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Sample records for gynecology outpatient unit

  1. Chlamydia trachomatis cervicitis in gynecologic outpatients.

    PubMed

    Ripa, K T; Svensson, L; Mårdh, P A; Weström, L

    1978-12-01

    Symptoms suggestive of a lower genital tract infection (LGTI) are common complaints in women who consult gynecologists. Sexually transmitted microorganisms, such as Chlamydia trachomatis. Neisseria gonorrhoeae, and Trichomonas vaginalis, are responsible for a substantial proportion of LGTI. This study was performed to establish the frequency of LGTI caused by C trachomatis in women attending a gynecologic outpatient clinic. Of 170 women with LGTI, 32.9% harbored one or more of these organisms: C trachomatis was found in 19.3%, N gonorrhoeae in 4.7%, and T vaginalis in 25.9%. The results of the isolation studies were correlated with clinical signs and symptoms. In women under 25 years of age, chlamydial cervicitis was found significantly more often in users of oral contraceptives than in nonusers. In women not taking such drugs, cervical erosion was found more often in Chlamydia-positive than Chlamydia-negative women. Since clinical examination failed to reveal any characteristic signs in cases of chlamydial infection, it was not possible to distinguish a chlamydial from a gonococcal infection. This study also reports the successful treatment of 15 women affected by chlamydial cervicitis with doxycycline or trimethoprim sulphamethoxazole.

  2. Psychological Symptoms Among Obstetric Fistula Patients Compared to Gynecology Outpatients in Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Sarah M.; Sikkema, Kathleen J.; Watt, Melissa H.; Masenga, Gileard G.

    2016-01-01

    Background Obstetric fistula is a childbirth injury prevalent in sub-Saharan Africa that causes uncontrollable leaking of urine and/or feces. Research has documented the social and psychological sequelae of obstetric fistula, including mental health dysfunction and social isolation. Purpose This cross-sectional study sought to quantify the psychological symptoms and social support in obstetric fistula patients, compared with a patient population of women without obstetric fistula. Methods Participants were gynecology patients (N = 144) at the Kilimanjaro Christian Medical Center in Moshi, Tanzania, recruited from the Fistula Ward (n = 54) as well as gynecology outpatient clinics (n = 90). Measures included previously validated psychometric questionnaires, administered orally by Tanzanian nurses. Outcome variables were compared between obstetric fistula patients and gynecology outpatients, controlling for background demographic variables and multiple comparisons. Results Compared to gynecology outpatients, obstetric fistula patients reported significantly higher symptoms of depression, posttraumatic stress disorder, somatic complaints, and maladaptive coping. They also reported significantly lower social support. Conclusions Obstetric fistula patients present for repair surgery with more severe psychological distress than gynecology outpatients. In order to address these mental health concerns, clinicians should engage obstetric fistula patients with targeted mental health interventions. PMID:25670025

  3. Psychiatric morbidity in outpatients of gynecological oncology clinic in a tertiary care hospital

    PubMed Central

    Mendonsa, Rohan Dilip; Appaya, Prakash

    2010-01-01

    Background: Psychiatric morbidity in gynecological oncology patients is relatively less studied. Aims: This cross-sectional observational study was undertaken to assess the common psychiatric disorders in women who consult the gynecological oncology outpatients’ department. Materials and methods: We assessed a total of 101 outpatients who were recruited by convenience method of sampling. The main outcome measures were PRIME-MD PHQ diagnoses, gynecological and sociodemographic profiles. Results: Psychiatric disorders as detected by PRIME –MD PHQ were diagnosed in 44% of the patients. Mood disorders were most common. Major depression was present in 25.7% of patients. Anxiety disorders were diagnosed in 16.8% of the patients. Among 44 patients with a psychiatric diagnosis only one patient was on psychiatric treatment. Major depression was much more common (34.4%) in cancer patients than in women with benign conditions (16.6%). Conclusion: The findings of our study reveal a high rate of psychiatric morbidity in the gynecological oncology outpatients. PMID:21267366

  4. Domestic sexual violence and sexual problems among gynecology outpatients: an example from Turkey.

    PubMed

    Ipekten Alaman, Mehtap; Yıldız, Hatice

    2014-01-01

    Domestic violence is a universal problem, and sexual violence in marriage, in particular, is a hidden form of it. This descriptive, cross-sectional study was conducted to determine to the prevalence of domestic sexual violence by husbands, the prevalence of sexual problems, and the relation of these among married women attending a gynecology outpatient clinic. This study was performed in a university hospital in Turkey and data were collected February-April 2009. The study sample consisted of 200 married women, 53% of whom reported having been exposed to at least one type of domestic sexual violence behaviors by their husbands. Among those behaviors, the rate of marital rape was 33%. The frequency of experiencing any sexual problem was 82%. Women expressed that they mostly had orgasmic problems, and their husbands had premature ejaculation problems. The majority of women who reported sexual violence reported experiencing sexual problems; the frequency of sexual problems was higher in the participants who did (94.3%) than in those who did not report (68.1%) sexual violence (p < .001). Bad sexual harmony (Odds ratio [OR] = 13.50, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 3.87-47.01) and experiencing sexual problems (OR = 12.67, 95% CI = 3.78-42.35) were strongly related to sexual violence in marriage. The results also revealed that the prevalence of sexual violence and sexual problems among those married women who attended gynecology clinics was considerable, even though they did not report this to the health care provider as a problem.

  5. Obstetrics and gynecology outpatient scenario of an Indian homeopathic hospital: A prospective, research-targeted study

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Subhranil; Koley, Munmun; Saha, Sangita; Singh, Rakesh; Hossain, Md. Monowar; Pramanik, Indrani

    2015-01-01

    The authors aimed to document prescriptions and clinical outcomes in routine homeopathic practice to short list promising areas of targeted research and efficacy trials of homeopathy in obstetrics and gynecology (O&G). Three homeopathic physicians participated in methodical data collection over a 3-month period in the O&G outpatient setting of The Calcutta Homeopathic Medical College and Hospital, West Bengal, India. A specifically designed Excel spreadsheet was used to record data on consecutive appointments, including date, patient identity, socioeconomic status, place of abode, religion, medical condition/complaint, whether chronic/acute, new/follow-up case, patient-assessed outcome (7-point Likert scale: −3 to +3), prescribed homeopathic medication, and whether other medication/s was being taken for the condition. These spreadsheets were submitted monthly for data synthesis and analysis. Data on 878 appointments (429 patients) were collected, of which 61% were positive, 20.8% negative, and 18.2% showed no change. Chronic conditions (93.2%) were chiefly encountered. A total of 434 medical conditions and 52 varieties were reported overall. The most frequently treated conditions were leucorrhea (20.5%), irregular menses (13.3%), dysmenorrhea (10%), menorrhagia (7.5%), and hypomenorrhea (6.3%). Strongly positive outcomes (+3/+2) were mostly recorded in oligomenorrhea (41.7%), leucorrhea (34.1%), polycystic ovary (33.3%), dysmenorrhea (28%), and irregular menses (22.2%). Individualized prescriptions predominated (95.6%). A total of 122 different medicines were prescribed in decimal (2.9%), centesimal (87.9%), and 50 millesimal potencies (4.9%). Mother tinctures and placebo were prescribed in 3.4% and 30.4% instances, respectively. Several instances of medicine-condition pairings were detected. This systematic recording cataloged the frequency and success rate of treating O&G conditions using homeopathy. PMID:27114940

  6. Prevalence of genital warts in reproductive-aged Turkish women presenting at gynecology outpatient clinics for any reason.

    PubMed

    Kose, M F; Akin, L; Yuce, K

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this multicenter descriptive study was to calculate the frequency of genital warts among Turkish women aged 15-49 years, who visited outpatient gynecology clinics for a variety of reasons. The study was conducted in February 2011 to collect data for a minimum of 154 patients at each center, and the total sample size reached 2,967 women (95.1% completion rate). Oral informed consents were obtained. A questionnaire including data on socio-demographic characteristics and reasons for admission was administered, and a pelvic examination was performed. The overall point prevalence was 35% (95% CI = 3.1%-4.0%), correcting for sampling design, with the highest rates observed in the 15 to 19-year-old group. The odds of having a genital wart was 1.82 times (95% CI = 0.99-3.33) higher among non-pregnant participants than in pregnant women (p = 0.051). The overall point prevalence of genital warts among reproductive-aged women attending gynecology outpatient clinics for any reason in Turkey was 35%.

  7. Nurse Manager Safety Practices in Outpatient Hemodialysis Units.

    PubMed

    Thomas-Hawkins, Charlotte; Flynn, Linda; Lindgren, Teri G; Weaver, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Little is known regarding the specific managerial activities or best practices that nurse managers in outpatient hemodialysis settings use to achieve positive safety outcomes. The purpose of this study was to identify and describe specific managerial practices used by nurse managers in outpatient hemodialysis units to enhance patient safety and quality of care. A descriptive qualitative design was used. Seventeen nurse managers in outpatient hemodialysis units comprised the study sample. Telephone interviews were conducted, and qualitative content analysis was used to encode the data. Nurse managers identified patients, staff, the dialysis unit environment, and the dialysis organization as sources of safety risks. Nurse manager safety practices illuminated from the data were complex and multifaceted, and were aimed at reducing patient, staff environmental, and organization risks. The findings from this study offer a description and a better understanding of the practices in which nurse managers in outpatient hemodialysis units engage to keep patients safe in their units, and they underscore the critical role of nurse managers in creating and maintaining patient safety within outpatient hemodialysis settings.

  8. Management of gynecologic oncology emergencies

    SciTech Connect

    Harwood-Nuss, A.L.; Benrubi, G.I.; Nuss, R.C.

    1987-08-01

    Gynecologic malignancies are the third most common cancer among women in the United States. Because of often subtle early findings, the diagnosis may not be made before the widespread dissemination of the disease. The Emergency Department physician will commonly encounter a woman with vaginal bleeding, pelvic pain, or a symptomatic abdominal mass. In this article, we have described the epidemiology, recognized patterns of spread, and associated findings of gynecologic tumors. The proper Emergency Department evaluation and management of these problems is emphasized with guidelines for the timing of referrals and consultation with the gynecologic oncologist. The treatment of gynecologic malignancies is often complicated and responsible for Emergency Department visits. The various modalities are addressed according to the organ systems affected and include sections on postoperative problems, gastrointestinal complaints, urologic complications of therapy, radiation therapy and its complications, with an emphasis on the most serious complications necessitating either careful outpatient management or hospital admission. As cost-containment pressure grows, we have included sections on chemotherapy and total parenteral nutrition, both of which are becoming common outpatient events for the cancer patient. 28 references.

  9. Hidden female urinary incontinence in urology and obstetrics and gynecology outpatient clinics in Turkey: what are the determinants of bothersome urinary incontinence and help-seeking behavior?

    PubMed

    Cetinel, Bulent; Demirkesen, Oktay; Tarcan, Tufan; Yalcin, Onay; Kocak, Taner; Senocak, Mustafa; Itil, Ismail

    2007-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence of female urinary incontinence (UI) and risk factors of bothersomeness and help-seeking behavior of hidden female UI in urology and obstetrics and gynecology outpatient clinics. This multicentric and cross-sectional study was conducted as a part of the Turkish Overactive Bladder Study. Female patients (n = 5,565) who were referred with complaints other than UI and overactive bladder symptoms were surveyed using the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire Short Form (ICIQ-SF) with supplementation of five more questions. The crude prevalence of UI was found to be 35.7%. The prevalence of frequent and severe incontinence was 8.2 and 6.8%, respectively. The mean age of incontinent patients was significantly higher (p < 0.001). The prevalence of stress, urge, and mixed UI was 39.8, 24.8, and 28.9%, respectively. More than half (53%) of incontinent patients were not bothered by UI, and only 12% of incontinent patients had previously sought medical help for their problem. Frequency, severity, and type of UI were independent factors for predicting bothersome UI, while only bothersomeness increased help-seeking behavior. The ICIQ-SF score of 8 has been found to be the best cutoff value to delineate the bothersome UI. Although the crude prevalence of female UI was found to be high, bothersome UI was not so common. The majority of incontinent female patients did not seek medical help. Frequency, severity, and mixed type of UI were found to be the determinants of bothersome UI for which the ICIQ-SF cutoff score of 8 was obtained.

  10. Public managed care and service access in outpatient substance abuse treatment units.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Emmeline; Wells, Rebecca; Alexander, Jeffrey A

    2011-10-01

    The continued growth of public managed behavioral health care has raised concerns about possible effects on services provided. This study uses a national sample of outpatient substance abuse treatment units surveyed in 2005 to examine associations between public managed care and service access, measured as both the types of services provided and the amount of treatment received by clients. The percentage of clients funded through public managed care versus other types of public funding was positively associated with treatment units' odds of providing some types of resource-intensive services and with the odds of providing transportation to clients, but was negatively associated with the average number of individual therapy sessions clients received over the course of treatment. In general, public managed care does not appear to restrict access to outpatient substance abuse treatment, although states should monitor these contracts to ensure clients receive adequate courses of individual treatment.

  11. Outpatient management of heart failure in the United States, 2006-2008.

    PubMed

    Mosalpuria, Kailash; Agarwal, Sunil K; Yaemsiri, Sirin; Pierre-Louis, Bredy; Saba, Samir; Alvarez, Rene; Russell, Stuart D

    2014-06-01

    Better outpatient management of heart failure might improve outcomes and reduce the number of rehospitalizations. This study describes recent outpatient heart-failure management in the United States. We analyzed data from the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey of 2006-2008, a multistage random sampling of non-Federal physician offices and hospital outpatient departments. Annually, 1.7% of all outpatient visits were for heart failure (51% females and 77% non-Hispanic whites; mean age, 73 ± 0.5 yr). Typical comorbidities were hypertension (62%), hyperlipidemia (36%), diabetes mellitus (35%), and ischemic heart disease (29%). Body weight and blood pressure were recorded in about 80% of visits, and health education was given in about 40%. The percentage of patients taking β-blockers was 38%; the percentage taking angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors/angiotensin receptor blockers (ACEI/ARBs) was 32%. Medication usage did not differ significantly by race or sex. In multivariate-adjusted logistic regression models, a visit to a cardiologist, hypertension, heart failure as a primary reason for the visit, and a visit duration longer than 15 minutes were positively associated with ACEI/ARB use; and a visit to a cardiologist, heart failure as a primary reason for the visit, the presence of ischemic heart disease, and visit duration longer than 15 minutes were positively associated with β-blocker use. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease was negatively associated with β-blocker use. Approximately 1% of heart-failure visits resulted in hospitalization. In outpatient heart-failure management, gaps that might warrant attention include suboptimal health education and low usage rates of medications, specifically ACEI/ARBs and β-blockers.

  12. Receipt of outpatient cardiac rehabilitation among heart attack survivors--United States, 2005.

    PubMed

    2008-02-01

    Each year, approximately 865,000 persons in the United States have a myocardial infarction (i.e., heart attack). In 2007, direct and indirect costs of heart disease were estimated at approximately $277.1 billion. Cardiac rehabilitation, an essential component of recovery care after a heart attack, focuses on cardiovascular risk reduction, promoting healthy behaviors, reducing death and disability, and promoting an active lifestyle for heart attack survivors. Current guidelines from the American Heart Association (AHA) and the American Association of Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Rehabilitation emphasize the importance of cardiac rehabilitation, which reduces morbidity and mortality, improves clinical outcomes, enhances psychological recovery, and decreases the risk for secondary cardiac events. To estimate the prevalence of receipt of outpatient cardiac rehabilitation among heart attack survivors in 21 states and the District of Columbia (DC), data from the 2005 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) were assessed. The results of that assessment indicated that 34.7% of BRFSS respondents who had experienced a heart attack participated in outpatient cardiac rehabilitation. Outpatient cardiac rehabilitation for eligible patients after a heart attack is an essential component of care that should be incorporated into treatment plans. Increasing the number of persons who participate in cardiac rehabilitation services also can reduce health-care costs for recurrent events and reduce the burden on families and caregivers of patients with serious sequelae.

  13. The Evolving Role of the Acute Assessment Unit - from inpatient to outpatient care.

    PubMed

    Connolly, V; Hamad, M; Scott, Y; Bramble, M

    2005-01-01

    Acute Assessment Units (AAUs) have been developed to meet the demand for emergency care. Traditionally, AAUs have been an admission route to secondary care but the role is now evolving to assessment. AAUs are complex and have many interactions both in hospitals and the community. The effective functioning of an AAU requires excellent clinical leadership, appropriate facilities, timely access to diagnostics and input from the multi-disciplinary team. Increasingly, AAUs will have to develop services which are not dependent on using hospital beds. A variety of emergency medical presentations can, with the appropriate resources, be delivered in an out-patient setting.

  14. Contribution of the outpatient surgery unit ITO the general surgery department of a district hospital.

    PubMed

    Carrasco; Flores; Aguayo; de Andres B; Moreno Egea A; Cartagena; De Vicente JP; Martin

    2000-07-01

    Introduction: The creation of Outpatient Surgery (OPS) units to combine the quality of medical attention and rationalize costs allows for greater efficiency in the use of resources. Aim: To report our series of patients undergoing surgery at the OPS units integrated into our Hospital (Type II): Patients and method: Between May 1994 and March 1998, 832 outpatients, of a total of 5230, underwent surgery at our General Surgery Unit. The criteria for exclusion from the programme depended on the patient and the enviroment or resulted from the operation itself. Results: Mean patient age was 47.5 years; there were 420 males and 412 females. Surgery was performed for 229 inguinofemoral hernias, 47 umbilical-epigastric hernias, nine incisional hernias, 193 pilonidal sinuses, 156 mammary nodules, 65 varicose veins, 64 arteriovenous fistulae and 69 proctology operations. The most common anesthesia techniques performed were rachianesthesia and local anesthesia. Eight point seven percent of the patients required admission (OPS failure), the most frequent causes being excessive pain, orthostatic-syncopal hypotension, nausea and vomiting and urine retention. There was no morbidity or mortality. Conclusion: OPS is a highly efficient procedure for resolving the most common pathologies in General Surgery. The anesthesia technique was an important factor in the rate of failure.

  15. Exploring Death Anxiety and Burnout Among Staff Members Who Work In Outpatient Hemodialysis Units.

    PubMed

    Lee, Valerie L; King, Anita H

    2014-01-01

    Outpatient hemodialysis unit staff members are at risk for psychological stress, including death anxiety, unresolved grieving, and burnout, due tofrequent interactions with chronically ill patients who have a high mortality rate. Experiencing death anxiety and burnout may impair the ability to build interpersonal relationships, decrease job satisfaction, and impact quality of patient care. A quantitative study to evaluate the effect of educational classes on the level of death anxiety and burnout among hemodialysis caregivers revealed a decrease in participants' level of death anxiety and a decrease in emotional exhaustion in one area that was directly related to the work environment Information from the study can be used to decrease psychological stress through education and support for staff members who work in the hemodialysis unit environment.

  16. Significant Independent Predictors of Vitamin D Deficiency in Inpatients and Outpatients of a Nephrology Unit

    PubMed Central

    Bentli, Recep; Taskapan, Hulya; Toktaş, Halil; Ulutas, Ozkan; Ozkahraman, Adnan; Comert, Melda

    2013-01-01

    Aims. Kidney disease was found to be a major risk factor for vitamin D deficiency in a population study of patients hospitalized. The aims of the study were to describe the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency inpatients and outpatients in a nephrology department during fall and to evaluate effect of assessing serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) levels and previous supplementation of cholecalciferol on vitamin D status. Methods. We studied 280 subjects in total, between October and January. The subjects were recruited from the following two groups: (a) inpatients and (b) outpatients in nephrology unit. We examined previous documentary evidence of vitamin D supplementation of the patients. Results. The prevalence of vitamin D deficiency among these 280 patients was 62,1% (174 patients). Fifty-three patients (18.9%) had severe vitamin D deficiency, 121 patients (43.2%) moderate vitamin D deficiency, and 66 patients (23.6%) vitamin D insufficiency. In logistic regression analysis female gender, not having vitamin D supplementation history, low serum albumin, and low blood urea nitrogen levels were significant independent predictors of vitamin D deficiency while no association of vitamin D deficiency with diabetes mellitus, serum creatinine, eGFR, and being hospitalized was found. Conclusion. Vitamin D deficiency, seems to be an important problem in both inpatients and outpatients of nephrology. Monitoring serum 25(OH)D concentrations regularly and replacement of vitamin D are important. Women in Turkey are at more risk of deficiency and may therefore need to consume higher doses of vitamin D. PMID:23737771

  17. Evaluating Infection Prevention Strategies in Out-Patient Dialysis Units Using Agent-Based Modeling.

    PubMed

    Wares, Joanna R; Lawson, Barry; Shemin, Douglas; D'Agata, Erika M C

    2016-01-01

    Patients receiving chronic hemodialysis (CHD) are among the most vulnerable to infections caused by multidrug-resistant organisms (MDRO), which are associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality. Current guidelines to reduce transmission of MDRO in the out-patient dialysis unit are targeted at patients considered to be high-risk for transmitting these organisms: those with infected skin wounds not contained by a dressing, or those with fecal incontinence or uncontrolled diarrhea. Here, we hypothesize that targeting patients receiving antimicrobial treatment would more effectively reduce transmission and acquisition of MDRO. We also hypothesize that environmental contamination plays a role in the dissemination of MDRO in the dialysis unit. To address our hypotheses, we built an agent-based model to simulate different treatment strategies in a dialysis unit. Our results suggest that reducing antimicrobial treatment, either by reducing the number of patients receiving treatment or by reducing the duration of the treatment, markedly reduces overall colonization rates and also the levels of environmental contamination in the dialysis unit. Our results also suggest that improving the environmental decontamination efficacy between patient dialysis treatments is an effective method for reducing colonization and contamination rates. These findings have important implications for the development and implementation of future infection prevention strategies.

  18. Regional variations in the provision of NHS gynecological and abortion services.

    PubMed

    Maresh, M

    1979-07-01

    areas where it appears that consultant policy is greatly limiting Naitonal Health Service abortions, it may be necessary for outpatient abortion units to be established relatively independent of the gynecological service.

  19. A Public Health Priority: Disparities in Gynecologic Cancer Research for African-Born Women in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Pinder, Leeya F.; Nelson, Brett D.; Eckardt, Melody; Goodman, Annekathryn

    2016-01-01

    African-born immigrants comprise one of the fastest growing populations in the U.S., nearly doubling its population size in recent years. However, it is also one of the most underrepresented groups in health-care research, especially research focused on gynecologic and breast malignancies. While the opportunity exists for access to an advanced health-care system, as immigrants migrate to the U.S., they encounter the same health-care inequalities that are faced by the native-born population based on ethnicity and social class, potentiated by limitations of health literacy and lack of familiarity with U.S. health systems. Given the continued influx of African-born immigrants in the U.S., we sought to understand the representation of this population in cervical and breast cancer research, recognizing the population’s high risk for these diseases at baseline while residing in their native countries. We determined that there is limited research in these diseases that disproportionately affect them; yet, there are identifiable and potentially modifiable factors that contribute to this paucity of evidence. This clinical commentary seeks to underscore the clear lack of research available involving African-born immigrants with respect to gynecologic and breast malignancies in the existing literature, demonstrate the need for more robust research in this population, and provide fundamental insights into barriers and solutions critical to the continued health of this growing population. PMID:27499654

  20. Reported Sexual Violence among Women and Children Seen at the Gynecological Emergency Unit of a Rural Tertiary Health Facility, Northwest Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Ashimi, AO; Amole, TG; Ugwa, EA

    2015-01-01

    Background: Various forms of sexual violence including: Coerced marriage or wife inheritance, female genital mutilation, forced exposure to pornography, rape by intimate partner or strangers, unwanted sexual advances, and sexual abuse occurs, especially in vulnerable groups. However, most of these cases are not reported. Aim: The aim was to review reported cases in the facility, determine the prevalence and pattern of presentation. Subjects and Methods: This was a prospective longitudinal study undertaken at the Gynecological Emergency Unit of a Tertiary Health Facility in a rural setting Northwest Nigeria. A study of survivors of alleged sexual violence who presented to the hospital from the September 1, 2011 to August 31, 2013. Results: During the study period, there were 24 cases of sexual violence (22 were alleged rape and 2 were others) of 973 gynecological consultations at the emergency unit, giving a prevalence of 3% (24/973) for sexual violence and 2.3% (22/973) for alleged rape. Majority 91.7% (22/24) of the cases were children < 16 years; 45.8% (11/24) had no formal education while 33.3% (8/24) hawked homemade drinks and snacks. The assailants were known in 83.3% (20/24) of the cases; of which 45.8% (11/24) were neighbors, 29.2% (7/24) were buyers of snacks and drinks while 8.3% (2/24) were family members. Conclusion: The prevalence of reported sexual violence in this facility was low with the majority of the survivors being children and nonstranger assailants’, mostly neighbors. PMID:25745572

  1. Society of Gynecologic Surgeons

    MedlinePlus

    ... Myers, MD SGS Mission The mission of the Society of Gynecologic Surgeons is to promote excellence in ... research, and professional and public education. Research The Society prides itself in mentoring young gynecologic surgeons and ...

  2. Factors Associated With Use of ASAM Criteria and Service Provision in a National Sample of Outpatient Substance Abuse Treatment Units.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Emmeline; Wells, Rebecca; Alexander, Jeffrey A; Friedmann, Peter D; Lee, I-Heng

    2009-09-01

    Standardized patient placement criteria such as those developed by the American Society of Addiction Medicine are increasingly common in substance abuse treatment, but it is unclear what factors are associated with their use or with treatment units' provision of related services. This study examined these issues in the context of a national survey of outpatient substance abuse treatment units. Regressions using 2005 data revealed that both public and private managed care were associated with a greater likelihood of using American Society of Addiction Medicine criteria to develop client treatment plans. However, only public managed care was associated with a greater likelihood of offering more resource-intensive services. Associations between client population severity and resource-intensive service provision were sparse but positive.

  3. Working toward a common goal: a collaborative obstetrics and gynecology practice.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Nicole; Egan, Sarah; Flores, Christina; Kirsch, Abbe; Mankoff, Ruth; Resnick, Melissa

    2012-09-01

    Health care reform in the United States will continue to necessitate creativity in the organization and staffing of health care models. The Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Bronx-Lebanon Hospital Center has expanded its staff by placing midwives as primary providers for most routine care and much of the specialty care offered within the department. Midwives and attending physicians work collaboratively in outpatient specialty clinics. Inpatient care is provided by a team of midwives, residents, and attending physicians. This model of care is easily replicated, and has resulted in improvements in clinical practice and increased patient and personnel satisfaction.

  4. Patterns in admission delays to outpatient methadone treatment in the United States.

    PubMed

    Gryczynski, Jan; Schwartz, Robert P; Salkever, David S; Mitchell, Shannon Gwin; Jaffe, Jerome H

    2011-12-01

    Waiting lists for methadone treatment have existed in many U.S. communities, but little is known nationally about what patient and service system factors are related to admission delays that stem from program capacity shortfalls. Using a combination of national data sources, this study examined patterns in capacity-related admission delays to outpatient methadone treatment in 40 U.S. metropolitan areas (N = 28,920). Patient characteristics associated with admission delays included racial/ethnic minority status, lower education, criminal justice referral, prior treatment experience, secondary cocaine or alcohol use, and co-occurring psychiatric problems. Injection drug users experienced fewer delays, as did self-pay patients and referrals from health care and addiction treatment providers. Higher community-level utilization of methadone treatment was associated with delay, whereas delays were less common in communities with higher utilization of alternative modalities. These findings highlight potential disparities in timely admission to outpatient methadone treatment. Implications for improving treatment access and service system monitoring are discussed.

  5. Definitions of Obstetric and Gynecologic Hospitalists.

    PubMed

    McCue, Brigid; Fagnant, Robert; Townsend, Arthur; Morgan, Meredith; Gandhi-List, Shefali; Colegrove, Tanner; Stosur, Harriet; Olson, Rob; Meyer, Karenmarie; Lin, Andrew; Tessmer-Tuck, Jennifer

    2016-02-01

    The obstetric hospitalist and the obstetric and gynecologic hospitalist evolved in response to diverse forces in medicine, including the need for leadership on labor and delivery units, an increasing emphasis on quality and safety in obstetrics and gynecology, the changing demographics of the obstetric and gynecologic workforce, and rising liability costs. Current (although limited) research suggests that obstetric and obstetric and gynecologic hospitalists may improve the quality and safety of obstetric care, including lower cesarean delivery rates and higher vaginal birth after cesarean delivery rates as well as lower liability costs and fewer liability events. This research is currently hampered by the use of varied terminology. The leadership of the Society of Obstetric and Gynecologic Hospitalists proposes standardized definitions of an obstetric hospitalist, an obstetric and gynecologic hospitalist, and obstetric and gynecologic hospital medicine practices to standardize communication and facilitate program implementation and research. Clinical investigations regarding obstetric and gynecologic practices (including hospitalist practices) should define inpatient coverage arrangements using these standardized definitions to allow for fair conclusions and comparisons between practices.

  6. Dissociative identity disorder among adolescents: prevalence in a university psychiatric outpatient unit.

    PubMed

    Sar, Vedat; Onder, Canan; Kilincaslan, Ayse; Zoroglu, Süleyman S; Alyanak, Behiye

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of dissociative identity disorder (DID) and other dissociative disorders among adolescent psychiatric outpatients. A total of 116 consecutive outpatients between 11 and 17 years of age who were admitted to the child and adolescent psychiatry clinic of a university hospital for the 1st time were evaluated using the Adolescent Dissociative Experiences Scale, adolescent version of the Child Symptom Inventory-4, Childhood Trauma Questionnaire, and McMaster Family Assessment Device. All patients were invited for an interview with the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Dissociative Disorders (SCID-D) administered by 2 senior psychiatrists in a blind fashion. There was excellent interrater reliability between the 2 clinicians on SCID-D diagnoses and scores. Among 73 participants, 33 (45.2%) had a dissociative disorder: 12 (16.4%) had DID, and 21 (28.8%) had dissociative disorder not otherwise specified. There was no difference in gender distribution, childhood trauma, or family dysfunction scores between the dissociative and nondissociative groups. Childhood emotional abuse and family dysfunction correlated with self-reported dissociation. Of the dissociative adolescents, 93.9% had an additional psychiatric disorder. Among them, only separation anxiety disorder was significantly more prevalent than in controls. Although originally designed for adults, the SCID-D is promising for diagnosing dissociative disorders in adolescents, its modest congruence with self-rated dissociation and lack of relationship between diagnosis and childhood trauma and family dysfunction suggest that the prevalence rates obtained with this instrument originally designed for adults must be replicated. The introduction of diagnostic criteria for adolescent DID in revised versions of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition, would refine the assessment of dissociative disorders in this age group.

  7. [Information technology in gynecological oncology today].

    PubMed

    Kupka, M S; Richter, O; Tutschek, B

    2003-11-01

    Information technology has been integrated in gynecological oncology treatment. Therefore, new software has been established in hospitals and out-patient clinics. A German law concerning data collection in oncology has attempted to unify different strategies. All intentions to establish new documentation systems for tumor diseases need a standardized basic data set. Nevertheless, local governmental health organizations are not yet prepared to implement a global information system such as prenatal and perinatal care databases. Financial support and political work is therefore needed.

  8. How Outpatient Substance Abuse Treatment Unit Director Activities May Affect Provision of Community Outreach Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chuang, Emmeline; Wells, Rebecca; Alexander, Jeffrey; Green, Sherri

    2013-01-01

    Aims: Community outreach services play an important role in infectious disease prevention and engaging drug users not currently in treatment. However, fewer than half of US substance abuse treatment units provide these services and many have little financial incentive to do so. Unit directors generally have latitude about scope of services,…

  9. Outpatient Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... Outpatient Surgery Share this Page Preparing For Surgery Effects of Anesthesia Children and Anesthesia Pregnancy and Anesthesia Seniors and Anesthesia Surgery Risks Anesthesia Awareness Obesity and Anesthesia Sleep Apnea and Anesthesia Smoking and Anesthesia Outpatient Surgery ...

  10. Cost of Outpatient Arthroscopic Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Among Commercially Insured Patients in the United States, 2005-2013

    PubMed Central

    Herzog, Mackenzie M.; Marshall, Stephen W.; Lund, Jennifer L.; Pate, Virginia; Spang, Jeffrey T.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Despite the significance of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries, these conditions have been under-researched from a population-level perspective. It is important to determine the economic effect of these injuries in order to document the public health burden in the United States. Purpose: To describe the cost of outpatient arthroscopic ACL reconstruction and health care utilization among commercially insured beneficiaries in the United States. Study Design: Economic and decision analysis; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: The study used the Truven Health Analytics MarketScan Commercial Claims and Encounters database, an administrative claims database that contains a large sample (approximately 148 million) of privately insured individuals aged <65 years and enrolled in employer-sponsored plans. All claims with Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) code 29888 (arthroscopically aided ACL reconstruction or augmentation) from 2005 to 2013 were included. “Immediate procedure” cost was computed assuming a 3-day window of care centered on date of surgery. “Total health care utilization” cost was computed using a 9-month window of care (3 months preoperative and 6 months postoperative). Results: There were 229,446 outpatient arthroscopic ACL reconstructions performed over the 9-year study period. Median immediate procedure cost was $9399.49. Median total health care utilization cost was $13,403.38. Patients who underwent concomitant collateral ligament (medial [MCL], lateral [LCL]) repair or reconstruction had the highest costs for both immediate procedure ($12,473.24) and health care utilization ($17,006.34). For patients who had more than 1 reconstruction captured in the database, total health care utilization costs were higher for the second procedure than the first procedure ($16,238.43 vs $15,000.36), despite the fact that immediate procedure costs were lower for second procedures ($8685.73 vs $9445.26). Conclusion: These results provide a

  11. POLYCLONAL OUTBREAK OF BLOODSTREAM INFECTIONS CAUSED BY Burkholderia cepacia COMPLEX IN HEMATOLOGY AND BONE MARROW TRANSPLANT OUTPATIENT UNITS

    PubMed Central

    Boszczowski, Icaro; do Prado, Gladys Villas Boas; Dalben, Mirian F.; Telles, Roberto C. P.; Freire, Maristela Pinheiro; Guimarães, Thaís; Oliveira, Maura S.; Rosa, Juliana F.; Soares, Robson E.; Llacer, Pedro Enrique Dorlhiac; Dulley, Frederico Luiz; Costa, Silvia F.; Levin, Anna S.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The objective was to describe an outbreak of bloodstream infections by Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) in bone marrow transplant and hematology outpatients. Methods: On February 15, 2008 a Bcc outbreak was suspected. 24 cases were identified. Demographic and clinical data were evaluated. Environment and healthcare workers' (HCW) hands were cultured. Species were determined and typed. Reinforcement of hand hygiene, central venous catheter (CVC) care, infusion therapy, and maintenance of laminar flow cabinet were undertaken. 16 different HCWs had cared for the CVCs. Multi-dose heparin and saline were prepared on counter common to both units. Findings: 14 patients had B. multivorans (one patient had also B. cenopacia), six non-multivorans Bcc and one did not belong to Bcc. Clone A B. multivorans occurred in 12 patients (from Hematology); in 10 their CVC had been used on February 11/12. Environmental and HCW cultures were negative. All patients were treated with meropenem, and ceftazidime lock-therapy. Eight patients (30%) were hospitalized. No deaths occurred. After control measures (multidose vial for single patient; CVC lock with ceftazidime; cleaning of laminar flow cabinet; hand hygiene improvement; use of cabinet to store prepared medication), no new cases occurred. Conclusions: This polyclonal outbreak may be explained by a common source containing multiple species of Bcc, maybe the laminar flow cabinet common to both units. There may have been contamination by B. multivorans (clone A) of multi-dose vials. PMID:24553612

  12. [Robotic surgery in gynecology].

    PubMed

    Hibner, Michał; Marianowski, Piotr; Szymusik, Iwona; Wielgós, Mirosław

    2012-12-01

    Introduction of robotic surgery in the first decade of the 21 century was one of the biggest breakthroughs in surgery since the introduction of anesthesia. For the first time in history the surgeon was placed remotely from the patient and was able to operate with the device that has more degrees of freedom than human hand. Initially developed for the US Military in order to allow surgeons to be removed from the battlefield, surgical robots quickly made a leap to the mainstream medicine. One of the first surgical uses for the robot was cardiac surgery but it is urology and prostate surgery that gave it a widespread popularity Gynecologic surgeons caught on very quickly and it is estimated that 31% of hysterectomies done in the United States in 2012 will be done robotically. With over half a million hysterectomies done each year in the US alone, gynecologic surgery is one of the main driving forces behind the growth of robotic surgery Other applications in gynecology include myomectomy oophorectomy and ovarian cystectomy resection of endometriosis and lymphadenectomy Advantages of the surgical robot are clearly seen in myomectomy The wrist motion allows for better more precise suturing than conventional "straight stick" laparoscopy The strength of the arms allow for better pulling of the suture and the third arm for holding the suture on tension. Other advantage of the robot is scaling of the movements when big movement on the outside translates to very fine movement on the inside. This enables much more precise surgery and may be important in the procedures like tubal anastomosis and implantation of the ureter Three-dimensional vision provides excellent depth of field perception. It is important for surgeons who are switching from open surgeries and preliminary evidence shows that it may allow for better identification of lesions like endometriosis. Another big advantage of robotics is that the surgeon sits comfortably with his/her arms and head supported. This

  13. Staff perception of interprofessional working relationships after a work redesign intervention in a Danish orthopaedic hand unit outpatient clinic.

    PubMed

    de Beijer, Anke Elisabeth; Hansen, Torben Bæk; Stilling, Maiken; Jakobsen, Flemming

    2016-01-01

    There is evidence that clinical pathways improve quality of care; however, knowledge is limited concerning the influence on and the benefits experienced by the interprofessional teams working with these pathways. Our working methods in a hand unit in an orthopaedic outpatient clinic in Denmark were redesigned to include, among other changes, the introduction of clinical pathways. Changes included standardising treatment and communication methods, delegating tasks from medical specialists to nurses, and providing nurses with their own consultation room. Using focus group interviews before and after the implementation of the new working methods, we investigated staff-perceived experiences of the effects on working relationships and the utilisation of professional skills and attitudes, resulting from the mentioned change in working methods. The results were changes in daily communication methods among healthcare staff and improvements in the actual communication and collaborative problem solving skills concerning standard patients with simple hand pathology; however, there are still challenges for patients with more complex hand pathology. Though this new interprofessional arrangement improves the use of nurse and medical specialist professional competencies, it also requires a high degree of trust among the team members.

  14. Gynecological Care and Information

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cibley, Leonard

    1978-01-01

    Based upon his experience as gynecologist at the Fernald School, the author suggests a set of criteria for establishing and running a gynecology program at an institution for the mentally retarded. (SBH)

  15. [Robotic surgery in gynecology].

    PubMed

    Csorba, Roland

    2012-06-24

    Minimally invasive surgery has revolutionized gynecological interventions over the past 30 years. The introduction of the da Vinci robotic surgery in 2005 has resulted in large changes in surgical management. The robotic platform allows less experienced laparoscopic surgeons to perform more complex procedures. It can be utilized mainly in general gynecology and reproductive gynecology. The robot is being increasingly used for procedures such as hysterectomy, myomectomy, adnexal surgery, and tubal anastomosis. In urogynecology, the robot is being utilized for sacrocolopexy as well. In the field of gynecologic oncology, the robot is being increasingly used for hysterectomy and lymphadenectomy in oncologic diseases. Despite the rapid and widespread adaption of robotic surgery in gynecology, there are no randomized trials comparing its efficacy and safety to other traditional surgical approaches. This article presents the development, technical aspects and indications of robotic surgery in gynecology, based on the previously published reviews. Robotic surgery can be highly advantageous with the right amount of training, along with appropriate patient selection. Patients will have less blood loss, less post-operative pain, faster recovery, and fewer complications compared to open surgery and laparoscopy. However, until larger randomized control trials are completed which report long-term outcomes, robotic surgery cannot be stated to have priority over other surgical methods.

  16. Decentralization of Care for Adults with Congenital Heart Disease in the United States: A Geographic Analysis of Outpatient Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Maxwell, Bryan G.; Maxwell, Thane G.; Wong, Jim K.

    2014-01-01

    Background Guidelines recommend that adults with congenital heart disease (CHD) undergo noncardiac surgery in regionalized centers of expertise, but no studies have assessed whether this occurs in the United States. We hypothesized that adults with CHD are less likely than children to receive care at specialized CHD centers. Methods Using a comprehensive state ambulatory surgical registry (California Ambulatory Surgery Database, 2005–2011), we calculated the proportion of adult and pediatric patients with CHD who had surgery at a CHD center, distance to the nearest CHD center, and distance to the facility where surgery was performed. Results Patients with CHD accounted for a larger proportion of the pediatric population (n = 11,254, 1.0%) than the adult population (n = 10,547, 0.07%). Only 2,741 (26.0%) adults with CHD had surgery in a CHD center compared to 6,403 (56.9%) children (p<0.0001). Adult CHD patients who had surgery at a non-specialty center (11.9±15.4 miles away) lived farther from the nearest CHD center (37.9±43.0 miles) than adult CHD patients who had surgery at a CHD center (23.2±28.4 miles; p<0.0001). Pediatric CHD patients who had surgery at a non-specialty center (18.0±20.7 miles away) lived farther from the nearest CHD center (35.7±45.2 miles) than pediatric CHD patients who had surgery at a CHD center (22.4±26.0 miles; p<0.0001). Conclusions Unlike children with CHD, most adults with CHD (74%) do not have outpatient surgery at a CHD center. For both adults and children with CHD, greater distance from a CHD center is associated with having surgery at a non-specialty center. These results have significant public health implications in that they suggest a failing to achieve adequate regional access to specialized ACHD care. Further studies will be required to evaluate potential strategies to more reliably direct this vulnerable population to centers of expertise. PMID:25247694

  17. [Outpatient care for urological patients].

    PubMed

    Kul'chitskiĭ, V V

    1999-01-01

    The presence of adequately equipped surgical unit in outpatient clinics provides surgical aid to more patients with urological diseases. Preoperative preparation, aseptic and antiseptic measures, local anesthesia were routine. 64 operations for phimosis, condylomatous growth of the foreskin, hydrocele, cyst of the epididymis and spermatic cord, chronic epididymitis, short frenulum of the prepuce were performed in outpatient setting. Recovery lasted as usual.

  18. Outpatient Antibiotic Prescribing Practices for Uncomplicated Urinary Tract Infection in Women in the United States, 2002–2011

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Miwako; Shapiro, Daniel J.; Hersh, Adam L.; Sanchez, Guillermo V.; Hicks, Lauri A.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Urinary tract infection (UTI) is one of the most common diagnoses leading to an antibiotic prescription for women seeking ambulatory care. Understanding current national outpatient antibiotic prescribing practices will help ongoing stewardship efforts to optimize antibiotic use; however, information on recent national outpatient antibiotic prescribing trends for UTI is limited. Methods. We analyzed the National Ambulatory Medical Care and National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey datasets from 2002 to 2011. Outpatient visits of women aged ≥18 years with a diagnosis of uncomplicated UTI were included for analysis. We conducted weighted descriptive analyses, examined time trends in antibiotic prescribing, and used multivariable logistic regression to identify patient and provider factors associated with fluoroquinolone prescribing. Results. A total of 7111 visits were identified. Eighty percent of visits resulted in an antibiotic prescription; fluoroquinolones were the most frequently prescribed antibiotics throughout the study period (49% overall). Older patients (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] for adults aged ≥70 years = 2.5; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.6–3.8) and patients treated by internists (AOR = 2.0; 95% CI, 1.1–3.3) were more likely than younger patients and those treated by family practitioners to receive fluoroquinolones. Outpatient visits in the West US Census region were less likely to be associated with fluoroquinolone prescribing (AOR = 0.6; 95% CI, .4–1.0) compared with visits in the Northeast. Conclusions. Fluoroquinolones were the most frequently selected antibiotic treatment for uncomplicated UTI in women during the study period. Outpatient antibiotic stewardship initiatives should include efforts to reduce overuse of fluoroquinolones for uncomplicated UTI. PMID:27704014

  19. Antiprogestins in gynecological diseases

    PubMed Central

    Goyeneche, Alicia A; Telleria, Carlos M

    2015-01-01

    Antiprogestins constitute a group of compounds, developed since the early 1980s, that bind progesterone receptors with different affinities. The first clinical uses for antiprogestins were in reproductive medicine, e.g., menstrual regulation, emergency contraception, and termination of early pregnancies. These initial applications, however, belied the capacity for these compounds to interfere with cell growth. Within the context of gynecological diseases, antiprogestins can block the growth of and kill gynecological-related cancer cells, such as those originating in the breast, ovary, endometrium, and cervix. They can also interrupt the excessive growth of cells giving rise to benign gynecological diseases such as endometriosis and leiomyomata (uterine fibroids). In this article, we present a review of the literature providing support for the antigrowth activity that antiprogestins impose on cells in various gynecological diseases. We also provide a summary of the cellular and molecular mechanisms reported for these compounds that lead to cell growth inhibition and death. The preclinical knowledge gained during the past few years provides robust evidence to encourage the use of antiprogestins in order to alleviate the burden of gynecological diseases, either as monotherapies or as adjuvants of other therapies with the perspective of allowing for long-term treatments with tolerable side effects. The key to the clinical success of antiprogestins in this field probably lies in selecting those patients who will benefit from this therapy. This can be achieved by defining the genetic makeup required – within each particular gynecological disease – for attaining an objective response to antiprogestin-driven growth inhibition therapy. Free Spanish abstract A Spanish translation of this abstract is freely available at http://www.reproduction-online.org/content/149/1/15/suppl/DC1. PMID:25252652

  20. Danish Gynecological Cancer Database

    PubMed Central

    Sørensen, Sarah Mejer; Bjørn, Signe Frahm; Jochumsen, Kirsten Marie; Jensen, Pernille Tine; Thranov, Ingrid Regitze; Hare-Bruun, Helle; Seibæk, Lene; Høgdall, Claus

    2016-01-01

    Aim of database The Danish Gynecological Cancer Database (DGCD) is a nationwide clinical cancer database and its aim is to monitor the treatment quality of Danish gynecological cancer patients, and to generate data for scientific purposes. DGCD also records detailed data on the diagnostic measures for gynecological cancer. Study population DGCD was initiated January 1, 2005, and includes all patients treated at Danish hospitals for cancer of the ovaries, peritoneum, fallopian tubes, cervix, vulva, vagina, and uterus, including rare histological types. Main variables DGCD data are organized within separate data forms as follows: clinical data, surgery, pathology, pre- and postoperative care, complications, follow-up visits, and final quality check. DGCD is linked with additional data from the Danish “Pathology Registry”, the “National Patient Registry”, and the “Cause of Death Registry” using the unique Danish personal identification number (CPR number). Descriptive data Data from DGCD and registers are available online in the Statistical Analysis Software portal. The DGCD forms cover almost all possible clinical variables used to describe gynecological cancer courses. The only limitation is the registration of oncological treatment data, which is incomplete for a large number of patients. Conclusion The very complete collection of available data from more registries form one of the unique strengths of DGCD compared to many other clinical databases, and provides unique possibilities for validation and completeness of data. The success of the DGCD is illustrated through annual reports, high coverage, and several peer-reviewed DGCD-based publications. PMID:27822089

  1. Robotic surgery in gynecology

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Rooma; Sanjay, Madhumati; Rupa, B.; Kumari, Samita

    2015-01-01

    FDA approved Da Vinci Surgical System in 2005 for gynecological surgery. It has been rapidly adopted and it has already assumed an important position at various centers where this is available. It comprises of three components: A surgeon's console, a patient-side cart with four robotic arms and a high-definition three-dimensional (3D) vision system. In this review we have discussed various robotic-assisted laparoscopic benign gynecological procedures like myomectomy, hysterectomy, endometriosis, tubal anastomosis and sacrocolpopexy. A PubMed search was done and relevant published studies were reviewed. Surgeries that can have future applications are also mentioned. At present most studies do not give significant advantage over conventional laparoscopic surgery in benign gynecological disease. However robotics do give an edge in more complex surgeries. The conversion rate to open surgery is lesser with robotic assistance when compared to laparoscopy. For myomectomy surgery, Endo wrist movement of robotic instrument allows better and precise suturing than conventional straight stick laparoscopy. The robotic platform is a logical step forward to laparoscopy and if cost considerations are addressed may become popular among gynecological surgeons world over. PMID:25598600

  2. [Outpatient emergencies].

    PubMed

    Rivallan, Armel; Le Nagard, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    The outpatient monitoring of patients sometimes involves emergency situations. In their practice, the nurses who visit the patient's home are confronted with the limits of their intervention. Faced with these delicate situations team coordination is a strength and the reactivity of the caregivers often contributes to a satisfactory outcome for the patient.

  3. Gynecologic Cancer Disparities: a Report from the Health Disparities Taskforce of the Society of Gynecologic Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Yvonne; Holcomb, Kevin; Chapman-Davis, Eloise; Khabele, Dineo; Farley, John H.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To review the extent of health disparities in gynecologic cancer care and outcomes and to propose recommendations to help counteract the disparities. Methods We searched the electronic databases PubMed and the Cochrane Library. We included studies demonstrating quantifiable differences by race and ethnicity in the incidence, treatment, and survival of gynecologic cancers in the United States (US). Most studies relied on retrospective data. We focused on differences between Black and White women, because of the limited number of studies on non-Black women. Results White women have a higher incidence of ovarian cancer compared to Black women. However, the all-cause ovarian cancer mortality in Black women is 1.3 times higher than that of White women. Endometrial and cervical cancer mortality in Black women is twice that of White women. The etiology of these disparities is multifaceted. However, much of the evidence suggests that equal care leads to equal outcomes for Black women diagnosed with gynecologic cancers. Underlying molecular factors may play an additional role in aggressive tumor biology and endometrial cancer disparities. Conclusion Gynecologic cancer disparities exist between Black and White women. The literature is limited by the lack of large prospective trials and adequate numbers of non-Black racial and ethnic groups. We conclude with recommendations for continued research and a multifaceted approach to eliminate gynecologic cancer disparities. PMID:24406291

  4. Gynecology in Pompeii.

    PubMed

    Bliquez, L J

    1995-01-01

    By tracing the proveniences of the Greco-Roman surgical instruments in the Naples Museum, it is possible to identify sites in Pompeii where surgeons were active. Some of these sites attract special attention owing to the intricacy and quantity of the tools in their instrumentaria. In a few cases a surgical specialty is apparent. Into this category fall three houses that can be associated with the practice of gynecology.

  5. Predictive value of human biomonitoring in environmental medicine: experiences at the outpatient unit of environmental medicine (UEM) of the University Hospital Aachen, Germany.

    PubMed

    Straff, Wolfgang; Möller, Manfred; Jakobi, Nikolaus; Weishoff-Houben, Michaela; Dott, Wolfgang; Wiesmüller, Gerhard Andreas

    2002-07-01

    There is little data on the distribution of biomonitoring parameters in patients at outpatient Units of Environmental Medicine (UEM). We evaluated the biomonitoring parameters of 646 UEM outpatients from our University Hospital 1988-1998. Few patients were exposed to specific substances. Data of patients who were not obviously exposed was analysed statistically (geometric mean, standard deviation, median, 95th percentile). Results were compared with reference values in literature. Normal distribution of biomonitoring parameters was rare. 95th percentiles for arsenic, chromium, selenium, zinc, phenol and toluene were below standard, 95th percentiles for copper and mercury above, and 95th percentiles for lead, cadmium, pentachlorophenol, lindane, and beta-hexachlorocyclohexane were within the published range of reference values. Thallium as well as most volatile organic compounds analyzed were below detection levels. Aluminum and fluorine exposure was rarely analysed. In view of these results, it is concluded that the indication for biomonitoring needs to be stringent as levels of biomonitoring parameters are generally not risen in patients of the UEM.

  6. Survey of robotic surgery training in obstetrics and gynecology residency.

    PubMed

    Gobern, Joseph M; Novak, Christopher M; Lockrow, Ernest G

    2011-01-01

    To examine the status of resident training in robotic surgery in obstetrics and gynecology programs in the United States, an online survey was emailed to residency program directors of 247 accredited programs identified through the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education website. Eighty-three of 247 program directors responded, representing a 34% response rate. Robotic surgical systems for gynecologic procedures were used at 65 (78%) institutions. Robotic surgery training was part of residency curriculum at 48 (58%) residency programs. Half of respondents were undecided on training effectiveness. Most program directors believed the role of robotic surgery would increase and play a more integral role in gynecologic surgery. Robotic surgery was widely reported in residency training hospitals with limited availability of effective resident training. Robotic surgery training in obstetrics and gynecology residency needs further assessment and may benefit from a structured curriculum.

  7. Use of Psychosocial Services Increases after a Social Worker-Mediated Intervention in Gynecology Oncology Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abbott, Yuko; Shah, Nina R.; Ward, Kristy K.; McHale, Michael T.; Alvarez, Edwin A.; Saenz, Cheryl C.; Plaxe, Steven C.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the introduction of psychosocial services to gynecologic oncology outpatients by a social worker increases service use. During the initial six weeks (phase I), patients were referred for psychosocial services by clinic staff. During the second six weeks (phase II), a nurse introduced available…

  8. OCT in Gynecology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsova, Irina A.; Gladkova, Natalia D.; Gelikonov, Valentin M.; Belinson, Jerome L.; Shakhova, Natalia M.; Feldchtein, Felix I.

    Timely and efficient diagnosis of diseases of the female reproductivesystem is very important from the social viewpoint [1, 2]. Diagnosticefficacy of the existing techniques still needs improvement sincemalignant neoplasms of the female reproductive system organs are stableleaders among causes of death (over 35.9 %) [3]. Each year, 851.9 thousand genital cancer cases are recorded worldwide [1, 2]. However, the diagnostic efficacy of the visual examination with biopsy is limited. Correct interpretation of colposcopic features requires high skills and long-term clinical experience, which makes colposcopy very subjective and limits interobserver agreement [8-10]. OCT is known to visualize in vivo and noninvasively tissue microstructure with spatial resolution approaching the histologic level and therefore can be expected to guide biopsies and to provide real-time tissue structure information when biopsies are contraindicated or impractical. Although thorough clinical studies are required to determine if OCT can be suitable for this purpose in gynecology in general and for cervical cancer in particular, the early results look encouraging. In this chapter, we present a wide spectrum of the OCT studies of different partsof the female reproductive system and demonstrate the potential of the clinical use of this new visualization method in gynecological practice.

  9. Building a pediatric neurocritical care program: a multidisciplinary approach to clinical practice and education from the intensive care unit to the outpatient clinic.

    PubMed

    Wainwright, Mark S; Grimason, Michele; Goldstein, Joshua; Smith, Craig M; Amlie-Lefond, Catherine; Revivo, Gadi; Noah, Zehava L; Harris, Zena L; Epstein, Leon G

    2014-12-01

    We describe our 10-year experience developing the Ruth D. & Ken M. Davee Pediatric Neurocritical Care Program at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine. The neurocritical care team includes intensivists, neurologists, and an advanced practice nurse who have expertise in critical care neurology and who continue care in long-term follow-up of intensive care unit patients in a dedicated neurocritical care outpatient clinic. Brain-directed critical care requires collaboration between intensivists and neurologists with specific expertise in neurocritical care, using protocol-directed consistent care, and physiological measures to protect brain function. The heterogeneity of neurologic disorders in the pediatric intensive care unit requires a background in the relevant basic science and pathophysiology that is beyond the scope of standard neurology or critical care fellowships. To address this need, we also created a fellowship in neurocritical care for intensivists, neurologists, and advanced practice nurses. Last, we discuss the implications for pediatric neurocritical care from the experience of management of pediatric stroke and the development of stroke centers.

  10. Robotic Surgery in Gynecologic Oncology

    PubMed Central

    DeBernardo, Robert; Starks, David; Barker, Nichole; Armstrong, Amy; Kunos, Charles A.

    2011-01-01

    Robotic surgery for the management of gynecologic cancers allows for minimally invasive surgical removal of cancer-bearing organs and tissues using sophisticated surgeon-manipulated, robotic surgical instrumentation. Early on, gynecologic oncologists recognized that minimally invasive surgery was associated with less surgical morbidity and that it shortened postoperative recovery. Now, robotic surgery represents an effective alternative to conventional laparotomy. Since its widespread adoption, minimally invasive surgery has become an option not only for the morbidly obese but for women with gynecologic malignancy where conventional laparotomy has been associated with significant morbidity. As such, this paper considers indications for robotic surgery, reflects on outcomes from initial robotic surgical outcomes data, reviews cost efficacy and implications in surgical training, and discusses new roles for robotic surgery in gynecologic cancer management. PMID:22190946

  11. [Oncologic gynecology and the Internet].

    PubMed

    Gizler, Robert; Bielanów, Tomasz; Kulikiewicz, Krzysztof

    2002-11-01

    The strategy of World Wide Web searching for medical sites was presented in this article. The "deep web" and "surface web" resources were searched. The 10 best sites connected with the gynecological oncology, according to authors' opinion, were presented.

  12. Is treatment in groups a useful alternative for psychiatry in low-income countries? An evaluation of a psychiatric outpatient unit in Nicaragua.

    PubMed

    Caldera, T; Kullgren, G; Penayo, U; Jacobsson, L

    1995-11-01

    Centro de Atención Psicosocial in León, Nicaragua is a psychiatric outpatient unit that has developed a group-oriented model of working, in which 80% of all visits are in groups: first-admission groups, insight-oriented group psychotherapy, psycho-educative, family groups and relatives groups. The aim of the present study was to analyze patient characteristics and make a preliminary study of improvement, compliance and patient satisfaction in a 1-year perspective. One hundred consecutive visits were assessed, 44 of them first admissions. They were assessed according to all axes of DSM-III-R plus the Structural Clinical Interview for DSM-III Disorders. A 1-year follow up was conducted on 39 of 41 selected patients within the major diagnostic groups. One of 4 patients had a psychotic disorder where schizophrenia dominated. Among nonpsychotics major depression, anxiety and adjustment disorders were most frequent. Personality disorders were common (80%) among nonpsychotic patients, paranoid, obsessive-compulsive, passive-aggressive and masochistic personality disorders dominating. The illiteracy rate was 10%, but 50% had high school or university background. Severity of mental disorders and functional level did not differ between educational levels. There was a strong male dominance in all diagnostic, socioeconomic and educational level strata and few old patients. Improvement in functional level was clinically and statistically significant in all groups, and more than two thirds were very satisfied with the group treatment offered.

  13. [Voice disorder clinic in the speech therapy outpatient unit at "Hospital das Clínicas da Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais"].

    PubMed

    Menezes, Letícia Neiva de; Behlau, Mara; Gama, Ana Cristina Côrtes; Teixeira, Letícia Caldas

    2011-07-01

    This study set out to describe the profile of the patients with voice complaints and/or alterations who were attended between July 2003 and December 2006 at the speech therapy outpatient unit of "Hospital das Clínicas da Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais." This was analyzed according to age, sex, profession, schooling, origin, treatment performed and factors that interfere in medical care evolution. This was a retrospective study based on the analysis of the recorded data of the individuals according to a specifically prepared Protocol. The results showed that the individuals included in this study were predominantly young women, referred by a specialist from Belo Horizonte, who do not work and also have incomplete elementary school education. Attendance of those patients was on an individual basis, and almost half of them were discharged by the speech therapist. The elderly patients, who have functional or psychogenic dysphonia and a neutral or wheezy type of voice, showed a close correlation with the discharge rate by speech therapist. The younger individuals with organo-functional dysphonia bore a statistical correlation with abandoning treatment. The individuals who eventually abandoned treatment did not bear any correlation with the crossed variables.

  14. Gynecological cancer in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Aziz, M Farid

    2009-03-01

    To overview the status of gynecologic cancer in Indonesia. Information regarding Indonesia obtained from World Bank Report and Statistical Yearbook of Indonesia 2007, epidemiological data obtained from Histopathological Data of Cancer in Indonesia 2002, Department of Health-Registry Body of Indonesian Specialist of Pathology Association-Indonesian Cancer Society; Various Hospitals in big Cities in Indonesia. Indonesia is an Archipelago with a total area of 1,922,570.00 km(2), the population is 222,192,000 (2006), the fourth world rank. Female is 49.86% with life expectancy 69 years. Gross National Product per Capita is 690.00 USD. Histopathological report in 2002 revealed that cervical cancer, ovarian cancer and uterine cancer were the most frequent cancer among female, which were the first (2,532 cases), the third (829 cases) and the eighth (316 cases) rank respectively. The peak age for cervical, uterine and ovarian cancer was 45-54 years. HPV 16, 18 were found in 82% of invasive cervical. Data from various academic hospitals in 2007 showed that cervical cancer is the most common malignancy followed by ovary, uterus, vulva and vagina. Five-year survival rate of stage I, II, III, IV cervical cancer were 50%, 40%, 20%, and 0% respectively. Overall five-year survival rate of carcinoma of the ovary was 54.8%. If sub-classified by stage, five-year survival rate are 94.3%, 75.0%, 31%, and 11.7% for stage I, II, III, and IV respectively. Five-year disease-free survival rate of endometrial cancer was 71.9%. Indonesia is the biggest Archipelago with a dense population but the income per capita still low (poor country). The most common gynecologic cancer is cervical cancer, followed by ovarian and uterine cancer. These cancers are included in top ten cancers in Indonesia. HPV 16, 18 were the most cause of cervical cancer. The five-year survival rates are comparable with world report.

  15. Laser treatment in gynecology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Riese, Cornelia

    2004-07-01

    This presentation is designed as a brief overview of laser use in gynecology, for non-medical researchers involved in development of new laser techniques. The literature of the past decade is reviewed. Differences in penetration, absorption, and suitable delivery media for the beams dictate clinical application. The use of CO2 laser in the treatment of uterine cervical intraepithelial lesions is well established and indications as well as techniques have not changed over 30 years. The Cochrane Systematic Review from 2000 suggests no obviously superior technique. CO2 laser ablation of the vagina is also established as a safe treatment modality for VAIN. CO2 laser permits treatment of lesions with excellent cosmetic and functional results. The treatment of heavy menstrual bleeding by destruction of the endometrial lining using various techniques has been the subject of a 2002 Cochran Database Review. Among the compared treatment modalities are newer and modified laser techniques. Conclusion by reviewers is that outcomes and complication profiles of newer techniques compare favorably with the gold standard of endometrial resection. The ELITT diode laser system is one of the new successful additions. CO2 laser is also the dominant laser type used with laparoscopy for ablation of endometriotic implants. Myoma coagulation or myolysis with Nd:Yag laser through the laparoscope or hysteroscope is a conservative treatment option. Even MRI guided percutaneous approaches have been described. No long-term data are available.

  16. Robotic surgery in gynecology.

    PubMed

    Alkatout, Ibrahim; Mettler, Liselotte; Maass, Nicolai; Ackermann, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Robotic surgery is the most dynamic development in the sector of minimally invasive operations currently. It should not be viewed as an alternative to laparoscopy, but as the next step in a process of technological evolution. The advancement of robotic surgery, in terms of the introduction of the Da Vinci Xi, permits the variable use of optical devices in all four trocars. Due to the new geometry of the "patient cart," an operation can be performed in all spatial directions without re-docking. Longer instruments and the markedly narrower mechanical elements of the "patient cart" provide greater flexibility as well as access similar to those of traditional laparoscopy. Currently, robotic surgery is used for a variety of indications in the treatment of benign gynecological diseases as well as malignant ones. Interdisciplinary cooperation and cooperation over large geographical distances have been rendered possible by telemedicine, and will ensure comprehensive patient care in the future by highly specialized surgery teams. In addition, the second operation console and the operation simulator constitute a new dimension in advanced surgical training. The disadvantages of robotic surgery remain the high costs of acquisition and maintenance as well as the laborious training of medical personnel before they are confident with using the technology.

  17. Robotic surgery in gynecology

    PubMed Central

    Alkatout, Ibrahim; Mettler, Liselotte; Maass, Nicolai; Ackermann, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Robotic surgery is the most dynamic development in the sector of minimally invasive operations currently. It should not be viewed as an alternative to laparoscopy, but as the next step in a process of technological evolution. The advancement of robotic surgery, in terms of the introduction of the Da Vinci Xi, permits the variable use of optical devices in all four trocars. Due to the new geometry of the “patient cart,” an operation can be performed in all spatial directions without re-docking. Longer instruments and the markedly narrower mechanical elements of the “patient cart” provide greater flexibility as well as access similar to those of traditional laparoscopy. Currently, robotic surgery is used for a variety of indications in the treatment of benign gynecological diseases as well as malignant ones. Interdisciplinary cooperation and cooperation over large geographical distances have been rendered possible by telemedicine, and will ensure comprehensive patient care in the future by highly specialized surgery teams. In addition, the second operation console and the operation simulator constitute a new dimension in advanced surgical training. The disadvantages of robotic surgery remain the high costs of acquisition and maintenance as well as the laborious training of medical personnel before they are confident with using the technology. PMID:27990092

  18. Gynecologic electrical impedance tomograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korjenevsky, A.; Cherepenin, V.; Trokhanova, O.; Tuykin, T.

    2010-04-01

    Electrical impedance tomography extends to the new and new areas of the medical diagnostics: lungs, breast, prostate, etc. The feedback from the doctors who use our breast EIT diagnostic system has induced us to develop the 3D electrical impedance imaging device for diagnostics of the cervix of the uterus - gynecologic impedance tomograph (GIT). The device uses the same measuring approach as the breast imaging system: 2D flat array of the electrodes arranged on the probe with handle is placed against the body. Each of the 32 electrodes of the array is connected in turn to the current source while the rest electrodes acquire the potentials on the surface. The current flows through the electrode of the array and returns through the remote electrode placed on the patient's limb. The voltages are measured relative to another remote electrode. The 3D backprojection along equipotential surfaces is used to reconstruct conductivity distribution up to approximately 1 cm in depth. Small number of electrodes enables us to implement real time imaging with a few frames per sec. rate. The device is under initial testing and evaluation of the imaging capabilities and suitability of usage.

  19. Business and Organizational Models of Obstetric and Gynecologic Hospitalist Groups.

    PubMed

    Garite, Thomas J; Levine, Lisa; Olson, Rob

    2015-09-01

    The growth of obstetric and gynecologic (OB/GYN) hospitalists throughout the United States has led to different organizational approaches, depending on the perception of what an OB/GYN hospitalist is. There are advantages of OB/GYN hospitalist practices; however, practitioners who do this as just 1 piece of their practice are not fulfilling the promise of what this new specialty can deliver. Because those with office practices have their own business models, this article is devoted to the organizational and business models of OB/GYN hospitalists for physicians whose practice is devoted to inpatient obstetrics with or without emergency room and/or inpatient gynecology coverage.

  20. Gynecologic tumors: how to communicate imaging results to the surgeon

    PubMed Central

    Calareso, Giuseppina; De Maria, Federica; Zanagnolo, Vanna; Lazzari, Roberta; Cecconi, Agnese; Bellomi, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Gynecologic cancers are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality for female patients, with an estimated 88,750 new cancer cases and 29,520 deaths in the United States in 2012. To offer the best treatment options to patients it is important that the radiologist, surgeon, radiation oncologist, and gynecologic oncologist work together with a multidisciplinary approach. Using the available diagnostic imaging modalities, the radiologist must give appropriate information to the surgeon in order to plan the best surgical approach and its timing. PMID:24434038

  1. CCCT - NCTN Steering Committees - Gynecologic Cancers

    Cancer.gov

    The Gynecologic Cancers Steering Committee evaluates and prioritizes concepts for phase 2 and 3 clinical trials in adult gynecologic cancers. The GCSC is also intent on fostering collaboration with international groups and institutions conducting trials.

  2. Gynecologic Cancer Center for Racial Disparities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-08-01

    Psychological Outcomes for Gynecologic Cancer Survivors. Arch Sex Behav. 2008 Apr 17. [Epub ahead of print]. 3. Simonelli LE, Fowler J, Maxwell GL, Andersen...Maxwell GL, Andersen BL: Does sexual morbidity predict psychological outcomes in gynecologic cancer survivors? Poster presented at Society of Behavioral...AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-05-2-0065 TITLE: Gynecologic Cancer Center for Racial

  3. Electrocardiograms of Adult Outpatients Followed-Up in Basic Health Care Units in the Community of the South Region of São Paulo City

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Alice T; Baldow, Renata X; Ribeiro, Carla; Ribeiro, Wilma N; Peruzzi, Carolina; Matsuda, Nilce M; Mansur, Alfredo J

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The electrocardiogram (ECG) is an important, available, and inexpensive diagnostic tool to assess cardiac symptoms. Few studies address the prevalence of ECG abnormalities or changes of a normal tracing in ECG in outpatients. Our objective was to evaluate ECGs of adult outpatients to determine whether changes from a normal tracing could disclose the patients’ cardiovascular health status. Methods: We evaluated all elective ECGs obtained in adult outpatients, from January 2009 to January 2010, at a municipal hospital in the city of São Paulo, Brazil. Electrocardiography was performed with a 3-channel, 12-lead machine (Dixtal Cardio-page EP-3, Dixtal Biomedica, São Paulo, Brazil), and results were interpreted by a cardiologist. Results: Electrocardiography was performed in 3567 adult outpatients, 62.5% of whom were women, with a mean age of 51 years (standard deviation [SD] = 16 years). Of the 1918 patients whose ECGs showed abnormalities (mean age = 56 years, SD = 15 years), 1137 were women. Electrocardiographic changes were found in 1184 of the patients. Minor changes were found in 38.3% of patients. A total of 3133 changes were found in 1918 abnormal ECG results. There was a statistical difference related to sex and age, and abnormal ECG results were more frequent in men. There was a high prevalence of abnormal ECG results in the population studied. Conclusions: There were more ECGs obtained from women; however, men and elderly patients more frequently had abnormal ECG results. PMID:24694315

  4. Prevention of Diseases in Gynecology

    PubMed Central

    Izetbegovic, Sebija; Alajbegovic, Jasmin; Mutevelic, Alma; Pasagic, Almir; Masic, Izet

    2013-01-01

    Background: Prevention of diseases in gynecology can be improved by better understanding of health promotion and management of diseases. Management is “the art of performing jobs by or with other people” Mary Parker Follet. Methods: A descriptive analysis was performed on scientific studies in several published articles in medical journals and books. Results: There are five primary functions of management as: Anticipate and plan, organize, command, coordinate and control. If we introduce the following definition in the sense of medical science and apply it to the medical practice that would mean way of recognizing, managing and resolving issues of diagnosis and therapy of diseases (in this case gynecology diseases) according to certain guidelines and treatment algorithms. Treatment of family doctors is an important aspect in the quality-of-life of women and their reproductive health as well as a significant issue in public, environmental and social problems. Conclusions: It is very important to deal with it on the primary care level and in addition to promote the primary and secondary prevention of diseases, which is sometimes more important than the curative procedures. The primary prevention involves regular gynecological examinations and screening. The doctors have also a duty to educate women about the risk factors for malignant diseases, as well as proposing some of the qualitative preventive measures. PMID:24498489

  5. Complications of Laparoscopic Gynecologic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Fuentes, Mariña Naveiro; Naveiro Rilo, José Cesáreo; Paredes, Aida González; Aguilar Romero, María Teresa; Parra, Jorge Fernández

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: To analyze the frequency of complications during laparoscopic gynecologic surgery and identify associated risk factors. Methods: A descriptive observational study was performed between January 2000 and December 2012 and included all gynecologic laparoscopies performed at our center. Variables were recorded for patient characteristics, indication for surgery, length of hospital stay (in days), major and minor complications, and conversions to laparotomy. To identify risk factors and variables associated with complications, crude and adjusted odds ratios were calculated with unconditional logistic regression. Results: Of all 2888 laparoscopies included, most were procedures of moderate difficulty (adnexal surgery) (54.2%). The overall frequency of major complications was 1.93%, and that of minor complications was 4.29%. The level of technical difficulty and existence of prior abdominal surgery were associated with a higher risk of major complications and conversions to laparotomy. Conclusion: Laparoscopic gynecologic surgery is associated with a low frequency of complications but is a procedure that is not without risk. Greater technical difficulty and prior surgery were factors associated with a higher frequency of complications. PMID:25392659

  6. Surgical Complications of Gynecologic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Weekes, Leroy R.; Gandhi, Shobhana Anil; Gandhi, Anil Krishnakumar

    1977-01-01

    Complications of gynecological surgery are considerable and when reviewed in detail are almost frightening. There is no substitute for experience and intimate knowledge of the intricate pelvic structures in health and disease. Anyone who is active in the field is sooner or later going to experience some difficulty whether it be due to his miscalculation or to innate conditions in the patient which are beyond his/her control. It is the responsibility of the pelvic surgeon to recognize the complication and apply proper corrective measures. The patient should not be given false hopes of sure success nor should she be deprived of whatever hope for success does exist. PMID:572875

  7. Obstetrics and Gynecology Hospitalist Fellowships.

    PubMed

    Vintzileos, Anthony M

    2015-09-01

    This article establishes the rationale and development of an obstetrics and gynecology (OB/GYN) hospitalist fellowship program. The pool of OB/GYN hospitalists needs to be drastically expanded to accommodate the country's needs. Fellowship programs should provide extra training and confidence for recent resident graduates who want to pursue a hospitalist career. Fellowships should train physicians in a way that aligns their interests with those of the hospital with respect to patient care, teaching, and research. Research in the core measures should be a necessary component of the fellowship so as to provide long-term benefits for all stakeholders, including hospitals and patients.

  8. Crohn disease and the gynecologic patient.

    PubMed

    Sides, Cleve; Trinidad, Mari Charisse; Heitlinger, Leo; Anasti, James

    2013-01-01

    Although Crohn disease (CD) is considered an inflammatory bowel disease, extraintestinal gynecologic manifestations are varied, frequent, and oftentimes difficult to manage. Its predilection for young and reproductive-age women makes it an important disease process for the gynecologist to understand, as its complications can have long-term repercussions on the developmental, sexual, reproductive, and psychological health of affected women. Patients may present with a variety of vulvovaginal, perineal, perianal, and urologic complaints. Perianal involvement from an intestinal fistula is the most common skin manifestation seen in CD. Other gynecologic manifestations include metastatic CD and rectovaginal and urovaginal fistulas. Recognition and accurate diagnosis of extraintestinal gynecologic manifestations, as well as a good understanding of the gynecologic effects of chronic disease, are necessary for optimal management. The article provides an overview of CD and highlights the gynecologic considerations in caring for women affected by this disease.

  9. Incidental (Prophylactic) Salpingectomy at Benign Gynecologic Surgery and Cesarean Section: a Survey of Practice in Austria.

    PubMed

    Potz, F L; Tomasch, G; Polterauer, S; Laky, R; Marth, C; Tamussino, K

    2016-12-01

    Introduction: Most serous ovarian cancers are now thought to originate in the fallopian tubes. This has raised the issue of performing incidental salpingectomy (also called elective, opportunistic, prophylactic or risk-reducing salpingectomy) at the time of benign gynecologic surgery or cesarean section. We conducted an online survey to ascertain the policies regarding incidental salpingectomy in Austria in late 2014. Material and Methods: All 75 departments of obstetrics and gynecology in public hospitals in Austria were surveyed for their policies regarding incidental salpingectomy at benign gynecologic surgery or cesarean section. Results: Sixty-six of 75 surveyed departments completed the questionnaire, resulting in a response rate of 88 %. Overall, 46 of 66 (70 %) units reported offering or recommending incidental salpingectomy at benign gynecologic surgery, 12 units (18 %) did not, and eight units (12 %) did not have a consistent policy. Salpingectomy was the preferred method for surgical sterilization, including sterilization at the time of cesarean section (71 % and 64 % of units, respectively). Conclusions: Incidental (elective, opportunistic, prophylactic, risk-reducing) salpingectomy is now widely offered at benign gynecologic surgery and cesarean section in Austria. Evidence for the role of the fallopian tubes in the origin of serous pelvic cancer has led to changes in clinical practice.

  10. Incidental (Prophylactic) Salpingectomy at Benign Gynecologic Surgery and Cesarean Section: a Survey of Practice in Austria

    PubMed Central

    Potz, F. L.; Tomasch, G.; Polterauer, S.; Laky, R.; Marth, C.; Tamussino, K.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Most serous ovarian cancers are now thought to originate in the fallopian tubes. This has raised the issue of performing incidental salpingectomy (also called elective, opportunistic, prophylactic or risk-reducing salpingectomy) at the time of benign gynecologic surgery or cesarean section. We conducted an online survey to ascertain the policies regarding incidental salpingectomy in Austria in late 2014. Material and Methods: All 75 departments of obstetrics and gynecology in public hospitals in Austria were surveyed for their policies regarding incidental salpingectomy at benign gynecologic surgery or cesarean section. Results: Sixty-six of 75 surveyed departments completed the questionnaire, resulting in a response rate of 88 %. Overall, 46 of 66 (70 %) units reported offering or recommending incidental salpingectomy at benign gynecologic surgery, 12 units (18 %) did not, and eight units (12 %) did not have a consistent policy. Salpingectomy was the preferred method for surgical sterilization, including sterilization at the time of cesarean section (71 % and 64 % of units, respectively). Conclusions: Incidental (elective, opportunistic, prophylactic, risk-reducing) salpingectomy is now widely offered at benign gynecologic surgery and cesarean section in Austria. Evidence for the role of the fallopian tubes in the origin of serous pelvic cancer has led to changes in clinical practice. PMID:28017973

  11. [HYPNOSIS IN OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY].

    PubMed

    Rabinerson, David; Yeoshua, Effi; Gabbay-Ben-Ziv, Rinat

    2015-05-01

    Hypnosis is an ancient method of treatment, in which an enhanced state of mind and elevated susceptibility for suggestion of the patient, are increased. Hypnosis is executed, either by a caregiver or by the person himself (after brief training). The use of hypnosis in alleviating labor pain has been studied as of the second half of the 20th century. In early studies, the use of hypnosis for this purpose has been proven quite effective. However, later studies, performed in randomized controlled trial terms, have shown controversial results. Other studies, in which the effect of hypnosis was tested in various aspects of both obstetrics and gynecology and with different levels of success, are elaborated on in this review.

  12. Gynecological Management of Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    TU, Frank F.; HELLMAN, Kevin; BACKONJA, Miroslav

    2011-01-01

    Obstetrician/gynecologists often are the initial management clinicians for pelvic neuropathic pain. While treatment may require comprehensive team management and consultation with other specialists, there a few critical and basic steps that can be performed on an office visit that offer the opportunity to significantly improve quality of life in this patient population. A key first step is a thorough clinical examination to physically map the pain site and identify potentially involved nerves. Only limited evidence exists on how best to manage neuropathic pain, but generally a combination of surgical, manipulative or pharmacological methods should be considered. Experimental methods for more precisely characterizing the nature of the nerve dysfunction exist to diagnose and treat neuropathic pain, but additional scientific evidence is needed to unanimously recommend these options. In the meantime, an approach adopted from guidelines of the International Association for Study of Pain tailored for gynecological pain is suggested. PMID:21777899

  13. Gynecological and reproductive issues for women in space: a review.

    PubMed

    Jennings, R T; Baker, E S

    2000-02-01

    Women have been an integral part of United States space crews since the initial flight of Dr. Sally Ride in 1983, and a total of 40 women have been selected as U.S. astronauts. This article examines the reproductive and gynecological aspects of selecting, training, medically certifying, and flying women in space. Gynecological data from the astronaut selection cycles in 1991 to 1997 are reviewed. In addition, the reproductive implications of delaying childbearing for a career as an astronaut and the impact of new technology such as assisted reproductive techniques are examined. The reproductive outcomes of U.S. female astronauts after spaceflight are also presented. Because women have gained considerable operational experience on the Shuttle and Mir, the unique operational considerations for preflight certification, menstruation control and hygiene, contraception, and urination are discussed. Medical and surgical implications for women on long-duration missions to remote locations are still evolving, and enabling technologies for health care delivery are being developed. There has been considerable progress in the development of zero-gravity surgical techniques, including laparoscopy, thoracoscopy, and laparotomy. The concepts of prevention of illness, conversion of surgical conditions to medically treatable conditions, and surgical intervention for long-duration spaceflights are explored in detail. There currently are no operational gynecological or reproductive constraints for women that would preclude their successful participation in the exploration of our nearby solar system.

  14. Obstetric and Gynecologic Patients' Attitudes and Perceptions Toward Medical Students in Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Anfinan, Nisrin; Alghunaim, Nadine; Boker, Abdulaziz; Hussain, Amro; Almarstani, Ahmad; Basalamah, Hussain; Sait, Hesham; Arif, Rawan; Sait, Khalid

    2014-01-01

    Objective To identify patients’ attitudes, preferences and comfort levels regarding the presence and involvement of medical students during consultations and examinations. Methods A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted from September 2011 to December 2011 at King Abdulaziz University Hospital in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. Participants were randomly selected from the outpatient and inpatient clinics at the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology and the Emergency Department, provided they were admitted for obstetric or gynecology-related conditions. Data were collected using a structured questionnaire, and data analysis was performed using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences. Results Of the 327 patients who were recruited, 272 (83%) were elective patients who were seen at the outpatient and inpatient clinics of the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology (group I). The other 55 (16.8%) were seen at the Emergency Department or the Labor and Delivery Ward (group II). One hundred seventy-nine participants (160 [58.8%] in group I and 19 [34.5%] in group II) reported positive attitudes about the presence of female medical students during consultations. Fewer participants (115 [42.3%] were in group I and 17 [30.9%] in group II) reported positive attitudes regarding the presence of male medical students during consultations (p=0.095). The gender of the medical student was the primary factor that influenced patients’ decision to accept or decline medical student involvement. No significant associations were observed between patients’ attitudes and perceptions toward medical students and the patients' age, educational level, nationality or the gender of the consultant. Conclusion Obstetrics and Gynecology patients are typically accepting of female medical student involvement during examinations. Student gender is the primary factor that influences patient attitudes regarding student involvement during physical examinations. PMID:24715936

  15. Topical hemostatic agents in gynecologic surgery.

    PubMed

    Duenas-Garcia, Omar Felipe; Goldberg, Jeffrey M

    2008-06-01

    Biosurgical compounds and pharmacologic agents can serve as surgical adjuncts to prevent or curtail intraoperative bleeding. Medline, PubMed, and Cochrane electronic data bases were used to search the English literature from 1966 to March 2007 using the terms topical, hemostatic agents, and gynecologic surgery. Several effective topical hemostatic agents are available to reduce intraoperative blood loss. Data on their application in gynecologic surgery are limited, and guidelines for selecting one over another for specific indications are lacking.

  16. [The observatory of rare malignant gynecologic tumors].

    PubMed

    Devouassoux-Shisheboran, Mojgan; Vacher-Lavenu, Marie-Cécile

    2014-02-01

    The observatory of gynecological rare tumors (TMRG) has been initially created for ovarian rare neoplasms (TMRO). Because of the similarities between ovarian and other gynecological tumors, this observatory has been then extended to all gynecological rare tumors. The recognition by INCa of three national expert centers (centre Léon-Bérard, hôpitaux de Paris, institut Gustave-Roussy) in rare gynecological cancers and a network of regional expert centers in 2010, expend the experience of the website "Observatoire francophone des tumeurs rares de l'ovaire". The major goals of this gynecology rare tumors experts network, are to promote systematic second opinion for initial diagnostic by experts in gynecopathology, systematic multidisciplinary advice by surgeons and medical oncologist experts, to disseminate clinical guidelines dedicated to rare gynecological tumors, to promote specific fundamental and translational research within clinical trials dedicated to rare tumors. At the end, we would like to improve benefit in term of survival and/or fertility for all these potential young patients.

  17. Achieving cost control in the hospital outpatient department.

    PubMed

    Sulvetta, M B

    1991-01-01

    The rapid growth in outpatient expenditures and the congressional mandate for development of a prospective payment system (PPS) for these expenditures are discussed. Extension of diagnosis-related groups to outpatient care is shown to be infeasible. Alternative patient classification schemes and options for defining the unit of payment and establishing weights and rates are discussed. A PPS primarily controls price and can only address volume by defining a broad unit of payment, such as an episode of care. Therefore, adoption of a volume performance standard approach could be effective. Outpatient payment policies must be integrated with those of other ambulatory care providers.

  18. Antimicrobial resistance of Streptococcus pneumoniae recovered from outpatients in the United States during the winter months of 1994 to 1995: results of a 30-center national surveillance study.

    PubMed Central

    Doern, G V; Brueggemann, A; Holley, H P; Rauch, A M

    1996-01-01

    A total of 1,527 clinically significant outpatient isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae were prospectively collected in 30 different U.S. medical centers between November 1994 and April 1995. Overall, 23.6% of strains were not susceptible to penicillin, with 14.1% intermediate and 9.5% high-level resistant. The frequencies of recovery of intermediate and high-level resistant strains varied considerably between different medical centers and in different geographic areas. In general, intermediate and high-level penicillin resistance was most common with isolates of S. pneumoniae recovered from pediatric patients. The in vitro activities of 22 other antimicrobial agents were assessed against this collection of isolates. Ampicillin was consistently 1 twofold dilution less active than penicillin. Amoxicillin and amoxicillin-clavulanate were essentially equivalent to penicillin in activity. The rank order of activity for cephalosporins was cefotaxime = ceftriaxone > or = cefpodoxime > or = cefuroxime > cefprozil > or = cefixime > cefaclor = loracarbef > cefadroxil = cephalexin. The National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards [Performance Standards for Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing, Sixth Information Supplement (M100-S6), 1995] has established MIC breakpoints for resistance (i.e., > or = 2 micrograms/ml) with three cephalosporins versus S. pneumoniae, namely, cefotaxime, ceftriaxone, and cefuroxime. The overall percentages of strains resistant to these three antimicrobial agents were 3, 5, and 12, respectively. The overall frequency of resistance was 10% with all three macrolides examined in this study, clarithromycin, erythromycin, and azithromycin. The overall percentages of chloramphenicol, tetracycline, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole resistance were 4.3, 7.5, and 18, respectively. The resistance percentages among the cephalosporins, macrolides, chloramphenicol, tetracycline, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole were consistently higher among penicillin

  19. Antimicrobial resistance of Streptococcus pneumoniae recovered from outpatients in the United States during the winter months of 1994 to 1995: results of a 30-center national surveillance study.

    PubMed

    Doern, G V; Brueggemann, A; Holley, H P; Rauch, A M

    1996-05-01

    A total of 1,527 clinically significant outpatient isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae were prospectively collected in 30 different U.S. medical centers between November 1994 and April 1995. Overall, 23.6% of strains were not susceptible to penicillin, with 14.1% intermediate and 9.5% high-level resistant. The frequencies of recovery of intermediate and high-level resistant strains varied considerably between different medical centers and in different geographic areas. In general, intermediate and high-level penicillin resistance was most common with isolates of S. pneumoniae recovered from pediatric patients. The in vitro activities of 22 other antimicrobial agents were assessed against this collection of isolates. Ampicillin was consistently 1 twofold dilution less active than penicillin. Amoxicillin and amoxicillin-clavulanate were essentially equivalent to penicillin in activity. The rank order of activity for cephalosporins was cefotaxime = ceftriaxone > or = cefpodoxime > or = cefuroxime > cefprozil > or = cefixime > cefaclor = loracarbef > cefadroxil = cephalexin. The National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards [Performance Standards for Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing, Sixth Information Supplement (M100-S6), 1995] has established MIC breakpoints for resistance (i.e., > or = 2 micrograms/ml) with three cephalosporins versus S. pneumoniae, namely, cefotaxime, ceftriaxone, and cefuroxime. The overall percentages of strains resistant to these three antimicrobial agents were 3, 5, and 12, respectively. The overall frequency of resistance was 10% with all three macrolides examined in this study, clarithromycin, erythromycin, and azithromycin. The overall percentages of chloramphenicol, tetracycline, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole resistance were 4.3, 7.5, and 18, respectively. The resistance percentages among the cephalosporins, macrolides, chloramphenicol, tetracycline, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole were consistently higher among penicillin

  20. Fluorescence diagnostics in oncological gynecology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyaeva, Ludmila A.; Adamyan, Leila V.; Kozachenko, Vladimir P.; Stratonnikov, Alexander A.; Stranadko, Eugene F.; Loschenov, Victor B.

    2003-10-01

    The method of fluorescent diagnostics (FD) of tumors is a promising tool that may allow to increase sensitivity of tumor detection especially at initial stages. One of the most promising photosensitizers today is 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) that, actually, is not photosensitizer itself but precursor of protoporphyrin IX (PpIX). This paper deals with cancer diagnostics in gynecology by means of ALA-induced Pp IX laser-fluorescence spectroscopy. The tissue fluorescence spectra in vivo were studied in patients with various pathologies of ovaries, uterine and vulva after 5-aminolevulinic acid administration. It was shown that different pathologies varies in accumulation of Pp IX. Coefficient of fluorescence kf for normal tissue is not high, but exceptions are endometrium and mucous membrane of uterine tubes. Benign tumors of uterus and ovary have low values of kf, but polyps of endometrium exhibit high kf. Optical express-biopsy is important for diagnosis of ovarian cancer and micrometastatic spread. Coefficients of diagnostic contrast were determined for cancer of endometrium, cervical cancer, vulvar cancer.

  1. Cross-Cultural Obstetric and Gynecologic Care of Muslim Patients.

    PubMed

    Shahawy, Sarrah; Deshpande, Neha A; Nour, Nawal M

    2015-11-01

    With the growing number of Muslim patients in the United States, there is a greater need for obstetrician-gynecologists (ob-gyns) to understand the health care needs and values of this population to optimize patient rapport, provide high-quality reproductive care, and minimize health care disparities. The few studies that have explored Muslim women's health needs in the United States show that among the barriers Muslim women face in accessing health care services is the failure of health care providers to understand and accommodate their beliefs and customs. This article outlines health care practices and cultural competency tools relevant to modern obstetric and gynecologic care of Muslim patients, incorporating emerging data. There is an exploration of the diversity of opinion, practice, and cultural traditions among Muslims, which can be challenging for the ob-gyn who seeks to provide culturally competent care while attempting to avoid relying on cultural or religious stereotypes. This commentary also focuses on issues that might arise in the obstetric and gynecologic care of Muslim women, including the patient-physician relationship, modesty and interactions with male health care providers, sexual health, contraception, abortion, infertility, and intrapartum and postpartum care. Understanding the health care needs and values of Muslims in the United States may give physicians the tools necessary to better deliver high-quality care to this minority population.

  2. Asian Society of Gynecologic Oncology International Workshop 2014

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jeong-Yeol; Ngan, Hextan Yuen Sheung; Park, Won; Cao, Zeyi; Wu, Xiaohua; Ju, Woong; Chung, Hyun Hoon; Chang, Suk-Joon; Park, Sang-Yoon; Ryu, Sang-Young; Kim, Jae-Hoon; Cho, Chi-Heum; Lee, Keun Ho; Lee, Jeong-Won; Kumarasamy, Suresh; Kim, Jae-Weon; Wilailak, Sarikapan; Kim, Byoung-Gie; Kim, Dae-Yeon; Konishi, Ikuo; Lee, Jae-Kwan; Wang, Kung-Liahng

    2015-01-01

    The Asian Society of Gynecologic Oncology International Workshop 2014 on gynecologic oncology was held in Asan Medical Center, Seoul, Korea on the 23rd to 24th August 2014. A total of 179 participants from 17 countries participated in the workshop, and the up-to-date findings on the management of gynecologic cancers were presented and discussed. This meeting focused on the new trends in the management of cervical cancer, fertility-sparing management of gynecologic cancers, surgical management of gynecologic cancers, and recent advances in translational research on gynecologic cancers. PMID:25609163

  3. National Training Course. Emergency Medical Technician. Paramedic. Instructor's Lesson Plans. Module XI. Obstetric/Gynecologic Emergencies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

    This instructor's lesson plan guide on obstetric/gynecologic emergencies is one of fifteen modules designed for use in the training of emergency medical technicians (paramedics). Six units of study are presented: (1) anatomy and physiology of the female reproductive system; (2) patient assessment; (3) pathophysiology and management of gynecologic…

  4. [Gynecological abnormalities in patients with rectovestibular fistula].

    PubMed

    Vilanova-Sánchez, A; Sánchez Galán, A; Andrés Moreno, A M; Encinas Hernández, J L; Núñez Cerezo, V; Amesty Morello, V; Chocarro Amatrianin, G; Martínez Martínez, L; Martínez-Urruta, M J; López Santamaría, M

    2016-04-10

    Patients with recto vestibular fistula may have gynecological malformations that could be unnoticed at the initial examination. The aim of this paper is to demonstrate the incidence of these malformations and propose a study method to help diagnose these malformations, avoiding unnecessary surgeries. We reviewed the records of patients treated with rectovaginal fistula (RVF) in the last 18 years and studied their gynecological malformations, time at diagnosis and treatment received. Of the 39 patients treated, 5 of them (13.1%) demonstrated 9 gynecological malformations: Hemivaginas (2), hemiuteros (2), uterine agenesis (2), vaginal agenesis (2) and vaginal septum (1). The diagnosis was made after the posterior sagittal approach (PSA) in two patients (acute abdomen and hydrometrocolpos), during the PSA in 2 patients and only one of them was diagnosed before the PSA. The 2 patients with hemivaginas and hemiuterus underwent a hemihysterosalpinguectomy and a vaginoplasty later in adolescence. The patient with vaginal and uterine agenesis diagnosed prior to PSA underwent a posterior sagittal anorectoplasty and a vaginoplasty with colon in the same procedure. The patient with vaginal and uterine agenesis (age 13 months) is waiting for vaginal replacement. The patient with vaginal septum (intraoperative finding) underwent a septum resection during the PSA. Gynecological defects are part of RVF spectrum. Girls with RVF require a complete gynecological examination prior to the definitive repair. Preoperative examinations assist in the timing and type of repair, and ultimately avoids complications and unnecessary interventions.

  5. The Relevance of Gynecologic Oncologists to Provide High-Quality of Care to Women with Gynecological Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Minig, Lucas; Padilla-Iserte, Pablo; Zorrero, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Gynecologic oncologists have an essential role to treat women with gynecological cancer. It has been demonstrated that specialized physicians who work in multidisciplinary teams to treat women with gynecological cancers are able to obtain the best clinical and oncological outcomes. However, the access to gynecologic oncologists for women with suspected gynecological cancer is scarce. Therefore, this review analyzes the importance of specialized care of women with ovarian, cervical, and endometrial cancer. In addition, the role of gynecologic oncologists who offer fertility-sparing treatment as well as their role in assisting general gynecologists and obstetricians is also reviewed. PMID:26835417

  6. Outpatient therapeutic nuclear oncology.

    PubMed

    Turner, J Harvey

    2012-05-01

    In the beginning, nuclear medicine was radionuclide therapy, which has evolved into molecular tumour-targeted control of metastatic cancer. Safe, efficacious, clinical practice of therapeutic nuclear oncology may now be based upon accurate personalised dosimetry by quantitative gamma SPECT/CT imaging to prescribe tumoricidal activities without critical organ toxicity. Preferred therapy radionuclides possess gamma emission of modest energy and abundance to enable quantitative SPECT/CT imaging for calculation of the beta therapy dosimetry, without radiation exposure risk to hospital personnel, carers, family or members of the public. The safety of outpatient radiopharmaceutical therapy of cancer with Iodine-131, Samarium-153, Holmium-166, Rhenium-186, Rhenium-188, Lutetium-177 and Indium-111 is reviewed. Measured activity release rates and radiation exposure to carers and the public are all within recommendations and guidelines of international regulatory agencies and, when permitted by local regulatory authorities allow cost-effective, safe, outpatient radionuclide therapy of cancer without isolation in hospital.

  7. Obstetrics and Gynecology Residency and Fertility Needs.

    PubMed

    Aghajanova, Lusine; Hoffman, Jacquelyn; Mok-Lin, Evelyn; Herndon, Christopher N

    2017-03-01

    Infertility is a common reproductive disease, with a prevalence of 9% to 18% of the general population. To date, no studies have attempted to examine the prevalence and experience of infertility among resident physicians in the United States. In female obstetrics and gynecology (Ob/Gyn) residents of age where infertility becomes more prevalent, ability to seek fertility may be influenced by rigorous professional demands and low remuneration. We seek to understand the prevalence of infertility, as well as experience and utilization of infertility services among Ob/Gyn residents. Cross-sectional descriptive survey was distributed among US Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education-accredited Ob/Gyn programs. Demographics, intentions to conceive during residency, fertility problems, fertility treatment, affordability of care, and perceptions of support were surveyed. A total of 241 responses were received in an equal distribution between junior (n = 120) and senior (n = 121) residents. The majority of respondents were female (91%), 25 to 35 years old (94%), and married (54%). Eighty-five percent (195 of 230) did not actively pursue fertility during residency. Twenty-nine percent (68 of 235) considered fertility preservation, but only 2% sought consultation. Twenty-nine percent of those interested in fertility (22 of 75) experienced infertility of some degree. Sixty-three percent felt low or no support from the program. Thirty-five percent reported stigma associated with their infertility. In conclusion, infertility is a prevalent reproductive health impairment among Ob/Gyn residents. The majority of residents defer childbearing during residency despite advancing reproductive age. A majority felt little or no support from training programs in addressing their fertility care. Further studies are indicated to understand the barriers and impact among resident trainees.

  8. Pelvic Surgical Site Infections in Gynecologic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Lachiewicz, Mark P.; Moulton, Laura J.; Jaiyeoba, Oluwatosin

    2015-01-01

    The development of surgical site infection (SSI) remains the most common complication of gynecologic surgical procedures and results in significant patient morbidity. Gynecologic procedures pose a unique challenge in that potential pathogenic microorganisms from the skin or vagina and endocervix may migrate to operative sites and can result in vaginal cuff cellulitis, pelvic cellulitis, and pelvic abscesses. Multiple host and surgical risk factors have been identified as risks that increase infectious sequelae after pelvic surgery. This paper will review these risk factors as many are modifiable and care should be taken to address such factors in order to decrease the chance of infection. We will also review the definitions, microbiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and management of pelvic SSIs after gynecologic surgery. PMID:25788822

  9. Laparoscopic Diagnosis and Treatment in Gynecologic Emergencies

    PubMed Central

    Cantele, Héctor; Leyba, José Luis; Navarrete, Manuel; Llopla, Salvador Navarrete

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To present an analysis of our experience with 22 consecutive cases of acute abdominal gynecologic emergencies managed with a laparoscopic approach. Methods: From March 1997 to October 1998, 22 patients with a diagnosis of acute abdominal gynecologic emergencies underwent laparoscopic intervention. A transvaginal ultrasound was performed on all patients preoperatively to supplement the diagnostic workup. Surgical time, complications, and length of hospital stay were evaluated, and the laparoscopic diagnosis was compared with the preoperative diagnosis. Results: The laparoscopic diagnosis was different from the preoperative diagnosis in 31.8% of patients. Of the 22 patients, laparoscopic therapeutic procedures were performed in 18 (81.8%), all satisfactorily, and with no need for conversion to open surgery. No morbidity or mortality occurred. Conclusion: Laparoscopy is a safe and effective method for diagnosing and treating gynecologic emergencies. PMID:14558712

  10. [Discussion on English translation of TCM gynecologic terms].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Kun; Han, Bing; Wang, Kui

    2008-01-01

    The existent problems, principles that should be observed and methods for English translation of TCM gynecological terms were discussed, and a scheme of translation for 150 TCM gynecological terms was explored.

  11. North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology

    MedlinePlus

    ... removeClass('notactive'); autoPlay();}); }); About NASPAG The North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology (NASPAG), founded in ... Bayer/NASPAG Young Investigator Grant The North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology (NASPAG) has partnered ...

  12. A Matter of Perspective: Comparison of the Characteristics of Persons with HIV Infection in the United States from the HIV Outpatient Study, Medical Monitoring Project, and National HIV Surveillance System

    PubMed Central

    Buchacz, Kate; Frazier, Emma L.; Hall, H. Irene; Hart, Rachel; Huang, Ping; Franklin, Dana; Hu, Xiaohong; Palella, Frank J.; Chmiel, Joan S.; Novak, Richard M.; Wood, Kathy; Yangco, Bienvenido; Armon, Carl; Brooks, John T.; Skarbinski, Jacek

    2015-01-01

    Comparative analyses of the characteristics of persons living with HIV infection (PLWH) in the United States (US) captured in surveillance and other observational databases are few. To explore potential joint data use to guide HIV treatment and prevention in the US, we examined three CDC-funded data sources in 2012: the HIV Outpatient Study (HOPS), a multisite longitudinal cohort; the Medical Monitoring Project (MMP), a probability sample of PLWH receiving medical care; and the National HIV Surveillance System (NHSS), a surveillance system of all PLWH. Overall, data from 1,697 HOPS, 4,901 MMP, and 865,102 NHSS PLWH were analyzed. Compared with the MMP population, HOPS participants were more likely to be older, non-Hispanic/Latino white, not using injection drugs, insured, diagnosed with HIV before 2009, prescribed antiretroviral therapy, and to have most recent CD4+ T-lymphocyte cell count ≥500 cells/mm3 and most recent viral load test<2 00 copies/mL. The MMP population was demographically similar to all PLWH in NHSS, except it tended to be slightly older, HIV diagnosed more recently, and to have AIDS. Our comparative results provide an essential first step for combined epidemiologic data analyses to inform HIV care and prevention for PLWH in the US. PMID:26793282

  13. Clinical statistics of gynecologic cancers in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Nagase, Satoru

    2017-01-01

    Cervical, endometrial, and ovarian cancers, have both high morbidity and mortality among the gynecologic malignant tumors in Japan. The present study was conducted using both the population-based cancer registry and the gynecologic cancer registry to elucidate the characteristics of gynecologic malignant tumors in Japan. Based on nationwide estimates from the population-based cancer registry in Japan, the morbidities and mortality of cervical, endometrial, and ovarian cancers were obtained and used for analysis. Clinicopathologic factors for cervical cancer, endometrial cancer, ovarian cancer, including age, clinical stage, postsurgical stage, histological type, therapeutic strategy, and prognosis were retrieved from the gynecologic cancer registry published by the Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology and used for analysis. The morbidities of cervical, endometrial, and ovarian cancers were 10,908, 13,606, and 9,384 women in 2012, respectively. The prevalence of endometrial cancer has significantly and consistently been increasing and represents the most common gynecologic malignant tumor in Japan. The mortalities of cervical, endometrial, and ovarian cancers were 2.1, 1.3, and 3.2 per 100,000 in 2012, respectively. In 2014, 52.2% of cervical cancer patients were classified as stage I, 22.5% as stage II, 10.2% as stage III, and 11.2% as stage IV. In addition, 71.9% of endometrial cancer patients were classified as stage I, 6.0% as stage II, 13.3% as stage III, and 7.5% as stage IV. Finally, 43.2% of ovarian cancer patients were classified as stage I, 9.1% as stage II, 27.6% as stage III, and 7.2% as stage IV. Twelve-point six percent of ovarian cancer patients received neoadjuvant chemotherapy. PMID:28198168

  14. What is an Obstetrics/Gynecology Hospitalist?

    PubMed

    McCue, Brigid

    2015-09-01

    The obstetrics/gynecology (OB/GYN) hospitalist is the latest subspecialist to evolve from obstetrics and gynecology. Starting in 2002, academic leaders recognized the impact of such coalescing forces as the pressure to reduce maternal morbidity and mortality, stagnant reimbursements and the increasing cost of private practice, the decrease in applications for OB/GYN residencies, and the demand among practicing OB/GYNs for work/life balance. Initially coined laborist, the concept of the OB/GYN hospitalist emerged. Thinking of becoming an OB/GYN hospitalist? Here is what you need to know.

  15. Gender Differences in Scholarly Productivity Within Academic Gynecologic Oncology Departments

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Emily K.; Blake, Rachel A.; Emerson, Jenna B.; Svider, Peter; Eloy, Jean Anderson; Raker, Christina; Robison, Katina; Stuckey, Ashley

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To estimate whether there is a gender difference in scholarly productivity among academic gynecologic oncologists. METHODS In this cross-sectional study, the academic rank and gender of gynecologic oncology faculty in the United States were determined from online residency and fellowship directories and departmental web sites. Each individual’s h-index and years of publication were determined from Scopus (a citation database of peer-reviewed literature). The h-index is a quantification of an author’s scholarly productivity that combines the number of publications with the number of times the publications have been cited. We generated descriptive statistics and compared rank, gender, and productivity scores. RESULTS Five hundred seven academic faculty within 137 U.S. teaching programs were identified. Of these, 215 (42%) were female and 292 (58%) were male. Men had significantly higher median h-indices than women, 16 compared with 8, respectively (P<.001). Women were more likely to be of junior academic rank with 63% of assistant professors being female compared with 20% of full professors. When stratifying h-indices by gender and academic rank, men had significantly higher h-indices at the assistant professor level (7 compared with 5, P<.001); however, this difference disappeared at the higher ranks. Stratifying by the years of active publication, there was no significant difference between genders. CONCLUSION Female gynecologic oncologists at the assistant professor level had lower scholarly productivity than men; however, at higher academic ranks, they equaled their male counterparts. Women were more junior in rank, had published for fewer years, and were underrepresented in leadership positions. PMID:26551177

  16. 21 CFR 884.4550 - Gynecologic surgical laser.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Gynecologic surgical laser. 884.4550 Section 884....4550 Gynecologic surgical laser. (a) Identification. A gynecologic surgical laser is a continuous wave carbon dioxide laser designed to destroy tissue thermally or to remove tissue by radiant light...

  17. 21 CFR 884.2225 - Obstetric-gynecologic ultrasonic imager.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Obstetric-gynecologic ultrasonic imager. 884.2225... Devices § 884.2225 Obstetric-gynecologic ultrasonic imager. (a) Identification. An obstetric-gynecologic ultrasonic imager is a device designed to transmit and receive ultrasonic energy into and from a...

  18. 21 CFR 884.2225 - Obstetric-gynecologic ultrasonic imager.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Obstetric-gynecologic ultrasonic imager. 884.2225... Devices § 884.2225 Obstetric-gynecologic ultrasonic imager. (a) Identification. An obstetric-gynecologic ultrasonic imager is a device designed to transmit and receive ultrasonic energy into and from a...

  19. 21 CFR 884.4550 - Gynecologic surgical laser.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Gynecologic surgical laser. 884.4550 Section 884....4550 Gynecologic surgical laser. (a) Identification. A gynecologic surgical laser is a continuous wave carbon dioxide laser designed to destroy tissue thermally or to remove tissue by radiant light...

  20. 21 CFR 884.4550 - Gynecologic surgical laser.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Gynecologic surgical laser. 884.4550 Section 884....4550 Gynecologic surgical laser. (a) Identification. A gynecologic surgical laser is a continuous wave carbon dioxide laser designed to destroy tissue thermally or to remove tissue by radiant light...

  1. 21 CFR 884.4550 - Gynecologic surgical laser.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Gynecologic surgical laser. 884.4550 Section 884....4550 Gynecologic surgical laser. (a) Identification. A gynecologic surgical laser is a continuous wave carbon dioxide laser designed to destroy tissue thermally or to remove tissue by radiant light...

  2. 21 CFR 884.4550 - Gynecologic surgical laser.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Gynecologic surgical laser. 884.4550 Section 884....4550 Gynecologic surgical laser. (a) Identification. A gynecologic surgical laser is a continuous wave carbon dioxide laser designed to destroy tissue thermally or to remove tissue by radiant light...

  3. Payment Reform: Unprecedented and Evolving Impact on Gynecologic Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Apte, Sachin M.; Patel, Kavita

    2016-01-01

    With the signing of the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act in April 2015, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) is now positioned to drive the development and implementation of sweeping changes to how physicians and hospitals are paid for the provision of oncology-related services. These changes will have a long-lasting impact on the sub-specialty of gynecologic oncology, regardless of practice structure, physician employment and compensation model, or local insurance market. Recently, commercial payers have piloted various models of payment reform via oncology-specific clinical pathways, oncology medical homes, episode payment arrangements, and accountable care organizations. Despite the positive results of some pilot programs, adoption remains limited. The goals are to eliminate unnecessary variation in cancer treatment, provide coordinated patient-centered care, while controlling costs. Yet, meaningful payment reform in oncology remains elusive. As the largest payer for oncology services in the United States, CMS has the leverage to make cancer services more value based. Thus far, the focus has been around pricing of physician-administered drugs with recent work in the area of the Oncology Medical Home. Gynecologic oncology is a unique sub-specialty that blends surgical and medical oncology, with treatment that often involves radiation therapy. This forward-thinking, multidisciplinary model works to keep the patient at the center of the care continuum and emphasizes care coordination. Because of the breadth and depth of gynecologic oncology, this sub-specialty has both the potential to be disrupted by payment reform as well as potentially benefit from the aspects of reform that can align incentives appropriately to improve coordination. Although the precise future payment models are unknown at this time, focused engagement of gynecologic oncologists and the full care team is imperative to assure that the practice remains patient centered

  4. Outpatient Pain Rehabilitation Programs

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Joseph J

    2006-01-01

    Outpatient pain rehabilitation programs that include an interdisciplinary approach have been shown to be effective treatments for patients with chronic pain. The objectives of this article are to describe the common interdisciplinary pain rehabilitation programs available, the appropriate indications for use, the components of typical pain rehabilitation programs, the short-term and long-term success rates, the costs of attending these programs, and the significant societal costs of those patients who do not complete these programs and do not return to work. PMID:16789457

  5. Gynecological pelvic pain as emergency pathology.

    PubMed

    Rivera Domínguez, A; Mora Jurado, A; García de la Oliva, A; de Araujo Martins-Romeo, D; Cueto Álvarez, L

    Acute pelvic pain is a common condition in emergency. The sources of acute pelvic pain are multifactorial, so it is important to be familiar with this type of pathologies. The purpose of this article is review the main causes of gynecological acute pelvic pain and their radiologic appearances to be able to make an accurate diagnosis and provide objective criteria for patient management.

  6. A Sexuality Curriculum for Gynecology Residents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Stephen B.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    The summary report of an educational research program conducted with the obstetrics and gynecology residents at University Hospitals of Cleveland in 1976 is presented. The goals were to provide residents with basic knowledge about female sexual problems, assess skill and comfort in interviewing patients with sexual problems, document the effects…

  7. Integrating Prevention into Obstetrics/Gynecology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carey, J. Christopher

    2000-01-01

    Discusses formats to teach preventive medicine in obstetrics and gynecology (including learning objectives, lectures/seminars, and rounds/office practice) and evaluation methods (oral examinations, computerized question banks, objective structured clinical examinations). Offers examples from specific programs at American medical schools, including…

  8. Possibilities of electrical impedance tomography in gynecology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    V, Trokhanova O.; A, Chijova Y.; B, Okhapkin M.; V, Korjenevsky A.; S, Tuykin T.

    2013-04-01

    The paper describes results of comprehensive EIT diagnostics of mammary glands and cervix. The data were obtained from examinations of 170 patients by EIT system MEM (multi-frequency electrical impedance mammograph) and EIT system GIT (gynecological impedance tomograph). Mutual dependence is discussed.

  9. Urinary Problems Amongst Gynecological Consultations. Association Between Prolapse, Gynecological Surgery and Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Saadia, Zaheera

    2015-01-01

    Background: Urinary incontinence is the inability of a woman to maintain bladder control. Symptoms range from urgency, frequency, nocturia to urge incontinence (1). It limits functional and social activities and leads to depression and social withdrawal. (2). This observational study aimed to describe the common urinary problems amongst gynecological consultations. It also describes the relationship of urinary incontinence with history of diabetes, previous gynecological surgery and prolapse. Methods: The study was conducted as a descriptive cross sectional study from Jan-May 2015 at Qassim University Clinic, Buraidah. Women with urinary problem and those without urinary problems were compared for risk factors including diabetes, prolapse and previous gynecological surgery. The Statistical Package for the Social Sciences 22 (SPSS 22) was used to conduct proportion z-tests to determine the association of prolapse, gynecological surgeries and diabetes with urinary incontinence. To test the hypothesis, differences between two groups on the aforementioned factors were examined. The groups included participants that reported having urinary problems (n = 111) and those who do not have urinary problems (n = 100). Results: The most frequent complaints of participants with urinary problems were urgency (n = 66, 59.46%), Stress incontinence (SI) (n = 65, 58.56%) and frequency (n = 62, 55.86%). For participants with a urinary problem, 89.19% have not had a gynecological surgery (n = 99) and the remaining 10.81% of participants had a gynecological surgery (n = 12). For participants without a urinary problem, 97.0% have not had a gynecological surgery (n = 97) and the remaining 3.0% had a gynecological surgery (n = 3). For participants with a urinary problem, 72.97% did not have diabetes (n = 81) and the remaining 27.03% of participants did have diabetes (n = 30). For participants without a urinary problem, 92.0% did not have diabetes (n = 92) and the remaining 8.0% did report

  10. URINARY PROBLEMS AMONGST GYNECOLOGICAL CONSULTATIONS. ASSOCIATION BETWEEN PROLAPSE, GYNECOLOGICAL SURGERY AND DIABETES

    PubMed Central

    Saadia, Zaheera

    2016-01-01

    Background: Urinary incontinence is the inability of a woman to maintain bladder control. Symptoms range from urgency, frequency, nocturia to urge incontinence (1). It limits functional and social activities and leads to depression and social withdrawal. (2). This observational study aimed to describe the common urinary problems amongst gynecological consultations. It also describes the relationship of urinary incontinence with history of diabetes, previous gynecological surgery and prolapse. Methods: The study was conducted as a descriptive cross sectional study from Jan-May 2015 at Qassim University Clinic, Buraidah. Women with urinary problem and those without urinary problems were compared for risk factors including diabetes, prolapse and previous gynecological surgery. The Statistical Package for the Social Sciences 22 (SPSS 22) was used to conduct proportion z-tests to determine the association of prolapse, gynecological surgeries and diabetes with urinary incontinence. To test the hypothesis, differences between two groups on the aforementioned factors were examined. The groups included participants that reported having urinary problems (n = 111) and those who do not have urinary problems (n = 100). Results: The most frequent complaints of participants with urinary problems were urgency (n = 66, 59.46%), Stress incontinence (SI) (n = 65, 58.56%) and frequency (n = 62, 55.86%). For participants with a urinary problem, 89.19% have not had a gynecological surgery (n = 99) and the remaining 10.81% of participants had a gynecological surgery (n = 12). For participants without a urinary problem, 97.0% have not had a gynecological surgery (n = 97) and the remaining 3.0% had a gynecological surgery (n = 3). For participants with a urinary problem, 72.97% did not have diabetes (n = 81) and the remaining 27.03% of participants did have diabetes (n = 30). For participants without a urinary problem, 92.0% did not have diabetes (n = 92) and the remaining 8.0% did report

  11. Geriatric gynecology: promoting health and avoiding harm.

    PubMed

    Miller, Karen L; Baraldi, Carole A

    2012-11-01

    Age increases vulnerability, commonly accompanied by greater reliance on others and susceptibility to maltreatment. Physiologic processes become less resilient; the potential for harm from medical care increases. Awareness of frailty, functional, social, and potential maltreatment issues enables early referrals to help the patient maintain her independence. Health issues that may impede both gynecologic care and self-sufficiency include sensory deficits, physical disability, and cognitive impairment. Speaking slowly and providing contextual information enhance patient comprehension. Cancer screening depends on life expectancy. Osteoporosis treatment requires managing fall risk. Gynecologic symptoms more likely have multiple contributing factors than one etiology. Incontinence is a particularly complex issue, but invariably includes bladder diary assessment and pelvic floor muscle training. Function and frailty measures best predict perioperative morbidity. Communication with the patient, her family, other providers, and health care organizations is an important frontier in avoiding errors and adverse outcomes.

  12. Gynecologic masses: value of magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Hricak, H; Lacey, C; Schriock, E; Fisher, M R; Amparo, E; Dooms, G; Jaffe, R

    1985-09-01

    Forty-two women with gynecologic abnormalities were studied with the use of magnetic resonance imaging. Magnetic resonance imaging correctly assessed the origin of the pelvic mass in all patients. In the evaluation of leiomyoma, magnetic resonance imaging accurately depicted the number, size, and location of the lesion. In the evaluation of endometrial carcinoma, magnetic resonance imaging depicted the location of the lesion, the presence of cervical extension, and the depth of myometrial penetration in the majority of the cases. In the analysis of adnexal cysts, magnetic resonance imaging was sensitive in localizing the lesion and was able to distinguish serous from hemorrhagic fluid. This preliminary report indicates that magnetic resonance imaging may become a valuable imaging modality in the diagnosis of gynecologic abnormalities.

  13. Virtual Reality Simulation of Gynecologic Laparoscopy

    PubMed

    Bernstein

    1996-08-01

    Realistic virtual simulation of gynecologic laparoscopy would permit the surgeon to practice any procedure, with any degree of pathology, at any time and as many times as necessary to achieve proficiency before attempting it in the operating room. Effective computer simulation requires accurate anatomy, realistic three-dimensional computer graphics, the ability to cut and deform tissue in response to instruments, and an appropriate hardware interface. The Visible Human Project from the National Library of Medicine has made available extremely accurate, three-dimensional, digital data that computer animation companies have begun to transform to three-dimensional graphic images. The problem of tissue deformation and movement is approached by a software package called TELEOS. Hardware consisting of two scissor-grip laparoscopic handles mounted on a sensor can interface with any simulation program to simulate a multiplicity of laparoscopic instruments. The next step will be to combine TELEOS with the three-dimensional anatomy data and configure it for gynecologic surgery.

  14. Perineovulvovaginal preoperative preparation in minor gynecological surgery.

    PubMed

    Adeleye, J A

    1976-09-01

    Fifty consecutive patients underwent minor elective gynecologic surgery. Most of them were from the low socioeconomic class. Twenty-five patients had their pubic, vulval and perineal hair shaved as part of the preoperative preparation. All patients underwent the same routine perineal, vulval and vaginal swabbing in the operating room. All patients were then examined for postoperative complications. Only two women (who were shaved) complained of mild lower abdominal pain 48 hours after operation, but neither had any clinical evidence of genital or urinary infection. Their symptoms disappeared with the use of analgesics. Even in developing countries where patients with poor personal hygiene are common, preoperative vulval, pubic and perineal hair shaving prior to minor gynecologic surgery is unnecessary. We suggest that this procedure should be discontinued.

  15. Gynecology resident laparoscopy training: present and future.

    PubMed

    Shore, Eliane M; Lefebvre, Guylaine G; Grantcharov, Teodor P

    2015-03-01

    Simulator education is essential to surgical training and it should be a requirement at all training programs across North America. Yet, in a survey of North American obstetrics and gynecology program directors (response rate 52%), we found that while 73% (n = 98) of programs teach laparoscopic skills, only 59% (n = 81) were satisfied with their curriculum. Most programs lacked standard setting in the form of theoretical examinations (94%, n = 127) or skills assessments (91%, n = 123) prior to residents performing surgery on patients in the operating room. Most programs (97%, n = 131) were interested in standardizing laparoscopy education by implementing a common curriculum. We present 3 core recommendations to ensure that gynecologists across North America are receiving adequate training in gynecologic laparoscopic surgery as residents: (1) uniform simulator education should be implemented at all training programs across North American residency programs; (2) a standardized curriculum should be developed using evidence-based techniques; and (3) standardized assessments should take place prior to operating room performance and specialty certification. Future collaborative research initiatives should focus on establishing the content of a standardized laparoscopy curriculum for gynecology residents utilizing a consensus method approach.

  16. RTOG Gynecologic Oncology Working Group: Comprehensive Results

    PubMed Central

    Gaffney, David K.; Jhingran, Anuja; Portelance, Lorraine; Viswanathan, Akila; Schefter, Tracey; Weidhaas, Joanne; Small, William

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to comprehensively describe the activities of the Gynecologic Oncology Working Group within the RTOG. Clinical trials will be reviewed as well as translational science and ancillary activities. Over the past 40 years, a myriad of clinical trials have been performed within the RTOG with the aim of improving overall survival and decreasing morbidity in women with cervical or endometrial cancer. Major study questions have included hyperbaric oxygen, neutron radiotherapy, altered fractionation, hypoxic cell sensitization, chemosensitization, and volume directed radiotherapy. RTOG 7920 demonstrated improvement in overall survival in patients with stages IB through IIB cervical carcinoma receiving prophylactic paraaortic irradiation compared to pelvic radiation alone. RTOG 9001 demonstrated that cisplatin and 5-FU chemoradiotherapy to the pelvis for advanced cervix cancer markedly improved overall survival compared to extended field radiotherapy alone. More recent trials have employed radioprotectors, molecular targeted therapy, and intensity modulated radiation therapy. Ancillary studies have developed CTV atlases for research protocols and routine clinical use. Worldwide practice patterns have been investigated in cervix, endometrial, and vulvar cancer thru the Gynecologic Cancer Intergroup (GCIG). Translational studies have focused on immunohistochemical markers, changes in gene expression, and miRNA patterns impacting prognosis. The RTOG gynecologic working group has performed clinical trials that have defined the standard of care, improved survival, and added to our understanding of the biology of cervical and endometrial cancers. PMID:24819663

  17. The future of lasers in gynecology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keye, William R.

    1993-05-01

    There were many claims of extraordinary possibilities for laser surgery by the early gynecologic laser surgeons. They promised that by using the laser there would be increased speed of the operation, decreased blood loss, decreased infection rates, decreased thermal damage and finally increased clinical results. Despite this `hype,' our clinical experience over the last decade has demonstrated in a large part that the clinical results using the laser are equivalent to those using either sharp scalpel or electrocautery. It appears that the skill of the surgeon is a far more important variable than the type of instrument used by the surgeon. As a result, since 1990, the laser has begun to fall out of favor with gynecologists and, more recently, general surgeons. The gynecologic surgeon of the 1990s is now exploring the use of intra-abdominal endoscopically delivered sutures and staples as well as electrocautery. Considering the increased expense associated with lasers, it is likely that a gynecologic surgeon will continue to explore non-laser options in the future. With planning and cooperation and consultation between clinicians, basic scientists and industry, lasers may ultimately play an even more significant role than they have in the 1980s.

  18. Pulmonary Embolism Following Outpatient Vasectomy

    PubMed Central

    Mott, Frank E.; Farooqi, Bilal; Moore, Harry

    2016-01-01

    Venous thromboembolic events have several known major risk factors such as prolonged immobilization or major surgery. Pulmonary embolism has rarely been reported after an outpatient vasectomy was completed. We present the rare case of a healthy 32-year-old Caucasian male with no known risk factors who presented with pleuritic chest pain 26 days after his outpatient vasectomy was performed. Subsequently, he was found to have a pulmonary embolism as per radiological imaging. We explore the association between outpatient vasectomies and venous thromboembolic events. A review of the literature is also included. PMID:26989373

  19. Monitoring Outpatient Care

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Each year, health care costs for managing chronically ill patients increase as the life expectancy of Americans continues to grow. To handle this situation, many hospitals, doctors practices, and home care providers are turning to disease management, a system of coordinated health care interventions and communications, to improve outpatient care. By participating in daily monitoring programs, patients with congestive heart failure, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, diabetes, and other chronic conditions requiring significant self-care are facing fewer emergency situations and hospitalizations. Cybernet Medical, a division of Ann Arbor, Michigan-based Cybernet Systems Corporation, is using the latest communications technology to augment the ways health care professionals monitor and assess patients with chronic diseases, while at the same time simplifying the patients interaction with technology. Cybernet s newest commercial product for this purpose evolved from research funded by NASA, the National Institute of Mental Health, and the Advanced Research Projects Agency. The research focused on the physiological assessment of astronauts and soldiers, human performance evaluation, and human-computer interaction. Cybernet Medical's MedStar Disease Management Data Collection System is an affordable, widely deployable solution for improving in-home-patient chronic disease management. The system's battery-powered and portable interface device collects physiological data from off-the-shelf instruments.

  20. Synchronous gynecologic cancer and the use of imaging for diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Boaventura, Camila Silva; Galvão, José Lucas Scarpinetti; Soares, Giovanna Milanes Bego; Bitencourt, Almir Galvão Vieira; Chojniak, Rubens; Bringel, Shenia Lauanna Rezende; Brot, Louise De

    2016-04-01

    Endometrial and cervical cancers are the most prevalent gynecologic neoplasms. While endometrial cancer occurs in older women, cervical cancer is more prevalente in young subjects. The most common clinical manifestation in these two gynecological cancers is vaginal bleeding. In the first case, diagnosis is made based on histological and imaging evaluation of the endometrium, while cervical cancers are diagnosed clinically, according to the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO). The authors present a case of synchronous gynecological cancer of the endometrium and cervix diagnosed during staging on MRI and confirmed by histological analysis of the surgical specimen.

  1. Breast and Gynecologic Cancer | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    [[{"fid":"184","view_mode":"default","fields":{"format":"default","field_file_image_alt_text[und][0][value]":"Breast and Gynecologic Cancer Research Group Homepage Logo","field_file_image_title_text[und][0][value]":"Breast and Gynecologic Cancer Research Group Homepage Logo","field_folder[und]":"15"},"type":"media","attributes":{"alt":"Breast and Gynecologic Cancer Research Group Homepage Logo","title":"Breast and Gynecologic Cancer Research Group Homepage Logo","height":"266","width":"400"," | Prevention and early detection of breast, cervix, endometrial and ovarian cancers and their precursors.

  2. Anxiety and support resources for Israeli women before gynecological surgery.

    PubMed

    Peles Bortz, Anat; Bluvstein, Irit; Bergman, Liat; Barnoy, Sivia

    2017-03-01

    Gynecologic surgery is a frequent procedure for benign and malignant diseases and may evoke anxiety and a need for support. The purpose of the present study was to examine whether women with suspicion of gynecologic malignancy and those with no suspicion of gynecologic malignancy had different sources of social support and the relationship between this support and their anxiety. A descriptive cross-sectional method was used at a large medical center. Data were collected between June and December 2010 from 100 hospitalized women 20-28 hours prior to gynecologic surgery: 50 with suspicion of gynecologic malignancy and 50 with no suspicion of gynecologic malignancy. Social Support and Anxiety Questionnaires were distributed to the participants. The results showed that sources of support differed between the groups: women with suspicion of gynecologic malignancy reported receiving more support from their family and from the nursing staff while women with no suspicion of gynecologic malignancy reported receiving more support from friends or the Internet. Both groups reported similar levels of anxiety. Because women seek support prior to gynecologic surgery, healthcare professionals should play a more active role by offering their support in addition to guiding patients to websites that aim to provide information and support.

  3. [The typical pathway of a patient in short route outpatient surgery].

    PubMed

    Chabanais, Stéphane; Debris, Annie; Paulhia, Guylaine; Pignoux, Agnès; Godarc, Marylène

    2014-01-01

    The short route is an outpatient surgical unit characterised by immediate proximity to the operating theatre. It is an organisational and architectural concept in which the patient management aims to be personalised and safe. After the procedure, patients are monitored for as long as necessary, as with traditional outpatient surgery, before being discharged.

  4. The FIGO Leadership in Obstetrics and Gynecology for Impact and Change (LOGIC) Initiative in Maternal and Newborn Health.

    PubMed

    Taylor, David J; Vander Plaetse, Bart

    2014-10-01

    The FIGO Leadership in Obstetrics and Gynecology for Impact and Change (LOGIC) Initiative in Maternal and Newborn Health developed the organizational capacity of national professional organizations of obstetrics and gynecology in eight African and Asian countries. The initiative was funded by a grant from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and had three key objectives. These goals were to support the eight FIGO member associations to strengthen their capacity to work effectively; to influence national policies on maternal and newborn health; and to work toward improving clinical practice in this area. The current supplement presents evidence that the focus and effectiveness of a national obstetric and gynecologic association-as well as its influence on major public health issues (such as United Nations Millennium Development Goals 4 and 5)-can be substantially broadened and enhanced by the provision of external support.

  5. Application of laser in obstetrics and gynecology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Ai-Hua

    1998-11-01

    Mainman developed the first ruby laser in 1960 and after 13 Kaplan successfully reported the use of CO2 laser in the treatment of cervicitis. Soon after, Chinese gynecologists started to use the laser for diagnosis and therapy. It had been proved that more than 30 kinds of gynecological diseases could be treated effectively by laser. The remarkable laser treatment technique partially replaced with conventional methods used in that century. However, the application of laser had shown a broad prospect along with its further investigation.

  6. Estrogen therapy in gynecological cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Guidozzi, F

    2013-12-01

    Treatment of gynecological cancer has significant impact on a woman's quality of life because it commonly includes removal of the uterus and ovaries, both being the core of a woman's femininity, whilst irradiation and chemotherapy, be they as primary therapy or when indicated as postoperative adjuvant therapy, will lead to ablation of ovarian function if the ovaries had not been removed. This will lead to an acute onset of menopausal symptoms, which may be more debilitating than those occurring as a result of natural aging, and of which hot flushes, night sweats, insomnia, mood swings, vaginal dryness, decreased libido, malaise and a general feeling of apathy are the most common. About 25% of gynecological cancers will occur in pre- and perimenopausal women, a large percentage of whom will become menopausal as a result of their treatment. There are also the gynecological cancer survivors who are not rendered menopausal as a result of the treatment strategy but who will become menopausal because of natural aging. Concern among the medical attendants of these women is whether use of estrogen therapy or estrogen and progestogens for their menopausal symptoms will reactivate tumor deposits and therefore increase the rate of recurrence and, as a result, decrease overall survival among these women. Yet the data that are available do not support this concern. There are eight retrospective studies and only one randomized study that have analyzed outcome in endometrial cancer survivors who used hormone therapy after their surgery, whilst, among ovarian cancer survivors, there are four retrospective studies and one randomized study. The studies do suffer from small numbers and, although the studies pertaining to endometrial cancer analyze mostly women with early-stage disease, a number of the studies in both the endometrial and ovarian cancer survivors do have a sizeable follow-up. These studies seem to support that estrogen therapy after the treatment for gynecological

  7. Interobserver Reproducibility Among Gynecologic Pathologists in Diagnosing Heterologous Osteosarcomatous Component in Gynecologic Tract Carcinosarcomas.

    PubMed

    Sangoi, Ankur R; Kshirsagar, Malti; Roma, Andres A; Horvai, Andrew E; Chivukula, Mamatha; Ellenson, Lora H; Fadare, Oluwole; Folkins, Ann K; Garg, Karuna; Hanley, Krisztina; Longacre, Teri A; Haas, Jacqueline; McCluggage, W Glenn; McKenney, Jesse K; Nucci, Marisa R; Oliva, Esther; Park, Kay J; Parkash, Vinita; Quick, Charles M; Rabban, Joseph T; Rutgers, Joanne K L; Soslow, Robert; Vang, Russell; Yemelyanova, Anna; Zaloudek, Charles; Beck, Andrew H

    2017-02-17

    Distinguishing hyalinized stroma from osteoid production by a heterologous osteosarcomatous component can be challenging in gynecologic tract carcinosarcomas. As heterologous components in a carcinosarcoma may have prognostic and therapeutic implications, it is important that these are recognized. This study examines interobserver reproducibility among gynecologic pathologists in the diagnosis of osteosarcomatous components, and its correlation with expression of the novel antibody SATB2 (marker of osteoblastic differentiation) in these osteosarcomatous foci. Digital H&E images from 20 gynecologic tract carcinosarcomas were reviewed by 22 gynecologic pathologists with a request to determine the presence or absence of an osteosarcomatous component. The 20 preselected cases included areas of classic heterologous osteosarcoma (malignant cells producing osteoid; n=10) and osteosarcoma mimics (malignant cells with admixed nonosteoid matrix; n=10). Interobserver agreement was evaluated and SATB2 scored on all 20 cases and compared with the original diagnoses. Moderate agreement (Fleiss' κ=0.483) was identified for the 22 raters scoring the 20 cases with a median sensitivity of 7/10 and a median specificity of 9/10 for the diagnosis of osteosarcoma. SATB2 showed 100% sensitivity (10/10) and 60% (6/10) specificity in discriminating classic osteosarcoma from osteosarcoma mimics. Utilizing negative SATB2 as a surrogate marker to exclude osteosarcoma, 73% (16/22) of the reviewers would have downgraded at least 1 case to not contain an osteosarcomatous component (range, 1-6 cases, median 1 case). Gynecologic pathologists demonstrate only a moderate level of agreement in the diagnosis of heterologous osteosarcoma based on morphologic grounds. In such instances, a negative SATB2 staining may assist in increasing accuracy in the diagnosis of an osteosarcomatous component.

  8. Ultrasonography in obstetrics and gynecology, 2nd edition

    SciTech Connect

    Callen, P.W.

    1988-01-01

    A text on obstetric and gynecologic ultrasound for radiologists, OB/GYN practitioners, and radiologic technicians. The second edition places greater emphasis on diagnosis of specific systemic disorders in the fetus, as well as the most current applications of ultrasound in gynecologic diagnosis.

  9. 42 CFR 493.855 - Standard; Cytology: gynecologic examinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Standard; Cytology: gynecologic examinations. 493... Complexity, Or Any Combination of These Tests § 493.855 Standard; Cytology: gynecologic examinations. To... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Participation...

  10. [Interventional ultrasound in obstetrics and gynecology].

    PubMed

    Kurjak, A; Alfirević, Z

    1989-01-01

    During 1988 there were 1029 invasive obstetrical and gynecological ultrasonically guided procedures: 788 early amniocenteses and 84 late amniocenteses, 26 chorion villi sampling, 24 by transcervical and 2 by transabdominal route, 74 fetal blood sampling (chordocenthesis) mainly for fetal karyotyping, in 9 cases the assessment of the fetal acid-base status was the main indication for the procedure. There was one patient with the increased risk of epidermolysis bulosa in whom fetal skin biopsy was performed. Prostaglandine was administered intraamnially under ultrasound control in 44 cases, in which the second trimester termination of pregnancy was indicated for medical reasons. In 3 cases a huge polyhydramnion was evacuated and in one case of several fetal hydrocephaly, craniocentesis and aspiration of the cerebral fluid were performed. There was one selective fetocide in twin pregnancy with a large meningomyelocele in one twin. In one case of a nonimune fetal hydrops at the 27-week gestation, the aspiration of the accumulated fluid and the intraperitoneal injection of albumin at 27 and 34 weeks, respectively, were performed. A total number of 6 gynecological invasive ultrasonically guided procedures was done. Three of them were punctures of ovarian follicles as part of IVF programme, one puncture of a large simple ovarian cyst, and two aspirations of extrauterine pregnancy with the administration of Metotrexate.

  11. Endometrial aspiration cytology in gynecological disorders

    PubMed Central

    Jadhav, Meenal V.; Phatke, Anjali S.; Kadgi, Nalini Vinayak; Rane, Sharda R.; Kulkarni, Kalpana K.

    2016-01-01

    Context: Endometrial aspiration is not a popular modality for the study of the endometrium despite its simplicity and potential utility. Aim: The present study was aimed at evaluating the utility of endometrial aspiration in various gynecological disorders. Materials and Methods: In this diagnostic accuracy study, 55 prospectively registered women with various gynecological disorders were evaluated clinically and subjected to endometrial aspiration cytology and study of endometrial histology. Endometrial aspiration was performed by infant feeding tube in 10 cases and intra cath cannula in 45 cases. The slides were stained with rapid Papanicolaou (PAP) stain and Leishman stain. Results: Endometrial aspiration cytology showed 90% and 94.6% sampling adequacy with infant feeding tube and intra cath cannula, respectively. Intra cath cannula was very convenient to handle and superior to infant feeding tube in aspirating the endometrium. Of the two stains used, rapid PAP stain was less time-consuming and superior to Leishman stain in studying the nuclear details. Leishman stain was helpful in detecting cytoplasmic vacuoles of secretory endometrium. Overall diagnostic accuracy of endometrial cytology was 90.4% while that for morphological hormonal evaluation was 97.6%. It enjoyed a sensitivity of 91.66%, a specificity of 88.23%, positive predictive value of 94.28%, and negative predictive value of 83.33%. Conclusion: Intra cath cannula emerged as an inexpensive, effective, and convenient device for endometrial aspiration. Endometrial aspiration proved to be a fairly effective, simple, and informative diagnostic modality. PMID:27011435

  12. Potential Impact of Obstetrics and Gynecology Hospitalists on Safety of Obstetric Care.

    PubMed

    Srinivas, Sindhu K

    2015-09-01

    Staffing models are critical aspects of care delivery. Provider staffing on the labor and delivery unit has recently received heightened attention. Based on the general medicine hospitalist model, the obstetrics and gynecology hospitalist or laborist model of obstetric care was introduced more than a decade ago as a plausible model-of-care delivery to improve provider satisfaction, with the goal of also improving safety and outcomes through continuous coverage by providers whose sole focus was on the labor and delivery unit without other competing clinical duties. It is plausible that this model of provider staffing and care delivery will increase safety.

  13. Sexuality and intimacy after gynecological cancer.

    PubMed

    Ratner, Elena S; Foran, Kelly A; Schwartz, Peter E; Minkin, Mary Jane

    2010-05-01

    Matters of sexuality and intimacy greatly impact quality of life of patients with gynecologic cancers. Vast amount of evidence exists showing that cancer dramatically impacts woman's sexuality, sexual functioning, intimate relationships and sense of self. Sexual functioning can be affected by illness, pain, anxiety, anger, stressful circumstances and medications. There is a growing acknowledgement that these needs are not being appropriately addressed by providers. With improvements in early detection, surgery and adjuvant therapy for gynecologic cancer, long term survival and cure are becoming possible. Quality of life is thus becoming a major issue for patients. Patients suffer from hot flashes, difficulty sleeping, loss of libido and intimacy, all resulting in significant morbidity and loss of quality of life. Using hormone replacement therapy in gynecologic cancer survivors is a topic a great debate. While limited studies are available to date, retrospective cohort reviews show no reported differences in overall or disease-free survival in patients using hormone replacements vs. controls in patients with ovarian cancer, endometrial cancer, cervical, vaginal or vulva cancer. Since safety of using HRT remains controversial and prospective studies are lacking, providers need to be able to provide alternatives to HRT. Centrally acting agents such as antiseizure agent gabapentin and selective serotonine re-uptake inhibitors, such as venlafaxine and fluoxitine have been demonstrated to show effectiveness in treating vasomotor symptoms and are easily tolerated. To address cardiovascular and osteoporosis risks of post-menopausal status, exercise, healthy diet, bisphosphonates, raloxifen and statins have been found to be effective. Psychotherapy plays an essential part in management of these issues. Review of the literature reveals recent trends among health psychologists to utilize psychoeducational interventions that include combined elements of cognitive and

  14. Complications in gynecological minimal-access oncosurgery.

    PubMed

    Becker, Sven; De Wilde, Rudy Leon

    2016-08-01

    Complications are the limiting factors of all surgeries. More than performing the actual surgery, learning how to avoid complications before, during, and after surgery is the most important task of every surgeon. Severe complications can lead to patient death. Complications such as ureterovaginal fistulas, resulting from <2 s of inattentive preparation, can lead to years of hardship, suffering, accusation, and litigation. Excellent surgery is about performing the right surgery for the right patient without any complications. Minimally invasive surgery in complex cases is technically challenging. This article details the major causes of complications in laparoscopy for the gynecologic cancer patient and present strategies for prevention, early detection, and intra- and postoperative management.

  15. The debate over robotics in benign gynecology.

    PubMed

    Rardin, Charles R

    2014-05-01

    The debate over the role of the da Vinci surgical robotic platform in benign gynecology is raging with increasing fervor and, as product liability issues arise, greater financial stakes. Although the best currently available science suggests that, in the hands of experts, robotics offers little in surgical advantage over laparoscopy, at increased expense, the observed decrease in laparotomy for hysterectomy is almost certainly, at least in part, attributable to the availability of the robot. In this author's opinion, the issue is not whether the robot has any role but rather to define the role in an institutional environment that also supports the safe use of vaginal and laparoscopic approaches in an integrated minimally invasive surgery program. Programs engaging robotic surgery should have a clear and self-determined regulatory process and should resist pressures in place that may preferentially support robotics over other forms of minimally invasive surgery.

  16. Celiac disease and obstetrical-gynecological contribution

    PubMed Central

    Casella, Giovanni; Orfanotti, Guido; Giacomantonio, Loredana; Bella, Camillo Di; Crisafulli, Valentina; Villanacci, Vincenzo; Baldini, Vittorio; Bassotti, Gabrio

    2016-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) shows an increased prevalence in female, particularly during the fertile period. Celiac disease should be researched in infertility, spontaneous and recurrent abortions, delayed menarche, amenorrhea, early menopause, and children with low birth-weight. Celiac disease is still little considered during the evaluation of infertility. Up to 50% of women with untreated CD refer an experience of miscarriage or an unfavorable outcome of pregnancy. Celiac patients taking a normal diet (with gluten) have a shorter reproductive period. Women with undiagnosed CD had a higher risk of small for gestation age infants very small for gestational age infants and pre-term birth when compared with women with noted CD. The link between NCGS and infertility is actually unknown. The goal of our work is to perform an actual review about this topic and to increase the awareness in the medical population to research celiac disease in selected obstetric and gynecological disorders. PMID:27895849

  17. [Adolescent gynecology in the medical office].

    PubMed

    Hürlimann, Renate

    2013-09-04

    In the age group of adolescents occur some gynecological problems which present different than in adult women. One is heavy menstrual bleeding, another menstrual problem is life burdening dysmenorrhea. Girls often do not speak about, they do not know what is really normal. Malignant breast masses are very rare, mostly fibroadenoma or cysts are found. With childhood obesity PCOS is a rising hormonal disturbance with impact on future fertility. Counseling adolescents in contraception is another challenge, focused on adherence, chronic disease and disabled teenagers. Together with the risks of unintended pregnancy adolescents have a high risk of sexually transmitted infections. Recommending preservative use and HPV and Hepatitis B vaccination is very important. Cervical cancer screening should start at age 21, girls with special risks (immunodeficiency, very early sexual activity) starting individually at earlier age.

  18. Trajectories of Evening Fatigue in Oncology Outpatients Receiving Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Fay; Melkus, Gail D’Eramo; Hammer, Marilyn; Schmidt, Brian L.; Knobf, M. Tish; Paul, Steven M.; Cartwright, Frances; Mastick, Judy; Cooper, Bruce A.; Chen, Lee-May; Melisko, Michelle; Levine, Jon D.; Kober, Kord; Aouizerat, Bradley E.; Miaskowski, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Context Fatigue is a distressing, persistent sense of physical tiredness that is not proportional to a person’s recent activity. Fatigue impacts patients’ treatment decisions and can limit their self-care activities. While significant interindividual variability in fatigue severity has been noted, little is known about predictors of interindividual variability in initial levels and trajectories of evening fatigue severity in oncology patients receiving chemotherapy (CTX). Objectives To determine whether demographic, clinical, and symptom characteristics were associated with initial levels as well as the trajectories of evening fatigue. Methods A sample of outpatients with breast, gastrointestinal, gynecological, and lung cancer (N=586) completed demographic and symptom questionnaires a total of six times over two cycles of CTX. Fatigue severity was evaluated using the Lee Fatigue Scale. Hierarchical linear modeling (HLM) was used to answer the study objectives. Results A large amount of interindividual variability was found in the evening fatigue trajectories. A piecewise model fit the data best. Patients who were White, diagnosed with breast, gynecological, or lung cancer, and who had more years of education, child care responsibilities, lower functional status, and higher levels of sleep disturbance and depression reported higher levels of evening fatigue at enrollment. Conclusion This study identified both non-modifiable (e.g., ethnicity) and modifiable (e.g., child care responsibilities, depressive symptoms, sleep disturbance) risk factors for more severe evening fatigue. Using this information, clinicians can identify patients at higher risk for more severe evening fatigue, provide individualized patient education, and tailor interventions to address the modifiable risk factors. PMID:25828560

  19. Clinical practice recommendations for quality of life assessment in patients with gynecological cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gottwald, Leszek; Forycka, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Quality of life (QoL) is a multidimensional concept regarding self-assessment of patients’ situation. Quality of life has not been clearly defined up to date, although it is clear that it is a subjective self-assessment that to a significant extent is determined by individual needs, beliefs, values, attitudes, which are changing with time. Health-related QoL comprises basic dimensions such as patients’ performance status, physical, emotional, and social functioning, symptoms of the disease and adverse effects of treatment, spiritual (God and existential) and other dimensions. In women, the ovary, cervical, corpus uterus, vagina and vulva cancers deteriorate QoL by disease progression and consequences of treatment, also in cancer survivors. Common symptoms include the genito-urinary system, the lower gastrointestinal tract and peripheral neuropathies induced by chemotherapy. In young women, QoL is impaired by infertility, sexual problems and menopause symptoms. An overview of QoL questionnaires used in oncology with special regard to patients with gynecological tumors was conducted. A screening tool for psychological state assessment of oncology patients (distress thermometer), the Edmonton Symptom Assessment System (ESAS) and modular approach of QoL assessment recommended by the EORTC (European Organization for the Research and Treatment of Cancer) were presented. Practical guidelines were proposed to assess appropriately QoL in patients with gynecological cancers who stay at in-patient gynecology units and those treated at home and in an ambulatory care setting. PMID:26848300

  20. The impact of robotic surgery on gynecologic oncology.

    PubMed

    Nick, Alpa M; Ramirez, Pedro T

    2011-09-01

    The objective of this article was to review the published scientific literature pertaining to robotic surgery and its applications in gynecologic malignancies and to summarize the impact of robotic surgery on the field of gynecologic oncology. Summarizing data from different gynecologic disease-sites, robotic-assisted surgery is safe, feasible, and demonstrates equivalent histopathologic and oncologic outcomes. In general, benefits to robotic surgery include decreased blood loss, fewer perioperative complications and decreased length of hospital stay. Disadvantages include accessibility to robot surgical systems, decreased haptic sensation and fixed cost as well as cost of disposable equipment. As robotic surgery becomes readily available it will be imperative to develop standardized training modalities. Further research is needed to validate the role of robotic surgery in the treatment of gynecologic malignancies.

  1. [110 years--University Obstetrics and Gynecology Hospital "Maichin dom"].

    PubMed

    Zlatkov, V

    2014-01-01

    The first specialized Obstetrics and Gynecology Hospital in Bulgaria was founded based on the idea of Queen Maria Luisa (1883). Construction began in 1896 and the official opening of the hospital took place on November 19, 1903. What is unique about the University Obstetrics and Gynecology Hospital "Maichin dom" is above all the fact that the Bulgarian school of obstetrics and gynecology was founded within its institution. Currently, the hospital has nearly 400 beds and 600 employees who work at nine clinics and six laboratories, covering the entire spectrum of obstetric and gynecological activities. Its leading specialists still continue to embody the highest level of professionalism and dedication. The future development of the hospital is chiefly associated with the renovation of facilities, resources and equipment and with the enhancement of the professional competence of the staff and of the quality of hospital products to improve the health and satisfaction of the patients.

  2. Surgical Coagulator With Carbon Dioxide Laser For Gynecology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolinski, Wieslaw; Kazmirowski, Antoni; Korobowicz, Witold; Olborski, Zbigniew

    1987-10-01

    The technical data and parameters of the CO2 surgical laser for gynecology are given. Coagulator was designed and constructed in Institute of Microelectronics and Optoelectronics Warsaw Technical University.

  3. Problems in outpatients with laryngeal hyperplastic lesions.

    PubMed

    Goldman, N C

    1997-01-01

    The care of outpatients with epithelial hyperplastic lesions of the larynx presents problems of classification, treatment, continued surveillance and prognosis. One hundred patients who underwent microlaryngoscopy and vocal cord stripping from 1990 through 1995 were studied retrospectively with a follow-up period of 8-156 months. Twenty-eight patients with biopsy proven epithelial hyperplastic lesions were given 21 different pathological diagnoses exclusive of invasive carcinoma following 52 operative microlaryngoscopies. Prognosis was inferred and treatment commenced primarily on the basis of the pathology report. Microlaryngoscopy and stripping with and without the carbon dioxide laser, "watchful waiting," radiation therapy, and partial laryngectomy were all used as treatment modalities. Controversy remains as of choice of treatment. Encouraging the patient to discontinue smoking is an integral part of treatment; however, most patients continue to smoke. Recent changes in the United States health care delivery system present additional problems in surveillance of the patient.

  4. The principles and practice of ultrasonography in obstetrics and gynecology

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, R.C.; James, A.E.

    1985-01-01

    This is the latest edition of a reference on diagnostic ultrasound in obstetrics and gynecology. Chapters have been added on infertility, legal aspects of ultrasound, and interventional techniques. Descriptions of instrumentation, physics and bioeffects, measurement data and normal anatomy in the fetus are given. There is a section on fetal anomalies and the investigation and management of various obstetrical problems, such as multiple pregnancy and hydatidiform mole. Coverage of gynecological ultrasound includes normal pelvic anatomy, pelvic masses, pelvic inflammatory disease, and breast evaluation.

  5. Simulation analysis of an outpatient services facility.

    PubMed

    Levy, J L; Watford, B A; Owen, V T

    1989-11-01

    Anderson Memorial Hospital in Anderson, South Carolina is in the process of constructing a new Outpatient Services Center. The Outpatient Services Center will combine existing outpatient services within the hospital and offsite services at the Outpatient Diagnostic Center. A simulation model of the proposed facility has been developed based on historical data. The information obtained from the simulation model includes the analysis of outpatient services utilization, patient waiting and flow times, and service area queue sizes. This information has been used to determine minimum facility design requirements, such as waiting room size, based on the expected demands.

  6. Surveillance and Care of the Gynecologic Cancer Survivor

    PubMed Central

    MacLaughlin, Kathy L.; Long, Margaret E.; Pruthi, Sandhya; Casey, Petra M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Care of the gynecologic cancer survivor extends beyond cancer treatment to encompass promotion of sexual, cardiovascular, bone, and brain health; management of fertility, contraception, and vasomotor symptoms; and genetic counseling. Methods: This is a narrative review of the data and guidelines regarding care and surveillance of the gynecologic cancer survivor. We searched databases including PubMed, Cochrane, and Scopus using the search terms gynecologic cancer, cancer surveillance, and cancer survivor and reached a consensus for articles chosen for inclusion in the review based on availability in the English language and publication since 2001, as well as key older articles, consensus statements, and practice guidelines from professional societies. However, we did not undertake an extensive systematic search of the literature to identify all potentially relevant studies, nor did we utilize statistical methods to summarize data. We offer clinical recommendations for the management of gynecologic cancer survivors based on review of evidence and our collective clinical experience. Results: Key messages include the limitations of laboratory studies, including CA-125, and imaging in the setting of gynecologic cancer surveillance, hormonal and non-hormonal management of treatment-related vasomotor symptoms and genitourinary syndrome of menopause, as well as recommendations for general health screening, fertility preservation, and contraception. Conclusions: A holistic approach to care extending beyond cancer treatment alone benefits gynecologic cancer survivors. In addition to surveillance for cancer recurrence and late treatment side effects, survivors benefit from guidance on hormonal, contraceptive, and fertility management and promotion of cardiovascular, bone, brain, and sexual health. PMID:26208166

  7. The development of outpatient milestones.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Donald E

    2014-06-01

    The Milestones work group sought to establish a baseline of expected competence development across the six core competencies. The subcompetencies and milestones reflect the committee's work with input from ABPN, AADPRT, and AAP. They are intended to serve not only as consistent markers of progress nationwide but also as a basis by which individual programs can build their own milestones that reflect unique qualities of any given learning environment. The Milestones work group anticipates that iterative changes will be made as the milestones are broadly implemented. In anticipating the implementation of outpatient milestones, the committee will be particularly interested to how effectively psychotherapy milestones will be captured through the combination of outpatient evaluations and other data points captured in the program director's semiannual evaluation.

  8. [Outpatient rheumatologic treatment in Germany].

    PubMed

    Edelmann, E

    2014-03-01

    Outpatient rheumatologic treatment in Germany is managed by rheumatologists in private practice (n = 557), by authorized rheumatism outpatient centers (n = 116), by rheumatism centers according to §116b (n = 43) and by university outpatient departments. A total number of 975 rheumatologists were registered by the end of 2012 of whom approximately 830 were active in outpatient care. With this number of rheumatologists Germany is in the middle range in comparison to eight industrial nations including the USA. This number is not sufficient to provide adequate medical care and the consequences are too long waiting times for an appointment with a rheumatologist. Statistical data of the Kassenärztliche Bundesvereinigung (KBV, National Association of Statutory Health Insurance Physicians) showed 688,000 general insurance patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). As some 68.9 % of the population are in this insurance scheme there are some 770,000 RA patients in Germany (almost 1 % of the population). One way to improve rheumatology care in spite of the lack of rheumatologists could be special agreements with the general health insurance providers to improve cooperation and division of responsibilities between rheumatologists and general practitioners, to implement patient education, tighter control and treat to target in rheumatology care. Another way could be a new treatment level called "ambulant specialist care", with no budget for medical care and no budget for the number of patients treated and therefore the chance for rheumatologists to treat more patients and have a better income. To achieve that more young doctors receive approval as a specialist in rheumatology, more chairs of rheumatology at universities and a nationwide stipendium for training assistants are needed.

  9. Interoperability evaluation case study: an Obstetrics-Gynecology Department and related Information Systems.

    PubMed

    Vida, Mihaela; Stoicu-Tivadar, Lăcrămioara; Blobel, Bernd; Bernad, Elena

    2013-01-01

    The paper presents the steps and metrics for evaluating the interoperability of an Obstetrics-Gynecology Department Information System applied on Bega Clinic Timisoara regarding its readiness for interoperability in relation with similar systems. The developed OGD IS was modeled starting from the Generic Component Model and sends information to other medical units using the HL7 Clinical Document Architecture and Continuity of Care Document standards. The data for evaluation are real, collected between 2009 and 2010 from Bega Clinic Timisoara. The results were relatively good for the investigated data and structure.

  10. Estimation of the Optimal Brachytherapy Utilization Rate in the Treatment of Gynecological Cancers and Comparison With Patterns of Care

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Stephen R.; Delaney, Geoff P.; Gabriel, Gabriel S.; Jacob, Susannah; Das, Prabir; Barton, Michael B.

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: We aimed to estimate the optimal proportion of all gynecological cancers that should be treated with brachytherapy (BT)-the optimal brachytherapy utilization rate (BTU)-to compare this with actual gynecological BTU and to assess the effects of nonmedical factors on access to BT. Methods and Materials: The previously constructed inter/multinational guideline-based peer-reviewed models of optimal BTU for cancers of the uterine cervix, uterine corpus, and vagina were combined to estimate optimal BTU for all gynecological cancers. The robustness of the model was tested by univariate and multivariate sensitivity analyses. The resulting model was applied to New South Wales (NSW), the United States, and Western Europe. Actual BTU was determined for NSW by a retrospective patterns-of-care study of BT; for Western Europe from published reports; and for the United States from Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results data. Differences between optimal and actual BTU were assessed. The effect of nonmedical factors on access to BT in NSW were analyzed. Results: Gynecological BTU was as follows: NSW 28% optimal (95% confidence interval [CI] 26%-33%) compared with 14% actual; United States 30% optimal (95% CI 26%-34%) and 10% actual; and Western Europe 27% optimal (95% CI 25%-32%) and 16% actual. On multivariate analysis, NSW patients were more likely to undergo gynecological BT if residing in Area Health Service equipped with BT (odds ratio 1.76, P=.008) and if residing in socioeconomically disadvantaged postcodes (odds ratio 1.12, P=.05), but remoteness of residence was not significant. Conclusions: Gynecological BT is underutilized in NSW, Western Europe, and the United States given evidence-based guidelines. Access to BT equipment in NSW was significantly associated with higher utilization rates. Causes of underutilization elsewhere were undetermined. Our model of optimal BTU can be used as a quality assurance tool, providing an evidence-based benchmark against

  11. New radiation techniques in gynecological cancer.

    PubMed

    Ahamad, A; Jhingran, A

    2004-01-01

    Radiation therapy has been a major therapeutic modality for eradicating malignant tumors over the past century. In fact, it was not long after the discovery of radium that the first woman with cervical cancer underwent intracavitary brachytherapy. Progress in the way that this cytotoxic agent is manipulated and delivered has seen an explosive growth over the past two decades with technological developments in physics, computing capabilities, and imaging. Although radiation oncologists are educated in and familiar with the wealth of new revolutionary techniques, it is not easy for other key members of the team to keep up with the rapid progress and its significance. However, to fully exploit these enormous gains and to communicate effectively, medical and gynecological oncologists are expected to be aware of state-of-the-art radiation oncology. Here, we elucidate and illustrate contemporary techniques in radiation oncology, with particular attention paid to the external beam radiotherapy used for adjuvant and primary definitive management of malignancies of the female pelvis.

  12. Color Doppler sonography in obstetrics and gynecology.

    PubMed

    Fleischer, Arthur C; Andreotti, Rochelle F

    2005-09-01

    This review aims to provide the reader with an overview of the present and future clinical applications in color Doppler sonography for the evaluation of vascularity and blood flow within the uterus (both gravid and nongravid), ovaries, fetus and placenta. The clinical use of color Doppler sonography has been demonstrated within many organ systems. Color Doppler sonography has become an integral part of cardiovascular imaging. Significant improvements have recently occurred, improving the visualization and evaluation of intra-organ vascularity, resulting from enhancements in delineation of tissue detail through electronic compounding and harmonics, as well as enhancements in signal processing of frequency- and/or amplitude-based color Doppler sonography. Spatial representation of vascularity can be improved by utilizing 3D and 4D (live 3D) processing. Greater sensitivity of color Doppler sonography to macro- and microvascular flow has provided improved anatomic and physiologic assessment throughout pregnancy and for pelvic organs. The potential use of contrast enhancement is also mentioned as a means to further differentiate benign from malignant ovarian lesions. The rapid development of these new sonographic techniques will continue to enlarge the scope of clinical applications in a variety of obstetric and gynecologic disorders.

  13. Three-Dimensional Imaging in Gynecologic Brachytherapy: A Survey of the American Brachytherapy Society

    SciTech Connect

    Viswanathan, Akila N.; Erickson, Beth A.

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: To determine current practice patterns with regard to three-dimensional (3D) imaging for gynecologic brachytherapy among American Brachytherapy Society (ABS) members. Methods and Materials: Registered physician members of the ABS received a 19-item survey by e-mail in August 2007. This report excludes physicians not performing brachytherapy for cervical cancer. Results: Of the 256 surveys sent, we report results for 133 respondents who perform one or more implantations per year for locally advanced cervical cancer. Ultrasound aids 56% of physicians with applicator insertion. After insertion, 70% of physicians routinely obtain a computed tomography (CT) scan. The majority (55%) use CT rather than X-ray films (43%) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI; 2%) for dose specification to the cervix. However, 76% prescribe to Point A alone instead of using a 3D-derived tumor volume (14%), both Point A and tumor volume (7%), or mg/h (3%). Those using 3D imaging routinely contour the bladder and rectum (94%), sigmoid (45%), small bowel (38%), and/or urethra (8%) and calculate normal tissue dose-volume histogram (DVH) analysis parameters including the D2cc (49%), D1cc (36%), D0.1cc (19%), and/or D5cc (19%). Respondents most commonly modify the treatment plan based on International Commission on Radiation Units bladder and/or rectal point dose values (53%) compared with DVH values (45%) or both (2%). Conclusions: More ABS physician members use CT postimplantation imaging than plain films for visualizing the gynecologic brachytherapy apparatus. However, the majority prescribe to Point A rather than using 3D image based dosimetry. Use of 3D image-based treatment planning for gynecologic brachytherapy has the potential for significant growth in the United States.

  14. Identifying priority actions for improving patient satisfaction with outpatient cancer care.

    PubMed

    Gesell, Sabina B; Gregory, Nancy

    2004-01-01

    In parallel to developing new cancer therapies, the healthcare community has the responsibility of creating positive treatment experiences for patients. Data from 5907 cancer outpatients treated at 23 hospitals across the United States were analyzed to identify the top priorities for service improvement in outpatient cancer treatment facilities. They included meeting patients' emotional needs, providing information to patients and family members, reducing waiting times, and providing convenience and coordinated care among physicians and other care providers.

  15. An Effective Outpatient Appointment System for General Leonard Wood Army Community Hospital

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-07-13

    Orthopedics, Pediatric , Physical Examination, xPodiatry, Surgical, Urology, Well Baby, Body Fat Evaluation, Nutrition , PFB, and Speech. 2. RESPONSIBILITIES. a...PROJECT TASK WvORK UNIT I1 I ILUE (include Securiy assicton) An Effective Outpatient Appointment System for Gen Leonard Wood Army Comunity Hospital 12...analysis. Thirty two variables were provided by the reports for the six following clinic; Internal Medicine, Pediatrics , General Outpatient, Family Practice

  16. Learning Needs of Gynecologic Cancer Survivors.

    PubMed

    Akkuzu, Gulcihan; Kurt, Gonul; Guvenc, Gulten; Kok, Gulsah; Simsek, Sevgi; Dogrusoy, Safiye; Ayhan, Ali

    2016-10-15

    To define the learning needs of patients with gynecological oncology. The study was performed as a descriptive study. A total of 92 patients were participated. Data were collected using Patient Learning Needs Scale (PLNS). The Pearson correlation test, independent sample t test, and analysis of one-way of variance (ANOVA) followed by Tukey's-B post hoc tests were used for statistical analyses by the SPSS 15.0 software package. The mean age of women's was 50.37 ± 12.20 years. The women's diagnoses were cervical (45.7 %), ovarian (27.2 %), and endometrial (19.6 %) cancers. The most frequently stated learning needs topics were coping with pain (47.8 %), daily living activities (46.2 %), and psychological support (44.6 %). The mean PLNS score of women was 212.56 ± 35.83. The mean subscales scores of PLNS were 34.06 ± 7.29 for medicines, 38.34 ± 6.74 for daily living activities, and 24.68 ± 5.41 for community subscales. Women who graduated from elementary school needed more education than the women with higher education (p < 0.001). Learning needs level of the women are high and related to increase quality of life, medicine usage, complications of treatment, skin problems, pain management, and supportive care. As a healthcare professional, we should plan and develop educational programs in order to adequately inform patients about their learning needs.

  17. Robotic Surgery in Gynecology: An Updated Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Weinberg, Lori; Rao, Sanjay; Escobar, Pedro F.

    2011-01-01

    The introduction of da Vinci Robotic Surgery to the field of Gynecology has resulted in large changes in surgical management. The robotic platform allows less experienced laparoscopic surgeons to perform more complex procedures. In general gynecology and reproductive gynecology, the robot is being increasingly used for procedures such as hysterectomies, myomectomies, adnexal surgery, and tubal anastomosis. Among urogynecology the robot is being utilized for sacrocolopexies. In the field of gynecologic oncology, the robot is being increasingly used for hysterectomies and lymphadenectomies in oncologic diseases. Despite the rapid and widespread adoption of robotic surgery in gynecology, there are no randomized trials comparing its efficacy and safety to other traditional surgical approaches. Our aim is to update previously published reviews with a focus on only comparative observational studies. We determined that, with the right amount of training and skill, along with appropriate patient selection, robotic surgery can be highly advantageous. Patients will likely have less blood loss, less post-operative pain, faster recoveries, and fewer complications compared to open surgery and potentially even laparoscopy. However, until larger, well-designed observational studies or randomized control trials are completed which report long-term outcomes, we cannot definitively state the superiority of robotic surgery over other surgical methods. PMID:22190948

  18. The effect of the SNAPPS (summarize, narrow, analyze, probe, plan, and select) method versus teacher-centered education on the clinical gynecology skills of midwifery students in Iran

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the effect of the SNAPPS (summarize, narrow, analyze, probe, plan, and select) method versus teacher-centered education on the clinical skills of midwifery students in Iran. In this clinical trial, 36 midwifery students in their 4th year of education in 2015 were enrolled and divided into 6 groups, 3 groups for teacher-centered education and 3 groups for the SNAPPS method, with each group spending 10 days in the outpatient gynecology clinic. A questionnaire and a checklist were used to gather data. An independent t-test and chi-square test were used to analyze the data. Ability to gain the trust of the patient, verbal and nonverbal communication skills, history taking, preparation of the patient for gynecological examination, and diagnosis and treatment of common diseases were significantly better in the SNAPPS group compared to the teacher-centered education group (P<0.05). The SNAPPS education method can significantly improve the clinical skills of midwifery students in gynecology, in particular history taking, differential diagnosis, and treatment of common diseases. PMID:27894183

  19. Outpatient management of pediatric burns.

    PubMed

    Kassira, Wrood; Namias, Nicholas

    2008-07-01

    The leading etiologies of pediatric burns are scald, thermal, and electrical injuries. The initial management of burns involves assessment of burn depth and total body surface area (TBSA) affected, a history, and physical examination. Calculation of percent of TBSA affected is an important determinant of the necessity for hospitalization versus outpatient management. Only second- and third-degree burns are included in the calculation. The criteria for outpatient management vary based on the center experience and resources. One such set of criteria in an experienced burn center includes burn affecting less than 15% TBSA, therefore not requiring fluid resuscitation; the ability to take in oral fluids, excluding serious perioral burns; no airway involvement or aspiration of hot liquid; no abuse; and dependable family able to transport the patient for clinic appointments. Once the child is ready to reenter school, the physician must discuss with the family and school staff any needs and expectations for the child, including wound care. Social reintegration can be difficult. Educating the teachers and staff of the child's appearance may help prepare the students.

  20. Update on immune checkpoint inhibitors in gynecological cancers

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, progress in our understanding of immune-modulatory signaling pathways in immune cells and the tumor microenvironment (TME) has led to rejuvenated interest in cancer immunotherapy. In particular, immunotherapy targeting the immune checkpoint receptors such as cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 (CTLA-4), programmed cell-death 1 (PD-1), and programmed cell-death ligand 1 (PD-L1) have demonstrated clinical activity in a wide variety of tumors, including gynecological cancers. This review will focus on the emerging clinical data on the therapeutic role of immune checkpoint inhibitors, and potential strategies to enhance the efficacy of this class of compounds, in the context of gynecological cancers. It is anticipated that future biomarker-directed clinical trials will provide further insights into the mechanisms underlying response and resistance to immunotherapy, and help guide our approach to designing therapeutic combinations that have the potential to enhance the benefit of immunotherapy in patients with gynecologic cancers. PMID:28028993

  1. Clinical research: making it work in the outpatient dialysis facility.

    PubMed

    Doss, Sheila; Schiller, Brigitte; Fox, Rosemary; Moran, John

    2009-01-01

    Performing clinical research in the outpatient dialysis facility can be very challenging. Research protocols define time-specific and detailed procedures to be performed. In dialysis units where staff members are responsible for the delivery of life-sustaining therapy to an aging end stage renal disease patient population with multiple co-morbidities, these requirements can easily be considered too burdensome to be implemented successfully. In the authors'facility, clinical research has been successfully implemented with a close team approach supported by a dedicated research group and unit staff

  2. The loneliness level of patients with gynecological cancer.

    PubMed

    Sevil, U; Ertem, G; Kavlak, O; Coban, A

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this descriptive study was to determine the loneliness levels and the variables that have an effect on the loneliness of women with a gynecological cancer diagnosis. The main questions that the study addressed were as follows: (1) What is the loneliness level of patients with gynecological cancer? and (2) What kind of relationships are there between general demographic characteristics of patients with gynecological cancer and their loneliness? This descriptive study was conducted at Ege University, Faculty of Medicine, Application and Investigation Hospital, Maternity and Women Diseases Gynecology Clinic, from July to December 2002. Maternity and Women Diseases Clinic Oncology Service treated 161 patients during this time period. While all patients hospitalized between the specified dates constituted the universe of the investigation; the actual sample was 94 patients. As data collection tools, a questionnaire form, which aimed at identifying sociodemographic characteristics of patients and the features related to their diseases relevant to the literature and the UCLA-loneliness scale were used. The general loneliness mean score of women with gynecological cancer was 35.85 +/- 9.302. Women's mean scores of loneliness were affected by whether psychologic support was needed, genital organ diseases were treated, or a family member had a gynecological operation, and by the income situation. The disease of cancer, which creates the most fear and anxiety in the community, has adverse psychologic effects on both the patient and the family. In societies where men dominate, as is the case in our society, women's place in the society has been reduced to their reproductive capacity, and thus, the health of their genital organs is very important.

  3. Annual report of the Committee on Gynecologic Oncology, the Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

    PubMed

    Yamagami, Wataru; Aoki, Daisuke

    2015-02-01

    The Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology collects and analyzes annual data on gynecologic cancers from member institutions. Here we present the Patient Annual Report for 2012 and the Treatment Annual Report for 2006. Data on 7028 patients with cervical cancer, 8217 with endometrial cancer, 5140 with ovarian cancer and 1725 with ovarian borderline tumor for whom treatment was initiated in 2012 were summarized in the Patient Annual Report. Data on the prognosis of 2699 patients with cervical cancer, 3243 with endometrial cancer and 1898 with ovarian cancer for whom treatment was initiated in 2006 were analyzed in the Treatment Annual Report. In the Patient Annual Report for 2012, stage I accounted for 55.4%, stage II for 23.0%, stage III for 11.0% and stage IV for 10.6% of all patients with cervical cancer. Stage I accounted for 72.2%, stage II for 7.0%, stage III for 13.4% and stage IV for 7.3% of all patients with endometrial cancer. Stage I accounted for 43.1%, stage II for 9.2%, stage III for 29.7% and stage IV for 7.2% of all patients with ovarian cancer. In the Treatment Annual Report for 2006, the 5-year overall survival rates for patients with cervical cancer were 92.9% for stage I, 74.6% for stage II, 55.3% for stage III and 24.3% for stage IV. The equivalent rates for patients with endometrial cancer were 96.3%, 92.7%, 80.6% and 35.8%, respectively; and those for patients with ovarian surface epithelial-stromal tumors were 90.6%, 82.9%, 48.7% and 40.9%, respectively.

  4. Use of topical hemostatic agents in gynecologic surgery.

    PubMed

    Wysham, Weiya Z; Roque, Dario R; Soper, John T

    2014-09-01

    Sutures, hemoclips, and electrocautery are the primary mechanisms used to achieve hemostasis during gynecologic surgery, but in situations in which these are inadequate or not feasible, an array of hemostatic agents are available to help achieve hemostasis. These agents include physical agents such as cellulose, collagen, or gelatin products as well as biologic agents such as thrombin and fibrin products. Limited data are available on many of these agents, although their use is increasing, sometimes at high costs. In gynecologic surgery, hemostatic agents are likely most effective when used in areas of oozing or slow bleeding and as an adjunct to conventional surgical methods of hemostasis.

  5. [Robotic surgery in gynecology: is it the future?].

    PubMed

    Coronado Martín, Pluvio Jesús

    2011-01-01

    Gynecologic surgery has been undergone a significant change in the last decade thanks to innovation in health technology. The appearance of the Da Vinci Surgical System has revolutionized the concept of minimally invasive surgery, due to add advantages over conventional laparoscopic surgery, such us three-dimensional vision, wristed forceps and a complete control of the instruments by the surgeon. The evidence published reflects that robotic surgery is preferable to laparotomy and laparoscopic approach, because it is more accurate, versatile, intuitive, and reduces perioperative morbidity. The future of Gynecologic Surgery is linked to the robotic approach.

  6. Leptomeningeal metastasis from gynecologic cancers diagnosed by brain MRI.

    PubMed

    Toyoshima, Masafumi; Tsuji, Keita; Shigeta, Shogo; Tokunaga, Hideki; Ito, Kiyoshi; Watanabe, Yoh; Yoshinaga, Kosuke; Otsuki, Takeo; Niikura, Hitoshi; Yaegashi, Nobuo

    Leptomeningeal metastasis (LM) is rarely observed in gynecologic cancers. As gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (Gd-MRI) is highly effective for diagnosing LM, the aim of this study is to describe the clinical behaviors and outcomes of LM patients who were diagnosed by Gd-MRI. After securing institutional review board approvals, we retrospectively reviewed patient records. Eight patients were found to have LM from gynecological malignancies. Primary tumors included three ovarian cancers, one tubal cancer, one peritoneal cancer, two endometrial cancers, and one cervical cancer. Gd-MRI of the brain and the spine is indicated as the high-priority inspection for the diagnosis of this devastating complication.

  7. Diagnosis of gynecological pseudoaneurysms and embolization with cyanoacrylate.

    PubMed

    Fernández Bermúdez, M J; Fernández Martínez, A M; Domitrovic, L A; Balboa Arregui, Ó

    2016-12-21

    Pseudoaneurysms of the uterine artery are an uncommon cause of severe gynecological bleeding secondary to surgical manipulation of the pelvis or to instrumental delivery. The different imaging techniques are of vital importance in the diagnosis. Angiography is the technique used for confirmation and also for treatment in many cases. Endovascular treatment by embolizing the pseudoaneurysm has become established as the treatment of choice, making it possible to avoid hysterectomy in women of childbearing age. This article presents two cases of gynecological bleeding due to pseudoaneurysms (one secondary to surgery and one secondary to childbirth) that were embolized in a novel way using cyanoacrylate.

  8. Inappropriate use of antibiotics in patients undergoing gynecologic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Joyce, John; Langsjoen, Jessica; Sharadin, Cynthia; Kuehl, Thomas J.

    2017-01-01

    We retrospectively examined prophylactic antibiotic use and documentation of wound classification in patients having gynecologic surgery at a tertiary hospital. Of the 326 cases reviewed, 175 (54%) received prophylactic antibiotics when not indicated according to guidelines of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. Antibiotic administration varied significantly (P < 0.02) among the different types of surgery, being given in 82% of laparoscopic cases, 35% of nonobstetrical dilation and curettage and operative hysteroscopy procedures, and 51% of open abdominal procedures. There were no recorded episodes of anaphylaxis or pseudomembranous colitis. In conclusion, antibiotic use is high among gynecologic surgeons at a tertiary hospital, but this use was unnecessary. PMID:28127125

  9. Organizational Determinants of Outpatient Substance Abuse Treatment Duration in Women

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Jeffrey A.; Lemak, Christy Harris

    2009-01-01

    Longer treatment duration has consistently been related to improved substance use outcomes. This study examined how tailored women's programming and organizational characteristics were related to duration in outpatient substance abuse treatment in women. Data were from two waves of a national outpatient substance abuse treatment unit survey (n=571 in 1999/2000, n=566 in 2005). Analyses were conducted separately for methadone and non-methadone programs. Negative binomial regressions tested associations between organizational determinants, tailored programming, and women's treatment duration. Of the tailored programming services, childcare was significantly related to longer duration in the non-methadone programs, but few other organizational factors were. Tailored programming was not associated to treatment duration in methadone programs, but ownership, affiliation, and accreditation were related to longer duration. Study findings suggest evidence for how external relationships related to resources, treatment constraints, and legitimacy may influence women's treatment duration. Methadone programs may be more vulnerable to external influences. PMID:19038526

  10. Effectiveness of the Gynecology Teaching Associate in Teaching Pelvic Examination Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guenther, Susan M.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    The effectiveness of using gynecology teaching associates is compared with training by gynecology residents on clinic patients for teaching the gynecologic examination. Sophomore medical students at the University of Iowa participated in the instruction and an evaluation session with a simulated patient trained to rate the students' examination…

  11. 76 FR 50485 - Obstetrics and Gynecology Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Amendment of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-15

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Obstetrics and Gynecology Devices Panel of the Medical... Obstetrics and Gynecology Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee. This meeting was announced... July 14, 2011, FDA announced that a meeting of the Obstetrics and Gynecology Devices Panel of...

  12. A Study to Determine the Impact of the Recently Established Primus Clinics on the Patient Workload in the Pediatric Clinic, General Outpatient Clinic and Emergency Room at Darnall Army Community Hospital

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-07-03

    pediatric clinic, general outpatient clinic, and emergency room at Darnall. 4. The present organization and resources for primary medical care at...specialty (e.g. family practice, internal medicine, pediatrics , emergency medicine, or obstetrics/gynecology). The medical director of the PRIMUS...Germantown, MD. < m zCallahan, Charles W. Jr. 1988. " Pediatric Clinic Briefing." KM z 12 September. CHAMPUS (Civilian Health and Medical Program of the

  13. Strategies for boosting outpatient care profitability.

    PubMed

    Baptist, A J; Lameka, R B

    1990-02-01

    With outpatient charges approaching one-fourth of hospital revenues nationwide, healthcare providers are pressed to handle this care more efficiently and profitably. Five steps toward healthier profit margins for outpatient services involve finding ways to expand volume and market share; setting and meeting strict quality standards; studying operational efficiency; working with physicians to improve productivity; and monitoring price-cost relationships.

  14. Heart Failure Update: Outpatient Management.

    PubMed

    Wojnowich, Katherine; Korabathina, Ravi

    2016-03-01

    Outpatient management of heart failure (HF) is aimed at treating symptoms and preventing hospitalizations and readmissions. Management is initiated in a stepwise approach. Blockade of the renin-angiotensin system is a cornerstone of therapy and should be started, along with beta blockers, as soon as the diagnosis of HF is made. Other drugs, including diuretics, aldosterone antagonists, hydralazine, and nitrates, may be added based on symptoms and American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association stage. Despite a great interest in and theoretical benefit of naturoceutical products in the mitigation of oxidative stress and HF progression, none has been proven to be beneficial, and concerns exist regarding their interactions with standard HF drugs. Other nonpharmacologic interventions, including sodium restriction, regular exercise, and/or cardiac rehabilitation, should be initiated at diagnosis. HF often is progressive, and clinicians should be aware of late stage management options, including implantable devices, cardiac transplantation, and hospice care.

  15. Outpatient treatment of adult asthma.

    PubMed Central

    Kleerup, E C; Tashkin, D P

    1995-01-01

    As a chronic disease with intermittent exacerbations, asthma is treated primarily in the outpatient setting by primary care physicians. Asthma is the result of complex and only partially understood interactions of respiratory, inflammatory, and neural cells and their mediators. The goals of asthma therapy are to prevent and relieve symptoms, allow normal activities of daily living, restore and maintain normal pulmonary function, avoid adverse effects from interventions, and minimize inconvenience and cost. These goals can be achieved through educating patients, assessing and monitoring asthma severity, avoiding or controlling asthma triggers, establishing an intervention plan for routine self-management and the management of exacerbations, and providing regular follow-up care. We present a stepped approach to asthma pharmacotherapy, emphasizing anti-inflammatory therapy--inhaled corticosteroids, cromolyn sodium, or nedocromil sodium--as a summary of recent national and international recommendations. PMID:7667983

  16. Robotics in Gynecology: Why is this Technology Worth Pursuing?

    PubMed Central

    Ayala-Yáñez, Rodrigo; Olaya-Guzmán, Emilio José; Haghenbeck-Altamirano, Javier

    2013-01-01

    Robotic laparoscopy in gynecology, which started in 2005 when the Da Vinci Surgical System (Intuitive Surgical Inc) was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for use in gynecologic procedures, represents today a modern, safe, and precise approach to pathology in this field. Since then, a great deal of experience has accumulated, and it has been shown that there is almost no gynecological surgery that cannot be approached with this technology, namely hysterectomy, myomectomy, sacrocolpopexia, and surgery for the treatment of endometriosis. Albeit no advantages have been observed over conventional laparoscopy and some open surgical procedures, robotics do seem to be advantageous in highly complicated procedures when extensive dissection and proper anatomy reestablishment is required, as in the case of oncologic surgery. There is no doubt that implementation of better logistics in finance, training, design, and application will exert a positive effect upon robotics expansion in gynecological medicine. Contrary to expectations, we estimate that a special impact is to be seen in emerging countries where novel technologies have resulted in benefits in the organization of health care systems. PMID:24453521

  17. Obstetric Outcomes in Non-Gynecologic Cancer Patients in Remission

    PubMed Central

    Timur, Hakan; Tokmak, Aytekin; Iskender, Cantekin; Yildiz, Elif Sumer; Inal, Hasan Ali; Uygur, Dilek; Danisman, Nuri

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the obstetric and perinatal outcomes in treated women who were diagnosed with non-gynecologic cancer and to compare these findings with pregnant women with no history of cancer. Materials and Methods: This retrospective study was conducted on 21 pregnant women with non-gynecologic cancer who were in remission (study group) and 63 pregnant women with no history of cancer (control group). The women were admitted to the high-risk pregnancy clinic of Zekai Tahir Burak Women’s Health Training and Research Hospital with a diagnosis of pregnancy and cancer between January 2010 and January 2015. Obstetric outcomes and demographic characteristics of the patients were recorded. Age, gravida, parity, abortus, body mass index (BMI), gestational week, smoking, mode of delivery, gestational weight, and perinatal outcomes were examined for each woman. Results: The most common cancer types were thyroid (28.5%) and breast cancers (23.8%), which constituted just over half of the non-gynecologic cancer cases during pregnancy. The time elapsed after the diagnosis was 3.8±2.2 (1–9) years. No statistically significant differences were found between the two groups with regard to age, obstetric history, BMI, gestational week, smoking, and obstetric and perinatal outcomes (p>0.05). Conclusion: Negative perinatal outcomes in non-gynecologic cancer patients in remission were found to be within acceptable levels. PMID:27551177

  18. Vitamin-B12 deficiency following therapy in gynecologic oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Bandy, L.C.; Clarke-Pearson, D.L.; Creasman, W.T.

    1984-03-01

    Vitamin-B12 deficiency results from inadequate absorption of the vitamin by the distal ileum and depletion of available stores. Both radiotherapy and intestinal resection can contribute to development of this condition. The significance of this problem in gynecologic oncology is discussed and two patients are described.

  19. Observations related to chronologic and gynecologic age in pregnant adolescents.

    PubMed Central

    Felice, M. E.; James, M.; Shragg, P.; Hollingsworth, D. R.

    1984-01-01

    A low chronologic age (less than or equal to 15 years) and low gynecologic age (less than or equal to 2 years) have been considered factors that increase medical complications among adolescent pregnant women. Gynecologic age (GA) is defined in this study as age in years at conception minus age at menarche. Two hundred twelve consecutive pregnant teenagers were followed prospectively in the Teen OB Clinic at the University of California, San Diego Medical Center, between August 1978 and July 1981. The clinic population consisted of 37.3 percent Whites, 35.8 percent Hispanics, 20.8 percent Blacks, and 6.1 percent other (mostly Indochinese). Sixty-eight percent of the patients were funded by MediCal. The patient population was divided by chronological age (CA) at conception into those 15 years or less or 16 years or older. A low chronological age was found to be a significant risk factor for premature rupture of membranes. Teenagers with a low gynecologic age (less than or equal to 2) had a lower mean pre-pregnancy weight and body mass index (Kg/M2) than teenagers with a higher gynecologic age. In this study, we did not find that a low CA or GA was correlated with a higher frequency of pregnancy-induced hypertension, prenatal medical problems, obstetrical problems at labor or delivery, or an excessive number of low-birthweight infants. PMID:6523906

  20. Continuum of Medical Education in Obstetrics and Gynecology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dohner, Charles W.; Hunter, Charles A., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Over the past eight years the obstetric and gynecology specialty has applied a system model of instructional planning to the continuum of medical education. The systems model of needs identification, preassessment, instructional objectives, instructional materials, learning experiences; and evaluation techniques directly related to objectives was…

  1. A National Survey of Undergraduate Teaching in Obstetrics and Gynecology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    And Others; Stenchever, Morton A.

    1979-01-01

    A survey of academic departments of obstetrics and gynecology was designed to assess undergraduate educational programs and the impact of efforts made to improve teaching in the specialty. It focuses on instructional patterns, the clinical clerkship, student evaluation, and program administration and evaluation. Prior surveys are noted.…

  2. Urologic issues in the pediatric and adolescent gynecology patient.

    PubMed

    Yerkes, Elizabeth B

    2009-03-01

    This article lends the urologist's perspective on complaints commonly seen in a pediatric and adolescent gynecology practice, such as perineal pain, repetitive posturing, vulvovaginitis and interlabial masses. Evaluation and management of urinary tract infections and daytime incontinence is discussed. The role of constipation and pelvic floor dysfunction in many of these complaints is emphasized.

  3. Hospital outpatient perceptions of the physical environment of waiting areas: the role of patient characteristics on atmospherics in one academic medical center

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Chun-Yen; Wang, Mu-Chia; Liao, Wei-Tsen; Lu, Jui-Heng; Sun, Pi-hung; Lin, Blossom Yen-Ju; Breen, Gerald-Mark

    2007-01-01

    Background This study examines hospital outpatient perceptions of the physical environment of the outpatient waiting areas in one medical center. The relationship of patient characteristics and their perceptions and needs for the outpatient waiting areas are also examined. Method The examined medical center consists of five main buildings which house seventeen primary waiting areas for the outpatient clinics of nine medical specialties: 1) Internal Medicine; 2) Surgery; 3) Ophthalmology; 4) Obstetrics-Gynecology and Pediatrics; 5) Chinese Medicine; 6) Otolaryngology; 7) Orthopedics; 8) Family Medicine; and 9) Dermatology. A 15-item structured questionnaire was developed to rate patient satisfaction covering the four dimensions of the physical environments of the outpatient waiting areas: 1) visual environment; 2) hearing environment; 3) body contact environment; and 4) cleanliness. The survey was conducted between November 28, 2005 and December 8, 2005. A total of 680 outpatients responded. Descriptive, univariate, and multiple regression analyses were applied in this study. Results All of the 15 items were ranked as relatively high with a range from 3.362 to 4.010, with a neutral score of 3. Using a principal component analysis' summated scores of four constructed dimensions of patient satisfaction with the physical environments (i.e. visual environment, hearing environment, body contact environment, and cleanliness), multiple regression analyses revealed that patient satisfaction with the physical environment of outpatient waiting areas was associated with gender, age, visiting frequency, and visiting time. Conclusion Patients' socio-demographics and context backgrounds demonstrated to have effects on their satisfaction with the physical environment of outpatient waiting areas. In addition to noticing the overall rankings for less satisfactory items, what should receive further attention is the consideration of the patients' personal characteristics when

  4. Patient Safety in Obstetrics and Gynecology Departments of two Teaching Hospitals in Delhi

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Bindiya; Guleria, Kiran; Arora, Renu

    2016-01-01

    Background: A healthy safety culture is integral to positive health care. A sound safety climate is required in Obstetrics and Gynecology to prevent adverse outcomes. Objective: The objective of this study was to assess and compare patient safety culture in two departments of Obstetrics and Gynecology. Materials and Methods: Using a closed-ended standard version of Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture (HSOPS), respondents were asked to answer 42 survey items, grouped into 10 dimensions and two outcome variables in two tertiary care teaching hospitals in Delhi. Qualitative data were compared using Fisher's exact test and chi-square test wherever applicable. Mean values were calculated and compared using unpaired t-test. Results: The overall survey response rate was 55%. A positive response rate of 57% was seen in the overall perception of patient safety that ranged from very good to acceptable. Sixty-four percent showed positive teamwork across hospital departments and units, while 36% gave an affirmative opinion with respect to interdepartmental handoffs. However, few adverse events (0-10) were reported in the last 12 months and only 38% of mistakes by doctors were reported. Half of the respondents agreed that their mistakes were held against them. There was no statistical difference in the safety culture between the two hospitals. Conclusions: Although the perception of patient safety and standards of patient safety were high in both the hospitals' departments, there is plenty of scope for improvement with respect to event reporting, positive feedback, and nonpunitive error. PMID:27385879

  5. Family planning, obstetrical and gynecological health care provision in the Soviet Far East.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, R J

    1992-01-01

    The Soviet model for both obstetrical and gynecological care and family planning provision seems entrenched in the Soviet Far East as found during a July 1991 visit to the Magadan and Chukotka Regions. Modern birth control is minimally practiced, but does include use of the older Soviet Loop intrauterine contraceptive device (IUD), recent introduction of the new Soviet Copper-T IUD and sporadic availability of condoms and foreign made birth control pills. Without male or female surgical sterilizations being performed, the consequence is that the major form of family planning is first trimester abortion. During this visit, I introduced the use of the NORPLANT Subdermal Contraceptive System and the Copper-T380A IUD to physicians at Anadry and Pevek regional hospitals. Gynecological surgery was also performed and fairly typical ob-gyn care units were toured. Ob-Gyn physicians in the Soviet Far East were found to be highly motivated. They look to the West for help in upgrading family planning and ob-gyn health care in the face of severe shortages after a half decade of perestroika.

  6. Outpatient competence restoration: A model and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Nicole R; Candilis, Philip J

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To describe a model outpatient competence restoration program (OCRP) and provide data on time to restoration of adjudicative competence. METHODS: The authors tracked the process by which individuals are referred for outpatient competence restoration (OCR) by courts in the United States capital, describing the unique requirements of American law, and the avenues available for compelling adherence. Competence to stand trial is a critical gate-keeping function of the judicial and forensic communities and assures that defendants understand courtroom procedures. OCR is therefore an effort to assure fairness and protection of important legal rights. Multi-media efforts are described that educate patients and restore competence to stand trial. These include resources such as group training, use of licensed clinicians, visual aids, structured instruments, and cinema. Aggregate data from the OCRP’s previous 4 years of OCR efforts were reviewed for demographic characteristics, restoration rate, and time to restoration. Poisson regression modeling identified the differences in restoration between sequential 45-d periods after entrance into the program. RESULTS: In the past 4 years, the DC OCRP has been successful in restoring 55 of 170 participants (32%), with an average referral rate of 35 persons per year. 76% are restored after the initial 45 d in the program. Demographics of the group indicate a predominance of African-American men with a mean age of 42. Thought disorders predominate and individuals in care face misdemeanor charges 78% of the time. Poisson regression modeling of the number attaining competence during four successive 45-d periods showed a substantial difference among the time periods for the rate of attaining competence (P = 0.0011). The three time periods after 45 d each showed a significant decrease in the restoration rate when compared to the initial 0 to 45 d period - their relative rates were only 22% to 33% as high as the rate for 0-45 d (all

  7. A Study of Factors Influencing Productivity in the Obstetrics and Gynecology Outpatient Clinic at Walter Reed Army Medical Center.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-08-01

    for fourteen physicians conducting various clinics (i.e., post-partum, oncology, infertility, colposcopy, cryotherapy , and sterilization), (d) three...Each area will have a circular coffee table as a centerpiece of the section. Carpeting, curtains, colorful wall prints, and plants will also be added

  8. An audit of travel and waiting times for outpatient radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Junor, E J; Macbeth, F R; Barrett, A

    1992-05-01

    The object of this study was to assess the non-medical factors which detract from the quality of outpatient receiving service to a population of 2.7 million in a wide geographical area. We conducted a survey by patient questionnaire of all outpatients receiving radiotherapy in the West of Scotland on a single day in 1990. A total of 216 outpatients attended for radiotherapy with a 92% response rate to the questionnaire being achieved. Median values (and ranges) were: age 58 (4-85) years, number of daily treatments 20 (4-33), distance travelled in one direction 10 (1-60) miles, travelling time 45 (5-130) minutes, waiting time in the unit for treatment 60 (0-200) minutes, and a time away from home of 2 hours 50 minutes (35 minutes-7 hours). Sixteen per cent of patients had a relative who lost time from work by transporting the patient and only 12 of 60 patients who were away from home over a meal time were offered a hospital meal. Sixteen per cent of patients came by ambulance and 73% by motor car. Of 146 travelling by car 27% used a charity service and 20% a volunteer driver ambulance service car. It is concluded that long travelling distances, travelling times and treatment waiting times for many patients require revision of transport provision, a strict appointment system, more treatment machines and hostel accommodation.

  9. Anesthesia for outpatient female sterilization.

    PubMed

    Fishburne, J I

    1983-04-01

    This issue of the Bulletin deals with the principles of anesthesia for outpatient female sterilization with emphasis on techniques for laparoscopy and minilaparotomy. General anesthesia techniques provide analgesia, amnesia, and muscle relaxation and are particularly useful for managing the anxious patient. Disadvantages include increased expense, need for specialized equipment, and highly trained personnel, and delayed recovery. Complications, though relatively rare, can be life-threatening and include aspiration of stomach contents, hypoxia, hypercarbia, hypotension, hypertension, cardiac arrhythmias, cardiorespiratory arrest, and death. There is no single preferred technique of general anesthesia, athough most anesthetists employ methods that allow rapid recovery of faculties, enabling the patient to be discharged soon after surgery. To accomplish this end, light anesthesia with sodium thiopental induction and nitrous oxide maintenance is often used. Short duration muscle relaxation with an agent such as succinylcholine supplements this technique. Other techniques include light anesthesia with inhalational anesthetic agents and the use of intravenous ketamine. Local anesthesia augmented by systemic and/or inhalational analgesia is supplanting general anesthesia techniques for laparoscopy in many locales. This approach is also particularly well-suited for minilaparotomy in developing countries, where it has achieved its greatest popularity. The local technique carries with it reduced morbidity and mortality but may not entirely relieve discomfort. The primary danger of local anesthesia is respiratory depression due to excessive narcosis and sedation. The operator must be alert to the action of the drugs and should always use the minimal effective dose. Although toxicity due to overdosage with local anesthetic drugs is occasionally experienced, allergic reactions to the amide-linkage drugs such as lidocaine or bupivacaine are exceedingly rare. For outpatient

  10. Outpatient Myelography: A Prospective Trial Comparing Complications after Myelography between Outpatients and Inpatients in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Tomohiro; Inoue, Hidenori; Aoki, Takaaki; Ishiguro, Naoki; Osawa, Yoshimitsu

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Prospective comparative study. Purpose To compare the incidence and severity of adverse reactions associated with myelography performed in outpatients vs. in inpatients and report the safety and usefulness of outpatient myelography in Japanese patients. Overview of Literature Myelography is normally performed as an inpatient procedure in most hospitals in Japan. No studies have reported the usefulness and adverse effects of outpatient myelography in Japanese patients. Methods We performed 221 myelography procedures. Eighty-five of the 221 patients underwent outpatient myelography using our new protocol. The incidence and severity of adverse reactions were compared with the other 136 patients, who underwent conventional inpatient myelography. We further compared the cost of outpatient and inpatient myelography. Results The overall rate of adverse effects was 9.4% in outpatients, as compared with 7.4% in inpatients. Overall, 1.2% of outpatients and 0.74% inpatients experienced "severe" adverse effects (requiring hospitalization). There were no significant differences between the 2 groups in either the overall rate of adverse effects or the rate of "severe" adverse effects. Moreover, the average outpatient procedure cost was only one-third to one-half that of the inpatient procedure. Conclusions This was the first study to address the safety and usefulness of outpatient myelography in Japanese patients. If selected according to proper inclusion criteria for outpatient procedure, no significant differences were observed in the adverse effects between inpatients and outpatients. The outpatient procedure is more economical and has the added benefit of being more convenient and time-efficient for the patient. PMID:26713127

  11. Depot medroxyprogesterone acetate contraception and the risk of breast and gynecologic cancer.

    PubMed

    Kaunitz, A M

    1996-05-01

    As the use of depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA) contraception increases in the United States and worldwide, assessing any impact on the risk of breast and gynecologic cancers becomes increasingly important. Overall, use of DMPA does not affect breast cancer risk. An elevated risk of this disease, however, has been noted in recent or current users. Hence, the association between DMPA use and breast cancer risk appears similar to that observed with oral contraceptives. Use of DMPA is associated with an 80% risk reduction of endometrial adenocarcinoma, a level of protection even greater than that noted with oral contraceptives. The risk of epithelial ovarian cancer and cervical neoplasia does not appear to be affected by DMPA use. Except for a substantial reduction in the risk of endometrial adenocarcinoma, use of DMPA does not appear to influence reproductive tract cancer risks.

  12. The Use of Barbed Sutures in Obstetrics and Gynecology

    PubMed Central

    Greenberg, James A

    2010-01-01

    Despite the multitude of different procedures performed with a host of different wound closure biomaterials, no study or surgeon has yet identified the perfect suture for all situations. In recent years, a new class of suture material—barbed suture—has been introduced into the surgeon’s armamentarium. This review focuses on barbed suture to better understand the role of this newer material in obstetrics and gynecology. PMID:21364859

  13. Copper-vapor laser in medical practice: gynecology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chvykov, Vladimir V.; Zazulya, O. I.; Zemskov, Konstantin I.

    1993-10-01

    About 100 patients were treated for cervical erosion, cervical leukoplakia, and vulval warts in the Gynecology Department of the adult polyclinic of the Zelenograd Center of Medicine. Copper vapor laser (CVL) was used with output average power up to 4 W in two lines (510 nm, 578 nm). Pulse repetition rate was about 10 kHz, pulselength approximately 20 - 40 ns. Four to twelve procedures were sufficient to recover.

  14. The epidemiologic status of gynecologic cancer in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Wilailak, Sarikapan; Lertchaipattanakul, Nuttapong

    2016-11-01

    Between the years of 2010-2012, it was estimated there were a total of 112,392 new cases of cancers in Thailand, thus, the total age-standardized rate (ASR) per 100,000 is 137.6. In regards to the most prevalent types of cancer in female, breast cancer has the highest ASR, followed by cervical cancer (ASR=14.4); liver and bile duct cancer; colon and rectum cancer; trachea, bronchus and lung cancer; ovarian cancer (ASR=6.0); thyroid cancer; non-Hodgkin lymphoma and uterine cancer (ASR=4.3). The trend of cervical cancer in Thailand is decreasing, one key factor in making this possible was the employment of dual tract strategy (Pap smear and visual inspection with acetic acid [VIA]) by the government in 2005. In the future, the government is also considering integrating human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination into the national immunization program, which may assist in the prevention of cervical cancer. By studying the statistical data of gynecologic cancer, it will be possible to formulate measures for the prevention, control and treatment of gynecologic cancer. Eventually, it will potentially improve the quality of life (QoL) of patients as well as decrease the mortality rate caused by gynecologic cancer.

  15. Gynecologic disorders and menstrual cycle lightheadedness in postural tachycardia syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Peggs, Kiffany J.; Nguyen, HoVan; Enayat, Diba; Keller, Nancy R.; Al-Hendy, Ayman; Raj, Satish R.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To assess differences in gynecologic history and lightheadedness during menstrual cycle phases among patients with POTS and healthy control women. Methods In a prospective, questionnaire-based study carried out at Paden Autonomic Dysfunction Center, Vanderbilt University, between April 2005 and January 2009, a custom-designed questionnaire was administered to patients with POTS (n=65) and healthy individuals (n=95). The results were analyzed via Fisher exact test and Mann–Whitney U test. Results Patients with POTS reported increased lightheadedness through all phases of the menstrual cycle phases as compared with healthy controls. Both groups experienced the greatest lightheadedness during menses, and a decrease in lightheadedness during the follicular phase. Patients with POTS reported a higher incidence of gynecologic diseases as compared with healthy controls. Conclusion The severity of lightheadedness was found to vary during the menstrual cycle, which may relate to changes in estrogen levels. Patients with POTS also reported an increase in estrogen-related gynecologic disease. PMID:22721633

  16. [Comparison of robotic surgery documentary in gynecological cancer].

    PubMed

    Vargas-Hernández, Víctor Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Robotic surgery is a surgical technique recently introduced, with major expansion and acceptance among the medical community is currently performed in over 1,000 hospitals around the world and in the management of gynecological cancer are being developed comprehensive programs for implementation. The objectives of this paper are to review the scientific literature on robotic surgery and its application in gynecological cancer to verify its safety, feasibility and efficacy when compared with laparoscopic surgery or surgery classical major surgical complications, infections are more common in traditional radical surgery compared with laparoscopic or robotic surgery and with these new techniques surgical and staying hospital are lesser than the former however, the disadvantages are the limited number of robot systems, their high cost and applies only in specialized centers that have with equipment and skilled surgeons. In conclusion robotic surgery represents a major scientific breakthrough and surgical management of gynecological cancer with better results to other types of conventional surgery and is likely in the coming years is become its worldwide.

  17. Gynecological cancers: A summary of published Indian data

    PubMed Central

    Maheshwari, Amita; Kumar, Neha; Mahantshetty, Umesh

    2016-01-01

    Gynecological cancers are among the most common cancers in women and hence an important public health issue. Due to the lack of cancer awareness, variable pathology, and dearth of proper screening facilities in developing countries such as India, most women report at advanced stages, adversely affecting the prognosis and clinical outcomes. Ovarian cancer has emerged as one of the most common malignancies affecting women in India and has shown an increase in the incidence rates over the years. Although cervical cancer is on a declining trend, it remains the second most common cancer in women after breast cancer. Many researchers in India have published important data in the field of gynecologic oncology, covering all domains such as basic sciences, preventive oncology, pathology, radiological imaging, and clinical outcomes. This work has given us an insight into the in-depth understanding of these cancers as well as the demographics and survival rates in the Indian population. This aim of this review is to discuss the important studies done in India for all gynecological cancers. PMID:27606294

  18. Major clinical research advances in gynecologic cancer in 2015

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    In 2015, fourteen topics were selected as major research advances in gynecologic oncology. For ovarian cancer, high-level evidence for annual screening with multimodal strategy which could reduce ovarian cancer deaths was reported. The best preventive strategies with current status of evidence level were also summarized. Final report of chemotherapy or upfront surgery (CHORUS) trial of neoadjuvant chemotherapy in advanced stage ovarian cancer and individualized therapy based on gene characteristics followed. There was no sign of abating in great interest in immunotherapy as well as targeted therapies in various gynecologic cancers. The fifth Ovarian Cancer Consensus Conference which was held in November 7–9 in Tokyo was briefly introduced. For cervical cancer, update of human papillomavirus vaccines regarding two-dose regimen, 9-valent vaccine, and therapeutic vaccine was reviewed. For corpus cancer, the safety concern of power morcellation in presumed fibroids was explored again with regard to age and prevalence of corpus malignancy. Hormone therapy and endometrial cancer risk, trabectedin as an option for leiomyosarcoma, endometrial cancer and Lynch syndrome, and the radiation therapy guidelines were also discussed. In addition, adjuvant therapy in vulvar cancer and the updated of targeted therapy in gynecologic cancer were addressed. For breast cancer, palbociclib in hormone-receptor-positive advanced disease, oncotype DX Recurrence Score in low-risk patients, regional nodal irradiation to internal mammary, supraclavicular, and axillary lymph nodes, and cavity shave margins were summarized as the last topics covered in this review. PMID:27775259

  19. Major clinical research advances in gynecologic cancer in 2015.

    PubMed

    Suh, Dong Hoon; Kim, Miseon; Kim, Hak Jae; Lee, Kyung Hun; Kim, Jae Weon

    2016-11-01

    In 2015, fourteen topics were selected as major research advances in gynecologic oncology. For ovarian cancer, high-level evidence for annual screening with multimodal strategy which could reduce ovarian cancer deaths was reported. The best preventive strategies with current status of evidence level were also summarized. Final report of chemotherapy or upfront surgery (CHORUS) trial of neoadjuvant chemotherapy in advanced stage ovarian cancer and individualized therapy based on gene characteristics followed. There was no sign of abating in great interest in immunotherapy as well as targeted therapies in various gynecologic cancers. The fifth Ovarian Cancer Consensus Conference which was held in November 7-9 in Tokyo was briefly introduced. For cervical cancer, update of human papillomavirus vaccines regarding two-dose regimen, 9-valent vaccine, and therapeutic vaccine was reviewed. For corpus cancer, the safety concern of power morcellation in presumed fibroids was explored again with regard to age and prevalence of corpus malignancy. Hormone therapy and endometrial cancer risk, trabectedin as an option for leiomyosarcoma, endometrial cancer and Lynch syndrome, and the radiation therapy guidelines were also discussed. In addition, adjuvant therapy in vulvar cancer and the updated of targeted therapy in gynecologic cancer were addressed. For breast cancer, palbociclib in hormone-receptor-positive advanced disease, oncotype DX Recurrence Score in low-risk patients, regional nodal irradiation to internal mammary, supraclavicular, and axillary lymph nodes, and cavity shave margins were summarized as the last topics covered in this review.

  20. Major clinical research advances in gynecologic cancer in 2014.

    PubMed

    Suh, Dong Hoon; Lee, Kyung Hun; Kim, Kidong; Kang, Sokbom; Kim, Jae Weon

    2015-04-01

    In 2014, 9 topics were selected as major advances in clinical research for gynecologic oncology: 2 each in cervical and corpus cancer, 4 in ovarian cancer, and 1 in breast cancer. For cervical cancer, several therapeutic agents showed viable antitumor clinical response in recurrent and metastatic disease: bevacizumab, cediranib, and immunotherapies including human papillomavirus (HPV)-tumor infiltrating lymphocytes and Z-100. The HPV test received FDA approval as the primary screening tool of cervical cancer in women aged 25 and older, based on the results of the ATHENA trial, which suggested that the HPV test was a more sensitive and efficient strategy for cervical cancer screening than methods based solely on cytology. For corpus cancers, results of a phase III Gynecologic Oncology Group (GOG) 249 study of early-stage endometrial cancer with high-intermediate risk factors are followed by the controversial topic of uterine power morcellation in minimally invasive gynecologic surgery. Promising results of phase II studies regarding the effectiveness of olaparib in various ovarian cancer settings are summarized. After a brief review of results from a phase III study on pazopanib maintenance therapy in advanced ovarian cancer, 2 outstanding 2014 ASCO presentations cover the topic of using molecular subtypes in predicting response to bevacizumab. A review of the use of opportunistic bilateral salpingectomy as an ovarian cancer preventive strategy in the general population is presented. Two remarkable studies that discussed the effectiveness of adjuvant ovarian suppression in premenopausal early breast cancer have been selected as the last topics covered in this review.

  1. The epidemiologic status of gynecologic cancer in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Between the years of 2010–2012, it was estimated there were a total of 112,392 new cases of cancers in Thailand, thus, the total age-standardized rate (ASR) per 100,000 is 137.6. In regards to the most prevalent types of cancer in female, breast cancer has the highest ASR, followed by cervical cancer (ASR=14.4); liver and bile duct cancer; colon and rectum cancer; trachea, bronchus and lung cancer; ovarian cancer (ASR=6.0); thyroid cancer; non-Hodgkin lymphoma and uterine cancer (ASR=4.3). The trend of cervical cancer in Thailand is decreasing, one key factor in making this possible was the employment of dual tract strategy (Pap smear and visual inspection with acetic acid [VIA]) by the government in 2005. In the future, the government is also considering integrating human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination into the national immunization program, which may assist in the prevention of cervical cancer. By studying the statistical data of gynecologic cancer, it will be possible to formulate measures for the prevention, control and treatment of gynecologic cancer. Eventually, it will potentially improve the quality of life (QoL) of patients as well as decrease the mortality rate caused by gynecologic cancer. PMID:27775261

  2. Outpatient Mental Health Services for Children in Foster Care: A National Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leslie, Laurel K.; Hurlburt, Michael S.; Landsverk, John; Barth, Richard; Slymen, Donald J.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To determine factors influencing the use of outpatient mental health services provided by mental health professionals (OMHS) for children in foster care using a national probability sample in the United States. Method: As part of the National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-being, detailed survey data were collected on 462 children,…

  3. Traumatization in Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Adult Psychiatric Outpatients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Øhre, Beate; Uthus, Mette Perly; von Tetzchner, Stephen; Falkum, Erik

    2015-01-01

    Deaf and hard-of-hearing persons are at risk for experiencing traumatic events and such experiences are associated with symptoms of mental disorder. We investigated the prevalence of traumatic events and subsequent traumatization in adults referred to specialized psychiatric outpatient units for deaf and hard-of-hearing patients. Sixty-two…

  4. To the point: obstetrics and gynecology global health experiences for medical students.

    PubMed

    Hampton, Brittany S; Chuang, Alice W; Abbott, Jodi F; Buery-Joyner, Samantha D; Cullimore, Amie J; Dalrymple, John L; Forstein, David A; Hueppchen, Nancy A; Kaczmarczyk, Joseph M; Page-Ramsey, Sarah; Pradhan, Archana; Wolf, Abigail; Dugoff, Lorraine

    2014-07-01

    This article, from the To the Point series prepared by the Association of Professors of Gynecology and Obstetrics Undergraduate Medical Education Committee, provides educators with an overview of considerations for obstetrics and gynecology global health experiences for the medical student. Options for integration of obstetrics and gynecology global health into undergraduate medical curricula are discussed. Specific considerations for global health clinical experiences for medical students, including choosing a clinical location, oversight and mentorship, goals and objectives, predeparture preparation, and evaluation, are reviewed.

  5. [Outpatient parenteral antibiotic therapy (OPAT): the Lausanne experience supporting new perspectives].

    PubMed

    Moulin, Estelle; Boillata, Noémie; De Vallière, Serge

    2016-04-13

    With the increase of infections without option for an oral treatment, the systematic use of hospitalization overloads the healthcare system and causes growing political concern. For carefully selected patients, outpatient parenteral antibiotic therapy is an interesting alternative, with more than 40 years of experience in several countries. In this perspective, an outpatient parenteral antibiotic therapy (OPAT) unit was established in Lausanne two years ago. This article aims to describe its activity. Its practice, involving especially self-administration, seems to be safe, efficacious and cost-effective, as long as international good practice recommendations are applied.

  6. Success and safety in outpatient microlumbar discectomy.

    PubMed

    Best, Natalie M; Sasso, Rick C

    2006-07-01

    Currently, many spine surgeons perform microlumbar discectomies on an outpatient basis. Yet, it is often customary for patients to have a 1-night stay in the hospital. Many studies have shown the efficacy of microlumbar discectomy (MLD) and its preference among surgeons for the treatment of lumbar disc herniation. It has also been shown to be safe, successful, and cost-effective. However, a large comprehensive study of this magnitude, gauging safety, success, and patient satisfaction for these procedures on an outpatient basis has not yet been done. One thousand three hundred seventy-seven MLD procedures have been done from 1992 to 2001 by 1 surgeon. A retrospective chart review was done on all procedures. Patients were then contacted by either telephone or mail to complete an outcome questionnaire. Seven hundred thirteen patients (53.9%) completed the questionnaire. Follow-up questionnaires were not completed due to deaths, incorrect contact information, and refused responses. Out of all MLD procedures, 55 (4.0%) were done with a hospital stay-only 24 of these (1.7%) were originally intended outpatient procedures. Of those that were done on an outpatient basis, 8.6% had a complication, including 6.4% who had a recurrent disc herniation. When asked, 81.6% said they would undergo the procedure again as an outpatient. In 82.1% the surgery's outcome was good, very good, or excellent. MLD is a routine procedure that can be performed on an outpatient basis safely, successfully, and with high patient satisfaction.

  7. Continuous Intravenous Milrinone Therapy in Pediatric Outpatients

    PubMed Central

    Curley, Michelle; Liebers, Jill

    2017-01-01

    Milrinone is a phosphodiesterase 3 inhibitor with both positive inotropic and vasodilator properties. Administered as a continuous infusion, milrinone is indicated for the short-term treatment of patients with acute decompensated heart failure. Despite limited data supporting long-term milrinone therapy in adults with congestive heart failure, children managed as outpatients may benefit from continuous milrinone as a treatment for cardiac dysfunction, as a destination therapy for cardiac transplant, or as palliative therapy for cardiomyopathy. The aim of this article is to review the medical literature and describe a home infusion company's experience with pediatric outpatient milrinone therapy. PMID:28248808

  8. Postoperative Irradiation of Gynecologic Malignancies: Improving Treatment Delivery Using Aperture-Based Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Nadeau, Sylvain . E-mail: sylvainn@rrsb.nb.ca; Bouchard, Myriam; Germain, Isabelle; Raymond, Paul-Emile; Beaulieu, Frederic; Beaulieu, Luc; Roy, Rene; Gingras, Luc

    2007-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate dosimetric and treatment delivery advantages of aperture-based intensity-modulated radiotherapy (AB-IMRT) for the treatment of patients receiving whole pelvic radiotherapy for gynecologic malignancies. Methods and Materials: Nineteen patients undergoing pelvic radiotherapy after resection of endometrial cancers were selected. A 45-Gy dose was prescribed to the target volume delineated on a planning CT scan. An in-house inverse planning system, Ballista, was used to develop a treatment plan using aperture-based multileaf collimator segments. This approach was compared with conventional four-field, enlarged four-field, and static beamlet-based IMRT (BB-IMRT) techniques in terms of target coverage, dose-volume histogram statistics for surrounding normal tissues, and numbers of segments and monitor units (MU). Results: Three quarters (76.4%) of the planning target volume received the prescription dose with conventional four-field plans. With adequate target coverage, the Ballista plans significantly reduced the volume of bowel and bladder irradiated at the prescribed dose (p < 0.001), whereas the two approaches provided equivalent results for the rectum (p 0.5). On the other hand, AB-IMRT and BB-IMRT plans showed only small differences in dose-volume histogram statistics of unknown clinical impact, whereas Ballista plan delivery required on average 73% and 59% fewer segments and MU, respectively. Conclusion: With respect to conventional techniques, AB-IMRT for the treatment of gynecologic malignancies provides dosimetric advantages similar to those with BB-IMRT but with clear treatment delivery improvements.

  9. Impact of obesity on recovery and pulmonary functions of obese women undergoing major abdominal gynecological surgeries.

    PubMed

    Moustafa, Ahmed A M; Abdelazim, Ibrahim A

    2016-06-01

    To determine impact of obesity on recovery parameters and pulmonary functions of women undergoing major abdominal gynecological surgeries. Eighty women undergoing major gynecological surgeries were included in this study. Anesthesia was induced by remifentanil bolus, followed by propofol and cisatracurium to facilitate oro-tracheal intubation and was maintained by balanced anesthesia of remifentanil intravenous infusion and sevoflurane in oxygen and air. Time from discontinuation of maintenance anesthesia to fully awake were recorded at 1-min intervals and time from discontinuation of anesthesia until patient was transferred to post-anesthesia care unit (PACU) and discharged from PACU was also recorded. Pulmonary function tests were performed before surgery and repeated 4 h, days 1, 2 and 3 post-operative for evaluation of forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in 1 s and peak expiratory flow rate. Occurrence of post-operative complications, re-admission to ICU, hospital stay and morbidities were also recorded. Induction of anesthesia using remifentanil bolus injection resulted in significant decrease of heart rate and arterial pressures compared to pre-operative and pre-induction values. Recovery times were significantly shorter in obese compared to morbidly obese women. Post-operative pulmonary function tests showed significant deterioration compared to pre-operative measures but showed progressive improvement through first 3 post-operative days. Hospital stay was significantly shorter for obese compared to morbid obese women. Obesity delays recovery from general anesthesia, adversely affects pulmonary functions and increases post-operative complications. Remifentanil infusion and sevoflurane could be appropriate combination for obese and morbidly obese women undergoing major surgeries.

  10. Towards increase of diagnostic efficacy in gynecologic OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirillin, Mikhail; Panteleeva, Olga; Eliseeva, Darya; Kachalina, Olga; Sergeeva, Ekaterina; Dubasova, Lyubov; Agrba, Pavel; Mikailova, Gyular; Prudnikov, Maxim; Shakhova, Natalia

    2013-06-01

    Gynecologic applications of optical coherence tomography (OCT) are usually performed in combination with routine diagnostic procedures: laparoscopy and colposcopy. In combination with laparoscopy OCT is employed for inspection of fallopian tubes in cases of unrecognized infertility while in colposcopy it is used to identify cervix pathologies including cancer. In this paper we discuss methods for increasing diagnostic efficacy of OCT application in these procedures. For OCT-laparoscopy we demonstrate independent criteria for pathology recognition which allow to increase accuracy of diagnostics. For OCT-colposcopy we report on application of device for controlled compression allowing to sense the elasticity of the inspected cervix area and distinguish between neoplasia and inflammatory processes.

  11. Robotic radical hysterectomy in the management of gynecologic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Pareja, Rene; Ramirez, Pedro T

    2008-01-01

    Robotic surgery is being used with increasing frequency in gynecologic oncology. To date, 44 cases were reported in the literature of radical hysterectomy performed with robotic surgery. When comparing robotic surgery with laparoscopy or laparotomy in performing a radical hysterectomy, the literature shows that robotic surgery offers an advantage over the other 2 surgical approaches with regard to operative time, blood loss, and length of hospitalization. Future studies are needed to further elucidate the equivalence or superiority of robotic surgery to laparoscopy or laparotomy in performing a radical hysterectomy.

  12. Group B Streptococcal Endocarditis in Obstetric and Gynecologic Practice

    PubMed Central

    Crespo, Antonio; Retter, Avi S.

    2003-01-01

    Background: We describe a case and review ten other instances of group B streptococcal endocarditis in the setting of obstetric and gynecologic practice reported since the last review in 1985. Case: Abortion remains a common antecedent event, but in contrast to earlier reports, most patients did not have underlying valvular disease, the tricuspid valve was most often involved, and mortality was low. Patients with tricuspid valve infection tended to have a subacute course, whereas those with aortic or mitral involvement typically had a more acute, fulminant course. Conclusion: Despite an improvement in mortality, morbidity remains high, with 8 of 11 patients having clinically significant emboli. PMID:14627217

  13. Dental Outpatients: Health Locus of Control Correlates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ludenia, Krista; Donham, Greg W.

    1983-01-01

    Examined relationships among specific personality variables, the Multidimensional Health Locus of Control Scales, and criterion-based ratings by staff dentists with dental outpatients (N=101). Found a consistent relationship between the perception that health is maintained by engaging in health-related behaviors and individual difference measures…

  14. Tobacco Smoking in Adolescent Psychiatric Outpatients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ditchburn, K. Marie; Sellman, J. Douglas

    2013-01-01

    Three main aims of this study were to ascertain the prevalence rate of smoking among adolescent psychiatric outpatients; estimate smokers' degree of nicotine dependence; and investigate the relationship between smoking and common mental health disorders. Face-to-face interviews were conducted on 93 patients ages 13-18 presenting to an adolescent…

  15. Outpatient coronary angioplasty: feasible and safe.

    PubMed

    Slagboom, Ton; Kiemeneij, Ferdinand; Laarman, Gert Jan; van der Wieken, Ron

    2005-04-01

    This study tested the safety and feasibility of coronary angioplasty on an outpatient basis. The purpose of this approach includes cost-effectiveness and patient comfort. Six hundred forty-four patients were randomized to either transradial or transfemoral PTCA using 6 Fr equipment. Patients were triaged to outpatient management based on a predefined set of predictors of an adverse outcome in the first 24 hr after initially successful coronary angioplasty. Three hundred seventy-five patients (58%) were discharged 4-6 hr after PTCA; 42% stayed in hospital overnight. In the outpatient group, one adverse event occurred (subacute stent thrombosis 7 hr postdischarge, nonfatal myocardial infarction). There were no major vascular complications. In the hospital group, 19 patients (7%) sustained an adverse cardiac even in the first 24 hr; 1 patient died. Patients treated via the femoral route had more (minor) bleeding complications (19 patients; 6%); in 17 of these, this was the sole reason that discharge was delayed. PTCA on an outpatient basis, performed via the radial or the femoral artery with low-profile equipment, is safe and feasible in a considerable part of a routine PTCA population. A larger proportion of transradial patients can be discharged due to a reduction in (minor) bleeding complications.

  16. [Dimensional modeling analysis for outpatient payments].

    PubMed

    Guo, Yi-zhong; Guo, Yi-min

    2008-09-01

    This paper introduces a data warehouse model for outpatient payments, which is designed according to the requirements of the hospital financial management while dimensional modeling technique is combined with the analysis on the requirements. This data warehouse model can not only improve the accuracy of financial management requirements, but also greatly increase the efficiency and quality of the hospital management.

  17. Women with Gynecologic Malignancies Have a Greater Incidence of Suicide than Women with Other Cancer Types

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, Kristy K.; Roncancio, Angelica M.; Plaxe, Steven C.

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate risk of suicide of women with invasive gynecologic malignancies, the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program (1973-2007) was queried. Suicide per 100,000 women with gynecologic malignancies was compared with that of women with other malignancies; suicide was 30% more likely in those with…

  18. The Lymphedema and Gynecologic Cancer (LEG) Study: Incidence, Risk Factors, and | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): The proposed study, "Lymphedema and Gynecologic cancer (LEG): Incidence, Risk Factors and Impact", will innovatively utilize the cooperative group setting of the GOG (Gynecologic Oncology Group) to prospectively study 1300 women newly diagnosed with cervical, endometrial, or vulvar cancer to determine the incidence and impact of lower extremity lymphedema following surgical treatment of these diseases. |

  19. Handling Sexuality Concerns in Women with Gynecological Cancer: Egyptian Nurse's Knowledge and Attitudes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mansour, Suzan E.; Mohamed, Hanan E.

    2015-01-01

    Sexuality is an important part of normal human functioning. Gynecological cancer diagnosis and treatment has devastating effect on Sexual issues. Study aim was to investigate Oncology Nurses knowledge and attitudes in Relation to Provision of Sexual Health Care to Women Diagnosed with Gynecological Cancer. The study setting was conducted at…

  20. Genetics of Breast and Gynecologic Cancers (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Cancer.gov

    Expert-reviewed information summary about the genetics of breast and gynecologic cancers, including information about specific genes and family cancer syndromes. The summary also contains information about interventions that may influence the risk of developing breast and gynecologic cancers in individuals who may be genetically susceptible to these diseases. Psychosocial issues associated with genetic testing are also discussed.

  1. Evaluation of Students' Clinical and Communication Skills in Performing a Gynecologic Examination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fang, Wei Li; And Others

    1984-01-01

    The use of trained gynecologic teaching associates (GTAs) in providing instruction on the gynecologic examination is discussed. GTAs work in pairs; while one provides instruction, the other serves as a model. A study to measure student anxiety and confidence during the examination is described. (MLW)

  2. Mapping the literature of maternal-child/gynecologic nursing

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Susan Kaplan

    2006-01-01

    Objectives: As part of a project to map the literature of nursing, sponsored by the Nursing and Allied Health Resources Section of the Medical Library Association, this study identifies core journals cited in maternal-child/gynecologic nursing and the indexing services that access the cited journals. Methods: Three source journals were selected and subjected to a citation analysis of articles from 1996 to 1998. Results: Journals were the most frequently cited format (74.1%), followed by books (19.7%), miscellaneous (4.2%), and government documents (1.9%). Bradford's Law of Scattering was applied to the results, ranking cited journal references in descending order. One-third of the citations were found in a core of 14 journal titles; one-third were dispersed among a middle zone of 100 titles; and the remaining third were scattered in a larger zone of 1,194 titles. Indexing coverage for the core titles was most comprehensive in PubMed/MEDLINE, followed by Science Citation Index and CINAHL. Conclusion: The core of journals cited in this nursing specialty revealed a large number of medical titles, thus, the biomedical databases provide the best access. The interdisciplinary nature of maternal-child/ gynecologic nursing topics dictates that social sciences databases are an important adjunct. The study results will assist librarians in collection development, provide end users with guidelines for selecting databases, and influence database producers to consider extending coverage to identified titles. PMID:16710464

  3. Major clinical research advances in gynecologic cancer in 2012.

    PubMed

    Suh, Dong Hoon; Kim, Jae-Weon; Kim, Kidong; Kim, Hak Jae; Lee, Kyung-Hun

    2013-01-01

    Ten topics were chosen among major clinical research achievements in gynecologic oncology in 2012. For ovarian cancer, comprehensive review of the history of bevacizumab studies was followed by poly adenosine diphosphate [ADP]-ribose polymerase (PARP) inhibitors and other molecular targeted agents such as epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor and AMG 386. For the development of genomic study in gynecologic cancers, BRCA and DICER1 mutations were covered in epithelial and nonepithelial ovarian cancer, respectively. For endometrial cancer, targeted agents including mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors and bevacizumab were discussed. Radiation therapy "sandwiched" between combination chemotherapy schedules for the treatment of uterine papillary serous carcinoma was also reviewed. Preoperative prediction of lymph node metastasis, definition of low-risk group, and recurrence and survival outcomes of laparoscopic approaches were addressed. For cervical cancer, we reviewed long-term benefit of human papillomavirus test and efficacy of paclitaxel/carboplatin versus paclitaxel/cisplatin in stage IVB, persistent or recurrent disease. In addition, the effect of three dimensional image-based high-dose rate brachytherapy was also reviewed. For vulvar cancer, the diagnostic value of sentinel lymph node biopsy was discussed. For breast cancer, positive results of three outstanding phase III randomized clinical trials, CLEOPATRA, EMILIA, and BOLERO-2 were introduced. Lastly, updates of major practice guidelines were summarized.

  4. Major clinical research advances in gynecologic cancer in 2012

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Dong Hoon; Kim, Kidong; Kim, Hak Jae; Lee, Kyung-Hun

    2013-01-01

    Ten topics were chosen among major clinical research achievements in gynecologic oncology in 2012. For ovarian cancer, comprehensive review of the history of bevacizumab studies was followed by poly adenosine diphosphate [ADP]-ribose polymerase (PARP) inhibitors and other molecular targeted agents such as epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor and AMG 386. For the development of genomic study in gynecologic cancers, BRCA and DICER1 mutations were covered in epithelial and nonepithelial ovarian cancer, respectively. For endometrial cancer, targeted agents including mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors and bevacizumab were discussed. Radiation therapy "sandwiched" between combination chemotherapy schedules for the treatment of uterine papillary serous carcinoma was also reviewed. Preoperative prediction of lymph node metastasis, definition of low-risk group, and recurrence and survival outcomes of laparoscopic approaches were addressed. For cervical cancer, we reviewed long-term benefit of human papillomavirus test and efficacy of paclitaxel/carboplatin versus paclitaxel/cisplatin in stage IVB, persistent or recurrent disease. In addition, the effect of three dimensional image-based high-dose rate brachytherapy was also reviewed. For vulvar cancer, the diagnostic value of sentinel lymph node biopsy was discussed. For breast cancer, positive results of three outstanding phase III randomized clinical trials, CLEOPATRA, EMILIA, and BOLERO-2 were introduced. Lastly, updates of major practice guidelines were summarized. PMID:23346316

  5. Nitromusk compounds in women with gynecological and endocrine dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Eisenhardt, S; Runnebaum, B; Bauer, K; Gerhard, I

    2001-12-01

    Musk xylene (MX), musk ketone (MK), musk ambrette, musk moskene, and musk tibetene are synthetic fragrances. Between 1994 and 1996 these five nitromusk compounds (NMCs) were tested in the blood of 152 women who consulted the Endocrinological Department of the University Hospital of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Heidelberg, Germany, because of gynecological problems. The testing was conducted by gas chromotography with mass-specific detector and mass spectrometry in a retrospective cross-sectional study. MX was detected in 95% and MK in 85% of the blood samples (>20 ng per liter whole blood). The median concentration of MX was 65.5 ng/L and the maximum level of MX was 1183 ng/L; the corresponding values for MK were respectively 55.5 and 518 ng/L. The other three NMCs were found in only a few patients or not at all. Significant associations between MX and MK concentrations were found in blood and different clinical parameters of the endocrine system. MX and MK may act centrally as a disrupter of the (supra-) hypothalamic-ovarian axis, which may result in a mild ovarian insufficiency. On the basis of our data, a reproductive toxicity and an endocrine effect of NMCs in women cannot be ruled out. Further experimental and clinical studies should be conducted.

  6. Gynecologic Care of the Female-to-Male Transgender Man

    PubMed Central

    Dutton, Lauren; Koenig, Karel; Kristopher, Fennie

    2016-01-01

    Transgender men are a vulnerable population whose health care needs have been difficult to identify because of limited research and an inability to identify the population. Limited evidence suggests that transgender men are at increased risk of having polycystic ovarian syndrome, contracting HIV, experiencing violence, and committing suicide. This qualitative study, conducted through face-to-face interviews of a convenient sample, was a three-part interview containing a demographic and health questionnaire, the Norbeck Social Support Questionnaire, as well as the Health Care Relationship Trust Scale. Audio recordings and written notes were reviewed and common themes were identified via content analysis. Six self-identified transgender men between the ages of 19 and 45 years were enrolled in the study. Participants were at varying degrees of social and medical transition. Four major themes were identified: 1) receiving gynecologic care was perceived to be important; 2) breasts caused the most gender identity conflict; 3) transgender men struggle with revealing their gender identity to health care providers; and 4) the male/female boxes on health intake forms, as well as pronoun usage by medical staff, were barriers to receiving health care. This gynecologic health care needs assessment of transgender men begins to characterize the barriers transgender men face when seeking health care. PMID:18586186

  7. Genetic screening for gynecological cancer: where are we heading?

    PubMed

    Manchanda, Ranjit; Jacobs, Ian

    2016-01-01

    The landscape of cancer genetics in gynecological oncology is rapidly changing. The traditional family history-based approach has limitations and misses >50% mutation carriers. This is now being replaced by population-based approaches. The need for changing the clinical paradigm from family history-based to population-based BRCA1/BRCA2 testing in Ashkenazi Jews is supported by data that demonstrate population-based BRCA1/BRCA2 testing does not cause psychological harm and is cost effective. This article covers various genetic testing strategies for gynecological cancers, including population-based approaches, panel and direct-to-consumer testing as well as the need for innovative approaches to genetic counseling. Advances in genetic testing technology and computational analytics have facilitated an integrated systems medicine approach, providing increasing potential for population-based genetic testing, risk stratification, and cancer prevention. Genomic information along-with biological/computational tools will be used to deliver predictive, preventive, personalized and participatory (P4) and precision medicine in the future.

  8. Changes in the Practice of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

    PubMed

    Rayburn, William F; Tracy, Erin E

    2016-01-01

    A projected shortage of obstetrician-gynecologists (OB-GYNs) is a result of both the increasing US population and the relatively static number of residency graduates. In addition, generational changes have contributed to increasing subspecialization, more desiring part-time employment, and earlier retirement. This article reviews data regarding changes in the practice of obstetrics and gynecology. Residency education is focusing more on a core curriculum in general obstetrics and gynecology, while subspecialty fellowship training has grown in popularity. There are no recent data to describe whether OB-GYNs are working fewer hours, yet more are employed in larger practices at mostly metropolitan locations. A team-based care model that incorporates nonphysician clinicians and digital conversion of clinical data has been encouraged to increase accessibility, improve comprehensiveness, commit to more continuity of care, and reduce redundancy. Compared with other medical specialists, OB-GYNs retire slightly earlier, especially females who will represent the field more. The specialty is moving toward a more comprehensive women's health care practice model that is more patient-centered, efficient, cost controlling, team-based, and adaptable to the needs of a diverse population. Implications from these changes for our practices and improving patient care are currently unclear and await more reported experience.

  9. Patient Perceptions of Open, Laparoscopic, and Robotic Gynecological Surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Prabakar, Cheruba; Nematian, Sepide; Julka, Nitasha; Bhatt, Devika; Bral, Pedram

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To investigate patient knowledge and attitudes toward surgical approaches in gynecology. Design. An anonymous Institutional Review Board (IRB) approved questionnaire survey. Patients/Setting. A total of 219 women seeking obstetrical and gynecological care in two offices affiliated with an academic medical center. Results. Thirty-four percent of the participants did not understand the difference between open and laparoscopic surgeries. 56% of the participants knew that laparoscopy is a better surgical approach for patients than open abdominal surgeries, while 37% thought that laparoscopy requires the surgeon to have a higher technical skill. 46% of the participants do not understand the difference between laparoscopic and robotic procedures. 67.5% of the participants did not know that the surgeon moves the robot's arms to perform the surgery. Higher educational level and/or history of previous abdominal surgeries were associated with the highest rates of answering all the questions correctly (p < 0.05), after controlling for age and race. Conclusions. A substantial percentage of patients do not understand the difference between various surgical approaches. Health care providers should not assume that their patients have an adequate understanding of their surgical options and accordingly should educate them about those options so they can make truly informed decisions. PMID:27840826

  10. 77 FR 5317 - Medicaid Program; Covered Outpatient Drugs

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-02

    ... 42 CFR Part 447 Medicaid Program; Covered Outpatient Drugs; Proposed Rule #0;#0;Federal Register... Outpatient Drugs AGENCY: Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), HHS. ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY... outpatient drugs to implement provisions of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010,...

  11. 42 CFR 410.60 - Outpatient physical therapy services: Conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Outpatient physical therapy services: Conditions... Services § 410.60 Outpatient physical therapy services: Conditions. (a) Basic rule. Except as specified in paragraph (a)(3)(iii) of this section, Medicare Part B pays for outpatient physical therapy services only...

  12. 42 CFR 410.60 - Outpatient physical therapy services: Conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Outpatient physical therapy services: Conditions... Services § 410.60 Outpatient physical therapy services: Conditions. (a) Basic rule. Except as specified in paragraph (a)(3)(iii) of this section, Medicare Part B pays for outpatient physical therapy services only...

  13. Stability and Change of Interest in Obstetrics-Gynecology among Medical Students: Eighteen Years of Longitudinal Data.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forouzan, Iraj; Hojat, Mohammadreza

    1993-01-01

    A study investigated, first, the percentage of medical students maintaining interest in obstetrics/gynecology during medical school compared to those maintaining interest in other specialties and, second, changes of interest from obstetrics/gynecology to other specialties and other specialties to obstetrics/gynecology. Results indicate instability…

  14. Outpatients' Knowledge About and Attitude Toward Randomised Clinical Trials

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-23

    Ambulatory Patients in the Dep. of Medical Gastroenterology; Ambulatory Patients in the Dep. of Gynecology; Ambulatory Patients in the Dep. of Orthopedic Surgery; Ambulatory Patients in the Dep. of Urology

  15. Clinical audit of COPD in outpatient respiratory clinics in Spain: the EPOCONSUL study

    PubMed Central

    Calle Rubio, Myriam; Alcázar Navarrete, Bernardino; Soriano, Joan B; Soler-Cataluña, Juan J; Rodríguez González-Moro, José Miguel; Fuentes Ferrer, Manuel E; López-Campos, José Luis

    2017-01-01

    Background Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) outpatients account for a large burden of usual care by respirologists. EPOCONSUL is the first national clinical audit conducted in Spain on the medical care for COPD patients delivered in outpatient respiratory clinics. We aimed to evaluate the clinical interventions and the degree of adherence to recommendations in outpatients of current COPD clinical practice guidelines. Methodology This is an observational study with prospective recruitment (May 2014–May 2015) of patients with a COPD diagnosis as seen in outpatient respiratory clinics. The information collected was historical in nature as for the clinical data of the last and previous consultations, and the information concerning hospital resources was concurrent. Results A total of 17,893 clinical records of COPD patients in outpatient respiratory clinics from 59 Spanish hospitals were evaluated. Of the 5,726 patients selected, 4,508 (78.7%) were eligible. Overall, 12.1% of COPD patients did not fulfill a diagnostic spirometry criteria. Considerable variability existed in the available resources and work organization of the hospitals, although the majority were university hospitals with respiratory inpatient units. There was insufficient implementation of clinical guidelines in preventive and educational matters. In contrast, quantitative evaluation of dyspnea grade (81.9%) and exacerbation history (70.9%) were more frequently performed. Only 12.4% had COPD severity calculated according to the Body mass index, airflow Obstruction, Dyspnoea and Exercise capacity (BODE) index. Phenotype characteristics according to Spanish National Guideline for COPD were determined in 46.3% of the audited patients, and the risk evaluation according to Global initiative for chronic Obstructive Lung Disease was estimated only in 21.9%. Conclusion The EPOCONSUL study reports the current situation of medical care for COPD patients in outpatient clinics in Spain, revealing

  16. DBT in an outpatient forensic setting.

    PubMed

    van den Bosch, L M C; Hysaj, M; Jacobs, P

    2012-01-01

    Literature shows that effective treatment of borderline personality disorder (BPD) has become possible. However, borderline patients in forensic psychiatry do not seem to benefit from this development. In forensic psychiatry, prevention of criminal recidivism is the main focus of treatment, not core borderline problems like parasuicidal and self-destructive behavior. A dialectical behavioral treatment program for BPD was implemented in an outpatient forensic clinic in The Netherlands. Sociodemographic, clinical, and treatment data were collected from ten male, and nineteen female forensic BPD patients, and compared with corresponding data from fifty-eight non-forensic BPD patients. The results show that it is possible to implement dialectical behavior therapy in an outpatient forensic clinic. The data indicate that the exclusion of forensic patients, and especially female forensic patients, from evidence-based treatment is unjustified given the highly comparable clinical and etiological characteristics they share with female BPD patients from general mental health settings.

  17. Outpatient commitment and procedural due process.

    PubMed

    Player, Candice Teri-Lowe

    2015-01-01

    A large empirical literature on Kendra's Law has assessed the impact of court ordered outpatient treatment on outcomes such as treatment adherence, psychiatric hospitalization, quality of life, and treatment costs. Missing from the empirical literature, however, is a better understanding of procedural due process under Kendra's Law. Procedural due process concerns the safeguards that must be in place when governments deprive persons of their liberties, for example--notice, the right to a hearing and the right to appeal. This article reports the findings from a qualitative study of procedural due process and assisted outpatient treatment hearings under Kendra's Law. Attorneys reported significant barriers to effective advocacy on behalf of their clients. Further, despite the shift from a medical model of civil commitment to a judicial model in the 1970s, by and large judges continue to accord great deference to clinical testimony.

  18. Technology and outpatient review: a preliminary evaluation.

    PubMed

    Bergman, A; Henderson, M; Cline, J L

    1990-06-01

    Most health care utilization and cost control programs focus on inpatient care or on high-cost, catastrophic illnesses or injuries. Recently, however, Parkside Health Management Corporation has developed a utilization review program that targets treatments and high-technology procedures performed primarily in an outpatient setting, as well as specific inpatient procedures not included in other review programs. These include chiropractic, podiatric, and physical therapy treatments; cesarean section; and endoscopy, ultrasound in pregnancy, and lithotripsy. The treatments/procedures examined in this program, called Technology and Outpatient Review (TOR), account for approximately 6% of claims expenses. Bigel Institute for Health Policy researchers are evaluating a pilot test to determine TOR's effect on health care costs and utilization, appropriateness, and patient satisfaction.

  19. Outpatient laser tonsillar ablation under local anaesthetic.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Peter J; Latif, Abdul

    2004-11-01

    Outpatient laser ablation of the palatine tonsils under local anaesthetic is an alternative technique to capsular tonsillectomy for recurrent tonsillitis under general anaesthetic. Laser tonsillotomy ablates up to 70% of the tonsillar tissue and is performed when patients choose not to have a conventional tonsillectomy, or are unfit for a general anaesthetic. The technique described here is an adaptation of Krespis' laser-assisted serial tonsillectomy (LAST) whereby only one sitting is required. Krespis' technique effectively eliminates recurrent tonsillitis in 96% of the cases over a 4-year follow-up period and represents the only substantial study looking at treating recurrent tonsillitis with outpatient laser ablation. This study is a retrospective postal survey of 19 patients who underwent laser tonsillar ablation under local anaesthetic for recurrent chronic tonsillitis from 1997 to 2001 and was performed in liaison with the clinical audit department at Basildon Hospital. We had a response rate of 74% and an admission rate of 0%, which compares favourably with day case tonsillectomy surgery. Of the patients, 75% did not experience further episodes of tonsillitis 12 months after the procedure and 77% of the patients were glad they had the operation. Although this technique does not completely eliminate tonsillitis, it offers an alternative for those patients who prefer a procedure that is done quickly in an outpatient setting without the additional problems of general anaesthesia, overnight hospital admission and long waiting lists.

  20. Disparities in internet use among orthopedic outpatients.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Kenneth P; Rehman, Saqib; Goldhirsh, Jessie

    2014-02-01

    Internet access has lagged behind for patients with lower incomes and from certain ethnic groups. This study investigated the possible improvement of access to health-related information on the Internet for all patients in an urban outpatient setting, regardless of socioeconomic background. A 28-question survey was completed by 100 orthopedic outpatients evaluating associations between their age, ethnicity, income, or education level and their access to the Internet. The survey also examined how patients used the Internet to obtain information about their medical condition, their privacy concerns when conducting online research, and their use of mobile phones as a primary means of Internet access. The Internet was used by 57% of orthopedic outpatients in this urban setting. Internet access decreased with advancing age but increased with increasing income and education, findings consistent with similar studies. Despite the inability to identify an association between ethnicity and Internet access in this patient population, fewer Latinos (33%) than whites (67%) or African Americans (77%) sought information about their medical condition. Among patients who used a mobile phone as the primary method for online access, 74% were African American or Latino and 26% were white. This difference in mobile phone use for online access suggests that mobile phones have provided ethnic minorities with greater Internet access and thus may have narrowed the digital divide among the races.

  1. Karman's cannula and vacuum aspirator in gynecological practice.

    PubMed Central

    Adinma, J. I.; Adinma, E.

    1996-01-01

    The charts of 340 patients who underwent an endometrial suction procedure using Karman's cannula and syringe were reviewed. The therapeutic uses of this instrument were for the treatment of chronic endometritis (18.6%), the evacuation of incomplete or missed abortion (14.6%) and hydatidiform mole (0.8%), and the retrieval of the missing tail of an intrauterine contraceptive device (1.2%). Its diagnostic indications include: the investigation of infertility (55.3%), dysfunctional uterine bleeding (8.7%), and postcoital bleeding (0.8%). The diagnostic yield of the instrument was 96.6%. Transient postoperative abdominal pain occurred in 65.9% of the cases while cervical dilatation preceded aspiration in 12.9% of the cases with cervical stenosis. The advantages of the instrument are discussed and its usefulness in everyday gynecological practice highlighted. PMID:8583487

  2. Effective feedback strategies for teaching in pediatric and adolescent gynecology.

    PubMed

    Kaul, Paritosh; Gong, Jennifer; Guiton, Gretchen

    2014-08-01

    The clinical setting of pediatric and adolescent gynecology poses complex tasks for the physician with its numerous procedures and the communication demands of interacting with an adolescent and/or guardian. Needless to say, teaching within this setting is highly demanding. Regardless of the level of learner or the professional role (e.g., nurse, medical student, resident, physician assistant) represented, clinical teaching requires that the instructor provide feedback in ways that benefit the student. Recent research on feedback suggests a more complex understanding of feedback than in the past. This article highlights key research and its implication for effective feedback by presenting a three part framework; know your learner, understand what is to be learned, and plan for improvement.

  3. Comparative studies of energy sources in gynecologic laparoscopy.

    PubMed

    Law, Kenneth S K; Lyons, Stephen D

    2013-01-01

    Energy sources incorporating "vessel sealing" capabilities are being increasingly used in gynecologic laparoscopic surgery although conventional monopolar and bipolar electrosurgery remain popular. The preference for one device over another is based on a combination of factors, including the surgeon's subjective experience, availability, and cost. Although comparative clinical studies and meta-analyses of laparoscopic energy sources have reported small but statistically significant differences in volumes of blood loss, the clinical significance of such small volumes is questionable. The overall usefulness of the various energy sources available will depend on a number of factors including vessel burst pressure and seal time, lateral thermal spread, and smoke production. Animal studies and laboratory-based trials are useful in providing a controlled environment to investigate such parameters. At present, there is insufficient evidence to support the use of one energy source over another.

  4. Common gynecological challenges in adolescents with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Stimpson, Sarah-Jo; Rebele, Erin C; DeBaun, Michael R

    2016-01-01

    Sickle cell anemia is one of the most common genetic blood disorders worldwide. Individuals with sickle cell disease (SCD) experience clinical manifestations such as chronic anemia, developmental delay, vaso-occlusive pain, acute chest syndrome, and neurological complications. Adolescent girls with SCD face unique gynecological challenges including delayed puberty marked by a later onset in menarche, vaso-occlusive pain associated with their menstrual cycle, and underdiagnosed abnormal uterine bleeding. This review focuses on these challenges with particular emphasis on delayed menarche and vaso-occlusive pain episodes associated with menstruation, in addition to the evaluation and initial management of heavy menstrual bleeding for adolescents with SCD. We highlight research opportunities in this neglected area to help enhance the comprehensive care model for this population.

  5. Phytochemicals: A Multitargeted Approach to Gynecologic Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Se-Woong; Song, Yong Sang; Tsang, Benjamin K.

    2014-01-01

    Gynecologic cancers constitute the fourth most common cancer type in women. Treatment outcomes are dictated by a multitude of factors, including stage at diagnosis, tissue type, and overall health of the patient. Current therapeutic options include surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy, although significant unmet medical needs remain in regard to side effects and long-term survival. The efficacy of chemotherapy is influenced by cellular events such as the overexpression of oncogenes and downregulation of tumor suppressors, which together determine apoptotic responses. Phytochemicals are a broad class of natural compounds derived from plants, a number of which exhibit useful bioactive effects toward these pathways. High-throughput screening methods, rational modification, and developments in regulatory policies will accelerate the development of novel therapeutics based on these compounds, which will likely improve overall survival and quality of life for patients. PMID:25093186

  6. Immunotherapy: New Strategies for the Treatment of Gynecologic Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Bourla, Ariel Bulua; Zamarin, Dmitriy

    2016-01-01

    Over the past decade, the ability of cancer cells to evade immune destruction has become recognized as one of the hallmarks of cancer. This understanding has paved the way for the development of novel therapeutic agents that can enhance activation of antitumor immune responses or reverse immunosuppressive mechanisms through which tumors escape immune-mediated rejection. The treatment of gynecologic cancers remains a therapeutic challenge, as these malignancies are often diagnosed in advanced stages, and many patients relapse despite appropriate management. Clinical trials have shown efficacy for various immunotherapeutic strategies, especially the use of tumor-targeting antibodies; enhancement of tumor antigen presentation, such as with vaccines and toll-like receptor agonists; and agents targeting immunosuppressive mechanisms, such as checkpoint blockade inhibitors. Emerging data on new and combination approaches currently under investigation provide a strong rationale for these approaches. PMID:26791846

  7. [Basic principles and results of brachytherapy in gynecological oncology].

    PubMed

    Kanaev, S V; Turkevich, V G; Baranov, S B; Savel'eva, V V

    2014-01-01

    The fundamental basics of contact radiation therapy (brachytherapy) for gynecological cancer are presented. During brachytherapy the principles of conformal radiotherapy should be implemented, the aim of which is to sum the maximum possible dose of radiation to the tumor and decrease the dose load in adjacent organs and tissues, which allows reducing the frequency of radiation damage at treatment of primary tumors. It is really feasible only on modern technological level, thanks to precision topometry preparation, optimal computer dosimetrical and radiobiological planning of each session and radiotherapy in general. Successful local and long-term results of the contact radiation therapy for cancer of cervix and endometrium are due to optimal anatomical and topometrical ratio of the tumor localization, radioactive sources, and also physical and radiobiological laws of distribution and effects of ionizing radiation, the dose load accounting rules.

  8. Surgery for invasive gynecologic cancer in the elderly female population.

    PubMed

    Lawton, F G; Hacker, N F

    1990-08-01

    Radical, curative surgery may not be considered in elderly patients with gynecologic cancer, yet the morbidity for this population from radiotherapy and cytotoxics may be high. This study compared the feasibility and outcome of such surgery in 226 consecutive patients, 72 women over 70 years old and 154 younger patients, in our institution over a 26-month period. Older patients presented with more advanced-stage cancers and, as a group, had significantly poorer presurgical performance status and more intercurrent medical problems. Nevertheless, the planned radical surgical procedure could be carried out in 90% of elderly patients, with a postoperative mortality of 1.5%. Minor postoperative complication rates were similar for the two groups and, except for vulvectomy patients, the mean inpatient stay was the same for both groups. Chronological age alone is a poor determinant of surgical risk, and elderly patients withstand radical surgery almost as well as their younger counterparts.

  9. Metformin in obstetric and gynecologic practice: a review.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Elizabeth A; Walker, Susan P; McLachlan, Kylie; Boyle, Jacqui; Permezel, Michael

    2004-02-01

    Metformin is a common treatment for women who have insulin resistance manifesting as type 2 diabetes or polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS). With an increasing number of these patients conceiving, it is expected that the use of metformin in and around the time of pregnancy will increase. This article reassesses the mechanisms, safety, and clinical experience of metformin use in obstetrics and gynecology. Metformin is an attractive therapeutic option because administration is simple, hypoglycemia rare, and weight loss promoted. There is a large volume of research supporting the use of metformin treatment in diabetes mellitus, androgenization, anovulation, infertility, and recurrent miscarriage. Although metformin is known to cross the placenta, there is, as yet, no evidence of teratogenicity. Metformin has an array of complex actions, accounting for the varied clinical roles, many of which are still to be fully evaluated. Much research is still needed.

  10. Obstetrics and gynecology at the crossroads--again? Still!

    PubMed

    Sokol, R J

    2001-06-01

    It seems, if one can believe presidential addresses, as if our specialty is always at some crossroads or other. In this "opinion piece," uniquely, I don't complain about managed care. I do attempt to identify some of the issues that will be of import for obstetrics and gynecology in the near and not-so-near futures. With regard to research, we await breakthroughs, for example, in the early detection of ovarian cancer, so as to finally be able to improve outcomes. A problem, though, is our failure to focus enough effort on developing a cadre of clinician scientists, who can work out research findings with direct clinical application; this is an issue with which the specialty needs to come to grips. Regarding education, I believe we need to refocus from what type of practitioners we might want to produce to best meet the needs of our patients. The bottom line should be more flexibility in training and emphasis on clinical competence, so that excellent practitioners with competence across the breadth of our specialty are available to provide a full range of appropriate women's health care. The concept of "women's health" is controversial and evolving rapidly. Review of several available sources suggests that reproductive medicine will remain an important component of women's health but that our specialty must now evolve to include other areas, as the major health problems of women change. We need to shift from an organ-based paradigm to a more holistic view, reflecting the woman-centered focus for our specialty. This "paradigm shift" will need to entail continuation of first-rate surgical and obstetrics services but will be expanded to include a full range of services, probably offered by highly trained and competent individuals with specific areas of expertise, practicing in a multi-single-specialty group. Obstetrics and gynecology at the crossroads, indeed!

  11. Resident education curriculum in pediatric and adolescent gynecology: the short curriculum.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Nathalie; Amies Oelschlager, Anne-Marie; Browner-Elhanan, Karen J; Huguelet, Patricia S; Kaul, Paritosh; Talib, Hina J; Wheeler, Carol; Loveless, Meredith

    2014-04-01

    The degree of exposure to Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology (PAG) varies across academic programs in Obstetrics and Gynecology, Pediatrics, and Adolescent Medicine. Nevertheless, these programs are responsible to train residents and provide opportunities within their training programs to fulfill PAG learning objectives. To that end, North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology has taken a leadership role in PAG resident education by disseminating the Short Curriculum with specific learning objectives and list of essential resources where key concepts in PAG can be covered.

  12. You Want Me in Outpatient Oncology Nursing? A New Graduate Story.

    PubMed

    Hawley, McKenzie

    2016-08-01

    When I was in nursing school, I was one of a handful of students presented with a unique opportunity to fulfill our medical-surgical nursing requirement: a six-week clinical rotation at a large, outpatient, National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive cancer center. This opportunity was an innovative experiment between the College of Nursing at Seattle University and the Seattle Cancer Care Alliance (SCCA). The collaboration was coined the Dedicated Education Unit (DEU) by nursing management.

  13. Patients of internists in hospital outpatient departments and in private practice.

    PubMed Central

    Rudd, P.; Carrier, A. C.

    1978-01-01

    To test the contention that patients in outpatient departments and private practices differ, variables were assessed that might affect both the process and the outcome of medical care. Two groups of 60 patients consulting nine Montreal internists who worked in both private practice and in an outpatient department of a university teaching hospital were surveyed. The internists served as their own controls. The two groups of patients were compared for 57 demographic, socioeconomic, access, utilization, attitudinal and current medical status variables. Financial factors were minimized by the existence of universal health insurance. The outpatient group was found to be older, less fluent in English, less likely to be employed, less educated, less wealthy, more dependent on public transportation, more disabled, more likely to use ambulatory services, more anxious about health, and more sceptical about physicians, yet more dependent on them than the private practice group. The outpatient group tended to have more active, significant medical conditions and to receive more prescriptions for medication than the private practice group, in contrast to the national patterns in the practice of internal medicine in the United States. Medical educators, researchers, administrators and providers of health care who have assumed that these two groups of patients are comparable must re-evaluate their practices. PMID:737639

  14. Whole Pelvic Intensity-modulated Radiotherapy for Gynecological Malignancies: A Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Hymel, Rockne; Jones, Guy C.; Simone, Charles B.

    2015-01-01

    Radiation therapy has long played a major role in the treatment of gynecological malignancies. There is increasing interest in the utility of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and its application to treat gynecological malignancies. Herein, we review the state-of-the-art use of IMRT for gynecological malignancies and report how it is being used alone as well as in combination with chemotherapy in both the adjuvant and definitive settings. Based on dosimetric and clinical evidence, IMRT can reduce gastrointestinal, genitourinary, and hematological toxicities compared with 3D conformal radiotherapy for gynecologic malignancies. We discuss how these attributes of IMRT may lead to improvements in disease outcomes by allowing for dose escalation of radiation therapy, intensification of chemotherapy, and limiting toxicity-related treatment breaks. Currently accruing trials investigating pelvic IMRT for cervical and endometrial cancers are discussed. PMID:25600840

  15. A National Survey of Medical School Obstetrics and Gynecology Departments, 1965 to 1975

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spellacy, William N.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Representatives of 108 departments of obstetrics and gynecology completed a written questionnaire in 1976 designed to assess the changes that had occurred in the teaching resources of the departments for the years 1965, 1970, and 1975.

  16. Feasibility of Outpatient Fully Integrated Closed-Loop Control

    PubMed Central

    Kovatchev, Boris P.; Renard, Eric; Cobelli, Claudio; Zisser, Howard C.; Keith-Hynes, Patrick; Anderson, Stacey M.; Brown, Sue A.; Chernavvsky, Daniel R.; Breton, Marc D.; Farret, Anne; Pelletier, Marie-Josée; Place, Jérôme; Bruttomesso, Daniela; Del Favero, Simone; Visentin, Roberto; Filippi, Alessio; Scotton, Rachele; Avogaro, Angelo; Doyle, Francis J.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the feasibility of a wearable artificial pancreas system, the Diabetes Assistant (DiAs), which uses a smart phone as a closed-loop control platform. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Twenty patients with type 1 diabetes were enrolled at the Universities of Padova, Montpellier, and Virginia and at Sansum Diabetes Research Institute. Each trial continued for 42 h. The United States studies were conducted entirely in outpatient setting (e.g., hotel or guest house); studies in Italy and France were hybrid hospital–hotel admissions. A continuous glucose monitoring/pump system (Dexcom Seven Plus/Omnipod) was placed on the subject and was connected to DiAs. The patient operated the system via the DiAs user interface in open-loop mode (first 14 h of study), switching to closed-loop for the remaining 28 h. Study personnel monitored remotely via 3G or WiFi connection to DiAs and were available on site for assistance. RESULTS The total duration of proper system communication functioning was 807.5 h (274 h in open-loop and 533.5 h in closed-loop), which represented 97.7% of the total possible time from admission to discharge. This exceeded the predetermined primary end point of 80% system functionality. CONCLUSIONS This study demonstrated that a contemporary smart phone is capable of running outpatient closed-loop control and introduced a prototype system (DiAs) for further investigation. Following this proof of concept, future steps should include equipping insulin pumps and sensors with wireless capabilities, as well as studies focusing on control efficacy and patient-oriented clinical outcomes. PMID:23801798

  17. Association between autoimmune thyroiditis and depressive disorder in psychiatric outpatients.

    PubMed

    Degner, Detlef; Haust, Merle; Meller, Johannes; Rüther, Eckart; Reulbach, Udo

    2015-02-01

    Thyroid diseases are often associated with psychiatric disorders. The prevalence of autoimmune thyroiditis in the general population is estimated to be at about 5-14 %. A clinical study was conducted to evaluate the association between autoimmune thyroiditis and depression in psychiatric outpatients. Fifty-two patients with depression and nineteen patients with schizophrenia (serving as control group), attending a psychiatric outpatient unit, were included. In addition to the measurement of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), free triiodothyronine, free thyroxine, antithyroid peroxidase (anti-TPO) antibodies, and anti-thyroglobulin antibodies, ultrasound examination of the thyroid gland was performed. The proportion of pathologically increased anti-TPO levels in patients with depression was high. Furthermore, the distribution of pathologically increased anti-TPO levels was significantly (χ (2) = 5.5; p = 0.019) different between patients with depression (32.7 %) and patients with schizophrenia (5.3 %). In a gender- and age-adjusted logistic regression, the odds ratio of uni- or bipolar patients with depression for an autoimmune thyroiditis was ten times higher (95 % CI = 1.2-85.3) when compared with schizophrenia patients. TSH basal level did not differ between patients with depression and patients with schizophrenia. Our study demonstrates a strong association between anti-TPO levels, which are considered to be of diagnostic value for autoimmune thyroiditis (in combination with a hypoechoic thyroid in ultrasonography) with uni- or bipolar depression. It should be noted that the routinely measured TSH level is not sufficient in itself to diagnose this relevant autoimmune comorbidity.

  18. Antiplatelet resistance in outpatients with monitored adherence.

    PubMed

    Walter, Philipp N; Tsakiris, Dimitrios A; Romanens, Michel; Arnet, Isabelle; Hersberger, Kurt E

    2014-01-01

    Antiplatelet resistance with aspirin and clopidogrel has been associated with clinical, cellular and pharmacogenetic factors; and non-adherence has been considered as a major contributor to resistance in outpatients. We aimed at assessing factors to resistance when adherence to the antiplatelet drugs and all other oral solid drugs was controlled for. In a pilot study, we tested arachidonic acid and/or ADP-induced in vitro platelet aggregation of 82 outpatients with chronic aspirin and/or clopidogrel treatment before and after a one-week period of measuring the patient's adherence with the polymedication electronic monitoring system (POEMS). Resistance was found in 20% (aspirin; n = 69) and 25% (clopidogrel; n = 32) of the patients after monitored adherence. Mean platelet aggregation was not (aspirin) or non-significantly (clopidogrel) lowered when compared to baseline. Diabetes mellitus and inflammation were consistently associated with resistance to both drugs, but CYP2C19 polymorphisms could not be confirmed as predictors of clopidogrel response. Electronically compiled multidrug dosing histories allowed the concomitant intake of high-dose lipophilic statins to be identified as a risk factor of impaired response to clopidogrel and revealed that exposure to further potential drug-drug interactions (DDIs) was too low for analysis. Multidrug adherence monitoring allowed thus dismissing non-adherence as a major contributor to resistance and inter-individual response variability in an outpatient setting. Additionally, it allowed analysing the impact of DDIs according to the actual exposure to the potentially interfering drugs. Further studies based on this methodology are essential to prevent misleading results due to incomplete adherence and gain additional insight into the impact of timing adherence on antiplatelet drug response.

  19. Plasma prostaglandins across the tumor bed of patients with gynecologic malignancy.

    PubMed

    Mortel, R; Allegra, J C; Demers, L M; Harvey, H A; Trautlein, J; Nahhas, W; White, D; Gillin, M A; Lipton, A

    1977-05-01

    Prostaglandin E produced by tumors has recently been implicated as a mechanism by which tumors may subvert the immune system and grow despite their antigenicity. Arterial and venous determinations of prostaglandin E were performed in eleven patients with gynecologic malignancy. No significant difference was found when arterial and venous levels were compared and there was no difference in venous PGE levels when subjects with cancer were compared to patients with benign gynecologic disease.

  20. [Value of 3D-4D sonography in fetal and gynecological ultrasound examination: principles and indications].

    PubMed

    Levaillant, Jm

    2006-12-01

    Three-dimensional ultrasound has become an essential tool for visualization of fetal structures in the past few years. The recent improvements in transducers and signal processing provide new information, particularly in obstetrics and gynecology sonography. The present paper will present the most recent advances in volume acquisition and presentation modes followed by results of fetal organ visualization in normal and abnormal cases as well as applications in gynecology.

  1. Woman to woman: a peer to peer support program for women with gynecologic cancer.

    PubMed

    Moulton, Arden; Balbierz, Amy; Eisenman, Stephanie; Neustein, Elizabeth; Walther, Virginia; Epstein, Irwin

    2013-01-01

    Gynecologic cancer has significant emotional and psychosocial implications for patients and their families. This article describes the origin and implementation of a peer to peer support program providing emotional support and information to women in treatment for gynecologic cancer and their families, in collaboration with medical and social work staff in a large, urban medical center. A formative evaluation of the program is included which suggests program participants view the program as a helpful source of support throughout treatment.

  2. Involuntary outpatient treatment (IOT) in Spain.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Viadel, M; Cañete-Nicolás, C; Bellido-Rodriguez, C; Asensio-Pascual, P; Lera-Calatayud, G; Calabuig-Crespo, R; Leal-Cercós, C

    2015-01-01

    In recent decades there have been significant legislative changes in Spain. Society develops faster than laws, however, and new challenges have emerged. In 2004, the Spanish Association of Relatives of the Mentally Ill (FEAFES) proposed amending the existing legislation to allow for the implementation of involuntary outpatient treatment (IOT) for patients with severe mental illness. Currently, and after having made several attempts at change, there is no specific legislation governing the application of this measure. Although IOT may be implemented in local programmes, we consider legal regulation to be needed in this matter.

  3. Management of hypertension in the outpatient setting.

    PubMed

    Sica, Domenic A

    2008-09-01

    The treatment of hypertension on an outpatient basis should be approached in a systematic manner. The diagnosis of hypertension should always be verified first before treatment is initiated and, where indicated, a workup should be done. Lifestyle modifications should be considered in all patients with hypertension. Blood pressure can be brought to goal in the majority of patients if antihypertensive medications are correctly dosed or combined. As blood pressure is brought to goal in the patient with hypertension, ongoing attention should be directed to long-term adherence to therapy.

  4. 42 CFR 419.21 - Hospital outpatient services subject to the outpatient prospective payment system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... hospice benefit: (1) Antigens. (2) Splints and casts. (3) Hepatitis B vaccine. (e) Effective January 1... prospective payment system for the following: (a) Medicare Part B services furnished to hospital outpatients designated by the Secretary under this part. (b) Services designated by the Secretary that are covered...

  5. 42 CFR 419.21 - Hospital outpatient services subject to the outpatient prospective payment system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... hospice benefit: (1) Antigens. (2) Splints and casts. (3) Hepatitis B vaccine. (e)(1) Effective January 1... prospective payment system for the following: (a) Medicare Part B services furnished to hospital outpatients designated by the Secretary under this part. (b) Services designated by the Secretary that are covered...

  6. 42 CFR 419.21 - Hospital outpatient services subject to the outpatient prospective payment system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... hospice benefit: (1) Antigens. (2) Splints and casts. (3) Hepatitis B vaccine. (e)(1) Effective January 1... prospective payment system for the following: (a) Medicare Part B services furnished to hospital outpatients designated by the Secretary under this part. (b) Services designated by the Secretary that are covered...

  7. HIV service provision for people with severe mental illness in outpatient mental health care settings in New York.

    PubMed

    Satriano, James; McKinnon, Karen; Adoff, Spencer

    2007-01-01

    People with severe mental illness evidence significantly higher rates of HIV infection than the general population in the United States. Frequently, the only access to health care for this population is through their outpatient mental health care providers. In order to determine how these providers were dealing with the increased risk of HIV infection among this group, a survey of all licensed and certified outpatient mental health care centers in New York State was conducted. The data were compared to a similar previous survey conducted in 1997.

  8. Standardising haemodialysis care by restricting nutrition during dialysis: introducing a quality improvement initiative for renal outpatients.

    PubMed

    De, Diana; Xiang Ai, Anna Tian

    2015-01-01

    A number of relevant issues are considered which show that it is essential to address the issue of in-centre meals during dialysis. This discussion paper critically explores the potential complications posed to patients who consume a large calorific intake during their dialysis treatment. The mission is to appeal to more dialysis units and outpatient departments to gradually implement a 'no food' policy during regular scheduled dialysis treatment sessions. The authors aim to put forward the significances and challenges and offer some possible solutions when introducing a 'no eating policy' like this into dialysis units. Nutritional supplements could, however, be offered on an as required basis.

  9. Radiation Enterocolitis Requiring Surgery in Patients With Gynecological Malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Iraha, Shiro; Ogawa, Kazuhiko . E-mail: kogawa@med.u-ryukyu.ac.jp; Moromizato, Hidehiko; Shiraishi, Masayuki; Nagai, Yutaka; Samura, Hironori; Toita, Takafumi; Kakinohana, Yasumasa; Adachi, Genki; Tamaki, Wakana; Hirakawa, Makoto; Kamiyama, Kazuya; Inamine, Morihiko; Nishimaki, Tadashi; Aoki, Yoichi; Murayama, Sadayuki

    2007-07-15

    Purpose: To identify the characteristics, risk factors, and clinical outcomes of radiation enterocolitis requiring surgery in patients with gynecologic malignancies. Methods and Materials: The records of 1,349 patients treated with pelvic radiotherapy were retrospectively reviewed. The majority of the patients (88%) were treated with 50 Gy or 50.4 Gy pelvic irradiation in conventional fractionations with anteroposterior fields. Results: Forty-eight patients (3.6%) developed radiation enterocolitis requiring surgery. Terminal ileum was the most frequent site (50%) and most of the lesions had stenosis or perforation. On univariate analysis, previous abdominopelvic surgery, diabetes mellitus (DM), smoking and primary site had an impact on the complications, and on multivariate analysis, abdominopelvic surgery, DM, and smoking were independent predictors of the complications requiring surgery. After the surgical intervention, the frequency of Grade 2 or more bleeding was significantly lower in patients treated with intestinal resection in addition to decompression than those treated with intestinal decompression alone. Conclusions: Severe radiation enterocolitis requiring surgery usually occurred at the terminal ileum and was strongly correlated with previous abdominopelvic surgery, DM, and smoking. Concerning the management, liberal resection of the affected bowel appears to be the preferable therapy.

  10. Incidence of trocar site herniation following robotic gynecologic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Leslie H.; Soliman, Pamela T.; Odetto, Diego; Munsell, Mark F.; Schmeler, Kathleen M.; Fleming, Nicole; Westin, Shannon N.; Nick, Alpa M.; Ramirez, Pedro T.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Trocar site herniation is a recognized complication of minimally invasive surgery, but published data on trocar site herniation after robotic surgery are scarce. We sought to determine the incidence of trocar site herniation in women undergoing robotic surgery for gynecologic disease. Methods A retrospective review of robotic surgeries performed from January 1, 2006, through December 31, 2012, was conducted. Postoperative trocar site herniations were identified, along with time to presentation, location of herniation, and management. Patients were excluded if surgery was converted to laparotomy or traditional laparoscopy. The Wilcoxon rank-sum test was used to compare patients with and without herniation with respect to continuous variables, and Fisher's exact test was used to compare these 2 groups with respect to categorical variables. Results The study included 500 patients, 3 of whom experienced herniation at a single trocar site. The patients with and without herniation did not differ with respect to age, body mass index, smoking status, medical comorbidities, operating time, or estimated blood loss. All 3 herniations occurred at 12-mm trocar sites. Two herniations occurred at assistant port sites, and 1 occurred at the umbilical camera port site. The median time to herniation was 21 days (range, 8-38 days). One patient required immediate surgical intervention; the other 2 patients had conservative management. Conclusions Trocar site herniation is a rare complication following robotic surgery. The most important risk factor for trocar site herniation appears to be larger trocar size, as all herniations occurred at 12-mm port sites. PMID:23988416

  11. Compassion in Soranus' Gynecology and Caelius Aurelianus' On Chronic Diseases.

    PubMed

    Porter, Amber J

    2016-01-01

    Compassion is considered an important quality for a successful physician today, but did ancient physicians display and value this emotion? How did they feel when faced with the pain and suffering of their patients? How did their patients' emotions affect their own? Many ancient physicians are not well-known for expressions of compassion in their writings; however, this seems to change in the second century AD. One medical writer who exemplifies this change is Soranus of Ephesus (c. 98-138 AD). In his Gynecology, there are a number of passages where compassion is addressed or expressed (such as the chapters on the qualities of the best midwife, the symptom of pica, childbirth, and superstition). The same points can be made of Soranus' On Chronic Diseases, preserved to some extent by the Latin version and adaptation by fifth century AD medical writer Caelius Aurelianus (see, for example, the chapters on chronic headache, mania and elephantiasis). Soranus and Caelius display compassion, understanding, and flexibility of approach when dealing with patient issues; they show themselves willing to change their medical technique when they see that it is doing more harm or discomfort than good. In Soranus and Caelius, we have an image of a physician who acknowledges and is aware of their patients' emotions, beliefs and attitudes, and who exhibits compassion for them.

  12. Psychosomatic Primary Care in Gynecology-Assessment and Acceptance by Residents for Obstetrics and Gynecology in Germany.

    PubMed

    Schott, S; Lermann, J; Rauchfuß, M; Ortmann, O; Ditz, S

    2014-06-01

    Background: The course "Psychosomatic Primary Care" has been part of the training curriculum of obstetrics and gynecology in Germany since 2003. The aim of the course is to train up physicians, whose prior training primarily focussed on somatic care, to enable them to offer care also taking into account biopsychosocial aspects. Taking the guidelines for psychotherapy as a template, the aim of psychosomatic primary care is to recognize the etiological links between psychological and somatic factors which contribute to diseases. The necessity for a compulsory course as part of training in gynecology was recently critically discussed. Major points discussed included the question whether the current forms of teaching, consisting of courses, are outdated and whether the required skills should be part of regular daily training. Method: A 3-part online questionnaire consisting of 30 items was developed and sent to 2431 residents in the period from September to December 2012 through the online mailing list of the DGGG. Results: The 540 residents who responded to the questionnaire were predominantly female (83.3 %) with an average age of 30 years; 50.3 % were in their 1st to their 4th year of training. Over the longer term, the majority of respondents (56.1 %) hoped to continue working in a hospital and regularly (84.6 %) attended teaching courses voluntarily. 70.9 % of them had already attended the course "Psychosomatic Primary Care". Of the group who had completed the course, 29.4 % were satisfied with the offer. The main criticism directed against the course was its scope which 24.1 % considered completely inadequate. 24.5 % considered the course to be an important part of training, while 16.5 % would have preferred that the course be abolished. 18 % of respondents reported that psychosomatic medicine did not feature regularly in their daily clinical routine. Perspective: Because of the huge gap between what is currently offered and the experiences

  13. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Isolates from Single Outpatient Clinic in Panama City Exhibit Wide Genetic Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Sambrano, Dilcia; Correa, Ricardo; Almengor, Pedro; Domínguez, Amada; Vega, Silvio; Goodridge, Amador

    2014-01-01

    Understanding Mycobacterium tuberculosis biodiversity and transmission is significant for tuberculosis control. This short report aimed to determine the genetic diversity of M. tuberculosis isolates from an outpatient clinic in Panama City. A total of 62 M. tuberculosis isolates were genotyped by 12 loci mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units-variable number of tandem repeats (MIRU-VNTR) and Spoligotyping. Forty-five (72.6%) of the isolates showed unique MIRU-VNTR genotypes, and 13 (21%) of the isolates were grouped into four clusters. Four isolates showed polyclonal MIRU-VNTR genotypes. The MIRU-VNTR Hunter-Gaston discriminatory index reached 0.988. The Spoligotyping analysis revealed 16 M. tuberculosis families, including Latin American-Mediterranean, Harlem, and Beijing. These findings suggest a wide genetic diversity of M. tuberculosis isolates at one outpatient clinic. A detailed molecular epidemiology survey is now warranted, especially following second massive immigration for local Panama Canal expansion activities. PMID:24865686

  14. Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from single outpatient clinic in Panama City exhibit wide genetic diversity.

    PubMed

    Sambrano, Dilcia; Correa, Ricardo; Almengor, Pedro; Domínguez, Amada; Vega, Silvio; Goodridge, Amador

    2014-08-01

    Understanding Mycobacterium tuberculosis biodiversity and transmission is significant for tuberculosis control. This short report aimed to determine the genetic diversity of M. tuberculosis isolates from an outpatient clinic in Panama City. A total of 62 M. tuberculosis isolates were genotyped by 12 loci mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units-variable number of tandem repeats (MIRU-VNTR) and Spoligotyping. Forty-five (72.6%) of the isolates showed unique MIRU-VNTR genotypes, and 13 (21%) of the isolates were grouped into four clusters. Four isolates showed polyclonal MIRU-VNTR genotypes. The MIRU-VNTR Hunter-Gaston discriminatory index reached 0.988. The Spoligotyping analysis revealed 16 M. tuberculosis families, including Latin American-Mediterranean, Harlem, and Beijing. These findings suggest a wide genetic diversity of M. tuberculosis isolates at one outpatient clinic. A detailed molecular epidemiology survey is now warranted, especially following second massive immigration for local Panama Canal expansion activities.

  15. Outpatient Dialysis for Patients with AKI: A Policy Approach to Improving Care.

    PubMed

    Heung, Michael; Faubel, Sarah; Watnick, Suzanne; Cruz, Dinna N; Koyner, Jay L; Mour, Girish; Liu, Kathleen D; Cerda, Jorge; Okusa, Mark D; Lukaszewski, Mark; Vijayan, Anitha

    2015-10-07

    The rate of AKI requiring dialysis has increased significantly over the past decade in the United States. At the same time, survival from AKI seems to be improving, and thus, more patients with AKI are surviving to discharge while still requiring dialysis. Currently, the options for providing outpatient dialysis in patients with AKI are limited, particularly after a 2012 revised interpretation of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services guidelines, which prohibited Medicare reimbursement for acute dialysis at ESRD facilities. This article provides a historical perspective on outpatient dialysis management of patients with AKI, reviews the current clinical landscape of care for these patients, and highlights key areas of knowledge deficit. Lastly, policy changes that have the opportunity to significantly improve the care of this at-risk population are suggested.

  16. Antimicrobial stewardship in outpatient settings: leveraging innovative physician-pharmacist collaborations to reduce antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Klepser, Michael E; Adams, Alex J; Klepser, Donald G

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is one of the world's most pressing public health problems. Historically, most drug-resistant bacteria have emerged in hospital settings, yet the vast majority of antimicrobials used in humans in the United States are administered in outpatient settings. Strong collaboration between physicians and pharmacists in the development of antimicrobial stewardship programs in outpatient settings is thus a critical strategy for curtailing antibiotic resistance. Recently, pilot projects have been launched in 3 states that pair physicians and community pharmacists under a Collaborative Practice Agreement (CPA) to treat patients with influenza and group A Streptococcus (GAS) pharyngitis. Under this model, community pharmacists use rapid point-of-care tests to guide clinical decision making and initiate treatment as appropriate under a physician-led, evidence-based protocol. Experience with this research initiative has suggested this model can lead to more judicious use of antibiotics and antivirals, improve public health, and provide safe and convenient care for patients.

  17. Evidence-Based Practices in Outpatient Treatment for Eating Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaffner, Angela D.; Buchanan, Linda Paulk

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the current issues relevant to implementing evidence-based practices in the context of outpatient treatment for eating disorders. The study also examined the effectiveness of an outpatient treatment program for eating disorders among a group of 196 patients presenting with anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, or eating disorder…

  18. Creative Art Therapy Groups: A Treatment Modality for Psychiatric Outpatients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drapeau, Marie-Celine; Kronish, Neomi

    2007-01-01

    This brief report examines the benefits of a creative art therapy group program for outpatients suffering from psychiatric disorders. Included is a review of relevant treatment outcomes literature on the effectiveness of group art therapy. The authors describe the Creative Art Therapy Group Program offered to adult psychiatric outpatients that is…

  19. Bypassing the Local Rural Hospital for Outpatient Procedures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saunders, Charles; Bellamy, Gail R.; Menachemi, Nir; Chukmaitov, Askar S.; Brooks, Robert G.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the amount of local rural hospital outpatient department (HOPD) bypass for outpatient procedures. Methods: We analyzed data on colonoscopies and upper gastrointestinal endoscopies performed in the state of Florida over the period 1997-2004. Findings: Approximately, 53% of colonoscopy and 45% of upper gastrointestinal endoscopy…

  20. 42 CFR 482.54 - Condition of participation: Outpatient services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... nonprofessional personnel available at each location where outpatient services are offered, based on the scope and... 42 Public Health 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Condition of participation: Outpatient services. 482.54 Section 482.54 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH...

  1. 42 CFR 482.54 - Condition of participation: Outpatient services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... nonprofessional personnel available at each location where outpatient services are offered, based on the scope and... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Condition of participation: Outpatient services. 482.54 Section 482.54 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH...

  2. 38 CFR 17.92 - Outpatient care for research purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... research purposes. 17.92 Section 17.92 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Outpatient Treatment § 17.92 Outpatient care for research purposes. Subject to the... the treatment to be rendered is part of an approved Department of Veterans Affairs research...

  3. 38 CFR 17.92 - Outpatient care for research purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... research purposes. 17.92 Section 17.92 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Outpatient Treatment § 17.92 Outpatient care for research purposes. Subject to the... the treatment to be rendered is part of an approved Department of Veterans Affairs research...

  4. 38 CFR 17.92 - Outpatient care for research purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... research purposes. 17.92 Section 17.92 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Outpatient Treatment § 17.92 Outpatient care for research purposes. Subject to the... the treatment to be rendered is part of an approved Department of Veterans Affairs research...

  5. 38 CFR 17.92 - Outpatient care for research purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... research purposes. 17.92 Section 17.92 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Outpatient Treatment § 17.92 Outpatient care for research purposes. Subject to the... the treatment to be rendered is part of an approved Department of Veterans Affairs research...

  6. 42 CFR 410.59 - Outpatient occupational therapy services: Conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Outpatient occupational therapy services... Other Health Services § 410.59 Outpatient occupational therapy services: Conditions. (a) Basic rule... occupational therapy services only if they are furnished by an individual meeting the qualifications in...

  7. 42 CFR 410.59 - Outpatient occupational therapy services: Conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Outpatient occupational therapy services... Other Health Services § 410.59 Outpatient occupational therapy services: Conditions. (a) Basic rule... occupational therapy services only if they are furnished by an individual meeting the qualifications in...

  8. 42 CFR 410.59 - Outpatient occupational therapy services: Conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Outpatient occupational therapy services... Other Health Services § 410.59 Outpatient occupational therapy services: Conditions. (a) Basic rule... occupational therapy services only if they are furnished by an individual meeting the qualifications in...

  9. Evaluation of outpatient experience with vitreoretinal surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Cannon, C S; Gross, J G; Abramson, I; Mazzei, W J; Freeman, W R

    1992-01-01

    The experience of 55 consecutive individuals undergoing outpatient vitreoretinal surgery was evaluated. Objective variables, including preoperative and intraoperative information, subjective postoperative pain, and discomfort were measured with a previously validated 100 mm visual analogue scale. Patients also ranked the overall experience. Average pain and discomfort scores in the recovery room were 21.8 and 22.6 and overnight were 26.7 and 30.4 (scale 0 to 100), respectively. Eighty eight per cent of subjects were satisfied with the experience. Elevated pain and discomfort scores were statistically correlated with scleral buckling, prolonged surgical or recovery room time, requirement for parenteral pain medications, and high intraocular pressure on the first postoperative visit. None of the patients needed further hospital treatment. This study suggests that vitreoretinal surgery in an appropriately selected population does not require routine inpatient care. PMID:1739718

  10. A decision-supported outpatient practice system.

    PubMed Central

    Barrows, R. C.; Allen, B. A.; Smith, K. C.; Arni, V. V.; Sherman, E.

    1996-01-01

    We describe a Decision-supported Outpatient Practice (DOP) system developed and now in use at the Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center. DOP is an automated ambulatory medical record system that integrates in-patient and ambulatory care data, and incorporates active and passive decision support mechanisms with a view towards improving the quality of primary care. Active decision support occurs in the form of event-driven reminders created within a remote clinical information system with its central data repository and decision support system (DSS). Novel features of DOP include patient specific health maintenance task lists calculated by the remote DSS. uses of a semantically structured controlled medical vocabulary to support clinical results review and provider data entry, and exploitation of an underlying ambulatory data model that provides for an explicit record of evolution of insight regarding patient management. Benefits, challenges, and plans are discussed. PMID:8947774

  11. Outpatient management of the suicidal child.

    PubMed

    Robinson, L H

    1984-07-01

    Susceptible children may become depressed and suicidal in response to stressful social factors including loss or separation from parents, parental abuse, neglect, rejection, pressure, or a chaotic, disorganized family environment. Psychological factors that predispose children to suicidal behavior include inadequate ego-defenses to cope with feelings engendered by the adverse environmental circumstances. Often these children relate poorly to others and are excessively dependent. Outpatient management is possible if the parents are able to be appropriately supportive and protective. Intensive psychotherapy is often necessary to modify a basic depressive outlook on life and to resolve inner conflict about self-worth. The suicidal child must be helped to give up perfectionistic attitudes and to alter aggressive responses to loss and disappointment. Work with parents is important, particularly when the child's suicidal state is reactive to inappropriate parental behavior. Antidepressant drugs may prove to be a useful adjunct.

  12. Comparison of Sexual Experience and Behavior between Bipolar Outpatients and Outpatients without Mood Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Downey, Jennifer; Friedman, Richard C.; Haase, Elizabeth; Goldenberg, David; Bell, Robinette; Edsall, Sidney

    2016-01-01

    Sexual behavior over the past year of 32 outpatients with Bipolar disorder is compared to that of 44 Comparison patients that had never had an episode of affective illness. Subjects were outpatients treated with drugs and psychotherapy in routine office practice. Differences in sexual behavior between the two groups as a whole were minimal, but meaningful differences emerged when subgroups were compared. Compared to control men, Bipolar men had had more partners in the last year and were more likely to have had sex without condoms. Compared to Bipolar females, Bipolar males had more sex partners, had more sex with strangers, and were more likely to have engaged in homosexual behavior. Even so, some patients in the Comparison group also had engaged in risky sexual behavior. They had failed to use condoms and had had sex with strangers and prostitutes during the previous year. PMID:27190984

  13. Errors associated with outpatient computerized prescribing systems

    PubMed Central

    Rothschild, Jeffrey M; Salzberg, Claudia; Keohane, Carol A; Zigmont, Katherine; Devita, Jim; Gandhi, Tejal K; Dalal, Anuj K; Bates, David W; Poon, Eric G

    2011-01-01

    Objective To report the frequency, types, and causes of errors associated with outpatient computer-generated prescriptions, and to develop a framework to classify these errors to determine which strategies have greatest potential for preventing them. Materials and methods This is a retrospective cohort study of 3850 computer-generated prescriptions received by a commercial outpatient pharmacy chain across three states over 4 weeks in 2008. A clinician panel reviewed the prescriptions using a previously described method to identify and classify medication errors. Primary outcomes were the incidence of medication errors; potential adverse drug events, defined as errors with potential for harm; and rate of prescribing errors by error type and by prescribing system. Results Of 3850 prescriptions, 452 (11.7%) contained 466 total errors, of which 163 (35.0%) were considered potential adverse drug events. Error rates varied by computerized prescribing system, from 5.1% to 37.5%. The most common error was omitted information (60.7% of all errors). Discussion About one in 10 computer-generated prescriptions included at least one error, of which a third had potential for harm. This is consistent with the literature on manual handwritten prescription error rates. The number, type, and severity of errors varied by computerized prescribing system, suggesting that some systems may be better at preventing errors than others. Conclusions Implementing a computerized prescribing system without comprehensive functionality and processes in place to ensure meaningful system use does not decrease medication errors. The authors offer targeted recommendations on improving computerized prescribing systems to prevent errors. PMID:21715428

  14. [Metformin--new treatment strategies for gynecologic neoplasms].

    PubMed

    Milewicz, Tomasz; Kiałka, Marta; Mrozińska, Sandra; Ociepka, Agnieszka; Krzysiek, Józef

    2013-01-01

    Metformin, a drug from the biguanide class, is now one of the most widely used drugs in the treatment of type 2 diabetes. This drug was also used in the treatment of polycystic ovarian syndrome and recent reports indicate the possibility of using this drug in oncology. Latest findings show that metformin has an anticancer effect. Influencing the transduction mechanisms primarily through activation of protein kinase activated by 5'AMP (AMPK) regulates the activity of the AMPK/mTOR signaling pathway. MTOR pathway dysregulation may be a factor in the pathogenesis of various human diseases, especially cancers. Overactivation of mTOR is observed in malignant cells and is associated with their resistance to treatment. It can therefore be concluded that metformin as an inhibitor of mTOR may be a factor that suppresses tumor development. There are also studies showing that metformin prevents the formation of metastases, reducing tumor vasculature and improves the effectiveness of anticancer drugs. The anticancer effect of metformin has been proven in the treatment of colorectal and breast cancer. The current studies reports the positive effects in the treatment of gynecological cancers such as ovarian, endometrial and cervical cancer. Incidence for these tumors in 2009 in Poland was: for ovarian cancer 11.01100000; for endometrial cancer 15.0/100000; for cervical cancer 10.5/100000. Metformin has antitumor activity in monotherapy and also synergistically with other anticancer agents. Metformin has antiproliferative properties; reduces the VEGF levels, causing a reduction in tumor vasculature; causes an increase in progesterone receptor, which increases the response to hormonal therapy; inhibits the expression of glyoxalase I, mediating resistance to chemotherapy; decreases in the concentration of human telomerase; reduces the activity of Akt and Erk kinases, key regulators of metabolism and progression of tumors and also inhibits the formation of metastases.

  15. Process of coping with intracavity radiation treatment for gynecologic cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Nail, L.M.D.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the process of coping with the experience of receiving intracavity radiation treatment (ICR) for gynecologic cancer. Data were collected on the outcomes of coping, emotion (Profile of Mood States) and level of function (Sickness Impact Profile), and symptom severity and upset the evening before, during, the day after, and 1 to 2 weeks after treatment. The subjects (N = 28) had a mean age of 52 years, 39% were employed full-time, 56% had occupations as manual workers, 57% had completed 12 or more years of education, and 68% were married or widowed. The treatment required the subjects to be hospitalized on complete bedrest with radiation precautions for an average of 48 hours. Intrauterine devices were used to treat 18 subjects and vaginal applications were used to treat 10 subjects. Negative mood and level of disruption in function were generally low. Repeated measures ANOVA showed no change in negative mood over time while the change in function was attributable to the increase in disruption during treatment. Utilization of affective coping strategies and problem-oriented coping strategies was positively correlated with negative mood and disruption in function over the points of measurement. The results indicate that subjects tolerated ICR well and rapidly resumed usual function following discharge from the hospital, despite the persistence of some symptoms 1 to 2 weeks after treatment. The positive association between the utilization of coping strategies and negative outcomes of coping suggests a need to examine the measurement of coping strategies and consider the possibility that these actions represent a response to a stressful situation rather than a method of dealing with the situation.

  16. Chinese Obstetrics & Gynecology journal club: a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Tsui, Ilene K; Dodson, William C; Kunselman, Allen R; Kuang, Hongying; Han, Feng-Juan; Legro, Richard S; Wu, Xiao-Ke

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To assess whether a journal club model could improve comprehension and written and spoken medical English in a population of Chinese medical professionals. Setting and participants The study population consisted of 52 medical professionals who were residents or postgraduate master or PhD students in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Heilongjiang University of Chinese Medicine, China. Intervention After a three-part baseline examination to assess medical English comprehension, participants were randomised to either (1) an intensive journal club treatment arm or (2) a self-study group. At the conclusion of the 8-week intervention participants (n=52) were re-tested with new questions. Outcome measures The primary outcome was the change in score on a multiple choice examination. Secondary outcomes included change in scores on written and oral examinations which were modelled on the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). Results Both groups had improved scores on the multiple choice examination without a statistically significant difference between them (90% power). However, there was a statistically significant difference between the groups in mean improvement in scores for both written (95% CI 1.1 to 5.0; p=0.003) and spoken English (95% CI 0.06 to 3.7; p=0.04) favouring the journal club intervention. Conclusions Interacting with colleagues and an English-speaking facilitator in a journal club improved both written and spoken medical English in Chinese medical professionals. Journal clubs may be suitable for use as a self-sustainable teaching model to improve fluency in medical English in foreign medical professionals. Trial registration number NCT01844609. PMID:26823180

  17. A novel ultrasound based approach for lesion segmentation and its applications in gynecological laparoscopic surgery.

    PubMed

    Gong, Xue-Hao; Lu, Jun; Liu, Jin; Deng, Ying-Yuan; Liu, Wei-Zong; Huang, Xian; Pirbhulal, Sandeep; Yu, Zhi-Ying; Wu, Wan-Qing

    2015-12-01

    Laparoscopic ultrasound (LUS) has been widely utilized as a surgical aide in general, urological, and gynecological applications. Our study summarizes the clinical applications of laparoscopic ultrasonography in laparoscopic gynecologic surgery. Retrospective analyses were performed on 42 women subjects using laparoscopic surgery during laparoscopic extirpation and excision of gynecological tumors in our hospital from August 2011 to August 2013. Specifically, the Esaote 7.5 × 10 MHz laparoscopic transducer was used to detect small residual lesions, as well as to assess, locate and guide in removing the lesions during laparoscopic operations. The findings of LUS were compared with those of preoperative trans-vaginal ultrasound, postoperative, and pathohistological examinations. In addition, a novel method for lesion segmentation was proposed in order to facilitate the laparoscopic gynecologic surgery. In our experiment, laparoscopic operation was performed using a higher frequency and more close to pelvic organs via laparoscopic access. LUS facilitates the ability of gynaecologists to find small residual lesions under laparoscopic visualization and their accurate diagnosis. LUS also helps to locate residual lesions precisely and provides guidance for the removal of residual tumor and eliminate its recurrence effectively. Our experiment provides a safer and more valuable assistance for clinical applications in laparoscopic gynecological surgery that are superior to trans-abdominal ultrasound and trans-vaginal ultrasound.

  18. Maintaining Sexual Health throughout Gynecologic Cancer Survivorship: A Comprehensive Review and Clinical Guide

    PubMed Central

    Huffman, Laura B.; Hartenbach, Ellen M.; Carter, Jeanne; Rash, Joanne K.; Kushner, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The diagnosis and treatment of gynecologic cancer can cause short- and long-term negative effects on sexual health and quality of life (QoL). The aim of this article is to present a comprehensive overview of the sexual health concerns of gynecologic cancer survivors and discuss evidence-based treatment options for commonly encountered sexual health issues. Methods A comprehensive literature search of English language studies on sexual health in gynecologic cancer survivors and the treatment of sexual dysfunction was conducted in MEDLINE databases. Relevant data are presented in this review. Additionally, personal and institutional practices are incorporated where relevant. Results Sexual dysfunction is prevalent among gynecologic cancer survivors as a result of surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy--negatively impacting QoL. Many patients expect their healthcare providers to address sexual health concerns, but most have never discussed sex-related issues with their physician. Lubricants, moisturizers, and dilators are effective, simple, non-hormonal interventions that can alleviate the morbidity of vaginal atrophy, stenosis, and pain. Pelvic floor physical therapy can be an additional tool to address dyspareunia. Cognitive behavioral therapy has been shown to be beneficial to patients reporting problems with sexual interest, arousal, and orgasm. Conclusion Oncology providers can make a significant impact on the QoL of gynecologic cancer survivors by addressing sexual health concerns. Simple strategies can be implemented into clinical practice to discuss and treat many sexual issues. Referral to specialized sexual health providers may be needed to address more complex problems. PMID:26556768

  19. [History of gynecology and perinatology in Croatia. Midwifery. Clinics and hospitals in Zagreb].

    PubMed

    Drazancić, A

    1999-03-01

    The development of obstetrics in Croatia and the formation of unique discipline of obstetrics and gynecology in Croatia in first ten years of 20th century are presented. The midwifery is mentioned in Croatia for the first time in Dubrovnik in 14th century. The "protomedicus" from Varazdin Johan Baptist Lalangue in 1777 has published the booklet "Brevis institutio de re obstetritia". First public school of midwifery was founded in Zadar on 1820 and the second one in Zagreb in 1877. In Zadar, Ante Kuzmanić, "magister obstetritiae et chirurgiae" published a short textbook "Sixty lessons from midwifery for midwifes", thereafter in 1908 Nikola Lalich "Book for midwifes". In Zagreb, Antun Lobmayer published in 1877 "The midwifery". Gynecology was developing in the second half of 19th century as a part of surgery. On break-time from 19th to 20th century rose the unique medical profession obstetrics and gynecology. In Croatia the unique discipline established Dr Franjo Durst, since he was in 1905 installed for the first head of Royal Country Maternity Hospital in Ilica street and thereafter in 1921 for the first head and university professor of Royal University Clinic for Gynecology and Obstetrics in Petrova street. The evolution of gynecology and obstetrics, respective of perinatology, during last 30 years, in the Zagreb in departments of clinical hospitals "Clinical Hospital Center", "Sestre Milosrdnice", "Merkur" and "Sv. Duh" is presented.

  20. Systematic review of robotic surgery in gynecology: robotic techniques compared with laparoscopy and laparotomy.

    PubMed

    Gala, Rajiv B; Margulies, Rebecca; Steinberg, Adam; Murphy, Miles; Lukban, James; Jeppson, Peter; Aschkenazi, Sarit; Olivera, Cedric; South, Mary; Lowenstein, Lior; Schaffer, Joseph; Balk, Ethan M; Sung, Vivian

    2014-01-01

    The Society of Gynecologic Surgeons Systematic Review Group performed a systematic review of both randomized and observational studies to compare robotic vs nonrobotic surgical approaches (laparoscopic, abdominal, and vaginal) for treatment of both benign and malignant gynecologic indications to compare surgical and patient-centered outcomes, costs, and adverse events associated with the various surgical approaches. MEDLINE and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were searched from inception to May 15, 2012, for English-language studies with terms related to robotic surgery and gynecology. Studies of any design that included at least 30 women who had undergone robotic-assisted laparoscopic gynecologic surgery were included for review. The literature yielded 1213 citations, of which 97 full-text articles were reviewed. Forty-four studies (30 comparative and 14 noncomparative) met eligibility criteria. Study data were extracted into structured electronic forms and reconciled by a second, independent reviewer. Our analysis revealed that, compared with open surgery, robotic surgery consistently confers shorter hospital stay. The proficiency plateau seems to be lower for robotic surgery than for conventional laparoscopy. Of the various gynecologic applications, there seems to be evidence that renders robotic techniques advantageous over traditional open surgery for management of endometrial cancer. However, insofar as superiority, conflicting data are obtained when comparing robotics vs laparoscopic techniques. Therefore, the specific method of minimally invasive surgery, whether conventional laparoscopy or robotic surgery, should be tailored to patient selection, surgeon ability, and equipment availability.

  1. Pre-participation gynecological evaluation of female athletes: a new proposal

    PubMed Central

    Parmigiano, Tathiana Rebizzi; Zucchi, Eliana Viana Monteiro; de Araujo, Maíta Poli; Guindalini, Camila Santa Cruz; Castro, Rodrigo de Aquino; Bella, Zsuzsanna Ilona Katalin de Jármy Di; Girão, Manoel João Batista Castello; Cohen, Moisés; Sartori, Marair Gracio Ferreira

    2014-01-01

    Objective To propose the inclusion of a gynecological investigation during the evaluation of athletes before competitions, using a specific instrument called the Pre-participation Gynecological Examination (PPGE). Methods The study assessed 148 athletes, mean age of 15.4±2.0 years, who engaged in eight different sports modalities, and who responded to a questionnaire named Pre-Participation Gynecological Examination (PPGE), to the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire - Short Form (for urinary loss), and to the Eating Attitudes Test (for eating disorders). Results Fifty percent of the participants reported irregular menstrual intervals, 23.0% did not know about sexually transmitted diseases, and 72.4% denied having, at least, an annual gynecological appointment. The study identified 18.2% who had urinary loss, and 15% presented with an increased risk of eating disorders. Moreover, 89.9% were not familiar with the occurrence of urinary incontinence in athletes and did not know that they were susceptible to the female athlete triad. A total of 87.1% of them stated that would not mention these issues to their coaches even if this would improve their health or performance. Conclusion The Pre-Participation Gynecological Examination can be considered an easy-to-apply instrument that allowed the diagnosis of alterations often underestimated by the athletes themselves. After its application, the alterations were identified, and determined the athletes’ referral to appropriate evaluation and treatment. PMID:25628197

  2. Physical Sequelae and Depressive Symptoms in Gynecologic Cancer Survivors: Meaning in Life as a Mediator

    PubMed Central

    Simonelli, Laura E.; Fowler, Jeffrey; Maxwell, G. Larry

    2009-01-01

    Background Continuing symptoms and poor health following cancer treatments may alter meaning in life for cancer survivors. Gynecologic cancer survivors are particularly troubled with physical sequelae. In addition, for the most common sites of disease, such as breast and gynecologic cancers, the prevalence of depression is also high. Purpose This study tests meaning in life as a mechanism for the relationship between physical symptoms and depressive symptoms. Methods Gynecologic cancer survivors (N=260) participated. Measures of physical sequelae (nurse rated symptoms/signs, patient-reported gynecologic symptoms), meaning in life (harmony, life purpose, spirituality, and conversely, confusion and loss), and depressive symptoms were obtained at the time of a routine clinical follow-up visit 2–10 years following the completion of treatment. Latent variables were defined, and structural equation modeling tested a mediator model. Results Analyses support partial mediation. That is, survivors with more physical sequelae also reported lower levels of meaning in life, which was associated with higher levels of depressive symptoms. Conclusions Gynecologic cancer patients have been neglected in psychosocial research, and findings highlight the importance of existential issues in their lives. While many adjust well, those with persistent physical functioning deficits may experience depressive symptoms. By appreciating the role of meaning in their experience, we may help survivors foster their own growth and perspectives important for their future. PMID:18386113

  3. Women's poorer satisfaction with their sex lives following gynecologic cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Lara, Lucia Alves Silva; de Andrade, Jurandyr Moreira; Consolo, Flavio Donaire; Romão, Adriana Peterson Mariano Salata

    2012-06-01

    Gynecologic cancer treatment can lead to anatomical changes in the genitalia that may impair sexual response. As a result, the authors aimed to assess women's self-perceptions of their sex lives following gynecologic cancer treatment and the impact of such treatment on sexual function. Thirty sexually active women were examined. At the first meeting with a physician sex therapist, women were asked about their satisfaction with their sexual activities prior to and after gynecologic cancer treatment, either with a partner or alone, and how many times per month they had sexual intercourse prior to the cancer diagnosis and after treatment. Women reported significantly worse sex lives and a significantly lower frequency of sexual relations following cancer treatment. All participants reported pain on vaginal penetration and feeling uncomfortable in discussing their sexual difficulties with the oncologist. The findings show that women experienced impaired sexual function, as well as poorer quality of sexual function, following gynecologic cancer treatment. Nurses should provide basic guidelines about sexual function to all patients who undergo treatment for gynecologic cancer.

  4. Blood transfusion practice in obstetric and gynecology: impact of educational programs to create awareness for judicious use of blood components.

    PubMed

    Gupte, Snehalata C; Patel, Pratima N

    2014-09-01

    The study presents the data analysis (1) To find out the trend of blood component use during the period 2003-2010 and to determine impact of component awareness programs on reduction in whole blood (WB) and single unit transfusions. (2) To determine Hb trigger. The details about blood units issued were entered in the integrated blood bank management software as well as in Microsoft Excel. The data of 4,838 cases of pregnancy anemia; 2,244 receiving blood for obstetric (Ob) hemorrhage including 270 cases of disseminated intravascular coagulation; 1,413 women having Gynecological (Gy) bleeding; 911 Ob, 2,032 Gy and 740 surgeries for Gy malignancy were analyzed. During the years 2003-2010 there was gradual increase in component utilization for pregnancy anemia, Ob/Gy surgeries and Ob/Gy bleeding and significant reduction in WB transfusions due to component awareness programs. But single unit transfusions showed comparatively lower trend of reduction. The mean Hb was 6.4 g/dL for pregnancy anemia, 8.1 g/dL for surgeries and 7.3 g/dL for Ob/Gy bleeding.

  5. Korean and American music reduces pain in Korean women after gynecologic surgery.

    PubMed

    Good, Marion; Ahn, Sukhee

    2008-09-01

    American music has been found to relieve pain in adults in several countries but has not been tested in Korea. Korean women have reported that they would like American music as well as Korean folk songs and religious music sung in Korean. The study purpose was to pilot-test the effects of music on pain after gynecologic surgery in Korean women and to compare pain relief between those who chose American or Korean music. Using a quasiexperimental pretest-posttest design, 73 South Korean women on a preoperative unit were assigned by day of the week to receive music (n = 34; 47%) or no music (n = 39; 53%). The music group chose among Korean (ballads and religious and popular songs) and American (soft slow piano and orchestra) music and heard it for 15 minutes at four time points (postoperatively), whereas the controls rested in bed. They marked VAS Sensation and Distress of Pain scales before and after each test. The two groups were similar on pretest pain. When controlling for pretest pain, MANCOVA indicated that there was significantly less posttest pain in those with music plus analgesics than those with analgesics alone at three of the four tests: p = .04 to .001. Two-thirds in the music group (n = 21; 62%) chose Korean music and one-third (n = 13; 38%) chose American, with no difference in pain: both were effective. In addition to analgesics, music can be used to reduce postoperative pain in Korean women. Patients selected music that was appealing to them. Nurses in many countries can consider music of the country and seek individual preferences to use in addition to analgesics for postoperative pain.

  6. Can we maximize both value and quality in gynecologic cancer care? A work in progress.

    PubMed

    Havrilesky, Laura J; Fountain, Cynthia

    2014-01-01

    Value is defined as desirable health outcomes achieved per monetary unit spent. Comparative effectiveness research and cost-effectiveness research are methods that have been developed to quantify effectiveness and value to inform management decisions. In this article we review the comparative and cost-effectiveness literature in the field of ovarian cancer treatment. Studies have shown that improved ovarian cancer survival is associated with complete primary surgical cytoreduction, with treatment at high volume facilities by subspecialist providers (gynecologic oncologists) and with National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) guideline-adherent care in both surgical staging and chemotherapy regimens. Intraperitoneal/intravenous chemotherapy (compared with intravenous alone) has been associated with improved survival and cost-effectiveness. Bevacizumab for primary and maintenance therapy has been found to not be cost-effective (even in selective subsets) despite a small progression-free survival (PFS) advantage. For platinum-sensitive recurrent ovarian cancer, secondary cytoreduction and platinum-based combinations are associated with improved overall survival (OS); several platinum-based combinations have also been found cost-effective. For platinum-resistant recurrence, single agent therapy and supportive care are cost-effective compared with combination therapies. Although little prospective clinical research has been done around end-of-life care, one study reported that for platinum-resistant ovarian cancer, palliative intervention would potentially reduce costs and increase quality adjusted life years compared with usual care (based on improvement in quality of life [QOL]). Overall, cost comparisons of individual chemotherapy regimens are highly dependent on market prices of novel therapeutic agents.

  7. Evaluation of PC-ISO for customized, 3D Printed, gynecologic 192-Ir HDR brachytherapy applicators.

    PubMed

    Cunha, J Adam M; Mellis, Katherine; Sethi, Rajni; Siauw, Timmy; Sudhyadhom, Atchar; Garg, Animesh; Goldberg, Ken; Hsu, I-Chow; Pouliot, Jean

    2015-01-08

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the radiation attenuation properties of PC-ISO, a commercially available, biocompatible, sterilizable 3D printing material, and its suitability for customized, single-use gynecologic (GYN) brachytherapy applicators that have the potential for accurate guiding of seeds through linear and curved internal channels. A custom radiochromic film dosimetry apparatus was 3D-printed in PC-ISO with a single catheter channel and a slit to hold a film segment. The apparatus was designed specifically to test geometry pertinent for use of this material in a clinical setting. A brachytherapy dose plan was computed to deliver a cylindrical dose distribution to the film. The dose plan used an 192Ir source and was normalized to 1500 cGy at 1 cm from the channel. The material was evaluated by comparing the film exposure to an identical test done in water. The Hounsfield unit (HU) distributions were computed from a CT scan of the apparatus and compared to the HU distribution of water and the HU distribution of a commercial GYN cylinder applicator. The dose depth curve of PC-ISO as measured by the radiochromic film was within 1% of water between 1 cm and 6 cm from the channel. The mean HU was -10 for PC-ISO and -1 for water. As expected, the honeycombed structure of the PC-ISO 3D printing process created a moderate spread of HU values, but the mean was comparable to water. PC-ISO is sufficiently water-equivalent to be compatible with our HDR brachytherapy planning system and clinical workflow and, therefore, it is suitable for creating custom GYN brachytherapy applicators. Our current clinical practice includes the use of custom GYN applicators made of commercially available PC-ISO when doing so can improve the patient's treatment. 

  8. Evaluation of PC-ISO for customized, 3D printed, gynecologic 192Ir HDR brachytherapy applicators.

    PubMed

    Cunha, J Adam M; Mellis, Katherine; Sethi, Rajni; Siauw, Timmy; Sudhyadhom, Atchar; Garg, Animesh; Goldberg, Ken; Hsu, I-Chow; Pouliot, Jean

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the radiation attenuation properties of PC-ISO, a commercially available, biocompatible, sterilizable 3D printing material, and its suitability for customized, single-use gynecologic (GYN) brachytherapy applicators that have the potential for accurate guiding of seeds through linear and curved internal channels. A custom radiochromic film dosimetry apparatus was 3D-printed in PC-ISO with a single catheter channel and a slit to hold a film segment. The apparatus was designed specifically to test geometry pertinent for use of this material in a clinical setting. A brachytherapy dose plan was computed to deliver a cylindrical dose distribution to the film. The dose plan used an 192Ir source and was normalized to 1500 cGy at 1 cm from the channel. The material was evaluated by comparing the film exposure to an identical test done in water. The Hounsfield unit (HU) distributions were computed from a CT scan of the apparatus and compared to the HU distribution of water and the HU distribution of a commercial GYN cylinder applicator. The dose depth curve of PC-ISO as measured by the radiochromic film was within 1% of water between 1 cm and 6 cm from the channel. The mean HU was -10 for PC-ISO and -1 for water. As expected, the honeycombed structure of the PC-ISO 3D printing process created a moderate spread of HU values, but the mean was comparable to water. PC-ISO is sufficiently water-equivalent to be compatible with our HDR brachytherapy planning system and clinical workflow and, therefore, it is suitable for creating custom GYN brachytherapy applicators. Our current clinical practice includes the use of custom GYN applicators made of commercially available PC-ISO when doing so can improve the patient's treatment. PACS number: none.

  9. Intramuscularly administered dexmedetomidine attenuates hemodynamic and stress hormone responses to gynecologic laparoscopy.

    PubMed

    Aho, M; Scheinin, M; Lehtinen, A M; Erkola, O; Vuorinen, J; Korttila, K

    1992-12-01

    The hemodynamic and endocrine effects of three different doses of dexmedetomidine (0.6, 1.2, and 2.4 micrograms/kg), oxycodone (0.13 mg/kg), and saline solution, injected intramuscularly 45-60 min before induction of general anesthesia, were compared in a double-blind, randomized study involving 100 women undergoing gynecologic diagnostic laparoscopy. Anesthesia was induced with thiopental (4.5 mg/kg) and maintained with 0.3% end-tidal isoflurane and 70% nitrous oxide in oxygen. Arterial blood pressure and heart rate increased after endotracheal intubation and during laparoscopy in all groups, but the maximal mean arterial pressure after tracheal intubation was lower in the dexmedetomidine 2.4-micrograms/kg group (104 mm Hg [SD 19]) than in the saline solution group (130 mm Hg [SD 12]). Dexmedetomidine (2.4 and 1.2 micrograms/kg) attenuated the maximal heart rate after intubation (84 [SD 11] and 101 beats/min [SD 15], respectively) compared with saline solution (116 beats/min [SD 19]). On the other hand, 40% of the patients in the dexmedetomidine 2.4-micrograms/kg group received atropine in the postanesthesia care unit for bradycardia (heart rate < or = 40 beats/min). Preoperative anxiety and sedation before and after preanesthetic medication were evaluated by the patients with the aid of a profile of mood-state questionnaire; only dexmedetomidine 2.4 micrograms/kg produced significant anxiolysis and sedation. Plasma concentrations of norepinephrine, epinephrine, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylglycol, cortisol, and beta-endorphin increased less in the dexmedetomidine 2.4-micrograms/kg group in response to tracheal intubation and surgery than in the saline solution group.

  10. Outpatient provider contact prior to unintentional opioid overdose

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Lewei (Allison); Bohnert, Amy; Ilgen, Mark; Pfeiffer, Paul Nelson; Ganoczy, Dara; Blow, Fred

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Prescribed opioid medications are the most commonly implicated substances in unintentional overdoses. Outpatient health care encounters represent a potential opportunity to intervene to reduce opioid overdose risk. This study assessed the timing and type of outpatient provider contacts prior to overdose. Methods This study examined all adult patients nationally in the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) who died from unintentional prescription opioid overdose in fiscal years 2004–2007 and used VHA services anytime within two years of their deaths (n=1,813). For those whose last treatment contact was in an outpatient setting (n=1,457), demographic, clinical and treatment characteristics were compared among patients categorized by the location of their last contact. Results 33% (N=479) of those last seen in outpatient settings were seen within one week and 62% (N=910) within one month of their overdose. A substantial proportion of patients were last seen within one month of death in mental health or substance disorder outpatient settings (30% N=438). The majority of patients did not fill an opioid prescription on their last outpatient visit prior to unintentional opioid overdose. Conclusions The majority of patients who died by unintentional overdose on prescription opioids were seen within a month of their overdose in outpatient settings. These settings may provide an opportunity to prevent patients from dying from prescription opioid overdoses, and interventions to reduce risk should not be limited to visits that resulted in an opioid prescription. PMID:26129993

  11. Gynecologic pain related to occupational stress among female factory workers in Tianjin, China

    PubMed Central

    Sznajder, Kristin K; Harlow, Siobán D; Burgard, Sarah A; Wang, Yanrang; Han, Cheng; Liu, Jing

    2014-01-01

    Background: Dysmenorrhea, dyspareunia, and non-cyclic pelvic pain are health concerns for factory workers in China and may be increased by occupational stress. Objectives: To estimate the prevalence and demographic and occupational factors associated with three types of gynecologic pain among female factory workers in Tianjin. Methods: The study included 651 female workers from three factories in Tianjin, China. Logistic regression models were estimated to determine associations between occupational stress and gynecologic pain. Results: Occupational stress including high job strain, exhaustion, and stress related to working conditions was a risk factor for gynecologic pain. High job strain and poor job security were associated with an increased risk for dysmenorrhea. Compulsory overtime and exhaustion were associated with increased non-cyclic pelvic pain. Working overtime and exhaustion were associated with increased dyspareunia. Conclusions: As China’s population of female factory workers grows, research on the reproductive health of this population is essential. PMID:24804338

  12. [Noninvasive total hemoglobin monitoring based on multiwave spectrophotometry in obstetrics and gynecology].

    PubMed

    Pyregov, A V; Ovechkin, A Iu; Petrov, S V

    2012-01-01

    Results of prospective randomized comparative research of 2 total hemoglobin estimation methods are presented. There were laboratory tests and continuous noninvasive technique with multiwave spectrophotometry on the Masimo Rainbow SET. Research was carried out in two stages. At the 1st stage (gynecology)--67 patients were included and in second stage (obstetrics)--44 patients during and after Cesarean section. The standard deviation of noninvasive total hemoglobin estimation from absolute values (invasive) was 7.2 and 4.1%, an standard deviation in a sample--5.2 and 2.7 % in gynecologic operations and surgical delivery respectively, that confirms lack of reliable indicators differences. The method of continuous noninvasive total hemoglobin estimation with multiwave spectrophotometry on the Masimo Rainbow SET technology can be recommended for use in obstetrics and gynecology.

  13. Radiotherapy for gynecologic cancer in nonagenarian patients: a framework for new paradigms.

    PubMed

    Méry, Benoîte; Ndong, Sylvie Mengue; Guy, Jean-Baptiste; Assouline, Avi; Falk, Alexander T; Valeille, Anaïs; Trone, Jane-Chloé; Rivoirard, Romain; Auberdiac, Pierre; Vallard, Alexis; Espenel, Sophie; Moriceau, Guillaume; Collard, Olivier; Bosacki, Claire; Jacquin, Jean-Philippe; de Laroche, Guy; Fournel, Pierre; Chargari, Cyrus; Magné, Nicolas

    2016-05-09

    No consensus exists regarding the role of radiotherapy in the management of gynecologic cancer in nonagenarian patients. We retrospectively reviewed the outcomes of 19 consecutive nonagenarian patients with gynecologic cancer (6 endometrial cancers, 6 cervical cancers, 4 vulvar cancers, and 3 vaginal cancers) who were treated with radiotherapy. Radiotherapy was performed mainly in a palliative setting (n = 12; 63.2%), with a median dose of 45 Gy (range, 6-76 Gy). Infrequent major acute or late toxicities were reported. Among 19 patients, 9 (47.4%) experienced tumor progression, 5 (26.3%) experienced complete response, 2 (10.5%) experienced stable disease and/or partial response. At last follow-up, 12 patients (63.2%) had died; most deaths (n = 9) occurred because of the cancer. These results suggest that radiotherapy is feasible in the treatment of nonagenarian patients with gynecologic cancer.

  14. Task analysis of information technology-mediated medication management in outpatient care

    PubMed Central

    van Stiphout, F; Zwart-van Rijkom, J E F; Maggio, L A; Aarts, J E C M; Bates, D W; van Gelder, T; Jansen, P A F; Schraagen, J M C; Egberts, A C G; ter Braak, E W M T

    2015-01-01

    Aims Educating physicians in the procedural as well as cognitive skills of information technology (IT)-mediated medication management could be one of the missing links for the improvement of patient safety. We aimed to compose a framework of tasks that need to be addressed to optimize medication management in outpatient care. Methods Formal task analysis: decomposition of a complex task into a set of subtasks. First, we obtained a general description of the medication management process from exploratory interviews. Secondly, we interviewed experts in-depth to further define tasks and subtasks. Setting: Outpatient care in different fields of medicine in six teaching and academic medical centres in the Netherlands and the United States. Participants: 20 experts. Tasks were divided up into procedural, cognitive and macrocognitive tasks and categorized into the three components of dynamic decision making. Results The medication management process consists of three components: (i) reviewing the medication situation; (ii) composing a treatment plan; and (iii) accomplishing and communicating a treatment and surveillance plan. Subtasks include multiple cognitive tasks such as composing a list of current medications and evaluating the reliability of sources, and procedural tasks such as documenting current medication. The identified macrocognitive tasks were: planning, integration of IT in workflow, managing uncertainties and responsibilities, and problem detection. Conclusions All identified procedural, cognitive and macrocognitive skills should be included when designing education for IT-mediated medication management. The resulting framework supports the design of educational interventions to improve IT-mediated medication management in outpatient care. PMID:25753467

  15. National Trends in Outpatient Surgical Treatment of Degenerative Cervical Spine Disease

    PubMed Central

    Baird, Evan O.; Egorova, Natalia N.; McAnany, Steven J.; Qureshi, Sheeraz A.; Hecht, Andrew C.; Cho, Samuel K.

    2014-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective population-based observational study. Objective To assess the growth of cervical spine surgery performed in an outpatient setting. Methods A retrospective study was conducted using the United States Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project's State Inpatient and Ambulatory Surgery Databases for California, New York, Florida, and Maryland from 2005 to 2009. Current Procedural Terminology, fourth revision (CPT-4) and International Classification of Diseases, ninth revision Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) codes were used to identify operations for degenerative cervical spine diseases in adults (age > 20 years). Disposition and complication rates were examined. Results There was an increase in cervical spine surgeries performed in an ambulatory setting during the study period. Anterior cervical diskectomy and fusion accounted for 68% of outpatient procedures; posterior decompression made up 21%. Younger patients predominantly underwent anterior fusion procedures, and patients in the eighth and ninth decades of life had more posterior decompressions. Charlson comorbidity index and complication rates were substantially lower for ambulatory cases when compared with inpatients. The majority (>99%) of patients were discharged home following ambulatory surgery. Conclusions Recently, the number of cervical spine surgeries has increased in general, and more of these procedures are being performed in an ambulatory setting. The majority (>99%) of patients are discharged home but the nature of analyzing administrative data limits accurate assessment of postoperative complications and thus patient safety. This increase in outpatient cervical spine surgery necessitates further discussion of its safety. PMID:25083354

  16. Morbidity and mortality in gynecological cancers among first- and second-generation immigrants in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Mousavi, Seyed Mohsen; Sundquist, Kristina; Hemminki, Kari

    2012-07-15

    We studied the effect of new environment on the risk in and mortality of gynecological cancers in first- and second-generation immigrants in Sweden. We used the nationwide Swedish Family-Cancer Database to calculate standardized incidence/mortality ratios (SIRs/SMRs) of cervical, endometrial and ovarian cancers among immigrants in comparison to the native Swedes. Risk of cervical cancer increased among first-generation immigrants with Danish (SIR = 1.64), Norwegian (1.33), former Yugoslavian (1.21) and East European (1.35) origins, whereas this risk decreased among Finns (0.88) and Asians (SIRs varies from 0.11 in Iranians to 0.54 in East Asians). Risk of endometrial (SIRs varies from 0.28 in Africans to 0.86 in Finns) and ovarian (SIRs varies from 0.23 in Chileans to 0.82 in Finns) cancers decreased in first-generation immigrants. The overall gynecological cancer risk for the second-generation immigrants, independent of the birth region, was almost similar to that obtained for the first generations. The birth region-specific SMRs of gynecological cancers in first- and second-generation immigrants co-varied with the SIRs. Risk of gynecological cancers among the first-generation immigrants is similar to that in their original countries, except for cervical cancer among Africans and endometrial cancer among North Americans and East Europeans. Our findings show that risk and mortality of gynecological cancers observed in the first-generation immigrants remain in the second generation. We conclude that the risk and protective factors of gynecological cancers are preserved upon immigration and through generations, suggesting a role for behavioral factors or familial aggregation in the etiology of these diseases.

  17. Vulnerability of Rural Hospitals to Medicare Outpatient Payment Reform

    PubMed Central

    Mohr, Penny E.; Franco, Sheila J.; Blanchfield, Bonnie B.; Cheng, C. Michael; Evans, William N.

    1999-01-01

    Because the Balanced Budget Act (BBA) of 1997 requires implementation of a Medicare prospective payment system (PPS) for hospital outpatient services, the authors evaluated the potential impact of outpatient PPS on rural hospitals. Areas examined include: (1) How dependent are rural hospitals on outpatient revenue? (2) Are they more likely than urban hospitals to be vulnerable to payment reform? (3) What types of rural hospitals will be most vulnerable to reform? Using Medicare cost report data, the authors found that small size and government ownership are more common among rural than urban hospitals and are the most important determinants of vulnerability to payment reform. PMID:11481724

  18. Physician Use of Outpatient Electronic Health Records to Improve Care

    PubMed Central

    Wilcox, Adam; Bowes, Watson A.; Thornton, Sidney N.; Narus, Scott P.

    2008-01-01

    We applied a model of usage categories of electronic health records for outpatient physicians to a large population of physicians, using an established electronic health record. This model categorizes physician users according to how extensively they adopt the various capabilities of electronic health records. We identified representative indicators from usage statistics for outpatient physician use of the HELP-2 outpatient electronic medical record, in use at Intermountain Healthcare. Using these indicators, we calculated the relative proportion of users in each category. These proportions are useful for predicting the expected benefits of electronic health record adoption. PMID:18999307

  19. The pros and cons of outpatient breast biopsy.

    PubMed

    Lou, M A; Mandal, A K; Alexander, J L

    1976-06-01

    A review of the 130 breast biopsies performed on women during the past three years at the Martin Luther King, Jr, General Hospital showed that 90 were performed on outpatients and 40 on inpatients. Of the 90 outpatient procedures, 61 were under local anesthesia and 29 under general. Only three outpatient biopsy specimens were malignant and required subsequent patient admission to the hospital for mastectomy at an interval of 9 to 14 days. In all three, the axillary nodes were uninvolved. In two, no residual tumor was found in the mastectomy specimen.

  20. [Multifactorial analysis of the impact of pesticides on the gynecologic rate in adolescents in the Belgorod Region].

    PubMed

    Verzilina, I N; Churnosov, M I; Evdokimov, V I

    2013-01-01

    In the course of the performed study the significant influence of pesticides introduced into arable farmland, on the frequency of gynecological morbidity in adolescents in 21 districts of the Belgorod region was established. With increasing pesticide load on the soil the prevalence of gynecological pathology in adolescents in rural areas is raising.

  1. The Changing Scenario of Obstetrics and Gynecology Residency Training

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Natasha; Dragovic, Kristina; Trester, Richard; Blankstein, Josef

    2015-01-01

    Background Significant changes have been noted in aspects of obstetrics-gynecology (ob-gyn) training over the last decade, which is reflected in Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) operative case logs for graduating ob-gyn residents. Objective We sought to understand the changing trends of ob-gyn residents' experience in obstetric procedures over the past 11 years. Methods We analyzed national ACGME procedure logs for all obstetric procedures recorded by 12 728 ob-gyn residents who graduated between academic years 2002–2003 and 2012–2013. Results The average number of cesarean sections per resident increased from 191.8 in 2002–2003 to 233.4 in 2012–2013 (17%; P < .001; 95% CI −47.769 to −35.431), the number of vaginal deliveries declined from 320.8 to 261 (18.6%; P < .001; 95% CI 38.842–56.35), the number of forceps deliveries declined from 23.8 to 8.4 (64.7%; P < .001; 95% CI 14.061–16.739), and the number of vacuum deliveries declined from 23.8 to 17.6 (26%; P < .001; 95% CI 5.043–7.357). Between 2002–2003 and 2007–2008, amniocentesis decreased from 18.5 to 11 (P < .001, 95% CI 6.298–8.702), and multifetal vaginal deliveries increased from 10.8 to 14 (P < .001, 95% CI −3.895 to −2.505). Both were not included in ACGME reporting after 2008. Conclusions Ob-gyn residents' training experience changed substantially over the past decade. ACGME obstetric logs demonstrated decreases in volume of vaginal, forceps, and vacuum deliveries, and increases in cesarean and multifetal deliveries. Change in experience may require use of innovative strategies to help improve residents' basic obstetric skills. PMID:26457146

  2. [Intrauterine contraception from the viewpoint of an ambulatory gynecologic department].

    PubMed

    Hagen, P

    1981-09-01

    The history, current status, indications and contraindications for intrauterine contraception are described, information on safety and side effects is cited from the literature, and the experience of 1 clinic with IUDs is discussed. In 1976, 200,000 women in the German Democratic Republic used IUDs, or 50/1000 women aged 15-45. Intrauterine contraception had a slower and less steady development than oral contraception. The most widely used 2nd generation IUDs in East Germany were manufactured of plastic in the USSR, while the DANA copper and copper-T are the most widely used 3rd generation devices. The last days of the menstrual period are the best times for insertion, but placement immediately following abortion or birth is also possible. IUDs are indicated in cases where hormonal contraception is contraindicated. Contraindications to IUD use include suspicion of pregnancy, genital infection, atypical cytological finding, serious menstrual disturbances or bleeding of unknown cause, myomatous uterus, genital neoplasia, and deformation of the cervix or uterine cavity. The most significant complications and side effects of IUD use are bleeding disorders, dysmenorrhea, expulsion of the IUD, inflammation of the pelvic organs, undesired pregnancy, extrauterine pregnancy, and perforation of the uterus. Data from a gynecological clinic serving a predominantly rural area on 121 patients who used IUDs for a variety of reasons between June 1975 and August 1980 are presented. Observations covered a total of 4309 cycles and averaged 35.6 cycles per woman. Average age of patients was 31.7 years, no insertions were done in nulliparous patients, and the longest user had an IUD in place for 94 months. 29 patients had DANA superlux, 61 had DANA cor, 10 had DANA copper, and 21 had copper T devices. Complications and side effects were observed in 32 cases, including 19 cases of bleeding problems, of which 6 required removal; 5 of pregnancy, all of which were ended by abortions and

  3. Leveraging Immunotherapy for the treatment of Gynecologic Cancers in the Era of Precision Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Zamarin, Dmitriy; Jazaeri, Amir A.

    2016-01-01

    During the past decade significant progress in the understanding of stimulatory and inhibitory signaling pathways in immune cells has reinvigorated the field of immuno-oncology. In this review we outline the current immunotherapy based approaches for the treatment of gynecological cancers, and focus on the emerging clinical data on immune checkpoint inhibitors, adoptive cell therapies, and vaccines. It is anticipated that in the coming years biomarker-guided clinical trials, will provide for a better understanding of the mechanisms of response and resistance to immunotherapy, and guide combination treatment strategies that will extend the benefit from immunotherapy to patients with gynecologic cancers. PMID:27016233

  4. Leveraging immunotherapy for the treatment of gynecologic cancers in the era of precision medicine.

    PubMed

    Zamarin, Dmitriy; Jazaeri, Amir A

    2016-04-01

    During the past decade significant progress in the understanding of stimulatory and inhibitory signaling pathways in immune cells has reinvigorated the field of immuno-oncology. In this review we outline the current immunotherapy based approaches for the treatment of gynecological cancers, and focus on the emerging clinical data on immune checkpoint inhibitors, adoptive cell therapies, and vaccines. It is anticipated that in the coming years biomarker-guided clinical trials, will provide for a better understanding of the mechanisms of response and resistance to immunotherapy, and guide combination treatment strategies that will extend the benefit from immunotherapy to patients with gynecologic cancers.

  5. To the point: teaching the obstetrics and gynecology medical student in the operating room.

    PubMed

    Hampton, Brittany S; Craig, LaTasha B; Abbott, Jodi F; Buery-Joyner, Samantha D; Dalrymple, John L; Forstein, David A; Hopkins, Laura; McKenzie, Margaret L; Page-Ramsey, Sarah M; Pradhan, Archana; Wolf, Abigail; Graziano, Scott C

    2015-10-01

    This article, from the "To the Point" series that is prepared by the Association of Professors of Gynecology and Obstetrics Undergraduate Medical Education Committee, is a review of considerations for teaching the medical student in the operating room during the obstetrics/gynecology clerkship. The importance of the medical student operating room experience and barriers to learning in the operating room are discussed. Specific considerations for the improvement of medical student learning and operating room experience, which include the development of operating room objectives and specific curricula, an increasing awareness regarding role modeling, and faculty development, are reviewed.

  6. Functions of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Gamma (PPARγ) in Gynecologic Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Ping; Zhang, Yuquan; Huang, Yan; Yang, Yingli; Jiang, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) is a member of a class of nuclear hormone receptors intimately involved in the regulation of expression of myriad genes that regulate energy metabolism, cell differentiation, apoptosis, and inflammation. Although originally discovered as a pivotal regulator of adipocyte differentiation, the roles that PPARγ plays in gynecological disorders are still unknown. There are a number of studies on the functions of PPARγ and its agonists in gynecological disorders. In this mini-review, we provide a brief summary of the advances in recent years. PMID:25987855

  7. [Evaluation of gynecologic morbidity in female cadets of military universities of St. Petersburg].

    PubMed

    Artiukhova, N S; Shmidt, A A; Abashin, V G

    2012-08-01

    In-depth medical examination carried out a comprehensive survey of the dynamic female cadets of higher military educational institutions of the city of St. Petersburg in order to analyze the health of the troops of the Russian Federation Ministry of Defense personnel in the learning process, their level of gynecological diseases, as a possible consequence of influence of combat training. Following the study, shape, volume and frequency of activities to assess the health of women students, as well as a set of measures for the prevention of gynecological morbidity and dispensary of the contingent were developed.

  8. Dissociative disorders and suicidality in psychiatric outpatients.

    PubMed

    Foote, Brad; Smolin, Yvette; Neft, Deborah I; Lipschitz, Deborah

    2008-01-01

    Although it is common for patients with dissociative disorders to report a history of suicide attempts, there is very little data systematically comparing suicidality in patients with dissociative disorders versus patients without these disorders. The subjects in our study were 231 patients consecutively admitted to an inner-city, hospital-based outpatient psychiatric clinic. Eighty-two of these patients completed structured interviews for dissociative disorders, borderline personality disorder, and trauma history (dissociative disorders interview schedule) and for posttraumatic stress disorder and substance abuse (Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV). Patients receiving a dissociative disorder diagnosis were compared with nondissociative patients on measures of self-harm and suicidality. Presence of a dissociative disorder was strongly associated with all measures of self-harm and suicidality. When we focused on patients with a history of multiple suicide attempts, significant associations were found between several diagnoses (dissociative disorder; borderline personality disorder; posttraumatic stress disorder; alcohol abuse/dependence) and multiple suicide attempter status. When these diagnoses were entered in a logistic regression, a highly significant association remained for dissociative diagnosis and multiple suicide attempter status (odds ratio, 15.09; 95% confidence interval, 2.67-85.32; p = 0.002). Dissociative disorders are commonly overlooked in studies of suicidality, but in this population they were the strongest predictor of multiple suicide attempter status.

  9. Assessing anxious features in depressed outpatients

    PubMed Central

    McClintock, Shawn M.; Husain, Mustafa M.; Bernstein, Ira H.; Wisniewski, Stephen R.; Trivedi, Madhukar H.; Morris, David; Alpert, Jonathan; Warden, Diane; Luther, James F.; Kornstein, Susan G.; Biggs, Melanie M.; Fava, Maurizio; Rush, A. John

    2013-01-01

    Both the 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD17) and 30-item Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology – Clinician-rated (IDS-C30) contain a subscale that assesses anxious symptoms. We used classical test theory and item response theory methods to assess and compare the psychometric properties of the two anxiety subscales (HRSDANX and IDS-CANX) in a large sample (N = 3453) of outpatients with non-psychotic major depressive disorder in the Sequenced Treatment Alternatives to Relieve Depression (STAR*D) study. Approximately 48% of evaluable participants had at least one concurrent anxiety disorder by the self-report Psychiatric Diagnostic Screening Questionnaire (PDSQ). The HRSDANX and IDS-CANX were highly correlated (r = 0.75) and both had moderate internal consistency given their limited number of items (HRSDANX Cronbach’s alpha = 0.48; IDS-CANX Cronbach’s alpha = 0.58). The optimal threshold for ascribing the presence/absence of anxious features was found at a total score of eight or nine for the HRSDANX and seven or eight for the IDS-CANX. It would seem beneficial to delete item 17 (loss of insight) from the HRSDANX as it negatively correlated with the scale’s total score. Both the HRSDANX and IDS-CANX subscales have acceptable psychometric properties and can be used to identify anxious features for clinical or research purposes. PMID:22057975

  10. Outpatient Management of Pediatric Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Cogen, Fran R.

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes (T1DM and T2DM) continues to rise within the pediatric population. However, T1DM remains the most prevalent form diagnosed in children. It is critical that health-care professionals understand the types of diabetes diagnosed in pediatrics, especially the distinguishing features between T1DM and T2DM, to ensure proper treatment. Similar to all individuals with T1DM, lifelong administration of exogenous insulin is necessary for survival. However, children have very distinct needs and challenges compared to those in the adult diabetes population. Accordingly, treatment, goals, and age-appropriate requirements must be individually addressed. The main objectives for the treatment of pediatric T1DM include maintaining glucose levels as close to normal as possible, avoiding acute complications, and preventing long-term complications. In addition, unique to pediatrics, facilitating normal growth and development is important to comprehensive care. To achieve these goals, a careful balance of insulin therapy, medical nutrition therapy, and exercise or activity is necessary. Pharmacological treatment options consist of various insulin products aimed at mimicking prior endogenous insulin secretion while minimizing adverse effects. This review focuses on the management of pediatric T1DM in the outpatient environment, highlighting pharmacotherapy management strategies. PMID:26472948

  11. Outpatient Management of Pediatric Type 1 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Beck, Joni K; Cogen, Fran R

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes (T1DM and T2DM) continues to rise within the pediatric population. However, T1DM remains the most prevalent form diagnosed in children. It is critical that health-care professionals understand the types of diabetes diagnosed in pediatrics, especially the distinguishing features between T1DM and T2DM, to ensure proper treatment. Similar to all individuals with T1DM, lifelong administration of exogenous insulin is necessary for survival. However, children have very distinct needs and challenges compared to those in the adult diabetes population. Accordingly, treatment, goals, and age-appropriate requirements must be individually addressed. The main objectives for the treatment of pediatric T1DM include maintaining glucose levels as close to normal as possible, avoiding acute complications, and preventing long-term complications. In addition, unique to pediatrics, facilitating normal growth and development is important to comprehensive care. To achieve these goals, a careful balance of insulin therapy, medical nutrition therapy, and exercise or activity is necessary. Pharmacological treatment options consist of various insulin products aimed at mimicking prior endogenous insulin secretion while minimizing adverse effects. This review focuses on the management of pediatric T1DM in the outpatient environment, highlighting pharmacotherapy management strategies.

  12. Outpatient management of alcohol withdrawal syndrome.

    PubMed

    Muncie, Herbert L; Yasinian, Yasmin; Oge', Linda

    2013-11-01

    Approximately 2% to 9% of patients seen in a family physician's office have alcohol dependence. These patients are at risk of developing alcohol withdrawal syndrome if they abruptly abstain from alcohol use. Alcohol withdrawal syndrome begins six to 24 hours after the last intake of alcohol, and the signs and symptoms include tremors, agitation, nausea, sweating, vomiting, hallucinations, insomnia, tachycardia, hypertension, delirium, and seizures. Treatment aims to minimize symptoms, prevent complications, and facilitate continued abstinence from alcohol. Patients with mild or moderate alcohol withdrawal syndrome can be treated as outpatients, which minimizes expense and allows for less interruption of work and family life. Patients with severe symptoms or who are at high risk of complications should receive inpatient treatment. In addition to supportive therapy, benzodiazepines, either in a fixed-dose or symptom-triggered schedule, are recommended. Medication should be given at the onset of symptoms and continued until symptoms subside. Other medications, including carbamazepine, oxcarbazepine, valproic acid, and gabapentin, have less abuse potential but do not prevent seizures. Typically, physicians should see these patients daily until symptoms subside. Although effective treatment is an initial step in recovery, long-term success depends on facilitating the patient's entry into ongoing treatment.

  13. Laboratory tests and compliance of dermatologic outpatients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jaehwan

    2013-01-01

    Laboratory tests, including blood tests and urine analysis, are frequently performed in the dermatology outpatient clinic, but doctors often do not consider the cognitive or psychological effect of the examinations. Based on terror management theory, we hypothesized that performing laboratory tests increases the patient’s fear of mortality, and therefore has a positive effect on the patient’s attitude toward the doctor’s recommendations and willingness to accept them. The study employed a single factor between-subjects design, using a questionnaire completed by the patients. One group consisted of patients who had undergone laboratory tests 1 week before the survey, and the other group consisted of patients who had not undergone a laboratory test. Although the differences between two groups were not statistically significant, the patients who had laboratory tests had tendency to show even lower positive attitude toward the doctor’s recommendations and less intention to follow the recommendations. In contrast to our hypothesis, performing laboratory tests does not subliminally increase patients’ fears or anxieties about their disease or their compliance with doctors’ recommendations. PMID:24555101

  14. Outpatient follow-up for critical limb ischemia.

    PubMed

    Watch, Libby

    2014-09-01

    Outpatient follow-Up for critical limb ischemia offers the clinician the opportunity to monitor the patient for risk factor modification and wound healing. Routine surveillance following intervention will improve long-term patency.

  15. 76 FR 49458 - TRICARE; Hospital Outpatient Radiology Discretionary Appeal Adjustments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-10

    ... of the Secretary TRICARE; Hospital Outpatient Radiology Discretionary Appeal Adjustments AGENCY... hospitals of an opportunity for net adjusted payments for radiology services for which TRICARE payments were... radiology services specified in the regulation as being reimbursed under the allowable charge...

  16. Outpatient angioplasty: 4-year experience in one practice.

    PubMed Central

    Payne, S. P.; Stanton, A.; Travers, P.; Glenn, D.; Hanel, K. C.

    1997-01-01

    Angioplasty is often performed as an inpatient procedure after preliminary angiography. In order to increase efficiency and patient comfort we introduced a policy of performing angioplasty for chronic leg ischaemia as an outpatient whenever possible, using duplex scanning to select suitable lesions. This paper examines the safety and feasibility of this policy over a 4-year period. We prospectively assessed 168 consecutive cases which were planned for outpatient angioplasty from a total of 190 cases undergoing angioplasty and found full agreement between duplex scanning and angiography in 92%. Six patients (4%) developed complications of angioplasty requiring admission and another five were admitted for unexpected organisational reasons. Thus, the complication rate of outpatient angioplasty was 4%. All complications were noted at the time of angioplasty with no unexpected readmissions. Angioplasty for leg ischaemia is feasible and safe to perform as an outpatient using duplex scanning to select appropriate cases. PMID:9326123

  17. Move to outpatient settings may boost medical hotels.

    PubMed

    Burns, J

    1992-06-08

    The shift of surgeries to outpatient settings could be healthy for medical hotels, those amenity-equipped facilities originally developed to ease patients out of costly acute-care beds. Because fewer hospitals have a pressing need to use such alternative lodging, some medical hotels are hoping to hitch their fortunes to the outpatient trade, keeping patients overnight after surgeries that don't require hospital admission.

  18. 42 CFR 440.20 - Outpatient hospital services and rural health clinic services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Definitions § 440.20 Outpatient hospital services and rural health clinic services. (a) Outpatient hospital... agency may exclude from the definition of “outpatient hospital services” those types of items and... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Outpatient hospital services and rural...

  19. Top manager effects on buprenorphine adoption in outpatient substance abuse treatment programs.

    PubMed

    Friedmann, Peter D; Jiang, Lan; Alexander, Jeffrey A

    2010-07-01

    To examine the influence of top managers' characteristics on the adoption of buprenorphine for opioid dependence among U.S. outpatient substance abuse treatment units, this investigation analyzed a cross-sectional national study of 547 such units in the 2004-2005 wave of the Drug Abuse Treatment System Survey. Administrators reported their demographics, training, and treatment orientation, as well as features of the unit and its pattern of use of buprenorphine. Nationally, 15.8% of programs offered any buprenorphine services. Greater adoption of buprenorphine correlated with directors' younger age, longer tenure, male gender, and weaker endorsement of abstinence as the most important treatment goal. Availability of naltrexone and medical services also correlated positively with buprenorphine adoption. The authors conclude that leaders' characteristics are related to the adoption of innovative practices in addiction treatment programs. Future work should examine whether leadership development for community addiction programs might speed up the diffusion of buprenorphine and other innovative, evidence-based practices.

  20. [Disorders of libido from the gynecological view point].

    PubMed

    Eicher, W

    1976-12-02

    Sexual dysfunctions are differentiated according to the following symptoms: libido dysfunction, orgasmic dysfunction, vaginism, algopareunia and polysymptomatic dysfunction. In the out-patient service for sexual and other psychosomatic disorders of the University of Heidelberg's Women's Hospital 90 women with libido dysfunction were treated with conflict-centered psychotherapy after exclusion of organic diseases which could explain the reduction of libido and after exclusion of a depression where the loss of libido is a regular symptom. The success-rate was 63%. It was attempted to reinforce the ego of the patient which enables him to experience his surroundings with less conflicts. Neurotic anxieties and symptoms are decreased and loos their importance so that the patient is able to handle his sexual disturbance. Among the psychosocial factors, i.e. focal causes, responsible for the libido dysfunction we found: In 48% of the cases the relationship between parents and children had been disturbed, which caused difficulties in the identification process (lack of father or mother, cool mother, divorce, borken home). Problems with the partners were found in 42%. 2/3 of these women had not grown up in intact families, which seems to predestinate difficulties in communication later on. Psychodynamically the loss of libido means sexual resistance which can lead to aversion or disgust. When there is no excitement the vasocongestion and lubrication do not take place: cohabitation pain (algopareunia) results. On the other hand the reduction of libido can also be a result of chronic algopareunia, i.e. secondary. Psychogenic bleedings ("aversion-bleeding") during or after intercourse occasionally occur in combination with algopareunia and lack of libido.

  1. Outpatient clinic referrals and their outcome.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, F M; Hoare, T; Gilmour, H

    1992-03-01

    A cohort of 392 patients referred to six outpatient clinics by general practitioners during 1987 with diagnoses of rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, peripheral vascular disease, psoriasis or eczema, were studied from the time of their first attendance until up to two years later. Six consultant clinics were studied in the three specialties: rheumatology, vascular surgery and dermatology. For each specialty a clinic in both a teaching hospital and a district general hospital were included. The cohort members were predominantly middle-aged or elderly people, with a greater proportion of women, except at the vascular surgery clinic where 65% of patients were men. The 392 patients made a total of 936 visits (median two, range one-eight) during the study period; 91 patients were still attending up to two years after the first visit. Patients referred by their general practitioner for therapy were less likely to be discharged than those referred for other reasons. The principal reason for continuing attendance as perceived by patients, general practitioners and hospital doctors was the necessity for consultant supervision, although agreement was far from complete in individual cases. Junior staff tended to see a higher proportion of patients at follow-up visits than did consultants, and were found to have lower discharge rates than consultants. Analyses of data showed that at the first visit, diagnosis, disease severity and the grade of doctor seeing the patient in the clinic was significantly associated with patient discharge at the P < 0.05 level of significance. Patients considered that their visits had produced improvement in their condition in 38% of cases.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Single-site robotic surgery in gynecologic cancer: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Ha-Na; Lee, Yoo-Young; Choi, Chel Hun; Lee, Jeong-Won; Bae, Duk-Soo; Kim, Byoung-Gie

    2015-01-01

    Objective To discuss the feasibility of single-site robotic surgery for benign gynecologic tumors and early stage gynecologic cancers. Methods In this single institution, prospective analysis, we analyzed six patients who had undergone single-site robotic surgery between December 2013 and August 2014. Surgery was performed using the da Vinci Si Surgical System. Patient characteristics and surgical outcomes were analyzed. Results Single-site robotic surgery was performed successfully in all six cases. The median patient age was 48 years, and the median body mass index was 25.5 kg/m2 (range, 22 to 33 kg/m2). The median total operative time was 211 minutes, and the median duration of intracorporeal vaginal cuff suturing was 32 minutes (range, 22 to 47 minutes). The median duration of pelvic lymph node dissection was 31 minutes on one side and 27 minutes on the other side. Patients' postoperative courses were uneventful. The median postoperative hospital stay was 4 days. No postoperative complications occurred. Conclusion When used to treat benign gynecologic tumors and early stage gynecologic cancers, the single-site da Vinci robotic surgery is feasible, safe, and produces favorable surgical outcomes. PMID:25609162

  3. Effect of home care service on the quality of life in patients with gynecological cancer.

    PubMed

    Aktas, Demet; Terzioglu, Fusun

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the research was to determine the effect of home care service on the quality of life in patients with gynecological cancer. This randomized case control study was carried out in a womans hospital between September 2011 and February 2012. Women undergoing gynecological cancer treatment were separated into intervention and control groups, of 35 patients each. The intervention group was provided with nursing care service through hospital and home visits (1st, 12th weeks) within the framework of a specifically developed nursing care plan. The control group was monitored without any intervention through the hospital routine protocols (1st, 12th weeks). Data were collected using An Interview Form, Home Visit Monitoring Form and Quality of Life Scale/Cancer Survivors. Effects of home care service on the quality of life in gynecological cancer patients were investigated using chi-square tests, McNemar's test, independent t-test and ANOVA. This study found that the intervention group receiving home care service had a moderately high quality of life (average mean: 6.01±0.64), while the control group had comparatively lower quality (average mean: 4.35±0.79) within the 12 week post- discharge period (p<0.05). This study found home care services to be efficient in improving the quality of life in patients with gynecological cancer.

  4. [Clinical evaluation of ureteral stenting for managing extrinsic ureteral obstruction due to gynecological and gastrointestinal cancer].

    PubMed

    Takehara, Kosuke; Onita, Toru; Mochizuki, Yasushi; Miyata, Yasuyoshi; Igawa, Tsukasa; Sakai, Hideki

    2014-01-01

    We retrospectively reviewed patients who were treated with an indwelling ureteral stent to manage extrinsic ureteral obstruction due to advanced gynecological and gastrointestinal cancers. A total of 34 patients, including 17 with gynecological cancer and 17 with gastrointestinal cancer, underwent a successful initial ureteral stent placement from January 2007 to December 2011. Functional ureteral stent failures, which required percutaneous nephrostomy within 3 months after initial ureteral stenting, occurred in 14 of the 34 patients (41%) during follow-up. The risk factors of functional ureteral stent failure were bilateral ureteral obstruction, elevated serum creatinine level, poor performance status, subsequent therapy for primary cancer after ureteral stent placement, presence of peritonitis carcinomatosa, and gastrointestinal cancer. Patients with gastrointestinal cancer had a higher rate of stent failure than did those with gynecological cancer (p = 0.01). Median survival from the diagnosis of hydronephrosis for patients with gastrointestinal and gynecological cancers was 9 and 23 months, respectively (p = 0. 02). Retrograde ureteral stenting is a useful treatment for malignant ureteral obstruction. However, patients with gastrointestinal cancer had a high stent failure rate and a short survival time from the diagnosis of hydronephrosis. Indications for retrograde ureteral stenting for malignant ureteral obstruction should be carefully considered while taking into account stent failure risk, patient prognosis and quality of life.

  5. Investigating Compliance with Standard Precautions During Residency Physicians in Gynecology and Obstetrics

    PubMed Central

    de Carvalho, Milton Jorge; Pereira, Fernanda Maria Vieira; Gir, Elucir; Lam, Simon Ching; Barbosa, Caio Parente

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Physician compliance with standard precautions is important in the specialty of gynecology and obstetrics because of the high frequency of invasive procedures. The current study investigated compliance with standard precautions among resident physicians working in gynecology and obstetrics. METHOD: A cross-sectional study was conducted among resident physicians in gynecology and obstetrics in their first (R1), second (R2) and third (R3) years of residency at a teaching hospital in a city in São Paulo. A structured questionnaire that included demographic and professional aspects and the Standard Precautions Adherence Scale were used to collect data. Statistical analysis was performed using IBM® SPSS version 20. Ethical aspects were considered. RESULTS: Fifty-eight resident physicians participated in the study. Of the enrolled participants, 27 (46.6%) were in R1, 12 (20.7%) were in R2 and 19 (32.8%) were in R3. The standard precautions compliance score was 4.1, which was classified as intermediate. There were no significant differences in the compliance scores of the resident physicians across the three years of residency (H=2.34, p=0.310). CONCLUSION: Compliance with standard precautions among resident physicians was intermediate. Preventive measures in clinical practice are not fully adopted in the specialty of gynecology and obstetrics. More important, many professionals claimed lack of sufficient training in standard precautions in the workplace. Such circumstances should draw the attention of hospital management with regard to occupational health risks. PMID:27464295

  6. About the Breast and Gynecologic Cancer Research Group | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Breast and Gynecologic Cancer Research Group conducts and fosters the development of research on the prevention and early detection of breast cancer, cervix and human papillomavirus (HPV)-related cancers, endometrial cancers, ovarian cancers, and precursor conditions related to these cancers. |

  7. American Academy of Pediatrics. Clinical report--gynecologic examination for adolescents in the pediatric office setting.

    PubMed

    Braverman, Paula K; Breech, Lesley

    2010-09-01

    The American Academy of Pediatrics promotes the inclusion of the gynecologic examination in the primary care setting within the medical home. Gynecologic issues are commonly seen by clinicians who provide primary care to adolescents. Some of the most common concerns include questions related to pubertal development; menstrual disorders such as dysmenorrhea, amenorrhea, oligomenorrhea, and abnormal uterine bleeding; contraception; and sexually transmitted and non-sexually transmitted infections. The gynecologic examination is a key element in assessing pubertal status and documenting physical findings. Most adolescents do not need an internal examination involving a speculum or bimanual examination. However, for cases in which more extensive examination is needed, the primary care office with the primary care clinician who has established rapport and trust with the patient is often the best setting for pelvic examination. This report reviews the gynecologic examination, including indications for the pelvic examination in adolescents and the approach to this examination in the office setting. Indications for referral to a gynecologist are included. The pelvic examination may be successfully completed when conducted without pressure and approached as a normal part of routine young women's health care.

  8. Prevalence of Burnout in residents of obstetrics and gynecology: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Moradi, Yousef; Baradaran, Hamid Reza; Yazdandoost, Maryam; Atrak, Shahla; Kashanian, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Background: Burnout is currently a major concern among physicians due to their high level of stress at work. There are several reports on various levels of burnout in residency programs due to several predisposing factors. The aim of this systematic review was to estimate a more precise prevalence of burnout among residents of obstetrics and gynecology. Methods: PubMed, Science Direct and Scopus were searched to identify peer-reviewed Englishlanguage studies published from January 1974 to 2005 reporting burnout among residents of obstetrics and gynecology. The key words used in the search were as follows: Residents, gynecology and obstetrics, professional burnout, depersonalization, distress, anxiety, or emotional exhaustion. Relevant additional articles were identified from the lists of the retrieved articles. Results: We identified 12 studies which met our criteria. A total of 2509 participants were included in this meta-analysis. The overall prevalence rate of burnout on all the three subscales was 44% (95% CI: 30 - 57) in this group of residents. Conclusion: This meta-analysis revealed a high prevalence of burnout syndrome in residents during obstetrics and gynecology residency program. Therefore, it is recommended to consider and address this important issue to develop solutions and interventions which could improve the work condition of the medical residents. PMID:26793673

  9. Genetics of Breast and Gynecologic Cancers (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Cancer.gov

    Expert-reviewed information summary about the genetics of breast and gynecologic cancers, including information about specific genes and family cancer syndromes. The summary also contains information about interventions that may influence the risk of developing breast and Psychosocial issues associated with genetic testing are also discussed.

  10. Biomagnetic activity and non linear analysis in obstetrics and gynecology in a Greek population.

    PubMed

    Anninos, P; Anastasiadis, P; Adamopoulos, A; Kotini, A

    2016-01-01

    This article reports the application of non-linear analysis to biomagnetic signals recorded from fetal growth restriction, fetal brain activity, ovarian lesions, breast lesions, umbilical arteries, uterine myomas, and uterine arteries in a Greek population. The results were correlated with clinical findings. The biomagnetic measurements and the application of non-linear analysis are promising procedures in Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  11. Coping and Communication-Enhancing Intervention versus Supportive Counseling for Women Diagnosed with Gynecological Cancers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manne, Sharon L.; Rubin, Stephen; Edelson, Mitchell; Rosenblum, Norman; Bergman, Cynthia; Hernandez, Enrique; Carlson, John; Rocereto, Thomas; Winkel, Gary

    2007-01-01

    This study compared the efficacy of 2 psychological interventions, a coping and communication-enhancing intervention (CCI) and supportive counseling (SC), in reducing depressive symptoms and cancer-specific distress of women diagnosed with gynecological cancer. Demographic, medical, and psychological moderators of intervention effects were…

  12. 76 FR 21237 - Medical Devices; Obstetrical and Gynecological Devices; Classification of the Hemorrhoid...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-15

    ... Gynecological Devices; Classification of the Hemorrhoid Prevention Pressure Wedge AGENCY: Food and Drug... hemorrhoid prevention pressure wedge into class II (special controls). The special controls will apply to the... prevention pressure wedge provides support to the perianal region during the labor and delivery...

  13. Effect of Music Therapy on Postoperative Pain Management in Gynecological Patients: A Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Sin, Wai Man; Chow, Ka Ming

    2015-12-01

    Unrelieved postoperative pain may have a negative impact on the physiological and psychological well-being of patients. Pharmacological methods are currently used to relieve such pain in gynecological patients; however, inadequate pain control is still reported, and the use of nonpharmacological pain-relieving methods is increasingly being advocated, one of which is music therapy. The purpose of this literature review was to identify, summarize, and critically appraise current evidence on music therapy and postoperative pain management among gynecological patients. A systematic search of MEDLINE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, British Nursing Index, and Allied and Complementary Medicine was conducted using the search terms music, gynecological, pain, surgery, operative, and post-operative to identify relevant articles in English from 1995 to the present. All identified articles were assessed independently for inclusion into review. A total of 7 articles were included after removal of duplicates and exclusion of irrelevant studies. All the included studies assessed the effects of music therapy on postoperative pain intensity, and three of them measured pain-related physiological symptoms. The findings indicated that music therapy, in general, was effective in reducing pain intensity, fatigue, anxiety, and analgesic consumption in gynecological patients during the postoperative period. It is recommended as an adjunct to pharmacological pain-relieving methods in reducing postoperative pain. Future researches on music therapy to identify the most effective application and evaluate its effect by qualitative study are recommended.

  14. The methodological quality of economic evaluation studies in obstetrics and gynecology: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Vijgen, Sylvia M C; Opmeer, Brent C; Mol, Ben Willem J

    2013-04-01

    We evaluated the methodological quality of economic evaluation studies in the field of obstetrics and gynecology published in the last decade. A MEDLINE search was performed to find economic evaluation studies in obstetrics and gynecology from the years 1997 through 2009. We included full economic evaluation studies concerning tests or interventions in the field of obstetrics or gynecology. Each included study was evaluated by two reviewers using a quality checklist that was based on international guidelines for medical economic evaluation studies and a checklist used in a previous review. The mean number of quality criteria adhered to was 23 of 30 items, whereas five articles (3%) met all 30 criteria. Compliance was low for the description of the perspective (40%), the completeness of costs looking at the perspective (48%) or time horizon (48%), and reporting of quantities of resources (47%). Furthermore, if no discounting was applied, an explanation was infrequently given (14%). A comparison of study quality to that reported by Smith and Blackmore showed a considerable improvement in the following criteria: presentation perspective (from 19 to 40%), statement of primary outcome measure (from 72 to 81%), completeness costs looking at the time horizon (from 14 to 48%), the presentation of discount rates (from 10 to 54%), details of sensitivity analyses (from 21 to 61%), reporting incremental results (from 17 to 70%), and reporting a summary measure (from 57 to 74%). The quality of economic studies in obstetrics and gynecology has considerably improved in the last decade, but room for further improvement is present.

  15. The Performance of Female Medical Students in an Obstetrics and Gynecology Clerkship.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Joseph M.; Smith, Imogene K.

    1982-01-01

    A study showed that although female medical students had slightly lower National Board examination scores on part one and lower grade point averages, they performed significantly better in the obstetrics and gynecology clerkship. Possible factors include women students' interest in women's health care and female representation on the house staff.…

  16. Use of an Information Retrieval Service in an Obstetrics/Gynecology Residency Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    And Others; Gunning, John E.

    1980-01-01

    A program that uses the clinical librarian as a member of the patient care team has been developed by an obstetrics and gynecology department of a university medical center to keep faculty and hospital house staff knowledgeable about current developments and research. Program objectives, methodology, costs, evaluation, and information utilization…

  17. Student Performance on the NBME Part II Subtest and Subject Examination in Obstetrics-Gynecology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metheny, William P.; Holzman, Gerald B.

    1988-01-01

    Comparison of the scores of 342 third-year medical students on the National Board of Medical Examiners subject examination and the Part II subtest on obstetrics-gynecology found significantly better performance on the former, suggesting a need to interpret the scores differently. (Author/MSE)

  18. Introductory Course in Biomedical Ethics in the Obstetrics-Gynecology Residency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elkins, Thomas E.

    1988-01-01

    Information used in a brief lecture that introduces a biomedical ethics curriculum in an obstetrics and gynecology residency is described. Major components include theories of philosophic ethics (formalist and consequentialist) and principles of biomedical ethics (honesty, contract-keeping, nonmaleficence, justice, autonomy, beneficence,…

  19. 38 CFR 4.116 - Schedule of ratings-gynecological conditions and disorders of the breast.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., disease, injury, or adhesions of. General Rating Formula for Disease, Injury, or Adhesions of Female Reproductive Organs (diagnostic codes 7610 through 7615): Symptoms not controlled by continuous treatment 30.... 7627Malignant neoplasms of gynecological system or breast 100 Note: A rating of 100 percent shall...

  20. 38 CFR 4.116 - Schedule of ratings-gynecological conditions and disorders of the breast.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., disease, injury, or adhesions of. General Rating Formula for Disease, Injury, or Adhesions of Female Reproductive Organs (diagnostic codes 7610 through 7615): Symptoms not controlled by continuous treatment 30.... 7627Malignant neoplasms of gynecological system or breast 100 Note: A rating of 100 percent shall...

  1. 38 CFR 4.116 - Schedule of ratings-gynecological conditions and disorders of the breast.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., disease, injury, or adhesions of. General Rating Formula for Disease, Injury, or Adhesions of Female Reproductive Organs (diagnostic codes 7610 through 7615): Symptoms not controlled by continuous treatment 30.... 7627Malignant neoplasms of gynecological system or breast 100 Note: A rating of 100 percent shall...

  2. 38 CFR 4.116 - Schedule of ratings-gynecological conditions and disorders of the breast.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., disease, injury, or adhesions of. General Rating Formula for Disease, Injury, or Adhesions of Female Reproductive Organs (diagnostic codes 7610 through 7615): Symptoms not controlled by continuous treatment 30.... 7627Malignant neoplasms of gynecological system or breast 100 Note: A rating of 100 percent shall...

  3. 38 CFR 4.116 - Schedule of ratings-gynecological conditions and disorders of the breast.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., disease, injury, or adhesions of. General Rating Formula for Disease, Injury, or Adhesions of Female Reproductive Organs (diagnostic codes 7610 through 7615): Symptoms not controlled by continuous treatment 30.... 7627Malignant neoplasms of gynecological system or breast 100 Note: A rating of 100 percent shall...

  4. Gynecologic malignancies in female-to-male transgender patients: the need of original gender surveillance.

    PubMed

    Urban, Renata R; Teng, Nelson N H; Kapp, Daniel S

    2011-05-01

    We report a case of uterine cancer and invasive cervical cancer, detected incidentally during the female-to-male sex reassignment surgery. The management of these patients is presented. Such individuals may not be receiving regular gynecologic care appropriate to their remaining genital organs; symptoms of malignant disease may be missed.

  5. Laparoscopy training in Belgium: results from a nationwide survey, in urology, gynecology, and general surgery residents

    PubMed Central

    De Win, Gunter; Everaerts, Wouter; De Ridder, Dirk; Peeraer, Griet

    2015-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to investigate the exposure of Belgian residents in urology, general surgery, and gynecology to laparoscopic surgery and to training of laparoscopic skills in dedicated training facilities. Methods Three similar specialty-specific questionnaires were used to interrogate trainees in urology, general surgery, and gynecology about their exposure to laparoscopic procedures, their acquired laparoscopic experience, training patterns, training facilities, and motivation. Residents were contacted via their Belgian specialist training organization, using Survey Monkey as an online survey tool. Data were analyzed with descriptive statistics. Results The global response rate was 58%. Only 28.8% of gynecology respondents, 26.9% of urology respondents, and 52.2% of general surgery respondents felt they would be able to perform laparoscopy once they had finished their training. A total 47% of urology respondents, 66.7% of general surgery respondents, and 69.2% of gynecology respondents had a surgical skills lab that included laparoscopy within their training hospital or university. Most training programs did not follow the current evidence about proficiency-based structured simulation training with deliberate practice. Conclusion Belgian resident training facilities for laparoscopic surgery should be optimized. PMID:25674032

  6. 21 CFR 884.4530 - Obstetric-gynecologic specialized manual instrument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... umbilical cord. (4) A uterine curette is an instrument used to scrape and remove material from the uterus... cervical os by stretching the cervix. (6) A uterine elevator is an instrument inserted into the uterus used to lift and manipulate the uterus. (7) A gynecological surgical forceps is an instrument with...

  7. 21 CFR 884.4530 - Obstetric-gynecologic specialized manual instrument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... umbilical cord. (4) A uterine curette is an instrument used to scrape and remove material from the uterus... cervical os by stretching the cervix. (6) A uterine elevator is an instrument inserted into the uterus used to lift and manipulate the uterus. (7) A gynecological surgical forceps is an instrument with...

  8. 21 CFR 884.4530 - Obstetric-gynecologic specialized manual instrument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... umbilical cord. (4) A uterine curette is an instrument used to scrape and remove material from the uterus... cervical os by stretching the cervix. (6) A uterine elevator is an instrument inserted into the uterus used to lift and manipulate the uterus. (7) A gynecological surgical forceps is an instrument with...

  9. 21 CFR 884.4530 - Obstetric-gynecologic specialized manual instrument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... umbilical cord. (4) A uterine curette is an instrument used to scrape and remove material from the uterus... cervical os by stretching the cervix. (6) A uterine elevator is an instrument inserted into the uterus used to lift and manipulate the uterus. (7) A gynecological surgical forceps is an instrument with...

  10. Effects of Geographical Accessibility on the Use of Outpatient Care Services: Quasi-Experimental Evidence from Panel Count Data.

    PubMed

    Elek, Péter; Váradi, Balázs; Varga, Márton

    2015-09-01

    In 2010-2012, new outpatient service locations were established in Hungarian micro-regions, which had lacked such capacities before. We exploit this quasi-experiment to estimate the effect of geographical accessibility on outpatient case numbers using both individual-level and semi-aggregate panel data. We find a 24-27 per cent increase of case numbers as a result of the establishments. Our specialty-by-specialty estimates imply that a 1-min reduction of travel time to the nearest outpatient unit increases case numbers for example by 0.9 per cent in internal care and 3.1 per cent in rheumatology. The size of the new outpatient capacities has a separate effect, raising the possibility of the presence of supplier-induced demand. By combining a fixed-effects logit and a fixed-effects truncated Poisson estimator, we decompose the effects into increases in the probability of ever visiting a doctor on the one hand and an increase of the frequency of visits on the other hand. We find that new visits were dominant in the vast majority of specialties, whereas both margins were important for example in rheumatology. Finally, we demonstrate the usefulness of the fixed-effects truncated Poisson estimator in modelling count data by examining its robustness by simulations.

  11. A Posterior TAP Block Provides More Effective Analgesia Than a Lateral TAP Block in Patients Undergoing Laparoscopic Gynecologic Surgery: A Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Yoshiyama, Sakatoshi; Ueshima, Hironobu; Sakai, Ryomi; Otake, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Background. There are a few papers that compared the lateral transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block with the posterior TAP block. Our study aimed to compare retrospectively the quality of analgesia after laparoscopic gynecologic surgery using the lateral TAP block with general anesthesia versus the posterior TAP block with general anesthesia. Method. Sixty-seven adult female patients were included in this retrospective study. Of these patients, thirty-four patients received the lateral TAP block with general anesthesia (lat. TAP group), and the rest of thirty-three patients received the posterior TAP block with general anesthesia (pos. TAP group). Pain scores both at rest and at movement and the use of additional analgesic drugs were recorded in the postoperative care unit within twenty-four hours after the operation. Postoperative complications were noted. Results. Patients who received pos. TAP reported lower visual analog scale (VAS) pain scores in all points, within twenty-four hours after the operation, than patients who received lat. TAP. Moreover, with the use of additional analgesic drugs, the incidence of nausea and vomiting during the first twenty-four hours after surgery was lower in the pos. TAP group than in the lat. TAP group. Conclusion. The posterior TAP block provided more effective analgesia than the lateral TAP block in patients undergoing laparoscopic gynecologic surgery. PMID:26941794

  12. Comparison of Women in Department Leadership in Obstetrics and Gynecology With Other Specialties

    PubMed Central

    Hofler, Lisa G.; Hacker, Michele R.; Dodge, Laura E.; Schutzberg, Rose; Ricciotti, Hope A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare the representation of women in Obstetrics and Gynecology department-based leadership to other clinical specialties, while accounting for proportions of women in historical residency cohorts. Methods This was a cross-sectional observational study. The gender of department-based leaders (chair, vice chair, division director) and residency program directors was determined from websites of 950 academic departments of Anesthesiology, Diagnostic Radiology, General Surgery, Internal Medicine, Neurology, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Pathology, Pediatrics, and Psychiatry. Each specialty's representation ratio—proportion of leadership roles held by women in 2013 divided by proportion of residents in 1990 who were women—and 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated. A ratio of one indicates proportionate representation. Results Women were significantly under-represented among chairs for all specialties (ratios ≤0.60, P≤0.02) and division directors for all specialties except Anesthesiology (ratio: 1.13, 95% CI: 0.87–1.46) and Diagnostic Radiology (ratio: 0.97, 95% CI: 0.81–1.16). The representation ratio for vice chair was below 1.0 for all specialties except Anesthesiology; this finding reached statistical significance only for Pathology, Pediatrics, and Psychiatry. Women were significantly over-represented as residency program directors in General Surgery, Anesthesiology, Obstetrics and Gynecology, and Pediatrics (ratios >1.19, P≤0.046). Obstetrics and Gynecology and Pediatrics had the highest proportions of residents in 1990 and department leaders in 2013 who were women. Conclusion Despite having the largest proportion of leaders who were women, representation ratios demonstrate Obstetrics and Gynecology is behind other specialties in progression of women to departmental leadership. Women's over-representation as residency program directors raises concern because education-based academic tracks may not lead to major leadership roles. PMID

  13. Determinants of pelvic organ prolapse among gynecologic patients in Bahir Dar, North West Ethiopia: a case–control study

    PubMed Central

    Asresie, Ayalnesh; Admassu, Eleni; Setegn, Tesfaye

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Pelvic organ prolapse (POP) is a significant public health problem in developing countries including Ethiopia. However, less has been documented on risk factors of POP. Therefore, the aim of this study was to identify the determinants factors of POP. Methods An unmatched case–control study was conducted among gynecologic patients in Bahir Dar city, North West Ethiopia, from July to October 2014. A total of 370 women (selected from outpatient departments) were included in the study. Cases (clients with stage III or IV POP) and controls (who declared free of any stages of POP) were identified by physicians using the Pelvic Organ Prolapse Quantitative Examination tool. Data analysis was carried out by SPSS version 20.0. Descriptive, bivariate, and multivariable logistic regression analyses were performed. Statistical differences were considered at P<0.05, and the strength of association was assessed by odds ratio (OR) and respective confidence intervals (CIs). Results This study revealed that determinants such as age of women (>40 years) (adjusted OR [AOR] =3.0 [95% CI: 1.59–5.89]), sphincter damage (AOR =8.1 [95% CI: 1.67–39.7]), family history of POP (AOR =4.9 [95% CI: 1.94–12.63]), parity (≥4) (AOR =4.5 [95% CI: 2.26–9.10]), nonattendance of formal education (AOR =4.3 [95% CI: 1.25–14.8]), carrying heavy objects (AOR =3.1 [95% CI: 1.56–6.30]), body mass index (BMI) <18.5 kg/m2 (AOR =3.1 [95% CI: 1.22–7.82]), and delivery assisted by nonhealth professionals (AOR =2.6 [95% CI: 1.24–5.56]) were significantly associated with POP. Conclusion In our study, sphincter damage, family history of POP, being uneducated, having ≥4 vaginal deliveries, carrying heavy objects, BMI <18.5 kg/m2, age ≥40 years, and having delivery assisted by nonhealth professional were the independent determinants of POP. Therefore, skilled delivery, further promoting family planning and girls’ education, early pelvic floor assessment, and counseling on

  14. Association between human resources and risk of hospitalisation in end-stage renal disease outpatients receiving haemodialysis: a longitudinal cohort study using claim data during 2013–2014

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hoon-Hee; Han, Kyu-Tae; Nam, Chung Mo; Moon, Ki Tae; Kim, Woorim; Park, Eun-Cheol

    2016-01-01

    Objective The number of patients requiring haemodialysis has gradually increased in South Korea. Owing to this growth, concerns have been raised regarding haemodialysis quality of care, and healthcare professionals must consider alternatives for appropriate management of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Therefore, we investigated the association between risk of hospitalisation of outpatients who received haemodialysis due to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and the human resources of the haemodialysis unit. Setting We used data from National Health Insurance (NHI) claims during October 2013 to September 2014. Participants These data comprised 40 543 outpatients with ESRD (4 751 047 outpatient cases) who received haemodialysis. Interventions No interventions were made. Outcome measure We performed Poisson regression analysis using a generalised estimating equation that included both patient and haemodialysis unit characteristics to examine the factors associated with hospitalisation of outpatients with ESRD. Results Among 4 751 047 outpatient cases, 27 997 (0.59%) were hospitalised during the study period. A higher proportion of haemodialysis patient care specialists and a higher number of nurses experienced in haemodialysis were inversely associated with the risk of hospitalisation (per 10% increase in haemodialysis patient care specialists: relative risk (RR)=0.987, 95% CI 0.981 to 0.993; per 10-person increase in nurses who provided haemodialysis: RR=0.876, 95% CI 0.833 to 0.921). In addition, such associations were greater in severe patients. Conclusions Our findings suggest that haemodialysis units with high-quality, haemodialysis-specialised human resources could positively affect the outcomes of outpatients with ESRD. Based on our findings, health policymakers and professionals should implement strategies for the optimal management of patients with CKD. PMID:27534988

  15. Lifestyle of Hemodialysis Patients in Comparison with Outpatients

    PubMed Central

    Moghadasian, Sima; Sahebi Hagh, Mohammad Hasan; Aghaallah Hokmabadi, Leila

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Nowadays, the chronic diseases are known to be associated with lifestyle risk factors. Hemodialysis patients encounter considerable amount of physical, mental and social pressure. Lifestyle is important because it affects quality of life and has important role in prevention. This study aimed to compare the lifestyle of hemodialysis patients and outpatients in health clinics of Tabriz. Methods: This was a case-control study on 155 hemodialysis patients and 155 outpatients referring to five dialysis centers and clinics, who met the inclusion criteria. Demographic data and some questions about lifestyle in nutrition, stress, physical activity and smoking were asked. Results: The history of hypertension among hemodialysis patients was 34.6% greater than outpatients. High daily salt consumption (more than two tablespoons a day) was 40.5% higher among hemodialysis patients than outpatients. In terms of saturated oil intake, it was 30.8%higher among hemodialysis patients. Problem in communicating with family members was 69.8% higher in hemodialysis patients. In terms of physical activity, 46.4% of outpatients had higher physical activity like walking. Conclusion: Lifestyle in different dimensions was associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD); therefore, the officials of health system are recommended to develop a program to combat chronic diseases and integrate it with providing the first-level health services. It seems that public education can have a major role in life-style modification and in chronic kidney diseases prevention. PMID:25276683

  16. Patterns of Psychiatric Outpatient Practice in Taiwan: A Nationwide Survey

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Ying-Xiu; Chen, Mu-Hong; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Lin, Ming-Hwai

    2016-01-01

    (1) Background: Limited studies have utilized nationwide data to assess the patterns of psychiatric practice in other countries. In this study, data from the National Health Insurance Research Database in Taiwan (NHIRD-TW) for 2012 was analyzed to determine the patterns of psychiatric outpatient practice in Taiwan; (2) Methods: To determine the patterns of psychiatric outpatient practice in Taiwan, the data were drawn from the datasets of Taiwan’s National Health Insurance Research Database for 2012, with 619,760 records of outpatient visits representing 1/500 of all the claims in Taiwan for that year. The analysis of psychiatric outpatient visits included patient demographics, diagnoses, and prescribed medications; (3) Results: Neurotic disorders were the most prevalent diagnoses (43.1%, n = 5714). Hypnotics-sedatives and anxiolytics were prescribed in 51.7% (n = 6850) and 39.1% (n = 5181) of psychiatric visits, respectively, with zolpidem being the most commonly prescribed drug (22.6%, n = 2998); and (4) Conclusion: Hypnotics and sedatives were widely prescribed for the outpatient population, and zolpidem had the highest annual prevalence of use. These findings deserve the attention of clinicians and policy makers for monitoring the abuse and dependence of these agents and subsequent adverse events. PMID:27690067

  17. Comparison of Antibiograms Developed for Inpatients and Primary Care Outpatients

    PubMed Central

    McGregor, Jessina C.; Bearden, David T.; Townes, John M.; Sharp, Susan E.; Gorman, Paul N.; Elman, Miriam R.; Mori, Motomi; Smith, David H.

    2013-01-01

    To support antimicrobial stewardship, some healthcare systems have begun creating outpatient antibiograms. We developed inpatient and primary care outpatient antibiograms for a regional health maintenance organization (HMO) and academic healthcare system (AHS). Antimicrobial susceptibilities from 16,428 Enterococcus, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa cultures from 2010 were summarized and compared. Methicillin susceptibility among S. aureus was similar in inpatients and primary care outpatients (HMO: 61.2% vs. 61.9%, p=0.951; AHS: 62.9% vs. 63.3%, p>0.999). E. coli susceptibility to trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole was also similar (HMO: 81.8% vs. 83.6%, p=0.328; AHS: 77.2% vs. 80.9%, p=0.192), but ciprofloxacin susceptibility differed (HMO: 88.9% vs. 94.6%, p<0.001; AHS: 81.2% vs. 90.6%, p<0.001). In the HMO, ciprofloxacin-susceptible P. aeruginosa were more frequent in primary care outpatients than inpatients (91.4% vs. 79.0%, p=0.007). Comparison of cumulative susceptibilities across settings yielded no consistent patterns; therefore, outpatient primary care antibiograms may more accurately inform prudent empiric antibiotic prescribing. PMID:23541690

  18. Ambient Air Pollution, Meteorological Factors and Outpatient Visits for Eczema in Shanghai, China: A Time-Series Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qiao; Yang, Yingying; Chen, Renjie; Kan, Haidong; Song, Weimin; Tan, Jianguo; Xu, Feng; Xu, Jinhua

    2016-01-01

    Environmental irritants are important risk factors for skin diseases, but little is known about the influence of environmental factors on eczema incidence. In this time-series study, our objective was to examine the associations of environmental factors with outpatient visits for eczema. Daily outpatient visits between 2007 and 2011 (1826 days) were collected from Huashan Hospital in Shanghai, China. We used an overdispersed generalized additive model to investigate the short-term association between environmental factors and outpatient visits for eczema. Daily outpatient visits for eczema were significantly associated with air pollution and meteorological factors. For example, a 10 μg/m3 increase of 7-day (lag 06) average concentrations of PM10 (particulate matter no greater than 10 microns), SO2, NO2 was associated with 0.81% (95% confidence intervals (CI) 0.39%, 1.22%), 2.22% (95% CI: 1.27%, 3.16%) and 2.31% (95% CI: 1.17%, 3.45%) increase in outpatient visits for eczema, respectively. A 10 °C elevation of temperature on lag 0 day were associated with 8.44% (95% CI: 4.66%, 12.22%) increase in eczema visits, whereas 10 unit decrease of 7-day average relative humidity were associated with 10.86% (95% CI: 8.83%, 12.89%) increase in eczema visits. This study provided clear evidence of ambient air pollution, high temperature and low relative humidity on increasing the incidence of eczema in Shanghai, China. PMID:27834842

  19. Effect of intraoperative intravenous lidocaine on postoperative pain and return of bowel function after laparoscopic abdominal gynecologic procedures.

    PubMed

    Grady, Philip; Clark, Nathaniel; Lenahan, John; Oudekerk, Christopher; Hawkins, Robert; Nezat, Greg; Pellegrini, Joseph E

    2012-08-01

    Abdominal surgery has a high incidence of postoperative pain and dysfunctional gastrointestinal motility. This study investigated the effect of a continuous intraoperative infusion of lidocaine on patients undergoing laparoscopic gynecologic surgery. In this double-blind, placebo-controlled investigation, 50 subjects were randomly assigned to control and experimental groups. Both groups received an intravenous lidocaine bolus of 1 mg/kg on induction. The experimental group received a continuous lidocaine infusion of 2 mg/kg/h, initiated following induction and discontinued 15 to 30 minutes before skin closure. Controls received a placebo infusion. Patients in the experimental group had lower postoperative day 3 pain scores using a verbal analog scale (P = .02). Morphine equivalent dose at second request for pain treatment in the postoperative anesthesia care unit was lower in the experimental group (P = .02). There was a statistically significant difference in time interval from surgical start to return of first flatus between the groups (P = .02). Data were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics. A P value less than .05 was considered significant. These study results are consistent with previous research suggesting that intraoperative lidocaine infusion may improve postoperative pain levels and may shorten the time to return of bowel function.

  20. Why the evidence for outpatient commitment is good enough.

    PubMed

    Swanson, Jeffrey W; Swartz, Marvin S

    2014-06-01

    After nearly three decades of studies evaluating the legal practice of involuntary outpatient commitment, there is yet little consensus about its effectiveness and only limited implementation. Debate continues over how best to assist adults with serious mental illnesses who are unable or unwilling to participate in prescribed community treatment and as a result experience repeated involuntary hospitalizations or involvement with the criminal justice system. The authors comment on the Oxford Community Treatment Order Evaluation Trial (OCTET), a recently conducted randomized trial of outpatient commitment, and discuss the limitations of the study's design for resolving the persistent question of whether compulsory treatment is more effective than purely voluntary treatment for this difficult-to-reach target population. The authors conclude that the search for a definitive and generalizable randomized trial of outpatient commitment may be a quixotic quest; the field should, rather, welcome the results of well-conducted, large-scale, quasi-experimental and naturalistic studies with rigorous multivariable statistical controls.

  1. [Outpatient anesthesia--the office-based anesthetist].

    PubMed

    Fischer, Guntram

    2013-03-01

    The aim of the present article is to describe the field of activity and prevailing conditions for office-based anesthetists in Germany. From the introduction of outpatient operations on the basis of actual numbers, data and facts, we present the project profile and the structures of the different fields of activity and practice constellations for office-based anesthesiology. Particular emphasis is placed on the requirements for room space and technical facilities, the criteria for patient selection, and the structural and procedural quality as well as quality management of outpatient anesthesia. With the aid of current numerical data the anesthetic procedures performed in the outpatient field through to the possibilities for development of continuous regional anesthetic procedures in catheter technique are illustrated. In conclusion, we discuss the economic conditions and the health-care economic significance together with a description of the current health-care quality of ambulant anesthesiology and the possibilities for participation in an error-reporting system.

  2. Continuity of outpatient and inpatient care for hospitalized older adults

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Gulshan; Fletcher, Kathlyn E.; Zhang, Dong; Kuo, Yong-Fang; Freeman, Jean L.; Goodwin, James S.

    2009-01-01

    Context Little is known about the extent of continuity of care across the transition from outpatient care to hospitalization. Objective To describe continuity of care in older hospitalized patients, its change over time, and factors associated with discontinuity. Design, Setting and Participants Retrospective cohort study of hospital admissions from a 5% national sample of Medicare patients between1996 and 2006 (n=3,020,770). Main Outcome Measures Percent of hospitalized patients who were seen while hospitalized by any outpatient physician they had seen in the year prior to hospitalization (Continuity with any outpatient physician) or by their primary care physician (Continuity with a PCP). Results In 1996, 50.5% (95% CI: 50.3% – 50.7%, n=125,789) of hospitalized patients saw at least one physician that they had seen in an outpatient setting in the prior year, whereas 44.3% (95% CI: 44.1% – 44.6%, n=58,046) of patients with an identifiable PCP saw that physician while hospitalized. These percentages had dropped to 39.8% (95% CI: 39.6%–40.0%, n=99,463) and 31.9% (95% CI: 31.6%–32.1%, n=47,761), respectively, by 2006. Greater absolute declines in continuity with any outpatient physician from 1996 to 2006 occurred in patients admitted on weekends (13.9%, 95% CI: 12.9%– 14.7%), those living in large metropolitan areas (11.7%, 95% CI: 11.1% – 12.3%) and in New England (16.2%, 95% CI: 14.4% – 18.0%). In multivariable, multilevel models, increasing involvement of hospitalists was associated with approximately one third of the decrease in continuity of care from 1996 to 2006. Conclusion Between 1996 and 2006, physician continuity from outpatient to inpatient settings declined in the Medicare population. PMID:19383958

  3. Association of hospital ownership with patient transfers to outpatient care under a prospective payment system in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Lin, Herng-Ching; Xirasagar, Sudha; Kao, Senyeong

    2004-07-01

    Case payment, a prospective payment system akin to diagnosis-related groups (DRGs) has in-built incentives for hospitals to transfer inpatients to their own ambulatory care units following early discharge. This study used nation-wide inpatient claims data on a total of 100,730 patients treated in 2000 in (Taiwan): cesarean section (59,364 cases), femoral/inguinal hernia operation (18,675 cases), and hemorrhoidectomy (22,691 cases), all reimbursed by case payment, to explore the relationship between hospital ownership and patient transfers to outpatient treatment. For all three diagnoses, for-profit (FP) hospitals not only had lower lengths of stay (LOS) compared to public hospitals, but also showed very high odds of patient transfer to their own outpatient units, after controlling for institutional variables, (hospital level, teaching status, and geographic location), hospital competitive environment (the Herfindal-Hirschman index), and patient variables (gender, age, length of stay, and number of secondary diagnoses, a proxy for severity of illness). Similar, though slightly lower odds were observed with not-for-profit (NFP) hospitals relative to public hospitals. The findings support the property rights theory, suggesting that in Taiwan, institutional profit maximization motives may be driving patient transfers under the case payment diagnoses, rather than medical care needs. In NFP hospitals, their physician compensation mechanism, driven largely by care volumes provided by each physician, appears to be driving the disproportionately greater likelihood of patient transfer to outpatient care.

  4. Voting preferences of outpatients with chronic mental illness in Germany.

    PubMed

    Bullenkamp, Jens; Voges, Burkhard

    2004-12-01

    Outpatients with chronic mental illness living in therapeutic residential facilities in Mannheim, Germany (N=110) responded to an opinion poll to determine their voting preferences for the 2002 federal election to the Bundestag. The poll found that the outpatients were significantly more likely than the general population in Mannheim to prefer left-wing parties (78 percent compared with 56 percent). This finding is in contrast to earlier reports; however, it seems to better reflect common beliefs about the political preferences of this population. In conclusion, persons with chronic mental illness seem to prefer political parties that they believe will best serve their perceived specific interests.

  5. Port central venous catheters-associated bloodstream infection during outpatient-based chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Mauri, Davide; Roumbkou, Sofia; Michalopoulou, Stella; Tsali, Lamprini; Spiliopoulou, Anastasia; Panou, Charalampos; Valachis, Antonis; Panagopoulos, Angelos; Polyzos, Nikolaos P

    2010-12-01

    Central venous catheters (CVCs) are commonly used for the administration of intravenous chemotherapy in outpatient setting. Nevertheless, outbreaks of catheter-associated bloodstream infections had been reported from oncology centers. We describe a large outbreak of CVCs-associated Klebsiella oxytoca bloodstream infection, occurring in an oncology chemotherapy outpatient unit of northern Greece between October 2006 and May 2007. The outbreak involved approximately 10% of the patients with CVCs who were receiving home-based chemotherapy, and it represents the second larger outbreak of CVCs-associated BSIs due to Klebsiella oxytoca in oncology outpatient centers. We retrospectively analyzed the chain of investigations and prophylactic/diagnostic measures taken to eradicate the infection: (1) patients' chart audit, (2) estimation of the infection among asymptomatic patients, (3) implementation of the level of awareness of medical and paramedical personnel, (4) collection of samples from environment, medications and infusion materials, (5) critical appraisal of chemotherapeutical schemes and (6) cooperation with peripheral institutions. The isolation of Klebsiella oxytoca in a chemotherapy solution (infusional 5-FU in dextrose 5% solution within a 48 h pump) from a peripheral General Hospital and the prompt transmission of the data to the chemotherapy center played a key role for the management of the infection cluster. This is the first report that evidenced the detection of Klebsiella oxytoca within a chemotherapeutical preparation. Data transmission from peripheral hospitals to the central institution resulted in an important feedback that allowed a better estimation of the infection cluster and more tailored actions for the eradication of the infection.

  6. Effects of wound closure on wound healing in gynecologic surgery: a systematic literature review.

    PubMed

    Boesch, Cedric E; Umek, Wolfgang

    2009-03-01

    A systematic review was undertaken using the Cochrane and PubMed databases to answer the question of how wound closure affects wound healing after gynecologic surgery. Leaving the vaginal vault open after vaginal and abdominal hysterectomy is as safe as closing it. When closing the vaginal vault, there is no difference between sutures and staples. Nonclosure of the peritoneum is a safe method after vaginal and abdominal hysterectomy. After laparotomy there is no difference between continuous and interrupted sutures regarding wound infection and/or dehiscence. After vertical midline incisions it is possible to close Camper's fascia, use drainage or close the skin only. The overall wound complication rate after laparoscopic surgery is lower when using transcutaneous as compared to subcuticular sutures. Adhesive paper tapes save time when closing smaller skin incisions. In conclusion, specific wound closure techniques improve wound healing after gynecologic operations.

  7. Contemporary issues in obstetrics and gynecology for the consultation-liaison psychiatrist.

    PubMed

    Stotland, N L

    1985-10-01

    Medical advances in obstetrics and gynecology, combined with the depersonalization of health care and changes in sexual and reproductive behaviors in the general population, lead to challenging new problems for the psychiatric consultant who deals with reproductive issues. The author describes contemporary issues encountered in consultation-liaison work with the obstetrics and gynecology service in a general hospital. They include the reproductive implications of medical illnesses, the stress of deciding whether to continue a pregnancy known to carry genetic risk, the intrusiveness of certain options for dealing with infertility, parental expectations for a perfect baby, and the difficulties some traditional practitioners have in adapting their practice styles to the changing needs of the patient population.

  8. Improving care for women after gynecological cancer: the development of a sexuality clinic.

    PubMed

    Barbera, Lisa; Fitch, Margaret; Adams, Lauran; Doyle, Catherine; Dasgupta, Tracey; Blake, Jennifer

    2011-12-01

    The impact of a gynecological cancer diagnosis and the subsequent treatment on women is profound, both physically and psychologically, in particular with respect to sexual function and sexuality. We describe our experience creating a specialized clinic to address concerns about sexual health and rehabilitation. We used a case study approach to describe the clinic's inception and first 2 years of operation. Fifty-six survivors of gynecological cancer were seen at the clinic in the first 2 years. These patients had a significant symptom burden, many related to menopause, as well as those aftereffects of radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and surgical operation as well as psychological and emotional responses to cancer. The most common interventions were education and counseling. Patients reported high levels of satisfaction with their experience at the clinic. We hope our experience may be of assistance to others considering a similar endeavor.

  9. Surgical manual of the Korean Gynecologic Oncology Group: ovarian, tubal, and peritoneal cancers

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    The Surgery Treatment Modality Committee of the Korean Gynecologic Oncology Group has determined to develop a surgical manual to facilitate clinical trials and to improve communication between investigators by standardizing and precisely describing operating procedures. The literature on anatomic terminology, identification of surgical components, and surgical techniques were reviewed and discussed in depth to develop a surgical manual for gynecologic oncology. The surgical procedures provided here represent the minimum requirements for participating in a clinical trial. These procedures should be described in the operation record form, and the pathologic findings obtained from the procedures should be recorded in the pathologic report form. Here, we describe surgical procedure for ovarian, fallopian tubal, and peritoneal cancers. PMID:27670260

  10. Gynecologic cancer screening and communication with health care providers in women with Lynch syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Burton-Chase, AM; Hovick, SR; Sun, CC; Boyd-Rogers, S; Lynch, PM; Lu, KH; Peterson, SK

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated knowledge of gynecologic cancer screening recommendations, screening behaviors, and communication with providers among women with Lynch syndrome (LS). Women aged ≥25 years who were at risk for LS-associated cancers completed a semi-structured interview and a questionnaire. Of 74 participants (mean age 40 years), 61% knew the appropriate age to begin screening, 75–80% correctly identified the recommended screening frequency, and 84% reported no previous screening endometrial biopsy. Women initiated discussions with their providers about their LS cancer risks, but many used nonspecific terms or relied on family history. Most were not offered high-risk screening options. While many women were aware of risk-appropriate LS screening guidelines, adherence was suboptimal. Improving communication between women and their providers regarding LS-related gynecologic cancer risk and screening options may help improve adherence. PMID:23906188

  11. Overcoming Electronic Medical Record Challenges on the Obstetrics and Gynecology Clerkship.

    PubMed

    Buery-Joyner, Samantha D; Dalrymple, John L; Abbott, Jodi F; Craig, LaTasha B; Forstein, David A; Graziano, Scott C; Hampton, Brittany S; Hopkins, Laura; Page-Ramsey, Sarah M; Pradhan, Archana; Wolf, Abigail; Mckenzie, Margaret L

    2015-09-01

    This article, for the "To the Point" series prepared by the Association of Professors of Gynecology and Obstetrics Undergraduate Medical Education Committee, supplies educators with a review of best practices regarding incorporation of the electronic medical record (EMR) into undergraduate medical education. The unique circumstances of the obstetrics and gynecology clerkship require specific attention as it pertains to medical student use of the EMR. An outline of the regulatory requirements and authoritative body recommendations provides some guidance for implementation in the undergraduate medical education setting. A review of the basic framework for development of an EMR curriculum and examples of curricular innovations published in the literature offers solutions for obstacles that may be encountered by students and medical educators.

  12. The role of obstetrics and gynecology national societies during natural disasters.

    PubMed

    Lalonde, André; Adrien, Lauré

    2015-07-01

    When a natural disaster occurs, such as an earthquake, floods, or a tsunami, the international response is quick. However, there is no organized strategy in place to address obstetric and gynecological (ob/gyn) emergencies. International organizations and national ob/gyn societies do not have an organized plan and rely on the good will of volunteers. Too often, local specialists are ignored and are not involved in the response. The massive earthquake in Haiti in 2010 exemplifies the lack of coordinated response involving national organizations following the disaster. The Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada (SOGC) engaged rapidly with Haitian colleagues in response to the obstetric and gynecological emergencies. An active strategy is proposed.

  13. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) Pathway as a Therapeutic Target in Gynecologic Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Frumovitz, Michael; Sood, Anil K.

    2007-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) plays a critical role in angiogenesis, which is required for tumor growth and metastasis. In this article, a review of the functional and biological roles of the VEGF pathway in driving angiogenesis and growth of gynecologic malignancies was performed. Based on the biological functions of VEGF, multiple approaches for targeting the VEGF/VEGF-receptor complex have been developed and many of these have demonstrated substantial activity in preclinical models. These promising data have led to rapid clinical development of VEGF-targeted agents. Therefore, we also assessed the status of VEGF-targeted therapies and associated toxicities in gynecologic malignancies. However, many questions remain related to optimal dosing, sequencing of therapies, management of toxicities, appropriate patient selection, and assessment of response, which will require further studies. Nevertheless, VEGF-targeted therapies offer hope for improving the outcome of cancer patients. PMID:17306693

  14. Capabilities of OCT in diagnosing pathological processes, functional states, and treatment adequacy in gynecology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakhova, Natalia M.; Kachalina, Tatiana S.; Kuznetzova, Irina N.; Chumakov, Yuri; Feldchtein, Felix I.; Gelikonov, Valentin M.; Gelikonov, Grigory V.; Gladkova, Natalia D.; Kamensky, Vladislav A.; Kuranov, Roman V.; Sergeev, Alexander M.

    1999-01-01

    We report on the results of using the optical coherence tomography (OCT) as one of the diagnostic methods at the Department of Gynecology of the Nizhny Novgorod Regional Hospital. An endoscopic OCT device adjusted for gynecological examinations with colposcopy, hysteroscopy and laparoscopy has been developed at the Institute of Applied Physics. It provides clinicians with sharp (up to 15 - 20 micron resolution) images of 1.5 mm thick superficial mucosa layers in the female genital tract, that are recorded at the 0.83 micron wavelength with approximately 1 frame/second rate for a 200 X 200 pixel image. Data obtained during examination of more than 100 patients demonstrate the capability of OCT in estimation of structural alterations in organs, connected with different types of pathologies and functional states of the female genital system. We present first results of OCT application to assess the adequacy of cervical pathologies treatment (electro-, laser surgery and cryotherapy) and to control the healing process.

  15. Infections with human coronaviruses NL63 and OC43 among hospitalised and outpatient individuals in São Paulo, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Cabeça, Tatiane Karen; Carraro, Emerson; Watanabe, Aripuanã; Granato, Celso; Bellei, Nancy

    2012-08-01

    The incidence and clinical features of human coronaviruses (HCoVs) among Brazilian patients with respiratory illness are not well known. We investigated the prevalence of HCoVs among Brazilian outpatients and hospitalised patients with respiratory illnesses during 2009 and 2010. To identify the HCoVs, pancoronavirus and species-specific reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction assays were performed. Five of 394 samples were positive for HCoVs (1.2%): 1/182 (0.5%) outpatients and 4/212 (1.8%) hospitalised patients. The OC43 and NL63 HCoVs were identified. Two patients were admitted to the intensive care unit. Underlying chronic disease was reported in cases and one diabetic adult died. HCoVs can cause lower respiratory infections and hospitalisation. Patients with pre-existing conditions and respiratory infections should be evaluated for HCoV infections.

  16. Role of Gamma Knife® Radiosurgery for the Treatment of Brain Metastases from Gynecological Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Ismail, Rahim; Potrebko, Peter S; Pepe, Julie; Wu, Meiling; Saigal, Kunal; Biagioli, Matthew; Shridhar, Ravi; Holloway, Robert; Field, Melvin; Rao, Nikhil G

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Gamma Knife® (GK) (Elekta Instruments, Stockholm, Sweden) radiosurgery is well established for treatment of brain metastases. There are limited data on patients treated with GK from gynecological cancers. The authors sought to determine the effectiveness of the GK in patients with brain metastases from gynecological cancers. Methods: An IRB-approved database was queried for patients with gynecologic cancers treated with GK between June 1996 and May 2016. Imaging studies were reviewed post-SRS (stereotactic radiosurgery) to evaluate local control (LC) and distant brain control (DC). Overall survival (OS), local control, and distant brain control were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier (KM) method and log-rank test.  Results: Thirty-three patients underwent SRS for 73 separate cranial lesions. The median age was ­58.5 years, and 17 (52%) also had extracranial metastases. Ten (30%) patients had previously received whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT), and 11 (33%) underwent concurrent WBRT. The median tumor volume was 0.96 cm3. Median radiographic follow-up was 11 months. At the time of treatment, 39% of patients were categorized as recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) Class I, 55% as RPA Class II, and 6% as RPA Class III. The local failure rate was 8%. Five patients (15%) developed new brain lesions outside the radiation field with a median progression-free survival (PFS) of seven (range: 3-9) months. Median OS was 15 months from GK treatment. One-year OS was 72.9% from GK treatment. Primary cancer histology was a significant predictor of OS, favoring ovarian and endometrial cancer (p = 0.03). Conclusions: Gamma Knife stereotactic radiosurgery for gynecologic brain metastases leads to excellent control rates of treated lesions. Primary histology may have a significant impact on OS following GK, with improved survival seen with ovarian and cervical cancer following Gamma Knife radiosurgery (p = 0.03). PMID:28168125

  17. Assessment of Sexual Activity and Dysfunction in Medically Underserved Women with Gynecologic Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Bradford, Andrea; Fellman, Bryan; Urbauer, Diana; Gallegos, Jessica; Meaders, Kristen; Tung, Celestine; Ramondetta, Lois

    2015-01-01

    Background Sexual dysfunction is a common long-term side effect of treatments for gynecologic cancer. Studies of sexual problems in gynecologic cancer survivors overrepresent White non-Hispanic, highly educated, and married women. Less is known about the sexual health needs of women in medically underserved populations. We therefore conducted a study to characterize sexual activity and sexual function in this population. Methods We recruited patients attending two gynecologic oncology clinics in a large public healthcare system that primarily serves uninsured and low-income patients. Participants were invited to complete a one-time survey to assess sexual function, sexual communication, sexual distress, relationship adjustment, depression, anxiety, prior help-seeking and help-seeking preferences, and reasons for sexual inactivity. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and multivariate models to predict sexual activity status and sexual dysfunction. Results Among 243 participants, the majority (n=160, 65.8%) were not sexually active in the past 4 weeks, most often due to lack of a partner or lack of desire for sex. Just over one-fourth of sexually active participants were identified as likely cases of sexual dysfunction. Greater endorsement of depressive symptoms predicted both sexual inactivity and sexual dysfunction in multivariate analyses. Prior help-seeking for sexual problems was uncommon; however, a significant minority of participants expressed interest in receiving care for sexual problems. Conclusions Gynecologic cancer survivors in our medically underserved population have high rates of sexual inactivity and sexual dysfunction. Future research should identify feasible strategies to address barriers to sexual health care in low-resource settings. PMID:26325527

  18. The Important Roles of Steroid Sulfatase and Sulfotransferases in Gynecological Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Rižner, Tea Lanišnik

    2016-01-01

    Gynecological diseases such as endometriosis, adenomyosis and uterine fibroids, and gynecological cancers including endometrial cancer and ovarian cancer, affect a large proportion of women. These diseases are estrogen dependent, and their progression often depends on local estrogen formation. In peripheral tissues, estrogens can be formed from the inactive precursors dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate and estrone sulfate. Sulfatase and sulfotransferases have pivotal roles in these processes, where sulfatase hydrolyzes estrone sulfate to estrone, and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate to dehydroepiandrosterone, and sulfotransferases catalyze the reverse reactions. Further activation of estrone to the most potent estrogen, estradiol, is catalyzed by 17-ketosteroid reductases, while estradiol can also be formed from dehydroepiandrosterone by the sequential actions of 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase-Δ4-isomerase, aromatase, and 17-ketosteroid reductase. This review introduces the sulfatase and sulfotransferase enzymes, in terms of their structures and reaction mechanisms, and the regulation and different transcripts of their genes, together with the importance of their currently known single nucleotide polymorphisms. Data on expression of sulfatase and sulfotransferases in gynecological diseases are also reviewed. There are often unchanged mRNA and protein levels in diseased tissue, with higher sulfatase activities in cancerous endometrium, ovarian cancer cell lines, and adenomyosis. This can be indicative of a disturbed balance between the sulfatase and sulfotransferases enzymes, defining the potential for sulfatase as a drug target for treatment of gynecological diseases. Finally, clinical trials with sulfatase inhibitors are discussed, where two inhibitors have already concluded phase II trials, although so far with no convincing clinical outcomes for patients with endometrial cancer and endometriosis. PMID:26924986

  19. EM-navigated catheter placement for gynecologic brachytherapy: an accuracy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehrtash, Alireza; Damato, Antonio; Pernelle, Guillaume; Barber, Lauren; Farhat, Nabgha; Viswanathan, Akila; Cormack, Robert; Kapur, Tina

    2014-03-01

    Gynecologic malignancies, including cervical, endometrial, ovarian, vaginal and vulvar cancers, cause significant mortality in women worldwide. The standard care for many primary and recurrent gynecologic cancers consists of chemoradiation followed by brachytherapy. In high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy, intracavitary applicators and /or interstitial needles are placed directly inside the cancerous tissue so as to provide catheters to deliver high doses of radiation. Although technology for the navigation of catheters and needles is well developed for procedures such as prostate biopsy, brain biopsy, and cardiac ablation, it is notably lacking for gynecologic HDR brachytherapy. Using a benchtop study that closely mimics the clinical interstitial gynecologic brachytherapy procedure, we developed a method for evaluating the accuracy of image-guided catheter placement. Future bedside translation of this technology offers the potential benefit of maximizing tumor coverage during catheter placement while avoiding damage to the adjacent organs, for example bladder, rectum and bowel. In the study, two independent experiments were performed on a phantom model to evaluate the targeting accuracy of an electromagnetic (EM) tracking system. The procedure was carried out using a laptop computer (2.1GHz Intel Core i7 computer, 8GB RAM, Windows 7 64-bit), an EM Aurora tracking system with a 1.3mm diameter 6 DOF sensor, and 6F (2 mm) brachytherapy catheters inserted through a Syed-Neblett applicator. The 3D Slicer and PLUS open source software were used to develop the system. The mean of the targeting error was less than 2.9mm, which is comparable to the targeting errors in commercial clinical navigation systems.

  20. Gynecologic Cancer InterGroup (GCIG) consensus review for cervical adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Hiroyuki; Yokota, Harushige; Monk, Bradley; Treilleux, Isabelle; Devouassoux-Shisheboran, Mojgan; Davis, Alison; Kim, Jae-Weon; Mahner, Sven; Stany, Michael; Pignata, Sandro; Ray-Coquard, Isabelle; Fujiwara, Keiichi

    2014-11-01

    Cervical adenocarcinoma is known to be less common than squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix comprising approximately 25% of all cervical carcinomas. Differences in associated human papillomavirus types, patterns of spread, and prognosis call for treatments that are not always like those for squamous cancers. In this review, we report a consensus developed by the Gynecologic Cancer InterGroup surrounding cervical adenocarcinoma for epidemiology, pathology, treatment, and unanswered questions. Prospective clinical trials are needed to help develop treatment guidelines.

  1. EM-Navigated Catheter Placement for Gynecologic Brachytherapy: An Accuracy Study.

    PubMed

    Mehrtash, Alireza; Damato, Antonio; Pernelle, Guillaume; Barber, Lauren; Farhat, Nabgha; Viswanathan, Akila; Cormack, Robert; Kapur, Tina

    2014-03-12

    Gynecologic malignancies, including cervical, endometrial, ovarian, vaginal and vulvar cancers, cause significant mortality in women worldwide. The standard care for many primary and recurrent gynecologic cancers consists of chemoradiation followed by brachytherapy. In high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy, intracavitary applicators and/or interstitial needles are placed directly inside the cancerous tissue so as to provide catheters to deliver high doses of radiation. Although technology for the navigation of catheters and needles is well developed for procedures such as prostate biopsy, brain biopsy, and cardiac ablation, it is notably lacking for gynecologic HDR brachytherapy. Using a benchtop study that closely mimics the clinical interstitial gynecologic brachytherapy procedure, we developed a method for evaluating the accuracy of image-guided catheter placement. Future bedside translation of this technology offers the potential benefit of maximizing tumor coverage during catheter placement while avoiding damage to the adjacent organs, for example bladder, rectum and bowel. In the study, two independent experiments were performed on a phantom model to evaluate the targeting accuracy of an electromagnetic (EM) tracking system. The procedure was carried out using a laptop computer (2.1GHz Intel Core i7 computer, 8GB RAM, Windows 7 64-bit), an EM Aurora tracking system with a 1.3mm diameter 6 DOF sensor, and 6F (2 mm) brachytherapy catheters inserted through a Syed-Neblett applicator. The 3D Slicer and PLUS open source software were used to develop the system. The mean of the targeting error was less than 2.9mm, which is comparable to the targeting errors in commercial clinical navigation systems.

  2. To Morcellate or Not to Morcellate: A Cross-Sectional Survey Of Gynecologic Surgeons

    PubMed Central

    Apostol, Radu; Greene, Alexis D.; Pilkinton, Marjorie L.

    2017-01-01

    Background and Objectives: The inadvertent dissemination of uterine cancer cells with the power morcellator has received much attention in the press and a warning from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Many hospitals prohibit the use of the morcellator in gynecologic surgery. We conducted a survey in an attempt to assess gynecologic surgeons' beliefs regarding the intracorporeal power morcellation of fibroids in light of the risk of dissemination of malignancy in patients in whom the presence of cancer is unknown before surgery. Methods: We conducted an Internet-based survey of 3505 members of the Society of Laparoendoscopic Surgeons (SLS) to assess demographics, current use of the intracorporeal power morcellator, and whether the recent negative press has affected gynecologic surgeons' use of the morcellator. Results: Of the 3505 SLS members surveyed, 518 responded (response rate, 14.77%). Three hundred thirteen (61%) of the respondents were not using the intracorporeal power morcellator. Of those, 48% reported the reason was a hospital-wide ban, and an additional 17% reported lack of availability (not in stock). Senior attendings with >20 years of experience used the morcellator more often than junior attendings and fellows (P = .007). Furthermore, the morcellator was used significantly less among those with the belief that morcellation of occult malignancy affects survival (P = .013). Three hundred sixty-one (76%) of the participants currently perform laparotomy in fewer than a quarter of their cases; most those cases are still performed using laparoscopic and robot-assisted techniques. Conclusion: The recent negative press suggesting that intracorporeal power morcellation can disseminate occult malignancy and affect survival has decreased the use of the morcellator. Despite the declining use of power morcellation, most practicing gynecologic surgeons have not converted their procedures to laparotomy. PMID:28144125

  3. Breast and gynecologic cancer-related extremity lymphedema: a review of diagnostic modalities and management options

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Lymphedema remains a poorly understood entity that can occur after lymphadenectomy. Herein, we will review the pathogenesis of lymphedema, diagnostic modalities and the natural history of extremity involvement. We will review the incidence of upper extremity lymphedema in patients treated for breast malignancies and lower extremity lymphedema in those treated for gynecologic malignancy. Finally, we will review traditional treatment modalities for lymphedema, as well as introduce new surgical treatment modalities that are under active investigation. PMID:24053624

  4. Clinical research education study teams: a research curriculum for obstetric and gynecology residents.

    PubMed

    Brubaker, Linda; Kenton, Kimberly

    2011-06-01

    Research education is a requirement for obstetrics and gynecology residents. Most obstetrics and gynecology residencies struggle with barriers to efficient, effective research education and productivity for their residents. These barriers include constraints on faculty time, lack of intrinsic desire within individual residents, and lack of relevant outcome measures. We developed an efficient, novel research education curriculum that overcomes many of these barriers and provides obstetrics and gynecology residents with a structured format that maximizes the likelihood of a successful, positive research experience. Since the start of the Clinical Research Education Study Team program, the graduating resident cohorts reliably complete and present prospective research projects, including three registered randomized trials. Residency-wide support for other team research has grown dramatically. The residents' work was acknowledged with several research awards, which further reinforces the positive perception of the program. The certainty of completion of their research requirement relieved our residents of the anxiety commonly reported by residents nearing graduation. The Clinical Research Education Study Team program's team design makes efficient use of faculty time. In addition, Clinical Research Education Study Team mentors also have incorporated junior faculty members who wish to improve their own research education skills. We offer our experience with this program in hopes that it may be of value to other programs that wish to improve their resident research education curriculum. It remains important for residents to acquire research skills before continuing into practice or fellowship. The Clinical Research Education Study Team program facilitates this education in an efficient, organized manner.

  5. To the Point: Integrating Patient Safety Education Into the Obstetrics and Gynecology Undergraduate Curriculum.

    PubMed

    Abbott, Jodi F; Pradhan, Archana; Buery-Joyner, Samantha; Casey, Petra M; Chuang, Alice; Dugoff, Lorraine; Dalrymple, John L; Forstein, David A; Hampton, Brittany S; Hueppchen, Nancy A; Kaczmarczyk, Joseph M; Katz, Nadine T; Nuthalapaty, Francis S; Page-Ramsey, Sarah; Wolf, Abigail; Cullimore, Amie J

    2016-07-26

    This article is part of the To the Point Series prepared by the Association of Professors of Gynecology and Obstetrics Undergraduate Medical Education Committee. Principles and education in patient safety have been well integrated into academic obstetrics and gynecology practices, although progress in safety profiles has been frustratingly slow. Medical students have not been included in the majority of these ambulatory practice or hospital-based initiatives. Both the Association of American Medical Colleges and Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education have recommended incorporating students into safe practices. The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education milestone 1 for entering interns includes competencies in patient safety. We present data and initiatives in patient safety, which have been successfully used in undergraduate and graduate medical education. In addition, this article demonstrates how using student feedback to assess sentinel events can enhance safe practice and quality improvement programs. Resources and implementation tools will be discussed to provide a template for incorporation into educational programs and institutions. Medical student involvement in the culture of safety is necessary for the delivery of both high-quality education and high-quality patient care. It is essential to incorporate students into the ongoing development of patient safety curricula in obstetrics and gynecology.

  6. Detection of peritoneal dissemination in gynecological malignancy: evaluation by diffusion-weighted MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Shinya; Matsusue, Eiji; Kanasaki, Yoshiko; Kanamori, Yasunobu; Nakanishi, Junko; Sugihara, Shuji; Kigawa, Junzo; Terakawa, Naoki; Ogawa, Toshihide

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the usefulness of diffusion-weighted (DW) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in detecting peritoneal dissemination in cases of gynecological malignancy. We retrospectively analyzed MR images obtained from 26 consecutive patients with gynecological malignancy. Peritoneal dissemination was histologically diagnosed in 15 of the 26 patients after surgery. We obtained DW images and half-Fourier single-shot turbo-spin-echo images in the abdomen and pelvis, and then generated fusion images. Coronal maximum-intensity-projection images were reconstructed from the axial source images. Reader interpretations were compared with the laparotomy findings in the surgical records. Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curves were used to represent the presence of peritoneal dissemination. In addition, the sensitivity and specificity were calculated. DW imaging depicted the tumors in 14 of 15 patients with peritoneal dissemination as abnormal signal intensity. ROC analysis yielded Az values of 0.974 and 0.932 for the two reviewers. The mean sensitivity and specificity were 90 and 95.5%. DW imaging plays an important role in the diagnosis and therapeutic management of patients with gynecological malignancy.

  7. Influence of Music on Preoperative Anxiety and Physiologic Parameters in Women Undergoing Gynecologic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Labrague, Leodoro J; McEnroe-Petitte, Denise M

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the influence of music on anxiety levels and physiologic parameters in women undergoing gynecologic surgery. This study employed a pre- and posttest experimental design with nonrandom assignment. Ninety-seven women undergoing gynecologic surgery were included in the study, where 49 were allocated to the control group (nonmusic group) and 48 were assigned to the experimental group (music group). Preoperative anxiety was measured using the State Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) while noninvasive instruments were used in measuring the patients' physiologic parameters (blood pressure [BP], pulse [P], and respiration [R]) at two time periods. Women allocated in the experimental group had lower STAI scores (t = 17.41, p < .05), systolic (t = 6.45, p < .05) and diastolic (t = 2.80, p < .006) BP, and P rate (PR; t = 7.32, p < .05) than in the control group. This study provides empirical evidence to support the use of music during the preoperative period in reducing anxiety and unpleasant symptoms in women undergoing gynecologic surgery.

  8. What the paediatrician should know about paediatric and adolescent gynecology: The perspective of a gynecologist

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Victoria Jane

    2003-01-01

    Gynecological problems are common in children but training in this subject is rare during paediatric postgraduate education. Knowledge in this area is important for providing comprehensive health care to children. The article explores the gynecological examination of the child and common gynecological disorders in the paediatric and adolescent age groups. Routine examination of the external genitalia as part of a well-child physical normalizes the examination for the child and helps to inform the physician about the large variations in normal genitals. Many complaints can be dealt with by reassurance, while most others respond to medical therapy and can be dealt with easily by paediatricians. Both young children and adolescents respond positively when allowed to have control over the tempo of the interview and the examination. A positive experience associated with a genital examination will help to open lines of trust. This along with nonjudgmental, open communication, will create educational opportunities to enhance a responsible transition from child to young adult. PMID:20019933

  9. Diagnosis of emergencies/urgencies in gynecology and during the first trimester of pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Zucchini, Stefano; Marra, Elena

    2014-03-01

    Several surgical and/or medical emergencies/urgencies may occur in gynecologic patients and in pregnant women during the first trimester. Particularly, ectopic pregnancies, ruptured or hemorrhagic ovarian cysts, ovarian or adnexal torsions, threatened or inevitable miscarriages, phlogistic gynecological disorders, complications involving the uterine fibroids, endometriosis, and spontaneous uterine rupture are possible acute complications. The diagnosis is suspected on the basis of symptoms (acute pelvic and/or abdominal pain, with or without vaginal bleeding or discharge, until acute abdomen with peritonitis), by means physical evaluation (abdominal, pelvic, and bimanual gynecological examinations), by means of transabdominal (TAS) and/or transvaginal (TVS) sonography, and laboratory tests. However, the diagnosis is often not that simple, especially when the symptoms and clinical signs are minimal, and ultrasound (US) examination is not diriment. The differential diagnosis of abdominal/pelvic pain is broad and includes primarily gastrointestinal and urogenital disorders. Generally, TAS should usually be used in conjunction with TVS for evaluation of the female pelvis. If the US examination is not conclusive, CT or MRI, especially in pregnant patients, should be considered.

  10. A Review of mTOR Pathway Inhibitors in Gynecologic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Paulino, Eduardo; Garces, Álvaro Henrique Ingles

    2017-01-01

    The treatment of advanced gynecologic cancers remains palliative in most of cases. Although systemic treatment has entered into the era of targeted drugs the antitumor efficacies of current therapies are still limited. In this context there is a great need for more active treatment and rationally designed targeted therapies. The PI3K/AKT/mTOR is a signaling pathway in mammal cells that coordinates important cell activities. It has a critical function in the survival, growth, and proliferation of malignant cells and was object of important research in the last two decades. The mTOR pathway emerges as an attractive therapeutic target in cancer because it serves as a convergence point for many growth stimuli and, through its downstream substrates, controls cellular processes that contribute to the initiation and maintenance of cancer. Aberrant PI3K-dependent signaling occurs frequently in a wide range of tumor types, including endometrial, cervical, and ovarian cancers. The present study reviewed the available evidence regarding the potential impact of some mTOR pathway inhibitors in the treatment of gynecological cancer. Few advances in medical management have occurred in recent years in the treatment of advanced or recurrent gynecological malignancies, and a poor prognosis remains. Rationally designed molecularly targeted therapy is an emerging and important option in this setting; then more investigation in PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway-targeted therapies is warranted. PMID:28286604

  11. A clinical analysis of brain metastasis in gynecologic cancer: a retrospective multi-institute analysis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Zoon; Kwon, Jae Hyun; Lim, Soyi

    2015-01-01

    This study analyzes the clinical characteristics of the brain metastasis (BM) of gynecologic cancer based on the type of cancer. In addition, the study examines the factors influencing the survival. Total 61 BM patients of gynecologic cancer were analyzed retrospectively from January 2000 to December 2012 in terms of clinical and radiological characteristics by using medical and radiological records from three university hospitals. There were 19 (31.1%) uterine cancers, 32 (52.5%) ovarian cancers, and 10 (16.4%) cervical cancers. The mean interval to BM was 25.4 months (21.6 months in ovarian cancer, 27.8 months in uterine cancer, and 33.1 months in cervical cancer). The mean survival from BM was 16.7 months (14.1 months in ovarian cancer, 23.3 months in uterine cancer, and 8.8 months in cervical cancer). According to a multivariate analysis of factors influencing survival, type of primary cancer, Karnofsky performance score, status of primary cancer, recursive partitioning analysis class, and treatment modality, particularly combined therapies, were significantly related to the overall survival. These results suggest that, in addition to traditional prognostic factors in BM, multiple treatment methods such as neurosurgery and combined chemoradiotherapy may play an important role in prolonging the survival for BM patients of gynecologic cancer.

  12. Direct and Buffering Effects of Social Support among Gynecologic Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, Kristen M.; Fowler, Jeffrey M.; Maxwell, G. Larry; Andersen, Barbara L.

    2013-01-01

    Background There are few studies of QoL among long-term gynecologic cancer survivors; available data suggest significant sequelae of disease and treatment. Research clarifying circumstances that improve difficult survivorship trajectories is lacking. Purpose The present study examines whether social support moderates the relationship between physical functioning and psychological outcomes by testing the stress-buffering hypothesis. Methods Participants (N=260) were gynecologic cancer survivors (cervical, n=47; endometrial, n=133; ovarian, n=69; vulvar, n=11). Compromised physical health was conceptualized as multidimensional. Social support (SNI, PSS-Fa, PSS-Fr, ISEL) was tested as a buffer of adverse psychological outcomes (IES-R, CES-D). Results Results for traumatic stress provided evidence for buffering; whereas social support was of general benefit for depressive symptoms. Effects varied by source/type of support. Conclusions These results suggest that circumstances for gynecologic cancer survivors burdened with physical symptoms may be worse for those with fewer support resources, providing needed insight into a common target of psychosocial interventions for cancer survivors. PMID:20151235

  13. Impact of specialization in gynecology and obstetrics departments on pregnant women's choice of maternity institutions.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Yoshimi; Iso, Hiroyasu; Shen, Junyi; Ban, Kanami; Fukui, On; Hashimoto, Hiroyuki; Nakashima, Takako; Morishige, Kenichiro; Saijo, Tatuyoshi

    2013-12-23

    In April 2008, specialization in gynecology and obstetrics departments was introduced in the Sennan area of Osaka prefecture in Japan that aimed at solving the problems of regional provisions of obstetrics services (e.g., shortage of obstetricians, overworking of obstetricians, and provision of specialist maternity services for high-risk pregnancies). Under this specialization, the gynecology and obstetrics departments in two city hospitals were combined and reconstructed into two centers, i.e., the gynecological care center in Kaizuka City Hospital and the prenatal care center in Izumisano City Hospital. This paper investigates to what extent and how this specialization affected pregnant women's choices of the prenatal care center and other maternity institutions. We used birth certificate data of 15,927 newborns from the Sennan area between April 1, 2007 and March 30, 2010, for Before and After Analysis to examine changes in pregnant women's choices of maternity institutions before and after the specialization was instituted. Our results indicated that this specialization scheme was, to some extent, successful on the basis of providing maternity services for high-risk pregnancies at the prenatal care center (i.e., Izumisano City Hospital) and having created a positive effect by pregnant women to other facilities in the nearby area.

  14. [Efficacy of Levofloxacin Hydrate in Febrile Neutropenia for Outpatient Chemotherapy].

    PubMed

    Inagaki, Manato; Sato, Junya; Nihei, Satoru; Kashiwaba, Masahiro; Kudo, Kenzo

    2016-05-01

    Management of febrile neutropenia (FN) is important for the safety of patients undergoing outpatient chemotherapy. Oral antimicrobials are usually prescribed as the initial treatment for FN, and outpatients are instructed to begin medication prior to chemotherapy. However, the effectiveness and safety of the use of these oral antibiotics have not yet been established. In this study, we investigated the effectiveness and safety of levofloxacin hydrate (LVFX) for breast cancer patients with FN, and the factors associated with the onset of FN in 134 breast cancer patients who underwent chemotherapy including the anticancer drug anthracycline (total, 513 courses), in an outpatient chemotherapy department. The effectiveness and safety of LVFX were defined respectively as defervescence within 5 days, and the appearance of side effects such as diarrhea and rashes. Fever was observed in 89 (66%) of the 134 patients, and during 164 (32%) of 513 courses. Defervescence was observed with the LVFX medication in 149 (93%) of 160 courses. The primary side effect was the development of rashes, and only 2 (1%) of the 160 courses were discontinued. Onset of stomatitis during chemotherapy was observed as a factor of FN (odds ratio: 1.36, p<0.05). Our results suggest that the use of LVFX according to the patients' discretion might be an effective and safe option for the management of FN during outpatient chemotherapy.

  15. Reducing Outpatient Waiting Time: A Simulation Modeling Approach

    PubMed Central

    Aeenparast, Afsoon; Tabibi, Seyed Jamaleddin; Shahanaghi, Kamran; Aryanejhad, Mir Bahador

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this study was to provide a model for reducing outpatient waiting time by using simulation. Materials and Methods A simulation model was constructed by using the data of arrival time, service time and flow of 357 patients referred to orthopedic clinic of a general teaching hospital in Tehran. The simulation model was validated before constructing different scenarios. Results In this study 10 scenarios were presented for reducing outpatient waiting time. Patients waiting time was divided into three levels regarding their physicians. These waiting times for all scenarios were computed by simulation model. According to the final scores the 9th scenario was selected as the best way for reducing outpatient's waiting time. Conclusions Using the simulation as a decision making tool helps us to decide how we can reduce outpatient's waiting time. Comparison of outputs of this scenario and the based- case scenario in simulation model shows that combining physician's work time changing with patient's admission time changing (scenario 9) would reduce patient waiting time about 73.09%. Due to dynamic and complex nature of healthcare systems, the application of simulation for the planning, modeling and analysis of these systems has lagged behind traditional manufacturing practices. Rapid growth in health care system expenditures, technology and competition has increased the complexity of health care systems. Simulation is a useful tool for decision making in complex and probable systems. PMID:24616801

  16. Out-Patient Nurse Involvement--An Answer to Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monaco, Ruth J.

    1976-01-01

    The article describes the planning and implementation of a continuing education inservice program for out-patient clinic nursing staff. Educational needs were assessed through interviews. Brief, twice-monthly seminar sessions stressed participant involvement. Copies of evaluation instruments are included which indicate favorable participant…

  17. Outpatient visits by dentists: a nationwide cohort study in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Chang-Ta; Huang, Shu-Min; Lin, Yu-Wen; Ko, Ming-Chung; Li, Chung-Yi

    2012-01-01

    We conducted a cohort study of 7,760 dentists in Taiwan between 2003 and 2007 to assess the risk of outpatient visit among dentists. Control groups included physicians and other health personnel. Over the 5-yr study period, the dentist cohort made a total of 270,712 outpatient visits, representing an incidence rate of 7,038 visits /10(3) person-years. Compared to physicians, dentists experienced a significantly reduced covariate adjusted rate ratio (ARR) for all-cause visits (ARR=0.59, 95%CI=0.58-0.59), as well as for nearly all other causes, except neoplasm (ARR=1.06, 95%CI=1.02-1.09). Compared to other health personnel, the dentists still experienced a significantly reduced ARR for all causes (ARR=0.70), but had a slightly but significantly increased risk for endocrine/metabolic/immunity (ARR=1.04, 95%CI=1.02-1.05) and mental (ARR=1.04, 95%CI=1.01-1.07) disorders. Although the dentists in Taiwan utilized lesser outpatient visits than did their medical colleagues, they tended to have slightly higher rates of outpatient visits for neoplasm, endocrine/metabolic/immunity disorders, and mental illnesses. Policy makers and hospital administrators must not overlook dentists' potentially unseen health problems. A mandatory periodical physical examination for dentists can seriously be considered.

  18. Aetiology of Intellectual Disability in Paediatric Outpatients in Northern India

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jauhari, Prashant; Boggula, Raju; Bhave, Anupama; Bhargava, Roli; Singh, Chandrakanta; Kohli, Neera; Yadav, Rajesh; Kumar, Rashmi

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To study the aetiology of intellectual disability in patients presenting to hospital and the diagnostic yield of a standardized examination. Method: Over a 1-year period, the first three children presenting to the paediatric outpatients department (OPD) on 2 selected weekdays with developmental delay, suspected intellectual disability, or…

  19. Outpatient Assessment of Neurovisual Functions in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barca, Laura; Cappelli, Francesca R.; Di Giulio, Paola; Staccioli, Susanna; Castelli, Enrico

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the feasibility of the Atkinson Battery for Child Development for Examining Functional Vision (Atkinson, Anker, Rae, et al., 2002) to evaluate neurovisual functions of children with neurodevelopmental disorders in outpatient setting. A total of 90 patients underwent a comprehensive evaluation. Among these, a group of 33…

  20. Unintentional Injuries among Psychiatric Outpatients with Major Depressive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Ching-I; Liu, Chia-Yih; Yang, Ching-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Background No study has investigated the percentages of and factors related to unintentional injuries among psychiatric outpatients with major depressive disorder (MDD). This study aimed to investigate these issues. Methods One-hundred and forty-one outpatients with MDD at baseline were enrolled from psychiatric outpatients by systematic sampling, and 119 subjects attended a one-year follow-up. Self-reported unintentional injuries in the past one year were recorded. Psychiatric disorders were diagnosed using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV-TR. The severity of depression was evaluated by the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale. Other data, including body weight and height, cigarette smoking, headaches, and medications, were collected. Generalized Estimating Equations were used to investigate independent factors related to unintentional injuries. Results At baseline and follow-up, 40.4% and 27.7% of subjects had experienced at least one unintentional injury in the past one year, respectively. About half of subjects with unintentional injuries needed medical treatment for injuries and had functional impairment due to injuries. A greater severity of depression, cigarette smoking, a higher body mass index, and an older age were independent risk factors related to unintentional injuries. Conclusion Unintentional injuries that increased the medical burden and functional impairment were common among outpatients with MDD and should not be neglected. Treatment of depression, control of body weight, and quitting cigarettes might be helpful to prevent unintentional injuries. PMID:27992483

  1. Human metapneumovirus infection among outpatient children in Dibrugarh.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Dipankar; Yadav, Kaushal; Borkakoty, Biswajyoti; Mahanta, Jagadish

    2014-11-01

    We describe the prevalence of human metapneumovirus infection in children visiting outpatient department with symptoms of respiratory illness in rural areas of Dibrugarh District of Assam. Human metapneumovirus was observed in 7.2% (20/276) of children aged =5 years with detection of genotypes A2b and B2.

  2. Behaviour Profile of Hungarian Adolescent Outpatients with a Dual Diagnosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dinya, Elek; Csorba, Janos; Suli, Agota; Grosz, Zsofia

    2012-01-01

    The behaviour dimensions of 244 Hungarian adolescent psychiatric outpatients with a dual diagnosis (intellectual disability and psychiatric diagnosis) were examined by means of the adapted version of the Behaviour Problem Inventory (BPI, Rojahn, Matson, Lott, Esbensen, & Smalls, 2001). Four IQ subgroups were created: borderline, mild, moderate…

  3. Dysfunctional Attitudes and Suicidal Ideation in Psychiatric Outpatients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beck, Aaron T.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Administered Dysfunctional Attitude Scale (DAS), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), Hopelessness Scale (BHS), Self-Concept Test (BST), and Scale for Suicide Ideation (SSI) to 908 psychiatric outpatients. Found that none of DAS subscales discriminated ideators and nonideators or was significantly related to SSI total scores of suicide ideators after…

  4. Azacitidine in outpatient treatment – single center experience

    PubMed Central

    Stefanko, Ewa; Bogucka-Fedorczuk, Aleksandra; Butrym, Aleksandra; Poręba, Rafał; Kuliczkowski, Kazimierz; Wróbel, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    Aim of the study Azacitidine is a hypomethylating agent which is used in the treatment of myelodysplastic syndromes, acute myeloid leukemia and chronic myelomonocytic leukemia. Because of good tolerance to the drug, azacitidine can be administered both during hospitalization and in an outpatient setting. The aim of our retrospective analysis was to assess the efficacy of azacitidine treatment in patients with a myelodysplastic syndrome and with acute myeloid leukemia who had received treatment in hospital and in an ambulatory care setting. Offsets in the course of azacitidine administration and discontinuations of treatment have a negative impact on patients’ response to the therapy. Material and methods The study included 31 patients. Sixteen patients received azacitidine in an ambulatory care setting, 15 patients within their hospitalization. Results A hematologic response was achieved in 48% of the patients. Forty-one percent of the cycles were delayed. In an outpatient setting, 62% of the cycles were administered systematically, while during hospitalization the patients received 54% of cycles on time. Administrative problems caused the delay of 26% of the cycles. Conclusions Azacitidine has a high tolerance level and a high safety profile which allows for its use in an outpatient care setting. Outpatient administration of azacitidine is feasible and safe without compromising efficacy. PMID:26843844

  5. Managing an outpatient parenteral antibiotic therapy team: challenges and solutions

    PubMed Central

    Halilovic, Jenana; Christensen, Cinda L; Nguyen, Hien H

    2014-01-01

    Outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy (OPAT) programs should strive to deliver safe, cost effective, and high quality care. One of the keys to developing and sustaining a high quality OPAT program is to understand the common challenges or barriers to OPAT delivery. We review the most common challenges to starting and managing an OPAT program and give practical advice on addressing these issues. PMID:24971015

  6. Hypomagnesemia Among Outpatient Long-Term Proton Pump Inhibitor Users.

    PubMed

    Biyik, Murat; Solak, Yalcin; Ucar, Ramazan; Cifci, Sami; Tekis, Dilek; Polat, İlker; Göktepe, Mevlüt Hakan; Sakiz, Davut; Ataseven, Huseyin; Demir, Ali

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are extensively prescribed drugs usually used for a long period. Recent reports linked PPI use with development of hypomagnesemia. However, there is still uncertainty regarding risk of hypomagnesemia in outpatients who were on long-term PPI use. Thus, we aimed to evaluate frequency of hypomagnesemia among a well-defined outpatient patient cohort with no other possible risk factors affecting serum magnesium levels. This was a case-control study carried out at the outpatient gastroenterology clinic of a University hospital. Patients who were on PPI therapy for at least 6 months without diuretic use and chronic kidney disease were included. Patients who were subjected to the same inclusion and exclusion criteria and not using PPI were included as control subjects. One hundred fifty-four patients and 84 control subjects were included. The mean duration of PPI use was 27.5 ± 2.5 months. Mean serum magnesium levels of PPI users and nonusers were 2.17 ± 0.20 mg/dL and 2.19 ± 0.15 mg/dL, respectively. None of the patient had a serum magnesium level below laboratory lower range of 1.7 mg/dL. Our results showed that for typical gastroenterology outpatient clinic patients with no other risk factors affecting serum magnesium levels, long-term PPI use did not affect serum magnesium levels.

  7. Resident Physicians' Perspectives on Effective Outpatient Teaching: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kisiel, John B.; Bundrick, John B.; Beckman, Thomas J.

    2010-01-01

    Learning theories, which suggest that experienced faculty use collaborative teaching styles, are reflected in qualitative studies of learners in hospital settings. However, little research has used resident focus groups to explore characteristics of successful teachers in outpatient clinics. Therefore, focus group discussions with first through…

  8. Self-Esteem and Suicide Ideation in Psychiatric Outpatients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhar, Sunil; Ghahramanlou-Holloway, Marjan; Brown, Gregory; Beck, Aaron T.

    2008-01-01

    Depression, hopelessness, and low self-esteem are implicated as vulnerability factors for suicide ideation. The association of self-esteem with suicide ideation after controlling for depressed mood and hopelessness was examined. Adult psychiatric outpatients (N = 338) completed measures of self-esteem, suicide ideation, hopelessness, and…

  9. Toward Instituting a Chaperone Policy in Outpatient Pediatric Clinics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldman, Kenneth W.; Jenkins, Carol; Laney, Tyler; Seidel, Kristy

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: We sought to evaluate child, parent and medical provider preferences for chaperones for outpatient encounters and to evaluate the acceptability and frequency of utilization following institution of a chaperone policy. Secondarily, we sought to understand what medical history and examinations teens consider "sensitive." Design: We…

  10. Occurrence of Medical Concerns in Psychiatric Outpatients with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Azimi, Kousha; Modi, Miti; Hurlbut, Janice; Lunsky, Yona

    2016-01-01

    Despite the fact that adults with both intellectual disabilities (ID) and psychiatric disorders are at increased risk for physical health problems, few studies have described their medical concerns specifically. This study reports on the rates of physical health issues and completion of recommended health screenings among 78 adult outpatients with…

  11. Perceived Mental Illness Stigma among Youth in Psychiatric Outpatient Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elkington, Katherine S.; Hackler, Dusty; McKinnon, Karen; Borges, Cristiane; Wright, Eric R.; Wainberg, Milton L.

    2012-01-01

    This research explores the experiences of mental illness stigma in 24 youth (58.3% male, 13-24 years, 75% Latino) in psychiatric outpatient treatment. Using Link and Phelan's (2001) model of stigmatization, we conducted thematic analysis of the interview texts, examining experiences of stigma at individual and structural levels, in addition to the…

  12. Effectiveness of Child Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy in a Clinical Outpatient Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deakin, Elisabeth Kuhn; Tiellet Nunes, Maria Lucia

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the outcome of child psychoanalytic psychotherapy in a clinical outpatient setting in a city in southern Brazil. Three psychological tests (Rorschach, Bender and WISC III) were administered to 23 children, aged 6-11 years old, and the Child Behaviour Check List (CBCL) was completed by the parents. All…

  13. Age, Gender, and Treatment Attendance among Forensic Psychiatric Outpatients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hadley, Dianne C.; Reddon, John R.; Reddick, Robert D.

    2001-01-01

    Uses the records of forensic psychiatry outpatients (N=6,299) to evaluate absenteeism from treatment in relation to age and gender. Results reveal that females had a significantly higher absentee rate than males in all age groups. For both males and females, missed appointments declined significantly with age. (Contains 34 references and 1 table.)…

  14. Identifying Outpatients with Entrenched Suicidal Ideation Following Hospitalization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Connor, Stephen S.; Jobes, David A.; Comtois, Katherine Anne; Atkins, David C.; Janis, Karin; Chessen, Chloe E.; Landes, Sara J.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify outpatients who experience entrenched suicidal ideation following inpatient psychiatric hospitalization. Our findings suggest that the use of a suicidal ambivalence index score was helpful at discriminating those who reported significantly greater ratings of suicidal ideation across a 1-year period of…

  15. Prevalence and characteristics of reported penicillin allergy in an urban outpatient adult population.

    PubMed

    Albin, Stephanie; Agarwal, Shradha

    2014-01-01

    Penicillin allergy remains the most common drug allergy, with a reported prevalence of 10% in the United States. Epidemiology of penicillin allergy in outpatient populations is relatively scarce. This study sought to determine the prevalence and characteristics of reported penicillin allergy in an urban outpatient population and to identify trends in clinical evaluation and management from a tertiary center serving a large inner-city population. A retrospective review of electronic medical records was performed of adult patients seen in the Internal Medicine Associates Clinic of Mount Sinai Hospital between January 31, 2012, and July 31, 2012. Medical records were selected based on the documentation of penicillin in patient's allergy section. Of the 11,761 patients seen in the clinic, 1348 patients (11.5%) reported a history of penicillin allergy. The most common allergic reactions were rash (37%), unknown/undocumented (20.2%), hives (18.9%), swelling/angioedema (11.8%), and anaphylaxis (6.8%). There was an increased prevalence of penicillin allergy in female patients compared with male patients (odds ratio [OR] = 1.82; 95% CI = 1.60, 2.08; p < 0.0001), and there were significantly fewer Asians with penicillin allergy compared with Caucasians (OR = 0.51; 95% CI = 0.32, 0.83; p = 0.007). However, only 78 (6%) of the patients reporting penicillin allergy had a referral to an allergy specialist. Overall, improved referral to an allergist will help to identify patients who have penicillin allergy requiring avoidance.

  16. Exploring aftercare programs following outpatient musculoskeletal physical therapy: a case series report.

    PubMed

    Hoover, Don; Domholdt, Elizabeth; Leland, Laura G; Kluver, Jill; Malloy, Andrew

    2009-02-01

    Aftercare programs allow patients to continue to exercise with supervision following discharge from physical therapy. Although not yet widespread in clinical practice, aftercare programs represent a growing trend following outpatient physical therapy settings in the United States. The purpose of this study was to explore and describe the characteristics, implementation, and impact of contemporary aftercare programs in a selected sample of outpatient physical therapy settings. A purposeful sample of three aftercare program and four clients were interviewed to provide the descriptive data for this study. Each client was also later interviewed at 3-4 months and again at 6 months. A general health outcomes measurement tool (SF-36) and musculoskeletal regional outcomes tools also were used to measure health status and function. Directors of the three programs cited similar rationales for starting their aftercare programs. However, specific features and goals of the three aftercare programs varied, as did utilization and participation. Clients were generally pleased with their aftercare involvement, and they demonstrated clinically important improvements on outcome measures of function and health-related quality of life in addition to subjective reports of satisfaction. Aftercare programs are an emerging clinical trend following physical therapy, and this study provides an initial description of the development, implementation, and effectiveness of such programs. Future study should investigate a greater variety of aftercare settings and larger samples of participants and should also further examine how well aftercare programs promote health and wellness.

  17. Use of the respiratory fluoroquinolones for the outpatient management of community-acquired pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hans H.

    2004-01-01

    Background Approximately 4 million cases of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) occur in the United States each year, with the majority treated on an outpatient basis. The first fluoroquinolones (eg, ciprofloxacin) were used with caution for respiratory tract infections due to limited in vitro activity against common gram-positive pathogens. With the availability of levofloxacin, followed by gatifloxacin and moxifloxacin hydrochloride, which exhibited increased activity against gram-positive organisms, the fluoroquinolones have become a practical choice for the treatment of CAP. Objective The aim of this review was to compare the respiratory fluoroquinolones in the outpatient management of CAP. Methods We conducted a search for English-language articles (key terms: fluoroquinolone, levofloxacin, gatifloxacin, moxifloxacin, and pneumonia; years: 1996–2004). Data from published literature were reviewed regarding clinical and microbiologic efficacy and tolerability; pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties; and drug costs of levofloxacin, gatifloxacin, and moxifloxacin. Results The 3 fluoroquinolones reviewed showed comparable clinical and microbiologic efficacy for the treatment of CAP. In general, the fluoroquinolones were well tolerated, although some differences have been reported, including higher rates of gastrointestinal and other adverse events for gatifloxacin and moxifloxacin. Gatifloxacin and moxifloxacin exhibited greater in vitro potency than levofloxacin against Streptococcus pneumoniae. However, levofloxacin achieved a higher serum drug concentration than the other agents, allowing similar attainment of pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic targets required for effective treatment. Conclusions The respiratory fluoroquinolones provided appropriate first line treatment in select patients with CAP on the basis of their microbiologic and clinical efficacy and their safety profiles. PMID:24764589

  18. Enhancing outpatient clinics management software by reducing patients' waiting time.

    PubMed

    Almomani, Iman; AlSarheed, Ahlam

    The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA) gives great attention to improving the quality of services provided by health care sectors including outpatient clinics. One of the main drawbacks in outpatient clinics is long waiting time for patients-which affects the level of patient satisfaction and the quality of services. This article addresses this problem by studying the Outpatient Management Software (OMS) and proposing solutions to reduce waiting times. Many hospitals around the world apply solutions to overcome the problem of long waiting times in outpatient clinics such as hospitals in the USA, China, Sri Lanka, and Taiwan. These clinics have succeeded in reducing wait times by 15%, 78%, 60% and 50%, respectively. Such solutions depend mainly on adding more human resources or changing some business or management policies. The solutions presented in this article reduce waiting times by enhancing the software used to manage outpatient clinics services. Both quantitative and qualitative methods have been used to understand current OMS and examine level of patient's satisfaction. Five main problems that may cause high or unmeasured waiting time have been identified: appointment type, ticket numbering, doctor late arrival, early arriving patient and patients' distribution list. These problems have been mapped to the corresponding OMS components. Solutions to the above problems have been introduced and evaluated analytically or by simulation experiments. Evaluation of the results shows a reduction in patient waiting time. When late doctor arrival issues are solved, this can reduce the clinic service time by up to 20%. However, solutions for early arriving patients reduces 53.3% of vital time, 20% of the clinic time and overall 30.3% of the total waiting time. Finally, well patient-distribution lists make improvements by 54.2%. Improvements introduced to the patients' waiting time will consequently affect patients' satisfaction and improve the quality of health care services.

  19. [The outpatient care in the Latium region (Italy) in 2001].

    PubMed

    Torri, C; Balducci, M; Silvestri, I; Trifelli, S; Pasquarella, A; Guasticchi, G

    2004-01-01

    The Region of Latium has been operating an Outpatient Care Information System (SIAS) since 1997 to monitor the supply of outpatient care in a territory with a population of over five million. The present work has the aim of describing the outpatient care in the region, in terms of number of facilities involved by category (public and private, operating in the regional public health system) and volume of procedures rendered to residents in 2001. Of the 971 outpatient facilities operating in hospitals and elsewhere--37% state managed and 67% private--distributed in a non-uniform manner throughout the region, the majority is concentrated in the city of Rome, which by itself accounts for 49% of its total amount of facilities, and in a lesser measure in the other provincial capitals (Viterbo, Rieti, Frosinone, Latina). In 2001, 71 million procedures were performed, comprising 17 million prescriptions, for an economic value of over 400 million Euros. The three specialties of greatest use were Lab Analysis, Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation, and Radiology, making up 88% of the total outpatient procedures performed within the precinct of the regional health service, in respective measures of 57%, 27%, and 4%. It is noted that the public facilities are prevalently polyspecialistic while a great number of private facilities are monospecialistic and perform procedures almost exclusively (96%) in the three specialties of greatest use. The other specialties which receive notable use are Cardiology, Eye Care, Orthopedics and Neurology. In general, the greater the number of facilities there are in either the public or private sector, the greater the level of activity in terms of procedures performed, with the exception of the area of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation where the correlation is inversely proportioned; in fact, for this specialty the public facilities, which are represented in a much greater number throughout the region, supply only 7% of the volume of activity.

  20. Oritavancin: a new opportunity for outpatient therapy of serious infections.

    PubMed

    Tice, Alan

    2012-04-01

    Oritavancin is a new antibiotic for the treatment of serious infections with Gram-positive bacteria. It has been shown to be effective against methicillin-susceptible and -resistant Staphylococcus aureus as well as enterococci. With a terminal half-life of 393 hours, oritavancin lends itself to a convenient and potentially cost-effective single-dose regimen. The single-dose regimen is currently being evaluated in pivotal phase 3 studies. This unique property provides an opportunity to assure consistent, effective, and safe treatment for serious infections while reducing the costs of care through the elimination of multiple infusions, reduced medical care staff, shorter hospital stays, and avoidance of hospital-acquired infections. These features seem ideal for the use of oritavancin in the outpatient management of serious infections. The impact that oritavancin will have on outpatient therapy is unclear. Current models will need to change with only a single infusion. Physician monitoring of the infection and underlying diseases may not be as frequent despite the need for close follow-up and frequent evaluations. There will be less need for a team of outpatient infusion specialists. Outpatient therapy will be compensated less without multiple infusions. With the possibility of fewer physician and other medical visits, there will be more responsibility for the patient and family and a reliance on patients to care for themselves. Although oritavancin offers tremendous theoretical advantages in the outpatient treatment of serious infections, care should be taken to assure the quality of care through changes in reimbursement, patient education, and development of systems to monitor care and outcomes.

  1. Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion in the outpatient ambulatory surgery setting compared with the inpatient hospital setting: analysis of 1000 consecutive cases.

    PubMed

    Adamson, Tim; Godil, Saniya S; Mehrlich, Melissa; Mendenhall, Stephen; Asher, Anthony L; McGirt, Matthew J

    2016-06-01

    OBJECTIVE In an era of escalating health care costs and pressure to improve efficiency and cost of care, ambulatory surgery centers (ASCs) have emerged as lower-cost options for many surgical therapies. Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) is one of the most prevalent spine surgeries performed, and the frequency of its performance is rapidly increasing as the aging population grows. Although ASCs offer significant cost advantages over hospital-based surgical centers, concern over the safety of outpatient ACDF has slowed its adoption. The authors intended to 1) determine the safety of the first 1000 consecutive ACDF surgeries performed in their outpatient ASC, and 2) compare the safety of these outpatient ACDFs with that of consecutive ACDFs performed during the same time period in the hospital setting. METHODS A total of 1000 consecutive patients who underwent ACDF in an ACS (outpatient ACDF) and 484 consecutive patients who underwent ACDF at Vanderbilt University Hospital (inpatient ACDF) from 2006 to 2013 were included in this retrospective study of patients' medical records. Data were collected on patient demographics, comorbidities, operative details, and perioperative and 90-day morbidity. Perioperative morbidity and hospital readmission were compared between the outpatient and inpatient ACDF groups. RESULTS Of the first 1000 outpatient ACDF cases performed in the authors' ASC, 629 (62.9%) were 1-level and 365 (36.5%) were 2-level ACDFs. Mean patient age was 49.5 ± 8.6, and 484 (48.4%) were males. All patients were observed postoperatively at the ASC postanesthesia care unit (PACU) for 4 hours before being discharged home. Eight patients (0.8%) were transferred from the surgery center to the hospital postoperatively (for pain control [n = 3], chest pain and electrocardiogram changes [n = 2], intraoperative CSF leak [n = 1], postoperative hematoma [n = 1], and profound postoperative weakness and surgical reexploration [n = 1]). No perioperative

  2. 42 CFR 410.62 - Outpatient speech-language pathology services: Conditions and exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Outpatient speech-language pathology services... Medical and Other Health Services § 410.62 Outpatient speech-language pathology services: Conditions and... for outpatient speech-language pathology services only if they are furnished by an individual...

  3. 42 CFR 410.62 - Outpatient speech-language pathology services: Conditions and exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Outpatient speech-language pathology services... Medical and Other Health Services § 410.62 Outpatient speech-language pathology services: Conditions and... for outpatient speech-language pathology services only if they are furnished by an individual...

  4. 42 CFR 410.62 - Outpatient speech-language pathology services: Conditions and exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Outpatient speech-language pathology services... Medical and Other Health Services § 410.62 Outpatient speech-language pathology services: Conditions and... for outpatient speech-language pathology services only if they are furnished by an individual...

  5. 42 CFR 410.62 - Outpatient speech-language pathology services: Conditions and exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Outpatient speech-language pathology services... Medical and Other Health Services § 410.62 Outpatient speech-language pathology services: Conditions and... for outpatient speech-language pathology services only if they are furnished by an individual...

  6. 42 CFR 410.62 - Outpatient speech-language pathology services: Conditions and exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Outpatient speech-language pathology services... Medical and Other Health Services § 410.62 Outpatient speech-language pathology services: Conditions and... for outpatient speech-language pathology services only if they are furnished by an individual...

  7. Are the CMS Hospital Outpatient Quality Measures Relevant for Rural Hospitals?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casey, Michelle M.; Prasad, Shailendra; Klingner, Jill; Moscovice, Ira

    2012-01-01

    Context: Quality measures focused on outpatient settings are of increasing interest to policy makers, but little research has been conducted on hospital outpatient quality measures, especially in rural settings. Purpose: To evaluate the relevance of Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services' (CMS) outpatient quality measures for rural hospitals,…

  8. Factors that Affect Treatment Expectations of Outpatients with Substance Use Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raylu, Namrata; Kaur, Inderjit

    2012-01-01

    The study assessed treatment expectations (TE) of outpatients with substance use problems as well as factors that affect their TE. Participants were 200 outpatients presenting at three community based substance abuse treatment services. Results of general linear modelling analyses showed that outpatients with substance use problems have higher…

  9. 38 CFR 17.94 - Outpatient medical services for military retirees and other beneficiaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... services for military retirees and other beneficiaries. 17.94 Section 17.94 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Outpatient Treatment § 17.94 Outpatient medical services for military retirees and other beneficiaries. Outpatient medical services for military retirees...

  10. Factors Associated with Deliberate Self-Harm Behaviour among Depressed Adolescent Outpatients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuisku, Virpi; Pelkonen, Mirjami; Kiviruusu, Olli; Karlsson, Linnea; Ruuttu, Titta; Marttunen, Mauri

    2009-01-01

    This study examined whether depressed adolescent outpatients with deliberate self-harm behaviour (DSH) differed from non-suicidal depressed adolescent outpatients in depressive and anxiety symptoms, alcohol use, perceived social support and number of negative life-events. Depressed adolescent outpatients (n = 155) aged 13-19 years were interviewed…

  11. 42 CFR 414.1105 - Payment for Comprehensive Outpatient Rehabilitation Facility (CORF) services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Payment for Comprehensive Outpatient Rehabilitation... HEALTH SERVICES Payment for Comprehensive Outpatient Rehabilitation Facility (CORF) Services § 414.1105 Payment for Comprehensive Outpatient Rehabilitation Facility (CORF) services. (a) Payment under...

  12. 42 CFR 447.325 - Other inpatient and outpatient facility services: Upper limits of payment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Other inpatient and outpatient facility services... Methods for Other Institutional and Noninstitutional Services Other Inpatient and Outpatient Facilities § 447.325 Other inpatient and outpatient facility services: Upper limits of payment. The agency may...

  13. 42 CFR 414.63 - Payment for outpatient diabetes self-management training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Payment for outpatient diabetes self-management... SERVICES Physicians and Other Practitioners § 414.63 Payment for outpatient diabetes self-management..., payment for outpatient diabetes self-management training is made under the physician fee schedule...

  14. 42 CFR 414.63 - Payment for outpatient diabetes self-management training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Payment for outpatient diabetes self-management... HEALTH SERVICES Physicians and Other Practitioners § 414.63 Payment for outpatient diabetes self... this section, payment for outpatient diabetes self-management training is made under the physician...

  15. 42 CFR 410.141 - Outpatient diabetes self-management training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Outpatient diabetes self-management training. 410... HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM SUPPLEMENTARY MEDICAL INSURANCE (SMI) BENEFITS Outpatient Diabetes Self-Management Training and Diabetes Outcome Measurements § 410.141 Outpatient diabetes self-management...

  16. 42 CFR 410.141 - Outpatient diabetes self-management training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Outpatient diabetes self-management training. 410... HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM SUPPLEMENTARY MEDICAL INSURANCE (SMI) BENEFITS Outpatient Diabetes Self-Management Training and Diabetes Outcome Measurements § 410.141 Outpatient diabetes self-management...

  17. 42 CFR 414.63 - Payment for outpatient diabetes self-management training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Payment for outpatient diabetes self-management... HEALTH SERVICES Physicians and Other Practitioners § 414.63 Payment for outpatient diabetes self... this section, payment for outpatient diabetes self-management training is made under the physician...

  18. 42 CFR 414.63 - Payment for outpatient diabetes self-management training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Payment for outpatient diabetes self-management... HEALTH SERVICES Physicians and Other Practitioners § 414.63 Payment for outpatient diabetes self... this section, payment for outpatient diabetes self-management training is made under the physician...

  19. 42 CFR 410.141 - Outpatient diabetes self-management training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Outpatient diabetes self-management training. 410... HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM SUPPLEMENTARY MEDICAL INSURANCE (SMI) BENEFITS Outpatient Diabetes Self-Management Training and Diabetes Outcome Measurements § 410.141 Outpatient diabetes self-management...

  20. 42 CFR 410.141 - Outpatient diabetes self-management training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Outpatient diabetes self-management training. 410... HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM SUPPLEMENTARY MEDICAL INSURANCE (SMI) BENEFITS Outpatient Diabetes Self-Management Training and Diabetes Outcome Measurements § 410.141 Outpatient diabetes self-management...

  1. 42 CFR 410.141 - Outpatient diabetes self-management training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Outpatient diabetes self-management training. 410... HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM SUPPLEMENTARY MEDICAL INSURANCE (SMI) BENEFITS Outpatient Diabetes Self-Management Training and Diabetes Outcome Measurements § 410.141 Outpatient diabetes self-management...

  2. 42 CFR 414.63 - Payment for outpatient diabetes self-management training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Payment for outpatient diabetes self-management... SERVICES Physicians and Other Practitioners § 414.63 Payment for outpatient diabetes self-management..., payment for outpatient diabetes self-management training is made under the physician fee schedule...

  3. Gynecologic disorders diagnosed during deployment to Southwest/Central Asia, active component females, U.S. Armed Forces, 2008-2013.

    PubMed

    2014-08-01

    Service women in the U.S. Armed Forces face unique challenges that may lead to or exacerbate gynecologic disorders - particularly during deployment. This report documented that approximately one in 10 military women who served in Southwest/Central Asia were diagnosed with a gynecologic disorder at least once during deployment. In addition, gynecologic disorders accounted for approximately one of every 20 medical evacuations of female service members from the war zone. A majority of clinically significant gynecologic disorder cases were attributable to irregular menstruation/bleeding or unspecified inflammation or pain of the female genital organs. Incidence rates of gynecologic disorder diagnoses were higher among black, non-Hispanic service women, among younger women, and among those in the Army and in motor transport and communications/intelligence occupations. Approximately 50% of gynecologic disorder cases had received gynecologic care within 6 months prior to deployment and nearly 90% had received care within 2 years of deployment. Despite pre-deployment care, it is apparent from this report that service women need continuous access to gynecologic care during deployment, particularly if conditions during deployment lead to and exacerbate gynecologic disorders.

  4. A national study of the impact of outpatient mental health services for children in long-term foster care.

    PubMed

    Bellamy, Jennifer L; Gopalan, Geetha; Traube, Dorian E

    2010-10-01

    Despite the tremendous mental health need evidenced by children in foster care and high rates of use of mental health services among children in foster care, little is known about the impact of outpatient mental health services on the behavioral health of this population. This study utilizes data from the National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-being (NSCAW), the first nationally representative study of child welfare in the United States. A subsample of 439 children who have experienced long-term foster care were included in this study. These data were used to estimate the impact of outpatient mental health services on the externalizing and internalizing behavior problems of children in long-term foster care. A propensity score matching model was employed to produce a robust estimate of the treatment effect. Results indicate that children who have experienced long-term foster care do not benefit from the receipt of outpatient mental health services. Study results are discussed in the context of earlier research on the quality of mental health services for children in foster care.

  5. Annual Report of the Committee on Gynecologic Oncology, Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology: Patient Annual Report for 2013 and Treatment Annual Report for 2008.

    PubMed

    Saito, Toshiaki; Katabuchi, Hidetaka

    2016-09-01

    The Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology collects and analyzes annual data on gynecologic cancers from member institutions. We present the Patient Annual Report for 2013 and the Treatment Annual Report for 2008. Data on 7280 patients with cervical cancer, 8952 with endometrial cancer, 5792 with ovarian cancer and 1903 with ovarian borderline tumor for whom treatment was initiated in 2013 were summarized in the Patient Annual Report. Stage I accounted for 56.7%, stage II for 23.4%, stage III for 9.8% and stage IV for 10.2% of all patients with cervical cancer. Stage I accounted for 71.7%, stage II for 6.5%, stage III for 14.5% and stage IV for 7.3% of all patients with endometrial cancer. Stage I accounted for 42.2%, stage II for 9.8%, stage III for 28.2% and stage IV for 8.3% of all patients with ovarian cancer. Data on the prognosis of 3658 patients with cervical cancer, 4159 with endometrial cancer and 2866 with ovarian cancer for whom treatment was initiated in 2008 were analyzed in the Treatment Annual Report. Survival was analyzed by using the Kaplan-Meier method, the log-rank test and the Wilcoxon test. The 5-year overall survival rates for patients with cervical cancer were 93.0% for stage I, 73.1% for stage II, 55.2% for stage III and 24.2% for stage IV. The equivalent rates for patients with endometrial cancer were 94.5%, 90.3%, 74.2% and 24.0%, respectively; and those for patients with ovarian cancer (surface epithelial-stromal tumors) were 90.5%, 73.5%, 48.1% and 29.4%, respectively.

  6. Traumatization in Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Adult Psychiatric Outpatients.

    PubMed

    Øhre, Beate; Uthus, Mette Perly; von Tetzchner, Stephen; Falkum, Erik

    2015-07-01

    Deaf and hard-of-hearing persons are at risk for experiencing traumatic events and such experiences are associated with symptoms of mental disorder. We investigated the prevalence of traumatic events and subsequent traumatization in adults referred to specialized psychiatric outpatient units for deaf and hard-of-hearing patients. Sixty-two patients were diagnosed with mental disorders and assessed for potential traumatic experiences in their preferred language and mode of communication using instruments translated into Norwegian Sign Language. All patients reported traumatic events, with a mean of 6.2 different types; 85% reported subsequent traumatization not significantly associated with either residential school setting or communicative competence of childhood caregivers. Traumatization patterns in both sexes were similar to those in hearing clinical samples. Findings indicate that psychiatric intake interviews should routinely assess potentially traumatic events and their impacts, and that mental health professionals working with deaf and hard-of-hearing patients should be able to treat trauma-related disorders.

  7. Internalizing the impossible: anorexic outpatients' experiences with women's beauty and fashion magazines.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, S R; McCoy, J K; Williams, M

    2001-01-01

    A growing body of research has linked the readership of women's beauty and fashion magazines with the development and perpetuation of anorexic behaviors in some young women. Although we know the link exists, little is known about the actual cognitive processes and the ways in which at risk women "use" these magazines to internalize the impossible thin ideal that appears to drive the illness. To understand this phenomenon and the process of internalization in greater depth, the authors conducted qualitative, semi-structured interviews with 28 outpatients at an eating disorder treatment facility in the western United States. Using a grounded theory approach, the authors' analysis provides a detailed description drawn from the patients' personal accounts of how the magazines have influenced their lives and eating-disordered behaviors.

  8. A Model to Estimate Human Resource Needs for the Treatment of Outpatients With Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fasola, Gianpiero; Aprile, Giuseppe; Aita, Marianna

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Although personnel costs significantly affect cancer health care expenditures, little is known about the relationship between workload, human resource requirements, and associated costs. An empirical model to forecast staffing demand is described according to the yearly caseload of outpatients with cancer beginning active treatment and the number of personnel working hours. Methods: The oncology department at the University Hospital of Udine (Udine, Italy) is a computerized unit taking care of approximately 1,300 patients per year. Each clinical episode is centrally recorded. We queried the database for the total number of consultations per patient beginning treatment during 2006. With predefined bonds (ie, time limit set for each visit type and annual working hours per employee), we sought to estimate yearly per-patient hours of care and the number of personnel needed. Results: In 2006, each outpatient with cancer beginning active treatment generated an average of 16 clinical evaluations, which in turn translated into 8 and 16 hours of physician and nurse working time, respectively. Assuming an average of 1,672 annual working hours, a need for one physician and three nurses for every 600 patients could be estimated for every 200 novel patients. In the next year, the same caseload induced 4.5 consultations on average; using a similar approach, the demand for additional time and resources was calculated. Conclusion: By means of a simple model combining predefined conditions with a centralized record of clinical episodes, we were able to provide a reasonable estimate of human resource requirements and a tool to forecast the staff expenditures of a cancer unit. PMID:22548005

  9. Actual outpatient PTCA: results of the OUTCLAS pilot study.

    PubMed

    Slagboom, T; Kiemeneij, F; Laarman, G J; van der Wieken, R; Odekerken, D

    2001-06-01

    This study tested the safety and feasibility of coronary angioplasty on an outpatient basis. The purpose of this approach includes cost-effectiveness and patient comfort. Included were 159 patients treated with balloon angioplasty or intracoronary stent placement, all performed via the radial artery with 6 French guiding catheters. Patients were selected for same-day discharge based on the absence of any adverse predictor for subacute occlusion or unfavorable clinical outcome during the first 24 hr after successful PTCA. One hundred and six (66%) patients were discharged 4-6 hr after PTCA. Stents were used in 40% of patients. There were no cardiac or vascular complications. We conclude that outpatient PTCA, performed via the radial artery, is both safe and feasible in a large part of a routine PTCA population.

  10. Patient satisfaction with services of the outpatient department

    PubMed Central

    Mohd, Athar; Chakravarty, Abhijit

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients' satisfaction is a useful measure to provide an indicator of quality in healthcare and thus needs to be measured frequently. The aim of the study was to analyse and compare the level of satisfaction of patients attending the Outpatient Department of a Hospital. Methods Study was conducted by using a pre-structured questionnaire with 120 samples. Samples were further stratified into sub-populations of Officers, Junior Commissioned Officers (JCOs) and Other Ranks (ORs) including dependents as study population. Results JCOs predominantly expressed lower satisfaction judgement with several attributes. Overall satisfaction judgement with Outpatient Department services were rated lower by JCOs (2.56) when compared with Officers and ORs (3.10), the difference being statistically significant. Conclusion Statistically significant differences have been identified by this study against various study attributes as well as overall impression towards OPD services among the study groups, which need to be addressed by the hospital leadership to achieve consumer delight. PMID:25378776

  11. Outpatient Mental Health Services in Mozambique: Use and Treatments.

    PubMed

    Wagenaar, Bradley H; Cumbe, Vasco; Raunig-Berhó, Manuela; Rao, Deepa; Kohrt, Brandon A; Stergachis, Andy; Napúa, Manuel; Sherr, Kenneth

    2016-06-01

    To describe current outpatient mental health service use and treatments in Mozambique, the authors reviewed registry entries for 2,071 outpatient psychiatric visits at the Beira Central Hospital in Sofala Province from January 2012 to September 2014. Service use was most common for schizophrenia, followed by epilepsy, delirium, and organic behavioral disorders. Only 3% of consultations for schizophrenia were first-visit patients. Treatment seeking among women was more likely for mood and neurotic disorders and less likely for substance use disorders and epilepsy. First-generation antipsychotics, most often paired with promethazine, dominated treatment regimens. Evidence-based reforms are needed to improve identification of mood disorders and broaden care beyond severe mental disorders.

  12. Outpatient antibiotic therapy for elderly patients. HIAT Study Group.

    PubMed

    Angel, J V

    1994-08-15

    The purpose of this study was to determine the safety and efficacy of outpatient intravenous (IV) therapy with a third-generation cephalosporin, cefotaxime, in patients > or = 60 years of age and to determine its effect on length of hospital stay. Subset analysis was performed with 62 patients with various infections who had been enrolled in a prospective, multicenter, open-label trial of IV cefotaxime delivered through a computerized ambulatory delivery system (ADS). Initial treatment was given in hospital if required, followed by home therapy. The overall clinical response rate among evaluable patients was 98%, and the overall bacteriologic response rate was 93%. The mean duration of inpatient therapy was 3.6 days less than the mean of 8.2 days allowed under diagnosis-related group (DRG) allotments. Outpatient therapy with cefotaxime via infusion pump is safe and effective and may reduce hospitalization requirements.

  13. [Should disease management be feared? (2): outpatient care].

    PubMed

    Rutschmann, O; Gaspoz, J M

    2005-11-23

    Outpatient disease management is a multidisciplinary team intervention for managing complex processes of chronic diseases, in order to improve healthcare quality and decrease process variations. Interventions are based on: (1) evidence-based guidelines; (2) educational programs; (3) close patient follow-up. This can be achieved by telephone follow-up, by outpatient clinic programs, or by homecare visits performed by case managers. For the management of patients with chronic heart failure, disease management programs have resulted in a 25% decrease in hospitalization and in reduced costs. In our Swiss health care system, however, a majority of patients are taken care of by private practitioners; thus, the involvement of these physicians in the development and in the realization of disease management programs will be key to their success.

  14. Effectiveness of prophylactic antibiotics in the outpatient treatment of burns.

    PubMed

    Boss, W K; Brand, D A; Acampora, D; Barese, S; Frazier, W H

    1985-03-01

    We compared wound infection rates in 133 outpatient burns treated with prophylactic antibiotics in our emergency room and 161 similar, untreated burns. Infection rates in the treated and untreated groups were 3.8% (5/133) and 3.1% (5/161), respectively. Since this was an observational cohort study, it was necessary to demonstrate the comparability of treated and untreated groups with respect to risk factors for infection, including patient age, size, location, and etiology of the burn injury, time since injury, and presence of co-morbidity. The groups were found to be comparable for all risk factors except size of burn: larger burns were over-represented in the treated group (p less than 0.05). Even after controlling for size, antibiotic use did not lower the infection rate. These results argue strongly against routine use of systemic antibiotics in the treatment of outpatient burns.

  15. Ertapenem: a new opportunity for outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy.

    PubMed

    Tice, Alan D

    2004-06-01

    Ertapenem is a parenteral carbapenem antimicrobial with pharmacological properties that allow it to be given once daily. This makes it a consideration for outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy (OPAT). In comparison with information from the OPAT Outcomes Registry, ertapenem seems well suited for the types of infections and bacteria that are commonly treated with OPAT, plus it has additional activity against anaerobic bacteria. This added spectrum makes it possible to treat complicated skin/skin-structure, complicated intra-abdominal and pelvic infections with a single antibiotic instead of the multiple agents that have usually been required. Ertapenem is also comparable to other OPAT antimicrobials in terms of adverse effects and clinical outcomes. This antimicrobial can be given with any delivery model, although its stability when mixed is such that daily preparation or self-mixing systems need to be considered. Ertapenem should be added to the growing list of once-daily parenteral antibiotics that can be given to outpatients.

  16. [Statement of the Polish Gynecological Society Expert Group on the use of Macmiror Complex 500].

    PubMed

    2012-12-01

    The group of experts representing the Polish Gynecologic Society has issued this statement based on the review of available literature on the potential benefits of the use of Macmiror Complex 500 in obstetrical and gynecologic practice. Mixed Vaginitis (MV) eg. the vaginal infection caused by at least two out of the triad of pathogens (fungi, bacteria and Trichomonas Vaginalis [TV]), constitutes the type of vaginitis which is underestimated as for its prevalence. Mixed pathogens are responsible for as much as one third of all vaginal infections. Macmiror Complex 500 contains two active ingredients: nifuratel and nystatin. Macmiror Complex 500 affects all common causes of vulvovaginitis, i.e. bacteria, yeasts and TV. At the same time, it is not effective against Lactobacillus spp., which is a clear advantage in the treatment of vaginal infections. The antibacterial spectrum of nifuratel includes aerobic and anaerobic bacteria. Moreover nifuratel is effective against Chlamydia trachomatis and Mycoplasma spp., it has an anti-trichomonal effect comparable to metranidazole and shows certain activity against Candida spp. Nystatin is effective against Candida albicans and is even very effective against Candida glabrata which is usually more resistant to imidazole antifungal agents. Nystatin's importance is rising due to the current increase of candidoses caused by non-albicans types. This increase is especially perceptible in recurring candidoses. The review of the available literature on the effectiveness of Macmiror Complex 500 in the OB/GYN practice leads to the following conclusions: the exeptionally broad antibacterial and antifungal and trichomonicidal activity of this formulation makes it a drug of choice in cases where MV is suspected. The possibility to treat both partners, favorable safety profile in pregnant patients and the availability of both vaginal ovules and the cream with applicator makes this drug an effective and suitable treatment option in

  17. Reduction of irradiated small bowel volume with Trendelenburg position in gynecologic pelvic radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Dirier, A; Adli, M; Andic, F; Cifci, S; Ors, Y; Kuzhan, A

    2010-04-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of Trendelenburg position in comparison to prone position on small bowel volume and treatment dose in gynecologic pelvic external beam radiotherapy using three-dimensional conformal treatment plans. Eight patients with gynecologic cancers, treated with definitive or postoperative pelvic radiotherapy were investigated. Pelvic computerized tomography (CT) scans for treatment planning were performed in prone and 25 degree Trendelenburg positions for each patient. The dose-volume histograms of small bowel within the treatment fields were obtained and compared for both positions. The clinical target volume (CTV) and the planning target volume (PTV) were also defined and evaluated in the subjects. Treatment dose was 5040 cGy to PTV with 180 cGy daily fraction doses in both techniques for all patients. The average irradiated small bowel volume was 726 cc for prone position and 458 cc for the Trendelenburg position. The average irradiated small bowel volume reduction in the Trendelenburg position was 38.0% (95% CI 19.5 +/- 38%) compared with the prone position. The average small bowel percent dose was 25.4% (1280 cGy) for Trendelenburg position and 39.9% (2010 cGy) for prone position. PTV doses were similar in both techniques. The results of this dosimetric study suggest that gynecologic pelvic radiotherapy in the Trendelenburg position decreases the volume of irradiated small bowel compared to prone position and may decrease treatment related small bowel morbidity. Clinical benefit of this position should be evaluated in further clinical studies.

  18. Peering into the Deep: Characterizing the Internet Search Patterns of Patients with Gynecologic Cancers.

    PubMed

    McLeod, Jane; Yu, Irene; Ingledew, Paris-Ann

    2017-03-01

    Cancer patients are increasingly using the Internet to learn about their disease, connect with others undergoing similar treatments and obtain support outside of the clinical encounter. The goal of this project was to explore how patients with gynecological cancers (ovarian, cervical, and endometrial) used the Internet as an information resource and how this influenced their treatment decisions and interactions with their health care specialists. From 2013 to 2014, ovarian, endometrial, and cervical cancer patients attending a comprehensive cancer centre were invited to complete a 24-item paper questionnaire detailing their experiences in searching the Internet. Twenty-eight patients completed survey. The largest portion of participants had an ovarian cancer diagnosis (61 %), followed by endometrial (29 %) and cervical cancer (11 %). Results indicate that the majority (85 %) of patients used the Internet as a resource to learn about their gynecological cancers. Most respondents (89 %) used Google as their search engine, and some used multiple search engines. The most frequently searched topics included treatment information (85 %), management of symptoms/treatment toxicity (59 %), and alternative treatments (37 %). Many patients (74 %) felt that the Internet was a useful tool for understanding their diagnosis; however, 33 % reported that the Internet was somewhat hard to understand. Most (78 %) patients reported that Internet information increased their understanding of their diagnosis, and 56 % felt it did not affect their decision-making. This study highlights how gynecological patients are accessing cancer information online and how physicians may support this within the clinical setting.

  19. Possible role of thymidine phosphorylase in gynecological tumors as an individualized treatment strategy

    PubMed Central

    Shida, Masako; Yasuda, Masanori; Fujita, Mariko; Miyazawa, Masaki; Kajiwara, Hiroshi; Hirasawa, Takeshi; Ikeda, Masae; Matsui, Naruaki; Muramatsu, Toshinari; Mikami, Mikio

    2016-01-01

    Thymidine phosphorylase (TP) is structurally similar to platelet-derived endothelial cell growth factor, and it activates 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) prodrugs and also promotes angiogenesis. In the present study, the possibility of using TP expression as a biomarker for 5-FU prodrugs, and the significance of TP as an angiogenic factor, were investigated in patients with gynecological tumors. The subjects enrolled in the study were 188 patients with gynecological tumors who provided informed consent and underwent tumor resection at the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology of Tokai University Hospital between February 2002 and January 2010. Measurement of the enzymatic activity of TP and dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD) was performed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. In addition, immunohistochemistry (IHC) analysis of microvessels by monochrome imaging, western blotting and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction were performed. The mean TP activity and the TP/DPD ratio were increased in squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix (306.9 and 2.2 U/mg protein, respectively) and adenosquamous carcinoma (317.6 and 1.4 U/mg protein, respectively) compared with benign tumors and other malignancies, including endometrial (uterine) carcinoma, ovarian serous adenocarcinoma and ovarian mucinous adenocarcinoma. However, these parameters were also elevated in other histological types of cancer such as clear cell adenocarcinoma of the ovary (115.2 and 2.1 U/mg protein, respectively), in which the microvessel area was the largest of all the histological types analyzed. Since high TP expression and a high TP/DPD ratio were identified in other tumors besides cervical cancer, it is possible that patients for whom 5-FU prodrugs are indicated could be selected appropriately if their TP activity is determined and their TP expression is analyzed by IHC prior to initiation of the treatment. PMID:27899985

  20. Overexpression of Cancer-Associated Genes via Epigenetic Derepression Mechanisms in Gynecologic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Hae Min; Kwon, Mi Jeong; Shin, Young Kee

    2014-01-01

    Like other cancers, most gynecologic cancers are caused by aberrant expression of cancer-related genes. Epigenetics is one of the most important gene expression mechanisms, which contribute to cancer development and progression by regulating cancer-related genes. Since the discovery of differential gene expression patterns in cancer cells when compared with normal cells, extensive efforts have been made to explore the origins of abnormal gene expression in cancer. Epigenetics, the study of inheritable changes in gene expression that do not alter DNA sequence is a key area of this research. DNA methylation and histone modification are well-known epigenetic mechanisms, while microRNAs and alternative splicing have recently been identified as important regulators of epigenetic mechanisms. These mechanisms not only affect specific target gene expression but also regulate the functioning of other epigenetic mechanisms. Moreover, these diverse epigenetic regulations occur simultaneously. Epigenetic regulation of gene expression is extraordinarily complicated and all epigenetic mechanisms to be studied at once to determine the exact gene regulation mechanisms. Traditionally, the contribution of epigenetics to cancer is thought to be mediated through the inactivation of tumor suppressor genes expression. But recently, it is arising that some oncogenes or cancer-promoting genes (CPGs) are overexpressed in diverse type of cancers through epigenetic derepression mechanism, such as DNA and histone demethylation. Epigenetic derepression arises from diverse epigenetic changes, and all of these mechanisms actively interact with each other to increase oncogenes or CPGs expression in cancer cell. Oncogenes or CPGs overexpressed through epigenetic derepression can initiate cancer development, and accumulation of these abnormal epigenetic changes makes cancer more aggressive and treatment resistance. This review discusses epigenetic mechanisms involved in the overexpression of

  1. Improving Patient Outcomes in Gynecology: The Role of Large Data Registries and Big Data Analytics.

    PubMed

    Erekson, Elisabeth A; Iglesia, Cheryl B

    2015-01-01

    Value-based care is quality health care delivered effectively and efficiently. Data registries were created to collect accurate information on patients with enough clinical information to allow for adequate risk adjustment of postoperative outcomes. Because most gynecologic procedures are elective and preference-sensitive, offering nonsurgical alternatives is an important quality measure. The Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), in conjunction with mandates from the Affordable Care Act, passed by Congress in 2010, has developed several initiatives centered on the concept of paying for quality care, and 1 of the first CMS initiatives began with instituting payment penalties for hospital-acquired conditions, such as catheter-associated urinary tract infections, central line-associated bloodstream infections, and surgical site infections. Registries specific to gynecology include the Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology registry established in 1996; the FIBROID registry established in 1999; the Pelvic Floor Disorders Registry established by the American Urogynecologic Society in conjunction with other societies (2014); and the Society of Gynecologic Oncologists Clinical Outcomes Registry. Data from these registries can be used to critically analyze practice patterns, find best practices, and enact meaningful changes in systems and workflow. The ultimate goal of data registries and clinical support tools derived from big data is to access accurate and meaningful data from electronic records without repetitive chart review or the need for direct data entry. The most efficient operating systems will include open-access computer codes that abstract data, in compliance with privacy regulations, in real-time to provide information about our patients, their outcomes, and the quality of care that we deliver.

  2. Evaluation of Association Between Gynecologic Oncology Fellowship Length and a Career in Academic Medicine.

    PubMed

    Kesterson, Joshua P; Szender, J Brian; Schaefer, Eric; Fanning, James; Lele, Shashikant; Frederick, Peter

    2016-04-28

    The purpose of this study is to determine the association between gynecologic oncology fellowship training factors, including fellowship length, and a career in academic medicine. A survey was sent to all 980 gynecologic oncologists identified via the SGO membership directory. The survey questions focused on demographics, fellowship training, practice- type, and research involvement. Demographics of the study population and survey responses were reported using frequencies and percentages. Chi-squared tests were used to test for associations between selected survey responses and length of fellowship. The authors received 410 (42 %) responses. Most respondents (60 %) graduated from a 3-year fellowship, while 27 and 13 % attended 2- and 4-year fellowships, respectively. Practice descriptions included academic/university (52 %), community/private practice (21 %), private practice with academic appointment (20 %), and other (7 %). A majority (64 %) reported current involvement in research as a principal investigator (PI); however, 54 % reported spending 10 % or less of their time in research-related activities. Approximately half reported that their fellowship research experience contributed to their current practice. Graduates of 3- and 4-year fellowships had similar rates of employment in academic/university settings (58 and 52 %, respectively). Graduates of 4-year fellowships were more likely to hold an advanced degree and 11 or more publications at completion of fellowship. A majority of graduates of a gynecologic oncology fellowship practice in an academic/university setting and are involved in research. Fellowship length does not correlate with a current academic medicine appointment. Graduates of 4-year fellowships are more likely to hold additional advanced degrees and more publications.

  3. Pain and Mean Absorbed Dose to the Pubic Bone After Radiotherapy Among Gynecological Cancer Survivors

    SciTech Connect

    Waldenstroem, Ann-Charlotte; Olsson, Caroline; Wilderaeng, Ulrica; Dunberger, Gail; Lind, Helena; Al-Abany, Massoud; Palm, Asa; Avall-Lundqvist, Elisabeth; Johansson, Karl-Axel; Steineck, Gunnar

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: To analyze the relationship between mean absorbed dose to the pubic bone after pelvic radiotherapy for gynecological cancer and occurrence of pubic bone pain among long-term survivors. Methods and Materials: In an unselected, population-based study, we identified 823 long-term gynecological cancer survivors treated with pelvic radiotherapy during 1991-2003. For comparison, we used a non-radiation-treated control population of 478 matched women from the Swedish Population Register. Pain, intensity of pain, and functional impairment due to pain in the pubic bone were assessed with a study-specific postal questionnaire. Results: We analyzed data from 650 survivors (participation rate 79%) with median follow-up of 6.3 years (range, 2.3-15.0 years) along with 344 control women (participation rate, 72 %). Ten percent of the survivors were treated with radiotherapy; ninety percent with surgery plus radiotherapy. Brachytherapy was added in 81%. Complete treatment records were recovered for 538/650 survivors, with dose distribution data including dose-volume histograms over the pubic bone. Pubic bone pain was reported by 73 survivors (11%); 59/517 (11%) had been exposed to mean absorbed external beam doses <52.5 Gy to the pubic bone and 5/12 (42%) to mean absorbed external beam doses {>=}52.5 Gy. Thirty-three survivors reported pain affecting sleep, a 13-fold increased prevalence compared with control women. Forty-nine survivors reported functional impairment measured as pain walking indoors, a 10-fold increased prevalence. Conclusions: Mean absorbed external beam dose above 52.5 Gy to the pubic bone increases the occurrence of pain in the pubic bone and may affect daily life of long-term survivors treated with radiotherapy for gynecological cancer.

  4. Hematological Toxicity After Robotic Stereotactic Body Radiosurgery for Treatment of Metastatic Gynecologic Malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Kunos, Charles A.; Debernardo, Robert; Radivoyevitch, Tomas; Fabien, Jeffrey; Dobbins, Donald C.; Zhang Yuxia; Brindle, James

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate hematological toxicity after robotic stereotactic body radiosurgery (SBRT) for treatment of women with metastatic abdominopelvic gynecologic malignancies. Methods and Materials: A total of 61 women with stage IV gynecologic malignancies treated with abdominopelvic SBRT were analyzed after ablative radiation (2400 cGy/3 divided consecutive daily doses) delivered by a robotic-armed Cyberknife SBRT system. Abdominopelvic bone marrow was identified using computed tomography-guided contouring. Fatigue and hematologic toxicities were graded by retrospective assignment of common toxicity criteria for adverse events (version 4.0). Bone marrow volume receiving 1000 cGy (V10) was tested for association with post-therapy (median 32 days [25%-75% quartile, 28-45 days]) white- or red-cell counts, hemoglobin levels, and platelet counts as marrow toxicity surrogates. Results: In all, 61 women undergoing abdominopelvic SBRT had a median bone marrow V10 of 2% (25%-75% quartile: 0%-8%). Fifty-seven (93%) of 61 women had received at least 1 pre-SBRT marrow-taxing chemotherapy regimen for metastatic disease. Bone marrow V10 did not associate with hematological adverse events. In all, 15 grade 2 (25%) and 2 grade 3 (3%) fatigue symptoms were self-reported among the 61 women within the first 10 days post-therapy, with fatigue resolved spontaneously in all 17 women by 30 days post-therapy. Neutropenia was not observed. Three (5%) women had a grade 1 drop in hemoglobin level to <10.0 g/dL. Single grade 1, 2, and 3 thrombocytopenias were documented in 3 women. Conclusions: Abdominopelvic SBRT provided ablative radiation dose to cancer targets without increased bone marrow toxicity. Abdominopelvic SBRT for metastatic gynecologic malignancies warrants further study.

  5. Evaluating performance of the operational managers of obstetrics and gynecology service providing wards

    PubMed Central

    Parvaresh, Zahra; Kazemi, Ashraf; Ehsanpour, Soheila; Sajadi, Haniye Sadat

    2016-01-01

    Background: The goal of hospitals, as the most important health care providing centers, is to improve the health level of the society. Achieving this goal is directly related with performance of the managers. This study was conducted to evaluate the performance of operational managers of obstetrics and gynecology service providing wards from the point of view of the staff at educational hospitals of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences in 2015. Materials and Methods: In this descriptive study, target population comprised all supervisors and the staff working at obstetrics and gynecology and maternity wards. Data were collected through a researcher-made questionnaire after evaluation of its reliability and validity using questions on managerial performance (planning, organizing, leadership, and control dimensions) and demographic characteristics of the managers and staff. Data were analyzed using independent t-test, one sample t-test, Spearman and Pearson coefficient tests, and one-way analysis of variance. Results: The total mean score of staff's point of view toward performance of managers’ performance was significantly higher than the average level (P < 0.001, t = 13.2). In addition, mean scores of managerial performance in planning (P < 0.001, t = 14.93), organizing (P < 0.001, t = 11.64), leadership (P < 0.001, t = 11.16), and control (P < 0.001, t = 13.75) dimensions were significantly higher than the moderate level. Conclusions: With respect to the fact that maintaining and improving the health of mothers and neonates depends on the management and managers’ performance in obstetrics and gynecology service providing wards, more than moderate managers’ performance need to be improved. It is recommended that higher-level managers pay special attention to the empowerment of managerial skills among operational managers. PMID:28194206

  6. Acute behavioral interventions and outpatient treatment strategies with suicidal adolescents

    PubMed Central

    O’Brien, Kimberly H. McManama; Singer, Jonathan B.; LeCloux, Mary; Duarté-Vélez, Yovanska; Spirito, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Despite the prevalence of suicidal thoughts and behaviors among adolescents, there is limited knowledge of effective interventions to use with this population. This paper reviews the findings of studies on behavioral interventions for adolescents who are at acute suicide risk, as well as outpatient treatment and risk management strategies with suicidal adolescents. The importance of addressing comorbid behaviors and enhancing protective factors are discussed. Cultural considerations in working with suicidal adolescents and strategies for conducting culturally competent treatment are explored. PMID:26279646

  7. Outpatient follow-up after traumatic injury: Challenges and opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Luke; Shaheen, Aisha; Crandall, Marie

    2014-01-01

    Background: It has been shown that rates of ambulatory follow-up after traumatic injury are not optimal, but the association with insurance status has not been studied. Aims: To describe trauma patient characteristics associated with completed follow-up after hospitalization and to compare relative rates of healthcare utilization across payor types. Setting and Design: Single institution retrospective cohort study. Materials and Methods: We compared patient demographics and healthcare utilization behavior after discharge among trauma patients between April 1, 2005 and April 1, 2010. Our primary outcome of interest was outpatient provider contact within 2 months of discharge. Statistical Analysis: Multivariate logistic regression was used to determine the association between characteristics including insurance status and subsequent ambulatory and acute care. Results: We reviewed the records of 2906 sequential trauma patients. Patients with Medicaid and those without insurance were significantly less likely to complete scheduled outpatient follow-up within 2 months, compared to those with private insurance (Medicaid, OR 0.67, 95% CI 0.51-0.88; uninsured, OR 0.29, 95% CI 0.23-0.36). Uninsured and Medicaid patients were twice as likely as privately insured patients to visit the Emergency Department (ED) for any reason after discharge (uninsured patients (Medicaid, OR 2.6, 95% CI 1.50-4.53; uninsured, OR 2.10, 94% CI 1.31-3.36). Conclusion: We found marked differences between patients in scheduled outpatient follow-up and ED utilization after injury associated with insurance status; however, Medicaid seemed to obviate some of this disparity. Medicaid expansion may improve outpatient follow-up and affect patient outcome disparities after injury. PMID:25400385

  8. Outpatient Workload (RVU) Predictors: Age, Gender & Beneficiary Category

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-15

    REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE Form Approved OMBNo. 0704-0188 The pubec repotting biwden tor this collection of rnfotmetton is estimated to average 1...official policy of the Departments of the Army, Air Force, Navy, Department of Defense, Baylor University, or the U.S. Government . Outpatient Workload...represented 16.0% of GDP, up slightly from the 15.9% reported in 2004. Bodenheimer’s (2005a) research stated that the federal government is projecting

  9. Clinical recovery time from conscious sedation for dental outpatients.

    PubMed Central

    Takarada, Tohru; Kawahara, Michio; Irifune, Masahiro; Endo, Chie; Shimizu, Yoshitaka; Maeoka, Kiyoshi; Tanaka, Chikako; Katayama, Sotaro

    2002-01-01

    For dental outpatients undergoing conscious sedation, recovery from sedation must be sufficient to allow safe discharge home, and many researchers have defined "recovery time" as the time until the patient was permitted to return home after the end of dental treatment. But it is frequently observed that patients remain in the clinic after receiving permission to go home. The present study investigated "clinical recovery time," which is defined as the time until discharge from the clinic after a dental procedure. We analyzed data from 61 outpatients who had received dental treatment under conscious sedation at the Hiroshima University Dental Hospital between January 1998 and December 2000 (nitrous oxide-oxygen inhalation sedation [n = 35], intravenous sedation with midazolam [n = 10], intravenous sedation with propofol [n = 16]). We found that the median clinical recovery time was 40 minutes after nitrous oxide-oxygen sedation, 80 minutes after midazolam sedation, and 52 minutes after propofol sedation. The clinical recovery time was about twice as long as the recovery time described in previous studies. In a comparison of the sedation methods, clinical recovery time differed (P = .0008), being longer in the midazolam sedation group than in the nitrous oxide-oxygen sedation group (P = .018). These results suggest the need for changes in treatment planning for dental outpatients undergoing conscious sedation. PMID:12779113

  10. Possibly Impossible Patients: Management of Difficult Behavior in Oncology Outpatients

    PubMed Central

    Peteet, John R.; Meyer, Fremonta L.; Miovic, Michael K.

    2011-01-01

    Angry, threatening, or otherwise disruptive behavior by patients can interfere with necessary oncologic treatment, sometimes to the point of rendering continued care impossible. We offer oncology clinicians guidance in dealing with difficult outpatients by discussing the differential diagnosis and multidisciplinary management of treatment-disrupting behavior in the ambulatory oncology setting. We review the existing literature on dealing with difficult patients and present clinical experience at a comprehensive cancer center where a formalized, institutional process for responding to disruptive outpatients has been developed. A structured, multidisciplinary approach to deal with difficult behavior in oncology outpatients can improve care and staff morale. Staff using this approach can identify causes of treatment-disrupting behavior, develop and implement appropriate behavior plans, facilitate communication, address mental health issues, and ensure that decisions to terminate a relationship with a patient are ethical, clinically justified, and supported by due process. In the future, clinical recommendations and institutional guidelines for dealing with difficult patients should be evaluated with more structured, quantitative research. PMID:22043189

  11. [WINHO quality indicators for outpatient oncology care in Germany].

    PubMed

    Hermes-Moll, Kerstin; Klein, Gudrun; Buschmann-Maiworm, Regina E; Baumann, Walter; Otremba, Burkhard; Lebahn, Herbert; Steinmetz, H Tilmann; Geraedts, Max; Kleeberg, Ulrich R; Schmitz, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the WINHO indicators project is to describe and enhance the quality of outpatient oncology care in Germany with indicators. This paper deals with the development of a set of evidence- and consensus-based meaningful indicators to assess the quality of outpatient oncology care in Germany. These indicators are intended to be applied in assessments of quality of patient care in oncology practices, in quality reports and in peer-to-peer benchmarking. A set of 272 already existing indicators was identified through internet and literature searches. After redundancy reduction and addition of newly developed indicators for areas of ambulatory oncology care that were not yet covered, a preliminary set of 67 indicators was established. The further development of the indicator set was based on a modified version of the two-step RAND/UCLA expert evaluation method, which has been internationally established for developing quality indicator sets. The indicators were modified after the first round of ratings. After completing and assessing the second round of ratings, a set of 46 homogeneously positively rated quality indicators is now available for outpatient oncology care in Germany.

  12. Medicaid outpatient utilization for waterborne pathogenic illness following Hurricane Floyd.

    PubMed Central

    Setzer, Christian; Domino, Marisa Elena

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Flooding provides an opportunity for epidemics of waterborne viral, protozoan, or bacterial diseases to develop in affected areas. Epidemic levels of disease may translate into higher than average levels of health services use, depending in part on help-seeking behaviors. The authors investigated whether the flooding that occurred as a result of Hurricane Floyd in September 1999 was associated with an increase in outpatient visits for waterborne diseases among Medicaid enrollees in eastern North Carolina. METHODS: Using a difference-in-differences estimation technique, the authors examined the change in outpatient visits by North Carolina Medicaid enrollees for selected waterborne diseases following the hurricane. The study focused on counties with high concentrations of hog farming that were mildly/moderately or severely affected by the hurricane, using unaffected counties and the year before the hurricane as controls. RESULTS: Small increases in Medicaid-covered outpatient visits were found in severely affected counties for two of the six pathogens selected for analysis, relative to unaffected counties. Larger increases in visits were found for nonspecific intestinal infections in both severely and moderately affected counties following the hurricane, relative to unaffected counties. CONCLUSIONS: The large increase in visits for ill-defined intestinal infection is noteworthy. The relative lack of increase in visits with specific pathogenic diagnoses may be attributable, at least in part, to a number of factors, including incomplete diagnostic information provided by treating clinicians, low treatment-seeking behavior, and use of non-Medicaid-funded emergency services. PMID:15313110

  13. [Outpatient blood pressure monitoring is not always necessary].

    PubMed

    Divisón Garrote, J A

    It is clear that clinical measurements of blood pressure can lead to errors in the diagnostic process and follow-up of patients with hypertension. Scientific societies recommend other measurement methods, such as home measurements and outpatient monitoring. Outpatient monitoring might be the golden standard but, nowadays has an important limitation-its availability. Home measurements solve 80-90% of the doubts of the diagnostic process and follow-up of patients with hypertension, and its higher availability and acceptance by the patient are clear. Home measurements should be used in the diagnostic process of arterial hypertension as a screening test for white coat hypertension and masked hypertension. They should be used as a screening test for resistant hypertension in the follow-up of patients with high blood pressure. Besides, in the follow-up of patients with hypertension home measurements have shown that they can contribute to treatment adherence, reduce clinical inertia and make data teletransmission possible, aspects that have proven to help improve the degree of control of hypertensive patients. Therefore, home measurements would be the treatment of choice for the diagnosis and follow-up of most patients with hypertension. We should consider home measurements and outpatient monitoring as complementary methods for the diagnosis and follow-up of patients with high blood pressure.

  14. Outpatient renal needle biopsy of the transplanted kidney: safety profile.

    PubMed

    Petrone, H; Frapiccini, M G; Skare, R; Baran, M

    2011-11-01

    Since May 2005, we began performing renal graft biopsies as outpatient procedures when the patient's condition did not require hospitalization. To evaluate the safety profile of the 137 procedures performed in 111 patients, we performed a retrospective analysis of complications after all biopsies between 4 May 2005 and 6 January 6, 2011. The analysis focused on types of complications as well as needs for hospitalization with length of stay, for blood transfusion or for a further intervention. There were complications in 10.9% of procedures (n = 15) with 8% requiring hospitalization (n = 11). The complications were: gross hematuria (n = 10) including blockage of urinary flow (n = 2) with one subject requiring urologic intervention, and one patient experienced severe pain at the puncture site. Neither renal graft nor patient survival was threatened; there was no hemodynamic decompensation needing blood transfusions. The average hospital stay was 2.27 days (range = 1-8). Outpatient renal biopsies in 111 patients (137 procedures) had an 8% incidence of complications requiring admission and an average length of hospitalization of 2.27 days. Gross hematuria the most frequent problem, in no way compromised patient or graft survival showing it to be a safe outpatient procedure.

  15. Breadth versus volume: Neurology outpatient clinic cases in medical education.

    PubMed

    Albert, Dara V; Blood, Angela D; Park, Yoon Soo; Brorson, James R; Lukas, Rimas V

    2016-06-01

    This study examined how volume in certain patient case types and breadth across patient case types in the outpatient clinic setting are related to Neurology Clerkship student performance. Case logs from the outpatient clinic experience of 486 students from The University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine, USA, participating in the 4week Neurology Clerkship from July 2008 to June 2013 were reviewed. A total of 12,381 patient encounters were logged and then classified into 13 diagnostic categories. How volume of cases within categories and the breadth of cases across categories relate to the National Board of Medical Examiners Clinical Subject Examination for Neurology and a Neurology Clerkship Objective Structured Clinical Examination was analyzed. Volume of cases was significantly correlated with the National Board of Medical Examiners Clinical Subject Examination for Neurology (r=.290, p<.001), the Objective Structured Clinical Examination physical examination (r=.236, p=.011), and the Objective Structured Clinical Examination patient note (r=.238, p=.010). Breadth of cases was significantly correlated with the National Board of Medical Examiners Clinical Subject Examination for Neurology (r=.231, p=.017), however was not significantly correlated with any component of the Objective Structured Clinical Examination. Volume of cases correlated with higher performance on measures of specialty knowledge and clinical skill. Fewer relationships emerged correlating breadth of cases and performance on the same measures. This study provides guidance to educators who must decide how much emphasis to place on volume versus breadth of cases in outpatient clinic learning experiences.

  16. 2014 First-trimester ultrasound forum from the Korean Society of Ultrasound in Obstetrics and Gynecology

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Soo-Young; Hong, Joon Seok; Seol, Hyun-Joo; Hwang, Han Sung; Park, Hyun Soo; Kim, Kunwoo; Ko, Hyun Sun; Kwak, Dong-Wook; Kim, Moon Young; Park, Mi Hye; Oh, Min Jeong; Park, Joong Shin

    2015-01-01

    A first-trimester ultrasound scan has become an essential part of antenatal care. The Korean Society of Ultrasound in Obstetrics and Gynecology held a first-trimester ultrasound forum on April 5, 2014. The forum aimed to present an updated review of the literature on the topic of first-trimester ultrasound in specific lectures and to host a panel discussion on several important issues regarding first-trimester scans. The forum provided evidence- and consensus-based best practice patterns for obstetricians in Korea. Here, we report the review and checklists presented from the forum. PMID:25629012

  17. [Experience in the use of Romashka-2 device in gynecologic laser microsurgery].

    PubMed

    Zuev, V M; Malyshev, B N; Saliuk, V A; Fundator, Iu V

    1990-01-01

    The outfit Romashka-2 intended for evaporation, coagulation and preparation of thin biostructures in the superficial and deep operative fields by focused radiation of CO2 laser is widely used mostly in gynecology, otolaryngology and other branches of medicine. Experience gained with the 4-years' clinical trial of the outfit, carried out at one of the women's consultation clinics permitted one to assess the Soviet public health requirement of the outfits Romashka-2 as well as to calculate the economic effect provided by its use.

  18. [Principles and advanced techniques for better internetpresentations in obstetrics and gynecology].

    PubMed

    Seufert, R; Molitor, N; Pollow, K; Woernle, F; Hawighorst-Knapstein, S

    2001-08-01

    Internet presentations are common tools for better medical communication and better scientific work. Meanwhile a great number of gynecological and obstetrical institutions present data via the world wide web within a wide range of quality and performance. Specific HTML editors offer quick and easy presentations, but only advanced internet techniques enable interesting multimedia presentations. N-tier applications are the future standard and we must integrate them in general informatical systems. New Concepts, actual tools and general problems will be discussed and new principles similar to actual E commerce techniques are able to solve our special medical demands.

  19. Personalized Circulating Tumor DNA Biomarkers Dynamically Predict Treatment Response and Survival In Gynecologic Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Anand, Sanya; Sebra, Robert; Catalina Camacho, Sandra; Garnar-Wortzel, Leopold; Nair, Navya; Moshier, Erin; Wooten, Melissa; Uzilov, Andrew; Chen, Rong; Prasad-Hayes, Monica; Zakashansky, Konstantin; Beddoe, Ann Marie; Schadt, Eric; Dottino, Peter; Martignetti, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Background High-grade serous ovarian and endometrial cancers are the most lethal female reproductive tract malignancies worldwide. In part, failure to treat these two aggressive cancers successfully centers on the fact that while the majority of patients are diagnosed based on current surveillance strategies as having a complete clinical response to their primary therapy, nearly half will develop disease recurrence within 18 months and the majority will die from disease recurrence within 5 years. Moreover, no currently used biomarkers or imaging studies can predict outcome following initial treatment. Circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) represents a theoretically powerful biomarker for detecting otherwise occult disease. We therefore explored the use of personalized ctDNA markers as both a surveillance and prognostic biomarker in gynecologic cancers and compared this to current FDA-approved surveillance tools. Methods and Findings Tumor and serum samples were collected at time of surgery and then throughout treatment course for 44 patients with gynecologic cancers, representing 22 ovarian cancer cases, 17 uterine cancer cases, one peritoneal, three fallopian tube, and one patient with synchronous fallopian tube and uterine cancer. Patient/tumor-specific mutations were identified using whole-exome and targeted gene sequencing and ctDNA levels quantified using droplet digital PCR. CtDNA was detected in 93.8% of patients for whom probes were designed and levels were highly correlated with CA-125 serum and computed tomography (CT) scanning results. In six patients, ctDNA detected the presence of cancer even when CT scanning was negative and, on average, had a predictive lead time of seven months over CT imaging. Most notably, undetectable levels of ctDNA at six months following initial treatment was associated with markedly improved progression free and overall survival. Conclusions Detection of residual disease in gynecologic, and indeed all cancers, represents a diagnostic

  20. Role of vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitors in the treatment of gynecologic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Burger, Robert A

    2010-03-01

    This article reviews the history and current status of vascular endothelial growth factor targeted therapy for the most common gynecologic malignancies - epithelial ovarian, endometrial and cervical cancers. The biologic rationale for targeting vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) for these disease sites is well-founded, and pre-clinical studies have supported the development of anti-VEGF agents. Their classification, known mechanisms of action, unique toxicities and clinical development are herein explored, the latter including issues related to study design, disease site and disease setting.