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Sample records for guided stereotactic high

  1. CT and Ultrasound Guided Stereotactic High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU)

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, Bradford J.; Frenkel, V.; Viswanathan, A.; Dromi, S.; Oh, K.; Kam, A.; Li, K. C. P.; Yanof, J.; Bauer, C.; Kruecker, J.; Seip, R.

    2006-05-08

    To demonstrate the feasibility of CT and B-mode Ultrasound (US) targeted HIFU, a prototype coaxial focused ultrasound transducer was registered and integrated to a CT scanner. CT and diagnostic ultrasound were used for HIFU targeting and monitoring, with the goals of both thermal ablation and non-thermal enhanced drug delivery. A 1 megahertz coaxial ultrasound transducer was custom fabricated and attached to a passive position-sensing arm and an active six degree-of-freedom robotic arm via a CT stereotactic frame. The outer therapeutic transducer with a 10 cm fixed focal zone was coaxially mounted to an inner diagnostic US transducer (2-4 megahertz, Philips Medical Systems). This coaxial US transducer was connected to a modified commercial focused ultrasound generator (Focus Surgery, Indianapolis, IN) with a maximum total acoustic power of 100 watts. This pre-clinical paradigm was tested for ability to heat tissue in phantoms with monitoring and navigation from CT and live US. The feasibility of navigation via image fusion of CT with other modalities such as PET and MRI was demonstrated. Heated water phantoms were tested for correlation between CT numbers and temperature (for ablation monitoring). The prototype transducer and integrated CT/US imaging system enabled simultaneous multimodality imaging and therapy. Pre-clinical phantom models validated the treatment paradigm and demonstrated integrated multimodality guidance and treatment monitoring. Temperature changes during phantom cooling corresponded to CT number changes. Contrast enhanced or non-enhanced CT numbers may potentially be used to monitor thermal ablation with HIFU. Integrated CT, diagnostic US, and therapeutic focused ultrasound bridges a gap between diagnosis and therapy. Preliminary results show that the multimodality system may represent a relatively inexpensive, accessible, and simple method of both targeting and monitoring HIFU effects. Small animal pre-clinical models may be translated to large

  2. Stereotactic CT-Guided Percutaneous Microwave Ablation of Liver Tumors With the Use of High-Frequency Jet Ventilation: An Accuracy and Procedural Safety Study.

    PubMed

    Engstrand, Jennie; Toporek, Grzegorz; Harbut, Piotr; Jonas, Eduard; Nilsson, Henrik; Freedman, Jacob

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to evaluate the accuracy and safety of antenna placement performed with the use of a CT-guided stereotactic navigation system for percutaneous ablation of liver tumors and to assess the safety of high-frequency jet ventilation for target motion control. Twenty consecutive patients with malignant liver lesions for which surgical resection was contraindicated or that were not readily visible on ultrasound or not accessible by ultrasound guidance were included in the study. Patients were treated with percutaneous microwave ablation performed using a CT-guided stereotactic navigation system. High-frequency jet ventilation was used to reduce liver motion during all interventions. The accuracy of antenna placement, the number of needle readjustments required, overall safety, and the radiation doses were assessed. Microwave ablation was completed for 20 patients (28 lesions). Performance data could be evaluated for 17 patients with 25 lesions (mean [± SD] lesion diameter, 14.9 ± 5.9 mm; mean lesion location depth, 87.5 ± 27.3 mm). The antennae were placed with a mean lateral error of 4.0 ± 2.5 mm, a depth error of 3.4 ± 3.2 mm, and a total error of 5.8 ± 3.2 mm in relation to the intended target. The median number of antenna readjustments required was zero (range, 0-1 adjustment). No major complications were related to either the procedure or the use of high-frequency jet ventilation. The mean total patient radiation dose was 957.5 ± 556.5 mGy × cm, but medical personnel were not exposed to irradiation. Percutaneous microwave ablation performed with CT-guided stereotactic navigation provides sufficient accuracy and requires almost no repositioning of the needle. Therefore, it is technically feasible and applicable for safe treatments.

  3. Gamma-Guided Stereotactic Breast Biopsy System

    SciTech Connect

    B. Welch, R. Brem, B. Kross, V. Popov, R. Wojcik, S. Majewski

    2006-10-01

    A gamma-ray imaging system has been developed for acquiring stereo images of the distribution of radiopharmaceuticals in breast tissue. The system consists of a small field-of-view gamma-ray camera mounted to a stereotactic biopsy table. The camera is mounted on a rotational arm such that it can be used to image the breast from two 15deg stereo views. These stereo images can be used to determine the three dimensional spatial location of a region of focal uptake. Once the location of this region is determined, this information can be used as a guide for stereotactic core needle biopsy. The accuracy that the spatial location of a source can be determined was investigated by moving a point source within the field of view. A center-of gravity calculation was used to localize the centroid of the image of the source and this was used to determine the spatial location. Measurements indicate that the source can be localized to within 1 mm. A comparison of the operation of the gamma imaging system and an x-ray imaging system has been done using a dual modality phantom. These measurements indicated that the spatial location of an isolated source can be determined by the gamma imaging system to within approximately the same performance criteria as required for the X-ray system (1 mm). Collimators were tested to determine the spatial resolution in the transverse dimension and the impact of this transverse resolution on the axial resolution was investigated. The performance of this gamma-guided stereotactic biopsy system will be presented.

  4. Role of high-field intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging on a multi-image fusion-guided stereotactic biopsy of the basal ganglia: A case report.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiang; Chen, Zhijuan; Yang, Shuyuan; Zhang, Jianning; Yue, Shuyuan; Wang, Zengguang; Yang, Weidong

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present case study was to investigate the advantages of intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging (iMRI) on the real-time guidance and monitoring of a stereotactic biopsy. The study describes a patient with intracranial lesions, which were examined by conventional MRI and diffusion tensor imaging using a 1.5T intraoperative MRI system. The digital and pre-operative positron emission/computed tomography image data were transferred to a BrainLAB planning workstation, and a variety of images were automatically fused. The BrainLAB software was then used to reconstruct the corticospinal tract (CST) and create a three-dimensional display of the anatomical association between the CST and the brain lesions. A Leksell surgical planning workstation was used to identify the ideal target site and a reasonable needle track for the biopsy. The 1.5T iMRI was used to effectively monitor the intracranial condition during the brain biopsy procedure. Post-operatively, the original symptoms of the patient were not aggravated and no further neurological deficits were apparent. The histopathological diagnosis of non-Hodgkin's B-cell lymphoma was made. Using high-field iMRI, the multi-image fusion-guided stereotactic brain biopsy allows for a higher positive rate of biopsy and a lower incidence of complications. The approach of combining multi-image fusion images with the frame-based stereotactic biopsy may be clinically useful for intracranial lesions of deep functional areas.

  5. MRI-guided vacuum-assisted breast biopsy: comparison with stereotactically guided and ultrasound-guided techniques.

    PubMed

    Imschweiler, Thomas; Haueisen, Harald; Kampmann, Gert; Rageth, Luzi; Seifert, Burkhardt; Rageth, Christoph; Freiwald, Bianka; Kubik-Huch, Rahel A

    2014-01-01

    To analyse the development of MRI-guided vacuum-assisted biopsy (VAB) in Switzerland and to compare the procedure with stereotactically guided and ultrasound-guided VAB. We performed a retrospective analysis of VABs between 2009 and 2011. A total of 9,113 VABs were performed. Of these, 557 were MRI guided. MRI-guided VAB showed the highest growth rate (97 %) of all three procedures. The technical success rates for MRI-guided, stereotactically guided and ultrasound-guided VAB were 98.4 % (548/557), 99.1 % (5,904/5,960) and 99.6 % (2,585/2,596), respectively. There were no significant differences (P = 0.12) between the MRI-guided and the stereotactically guided procedures. The technical success rate for ultrasound-guided VAB was significantly higher than that for MRI-guided VAB (P < 0.001). There were no complications using MRI-guided VAB requiring open surgery. The malignancy diagnosis rate for MRI-guided VAB was similar to that for stereotactically guided VAB (P = 0.35). MRI-guided VAB is a safe and accurate procedure that provides insight into clinical breast findings. • Three vacuum-assisted breast biopsy (VAB) procedures were compared. • Technical success rates were high for all three VAB procedures. • Medical complications were relatively low using all three VAB procedures. • The use of MRI-guided vacuum-assisted breast biopsy is growing.

  6. Implementation of Upright Digital Breast Tomosynthesis-guided Stereotactic Biopsy.

    PubMed

    Omofoye, Toma S; Martaindale, Sarah; Teichgraeber, Davis C; Parikh, Jay R

    2017-06-27

    With growing adoption of digital breast tomosynthesis, an increasing number of imaging abnormalities are being identified only by tomosynthesis. Upright digital breast tomosynthesis-guided stereotactic biopsy is a proven method for sampling these abnormalities as well as abnormalities traditionally evaluated using conventional stereotactic biopsy. In this article, we describe the technique of upright digital breast tomosynthesis-guided stereotactic biopsy and outline a systematic operational approach to implementation of this technique in clinical radiology practices. Copyright © 2017 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Peripheral nervous system injury after high-dose single-fraction image-guided stereotactic radiosurgery for spine tumors.

    PubMed

    Stubblefield, Michael D; Ibanez, Katarzyna; Riedel, Elyn R; Barzilai, Ori; Laufer, Ilya; Lis, Eric; Yamada, Yoshiya; Bilsky, Mark H

    2017-03-01

    OBJECTIVE The object of this study was to determine the percentage of high-dose (1800-2600 cGy) single-fraction stereotactic radiosurgery (SF-SRS) treatments to the spine that result in peripheral nervous system (PNS) injury. METHODS All patients treated with SF-SRS for primary or metastatic spine tumors between January 2004 and May 2013 and referred to the Rehabilitation Medicine Service for evaluation and treatment of neuromuscular, musculoskeletal, or functional impairments or pain were retrospectively identified. RESULTS Five hundred fifty-seven SF-SRS treatments in 447 patients resulted in 14 PNS injuries in 13 patients. All injures resulted from SF-SRS delivered to the cervical or lumbosacral spine at 2400 cGy. The overall percentage of SF-SRS treatments resulting in PNS injury was 2.5%, increasing to 4.5% when the thoracic spine was excluded from analysis. The median time to symptom onset following SF-SRS was 10 months (range 4-32 months). The plexus (cervical, brachial, and/or lumbosacral) was affected clinically and/or electrophysiologically in 12 (86%) of 14 cases, the nerve root in 2 (14%) of 14, and both in 6 (43%) of 14 cases. All patients experienced pain and most (93%) developed weakness. Peripheral nervous system injuries were CTCAE Grade 1 in 14% of cases, 2 in 64%, and 3 in 21%. No dose relationship between SF-SRS dose and PNS injury was detected. CONCLUSIONS Single-fraction SRS to the spine can result in PNS injury with major implications for function and quality of life.

  8. Stereotactic Image-Guided Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy Using the HI-ART II Helical Tomotherapy System

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, Timothy W. Hudes, Richard; Dziuba, Sylwester; Kazi, Abdul; Hall, Mark; Dawson, Dana

    2008-07-01

    The highly integrated adaptive radiation therapy (HI-ART II) helical tomotherapy unit is a new radiotherapy machine designed to achieve highly precise and accurate treatments at all body sites. The precision and accuracy of the HI-ART II is similar to that provided by stereotactic radiosurgery systems, hence the historical distinction between external beam radiotherapy and stereotactic procedures based on differing precision requirements is removed for this device. The objectives of this work are: (1) to describe stereotactic helical tomotherapy processes (SRS, SBRT); (2) to show that the precision and accuracy of the HI-ART meet the requirements defined for SRS and SBRT; and (3) to describe the clinical implementation of a stereotactic image-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy (IG-IMRT) system that incorporates optical motion management.

  9. Computerized Tomography-Guided Stereotactic Biopsy of Intracranial Lesions: Report of 500 Consecutive Cases.

    PubMed

    Can, Songul Meltem; Turkmenoglu, Osman Nuri; Tanik, Canan; Uysal, Ender; Ozoner, Baris; Kaldirimoglu, Saime Ayca; Musluman, Ahmet Murat; Yilmaz, Adem; Cavusoglu, Halit; Bayindir, Cicek; Aydin, Yunus

    2017-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT)-guided stereotactic brain biopsy has been performed in our clinic since March 1998. In this prospective study, we examined the patient data undergoing stereotactic biopsy and the results of biopsies in 500 consecutive patients. Between the dates of March 1998 and January 2015, CT-guided stereotactic biopsies were performed by using the Leksell stereotactic frame system (Elekta Instruments EU, Sweden) in 500 patients. A total of 512 procedures were performed in patients consisting of 184 females (36.8%) and 316 males (63.2%), ages ranging from 3 to 81 years (mean 50.40±16.67). Conclusive histopathological diagnosis was not achieved in 17(3.3%) of 512 procedures. Of the others, 173 (33.8%) were high-grade gliomas, 103 (20.1%) were low-grade gliomas, 36 (7%) were malignant lymphomas, 34 (6.6%) were other types of brain tumors, 82 (16%) were metastasis and 67 (13.1%) were non-tumoral lesions. Complications were occurred in ten cases: 3 tumoral bleedings, 2 hypertensive cerebral hematomas, 2 peroperative convulsions, 1 epidural hematoma, 1 myocardial infarction and 1 brain edema. The patients who developed myocardial infarction and hypertensive thalamic hematoma died. The mortality was 0.4% and morbidity was 1.6% in 512 procedures. CT-guided stereotactic biopsy is a reliable and a safe procedure in cases with intracranial lesions when histopathological diagnosis is required for the appropriate treatment.

  10. An image guided small animal stereotactic radiotherapy system

    PubMed Central

    Sha, Hao; Udayakumar, Thirupandiyur S.; Johnson, Perry B.; Dogan, Nesrin; Pollack, Alan; Yang, Yidong

    2016-01-01

    Small animal radiotherapy studies should be performed preferably on irradiators capable of focal tumor irradiation and healthy tissue sparing. In this study, an image guided small animal arc radiation treatment system (iSMAART) was developed which can achieve highly precise radiation targeting through the utilization of onboard cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) guidance. The iSMAART employs a unique imaging and radiation geometry where animals are positioned upright. It consists of a stationary x-ray tube, a stationary flat panel detector, and a rotatable and translational animal stage. System performance was evaluated in regards to imaging, image guidance, animal positioning, and radiation targeting using phantoms and tumor bearing animals. The onboard CBCT achieved good signal, contrast, and sub-millimeter spatial resolution. The iodine contrast CBCT accurately delineated orthotopic prostate tumors. Animal positioning was evaluated with ∼0.3 mm vertical displacement along superior-inferior direction. The overall targeting precision was within 0.4 mm. Stereotactic radiation beams conformal to tumor targets can be precisely delivered from multiple angles surrounding the animal. The iSMAART allows radiobiology labs to utilize an image guided precision radiation technique that can focally irradiate tumors while sparing healthy tissues at an affordable cost. PMID:26958942

  11. Microrecording and image-guided stereotactic biopsy of deep-seated brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Iijima, Keiya; Hirato, Masafumi; Miyagishima, Takaaki; Horiguchi, Keishi; Sugawara, Kenichi; Hirato, Junko; Yokoo, Hideaki; Yoshimoto, Yuhei

    2015-10-01

    Image-guided stereotactic brain tumor biopsy cannot easily obtain samples of small deep-seated tumor or selectively sample the most viable region of malignant tumor. Image-guided stereotactic biopsy in combination with depth microrecording was evaluated to solve such problems. Operative records, MRI findings, and pathological specimens were evaluated in 12 patients with small deep-seated brain tumor, in which image-guided stereotactic biopsy was performed with the aid of depth microrecording. The tumors were located in the caudate nucleus (1 patient), thalamus (7 patients), midbrain (2 patients), and cortex (2 patients). Surgery was performed with a frameless stereotactic system in 3 patients and with a frame-based stereotactic system in 9 patients. Microrecording was performed to study the electrical activities along the trajectory in the deep brain structures and the tumor. The correlations were studied between the electrophysiological, MRI, and pathological findings. Thirty-two patients with surface or large brain tumor were also studied, in whom image-guided stereotactic biopsy without microrecording was performed. The diagnostic yield in the group with microrecording was 100% (low-grade glioma 4, high-grade glioma 4, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma 3, and germinoma 1), which was comparable to 93.8% in the group without microrecording. The postoperative complication rate was as low as that of the conventional image-guided method without using microelectrode recording, and the mortality rate was 0%, although the target lesions were small and deep-seated in all cases. Depth microrecording revealed disappearance of neural activity in the tumor regardless of the tumor type. Neural activity began to decrease from 6.3 ± 4.5 mm (mean ± SD) above the point of complete disappearance along the trajectory. Burst discharges were observed in 6 of the 12 cases, from 3 ± 1.4 mm above the point of decrease of neural activity. Injury discharges were often found at 0.5-1 mm

  12. CT-guided stereotactic neurosurgery: experience in 24 cases with a new stereotactic system.

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, D G; Anderson, R E; du Boulay, G H

    1984-01-01

    Twenty-four cases have been operated upon using a prototype Brown-Roberts-Wells, CT-guided stereotactic neurosurgical system. This device has proved to be practical and flexible in clinical use. No CT scanner modifications were required, a fact which simplified its use in more than one hospital. Multiple targets can be biopsied with ease and relative safety. Drainage and other therapeutic procedures can be carried out with minimal hazard. Future applications of this system may include its use with NMR and PET images. Images PMID:6363629

  13. High Dose-Per-Fraction Irradiation of Limited Lung Volumes Using an Image-Guided, Highly Focused Irradiator: Simulating Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy Regimens in a Small-Animal Model

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Jaeho; Kodym, Reinhard; Seliounine, Serguei

    2010-07-01

    Purpose: To investigate the underlying biology associated with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT), both in vivo models and image-guided, highly focal irradiation systems are necessary. Here, we describe such an irradiation system and use it to examine normal tissue toxicity in a small-animal model at lung volumes similar to those associated with human therapy. Methods and Materials: High-dose radiation was delivered to a small volume of the left lung of C3H/HeJCr mice using a small-animal stereotactic irradiator. The irradiator has a collimation mechanism to produce focal radiation beams, an imaging subsystem consisting of a fluorescent screen coupled to a charge-coupled device camera, and a manual positioning stage. Histopathologic examination and micro-CT were used to evaluate the radiation response. Results: Focal obliteration of the alveoli by fibrous connective tissue, hyperplasia of the bronchiolar epithelium, and presence of a small number of inflammatory cells are the main reactions to low-volume/high-dose irradiation of the mouse lung. The tissue response suggested a radiation dose threshold for early phase fibrosis lying between 40 and 100 Gy. The irradiation system satisfied our requirements of high-dose-rate, small beam diameter, and precise localization and verification. Conclusions: We have established an experimental model and image-guided animal irradiation system for the study of high dose per fraction irradiations such as those used with SBRT at volumes analogous to those used in human beings. It will also allow the targeting of specific anatomical structures of the thorax or ultimately, orthotopic tumors of the lung.

  14. High dose-per-fraction irradiation of limited lung volumes using an image-guided, highly focused irradiator: simulating stereotactic body radiotherapy regimens in a small-animal model.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jaeho; Kodym, Reinhard; Seliounine, Serguei; Richardson, James A; Solberg, Timothy D; Story, Michael D

    2010-07-01

    To investigate the underlying biology associated with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT), both in vivo models and image-guided, highly focal irradiation systems are necessary. Here, we describe such an irradiation system and use it to examine normal tissue toxicity in a small-animal model at lung volumes similar to those associated with human therapy. High-dose radiation was delivered to a small volume of the left lung of C3H/HeJCr mice using a small-animal stereotactic irradiator. The irradiator has a collimation mechanism to produce focal radiation beams, an imaging subsystem consisting of a fluorescent screen coupled to a charge-coupled device camera, and a manual positioning stage. Histopathologic examination and micro-CT were used to evaluate the radiation response. Focal obliteration of the alveoli by fibrous connective tissue, hyperplasia of the bronchiolar epithelium, and presence of a small number of inflammatory cells are the main reactions to low-volume/high-dose irradiation of the mouse lung. The tissue response suggested a radiation dose threshold for early phase fibrosis lying between 40 and 100 Gy. The irradiation system satisfied our requirements of high-dose-rate, small beam diameter, and precise localization and verification. We have established an experimental model and image-guided animal irradiation system for the study of high dose per fraction irradiations such as those used with SBRT at volumes analogous to those used in human beings. It will also allow the targeting of specific anatomical structures of the thorax or ultimately, orthotopic tumors of the lung. (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Stereotactic biopsy in gliomas guided by 3-tesla 1H-chemical-shift imaging of choline.

    PubMed

    Hermann, Elvis J; Hattingen, Elke; Krauss, Joachim K; Marquardt, Gerhard; Pilatus, Ulrich; Franz, Kea; Setzer, Matthias; Gasser, Thomas; Tews, Dominique S; Zanella, Friedhelm E; Seifert, Volker; Lanfermann, Heinrich

    2008-01-01

    To investigate chemical-shift imaging (CSI) to guide stereotactic biopsy of the choline 'hot spot' in cerebral lesions suggestive of low-grade glioma. Nine patients with hyperintense lesions on T(2)-weighted images of standard magnetic resonance imaging without contrast enhancement underwent advanced magnetic resonance studies. These studies included 3-dimensional T(1)-weighted sequences with contrast enhancement and 2-dimensional (1)H-CSI spectroscopy at 3 T. Signal intensity maps with relative signal intensities for choline were generated. The region with the highest choline signal intensity (the hot spot) was chosen as the target for stereotactic biopsy. The histopathological results were correlated with the increase in choline. All spectroscopic data were of sufficient quality. In 5 instances the neuropathological diagnosis was grade II glioma, according to the WHO classification, and in 4 instances it was grade III glioma. According to the CSI criteria, all grade III gliomas and 4 of the 5 grade II gliomas were classified correctly. One grade II glioma was overestimated by CSI as a high-grade glioma. (1)H-CSI-guided stereotactic biopsy may offer advantages as compared to conventional stereotactic biopsy. The biopsy of the choline hot spot in suggestive low-grade gliomas may help to identify focal points of higher tumor malignancy independent of contrast enhancement. Copyright 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Diagnostic impact of proton MR-spectroscopy versus image-guided stereotactic biopsy.

    PubMed

    Setzer, M; Herminghaus, S; Marquardt, G; Tews, D S; Pilatus, U; Seifert, V; Zanella, F; Lanfermann, H

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the diagnostic accuracy of (1)H MR-spectroscopy versus image-guided stereotactic biopsy. A cohort of 83 consecutive patients with a broad spectrum of brain lesions were examined. Prior to stereotactic biopsy, the patients were subjected to (1)H MR-spectroscopy examination. Diagnostic accuracy of (1)H MR-spectroscopy and image guided stereotactic biopsy was determined for the largest diagnostic subgroups. Each diagnostic procedure was tested for concordance in every subgroup. The subgroups of patients comprised: low grade glioma, high grade glioma (grades III and IV), lymphoma and metastasis. For the sensitivity of (1)H MR-spectroscopy ranged from 87.7 in high grade glioma to 92.3% in metastasis and for specificity from 93.3% for high grade glioma to 100% in low grade glioma. The highest positive predictive value of 100% was reached in the subgroup of low grade glioma. The highest negative predictive value was reached in lymphoma and metastasis, 100%. The kappa values were highly significant for all comparisons (p<0.001). The co-efficient ranged from 0.68 to 0.84. It was lowest in assessing high grade glioma and highest in lymphoma. Compared with each other (1)H MR-spectroscopy and image-guided stereotactic biopsy showed a moderate to good, statistically highly significant concordance. In patients in whom operation is at an increased risk e.g., due to severe medical illness, (1)H MR-spectroscopy as a noninvasive procedure may be sufficient to assess the diagnosis.

  17. MRI-guided stereotactic radiofrequency thermocoagulation for 100 hypothalamic hamartomas.

    PubMed

    Kameyama, Shigeki; Shirozu, Hiroshi; Masuda, Hiroshi; Ito, Yosuke; Sonoda, Masaki; Akazawa, Kohei

    2016-05-01

    OBJECT The aim of this study was to elucidate the invasiveness, effectiveness, and feasibility of MRI-guided stereotactic radiofrequency thermocoagulation (SRT) for hypothalamic hamartoma (HH). METHODS The authors examined the clinical records of 100 consecutive patients (66 male and 34 female) with intractable gelastic seizures (GS) caused by HH, who underwent SRT as a sole surgical treatment between 1997 and 2013. The median duration of follow-up was 3 years (range 1-17 years). Seventy cases involved pediatric patients. Ninety percent of patients also had other types of seizures (non-GS). The maximum diameter of the HHs ranged from 5 to 80 mm (median 15 mm), and 15 of the tumors were giant HHs with a diameter of 30 mm or more. Comorbidities included precocious puberty (33.0%), behavioral disorder (49.0%), and mental retardation (50.0%). RESULTS A total of 140 SRT procedures were performed. There was no adaptive restriction for the giant or the subtype of HH, regardless of any prior history of surgical treatment or comorbidities. Patients in this case series exhibited delayed precocious puberty (9.0%), pituitary dysfunction (2.0%), and weight gain (7.0%), besides the transient hypothalamic symptoms after SRT. Freedom from GS was achieved in 86.0% of patients, freedom from other types of seizures in 78.9%, and freedom from all seizures in 71.0%. Repeat surgeries were not effective for non-GS. Seizure freedom led to disappearance of behavioral disorders and to intellectual improvement. CONCLUSIONS The present SRT procedure is a minimally invasive and highly effective surgical procedure without adaptive limitations. SRT involves only a single surgical procedure appropriate for all forms of epileptogenic HH and should be considered in patients with an early history of GS.

  18. Robotic System for MRI-Guided Stereotactic Neurosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Li, Gang; Cole, Gregory A.; Shang, Weijian; Harrington, Kevin; Camilo, Alex; Pilitsis, Julie G.; Fischer, Gregory S.

    2015-01-01

    Stereotaxy is a neurosurgical technique that can take several hours to reach a specific target, typically utilizing a mechanical frame and guided by preoperative imaging. An error in any one of the numerous steps or deviations of the target anatomy from the preoperative plan such as brain shift (up to 20 mm), may affect the targeting accuracy and thus the treatment effectiveness. Moreover, because the procedure is typically performed through a small burr hole opening in the skull that prevents tissue visualization, the intervention is basically “blind” for the operator with limited means of intraoperative confirmation that may result in reduced accuracy and safety. The presented system is intended to address the clinical needs for enhanced efficiency, accuracy, and safety of image-guided stereotactic neurosurgery for Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) lead placement. The work describes a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided, robotically actuated stereotactic neural intervention system for deep brain stimulation procedure, which offers the potential of reducing procedure duration while improving targeting accuracy and enhancing safety. This is achieved through simultaneous robotic manipulation of the instrument and interactively updated in situ MRI guidance that enables visualization of the anatomy and interventional instrument. During simultaneous actuation and imaging, the system has demonstrated less than 15% signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) variation and less than 0.20% geometric distortion artifact without affecting the imaging usability to visualize and guide the procedure. Optical tracking and MRI phantom experiments streamline the clinical workflow of the prototype system, corroborating targeting accuracy with 3-axis root mean square error 1.38 ± 0.45 mm in tip position and 2.03 ± 0.58° in insertion angle. PMID:25376035

  19. [Computerized atlas for image-guided stereotactic functional neurosurgery].

    PubMed

    Carballo-Barreda, M; RodríGuez-Rojas, R; Torres-Montoya, A; LóPez-Flores, G

    2007-12-01

    A computerized version of the Schaltenbrand and Wahren's stereotactic brain atlas for image-guided functional neurosurgery planning has been developed and integrated into our PC-based planning system. The SW atlas plates were digitized, contoured and labeled for both hemispheres. The computerized atlas may be interactively registered with patient's data using linear and non-linear transformation. The implemented computational tools and applications are presented. Our computer system permits navigation through original or reconstructed slices, multiple-views synchronization and zoom to improve the localization of the commisures and the surgical targets, likewise the optimum path selection. Atlas position in the target's region can be interactively actualized and lesion's position and volume may be simulated. Its benefits of this approach include increased accuracy of target definition, decreased the number of electrode tracts and for instance the time of the surgery, and reduced surgical complications.

  20. False-negative results after stereotactically guided vacuum biopsy.

    PubMed

    Peter, D; Grünhagen, J; Wenke, R; Schäfer, F K W; Schreer, I

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the false negative rate of stereotactically guided vacuum biopsy (VB). Data of patients with benign lesions in VB were evaluated retrospectively during a median follow-up period of 21 months. A total of 404 VB were considered benign and representative and were recommended for follow-up. Of these 404 lesions, 195 were completely removed radiologically. Follow-up data were available for 354/404 patients (87.6%), with intervals ranging from 3 to 66 months (median 21, mean 22.4). Reintervention or surgery was necessary in 13/354 (3.7%) cases. Of these cases, 5/354 (1.4%) turned out to be false negatives. Four of these cases showed large areas of microcalcifications or several clusters, and only partial removal was possible due to the size of the lesions. Although VB is an accurate procedure for diagnosing nonpalpable breast lesions with a low cancer miss rate, we consider the exclusion of malignancy in cases of disseminated microcalcifications or several clusters as a limitation. The radiologic-pathologic correlation in these cases is a challenge, particularly in terms of the residuals. Strict follow-up of benign lesions is essential to avoid delayed cancer diagnosis.

  1. Evaluation of Thiel cadaveric model for MRI-guided stereotactic procedures in neurosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Eljamel, Sam; Volovick, Alexander; Saliev, Timur; Eisma, Roos; Melzer, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Background: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided deep brain stimulation (DBS) and high frequency focused ultrasound (FUS) is an emerging modality to treat several neurological disorders of the brain. Developing reliable models to train and assess future neurosurgeons is paramount to ensure safety and adequate training of neurosurgeons of the future. Methods: We evaluated the use of Thiel cadaveric model to practice MRI-guided DBS implantation and high frequency MRI-guided FUS in the human brain. We performed three training sessions for DBS and five sonications using high frequency MRI-guided FUS in five consecutive cadavers to assess the suitability of this model to use in training for stereotactic functional procedures. Results: We found the brains of these cadavers preserved in an excellent anatomical condition up to 15 months after embalmment and they were excellent model to use, MRI-guided DBS implantation and FUS produced the desired lesions accurately and precisely in these cadaveric brains. Conclusion: Thiel cadavers provided a very good model to perform these procedures and a potential model to train and assess neurosurgeons of the future. PMID:25289170

  2. Reliability of the Bony Anatomy in Image-Guided Stereotactic Radiotherapy of Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Guckenberger, Matthias Baier, Kurt; Guenther, Iris; Richter, Anne; Wilbert, Juergen; Sauer, Otto; Vordermark, Dirk; Flentje, Michael

    2007-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate whether the position of brain metastases remains stable between planning and treatment in cranial stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT). Methods and Materials: Eighteen patients with 20 brain metastases were treated with single-fraction (17 lesions) or hypofractionated (3 lesions) image-guided SRT. Median time interval between planning and treatment was 8 days. Before treatment a cone-beam CT (CBCT) and a conventional CT after application of i.v. contrast were acquired. Setup errors using automatic bone registration (CBCT) and manual soft-tissue registration of the brain metastases (conventional CT) were compared. Results: Tumor size was not significantly different between planning and treatment. The three-dimensional setup error (mean {+-} SD) was 4.0 {+-} 2.1 mm and 3.5 {+-} 2.2 mm according to the bony anatomy and the lesion itself, respectively. A highly significant correlation between automatic bone match and soft-tissue registration was seen in all three directions (r {>=} 0.88). The three-dimensional distance between the isocenter according to bone match and soft-tissue registration was 1.7 {+-} 0.7 mm, maximum 2.8 mm. Treatment of intracranial pressure with steroids did not influence the position of the lesion relative to the bony anatomy. Conclusion: With a time interval of approximately 1 week between planning and treatment, the bony anatomy of the skull proved to be an excellent surrogate for the target position in image-guided SRT.

  3. MRI-guided stereotactic amygdalohippocampectomy: a single center experience

    PubMed Central

    Vojtěch, Zdeněk; Malíková, Hana; Krámská, Lenka; Liščák, Roman; Vladyka, Vilibald

    2015-01-01

    Background This paper presents our experience of stereotactic radiofrequency amygdalohippocampectomy performed for intractable mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. Methods The article describes the cases of 61 patients who were treated during the period from 2004 to 2010. Mean postoperative follow-up was 5.3 years. Neuropsychological results were obtained for a subset of 31 patients. Results At their last postsurgical visit, 43 (70.5%) patients were Engel class I, six (9.8%) class II, nine (14.8%) class III, and three (4.9%) class IV. The surgery was complicated by four intracranial hematomas. One of them caused acute hydrocephalus and was treated by shunting and resolved without sequelae, while another caused transitory aphasia. The remaining hematomas were asymptomatic. There were two cases of meningitis which required antibiotic treatment. One patient committed suicide due to postoperative depression. After the procedure, we performed open epilepsy surgery and rethermolesions in three and two patients, respectively (8.2%). Patients showed increases in their mean full scale, verbal, and performance intelligence quotient (IQ) scores of 4, 3, and 4 IQ points, respectively (P<0.05). Five (17.2%), four (13.8%), and four (13.3%) patients improved their full scale, verbal, and performance IQ scores, respectively. No significant changes were found in memory performance, with a mean increase of 1, 3, and 0 memory quotient points in global, verbal, and visual memory, respectively (P<0.05). Global memory improved in three (10.3%) patients, verbal memory in one (3.4%), and one patient (3.3%) showed deterioration in visual memory. Conclusion Stereotactic radiofrequency amygdalohippocampectomy offers a safe, effective, and less aggressive treatment modality in cases of well-defined mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. Seizure outcome is comparable with the results of conventional epilepsy surgery and cognitive results could be even better. PMID:25709460

  4. A vision guided hybrid robotic prototype system for stereotactic surgery.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jun; Wang, Tianmiao; Liu, Da

    2011-12-01

    Robot-assisted surgery (RAS) systems help surgeons performing accurate operations, but a number of drawbacks render them not yet suitable for clinical theaters and procedures. In this paper, a novel vision guided robotic system is proposed to facilitate navigation procedures. A vision guided hybrid robotic system is designed, consisting of a passive serial arm and an active parallel frame. Navigation is accomplished in three steps: approaching, aiming and insertion. First, the target is safely approached with the passive arm. Second, the trajectory is automatically aligned using the parallel frame. And then the target is reached by manual insertion. A stereo camera is used to position fiducials, the robot and the surgical tool. It also provides working area images for professional surgeons at a remote site. The prototype system accomplished phantom and animal trials with satisfactory accuracy. The robot can easily be adjusted to avoid obstacles and quickly set up on an optimal 'approaching' place. The surgical tool is automatically aligned with the trajectory. The system can withdraw from the working area and restore the aiming posture freely. With the help of the working area images, some important navigation steps can be handled remotely. A novel vision guided robotic system is proposed and validated. It enables surgeons to fit the system to the clinical theater. System safety and feasibility are enhanced by multi-step navigation procedures and remote image monitoring. The system can be operated easily by general clinical staff. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. [The development of a guide device for stereotactic core-needle biopsy of the breast].

    PubMed

    Kong, Longyang; Wu, Jian; Gao, Peng; Wu, Guohui; Li, Xiuwang

    2013-11-01

    To meet the need of accurate positioning for biopsy gun in the breast biopsy operation, a new stereotactic biopsy guide device have been developed to adapt to the domestic mammary machine, which can help physician to carry out biopsy operation more accurately and effectively. The guide device has the motion model, measurement model and display model and can realize linear motion and display real-time displacement values in X, Y and Z direction. The experimental results showed that the guide device could be well fixed in the domestic mammary machine, and achieved good accuracy and repeatability in each direction. Depending on the displacement values, physician can change the space of biopsy gun accurately.

  6. Image-guided stereotactic spine radiosurgery on a conventional linear accelerator.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jia-Zhu; Rice, Roger; Mundt, Arno; Sandhu, Ajay; Murphy, Kevin

    2010-01-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery for spinal metastasis consists of a high radiation dose delivered to the tumor in 1 to 5 fractions. Due to the high radiation dose in a single or fewer treatments, the precision of tumor localization and dose delivery is of great concern. Many groups have published their experiences of spinal radiosurgery with the use of CyberKnife System (Accuray Inc.). In this study, we report in detail our approach to stereotactic spine radiosurgery (SSRS) using a conventional linear accelerator (Varian Trilogy), utilizing the features of kilovolt on-board imaging (kV-OBI) and cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) for image guidance. We present our experience in various aspects of the SSRS procedure, including patient simulation and immobilization, intensity-modulated radiation treatment (IMRT) planning and beam selection, portal dosimetry for patient planning quality assurance (QA), and the use of image guidance in tumor localization prior to and during treatment delivery.

  7. Image-Guided Stereotactic Spine Radiosurgery on a Conventional Linear Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Jiazhu Rice, Roger; Mundt, Arno; Sandhu, Ajay; Murphy, Kevin

    2010-04-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery for spinal metastasis consists of a high radiation dose delivered to the tumor in 1 to 5 fractions. Due to the high radiation dose in a single or fewer treatments, the precision of tumor localization and dose delivery is of great concern. Many groups have published their experiences of spinal radiosurgery with the use of CyberKnife System (Accuray Inc.). In this study, we report in detail our approach to stereotactic spine radiosurgery (SSRS) using a conventional linear accelerator (Varian Trilogy), utilizing the features of kilovolt on-board imaging (kV-OBI) and cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) for image guidance. We present our experience in various aspects of the SSRS procedure, including patient simulation and immobilization, intensity-modulated radiation treatment (IMRT) planning and beam selection, portal dosimetry for patient planning quality assurance (QA), and the use of image guidance in tumor localization prior to and during treatment delivery.

  8. Accuracy of Novel Computed Tomography-Guided Frameless Stereotactic Drilling and Catheter System in Human Cadavers.

    PubMed

    Sankey, Eric W; Butler, Eric; Sampson, John H

    2017-10-01

    To evaluate accuracy of a computed tomography (CT)-guided frameless stereotactic drilling and catheter system. A prospective, single-arm study was performed using human cadaver heads to evaluate placement accuracy of a novel, flexible intracranial catheter and stabilizing bone anchor system and drill kit. There were 20 catheter placements included in the analysis. The primary endpoint was accuracy of catheter tip location on intraoperative CT. Secondary endpoints included target registration error and entry and target point error before and after drilling. Measurements are reported as mean ± SD (median, range). Target registration error was 0.46 mm ± 0.26 (0.50 mm, -1.00 to 1.00 mm). Two (10%) target point trajectories were negatively impacted by drilling. Intracranial catheter depth was 59.8 mm ± 9.4 (60.5 mm, 38.0-80.0 mm). Drilling angle was 22° ± 9 (21°, 7°-45°). Deviation between planned and actual entry point on CT was 1.04 mm ± 0.38 (1.00 mm, 0.40-2.00 mm). Deviation between planned and actual target point on CT was 1.60 mm ± 0.98 (1.40 mm, 0.40-4.00 mm). No correlation was observed between intracranial catheter depth and target point deviation (accuracy) (Pearson coefficient 0.018) or between technician experience and accuracy (Pearson coefficient 0.020). There was no significant difference in accuracy with trajectories performed for different cadaver heads (P = 0.362). Highly accurate catheter placement is achievable using this novel flexible catheter and bone anchor system placed via frameless stereotaxy, with an average deviation between planned and actual target point of 1.60 mm ± 0.98 (1.40 mm, 0.40-4.00 mm). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Non-stereotactic method involving combination of ultrasound-guided wire localization and vacuum-assisted breast biopsy for microcalcification

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jeeyeon; Park, Ho Yong; Jung, Jin Hyang; Kim, Wan Wook; Hwang, Seung Ook; Kwon, Taek Ju; Chung, Jin Ho

    2016-01-01

    Background Stereotactic breast biopsy is a standard intervention for evaluation of “microcalcification-only” lesions. However, an expensive stereotactic device and radiologic expertise are necessary for this procedure. We herein report a non-stereotactic technique involving the combination of wire localization and vacuum-assisted breast biopsy (VABB) under ultrasound (US) guidance. Methods Twenty-two consecutive patients with category 3 or 4a microcalcification only as shown by mammography underwent the above-mentioned non-stereotactic combination method involving US-guided wire localization and VABB. The location of the microcalcification was measured by manual stereotaxis, and the microcalcification was confirmed by specimen mammography after the procedure. Results The mean number ± standard deviation of removed cores and calcified cores was 28.4±13.4 and 2.2±0.9, respectively. In one case, the procedure was repeated 3 times. The histologic diagnoses were fibrocystic change (n=14), fibroadenoma (n=4), sclerosing adenosis (n=1), usual ductal hyperplasia (n=2), and atypical ductal hyperplasia (n=1). Conclusions “Microcalcification-only” breast lesions can be easily evaluated with the combination of non-stereotactic US-guided wire localization and VABB. This would be an effective diagnostic technique for breast lesion which reveals only microcalcification. PMID:27294037

  10. Frameless Image-Guided Intracranial Stereotactic Radiosurgery: Clinical Outcomes for Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Breneman, John C. Steinmetz, Ryan; Smith, Aaron; Lamba, Michael; Warnick, Ronald E.

    2009-07-01

    Purpose: After preclinical investigations confirming the accuracy of target localization by frameless image-guided radiosurgery, we report the clinical outcomes of patients with brain metastases who underwent frameless radiosurgery. Methods and Materials: Between 2005 and 2006, 53 patients underwent frameless stereotactic radiosurgery using a linear accelerator equipped with on-board image guidance for the treatment of 158 brain metastases. The radiation doses were delivered in a single fraction (dose range, 12-22 Gy; median, 18). Patients were followed with magnetic resonance imaging scans at 2-3-month intervals. Progression-free survival was the primary study endpoint. Results: With a median follow-up of 38 weeks (range, 14-112), the overall survival rate was 70% at 6 months, 44% at 1 year, 29% at 18 months, and 16% at 24 months. Local control was achieved in 90% of 168 treated lesions at 6 months, 80% at 12 months, 78% at 18 months, and 78% at 24 months. Local control tended to be improved in lesions treated with {>=}18 Gy and for lesions <0.2 cm{sup 3}. Adverse events occurred in 5 patients (9.6%). No evidence of imaging changes on post-stereotactic radiosurgery scans was found to suggest mistargeting of a radiation isocenter. Conclusion: The clinical outcomes after frameless stereotactic radiosurgery were comparable to those after frame-based radiosurgery techniques. Given its significant advantages in terms of patient comfort, ability to use fractionated treatment regimens, and convenience in scheduling of personnel and equipment resources, frameless radiosurgery will likely become a common technique for intracranial radiosurgery.

  11. [Evaluation of computerized tomography-guided stereotactic evacuation of putaminal hematomas by somatosensory evoked potentials].

    PubMed

    Takizawa, T; Sato, S; Sano, A; Murakami, Y; Matsumoto, A; Ohta, K

    1986-04-01

    Computerized tomography (CT) guided stereotactic evacuation of intracerebral hematomas is effective and little invasive treatment at subacute or chronic stage. Somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs) of 23 patients with putaminal hemorrhage whose stereotactic evacuations were performed from day 4 to day 24 are studied about surgical result and CT findings. As for SEP, N20 which is thought to be generated in the thalamus or in the primary parietal area receiving direct projections from the thalamus is used for comparison with functional recovery. Among 12 patients whose N20s before the evacuation showed normal, 9 had good recovery of their hemiplegia. Motor recovery tended to begin quickly after the evacuation and the evacuation of hematomas were thought to make better result than conservative treatment. CT findings of 9 patients with good recovery revealed that the hematomas didn't invade to the internal capsule or invaded to the posterior part of the posterior limb alone. Among 3 patients whose N20s before the evacuation were not distinct and those after the evacuation were normal, 2 had good recovery of their hemiplegia. As those hematomas were relatively large but located laterally, the internal capsule was seem to be not invaded but only compressed. Among 8 patients whose N20s were not distinct both before and after the evacuation, 7 could not get the recovery of their hemiplegia. CT findings of them revealed that the hematomas were large or invaded toward the internal capsule and thalamus. From this study N20s of SEPs are thought to be useful to the decision of indication and the prediction of the functional prognosis about stereotactic evacuation of putaminal hemorrhage.

  12. Real-Time Magnetic Resonance-Guided Stereotactic Laser Amygdalohippocampotomy for Mesial Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Willie, Jon T.; Laxpati, Nealen G.; Drane, Daniel L.; Gowda, Ashok; Appin, Christina; Hao, Chunhai; Brat, Daniel J.; Helmers, Sandra L.; Saindane, Amit; Nour, Sherif G.; Gross, Robert E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Open surgery effectively treats mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE), but carries risks of neurocognitive deficits, which may be reduced with minimally invasive alternatives. Objective To describe technical and clinical outcomes of stereotactic laser amygdalohippocampotomy (SLAH) with real-time magnetic resonance thermal imaging (MRTI) guidance. Methods Under general anesthesia and utilizing standard stereotactic methods, 13 adult patients with intractable MTLE (with and without mesial temporal sclerosis, MTS) prospectively underwent insertion of a saline-cooled fiber-optic laser applicator into amygdalohippocampal structures from an occipital trajectory. Computer-controlled laser ablation was performed during continuous MRTI followed by confirmatory contrast-enhanced anatomic imaging and volumetric reconstruction. Clinical outcomes were determined from seizure diaries. Results A mean 60% volume of the amygdalohippocampal complex was ablated in 13 patients (9 with MTS) undergoing 15 procedures. Median hospitalization was one day. With follow-up ranging from 5-26 (median 14) months, 77% (10/13) of patients achieved meaningful seizure reduction, of which 54% (7/13) were free of disabling seizures. Of patients with preoperative MTS, 67% (6/9) achieved seizure freedom. All recurrences were observed by<6 months. Variances in ablation volume and length did not account for individual clinical outcomes. Whereas no complications of laser therapy itself were observed, one significant complication, a visual field defect, resulted from deviated insertion of a stereotactic aligning rod, which was corrected prior to ablation. Conclusion Real-time MR-guided SLAH is a technically novel, safe, and effective alternative to open surgery. Further evaluation with larger cohorts over time is warranted. PMID:24618797

  13. [Stereotactic radiation therapy].

    PubMed

    Aristu, J J; Ciérvide, R; Guridi, J; Moreno, M; Arbea, L; Azcona, J D; Ramos, L I; Zubieta, J L

    2009-01-01

    Stereotactic radiotherapy is a form of external radiotherapy that employs a system of three dimensional coordinates independent of the patient for the precise localisation of the lesion. It also has the characteristic that the radiation beams are conformed and precise, and converge on the lesion, making it possible to administer very high doses of radiotherapy without increasing the radiation to healthy adjacent organs or structures. When the procedure is carried out in one treatment session it is termed radiosurgery, and when administered over several sessions it is termed stereotactic radiotherapy. Special systems of fixing or immobilising the patient (guides or stereotactic frames) are required together with radiotherapy devices capable of generating conformed beams (lineal accelerator, gammaknife, cyberknife, tomotherapy, cyclotrons). Modern stereotactic radiotherapy employs intra-tumoural radio-opaque frames or CAT image systems included in the irradiation device, which make possible a precise localisation of mobile lesions in each treatment session. Besides, technological advances make it possible to coordinate the lesion's movements in breathing with the radiotherapy unit (gating and tracking) for maximum tightening of margins and excluding a greater volume of healthy tissue. Radiosurgery is mainly indicated in benign or malign cerebral lesions less than 3-4 centimetres (arteriovenous malformations, neurinomas, meningiomas, cerebral metastases) and stereotactic radiotherapy is basically administered in tumours of extracraneal localisation that require high conforming and precision, such as inoperable early lung cancer and hepatic metastasis.

  14. Effect of image-guided hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy on peripheral non-small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shu-wen; Ren, Juan; Yan, Yan-li; Xue, Chao-fan; Tan, Li; Ma, Xiao-wei

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the effects of image-guided hypofractionated radiotherapy and conventional fractionated radiotherapy on non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Fifty stage- and age-matched cases with NSCLC were randomly divided into two groups (A and B). There were 23 cases in group A and 27 cases in group B. Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) and stereotactic radiotherapy were conjugately applied to the patients in group A. Group A patients underwent hypofractionated radiotherapy (6–8 Gy/time) three times per week, with a total dose of 64–66 Gy; group B received conventional fractionated radiotherapy, with a total dose of 68–70 Gy five times per week. In group A, 1-year and 2-year local failure survival rate and 1-year local failure-free survival rate were significantly higher than in group B (P<0.05). The local failure rate (P<0.05) and distant metastasis rate (P>0.05) were lower in group A than in group B. The overall survival rate of group A was significantly higher than that of group B (P=0.03), and the survival rate at 1 year was 87% vs 63%, (P<0.05). The median survival time of group A was longer than that of group B. There was no significant difference in the incidence of complications between the two groups (P>0.05). Compared with conventional fractionated radiation therapy, image-guided hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy in NSCLC received better treatment efficacy and showed good tolerability. PMID:27574441

  15. A novel stereotactic frame for real PET-guided biopsies: A preclinical proof-of-concept.

    PubMed

    Cortes-Rodicio, J; Sanchez-Merino, G; Garcia-Fidalgo, M A; Tobalina-Larrea, I

    2017-09-01

    To design, build and test a stereotactic device that allows PET image-guided biopsies to be performed. An initial prototype consisting of four main pieces, one of which contains radioactive markers to make it visible in the PET images, was built using a 3D printer. Once the device is mounted, a spherical coordinate system is built with the entrance needle point in the skin as the origin of coordinates. Two in-house software programs, namely getCoord.ijm, which obtains the spherical coordinates of the tumour tissue to be biopsied, and getNeedle.ijm, which virtualizes the inner needle tip once the puncture has taken place, were written. This prototype was tested on an FDG-doped phantom to characterize both the accuracy of the system and the procedure time. Up to 11 complete biopsy procedures were conducted. The mean total procedure time was less than 20min, which is less than the procedure time of conventional standard CT-guided biopsies. The overall accuracy of the system was found to be 5.0±1.3mm, which outperforms the criterion used in routine clinical practice when targeting tumours with a diameter of 10mm. A stereotactic frame to conduct real PET image-guided biopsies has been designed and built. A proof-of-concept was performed to characterize the system. The procedure time and accuracy of the system were found to meet the current needs of physicians performing biopsies. Copyright © 2017 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Clinical results of a pilot study on stereovision-guided stereotactic radiotherapy and intensity modulated radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Shidong; Kleinberg, Lawrence R; Rigamonti, Daniele; Wharam, Moody D; Rashid, Abdul; Jackson, Juan; Djajaputra, David; He, Shenjen; Creasey, Tunisia; DeWeese, Theodore L

    2010-12-01

    Real-time stereovision-guidance has been introduced for efficient and convenient fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSR) and image-guided intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). This first pilot study is to clinically evaluate its accuracy and precision as well as impact on treatment doses. Sixty-one FSR patients wearing stereotactic masks (SMs) and nine IMRT patients wearing flexible masks (FMs), were accrued. Daily target reposition was initially based-on biplane-radiographs and then adjusted in six degrees of freedom under real-time stereovision guidance. Mean and standard deviation of the head displacements measured the accuracy and precision. Head positions during beam-on times were measured with real-time stereovisions and used for determination of delivered doses. Accuracy ± ± precision in direction with the largest errors shows improvement from 0.4 ± 2.3 mm to 0.0 ± 1.0 mm in the inferior-to-superior direction for patients wearing SM or from 0.8 ± 4.3 mm to 0.4 ± 1.7 mm in the posterior-to-anterior direction for patients wearing FM. The image-guidance increases target volume coverage by >30% for small lesions. Over half of head position errors could be removed from the stereovision-guidance. Importantly, the technique allows us to check head position during beam-on time and makes it possible for having frameless head refixation without tight masks.

  17. Clinical Results of a Pilot Study on Stereovision-Guided Stereotactic Radiotherapy and Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shidong; Kleinberg, Lawrence R.; Rigamonti, Daniele; Wharam, Moody D.; Rashid, Abdul; Jackson, Juan; Djajaputra, David; He, Shenjen; Creasey, Tunisia; DeWeese, Theodore L.

    2011-01-01

    Real-time stereovision-guidance has been introduced for efficient and convenient fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSR) and image-guided intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). This first pilot study is to clinically evaluate its accuracy and precision as well as impact on treatment doses. Sixty-one FSR patients wearing stereotactic masks (SMs) and nine IMRT patients wearing flexible masks (FMs), were accrued. Daily target reposition was initially based-on biplane-radiographs and then adjusted in six degrees of freedom under real-time stereovision guidance. Mean and standard deviation of the head displacements measured the accuracy and precision. Head positions during beam-on times were measured with real-time stereovisions and used for determination of delivered doses. Accuracy ± precision in direction with the largest errors shows improvement from 0.4 ± 2.3 mm to 0.0 ± 1.0 mm in the inferior-to-superior direction for patients wearing SM or from 0.8 ± 4.3 mm to 0.4 ± 1.7 mm in the posterior-to-anterior direction for patients wearing FM. The image-guidance increases target volume coverage by >30% for small lesions. Over half of head position errors could be removed from the stereovision-guidance. Importantly, the technique allows us to check head position during beam-on time and makes it possible for having frameless head refixation without tight masks. PMID:21070083

  18. CT-guided stereotactic biopsies using a modified frame and Gildenberg techniques.

    PubMed Central

    Bullard, D E; Nashold, B S; Osborne, D; Burger, P C; Dubois, P

    1984-01-01

    Eighteen patients underwent CT guided stereotactic biopsies using either a Riechert-Mundinger stereotactic frame modified for use in the CT scanner or the CT-based intracranial landmark technique of Gildenberg and a Todd-Wells frame. In seven patients undergoing biopsy with the modified frame technique, representative tissue samples were obtained in all cases. Eleven patients had biopsies using the Gildenberg technique and representative tissue samples were obtained in 10 of the 11. No major postoperative complications occurred in either group. Both techniques allowed samples of intracranial tissue to be obtained safely and efficiently. The modified frame technique provided a higher degree of accuracy while the Gildenberg technique required significantly less CT time and provided a satisfactory degree of accuracy. In seven patients with ring enhancing lesions, biopsies of the enhancing rim provided diagnostic tissue while biopsy of the central low density center of the lesion in three patients provided necrotic material which was useful in histologically grading the tumour. Images PMID:6330310

  19. MRI-Guided stereotactic laser ablation for epilepsy surgery: Promising preliminary results for cognitive outcome.

    PubMed

    Drane, Daniel L

    2017-09-23

    Cognitive outcome data are reviewed with respect to the use of magnetic-resonance guided stereotactic laser ablation (SLA) as an epilepsy surgical procedure, with comparisons drawn to traditional open resection procedures. Cognitive outcome with stereotactic laser amygdalohippocampotomy (SLAH) appears better than open resection for several functions dependent on extra-mesial temporal lobe (TL) structures, including category-related naming, verbal fluency, and object/familiar person recognition. Preliminary data suggests episodic, declarative verbal memory can decline following SLAH in the language dominant hemisphere, although early findings suggest comparable or even superior outcomes compared with open resection. The hippocampus has long been considered a central structure supporting episodic, declarative memory, with epilepsy surgical teams attempting to spare it whenever possible. However, ample data from animal and human neuroscience research suggests declarative memory deficits are greater following broader mesial TL lesions that include parahippocampal gyrus and lateral TL inputs. Therefore, employing a neurosurgical technique that restricts the surgical lesion zone holds promise for achieving a better cognitive outcome. Focal SLA lesions outside of the amygdalohippocampal complex may impair select cognitive functions, although few data have been published in such patients to date. SLA is being effectively employed with adults and children with TL or lesional epilepsies across several U.S. epilepsy centers, which may simultaneously optimize cognitive outcome while providing a curative treatment for seizures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Versatility of the Novalis system to deliver image-guided stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for various anatomical sites.

    PubMed

    Teh, Bin S; Paulino, Arnold C; Lu, Hsin H; Chiu, J Kam; Richardson, Susan; Chiang, Stephen; Amato, Robert; Butler, E Brian; Bloch, Charles

    2007-08-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) programs to treat brain tumors were implemented when we first acquired the Brainlab Novalis system in 2003. Two years later, we started an extra-cranial stereotactic radio-ablation or more appropriately a stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) program using the Brainlab Novalis image-guided system at The Methodist Hospital in Houston, Texas. We hereby summarize our initial experience with this system in delivering image-guided SBRT to a total of 80 patients during our first year of clinical implementation, from February 2005 to January 2006. Over 100 lesions in more than 20 distinct anatomical sites were treated. These include all levels of spine from cervical, thoracic, lumbar, and sacral lesions. Spinal lesions encompass intramedullary, intradural, extradural, or osseous compartments. Also treated were lesions in other bony sites including orbit, clavicle, scapula, humerus, sternum, rib, femur, and pelvis (ilium, ischium, and pubis). Primary or metastatic lesions located in the head and neck, supraclavicular region, axilla, mediastinum, lung (both central and peripheral), abdominal wall, liver, kidney, para-aortic lymph nodes, prostate, and pelvis were also treated. In addition to primary radiotherapy, SBRT program using the Brainlab Novalis system allows re-irradiation for recurrence and "boost" after conventional treatment to various anatomical sites. Treating these sites safely and efficaciously requires knowledge in radiation tolerance, fraction size, total dose, biologically equivalent dose (BED), prior radiotherapy, detailed dose volume histograms (DVH) of normal tissues, and the radiosensitive/radioresistant nature of the tumor. Placement of radio-opaque markers (Visicoil, Radiomed) in anatomical sites not in close proximity to bony landmarks (e.g., kidney and liver) helps in measuring motion and providing image guidance during each treatment fraction. Tumor/organ motion

  1. Stereotactic mammography imaging combined with 3D US imaging for image guided breast biopsy

    SciTech Connect

    Surry, K. J. M.; Mills, G. R.; Bevan, K.; Downey, D. B.; Fenster, A.

    2007-11-15

    Stereotactic X-ray mammography (SM) and ultrasound (US) guidance are both commonly used for breast biopsy. While SM provides three-dimensional (3D) targeting information and US provides real-time guidance, both have limitations. SM is a long and uncomfortable procedure and the US guided procedure is inherently two dimensional (2D), requiring a skilled physician for both safety and accuracy. The authors developed a 3D US-guided biopsy system to be integrated with, and to supplement SM imaging. Their goal is to be able to biopsy a larger percentage of suspicious masses using US, by clarifying ambiguous structures with SM imaging. Features from SM and US guided biopsy were combined, including breast stabilization, a confined needle trajectory, and dual modality imaging. The 3D US guided biopsy system uses a 7.5 MHz breast probe and is mounted on an upright SM machine for preprocedural imaging. Intraprocedural targeting and guidance was achieved with real-time 2D and near real-time 3D US imaging. Postbiopsy 3D US imaging allowed for confirmation that the needle was penetrating the target. The authors evaluated 3D US-guided biopsy accuracy of their system using test phantoms. To use mammographic imaging information, they registered the SM and 3D US coordinate systems. The 3D positions of targets identified in the SM images were determined with a target localization error (TLE) of 0.49 mm. The z component (x-ray tube to image) of the TLE dominated with a TLE{sub z} of 0.47 mm. The SM system was then registered to 3D US, with a fiducial registration error (FRE) and target registration error (TRE) of 0.82 and 0.92 mm, respectively. Analysis of the FRE and TRE components showed that these errors were dominated by inaccuracies in the z component with a FRE{sub z} of 0.76 mm and a TRE{sub z} of 0.85 mm. A stereotactic mammography and 3D US guided breast biopsy system should include breast compression for stability and safety and dual modality imaging for target localization

  2. Spatial Distortion in MRI-Guided Stereotactic Procedures: Evaluation in 1.5-, 3- and 7-Tesla MRI Scanners.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Jan-Oliver; Giese, Henrik; Biller, Armin; Nagel, Armin M; Kiening, Karl

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is replacing computed tomography (CT) as the main imaging modality for stereotactic transformations. MRI is prone to spatial distortion artifacts, which can lead to inaccuracy in stereotactic procedures. Modern MRI systems provide distortion correction algorithms that may ameliorate this problem. This study investigates the different options of distortion correction using standard 1.5-, 3- and 7-tesla MRI scanners. A phantom was mounted on a stereotactic frame. One CT scan and three MRI scans were performed. At all three field strengths, two 3-dimensional sequences, volumetric interpolated breath-hold examination (VIBE) and magnetization-prepared rapid acquisition with gradient echo, were acquired, and automatic distortion correction was performed. Global stereotactic transformation of all 13 datasets was performed and two stereotactic planning workflows (MRI only vs. CT/MR image fusion) were subsequently analysed. Distortion correction on the 1.5- and 3-tesla scanners caused a considerable reduction in positional error. The effect was more pronounced when using the VIBE sequences. By using co-registration (CT/MR image fusion), even a lower positional error could be obtained. In ultra-high-field (7 T) MR imaging, distortion correction introduced even higher errors. However, the accuracy of non-corrected 7-tesla sequences was comparable to CT/MR image fusion 3-tesla imaging. MRI distortion correction algorithms can reduce positional errors by up to 60%. For stereotactic applications of utmost precision, we recommend a co-registration to an additional CT dataset. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. VarioGuide: a new frameless image-guided stereotactic system--accuracy study and clinical assessment.

    PubMed

    Ringel, Florian; Ingerl, Dominik; Ott, Stephanie; Meyer, Bernhard

    2009-05-01

    VarioGuide (BrainLAB AG, Feldkirchen, Germany) is a new system for frameless image-guided stereotaxy. In the present study, we aimed to assess target point accuracy in a laboratory setting and the clinical feasibility of the system. Using the phantom of our frame-based stereotactic system (Riechert-Mundinger; Inomed Medizintechnik GmbH, Teningen, Germany), target points were approached from different angles with the frameless system. Target point deviation in the x, y, and z planes was assessed. Furthermore, patients harboring intracranial lesions were diagnostically biopsied using VarioGuide. Phantom-based accuracy measurements yielded a mean target point deviation of 0.7 mm. Between February 2007 and April 2008, 27 patients were diagnostically biopsied. Lesion volumes ranged from 0.2 to 117.6 cm3, trajectory length ranged from 25.3 to 64.1 mm, and the diagnostic yield was 93%. Concluding from the phantom measurements with ideal image-object registration, assumed spherical lesions with a volume of 0.524 cm can be biopsied with 100% target localization. Early clinical data revealed VarioGuide to be safe and accurate for lesions of 0.2 cm3 and larger. Thereby, the system seems feasible for the biopsy of most intracranial lesions.

  4. MRI-guided stereotactic neurosurgical procedures in a diagnostic MRI suite: Background and safe practice recommendations.

    PubMed

    Larson, Paul S; Willie, Jon T; Vadivelu, Sudhakar; Azmi-Ghadimi, Hooman; Nichols, Amy; Fauerbach, Loretta Litz; Johnson, Helen Boehm; Graham, Denise

    2017-07-01

    The development of navigation technology facilitating MRI-guided stereotactic neurosurgery has enabled neurosurgeons to perform a variety of procedures ranging from deep brain stimulation to laser ablation entirely within an intraoperative or diagnostic MRI suite while having real-time visualization of brain anatomy. Prior to this technology, some of these procedures required multisite workflow patterns that presented significant risk to the patient during transport. For those facilities with access to this technology, safe practice guidelines exist only for procedures performed within an intraoperative MRI. There are currently no safe practice guidelines or parameters available for facilities looking to integrate this technology into practice in conventional MRI suites. Performing neurosurgical procedures in a diagnostic MRI suite does require precautionary measures. The relative novelty of technology and workflows for direct MRI-guided procedures requires consideration of safe practice recommendations, including those pertaining to infection control and magnet safety issues. This article proposes a framework of safe practice recommendations designed for assessing readiness and optimization of MRI-guided neurosurgical interventions in the diagnostic MRI suite in an effort to mitigate patient risk. The framework is based on existing clinical evidence, recommendations, and guidelines related to infection control and prevention, health care-associated infections, and magnet safety, as well as the clinical and practical experience of neurosurgeons utilizing this technology. © 2017 American Society for Healthcare Risk Management of the American Hospital Association.

  5. Dosimetric Comparison of Real-Time MRI-Guided Tri-Cobalt-60 Versus Linear Accelerator-Based Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Lung Cancer Plans.

    PubMed

    Wojcieszynski, Andrzej P; Hill, Patrick M; Rosenberg, Stephen A; Hullett, Craig R; Labby, Zacariah E; Paliwal, Bhudatt; Geurts, Mark W; Bayliss, R Adam; Bayouth, John E; Harari, Paul M; Bassetti, Michael F; Baschnagel, Andrew M

    2017-06-01

    .25 ( P = .98). Magnetic resonance imaging-guided tri-cobalt-60 radiation therapy is capable of delivering lung high-quality stereotactic body radiation therapy plans that are clinically acceptable as compared to volumetric-modulated arc therapy-based plans. Real-time magnetic resonance imaging provides the unique capacity to directly observe tumor motion during treatment for purposes of motion management.

  6. Radionuclide-guided stereotactic prebiopsy localization of nonpalpable breast lesions with normal mammograms.

    PubMed

    Khalkhali, I; Mishkin, F S; Diggles, L E; Klein, S R

    1997-07-01

    Scintimammography with 99mTc-sestamibi can be used as a complementary technique to improve the mammogram's sensitivity and specificity for detection of breast carcinoma. We have observed in some patients focal areas of increased 99mTc-sestamibi uptake with no corresponding abnormalities on physical examination or mammogram. A phantom device and a special needle were designed to stereotactically localize these lesions before biopsy. After intravenous injection of 30 mCI (1110 MBq) of 99m Tc-sestamibi, a prone lateral image of the abnormal breast was obtained. With the patient in the prone position, the breast was compressed with two fenestrated plates in the prone position. The x and y coordinates of the abnormal hot spot of the breast were determined. The z coordinate of focal 99mTc-sestamibi uptake was determined by advancing a localizer needle through a selected predetermined hole of the fenestrated plate using real-time visualization on the persistence monitor. The tip of the opturator inside the needle is welded with 57Co to determine the depth of the hot spot in the breast. Three women, all of whom had normal mammogram and breast physical examinations, were studied using 99mTc-sestamibi prone breast imaging. Pre-excisional biopsy needle localization of abnormal focal uptake was performed. Two women demonstrated infiltrative ductal carcinoma, and the third had proliferative fibrocystic disease of the breast. Our initial experience demonstrates that nuclear medicine guided stereotactic needle biopsy of the breast in patients with positive scintimammograms is technically feasible. In the future, this technology will enable us to detect breast carcinoma in the absence of clear-cut clinical and mammographic findings.

  7. Real-time magnetic resonance imaging-guided frameless stereotactic brain biopsy: technical note.

    PubMed

    Mohyeldin, Ahmed; Lonser, Russell R; Elder, J Bradley

    2016-04-01

    The object of this study was to assess the feasibility, accuracy, and safety of real-time MRI-compatible frameless stereotactic brain biopsy. Clinical, imaging, and histological data in consecutive patients who underwent stereotactic brain biopsy using a frameless real-time MRI system were analyzed. Five consecutive patients (4 males, 1 female) were included in this study. The mean age at biopsy was 45.8 years (range 29-60 years). Real-time MRI permitted concurrent display of the biopsy cannula trajectory and tip during placement at the target. The mean target depth of biopsied lesions was 71.3 mm (range 60.4-80.4 mm). Targeting accuracy analysis revealed a mean radial error of 1.3 ± 1.1 mm (mean ± standard deviation), mean depth error of 0.7 ± 0.3 mm, and a mean absolute tip error of 1.5 ± 1.1 mm. There was no correlation between target depth and absolute tip error (Pearson product-moment correlation coefficient, r = 0.22). All biopsy cannulae were placed at the target with a single penetration and resulted in a diagnostic specimen in all cases. Histopathological evaluation of biopsy samples revealed dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumor (1 case), breast carcinoma (1 case), and glioblastoma multiforme (3 cases). The ability to place a biopsy cannula under real-time imaging guidance permits on-the-fly alterations in the cannula trajectory and/or tip placement. Real-time imaging during MRI-guided brain biopsy provides precise safe targeting of brain lesions.

  8. Can galactography-guided stereotactic, 11-gauge, vacuum-assisted breast biopsy of intraductal lesions serve as an alternative to surgical biopsy?

    PubMed

    Reiner, Caecilia S; Helbich, Thomas H; Rudas, Margaretha; Ponhold, Lothar; Riedl, Christopher C; Kropf, Nina; Fuchsjäger, Michael H

    2009-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the value of galactography-guided, stereotactic, vacuum-assisted breast biopsy (VABB) for the assessment of intraductal breast lesions and its potential as a therapeutic tool that could eliminate the need for surgical excision. Eighteen patients (median age 64 years, range 37-80) with nipple discharge and galactography-verified intraductal lesions underwent galactography-guided, stereotactic, 11-gauge VABB followed by surgery. Histopathology findings from VABB and subsequent surgery were compared. Underestimation and false-negative rates were assessed. After VABB, histopathology revealed invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) in three (17%), ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) in six (33%), high-risk lesions in six (33%) and benign lesions in three (17%) cases. After surgical biopsy, histopathology confirmed the previously established diagnosis in 11 lesions (61%). The underestimation rate for high-risk lesions and DCIS was 50% (6/12). The false-negative rate was 7% (1/14). Histopathology examination after surgery showed that not a single lesion had been completely removed at VABB. Galactography-guided VABB is a feasible diagnostic tool. However, its value as a therapeutic procedure is limited because of the high number of underestimated and missed lesions and because of the histopathological detection of lesions' remnants in every case. Surgical excision should be the therapeutic gold standard in cases of pathological nipple discharge and galactography abnormalities.

  9. Computer-assisted CT-guided stereotactic biopsy and brachytherapy of brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Quiñones-Molina, R; Alaminos, A; Molina, H; Muñoz, J; López, G; Alvarez, L; Ortega, I; Piedra, J; Soler, W; Torres, A

    1994-01-01

    From March 1991 to September 1993, 26 patients (aged 4-78 years) with brain tumors (4 glioblastoma multiforme, 10 nonglioblastoma multiforme, 1 mixed oligoastrocytoma, 2 carniopharyngiomas, 2 meningiomas and 7 metastases) were treated with stereotactic techniques at the Centro Internacional de Restauración Neurológica, La Habana, Cuba. A total of 28 stereotactic surgical procedures were performed with no operative mortality; they included biopsies in all cases, 1 stereotactic microsurgical resection and 12 permanent implants of 192Ir, followed by external beam fractionated radiation therapy (40-60 Gy). The present paper shows that the combined use of a stereotactic approach, a comprehensive and reliable stereotactic dosimetric planning system, stereotactic brachytherapy with 192Ir and complementary percutaneous radiation treatment constitutes a promising strategy for brain tumor management.

  10. Potentials and Limitations of Guiding Liver Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Set-Up on Liver-Implanted Fiducial Markers

    SciTech Connect

    Wunderink, Wouter; Mendez Romero, Alejandra; Seppenwoolde, Yvette; Boer, Hans de; Levendag, Peter; Heijmen, Ben

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: We investigated the potentials and limitations of guiding liver stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) set-up on liver-implanted fiducial markers. Methods and Materials: Twelve patients undergoing compression-supported SBRT in a stereotactic body frame received fluoroscopy at treatment preparation and before each treatment fraction. In fluoroscopic videos we localized the markers and diaphragm tip at expiration and the spine (measurements on free-breathing and abdominal compression). Day-to-day displacements, rotations (markers only), and deformations were determined. Marker guidance was compared to conventional set-up strategies in treatment set-up simulations. Results: For compression, day-to-day motion of markers with respect to their centers of mass (COM) was {sigma} = 0.9 mm (random error SD), {Sigma} = 0.4 mm (systematic error SD), and <2.1 mm (maximum). Consequently, assuming that markers were closely surrounding spherical tumors, marker COM-guided set-up would have required safety margins of {approx}2 mm. Using marker COM as the gold standard, other set-up methods (using no correction, spine registration, and diaphragm tip craniocaudal registration) resulted in set-up errors of 1.4 mm < {sigma} < 2.8 mm, 2.6 mm < {Sigma} < 5.1 mm, and 6.3 mm < max < 12.4 mm. Day-to-day intermarker motion of <16.7%, 2.2% median, and rotations between 3.5{sup o} and 7.2{sup o} were observed. For markers not surrounding the tumor, e.g., 5 cm between respective COMs, these changes could effect residual tumor set-up errors up to 8.4 mm, 1.1 mm median (deformations), and 3.1 mm to 6.3 mm (rotations). Compression did not systematically contribute to deformations and rotations, since similar results were observed for free-breathing. Conclusions: If markers can be implanted near and around the tumor, residual set-up errors by marker guidance are small compared to those of conventional set-up methods, allowing high-precision tumor radiation set-up. However, substantial

  11. Deep inspiration breath-hold technique guided by an opto- electronic system for extracranial stereotactic treatments.

    PubMed

    Garibaldi, Cristina; Catalano, Gianpiero; Baroni, Guido; Tagaste, Barbara; Riboldi, Marco; Spadea, Maria Francesca; Ciocca, Mario; Cambria, Raffaella; Serafini, Flavia; Orecchia, Roberto

    2013-07-08

    The purpose of this work was to evaluate the intrapatient tumor position reproducibility in a deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) technique based on two infrared optical tracking systems, ExacTrac and ELITETM, in stereotactic treatment of lung and liver lesions. After a feasibility study, the technique was applied to 15 patients. Each patient, provided with a real-time visual feedback of external optical marker displacements, underwent a full DIBH, a free-breathing (FB), and three consecutive DIBH CT-scans centered on the lesion to evaluate the tumor position reproducibility. The mean reproducibility of tumor position during repeated DIBH was 0.5 ± 0.3 mm in laterolateral (LL), 1.0 ± 0.9 mm in anteroposterior (AP), and 1.4 ± 0.9 mm in craniocaudal (CC) direction for lung lesions, and 1.0 ± 0.6 mm in LL, 1.1 ± 0.5 mm in AP, and 1.2 ± 0.4 mm in CC direction for liver lesions. Intra- and interbreath-hold reproducibility during treatment, as determined by optical markers displacements, was below 1 mm and 3 mm, respectively, in all directions for all patients. Optically-guided DIBH technique provides a simple noninvasive method to minimize breathing motion for collaborative patients. For each patient, it is important to ensure that the tumor position is reproducible with respect to the external markers configuration.

  12. Real-time 3D-surface-guided head refixation useful for fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Li Shidong; Liu Dezhi; Yin Gongjie; Zhuang Ping; Geng, Jason

    2006-02-15

    Accurate and precise head refixation in fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy has been achieved through alignment of real-time 3D-surface images with a reference surface image. The reference surface image is either a 3D optical surface image taken at simulation with the desired treatment position, or a CT/MRI-surface rendering in the treatment plan with corrections for patient motion during CT/MRI scans and partial volume effects. The real-time 3D surface images are rapidly captured by using a 3D video camera mounted on the ceiling of the treatment vault. Any facial expression such as mouth opening that affects surface shape and location can be avoided using a new facial monitoring technique. The image artifacts on the real-time surface can generally be removed by setting a threshold of jumps at the neighboring points while preserving detailed features of the surface of interest. Such a real-time surface image, registered in the treatment machine coordinate system, provides a reliable representation of the patient head position during the treatment. A fast automatic alignment between the real-time surface and the reference surface using a modified iterative-closest-point method leads to an efficient and robust surface-guided target refixation. Experimental and clinical results demonstrate the excellent efficacy of <2 min set-up time, the desired accuracy and precision of <1 mm in isocenter shifts, and <1 deg. in rotation.

  13. CT-Guided Fiducial Placement for CyberKnife Stereotactic Radiosurgery: An Initial Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Sotiropoulou, Evangelia; Stathochristopoulou, Irene; Stathopoulos, Konstantinos; Verigos, Kosmas; Salvaras, Nikolaos; Thanos, Loukas

    2010-06-15

    CyberKnife frameless image-guided radiosurgery has become a widely used system for parenchymal extracranial lesions. Gold fiducials are required for the planning and aiming of CyberKnife therapy. We report our initial experience and describe the technique of positioning tumor markers, under CT guidance. We conducted a retrospective review of 105 patients who were referred for CyberKnife stereotactic radiosurgery at Iatropolis CyberKnife Center in Athens. All patients underwent percutaneous fiducial placement via CT guidance. At the desired location, the 18-G needle was advanced into or near the tumor. Data collected included number and locations of fiducials placed and complications experienced to date. One hundred five patients underwent fiducial placement under CT guidance and a total number of 319 gold seeds were implanted. We experienced one episode of pneumothorax that required drainage, one mild pneumothorax, and three episodes of perifocal pulmonary hemorrhage. In conclusion, fiducial implantation under CT guidance appears to be a safe and efficient procedure, as long as it is performed by an experienced interventional radiologist.

  14. Comparison of intensity-modulated tomotherapy with stereotactically guided conformal radiotherapy for brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Khoo, V S; Oldham, M; Adams, E J; Bedford, J L; Webb, S; Brada, M

    1999-09-01

    Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) offers the potential to more closely conform dose distributions to the target, and spare organs at risk (OAR). Its clinical value is still being defined. The present study aims to compare IMRT with stereotactically guided conformal radiotherapy (SCRT) for patients with medium size convex-shaped brain tumors. Five patients planned with SCRT were replanned with the IMRT-tomotherapy method using the Peacock system (Nomos Corporation). The planning target volume (PTV) and relevant OAR were assessed, and compared relative to SCRT plans using dose statistics, dose-volume histograms (DVH), and the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) stereotactic radiosurgery criteria. The median and mean PTV were 78 cm3 and 85 cm3 respectively (range 62-119 cm3). The differences in PTV doses for the whole group (Peacock-SCRT +/-1 SD) were 2%+/-1.8 (minimum PTV), and 0.1%+/-1.9 (maximum PTV). The PTV homogeneity achieved by Peacock was 12.1%+/-1.7 compared to 13.9%+/-1.3 with SCRT. Using RTOG guidelines, Peacock plans provided acceptable PTV coverage for all 5/5 plans compared to minor coverage deviations in 4/5 SCRT plans; acceptable homogeneity index for both plans (Peacock = 1.1 vs. SCRT = 1.2); and comparable conformity index (1.4 each). As a consequence of the transaxial method of arc delivery, the optic nerves received mean and maximum doses that were 11.1 to 11.6%, and 10.3 to 15.2% higher respectively with Peacock plan. The maximum optic lens, and brainstem dose were 3.1 to 4.8% higher, and 0.6% lower respectively with Peacock plan. However, all doses remained below the tolerance threshold (5 Gy for lens, and 50 Gy for optic nerves) and were clinically acceptable. The Peacock method provided improved PTV coverage, albeit small, in this group of convex tumors. Although the OAR doses were higher using the Peacock plans, all doses remained within the clinically defined threshold and were clinically acceptable. Further improvements may be

  15. Evaluation of patient setup uncertainty of optical guided frameless system for intracranial stereotactic radiosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jia-Zhu; Rice, Roger; Pawlicki, Todd; Mundt, Arno J.; Sandhu, Ajay; Lawson, Joshua; Murphy, Kevin T.

    2015-01-01

    The optically-guided frameless system (OFLS) has been used in our clinic for intracranial stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) since 2006, as it is especially effective in IMRT-based radiosurgery (IMRS), which allows treating multiple brain lesions simultaneously using single isocenter approach. This study reports our retrospective analysis of patient setup accuracy using this system. The OFLS consists of a bite block with fiducial markers and an infra-red camera system. To test reproducibility, patients are taken for reseat verification after bite block construction. Upon the completion of radiosurgery planning, the isocenter position(s) and images are sent to the optical guidance computer where fiducials are manually registered from the CT scan. During treatment, patient setup is monitored and guided by the camera readings on the fiducials. In addition, two orthogonal kV images are acquired and used as an isocenter verification tool. In addition, we have analyzed the reseat and fiducial digitization data of 56 patients. Retrospective comparison of kV images with reference images has been carried out for all the patients to evaluate actual patient setup accuracy at the time of treatment. The histogram of the findings shows that 82.2% of patients had 3D isodisplacement (E ≤ 1 mm; 5.2% had 1< E ≤ 2 mm). Hence, for 87.5 % of the patients in the study, treatments were finished under the optical guidance with a maximum setup error of 2 mm and the median setup error of 0 mm. For the remaining 12.5% of patients in the study, the isodisplacements were greater than 2 mm and the treatment records showed that those patients were repositioned, guided by the orthogonal kV-images. It is found that the OFLS in the SRS treatment has acceptable accuracy when used in conjunction with orthogonal kV images, and the use of orthogonal kV images as a verification tool ensures the efficacy of frameless localization in the radiosurgery treatment. PMID:20592701

  16. Cone-beam Computed Tomography-guided Stereotactic Liver Punctures: A Phantom Study

    SciTech Connect

    Toporek, Grzegorz Wallach, Daphne Weber, Stefan; Bale, Reto; Widmann, Gerlig

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: Images from computed tomography (CT), combined with navigation systems, improve the outcomes of local thermal therapies that are dependent on accurate probe placement. Although the usage of CT is desired, its availability for time-consuming radiological interventions is limited. Alternatively, three-dimensional images from C-arm cone-beam CT (CBCT) can be used. The goal of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of navigated CBCT-guided needle punctures, controlled with CT scans. Methods: Five series of five navigated punctures were performed on a nonrigid phantom using a liver specific navigation system and CBCT volumetric dataset for planning and navigation. To mimic targets, five titanium screws were fixed to the phantom. Target positioning accuracy (TPE{sub CBCT}) was computed from control CT scans and divided into lateral and longitudinal components. Additionally, CBCT-CT guidance accuracy was deducted by performing CBCT-to-CT image coregistration and measuring TPE{sub CBCT-CT} from fused datasets. Image coregistration was evaluated using fiducial registration error (FRE{sub CBCT-CT}) and target registration error (TRE{sub CBCT-CT}). Results: Positioning accuracies in lateral directions pertaining to CBCT (TPE{sub CBCT} = 2.1 {+-} 1.0 mm) were found to be better to those achieved from previous study using CT (TPE{sub CT} = 2.3 {+-} 1.3 mm). Image coregistration error was 0.3 {+-} 0.1 mm, resulting in an average TRE of 2.1 {+-} 0.7 mm (N = 5 targets) and average Euclidean TPE{sub CBCT-CT} of 3.1 {+-} 1.3 mm. Conclusions: Stereotactic needle punctures might be planned and performed on volumetric CBCT images and controlled with multidetector CT with positioning accuracy higher or similar to those performed using CT scanners.

  17. Computer assisted CT-guided stereotactic transplantation of foetal ventral mesencephalon to the caudate nucleus and putamen in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Molina, H; Quiñones, R; Ortega, I; Alvarez, L; Muñoz, J; Gonzalez, C; Suárez, C

    1993-01-01

    We report our preliminary results related to CT-guided stereotactic transplantation of foetal ventral mesencephalic cell suspension into the striatum of five patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease. The mean age was 51 years, the evolution time of the disease ranged from 7 to 14 years, and all of them had motor complications associated with chronic L-dopa therapy. The patients were evaluated according to the Core Assessment Program for Intracerebral Transplantations (CAPIT) for one year before and three months after surgery. The postoperative clinical assessment demonstrated significant improvement of neurological symptoms and reduction of daily L-dopa dosage.

  18. Magnetic Resonance-Guided Laser-Induced Thermal Therapy for Recurrent Brain Metastases in the Motor Strip After Stereotactic Radiosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Halpern, Casey H; Grant, Gerald A; Deb, Sayantan; Li, Gordon H

    2016-01-01

    The authors report a challenging case of a brain metastasis located in the motor cortex, which was not responsive to radiosurgery. Use of a novel technique, magnetic resonance-guided laser-induced thermotherapy (MRgLITT), resulted in the complete obliteration of the lesion without adverse effects or evidence of tumor recurrence at follow-up. This case illustrates that MRgLITT may provide a viable alternative for patients with brain metastases refractory to radiosurgery or in deep locations, where both stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and surgical resection may be ineffective.   PMID:28083463

  19. Cone Beam CT Image Guidance for Intracranial Stereotactic Treatments: Comparison With a Frame Guided Set-Up

    SciTech Connect

    Masi, Laura Casamassima, Franco; Polli, Caterina; Menichelli, Claudia; Bonucci, Ivano; Cavedon, Carlo

    2008-07-01

    Purpose: An analysis is performed of the setup errors measured by a kV cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) for intracranial stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) patients immobilized by a thermoplastic mask and a bite-block and positioned using stereotactic coordinates. We evaluated the overall positioning precision and accuracy of the immobilizing and localizing systems. The potential of image-guided radiotherapy to replace stereotactic methods is discussed. Methods and Materials: Fifty-seven patients received brain SRT. After a frame-guided setup, before each fraction (131 fractions), a CBCT was acquired and the detected displacements corrected online. Translational and rotational errors were analyzed calculating overall mean and standard deviation. A separate analysis was performed for bite-block (in conjunction with mask) and for simple thermoplastic mask. Interobserver variability for CBCT three-dimensional registration was assessed. The residual error after correction and intrafractional motion were calculated. Results: The mean module of the three-dimensional displacement vector was 3.0 {+-} 1.4 mm. Setup errors for bite block and mask were smaller (2.9 {+-} 1.3 mm) than those for thermoplastic mask alone (3.2 {+-} 1.5 mm), but statistical significance was not reached (p = 0.15). Interobserver variability was negligible. The maximum margin calculated for residual errors and intra fraction motion was small but not negligible (1.57 mm). Conclusions: Considering the detected setup errors, daily image guidance is essential for the efficacy of SRT treatments when mask immobilization is used, and even when a bite-block is used in conjunction. The frame setup is still used as a starting point for the opportunity of rotational corrections. Residual margins after on-line corrections must be evaluated.

  20. Cone beam CT image guidance for intracranial stereotactic treatments: comparison with a frame guided set-up.

    PubMed

    Masi, Laura; Casamassima, Franco; Polli, Caterina; Menichelli, Claudia; Bonucci, Ivano; Cavedon, Carlo

    2008-07-01

    An analysis is performed of the setup errors measured by a kV cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) for intracranial stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) patients immobilized by a thermoplastic mask and a bite-block and positioned using stereotactic coordinates. We evaluated the overall positioning precision and accuracy of the immobilizing and localizing systems. The potential of image-guided radiotherapy to replace stereotactic methods is discussed. Fifty-seven patients received brain SRT. After a frame-guided setup, before each fraction (131 fractions), a CBCT was acquired and the detected displacements corrected online. Translational and rotational errors were analyzed calculating overall mean and standard deviation. A separate analysis was performed for bite-block (in conjunction with mask) and for simple thermoplastic mask. Interobserver variability for CBCT three-dimensional registration was assessed. The residual error after correction and intrafractional motion were calculated. The mean module of the three-dimensional displacement vector was 3.0 +/- 1.4 mm. Setup errors for bite block and mask were smaller (2.9 +/- 1.3 mm) than those for thermoplastic mask alone (3.2 +/- 1.5 mm), but statistical significance was not reached (p = 0.15). Interobserver variability was negligible. The maximum margin calculated for residual errors and intra fraction motion was small but not negligible (1.57 mm). Considering the detected setup errors, daily image guidance is essential for the efficacy of SRT treatments when mask immobilization is used, and even when a bite-block is used in conjunction. The frame setup is still used as a starting point for the opportunity of rotational corrections. Residual margins after on-line corrections must be evaluated.

  1. Technical Note: Evaluation of the systematic accuracy of a frameless, multiple image modality guided, linear accelerator based stereotactic radiosurgery system

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, N. Snyder, K. C.; Qin, Y.; Li, H.; Siddiqui, M. S.; Chetty, I. J.; Scheib, S. G.; Schmelzer, P.

    2016-05-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the total systematic accuracy of a frameless, image guided stereotactic radiosurgery system. Methods: The localization accuracy and intermodality difference was determined by delivering radiation to an end-to-end prototype phantom, in which the targets were localized using optical surface monitoring system (OSMS), electromagnetic beacon-based tracking (Calypso®), cone-beam CT, “snap-shot” planar x-ray imaging, and a robotic couch. Six IMRT plans with jaw tracking and a flattening filter free beam were used to study the dosimetric accuracy for intracranial and spinal stereotactic radiosurgery treatment. Results: End-to-end localization accuracy of the system evaluated with the end-to-end phantom was 0.5 ± 0.2 mm with a maximum deviation of 0.9 mm over 90 measurements (including jaw, MLC, and cone measurements for both auto and manual fusion) for single isocenter, single target treatment, 0.6 ± 0.4 mm for multitarget treatment with shared isocenter. Residual setup errors were within 0.1 mm for OSMS, and 0.3 mm for Calypso. Dosimetric evaluation based on absolute film dosimetry showed greater than 90% pass rate for all cases using a gamma criteria of 3%/1 mm. Conclusions: The authors’ experience demonstrates that the localization accuracy of the frameless image-guided system is comparable to robotic or invasive frame based radiosurgery systems.

  2. Image-Guided Robotic Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Liver Metastases: Is There a Dose Response Relationship?

    SciTech Connect

    Vautravers-Dewas, Claire; Dewas, Sylvain; Bonodeau, Francois; Adenis, Antoine; Lacornerie, Thomas; Penel, Nicolas; Lartigau, Eric; Mirabel, Xavier

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcome, tolerance, and toxicity of stereotactic body radiotherapy, using image-guided robotic radiation delivery, for the treatment of patients with unresectable liver metastases. Methods and Material: Patients were treated with real-time respiratory tracking between July 2007 and April 2009. Their records were retrospectively reviewed. Metastases from colorectal carcinoma and other primaries were not necessarily confined to liver. Toxicity was evaluated using National Cancer Institute Common Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. Results: Forty-two patients with 62 metastases were treated with two dose levels of 40 Gy in four Dose per Fraction (23) and 45 Gy in three Dose per Fraction (13). Median follow-up was 14.3 months (range, 3-23 months). Actuarial local control for 1 and 2 years was 90% and 86%, respectively. At last follow-up, 41 (66%) complete responses and eight (13%) partial responses were observed. Five lesions were stable. Nine lesions (13%) were locally progressed. Overall survival was 94% at 1 year and 48% at 2 years. The most common toxicity was Grade 1 or 2 nausea. One patient experienced Grade 3 epidermitis. The dose level did not significantly contribute to the outcome, toxicity, or survival. Conclusion: Image-guided robotic stereotactic body radiation therapy is feasible, safe, and effective, with encouraging local control. It provides a strong alternative for patients who cannot undergo surgery.

  3. Technical Note: Evaluation of the systematic accuracy of a frameless, multiple image modality guided, linear accelerator based stereotactic radiosurgery system.

    PubMed

    Wen, N; Snyder, K C; Scheib, S G; Schmelzer, P; Qin, Y; Li, H; Siddiqui, M S; Chetty, I J

    2016-05-01

    To evaluate the total systematic accuracy of a frameless, image guided stereotactic radiosurgery system. The localization accuracy and intermodality difference was determined by delivering radiation to an end-to-end prototype phantom, in which the targets were localized using optical surface monitoring system (OSMS), electromagnetic beacon-based tracking (Calypso®), cone-beam CT, "snap-shot" planar x-ray imaging, and a robotic couch. Six IMRT plans with jaw tracking and a flattening filter free beam were used to study the dosimetric accuracy for intracranial and spinal stereotactic radiosurgery treatment. End-to-end localization accuracy of the system evaluated with the end-to-end phantom was 0.5 ± 0.2 mm with a maximum deviation of 0.9 mm over 90 measurements (including jaw, MLC, and cone measurements for both auto and manual fusion) for single isocenter, single target treatment, 0.6 ± 0.4 mm for multitarget treatment with shared isocenter. Residual setup errors were within 0.1 mm for OSMS, and 0.3 mm for Calypso. Dosimetric evaluation based on absolute film dosimetry showed greater than 90% pass rate for all cases using a gamma criteria of 3%/1 mm. The authors' experience demonstrates that the localization accuracy of the frameless image-guided system is comparable to robotic or invasive frame based radiosurgery systems.

  4. Image-guided stereotactic radiotherapy in 4 dogs with intracranial neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Moon, Alaina Burkard; Heller, Heidi Barnes; Forrest, Lisa

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the use, and side effects, of a novel stereotactic radiotherapy protocol using TomoTherapy(®) in 4 dogs with confirmed or suspected primary extra-axial intracranial neoplasia. Three fractions of 8 Gy were prescribed. Acute side effects were noted in 1 dog; no late effects were noted.

  5. Percutaneous laser discectomy guided with stereotactic computer-assisted surgical navigation.

    PubMed

    von Jako, Ronald A; Cselik, Zsolt

    2009-01-01

    Percutaneous laser discectomy at various wavelengths has been used for minimally invasive surgery of herniated intervertebral discs. Using a high-intensity diode laser at 980-nm wavelength, we aimed to improve the safe insertion of the laser trocar with the aid of a stereotactic computer-assisted surgical navigation system. The experiments were performed on ex vivo porcine spines with intact soft tissue. Before laser irradiation, each specimen was imaged by computed tomography (CT) with fiduciary markers. The Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM standard) data sets were retrieved into the GE Healthcare Surgery InstaTRAK3500 Plus computer-assisted surgical navigation platform via the hospital Ethernet using a picture archiving and communication system. A special trocar with quartz waveguide connected to the navigation system was inserted into a total of 12 lumbar discs of two fresh intact porcine specimens. Various laser energies (200-700 J) with different exposure times were delivered. Pre- and post-irradiation magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and postoperative macroscopic and histologic studies were carried out. A navigation system accuracy of better than 2 mm was achieved. Tracking of the instrument from pre-acquired formatted CT reconstructed images reduced overall radiation exposure by limiting the need for continuous intraoperative C-arm fluoroscopy. The use of surgical navigation by CT images enhanced the precision insertion of the laser trocar. Irradiation with the 980-nm wavelength diode laser resulted in tissue evaporation changes of the intervertebral disc material as demonstrated by comparing pre- and post-irradiation changes of MR images and macro- and microscopic changes of the dissected disc material. This preclinical study demonstrates the clinical utility of a 980-nm diode laser delivered through a fiber-optic waveguide trocar in which precise insertion was enabled by the use of surgical navigation. This in turn decreases the

  6. Image-guided localization accuracy of stereoscopic planar and volumetric imaging methods for stereotactic radiation surgery and stereotactic body radiation therapy: a phantom study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jinkoo; Jin, Jian-Yue; Walls, Nicole; Nurushev, Teamour; Movsas, Benjamin; Chetty, Indrin J; Ryu, Samuel

    2011-04-01

    To evaluate the positioning accuracies of two image-guided localization systems, ExacTrac and On-Board Imager (OBI), in a stereotactic treatment unit. An anthropomorphic pelvis phantom with eight internal metal markers (BBs) was used. The center of one BB was set as plan isocenter. The phantom was set up on a treatment table with various initial setup errors. Then, the errors were corrected using each of the investigated systems. The residual errors were measured with respect to the radiation isocenter using orthogonal portal images with field size 3 × 3 cm(2). The angular localization discrepancies of the two systems and the correction accuracy of the robotic couch were also studied. A pair of pre- and post-cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images was acquired for each angular correction. Then, the correction errors were estimated by using the internal BBs through fiducial marker-based registrations. The isocenter localization errors (μ ±σ) in the left/right, posterior/anterior, and superior/inferior directions were, respectively, -0.2 ± 0.2 mm, -0.8 ± 0.2 mm, and -0.8 ± 0.4 mm for ExacTrac, and 0.5 ± 0.7 mm, 0.6 ± 0.5 mm, and 0.0 ± 0.5 mm for OBI CBCT. The registration angular discrepancy was 0.1 ± 0.2° between the two systems, and the maximum angle correction error of the robotic couch was 0.2° about all axes. Both the ExacTrac and the OBI CBCT systems showed approximately 1 mm isocenter localization accuracies. The angular discrepancy of two systems was minimal, and the robotic couch angle correction was accurate. These positioning uncertainties should be taken as a lower bound because the results were based on a rigid dosimetry phantom. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Image-Guided Localization Accuracy of Stereoscopic Planar and Volumetric Imaging Methods for Stereotactic Radiation Surgery and Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy: A Phantom Study

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jinkoo; Jin, Jian-Yue; Walls, Nicole; Nurushev, Teamour; Movsas, Benjamin; Chetty, Indrin J.; Ryu, Samuel

    2011-04-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the positioning accuracies of two image-guided localization systems, ExacTrac and On-Board Imager (OBI), in a stereotactic treatment unit. Methods and Materials: An anthropomorphic pelvis phantom with eight internal metal markers (BBs) was used. The center of one BB was set as plan isocenter. The phantom was set up on a treatment table with various initial setup errors. Then, the errors were corrected using each of the investigated systems. The residual errors were measured with respect to the radiation isocenter using orthogonal portal images with field size 3 x 3 cm{sup 2}. The angular localization discrepancies of the two systems and the correction accuracy of the robotic couch were also studied. A pair of pre- and post-cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images was acquired for each angular correction. Then, the correction errors were estimated by using the internal BBs through fiducial marker-based registrations. Results: The isocenter localization errors ({mu} {+-}{sigma}) in the left/right, posterior/anterior, and superior/inferior directions were, respectively, -0.2 {+-} 0.2 mm, -0.8 {+-} 0.2 mm, and -0.8 {+-} 0.4 mm for ExacTrac, and 0.5 {+-} 0.7 mm, 0.6 {+-} 0.5 mm, and 0.0 {+-} 0.5 mm for OBI CBCT. The registration angular discrepancy was 0.1 {+-} 0.2{sup o} between the two systems, and the maximum angle correction error of the robotic couch was 0.2{sup o} about all axes. Conclusion: Both the ExacTrac and the OBI CBCT systems showed approximately 1 mm isocenter localization accuracies. The angular discrepancy of two systems was minimal, and the robotic couch angle correction was accurate. These positioning uncertainties should be taken as a lower bound because the results were based on a rigid dosimetry phantom.

  8. Comparison of Effects Between Central and Peripheral Stage I Lung Cancer Using Image-Guided Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy via Helical Tomotherapy.

    PubMed

    He, Jian; Huang, Yan; Shi, Shiming; Hu, Yong; Zeng, Zhaochong

    2015-12-01

    Lung cancer is a common malignant tumor with high morbidity and mortality. Here we compared the effects and outcome between central and peripheral stage I lung cancer using image-guided stereotactic body radiotherapy. From June 2011 to July 2013, a total of 33 patients with stage I lung cancer were enrolled. A total of 50 Gy in 10 fractions or 60 Gy in 10 fractions was delivered in the central arm (n = 18), while 50 Gy in 5 fractions in the peripheral arm (n = 15). Statistical analyses were performed using logistic regression analysis and Kaplan-Meier method. The mean follow-up time was 38.1 months. Three-month, 1-, 2-, and 3-year overall response rates were 66.7%, 83.3%, 61.1%, and 72.2% and 66.7%, 80%, 80%, and 80% in the central and peripheral arms, respectively. Three-year local control rates (94.4% vs 93.3%, P = .854), regional control rates (94.4% vs 86.7%, P = .412), and distant control rates (64.2% vs 61.7%, P = .509) had no differences between the central and the peripheral arms. Grade 2 radiation pneumonitis was observed in 6 of 18 patients in the central arm and in 1 of 15 patients in the peripheral arm (P = .92). Grade 2 radiation esophagitis was 5.7% in the central arm, while none occurred in the peripheral arm (P = .008). Five (15.1%) of all patients felt slight fatigue during radiotherapy. Other major complications were not observed. In conclusion, helical image-guided stereotactic body radiotherapy for central stage I lung cancer is safe and effective compared to peripheral stage I lung cancer.

  9. Touch Imprint Cytology and Stereotactically-Guided Core Needle Biopsy of Suspicious Breast Lesions: 15-Year Follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Schulz-Wendtland, R.; Fasching, P. A.; Bani, M. R.; Lux, M. P.; Jud, S.; Rauh, C.; Bayer, C.; Wachter, D. L.; Hartmann, A.; Beckmann, M. W.; Uder, M.; Loehberg, C. R.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Stereotactically-guided core needle biopsies (CNB) of breast tumours allow histological examination of the tumour without surgery. Touch imprint cytology (TIC) of CNB promises to be useful in providing same-day diagnosis for counselling purposes and for planning future surgery. Having addressed the issue of accuracy of immediate microscopic evaluation of TIC, we wanted to re-examine the usefulness of this procedure in light of the present health care climate of cost containment by incorporating the surgical 15-year follow-up data and outcome. Patients and Methods: From January until December 1996 we performed TIC in core needle biopsies of 173 breast tumours in 169 patients, consisting of 122 malignant and 51 benign tumours. Histology of core needle biopsies was proven by surgical histology in all malignant and in 5 benign tumours. Surgical breast biopsy was not performed in 46 patients with 46 benign lesions, as the histological result from the core needle biopsy and the result of the TIC were in agreement with the suspected diagnosis from the complementary breast diagnostics. A 15-year follow-up of these patients followed in 2013 and follow-up data was collected from 40 women. Results: In the 15-year follow-up of the 40 benign lesions primarily confirmed using CNB and TIC, a diagnostic sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive value and accuracy of 100 % was found. Conclusion: TIC and stereotactically guided CNB showed excellent long-term follow-up in patients with benign breast lesions. The use of TIC to complement CNB can therefore provide immediate cytological diagnosis of breast lesions. PMID:26855442

  10. Outcomes and Toxicity for Hypofractionated and Single-Fraction Image-Guided Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Sarcomas Metastasizing to the Spine

    SciTech Connect

    Folkert, Michael R.; Bilsky, Mark H.; Tom, Ashlyn K.; Oh, Jung Hun; Alektiar, Kaled M.; Laufer, Ilya; Tap, William D.; Yamada, Yoshiya

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: Conventional radiation treatment (20-40 Gy in 5-20 fractions, 2-5 Gy per fraction) for sarcoma metastatic to the spine provides subtherapeutic doses, resulting in poor durable local control (LC) (50%-77% at 1 year). Hypofractionated (HF) and/or single-fraction (SF) image-guided stereotactic radiosurgery (IG-SRS) may provide a more effective means of managing these lesions. Methods and Materials: Patients with pathologically proven high-grade sarcoma metastatic to the spine treated with HF and SF IG-SRS were included. LC and overall survival (OS) were analyzed by the use of Kaplan-Meier statistics. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed by the use of Cox regression with competing-risks analysis; all confidence intervals are 95%. Toxicities were assessed according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 4.0. Results: From May 2005 to November 11, 2012, 88 patients with 120 discrete metastases received HF (3-6 fractions; median dose, 28.5 Gy; n=52, 43.3%) or SF IG-SRS (median dose, 24 Gy; n=68, 56.7%). The median follow-up time was 12.3 months. At 12 months, LC was 87.9% (confidence interval [CI], 81.3%-94.5%), OS was 60.6% (CI, 49.6%-71.6%), and median survival was 16.9 months. SF IG-SRS demonstrated superior LC to HF IG-SRS (12-month LC of 90.8% [CI, 83%-98.6%] vs 84.1% [CI, 72.9%-95.3%] P=.007) and retained significance on multivariate analysis (P=.030, hazard ratio 0.345; CI, 0.132-0.901]. Treatment was well tolerated, with 1% acute grade 3 toxicity, 4.5% chronic grade 3 toxicity, and no grade >3 toxicities. Conclusions: In the largest series of metastatic sarcoma to the spine to date, IG-SRS provides excellent LC in the setting of an aggressive disease with low radiation sensitivity and poor prognosis. Single-fraction IG-SRS is associated with the highest rates of LC with minimal toxicity.

  11. Stereotactic-guided laser-induced interstitial thermotherapy (SLITT) in gliomas with intraoperative morphologic monitoring in open MR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lumenta, Christianto B.; Leonardi, Massimo A.; von Einsiedel, Helga

    2001-01-01

    Stereotactic guided laser-induced interstitial thermotherapy (SLITT) is a minimal invasive method to produce thermo necrosis in cerebral tumor tissue. Clinical data about dose/response relationship and patients outcome is poor. Twenty-four patients with brain tumors were treated with SLITT, totally 30 laser procedures were performed. Under local anesthesia 600 micrometers laser-fiber were inserted by the stererotactic-guided technique. IN open MR the denaturation of the tumor by a Neodym-YAG-laser was monitored using T1-weighted 3D tumor FLASH sequences. Laser energy was applied in steps of 400 to 1200 Joules. Development of necrosis at a mean total energy-dose of 2979 Joules could be monitored in all procedures. Initial signal changes were seen after a mean of 1250 Joules. Mean max total lesion size was 21.2 mm. The higher the total energy, the larger the thermo lesion, but no linear relationship could be seen. Tumor tissue response showed no dependency form tumor grading. Although lesion-size basically is energy dependent, it should be applied individually, since thermo response in brain tumors varies due to different optical properties. Energy application in steps of 500 Joules monitored in near on-line modus in an open MR-system is safe and feasible. Conclusions about the clinical value of SLITT are not definite.

  12. Electromagnetic navigational bronchoscopy-guided fiducial markers for lung stereotactic body radiation therapy: analysis of safety, feasibility, and interfraction stability.

    PubMed

    Nabavizadeh, Nima; Zhang, Junan; Elliott, David A; Tanyi, James A; Thomas, Charles R; Fuss, Martin; Deffebach, Mark

    2014-04-01

    Embolization coils as fiducial markers for pulmonary stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) are perceived to be the optimal marker type, given their ability to conform and anchor within the small airways. The aim of our study was to assess retention, placement, migration, feasibility, and safety of electromagnetic navigational bronchoscopy (ENB)-guided embolization coil markers throughout courses of SBRT. Thirty-one patients with 34 nodules underwent ENB-guided fiducial placement of several 4 mm fibered platinum embolization coils before SBRT. Patient and nodule positioning was confirmed with daily pretreatment cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Fiducial positional characteristics were analyzed utilizing radiation treatment-planning software comparing the simulation CT with daily CBCTs. Of 105 fiducials placed, 103 were identifiable on simulation CT (retention rate: 98.1%). Incidence of asymptomatic pneumothoraces was 6%. One patient experienced hemoptysis requiring hospitalization. Eighty-six percent of fiducials were placed within 1 cm of the nodule, with 52% of fiducials placed directly on the nodule surface. Throughout a 5-fraction SBRT course, fiducial displacement was <7, 5, and 2 mm in 98%, 96%, and 67% of pretreatment CBCTs. ENB placement of embolization coils as fiducials for lung SBRT image guidance is associated with a low rate of iatrogenic pneumothoraces, and resulted in reliable placement of the fiducials in close proximity to the lung nodule. Embolization coils retained their relative position to the nodule throughout the course of SBRT, and provide an excellent alternative to linear gold seeds.

  13. Five-Year Outcomes of High-Dose Single-Fraction Spinal Stereotactic Radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Moussazadeh, Nelson; Lis, Eric; Katsoulakis, Evangelia; Kahn, Sweena; Svoboda, Marek; DiStefano, Natalie M.; McLaughlin, Lily; Bilsky, Mark H.; Yamada, Yoshiya; Laufer, Ilya

    2015-10-01

    Purpose: To characterize local tumor control and toxicity risk in very long-term survivors (>5 years) after high-dose spinal image guided, intensity modulated radiation therapy delivered as single-dose stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Previously published spinal SRS outcome analyses have included a heterogeneous population of cancer patients, mostly with short survival. This is the first study reporting the long-term tumor control and toxicity profiles after high-dose single-fraction spinal SRS. Methods and Materials: The study population included all patients treated from June 2004 to July 2009 with single-fraction spinal SRS (dose 24 Gy) who had survived at least 5 years after treatment. The endpoints examined included disease progression, surgical or radiation retreatment, in-field fracture development, and radiation-associated toxicity, scored using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group radiation morbidity scoring criteria and the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 4.0. Local control and fracture development were assessed using Kaplan-Meier analysis. Results: Of 278 patients, 31 (11.1%), with 36 segments treated for spinal tumors, survived at least 5 years after treatment and were followed up radiographically and clinically for a median of 6.1 years (maximum 102 months). The histopathologic findings for the 5-year survivors included radiation-resistant metastases in 58%, radiation-sensitive metastases in 22%, and primary bone tumors in 19%. In this selected cohort, 3 treatment failures occurred at a median of 48.6 months, including 2 recurrences in the radiation field and 1 patient with demonstrated progression at the treatment margins. Ten lesions (27.8%) were associated with acute grade 1 cutaneous or gastrointestinal toxicity. Delayed toxicity ≥3 months after treatment included 8 cases (22.2%) of mild neuropathy, 2 (5.6%) of gastrointestinal discomfort, 8 (22.2%) of dermatitides, and 3 (8.3%) of myalgias/myositis. Thirteen

  14. Robotic image-guided stereotactic radiotherapy, for isolated recurrent primary, lymph node or metastatic prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Jereczek-Fossa, Barbara Alicja; Beltramo, Giancarlo; Fariselli, Laura; Fodor, Cristiana; Santoro, Luigi; Vavassori, Andrea; Zerini, Dario; Gherardi, Federica; Ascione, Carmen; Bossi-Zanetti, Isa; Mauro, Roberta; Bregantin, Achille; Bianchi, Livia Corinna; De Cobelli, Ottavio; Orecchia, Roberto

    2012-02-01

    To evaluate the outcome of robotic CyberKnife (Accuray, Sunnyvale, CA)-based stereotactic radiotherapy (CBK-SRT) for isolated recurrent primary, lymph node, or metastatic prostate cancer. Between May 2007 and December 2009, 34 consecutive patients/38 lesions were treated (15 patients reirradiated for local recurrence [P], 4 patients reirradiated for anastomosis recurrence [A], 16 patients treated for single lymph node recurrence [LN], and 3 patients treated for single metastasis [M]). In all but 4 patients, [(11)C]choline positron emission tomography/computed tomography was performed. CBK-SRT consisted of reirradiation and first radiotherapy in 27 and 11 lesions, respectively. The median CBK-SRT dose was 30 Gy in 4.5 fractions (P, 30 Gy in 5 fractions; A, 30 Gy in 5 fractions; LN, 33 Gy in 3 fractions; and M, 36 Gy in 3 fractions). In 18 patients (21 lesions) androgen deprivation was added to CBK-SRT (median duration, 16.6 months). The median follow-up was 16.9 months. Acute toxicity included urinary events (3 Grade 1, 2 Grade 2, and 2 Grade 3 events) and rectal events (1 Grade 1 event). Late toxicity included urinary events (3 Grade 1, 2 Grade 2, and 2 Grade 3 events) and rectal events (1 Grade 1 event and 1 Grade 2 event). Biochemical response was observed in 32 of 38 evaluable lesions. Prostate-specific antigen stabilization was seen for 4 lesions, and in 2 cases prostate-specific antigen progression was reported. The 30-month progression-free survival rate was 42.6%. Disease progression was observed for 14 lesions (5, 2, 5, and 2 in Groups P, A, LN, and M respectively). In only 3 cases, in-field progression was seen. At the time of analysis (May 2010), 19 patients are alive with no evidence of disease and 15 are alive with disease. CyberKnife-based stereotactic radiotherapy is a feasible approach for isolated recurrent primary, lymph node, or metastatic prostate cancer, offering excellent in-field tumor control and a low toxicity profile. Further investigation

  15. Robotic Image-Guided Stereotactic Radiotherapy, for Isolated Recurrent Primary, Lymph Node or Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Jereczek-Fossa, Barbara Alicja; Beltramo, Giancarlo; Fariselli, Laura; Fodor, Cristiana; Santoro, Luigi; Vavassori, Andrea; Zerini, Dario; Gherardi, Federica; Ascione, Carmen; Bossi-Zanetti, Isa; Mauro, Roberta; Bregantin, Achille; Bianchi, Livia Corinna; De Cobelli, Ottavio; Orecchia, Roberto

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcome of robotic CyberKnife (Accuray, Sunnyvale, CA)-based stereotactic radiotherapy (CBK-SRT) for isolated recurrent primary, lymph node, or metastatic prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between May 2007 and December 2009, 34 consecutive patients/38 lesions were treated (15 patients reirradiated for local recurrence [P], 4 patients reirradiated for anastomosis recurrence [A], 16 patients treated for single lymph node recurrence [LN], and 3 patients treated for single metastasis [M]). In all but 4 patients, [{sup 11}C]choline positron emission tomography/computed tomography was performed. CBK-SRT consisted of reirradiation and first radiotherapy in 27 and 11 lesions, respectively. The median CBK-SRT dose was 30 Gy in 4.5 fractions (P, 30 Gy in 5 fractions; A, 30 Gy in 5 fractions; LN, 33 Gy in 3 fractions; and M, 36 Gy in 3 fractions). In 18 patients (21 lesions) androgen deprivation was added to CBK-SRT (median duration, 16.6 months). Results: The median follow-up was 16.9 months. Acute toxicity included urinary events (3 Grade 1, 2 Grade 2, and 2 Grade 3 events) and rectal events (1 Grade 1 event). Late toxicity included urinary events (3 Grade 1, 2 Grade 2, and 2 Grade 3 events) and rectal events (1 Grade 1 event and 1 Grade 2 event). Biochemical response was observed in 32 of 38 evaluable lesions. Prostate-specific antigen stabilization was seen for 4 lesions, and in 2 cases prostate-specific antigen progression was reported. The 30-month progression-free survival rate was 42.6%. Disease progression was observed for 14 lesions (5, 2, 5, and 2 in Groups P, A, LN, and M respectively). In only 3 cases, in-field progression was seen. At the time of analysis (May 2010), 19 patients are alive with no evidence of disease and 15 are alive with disease. Conclusions: CyberKnife-based stereotactic radiotherapy is a feasible approach for isolated recurrent primary, lymph node, or metastatic prostate cancer, offering excellent in-field tumor

  16. [Assessment of overall spatial accuracy in image guided stereotactic body radiotherapy using a spine registration method].

    PubMed

    Nakazawa, Hisato; Uchiyama, Yukio; Komori, Masataka; Hayashi, Naoki

    2014-06-01

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for lung and liver tumors is always performed under image guidance, a technique used to confirm the accuracy of setup positioning by fusing planning digitally reconstructed radiographs with X-ray, fluoroscopic, or computed tomography (CT) images, using bony structures, tumor shadows, or metallic markers as landmarks. The Japanese SBRT guidelines state that bony spinal structures should be used as the main landmarks for patient setup. In this study, we used the Novalis system as a linear accelerator for SBRT of lung and liver tumors. The current study compared the differences between spine registration and target registration and calculated total spatial accuracy including setup uncertainty derived from our image registration results and the geometric uncertainty of the Novalis system. We were able to evaluate clearly whether overall spatial accuracy is achieved within a setup margin (SM) for planning target volume (PTV) in treatment planning. After being granted approval by the Hospital and University Ethics Committee, we retrospectively analyzed eleven patients with lung tumor and seven patients with liver tumor. The results showed the total spatial accuracy to be within a tolerable range for SM of treatment planning. We therefore regard our method to be suitable for image fusion involving 2-dimensional X-ray images during the treatment planning stage of SBRT for lung and liver tumors.

  17. Fiducial migration following small peripheral lung tumor image-guided CyberKnife stereotactic radiosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strulik, Konrad L.; Cho, Min H.; Collins, Brian T.; Khan, Noureen; Banovac, Filip; Slack, Rebecca; Cleary, Kevin

    2008-03-01

    To track respiratory motion during CyberKnife stereotactic radiosurgery in the lung, several (three to five) cylindrical gold fiducials are implanted near the planned target volume (PTV). Since these fiducials remain in the human body after treatment, we hypothesize that tracking fiducial movement over time may correlate with the tumor response to treatment and pulmonary fibrosis, thereby serving as an indicator of treatment success. In this paper, we investigate fiducial migration in 24 patients through examination of computed tomography (CT) volume images at four time points: pre-treatment, three, six, and twelve month post-treatment. We developed a MATLAB based GUI environment to display the images, identify the fiducials, and compute our performance measure. After we semi-automatically segmented and detected fiducial locations in CT images of the same patient over time, we identified them according to their configuration and introduced a relative performance measure (ACD: average center distance) to detect their migration. We found that the migration tended to result in a movement towards the fiducial center of the radiated tissue area (indicating tumor regression) and may potentially be linked to the patient prognosis.

  18. Feasibility study on image guided patient positioning for stereotactic body radiation therapy of liver malignancies guided by liver motion.

    PubMed

    Heinz, Christian; Gerum, Sabine; Freislederer, Philipp; Ganswindt, Ute; Roeder, Falk; Corradini, Stefanie; Belka, Claus; Niyazi, Maximilian

    2016-06-27

    Fiducial markers are the superior method to compensate for interfractional motion in liver SBRT. However this method is invasive and thereby limits its application range. In this retrospective study, the compensation method for the interfractional motion using fiducial markers (gold standard) was compared to a new non-invasive approach, which does rely on the organ motion of the liver and the relative tumor position within this volume. We analyzed six patients (3 m, 3f) treated with SBRT in 2014. After fiducial marker implantation, all patients received a treatment CT (free breathing, without abdominal compression) and a 4D-CT (consisting of 10 respiratory phases). For all patients the gross tumor volumes (GTVs), internal target volume (ITV), planning target volume (PTV), internal marker target volumes (IMTVs) and the internal liver target volume (ILTV) were delineated based on the CT and 4D-CT images. CBCT imaging was used for the standard treatment setup based on the fiducial markers. According to the patient coordinates the 3 translational compensation values (t x , t y , t z ) for the interfractional motion were calculated by matching the blurred fiducial markers with the corresponding IMTV structures. 4 observers were requested to recalculate the translational compensation values for each CBCT (31) based on the ILTV structures. The differences of the translational compensation values between the IMTV and ILTV approach were analyzed. The magnitude of the mean absolute 3D registration error with regard to the gold standard overall patients and observers was 0.50 cm ± 0.28 cm. Individual registration errors up to 1.3 cm were observed. There was no significant overall linear correlation between the respiratory motion and the registration error of the ILTV approach. Two different methods to calculate the translational compensation values for interfractional motion in stereotactic liver therapy were evaluated. The registration accuracy of the ILTV approach is

  19. Intraoperative direct subcortical stimulation for identification of the internal capsule, combined with an image-guided stereotactic system during surgery for basal ganglia lesions.

    PubMed

    Duffau, H

    2000-03-01

    The two main problems of surgery for basal ganglia lesions are: first, the difficulty of accurately localizing the lesion in this deep location; and second, the proximity to the internal capsule, with the risk of permanent postoperative sequelae. The author describes the use of intraoperative direct electrical subcortical stimulation in the identification and preservation of the internal capsule, combined with an image-guided stereotactic system for the selection of the best surgical approach in a case of deep cavernoma. A 33-year-old man was admitted to our institution with a history of three episodes of transitory left hemiparesia in the last 12 years. Neurological examination revealed a mild left weakness. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed typical features of a right posterior capsular-lentiform cavernoma. To prevent another hemorrhagic event, surgery was performed via a right transdistal sylvian approach, using a computer-assisted stereotactic method that allowed us to reach the lesion directly and direct stimulations to detect the subcortical pyramidal pathways. The patient had a transitory worsening with complete recovery in 10 days. Control MRI showed total resection. As described at the cortical level, the intraoperative direct subcortical stimulations seem also to represent an easy, safe, accurate, and reliable method of real-time functional identification of the internal capsule during surgery for basal ganglia lesions. The combination with an image-guided stereotactic system to accurately localize the lesion minimizes the risk of postoperative sequelae, and seems to warrant an increase of the surgical indications in this location.

  20. [Setup accuracy of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) using virtual isocenter in image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT)].

    PubMed

    Nakazawa, Hisato; Uchiyama, Yukio; Komori, Masataka; Hagiwara, Masahiro; Mori, Yoshimasa

    2012-01-01

    We use Novalis Body system for stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) in lung and liver tumors. Novalis system is dedicated to SBRT with image-guided patient setup system ExacTrac. The spinal bone is the main landmark in patient setup during SBRT using ExacTrac kV X-ray system. When the target tumor is located laterally distant from the spinal bone at the midline, it is difficult to ensure the accuracy of the setup, especially if there are rotational gaps (yaw, pitch and roll) in the setup. For this, we resolve the problem by using a virtual isocenter (VIC) different from isocenter (IC) .We evaluated the setup accuracy in a rand phantom by using VIC and checked the setup errors using rand phantom and patient cases by our original method during the setup for IC. The accuracy of setup using VIC was less than 1.0 mm. Our original method was useful for checking patient setup when VIC used.

  1. Intrafraction Variation of Mean Tumor Position During Image-Guided Hypofractionated Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, Chirag; Grills, Inga S.; Kestin, Larry L.; McGrath, Samuel; Ye Hong; Martin, Shannon K.; Yan Di

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: Prolonged delivery times during daily cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT)-guided lung stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) introduce concerns regarding intrafraction variation (IFV) of the mean target position (MTP). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the magnitude of the IFV-MTP and to assess target margins required to compensate for IFV and postonline CBCT correction residuals. Patient, treatment, and tumor characteristics were analyzed with respect to their impact on IFV-MTP. Methods and Materials: A total of 126 patients with 140 tumors underwent 659 fractions of lung SBRT. Dose prescribed was 48 or 60 Gy in 12 Gy fractions. Translational target position correction of the MTP was performed via onboard CBCT. IFV-MTP was measured as the difference in MTP between the postcorrection CBCT and the posttreatment CBCT excluding residual error. Results: IFV-MTP was 0.2 {+-} 1.8 mm, 0.1 {+-} 1.9 mm, and 0.01 {+-} 1.5 mm in the craniocaudal, anteroposterior, and mediolateral dimensions and the IFV-MTP vector was 2.3 {+-} 2.1 mm. Treatment time and excursion were found to be significant predictors of IFV-MTP. An IFV-MTP vector greater than 2 and 5 mm was seen in 40.8% and 7.2% of fractions, respectively. IFV-MTP greater than 2 mm was seen in heavier patients with larger excursions and longer treatment times. Significant differences in IFV-MTP were seen between immobilization devices. The stereotactic frame immobilization device was found to be significantly less likely to have an IFV-MTP vector greater than 2 mm compared with the alpha cradle, BodyFIX, and hybrid immobilization devices. Conclusions: Treatment time and respiratory excursion are significantly associated with IFV-MTP. Significant differences in IFV-MTP were found between immobilization devices. Target margins for IFV-MTP plus post-correction residuals are dependent on immobilization device with 5-mm uniform margins being acceptable for the frame immobilization device.

  2. Salvage image-guided intensity modulated or stereotactic body reirradiation of local recurrence of prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jereczek-Fossa, B A; Fodor, C; Bazzani, F; Maucieri, A; Ronchi, S; Ferrario, S; Colangione, S P; Gerardi, M A; Caputo, M; Cecconi, A; Gherardi, F; Vavassori, A; Comi, S; Cambria, R; Garibaldi, C; Cattani, F; De Cobelli, O; Orecchia, R

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To retrospectively evaluate external beam reirradiation (re-EBRT) delivered to the prostate/prostatic bed for local recurrence, after radical or adjuvant/salvage radiotherapy (RT). Methods: 32 patients received re-EBRT between February 2008 and October 2013. All patients had clinical/radiological local relapse in the prostate or prostatic bed and no distant metastasis. re-EBRT was delivered with selective RT technologies [stereotactic RT including CyberKnifeTM (Accuray, Sunnyvale, CA); image-guidance and intensity-modulated RT etc.]. Toxicity was evaluated using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer criteria. Biochemical control was assessed according to the Phoenix definition (NADIR + 2 ng ml−1). Results: Acute urinary toxicity: G0, 24 patients; G1, 6 patients; G2, 2 patients. Acute rectal toxicity: G0, 28 patients; G1, 2 patients; and G2, 1 patient. Late urinary toxicity (evaluated in 30 cases): G0, 23 patients; G1, 6 patients; G2, 1 patient. Late renal toxicity: G0, 25 patients; G1, 5 patients. A mean follow-up of 21.3 months after re-EBRT showed that 13 patients were free of cancer, 3 were alive with biochemical relapse and 12 patients were alive with clinically evident disease. Four patients had died: two of disease progression and two of other causes. Conclusion: re-EBRT using modern technology is a feasible approach for local prostate cancer recurrence offering 2-year tumour control in about half of the patients. Toxicity of re-EBRT is low. Future studies are needed to identify the patients who would benefit most from this treatment. Advances in knowledge: Our series, based on experience in one hospital alone, shows that re-EBRT for local relapse of prostate cancer is feasible and offers a 2-year cure in about half of the patients. PMID:26055506

  3. Probabilities of Radiation Myelopathy Specific to Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy to Guide Safe Practice

    SciTech Connect

    Sahgal, Arjun; Weinberg, Vivian; Ma, Lijun; Chang, Eric; Chao, Sam; Muacevic, Alexander; Gorgulho, Alessandra; Soltys, Scott; Gerszten, Peter C.; Ryu, Sam; Angelov, Lilyana; Gibbs, Iris; Wong, C. Shun; Larson, David A.

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: Dose-volume histogram (DVH) results for 9 cases of post spine stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) radiation myelopathy (RM) are reported and compared with a cohort of 66 spine SBRT patients without RM. Methods and Materials: DVH data were centrally analyzed according to the thecal sac point maximum (Pmax) volume, 0.1- to 1-cc volumes in increments of 0.1 cc, and to the 2 cc volume. 2-Gy biologically equivalent doses (nBED) were calculated using an {alpha}/{beta} = 2 Gy (units = Gy{sub 2/2}). For the 2 cohorts, the nBED means and distributions were compared using the t test and Mann-Whitney test, respectively. Significance (P<.05) was defined as concordance of both tests at each specified volume. A logistic regression model was developed to estimate the probability of RM using the dose distribution for a given volume. Results: Significant differences in both the means and distributions at the Pmax and up to the 0.8-cc volume were observed. Concordant significance was greatest for the Pmax volume. At the Pmax volume the fit of the logistic regression model, summarized by the area under the curve, was 0.87. A risk of RM of 5% or less was observed when limiting the thecal sac Pmax volume doses to 12.4 Gy in a single fraction, 17.0 Gy in 2 fractions, 20.3 Gy in 3 fractions, 23.0 Gy in 4 fractions, and 25.3 Gy in 5 fractions. Conclusion: We report the first logistic regression model yielding estimates for the probability of human RM specific to SBRT.

  4. Dosimetric characterization of an image-guided stereotactic small animal irradiator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pidikiti, R.; Stojadinovic, S.; Speiser, M.; Song, K. H.; Hager, F.; Saha, D.; Solberg, T. D.

    2011-04-01

    Small animal irradiation provides an important tool used by preclinical studies to assess and optimize new treatment strategies such as stereotactic ablative radiotherapy. Characterization of radiation beams that are clinically and geometrically scaled for the small animal model is uniquely challenging for orthovoltage energies and minute field sizes. The irradiator employs a commercial x-ray device (XRAD 320, Precision x-ray, Inc.) with a custom collimation system to produce 1-10 mm diameter beams and a 50 mm reference beam. Absolute calibrations were performed using the AAPM TG-61 methodology. Beam's half-value layer (HVL) and timer error were measured with an ionization chamber. Percent depth dose (PDD), output factors (OFs) and off-axis ratios were measured using radiochromic film, a diode and a pinpoint ionization chamber at 19.76 and 24.76 cm source-to-surface distance (SSD). PDD measurements were also compared with Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. In-air and in-water absolute calibrations for the reference 50 mm diameter collimator at 19.76 cm SSD were measured as 20.96 and 20.79 Gy min-1, respectively, agreeing within 0.8%. The HVL at 250 kVp and 15 mAs was measured to be 0.45 mm Cu. The reference field PDD MC simulation results agree with measured data within 3.5%. PDD data demonstrate typical increased penetration with increasing field size and SSD. For collimators larger than 5 mm in diameter, OFs measured using film, an ion chamber and a diode were within 3% agreement.

  5. Dosimetric characterization of an image-guided stereotactic small animal irradiator.

    PubMed

    Pidikiti, R; Stojadinovic, S; Speiser, M; Song, K H; Hager, F; Saha, D; Solberg, T D

    2011-04-21

    Small animal irradiation provides an important tool used by preclinical studies to assess and optimize new treatment strategies such as stereotactic ablative radiotherapy. Characterization of radiation beams that are clinically and geometrically scaled for the small animal model is uniquely challenging for orthovoltage energies and minute field sizes. The irradiator employs a commercial x-ray device (XRAD 320, Precision x-ray, Inc.) with a custom collimation system to produce 1-10 mm diameter beams and a 50 mm reference beam. Absolute calibrations were performed using the AAPM TG-61 methodology. Beam's half-value layer (HVL) and timer error were measured with an ionization chamber. Percent depth dose (PDD), output factors (OFs) and off-axis ratios were measured using radiochromic film, a diode and a pinpoint ionization chamber at 19.76 and 24.76 cm source-to-surface distance (SSD). PDD measurements were also compared with Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. In-air and in-water absolute calibrations for the reference 50 mm diameter collimator at 19.76 cm SSD were measured as 20.96 and 20.79 Gy min(-1), respectively, agreeing within 0.8%. The HVL at 250 kVp and 15 mAs was measured to be 0.45 mm Cu. The reference field PDD MC simulation results agree with measured data within 3.5%. PDD data demonstrate typical increased penetration with increasing field size and SSD. For collimators larger than 5 mm in diameter, OFs measured using film, an ion chamber and a diode were within 3% agreement.

  6. An Optimized System for Interventional MRI Guided Stereotactic Surgery: Preliminary Evaluation of Targeting Accuracy

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Paul S.; Starr, Philip A.; Bates, Geoffrey; Tansey, Lisa; Richardson, R. Mark; Martin, Alastair J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Deep brain stimulation (DBS) electrode placement using interventional MRI has been previously reported using a commercially available skull mounted aiming device (Medtronic Nexframe MR) and native MRI scanner software. This first-generation method has technical limitations that are inherent to the hardware and software used. A novel system (SurgiVision ClearPoint) consisting of an aiming device (SMARTFrame) and software has been developed specifically for iMRI interventions including DBS. Objective A series of phantom and cadaver tests were performed to determine the system’s capability, preliminary accuracy and workflow. Methods 18 experiments using a water phantom were used to determine predictive accuracy of the software. 16 experiments using a gelatin-filled skull phantom were used to determine targeting accuracy of the aiming device. 6 procedures in three cadaver heads were performed to compare workflow and accuracy of ClearPoint with Nexframe MR. Results Software prediction experiments showed an average error of 0.9±0.5 mm in magnitude in pitch and roll (mean pitch error −0.2±0.7 mm, mean roll error +0.2±0.7 mm) and an average error of 0.7±0.3 mm in X-Y translation with a slight anterior (0.5±0.3 mm) and lateral (0.4±0.3mm) bias. Targeting accuracy experiments showed average radial error of 0.5±0.3 mm. Cadaver experiments showed a radial error of 0.2±0.1 mm with the ClearPoint system (average procedure time 88±14 minutes) vs 0.6±0.2 mm with the Nexframe MR (average procedure time 92±12 minutes). Conclusion This novel system provides the submillimetric accuracy required for stereotactic interventions including DBS placement. It also overcomes technical limitations inherent in the first-generation iMRI system. PMID:21796000

  7. Probabilities of radiation myelopathy specific to stereotactic body radiation therapy to guide safe practice.

    PubMed

    Sahgal, Arjun; Weinberg, Vivian; Ma, Lijun; Chang, Eric; Chao, Sam; Muacevic, Alexander; Gorgulho, Alessandra; Soltys, Scott; Gerszten, Peter C; Ryu, Sam; Angelov, Lilyana; Gibbs, Iris; Wong, C Shun; Larson, David A

    2013-02-01

    Dose-volume histogram (DVH) results for 9 cases of post spine stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) radiation myelopathy (RM) are reported and compared with a cohort of 66 spine SBRT patients without RM. DVH data were centrally analyzed according to the thecal sac point maximum (Pmax) volume, 0.1- to 1-cc volumes in increments of 0.1 cc, and to the 2 cc volume. 2-Gy biologically equivalent doses (nBED) were calculated using an α/β = 2 Gy (units = Gy(2/2)). For the 2 cohorts, the nBED means and distributions were compared using the t test and Mann-Whitney test, respectively. Significance (P<.05) was defined as concordance of both tests at each specified volume. A logistic regression model was developed to estimate the probability of RM using the dose distribution for a given volume. Significant differences in both the means and distributions at the Pmax and up to the 0.8-cc volume were observed. Concordant significance was greatest for the Pmax volume. At the Pmax volume the fit of the logistic regression model, summarized by the area under the curve, was 0.87. A risk of RM of 5% or less was observed when limiting the thecal sac Pmax volume doses to 12.4 Gy in a single fraction, 17.0 Gy in 2 fractions, 20.3 Gy in 3 fractions, 23.0 Gy in 4 fractions, and 25.3 Gy in 5 fractions. We report the first logistic regression model yielding estimates for the probability of human RM specific to SBRT. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Image guided respiratory gated hypofractionated Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (H-SBRT) for liver and lung tumors: Initial experience.

    PubMed

    Wurm, R E; Gum, F; Erbel, S; Schlenger, L; Scheffler, D; Agaoglu, D; Schild, R; Gebauer, B; Rogalla, P; Plotkin, M; Ocran, K; Budach, V

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate our initial experience with image guided respiratory gated H-SBRT for liver and lung tumors. The system combines a stereoscopic x-ray imaging system (ExacTrac X-Ray 6D) with a dedicated conformal stereotactic radiosurgery and radiotherapy linear accelerator (Novalis) and ExacTrac Adaptive Gating for dynamic adaptive treatment. Moving targets are located and tracked by x-ray imaging of implanted fiducial markers defined in the treatment planning computed tomography (CT). The marker position is compared with the position in verification stereoscopic x-ray images, using fully automated marker detection software. The required shift for a correct, gated set-up is calculated and automatically applied. We present our acceptance testing and initial experience in patients with liver and lung tumors. For treatment planning CT and Fluorodeoxyglucose-Positron Emission Tomography (FDG-PET) as well as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) taken at free breathing and expiration breath hold with internal and external fiducials present were used. Patients were treated with 8-11 consecutive fractions to a dose of 74.8-79.2 Gy. Phantom tests demonstrated targeting accuracy with a moving target to within +/-1 mm. Inter- and intrafractional patient set-up displacements, as corrected by the gated set-up and not detectable by a conventional set-up, were up to 30 mm. Verification imaging to determine target location during treatment showed an average marker position deviation from the expected position of up to 4 mm on real patients. This initial evaluation shows the accuracy of the system and feasibility of image guided real-time respiratory gated H-SBRT for liver and lung tumors.

  9. Cortical mapping and frameless stereotactic navigation in the high-field intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging suite

    PubMed Central

    Weingarten, David M.; Asthagiri, Ashok R.; Butman, John A.; Sato, Susumu; Wiggs, Edythe A.; Damaska, Bonita; Heiss, John D.

    2013-01-01

    Frameless stereotactic neuronavigation provides tracking of surgical instruments on radiographic images and orients the surgeon to tumor margins at surgery. Bipolar electrical stimulation mapping (ESM) delineates safe limits for resection of brain tumors adjacent to eloquent cortex. These standard techniques could complement the capability of intraoperative MR (iMR) imaging to evaluate for occult residual disease during surgery and promote more complete tumor removal. The use of frameless neuronavigation in the high-field iMR imaging suite requires that a few pieces of standard equipment be replaced by nonferromagnetic instruments. Specific use of ESM in a high-field iMR imaging suite has not been reported in the literature. To study whether frameless neuronavigation and electrical stimulation mapping could be successfully integrated in the high-field iMR imaging suite, the authors employed these modalities in 10 consecutive cases involving patients undergoing conscious craniotomy for primary brain tumors located in or adjacent to eloquent cortices. Equipment included a custom high-field MR imaging–compatible head holder and dynamic reference frame attachment, a standard MR imaging–compatible dynamic reference frame, a standard MR imaging machine with a table top that could be translated to a pedestal outside the 5-gauss line for the operative intervention, and standard neuronavigational and cortical stimulation equipment. Both ESM and frameless stereotactic guidance were performed outside the 5-gauss line. The presence of residual neoplasm was evaluated using iMR imaging; resection was continued until eloquent areas were encountered or iMR imaging confirmed complete removal of any residual tumor. Mapping identified essential language (5 patients), sensory (6), and motor (7) areas. The combined use of frameless stereotactic navigation, ESM, and iMR imaging resulted in complete radiographic resection in 7 cases and resection to an eloquent margin in 3 cases

  10. MRI-Guided Stereotactic Biopsy of Murine GBM for Spatiotemporal Molecular Genomic Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Galbán, Stefanie; Al-Holou, Wajd N.; Wang, Hanxiao; Welton, Amanda R.; Heist, Kevin; Hu, Xin Kathy; Verhaak, Roeland GW; Zhu, Yuan; Espinoza, Carlos; Chenevert, Thomas L; Hoff, Ben A.; Galbán, Craig J.; Ross, Brian D.

    2017-01-01

    Brain tumor biopsies that are routinely performed in clinical settings significantly aid in diagnosis and staging. The aim of this study is to develop and evaluate a methodological image-guided approach that would allow for routine sampling of glioma tissue from orthotopic mouse brain tumor models. A magnetic resonance imaging-guided biopsy method is presented to allow for spatially precise stereotaxic sampling of a murine glioma coupled with genome-scale technology to provide unbiased characterization of intra- and intertumoral clonal heterogeneity. Longitudinal and multiregional sampling of intracranial tumors allows for successful collection of tumor biopsy samples, thus allowing for a pathway-enrichment analysis and a transcriptional profiling of RNA sequencing data. Spatiotemporal gene expression pattern variations revealing genomic heterogeneity were found. PMID:28553660

  11. The impact of the reference imaging modality, registration method and intraoperative flat-panel computed tomography on the accuracy of the ROSA® stereotactic robot.

    PubMed

    Lefranc, Michel; Capel, Cyril; Pruvot, Anne Sophie; Fichten, Anthony; Desenclos, Christine; Toussaint, Patrick; Le Gars, Daniel; Peltier, Johan

    2014-01-01

    To establish the impact of the imaging modality, registration method and use of intraoperative computed tomography (CT) scan on the accuracy of the ROSA® stereotactic robot. Using a dedicated phantom device, we measured the accuracy of the stereotactic robot for 20 targets as a function of the registration method (frameless, FL, or frame-based, FB) and the reference imaging modality (3T magnetic resonance imaging, MRI, CT scanner or flat-panel CT, fpCT). We performed a retrospective study of the accuracy of the first 26 FB and 31 FL robotized stereotactic surgeries performed in our department. In a phantom study, the mean target accuracy was 1.59 mm for 3T MRI-guided FL surgery, 0.3 mm for fpCT-guided FL surgery and 0.3 mm for CT-guided FB surgery. In our retrospective series, the mean accuracy was 0.81 mm for FB stereotactic surgery, 1.22 mm for our 24 stereotactic surgery procedures with FL (surface recognition) registration and 0.7 mm for our 7 stereotactic surgery procedures with FL fiducial marker registration. Intraoperative fpCT fully corrected all the registration errors. The ROSA stereotactic robot is highly accurate. Robotized FB stereotactic surgery is more accurate than robotized FL stereotactic surgery. 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Liver motion during cone beam computed tomography guided stereotactic body radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Justin C.; Park, Sung Ho; Kim, Jong Hoon; Yoon, Sang Min; Song, Si Yeol; Liu Zhaowei; Song Bongyong; Kauweloa, Kevin; Webster, Matthew J.; Sandhu, Ajay; Mell, Loren K.; Jiang, Steve B.; Mundt, Arno J.; Song, William Y.

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: Understanding motion characteristics of liver such as, interfractional and intrafractional motion variability, difference in motion within different locations in the organ, and their complex relationship with the breathing cycles are particularly important for image-guided liver SBRT. The purpose of this study was to investigate such motion characteristics based on fiducial markers tracked with the x-ray projections of the CBCT scans, taken immediately prior to the treatments. Methods: Twenty liver SBRT patients were analyzed. Each patient had three fiducial markers (2 Multiplication-Sign 5-mm gold) percutaneously implanted around the gross tumor. The prescription ranged from 2 to 8 fractions per patient. The CBCT projections data for each fraction ({approx}650 projections/scan), for each patient, were analyzed and the 2D positions of the markers were extracted using an in-house algorithm. In total, >55 000 x-ray projections were analyzed from 85 CBCT scans. From the 2D extracted positions, a 3D motion trajectory of the markers was constructed, from each CBCT scans, resulting in left-right (LR), anterior-posterior (AP), and cranio-caudal (CC) location information of the markers with >55 000 data points. The authors then analyzed the interfraction and intrafraction liver motion variability, within different locations in the organ, and as a function of the breathing cycle. The authors also compared the motion characteristics against the planning 4DCT and the RPM Trade-Mark-Sign (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) breathing traces. Variations in the appropriate gating window (defined as the percent of the maximum range at which 50% of the marker positions are contained), between fractions were calculated as well. Results: The range of motion for the 20 patients were 3.0 {+-} 2.0 mm, 5.1 {+-} 3.1 mm, and 17.9 {+-} 5.1 mm in the planning 4DCT, and 2.8 {+-} 1.6 mm, 5.3 {+-} 3.1 mm, and 16.5 {+-} 5.7 mm in the treatment CBCT, for LR, AP, and CC directions

  13. Integral test phantom for dosimetric quality assurance of image guided and intensity modulated stereotactic radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Letourneau, Daniel; Keller, Harald; Sharpe, Michael B.; Jaffray, David A.

    2007-05-15

    The objective of this work is to develop a dosimetric phantom quality assurance (QA) of linear accelerators capable of cone-beam CT (CBCT) image guided and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT). This phantom is to be used in an integral test to quantify in real-time both the performance of the image guidance and the dose delivery systems in terms of dose localization. The prototype IG-IMRT QA phantom consisted of a cylindrical imaging phantom (CatPhan) combined with an array of 11 radiation diodes mounted on a 10 cm diameter disk, oriented perpendicular to the phantom axis. Basic diode response characterization was performed for 6 and 18 MV photons. The diode response was compared to planning system calculations in the open and penumbrae regions of simple and complex beam arrangements. The clinical use of the QA phantom was illustrated in an integral test of an IG-IMRT treatment designed for a clinical spinal radiosurgery case. The sensitivity of the phantom to multileaf collimator (MLC) calibration and setup errors in the clinical setting was assessed by introducing errors in the IMRT plan or by displacing the phantom. The diodes offered good response linearity and long-term reproducibility for both 6 and 18 MV. Axial dosimetry of coplanar beams (in a plane containing the beam axes) was made possible with the nearly isoplanatic response of the diodes over 360 deg. of gantry (usually within {+-}1%). For single beam geometry, errors in phantom placement as small as 0.5 mm could be accurately detected (in gradient {>=}1%/mm). In clinical setting, MLC systematic errors of 1 mm on a single MLC bank introduced in the IMRT plan were easily detectable with the QA phantom. The QA phantom demonstrated also sufficient sensitivity for the detection of setup errors as small as 1 mm for the IMRT delivery. These results demonstrated that the prototype can accurately and efficiently verify the entire IG-IMRT process. This tool, in conjunction with image guidance capabilities

  14. Effect of intra-fraction motion on the accumulated dose for free-breathing MR-guided stereotactic body radiation therapy of renal-cell carcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stemkens, Bjorn; Glitzner, Markus; Kontaxis, Charis; de Senneville, Baudouin Denis; Prins, Fieke M.; Crijns, Sjoerd P. M.; Kerkmeijer, Linda G. W.; Lagendijk, Jan J. W.; van den Berg, Cornelis A. T.; Tijssen, Rob H. N.

    2017-09-01

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) has shown great promise in increasing local control rates for renal-cell carcinoma (RCC). Characterized by steep dose gradients and high fraction doses, these hypo-fractionated treatments are, however, prone to dosimetric errors as a result of variations in intra-fraction respiratory-induced motion, such as drifts and amplitude alterations. This may lead to significant variations in the deposited dose. This study aims to develop a method for calculating the accumulated dose for MRI-guided SBRT of RCC in the presence of intra-fraction respiratory variations and determine the effect of such variations on the deposited dose. For this, RCC SBRT treatments were simulated while the underlying anatomy was moving, based on motion information from three motion models with increasing complexity: (1) STATIC, in which static anatomy was assumed, (2) AVG-RESP, in which 4D-MRI phase-volumes were time-weighted, and (3) PCA, a method that generates 3D volumes with sufficient spatio-temporal resolution to capture respiration and intra-fraction variations. Five RCC patients and two volunteers were included and treatments delivery was simulated, using motion derived from subject-specific MR imaging. Motion was most accurately estimated using the PCA method with root-mean-squared errors of 2.7, 2.4, 1.0 mm for STATIC, AVG-RESP and PCA, respectively. The heterogeneous patient group demonstrated relatively large dosimetric differences between the STATIC and AVG-RESP, and the PCA reconstructed dose maps, with hotspots up to 40% of the D99 and an underdosed GTV in three out of the five patients. This shows the potential importance of including intra-fraction motion variations in dose calculations.

  15. Accuracy of VarioGuide Frameless Stereotactic System Against Frame-Based Stereotaxy: Prospective, Randomized, Single-Center Study.

    PubMed

    Bradac, Ondrej; Steklacova, Anna; Nebrenska, Katerina; Vrana, Jiri; de Lacy, Patricia; Benes, Vladimir

    2017-08-01

    Frameless stereotactic brain biopsy systems are widely used today. VarioGuide (VG) is a relatively novel frameless system. Its accuracy was studied in a laboratory setting but has not yet been studied in the clinical setting. The purpose of this study was to determine its accuracy and diagnostic yield and to compare this with frame-based (FB) stereotaxy. Overall, 53 patients (33 males and 20 females, 60 ± 15 years old) were enrolled into this prospective, randomized, single-center study. Twenty-six patients were randomized into the FB group and 27 patients into the VG group. Real trajectory was pointed on intraoperative magnetic resonance. The distance of the targets and angle deviation between the planned and real trajectories were computed. The overall discomfort of the patient was subjectively assessed by the visual analog scale score. The median lesion volume was 5 mL (interquartile range [IQR]: 2-16 mL) (FB) and 16 mL (IQR: 2-27 mL) (VG), P = 0.133. The mean distance of the targets was 2.7 ± 1.1 mm (FB) and 2.9 ± 1.3 mm (VG), P = 0.456. Mean angle deviation was 2.6 ± 1.3 deg (FB) and 3.5 ± 2.1 deg (VG), P = 0.074. Diagnostic yield was 93% (25/27) in VG and 96% (25/26) in FB, P = 1.000. Mean operating time was 47 ± 26 minutes (FB) and 59 ± 31 minutes (VG), P = 0.140. One minor bleeding was encountered in the VG group. Overall patient discomfort was significantly higher in the FB group (visual analog scale score 2.5 ± 2.1 vs. 1.2 ± 0.6, P = 0,004). The VG system proved to be comparable in terms of the trajectory accuracy, rate of complications and diagnostic yield compared with the "gold standard" represented by the traditional FB stereotaxy for patients undergoing brain biopsy. VG is also better accepted by patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Implementation of Feedback-Guided Voluntary Breath-Hold Gating for Cone Beam CT-Based Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Peng Yong; Vedam, Sastry; Chang, Joe Y.; Gao Song; Sadagopan, Ramaswamy; Bues, Martin; Balter, Peter

    2011-07-01

    Purpose: To analyze tumor position reproducibility of feedback-guided voluntary deep inspiration breath-hold (FGBH) gating for cone beam computed tomography (CBCT)-based stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Methods and materials: Thirteen early-stage lung cancer patients eligible for SBRT with tumor motion of >1cm were evaluated for FGBH-gated treatment. Multiple FGBH CTs were acquired at simulation, and single FGBH CBCTs were also acquired prior to each treatment. Simulation CTs and treatment CBCTs were analyzed to quantify reproducibility of tumor positions during FGBH. Benefits of FGBH gating compared to treatment during free breathing, as well treatment with gating at exhalation, were examined for lung sparing, motion margins, and reproducibility of gross tumor volume (GTV) position relative to nonmoving anatomy. Results: FGBH increased total lung volumes by 1.5 times compared to free breathing, resulting in a proportional drop in total lung volume receiving 10 Gy or more. Intra- and inter-FGBH reproducibility of GTV centroid positions at simulation were 1.0 {+-} 0.5 mm, 1.3 {+-} 1.0 mm, and 0.6 {+-} 0.4 mm in the anterior-posterior (AP), superior-inferior (SI), and left-right lateral (LR) directions, respectively, compared to more than 1 cm of tumor motion at free breathing. During treatment, inter-FGBH reproducibility of the GTV centroid with respect to bony anatomy was 1.2 {+-} 0.7 mm, 1.5 {+-} 0.8 mm, and 1.0 {+-} 0.4 mm in the AP, SI, and LR directions. In addition, the quality of CBCTs was improved due to elimination of motion artifacts, making this technique attractive for poorly visualized tumors, even with small motion. Conclusions: The extent of tumor motion at normal respiration does not influence the reproducibility of the tumor position under breath hold conditions. FGBH-gated SBRT with CBCT can improve the reproducibility of GTV centroids, reduce required margins, and minimize dose to normal tissues in the treatment of mobile tumors.

  17. Defining the Optimal Planning Target Volume in Image-Guided Stereotactic Radiosurgery of Brain Metastases: Results of a Randomized Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkpatrick, John P.; Wang, Zhiheng; Sampson, John H.; McSherry, Frances; Herndon, James E.; Allen, Karen J.; Duffy, Eileen; Hoang, Jenny K.; Chang, Zheng; Yoo, David S.; Kelsey, Chris R.; Yin, Fang-Fang

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To identify an optimal margin about the gross target volume (GTV) for stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) of brain metastases, minimizing toxicity and local recurrence. Methods and Materials: Adult patients with 1 to 3 brain metastases less than 4 cm in greatest dimension, no previous brain radiation therapy, and Karnofsky performance status (KPS) above 70 were eligible for this institutional review board–approved trial. Individual lesions were randomized to 1- or 3- mm uniform expansion of the GTV defined on contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The resulting planning target volume (PTV) was treated to 24, 18, or 15 Gy marginal dose for maximum PTV diameters less than 2, 2 to 2.9, and 3 to 3.9 cm, respectively, using a linear accelerator–based image-guided system. The primary endpoint was local recurrence (LR). Secondary endpoints included neurocognition Mini-Mental State Examination, Trail Making Test Parts A and B, quality of life (Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Brain), radionecrosis (RN), need for salvage radiation therapy, distant failure (DF) in the brain, and overall survival (OS). Results: Between February 2010 and November 2012, 49 patients with 80 brain metastases were treated. The median age was 61 years, the median KPS was 90, and the predominant histologies were non–small cell lung cancer (25 patients) and melanoma (8). Fifty-five, 19, and 6 lesions were treated to 24, 18, and 15 Gy, respectively. The PTV/GTV ratio, volume receiving 12 Gy or more, and minimum dose to PTV were significantly higher in the 3-mm group (all P<.01), and GTV was similar (P=.76). At a median follow-up time of 32.2 months, 11 patients were alive, with median OS 10.6 months. LR was observed in only 3 lesions (2 in the 1 mm group, P=.51), with 6.7% LR 12 months after SRS. Biopsy-proven RN alone was observed in 6 lesions (5 in the 3-mm group, P=.10). The 12-month DF rate was 45.7%. Three months after SRS, no significant change in

  18. Invention of the N-localizer for stereotactic neurosurgery and its use in the Brown-Roberts-Wells stereotactic frame.

    PubMed

    Brown, Russell A; Nelson, James A

    2012-06-01

    The N-localizer, which facilitates computed tomography-guided stereotactic surgery, was invented in the late 1970s by a medical student who built a prototype stereotactic frame to test the concept. Initial experiments using the prototype frame were soon followed by surgery in humans using the Brown-Roberts-Wells stereotactic frame.

  19. Pathological characteristics of spine metastases treated with high-dose single-fraction stereotactic radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Katsoulakis, Evangelia; Laufer, Ilya; Bilsky, Mark; Agaram, Narasimhan P; Lovelock, Michael; Yamada, Yoshiya

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Spine radiosurgery is increasingly being used to treat spinal metastases. As patients are living longer because of the increasing efficacy of systemic agents, appropriate follow-up and posttreatment management for these patients is critical. Tumor progression after spine radiosurgery is rare; however, vertebral compression fractures are recognized as a more common posttreatment effect. The use of radiographic imaging alone posttreatment may makeit difficult to distinguish tumor progression from postradiation changes such as fibrosis. This is the largest series from a prospective database in which the authors examine histopathology of samples obtained from patients who underwent surgical intervention for presumed tumor progression or mechanical pain secondary to compression fracture. The majority of patients had tumor ablation and resulting fibrosis rather than tumor progression. The aim of this study was to evaluate tumor histopathology and characteristics of patients who underwent pathological sampling because of radiographic tumor progression, fibrosis, or collapsed vertebrae after receiving high-dose single-fraction stereotactic radiosurgery. METHODS Between January 2005 and January 2014, a total of 582 patients were treated with linear accelerator-based single-fraction (18-24 Gy) stereotactic radiosurgery. The authors retrospectively identified 30 patients (5.1%) who underwent surgical intervention for 32 lesions with vertebral cement augmentation for either mechanical pain or instability secondary to vertebral compression fracture (n = 17) or instrumentation (n = 15) for radiographic tumor progression. Radiation and surgical treatment, histopathology, and long-term outcomes were reviewed. Survival and time to recurrence were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. RESULTS The mean age at the time of radiosurgery was 59 years (range 36-80 years). The initial pathological diagnoses were obtained for all patients and primarily included radioresistant

  20. IMRT with Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy Boost for High Risk Malignant Salivary Gland Malignancies: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Karam, Sana D.; Rashid, Abdul; Snider, James W.; Wooster, Margaux; Bhatia, Shilpa; Jay, Ann K.; Newkirk, Kenneth; Davidson, Bruce; Harter, William K.

    2014-01-01

    Patients with high risk salivary gland malignancies are at increased risk of local failure. We present our institutional experience with dose escalation using hypofractionated stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in a subset of this rare disease. Over the course of 9 years, 10 patients presenting with skull base invasion, gross disease with one or more adverse features, or those treated with adjuvant radiation with three or more pathologic features were treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy followed by hypofractionated SBRT boost. Patients presented with variable tumor histologies, and in all but one, the tumors were classified as poorly differentiated high grade. Four patients had gross disease, three had gross residual disease, three had skull base invasion, and two patients had rapidly recurrent disease (≤6 months) that had been previously treated with surgical resection. The median stereotactic radiosurgery boost dose was 17.5 Gy (range 10–30 Gy) given in a median of five fractions (range 3–6 fractions) for a total median cumulative dose of 81.2 Gy (range 73.2–95.6 Gy). The majority of the patients received platinum based concurrent chemotherapy with their radiation. At a median follow-up of 32 months (range 12–120) for all patients and 43 months for surviving patients (range 12–120), actuarial 3-year locoregional control, distant control, progression-free survival, and overall survival were 88, 81, 68, and 79%, respectively. Only one patient failed locally and two failed distantly. Serious late toxicity included graft ulceration in one patient and osteoradionecrosis in another patient, both of which underwent surgical reconstruction. Six patients developed fibrosis. In a subset of patients with salivary gland malignancies with skull base invasion, gross disease, or those treated adjuvantly with three or more adverse pathologic features, hypofractionated SBRT boost to intensity-modulated radiotherapy yields good local

  1. Performance of a Novel Repositioning Head Frame for Gamma Knife Perfexion and Image-Guided Linac-Based Intracranial Stereotactic Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ruschin, Mark; Nayebi, Nazanin; Carlsson, Per; Brown, Kevin

    2010-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the geometric positioning and immobilization performance of a vacuum bite-block repositioning head frame (RHF) system for Perfexion (PFX-SRT) and linac-based intracranial image-guided stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT). Methods and Materials: Patients with intracranial tumors received linac-based image-guided SRT using the RHF for setup and immobilization. Three hundred thirty-three fractions of radiation were delivered in 12 patients. The accuracy of the RHF was estimated for linac-based SRT with online cone-beam CT (CBCT) and for PFX-SRT with a repositioning check tool (RCT) and offline CBCT. The RCT's ability to act as a surrogate for anatomic position was estimated through comparison to CBCT image matching. Immobilization performance was evaluated daily with pre- and postdose delivery CBCT scans and RCT measurements. Results: The correlation coefficient between RCT- and CBCT-reported displacements was 0.59, 0.75, 0.79 (Right, Superior, and Anterior, respectively). For image-guided linac-based SRT, the mean three-dimensional (3D) setup error was 0.8 mm with interpatient ({Sigma}) and interfraction ({sigma}) variations of 0.1 and 0.4 mm, respectively. For PFX-SRT, the initial, uncorrected mean 3D positioning displacement in stereotactic coordinates was 2.0 mm, with {Sigma} = 1.1 mm and {sigma} = 0.8 mm. Considering only RCT setups <1mm (PFX action level) the mean 3D positioning displacement reduced to 1.3 mm, with {Sigma} = 0.9 mm and {sigma} = 0.4 mm. The largest contributing systematic uncertainty was in the superior-inferior direction (mean displacement = -0.5 mm; {Sigma} = 0.9 mm). The largest mean rotation was 0.6{sup o} in pitch. The mean 3D intrafraction motion was 0.4 {+-} 0.3 mm. Conclusion: The RHF provides excellent immobilization for intracranial SRT and PFX-SRT. Some small systematic uncertainties in stereotactic positioning exist and must be considered when generating PFX-SRT treatment plans. The RCT provides reasonable surrogacy

  2. Performance of a novel repositioning head frame for gamma knife perfexion and image-guided linac-based intracranial stereotactic radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ruschin, Mark; Nayebi, Nazanin; Carlsson, Per; Brown, Kevin; Tamerou, Messeret; Li, Winnie; Laperriere, Normand; Sahgal, Arjun; Cho, Young-Bin; Ménard, Cynthia; Jaffray, David

    2010-09-01

    To evaluate the geometric positioning and immobilization performance of a vacuum bite-block repositioning head frame (RHF) system for Perfexion (PFX-SRT) and linac-based intracranial image-guided stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT). Patients with intracranial tumors received linac-based image-guided SRT using the RHF for setup and immobilization. Three hundred thirty-three fractions of radiation were delivered in 12 patients. The accuracy of the RHF was estimated for linac-based SRT with online cone-beam CT (CBCT) and for PFX-SRT with a repositioning check tool (RCT) and offline CBCT. The RCT's ability to act as a surrogate for anatomic position was estimated through comparison to CBCT image matching. Immobilization performance was evaluated daily with pre- and postdose delivery CBCT scans and RCT measurements. The correlation coefficient between RCT- and CBCT-reported displacements was 0.59, 0.75, 0.79 (Right, Superior, and Anterior, respectively). For image-guided linac-based SRT, the mean three-dimensional (3D) setup error was 0.8 mm with interpatient (Sigma) and interfraction (sigma) variations of 0.1 and 0.4 mm, respectively. For PFX-SRT, the initial, uncorrected mean 3D positioning displacement in stereotactic coordinates was 2.0 mm, with Sigma = 1.1 mm and sigma = 0.8 mm. Considering only RCT setups <1mm (PFX action level) the mean 3D positioning displacement reduced to 1.3 mm, with Sigma = 0.9 mm and sigma = 0.4 mm. The largest contributing systematic uncertainty was in the superior-inferior direction (mean displacement = -0.5 mm; Sigma = 0.9 mm). The largest mean rotation was 0.6 degrees in pitch. The mean 3D intrafraction motion was 0.4 +/- 0.3 mm. The RHF provides excellent immobilization for intracranial SRT and PFX-SRT. Some small systematic uncertainties in stereotactic positioning exist and must be considered when generating PFX-SRT treatment plans. The RCT provides reasonable surrogacy for internal anatomic displacement. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc

  3. Image-Guided Radiotherapy via Daily Online Cone-Beam CT Substantially Reduces Margin Requirements for Stereotactic Lung Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Grills, Inga S. Hugo, Geoffrey; Kestin, Larry L.; Galerani, Ana Paula; Chao, K. Kenneth; Wloch, Jennifer; Yan Di

    2008-03-15

    Purpose: To determine treatment accuracy and margins for stereotactic lung radiotherapy with and without cone-beam CT (CBCT) image guidance. Methods and Materials: Acquired for the study were 308 CBCT of 24 patients with solitary peripheral lung tumors treated with stereotactic radiotherapy. Patients were immobilized in a stereotactic body frame (SBF) or alpha-cradle and treated with image guidance using daily CBCT. Four (T1) or five (T2/metastatic) 12-Gy fractions were prescribed to the planning target volume (PTV) edge. The PTV margin was {>=}5 mm depending on a pretreatment estimate of tumor excursion. Initial daily setup was according to SBF coordinates or tattoos for alpha-cradle cases. A CBCT was performed and registered to the planning CT using soft tissue registration of the target. The initial setup error/precorrection position, was recorded for the superior-inferior, anterior-posterior, and medial-lateral directions. The couch was adjusted to correct the tumor positional error. A second CBCT verified tumor position after correction. Patients were treated in the corrected position after the residual errors were {<=}2 mm. A final CBCT after treatment assessed intrafraction tumor displacement. Results: The precorrection systematic ({sigma}) and random errors ({sigma}) for the population ranged from 2-3 mm for SBF and 2-6 mm for alpha-cradle patients; postcorrection errors ranged from 0.4-1.0 mm. Calculated population margins were 9 to 13 mm (SBF) and 10-14 mm (cradle) precorrection, 1-2 mm (SBF), and 2-3 mm (cradle) postcorrection, and 2-4 mm (SBF) and 2-5 mm (cradle) posttreatment. Conclusions: Setup for stereotactic lung radiotherapy using a SBF or alpha-cradle alone is suboptimal. CBCT image guidance significantly improves target positioning and substantially reduces required target margins and normal tissue irradiation.

  4. Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Pediatric High-Grade Brain Arteriovenous Malformations: Our Experience and Review of Literature.

    PubMed

    Patibandla, Mohana Rao; Ding, Dale; Xu, Zhiyuan; Sheehan, Jason P

    2017-06-01

    Although high-grade AVMs pose a particularly high lifetime hemorrhage risk to pediatric patients (age <18 years), little is known about the treatment outcomes. Therefore, the aim of this retrospective cohort study was to evaluate the outcomes after single-session stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for pediatric high-grade AVMs. We reviewed baseline and treatment outcomes data from pediatric patients aged less than 18 years with Spetzler-Martin grade IV AVMs treated with SRS in a single session at our institution. The study cohort comprised 28 pediatric patients with Spetzler-Martin grade IV AVMs, with a mean age of 12.1 years. Statistical analyses were performed to determine predictors of obliteration and compare the outcomes of patients with versus without previous AVM hemorrhage. The mean nidus volume, radiosurgical margin dose, and follow-up duration were 5.9 cm(3), 19.4 Gy, and 116 months, respectively. The actuarial obliteration rates at 3, 5, 7, and 10 years were 11%, 19%, 29%, and 35%, respectively. Older age was significantly associated with obliteration in the univariate Cox proportional regression analysis (P = 0.01). During the latency period before obliteration, the annual post-SRS hemorrhage rate was 3.2%. Symptomatic and permanent radiation-induced changes were detected in 7.1% and 3.5%, respectively. A favorable outcome was achieved in 35.7%, and it was more frequently achieved for those with ruptured AVMs (P = 0.0484). The efficacy of single-session SRS for the treatment of high-grade AVMs in the pediatric population is limited, particularly for those with unruptured nidi. Multimodal therapies should be considered in the management of selected pediatric high-grade AVMs. However, further prospective analyses are warranted to define the optimal management strategy for these challenging vascular malformations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Planned Two-Fraction Proton Beam Stereotactic Radiosurgery for High-Risk Inoperable Cerebral Arteriovenous Malformations

    SciTech Connect

    Hattangadi, Jona A.; Chapman, Paul H.; Bussiere, Marc R.; Niemierko, Andrzej; Ogilvy, Christopher S.; Rowell, Alison; Daartz, Juliane; Loeffler, Jay S.; Shih, Helen A.

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate patients with high-risk cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs), based on eloquent brain location or large size, who underwent planned two-fraction proton stereotactic radiosurgery (PSRS). Methods and Materials: From 1991 to 2009, 59 patients with high-risk cerebral AVMs received two-fraction PSRS. Median nidus volume was 23 cc (range, 1.4-58.1 cc), 70% of cases had nidus volume {>=}14 cc, and 34% were in critical locations (brainstem, basal ganglia). Median AVM score based on age, AVM size, and location was 3.19 (range, 0.9-6.9). Many patients had prior surgery or embolization (40%) or prior PSRS (12%). The most common prescription was 16 Gy radiobiologic equivalent (RBE) in two fractions, prescribed to the 90% isodose. Results: At a median follow-up of 56.1 months, 9 patients (15%) had total and 20 patients (34%) had partial obliteration. Patients with total obliteration received higher total dose than those with partial or no obliteration (mean dose, 17.6 vs. 15.5 Gy (RBE), p = 0.01). Median time to total obliteration was 62 months (range, 23-109 months), and 5-year actuarial rate of partial or total obliteration was 33%. Five-year actuarial rate of hemorrhage was 22% (95% confidence interval, 12.5%-36.8%) and 14% (n = 8) suffered fatal hemorrhage. Lesions with higher AVM scores were more likely to hemorrhage (p = 0.024) and less responsive to radiation (p = 0.026). The most common complication was Grade 1 headache acutely (14%) and long term (12%). One patient developed a Grade 2 generalized seizure disorder, and two had mild neurologic deficits. Conclusions: High-risk AVMs can be safely treated with two-fraction PSRS, although total obliteration rate is low and patients remain at risk for future hemorrhage. Future studies should include higher doses or a multistaged PSRS approach for lesions more resistant to obliteration with radiation.

  6. Hypofractionated Stereotactic Radiation Therapy in Recurrent High-Grade Glioma: A New Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Navarria, Pierina; Ascolese, Anna Maria; Tomatis, Stefano; Reggiori, Giacomo; Clerici, Elena; Villa, Elisa; Maggi, Giulia; Bello, Lorenzo; Pessina, Federico; Cozzi, Luca; Scorsetti, Marta

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to evaluate outcomes of hypofractionated stereotactic radiation therapy (HSRT) in patients re-treated for recurrent high-grade glioma. Materials and Methods From January 2006 to September 2013, 25 patients were treated. Six patients underwent radiation therapy alone, while 19 underwent combined treatment with surgery and/or chemotherapy. Only patients with Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS) > 70 and time from previous radiotherapy greater than 6 months were re-irradiated. The mean recurrent tumor volume was 35 cm3 (range, 2.46 to 116.7 cm3), and most of the patients (84%) were treated with a total dose of 25 Gy in five fractions (range, 20 to 50 Gy in 5-10 fractions). Results The median follow-up was 18 months (range, 4 to 36 months). The progression-free survival (PFS) at 1 and 2 years was 72% and 34% and the overall survival (OS) 76% and 50%, respectively. No severe toxicity was recorded. In univariate and multivariate analysis extent of resection at diagnosis significantly influenced PFS and OS (p < 0.01). Patients with smaller recurren tumor volume treated had better local control and survival. Indeed, the 2-year PFS was 40% (≤ 50 cm3) versus 11% (p=0.1) and the 2-year OS 56% versus 33% (> 50 cm3), respectively (p=0.26). Conclusion In our experience, HSRT could be a safe and feasible therapeutic option for recurrent high grade glioma even in patients with larger tumors. We believe that a multidisciplinary evaluation is mandatory to assure the best treatment for selected patients. Local treatment should also be considered as part of an integrated approach. PMID:25761491

  7. Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) in high-grade glioma: judicious selection of small target volumes improves results.

    PubMed

    Bokstein, Felix; Blumenthal, Deborah T; Corn, Benjamin W; Gez, Eliahu; Matceyevsky, Diana; Shtraus, Natan; Ram, Zvi; Kanner, Andrew A

    2016-02-01

    We present a retrospective review of 55 Stereotactic Radiosurgery (SRS) procedures performed in 47 consecutive patients with high-grade glioma (HGG). Thirty-three (70.2%) patients were diagnosed with glioblastoma and 14 (29.8%) with grade III glioma. The indications for SRS were small (up to 30 mm in diameter) locally progressing lesions in 32/47 (68%) or new distant lesions in 15/47 (32%) patients. The median target volume was 2.2 cc (0.2-9.5 cc) and the median prescription dose was 18 Gy (14-24 Gy). Three patients (5.5% incidence in 55 treatments) developed radiation necrosis. In eight cases (17%) patients received a second salvage SRS treatment to nine new lesions detected during follow-up. In 22/55 SRS treatments (40.0%) patients received concurrent chemo- or biological therapy, including temozolamide (TMZ) (15 patients), bevacizumab (BVZ) (6 patients) and carboplatin in one patient. Median time to progression after SRS was 5.0 months (1.0-96.4). Median survival time after SRS was 15.9 months (2.3-109.3) overall median survival (since diagnosis) was 37.4 months (9.6-193.6 months). Long-lasting responses (>12 months) after SRS were observed in 25/46 (54.3%) patients. We compared a matched (histology, age, KPS) cohort of patients with recurrent HGG treated with BVZ alone with the current study group. Median survival was significantly longer for SRS treated patients compared to the BVZ only cohort (12.6 vs. 7.3 months, p = 0.0102). SRS may be considered an effective salvage procedure for selected patients with small volume, recurrent high-grade gliomas. Long-term radiological control was observed in more than 50% of the patients.

  8. Hypofractionated Stereotactic Radiation Therapy in Recurrent High-Grade Glioma: A New Challenge.

    PubMed

    Navarria, Pierina; Ascolese, Anna Maria; Tomatis, Stefano; Reggiori, Giacomo; Clerici, Elena; Villa, Elisa; Maggi, Giulia; Bello, Lorenzo; Pessina, Federico; Cozzi, Luca; Scorsetti, Marta

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate outcomes of hypofractionated stereotactic radiation therapy (HSRT) in patients re-treated for recurrent high-grade glioma. From January 2006 to September 2013, 25 patients were treated. Six patients underwent radiation therapy alone, while 19 underwent combined treatment with surgery and/or chemotherapy. Only patients with Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS) > 70 and time from previous radiotherapy greater than 6 months were re-irradiated. The mean recurrent tumor volume was 35 cm(3) (range, 2.46 to 116.7 cm(3)), and most of the patients (84%) were treated with a total dose of 25 Gy in five fractions (range, 20 to 50 Gy in 5-10 fractions). The median follow-up was 18 months (range, 4 to 36 months). The progression-free survival (PFS) at 1 and 2 years was 72% and 34% and the overall survival (OS) 76% and 50%, respectively. No severe toxicity was recorded. In univariate and multivariate analysis extent of resection at diagnosis significantly influenced PFS and OS (p < 0.01). Patients with smaller recurren tumor volume treated had better local control and survival. Indeed, the 2-year PFS was 40% (≤ 50 cm(3)) versus 11% (p=0.1) and the 2-year OS 56% versus 33% (> 50 cm(3)), respectively (p=0.26). In our experience, HSRT could be a safe and feasible therapeutic option for recurrent high grade glioma even in patients with larger tumors. We believe that a multidisciplinary evaluation is mandatory to assure the best treatment for selected patients. Local treatment should also be considered as part of an integrated approach.

  9. Use of Frameless Stereotactic Neuronavigation and O-arm for Transoral Transpalatal Odontoidectomy to Treat a Very High Basilar Invagination

    PubMed Central

    Moorthy, Skanda; Raheja, Amol; Agrawal, Deepak

    2016-01-01

    Frameless stereotactic neuronavigation system has been in wide use since many years for precise localization of cranial tumors and navigation for spinal instrumentation. We present its usage in the localization of odontoid process in a very high basilar invagination for a transoral transpalatal resection of the same. We discuss the technical aspects of assembly of neuronavigation system, O-arm and Mayfield head frame on Allen spine system to achieve precise and accurate localization of high riding odontoid process through an extremely narrow operative corridor. PMID:28163511

  10. High-dose MVCT image guidance for stereotactic body radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Westerly, David C.; Schefter, Tracey E.; Kavanagh, Brian D.; Chao, Edward; Lucas, Dan; Flynn, Ryan T.; Miften, Moyed

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is a potent treatment for early stage primary and limited metastatic disease. Accurate tumor localization is essential to administer SBRT safely and effectively. Tomotherapy combines helical IMRT with onboard megavoltage CT (MVCT) imaging and is well suited for SBRT; however, MVCT results in reduced soft tissue contrast and increased image noise compared with kilovoltage CT. The goal of this work was to investigate the use of increased imaging doses on a clinical tomotherapy machine to improve image quality for SBRT image guidance. Methods: Two nonstandard, high-dose imaging modes were created on a tomotherapy machine by increasing the linear accelerator (LINAC) pulse rate from the nominal setting of 80 Hz, to 160 Hz and 300 Hz, respectively. Weighted CT dose indexes (wCTDIs) were measured for the standard, medium, and high-dose modes in a 30 cm solid water phantom using a calibrated A1SL ion chamber. Image quality was assessed from scans of a customized image quality phantom. Metrics evaluated include: contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs), high-contrast spatial resolution, image uniformity, and percent image noise. In addition, two patients receiving SBRT were localized using high-dose MVCT scans. Raw detector data collected after each scan were used to reconstruct standard-dose images for comparison. Results: MVCT scans acquired using a pitch of 1.0 resulted in wCTDI values of 2.2, 4.7, and 8.5 cGy for the standard, medium, and high-dose modes respectively. CNR values for both low and high-contrast materials were found to increase with the square root of dose. Axial high-contrast spatial resolution was comparable for all imaging modes at 0.5 lp/mm. Image uniformity was improved and percent noise decreased as the imaging dose increased. Similar improvements in image quality were observed in patient images, with decreases in image noise being the most notable. Conclusions: High-dose imaging modes are made possible on a

  11. Image-Guided Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Lung Tumors Using BodyLoc With Tomotherapy: Clinical Implementation and Set-Up Accuracy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Jining Uhl, Barry; Dewitt, Kelly; Young, Mark; Taylor, Brian; Fei Dingyu; Lo, Y-C

    2010-04-01

    We investigated the use of a BodyLoc immobilization and stereotactic localization device combined with TomoTherapy megavoltage CT (MVCT) in lung stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) to reduce set-up uncertainty and treatment time. Eight patients treated with 3-5 fractions of SBRT were retrospectively analyzed. A BodyLoc localizer was used in both CT simulation for localization and the initial patient treatment set-up. Patients were immobilized with a vacuum cushion on the back and a thermoplastic body cast on the anterior body. Pretreatment MVCT from the TomoTherapy unit was fused with the planning kilovoltage CT (KVCT) before each fraction of treatment to determine interfractional set-up error. The comparison of two MVCTs during a fraction of treatment resulted in the intrafractional uncertainty of the treatment. A total of 224 target isocenter shifts were analyzed to assess these inter- and intrafractional tumor motions. We found that for interfractional shifts, the mean set-up errors and standard deviations were -1.1 {+-} 2.8 mm, -2.5 {+-} 8.7 mm, and 4.1 {+-} 2.6 mm, for lateral, longitudinal, and vertical variation, respectively; the mean setup rotational variation was -0.3 {+-} 0.7 deg.; and the maximum motion was 13.5 mm in the longitudinal direction. For intrafractional shifts, the mean set-up errors and standard deviations were -0.1 {+-} 0.7 mm, -0.3 {+-} 2.0 mm, and 0.5 {+-} 1.1 mm for the lateral, longitudinal, and vertical shifts, respectively; the mean rotational variation was 0.1 {+-} 0.2 deg.; and the maximum motion was 3.8 mm in the longitudinal direction. There was no correlation among patient characteristics, set-up uncertainties, and isocenter shifts, and the interfractional set-up uncertainties were larger than the intrafractional isocenter shift. The results of this study suggested that image-guided stereotactic body radiotherapy using the BodyLoc immobilization system with TomoTherapy can improve treatment accuracy.

  12. [Stereotactic radiotherapy for pelvic tumors].

    PubMed

    Mazeron, R; Fumagalli, I

    2014-01-01

    Extracranial stereotactic radiotherapy is booming. The development and spread of dedicated accelerators coupled with efficient methods of repositioning can now allow treatments of mobile lesions with moderate size, with high doses per fraction. Intuitively, except for the prostate, pelvic tumours, often requiring irradiation of regional lymph node drainage, lend little to this type of treatment. However, in some difficult circumstances, such as boost or re-radiation, stereotactic irradiation condition is promising and clinical experiences have already been reported.

  13. Feasibility of CT-based intraoperative 3D stereotactic image-guided navigation in the upper cervical spine of children 10 years of age or younger: initial experience.

    PubMed

    Kovanda, Timothy J; Ansari, Shaheryar F; Qaiser, Rabia; Fulkerson, Daniel H

    2015-07-24

    OBJECT Rigid screw fixation may be technically difficult in the upper cervical spine of young children. Intraoperative stereotactic navigation may potentially assist a surgeon in precise placement of screws in anatomically challenging locations. Navigation may also assist in defining abnormal anatomy. The object of this study was to evaluate the authors' initial experience with the feasibility and accuracy of this technique, both for resection and for screw placement in the upper cervical spine in younger children. METHODS Eight consecutive pediatric patients 10 years of age or younger underwent upper cervical spine surgery aided by image-guided navigation. The demographic, surgical, and clinical data were recorded. Screw position was evaluated with either an intraoperative or immediately postoperative CT scan. RESULTS One patient underwent navigation purely for guidance of bony resection. A total of 14 navigated screws were placed in the other 7 patients, including 5 C-2 pedicle screws. All 14 screws were properly positioned, defined as the screw completely contained within the cortical bone in the expected trajectory. There were no immediate complications associated with navigation. CONCLUSIONS Image-guided navigation is feasible within the pediatric cervical spine and may be a useful surgical tool for placing screws in a patient with small, often difficult bony anatomy. The authors describe their experience with their first 8 pediatric patients who underwent navigation in cervical spine surgery. The authors highlight differences in technique compared with similar navigation in adults.

  14. Esophageal Toxicity From High-Dose, Single-Fraction Paraspinal Stereotactic Radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, Brett W.; Jackson, Andrew; Hunt, Margie; Bilsky, Mark; Yamada, Yoshiya

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To report the esophageal toxicity from single-fraction paraspinal stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and identify dosimetric and clinical risk factors for toxicity. Methods and Materials: A total of 204 spinal metastases abutting the esophagus (182 patients) were treated with high-dose single-fraction SRS during 2003-2010. Toxicity was scored using the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events, version 4.0. Dose-volume histograms were combined to generate a comprehensive atlas of complication incidence that identifies risk factors for toxicity. Correlation of dose-volume factors with esophageal toxicity was assessed using Fisher's exact test and logistic regression. Clinical factors were correlated with toxicity. Results: The median dose to the planning treatment volume was 24 Gy. Median follow-up was 12 months (range, 3-81). There were 31 (15%) acute and 24 (12%) late esophageal toxicities. The rate of grade {>=}3 acute or late toxicity was 6.8% (14 patients). Fisher's exact test resulted in significant median splits for grade {>=}3 toxicity at V12 = 3.78 cm{sup 3} (relative risk [RR] 3.7, P=.05), V15 = 1.87 cm{sup 3} (RR 13, P=.0013), V20 = 0.11 cm{sup 3} (RR 6, P=0.01), and V22 = 0.0 cm{sup 3} (RR 13, P=.0013). The median split for D2.5 cm{sup 3} (14.02 Gy) was also a significant predictor of toxicity (RR 6; P=.01). A highly significant logistic regression model was generated on the basis of D2.5 cm{sup 3}. One hundred percent (n = 7) of grade {>=}4 toxicities were associated with radiation recall reactions after doxorubicin or gemcitabine chemotherapy or iatrogenic manipulation of the irradiated esophagus. Conclusions: High-dose, single-fraction paraspinal SRS has a low rate of grade {>=}3 esophageal toxicity. Severe esophageal toxicity is minimized with careful attention to esophageal doses during treatment planning. Iatrogenic manipulation of the irradiated esophagus and systemic agents classically associated with radiation

  15. On-Board Imaging Validation of Optically Guided Stereotactic Radiosurgery Positioning System for Conventionally Fractionated Radiotherapy for Paranasal Sinus and Skull Base Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Maxim, Peter G.; Loo, Billy W.; Murphy, James D.; Chu, Karen P.M.; Hsu, Annie; Le, Quynh-Thu

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the positioning accuracy of an optical positioning system for stereotactic radiosurgery in a pilot experience of optically guided, conventionally fractionated, radiotherapy for paranasal sinus and skull base tumors. Methods and Materials: Before each daily radiotherapy session, the positioning of 28 patients was set up using an optical positioning system. After this initial setup, the patients underwent standard on-board imaging that included daily orthogonal kilovoltage images and weekly cone beam computed tomography scans. Daily translational shifts were made after comparing the on-board images with the treatment planning computed tomography scans. These daily translational shifts represented the daily positional error in the optical tracking system and were recorded during the treatment course. For 13 patients treated with smaller fields, a three-degree of freedom (3DOF) head positioner was used for more accurate setup. Results: The mean positional error for the optically guided system in patients with and without the 3DOF head positioner was 1.4 {+-} 1.1 mm and 3.9 {+-} 1.6 mm, respectively (p <.0001). The mean positional error drifted 0.11 mm/wk upward during the treatment course for patients using the 3DOF head positioner (p = .057). No positional drift was observed in the patients without the 3DOF head positioner. Conclusion: Our initial clinical experience with optically guided head-and-neck fractionated radiotherapy was promising and demonstrated clinical feasibility. The optically guided setup was especially useful when used in conjunction with the 3DOF head positioner and when it was recalibrated to the shifts using the weekly portal images.

  16. A Study on Target Positioning Error and Its Impact on Dose Variation in Image-Guided Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for the Spine

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Siyong Jin, Hosang; Yang, Huey; Amdur, Robert J.

    2009-04-01

    Purpose: To investigate the amount of target positioning error and evaluate its dosimetric impact during image-guided stereotactic body radiotherapy for single-fraction spine treatment. Methods and Materials: A prescription dose of 15 Gy and five to nine coplanar intensity-modulated beams were used. The patient was immobilized with a custom-fit vacuum mold, and the target was localized with a volumetric cone-beam CT image. A robotic couch with six degrees of freedom was used for target adjustment. For evaluation a cone-beam CT image was obtained at the end of treatment. Both target positioning error and its dosimetric impact were investigated for the first 9 cases. Results: For cases studied, translational errors were 0.9 {+-} 0.5 mm (lateral), 1.2 {+-} 0.9 mm (longitudinal), 0.7 {+-} 0.6 mm (vertical), and 1.8 {+-} 1.0 mm (vector), and rotational errors were 1.6 deg. {+-} 1.3 deg. (pitch), 0.8 deg. {+-} 0.9 deg. (roll), and 0.8 deg. {+-} 0.4{sup o} (yaw). For the clinical target volume, D{sub 95} (dose to 95% of target volume), D{sub 90}, D{sub max}, and D{sub mean} were evaluated. Only 1 case showed significant dose variations, reaching up to 18% in D{sub 95}. The spinal cord dose was evaluated by observing D{sub 0.1} (dose to 0.1 cm{sup 3}), D{sub 0.5}, D{sub 1.0}, and D{sub max}. Although 1 case showed a dose change reaching up to 30% in D{sub max}, cord dose was within the planning tolerance limit in all but 2 cases (3% higher in one and 0.4% higher in the other). Conclusion: The implemented image-guided stereotactic body radiotherapy provides precise target localization. However, despite reasonably precise spatial precision, dosimetric perturbation can be significant because of both extremely steep dose gradients and close distances between the target and the spinal cord.

  17. Predictors of Local Control After Single-Dose Stereotactic Image-Guided Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Extracranial Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Greco, Carlo; Zelefsky, Michael J.; Lovelock, Michael; Fuks, Zvi; Hunt, Margie; Rosenzweig, Kenneth; Zatcky, Joan; Kim, Balem; Yamada, Yoshiya

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: To report tumor local control after treatment with single-dose image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (SD-IGRT) to extracranial metastatic sites. Methods and Materials: A total of 126 metastases in 103 patients were treated with SD-IGRT to prescription doses of 18-24 Gy (median, 24 Gy) between 2004 and 2007. Results: The overall actuarial local relapse-free survival (LRFS) rate was 64% at a median follow-up of 18 months (range, 2-45 months). The median time to failure was 9.6 months (range, 1-23 months). On univariate analysis, LRFS was significantly correlated with prescription dose (p = 0.029). Stratification by dose into high (23 to 24 Gy), intermediate (21 to 22 Gy), and low (18 to 20 Gy) dose levels revealed highly significant differences in LRFS between high (82%) and low doses (25%) (p < 0.0001). Overall, histology had no significant effect on LRFS (p = 0.16). Renal cell histology displayed a profound dose-response effect, with 80% LRFS at the high dose level (23 to 24 Gy) vs. 37% with low doses ({<=}22 Gy) (p = 0.04). However, for patients who received the high dose level, histology was not a statistically significant predictor of LRFS (p = 0.90). Target organ (bone vs. lymph node vs. soft tissues) (p = 0.5) and planning target volume size (p = 0.55) were not found to be associated with long-term LRFS probability. Multivariate Cox regression analysis confirmed prescription dose to be a significant predictor of LRFS (p = 0.003). Conclusion: High-dose SD-IGRT is a noninvasive procedure resulting in high probability of local tumor control. Single-dose IGRT may be effectively used to locally control metastatic deposits regardless of histology and target organ, provided sufficiently high doses (> 22 Gy) of radiation are delivered.

  18. Clinical Feasibility of Using an EPID in cine Mode for Image-Guided Verification of Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Berbeco, Ross I.

    2007-09-01

    Purpose: To introduce a novel method for monitoring tumor location during stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) while the treatment beam is on by using a conventional electronic portal imaging device (EPID). Methods and Materials: In our clinic, selected patients were treated under a phase I institutional review board-approved SBRT protocol for limited hepatic metastases from solid tumors. Before treatment planning multiple gold fiducial markers were implanted on the periphery of the tumor. During treatment the EPID was used in cine mode to collect the exit radiation and produce a sequence of images for each field. An in-house program was developed for calculating the location of the fiducials and their relative distance to the planned locations. Results: Three case studies illustrate the utility of the technique. Patient A exhibited a systematic shift of 4 mm during one of the treatment beams. Patient B showed an inferior drift of the target of approximately 1 cm from the time of setup to the end of the fraction. Patient C had a poor setup on the first day of treatment that was quantified and accounted for on subsequent treatment days. Conclusions: Target localization throughout each treatment beam can be quickly assessed with the presented technique. Treatment monitoring with an EPID in cine mode is shown to be a clinically feasible and useful tool.

  19. Translational and rotational localization errors in cone-beam CT based image-guided lung stereotactic radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Garibaldi, Cristina; Piperno, Gaia; Ferrari, Annamaria; Surgo, Alessia; Muto, Matteo; Ronchi, Sara; Bazani, Alessia; Pansini, Floriana; Cremonesi, Marta; Jereczek-Fossa, Barbara Alicja; Orecchia, Roberto

    2016-07-01

    Accurate localization is crucial in delivering safe and effective stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). The aim of this study was to analyse the accuracy of image-guidance using the cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) of the VERO system in 57 patients treated for lung SBRT and to calculate the treatment margins. The internal target volume (ITV) was obtained by contouring the tumor on maximum and mean intensity projection CT images reconstructed from a respiration correlated 4D-CT. Translational and rotational tumor localization errors were identified by comparing the manual registration of the ITV to the motion-blurred tumor on the CBCT and they were corrected by means of the robotic couch and the ring rotation. A verification CBCT was acquired after correction in order to evaluate residual errors. The mean 3D vector at initial set-up was 6.6±2.3mm, which was significantly reduced to 1.6±0.8mm after 6D automatic correction. 94% of the rotational errors were within 3°. The PTV margins used to compensate for residual tumor localization errors were 3.1, 3.5 and 3.3mm in the LR, SI and AP directions, respectively. On-line image guidance with the ITV-CBCT matching technique and automatic 6D correction of the VERO system allowed a very accurate tumor localization in lung SBRT. Copyright © 2016 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Outcome of Elderly Patients with Meningioma after Image-Guided Stereotactic Radiotherapy: A Study of 100 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Budach, Volker; Graaf, Lukas; Gollrad, Johannes; Badakhshi, Harun

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Incidence of meningioma increases with age. Surgery has been the mainstay treatment. Elderly patients, however, are at risk of severe morbidity. Therefore, we conducted this study to analyze long-term outcomes of linac-based fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) for older adults (aged ≥65 years) with meningioma and determine prognostic factors. Materials and Methods. Between October 1998 and March 2009, 100 patients (≥65, median age, 71 years) were treated with FSRT for meningioma. Two patients were lost to follow-up. Eight patients each had grade I and grade II meningiomas, and five patients had grade III meningiomas. The histology was unknown in 77 cases (grade 0). Results. The median follow-up was 37 months, and 3-year, 5-year, and 10-year progression-free survival (PFS) rates were 93.7%, 91.1%, and 82%. Patients with grade 0/I meningioma showed 3- and 5-year PFS rates of 98.4% and 95.6%. Patients with grade II or III meningiomas showed 3-year PFS rates of 36%. 93.8% of patients showed local tumor control. Multivariate analysis did not indicate any significant prognostic factors. Conclusion. FSRT may play an important role as a noninvasive and safe method in the clinical management of older patients with meningioma. PMID:26101778

  1. Frameless high dose rate stereotactic lung radiotherapy: intrafraction tumor position and delivery time.

    PubMed

    Peguret, Nicolas; Dahele, Max; Cuijpers, Johan P; Slotman, Ben J; Verbakel, Wilko F A R

    2013-06-01

    Intrafraction change in tumor position (Δ) was evaluated for stereotactic lung radiotherapy delivered with flattening filter free volumetric modulated arc therapy. In 140 fractions from 32 patients mean Δ (±SD) was -0.7±1.4 mm (vertical), -0.7±1.3 mm (longitudinal) and +0.2±1.2 mm (lateral) with mean vector 2.1±1.2 mm. Mean delivery time was 4.4±3.4 min (mean beam-on 1.9±0.4 min). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Stereotactic biopsy for brainstem tumors in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Gómez, José L; Rodríguez-Alvarez, Carlos A; Marhx-Bracho, Alfonso; Rueda-Franco, Fernando

    2010-01-01

    Our aim is to describe clinical and paraclinical features in patients who underwent stereotactic-guided biopsy for brainstem tumors. A study of case series was made by reviewing the records of patients who underwent stereotactic biopsy for brainstem tumors. Stereotactic biopsy for brainstem tumors was performed (between 2000 and 2008) in 20 children (11 girls, and 9 boys), mean age 7.95 +/- 3.12 years at the time of diagnosis. The mean time from onset of symptoms to diagnosis was 6.59 +/- 13.58 months (0.50-60 months). The most frequent symptoms and signs at onset were related to disturbance of cerebellar function and cranial nerve nuclei. Location was pontomesencephalic (35%), pontine (30%), pontomedullar (25%), and in the whole brainstem (10%). The most common type of image was intrinsic-diffused (55%). The histopathology was anaplastic astrocytoma (30%), followed by fibrillary and pilocytic types (25% each), low-grade astrocytoma (5%), high-grade astrocytoma (5%), and normal tissue (10%). Mild complications were observed in only two cases. Stereotactic biopsy done for clarifiying a diagnostic imaging in brainstem tumors is important in obtaining a definitive diagnosis with a low rate of complications.

  3. The impact of 18 F-FET PET-CT on target definition in image-guided stereotactic radiotherapy in patients with skull base lesions.

    PubMed

    Badakhshi, Harun; Graf, Reinhold; Prasad, Vikas; Budach, Volker

    2014-06-25

    as targets for Image-guided stereotactic Radiotherapy. This has to be investigated prospectively in larger cohorts.

  4. Hypofractionated stereotactic body radiotherapy for primary and metastatic liver tumors using the novalis image-guided system: preliminary results regarding efficacy and toxicity.

    PubMed

    Iwata, Hiromitsu; Shibamoto, Yuta; Hashizume, Chisa; Mori, Yoshimasa; Kobayashi, Tatsuya; Hayashi, Naoki; Kosaki, Katsura; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Kuzuya, Teiji; Utsunomiya, Setsuo

    2010-12-01

    www.tcrt.org The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for primary and metastatic liver tumors using the Novalis image-guided radiotherapy system. After preliminarily treating liver tumors using the Novalis system from July 2006, we started a protocol-based study in February 2008. Eighteen patients (6 with primary hepatocellular carcinoma and 12 with metastatic liver tumor) were treated with 55 or 50 Gy, depending upon their planned dose distribution and liver function, delivered in 10 fractions over 2 weeks. Four non-coplanar and three coplanar static beams were used. Patient age ranged from 54 to 84 years (median: 72 years). The Child-Pugh classification was Grade A in 17 patients and Grade B in 1. Tumor diameter ranged from 12 to 35 mm (median: 23 mm). Toxicities were evaluated according to the Common Terminology Criteria of Adverse Events version 4.0, and radiation-induced liver disease (RILD) was defined by Lawrence's criterion. The median follow-up period was 14.5 months. For all patients, the 1-year overall survival and local control rates were 94% and 86%, respectively. A Grade 1 liver enzyme change was observed in 5 patients, but no RILD or chronic liver dysfunction was observed. SBRT using the Novalis image-guided system is safe and effective for treating primary and metastatic liver tumors. Further investigation of SBRT for liver tumors is warranted. In view of the acceptable toxicity observed with this protocol, we have moved to a new protocol to shorten the overall treatment time and escalate the dose.

  5. A Pilot Study of Hypofractionated Stereotactic Radiation Therapy and Sunitinib in Previously Irradiated Patients With Recurrent High-Grade Glioma

    SciTech Connect

    Wuthrick, Evan J.; Curran, Walter J.; Camphausen, Kevin; Lin, Alexander; Glass, Jon; Evans, James; Andrews, David W.; Axelrod, Rita; Shi, Wenyin; Werner-Wasik, Maria; Haacke, E. Mark; Hillman, Gilda G.; Dicker, Adam P.

    2014-10-01

    Purpose/Objective(s): Angiogenic blockade with irradiation may enhance the therapeutic ratio of radiation therapy (RT) through vascular normalization. We sought to determine the safety and toxicity profile of continuous daily-dosed sunitinib when combined with hypofractionated stereotactic RT (fSRT) for recurrent high-grade gliomas (rHGG). Methods and Materials: Eligible patients had malignant high-grade glioma that recurred or progressed after primary surgery and RT. All patients received a minimum of a 10-day course of fSRT, had World Health Organization performance status of 0 to 1, and a life expectancy of >3 months. During fSRT, sunitinib was administered at 37.5 mg daily. The primary endpoint was acute toxicity, and response was assessed via serial magnetic resonance imaging. Results: Eleven patients with rHGG were enrolled. The fSRT doses delivered ranged from 30 to 42 Gy in 2.5- to 3.75-Gy fractions. The median follow-up time was 40 months. Common acute toxicities included hematologic disorders, fatigue, hypertension, and elevated liver transaminases. Sunitinib and fSRT were well tolerated. One grade 4 mucositis toxicity occurred, and no grade 4 or 5 hypertensive events or intracerebral hemorrhages occurred. One patient had a nearly complete response, and 4 patients had stable disease for >9 months. Two patients (18%) remain alive and progression-free >3 years from enrollment. The 6-month progression-free survival was 45%. Conclusions: Sunitinib at a daily dose of 37.5 mg given concurrently with hypofractionated stereotactic reirradiation for rHGG yields acceptable toxicities and an encouraging 6-month progression-free survival.

  6. Indirect Tumor Cell Death After High-Dose Hypofractionated Irradiation: Implications for Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy and Stereotactic Radiation Surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Chang W.; Lee, Yoon-Jin; Griffin, Robert J.; Park, Inhwan; Koonce, Nathan A.; Hui, Susanta; Kim, Mi-Sook; Dusenbery, Kathryn E.; Sperduto, Paul W.; Cho, L. Chinsoo

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to reveal the biological mechanisms underlying stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and stereotactic radiation surgery (SRS). Methods and Materials: FSaII fibrosarcomas grown subcutaneously in the hind limbs of C3H mice were irradiated with 10 to 30 Gy of X rays in a single fraction, and the clonogenic cell survival was determined with in vivo–in vitro excision assay immediately or 2 to 5 days after irradiation. The effects of radiation on the intratumor microenvironment were studied using immunohistochemical methods. Results: After cells were irradiated with 15 or 20 Gy, cell survival in FSaII tumors declined for 2 to 3 days and began to recover thereafter in some but not all tumors. After irradiation with 30 Gy, cell survival declined continuously for 5 days. Cell survival in some tumors 5 days after 20 to 30 Gy irradiation was 2 to 3 logs less than that immediately after irradiation. Irradiation with 20 Gy markedly reduced blood perfusion, upregulated HIF-1α, and increased carbonic anhydrase-9 expression, indicating that irradiation increased tumor hypoxia. In addition, expression of VEGF also increased in the tumor tissue after 20 Gy irradiation, probably due to the increase in HIF-1α activity. Conclusions: Irradiation of FSaII tumors with 15 to 30 Gy in a single dose caused dose-dependent secondary cell death, most likely by causing vascular damage accompanied by deterioration of intratumor microenvironment. Such indirect tumor cell death may play a crucial role in the control of human tumors with SBRT and SRS.

  7. Correlation between heterogeneity index (HI) and gradient index (GI) for high dose stereotactic radiotherapy/radiosurgery (SRT/SRS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tas, B.; Durmus, I. F.; Okumus, A.; Uzel, O. E.

    2017-02-01

    To evaluate between Heterogeneity Index (HI) and Gradient Index (GI) correlation for high dose Stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) / Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) using Versa HD® lineer accelerator. Nine patients with single metastasis were used in this study. Patient's treatment planning were performed using Monaco5.1® Treatment planning system (TPS) with non-coplanar 6MV Flattening filter free (FFF) beams by partial Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) tecnique for each patient. We determined three different size of metastasis catagory which are less than 1cc, between 1cc and 5cc and larger than 5cc volume. Also, three different HI were calculated for each patients. These are 1.10, 1.20 and 1.30. Mean GI was determined 8.57±2.2 for 1.10 HI, 7.23±1.7 for 1.20 HI and 6.0±1.1 for 1.30 HI for less than 1cc metastasis. Then GI was determined 4.77±0.4 for 1.10 HI, 4.37±0.3 for 1.20 HI and 3.97±0.3 for 1.30 HI for between 1cc and 5cc metastasis. Finally, GI was determined 4.00±0.5 for 1.10 HI,3.63±0.5 for 1.20 HI and 3.27±0.4 for 1.30 HI for larger than 5cc metastasis. These results show that GI depends on significantly size and HI of metastasis especially for less than 1cc.

  8. GammaPod-A new device dedicated for stereotactic radiotherapy of breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Cedric X.; Shao Xinyu; Deng Jianchun; Duan Zhengcheng; Zhang Jin; Zheng, Mike; Yu, Ying S.; Regine, William

    2013-05-15

    Purpose: This paper introduces a new external beam radiotherapy device named GammaPod that is dedicated for stereotactic radiotherapy of breast cancer. Methods: The design goal of the GammaPod as a dedicated system for treating breast cancer is the ability to deliver ablative doses with sharp gradients under stereotactic image guidance. Stereotactic localization of the breast is achieved by a vacuum-assisted breast immobilization cup with built-in stereotactic frame. Highly focused radiation is achieved at the isocenter due to the cross-firing from 36 radiation arcs generated by rotating 36 individual Cobalt-60 beams. The dedicated treatment planning system optimizes an optimal path of the focal spot using an optimization algorithm borrowed from computational geometry such that the target can be covered by 90%-95% of the prescription dose and the doses to surrounding tissues are minimized. The treatment plan is intended to be delivered with continuous motion of the treatment couch. In this paper the authors described in detail the gamma radiation unit, stereotactic localization of the breast, and the treatment planning system of the GammaPod system. Results: A prototype GammaPod system was installed at University of Maryland Medical Center and has gone through a thorough functional, geometric, and dosimetric testing. The mechanical and functional performances of the system all meet the functional specifications. Conclusions: An image-guided breast stereotactic radiotherapy device, named GammaPod, has been developed to deliver highly focused and localized doses to a target in the breast under stereotactic image guidance. It is envisioned that the GammaPod technology has the potential to significantly shorten radiation treatments and even eliminate surgery by ablating the tumor and sterilizing the tumor bed simultaneously.

  9. GammaPod—A new device dedicated for stereotactic radiotherapy of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Cedric X.; Shao, Xinyu; Zhang, Jin; Regine, William; Zheng, Mike; Yu, Ying S.; Deng, Jianchun; Duan, Zhengcheng

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This paper introduces a new external beam radiotherapy device named GammaPod that is dedicated for stereotactic radiotherapy of breast cancer. Methods: The design goal of the GammaPod as a dedicated system for treating breast cancer is the ability to deliver ablative doses with sharp gradients under stereotactic image guidance. Stereotactic localization of the breast is achieved by a vacuum-assisted breast immobilization cup with built-in stereotactic frame. Highly focused radiation is achieved at the isocenter due to the cross-firing from 36 radiation arcs generated by rotating 36 individual Cobalt-60 beams. The dedicated treatment planning system optimizes an optimal path of the focal spot using an optimization algorithm borrowed from computational geometry such that the target can be covered by 90%–95% of the prescription dose and the doses to surrounding tissues are minimized. The treatment plan is intended to be delivered with continuous motion of the treatment couch. In this paper the authors described in detail the gamma radiation unit, stereotactic localization of the breast, and the treatment planning system of the GammaPod system. Results: A prototype GammaPod system was installed at University of Maryland Medical Center and has gone through a thorough functional, geometric, and dosimetric testing. The mechanical and functional performances of the system all meet the functional specifications. Conclusions: An image-guided breast stereotactic radiotherapy device, named GammaPod, has been developed to deliver highly focused and localized doses to a target in the breast under stereotactic image guidance. It is envisioned that the GammaPod technology has the potential to significantly shorten radiation treatments and even eliminate surgery by ablating the tumor and sterilizing the tumor bed simultaneously. PMID:23635251

  10. Results for local control and functional outcome after linac-based image-guided stereotactic radiosurgery in 190 patients with vestibular schwannoma

    PubMed Central

    Badakhshi, Harun; Graf, Reinhold; Böhmer, Dirk; Synowitz, Michael; Wiener, Edzard; Budach, Volker

    2014-01-01

    Background We assessed local control (LC) and functional outcome after linac-based stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for vestibular schwannoma (VS). Methods Between 1998 and 2008, 190 patients with VS were treated with SRS. All patients had tumors <2 cm diameter. Patients received 13.5 Gy prescribed to the 80th isodose at the tumor margin. The primary endpoint was LC. Secondary endpoints were symptomatic control and morbidity. Results Median follow-up was 40 months. LC was achieved in 88% of patients. There were no acute reactions exceeding Grade I. Trigeminal nerve dysfunction was present in 21.6% (n = 41) prior to SRS. After treatment, 85% (n = 155) had no change, 4.4,% (n = 8) had a relief of symptoms, 10.4% (n = 19) had new symptoms. Facial nerve dysfunction was present in some patients prior to treatment, e.g. paresis (12.6%; n = 24) and dysgeusia (0.5%; n = 1). After treatment 1.1% (n = 2) reported improvement and 6.1% (n = 11) experienced new symptoms. Hearing problems before SRS were present in 69.5% of patients (n = 132). After treatment, 62.6% (n = 144) had no change, 10.4% (n = 19) experienced improvement and 26.9% (n = 49) became hearing impaired. Conclusion This series of SRS for small VS provided similar LC rates to microsurgery; thus, it is effective as a non-invasive, image-guided procedure. The functional outcomes observed indicate the safety and effectiveness of linac-based SRS. Patients may now be informed of the clinical equivalence of SRS to microsurgery. PMID:23979079

  11. Image-Guidance for Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Fuss, Martin . E-mail: fussm@ohsu.edu; Boda-Heggemann, Judit; Papanikolau, Nikos; Salter, Bill J.

    2007-07-01

    The term stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) describes a recently introduced external beam radiation paradigm by which small lesions outside the brain are treated under stereotactic conditions, in a single or few fractions of high-dose radiation delivery. Similar to the treatment planning and delivery process for cranial radiosurgery, the emphasis is on sparing of adjacent normal tissues through the creation of steep dose gradients. Thus, advanced methods for assuring an accurate relationship between the target volume position and radiation beam geometry, immediately prior to radiation delivery, must be implemented. Such methods can employ imaging techniques such as planar (e.g., x-ray) or volumetric (e.g., computed tomography [CT]) approaches and are commonly summarized under the general term image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT). This review summarizes clinical experience with volumetric and ultrasound based image-guidance for SBRT. Additionally, challenges and potential limitations of pre-treatment image-guidance are presented and discussed.

  12. ICES (Intraoperative Stereotactic Computed Tomography-Guided Endoscopic Surgery) for Brain Hemorrhage: A Multicenter Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Vespa, Paul; Hanley, Daniel; Betz, Joshua; Hoffer, Alan; Engh, Johnathan; Carter, Robert; Nakaji, Peter; Ogilvy, Chris; Jallo, Jack; Selman, Warren; Bistran-Hall, Amanda; Lane, Karen; McBee, Nichol; Saver, Jeffery; Thompson, Richard E; Martin, Neil

    2016-11-01

    Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is a devastating disease without a proven therapy to improve long-term outcome. Considerable controversy about the role of surgery remains. Minimally invasive endoscopic surgery for ICH offers the potential of improved neurological outcome. We tested the hypothesis that intraoperative computerized tomographic image-guided endoscopic surgery is safe and effectively removes the majority of the hematoma rapidly. A prospective randomized controlled study was performed on 20 subjects (14 surgical and 4 medical) with primary ICH of >20 mL volume within 48 hours of ICH onset. We prospectively used a contemporaneous medical control cohort (n=36) from the MISTIE trial (Minimally Invasive Surgery and r-tPA for ICH Evacuation). We evaluated surgical safety and neurological outcomes at 6 months and 1 year. The intraoperative computerized tomographic image-guided endoscopic surgery procedure resulted in immediate reduction of hemorrhagic volume by 68±21.6% (interquartile range 59-84.5) within 29 hours of hemorrhage onset. Surgery was successfully completed in all cases, with a mean operative time of 1.9 hours (interquartile range 1.5-2.2 hours). One surgically related bleed occurred peri-operatively, but no patient met surgical safety stopping threshold end points for intraoperative hemorrhage, infection, or death. The surgical intervention group had a greater percentage of patients with good neurological outcome (modified Rankin scale score 0-3) at 180 and 365 days as compared with medical control subjects (42.9% versus 23.7%; P=0.19). Early computerized tomographic image-guided endoscopic surgery is a safe and effective method to remove acute intracerebral hematomas, with a potential to enhance neurological recovery. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00224770. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  13. 11C-Choline-Pet Guided Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Lymph Node Metastases in Oligometastatic Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Franzese, Ciro; Lopci, Egesta; Di Brina, Lucia; D'Agostino, Giuseppe Roberto; Navarria, Pierina; Mancosu, Pietro; Tomatis, Stefano; Chiti, Arturo; Scorsetti, Marta

    2017-10-05

    aim is outcome of 11C-Choline-PET guided SBRT on lymph node metastases. patients with 1 - 4 lymph node metastases detected by 11C-choline-PET were treated with SBRT. Toxicity, treated metastases control and Progression Free Survival were computed. twenty-six patients, 38 lymph node metastases were irradiated. No grade ≥ 2 toxicity. Median PSA-nadir after RT was 1.02 ng/mL. Post-treatment 11C-Choline-PET showed metabolic complete response in 17 metastases (44,7%), partial response in 9 metastases (38%). SBRT is effective and safe for lymph node metastases. PET is important in identification of gross tumor and evaluation of the response.

  14. Phase I trial of panobinostat and fractionated stereotactic re-irradiation therapy for recurrent high grade gliomas.

    PubMed

    Shi, Wenyin; Palmer, Joshua D; Werner-Wasik, Maria; Andrews, David W; Evans, James J; Glass, Jon; Kim, Lyndon; Bar-Ad, Voichita; Judy, Kevin; Farrell, Christopher; Simone, Nicole; Liu, Haisong; Dicker, Adam P; Lawrence, Yaacov R

    2016-05-01

    Panobinostat is an oral HDAC inhibitor with radiosensitizing activity. We investigated the safety, tolerability and preliminary efficacy of panobinostat combined with fractionated stereotactic re-irradiation therapy (FSRT) for recurrent high grade gliomas. Patients with recurrent high grade gliomas were enrolled in a 3 + 3 dose escalation study to determine dose limiting toxicities (DLTs), maximum tolerated dose (MTD), safety, tolerability, and preliminary efficacy. FSRT was prescribed to 30-35 Gy delivered in 10 fractions. Panobinostat was administrated concurrently with radiotherapy. Of 12 evaluable patients, 8 had recurrent GBM, and 4 had recurrent anaplastic astrocytoma. There were three grade 3 or higher toxicities in each the 10 and 30 mg cohorts. In the 30 mg cohort, there was one DLT; grade 4 neutropenia. One patient developed late grade 3 radionecrosis. The median follow up was 18.8 months. The PFS6 was 67, 33, and 83 % for 10, 20, and 30 mg cohorts, respectively. The median OS was 7.8, 6.1 and 16.1 months for the 10, 20 and 30 mg cohorts, respectively. Panobinostat administrated with FSRT is well tolerated at 30 mg. A phase II trial is warranted to assess the efficacy of panobinostat plus FSRT for recurrent glioma.

  15. Safety and Efficacy of Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy in the Treatment of Pulmonary Metastases from High Grade Sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Niraj; Selch, Michael; Lee, Jay M.; Eilber, Fritz C.; Chmielowski, Bartosz; Agazaryan, Nzhde; Steinberg, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Patients with high-grade sarcoma (HGS) frequently develop metastatic disease thus limiting their long-term survival. Lung metastases (LM) have historically been treated with surgical resection (metastasectomy). A potential alternative for controlling LM could be stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). We evaluated the outcomes from our institutional experience utilizing SBRT. Methods. Sixteen consecutive patients with LM from HGS were treated with SBRT between 2009 and 2011. Routine radiographic and clinical follow-up was performed. Local failure was defined as CT progression on 2 consecutive scans or growth after initial shrinkage. Radiation pneumonitis and radiation esophagitis were scored using Common Toxicity Criteria (CTC) version 3.0. Results. All 16 patients received chemotherapy, and a subset (38%) also underwent prior pulmonary metastasectomy. Median patient age was 56 (12–85), and median follow-up time was 20 months (range 3–43). A total of 25 lesions were treated and evaluable for this analysis. Most common histologies were leiomyosarcoma (28%), synovial sarcoma (20%), and osteosarcoma (16%). Median SBRT prescription dose was 54 Gy (36–54) in 3-4 fractions. At 43 months, local control was 94%. No patient experienced G2-4 radiation pneumonitis, and no patient experienced radiation esophagitis. Conclusions. Our retrospective experience suggests that SBRT for LM from HGS provides excellent local control and minimal toxicity. PMID:24198717

  16. Red Shell: Defining a High-Risk Zone of Normal Tissue Damage in Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Jun; Fowler, Jack F.; Lamond, John P.; Lanciano, Rachelle; Feng Jing; Brady, Luther W.

    2010-07-01

    Purpose: To define a volume of tissue just outside of the clinical target volume (CTV) or planning target volume (PTV) in stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) that receives doses appreciably above the tolerance level and in which other critical tissue structures must be avoided. Methods and Materials: We define the tissue between the borders of the CTV and PTV as the Inner Red Shell. The tissue surrounding the PTV that receives higher than the local tissue tolerance is defined as the Outer Red Shell. Contributing factors to the volume of the Red Shell include the prescription dose, dose gradient and PTV size, together with the type of tissue and its tolerance are discussed. An illustrative example and two clinical cases are reported. Results: The volume of Red Shell increases with higher prescription dose, slower dose fall-off, larger PTV volume, and higher tissue radiosensitivity. Avoidance of proximal critical serial organs may alter the volume and shape of the Red Shell after repeated, detailed treatment planning. Conclusion: Rather than defining tolerance and toxicity as simply a dose level received by the tissues, the volume of tissue receiving risk levels above tolerance can be quantified as the 'cost' of SBRT. This concept may be adopted in other techniques offering ablative and high-dose gradients. Further consideration should be given to collecting clinical data for refining the choice of constraint doses, especially in parts of the brain, lung, liver, and kidney.

  17. Performance evaluation of a CyberKnife® G4 image-guided robotic stereotactic radiosurgery system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antypas, Christos; Pantelis, Evaggelos

    2008-09-01

    The aim of the current work was to present the performance evaluation procedures implemented at our department for the commissioning of a G4 CyberKnife system. This system consists of a robotic manipulator, a target-locating system and a lightweight 6-MV linac. Individual quality assurance procedures were performed for each of the CyberKnife subsystems. The system was checked for the mechanical accuracy of its robotic manipulator. The performance of the target-locating system was evaluated in terms of mechanical accuracy of both cameras' alignment and quality assurance tests of the x-ray generators and the flat-panel detectors. The traditional linac 6-MV beam characteristics and beam output parameters were also measured. Results revealed a manipulator mechanical mean accuracy of ~0.1 mm, with individual maximum position uncertainties less than 0.25 mm. The target-locating system mechanical accuracy was found within the acceptance limits. For the most clinically used parameters in the CyberKnife practice, e.g. 100-120 kV and 50-200 ms, kV and exposure time accuracy error were measured as less than 2%, while the precision error of the kV was determined as less than 1%. The acquired images of the ETR grid pattern revealed no geometrical distortion while the critical frequency f50 values for cameras A and B were calculated as 1.5 lp mm-1 and 1.4 lp mm-1, respectively. Dose placement measurements were performed in a head and neck phantom. Results revealed sub-millimeter beam delivery precision whereas the total clinical accuracy of the system was measured equal to 0.44 ± 0.12 mm, 0.29 ± 0.10 mm and 0.53 ± 0.16 mm for the skull, fiducial and Xsight spine tracking methods, respectively. The results of this work certify the G4 CyberKnife SRS system capable of delivering high dose distributions with sub-millimeter accuracy and precision to intracranial and extracranial lesions. Moreover, total clinical accuracy of the investigated G4 system was found to be improved for

  18. Stereotactic (Mammographically Guided) Breast Biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... any medications you’re taking, including aspirin and herbal supplements, and whether you have any allergies — especially to ... to stop taking aspirin, blood thinners, or particular herbal supplements which can increase your risk of bleeding for ...

  19. Stereotactic (Mammographically Guided) Breast Biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... any medications you’re taking, including aspirin and herbal supplements, and whether you have any allergies – especially to ... doctor all medications that you are taking, including herbal supplements, and if you have any allergies, especially to ...

  20. EMR Curriculum Guide: Junior High and Senior High.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruschmeier, Veronica M., Ed.; Rockwell, Linda, Ed.

    Presented are two curriculum guides written and field tested by teachers for junior and senior high school educable retarded students. In each guide behavioral objectives are set forth for basic skills (listening, speaking, reading, arithmetic, writing, environmental awareness, and consumerism), vocational competencies (attitudes, choosing a job,…

  1. Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy plus bevacizumab after response to bevacizumab plus irinotecan as a rescue treatment for high-grade gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Conde-Moreno, Antonio José; García-Gómez, Raquel; Albert-Antequera, María; Almendros-Blanco, Piedad; De Las Peñas-Bataller, Ramón; González-Vidal, Verónica; López-Torrecilla, José Luis; Ferrer-Albiach, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the possibility of implementing a new scheme of rescue treatment after relapse or progression of high-grade glioma (HGG) treated at the first-line with bevacizumab and irinotecan (BVZ+CPT11), evaluating the response and toxicity of associating BVZ and fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (BVZ+FSRT). Materials and methods We retrospectively analysed data from 59 patients with relapse of HGG. Nine patients with HGG relapse after treatment using the Stupp protocol that were treated with BVZ+CPT11 for progression between July 2007 and August 2012, after which the response was assessed according to the Revised Assessment in Neuro-Oncology (RANO) criteria. BVZ was administered at a dose of 10 mg/kg and FSRT up to a prescribed dose of 30 Gy, 500 cGy per fraction, three days a week. The median follow-up was 38 months. Results The treatment was well-tolerated by all patients. The response after nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 3–6 months was progression in two patients, stable disease in four, and three patients had a partial response. The median overall survival (OS) from diagnosis until death or the last control was 36.8 months. The median progression-free survival (PFS) was 10.8 months. The results from tumour sub-group analysis indicated that the PFS was not statistically significant although it seemed that it was higher in grade-III. The OS was higher in grade-III gliomas. Conclusions The combination of BVZ+FSRT as a second-line HGG relapse rescue treatment is well-tolerated and seems to offer promising results. We believe that multi-centre prospective studies are needed to determine the long-term efficacy and toxicity of this therapeutic approach. PMID:25949228

  2. Patterns of Failure After Concurrent Bevacizumab and Hypofractionated Stereotactic Radiation Therapy for Recurrent High-Grade Glioma

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, Lauren Q.; Beal, Kathryn; Goenka, Anuj; Karimi, Sasan; Iwamoto, Fabio M.; Yamada, Yoshiya; Zhang, Zhigang; Lassman, Andrew B.; Abrey, Lauren E.; Gutin, Philip H.

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: Concurrent bevacizumab with hypofractionated stereotactic radiation therapy (HSRT) is safe and effective for the treatment of recurrent high-grade gliomas (HGG). The objective of this study was to characterize the patterns of failure after this treatment regimen. Methods and Materials: Twenty-four patients with recurrent enhancing HGG were previously treated on an institutional review board-approved protocol of concurrent bevacizumab and reirradiation. Patients received 30 Gy in 5 fractions to the recurrent tumor with HSRT. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed every 2 cycles, and bevacizumab was continued until clinical or radiographic tumor progression according to the criteria of Macdonald et al. MRI at the time of progression was fused to the HSRT treatment plan, and the location of recurrence was classified on the basis of volume within the 95% isodose line. Outcomes based on patient characteristics, tumor grade, recurrence pattern, and best response to treatment were analyzed by the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: Twenty-two patients experienced either clinical or radiographic progression. Recurrent tumor was enhancing in 15 (71.4%) and nonenhancing in 6 (28.6%) patients. Eleven patients (52.4%) had recurrence within the radiation field, 5 patients (23.8%) had marginal recurrence, and 5 patients had recurrence outside the radiation field. Pattern of enhancement and location of failure did not correlate with overall survival or progression-free survival. Radiographic response was the only variable to significantly correlate with progression-free survival. Conclusions: Despite the promising initial response seen with the addition of HSRT to bevacizumab as salvage treatment for recurrent HGG, approximately half of patients ultimately still experience failure within the radiation field. The rate of local failure with the addition of HSRT seems to be lower than that seen with bevacizumab alone in the salvage setting. Our data underscore the

  3. Dosimetric and deformation effects of image-guided interventions during stereotactic body radiation therapy of the prostate using an endorectal balloon

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Bernard L.; Gan, Gregory; Diot, Quentin; Kavanagh, Brian; Timmerman, Robert D.; Miften, Moyed

    2012-06-15

    Purpose: During stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for the treatment of prostate cancer, an inflatable endorectal balloon (ERB) may be used to reduce motion of the target and reduce the dose to the posterior rectal wall. This work assessed the dosimetric impact of manual interventions on ERB position in patients receiving prostate SBRT and investigated the impact of ERB interventions on prostate shape. Methods: The data of seven consecutive patients receiving SBRT for the treatment of clinical stage T1cN0M0 prostate cancer enrolled in a multi-institutional, IRB-approved trial were analyzed. The SBRT dose was 50 Gy in five fractions to a planning target volume (PTV) that included the prostate (implanted with three fiducial markers) with a 3-5 mm margin. All plans were based on simulation images that included an ERB inflated with 60 cm{sup 3} of air. Daily kilovoltage cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging was performed to localize the PTV, and an automated fusion with the planning images yielded displacements required for PTV relocalization. When the ERB volume and/or position were judged to yield inaccurate repositioning, manual adjustment (ERB reinflation and/or repositioning) was performed. Based on all 59 CBCT image sets acquired, a deformable registration algorithm was used to determine the dose received by, displacement of, and deformation of the prostate, bladder (BLA), and anterior rectal wall (ARW). This dose tracking methodology was applied to images taken before and after manual adjustment of the ERB (intervention), and the delivered dose was compared to that which would have been delivered in the absence of intervention. Results: Interventions occurred in 24 out of 35 (69%) of the treated fractions. The direct effect of these interventions was an increase in the prostate radiation dose that included 95% of the PTV (D95) from 9.6 {+-} 1.0 to 10.0 {+-} 0.2 Gy (p = 0.06) and an increase in prostate coverage from 94.0% {+-} 8.5% to 97.8% {+-} 1

  4. Tumor Control Outcomes After Hypofractionated and Single-Dose Stereotactic Image-Guided Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Extracranial Metastases From Renal Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Zelefsky, Michael J.; Greco, Carlo; Motzer, Robert; Magsanoc, Juan Martin; Pei Xin; Lovelock, Michael; Mechalakos, Jim; Zatcky, Joan; Fuks, Zvi; Yamada, Yoshiya

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To report tumor local progression-free outcomes after treatment with single-dose, image-guided, intensity-modulated radiotherapy and hypofractionated regimens for extracranial metastases from renal cell primary tumors. Patients and Methods: Between 2004 and 2010, 105 lesions from renal cell carcinoma were treated with either single-dose, image-guided, intensity-modulated radiotherapy to a prescription dose of 18-24 Gy (median, 24) or hypofractionation (three or five fractions) with a prescription dose of 20-30 Gy. The median follow-up was 12 months (range, 1-48). Results: The overall 3-year actuarial local progression-free survival for all lesions was 44%. The 3-year local progression-free survival for those who received a high single-dose (24 Gy; n = 45), a low single-dose (<24 Gy; n = 14), or hypofractionation regimens (n = 46) was 88%, 21%, and 17%, respectively (high single dose vs. low single dose, p = .001; high single dose vs. hypofractionation, p < .001). Multivariate analysis revealed the following variables were significant predictors of improved local progression-free survival: 24 Gy dose compared with a lower dose (p = .009) and a single dose vs. hypofractionation (p = .008). Conclusion: High single-dose, image-guided, intensity-modulated radiotherapy is a noninvasive procedure resulting in high probability of local tumor control for metastatic renal cell cancer generally considered radioresistant according to the classic radiobiologic ranking.

  5. TEACHER'S GUIDE TO HIGH SCHOOL JOURNALISM.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    JENKINSON, EDWARD B., ED.

    IN AN EFFORT TO TRAIN HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS TO BECOME INTELLIGENT READERS, LISTENERS, AND VIEWERS OF MASS MEDIA, THE INDIANA STATE DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION PUBLISHED A GUIDE FOR TEACHERS OF JOURNALISM. PART I ESTABLISHES GUIDELINES FOR A FIRST SEMESTER COURSE IN JOURNALISM AND CONTAINS CHAPTERS ON (1) EXPLORING MASS MEDIA, A DISCUSSION OF…

  6. TEACHER'S GUIDE TO HIGH SCHOOL SPEECH.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    JENKINSON, EDWARD B., ED.

    THIS GUIDE TO HIGH SCHOOL SPEECH FOCUSES ON SPEECH AS ORAL COMPOSITION, STRESSING THE IMPORTANCE OF CLEAR THINKING AND COMMUNICATION. THE PROPOSED 1-SEMESTER BASIC COURSE IN SPEECH ATTEMPTS TO IMPROVE THE STUDENT'S ABILITY TO COMPOSE AND DELIVER SPEECHES, TO THINK AND LISTEN CRITICALLY, AND TO UNDERSTAND THE SOCIAL FUNCTION OF SPEECH. IN ADDITION…

  7. TEACHER'S GUIDE TO HIGH SCHOOL SPEECH.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    JENKINSON, EDWARD B., ED.

    THIS GUIDE TO HIGH SCHOOL SPEECH FOCUSES ON SPEECH AS ORAL COMPOSITION, STRESSING THE IMPORTANCE OF CLEAR THINKING AND COMMUNICATION. THE PROPOSED 1-SEMESTER BASIC COURSE IN SPEECH ATTEMPTS TO IMPROVE THE STUDENT'S ABILITY TO COMPOSE AND DELIVER SPEECHES, TO THINK AND LISTEN CRITICALLY, AND TO UNDERSTAND THE SOCIAL FUNCTION OF SPEECH. IN ADDITION…

  8. The Early Result of Whole Pelvic Radiotherapy and Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy Boost for High-Risk Localized Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yu-Wei; Lin, Li-Ching; Lin, Kuei-Li

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The rationale for hypofractionated radiotherapy in the treatment of prostate cancer is based on the modern understanding of radiobiology and advances in stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) techniques. Whole-pelvis irradiation combined with SBRT boost for high-risk prostate cancer might escalate biologically effective dose without increasing toxicity. Here, we report our 4-year results of SBRT boost for high-risk localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: From October 2009 to August 2012, 41 patients newly diagnosed, high-risk or very high-risk (NCCN definition) localized prostate cancer were treated with whole-pelvis irradiation and SBRT boost. The whole pelvis dose was 45 Gy (25 fractions of 1.8 Gy). The SBRT boost dose was 21 Gy (three fractions of 7 Gy). Ninety percent of these patients received hormone therapy. The toxicities of gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) tracts were scored by Common Toxicity Criteria Adverse Effect (CTCAE v3.0). Biochemical failure was defined by Phoenix definition. Results: Median follow-up was 42 months. Mean PSA before treatment was 44.18 ng/ml. Mean PSA level at 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months was 0.94, 0.44, 0.13, 0.12, and 0.05 ng/ml, respectively. The estimated 4-year biochemical failure-free survival was 91.9%. Three biochemical failures were observed. GI and GU tract toxicities were minimal. No grade 3 acute GU or GI toxicity was noted. During radiation therapy, 27% of the patient had grade 2 acute GU toxicity and 12% had grade 2 acute GI toxicity. At 3 months, most toxicity scores had returned to baseline. At the last follow-up, there was no grade 3 late GU or GI toxicity. Conclusions: Whole-pelvis irradiation combined with SBRT boost for high-risk localized prostate cancer is feasible with minimal toxicity and encouraging biochemical failure-free survival. Continued accrual and follow-up would be necessary to confirm the biochemical control rate and the toxicity profiles. PMID

  9. High resolution guided wave pipe inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velichko, Alexander; Wilcox, Paul D.

    2009-03-01

    Commercial guided wave inspection systems provide rapid screening of pipes, but limited sizing capability for small defects. However, accurate detection and sizing of small defects is essential for assessing the integrity of inaccessible pipe regions where guided waves provide the only possible inspection mechanism. In this paper an array-based approach is presented that allows guided waves to be focused on both transmission and reception to produce a high resolution image of a length of pipe. In the image, it is shown that a signal to coherent noise ratio of over 40 dB with respect to the reflected signal from a free end of pipe can be obtained, even taking into account typical levels of experimental uncertainty in terms of transducer positioning, wave velocity etc. The combination of an image with high resolution and a 40 dB dynamic range enables the detection of very small defects. It also allows the in-plane shape of defects over a certain size to be observed directly. Simulations are used to estimate the detection and sizing capability of the system for crack-like defects. Results are presented from a prototype system that uses EMATs to fully focus pipe guided wave modes on both transmission and reception in a 12 inch diameter stainless steel pipe. The 40 dB signal to coherent noise ratio is obtained experimentally and a 2 mm diameter (0.08 wavelengths) half-thickness hole is shown to be detectable.

  10. Use of a hemostasis introducer sheath to guide clip delivery during stereotactic directional vacuum-assisted breast biopsy when the biopsy system malfunctions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jane; Chang, Chun-Ju

    2010-01-01

    Stereotactic directional vacuum-assisted breast biopsy (ST DVAB) is an accurate biopsy method. Marking the biopsy site with a clip is mandatory after ST DVAB, in case excision is required. With the ST DVAB system we use, clip was delivered through the biopsy probe. We report a case with malfunctioning of the ST DVAB system during the procedure, and thus the clip could not be placed through the biopsy probe. To salvage the procedure, we placed the clip to the biopsy site via a hemostasis introducer sheath.

  11. Stereotactic Radiosurgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... benign and malignant), blood vessel abnormalities in the brain, defined areas of cancer, certain small tumors in the lungs and liver, ... or months after treatment. These reactions can include cell death in the high radiation dose region due to the ... Phone: 773-577-8750 Fax: 773-577-8738 CareLine: ...

  12. Stereotactic radiosurgery - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... pg=stereotactic . Accessed July 22, 2016. Read More Acoustic neuroma Brain tumor - primary - adults Cerebral arteriovenous malformation ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Acoustic Neuroma Arteriovenous Malformations Brain Tumors Childhood Brain Tumors ...

  13. High-dose stereotactic body radiotherapy correlates increased local control and overall survival in patients with inoperable hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Recent studies using stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) have reported high tumor response and local control. However, the optimal SBRT dose remains unknown, and it is still not clear whether a dose response relationship for local control (LC) and overall survival (OS) exist or not. We performed this study to determine whether a dose response relationship for LC and OS is observed in SBRT for inoperable HCC. Methods Between 2003 and 2011, 108 patients with HCC were treated with SBRT. All patients were unsuitable for surgery or local ablation and had incomplete response to transarterial chemoembolization. Eighty-two patients with a longest tumor diameter (LD) less than or equal to 7.0 cm who were treated with 3-fraction SBRT and were analyzed. This cohort comprised 74 Child-Turcotte-Pugh (CTP) class A patients and 8 CTP class B7 patients. The median LD was 3.0 cm (range, 1.0–7.0 cm), and the median dose was 51 Gy (range, 33–60 Gy). Results LC and OS rates at 2 years after SBRT were 87% and 63%, respectively, with a median follow-up duration of 30 months for all patients. The 2-year LC/OS rates for patients treated with doses of > 54, 45–54, and < 45 Gy were 100/71, 78/64, and 64%/30%, respectively (p = .009/p < .001). Multivariate analysis revealed that the SBRT dose (p = .005) and Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer stage (p = .015) were significant prognostic factors for OS. Correlation analysis revealed a positive linear relationship between the SBRT dose and LC (p = .006, R = .899)/OS (p = .002, R = .940) at 2 years. Based on the tumor-control probability model, a dose of 54.8 Gy provides 2-year LC with a 90% probability. Five patients experienced grade 3 or higher gastrointestinal toxicity, and 6 had deteriorating of CTP score by greater than or equal to 2 within 3 months of SBRT. Conclusions This study demonstrated a dose response relationship for LC and OS with SBRT for HCC. Higher LC rates resulting from an

  14. Fluorescence guidance during stereotactic biopsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepp, Herbert; Beyer, Wolfgang; Brucker, David; Ehrhardt, Andre; Fischer, Stefan; Goebel, Werner; Goetz, Marcus; Guenther, Bettina; Hennig, Georg; Herms, Jochen; Irion, Klaus-Martin; Johansson, Ann; Kienast, Yvonne; Kniebuehler, Gesa; Li, Pan; Ruehm, Adrian; Sandner, Sabine

    2012-02-01

    Objective: When a stereotactic biopsy is taken to enable histopathological diagnosis of a suspected brain tumor, it is essential to i) do this safely, that is not injure a major blood vessel and ii) to obtain relevant vital material from the tumor. We are investigating the suitability of Indocyanine Green (ICG) fluorescence for blood vessel recognition and 5- Aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) induced Protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) fluorescence for identification of proliferative brain tumor tissue. Methods: A fiber-optic endoscopic approach was studied to generate and detect both fluorescence signals. PpIX concentrations in brain tumors have been measured by chemical extraction. Preliminary equipment was studied in a mouse model. Results: PpIX-concentrations in glioblastoma tissue showed high inner- and inter-patient variability, but each patient out of 15 with interpretable data showed at least one sample with a PpIX-concentration exceeding 2.4 μmol/l, which is easily detectable by state-of-the-art fiberoptic fluorescence spectroscopy and imaging. The imaging fluoroscope with 30,000 pixels resolution could be introduced through a position controlled stereotactic needle. ICG-fluorescence from vessels with diameters >= 0.1 mm can be detected with a contrast of 2-2.5 against surrounding tissue. Conclusion: Fluorescence detection during stereotactic biopsy might increase safety and precision of the procedure significantly.

  15. Stereotactic body radiotherapy: current strategies and future development

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) has emerged as the standard treatment for medically inoperable early-staged non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The local control rate after SBRT is over 90%. Some forms of tumour motion management and image-guided radiation delivery techniques are the prerequisites for fulfilment of its goal to deliver a high radiation dose to the tumour target without overdosing surrounding normal tissues. In this review, the current strategies of tumour motion management will be discussed, followed by an overview of various image-guided radiotherapy (RT) systems and devices available for clinical practice. Besides medically inoperable stage I NSCLC, SBRT has also been widely adopted for treatment of oligometastasis involving the lungs. Its possible applications in various other cancer illnesses are under extensive exploration. The progress of SBRT is critically technology-dependent. With advancement of technology, the ideal of personalised, effective and yet safe SBRT is already on the horizon. PMID:27606082

  16. Stereotactic localization and removal of a bullet in the third ventricle causing obstructive hydrocephalus after a cerebral gunshot wound: case report.

    PubMed

    Linskey, M E; Kondziolka, D; Marion, D W

    1994-06-01

    A bullet, lodged in the pineal-posterior region of the third ventricle and causing obstructive hydrocephalus, was removed without damage to critical adjacent vascular structures using stereotactic localization followed by laser-guided stereotactic craniotomy. Stereotactic techniques provided precise target localization and allowed dissection to be restricted to the previously injured missile track, thus avoiding any additional morbidity from the surgical procedure.

  17. Guiding Center Equations of High Accuracy

    SciTech Connect

    R.B. White, G. Spizzo and M. Gobbin

    2013-03-29

    Guiding center simulations are an important means of predicting the effect of resistive and ideal magnetohydrodynamic instabilities on particle distributions in toroidal magnetically confined thermonuclear fusion research devices. Because saturated instabilities typically have amplitudes of δ B/B of a few times 10-4 numerical accuracy is of concern in discovering the effect of mode particle resonances. We develop a means of following guiding center orbits which is greatly superior to the methods currently in use. In the presence of ripple or time dependent magnetic perturbations both energy and canonical momentum are conserved to better than one part in 1014, and the relation between changes in canonical momentum and energy is also conserved to very high order.

  18. Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Minesh

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common primary malignant brain tumor in adults and one of the most aggressive of all human cancers. GBM tumors are highly infiltrative and relatively resistant to conventional therapies. Aggressive management of GBM using a combination of surgical resection, followed by fractionated radiotherapy and chemotherapy has been shown to improve overall survival; however, GBM tumors recur in the majority of patients and the disease is most often fatal. There is a need to develop new treatment regimens and technological innovations to improve the overall survival of GBM patients. The role of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for the treatment of GBM has been explored and is controversial. SRS utilizes highly precise radiation techniques to allow dose escalation and delivery of ablative radiation doses to the tumor while minimizing dose to the adjacent normal structures. In some studies, SRS with concurrent chemotherapy has shown improved local control with acceptable toxicities in select GBM patients. However, because GBM is a highly infiltrative disease, skeptics argue that local therapies, such as SRS, do not improve overall survival. The purpose of this article is to review the literature regarding SRS in both newly diagnosed and recurrent GBM, to describe SRS techniques, potential eligible SRS candidates, and treatment-related toxicities. In addition, this article will propose promising areas for future research for SRS in the treatment of GBM. PMID:26848407

  19. An easy to produce and economical three-dimensional brain phantom for stereotactic computed tomographic-guided brain biopsy training in the dog.

    PubMed

    Sidhu, Deepinder S; Ruth, Jeffrey D; Lambert, Gregory; Rossmeisl, John H

    2017-07-01

    To develop and validate a three-dimensional (3D) brain phantom that can be incorporated into existing stereotactic headframes to simulate stereotactic brain biopsy (SBB) and train veterinary surgeons. Experimental study. Canine brain phantoms were fabricated from osteological skull specimens, agarose brain parenchyma, and cheddar and mozzarella cheese molds (simulating meningiomas and gliomas). The neuroradiologic and viscoelastic properties of phantoms were quantified with computed tomography (CT) and oscillatory compression tests, respectively. Phantoms were validated by experienced and novice operators performing SBB on phantoms containing randomly placed, focal targets. Target yield and needle placement error (NPE) were compared between operators. Phantoms were produced in <4 hours, at an average cost of $92. The CT appearances of the phantom skull, agarose, and cheese components approximated the in vivo features of skull, brain parenchyma, and contrast-enhancing tumors of meningeal and glial origin, respectively. The complex moduli of the agarose and cheeses were comparable to the viscoelastic properties of in vivo brain tissues and brain tumors. The overall diagnostic yield of SBB was 88%. Although NPE did not differ between novice (median 3.68 mm; range, 1.46-14.54 mm) and experienced surgeons (median 1.17 mm, range, 0.78-1.58 mm), our results support the relevance of the learning curve associated with the SBB procedure. This 3D phantom replicates anatomical, CT, and tactile features of brain tissues and tumors and can be used to develop the technical skills required to perform SBB. © 2017 The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  20. Isocentric stereotactic three-dimensional digitizer for neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Takizawa, T

    1993-01-01

    A new system has been developed, comprising a frameless isocentric stereotactic mechanism and a three-dimensional (3-D) digitizer for intraoperative spatial monitoring. The 3-D digitizer's multiarticulated arm has three joints related to Cartesian coordinates, two quadrant arcs forming an isocenter system, a microdrive, and a probe holder. The frameless isocentric mechanism is useful for open stereotaxy. Routine CT- or MRI-guided stereotactic surgery is also possible, due to the high level of accuracy of the system. Before surgery, CT and/or MR images are acquired after placing on the scalp three or four external markers. For surgical procedures which require high accuracy, Laitinen's noninvasive CT or MRI localizing markers are used. CT or MR images are entered into a computer using an image scanner, and are stored on a floppy disk. After the patient's head is fixed to the operating table using a Mayfield clamp, the 3-D digitizer is used to read the spatial points and external markers on the scalp or the reference points of Laitinen's localizing markers. During the procedure, the coordinates on the patient's head are automatically entered into the computer and matched with those of the 3-D digitizer and CT/MR images on the CRT display. This system has been used in 22 cases of open craniotomy and 33 cases of burr hole surgery, both carried out using the stereotactic function and the 3-D spatial monitoring function in parallel. Errors in mechanical accuracy of the 3-D digitizer were less than 0.8 mm, and the maximum error during operation was presumed not to exceed 2 mm.

  1. Tumor Control Outcomes Following Hypofractionated and Single-Dose Stereotactic Image-Guided Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Extracranial Metastases from Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zelefsky, Michael J; Greco, Carlo; Motzer, Robert; Magsanoc, Juan Martin; Pei, Xin; Lovelock, Michael; Mechalakos, Jim; Zatcky, Joan; Fuks, Zvi; Yamada, Yoshiya

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To report tumor local progression-free outcomes following treatment with single-dose image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (SD-IGRT) and hypofractionated regimens for extracranial metastases from renal cell primary tumors. Methods and Materials Between 2004 and 2010, a total of 105 lesions from renal cell carcinomas were treated with either SD-IGRT to prescription doses of 18–24 Gy (median, 24 Gy) or hypofractionation (3 or 5 fractions) with prescription doses ranging between 20 and 30 Gy. The median follow-up was 12 months (range, 1–48 months). Results The overall 3-year actuarial local progression-free survival (LPFS) for all lesions was 44%. The 3-year LPFS for those who received high single-dose (24 Gy; n = 45), low single-dose (< 24 Gy; n = 14), and hypofractionation regimens (n = 46) were 88%, 21%, and 17%, respectively (high single dose versus low single dose, p = 0.001; high single dose versus hypofractionation, p < 0.001). Multivariate analysis revealed the following variables as significant predictors of improved LPFS: dose of 24 Gy compared with lower dose (p = 0.009), and single dose versus hypofractionation (p = 0.008). Conclusion High-dose SD-IGRT is a non-invasive procedure resulting in high probability of local tumor control for metastatic renal cell cancers, generally considered radioresistant according to classical radiobiological ranking. PMID:21596489

  2. [Stereotactic ablative irradiation for lung cancer].

    PubMed

    Antoni, D; Srour, I; Noël, G; Mornex, F

    2014-01-01

    Stereotactic radiotherapy for lung cancer is a technique that is now well established in the therapeutic arsenal. Protocols are effective, with very high local control rate and an acceptable rate of survival if one takes into account the patient's age and comorbidities. Complications are rare. This review of the literature analyses the whole process of the therapeutic indications and future prospects.

  3. Imaging for Stereotactic Spine Radiotherapy: Clinical Considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Dahele, Max; Zindler, Jaap D.; Sanchez, Esther; Verbakel, Wilko F.; Kuijer, Joost P.A.; Slotman, Ben J.; Senan, Suresh

    2011-10-01

    There is growing interest in the use of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for spinal metastases. With the need for accurate target definition and conformal avoidance of critical normal structures, high-quality multimodal imaging has emerged as a key component at each stage of the treatment process. Multidisciplinary collaboration is necessary to optimize imaging protocols and implement imaging advances into routine patient care.

  4. Stereotactic linear accelerator radiotherapy for pituitary tumors.

    PubMed

    Ajithkumar, Thankama; Brada, Michael

    2004-01-01

    Last decade has seen important advances in radiotherapy technology which combine precise tumor localization with accurate targeted delivery of radiation. This technique of high precision conformal radiotherapy, described as stereotactic radiotherapy or radiosurgery, uses modern linear accelerators available in most radiation oncology departments. The article describes the new technique as applied to the treatment of pituitary adenoma and reviews published clinical results.

  5. Optical Tracking Technology in Stereotactic Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, Thomas H. . E-mail: thomas.wagner@orhs.org; Meeks, Sanford L.; Bova, Frank J.; Friedman, William A.; Willoughby, Twyla R.; Kupelian, Patrick A.; Tome, Wolfgang

    2007-07-01

    The last decade has seen the introduction of advanced technologies that have enabled much more precise application of therapeutic radiation. These relatively new technologies include multileaf collimators, 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy planning, and intensity modulated radiotherapy in radiotherapy. Therapeutic dose distributions have become more conformal to volumes of disease, sometimes utilizing sharp dose gradients to deliver high doses to target volumes while sparing nearby radiosensitive structures. Thus, accurate patient positioning has become even more important, so that the treatment delivered to the patient matches the virtual treatment plan in the computer treatment planning system. Optical and image-guided radiation therapy systems offer the potential to improve the precision of patient treatment by providing a more robust fiducial system than is typically used in conventional radiotherapy. The ability to accurately position internal targets relative to the linac isocenter and to provide real-time patient tracking theoretically enables significant reductions in the amount of normal tissue irradiated. This report reviews the concepts, technology, and clinical applications of optical tracking systems currently in use for stereotactic radiation therapy. Applications of radiotherapy optical tracking technology to respiratory gating and the monitoring of implanted fiducial markers are also discussed.

  6. A novel compound 6D-offset simulating phantom and quality assurance program for stereotactic image-guided radiation therapy system.

    PubMed

    Yuen Kan Ngar, Dennis; Lok-Man Cheung, Michael; Koon-Ming Kam, Michael; Poon, Wai-Sang; Tak-Cheung Chan, Anthony

    2014-11-04

    A comprehensive quality assurance (QA) device cum program was developed for the commissioning and routine testing of the 6D IGRT systems. In this article, both the new QA system and the BrainLAB IGRT system which was added onto a Varian Clinac were evaluated. A novel compound 6D-offset simulating phantom was designed and fabricated in the Prince of Wales Hospital (PWH), Hong Kong. The QA program generated random compound 6D-offset values. The 6D phantom was simply set up and shifted accordingly. The BrainLAB ExacTrac X-ray IGRT system detected the offsets and then corrected the phantom position automatically through the robotic couch. Routine QA works facilitated data analyses of the detection errors, the correction errors, and the correlations. Fifty sets of data acquired in 2011 in PWH were thoroughly analyzed. The 6D component detection errors and correction errors of the IGRT system were all within ± 1 mm and ± 1° individually. Translational and rotational scalar resultant errors were found to be 0.50 ± 0.27 mm and 0.54 ± 0.23°, respectively. Most individual component errors were shown to be independent of their original offset values. The system characteristics were locally established. The BrainLAB 6D IGRT system added onto a regular linac is sufficiently precise for stereotactic RT. This new QA methodology is competent to assure the IGRT system overall integrity. Annual grand analyses are recommended to check local system consistency and for external cross comparison. The target expansion policy of 1.5 mm 3D margin from CTV to PTV is confirmed for this IGRT system currently in PWH.

  7. [Discrepancy between the intended isocenter and that from orthogonal linacgrams in the treatment of CT-guided stereotactic body radiotherapy(SBRT)].

    PubMed

    Oooka, Yoshikazu; Takeda, Atsuya; Sudo, Yasunobu; Iwashita, Hideo; Aoki, Yousuke; Katayose, Tetsurou; Sasajima, Noriaki; Sanuki, Naoko; Oohashi, Toshio; Kunieda, Etsuo; Nagaoka, Tomoaki

    2009-01-20

    In our institution a CT scanner was installed in the same room as the linear accelerator. In stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) we confirmed the isocenter position by serial thin-slice and long-scan-time CT images before every treatment as well as in planning. In planning we constructed digitally reconstructed radiography (DRR) of both the anterior and lateral views. At the first treatment we also checked the isocenter with linacgraphy. Then we compared the isocenter positions obtained from the DRR and linacgraphy. Between Feb. 2005 and Oct. 2006, we treated 75 lung and liver tumors with SBRT in this way. Based on bony structures, we measured the differences between in-isocenter positions for SI, LR, and AP directions between DRR and linacgraphy. The median (min-max) of the differences in-isocenter positions for SI, LR, and AP directions between DRR and linacgraphy were 0.0 mm (0-6.0), 0.0 mm (0-10.0), and 0.0 mm (0-10.0), respectively, as well as 3.2 mm (0-12.3) for 3-dimensional distance. In 28 tumors (37%) the differences exceeded 5 mm in three-dimensional distance. The frequency of differences exceeding 5 mm in upper lung lesions tended to be more than that in liver lesions, and that in left pulmonary lesions was significantly more than that in right ones. This result suggests that the relative position of the target volume to the bony structure differ in planning and in every treatment. It was recommended to verify isocenter accuracy in institutions where isocenter position is checked only by orthogonal linacgraphy in SBRT.

  8. Use of Image-Guided Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy in Lieu of Intracavitary Brachytherapy for the Treatment of Inoperable Endometrial Neoplasia

    SciTech Connect

    Kemmerer, Eric; Hernandez, Enrique; Ferriss, James S.; Valakh, Vladimir; Miyamoto, Curtis; Li, Shidong; Micaily, Bizhan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Retrospective analysis of patients with invasive endometrial neoplasia who were treated with external beam radiation therapy followed by stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) boost because of the inability to undergo surgery or brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: We identified 11 women with stage I-III endometrial cancer with a median age of 78 years that were not candidates for hysterectomy or intracavitary brachytherapy secondary to comorbidities (91%) or refusal (9%). Eight patients were American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) stage I (3 stage IA, 5 stage IB), and 3 patients were AJCC stage III. Patients were treated to a median of 4500 cGy at 180 cGy per fraction followed by SBRT boost (600 cGy per fraction Multiplication-Sign 5). Results: The most common side effect was acute grade 1 gastrointestinal toxicity in 73% of patients, with no late toxicities observed. With a median follow-up of 10 months since SBRT, 5 patients (45%) experienced locoregional disease progression, with 3 patients (27%) succumbing to their malignancy. At 12 and 18 months from SBRT, the overall freedom from progression was 68% and 41%, respectively. Overall freedom from progression (FFP) was 100% for all patients with AJCC stage IA endometrial carcinoma, whereas it was 33% for stage IB at 18 months. The overall FFP was 100% for International Federation of Obstetrics and Gynecology grade 1 disease. The estimated overall survival was 57% at 18 months from diagnosis. Conclusion: In this study, SBRT boost to the intact uterus was feasible, with encouragingly low rates of acute and late toxicity, and favorable disease control in patients with early-stage disease. Additional studies are needed to provide better insight into the best management of these clinically challenging cases.

  9. Image-Guided Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy in Patients With Isolated Para-Aortic Lymph Node Metastases From Uterine Cervical and Corpus Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Chul Won; Cho, Chul Koo Yoo, Seong Yul; Kim, Mi Sook; Yang, Kwang Mo; Yoo, Hyung Jun; Seo, Young Seok; Kang, Jin Kyu; Lee, Dong Han; Lee, Kyung Hee; Lee, Eui Don; Rhu, Sang Young; Choi, Suck Chul; Kim, Moon Hong; Kim, Beob Jong

    2009-05-01

    Purpose: The aims of this study were to evaluate the role of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) as a local treatment for isolated para-aortic lymph node (PALN) metastases originating from uterine cervical and corpus cancer. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively enrolled 30 patients with isolated PALN metastases originating from uterine cervical and corpus cancer who had received SBRT using the CyberKnife (CK). All patients were shown to have isolated PALN metastases by computed tomography (CT) and/or positron emission tomography (PET)-CT. The overall survival (OS), local control (LC) rate, and disease progression-free survival (DPFS) rate were calculated according to the Kaplan-Meier method. Comparison between prognosis groups was performed using log-rank analysis. Toxicities were also evaluated. Results: The 4-year OS rate was 50.1%, and the median survival time was not reached. The OS rate among symptomatic patients was significantly lower than that among asymptomatic patients (p = 0.002). The 4-year actuarial LC rate was 67.4%. Patients with a planning target volume of {<=}17 ml had significantly higher LC rates (p = 0.009). The 4-year DPFS rate was 45.0%, and the median time to disease progression was 32 months. Small planning target volume was a favorable prognostic factor (p = 0.043). Grade 3 or 4 complications requiring hospitalization were reported in 1 patient at 20 months after SBRT. Conclusion: The OS and LS rates were promising, and the incidence of toxicities was low. Use of SBRT with the CyberKnife is an effective modality for treating isolated PALN metastases in patients with uterine cervical and corpus cancer.

  10. Beavercreek High School English Curriculum Guide, 1975.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beavercreek Local School District, Xenia, OH.

    This curriculum guide is divided into four major sections: English Skills, Writing and Composition Courses, Literature Courses, and Elective Courses. Thirty courses are described, and the guide outlines the general objectives, specific objectives, activities, and resources for each course. The courses include Advanced Composition, Journalism I,…

  11. Beavercreek High School English Curriculum Guide, 1975.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beavercreek Local School District, Xenia, OH.

    This curriculum guide is divided into four major sections: English Skills, Writing and Composition Courses, Literature Courses, and Elective Courses. Thirty courses are described, and the guide outlines the general objectives, specific objectives, activities, and resources for each course. The courses include Advanced Composition, Journalism I,…

  12. Neutron guide-split: A high performance guide bundle concept for elliptical guides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holm, Sonja L.; Rasmussen, Nina; Høpfner, Louise; Bertelsen, Mads; Voigt, Jörg; Andersen, Ken H.; Lefmann, Kim

    2015-05-01

    We present a new guide-split concept for transporting cold and thermal neutrons to multiple instruments from a single beam port at a neutron facility without compromising the useful neutron brilliance notably for any of the instruments. Elliptical guides are capable of transporting an almost completely filled phase space within a large divergence (±2° for cold neutrons). It is therefore possible to place several secondary guides side by side pointing in slightly different directions using the end of a primary guide as a virtual source. The instruments placed at the secondary guides hence exploit different parts of the phase space transported by the primary guide. In addition, the resulting kink between the primary and secondary guide eliminates line of sight. Using ray-tracing simulations of three different set-ups (with two, four, and eight secondary guides) we show that it is possible to illuminate at least eight sample positions from one beam port with a brilliance transfer above 90% on each sample on a 150 m long instrument. This has been done for a phase space volume comprised of an area of 1×1 cm2 and a maximum divergence of±0.5° within a wavelength band of 4.25-5.75 Å. We show, by a full virtual experiment, an example of applying the guide-split concept to an instrument proposed for the European Spallation Source, namely a magnetism diffractometer.

  13. [Is medical linac suitable for high-precision stereotactic irradiation?: investigations in geometrical accuracies of gantry and couch].

    PubMed

    Kunieda, E; Kitamura, M; Kawaguchi, O; Ohira, T; Shigematsu, N; Tonai, T; Ando, Y; Kubo, A; Kawase, T

    1998-02-01

    Linac-based radiosurgery has many advantages over the gamma knife, including low initial cost and no need of source replacement. On the other hand, most of the medical linacs currently in use were not originally designed to be applied for radiosurgery, and, therefore, careful quality assurance programs are required. In the gantry-head of a linac, a small CCD video camera is mounted in a position optically identical to that of the x-ray source. The video signal from the camera was digitalized to be evaluated for geometrical errors. A metal ball fixed to the stereotactic base frame via XYZ-sliding rods was used as a simulated target. Displacements of the target from the isocenter were measured during rotation of the gantry. Displacements in the gantry-rotation plane were satisfactorily small, while those perpendicular to it were maximal at gantry position angles of 0 degree and 180 degrees. This error night be caused by gravitational vending of the heavy gantry head. Although other major errors of the linac were within one millimeter, the center of coach rotation around the isocenter did not coincide with the center of gantry rotation, probably owing to gravitational vending. Special care should be taken when very small collimators are employed.

  14. SU-E-J-269: Assessing the Precision of Dose Delivery in CBCT-Guided Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Lung and Soft Tissue Metastatic Lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Parsai, S; Dalhart, A; Chen, C; Parsai, E; Pearson, D; Sperling, N; Reddy, K

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Ensuring reproducibility of target localization is critical to accurate stereotactic body radiation treatment (SBRT) for lung and soft tissue metastatic lesions. To characterize interfraction variability in set-up and evaluate PTV margins utilized for SBRT, daily CBCTs were used to calculate delivered target and OAR doses compared to those expected from planning. Methods: CBCT images obtained prior to each fraction of SBRT for a lung and thyroid metastatic lesion were evaluated. The target CTV/ITV and OARs on each of 8 CBCT data sets were contoured. Using MIM fusion software and Pinnacle{sup 3} RTP system, delivered dose distribution was reconstructed on each CBCT, utilizing translational shifts performed prior to treatment. Actual delivered vs. expected doses received by target CTV/ITV and adjacent critical structures were compared to characterize accuracy of pre-treatment translational shifts and PTV margins. Results: The planned CTV/ITV D95% and V100% were 4595cGy and 91.47% for the lung lesion, and 3010cGy and 96.34% for the thyroid lesion. Based on CBCT analysis, actual mean D95% and V100% for lung ITV were 4542±344.4cGy and 91.54±3.45%; actual mean D95% and V100% for thyroid metastasis CTV were 3005±25.98cGy and 95.20±2.522%. For the lung lesion, ipsilateral lung V20, heart V32 (cc) and spinal cord (.03 cc) max were 110.15cc, 3.33cc, and 1680cGy vs. 110.27±14.79cc, 6.74±3.76cc, and 1711±46.56cGy for planned vs. delivered doses, respectively. For the thyroid metastatic lesion, esophagus V18, trachea (.03 cc) max, and spinal cord (.03 cc) max were 0.35cc, 2555cGy, and 850cGy vs. 0.16±0.13cc, 2147±367cGy, and 838±45cGy for planned vs. delivered treatments, respectively. Conclusion: Minimal variability in SBRT target lesion dose delivered based on pre-treatment CBCT-based translational shifts suggests tighter PTV margins may be considered to further decrease dose to surrounding critical structures. Guidelines for optimal target alignment during

  15. Target localization of 3D versus 4D cone beam computed tomography in lipiodol-guided stereotactic radiotherapy of hepatocellular carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Chan, Mark; Chiang, Chi Leung; Lee, Venus; Cheung, Steven; Leung, Ronnie; Wong, Matthew; Lee, Frankle; Blanck, Oliver

    2017-01-01

    Aim of this study was to comparatively evaluate the accuracy of respiration-correlated (4D) and uncorrelated (3D) cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) in localizing lipiodolized hepatocellular carcinomas during stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). 4D-CBCT scans of eighteen HCCs were acquired during free-breathing SBRT following trans-arterial chemo-embolization (TACE) with lipiodol. Approximately 1320 x-ray projections per 4D-CBCT were collected and phase-sorted into ten bins. A 4D registration workflow was followed to register the reconstructed time-weighted average CBCT with the planning mid-ventilation (MidV) CT by an initial bone registration of the vertebrae and then tissue registration of the lipiodol. For comparison, projections of each 4D-CBCT were combined to synthesize 3D-CBCT without phase-sorting. Using the lipiodolized tumor, uncertainties of the treatment setup estimated from the absolute and relative lipiodol position to bone were analyzed separately for 4D- and 3D-CBCT. Qualitatively, 3D-CBCT showed better lipiodol contrast than 4D-CBCT primarily because of a tenfold increase of projections used for reconstruction. Motion artifact was observed to subside in 4D-CBCT compared to 3D-CBCT. Group mean, systematic and random errors estimated from 4D- and 3D-CBCT agreed to within 1 mm in the cranio-caudal (CC) and 0.5 mm in the anterior-posterior (AP) and left-right (LR) directions. Systematic and random errors are largest in the CC direction, amounting to 4.7 mm and 3.7 mm from 3D-CBCT and 5.6 mm and 3.8 mm from 4D-CBCT, respectively. Safety margin calculated from 3D-CBCT and 4D-CBCT differed by 2.1, 0.1 and 0.0 mm in the CC, AP, and LR directions. 3D-CBCT is an adequate alternative to 4D-CBCT when lipoid is used for localizing HCC during free-breathing SBRT. Similar margins are anticipated with 3D- and 4D-CBCT.

  16. Lifework Planning Guide: A Student Guide to High School Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin State Dept. of Public Instruction, Madison.

    This document is designed to help Wisconsin eighth grade students, their parents, and their teachers plan an individualized course of study in high school that will help these students research their post-high school goals. The document begins by describing the process of lifework planning, which is intended to equip students with the research…

  17. Dynamics of laser-guided alternating current high voltage discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daigle, J.-F.; Théberge, F.; Lassonde, P.; Kieffer, J.-C.; Fujii, T.; Fortin, J.; Châteauneuf, M.; Dubois, J.

    2013-10-01

    The dynamics of laser-guided alternating current high voltage discharges are characterized using a streak camera. Laser filaments were used to trigger and guide the discharges produced by a commercial Tesla coil. The streaking images revealed that the dynamics of the guided alternating current high voltage corona are different from that of a direct current source. The measured effective corona velocity and the absence of leader streamers confirmed that it evolves in a pure leader regime.

  18. What's Next?: A Guide to Planning Life after High School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bridgeport Public Education Fund, CT.

    This guide was written to help high school students to plan for their lives after high school, regardless of whether their interests are directed toward the work place, vocational education, or institutions of higher education. The goal of the guide is to enable students to create and organize a plan tailored to their own needs and objectives.…

  19. The use of high field strength and parallel imaging techniques for MRI-based gel dosimetry in stereotactic radiosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seimenis, I.; Moutsatsos, A.; Petrokokkinos, L.; Kantemiris, I.; Benekos, O.; Efstathopoulos, E.; Papagiannis, P.; Spevacek, V.; Semnicka, J.; Dvorak, P.

    2009-07-01

    The poor clinical acceptance of polymer gel dosimetry for dose verification in stereotactic radio-surgery applications stems, inter alia, from the increased MRI acquisition times needed to meet the associated spatial resolution demands. To examine whether this could be partly alleviated by the employment of 3 Tesla imagers and parallel imaging techniques, a PolyAcrylamide Gel filled tube was irradiated in a Leksell Gamma Knife unit with two single irradiation shots (4 mm and 8 mm) and underwent four different scanning sessions using an optimised, volume selective, 32 echo CPMG pulse sequence: One performed on a 1.5 T imager with 0.5 × 0.5 mm2 in-plane spatial resolution and 0.75 mm slice thickness (scan A), while the rest three on a 3.0 T imager; one with the same spatial resolution as in scan A (scan B) and two with finer in-plane resolution (scans C and D). In scans B and C the sensitivity encoding (SENSE) parallel imaging technique was employed. Relative dose distributions derived by scan A were benchmarked against Monte Carlo and treatment planning system calculations, and then used as the reference for the comparison of 2D relative dose distributions derived by each scan in terms of dose difference and distance-to-agreement criteria (γ index tool). Findings suggest that careful MRI planning based on a figure of merit accounting for scanning time and precision for a given increase in spatial resolution, could facilitate the introduction of polymer gel dosimetry into the clinical setting as a practical quality assurance tool for complex radio-surgery techniques.

  20. [Stereotactic body radiotherapy for liver tumors: State of the art].

    PubMed

    Riou, O; Azria, D; Mornex, F

    2017-09-06

    Thanks to the improvement in radiotherapy physics, biology, computing and imaging, patients presenting with liver tumors can be efficiently treated by radiation. Radiotherapy has been included in liver tumors treatment guidelines at all disease stages. Liver stereotactic radiotherapy has to be preferred to standard fractionated radiotherapy whenever possible, as potentially more efficient because of higher biological equivalent dose. Liver stereotactic radiotherapy planning and delivery require extensive experience and optimal treatment quality at every step, thus limiting its availability to specialized centres. Multicentre studies are difficult to develop due to a large technical heterogeneity. Respiratory management, image guidance and immobilization are considerations as important as machine type. The use of multimodal planning imaging is compulsory to achieve expected contouring quality. Treatment efficacy is difficult to assess following liver stereotactic radiotherapy, but local control is high and toxicity unusual. As a consequence, liver stereotactic radiotherapy is part of multimodal and multidisciplinary management of liver tumors. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  1. High Performance Home Building Guide for Habitat for Humanity Affiliates

    SciTech Connect

    Lindsey Marburger

    2010-10-01

    This guide covers basic principles of high performance Habitat construction, steps to achieving high performance Habitat construction, resources to help improve building practices, materials, etc., and affiliate profiles and recommendations.

  2. Health, An Instructional Guide, Junior High School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Los Angeles City Schools, CA. Div. of Instructional Planning and Services.

    This teacher's guide was designed to be used with a one semester course required during the seventh grade to meet the graduation requirement for health instruction. Broad topics included are: growing and maturing; achieving personal health; food for growth and health; addicting, habit-forming, and other harmful substances; community health; and…

  3. Health Education Resource Guide, Junior High.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Way School District 210, WA.

    As part of a health education program for K-12, this curriculum guide for grade eight provides: (1) a short overview of health education; (2) a scope and sequence chart which lists specific topics to teach on mental health, physical health, community health, and safety that are appropriate at different grade levels; (3) a list of objectives; and…

  4. Geometry, Senior High School Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klier, Katherine M., Ed.

    This syllabus presents a fused course in plane, solid, and coordinate geometry for secondary school students. Elementary set theory, logic, and the principles of separation provide unifying threads throughout this approach to geometry. There are actually two curriculum guides included; one for each of two different texts--Henderson, Pingry, and…

  5. The Curriculum Guide: High School Psychology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenstone, James L.

    Designed for the secondary level, this curriculum guide suggests concepts and teaching strategies for ten areas of psychology. The content areas of instruction include learning and study skills, behavior patterns, adjustment to the social environment, development of critical thinking, sensitivity to needs and feelings of others, physiological…

  6. Stereotactic surgery for eating disorders.

    PubMed

    Sun, Bomin; Liu, Wei

    2013-01-01

    EATING DISORDERS (EDS) ARE A GROUP OF SEVERELY IMPAIRED EATING BEHAVIORS, WHICH INCLUDE THREE SUBGROUPS: anorexia nervosa (AN), bulimia nervosa (BN), and ED not otherwise specified (EDNOS). The precise mechanism of EDs is still unclear and the disorders cause remarkable agony for the patients and their families. Although there are many available treatment methods for EDs today, such as family therapy, cognitive behavioral therapy, medication, psychotherapy, and so on, almost half of the patients are refractory to all current medical treatment and never fully recover. For treatment-refractory EDs, stereotactic surgery may be an alternative therapy. This review discusses the history of stereotactic surgery, the modern procedures, and the mostly used targets of stereotactic surgery in EDs. In spite of the limited application of stereotactic surgery in ED nowadays, stereotactic lesion and deep brain stimulation (DBS) are promising treatments with the development of modern functional imaging techniques and the increasing understanding of its mechanism in the future.

  7. Stereotactic surgery for eating disorders

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Bomin; Liu, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Eating disorders (EDs) are a group of severely impaired eating behaviors, which include three subgroups: anorexia nervosa (AN), bulimia nervosa (BN), and ED not otherwise specified (EDNOS). The precise mechanism of EDs is still unclear and the disorders cause remarkable agony for the patients and their families. Although there are many available treatment methods for EDs today, such as family therapy, cognitive behavioral therapy, medication, psychotherapy, and so on, almost half of the patients are refractory to all current medical treatment and never fully recover. For treatment-refractory EDs, stereotactic surgery may be an alternative therapy. This review discusses the history of stereotactic surgery, the modern procedures, and the mostly used targets of stereotactic surgery in EDs. In spite of the limited application of stereotactic surgery in ED nowadays, stereotactic lesion and deep brain stimulation (DBS) are promising treatments with the development of modern functional imaging techniques and the increasing understanding of its mechanism in the future. PMID:23682343

  8. Compression-refractory breast hematoma secondary to pseudoaneurysm after stereotactically guided vacuum-assisted biopsy: the critical role of urgent surgical evacuation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Simon; Hennessey, Hooman; Kam Nakch, Idris; Alsharif, Shaza; Meterissian, Sarkis; Mesurolle, Benoît

    2014-10-01

    We report the case of a patient who underwent a vacuum-assisted biopsy of amorphous clustered microcalcifications complicated by a large compression-refractory hematoma secondary to pseudoaneurysm formation. Breast sonography was used to identify an actively bleeding vessel and guide compression. However, due to its unresponsiveness to conventional management and rapid progression, the hematoma required surgical evacuation and ligation of the bleeding vessel. This suggests that, in the face of significant intractable bleeding, a heightened awareness of the possible need for surgical intervention should be maintained.

  9. Feasibility of stereotactic body radiation therapy with volumetric modulated arc therapy and high intensity photon beams for hepatocellular carcinoma patients.

    PubMed

    Wang, Po-Ming; Hsu, Wei-Chung; Chung, Na-Na; Chang, Feng-Ling; Jang, Chin-Jyh; Fogliata, Antonella; Scorsetti, Marta; Cozzi, Luca

    2014-01-10

    To report technical features, early outcome and toxicity of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) treatments with volumetric modulated arc therapy (RapidArc) for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Twenty patients (22 lesions) were prospectively enrolled in a feasibility study. Dose prescription was 50 Gy in 10 fractions. Seven patients (35%) were classified as AJCC stage I-II while 13 (65%) were stages III-IV. Eighteen patients (90%) were Child-Pugh stage A, the remaining were stage B. All patients were treated with RapidArc technique with flattening filter free (FFF) photon beams of 10 MV from a TrueBeam linear accelerator. Technical, dosimetric and early clinical assessment was performed to characterize treatment and its potential outcome. Median age was 68 years, median initial tumor volume was 124 cm3 (range: 6-848). Median follow-up time was 7.4 months (range: 3-13). All patients completed treatment without interruption. Mean actuarial overall survival was of 9.6 ± 0.9 months (95%C.L. 7.8-11.4), median survival was not reached; complete response was observed in 8/22 (36.4%) lesions; partial response in 7/22 (31.8%), stable disease in 6/22 (27.3%), 1/22 (4.4%) showed progression. Toxicity was mild with only 1 case of grade 3 RILD and all other types were not greater than grade 2. Concerning dosimetric data, Paddick conformity index was 0.98 ± 0.02; gradient index was 3.82 ± 0.93; V95% to the clinical target volume was 93.6 ± 7.7%. Mean dose to kidneys resulted lower than 3.0 Gy; mean dose to stomach 4.5 ± 3.0 Gy; D(3) 1(cm) to spinal cord was 8.2 ± 4.5 Gy; D1% to the esophagus was 10.2 ± 9.7 Gy. Average beam on time resulted 0.7 ± 0.2 minutes (range: 0.4-1.4) with the delivery of an average of 4.4 partial arcs (range: 3-6) of those 86% non-coplanar. Clinical results could suggest to introduce VMAT-RapidArc as an appropriate SBRT technique for patients with HCC in view of a prospective dose escalation trial.

  10. Is robotic arm stereotactic body radiation therapy “virtual high dose ratebrachytherapy” for prostate cancer? An analysis of comparative effectiveness using published data [corrected].

    PubMed

    Zaorsky, Nicholas George; Hurwitz, Mark D; Dicker, Adam P; Showalter, Timothy N; Den, Robert B

    2015-05-01

    High-dose rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) monotherapy and robotic arm (i.e., CyberKnife) stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) are emerging technologies that have become popular treatment options for prostate cancer. Proponents of both HDR-BT monotherapy and robotic arm SBRT claim that these modalities are as efficacious as intensity-modulated radiation therapy in treating prostate cancer. Moreover, proponents of robotic arm SBRT believe it is more effective than HDR-BT monotherapy because SBRT is non-invasive, touting it as 'virtual HDR-BT.' We perform a comparative effective analysis of the two technologies. The tumor control rates and toxicities of HDR-BT monotherapy and robotic arm SBRT are promising. However, at present, it would be inappropriate to state that HDR-BT monotherapy and robotic arm SBRT are as efficacious or effective as other treatment modalities for prostate cancer, which have stronger foundations of evidence. Studies reporting on these technologies have relatively short follow-up time, few patients and are largely retrospective.

  11. Stereotactic body radiotherapy for oligometastases.

    PubMed

    Tree, Alison C; Khoo, Vincent S; Eeles, Rosalind A; Ahmed, Merina; Dearnaley, David P; Hawkins, Maria A; Huddart, Robert A; Nutting, Christopher M; Ostler, Peter J; van As, Nicholas J

    2013-01-01

    The management of metastatic solid tumours has historically focused on systemic treatment given with palliative intent. However, radical surgical treatment of oligometastases is now common practice in some settings. The development of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT), building on improvements in delivery achieved by intensity-modulated and image-guided radiotherapy, now allows delivery of ablative doses of radiation to extracranial sites. Many non-randomised studies have shown that SBRT for oligometastases is safe and effective, with local control rates of about 80%. Importantly, these studies also suggest that the natural history of the disease is changing, with 2-5 year progression-free survival of about 20%. Although complete cure might be possible in a few patients with oligometastases, the aim of SBRT in this setting is to achieve local control and delay progression, and thereby also postpone the need for further treatment. We review published work showing that SBRT offers durable local control and the potential for progression-free survival in non-liver, non-lung oligometastatic disease at a range of sites. However, to test whether SBRT really does improve progression-free survival, randomised trials will be essential. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Tomotherapy and stereotactic radiosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soisson, Emilie T.

    Currently, at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, a linear accelerator equipped with circular collimators and a floor stand is used for stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) delivery. In the interest of providing a more efficient delivery option for patients with multiple brain metastases, a Tomotherapy-based radiosurgery program was developed to serve as an intensity modulated compliment to our existing delivery method. The unique advantage of Tomotherapy over other radiotherapy delivery units is the on board megavoltage CT that can be used for both stereotactic localization and treatment planning. As such, a workflow was designed in which the planning image is acquired on the treatment unit itself and, instead using a patient-frame based coordinate system for stereotactic localization, volumetric imaging is used to precisely locate the target at the time of treatment. Localization and delivery accuracy was found to be comparable to conventional approaches and well within stated tolerances. A Tomotherapy-specific treatment planning technique was also developed using the Tomotherapy treatment planning system that reliably produces plans that achieve both conformal target coverage and sufficiently steep dose falloff into surrounding normal brain. Tomotherapy plans have been compared to conventional circular collimator based plans for both the treatment of brain metastases and arteriovenous malformations in terms of both target conformity and dose to normal brain. To determine the effect of plan differences on patient outcome, clinical data was used to predict the resulting risk of treatment induced symptomatic brain necrosis for both conventional and Tomotherapy based plans. Overall, it was determined that plans generated using the described planning technique are acceptable for radiosurgery. In addition, delivery time for complex cases is comparable to or improved over conventional isocentric approaches. Finally, this work explores the impact of future product

  13. Stereotactic PET atlas of the human brain: Aid for visual interpretation of functional brain images

    SciTech Connect

    Minoshima, S.; Koeppe, R.A.; Frey, A.; Ishihara, M.; Kuhl, D.E.

    1994-06-01

    In the routine analysis of functional brain images obtained by PET, subjective visual interpretation is often used for anatomic localization. To enhance the accuracy and consistency of the anatomic interpretation, a PET stereotactic atlas and localization approach was designed for functional brain images. The PET atlas was constructed from a high-resolution [{sup 18}F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) image set of a normal volunteer (a 41-yr-ld woman). The image set was reoriented stereotactically, according to the intercommissural (anterior and posterior commissures) line and transformed to the standard stereotactic atlas coordinates. Cerebral structures were annotated on the transaxial planes using a proportional grid system and surface-rendered images. The stereotactic localization technique was applied to image sets from patients with Alzheimer`s disease, and areas of functional alteration were localized visually by referring to the PET atlas. Major brain structures were identified on both transaxial planes and surface-rendered images. In the stereotactic system, anatomic correspondence between the PET atlas and stereotactically reoriented individual image sets of patients with Alzheimer`s disease facilitated both indirect and direct localization of the cerebral structures. Because rapid stereotactic alignment methods for PET images are now available for routine use, the PET atlas will serve as an aid for visual interpretation of functional brain images in the stereotactic system. Widespread application of stereotactic localization may be used in functional brain images, not only in the research setting, but also in routine clinical situations. 41 refs., 3 figs.

  14. High School/Preschool Partnership Program: Administrative Guide [and] Curriculum Guide. Field Test Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinellas County School Board, Clearwater, FL.

    An administrative and curriculum guide are presented for the High School/Preschool Partnership Program in which high school students gain experience with handicapped preschoolers in a mainstreamed setting. The program is intended to expand services to high schoolers (parenting skills and career skills) as well as preschoolers. The administrative…

  15. MR-guided stereotactic breast biopsy using a mixed ferromagnetic-nonmagnetic coaxial system with 12- to 18-gauge needles: clinical experience and long-term outcome.

    PubMed

    Belloni, Elena; Panizza, Pietro; Ravelli, Silvia; De Cobelli, Francesco; Gusmini, Simone; Losio, Claudio; Sassi, Isabella; Perseghin, Gianluca; Del Maschio, Alessandro

    2013-10-01

    This study investigated the clinical application of a magnetic-resonance (MR)-guided breast biopsy (MRBB) system consisting of a nonmagnetic coaxial needle and a ferromagnetic core biopsy needle. MRBB was performed on 70 breast lesions. The biopsy device consisted of a nonmagnetic 14- to 16-gauge coaxial needle and a ferromagnetic 16- to 18-gauge biopsy needle. Of the 70 lesions, 29 were malignant and 41 nonmalignant. All 29 malignant lesions underwent surgery and were confirmed as malignant at final histology. Of the 41 nonmalignant lesions, 35 underwent follow-up breast MR imaging (mean, 26 ± 19 months), which demonstrated no lesions changes; six lesions underwent surgery because of poor radiological-pathological correlation; of these 6 lesions, 3 were nonmalignant, one was borderline (lobular carcinoma in situ) and two were malignant (well-differentiated tubular carcinoma and infiltrating ductal carcinoma). Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values and diagnostic accuracy were, respectively, 93.5%, 100%, 100%, 95.1% and 97.1% if the lobular carcinoma in situ was considered a nonmalignant histological result, and 90.6%, 100%, 100%, 92.7% and 95.7% if the lobular carcinoma in situ was considered malignant. MRBB with a ferromagnetic-nonmagnetic coaxial system represented an easy way to perform a biopsy procedure and was easily applicable in the routine clinical setting.

  16. High-dose-rate Three-dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy Combined with Active Breathing Control for Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy of Early-stage Non-small-cell Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ruozheng; Yin, Yong; Qin, Yonghui; Yu, Jinming

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and benefits of using high-dose-rate three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) combined with active breathing control (ABC) for stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) of patients with early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Eight patients with early-stage NSCLC underwent CT scans under standard free-breathing (FB) and moderately deep inspiration breath-hold (mDIBH) with ABC. Two high-dose-rate 3D-CRT plans (1000 Mu/min) were designed based on the CT scans with FB and mDIBH. The maximal dose (D1%), minimal dose (D99%), conformity index (CI), and homogeneity index (HI) of the planning target volume (PTV), and dose-volume indices of the organs at risk between each plan were compared. The mean PTV volume decreased from 158.04 cm(3) with FB to 76.90 cm(3) with mDIBH (p < 0.05). When mDIBH was used, increases in the affected lung volume (by 47%), contralateral lung volume (by 55%), and total lung volume (by 50%) were observed compared to FB (p < 0.05). The V5-V40 of the affected lung (Vx represented the percentage volume of organs receiving at least the x Gy), V5-V40 and the mean dose for the total lung, V5-V40 and mean dose of the chest wall, and the maximum dose of the spinal cord were less for mDIBH than FB (p < 0.05). There were no significant differences in CI, HI, D1%, or D99% for the PTV between the plans. In conclusion, high-dose-rate 3D-CRT combined with ABC reduced the radiation dose to the lungs and chest wall without affecting the dose distribution in SBRT of early-stage NSCLC patients.

  17. A pilot study of intensity modulated radiation therapy with hypofractionated stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) boost in the treatment of intermediate- to high-risk prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Oermann, Eric K; Slack, Rebecca S; Hanscom, Heather N; Lei, Sue; Suy, Simeng; Park, Hyeon U; Kim, Joy S; Sherer, Benjamin A; Collins, Brian T; Satinsky, Andrew N; Harter, K William; Batipps, Gerald P; Constantinople, Nicholas L; Dejter, Stephen W; Maxted, William C; Regan, James B; Pahira, John J; McGeagh, Kevin G; Jha, Reena C; Dawson, Nancy A; Dritschilo, Anatoly; Lynch, John H; Collins, Sean P

    2010-10-01

    Clinical data suggest that large radiation fractions are biologically superior to smaller fraction sizes in prostate cancer radiotherapy. The CyberKnife is an appealing delivery system for hypofractionated radiosurgery due to its ability to deliver highly conformal radiation and to track and adjust for prostate motion in real-time. We report our early experience using the CyberKnife to deliver a hypofractionated stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) boost to patients with intermediate- to high-risk prostate cancer. Twenty-four patients were treated with hypofractionated SBRT and supplemental external radiation therapy plus or minus androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). Patients were treated with SBRT to a dose of 19.5 Gy in 3 fractions followed by intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) to a dose of 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions. Quality of life data were collected with American Urological Association (AUA) symptom score and Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite (EPIC) questionnaires before and after treatment. PSA responses were monitored; acute urinary and rectal toxicities were assessed using Common Toxicity Criteria (CTC) v3. All 24 patients completed the planned treatment with an average follow-up of 9.3 months. For patients who did not receive ADT, the median pre-treatment PSA was 10.6 ng/ml and decreased in all patients to a median of 1.5 ng/ml by 6 months post-treatment. Acute effects associated with treatment included Grade 2 urinary and gastrointestinal toxicity but no patient experienced acute Grade 3 or greater toxicity. AUA and EPIC scores returned to baseline by six months post-treatment. Hypofractionated SBRT combined with IMRT offers radiobiological benefits of a large fraction boost for dose escalation and is a well tolerated treatment option for men with intermediate- to high-risk prostate cancer. Early results are encouraging with biochemical response and acceptable toxicity. These data provide a basis for the design of a phase II clinical

  18. New stereotactic X-ray knife

    SciTech Connect

    Barish, R.J.; Barish, S.V.

    1988-06-01

    For many years, the irradiation of small volumes of tissue in the brain to necrotizing doses has been investigated as a non-invasive alternative to neurosurgery. We propose a new system in which a precisely machined helmet serves as a multi-port focussed X-ray collimator when it is itself irradiated by a conventional medical linear accelerator run in the electron mode. When the collimator is attached to a stereotactic frame, the geometric accuracy of delivering small radiation fields to the brain is limited primarily by the accuracy of the stereotactic localization, and is relatively independent of the positional stability of the accelerator. Field sizes as small as two millimeters are readily achievable. The problem of low dose rate associated with these small fields is overcome by the use of high electron beam currents.

  19. Imaged-guided liver stereotactic body radiotherapy using VMAT and real-time adaptive tumor gating. Concerns about technique and preliminary clinical results.

    PubMed

    Llacer-Moscardo, Carmen; Riou, Olivier; Azria, David; Bedos, Ludovic; Ailleres, Norbert; Quenet, Francois; Rouanet, Philippe; Ychou, Marc; Fenoglietto, Pascal

    2017-01-01

    Motion management is a major challenge in abdominal SBRT. We present our study of SBRT for liver tumors using intrafraction motion review (IMR) allowing simultaneous KV information and MV delivery to synchronize the beam during gated RapidArc treatment. Between May 2012 and March 2015, 41 patients were treated by liver SBRT using gated RapidArc technique in a Varian Novalis Truebeam STx linear accelerator. PTV was created by expanding 5 mm from the ITV. Dose prescription ranged from 40 to 50 Gy in 5-10 fractions. The prescribed dose and fractionation were chosen depending on hepatic function and dosimetric results. Thirty-four patients with a minimal follow-up of six months were analyzed for local control and toxicity. Accuracy for tumor repositioning was evaluated for the first ten patients. With a median follow-up of 13 months, the treatment was well tolerated and no patient presented RILD, perforation or gastrointestinal bleeding. Acute toxicity was found in 3 patients with G1 abdominal pain, 2 with G1 nausea, 10 with G1 asthenia and 1 with G2 asthenia. 6 patients presented asymptomatic transitory perturbation of liver enzymes. In-field local control was 90.3% with 7 complete responses, 14 partial responses and 7 stabilisations. 3 patients evolved "in field". 12 patients had an intrahepatic progression "out of field". Mean intrafraction deviation of fiducials in the craneo-caudal direction was 0.91 mm (0-6 mm). The clinical tolerance and oncological outcomes were favorable when using image-guided liver SBRT with real-time adaptive tumor gating.

  20. Frameless robotically targeted stereotactic brain biopsy: feasibility, diagnostic yield, and safety.

    PubMed

    Bekelis, Kimon; Radwan, Tarek A; Desai, Atman; Roberts, David W

    2012-05-01

    Frameless stereotactic brain biopsy has become an established procedure in many neurosurgical centers worldwide. Robotic modifications of image-guided frameless stereotaxy hold promise for making these procedures safer, more effective, and more efficient. The authors hypothesized that robotic brain biopsy is a safe, accurate procedure, with a high diagnostic yield and a safety profile comparable to other stereotactic biopsy methods. This retrospective study included 41 patients undergoing frameless stereotactic brain biopsy of lesions (mean size 2.9 cm) for diagnostic purposes. All patients underwent image-guided, robotic biopsy in which the SurgiScope system was used in conjunction with scalp fiducial markers and a preoperatively selected target and trajectory. Forty-five procedures, with 50 supratentorial targets selected, were performed. The mean operative time was 44.6 minutes for the robotic biopsy procedures. This decreased over the second half of the study by 37%, from 54.7 to 34.5 minutes (p < 0.025). The diagnostic yield was 97.8% per procedure, with a second procedure being diagnostic in the single nondiagnostic case. Complications included one transient worsening of a preexisting deficit (2%) and another deficit that was permanent (2%). There were no infections. Robotic biopsy involving a preselected target and trajectory is safe, accurate, efficient, and comparable to other procedures employing either frame-based stereotaxy or frameless, nonrobotic stereotaxy. It permits biopsy in all patients, including those with small target lesions. Robotic biopsy planning facilitates careful preoperative study and optimization of needle trajectory to avoid sulcal vessels, bridging veins, and ventricular penetration.

  1. The value of micro-Doppler in stereotactic brain biopsy.

    PubMed

    Hertel, F; Feiden, W; Bettag, M

    2005-06-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the value of intraoperative micro-Doppler in stereotactic brain biopsy (SBB). So far, only a few studies have reported about the usefulness of micro-Doppler in stereotactic brain biopsy. Between 1998 and 2003, 155 SBBs were performed in 153 patients with micro-Doppler (81 males, 72 females, mean age: 59 years). All operations were performed using a ZD-frame and a multiplanar computer tomography-guided trajectory planning system (Leibinger SPP). A 16 MHz micro-Doppler probe (diameter 1 mm, DWL) was used in all cases to explore the area of biopsy before the tissue probes were taken. Serial biopsies (mean, 6 samples) were taken with the Sedan side-cutting cannula (n = 145) or the small forceps (n = 10). We evaluated the number of intraoperative detectable vessel signals by micro-Doppler, intraoperative bleedings as well as bleedings detected by postoperative CT (which was performed in all cases). We compared our results according to bleeding-related complications with the data of stereotactic biopsy series from the recent literature. A conclusive histopathological diagnosis was achieved in 150/153 patients (98 %). A re-biopsy had to be undertaken in 2 cases. In 98 biopsies (63 %), no vessel could be detected with the micro-Doppler. In the remainder, a signal of arterial vessels was detected in 22 (14 %) and a signal of venous vessels in 35 cases (23 %). Detection of a vessel in the micro-Doppler led to a change of the biopsy site in each case within the same trajectory. Biopsy-related bleedings were detected in 4 cases (2.6 %). Among these, the only bleeding which occurred without any signs of vessels in the micro-Doppler happened in a case of a melanoma. The overall biopsy-related permanent morbidity was 0.6 % (n = 1). The biopsy-related mortality was 0. Despite the overall high security of SBB, the use of intraoperative micro-Doppler may lead to an additional reduction of the risk for a biopsy-related bleeding without enormous

  2. A high-performance wave guide cryogenic thermal break

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melhuish, S. J.; McCulloch, M. A.; Piccirillo, L.; Stott, C.

    2016-10-01

    We describe a high-performance wave guide cryogenic thermal break. This has been constructed both for Ka band, using WR28 wave guide, and Q band, using WR22 wave guide. The mechanical structure consists of a hexapod (Stewart platform) made from pultruded carbon fibre tubing. We present a tentative examination of the cryogenic Young's modulus of this material. The thermal conductivity is measured at temperatures above the range explored by Runyan and Jones, resulting in predicted conductive loads through our thermal breaks of 3.7 mW to 3 K and 17 μK to 1 K.

  3. A high-performance wave guide cryogenic thermal break.

    PubMed

    Melhuish, S J; McCulloch, M A; Piccirillo, L; Stott, C

    2016-10-01

    We describe a high-performance wave guide cryogenic thermal break. This has been constructed both for Ka band, using WR28 wave guide, and Q band, using WR22 wave guide. The mechanical structure consists of a hexapod (Stewart platform) made from pultruded carbon fibre tubing. We present a tentative examination of the cryogenic Young's modulus of this material. The thermal conductivity is measured at temperatures above the range explored by Runyan and Jones, resulting in predicted conductive loads through our thermal breaks of 3.7 mW to 3 K and 17 μK to 1 K.

  4. Failure Mode and Effect Analysis for Delivery of Lung Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Perks, Julian R.; Stanic, Sinisa; Stern, Robin L.; Henk, Barbara; Nelson, Marsha S.; Harse, Rick D.; Mathai, Mathew; Purdy, James A.; Valicenti, Richard K.; Siefkin, Allan D.; Chen, Allen M.

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: To improve the quality and safety of our practice of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT), we analyzed the process following the failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) method. Methods: The FMEA was performed by a multidisciplinary team. For each step in the SBRT delivery process, a potential failure occurrence was derived and three factors were assessed: the probability of each occurrence, the severity if the event occurs, and the probability of detection by the treatment team. A rank of 1 to 10 was assigned to each factor, and then the multiplied ranks yielded the relative risks (risk priority numbers). The failure modes with the highest risk priority numbers were then considered to implement process improvement measures. Results: A total of 28 occurrences were derived, of which nine events scored with significantly high risk priority numbers. The risk priority numbers of the highest ranked events ranged from 20 to 80. These included transcription errors of the stereotactic coordinates and machine failures. Conclusion: Several areas of our SBRT delivery were reconsidered in terms of process improvement, and safety measures, including treatment checklists and a surgical time-out, were added for our practice of gantry-based image-guided SBRT. This study serves as a guide for other users of SBRT to perform FMEA of their own practice.

  5. Dosimetry analyses comparing high-dose-rate brachytherapy, administered as monotherapy for localized prostate cancer, with stereotactic body radiation therapy simulated using CyberKnife

    PubMed Central

    Fukuda, Shoichi; Seo, Yuji; Shiomi, Hiroya; Yamada, Yuji; Ogata, Toshiyuki; Morimoto, Masahiro; Konishi, Koji; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Ogawa, Kazuhiko

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to perform dosimetry analyses comparing high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) with simulated stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). We selected six consecutive patients treated with HDR-BT monotherapy in 2010, and a CyberKnife SBRT plan was simulated for each patient using computed tomography images and the contouring set used in the HDR-BT plan for the actual treatment, but adding appropriate planning target volume (PTV) margins for SBRT. Then, dosimetric profiles for PTVs of the rectum, bladder and urethra were compared between the two modalities. The SBRT plan was more homogenous and provided lower dose concentration but better coverage for the PTV. The maximum doses in the rectum were higher in the HDR-BT plans. However, the HDR-BT plan provided a sharper dose fall-off around the PTV, resulting in a significant and considerable difference in volume sparing of the rectum with the appropriate PTV margins added for SBRT. While the rectum D5cm3 for HDR-BT and SBRT was 30.7 and 38.3 Gy (P < 0.01) and V40 was 16.3 and 20.8 cm3 (P < 0.01), respectively, SBRT was significantly superior in almost all dosimetric profiles for the bladder and urethra. These results suggest that SBRT as an alternative to HDR-BT in hypofractionated radiotherapy for prostate cancer might have an advantage for bladder and urethra dose sparing, but for the rectum only when proper PTV margins for SBRT are adopted. PMID:24957754

  6. Dosimetry analyses comparing high-dose-rate brachytherapy, administered as monotherapy for localized prostate cancer, with stereotactic body radiation therapy simulated using CyberKnife.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Shoichi; Seo, Yuji; Shiomi, Hiroya; Yamada, Yuji; Ogata, Toshiyuki; Morimoto, Masahiro; Konishi, Koji; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Ogawa, Kazuhiko

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to perform dosimetry analyses comparing high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) with simulated stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). We selected six consecutive patients treated with HDR-BT monotherapy in 2010, and a CyberKnife SBRT plan was simulated for each patient using computed tomography images and the contouring set used in the HDR-BT plan for the actual treatment, but adding appropriate planning target volume (PTV) margins for SBRT. Then, dosimetric profiles for PTVs of the rectum, bladder and urethra were compared between the two modalities. The SBRT plan was more homogenous and provided lower dose concentration but better coverage for the PTV. The maximum doses in the rectum were higher in the HDR-BT plans. However, the HDR-BT plan provided a sharper dose fall-off around the PTV, resulting in a significant and considerable difference in volume sparing of the rectum with the appropriate PTV margins added for SBRT. While the rectum D5cm(3) for HDR-BT and SBRT was 30.7 and 38.3 Gy (P < 0.01) and V40 was 16.3 and 20.8 cm(3) (P < 0.01), respectively, SBRT was significantly superior in almost all dosimetric profiles for the bladder and urethra. These results suggest that SBRT as an alternative to HDR-BT in hypofractionated radiotherapy for prostate cancer might have an advantage for bladder and urethra dose sparing, but for the rectum only when proper PTV margins for SBRT are adopted.

  7. High-gradient Magnetic Guide for Rydberg Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mhaskar, R.; Hempel, C.; Traxler, M.; Vaidya, V.; Raithel, G.

    2008-05-01

    The theory of guided Rydberg atoms and one-dimensional systems of Rydberg atoms has attracted immense interest recently in context of spin chains and one dimensional quantum random walks. Here we describe an experimental setup to guide Rydberg atoms in a high-gradient magnetic trap and provide an outlook toward implementing traps for Rydberg atoms with a very large aspect ratio of 1:1000. The magnetic guide consists of a two-dimensional quadrupole field generated by two parallel wires carrying parallel currents, producing a magnetic-field gradient at the guide center of 2.7 kGauss-cm-1. The magnetic guiding of cold, dense beams of ^87Rb atoms is described in [1]. In the guide, the atoms are subjected to a two-step excitation 5S1/2->5P3/2->nD5/2 process, where n is the principal quantum number of the Rydberg state. For detection, the Rydberg atoms are field-ionized, and the ions are imaged onto a spatially resolving Multi-Channel Plate detector. Due to the high density of the guided atomic beam, the density of the Rydberg atoms is expected to be high, leading to state-mixing collisions. These will populate high angular momentum states having a large magnetic moment and long lifetimes. It is expected that a fraction of the atoms will become trapped and magnetically guided. [1] S. E. Olson, R. R. Mhaskar, and G. Raithel, Phys. Rev. A 73, 033622 (2006).

  8. Stereotactic Radiosurgery (SRS) / Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT): Benefit to Irish patients and Irish Healthcare Economy.

    PubMed

    Cagney, D N; Armstrong, J G

    2017-01-11

    Cancer incidence across Europe is projected to rise rapidly over the next decade. This rising cancer incidence is mirrored by increasing use of and indications for stereotactic radiation. This paper seeks to summarize the exponential increase in indications for stereotactic radiotherapy as well as the evolving economic advantages of stereotactic radiosurgery and stereotactic body radiotherapy.

  9. High voltage design guide. Volume 4: Aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunbar, W. G.

    1983-01-01

    This report supplies the theoretical background and design techniques needed by an engineer who is designing electrical insulation for high-voltage, high-power components, equipment, and systems for aircraft. A literature survey and abundant bibliography identify references that provide further data on the subjects of partial discharges, corona, field theory and plotting, voids and processes for applying insulation. Both gaseous and solid insulations are treated. Cryogenic and liquid design notes are included. Tests and test equipment for high voltage insulation and equipment are defined. Requirements of test plans and procedures for high-voltage, high-power equipment are identified and illustrated by examples. Suggestions for high-voltage specifications are provided. Very few of the Military and Government specifications deal with system voltages above 10kV, thus most aircraft high-voltage specifications will have to be derived from the power industry specifications and standards produced by ASTM, IEEE, and NEMA.

  10. High School Counselors Training Participant's Guide, 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Education, Washington, DC.

    This booklet is designed to be used by participants in the 1999 High School Counselors Training Program sponsored by the United States Department of Education. The program is divided into eight sessions that teach high school counselors how to help their students look for financial aid opportunities in higher education. Session One,…

  11. A Teacher's Guide to Folksinging. A Curriculum Guide for a High School Elective in Music Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of Secondary Curriculum Development.

    The material in this teacher's guide for a high school elective course may be used in a variety of curriculum designs--from a mini elective to a full year course. The rationale section explains that folksinging can be a valuable activity in the classroom by: 1) presenting a mirror for the student's personality and by being a useful tool for…

  12. Stereotactic radiosurgery: comparing different technologies

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, M

    1998-01-01

    Radiosurgery can be defined as 3-dimensional stereotactic irradiation of small intracranial targets by various radiation techniques. The goal is to deliver, with great accuracy, a large, single fraction dose to a small intracranial target, while minimizing the absorbed dose in the surrounding tissue. This article describes certain technical aspects of radiosurgery and compares the different methods of performing such treatment. The 2 most frequently used types of devices for radiosurgery are units with multiple cobalt sources (e.g., the Gamma Knife) and those based on a linear accelerator. In the former, highly collimated beams of radiation from the cobalt sources intersect at the target. In the latter, the source of a highly collimated beam of high-energy photons directed at the target turns through an arc or set of arcs. The accuracy of target localization, the steepness of fall-off of the radiation dose outside the target and the ability to irradiate an irregularly shaped target are all comparable for these 2 types of devices, despite claims to the contrary. PMID:9526480

  13. Guide to NYC Small High Schools, 2005-2006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New Visions for Public Schools, 2005

    2005-01-01

    New Visions for Public Schools has put together "The New York City Guide to Small High Schools" to describe new opportunities in the public high school system: over 200 small secondary schools created over the last five years. These small schools are part of the Department of Education's efforts to create more choices for thousands of…

  14. The Black Student's Guide to High School Success.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ekeler, William J., Ed.

    The selections in this book offer advice on how to get the most out of a high school education by making intelligent and informed decisions in and out of the classroom. The guide features 15 essays geared to the student, each written by a professional or educator. Each is followed by a short essay by a black high school student about his or her…

  15. Making Sense of Integrated Science: A Guide for High Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biological Sciences Curriculum Study, Colorado Springs.

    This guide outlines the initial work and includes recommendations for schools and districts on how to implement an integrated science program. Chapters include: (1) "What Is Integrated Science and What Does It Look Like at the High School Level?"; (2) "Coherence in High School Science" (F. James Rutherford); (3) "Thinking about Change: What Will…

  16. Users guide to high altitude imagery of Michigan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    A guide to the high altitude imagery of Michigan outlines the areas of the state covered by selected recent high altitude aircraft and Earth Resources Technology Satellite flights. The types of remote sensing used are described. Maps of the flight coverage areas are included along with price lists of available imagery.

  17. The Black Student's Guide to High School Success.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ekeler, William J., Ed.

    The selections in this book offer advice on how to get the most out of a high school education by making intelligent and informed decisions in and out of the classroom. The guide features 15 essays geared to the student, each written by a professional or educator. Each is followed by a short essay by a black high school student about his or her…

  18. High-efficiency backlight module with two guiding modes.

    PubMed

    Li, Chang-Yi; Pan, Jui-Wen

    2014-03-10

    We propose a design for a high-efficiency backlight module that does not require a brightness enhancement film (BEF). With the high-efficiency backlight module it is possible to achieve almost the same half-luminance angle as a conventional edge-lit backlight module can achieve. The backlight system is comprised of a crisscross light guide plate (LGP) and one diffuser sheet. The crisscross LGP is composed of a LGP and optically patterned film (OPF). The backlight module allows light to be extracted through the direct guiding mode and top guiding mode, respectively. We controlled arrangement of the microstructures to increase the optical efficiency and the uniformity by two modes. Compared to the conventional edge-lit backlight module, there is a two-fold improvement in both the total optical efficiency and on-axis luminance with the high-efficiency backlight module.

  19. Intraoperative Probe-Based Confocal Laser Endomicroscopy in Surgery and Stereotactic Biopsy of Low-Grade and High-Grade Gliomas: A Feasibility Study in Humans.

    PubMed

    Pavlov, Vladislav; Meyronet, David; Meyer-Bisch, Vincent; Armoiry, Xavier; Pikul, Brian; Dumot, Chloé; Beuriat, Pierre-Aurelien; Signorelli, Francesco; Guyotat, Jacques

    2016-10-01

    The management of gliomas is based on precise histologic diagnosis. The tumor tissue can be obtained during open surgery or via stereotactic biopsy. Intraoperative tissue imaging could substantially improve biopsy precision and, ultimately, the extent of resection. To show the feasibility of intraoperative in vivo probe-based confocal laser endomicroscopy (pCLE) in surgery and biopsy of gliomas. In our prospective observational study, 9 adult patients were enrolled between September 2014 and January 2015. Two contrast agents were used: 5-aminolevulinic acid (3 cases) or intravenous fluorescein (6 cases). Intraoperative imaging was performed with the Cellvizio system (Mauna Kea Technologies, Paris). A 0.85-mm probe was used for stereotactic procedures, with the biopsy needle modified to have a distal opening. During open brain surgery, a 2.36-mm probe was used. Each series corresponds to a separate histologic fragment. The diagnoses of the lesions were glioblastoma (4 cases), low-grade glioma (2), grade III oligoastrocytoma (2), and lymphoma (1). Autofluorescence of neurons in cortex was observed. Cellvizio images enabled differentiation of healthy "normal" tissue from pathological tissue in open surgery and stereotactic biopsy using fluorescein. 5-Aminolevulinic acid confocal patterns were difficult to establish. No intraoperative complications related to pCLE or to use of either contrast agent were observed. We report the initial feasibility and safety of intraoperative pCLE during primary brain tumor resection and stereotactic biopsy procedures. Pending further investigation, pCLE of brain tissue could be utilized for intraoperative surgical guidance, improvement in brain biopsy yield, and optimization of glioma resection via analysis of tumor margins. 5-ALA, 5-aminolevulinic acidpCLE, probe-based confocal laser endomicroscopyPpIX, protoporphyrin IX.

  20. Human Biology, High School Science Course Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donovan, Edward P.; Prickitt, Ralph

    A course in human biology was developed to increase course options for students of all abilities and interest levels who successfully completed 1 year of high school science. Major topic areas of the course include: general plan of the human body; causes, cures, and prevention of diseases; human body chemistry; structure and function of cells,…

  1. High School Law Awareness Curriculum Guide, 1980.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seminole County Board of Public Instruction, Sanford, FL.

    Instructional materials, activities, and lesson plans used to teach high school students about the law, the legal process, and the legal system are presented. The materials are intended to be incorporated into the U.S. history curriculum. The following topics are covered: procedure for trial simulation; the Boston Massacre; the debate over…

  2. High Temperature Calibration Furnace System user's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The High Temperature Calibration Furnace System (HTCFS) was developed by Summitec Corporation. It is a high precision instrument providing a constant temperature which can be used to calibrate high temperature thermocouples. Incorporating the many recent technological advances from the fields of optical fiber thermometry, material science, computer systems interfacing, and process control, the engineers at Summitec Corporation have been able to create a system that can reach a steady operating temperature of 1700 C. The precision for the system requires the measurement of temperature to be within 1 C in two hours and within 2 C in 24 hours. As documented, the experimental result shows that this system has been able to stay within .5 C in 5 hours. No other systems commercially available have been able to achieve such high temperature precision. This manual provides an overview of the system design, instructions for instrument setup, and operation procedures. Also included are a vendor list and the source codes for the custom-designed software.

  3. [Stereotactic radiosurgery and radiotherapy for brain metastases].

    PubMed

    Tanguy, Ronan; Métellus, Philippe; Mornex, Françoise; Mazeron, Jean-Jacques

    2013-01-01

    Brain metastases management is still controversial even though many trials are trying to define the respective roles of neurosurgery, whole-brain radiotherapy, single-dose stereotactic radiotherapy and fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy. In this article, we review data from trials that examine the role of radiosurgery and fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy in the management of brain metastases.

  4. SU-E-T-620: Dosimetric Compliance Study for a New Prostate Protocol of Combined High Dose Rate Brachytherapy and Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, C; Giaddui, T; Den, R; Harrison, A; Yu, Y

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the adherence of treatment plans of prostate cancer patients with the dosimetric compliance criteria of the new in house phase I trial of high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy combined with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for intermediate risk prostate cancer patients. Methods: Ten prostate cancer patients were treated using this trial. They received one fraction of HDR to 15Gy, followed by external beam(EB) boost of 3.2Gy(Level 1, five patients) or 3.94Gy(level 2, five patients) per fraction for 10 or 7 fractions, respectively, both equivalent to EB treatments of 113.5Gy in 2Gy fractions. The EB plans were either IMRT or VMAT plans. DVH analysis was performed to verify the adherence of treatment plans to the dosimetric criteria of the trial. Results: For Level 1 patients, target coverage were adequate, with CTV V32Gy(%) of 99.0±1.0 (mean ± 1 standard deviation), and PTV V31Gy(%) of 99.6±0.3. PTV V32.9Gy(%) is 1.4±3.1 and PTVmax is 32.9±0.2Gy. Rectum, bladder and femoral heads sparing were well within protocol criteria. For Level 2 patients, CTV V27.6Gy(%) is 98.7±1.8; PTV V26.7Gy(%) is 99.0±1.4. PTV V28.4Gy(%) is 1.3±1.4, with three patients having minor deviation from protocol. Again critical structures were spared compliant to the protocol. The analysis of HDR plans show similar results, with adequate dose coverage to the prostate and sparing of critical structures including urethra and rectum. V100(%) and V90(%) of prostate are 96.0±1.1 and 98.9±0.5. Urethra D10(%) is 113.1±2.9. Rectum V80(cc) is 1.4±0.5. Hotspot in prostate is substantially higher than what the protocol specifies. But the criteria for hotspot are only guidelines, serving to lower the dose to urethra . Conclusion: This new high biological equivalent dose prostate trial has been carried out successfully for ten patients. Based on dosimetric analysis, all HDR and external plans were compliant to the protocol criteria, with only minor deviations.

  5. SU-E-T-383: Can Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy Mimic the Dose Distribution of High-Dose-Rate Tandem and Ovoids/ring Brachytherapy?

    SciTech Connect

    Park, S; Demanes, J; Kamrava, M; Scanderbeg, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) using volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) can mimic the dosimetry of tandem and ovoids/ring brachytherapy. Methods: We selected 5 patients treated with 3D-CT based high-dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy using 4 tandem and ovoid and 1 tandem and ring case. Manual optimization based on the Manchester system followed by graphical optimization (Nucletron Oncentra MasterPlan or Varian BrachyVision) was performed to deliver 6.0 Gy per fraction to a high-risk CTV while maintaining dose to organs at risk (OAR) below the ABS recommendations. For theoretical SBRT plans, CT images and OAR contours from the HDR plans were imported into Eclipse (Varian). The SBRT plan was created to mimic the heterogeneity of HDR plans by using a simultaneous integrated boost technique to match the V100, V150, and V200 isodose volumes from HDR. The OAR Dmax from HDR was used to define the OAR dose constraints for SBRT. Target coverage, dose spill-out, and OAR doses (D0.1cc, D1cc, and D2cc) between the HDR and SBRT plans were compared for significance using a two-tail paired ttest. Results: The mean isodose volumes for HDR vs. SBRT were 29.4 cc vs. 29.0 cc (V200, p = 0.674), 49.2 cc vs. 56.3 cc (V150, p = 0.017), 95.4 cc vs. 127.7 cc (V100, p = 0.001), and 271.9 cc vs. 581.6 cc (V50, p = 0.001). The D2cc to OAR for HDR vs. SBRT was 71.6% vs. 96.2% (bladder, p = 0.002), 69.2% vs. 101.7% (rectum, p = 0.0003), and 56.9% vs. 68.6% (sigmoid, p = 0.004). Conclusion: SBRT with VMAT can provide similar dose target coverage (V200), but dose spill-out and doses to OAR were statistically significantly higher than HDR. This study clearly demonstrated that brachytherapy can not be substituted with SBRT in gynecologic cervical cancer treatment.

  6. Design guide for high pressure oxygen systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bond, A. C.; Pohl, H. O.; Chaffee, N. H.; Guy, W. W.; Allton, C. S.; Johnston, R. L.; Castner, W. L.; Stradling, J. S.

    1983-01-01

    A repository for critical and important detailed design data and information, hitherto unpublished, along with significant data on oxygen reactivity phenomena with metallic and nonmetallic materials in moderate to very high pressure environments is documented. This data and information provide a ready and easy to use reference for the guidance of designers of propulsion, power, and life support systems for use in space flight. The document is also applicable to designs for industrial and civilian uses of high pressure oxygen systems. The information presented herein are derived from data and design practices involving oxygen usage at pressures ranging from about 20 psia to 8000 psia equal with thermal conditions ranging from room temperatures up to 500 F.

  7. High Frequency Guided Wave Virtual Array SAFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, R.; Pardini, A.; Diaz, A.

    2003-03-01

    The principles of the synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT) are generalized for application to high frequency plate wave signals. It is shown that a flaw signal received in long-range plate wave propagation can be analyzed as if the signals were measured by an infinite array of transducers in an unbounded medium. It is shown that SAFT-based flaw sizing can be performed with as few as three or less actual measurement positions.

  8. High Voltage Design Guide. Volume IV. Aircraft

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-01

    Pressure In A Negative Point-Sph-,re Gap In Air 49 18. Dielectric Polarizations 53 19. Temperature Affects AC Dielectric Strength Of Type H Kapton Film 56 20...High Humidity Degrades The Dielectric Strength Of Type H Kapton Film 57 x LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS (CONT.) FigureP 21. Insulation Thickness Affects...Dielectric Strength Of Type H Kapton Film 57 22. Film Area Vs. Dielectric Strength Of Type H Kapton Film 59 23. Life As A Function Of Voltage For Type H

  9. Frameless stereotactic functional neuronavigation combined with intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging as a strategy in highly eloquent located tumors causing epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Sommer, Bjoern; Grummich, Peter; Hamer, Hajo; Bluemcke, Ingmar; Coras, Roland; Buchfelder, Michael; Roessler, Karl

    2014-01-01

    Intractable epilepsy due to tumors located in highly eloquent brain regions is often considered surgically inaccessible because of a high risk of postoperative neurological deterioration. Intraoperative MRI and functional navigation contribute to overcome this problem. To retrospectively investigate the long-term results and impact of functional neuronavigation and 1.5-tesla intraoperative MRI on patients who underwent surgery of tumors associated with epilepsy located close to or within eloquent brain areas. Nineteen patients (9 female, 10 male, mean age 41.4 ± 13.4 years, 11 low-grade and 8 high-grade glial tumors) were evaluated preoperatively using BOLD imaging, diffusion-tensor imaging tractography and magnetoencephalography. Functional data were implemented into neuronavigation in this multimodal approach. In 14 of 19 patients (74%), complete resection was achieved, and in 5 patients significant tumor volume reduction was accomplished. Eight of 14 (57%) complete resections were achieved only by performing an intraoperative image update. Neurological deterioration was found permanently in 2 patients. After a mean follow-up of 43.8 ± 23.8 months, 15 patients (79%) became seizure free (Engel class Ia). Despite the highly eloquent location of tumors causing intractable epilepsy, our multimodal approach led to complete resection in more than two-thirds of patients with an acceptable neurological morbidity and excellent long-term seizure control.

  10. A novel, integrated PET-guided MRS technique resulting in more accurate initial diagnosis of high-grade glioma.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ellen S; Satter, Martin; Reed, Marilyn; Fadell, Ronald; Kardan, Arash

    2016-06-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and lethal malignant glioma in adults. Currently, the modality of choice for diagnosing brain tumor is high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with contrast, which provides anatomic detail and localization. Studies have demonstrated, however, that MRI may have limited utility in delineating the full tumor extent precisely. Studies suggest that MR spectroscopy (MRS) can also be used to distinguish high-grade from low-grade gliomas. However, due to operator dependent variables and the heterogeneous nature of gliomas, the potential for error in diagnostic accuracy with MRS is a concern. Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging with (11)C-methionine (MET) and (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) has been shown to add additional information with respect to tumor grade, extent, and prognosis based on the premise of biochemical changes preceding anatomic changes. Combined PET/MRS is a technique that integrates information from PET in guiding the location for the most accurate metabolic characterization of a lesion via MRS. We describe a case of glioblastoma multiforme in which MRS was initially non-diagnostic for malignancy, but when MRS was repeated with PET guidance, demonstrated elevated choline/N-acetylaspartate (Cho/NAA) ratio in the right parietal mass consistent with a high-grade malignancy. Stereotactic biopsy, followed by PET image-guided resection, confirmed the diagnosis of grade IV GBM. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of an integrated PET/MRS technique for the voxel placement of MRS. Our findings suggest that integrated PET/MRS may potentially improve diagnostic accuracy in high-grade gliomas.

  11. Pelvic Nodal Dosing With Registration to the Prostate: Implications for High-Risk Prostate Cancer Patients Receiving Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kishan, Amar U. Lamb, James M.; Jani, Shyam S.; Kang, Jung J.; Steinberg, Michael L.; King, Christopher R.

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: To determine whether image guidance with rigid registration (RR) to intraprostatic markers (IPMs) yields acceptable coverage of the pelvic lymph nodes in the context of a stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) regimen. Methods and Materials: Four to seven kilovoltage cone-beam CTs (CBCTs) from 12 patients with high-risk prostate cancer were analyzed, allowing approximation of an SBRT regimen. The nodal clinical target volume (CTV{sub N}) and bladder were contoured on all kilovoltage CBCTs. The V{sub 100} CTV{sub N}, expressed as a ratio to the same parameter on the initial plan, and the magnitude of translational shift between RR to the IPMs versus RR to the pelvic bones, were computed. The ability of a multimodality bladder filling protocol to minimize bladder height variation was assessed in a separate cohort of 4 patients. Results: Sixty-five CBCTs were assessed. The average V{sub 100} CTV{sub N} was 92.6%, but for a subset of 3 patients the average was 80.0%, compared with 97.8% for the others (P<.0001). The average overall and superior–inferior axis magnitudes of the bony-to-fiducial translations were significantly larger in the subgroup with suboptimal nodal coverage (8.1 vs 3.9 mm and 5.8 vs 2.4 mm, respectively; P<.0001). Relative bladder height changes were also significantly larger in the subgroup with suboptimal nodal coverage (42.9% vs 18.5%; P<.05). Use of a multimodality bladder-filling protocol minimized bladder height variation (P<.001). Conclusion: A majority of patients had acceptable nodal coverage after RR to IPMs, even when approximating SBRT. However, a subset of patients had suboptimal nodal coverage. These patients had large bony-to-fiducial translations and large variations in bladder height. Nodal coverage should be excellent if the superior–inferior axis bony-to-fiducial translation and the relative bladder height change (both easily measured on CBCT) are kept to a minimum. Implementation of a strict bladder filling

  12. A Phase II Study of Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Low-Intermediate-High-Risk Prostate Cancer Using Helical Tomotherapy: Dose-Volumetric Parameters Predicting Early Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Macias, Victor A.; Blanco, Manuel L.; Barrera, Inmaculada; Garcia, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    Endpoint: To assess early urinary (GU) and rectal (GI) toxicities after helical tomotherapy Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT), and to determine their predictive factors. Methods: Since May 2012, 45 prostate cancer patients were treated with eight fractions of 5.48 (low risk, 29%) or 5.65 Gy (intermediate-high risk, 71%) on alternative days over 2.5 weeks. The exclusion criteria were Gleason score 9–10, PSA >40 ng/mL, cT3b-4, IPSS ≥20, and history of acute urinary retention. During the follow-up, a set of potential prognostic factors was correlated with urinary or rectal toxicity. Results: The median follow-up was 13.8 months (2–25 months). There were no grade ≥3 toxicities. Acute grade 2 GU complications were found in a 22.7% of men, but in 2.3% of patients at 1 month, 0% at 6 months, and 0% at 12 months. The correspondent figures for grade 2 GI toxicities were 20.4% (acute), 2.3% (1 month), 3.6% (6 months), and 5% (12 months). Acute GI toxicity was significantly correlated with the rectal volume (>15 cm3) receiving 28 Gy, only when expressed as absolute volume. The age (>72 years old) was a predictor of GI toxicity after 1 month of treatment. No correlation was found, however, between urinary toxicity and the other analyzed variables. IPSS increased significantly at the time of the last fraction and within the first month, returning to the baseline at sixth month. Urinary-related quality of life (IPSS question 8 score), it was not significantly worsen during radiotherapy returning to the baseline levels 1 month after the treatment. At 12 months follow-up patient’s perception of their urinary function improved significantly in comparison with the baseline. Conclusion: Our scheme of eight fractions on alternative days delivered using helical tomotherapy is well tolerated. We recommend using actual volume instead of percentual volume in the treatment planning, and not to exceed 15 cm3 of rectal volume receiving

  13. A Pooled Analysis of Biochemical Failure in Intermediate-risk Prostate Cancer Following Definitive Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT) or High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy (HDR-B) Monotherapy.

    PubMed

    Hegde, John V; Collins, Sean P; Fuller, Donald B; King, Christopher R; Demanes, D Jeffrey; Wang, Pin-Chieh; Kupelian, Patrick A; Steinberg, Michael L; Kamrava, Mitchell

    2016-06-17

    To investigate biochemical relapse-free survival (BRFS) in men with National Comprehensive Cancer Network-defined intermediate-risk prostate cancer (PC) treated with either stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) or high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-B) monotherapy. A retrospective, multi-institutional analysis of 437 patients with intermediate-risk PC treated with SBRT (N=300) or HDR-B (N=137) was performed. Men who underwent SBRT were treated to 35 to 40 Gy in 4 to 5 fractions. A total of 95.6% who underwent HDR-B were treated to 42 Gy in 6 fractions. Baseline patient characteristics were compared using a T test for continuous variables and the Mantel-Haenszel χ metric or Fisher exact test for categorical variables. Kaplan-Meier curves were generated to estimate 5-year actuarial BRFS. Multivariate analysis using a Cox proportional-hazards model was used to evaluate factors associated with biochemical failure. The mean age at diagnosis was 68.4 (SD±7.8) years. T-category was T1 in 63.6% and T2 in 36.4%. Mean initial prostate-specific antigen was 7.4 (SD±3.4) ng/mL. Biopsy Gleason score was ≤3+4 in 82.8% and 4+3 in 17.2%. At a median of 4.1 years of follow-up, the BRFS rate (Phoenix definition) was 96.3%, with no difference when stratifying by treatment modality or biologically equivalent dose (BED1.5). On multivariate analysis, age (hazard ratio 1.08, P=0.04) and biopsy Gleason score (hazard ratio 2.48, P=0.03) were significant predictors of BRFS. With a median follow-up period of 4 years, SBRT and HDR-B monotherapy provide excellent BRFS in intermediate-risk PC. Longer-term follow-up is necessary to determine the ultimate efficacy of these hypofractionated approaches, but they appear promising relative to standard fractionation outcomes.

  14. Postoperative stereotactic body radiotherapy for spinal metastases.

    PubMed

    Alghamdi, Majed; Tseng, Chia-Lin; Myrehaug, Sten; Maralani, Pejman; Heyn, Chris; Soliman, Hany; Lee, Young; Ruschin, Mark; Da Costa, Leodante; Yang, Victor; Campbell, Mikki; Sahgal, Arjun

    2017-09-01

    Spine is a common site of metastases in cancer patients. Spine surgery is indicated for select patients, typically those with mechanical instability and/or malignant epidural spinal cord (or cauda equina) compression. Although post-operative conventional palliative external beam radiation therapy has been the standard of care, technical improvements in radiation planning and image-guided radiotherapy have allowed for the application of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) to the spine. Spine SBRT is intended to ablate residual tumor and optimize local control by delivering several fold greater biologically effective doses. Early clinical experience of postoperative spinal SBRT report encouraging results in terms of safety and efficacy. In this review, we summarize the clinical and technical aspects pertinent to a safe and effective practice of postoperative SBRT for spinal metastases.

  15. Law and the Family: A High School Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khanlian, John F., Ed.; And Others

    This curriculum guide is designed to assist high school classroom teachers in developing and implementing a program on family law. The major objective of the document is to help students understand how profoundly the law is associated with their private lives. The document is presented in four chapters. Key areas in this frequently ignored area of…

  16. Inglemoor High School Curriculum Guide for Outdoor Recreation & Outdoor Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kline, Jim

    Descriptions of 12-week courses in hunting and fishing and in outdoor activities for male and female students at Inglemoor High School in Bothell, Washington, are presented in this curriculum guide for outdoor education and recreation. Offering both classroom and field experience, each of the two courses meets 55 minutes daily; recommended class…

  17. Heads Up: Concussion in High School Sports. Guide for Coaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2005

    2005-01-01

    This guide provides general information to high school sports coaches about concussions. It focuses on the fact that coaches can play a key role in preventing concussions and managing them properly when they occur. The following sections are included: (1) The Facts; (2) Signs and Symptoms; (3) Prevention and Preparation; (4) When a Concussion…

  18. Law and the Family: A High School Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khanlian, John F., Ed.; And Others

    This curriculum guide is designed to assist high school classroom teachers in developing and implementing a program on family law. The major objective of the document is to help students understand how profoundly the law is associated with their private lives. The document is presented in four chapters. Key areas in this frequently ignored area of…

  19. Inglemoor High School Curriculum Guide for Outdoor Recreation & Outdoor Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kline, Jim

    Descriptions of 12-week courses in hunting and fishing and in outdoor activities for male and female students at Inglemoor High School in Bothell, Washington, are presented in this curriculum guide for outdoor education and recreation. Offering both classroom and field experience, each of the two courses meets 55 minutes daily; recommended class…

  20. High School Industrial Arts. A Guide for Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon State Dept. of Education, Salem.

    This teacher's guide is designed to help high school industrial arts teachers plan activities to develop their students' awareness of technology in our culture and the variety of related careers available to them. Discussed first are the objectives, scope, and sequence of industrial arts. Next, the special characteristics and needs of adolescents,…

  1. The Estuary Guide. Level 3: High School. Draft.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, Glen; And Others

    Estuaries are marine systems that serve as nurseries for animals, links in the migratory pathways, and habitat for a complex community of organisms. This curriculum guide intended for use at the high school level seeks to teach what estuaries are; provide opportunities to practice decision-making that affects estuaries; and encourage students to…

  2. Teachers Guide to Social Studies in the Senior High School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cason, Constance; And Others

    This guide to the social studies was developed for use in the senior high schools of Duval County, Jacksonville, Florida. Topics covered are United States government, United States history, anthropology, bible history, comparative institutions, European history, Florida history, human relations, political science, economics, psychology, sociology,…

  3. Investigating Safely: A Guide for High School Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texley, Juliana; Kwan, Terry; Summers, John

    2004-01-01

    Just as high school science is more complex than it is at lower grade levels, so are the safety issues teachers face in their classes and labs. Reduce the risks to people and place with Investigating Safely, the third and most advanced and detailed volume in NSTA's unique series of safety guidebooks for science teachers. Some of the guides 11…

  4. Investigating Safely: A Guide for High School Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texley, Juliana; Kwan, Terry; Summers, John

    2004-01-01

    Just as high school science is more complex than it is at lower grade levels, so are the safety issues teachers face in their classes and labs. Reduce the risks to people and place with Investigating Safely, the third and most advanced and detailed volume in NSTA's unique series of safety guidebooks for science teachers. Some of the guides 11…

  5. A Curriculum Guide for Teaching the Educable Mentally Retarded: Elementary - Junior High - High School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Carol D.; And Others

    The curriculum guide suggests ideas, activities, procedures, and materials for teaching the educable mentally retarded at the elementary, junior high, and high school levels. For the elementary level, the guide covers the areas of maturational skills and concepts and social skills, reading, writing, spelling, arithmetic, social relationships (life…

  6. A collaborative analysis of stereotactic lung radiotherapy outcomes for early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer using daily online cone-beam computed tomography image-guided radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Grills, Inga Siiner; Hope, Andrew J; Guckenberger, Matthias; Kestin, Larry L; Werner-Wasik, Maria; Yan, Di; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Bissonnette, Jean-Pierre; Wilbert, Juergen; Xiao, Ying; Belderbos, Jose

    2012-09-01

    We report lung stereotactic-body radiotherapy (SBRT) outcomes for a large pooled cohort treated using daily online cone-beam computed tomography. Five hundred and five stage I-IIB (T1-3N0M0) non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cases underwent SBRT using cone-beam computed tomography image guidance at five international institutions from 1998 to 2010. Median age was 74 years (range, 42-92) whereas median forced expiratory volume in 1 second/diffusing lung capacity for carbon monoxide were 1.4 liter (65%) and 10.8 ml/min/mmHg (53%). Of the 505 cases, 64% were biopsy proven and 87% medically inoperable. Staging was: IA 63%, IB 33%, IIA 2%, and recurrent 1%. Median max tumor dimension was 2.6 cm (range, 0.9-8.5). Median heterogeneously calculated volumetric prescription dose (PD) was 54 Gy (range, 20-64 Gy) in three fractions (range, 1-15) over 8 days (range, 1-27). Median biologically equivalent PD biological equivalent doses (BED10) was 132 Gy (range, 60-180). With a median follow-up of 1.6 years (range, 0.1-7.3), the 2-year Kaplan-Meier local control (LC), regional control, and distant metastasis (DM) rates were 94%, 89%, and 20%, respectively, whereas cause-specific and overall survival were 87% and 60% (78% operable, 58% inoperable, p = 0.01), respectively. Stage, gross-tumor volume size (≥ 2.7 cm) and PD(BED10) predicted local relapse (LR) and DM. LR was 15% for BED10 less than 105 Gy versus 4% for BED10 of 105 Gy or more (p < 0.001); DM was 31% versus 18% for BED10 less than 105 versus 105 Gy or more (p = 0.01). On multivariate analysis, PD(BED10) and elapsed days during radiotherapy predicted LR; gross-tumor volume size predicted DM. Grade 2 or higher pneumonitis, rib fracture, myositis, and dermatitis were 7%, 3%, 1%, and 2%, respectively. In the largest early-stage NSCLC SBRT data set to date, a high rate of local control was achieved, which was correlated with a PD(BED10) of 105 Gy or more. Failures were primarily distant, severe toxicities were rare, and

  7. Targeting accuracy of transcranial magnetic resonance-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound brain therapy: a fresh cadaver model.

    PubMed

    Chauvet, Dorian; Marsac, Laurent; Pernot, Mathieu; Boch, Anne-Laure; Guillevin, Rémy; Salameh, Najat; Souris, Line; Darrasse, Luc; Fink, Mathias; Tanter, Mickaël; Aubry, Jean-François

    2013-05-01

    This work aimed at evaluating the accuracy of MR-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (MRgHIFU) brain therapy in human cadaver heads. Eighteen heads of fresh human cadavers were removed with a dedicated protocol preventing intracerebral air penetration. The MR images allowed determination of the ultrasonic target: a part of the thalamic nucleus ventralis intermedius implicated in essential tremor. Osseous aberrations were corrected with simulation-based time reversal by using CT data from the heads. The ultrasonic session was performed with a 512-element phased-array transducer system operating at 1 MHz under stereotactic conditions with thermometric real-time MR monitoring performed using a 1.5-T imager. Dissection, imaging, targeting, and planning have validated the feasibility of this human cadaver model. The average temperature elevation measured by proton resonance frequency shift was 7.9°C ± 3°C. Based on MRI data, the accuracy of MRgHIFU is 0.4 ± 1 mm along the right/left axis, 0.7 ± 1.2 mm along the dorsal/ventral axis, and 0.5 ± 2.4 mm in the rostral/caudal axis. Despite its limits (temperature, vascularization), the human cadaver model is effective for studying the accuracy of MRgHIFU brain therapy. With the 1-MHz system investigated here, there is millimetric accuracy.

  8. Intracranial stereotactic radiosurgery: concepts and techniques.

    PubMed

    De Salles, Antonio A F; Gorgulho, Alessandra A; Pereira, Julio L B; McLaughlin, Nancy

    2013-10-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery was conceptualized to treat functional diseases of the brain. The need for devices capable of molding the radiation dose to the nuances of intracranial lesions and yet preserve brain function became a challenge. Several devices capable of performing radiosurgery of high quality became commercially available, each with advantages and disadvantages. Speed of radiosurgery delivery for cost effectiveness and comfort for the patient are currently the main developments in the field. Nuances of these devices, procedural steps of radiosurgery, and the team approach of radiosurgery are discussed in this article.

  9. Stereotactic biopsy with electrical monitoring for deep-seated brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Ooba, Hiroshi; Abe, Tatsuya; Momii, Yasutomo; Fujiki, Minoru

    2013-01-01

    The stereotactic biopsy is widely integrated into clinical practice as an efficient and safe procedure for histologic diagnoses. However, the surgical risk increases when the lesions are close to the eloquence of the adjacent brain. The present report describes two patients with deep-seated brain tumors who underwent a stereotactic biopsy with electrical monitoring and demonstrates the importance of this technique. The tentative target and trajectory were determined on a stereotactic map from the Schaltenbrand and Wahren atlas. A Cosman-Roberts-Wells stereotactic frame was applied to the patient. Electrical recording along a single trajectory was used to identify the circumscribed neuronal structures, and electrical simulation was administered to the target. The biopsy point was decided when no adverse events were observed with a low electric current level. A 34-year-old male patient with anaplastic astrocytoma in the putamen and thalamus and an 81-year-old female patient with malignant lymphoma in the midbrain underwent stereotactic biopsies with electrical monitoring. The biopsies were successfully performed without any resulting neurologic deficits. This report describes two patients with deep-seated brain tumors who underwent stereotactic biopsies with electrical recording and stimulation. The electrical monitoring appears to be a useful technique to complement the ordinary image-guided biopsy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Corrosion monitoring using high-frequency guided ultrasonic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fromme, Paul

    2014-02-01

    Corrosion develops due to adverse environmental conditions during the life cycle of a range of industrial structures, e.g., offshore oil platforms, ships, and desalination plants. Both pitting corrosion and generalized corrosion leading to wall thickness loss can cause the degradation of the structural integrity. The nondestructive detection and monitoring of corrosion damage in difficult to access areas can be achieved using high frequency guided waves propagating along the structure from accessible areas. Using standard ultrasonic transducers with single sided access to the structure, guided wave modes were generated that penetrate through the complete thickness of the structure. The wave propagation and interference of the different guided wave modes depends on the thickness of the structure. Laboratory experiments were conducted and the wall thickness reduced by consecutive milling of the steel structure. Further measurements were conducted using accelerated corrosion in a salt water bath and the damage severity monitored. From the measured signal change due to the wave mode interference the wall thickness reduction was monitored. The high frequency guided waves have the potential for corrosion damage monitoring at critical and difficult to access locations from a stand-off distance.

  11. Corrosion monitoring using high-frequency guided waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fromme, P.

    2016-04-01

    Corrosion can develop due to adverse environmental conditions during the life cycle of a range of industrial structures, e.g., offshore oil platforms, ships, and desalination plants. Generalized corrosion leading to wall thickness loss can cause the reduction of the strength and thus degradation of the structural integrity. The monitoring of corrosion damage in difficult to access areas can be achieved using high frequency guided waves propagating along the structure from accessible areas. Using standard ultrasonic wedge transducers with single sided access to the structure, guided wave modes were selectively generated that penetrate through the complete thickness of the structure. The wave propagation and interference of the different guided wave modes depends on the thickness of the structure. Laboratory experiments were conducted for wall thickness reduction due to milling of the steel structure. From the measured signal changes due to the wave mode interference the reduced wall thickness was monitored. Good agreement with theoretical predictions was achieved. The high frequency guided waves have the potential for corrosion damage monitoring at critical and difficult to access locations from a stand-off distance.

  12. Measurement of Total Scatter Factor for Stereotactic Cones with Plastic Scintillation Detector

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhari, Suresh H; Dobhal, Rishabh; Kinhikar, Rajesh A.; Kadam, Sudarshan S.; Deshpande, Deepak D.

    2017-01-01

    Advanced radiotherapy modalities such as stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and image-guided radiotherapy may employ very small beam apertures for accurate localized high dose to target. Accurate measurement of small radiation fields is a well-known challenge for many dosimeters. The purpose of this study was to measure total scatter factors for stereotactic cones with plastic scintillation detector and its comparison against diode detector and theoretical estimates. Measurements were performed on Novalis Tx™ linear accelerator for 6MV SRS beam with stereotactic cones of diameter 6 mm, 7.5 mm, 10 mm, 12.5 mm, and 15 mm. The advantage of plastic scintillator detector is in its energy dependence. The total scatter factor was measured in water at the depth of dose maximum. Total scatter factor with plastic scintillation detector was determined by normalizing the readings to field size of 10 cm × 10 cm. To overcome energy dependence of diode detector for the determination of scatter factor with diode detector, daisy chaining method was used. The plastic scintillator detector was calibrated against the ionization chamber, and the reproducibility in the measured doses was found to be within ± 1%. Total scatter factor measured with plastic scintillation detector was 0.728 ± 0.3, 0.783 ± 0.05, 0.866 ± 0.55, 0.885 ± 0.5, and 0.910 ± 0.06 for cone sizes of 6 mm, 7.5 mm, 10 mm, 12.5 mm, and 15 mm, respectively. Total scatter factor measured with diode detector was 0.733 ± 0.03, 0.782 ± 0.02, 0.834 ± 0.07, 0.854 ± 0.02, and 0.872 ± 0.02 for cone sizes of 6 mm, 7.5 mm, 10 mm, 12.5 mm, and 15 mm, respectively. The variation in the measurement of total scatter factor with published Monte Carlo data was found to be −1.3%, 1.9%, −0.4%, and 0.4% for cone sizes of 7.5 mm, 10 mm, 12.5 mm, and 15 mm, respectively. We conclude that total scatter factor measurements for stereotactic cones can be adequately carried out with a plastic scintillation detector. Our results show

  13. Patient specific quality control for Stereotactic Ablative Body Radiotherapy (SABR): it takes more than one phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kron, T.; Ungureanu, E.; Antony, R.; Hardcastle, N.; Clements, N.; Ukath, J.; Fox, C.; Lonski, P.; Wanigaratne, D.; Haworth, A.

    2017-01-01

    Stereotactic Ablative Body Radiotherapy (SABR) is an extension of the concepts of Stereotactic Radiosurgery from intracranial procedures to extracranial targets. This brings with it new technological challenges for set-up of a SABR program and continuing quality assurance. Compared with intracranial procedures SABR requires consideration of motion and inhomogeneities and has to deal with a much larger variety of targets ranging from lung to liver, kidney and bone. To meet many of the challenges virtually all advances in modern radiotherapy, such as Intensity Modulated and Image Guided Radiation Therapy (IMRT and IGRT) are used. Considering the few fractions and high doses per fraction delivered to complex targets it is not surprising that patient specific quality control is considered essential for safe delivery. Given the variety of targets and clinical scenarios we employ different strategies for different patients to ensure that the most important aspects of the treatment are appropriately tested, be it steep dose gradients, inhomogeneities or the delivery of dose in the presence of motion. The current paper reviews the different approaches and phantoms utilised at Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre for SABR QA.

  14. A current perspective on stereotactic body radiation therapy for pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Julian C; Czito, Brian G; Willett, Christopher G; Palta, Manisha

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a formidable malignancy with poor outcomes. The majority of patients are unable to undergo resection, which remains the only potentially curative treatment option. The management of locally advanced (unresectable) pancreatic cancer is controversial; however, treatment with either chemotherapy or chemoradiation is associated with high rates of local tumor progression and metastases development, resulting in low survival rates. An emerging local modality is stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT), which uses image-guided, conformal, high-dose radiation. SBRT has demonstrated promising local control rates and resultant quality of life with acceptable rates of toxicity. Over the past decade, increasing clinical experience and data have supported SBRT as a local treatment modality. Nevertheless, additional research is required to further evaluate the role of SBRT and improve upon the persistently poor outcomes associated with pancreatic cancer. This review discusses the existing clinical experience and technical implementation of SBRT for pancreatic cancer and highlights the directions for ongoing and future studies. PMID:27826200

  15. Evaluation of stability of stereotactic space defined by cone-beam CT for the Leksell Gamma Knife Icon.

    PubMed

    AlDahlawi, Ismail; Prasad, Dheerendra; Podgorsak, Matthew B

    2017-05-01

    The Gamma Knife Icon comes with an integrated cone-beam CT (CBCT) for image-guided stereotactic treatment deliveries. The CBCT can be used for defining the Leksell stereotactic space using imaging without the need for the traditional invasive frame system, and this allows also for frameless thermoplastic mask stereotactic treatments (single or fractionated) with the Gamma Knife unit. In this study, we used an in-house built marker tool to evaluate the stability of the CBCT-based stereotactic space and its agreement with the standard frame-based stereotactic space. We imaged the tool with a CT indicator box using our CT-simulator at the beginning, middle, and end of the study period (6 weeks) for determining the frame-based stereotactic space. The tool was also scanned with the Icon's CBCT on a daily basis throughout the study period, and the CBCT images were used for determining the CBCT-based stereotactic space. The coordinates of each marker were determined in each CT and CBCT scan using the Leksell GammaPlan treatment planning software. The magnitudes of vector difference between the means of each marker in frame-based and CBCT-based stereotactic space ranged from 0.21 to 0.33 mm, indicating good agreement of CBCT-based and frame-based stereotactic space definition. Scanning 4-month later showed good prolonged stability of the CBCT-based stereotactic space definition. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Applied Clinical Medical Physics published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  16. Stereotactic Radiosurgery and Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT)

    MedlinePlus

    ... due to the development of highly advanced radiation technologies that permit maximum dose delivery within the target ... local control. SRS and SBRT rely on several technologies: three-dimensional imaging and localization techniques that determine ...

  17. High Five: A Nutrition Program for High School Youth. Teacher Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Delores C. S.; Rienzo, Barbara A.

    This teacher's guide is part of a multiculturally sensitive teaching package to promote health-enhancing nutrition concepts for Florida public high school students. These nutrition promotion materials are intended to be incorporated into life skills management, home economics, physical education, or life science classes. The guide includes…

  18. Cranial Stereotactic Radiosurgery: Current Status of the Initial Paradigm Shifter

    PubMed Central

    Sheehan, Jason P.; Yen, Chun-Po; Lee, Cheng-Chia; Loeffler, Jay S.

    2014-01-01

    The concept of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) was first described by Lars Leksell in 1951. It was proposed as a noninvasive alternative to open neurosurgical approaches to manage a variety of conditions. In the following decades, SRS emerged as a unique discipline involving a collegial partnership among neurosurgeons, radiation oncologists, and medical physicists. SRS relies on the precisely guided delivery of high-dose ionizing radiation to an intracranial target. The focused convergence of multiple beams yields a potent therapeutic effect on the target and a steep dose fall-off to surrounding structures, thereby minimizing the risk of collateral damage. SRS is typically administered in a single session but can be given in as many as five sessions or fractions. By providing an ablative effect noninvasively, SRS has altered the treatment paradigms for benign and malignant intracranial tumors, functional disorders, and vascular malformations. Literature on extensive intracranial radiosurgery has unequivocally demonstrated the favorable benefit-to-risk profile that SRS affords for appropriately selected patients. In a departure from conventional radiotherapeutic strategies, radiosurgical principles have recently been extended to extracranial indications such as lung, spine, and liver tumors. The paradigm shift resulting from radiosurgery continues to alter the landscape of related fields. PMID:25113762

  19. [Nationwide implementation of stereotactic radiotherapy: the challenges of initial training and continuing professional education].

    PubMed

    Bibault, J-E; Denis, F; Marchesi, V; Lisbona, A; Noël, G; Mahé, M A

    2014-10-01

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy is a rapidly growing advanced treatment technique that delivers high radiation dose with great precision. The implementation of stereotactic body radiation therapy should be associated with a specific initial training and continuing professional education for radiation oncologists and medical physicists. The creation of a French stereotactic body radiation therapy group gathering radiation oncologists (SFRO and AFCOR) and medical physicists (SFPM) is mandatory in order to create dedicated national guidelines, prospective databases and to promote clinical trials in this field. Copyright © 2014 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. High frequency guided wave propagation in monocrystalline silicon wafers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pizzolato, Marco; Masserey, Bernard; Robyr, Jean-Luc; Fromme, Paul

    2017-04-01

    Monocrystalline silicon wafers are widely used in the photovoltaic industry for solar panels with high conversion efficiency. The cutting process can introduce micro-cracks in the thin wafers and lead to varying thickness. High frequency guided ultrasonic waves are considered for the structural monitoring of the wafers. The anisotropy of the monocrystalline silicon leads to variations of the wave characteristics, depending on the propagation direction relative to the crystal orientation. Full three-dimensional Finite Element simulations of the guided wave propagation were conducted to visualize and quantify these effects for a line source. The phase velocity (slowness) and skew angle of the two fundamental Lamb wave modes (first anti-symmetric mode A0 and first symmetric mode S0) for varying propagation directions relative to the crystal orientation were measured experimentally. Selective mode excitation was achieved using a contact piezoelectric transducer with a custom-made wedge and holder to achieve a controlled contact pressure. The out-of-plane component of the guided wave propagation was measured using a noncontact laser interferometer. Good agreement was found with the simulation results and theoretical predictions based on nominal material properties of the silicon wafer.

  1. Stereotactic multiple are radiotherapy. IV--Haemangioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Chakraborti, P R; Chakrabarti, K B; Doughty, D; Plowman, P N

    1997-04-01

    Our initial experience in the treatment of haemangioblastoma using conventional external beam radiotherapy and stereotactic radiotherapy (radiosurgery), by the linear accelerator method, is reported. Six haemangioblastomas in five patients were treated with a mean follow-up of 40 months (range 14-60). Five haemangioblastomas in four patients were treated with stereotactic radiotherapy, where four showed complete radiological response and the fifth was static. Neurological symptoms and signs improved in those patients. The sixth haemangioblastoma was situated close to the pituitary and optic chiasm, and was treated with conventionally fractionated external beam radiotherapy. The lesion showed partial response. No complications were noted in this patient group. This series complements and extends the relatively sparse published literature demonstrating that radiotherapy is an effective option for treating haemangioblastomas. Radiosurgery often lends itself particularly well to these discrete lesions allowing highly focused treatment. For patients with multiple and metachronous cerebellar haemangioblastomas as part of the von Hipple-Lindau syndrome, the data support a policy of conventionally fractionated external beam radiotherapy to the whole cerebellum of 50-55 Gy followed, after a period of time, by radiosurgery to persisting lesions (patients 3 and 4).

  2. A novel semi-robotized device for high-precision (18)F-FDG-guided breast cancer biopsy.

    PubMed

    Hellingman, D; Teixeira, S C; Donswijk, M L; Rijkhorst, E J; Moliner, L; Alamo, J; Loo, C E; Valdés Olmos, R A; Stokkel, M P M

    To assess the 3D geometric sampling accuracy of a new PET-guided system for breast cancer biopsy (BCB) from areas within the tumour with high (18)F-FDG uptake. In the context of the European Union project MammoCare, a prototype semi-robotic stereotactic prototype BCB-device was incorporated into a dedicated high resolution PET-detector for breast imaging. The system consists of 2 stacked rings, each containing 12 plane detectors, forming a dodecagon with a 186mm aperture for 3D reconstruction (1mm(3) voxel). A vacuum-assisted biopsy needle attached to a robot-controlled arm was used. To test the accuracy of needle placement, the needle tip was labelled with (18)F-FDG and positioned at 78 target coordinates distributed over a 35mm×24mm×28mm volume within the PET-detector field-of-view. At each position images were acquired from which the needle positioning accuracy was calculated. Additionally, phantom-based biopsy proofs, as well as MammoCare images of 5 breast cancer patients, were evaluated for the 3D automated locating of (18)F-FDG uptake areas within the tumour. Needle positioning tests revealed an average accuracy of 0.5mm (range 0-1mm), 0.6mm (range 0-2mm), and 0.4mm (range 0-2mm) for the x/y/z-axes, respectively. Furthermore, the MammoCare system was able to visualize and locate small (<10mm) regions with high (18)F-FDG uptake within the tumour suitable for PET-guided biopsy after being located by the 3D automated application. Accuracy testing demonstrated high-precision of this semi-automatic 3D PET-guided system for breast cancer core needle biopsy. Its clinical feasibility evaluation in breast cancer patients scheduled for neo-adjuvant chemotherapy will follow. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  3. Stereotactic CO2 laser therapy for hydrocephalus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozodoy-Pins, Rebecca L.; Harrington, James A.; Zazanis, George A.; Nosko, Michael G.; Lehman, Richard M.

    1994-05-01

    A new fiber-optic delivery system for CO2 radiation has been used to successfully treat non-communicating hydrocephalus. This system consists of a hollow sapphire waveguide employed in the lumen of a stereotactically-guided neuroendoscope. CO2 gas flows through the bore of the hollow waveguide, creating a path for the laser beam through the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). This delivery system has the advantages of both visualization and guided CO2 laser radiation without the same 4.3 mm diameter scope. Several patients with hydrocephalus were treated with this new system. The laser was used to create a passage in the floor of the ventricle to allow the flow of CSF from the ventricles to the sub-arachnoid space. Initial postoperative results demonstrated a relief of the clinical symptoms. Long-term results will indicate if this type of therapy will be superior to the use of implanted silicone shunts. Since CO2 laser radiation at 10.6 micrometers is strongly absorbed by the water in tissue and CSF, damage to tissue surrounding the lesion with each laser pulse is limited. The accuracy and safety of this technique may prove it to be an advantageous therapy for obstructive hydrocephalus.

  4. Role of Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy with Volumetric-Modulated Arcs and High-Intensity Photon Beams for the Treatment of Abdomino-Pelvic Lymph-Node Metastases.

    PubMed

    Franzese, Ciro; Cozzi, Luca; Franceschini, Davide; D'Agostino, Giuseppe; Comito, Tiziana; De Rose, Fiorenza; Navarria, Pierina; Mancosu, Pietro; Tomatis, Stefano; Fogliata, Antonella; Scorsetti, Marta

    2016-08-08

    To study clinical outcome for oligometastatic patients (abdominal lymph-node metastases) treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy. Seventy-one patients were studied retrospectively. Dose prescription was 45 Gy in six fractions. Clinical outcome was assessed with actuarial analysis. The median follow-up was 1.5 years; 45 patients (63.3%) had solitary metastasis, and 26 (36.6%) had multiple lesions. Local control was achieved in 97.5% with a 1-year actuarial rate of 83%. Two-year progression-free survival was 63.1%, and the overall survival was 76.9%. Two patients (3%) developed grade 2 gastro-enteric toxicity. The treatment provided adequate clinical response in the management of oligometastatic cases.

  5. Stereotactic radiofrequency thermocoagulation for hypothalamic hamartoma with intractable gelastic seizures.

    PubMed

    Homma, Junpei; Kameyama, Shigeki; Masuda, Hiroshi; Ueno, Takehiko; Fujimoto, Ayataka; Oishi, Makoto; Fukuda, Masafumi

    2007-08-01

    Management of hypothalamic hamartoma with intractable gelastic epilepsy remains controversial. We have used stereotactic thermocoagulation for treatment of hypothalamic hamartoma with intractable gelastic epilepsy since 1997. Herein, we review our experience in five cases to clarify the usefulness of this treatment. A total of five patients with hypothalamic hamartoma were treated by stereotactic thermocoagulation at our hospital during the period October 1997 through February 2004. In all patients, the hamartoma was less than 10mm in diameter and was located on the floor of the third ventricle with sessile attachment to the wall. To identify ictal onset, chronic intracranial electroencephalography was performed in three patients with the use of a depth electrode implanted in the hamartoma. Attempts were made to induce gelastic seizure by electrical stimulation of the hamartoma in three patients. After magnetic resonance imaging-guided targeting, radiofrequency thermocoagulation of the boundary between the hamartoma and normal hypothalamus was performed to achieve disconnection effects. Marked reductions in seizure frequency were obtained in all cases, with three patients becoming seizure-free after the procedure. No intraoperative complications occurred except in one patient who experienced acute and transient panidrosis with hot flushes during coagulation. Our results suggest that stereotactic thermocoagulation of hypothalamic hamartoma is an acceptable treatment option for patients with intractable gelastic seizures.

  6. Stereotactic radiosurgery of the foramen magnum region and upper neck lesions: technique modification.

    PubMed

    Samblas, J M; Bustos, J C; Gutiérrez-Díaz, J A; Donckaster, G; Santos, M; Ortiz de Urbina, D I

    1994-04-01

    A modification of the stereotactic radiosurgical procedure to permit treatment of lesions in the foramen magnum and upper cervical regions is described. The modification consists of placing the frontal pins of the stereotactic head ring in the zigoma bone, with no changes in the position of the occipital pins, so the final BRW head ring is oblique to the orbito-meatal plane. In this new position there is room enough in the posterior part of the guide for the support scrubs. This is unhampered by the patient's shoulders and the lesion is far enough to permit setting the axial coordinate sufficiently above the head ring plane.

  7. Decision theoretic steering and genetic algorithm optimization: application to stereotactic radiosurgery treatment planning.

    PubMed

    Yu, Y; Schell, M C; Zhang, J B

    1997-11-01

    Treatment planning for stereotactic radiosurgery and fractionated radiotherapy is currently a labor intensive, operator-dependent process. Many degrees of freedom exist to make rigorous optimization intractable except by computationally intelligent techniques. The quality of a given plan is determined by an aggregate of clinical objectives, most of which are subject to competing tradeoffs. In this work, we present an autonomous scheme that couples decision theoretic guidance with a genetic algorithm for optimization. Ordinal ranking among a population of viable treatment plans is based on a generalized distance metric, which promotes a decreasing hyperfrontier of the efficient solution set. The solution set is driven toward efficiency by the genetic algorithm, which uses the tournament selection mechanism based on the ordinal ranking. Goals and satisficing conditions can be defined to signal the ultimate and the minimum achievement levels in a given objective. A conventionally challenging case in radiosurgery was used to demonstrate the practical utility and the problem-solving power of the decision theoretic genetic algorithm. Treatment plans with one isocenter and four isocenters were derived under the autonomous scheme and compared to the actual treatment plan manually optimized by the expert planner. Quality assessment based on dose-volume histograms and normal tissue complication probabilities suggested that computational optimization could be driven to offer varying degrees of dosimetric improvement over a human-guided optimization effort. Furthermore, it was possible to achieve a high degree of isodose conformity to the target volume in computational optimization by increasing the degree of freedom in the treatment parameters. The time taken to derive an efficient planning solution was comparable and usually shorter than in the manual planning process, and can be scaled down almost linearly with the number of processors. Overall, the autonomous genetic

  8. Ion imaging in a high-gradient magnetic guide

    SciTech Connect

    Vaidya, V. D.; Traxler, M.; Mhaskar, R. R.; Raithel, G.; Hempel, C.

    2010-04-15

    We study a photoionization method to detect and image a narrow beam of cold atoms traveling along a high-gradient two-wire magnetic guide that is continuously on. Ions are accelerated in a compact acceleration region, directed through a drift region several centimeters in length, and detected using a position-sensitive ion detector. The potentials of several electrodes can be varied to adjust the imaging properties. Using ion trajectory simulations as well as experiments, we study the passage of the ions through the detection system, the magnification of the detection system, and the time-of-flight characteristics.

  9. Ion imaging in a high-gradient magnetic guide.

    PubMed

    Vaidya, V D; Traxler, M; Hempel, C; Mhaskar, R R; Raithel, G

    2010-04-01

    We study a photoionization method to detect and image a narrow beam of cold atoms traveling along a high-gradient two-wire magnetic guide that is continuously on. Ions are accelerated in a compact acceleration region, directed through a drift region several centimeters in length, and detected using a position-sensitive ion detector. The potentials of several electrodes can be varied to adjust the imaging properties. Using ion trajectory simulations as well as experiments, we study the passage of the ions through the detection system, the magnification of the detection system, and the time-of-flight characteristics.

  10. Thallium SPECT-based stereotactic targeting for brain tumor biopsies. A technical note.

    PubMed

    Hemm, S; Vayssiere, Nathalie; Zanca, Michel; Ravel, Patrice; Coubes, Philippe

    2004-01-01

    MR or CT images acquired under stereotactic conditions are often used to plan and guide brain tumor biopsies. The objective of this study was to design and test a methodology to increase target selection reliability by acquiring stereotactic 201Tl-SPECT data and by integrating them into the surgical planning. The three-headed Philips gamma camera system (Prism 3000) was adapted to stereotactic acquisitions (patient pallet, headholder). A software was developed for the stereotactic target determination based on SPECT images (pixel with the highest metabolic activity inside the tumor). The whole system accuracy was tested with the Elekta phantom adapted to SPECT imaging. The methodology was applied to one brain tumor biopsy. Comparison of the specific phantom coordinates evaluated in SPECT with the theoretical ones did not reveal any significant difference. In this way, our methodology including our homemade software (identification of the stereotactic frame, determination of the pixel with highest metabolic activity within the tumor in the stereotactic coordinate system) was validated. No significant geometric deformations were detected. Clinical feasibility was confirmed in 1 patient with a brain glioma. This study illustrates the feasibility and the accuracy of SPECT acquisitions with the stereotactic Leksell G-frame. The clinical relevance of this methodology is under evaluation. This definition of the target, based on the point with the highest metabolic activity within the tumor, might lead to improved diagnosis in biopsies and patient management. Furthermore, it might prepare the future for therapy aimed at delivering a therapeutic agent within a tumor. Copyright 2004 S. Karger AG, Basel

  11. Clip migration after vacuum-assisted stereotactic breast biopsy: a pitfall in preoperative wire localization.

    PubMed

    Bernaerts, A; De Schepper, A; Van Dam, P; Pouillon, M

    2007-01-01

    Vacuum-assisted stereotactic breast biopsy has become an irreplaceable instrument in the management of suspicious mammographic lesions. If the initial mammographic lesion becomes obscured or absent following the biopsy, a clip is commonly placed by interventional breast radiologists at the biopsy site. This enables future wire localization if atypical or malignant histology warrants excision. Currently, clip malposition or migration has become increasingly recognized in the literature as a possible complication of stereotactic breast biopsy. As in this case, recognition of migration of the clip was crucial in the planning of the patient's subsequent wire localization procedure. This article aims to increase the awareness of radiologists and surgeons of this potential pitfall to prevent false-negative biopsies and minimize positive surgical margins after wire-guided breast conservation surgery. Routine evaluation of pre- and postbiopsy mammograms and prospective identification of inaccurate clip placement before stereotactic wire localization and excision should be performed.

  12. 1D profiling using highly dispersive guided waves

    SciTech Connect

    Volker, Arno; Zon, Tim van; Enthoven, Daniel; Verburg, Wesley

    2015-03-31

    Corrosion is one of the industries major issues regarding the integrity of assets. Currently inspections are conducted at regular intervals to ensure a sufficient integrity level of these assets. Cost reduction while maintaining a high level of reliability and safety of installations is a major challenge. There are many situations where the actual defect location is not accessible, e.g., a pipe support or a partially buried pipe. Guided wave tomography has been developed to reconstruct the wall thickness. In case of bottom of the line corrosion, i.e., a single corrosion pit, a simpler approach may be followed. Data is collected in a pit-catch configuration at the 12 o'clock position using highly dispersive guided waves. The phase spectrum is used to invert for a wall thickness profile in the circumferential direction, assuming a Gaussian defect profile. An EMAT sensor design has been made to measure at the 12 o'clock position of a pipe. The concept is evaluated on measured data, showing good sizing capabilities on a variety simple defect profiles.

  13. 1-D profiling using highly dispersive guided waves

    SciTech Connect

    Volker, Arno; Zon, Tim van

    2014-02-18

    Corrosion is one of the industries major issues regarding the integrity of assets. Currently, inspections are conducted at regular intervals to ensure a sufficient integrity level of these assets. Cost reduction while maintaining a high level of reliability and safety of installations is a major challenge. There are many situations where the actual defect location is not accessible, e.g., a pipe support or a partially buried pipe. Guided wave tomography has been developed to reconstruct the wall thickness of steel pipes. In case of bottom of the line corrosion, i.e., a single corrosion pit, a simpler approach may be followed. Data is collected in a pitch-catch configuration at the 12 o'clock position using highly dispersive guided waves. After dispersion correction the data collapses to a short pulse, any residual dispersion indicates wall loss. The phase spectrum is used to invert for the wall thickness profile in the circumferential direction, assuming a Gaussian defect profile. The approach is evaluated on numerically simulated and on measured data. The method is intended for rapid, semi-quantitative screening of pipes.

  14. 1D profiling using highly dispersive guided waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volker, Arno; van Zon, Tim; Hsu, Mick; Boogert, Lennart

    2016-02-01

    Corrosion is one of the industries major issues regarding the integrity of assets. Currently inspections are conducted at regular intervals to ensure a sufficient integrity level of these assets. Cost reduction while maintaining a high level of reliability and safety of installations is a major challenge. There are many situations where the actual defect location is not accessible, e.g., a pipe support or a partially buried pipe. In case of bottom of the line corrosion, i.e., a single corrosion pit, a simpler approach may be followed. Guided waves are propagated around the circumference of a pipe. In case of wall loss, the phase of the signal changes which is used to estimate the local wall thickness profile. A special EMAT sensor has been developed, which works in a pit-catch configuration at the 12 o'clock position using highly dispersive guided waves. In order to improve the sensitivity, an inversion in performed on multiple orders of circumferential passes. Experimental results are presented on different pipes containing artificial and real defects.

  15. Greatly improved neuroprotective efficiency of citicoline by stereotactic delivery in treatment of ischemic injury.

    PubMed

    Xu, Fangjingwei; Hongbin Han; Yan, Junhao; Chen, He; He, Qingyuan; Xu, Weiguo; Zhu, Ning; Zhang, Hong; Zhou, Fugen; Lee, Kejia

    2011-01-01

    Limited penetration of neuroprotective drug citicoline into the central nervous system (CNS) by systemic administration led to poor efficiency. A novel method of stereotactic drug delivery was explored to make citicoline bypass the blood brain barrier (BBB) and take effect by direct contact with ischemic neurons. A permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (pMCAO) model of rats was prepared. To get the optimal conditions for citicoline administration by the novel stereotactic delivery pathway, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) tracer method was used, and a dose-dependent effect was given. Examinations of MRI, behavior evaluation, infarct volume assessment and histological staining were performed to evaluate the outcome. This MRI-guided stereotactic delivery of citicoline resulted in a notable reduction (>80%) in infarct size and a delayed ischemic injury in cortex 12 hours after onset of acute ischemia when compared with the systematic delivery. The improved neuroprotective efficiency was realized by a full distribution of citicoline in most of middle cerebral artery (MCA) territory and an adequate drug reaction in the involved areas of the brain. Brain lesions of treated rats by stereotactic delivery of citicoline were well predicted in the lateral ventricle and thalamus due to a limited drug deposition by MRI tracer method. Our study realized an improved neuroprotective efficiency of citicoline by stereotactic delivery, and an optimal therapeutic effect of this administration pathway can be achieved under MRI guidance.

  16. [The "LINAC Knife": stereotactic radiotherapy with a linear accelerator].

    PubMed

    Vetterli, D; Born, E J; Curschmann, J

    1998-07-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery stands for a high precision irradiation concept, which allows to deliver a high dose of ionizing radiation to the tumor volume. The characteristic steep dose fall-off immediately outside the target volume enables the selective destruction of small intracranial tumors while sharply minimizing the dose to the surrounding healthy tissue. This treatment modality is non-invasive and in general well tolerated with minimal side-effects. Especially for palliative concepts the short treatment time is of great importance.

  17. Junior High Business Education. Arkansas Public School Course Content Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arkansas State Dept. of Education, Little Rock.

    This course content guide was developed in accordance with the Standards for Accreditation of Public Schools adopted by the Arkansas State Board of Education. The guide is offered as a framework upon which a curriculum can be built. Within the subject area and at each grade level, the content guide identifies skills at three instructional levels:…

  18. Junior High Business Education. Arkansas Public School Course Content Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arkansas State Dept. of Education, Little Rock.

    This course content guide was developed in accordance with the Standards for Accreditation of Public Schools adopted by the Arkansas State Board of Education. The guide is offered as a framework upon which a curriculum can be built. Within the subject area and at each grade level, the content guide identifies skills at three instructional levels:…

  19. Image Guided Endoscopic Evacuation of Spontaneous Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Chad M; Vespa, Paul; Saver, Jeffrey L; Kidwell, Chelsea S; Carmichael, Stanley T.; Alger, Jeffry; Frazee, John; Starkman, Sid; Liebeskind, David; Nenov, Valeriy; Elashoff, Robert; Martin, Neil

    2014-01-01

    Background Spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is a devastating disease with high morbidity and mortality. ICH lacks an effective medical or surgical treatment despite the acknowledged pathophysiological benefits of achieved hemostasis and clot removal. Image guided stereotactic endoscopic hematoma evacuation is a promising minimally invasive approach designed to limit operative injury and maximize hematoma removal. Methods A single center randomized controlled trial was designed to assess the safety and efficacy of stereotactic hematoma evacuation compared to best medical management. Patients were randomized within 24 hours of hemorrhage in a 3:2 fashion to best medical management plus endoscopic hematoma evacuation or best medical management alone. Data was collected to assess efficacy and safety of hematoma evacuation and to identify procedural components requiring technical improvement. Results 10 patients have been enrolled and randomized to treatment. Six patients underwent endoscopic evacuation with a hematoma volume reduction of 80% +/−13 at 24 hours post procedure. The medical arm demonstrated a hematoma enlargement of 78% +/−142 during this same period. Rehemorrhage rates and deterioration rates were similar in the two groups. Mortality was 20% in the endoscopic group and 50% in the medical treatment cohort. The endoscopic technique was shown to be effective in identification and evacuation of hematomas while reduction in the number of endoscopic passes and maintenance of hemostasis require further study. Conclusion Image guided stereotactic endoscopic hematoma removal is a promising minimally invasive technique that is effective in immediate hematoma evacuation. This technique deserves further investigation to determine its role in ICH management. PMID:18424298

  20. [Stereotactic body radiation therapy for spinal metastases].

    PubMed

    Pasquier, D; Martinage, G; Mirabel, X; Lacornerie, T; Makhloufi, S; Faivre, J-C; Thureau, S; Lartigau, É

    2016-10-01

    After the liver and lungs, bones are the third most common sites of cancer metastasis. Palliative radiotherapy for secondary bone tumours helps relieve pain, improve the quality of life and reduce the risk of fractures. Stereotactic body radiotherapy can deliver high radiation doses with very tight margins, which has significant advantages when treating tumours close to the spinal cord. Strict quality control is essential as dose gradient at the edge of the spinal cord is important. Optimal schedule is not defined. A range of dose-fractionation schedules have been used. Pain relief and local control are seen in over 80%. Toxicity rates are low, although vertebral fracture may occur. Ongoing prospective studies will help clarify its role in the management of oligometastatic patients.

  1. Stereotactic hypothalamotomy for behaviour disorders

    PubMed Central

    Schvarcz, J. R.; Driollet, R.; Rios, E.; Betti, O.

    1972-01-01

    Posterior hypothalamotomy is a relatively simple stereotactic procedure. The radiological determination of the target and its physiological corroboration by electrical stimulation are accurate. The lesions have always been made in the site of maximum sympathetic response. In this respect, the cardiovascular changes (hypertension and tachycardia), which are always elicited from a more restricted area, are of particular importance. Depth recordings, however, have been less useful. Undesirable side-effects, if present, were mild and transitory. There was no postoperative intelligence deficit, at least with the standard tests. Images PMID:5035309

  2. Stereotactic limbic leucotomy: surgical technique

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Alan

    1973-01-01

    The requirements for modern psychosurgery are safety and accuracy. Stereotactic techniques give the geometric accuracy and stimulation gives physiological information, which is important in determining lesion sites or at least lesion symmetry. The process whereby focal brain destruction is produced is ideally by a freezing probe, but equally effectively by coagulation. A number of small lesions is thus required. This at present is unavoidable if side effects are to be obviated. Careful continuing assessment of results is necessary to validate any surgical procedure. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4 PMID:4618905

  3. [Stereotactic surgery in Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Linazasoro, G; Guridi, J; Vela, L; Gorospe, A; Rodríguez, M C; Aguilar, M; Ramos, E; Tolosa, E; Obeso, J A

    1997-10-01

    Stereotactic surgery for Parkinson's disease (PD) has regained interest due to the recently described hyperactivity of the subthalamic-pallidal pathway. Many patients suffering from complications associated with the chronic use of levodopa may benefit from surgical treatments. There are different surgical targets and techniques (ablative and deep brain stimulation). The choice of one particular target and technique relies on the clinical symptoms of the patient. The risk/benefit ratio of surgery is related to the careful selection of patients and the technical accuracy. Intraoperative microrecording is considered the best method to avoid side effects and partial results. A series of patient's selection and follow-up assessment criteria are proposed.

  4. Navigation-guided endoscopic biopsy for intraparenchymal brain tumor.

    PubMed

    Tsuda, Kyoji; Ishikawa, Eiichi; Zaboronok, Alexander; Nakai, Kei; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Sakamoto, Noriaki; Uemae, Yoji; Tsurubuchi, Takao; Akutsu, Hiroyoshi; Ihara, Satoshi; Ayuzawa, Satoshi; Takano, Shingo; Matsumura, Akira

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of intraparenchymal brain tumor biopsy using endoscopy and a navigation system (navigation-guided endoscopic biopsy) as a diagnostic tool, a case series of intraparenchymal tumor biopsies was reviewed. Navigation-guided endoscopic biopsy was applied in 9 cases, stereotactic needle biopsy in 16 cases, and open biopsy with or without navigation system in 34 cases. In all biopsy cases, 84.7% of biopsy points were sampled accurately, and 93.2% of diagnoses by biopsy were correct. Comparison of each type of biopsy showed that the resected volumes in navigation-guided endoscopic biopsy and open biopsy tended to be larger than those in stereotactic biopsy, and the mean operation time for the open biopsy procedure was the longest. To define the most applicable device or examination method to increase sampling accuracy, various factors were analyzed in 59 procedures. Navigation-guided endoscopic biopsy was the most accurate of the three types of biopsy, although the statistical difference was not significant. Older patients, histological diagnosis of high-grade glioma or malignant lymphoma, positive photodynamic diagnosis, and positive intraoperative pathology were significant factors in improving the sampling accuracy. Navigation-guided endoscopic biopsy could provide a larger sample volume within a relatively short operation time. The biopsy can be easily combined with both photodynamic diagnosis and intraoperative pathology, significantly improving the histological diagnostic yield.

  5. Salvage Reirradiaton With Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Locally Recurrent Head-and-Neck Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Cengiz, Mustafa; Ozyigit, Goekhan; Yazici, Goezde; Dogan, Ali; Yildiz, Ferah; Zorlu, Faruk; Guerkaynak, Murat; Gullu, Ibrahim H.; Hosal, Sefik; Akyol, Fadil

    2011-09-01

    Purpose: In this study, we present our results of reirradiation of locally recurrent head-and-neck cancer with image-guided, fractionated, frameless stereotactic body radiotherapy technique. Methods and Materials: From July 2007 to February 2009, 46 patients were treated using the CyberKnife (Accuray, Sunnyvale, CA) at the Department of Radiation Oncology, Hacettepe University, Ankara, Turkey. All patients had recurrent, unresectable, and previously irradiated head-and-neck cancer. The most prominent site was the nasopharynx (32.6%), and the most common histopathology was epidermoid carcinoma. The planning target volume was defined as the gross tumor volume identified on magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography. There were 22 female and 24 male patients. Median age was 53 years (range, 19-87 years). The median tumor dose with stereotactic body radiotherapy was 30 Gy (range, 18-35 Gy) in a median of five (range, one to five) fractions. Results: Of 37 patients whose response to therapy was evaluated, 10 patients (27%) had complete tumor regression, 11 (29.8%) had partial response, and 10 (27%) had stable disease. Ultimate local disease control was achieved in 31 patients (83.8%). The overall survival was 11.93 months in median (ranged, 11.4 - 17.4 months), and the median progression free survival was 10.5 months. One-year progression-free survival and overall survival were 41% and 46%, respectively. Grade II or greater long-term complications were observed in 6 (13.3%) patients. On follow-up, 8 (17.3%) patients had carotid blow-out syndrome, and 7 (15.2%) patients died of bleeding from carotid arteries. We discovered that this fatal syndrome occurred only in patients with tumor surrounding carotid arteries and carotid arteries receiving all prescribed dose. Conclusions: Stereotactic body radiotherapy is an appealing treatment option for patients with recurrent head-and-neck cancer previously treated with radiation to high doses. Good local control with

  6. Dynamic Lung Tumor Tracking for Stereotactic Ablative Body Radiation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kunos, Charles A.; Fabien, Jeffrey M.; Shanahan, John P.; Collen, Christine; Gevaert, Thierry; Poels, Kenneth; Van den Begin, Robbe; Engels, Benedikt; De Ridder, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Physicians considering stereotactic ablative body radiation therapy (SBRT) for the treatment of extracranial cancer targets must be aware of the sizeable risks for normal tissue injury and the hazards of physical tumor miss. A first-of-its-kind SBRT platform achieves high-precision ablative radiation treatment through a combination of versatile real-time imaging solutions and sophisticated tumor tracking capabilities. It uses dual-diagnostic kV x-ray units for stereoscopic open-loop feedback of cancer target intrafraction movement occurring as a consequence of respiratory motions and heartbeat. Image-guided feedback drives a gimbaled radiation accelerator (maximum 15 x 15 cm field size) capable of real-time ±4 cm pan-and-tilt action. Robot-driven ±60° pivots of an integrated ±185° rotational gantry allow for coplanar and non-coplanar accelerator beam set-up angles, ultimately permitting unique treatment degrees of freedom. State-of-the-art software aids real-time six dimensional positioning, ensuring irradiation of cancer targets with sub-millimeter accuracy (0.4 mm at isocenter). Use of these features enables treating physicians to steer radiation dose to cancer tumor targets while simultaneously reducing radiation dose to normal tissues. By adding respiration correlated computed tomography (CT) and 2-[18F] fluoro-2-deoxy-ᴅ-glucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) images into the planning system for enhanced tumor target contouring, the likelihood of physical tumor miss becomes substantially less1. In this article, we describe new radiation plans for the treatment of moving lung tumors. PMID:26131774

  7. Apparatus-dependent dosimetric differences in spine stereotactic body radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ma, Lijun; Sahgal, Arjun; Cozzi, Luca; Chang, Eric; Shiu, Almon; Letourneau, Daniel; Yin, Fang-Fang; Fogliata, Antonella; Kaissl, Wolfgang; Hyde, Derek; Laperriere, Normand J; Shrieve, Dennis C; Larson, David A

    2010-12-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to study apparatus-dependent dose distribution differences specific to spine stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) treatment planning. This multi-institutional study was performed evaluating an image-guided robotic radiosurgery system (CK), intensity modulated protons (IMP), multileaf collimator (MLC) fixed-field IMRT with 5 mm (11 field), 4 mm (9 field), and 2.5 mm (8- and 9-field) leaf widths and intensity modulated volumetric arc therapy (IMVAT) with a 2.5 mm MLC. Treatment plans were systematically developed for targets consisting of one, two and three consecutive thoracic vertebral bodies (VBs) with the esophagus and spinal cord contoured as the organs at risk. It was found that all modalities achieved acceptable treatment planning constraints. However, following normalization fixed field IMRT with a 2.5 mm MLC, IMVAT and IMP systems yielded the smallest ratio of maximum dose divided by the prescription dose (MD/PD) for one-, two- and three-VB PTVs (ranging from 1.1-1.16). The 2.5 mm MLC 9-field IMRT, IMVAT and CK plans resulted in the least dose to 0.1 cc volumes of spinal cord and esophagus. CK plans had the greatest degree of target dose inhomogeneity. As the level of complexity increased with an increasing number of vertebral bodies, distinct apparatus features such as the use of a high number of beams and a finer leaf size MLC were favored. Our study quantified apparatus-dependent dose-distribution differences specific to spine SBRT given strict, but realistic, constraints and highlights the need to benchmark physical dose distributions for multi-institutional clinical trials.

  8. Junior High Computer Literacy. Curriculum Guide=L'Informatique au Secondaire 7-8-9. Guide Pedagogique.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberta Dept. of Education, Edmonton. Curriculum Branch.

    This curriculum guide provides information in both English and French for the teaching of computer literacy in junior high schools in the Canadian province of Alberta. A basic introductory course developed in response to the need to acquaint junior high school students with a general understanding of computers and their use, the program for grades…

  9. Junior High Computer Literacy. Curriculum Guide=L'Informatique au Secondaire 7-8-9. Guide Pedagogique.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberta Dept. of Education, Edmonton. Curriculum Branch.

    This curriculum guide provides information in both English and French for the teaching of computer literacy in junior high schools in the Canadian province of Alberta. A basic introductory course developed in response to the need to acquaint junior high school students with a general understanding of computers and their use, the program for grades…

  10. Creating Career Cluster Programs: A Guide for Oregon High Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon State Dept. of Education, Salem. Career and Vocational Education Section.

    The guide was intended to provide the information needed to implement or improve an 11th and 12th grade career education cluster program. The authors suggest that the guide will be most useful in schools where a long-range plan for career education has been prepared and adopted by the local board of education, and where it has been decided to…

  11. Cushing's disease: a single centre's experience using the linear accelerator (LINAC) for stereotactic radiosurgery and fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Wilson, P J; Williams, J R; Smee, R I

    2014-01-01

    Cushing's disease is hypercortisolaemia secondary to an adrenocorticotrophic hormone secreting pituitary adenoma. Primary management is almost always surgical, with limited effective medical interventions available. Adjuvant therapy in the form of radiation is gaining popularity, with the bulk of the literature related to the Gamma Knife. We present the results from our own institution using the linear accelerator (LINAC) since 1990. Thirty-six patients who underwent stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), one patient who underwent fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) and for the purposes of comparison, 13 patients who had undergone conventional radiotherapy prior to 1990, were included in the analysis. Serum cortisol levels improved in nine of 36 (25%) SRS patients and 24 hour urinary free cortisol levels improved in 13 of 36 patients (36.1%). Tumour volume control was excellent in the SRS group with deterioration in only one patient (3%). The patient who underwent FSRT had a highly aggressive tumour refractory to radiation.

  12. Nelson's syndrome: single centre experience using the linear accelerator (LINAC) for stereotactic radiosurgery and fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Peter J; Williams, Janet R; Smee, Robert I

    2014-09-01

    Nelson's syndrome is a unique clinical phenomenon of growth of a pituitary adenoma following bilateral adrenalectomies for the control of Cushing's disease. Primary management is surgical, with limited effective medical therapies available. We report our own institution's series of this pathology managed with radiation: prior to 1990, 12 patients were managed with conventional radiotherapy, and between 1990 and 2007, five patients underwent stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and two patients fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT), both using the linear accelerator (LINAC). Tumour control was equivocal, with two of the five SRS patients having a reduction in tumour volume, one patient remaining unchanged, and two patients having an increase in volume. In the FSRT group, one patient had a decrease in tumour volume whilst the other had an increase in volume. Treatment related morbidity was low. Nelson's syndrome is a challenging clinical scenario, with a highly variable response to radiation in our series.

  13. Best Practices Guide for High-Performance Indian Office Buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Reshma; Sartor, Dale; Ghatikar, Girish

    2013-04-01

    This document provides best practice guidance and energy- efficiency recommendations for the design, construction, and operation of high-­performance office buildings in India. Through a discussion of learnings from exemplary projects and inputs from experts, it provides recommendations that can potentially help achieve (1) enhanced working environments, (2) economic construction/faster payback, (3) reduced operating costs, and (4) reduced greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. It also provides ambitious (but achievable) energy performance benchmarks, both as adopted targets during building modeling (design phase) and during measurement and verification (operations phase). These benchmarks have been derived from a set of representative best-in-class office buildings in India. The best practices strategies presented in this guide would ideally help in delivering high-­performance in terms of a triad—of energy efficiency, cost efficiency, and occupant comfort and well-­being. These best practices strategies and metrics should be normalized—that is, corrected to account for building characteristics, diversity of operations, weather, and materials and construction methods.

  14. Plans, Patterns, and Move Categories Guiding a Highly Selective Search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trippen, Gerhard

    In this paper we present our ideas for an Arimaa-playing program (also called a bot) that uses plans and pattern matching to guide a highly selective search. We restrict move generation to moves in certain move categories to reduce the number of moves considered by the bot significantly. Arimaa is a modern board game that can be played with a standard Chess set. However, the rules of the game are not at all like those of Chess. Furthermore, Arimaa was designed to be as simple and intuitive as possible for humans, yet challenging for computers. While all established Arimaa bots use alpha-beta search with a variety of pruning techniques and other heuristics ending in an extensive positional leaf node evaluation, our new bot, Rat, starts with a positional evaluation of the current position. Based on features found in the current position - supported by pattern matching using a directed position graph - our bot Rat decides which of a given set of plans to follow. The plan then dictates what types of moves can be chosen. This is another major difference from bots that generate "all" possible moves for a particular position. Rat is only allowed to generate moves that belong to certain categories. Leaf nodes are evaluated only by a straightforward material evaluation to help avoid moves that lose material. This highly selective search looks, on average, at only 5 moves out of 5,000 to over 40,000 possible moves in a middle game position.

  15. The Clinical Outcome of Hypofractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy With CyberKnife Robotic Radiosurgery for Perioptic Pituitary Adenoma.

    PubMed

    Puataweepong, Putipun; Dhanachai, Mantana; Hansasuta, Ake; Dangprasert, Somjai; Swangsilpa, Thiti; Sitathanee, Chomporn; Jiarpinitnun, Chuleeporn; Vitoonpanich, Patamintita; Yongvithisatid, Pornpan

    2016-12-01

    Stereotactic radiation technique including single fraction radiosurgery and conventional fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy is widely reported as an effective treatment of pituitary adenomas. Because of the restricted radiation tolerance dose of the optic pathway, single fraction radiosurgery has been accepted for small tumor located far away from the optic apparatus, while fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy may be suitable for larger tumor located close to the optic pathway. More recently, hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy has become an alternative treatment option that provides high rate of tumor control and visual preservation for the perioptic lesions within 2 to 3 mm of the optic pathway. The objective of the study was to analyze the clinical outcomes of perioptic pituitary adenomas treated with hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy. From 2009 to 2012, 40 patients with perioptic pituitary adenoma were treated with CyberKnife robotic radiosurgery. The median tumor volume was 3.35 cm(3) (range, 0.82-25.86 cm(3)). The median prescribed dose was 25 Gy (range, 20-28 Gy) in 5 fractions (range, 3-5). After the median follow-up time of 38.5 months (range, 14-71 months), 1 (2.5%) patient with prolactinoma had tumor enlargement, 31 (77.5%) were stable, and the remaining 8 (20%) tumors were smaller in size. No patient's vision deteriorated after hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy. Hormone normalization was observed in 7 (54%) of 13 patients. No newly developed hypopituitarism was detected in our study. These data confirmed that hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy achieved high rates of tumor control and visual preservation. Because of the shorter duration of treatment, it may be preferable to use hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy over fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for selected pituitary adenomas immediately adjacent to the optic apparatus.

  16. Roughness Effects on Compressor Outlet Guide Vanes at High Reynolds Number and High Turning Angle.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-11-01

    controlled environment was necessary to reduce the effects of ambient temperture fluctuations on the resistance of the bridoe circuit of the anemormeter...RD-Ai24 688 ROUGHNESS EFFECTS ON COMPRESSOR OUTLET GUIDE YANES AT I HIGH REYNOLDS NUMBE..(U) AR FORCE INST OF TECH IRIGHT-PRTTERSONRRFB OH SCHOOL OF...RESOLUTION TEST CHART ~.~~-NAONAL BUREAU OF STAMDOARDS-1963-A AF....ED , . - . . . .Genovese ili t~t.V ROUGHESS EFFECTS ON COMP RROTT .AND HIGH

  17. Once-Weekly, High-Dose Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Lung Cancer: 6-Year Analysis of 60 Early-Stage, 42 Locally Advanced, and 7 Metastatic Lung Cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Salazar, Omar M. Sandhu, Taljit S.; Lattin, Paul B.; Chang, Jung H.; Lee, Choon K.; Groshko, Gayle A.; Lattin, Cheryl J.

    2008-11-01

    Purpose: To explore once-weekly stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in nonoperable patients with localized, locally advanced, or metastatic lung cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 102 primary (89 untreated plus 13 recurrent) and 7 metastatic tumors were studied. The median follow-up was 38 months, the average patient age was 75 years. Of the 109 tumors studied, 60 were Stage I (45 IA and 15 IB), 9 were Stage II, 30 were Stage III, 3 were Stage IV, and 7 were metastases. SBRT only was given in 73% (40 Gy in four fractions to the planning target volume to a total dose of 53 Gy to the isocenter for a biologically effective dose of 120 Gy{sub 10}). SBRT was given as a boost in 27% (22.5 Gy in three fractions once weekly for a dose of 32 Gy at the isocenter) after 45 Gy in 25 fractions to the primary plus the mediastinum. The total biologically effective dose was 120 Gy{sub 10}. Respiration gating was used in 46%. Results: The overall response rate was 75%; 33% had a complete response. The overall response rate was 89% for Stage IA patients (40% had a complete response). The local control rate was 82%; it was 100% and 93% for Stage IA and IB patients, respectively. The failure rate was 37%, with 17% within the planning target volume. No Grade 3-4 acute toxicities developed in any patient; 12% and 7% of patients developed Grade 1 and 2 toxicities, respectively. Late toxicity, all Grade 2, developed in 3% of patients. The 5-year cause-specific survival rate for Stage I was 70% and was 74% and 64% for Stage IA and IB patients, respectively. The 3-year Stage III cause-specific survival rate was 30%. The patients with metastatic lung cancer had a 57% response rate, a 27% complete response rate, an 86% local control rate, a median survival time of 19 months, and 23% 3-year survival rate. Conclusions: SBRT is noninvasive, convenient, fast, and economically attractive; it achieves results similar to surgery for early or metastatic lung cancer patients who are older

  18. Once-weekly, high-dose stereotactic body radiotherapy for lung cancer: 6-year analysis of 60 early-stage, 42 locally advanced, and 7 metastatic lung cancers.

    PubMed

    Salazar, Omar M; Sandhu, Taljit S; Lattin, Paul B; Chang, Jung H; Lee, Choon K; Groshko, Gayle A; Lattin, Cheryl J

    2008-11-01

    To explore once-weekly stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in nonoperable patients with localized, locally advanced, or metastatic lung cancer. A total of 102 primary (89 untreated plus 13 recurrent) and 7 metastatic tumors were studied. The median follow-up was 38 months, the average patient age was 75 years. Of the 109 tumors studied, 60 were Stage I (45 IA and 15 IB), 9 were Stage II, 30 were Stage III, 3 were Stage IV, and 7 were metastases. SBRT only was given in 73% (40 Gy in four fractions to the planning target volume to a total dose of 53 Gy to the isocenter for a biologically effective dose of 120 Gy(10)). SBRT was given as a boost in 27% (22.5 Gy in three fractions once weekly for a dose of 32 Gy at the isocenter) after 45 Gy in 25 fractions to the primary plus the mediastinum. The total biologically effective dose was 120 Gy(10). Respiration gating was used in 46%. The overall response rate was 75%; 33% had a complete response. The overall response rate was 89% for Stage IA patients (40% had a complete response). The local control rate was 82%; it was 100% and 93% for Stage IA and IB patients, respectively. The failure rate was 37%, with 17% within the planning target volume. No Grade 3-4 acute toxicities developed in any patient; 12% and 7% of patients developed Grade 1 and 2 toxicities, respectively. Late toxicity, all Grade 2, developed in 3% of patients. The 5-year cause-specific survival rate for Stage I was 70% and was 74% and 64% for Stage IA and IB patients, respectively. The 3-year Stage III cause-specific survival rate was 30%. The patients with metastatic lung cancer had a 57% response rate, a 27% complete response rate, an 86% local control rate, a median survival time of 19 months, and 23% 3-year survival rate. SBRT is noninvasive, convenient, fast, and economically attractive; it achieves results similar to surgery for early or metastatic lung cancer patients who are older, debilitated, and with comorbidities. Elderly patients and

  19. Stereotactic Ablative Radiation Therapy is Highly Safe and Effective for Elderly Patients With Early-stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Eric D; Sun, Bing; Zhao, Lina; Komaki, Ritsuko; Liao, Zhonxing; Jeter, Melenda; Welsh, James W; O'Reilly, Michael S; Gomez, Daniel R; Hahn, Stephen M; Heymach, John V; Rice, David C; Chang, Joe Y

    2017-07-15

    To discern the effectiveness and toxicity of stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR) in the elderly population (aged ≥75 years) and to consider how SABR outcomes compare with surgical outcomes historically reported in the elderly. A total of 772 patients with clinical early-stage I-II non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC; stage T1-T3N0M0) underwent SABR (50 Gy in 4 fractions or 70 Gy in 10 fractions) from 2004 to 2014 at our center (n=442, aged <75 years; n=330, aged ≥75 years). The primary endpoints included overall survival (OS), time-to-progression, and grade ≥3 toxicity. The median follow-up time was approximately 55 months. Compared with patients aged <75 years, those aged ≥75 years had no difference in the time-to-progression (P=.419), lung cancer-specific survival (P=.275), or toxicity (P=.536). OS was the same between both age groups at 2 years of follow-up but diverged thereafter, with patients aged <75 years when treatment began having greater OS rates at 5 years. The median OS rates for patients aged ≥75 years were 86% at 1 year, 57.5% at 3 years, and 39.5% at 5 years. The median OS rates for patients aged <75 years were 87.3% at 1 year, 67.6% at 3 years, and 51.5% at 5 years. No patient aged ≥75 years experienced any grade 4 or 5 toxicity. The effectiveness of SABR was the same for the elderly as for the average-age population according to lung cancer-specific survival and time-to-progression. It also poses no increased toxicity. Compared with the historical outcomes with surgery in the elderly, SABR outcomes can be considered comparable for stage I-II disease but with less morbidity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Extracranial stereotactic radiotherapy: evaluation of PTV coverage and dose conformity.

    PubMed

    Hädinger, Ulrich; Thiele, Wibke; Wulf, Jörn

    2002-01-01

    During the past few years the concept of cranial stereotactic radiotherapy has been successfully extended to extracranial tumoral targets. In our department, hypofractionated treatment of tumours in lung, liver, abdomen, and pelvis is performed in the Stereotactic Body Frame (ELEKTA Instrument AB) since 1997. We present the evaluation of 63 consecutively treated targets (22 lung, 21 liver, 20 abdomen/pelvis) in 58 patients with respect to dose coverage of the planning target volume (PTV) as well as conformity of the dose distribution. The mean PTV coverage was found to be 96.3% +/- 2.3% (lung), 95.0% +/- 4.5% (liver), and 92.1% +/- 5.2% (abdomen/pelvis). For the so-called conformation number we obtained values of 0.73 +/- 0.09 (lung), 0.77 +/- 0.10 (liver), and 0.70 +/- 0.08 (abdomen/pelvis). The results show that highly conformal treatment techniques can be applied also in extracranial stereotactic radiotherapy. This is primarily due to the relatively simple geometrical shape of most of the targets. Especially lung and liver targets turned out to be approximately spherically/cylindrically shaped, so that the dose distribution can be easily tailored by rotational fields.

  1. Optical spectroscopy for stereotactic biopsy of brain tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markwardt, Niklas; von Berg, Anna; Fiedler, Sebastian; Goetz, Marcus; Haj-Hosseini, Neda; Polzer, Christoph; Stepp, Herbert; Zelenkov, Petr; Rühm, Adrian

    2015-07-01

    Stereotactic biopsy procedure is performed to obtain a tissue sample for diagnosis purposes. Currently, a fiber-based mechano-optical device for stereotactic biopsies of brain tumors is developed. Two different fluorophores are employed to improve the safety and reliability of this procedure: The fluorescence of intravenously applied indocyanine green (ICG) facilitates the recognition of blood vessels and thus helps minimize the risk of cerebral hemorrhages. 5- aminolevulinic-acid-induced protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) fluorescence is used to localize vital tumor tissue. ICG fluorescence detection using a 2-fiber probe turned out to be an applicable method to recognize blood vessels about 1.5 mm ahead of the fiber tip during a brain tumor biopsy. Moreover, the suitability of two different PpIX excitation wavelengths regarding practical aspects was investigated: While PpIX excitation in the violet region (at 405 nm) allows for higher sensitivity, red excitation (at 633 nm) is noticeably superior with regard to blood layers obscuring the fluorescence signal. Contact measurements on brain simulating agar phantoms demonstrated that a typical blood coverage of the tumor reduces the PpIX signal to about 75% and nearly 0% for 633 nm and 405 nm excitation, respectively. As a result, 633 nm seems to be the wavelength of choice for PpIX-assisted detection of high-grade gliomas in stereotactic biopsy.

  2. Review of long-term results of stereotactic psychosurgery.

    PubMed

    Kim, Moon-Chan; Lee, Tae-Kyu; Choi, Chang-Rak

    2002-09-01

    Stereotactic psychosurgery is an effective method for treating some medically intractable psychiatric illnesses. However, it is unfamiliar and the long-term clinical results have not been reported in Asia. The long-term results of psychosurgery are evaluated and the neuroanatomical basis is discussed. Twenty-one patients underwent stereotactic psychosurgery for medically intractable psychiatric illnesses since 1993. All were referred from psychiatrists for these disorders. Two patients showed aggressive behavior, 12 had obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), and seven had depression with anxiety disorders. Bilateral amygdalotomy and subcaudate tractotomy were performed for aggressive behavior, limbic leucotomy was performed for OCD, and subcaudate tractotomy with or without cingulotomy was performed for depression with anxiety. OCD was evaluated with the Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale (YBOCS), the visual analogue scale, the Clinical Global Impression Scale, and the Overt Aggression Scale (OAS). The Mini-Mental State Examination and the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised were used for the evaluation of aggressive behavior. The 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD) was used for evaluation of depression. Ventriculography was used in the first seven patients and magnetic resonance imaging-guided stereotaxy was used in the recent 14 cases for localization of the target. The lesions were made with a radiofrequency lesion generator. OAS scores in the two patients with aggressive behavior during follow up declined from 8 to 2 with clinical improvement. All 12 patients with OCD returned to their previous life and showed the mean YBOCS scores decreased from 34 to 3. Ten patients with OCD could be followed up (mean 45 months). All patients returned to their previous social life. In seven patients with depression with anxiety, HAMD scores declined from 28.5 to 16.5. There was no operative mortality and no significant morbidity except for one case of mild

  3. Principles of Stereotactic Electroencephalography in Epilepsy Surgery.

    PubMed

    Lhatoo, Samden; Lacuey, Nuria; Ryvlin, Philippe

    2016-12-01

    Stereotactic electroencephalography is a method for the invasive study for the human epileptic brain as a prelude to epilepsy surgery. The discipline of stereotactic electroencephalography is underpinned by an anatomo-electro-clinical analysis of epileptic seizures of focal origin and goes beyond simple stereotactic placement of depth electrodes. Stringent analysis of semiological and electrophysiological features is coupled with an understanding of this information in 3D anatomical space. Stereotactic electroencephalography offers significant advantages over subdural grid implantations, allowing pinpoint accuracy access to sulcal areas and deep brain structures, such as the insula, cingulate, basal and mesial brain regions, while associated with lower complication rates. Recent times have seen an exponential growth in stereotactic electroencephalography interest, driven in part by increasing complexity of typical epilepsy surgery patients in epilepsy surgery centers. Such patients are much more likely to be magnetic resonance imaging negative, or reoperations, or to have multifocal or widespread areas of cortical abnormalities. Herein, we discuss the advantages of stereotactic electroencephalography, principles of patient selection, implantation, and interpretation.

  4. MR-Guided Ultrasonic Brain Therapy: High Frequency Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubry, J. F.; Marsac, L.; Pernot, M.; Tanter, M.; Robert, B.; Brentnall, M.; Annic, P.; La Greca, R.; de Charentenay, A.; Pomatta, F.; Martin, Y.; Cohen-Bacrie, C.; Souquet, J.; Fink, M.

    2010-03-01

    A novel MR-guided brain therapy device operating at 1 MHz has been designed and constructed. The system has been installed and tested in a clinical 1.5 T Philips Achieva MRI. Three dimensional time domain finite differences simulations were used to compute the propagation of the wave field through three human skulls. The simulated phase distortions were used as inputs for transcranial correction and the corresponding pressure fields were scanned in the focal plane. At half of the maximum power (10 W/cm2 on the surface of the transducers), necroses were induced 2 cm deep in turkey breasts placed behind a human skull. In vitro experiments on human skulls show that simulations restore more than 85% of the pressure level through the skull bone when compared to a control correction performed with an implanted hydrophone. Finally, high power experiments are performed though the skull bone and a MR-Thermometry sequence is used to map the temperature rise in a brain phantom every 3 s in two orthogonal planes (focal plane and along the axis of the probe).

  5. Feasibility of magnetic resonance imaging-guided liver stereotactic body radiation therapy: A comparison between modulated tri-cobalt-60 teletherapy and linear accelerator-based intensity modulated radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Kishan, Amar U; Cao, Minsong; Wang, Pin-Chieh; Mikaeilian, Argin G; Tenn, Stephen; Rwigema, Jean-Claude M; Sheng, Ke; Low, Daniel A; Kupelian, Patrick A; Steinberg, Michael L; Lee, Percy

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the dosimetric feasibility of liver stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) using a teletherapy system equipped with 3 rotating (60)Co sources (tri-(60)Co system) and a built-in magnetic resonance imager (MRI). We hypothesized tumor size and location would be predictive of favorable dosimetry with tri-(60)Co SBRT. The primary study population consisted of 11 patients treated with SBRT for malignant hepatic lesions whose linear accelerator (LINAC)-based SBRT plans met all mandatory Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 1112 organ-at-risk (OAR) constraints. The secondary study population included 5 additional patients whose plans did not meet the mandatory constraints. Patients received 36 to 60 Gy in 3 to 5 fractions. Tri-(60)Co system SBRT plans were planned with ViewRay system software. All patients in the primary study population had tri-(60)Co SBRT plans that passed all RTOG constraints, with similar planning target volume coverage and OAR doses to LINAC plans. Mean liver doses and V10Gy to the liver, although easily meeting RTOG 1112 guidelines, were significantly higher with tri-(60)Co plans. When the 5 additional patients were included in a univariate analysis, the tri-(60)Co SBRT plans were still equally able to pass RTOG constraints, although they did have inferior ability to pass more stringent liver and kidney constraints (P < .05). A multivariate analysis found the ability of a tri-(60)Co SBRT plan to meet these constraints depended on lesion location and size. Patients with smaller or more peripheral lesions (as defined by distance from the aorta, chest wall, liver dome, and relative lesion volume) were significantly more likely to have tri-(60)Co plans that spared the liver and kidney as well as LINAC plans did (P < .05). It is dosimetrically feasible to perform liver SBRT with a tri-(60)Co system with a built-in MRI. Patients with smaller or more peripheral lesions are more likely to have optimal liver

  6. [Stereotactic radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer: From concept to clinical reality. 2011 update].

    PubMed

    Girard, N; Mornex, F

    2011-10-01

    Only 60% of patients with early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), a priori bearing a favorable prognosis, undergo radical resection because of the very frequent co-morbidities occurring in smokers, precluding surgery to be safely performed. Stereotactic radiotherapy consists of the use of multiple radiation microbeams, allowing high doses of radiation to be delivered to the tumour (ranging from 7.5 to 20 Gy per fraction) in a small number of fractions (one to eight on average). Several studies with long-term follow-up are now available, showing the effectiveness of stereotactic radiotherapy to control stage I/II non-small cell lung cancer in medically inoperable patients. Local control rates are consistently reported to be above 95% with a median survival of 34 to 45 months. Because of these excellent results, stereotactic radiation therapy is now being evaluated in operable patients in several randomized trials with a surgical arm. Ultimately, the efficacy of stereotactic radiotherapy in early-stage tumours leads to hypothesize that it may represent an opportunity for locally-advanced tumors. The specific toxicities of stereotactic radiotherapy mostly correspond to radiation-induced chest wall side effects, especially for peripheral tumours. The use of adapted fractionation schemes has made feasible the use of stereotactic radiotherapy to treat proximal tumours. Overall, from a technical concept to the availability of specific treatment devices and the publication of clinical results, stereotactic radiotherapy represents a model of implementation in thoracic oncology. Copyright © 2011 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Evaluation of linear accelerator-based stereotactic radiosurgery in the management of glomus jugulare tumors.

    PubMed

    Sager, Omer; Beyzadeoglu, Murat; Dincoglan, Ferrat; Gamsiz, Hakan; Demiral, Selcuk; Uysal, Bora; Oysul, Kaan; Dirican, Bahar; Sirin, Sait

    2014-01-01

    Although mostly benign and slow-growing, glomus jugulare tumors have a high propensity for local invasion of adjacent vascular structures, lower cranial nerves and the inner ear, which may result in substantial morbidity and even mortality. Treatment strategies for glomus jugulare tumors include surgery, preoperative embolization followed by surgical resection, conventionally fractionated external beam radiotherapy, radiosurgery in the form of stereotactic radiosurgery or fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy, and combinations of these modalities. In the present study, we evaluate the use of linear accelerator (LINAC)-based stereotactic radiosurgery in the management of glomus jugulare tumors and report our 15-year single center experience. Between May 1998 and May 2013, 21 patients (15 females, 6 males) with glomus jugulare tumors were treated using LINAC-based stereotactic radiosurgery at the Department of Radiation Oncology, Gulhane Military Medical Academy. The indication for stereotactic radiosurgery was the presence of residual or recurrent tumor after surgery for 5 patients, whereas 16 patients having growing tumors with symptoms received stereotactic radiosurgery as the primary treatment. Median follow-up was 49 months (range, 3-98). Median age was 55 years (range, 24-77). Of the 21 lesions treated, 13 (61.9%) were left-sided and 8 (38.1%) were right-sided. Median dose was 15 Gy (range, 10-20) prescribed to the 85%-100% isodose line encompassing the target volume. Local control defined as either tumor shrinkage or the absence of tumor growth on periodical follow-up neuroimaging was 100%. LINAC-based stereotactic radiosurgery offers a safe and efficacious management strategy for glomus jugulare tumors by providing excellent tumor growth control with few complications.

  8. Science Fair. It's a Blast! A Guide for Junior High Students. Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riggins, Patricia C., Ed.

    Science fairs have the potential to help students develop new ways of solving problems using a scientific approach. This supplemental guide was developed for those teachers involved with science fairs as well as others who work with students in developing a project. Several reasons for holding a science fair are listed, along with some…

  9. Science Fair. It's a Blast! A Guide for Junior High Students. Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riggins, Patricia C., Ed.

    Science fairs have the potential to help students develop new ways of solving problems using a scientific approach. This supplemental guide was developed for those teachers involved with science fairs as well as others who work with students in developing a project. Several reasons for holding a science fair are listed, along with some…

  10. Alaska's Living Tundra. Alaska Wildlife Week, 25-29 April 1988. Unit 6: Primary Teacher's Guide; Upper Elementary Teacher's Guide; Junior/Senior High School Teacher's Guide; Supplement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quinlan, Susan E.

    Despite its cold and barren appearance, Alaska's tundra supports a surprising variety of insects, birds, and mammals. In this document, three teacher's guides (for primary, upper elementary, and junior and senior high schools) and a supplementary resource packet present a comprehensive unit of study on Alaska's living tundra. The five lessons in…

  11. Alaska's Living Tundra. Alaska Wildlife Week, 25-29 April 1988. Unit 6: Primary Teacher's Guide; Upper Elementary Teacher's Guide; Junior/Senior High School Teacher's Guide; Supplement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quinlan, Susan E.

    Despite its cold and barren appearance, Alaska's tundra supports a surprising variety of insects, birds, and mammals. In this document, three teacher's guides (for primary, upper elementary, and junior and senior high schools) and a supplementary resource packet present a comprehensive unit of study on Alaska's living tundra. The five lessons in…

  12. High School/High Tech Program Guide: An Implementation Guide for High School/High Tech Program Coordinators. Promoting Careers in Science and Technology for High School Students with Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Disability Employment Policy (DOL), Washington, DC.

    This implementation guide is intended to assist educators in planning, establishing, building, and managing a High School/High Tech project for high school students with disabilities. The program is designed to develop career opportunities, provide activities that will spark an interest in high technology fields, and encourage students to pursue…

  13. Management of vestibular schwannomas with linear accelerator-based stereotactic radiosurgery: a single center experience.

    PubMed

    Sager, Omer; Beyzadeoglu, Murat; Dincoglan, Ferrat; Demiral, Selcuk; Uysal, Bora; Gamsiz, Hakan; Oysul, Kaan; Dirican, Bahar; Sirin, Sait

    2013-01-01

    The primary goal of treatment for vestibular schwannoma is to achieve local control without comprimising regional cranial nerve function. Stereotactic radiosurgery has emerged as a viable therapeutic option for vestibular schwannoma. The aim of the study is to report our 15-year single center experience using linear accelerator-based stereotactic radiosurgery in the management of patients with vestibular schwannoma. Between July 1998 and January 2013, 68 patients with unilateral vestibular schwannoma were treated using stereotactic radiosurgery at the Department of Radiation Oncology, Gulhane Military Medical Academy. All patients underwent high-precision stereotactic radiosurgery using a linear accelerator with 6-MV photons. Median follow-up time was 51 months (range, 9-107). Median age was 45 years (range, 20-77). Median dose was 12 Gy (range, 10-13) prescribed to the 85%-95% isodose line encompassing the target volume. Local tumor control in patients with periodic follow-up imaging was 96.1%. Overall hearing preservation rate was 76.5%. Linear accelerator-based stereotactic radiosurgery offers a safe and effective treatment for patients with vestibular schwannoma by providing high local control rates along with improved quality of life through well-preserved hearing function.

  14. Updates in outcomes of stereotactic radiation therapy in acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Gheorghiu, Monica Livia

    2017-02-01

    Purpose Treatment of acromegaly has undergone important progress in the last 20 years mainly due to the development of new medical options and advances in surgical techniques. Pituitary surgery is usually first-line therapy, and medical treatment is indicated for persistent disease, while radiation (RT) is often used as third-line therapy. The benefits of RT (tumor volume control and decreased hormonal secretion) are hampered by the long latency of the effect and the high risk of adverse effects. Stereotactic RT methods have been developed with the aim to provide more precise targeting of the tumor with better control of the radiation dose received by the adjacent brain structures. The purpose of this review is to present the updates in the efficacy and safety of pituitary RT in acromegalic patients, with an emphasis on the new stereotactic radiation techniques. Methods A systematic review was performed using PubMed and articles/abstracts and reviews detailing RT in acromegaly from 2000 to 2016 were included. Results Stereotactic radiosurgery and fractionated stereotactic RT (FSRT) for patients with persistent active acromegaly after surgery and/or during medical therapy provide comparable high rates of tumor control, i.e. stable or decrease in size of the tumor in 93-100% of patients at 5-10 years and endocrinological remission in 40-60% of patients at 5 years. Hypofractionated RT is an optimal option for tumors located near the optic structures, due to its lower toxicity for the optic nerves compared to single-dose radiosurgery. The rate of new hypopituitarism varies from 10 to 50% at 5 years and increases with the duration of follow-up. The risk for other radiation-induced complications is usually low (0-5% for new visual deficits, cranial nerves damage or brain radionecrosis and 0-1% for secondary brain tumors) and risk of stroke may be higher in FSRT. Conclusion Although the use of radiotherapy in patients with acromegaly has decreased with advances in

  15. Characteristics Data Base: Programmer's guide to the High-Level Waste Data Base

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, K.E. ); Salmon, R. )

    1990-08-01

    The High-Level Waste Data Base is a menu-driven PC data base developed as part of OCRWM's technical data base on the characteristics of potential repository wastes, which also includes spent fuel and other materials. This programmer's guide completes the documentation for the High-Level Waste Data Base, the user's guide having been published previously. 3 figs.

  16. Proposal to develop guides for high school teachers on Global Systems Science. Final project report

    SciTech Connect

    Sneider, C.I.; Golden, R.

    1993-02-16

    The Lawrence Hall of Science requests funding for development of trial versions of five guides for high school teachers on the topic of Global Systems Science. The guides will reflect the guided-discovery approach for which the Lawrence Hall of Science has gained an international reputation. They will include a wealth of materials already developed as well as new materials, organized as a comprehensive program on global change. The guides could be used together for an entire one-semester course, or integrated individually into existing high school courses in the sciences and social studies.

  17. Proposal to develop guides for high school teachers on Global Systems Science. [Final project report

    SciTech Connect

    Sneider, C.I.; Golden, R. )

    1993-02-16

    The Lawrence Hall of Science requests funding for development of trial versions of five guides for high school teachers on the topic of Global Systems Science. The guides will reflect the guided-discovery approach for which the Lawrence Hall of Science has gained an international reputation. They will include a wealth of materials already developed as well as new materials, organized as a comprehensive program on global change. The guides could be used together for an entire one-semester course, or integrated individually into existing high school courses in the sciences and social studies.

  18. Guidelines for safe practice of stereotactic body (ablative) radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Foote, Matthew; Bailey, Michael; Smith, Leigh; Siva, Shankar; Hegi-Johnson, Fiona; Seeley, Anna; Barry, Tamara; Booth, Jeremy; Ball, David; Thwaites, David

    2015-10-01

    The uptake of stereotactic ablative body radiation therapy (SABR)/stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) worldwide has been rapid. The Australian and New Zealand Faculty of Radiation Oncology (FRO) assembled an expert panel of radiation oncologists, radiation oncology medical physicists and radiation therapists to establish guidelines for safe practice of SABR. Draft guidelines were reviewed by a number of international experts in the field and then distributed through the membership of the FRO. Members of the Australian Institute of Radiography and the Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine were also asked to comment on the draft. Evidence-based recommendations (where applicable) address aspects of departmental staffing, procedures and equipment, quality assurance measures, as well as organisational considerations for delivery of SABR treatments. Central to the guidelines is a set of key recommendations for departments undertaking SABR. These guidelines were developed collaboratively to provide an educational guide and reference for radiation therapy service providers to ensure appropriate care of patients receiving SABR. © 2015 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  19. Sci—Sat AM: Stereo — 08: Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy (SABR) for low, intermediate and high risk prostate cancer using Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) with a 10x Flattening Filter Free (FFF) beam

    SciTech Connect

    Mestrovic, A; Fortin, D; Alexander, A

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: To determine the feasibility of using Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) with a 10x Flattening Filter Free (FFF) beam for Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy (SABR) for low, intermediate and high risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Ten anonymized patient CT data sets were used in this planning study. For each patient CT data set, three sets of contours were generated: 1) low risk, 2) intermediate risk, and 3) high risk scenarios. For each scenario, a single-arc and a double-arc VMAT treatment plans were created. Plans were generated with the Varian Eclipse™ treatment planning system for a Varian TrueBeam™ linac equipped with Millenium 120 MLC. Plans were created using a 10x-FFF beam with a maximum dose rate of 2400 MU/min. Dose prescription was 36.25Gy/5 fractions with the planning objective of covering 99% of the Planning Target Volume with the 95% of the prescription dose. Normal tissue constraints were based on provincial prostate SABR planning guidelines, derived from national and international prostate SABR protocols. Plans were evaluated and compared in terms of: 1) dosimetric plan quality, and 2) treatment delivery efficiency. Results: Both single-arc and double-arc VMAT plans were able to meet the planning goals for low, intermediate and high risk scenarios. No significant dosimetric differences were observed between the plans. However, the treatment time was significantly lower for a single-arc VMAT plans. Conclusions: Prostate SABR treatments are feasible with 10x-FFF VMAT technique. A single-arc VMAT offers equivalent dosimetric plan quality and a superior treatment delivery efficiency, compared to a double-arc VMAT.

  20. Hospitality Education: A Guide for High School Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois State Office of Education, Springfield. Div. of Vocational and Technical Education.

    The guide presents key steps in establishing hospitality education curricula, based on recommendations of more than 300 surveyed educators and industry personnel and on information from over 60 proposed or existing curricula. The scope of the hospitality industries is described as including the categories of food service, lodging, tourism, and…

  1. Social Science Instructional Guides: High School (Grades 9-12).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartman, Carl; And Others

    The guide, part of a social science learning continuum from first through twelfth grades, contains outlines for two-semester social studies courses for grades 9-12. Three components comprise each section: time allocations for units, instructional objectives, and a content outline. The Grade 9 course, Cultures of the Non-Western World, contains…

  2. Competency-Based Adult High School Completion Student Services Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singer, Elizabeth; And Others

    Designed as part of a 310 Special Demonstration and Teacher Training Project undertaken at Brevard Community College, this student services guide contains information to assist adult education administrators, counselors, instructors, and office personnel in meeting the needs of students enrolled in adult/community education schools. Primary…

  3. Social Science Instructional Guides: High School (Grades 9-12).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartman, Carl; And Others

    The guide, part of a social science learning continuum from first through twelfth grades, contains outlines for two-semester social studies courses for grades 9-12. Three components comprise each section: time allocations for units, instructional objectives, and a content outline. The Grade 9 course, Cultures of the Non-Western World, contains…

  4. Resource Guide to Mathematics Curriculum Materials for High Ability Learners, Grades K-8

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Gifted Education, 2004

    2004-01-01

    Mathematics education has undergone many changes over the past few decades. Those changes are reflected in the curriculum materials that are currently available. This guide is intended to help the teachers, administrators, and parents of high ability mathematics students explore the materials on the market today. The guide gives a set of criteria…

  5. Environmental Education Teacher's Guide, Junior High School. A Core Experience Study of the Natural Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Dean B.; Willink, Wesley H.

    This Environmental Education Teacher's Guide, developed for use in the junior high school, is designed to familiarize teachers with how an environmental education program can help in their teaching and in achieving the goals of the school. The suggested core activities in this guide are designed to be a motivating way of introducting junior high…

  6. Guided Practice Software for Teaching DNA Replication to Senior High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woods, Eric C.; McKinnon, Alan E.; Hickford, Jonathan G. H.; Abell, Walt A.

    2008-01-01

    The prototype of a guided practice application was developed to instruct year 13 biology students in the process of DNA replication. The application uses a high degree of interaction to engage the student in a guided exploration and problem solving exercise. An evaluation revealed that the students showed considerable enthusiasm and significant…

  7. Curriculum Guide for Junior High School English (Grades 7, 8, and 9). Revised Draft.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bouvier, Jeff; And Others

    The instructional program outlined in this curriculum guide is designed to develop junior high school students' communication skills and their appreciation for and enjoyment of the communication arts. The first part of the guide deals with developing skills in written composition, grammar and usage, spelling, vocabulary, speech, and library…

  8. Guided Practice Software for Teaching DNA Replication to Senior High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woods, Eric C.; McKinnon, Alan E.; Hickford, Jonathan G. H.; Abell, Walt A.

    2008-01-01

    The prototype of a guided practice application was developed to instruct year 13 biology students in the process of DNA replication. The application uses a high degree of interaction to engage the student in a guided exploration and problem solving exercise. An evaluation revealed that the students showed considerable enthusiasm and significant…

  9. Environmental Education Teacher's Guide, Junior High School. A Core Experience Study of the Natural Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Dean B.; Willink, Wesley H.

    This Environmental Education Teacher's Guide, developed for use in the junior high school, is designed to familiarize teachers with how an environmental education program can help in their teaching and in achieving the goals of the school. The suggested core activities in this guide are designed to be a motivating way of introducting junior high…

  10. Environmental Education Teacher's Guide, Junior High School. A Core Experience Study of the Human Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Dean B.; Willink, Wesley H.

    This Environmental Education Teacher's Guide, developed for use in the junior high school, is designed to familiarize teachers with how an environmental education program can help in their teaching and in achieving the goals of the school. The suggested core activities in this guide are designed to be a motivating way of introducing junior high…

  11. Creating and Sustaining High-Quality Charter School Governing Boards. A Guide for State Policymakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Elizabeth A.

    2008-01-01

    This guide for state policymakers examines the laws, policies, and programs that states are using to create and sustain high-quality charter school governing boards. In particular, the guide focuses on the two aspects of governing boards that interviews with state administrators revealed are most critical for a board's success: board composition…

  12. Basic Speech in the Senior High School. Michigan Speech Association Curriculum Guide Series, No. 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cortright, Henrietta H.; And Others

    This guide for a basic high school speech course is intented to develop the student's sense of responsibility for words and actions, his skills in the use of the voice and bodily actions, his poise and self-confidence, and his appreciation and understanding of other people's ideas. The nine units included in the guide are concerned with listening,…

  13. 2D/3D Image fusion for accurate target localization and evaluation of a mask based stereotactic system in fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy of cranial lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, J.-Y.; Ryu, Samuel; Faber, Kathleen; Mikkelsen, Tom; Chen Qing; Li Shidong; Movsas, Benjamin

    2006-12-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of a two-dimensional (2D) to three-dimensional (3D) image-fusion-guided target localization system and a mask based stereotactic system for fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) of cranial lesions. A commercial x-ray image guidance system originally developed for extracranial radiosurgery was used for FSRT of cranial lesions. The localization accuracy was quantitatively evaluated with an anthropomorphic head phantom implanted with eight small radiopaque markers (BBs) in different locations. The accuracy and its clinical reliability were also qualitatively evaluated for a total of 127 fractions in 12 patients with both kV x-ray images and MV portal films. The image-guided system was then used as a standard to evaluate the overall uncertainty and reproducibility of the head mask based stereotactic system in these patients. The phantom study demonstrated that the maximal random error of the image-guided target localization was {+-}0.6 mm in each direction in terms of the 95% confidence interval (CI). The systematic error varied with measurement methods. It was approximately 0.4 mm, mainly in the longitudinal direction, for the kV x-ray method. There was a 0.5 mm systematic difference, primarily in the lateral direction, between the kV x-ray and the MV portal methods. The patient study suggested that the accuracy of the image-guided system in patients was comparable to that in the phantom. The overall uncertainty of the mask system was {+-}4 mm, and the reproducibility was {+-}2.9 mm in terms of 95% CI. The study demonstrated that the image guidance system provides accurate and precise target positioning.

  14. Plastic Technology (Production). Industrial Arts, Senior High--Level II. North Dakota Senior High Industrial Arts Curriculum Guides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Claus, Robert; And Others

    This course guide for a plastic technology course is one of four developed for the production area in the North Dakota senior high industrial arts education program. (Eight other guides are available for two other areas of Industrial Arts--energy/power and graphic communications.) Part 1 provides such introductory information as a definition and…

  15. Energy Sources (Energy/Power). Industrial Arts, Senior High--Level II. North Dakota Senior High Industrial Arts Curriculum Guides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawrence, Allen; And Others

    This course guide for an energy sources course is one of four developed for the energy/power area in the North Dakota senior high industrial arts education program. (Eight other guides are available for two other areas of Industrial Arts--graphic communications and production.) Part 1 provides such introductory information as a definition and…

  16. Design/Drafting (Graphic Communications). Industrial Arts, Senior High--Level II. North Dakota Senior High Industrial Arts Curriculum Guides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poehls, Eddie; And Others

    This course guide for a design/drafting course is one of four developed for the graphic communications area in the North Dakota senior high industrial arts education program. (Eight other guides are available for two other areas of Industrial Arts--energy/power and production.) Part 1 provides such introductory information as a definition and…

  17. Transportation (Energy/Power). Industrial Arts, Senior High--Level II. North Dakota Senior High Industrial Arts Curriculum Guides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawrence, Allen; And Others

    This course guide for a transportation course is one of four developed for the energy/power area in the North Dakota senior high industrial arts education program. (Eight other guides are available for two other areas of Industrial Arts--graphic communications and production.) Part 1 provides such introductory information as a definition and…

  18. Photography (Graphic Communications). Industrial Arts, Senior High--Level II. North Dakota Senior High Industrial Arts Curriculum Guides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poehls, Eddie; And Others

    This course guide for a photography course is one of four developed for the graphic communications area in the North Dakota senior high industrial arts education program. (Eight other guides are available for two other areas of Industrial Arts--energy/power and production.) Part 1 provides such introductory information as a definition and…

  19. Industrial Crafts (Production.) Industrial Arts, Senior High--Level II. North Dakota Senior High Industrial Arts Curriculum Guides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Claus, Robert; And Others

    This course guide for an industrial crafts course is one of four developed for the production area in the North Dakota senior high industrial arts education program. (Eight other guides are available for two other areas of Industrial Arts--energy/power and graphic communications.) Part 1 provides such introductory information as a definition and…

  20. Transportation (Energy/Power). Industrial Arts, Senior High--Level II. North Dakota Senior High Industrial Arts Curriculum Guides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawrence, Allen; And Others

    This course guide for a transportation course is one of four developed for the energy/power area in the North Dakota senior high industrial arts education program. (Eight other guides are available for two other areas of Industrial Arts--graphic communications and production.) Part 1 provides such introductory information as a definition and…

  1. Plastic Technology (Production). Industrial Arts, Senior High--Level II. North Dakota Senior High Industrial Arts Curriculum Guides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Claus, Robert; And Others

    This course guide for a plastic technology course is one of four developed for the production area in the North Dakota senior high industrial arts education program. (Eight other guides are available for two other areas of Industrial Arts--energy/power and graphic communications.) Part 1 provides such introductory information as a definition and…

  2. Energy Sources (Energy/Power). Industrial Arts, Senior High--Level II. North Dakota Senior High Industrial Arts Curriculum Guides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawrence, Allen; And Others

    This course guide for an energy sources course is one of four developed for the energy/power area in the North Dakota senior high industrial arts education program. (Eight other guides are available for two other areas of Industrial Arts--graphic communications and production.) Part 1 provides such introductory information as a definition and…

  3. Power Technology (Energy/Power). Industrial Arts, Senior High--Level II. North Dakota Senior High Industrial Arts Curriculum Guides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawrence, Allen; And Others

    This course guide for a power technology course is one of four developed for the energy/power area in the North Dakota senior high industrial arts education program. (Eight other guides are available for two other areas of Industrial Arts--graphic communications and production.) Part 1 provides such introductory information as a definition and…

  4. Stereotactic body radiation therapy for liver tumors.

    PubMed

    Maingon, P; Nouhaud, É; Mornex, F; Créhange, G

    2014-01-01

    Recent improvements in radiation therapy delivery techniques provide new tools to treat patients with liver-confined disease, either with hepatocellular carcinoma or liver metastases. An appropriate selection of the patients made during a multidisciplinary specialized tumour board is mandatory. It should be based on the disease extension, an accurate evaluation of the comorbidities and the liver functions. The added value of this approach has to be evaluated in well-designed trials, alone or in combination with other treatments such as surgery, local treatments, chemoembolization and/or chemotherapy with or without targeted agents. Stereotactic body radiation therapy should be applied under strict conditions of expertise of the radiation oncology departments, including equipment and educational training programmes. However under these conditions, preliminary results seems highly encouraging in terms of local control and tolerance but should be confirmed in large controlled prospective trials. Copyright © 2014 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Comprehensive quality assurance for stereotactic radiosurgery treatments.

    PubMed

    Ramaseshan, R; Heydarian, M

    2003-07-21

    We have used a commercially available high precision Lucy phantom to perform comprehensive quality assurance for stereotactic radiosurgery treatments. The quantitative evaluation of system uncertainties included imaging, planning and treatment delivery systems. The quality assurance tests showed that the well-defined targets were identified to within +/-1 mm in all the imaging modalities. The pre-known target volumes were reproduced within 2 cm3 in both MR and CT. The planned target was delivered within 2% of the prescribed dose and to within 2 mm accuracy. The inaccuracy in the isocentre position at the Linac was less than 1.2 mm. The maximum error observed in the depth helmet was 0.5 mm and the overall uncertainty was within 0.23 mm. We have also established a quality assurance program based on the study and proposed the tolerance and the frequency of the tests required to be carried out. The tests were carried out using a Radionics planning system and delivered on a Varian Clinac 2100 linear accelerator machine. These tests also established a base line for future comparisons.

  6. Stereotactic radiosurgery of brain metastasis from melanoma.

    PubMed

    Marchan, Edward M; Sheehan, Jason

    2012-01-01

    Brain metastasis represents the most common intracranial neoplasm in adult patients. Melanoma is the third most frequent cancer histology and consequently comprises a significant portion of brain metastasis patients. Unlike the more frequent lung and breast cancers, melanoma represents a particularly challenging entity because of its radioresistant nature. Stereotactic radiosurgery appears to overcome the inherent radioresistance of brain metastasis from melanoma and, thereby, affords a high rate of local tumor control. Reports from leading centers indicate a favorable benefit to risk profile for radiosurgery in melanoma patients. Local tumor control after radiosurgery generally exceeds 80%, and neurological complications as a result of radiosurgery are infrequent. A higher performance status and lower intracranial tumor burden in melanoma patients at the time of radiosurgery are associated with longer survival. Radiosurgery may be used in conjunction upfront with radiotherapy, resection, and chemotherapy or as a salvage therapy in selected melanoma patients. Careful radiological and neurological follow-up is required to assess local tumor control and distant intracranial disease progression. Further clinical studies will be required to better define the role of upfront and salvage radiosurgery in selected cohorts of patients with brain metastasis from melanoma. However, it appears likely that radiosurgery will play an expanded role in the overall management of these patients.

  7. Triple-tandem high-dose-rate brachytherapy for early-stage medically inoperable endometrial cancer: Initial report on acute toxicity and dosimetric comparison to stereotactic body radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Kauffmann, Greg; Wu, Tianming; Al-Hallaq, Hania; Hasan, Yasmin

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) may be appealing in medically inoperable endometrial cancer to avoid procedural risks. We performed a dosimetric comparison to triple-tandem, high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy. Six consecutive clinical stage I, grade 1-2, medically inoperable endometrial cancer patients were treated with triple-tandem HDR brachytherapy. We report patient factors and acute toxicity. Also, we performed dosimetric comparison to SBRT using both 3D conformal arc (3DArc) and volumetric-modulated arc therapy. D2cc values for normal tissues were calculated and compared to the HDR plans. Median age was 57 years. Patient comorbidities included morbid obesity, congestive heart failure, diabetes, and pulmonary emboli. In three patients who received prior external beam radiation (EBRT), median EBRT and HDR doses were 46 Gy and 20 Gy, respectively. The median dose with HDR brachytherapy monotherapy was 35 Gy. Acute toxicities during EBRT included gastrointestinal (3/3 with grade 1-2) and genitourinary (3/3 with grade 1-2). Acute toxicities during HDR brachytherapy were gastrointestinal (2/6 total with grade 1-2) and genitourinary (2/6 total with grade 1). The mean D2cc/Gy of prescription dose for rectum, sigmoid, and bladder were 0.58, 0.40, and 0.47 respectively. Overall, doses to normal tissues were higher for SBRT plans as compared to HDR. Also, the R50 (ratio of the 50% prescription isodose volume to the PTV) was lowest with HDR brachytherapy. In medically inoperable, clinical stage I endometrial cancer patients with multiple comorbidities, definitive triple-tandem, HDR brachytherapy results in mild acute toxicity. In addition, HDR brachytherapy achieves relatively lower doses to surrounding normal tissues as compared to SBRT. Copyright © 2016 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The role of technology in clinical trials using stereotactic body radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Aznar, Marianne; Méndez Romero, Alejandra; Heijmen, Ben J M

    2017-03-01

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy is a highly technology-driven treatment modality. The wider availability of in-room imaging and advanced radiotherapy delivery techniques has led to more institutions offering stereotactic ablative therapy (SABR). While some technological challenges remain, the crucial point for the next generation of SABR clinical trials is that today's technology is used correctly and close to its optimal potential for accuracy. The credentialing procedure of SABR needs to be extensive, but this investment will benefit the trial itself, the patients and the professionals involved.

  9. Exceptional Response to Nivolumab and Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) in Neuroendocrine Cervical Carcinoma with High Tumor Mutational Burden: Management Considerations from the Center For Personalized Cancer Therapy at UC San Diego Moores Cancer Center.

    PubMed

    Sharabi, Andrew; Kim, Sangwoo Shawn; Kato, Shumei; Sanders, Philip D; Patel, Sandip Pravin; Sanghvi, Parag; Weihe, Elizabeth; Kurzrock, Razelle

    2017-06-01

    Neuroendocrine carcinoma of the cervix is an ultra-rare malignancy with a poor prognosis and limited treatment options. Checkpoint blockade immunotherapy has rapidly developed into an emerging standard of care for several common disease types. Interestingly, in preclinical and retrospective clinical data, radiation therapy has been demonstrated to synergize with checkpoint inhibitors. Here we report a patient with metastatic, chemotherapy-refractory neuroendocrine carcinoma who presented with partial bowel obstruction due to a large tumor burden. Genomic analysis demonstrated a high number of alterations on liquid biopsy (circulating tumor DNA [ctDNA]), which prompted treatment with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) combined with anti-programmed cell death protein 1 antibody. Tissue rebiopsy and comprehensive genomic profiling confirmed high tumor mutational burden and a mismatch repair gene defect. The patient manifested near-complete systemic resolution of disease, ongoing at 10+ months. We discuss the novel treatment modality of SBRT combined with a checkpoint inhibitor and the implications of molecular profiling and tumor mutational burden as potential predictors of response. High-grade, large-cell neuroendocrine carcinoma of the cervix is an ultra-rare malignancy that carries a grim prognosis.Next-generation sequencing may reveal key mutations in MSH2 genes amongst others. MSH2 mutations target the DNA mismatch repair process and can predispose patients to malignancies with high mutational burdens.Immunotherapy combined with radiation therapy can elicit a significant response, both within and outside the field of radiation. The latter is termed the "abscopal" effect, perhaps mediated by radiation-induced cross presentation of tumor antigens resulting in immune activation.Sequencing of blood-derived ctDNA showed a high number of alterations, and tissue sequencing confirmed a high tumor mutational burden as a consequence of a mismatch repair gene defect

  10. Imaging of Radiation Dose for Stereotactic Radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Guan, Timothy Y.; Almond, Peter R.; Park, Hwan C.; Lindberg, Robert D.; Shields, Christopher B.

    2015-01-15

    The distributions of radiation dose for stereotactic radiosurgery, using a modified linear accelerator (Philips SL-25 and SRS-200), have been studied by using three different dosimeters: (1) ferrous-agarose-xylenol orange (FAX) gels, (2) TLD, and (3) thick-emulsion GafChromic dye film. These dosimeters were loaded into a small volume of defect in a phantom head. A regular linac stereotactic radiosurgery treatment was then given to the phantom head for each type of dosimeter. The measured radiation dose and its distributions were found to be in good agreement with those calculated by the treatment planning computer.

  11. Magnetic resonance image-guided versus ultrasound-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound in the treatment of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Sheng; Wu, Pei-Hong

    2013-01-01

    Image-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) has been used for more than ten years, primarily in the treatment of liver and prostate cancers. HIFU has the advantages of precise cancer ablation and excellent protection of healthy tissue. Breast cancer is a common cancer in women. HIFU therapy, in combination with other therapies, has the potential to improve both oncologic and cosmetic outcomes for breast cancer patients by providing a curative therapy that conserves mammary shape. Currently, HIFU therapy is not commonly used in breast cancer treatment, and efforts to promote the application of HIFU is expected. In this article, we compare different image-guided models for HIFU and reviewed the status, drawbacks, and potential of HIFU therapy for breast cancer. PMID:23237221

  12. An x-ray image guidance system for small animal stereotactic irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, K. H.; Pidikiti, R.; Stojadinovic, S.; Speiser, M.; Seliounine, S.; Saha, D.; Solberg, T. D.

    2010-12-01

    An x-ray image-guided small animal stereotactic irradiator was developed and characterized to enable tumor visualization and accurate target localization for small field, high dose irradiation. The system utilizes a custom collimation system, a motorized positioning system (x, y, θ), a digital imaging panel and operating software, and is integrated with a commercial x-ray unit. The essential characteristics of the irradiator include small radiation fields (1-10 mm), high dose rate (>10 Gy min-1) and submillimeter target localization. The software enables computer-controlled image acquisition, stage motion and target localization providing simple and precise automated target localization. The imaging panel was characterized in terms of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and spatial resolution. Overall localization accuracy and precision were assessed. SNR, CNR and spatial resolution are 24 dB, 21 dB and 2.8 lp mm-1, respectively, and localization accuracy is approximately 65 µm with 6 µm precision. With the aid of image guidance, system performance was subsequently used to evaluate radiation response in a rat orthotopic lung tumor effectively sparing normal tissues and in a mouse normal lung. The capabilities of 3D treatment and cone-beam computed tomography are presented for 3D localization and delivery as a work in progress.

  13. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Delivery in a Genetically Engineered Mouse Model of Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Du, Shisuo; Lockamy, Virginia; Zhou, Lin; Xue, Christine; LeBlanc, Justin; Glenn, Shonna; Shukla, Gaurav; Yu, Yan; Dicker, Adam P.; Leeper, Dennis B.; Lu, You; Lu, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To implement clinical stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) using a small animal radiation research platform (SARRP) in a genetically engineered mouse model of lung cancer. Methods and Materials A murine model of multinodular Kras-driven spontaneous lung tumors was used for this study. High-resolution cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging was used to identify and target peripheral tumor nodules, whereas off-target lung nodules in the contralateral lung were used as a nonirradiated control. CBCT imaging helps localize tumors, facilitate high-precision irradiation, and monitor tumor growth. SBRT planning, prescription dose, and dose limits to normal tissue followed the guidelines set by RTOG protocols. Pathologic changes in the irradiated tumors were investigated using immunohistochemistry. Results The image guided radiation delivery using the SARRP system effectively localized and treated lung cancer with precision in a genetically engineered mouse model of lung cancer. Immunohistochemical data confirmed the precise delivery of SBRT to the targeted lung nodules. The 60 Gy delivered in 3 weekly fractions markedly reduced the proliferation index, Ki-67, and increased apoptosis per staining for cleaved caspase-3 in irradiated lung nodules. Conclusions It is feasible to use the SARRP platform to perform dosimetric planning and delivery of SBRT in mice with lung cancer. This allows for preclinical studies that provide a rationale for clinical trials involving SBRT, especially when combined with immunotherapeutics. PMID:27681749

  14. Stereotactic radiotherapy for malignancies involving the trigeminal and facial nerves.

    PubMed

    Cuneo, K C; Zagar, T M; Brizel, D M; Yoo, D S; Hoang, J K; Chang, Z; Wang, Z; Yin, F F; Das, S K; Green, S; Ready, N; Bhatti, M T; Kaylie, D M; Becker, A; Sampson, J H; Kirkpatrick, J P

    2012-06-01

    Involvement of a cranial nerve caries a poor prognosis for many malignancies. Recurrent or residual disease in the trigeminal or facial nerve after primary therapy poses a challenge due to the location of the nerve in the skull base, the proximity to the brain, brainstem, cavernous sinus, and optic apparatus and the resulting complex geometry. Surgical resection caries a high risk of morbidity and is often not an option for these patients. Stereotactic radiosurgery and radiotherapy are potential treatment options for patients with cancer involving the trigeminal or facial nerve. These techniques can deliver high doses of radiation to complex volumes while sparing adjacent critical structures. In the current study, seven cases of cancer involving the trigeminal or facial nerve are presented. These patients had unresectable recurrent or residual disease after definitive local therapy. Each patient was treated with stereotactic radiation therapy using a linear accelerator based system. A multidisciplinary approach including neuroradiology and surgical oncology was used to delineate target volumes. Treatment was well tolerated with no acute grade 3 or higher toxicity. One patient who was reirradiated experienced cerebral radionecrosis with mild symptoms. Four of the seven patients treated had no evidence of disease after a median follow up of 12 months (range 2-24 months). A dosimetric analysis was performed to compare intensity modulated fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy (IM-FSRT) to a 3D conformal technique. The dose to 90% (D90) of the brainstem was lower with the IM-FSRT plan by a mean of 13.5 Gy. The D95 to the ipsilateral optic nerve was also reduced with IM-FSRT by 12.2 Gy and the D95 for the optic chiasm was lower with FSRT by 16.3 Gy. Treatment of malignancies involving a cranial nerve requires a multidisciplinary approach. Use of an IM-FSRT technique with a micro-multileaf collimator resulted in a lower dose to the brainstem, optic nerves and chiasm

  15. Stereotactic radiosurgery - CyberKnife

    MedlinePlus

    ... slides into a machine that delivers radiation. A robotic arm controlled by a computer moves around you. ... DE, Adler JR Jr, Ewend MG. Image-guided robotic radiosurgery. In: Winn RH, ed. Youmans Neurological Surgery . ...

  16. Guiding Principles for Federal Leadership in High Performance and Sustainable Buildings

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This page provides and overview of the memorandum of understanding (MOU) which was voluntarily committed the Agency to follow the Guiding Principles for Federal Leadership in High Performance and Sustainable Buildings.

  17. Intraoperative MR-guided DBS implantation for treating PD and ET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Haiying; Maxwell, Robert E.; Truwit, Charles L.

    2001-05-01

    Deep brain stimulator (DBS) implantation is a promising treatment alternative for suppressing the motor tremor symptoms in Parkinson disease (PD) patient. The main objective is to develop a minimally invasive approach using high spatial resolution and soft-tissue contrast MR imaging techniques to guide the surgical placement of DBS. In the MR-guided procedure, the high spatial resolution MR images were obtained intra-operatively and used to target stereotactically a specific deep brain location. The neurosurgery for craniotomy was performed in the front of the magnet outside of the 10 Gauss line. Aided with positional registration assembly for the stereotactic head frame, the target location (VIM or GPi or STN) in deep brain areas was identified and measured from the MR images in reference to the markers in the calibration assembly of the head frame before the burrhole prep. In 20 patients, MR- guided DBS implantations have been performed according to the new methodology. MR-guided DBS implantation at high magnetic field strength has been shown to be feasible and desirable. In addition to the improved outcome, this offers a new surgical approach in which intra-operative visualization is possible during intervention, and any complications such as bleeding can be assessed in situ immediately prior to dural closure.

  18. Early manifestation of communicating hydrocephalus after fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for aggressive giant atypical prolactinoma.

    PubMed

    Ohtakara, Kazuhiro; Ohe, Naoyuki; Iwama, Toru; Hoshi, Hiroaki

    2014-05-01

    Aggressive giant invasive pituitary adenomas refractory to standard surgical or medical treatment remain a genuine challenge. In addition, communicating hydrocephalus (CH) attributed to malabsorption of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) developing after radiotherapy for pituitary adenomas has not been previously reported. Herein, we describe the case of a 48-year-old male presenting with a giant atypical prolactinoma refractory to previous therapies, including pharmacotherapy and repetitive surgery. He underwent image-guided fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy in 28 fractions, resulting in early manifestation of CH associated with undisputed, both radiological and hormonal response. He recovered well after a shunt placement, with otherwise favorable consequences such as sustained tumor regression, decreasing prolactin level, and retained visual function for a 22-month follow-up. Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy would provide a viable treatment alternative for these refractory cases, while caution should be exercised regarding the possibility of iatrogenic CH.

  19. Scattering of high order guided wave modes around a through-thickness circular hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Travaglini, Christophe; Bescond, Christophe; França, Demartonne Ramos; Kruger, Silvio E.; Viens, Martin; Bélanger, Pierre

    2016-02-01

    Ultrasonic guided waves have the ability to propagate long distances with minimal attenuation, which makes them particularly interesting in structural health monitoring (SHM) applications. Using the baseline subtraction approach, the signal from a defect-free structure is compared with the actual monitoring signal to detect and locate defects. There are many scientific publications on low-frequency guided waves for SHM purposes, and the interaction between guided wave fundamental modes and defects is also well documented. There is however a very limited number of studies on high order modes. High-frequency guided waves may enable the detection of smaller cracks related to conventional low-frequency guided wave SHM. The main difficulty at high frequency is the existence of several modes with different velocities. This study investigates the scattering of high order guided wave modes around a through-thickness hole with a view to developing a highly sensitive SHM method. A 3D finite element model of a 305 mm × 305 mm × 1.6 mm aluminium plate was used to determine the scattering of cracks on the circumference of a through-thickness hole in the middle of the plate. Crack properties such as orientation, length and depth were studied. A subset of the finite element simulations were validated against experimental results. The experimental setup comprised a film type PZT actuator bonded on the side of the plate and a laser interferometer detector. An input signal centered at 4 MHz was used in all simulations and experiments.

  20. Micro-stereotactic frame utilizing bone cement for individual fabrication: an initial investigation of its accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rau, Thomas S.; Lexow, G. Jakob; Blume, Denise; Kluge, Marcel; Lenarz, Thomas; Majdani, Omid

    2017-03-01

    A new method for template-guided cochlear implantation surgery is proposed which has been developed to create a minimally invasive access to the inner ear. A first design of the surgical template was drafted, built, and finally tested regarding its accuracy. For individual finalization of the micro-stereotactic frame bone cement is utilized as this well-known and well-established material suggests ease of use as well as high clinical acceptance and enables both sterile and rapid handling. The new concept includes an alignment device, based on a passive hexapod with manually adjustable legs for temporary fixation of the separate parts in the patient-specific pose until the bone cement is spread and finally cured. Additionally, a corresponding evaluation method was developed to determine the accuracy of the microstereotactic frame in some initial experiments. In total 18 samples of the surgical template were fabricated based on previously planned trajectories. The mean positioning error at the target point was 0.30 mm with a standard deviation of 0.25 mm.

  1. Neutron Spectral Brightness of Cold Guide 4 at the High Flux Isotope Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winn, B. L.; Robertson, J. L.; Iverson, E. B.; Selby, D. L.

    2010-11-01

    The High Flux Isotope Reactor resumed operation in June of 2007 with a supercritical hydrogen cold source in horizontal beam tube 4. Cold guide 4 is a guide system designed to deliver neutrons from this source with a reasonable flux at wavelengths greater than 4 Å to several instruments, and includes a 15-m, 96-section, 4-channel bender. A time-of-flight spectrum with calibrated detector was recorded at port C of cold guide 4, and compared to McStas simulations, to generate a brightness spectrum.

  2. Hypofractionation Regimens for Stereotactic Radiotherapy for Large Brain Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan Jiankui; Wang, Jian Z. Lo, Simon; Grecula, John C.; Ammirati, Mario; Montebello, Joseph F.; Zhang Hualin; Gupta, Nilendu; Yuh, William T.C.; Mayr, Nina A.

    2008-10-01

    Purpose: To investigate equivalent regimens for hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (HSRT) for brain tumor treatment and to provide dose-escalation guidance to maximize the tumor control within the normal brain tolerance. Methods and Materials: The linear-quadratic model, including the effect of nonuniform dose distributions, was used to evaluate the HSRT regimens. The {alpha}/{beta} ratio was estimated using the Gammaknife stereotactic radiosurgery (GKSRS) and whole-brain radiotherapy experience for large brain tumors. The HSRT regimens were derived using two methods: (1) an equivalent tumor control approach, which matches the whole-brain radiotherapy experience for many fractions and merges it with the GKSRS data for few fractions; and (2) a normal-tissue tolerance approach, which takes advantages of the dose conformity and fractionation of HSRT to approach the maximal dose tolerance of the normal brain. Results: A plausible {alpha}/{beta} ratio of 12 Gy for brain tumor and a volume parameter n of 0.23 for normal brain were derived from the GKSRS and whole-brain radiotherapy data. The HSRT prescription regimens for the isoeffect of tumor irradiation were calculated. The normal-brain equivalent uniform dose decreased as the number of fractions increased, because of the advantage of fractionation. The regimens for potential dose escalation of HSRT within the limits of normal-brain tolerance were derived. Conclusions: The designed hypofractionated regimens could be used as a preliminary guide for HSRT dose prescription for large brain tumors to mimic the GKSRS experience and for dose escalation trials. Clinical studies are necessary to further tune the model parameters and validate these regimens.

  3. Hypofractionation regimens for stereotactic radiotherapy for large brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jiankui; Wang, Jian Z; Lo, Simon; Grecula, John C; Ammirati, Mario; Montebello, Joseph F; Zhang, Hualin; Gupta, Nilendu; Yuh, William T C; Mayr, Nina A

    2008-10-01

    To investigate equivalent regimens for hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (HSRT) for brain tumor treatment and to provide dose-escalation guidance to maximize the tumor control within the normal brain tolerance. The linear-quadratic model, including the effect of nonuniform dose distributions, was used to evaluate the HSRT regimens. The alpha/beta ratio was estimated using the Gammaknife stereotactic radiosurgery (GKSRS) and whole-brain radiotherapy experience for large brain tumors. The HSRT regimens were derived using two methods: (1) an equivalent tumor control approach, which matches the whole-brain radiotherapy experience for many fractions and merges it with the GKSRS data for few fractions; and (2) a normal-tissue tolerance approach, which takes advantages of the dose conformity and fractionation of HSRT to approach the maximal dose tolerance of the normal brain. A plausible alpha/beta ratio of 12 Gy for brain tumor and a volume parameter n of 0.23 for normal brain were derived from the GKSRS and whole-brain radiotherapy data. The HSRT prescription regimens for the isoeffect of tumor irradiation were calculated. The normal-brain equivalent uniform dose decreased as the number of fractions increased, because of the advantage of fractionation. The regimens for potential dose escalation of HSRT within the limits of normal-brain tolerance were derived. The designed hypofractionated regimens could be used as a preliminary guide for HSRT dose prescription for large brain tumors to mimic the GKSRS experience and for dose escalation trials. Clinical studies are necessary to further tune the model parameters and validate these regimens.

  4. Practical patterns for stereotactic body radiotherapy to hepatocellular carcinoma in Korea: a survey of the Korean Stereotactic Radiosurgery Group

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Sun Hyun; Kim, Mi-Sook; Jang, Won Il; Kay, Chul-Seung; Kim, Woochul; Kim, Eun Seog; Kim, Jin Ho; Kim, Jin Hee; Yang, Kwang Mo; Lee, Kyu Chan; Chang, A Ram; Jo, Sunmi

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate practical patterns for stereotactic body radiotherapy to hepatocellular carcinoma in Korea. Methods In June 2013, the Korean Stereotactic Radiosurgery Group of the Korean Society for Radiation Oncology conducted a national patterns-of-care survey about stereotactic body radiotherapy to the liver lesion in hepatocellular carcinoma, consisting of 19 questions and 2 clinical scenarios. Results All 208 radiation oncologists (100%), who are regular members of Korean Society for Radiation Oncology, responded to this survey. Among these, 95 radiation oncologists were specialists for hepatology; 64 physicians did not use stereotactic body radiotherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma, and 31 physicians used stereotactic body radiotherapy. Most physicians (52%) performed stereotactic body radiotherapy to hepatocellular carcinoma in ≤5 cases per year. Physicians applied stereotactic body radiotherapy according to tumour size and baseline Child–Pugh class. All physicians agreed the use of stereotactic body radiotherapy to 2.8-cm hepatocellular carcinoma with Child–Pugh class of A, while 23 physicians (74%) selected stereotactic body radiotherapy for Child–Pugh class of B. Nineteen physicians (61%) selected stereotactic body radiotherapy to 5-cm hepatocellular carcinoma with Child–Pugh class of A, and only 14 physicians (45%) selected stereotactic body radiotherapy for Child–Pugh class of B. On the other hand, the preferred dose scheme was same as 60 Gy in three fractions. Conclusions Among radiation oncologists in Korea, there was diversity in the practice for stereotactic body radiotherapy to the liver lesion in hepatocellular carcinoma. Additional prospective studies are necessary to standardize the practice and establish Korea-specific practice guidelines for hepatocellular carcinoma stereotactic body radiotherapy. PMID:26826720

  5. 1D profiling using highly dispersive guided waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volker, Arno; Brandenburg, Martijn

    2017-02-01

    Corrosion is one of the industries major issues regarding the integrity of assets. Currently inspections are conducted at regular intervals to ensure a sufficient integrity level of these assets. There are many situations where the actual defect location is not accessible, e.g., a pipe support or a partially buried pipe. Last year an approach was presented using a phase inversion of guided waves that propagated around the circumference of a pipe. This approach works well for larger corrosion spots, but shows significant under-sizing of small spots due to lack of sufficient phase rotation. In this paper the use of arrival time and amplitude loss of higher order circumferential passes is evaluated. Using higher order passes increases sensitivity for sizing smaller defects. Different defect profiles are assumed and the change in arrival time and amplitude loss are calculated using a wave equation based approach for different defect widths and depths. This produces a differential travel time and amplitude change map as function of defect depth and defect width. The actually measured travel time change and amplitude change produces two contours in these maps. Calculating the intersection point gives the defect dimensions. The contours for amplitude loss and travel time change are quite orthogonal, this yields a good discrimination between deep and shallow defects. The approach is evaluated using experimental data from different pipes contain artificial and real defects.

  6. Futures, 1999: Your Guide to Life after High School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kentucky Council on Postsecondary Education, Frankfort.

    Futures is an annual resource document designed to help high school students prepare for post-high school activities and decisions. Materials are provided for a variety of audiences, including counselors and teachers, students, and parents. The resource document covers high school curriculum choice, employment and work profiles for a variety of…

  7. A Phase 1/2 Trial of Brief Androgen Suppression and Stereotactic Radiation Therapy (FASTR) for High-Risk Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Bauman, Glenn; Ferguson, Michelle; Lock, Michael; Chen, Jeff; Ahmad, Belal; Venkatesan, V.M.; Sexton, Tracy; D'Souza, David; Loblaw, Andrew; Warner, Andrew; Rodrigues, George

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: To initiate a phase 1/2 trial to examine the tolerability of a condensed combined-modality protocol for high-risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Men scoring ≥3 on the Vulnerable Elderly Scale (VES) or refusing conventionally fractionated treatment for high-risk prostate cancer were eligible to participate. Androgen suppression was delivered for 12 months, and radiation therapy was delivered using 25 Gy to pelvic nodes delivered synchronously with 40 Gy to the prostate given as 1 fraction per week over 5 weeks. The phase 1 component included predetermined stopping rules based on 6-month treatment-related toxicity, with trial suspension specified if there were ≥6 of 15 patients (40%) or ≥3 of 15 (20%) who experienced grade ≥2 or ≥3 gastrointestinal (GI) or genitourinary (GU) toxicity, respectively. Results: Sixteen men were enrolled, with 7 men meeting the criteria of VES ≥3 and 9 men having a VES <3 but choosing the condensed treatment. One man was not treated owing to discovery of a synchronous primary rectal cancer. Four patients (26%) experienced grade ≥2 toxicity at 6 weeks after treatment. There were 9 of 15 (60%) who experienced grade ≥2 GI or GU toxicity and 4 of 15 (26%) grade ≥3 GI or GU toxicity at 6 months, and 5 of 15 (30%) grade ≥2 GI and GU toxicity at 6 months. A review of the 15 cases did not identify any remedial changes, thus the phase 1 criteria were not met. Conclusion: This novel condensed treatment had higher than anticipated late toxicities and was terminated before phase 2 accrual. Treatment factors, such as inclusion of pelvic lymph node radiation therapy, planning constraints, and treatment margins, or patient factors related to the specific frail elderly population may be contributing.

  8. Six-Dimensional Correction of Intra-Fractional Prostate Motion with CyberKnife Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Siyuan; Piel, Nathaniel; Oermann, Eric K.; Chen, Viola; Ju, Andrew W.; Dahal, Kedar N.; Hanscom, Heather N.; Kim, Joy S.; Yu, Xia; Zhang, Guowei; Collins, Brian T.; Jha, Reena; Dritschilo, Anatoly; Suy, Simeng; Collins, Sean P.

    2011-01-01

    Large fraction radiation therapy offers a shorter course of treatment and radiobiological advantages for prostate cancer treatment. The CyberKnife is an attractive technology for delivering large fraction doses based on the ability to deliver highly conformal radiation therapy to moving targets. In addition to intra-fractional translational motion (left–right, superior–inferior, and anterior–posterior), prostate rotation (pitch, roll, and yaw) can increase geographical miss risk. We describe our experience with six-dimensional (6D) intra-fraction prostate motion correction using CyberKnife stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Eighty-eight patients were treated by SBRT alone or with supplemental external radiation therapy. Trans-perineal placement of four gold fiducials within the prostate accommodated X-ray guided prostate localization and beam adjustment. Fiducial separation and non-overlapping positioning permitted the orthogonal imaging required for 6D tracking. Fiducial placement accuracy was assessed using the CyberKnife fiducial extraction algorithm. Acute toxicities were assessed using Common Toxicity Criteria v3. There were no Grade 3, or higher, complications and acute morbidity was minimal. Ninety-eight percent of patients completed treatment employing 6D prostate motion tracking with intra-fractional beam correction. Suboptimal fiducial placement limited treatment to 3D tracking in two patients. Our experience may guide others in performing 6D correction of prostate motion with CyberKnife SBRT. PMID:22655248

  9. Six-Dimensional Correction of Intra-Fractional Prostate Motion with CyberKnife Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy.

    PubMed

    Lei, Siyuan; Piel, Nathaniel; Oermann, Eric K; Chen, Viola; Ju, Andrew W; Dahal, Kedar N; Hanscom, Heather N; Kim, Joy S; Yu, Xia; Zhang, Guowei; Collins, Brian T; Jha, Reena; Dritschilo, Anatoly; Suy, Simeng; Collins, Sean P

    2011-01-01

    Large fraction radiation therapy offers a shorter course of treatment and radiobiological advantages for prostate cancer treatment. The CyberKnife is an attractive technology for delivering large fraction doses based on the ability to deliver highly conformal radiation therapy to moving targets. In addition to intra-fractional translational motion (left-right, superior-inferior, and anterior-posterior), prostate rotation (pitch, roll, and yaw) can increase geographical miss risk. We describe our experience with six-dimensional (6D) intra-fraction prostate motion correction using CyberKnife stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Eighty-eight patients were treated by SBRT alone or with supplemental external radiation therapy. Trans-perineal placement of four gold fiducials within the prostate accommodated X-ray guided prostate localization and beam adjustment. Fiducial separation and non-overlapping positioning permitted the orthogonal imaging required for 6D tracking. Fiducial placement accuracy was assessed using the CyberKnife fiducial extraction algorithm. Acute toxicities were assessed using Common Toxicity Criteria v3. There were no Grade 3, or higher, complications and acute morbidity was minimal. Ninety-eight percent of patients completed treatment employing 6D prostate motion tracking with intra-fractional beam correction. Suboptimal fiducial placement limited treatment to 3D tracking in two patients. Our experience may guide others in performing 6D correction of prostate motion with CyberKnife SBRT.

  10. Isocenter accuracy in frameless stereotactic radiotherapy using implanted fiducials.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki-Hwan; Cho, Moon-June; Kim, Jun-Sang; Kim, Jae-Sung; Song, Chang-Joon; Song, Shi-Hun; Kim, Seon-Hwan; Myers, Lee; Kim, Yong-Eun

    2003-05-01

    The stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) system verifies isocenter accuracy in patient space. In this study, we evaluate isocenter accuracy in frameless SRT using implanted cranial gold markers. We performed frameless SRT on 43 intracranial tumor patients between August 1997 and December 2000. The treatment technique was determined by the tumor shape and volume, and by the location of critical organs. The coordinates of anterior-posterior and lateral port film were inputted to ISOLOC software, which calculated (1) the couch moves translation distance required to bring the target point to the isocenter, and (2) the intermarker distance comparisons between the CT study and the treatment machine films. We evaluated the isocenter deviation based on the error between orthogonal film target coordinates and isocenter coordinates. The mean treatment isocenter deviations (x, y, z) were -0.03, 0.14, and -0.04 mm, respectively. The systematic component isocenter standard deviations were 0.28, 0.31, and 0.35 mm (1 SD), respectively, and the random component isocenter standard deviations were 0.53, 0.52, and 0.50 mm (1 SD), respectively. The isocenter accuracy in the frameless SRT-implanted fiducial system is highly reliable and is comparable to that of other stereotactic radiosurgery systems.

  11. A Survey of Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Sun Hyun; Kim, Mi-Sook; Jang, Won Il; Kay, Chul-Seung; Kim, Woochul; Kim, Eun Seog; Kim, Jin Ho; Kim, Jin Hee; Yang, Kwang Mo; Lee, Kyu Chan; Chang, A Ram; Jo, Sunmi

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to investigate the current status of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in Korea. A nationwide survey was conducted by the Korean Stereotactic Radiosurgery Group of the Korean Society for Radiation Oncology (KROG 13-13). Materials and Methods SBRT was defined as radiotherapy with delivery of a high dose of radiation to an extracranial lesion in ≤ 4 fractions. A 16-questionnaire survey was sent by e-mail to the chief of radiation oncology at 85 institutions in June 2013. Results All institutions (100%) responded to this survey. Of these, 38 institutions (45%) have used SBRT and 47 institutions (55%) have not used SBRT. Regarding the treatment site, the lung (92%) and liver (76%) were the two most common sites. The most common schedules were 60 Gy/4 fractions for non-small cell lung cancer, 48 Gy/4 fractions for lung metastases, 60 Gy/3 fractions for hepatocellular carcinoma, and 45 Gy/3 fractions or 40 Gy/4 fractions for liver metastases. Four-dimensional computed tomography (CT) was the most common method for planning CT (74%). During planning CT, the most common method of immobilization was the use of an alpha cradle/vacuum-lock (42%). Conclusion Based on this survey, conduct of further prospective studies will be needed in order to determine the appropriate prescribed doses and to standardize the practice of SBRT. PMID:25578057

  12. Stereotactic multibeam radiation therapy system in a PACS environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fresne, Francoise; Le Gall, G.; Barillot, Christian; Gibaud, Bernard; Manens, Jean-Pierre; Toumoulin, Christine; Lemoine, Didier; Chenal, C.; Scarabin, Jean-Marie

    1991-05-01

    A Multibeam radiation therapy treatment is a non-invasive technique devoted to treat a lesion within the cerebral medium by focusing photon-beams on the same target from a high number of entrance points. We present here a computer assisted dosimetric planning procedure which includes: (1) an analysis module to define the target volume by using 2D and 3D displays, (2) a planing module to issue a treatment strategy including the dosimetric simulations and (3) a treatment module setting up the parameters to order the robotized treatment system (i.e. chair- framework, radiation unit machine). Another important feature of this system is its connection to the PACS system SIRENE settled in the University hospital of Rennes which makes possible the archiving and the communication of the multimodal images (CT, MRI, Angiography) used by this application. The corporate use of stereotactic methods and the multimodality imagery ensures spatial coherence and makes the target definition and the cognition of the structures environment more accurate. The dosimetric planning suited to the spatial reference (i.e. the stereotactic frame) guarantees an optimal distribution of the dose computed by an original 3D volumetric algorithm. The robotic approach of the treatment stage has consisted to design a computer driven chair-framework cluster to position the target volume at the radiation unit isocenter.

  13. Robot Assisted Stereotactic Laser Ablation for a Radiosurgery Resistant Hypothalamic Hamartoma

    PubMed Central

    Acharya, Vinita; Sather, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Hypothalamic hamartomas (HH) are benign tumors that can cause significant morbidity in adults as a cause of epilepsy, particularly gelastic seizures. Open and endoscopic resections of HH offer good seizure control but have high rates of morbidity and are technically challenging. Stereotactic radiosurgery has been an alternative treatment; however, it results in comparably poor seizure control. Recently, in children, stereotactic laser ablation has shown promise as a surgical technique that can combine the best features of both of these approaches for the treatment of HH. Here we present the first reported use of a frameless robot-assisted stereotactic system to treat an HH. The patient had failed two previous Gamma Knife radiosurgery treatments. Post-procedure he had a stable, but unintentional weight loss of 20 kg and a transient episode of hemiparesis the night of the operation. At six months postoperatively the patient remained seizure free. Stereotactic laser ablation may represent a new standard in the treatment of HH in adults, especially in those who have failed radiosurgery. Further study is warranted in this population to determine efficacy and safety profiles. PMID:27217984

  14. High School Completion Programs: A Community Guide Systematic Economic Review.

    PubMed

    Qu, Shuli; Chattopadhyay, Sajal K; Hahn, Robert A

    2016-01-01

    On-time high school graduation rate is among the 26 leading health indicators for Healthy People 2020. High school completion (HSC) programs aim to increase the likelihood that students finish high school and receive a high school diploma or complete a GED (General Educational Development) program. This systematic review was conducted to determine the economic impact of HSC interventions, assess variability in cost-effectiveness of different types of programs, and compare the lifetime benefit of completing high school with the cost of intervention. Forty-seven included studies were identified from 5303 articles published in English from January 1985 to December 2012. The economic evidence was summarized by type of HSC program. All monetary values were expressed in 2012 US dollars. The data were analyzed in 2013. Thirty-seven studies provided estimates of incremental cost per additional high school graduate, with a median cost for HSC programs of $69 800 (interquartile interval = $35 900-$130 300). Cost-effectiveness ratios varied depending on intervention type, study settings, student populations, and costing methodologies. Ten studies estimated the lifetime difference of economic benefits between high school nongraduates and graduates; 4 used a governmental perspective and reported benefit per additional high school to range from $187 000 to $240 000; 6 used a societal perspective and reported a range of $347 000 to $718 000. Benefits exceeded costs in most studies from a governmental perspective and in all studies from a societal perspective. Interventions to increase HSC rates produce substantial economic benefits to government and society including averted health care costs. From a societal perspective, the benefits also exceed costs, implying a positive rate of return from investment in HSC programs.

  15. A Resource Guide for Career Development in the Junior High School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benson, Arland

    This resource guide for a developmental junior high career education program contains general and specific behavioral objectives, a program description, and a wide range of resource materials, including student and teacher worksheets and evaluation forms. Developed by a junior high counselor and funded by the Elementary Secondary Education Act,…

  16. A Resource Guide for Career Development in the Junior High School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benson, Arland

    This resource guide for a developmental junior high career education program contains general and specific behavioral objectives, a program description, and a wide range of resource materials, including student and teacher worksheets and evaluation forms. Developed by a junior high counselor and funded by the Elementary Secondary Education Act,…

  17. Transition of Students with Disabilities to Postsecondary Education: A Guide for High School Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Education, 2007

    2007-01-01

    For students with disabilities, a big factor in their successful transition from high school to postsecondary education is accurate knowledge about their civil rights. The purpose of this guide is to provide high school educators with answers to questions students with disabilities may have as they get ready to move to the postsecondary education…

  18. Curriculum in Food Handling and Distribution; a Guide for Experimentation in High School and Post High School Vocational Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stiles, Philip G.; And Others

    The project developed an experimental curriculum guide for training persons at the high school and post-high school levels in food handling and distribution. Data were gathered through interviews with over 200 food industries in Connecticut. Courses and curriculums were obtained from six secondary schools and seven post-secondary schools. Some of…

  19. Theory of high-frequency waves in a coaxial plasma wave guide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maraghechi, B.; Farrokhi, B.; Willett, J. E.

    1999-10-01

    An analysis of the high-frequency eigenmodes of a coaxial wave guide containing a magnetized annular plasma column is presented. A transcendental equation is derived from the boundary conditions in the form of an eighth-order determinant equated to zero. Simultaneous solution of this determinantal equation and a polynomial equation derived from the wave equation yields the dispersion relations for the eigenmodes. By reduction of the order of the determinant the appropriate transcendental equation is easily obtained for some special cases, e.g., partially filled coaxial wave guide. The electrostatic treatment of a coaxial cylindrical wave guide is also presented. The corresponding transcendental equation is reduced to some special cases, e.g., conventional wave guide containing an annular plasma column under electrostatic approximation. Numerical solutions are obtained for some azimuthally symmetric EH (perturbed TM) and HE (perturbed TE) wave guide modes, cyclotron modes, and space-charge modes. A strong dependence of the frequencies of these electromagnetic-electrostatic waves on the radii of the coaxial wave guide and the plasma column is revealed.

  20. Impact of Stereotactic Biopsy in HIV Patients.

    PubMed

    Quick-Weller, Johanna; Kann, Gerrit; Lescher, Stephanie; Imöhl, Lioba; Seifert, Volker; Weise, Lutz Martin; Brodt, Hans-Reinhard; Marquardt, Gerhard

    2016-02-01

    During their disease a significant number of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients develop neurologic symptoms due to intracerebral pathologies. Entities commonly found are toxoplasmosis, lymphomas, or progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. In some patients, diagnosis is not feasible with imaging alone, requiring biopsy. The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of stereotactic biopsy in HIV patients on adjustment of therapy. Between January 2004 and May 2015 at our clinic, 26 HIV-infected patients underwent stereotactic biopsy. Thin-layer magnetic resonance images were obtained and fused with computed tomography scans, taken with the stereotactic frame (Leksell) mounted. Biopsy material was evaluated pathologically and microbiologically. Histologic analysis revealed B-cell lymphoma in 6 patients (23.1%) and progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy in 2 patients (7.7%). Abscess and toxoplasmosis were found in 3 patients each (11.5% and 11.5%), and encephalitis occurred in 4 patients (15.4%). In 2 patients each (7.7%), vasculitis, metastasis, and glioblastoma were diagnosed. Further findings comprised non-Hodgkin lymphoma and Burkitt lymphoma in 1 patient each. After biopsy, treatment was significantly changed in 18 (69.2%) patients (P < 0.01). Antibiotic therapy was adjusted in 6 patients (23.1%), and chemotherapy in 3 patients (16.7%). Other changes included antibiotic/antiviral therapy to chemotherapy in 3 patients (16.7%), chemotherapy to radiation, cortisone to chemotherapy, and aciclovir to cortisone in 1 patient each. One patient with glioblastoma underwent resection, and another patient received radiation. One patient underwent palliative care. Stereotactic biopsy in HIV-infected patients results in significant changes of therapy in more than two thirds of the patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Convection-enhanced delivery improves MRI visualization of basal ganglia for stereotactic surgery.

    PubMed

    Bond, Aaron E; Dallapiazza, Robert F; Lopes, M Beatriz; Elias, W Jeffrey

    2016-11-01

    OBJECTIVE Stereotactic deep brain stimulation surgery is most commonly performed while patients are awake. This allows for intraoperative clinical assessment and electrophysiological target verification, thereby promoting favorable outcomes with few side effects. Intraoperative CT and MRI have challenged this concept of clinical treatment validation. Image-guided surgery is capable of delivering electrodes precisely to a planned, stereotactic target; however, these methods can be limited by low anatomical resolution even with sophisticated MRI modalities. The authors are developing a novel method using convection-enhanced delivery to safely manipulate the extracellular space surrounding common anatomical targets for surgery. By altering the extracellular content of deep subcortical structures and their associated white matter tracts, the MRI visualization of the basal ganglia can be improved to better define the anatomy. This technique could greatly improve the accuracy and success of stereotactic surgery, potentially eliminating the reliance on awake surgery. METHODS Observations were made in the clinical setting where vasogenic and cytotoxic edema improved the MRI visualization of the basal ganglia. These findings were replicated in the experimental setting using an FDA-approved intracerebral catheter that was stereotactically inserted into the thalamus or basal ganglia of 7 swine. Five swine were infused with normal saline, and 2 were infused with autologous CSF. Flow rates varied between 1 μl/min to 6 μl/min to achieve convective distributions. Concurrent MRI was performed at 15-minute intervals to monitor the volume of infusion and observe the imaging changes of the deep subcortical structures. The animals were then clinically observed, and necropsy was performed within 48 hours, 1 week, or 1 month for histological analysis. RESULTS In all animals, the white matter tracts became hyperintense on T2-weighted imaging as compared with basal ganglia nuclei

  2. Stereotactic radiosurgery for trigeminal neuralgia utilizing the BrainLAB Novalis system.

    PubMed

    Zahra, Hadi; Teh, Bin S; Paulino, Arnold C; Yoshor, Daniel; Trask, Todd; Baskin, David; Butler, E Brian

    2009-12-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is one of the least invasive treatments for trigeminal neuralgia (TN). To date, most reports have been about Cobalt-based treatments (i.e., Gamma Knife) with limited data on image-guided stereotactic linear accelerator treatments. We describe our initial experience of using BrainLAB Novalis stereotactic system for the radiosurgical treatment of TN. A total of 20 patients were treated between July 2004 and February 2007. Each SRS procedure was performed using the BrainLAB Novalis System. Thin cuts MRI images of 1.5 mm thickness were acquired and fused with the simulation CT of each patient. Majority of the patients received a maximum dose of 90 Gy. The median brainstem dose to 1.0 cc and 0.1 cc was 2.3 Gy and 13.5 Gy, respectively. In addition, specially acquired three-dimensional fast imaging sequence employing steady-state acquisition (FIESTA) MRI was utilized to improve target delineation of the trigeminal proximal nerve root entry zone. Barrow Neurological Index (BNI) pain scale for TN was used for assessing treatment outcome. At a median follow-up time of 14.2 months, 19 patients (95%) reported at least some improvement in pain. Eight (40%) patients were completely pain-free and stopped all medications (BNI Grade I) while another 2 (10%) patients also stopped medications but reported occasional pain (BNI Grade II). Another 2 (10%) patients reported no pain and 7 (35%) patients only occasional pain while continuing medications, BNI Grade IIIA and IIIB, respectively. Median time to pain control was 8.5 days (range: 1-70 days). No patient reported severe pain, worsening pain or any pain not controlled on their previously taken medication. Intermittent or persistent facial numbness following treatments occurred in 35% of patients. No other complications were reported. Stereotactic radiosurgery using the BrainLAB Novalis system is a safe and effective treatment for TN. This information is important as more centers are obtaining image-guided

  3. Noncontact monitoring of fatigue crack growth using high frequency guided waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masserey, B.; Fromme, P.

    2014-03-01

    The development of fatigue cracks at fastener holes due to stress concentration is a common problem in aircraft maintenance. This contribution investigates the use of high frequency guided waves for the non-contact monitoring of fatigue crack growth in tensile, aluminium specimens. High frequency guided ultrasonic waves have a good sensitivity for defect detection and can propagate along the structure, thus having the potential for the inspection of difficult to access parts by means of non-contact measurements. Experimentally the required guided wave modes are excited using standard wedge transducers and measured using a laser interferometer. The growth of fatigue cracks during cyclic loading was monitored optically and the resulting changes in the signal caused by crack growth are quantified. Full three-dimensional simulation of the scattering of the high frequency guided ultrasonic waves at the fastener hole and crack has been implemented using the Finite Difference (FD) method. The comparison of the results shows a good agreement of the measured and predicted scattered field of the guided wave at quarter-elliptical and through-thickness fatigue cracks. The measurements show a good sensitivity for the early detection of fatigue damage and for the monitoring of fatigue crack growth at a fastener hole. The sensitivity and repeatability are ascertained, and the robustness of the methodology for practical in-situ ultrasonic monitoring of fatigue crack growth is discussed.

  4. High precision ultrasonic guided wave technique for inspection of power transmission line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Jun; Qiu, Jinhao; Ji, Hongli; Wang, Enrong; Takagi, Toshiyuki; Uchimoto, Tetsuya

    2017-01-01

    Due to the merits of high inspection speed and long detecting distance, Ultrasonic Guided Wave(UGW) method has been commonly applied to the on-line maintenance of power transmission line. However, the guided wave propagation in this structure is very complicated, leading to the unfavorable defect localization accuracy. Aiming at this situation, a high precision UGW technique for inspection of local surface defect in power transmission line is proposed. The technique is realized by adopting a novel segmental piezoelectric ring transducer and transducer mounting scheme, combining with the comprehensive characterization of wave propagation and circumferential defect positioning with multiple piezoelectric elements. Firstly, the propagation path of guided waves in the multi-wires of transmission line under the proposed technique condition is investigated experimentally. Next, the wave velocities are calculated by dispersion curves and experiment test respectively, and from comparing of the two results, the guided wave mode propagated in transmission line is confirmed to be F(1,1) mode. Finally, the axial and circumferential positioning of local defective wires in transmission line are both achieved, by using multiple piezoelectric elements to surround the stands and send elastic waves into every single wire. The proposed research can play a role of guiding the development of highly effective UGW method and detecting system for multi-wire transmission line.

  5. Which Type of Inquiry Project Do High School Biology Students Prefer: Open or Guided?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeh, Irit; Zion, Michal

    2012-10-01

    In teaching inquiry to high school students, educators differ on which method of teaching inquiry is more effective: Guided or open inquiry? This paper examines the influence of these two different inquiry learning approaches on the attitudes of Israeli high school biology students toward their inquiry project. The results showed significant differences between the two groups: Open inquiry students were more satisfied and felt they gained benefits from implementing the project to a greater extent than guided inquiry students. On the other hand, regarding documentation throughout the project, guided inquiry students believed that they conducted more documentation, as compared to their open inquiry peers. No significant differences were found regarding `the investment of time', but significant differences were found in the time invested and difficulties which arose concerning the different stages of the inquiry process: Open inquiry students believed they spent more time in the first stages of the project, while guided inquiry students believed they spent more time in writing the final paper. In addition, other differences were found: Open inquiry students felt more involved in their project, and felt a greater sense of cooperation with others, in comparison to guided inquiry students. These findings may help teachers who hesitate to teach open inquiry to implement this method of inquiry; or at least provide their students with the opportunity to be more involved in inquiry projects, and ultimately provide their students with more autonomy, high-order thinking, and a deeper understanding in performing science.

  6. Guide to School Design: Healthy + High Performance Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Healthy Schools Network, Inc., 2007

    2007-01-01

    A "healthy and high performance school" uses a holistic design process to promote the health and comfort of children and school employees, as well as conserve resources. Children may spend over eight hours a day at school with little, if any, legal protection from environmental hazards. Schools are generally not well-maintained; asthma is a…

  7. An Educator's Guide to High-End Videoconferencing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maring, Gerald H.; Schmid, Jason A.; Roark, Jeremy

    This document describes the origins of cybermentoring and focuses on projects with elementary and secondary schools throughout the state of Washington. It discusses use of telephone communication, email, web design, and low-end videoconferencing technologies in initial cyberprojects, and recent cyberprojects that have begun to make use of high-end…

  8. Critical Thinking Handbook: High School. A Guide for Redesigning Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paul, Richard; And Others

    This handbook, designed to help high school teachers remodel their lesson plans, has one basic objective: to demonstrate that it is possible and practical to integrate instruction for critical thinking into the teaching of all subjects. The handbook discusses the concept of critical thinking and the principles that underlie it and shows how…

  9. Guide for Planning a High School Environmental Action Conference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wanless, Angie, Comp.; And Others

    The purpose of this manual is to provide guidelines and suggestions for people organizing an environmental action conference for high school students. The format and planning suggestions are based on the methods used for a conference organized by the Wisconsin Center for Environmental Education in 1991. The bulk of the manual provides structure…

  10. Curriculum Guide for Art Education in the Senior High School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byar, Corinne L.; Dougherty, Marguerite D.

    This course outline for art education at the senior high school level aims to promote the development of each child so that he is not only proficient in measurable skills and knowledge but is also a resourceful and creative individual. The suggested teaching activities include classroom demonstrations and slide shows followed by student…

  11. Stereotactic radiosurgery for multiple brain metastases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Anna; (Josh Yamada, Yoshiya

    2017-01-01

    Whole brain radiation therapy has been the traditional treatment of choice for patients with multiple brain metastases. Although stereotactic radiosurgery is widely accepted for the management to up to 4 brain metastases, its use is still controversial in cases of 5 or more brain metastases. Randomized trials have suggested that stereotactic radiosurgery alone is appropriate in up to 4 metastases without concomitant whole brain radiation. Level 1 evidence also suggests that withholding whole brain radiation may also reduce the impact of radiation on neurocognitive function and also may even offer a survival advantage. A recent analysis of a large multicentre prospective database has suggested that there are no differences in outcomes such as the likelihood of new metastasis or leptomeningeal disease in cases of 2-10 brain metastases, nor in overall survival. Hence in the era of prolonged survival with stage IV cancer, stereotactic radiosurgery is a reasonable alternative to whole brain radiation in order to minimize the impact of treatment upon quality of life without sacrificing overall survival.

  12. Single-Fraction Spine Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for the Treatment of Chordoma

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Edward W.; Jung, David L.; Balagamwala, Ehsan H.; Angelov, Lilyana; Suh, John H.; Djemil, Toufik; Magnelli, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Chordoma is a radioresistant tumor that presents a therapeutic challenge with spine involvement, as high doses of radiation are needed for local control while limiting dose to the spinal cord. The purpose of this study is to determine the efficacy and safety of single-fraction spine stereotactic body radiation therapy for the treatment of spine chordoma. Methods: A retrospective review of our institutional database from 2006 to 2013 identified 8 patients (12 cases) with chordoma of the spine who were treated with spine stereotactic body radiation therapy. Surgical resection was performed in 7 of the 12 cases. The treatment volume was defined by the bony vertebral level of the tumor along with soft tissue extension appreciated on magnetic resonance imaging fusion. Medical records and imaging were assessed for pain relief and local control. Treatment toxicity was evaluated using Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0. Results: Median age was 59 years (range, 17-91). Median target volume was 48 cm3 (1-304), and median prescription dose was 16 Gy (11-16). Median conformality index was 1.44 (1.14-3.21), and homogeneity index was 1.12 (1.05-1.19). With a median follow-up time of 9.7 months (.5-84), local control was achieved in 75% of the cases treated. One patient developed limited grade 2 spinal cord myelopathy that resolved with steroids. There were no other treatment toxicities from spine stereotactic body radiation therapy. Conclusion: Single-fraction spine stereotactic body radiation therapy can be safely delivered to treat chordoma of the spine with the potential to improve pain symptoms. Although the early data are suggestive, long-term follow-up with more patients is necessary to determine the efficacy of spine stereotactic body radiation therapy in the treatment of chordoma of the spine. PMID:27260562

  13. Brain mapping in stereotactic surgery: a brief overview from the probabilistic targeting to the patient-based anatomic mapping.

    PubMed

    Lemaire, Jean-Jacques; Coste, Jérôme; Ouchchane, Lemlih; Caire, François; Nuti, Christophe; Derost, Philippe; Cristini, Vittorio; Gabrillargues, Jean; Hemm, Simone; Durif, Franck; Chazal, Jean

    2007-01-01

    In this article, we briefly review the concept of brain mapping in stereotactic surgery taking into account recent advances in stereotactic imaging. The gold standard continues to rely on probabilistic and indirect targeting, relative to a stereotactic reference, i.e., mostly the anterior (AC) and the posterior (PC) commissures. The theoretical position of a target defined on an atlas is transposed into the stereotactic space of a patient's brain; final positioning depends on electrophysiological analysis. The method is also used to analyze final electrode or lesion position for a patient or group of patients, by projection on an atlas. Limitations are precision of definition of the AC-PC line, probabilistic location and reliability of the electrophysiological guidance. Advances in MR imaging, as from 1.5-T machines, make stereotactic references no longer mandatory and allow an anatomic mapping based on an individual patient's brain. Direct targeting is enabled by high-quality images, an advanced anatomic knowledge and dedicated surgical software. Labeling associated with manual segmentation can help for the position analysis along non-conventional, interpolated planes. Analysis of final electrode or lesion position, for a patient or group of patients, could benefit from the concept of membership, the attribution of a weighted membership degree to a contact or a structure according to its level of involvement. In the future, more powerful MRI machines, diffusion tensor imaging, tractography and computational modeling will further the understanding of anatomy and deep brain stimulation effects.

  14. Extracranial stereotactic body radiotherapy. Review of main SBRT features and indications in primary tumors

    PubMed Central

    Rubio, Carmen; Morera, Rosa; Hernando, Ovidio; Leroy, Thomas.; Lartigau, S. Eric

    2013-01-01

    Aim Review of main SBRT features and indications in primary tumors. Background Stereotactic body radiotherapy has been developed in the last few years. SBRT allows the hypofractionated treatment of extra cranial tumors, using either a single or limited number of dose fractions, and resulting in the delivery of a high biological effective dose with low toxicity. Material and methods SBRT requires a high level of accuracy for all phases of the treatment process: effective patient immobilization, precise target localization, highly conformed dosimetry and image guided systems for treatment verification. The implementation of SBRT in routine requires a careful considering of organ motion. Gating and tracking are effective ways to do so, and less invasive technologies “fiducials free” have been developed. Due to the hypofractionated scheme, the physician must pay attention to new dosimetric constraints in organ at risk and new radiobiological models are needed to assess the optimal fractionation and dose schemes. Results Currently, SBRT is safe and effective to treat primary tumors, which are otherwise untreatable with conventional radiotherapy or surgery. SBRT has quickly developed because of its excellent results in terms of tolerance and its high locoregional control rates. SBRT indications in primary tumors, such as lung primary tumors, have become a standard of care for inoperable patients. SBRT seems to be effective in many others indications in curative or palliative intent such as liver primary tumors, and novel indications and strategies are currently emerging in prostate cancer, head and neck tumor recurrences or pelvis reirradiations. Conclusion Currently, SBRT is mainly used when there is no other therapeutic alternative for the patient. This is due to the lack of randomized trials in these settings. However, the results shown in retrospective studies let us hope to impose SBRT as a new standard of care for many patients in the next few years. PMID

  15. Stereotactic Laser Ablation for Medically Intractable Epilepsy: The Next Generation of Minimally Invasive Epilepsy Surgery

    PubMed Central

    LaRiviere, Michael J.; Gross, Robert E.

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy is a common, disabling illness that is refractory to medical treatment in approximately one-third of patients, particularly among those with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. While standard open mesial temporal resection is effective, achieving seizure freedom in most patients, efforts to develop safer, minimally invasive techniques have been underway for over half a century. Stereotactic ablative techniques, in particular, radiofrequency (RF) ablation, were first developed in the 1960s, with refinements in the 1990s with the advent of modern computed tomography and magnetic resonance-based imaging. In the past 5 years, the most recent techniques have used MRI-guided laser interstitial thermotherapy (LITT), the development of which began in the 1980s, saw refinements in MRI thermal imaging through the 1990s, and was initially used primarily for the treatment of intracranial and extracranial tumors. The present review describes the original stereotactic ablation trials, followed by modern imaging-guided RF ablation series for mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. The developments of LITT and MRI thermometry are then discussed. Finally, the two currently available MRI-guided LITT systems are reviewed for their role in the treatment of mesial temporal lobe and other medically refractory epilepsies. PMID:27995127

  16. A simple guide screw method for intracranial xenograft studies in mice.

    PubMed

    Donoghue, Jacqueline F; Bogler, Oliver; Johns, Terrance G

    2011-09-26

    The grafting of human tumor cells into the brain of immunosuppressed mice is an established method for the study of brain cancers including glioblastoma (glioma) and medulloblastoma. The widely used stereotactic approach only allows for the injection of a single animal at a time, is labor intensive and requires highly specialized equipment. The guide screw method, initially developed by Lal et al.,(1) was developed to eliminate cumbersome stereotactic procedures. We now describe a modified guide screw approach that is rapid and exceptionally safe; both of which are critical ethical considerations. Notably, our procedure now incorporates an infusion pump that allows up to 10 animals to be simultaneously injected with tumor cells. To demonstrate the utility of this procedure, we established human U87MG glioma cells as intracranial xenografts in mice, which were then treated with AMG102; a fully human antibody directed to HGF/scatter factor currently undergoing clinical evaluation(2-5). Systemic injection of AMG102 significantly prolonged the survival of all mice with intracranial U87MG xenografts and resulted in a number of complete cures. This study demonstrates that the guide screw method is an inexpensive, highly reproducible approach for establishing intracranial xenografts. Furthermore, it provides a relevant physiological model for validating novel therapeutic strategies for the treatment of brain cancers.

  17. Initial Experience with a Cone-beam Breast Computed Tomography-guided Biopsy System

    PubMed Central

    Seifert, Posy J; Morgan, Renee C; Conover, David L; Arieno, Andrea L

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate our initial experience with a cone-beam breast computed tomography (BCT)-guided breast biopsy system for lesion retrieval in phantom studies for use with a cone-beam BCT imaging system. Materials and Methods: Under the Institutional Review Board approval, a phantom biopsy study was performed using a dedicated BCT-guided biopsy system. Fifteen biopsies were performed on each of the small, medium, and large anthropomorphic breast phantoms with both BCT and stereotactic guidance for comparison. Each set of the 45 phantoms contained masses and calcification clusters of varying sizes. Data included mass/calcium retrieval rate and dose and length of procedure time for phantom studies. Results: Phantom mass and calcium retrieval rate were 100% for BCT and stereotactic biopsy. BCT dose for small and medium breast phantoms was found to be equivalent to or less than the corresponding stereotactic approach. Stereotactic-guided biopsy dose was 34.2 and 62.5 mGy for small and medium breast phantoms, respectively. BCT-guided biopsy dose was 15.4 and 30.0 mGy for small and medium breast phantoms, respectively. Both computed tomography biopsy and stereotactic biopsy study time ranged from 10 to 20 min. Conclusion: Initial experience with a BCT-guided biopsy system has shown to be comparable to stereotactic biopsy in phantom studies with equivalent or decreased dose. PMID:28217404

  18. Plasma guiding and deflection of high speed projectiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starikovskiy, Andrey; Miles, Richard; PU Team

    2016-09-01

    The deposition of energy in the air in front of a high-speed projectile can lead to both the reduction of drag and the production of steering moments. Modeling has shown that the major contributor to the drag reduction and the steering moment is the high temperature, low density region that is produced by the energy addition. If the energy addition is off axis, it leads to a non symmetric pressure distribution on the projectile as it passes through this region, producing steering control authority that increases nonlinearly with Mach number. Experiments with a tethered projectile and subsequently with a rotating projectile using pulsed laser energy addition were reported. More recent experiments with a 30-mm diameter projectile in M =3.5 flow have been undertaken using a nozzle driven by a pulsed shock tunnel 9.5 m in length and 100 mm internal diameter. Energy was deposited by Nd-YAG laser with pulse energy of about 3 Joules at 1064nm. The laser pulse duration was 5-6 ns. Preliminary results indicate that the laser spark - flow interaction changes the angular momentum of the model for with a laser pulse energy of 2.85 J, the angle between laser spark axis and the flow 30-0 and a flow speed 1100 m/s.

  19. High Frequency Ultrasound Array Designed for Ultrasound Guided Breast Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Cummins, Thomas; Eliahoo, Payam; Shung, K. Kirk

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a miniaturized high frequency linear array that can be integrated within a core biopsy needle to improve tissue sampling accuracy during breast cancer biopsy procedures. The 64 element linear array has an element width of 14 μm, kerf width of 6 μm, element length of 1 mm and element thickness of 24 μm. The 2–2 array composite was fabricated using deep reactive ion etching of PMN-PT single crystal material. The array composite fabrication process as well as a novel high density electrical interconnect solution are presented and discussed. Array performance measurements show that the array had a center frequency and fractional bandwidth (−6 dB) of 59.1 MHz and 29.4%, respectively. Insertion loss and adjacent element cross talk at the center frequency were −41.0 dB and −23.7 dB, respectively. A B-mode image of a tungsten wire target phantom was captured using a synthetic aperture imaging system and the imaging test results demonstrate axial and lateral resolutions of 33.2 μm and 115.6 um, respectively. PMID:27046895

  20. Guided-Mode-Leaky-Mode-Guided-Mode Fiber Interferometer and Its High Sensitivity Refractive Index Sensing Technology.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qi; Li, Chunyue; Zhao, Chengwu; Li, Weizheng

    2016-06-01

    A cascaded symmetrical dual-taper Mach-Zehnder interferometer structure based on guided-mode and leaky-mode interference is proposed in this paper. Firstly, the interference spectrum characteristics of interferometer has been analyzed by the Finite Difference-Beam Propagation Method (FD-BPM). When the diameter of taper waist is 20 μm-30 μm, dual-taper length is 1 mm and taper distance is 4 cm-6 cm, the spectral contrast is higher, which is suitable for sensing. Secondly, experimental research on refractive index sensitivity is carried out. A refractive index sensitivity of 62.78 nm/RIU (refractive index unit) can achieved in the RI range of 1.3333-1.3792 (0%~25% NaCl solution), when the sensor structure parameters meet the following conditions: diameter of taper waist is 24 μm, dual-taper length is 837 μm and taper distance is 5.5 cm. The spectrum contrast is 0.8 and measurement resolution is 1.6 × 10(-5) RIU. The simulation analysis is highly consistent with experimental results. Research shows that the sensor has promising application in low RI fields where high-precision measurement is required due to its high sensitivity and stability.

  1. Guided-Mode-Leaky-Mode-Guided-Mode Fiber Interferometer and Its High Sensitivity Refractive Index Sensing Technology

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qi; Li, Chunyue; Zhao, Chengwu; Li, Weizheng

    2016-01-01

    A cascaded symmetrical dual-taper Mach-Zehnder interferometer structure based on guided-mode and leaky-mode interference is proposed in this paper. Firstly, the interference spectrum characteristics of interferometer has been analyzed by the Finite Difference-Beam Propagation Method (FD-BPM). When the diameter of taper waist is 20 μm–30 μm, dual-taper length is 1 mm and taper distance is 4 cm–6 cm, the spectral contrast is higher, which is suitable for sensing. Secondly, experimental research on refractive index sensitivity is carried out. A refractive index sensitivity of 62.78 nm/RIU (refractive index unit) can achieved in the RI range of 1.3333–1.3792 (0%~25% NaCl solution), when the sensor structure parameters meet the following conditions: diameter of taper waist is 24 μm, dual-taper length is 837 μm and taper distance is 5.5 cm. The spectrum contrast is 0.8 and measurement resolution is 1.6 × 10−5 RIU. The simulation analysis is highly consistent with experimental results. Research shows that the sensor has promising application in low RI fields where high-precision measurement is required due to its high sensitivity and stability. PMID:27258281

  2. Stereotactic radiotherapy of meningiomas compressing optical pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Hamm, Klaus-Detlef . E-mail: khamm@erfurt.helios-kliniken.de; Henzel, Martin; Gross, Markus W.; Surber, Gunnar; Kleinert, Gabriele; Engenhart-Cabillic, Rita

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: Microsurgical resection is usually the treatment of choice for meningiomas, especially for those that compress the optical pathways. However, in many cases of skull-base meningiomas a high risk of neurological deficits and recurrences exist in cases where the complete tumor removal was not possible. In such cases (fractionated) stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) can offer an alternative treatment option. We evaluated the local control rate, symptomatology, and toxicity. Patients and Methods: Between 1997 and 2003, 183 patients with skull-base meningiomas were treated with SRT, among them were 65 patients with meningiomas that compressed optical pathways (64 benign, 1 atypical). Of these 65 cases, 20 were treated with SRT only, 27 were subtotally resected before SRT, and 18 underwent multiple tumor resections before SRT. We investigated the results until 2005, with a median follow-up of 45 months (range, 22-83 months). The tumor volume (TV = gross tumor volume) ranged from 0.61 to 90.20 cc (mean, 18.9 cc). Because of the risk of new visual disturbances, the dose per fraction was either 2 or 1.8 Gy for all patients, to a total dose of 50 to 60 Gy. Results: The overall survival and the progression-free survival rates for 5 years were assessed to 100% in this patient group. To date, no progression for these meningiomas have been observed. Quantitatively, tumor shrinkage of more than 20%, or more than 2 mm in diameter, was proved in 35 of the 65 cases after SRT. In 29 of the 65 patients, at least 1 of the symptoms improved. On application of the Common Toxicity Criteria (CTC), acute toxicity (Grade 3) was seen in 1 case (worsening of conjunctivitis). Another 2 patients developed late toxicity by LENT-SOMA score, 1 x Grade 1 and 1 x Grade 3 (field of vision loss). Conclusion: As a low-risk and effective treatment option for tumor control, SRT with 1.8 to 2.0 Gy per fraction can also be recommended in case of meningiomas that compress optical pathways. An

  3. High Voltage Power Supply Design Guide for Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bever, Renate S.; Ruitberg, Arthur P.; Kellenbenz, Carl W.; Irish, Sandra M.

    2006-01-01

    This book is written for newcomers to the topic of high voltage (HV) in space and is intended to replace an earlier (1970s) out-of-print document. It discusses the designs, problems, and their solutions for HV, mostly direct current, electric power, or bias supplies that are needed for space scientific instruments and devices, including stepping supplies. Output voltages up to 30kV are considered, but only very low output currents, on the order of microamperes. The book gives a brief review of the basic physics of electrical insulation and breakdown problems, especially in gases. It recites details about embedment and coating of the supplies with polymeric resins. Suggestions on HV circuit parts follow. Corona or partial discharge testing on the HV parts and assemblies is discussed both under AC and DC impressed test voltages. Electric field analysis by computer on an HV device is included in considerable detail. Finally, there are many examples given of HV power supplies, complete with some of the circuit diagrams and color photographs of the layouts.

  4. Dosimetric verification of stereotactic radiosurgery/stereotactic radiotherapy dose distributions using Gafchromic EBT3

    SciTech Connect

    Cusumano, Davide; Fumagalli, Maria L.; Marchetti, Marcello; Fariselli, Laura; De Martin, Elena

    2015-10-01

    Aim of this study is to examine the feasibility of using the new Gafchromic EBT3 film in a high-dose stereotactic radiosurgery and radiotherapy quality assurance procedure. Owing to the reduced dimensions of the involved lesions, the feasibility of scanning plan verification films on the scanner plate area with the best uniformity rather than using a correction mask was evaluated. For this purpose, signal values dispersion and reproducibility of film scans were investigated. Uniformity was then quantified in the selected area and was found to be within 1.5% for doses up to 8 Gy. A high-dose threshold level for analyses using this procedure was established evaluating the sensitivity of the irradiated films. Sensitivity was found to be of the order of centiGray for doses up to 6.2 Gy and decreasing for higher doses. The obtained results were used to implement a procedure comparing dose distributions delivered with a CyberKnife system to planned ones. The procedure was validated through single beam irradiation on a Gafchromic film. The agreement between dose distributions was then evaluated for 13 patients (brain lesions, 5 Gy/die prescription isodose ~80%) using gamma analysis. Results obtained using Gamma test criteria of 5%/1 mm show a pass rate of 94.3%. Gamma frequency parameters calculation for EBT3 films showed to strongly depend on subtraction of unexposed film pixel values from irradiated ones. In the framework of the described dosimetric procedure, EBT3 films proved to be effective in the verification of high doses delivered to lesions with complex shapes and adjacent to organs at risk.

  5. Getting it Together [8]. A Teacher's Guide: An Integrated Approach to Junior High Career Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Carol Gorby

    Most of the document is a teacher's guide for an eighth grade course in career education, in use at Cal Young Junior High School, Eugene, Oregon, emphasizing small group work. The five main parts of the course are: (1) career corner, a multimedia career information center for student job studies, (2) life career, a life planning simulation game,…

  6. "Failure Is Not an Option": Struggling High School Uses Standards to Guide Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lambertson, Sherry

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the use of standards to guide the reform of a struggling high school in Grant Michigan. The author describes the challenges and obstacles that the school was facing, and admits that school reform was difficult. Turnaround seemed impossible, but it held the promise of something larger than life: successful students who become…

  7. Protecting Youth, Preventing AIDS: A Guide for Effective High School HIV Prevention Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freudenberg, Nicholas; Radosh, Alice

    This guidebook is for school administrators, teachers, health care workers, parents, and students who want to help their schools prevent HIV, sexually transmitted diseases, and unwanted pregnancy among young people. The experience in more than 120 high schools in New York City has been the basis for the guide, which was developed with the help of…

  8. Consumer Education: A Conceptual Structure and Planning Guide for Senior High Schools in Wisconsin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Appleton Public Schools, WI.

    Prepared by junior and senior high teachers, the curriculum guide is an interdisciplinary approach by the business education, home economics, and social studies departments to a consumer education course. The initial development of materials was field tested and revised; a second-year field testing of the revised curriculum and a final analysis…

  9. Social Studies: A Resource Guide for Hearing-Impaired High School Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaggers, Robert A.; Jaggers, Barbara A.

    The guide was written to give secondary level hearing impaired students exposure to real life problems from a social studies perspective. Units are outlined for the three levels of the high school years and provide an overview, information on vocabulary, target competencies, suggested activities, sources, and a list of objectives. The units are…

  10. Prospective Mathematics Teachers' Ways of Guiding High School Students in GeoGebra-Supported Inquiry Tasks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hahkioniemi, Markus; Leppaaho, Henry

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we study how prospective teachers guide students' reasoning in GeoGebra-supported inquiry tasks. Twenty prospective mathematics teachers wrote about how they would react as a teacher in hypothetical situations where high school students present their GeoGebra-supported solutions to the teacher. Before writing their reactions, the…

  11. BO-CEC Business and Office Careers Course Guide; Junior High and Middle Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado State Univ., Ft. Collins. Dept. of Vocational Education.

    The curriculum guide for middle and junior high school grades presents 15 resource units, designed to simulate business career situations, organized into five sections: clerical (receptionist, general office worker, cashier, typist, and accounting clerk), secretarial/stenographic (secretary, court reporter, executive secretary), accounting and…

  12. The 2009 High School Transcript Study User's Guide. NCES 2011-465

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nord, C.; Hicks, L.; Hoover, K.; Jones, M.; Lin, A.; Lyons, M.; Perkins, R.; Roey, S.; Rust, K.; Sickles, D.

    2011-01-01

    This user's guide documents the procedures used to collect, process, and summarize data from the 2009 High School Transcript Study (HSTS 2009). Chapters detail the sampling of schools and graduates (chapters 2 and 3), data collection procedures (chapter 4), data processing procedures (chapter 5), and weighting procedures (chapter 6). Chapter 7…

  13. GUIDE FOR SOCIAL STUDIES AND SCIENCE-HEALTH, FIRST YEAR. JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL SPECIAL CURRICULUM.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    STINCHCOMB, KOMA D.; AND OTHERS

    THIS CURRICULUM GUIDE FOR JUNIOR HIGH EDUCABLE MENTALLY HANDICAPPED STUDENTS PROVIDES INFORMATION ON TEACHING PROCEDURES, SUGGESTIONS FOR PLANNING SUPPLEMENTAL UNITS, TYPES OF LESSONS, AND EVALUATION. INDIVIDUAL UNITS INCLUDE THE INFORMATION CONTENT, SUGGESTIONS FOR BACKGROUND STUDY, SPECIFIC TEACHING PLANS, DISCUSSION QUESTIONS, ASSIGNMENTS,…

  14. Post High School Transition: A Planning Guide for Educational and Job Placement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Research for Better Schools, Inc., Philadelphia, PA.

    This guide for teachers, counselors, and administrators presents a comprehensive system for educational and job placement aimed at facilitating post high school transition. It emphasizes activities and services for educational placement and job placement and development of student skills leading to self-placement. Chapter 1 describes features of…

  15. The 1998 High School Transcript Study User's Guide and Technical Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roey, Stephen; Caldwell, Nancy; Rust, Keith; Blumstein, Eyal; Krenzke, Tom; Legum, Stan; Kuhn, Judy; Waksberg, Mark; Haynes, Jacqueline

    The 1998 High School Transcript Study provides the U.S. Department of Education and other educational policymakers with information regarding current course offerings and students' course-taking patterns in U.S. secondary schools. Similar studies were conducted in 1982, 1987, 1990, and 1994. This guide documents the procedures used to collect and…

  16. Development of a Career Student Guide for the Tech Prep Program for Henry County High School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winchester, Ruth Ann

    This practicum report describes the research conducted in preparation for developing a career student guide to acquaint students attending Henry County High School (HCHS) in McDonough, Georgia, with the school's new tech prep program. Chapters 1 and 2 contain background information about HCHS' tech prep program and a review of literature regarding…

  17. Junior High School Social Studies Program. Curriculum Guide 1971-72.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anchorage Borough School District, AK.

    New approaches in the junior high social studies classroom are provided in this curriculum guide framework. Emphasis is upon the use of activities to help students become informed citizens, understand and have empathy for others, and organize and analyze knowledge. Interdisciplinary social studies are organized around substantive and…

  18. Occupational Preparation in the Natural Resources: A Suggested High School Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mortensen, James H.

    This curriculum guide was developed to provide a model plan to help public high schools and area vocational-technical schools to initiate, or evaluate and improve, natural resource occupational preparation programs. It offers a curriculum plan which can be modified to meet particular needs and objectives which are career education oriented. This…

  19. Conversation Compass: A Teacher's Guide to High-Quality Language Learning in Young Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curenton, Stephanie M.

    2016-01-01

    Classroom conversation plays an important role in the development of children's language and reasoning. However, studies show that classroom talk relies too much on directives and close-ended questions. "Conversation Compass" provides the tools to strengthen your language-learning environment: (1) The Compass: guide high-quality…

  20. Coastal Awareness: A Resource Guide for Teachers in Junior High Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rasmussen, Frederick A.

    Background information, activity suggestions, and recommended resource materials comprise this guide for designing a week-long ecology unit for junior high school students on Coastal Awareness. Discussed is how various physical processes such as waves, currents, and tides affect rocky shores, marshes, sandy beaches, and estuaries. To encourage…

  1. Common Core Standards for High School English Language Arts: A Quick-Start Guide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kendall, John; Frazee, Dana; Ryan, Susan

    2012-01-01

    High school teachers and leaders with responsibility for English language arts (ELA) need this handy guide to successfully implement the Common Core in their respective grade levels. Getting a copy for every staff member ensures they know: (1) How grades 11-12 ELA content differs from and builds upon 9-10 standards; (2) How the four strands…

  2. Natural Resources Technologies: A Suggested Post High School Program Development Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soles, Robert L.

    This post high school program development guide considers the following natural resources technological areas: air pollution control, forest, rangeland, minerals and mineral fuels, geological, outdoor recreation, soil, urban-regional planning, landscape, water, wastewater, oceanography, wildlife, fish, and marine life. Within each area, the…

  3. Teachers' Guide to Music Appreciation III A and III B in the Senior High School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, J. Mark; Dawkins, Barbara R.

    This guide to music appreciation courses was developed for use in senior high schools in Duval County, Jacksonville, Florida. Music Appreciation III A examines the development of music, from the Gothic period through the Classical period. Music Appreciation III B examines the development of music from the Romantic period through the 1970s.…

  4. Curriculum Assessment Guide. Developing Science Curriculum for High Ability Learners K-8. Draft.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyce, Linda Neal; And Others

    This guide is intended to assist in the evaluation of elementary science curriculum materials for use with high ability learners, in the light of calls for a "new science" which stresses depth of conceptual understanding. It presents a curriculum review process and two evaluation instruments. The process is intended to balance sound practices of…

  5. High/Scope Buyer's Guide to Children's Software. 11th Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hohmann, Charles; And Others

    This 11th edition of the High/Scope Buyer's Guide to Children's Software was designed to help teachers, caregivers, and parents make good choices when purchasing software to enhance children's learning. The book consists of an introduction, a chapter on finding the best software, software reviews for 48 different software products. The…

  6. Makiko's New World: Activities for the High School Classroom. [Videotape with] Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanford Univ., CA. Stanford Program on International and Cross Cultural Education.

    The film "Makiko's New World" offers U.S. high school students a unique glimpse into the latter part of the Meiji Period (1868-1912) in Japanese history. Students have the opportunity to experience the life of one Japanese woman, Makiko, during the Meiji Period through the "lens" of her diary. The teacher's guide was developed…

  7. Speech Courses in the Senior High School Program: A Guide for Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Detroit Public Schools, MI.

    This teacher guide to senior high school speech programs includes philosophy, objectives, course outlines, numerous sample materials, suggestions for projects and procedures, bibliographies, listings of suggested films, and evaluation materials for courses in (1) basic speech (e.g., voice and diction; action; rhetoric; advertising psychology;…

  8. Natural Resources Technologies: A Suggested Post High School Program Development Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soles, Robert L.

    This post high school program development guide considers the following natural resources technological areas: air pollution control, forest, rangeland, minerals and mineral fuels, geological, outdoor recreation, soil, urban-regional planning, landscape, water, wastewater, oceanography, wildlife, fish, and marine life. Within each area, the…

  9. Makiko's New World: Activities for the High School Classroom. [Videotape with] Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanford Univ., CA. Stanford Program on International and Cross Cultural Education.

    The film "Makiko's New World" offers U.S. high school students a unique glimpse into the latter part of the Meiji Period (1868-1912) in Japanese history. Students have the opportunity to experience the life of one Japanese woman, Makiko, during the Meiji Period through the "lens" of her diary. The teacher's guide was developed…

  10. Social Studies: A Resource Guide for Hearing-Impaired High School Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaggers, Robert A.; Jaggers, Barbara A.

    The guide was written to give secondary level hearing impaired students exposure to real life problems from a social studies perspective. Units are outlined for the three levels of the high school years and provide an overview, information on vocabulary, target competencies, suggested activities, sources, and a list of objectives. The units are…

  11. TEACHING HIGH SCHOOL BIOLOGY--A GUIDE TO WORKING WITH POTENTIAL BIOLOGISTS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BRANDWEIN, PAUL F.; AND OTHERS

    THIS VOLUME CONTAINS A COLLECTION OF PAPERS CONCERNING GIFTED HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS AND IDENTIFIES PROCEDURES TEACHERS CAN USE TO GUIDE SUCH STUDENTS IN BIOLOGICAL INVESTIGATIONS. THE FIRST FOUR CHAPTERS SUMMARIZE CURRENT INFORMATION ABOUT (1) TRAITS OF CREATIVE STUDENTS, (2) PROMISING PROCEDURES AND TECHNIQUES FOR WORKING WITH CAPABLE BIOLOGY…

  12. Nutrition Education: Choose Well, Be Well. A Curriculum Guide for High School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Dept. of Education, Sacramento.

    This curriculum guide for high school students contains 20 information acquisition lessons, 6 values awareness lessons, and 5 open-ended discussion lessons. Some lessons contain activities that extend over several days; other lessons contain one specific activity. The nutrition education goals are directed toward the attainment of nutrition…

  13. Nutrition Education: Choose Well, Be Well. A Curriculum Guide for Junior High School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Dept. of Education, Sacramento.

    This curriculum guide for junior high school students contains 17 information acquisition lessons, 5 values awareness lessons, and 6 open-ended discussion lessons. Some lessons contain activities that extend over several days; other lessons contain one specific activity. The nutrition education goals are directed toward the attainment of nutrition…

  14. The Negro in United States History. A Resource Guide (Tentative) for Senior High School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boston Public Schools, MA.

    GRADES OR AGES: Senior high school (Grades 10-12). SUBJECT MATTER: The Negro in United States history. ORGANIZATION AND PHYSICAL APPEARANCE: The guide has 12 units: 1) African Background; 2) Exploration; 3) The Revolution; 4) The Constitution; 5) Westward Expansion; 6) Slavery; 7) Lincoln and Slavery; 8) The Civil War; 9) Reconstruction; 10)…

  15. Robust frameless stereotactic localization in extra-cranial radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Riboldi, Marco; Baroni, Guido; Spadea, Maria Francesca; Bassanini, Fabio; Tagaste, Barbara; Garibaldi, Cristina; Orecchia, Roberto; Pedotti, Antonio

    2006-04-15

    In the field of extra-cranial radiotherapy, several inaccuracies can make the application of frameless stereotactic localization techniques error-prone. When optical tracking systems based on surface fiducials are used, inter- and intra-fractional uncertainties in marker three-dimensional (3D) detection may lead to inexact tumor position estimation, resulting in erroneous patient setup. This is due to the fact that external fiducials misdetection results in deformation effects that are poorly handled in a rigid-body approach. In this work, the performance of two frameless stereotactic localization algorithms for 3D tumor position reconstruction in extra-cranial radiotherapy has been specifically tested. Two strategies, unweighted versus weighted, for stereotactic tumor localization were examined by exploiting data coming from 46 patients treated for extra-cranial lesions. Measured isocenter displacements and rotations were combined to define isocentric procedures, featuring 6 degrees of freedom, for correcting patient alignment (isocentric positioning correction). The sensitivity of the algorithms to uncertainties in the 3D localization of fiducials was investigated by means of 184 numerical simulations. The performance of the implemented isocentric positioning correction was compared to conventional point-based registration. The isocentric positioning correction algorithm was tested on a clinical dataset of inter-fractional and intra-fractional setup errors, which was collected by means of an optical tracker on the same group of patients. The weighted strategy exhibited a lower sensitivity to fiducial localization errors in simulated misalignments than those of the unweighted strategy. Isocenter 3D displacements provided by the weighted strategy were consistently smaller than those featured by the unweighted strategy. The peak decrease in median and quartile values of isocenter 3D displacements were 1.4 and 2.7 mm, respectively. Concerning clinical data, the

  16. Is Your Local High School Making the Grade? Ten Elements of Successful High Schools: A Guide for Rural Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The Alliance for Excellent Education understands that the first step in improving any rural high school is to encourage and support the active engagement of students, parents, teachers, the community, and business leaders. This guide is designed to give parents and community members some suggested ways to begin thinking about whether their local…

  17. Relativistic electron motion in cylindrical waveguide with strong guiding magnetic field and high power microwave

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Ping; Sun, Jun; Cao, Yibing

    2015-06-15

    In O-type high power microwave (HPM) devices, the annular relativistic electron beam is constrained by a strong guiding magnetic field and propagates through an interaction region to generate HPM. Some papers believe that the E × B drift of electrons may lead to beam breakup. This paper simplifies the interaction region with a smooth cylindrical waveguide to research the radial motion of electrons under conditions of strong guiding magnetic field and TM{sub 01} mode HPM. The single-particle trajectory shows that the radial electron motion presents the characteristic of radial guiding-center drift carrying cyclotron motion. The radial guiding-center drift is spatially periodic and is dominated by the polarization drift, not the E × B drift. Furthermore, the self fields of the beam space charge can provide a radial force which may pull electrons outward to some extent but will not affect the radial polarization drift. Despite the radial drift, the strong guiding magnetic field limits the drift amplitude to a small value and prevents beam breakup from happening due to this cause.

  18. High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound: Current Status for Image-Guided Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Copelan, Alexander; Hartman, Jason; Chehab, Monzer; Venkatesan, Aradhana M.

    2015-01-01

    Image-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is an innovative therapeutic technology, permitting extracorporeal or endocavitary delivery of targeted thermal ablation while minimizing injury to the surrounding structures. While ultrasound-guided HIFU was the original image-guided system, MR-guided HIFU has many inherent advantages, including superior depiction of anatomic detail and superb real-time thermometry during thermoablation sessions, and it has recently demonstrated promising results in the treatment of both benign and malignant tumors. HIFU has been employed in the management of prostate cancer, hepatocellular carcinoma, uterine leiomyomas, and breast tumors, and has been associated with success in limited studies for palliative pain management in pancreatic cancer and bone tumors. Nonthermal HIFU bioeffects, including immune system modulation and targeted drug/gene therapy, are currently being explored in the preclinical realm, with an emphasis on leveraging these therapeutic effects in the care of the oncology patient. Although still in its early stages, the wide spectrum of therapeutic capabilities of HIFU offers great potential in the field of image-guided oncologic therapy. PMID:26622104

  19. Inception of a national multidisciplinary registry for stereotactic radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Sheehan, Jason P; Kavanagh, Brian D; Asher, Anthony; Harbaugh, Robert E

    2016-01-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) represents a multidisciplinary approach to the delivery of ionizing high-dose radiation to treat a wide variety of disorders. Much of the radiosurgical literature is based upon retrospective single-center studies along with a few randomized controlled clinical trials. More timely and effective evidence is needed to enhance the consistency and quality of and clinical outcomes achieved with SRS. The authors summarize the creation and implementation of a national SRS registry. The American Association of Neurological Surgeons (AANS) through NeuroPoint Alliance, Inc., started a successful registry effort with its lumbar spine initiative. Following a similar approach, the AANS and NeuroPoint Alliance collaborated with corporate partners and the American Society for Radiation Oncology to devise a data dictionary for an SRS registry. Through administrative and financial support from professional societies and corporate partners, a framework for implementation of the registry was created. Initial plans were devised for a 3-year effort encompassing 30 high-volume SRS centers across the country. Device-specific web-based data-extraction platforms were built by the corporate partners. Data uploaders were then used to port the data to a common repository managed by Quintiles, a national and international health care trials company. Audits of the data for completeness and veracity will be undertaken by Quintiles to ensure data fidelity. Data governance and analysis are overseen by an SRS board comprising equal numbers of representatives from the AANS and NeuroPoint Alliance. Over time, quality outcome assessments and post hoc research can be performed to advance the field of SRS. Stereotactic radiosurgery offers a high-technology approach to treating complex intracranial disorders. Improvements in the consistency and quality of care delivered to patients who undergo SRS should be afforded by the national registry effort that is underway.

  20. TU-AB-201-06: Evaluation of Electromagnetically Guided High- Dose Rate Brachytherapy for Ablative Treatment of Lung Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Pinkham, D.W.; Shultz, D.; Loo, B.W.; Sung, A.; Diehn, M.; Fahimian, B.P.

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The advent of electromagnetic navigation bronchoscopy has enabled minimally invasive access to peripheral lung tumors previously inaccessible by optical bronchoscopes. As an adjunct to Stereotactic Ablative Radiosurgery (SABR), implantation of HDR catheters can provide focal treatments for multiple metastases and sites of retreatments. The authors evaluate a procedure to deliver ablative doses via Electromagnetically-Guided HDR (EMG-HDR) to lung metastases, quantify the resulting dosimetry, and assess its role in the comprehensive treatment of lung cancer. Methods: A retrospective study was conducted on ten patients, who, from 2009 to 2011, received a hypo-fractionated SABR regimen with 6MV VMAT to lesions in various lobes ranging from 1.5 to 20 cc in volume. A CT visible pathway was delineated for EM guided placement of an HDR applicator (catheter) and dwell times were optimized to ensure at least 98% prescription dose coverage of the GTV. Normal tissue doses were calculated using inhomogeneity corrections via a grid-based Boltzmann solver (Acuros-BV-1.5.0). Results: With EMG-HDR, an average of 83% (+/−9% standard deviation) of each patient’s GTV received over 200% of the prescription dose, as compared to SABR where the patients received an average maximum dose of 125% (+/−5%). EMG-HDR enabled a 59% (+/−12%) decrease in the aorta maximum dose, a 63% (+/−26%) decrease in the spinal cord max dose, and 57% (+/−23%) and 70% (+/−17%) decreases in the volume of the body receiving over 50% and 25% of the prescription dose, respectively. Conclusion: EMG-HDR enables delivery of higher ablative doses to the GTV, while concurrently reducing surrounding normal tissue doses. The single catheter approach shown here is limited to targets smaller than 20 cc. As such, the technique enables ablation of small lesions and a potentially safe and effective retreatment option in situations where external beam utility is limited by normal tissue constraints.

  1. Damage detection using high order longitudinal guided waves (HOLGW) in the anchorage zone of stayed cable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Yong-dong; Jin, Jian; Yang, Feng; Chen, Wei-zhen

    2017-02-01

    High order longitudinal guided waves (HOLGW) are studied for the damage detection in the anchorage zone of stayed cable through the theoretical analysis, numerical simulation and experimental validation. First, based on the theory of elastic wave propagation in cylinder, the dispersion curves of longitudinal modes were obtained and calculated analytically and the high-frequency such as 5MHz corresponding to the higher order longitudinal guided wave modes are identified for the damage detection. Then, the ultrasonic guided waves propagating in a steel wire with or without defects were simulated by using the finite element method and the effects of defect depth and length on the reflection coefficient are studied. Finally, the free wires and a tested cable were studied experimentally. The results show that the finite element method is able to model the high-order guided wave propagation in the steel wire. The agreement between the experiment and theory has demonstrated that the HOLGW is a potential candidate for the damage detection in anchorage zones of stayed-cables.

  2. [Brain radiation necrosis after stereotactic radiotherapy of the resection cavity for intracranial metastases: analysis of the literature from four cases].

    PubMed

    Doré, M; Lefebvre, L; Delpon, G; Thillays, F

    2015-04-01

    Stereotactic hypofractionated radiotherapy after resection of brain metastasis is an alternative to whole brain radiotherapy. A high dose per fraction is associated with a risk of radiation necrosis. We present four cases of confirmed histological radiation necrosis. Differentiating recurrent tumour from radiation necrosis in this scenario is challenging. An enhancing area in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with a "cut bell pepper" appearance may suggest radiation necrosis. Advanced imaging modalities such as perfusion MR imaging and positron emission tomography can be useful. Dosimetric predictors of the occurrence of radiation necrosis after stereotactic hypofractionated radiotherapy are poorly understood and require prospective studies on larger cohorts.

  3. Complications from Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kang, Kylie H; Okoye, Christian C; Patel, Ravi B; Siva, Shankar; Biswas, Tithi; Ellis, Rodney J; Yao, Min; Machtay, Mitchell; Lo, Simon S

    2015-06-15

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) has become a standard treatment option for early stage, node negative non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in patients who are either medically inoperable or refuse surgical resection. SBRT has high local control rates and a favorable toxicity profile relative to other surgical and non-surgical approaches. Given the excellent tumor control rates and increasing utilization of SBRT, recent efforts have focused on limiting toxicity while expanding treatment to increasingly complex patients. We review toxicities from SBRT for lung cancer, including central airway, esophageal, vascular (e.g., aorta), lung parenchyma (e.g., radiation pneumonitis), and chest wall toxicities, as well as radiation-induced neuropathies (e.g., brachial plexus, vagus nerve and recurrent laryngeal nerve). We summarize patient-related, tumor-related, dosimetric characteristics of these toxicities, review published dose constraints, and propose strategies to reduce such complications.

  4. Stereotactic body radiotherapy: a critical review for nonradiation oncologists.

    PubMed

    Kirkpatrick, John P; Kelsey, Christopher R; Palta, Manisha; Cabrera, Alvin R; Salama, Joseph K; Patel, Pretesh; Perez, Bradford A; Lee, Jason; Yin, Fang-Fang

    2014-04-01

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) involves the treatment of extracranial primary tumors or metastases with a few, high doses of ionizing radiation. In SBRT, tumor kill is maximized and dose to surrounding tissue is minimized, by precise and accurate delivery of multiple radiation beams to the target. This is particularly challenging, because extracranial lesions often move with respiration and are irregular in shape, requiring careful treatment planning and continual management of this motion and patient position during irradiation. This review presents the rationale, process workflow, and technology for the safe and effective administration of SBRT, as well as the indications, outcome, and limitations for this technique in the treatment of lung cancer, liver cancer, and metastatic disease.

  5. New developments in intracranial stereotactic radiotherapy for metastases.

    PubMed

    Pinkham, M B; Whitfield, G A; Brada, M

    2015-05-01

    Brain metastases are common and the prognosis for patients with multiple brain metastases treated with whole brain radiotherapy is limited. As systemic disease control continues to improve, the expectations of radiotherapy for brain metastases are growing. Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) as a high precision localised irradiation given in a single fraction prolongs survival in patients with a single brain metastasis and functional independence in those with up to three brain metastases. SRS technology has become commonplace and is available in many radiation oncology and neurosurgery departments. With increasing use there is a need for appropriate patient selection, refinement of dose-fractionation and safe integration of SRS with other treatment modalities. We review the evidence for current practice and new developments in the field, with a specific focus on patient-relevant outcomes.

  6. Normal tissue toxicity after small field hypofractionated stereotactic body radiation

    PubMed Central

    Milano, Michael T; Constine, Louis S; Okunieff, Paul

    2008-01-01

    Stereotactic body radiation (SBRT) is an emerging tool in radiation oncology in which the targeting accuracy is improved via the detection and processing of a three-dimensional coordinate system that is aligned to the target. With improved targeting accuracy, SBRT allows for the minimization of normal tissue volume exposed to high radiation dose as well as the escalation of fractional dose delivery. The goal of SBRT is to minimize toxicity while maximizing tumor control. This review will discuss the basic principles of SBRT, the radiobiology of hypofractionated radiation and the outcome from published clinical trials of SBRT, with a focus on late toxicity after SBRT. While clinical data has shown SBRT to be safe in most circumstances, more data is needed to refine the ideal dose-volume metrics. PMID:18976463

  7. Extent of perilesional edema differentiates radionecrosis from tumor recurrence following stereotactic radiosurgery for brain metastases.

    PubMed

    Leeman, Jonathan E; Clump, David A; Flickinger, John C; Mintz, Arlan H; Burton, Steven A; Heron, Dwight E

    2013-12-01

    Differentiation of tumor recurrence from radionecrosis is a critical step in the follow-up management of patients treated with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for brain metastases. A method that can reliably differentiate tumor recurrence from radiation necrosis using standard MR sequences would be of significant value. We analyzed the records of 49 patients with 52 brain metastases treated with SRS who subsequently underwent surgical resection of the same lesion. Forty-seven of the lesions had preoperative MRI available for review (90%), including T1 postcontrast, T2, and fluid attenuated inversion recovery sequences. Pre-SRS and preoperative lesion and edema volumes were manually contoured and measured in a blinded fashion using radiation treatment planning software. A neuropathologist analyzed samples for the presence of tumor and/or radiation necrosis. Longer time between SRS and resection (P < .001) and a larger edema/lesion volume ratio (high T2/T1c, P = .002) were found to be predictive of radionecrosis as opposed to tumor recurrence. Using a cutoff value of 10 for the edema/lesion volume ratio, we were able to predict the presence of tumor with a positive predictive value of 92%, which increased to 100% when looking only at patients who underwent resection <18 months following SRS. On follow-up imaging, lesions with a high edema/lesion volume ratio and lesions that progress later after SRS are more likely to contain radionecrosis. These indices may help guide clinical decision making in the context of evolving lesions after SRS for brain metastases and thereby avoid unnecessary interventions.

  8. BiopSee® – transperineal stereotactic navigated prostate biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Sakas, Georgios; Rösch, Woerner; Baltas, Dimos

    2011-01-01

    In the recent years, prostate cancer was the most commonly diagnosed cancer in men. Currently secure diagnosis confirmation is done by a transrectal biopsy and following histopathological examination. Conventional transrectal biopsy success rates are rather low with ca. 30% detection upon the first and ca 20% after re-biopsy. The paper presents a novel system for stereotactic navigated prostate biopsy. The approach results into higher accuracy, reproducibility and unrestricted and effective access to all prostate regions. Custom designed ultrasound, new template design and integrated 2-axes stepper allows superior 2D and 3D prostate imaging quality and precise needle navigation. DICOM functionality and image fusion enable to import pre-operative datasets (e.g. multiparametric MRI, targets etc.) and overlay all available radiological information into the biopsy planning and guiding procedure. The biopsy needle insertion itself is performed under augmented reality ultrasound guidance. Each procedure step is automatically documented in order to provide quality assurance and permit data re-usage for the further treatment. First clinical results indicates success rates of ca. 70% by first biopsies by our approach. PMID:27895675

  9. A Virtual Frame System for Stereotactic Radiosurgery Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, Eric Purger, David; Tryggestad, Erik; McNutt, Todd; Christodouleas, John; Rigamonti, Daniele; Shokek, Ori; Won Sang; Zhou, Jessica; Lim, Michael; Wong, John; Kleinberg, Larry

    2008-11-15

    Purpose: We describe a computerized (or virtual) model of a stereotactic head frame to enable planning prior to the day of radiosurgery. The location of the virtual frame acts as a guide to frame placement on the day of the procedure. Methods and Materials: The software consists of a triangular mesh representation of the essential frame hardware that can be overlaid with any MR scan of the patient and manipulated in three dimensions. The software calculates regions of the head that will actually be accessible for treatment, subject to the geometric constraints of the Leksell Gamma Knife hardware. DICOM-compliant MR images with virtual fiducial markers overlaid onto the image can then be generated for recognition by the treatment planning system. Results: Retrospective evaluation of the software on 24 previously treated patients shows a mean deviation of the position of the virtual frame from the actual frame position of 1.6 {+-} 1.3 mm. Initial clinical use on five patients indicates an average discrepancy of the virtual frame location and the actual frame location of <1 mm. MR images with virtual fiducial markers can be imported into radiosurgical treatment planning software and used to generate an initial treatment plan. Conclusions: The virtual frame provides a tool for prospective determination of lesion accessibility, optimization of the frame placement, and treatment planning before the day of the procedure. This promises to shorten overall treatment times, improve patient comfort, and reduce the need for repeat treatments due to suboptimally placed frames.

  10. Stereotactic guidance for navigated percutaneous sacroiliac joint fusion.

    PubMed

    Lee, Darrin J; Kim, Sung-Bum; Rosenthal, Philip; Panchal, Ripul R; Kim, Kee D

    2016-03-01

    Arthrodesis of the sacroiliac joint (SIJ) for surgical treatment of SIJ dysfunction has regained interest among spine specialists. Current techniques described in the literature most often utilize intraoperative fluoroscopy to aid in implant placement; however, image guidance for SIJ fusion may allow for minimally invasive percutaneous instrumentation with more precise implant placement. In the following cases, we performed percutaneous stereotactic navigated sacroiliac instrumentation using O-arm(®) multidimensional surgical imaging with StealthStation(®) navigation (Medtronic, Inc. Minneapolis, MN). Patients were positioned prone and an image-guidance reference frame was placed contralateral to the surgical site. O-arm(®) integrated with StealthStation(®) allowed immediate auto-registration. The skin incision was planned with an image-guidance probe. An image-guided awl, drill and tap were utilized to choose a starting point and trajectory. Threaded titanium cage(s) packed with autograft and/or allograft were then placed. O-arm(®) image-guidance allowed for implant placement in the SIJ with a small skin incision. However, we could not track the cage depth position with our current system, and in one patient, the SIJ cage had to be revised secondary to the anterior breach of sacrum. © 2016 by the Journal of Biomedical Research. All rights reserved.

  11. Stereotactic guidance for navigated percutaneous sacroiliac joint fusion

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Darrin J.; Kim, Sung-Bum; Rosenthal, Philip; Panchal, Ripul R.; Kim, Kee D.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Arthrodesis of the sacroiliac joint (SIJ) for surgical treatment of SIJ dysfunction has regained interest among spine specialists. Current techniques described in the literature most often utilize intraoperative fluoroscopy to aid in implant placement; however, image guidance for SIJ fusion may allow for minimally invasive percutaneous instrumentation with more precise implant placement. In the following cases, we performed percutaneous stereotactic navigated sacroiliac instrumentation using O-arm® multidimensional surgical imaging with StealthStation® navigation (Medtronic, Inc. Minneapolis, MN). Patients were positioned prone and an image-guidance reference frame was placed contralateral to the surgical site. O-arm® integrated with StealthStation® allowed immediate auto-registration. The skin incision was planned with an image-guidance probe. An image-guided awl, drill and tap were utilized to choose a starting point and trajectory. Threaded titanium cage(s) packed with autograft and/or allograft were then placed. O-arm® image-guidance allowed for implant placement in the SIJ with a small skin incision. However, we could not track the cage depth position with our current system, and in one patient, the SIJ cage had to be revised secondary to the anterior breach of sacrum. PMID:28270652

  12. High-frequency guided ultrasonic waves to monitor corrosion thickness loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fromme, Paul; Bernhard, Fabian; Masserey, Bernard

    2017-02-01

    Corrosion due to adverse environmental conditions can occur for a range of industrial structures, e.g., ships and offshore oil platforms. Pitting corrosion and generalized corrosion can lead to the reduction of the strength and thus degradation of the structural integrity. The nondestructive detection and monitoring of corrosion damage in difficult to access areas can be achieved using high frequency guided ultrasonic waves propagating along the structure. Using standard ultrasonic transducers with single sided access to the structure, the two fundamental Lamb wave modes were selectively generated simultaneously, penetrating through the complete thickness of the structure. The wave propagation and interference of the guided wave modes depends on the thickness of the structure. Numerical simulations were performed using a 2D Finite Difference Method (FDM) algorithm in order to visualize the guided wave propagation and energy transfer across the plate thickness. Laboratory experiments were conducted and the wall thickness reduced initially uniformly by milling of the steel structure. Further measurements were conducted using accelerated corrosion in salt water. From the measured signal change due to the wave mode interference, the wall thickness reduction was monitored and good agreement with theoretical predictions was achieved. Corrosion can lead to non-uniform thickness reduction and the influence of this on the propagation of the high frequency guided ultrasonic waves was investigated. The wave propagation in a steel specimen with varying thickness was measured experimentally and the influence on the wave propagation characteristics quantified.

  13. The comparative accuracy of the ROSA stereotactic robot across a wide range of clinical applications and registration techniques.

    PubMed

    Brandmeir, Nicholas J; Savaliya, Sandip; Rohatgi, Pratik; Sather, Michael

    2017-05-08

    Robot-assisted stereotactic neurosurgery is an emerging technology with a growing range of applications. The ROSA system is a robotic stereotactic system that has been shown to be accurate in laboratory studies and large case series. The goal of this study was to examine the accuracy of the ROSA across different registration methods as well as different clinical applications. Sixteen patients with one hundred and seventeen stereotactic trajectories were examined. Accuracy was compared by measuring the distance between the trajectory target and the actual termination of the device as determined by imaging. Entry error and angular deviation were also measured. Variables included bone fiducials vs. laser facial scanning, the clinical indication for stereotactic surgery, and the effect of lead deflection on accuracy. Bone fiducials did not offer an accuracy benefit over laser facial scanning (mean target error 4.5-3.9 mm, p = 0.34) in these clinical scenarios. Laser interstitial thermal therapy, responsive neurostimulation, and stereo electroencephalography were equally accurate when placed by the ROSA (mean target error 4.4-4.3-4.0 mm, respectively, p = 0.69). Deflection did not affect lead accuracy (mean target error 4.4-3.9 mm, p = 0.11). Similar results are seen for entry error and angular deviation. ROSA is a highly accurate stereotactic system. Laser facial scanning provides the same accuracy as bone fiducials in these stereotactic applications. The ROSA is equally accurate across a wide spectrum of applications. The ROSA is effective at limiting lead deflection, and when it does occur, it does not impact target accuracy in a significant way.

  14. Life Experience Unit Guide Developed for Junior High and High School Resource Room Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorhman, Mary H.; Riker, Jerry

    The life experience unit guide, which is intended to be used with emotionally unstable adolescents and which offers selected activities for an integrated language arts, science, and social studies curriculum, is described. Provided for the language arts strand are forms such as sentence completion forms, a feeling checklist, a self evaluation…

  15. Dosimetric impact of a frame-based strategy in stereotactic radiotherapy of lung tumors.

    PubMed

    Waldeland, Einar; Ramberg, Christina; Arnesen, Marius Røthe; Helland, Aslaug; Brustugun, Odd Terje; Malinen, Eirik

    2012-05-01

    Technological innovations have taken stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) from frame-based strategies to image-guided strategies. In this study, cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images acquired prior to SBRT of patients with lung tumors was used to study the dosimetric impact of a pure frame-based strategy. Thirty patients with inoperable lung tumors were retrospectively analyzed. All patients had received CBCT-guided SBRT with 3 fractions of 15 Gy to the planning target volume (PTV) margin including immobilization in a stereotactic body frame (SBF). Using the set-up corrections from the co-registration of the CBCT with the planning CT, all individual dose plans were recalculated with an isocenter position equal to the initial set-up position. Dose Volume Histogram (DVH) parameters of the recalculated dose plans were then analyzed. The simulated plans showed that 88% of all fractions resulted in minimum 14.5 Gy to the internal target volume (ITV). For the simulated summed treatment (3 fractions per patient), 83% of the patients would minimum receive the prescription dose (45 Gy) to 100% of the ITV and all except one would receive the prescription dose to more than 90% of the ITV. SBRT including SBF, but without image guidance, results in appropriate dose coverage in most cases, using the current margins. With image guidance, margins for SBRT of lung tumors could possibly be reduced.

  16. Hyperfractionated stereotactic reirradiation for recurrent head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Cvek, Jakub; Knybel, Lukas; Skacelikova, Eva; Stransky, Jiri; Matousek, Petr; Zelenik, Karol; Res, Oldrich; Otahal, Bretislav; Molenda, Lukas; Feltl, David

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this work was to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of hyperfractionated stereotactic reirradiation (re-RT) as a treatment for inoperable, recurrent, or second primary head and neck squamous cell cancer (HNSCC) that is not suitable for systemic treatment. Forty patients with recurrent or second primary HNSCC were included in this study. The patients had a median gross tumor volume of 76 ml (range 14-193 ml) and a previous radiotherapy dose greater than 60 Gy. Treatment was designed to cover 95 % of the planning target volume (PTV, defined as gross tumor volume [GTV] + 3 mm to account for microscopic spreading, with no additional set-up margin) with the prescribed dose (48 Gy in 16 fractions b.i.d.). Treatment was administered twice daily with a minimum 6 h gap. Uninvolved lymph nodes were not irradiated. Treatment was completed as planned for all patients (with median duration of 11 days, range 9-14 days). Acute toxicity was evaluated using the RTOG/EORTC scale. A 37 % incidence of grade 3 mucositis was observed, with recovery time of ≤ 4 weeks for all of these patients. Acute skin toxicity was never observed to be higher than grade 2. Late toxicity was also evaluated according to the RTOG/EORTC scale. Mandible radionecrosis was seen in 4 cases (10 %); however, neither carotid blowout syndrome nor other grade 4 late toxicity occurred. One-year overall survival (OS) and local progression-free survival (L-PFS) were found to be 33 and 44 %, respectively. Performance status and GTV proved to be significant prognostic factors regarding local control and survival. Hyperfractionated stereotactic re-RT is a reasonable treatment option for patients with recurrent/second primary HNSCC who were previously exposed to high-dose irradiation and who are not candidates for systemic treatment or hypofractionation.

  17. Clinical outcomes of single dose stereotactic radiotherapy for lung metastases.

    PubMed

    Osti, Mattia F; Carnevale, Alessia; Valeriani, Maurizio; De Sanctis, Vitaliana; Minniti, Giuseppe; Cortesi, Enrico; Martelli, Massimo; Maurizi Enrici, Riccardo

    2013-11-01

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy is an emerging noninvasive technique for the treatment of oligometastatic cancer. The use of small numbers of large doses achieve a high percentage of local control. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of SBRT for the treatment of lung metastases in a cohort of patients treated between 2008 and 2012 at our institution. A total of 66 patients with oligometastatic lung tumors (single pulmonary nodules in 40 patients; 61%) were included in the study. SBRT was performed with a stereotactic body frame and a 3-D conformal technique. Forty-nine central tumors received 23 Gy in a single fraction and 54 peripheral tumors received a dose of 30 Gy in a single fraction. The primary end point was local control; secondary end points were survival and toxicity. Median follow-up was 15 months (range, 3-45 months). Local control rates at 1 and 2 years were 89.1% and 82.1%, overall survival rates were 76.4% and 31.2%, cancer-specific survival rates were 78.5% and 35.4%, and progression-free survival rates were 53.9% and 22%, respectively. Median survival time was 12 months, and median progression-free survival time was 10 months. Toxicity profiles were good, with 2 cases of Grade 3 toxicity (pneumonitis). SBRT is an effective and safe local treatment option for patients with lung metastases, although it remains investigational; longer follow-up to confirm results is required. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Spine Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy: Indications, Outcomes, and Points of Caution

    PubMed Central

    Eppinga, Wietse; Charest-Morin, Raphaele; Soliman, Hany; Myrehaug, Sten; Maralani, Pejman Jabehdar; Campbell, Mikki; Lee, Young K.; Fisher, Charles; Fehlings, Michael G.; Chang, Eric L.; Lo, Simon S.; Sahgal, Arjun

    2017-01-01

    Study Design: A broad narrative review. Objectives: The objective of this article is to provide a technical review of spine stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) planning and delivery, indications for treatment, outcomes, complications, and the challenges of response assessment. The surgical approach to spinal metastases is discussed with an overview of emerging minimally invasive techniques. Methods: A comprehensive review of the literature was conducted on the techniques, outcomes, and developments in SBRT and surgery for spinal metastases. Results: The optimal management of patients with spinal metastases is complex and requires multidisciplinary assessment from an oncologic team that is familiar with the shifting paradigm as a consequence of evolving techniques in surgery and stereotactic radiation, as well as new developments in systemic agents. The Spinal Instability Neoplastic Score and the epidural spinal cord compression (Bilsky) grading system are useful tools that facilitate communication among oncologic team members and can direct management by providing a baseline assessment of risks prior to therapy. The combined multimodality approach with “separation surgery” followed by postoperative spine SBRT achieves thecal sac decompression, improves tumor control, and avoids complications that may be associated with more extensive surgery. Conclusion: Spine SBRT is a highly effective treatment that is capable of delivering ablative doses to the target while sparing the critical organs-at-risk, chiefly the critical neural tissues, within a short and manageable schedule. At the same time, surgery occupies an important role in select patients, particularly with the expanding availability and expertise in minimally invasive techniques. With rapid adoption of spine SBRT in centers outside of the academic setting, it is imperative for the practicing oncologist to understand the relevance and application of these evolving concepts. PMID:28507888

  19. Invited review article: high-speed flexure-guided nanopositioning: mechanical design and control issues.

    PubMed

    Yong, Y K; Moheimani, S O R; Kenton, B J; Leang, K K

    2012-12-01

    Recent interest in high-speed scanning probe microscopy for high-throughput applications including video-rate atomic force microscopy and probe-based nanofabrication has sparked attention on the development of high-bandwidth flexure-guided nanopositioning systems (nanopositioners). Such nanopositioners are designed to move samples with sub-nanometer resolution with positioning bandwidth in the kilohertz range. State-of-the-art designs incorporate uniquely designed flexure mechanisms driven by compact and stiff piezoelectric actuators. This paper surveys key advances in mechanical design and control of dynamic effects and nonlinearities, in the context of high-speed nanopositioning. Future challenges and research topics are also discussed.

  20. Benefit and Complications of Frame-Based Stereotactic Biopsy in Old and Very Old Patients.

    PubMed

    Quick-Weller, Johanna; Tichy, Julia; Dinc, Nazife; Tritt, Stephanie; Won, Sae-Yeon; Behmanesh, Bedjan; Bruder, Markus; Seifert, Volker; Weise, Lutz M; Marquardt, Gerhard

    2017-06-01

    Stereotactic biopsy is an everyday procedure implemented in numerous neurosurgical departments. The procedure is performed to obtain tumor tissue of unclear diagnosis. Going in hand with low complication rates and high diagnostic yield, stereotactic biopsies can be performed in adults and children likewise for histopathologic evaluation of lesions in eloquent localizations. However, little is known about whether aged patients do benefit from stereotactic biopsy or rather the therapy that is derived from histopathologic results. In this study, we therefore focused on old (80-84 years) and very old patients (85 years and older) to evaluate whether stereotactic biopsy should be performed leading to further therapy. We also assessed the complication rates of the procedure in this aged population. We performed a retrospective analysis of our database and included all patients older than 80 years who underwent stereotactic biopsy at our department from October 2005 until May 2016. Forty-seven patients were included in this study. These patients were divided into 2 subgroups: group 1 consisted of patients from 80 to 84 years old and group 2 of patients aged 85 years and older. All patients underwent stereotactic biopsy to establish histopathologic diagnosis. We excluded patients who underwent cyst puncture or puncture of a hemorrhage because the procedure was not performed for diagnostic purposes. We assessed gender, neuroradiologic diagnosis, Karnofsky Performance Score (KPS), number of tissue samples taken, histopathologic diagnosis, localization, postoperative hemorrhage, modality of anesthesia anticoagulation, and further therapy. Group 1 consisted of 34 patients and group 2 of 13 patients. KPS was 80 and 70, respectively. A histopathologic diagnosis was possible in all but 1 patient. In group 1, 61.8% of the patients agreed to further postoperative therapy (radiation, 35.3%; chemotherapy, 11.8%; combined radiochemotherapy, 11.8%; complication that prevented therapy

  1. Frameless Angiogram-Based Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Treatment of Arteriovenous Malformations

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Xingqi; Mahadevan, Anand; Mathiowitz, George; Lin, Pei-Jan P.; Thomas, Ajith; Kasper, Ekkehard M.; Floyd, Scott R.; Holupka, Edward; La Rosa, Salvatore; Wang, Frank; Stevenson, Mary Ann

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is an effective alternative to microsurgical resection or embolization for definitive treatment of arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). Digital subtraction angiography (DSA) is the gold standard for pretreatment diagnosis and characterization of vascular anatomy, but requires rigid frame (skull) immobilization when used in combination with SRS. With the advent of advanced proton and image-guided photon delivery systems, SRS treatment is increasingly migrating to frameless platforms, which are incompatible with frame-based DSA. Without DSA as the primary image, target definition may be less than optimal, in some cases precluding the ability to treat with a frameless system. This article reports a novel solution. Methods and Materials: Fiducial markers are implanted into the patient's skull before angiography. Angiography is performed according to the standard clinical protocol, but, in contrast to the previous practice, without the rigid frame. Separate images of a specially designed localizer box are subsequently obtained. A target volume projected on DSA can be transferred to the localizer system in three dimensions, and in turn be transferred to multiple CT slices using the implanted fiducials. Combined with other imaging modalities, this 'virtual frame' approach yields a highly precise treatment plan that can be delivered by frameless SRS technologies. Results: Phantom measurements for point and volume targets have been performed. The overall uncertainty of placing a point target to CT is 0.4 mm. For volume targets, deviation of the transformed contour from the target CT image is within 0.6 mm. The algorithm and software are robust. The method has been applied clinically, with reliable results. Conclusions: A novel and reproducible method for frameless SRS of AVMs has been developed that enables the use of DSA without the requirement for rigid immobilization. Multiple pairs of DSA can be used for better conformality

  2. Results of patient specific quality assurance for patients undergoing stereotactic ablative radiotherapy for lung lesions.

    PubMed

    Hardcastle, Nicholas; Clements, Natalie; Chesson, Brent; Aarons, Yolanda; Cramb, Jim; Siva, Shankar; Wanigaratne, Derrick M; Ball, David; Kron, Tomas

    2014-03-01

    Hypofractionated image guided radiotherapy of extracranial targets has become increasingly popular as a treatment modality for inoperable patients with one or more small lesions, often referred to as stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SABR). This report details the results of the physical quality assurance (QA) program used for the first 33 lung cancer SABR radiotherapy 3D conformal treatment plans in our centre. SABR involves one or few fractions of high radiation dose delivered in many small fields or arcs with tight margins to mobile targets often delivered through heterogeneous media with non-coplanar beams. We have conducted patient-specific QA similar to the more common intensity modulated radiotherapy QA with particular reference to motion management. Individual patient QA was performed in a Perspex phantom using point dose verification with an ionisation chamber and radiochromic film for verification of the dose distribution both with static and moving detectors to verify motion management strategies. While individual beams could vary by up to 7%, the total dose in the target was found to be within ±2% of the prescribed dose for all 33 plans. Film measurements showed qualitative and quantitative agreement between planned and measured isodose line shapes and dimensions. The QA process highlighted the need to account for couch transmission and demonstrated that the ITV construction was appropriate for the treatment technique used. QA is essential for complex radiotherapy deliveries such as SABR. We found individual patient QA helpful in setting up the technique and understanding potential weaknesses in SABR workflow, thus providing confidence in SABR delivery.

  3. A Rabbit Irradiation Platform for Outcome Assessment of Lung Stereotactic Radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Cai Jing; Mata, Jaime F.; Orton, Matthew D.; Hagspiel, Klaus D.; Mugler, John P.; Larner, James M.; Sheng Ke; Read, Paul W.

    2009-04-01

    Purpose: To evaluate a helical tomotherapy-based rodent radiosurgery platform that reproduces human image-guided radiosurgery treatment to study radiobiologic effects of stereotactic radiosurgery on lung tissues using functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods and Materials: Hypofractionated radisourgery (20 Gy x 3) was delivered to the right lung of three New Zealand rabbits using Helical TomoTherapy with MVCT image guidance. Contrast-enhanced MR perfusion, hyperpolarized helium-3 MR ventilation, and CT were obtained before radiation and monthly for 4 months after radiation. All MRI was performed on a 1.5-T whole-body scanner with broad-band capabilities. Results: Precise dose delivery to 1.6 cc of the lower right lung was achieved without additional immobilization. No deficits were detected at baseline with respect to perfusion and ventilation. Lung perfusion deficits in the irradiated lung regions began at 2 months after radiation and worsened with time. No ventilation deficits were observed after radiation. Decrease in lung CT density in irradiated regions was observed after radiation, but the changes were less significant than those in perfusion MRI. Conclusions: We demonstrated that highly conformal radiation can be reproducibly delivered to a small volume of rodent lung on a widely available clinical unit. The radiation-induced lung injury can be detected as early as 2 months after radiation with perfusion MRI. The primary pattern of injury agrees with previously reported endothelial damage to radiosurgical radiation doses. This experimental design provides a cost-effective methodology for producing radiosurgical injuries in rodents that reproduces current human treatments for studying radiation injury and agents that might affect it.

  4. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Localized Prostate Cancer: Interim Results of a Prospective Phase II Clinical Trial

    SciTech Connect

    King, Christopher R. Brooks, James D.; Gill, Harcharan; Pawlicki, Todd; Cotrutz, Cristian; Presti, Joseph C.

    2009-03-15

    Purpose: The radiobiology of prostate cancer favors a hypofractionated dose regimen. We report results of a prospective Phase II clinical trial of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Forty-one low-risk prostate cancer patients with 6 months' minimum follow-up received 36.25 Gy in five fractions of 7.25 Gy with image-guided SBRT alone using the CyberKnife. The early (<3 months) and late (>6 months) urinary and rectal toxicities were assessed using validated quality of life questionnaires (International Prostate Symptom Score, Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite) and the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) toxicity criteria. Patterns of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) response are analyzed. Results: The median follow-up was 33 months. There were no RTOG Grade 4 acute or late rectal/urinary complications. There were 2 patients with RTOG Grade 3 late urinary toxicity and none with RTOG Grade 3 rectal complications. A reduced rate of severe rectal toxicities was observed with every-other-day vs. 5 consecutive days treatment regimen (0% vs. 38%, p = 0.0035). A benign PSA bounce (median, 0.4 ng/mL) was observed in 12 patients (29%) occurring at 18 months (median) after treatment. At last follow-up, no patient has had a PSA failure regardless of biochemical failure definition. Of 32 patients with 12 months minimum follow-up, 25 patients (78%) achieved a PSA nadir {<=}0.4 ng/mL. A PSA decline to progressively lower nadirs up to 3 years after treatment was observed. Conclusions: The early and late toxicity profile and PSA response for prostate SBRT are highly encouraging. Continued accrual and follow-up will be necessary to confirm durable biochemical control rates and low toxicity profiles.

  5. The first formulation of image-based stereotactic principles: the forgotten work of Gaston Contremoulins.

    PubMed

    Giller, Cole A; Mornet, Patrick; Moreau, Jean-François

    2017-02-17

    Although image-based human stereotaxis began with Spiegel and Wycis in 1947, the major principles of radiographic stereotaxis were formulated 50 years earlier by the French scientific photographer Gaston Contremoulins. In 1897, frustrated by the high morbidity of bullet extraction from the brain, the Parisian surgeon Charles Rémy asked Contremoulins to devise a method for bullet localization using the then new technology of x-rays. In doing so, Contremoulins conceived of many of the modern principles of stereotaxis, including the use of a reference frame, radiopaque fiducials for registration, images to locate the target in relation to the frame, phantom devices to locate the target in relation to the fiducial marks, and the use of an adjustable pointer to guide the surgical approach. Contremoulins' ideas did not emerge from science or medicine, but instead were inspired by his training in the fine arts. Had he been a physician instead of an artist, he might have never discovered his extraordinary methods. Contremoulins' "compass" and its variants enjoyed great success during World War I, but were abandoned by 1920 for simpler methods. Although Contremoulins was one of the most eminent radiographers in France, he was not a physician, and his personality was uncompromising. By 1940, both he and his methods were forgotten. It was not until 1988 that he was rediscovered by Moreau while reviewing the history of French radiology, and chronicled by Mornet in his extensive biography. The authors examine Contremoulins' stereotactic methods in historical context, describe the details of his devices, relate his discoveries to his training in the fine arts, and discuss how his prescient formulation of stereotaxis was forgotten for more than half a century.

  6. Clinical accuracy of ExacTrac intracranial frameless stereotactic system

    SciTech Connect

    Ackerly, T.; Lancaster, C. M.; Geso, M.; Roxby, K. J.

    2011-09-15

    Purpose: In this paper, the authors assess the accuracy of the Brainlab ExacTrac system for frameless intracranial stereotactic treatments in clinical practice. Methods: They recorded couch angle and image fusion results (comprising lateral, longitudinal, and vertical shifts, and rotation corrections about these axes) for 109 stereotactic radiosurgery and 166 stereotactic radiotherapy patient treatments. Frameless stereotactic treatments involve iterative 6D image fusion corrections applied until the results conform to customizable pass criteria, theirs being 0.7 mm and 0.5 deg. for each axis. The planning CT slice thickness was 1.25 mm. It has been reported in the literature that the CT slices' thickness impacts the accuracy of localization to bony anatomy. The principle of invariance with respect to patient orientation was used to determine spatial accuracy. Results: The data for radiosurgery comprised 927 image pairs, of which 532 passed (pass ratio of 57.4%). The data for radiotherapy comprised 15983 image pairs, of which 10 050 passed (pass ratio of 62.9%). For stereotactic radiotherapy, the combined uncertainty of ExacTrac calibration, image fusion, and intrafraction motion was (95% confidence interval) 0.290-0.302 and 0.306-0.319 mm in the longitudinal and lateral axes, respectively. The combined uncertainty of image fusion and intrafraction motion in the anterior-posterior coordinates was 0.174-0.182 mm. For stereotactic radiosurgery, the equivalent ranges are 0.323-0.393, 0.337-0.409, and 0.231-0.281 mm. The overall spatial accuracy was 1.24 mm for stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) and 1.35 mm for stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Conclusions: The ExacTrac intracranial frameless stereotactic system spatial accuracy is adequate for clinical practice, and with the same pass criteria, SRT is more accurate than SRS. They now use frameless stereotaxy exclusively at their center.

  7. High-density polytetrafluoroethylene membranes in guided bone and tissue regeneration procedures: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Carbonell, J M; Martín, I Sanz; Santos, A; Pujol, A; Sanz-Moliner, J D; Nart, J

    2014-01-01

    Expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (e-PTFE) has been used successfully as a membrane barrier for regeneration procedures. However, when exposed to the oral cavity, its high porosity increases the risk of early infection, which can affect surgical outcomes. An alternative to e-PTFE is non-expanded and dense polytetrafluoroethylene (n-PFTE), which results in lower levels of early infection following surgical procedures. The aim of this literature review was to analyze and describe the available literature on n-PFTE, report the indications for use, advantages, disadvantages, surgical protocols, and complications. The medical databases Medline-PubMed and Cochrane Library were searched and supplemented with a hand search for reports published between 1980 and May 2012 on n-PTFE membranes. The search strategy was limited to animal, human, and in vitro studies in dental journals published in English. Twenty-four articles that analyzed the use of n-PTFE as a barrier membrane for guided tissue regeneration and guided bone regeneration around teeth and implants were identified: two in vitro studies, seven experimental studies, and 15 clinical studies. There is limited clinical and histological evidence for the use of n-PTFE membranes at present, with some indications in guided tissue regeneration and guided bone regeneration in immediate implants and fresh extraction sockets.

  8. 3D Surgical Printing Cutting Guides for Open-Wedge High Tibial Osteotomy: Do It Yourself.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Mañanes, Rubén; Burró, Juan Arnal; Manaute, Jose Rojo; Rodriguez, Francisco Chana; Martín, Javier Vaquero

    2016-11-01

    Opening wedge osteotomy has recently gained popularity, thanks to the recent implementation of locking plates, which have shown equivalent stability with greater reproducibility, accuracy, and longevity than the closing wedge techniques and a lower prosthetic conversion rate. We present a new "do-it-yourself" cutting guides system for tibial opening osteotomy. Using a conventional computed tomography digital image, a positioning guide and wedge spacers were printed in three dimensions (3D) for implementing the osteotomy and obtaining the planned correction. The surgeon makes the whole process in a do-it-yourself style. This new technique was used in eight cases. Previous opening osteotomies with the standard technique were used as control (20 cases). Surgical time, fluoroscopic time, and accuracy of the axial correction were measured. The use of a custom positioning guide reduced the surgical (31 minutes less) and fluoroscopic times (6.9 times less) while achieving a high-axis correction accuracy compared with the standard technique. Digitally planned and executed osteotomies under 3D printed osteotomy positioning guides help the surgeon to minimize human error while reducing surgical time. The reproducibility of this technique is very robust, allowing a transfer of the steps planned in a virtual environment to the operating table.

  9. Dual mode stereotactic localization method and application

    DOEpatents

    Keppel, Cynthia E.; Barbosa, Fernando Jorge; Majewski, Stanislaw

    2002-01-01

    The invention described herein combines the structural digital X-ray image provided by conventional stereotactic core biopsy instruments with the additional functional metabolic gamma imaging obtained with a dedicated compact gamma imaging mini-camera. Before the procedure, the patient is injected with an appropriate radiopharmaceutical. The radiopharmaceutical uptake distribution within the breast under compression in a conventional examination table expressed by the intensity of gamma emissions is obtained for comparison (co-registration) with the digital mammography (X-ray) image. This dual modality mode of operation greatly increases the functionality of existing stereotactic biopsy devices by yielding a much smaller number of false positives than would be produced using X-ray images alone. The ability to obtain both the X-ray mammographic image and the nuclear-based medicine gamma image using a single device is made possible largely through the use of a novel, small and movable gamma imaging camera that permits its incorporation into the same table or system as that currently utilized to obtain X-ray based mammographic images for localization of lesions.

  10. [Frameless stereotactic biopsy: diagnostic yield and complications].

    PubMed

    Castle, Maria; Nájera, Edinson; Samprón, Nicolas; Bollar, Alicia; Urreta, Iratxe; Urculo, Enrique

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the variables that could modify the diagnostic yield of frameless stereotactic biopsy, as well as its complications. This was a retrospective study of frameless stereotactic biopsies carried out between July 2008 and December 2011 at Donostia University Hospital. The variables studied were size, distance to the cortex, contrast uptake and location. A total of 70 patients were included (75 biopsies); 39 males and 31 females with an age range between 39 and 83 years. The total diagnostic yield in our series was 97.1%. For lesions >19mm, the technique offered a sensitivity of 95.2% (95% CI: 86.9-98.4) and specificity of 57.1% (95% CI: 25.0-84.2). The yield was lower for lesions within 17mm of the cortex: sensitivity of 74.6% (95% CI: 62.1-84.7) and specificity of 71.4% (95% CI: 29.0-96.3). Seven (10%) patients developed complications after the first biopsy and none after the second. The diagnostic yield was lower for lesions less than 2cm in size and located superficially. In this series we did not observe an increased rate of complications after a second biopsy. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  11. Survival after stereotactic biopsy of malignant gliomas

    SciTech Connect

    Coffey, R.J.; Lunsford, L.D.; Taylor, F.H.

    1988-03-01

    For many patients with malignant gliomas in inaccessible or functionally important locations, stereotactic biopsy followed by radiation therapy (RT) may be a more appropriate initial treatment than craniotomy and tumor resection. We studied the long term survival in 91 consecutive patients with malignant gliomas diagnosed by stereotactic biopsy: 64 had glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and 27 had anaplastic astrocytoma (AA). Sixty-four per cent of the GBMs and 33% of the AAs involved deep or midline cerebral structures. The treatment prescribed after biopsy, the tumor location, the histological findings, and the patient's age at presentation (for AAs) were statistically important factors determining patient survival. If adequate RT (tumor dose of 5000 to 6000 cGy) was not prescribed, the median survival was less than or equal to 11 weeks regardless of tumor histology or location. The median survival for patients with deep or midline tumors who completed RT was similar in AA (19.4 weeks) and GBM (27 weeks) cases. Histology was an important predictor of survival only for patients with adequately treated lobar tumors. The median survival in lobar GBM patients who completed RT was 46.9 weeks, and that in lobar AA patients who completed RT was 129 weeks. Cytoreductive surgery had no statistically significant effect on survival. Among the clinical factors examined, age of less than 40 years at presentation was associated with prolonged survival only in AA patients. Constellations of clinical features, tumor location, histological diagnosis, and treatment prescribed were related to survival time.

  12. Application of polymer-gel dosimetry in stereotactic radiosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novotny, J., Jr.; Spevacek, V.; Dvorak, P.; Hrbacek, J.; Novotny, J.; Tlachacova, D.; Schmitt, M.; Vymazal, J.; Tintera, J.; Cechak, T.

    2004-01-01

    Stereotactic irradiation with the Leksell gamma knife (Elekta Instrument AB, Stockholm, Sweden) is one of the primary methods used for the stereotactic radiosurgery treatment of intracranial lesions. To assure the quality of the whole treatment procedure a proper dosimetric system is required. The polymer-gel dosimeter evaluated by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a promising tool to satisfy this requirement. The purpose of this study was to investigate the use of polymer-gel dosimeter as a dosimetric tool for the quality control of stereotactic radiosurgery procedures performed by the Leksell gamma knife.

  13. High-integrated spectral splitting solar concentrator with double-light guide layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Hongcai; Meng, Qingyu; Xu, Shuyan; Dong, Jihong; Li, Wei

    2014-10-01

    Individual secondary optical components in a spectral splitting solar concentrator utilizing a microlens array require multiple photovoltaic (PV) cells, which leads to the complexity of system alignment and a high cost. In order to improve the integration of the PV cells and thermal management, a spectral splitting concentrator coupled to double-light guide layers has been proposed. Using one-axis tracking, we further investigate the optical performance of the concentrator combined with a cylindrical microlens array with double vertically staggered light guide layers in detail. The results show that this solar concentrator maintains a good acceptance angle of ±2 deg in the east-west direction and an acceptable angle of ±14 deg in the perpendicular direction on both low and high spectrums, achieving a concentration ratio of 10×. Finally, the capability of lateral displacement tracking has been explored for an aperture angle of ±24 deg in this concentrator.

  14. High frequency guided waves for hidden fatigue crack growth monitoring in multi-layer aerospace structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Henry; Fromme, Paul

    2015-03-01

    Varying loading conditions of aircraft structures result in stress concentration at fastener holes, where multi-layered components are connected, possibly leading to the development of fatigue cracks. High frequency guided waves propagating along the structure allow for the non-destructive testing of such components, e.g., aircraft wings. However, the sensitivity for the detection of small, potentially hidden, fatigue cracks has to be ascertained. The type of multi-layered model structure investigated consists of two adhesively bonded aluminium plate-strips. Fatigue experiments were carried out. The sensitivity of the high frequency guided wave modes to monitor fatigue crack growth at a fastener hole during cyclic loading was investigated, using both standard pulse-echo equipment and laser interferometry. The sensitivity and repeatability of the measurements were ascertained, having the potential for fatigue crack growth monitoring at critical and difficult to access fastener locations from a stand-off distance.

  15. Defect Detection in Multi-Layered Structures Using High Frequency Guided Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masserey, B.; Kostson, E.; Fromme, P.

    2011-06-01

    Aircraft structures contain multi-layered components connected by fasteners, where fatigue cracks and disbonds can develop due to cyclic loading conditions and stress concentration. High frequency guided waves propagating along the structure allow for the efficient non-destructive testing of components, such as aircraft wings. However, the sensitivity for the detection of small defects has to be ascertained. The type of multi-layered model structure investigated consists of two adhesively bonded aluminium plate-strips. High frequency ultrasonic wave propagation along the structure and the sensitivity to disbonds and small defects in the metallic layers was investigated and verified experimentally. Preliminary fatigue experiments were carried out and the sensitivity of the guided waves to monitor fatigue crack growth at a fastener hole during cyclic loading was investigated. The measurement setup has the potential for fatigue crack growth monitoring at critical and difficult to access fastener locations from a stand-off distance.

  16. High-frequency guided ultrasonic waves for hidden defect detection in multi-layer aircraft structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masserey, B.; Raemy, C.; Fromme, P.

    2012-05-01

    Aerospace structures contain multi-layer components subjected to cyclic loading conditions; fatigue cracks and disbonds can develop, often at fastener holes. High-frequency guided waves have the potential for non-destructive damage detection at critical and difficult to access locations from a stand-off distance. Using commercially available ultrasonic transducers, high frequency guided waves were generated that penetrate through the complete thickness of a model structure, consisting of two adhesively bonded aluminum plates. The wave propagation along the specimen was measured and quantified using a laser interferometer. The wave propagation and scattering at internal defects was simulated using Finite Element (FE) models and good agreement with the measurement results found. The detection sensitivity using standard pulse-echo measurements was verified and the influence of the stand-off distance predicted from the FE simulation results.

  17. Dose profile measurements during respiratory-gated lung stereotactic radiotherapy: A phantom study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jong, W. L.; Wong, J. H. D.; Ng, K. H.; Ung, N. M.

    2016-03-01

    During stereotactic body radiotherapy, high radiation dose (∼60 Gy) is delivered to the tumour in small fractionation regime. In this study, the dosimetric characteristics were studied using radiochromic film during respiratory-gated and non-gated lung stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Specifically, the effect of respiratory cycle and amplitude, as well as gating window on the dosimetry were studied. In this study, the dose profiles along the irradiated area were measured. The dose profiles for respiratory-gated radiation delivery with different respiratory or tumour motion amplitudes, gating windows and respiratory time per cycle were in agreement with static radiation delivery. The respiratory gating system was able to deliver the radiation dose accurately (±1.05 mm) in the longitudinal direction. Although the treatment time for respiratory-gated SBRT was prolonged, this approach can potentially reduce the margin for internal tumour volume without compromising the tumour coverage. In addition, the normal tissue sparing effect can be improved.

  18. Quality Assurance of Immobilization and Target Localization Systems for Frameless Stereotactic Cranial and Extracranial Hypofractionated Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Solberg, Timothy D. Medin, Paul M.; Mullins, John; Li Sicong

    2008-05-01

    The success of stereotactic radiosurgery has stimulated significant interest in the application of such an approach for the treatment of extracranial tumors. The potential benefits of reduced healthcare costs and improved patient outcomes that could be realized in a high-precision, hypofractionated treatment paradigm are numerous. Image-guidance technologies are eliminating the historic requirement for rigid head fixation and will also accelerate the clinical implementation of the approach in extracranial sites. An essential prerequisite of 'frameless' stereotactic systems is that they provide localization accuracy consistent with the safe delivery of a therapeutic radiation dose given in one or few fractions. In this report, we reviewed the technologies for frameless localization of cranial and extracranial targets with emphasis on the quality assurance aspects.

  19. A quality assurance program in stereotactic radiosurgery using the Gamma Knife unit.

    PubMed

    Stuecklschweiger, G F; Feichtinger, K

    1998-10-01

    Because of the large single-fraction dose in stereotactic radiosurgery it is important to guarantee a high geometric and dosimetric accuracy. The paper represent the quality assurance program for the Gamma Knife unit at the University Clinic of Neurosurgery in Graz. The program includes the following procedures: timer control, mechanical radiation isocenter coincidence, trunnion centricity, helmet microswitches test, radiation output and relative helmet factors, dose profile verification, safety interlocks checks and software quality assurance. In summary, the mechanical accuracy and reproducibility of the Gamma Knife unit are < 1 mm. The geometric failure in stereotactic Gamma Knife treatment is limited by the human error in setting the clinical target volume and the spatial accuracy of dose delivery to the patient is limited by the accuracy of modern target localization procedures.

  20. SU-F-P-05: Initial Experience with an Independent Certification Program for Stereotactic Radiosurgery and Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Solberg, T; Robar, J; Gevaert, T; Todorovic, M; Howe, J

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The ASTRO document “Safety is no accident: A FRAMEWORK FOR QUALITY RADIATION ONCOLOGY AND CARE” recommends external reviews of specialized modalities. The purpose of this presentation is to describe the implementation of such a program for Stereotactic Radiosurgery (SRS) and Stereotactic Body radiation Therapy (SBRT). Methods: The margin of error for SRS and SBRT delivery is significantly smaller than that of conventional radiotherapy and therefore requires special attention and diligence. The Novalis Certified program was created to fill an unmet need for specialized SRS / SBRT credentialing. A standards document was drafted by a panel of experts from several disciplines, including medical physics, radiation oncology and neurosurgery. The document, based on national and international standards, covers requirements in program structure, personnel, training, clinical application, technology, quality management, and patient and equipment QA. The credentialing process was modeled after existing certification programs and includes an institution-generated self-study, extensive document review and an onsite audit. Reviewers generate a descriptive report, which is reviewed by a multidisciplinary expert panel. Outcomes of the review may include mandatory requirements and optional recommendations. Results: 15 institutions have received Novalis Certification, including 3 in the US, 7 in Europe, 4 in Australia and 1 in Asia. 87 other centers are at various stages of the process. Nine reviews have resulted in mandatory requirements, however all of these were addressed within three months of the audit report. All reviews have produced specific recommendations ranging from programmatic to technical in nature. Institutions felt that the credentialing process addressed a critical need and was highly valuable to the institution. Conclusion: Novalis Certification is a unique peer review program assessing safety and quality in SRS and SBRT, while recognizing

  1. Monitoring of corrosion damage using high-frequency guided ultrasonic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chew, D.; Fromme, P.

    2014-03-01

    Due to adverse environmental conditions corrosion can develop during the life cycle of industrial structures, e.g., offshore oil platforms, ships, and desalination plants. Both pitting corrosion and generalized corrosion leading to wall thickness loss can cause the degradation of the integrity and load bearing capacity of the structure. Structural health monitoring of corrosion damage in difficult to access areas can in principle be achieved using high frequency guided waves propagating along the structure from accessible areas. Using standard ultrasonic transducers with single sided access to the structure, high frequency guided wave modes were generated that penetrate through the complete thickness of the structure. Wall thickness reduction was induced using accelerated corrosion in a salt water bath. The corrosion damage was monitored based on the effect on the wave propagation and interference of the different modes. The change in the wave interference was quantified based on an analysis in the frequency domain (Fourier transform) and was found to match well with theoretical predictions for the wall thickness loss. High frequency guided waves have the potential for corrosion damage monitoring at critical and difficult to access locations from a stand-off distance.

  2. Monitoring of corrosion damage using high-frequency guided ultrasonic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chew, D.; Fromme, P.

    2015-03-01

    Due to adverse environmental conditions corrosion can develop during the life cycle of industrial structures, e.g., offshore oil platforms, ships, and desalination plants. Both pitting corrosion and generalized corrosion leading to wall thickness loss can cause the degradation of the integrity and load bearing capacity of the structure. Structural health monitoring of corrosion damage in difficult to access areas can in principle be achieved using high frequency guided waves propagating along the structure from accessible areas. Using standard ultrasonic transducers with single sided access to the structure, high frequency guided wave modes were generated that penetrate through the complete thickness of the structure. Wall thickness reduction was induced using accelerated corrosion in a salt water bath. The corrosion damage was monitored based on the effect on the wave propagation and interference of the different modes. The change in the wave interference was quantified based on an analysis in the frequency domain (Fourier transform) and was found to match well with theoretical predictions for the wall thickness loss. High frequency guided waves have the potential for corrosion damage monitoring at critical and difficult to access locations from a stand-off distance.

  3. Monitoring of hidden damage in multi-layered aerospace structures using high-frequency guided waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semoroz, A.; Masserey, B.; Fromme, P.

    2011-04-01

    Aerospace structures contain multi-layered components connected by fasteners, where fatigue cracks and disbonds or localized lack of sealant can develop due to cyclic loading conditions and stress concentration. High frequency guided waves propagating along such a structure allow for the efficient non-destructive testing of large components, such as aircraft wings. The type of multi-layered model structure investigated in this contribution consists of two aluminium plates adhesively bonded with an epoxy based sealant layer. Using commercially available transducer equipment, specific high frequency guided ultrasonic wave modes that penetrate through the complete thickness of the structure were excited. The wave propagation along the structure was measured experimentally using a laser interferometer. Two types of hidden damage were considered: a localized lack of sealant and small surface defects in the metallic layer facing the sealant. The detection sensitivity using standard pulse-echo measurement equipment has been quantified and the detection of small hidden defects from significant stand-off distances has been shown. Fatigue experiments were carried out and the potential of high frequency guided waves for the monitoring of fatigue crack growth at a fastener hole during cyclic loading was discussed.

  4. Dimeric CRISPR RNA-guided FokI nucleases for highly specific genome editing.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Shengdar Q; Wyvekens, Nicolas; Khayter, Cyd; Foden, Jennifer A; Thapar, Vishal; Reyon, Deepak; Goodwin, Mathew J; Aryee, Martin J; Joung, J Keith

    2014-06-01

    Monomeric CRISPR-Cas9 nucleases are widely used for targeted genome editing but can induce unwanted off-target mutations with high frequencies. Here we describe dimeric RNA-guided FokI nucleases (RFNs) that can recognize extended sequences and edit endogenous genes with high efficiencies in human cells. RFN cleavage activity depends strictly on the binding of two guide RNAs (gRNAs) to DNA with a defined spacing and orientation substantially reducing the likelihood that a suitable target site will occur more than once in the genome and therefore improving specificities relative to wild-type Cas9 monomers. RFNs guided by a single gRNA generally induce lower levels of unwanted mutations than matched monomeric Cas9 nickases. In addition, we describe a simple method for expressing multiple gRNAs bearing any 5' end nucleotide, which gives dimeric RFNs a broad targeting range. RFNs combine the ease of RNA-based targeting with the specificity enhancement inherent to dimerization and are likely to be useful in applications that require highly precise genome editing.

  5. 48 CFR 570.117-2 - Guiding principles for federal leadership in high performance and sustainable buildings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Guiding principles for federal leadership in high performance and sustainable buildings. 570.117-2 Section 570.117-2 Federal... LEASEHOLD INTERESTS IN REAL PROPERTY General 570.117-2 Guiding principles for federal leadership in...

  6. Understanding California State Government. A Guide for High School Teachers: Preparing To Be Effective Citizens in California.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Council for the Social Studies.

    Developed for California high school teachers, this guide is designed to help them clarify the role of the state government and improve students' understanding of the democratic process through their acquisition of knowledge, skills and attitudes. The guide provides the tools necessary to help students inform themselves about: current economic,…

  7. Image guided surgery in the management of craniocerebral gunshot injuries

    PubMed Central

    Elserry, Tarek; Anwer, Hesham; Esene, Ignatius Ngene

    2013-01-01

    Background: A craniocerebral trauma caused by firearms is a complex injury with high morbidity and mortality. One of the most intriguing and controversial part in their management in salvageable patients is the decision to remove the bullet/pellet. A bullet is foreign to the brain and, in principle, should be removed. Surgical options for bullet extraction span from conventional craniotomy, through C-arm-guided surgery to minimally invasive frame or frameless stereotaxy. But what is the best surgical option? Methods: We prospectively followed up a cohort of 28 patients with cranio-cerebral gunshot injury (CCHSI) managed from January to December 2012 in our department of neurosurgery. The missiles were extracted via stereotaxy (frame or frameless), C-arm-guided, or free-hand-based surgery. Cases managed conservatively were excluded. The Glasgow Outcome Score was used to assess the functional outcome on discharge. Results: Five of the eight “stereotactic cases” had an excellent outcome after missile extraction while the initially planned stereotaxy missed locating the missile in three cases and were thus subjected to free hand craniotomy. Excellent outcome was obtained in five of the nine “neuronavigation cases, five of the eight cases for free hand surgery based on the bony landmarks, and five of the six C-arm-based surgery. Conclusion: Conventional craniotomy isn’t indicated in the extraction of isolated, retained, intracranial firearm missiles in civilian injury but could be useful when the missile is incorporated within a surgical lesion. Stereotactic surgery could be useful for bullet extraction, though with limited precision in identifying small pellets because of their small sizes, thus exposing patients to same risk of brain insult when retrieving a missile by conventional surgery. Because of its availability, C-arm-guided surgery continues to be of much benefit, especially in emergency situations. We recommend an extensive long-term study of these

  8. High-quality Linac-based Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy with Flattening Filter Free Beams and Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy for Low-Intermediate Risk Prostate Cancer. A Mono-institutional Experience with 90 Patients.

    PubMed

    D'Agostino, G; Franzese, C; De Rose, F; Franceschini, D; Comito, T; Villa, E; Alongi, F; Liardo, R; Tomatis, S; Navarria, P; Mancosu, P; Reggiori, G; Cozzi, L; Scorsetti, M

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this phase II study was to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of stereotactic body radiotherapy in patients with low or intermediate risk prostate cancer. Biopsy-confirmed prostate cancer patients were enrolled, provided that they had the following characteristics: initial prostate-specific antigen (PSA) ≤ 20 ng/ml, Gleason Score < 7, International Prostate Symptom Score < 7. The treatment schedule was 35 Gy in five fractions, delivered with volumetric modulated arcs with flattening filter free beams. Toxicity was recorded according to CTCAE criteria v4.0. Biochemical failure was calculated according to the Phoenix definition. The Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite questionnaire was used to record health-related quality of life. Between December 2011 and March 2015, 90 patients were enrolled (53 low risk, 37 intermediate risk). The median age was 71 years (range 48-82). In total, 58 (64.5%) of the patients had Gleason Score=6, the remaining had Gleason Score=7.The median initial PSA was 6.9 ng/ml (range 2.7-17.0). Acute toxicity was mild, with 32.2 patients presenting grade 1 urinary toxicity and 32.2% of patients presenting grade 2 urinary toxicity, mainly represented by urgency, dysuria and stranguria. Rectal grade 1 toxicity was found in 15.5% of patients, whereas grade 2 toxicity was recorded in 6.6% of patients. Regarding late toxicity, grade 1 proctitis was recorded in 11.1% of patients and grade 1 urinary in 38.8%; only two events of grade 2 urinary toxicity were observed (transient urethral stenosis, resolved by a 24 h catheterisation). At a median follow-up of 27 months (6-62 months) only two intermediate risk patients experienced a biochemical failure. Health-related quality of life revealed a slight worsening in all the domains during treatment, with a return to baseline 3 months after treatment. Stereotactic body radiotherapy delivered using linac-based flattening filter free volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy in low and

  9. A real-time image-guided intraoperative high-dose-rate brachytherapy system.

    PubMed

    Li, Shidong; Frassica, Deborah; DeWeese, Theodore; Lee, Ding-Jen; Geng, Jason; Nag, Subir

    2003-01-01

    To develop a real-time, image-guided intraoperative high-dose-rate brachytherapy system. The surface applicator, a catheter array on a 1-mm-thick soft and semitransparent silicone rubber sheet, was directly sutured on the surgical bed. A three-dimensional video camera was then used to instantly capture images of the catheters and the surgical surface. Tracing the catheters on the images allowed us to automatically determine the dwell source positions. Dwell times in the dwell positions were optimized to minimize the dose variation and deviation from the treatment prescription. A dose-texture plot was created to quantify the dose distribution. Treatment planning time was reduced from hours to a few minutes. Phantom tests have shown that the new source localization is accurate with sigma<1.5 mm. All hot spots and cold spots had been eliminated after the dwell-time optimization. This real-time, image-guided planning system can provide optimal image-guided intraoperative high-dose-rate brachytherapy with geometric and dosimetric improvements and a short planning time.

  10. Clinical Assessment Of Stereotactic IGRT: Spinal Radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Gerszten, Peter C. Burton, Steven A.

    2008-07-01

    The role of stereotactic radiosurgery for the treatment of intracranial lesions is well established. Its use for the treatment of spinal lesions has been limited because of the availability of effective target immobilization devices. Recent advances in stereotactic IGRT have allowed for spinal applications. Large clinical experience with spinal radiosurgery to properly assess clinical outcomes has previously been limited. At our institution, we have developed a successful multidisciplinary spinal radiosurgery program in which 542 spinal lesions (486 malignant and 56 benign lesions) were treated with a single-fraction radiosurgery technique. Patient ages ranged from 18 to 85 years (mean 56 years). Lesion location included 92 cervical, 234 thoracic, 130 lumbar, and 86 sacral. The most common metastatic tumors were renal cell (89 cases), breast (74 cases), and lung (71 cases). The most common benign tumors were neurofibroma (24 cases), schwannoma (13 cases), and meningioma (7 cases). Eighty-nine cervical lesions were treated using skull tracking. Thoracic, lumbar, and sacral tumors were tracked relative to either gold or stainless steel fiducial markers. The maximum intratumoral dose ranged from 12.5 to 30 Gy (mean 20 Gy). Tumor volume ranged from 0.16 to 298 mL (mean 47 mL). Three hundred thirty-seven lesions had received prior external beam irradiation with spinal cord doses precluding further conventional irradiation. The primary indication for radiosurgery was pain in 326 cases, as a primary treatment modality in 70 cases, for tumor radiographic tumor progression in 65 cases, for post-surgical treatment in 38 cases, for progressive neurological deficit in 35 cases, and as a radiation boost in 8 cases. Follow-up period was at least 3 to 49 months. Axial and/or radicular pain improved in 300 of 326 cases (92%). Long-term tumor control was demonstrated in 90% of lesions treated with radiosurgery as a primary treatment modality and in 88% of lesions treated for

  11. Accuracy of marketing claims by providers of stereotactic radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Narang, Amol K; Lam, Edwin; Makary, Martin A; Deweese, Theodore L; Pawlik, Timothy M; Pronovost, Peter J; Herman, Joseph M

    2013-01-01

    Direct-to-consumer advertising by industry has been criticized for encouraging overuse of unproven therapies, but advertising by health care providers has not been as carefully scrutinized. Stereotactic radiation therapy is an emerging technology that has sparked controversy regarding the marketing campaigns of some manufacturers. Given that this technology is also being heavily advertised on the Web sites of health care providers, the accuracy of providers' marketing claims should be rigorously evaluated. We reviewed the Web sites of all U.S. hospitals and private practices that provide stereotactic radiation using two leading brands of stereotactic radiosurgery technology. Centers were identified by using data from the manufacturers. Centers without Web sites were excluded. The final study population consisted of 212 centers with online advertisements for stereotactic radiation. Web sites were evaluated for advertisements that were inconsistent with advertising guidelines provided by the American Medical Association. Most centers (76%) had individual pages dedicated to the marketing of their brand of stereotactic technology that frequently contained manufacturer-authored images (50%) or text (55%). Advertising for the treatment of tumors that have not been endorsed by professional societies was present on 66% of Web sites. Centers commonly claimed improved survival (22%), disease control (20%), quality of life (17%), and toxicity (43%) with stereotactic radiation. Although 40% of Web sites championed the center's regional expertise in delivering stereotactic treatments, only 15% of Web sites provided data to support their claims. Provider advertisements for stereotactic radiation were prominent and aggressive. Further investigation of provider advertising, its effects on quality of care, and potential oversight mechanisms is needed.

  12. Resonantly guided modes in microstructured optical fibers with a circular array of high-index rods.

    PubMed

    Ohtera, Yasuo; Hirose, Haruka; Yamada, Hirohito

    2013-08-01

    A microstructured optical fiber with a new type of waveguiding mechanism is proposed. The fiber consists of a circular rod array of high index material (n=3.48) embedded in a low index background (n=1.44). The rod array exhibits guided-mode resonance (GMR) for cylindrical waves arriving from inside the array, and thus functions as a highly reflective circular wall. Through finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulations, we confirmed light confinement and guidance near the GMR wavelength. Basic optical characteristics such as dispersion relations, loss spectra, and mode field profiles were calculated.

  13. Problems Involved in an Emergency Method of Guiding a Gliding Vehicle from High Altitudes to a High Key Position

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jewel, Joseph W., Jr.; Whitten, James B.

    1960-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted to determine the problems involved in an emergency method of guiding a gliding vehicle from high altitudes to a high key position (initial position) above a landing field. A jet airplane in a simulated flameout condition, conventional ground-tracking radar, and a scaled wire for guidance programming on the radar plotting board were used in the tests. Starting test altitudes varied from 30,000 feet to 46,500 feet, and starting positions ranged 8.4 to 67 nautical miles from the high key. Specified altitudes of the high key were 12,000, 10,000 or 4,000 feet. Lift-drag ratios of the aircraft of either 17, 16, or 6 were held constant during any given flight; however, for a few flights the lift-drag ratio was varied from 11 to 6. Indicated airspeeds were held constant at either 160 or 250 knots. Results from these tests indicate that a gliding vehicle having a lift-drag ratio of 16 and an indicated approach speed of 160 knots can be guided to within 800 feet vertically and 2,400 feet laterally of a high key position. When the lift-drag ratio of the vehicle is reduced to 6 and the indicated approach speed is raised to 250 knots, the radar controller was able to guide the vehicle to within 2,400 feet vertically and au feet laterally of the high key. It was also found that radar stations which give only azimuth-distance information could control the glide path of a gliding vehicle as well as stations that receive azimuth-distance-altitude information, provided that altitude information is supplied by the pilot.

  14. Emerging applications of stereotactic body radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Lo, Simon S; Loblaw, Andrew; Chang, Eric L; Mayr, Nina A; Teh, Bin S; Huang, Zhibin; Yao, Min; Ellis, Rodney J; Biswas, Tithi; Sohn, Jason W; Machtay, Mitchell; Sahgal, Arjun

    2014-05-01

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) has been used extensively in patients with lung, liver and spinal tumors, and the treatment outcomes are very favorable. For certain conditions such as medically inoperable stage I non-small-cell lung cancer, liver and lung oligometastases, primary liver cancer and spinal metastases, SBRT is regarded as one of the standard therapies. In the recent years, the use of SBRT has been extended to other disease conditions and sites such as recurrent head and neck cancer, renal cell carcinoma, prostate cancer, adrenal metastasis, pancreatic cancer, gynecological malignancies, spinal cord compression, breast cancer, and stage II-III non-small-cell lung cancer. Preliminary data in the literature show promising results but the follow-up intervals are short for most studies. This paper will provide an overview of these emerging applications.

  15. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Karyn A

    2016-01-01

    The role of radiation therapy in the management of pancreatic cancer represents an area of some controversy. However, local disease progression remains a significant cause of morbidity and even mortality for patients with this disease. Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is an emerging treatment option for pancreatic cancer, primarily for locally advanced (unresectable) disease as it can provide a therapeutic benefit with significant advantages for patients' quality of life over standard conventional chemoradiation. There may also be a role for SBRT as neoadjuvant therapy for patients with borderline resectable disease to allow conversion to resectability. The objective of this review is to present the data supporting SBRT in pancreatic cancer as well as the potential limitations and caveats of current studies.

  16. Dosimetric considerations of stereotactic brain implants

    SciTech Connect

    Saw, C.B.; Suntharalingam, N.; Ayyangar, K.M.; Tupchong, L. )

    1989-10-01

    Dose distributions of stereotactic brain implants performed by four institutions were analyzed. In these implants {sup 192}Ir or {sup 125}I sources were used. The analyses involved an evaluation of the isodose distributions in two orthogonal planes, the dose gradient outside, and the dose homogeneity within the target volume. Quantitative evaluation of the dose homogeneity was performed using three volumetric irradiation indices. The dose homogeneity was observed to improve as the number of catheters increased. However, the number of catheters used is influenced by neurosurgical considerations. Thus, it is necessary to make a compromise between dose homogeneity and the maximum number of catheters to be used. The dose gradient, a centimeter outside the target volume, was found to depend on the geometry of the implant and at distances beyond, it was found to depend on the type of radioisotopes used.

  17. CONSORT: May stereotactic intracavity administration of antibiotics shorten the course of systemic antibiotic therapy for brain abscesses?

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xin; Liu, Rui; Wang, Yaming; Zhao, Hulin; Chen, Jinhui; Zhang, Jianning; Hu, Chenhao

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Despite advances in surgical techniques in the management of the brain abscess, continuous systemic long-term antibiotics are necessary and crucial. This study was designed to evaluate the effect of intracavity administration of high-dose antibiotics on the course of antibiotic therapy. Methods: Between 2003 and 2013, 55 patients with bacterial brain abscesses (83 abscesses) were treated with stereotactic aspiration and intracavity injection of high-dose antibiotics combined with a short course systemic antibiotic therapy. Antibiotics of one-eighth daily systemic dosage were injected into the abscess cavity after stereotactic aspiration and intravenous antibiotics were given in all patients for 3 to 4 weeks. The results of the group treated with stereotactic aspiration and intracavity injection of antibiotic solution were compared to the results of our previous patients treated by stereotactic aspiration only. Results: Thirty-nine males and 16 females (age ranging from 1.5 to 76 years; mean age 38.7 years) were included in this study. During the follow-up (mean 26.2 months, ranging from 6 to 72 months), all the abscesses subsided with no recurrence. No adverse effects related to topical use of antibiotics occurred. At the end of follow-up, 38 patients had good outcomes, 11 had mild neurological deficits, 3 had moderate deficits, 1 was in vegetative state, and 2 died of accidents not related to brain abscesses. Compared with conventional stereotactic aspiration and drainage, intracavity injection of antibiotics shorted the course of consecutive systemic intravenous antibiotics by average 10.8 days without an increase of the recurrence rate of abscesses. Conclusions: Our results indicate that topical application of antibiotics into the brain abscess cavity helps to reduce the length of systemic antibiotic therapy, decreases the abscess recurrence rate, avoids the side effects of long-term high dose antibiotics, shortens the hospitalization and

  18. Using problem based learning and guided inquiry in a high school acid-base chemistry unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKinley, Katie

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine if incorporating problem based learning and guided inquiry would improve student achievement in an acid base unit for high school chemistry. The activities and labs in the unit were modified to be centered around the problem of a fish kill that students investigated. Students also participated in guided inquiry labs to increase the amount of critical thinking and problem solving being done in the classroom. The hypothesis was that the implementation of problem based learning and guided inquiry would foster student learning. Students took a pre-test and post-test on questions covering the objectives of the acid base unit. These assessments were compared to determine the effectiveness of the unit. The results indicate that the unit was effective in increasing student performance on the unit test. This study also analyzed the process of problem based learning. Problem based learning can be an effective method of engaging students in inquiry. However, designing an effective problem based learning unit requires careful design of the problem and enough structure to assure students learn the intended content.

  19. A preclinical rodent model of acute radiation-induced lung injury after ablative focal irradiation reflecting clinical stereotactic body radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Hong, Zhen-Yu; Lee, Hae-June; Choi, Won Hoon; Lee, Yoon-Jin; Eun, Sung Ho; Lee, Jung Il; Park, Kwangwoo; Lee, Ji Min; Cho, Jaeho

    2014-07-01

    In a previous study, we established an image-guided small-animal micro-irradiation system mimicking clinical stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). The goal of this study was to develop a rodent model of acute phase lung injury after ablative irradiation. A radiation dose of 90 Gy was focally delivered to the left lung of C57BL/6 mice using a small animal stereotactic irradiator. At days 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11 and 14 after irradiation, the lungs were perfused with formalin for fixation and paraffin sections were stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) and Masson's trichrome. At days 7 and 14 after irradiation, micro-computed tomography (CT) images of the lung were taken and lung functional measurements were performed with a flexiVent™ system. Gross morphological injury was evident 9 days after irradiation of normal lung tissues and dynamic sequential events occurring during the acute phase were validated by histopathological analysis. CT images of the mouse lungs indicated partial obstruction located in the peripheral area of the left lung. Significant alteration in inspiratory capacity and tissue damping were detected on day 14 after irradiation. An animal model of radiation-induced lung injury (RILI) in the acute phase reflecting clinical stereotactic body radiotherapy was established and validated with histopathological and functional analysis. This model enhances our understanding of the dynamic sequential events occurring in the acute phase of radiation-induced lung injury induced by ablative dose focal volume irradiation.

  20. Electrical/Electronic Technology (Energy/Power). Industrial Arts, Senior High--Level II. North Dakota Senior High Industrial Arts Curriculum Guides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawrence, Allen; And Others

    This course guide for an electrical/electronic technology course is one of four developed for the energy/power area in the North Dakota senior high industrial arts education program. (Eight other guides are available for two other areas of Industrial Arts--graphic communications and production.) Part 1 provides such introductory information as a…