancer Research Center and Heidelberg University were the most prolific research institutes for publications on precision radiotherapy for brain tumors. Among the top 13 research institutes publishing in this field, seven

  16. Successful treatment of a 67-year-old woman with urethral adenocarcinoma with the use of external beam radiotherapy and image guided adaptive interstitial brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Mujkanovic, Jasmin; Tanderup, Kari; Agerbæk, Mads; Bisgaard, Ulla; Høyer, Søren; Lindegaard, Jacob Christian

    2016-01-01

    Primary urethral cancer (PUC) is a very rare disease. This case report illustrates a successful treatment approach of a 67-year-old woman with a urethral adenocarcinoma selected for an organ preserving treatment with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and interstitial brachytherapy (BT) boost, using the GEC-ESTRO target concept originally designed for locally advanced cervical cancer (LACC). Treatment included EBRT with 45 Gy in 25 fractions followed by image guided adaptive interstitial BT (IGABT) with a pulsed-dose-rate (PDR) BT boost with 30 Gy in 50 hourly pulses. The D90 for CTVHR was 79.1 Gy in EQD23. At 24 months follow-up, the patient was recurrence free and without treatment related side effects. PMID:27895686

  17. Accuracy in automatic image registration between MV cone beam computed tomography and planning kV computed tomography in image guided radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Kanakavelu, Nithya; Samuel, E James Jebaseelan

    2016-01-01

    To verify the accuracy of automatic image registration (IR) between the planning kilo voltage computed tomography (kV CT) and megavoltage cone beam computed tomography (MV CBCT) datasets using phantom and patient images. The automatic IR between MV CBCT and planning kV CT is a fast solution for performing online image guided radiotherapy (IGRT). The IR accuracy has to be verified periodically as it directly affects patient setup accuracy. The automatic IR accuracy was evaluated using image quality phantom acquired with different kV CT slice thickness, different MV CBCT acquisition MUs and reconstruction slice size and thickness. The IR accuracy was also evaluated on patient images on different anatomical sites such as brain, head & neck, thorax and pelvis. The uncertainty in the automatic registration was assessed by introducing known offset to kV CT dataset and compared with the registration results. The result with the phantom images was within 2 mm in all three translational directions. The accuracy in automatic IR using patient images was within 2 mm in most of the cases. 3 mm planning kV CT slice thickness was sufficient to perform automatic IR successfully within 2 mm accuracy. The MV CBCT reconstruction parameters such as slice thickness and slice size had no effect on the registration accuracy. This study shows that the automatic IR is accurate within 2 mm and provides confidence in performing them between planning kV CT and MV CBCT image datasets for online image guided radiotherapy.

  18. Hypofractionated stereotactic body radiotherapy for primary and metastatic liver tumors using the novalis image-guided system: preliminary results regarding efficacy and toxicity.

    PubMed

    Iwata, Hiromitsu; Shibamoto, Yuta; Hashizume, Chisa; Mori, Yoshimasa; Kobayashi, Tatsuya; Hayashi, Naoki; Kosaki, Katsura; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Kuzuya, Teiji; Utsunomiya, Setsuo

    2010-12-01

    www.tcrt.org The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for primary and metastatic liver tumors using the Novalis image-guided radiotherapy system. After preliminarily treating liver tumors using the Novalis system from July 2006, we started a protocol-based study in February 2008. Eighteen patients (6 with primary hepatocellular carcinoma and 12 with metastatic liver tumor) were treated with 55 or 50 Gy, depending upon their planned dose distribution and liver function, delivered in 10 fractions over 2 weeks. Four non-coplanar and three coplanar static beams were used. Patient age ranged from 54 to 84 years (median: 72 years). The Child-Pugh classification was Grade A in 17 patients and Grade B in 1. Tumor diameter ranged from 12 to 35 mm (median: 23 mm). Toxicities were evaluated according to the Common Terminology Criteria of Adverse Events version 4.0, and radiation-induced liver disease (RILD) was defined by Lawrence's criterion. The median follow-up period was 14.5 months. For all patients, the 1-year overall survival and local control rates were 94% and 86%, respectively. A Grade 1 liver enzyme change was observed in 5 patients, but no RILD or chronic liver dysfunction was observed. SBRT using the Novalis image-guided system is safe and effective for treating primary and metastatic liver tumors. Further investigation of SBRT for liver tumors is warranted. In view of the acceptable toxicity observed with this protocol, we have moved to a new protocol to shorten the overall treatment time and escalate the dose.

  19. Long-term outcomes from dose-escalated image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy with androgen deprivation: encouraging results for intermediate- and high-risk prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wilcox, Shea W; Aherne, Noel J; Benjamin, Linus C; Wu, Bosco; de Campos Silva, Thomaz; McLachlan, Craig S; McKay, Michael J; Last, Andrew J; Shakespeare, Thomas P

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Dose-escalated (DE) radiotherapy in the setting of localized prostate cancer has been shown to improve biochemical disease-free survival (bDFS) in several studies. In the same group of patients, androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) has been shown to confer a survival benefit when combined with radiotherapy doses of up to 70 Gy; however, there is currently little long-term data on patients who have received high-dose intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with ADT. We report the long-term outcomes in a large cohort of patients treated with the combination of DE image-guided IMRT (IG-IMRT) and ADT. Methods and materials Patients with localized prostate cancer were identified from a centralized database across an integrated cancer center. All patients received DE IG-IMRT, combined with ADT, and had a minimum follow up of 12 months post-radiotherapy. All relapse and toxicity data were collected prospectively. Actuarial bDFS, metastasis-free survival, prostate cancer-specific survival, and multivariate analyses were calculated using the SPSS v20.0 statistical package. Results Seven hundred and eighty-two eligible patients were identified with a median follow up of 46 months. Overall, 4.3% of patients relapsed, 2.0% developed distant metastases, and 0.6% died from metastatic prostate cancer. At 5-years, bDFS was 88%, metastasis-free survival was 95%, and prostate cancer-specific survival was 98%. Five-year grade 2 genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicity was 2.1% and 3.4%, respectively. No grade 3 or 4 late toxicities were reported. Pretreatment prostate specific antigen (P=0.001) and Gleason score (P=0.03) were significant in predicting biochemical failure on multivariate analysis. Conclusion There is a high probability of tumor control with DE IG-IMRT combined with androgen deprivation, and this is a technique with a low probability of significant late toxicity. Our long term results corroborate the safety and efficacy of treating with IG-IMRT to high doses

  20. Long-term outcomes from dose-escalated image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy with androgen deprivation: encouraging results for intermediate- and high-risk prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, Shea W; Aherne, Noel J; Benjamin, Linus C; Wu, Bosco; de Campos Silva, Thomaz; McLachlan, Craig S; McKay, Michael J; Last, Andrew J; Shakespeare, Thomas P

    2014-01-01

    Dose-escalated (DE) radiotherapy in the setting of localized prostate cancer has been shown to improve biochemical disease-free survival (bDFS) in several studies. In the same group of patients, androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) has been shown to confer a survival benefit when combined with radiotherapy doses of up to 70 Gy; however, there is currently little long-term data on patients who have received high-dose intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with ADT. We report the long-term outcomes in a large cohort of patients treated with the combination of DE image-guided IMRT (IG-IMRT) and ADT. Patients with localized prostate cancer were identified from a centralized database across an integrated cancer center. All patients received DE IG-IMRT, combined with ADT, and had a minimum follow up of 12 months post-radiotherapy. All relapse and toxicity data were collected prospectively. Actuarial bDFS, metastasis-free survival, prostate cancer-specific survival, and multivariate analyses were calculated using the SPSS v20.0 statistical package. Seven hundred and eighty-two eligible patients were identified with a median follow up of 46 months. Overall, 4.3% of patients relapsed, 2.0% developed distant metastases, and 0.6% died from metastatic prostate cancer. At 5-years, bDFS was 88%, metastasis-free survival was 95%, and prostate cancer-specific survival was 98%. Five-year grade 2 genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicity was 2.1% and 3.4%, respectively. No grade 3 or 4 late toxicities were reported. Pretreatment prostate specific antigen (P=0.001) and Gleason score (P=0.03) were significant in predicting biochemical failure on multivariate analysis. There is a high probability of tumor control with DE IG-IMRT combined with androgen deprivation, and this is a technique with a low probability of significant late toxicity. Our long term results corroborate the safety and efficacy of treating with IG-IMRT to high doses and compares favorably with published series for

  1. Adaptive multibeam antenna array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novikov, V. I.

    1984-01-01

    An adaptive multibeam antenna array is considered which will enhance the advantages of a plain one. By providing simultaneous reception of signals from different directions and their sequential processing. The optimization of the array control for maximum interference suppression in the radiation pattern is emphasized. The optimum control is sought with respect to the signal-to-interference power ratio as a genaralized criterion. Sampled useful signals and transmission coefficients are found to be complex-conjugate quantities, assuming compatible formation of beams, so that synphasal equiamplitude addition of signals from all array element is attainable by unique settings of the weight factors. Calculations are simplified by letting the useful signal power in the 1-th beam be approximately equal to the k-th weight factor, before optimizing the weight vector for maximum signal-to-interference ratio. A narrowband interference described by power P and vector V of signal distribution over the array is considered as an example, to demonstrate the algorithm of synthesis. The algorithm, using the Butler matrix, was executed experimentally on a computer for a linear equidistant antenna array of 32 elements with compatible formation of beams.

  2. The ACTS multibeam antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Regier, Frank A.

    1992-01-01

    The Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) to be launched in 1993 introduces several new technologies including a multibeam antenna (MBA) operating at Ka-band. The satellite is introduced briefly, and then the MBA, consisting of electrically similar 30 GHz received and 20 GHz transmit offset Cassegrain systems utilizing orthogonal linear polarizations, is described. Dual polarization is achieved by using one feed assembly for each polarization in conjunction with nested front and back subreflectors, the gridded front subreflector acting as a window for one polarization and a reflector for the other. The antennas produce spot beams with approximately 0.3 deg beamwidth and gains of approximately 50 dbi. High surface accuracy and high edge taper produce low sidelobe levels and high cross-polarization isolation. A brief description is given of several Ka-band components fabricated for ACTS. These include multiflare antenna feedhorns, beam-forming networks utilizing latching ferrite waveguide switches, a 30 GHz high mobility electron transmitter (HEMT) low-noise amplifier and a 20 GHz TWT power amplifier.

  3. The ACTS multibeam antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regier, Frank A.

    1992-04-01

    The Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) to be launched in 1993 introduces several new technologies including a multibeam antenna (MBA) operating at Ka-band. The satellite is introduced briefly, and then the MBA, consisting of electrically similar 30 GHz received and 20 GHz transmit offset Cassegrain systems utilizing orthogonal linear polarizations, is described. Dual polarization is achieved by using one feed assembly for each polarization in conjunction with nested front and back subreflectors, the gridded front subreflector acting as a window for one polarization and a reflector for the other. The antennas produce spot beams with approximately 0.3 deg beamwidth and gains of approximately 50 dbi. High surface accuracy and high edge taper produce low sidelobe levels and high cross-polarization isolation. A brief description is given of several Ka-band components fabricated for ACTS. These include multiflare antenna feedhorns, beam-forming networks utilizing latching ferrite waveguide switches, a 30 GHz high mobility electron transmitter (HEMT) low-noise amplifier and a 20 GHz TWT power amplifier.

  4. Image-Guided Radiotherapy (IGRT) for Prostate Cancer Comparing kV Imaging of Fiducial Markers With Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT)

    SciTech Connect

    Barney, Brandon M.; Lee, R. Jeffrey; Handrahan, Diana; Welsh, Keith T.; Cook, J. Taylor; Sause, William T.

    2011-05-01

    Purpose: To present our single-institution experience with image-guided radiotherapy comparing fiducial markers and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) for daily localization of prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: From April 2007 to October 2008, 36 patients with prostate cancer received intensity-modulated radiotherapy with daily localization by use of implanted fiducials. Orthogonal kilovoltage (kV) portal imaging preceded all 1244 treatments. Cone-beam computed tomography images were also obtained before 286 treatments (23%). Shifts in the anterior-posterior (AP), superior-inferior (SI), and left-right (LR) dimensions were made from kV fiducial imaging. Cone-beam computed tomography shifts based on soft tissues were recorded. Shifts were compared by use of Bland-Altman limits of agreement. Mean and standard deviation of absolute differences were also compared. A difference of 5 mm or less was acceptable. Subsets including start date, body mass index, and prostate size were analyzed. Results: Of 286 treatments, 81 (28%) resulted in a greater than 5.0-mm difference in one or more dimensions. Mean differences in the AP, SI, and LR dimensions were 3.4 {+-} 2.6 mm, 3.1 {+-} 2.7 mm, and 1.3 {+-} 1.6 mm, respectively. Most deviations occurred in the posterior (fiducials, 78%; CBCT, 59%), superior (79%, 61%), and left (57%, 63%) directions. Bland-Altman 95% confidence intervals were -4.0 to 9.3 mm for AP, -9.0 to 5.3 mm for SI, and -4.1 to 3.9 mm for LR. The percentages of shift agreements within {+-}5 mm were 72.4% for AP, 72.7% for SI, and 97.2% for LR. Correlation between imaging techniques was not altered by time, body mass index, or prostate size. Conclusions: Cone-beam computed tomography and kV fiducial imaging are similar; however, more than one-fourth of CBCT and kV shifts differed enough to affect target coverage. This was even more pronounced with smaller margins (3 mm). Fiducial imaging requires less daily physician input, is less time-consuming, and is

  5. Assessment of contrast enhanced respiration managed cone-beam CT for image guided radiotherapy of intrahepatic tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, Nikolaj K. G.; Stewart, Errol; Lock, Michael; Fisher, Barbara; Kozak, Roman; Chen, Jeff; Lee, Ting-Yim; Wong, Eugene

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: Contrast enhancement and respiration management are widely used during image acquisition for radiotherapy treatment planning of liver tumors along with respiration management at the treatment unit. However, neither respiration management nor intravenous contrast is commonly used during cone-beam CT (CBCT) image acquisition for alignment prior to radiotherapy. In this study, the authors investigate the potential gains of injecting an iodinated contrast agent in combination with respiration management during CBCT acquisition for liver tumor radiotherapy. Methods: Five rabbits with implanted liver tumors were subjected to CBCT with and without motion management and contrast injection. The acquired CBCT images were registered to the planning CT to determine alignment accuracy and dosimetric impact. The authors developed a simulation tool for simulating contrast-enhanced CBCT images from dynamic contrast enhanced CT imaging (DCE-CT) to determine optimal contrast injection protocols. The tool was validated against contrast-enhanced CBCT of the rabbit subjects and was used for five human patients diagnosed with hepatocellular carcinoma. Results: In the rabbit experiment, when neither motion management nor contrast was used, tumor centroid misalignment between planning image and CBCT was 9.2 mm. This was reduced to 2.8 mm when both techniques were employed. Tumors were not visualized in clinical CBCT images of human subjects. Simulated contrast-enhanced CBCT was found to improve tumor contrast in all subjects. Different patients were found to require different contrast injections to maximize tumor contrast. Conclusions: Based on the authors’ animal study, respiration managed contrast enhanced CBCT improves IGRT significantly. Contrast enhanced CBCT benefits from patient specific tracer kinetics determined from DCE-CT.

  6. Multibeam antenna study, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bellamy, J. L.

    1972-01-01

    A multibeam antenna concept was developed for providing spot beam coverage of the contiguous 48 states. The selection of a suitable antenna concept for the multibeam application and an experimental evaluation of the antenna concept selected are described. The final analysis indicates that the preferred concept is a dual-antenna, circular artificial dielectric lens. A description of the analytical methods is provided, as well as a discussion of the absolute requirements placed on the antenna concepts. Finally, a comparative analysis of reflector antenna off-axis beam performance is presented.

  7. X-ray volumetric imaging in image-guided radiotherapy: The new standard in on-treatment imaging

    SciTech Connect

    McBain, Catherine A.; Henry, Ann M. . E-mail: catherine.mcbain@christie-tr.nwest.nhs.uk; Sykes, Jonathan; Amer, Ali; Marchant, Tom; Moore, Christopher M.; Davies, Julie; Stratford, Julia; McCarthy, Claire; Porritt, Bridget; Williams, Peter; Khoo, Vincent S.; Price, Pat

    2006-02-01

    Purpose: X-ray volumetric imaging (XVI) for the first time allows for the on-treatment acquisition of three-dimensional (3D) kV cone beam computed tomography (CT) images. Clinical imaging using the Synergy System (Elekta, Crawley, UK) commenced in July 2003. This study evaluated image quality and dose delivered and assessed clinical utility for treatment verification at a range of anatomic sites. Methods and Materials: Single XVIs were acquired from 30 patients undergoing radiotherapy for tumors at 10 different anatomic sites. Patients were imaged in their setup position. Radiation doses received were measured using TLDs on the skin surface. The utility of XVI in verifying target volume coverage was qualitatively assessed by experienced clinicians. Results: X-ray volumetric imaging acquisition was completed in the treatment position at all anatomic sites. At sites where a full gantry rotation was not possible, XVIs were reconstructed from projection images acquired from partial rotations. Soft-tissue definition of organ boundaries allowed direct assessment of 3D target volume coverage at all sites. Individual image quality depended on both imaging parameters and patient characteristics. Radiation dose ranged from 0.003 Gy in the head to 0.03 Gy in the pelvis. Conclusions: On-treatment XVI provided 3D verification images with soft-tissue definition at all anatomic sites at acceptably low radiation doses. This technology sets a new standard in treatment verification and will facilitate novel adaptive radiotherapy techniques.

  8. Protocols for calibrating multibeam sonar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foote, Kenneth G.; Chu, Dezhang; Hammar, Terence R.; Baldwin, Kenneth C.; Mayer, Larry A.; Hufnagle, Lawrence C.; Jech, J. Michael

    2005-04-01

    Development of protocols for calibrating multibeam sonar by means of the standard-target method is documented. Particular systems used in the development work included three that provide the water-column signals, namely the SIMRAD SM2000/90- and 200-kHz sonars and RESON SeaBat 8101 sonar, with operating frequency of 240 kHz. Two facilities were instrumented specifically for the work: a sea well at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and a large, indoor freshwater tank at the University of New Hampshire. Methods for measuring the transfer characteristics of each sonar, with transducers attached, are described and illustrated with measurement results. The principal results, however, are the protocols themselves. These are elaborated for positioning the target, choosing the receiver gain function, quantifying the system stability, mapping the directionality in the plane of the receiving array and in the plane normal to the central axis, measuring the directionality of individual beams, and measuring the nearfield response. General preparations for calibrating multibeam sonars and a method for measuring the receiver response electronically are outlined. Advantages of multibeam sonar calibration and outstanding problems, such as that of validation of the performance of multibeam sonars as configured for use, are mentioned. .

  9. Image-Guided Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer: A Prospective Trial of Concomitant Boost Using Indium-111-Capromab Pendetide (ProstaScint) Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, William W.; Schild, Steven E.; Vora, Sujay A.; Ezzell, Gary A.; Nguyen, Ba D.; Ram, Panol C.; Roarke, Michael C.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate, in a prospective study, the use of {sup 111}In-capromab pendetide (ProstaScint) scan to guide the delivery of a concomitant boost to intraprostatic region showing increased uptake while treating the entire gland with intensity-modulated radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: From September 2002 to November 2005, 71 patients were enrolled. Planning pelvic CT and {sup 111}In-capromab pendetide scan images were coregistered. The entire prostate gland received 75.6 Gy/42 fractions, whereas areas of increased uptake in {sup 111}In-capromab pendetide scan received 82 Gy. For patients with T3/T4 disease, or Gleason score {>=}8, or prostate-specific antigen level >20 ng/mL, 12 months of adjuvant androgen deprivation therapy was given. In January 2005 the protocol was modified to give 6 months of androgen deprivation therapy to patients with a prostate-specific antigen level of 10-20 ng/mL or Gleason 7 disease. Results: Thirty-one patients had low-risk, 30 had intermediate-risk, and 10 had high-risk disease. With a median follow-up of 66 months, the 5-year biochemical control rates were 94% for the entire cohort and 97%, 93%, and 90% for low-, intermediate-, and high-risk groups, respectively. Maximum acute and late urinary toxicities were Grade 2 for 38 patients (54%) and 28 patients (39%) and Grade 3 for 1 and 3 patients (4%), respectively. One patient had Grade 4 hematuria. Maximum acute and late gastrointestinal toxicities were Grade 2 for 32 patients (45%) and 15 patients (21%), respectively. Most of the side effects improved with longer follow-up. Conclusion: Concomitant boost to areas showing increased uptake in {sup 111}In-capromab pendetide scan to 82 Gy using intensity-modulated radiotherapy while the entire prostate received 75.6 Gy was feasible and tolerable, with 94% biochemical control rate at 5 years.

  10. Intermediate-risk prostate cancer patients treated with androgen deprivation therapy and a hypofractionated radiation regimen with or without image guided radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To evaluate the efficacy of hypofractionated radiotherapy (HyRT) with or without image guided radiotherapy (IGRT) in intermediate risk prostate cancer. Methods 105 patients were treated with HyRT, 43,8 Gy and 54,75 Gy were delivered to the seminal vescicles and to the prostate, respectively; 3,65 Gy/fraction three times weekly. All patients underwent 9 months hormonal therapy. Patient position was verified with daily kV cone beam CT in 69 patients (IGRT group). Acute and late toxicities were evaluated according to RTOG scale. Biochemical relapse was defined using PSA nadir + 2 ng/mL. The data were prospectively collected and retrospectively analyzed to evaluate the efficacy of IGRT. Results After a median follow-up of 31 months the actuarial 3-year bNED was 93,7%. During RT, 10.5% and 7.6% of patients developed ≥Grade 2 rectal and urinary toxicities, respectively. The cumulative incidence of ≥Grade 2 late rectal and urinary toxicities at 3 years were 6,9%, and 10,8%, respectively. The incidence of ≥Grade 2 late rectal toxicities was significant reduced in the IGRT group (1,6% vs. 14,5%, p=0,021). Two patients developed Grade 3 urethral obstruction and one patient developed grade 3 rectal bleeding. Conclusions HyRT represents a well-tolerated treatment able to achieve a high bNED. The use of daily IGRT is beneficial for reducing the incidence of late toxicities. PMID:23759081

  11. Effect of Patient Set-up and Respiration motion on Defining Biological Targets for Image-Guided Targeted Radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCall, Keisha C.

    Identification and monitoring of sub-tumor targets will be a critical step for optimal design and evaluation of cancer therapies in general and biologically targeted radiotherapy (dose-painting) in particular. Quantitative PET imaging may be an important tool for these applications. Currently radiotherapy planning accounts for tumor motion by applying geometric margins. These margins create a motion envelope to encompass the most probable positions of the tumor, while also maintaining the appropriate tumor control and normal tissue complication probabilities. This motion envelope is effective for uniform dose prescriptions where the therapeutic dose is conformed to the external margins of the tumor. However, much research is needed to establish the equivalent margins for non-uniform fields, where multiple biological targets are present and each target is prescribed its own dose level. Additionally, the size of the biological targets and close proximity make it impractical to apply planning margins on the sub-tumor level. Also, the extent of high dose regions must be limited to avoid excessive dose to the surrounding tissue. As such, this research project is an investigation of the uncertainty within quantitative PET images of moving and displaced dose-painting targets, and an investigation of the residual errors that remain after motion management. This included characterization of the changes in PET voxel-values as objects are moved relative to the discrete sampling interval of PET imaging systems (SPECIFIC AIM 1). Additionally, the repeatability of PET distributions and the delineating dose-painting targets were measured (SPECIFIC AIM 2). The effect of imaging uncertainty on the dose distributions designed using these images (SPECIFIC AIM 3) has also been investigated. This project also included analysis of methods to minimize motion during PET imaging and reduce the dosimetric impact of motion/position-induced imaging uncertainty (SPECIFIC AIM 4).

  12. Prospective assessment of the quality of life before, during and after image guided intensity modulated radiotherapy for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Sveistrup, Joen; Mortensen, Ole Steen; Bjørner, Jakob B; Engelholm, Svend Aage; Munck Af Rosenschöld, Per; Petersen, Peter Meidahl

    2016-09-07

    Radiotherapy (RT) in combination with androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) for prostate cancer (PCa) carries a risk of gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary toxicity, which might affect the quality of life (QoL). The purpose of this study was to assess the QoL in patients with PCa before, during and after radiotherapy (RT) and to compare the QoL 1 year after RT to a normal population. The QoL was evaluated prospectively by the self-administered questionnaire SF-36 in 87 patients with PCa. The SF-36 was completed before RT (baseline), at start of RT, at end of RT and 1 year after RT. A mixed model analysis was used to determine the changes in QoL at each time point compared to baseline. The patients' QoL 1 year after RT was compared to a normal population consisting of 462 reference subjects matched on age and education. One year after RT, patients reported significantly less pain and significantly fewer limitations due to their physical health compared to baseline. Compared to the normal population, patients reported significantly less pain 1 year after RT. However, patients also reported significantly less vitality, worse mental health as well as significantly more limitations due to physical and mental health 1 year after RT compared to the normal population. In this study, patients with PCa did not experience significant impairment in the QoL 1 year after RT compared to baseline. However, patients reported significantly worse mental health before, during and 1 year after RT compared to the normal population.

  13. 3D-image-guided HDR-brachytherapy versus 2D HDR - brachytherapy after external beam radiotherapy for early T-stage nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ren, YuFeng; Zhao, QuanCheng; Liu, Hui; Huang, YingJuan; Wang, ZhenYu; Cao, XinPing; Teh, Bin S; Wen, BiXiu

    2014-11-29

    Two-dimensional high-dose-rate brachytherapy (2D-HDR-BT) is an effective method of dose escalation for local tumor control in early T-stage nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Treatment outcomes for 3D-image-guided high-dose-rate brachytherapy (3D-image-guided-HDR-BT) after external beam radiotherapy (ERT) have not been examined in early T-stage NPC patients. The current study was designed to evaluate whether addition of 3D-HDR-BT to ERT showed further improvement in treatment outcomes in patients with early T-stage NPC when compared to 2D-HDR-BT after ERT. The current study retrospectively analyzed and compared treatment outcomes for patients with nonmetastatic stage T1-2b NPC treated with 2D-HDR-BT (n =101) or 3D-HDR-BT (n =118) after ERT. Patients in both groups were treated with ERT at a mean dose of 60 Gy and a brachytherapy dose of 12Gy (8 ~ 20Gy), 2.5 ~ 5Gy per fraction under local anesthesia. Compared to patients treated with 2D-HDR-BT after ERT, patients treated with 3D-HDR-BT after ERT showed improvement in five-year actuarial local control survival rates (p = 0.024), local/regional relapse-free survival rates (p = 0.038), and disease-free survival rates (p = 0.021). Multivariate analysis showed that NPC patients treated with 3D-HDR-BT had improved local control survival (p = 0.042). The incidence rates of acute or chronic complications were similar between two groups. The current study showed that 3D-image-guided HDR-BT after ERT was an effective treatment modality for patients with stage T1-2 NPC with acceptable complications. The improvement in local tumor control and disease free survival is likely due to improved conformal dose distributions.

  14. Do We Need Daily Image-Guided Radiotherapy by Megavoltage Computed Tomography in Head and Neck Helical Tomotherapy? The Actual Delivered Dose to the Spinal Cord

    SciTech Connect

    Duma, Marciana Nona; Kampfer, Severin; Schuster, Tibor; Aswathanarayana, Nandana; Fromm, Laura-Sophie; Molls, Michael; Andratschke, Nicolaus; Geinitz, Hans

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To quantify the actual delivered dose to the cervical spinal cord with different image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) approaches during head and neck (HN) cancer helical tomotherapy. Methods and Materials: Twenty HN patients (HNpts) treated with bilateral nodal irradiation were analyzed. Daily megavoltage computed tomography MVCT) scans were performed for setup purposes. The maximum dose on the planning CT scan (plan-Dmax) and the magnitude and localization of the actual delivered Dmax (a-Dmax) were analyzed for four scenarios: daily image-guided radiotherapy (dIGRT), twice weekly IGRT (2 Multiplication-Sign WkIGRT), once weekly IGRT (1 Multiplication-Sign WkIGRT), and no IGRT at all (non-IGRT). The spinal cord was recontoured on 236 MVCTs for each scenario (total, 944 fractions), and the delivered dose was recalculated for each fraction (fx) separately. Results: Fifty-one percent of the analyzed fx for dIGRT, 56% of the analyzed fx for the 2 Multiplication-Sign WkIGRT, 62% of the analyzed fx for the 1 Multiplication-Sign WkIGRT, and 63% of the analyzed fx for the non-IGRT scenarios received a higher a-Dmax than the plan-Dmax. The median increase of dose in these fx was 3.3% more for dIGRT, 5.8% more for 2 Multiplication-Sign WkIGRT, 10.0% more for 1 Multiplication-Sign WkIGRT, and 9.5% more for non-IGRT than the plan-Dmax. The median spinal cord volumes receiving a higher dose than the plan-Dmax were 0.02 cm{sup 3} for dIGRT, 0.11 cm{sup 3} for 2 Multiplication-Sign WkIGRT, 0.31 cm{sup 3} for 1 Multiplication-Sign WkIGRT, and 0.22 cm{sup 3} for non-IGRT. Differences between the dIGRT and all other scenarios were statistically significant (p < 0.05). Conclusions: Compared to the Dmax of the initial plan, daily IGRT had the smallest increase in dose. Furthermore, daily IGRT had the lowest proportion of fractions and the smallest volumes affected by a dose that was higher than the planned dose. For patients treated with doses close to the tolerance dose of the

  15. A Study on Target Positioning Error and Its Impact on Dose Variation in Image-Guided Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for the Spine

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Siyong Jin, Hosang; Yang, Huey; Amdur, Robert J.

    2009-04-01

    Purpose: To investigate the amount of target positioning error and evaluate its dosimetric impact during image-guided stereotactic body radiotherapy for single-fraction spine treatment. Methods and Materials: A prescription dose of 15 Gy and five to nine coplanar intensity-modulated beams were used. The patient was immobilized with a custom-fit vacuum mold, and the target was localized with a volumetric cone-beam CT image. A robotic couch with six degrees of freedom was used for target adjustment. For evaluation a cone-beam CT image was obtained at the end of treatment. Both target positioning error and its dosimetric impact were investigated for the first 9 cases. Results: For cases studied, translational errors were 0.9 {+-} 0.5 mm (lateral), 1.2 {+-} 0.9 mm (longitudinal), 0.7 {+-} 0.6 mm (vertical), and 1.8 {+-} 1.0 mm (vector), and rotational errors were 1.6 deg. {+-} 1.3 deg. (pitch), 0.8 deg. {+-} 0.9 deg. (roll), and 0.8 deg. {+-} 0.4{sup o} (yaw). For the clinical target volume, D{sub 95} (dose to 95% of target volume), D{sub 90}, D{sub max}, and D{sub mean} were evaluated. Only 1 case showed significant dose variations, reaching up to 18% in D{sub 95}. The spinal cord dose was evaluated by observing D{sub 0.1} (dose to 0.1 cm{sup 3}), D{sub 0.5}, D{sub 1.0}, and D{sub max}. Although 1 case showed a dose change reaching up to 30% in D{sub max}, cord dose was within the planning tolerance limit in all but 2 cases (3% higher in one and 0.4% higher in the other). Conclusion: The implemented image-guided stereotactic body radiotherapy provides precise target localization. However, despite reasonably precise spatial precision, dosimetric perturbation can be significant because of both extremely steep dose gradients and close distances between the target and the spinal cord.

  16. Image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy for prostate cancer: Dose constraints for the anterior rectal wall to minimize rectal toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, Jennifer L.; Buskirk, Steven J.; Heckman, Michael G.; Diehl, Nancy N.; Bernard, Johnny R.; Tzou, Katherine S.; Casale, Henry E.; Bellefontaine, Louis P.; Serago, Christopher; Kim, Siyong; Vallow, Laura A.; Daugherty, Larry C.; Ko, Stephen J.

    2014-04-01

    Rectal adverse events (AEs) are a major concern with definitive radiotherapy (RT) treatment for prostate cancer. The anterior rectal wall is at the greatest risk of injury as it lies closest to the target volume and receives the highest dose of RT. This study evaluated the absolute volume of anterior rectal wall receiving a high dose to identify potential ideal dose constraints that can minimize rectal AEs. A total of 111 consecutive patients with Stage T1c to T3a N0 M0 prostate cancer who underwent image-guided intensity-modulated RT at our institution were included. AEs were graded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 4.0. The volume of anterior rectal wall receiving 5 to 80 Gy in 2.5-Gy increments was determined. Multivariable Cox regression models were used to identify cut points in these volumes that led to an increased risk of early and late rectal AEs. Early AEs occurred in most patients (88%); however, relatively few of them (13%) were grade ≥2. At 5 years, the cumulative incidence of late rectal AEs was 37%, with only 5% being grade ≥2. For almost all RT doses, we identified a threshold of irradiated absolute volume of anterior rectal wall above which there was at least a trend toward a significantly higher rate of AEs. Most strikingly, patients with more than 1.29, 0.73, or 0.45 cm{sup 3} of anterior rectal wall exposed to radiation doses of 67.5, 70, or 72.5 Gy, respectively, had a significantly increased risk of late AEs (relative risks [RR]: 2.18 to 2.72; p ≤ 0.041) and of grade ≥ 2 early AEs (RR: 6.36 to 6.48; p = 0.004). Our study provides evidence that definitive image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT) for prostate cancer is well tolerated and also identifies dose thresholds for the absolute volume of anterior rectal wall above which patients are at greater risk of early and late complications.

  17. Clinical Feasibility of Using an EPID in cine Mode for Image-Guided Verification of Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Berbeco, Ross I.

    2007-09-01

    Purpose: To introduce a novel method for monitoring tumor location during stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) while the treatment beam is on by using a conventional electronic portal imaging device (EPID). Methods and Materials: In our clinic, selected patients were treated under a phase I institutional review board-approved SBRT protocol for limited hepatic metastases from solid tumors. Before treatment planning multiple gold fiducial markers were implanted on the periphery of the tumor. During treatment the EPID was used in cine mode to collect the exit radiation and produce a sequence of images for each field. An in-house program was developed for calculating the location of the fiducials and their relative distance to the planned locations. Results: Three case studies illustrate the utility of the technique. Patient A exhibited a systematic shift of 4 mm during one of the treatment beams. Patient B showed an inferior drift of the target of approximately 1 cm from the time of setup to the end of the fraction. Patient C had a poor setup on the first day of treatment that was quantified and accounted for on subsequent treatment days. Conclusions: Target localization throughout each treatment beam can be quickly assessed with the presented technique. Treatment monitoring with an EPID in cine mode is shown to be a clinically feasible and useful tool.

  18. Ultrasound-Guided Transrectal Implantation of Gold Markers for Prostate Localization During External Beam Radiotherapy: Complication Rate and Risk Factors

    SciTech Connect

    Langenhuijsen, Johan F.; Lin, Emile N.J.T. van Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Vight, Lisette P. van der; McColl, Gill; Visser, Andries G.; Witjes, J. Alfred

    2007-11-01

    Purpose: To report the complication rate and risk factors of transrectally implanted gold markers, used for prostate position verification and correction procedures. Methods and Materials: In 209 consecutive men with localized prostate cancer, four gold markers (1 x 7 mm) were inserted under ultrasound guidance in an outpatient setting, and the toxicity was analyzed. All patients received a questionnaire regarding complications after marker implantation. The complications and risk factors were further evaluated by reviewing the medical charts. Results: Of the 209 men, 13 (6.2%) had a moderate complication, consisting of pain and fever that resolved after treatment with oral medication. In 1.9% of the men, minor voiding complaints were observed. Other minor transient complications, defined as hematuria lasting >3 days, hematospermia, and rectal bleeding, occurred in 3.8%, 18.5%, and 9.1% of the patients, respectively. These complications were seen more often in patients with advanced tumor stage, younger age, and shorter duration of hormonal therapy. Conclusion: Transrectal gold marker implantation for high-precision prostate radiotherapy is a safe and well-tolerated procedure.

  19. Outcome of Elderly Patients with Meningioma after Image-Guided Stereotactic Radiotherapy: A Study of 100 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Budach, Volker; Graaf, Lukas; Gollrad, Johannes; Badakhshi, Harun

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Incidence of meningioma increases with age. Surgery has been the mainstay treatment. Elderly patients, however, are at risk of severe morbidity. Therefore, we conducted this study to analyze long-term outcomes of linac-based fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) for older adults (aged ≥65 years) with meningioma and determine prognostic factors. Materials and Methods. Between October 1998 and March 2009, 100 patients (≥65, median age, 71 years) were treated with FSRT for meningioma. Two patients were lost to follow-up. Eight patients each had grade I and grade II meningiomas, and five patients had grade III meningiomas. The histology was unknown in 77 cases (grade 0). Results. The median follow-up was 37 months, and 3-year, 5-year, and 10-year progression-free survival (PFS) rates were 93.7%, 91.1%, and 82%. Patients with grade 0/I meningioma showed 3- and 5-year PFS rates of 98.4% and 95.6%. Patients with grade II or III meningiomas showed 3-year PFS rates of 36%. 93.8% of patients showed local tumor control. Multivariate analysis did not indicate any significant prognostic factors. Conclusion. FSRT may play an important role as a noninvasive and safe method in the clinical management of older patients with meningioma. PMID:26101778

  20. Clinical experience using a video-guided spirometry system for deep inhalation breath-hold radiotherapy of left-sided breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wensha; McKenzie, Elizabeth M; Burnison, Michele; Shiao, Stephen; Mirhadi, Amin; Hakimian, Behrooz; Reznik, Robert; Tuli, Richard; Sandler, Howard; Fraass, Benedick A

    2015-03-08

    The purpose was to report clinical experience of a video-guided spirometry system in applying deep inhalation breath-hold (DIBH) radiotherapy for left-sided breast cancer, and to study the systematic and random uncertainties, intra- and interfraction motion and impact on cardiac dose associated with DIBH. The data from 28 left-sided breast cancer patients treated with spirometer-guided DIBH radiation were studied. Dosimetric comparisons between free-breathing (FB) and DIBH plans were performed. The distance between the heart and chest wall measured on the digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRR) and MV portal images, dDRR(DIBH) and dport(DIBH), respectively, was compared as a measure of DIBH setup uncertainty. The difference (Δd) between dDRR(DIBH) and dport(DIBH) was defined as the systematic uncertainty. The standard deviation of Δd for each patient was defined as the random uncertainty. MV cine images during radiation were acquired. Affine registrations of the cine images acquired during one fraction and multiple fractions were performed to study the intra- and interfraction motion of the chest wall. The median chest wall motion was used as the metric for intra- and interfraction analysis. Breast motions in superior-inferior (SI) direction and "AP" (defined on the DRR or MV portal image as the direction perpendicular to the SI direction) are reported. Systematic and random uncertainties of 3.8 mm and 2mm, respectively, were found for this spirometer-guided DIBH treatment. MV cine analysis showed that intrafraction chest wall motions during DIBH were 0.3mm in "AP" and 0.6 mm in SI. The interfraction chest wall motions were 3.6 mm in "AP" and 3.4 mm in SI. Utilization of DIBH with this spirometry system led to a statistically significant reduction of cardiac dose relative to FB treatment. The DIBH using video-guided spirometry provided reproducible cardiac sparing with minimal intra- and interfraction chest wall motion, and thus is a valuable adjunct to modern

  1. Dosimetric evaluation of the OneDose MOSFET for measuring kilovoltage imaging dose from image-guided radiotherapy procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, George X.; Coffey, Charles W.

    2010-09-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to investigate the feasibility of using a single-use dosimeter, OneDose MOSFET designed for in vivo patient dosimetry, for measuring the radiation dose from kilovoltage (kV) x rays resulting from image-guided procedures. Methods: The OneDose MOSFET dosimeters were precalibrated by the manufacturer using Co-60 beams. Their energy response and characteristics for kV x rays were investigated by using an ionization chamber, in which the air-kerma calibration factors were obtained from an Accredited Dosimetry Calibration Laboratory (ADCL). The dosimetric properties have been tested for typical kV beams used in image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT). Results: The direct dose reading from the OneDose system needs to be multiplied by a correction factor ranging from 0.30 to 0.35 for kilovoltage x rays ranging from 50 to 125 kVp, respectively. In addition to energy response, the OneDose dosimeter has up to a 20% reduced sensitivity for beams (70-125 kVp) incident from the back of the OneDose detector. Conclusions: The uncertainty in measuring dose resulting from a kilovoltage beam used in IGRT is approximately 20%; this uncertainty is mainly due to the sensitivity dependence of the incident beam direction relative to the OneDose detector. The ease of use may allow the dosimeter to be suitable for estimating the dose resulting from image-guided procedures.

  2. Clinical outcome of protocol based image (MRI) guided adaptive brachytherapy combined with 3D conformal radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy in patients with locally advanced cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pötter, Richard; Georg, Petra; Dimopoulos, Johannes C.A.; Grimm, Magdalena; Berger, Daniel; Nesvacil, Nicole; Georg, Dietmar; Schmid, Maximilian P.; Reinthaller, Alexander; Sturdza, Alina; Kirisits, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Background To analyse the overall clinical outcome and benefits by applying protocol based image guided adaptive brachytherapy combined with 3D conformal external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) ± chemotherapy (ChT). Methods Treatment schedule was EBRT with 45–50.4 Gy ± concomitant cisplatin chemotherapy plus 4 × 7 Gy High Dose Rate (HDR) brachytherapy. Patients were treated in the “protocol period” (2001–2008) with the prospective application of the High Risk CTV concept (D90) and dose volume constraints for organs at risk including biological modelling. Dose volume adaptation was performed with the aim of dose escalation in large tumours (prescribed D90 > 85 Gy), often with inserting additional interstitial needles. Dose volume constraints (D2cc) were 70–75 Gy for rectum and sigmoid and 90 Gy for bladder. Late morbidity was prospectively scored, using LENT/SOMA Score. Disease outcome and treatment related late morbidity were evaluated and compared using actuarial analysis. Findings One hundred and fifty-six consecutive patients (median age 58 years) with cervix cancer FIGO stages IB–IVA were treated with definitive radiotherapy in curative intent. Histology was squamous cell cancer in 134 patients (86%), tumour size was >5 cm in 103 patients (66%), lymph node involvement in 75 patients (48%). Median follow-up was 42 months for all patients. Interstitial techniques were used in addition to intracavitary brachytherapy in 69/156 (44%) patients. Total prescribed mean dose (D90) was 93 ± 13 Gy, D2cc 86 ± 17 Gy for bladder, 65 ± 9 Gy for rectum and 64 ± 9 Gy for sigmoid. Complete remission was achieved in 151/156 patients (97%). Overall local control at 3 years was 95%; 98% for tumours 2–5 cm, and 92% for tumours >5 cm (p = 0.04), 100% for IB, 96% for IIB, 86% for IIIB. Cancer specific survival at 3 years was overall 74%, 83% for tumours 2–5 cm, 70% for tumours >5 cm, 83% for IB, 84% for IIB, 52% for IIIB. Overall

  3. Tumor Control Outcomes Following Hypofractionated and Single-Dose Stereotactic Image-Guided Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Extracranial Metastases from Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zelefsky, Michael J; Greco, Carlo; Motzer, Robert; Magsanoc, Juan Martin; Pei, Xin; Lovelock, Michael; Mechalakos, Jim; Zatcky, Joan; Fuks, Zvi; Yamada, Yoshiya

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To report tumor local progression-free outcomes following treatment with single-dose image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (SD-IGRT) and hypofractionated regimens for extracranial metastases from renal cell primary tumors. Methods and Materials Between 2004 and 2010, a total of 105 lesions from renal cell carcinomas were treated with either SD-IGRT to prescription doses of 18–24 Gy (median, 24 Gy) or hypofractionation (3 or 5 fractions) with prescription doses ranging between 20 and 30 Gy. The median follow-up was 12 months (range, 1–48 months). Results The overall 3-year actuarial local progression-free survival (LPFS) for all lesions was 44%. The 3-year LPFS for those who received high single-dose (24 Gy; n = 45), low single-dose (< 24 Gy; n = 14), and hypofractionation regimens (n = 46) were 88%, 21%, and 17%, respectively (high single dose versus low single dose, p = 0.001; high single dose versus hypofractionation, p < 0.001). Multivariate analysis revealed the following variables as significant predictors of improved LPFS: dose of 24 Gy compared with lower dose (p = 0.009), and single dose versus hypofractionation (p = 0.008). Conclusion High-dose SD-IGRT is a non-invasive procedure resulting in high probability of local tumor control for metastatic renal cell cancers, generally considered radioresistant according to classical radiobiological ranking. PMID:21596489

  4. SU-E-T-306: Study of the Reduction Technique for the Secondary Cancer Risk Due to Cone Beam CT in Image Guided Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Sung, J; Kim, D; Kim, D; Chung, W; Baek, T; Lee, H; Yoon, M

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: This study evaluated the effectiveness of a thin lead sheet based simple shielding method for imaging doses from cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) in image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT). Methods: The entire body, except for the region scanned by CBCT, was shielded by wrapping in a 2 mm lead sheet. Reduction of secondary doses from CBCT was measured using a radio-photoluminescence glass dosimeter (RPLGD) placed inside an anthropomorphic phantom and changes in secondary cancer risk due to the shielding effect were estimated using BEIR VII model. Results: Doses to out-of-field organs for head-and-neck, chest, and pelvis scans were decreased 15∼100 %, 23∼90 %, and 23∼98 %, respectively, and the average reductions in lifetime secondary cancer risk due to the 2 mm lead shielding were 1.61, 10.4, and 12.8 persons per 100,000, respectively. Conclusion: This study suggests that a simple thin lead sheet based shielding method results in a non-negligible reduction of secondary doses to out-of-field regions for CBCT.

  5. Postprostatectomy ultrasound-guided transrectal implantation of gold markers for external beam radiotherapy. Technique and complications rate.

    PubMed

    Langenhuijsen, J F; Donker, R; McColl, G M; Kiemeney, L A L M; Witjes, J A; van Lin, E N J T

    2013-06-01

    Postprostatectomy radiotherapy (RT) improves survival in adjuvant and salvage settings. The implantation technique and complications rate of gold markers in the prostate bed for high-precision RT were analyzed. Patients undergoing postprostatectomy RT for prostate-specific antigen (PSA) relapse or high-risk disease were enrolled in the study. Under transrectal ultrasound guidance, three fine gold markers were implanted in the prostate bed and the technical difficulties of insertion were documented. Patients received our self-designed questionnaires concerning complications and pain. The influence of anticoagulants and coumarins on bleeding was analyzed, as was the effect of potential risk factors on pain. In 77 consecutive patients, failure of marker implantation or marker migration was seen in six cases. Rectal bleeding was reported by 10 patients and 1 had voiding complaints. No macroscopic hematuria persisting for more than 3 days was observed. Other complications included rectal discomfort (n = 2), nausea (n = 1), abdominal discomfort (n = 1), and pain requiring analgesics (n = 4). No major complications were reported. On a 0-10 visual analogue scale (VAS), the mean pain score was 3.7. No clinically significant risk factors for complications were identified. Transrectal implantation of gold markers in the prostate bed is feasible and safe. Alternatives like cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) should be considered, but the advantages of gold marker implantation for high-precision postprostatectomy RT would seem to outweigh the minor risks involved.

  6. Definition and visualisation of regions of interest in post-prostatectomy image-guided intensity modulated radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, Linda J Cox, Jennifer; Eade, Thomas; Rinks, Marianne; Kneebone, Andrew

    2014-09-15

    Standard post-prostatectomy radiotherapy (PPRT) image verification uses bony anatomy alignment. However, the prostate bed (PB) moves independently of bony anatomy. Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) can be used to soft tissue match, so radiation therapists (RTs) must understand pelvic anatomy and PPRT clinical target volumes (CTV). The aims of this study are to define regions of interest (ROI) to be used in soft tissue matching image guidance and determine their visibility on planning CT (PCT) and CBCT. Published CTV guidelines were used to select ROIs. The PCT scans (n = 23) and CBCT scans (n = 105) of 23 post-prostatectomy patients were reviewed. Details on ROI identification were recorded. Eighteen patients had surgical clips. All ROIs were identified on PCTs at least 90% of the time apart from mesorectal fascia (MF) (87%) due to superior image quality. When surgical clips are present, the seminal vesicle bed (SVB) was only seen in 2.3% of CBCTs and MF was unidentifiable. Most other structures were well identified on CBCT. The anterior rectal wall (ARW) was identified in 81.4% of images and penile bulb (PB) in 68.6%. In the absence of surgical clips, the MF and SVB were always identified; the ARW was identified in 89.5% of CBCTs and PB in 73.7%. Surgical clips should be used as ROIs when present to define SVB and MF. In the absence of clips, SVB, MF and ARW can be used. RTs must have a strong knowledge of soft tissue anatomy and PPRT CTV to ensure coverage and enable soft tissue matching.

  7. Technical feasibility of integrating 7 T anatomical MRI in image-guided radiotherapy of glioblastoma: a preparatory study.

    PubMed

    Compter, Inge; Peerlings, Jurgen; Eekers, Daniëlle B P; Postma, Alida A; Ivanov, Dimo; Wiggins, Christopher J; Kubben, Pieter; Küsters, Benno; Wesseling, Pieter; Ackermans, Linda; Schijns, Olaf E M G; Lambin, Philippe; Hoffmann, Aswin L

    2016-06-01

    The use of 7 Tesla (T) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has recently shown great potential for high-resolution soft-tissue neuroimaging and visualization of microvascularization in glioblastoma (GBM). We have designed a clinical trial to explore the value of 7 T MRI in radiation treatment of GBM. For this aim we performed a preparatory study to investigate the technical feasibility of incorporating 7 T MR images into the neurosurgical navigation and radiotherapy treatment planning (RTP) systems via qualitative and quantitative assessment of the image quality. The MR images were acquired with a Siemens Magnetom 7 T whole-body scanner and a Nova Medical 32-channel head coil. The 7 T MRI pulse sequences included magnetization-prepared two rapid acquisition gradient echoes (MP2RAGE), T2-SPACE, SPACE-FLAIR and gradient echo sequences (GRE). A pilot study with three healthy volunteers and an anthropomorphic 3D phantom was used to assess image quality and geometrical image accuracy. The MRI scans were well tolerated by the volunteers. Susceptibility artefacts were observed in both the cortex and subcortical white matter at close proximity to air-tissue interfaces. Regional loss of signal and contrast could be minimized by the use of dielectric pads. Image transfer and processing did not degrade image quality. The system-related spatial uncertainty of geometrical distortion-corrected MP2RAGE pulse sequences was ≤2 mm. Integration of high-quality and geometrically-reliable 7 T MR images into neurosurgical navigation and RTP software is technically feasible and safe.

  8. [Which rules apply to hypofractionated radiotherapy?].

    PubMed

    Supiot, S; Clément-Colmou, K; Paris, F; Corre, I; Chiavassa, S; Delpon, G

    2015-10-01

    Hypofractionated radiotherapy is now more widely prescribed due to improved targeting techniques (intensity modulated radiotherapy, image-guided radiotherapy and stereotactic radiotherapy). Low dose hypofractionated radiotherapy is routinely administered mostly for palliative purposes. High or very high dose hypofractionated irradiation must be delivered according to very strict procedures since every minor deviation can lead to major changes in dose delivery to the tumor volume and organs at risk. Thus, each stage of the processing must be carefully monitored starting from the limitations and the choice of the hypofractionation technique, tumour contouring and dose constraints prescription, planning and finally dose calculation and patient positioning verification.

  9. Imaging and dosimetric errors in 4D PET/CT-guided radiotherapy from patient-specific respiratory patterns: a dynamic motion phantom end-to-end study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowen, S. R.; Nyflot, M. J.; Herrmann, C.; Groh, C. M.; Meyer, J.; Wollenweber, S. D.; Stearns, C. W.; Kinahan, P. E.; Sandison, G. A.

    2015-05-01

    delivery under a dose painting paradigm is feasible within an integrated respiratory motion phantom workflow. For a limited set of cases, the magnitude of errors was comparable during PET/CT imaging and treatment delivery without motion compensation. Errors were moderately mitigated during PET/CT imaging and significantly mitigated during RT delivery with motion compensation. This dynamic motion phantom end-to-end workflow provides a method for quality assurance of 4D PET/CT-guided radiotherapy, including evaluation of respiratory motion compensation methods during imaging and treatment delivery.

  10. 11C choline PET guided salvage radiotherapy with volumetric modulation arc therapy and hypofractionation for recurrent prostate cancer after HIFU failure: preliminary results of tolerability and acute toxicity.

    PubMed

    Alongi, Filippo; Liardo, Rocco L E; Iftode, Cristina; Lopci, Egesta; Villa, Elisa; Comito, Tiziana; Tozzi, Angelo; Navarria, Pierina; Ascolese, Anna M; Mancosu, Pietro; Tomatis, Stefano; Bellorofonte, Carlo; Arturo, Chiti; Scorsetti, Marta

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this work was to evaluate tolerance, feasibility and acute toxicity in patients undergoing salvage radiotherapy after high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) failure. From 2005 to 2011 a total of 15 patients were treated with HIFU as primary radical treatment. Between July 2011 and February 2013, all 15 patients presented biochemical relapse after HIFU and 11C choline PET documenting intrapostatic-only failure. Salvage EBRT was performed with moderate hypofractionation schedule in 28 fractions with volumetric modulation arc therapy (VMAT). Genito-urinary (GU) and rectal and bowel toxicity were scored by common terminology criteria for adverse events version 4 (CTCAE V.4) scale. Biochemical response was assessed by ASTRO Phoenix criteria. Median age of patients was 67 years (range: 53-85). The median Gleason score was 7 (range: 6-9). The median prostate specific antigen (PSA) at the time of biochemical relapse after HIFU was 5.2 ng/mL (range: 2-64.2). Seven of the 15 patients received androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) started after HIFU failure, interrupted before 11C choline PET and radiotherapy. Median prescribed dose was 71.4 Gy (range: 71.4-74.2 Gy) in 28 fractions. No radiation related major upper gastrointestinal (GI), rectal and GU toxicity were experienced. GU, acute grade 1 and grade 2 toxicities were recorded in 7/15 and 4/15 respectively; bowel acute grade 1 and grade 2 toxicities in 4/15 and 1/15; rectal acute grade 1 and grade 2 toxicities in 3/15 and 2/15 respectively. No grade 3 or greater acute or late toxicities occurred. Biochemical control was assessed in 12/15 (80%) patients. With a median follow up of 12 months, three out of 15 patients, with biochemical relapse, showed lymph-nodal recurrence. Our early clinical results and biochemical data confirm the feasibility and show a good tolerance of the 11C choline PET guided salvage radiation therapy after HIFU failure. The findings of low acute toxicity is encouraging, but longer

  11. SU-E-J-210: Characterizing Tissue Equivalent Materials for the Development of a Dual MRI-CT Heterogeneous Anthropomorphic Phantom Designed Specifically for MRI Guided Radiotherapy Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Steinmann, A; Stafford, R; Yung, J; Followill, D

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: MRI guided radiotherapy (MRIgRT) is an emerging technology which will eventually require a proficient quality auditing system. Due to different principles in which MR and CT acquire images, there is a need for a multi-imaging-modality, end-to-end QA phantom for MRIgRT. The purpose of this study is to identify lung, soft tissue, and tumor equivalent substitutes that share similar human-like CT and MR properties (i.e. Hounsfield units and relaxation times). Methods: Materials of interested such as common CT QA phantom materials, and other proprietary gels/silicones from Polytek, SmoothOn, and CompositeOne were first scanned on a GE 1.5T Signa HDxT MR. Materials that could be seen on both T1-weighted and T2-weighted images were then scanned on a GE Lightspeed RT16 CT simulator and a GE Discovery 750HD CT scanner and their HU values were then measured. The materials with matching HU values of lung (−500 to −700HU), muscle (+40HU) and soft tissue (+100 to +300HU) were further scanned on GE 1.5T Signa HDx to measure their T1 and T2 relaxation times from varying parameters of TI and TE. Results: Materials that could be visualized on T1-weighted and T2-weighted images from a 1.5T MR unit and had an appropriate average CT number, −650, −685, 46,169, and 168 HUs were: compressed cork saturated with water, Polytek Platsil™ Gel-00 combined with mini styrofoam balls, radiotherapy bolus material, SmoothOn Dragon-Skin™ and SmoothOn Ecoflex™, respectively. Conclusion: Post processing analysis is currently being performed to accurately map T1 and T2 values for each material tested. From previous MR visualization and CT examinations it is expected that Dragon-Skin™, Ecoflex™ and bolus will have values consistent with tissue and tumor substitutes. We also expect compressed cork statured with water, and Polytek™-styrofoam combination to have approximate T1 and T2 values suitable for lung-equivalent materials.

  12. Image-Guided Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Lung Tumors Using BodyLoc With Tomotherapy: Clinical Implementation and Set-Up Accuracy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Jining Uhl, Barry; Dewitt, Kelly; Young, Mark; Taylor, Brian; Fei Dingyu; Lo, Y-C

    2010-04-01

    We investigated the use of a BodyLoc immobilization and stereotactic localization device combined with TomoTherapy megavoltage CT (MVCT) in lung stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) to reduce set-up uncertainty and treatment time. Eight patients treated with 3-5 fractions of SBRT were retrospectively analyzed. A BodyLoc localizer was used in both CT simulation for localization and the initial patient treatment set-up. Patients were immobilized with a vacuum cushion on the back and a thermoplastic body cast on the anterior body. Pretreatment MVCT from the TomoTherapy unit was fused with the planning kilovoltage CT (KVCT) before each fraction of treatment to determine interfractional set-up error. The comparison of two MVCTs during a fraction of treatment resulted in the intrafractional uncertainty of the treatment. A total of 224 target isocenter shifts were analyzed to assess these inter- and intrafractional tumor motions. We found that for interfractional shifts, the mean set-up errors and standard deviations were -1.1 {+-} 2.8 mm, -2.5 {+-} 8.7 mm, and 4.1 {+-} 2.6 mm, for lateral, longitudinal, and vertical variation, respectively; the mean setup rotational variation was -0.3 {+-} 0.7 deg.; and the maximum motion was 13.5 mm in the longitudinal direction. For intrafractional shifts, the mean set-up errors and standard deviations were -0.1 {+-} 0.7 mm, -0.3 {+-} 2.0 mm, and 0.5 {+-} 1.1 mm for the lateral, longitudinal, and vertical shifts, respectively; the mean rotational variation was 0.1 {+-} 0.2 deg.; and the maximum motion was 3.8 mm in the longitudinal direction. There was no correlation among patient characteristics, set-up uncertainties, and isocenter shifts, and the interfractional set-up uncertainties were larger than the intrafractional isocenter shift. The results of this study suggested that image-guided stereotactic body radiotherapy using the BodyLoc immobilization system with TomoTherapy can improve treatment accuracy.

  13. Treatment outcomes and patterns of radiologic appearance after hypofractionated image-guided radiotherapy delivered with helical tomotherapy (HHT) for lung tumours.

    PubMed

    Arcangeli, Stefano; Falcinelli, Lorenzo; Bracci, Stefano; Greco, Alessandro; Monaco, Alessia; Dognini, Jessica; Chiostrini, Cinzia; Bellavita, Rita; Aristei, Cynthia; Donato, Vittorio

    2017-03-01

    To evaluate treatment outcomes and patterns of CT lung injury after hypofractionated image-guided radiotherapy delivered with helical tomotherapy (HHT) in a series of inoperable lung lesions. 68 patients who were medically inoperable (69 lesions) without evidence of viable extrathoracic disease were included. Dose prescription was driven by tumour location (hilar/pericentral vs peripheral) and/or target volume. 52% of the lesions received a biological equivalent dose (BED10) ≥100 Gy. Assessment of tumour response was based on the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumours 1.1 criteria coupled with fluorine-18 fludeoxyglucose/positron emission tomography-CT. Toxicity monitoring was focused on treatment-related pulmonary adverse events according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v. 4.0. Acute and late events were classified as radiation pneumonitis (RP) and radiation fibrosis (RF), respectively. Survival curves were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Univariate and multivariate analyses of survival were performed using the Cox proportional hazards model. After a median follow-up of 12 months (range, 3-31 months), no instances of ≥Grade 4 RP was documented, and clinically severe (Grade 3) RP occurred in 5.8% of the patients. 2 (3%) patients developed a late severe (≥Grade 3) symptomatic RF. No specific pattern of CT lung injury was demonstrated, in both acute and late settings. Median overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) for the entire population were 30.8 and 14.1 months, respectively. At multivariate analysis (MVA), BED10 ≥ 100 Gy and KPS ≥ 90 emerged as significant prognostic factors for OS (p = 0.01 and p = 0.001, respectively), and BED10 ≥ 100 Gy for PFS (p = 0.02). Our findings show that HHT adjusted for tumour location and/or target volume is an effective treatment with an acceptable toxicity profile in patients who are medically inoperable with lung tumours and is not

  14. Imaging and dosimetric errors in 4D PET/CT-guided radiotherapy from patient-specific respiratory patterns: a dynamic motion phantom end-to-end study.

    PubMed

    Bowen, S R; Nyflot, M J; Herrmann, C; Groh, C M; Meyer, J; Wollenweber, S D; Stearns, C W; Kinahan, P E; Sandison, G A

    2015-05-07

    RT delivery under a dose painting paradigm is feasible within an integrated respiratory motion phantom workflow. For a limited set of cases, the magnitude of errors was comparable during PET/CT imaging and treatment delivery without motion compensation. Errors were moderately mitigated during PET/CT imaging and significantly mitigated during RT delivery with motion compensation. This dynamic motion phantom end-to-end workflow provides a method for quality assurance of 4D PET/CT-guided radiotherapy, including evaluation of respiratory motion compensation methods during imaging and treatment delivery.

  15. 11C Choline PET Guided Salvage Radiotherapy with Volumetric Modulation Arc Therapy and Hypofractionation for Recurrent Prostate Cancer after HIFU Failure

    PubMed Central

    Alongi, Filippo; Liardo, Rocco L. E.; Iftode, Cristina; Lopci, Egesta; Villa, Elisa; Comito, Tiziana; Tozzi, Angelo; Navarria, Pierina; Ascolese, Anna M.; Mancosu, Pietro; Tomatis, Stefano; Bellorofonte, Carlo; Arturo, Chiti; Scorsetti, Marta

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to evaluate tolerance, feasibility and acute toxicity in patients undergoing salvage radiotherapy after high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) failure. From 2005 to 2011 a total of 15 patients were treated with HIFU as primary radical treatment. Between July 2011 and February 2013, all 15 patients presented biochemical relapse after HIFU and 11C choline PET documenting intrapostatic-only failure. Salvage EBRT was performed with moderate hypofractionation schedule in 28 fractions with volumetric modulation arc therapy (VMAT). Genito-urinary (GU) and rectal and bowel toxicity were scored by common terminology criteria for adverse events version 4 (CTCAE V.4) scale. Biochemical response was assessed by ASTRO Phoenix criteria. Median age of patients was 67 years (range: 53-85). The median Gleason score was 7 (range: 6-9). The median prostate specific antigen (PSA) at the time of biochemical relapse after HIFU was 5.2 ng/mL (range: 2-64.2). Seven of the 15 patients received androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) started after HIFU failure, interrupted before 11C choline PET and radiotherapy. Median prescribed dose was 71.4 Gy (range: 71.4-74.2 Gy) in 28 fractions. No radiation related major upper gastrointestinal (GI), rectal and GU toxicity were experienced. GU, acute grade 1 and grade 2 toxicities were recorded in 7/15 and 4/15 respectively; bowel acute grade 1 and grade 2 toxicities in 4/15 and 1/15; rectal acute grade 1 and grade 2 toxicities in 3/15 and 2/15 respectively. No grade 3 or greater acute or late toxicities occurred. Biochemical control was assessed in 12/15 (80%) patients. With a median follow up of 12 months, three out of 15 patients, with biochemical relapse, showed lymph-nodal recurrence. Our early clinical results and biochemical data confirm the feasibility and show a good tolerance of the 11C choline PET guided salvage radiation therapy after HIFU failure. The findings of low acute toxicity is encouraging, but longer

  16. The impact of 18 F-FET PET-CT on target definition in image-guided stereotactic radiotherapy in patients with skull base lesions.

    PubMed

    Badakhshi, Harun; Graf, Reinhold; Prasad, Vikas; Budach, Volker

    2014-06-25

    as targets for Image-guided stereotactic Radiotherapy. This has to be investigated prospectively in larger cohorts.

  17. Imaging and dosimetric errors in 4D PET/CT-guided radiotherapy from patient-specific respiratory patterns: a dynamic motion phantom end-to-end study

    PubMed Central

    Bowen, S R; Nyflot, M J; Hermann, C; Groh, C; Meyer, J; Wollenweber, S D; Stearns, C W; Kinahan, P E; Sandison, G A

    2015-01-01

    planning, and RT delivery under a dose painting paradigm is feasible within an integrated respiratory motion phantom workflow. For a limited set of cases, the magnitude of errors was comparable during PET/CT imaging and treatment delivery without motion compensation. Errors were moderately mitigated during PET/CT imaging and significantly mitigated during RT delivery with motion compensation. This dynamic motion phantom end-to-end workflow provides a method for quality assurance of 4D PET/CT-guided radiotherapy, including evaluation of respiratory motion compensation methods during imaging and treatment delivery. PMID:25884892

  18. Accuracy and efficiency of an infrared based positioning and tracking system for patient set-up and monitoring in image guided radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Jing; Xu, Gongming; Pei, Xi; Cao, Ruifen; Hu, Liqin; Wu, Yican

    2015-03-01

    monitoring during image guided radiotherapy treatments.

  19. SU-E-J-14: A Novel Approach to Evaluate the Dosimetric Effect of Rectal Variation During Image Guided Prostate Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, J; McQuaid, D; Dunlop, A; Nill, S; Gulliford, S; Buettner, F; Hall, E; Dearnaley, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Deformable registration establishes the spatial correspondence back to the reference image in order to accumulate dose. However, in prostate radiotherapy the changing shape and volume of the rectum present a challenge to accurate deformable registration and consequently calculation of delivered dose. We explored an alternative approach to calculating accumulated dose to the rectum, independent of deformable registration. Methods: This study was performed on three patients who received online image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) with daily CBCT (XVI-system,Elekta) and target localization using intraprostatic fiducials. On each CBCT, the rectum was manually contoured and bulk density assignments were made allowing dose to be calculated for each fraction. Dose-surface maps (DSM) were generated (MATLAB,Mathworks,Natick,MA) by considering the rectum as a cylinder and sampling the dose at 21-equispaced points on each CT slice. The cylinder was “cut” at the posterior-most position on each CT and unfolded to generate a DSM. These were normalised in the longitudinal direction by interpolation creating maps of 21×21 pixels. A DSM was produced for each CBCT and the dose was accumulated. Results: The mean accumulated delivered rectal surface dose was on average 7.5(+/−3.5)% lower than the planned dose. The dose difference maps consistently show that the greatest variation in dose between planned and delivered dose is away from where the rectal surface is adjacent to the prostate. Conclusion: Estimation of dose accumulation using DSM provides an alternative method for determining actual delivered dose to the rectum. The dose difference is greatest in areas away from the region where the rectal surface abuts the prostate, the region where set-up is verified. The change in size and shape of the rectum was shown to resultin a change in the accumulated dose compared to the planned dose and this will have an impact on determining the relationships between dose delivered

  20. Performance of a Novel Repositioning Head Frame for Gamma Knife Perfexion and Image-Guided Linac-Based Intracranial Stereotactic Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ruschin, Mark; Nayebi, Nazanin; Carlsson, Per; Brown, Kevin

    2010-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the geometric positioning and immobilization performance of a vacuum bite-block repositioning head frame (RHF) system for Perfexion (PFX-SRT) and linac-based intracranial image-guided stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT). Methods and Materials: Patients with intracranial tumors received linac-based image-guided SRT using the RHF for setup and immobilization. Three hundred thirty-three fractions of radiation were delivered in 12 patients. The accuracy of the RHF was estimated for linac-based SRT with online cone-beam CT (CBCT) and for PFX-SRT with a repositioning check tool (RCT) and offline CBCT. The RCT's ability to act as a surrogate for anatomic position was estimated through comparison to CBCT image matching. Immobilization performance was evaluated daily with pre- and postdose delivery CBCT scans and RCT measurements. Results: The correlation coefficient between RCT- and CBCT-reported displacements was 0.59, 0.75, 0.79 (Right, Superior, and Anterior, respectively). For image-guided linac-based SRT, the mean three-dimensional (3D) setup error was 0.8 mm with interpatient ({Sigma}) and interfraction ({sigma}) variations of 0.1 and 0.4 mm, respectively. For PFX-SRT, the initial, uncorrected mean 3D positioning displacement in stereotactic coordinates was 2.0 mm, with {Sigma} = 1.1 mm and {sigma} = 0.8 mm. Considering only RCT setups <1mm (PFX action level) the mean 3D positioning displacement reduced to 1.3 mm, with {Sigma} = 0.9 mm and {sigma} = 0.4 mm. The largest contributing systematic uncertainty was in the superior-inferior direction (mean displacement = -0.5 mm; {Sigma} = 0.9 mm). The largest mean rotation was 0.6{sup o} in pitch. The mean 3D intrafraction motion was 0.4 {+-} 0.3 mm. Conclusion: The RHF provides excellent immobilization for intracranial SRT and PFX-SRT. Some small systematic uncertainties in stereotactic positioning exist and must be considered when generating PFX-SRT treatment plans. The RCT provides reasonable surrogacy

  1. Performance of a novel repositioning head frame for gamma knife perfexion and image-guided linac-based intracranial stereotactic radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ruschin, Mark; Nayebi, Nazanin; Carlsson, Per; Brown, Kevin; Tamerou, Messeret; Li, Winnie; Laperriere, Normand; Sahgal, Arjun; Cho, Young-Bin; Ménard, Cynthia; Jaffray, David

    2010-09-01

    To evaluate the geometric positioning and immobilization performance of a vacuum bite-block repositioning head frame (RHF) system for Perfexion (PFX-SRT) and linac-based intracranial image-guided stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT). Patients with intracranial tumors received linac-based image-guided SRT using the RHF for setup and immobilization. Three hundred thirty-three fractions of radiation were delivered in 12 patients. The accuracy of the RHF was estimated for linac-based SRT with online cone-beam CT (CBCT) and for PFX-SRT with a repositioning check tool (RCT) and offline CBCT. The RCT's ability to act as a surrogate for anatomic position was estimated through comparison to CBCT image matching. Immobilization performance was evaluated daily with pre- and postdose delivery CBCT scans and RCT measurements. The correlation coefficient between RCT- and CBCT-reported displacements was 0.59, 0.75, 0.79 (Right, Superior, and Anterior, respectively). For image-guided linac-based SRT, the mean three-dimensional (3D) setup error was 0.8 mm with interpatient (Sigma) and interfraction (sigma) variations of 0.1 and 0.4 mm, respectively. For PFX-SRT, the initial, uncorrected mean 3D positioning displacement in stereotactic coordinates was 2.0 mm, with Sigma = 1.1 mm and sigma = 0.8 mm. Considering only RCT setups <1mm (PFX action level) the mean 3D positioning displacement reduced to 1.3 mm, with Sigma = 0.9 mm and sigma = 0.4 mm. The largest contributing systematic uncertainty was in the superior-inferior direction (mean displacement = -0.5 mm; Sigma = 0.9 mm). The largest mean rotation was 0.6 degrees in pitch. The mean 3D intrafraction motion was 0.4 +/- 0.3 mm. The RHF provides excellent immobilization for intracranial SRT and PFX-SRT. Some small systematic uncertainties in stereotactic positioning exist and must be considered when generating PFX-SRT treatment plans. The RCT provides reasonable surrogacy for internal anatomic displacement. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc

  2. Atlas-guided generation of pseudo-CT images for MRI-only and hybrid PET-MRI-guided radiotherapy treatment planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arabi, Hossein; Koutsouvelis, Nikolaos; Rouzaud, Michel; Miralbell, Raymond; Zaidi, Habib

    2016-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided attenuation correction (AC) of positron emission tomography (PET) data and/or radiation therapy (RT) treatment planning is challenged by the lack of a direct link between MRI voxel intensities and electron density. Therefore, even if this is not a trivial task, a pseudo-computed tomography (CT) image must be predicted from MRI alone. In this work, we propose a two-step (segmentation and fusion) atlas-based algorithm focusing on bone tissue identification to create a pseudo-CT image from conventional MRI sequences and evaluate its performance against the conventional MRI segmentation technique and a recently proposed multi-atlas approach. The clinical studies consisted of pelvic CT, PET and MRI scans of 12 patients with loco-regionally advanced rectal disease. In the first step, bone segmentation of the target image is optimized through local weighted atlas voting. The obtained bone map is then used to assess the quality of deformed atlases to perform voxel-wise weighted atlas fusion. To evaluate the performance of the method, a leave-one-out cross-validation (LOOCV) scheme was devised to find optimal parameters for the model. Geometric evaluation of the produced pseudo-CT images and quantitative analysis of the accuracy of PET AC were performed. Moreover, a dosimetric evaluation of volumetric modulated arc therapy photon treatment plans calculated using the different pseudo-CT images was carried out and compared to those produced using CT images serving as references. The pseudo-CT images produced using the proposed method exhibit bone identification accuracy of 0.89 based on the Dice similarity metric compared to 0.75 achieved by the other atlas-based method. The superior bone extraction resulted in a mean standard uptake value bias of  -1.5  ±  5.0% (mean  ±  SD) in bony structures compared to  -19.9  ±  11.8% and  -8.1  ±  8.2% achieved by MRI segmentation-based (water

  3. Atlas-guided generation of pseudo-CT images for MRI-only and hybrid PET-MRI-guided radiotherapy treatment planning.

    PubMed

    Arabi, Hossein; Koutsouvelis, Nikolaos; Rouzaud, Michel; Miralbell, Raymond; Zaidi, Habib

    2016-09-07

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided attenuation correction (AC) of positron emission tomography (PET) data and/or radiation therapy (RT) treatment planning is challenged by the lack of a direct link between MRI voxel intensities and electron density. Therefore, even if this is not a trivial task, a pseudo-computed tomography (CT) image must be predicted from MRI alone. In this work, we propose a two-step (segmentation and fusion) atlas-based algorithm focusing on bone tissue identification to create a pseudo-CT image from conventional MRI sequences and evaluate its performance against the conventional MRI segmentation technique and a recently proposed multi-atlas approach. The clinical studies consisted of pelvic CT, PET and MRI scans of 12 patients with loco-regionally advanced rectal disease. In the first step, bone segmentation of the target image is optimized through local weighted atlas voting. The obtained bone map is then used to assess the quality of deformed atlases to perform voxel-wise weighted atlas fusion. To evaluate the performance of the method, a leave-one-out cross-validation (LOOCV) scheme was devised to find optimal parameters for the model. Geometric evaluation of the produced pseudo-CT images and quantitative analysis of the accuracy of PET AC were performed. Moreover, a dosimetric evaluation of volumetric modulated arc therapy photon treatment plans calculated using the different pseudo-CT images was carried out and compared to those produced using CT images serving as references. The pseudo-CT images produced using the proposed method exhibit bone identification accuracy of 0.89 based on the Dice similarity metric compared to 0.75 achieved by the other atlas-based method. The superior bone extraction resulted in a mean standard uptake value bias of  -1.5  ±  5.0% (mean  ±  SD) in bony structures compared to  -19.9  ±  11.8% and  -8.1  ±  8.2% achieved by MRI segmentation-based (water

  4. Clinical Application of High-Dose, Image-Guided Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy in High-Risk Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Bayley, Andrew; Rosewall, Tara; Craig, Tim; Bristow, Rob; Chung, Peter; Gospodarowicz, Mary; Menard, Cynthia; Milosevic, Michael; Warde, Padraig; Catton, Charles

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: To report the feasibility and early toxicity of dose-escalated image-guided IMRT to the pelvic lymph nodes (LN), prostate (P), and seminal vesicles (SV). Methods and Materials: A total of 103 high-risk prostate cancer patients received two-phase, dose-escalated, image-guided IMRT with 3 years of androgen deprivation therapy. Clinical target volumes (CTVs) were delineated using computed tomography/magnetic resonance co-registration and included the prostate, portions of the SV, and the LN. Planning target volume margins (PTV) used were as follows: P (10 mm, 7 mm posteriorly), SV (10 mm), and LN (5 mm). Organs at risk (OaR) were the rectal and bladder walls, femoral heads, and large and small bowel. The IMRT was planned with an intended dose of 55.1 Gy in 29 fractions to all CTVs (Phase 1), with P+SV consecutive boost of 24.7 Gy in 13 fractions. Daily online image guidance was performed using bony landmarks and intraprostatic markers. Feasibility criteria included delivery of intended doses in 80% of patients, 95% of CTV displacements incorporated within PTV during Phase 1, and acute toxicity rate comparable to that of lower-dose pelvic techniques. Results: A total of 91 patients (88%) received the total prescription dose. All patients received at least 72 Gy. In Phase 1, 63 patients (61%) received the intended 55.1 Gy, whereas 87% of patients received at least 50 Gy. Dose reductions were caused by small bowel and rectal wall constraints. All CTVs received the planned dose in >95% of treatment fractions. There were no Radiation Therapy Oncology Group acute toxicities greater than Grade 3, although there were five incidences equivalent to Grade 3 within a median follow-up of 23 months. Conclusion: These results suggest that dose escalation to the PLN+P+SV using IMRT is feasible, with acceptable rates of acute toxicity.

  5. Tissue feature-based intra-fractional motion tracking for stereoscopic x-ray image guided radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yaoqin; Xing, Lei; Gu, Jia; Liu, Wu

    2013-06-07

    Real-time knowledge of tumor position during radiation therapy is essential to overcome the adverse effect of intra-fractional organ motion. The goal of this work is to develop a tumor tracking strategy by effectively utilizing the inherent image features of stereoscopic x-ray images acquired during dose delivery. In stereoscopic x-ray image guided radiation delivery, two orthogonal x-ray images are acquired either simultaneously or sequentially. The essence of markerless tumor tracking is the reliable identification of inherent points with distinct tissue features on each projection image and their association between two images. The identification of the feature points on a planar x-ray image is realized by searching for points with high intensity gradient. The feature points are associated by using the scale invariance features transform descriptor. The performance of the proposed technique is evaluated by using images of a motion phantom and four archived clinical cases acquired using either a CyberKnife equipped with a stereoscopic x-ray imaging system, or a LINAC equipped with an onboard kV imager and an electronic portal imaging device. In the phantom study, the results obtained using the proposed method agree with the measurements to within 2 mm in all three directions. In the clinical study, the mean error is 0.48 ± 0.46 mm for four patient data with 144 sequential images. In this work, a tissue feature-based tracking method for stereoscopic x-ray image guided radiation therapy is developed. The technique avoids the invasive procedure of fiducial implantation and may greatly facilitate the clinical workflow.

  6. Tissue feature-based intra-fractional motion tracking for stereoscopic x-ray image guided radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yaoqin; Xing, Lei; Gu, Jia; Liu, Wu

    2013-06-01

    Real-time knowledge of tumor position during radiation therapy is essential to overcome the adverse effect of intra-fractional organ motion. The goal of this work is to develop a tumor tracking strategy by effectively utilizing the inherent image features of stereoscopic x-ray images acquired during dose delivery. In stereoscopic x-ray image guided radiation delivery, two orthogonal x-ray images are acquired either simultaneously or sequentially. The essence of markerless tumor tracking is the reliable identification of inherent points with distinct tissue features on each projection image and their association between two images. The identification of the feature points on a planar x-ray image is realized by searching for points with high intensity gradient. The feature points are associated by using the scale invariance features transform descriptor. The performance of the proposed technique is evaluated by using images of a motion phantom and four archived clinical cases acquired using either a CyberKnife equipped with a stereoscopic x-ray imaging system, or a LINAC equipped with an onboard kV imager and an electronic portal imaging device. In the phantom study, the results obtained using the proposed method agree with the measurements to within 2 mm in all three directions. In the clinical study, the mean error is 0.48 ± 0.46 mm for four patient data with 144 sequential images. In this work, a tissue feature-based tracking method for stereoscopic x-ray image guided radiation therapy is developed. The technique avoids the invasive procedure of fiducial implantation and may greatly facilitate the clinical workflow.

  7. First Clinical Release of an Online, Adaptive, Aperture-Based Image-Guided Radiotherapy Strategy in Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy to Correct for Inter- and Intrafractional Rotations of the Prostate

    SciTech Connect

    Deutschmann, Heinz; Kametriser, Gerhard; Steininger, Philipp; Scherer, Philipp; Schoeller, Helmut; Gaisberger, Christoph; Mooslechner, Michaela; Mitterlechner, Bernhard; Weichenberger, Harald; Fastner, Gert; Wurstbauer, Karl; Jeschke, Stephan; Forstner, Rosemarie; Sedlmayer, Felix

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: We developed and evaluated a correction strategy for prostate rotations using direct adaptation of segments in intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Method and Materials: Implanted fiducials (four gold markers) were used to determine interfractional translations, rotations, and dilations of the prostate. We used hybrid imaging: The markers were automatically detected in two pretreatment planar X-ray projections; their actual position in three-dimensional space was reconstructed from these images at first. The structure set comprising prostate, seminal vesicles, and adjacent rectum wall was transformed accordingly in 6 degrees of freedom. Shapes of IMRT segments were geometrically adapted in a class solution forward-planning approach, derived within seconds on-site and treated immediately. Intrafractional movements were followed in MV electronic portal images captured on the fly. Results: In 31 of 39 patients, for 833 of 1013 fractions (supine, flat couch, knee support, comfortably full bladder, empty rectum, no intraprostatic marker migrations >2 mm of more than one marker), the online aperture adaptation allowed safe reduction of margins clinical target volume-planning target volume (prostate) down to 5 mm when only interfractional corrections were applied: Dominant L-R rotations were found to be 5.3 Degree-Sign (mean of means), standard deviation of means {+-}4.9 Degree-Sign , maximum at 30.7 Degree-Sign . Three-dimensional vector translations relative to skin markings were 9.3 {+-} 4.4 mm (maximum, 23.6 mm). Intrafractional movements in 7.7 {+-} 1.5 min (maximum, 15.1 min) between kV imaging and last beam's electronic portal images showed further L-R rotations of 2.5 Degree-Sign {+-} 2.3 Degree-Sign (maximum, 26.9 Degree-Sign ), and three-dimensional vector translations of 3.0 {+-}3.7 mm (maximum, 10.2 mm). Addressing intrafractional errors could further reduce margins to 3 mm. Conclusion: We demonstrated the clinical feasibility of an online

  8. SU-E-J-47: Development of a High-Precision, Image-Guided Radiotherapy, Multi- Purpose Radiation Isocenter Quality-Assurance Calibration and Checking System

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C; Yan, G; Helmig, R; Lebron, S; Kahler, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To develop a system that can define the radiation isocenter and correlate this information with couch coordinates, laser alignment, optical distance indicator (ODI) settings, optical tracking system (OTS) calibrations, and mechanical isocenter walkout. Methods: Our team developed a multi-adapter, multi-purpose quality assurance (QA) and calibration device that uses an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) and in-house image-processing software to define the radiation isocenter, thereby allowing linear accelerator (Linac) components to be verified and calibrated. Motivated by the concept that each Linac component related to patient setup for image-guided radiotherapy based on cone-beam CT should be calibrated with respect to the radiation isocenter, we designed multiple concentric adapters of various materials and shapes to meet the needs of MV and KV radiation isocenter definition, laser alignment, and OTS calibration. The phantom's ability to accurately define the radiation isocenter was validated on 4 Elekta Linacs using a commercial ball bearing (BB) phantom as a reference. Radiation isocenter walkout and the accuracy of couch coordinates, ODI, and OTS were then quantified with the device. Results: The device was able to define the radiation isocenter within 0.3 mm. Radiation isocenter walkout was within ±1 mm at 4 cardinal angles. By switching adapters, we identified that the accuracy of the couch position digital readout, ODI, OTS, and mechanical isocenter walkout was within sub-mm. Conclusion: This multi-adapter, multi-purpose isocenter phantom can be used to accurately define the radiation isocenter and represents a potential paradigm shift in Linac QA. Moreover, multiple concentric adapters allowed for sub-mm accuracy for the other relevant components. This intuitive and user-friendly design is currently patent pending.

  9. SU-E-J-151: Dosimetric Evaluation of DIR Mapped Contours for Image Guided Adaptive Radiotherapy with 4D Cone-Beam CT

    SciTech Connect

    Balik, S; Weiss, E; Williamson, J; Hugo, G; Jan, N; Zhang, L; Roman, N; Christensen, G

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To estimate dosimetric errors resulting from using contours deformably mapped from planning CT to 4D cone beam CT (CBCT) images for image-guided adaptive radiotherapy of locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods: Ten locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients underwent one planning 4D fan-beam CT (4DFBCT) and weekly 4DCBCT scans. Multiple physicians delineated the gross tumor volume (GTV) and normal structures in planning CT images and only GTV in CBCT images. Manual contours were mapped from planning CT to CBCTs using small deformation, inverse consistent linear elastic (SICLE) algorithm for two scans in each patient. Two physicians reviewed and rated the DIR-mapped (auto) and manual GTV contours as clinically acceptable (CA), clinically acceptable after minor modification (CAMM) and unacceptable (CU). Mapped normal structures were visually inspected and corrected if necessary, and used to override tissue density for dose calculation. CTV (6mm expansion of GTV) and PTV (5mm expansion of CTV) were created. VMAT plans were generated using the DIR-mapped contours to deliver 66 Gy in 33 fractions with 95% and 100% coverage (V66) to PTV and CTV, respectively. Plan evaluation for V66 was based on manual PTV and CTV contours. Results: Mean PTV V66 was 84% (range 75% – 95%) and mean CTV V66 was 97% (range 93% – 100%) for CAMM scored plans (12 plans); and was 90% (range 80% – 95%) and 99% (range 95% – 100%) for CA scored plans (7 plans). The difference in V66 between CAMM and CA was significant for PTV (p = 0.03) and approached significance for CTV (p = 0.07). Conclusion: The quality of DIR-mapped contours directly impacted the plan quality for 4DCBCT-based adaptation. Larger safety margins may be needed when planning with auto contours for IGART with 4DCBCT images. Reseach was supported by NIH P01CA116602.

  10. Interfractional Prostate Shifts: Review of 1870 Computed Tomography (CT) Scans Obtained During Image-Guided Radiotherapy Using CT-on-Rails for the Treatment of Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, James R. Gao Zhanrong; Uematsu, Minoru; Merrick, Scott; Machernis, Nolan P.; Chen, Timothy; Cheng, C.W.

    2008-12-01

    Purpose: To review 1870 CT scans of interfractional prostate shift obtained during image-guided radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 1870 pretreatment CT scans were acquired with CT-on-rails, and the corresponding shift data for 329 patients with prostate cancer were analyzed. Results: Of the 1870 scans reviewed, 44% required no setup adjustments in the anterior-posterior (AP) direction, 14% had shifts of 3-5 mm, 29% had shifts of 6-10 mm, and 13% had shifts of >10 mm. In the superior-inferior direction, 81% had no adjustments, 2% had shifts of 3-5 mm, 15% had shifts of 6-10 mm, and 2% had shifts of >10 mm. In the left-right direction, 65% had no adjustment, 13% had shifts of 3-5 mm, 17% had shifts of 6-10 mm, and 5% had shifts of >10 mm. Further analysis of the first 66 consecutive patients divided into three groups according to body mass index indicates that the shift in the AP direction for the overweight subgroup was statistically larger than those for the control and obese subgroups (p < 0.05). The interfractional shift in the lateral direction for the obese group (1 SD, 5.5 mm) was significantly larger than those for the overweight and control groups (4.1 and 2.9 mm, respectively) (p < 0.001). Conclusions: These data demonstrate that there is a significantly greater shift in the AP direction than in the lateral and superior-inferior directions for the entire patient group. Overweight and obese patient groups show a significant difference from the control group in terms of prostate shift.

  11. Residual Seminal Vesicle Displacement in Marker-Based Image-Guided Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer and the Impact on Margin Design

    SciTech Connect

    Smitsmans, Monique H.P.; Bois, Josien de; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Catton, Charles N.; Jaffray, David A.; Lebesque, Joos V.; Herk, Marcel van

    2011-06-01

    Purpose: The objectives of this study were to quantify residual interfraction displacement of seminal vesicles (SV) and investigate the efficacy of rotation correction on SV displacement in marker-based prostate image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT). We also determined the effect of marker registration on the measured SV displacement and its impact on margin design. Methods and Materials: SV displacement was determined relative to marker registration by using 296 cone beam computed tomography scans of 13 prostate cancer patients with implanted markers. SV were individually registered in the transverse plane, based on gray-value information. The target registration error (TRE) for the SV due to marker registration inaccuracies was estimated. Correlations between prostate gland rotations and SV displacement and between individual SV displacements were determined. Results: The SV registration success rate was 99%. Displacement amounts of both SVs were comparable. Systematic and random residual SV displacements were 1.6 mm and 2.0 mm in the left-right direction, respectively, and 2.8 mm and 3.1 mm in the anteroposterior (AP) direction, respectively. Rotation correction did not reduce residual SV displacement. Prostate gland rotation around the left-right axis correlated with SV AP displacement (R{sup 2} = 42%); a correlation existed between both SVs for AP displacement (R{sup 2} = 62%); considerable correlation existed between random errors of SV displacement and TRE (R{sup 2} = 34%). Conclusions: Considerable residual SV displacement exists in marker-based IGRT. Rotation correction barely reduced SV displacement, rather, a larger SV displacement was shown relative to the prostate gland that was not captured by the marker position. Marker registration error partly explains SV displacement when correcting for rotations. Correcting for rotations, therefore, is not advisable when SV are part of the target volume. Margin design for SVs should take these uncertainties into

  12. Dosimetric Advantages of Four-Dimensional Adaptive Image-Guided Radiotherapy for Lung Tumors Using Online Cone-Beam Computed Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Harsolia, Asif; Hugo, Geoffrey D.; Kestin, Larry L. Grills, Inga S.; Yan Di

    2008-02-01

    Purpose: This study compares multiple planning techniques designed to improve accuracy while allowing reduced planning target volume (PTV) margins though image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) with four-dimensional (4D) cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Methods and Materials: Free-breathing planning and 4D-CBCT scans were obtained in 8 patients with lung tumors. Four plans were generated for each patient: 3D-conformal, 4D-union, 4D-offline adaptive with a single correction (offline ART), and 4D-online adaptive with daily correction (online ART). For the 4D-union plan, the union of gross tumor volumes from all phases of the 4D-CBCT was created with a 5-mm expansion applied for setup uncertainty. For offline and online ART, the gross tumor volume was delineated at the mean position of tumor motion from the 4D-CBCT. The PTV margins were calculated from the random components of tumor motion and setup uncertainty. Results: Adaptive IGRT techniques provided better PTV coverage with less irradiated normal tissues. Compared with 3D plans, mean relative decreases in PTV volumes were 15%, 39%, and 44% using 4D-union, offline ART, and online ART planning techniques, respectively. This resulted in mean lung volume receiving {>=} 20Gy (V20) relative decreases of 21%, 23%, and 31% and mean lung dose relative decreases of 16%, 26%, and 31% for the 4D-union, 4D-offline ART, and 4D-online ART, respectively. Conclusions: Adaptive IGRT using CBCT is feasible for the treatment of patients with lung tumors and significantly decreases PTV volume and dose to normal tissues, allowing for the possibility of dose escalation. All analyzed 4D planning strategies resulted in improvements over 3D plans, with 4D-online ART appearing optimal.

  13. Scapula alata in early breast cancer patients enrolled in a randomized clinical trial of post-surgery short-course image-guided radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Scapula alata (SA) is a known complication of breast surgery associated with palsy of the serratus anterior, but it is seldom mentioned. We evaluated the risk factors associated with SA and the relationship of SA with ipsilateral shoulder/arm morbidity in a series of patients enrolled in a trial of post-surgery radiotherapy (RT). Methods The trial randomized women with completely resected stage I-II breast cancer to short-course image-guided RT, versus conventional RT. SA, arm volume and shoulder-arm mobility were measured prior to RT and at one to three months post-RT. Shoulder/arm morbidities were computed as a post-RT percentage change relative to pre-RT measurements. Results Of 119 evaluable patients, 13 (= 10.9%) had pre-RT SA. Age younger than 50 years old, a body mass index less than 25 kg/m2, and axillary lymph node dissection were significant risk factors, with odds ratios of 4.8 (P = 0.009), 6.1 (P = 0.016), and 6.1 (P = 0.005), respectively. Randomization group was not significant. At one to three months’ post-RT, mean arm volume increased by 4.1% (P = 0.036) and abduction decreased by 8.6% (P = 0.046) among SA patients, but not among non-SA patients. SA resolved in eight, persisted in five, and appeared in one patient. Conclusion The relationship of SA with lower body mass index suggests that SA might have been underestimated in overweight patients. Despite apparent resolution of SA in most patients, pre-RT SA portended an increased risk of shoulder/arm morbidity. We argue that SA warrants further investigation. Incidentally, the observation of SA occurring after RT in one patient represents the second case of post-RT SA reported in the literature. PMID:22591589

  14. Technical Note: Radiological properties of tissue surrogates used in a multimodality deformable pelvic phantom for MR-guided radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Niebuhr, Nina I. Johnen, Wibke; Güldaglar, Timur; Runz, Armin; Echner, Gernot; Mann, Philipp; Möhler, Christian; Pfaffenberger, Asja; Greilich, Steffen; Jäkel, Oliver

    2016-02-15

    Purpose: Phantom surrogates were developed to allow multimodal [computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and teletherapy] and anthropomorphic tissue simulation as well as materials and methods to construct deformable organ shapes and anthropomorphic bone models. Methods: Agarose gels of variable concentrations and loadings were investigated to simulate various soft tissue types. Oils, fats, and Vaseline were investigated as surrogates for adipose tissue and bone marrow. Anthropomorphic shapes of bone and organs were realized using 3D-printing techniques based on segmentations of patient CT-scans. All materials were characterized in dual energy CT and MRI to adapt CT numbers, electron density, effective atomic number, as well as T1- and T2-relaxation times to patient and literature values. Results: Soft tissue simulation could be achieved with agarose gels in combination with a gadolinium-based contrast agent and NaF to simulate muscle, prostate, and tumor tissues. Vegetable oils were shown to be a good representation for adipose tissue in all modalities. Inner bone was realized using a mixture of Vaseline and K{sub 2}HPO{sub 4}, resulting in both a fatty bone marrow signal in MRI and inhomogeneous areas of low and high attenuation in CT. The high attenuation of outer bone was additionally adapted by applying gypsum bandages to the 3D-printed hollow bone case with values up to 1200 HU. Deformable hollow organs were manufactured using silicone. Signal loss in the MR images based on the conductivity of the gels needs to be further investigated. Conclusions: The presented surrogates and techniques allow the customized construction of multimodality, anthropomorphic, and deformable phantoms as exemplarily shown for a pelvic phantom, which is intended to study adaptive treatment scenarios in MR-guided radiation therapy.

  15. Cone-beam CT-guided radiotherapy in the management of lung cancer: Diagnostic and therapeutic value.

    PubMed

    Elsayad, Khaled; Kriz, Jan; Reinartz, Gabriele; Scobioala, Sergiu; Ernst, Iris; Haverkamp, Uwe; Eich, Hans Theodor

    2016-02-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated an increase in the necessity of adaptive planning over the course of lung cancer radiation therapy (RT) treatment. In this study, we evaluated intrathoracic changes detected by cone-beam CT (CBCT) in lung cancer patients during RT. A total of 71 lung cancer patients treated with fractionated CBCT-guided RT were evaluated. Intrathoracic changes and plan adaptation priority (AP) scores were compared between small cell lung cancer (SCLC, n = 13) and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC, n = 58) patients. The median cumulative radiation dose administered was 54 Gy (range 30-72 Gy) and the median fraction dose was 1.8 Gy (range 1.8-3.0 Gy). All patients were subjected to a CBCT scan at least weekly (range 1-5/week). We observed intrathoracic changes in 83 % of the patients over the course of RT [58 % (41/71) regression, 17 % (12/71) progression, 20 % (14/71) atelectasis, 25 % (18/71) pleural effusion, 13 % (9/71) infiltrative changes, and 10 % (7/71) anatomical shift]. Nearly half, 45 % (32/71), of the patients had one intrathoracic soft tissue change, 22.5 % (16/71) had two, and three or more changes were observed in 15.5 % (11/71) of the patients. Plan modifications were performed in 60 % (43/71) of the patients. Visual volume reduction did correlate with the number of CBCT scans acquired (r = 0.313, p = 0.046) and with the timing of chemotherapy administration (r = 0.385, p = 0.013). Weekly CBCT monitoring provides an adaptation advantage in patients with lung cancer. In this study, the monitoring allowed for plan adaptations due to tumor volume changes and to other anatomical changes.

  16. Polymeric micelles as a diagnostic tool for image-guided drug delivery and radiotherapy of HER2 overexpressing breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoang, Nu Bryan

    Block copolymer micelles have emerged as a viable formulation strategy with several drugs relying on this technology in clinical evaluation. To date, information on the tumor penetration and intratumoral distribution of block copolymer micelles (BCM) has been quite limited. Thus, there is impetus to develop a radiolabeled formulation that can be used to gain invaluable insight into the intratumoral distribution of the BCMs. This information could then be used to direct formulation strategies as a means to optimize treatment outcomes. This thesis describes the synthesis and characterization of a targeted block copolymer micelle system based on poly(ethylene glycol)-block -poly(epsilon-caprolactone) labeled with the radionuclide Indium-111 (111In). The incorporation of the imageable component, 111In permits pursuit of image-guided drug delivery for real-time monitoring of tumor localization and intratumoral distribution. Intracellular trafficking of drugs and therapies such as Auger electron emitting radionuclides to perinuclear and nuclear regions of cells is critical to realizing their full therapeutic potential. HER2 specific antibodies (trastuzumab fab fragments) and nuclear localization signal peptides were conjugated to the surface of the BCMs to direct uptake in HER2 expressing cells and subsequent localization in the cell nucleus. Cell uptake was HER2 density dependent, confirming receptor-mediated internalization of the BCMs. Importantly, conjugation of NLS resulted in a significant increase in nuclear uptake of the radionuclide 111In. Successful nuclear targeting was shown to improve the antiproliferative effect of the Auger electrons. In addition, a significant radiation enhancement effect was observed by concurrent delivery of low-dose MTX and 111In in all breast cancer cell lines evaluated. Imaging enabled the accurate quantification of the specific tumor uptake of the micelles and visualization of their degree of tumor penetration in relation to

  17. Dosimetric implications of residual seminal vesicle motion in fiducial-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Stenmark, Matthew H.; Vineberg, Karen; Ten Haken, Randall K.; Hamstra, Daniel A.; Feng, Mary

    2012-10-01

    To determine whether residual interfraction seminal vesicle (SV) displacement necessitates specific planning target volume (PTV) margins during fiducial-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) of the prostate. A planning computed tomography (CT) scan and 2 subsequent CT scans were prospectively obtained for 20 prostate cancer patients with intraprostatic fiducial markers. After CT registration, SV displacement relative to the prostate was quantified as a function of margin size for both the proximal (1 cm) SV (PSV) and the full SV (FSV). Two IMRT plans were simulated for each patient (prostate + PSV and prostate + FSV) both with a uniform 5-mm PTV margin. Minimum clinical target volume (CTV) dose (D{sub min}) and the volume of SV receiving 95% of the prescription dose (V{sub 95%}) were assessed during treatment and compared with the initial plan. In all cases, SV displacement with respect to the prostate was greater for the FSV compared with the PSV. To ensure at least 95% geometrical coverage of the CTV for 90% of patients, margins of 5 and 8 mm were required for the PSV and FSV, respectively. Dosimetrically, residual SV displacement had minimal impact on PSV coverage compared with FSV coverage. For the PSV D{sub min} was {>=}95% of the prescribed dose in 90% of patients with an overall mean V{sub 95%} of 99.6 {+-} 0.8%; for the FSV D{sub min} was {>=}95% of the prescribed dose in only 45% of patients with a mean V{sub 95%} of 97.9 {+-} 2.4%. The SVs move differentially from the prostate and exhibit greater variation with increasing distance from the prostate. For plans targeting just the prostate and PSVs, 5-mm PTV expansions are adequate. However, despite daily localization of the prostate, larger PTV margins are required for cases where the intent is to completely cover the FSV.

  18. Image-Guided Radiotherapy for Cervix Cancer: High-Tech External Beam Therapy Versus High-Tech Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Georg, Dietmar Kirisits, Christian; Hillbrand, Martin; Dimopoulos, Johannes; Poetter, Richard

    2008-07-15

    Purpose: Many studies comparing external-beam therapy (EBT) and brachytherapy (BT) are biased because advanced EBT is compared with conventional BT. This study compares high-tech EBT against high-tech BT. Methods and Materials: Nine patients were selected with locally advanced cervix cancer, representing typical clinical situations according to initial tumor extension and response after EBT. Patients were treated either with intracavitary, combined interstitial/intracavitary, or complex interstitial BT. Gross tumor volume, high-risk clinical target volume (CTV), intermediate-risk CTV, bladder, rectum, and sigmoid were delineated. Magnetic resonance-guided BT planning was manually optimized with respect to organ dose limits. Margins (3 and 5 mm) were added to BT CTVs to construct planning target volumes (PTVs) for EBT. Inversely planned EBT with photons (IMRT) and protons (IMPT) was challenged to deliver the highest possible doses to PTVs while respecting D{sub 1cc} and D{sub 2cc} limits from BT, assuming the same fractionation (4 x 7 Gy). The D90 for target structures and normal tissue volumes receiving fractionated doses between 3 and 7 Gy were compared. Results: High-risk CTV doses depended on the clinical situation and radiation quality. If IMRT was limited to D{sub 2cc} and D{sub 1cc} from BT, the D90 for high-risk PTV and intermediate-risk PTV was mostly lower. Volumes receiving 60 Gy (in equivalent dose in 20 Gy fractions) were approximately twice as large for IMRT compared with BT. For IMPT, this volume ratio was lower. Planning target volume doses of IMPT plans with 3-mm margins were comparable to those with BT. Gross tumor volume doses were mostly lower for both IMRT and IMPT. Conclusion: For benchmarking high-tech EBT, high-tech BT techniques have to be used. For cervix cancer boost treatments, both IMRT and IMPT seem to be inferior to advanced BT.

  19. SU-E-J-12: An Image-Guided Soft Robotic Patient Positioning System for Maskless Head-And-Neck Cancer Radiotherapy: A Proof-Of-Concept Study

    SciTech Connect

    Ogunmolu, O; Gans, N; Jiang, S; Gu, X

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: We propose a surface-image-guided soft robotic patient positioning system for maskless head-and-neck radiotherapy. The ultimate goal of this project is to utilize a soft robot to realize non-rigid patient positioning and real-time motion compensation. In this proof-of-concept study, we design a position-based visual servoing control system for an air-bladder-based soft robot and investigate its performance in controlling the flexion/extension cranial motion on a mannequin head phantom. Methods: The current system consists of Microsoft Kinect depth camera, an inflatable air bladder (IAB), pressured air source, pneumatic valve actuators, custom-built current regulators, and a National Instruments myRIO microcontroller. The performance of the designed system was evaluated on a mannequin head, with a ball joint fixed below its neck to simulate torso-induced head motion along flexion/extension direction. The IAB is placed beneath the mannequin head. The Kinect camera captures images of the mannequin head, extracts the face, and measures the position of the head relative to the camera. This distance is sent to the myRIO, which runs control algorithms and sends actuation commands to the valves, inflating and deflating the IAB to induce head motion. Results: For a step input, i.e. regulation of the head to a constant displacement, the maximum error was a 6% overshoot, which the system then reduces to 0% steady-state error. In this initial investigation, the settling time to reach the regulated position was approximately 8 seconds, with 2 seconds of delay between the command start of motion due to capacitance of the pneumatics, for a total of 10 seconds to regulate the error. Conclusion: The surface image-guided soft robotic patient positioning system can achieve accurate mannequin head flexion/extension motion. Given this promising initial Result, the extension of the current one-dimensional soft robot control to multiple IABs for non-rigid positioning control

  20. Setup Variations in Radiotherapy of Anal Cancer: Advantages of Target Volume Reduction Using Image-Guided Radiation Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Yijen; Suh, Steve; Nelson, Rebecca A.; Liu An; Pezner, Richard D.; Wong, Jeffrey Y.C.

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To define setup variations in the radiation treatment (RT) of anal cancer and to report the advantages of image-guided RT (IGRT) in terms of reduction of target volume and treatment-related side effects. Methods and Materials: Twelve consecutive patients with anal cancer treated by combined chemoradiation by use of helical tomotherapy from March 2007 to November 2008 were selected. With patients immobilized and positioned in place, megavoltage computed tomography (MVCT) scans were performed before each treatment and were automatically registered to planning CT scans. Patients were shifted per the registration data and treated. A total of 365 MVCT scans were analyzed. The primary site received a median dose of 55 Gy. To evaluate the potential dosimetric advantage(s) of IGRT, cases were replanned according to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0529, with and without adding recommended setup variations from the current study. Results: Significant setup variations were observed throughout the course of RT. The standard deviations for systematic setup correction in the anterior-posterior (AP), lateral, and superior-inferior (SI) directions and roll rotation were 1.1, 3.6, and 3.2 mm, and 0.3 Degree-Sign , respectively. The average random setup variations were 3.8, 5.5, and 2.9 mm, and 0.5 Degree-Sign , respectively. Without daily IGRT, margins of 4.9, 11.1, and 8.5 mm in the AP, lateral, and SI directions would have been needed to ensure that the planning target volume (PTV) received {>=}95% of the prescribed dose. Conversely, daily IGRT required no extra margins on PTV and resulted in a significant reduction of V15 and V45 of intestine and V10 of pelvic bone marrow. Favorable toxicities were observed, except for acute hematologic toxicity. Conclusions: Daily MVCT scans before each treatment can effectively detect setup variations and thereby reduce PTV margins in the treatment of anal cancer. The use of concurrent chemotherapy and IGRT provided favorable

  1. Technical Note: Dose effects of 1.5 T transverse magnetic field on tissue interfaces in MRI-guided radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xinfeng; Prior, Phil; Chen, Guang-Pei; Schultz, Christopher J; Li, X Allen

    2016-08-01

    significantly reduced in most cases. The doses on tissue interfaces can be significantly changed by the presence of a TMF during MR-guided RT when the magnetic field is not included in plan optimization. These changes can be substantially reduced or even eliminated during VMAT/IMRT optimization that specifically considers the TMF, without deteriorating overall plan quality.

  2. Technological Progress on Multi-Beam Klystrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Yaogen

    2006-01-01

    The technological progress on Multi-Beam Klystrons (MBKs) at the Institute of Electronics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (IECAS) is presented in this paper. Topics to be discussed include the development of cathodes with high current densities and low evaporation rates; multi-beam electron guns with reduced chances for breakdown; multi-beam electron optics systems with high beam transmission; RF systems with wide bandwidth and high efficiency; the oscillation and broad spectrum noise caused by non-operational modes and reflecting electrons; and computer simulations of the multi-beam electron optics system and beam-wave interaction. In addition, the research progress of several types of MBKs developed in IECAS is reported. These MBKs range in frequency from L- to X-band with corresponding peak powers ranging from several tens to several hundreds of kilowatts, average powers from several kilowatts to tens of kilowatts, and bandwidths from 3% to 12%.

  3. Innovations in Radiotherapy Technology.

    PubMed

    Feain, I J; Court, L; Palta, J R; Beddar, S; Keall, P

    2017-02-01

    Many low- and middle-income countries, together with remote and low socioeconomic populations within high-income countries, lack the resources and services to deal with cancer. The challenges in upgrading or introducing the necessary services are enormous, from screening and diagnosis to radiotherapy planning/treatment and quality assurance. There are severe shortages not only in equipment, but also in the capacity to train, recruit and retain staff as well as in their ongoing professional development via effective international peer-review and collaboration. Here we describe some examples of emerging technology innovations based on real-time software and cloud-based capabilities that have the potential to redress some of these areas. These include: (i) automatic treatment planning to reduce physics staffing shortages, (ii) real-time image-guided adaptive radiotherapy technologies, (iii) fixed-beam radiotherapy treatment units that use patient (rather than gantry) rotation to reduce infrastructure costs and staff-to-patient ratios, (iv) cloud-based infrastructure programmes to facilitate international collaboration and quality assurance and (v) high dose rate mobile cobalt brachytherapy techniques for intraoperative radiotherapy. Copyright © 2016 The Royal College of Radiologists. All rights reserved.

  4. Adaptive Image-Guided Radiotherapy (IGRT) Eliminates the Risk of Biochemical Failure Caused by the Bias of Rectal Distension in Prostate Cancer Treatment Planning: Clinical Evidence

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Sean S.; Yan Di; McGrath, Samuel; Dilworth, Joshua T.; Liang Jian; Ye Hong; Krauss, Daniel J.; Martinez, Alvaro A.; Kestin, Larry L.

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: Rectal distension has been shown to decrease the probability of biochemical control. Adaptive image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) corrects for target position and volume variations, reducing the risk of biochemical failure while yielding acceptable rates of gastrointestinal (GI)/genitourinary (GU) toxicities. Methods and Materials: Between 1998 and 2006, 962 patients were treated with computed tomography (CT)-based offline adaptive IGRT. Patients were stratified into low (n = 400) vs. intermediate/high (n = 562) National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) risk groups. Target motion was assessed with daily CT during the first week. Electronic portal imaging device (EPID) was used to measure daily setup error. Patient-specific confidence-limited planning target volumes (cl-PTV) were then constructed, reducing the standard PTV and compensating for geometric variation of the target and setup errors. Rectal volume (RV), cross-sectional area (CSA), and rectal volume from the seminal vesicles to the inferior prostate (SVP) were assessed on the planning CT. The impact of these volumetric parameters on 5-year biochemical control (BC) and chronic Grades {>=}2 and 3 GU and GI toxicity were examined. Results: Median follow-up was 5.5 years. Median minimum dose covering cl-PTV was 75.6 Gy. Median values for RV, CSA, and SVP were 82.8 cm{sup 3}, 5.6 cm{sup 2}, and 53.3 cm{sup 3}, respectively. The 5-year BC was 89% for the entire group: 96% for low risk and 83% for intermediate/high risk (p < 0.001). No statistically significant differences in BC were seen with stratification by RV, CSA, and SVP in quartiles. Maximum chronic Grades {>=}2 and 3 GI toxicities were 21.2% and 2.9%, respectively. Respective values for GU toxicities were 15.5% and 4.3%. No differences in GI or GU toxicities were noted when patients were stratified by RV. Conclusions: Incorporation of adaptive IGRT reduces the risk of geometric miss and results in excellent biochemical control that is

  5. Setup deviations for whole-breast radiotherapy with TomoDirect: A comparison of weekly and biweekly image-guided protocols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Jae Hong; Jung, Joo-Young; Bae, Sun Hyun; Moon, Seong Kwon; Cho, Kwang Hwan

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare patient setup deviations for different image-guided protocols (weekly vs. biweekly) that are used in TomoDirect three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (TD-3DCRT) for whole-breast radiation therapy (WBRT). A total of 138 defined megavoltage computed tomography (MVCT) image sets from 46 breast cancer cases were divided into two groups based on the imaging acquisition times: weekly or biweekly. The mean error, three-dimensional setup displacement error (3D-error), systematic error (Σ), and random error (σ) were calculated for each group. The 3D-errors were 4.29 ± 1.11 mm and 5.02 ± 1.85 mm for the weekly and biweekly groups, respectively; the biweekly error was 14.6% higher than the weekly error. The systematic errors in the roll angle and the x, y, and z directions were 0.48°, 1.72 mm, 2.18 mm, and 1.85 mm for the weekly protocol and 0.21°, 1.24 mm, 1.39 mm, and 1.85 mm for the biweekly protocol. Random errors in the roll angle and the x, y, and z directions were 25.7%, 40.6%, 40.0%, and 40.8% higher in the biweekly group than in the weekly group. For the x, y, and z directions, the distributions of the treatment frequency at less than 5 mm were 98.6%, 91.3%, and 94.2% in the weekly group and 94.2%, 89.9%, and 82.6% in the biweekly group. Moreover, the roll angles with 0 - 1° were 79.7% and 89.9% in the weekly and the biweekly groups, respectively. Overall, the evaluation of setup deviations for the two protocols revealed no significant differences (p > 0.05). Reducing the frequency of MVCT imaging could have promising effects on imaging doses and machine times during treatment. However, the biweekly protocol was associated with increased random setup deviations in the treatment. We have demonstrated a biweekly protocol of TD-3DCRT for WBRT, and we anticipate that our method may provide an alternative approach for considering the uncertainties in the patient setup.

  6. Status of Multi-Beam Long Trace- Profiler Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gubarev, Mikhail V.; Kilaru, Kiranmayee; Merthe, Daniel J.; Kester, Thomas; McKinney, Wayne R.; Takacs, Peter Z.; Eng, Ron; Dahir, Andrew; Yashchuk, Valeriy V.

    2013-01-01

    A multi-beam LTP is under development at MSFC in collaboration with Lawrence Berkeley National laboratory and Brookhaven National Laboratory. The Multi-beam LTP has been fully assembled. First tests of the MBLTP has demonstrated the feasibility of the multibeam approach. The calibrations are under way. The MBLTP is intended to be used for metrology support of the deterministic polishing experiments.

  7. Image-guided brachytherapy (IGBT) combined with whole pelvic intensity-modulated radiotherapy (WP-IMRT) for locally advanced cervical cancer: a prospective study from Chiang Mai University Hospital, Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Wanwilairat, Somsak; Chakrabandhu, Somvilai; Klunklin, Pitchayaponne; Onchan, Wimrak; Tippanya, Damrongsak; Nopnop, Wannapa; Galalae, Razvan; Chitapanarux, Imjai

    2013-01-01

    Purpose A report of preliminary results and toxicity profiles using image-guided brachytherapy (IGBT) combined with whole pelvic intensity-modulated radiation therapy (WP-IMRT) for locally advanced cervical cancer. Material and methods Fifteen patients with locally advanced cervical cancer were enrolled into the study. WP-IMRT was used to treat the Clinical Target Volume (CTV) with a dose of 45 Gy in 25 fractions. Concurrent cisplatin (40 mg/m2) was prescribed during radiotherapy (RT) on weekly basis. IGBT using computed tomography was performed at the dose of 7 Gy × 4 fractions to the High-Risk Clinical Target Volume (HR-CTV). Results The mean cumulative doses – in terms of equivalent dose of 2 Gy (EQD2) – of IGBT plus WP-IMRT to HR-CTV, bladder, rectum, and sigmoid colon were 88.3, 85.0, 68.2 and 73.6 Gy, respectively. In comparison with standard (point A prescription) dose-volume histograms, volume-based image-guided brachytherapy improved the cumulative doses for bladder of 67%, rectum of 47% and sigmoid of 46%. At the median follow-up time of 14 months, the local control, metastasis-free survival and overall survival rates were 93%, 100% and 93%, respectively. No grade 3-4 acute and late toxicities were observed. Conclusion The combination of image-guided brachytherapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy improved the dose distribution to tumor volumes and avoided overdose in OARs which could be converted in excellent local control and toxicity profiles. PMID:23634150

  8. Initial application of a geometric QA tool for integrated MV and kV imaging systems on three image guided radiotherapy systems.

    PubMed

    Mao, Weihua; Speiser, Michael; Medin, Paul; Papiez, Lech; Solberg, Timothy; Xing, Lei

    2011-05-01

    Several linacs with integrated kilovoltage (kV) imaging have been developed for delivery of image guided radiation therapy (IGRT). High geometric accuracy and coincidence of kV imaging systems and megavoltage (MV) beam delivery are essential for successful image guidance. A geometric QA tool has been adapted for routine QA for evaluating and characterizing the geometric accuracy of kV and MV cone-beam imaging systems. The purpose of this work is to demonstrate the application of methodology to routine QA across three IGRT-dedicated linac platforms. It has been applied to a Varian Trilogy (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA), an Elekta SynergyS (Elekta, Stockholm, Sweden), and a Brainlab Vero (Brainlab AG, Feldkirchen, Germany). Both the Trilogy and SynergyS linacs are equipped with a retractable kV x-ray tube and a flat panel detector. The Vero utilizes a rotating, rigid ring structure integrating a MV x-ray head mounted on orthogonal gimbals, an electronic portal imaging device (EPID), two kV x-ray tubes, and two fixed flat panel detectors. This dual kV imaging system provides orthogonal radiographs, CBCT images, and real-time fluoroscopic monitoring. Two QA phantoms were built to suit different field sizes. Projection images of a QA phantom were acquired using MV and kV imaging systems at a series of gantry angles. Software developed for this study was used to analyze the projection images and calculate nine geometric parameters for each projection. The Trilogy was characterized five times over one year, while the SynergyS was characterized four times and the Vero once. Over 6500 individual projections were acquired and analyzed. Quantitative geometric parameters of both MV and kV imaging systems, as well as the isocenter consistency of the imaging systems, were successfully evaluated. A geometric tool has been successfully implemented for calibration and QA of integrated kV and MV across a variety of radiotherapy platforms. X-ray source angle deviations up to

  9. Multi-beam laser altimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bufton, Jack L.; Harding, David J.; Ramos-Izquierdo, Luis

    1993-01-01

    Laser altimetry provides a high-resolution, high-accuracy method for measurement of the elevation and horizontal variability of Earth-surface topography. The basis of the measurement is the timing of the round-trip propagation of short-duration pulses of laser radiation between a spacecraft and the Earth's surface. Vertical resolution of the altimetry measurement is determined primarily by laser pulsewidth, surface-induced spreading in time of the reflected pulse, and the timing precision of the altimeter electronics. With conventional gain-switched pulses from solid-state lasers and sub-nsec resolution electronics, sub-meter vertical range resolution is possible from orbital attitudes of several hundred kilometers. Horizontal resolution is a function of laser beam footprint size at the surface and the spacing between successive laser pulses. Laser divergence angle and altimeter platform height above the surface determine the laser footprint size at the surface, while laser pulse repetition-rate, laser transmitter beam configuration, and altimeter platform velocity determine the space between successive laser pulses. Multiple laser transitters in a singlaltimeter instrument provide across-track and along-track coverage that can be used to construct a range image of the Earth's surface. Other aspects of the multi-beam laser altimeter are discussed.

  10. Percutaneous CT-guided thermal ablation as salvage therapy for recurrent non-small cell lung cancer after external beam radiotherapy: A retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Matthew; Fay, Michael; Steinke, Karin

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate radiofrequency ablation (RFA) and microwave ablation (MWA) as a viable salvage option for patients with locally recurrent non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) after radiotherapy. This retrospective study was conducted on patients who had received thermal ablation for recurrent NSCLC post-curative radiotherapy. Medical records and follow-up imaging with computed tomography (CT) and PET-CT were analysed to determine time to local progression (TTLP) and overall survival (OS). TTLP was determined according to the modified RECIST criteria. Twelve patients, mean age 71 ± 7 years, received 17 thermal ablation sessions, with RFA performed for four lesions and MWA for 13. Nine tumours were squamous cell cancers (SCC) and eight were adenocarcinomas. Eleven tumours had recurred post-external beam radiation and one post-stereotactic body radiation therapy. Mean tumour size was 34.2 ± 12.8 mm, tumour stages prior to radiotherapy were Ia (2), Ib (3), IIa (4), IIb (1) and III (2). Follow-up period was 19 ± 11 months. Overall median TTLP was 14 months (95% CI: 8, 19), and median OS was 35 months (95% CI: 12, 58). Mean TTLP for tumours <30 mm was 23 months and for tumours >30 mm 14 months (p = 0.20). Recurrence rates reduced from 50% after initial ablation to 20% with a second ablation. Complication rate for pneumothorax requiring intervention was 17%. Both RFA and MWA ablation prolonged local tumour control with minimal morbidity in this study group of recurrent NSCLC after radiotherapy.

  11. Intensity-modulated salvage radiotherapy with simultaneous integrated boost for local recurrence of prostate carcinoma: a pilot study on the place of PET-choline for guiding target volume delineation

    PubMed Central

    Wahart, Aurélien; Guy, Jean-Baptiste; Vallard, Alexis; Geissler, Benjamin; Ben Mrad, Majed; Falk, Alexander T; Prevot, Nathalie; de Laroche, Guy; Rancoule, Chloé; Chargari, Cyrus

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to report the first cases of salvage radiotherapy (RT) using the intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) targeted on choline positron emission tomography (PET) uptake in a local recurrent prostate cancer, after a radical prostatectomy. Methods: Four patients received salvage irradiation for biochemical relapse that occurred after the initial radical prostatectomy. The relapse occurred from 10 months to 6 years with PSA levels ranging from 2.35 to 4.86 ng ml−1. For each patient, an 18F-choline PET-CT showed a focal choline uptake in prostatic fossa, with standardized uptake value calculated on the basis of predicted lean body mass (SUL) max of 3.3–6.8. No involved lymph node or distant metastases were diagnosed. IMRT doses were of 62.7 Gy (1.9 Gy/fraction, 33 fractions), with a SIB of 69.3 Gy (2.1 Gy/fraction, 33 fractions) to a PET-guided target volume. Results: Acute toxicities were limited. We observed no gastrointestinal toxicity ≥grade 2 and only one grade 2 genitourinary toxicity. At 1-month follow-up evaluation, no complication and a decrease in PSA level (6.8–43.8% of the pre-therapeutic level) were reported. After 4 months, a decrease in PSA level was obtained for all the patients, ranging from 30% to 70%. At a median follow-up of 15 months, PSA level was controlled for all the patients, but one of them experienced a distant lymph node recurrence. Conclusion: Salvage irradiation to the prostate bed with SIB guided by PET-CT is feasible, with biological efficacy and no major acute toxicity. Advances in knowledge: IMRT with PET-oriented SIB for salvage treatment of prostate cancer is possible, without major acute toxicity. PMID:26648528

  12. Multibeam satellite EIRP adaptability for aeronautical communications.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinal, G. V.; Bisaga, J. J.

    1973-01-01

    EIRP enhancement and management techniques, emphasizing aeronautical communications and adaptable multibeam concepts, are classified and characterized. User requirement and demand characteristics that exploit the improvement available from each technique are identified, and the relative performance improvement of each is discussed. It is concluded that aeronautical satellite communications could benefit greatly by the employment of these techniques.

  13. A collaborative analysis of stereotactic lung radiotherapy outcomes for early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer using daily online cone-beam computed tomography image-guided radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Grills, Inga Siiner; Hope, Andrew J; Guckenberger, Matthias; Kestin, Larry L; Werner-Wasik, Maria; Yan, Di; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Bissonnette, Jean-Pierre; Wilbert, Juergen; Xiao, Ying; Belderbos, Jose

    2012-09-01

    We report lung stereotactic-body radiotherapy (SBRT) outcomes for a large pooled cohort treated using daily online cone-beam computed tomography. Five hundred and five stage I-IIB (T1-3N0M0) non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cases underwent SBRT using cone-beam computed tomography image guidance at five international institutions from 1998 to 2010. Median age was 74 years (range, 42-92) whereas median forced expiratory volume in 1 second/diffusing lung capacity for carbon monoxide were 1.4 liter (65%) and 10.8 ml/min/mmHg (53%). Of the 505 cases, 64% were biopsy proven and 87% medically inoperable. Staging was: IA 63%, IB 33%, IIA 2%, and recurrent 1%. Median max tumor dimension was 2.6 cm (range, 0.9-8.5). Median heterogeneously calculated volumetric prescription dose (PD) was 54 Gy (range, 20-64 Gy) in three fractions (range, 1-15) over 8 days (range, 1-27). Median biologically equivalent PD biological equivalent doses (BED10) was 132 Gy (range, 60-180). With a median follow-up of 1.6 years (range, 0.1-7.3), the 2-year Kaplan-Meier local control (LC), regional control, and distant metastasis (DM) rates were 94%, 89%, and 20%, respectively, whereas cause-specific and overall survival were 87% and 60% (78% operable, 58% inoperable, p = 0.01), respectively. Stage, gross-tumor volume size (≥ 2.7 cm) and PD(BED10) predicted local relapse (LR) and DM. LR was 15% for BED10 less than 105 Gy versus 4% for BED10 of 105 Gy or more (p < 0.001); DM was 31% versus 18% for BED10 less than 105 versus 105 Gy or more (p = 0.01). On multivariate analysis, PD(BED10) and elapsed days during radiotherapy predicted LR; gross-tumor volume size predicted DM. Grade 2 or higher pneumonitis, rib fracture, myositis, and dermatitis were 7%, 3%, 1%, and 2%, respectively. In the largest early-stage NSCLC SBRT data set to date, a high rate of local control was achieved, which was correlated with a PD(BED10) of 105 Gy or more. Failures were primarily distant, severe toxicities were rare, and

  14. [Postoperative radiotherapy of prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Guérif, S; Latorzeff, I; Lagrange, J-L; Hennequin, C; Supiot, S; Garcia, A; François, P; Soulié, M; Richaud, P; Salomon, L

    2014-10-01

    Between 10 and 40% of patients who have undergone a radical prostatectomy may have a biologic recurrence. Local or distant failure represents the possible patterns of relapse. Patients at high-risk for local relapse have extraprostatic disease, positive surgical margins or seminal vesicles infiltration or high Gleason score at pathology. Three phase-III randomized clinical trials have shown that, for these patients, adjuvant irradiation reduces the risk of tumoral progression without higher toxicity. Salvage radiotherapy for late relapse allows a disease control in 60-70% of the cases. Several research in order to improve the therapeutic ratio of the radiotherapy after prostatectomy are evaluate in the French Groupe d'Étude des Tumeurs Urogénitales (Gétug) and of the French association of urology (Afu). The Gétug-Afu 17 trial will provide answers to the question of the optimal moment for postoperative radiotherapy for pT3-4 R1 pN0 Nx patients, with the objective of comparing an immediate treatment to a differed early treatment initiated at biological recurrence. The Gétug-Afu 22 questions the place of a short hormonetherapy combined with image-guided, intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in adjuvant situation for a detectable prostate specific antigen (PSA). The implementation of a multicenter quality control within the Gétug-Afu in order to harmonize a modern postoperative radiotherapy will allow the development of a dose escalation IMRT after surgery.

  15. Geant4 simulation of the Elekta XVI kV CBCT unit for accurate description of potential late toxicity effects of image-guided radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Brochu, F M; Burnet, N G; Jena, R; Plaistow, R; Parker, M A; Thomas, S J

    2014-12-21

    This paper describes the modelisation of the Elekta XVI Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) machine components with Geant4 and its validation against calibration data taken for two commonly used machine setups. Preliminary dose maps of simulated CBCTs coming from this modelisation work are presented. This study is the first step of a research project, GHOST, aiming to improve the understanding of late toxicity risk in external beam radiotherapy patients by simulating dose depositions integrated from different sources (imaging, treatment beam) over the entire treatment plan. The second cancer risk will then be derived from different models relating irradiation dose and second cancer risk.

  16. Geant4 simulation of the Elekta XVI kV CBCT unit for accurate description of potential late toxicity effects of image-guided radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brochu, F. M.; Burnet, N. G.; Jena, R.; Plaistow, R.; Parker, M. A.; Thomas, S. J.

    2014-12-01

    This paper describes the modelisation of the Elekta XVI Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) machine components with Geant4 and its validation against calibration data taken for two commonly used machine setups. Preliminary dose maps of simulated CBCTs coming from this modelisation work are presented. This study is the first step of a research project, GHOST, aiming to improve the understanding of late toxicity risk in external beam radiotherapy patients by simulating dose depositions integrated from different sources (imaging, treatment beam) over the entire treatment plan. The second cancer risk will then be derived from different models relating irradiation dose and second cancer risk.

  17. Interfractional Seminal Vesicle Motion Relative to the Prostate Gland for Image-guided Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer with/without Androgen Deprivation Therapy: A Retrospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Waki, Takahiro; Katsui, Kuniaki; Mitsuhashi, Toshiharu; Ogata, Takeshi; Katayama, Norihisa; Takemoto, Mitsuhiro; Nasu, Yasutomo; Kumon, Hiromi; Kanazawa, Susumu

    2017-02-01

    We investigated differences in seminal vesicle (SV) length and interfractional SV motion relative to the prostate gland in prostate cancer patients. We compared 32 patients who received androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) before radiotherapy with 12 patients receiving radiotherapy alone at Okayama University Hospital in August 2008-July 2011. We examined the right and left SVs' length and motion by computed tomography (CT) to determine the ADT's effects and analyzed 347 CT scans in a multiple linear regression model. The ADT patients' SV length was significantly shorter than the non-ADT patients'. The differences in right and left SV lengths between the ADT and non-ADT patients were 6.8 mm (95% CI 2.0-11.7 mm) and 7.2 mm (95% CI 3.1- 11.3 mm) respectively in an adjusted regression model. SV motion did not differ between the ADT and non- ADT patients in terms of interfractional motion of the SV tips and the SVs' center relative to the prostate gland. The ADT patients had significantly shorter SVs compared to the non-ADT patients, but no difference in SV motion was observed. SV interfractional motion should thus be compensated using the same planning margins, regardless of whether ADT is used.

  18. Protocol for a phase III randomised trial of image-guided intensity modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT) and conventional radiotherapy for late small bowel toxicity reduction after postoperative adjuvant radiation in Ca cervix

    PubMed Central

    Chopra, Supriya; Engineer, Reena; Mahantshetty, Umesh; Misra, Shagun; Phurailatpam, Reena; Paul, Siji N; Kannan, Sadhna; Kerkar, Rajendra; Maheshwari, Amita; Shylasree, TS; Ghosh, Jaya; Gupta, Sudeep; Thomas, Biji; Singh, Shalini; Sharma, Sanjiv; Chilikuri, Srinivas; Shrivastava, Shyam Kishore

    2012-01-01

    Introduction External beam radiation followed by vaginal brachytherapy (±chemotherapy) leads to reduction in the risk of local recurrence and improves progression-free survival in patients with adverse risk factors following Wertheim's hysterectomy albeit at the risk of late bowel toxicity. Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) results in reduction in bowel doses and has potential to reduce late morbidity, however, needs to be confirmed prospectively in a randomised trial. The present randomised trial tests reduction if any in late small bowel toxicity with the use of IMRT in postoperative setting. Methods and analysis Patients more than 18 years of age who need adjuvant (chemo) radiation will be eligible. Patients with residual pelvic or para-aortic nodal disease, history of multiple abdominal surgeries or any other medical bowel condition will be excluded. The trial will randomise patients into standard radiation or IMRT. The primary aim is to compare differences in late grades II–IV bowel toxicity between the two arms. The secondary aims of the study focus on evaluating correlation of dose–volume parameters and late toxicity and quality of life. The trial is planned as a multicentre randomised study. The trial is designed to detect a 13% difference in late grades II–IV bowel toxicity with an α of 0.05 and β of 0.80. A total of 240 patients will be required to demonstrate the aforesaid difference. Ethics and dissemination The trial is approved by institutional ethics review board and will be routinely monitored as per standard guidelines. The study results will be disseminated via peer reviewed scientific journals, conference presentations and submission to regulatory authorities. Registration The trial is registered with clinicaltrials.gov (NCT 01279135). PMID:23242243

  19. Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography-Guided Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Limited-Stage Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Shirvani, Shervin M.; Komaki, Ritsuko; Heymach, John V.; Fossella, Frank V.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Omitting elective nodal irradiation from planning target volumes does not compromise outcomes in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer, but whether the same is true for those with limited-stage small-cell lung cancer (LS-SCLC) is unknown. Therefore, in the present study, we sought to determine the clinical outcomes and the frequency of elective nodal failure in patients with LS-SCLC staged using positron emission tomography/computed tomography and treated with involved-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Between 2005 and 2008, 60 patients with LS-SCLC at our institution underwent disease staging using positron emission tomography/computed tomography before treatment using an intensity-modulated radiotherapy plan in which elective nodal irradiation was intentionally omitted from the planning target volume (mode and median dose, 45 Gy in 30 fractions; range, 40.5 Gy in 27 fractions to 63.8 Gy in 35 fractions). In most cases, concurrent platinum-based chemotherapy was administered. We retrospectively reviewed the clinical outcomes to determine the overall survival, relapse-free survival, and failure patterns. Elective nodal failure was defined as recurrence in initially uninvolved hilar, mediastinal, or supraclavicular nodes. Survival was assessed using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: The median age of the study patients at diagnosis was 63 years (range, 39-86). The median follow-up duration was 21 months (range, 4-58) in all patients and 26 months (range, 4-58) in the survivors. The 2-year actuarial overall survival and relapse-free survival rate were 58% and 43%, respectively. Of the 30 patients with recurrence, 23 had metastatic disease and 7 had locoregional failure. We observed only one isolated elective nodal failure. Conclusions: To our knowledge, this is the first study to examine the outcomes in patients with LS-SCLC staged with positron emission tomography/computed tomography and treated with definitive intensity

  20. SU-E-CAMPUS-J-04: Image Guided Radiation Therapy (IGRT): Review of Technical Standards and Credentialing in Radiotherapy Clinical Trials

    SciTech Connect

    Giaddui, T; Chen, W; Yu, J; Gong, Y; Galvin, J; Xiao, Y; Cui, Y; Yin, F; Craig, T; Dawson, L; Al-Hallaq, H; Chmura, S

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To review IGRT credentialing experience and unexpected technical issues encountered in connection with advanced radiotherapy technologies as implemented in RTOG clinical trials. To update IGRT credentialing procedures with the aim of improving the quality of the process, and to increase the proportion of IGRT credentialing compliance. To develop a living disease site-specific IGRT encyclopedia. Methods: Numerous technical issues were encountered during the IGRT credentialing process. The criteria used for credentialing review were based on: image quality; anatomy included in fused data sets and shift results. Credentialing requirements have been updated according to the AAPM task group reports for IGRT to ensure that all required technical items are included in the quality review process. Implementation instructions have been updated and expanded for recent protocols. Results: Technical issues observed during the credentialing review process include, but are not limited to: poor quality images; inadequate image acquisition region; poor data quality; shifts larger than acceptable; no soft tissue surrogate. The updated IGRT credentialing process will address these issues and will also include the technical items required from AAPM: TG 104; TG 142 and TG 179 reports. An instruction manual has been developed describing a remote credentialing method for reviewers. Submission requirements are updated, including images/documents as well as facility questionnaire. The review report now includes summary of the review process and the parameters that reviewers check. We have reached consensus on the minimum IGRT technical requirement for a number of disease sites. RTOG 1311(NRG-BR002A Phase 1 Study of Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT) for the Treatment of Multiple Metastases) is an example, here; the protocol specified the minimum requirement for each anatomical sites (with/without fiducials). Conclusion: Technical issues are identified and reported. IGRT

  1. SU-C-18A-04: 3D Markerless Registration of Lung Based On Coherent Point Drift: Application in Image Guided Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Nasehi Tehrani, J; Wang, J; Guo, X; Yang, Y

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: This study evaluated a new probabilistic non-rigid registration method called coherent point drift for real time 3D markerless registration of the lung motion during radiotherapy. Method: 4DCT image datasets Dir-lab (www.dir-lab.com) have been used for creating 3D boundary element model of the lungs. For the first step, the 3D surface of the lungs in respiration phases T0 and T50 were segmented and divided into a finite number of linear triangular elements. Each triangle is a two dimensional object which has three vertices (each vertex has three degree of freedom). One of the main features of the lungs motion is velocity coherence so the vertices that creating the mesh of the lungs should also have features and degree of freedom of lung structure. This means that the vertices close to each other tend to move coherently. In the next step, we implemented a probabilistic non-rigid registration method called coherent point drift to calculate nonlinear displacement of vertices between different expiratory phases. Results: The method has been applied to images of 10-patients in Dir-lab dataset. The normal distribution of vertices to the origin for each expiratory stage were calculated. The results shows that the maximum error of registration between different expiratory phases is less than 0.4 mm (0.38 SI, 0.33 mm AP, 0.29 mm RL direction). This method is a reliable method for calculating the vector of displacement, and the degrees of freedom (DOFs) of lung structure in radiotherapy. Conclusions: We evaluated a new 3D registration method for distribution set of vertices inside lungs mesh. In this technique, lungs motion considering velocity coherence are inserted as a penalty in regularization function. The results indicate that high registration accuracy is achievable with CPD. This method is helpful for calculating of displacement vector and analyzing possible physiological and anatomical changes during treatment.

  2. Evaluation of Juvenile Salmon Behavior at Bonneville Dam, Columbia River, Using a Multibeam Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Robert L. ); Moursund, Russell A. )

    1999-11-01

    In recent years, with increased effort to bypass and guide fragile stocks of juvenile salmon in the Columbia Basin past hydroelectric projects, it has been increasingly important to obtain fine-scale fish behavior data in a non-intrusive manner. The Dual-Head Multibeam Sonar is an emerging technology for fisheries applications that addresses that requirement. It has two principal advantages over traditional hydroacoustic techniques: (1) it allows for simultaneous large-volume coverage of a region of interest, and (2) it affords 3-D tracking capability. The use of Dual-Head Multibeam Sonar in this study resulted in unprecedented insight into fine-scale smolt behavior upstream of a prototype surface collector at Bonneville Dam first powerhouse in 1998. Our results indicated that outmigrant juvenile salmon had an increased likelihood of milling or holding. This discovery will lead to better design criteria for future bypass and collector systems. Future fisheries multibeam sonar systems will likely be fully integrated systems with built-in real time tracking capability. These systems may be used to track targets relative to physical guidance structures or other behavior modifying stimuli such as light, turbulent flow, electrical/magnetic fields, or low-frequency sound and vibration. The combination of fine-scale fish behavior data and environmental parameters will yield better design criteria for the safe passage of listed or endangered species of Pacific salmon.

  3. MR-Guided Pulsed High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound Enhancement of Gene Therapy Combined With Androgen Deprivation and Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer Treatment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-01

    ultrasound . J. Acoust. Soc.Am. 72 1926-1932, (1982) (7) Neppiras E A. Acoustic cavitation . Physics reports 61(3): 159-251, (1980) (8) ter Haar G R, Daniels...Guided Pulsed High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound Enhancement of 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-08-1-0469 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT...failing to This work is aimed to study MR guided high intensity focused ultrasound (MRgHIFU) enhancement of gene therapy for Prostate Cancer. The

  4. Field Calibration Procedures for Multibeam Sonar Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-06-01

    include multibeam sonar transducers, light detection and ranging ( LIDAR ) surveys, acoustic seafloor classification systems, sub-bottom profilers, and... DTM ) of the reference surface is created from the cleaned data, and an averaging gridding algorithm is used to smooth the data. The gridding size...should be no larger than the average footprint of the inner beams. Using large vertical exaggeration, the DTM should be observed on 3-D visualization

  5. Radiotherapy Planning using MRI

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Maria A; Payne, Geoffrey S

    2016-01-01

    The use of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in Radiotherapy (RT) planning is rapidly expanding. We review the wide range of image contrast mechanisms available to MRI and the way they are exploited for RT planning. However a number of challenges are also considered: the requirements that MR images are acquired in the RT treatment position, that they are geometrically accurate, that effects of patient motion during the scan are minimised, that tissue markers are clearly demonstrated, that an estimate of electron density can be obtained. These issues are discussed in detail, prior to the consideration of a number of specific clinical applications. This is followed by a brief discussion on the development of real-time MRI-guided RT. PMID:26509844

  6. Commissioning and quality assurance of the X-ray volume Imaging system of an image-guided radiotherapy capable linear accelerator

    PubMed Central

    Muralidhar, K. R.; Murthy, P. Narayana; Kumar, Rajneesh

    2008-01-01

    An Image-Guided Radiotherapy–capable linear accelerator (Elekta Synergy) was installed at our hospital, which is equipped with a kV x-ray volume imaging (XVI) system and electronic portal imaging device (iViewGT). The objective of this presentation is to describe the results of commissioning measurements carried out on the XVI facility to verify the manufacturer's specifications and also to evolve a QA schedule which can be used to test its performance routinely. The QA program consists of a series of tests (safety features, geometric accuracy, and image quality). These tests were found to be useful to assess the performance of the XVI system and also proved that XVI system is very suitable for image-guided high-precision radiation therapy. PMID:19893694

  7. SU-E-J-55: End-To-End Effectiveness Analysis of 3D Surface Image Guided Voluntary Breath-Holding Radiotherapy for Left Breast

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, M; Feigenberg, S

    2015-06-15

    Purpose To evaluate the effectiveness of using 3D-surface-image to guide breath-holding (BH) left-side breast treatment. Methods Two 3D surface image guided BH procedures were implemented and evaluated: normal-BH, taking BH at a comfortable level, and deep-inspiration-breath-holding (DIBH). A total of 20 patients (10 Normal-BH and 10 DIBH) were recruited. Patients received a BH evaluation using a commercialized 3D-surface- tracking-system (VisionRT, London, UK) to quantify the reproducibility of BH positions prior to CT scan. Tangential 3D/IMRT plans were conducted. Patients were initially setup under free-breathing (FB) condition using the FB surface obtained from the untaged CT to ensure a correct patient position. Patients were then guided to reach the planned BH position using the BH surface obtained from the BH CT. Action-levels were set at each phase of treatment process based on the information provided by the 3D-surface-tracking-system for proper interventions (eliminate/re-setup/ re-coaching). We reviewed the frequency of interventions to evaluate its effectiveness. The FB-CBCT and port-film were utilized to evaluate the accuracy of 3D-surface-guided setups. Results 25% of BH candidates with BH positioning uncertainty > 2mm are eliminated prior to CT scan. For >90% of fractions, based on the setup deltas from3D-surface-trackingsystem, adjustments of patient setup are needed after the initial-setup using laser. 3D-surface-guided-setup accuracy is comparable as CBCT. For the BH guidance, frequency of interventions (a re-coaching/re-setup) is 40%(Normal-BH)/91%(DIBH) of treatments for the first 5-fractions and then drops to 16%(Normal-BH)/46%(DIBH). The necessity of re-setup is highly patient-specific for Normal-BH but highly random among patients for DIBH. Overall, a −0.8±2.4 mm accuracy of the anterior pericardial shadow position was achieved. Conclusion 3D-surface-image technology provides effective intervention to the treatment process and ensures

  8. High Dose-Per-Fraction Irradiation of Limited Lung Volumes Using an Image-Guided, Highly Focused Irradiator: Simulating Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy Regimens in a Small-Animal Model

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Jaeho; Kodym, Reinhard; Seliounine, Serguei

    2010-07-01

    Purpose: To investigate the underlying biology associated with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT), both in vivo models and image-guided, highly focal irradiation systems are necessary. Here, we describe such an irradiation system and use it to examine normal tissue toxicity in a small-animal model at lung volumes similar to those associated with human therapy. Methods and Materials: High-dose radiation was delivered to a small volume of the left lung of C3H/HeJCr mice using a small-animal stereotactic irradiator. The irradiator has a collimation mechanism to produce focal radiation beams, an imaging subsystem consisting of a fluorescent screen coupled to a charge-coupled device camera, and a manual positioning stage. Histopathologic examination and micro-CT were used to evaluate the radiation response. Results: Focal obliteration of the alveoli by fibrous connective tissue, hyperplasia of the bronchiolar epithelium, and presence of a small number of inflammatory cells are the main reactions to low-volume/high-dose irradiation of the mouse lung. The tissue response suggested a radiation dose threshold for early phase fibrosis lying between 40 and 100 Gy. The irradiation system satisfied our requirements of high-dose-rate, small beam diameter, and precise localization and verification. Conclusions: We have established an experimental model and image-guided animal irradiation system for the study of high dose per fraction irradiations such as those used with SBRT at volumes analogous to those used in human beings. It will also allow the targeting of specific anatomical structures of the thorax or ultimately, orthotopic tumors of the lung.

  9. High dose-per-fraction irradiation of limited lung volumes using an image-guided, highly focused irradiator: simulating stereotactic body radiotherapy regimens in a small-animal model.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jaeho; Kodym, Reinhard; Seliounine, Serguei; Richardson, James A; Solberg, Timothy D; Story, Michael D

    2010-07-01

    To investigate the underlying biology associated with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT), both in vivo models and image-guided, highly focal irradiation systems are necessary. Here, we describe such an irradiation system and use it to examine normal tissue toxicity in a small-animal model at lung volumes similar to those associated with human therapy. High-dose radiation was delivered to a small volume of the left lung of C3H/HeJCr mice using a small-animal stereotactic irradiator. The irradiator has a collimation mechanism to produce focal radiation beams, an imaging subsystem consisting of a fluorescent screen coupled to a charge-coupled device camera, and a manual positioning stage. Histopathologic examination and micro-CT were used to evaluate the radiation response. Focal obliteration of the alveoli by fibrous connective tissue, hyperplasia of the bronchiolar epithelium, and presence of a small number of inflammatory cells are the main reactions to low-volume/high-dose irradiation of the mouse lung. The tissue response suggested a radiation dose threshold for early phase fibrosis lying between 40 and 100 Gy. The irradiation system satisfied our requirements of high-dose-rate, small beam diameter, and precise localization and verification. We have established an experimental model and image-guided animal irradiation system for the study of high dose per fraction irradiations such as those used with SBRT at volumes analogous to those used in human beings. It will also allow the targeting of specific anatomical structures of the thorax or ultimately, orthotopic tumors of the lung. (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Magnitude of shift of tumor position as a function of moderated deep inspiration breath-hold: An analysis of pooled data of lung patients with active breath control in image-guided radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Muralidhar, K. R.; Murthy, P. Narayana; Mahadev, D. Shankar; Subramanyam, K.; Sudarshan, G.; Raju, A. Krishnam

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the reproducibility and magnitude of shift of tumor position by using active breathing control and iView-GT for patients with lung cancer with moderate deep-inspiration breath-hold (mDIBH) technique. Eight patients with 10 lung tumors were studied. CT scans were performed in the breath-holding phase. Moderate deep-inspiration breath-hold under spirometer-based monitoring system was used. Few important bony anatomic details were delineated by the radiation oncologist. To evaluate the interbreath-hold reproducibility of the tumor position, we compared the digital reconstruction radiographs (DRRs) from planning system with the DRRs from the iView-GT in the machine room. We measured the shift in x, y, and z directions. The reproducibility was defined as the difference between the bony landmarks from the DRR of the planning system and those from the DRR of the iView-GT. The maximum shift of the tumor position was 3.2 mm, 3.0 mm, and 2.9 mm in the longitudinal, lateral, and vertical directions. In conclusion, the moderated deep-inspiration breath-hold method using a spirometer is feasible, with relatively good reproducibility of the tumor position for image-guided radiotherapy in lung cancers. PMID:19893708

  11. Image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy for refractory bilateral breast cancer in a patient with extensive cutaneous metastasis in the chest and abdominal walls

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yueh-Feng; Lin, Yu-Chin; Chen, Kuo-Hsin; Shueng, Pei-Wei; Yeh, Hsin-Pei; Hsieh, Chen-Hsi

    2016-01-01

    Treatment for bilateral breast cancer with chest wall and abdominal skin invasion normally involves conventional radiotherapy (RT); however, conventional RT provides inadequate target volume coverage and excessive treatment of large volumes of normal tissue. Helical tomotherapy (HT) has the ability to deliver continuous craniocaudal irradiation that suppresses junction problems and provides good conformity of dose distribution. A 47-year-old female with stage IV bilateral breast cancer with chest wall and pectoralis major muscle invasion, lymphadenopathy, bilateral pleural effusion, and multiple bone metastases received chemotherapy and target therapy beginning in January 2014; 4 months after the initiation of chemotherapy, computed tomography revealed progression of chest and abdominal wall invasion. A total dose of 70.2 Gy was delivered to both breasts, the chest wall, the abdominal wall, and the bilateral supraclavicular nodal areas in 39 fractions via HT. The total planning target volume was 4,533.29 cm3. The percent of lung volume receiving at least 20 Gy (V20) was 28%, 22%, and 25% for the right lung, left lung, and whole lung, respectively. The mean dose to the heart was 8.6 Gy. Follow-up computed tomography revealed complete response after the RT course. Grade 1 dysphagia, weight loss, grade 2 neutropenia, and grade 3 dermatitis were noted during the RT course. Pain score decreased from 6 to 1. No cardiac, pulmonary, liver, or intestinal toxicity developed during treatment or follow-up. Concurrent HT with or without systemic treatment could be a safe salvage therapy for chemorefractory locally advanced breast cancer patients with extensive cutaneous metastasis. PMID:27284253

  12. FIRE: an open-software suite for real-time 2D/3D image registration for image guided radiotherapy research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furtado, H.; Gendrin, C.; Spoerk, J.; Steiner, E.; Underwood, T.; Kuenzler, T.; Georg, D.; Birkfellner, W.

    2016-03-01

    Radiotherapy treatments have changed at a tremendously rapid pace. Dose delivered to the tumor has escalated while organs at risk (OARs) are better spared. The impact of moving tumors during dose delivery has become higher due to very steep dose gradients. Intra-fractional tumor motion has to be managed adequately to reduce errors in dose delivery. For tumors with large motion such as tumors in the lung, tracking is an approach that can reduce position uncertainty. Tumor tracking approaches range from purely image intensity based techniques to motion estimation based on surrogate tracking. Research efforts are often based on custom designed software platforms which take too much time and effort to develop. To address this challenge we have developed an open software platform especially focusing on tumor motion management. FLIRT is a freely available open-source software platform. The core method for tumor tracking is purely intensity based 2D/3D registration. The platform is written in C++ using the Qt framework for the user interface. The performance critical methods are implemented on the graphics processor using the CUDA extension. One registration can be as fast as 90ms (11Hz). This is suitable to track tumors moving due to respiration (~0.3Hz) or heartbeat (~1Hz). Apart from focusing on high performance, the platform is designed to be flexible and easy to use. Current use cases range from tracking feasibility studies, patient positioning and method validation. Such a framework has the potential of enabling the research community to rapidly perform patient studies or try new methods.

  13. Real-time intensity based 2D/3D registration using kV-MV image pairs for tumor motion tracking in image guided radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furtado, H.; Steiner, E.; Stock, M.; Georg, D.; Birkfellner, W.

    2014-03-01

    Intra-fractional respiratorymotion during radiotherapy is one of themain sources of uncertainty in dose application creating the need to extend themargins of the planning target volume (PTV). Real-time tumormotion tracking by 2D/3D registration using on-board kilo-voltage (kV) imaging can lead to a reduction of the PTV. One limitation of this technique when using one projection image, is the inability to resolve motion along the imaging beam axis. We present a retrospective patient study to investigate the impact of paired portal mega-voltage (MV) and kV images, on registration accuracy. We used data from eighteen patients suffering from non small cell lung cancer undergoing regular treatment at our center. For each patient we acquired a planning CT and sequences of kV and MV images during treatment. Our evaluation consisted of comparing the accuracy of motion tracking in 6 degrees-of-freedom(DOF) using the anterior-posterior (AP) kV sequence or the sequence of kV-MV image pairs. We use graphics processing unit rendering for real-time performance. Motion along cranial-caudal direction could accurately be extracted when using only the kV sequence but in AP direction we obtained large errors. When using kV-MV pairs, the average error was reduced from 3.3 mm to 1.8 mm and the motion along AP was successfully extracted. The mean registration time was of 190+/-35ms. Our evaluation shows that using kVMV image pairs leads to improved motion extraction in 6 DOF. Therefore, this approach is suitable for accurate, real-time tumor motion tracking with a conventional LINAC.

  14. Local Setup Errors in Image-Guided Radiotherapy for Head and Neck Cancer Patients Immobilized With a Custom-Made Device

    SciTech Connect

    Giske, Kristina; Stoiber, Eva M.; Schwarz, Michael; Stoll, Armin; Muenter, Marc W.; Timke, Carmen; Roeder, Falk; Debus, Juergen; Huber, Peter E.; Thieke, Christian; Bendl, Rolf

    2011-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the local positioning uncertainties during fractionated radiotherapy of head-and-neck cancer patients immobilized using a custom-made fixation device and discuss the effect of possible patient correction strategies for these uncertainties. Methods and Materials: A total of 45 head-and-neck patients underwent regular control computed tomography scanning using an in-room computed tomography scanner. The local and global positioning variations of all patients were evaluated by applying a rigid registration algorithm. One bounding box around the complete target volume and nine local registration boxes containing relevant anatomic structures were introduced. The resulting uncertainties for a stereotactic setup and the deformations referenced to one anatomic local registration box were determined. Local deformations of the patients immobilized using our custom-made device were compared with previously published results. Several patient positioning correction strategies were simulated, and the residual local uncertainties were calculated. Results: The patient anatomy in the stereotactic setup showed local systematic positioning deviations of 1-4 mm. The deformations referenced to a particular anatomic local registration box were similar to the reported deformations assessed from patients immobilized with commercially available Aquaplast masks. A global correction, including the rotational error compensation, decreased the remaining local translational errors. Depending on the chosen patient positioning strategy, the remaining local uncertainties varied considerably. Conclusions: Local deformations in head-and-neck patients occur even if an elaborate, custom-made patient fixation method is used. A rotational error correction decreased the required margins considerably. None of the considered correction strategies achieved perfect alignment. Therefore, weighting of anatomic subregions to obtain the optimal correction vector should be investigated in the

  15. [Comparison of setup accuracy between ExacTrac X-ray 6 dimensions and cone-beam computed tomography for intracranial and pelvic image-guided radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Kudo, Tsuyoshi; Ono, Kaoru; Furukawa, Kengo; Fujimoto, Sachie; Akagi, Yukio; Koyama, Tadashi; Hirokawa, Yutaka

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the setup difference measured with ExacTrac X-ray 6D (ETX6D) and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) for non-invasive fractionated radiotherapy. Setup data were collected on a Novalis Tx treatment unit for both a head phantom and patients with intracranial tumors and a pelvic phantom and patients with prostate cancer. Initially, setup was done for a phantom using ETX6D. Secondly, a treatment couch was shifted or rotated by each already known value. Thirdly, ETX6D and CBCT scans were obtained. Finally, setup difference was determined: the registrations of ETX6D images with the corresponding digitally reconstructed radiographs using ETX6D fusion, and registrations of CBCT images with the planning CT using online 6D fusion. The setup difference between ETX6D and CBCT was compared. The impact of shifts and rotations on the difference was evaluated. Patients' setup data was similarly analyzed. In phantom experiments, the root mean square (RMS) of difference of the shift and rotation was less than 0.45 mm for translations, and 0.17 degrees for rotations. In intracranial patients' data, the RMS of that was 0.55 mm and 0.44 degree, respectively. In prostate cancer patients' data, the RMS of that was 0.77 mm and 0.79 degree, respectively. In this study, we observed modest setup differences between ETX6D and CBCT. These differences were generally less than 1.00 mm for translations, and 1.00 degrees for rotations, respectively.

  16. [Discrepancy between the intended isocenter and that from orthogonal linacgrams in the treatment of CT-guided stereotactic body radiotherapy(SBRT)].

    PubMed

    Oooka, Yoshikazu; Takeda, Atsuya; Sudo, Yasunobu; Iwashita, Hideo; Aoki, Yousuke; Katayose, Tetsurou; Sasajima, Noriaki; Sanuki, Naoko; Oohashi, Toshio; Kunieda, Etsuo; Nagaoka, Tomoaki

    2009-01-20

    In our institution a CT scanner was installed in the same room as the linear accelerator. In stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) we confirmed the isocenter position by serial thin-slice and long-scan-time CT images before every treatment as well as in planning. In planning we constructed digitally reconstructed radiography (DRR) of both the anterior and lateral views. At the first treatment we also checked the isocenter with linacgraphy. Then we compared the isocenter positions obtained from the DRR and linacgraphy. Between Feb. 2005 and Oct. 2006, we treated 75 lung and liver tumors with SBRT in this way. Based on bony structures, we measured the differences between in-isocenter positions for SI, LR, and AP directions between DRR and linacgraphy. The median (min-max) of the differences in-isocenter positions for SI, LR, and AP directions between DRR and linacgraphy were 0.0 mm (0-6.0), 0.0 mm (0-10.0), and 0.0 mm (0-10.0), respectively, as well as 3.2 mm (0-12.3) for 3-dimensional distance. In 28 tumors (37%) the differences exceeded 5 mm in three-dimensional distance. The frequency of differences exceeding 5 mm in upper lung lesions tended to be more than that in liver lesions, and that in left pulmonary lesions was significantly more than that in right ones. This result suggests that the relative position of the target volume to the bony structure differ in planning and in every treatment. It was recommended to verify isocenter accuracy in institutions where isocenter position is checked only by orthogonal linacgraphy in SBRT.

  17. Evaluation of overall setup accuracy and adequate setup margins in pelvic image-guided radiotherapy: Comparison of the male and female patients

    SciTech Connect

    Laaksomaa, Marko; Kapanen, Mika; Tulijoki, Tapio; Peltola, Seppo; Hyödynmaa, Simo; Kellokumpu-Lehtinen, Pirkko-Liisa

    2014-04-01

    We evaluated adequate setup margins for the radiotherapy (RT) of pelvic tumors based on overall position errors of bony landmarks. We also estimated the difference in setup accuracy between the male and female patients. Finally, we compared the patient rotation for 2 immobilization devices. The study cohort included consecutive 64 male and 64 female patients. Altogether, 1794 orthogonal setup images were analyzed. Observer-related deviation in image matching and the effect of patient rotation were explicitly determined. Overall systematic and random errors were calculated in 3 orthogonal directions. Anisotropic setup margins were evaluated based on residual errors after weekly image guidance. The van Herk formula was used to calculate the margins. Overall, 100 patients were immobilized with a house-made device. The patient rotation was compared against 28 patients immobilized with CIVCO's Kneefix and Feetfix. We found that the usually applied isotropic setup margin of 8 mm covered all the uncertainties related to patient setup for most RT treatments of the pelvis. However, margins of even 10.3 mm were needed for the female patients with very large pelvic target volumes centered either in the symphysis or in the sacrum containing both of these structures. This was because the effect of rotation (p ≤ 0.02) and the observer variation in image matching (p ≤ 0.04) were significantly larger for the female patients than for the male patients. Even with daily image guidance, the required margins remained larger for the women. Patient rotations were largest about the lateral axes. The difference between the required margins was only 1 mm for the 2 immobilization devices. The largest component of overall systematic position error came from patient rotation. This emphasizes the need for rotation correction. Overall, larger position errors and setup margins were observed for the female patients with pelvic cancer than for the male patients.

  18. Comparison of Localization Performance with Implanted Fiducial Markers and Cone-Beam Computed Tomography for On-line Image-Guided Radiotherapy of the Prostate

    PubMed Central

    Moseley, Douglas J; White, Elizabeth A; Wiltshire, Kirsty L; Rosewall, Tara; Sharpe, Michael B; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H; Bissonnette, Jean-Pierre; Gospodarowicz, Mary; Warde, Padraig; Catton, Charles N; Jaffray, David A

    2007-01-01

    Purpose To assess the accuracy of kV cone-beam CT (CBCT) based setup corrections as compared to orthogonal MV portal image-based corrections for patients undergoing external-beam radiotherapy of the prostate. Method and Materials Daily cone-beam CT volumetric images were acquired after setup for patients with three intra-prostatic fiducial markers. The estimated couch shifts were compared retrospectively to patient adjustments based on two orthogonal MV portal images (the current clinical standard of care in our institution). The CBCT soft-tissue based shifts were also estimated by digitally removing the gold markers in each projection to suppress the artifacts in the reconstructed volumes. A total of 256 volumetric images for 15 patients were analyzed. Results The Pearson coefficient of correlation for the patient position shifts using fiducial markers in MV vs kV was (R2 = 0.95, 0.84, 0.81) in the L/R, A/P and S/I directions respectively. The correlation using soft-tissue matching was ((R2 = 0.90, 0.49, 0.51) in the L/R, A/P and S/I directions. A Bland-Altman analysis showed no significant trends in the data. The percentage of shifts within a +/−3mm tolerance (the clinical action level) was (99.7, 95.5, 91.3) for fiducial marker matching and (99.5, 70.3, 78.4) for soft-tissue matching. Conclusions Cone-beam CT is an accurate and precise tool for image-guidance. It provides an equivalent means of patient setup correction for prostate patients with implanted gold fiducial markers. Use of the additional information provided by the visualization of soft-tissue structures is an active area of research. PMID:17293243

  19. Comparison of localization performance with implanted fiducial markers and cone-beam computed tomography for on-line image-guided radiotherapy of the prostate

    SciTech Connect

    Moseley, Douglas J. . E-mail: douglas.moseley@rmp.uhn.on.ca; White, Elizabeth A.; Wiltshire, Kirsty L.; Rosewall, Tara; Sharpe, Michael B.; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.; Bissonnette, Jean-Pierre; Gospodarowicz, Mary; Warde, Padraig; Catton, Charles N.; Jaffray, David A.

    2007-03-01

    Purpose: The aim of this work was to assess the accuracy of kilovoltage (kV) cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT)-based setup corrections as compared with orthogonal megavoltage (MV) portal image-based corrections for patients undergoing external-beam radiotherapy of the prostate. Methods and Materials: Daily cone-beam CT volumetric images were acquired after setup for patients with three intraprostatic fiducial markers. The estimated couch shifts were compared retrospectively to patient adjustments based on two orthogonal MV portal images (the current clinical standard of care in our institution). The CBCT soft-tissue based shifts were also estimated by digitally removing the gold markers in each projection to suppress the artifacts in the reconstructed volumes. A total of 256 volumetric images for 15 patients were analyzed. Results: The Pearson coefficient of correlation for the patient position shifts using fiducial markers in MV vs. kV was (R{sup 2} = 0.95, 0.84, 0.81) in the left-right (LR), anterior-posterior (AP), and superior-inferior (SI) directions, respectively. The correlation using soft-tissue matching was as follows: R{sup 2} = 0.90, 0.49, 0.51 in the LR, AP and SI directions. A Bland-Altman analysis showed no significant trends in the data. The percentage of shifts within a {+-}3-mm tolerance (the clinical action level) was 99.7%, 95.5%, 91.3% for fiducial marker matching and 99.5%, 70.3%, 78.4% for soft-tissue matching. Conclusions: Cone-beam CT is an accurate and precise tool for image guidance. It provides an equivalent means of patient setup correction for prostate patients with implanted gold fiducial markers. Use of the additional information provided by the visualization of soft-tissue structures is an active area of research.

  20. The feasibility of prostate-specific membrane antigen positron emission tomography(PSMA PET/CT)-guided radiotherapy in oligometastatic prostate cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Guler, O C; Engels, B; Onal, C; Everaert, H; Van den Begin, R; Gevaert, T; de Ridder, M

    2017-08-09

    To investigate the efficacy and toxicity of 68Ga-PSMA-HBED-CC ((68)Ga-PSMA) PET-CT-guided RT in the treatment of oligometastatic prostate cancer retrospectively. A total of 23 prostate cancer patients with biochemical relapse, of which 13 were castration sensitive (CS) and 10 castration resistant (CR), were treated with intensity-modulated and image-guided RT (IMRT-IGRT) on ≤3 metastases detected by (68)Ga PSMA PET-CT. Androgen deprivation therapy was continued in CR patients. A total of 38 metastases were treated. The involved sites were pelvic bone (n = 16), pelvic lymph nodes (n = 11), paraaortic lymph nodes (n = 6), ribs (n = 3) and vertebral body (n = 2). The median PSA prior to RT was 1.1 ng/mL (range 0.1-29.0 ng/mL). A median dose of 43.5 Gy (range 30-64 Gy) was delivered by IMRT-IGRT in 12-27 fractions. At a median follow-up of 7 months (range 2-17 months), 19 patients (83%) were in remission. Four patients (17%) developed distant recurrences. The actuarial 1-year LC, PFS and OS rates were 100, 51 (95% CI 8-83%) and 100%. Univariate analysis demonstrated a statistically significantly better PFS in CS patients as compared to CR patients (1-year PFS 67 vs. 0%, p < 0.01). One patient experienced grade 2 acute gastrointestinal toxicity. Grade 3 or more toxicity events were not observed. By providing optimal LC, low toxicity and a promising PFS in CS patients, the current retrospective study illustrated that (68)Ga PSMA PET-CT-guided RT may be an attractive treatment strategy in patients with oligometastatic prostate cancer. Validation by randomized trials is eagerly awaited.

  1. Multibeam synthetic aperture radar for global oceanography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, A.

    1979-01-01

    A single-frequency multibeam synthetic aperture radar concept for large swath imaging desired for global oceanography is evaluated. Each beam iilluminates a separate range and azimuth interval, and images for different beams may be separated on the basis of the Doppler spectrum of the beams or their spatial azimuth separation in the image plane of the radar processor. The azimuth resolution of the radar system is selected so that the Doppler spectrum of each beam does not interfere with the Doppler foldover due to the finite pulse repetition frequency of the radar system.

  2. Incidence of Secondary Cancer Development After High-Dose Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy and Image-Guided Brachytherapy for the Treatment of Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Zelefsky, Michael J.; Housman, Douglas M.; Pei Xin; Alicikus, Zumre; Magsanoc, Juan Martin; Dauer, Lawrence T.; St Germain, Jean; Yamada, Yoshiya; Kollmeier, Marisa; Cox, Brett; Zhang Zhigang

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To report the incidence and excess risk of second malignancy (SM) development compared with the general population after external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and brachytherapy to treat prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between 1998 and 2001, 1,310 patients with localized prostate cancer were treated with EBRT (n = 897) or brachytherapy (n = 413). We compared the incidence of SMs in our patients with that of the general population extracted from the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results data set combined with the 2000 census data. Results: The 10-year likelihood of SM development was 25% after EBRT and 15% after brachytherapy (p = .02). The corresponding 10-year likelihood for in-field SM development in these groups was 4.9% and 1.6% (p = .24). Multivariate analysis showed that EBRT vs. brachytherapy and older age were the only significant predictors for the development of all SMs (p = .037 and p = .030), with a trend for older patients to develop a SM. The increased incidence of SM for EBRT patients was explained by the greater incidence of skin cancer outside the radiation field compared with that after brachytherapy (10.6% and 3.3%, respectively, p = .004). For the EBRT group, the 5- and 10-year mortality rate was 1.96% and 5.1% from out-of field cancer, respectively; for in-field SM, the corresponding mortality rates were 0.1% and 0.7%. Among the brachytherapy group, the 5- and 10-year mortality rate related to out-of field SM was 0.8% and 2.7%, respectively. Our observed SM rates after prostate RT were not significantly different from the cancer incidence rates in the general population. Conclusions: Using modern sophisticated treatment techniques, we report low rates of in-field bladder and rectal SM risks after prostate cancer RT. Furthermore, the likelihood of mortality secondary to a SM was unusual. The greater rate of SM observed with EBRT vs. brachytherapy was related to a small, but significantly increased

  3. Target localization of 3D versus 4D cone beam computed tomography in lipiodol-guided stereotactic radiotherapy of hepatocellular carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Chan, Mark; Chiang, Chi Leung; Lee, Venus; Cheung, Steven; Leung, Ronnie; Wong, Matthew; Lee, Frankle; Blanck, Oliver

    2017-01-01

    Aim of this study was to comparatively evaluate the accuracy of respiration-correlated (4D) and uncorrelated (3D) cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) in localizing lipiodolized hepatocellular carcinomas during stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). 4D-CBCT scans of eighteen HCCs were acquired during free-breathing SBRT following trans-arterial chemo-embolization (TACE) with lipiodol. Approximately 1320 x-ray projections per 4D-CBCT were collected and phase-sorted into ten bins. A 4D registration workflow was followed to register the reconstructed time-weighted average CBCT with the planning mid-ventilation (MidV) CT by an initial bone registration of the vertebrae and then tissue registration of the lipiodol. For comparison, projections of each 4D-CBCT were combined to synthesize 3D-CBCT without phase-sorting. Using the lipiodolized tumor, uncertainties of the treatment setup estimated from the absolute and relative lipiodol position to bone were analyzed separately for 4D- and 3D-CBCT. Qualitatively, 3D-CBCT showed better lipiodol contrast than 4D-CBCT primarily because of a tenfold increase of projections used for reconstruction. Motion artifact was observed to subside in 4D-CBCT compared to 3D-CBCT. Group mean, systematic and random errors estimated from 4D- and 3D-CBCT agreed to within 1 mm in the cranio-caudal (CC) and 0.5 mm in the anterior-posterior (AP) and left-right (LR) directions. Systematic and random errors are largest in the CC direction, amounting to 4.7 mm and 3.7 mm from 3D-CBCT and 5.6 mm and 3.8 mm from 4D-CBCT, respectively. Safety margin calculated from 3D-CBCT and 4D-CBCT differed by 2.1, 0.1 and 0.0 mm in the CC, AP, and LR directions. 3D-CBCT is an adequate alternative to 4D-CBCT when lipoid is used for localizing HCC during free-breathing SBRT. Similar margins are anticipated with 3D- and 4D-CBCT.

  4. [Radiotherapy of bone metastases].

    PubMed

    Thureau, S; Vieillard, M-H; Supiot, S; Lagrange, J-L

    2016-09-01

    Radiotherapy plays a major role in palliative treatment of bone metastases. Recent developments of stereotactic radiotherapy and intensity modulated radiation therapy give the possibility to treat oligometastatic diseases. The objective of this paper is to report indications and treatment modalities of radiotherapy in these situations.

  5. SU-E-J-219: Quantitative Evaluation of Motion Effects On Accuracy of Image-Guided Radiotherapy with Fiducial Markers Using CT Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, I; Oyewale, S; Ahmad, S; Algan, O; Alsbou, N

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate quantitatively patient motion effects on the localization accuracy of image-guided radiation with fiducial markers using axial CT (ACT), helical CT (HCT) and cone-beam CT (CBCT) using modeling and experimental phantom studies. Methods: Markers with different lengths (2.5 mm, 5 mm, 10 mm, and 20 mm) were inserted in a mobile thorax phantom which was imaged using ACT, HCT and CBCT. The phantom moved with sinusoidal motion with amplitudes ranging 0–20 mm and a frequency of 15 cycles-per-minute. Three parameters that include: apparent marker lengths, center position and distance between the centers of the markers were measured in the different CT images of the mobile phantom. A motion mathematical model was derived to predict the variations in the previous three parameters and their dependence on the motion in the different imaging modalities. Results: In CBCT, the measured marker lengths increased linearly with increase in motion amplitude. For example, the apparent length of the 10 mm marker was about 20 mm when phantom moved with amplitude of 5 mm. Although the markers have elongated, the center position and the distance between markers remained at the same position for different motion amplitudes in CBCT. These parameters were not affected by motion frequency and phase in CBCT. In HCT and ACT, the measured marker length, center and distance between markers varied irregularly with motion parameters. The apparent lengths of the markers varied with inverse of the phantom velocity which depends on motion frequency and phase. Similarly the center position and distance between markers varied inversely with phantom speed. Conclusion: Motion may lead to variations in maker length, center position and distance between markers using CT imaging. These effects should be considered in patient setup using image-guided radiation therapy based on fiducial markers matching using 2D-radiographs or volumetric CT imaging.

  6. Maskless lithography and nanopatterning with electron and ion multibeam projection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platzgummer, Elmar

    2010-03-01

    Multi-beam writing becomes mandatory in order to stay within reasonable realization times for the fabrication of leading-edge complex masks and templates. IMS Nanofabrication has developed multi-beam projection techniques implementing a programmable aperture plate system (APS) and charged-particle projection optics with 200x reduction. Proof-of-concept of multi-beam writing was demonstrated in 2009 with 10 keV ion multi-beams and 50 keV electron multi-beams using 43-thousand and 2.5-thousand, respectively, programmable 12.5nm sized beams. In Q4 2009 the development of a 50 keV electron multi-beam Mask Exposure Tool (eMET) was started with the aim to realize 256-thousand programmable 20 nm and 10 nm sized beams. The eMET column realization will provide important synergies for the development of projection mask-less lithography (PML2) for direct write on wafers. In order to enhance throughput a Multi-Axis-PML2 scheme is put forward with potential throughput of 5 WPH for the 16 nm hp technology node and below. Clustering such maskless tools a throughput of 50-100 WPH within a scanner floor space is envisioned. Ion multi-beam techniques may be applied for 2.5D / 3D template fabrication and resistless nanopatterning.

  7. 45 or 50 Gy, Which is the Optimal Radiotherapy Pelvic Dose in Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer in the Perspective of Reaching Magnetic Resonance Image-guided Adaptive Brachytherapy Planning Aims?

    PubMed

    Mazeron, R; Petit, C; Rivin, E; Limkin, E; Dumas, I; Maroun, P; Annede, P; Martinetti, F; Seisen, T; Lefkopoulos, D; Chargari, C; Haie-Meder, C

    2016-03-01

    In locally advanced cervical cancer, the dose delivered results from the sum of external beam radiotherapy and brachytherapy, and is limited by the surrounding organs at risk. The balance between both techniques influences the total dose delivered to the high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV). The aim of the present study was to compare the ability of reaching different planning aims after external beam radiotherapy pelvic doses of 45 Gy in 25 fractions or 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions, both considered as standard prescriptions. The optimised plans of 120 patients treated with pelvic chemoradiation followed by magnetic resonance image-guided intracavitary brachytherapy were reviewed. The doses per pulse were calculated, and the number of pulses required to reach the planning aims, or a limiting dose constraint to organs at risk, was calculated. All doses were converted to 2-Gy equivalents. Three scenarios were applied consisting of different sets of planning aims: 85 and 60 Gy for the HR-CTV and the intermediate-risk CTV (IR-CTV) D90 (minimal dose received by 90% of the volume) in scenario 1, 90 and 60 Gy, respectively, for scenarios 2 and 3. For organs at risk, dose constraints were 90, 75 and 75 Gy to the bladder, rectum and sigmoid D2cm(3), respectively, in scenarios 1 and 2, and 80, 65 and 70 Gy in scenario 3. A similar HR-CTV D90 could have been reached in scenarios 1 and 2 according to both pelvic doses. In scenario 3, a higher mean HR-CTV could have been reached in the 45 Gy arm (83.5 ± 8.0 versus 82.4 ± 8.0, P < 0.0001). The mean D2cm(3) of organs at risk was systematically and significantly increased after a delivery of 50.4 Gy to the pelvis, from 0.9 to 2.89 Gy. The proportions of plans reaching planning aims were 85.8, 72.5 and 42.5% after 45 Gy and 85.5, 67.5 and 33.3% after 50.4 Gy according to scenarios 1, 2 and 3, respectively. According to scenario 3, 50.4 Gy, the reachable HR-CTV D90 was higher in 30% of the cases, by 2 Gy in two

  8. Phase II dose escalation study of image-guided adaptive radiotherapy for prostate cancer: Use of dose-volume constraints to achieve rectal isotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Vargas, Carlos; Yan Di; Kestin, Larry L.; Krauss, Daniel; Lockman, David M.; Brabbins, Donald S.; Martinez, Alvaro A. . E-mail: amartinez@beaumont.edu

    2005-09-01

    significant difference by dose level was seen in the 2-year rate of Grade 2 or higher chronic rectal toxicity. These rates were 27%, 15%, 14%, 17%, and 24% for dose levels equal to or less than 72, 73.8, 75.6, 77.4, and 79.2 Gy, respectively (p = 0.3). Grade 2 or higher chronic rectal bleeding was significantly greater for Group 2 than for Group 1, 17% vs. 8% (p = 0.035). Conclusions: High doses (79.2 Gy) were safely delivered in selected patients by our adaptive radiotherapy process. Under the rectal dose-volume histogram constraints for the dose level selection, the risk of chronic rectal toxicity is similar among patients treated to different dose levels. Therefore, rectal chronic toxicity rates reflect the dose-volume cutoff used and are independent of the actual dose levels. On the other hand, a larger PTV will increase the rectal wall dose and chronic rectal toxicity rates. PTV volume and dose constraints should be defined, considering their potential benefit.

  9. Towards ultrasound-guided adaptive radiotherapy for cervical cancer: Evaluation of Elekta's semiautomated uterine segmentation method on 3D ultrasound images.

    PubMed

    Mason, Sarah A; O'Shea, Tuathan P; White, Ingrid M; Lalondrelle, Susan; Downey, Kate; Baker, Mariwan; Behrens, Claus F; Bamber, Jeffrey C; Harris, Emma J

    2017-07-01

    3D ultrasound (US) images of the uterus may be used to adapt radiotherapy (RT) for cervical cancer patients based on changes in daily anatomy. This requires accurate on-line segmentation of the uterus. The aim of this work was to assess the accuracy of Elekta's "Assisted Gyne Segmentation" (AGS) algorithm in semi-automatically segmenting the uterus on 3D transabdominal ultrasound images by comparison with manual contours. Nine patients receiving RT for cervical cancer were imaged with the 3D Clarity(®) transabdominal probe at RT planning, and 1 to 7 times during treatment. Image quality was rated from unusable (0)-excellent (3). Four experts segmented the uterus (defined as the uterine body and cervix) manually and using AGS on images with a ranking > 0. Pairwise analysis between manual contours was evaluated to determine interobserver variability. The accuracy of the AGS method was assessed by measuring its agreement with manual contours via pairwise analysis. 35/44 images acquired (79.5%) received a ranking > 0. For the manual contour variation, the median [interquartile range (IQR)] distance between centroids (DC) was 5.41 [5.0] mm, the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) was 0.78 [0.11], the mean surface-to-surface distance (MSSD) was 3.20 [1.8] mm, and the uniform margin of 95% (UM95) was 4.04 [5.8] mm. There was no correlation between image quality and manual contour agreement. AGS failed to give a result in 19.3% of cases. For the remaining cases, the level of agreement between AGS contours and manual contours depended on image quality. There were no significant differences between the AGS segmentations and the manual segmentations on the images that received a quality rating of 3. However, the AGS algorithm had significantly worse agreement with manual contours on images with quality ratings of 1 and 2 compared with the corresponding interobserver manual variation. The overall median [IQR] DC, DSC, MSSD, and UM95 between AGS and manual contours was 5.48 [5

  10. Further advancing the throughput of a multi-beam SEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemen, Thomas; Malloy, Matt; Thiel, Brad; Mikula, Shawn; Denk, Winfried; Dellemann, Gregor; Zeidler, Dirk

    2015-03-01

    Multiple electron beam SEMs enable detecting structures of few nanometer in diameter at much higher throughputs than possible with single beam electron microscopes at comparable electron probe parameters. Although recent multiple beam SEM development has already demonstrated a large speed increase1, higher throughputs are still required to match the needs of many semiconductor applications2. We demonstrate the next step in the development of multi-beam SEMs by increasing the number of beams and the current per beam. The modularity of the multi-beam concept ensures that design changes in the multi-beam SEM are minimized.

  11. Theoretical and experimental research on multi-beam klystron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaogen, Ding; Jun, Peng; Yunshu, Zhu; Shaoming, Shi

    1999-05-01

    Theoretical and experimental research work on multi-beam klystron (MBK) conducted in Institute of Electronics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (IECAS) is described in this paper. Research progress on Interaction between multi-electron beam and microwave electric field, multi-beam cavity, filter loaded double gap cavity broadband output circuit, multi-beam electron gun, and periodic reversal focusing system is presented. Performance and measurement results of five types of MBK are also given out. The key technical problems for present MBK are discussed in this paper.

  12. SU-E-J-44: A Novel Approach to Quantify Patient Setup and Target Motion for Real-Time Image-Guided Radiotherapy (IGRT)

    SciTech Connect

    Li, S; Charpentier, P; Sayler, E; Micaily, B; Miyamoto, C; Geng, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose Isocenter shifts and rotations to correct patient setup errors and organ motion cannot remedy some shape changes of large targets. We are investigating new methods in quantification of target deformation for realtime IGRT of breast and chest wall cancer. Methods Ninety-five patients of breast or chest wall cancer were accrued in an IRB-approved clinical trial of IGRT using 3D surface images acquired at daily setup and beam-on time via an in-room camera. Shifts and rotations relating to the planned reference surface were determined using iterative-closest-point alignment. Local surface displacements and target deformation are measured via a ray-surface intersection and principal component analysis (PCA) of external surface, respectively. Isocenter shift, upper-abdominal displacement, and vectors of the surface projected onto the two principal components, PC1 and PC2, were evaluated for sensitivity and accuracy in detection of target deformation. Setup errors for some deformed targets were estimated by superlatively registering target volume, inner surface, or external surface in weekly CBCT or these outlines on weekly EPI. Results Setup difference according to the inner-surface, external surface, or target volume could be 1.5 cm. Video surface-guided setup agreed with EPI results to within < 0.5 cm while CBCT results were sometimes (∼20%) different from that of EPI (>0.5 cm) due to target deformation for some large breasts and some chest walls undergoing deep-breath-hold irradiation. Square root of PC1 and PC2 is very sensitive to external surface deformation and irregular breathing. Conclusion PCA of external surfaces is quick and simple way to detect target deformation in IGRT of breast and chest wall cancer. Setup corrections based on the target volume, inner surface, and external surface could be significant different. Thus, checking of target shape changes is essential for accurate image-guided patient setup and motion tracking of large deformable

  13. Imaged-guided liver stereotactic body radiotherapy using VMAT and real-time adaptive tumor gating. Concerns about technique and preliminary clinical results.

    PubMed

    Llacer-Moscardo, Carmen; Riou, Olivier; Azria, David; Bedos, Ludovic; Ailleres, Norbert; Quenet, Francois; Rouanet, Philippe; Ychou, Marc; Fenoglietto, Pascal

    2017-01-01

    Motion management is a major challenge in abdominal SBRT. We present our study of SBRT for liver tumors using intrafraction motion review (IMR) allowing simultaneous KV information and MV delivery to synchronize the beam during gated RapidArc treatment. Between May 2012 and March 2015, 41 patients were treated by liver SBRT using gated RapidArc technique in a Varian Novalis Truebeam STx linear accelerator. PTV was created by expanding 5 mm from the ITV. Dose prescription ranged from 40 to 50 Gy in 5-10 fractions. The prescribed dose and fractionation were chosen depending on hepatic function and dosimetric results. Thirty-four patients with a minimal follow-up of six months were analyzed for local control and toxicity. Accuracy for tumor repositioning was evaluated for the first ten patients. With a median follow-up of 13 months, the treatment was well tolerated and no patient presented RILD, perforation or gastrointestinal bleeding. Acute toxicity was found in 3 patients with G1 abdominal pain, 2 with G1 nausea, 10 with G1 asthenia and 1 with G2 asthenia. 6 patients presented asymptomatic transitory perturbation of liver enzymes. In-field local control was 90.3% with 7 complete responses, 14 partial responses and 7 stabilisations. 3 patients evolved "in field". 12 patients had an intrahepatic progression "out of field". Mean intrafraction deviation of fiducials in the craneo-caudal direction was 0.91 mm (0-6 mm). The clinical tolerance and oncological outcomes were favorable when using image-guided liver SBRT with real-time adaptive tumor gating.

  14. An algorithm for signal processing in multibeam antenna arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danilevskii, L. N.; Domanov, Iu. A.; Korobko, O. V.

    1980-09-01

    A signal processing method for multibeam antenna arrays is presented which can be used to effectively reduce discrete-phasing sidelobes. Calculations of an 11-element array are presented as an example.

  15. Biomarkers for DNA DSB inhibitors and radiotherapy clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Liu, Stanley K; Olive, Peggy L; Bristow, Robert G

    2008-09-01

    Major technical advances in radiotherapy, including IMRT and image-guided radiotherapy, have allowed for improved physical precision and increased dose delivery to the tumor, with better sparing of surrounding normal tissue. The development of inhibitors of the sensing and repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) is exciting and could be combined with precise radiotherapy targeting to improve local control following radiotherapy. However, caution must be exercised in order that DSB inhibitors are combined with radiotherapy in such a manner as to preserve the therapeutic ratio by exploiting repair deficiencies in malignant cells over that of normal cells. In this review, we discuss the rationale and current approaches to targeting DSB sensing and repair pathways in combined modality with radiotherapy. We also describe potential biomarkers that could be useful in detecting functional inhibition of DSB repair in a patient's tissues during clinical radiotherapy trials. Finally, we examine a number of issues relating to the use of DSB-inhibiting molecular agents and radiotherapy in the context of the tumor microenvironment, effects on normal tissues and the optimal timing and duration of the agent in relation to fractionated radiotherapy.

  16. TU-AB-303-09: Investigation of Simple Method to Guide Adaptive Radiotherapy of Head-And-Neck Treatment Using Portal Imager

    SciTech Connect

    Al Etreby, M; Elshemey, W; El Sherbini, N

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Planned dose distribution for IMRT or VMAT could be altered by tissue changes during treatment course as in head and neck patients. Thus the aim of our study is to investigate a simple method that guides decision for re-planning. We will correlate changes in exit fluence tracked through entire treatment course with the anatomical changes. Methods: Fifteen patients were planned for IMRT; weekly CT scan was registered to original CT. Volume changes of different structures were assessed for each week. Frequently integrated images were acquired for all fields twice weekly via portal imager. The delivered fluences were compared with reference images. Gamma analysis (3% and 3 mm) including maximum γ, and percentage of points with γ≥ 1, were calculated for all fields. Results: Continuous reduction in GTV, CTV1 and parotids volumes during treatment was found [median value of 5.3 (1.3–20.8), 23.8 (3.0–128.7) and 1.7 (0.5–6.3) cm3 respectively] with significant change on week 2 (p= < 0.005). Also the value of gamma area >1 parameter continued to increase, significantly (P < 0.005), starting from second week (1.8 ± 1.9%) reaching 4.1 ± 1.6% by the end of treatment. Most of these changes in the exit fluences are significantly correlated to patient anatomy variations. Pearson correlation coefficient was −0.984 (P = 0.002) and −0.984 (P = 0.014) for the maximum gamma value and the value of gamma area >1, respectively. Conclusion: The changes in exit fluences are reflecting the corresponding anatomical changes. We proposed a method to track the changes in the averaged maximum gamma value and the gamma area > 1 value for the exit fluences during treatment. Maximum gamma value of 2.6% and Maximum gamma area > 1 value of 1.8% would be useful boarder lines that if exceeded a re-planning would be recommended.

  17. Contour propagation in MRI-guided radiotherapy treatment of cervical cancer: the accuracy of rigid, non-rigid and semi-automatic registrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Put, R. W.; Kerkhof, E. M.; Raaymakers, B. W.; Jürgenliemk-Schulz, I. M.; Lagendijk, J. J. W.

    2009-12-01

    External beam radiation treatment for patients with cervical cancer is hindered by the relatively large motion of the target volume. A hybrid MRI-accelerator system makes it possible to acquire online MR images during treatment in order to correct for motion and deformation. To fully benefit from such a system, online delineation of the target volumes is necessary. The aim of this study is to investigate the accuracy of rigid, non-rigid and semi-automatic registrations of MR images for interfractional contour propagation in patients with cervical cancer. Registration using mutual information was performed on both bony anatomy and soft tissue. A B-spline transform was used for the non-rigid method. Semi-automatic registration was implemented with a point set registration algorithm on a small set of manual landmarks. Online registration was simulated by application of each method to four weekly MRI scans for each of 33 cervical cancer patients. Evaluation was performed by distance analysis with respect to manual delineations. The results show that soft-tissue registration significantly (P < 0.001) improves the accuracy of contour propagation compared to registration based on bony anatomy. A combination of user-assisted and non-rigid registration provides the best results with a median error of 3.2 mm (1.4-9.9 mm) compared to 5.9 mm (1.7-19.7 mm) with bone registration (P < 0.001) and 3.4 mm (1.3-19.1 mm) with non-rigid registration (P = 0.01). In a clinical setting, the benefit may be further increased when outliers can be removed by visual inspection of the online images. We conclude that for external beam radiation treatment of cervical cancer, online MRI imaging will allow target localization based on soft tissue visualization, which provides a significantly higher accuracy than localization based on bony anatomy. The use of limited user input to guide the registration increases overall accuracy. Additional non-rigid registration further reduces the propagation

  18. Multi-beam linear accelerator EVT

    SciTech Connect

    Teryaev, Vladimir E.; Kazakov, Sergey Yu.; Hirshfield, Jay L.

    2016-03-29

    A novel electron multi-beam accelerator is presented. The accelerator, short-named EVT (Electron Voltage Transformer) belongs to the class of two-beam accelerators. It combines an RF generator and essentially an accelerator within the same vacuum envelope. Drive beam-lets and an accelerated beam are modulated in RF modulators and then bunches pass into an accelerating structure, comprising uncoupled with each other and inductive tuned cavities, where the energy transfer from the drive beams to the accelerated beam occurs. A phasing of bunches is solved by choice correspond distances between gaps of the adjacent cavities. Preliminary results of numerical simulations and the initial specification of EVT operating in S-band, with a 60 kV gun and generating a 2.7 A, 1.1 MV beam at its output is presented. Furthermore, a relatively high efficiency of 67% and high design average power suggest that EVT can find its use in industrial applications.

  19. Multi-beam linear accelerator EVT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teryaev, Vladimir E.; Kazakov, Sergey Yu.; Hirshfield, Jay L.

    2016-09-01

    A novel electron multi-beam accelerator is presented. The accelerator, short-named EVT (Electron Voltage Transformer) belongs to the class of two-beam accelerators. It combines an RF generator and essentially an accelerator within the same vacuum envelope. Drive beam-lets and an accelerated beam are modulated in RF modulators and then bunches pass into an accelerating structure, comprising uncoupled with each other and inductive tuned cavities, where the energy transfer from the drive beams to the accelerated beam occurs. A phasing of bunches is solved by choice correspond distances between gaps of the adjacent cavities. Preliminary results of numerical simulations and the initial specification of EVT operating in S-band, with a 60 kV gun and generating a 2.7 A, 1.1 MV beam at its output is presented. A relatively high efficiency of 67% and high design average power suggest that EVT can find its use in industrial applications.

  20. Development of image quality assurance measures of the ExacTrac localization system using commercially available image evaluation software and hardware for image-guided radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Dennis N; Papanikolaou, Nikos; Gutierrez, Alonso N

    2014-11-01

    Quality assurance (QA) of the image quality for image-guided localization systems is crucial to ensure accurate visualization and localization of target volumes. In this study, a methodology was developed to assess and evaluate the constancy of the high-contrast spatial resolution, dose, energy, contrast, and geometrical accuracy of the BrainLAB ExacTrac system. An in-house fixation device was constructed to hold the QCkV-1 phantom firmly and reproducibly against the face of the flat panel detectors. Two image sets per detector were acquired using ExacTrac preset console settings over a period of three months. The image sets were analyzed in PIPSpro and the following metrics were recorded: high-contrast spatial resolution (f30,f40,f50 (lp/mm)), noise, and contrast-to-noise ratio. Geometrical image accuracy was evaluated by assessing the length between to predetermined points of the QCkV-1 phantom. Dose and kVp were recorded using the Unfors RaySafe Xi R/F Detector. The kVp and dose were evaluated for the following: Cranial Standard (CS) (80 kV,80 mA,80 ms), Thorax Standard (TS) (120 kV,160 mA,160 ms), Abdomen Standard (AS) (120 kV,160 mA,130 ms), and Pelvis Standard (PS) (120 kV,160 mA,160 ms). With regard to high-contrast spatial resolution, the mean values of the f30 (lp/mm), f40 (lp/mm) and f50 (lp/mm) for the left detector were 1.39±0.04,1.24±0.05, and 1.09±0.04, respectively, while for the right detector they were 1.38±0.04,1.22±0.05, and 1.09±0.05, respectively. Mean CNRs for the left and right detectors were 148±3 and 143±4, respectively. For geometrical accuracy, both detectors had a measured image length of the QCkV-1 of 57.9±0.5mm. The left detector showed dose measurements of 20.4±0.2μGy(CS), 191.8±0.7μGy(TS), 154.2±0.7μGy(AS), and 192.2±0.6μGy(PS), while the right detector showed 20.3±0.3μGy(CS), 189.7±0.8μGy(TS), 151.0±0.7μGy(AS), and 189.7±0.8μGy(PS), respectively. For X-ray energy, the left detector (right X-ray tube) had

  1. Development of image quality assurance measures of the ExacTrac localization system using commercially available image evaluation software and hardware for image-guided radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Dennis N; Papanikolaou, Nikos; Gutiérrez, Alonso N

    2014-11-08

    Quality assurance (QA) of the image quality for image-guided localization systems is crucial to ensure accurate visualization and localization of target volumes. In this study, a methodology was developed to assess and evaluate the constancy of the high-contrast spatial resolution, dose, energy, contrast, and geometrical accuracy of the BrainLAB ExacTrac system. An in-house fixation device was constructed to hold the QCkV-1 phantom firmly and reproducibly against the face of the flat panel detectors. Two image sets per detector were acquired using ExacTrac preset console settings over a period of three months. The image sets were analyzed in PIPSpro and the following metrics were recorded: high-contrast spatial resolution (f30, f40, f50 (lp/mm)), noise, and contrast-to-noise ratio. Geometrical image accu- racy was evaluated by assessing the length between to predetermined points of the QCkV-1 phantom. Dose and kVp were recorded using the Unfors RaySafe Xi R/F Detector. The kVp and dose were evaluated for the following: Cranial Standard (CS) (80 kV,80 mA,80 ms), Thorax Standard (TS) (120 kV,160 mA,160 ms), Abdomen Standard (AS) (120 kV,160 mA,130 ms), and Pelvis Standard (PS) (120 kV,160 mA,160 ms). With regard to high-contrast spatial resolution, the mean values of the f30 (lp/mm), f40 (lp/mm) and f50 (lp/mm) for the left detector were 1.39 ± 0.04, 1.24 ± 0.05, and 1.09 ± 0.04, respectively, while for the right detector they were 1.38 ± 0.04, 1.22 ± 0.05, and 1.09 ± 0.05, respectively. Mean CNRs for the left and right detectors were 148 ± 3 and 143 ± 4, respectively. For geometrical accuracy, both detectors had a measured image length of the QCkV-1 of 57.9 ± 0.5 mm. The left detector showed dose measurements of 20.4 ± 0.2 μGy (CS), 191.8 ± 0.7 μGy (TS), 154.2 ± 0.7 μGy (AS), and 192.2 ± 0.6 μGy (PS), while the right detector showed 20.3 ± 0.3 μGy (CS), 189.7 ± 0.8 μGy (TS), 151.0 ± 0.7 μGy (AS), and 189.7 ± 0.8 μGy (PS), respectively. For X

  2. [Radiotherapy of hypopharynx cancers].

    PubMed

    Pointreau, Y; Lafond, C; Trémolières, P; Legouté, F; Servagi-Vernat, S; Giraud, P; Maingon, P; Calais, G; Lapeyre, M

    2016-09-01

    The intensity-modulated radiotherapy is the gold standard in the treatment of hypopharynx cancers. Early T1 and T2 tumours could be treated by exclusive radiotherapy or surgery. For tumours requiring total pharyngolaryngectomy (T2 or T3), induction chemotherapy followed by exclusive radiotherapy or concurrent chemoradiotherapy are possible. For T4 tumours, surgery must be proposed. The treatment of lymph nodes is based on the initial treatment of the primary tumour. In non-surgical procedure, in case of sequential radiotherapy, curative dose is 70Gy and prophylactic dose is 50Gy. An integrated simultaneous boost radiotherapy is allowed (70Gy in 2Gy per fraction and 56Gy in 1.8Gy per fraction or 70Gy in 2.12Gy per fraction). Postoperatively, radiotherapy is used for locally advanced cancers with dose levels based on pathologic criteria (66Gy for R1 resection, 50 to 54Gy for complete resection). Volume delineation is based on guidelines.

  3. [Clinical to planning target volume margins in prostate cancer radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Ramiandrisoa, F; Duvergé, L; Castelli, J; Nguyen, T D; Servagi-Vernat, S; de Crevoisier, R

    2016-10-01

    The knowledge of inter- and intrafraction motion and deformations of the intrapelvic target volumes (prostate, seminal vesicles, prostatectomy bed and lymph nodes) as well as the main organs at risk (bladder and rectum) allow to define rational clinical to planning target volume margins, depending on the different radiotherapy techniques and their uncertainties. In case of image-guided radiotherapy, prostate margins and seminal vesicles margins can be between 5 and 10mm. The margins around the prostatectomy bed vary from 10 to 15mm and those around the lymph node clinical target volume between 7 and 10mm. Stereotactic body radiotherapy allows lower margins, which are 3 to 5mm around the prostate. Image-guided and stereotactic body radiotherapy with adequate margins allow finally moderate or extreme hypofractionation.

  4. Heavy-ion radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanai, Tatsuaki

    2000-11-01

    Heavy-ion radiotherapy using high-energy carbon beams has been performed at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Japan. The physical frame works for heavy-ion radiotherapy are established using physical understandings of radiation physics. In order to increase the accuracy of heavy-ion radiotherapy, many physical problems should be solved. Unsolved problems, such as the depth dose distributions, range of heavy-ion in patients and heavy-ion dosimetry in the radiation therapy, are discussed. .

  5. [Radiotherapy of oropharynx carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Servagi Vernat, S; Tochet, F; Vieillevigne, L; Pointreau, Y; Maingon, P; Giraud, P

    2016-09-01

    Indication, doses, technique of radiotherapy and concomitant chemotherapy for oropharynx carcinoma are presented. The recommendations for delineation of the target volumes and organs at risk are detailed.

  6. Japanese structure survey of high-precision radiotherapy in 2012 based on institutional questionnaire about the patterns of care.

    PubMed

    Tomita, Natsuo; Kodaira, Takeshi; Teshima, Teruki; Ogawa, Kazuhiko; Kumazaki, Yu; Yamauchi, Chikako; Toita, Takafumi; Uno, Takashi; Sumi, Minako; Onishi, Hiroshi; Kenjo, Masahiro; Nakamura, Katsumasa

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify operational situations, treatment planning and processes, quality assurance and quality control with relevance to stereotactic radiotherapy, intensity-modulated radiotherapy and image-guided radiotherapy in Japan. We adopted 109 items as the quality indicators of high-precision radiotherapy to prepare a questionnaire. In April 2012, we started to publicly open the questionnaire on the website, requesting every institution with radiotherapy machines for response. The response ratio was 62.1% (490 out of 789 institutions responded). Two or more radiotherapy technologists per linear accelerator managed linear accelerator operation in ∼90% of the responded institutions while medical physicists/radiotherapy quality managers were engaged in the operation in only 64.9% of the institutions. Radiotherapy certified nurses also worked in only 18.4% of the institutions. The ratios of the institutions equipped for stereotactic radiotherapy of lung tumor, intensity-modulated radiotherapy and image-guided radiotherapy were 43.3, 32.6 and 46.8%, respectively. In intensity-modulated radiotherapy planning, radiation oncologists were usually responsible for delineation while medical physicists/radiotherapy quality managers or radiotherapy technologists set up beam in 33.3% of the institutions. The median time required for quality assurance of intensity-modulated radiotherapy at any site of brain, head and neck and prostate was 4 h. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy quality assurance activity had to be started after clinical hours in >60% of the institutions. This study clarified one major issue in the current high-precision radiotherapy in Japan. A manpower shortage should be corrected for high-precision radiotherapy, especially in the area relevant to quality assurance/quality control. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Auv Multibeam Bathymetry and Sidescan Survey of the SS Montebello wreck Offshore Cambria CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caress, D. W.; Thomas, H.; Conlin, D.; Thompson, D.; Paull, C. K.

    2010-12-01

    An MBARI Mapping AUV survey of the SS Montebello wreck offshore Cambria, CA collected high-resolution multibeam bathymetry and sidescan imagery of the vessel and the surrounding seafloor. The Montebello was an oil tanker that was torpedoed and sunk about 11 km offshore in 275 m water depth by a Japanese submarine on December 23, 1941. The Montebello was loaded with 3,000,000 gallons of crude oil, and there is no evidence that significant leakage of that cargo occurred at the time of the sinking or in the 69 years since. The California Department of Fish and Game’s Office of Spill Prevention and Response (OSPR) commissioned the AUV survey as part of a multi-agency Montebello Task Force effort to assess the potential pollution threat. The survey data will be used to determine the extent and general character of the wreckage for a pending Task Force report and to guide any future ROV dive or assessment activity . The AUV surveyed the wreck site from altitudes of 75 and 25 m; the low-altitude high-resolution survey consists of a grid with a 50 m line spacing both parallel and orthogonal to the ship. The 200 kHz multibeam bathymetry images the wreck from both above and from the sides with an 0.5 m lateral resolution. The combination of soundings from all of the survey lines results in a three-dimensional distribution of soundings that delineates the external morphology and some of the internal structure of the wreck. 410 kHz chirp sidescan sonar data also image the site from both directions. The bathymetry data indicate that the Montebello was pitched forward down when it impacted the bottom, crushing and breaking off the bow section. Both forward and aft deckhouses are largely intact, and in fact the multibeam images the individual decks within those structures. About half of the forward mast remains, both amidships masts and the smokestack are missing. A good deal of the deck piping and equipment appears intact, and aside from the bow, the ship’s sides appear

  8. [Radiotherapy of skin cancers].

    PubMed

    Hennequin, C; Rio, E; Mahé, M-A

    2016-09-01

    The indications of radiotherapy for skin cancers are not clearly defined because of the lack of randomised trials or prospective studies. For basal cell carcinomas, radiotherapy frequently offers a good local control, but a randomized trial showed that surgery is more efficient and less toxic. Indications of radiotherapy are contra-indications of surgery for patients older than 60, non-sclerodermiform histology and occurring in non-sensitive areas. Adjuvant radiotherapy could be proposed to squamous cell carcinomas, in case of poor prognostic factors. Dose of 60 to 70Gy are usually required, and must be modulated to the size of the lesions. Adjuvant radiotherapy seems beneficial for desmoplastic melanomas but not for the other histological types. Prophylactic nodal irradiation (45 to 50Gy), for locally advanced tumours (massive nodal involvement), decreases the locoregional failure rate but do not increase survival. Adjuvant radiotherapy (50 to 56Gy) for Merckel cell carcinomas increases also the local control rate, as demonstrated by meta-analysis and a large epidemiological study. Nodal areas must be included, if there is no surgical exploration (sentinel lymph node dissection). Kaposi sarcomas are radiosensitive and could be treated with relatively low doses (24 to 30Gy). Also, cutaneous lymphomas are good indications for radiotherapy: B lymphomas are electively treated with limited fields. The role of total skin electron therapy for T-lymphomas is still discussed; but palliative radiotherapy is very efficient in case of cutaneous nodules.

  9. Multi-beam linear accelerator EVT

    DOE PAGES

    Teryaev, Vladimir E.; Kazakov, Sergey Yu.; Hirshfield, Jay L.

    2016-03-29

    A novel electron multi-beam accelerator is presented. The accelerator, short-named EVT (Electron Voltage Transformer) belongs to the class of two-beam accelerators. It combines an RF generator and essentially an accelerator within the same vacuum envelope. Drive beam-lets and an accelerated beam are modulated in RF modulators and then bunches pass into an accelerating structure, comprising uncoupled with each other and inductive tuned cavities, where the energy transfer from the drive beams to the accelerated beam occurs. A phasing of bunches is solved by choice correspond distances between gaps of the adjacent cavities. Preliminary results of numerical simulations and the initialmore » specification of EVT operating in S-band, with a 60 kV gun and generating a 2.7 A, 1.1 MV beam at its output is presented. Furthermore, a relatively high efficiency of 67% and high design average power suggest that EVT can find its use in industrial applications.« less

  10. ACTS Multibeam Antenna On-Orbit Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acosta, R.; Wright, D.; Mitchell, Kenneth

    1996-01-01

    The Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) launched in September 1993 introduces several new technologies including a multibeam antenna (MBA) operating at Ka-band. The MBA with fixed and rapidly reconfigurable spot beams serves users equipped with small aperture terminals within the coverage area. The antenna produces spot beams with approximately 0.3 degrees beamwidth and gains of approximately 50 dBi. A number of MBA performance evaluations have been performed since the ACTS launch. These evaluations were designed to assess MBA performance (e.g., beam pointing stability, beam shape, gain, etc.) in the space environment. The on-orbit measurements found systematic environmental perturbation to the MBA beam pointing. These perturbations were found to be imposed by satellite attitude control system, antenna and spacecraft mechanical alignments, on-orbit thermal effects, etc. As a result, the footprint coverage of the MBA may not exactly cover the intended service area at all times. This report describes the space environment effects on the ACTS MBA performance as a function of time of the day and time of the year and compensation approaches for these effects.

  11. ACTS Multibeam Antenna On-Orbit Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acosta, R.; Wright, D.; Mitchell, Kenneth

    1996-01-01

    The Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) launched in September 1993 introduces several new technologies including a multibeam antenna (MBA) operating at Ka-band. The MBA with fixed and rapidly reconfigurable spot beams serves users equipped with small aperture terminals within the coverage area. The antenna produces spot beams with approximately 0.3 degrees beamwidth and gains of approximately 50 dBi. A number of MBA performance evaluations have been performed since the ACTS launch. These evaluations were designed to assess MBA performance (e.g., beam pointing stability, beam shape, gain, etc.) in the space environment. The on-orbit measurements found systematic environmental perturbation to the MBA beam pointing. These perturbations were found to be imposed by satellite attitude control system, antenna and spacecraft mechanical alignments, on-orbit thermal effects, etc. As a result, the footprint coverage of the MBA may not exactly cover the intended service area at all times. This report describes the space environment effects on the ACTS MBA performance as a function of time of the day and time of the year and compensation approaches for these effects.

  12. Contrast enhanced exposure strategy in multi-beam mask writing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belic, Nikola; Hofmann, Ulrich; Klikovits, Jan; Martens, Stephan

    2013-03-01

    Since multi electron beam exposure has become a serious contender for next generation mask making, proximity- and process effect corrections (PEC) need to be adapted to this technology. With feature sizes in the order of the short-range blurs (resist and tool), contrast enhancements need to be combined with standard linearity corrections. Different PEC strategies are reviewed and compared with respect to their suitability for multi-beam exposure. This analysis recommends a hybrid approach that combines the benefits of shape- and dose PEC and is optimally applicable for multibeam exposure. Exposure results on the proof-of-concept 50keV electron multi-beam mask exposure tool (eMET POC) and a standard 50 kV vector shaped beam tool (VSB) are shown to verify that the combined PEC with overdose contrast enhancement covers the whole pattern range from isolated to opaque.

  13. Errors in radiotherapy: motivation for development of new radiotherapy quality assurance paradigms.

    PubMed

    Fraass, Benedick A

    2008-01-01

    Modern radiotherapy practice has rapidly evolved during the past decade, making use of many highly complex and/or automated processes for planning and delivery, including new techniques, like intensity-modulated radiotherapy driven by inverse planning optimization methods, or near real-time image-guided adaptive therapy based on fluoroscopic or tomographic imaging on the treatment machine. In spite of the modern technology, or potentially because of it in some instances, errors and other problems continue to have a significant impact on the field. This report reviews example errors and problems, discusses some of the quality assurance issues that these types of problems raise, and motivates the development of more modern and sophisticated approaches to assure quality for our clinical radiotherapy treatment methods.

  14. Stereotactic body radiotherapy for oligometastases.

    PubMed

    Tree, Alison C; Khoo, Vincent S; Eeles, Rosalind A; Ahmed, Merina; Dearnaley, David P; Hawkins, Maria A; Huddart, Robert A; Nutting, Christopher M; Ostler, Peter J; van As, Nicholas J

    2013-01-01

    The management of metastatic solid tumours has historically focused on systemic treatment given with palliative intent. However, radical surgical treatment of oligometastases is now common practice in some settings. The development of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT), building on improvements in delivery achieved by intensity-modulated and image-guided radiotherapy, now allows delivery of ablative doses of radiation to extracranial sites. Many non-randomised studies have shown that SBRT for oligometastases is safe and effective, with local control rates of about 80%. Importantly, these studies also suggest that the natural history of the disease is changing, with 2-5 year progression-free survival of about 20%. Although complete cure might be possible in a few patients with oligometastases, the aim of SBRT in this setting is to achieve local control and delay progression, and thereby also postpone the need for further treatment. We review published work showing that SBRT offers durable local control and the potential for progression-free survival in non-liver, non-lung oligometastatic disease at a range of sites. However, to test whether SBRT really does improve progression-free survival, randomised trials will be essential. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Multibeam Phased-Array Antennas Developed and Characterized

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Richard Q.; Lambert, Kevin M.

    2003-01-01

    Fixed-formation microsatellites have been proposed for future NASA missions to lower costs and improve data collection and reliability. Achieving seamless connectivity communications between these satellites requires the use of multibeam array antennas. As a result of NASA Glenn Research Center s collaborative efforts with the University of Colorado and Texas A&M University, two prototype multibeam array antennas have been developed and demonstrated at Ka-band frequencies. These arrays are designed to be dual-beam, dual-frequency arrays, with two fixed scan beams at around +/- 30 . They can be used in both ground and space systems for transmit and receive functions.

  16. [Radiotherapy of benign intracranial tumors].

    PubMed

    Delannes, M; Latorzeff, I; Chand, M E; Huchet, A; Dupin, C; Colin, P

    2016-09-01

    Most of the benign intracranial tumors are meningiomas, vestibular schwannomas, pituitary adenomas, craniopharyngiomas, and glomus tumors. Some of them grow very slowly, and can be observed without specific treatment, especially if they are asymptomatic. Symptomatic or growing tumors are treated by surgery, which is the reference treatment. When surgery is not possible, due to the location of the lesion, or general conditions, radiotherapy can be applied, as it is if there is a postoperative growing residual tumor, or a local relapse. Indications have to be discussed in polydisciplinary meetings, with precise evaluation of the benefit and risks of the treatments. The techniques to be used are the most modern ones, as multimodal imaging and image-guided radiation therapy. Stereotactic treatments, using fractionated or single doses depending on the size or the location of the tumors, are commonly realized, to avoid as much a possible the occurrence of late side effects.

  17. Recruitment in Radiotherapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deeley, T. J.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    The Faculty Board of Radiotherapy and Oncology of the Royal College of Radiobiologists surveyed the factors thought to influence recruitment into the specialty. Possible factors listed in replies of 36 questionnaires are offered. (LBH)

  18. Recruitment in Radiotherapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deeley, T. J.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    The Faculty Board of Radiotherapy and Oncology of the Royal College of Radiobiologists surveyed the factors thought to influence recruitment into the specialty. Possible factors listed in replies of 36 questionnaires are offered. (LBH)

  19. Planning a Radiotherapy Department.

    PubMed

    van der Merwe, D

    2017-02-01

    The master planning of new radiotherapy facilities requires the input and engagement of a range of highly specialised professionals, both in the construction and health sector. Although radiation protection and safety aspects of radiotherapy services are universal, low and middle income countries are often presented with unique challenges that also need to be considered, e.g. competing needs within the health sector, lack of financial and human resources, environmental factors like poor provision of transport or electrical power, inadequate regulatory infrastructure, etc. Efforts to establish, upgrade or expand radiotherapy services should therefore not only focus on the technology that is appropriate and sustainable, but also be mindful of the need for quality, safety and optimal utilisation of technology. The workflow in a radiotherapy department can be facilitated by strategic placement of the main functional areas into the concept design. Copyright © 2016 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Understanding Cross Talk on the NPOI Multibeam Combiner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, H. R.; Armstrong, J. T.; Hindsley, R. B.; Pauls, T. A.

    We present the results of tests done with the Navy Prototype Optical Interferometer (NPOI) multibeam combiner, designed to study the effects of fringe cross talk resulting from multiple baselines being recorded by the same spectrograph. We find that in most cases cross talk is not a significant issue, except when the fringes are separated by only one wavenumber.

  1. A multilevel optical element based on the Fizeau multibeam interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhmud', A. A.

    1990-10-01

    A new multilevel optical element is proposed which is based on the Fizeau multibeam interferometer and a single-frequency wavelength-tunable semiconductor injection lazer. Possible applications of the optical element in optical data processors are discussed. As an example, a high-speed 17-bit analog-digital converter based on this element is considered.

  2. NASA Adaptive Multibeam Phased Array (AMPA): An application study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittra, R.; Lee, S. W.; Gee, W.

    1982-01-01

    The proposed orbital geometry for the adaptive multibeam phased array (AMPA) communication system is reviewed and some of the system's capabilities and preliminary specifications are highlighted. Typical AMPA user link models and calculations are presented, the principal AMPA features are described, and the implementation of the system is demonstrated. System tradeoffs and requirements are discussed. Recommendations are included.

  3. MR Imaging Based Treatment Planning for Radiotherapy of Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-02-01

    image- guided stereotactic localization in the hypofractionated treatment of lung cancer. Int. J. Rad. Oncol. Bio. Phys. 66: 738-747, 2006. Chapters...L, Ma C. Benefit of 3D image-guided stereotactic localization in the hypofractionated treatment of lung cancer. Proc. Medical Physics, 33(6), 1993...9. Amer AM, Mott J, Mackay RI, et al. Prediction of the benefits from dose-escalated hypofractionated intensity-modulated radiotherapy for

  4. Postoperative stereotactic body radiotherapy for spinal metastases.

    PubMed

    Alghamdi, Majed; Tseng, Chia-Lin; Myrehaug, Sten; Maralani, Pejman; Heyn, Chris; Soliman, Hany; Lee, Young; Ruschin, Mark; Da Costa, Leodante; Yang, Victor; Campbell, Mikki; Sahgal, Arjun

    2017-09-01

    Spine is a common site of metastases in cancer patients. Spine surgery is indicated for select patients, typically those with mechanical instability and/or malignant epidural spinal cord (or cauda equina) compression. Although post-operative conventional palliative external beam radiation therapy has been the standard of care, technical improvements in radiation planning and image-guided radiotherapy have allowed for the application of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) to the spine. Spine SBRT is intended to ablate residual tumor and optimize local control by delivering several fold greater biologically effective doses. Early clinical experience of postoperative spinal SBRT report encouraging results in terms of safety and efficacy. In this review, we summarize the clinical and technical aspects pertinent to a safe and effective practice of postoperative SBRT for spinal metastases.

  5. Multibeam Bathymetry of Haleakala Volcano, Maui

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eakins, B. W.; Robinson, J.

    2002-12-01

    The submarine northeast flank of Haleakala Volcano, Maui was mapped in detail during the summers of 2001 and 2002 by a joint team from the Japan Marine Science and Technology Center (JAMSTEC), Tokyo Institute of Technology, University of Hawaii, and the U.S. Geological Survey. JAMSTEC instruments used included SeaBeam 2112 hull-mounted multibeam sonar (bathymetry and sidescan imagery), manned submersible Shinkai 6500 and ROV Kaiko (bottom video, photographs and sampling of Hana Ridge), gravimeter, magnetometer, and single-channel seismic system. Hana Ridge, Haleakala's submarine east rift zone, is capped by coral-reef terraces for much of its length, which are flexurally tilted towards the axis of the Hawaiian Ridge and delineate former shorelines. Its deeper, more distal portion exhibits a pair of parallel, linear crests, studded with volcanic cones, that suggest lateral migration of the rift zone during its growth. The northern face of the arcuate ridge terminus is a landslide scar in one of these crests, while its southwestern prong is a small, constructional ridge. The Hana slump, a series of basins and ridges analogous to the Laupahoehoe slump off Kohala Volcano, Hawaii, lies north of Hana Ridge and extends down to the Hawaiian moat. Northwest of this slump region a small, dual-crested ridge strikes toward the Hawaiian moat and is inferred to represent a fossil rift zone, perhaps of East Molokai Volcano. A sediment chute along its southern flank has built a large submarine fan with a staircase of contour-parallel folds on its surface that are probably derived from slow creep of sediments down into the moat. Sediments infill the basins of the Hana slump [Moore et al., 1989], whose lowermost layers have been variously back-tilted by block rotation during slumping and flexural loading of the Hawaiian Ridge; the ridges define the outer edges of those down-dropped blocks, which may have subsided several kilometers. An apron of volcaniclastic debris shed from

  6. [Radiotherapy of larynx cancers].

    PubMed

    Pointreau, Y; Lafond, C; Legouté, F; Trémolières, P; Servagi-Vernat, S; Giraud, P; Maingon, P; Calais, G; Lapeyre, M

    2016-09-01

    Intensity-modulated radiotherapy is the gold standard in the treatment of larynx cancers (except T1 glottic tumour). Early T1 and T2 tumours may be treated by exclusive radiation or surgery. For tumours requiring total laryngectomy (T2 or T3), induction chemotherapy followed by exclusive radiotherapy or concurrent chemoradiotherapy is possible. For T4 tumour, surgery must be proposed. The treatment of lymph nodes is based on the initial treatment of the primary tumour. In non-surgical procedure, in case of sequential radiotherapy, the curative dose is 70Gy and the prophylactic dose is 50Gy. An integrated simultaneous boost radiotherapy is allowed (70Gy in 2Gy per fraction and 56Gy in 1.8Gy per fraction or 70Gy in 2.12Gy per fraction). Postoperatively, radiotherapy is used in locally advanced cancer with dose levels based on pathologic criteria (66Gy for R1 resection, 50 to 54Gy for complete resection). Volume delineation was based on guidelines.

  7. [Radiotherapy for retroperitoneal sarcomas].

    PubMed

    Sargos, P; Stoeckle, E; Henriques de Figueiredo, B; Antoine, M; Delannes, M; Mervoyer, A; Kantor, G

    2016-10-01

    The management of retroperitoneal sarcoma can be very challenging, and the quality of initial treatment strategy appears to be a crucial prognostic factor. En bloc surgery is currently the standard of care for these rare tumours and perioperative treatments such as chemotherapy or radiotherapy have not been validated yet. However, local-regional relapse constitutes the most common disease course. While adjuvant radiotherapy is less and less common due to gastrointestinal toxicities, preoperative radiation therapy offers numerous advantages and is being evaluated as part of a national multicentre phase II study (TOMOREP trial) and is the subject of a European randomized phase III study (STRASS trial). The objective of this article is to present data on preoperative irradiation in terms of dose, volumes and optimal radiotherapy techniques for the treatment of this rare disease.

  8. Bathymetry, Multibeam, and Coastal Relief: Data on Demand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharman, G. F.; Virden, W. T.; Divins, D. L.; Fox, C. G.; Habermann, T.

    2004-12-01

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC), Boulder, Colorado is distributing increasing quantities of data via the Internet. With evolving technology and broader bandwidth, it is possible to deliver large volumes (up to 2 GB) of data directly over the Internet and to provide server-side-generated products and services with more user options. In 2004, NGDC (www.ngdc.noaa.gov) initiated a web-based multibeam bathymetric data system,leveraging off geospatial and relational database technologies being utilized at the Center. The system has an ESRI ArcIMS interface, which handles the geospatial character of the data, and provides a standardized GIS interface and tool suite. All of this rests on a foundation Oracle database containing an inventory and metadata. It also uses software developed at NOAA's Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, which scripts the National Science Foundation-supported software packages: MBSystem (for managing multibeam data) and Generic Mapping Tools (GMT) (for mapping and display). In whole, the MultiBeam Bathymetric Data Base (MBBDB) (Virden, et al., "Multibeam Bathymetric Data at NOAA/NGDC," OTO '04) enables the web user to browse, discover, review, select, map, and download multibeam data directly, without human intervention by NGDC. A similar development, the NGDC Coastal Relief Model (CRM), http://www.ngdc.noaa.gov/mgg/coastal/coastal.html, is available for download at a variety of sampling intervals. This data set is built on multibeam and conventional offshore hydrography, resampled into a 3 arc-second lat-lon grid, which is matched to a 3 arc-second version of the USGS National Elevation Database (NED). The resulting fusion gives a continuous elevation surface model from the seafloor, across the coastline and onto the land. These data provide the foundation for a multitude of environmental studies and models, such as Tsunami or storm surge propagation, run up, and inundation

  9. Multibeam Mapping of the Uncertainty of the Seafloor in the Southern East China Sea

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-30

    DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited Multibeam Mapping of the Uncertainty of the Seafloor in the...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Multibeam Mapping Of The Uncertainty Of The Seafloor In The Southern East China Sea 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c...application of Angular Range Analysis to Multibeam sonar data.”, Mar. Geo. Res., 28(2), pp. 119-126. Goff, J., Jenkins, C. and Calder, B. R., 2006

  10. New Bottom Roughness Calculation from Multibeam Echo Sounders for Mine Warfare

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    ROUGHNESS CALCULATION FROM MULTIBEAM ECHO SOUNDERS FOR MINE WARFARE by Patrick J. Earls September 2012 Thesis Advisor: Peter Chu Second Reader...AND DATES COVERED Master’s Thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE New Bottom Roughness Calculation from Multibeam Echo Sounders for Mine Warfare 5. FUNDING...around these objects to make detection more difficult. High resolution (1 m × 1 m) seafloor data collected by the Navy using multibeam echo sounder (EM710

  11. Radiotherapy for lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Bleehen, N.M.; Cox, J.D.

    1985-05-01

    The role of radiation therapy in the management of lung cancer was reviewed at a workshop held in Cambridge, England, in June 1984. It was concluded that there was a continuing role for radiation therapy in the primary management of small cell lung cancer, including the loco-regional treatment for patients with limited disease. Radical radiotherapy for patients with non-small cell carcinoma could be curative for a proportion of patients with limited disease. Careful planning and quality control was essential. Palliative radiotherapy provided useful treatment for many other patients. Other related aspects of treatment are also presented.

  12. Radiotherapy in Glioblastoma: the Past, the Present and the Future.

    PubMed

    Gzell, C; Back, M; Wheeler, H; Bailey, D; Foote, M

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this review is to explore the changing utility of radiotherapy in the treatment of patients with glioblastoma over the past 60 years. Together with surgery, radiotherapy has always been the cornerstone of treatment of glioblastoma, but techniques have significantly advanced over this time. The exploration of early two-dimensional techniques, investigation of dose escalation, concomitant chemotherapy and modern techniques, including intensity-modulated radiotherapy, image-guided radiotherapy, and volumetric-modulated arc therapy will be covered. In addition, current controversies including decreasing margin size, re-irradiation, treatment of elderly patients, and novel imaging tracers will be discussed. Future directions including immunotherapy and tumour treating fields are examined. Radiotherapy-based treatments cannot rely solely on advances in chemotherapy or immunotherapy to improve the overall survival of patients with glioblastoma. Radiation oncology needs to continue to develop and improve the delivery, target definition, and dose of radiotherapy to these patients to improve their survival and the toxicity associated with treatment.

  13. Breast Molecular Profiling and Radiotherapy Considerations.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, Omar; Haffty, Bruce G

    2016-01-01

    The last decade has seen major changes in the management of breast cancer. Heterogeneity regarding histology, therapeutic response, dissemination patterns, and patient outcome is evident. Molecular profiling provides an accurate tool to predict treatment outcome compared with classical clinicopathologic features. The genomic profiling unveiled the heterogeneity of breast cancer and identified distinct biologic subtypes. These advanced techniques were integrated into the clinical management; predicting systemic therapy benefit and overall survival. Utilizing genotyping to guide locoregional management decisions needs further characterization. In this chapter we will review available data on molecular classification of breast cancer, their association with locoregional outcome, their radiobiological properties and radiotherapy considerations.

  14. Structuring by multi-beam interference using symmetric pyramids.

    PubMed

    Lei, Ming; Yao, Baoli; Rupp, Romano A

    2006-06-12

    A method for producing optical structures using rotationally symmetric pyramids is proposed. Two-dimensional structures can be achieved using acute prisms. They form by multi-beam interference of plane waves that impinge from directions distributed symmetrically around the axis of rotational symmetry. Flat-topped pyramids provide an additional beam along the axis thus generating three-dimensional structures. Experimental results are consistent with the results of numerical simulations. The advantages of the method are simplicity of operation, low cost, ease of integration, good stability, and high transmittance. Possible applications are the fabrication of photonic micro-structures such as photonic crystals or array waveguides as well as multi-beam optical tweezers.

  15. Status of Multi-beam Long Trace-profiler Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gubarev, Mikhail V.; Merthe, Daniel J.; Kilaru, Kiranmayee; Kester, Thomas; Ramsey, Brian; McKinney, Wayne R.; Takacs, Peter Z.; Dahir, A.; Yashchuk, Valeriy V.

    2013-01-01

    The multi-beam long trace profiler (MB-LTP) is under development at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center. The traditional LTPs scans the surface under the test by a single laser beam directly measuring the surface figure slope errors. While capable of exceptional surface slope accuracy, the LTP single beam scanning has slow measuring speed. Metrology efficiency can be increased by replacing the single laser beam with multiple beams that can scan a section of the test surface at a single instance. The increase in speed with such a system would be almost proportional to the number of laser beams. The progress for a multi-beam long trace profiler development is presented.

  16. Multi-beam RFQ linac structure for heavy ion fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashizaki, Noriyosu; Ishibashi, Takuya; Ito, Taku; Hattori, Toshiyuki

    2009-07-01

    Both the RF linear accelerator (linac) and the linear induction accelerator have been considered as injectors in a driver system for heavy ion fusion (HIF). In order to relax beam defocusing by space charge effect in the low-energy region, the accelerating beams that were merged and had their beam currents increased by the funnel tree system are injected into storage rings. A multi-beam linac that accelerates multiple beams in an accelerator cavity has the advantages of cost reduction and downsizing of the system. We modeled the multi-beam Interdigital-H type radio frequency quadruple (IH-RFQ) cavities with the different beam numbers and evaluated the electromagnetic characteristics by simulation. As a result, the reasonable ranges of their configuration were indicated for a practical use.

  17. Status of Multi-beam Long Trace-profiler Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gubarev, Mikhail V.; Kilaru, Kiranmayee; Ramsey, Brian; McKinney, Wayne R.; Merthe, Daniel J.; Yashchuk, Valeriy V.; Takacs, Peter Z.

    2013-01-01

    The multi-beam long trace profiler (MB-LTP) is under development at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center. The traditional LTPs scans the surface under the test by a single laser beam directly measuring the surface figure slope errors. While capable of exceptional surface slope accuracy, the LTP single beam scanning has slow measuring speed. Metrology efficiency can be increased by replacing the single laser beam with multiple beams that can scan a section of the test surface at a single instance. The increase in speed with such a system would be almost proportional to the number of laser beams. The progress for a multi-beam long trace profiler development will be presented.

  18. Adaptive multibeam antennas for spacelab. Phase A: Feasibility study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, C. C.; Applebaum, S. P.; Popowsky, W. J.; Wouch, G.

    1976-01-01

    The feasibility was studied of using adaptive multibeam multi-frequency antennas on the spacelab, and to define the experiment configuration and program plan needed for a demonstration to prove the concept. Three applications missions were selected, and requirements were defined for an L band communications experiment, an L band radiometer experiment, and a Ku band communications experiment. Reflector, passive lens, and phased array antenna systems were considered, and the Adaptive Multibeam Phased Array (AMPA) was chosen. Array configuration and beamforming network tradeoffs resulted in a single 3m x 3m L band array with 576 elements for high radiometer beam efficiency. Separate 0.4m x 0.4 m arrays are used to transmit and receive at Ku band with either 576 elements or thinned apertures. Each array has two independently steerable 5 deg beams, which are adaptively controlled.

  19. Advanced Communication Technology Satellite (ACTS) multibeam antenna technology verification experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acosta, Roberto J.; Larko, Jeffrey M.; Lagin, Alan R.

    1992-01-01

    The Advanced Communication Technology Satellite (ACTS) is a key to reaching NASA's goal of developing high-risk, advanced communications technology using multiple frequency bands to support the nation's future communication needs. Using the multiple, dynamic hopping spot beams, and advanced on board switching and processing systems, ACTS will open a new era in communications satellite technology. One of the key technologies to be validated as part of the ACTS program is the multibeam antenna with rapidly reconfigurable hopping and fixed spot beam to serve users equipped with small-aperature terminals within the coverage areas. The proposed antenna technology experiments are designed to evaluate in-orbit ACTS multibeam antenna performance (radiation pattern, gain, cross pol levels, etc.).

  20. Adaptive multibeam phased array design for a Spacelab experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noji, T. T.; Fass, S.; Fuoco, A. M.; Wang, C. D.

    1977-01-01

    The parametric tradeoff analyses and design for an Adaptive Multibeam Phased Array (AMPA) for a Spacelab experiment are described. This AMPA Experiment System was designed with particular emphasis to maximize channel capacity and minimize implementation and cost impacts for future austere maritime and aeronautical users, operating with a low gain hemispherical coverage antenna element, low effective radiated power, and low antenna gain-to-system noise temperature ratio.

  1. Multibeam Altimeter Navigation Update Using Faceted Shape Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayard, David S.; Brugarolas, Paul; Broschart, Steve

    2008-01-01

    A method of incorporating information, acquired by a multibeam laser or radar altimeter system, pertaining to the distance and direction between the system and a nearby target body, into an estimate of the state of a vehicle upon which the system is mounted, involves the use of a faceted model to represent the shape of the target body. Fundamentally, what one seeks to measure is the distance from the vehicle to the target body.

  2. A new integrated slot element feed array for multibeam systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yngvesson, K. Sigfrid; Johansson, Joakim F.; Kollberg, Erik L.

    1986-01-01

    A feed array consisting of constant width slot antennas (CWSA), fed from a block containing fin-line transitions, has been developed. The array has a two-dimensional configuration, with five elements each on five parallel substrates. Beamwidths are compatible with use in f/D = 1.0 multibeam systems, with optimum taper. Array element spacings are close to a factor of two smaller than for other typical arrays, and spillover efficiency is about 65 percent.

  3. The Tumour Microenvironment after Radiotherapy: Mechanisms of Resistance and Recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Barker, Holly E.; Paget, James T. E.; Khan, Aadil A.; Harrington, Kevin J.

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy plays a central part in curing cancer. For decades, most research on improving treatment outcomes has focussed on modulating radiation-induced biological effects on cancer cells. Recently, we have better understood that components within the tumour microenvironment have pivotal roles in determining treatment outcomes. In this Review, we describe vascular, stromal and immunological changes induced in the tumour microenvironment by irradiation and discuss how they may promote radioresistance and tumour recurrence. Subsequently, we highlight how this knowledge is guiding the development of new treatment paradigms in which biologically targeted agents will be combined with radiotherapy. PMID:26105538

  4. A new fixation aid for the radiotherapy of eye tumors.

    PubMed

    Buchgeister, Markus; Grisanti, Salvatore; Süsskind, Daniela; Bamberg, Michael; Paulsen, Frank

    2007-12-01

    A modified swim goggle holding a light spot as an optical guide for actively aligning the eye in a reproducible orientation has been constructed to perform radiotherapy of ocular tumors. This device is compatible with computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging systems. Image fusion of these data sets yielded clinically acceptable results. The reproducibility of the eye's positioning is tested by repeated CT. The eye's alignment during radiotherapy is monitored by an infrared TV camera with individual markings of the eye's position on the TV-monitor screen. From 2003-2006, 50 patients were treated with this fixation aid by radiosurgery with good patient compliance.

  5. A new fixation aid for the radiotherapy of eye tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Buchgeister, Markus; Grisanti, Salvatore; Suesskind, Daniela; Bamberg, Michael; Paulsen, Frank

    2007-12-15

    A modified swim goggle holding a light spot as an optical guide for actively aligning the eye in a reproducible orientation has been constructed to perform radiotherapy of ocular tumors. This device is compatible with computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging systems. Image fusion of these data sets yielded clinically acceptable results. The reproducibility of the eye's positioning is tested by repeated CT. The eye's alignment during radiotherapy is monitored by an infrared TV camera with individual markings of the eye's position on the TV-monitor screen. From 2003-2006, 50 patients were treated with this fixation aid by radiosurgery with good patient compliance.

  6. Multibeam 3D Underwater SLAM with Probabilistic Registration

    PubMed Central

    Palomer, Albert; Ridao, Pere; Ribas, David

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes a pose-based underwater 3D Simultaneous Localization and Mapping (SLAM) using a multibeam echosounder to produce high consistency underwater maps. The proposed algorithm compounds swath profiles of the seafloor with dead reckoning localization to build surface patches (i.e., point clouds). An Iterative Closest Point (ICP) with a probabilistic implementation is then used to register the point clouds, taking into account their uncertainties. The registration process is divided in two steps: (1) point-to-point association for coarse registration and (2) point-to-plane association for fine registration. The point clouds of the surfaces to be registered are sub-sampled in order to decrease both the computation time and also the potential of falling into local minima during the registration. In addition, a heuristic is used to decrease the complexity of the association step of the ICP from O(n2) to O(n). The performance of the SLAM framework is tested using two real world datasets: First, a 2.5D bathymetric dataset obtained with the usual down-looking multibeam sonar configuration, and second, a full 3D underwater dataset acquired with a multibeam sonar mounted on a pan and tilt unit. PMID:27104538

  7. Multibeam 3D Underwater SLAM with Probabilistic Registration.

    PubMed

    Palomer, Albert; Ridao, Pere; Ribas, David

    2016-04-20

    This paper describes a pose-based underwater 3D Simultaneous Localization and Mapping (SLAM) using a multibeam echosounder to produce high consistency underwater maps. The proposed algorithm compounds swath profiles of the seafloor with dead reckoning localization to build surface patches (i.e., point clouds). An Iterative Closest Point (ICP) with a probabilistic implementation is then used to register the point clouds, taking into account their uncertainties. The registration process is divided in two steps: (1) point-to-point association for coarse registration and (2) point-to-plane association for fine registration. The point clouds of the surfaces to be registered are sub-sampled in order to decrease both the computation time and also the potential of falling into local minima during the registration. In addition, a heuristic is used to decrease the complexity of the association step of the ICP from O(n2) to O(n) . The performance of the SLAM framework is tested using two real world datasets: First, a 2.5D bathymetric dataset obtained with the usual down-looking multibeam sonar configuration, and second, a full 3D underwater dataset acquired with a multibeam sonar mounted on a pan and tilt unit.

  8. Plasma parameter estimation from multistatic, multibeam incoherent scatter data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virtanen, I. I.; McKay-Bukowski, D.; Vierinen, J.; Aikio, A.; Fallows, R.; Roininen, L.

    2014-12-01

    Multistatic incoherent scatter radars are superior to monostatic facilities in the sense that multistatic systems can measure plasma parameters from multiple directions in volumes limited by beam dimensions and measurement range resolution. We propose a new incoherent scatter analysis technique that uses data from all receiver beams of a multistatic, multibeam radar system and produces, in addition to the plasma parameters typically measured with monostatic radars, estimates of ion velocity vectors and ion temperature anisotropies. Because the total scattered energy collected with remote receivers of a modern multistatic, multibeam radar system may even exceed the energy collected with the core transmit-and-receive site, the remote data improve the accuracy of all plasma parameter estimates, including those that could be measured with the core site alone. We apply the new multistatic analysis method for data measured by the tristatic European Incoherent Scatter VHF radar and the Kilpisjärvi Atmospheric Imaging Receiver Array (KAIRA) multibeam receiver and show that a significant improvement in accuracy is obtained by adding KAIRA data in the multistatic analysis. We also demonstrate the development of a pronounced ion temperature anisotropy during high-speed ionospheric plasma flows in substorm conditions.

  9. Meter Accuracy Seafloor Geodesy using Repeated Multibeam Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeSanto, J. B.; Sandwell, D. T.

    2014-12-01

    Ship-board multibeam surveys are a useful tool in measuring tectonic deformation of the seafloor, having been used to measure the ~50 m of surface slip along the Japan trench during the 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake with an uncertainty of 20 m (Fujiwara et al, 2011, Science). In this study, we investigate the improvement in positioning accuracy obtainable when comparing multibeam and sidescan surveys repeated along the same track to within 1/10 of the critical baseline and taken at a slow ship speed of 1 knot. We compare two surveys of the Juan de Fuca Ridge axis fitting these criteria with two coincident surveys of the Cocos Ridge, taken at 11 knots. Both pairs of surveys were collected using a Simrad EM120 sonar system aboard the RV Roger Revelle. We find the multibeam surveys of the Juan de Fuca ridge axis sufficient to measure displacements accurate to better than 2 m, a marked improvement over the 50 m accuracy of the Cocos ridge surveys. Likewise, we can measure displacement accurate to 2 m using the sidescan data from the Juan de Fuca surveys. This accuracy is sufficient to observe meter-level horizontal movements on the deep ocean associated with large earthquakes and landslides.

  10. Vibration piezoelectric energy harvester with multi-beam

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, Yan Zhang, Qunying Yao, Minglei; Dong, Weijie; Gao, Shiqiao

    2015-04-15

    This work presents a novel vibration piezoelectric energy harvester, which is a micro piezoelectric cantilever with multi-beam. The characteristics of the PZT (Pb(Zr{sub 0.53}Ti{sub 0.47})O{sub 3}) thin film were measured; XRD (X-ray diffraction) pattern and AFM (Atomic Force Microscope) image of the PZT thin film were measured, and show that the PZT (Pb(Zr{sub 0.53}Ti{sub 0.47})O{sub 3}) thin film is highly (110) crystal oriented; the leakage current is maintained in nA magnitude, the residual polarisation Pr is 37.037 μC/cm{sup 2}, the coercive field voltage Ec is 27.083 kV/cm, and the piezoelectric constant d{sub 33} is 28 pC/N. In order to test the dynamic performance of the energy harvester, a new measuring system was set up. The maximum output voltage of the single beam of the multi-beam can achieve 80.78 mV under an acceleration of 1 g at 260 Hz of frequency; the maximum output voltage of the single beam of the multi-beam is almost 20 mV at 1400 Hz frequency. .

  11. Estimation and simulation of multi-beam sonar noise.

    PubMed

    Holmin, Arne Johannes; Korneliussen, Rolf J; Tjøstheim, Dag

    2016-02-01

    Methods for the estimation and modeling of noise present in multi-beam sonar data, including the magnitude, probability distribution, and spatial correlation of the noise, are developed. The methods consider individual acoustic samples and facilitate compensation of highly localized noise as well as subtraction of noise estimates averaged over time. The modeled noise is included in an existing multi-beam sonar simulation model [Holmin, Handegard, Korneliussen, and Tjøstheim, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 132, 3720-3734 (2012)], resulting in an improved model that can be used to strengthen interpretation of data collected in situ at any signal to noise ratio. Two experiments, from the former study in which multi-beam sonar data of herring schools were simulated, are repeated with inclusion of noise. These experiments demonstrate (1) the potentially large effect of changes in fish orientation on the backscatter from a school, and (2) the estimation of behavioral characteristics such as the polarization and packing density of fish schools. The latter is achieved by comparing real data with simulated data for different polarizations and packing densities.

  12. Tests of Multibeam Scintillation Mitigation on Laser Uplinks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Keith

    2004-01-01

    A report presents additional details about parts of the program of research and development that is the topic of the immediately preceding article. The report emphasizes those aspects of the program that pertain to the use of multiple uplink laser beams in a ground-to-spacecraft optical communication system to reduce (relative to the case of a single uplink laser beam) the depth and frequency of occurrence of fades in the uplink signal received at the spacecraft. The underlying multibeam scintillation-mitigation concept was described in "Multiple-Beam Transmission for Optical Communication" (NPO-20384), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 22, No. 11 (November 1998), page 56. The report discusses the need for mitigating uplink scintillation; briefly describes the Optical Communications Telescope Laboratory and its role as the ground station in the research; summarizes prior experiments in uplink scintillation and multibeam mitigation of scintillation in ground-to-spacecraft laser communications; and describes key experiments planned to be performed in the next five years. The report then elaborates somewhat on the initial experiments, which are to be dedicated to understanding and perfecting the multibeam scintillation-mitigation strategy.

  13. Big Data Analytics for Prostate Radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Coates, James; Souhami, Luis; El Naqa, Issam

    2016-01-01

    Radiation therapy is a first-line treatment option for localized prostate cancer and radiation-induced normal tissue damage are often the main limiting factor for modern radiotherapy regimens. Conversely, under-dosing of target volumes in an attempt to spare adjacent healthy tissues limits the likelihood of achieving local, long-term control. Thus, the ability to generate personalized data-driven risk profiles for radiotherapy outcomes would provide valuable prognostic information to help guide both clinicians and patients alike. Big data applied to radiation oncology promises to deliver better understanding of outcomes by harvesting and integrating heterogeneous data types, including patient-specific clinical parameters, treatment-related dose-volume metrics, and biological risk factors. When taken together, such variables make up the basis for a multi-dimensional space (the "RadoncSpace") in which the presented modeling techniques search in order to identify significant predictors. Herein, we review outcome modeling and big data-mining techniques for both tumor control and radiotherapy-induced normal tissue effects. We apply many of the presented modeling approaches onto a cohort of hypofractionated prostate cancer patients taking into account different data types and a large heterogeneous mix of physical and biological parameters. Cross-validation techniques are also reviewed for the refinement of the proposed framework architecture and checking individual model performance. We conclude by considering advanced modeling techniques that borrow concepts from big data analytics, such as machine learning and artificial intelligence, before discussing the potential future impact of systems radiobiology approaches.

  14. Role of Radiotherapy and Newer Techniques in the Treatment of GI Cancers.

    PubMed

    Hajj, Carla; Goodman, Karyn A

    2015-06-01

    The role of radiotherapy in multidisciplinary treatment of GI malignancies is well established. Recent advances in imaging as well as radiotherapy planning and delivery techniques have made it possible to target tumors more accurately while sparing normal tissues. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy is an advanced method of delivering radiation using cutting-edge technology to manipulate beams of radiation. The role of intensity-modulated radiotherapy is growing for many GI malignancies, such as cancers of the stomach, pancreas, esophagus, liver, and anus. Stereotactic body radiotherapy is an emerging treatment option for some GI tumors such as locally advanced pancreatic cancer and primary or metastatic tumors of the liver. Stereotactic body radiotherapy requires a high degree of confidence in tumor location and subcentimeter accuracy of the delivered dose. New image-guided techniques have been developed to overcome setup uncertainties at the time of treatment, including real-time imaging on the linear accelerator. Modern imaging techniques have also allowed for more accurate pretreatment staging and delineation of the primary tumor and involved sites. In particular, magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography scans can be particularly useful in radiotherapy planning and assessing treatment response. Molecular biomarkers are being investigated as predictors of response to radiotherapy with the intent of ultimately moving toward using genomic and proteomic determinants of therapeutic strategies. The role of all of these new approaches in the radiotherapeutic management of GI cancers and the evolving role of radiotherapy in these tumor sites will be highlighted in this review.

  15. Ka-Band Multibeam Aperture Phased Array Being Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinhart, Richard C.; Kacpura, Thomas J.

    2004-01-01

    Phased-array antenna systems offer many advantages to low-Earth-orbiting satellite systems. Their large scan angles and multibeam capabilities allow for vibration-free, rapid beam scanning and graceful degradation operation for high rate downlink of data to users on the ground. Technology advancements continue to reduce the power, weight, and cost of these systems to make phased arrays a competitive alternative in comparison to the gimbled reflector system commonly used in science missions. One effort to reduce the cost of phased arrays is the development of a Ka-band multibeam aperture (MBA) phased array by Boeing Corporation under a contract jointly by the NASA Glenn Research Center and the Office of Naval Research. The objective is to develop and demonstrate a space-qualifiable dual-beam Ka-band (26.5-GHz) phased-array antenna. The goals are to advance the state of the art in Ka-band active phased-array antennas and to develop and demonstrate multibeam transmission technology compatible with spacecraft in low Earth orbit to reduce the cost of future missions by retiring certain development risks. The frequency chosen is suitable for space-to-space and space-to-ground communication links. The phased-array antenna has a radiation pattern designed by combining a set of individual radiating elements, optimized with the type of radiating elements used, their positions in space, and the amplitude and phase of the currents feeding the elements. This arrangement produces a directional radiation pattern that is proportional to the number of individual radiating elements. The arrays of interest here can scan the main beam electronically with a computerized algorithm. The antenna is constructed using electronic components with no mechanical parts, and the steering is performed electronically, without any resulting vibration. The speed of the scanning is limited primarily by the control electronics. The radiation performance degrades gracefully if a portion of the elements

  16. Visualizing sediment dynamics through repeated high-resolution multibeam mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vries, J. J.; Greinert, J.; Maierhofer, T.

    2013-12-01

    Multibeam mapping has become a common method for mapping the seafloor in shallow and great water depths with different spatial resolutions depending on the system platform (ship-based, AUV- or ROV-based), the beam angle of the system itself, the survey speed, and the distance to the seafloor. Significant advances in system accuracy, processing power and new software make multibeam mapping a powerful tool for studying sediment dynamics in 4D through repeated surveys that are ideally linked to additional studies on currents and sediment load in the water column. The Texelstroom channel, which is part of the Marsdiep between the city of Den Helder and the island of Texel (North Holland, the Netherlands), has been investigated in such a way for many years using water depth estimates from an ADCP installed on a ferry shuttling 24 times a day between the mainland and the island. Since 2009, repeated multibeam surveys have been undertaken up to three times per year as part of a student course, revealing sediment dynamics in much more detail than could be previously seen with the water depth estimates from the ferry-based ADCP. In the Texelstroom channel, the water depth ranges from a few meters to 45 meters. In the highly variable bathymetry, a series of large, bended sand waves exist mainly perpendicular to the direction of the main current. The shape of the sand waves changes from asymmetrical to symmetrical depending on the time of year, with more symmetrical shapes in spring and summer. Perpendicular to the large sand waves, smaller ripples develop during autumn. In addition to these changes in sand wave characteristics, sand wave crests sometimes migrate more than 30m in two months with an average movement of half a meter per day. The migration direction changes during the year resulting in a non-constant back-and-forth movement of the large sand waves. These intra-annual variations are characterized by changes in the slope of the sand waves, variations in the

  17. [Radiotherapy for Graves' ophthalmopathy].

    PubMed

    Kuhnt, T; Müller, A C; Janich, M; Gerlach, R; Hädecke, J; Duncker, G I W; Dunst, J

    2004-11-01

    Graves' ophthalmopathy (GO) is the most frequent extrathyroidal manifestation of Graves' disease, an autoimmune disorder of the thyroid, whereas the precise pathogenesis still remains unclear. In Hashimoto's thyroiditis the occurrence of proptosis is an extremely rare event. The therapy for middle and severe courses of GO shows in partly disappointing results, although several therapy modalities are possible (glucocorticoid therapy, radiotherapy, antithyroid drug treatment, surgery). All these therapies lead in only 40 - 70 % to an improvement of the pathogenic symptoms. An intensive interdisciplinary cooperation is necessary to satisfy the requirements for the treatment of Graves' ophthalmopathy. As a consequence of the very different results of the few of clinical studies that were accomplished with reference to this topic, treatment by radiotherapy in the management of the disease is presently controversially discussed. In the German-speaking countries the radiotherapy is, however, firmly established as a therapy option in the treatment of the moderate disease classes (class 2-5 according to NO SPECS), especially if diplopia is present. This article describes the sequences, dosages and fractionation schemes as well as the risks and side effects of the radiotherapy. Altogether, radiotherapy is assessed as an effective and sure method. The administration of glucocorticoids can take place before the beginning of or during the radiotherapy. For the success of treatment the correct selection of patients who may possibly profit from a radiotherapy is absolutely essential. By realising that GO proceeds normally over a period of 2-5 years, which is followed by a period of fibrotic alteration, the application of the radiotherapy in the early, active phase is indispensable. A precise explanation for the effects of radiotherapy in treatment of the GO does not exist at present. The determination of the most effective irradiation doses was made from retrospectively evaluated

  18. Current concepts on imaging in radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Lecchi, Michela; Fossati, Piero; Elisei, Federica; Orecchia, Roberto; Lucignani, Giovanni

    2008-04-01

    New high-precision radiotherapy (RT) techniques, such as intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) or hadrontherapy, allow better dose distribution within the target and spare a larger portion of normal tissue than conventional RT. These techniques require accurate tumour volume delineation and intrinsic characterization, as well as verification of target localisation and monitoring of organ motion and response assessment during treatment. These tasks are strongly dependent on imaging technologies. Among these, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), ultrasonography (US) and positron emission tomography (PET) have been applied in high-precision RT. For tumour volume delineation and characterization, PET has brought an additional dimension to the management of cancer patients by allowing the incorporation of crucial functional and molecular images in RT treatment planning, i.e. direct evaluation of tumour metabolism, cell proliferation, apoptosis, hypoxia and angiogenesis. The combination of PET and CT in a single imaging system (PET/CT) to obtain a fused anatomical and functional dataset is now emerging as a promising tool in radiotherapy departments for delineation of tumour volumes and optimization of treatment plans. Another exciting new area is image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT), which focuses on the potential benefit of advanced imaging and image registration to improve precision, daily target localization and monitoring during treatment, thus reducing morbidity and potentially allowing the safe delivery of higher doses. The variety of IGRT systems is rapidly expanding, including cone beam CT and US. This article examines the increasing role of imaging techniques in the entire process of high-precision radiotherapy.

  19. Translational Research to Improve the Efficacy of Carbon Ion Radiotherapy: Experience of Gunma University

    PubMed Central

    Oike, Takahiro; Sato, Hiro; Noda, Shin-ei; Nakano, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Carbon ion radiotherapy holds great promise for cancer therapy. Clinical data show that carbon ion radiotherapy is an effective treatment for tumors that are resistant to X-ray radiotherapy. Since 1994 in Japan, the National Institute of Radiological Sciences has been heading the development of carbon ion radiotherapy using the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba. The Gunma University Heavy Ion Medical Center (GHMC) was established in the year 2006 as a proof-of-principle institute for carbon ion radiotherapy with a view to facilitating the worldwide spread of compact accelerator systems. Along with the management of more than 1900 cancer patients to date, GHMC engages in translational research to improve the treatment efficacy of carbon ion radiotherapy. Research aimed at guiding patient selection is of utmost importance for making the most of carbon ion radiotherapy, which is an extremely limited medical resource. Intratumoral oxygen levels, radiation-induced cellular apoptosis, the capacity to repair DNA double-strand breaks, and the mutational status of tumor protein p53 and epidermal growth factor receptor genes are all associated with X-ray sensitivity. Assays for these factors are useful in the identification of X-ray-resistant tumors for which carbon ion radiotherapy would be beneficial. Research aimed at optimizing treatments based on carbon ion radiotherapy is also important. This includes assessment of dose fractionation, normal tissue toxicity, tumor cell motility, and bystander effects. Furthermore, the efficacy of carbon ion radiotherapy will likely be enhanced by research into combined treatment with other modalities such as chemotherapy. Several clinically available chemotherapeutic drugs (carboplatin, paclitaxel, and etoposide) and drugs at the developmental stage (Wee-1 and heat shock protein 90 inhibitors) show a sensitizing effect on tumor cells treated with carbon ions. Additionally, the efficacy of carbon ion radiotherapy can be improved by

  20. Translational Research to Improve the Efficacy of Carbon Ion Radiotherapy: Experience of Gunma University.

    PubMed

    Oike, Takahiro; Sato, Hiro; Noda, Shin-Ei; Nakano, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Carbon ion radiotherapy holds great promise for cancer therapy. Clinical data show that carbon ion radiotherapy is an effective treatment for tumors that are resistant to X-ray radiotherapy. Since 1994 in Japan, the National Institute of Radiological Sciences has been heading the development of carbon ion radiotherapy using the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba. The Gunma University Heavy Ion Medical Center (GHMC) was established in the year 2006 as a proof-of-principle institute for carbon ion radiotherapy with a view to facilitating the worldwide spread of compact accelerator systems. Along with the management of more than 1900 cancer patients to date, GHMC engages in translational research to improve the treatment efficacy of carbon ion radiotherapy. Research aimed at guiding patient selection is of utmost importance for making the most of carbon ion radiotherapy, which is an extremely limited medical resource. Intratumoral oxygen levels, radiation-induced cellular apoptosis, the capacity to repair DNA double-strand breaks, and the mutational status of tumor protein p53 and epidermal growth factor receptor genes are all associated with X-ray sensitivity. Assays for these factors are useful in the identification of X-ray-resistant tumors for which carbon ion radiotherapy would be beneficial. Research aimed at optimizing treatments based on carbon ion radiotherapy is also important. This includes assessment of dose fractionation, normal tissue toxicity, tumor cell motility, and bystander effects. Furthermore, the efficacy of carbon ion radiotherapy will likely be enhanced by research into combined treatment with other modalities such as chemotherapy. Several clinically available chemotherapeutic drugs (carboplatin, paclitaxel, and etoposide) and drugs at the developmental stage (Wee-1 and heat shock protein 90 inhibitors) show a sensitizing effect on tumor cells treated with carbon ions. Additionally, the efficacy of carbon ion radiotherapy can be improved by

  1. Imaging practices and radiation doses from imaging in radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Siiskonen, Teemu; Kaijaluoto, Sampsa; Florea, Tudor

    2017-03-25

    Modern radiotherapy treatments require frequent imaging for accurate patient positioning relative to the therapeutic radiation beam. Imaging practices in five Finnish radiotherapy clinics were assessed and discussed from the patient dose optimization point of view. The results show that imaging strategies are not jointly established and variations exist. The organ absorbed doses depend on imaging technique and imaging frequency. In particular, organ doses from the cone beam computed tomography can have very large variations (a factor of 10-50 in breast imaging and factor of 5 in prostate imaging). The cumulative imaging organ dose from the treatment can vary by a factor of ten or more for the same treatment, depending on the chosen technique and imaging frequency. Awareness and optimization of the imaging dose in image-guided radiotherapy should be strengthened.

  2. [Current Trends in Radiotherapy Following Surgical Resection of Soft-tissue Sarcoma of the Extremities and Trunk].

    PubMed

    Kraus-Tiefenbacher, U S; Van Kampen, M

    2015-04-01

    Besides surgery, radiotherapy plays its well-established part in the multimodality treatment of soft-tissue sarcomas. It can be delivered before or after surgery with similar control rates. Adjuvant radiotherapy increases the local control rates as well as the overall survival in intermediate or high-grade soft-tissue sarcomas. Due to the complex and sophisticated nature of the treatment, patients should be referred to specialised centres where modern radiotherapeutic options like intensity modulated radiotherapy and image-guided radiotherapy can be offered.

  3. Radiotherapy for bone pain.

    PubMed Central

    Needham, P R; Mithal, N P; Hoskin, P J

    1994-01-01

    Painful bone metastases are a common problem for cancer patients. Although current evidence supports the use of a single fraction of radiotherapy as the treatment of choice, many radiotherapists, for a variety of reasons, continue to use fractionated regimens. Over one six month period 105 patients received external beam irradiation for painful bone metastases at the Royal London Hospital (RLH). Thirty-one per cent of the patients were aged 70 or over. The treatment of 97 of these patients was assessed. They had a total of 280 sites treated over the course of their disease. Fifty-nine per cent of sites treated received a fractionated course of radiotherapy. Site significantly influenced fractionation. Overall response rates of 82% were achieved. Fractionation did not appear to influence this. Ten patients received large field irradiation. Fifteen patients had five or more sites irradiated, of whom only one received hemibody irradiation. PMID:7523672

  4. Squamous-cell carcinoma of the anus: progress in radiotherapy treatment.

    PubMed

    Glynne-Jones, Rob; Tan, David; Hughes, Robert; Hoskin, Peter

    2016-07-01

    Chemoradiotherapy is the standard-of-care treatment of squamous-cell carcinoma of the anus (SCCA), and this has not changed in decades. Radiation doses of 50-60 Gy, as used in many phase III trials, result in substantial late morbidities and fail to control larger and node-positive tumours. Technological advances in radiation therapy are improving patient outcomes and quality of life, and should be applied to patients with SCCA. Modern techniques such as intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), rotational IMRT, image-guided radiotherapy using cone-beam CT, and stereotactic techniques have enabled smaller margins and highly conformal plans, resulting in decreased radiation doses to the organs at risk and ensuring a shorter overall treatment time. In this Perspectives article, the use of novel approaches to target delineation, optimized radiotherapy techniques, adaptive radiotherapy, dose-escalation with external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT) or brachytherapy, and the potential for modified fractionation are discussed in the context of SCCA.

  5. Melanoma: Last call for radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Espenel, Sophie; Vallard, Alexis; Rancoule, Chloé; Garcia, Max-Adrien; Guy, Jean-Baptiste; Chargari, Cyrus; Deutsch, Eric; Magné, Nicolas

    2017-02-01

    Melanoma is traditionally considered to be a radioresistant tumor. However, radiotherapy and immunotherapy latest developments might upset this radiobiological dogma. Stereotactic radiotherapy allows high dose per fraction delivery, with high dose rate. More DNA lethal damages, less sublethal damages reparation, endothelial cell apoptosis, and finally clonogenic cell dysfunction are produced, resulting in improved local control. Radiotherapy can also enhance immune responses, inducing neoantigens formation, tumor antigen presentation, and cytokines release. A synergic effect of radiotherapy with immunotherapy is expected, and might lead to abscopal effects. If hadrontherapy biological properties seem able to suppress hypoxia-induced radioresistance and increase biological efficacy, ballistic advantages over photon radiations might also improve radiotherapy outcomes on usually poor prognosis locations. The present review addresses biological and clinical effects of high fraction dose, bystander effect, abscopal effect, and hadrontherapy features in melanoma. Clinical trials results are warranted to establish indications of innovative radiotherapy in melanoma.

  6. The technical consideration of multi-beam mask writer for production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sang Hee; Ahn, Byung-Sup; Choi, Jin; Shin, In Kyun; Tamamushi, Shuichi; Jeon, Chan-Uk

    2016-10-01

    Multi-beam mask writer is under development to solve the throughput and patterning resolution problems in VSB mask writer. Theoretically, the writing time is appropriate for future design node and the resolution is improved with multi-beam mask writer. Many previous studies show the feasible results of resolution, CD control and registration. Although such technical results of development tool seem to be enough for mass production, there are still many unexpected problems for real mass production. In this report, the technical challenges of multi-beam mask writer are discussed in terms of production and application. The problems and issues are defined based on the performance of current development tool compared with the requirements of mask quality. Using the simulation and experiment, we analyze the specific characteristics of electron beam in multi-beam mask writer scheme. Consequently, we suggest necessary specifications for mass production with multi-beam mask writer in the future.

  7. Accident prevention in radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Holmberg, O

    2007-01-01

    In order to prevent accidents in radiotherapy, it is important to learn from accidents that have occurred previously. Lessons learned from a number of accidents are summarised and underlying patterns are looked for in this paper. Accidents can be prevented by applying several safety layers of preventive actions. Categories of these preventive actions are discussed together with specific actions belonging to each category of safety layer. PMID:21614274

  8. [Radiotherapy of bladder cancer].

    PubMed

    Riou, O; Chauvet, B; Lagrange, J-L; Martin, P; Llacer Moscardo, C; Charissoux, M; Lauche, O; Aillères, N; Fenoglietto, P; Azria, D

    2016-09-01

    Surgery (radical cystectomy) is the standard treatment of muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Radiochemotherapy has risen as an alternative treatment option to surgery as part as organ-sparing combined modality treatment or for patients unfit for surgery. Radiochemotherapy achieves 5-year bladder intact survival of 40 to 65% and 5-year overall survival of 40 to 50% with excellent quality of life. This article introduces the French recommendations for radiotherapy of bladder cancer: indications, exams, technique, dosimetry, delivery and image guidance.

  9. Radiotherapy DICOM packet sniffing.

    PubMed

    Ackerly, T; Gesoand, M; Smith, R

    2008-09-01

    The Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) standard is meant to allow communication of medical images between equipment provided by different vendors, but when two applications do not interact correctly in a multi-vendor environment it is often first necessary to demonstrate non-compliance of either the sender or the receiver before a resolution to the problem can be progressed. Sometimes the only way to do this is to monitor the network communication between the two applications to find out which one is not complying with the DICOM standard. Packet sniffing is a technique of network traffic analysis by passive observation of all information transiting a point on the network, regardless of the specified sender or receiver. DICOM packet sniffing traps and interprets the network communication between two DICOM applications to determine which is non compliant. This is illustrated with reference to three examples, a radiotherapy planning system unable to receive CT data from a particular CT scanner, a radiotherapy simulator unable to print correctly on a DICOM printer, and a PACS unable to respond when queried about what images it has in its archive by a radiotherapy treatment planning system. Additionally in this work it has been proven that it is feasible to extract DICOM images from the intercepted network data. This process can be applied to determine the cause of a DICOM image being rendered differently by the sender and the receiver.

  10. Imaging in radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Van den Berge, D L; De Ridder, M; Storme, G A

    2000-10-01

    Radiotherapy, more then any other treatment modality, relies heavily and often exclusively on medical imaging to determine the extent of disease and the spatial relation between target region and neighbouring healthy tissues. Radically new approaches to radiation delivery are inspired on CT scanning and treat patients in a slice-by-slice fashion using intensity modulated megavoltage fan beams. For quality assurance of complex 3-D dose distributions, MR based 3-D verificative dosimetry on irradiated phantoms has been described. As treatment delivery becomes increasingly refined, the need for accurate target definition increases as well and sophisticated imaging tools like image fusion and 3-D reconstruction are routinely used for treatment planning. While in the past patients were positioned on the treatment machines based exclusively on surface topography and the well-known skin marks, such approach is no longer sufficient for high-accuracy radiotherapy and special imaging tools like on-line portal imaging are used to verify and correct target positioning. Much of these applications rely on digital image processing, transmission and storage, and the development of standards, like DICOM and PACS have greatly contributed to these applications. Digital imaging plays an increasing role in many areas in radiotherapy and has been fundamental in new developments that have demonstrated impact on patient care.

  11. [Radiotherapy for primary lung carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Giraud, P; Lacornerie, T; Mornex, F

    2016-09-01

    Indication, doses, technique of radiotherapy and concomitant chemotherapy, for primary lung carcinoma are presented. The recommendations for delineation of the target volumes and organs at risk are detailed.

  12. [Radiotherapy of breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Hennequin, C; Barillot, I; Azria, D; Belkacémi, Y; Bollet, M; Chauvet, B; Cowen, D; Cutuli, B; Fourquet, A; Hannoun-Lévi, J M; Leblanc, M; Mahé, M A

    2016-09-01

    In breast cancer, radiotherapy is an essential component of the treatment. After conservative surgery for an infiltrating carcinoma, radiotherapy must be systematically performed, regardless of the characteristics of the disease, because it decreases the rate of local recurrence and by this way, specific mortality. Partial breast irradiation could not be proposed routinely but only in very selected and informed patients. For ductal carcinoma in situ, adjuvant radiotherapy must be also systematically performed after lumpectomy. After mastectomy, chest wall irradiation is required for pT3-T4 tumours and if there is an axillary nodal involvement, whatever the number of involved lymph nodes. After neo-adjuvant chemotherapy and mastectomy, in case of pN0 disease, chest wall irradiation is recommended if there is a clinically or radiologically T3-T4 or node positive disease before chemotherapy. Axillary irradiation is recommended only if there is no axillary surgical dissection and a positive sentinel lymph node. Supra and infra-clavicular irradiation is advised in case of positive axillary nodes. Internal mammary irradiation must be discussed case by case, according to the benefit/risk ratio (cardiac toxicity). Dose to the chest wall or the breast must be between 45-50Gy with a conventional fractionation. A boost dose over the tumour bed is required if the patient is younger than 60 years old. Hypofractionation (42.5 Gy in 16 fractions, or 41.6 Gy en 13 or 40 Gy en 15) is possible after tumorectomy and if a nodal irradiation is not mandatory. Delineation of the breast, the chest wall and the nodal areas are based on clinical and radiological evaluations. 3D-conformal irradiation is the recommended technique, intensity-modulated radiotherapy must be proposed only in case of specific clinical situations. Respiratory gating could be useful to decrease the cardiac dose. Concomitant administration of chemotherapy in unadvised, but hormonal treatment could be start with

  13. [The need for a paradigm shift in radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Mayer, Árpád; Katona, Csilla; Farkas, Róbert; Póti, Zsuzsa

    2015-11-01

    The status and indications of radiotherapy have significantly changed in the past decade because novel techniques, radiobiological research and major advances in informatics have made better local control possible. Using supplemented marking of the target volume with computer tomography based other image-making methods adapted made it possible to define the tumor and intact surrounding tissues more precisely. With novel radiotherapy techniques the dosage of the homogenity and the covering in the target volume can be raised optimally, especially with intensity modulated arc radiotherapy (volumetric modulated arc therapy) without causing radiation injury or damage to intact surrounding tissues. Furthermore, with novel techniques and target volume marking, new indications have appeared in clinical practice and besides stereotactic radiotherapy for intracranial metastases, the extracranial so-called oligometastic conditions can be maintained close to a curative state (or in remission) for many years. Among these, perhaps the most striking is the stereotactic radiotherapy treatment of liver, lung and spinal cord metastases in one or more fractions, for which the indispensable condition is the image or respiratory guided technique.

  14. A quality assurance system based on ISO standards: experience in a radiotherapy department.

    PubMed

    Leer, J W; Corver, R; Kraus, J J; vd Togt, J C; Buruma, O J

    1995-04-01

    The European radiotherapy society has for many years had a great interest in quality assurance. The EORTC radiotherapy group has put enormous effort into its quality assurance programmes. However, besides programmes for dosimetry and guide-lines for infrastructure, the organisation of a department should also be subject to a quality assurance system. In 1992, in the radiotherapy department in Leiden, a project was started to develop a quality assurance system based on the so-called ISO 9001 quality standards. This paper describes how these standards can be applied to create a quality assurance system in a hospital department.

  15. Multibeam bathymetry and selected perspective views offshore San Diego, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dartnell, Peter; Normark, William R.; Driscoll, Neal W.; Babcock, Jeffrey M.; Gardner, James V.; Kvitek, Rikk G.; Iampietro, Pat J.

    2007-01-01

    This set of two posters consists of a map on one sheet and a set of seven perspective views on the other. The ocean floor image was generated from multibeam-bathymetry data acquired by Federal and local agencies as well as academic institutions including: - U.S. Geological Survey mapped from the La Jolla Canyon south to the US-Mexico border using a Kongsberg Simrad multibeam echosounder system (MBES) (March - April 1998). Data and metadata available at http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2004/1221/. - Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and SCRIPPS Institution of Oceanography mapped the majority of the La Jolla Fan Valley including the sea floor to the north and south of the valley using a Seabeam 2100 MBES. Data available at http://www.ngdc.noaa.gov/mgg/bathymetry/multibeam.html. Survey ID, AT07L09, Chief Scientists, Barrie Walden and Joseph Coburn (April 2002). - California State University, Monterey Bay, mapped Scripps Canyon and the head of La Jolla Canyon using a Reson 8101 MBES (October 2001). Data and metadata available at http://seafloor.csumb.edu/SFMLwebDATA.htm. This work was funded by the California Department of Fish and Game California Coastal Conservancy, San Diego Association of Governments (SANDAG), California Department of Fish and Game, and Fugro Pelagos mapped the nearshore region out to about 35-40 m. - The sea floor within this image that has not been mapped with MBES is filled in with interpreted bathymetry gridded from single-beam data available at http://www.ngdc.noaa.gov/mgg/bathymetry/hydro.html. Depths are in meters below sea level, which is referenced to Mean Lower Low Water.

  16. Geodetic constraints from multi-beam laser altimeter crossovers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazarico, Erwan; Neumann, G. A.; Rowlands, D. D.; Smith, D. E.

    2010-06-01

    The round-trip travel time measurements made by spacecraft laser altimeters are primarily used to construct topographic maps of the target body. The accuracy of the calculated bounce point locations of the laser pulses depends on the quality of the spacecraft trajectory reconstruction. The trajectory constraints from Doppler and range radio tracking data can be supplemented by altimetric “crossovers”, to greatly improve the reconstruction of the spacecraft trajectory. Crossovers have been used successfully in the past (e.g., Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter on Mars Global Surveyor), but only with single-beam altimeters. The same algorithms can be used with a multi-beam laser altimeter, but we present a method using the unique cross-track topographic information present in the multi-beam data. Those crossovers are especially adapted to shallow (small angle) intersections, as the overlapping area is large, reducing the inherent ambiguities of single-beam data in that situation. We call those “swath crossovers”. They prove particularly useful in the case of polar-orbiting spacecraft over slowly rotating bodies, because all the non-polar crossovers have small intersection angles. To demonstrate this method, we perform a simplified simulation based on the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) and its five-beam Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter. We show that swath crossovers over one lunar month can independently, from geometry alone, recover the imposed orbital perturbations with great accuracy (5 m horizontal, < 1 m vertical, about one order of magnitude smaller than the imposed perturbations). We also present new types of constraints that can be derived from the swath crossovers, and designed to be used in a precision orbit determination setup. In future work, we will use such multi-beam altimetric constraints with data from LRO.

  17. Processing and analysis of Simrad multibeam sonar data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Neil C.

    1996-12-01

    The common approach to analysing data collected with multibeam and sidescan sonars is to visually interpret charts of contoured bathymetry and mosaics of seabed images. However, some of the information content is lost by processing the data into charts because this involves some averaging; the analysis might uncover more information if done on the data at an earlier stage in the processing. Motivated by this potential, I have created a software system which can be used to analyse data collected with Simrad EM1000 (shallow water) and EM12 (deep water) multibeam sonars, as well as to generate bathymetry contour charts and backscatter mosaics. The system includes data preprocessing, such as navigation filtering, depth filtering (removal of outlying values), and amplitude mapping using the multibeam bathymetry to correctly position image pixels across the swath. The data attributes that can be analysed include the orientation and slope of the seafloor, and the mean signal strength for each sounding. To determine bathymetry attributes such as slope, the soundings across a number of beams and across a series of pings are grouped and a least-squares plane fitted to them. Bathymetric curvature is obtained by detrending the grouped data using the least-squares plane and fitting a paraboloid to the residuals. The magnitudes and signs of the paraboloid's coefficients reveal depressions and hills and their orientations. Furthermore, the seafloor geology can be classified using a simple combination of these attributes. For example, flat-lying sediments can be classified where the backscatter, slope and curvature fall below specified values.

  18. Caring for children undergoing radiotherapy treatment: Swedish radiotherapy nurses' perceptions.

    PubMed

    Gårdling, J; Edwinson Månsson, M; Törnqvist, E; Hallström, I

    2015-12-01

    The aim was to explore radiotherapy nurses' perceptions of their experiences of caring for children undergoing radiotherapy treatment for cancer. Semi-structured interviews of 12 nurses were conducted. The interviews were analysed using a phenomenographical approach. All interviewees were women, and the group's mean age was 49 years. Caring for children during radiotherapy treatment was perceived as a complex task. Their perceptions included views on providing holistic care, creating a sense of security and being committed. Through holistic care the radiotherapy nurses took responsibility regarding care for the child and family, technical aspects of the radiotherapy procedure and the development of their profession. They tried to create a sense of security through individualized information and preparation, through teamwork with the child and family, and regarding anaesthetic personnel (if needed) while balancing the care they gave related to the child, to the family, to anaesthetic personnel, and to their own tasks. The radiotherapy nurses perceived themselves as committed in their care and reported being emotionally affected by sadness, but also joy. By clarifying radiotherapy nurses perceptions of caring for children guidelines can be developed to lessen anxiety and increase the sense of security amongst children undergoing radiotherapy treatment and their family members. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. On intermodulation beams of satellite DBF transmitting multibeam array antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hongmei; Wang, Huali; Mu, Shanxiang

    2007-11-01

    Digital beamforming (DBF) transmitting multibeam planar array antenna with nonlinear behaviors of solid-state power amplifiers (SSPA) is discussed. This paper investigates the intermodulation beams produced by the nonlinearity characteristics of the SSPA with multiple carrier components. The Shimbo model is simplified to describe the nonlinear behaviors of SSPA. The optimal SSPA input back-off (IBO) point which is given the desired the carrier and the intermodulatin ratio (C/IM) is simulated. And the tradeoffs between linearity and efficiency of the power amplifier which influence this IBO is also discussed, helping to selecting suitable SSPA device and reducing the dc power consumption in satellite array antenna system.

  20. Stereotactic body radiotherapy: current strategies and future development

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) has emerged as the standard treatment for medically inoperable early-staged non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The local control rate after SBRT is over 90%. Some forms of tumour motion management and image-guided radiation delivery techniques are the prerequisites for fulfilment of its goal to deliver a high radiation dose to the tumour target without overdosing surrounding normal tissues. In this review, the current strategies of tumour motion management will be discussed, followed by an overview of various image-guided radiotherapy (RT) systems and devices available for clinical practice. Besides medically inoperable stage I NSCLC, SBRT has also been widely adopted for treatment of oligometastasis involving the lungs. Its possible applications in various other cancer illnesses are under extensive exploration. The progress of SBRT is critically technology-dependent. With advancement of technology, the ideal of personalised, effective and yet safe SBRT is already on the horizon. PMID:27606082

  1. [Radiotherapy in cancers of the oesophagus, the gastric cardia and the stomach].

    PubMed

    Créhange, G; Huguet, F; Quero, L; N'Guyen, T V; Mirabel, X; Lacornerie, T

    2016-09-01

    Localized oesophageal and gastric cancers have a poor prognosis. In oesophageal cancer, external radiotherapy combined with concomitant chemotherapy is accepted as part of the therapeutic armamentarium in a curative intent in the preoperative setting for resectable tumours; or without surgery in inoperable patients or non-resectable tumours due to wide local and/or regional extension. Data from the literature show conflicting results with no clinical evidence in favour of either a unique dose protocol or consensual target volume definition in the setting of exclusive chemoradiation. In the preoperative setting, chemoradiotherapy has become the standard in oesophageal cancer, even though there is no evidence that surgery may be beneficial in locally advanced tumours that respond to radiotherapy and chemotherapy. The main cause of failure after exclusive chemoradiotherapy in oesophageal cancer is locoregional relapse suggesting that doses and volumes usually considered may be inadequate. In gastric cancer, radiotherapy may be indicated postoperatively in patients with resected tumours that include less than D2 lymph node dissection or in the absence of perioperative chemotherapy. Preoperative chemoradiotherapy in gastric cancers is still under investigation. The evolving techniques of external radiotherapy, such as image-guided radiotherapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arctherapy (VMAT) have reduced the volume of lung and heart exposed to radiation, which seems to have diminished radiotherapy-related morbi-mortality rates. Given this, quality assurance for radiotherapy and protocols for radiotherapy delivery must be better standardized. This article on the indications for radiotherapy and the techniques used in oesophageal and gastric cancers is included in a special issue dedicated to national recommendations from the French society of radiation oncology (SFRO) on radiotherapy indications, planning, dose prescription, and techniques of radiotherapy delivery

  2. Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy with High Energy Photon and Hadron Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oelfke, U.

    2004-07-01

    This short contribution will briefly describe the basic concepts of intensity modulated radiation therapy with high energy photons (IMRT) and charged particle beams (IMPT). Dose delivery and optimization strategies like the `Inverse Planning' approach will be explained for both radiation modalities and their potential advantages are demonstrated for characteristic clinical examples. Finally, future development like image guided radiotherapy (IGRT) and adaptive radiation therapy, based on functional imaging methods, will be introduced.

  3. Demand for radiotherapy in Spain.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, A; Borrás, J M; López-Torrecilla, J; Algara, M; Palacios-Eito, A; Gómez-Caamaño, A; Olay, L; Lara, P C

    2017-02-01

    Assessing the demand for radiotherapy in Spain based on existing evidence to estimate the human resources and equipment needed so that every person in Spain has access to high-quality radiotherapy when they need it. We used data from the European Cancer Observatory on the estimated incidence of cancer in Spain in 2012, along with the evidence-based indications for radiotherapy developed by the Australian CCORE project, to obtain an optimal radiotherapy utilisation proportion (OUP) for each tumour. About 50.5 % of new cancers in Spain require radiotherapy at least once over the course of the disease. Additional demand for these services comes from reradiation therapy and non-melanoma skin cancer. Approximately, 25-30 % of cancer patients with an indication for radiotherapy do not receive it due to factors that include access, patient preference, familiarity with the treatment among physicians, and especially resource shortages, all of which contribute to its underutilisation. Radiotherapy is underused in Spain. The increasing incidence of cancer expected over the next decade and the greater frequency of reradiations necessitate the incorporation of radiotherapy demand into need-based calculations for cancer services planning.

  4. Particle radiotherapy for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Suefuji, Hiroaki; Sinoto, Makoto; Matsunobu, Akira; Toyama, Shingo; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Kudo, Sho

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in external beam radiotherapy have allowed us to deliver higher doses to the tumors while decreasing doses to the surrounding tissues. Dose escalation using high-precision radiotherapy has improved the treatment outcomes of prostate cancer. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy has been widely used throughout the world as the most advanced form of photon radiotherapy. In contrast, particle radiotherapy has also been under development, and has been used as an effective and non-invasive radiation modality for prostate and other cancers. Among the particles used in such treatments, protons and carbon ions have the physical advantage that the dose can be focused on the tumor with only minimal exposure of the surrounding normal tissues. Furthermore, carbon ions also have radiobiological advantages that include higher killing effects on intrinsic radio-resistant tumors, hypoxic tumor cells and tumor cells in the G0 or S phase. However, the degree of clinical benefit derived from these theoretical advantages in the treatment of prostate cancer has not been adequately determined. The present article reviews the available literature on the use of particle radiotherapy for prostate cancer as well as the literature on the physical and radiobiological properties of this treatment, and discusses the role and the relative merits of particle radiotherapy compared with current photon-based radiotherapy, with a focus on proton beam therapy and carbon ion radiotherapy.

  5. Bystander effects and radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Marín, Alicia; Martín, Margarita; Liñán, Olga; Alvarenga, Felipe; López, Mario; Fernández, Laura; Büchser, David; Cerezo, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Radiation-induced bystander effects are defined as biological effects expressed after irradiation by cells whose nuclei have not been directly irradiated. These effects include DNA damage, chromosomal instability, mutation, and apoptosis. There is considerable evidence that ionizing radiation affects cells located near the site of irradiation, which respond individually and collectively as part of a large interconnected web. These bystander signals can alter the dynamic equilibrium between proliferation, apoptosis, quiescence or differentiation. The aim of this review is to examine the most important biological effects of this phenomenon with regard to areas of major interest in radiotherapy. Such aspects include radiation-induced bystander effects during the cell cycle under hypoxic conditions when administering fractionated modalities or combined radio-chemotherapy. Other relevant aspects include individual variation and genetics in toxicity of bystander factors and normal tissue collateral damage. In advanced radiotherapy techniques, such as intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), the high degree of dose conformity to the target volume reduces the dose and, therefore, the risk of complications, to normal tissues. However, significant doses can accumulate out-of-field due to photon scattering and this may impact cellular response in these regions. Protons may offer a solution to reduce out-of-field doses. The bystander effect has numerous associated phenomena, including adaptive response, genomic instability, and abscopal effects. Also, the bystander effect can influence radiation protection and oxidative stress. It is essential that we understand the mechanisms underlying the bystander effect in order to more accurately assess radiation risk and to evaluate protocols for cancer radiotherapy.

  6. Bystander effects and radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Marín, Alicia; Martín, Margarita; Liñán, Olga; Alvarenga, Felipe; López, Mario; Fernández, Laura; Büchser, David; Cerezo, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Radiation-induced bystander effects are defined as biological effects expressed after irradiation by cells whose nuclei have not been directly irradiated. These effects include DNA damage, chromosomal instability, mutation, and apoptosis. There is considerable evidence that ionizing radiation affects cells located near the site of irradiation, which respond individually and collectively as part of a large interconnected web. These bystander signals can alter the dynamic equilibrium between proliferation, apoptosis, quiescence or differentiation. The aim of this review is to examine the most important biological effects of this phenomenon with regard to areas of major interest in radiotherapy. Such aspects include radiation-induced bystander effects during the cell cycle under hypoxic conditions when administering fractionated modalities or combined radio-chemotherapy. Other relevant aspects include individual variation and genetics in toxicity of bystander factors and normal tissue collateral damage. In advanced radiotherapy techniques, such as intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), the high degree of dose conformity to the target volume reduces the dose and, therefore, the risk of complications, to normal tissues. However, significant doses can accumulate out-of-field due to photon scattering and this may impact cellular response in these regions. Protons may offer a solution to reduce out-of-field doses. The bystander effect has numerous associated phenomena, including adaptive response, genomic instability, and abscopal effects. Also, the bystander effect can influence radiation protection and oxidative stress. It is essential that we understand the mechanisms underlying the bystander effect in order to more accurately assess radiation risk and to evaluate protocols for cancer radiotherapy. PMID:25535579

  7. Echoview as a multibeam sonar data processing and analysis toolkit for fisheries research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buelens, Bart; Pauly, Tim; Higginbottom, Ian

    2003-10-01

    Echoview is a hydroacoustic data analysis software package, widely used in the fisheries research and stock assessment communities. Originally developed to handle a variety of single-beam sonar data formats, Echoview has been extended to support multibeam data. Multibeam data logging, lossless compression, and real time beamforming and display are some of the software's core features. Multibeam data has an additional dimension compared to single-beam data, and a 3D data viewer has been developed providing 3D visualizations of the seabed and fish schools detected by built-in algorithms. Since the multibeam module is just one of many software modules of the Echoview package, data from other sources such as single-beam sonar systems and current profilers can be combined and analyzed together with the multibeam data. The combination of coincident fish density estimates from calibrated single-beam backscatter data with school volume estimates from multibeam data will represent a significant improvement in stock assessment methods. Ongoing research and development will make it possible for Echoview to follow and even set new trends in multibeam water-column data analysis for fisheries research. Features under development include calibration, vessel motion compensation, improved feature detection, and enhanced and animated 3D displays.

  8. Challenges and technical requirements for multi-beam mask writer development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sang Hee; Choi, Jin; Lee, Ho June; Shin, In Kyun; Tamamushi, Shuichi; Jeon, Chan-Uk

    2014-07-01

    Because mask patterning quality of CD uniformity, MTT, registration and smaller assist feature size is important for wafer patterning, the higher exposure dose and complex pattern design will be necessary. It is the reason why the faster and more accurate e-beam mask writer is needed for future design node. Multi-beam mask writer is the most promising new e-beam mask writer technology for future sub-10nm device mask patterning to solve the pattern quality issue and writing time problem. In this report, the technical challenges of multi-beam mask writer are discussed by comparison with problems of current VSB e-beam mask writer. Comparing with e-beam mask writer which has the critical issues of beam size and position control, the application of entirely different methods and techniques of CD and position control is essential for multi-beam mask writer which has new architecture and writing strategy. Using the simulation method, we present the different challenges between VSB and multi-beam mask writer. And there are many important technical requirements to achieve expected specification of multi-beam mask writer. To understand such requirements, the patterning simulation and mathematical calculation are done for analysis. Based on the patterning simulation, the detail technical requirements and issues of multi-beam mask writer are achieved. Consequently, we suggest the direction of multi-beam mask writer development in terms of technical challenges and requirements.

  9. [Radiotherapy during pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Mazeron, R; Barillot, I; Mornex, F; Giraud, P

    2016-09-01

    The diagnostic of cancer during pregnancy is a rare and delicate situation. As the developments of the embryo and the human fetus are extremely sensitive to ionizing radiations, the treatment of these tumors should be discussed. The studies - preclinical and clinical - based mostly on exposure accidents show that subdiaphragmatic treatments are possible during pregnancy. When radiotherapy is used, phantom estimations of the dose to the fetus, confirmed by in vivo measurements are required. Irradiation and imaging techniques should be arranged to decrease as much as possible the dose delivered to the fetus and hold below the threshold of 0.1Gy.

  10. Radiotherapy in the UK

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsay, S.

    1993-10-09

    What is wrong with radiation treatment in the UK Is it bad practice or merely bad publicity Between 1982 and 1991, 1,000 patients receiving isocentric radiation therapy at the North Staffordshire Royal Infirmary received a substantial underdose of radiation; the clinical report on this incident was published last week. The operator had been using a correction factor for tumor-to-skin distance, unaware that this factor had already been applied by the computer system. Although the report pointed out that it is not surprising that the clinicians were not alerted to the undertreatment, is also noted that there were no resources at the hospital to audit the outcome of radiotherapy.

  11. Development of Multi-Beam Long Trace Profiler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilaru, Kiranmayee; Merthe, Daniel J.; Ali, Zulfiqar; Gubarev, Mikhail V.; Kester, Thomas; McKinney, Wayne R.; Takacs, Peter Z.; Yashchuk, Valeriy V.

    2011-01-01

    In order to fulfill the angular resolution requirements and make the performance goals for future NASA missions feasible, it is crucial to develop instruments capable of fast and precise figure metrology of x-ray optical elements for further correction of the surface errors. The Long Trace Profilometer (LTP) is an instrument widely used for measuring the surface figure of grazing incidence X-ray mirrors. In the case of replicated optics designed for x-ray astronomy applications, such as mirrors and the corresponding mandrels have a cylindrical shape and their tangential profile is parabolic or hyperbolic. Modern LTPs have sub-microradian accuracy, but the measuring speed is very low, because the profilometer measures surface figure point by point using a single laser beam. The measurement rate can be significantly improved by replacing the single optical beam with multiple beams. The goal of this study is to demonstrate the viability of multi-beam metrology as a way of significantly improving the quality and affordability of replicated x-ray optics. The multi-beam LTP would allow one- and two-dimensional scanning with sub-microradian resolution and a measurement rate of about ten times faster compared to the current LTP. The design details of the instrument's optical layout and the status of optical tests will be presented.

  12. W-CMOS blanking device for projection multibeam lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurisch, Michael; Irmscher, Mathias; Letzkus, Florian; Eder-Kapl, Stefan; Klein, Christof; Loeschner, Hans; Piller, Walter; Platzgummer, Elmar

    2010-05-01

    As the designs of future mask nodes become more and more complex the corresponding pattern writing times will rise significantly when using single beam writing tools. Projection multi-beam lithography [1] is one promising technology to enhance the throughput compared to state of the art VSB pattern generators. One key component of the projection multi-beam tool is an Aperture Plate System (APS) to form and switch thousands of individual beamlets. In our present setup a highly parallel beam is divided into 43,008 individual beamlets by a Siaperture- plate. These micrometer sized beams pass through larger openings in a blanking-plate and are individually switched on and off by applying a voltage to blanking-electrodes which are placed around the blanking-plate openings. A charged particle 200x reduction optics demagnifies the beamlet array to the substrate. The switched off beams are filtered out in the projection optics so that only the beams which are unaffected by the blanking-plate are projected to the substrate with 200x reduction. The blanking-plate is basically a CMOS device for handling the writing data. In our work the blanking-electrodes are fabricated using CMOS compatible add on processes like SiO2-etching or metal deposition and structuring. A new approach is the implementation of buried tungsten electrodes for beam blanking.

  13. Correction for depth biases to shallow water multibeam bathymetric data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Fan-lin; Li, Jia-biao; Liu, Zhi-min; Han, Li-tao

    2013-04-01

    Vertical errors often present in multibeam swath bathymetric data. They are mainly sourced by sound refraction, internal wave disturbance, imperfect tide correction, transducer mounting, long period heave, static draft change, dynamic squat and dynamic motion residuals, etc. Although they can be partly removed or reduced by specific algorithms, the synthesized depth biases are unavoidable and sometimes have an important influence on high precise utilization of the final bathymetric data. In order to confidently identify the decimeter-level changes in seabed morphology by MBES, we must remove or weaken depth biases and improve the precision of multibeam bathymetry further. The fixed-interval profiles that are perpendicular to the vessel track are generated to adjust depth biases between swaths. We present a kind of postprocessing method to minimize the depth biases by the histogram of cumulative depth biases. The datum line in each profile can be obtained by the maximum value of histogram. The corrections of depth biases can be calculated according to the datum line. And then the quality of final bathymetry can be improved by the corrections. The method is verified by a field test.

  14. Progress of Multi-Beam Long Trace-Profiler Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gubarev, Mikhail; Kilaru, Kiranmayee; Merthe, Daniel J.; Kester, Thomas; McKinney, Wayne R.; Takacs, Peter Z.; Yashchuk, Valeriy V.

    2012-01-01

    The multi-beam long trace profiler (LTP) under development at NASA s Marshall Space Flight Center[1] is designed to increase the efficiency of metrology of replicated X-ray optics. The traditional LTP operates on a single laser beam that scans along the test surface to detect the slope errors. While capable of exceptional surface slope accuracy, the LTP single beam scanning has slow measuring speed. As metrology constitutes a significant fraction of the time spent in optics production, an increase in the efficiency of metrology helps in decreasing the cost of fabrication of the x-ray optics and in improving their quality. Metrology efficiency can be increased by replacing the single laser beam with multiple beams that can scan a section of the test surface at a single instance. The increase in speed with such a system would be almost proportional to the number of laser beams. A collaborative feasibility study has been made and specifications were fixed for a multi-beam long trace profiler. The progress made in the development of this metrology system is presented.

  15. Method for enhancing stability in multi-beam microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yujia; Wang, Yifan; Kuang, Cuifang; Liu, Xu

    2016-10-01

    A method based on close loop control of four degrees of freedom (4DF) is proposed to enhance angular and translational stability of beams in multi-beam microscopy including STED, RESOLFT and CARS, etc. Deviations of multi-beams can be measured and corrected by our module, which is composed of four degrees of freedom position sensitive detectors (4DF PSD) and two actuator mirrors (AM) with motor and piezo servos. An output crosslink matrix obtained by a self-learning process is used to control four actuators to compensate for 4DF independently in beam deviations. We realize a standard deviation within about 2 µm at the entrance pupil plane (a spatial optical path of 180 cm for the whole system) using a compact stabilization system, which is equivalent to around 3 nm at the sample plane under the 100×  objective lens with a focal length of 2 mm, corresponding to an improvement of stability by an order of magnitude. Our method can react fast in real time and compensate for large disturbances caused by air agitation or temperature variation.

  16. Design and Simulation of Electron Gun for a Multibeam Klystron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nehra, A. K.; Gupta, R. K.; Sharma, S. M.; Panda, P. C.; Choyal, Y.; Sharma, R. K.

    2012-11-01

    This paper represents the design of multi-beam (sixty-beam) electron gun and focusing system for high power, compact klystron. The beam voltage is 4 kV with a total beam current of 513 (8.55 × 60) mA which is equally divided among sixty-beam. Each beam has a perveance of 0.033 μP making a total gun perveance of 2.02 μP corresponding to a total beam power of more than 2 kW. The cathode radius is7 mm and individual emitter radius is 0.2 mm having current density 6.7 A/cm2. The design has been accomplished using OPERA 3D code. All beamlets have individual anode as well as BFE and a common focusing system. Potential difference between cathode and anode is 4 kV. A magnetic field of 1200 Gauss is applied along the beam axis. A major challenge for the development of multi-beam klystron is design and technology for the focusing of off-axis beamlets because off-axis beams are at various azimuths.

  17. Development of Topological Correction Algorithms for ADCP Multibeam Bathymetry Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Sung-Kee; Kim, Dong-Su; Kim, Soo-Jeong; Jung, Woo-Yul

    2013-04-01

    Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers (ADCPs) are increasingly popular in the river research and management communities being primarily used for estimation of stream flows. ADCPs capabilities, however, entail additional features that are not fully explored, such as morphologic representation of river or reservoir bed based upon multi-beam depth measurements. In addition to flow velocity, ADCP measurements include river bathymetry information through the depth measurements acquired in individual 4 or 5 beams with a given oblique angle. Such sounding capability indicates that multi-beam ADCPs can be utilized as an efficient depth-sounder to be more capable than the conventional single-beam eco-sounders. The paper introduces the post-processing algorithms required to deal with raw ADCP bathymetry measurements including the following aspects: a) correcting the individual beam depths for tilt (pitch and roll); b) filtering outliers using SMART filters; d) transforming the corrected depths into geographical coordinates by UTM conversion; and, e) tag the beam detecting locations with the concurrent GPS information; f) spatial representation in a GIS package. The developed algorithms are applied for the ADCP bathymetric dataset acquired from Han-Cheon in Juju Island to validate their applicability.

  18. Mechanical scanner-less multi-beam confocal microscope with wavefront modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takiguchi, Yu; Seo, Min-Woong; Kagawa, Keiichiro; Takamoto, Hisayoshi; Inoue, Takashi; Kawahito, Shoji; Terakawa, Susumu

    2016-04-01

    We propose a novel full-electronically controlled laser confocal microscope in which a liquid-crystal-on-silicon spatial light modulator and a custom CMOS imaging sensor are synchronized for performing multi-beam confocal imaging. Adaptive wavefront modulation for functional multi-beam excitation can be achieved by displaying appropriate computer generated holograms on the spatial light modulator, in consideration of the numerical aperture of the focusing objective. We also adopted a custom CMOS imaging sensor to realize multi-beam confocal microscopy without any physical pinhole. The confocality of this microscope was verified by improvements in transverse and axial resolutions of fluorescent micro-beads.

  19. [Hodgkin's lymphoma and radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Datsenko, P V; Panshin, G A

    2015-01-01

    After a median observation time of 4,5 years, 440 patients with Hodgkin's lymphoma stage I-IV to the Ann Arbor classification were treated with radiotherapy (2200 lymph areas) and ABVD (n=204) or BEACOPP (n=117) or CEA/ABVD (lomustine, etoposide, adriamycine, bleomycine, vinblastine and dacarbacine; n=119) regimens in 1995-2012. Correct allocation of groups with "CR or PR ≥80%" and "PR: 0-79%", after first-line chemotherapy, is extremely important for following RT planning. Adaptation of patients with Hodgkin's lymphoma can take place only after successful treatment, the probability of relapse and fear of repeated courses strongly interfere with this process, especially in the first years after its closure. Duration of remission period, especially in young people, is no less important than the criteria for overall survival. It is impossible to build recommendations for treatment for Hodgkin's lymphoma, based only on long-term survival rates. Importance of radiotherapy in reducing the number of relapses is undeniable, so the idea that the development of the role of chemotherapy in the treatment of the ray method Hodgkin's lymphoma gradually becomes secondary is in serious doubt. Our findings suggest the importance of both maintaining a high disease-free survival and reducing long-term complications in designing treatments of Hodgkin's lymphoma.

  20. Fertility impairment in radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Kuźba-Kryszak, Tamara; Nowikiewicz, Tomasz; Żyromska, Agnieszka

    2016-01-01

    Infertility as a result of antineoplastic therapy is becoming a very important issue due to the growing incidence of neoplastic diseases. Routinely applied antineoplastic treatments and the illness itself lead to fertility disorders. Therapeutic methods used in antineoplastic treatment may cause fertility impairment or sterilization due to permanent damage to reproductive cells. The risk of sterilization depends on the patient's sex, age during therapy, type of neoplasm, radiation dose and treatment area. It is known that chemotherapy and radiotherapy can lead to fertility impairment and the combination of these two gives an additive effect. The aim of this article is to raise the issue of infertility in these patients. It is of growing importance due to the increase in the number of children and young adults who underwent radiotherapy in the past. The progress in antineoplastic therapy improves treatment results, but at the same time requires a deeper look at existential needs of the patient. Reproductive function is an integral element of self-esteem and should be taken into account during therapy planning. PMID:27647982

  1. Imaging in radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calandrino, R.; Del Maschio, A.; Cattaneo, G. M.; Castiglioni, I.

    2009-09-01

    The diagnostic methodologies used for the radiotherapy planning have undergone great developments in the last 30 years. Since the 1980s, after the introduction of the CT scanner, the modality for the planning moved beyond the planar 2D assessment to approach a real and more realistic volumetric 3D definition. Consequently the dose distribution, previously obtained by means of an overly simple approximation, became increasingly complex, better tailoring the true shape of the tumour. The final therapeutic improvement has been obtained by a parallel increase in the complexity of the irradiating units: the Linacs for therapy have, in fact, been equipped with a full accessory set capable to modulate the fluence (IMRT) and to check the correct target position continuously during the therapy session (IMRT-IGRT). The multimodal diagnostic approach, which integrates diagnostic information, from images of the patient taken with CT, NMR, PET and US, further improves the data for a biological and topological optimization of the radiotherapy plan and consequently of the dose distribution in the Planning Target Volume. Proteomic and genomic analysis will be the next step in tumour diagnosis. These methods will provide the planners with further information, for a true personalization of the treatment regimen and the assessment of the predictive essays for each tumour and each patient.

  2. Big Data Analytics for Prostate Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Coates, James; Souhami, Luis; El Naqa, Issam

    2016-01-01

    Radiation therapy is a first-line treatment option for localized prostate cancer and radiation-induced normal tissue damage are often the main limiting factor for modern radiotherapy regimens. Conversely, under-dosing of target volumes in an attempt to spare adjacent healthy tissues limits the likelihood of achieving local, long-term control. Thus, the ability to generate personalized data-driven risk profiles for radiotherapy outcomes would provide valuable prognostic information to help guide both clinicians and patients alike. Big data applied to radiation oncology promises to deliver better understanding of outcomes by harvesting and integrating heterogeneous data types, including patient-specific clinical parameters, treatment-related dose–volume metrics, and biological risk factors. When taken together, such variables make up the basis for a multi-dimensional space (the “RadoncSpace”) in which the presented modeling techniques search in order to identify significant predictors. Herein, we review outcome modeling and big data-mining techniques for both tumor control and radiotherapy-induced normal tissue effects. We apply many of the presented modeling approaches onto a cohort of hypofractionated prostate cancer patients taking into account different data types and a large heterogeneous mix of physical and biological parameters. Cross-validation techniques are also reviewed for the refinement of the proposed framework architecture and checking individual model performance. We conclude by considering advanced modeling techniques that borrow concepts from big data analytics, such as machine learning and artificial intelligence, before discussing the potential future impact of systems radiobiology approaches. PMID:27379211

  3. [Stereotactic radiosurgery and radiotherapy for brain metastases].

    PubMed

    Tanguy, Ronan; Métellus, Philippe; Mornex, Françoise; Mazeron, Jean-Jacques

    2013-01-01

    Brain metastases management is still controversial even though many trials are trying to define the respective roles of neurosurgery, whole-brain radiotherapy, single-dose stereotactic radiotherapy and fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy. In this article, we review data from trials that examine the role of radiosurgery and fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy in the management of brain metastases.

  4. Patterns of care of radiotherapy in México

    PubMed Central

    Poitevin-Chacón, Adela; Hinojosa-Gómez, José

    2012-01-01

    Aim This survey is performed to learn about the structure of radiotherapy in México. Background Radiation oncology practice is increasing because of the higher incidence of cancer. There is no published data about radiotherapy in México. Materials and methods A questionnaire was sent to the 83 registered centers in the database of the Mexican regulatory agency. One out of the 32 states has no radiotherapy. 27 centers from 14 states provided their answers. Results 829 patients are treated annually with any radiotherapy modality in each center. Two centers have one cobalt machine, 7 have a cobalt and a linac and 10 have more than one linac. Five centers use 2D planning systems, 22 use 3D; 9, conventional simulators; 22, CT based simulation, and 1 center has no simulation. Most of the centers verify beams with films, electronic portal image devices and cone beam CTs are also used. Intensity modulated and image guided radiotherapy are performed in 5 states. Breast, prostate, cervix, lung, rectum and head and neck cancer are the six most common locations. There are 45 public and 38 private centers, 2 dedicated to children. Two gamma knife units, 5 Novalis systems, 1 tomotherapy and 2 cyberknife machines are working. All centers have at least one radiation oncologist, one physicist and one radiotherapist. Conclusions Definitive conclusions cannot be drawn from this limited feedback due to a low participation of centers. This survey about radiotherapy in Mexico shows the heterogeneity of equipment as well as medical and technical staff in the whole country. PMID:24416531

  5. Intraoperative radiotherapy for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Vaidya, Jayant S; Tobias, Jeffrey S; Baum, Michael; Keshtgar, Mohammed; Joseph, David; Wenz, Frederik; Houghton, Joan; Saunders, Christobel; Corica, Tammy; D'Souza, Derek; Sainsbury, Richard; Massarut, Samuele; Taylor, Irving; Hilaris, Basil

    2004-03-01

    Postoperative radiotherapy, which forms part of breast-conserving therapy, may not need to encompass the whole breast. Apart from the consumption of huge resources and patients' time, postoperative radiotherapy deters many women from receiving the benefits of breast-conserving surgery, forcing them to choose a mastectomy instead. If radiotherapy could be given in the operating theatre immediately after surgery, many of these disadvantages could be overcome. One striking fact about local recurrence after breast-conserving surgery is that most occurs in the area of breast immediately next to the primary tumour; this is despite the finding that two-thirds of mastectomy samples have microscopic tumours distributed throughout the breast, even when radiotherapy is omitted. Thus, only the area adjacent to the tumour may need treatment with radiotherapy. On the basis of this premise, clinical scientists have used new technology to administer radiotherapy to the area at greatest risk of local recurrence, with the aim of completing the whole local treatment in one sitting. In this review, we have elaborated on the rationale and different methods of delivery of intraoperative radiotherapy. If this approach is validated by the results of current randomised trials, it could save time, money, and breasts.

  6. Pituitary radiotherapy for Cushing's disease.

    PubMed

    Losa, Marco; Picozzi, Piero; Redaelli, Maria Grazia; Laurenzi, Andrea; Mortini, Pietro

    2010-01-01

    The treatment of choice for Cushing's disease is pituitary surgery. Second-line treatments include repeat pituitary surgery, radiation therapy, medical therapy, and bilateral adrenalectomy. The most used modalities to irradiate patients with Cushing's disease include fractionated radiotherapy and single-dose Gamma Knife. We aim to review the efficacy and safety of radiotherapy in patients with persistent or recurring Cushing's disease. Remission of Cushing's disease after radiotherapy ranges from 42 to 83%. There seems to be no clear difference according to the technique of radiation used. Most patients experience remission of disease within 3 years from treatment, with only few cases reaching normal cortisol secretion after a longer follow-up. Control of tumor growth varies from 93 to 100%. Severe side effects of radiotherapy, such as optic neuropathy and radionecrosis, are uncommon. New-onset hypopituitarism is the most frequent side effect of radiation, occurring in 30-50% of patients treated by fractionated radiotherapy while it has been reported in 11-22% of patients after Gamma Knife. Radiotherapy is an effective second-line treatment in patients with Cushing's disease not cured by surgery. Consideration of the advantages and disadvantages of radiotherapy in comparison with other therapeutic options should always be carried out in the single patient before deciding the second-line therapeutic strategy for persisting or recurring Cushing's disease. Copyright © 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Radiotherapy in Phyllodes Tumour

    PubMed Central

    Sasidharan, Balukrishna; Manipadam, Marie Therese; Paul, M J; Backianathan, Selvamani

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Phyllodes Tumour (PT) of the breast is a relatively rare breast neoplasm (<1%) with diverse range of pathology and biological behaviour. Aim To describe the clinical course of PT and to define the role of Radiotherapy (RT) in PT of the breast. Materials and Methods Retrospective analysis of hospital data of patients with PT presented from 2005 to 2014 was done. Descriptive statistics was used to analyze the results. Simple description of data was done in this study. Age and duration of symptoms were expressed in median and range. Percentages, tables and general discussions were used to understand the meaning of the data analyzed. Results Out of the 98 patients, 92 were eligible for analysis. The median age of presentation was 43 years. A total of 64/92 patients were premenopausal. There was no side predilection for this tumour but 57/92 patients presented as an upper outer quadrant lump. Fifty percent of the patients presented as giant (10 cm) PT. The median duration of symptoms was 12 months (range: 1-168 months). A 60% of patients had Benign (B), 23% had Borderline (BL) and 17% had malignant (M) tumours. The surgical treatment for benign histology included Lumpectomy (L) for 15%, Wide Local Excision (WLE) for 48%, and Simple Mastectomy (SM) for 37%. All BL and M tumours were treated with WLE or SM. There was no recurrence in B and BL group when the margin was ≥1 cm. All non-metastatic M tumours received adjuvant RT irrespective of their margin status. Total 3/16 patients with M developed local recurrence. Total 6/16 M patients had distant metastases (lung or bone). Our median duration of follow up was 20 months (range: 1-120 months). Conclusion Surgical resection with adequate margins (>1 cm) gave excellent local control in B and BL tumours. For patients with BL PT, local radiotherapy is useful, if margins are close or positive even after the best surgical resection. There is a trend towards improved local control with adjuvant radiotherapy for

  8. [Respiratory synchronization and breast radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Mège, A; Ziouèche-Mottet, A; Bodez, V; Garcia, R; Arnaud, A; de Rauglaudre, G; Pourel, N; Chauvet, B

    2016-10-01

    Adjuvant radiation therapy following breast cancer surgery continues to improve locoregional control and overall survival. But the success of highly targeted-conformal radiotherapy such as intensity-modulated techniques, can be compromised by respiratory motion. The intrafraction motion can potentially result in significant under- or overdose, and also expose organs at risk. This article summarizes the respiratory motion and its effects on imaging, dose calculation and dose delivery by radiotherapy for breast cancer. We will review the methods of respiratory synchronization available for breast radiotherapy to minimize the respiratory impact and to spare organs such as heart and lung.

  9. Reliability of fish size estimates obtained from multibeam imaging sonar

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hightower, Joseph E.; Magowan, Kevin J.; Brown, Lori M.; Fox, Dewayne A.

    2013-01-01

    Multibeam imaging sonars have considerable potential for use in fisheries surveys because the video-like images are easy to interpret, and they contain information about fish size, shape, and swimming behavior, as well as characteristics of occupied habitats. We examined images obtained using a dual-frequency identification sonar (DIDSON) multibeam sonar for Atlantic sturgeon Acipenser oxyrinchus oxyrinchus, striped bass Morone saxatilis, white perch M. americana, and channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus of known size (20–141 cm) to determine the reliability of length estimates. For ranges up to 11 m, percent measurement error (sonar estimate – total length)/total length × 100 varied by species but was not related to the fish's range or aspect angle (orientation relative to the sonar beam). Least-square mean percent error was significantly different from 0.0 for Atlantic sturgeon (x̄  =  −8.34, SE  =  2.39) and white perch (x̄  = 14.48, SE  =  3.99) but not striped bass (x̄  =  3.71, SE  =  2.58) or channel catfish (x̄  = 3.97, SE  =  5.16). Underestimating lengths of Atlantic sturgeon may be due to difficulty in detecting the snout or the longer dorsal lobe of the heterocercal tail. White perch was the smallest species tested, and it had the largest percent measurement errors (both positive and negative) and the lowest percentage of images classified as good or acceptable. Automated length estimates for the four species using Echoview software varied with position in the view-field. Estimates tended to be low at more extreme azimuthal angles (fish's angle off-axis within the view-field), but mean and maximum estimates were highly correlated with total length. Software estimates also were biased by fish images partially outside the view-field and when acoustic crosstalk occurred (when a fish perpendicular to the sonar and at relatively close range is detected in the side lobes of adjacent beams). These sources of

  10. Quantifying methane flux from lake sediments using multibeam sonar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scandella, B.; Urban, P.; Delwiche, K.; Greinert, J.; Hemond, H.; Ruppel, C. D.; Juanes, R.

    2013-12-01

    Methane is a potent greenhouse gas, and the production and emission of methane from sediments in wetlands, lakes and rivers both contributes to and may be exacerbated by climate change. In some of these shallow-water settings, methane fluxes may be largely controlled by episodic venting that can be triggered by drops in hydrostatic pressure. Even with better constraints on the mechanisms for gas release, quantifying these fluxes has remained a challenge due to rapid spatiotemporal changes in the patterns of bubble emissions from the sediments. The research presented here uses a fixed-location Imagenex DeltaT 837B multibeam sonar to estimate methane-venting fluxes from organic-rich lake sediments over a large area (~400 m2) and over a multi-season deployment period with unprecedented spatial and temporal resolution. Simpler, single-beam sonar systems have been used in the past to estimate bubble fluxes in a variety of settings. Here we extend this methodology to a multibeam system by means of: (1) detailed calibration of the sonar signal against imposed bubble streams, and (2) validation against an in situ independent record of gas flux captured by overlying bubble traps. The calibrated sonar signals then yield estimates of the methane flux with high spatial resolution (~1 m) and temporal frequency (6 Hz) from a portion of the deepwater basin of Upper Mystic Lake, MA, USA, a temperate eutrophic kettle lake. These results in turn inform mathematical models of methane transport and release from the sediments, which reproduce with high fidelity the ebullitive response to hydrostatic pressure variations. In addition, the detailed information about spatial variability of methane flux derived from sonar records is used to estimate the uncertainty associated with upscaling flux measurements from bubble traps to the scale of the sonar observation area. Taken together, these multibeam sonar measurements and analysis provide a novel quantitative approach for the assessment of

  11. Building a Digital Library for Multibeam Data, Images and Documents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, S. P.; Staudigel, H.; Koppers, A.; Johnson, C.; Cande, S.; Sandwell, D.; Peckman, U.; Becker, J. J.; Helly, J.; Zaslavsky, I.; Schottlaender, B. E.; Starr, S.; Montoya, G.

    2001-12-01

    The Scripps Institution of Oceanography, the UCSD Libraries and the San Diego Supercomputing Center have joined forces to establish a digital library for accessing a wide range of multibeam and marine geophysical data, to a community that ranges from the MGG researcher to K-12 outreach clients. This digital library collection will include 233 multibeam cruises with grids, plots, photographs, station data, technical reports, planning documents and publications, drawn from the holdings of the Geological Data Center and the SIO Archives. Inquiries will be made through an Ocean Exploration Console, reminiscent of a cockpit display where a multitude of data may be displayed individually or in two or three-dimensional projections. These displays will provide access to cruise data as well as global databases such as Global Topography, crustal age, and sediment thickness, thus meeting the day-to-day needs of researchers as well as educators, students, and the public. The prototype contains a few selected expeditions, and a review of the initial approach will be solicited from the user community during the poster session. The search process can be focused by a variety of constraints: geospatial (lat-lon box), temporal (e.g., since 1996), keyword (e.g., cruise, place name, PI, etc.), or expert-level (e.g., K-6 or researcher). The Storage Resource Broker (SRB) software from the SDSC manages the evolving collection as a series of distributed but related archives in various media, from shipboard data through processing and final archiving. The latest version of MB-System provides for the systematic creation of standard metadata, and for the harvesting of metadata from multibeam files. Automated scripts will be used to load the metadata catalog to enable queries with an Oracle database management system. These new efforts to bridge the gap between libraries and data archives are supported by the NSF Information Technology and National Science Digital Library (NSDL) programs

  12. [Hepatic tumors and radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Rio, E; Mornex, F; Peiffert, D; Huertas, A

    2016-09-01

    Recent technological developments led to develop the concept of focused liver radiation therapy. We must distinguish primary and secondary tumors as the indications are restricted and must be discussed as an alternative to surgical or medical treatments. For hepatocellular carcinoma 5 to 10cm (or more), a conformational radiation with or without intensity modulation is performed. Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is being evaluated and is increasingly proposed as an alternative to radiofrequency ablative treatment for primary or secondary tumors (typically less than 5cm). Tumor (and liver) movements induced by respiratory motions must be taken into account. Strict dosimetric criteria must be met with particular attention to the dose-volume histograms to liver and the hollow organs, including cases of SBRT.

  13. [Radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Maingon, P; Blanchard, P; Bidault, F; Calmels, L

    2016-09-01

    Nasapharyngeal carcinoma is a rare disease. Oftenly, the diagnostic is made for advanced disease. Localized tumors, T1 or T2 NO observed a good prognosis and are locally controlled in more than 90 % of the cases by radiotherapy alone. The standard treatment of locally advanced disease is combined chemoradiation. A special vigilance of fast decrease of the volume of the pathological lymph nodes, sometimes associated to loss of weight might indicate an adaptive dosimetric revision. The treatment of recurrent disease is of great importance. Surgical indications are limited but should be discussed in multidisciplinary tumor board when possible. Surgical nodal sampling has to be proposed for nodal recurrence as well as reirradiation, which could be indicated according to the technical issues.

  14. Radiotherapy on hidradenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lalya, Issam; Hadadi, Khalid; Tazi, El Mehdi; Lalya, Ilham; Bazine, Amine; Andaloussy, Khalid; Elmarjany, Mohamed; Sifat, Hassan; Hassouni, Khalid; Kebdani, Tayeb; Mansouri, Hamid; Benjaafar, Noureddine; Elgueddari, Brahim Khalil

    2011-01-01

    Context: Clear cell Hidradenocarcinoma is a rare carcinoma arising from sweat glands. It is an aggressive tumor that most metastasizes to regional lymph nodes and distant viscera; surgery with safe margins is the mainstay of treatment. Case Report: We report a case of 68-year-old woman who presented with an invasive clear cell hidradenocarcinoma situated in the left parotid area which recurred 5 months after surgery, this recurrence was managed successfully by high-dose irradiation of the tumor bed (66 Gy) and regional lymphatic chains (50 Gy), after a follow-up of more than 15 months, the patient is in good local control without significant toxicity. Conclusion: Post operative radiotherapy allows better local control and should be mandatory when histological features predictive of recurrence are present: positive margins, histology poorly differentiated, perineural invasion, vascular and lymphatic invasion, lymph node involvement, and extracapsular spread. PMID:22540063

  15. Pion radiotherapy at LAMPF

    SciTech Connect

    Bush, S.E.; Smith, A.R.; Zink, S.

    1982-12-01

    Clinical investigations of pi meson radiotherapy were conducted by the Cancer Research and Treatment Center of the University of New Mexico and the Los Alamos National Laboratory from 1974 until 1982. Two hundred and thirty patients have been treated for a variety of locally advanced primary and metastatic neoplasms. One hundred and ninety-six patients have been followed for a minimum of 18 months. Crude survival data range from 11% for unresectable pancreatic carcinoma to 82% for Stages C and D1 adenocarcinoma of the prostate. Acute tolerance of normal tissues is approximately 4500 pion rad in 36 fractions over 7 weeks. Severe chronic reactions have appeared with increasing frequency after doses in excess of 4000 pion rad.

  16. Simulation and Modeling of a New Medium Access Control Scheme for Multi-Beam Directional Networking

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-03-03

    Simulation and Modeling of a New Medium Access Control Scheme for Multi-Beam Directional Networking Brian Proulx, Greg Kuperman, Nathaniel M. Jones...paper, we analyze a new medium access control (MAC) protocol for multi-beam directional network via high- fidelity simulation using a real-time emulator...implement our protocol in both simula- tion and a new Extendable Mobile Ad-hoc Network Emula- tor (EMANE) model that allows for real-time, high fidelity

  17. Multibeam Mapping of the Uncertainty of the Seafloor in the Southern East China Sea

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-30

    1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A: Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Multibeam Mapping of the Uncertainty of the Seafloor in...2010 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2010 to 00-00-2010 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Multibeam Mapping of the Uncertainty of the Seafloor in the...the Southern East China Sea Brian R. Calder1 and Larry Mayer Center for Coastal and Ocean Mapping 2 University of New Hampshire, Durham NH 03824

  18. Multibeam Mapping of the Uncertainty of the Seafloor in the Southern East China Sea

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-30

    Multibeam Mapping of the Uncertainty of the Seafloor in the Southern East China Sea Brian R. Calder Center for Coastal and Ocean Mapping ...DATE 30 SEP 2008 2. REPORT TYPE Annual 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2008 to 00-00-2008 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Multibeam Mapping Of The Uncertainty Of...University of New Hampshire, Durham NH 03824 Phone: (603) 862 0526 E-Mail: brc@ccom.unh.edu Larry Mayer Center for Coastal and Ocean Mapping

  19. MRI-guided brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Tanderup, Kari; Viswanathan, Akila; Kirisits, Christian; Frank, Steven J.

    2014-01-01

    The application of MRI-guided brachytherapy has demonstrated significant growth during the last two decades. Clinical improvements in cervix cancer outcomes have been linked to the application of repeated MRI for identification of residual tumor volumes during radiotherapy. This has changed clinical practice in the direction of individualized dose administration, and mounting evidence of improved clinical outcome with regard to local control, overall survival as well as morbidity. MRI-guided prostate HDR and LDR brachytherapy has improved the accuracy of target and organs-at-risk (OAR) delineation, and the potential exists for improved dose prescription and reporting for the prostate gland and organs at risk. Furthermore, MRI-guided prostate brachytherapy has significant potential to identify prostate subvolumes and dominant lesions to allow for dose administration reflecting the differential risk of recurrence. MRI-guided brachytherapy involves advanced imaging, target concepts, and dose planning. The key issue for safe dissemination and implementation of high quality MRI-guided brachytherapy is establishment of qualified multidisciplinary teams and strategies for training and education. PMID:24931089

  20. Technical Advances and Pitfalls in Head and Neck Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Parvathaneni, Upendra; Laramore, George E.; Liao, Jay J.

    2012-01-01

    Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) is the standard of care in the treatment of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) based on level 1 evidence. Technical advances in radiotherapy have revolutionized the treatment of HNSCC, with the most tangible gain being a reduction in long term morbidity. However, these benefits come with a serious and sobering price. Today, there is a greater chance of missing the target/tumor due to uncertainties in target volume definition by the clinician that is demanded by the highly conformal planning process involved with IMRT. Unless this is urgently addressed, our patients would be better served with the historically practiced non conformal radiotherapy, than IMRT which promises lesser morbidity. Image guided radiotherapy (IGRT) ensures the level of set up accuracy warranted to deliver a highly conformal treatment plan and should be utilized with IMRT, where feasible. Proton therapy has a theoretical physical advantage over photon therapy due to a lack of “exit dose”. However, clinical data supporting the routine use of this technology for HNSCC are currently sparse. The purpose of this article is to review the literature, discuss the salient issues and make recommendations that address the gaps in knowledge. PMID:22701482

  1. [New techniques and potential benefits for radiotherapy of lung cancer].

    PubMed

    Lefebvre, L; Doré, M; Giraud, P

    2014-10-01

    Radiotherapy is used for inoperable lung cancers, sometimes in association with chemotherapy. Outcomes of conventional radiotherapy are disappointing. New techniques improve adaptation to tumour volume, decrease normal tissue irradiation and lead to increasing tumour dose with the opportunity for improved survival. With intensity-modulated radiation therapy, isodoses can conform to complex volumes. It is widely used and seems to be indicated in locally advanced stages. Its dosimetric improvements have been demonstrated but outcomes are still heterogeneous. Stereotactic radiotherapy allows treatment of small volumes with many narrow beams. Dedicated devices or appropriate equipment on classical devices are needed. In early stages, its efficacy is comparable to surgery with an acceptable toxicity. Endobronchial brachytherapy could be used for early stages with specific criteria. Hadrontherapy is still experimental regarding lung cancer. Hadrons have physical properties leading to very accurate dose distribution. In the rare published studies, toxicities are roughly lower than others techniques but for early stages its effectiveness is not better than stereotactic radiotherapy. These techniques are optimized by metabolic imaging which precisely defines the target volume and assesses the therapeutic response; image-guided radiation therapy which allows a more accurate patient set up and by respiratory tracking or gating which takes account of tumour respiratory motions.

  2. Protons and more: state of the art in radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Hoskin, Peter J; Bhattacharya, Indrani S

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of modern radiotherapy is to deliver a precise high dose of radiation which will result in reproductive death of the cells. Radiation should transverse within the tumour volume whilst minimising damage to surrounding normal tissue. Overall 40% of cancers which are cured will have received radiotherapy. Current state of the art treatment will incorporate cross-sectional imaging and multiple high energy X-ray beams in processes called intensity modulated radiotherapy and image guided radiotherapy. Brachytherapy enables very high radiation doses to be delivered by the direct passage of a radiation source through or within the tumour volume and similar results can be achieved using rotational stereotactic X-ray beam techniques. Protons have the characteristics of particle beams which deposit their energy in a finite fixed peak at depth in tissue with no dose beyond this point - the Bragg peak. This has advantages in certain sites such as the spine adjacent to the spinal cord and particularly in children when the overall volume of tissue receiving radiation can be minimised. © 2014 Royal College of Physicians.

  3. X-ray volume imaging in bladder radiotherapy verification

    SciTech Connect

    Henry, Ann M. . E-mail: amhenry@doctors.net.uk; Stratford, Julia; McCarthy, Claire; Davies, Julie; Sykes, Jonathan R.; Amer, Ali; Marchant, Tom; Cowan, Richard; Wylie, James; Logue, John; Livsey, Jacqueline; Khoo, Vincent S.; Moore, Chris; Price, Pat

    2006-03-15

    Purpose: To assess the clinical utility of X-ray volume imaging (XVI) for verification of bladder radiotherapy and to quantify geometric error in bladder radiotherapy delivery. Methods and Materials: Twenty subjects undergoing conformal bladder radiotherapy were recruited. X-ray volume images and electronic portal images (EPIs) were acquired for the first 5 fractions and then once weekly. X-ray volume images were co-registered with the planning computed tomography scan and clinical target volume coverage assessed in three dimensions (3D). Interfraction bladder volume change was described by quantifying changes in bladder volume with time. Bony setup errors were compared from both XVI and EPI. Results: The bladder boundary was clearly visible on coronal XVI views in nearly all images, allowing accurate 3D treatment verification. In 93.5% of imaged fractions, the clinical target volume was within the planning target volume. Most subjects displayed consistent bladder volumes, but 25% displayed changes that could be predicted from the first three XVIs. Bony setup errors were similar whether calculated from XVI or EPI. Conclusions: Coronal XVI can be used to verify 3D bladder radiotherapy delivery. Image-guided interventions to reduce geographic miss and normal tissue toxicity are feasible with this technology.

  4. ACTS on-orbit multibeam antenna pattern measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acosta, R.; Wright, D.; Regier, F.

    1995-01-01

    The Advanced Communication Technology (ACTS) is a key to NASA's goal of developing high-risk, advanced communications technology using multiple frequency bands to support the nation's future communication needs. Using the multiple, dynamic hopping spot beams and advanced on board switching and processing systems, ACTS will open a new era in communications satellite technology. One of the key technologies to be validated as part of the ACTS program is the multibeam antenna (MBA) with rapidly reconfigurable hopping and fixed spot beams to serve users equipped with small-aperture terminals within the coverage areas. The MBA test program is designed to evaluate the on-orbit ACTS antenna performance. The main parameters measured are beam shape, beam center location and gain.

  5. Cross Talk Effects on the NPOI Multibeam Combiner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, H. R.; Armstrong, J. T.; Hindsley, R. B.; Pauls, T. A.

    2005-05-01

    We present results of a series of tests done with the Navy Prototype Optical Interferometer multibeam combiner. These tests take advantage of the NPOI beam combiner design, where certain baselines can be recorded on two different spectrographs. Based on this characteristic we chose a set of stations such that one spectrograph only records the light from two stations, while a second one records these two stations as well as two additional ones. Since the first spectrograph has only one fringe frequency, it is used as a reference for comparison with the second spectrograph, when light from a third and a fourth station are added to it. These observations were used to characterize properties of the NPOI system and to study the effects of fringe frequency cross talk resulting from adding multiple baselines in the same spectrograph.

  6. An attempt at multibeam imaging of laboratory sea ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chayes, D. N.; Schmidt, V. E.

    2015-12-01

    Sea ice was grown in a wave tank at the Hamburgische Schiffbau-Versuchsanstalt GmbH (HSVA) in Hamburg, Germany from December 12-20, 2013 as part of an EU-funded effort to understand the behavior of crude oil under sea ice. As an add-on to that experiment, we borrowed a Teledyne ODOM MB1 multibeam sonar that works in the frequency range from 170 to 220 kHz, mounted it on a moveable trolly, and collected beamformed and time series data with it looking upward at sea ice grown under various conditions.The water depth between the sonar transducer and the bottom of the sea ice was shallower than expected so the sonar was operating in the vicinity of the near field boundary. The experimental setup, data processing methods, and results will be presented in this poster.

  7. The Effect of Adjuvant Postmastectomy Radiotherapy Bolus Technique on Local Recurrence

    SciTech Connect

    Tieu, Minh Thi; Graham, Peter; Browne, Lois; Chin, Yaw Sinn

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: Postmastectomy radiotherapy bolus is heterogenous, with little evidence to guide clinical practise. This study explores the effect of chest wall bolus technique on chest wall recurrence. Methods and Materials: This was a retrospective cohort study of 254 patients treated with adjuvant postmastectomy radiotherapy between 1993 and 2003. Patient and treatment characteristics including bolus details were extracted. Outcomes considered were treatment toxicities, treatment delivery, and local recurrence. Results: In all, 143 patients received radiotherapy with whole chest wall bolus, 88 patients with parascar bolus, and 23 with no bolus. Twenty patients did not complete radiotherapy because of acute skin toxicity: 17 in the whole chest wall bolus group, 2 in the parascar bolus group, and 1 in the group not treated with bolus. On multivariate analysis, whole chest wall bolus and chemotherapy were found to be significant predictors for early cessation of radiotherapy resulting from acute skin toxicity. There were 19 chest wall failures: 13 in the whole chest wall bolus group, 4 in the parascar bolus group, and 2 in the no-bolus group. On multivariate analysis, lymphovascular invasion and failure to complete radiotherapy because of acute skin toxicity were associated with chest wall recurrence. Conclusions: From our results, parascar bolus and no bolus performed no worse than did whole chest wall bolus with regard to chest wall recurrence. However, bolus may have an impact on early cessation of radiotherapy caused by skin toxicity, which then may influence chest wall recurrence.

  8. Using a Multibeam Echosounder to Monitor AN Artificial Reef

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tassetti, A. N.; Malaspina, S.; Fabi, G.

    2015-04-01

    Artificial reefs (ARs) have become popular technological interventions in shallow water environments characterized by soft seabed for a wide number of purposes, from fisheries/environmental protection and enhancement to research and tourism. AR deployment has the potential for causing significant hydrographical and biological changes in the receiving environments and, in turn, ARs are strongly affected by the surrounding area in terms of spatial arrangement and structural integrity as well as colonization by benthic communities and finfish. In this context, ARs require a systematic monitoring program that a multibeam echosounder (MBES) can provide better than other sampling methods such as visual dives and ROV inspections that are not quantitative and often influenced by water visibility and diver experience/skills. In this paper, some subsequent MBES surveys of the Senigallia scientifically-planned AR (Northern Adriatic Sea) are presented and state-of-the art data processing and visualization techniques are used to draw post-reef deployment comparisons and quantify the evolution of the reef in terms of spatial arrangement and bulk volume. These multibeam surveys play a leading part in a general multi-year program, started simultaneously with the AR design and deployment and aimed to map how the reef structure quantitatively changes over time, as well as it affects the sea-bottom morphology and the fishery resource. All the data, surveyed over years making use of different sampling methods such as visual and instrumental echosounding observations and catch rate surveys, gain a mechanistic and predictive understanding of how the Senigallia AR functions ecologically and physically across spatial and temporal scales during its design life

  9. Multibeam monopulse radar for airborne sense and avoid system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorwara, Ashok; Molchanov, Pavlo

    2016-10-01

    The multibeam monopulse radar for Airborne Based Sense and Avoid (ABSAA) system concept is the next step in the development of passive monopulse direction finder proposed by Stephen E. Lipsky in the 80s. In the proposed system the multibeam monopulse radar with an array of directional antennas is positioned on a small aircaraft or Unmanned Aircraft System (UAS). Radar signals are simultaneously transmitted and received by multiple angle shifted directional antennas with overlapping antenna patterns and the entire sky, 360° for both horizontal and vertical coverage. Digitizing of amplitude and phase of signals in separate directional antennas relative to reference signals provides high-accuracy high-resolution range and azimuth measurement and allows to record real time amplitude and phase of reflected from non-cooperative aircraft signals. High resolution range and azimuth measurement provides minimal tracking errors in both position and velocity of non-cooperative aircraft and determined by sampling frequency of the digitizer. High speed sampling with high-accuracy processor clock provides high resolution phase/time domain measurement even for directional antennas with wide Field of View (FOV). Fourier transform (frequency domain processing) of received radar signals provides signatures and dramatically increases probability of detection for non-cooperative aircraft. Steering of transmitting power and integration, correlation period of received reflected signals for separate antennas (directions) allows dramatically decreased ground clutter for low altitude flights. An open architecture, modular construction allows the combination of a radar sensor with Automatic Dependent Surveillance - Broadcast (ADS-B), electro-optic, acoustic sensors.

  10. Uses of megavoltage digital tomosynthesis in radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Vikren

    With the advent of intensity modulated radiotherapy, radiation treatment plans are becoming more conformal to the tumor with the decreasing margins. It is therefore of prime importance that the patient be positioned correctly prior to treatment. Therefore, image guided treatment is necessary for intensity modulated radiotherapy plans to be implemented successfully. Current advanced imaging devices require costly hardware and software upgrade, and radiation imaging solutions, such as cone beam computed tomography, may introduce extra radiation dose to the patient in order to acquire better quality images. Thus, there is a need to extend current existing imaging device ability and functions while reducing cost and radiation dose. Existing electronic portal imaging devices can be used to generate computed tomography-like tomograms through projection images acquired over a small angle using the technique of cone-beam digital tomosynthesis. Since it uses a fraction of the images required for computed tomography reconstruction, use of this technique correspondingly delivers only a fraction of the imaging dose to the patient. Furthermore, cone-beam digital tomosynthesis can be offered as a software-only solution as long as a portal imaging device is available. In this study, the feasibility of performing digital tomosynthesis using individually-acquired megavoltage images from a charge coupled device-based electronic portal imaging device was investigated. Three digital tomosynthesis reconstruction algorithms, the shift-and-add, filtered back-projection, and simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique, were compared considering the final image quality and radiation dose during imaging. A software platform, DART, was created using a combination of the Matlab and C++ languages. The platform allows for the registration of a reference Cone Beam Digital Tomosynthesis (CBDT) image against a daily acquired set to determine how to shift the patient prior to treatment. Finally

  11. Bone Health and Pelvic Radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Higham, C E; Faithfull, S

    2015-11-01

    Survivors who have received pelvic radiotherapy make up many of the long-term cancer population, with therapies for gynaecological, bowel, bladder and prostate malignancies. Individuals who receive radiotherapy to the pelvis as part of their cancer treatment are at risk of insufficiency fractures. Symptoms of insufficiency fractures include pelvic and back pain and immobility, which can affect substantially quality of life. This constellation of symptoms can occur within 2 months of radiotherapy up to 63 months post-treatment, with a median incidence of 6-20 months. As a condition it is under reported and evidence is poor as to the contributing risk factors, causation and best management to improve the patient's bone health and mobility. As radiotherapy advances, chronic symptoms, such as insufficiency fractures, as a consequence of treatment need to be better understood and reviewed. This overview explores the current evidence for the effect of radiotherapy on bone health and insufficiency fractures and identifies what we know and where gaps in our knowledge lie. The overview concludes with the need to take seriously complaints of pelvic pain from patients after pelvic radiotherapy and to investigate and manage these symptoms more effectively. There is a clear need for definitive research in this field to provide the evidence-based guidance much needed in practice.

  12. Personalized estimation of dose to red bone marrow and the associated leukaemia risk attributable to pelvic kilo-voltage cone beam computed tomography scans in image-guided radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yibao; Yan, Yulong; Nath, Ravinder; Bao, Shanglian; Deng, Jun

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the imaging dose to red bone marrow (RBM) and the associated leukaemia risks attributable to pelvic kilo-voltage cone beam computed tomography (kVCBCT) scans in image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT). The RBM doses of 42 patients (age 2.7-86.4 years) were calculated using Monte Carlo simulations. The trabecular spongiosa was segmented to substitute RBM rather than the whole bone. Quantitative correlations between anthropometric variables such as age, physical bone density (PBD) and RBM dose were established. Personalized leukaemia risk was evaluated using an improved Boice model which included the age-associated RBM involvement. An incremental leukaemia risk of 29%-82% (mean = 45%) was found to be associated with 40 pelvic kVCBCT scans in the subject group used in a typical external beam radiation therapy course. Higher risks were observed in children. Due to the enhanced photoelectric effect in high atomic number materials, PBD was observed to strongly affect the RBM dose. Considerable overestimations (9%-42%, mean = 28%) were observed if the whole bone doses were used as surrogates of RBM doses. The personalized estimation of RBM dose and associated leukaemia risk caused by pelvic kVCBCT scans is cli