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Sample records for gypsum board exposed

  1. Sag-resistant gypsum board containing coal fly ash and method for making same

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce, R.B.; Kuntze, R.A.

    1983-09-06

    A gypsum board consisting essentially of a monolithic cellular core of set gypsum and a fiberous cover sheet encasement provided with improved properties by the gypsum core having incorporated therein coal fly ash in an amount of about 1-20% by weight of stucco in the gypsum slurry used in forming the board and method of producing the board are disclosed.

  2. Gamma doses from phospho-gypsum plaster-board.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, R S

    1997-01-01

    The use of phospho-gypsum plaster-board and plaster cement in buildings as a substitute for natural gypsum may constitute an additional source of radiation exposure to both workers and members of the public, both from inhalation of radon progeny produced from radon which is exhaled from the plaster-board and from beta and gamma radiation produced by radioactive decay in the plaster-board. The calculations presented in this paper indicate that if phospho-gypsum sheets 1 cm thick containing a 226Ra concentration of 400 Bq kg(-1) are used to line the walls and ceiling of a room of dimensions up to 5 m x 5 m x 3 m, the annual effective dose from gamma radiation for a person continually occupying the room should not exceed approximately 0.13 mSv. This compares with a measured annual average effective dose from gamma radiation in Australian homes of 0.9 mSv. The annual effective dose from such thin sheets is directly proportional to the 226Ra concentration in the plaster-board.

  3. Gypsum

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crangle, R.D.

    2013-01-01

    The United States is the world’s fifth ranked producer and consumer of gypsum. Production of crude gypsum in the United States during 2012 was estimated to be 9.9 Mt (10.9 million st), an increase of 11 percent compared with 2011 production. The average price of mined crude gypsum was $7/t ($6.35/st). Synthetic gypsum production in 2012, most of which is generated as a flue-gas desulphurization product from coal-fired electric powerplants, was estimated to be 11.8 Mt (13 million st) and priced at approximately $1.50/t ($1.36/st). Forty-seven companies produced gypsum in the United States at 54 mines and plants in 34 states. U.S. gypsum exports totaled 408 kt (450,000 st). Imports were much higher at 3.2 Mt (3.5 million st).

  4. Gypsum

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crangle, R.D.

    2012-01-01

    The United States is the world's fourth leading producer and consumer of gypsum. Production of gypsum in the U.S. during 2011 was estimated to be 9.4 Mt (103 million st), an increase of 6 percent compared with 2010 production. The average price of mined crude gypsum was $7/t ($6.35/st). Synthetic gypsum, most of which is generated as a fluegas desulfurization process from coal-fired electric powerplants, was priced at approximately $1.50/t (1.36/st). Forty-seven companies produced gypsum in the U.S. at 54 mines and plants in 34 states. U.S. gypsum exports totaled about 300 kt (330,000 st). Imports were much higher at approximately 3.3 Mt (3.6 million st).

  5. Quantification of centennial erosion rates in gypsum outcrops based on anatomical modifications in exposed roots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corona, Christophe; Lopez Saez, Jerome; Stoffel, Markus

    2016-04-01

    The karstic landscape of Triassic gypsum and anhydrite in the northern French Alps is of a discontinuous nature and is found mainly in the internal zone and high mountain areas, where it is made up of original landforms such as karstic domes. To date, despite intense surface weathering and karstic corrosion which generate karstic forms, gullies and result in the transport of considerable loads by mountain torrents after heavy rains data on the meteorological degradation of gypsum outcrops are yet extermely rare. In the Vanoise Massif (French Alps) erosion rates were obtained with the monitoring of weight and volume losses of calibrated gypsum tablets. Measurements from these sites indicate denudation rates varying between 0.2 and 6 mm yr-1 in the subalpine zone. Erosion is attributed to intense dissolution, seasonal water streams, avalanches and freezethaw cycles weathering. On woody slopes, such continuous denudation processes are sufficient to expose roots while allowing them to keep their tips in the ground. In this study, data from continuous field monitoring of micrometric method and gypsum tablets covering the past 10 years, have, for the first time, been compared with an alternative method based on dendrogeomorphology. A total of 45 exposed roots of Pinus montana were sampled in the gypsum badlands and the anatomical variations in annual growth rings due to exposure caused by denudation were analysed. The first year of exposure was determined via the peculiar size reduction of earlywood tracheids. The medium-term erosion rates (0.5-5 mm.yr-1) as observed in the root-ring series match with erosion rates derived from gypsum tablets. The detailed knowledge of anatomical changes in roots is thus demonstrated a powerful tool for geoscientists to quantify minimal rates of soil erosion in areas where measurements of past processes are not readily available.

  6. Estimates of inhalation doses resulting from the possible use of phospho-gypsum plaster-board in Australian homes.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, R S; Peggie, J R; Leith, I S

    1995-04-01

    Current materials used as internal lining in Australian buildings are based on natural gypsum of low radium content. A study was carried out to estimate the contribution to the annual effective dose due to airborne contamination from chemical by-product gypsum plaster-board of higher radium content if it were used as an internal lining. The 226Ra content and 222Rn exhalation rate were measured for several samples of the plaster-board, and the behavior of 222Rn and its progeny (218Po, 214Pb, 214Bi, and 214Po) in a typical building was modeled numerically, using the results of the exhalation rate measurements as input. For building ventilation rates greater than approximately 0.5 air changes per hour, the contribution to the total annual effective dose from inhalation of 222Rn and its progeny exhaled from the phospho-gypsum plaster-board is estimated to be below 1 mSv. This contribution is reduced if the surface of the plaster-board is coated with paint or cardboard, or if the very fine particles are removed from the phospho-gypsum during manufacture of the plaster-board. The effective doses arising from dust generation during the installation of the plaster-board are also estimated to be below 1 mSv. The recommended action level of 200 Bq m-3 for radon in air in Australia corresponds to an annual effective dose of approximately 6 mSv. The study indicates that the suggested acceptable level of 185 Bq kg-1 for the 226Ra concentration in the plaster-board may be too restrictive under Australian conditions.

  7. Characterization of gypsum crystals exposed to a high CO2 concentration fog using x-ray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carreño-Márquez, I. J. A.; Castillo-Sandoval, I.; Esparza-Ponce, H. E.; Fuentes-Cobas, L.; Montero-Cabrera, M. E.

    2015-07-01

    In Chihuahua State, a little town called Naica has the largest gypsum single crystals in the world. The growth of these structures has been described as a long and stable process developed over thousands of years. Due to the change in the environmental conditions, these crystals could suffer alterations on their surface. In this project we study the cause of possible deterioration of the giant crystals and intend to suggest measures for their preservation. For this sake, our first experiment consists on several gypsum crystals that have been subjected in a climate chamber to a fog at high CO2 concentration and 51 °C for a period of time of six months, extracting two crystals every 15 days. Then the crystals have been characterized through Grazing Incidence X-Ray Diffraction using a diffractometer PanAlytical X'PertPro with two different detectors; Xe-filled proportional detector and a Pixel 3D detector. The results were compared to determine which technique is the most suitable to study the degradation of gypsum single crystals. In the two cases, we have identified only the gypsum phase, but with different crystal plane orientations.

  8. COMPARING MOISTURE METER READINGS WITH MEASURED EQUILIBRIUM MOISTURE CONTENT OF GYPSUM BOARD

    EPA Science Inventory

    Moisture meters routinely used in the field to determine the moisture content in gypsum wallboard are primarily designed and manufactured to measure the moisture content of wood. Often they are used to decide whether to replace wallboard by determining if moisture is qualitativel...

  9. Visualization of the structural changes in plywood and gypsum board during the growth of Chaetomium globosum and Stachybotrys chartarum.

    PubMed

    Lewinska, Anna M; Hoof, Jakob B; Peuhkuri, Ruut H; Rode, Carsten; Lilje, Osu; Foley, Matthew; Trimby, Patrick; Andersen, Birgitte

    2016-10-01

    Fungal growth in indoor environments is associated with many negative health effects. Many studies focus on brown- and white-rot fungi and their effect on wood, but there is none that reveals the influence of soft-rot fungi, such as Stachybotrys spp. and Chaetomium spp., on the structure of building materials such as plywood and gypsum wallboard. This study focuses on using micro-computed tomography (microCT) to investigate changes of the structure of plywood and gypsum wallboard during fungal degradation by S. chartarum and C. globosum. Changes in the materials as a result of dampness and fungal growth were determined by measuring porosity and pore shape via microCT. The results show that the composition of the building material influenced the level of penetration by fungi as shown by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Plywood appeared to be the most affected, with the penetration of moisture and fungi throughout the whole thickness of the sample. Conversely, fungi grew only on the top cardboard in the gypsum wallboard and they did not have significant influence on the gypsum wallboard structure. The majority of the observed changes in gypsum wallboard occurred due to moisture. This paper suggests that the mycelium distribution within building materials and the structural changes, caused by dampness and fungal growth, depend on the type of the material.

  10. Characterization of gypsum crystals exposed to a high CO{sub 2} concentration fog using x-ray

    SciTech Connect

    Carreño-Márquez, I. J. A.; Castillo-Sandoval, I.; Esparza-Ponce, H. E.; Fuentes-Cobas, L.; Montero-Cabrera, M. E.

    2015-07-23

    In Chihuahua State, a little town called Naica has the largest gypsum single crystals in the world. The growth of these structures has been described as a long and stable process developed over thousands of years. Due to the change in the environmental conditions, these crystals could suffer alterations on their surface. In this project we study the cause of possible deterioration of the giant crystals and intend to suggest measures for their preservation. For this sake, our first experiment consists on several gypsum crystals that have been subjected in a climate chamber to a fog at high CO{sub 2} concentration and 51 °C for a period of time of six months, extracting two crystals every 15 days. Then the crystals have been characterized through Grazing Incidence X-Ray Diffraction using a diffractometer PanAlytical X’PertPro with two different detectors; Xe-filled proportional detector and a Pixel 3D detector. The results were compared to determine which technique is the most suitable to study the degradation of gypsum single crystals. In the two cases, we have identified only the gypsum phase, but with different crystal plane orientations.

  11. Study of heat and mass transfer of water evaporation in a gypsum board subjected to natural convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zannouni, K.; El Abrach, H.; Dhahri, H.; Mhimid, A.

    2016-12-01

    The present paper reports a numerical study to investigate the drying of rectangular gypsum sample based on a diffusive model. Both vertical and low sides of the porous media are treated as adiabatic and impermeable surfaces plate. The upper face of the plate represents the permeable interface. The energy equation model is based on the local thermal equilibrium assumption between the fluid and the solid phases. The lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) is used for solving the governing differential equations system. The obtained numerical results concerning the moisture content and the temperature within a gypsum sample were discussed. A comprehensive analysis of the influence of the mass transfer coefficient, the convective heat transfer coefficient, the external temperature, the relative humidity and the diffusion coefficient on macroscopic fields are also investigated. They all presented results in this paper and obtained in the stable regime correspond to time superior than 4000 s. Therefore the numerical error is inferior to 2%. The experimental data and the descriptive information of the approach indicate an excellent agreement between the results of our developed numerical code based on the LBM and the published ones.

  12. The astrobiological mission EXPOSE-R on board of the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabbow, Elke; Rettberg, Petra; Barczyk, Simon; Bohmeier, Maria; Parpart, Andre; Panitz, Corinna; Horneck, Gerda; Burfeindt, Jürgen; Molter, Ferdinand; Jaramillo, Esther; Pereira, Carlos; Weiß, Peter; Willnecker, Rainer; Demets, René; Dettmann, Jan

    2015-01-01

    EXPOSE-R flew as the second of the European Space Agency (ESA) EXPOSE multi-user facilities on the International Space Station. During the mission on the external URM-D platform of the Zvezda service module, samples of eight international astrobiology experiments selected by ESA and one Russian guest experiment were exposed to low Earth orbit space parameters from March 10th, 2009 to January 21st, 2011. EXPOSE-R accommodated a total of 1220 samples for exposure to selected space conditions and combinations, including space vacuum, temperature cycles through 273 K, cosmic radiation, solar electromagnetic radiation at >110, >170 or >200 nm at various fluences up to GJ m-2. Samples ranged from chemical compounds via unicellular organisms and multicellular mosquito larvae and seeds to passive radiation dosimeters. Additionally, one active radiation measurement instrument was accommodated on EXPOSE-R and commanded from ground in accordance with the facility itself. Data on ultraviolet radiation, cosmic radiation and temperature were measured every 10 s and downlinked by telemetry and data carrier every few months. The EXPOSE-R trays and samples returned to Earth on March 9th, 2011 with Shuttle flight, Space Transportation System (STS)-133/ULF 5, Discovery, after successful total mission duration of 27 months in space. The samples were analysed in the individual investigators laboratories. A parallel Mission Ground Reference experiment was performed on ground with a parallel set of hardware and samples under simulated space conditions following to the data transmitted from the flight mission.

  13. Effect of high temperatures on gypsum paste and mortar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krejsová, Jitka; Doleželová, Magdalena; Vimmrová, Alena

    2016-07-01

    This paper describes the influence of high temperatures on some physical and mechanical properties of gypsum mixtures. Two gypsum mixtures were designed, first one was composed of gypsum and citric acid and the second one contained standardized sand also. The samples were exposed to temperatures from 50°C to 1000°C. Results show, that strength changes caused by high temperatures are significant in both mixtures and that the thermal shrinkage is reduced by adding sand to a gypsum mixture.

  14. MICROBIAL RESISTANT GYPSUM PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gypsum building materials often become wet, resulting in mold growth that leads to health and productivity impacts. A major source of mold growth is gypsum wallboard since nearly 90% of the interior finished surfaces of buildings are covered with gypsum products. It has been est...

  15. 18. INTERIOR OF ROOM 106 LOOKING SOUTHEAST. EXPOSED BEAM AT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. INTERIOR OF ROOM 106 LOOKING SOUTHEAST. EXPOSED BEAM AT CEILING IS PAINTED. FLOOR IS VINYL COMPOSITION TILE. WALLS AND CEILING ARE PAINTED GYPSUM BOARD. - Presidio of San Francisco, Cavalry Stables, Cowles Street, between Lincoln Boulevard & McDowell Street, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  16. TOOL CRIB FROM NORTHWEST, SHOWING ALUMINUM DOORS, STONE PIER, GYPSUM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    TOOL CRIB FROM NORTHWEST, SHOWING ALUMINUM DOORS, STONE PIER, GYPSUM BOARD-FACED PARTITION AND ORIGINAL TIMBER STRUCTURE - Fort Huachuca, Cavalry Stable, Clarkson Road, Sierra Vista, Cochise County, AZ

  17. Petrography of gypsum-bearing facies of the Codó Formation (Late Aptian), Northern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Paz, Jackson D S; Rossetti, Dilce F

    2006-09-01

    An original and detailed study focusing the petrography of evaporites from the Late Aptian deposits exposed in the eastern and southern São Luís-Grajaú Basin is presented herein, with the attempt of distinguishing between primary and secondary evaporites, and reconstructing their post-depositional evolution. Seven evaporites phases were recognized: 1. chevron gypsum; 2. nodular to lensoidal gypsum or anhydrite; 3. fibrous to acicular gypsum; 4. mosaic gypsum; 5. brecciated gypsum or gypsarenite; 6. pseudo-nodular anhydrite or gypsum; and 7. rosettes of gypsum. The three first phases of gypsum display petrographic characteristics that conform to a primary nature. The fibrous to acicular and mosaic gypsum were formed by replacement of primary gypsum, but their origin took place during the eodiagenesis, still under influence of the depositional setting. These gypsum morphologies are closely related to the laminated evaporites, serving to demonstrate that their formation was related to replacements that did not affect the primary sedimentary structures. The pseudo-nodular anhydrite or gypsum seems to have originated by mobilization of sulfate-rich fluids during burial, probably related to halokinesis. The rosettes of gypsum, which intercept all the other gypsum varieties, represent the latest phase of evaporite formation in the study area, resulting from either intrastratal waters or surface waters during weathering.

  18. Geoelectrical Classification of Gypsum Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guinea, Ander; Playà, Elisabet; Rivero, Lluís; Himi, Mahjoub; Bosch, Ricard

    2010-12-01

    Gypsum rocks are widely exploited in the world as industrial minerals. The purity of the gypsum rocks (percentage in gypsum mineral in the whole rock) is a critical factor to evaluate the potential exploitability of a gypsum deposit. It is considered than purities higher than 80% in gypsum are required to be economically profitable. Gypsum deposits have been studied with geoelectrical methods; a direct relationship between the electrical resistivity values of the gypsum rocks and its lithological composition has been established, with the presence of lutites being the main controlling factor in the geoelectrical response of the deposit. This phenomenon has been quantified in the present study, by means of a combination of theoretical calculations, laboratory measurements and field data acquisition. Direct modelling has been performed; the data have been inverted to obtain the mean electrical resistivity of the models. The laboratory measurements have been obtained from artificial gypsum-clay mixture pills, and the electrical resistivity has been measured using a simple electrical circuit with direct current power supply. Finally, electrical resistivity tomography data have been acquired in different evaporite Tertiary basins located in North East Spain; the selected gypsum deposits have different gypsum compositions. The geoelectrical response of gypsum rocks has been determined by comparing the resistivity values obtained from theoretical models, laboratory tests and field examples. A geoelectrical classification of gypsum rocks defining three types of gypsum rocks has been elaborated: (a) Pure Gypsum Rocks (>75% of gypsum content), (b) Transitional Gypsum Rocks (75-55%), and (c) Lutites and Gypsum-rich Lutites (<55%). From the economic point of view, the Pure Gypsum Rocks, displaying a resistivity value of >800 ohm.m, can be exploited as industrial rocks. The methodology used could be applied in other geoelectrical rock studies, given that this relationship

  19. Gypsum accumulation on carbonate stone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGee, E.S.; Mossotti, V.G.

    1992-01-01

    The accumulation of gypsum on carbonate stone has been investigated through exposure of fresh samples of limestone and marble at monitored sites, through examination of alteration crusts from old buildings and through laboratory experiments. Several factors contribute to gypsum accumulation on carbonate stone. Marble or limestone that is sheltered from direct washing by rain in an urban environment with elevated pollution levels is likely to accumulate a gypsum crust. Crust development may be enhanced if the stone is porous or has an irregular surface area. Gypsum crusts are a surficial alteration feature; gypsum crystals form at the pore opening-air interface, where evaporation is greatest.

  20. Gypsum at Olympia Undae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    This Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) 'targeted image' shows a region of sand dunes surrounding the Martian north polar cap. CRISM, an instrument on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, acquired the image at 1811 UTC (2:11 p.m. EDT) on Oct. 1, 2006. The imaged site is near 80.0 degrees north latitude, 240.7 degrees east longitude. It covers an area about 12 kilometers (7.5 miles) square. At the center of the image, the spatial resolution is as good as 20 meters (65 feet) per pixel. The image was taken in 544 colors covering 0.36 to 3.92 micrometers.

    CRISM's sister instrument on the Mars Express spacecraft, OMEGA, has spectrally mapped Mars at lower spatial resolution and discovered that several regions of the planet are rich in sulfate minerals formed by liquid water. Surprisingly, one of the sulfate-rich deposits is a part of the giant field of sand dunes surrounding the north polar cap. CRISM is remapping the dune field at about five times higher resolution than OMEGA, and imaging selected regions at 50 times higher resolution. This image is the first of the high-resolution images of the dune field.

    This visualization includes two renderings of the data, both map-projected. The left images are false-color representations showing brightness of the surface at selected infrared wavelengths. The right images show strength of an absorption band at 1900 nanometers wavelength, which indicates the relative abundance of the sulfate mineral gypsum. Brighter areas have more gypsum, and darker areas have less gypsum. The bottom views are enlargements of the central part of the two versions of the image shown at top.

    Gypsum is a light-colored, whitish mineral, so it was anticipated that gypsum-rich parts of the sand dunes would be light in color. In fact, there are light-colored areas in the left images, but the images of the gypsum absorption at right show that the light areas have only low gypsum abundance. The dark sand dunes

  1. 16. INTERIOR OF ROOM 105 LOOKING TOWARD SOUTHEAST WALL. EXPOSED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. INTERIOR OF ROOM 105 LOOKING TOWARD SOUTHEAST WALL. EXPOSED POST EXISTS IN MIDDLE OF ROOM. A SMALL OPENING HAS BEEN CUT INTO THE UPPER PORTION OF THE SOUTHEAST WALL THROUGH TO THE ADJOINING ROOM (106). GYPSUM BOARD ON WALLS WITH WOOD TRIM, FLUORESCENT LIGHTING, AND VINYL COMPOSITION TILE ON FLOORS ARE ALL LATER ADDITIONS. - Presidio of San Francisco, Cavalry Stables, Cowles Street, between Lincoln Boulevard & McDowell Street, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  2. [Investigation of tibial bones of the rats exposed on board "Spacelab-2":histomorphometric analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durnova, G. N.; Kaplanskii, A. S.; Morey-Holton, E. R.; Vorobeva, V. N.

    1996-01-01

    Proximal metaphyses of tibial bones from the Sprague-Dowly rats exposed in US dedicated space life sciences laboratory SLS-2 for 13-14 days and sacrificed on day 13 in microgravity and within 5 hours and 14 days following recovery were the subject of histological, histochemical, and histomorphometric analyses. After the 13-day flight of SLS-2 the rats showed initial signs of osteopenia in the spongy tissue of tibial bones, secondary spongiosis affected first. Resorption of the secondary spongiosis was consequent to enhanced resorption and inhibition of osteogenesis. In rats sacrificed within 5 hours of recovery manifestations of tibial osteopenia were more evident than in rats sacrificed during the flight. Spaceflight-induced changes in tibial spongiosis were reverse by character the amount of spongy bone was fully compensated and following 14 days of readaptation to the terrestrial gravity.

  3. [Investigation of tibial bones of the rats exposed on board "Spacelab-2":histomorphometric analysis].

    PubMed

    Durnova, G N; Kaplanskii, A S; Morey-Holton, E R; Vorobéva, V N

    1996-01-01

    Proximal metaphyses of tibial bones from the Sprague-Dowly rats exposed in US dedicated space life sciences laboratory SLS-2 for 13-14 days and sacrificed on day 13 in microgravity and within 5 hours and 14 days following recovery were the subject of histological, histochemical, and histomorphometric analyses. After the 13-day flight of SLS-2 the rats showed initial signs of osteopenia in the spongy tissue of tibial bones, secondary spongiosis affected first. Resorption of the secondary spongiosis was consequent to enhanced resorption and inhibition of osteogenesis. In rats sacrificed within 5 hours of recovery manifestations of tibial osteopenia were more evident than in rats sacrificed during the flight. Spaceflight-induced changes in tibial spongiosis were reverse by character the amount of spongy bone was fully compensated and following 14 days of readaptation to the terrestrial gravity.

  4. Mineral of the month: gypsum

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Founie, Alan

    2004-01-01

    The earliest known use of gypsum as a building material was in Anatolia (in what is now Turkey) around 6000 B.C. It has been found on the interiors of the great pyramids in Egypt, which were erected in about 3700 B.C. Now an average new American home contains more than 7 metric tons of gypsum in the form of more than 6,000 square feet of wallboard.

  5. Study on the Possibility of Using Vine Stalk Waste ( Vitis Vinifera) for Producing Gypsum Particleboards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rangavar, H.; Khosro, S. Kh.; Payan, M. H.; Soltani, A.

    2014-09-01

    The objective of this study was the production of gypsum particleboards with vine stalk waste and the investigation of some physical and mechanical properties of the boards. For this purpose, boards were made from gypsum, oven-dried mass of vine stalk waste, and the white portland cement in various ratios. The thickness swelling and water absorption after 2 and 24 hours of immersion in water, the modulus of rupture, the modulus of elasticity, and the internal bond strength of the boards were determined according to the European Norms standard. The results show that, by selecting proper ratios between the constituents, particleboards with good physicomechanical properties can be produced.

  6. Economics of Gypsum Production in Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esmaeili, Abdoulkarim

    The purpose of this research is to analyze the economics of gypsum production in Iran. The trend in production cost, selling price and profit are used to investigate economics of gypsum production. In addition, the multivariate time series method is used to determine factors affecting gypsum price in domestic market. The results indicated that due to increase in production and inflation, profitability of gypsum production has decreased during recent years. It is concluded that tariff and non-tariff barriers on mines machinery are among reasons for increasing production cost in Iranian gypsum mines. Decreasing such barriers could increase profitability of gypsum production in Iran.

  7. Fate of Mercury in Synthetic Gypsum Used for Wallboard Production

    SciTech Connect

    Jessica Sanderson

    2007-12-31

    coal type. In the project, process stacks in the wallboard plant were sampled using the Ontario Hydro method. In every task, the stack locations sampled included a gypsum dryer and a gypsum calciner. In Tasks 1 and 4 through 7, the stack of the dryer for the wet wallboard product was also tested. Also at each site, in-stream process samples were collected and analyzed for mercury concentration before and after each significant step in wallboard production. These results and process data were used to construct mercury mass balances across the wallboard plants. The results from the project showed a wide range of percentage mercury losses from the synthetic gypsum feedstocks as measured by the Ontario Hydro method at the process stacks, ranging from 2% to 55% of the mercury in the gypsum feedstock. For the tasks exceeding 10% mercury loss across the wallboard plant, most of the loss occurred across the gypsum calciner. When total wallboard emissions remained below 10%, the primary emission location varied with a much less pronounced difference in emission between the gypsum dryer, calciner and board dryer. For all seven tasks, the majority of the mercury emissions were measured to be in the elemental form (Hg{sup 0}). Overall, the measured mercury loss mass rates ranged from 0.01 to 0.17 grams of mercury per dry ton of synthetic gypsum processed, or 0.01 to 0.4 pounds of mercury released per million square feet of wallboard produced from synthetic gypsum. The Coal Combustion Product Production and Use Survey from the American Coal Ash Association (ACAA) indicate that 7,579,187 short tons of synthetic gypsum were used for wallboard production in 2006. Extrapolating the results of this study to the ACAA industry usage rate, we estimate that mercury releases from wallboard production plants in 2006 ranged between 150 to 3000 pounds for the entire U.S. wallboard industry. With only seven sets of wallboard plant measurements, it is difficult to draw firm conclusions about what

  8. Geology of the Gypsum Gap quadrangle, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cater, Fred W.

    1953-01-01

    The Gypsum Gap quadrangle is one eighteen 7 1/2-minute quadrangles covering the principal carnotite-producing area of southwestern Colorado. The geology of these quadrangles was mapped by the U.S. Geological Survey for the Atomic Energy Commission as part of a comparative study of carnotite deposits. The rocks exposed in the eighteen quadrangles consist of crystalline rocks of pre-Cambrian age and sedimentary rocks that range in age from late Paleozoic to Quaternary. Over much of the area the sedimentary rocks are flat lying, but in places the rocks are disrupted by high-angle faults, and northwest-trending folds. Conspicuous among the folds are large anticlines having cores of intrusive salt and gypsum. Most of the carnotite deposits are confined to the Salt Wash sandstone member of the Jurassic Morrison formation. Within this sandstone, most of the deposits are spottily distributed through a arcuate zone known as the "Uravan Mineral Belt". Individual deposits range in size from irregular masses containing only a few tons of ore to large, tabular masses containing many thousands of tons. The core consists largely of sandstone selectively impregnated and in part replaced by uranium and vanadium minerals. Most of the deposits appear to be related to certain sedimentary structures in sandstones of favorable composition.

  9. Mineral resource of the month: gypsum

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crangle, Robert D.

    2011-01-01

    You may not realize it, but the walls of your office are probably made from a mineral: gypsum. Gypsum is an abundant, evaporite-derived sedimentary mineral with deposits located throughout the world. It is often associated with paleoenvironmental lake and marine environments. In its pure form, gypsum consists of calcium sulfate dihydrate, although most crude gypsum naturally occurs in combination with anhydrite, clay, dolomite and/or limestone.

  10. Purification of FGD gypsum product

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, K.J.; Owens, F.C. II.

    1993-06-01

    A method of purifying a gypsum slurry resulting from an upstream flue gas desulfurization process is described comprising the steps of: (a) delivering the gypsum slurry to a primary dewatering device; (b) separating this gypsum slurry in said primary dewatering device into a coarse solids stream and a fine solids stream, said coarse solids stream primarily containing coarse particle sizes therein and said fine solids stream primarily containing fine particle sizes therein; (c) selectively returning all or a portion of said fine solids stream back to the upstream flue gas desulfurization process or delivering all or a portion of said fine solids stream to downstream separation means for further separation into a thickened fines stream and a process water stream, said process water stream thereafter being selectively delivered, as desired, to the upstream flue gas desulfurization process; (d) delivering said coarse solids stream to a surge/mix tank where it is selectively mixed with a portion of said thickened fines stream prior to being delivered to a secondary dewatering device; and, (e) collecting a purified gypsum product from said secondary dewatering device.

  11. Polymer composites based on gypsum matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mucha, Maria; Mróz, Patrycja; Kocemba, Aleksandra

    2016-05-01

    The role of polymers as retarder additives is to prolong the workability connected with setting time of gypsum. Various cellulose derivatives, soluble in water in concentration up to 1,5% by weight were applied taking different water/binder ratio. The hydration process of calcium sulfate hemihydrate (gypsum binder) into dihydrate (gypsum plaster) was observed by setting and calorimetric techniques. Scanning electron microscopy confirmed that the gypsum microstructure was varied when polymers are used. The mechanical properties of gypsum plasters were studied by bending strength test and they are correlated with sample microstructure

  12. Fate of Mercury in Synthetic Gypsum Used for Wallboard Production

    SciTech Connect

    Jessica Sanderson; Gary M. Blythe; Mandi Richardson

    2006-12-01

    to impact the stability of mercury in synthetic gypsum used to produce wallboard, so Task 6 was added to the project to test this theory. In this project, process stacks in the wallboard plant have been sampled using the Ontario Hydro method. For every task, the stack locations sampled have included a dryer for the wet gypsum as it enters the plant and a gypsum calciner. For Tasks 1, 4, 5 and 6, the stack of the dryer for the wet wallboard product was also tested. Also at each site, in-stream process samples were collected and analyzed for mercury concentration before and after each significant step in wallboard production. The Ontario Hydro results, process sample mercury concentration data, and process data were used to construct mercury mass balances across the wallboard plants. Task 6 was conducted at a wallboard plant processing synthetic gypsum from a power plant that fires Eastern bituminous coal. The power plant has a single-loop, open spray tower limestone forced oxidation FGD system, with the forced oxidation conducted in the reaction tank integral with the FGD absorber. The FGD system has gypsum fines blow down as part of the dewatering step. The power plant is equipped with a selective catalytic reduction (SCR) system for NOX emissions control, and the SCR was in service during the time period the gypsum tested was produced. Also, as mentioned above, Degussa additive TMT-15 was being added to the FGD system when this gypsum was produced. The results of the Task 6 stack testing, as measured by the Ontario Hydro method, detected that an average of 55% of the incoming mercury was emitted during wallboard production. These losses were distributed as about 4% across the dryer mill, 6% across the board dryer kiln, and 45% across the kettle calciner. Emissions were similar to what Task 5 results showed on a percentage basis, but about 30% lower on a mass basis. The same power plant FGD system produced the synthetic gypsum used in Task 5 (with no use of TMT-15

  13. The role of biofilms in the sedimentology of actively forming gypsum deposits at Guerrero Negro, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Marilyn B; Des Marais, David J; Turk, Kendra A; Parenteau, Mary N; Jahnke, Linda L; Kubo, Michael D Y

    2009-11-01

    Actively forming gypsum deposits at the Guerrero Negro sabkha and saltern system provided habitats for stratified, pigmented microbial communities that exhibited significant morphological and phylogenetic diversity. These deposits ranged from meter-thick gypsum crusts forming in saltern seawater concentration ponds to columnar microbial mats with internally crystallized gypsum granules developing in natural anchialine pools. Gypsum-depositing environments were categorized as forming precipitation surfaces, biofilm-supported surfaces, and clastic surfaces. Each surface type was described in terms of depositional environment, microbial diversity, mineralogy, and sedimentary fabrics. Precipitation surfaces developed in high-salinity subaqueous environments where rates of precipitation outpaced the accumulation of clastic, organic, and/or biofilm layers. These surfaces hosted endolithic biofilms comprised predominantly of oxygenic and anoxygenic phototrophs, sulfate-reducing bacteria, and bacteria from the phylum Bacteroidetes. Biofilm-supported deposits developed in lower-salinity subaqueous environments where light and low water-column turbulence supported dense benthic microbial communities comprised mainly of oxygenic phototrophs. In these settings, gypsum granules precipitated in the extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) matrix as individual granules exhibiting distinctive morphologies. Clastic surfaces developed in sabkha mudflats that included gypsum, carbonate, and siliclastic particles with thin gypsum/biofilm components. Clastic surfaces were influenced by subsurface brine sheets and capillary evaporation and precipitated subsedimentary gypsum discs in deeper regions. Biofilms appeared to influence both chemical and physical sedimentary processes in the various subaqueous and subaerially exposed environments studied. Biofilm interaction with chemical sedimentary processes included dissolution and granularization of precipitation surfaces, formation of

  14. The structural and functional organization of the vestibular apparatus of rats exposed to weightlessness for 20 days on board the Sputnik "Kosmos-782".

    PubMed

    Vinnikov, Y A; Gazenko, O G; Titova, L K; Bronstein, A A; Govardovskii, V I; Gribakin, F G; Pevzner, R A; Aronova, M Z; Kharkeevich, T A; Tsirulis, T P; Pyatkina, G A; Lichakov, D V; Pal'mbach, L P; Anichin, V F

    1979-01-01

    This investigation of the vestibular apparatus of rats exposed for 20 days to weightlessness on board an earth satellite and to acceleration during take-off and landing has revealed a set of changes in the structural and functional organization, such as adjoinment of the otolith to the utricle receptor surface and peripheral localization of the nucleoli inside the receptor cells' nuclei. Destruction of some receptor cells, apparently due to increased swelling of the vestibular apparatus tissue and alteration of the shape and structure of the otoconia were observed. In the horizontal crista, detachment of the cupula took place.

  15. New interpretation of vertically aligned gypsum fabrics: Implications for gypsum depositional environments and diagenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, M.R. ); Warren, J.K. )

    1990-05-01

    Gypsum and anhydrite fabrics in trenches and deep 500-m cores from Bristol Dry Lake, California, exhibit a vertical alignment of crystals similar to the fabric seen in bottom-nucleated brine pond gypsum. However, geochemical and sedimentologic evidence indicates that the gypsum formed in Bristol Dry Lake precipitated as a diagenetic displacive mineral within the sediment where groundwater saturated with respect to gypsum recharges around the playa margin (groundwater seepage gypsum). Evidence for displacive growth of gypsum comes from (1) the geometry of the deposit, (2) stable isotopic data and the water chemistry of the brine, and (3) inclusions of matrix that follow twin planes and completely surround crystals as they grow. Because the fabrics and textures of this diagenetic gypsum formed by groundwater in playa settings are similar to those of primary gypsum formed in a brine pond, it is necessary to refine the criteria for the distinction between subaerial, groundwater, and subaqueous gypsum. When compared to the features observed in a Holocene subaqueous gypsum deposit (Marion Lake, Australia) and a Holocene subaerial deposit (Abu Dhabi sabkha), the following criteria can be used to distinguish between the three different types of gypsum deposits: (1) amount of matrix, (2) geometry of the deposit, (3) gypsum crystal size and orientation, (4) distribution of matrix and fluid inclusions within individual crystals, and (5) fabric of the matrix around the gypsum. Distinguishing between subaqueous and groundwater gypsum may be difficult. However, sufficient mesoscale differences exist such that, in most cases, the different gypsum types can be resolved from core slabs and thin sections. These criteria may be applied in ancient examples even after gypsum has been converted to anhydrite.

  16. Method Analysis of Microbial Resistant Gypsum Products

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract: Several commercially available gypsum products are marketed as microbial-resistant. During previous test method research on a microbial resistant gypsum wallboard study, a common theme from both stakeholders and product vendors was the need for a unified and accepted m...

  17. Effects of gypsum on trace metals in soils and earthworms

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mined gypsum has been beneficially used for many years as an agricultural amendment. Currently a large amount of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum is produced by removal of SO2 from flue gas streams when fuels with high S content are burned. The FGD gypsum, similar to mined gypsum, can enhance c...

  18. MOISTURE MOVEMENT (WICKING) WITHIN GYPSUM WALLBOARD

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gypsum wallboard with repeated or prolonged exposure to water or excess moisture can lose its structural integrity and provide a growth medium for biological contaminants. Poorly sealed buildings, leaking or failed plumbing systems, or improperly constructed HVAC systems can all ...

  19. FGD gypsum's place in American agriculture

    SciTech Connect

    Haynes, C.

    2007-07-01

    Surface cracks and soil clumps form when saline-sodic, high-clay soil dries out. Treatment with FGD gypsum and irrigation water flowing into these cracks leaches salts until the aggregates swell and the cracks close up. The article describes research projects to develop agricultural uses of FGD gypsum from coal-fired power plants that have been conducted by university researchers and USDA-Agricultural Research Service scientists.

  20. Temperature resistance of the ternary gypsum-based binder with microsilica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doleželová, Magdaléna; Krejsová, Jitka; Vimmrová, Alena

    2016-07-01

    The influence of high temperatures on the ternary gypsum materials with microsilica is described in the paper. The ternary samples, prepared from gypsum, lime and microsilica and samples without pozzolan admixture were exposed to temperatures from 50 °C to 1000 °C and their mechanical properties were investigated. The visual comparison and the comparison of mechanical properties of ternary samples and samples without microsilica were carried out. The mixtures with microsilica resisted better to the high temperatures than the samples without microsilica, although the resistance of both materials against the high temperature was not very good.

  1. Consolidation of archaeological gypsum plaster by bacterial biomineralization of calcium carbonate.

    PubMed

    Jroundi, Fadwa; Gonzalez-Muñoz, Maria Teresa; Garcia-Bueno, Ana; Rodriguez-Navarro, Carlos

    2014-09-01

    Gypsum plasterworks and decorative surfaces are easily degraded, especially when exposed to humidity, and thus they require protection and/or consolidation. However, the conservation of historical gypsum-based structural and decorative materials by conventional organic and inorganic consolidants shows limited efficacy. Here, a new method based on the bioconsolidation capacity of carbonatogenic bacteria inhabiting the material was assayed on historical gypsum plasters and compared with conventional consolidation treatments (ethyl silicate; methylacrylate-ethylmethacrylate copolymer and polyvinyl butyral). Conventional products do not reach in-depth consolidation, typically forming a thin impervious surface layer which blocks pores. In contrast, the bacterial treatment produces vaterite (CaCO3) biocement, which does not block pores and produces a good level of consolidation, both at the surface and in-depth, as shown by drilling resistance measurement system analyses. Transmission electron microscopy analyses show that bacterial vaterite cement formed via oriented aggregation of CaCO3 nanoparticles (∼20nm in size), resulting in mesocrystals which incorporate bacterial biopolymers. Such a biocomposite has superior mechanical properties, thus explaining the fact that drilling resistance of bioconsolidated gypsum plasters is within the range of inorganic calcite materials of equivalent porosity, despite the fact that the bacterial vaterite cement accounts for only a 0.02 solid volume fraction. Bacterial bioconsolidation is proposed for the effective consolidation of this type of material. The potential applications of bacterial calcium carbonate consolidation of gypsum biomaterials used as bone graft substitutes are discussed.

  2. Gypsum-hosted endolithic communities of the Lake St. Martin impact structure, Manitoba, Canada: spectroscopic detectability and implications for Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhind, T.; Ronholm, J.; Berg, B.; Mann, P.; Applin, D.; Stromberg, J.; Sharma, R.; Whyte, L. G.; Cloutis, E. A.

    2014-09-01

    There is increasing evidence that Mars may have once been a habitable environment. Gypsum is targeted in the search for Martian biosignatures because it can host extensive cryptoendolithic communities in extreme terrestrial environments and is widespread on Mars. In this study the viability of using different spectroscopy-based techniques to identify the presence of gypsum endolithic communities was investigated by analysing various cryptoendoliths collected from the Lake St. Martin impact crater (LSM), a Mars analogue site found in Manitoba, Canada. Concurrently, the cryptoendolithic microbial community structure present was also analysed to aid in assigning spectroscopic features to microbial community members. Two main morphologies of endolithic communities were collected from gypsum deposits at LSM: true cryptoendolithic communities and annular deposits on partially buried boulders and cobbles <1 cm below the soil surface. Endolithic communities were found to be visibly present only in gypsum with a high degree of translucency and could occur as deep as 3 cm below the exterior surface. The bacterial community was dominated by a phylum (Chloroflexi) that has not been previously observed in gypsum endoliths. The exterior surfaces of gypsum boulders and cobbles are devoid of spectroscopic features attributable to organic molecules and detectable by reflectance, Raman, or ultraviolet-induced fluorescence spectroscopies. However, exposed interior surfaces show unique endolithic signatures detectable by each spectroscopic technique. This indicates that cryptoendolithic communities can be detected via spectroscopy-based techniques, provided they are either partially or fully exposed and enough photon-target interactions occur to enable detection.

  3. A Whole-Genome Microarray Study of Arabidopsis thaliana Semisolid Callus Cultures Exposed to Microgravity and Nonmicrogravity Related Spaceflight Conditions for 5 Days on Board of Shenzhou 8

    PubMed Central

    Neef, Maren; Ecke, Margret; Hampp, Rüdiger

    2015-01-01

    The Simbox mission was the first joint space project between Germany and China in November 2011. Eleven-day-old Arabidopsis thaliana wild type semisolid callus cultures were integrated into fully automated plant cultivation containers and exposed to spaceflight conditions within the Simbox hardware on board of the spacecraft Shenzhou 8. The related ground experiment was conducted under similar conditions. The use of an in-flight centrifuge provided a 1 g gravitational field in space. The cells were metabolically quenched after 5 days via RNAlater injection. The impact on the Arabidopsis transcriptome was investigated by means of whole-genome gene expression analysis. The results show a major impact of nonmicrogravity related spaceflight conditions. Genes that were significantly altered in transcript abundance are mainly involved in protein phosphorylation and MAPK cascade-related signaling processes, as well as in the cellular defense and stress responses. In contrast to short-term effects of microgravity (seconds, minutes), this mission identified only minor changes after 5 days of microgravity. These concerned genes coding for proteins involved in the plastid-associated translation machinery, mitochondrial electron transport, and energy production. PMID:25654111

  4. Limestone-gypsum flue gas desulfurization process

    SciTech Connect

    Kuroda, H.; Hashimoto, T.; Kanda, O.; Nishimura, M.; Nishimura, T.; Nozawa, S.

    1984-12-11

    A flue gas desulfurization process capable of producing a high purity gypsum and also making equipment employed as minimum as possible is provided, which process comprises the steps of cooling and dedusting flue gas containing SO /SUB x/ ; contacting the cooled gas with a slurry containing limestone to remove SO /SUB x/ by absorption and also form CaSO/sub 3/; controlling the pH of the resulting slurry and then blowing air therein to form gypsum; and separating gypsum from the resulting slurry. As a modification of the above process, the slurry of the above second absorption step is further fed to the above first cooling step where unreacted limestone and SO /SUB x/ are reacted to form CaSO/sub 3/.

  5. Ultraslow growth rates of giant gypsum crystals

    PubMed Central

    Van Driessche, A. E. S.; García-Ruíz, J. M.; Tsukamoto, K.; Patiño-Lopez, L. D.; Satoh, H.

    2011-01-01

    Mineralogical processes taking place close to equilibrium, or with very slow kinetics, are difficult to quantify precisely. The determination of ultraslow dissolution/precipitation rates would reveal characteristic timing associated with these processes that are important at geological scale. We have designed an advanced high-resolution white-beam phase-shift interferometry microscope to measure growth rates of crystals at very low supersaturation values. To test this technique, we have selected the giant gypsum crystals of Naica ore mines in Chihuahua, Mexico, a challenging subject in mineral formation. They are thought to form by a self-feeding mechanism driven by solution-mediated anhydrite-gypsum phase transition, and therefore they must be the result of an extremely slow crystallization process close to equilibrium. To calculate the formation time of these crystals we have measured the growth rates of the {010} face of gypsum growing from current Naica waters at different temperatures. The slowest measurable growth rate was found at 55 °C, 1.4 ± 0.2 × 10-5 nm/s, the slowest directly measured normal growth rate for any crystal growth process. At higher temperatures, growth rates increase exponentially because of decreasing gypsum solubility and higher kinetic coefficient. At 50 °C neither growth nor dissolution was observed indicating that growth of giant crystals of gypsum occurred at Naica between 58 °C (gypsum/anhydrite transition temperature) and the current temperature of Naica waters, confirming formation temperatures determined from fluid inclusion studies. Our results demonstrate the usefulness of applying advanced optical techniques in laboratory experiments to gain a better understanding of crystal growth processes occurring at a geological timescale. PMID:21911400

  6. Ultraslow growth rates of giant gypsum crystals.

    PubMed

    Van Driessche, A E S; García-Ruíz, J M; Tsukamoto, K; Patiño-Lopez, L D; Satoh, H

    2011-09-20

    Mineralogical processes taking place close to equilibrium, or with very slow kinetics, are difficult to quantify precisely. The determination of ultraslow dissolution/precipitation rates would reveal characteristic timing associated with these processes that are important at geological scale. We have designed an advanced high-resolution white-beam phase-shift interferometry microscope to measure growth rates of crystals at very low supersaturation values. To test this technique, we have selected the giant gypsum crystals of Naica ore mines in Chihuahua, Mexico, a challenging subject in mineral formation. They are thought to form by a self-feeding mechanism driven by solution-mediated anhydrite-gypsum phase transition, and therefore they must be the result of an extremely slow crystallization process close to equilibrium. To calculate the formation time of these crystals we have measured the growth rates of the {010} face of gypsum growing from current Naica waters at different temperatures. The slowest measurable growth rate was found at 55 °C, 1.4 ± 0.2 × 10(-5) nm/s, the slowest directly measured normal growth rate for any crystal growth process. At higher temperatures, growth rates increase exponentially because of decreasing gypsum solubility and higher kinetic coefficient. At 50 °C neither growth nor dissolution was observed indicating that growth of giant crystals of gypsum occurred at Naica between 58 °C (gypsum/anhydrite transition temperature) and the current temperature of Naica waters, confirming formation temperatures determined from fluid inclusion studies. Our results demonstrate the usefulness of applying advanced optical techniques in laboratory experiments to gain a better understanding of crystal growth processes occurring at a geological timescale.

  7. Diagenetic gypsum related to sulfur deposits in evaporites (Libros Gypsum, Miocene, NE Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortí, Federico; Rosell, Laura; Anadón, Pere

    2010-07-01

    The Libros Gypsum is the thickest evaporite unit of the Miocene infill of the Teruel Basin in NE Spain. During the deposition of this unit, intense bacterial sulfate-reducing (BSR) activity in the lake depocenter generated a native sulfur deposit. Diagenetic gypsum resulted from subsequent sulfur oxidation. The different processes involved in these transformations were first investigated by Anadón et al. (1992). The present paper is concerned with this diagenetic gypsum from the stratigraphic, petrographic, isotopic and genetic points of view. Diagenetic gypsum occurs mainly as continuous or discontinuous layers, individual levels or lenses, irregular masses, nodules and micronodules, and veins. Its main textures are coarse-crystalline anhedral and fine-grained (alabastrine), both of which can replace any former lithology (carbonate, gypsum, and sulfur). The following sequence of processes and mineral/textural transformations is deduced: primary gypsum deposition — BSR and biodiagenetic carbonate/H 2S production — growth of native sulfur — growth of diagenetic gypsum — partial recrystallization of the diagenetic gypsum textures. The gypsification of the native sulfur generated two types of banded structures in the diagenetic gypsum: (1) concentric structures of centripetal growth, and (2) expansive, roughly concentric structures. In the first type, the gypsification operated from the outer boundaries towards the inner parts. In the second type, part of the carbonate hosting the sulfur was also gypsified (replaced/cemented). In the diagenetic gypsum, the δ34S values are in agreement with a native sulfur and H 2S provenance. The δ18O sulfate values, however, enable us to differentiate two main groups of values: one with positive values and the other with negative values. In the group of positive values, interstitial (evaporated) solutions participated in the sulfur oxidation; this process presumably occurred in a first oxidation stage during shallow

  8. Gypsum karst in Italy: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Waele, Jo; Chiarini, Veronica; Columbu, Andrea; D'Angeli, Ilenia M.; Madonia, Giuliana; Parise, Mario; Piccini, Leonardo; Vattano, Marco; Vigna, Bartolomeo; Zini, Luca; Forti, Paolo

    2016-04-01

    Although outcropping only rarely in Italy, gypsum karst has been described in detail since the early XXth century (Marinelli, 1917). Gypsum caves are now known from almost all Italian regions (Madonia & Forti, 2003), but are mainly localised along the northern border of the Apennine chain (Emilia Romagna and Marche regions), Calabria, and Sicily, where the major outcrops occur. Recently, important caves have also been discovered in the underground gypsum quarries in Piedmont (Vigna et al., 2010). During the late 80s and 90s several multidisciplinary studies have been carried out in many gypsum areas. All this work converged into a comprehensive overview in 2003 (Madonia & Forti, 2003). Further detailed studies focused on the gypsum areas of Emilia Romagna (Chiesi et al., 2010; Forti & Lucci, 2010; Demaria et al., 2012; De Waele & Pasini, 2013; Ercolani et al., 2013; Columbu et al., 2015; Lucci & Piastra, 2015; Tedeschi et al., 2015) and of Sicily (Madonia & Vattano, 2011). Sinkholes related to Permo-Triassic gypsum have been studied in Friuli Venezia Giulia (Zini et al., 2015). This presentation will review the state of the art regarding different aspects of evaporite karst in Italy focusing on the main new results. References Chiesi M., et al. (2010) - Origin and evolution of a salty gypsum/anhydrite karst spring: the case of Poiano (Northern Apennines, Italy). Hydrogeology Journal, 18, pp. 1111-1124. Columbu A. et al. (2015) - Gypsum caves as indicators of climate-driven river incision and aggradation in a rapidly uplifting region. Geology, 43(6), 539-542. Demaria D. et al. (Eds.) (2012), Le Grotte Bolognesi, GSB-USB, 431 p. De Waele J., Pasini G. (2013) - Intra-messinian gypsum palaeokarst in the northern Apennines and its palaeogeographic implications. Terra Nova 25, pp. 199-205. Ercolani M., et al. (Eds.) (2013), I Gessi e la Cave i Monte Tondo. Studio multidisciplinare di un'area carsica nella Vena del Gesso Romagnola. Memorie Ist. It. Spel. II(26), 559 p

  9. Ancient gypsum mortars from Cyprus: characterization and reinvention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theodoridou, M.; Ioannou, I.

    2012-04-01

    confirms the phenomena of crystallisation and recrystallisation closed to the exposed surfaces due to long-term weathering. As anticipated, the results of this study have proven useful in reinventing gypsum-based materials based on the production technology of the past and the use of local raw materials. It is worth noting that gypsum is a widely available mineral in Cyprus due to the extensive evaporite deposits on the island. In the mortars designed and produced in the laboratory, ratios of binder to aggregates were based on the results of the analysed ancient samples. Gypsum and lime based materials were used in different proportions both as binder and aggregates. The new mixtures were tested in fresh and dry conditions at 7, 28, 56 and 90 days after their production. The results indicated higher mechanical strengths (7.6-9.6 MPa) when only gypsum based materials were used both as binder and aggregates. Porosity and average pore diameter tended to increase as the percentage of calcite increased in the mixtures. The variability of the results enhances the possibility of selecting the appropriate repair mortar depending on the nature of the material which may demand a conservation treatment.

  10. Flue gas desulfurization gypsum agricultural network alabama (bermudagrass)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Synthetic gypsum is being produced in large quantities each year as a byproduct of SO2 removal from flue gas stream at coal-fired utility plants. This synthetic gypsum which is believed to be comparable or better than mined gypsum may enhance crop production. However, there is a paucity of informati...

  11. Flue gas desulfurization gypsum agricultural network alabama (cotton)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Flue gas desulfurization gypsum (FGDG) is an excellent source of gypsum (CaSO4•2H2O) that can be beneficially used in agriculture. Research was conducted as part of the Flue Gas Desulfurization Gypsum Agricultural Network program sponsored by the Electric Power Research Institute in collaboration wi...

  12. Gypsum Wallboard as a sink for formaldehyde

    EPA Science Inventory

    Formaldehyde (HCHO) has been of special concern as an indoor air pollutant because of its presence in a wide range of consumer products and its adverse health effects. Materials acting as HCHO sinks, such as painted gypsum wallboard, can become emission sources. However, adsorpti...

  13. Effects of gypsum on trace metals in soils and earthworms.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liming; Kost, Dave; Tian, Yongqiang; Guo, Xiaolu; Watts, Dexter; Norton, Darrell; Wolkowski, Richard P; Dick, Warren A

    2014-01-01

    Mined gypsum has been beneficially used for many years as an agricultural amendment. A large amount of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum is produced by removal of SO from flue gas streams when fuels with high S content are burned. The FGD gypsum, similar to mined gypsum, can enhance crop production. However, information is lacking concerning the potential environmental impacts of trace metals, especially Hg, in the FGD gypsum. Flue gas desulfurization and mined gypsums were evaluated to determine their ability to affect concentrations of Hg and other trace elements in soils and earthworms. The study was conducted at four field sites across the United States (Ohio, Indiana, Alabama, and Wisconsin). The application rates of gypsums ranged from 2.2 Mg ha in Indiana to 20 Mg ha in Ohio and Alabama. These rates are 2 to 10 times higher than typically recommended. The lengths of time from gypsum application to soil and earthworm sampling were 5 and 18 mo in Ohio, 6 mo in Indiana, 11 mo in Alabama, and 4 mo in Wisconsin. Earthworm numbers and biomass were decreased by FGD and mined gypsums in Ohio. Among all the elements examined, Hg was slightly increased in soils and earthworms in the FGD gypsum treatments compared with the control and the mined gypsum treatments. The differences were not statistically significant except for the Hg concentration in the soil at the Wisconsin site. Selenium in earthworms in the FGD gypsum treatments was statistically higher than in the controls but not higher than in the mined gypsum treatments at the Indiana and Wisconsin sites. Bioaccumulation factors for nondepurated earthworms were statistically similar or lower for the FGD gypsum treatments compared with the controls for all elements. Use of FGD gypsum at normal recommended agricultural rates seems not to have a significant impact on concentrations of trace metals in earthworms and soils.

  14. Evaluation of potential for mercury volatilization from natural and FGD gypsum products using flux-chamber tests.

    PubMed

    Shock, Scott S; Noggle, Jessica J; Bloom, Nicholas; Yost, Lisa J

    2009-04-01

    Synthetic gypsum produced by flue-gas desulfurization (FGD) in coal-fired power plants (FGD gypsum) is put to productive use in manufacturing wallboard. FGD gypsum wallboard is widely used, accounting for nearly 30% of wallboard sold in the United States. Mercury is captured in flue gas and thus is one of the trace metals present in FGD gypsum; raising questions about the potential for mercury exposure from wallboard. Mercury is also one of the trace metals present in "natural" mined gypsum used to make wall board. Data available in the literature were not adequate to assess whether mercury in wallboard from either FGD or natural gypsum could volatilize into indoor air. In this study, mercury volatilization was evaluated using small-scale (5 L) glass and Teflon flux chambers, with samples collected using both iodated carbon and gold-coated sand traps. Mercury flux measurements made using iodated carbon traps (n=6) were below the detection limit of 11.5 ng/m2-day for all natural and synthetic gypsum wallboard samples. Mercury flux measurements made using gold-coated sand traps (n=6) were 0.92 +/- 0.11 ng/m2-day for natural gypsum wallboard and 5.9 +/- 2.4 ng/m2-day for synthetic gypsum wallboard. Room air mercury concentrations between 0.028 and 0.28 ng/m3 and between 0.13 and 2.2 ng/m3 were estimated based on the flux-rate data for natural and synthetic gypsum wallboard samples, respectively, and were calculated assuming a 3 m x 4 m x 5 m room, and 10th and 90th percentile air exchange rates of 0.18/hour and 1.26/hour. The resulting concentration estimates are well below the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) reference concentration for indoor air elemental mercury of 300 ng/m3 and the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry minimal risk level (MRL) of 200 ng/m3. Further, these estimates are below background mercury concentrations in indoor air and within or below the range of typical background mercury concentrations in outdoor air.

  15. Plants Living on Gypsum: Beyond the Specialist Model

    PubMed Central

    Palacio, Sara; Escudero, Adrián; Montserrat-Martí, Gabriel; Maestro, Melchor; Milla, Rubén; Albert, MarÍa J.

    2007-01-01

    Background and Aims Plants from gypsum habitats are classified as gypsophiles and gypsovags. The former include both narrow endemics limited to small gypsum areas and regionally dominant gypsophiles growing in gypsum areas of large regions, whereas gypsovags are plants that can grow both in gypsum and non-gypsum soils. Factors controlling the distribution of gypsum plants are still not fully understood. Methods To assess how the different types of gypsum plants deal with the stressful conditions of gypsum substrates, comparisons were made of the leaf chemical composition of four gypsovags, five regionally dominant gypsophiles and four narrow gypsum endemics growing in two massive gypsum areas of the Iberian Peninsula. Key Results The chemical composition of gypsovags was clearly different from regionally dominant gypsophiles, while the chemical composition of narrow-gypsophile endemics was more similar to the chemical composition of gypsovags than to that of regionally dominant gypsophiles. Regionally dominant gypsophiles showed higher concentrations of ash, Ca, S, N, Mg P and Na, whereas gypsovags and local gypsophile endemics displayed higher concentrations of C and greater C : N ratios. Conclusions Such differences suggest that the three groups of gypsum plants follow diverse ecological strategies. It is suggested that regionally dominant gypsophiles might fit the ‘specialist’ model, being species specifically adapted to gypsum, whereas both gypsovags and narrow-gypsophile endemics might fit the ‘refuge’ model, being stress-tolerant species that find refuge on gypsum soils from competition. The analysis of the leaf chemical composition could be a good predictor of the degree of plants specialization to gypsum soils. PMID:17204537

  16. Phosphohemihydrate process for purification of gypsum

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, J.W.; Gaynor, J.C.

    1984-01-03

    A wet process for producing phosphoric acid and phosphohemihydrate by acidulation of phosphate rock. A strong phosphoric acid is obtained with concomitant production of an improved calcium sulfate that is extremely low in radioactivity by operation in Region II for shorter time so as to produce small sized hemihydrate particles, then hydration of a substantial proportion but less than all of the hemihydrate to coarse gypsum substantially free of radioactivity in a dilute acidic aqueous slurry at a temperature and P/sub 2/O/sub 5/ concentration selected so as to be within Region I of FIG. 1 and having a substantial weight proportion of coarser gypsum particles that are substantially free of radioactivity.

  17. Tunisian gypsums: Characteristics and use in cement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoudi, Salah; Bennour, Ali; Chalwati, Youssef; Souidi, Khouloud; Thabet, Manel; Srasra, Ezzedine; Zargouni, Fouad

    2016-09-01

    Gypsum materials of hundred meters thickness and interbedded with marine claystones and limestones from different paleogeographic sectors in the Tunisian territory are studied to assess their suitability for cement production. For this reason, thirty representative samples are analysed by chemical, physical and geotechnical tests. The obtained results for the studied gypsum materials are compared to Tunisian and European norms and with the local cements, currently marketed and which obey international norms. Indeed, for all samples hydraulic modulus HM, silica modulus SM and alumina modulus AM vary from (2.37-2.44), (2.48-2.68) and (1.45-2.5), respectively; whereas the required values for these modulus are (1.5-2.5), (2-3) and (1.5-2.5). The same behavior is observed for mineralogical analyses of C3S, C2S, C3A and C4AF and compressive strength at different ages. Briefly, Tunisia contains important reserves of gypsum scattered and spread over the Tunisian territory and can be used for cement production.

  18. Gypsum scaling and cleaning in forward osmosis: measurements and mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Mi, Baoxia; Elimelech, Menachem

    2010-03-15

    This study investigates gypsum scaling and cleaning behavior in forward osmosis (FO). The results show that gypsum scaling in FO is almost fully reversible, with more than 96% recovery of permeate water flux following a water rinse without addition of chemical cleaning reagents. Parallel comparisons of fouling and cleaning were made between FO (without hydraulic pressure) and RO (under high hydraulic pressure) modes. The shape of the water flux decline curves during gypsum scaling is similar in the two modes, but the flux recovery in FO mode is higher than that in RO mode by about 10%. This behavior suggests that operating in FO mode may reduce the need for chemical cleaning. The role of membrane materials in controlling gypsum scaling and cleaning was investigated using cellulose acetate (CA) and polyamide (PA) membranes. Gypsum scaling of PA membranes causes more severe flux decline and is harder to clean than that of CA membranes. AFM force measurements were performed between a gypsum particle probe and the membrane surfaces to elucidate gypsum scaling mechanisms. Analysis of adhesion force data indicates that gypsum scaling of the PA membrane is dominated by heterogeneous/surface crystallization, while gypsum scaling of the CA membrane is dominated by bulk crystallization and subsequent particle deposition.This finding implies that membrane surface modification and new material development can be an effective strategy to mitigate membrane scaling.

  19. Sustainable Uses of FGD Gypsum in Agricultural Systems: Introduction.

    PubMed

    Watts, Dexter B; Dick, Warren A

    2014-01-01

    Interest in using gypsum as a management tool to improve crop yields and soil and water quality has recently increased. Abundant supply and availability of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum, a by-product of scrubbing sulfur from combustion gases at coal-fired power plants, in major agricultural producing regions within the last two decades has attributed to this interest. Currently, published data on the long-term sustainability of FGD gypsum use in agricultural systems is limited. This has led to organization of the American Society of Agronomy's Community "By-product Gypsum Uses in Agriculture" and a special collection of nine technical research articles on various issues related to FGD gypsum uses in agricultural systems. A brief review of FGD gypsum, rationale for the special collection, overviews of articles, knowledge gaps, and future research directions are presented in this introductory paper. The nine articles are focused in three general areas: (i) mercury and other trace element impacts, (ii) water quality impacts, and (iii) agronomic responses and soil physical changes. While this is not an exhaustive review of the topic, results indicate that FGD gypsum use in sustainable agricultural production systems is promising. The environmental impacts of FGD gypsum are mostly positive, with only a few negative results observed, even when applied at rates representing cumulative 80-year applications. Thus, FGD gypsum, if properly managed, seems to represent an important potential input into agricultural systems.

  20. Plant life on gypsum: a review of its multiple facets.

    PubMed

    Escudero, Adrián; Palacio, Sara; Maestre, Fernando T; Luzuriaga, Arantzazu L

    2015-02-01

    The adaptation of plants to particular soil types has long intrigued biologists. Gypsum soils occupy large areas in many regions of the world and host a striking biological diversity, but their vegetation has been much less studied than that developing over serpentine or saline soils. Herein, we review all aspects of plant life on gypsum ecosystems, discuss the main processes driving their structure and functioning, and highlight the main conservation threats that they face. Plant communities in gypsum habitats typically show distinctive bands at very small spatial scales, which are mainly determined by topography. Plants living on gypsum soils can be classified into three categories: (i) wide gypsophiles are specialists that can penetrate the physical soil crust during early life stages and have physiological adjustments to cope with the chemical limitations imposed by gypsum soils; (ii) narrow gypsophiles are refugee plants which successfully deal with the physical soil crust and can tolerate these chemical limitations but do not show specific adaptations for this type of soils; and (iii) gypsovags are non-specialist gypsum plants that can only thrive in gypsum soils when the physical crust is absent or reduced. Their ability to survive in gypsum soils may also be mediated by below-ground interactions with soil microorganisms. Gypsophiles and gypsovags show efficient germination at low temperatures, seed and fruit heteromorphism within and among populations, and variation in seed dormancy among plants and populations. In gypsum ecosystems, spatio-temporal changes in the composition and structure of above-ground vegetation are closely related to those of the soil seed bank. Biological soil crusts (BSCs) dominated by cyanobacteria, lichens and mosses are conspicuous in gypsum environments worldwide, and are important drivers of ecosystem processes such as carbon and nitrogen cycling, water infiltration and run-off and soil stability. These organisms are also

  1. Flue gas desulfurization gypsum and fly ash

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-05-01

    The Cumberland Fossil Plant (CUF) is located in Stewart County, Tennessee, and began commercial operation in 1972. This is the Tennessee Valley Authority`s newest fossil (coal-burning) steam electric generating plant. Under current operating conditions, the plant burns approximately seven million tons of coal annually. By-products from the combustion of coal are fly ash, approximately 428,000 tons annually, and bottom ash, approximately 115,000 tons annually. Based on historical load and projected ash production rates, a study was initially undertaken to identify feasible alternatives for marketing, utilization and disposal of ash by-products. The preferred alternative to ensure that facilities are planned for all by-products which will potentially be generated at CUF is to plan facilities to handle wet FGD gypsum and dry fly ash. A number of different sites were evaluated for their suitability for development as FGD gypsum and ash storage facilities. LAW Engineering was contracted to conduct onsite explorations of sites to develop information on the general mature of subsurface soil, rock and groundwater conditions in the site areas. Surveys were also conducted on each site to assess the presence of endangered and threatened species, wetlands and floodplains, archaeological and cultural resources, prime farmland and other site characteristics which must be considered from an environmental perspective.

  2. Long-term erosion rate measurements in gypsum caves of Sorbas (SE Spain) by the Micro-Erosion Meter method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanna, Laura; De Waele, Jo; Calaforra, José Maria; Forti, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    The present work deals with the results of long-term micro-erosion measurements in the most important gypsum cave of Spain, the Cueva del Agua (Sorbas, Almeria, SE Spain). Nineteen MEM stations were positioned in 1992 in a wide range of morphological and environmental settings (gypsum floors and walls, carbonate speleothems, dry conduits and vadose passages) inside and outside the cave, on gypsum and carbonate bedrocks and exposed to variable degree of humidity, different air flow and hydrodynamic conditions. Four different sets of stations have been investigated: (1) the main cave entrance (Las Viñicas spring); (2) the main river passage; (3) the abandoned Laboratory tunnel; and (4) the external gypsum surface. Data over a period of about 18 years are available. The average lowering rates vary from 0.014 to 0.016 mm yr- 1 near the main entrance and in the Laboratory tunnel, to 0.022 mm - 1 on gypsum floors and 0.028 mm yr- 1 on carbonate flowstones. The denudation data from the external gypsum stations are quite regular with a rate of 0.170 mm yr- 1. The observations allowed the collecting of important information concerning the feeding of the karst aquifer not only by infiltrating rainwater, but under present climate conditions also by water condensation of moist air flow. This contribution to the overall karst processes in the Cueva del Agua basin represents over 20% of the total chemical dissolution of the karst area and more than 50% of the speleogenetically removed gypsum in the cave system, thus representing all but a secondary role in speleogenesis. Condensation-corrosion is most active along the medium walls, being slower at the roof and almost absent close to the floor. This creates typical corrosion morphologies such as cupola, while gypsum flowers develop where evaporation dominates. This approach also shows quantitatively the morphological implications of condensation-corrosion processes in gypsum karst systems in arid zones, responsible for an

  3. Hydrogen sulfide release from dairy manure storages containing gypsum bedding

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recycled gypsum products can provide a cost-effective bedding alternative for dairy producers. Manufacturers report reduced odors, moisture and bacteria in the stall environment when compared to traditional bedding. Gypsum provides a sulfate source that can be converted to hydrogen sulfide under ana...

  4. Properties study of cotton stalk fiber/gypsum composite

    SciTech Connect

    Li Guozhong; Yu Yanzhen; Zhao Zhongjian; Li Jianquan; Li Changchun

    2003-01-01

    This manuscript addresses treating cotton stalk fiber surface with styrene acrylic emulsion, which improves the interfacial combined state of cotton stalk fiber/gypsum composite effectively and improves its mechanical properties notably. Mixes less slag, ordinary Portland cement, etc., to modify gypsum base. The electron microscope was utilized to analyze and research on the effect on composite properties of the abovementioned mixtures.

  5. Utilization of FGD gypsum in agriculture for environmental benefits

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper will discuss the utilization of FGD gypsum in agriculture for environmental benefits. Gypsum (CaSO4 .2H2O) has been used as an agricultural soil amendment for over 250 years. It is a soluble source of calcium and sulfur for crops and has been shown to improve soil physical and chemical pr...

  6. Conversion to full forced oxidation solves scrubber problems, produces gypsum

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-11-01

    A Michigan utility is negotiating the first long-term contract in the utility industry for the sale of scrubber-produced gypsum to a wallboard manufacturer. The Grand Haven utility produces commercial-grade gypsum which has passed trial tests at a Michigan wallboard plant. A commercial contract to sell gypsum has proved elusive even though forced oxidation of scrubber effluent to gypsum is not new. The problem is finding the right match between a high-purity calcium sulfate and a nearby facility that buys gypsum. The Grand Haven unit burns high-sulfur Indiana coal, and has a wet lime scrubber designed to remove 90% of the sulfur dioxide from the flue gas with high-calcium lime. There are two 100% capacity scrubber modules with forced oxidation in the spent slurry. The product is so pure that the wallboard company uses it to improve the natural product. 2 figures, 1 table.

  7. Modification of FGD gypsum in hydrothermal mixed salt solution.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiao-Qin; Wu, Zhong-Biao

    2006-01-01

    A novel utilization way of the sludge from wet calcium-based flue gas desulfurization (FGD) processes has been developed in this paper. This study focused on the conversion of the FGD gypsum into alpha-hemihydrate calcium sulfate by a hydrothermal salt solution method at atmospheric pressure. Experimental study has been carried out in a batch reactor. Qualitative and quantitative analyses were made by DSC/TG thermal analysis, SEM, XRD, metalloscope and chemical analysis. The experimental results showed that the modification of FGD gypsum was controlled by the dissolution and recrystallization mechanisms. With the introduction of FGD gypsum the salt solution was supersaturated, then crystal nucleus of alpha-hemihydrate calcium sulfate were produced in the solution. With the submicroscopic structure of FGD gypsum crystal changed, the crystal nucleus grew up into alpha-hemihydrate calcium sulfate crystals. Thus, the modification of FGD gypsum was fulfilled.

  8. Porosity change after gypsum crust formation on macro-porous limestones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewanckele, Jan; Cnudde, Veerle; de Kock, Tim; Boone, Marijn; Boone, Matthieu; van Hoorebeke, Luc; Jacobs, Patric

    2010-05-01

    The deterioration of stone is a complex process in which physical, biological and chemical mechanisms are involved. In this research, pore structure changes inside two types of porous limestone were analyzed before, during and after strong acid tests with SO2. Sulphatation and crust formation phenomena on natural building stones exposed to a polluted environment, are largely described in literature. As far as rocks rich in calcium carbonate are concerned, the main processes involved are the dissolution of the calcium carbonate and the formation of gypsum (CaSO4.2H2O) in presence of an acid atmosphere. The low mobility of this newly formed salt favours its accumulation in porous materials and at the surface of less porous media. The main actor in the process of gypsum crystallization on limestone is the aggressive sulphur dioxide gas (SO2). In this study, the Savonnières and Euville limestone were subjected to tests with a strong acid. According to the standard EN 13919:2002E, samples were put in acid environment for 21 days. At the bottom of the container a mixture of 500 ± 10 ml H2SO3 and 150 ± 10 ml de-mineralized H2O was added. No airborne particles or oxides of nitrogen (NOx) were added. Before exposure, after 6 days in the polluted environment and at the end of the test, the two samples were scanned with X-ray computed tomography (X-ray CT) at the Centre for X-ray Tomography at Ghent University, Belgium (UGCT; www.ugct.ugent.be). This visualization technique allows 2D and 3D reconstructions on a micrometer scale of the internal structure of an object without damaging the material. It thus enables to scan the same sample in a sequential way. In order to obtain information about the sample's interior of which the characteristics can be compared before, during and after the test, the same scanning parameters (exposure time, amount of frames, energy, etc.) were used. In addition, the same adjustments like beam hardening correction, normalizing, ring and spot

  9. Drinkable rocks: plants can use crystallization water from gypsum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palacio, Sara; Azorín, José; Montserrat-Martí, Gabriel; Ferrio, Juan Pedro

    2015-04-01

    Some minerals hold water in their crystalline structure. Such is the case of gypsum (CaSO4•2H2O), a rock forming mineral present in the arid and semi-arid regions of the five continents, including the dry most areas of the planet. Gypsum is also extensively found on Mars, where it constitutes a targeted substrate for the search of life. Under natural conditions and depending on the temperature, pressure, and dissolved electrolytes or organics, gypsum may lose crystallization water molecules, becoming bassanite (i.e. hemihydrate: CaSO4•½H2O) or anhydrite (CaSO4). As crystallization water can account for up to 20.8% of gypsum weight, it has been suggested that it could constitute a relevant source of water for organisms, particularly during summer. This suggestion is consistent with the phenology observed in some shallow-rooted plants growing on gypsum, which remain active when drought is intense, and with the increased soil moisture of gypsum soils during summer as compared to surrounding non-gypsum soils. Here we use the fact that the isotopic composition of free water differs from gypsum crystallization water to show that plants can use crystallization water from the gypsum structure. The composition of the xylem sap of gypsum plants during summer shows closer values to gypsum crystallization water than to free soil water. Crystallization water represents a significant water source for organisms growing on gypsum, especially during summer, when it accounts for 70-90% of the water used by shallow-rooted plants. These results significantly modify the current paradigm on water use by plants, where water held in the crystalline structure of mineral rocks is not regarded as a potential source. Given the existence of gypsum on the surface of Mars and its widespread occurrence on arid and semi-arid regions worldwide, our results have important implications for exobiology, the study of life under extreme conditions and arid land reclamation.

  10. Enhancing seedling production of native species to restore gypsum habitats.

    PubMed

    Cañadas, E M; Ballesteros, M; Foronda, A; Navarro, F B; Jiménez, M N; Lorite, J

    2015-11-01

    Gypsum habitats are widespread globally and are important for biological conservation. Nevertheless, they are often affected by human disturbances and thus require restoration. Sowing and planting have shown positive results, but these actions are usually limited by the lack of native plant material in commercial nurseries, and very little information is available on the propagation of these species. We address this issue from the hypothesis that gypsum added to a standard nursery growing medium (peat) can improve seedling performance of gypsum species and, therefore, optimise the seedling production for outplanting purposes. We test the effect of gypsum on emergence, survival, and growth of nine native plant species, including gypsophiles (exclusive to gypsum) and gypsovags (non-exclusive to gypsum). We used four treatments according to the proportions, in weight, of gypsum:standard peat (G:S), i.e. high-g (50G:50S), medium-g (25G:75S), low-g (10G:90S), and standard-p (0G:100S). Our results showed that the gypsum treatments especially benefited the emergence stage, gypsophiles as group, and Ononis tridentata as a taxon. In particular, the gypsum treatments enhanced emergence of seven species, survival of three species, and growth of two gypsophiles, while the use of the standard peat favoured only the emergence or growth of three gypsovags. Improving emergence and survival at the nursery can provide a reduction of costs associated with seed harvesting, watering, and space, while enlarging seedlings can favour the establishment of individuals after outplanting. Thus, we suggest adding gypsum to standard peat for propagating seedlings in species from gypsum habitats, thereby potentially cutting the costs of restoring such habitats. Our assessment enables us to provide particular advice by species. In general, we recommend using between 25 and 50% of gypsum to propagate gypsophiles, and between 0 and 10% for gypsovags. The results can benefit not only the production

  11. Effect of background electrolytes on gypsum dissolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgos-Cara, Alejandro; Putnis, Christine; Ruiz-Agudo, Encarnacion

    2015-04-01

    Knowledge of the dissolution behaviour of gypsum (CaSO4· 2H2O) in aqueous solutions is of primary importance in many natural and technological processes (Pachon-Rodriguez and Colombani, 2007), including the weathering of rocks and gypsum karst formations, deformation of gypsum-bearing rocks, the quality of drinking water, amelioration of soil acidity, scale formation in the oil and gas industry or measurement of water motion in oceanography. Specific ions in aqueous solutions can play important but very different roles on mineral dissolution. For example, the dissolution rates and the morphology of dissolution features may be considerably modified by the presence of the foreign ions in the solution, which adsorb at the surface and hinder the detachment of the ions building the crystal. Dissolution processes in the aqueous environment are closely related to the rearrangement of water molecules around solute ions and the interaction between the solvent molecules themselves. The rearrangement of water molecules with respect to solute species has been recognized as the main kinetic barrier for crystal dissolution in many systems (Davis, 2000; De Yoreo and Dove 2004; Wasylenki et al. 2005). Current research suggest that the control that electrolytes exert on water structure is limited to the local environment surrounding the ions and is not related to long-range electric fields emanating from the ions but results from effects associated with the hydration shell(s) of the ions (Collins et al. 2007) and the ions' capacity to break or structure water (i.e. chaotropic and kosmotropic ions, respectively). These effects will ultimately affect the kinetics of crystal dissolution, and could be correlated with the water affinity of the respective background ions following a trend known as the lyotropic or Hofmeister series (Kunz et al. 2004; Dove and Craven, 2005). In situ macroscopic and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) flow-through dissolution experiments were conducted at a

  12. Hyperspectral sensor for gypsum detection on monumental buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camaiti, M.; Vettori, S.; Benvenuti, M.; Chiarantini, L.; Costagliola, P.; Di Benedetto, F.; Moretti, S.; Paba, F.; Pecchioni, E.

    2011-09-01

    A portable hyperspectral device (ASD-FieldSpec FR Pro) has been employed for the characterization of alterations affecting the marble facade of the Santa Maria Novella church (XIII cent.) in Florence (Italy). The ASD-FieldSpec FR Pro collects the reflectance spectra of a selected target area (about 1.5 cm2). The spectra of calcite, gypsum and other mineral phases commonly occurring on outdoor surfaces exposed to the urban atmosphere were collected and presented. The spectral features of alteration minerals (depth of reflectance minima) appear to be affected by grain size, phase abundance in addition to lightness (L*) of the target area. Notwithstanding these limitations, the spectra may be used for a qualitative screening of the alteration and, under reasonable assumptions, the reflectance band depth may be used also for quantitative estimation of phase abundance. The monitoring of the conservation state of outdoor surfaces is considered of fundamental importance to plan conservative interventions on historical buildings. Our results point out that portable hyperspectral instruments may be considered as powerful tools for characterizing historical surfaces in a nondestructive and noninvasive way.

  13. Water defluoridation using Malawi’s locally sourced gypsum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masamba, W. R. L.; Sajidu, S. M.; Thole, B.; Mwatseteza, J. F.

    Free fluoride levels above the WHO guideline maximum value of 1.5 mg/l have been reported in several parts of Malawi. Dental fluorosis has also been observed in the same areas such that search for local defluoridation techniques has become important in the country. The present research intended to determine the potential of using Malawi gypsum in defluoridation, identify the best pre-treatment of the gypsum and optimum conditions under which effective water defluoridation with the gypsum may be obtained. Laboratory experiments were carried out to explore defluoridation of drinking water using locally sourced gypsum and gypsum calcined at high temperatures. A 400 °C calcined phase of gypsum gave the highest defluoridation capacity of 67.80% compared to raw (uncalcined) gypsum, 200, 300 and 500 °C calcined phases. Powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) pattern of the 400 °C phase revealed existence of less crystalline CaSO 4 that was thought to be responsible for such relatively high defluoridation capacity. The dependence of the fluoride removal by the 400 °C calcined phase on other drinking water quality parameters was assessed by simple correlation analysis. Reaction kinetics and mechanisms of fluoride removal by the materials were also investigated. It was found that ion exchange was the dominant mechanism through which fluoride was removed from water by the materials.

  14. Measuring the gypsum content of C&D debris fines.

    PubMed

    Musson, Stephen E; Xu, Qiyong; Townsend, Timothy G

    2008-11-01

    Construction and demolition (C&D) debris recycling facilities often produce a screened material intended for use as alternative daily cover (ADC) at active landfills or for shaping and grading at closed landfills. This product contains soil and small pieces of wood, concrete, gypsum drywall, shingles and other components of C&D debris. Concerns have been raised over the contribution of gypsum drywall in C&D debris fines to odor problems at landfills where the product is used. To address such concerns, limitations may be placed on the percentage of gypsum (or sulfate) that can occur, and standardized testing procedures are required to permit valid compliance testing. A test procedure was developed for measuring the gypsum content in C&D debris fines. The concentration of sulfate leached in an aqueous solution was used to estimate the initial gypsum content of the sample. The impact of sample size and leaching time were evaluated. Precision and accuracy increased with increasing gypsum content. Results from replicate samples had an average relative standard deviation of 9%. The gypsum content of fines obtained from different facilities in the US varied widely from 1% to over 25%. These variations not only occurred between differing facilities, but within batches produced within a single facility.

  15. Gypsum-karst problems in constructing dams in the USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Kenneth S.

    2008-01-01

    Gypsum is a highly soluble rock and is dissolved readily to form caves, sinkholes, disappearing streams, and other karst features that typically are also present in limestones and dolomites. Gypsum karst is widespread in the USA and has caused problems at several sites where dams were built, or where dam construction was considered. Gypsum karst is present (at least locally) in most areas where gypsum crops out, or is less than 30-60 m below the land surface. These karst features can compromise on the ability of a dam to hold water in a reservoir, and can even cause collapse of a dam. Gypsum karst in the abutments or foundation of a dam can allow water to pass through, around, or under a dam, and solution channels can enlarge quickly, once water starts flowing through such a karst system. The common procedure for controlling gypsum karst beneath the dam is a deep cut-off trench, backfilled with impermeable material, or a close-spaced grout curtain that hopefully will fill all cavities. In Oklahoma, the proposed Upper Mangum Dam was abandoned before construction, because of extensive gypsum karst in the abutments and impoundment area. Catastrophic failure of the Quail Creek Dike in southwest Utah in 1989 was due to flow of water through an undetected karstified gypsum unit beneath the earth-fill embankment. The dike was rebuilt, at a cost of US 12 million, with construction of a cut-off trench 600 m long and 25 m deep. Other dams in the USA with severe gypsum-karst leakage problems in recent years are Horsetooth and Carter Lake Dams, in Colorado, and Anchor Dam, in Wyoming.

  16. Gypsum-karst problems in constructing dams in the USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, K.S.

    2008-01-01

    Gypsum is a highly soluble rock and is dissolved readily to form caves, sinkholes, disappearing streams, and other karst features that typically are also present in limestones and dolomites. Gypsum karst is widespread in the USA and has caused problems at several sites where dams were built, or where dam construction was considered. Gypsum karst is present (at least locally) in most areas where gypsum crops out, or is less than 30-60 m below the land surface. These karst features can compromise on the ability of a dam to hold water in a reservoir, and can even cause collapse of a dam. Gypsum karst in the abutments or foundation of a dam can allow water to pass through, around, or under a dam, and solution channels can enlarge quickly, once water starts flowing through such a karst system. The common procedure for controlling gypsum karst beneath the dam is a deep cut-off trench, backfilled with impermeable material, or a close-spaced grout curtain that hopefully will fill all cavities. In Oklahoma, the proposed Upper Mangum Dam was abandoned before construction, because of extensive gypsum karst in the abutments and impoundment area. Catastrophic failure of the Quail Creek Dike in southwest Utah in 1989 was due to flow of water through an undetected karstified gypsum unit beneath the earth-fill embankment. The dike was rebuilt, at a cost of US $12 million, with construction of a cut-off trench 600 m long and 25 m deep. Other dams in the USA with severe gypsum-karst leakage problems in recent years are Horsetooth and Carter Lake Dams, in Colorado, and Anchor Dam, in Wyoming. ?? 2007 Springer-Verlag.

  17. Differential comminution of gypsum in cements ground in different mills

    SciTech Connect

    Panigrahy, P.K.; Goswami, G.; Panda, J.D.; Panda, R.K

    2003-07-01

    Identical mixes containing fixed amounts of ordinary Portland cement clinker and gypsum were ground in two types of industrial cement mills - viz. ball mill (BM) and vertical roller mill (VRM) - to identical Blaine fineness to examine the effect of any possible differential comminution of gypsum on cement setting times. The present investigation demonstrates that during comminution of cements, the degree of crystallinity of gypsum, as determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD), changes with used grinding mills and this causes changes in setting times of similar cements even when ground to identical Blaine fineness.

  18. Window contamination on Expose-R

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demets, R.; Bertrand, M.; Bolkhovitinov, A.; Bryson, K.; Colas, C.; Cottin, H.; Dettmann, J.; Ehrenfreund, P.; Elsaesser, A.; Jaramillo, E.; Lebert, M.; van Papendrecht, G.; Pereira, C.; Rohr, T.; Saiagh, K.

    2015-01-01

    Expose is a multi-user instrument for astrobiological and astrochemical experiments in space. Installed at the outer surface of the International Space Station, it enables investigators to study the impact of the open space environment on biological and biochemical test samples. Two Expose missions have been completed so far, designated as Expose-E (Rabbow et al. 2012) and Expose-R (Rabbow et al. this issue). One of the space-unique environmental factors offered by Expose is full-spectrum, ultraviolet (UV)-rich electromagnetic radiation from the Sun. This paper describes and analyses how on Expose-R, access of the test samples to Solar radiation degraded during space exposure in an unpredicted way. Several windows in front of the Sun-exposed test samples acquired a brown shade, resulting in a reduced transparency in visible light, UV and vacuum UV (VUV). Post-flight investigations revealed the discolouration to be caused by a homogenous film of cross-linked organic polymers at the inside of the windows. The chemical signature varied per sample carrier. No such films were found on windows from sealed, pressurized compartments, or on windows that had been kept out of the Sun. This suggests that volatile compounds originating from the interior of the Expose facility were cross-linked and photo-fixed by Solar irradiation at the rear side of the windows. The origin of the volatiles was not fully identified; most probably there was a variety of sources involved including the biological test samples, adhesives, plastics and printed circuit boards. The outer surface of the windows (pointing into space) was chemically impacted as well, with a probable effect on the transparency in VUV. The reported analysis of the window contamination on Expose-R is expected to help the interpretation of the scientific results and offers possibilities to mitigate this problem on future missions - in particular Expose-R2, the direct successor of Expose-R.

  19. Evaluation of FGD-gypsum to improve forage production and reduce phosphorus lossed from Piedmont soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Flue gas desulfurization gypsum (FGD-gypsum), a byproduct from coal fired electricity generators, has the potential for beneficial use in agricultural systems as a soil amendment. Similar to mined gypsum it can improve soil chemical and physical properties and increase crop productivity. FGD-gypsum ...

  20. Gypsum under pressure: A first-principles study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giacomazzi, Luigi; Scandolo, Sandro

    2010-02-01

    We investigate by means of first-principles methods the structural response of gypsum (CaSO4ṡ2H2O) to pressures within and above the stability range of gypsum-I (P≤4GPa) . Structural and vibrational properties calculated for gypsum-I are in excellent agreement with experimental data. Compression within gypsum-I takes place predominantly through a reduction in the volume of the CaO8 polyhedra and through a distortion of the hydrogen bonds. The distance between CaSO4 layers becomes increasingly incompressible, indicating a mechanical limit to the packing of water molecules between the layers. We find that a structure with collapsed interlayer distances becomes more stable than gypsum-I above about 5 GPa. The collapse is concomitant with a rearrangement of the hydrogen-bond network of the water molecules. Comparison of the vibrational spectra calculated for this structure with experimental data taken above 5 GPa supports the validity of our model for the high-pressure phase of gypsum.

  1. Structure of cortical cytoskeleton in fibers of mouse muscle cells after being exposed to a 30-day space flight on board the BION-M1 biosatellite.

    PubMed

    Ogneva, I V; Maximova, M V; Larina, I M

    2014-05-15

    The aim of the work was to analyze changes in the organization of the cortical cytoskeleton in fibers of the mouse soleus muscle, tibialis anterior muscle and left ventricular cardiomyocytes after completion of a 30-day space flight on board the BION-M1 biosatellite (Russia, 2013). The transversal stiffness of the cortical cytoskeleton of the cardiomyocytes and fibers of the skeletal muscles did not differ significantly within the study groups compared with the vivarium control group. The content of beta- and gamma-actin in the membranous fraction of proteins in the left ventricular cardiomyocytes did not differ significantly within all study groups and correlated with the transversal stiffness. A similar situation was revealed in fibers of the soleus muscle and tibialis anterior muscle. At the same time, the content of beta-actin in the cytoplasmic fraction of proteins was found to be decreased in all types of studied tissues compared with the control levels in the postflight group, with lowered beta-actin gene expression rates in the postflight group. After completion of the space flight, the content of alpha-actinin-4 was found to be reduced in the membranous fraction of proteins from the mouse cardiomyocytes, while its content in the cytoplasmic fraction of proteins did not change significantly. Furthermore, gene expression rates of this protein were decreased at the time of dissection (it was started after 13 h after landing). At the same time, the content of alpha-actinin-1 decreased in the membranous fraction and increased in the cytoplasmic fraction of proteins from the soleus muscle fibers.

  2. Testing a portable Raman instrument: The detection of biomarkers in gypsum powdered matrix under gypsum crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Culka, A.; Jehlička, J.; Strnad, L.

    2012-02-01

    In this study the possibility to detect biomarkers in experimentally prepared evaporitic matrices using a portable Raman instrument was estimated. Testing of the instrument was carried-out under the Alpine conditions outdoors at a low ambient temperature of -10 °C and at an altitude of 2860 m (Pitztal, Austria). Amino acids glycine and L-alanine, nucleo bases thymine and adenine, and metabolite urea were the organics mixed with gypsum powder. In this step it was shown that portable Raman spectroscopic instrumentation is capable of detecting biomarkers in complex samples in a host geological matrix. Such detection is possible even when the laser beam was focussed through the gypsum crystals 3-9 mm thick. For exobiology areas, this is an important fact, because life and/or related biomolecules are likely to be found in cavities under the surface of partially transparent evaporitic minerals that provide them a shelter from the hostile surrounding environment. For influencing the intensity of Raman bands the thickness of covering crystals is not as important as is the actual concentration of the biomarkers. This work and similar experiments serve for better evaluation of Raman spectroscopy as a method for future planetary exploration mission adoption.

  3. Groundwater changes in evaporating basins using gypsum crystals' isotopic compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatti, E.; Bustos, D.; Allwood, A.; Coleman, M. L.

    2014-12-01

    While the dynamics of groundwater evaporation are well known, it is still challenging to reconstruct the water patterns in areas where water is not available anymore. We selected a specific location in White Sands National Monument (WSNM), New Mexico, to validate a method to extract information from hydrated minerals regarding past groundwater evaporation patterns in evaporitic basins. WSNM has gypsum (CaSO4.2H2O) dunes and crystals precipitated from the evaporation of an ancient lake. Our approach aims to extract the water of crystallization of gypsum and measure its oxygen and hydrogen isotopic compositions, in order to reconstruct the groundwater history of the area. The idea is that as the mother brine evaporates its isotopic composition changes continuously, recorded as water of crystallization in successive growth zones of gypsum. To check if the isotopic composition of the salt could effectively differentiate between distinctive humidity conditions, the methodology was tested first on synthetic gypsum grown under controlled humidity and temperature conditions. T and RH% were maintained constant in a glove box and precipitated gypsum was harvested every 24 hours. d2H and d18O of water of crystallization from the synthetic gypsum was extracted using a specially developed technique on a TC/EA. The brine was measured using a Gas Bench II for d18O and an H-Device for d2H on a Thermo Finnigan MAT 253 mass spectrometer. With the method tested, we measured natural gypsum. In order to identify the growth zones we mapped the surface of the crystals using an experimental space flight XRF instrument. Crystals were then sampled for isotopic analyses. Preliminary results suggest that site-specific groundwater changes can be described by the isotopic variations. We will show that the methodology is a reliable and fast method to quantify hydrological changes in a targeted environment. The study is currently ongoing but the full dataset will be presented at the conference.

  4. Morphological biosignatures in gypsum: diverse formation processes of Messinian (∼6.0 Ma) gypsum stromatolites.

    PubMed

    Allwood, A C; Burch, I W; Rouchy, J M; Coleman, M

    2013-09-01

    The ∼5.3-6.0 million-year-old evaporitic gypsum deposits of Cyprus and Crete contain a variety of stromatolites that formed during the Messinian salinity crisis. We recognize four stromatolite morphotypes, including domical, conical, columnar, and flat-laminated structures. Observations of morphological and textural variations among the different morphotypes reveal significant diversity and complexity in the nature of interactions between microorganisms, gypsum deposition, and gypsum crystal growth. Nonbiological processes (detrital gypsum deposition, in situ crust precipitation, syntaxial crystal growth, subsurface crystal growth, and recrystallization) interacted with inferred microbial processes (including localized growth of biofilms, trapping and binding of grains in mats, nucleation of gypsum on cells) to produce distinct morphological-textural assemblages. Evidence for biological origins is clear in some stromatolite morphotypes and can come from the presence of microfossils, the spatial distribution of organic matter, and stromatolite morphology. In one stromatolite morphotype, the presence of the stromatolite, or the biota associated with it, may have determined the morphology of gypsum crystals. In some stromatolite morphotypes, definitive evidence of a microbial influence is not as clear. There are broad similarities between the Messinian gypsum stromatolites and carbonate stromatolites elsewhere in the geologic record, such as the formation of precipitated and granular layers; the development of domed, columnar, and conical morphotypes; the potential for microbes to influence mineral precipitation; and the recrystallization of deposits during burial. However, in detail the array of microbial-sedimentary-diagenetic process interactions is quite distinct in gypsiferous systems due to differences in the way gypsum typically forms and evolves in the paleoenvironment compared to carbonate. Unique aspects of the taphonomy of gypsum compared to carbonate

  5. Fate of Mercury in Synthetic Gypsum Used for Wallboard Production

    SciTech Connect

    Jessica Marshall Sanderson

    2006-06-01

    This report presents and discusses results from Task 5 of the study ''Fate of Mercury in Synthetic Gypsum Used for Wallboard Production,'' performed at a full-scale commercial wallboard plant. Synthetic gypsum produced by wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems on coal-fired power plants is commonly used in the manufacture of wallboard. The FGD process is used to control the sulfur dioxide emissions which would result in acid rain if not controlled. This practice has long benefited the environment by recycling the FGD gypsum byproduct, which is becoming available in increasing quantities, decreasing the need to landfill this material, and increasing the sustainable design of the wallboard product. However, new concerns have arisen as recent mercury control strategies developed for power plants involve the capture of mercury in FGD systems. The objective of this study is to determine whether any mercury is released into the atmosphere when the synthetic gypsum material is used as a feedstock for wallboard production. The project is being co-funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory (Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42080), USG Corporation, and EPRI. USG Corporation is the prime contractor, and URS Group is a subcontractor. The project scope includes five discrete tasks, each conducted at various USG wallboard plants using synthetic gypsum from different FGD systems. The five tasks were to include (1) a baseline test, then variations representing differing power plant (2) emissions control configurations, (3) treatment of fine gypsum particles, (4) coal types, and (5) FGD reagent types. However, Task 5, which was to evaluate gypsum produced from an alternate FGD reagent, could not be conducted as planned. Instead, Task 5 was conducted at conditions similar to a previous task, Task 3, although with gypsum from an alternate FGD system. In this project, process stacks in the wallboard plant have been sampled using the Ontario Hydro method. The

  6. Unravelling the mechanisms for plant survival on gypsum soils: an analysis of the chemical composition of gypsum plants from Turkey.

    PubMed

    Bolukbasi, A; Kurt, L; Palacio, S

    2016-03-01

    Depending on their specificity to gypsum, plants can be classified as gypsophiles (gypsum exclusive) and gypsovags (non-exclusive). The former may further be segregated into wide and narrow gypsophiles, depending on the breadth of their distribution area. Narrow gypsum endemics have a putative similar chemical composition to plants non-exclusive to gypsum (i.e. gypsovags), which may indicate their similar ecological strategy as stress-tolerant plant refugees on gypsum. However, this hypothesis awaits testing in different regions of the world. We compared the chemical composition of four narrow gypsum endemics, one widely distributed gypsophile and six gypsovags from Turkey. Further, we explored the plasticity in chemical composition of Turkish gypsovags growing on high- and low-gypsum content soils. Differences were explored with multivariate analyses (RDA) and mixed models (REML). Narrow gypsum endemics segregated from gypsovags in their chemical composition according to RDAs (mainly due to higher K and ash content in the former). Nevertheless, differences were small and disappeared when different nutrients were analysed individually. All the gypsovags studied accumulated more S and ash when growing on high-gypsum than on low-gypsum soils. Similar to narrow gypsum endemics from other regions of the world, most local gypsum endemics from Turkey show a similar chemical composition to gypsovags. This may indicate a shared ecological strategy as stress-tolerant plants not specifically adapted to gypsum. Nevertheless, the narrow gypsum endemic Gypsophila parva showed a chemical composition typical of gypsum specialists, indicating that various strategies are feasible within narrowly distributed gypsophiles.

  7. Experimental deformation tests on natural gypsum in simple shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barberini, V.; Burlini, L.; Rutter, E.; Dapiaggi, M.

    2003-04-01

    Gypsum, together with anhydrite and halite, is the main mineral forming evaporitic rocks. These rocks, interlayered within sedimentary sequences, play an important role in structural development in several ways on accounts of their particular physical properties. Evaporites are more plastic and less permeable compared to sandstones, limestones and shales. Moreover, gypsum starts to dehydrate at less than 100 °C. High plasticity at relatively low temperature, together with the possible presence of pressurised water, imply that, when sedimentary sequences are involved in thrust tectonics, deformation is often localised in evaporitic levels (Apennines, South Alpine region, Zagros, Gulf of Mexico, etc.); in some cases the deformation is accompanied by seismicity as in the Northern Apennines extensional systems. Low permeability of evaporitic rocks allow them to be a good sealing rock for oil reservoirs and a very efficient rock to localise waste disposal. In this framework, a set of experiments was performed on gypsum samples from Volterra (Tuscany, Italy) in order to investigate how gypsum behaves at increasing stress/strain conditions. Experimental deformation tests were performed at confining pressures up to 300 MPa, at different temperatures (20, 70, 90 and 130 °C) and at strain rates ranging between 1*10-4 and 5*10-6 s-1. In order to reach high shear strain values (up to gamma = 4), we used: 1) gypsum cores deformed using the newly developed torsion technique in a Paterson-type apparatus and 2) both gypsum slices and powder in sawcut assembly at 35°, deformed in a Heard-type triaxial apparatus. All the deformed samples have been studied both by optical microscopy, to investigate the evolution of the microstructure with strain, and by XRD analysis, to determine if and to what extent gypsum dehydrated during deformation. A peak in the shear stress value (60-120 MPa) was reached at shear strains between gamma = 0.2 and gamma = 1, followed by strain softening or

  8. Heterogeneous and multiphase formation pathways of gypsum in the atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Ma, Qingxin; He, Hong; Liu, Yongchun; Liu, Chang; Grassian, Vicki H

    2013-11-28

    Gypsum is a major sulphur-containing component of atmospheric particulate matter. To date, however, its formation pathways in the atmosphere are still not well known. In this study, several potentially important formation pathways of gypsum in atmospheric aerosols are proposed. We found that gypsum was formed in the humidifying-dehumidifying process of mixed sulphate and calcium salts. A deliquescent layer is crucial for the formation of gypsum from Ca(2+) and SO4(2-) ions. In particular, the presence of hygroscopic components, such as (NH4)2SO4 and Ca(NO3)2, is necessary for the conversion of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) upon heterogeneous reaction of either SO2 + O3 or SO2 + NO2 as well as anhydrous calcium sulphate (CaSO4) to form gypsum (CaSO4·2H2O) under ambient conditions. This study provides definitive evidence that synergistic effects in the physical and chemical processing of aerosol particles have a significant effect on their final chemical composition, mixing state and hygroscopic behaviour which dictates the environmental and climate impacts of the resulting aerosol.

  9. Hydration of C{sub 3}A-gypsum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Quennoz, Alexandra Scrivener, Karen L.

    2012-07-15

    Hydration of C{sub 3}A-gypsum systems with different gypsum additions was investigated in terms of the phase assemblage, kinetics and microstructural development. The second stage of the reaction, which begins after the depletion of gypsum, was of particular interest. From in-situ X-ray diffraction results, it was seen that the dissolution of ettringite and C{sub 3}A to form monosulfoaluminate and/or hydroxy-AFm phases is a rapid reaction that occurs right after the depletion of gypsum. The observation of the calorimetric curves obtained for the different gypsum additions leads us to the conclusion that the mechanism controlling the hydration rate during this period is the nucleation and growth of the AFm phases. The microstructural study showed that the formation of AFm phases occurs in the space between the C{sub 3}A grains but also within the boundaries of the original C{sub 3}A grains. Hydrogarnet was observed growing as a shell around the C{sub 3}A grains.

  10. Using stable isotopes (δ^{18}O and δ$D) of gypsum hydration water to unravel the mode of gypsum speleothem formation in semi-arid caves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gázquez, Fernando; Calaforra, Jose Maria; Evans, Nicholas P.; Hodell, David A.

    2016-04-01

    Subaerial gypsum speleothems form during the evaporation of calcium-sulfate-rich solutions in caves. The evaporation of infiltration water is the widely accepted mechanism to explain precipitation of gypsum speleothems; i.e., the dissolution of gypsum host-rock (e.g. Messinian marine gypsum) supplies Ca2+ and SO42- ions to cave waters and subsequent evaporation leads to gypsum saturation. However, water condensation actively occurs in caves of semi-arid regions and plays a key role in subaerial cave speleogenesis and recharge of aquifers in low-rainfall environments. To date, water condensation in karstic environments has not been considered as an important factor in gypsum speleothem formation. We collected speleothem samples from the upper passages of Covadura Cave in the gypsum karst of Sorbas (Almeria, SE Spain). This cave is located in a temperate (annual mean temperature of 19.5oC), semi-arid region (

  11. Gypsum scaling in pressure retarded osmosis: experiments, mechanisms and implications.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Minmin; Hou, Dianxun; She, Qianhong; Tang, Chuyang Y

    2014-01-01

    Pressure retarded osmosis (PRO) is an osmotically-driven membrane process that can be used to harvest salinity-gradient power. The PRO performance (both water flux and power density) can be severely limited by membrane fouling. The current study, for the first time, investigates PRO scaling in a bench-scale pressurized system using calcium sulfate dihydrate (gypsum) as a model scalant. In addition to the bulk feed solution (FS) saturation index (SI bulk), gypsum scaling was found to be strongly affected by the draw solution (DS) type and concentration, the applied hydraulic pressure, and the membrane orientation. The commonly recommended active layer facing draw solution (AL-DS) orientation was highly prone to internal scaling. In this orientation, severe internal concentration polarization (ICP) of scaling precursors induced gypsum clogging in membrane support layer even when the FS was undersaturated (e.g., SI bulk = 0.8). At higher SI bulk values, external gypsum crystal deposition occurred in addition to internal scaling. More severe scaling was observed when the DS contained scaling precursors such as Ca(2+) or SO4(2-), suggesting that the reverse diffusion of these precursors into the FS can significantly enhanced gypsum scaling. Increasing applied hydraulic pressure could enhance reverse solute diffusion and thus result in more severe gypsum scaling when the DS contained scaling precursors. A conceptual model, capturing the two important PRO scaling mechanisms (ICP of scaling precursors from FS and reverse diffusion of scaling precursors from the DS), is presented to rationalize the experimental results. Our results provide significant implications for PRO scaling control.

  12. Calcium isotopic fractionation in microbially mediated gypsum precipitates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harouaka, Khadouja; Mansor, Muammar; Macalady, Jennifer L.; Fantle, Matthew S.

    2016-07-01

    Gypsum (CaSO4·2H2O) precipitation experiments were carried out at low pH in the presence of the sulfur oxidizing bacterium Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans. The observed Ca isotopic fractionation (expressed as Δ44/40Cas-f = δ44/40Casolid-δ44/40Cafluid) at the end of each experimental time period (∼50 to 60 days) was -1.41‰ to -1.09‰ in the biotic experiments, -1.09‰ in the killed control, and -1.01‰ to -0.88‰ in the abiotic controls. As there were no strong differences in the solution chemistry and the rate at which gypsum precipitated in the biotic and abiotic controls, we deduce a biological Ca isotope effect on the order of -0.3‰. The isotope effect correlates with a difference in crystal aspect ratios between the biotic experiments (8.05 ± 3.99) and abiotic controls (31.9 ± 8.40). We hypothesize that soluble and/or insoluble organic compounds selectively inhibit crystal growth at specific crystal faces, and that the growth inhibition affects the fractionation factor associated with gypsum precipitation. The experimental results help explain Ca isotopic variability in gypsum sampled from a sulfidic cave system, in which gypsum crystals exhibiting a diversity of morphologies (microcrystalline to cm-scale needles) have a broad range of δ44/40Ca values (∼1.2-0.4‰) relative to the limestone wall (δ44/40Ca = 1.3‰). In light of the laboratory experiments, the variation in Ca isotope values in the caves can be interpreted as a consequence of gypsum precipitation in the presence of microbial organic matter and subsequent isotopic re-equilibration with the Ca source.

  13. Comparison of soil applied flue gas desulfurization (FGD) and agricultural gypsum on soil physical properties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gypsum can come from different sources. Agricultural gypsum is typically mined and used to supply calcium to crops. Flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum is a by-product of coal power plants. Although their chemical formulas are the same, different trace elements and materials are present in them....

  14. Method Analysis of Microbial-Resistant Gypsum Products

    EPA Science Inventory

    Method Analysis of Microbial-Resistant Gypsum ProductsD.A. Betancourt1, T.R.Dean1, A. Evans2, and G.Byfield2 1. US Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, National Risk Management Research Laboratory; RTP, NC 277112. RTI International, RTP, NCSeveral...

  15. Evaluation of gypsum rates on greenhouse crop production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was to determine the potential of an added value distribution channel for gypsum waste by evaluating various greenhouse crops with captious pH and calcium needs. Three studies consisting of: Zonal geranium (Pelargonium x hortorum) and petunia (Petunia x hybrida); tomato (Solanum lycoper...

  16. MOLD GROWTH ON GYPSUM WALLBOARD--A RESEARCH SUMMARY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Reducing occupant exposure to mold growing on damp gypsum wallboard is a research objective of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Often mold contaminated building materials are not properly removed but instead surface cleaners are used and then paint is applied in an attem...

  17. Use of soil electrical conductivity to determine gypsum movement

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There has been renewed interest in the land application of industrial by-products, such as flue-gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum. Some of these materials can be beneficial to crop production under certain circumstances. However, recent findings show that annual applications might be needed to provid...

  18. Formation of natural gypsum megacrystals in Naica, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Ruiz, Juan Manuel; Villasuso, Roberto; Ayora, Carlos; Canals, Angels; Otálora, Fermín

    2007-04-01

    Exploration in the Naica mine (Chihuahua, Mexico) recently unveiled several caves containing giant, faceted, and transparent single crystals of gypsum (CaSO4•2H2O) as long as 11 m. These large crystals form at very low supersaturation. The problem is to explain how proper geochemical conditions can be sustained for a long time without large fluctuations that would trigger substantial nucleation. Fluid inclusion analyses show that the crystals grew from low-salinity solutions at a temperature of ˜54 °C, slightly below the one at which the solubility of anhydrite equals that of gypsum. Sulfur and oxygen isotopic compositions of gypsum crystals are compatible with growth from solutions resulting from dissolution of anhydrite previously precipitated during late hydrothermal mineralization, suggesting that these megacrystals formed by a self-feeding mechanism driven by a solution-mediated, anhydrite-gypsum phase transition. Nucleation kinetics calculations based on laboratory data show that this mechanism can account for the formation of these giant crystals, yet only when operating within the very narrow range of temperature identified by our fluid inclusion study. These singular conditions create a mineral wonderland, a site of scientific interest, and an extraordinary phenomenon worthy of preservation.

  19. The Gypsum: White gold of Rajasthan, introduction, uses and future prospective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Gayatri

    2013-06-01

    Rajasthan is mineral based state and Bikaner and its surrounding district have been gifted with Gypsum. Mt of Gypsum is available in these districts. Gypsum has multiple uses including basic raw material for POP industry, addition in cement and a natural fertilizer. This mineral has changes the economic scenario in the remote areas of Bikaner, Nagaur, Hanumangarh, Sanchore, Shriganganagar etc. Gypsum and selenite are mined about 3.0 million tons per year. There is huge demand from cement industry as Gypsum is added for improving setting time of cement. Gypsum is a natural fertilizer for alkaline land and it role is vital in state like India where alkaline land is major role. Its high use as fertilizer has potential to change millions of poor farmer families and improving in crop production. Cement Industry has started importing Gypsum from Thailand, Bankong, Pakistan, Iran etc. The mining of gypsum of purity of 70% CaSO4.2H2O is cooperative effort between the land owners and Rajasthan State Mines and Minerals Limited. Gypsum fulfills the demand of POP and Cement industry in Rajasthan and powder gypsum used in agriculture for recon dining of alkaline soil. This paper deals with multiple uses, availability, and future prospective of Gypsum, a white gold of Rajasthan.

  20. The crystallization water of gypsum rocks is a relevant water source for plants.

    PubMed

    Palacio, Sara; Azorín, José; Montserrat-Martí, Gabriel; Ferrio, Juan Pedro

    2014-08-18

    Some minerals, like gypsum, hold water in their crystalline structure. Although still unexplored, the use of such crystallization water by organisms would point to a completely new water source for life, critical under dry conditions. Here we use the fact that the isotopic composition of free water differs from gypsum crystallization water to show that plants can use crystallization water from the gypsum structure. The composition of the xylem sap of gypsum plants during summer shows closer values to gypsum crystallization water than to free soil water. Crystallization water represents a significant water source for organisms growing on gypsum, especially during summer, when it accounts for 70-90% of the water used by shallow-rooted plants. Given the widespread occurrence of gypsum in dry lands throughout the Earth and in Mars, these results may have important implications for arid land reclamation and exobiology.

  1. Fibrous gypsum veins as diffuse features and within fault zones: the case study of the Pisco Basin (Ica desert, southern Peru)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rustichelli, Andrea; Di Celma, Claudio; Tondi, Emanuele; Baud, Patrick; Vinciguerra, Sergio

    2016-04-01

    New knowledge on patterns of fibrous gypsum veins, their genetic mechanisms, deformation style and weathering are provided by a field- and laboratory-based study carried out on the Neogene to Quaternary Pisco Basin sedimentary strata (porous sandstones, siltstones and diatomites) exposed in the Ica desert, southern Peru. Gypsum veins vary considerably in dimensions, attitudes and timing and can develop in layered and moderately fractured rocks also in the absence of evaporitic layers. Veins occur both as diffuse features, confined to certain stratigraphic levels, and localised within fault zones. Arrays formed by layer-bounded, mutually orthogonal sets of steeply-dipping gypsum veins are reported for the first time. Vein length, height and spacing depend on the thickness of the bed packages in which they are confined. Within fault zones, veins are partly a product of faulting but also inherited layer-bounded features along which faults are superimposed. Due to the different petrophysical properties with respect to the parent rocks and their susceptibility to textural and mineralogical modifications, water dissolution and rupture, gypsum veins may have a significant role in geofluid management. Depending on their patterns and grade of physical and chemical alteration, veins may influence geofluid circulation and storage, acting as barriers to flow and possibly also as conduits.

  2. Uranium minerals in Oligocene gypsum near Chadron, Dawes County, Nebraska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dunham, R.J.

    1955-01-01

    Carnotite, sabugalite [HAI(UO2)4(PO4)4 • 16H2O] and autunite occur in the basal 25 feet of a 270-foot sequence of nonmarine bedded gypsum and gypsiferous clay in the Brule formation of Oligocene age about 12 miles northeast of Chadron in northeastern Dawes County, Nebraska. Uranium minerals are visible at only two localities and are associated with carbonaceous matter. Elsewhere the basal 25 feet of the gypsum sequence is interbedded with carbonate rocks and is weakly but persistently uraniferous. Uranium probably was emplaced from above by uranyl solutions rich in sulfate.

  3. Inhibition of Gypsum Precipitation for Subsurface Barrier Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrett, E.; Barcelona, M.

    2008-12-01

    As coastal and arid climate regions around the world experience population growth and changing climates, they face the issue of seawater intrusion into freshwater aquifers. Seawater intrusion is the result of overexploitation of freshwater resources and leads to contamination of freshwater aquifers rendering them unfit for drinking water without treatment. It is most common in locations such as Yucatan Peninsula, Mediterranean, Southeast and Southwest areas of the United States, Middle East, and many arid to semi-arid islands. Induction of gypsum precipitation for the creation of an in-situ subsurface barrier may be effective to efficiently prevent the seawater intrusion into coastal aquifers. Gypsum precipitation in the barrier must occur slowly, however, over a wide area. Laboratory research was conducted for the purpose of finding an inhibitor which decreases the rate at which gypsum (CaSO4*2H2O) precipitates in high salinity solutions at favorable temperatures. A series of Non-Inhibited experiments were performed at temperatures 10° C, 15° C, 20° C and 25° C to serve as a comparison to inhibited experiments. Organic Polymers, PEO (Poly(ethylene-oxide)) and PMAA (Poly(methyl-acrylic acid)), were shown in prior laboratory research to be most effective, therefore they were used in this study. Samples were taken periodically to determine average number of gypsum particles per mL and crystal size and geometry. Alteration of crystal habit occurred due to the adsorption of the inhibitors on the 111 (Ca) face of nucleating crystals. This resulted in precipitation of more tabular than needle-like (orthorhombic) crystals. Inhibition times of days could be achieved with less than 100ppm of the better inhibitors (i.e. PEO, PMAA) in 50:50 Seawater: Freshwater solutions.

  4. Biological sulfate removal from gypsum contaminated construction and demolition debris.

    PubMed

    Kijjanapanich, Pimluck; Annachhatre, Ajit P; Esposito, Giovanni; van Hullebusch, Eric D; Lens, Piet N L

    2013-12-15

    Construction and demolition debris (CDD) contains high levels of sulfate that can cause detrimental environmental impacts when disposed without adequate treatment. In landfills, sulfate can be converted to hydrogen sulfide under anaerobic conditions. CDD can thus cause health impacts or odor problems to landfill employees and surrounding residents. Reduction of the sulfate content of CDD is an option to overcome these problems. This study aimed at developing a biological sulfate removal system to reduce the sulfate content of gypsum contaminated CDD in order to decrease the amount of solid waste, to improve the quality of CDD waste for recycling purposes and to recover sulfur from CDD. The treatment leached out the gypsum contained in CDD by water in a leaching column. The sulfate loaded leachate was then treated in a biological sulfate reducing Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket (UASB) reactor to convert the sulfate to sulfide. The UASB reactor was operated at 23 ± 3 °C with a hydraulic retention time and upflow velocity of 15.5 h and 0.1 m h(-1), respectively while ethanol was added as electron donor at a final organic loading rate of 3.46 g COD L(-1) reactor d(-1). The CDD leachate had a pH of 8-9 and sulfate dissolution rates of 526.4 and 609.8 mg L(-1) d(-1) were achieved in CDD gypsum and CDD sand, respectively. Besides, it was observed that the gypsum dissolution was the rate limiting step for the biological treatment of CDD. The sulfate removal efficiency of the system stabilized at around 85%, enabling the reuse of the UASB effluent for the leaching step, proving the versatility of the bioreactor for practical applications.

  5. Sulfur dioxide removal process with gypsum and magnesium hydroxide production

    SciTech Connect

    College, J.W.; Benson, L.B.

    1992-01-28

    This patent describes improvement in a method for removing sulfur dioxide from flue gases wherein the flue gases are contacted in a wet scrubbing unit, in the absence of any substantial amount of calcium components, with an aqueous solution of magnesium components and magnesium sulfite produced, with aqueous solution, following the contact, collected and recycled to the wet scrubber for further contact with flue gases, and subjecting a portion of the aqueous discharge from the scrubbing unit, containing magnesium sulfite, to oxidation in an oxidation unit. The improvement comprises: adding calcium sulfate to the portion of aqueous discharge containing magnesium sulfite prior to oxidation in the oxidation unit to form an oxidized aqueous effluent containing calcium sulfate solids and dissolved magnesium sulfate; passing the oxidized aqueous effluent to a regeneration tank; adding lime to the regeneration tank to precipitate gypsum from and form an aqueous magnesium hydroxide suspension in the oxidized aqueous effluent; separating the precipitated gypsum from the aqueous magnesium hydroxide suspension; and returning at least a portion of the separated precipitated gypsum to the oxidizing unit as the added calcium sulfate.

  6. Effect of Time on Gypsum-Impression Material Compatibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Won, John Boram

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the compatibility of dental gypsum with three recently introduced irreversible hydrocolloid (alginate) alternatives. The test materials were Alginot® (Kerr™), Position Penta Quick® (3M ESPE™) and Silgimix ® (Sultan Dental™). The irreversible hydrocolloid impression material, Jeltrate Plus antimicrobial® (Dentsply Caulk™) served as the control. Materials and Methods: Testing of materials was conducted in accordance with ANSI/ADA Specification No. 18 for Alginate Impression Materials. Statistical Analysis: The 3-Way ANOVA test was used to analyze measurements between different time points at a significance level of (p < 0.05). Outcome: It was found that there was greater compatibility between gypsum and the alternative materials over time than the traditional irreversible hydrocolloid material that was tested. A statistically significant amount of surface change/incompatibility was found over time with the combination of the dental gypsum products and the control impression material (Jeltrate Plus antimicrobial®).

  7. View of double floor boards with mortises cross beams, showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of double floor boards with mortises cross beams, showing spikes and flooring nails (Lower board layer exposed) - Silas C. Read Sawmill, Outlet of Maxwell Lake near North Range Road, Fort Gordon, Richmond County, GA

  8. Kinetics of gypsum nucleation and crystal growth from Dead Sea brine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reznik, Itay J.; Gavrieli, Ittai; Ganor, Jiwchar

    2009-10-01

    The Dead Sea brine is supersaturated with respect to gypsum ( Ω = 1.42). Laboratory experiments and evaluation of historical data show that gypsum nucleation and crystal growth kinetics from Dead Sea brine are both slower in comparison with solutions at a similar degree of supersaturation. The slow kinetics of gypsum precipitation in the Dead Sea brine is mainly attributed to the low solubility of gypsum which is due to the high Ca 2+/SO 42- molar ratio (115), high salinity (˜280 g/kg) and to Na + inhibition. Experiments with various clay minerals (montmorillonite, kaolinite) indicate that these minerals do not serve as crystallization seeds. In contrast, calcite and aragonite which contain traces of gypsum impurities do prompt precipitation of gypsum but at a considerable slower rate than with pure gypsum. This implies that transportation inflow of clay minerals, calcite and local crystallization of minerals in the Dead Sea does not prompt significant heterogeneous precipitation of gypsum. Based on historical analyses of the Dead Sea, it is shown that over the last decades, as inflows to the lake decreased and its salinity increased, gypsum continuously precipitated from the brine. The increasing salinity and Ca 2+/SO 42- ratio, which results from the precipitation of gypsum, lead to even slower kinetics of nucleation and crystal growth, which resulted in an increasing degree of supersaturation with respect to gypsum. Therefore, we predict that as the salinity of the Dead Sea brine continues to increase (accompanied by Dead Sea water level decline), although gypsum will continuously precipitate, the degree of supersaturation will increase furthermore due to progressively slower kinetics.

  9. Carbonate replacement of lacustrine gypsum deposits in two Neogene continental basins, eastern Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anadón, P.; Rosell, L.; Talbot, M. R.

    1992-07-01

    Bedded nonmarine gypsum deposits in the Miocene Teruel and Cabriel basins, eastern Spain, are partly replaced by carbonate. The Libros gypsum (Teruel Graben) is associated with fossiliferous carbonate wackestones and finely laminated, organic matter-rich mudstones which accumulated under anoxic conditions in a meromictic, permanent lake. The gypsum is locally pseudomorphed by aragonite or, less commonly, replaced by calcite. Low δ 13C values indicate that sulphate replacement resulted from bacterial sulphate reduction processes that were favoured by anacrobic conditions and abundant labile organic matter in the sediments. Petrographic evidence and oxygen isotopic composition suggest that gypsum replacement by aragonite occurred soon after deposition. A subsequent return to oxidising conditions caused some aragonite to be replaced by diagenetic gypsum. Native sulphur is associated with some of these secondary gypsum occurrences. The Los Ruices sulphate deposits (Cabriel Basin) contain beds of clastic and selenitic gypsum which are associated with limestones and red beds indicating accumulation in a shallow lake. Calcite is the principal replacement mineral. Bacterial sulphate reduction was insignificant in this basin because of a scarcity of organic matter. Stable isotope composition of diagenetic carbonate indicates that gypsum replacement occurred at shallow burial depths due to contact with dilute groundwaters of meteoric origin. Depositional environment evidently has a major influence upon the diagenetic history of primary sulphate deposits. The quantity of preserved organic matter degradable by sulphate-reducing bacteria is of particular importance and, along with groundwater composition, is the main factor controlling the mechanism of gypsum replacement by carbonate.

  10. Light in the darkening on Naica gypsum crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo-Sandoval, I.; Fuentes-Cobas, L. E.; Fuentes-Montero, M. E.; Esparza-Ponce, H. E.; Carreno-Márquez, J.; Reyes-Cortes, M.; Montero-Cabrera, M. E.

    2015-07-01

    Naica mine is located in a semi-desertic region at the central-south of Chihuahua State. The Cave of Swords was discovered in 1910 and the Cave of Crystals 90 years later at Naica mines. It is expected that during the last century the human presence has changed the microclimatic conditions inside the cave, resulting in the deterioration of the crystals and the deposition of impurities on gypsum surfaces. As a contribution to the clarification of the mentioned issues, the present work refers to the use of synchrotron radiation for the identification of phases on these surfaces. All the experiments were performed at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource. Grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXRD) and radiography-aided X-ray diffraction (RAXRD) experiments were performed at beamline 11-3. X-Ray micro-fluorescence (μ-SXRF) and micro-X-ray absorption (μ-XANES) were measured at beamline 2-3. Representative results obtained may be summarized as follows: a) Gypsum, galena, sphalerite, hematite and cuprite at the surface of the gypsum crystals were determined. b) The samples micro-structure is affected by impurities. c) The elemental distributions and correlations (0.6-0.9) of Cu, K, Fe, Mn, Pb, Zn, Ca and S were identified by μ-SXRF. The correlations among elemental contents confirmed the phase identification, with the exception of manganese and potassium due to the amorphous nature of some impurity compounds in these samples. The compounds hematite (Fe2O3), β-MnO2, Mn2O3, MnO and/or MnCO3, PbS, PbCO3 and/or PbSO4, ZnO4, ZnS and/or smithsonite (ZnCO3), CuS + Cu Oxide were identified by XANES. Plausibly, these latter compounds do not form crystalline phases.

  11. Light in the darkening on Naica gypsum crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Castillo-Sandoval, I.; Fuentes-Cobas, L. E.; Esparza-Ponce, H. E.; Carreno-Márquez, J.; Montero-Cabrera, M. E.; Fuentes-Montero, M. E.; Reyes-Cortes, M.

    2015-07-23

    Naica mine is located in a semi-desertic region at the central-south of Chihuahua State. The Cave of Swords was discovered in 1910 and the Cave of Crystals 90 years later at Naica mines. It is expected that during the last century the human presence has changed the microclimatic conditions inside the cave, resulting in the deterioration of the crystals and the deposition of impurities on gypsum surfaces. As a contribution to the clarification of the mentioned issues, the present work refers to the use of synchrotron radiation for the identification of phases on these surfaces. All the experiments were performed at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource. Grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXRD) and radiography-aided X-ray diffraction (RAXRD) experiments were performed at beamline 11-3. X-Ray micro-fluorescence (μ-SXRF) and micro-X-ray absorption (μ-XANES) were measured at beamline 2-3. Representative results obtained may be summarized as follows: a) Gypsum, galena, sphalerite, hematite and cuprite at the surface of the gypsum crystals were determined. b) The samples micro-structure is affected by impurities. c) The elemental distributions and correlations (0.6-0.9) of Cu, K, Fe, Mn, Pb, Zn, Ca and S were identified by μ-SXRF. The correlations among elemental contents confirmed the phase identification, with the exception of manganese and potassium due to the amorphous nature of some impurity compounds in these samples. The compounds hematite (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}), β-MnO{sub 2}, Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3}, MnO and/or MnCO{sub 3}, PbS, PbCO{sub 3} and/or PbSO4, ZnO{sub 4}, ZnS and/or smithsonite (ZnCO{sub 3}), CuS + Cu Oxide were identified by XANES. Plausibly, these latter compounds do not form crystalline phases.

  12. Wettability of elastomeric impression materials and voids in gypsum casts.

    PubMed

    Cullen, D R; Mikesell, J W; Sandrik, J L

    1991-08-01

    Numerous factors are involved in making an accurate void-free dental artificial stone cast or die. The relationship of the wettability of an elastomeric impression material and its interaction with the gypsum slurry is an important factor. This study examined the relative "pourability" of several impression materials by counting the number of resultant voids in artificial stone casts containing 48 point angles. Those elastomers that exhibited the lowest contact angle with water produced artificial stone casts with the fewest voids. Surfactants applied to the impression material significantly reduced the number of voids in artificial stone casts, as did modified elastomers designated by the manufacturer as hydrophilic.

  13. Gypsum's influence on corn yield and p loss from an eroded southern piedmont soil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gypsum (CaSO4) has been shown to reduce dissolved P in surface water runoff from pastures fertilized with poultry litter (PL). However, limited research has evaluated gypsum’s influence on P loss under row crops. Moreover, can gypsum effectively reduce P loss when applied only to grass buffer strips...

  14. Direct nanoscale observations of the coupled dissolution of calcite and dolomite and the precipitation of gypsum

    PubMed Central

    Cama, Jordi; Soler, Josep Maria; Putnis, Christine V

    2014-01-01

    Summary In-situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments were performed to study the overall process of dissolution of common carbonate minerals (calcite and dolomite) and precipitation of gypsum in Na2SO4 and CaSO4 solutions with pH values ranging from 2 to 6 at room temperature (23 ± 1 °C). The dissolution of the carbonate minerals took place at the (104) cleavage surfaces in sulfate-rich solutions undersaturated with respect to gypsum, by the formation of characteristic rhombohedral-shaped etch pits. Rounding of the etch pit corners was observed as solutions approached close-to-equilibrium conditions with respect to calcite. The calculated dissolution rates of calcite at pH 4.8 and 5.6 agreed with the values reported in the literature. When using solutions previously equilibrated with respect to gypsum, gypsum precipitation coupled with calcite dissolution showed short gypsum nucleation induction times. The gypsum precipitate quickly coated the calcite surface, forming arrow-like forms parallel to the crystallographic orientations of the calcite etch pits. Gypsum precipitation coupled with dolomite dissolution was slower than that of calcite, indicating the dissolution rate to be the rate-controlling step. The resulting gypsum coating partially covered the surface during the experimental duration of a few hours. PMID:25161860

  15. Impact of FGD gypsum on soil fertility and plant nutrient uptake

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Use of FGD gypsum is thought to improve soil productivity and increase plant production. Thus, a study was conducted to evaluate the effects of FGD gypsum on yield, plant nutrient uptake and soil productivity. The study was conducted on an established bermudagrass pasture. Poultry litter was applied...

  16. Direct nanoscale observations of the coupled dissolution of calcite and dolomite and the precipitation of gypsum.

    PubMed

    Offeddu, Francesco Giancarlo; Cama, Jordi; Soler, Josep Maria; Putnis, Christine V

    2014-01-01

    In-situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments were performed to study the overall process of dissolution of common carbonate minerals (calcite and dolomite) and precipitation of gypsum in Na2SO4 and CaSO4 solutions with pH values ranging from 2 to 6 at room temperature (23 ± 1 °C). The dissolution of the carbonate minerals took place at the (104) cleavage surfaces in sulfate-rich solutions undersaturated with respect to gypsum, by the formation of characteristic rhombohedral-shaped etch pits. Rounding of the etch pit corners was observed as solutions approached close-to-equilibrium conditions with respect to calcite. The calculated dissolution rates of calcite at pH 4.8 and 5.6 agreed with the values reported in the literature. When using solutions previously equilibrated with respect to gypsum, gypsum precipitation coupled with calcite dissolution showed short gypsum nucleation induction times. The gypsum precipitate quickly coated the calcite surface, forming arrow-like forms parallel to the crystallographic orientations of the calcite etch pits. Gypsum precipitation coupled with dolomite dissolution was slower than that of calcite, indicating the dissolution rate to be the rate-controlling step. The resulting gypsum coating partially covered the surface during the experimental duration of a few hours.

  17. Impact of FGD gypsum soil amendment applications on soil and environmental quality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper will discuss the utilization of FGD gypsum in agriculture for improving soil quality and other environmental benefits. Gypsum (CaSO4 .2H2O) has been used as an agricultural soil amendment for over 250 years. It is a soluble source of calcium and sulfur- for crops and has been shown to i...

  18. Calcium sulfoaluminate (Ye'elimite) hydration in the presence of gypsum, calcite, and vaterite

    SciTech Connect

    Hargis, Craig W.; Telesca, Antonio; Monteiro, Paulo J.M.

    2014-11-15

    Six calcium sulfoaluminate-based cementitious systems composed of calcium sulfoaluminate, calcite, vaterite, and gypsum were cured as pastes and mortars for 1, 7, 28 and 84 days. Pastes were analyzed with X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric and differential thermal analyses. Mortars were tested for compressive strength, dimensional stability and setting time. Furthermore, pastes with a water/cementitious material mass ratio of 0.80 were tested for heat evolution during the first 48 h by means of isothermal conduction calorimetry. It has been found that: (1) both calcite and vaterite reacted with monosulfoaluminate to give monocarboaluminate and ettringite, with vaterite being more reactive; (2) gypsum lowered the reactivity of both carbonates; (3) expansion was reduced by calcite and vaterite, irrespective of the presence of gypsum; and (4) both carbonates increased compressive strength in the absence of gypsum and decreased compressive strength less in the presence of gypsum, with vaterite's action more effective than that of calcite.

  19. Environmental impacts of the gypsum mining operation at Maqna area, Tabuk, Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Harthi, Abbas

    2001-11-01

    The impacts of quarrying of the gypsum deposits on the environment at Maqna, Tabuk, were evaluated by intensive field studies including in situ testing, mapping and sampling of gypsum and well water. Field and laboratory tests were made to determine the engineering properties including tensile and compressive strengths, unit weight, fracture spacing and the rock quality designation (RQD) values. Results were used to determine the most suitable method for quarrying and extraction. Chemical analyses of gypsum and water well samples were conducted along with mineralogical analysis using X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD). Results show that there are no harmful impacts on the environment of the studied area associated with the extraction and quarrying of the gypsum deposits at the Maqna area. They also revealed that the gypsum can be quarried using a ripping technique, which does not create noise and/or vibration in the surrounding areas.

  20. Carbonation of gypsum from wet flue gas desulfurization process: experiments and modeling.

    PubMed

    Tan, Wenyi; Zhang, Zixin; Li, Hongyi; Li, Youxu; Shen, Zewen

    2017-02-13

    In this paper, waste gypsum from wet flue gas desulfurization (WFGD) mixed with NH3·H2O was applied for CO2 absorption in the solid-liquid-gas phase system. The effects of operation temperature, CO2 flow rates, and ammonia-to-gypsum ratio on carbonation process were discussed. Meanwhile, a model for CO2 absorption in the suspension of WFGD gypsum and ammonia was established. The results indicate that higher temperature favors the reaction, and WFGD gypsum conversion can be achieved above 90% even at lower ammonia-to-gypsum ratio, while CO2 conversion reaches 90% and ammonia utilization is up to 83.69%. The model fits well with the experimental results at various CO2 flow rates and predicts the concentration distribution of the main species, including CO2 absorbed, NH2COO(-), and HCO3(-).

  1. Pre-contamination of new gypsum wallboard with potentially harmful fungal species.

    PubMed

    Andersen, B; Dosen, I; Lewinska, A M; Nielsen, K F

    2017-01-01

    Gypsum wallboard is a popular building material, but is also very frequently overgrown by Stachybotrys chartarum after severe and/or undetected water damage. The purpose of this study was to determine whether Stachybotrys and other fungi frequently isolated from wet gypsum wallboard are already present in the panels directly from the factory. Surface-disinfected gypsum disks were wetted with sterile water, sealed, and incubated for 70 days. The results showed that Neosartorya hiratsukae (≡ Aspergillus hiratsukae) was the most dominant fungus on the gypsum wallboard followed by Chaetomium globosum and Stachybotrys chartarum. Our results suggest that these three fungal species are already embedded in the materials, presumably in the paper/carton layer surrounding the gypsum core, before the panels reach the retailers/building site.

  2. Gypsophile Chemistry Unveiled: Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectroscopy Provides New Insight into Plant Adaptations to Gypsum Soils

    PubMed Central

    Palacio, Sara; Aitkenhead, Matt; Escudero, Adrián; Montserrat-Martí, Gabriel; Maestro, Melchor; Robertson, A. H. Jean

    2014-01-01

    Gypsum soils are among the most restrictive and widespread substrates for plant life. Plants living on gypsum are classified as gypsophiles (exclusive to gypsum) and gypsovags (non-exclusive to gypsum). The former have been separated into wide and narrow gypsophiles, each with a putative different ecological strategy. Mechanisms displayed by gypsum plants to compete and survive on gypsum are still not fully understood. The aim of this study was to compare the main chemical groups in the leaves of plants with different specificity to gypsum soils and to explore the ability of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra analyzed with neural network (NN) modelling to discriminate groups of gypsum plants. Leaf samples of 14 species with different specificity to gypsum soils were analysed with FTIR spectroscopy coupled to neural network (NN) modelling. Spectral data were further related to the N, C, S, P, K, Na, Ca, Mg and ash concentrations of samples. The FTIR spectra of the three groups analyzed showed distinct features that enabled their discrimination through NN models. Wide gypsophiles stood out for the strong presence of inorganic compounds in their leaves, particularly gypsum and, in some species, also calcium oxalate crystals. The spectra of gypsovags had less inorganic chemical species, while those of narrow gypsum endemisms had low inorganics but shared with wide gypsophiles the presence of oxalate. Gypsum and calcium oxalate crystals seem to be widespread amongst gypsum specialist plants, possibly as a way to tolerate excess Ca and sulphate. However, other mechanisms such as the accumulation of sulphates in organic molecules are also compatible with plant specialization to gypsum. While gypsovags seem to be stress tolerant plants that tightly regulate the uptake of S and Ca, the ability of narrow gypsum endemisms to accumulate excess Ca as oxalate may indicate their incipient specialization to gypsum. PMID:25222564

  3. Gypsophile chemistry unveiled: Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy provides new insight into plant adaptations to gypsum soils.

    PubMed

    Palacio, Sara; Aitkenhead, Matt; Escudero, Adrián; Montserrat-Martí, Gabriel; Maestro, Melchor; Robertson, A H Jean

    2014-01-01

    Gypsum soils are among the most restrictive and widespread substrates for plant life. Plants living on gypsum are classified as gypsophiles (exclusive to gypsum) and gypsovags (non-exclusive to gypsum). The former have been separated into wide and narrow gypsophiles, each with a putative different ecological strategy. Mechanisms displayed by gypsum plants to compete and survive on gypsum are still not fully understood. The aim of this study was to compare the main chemical groups in the leaves of plants with different specificity to gypsum soils and to explore the ability of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra analyzed with neural network (NN) modelling to discriminate groups of gypsum plants. Leaf samples of 14 species with different specificity to gypsum soils were analysed with FTIR spectroscopy coupled to neural network (NN) modelling. Spectral data were further related to the N, C, S, P, K, Na, Ca, Mg and ash concentrations of samples. The FTIR spectra of the three groups analyzed showed distinct features that enabled their discrimination through NN models. Wide gypsophiles stood out for the strong presence of inorganic compounds in their leaves, particularly gypsum and, in some species, also calcium oxalate crystals. The spectra of gypsovags had less inorganic chemical species, while those of narrow gypsum endemisms had low inorganics but shared with wide gypsophiles the presence of oxalate. Gypsum and calcium oxalate crystals seem to be widespread amongst gypsum specialist plants, possibly as a way to tolerate excess Ca and sulphate. However, other mechanisms such as the accumulation of sulphates in organic molecules are also compatible with plant specialization to gypsum. While gypsovags seem to be stress tolerant plants that tightly regulate the uptake of S and Ca, the ability of narrow gypsum endemisms to accumulate excess Ca as oxalate may indicate their incipient specialization to gypsum.

  4. Gypsum effects on crop yield and chemistry of soil, crop tissue, and vadose zone water: A meta-analysis.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gypsum has various potential benefits as a soil amendment, but data are lacking on gypsum effects on crop yields and on environmental impacts across diverse field sites. Gypsum studies were conducted in six states using a common design with three rates each of mined and flue gas desulfurization (FGD...

  5. XRD and mineralogical analysis of gypsum dunes at White Sands National Monument, New Mexico and applications to gypsum detection on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafuente, B.; Bishop, J. L.; Fenton, L. K.; King, S. J.; Blake, D.; Sarrazin, P.; Downs, R.; Horgan, B. H.

    2013-12-01

    A field portable X-ray Diffraction (XRD) instrument was used at White Sands National Monument to perform in-situ measurements followed by laboratory analyses of the gypsum-rich dunes and to determine its modal mineralogy. The field instrument is a Terra XRD (Olympus NDT) based on the technology of the CheMin (Chemistry and Mineralogy) instrument onboard the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover Curiosity which is providing the mineralogical and chemical composition of scooped soil samples and drilled rock powders collected at Gale Crater [1]. Using Terra at White Sands will contribute to 'ground truth' for gypsum-bearing environments on Mars. Together with data provided by VNIR spectra [2], this study clarifies our understanding of the origin and history of gypsum-rich sand dunes discovered near the northern polar region of Mars [3]. The results obtained from the field analyses performed by XRD and VNIR spectroscopy in four dunes at White Sands revealed the presence of quartz and dolomite. Their relative abundance has been estimated using the Reference Intensity Ratio (RIR) method. For this study, particulate samples of pure natural gypsum, quartz and dolomite were used to prepare calibration mixtures of gypsum-quartz and gypsum-dolomite with the 90-150μm size fractions. All single phases and mixtures were analyzed by XRD and RIR factors were calculated. Using this method, the relative abundance of quartz and dolomite has been estimated from the data collected in the field. Quartz appears to be present in low amounts (2-5 wt.%) while dolomite is present at percentages up to 80 wt.%. Samples from four dunes were collected and prepared for subsequent XRD analysis in the lab to estimate their composition and illustrate the changes in mineralogy with respect to location and grain size. Gypsum-dolomite mixtures: The dolomite XRD pattern is dominated by an intense diffraction peak at 2θ≈36 deg. which overlaps a peak of gypsum, This makes low concentrations of dolomite

  6. GPR and seismic imaging in a gypsum quarry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dérobert, Xavier; Abraham, Odile

    2000-10-01

    A combination of ground penetrating radar (GPR) and seismic imaging has been performed in a gypsum quarry in western Europe. The objective was to localize main cracks and damaged areas inside some of the pillars, which presented indications of having reached stress limits. The GPR imaging was designed from classical profiles with GPR processes and a customized, PC-based image-processing software. The detection of energy reflection seems to be an efficient process for localizing damaged areas. Seismic tomographic images have been obtained from travel time measurements, which were inverted using a simultaneous iterative reconstruction technique (SIRT) technique in order to provide a map of seismic velocities. The imaging and techniques employed are compared herein. The two techniques are complementary; seismic tomography produces a map of velocities related to the state of the pillar's internal stress, while radar data serve to localize the main cracks. Moreover, these imaging processes present similarities with respect to the damaged zone detection.

  7. Calcium Sulfates at Gale Crater and Limitations on Gypsum Stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vantiman, D. T.; Martinez, G. M.; Rampe, E. B.; Bristow, T. F.; Blake, D. F.; Yen, A. H.; Ming, D. W.; Rapin, W.; Meslin, P. -Y.; Morookian, J. M.; Morris, R. V.; Crisp, J. A.

    2017-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory rover has been exploring sedimentary rocks of the Bradbury group and overlying Murray formation, as well as the unconformably overlying Stimson formation. Early in exploration, and continuing to present, there have been observations of many Ca-sulfate veins that cut all three stratigraphic units. The CheMin XRD instrument on Curiosity provides complete mineralogy for drilled or scooped samples, with explicit identification of gypsum, bassanite, and anhydrite (crystal structure of so-called "soluble anhydrite," or gamma-CaSO4, is so similar to bassanite that it can't be distinguished at CheMin 2-theta resolution; here we refer to these similar dehydrated forms simply as bassanite).

  8. Optically stimulated luminescence dosimetry with gypsum wallboard (drywall).

    PubMed

    Thompson, Jeroen W; Burdette, Kevin E; Inrig, Elizabeth L; Dewitt, Regina; Mistry, Rajesh; Rink, W Jack; Boreham, Douglas R

    2010-09-01

    Gypsum wallboard (drywall) represents an attractive target for retrospective dosimetry by optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) in the event of a radiological accident or malicious use of nuclear material. In this study, wallboard is shown to display a radiation-induced luminescence signal (RIS) as well as a natural background signal (NS), which is comparable in intensity to the RIS. Excitation and emission spectra show that maximum luminescence intensity is obtained for stimulation with blue light-emitting diodes (470 nm) and for detection in the ultraviolet region (290-370 nm). It is necessary to decrease the optical stimulation power dramatically in order to adequately separate the RIS from the interfering background signal. The necessary protocols are developed for accurately measuring the absorbed dose as low as 500 mGy and demonstrate that the RIS decays logarithmically with storage time, with complete erasure expected within 1-4 d.

  9. Carbonate speleothems from western Mediterranean gypsum karst: palaeoclimate implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Columbu, Andrea; Drysdale, Russell; Woodhead, Jon; Chiarini, Veronica; De Waele, Jo; Hellstrom, John; Forti, Paolo; Sanna, Laura

    2016-04-01

    Gypsum caves are uncommon environments for carbonate speleothems (cave deposits). Contrary to limestone caves, the only source of non-atmospheric carbon is from biogenic CO2 produced by the overlying soils. Enhanced CO2 content in soils is in turn related with climate, where warm temperatures and high humidity favour plant activity .().....(Fairchild and Baker, 2012). Although poorly decorated, the exploration of northern Italian and Spanish gypsum karst systems reveals the existence of several generations of carbonate speleothems, which have been dated with the U-Th series method .()......(Hellstrom, 2003; Scholz and Hoffmann, 2008). Their ages coincide with current and previous two interglacials (MIS 1, 5e and 7e and Greenland interstadials (GIS) 19, 20, 21 and 24. Considering that these periods are amongst the most pronounced warm-wet pulsations over the last 250,000 ...(Martrat et al., 2007; NGRIP, 2004), and that CO2 has a fundamental role in this karst process, this study explores the climate-driven hydrogeological conditions necessary to trigger carbonate deposition in gypsum voids. The further correlation with sapropel events 5, 4, 3 and 1, considered symptomatic of enhanced rainfall across the whole Mediterranean basin .(.)(Emeis et al., 1991), highlights the importance of flow-rate in the fracture network and infiltration of meteoric water into the caves. The combination of high CO2 and a phreatic status of the fracture network is thus indispensable for the formation of carbonate speleothems in gypsum karst. This condition appears to be triggered by periods of orbital precession minimum, when the monsoonal activity peaked in the Atlantic area. Stable oxygen isotope signatures suggest that the speleothems did not grow during any interglacial-glacial or main interstadial-stadial transitions, confirming that variations from optimum climate conditions may hamper the formation of this category of speleothems. New speleological exploration and sampling campaign

  10. Seeking Election: Evaluating a Campaign for Public School Board Trusteeship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mueller, Robin

    2011-01-01

    Canadian public school board trustees are generally chosen by way of public ballot in civic elections. A comparison of board governance literature to a local narrative account of public school board elections exposes several gaps between espoused democratic ideals and the realities of public engagement in trustee selection. I investigate the…

  11. Control of Transient Slip Weakening During Gypsum Dehydration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leclere, H.; Faulkner, D.; Wheeler, J.; Mariani, E.

    2015-12-01

    The understanding of fault mechanics is of first order importance to unravel earthquake triggering. Among the parameters influencing fault reactivation and earthquake triggering, the influence of pore-fluid pressure and friction on stability of fault zones have been a focus of recent work based on geological, geophysical and experimental analyses. Here, the effects of dehydration reactions on hydraulic and mechanical properties of rock are analysed to better understand the conditions required to trigger earthquakes. Triaxial experiments are conducted using gypsum and a direct shear sample assembly that allows a constant normal stress to be applied and permeability to be measured during sliding. The evolutions of shear stress, pore-fluid pressure and permeability are continuously measured throughout the experiment until dehydration reaction reached completion. Tests are conducted with a temperature ramp from 70 to 150 °C and with different effective confining pressures (50, 100 and 150 MPa) and velocities (0.1 and 0.4 μm.s-1). Results show that gypsum dehydration induces transient stable slip weakening that is controlled by pore-fluid pressure and permeability evolutions followed by unstable slip on fully dehydrated product.The evolution of microstructures and mineralogy during the experiment are inferred from SEM and XRD analyses of deformed samples collected at different key stages during repeated tests. The microstructural analysis shows clear evidence of dehydration reactions related to the development of S-C-C' structures where dehydration product is preferentially localized along shear and schistosity planes. A conceptual model is then proposed to explain transient slip weakening during dehydration reactions incorporating the key role played by permeability, and to provide a framework to define the conditions required to trigger unstable events during dehydration reactions.

  12. A microscopy study of hyphal growth of Penicillium rubens on gypsum under dynamic humidity conditions.

    PubMed

    van Laarhoven, Karel A; Huinink, Hendrik P; Adan, Olaf C G

    2016-05-01

    To remediate indoor fungal growth, understanding the moisture relations of common indoor fungi is crucial. Indoor moisture conditions are commonly quantified by the relative humidity (RH). RH is a major determinant of the availability of water in porous indoor surfaces that fungi grow on. The influence of steady-state RH on growth is well understood. Typically, however, the indoor RH constantly changes so that fungi have to endure frequent periods of alternating low and high RH. Knowledge of how common indoor fungi survive and are affected by the low-RH periods is limited. In particular, the specific effects of a drop in RH on the growth of the mycelium remain unclear. In this work, video microscopy was used to monitor hyphal growth of Penicillium rubens on gypsum substrates under controlled dynamic humidity conditions. The effect of a single period of low RH (RH = 50-90%) interrupting favourable conditions (RH = 97%) was tested. It was found that hyphal tips ceased to extend when exposed to any tested decrease in RH. However, new hyphal growth always emerges, seemingly from the old mycelium, suggesting that this indoor fungus does not rely only on conidia to survive the humidity patterns considered. These findings are a fundamental step in unravelling the effect of RH on indoor fungal growth.

  13. Gypsum veins in Triassic Moenkopi mudrocks of southern Utah: Analogs to calcium sulfate veins on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, B. W.; Chan, M. A.

    2017-01-01

    Well-exposed gypsum veins in the Triassic Moenkopi formation in southern Utah, USA, are similar to veins at Endeavour and Gale Craters on Mars. Both Moenkopi and Mars veins are hydrated calcium sulfate, have fibrous textures, and crosscut other diagenetic features. Moenkopi veins are stratigraphically localized with strontium and sulfur isotope ratios similar to primary Moenkopi sulfate beds and are thus interpreted to be sourced from within the unit. Endeavour veins seem to be distributed by lithology and may have a local source. Gale veins cut across multiple lithologies and appear to be sourced from another stratigraphic interval. Evaluation of vein network geometries indicates that horizontal Moenkopi veins are longer and thicker than vertical veins. Moenkopi veins are also generally oriented with the modern stress field, so are interpreted to have formed in the latest stages of exhumation. Endeavour veins appear to be generally vertical and oriented parallel to the margins of Cape York and are interpreted to have formed in response to topographic collapse of the crater rim. Gale horizontal veins appear to be slightly more continuous than vertical veins and may have formed during exhumation. Abrupt changes in orientation, complex crosscutting relationships, and fibrous (antitaxial) texture in Moenkopi and Mars veins suggest emplacement via hydraulic fracture at low temperatures. Moenkopi and Mars veins are interpreted as late-stage diagenetic features that have experienced little alteration since emplacement. Moenkopi veins are useful terrestrial analogs for Mars veins because vein geometry, texture, and chemistry record information about crustal deformation and vein emplacement.

  14. Initiation and growth of gypsum piercement structures in the Zechstein Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams-Stroud, S. C.; Paul, J.

    1997-01-01

    The importance of tectonic processes in initiating halite diapirs has become much better understood in recent years. Less well understood is the development of diapiric structures involving rocks composed predominantly of gypsum. Below about 1000 m, gypsum dehydrates to anhydrite, which often obscures primary sedimentary textures. If the strain associated with diapiric rise in the rock induces the transition to anhydrite, obliteration of primary features in the gypsum can be expected. In our study, we infer that the diapiric movement in the Werra Anhydrite member of cycle 1 of the Zechstein Formation of Europe occurred before the initial transition of gypsum to anhydrite based on the presence of pseudomorphs of bedded primary gypsum crystals, the overburden lithologies and depositional environment, and the mechanical properties of gypsum, anhydrite and carbonate rocks. Faulting and differential loading of a shallow overburden were the key components in initiating the gypsum diapirism. The transition to anhydrite occurred after burial and after cessation of diapirism. In comparison, the diapirism of calcium sulfate of the Leine Anhydrite into the Leine Halite members of cycle 3 of the Zechstein Formation probably occurred much later after burial and appears to have been triggered by halite diapirism, which in turn triggered the dehydration reaction, causing the calcium sulfate to become the incompetent phase relative to the halite. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd.

  15. Gypsum-bonded alumina dental investment for high-fusing casting.

    PubMed

    Yan, M; Takahashi, H

    1998-09-01

    In this study, we developed a new gypsum-bonded investment for high-fusing alloys. The investment was composed of gypsum as a binder and alumina as a refractory. Effects of type of alumina powder and gypsum content on characteristics of the gypsum-bonded alumina investment were investigated. Obtained characteristics of this experimental investment were as follows: fluidities ranged from 48.8 to 88.9 mm; setting times ranged from 21.2 to more than 120 minutes; setting expansions ranged from 0.4 to 1.3%; green strengths showed 0.5 to 4.5 MPa; fired strengths ranged from 0.2 to 1.7 MPa; thermal expansions after firing were -1.60 to 2.16%. Thermal expansion occurred because of the chemical reaction between Al2O3 and CaO decomposed from gypsum. These results suggest that this gypsum-bonded alumina investment with 20 or 25 mass% gypsum content possessed the fundamental properties for high-fusing alloy casting.

  16. Enhanced gypsum scaling by organic fouling layer on nanofiltration membrane: Characteristics and mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiaxuan; Wang, Lei; Miao, Rui; Lv, Yongtao; Wang, Xudong; Meng, Xiaorong; Yang, Ruosong; Zhang, Xiaoting

    2016-03-15

    To investigate how the characteristics of pregenerated organic fouling layers on nanofiltration (NF) membranes influence the subsequent gypsum scaling behavior, filtration experiments with gypsum were carried out with organic-fouled poly(piperazineamide) NF membranes. Organic fouling layer on membrane was induced by bovine serum albumin (BSA), humic acid (HA), and sodium alginate (SA), respectively. The morphology and components of the scalants, the role of Ca(2+) adsorption on the organic fouling layer during gypsum crystallization, and the interaction forces of gypsum on the membrane surface were investigated. The results indicated that SA- and HA-fouled membranes had higher surface crystallization tendency along with more severe flux decline during gypsum scaling than BSA-fouled and virgin membranes because HA and SA macromolecules acted as nuclei for crystallization. Based on the analyses of Ca(2+) adsorption onto organic adlayers and adhesion forces, it was found that the flux decline rate and extent in the gypsum scaling experiment was positively related to the Ca(2+)-binding capacity of the organic matter. Although the dominant gypsum scaling mechanism was affected by coupling physicochemical effects, the controlling factors varied among foulants. Nevertheless, the carboxyl density of organic matter played an important role in determining surface crystallization on organic-fouled membrane.

  17. Geochemical studies of northern taiga (gypsum) karst ecosystems and their high vulnerability to natural and anthropogenic hazards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuyukina, T. Yu.

    2009-07-01

    In the taiga gypsum karst ecosystems, gypsum soils formed on the hard gypsum substrates predominate in the soil cover. In these soils, the mineral horizons consist of 95-99% gypsum (CaSO4·2H2O) and the litter is the main horizon for nutrient accumulation. For this reason, the ecosystems are vulnerable to fire and erosion by walkers, from which they only recover slowly. Gypsum mining for industrial uses is also leading to the destruction of this unique ecosystem.

  18. Influence of Flue Gas Desulfurization Gypsum Amendments on Heavy Metal Distribution in Reclaimed Sodic Soils

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qun; Wang, Shujuan; Li, Yan; Zhang, Ning; Zhao, Bo; Zhuo, Yuqun; Chen, Changhe

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Although flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum has become an effective soil amendment for sodic soil reclamation, it carries extra heavy metal contamination into the soil environment. The fate of heavy metals introduced by FGD gypsum in sodic or saline–alkali soils is still unclear. This work aims to investigate the effects of FGD gypsum addition on the heavy metal distributions in a sodic soil. Original soil samples were collected from typical sodic land in north China. Soil column leaching tests were conducted to investigate the influence of FGD gypsum addition on the soil properties, especially on distribution profiles of the heavy metals (Pb, Cd, Cr, As, and Hg) in the soil layers. Results showed that pH, electrical conductivity, and exchangeable sodium percentage in amended soils were significantly reduced from 10.2 to 8.46, 1.8 to 0.2 dS/m, and 18.14% to 1.28%, respectively. As and Hg concentrations in the soils were found to be positively correlated with FGD gypsum added. The amount of Hg in the leachate was positively correlated with FGD gypsum application ratio, whereas a negative correlation was observed between the Pb concentration in the leachate and the FGD gypsum ratio. Results revealed that heavy metal concentrations in soils complied well with Environmental Quality Standard for Soils in China (GB15618-1995). This work helps to understand the fate of FGD gypsum-introduced heavy metals in sodic soils and provides a baseline for further environmental risk assessment associated with applying FGD gypsum for sodic soil remediation. PMID:26064038

  19. Rehabilitation of gypsum-mined lands in the Indian desert

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sharma, K.D.; Kumar, S.; Gough, L.P.

    2001-01-01

    The economic importance of mining in the Indian Desert is second only to agriculture. Land disturbed by mining, however, has only recently been the focus of rehabilitation efforts. This research assesses the success of rehabilitation plans used to revegetate gypsum mine spoils within the environmental constraints of the north-west Indian hot-desert ecosystem. The rehabilitation plan first examined both mined and unmined areas and established assessments of existing vegetative cover and the quality of native soils and mine spoils. Tests were made on the effect of the use, and conservation, of available water through rainwater harvesting, amendment application (for physical and chemical spoil modification), plant establishment protocols, and the selection of appropriate germ plasm. Our results show that the resulting vegetative cover is capable of perpetuating itself under natural conditions while concurrently meeting the needs of farmers. Although the mine spoils are deficient in organic matter and phosphorus, they possess adequate amounts of all other nutrients. Total boron concentrations (>5.0 mg kg-1) in both the topsail and mine spoil indicate potentially phytotoxic conditions. Electrical conductance of mine spoil is 6-10 times higher than for topsail with a near-neutral pH. Populations of spoil fungi, Azotobactor, and nitrifying bacteria are low. The soil moisture storage in rainwater harvesting plots increased by 8% over the control and 48% over the unmined area. As a result of rehabilitation efforts, mine spoils show a steady buildup in organic carbon, and P and K due to the decomposition of farmyard manure and the contribution of nitrogen fixation by the established leguminous plant species. The rehabilitation protocol used at the site appears to have been successful. Following revegetation of the area with a mixture of trees, shrubs, and grasses, native implanted species have become established. Species diversity, measured in terms of species richness

  20. Oriented attachment by enantioselective facet recognition in millimeter-sized gypsum crystals.

    PubMed

    Viedma, Cristóbal; Cuccia, Louis A; McTaggart, Alicia; Kahr, Bart; Martin, Alexander T; McBride, J Michael; Cintas, Pedro

    2016-09-22

    Crystal growth by oriented attachment involves the spontaneous self-assembly of adjoining crystals with common crystallographic orientations. Herein, we report the oriented attachment of gypsum crystals on agitation to form stereoselective mesoscale aggregates.

  1. Study of gypsum crystal nucleation and growth rates in simulated flue gas desulfurization liquors. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Randolph, A.D.; Etherton, D.

    1981-06-01

    The kinetics of gypsum crystal nucleation and growth rates were measured in flue gas desulfurization (FGD) scrubber liquors. Variables studied were parent seed crystal size and mass; the organic additives citric acid, adipic acid, sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate, and Calgon CL246 polyacrylic acid formulation; and pH. Citric acid produced gypsum crystals with a more favorable columnar structure. Lower pH resulted in increased nucleation rates. Stable secondary nucleation was observed in the presence of retained parent gypsum seed crystals of size >150 ..mu..m. Growth and nucleation rates were correlated using reaction kinetic models. These kinetics were then used in rigorous computer simulations to predict crystal-size distribution (CSD) with different scrubber configurations. Scrubber process configurations employing classified product removal were calculated to produce a gypsum sludge having a mean particle size up to twice as large as the particle size with unclassified operation.

  2. Coal Combustion Residual Beneficial Use Evaluation: Fly Ash Concrete and FGD Gypsum Wallboard

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This page contains documents related to the evaluation of coal combustion residual beneficial use of fly ash concrete and FGD gypsum wallboard including the evaluation itself and the accompanying appendices

  3. The role and implications of bassanite as a stable precursor phase to gypsum precipitation.

    PubMed

    Van Driessche, A E S; Benning, L G; Rodriguez-Blanco, J D; Ossorio, M; Bots, P; García-Ruiz, J M

    2012-04-06

    Calcium sulfate minerals such as gypsum play important roles in natural and industrial processes, but their precipitation mechanisms remain largely unexplored. We used time-resolved sample quenching and high-resolution microscopy to demonstrate that gypsum forms via a three-stage process: (i) homogeneous precipitation of nanocrystalline hemihydrate bassanite below its predicted solubility, (ii) self-assembly of bassanite into elongated aggregates co-oriented along their c axis, and (iii) transformation into dihydrate gypsum. These findings indicate that a stable nanocrystalline precursor phase can form below its bulk solubility and that in the CaSO(4) system, the self-assembly of nanoparticles plays a crucial role. Understanding why bassanite forms prior to gypsum can lead to more efficient anti-scaling strategies for water desalination and may help to explain the persistence of CaSO(4) phases in regions of low water activity on Mars.

  4. Primary Evaporites for the Messinian Salinity Crisis: the shallow gypsum vs. deep dolomite formation paradox solved

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Lange, Gert J.; Krijgsman, Wout

    2014-05-01

    The Messinian Salinity Crisis (MSC) is a dramatic event that took place ~ 5.9 Ma ago, and resulted in the deposition of 0.3-3 km thick evaporites at the Mediterranean seafloor. A considerable and long-lasting controversy existed on the modes of their formation. During the CIESM Almeria Workshop a consensus was reached on several aspects. In addition, remaining issues to be solved were identified, such as for the observed shallow gypsum versus deep dolostone deposits for the early phase of MSC. The onset of MSC is marked by deposition of gypsum/sapropel-like alternations, thought to relate to arid/humid climate conditions. Gypsum precipitation only occurred at marginal settings, while dolomite containing rocks have been reported from deeper settings. A range of potential explanations have been reported, most of which cannot satisfactorily explain all observations. Biogeochemical processes during MSC are poorly understood and commonly neglected. These may, however, explain that different deposits formed in shallow versus deep environments without needing exceptional physical boundary conditions for each. We present here a unifying mechanism in which gypsum formation occurs at all shallow water depths but its preservation is mostly limited to shallow sedimentary settings. In contrast, ongoing anoxic organic matter (OM) degradation processes in the deep basin result in the formation of dolomite. Gypsum precipitation in evaporating seawater takes place at 3-7 times concentrated seawater; seawater is always largely oversaturated relative to dolomite but its formation is thought to be inhibited by the presence of dissolved sulphate. Thus the conditions for formation of gypsum exclude those for the formation of dolomite and vice versa. Another process that links the saturation states of gypsum and dolomite is that of OM degradation by sulphate reduction. In stagnant deep water, oxygen is rapidly depleted through OM degradation, then sulphate becomes the main oxidant for OM

  5. Gypsum precipitation/dissolution as an explanation of the decrease of sulphate concentration during seawater intrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomis-Yagües, V.; Boluda-Botella, N.; Ruiz-Beviá, F.

    2000-02-01

    The precipitation of gypsum during the intrusion of seawater in a coastal aquifer is shown to be a possible cause of the decrease of the sulphate concentration with respect to the conservative freshwater/seawater mixing observed in many field studies. Results of previously published laboratory column experiments and the application of a multicomponent reactive transport model show that gypsum precipitates during the first stages of seawater intrusion, causing a decrease in sulphate concentration. As the resultant front advances, the water becomes undersaturated with respect to gypsum when the content of seawater <50%. At that point, water samples exhibit a deficit of sulphate of several mmol/l, in the range of the field values reported in papers on intrusion in coastal aquifers. Thus, in addition to bacterial sulphate reduction by organic matter, gypsum precipitation is a possible explanation for the non-conservative behaviour of sulphate during seawater intrusion.

  6. Effective Student Board Membership.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rennell, Corey

    This booklet addresses student membership on local boards of education. It is intended to serve as guide for boards considering adding youth to their membership. It discusses the following topics: (1) the benefits to both students and the board of youth serving as board members; (2) researching issues before accepting students on boards; (3)…

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging studies of spontaneous capillary water imbibition in aerated gypsum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Kyung-Min; Mitchell, Jonathan; Jaffel, Hamouda; Gladden, Lynn F.

    2011-03-01

    In this paper we investigate both capillary water imbibition and the sorptivity of aerated gypsum plaster, and how these sorption characteristics are related to the pore structure of the material. These characteristics are examined by monitoring mass change using the conventional gravimetric method and by obtaining water content profiles using non-destructive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques during capillary imbibition of water. Here, three different gypsum samples are investigated: one non-aerated reference gypsum sample and two aerated gypsum samples produced with different volumetric air fractions. The capillary water absorption into the reference sample follows t1/2 kinetics (Fickian diffusion), where t is the time of ingress. However, in the aerated gypsum samples there are deviations from t1/2 kinetics. The MRI results show unambiguously that two wetting fronts advance through the aerated structure; an observation that cannot be made from the gravimetric data alone. The water content profiles of the aerated gypsum samples are therefore analysed by treating them as the sum of two separate absorption processes using sharp front analysis. The capillary water absorption properties of this material are well described as a parallel combination of fast absorption into fine matrix pores and slow absorption into a modified structure of matrix pores inter-connected to air voids introduced into the slurry by aeration.

  8. Oxidation of North Dakota scrubber sludge for soil amendment and production of gypsum. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hassett, D.J.; Moe, T.A.

    1997-10-01

    Cooperative Power`s Coal Creek Station (CCS) the North Dakota Industrial Commission, and the US Department of Energy provided funds for a research project at the Energy and Environmental Research Center. The goals of the project were (1) to determine conditions for the conversion of scrubber sludge to gypsum simulating an ex situ process on the laboratory scale; (2) to determine the feasibility of scaleup of the process; (3) if warranted, to demonstrate the ex situ process for conversion on the pilot scale; and (4) to evaluate the quality and handling characteristics of the gypsum produced on the pilot scale. The process development and demonstration phases of this project were successfully completed focusing on ex situ oxidation using air at low pH. The potential to produce a high-purity gypsum on a commercial scale is excellent. The results of this project demonstrate the feasibility of converting CCS scrubber sludge to gypsum exhibiting characteristics appropriate for agricultural application as soil amendment as well as for use in gypsum wallboard production. Gypsum of a purity of over 98% containing acceptable levels of potentially problematic constituents was produced in the laboratory and in a pilot-scale demonstration.

  9. Hydrology of marginal evaporitic basins during the Messinian Salinity Crisis: isotopic investigation of gypsum deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Kilany, Aida; Caruso, Antonio; Dela Pierre, Francesco; Natalicchio, Marcello; Rouchy, Jean-Marie; Pierre, Catherine; Balter, Vincent; Aloisi, Giovanni

    2016-04-01

    The deposition of gypsum in Messinian Mediterranean marginal basins is controlled by basin restriction and the local hydrological cycle (evaporation/precipitation rates and relative importance of continental vs marine water inputs). We are using the stable isotopic composition of gypsum as a proxy of the hydrological cycle that dominated at the moment of gypsum precipitation. We studied the Messinian Caltanissetta (Sicily) and Tertiary Piedmont (north western Italy) basins where we carried out a high-resolution isotopic study of gypsum layers composing gypsum-marl cycles. These cycles are thought to be the sedimentary expression of astronomical precession cycles, lasting approximately 20 kyr, during which the marginal basins experienced a succession of arid and a wet conditions. We determined the isotopic composition of gypsum hydration water (18O and D), of the sulphate ion (34S, 18O) and of Strontium (87/86Sr), all of which are potentially affected by the hydrological cycle. In our samples, the mother water from which gypsum precipitated is considerably lighter (-4.0 < 18OH2O ‰ vs SMOW < 3.1; -34.8 < DH2O ‰ vs SMOW < 25.3) than evaporated marine waters from which gypsum precipitates (18OH2O  6-7 ‰ vs SMOW; DH2O  30-40‰ vs SMOW), suggesting that the marginal basins were receiving an input of continental water during gypsum precipitation. Moreover, the degree of 18O and D-depletion is basin-specific, which is consistent with the geographical distance between the two basins and their independent local climates and watersheds. Continental water inputs are consistent also with most of the Sr data (0.70861 < 87/86Sr < 0.70897), and with previously published low-salinity fluid inclusion data from the same gypsum layers in the Tertiary Piedmont basin (suggesting a salinity lower than 35 ‰ in many cases). However, in the samples from the Caltanissetta basin, the sulphate ion suggests a marine water source (20.7 < δ34S ‰ vs CTD

  10. Meteoric Water Influx, Gypsum and Halite Dissolution, and Fluid Mixing on the Flanks of the South Liberty Salt Dome, Texas Gulf Coast.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banga, T.; Capuano, R. M.

    2001-12-01

    Brine samples were collected from non-geopressured oil-bearing horizons of the Frio, Yegua and Cook Mountain Formations along the flanks of the South Liberty Dome, Liberty County, Texas. The dome is capped with gypsum, anhydrite and minor calcite. Twenty six water samples were analyzed for Na, K, Ca, Mg, Si, Al, HCO3, CO3, Cl, SO4, Br, I, P, Li, B, Ba, Mn, acetate, δ D and δ ^{18}O. Data from several 2-D seismic lines were used for interpretation of sequence stratigraphy and structure of the sediments in the area. The water is a Na-Cl brine with dissolved solids ranging from 68,000 to 208,000 mg/L. The fluid source as indicated by chemical and isotopic tracers is brine from the surrounding geopressured sediments mixing with the local meteoric water. This brine shows a mixing trend, with increased meteoric water fraction with decreased depth. This mixing trend occurs across formations and in some areas it appears to follow a migration pathway. All of the samples, excepting one, show evidence of halite dissolution with elevated Na and Cl concentrations; nine of these samples also show evidence of gypsum dissolution, with SO_{4}$ up to 2,000 mg/L. Samples with the greatest gypsum dissolution are located very near the dome and show the greatest fraction of meteoric water, suggesting that meteoric water influx to depth is the greatest at the margins of the salt/host rock contact. [The Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board Advanced Research Program supported this research.

  11. Properties of mortars made by uncalcined FGD gypsum-fly ash-ground granulated blast furnace slag composite binder

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong Shiyun; Ni Kun; Li Jinmei

    2012-07-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The mortar with uncalcined FGD gypsum has suitable workability. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The strength of mortar with uncalcined FGD gypsum is higher than that of mortar without uncalcined FGD gypsum. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The dry shrinkage of mortar with uncalcined FGD gypsum is lower than that of mortar without uncalcined FGD gypsum. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The leaching of sulfate ion of mortar is studied. - Abstract: A series of novel mortars were developed from composite binder of uncalcined FGD gypsum, fly ash (FA) and ground granulated blast furnace slag (GGBFS) for the good utilization of flue gas desulphurization (FGD) gypsum. At a fixed ratio (20%) of GGBFS to the composite binder, keeping consistency of the mortar between 9.5 and 10.0 cm, the properties of the composite mortar were studied. The results show that higher water/binder (W/B) is required to keep the consistency when increasing the percentage of FGD gypsum. No obvious influences of the W/B and content of FGD gypsum on the bleeding of paste were observed which keeps lower than 2% under all experimental conditions tried. The highest compressive and flexural strengths (ratio is 20% FGD gypsum, 20% GGBFS and 60% FA) are 22.6 and 4.3 MPa at 28 days, respectively. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) results indicate that massive ettringite crystals and C-S-H gels exist in the hydration products. At 90 days the mortars with FGD gypsum is dramatically smaller drying shrinkage (563-938 micro strain) than that without FGD gypsum (about 2250 micro strain). The release of the SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} from the mortar was analyzed, indicating that the dissolution of sulfate increases with FGD gypsum. The concentration of SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} releasing from the mortar with 10% FGD gypsum is almost equal to that obtained from the mortar without FGD gypsum. The release of SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} from the mortar with 20% FGD gypsum is 9200 mg

  12. Physical properties of salt, anhydrite and gypsum : preliminary report

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robertson, Eugene C.; Robie, Richard A.; Books, Kenneth G.

    1958-01-01

    This summary is the result of a search of the available literature. Emphasis is placed on the mechanical and calorimetric properties of salt; the measurements of elastic, thermal, magnetic, and mass properties of salt are merely tabulated. Under hydrostatic pressure 100 percent at a nearly constant stress difference of about 300 kg/cm2. Similarily, under temperatures > 400?C at one atmosphere, salt deforms plastically to strains > 100 percent under stress differences of about 100 kg/cm2. Entha1pies were calculated for various temperatures to 2,000? C from the low temperature and high temperature heat capacities and the heats of solution of the following minerals: salt (or halite), NaCl; anhydrite, CaS04; quartz, Si02; and calcite, CaC03. Three combinations of these minerals were assumed to represent three possible natural salt beds, and the heats required to raise the temperature of each to 1,500?C and to 2,000?C were calculated. For a half and half mixture of salt and anhydrite, 1,300 cal/gm were required to raise the temperature to 2,000?C. For an evaporite containing 60 percent salt and about equal amounts of anhydrite, calcite, and quartz, 1,100 cal/gm are required to raise the temperature to 2,OOO?C. Most of the measurements of the elastic moduli were made on single crystals of salt, anhydrite, and gypsum. For the most part, the measurements of density, magnetic susceptibility, and other properties were made on natural salt samples.

  13. Field Study on Moisture Problems in Exterior Walls of Family Housing Units at Naval Air Station Pensacola, Florida.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-02-01

    exterior exposed concrete block walls with 2 inch (nominal) furring, 1 inch cellular board ( expanded polystyrene ) insulation, and gypsum board finish, as...furring strips, and new expanded polystyrene board thermal insu- lation and new gypsum board were installed. The purpose of the coating on the concrete

  14. Properties of mortars made by uncalcined FGD gypsum-fly ash-ground granulated blast furnace slag composite binder.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Shiyun; Ni, Kun; Li, Jinmei

    2012-07-01

    A series of novel mortars were developed from composite binder of uncalcined FGD gypsum, fly ash (FA) and ground granulated blast furnace slag (GGBFS) for the good utilization of flue gas desulphurization (FGD) gypsum. At a fixed ratio (20%) of GGBFS to the composite binder, keeping consistency of the mortar between 9.5 and 10.0 cm, the properties of the composite mortar were studied. The results show that higher water/binder (W/B) is required to keep the consistency when increasing the percentage of FGD gypsum. No obvious influences of the W/B and content of FGD gypsum on the bleeding of paste were observed which keeps lower than 2% under all experimental conditions tried. The highest compressive and flexural strengths (ratio is 20% FGD gypsum, 20% GGBFS and 60% FA) are 22.6 and 4.3 MPa at 28 days, respectively. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) results indicate that massive ettringite crystals and C-S-H gels exist in the hydration products. At 90 days the mortars with FGD gypsum is dramatically smaller drying shrinkage (563-938 micro strain) than that without FGD gypsum (about 2250 micro strain). The release of the SO(4)(2-) from the mortar was analyzed, indicating that the dissolution of sulfate increases with FGD gypsum. The concentration of SO(4)(2-) releasing from the mortar with 10% FGD gypsum is almost equal to that obtained from the mortar without FGD gypsum. The release of SO(4)(2-) from the mortar with 20% FGD gypsum is 9200 mg·m(-2), which is lower than that from the mortar with 95% cement clinker and 5% FGD gypsum.

  15. Messinian Salinity Crisis' Primary Evaporites: the shallow gypsum vs. deep dolomite formation paradox solved

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Lange, G. J.; Krijgsman, W.

    2015-12-01

    The Messinian Salinity Crisis (MSC) is a dramatic event that took place ~ 5.9 Ma ago, resulting in deposition of 1-3 km thick evaporites at the Mediterranean seafloor. A considerable, long-lasting controversy existed on the modes of their formation, including the observed shallow gypsum versus deep dolostone deposits for the early phase of MSC. The onset of MSC is marked by deposition of gypsum/sapropel-like alternations, thought to relate to arid/humid climate conditions at a precessional rhythm. Gypsum precipitation only occurred at marginal- and dolomite formation at deeper settings. A range of potential explanations was given, most of which cannot satisfactorily explain all observations. Biogeochemical processes during MSC are commonly neglected but may explain that different deposits formed in shallow vs deep environments without exceptional physical boundary conditions for each. A unifying mechanism is presented in which gypsum formation occurs at all shallow water depths but its preservation is limited to shallow sedimentary settings. In contrast, ongoing deep-basin anoxic organic matter (OM) degradation processes result in dolomite formation. Gypsum precipitation in evaporating seawater takes place at 3-7 times concentrated seawater; seawater is always oversaturated relative to dolomite but its formation is inhibited by the presence of dissolved sulphate. Thus conditions for formation of gypsum exclude those for formation of dolomite and vice versa. Another process linking the saturation states of gypsum and dolomite is that of OM degradation by sulphate reduction. In stagnant deep water, ongoing OM-degradation may result in reducing the sulphate and enhancing the dissolved carbonate content. Such low-sulphate / high carbonate conditions in MSC deepwater are. unfavorable for gypsum preservation and favorable for dolomite formation, and always coincide with anoxic, i.e. oxygen-free conditions. Including dynamic biogeochemical processes in the thusfar static

  16. Composting and gypsum amendment of broiler litter to reduce nutrient leaching loss.

    PubMed

    Adeli, Ardeshir; Sheng, J; Jenkins, J N; Feng, G

    2015-03-01

    The effect of composted litter relative to fresh litter on leaching losses of nutrients has not been well documented. Fresh and composted broiler litter was surface-applied to bermudagrass (hay) [ (L.) Pers.] established in undisturbed soil columns based on N need of the grass in the presence or absence of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum to evaluate an approach to reduce broiler litter nutrient leaching potential. Columns were periodically leached and biomass was harvested during the 60-d experiment. Total N applied to bermudagrass from broiler litter was 320 kg ha. Gypsum was mixed with fresh and composted litter at the rate based on 20% of litter weight. For composted broiler litter, NO-N, P, K, Cu, and Zn contents in the leachate obtained from the first leaching event were 58, 50, 40, 32, and 38% less than fresh broiler litter, respectively. Significant decreases in NO-N (13%), P (53%), Cu (17%), and Zn (28%) in leachate were obtained when gypsum was mixed with fresh broiler litter. Fresh broiler litter and composted broiler litter applications increased bermudagrass growth compared with the control and gypsum significantly increased yields when mixed with broiler litter. Composted broiler litter application significantly increased N and organic C in the soil compared with fresh litter. Results demonstrate that coapplication of composted broiler litter with FGD gypsum provide the most effective management option for minimizing leaching losses of nutrients while sustaining crop productivity.

  17. Laminar gypsum crust on lede stone: Microspatial characterization and laboratory acid weathering.

    PubMed

    De Kock, Tim; Van Stappen, Jeroen; Fronteau, Gilles; Boone, Marijn; De Boever, Wesley; Dagrain, Fabrice; Silversmit, Geert; Vincze, Laszlo; Cnudde, Veerle

    2017-01-01

    Gypsum crusts are typical decay forms on limestone in polluted urban environments. Their origin and relation to the stone facies have been thoroughly investigated in the past three decades. Here, we present the combined use of novel techniques for a microspatial structural, chemical and mechanical characterization of a laminar black gypsum crust on a sandy limestone. These techniques include i.a. X-ray computed microtomography, X-ray Fluorescence micromapping, permeability mapping and the scratch test. They reveal the typical architecture of a laminar gypsum crust, with an outer opaque layer, a subsurface gypsum crystallization layer and a deeper cracked zone passing irregularly into the sound stone. Gypsum crystallization is mostly restricted to an irregular outer zone with an average thickness of 500µm, while cracks are found deeper within the rock. These cracks decrease the rock strength to more than 27.5mm below the surface. Because of their surface parallel orientation and thickness of >10-100µm, they create the potential for surface scaling. This is shown by a laboratory acid test where the crack network extensively developed due to further exposure to an SO2 environment. The use of novel techniques opens potential for the study of different decay forms and can be used for stone diagnosis with regards to conservation studies.

  18. Gypsum-permineralized microfossils and their relevance to the search for life on Mars.

    PubMed

    Schopf, J William; Farmer, Jack D; Foster, Ian S; Kudryavtsev, Anatoliy B; Gallardo, Victor A; Espinoza, Carola

    2012-07-01

    Orbital and in situ analyses establish that aerially extensive deposits of evaporitic sulfates, including gypsum, are present on the surface of Mars. Although comparable gypsiferous sediments on Earth have been largely ignored by paleontologists, we here report the finding of diverse fossil microscopic organisms permineralized in bottom-nucleated gypsums of seven deposits: two from the Permian (∼260 Ma) of New Mexico, USA; one from the Miocene (∼6 Ma) of Italy; and four from Recent lacustrine and saltern deposits of Australia, Mexico, and Peru. In addition to presenting the first report of the widespread occurrence of microscopic fossils in bottom-nucleated primary gypsum, we show the striking morphological similarity of the majority of the benthic filamentous fossils of these units to the microorganisms of a modern sulfuretum biocoenose. Based on such similarity, in morphology as well as habitat, these findings suggest that anaerobic sulfur-metabolizing microbial assemblages have changed relatively little over hundreds of millions of years. Their discovery as fossilized components of the seven gypsiferous units reported suggests that primary bottom-nucleated gypsum represents a promising target in the search for evidence of past life on Mars. Key Words: Confocal laser scanning microscopy-Gypsum fossils-Mars sample return missions-Raman spectroscopy-Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument-Sulfuretum.

  19. Manufacture of ammonium sulfate fertilizer from FGD-gypsum. Technical report, September 1--November 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, M.I.M.; Rostam-Abadi, M.; Lytle, J.M.; Hoeft, R.; Blevins, F.Z.; Achron, F.

    1994-12-31

    The overall goal of this project is to assess the technical and economic feasibility for producing commercial-grade ammonium sulfate fertilizer from gypsum produced as part of limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) processes. This is a cooperative effort among the ISGS, the UIUC, AlliedSignal, SE-ME, Henry Fertilizer, Illinois Power Co. (IP), and Central Illinois Public Services (CIPS). Bench-scale experiments will be conducted to obtain process engineering data for manufacture of ammonium sulfate from FGD-gypsum and to help evaluate technical and economical feasibility of the process. Controlled greenhouse experiments will be conducted at UIUC to evaluate the chemical impact of the produced ammonium sulfate on soil properties. A process flow sheet will be proposed and market demand for the products will be established. An engineering team at IP will provide an independent review of the economics of the process. AlliedSignal will be involved in testing and quality evaluation of ammonium sulfate samples and is interested in an agreement to market the finished product. CIPS will provide technical assistance and samples of FGD-gypsum for the project. In this quarter, a literature study that should give detailed insight into the chemistry, process schemes, and costs of producing ammonium sulfate from gypsum is in progress at the ISGS. Acquisition of a high quality FGD-gypsum sample was completed. Collecting of the other lower grade sample was scheduled to be conducted in December. Characterization of these feed materials is in progress.

  20. Gypsum: a review of its role in the deterioration of building materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charola, A. Elena; Pühringer, Josef; Steiger, Michael

    2007-03-01

    The deterioration of buildings and monuments by gypsum is the result of crystallization cycles of this salt. Although gypsum can dehydrate to a hemihydrate, the mineral bassanite, and to an anhydrate, the mineral anhydrite, this reaction occurs in nature on a geological time scale and therefore it is unlikely to occur when gypsum is found on and in building materials. The CaSO4-H2O system appears deceptively simple, however there are still discrepancies between the experimental and thermodynamically calculated data. The reason for the latter can be attributed to the slow crystallization kinetics of anhydrite. Apart from this, the large numbers of studies carried out on this system have focused on industrially important metastable phases, such as the hemihydrate and soluble anhydrite. The paper presents a review of the studies dealing with the phase equilibria of the CaSO4-H2O system as well as the influence of other salts on the solubility of gypsum. It tries to glean out the relevant information that will serve to explain the deterioration observed on building materials by the crystallization of gypsum and thus allows developing improved conservation methods.

  1. Effect of gypsum on the strength development of portland cement by Mössbauer spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassaan, M. Y.

    1988-02-01

    Portland cement was prepared by adding 1,3,5 and 6 wt% gypsum to Egyptian clinker. Each sample was mixed with 25wt% water and was hydrated at 1,3,7,28 and 90 days. The Mössbauer spectra showed two doublets, one represents the tetrahedral ferric ions and the other the octahedral ferric ions in addition to the iron metal. The degree of hydration was calculated from the spectra. The compressive strength test was performed. The time at which complete hydration takes place and the corresponding value of compressive strength were expected by calculations. The 5wt% sample showed the highest value of strength at the same degree of hydration. It showed also the lowest degree of hydration at the same value of compressive strength. It could be concluded that the optimum amount of gypsum addition should be 5 wt%, and the rate of hydration didn't affect by the different amount of gypsum.

  2. Compartmentalization of gypsum and halite associated with cyanobacteria in saline soil crusts.

    PubMed

    Canfora, Loredana; Vendramin, Elisa; Vittori Antisari, Livia; Lo Papa, Giuseppe; Dazzi, Carmelo; Benedetti, Anna; Iavazzo, Pietro; Adamo, Paola; Jungblut, Anne D; Pinzari, Flavia

    2016-06-01

    The interface between biological and geochemical components in the surface crust of a saline soil was investigated using X-ray diffraction, and variable pressure scanning electron microscopy in combination with energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry. Mineral compounds such as halite and gypsum were identified crystallized around filaments of cyanobacteria. A total of 92 genera were identified from the bacterial community based on 16S gene pyrosequencing analysis. The occurrence of the gypsum crystals, their shapes and compartmentalization suggested that they separated NaCl from the immediate microenvironment of the cyanobacteria, and that some cyanobacteria and communities of sulfur bacteria may had a physical control over the distinctive halite and gypsum structures produced. This suggests that cyanobacteria might directly or indirectly promote the formation of a protective envelope made of calcium and sulfur-based compounds.

  3. The effect of magnesium on partial sulphate removal from mine water as gypsum.

    PubMed

    Tolonen, Emma-Tuulia; Rämö, Jaakko; Lassi, Ulla

    2015-08-15

    The aim of this research was to investigate the effect of magnesium on the removal efficiency of sulphate as gypsum from mine water. The precipitation conditions were simulated with MINEQL + software and the simulation results were compared with the results from laboratory jar test experiments. Both the simulation and the laboratory results showed that magnesium in the mine water was maintaining sulphate in a soluble form as magnesium sulphate (MgSO4) at pH 9.6. Thus magnesium was preventing the removal of sulphate as gypsum (CaSO4·2H2O). However, change in the lime precipitation pH from 9.6 to 12.5 resulted in magnesium hydroxide (Mg(OH)2) precipitation and improved sulphate removal. Additionally, magnesium hydroxide could act as seed crystals for gypsum precipitation or co-precipitate sulphate further enhancing the removal of sulphate from mine water.

  4. Testing CO2 Sequestration in an Alkaline Soil Treated with Flue Gas Desulfurization Gypsum (FGDG)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Y.; Tokunaga, T. K.

    2012-12-01

    Identifying effective and economical methods for increasing carbon storage in soils is of interest for reducing soil CO2 fluxes to the atmosphere in order to partially offset anthropogenic CO2 contributions to climate change This study investigates an alternative strategy for increasing carbon retention in soils by accelerating calcite (CaCO3) precipitation and promoting soil organic carbon (SOC) complexation on mineral surfaces. The addition of calcium ion to soils with pH > 8, often found in arid and semi-arid regions, may accelerate the slow process of calcite precipitation. Increased ionic strength from addition of a soluble Ca source also suppresses microbial activity which oxidizes SOC to gaseous CO2. Through obtaining C mass balances in soil profiles, this study is quantifying the efficiency of gypsum amendments for mitigating C losses to the atmosphere. The objective of this study is to identify conditions in which inorganic and organic C sequestration is practical in semi-arid and arid soils by gypsum treatment. As an inexpensive calcium source, we proposed to use flue gas desulfurization gypsum (FGDG), a byproduct of fossil fuel burning electric power plants. To test the hypothesis, laboratory column experiments have been conducted in calcite-buffered soil with addition of gypsum and FGDG. The results of several months of column monitoring are demonstrating that gypsum-treated soil have lowered amounts of soil organic carbon loss and increased inorganic carbon (calcite) production. The excess generation of FGDG relative to industrial and agricultural needs, FGDG, is currently regarded as waste. Thus application of FGDG application in some soils may be an effective and economical means for fixing CO2 in soil organic and inorganic carbon forms.Soil carbon cycle, with proposed increased C retention by calcite precipitation and by SOC binding onto soil mineral surfaces, with both processes driven by calcium released from gypsum dissolution.

  5. Impact of gypsum applied to grass buffer strips on reducing soluble p in surface water runoff.

    PubMed

    Watts, D B; Torbert, H A

    2009-01-01

    The threat of P transport from land applied manure has resulted in water quality concerns. Research was conducted to evaluate gypsum as a soil amendment applied to grass buffer strips for reducing soluble P in surface runoff. A simulated concentrated flow was created in an established tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb.) pasture. Poultry litter (PL) was applied at a rate of 250 kg N ha(-1) to the upper 3.05 m of each plot, while gypsum was applied at rates of 0, 1, 3.2, and 5.6 Mg ha-1to the lower 1.52 m of the plot functioning as a grass buffer strip. Two 30-min runoff events ( approximately 4 L min(-1)) were conducted, immediately after PL application and 4 wk later to determined soluble P concentration in the surface water samples. The greatest concentration of soluble P was in the runoff event occurring immediately after the PL application. Gypsum applied to grass buffer strips was effective in reducing soluble P concentrations (32-40%) in surface runoff, while the untreated buffer strip was somewhat effective in reducing soluble P (18%). No significant differences were observed between gypsum rates, suggesting that land managers would achieve the greatest benefit from the lowest application rate (1Mgha(-1)). In the second runoff event, although concentrations of soluble P in the surface water runoff were greatly reduced, the effect of gypsum had disappeared. Thus, these results show that gypsum is most effective in reducing the initial P losses from PL application when applied to grass buffer strips. The information obtained from this study may be useful in aiding land managers in developing management practices that reduce soluble P loss at the edge of a field.

  6. Marketable products from gypsum, a coal combustion byproduct derived from a wet flue gas desulfurization process

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, M.I.M.; Ghiassi, K.; Lytle, J.M.; Chou, S.J.; Banerjee, D.D.

    1998-04-01

    For two years the authors have been developing a process to produce two marketable products, ammonium sulfate fertilizer and precipitated calcium carbonate (PCC), from wet limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by-product gypsum. Phase I of the project focused on the process for converting FGD-gypsum to ammonium sulfate fertilizer with PCC produced as a by-product during the conversion. Early cost estimates suggested that the process was economically feasible when granular size ammonium sulfate crystals were produced. However, sale of the by-product PCC for high-value commercial application could further improve the economics of the process. The results of our evaluation of the market potential of the PCC by-product are reported in this paper. The most significant attributes of carbonate fillers that determine their usefulness in industry are particle size (i.e. fineness) and shape, whiteness (brightness), and mineralogical and chemical purity. The PCC produced from the FGD gypsum obtained from the Abbott Power Plant at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign campus are pure calcite with a CaCO{sub 3} content greater than 98%, 3% higher than the minimum requirement of 95%. However, the size, shape, and brightness of the PCC particles are suitable only for certain applications. Impurities in the gypsum from Abbott power plant influence the whiteness of the PCC products. Test results suggested that, to obtain gypsum that is pure enough to produce a high whiteness PCC for high value commercial applications, limestone with minimum color impurities should be used during the FGD process. Alternatively, purification procedures to obtain the desired whiteness of the FGD-gypsum can be used. Further improvement in the overall qualities of the PCC products should lead to a product that is adequate for high-value paper applications.

  7. Towards the establishment of a general rate law for gypsum nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reznik, Itay J.; Ganor, Jiwchar; Gruber, Chen; Gavrieli, Ittai

    2012-05-01

    Gypsum nucleation kinetics from a wide range of chemical compositions (1.45 < Ca2+/SO42- < 115), ionic strengths (I = 2.5-10 m) and saturation state with respect to gypsum (Ωgyp = 1.07-8.4) were examined in batch experiments containing mixtures of Ca2+-rich Dead Sea brine and SO42-rich seawater with or without addition of extra Na2SO4 and CaCl2·2H2O. The induction times attained in the present study were compiled together with literature values from experiments carried out under significantly different conditions (synthetic NaCl solutions; I = 0.09-6.3 m; Ca2+/SO42- = 1; Ωgyp:1.59-7.76). Despite the variability in the experimental solutions, a single rate law based on classic nucleation theory was formulated to describe the induction times from more than 80 experiments: logT=log{1}/{3.17·Cs·exp{-}7.08ln2Ω}+0.072·Cs·exp-{1.426}/{ln2Ω} where Tind is the induction time, Cs is the solubility of gypsum and Ω is the saturation state with respect to gypsum. The rate law provides Tind for gypsum precipitation from aqueous solutions at 25 °C, containing no synthetic antiscalants or catalysts, within a 95% confidence interval within a factor of 5. Based on this rate law, we show that at present most of the precipitation of gypsum from the Dead Sea brine occurs following significant evaporation in the industrial evaporation ponds and not in the Dead Sea itself. Whereas Tind in Dead Sea brines is very long (on the order of 3 years), the evaporation of brine in the industrial ponds leads to increased Ω values, and thus to short Tind in the order of a few days. However, if seawater or reject brine from seawater desalinization will be introduced to the Dead Sea to restore its declining level, Tind will be significantly reduced and gypsum nucleation and precipitation will occur. For evaporated seawater, the proposed rate law predicts that even though saturation is obtained when seawater is evaporated by a factor of 2.8, gypsum will nucleate at reasonable times (few

  8. Gypsum addition to soils contaminated by red mud: implications for aluminium, arsenic, molybdenum and vanadium solubility.

    PubMed

    Lehoux, Alizée P; Lockwood, Cindy L; Mayes, William M; Stewart, Douglas I; Mortimer, Robert J G; Gruiz, Katalin; Burke, Ian T

    2013-10-01

    Red mud is highly alkaline (pH 13), saline and can contain elevated concentrations of several potentially toxic elements (e.g. Al, As, Mo and V). Release of up to 1 million m(3) of bauxite residue (red mud) suspension from the Ajka repository, western Hungary, caused large-scale contamination of downstream rivers and floodplains. There is now concern about the potential leaching of toxic metal(loid)s from the red mud as some have enhanced solubility at high pH. This study investigated the impact of red mud addition to three different Hungarian soils with respect to trace element solubility and soil geochemistry. The effectiveness of gypsum amendment for the rehabilitation of red mud-contaminated soils was also examined. Red mud addition to soils caused a pH increase, proportional to red mud addition, of up to 4 pH units (e.g. pH 7 → 11). Increasing red mud addition also led to significant increases in salinity, dissolved organic carbon and aqueous trace element concentrations. However, the response was highly soil specific and one of the soils tested buffered pH to around pH 8.5 even with the highest red mud loading tested (33 % w/w); experiments using this soil also had much lower aqueous Al, As and V concentrations. Gypsum addition to soil/red mud mixtures, even at relatively low concentrations (1 % w/w), was sufficient to buffer experimental pH to 7.5-8.5. This effect was attributed to the reaction of Ca(2+) supplied by the gypsum with OH(-) and carbonate from the red mud to precipitate calcite. The lowered pH enhanced trace element sorption and largely inhibited the release of Al, As and V. Mo concentrations, however, were largely unaffected by gypsum induced pH buffering due to the greater solubility of Mo (as molybdate) at circumneutral pH. Gypsum addition also leads to significantly higher porewater salinities, and column experiments demonstrated that this increase in total dissolved solids persisted even after 25 pore volume replacements. Gypsum

  9. Experimental Shock Transformation of Gypsum to Anhydrite: A New Low Pressure Regime Shock Indicator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, Mary S.; Zolensky, Michael E.

    2011-01-01

    The shock behavior of gypsum is important in understanding the Cretaceous/Paleogene event and other terrestrial impacts that contain evaporite sediments in their targets (e.g., Mars Exploration Rover Spirit detected sulfate at Gusev crater, [1]). Most interest focuses on issues of devolatilization to quantify the production of SO2 to better understand its role in generating a temporary atmosphere and its effects on climate and biota [2,3]. Kondo and Ahrens [4] measured induced radiation emitted from single crystal gypsum shocked to 30 and 40 GPa. They observed greybody emission spectra corresponding to temperatures in the range of 3,000 to 4,000 K that are a factor of 2 to 10 times greater than calculated pressure-density energy equation of state temperatures (Hugoniot) and are high enough to melt gypsum. Chen et al. [5] reported results of shock experiments on anhydrite, gypsum, and mixtures of these phases with silica. Their observations indicated little or no devolatilization of anhydrite shocked to 42 GPa and that the fraction of sulfur, by mass, that degassed is approx.10(exp -2) of theoretical prediction. In another report of shock experiments on calcite, anhydrite, and gypsum, Badjukov et al. [6] observed only intensive plastic deformation in anhydrite shock loaded at 63 GPa, and gypsum converted to anhydrite when shock loaded at 56 GPa but have not experimentally shocked gypsum in a step-wise manner to constrain possible incipient transformation effects. Schmitt and Hornemann [7] shock loaded anhydrite and quartz to a peak pressure of 60 GPa and report the platy anhydrite grains were completely pseudomorphed by small crystallized anhydrite grains. However, no evidence of interaction between the two phases could be observed and they suggested that recrystallization of anhydrite grains is the result of a solid-state transformation. They concluded that significant decomposition of anhydrite requires shock pressures higher than 60 GPa. Gupta et al. [8

  10. Constraining the origin of the Messinian gypsum deposits using coupled measurement of δ^{18}O$/δD in gypsum hydration water and salinity of fluid inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Nicholas P.; Gázquez, Fernando; McKenzie, Judith A.; Chapman, Hazel J.; Hodell, David A.

    2016-04-01

    We used oxygen and hydrogen isotopes of gypsum hydration water (GHW) coupled with salinity deduced from ice melting temperatures of primary fluid inclusions in the same samples (in tandem with 87Sr/86Sr, δ34S and other isotopic measurements) to determine the composition of the mother fluids that formed the gypsum deposits of the Messinian Salinity Crisis from shallow and intermediate-depth basins. Using this method, we constrain the origin of the Messinian Primary Lower Gypsum (PLG) of the Sorbas basin (Betic foreland) and both the Upper Gypsum (UG) and the Lower Gypsum of the Sicilian basin. We then compare these results to measurements made on UG recovered from the deep Ionian and Balearic basins drilled during DSDP Leg 42A. The evolution of GHW δ18O/δD vs. salinity is controlled by mixing processes between fresh and seawater, coupled with the degree of evaporation. Evaporation and subsequent precipitation of gypsum from fluids dominated by freshwater will result in a depressed 87Sr/86Sr values and different trajectory in δ18O/δD vs. salinity space compared to fluids dominated by seawater. The slopes of these regression equations help to define the end-members from which the fluid originated. For example, salinity estimates from PLG cycle 6 in the Sorbas basin range from 18 to 51ppt, and after correction for fractionation factors, estimated δ18O and δD values of the mother water are low (-2.6 < δ18O < 2.7‰ ; -16.2 < δD < 15.8‰). The intercepts of the regression equations (i.e. at zero salinity) are within error of the average isotope composition of the modern precipitation and groundwater in this region of SE Spain. This indicates there was a significant contribution of meteoric water during gypsum deposition, while 87Sr/86Sr (0.708942 < 87Sr/86Sr < 0.708971) indicate the ions originated from the dissolution of previously marine evaporites. Gypsum from cycle 2 displays similar mother water values (-2.4 < δ18O < 2.4‰ ; -13.2 < δD < 17.0‰) to

  11. High rates of surface-applied FGD-gypsum decrease soil P availability under short-term flooding

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    FGD-gypsum, a calcium sulfate hydrate by-product of the flue gas desulfurization process, is commonly used by farmers as soil conditioner mainly to increase the amount of Ca and S to the soil and plants. FGD-gypsum has been largely used to amend well drained soils and it is not well known its effect...

  12. Building on previous OSL dating techniques for gypsum: a case study from Salt Basin playa, New Mexico and Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mahan, Shannon; Kay, John

    2012-01-01

    The long term stability and reliability of the luminescence signal for gypsum has not been well documented or systematically measured until just recently. A review of the current literature for luminescence dating of gypsum is compiled here along with original efforts at dating an intact and in-situ bed of selenite gypsum at Salt Basin Playa, New Mexico and Texas. This effort differs from other documented luminescence dating efforts because the gypsum is not powdery or redistributed from its original growth patterns within the playa basin but is instead of a crystalline form. Sixteen ages from eight cores were ultimately produced with seven of the ages coming from rare detrital quartz encased in or with the gypsum crystals while the remaining ages are from the crystalline gypsum. As far as can be ascertained, the quartz was measured separately from the gypsum and no contaminants were noted in any of the aliquots. Some basic and preliminary tests of signal stability were measured and found to be mitigated by lessening of pre-heat protocols. Ages ranged from 8 ka to 10 ka in the shallow cores and 16 ka to 22 ka in the deeper cores. These ages will be useful in determining rates of gypsum growth within a sequence of evaporates which, in turn, will help to better document historic rates of evaporation and thus estimate, with more precision, the corresponding annual evaporation rates.

  13. Gypsum and organic matter distribution in a mixed construction and demolition waste sorting process and their possible removal from outputs.

    PubMed

    Montero, A; Tojo, Y; Matsuo, T; Matsuto, T; Yamada, M; Asakura, H; Ono, Y

    2010-03-15

    With insufficient source separation, construction and demolition (C&D) waste becomes a mixed material that is difficult to recycle. Treatment of mixed C&D waste generates residue that contains gypsum and organic matter and poses a risk of H(2)S formation in landfills. Therefore, removing gypsum and organic matter from the residue is vital. This study investigated the distribution of gypsum and organic matter in a sorting process. Heavy liquid separation was used to determine the density ranges in which gypsum and organic matter were most concentrated. The fine residue that was separated before shredding accounted for 27.9% of the waste mass and contained the greatest quantity of gypsum; therefore, most of the gypsum (52.4%) was distributed in this fraction. When this fine fraction was subjected to heavy liquid separation, 93% of the gypsum was concentrated in the density range of 1.59-2.28, which contained 24% of the total waste mass. Therefore, removing this density range after segregating fine particles should reduce the amount of gypsum sent to landfills. Organic matter tends to float as density increases; nevertheless, separation at 1.0 density could be more efficient.

  14. Fluid inclusion analysis of twinned selenite gypsum beds from the Miocene of the Madrid basin (Spain). Implication on dolomite bioformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayllón-Quevedo, F.; Souza-Egipsy, V.; Sanz-Montero, M. E.; Rodríguez-Aranda, J. P.

    2007-09-01

    This research work is centred on continental lacustrine gypsum deposits of Miocene age cropping out in the easternmost part of the Madrid Basin. These gypsum deposits, accumulated in a continental saline lake, are characterized by a spectacular, distinctive Christmas-tree morphology and a peculiar dolomite replacement. A combination of microscopic (petrography and scanning electron microscopy) and analytical techniques (fluid inclusion microthermometry, X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy and X-ray diffractometry) was used in order to study the crystallographic distribution and the composition of the fluid inclusions within the gypsum. The objectives were to characterize the continental brine from which the mineral precipitated, and to detect mineral and element traces that could indicate early diagenetic processes altering the gypsum deposits. Data from primary fluid inclusions indicated that gypsum precipitated from an aqueous fluid (lake water) of low to moderate total salinity (between 20 and 90 g/L NaCl). Secondary fluid inclusions represent interstitial lake brine in contact with gypsum, slightly enriched in total salt content as crystal formation proceeded. Textural, ultrastructural and microanalytical analysis indicate that the presence of dolomite precipitates inside the gypsum layers is related to the microbial colonization of the gypsum deposits and the biomineralization of the cell walls and extracellular polymeric substances around the cells. Our investigation emphasizes necessity of a multidisciplinary approach to assess geobiological processes.

  15. The Aspects About of Objectively Appraisals of Modeling Gypsum Quality and Composites of Phonic-Absorbent and Orthopedic on Base of Gypsum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pop, P. A.; Ungur, P. A.; Lazar, L.; Marcu, F.

    2009-11-01

    The EU Norms about of protection environment, outside and inside ambient, and human health demands has lead at obtain of new materials on the base of airborne material, with high thermo and phonic-absorbent properties, porous and lightweight. The α and β-modeling gypsum plaster quality and lightweight depend on many factors as: fabrication process, granulation, roast temperature, work temperature, environment, additives used, breakage, etc. Also, the objectively appraisal of modeling gypsum quality depends of proper tests methods selection, which are legislated in norms, standards and recommendations. In Romanian Standards SR EN 13279-1/2005 and SR EN 13279-2/2005, adaptable from EU Norms EN 13279-1/2004 and EN 13279-2/2004, the characteristics gypsum family tests are well specification, as: granule-metric analysis, determination of water/plaster ratio, setting time, mechanical characteristics, adhesions and water restrain. For plaster with special use (phonic-absorbent and orthopedic materials, etc.) these determinations are not concluding, being necessary more parameters finding, as: elastic constant, phonic-absorbent coefficient, porosity, working, etc., which is imposed the completion of norms and standards with new determinations.

  16. Recovery of calcium carbonate from waste gypsum and utilization for remediation of acid mine drainage from coal mines.

    PubMed

    Mulopo, J; Radebe, V

    2012-01-01

    The recovery of calcium carbonate from waste gypsum (a waste product of the reverse osmosis (RO) desalination process) was tested using sodium carbonate. Batch recovery of calcium carbonate from waste gypsum slurries by reacting with sodium carbonate under ambient conditions was used to assess the technical feasibility of CaCO(3) recovery and its use for pre-treatment of acid mine drainage (AMD) from coal mines. The effect of key process parameters, such as the slurry concentration (%) and the molar ratio of sodium carbonate to gypsum were considered. It was observed that batch waste gypsum conversion significantly increased with decrease in the slurry concentration or increase in the molar ratio of sodium carbonate to gypsum. The CaCO(3) recovered from the bench-scale batch reactor demonstrated effective neutralization ability during AMD pre-treatment compared with commercial laboratory grade CaCO(3).

  17. 77 FR 62240 - Advisory Board on Radiation and Worker Health (ABRWH or Advisory Board), National Institute for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-12

    ... Prevention Advisory Board on Radiation and Worker Health (ABRWH or Advisory Board), National Institute for... employees at any Department of Energy facility who were exposed to radiation but for whom it is not feasible to estimate their radiation dose, and on whether there is reasonable likelihood that such...

  18. Biosignatures in modern sulfates: texture, composition and depositional environments of gypsum deposits at Guerrero Negro, Baja, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, M. B.; Des Marais, D. J.; Jahnke, L. L.; Turk, K.; Kubo, M.

    2007-12-01

    Gypsum (CaSO4·H2O) is an important phase in biogeochemistry and sedimentology as a mineral sink for sulfur, a paleoclimatic indicator, and an endolithic niche for phototrophic and chemotrophic bacteria. Sulfate deposits are also important targets of exploration for evidence of habitable environments and life on Mars. Gypsum deposits from a range of sedimentary environments at the Guerrero Negro crystallizer ponds and sabkha settings were investigated for microscale structure and composition to differentiate fabrics formed under microbial influence from those formed under abiogenic conditions. Sub-sedimentary gypsum forms in sabkha environments as mm to cm scale selenite discs (termed bird beak gypsum; Warren, 2006) and selenite disc aggregates. Selenite discs and other sub-sedimentary gypsum are characterized by a sinuous axial microtexture and poikilitically enclosed detrital particles. Sub-aqueous gypsum forms as cements, granules (termed gypsooids), and massive botryoidal crusts that line the sediment water interface and margins of managed crystallizer ponds and natural anchialine pools. Sub-aqueous gypsum exhibits a wide range of textures and mineral/biofilm associations that include amorphous to euhedral, tabular, needle and lensoidal morphologies. Elemental sulfur forms rinds on prismatic, growth aligned gypsum twins and reticulate magnesian carbonate is interspersed with both twinned crystals and rosette aggregates in stratified sub-aqueous environments. Intracrystalline biofilms and cell material was observed in association with nearly all sub-aqueous morphologies but only scarce evidence has been found for intercrystalline microbial communities. Columnar microbial communities living in anchialine pools were found to host precipitation of mm scale gypsum granules in their EPS matrix. Fine scale gypsum textures are unlikely to persist through diagenetic alteration, but understanding their primary associations with sulfur and carbonates is necessary for

  19. Field studies on the use of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum in agriculture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Flue gas desulfurization gypsum (FGDG) is a product of precipitation of sulfur from stack gases from coal-fired electric power plants. This material is produced in increasingly large quantities by electric power companies to meet clean air standards. We have evaluated this material for beneficial us...

  20. Composting and gypsum amendment of broiler litter to reduce nutrient leaching loss

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Relative to fresh broiler litter, little is known about the dynamics of composted litter derived-nutrient in the ecosystem. In this study, the potential leaching losses of nutrients from compost relative to fresh broiler litter along with flue gas desulfurization (FGD gypsum), as a nutrient immobil...

  1. Framework of risk assessment in relation to FGD-gypsum use as agricultural amendment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Due to the concerns by EPA of air pollution from coal fired power plants, the industry are building and retrofitting existing facilities to remove more impurities from the environment. Industry has introduced removal of fly ash contaminates before SO2 removal, allowing generation of FGD-gypsum with...

  2. Soil test and bermudagrass forage yield responses to animal waste and FGD gypsum ammendments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Knowledge of soil and plant responses to animal or industrial byproducts is needed for effective use of these potential amendments on reclaimed mine soil. This study compared seven treatments of 11.2 Mg ha-1 flue gas desulfurized (FGD) gypsum (control), 896 kg ha-1 NPK fertilizer (13-13-13), 22.4 M...

  3. Effect of land application of phosphorus-saturated gypsum on soil phosphorus in a laboratory incubation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Agricultural drainage ditches can deliver high loads of phosphorus (P) to surface water. Installation of filter structures containing P sorbing materials (PSMs), including gypsum, is an emerging practice that has shown promise to reduce these P loads. The objective of this study was to evaluate what...

  4. Microbial Volatile Organic Compound Emissions from Stachybotrys chartarum growing on Gypsum Wallboard and Ceiling tile

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study compared seven toxigenic strains of S. chartarum found in water-damaged buildings to characterize the microbial volatile organic compound (MVOC) emissions profile while growing on gypsum wallboard (W) and ceiling tile (C) coupons. The inoculated coupons with their sub...

  5. Use of Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) Gypsum as a Heavy Metal Stabilizer in Contaminated Soils

    EPA Science Inventory

    Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) gypsum is a synthetic by-product generated from the flue gas desulfurization process in coal power plants. It has several beneficial applications such as an ingredient in cement production, wallboard production and in agricultural practice as a soil...

  6. Assessment of Mercury in Soils, Crops, Earthworms, and Water when Soil is Treated with Gypsum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum from fossil fuel combustion has many potential uses in agriculture, but there is concern about the potential environmental effects of its elevated mercury (Hg) concentration. The wet limestone scrubbing process that removes sulfur from flue gas (and produces gyp...

  7. Manufacture of ammonium sulfate fertilizer from FGD-gypsum. Technical report, March 1--May 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, M.I.M.; Rostam-Abadi, Ml; Lytle, J.M.; Bruinius, J.A.; Li, Y.C.; Hoeft, R.; Dewey, S.; Achorn, F.

    1995-12-31

    Goal is to assess technical and economic feasibility for producing fertilizer-grade ammonium sulfate from gypsum produced in limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD). This is the 1st year of a 2-year program among Illinois State Geological Survey, University of Illinois (Urbana-Champaign), Allied-Signal, Marketing Chem. Process Inc., Henry Fertilizer, Illinois Power Co., and Central Illinois Public Services. In previous quarter, chemistry and process conditions were reviewed and a reactor system set up and used to conduct laboratory tests. FGD-gypsum from Abbott power plant was used. The scrubber, a Chiyoda Thoroughbred 121 FGD, produced a filter cake (98.36% gypsum and < 0.01% CaSO{sub 3}). Conversion of FGD- gypsum to ammonium sulfate was tested at 60-70{degree}C for 5-6 hr. Yield up to 82% and purity up to 95% were achieved for the ammonium sulfate production. During this quarter, more bench-scale experiments including a mass balance analysis were conducted; a yield up to 83% and up to 99% purity were achieved. A literature survey was completed and a preliminary process flow sheet was developed. Economics of the process is being estimated.

  8. Use of FGD gypsum to reduce p loss from agricultural fields

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Controlling P loss from agricultural fields has become a major issue in recent years, especially in areas where manure is used as nutrient sources. It is believed that FGD gypsum can be used as a management practice to reduce soluble P loss. Thus, the objective of this study was to determine FGD gy...

  9. Application of gypsum to control P runoff from poultry litter fertilization of pasture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper will discuss the utilization of gypsum (CaSO4 .2H2O) to reduce P losses from surface runoff when poultry litter is used as a fertilizer source in agriculture. Utilization of poultry litter as a fertilizer source is common in regions with intense poultry production. While poultry litter ...

  10. FGD gypsum application: Impacts on soil P from city parks in the Tampa area

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Controlling excessive P loss from agricultural fields has become a major issue in recent years. However, managed city parks may also contribute to P loss. Thus, a study was conducted at three different city parks located in the Tampa Area to evaluate the use of FGD gypsum as an amendment to reduce w...

  11. Animal waste and FGD gypsum effects on bermudagrass and soil leachate nutrient contents

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In previous experiments on newly relcaimed coal mine soils in northeastern Mississippi, applying poultry litter at 22.4 Mg ha-1 yr-1 enhanced bermudagrass (Cynodon dactylon L.) biomass and selected soil quality parameters. Additionally, co-application of 11.2 Mg ha-1 FGD gypsum and litter reduced so...

  12. Flue gas desulfurization gypsum: Its effectiveness as an alternative bedding material for broiler production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Flue gas desulfurization gypsum (FGDG) may be a viable low-cost alternative bedding material for broiler production. In order to evaluate FGD gypsum’s viability, three consecutive trials were conducted to determine its influence on live performance (body weight, feed consumption, feed efficiency, an...

  13. Decreasing phosphorus loss in tile-drained landscapes using flue gas desulfurization gypsum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Elevated phosphorus (P) loading from agricultural non-point source pollution continues to impair inland waterbodies throughout the world. The application of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum to agricultural fields has been suggested to decrease P loading because of its high calcium content and P...

  14. Modeling grain size variations of aeolian gypsum deposits at White Sands, New Mexico, using AVIRIS imagery

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ghrefat, H.A.; Goodell, P.C.; Hubbard, B.E.; Langford, R.P.; Aldouri, R.E.

    2007-01-01

    Visible and Near-Infrared (VNIR) through Short Wavelength Infrared (SWIR) (0.4-2.5????m) AVIRIS data, along with laboratory spectral measurements and analyses of field samples, were used to characterize grain size variations in aeolian gypsum deposits across barchan-transverse, parabolic, and barchan dunes at White Sands, New Mexico, USA. All field samples contained a mineralogy of ?????100% gypsum. In order to document grain size variations at White Sands, surficial gypsum samples were collected along three Transects parallel to the prevailing downwind direction. Grain size analyses were carried out on the samples by sieving them into seven size fractions ranging from 45 to 621????m, which were subjected to spectral measurements. Absorption band depths of the size fractions were determined after applying an automated continuum-removal procedure to each spectrum. Then, the relationship between absorption band depth and gypsum size fraction was established using a linear regression. Three software processing steps were carried out to measure the grain size variations of gypsum in the Dune Area using AVIRIS data. AVIRIS mapping results, field work and laboratory analysis all show that the interdune areas have lower absorption band depth values and consist of finer grained gypsum deposits. In contrast, the dune crest areas have higher absorption band depth values and consist of coarser grained gypsum deposits. Based on laboratory estimates, a representative barchan-transverse dune (Transect 1) has a mean grain size of 1.16 ??{symbol} (449????m). The error bar results show that the error ranges from - 50 to + 50????m. Mean grain size for a representative parabolic dune (Transect 2) is 1.51 ??{symbol} (352????m), and 1.52 ??{symbol} (347????m) for a representative barchan dune (Transect 3). T-test results confirm that there are differences in the grain size distributions between barchan and parabolic dunes and between interdune and dune crest areas. The t-test results

  15. Mistakes Board Members Make.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caruso, Nicholas D., Jr.

    2001-01-01

    Board members should avoid 10 common errors: losing patience, behaving badly, challenging the board after a vote, acting like inspectors, micromanaging school administrators, springing surprise questions at meetings, putting politics before children, representing special interests, violating executive session, and putting the board before family…

  16. Building a Better Board.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sabo, Sandra R.

    1994-01-01

    The Shaker Heights (Ohio) Citizens' Committee (SHCC) has been actively participating in school board member selections since 1931. The SHCC seeks out possible board members and after a process of interviews, selects a candidate to endorse and back financially. The SHCC seeks out an ethnic and gender balance on the school board. (KDP)

  17. Scrum Board Game

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Oord, Stefan; van de Goor, Wim

    The Scrum Board Game is a workshop for beginners. It is for people with any role (customer, developer, tester, etc.), who don’t exactly know what a Scrum Board is, or how to create one themselves. The workshop teaches the benefits of a Scrum Board, how to use it, and how to introduce it in projects.

  18. Urban School Board Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council of the Great City Schools, 2005

    2005-01-01

    The Council of the Great City Schools surveyed its member districts in the fall of 2004 to determine the characteristics of school boards and board members in U.S. urban schools. This was the first survey of its school boards and this report contains the results of that survey. Respondents were asked to provide information on a range of topics…

  19. Marketable products from gypsum, a coal combustion byproduct derived from a wet flue gas desulfurization process

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, M.I.M.; Ghiassi, K.; Lytle, J.M.; Chou, S.J.; Banerjee, D.D.

    1998-07-01

    For two years the authors have been developing a process to produce two marketable products, ammonium sulfate fertilizer and precipitated calcium carbonate (PCC), from wet limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by-product gypsum. Phase 1 of the project focused on the process for converting FGD-gypsum to ammonium sulfate fertilizer with PCC produced as a by-product during the conversion. Early cost estimates suggested that the process was economically feasible when granular size ammonium sulfate crystals were produced. However, sale of the by-product PCC for high-value commercial application could further improve the economics of the process. The results of their evaluation of the market potential of the PCC by-product are reported in this paper. The most significant attributes of carbonate fillers that determine their usefulness in industry are particle size (i.e, fineness) and shape, whiteness (brightness), and mineralogical and chemical purity. The PCC produced from the FGD dypsum obtained from the Abbott Power Plant at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign campus are pure calcite with a CaCO{sub 3} content greater than 98%, 3% higher than the minimum requirement of 95%. However, the size, shape, and brightness of the PCC particles are suitable only for certain applications. Impurities in the gypsum from Abbott power plant influence the whiteness of the PCC products. Test results suggested that, to obtain gypsum that is pure enough to produce a high whiteness PCC for high value commercial applications, limestone with minimum color impurities should be used during the FGD process. Alternatively, purification procedures to obtain the desired whiteness of the FGD-gypsum can be used. Further improvement in the overall qualities of the PCC products should lead to a product that is adequate for high-value paper applications.

  20. Gypsum treated fly ash as a liner for waste disposal facilities.

    PubMed

    Sivapullaiah, Puvvadi V; Baig, M Arif Ali

    2011-02-01

    Fly ash has potential application in the construction of base liners for waste containment facilities. While most of the fly ashes improve in the strength with curing, the ranges of permeabilities they attain may often not meet the basic requirement of a liner material. An attempt has been made in the present context to reduce the hydraulic conductivity by adding lime content up to 10% to two selected samples of class F fly ashes. The use of gypsum, which is known to accelerate the unconfined compressive strength by increasing the lime reactivity, has been investigated in further improving the hydraulic conductivity. Hydraulic conductivities of the compacted specimens have been determined in the laboratory using the falling head method. It has been observed that the addition of gypsum reduces the hydraulic conductivity of the lime treated fly ashes. The reduction in the hydraulic conductivity of the samples containing gypsum is significantly more for samples with high amounts of lime contents (as high as 1000 times) than those fly ashes with lower amounts of lime. However there is a relatively more increase in the strengths of the samples with the inclusion of gypsum to the fly ashes at lower lime contents. This is due to the fact that excess lime added to fly ash is not effectively converted into pozzolanic compounds. Even the presence of gypsum is observed not to activate these reactions with excess lime. On the other hand the higher amount of lime in the presence of sulphate is observed to produce more cementitious compounds which block the pores in the fly ash. The consequent reduction in the hydraulic conductivity of fly ash would be beneficial in reducing the leachability of trace elements present in the fly ash when used as a base liner.

  1. Can isotopic variations in structural water of gypsum reveal paleoclimatic changes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatti, E.; Bustos, D.; Coleman, M. L.

    2015-12-01

    Water of crystallization in gypsum can be used as paleo-environmental proxy to study large scale climatic variability in arid areas. This is because changes in the isotopic composition of water of crystallization are due to isotopic variations in the mother brine from which the mineral precipitated, and the brine isotopic composition is linked to evaporation processes and humidity. This is particularly important when the salts are the only traces left of the original water, i.e. in modern arid areas. This study aims to prove that the 2-D/18-O compositions of the water of crystallization extracted from successive precipitates or even different growth zones of natural gypsum (CaSO4·H2O) can reconstruct the evaporation history and paleo-humidity of the source water basin. The method was tested in a laboratory experiment that evaporated CaSO4 brines under controlled temperature and humidity conditions. The brine was left to evaporate for five days at two different humidities (45 and 75 RH%); subsequently, brines and precipitated gypsum were sampled at 24 hour intervals. In this way we simulated zoned growth of gypsum. The samples were then analyzed for oxygen and hydrogen isotopic composition using a Thermo Scientific TC/EA with modified column, coupled to a MAT 253 Thermo Finnigan mass spectrometer at JPL. If preliminary results validate the novel hypothesis that changes in mineral composition can reveal details of paleo-environmental conditions the theory will be tested on natural gypsum collected from selected areas in White Sands National Monument, New Mexico. The study is currently ongoing but the full dataset will be presented at the conference.

  2. 7 CFR 1250.304 - Egg Board or Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Egg Board or Board. 1250.304 Section 1250.304... AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE EGG RESEARCH AND PROMOTION Egg Research and Promotion Order Definitions § 1250.304 Egg Board or Board. Egg Board or Board or...

  3. 7 CFR 1250.304 - Egg Board or Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Egg Board or Board. 1250.304 Section 1250.304... AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE EGG RESEARCH AND PROMOTION Egg Research and Promotion Order Definitions § 1250.304 Egg Board or Board. Egg Board or Board or...

  4. 7 CFR 1250.304 - Egg Board or Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Egg Board or Board. 1250.304 Section 1250.304... AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE EGG RESEARCH AND PROMOTION Egg Research and Promotion Order Definitions § 1250.304 Egg Board or Board. Egg Board or Board or...

  5. 7 CFR 1250.304 - Egg Board or Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Egg Board or Board. 1250.304 Section 1250.304... AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE EGG RESEARCH AND PROMOTION Egg Research and Promotion Order Definitions § 1250.304 Egg Board or Board. Egg Board or Board or...

  6. 7 CFR 1250.304 - Egg Board or Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Egg Board or Board. 1250.304 Section 1250.304... AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE EGG RESEARCH AND PROMOTION Egg Research and Promotion Order Definitions § 1250.304 Egg Board or Board. Egg Board or Board or...

  7. Permian paleogeography of west-central Pangea: Reconstruction using sabkha-type gypsum-bearing deposits of Parnaíba Basin, Northern Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrantes, Francisco R.; Nogueira, Afonso C. R.; Soares, Joelson L.

    2016-07-01

    Extreme aridity during Late Permian - Early Triassic period was the main factor for resetting the entire paleoclimate of the planet. Permian evaporite basins and lacustrine red beds were widely distributed along the supercontinent of Pangea. Sulphate deposits in Western Pangea, particularly in Northern Brazil, accumulated in an extensive playa lake system. Outcrop-based facies and stratigraphic analysis of up to 20 m thick evaporite-siliciclastic deposits reveal the predominance of laminated reddish mudstone with subordinate limestone, marl and lenses of gypsum. The succession was deposited in shallow lacustrine and inland sabkha environments associated with saline pans and mudflats. Gypsum deposits comprise six lithofacies: 1) bottom-growth gypsum, 2) nodular/micronodular gypsum, 3) mosaic gypsum, 4) fibrous/prismatic gypsum, 5) alabastrine gypsum, and 6) rosettes of gypsum. Gypsum types 1 and 2 are interpreted as primary deposition in saline pans. Bottom-growth gypsum forms grass-like crusts while nodular/micronodular gypsum indicates displacive precipitation of the crust in shallow water and the groundwater capillary zone. Types 3 and 4 are early diagenetic precipitates. Abundant inclusions of tiny lath-like anhydrite crystals suggest a primary origin of anhydrite. Alabastrine gypsum, fibrous gypsum (satinspar) and rosettes of gypsum probably derived from near-surface hydration of anhydrite. The gypsum-bearing deposits in the Parnaíba Basin contribute towards understanding paleogeographic changes in Western Pangea. A progressive uplift of East Pangea, culminated in the forced regression and retreat of epicontinental seas to the West. Restricted seas or large lakes were formed before the definitive onset of desert conditions in Pangea, leading to the development of extensive ergs.

  8. Biological Responses of Raw 264.7 Macrophage Exposed to Two Strains of Stachybotrys chartarum Spores Grown on Four Different Wallboard Types

    EPA Science Inventory

    The focus of this research was to provide a better understanding of the health impacts caused by Stachybotrys chartarum (Houston and 51-11) spores grown on four gypsum products two of which were resistant to microbes. Raw 264.7 cells were exposed to whole spores and fragmented 51...

  9. Formation mechanism of authigenic gypsum in marine methane hydrate settings: Evidence from the northern South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Qi; Wang, Jiasheng; Algeo, Thomas J.; Su, Pibo; Hu, Gaowei

    2016-09-01

    During the last decade, gypsum has been discovered widely in marine methane hydrate-bearing sediments. However, whether this gypsum is an in-situ authigenic precipitate remains controversial. The GMGS2 expedition carried out in 2013 by the Guangzhou Marine Geological Survey (GMGS) in the northern South China Sea provided an excellent opportunity for investigating the formation of authigenic minerals and, in particular, the relationship between gypsum and methane hydrate. In this contribution, we analyzed the morphology and sulfur isotope composition of gypsum and authigenic pyrite as well as the carbon and oxygen isotopic compositions of authigenic carbonate in a drillcore from Site GMGS2-08. These methane-derived carbonates have characteristic carbon and oxygen isotopic compositions (δ13C: -57.9‰ to -27.3‰ VPDB; δ18O: +1.0‰ to +3.8‰ VPDB) related to upward seepage of methane following dissociation of underlying methane hydrates since the Late Pleistocene. Our data suggest that gypsum in the sulfate-methane transition zone (SMTZ) of this core precipitated as in-situ authigenic mineral. Based on its sulfur isotopic composition, the gypsum sulfur is a mixture of sulfate derived from seawater and from partial oxidation of authigenic pyrite. Porewater Ca2+ ions for authigenic gypsum were likely generated from carbonate dissolution through acidification produced by oxidation of authigenic pyrite and ion exclusion during methane hydrate formation. This study thus links the formation mechanism of authigenic gypsum with the oxidation of authigenic pyrite and evolution of underlying methane hydrates. These findings suggest that authigenic gypsum may be a useful proxy for recognition of SMTZs and methane hydrate zones in modern and ancient marine methane hydrate geo-systems.

  10. EXAFS speciation and phytoavailability of Pb in a contaminated soil amended with compost and gypsum.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Yohey; Yamaguchi, Noriko; Takaoka, Masaki; Shiota, Kenji

    2011-02-01

    Due to unregulated uses of lead pellets for hunting purposes in Japan, soils and sediments in some river basins and wetlands have become highly contaminated with Pb. Deterioration of natural vegetation has occurred sporadically in these areas, and therefore revegetation is needed for ecological restoration. The objectives of the present study were to assess the effects of surface applications of compost and gypsum amendments on Pb availability to a watercress plant (Nasturtium officinale W.T. Aiton) and molecular-scale speciation of Pb in soil solid phases. The compost and gypsum amendments significantly decreased dissolved Pb and Sb in pore water. The concentration of Pb in aboveground plant tissues was 190mg kg(-1) in the control soil and was reduced to <20mg kg(-1) in the compost and gypsum-amended soils. The concentration of Sb in plants grown in the control soil was 13mg kg(-1), whereas that in the soils receiving compost and gypsum decreased below detectable levels. Redox potential was higher in vegetated soils (ave. 349mV) than in the unvegetated soils (ave. 99mV) due to oxygen introduced by plant roots. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy illustrated that Pb occurred as Pb sorbed on birnessite and/or ferrihydrite (Pb-Mn/Fe, ~60%) and Pb sorbed on organic matter (Pb-org, ~15%), and galena (PbS, ~10%) in the vegetated and unvegetated control soils. The compost amendment increased the proportion of Pb-org by 2-fold than in the control soils. The amended soils with plant growth decreased the proportion of Pb-Mn/Fe phases by half of that without plant growth. Galena and anglesite (PbSO(4)) were not detected in compost-amended soils and even in gypsum-amended soils since a significant soil reduction to anoxic levels did not occur in the entire soil. The present study indicated that, under flooded conditions, surface applications of compost and gypsum amendments reduced plant Pb uptake from the Pb contaminated soil.

  11. Rheological Behaviour and Microstructures of Natural Gypsum Experimentally Deformed in Simple Shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barberini, V.; Burlini, L.; Rutter, E. H.; Dapiaggi, M.

    2003-12-01

    Gypsum is an important mineral of evaporitic rocks. Evaporites, interlayered within sedimentary sequences, play an important role in localizing the deformation especially in thrust tectonics (Apennines, Zagros, Gulf of Mexico, etc.) since are generally weaker than the other rocks; in some cases the deformation is accompanied by seismicity as in the Northern Apennines extensional systems. In order to determine the rheological and microstructural evolution of gypsum with strain, a set of experiments was performed on natural gypsum samples from Volterra (Tuscany, Italy). Experimental deformation tests were performed at confining pressures up to 300 MPa, at temperatures up to 130° C and at strain rates ranging between 6x10-4 and 5x10-6 s-1. In order to reach high shear strain values, we deformed gypsum specimens using both the torsion technique in the Paterson apparatus at ETH Zurich (up to γ = 5) and the sawcut-type assembly at 35° in a Heard-type apparatus at Manchester University (up to γ = 1.2). All samples have been studied by optical microscopy, to investigate the evolution of the microstructure with strain, and by XRD analysis, to determine whether and to what extent gypsum dehydrated during deformation. In torsion, the shear stress increased with the strain rate and decreased with the temperature. In general a peak stress was reached at γ between 0.5 and 1 (at higher temperatures is reached sooner). After the peak, a various amount of weakening occurred, and mechanical 'steady state' conditions were never reached. Weakening was up to 30-40%. Most of the times the jacket failure ended prematurely the experiment. The microstructure evolved from a deformation microstructure, where grains changed shape according to the bulk strain imposed, into a recrystallization microstructure, where grains were more aequant. Grain boundary migration recrystallization was very effective in resetting the microstructure after γ of 1 or 2. In the samples deformed using saw

  12. Development of fly ash boards with thermal, acoustic and fire insulation properties.

    PubMed

    Leiva, C; Arenas, C; Vilches, L F; Alonso-Fariñas, B; Rodriguez-Galán, M

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents an experimental analysis on a new board composed of gypsum and fly ashes from coal combustion, which are mutually compatible. Physical and mechanical properties, sound absorption coefficient, thermal properties and leaching test have been obtained. The mechanical properties showed similar values to other commercial products. As far as the acoustic insulation characteristics are concerned, sound absorption coefficients of 0.3 and 0.8 were found. The board presents a low thermal conductivity and a fire resistance higher than 50 min (for 4 cm of thickness). The leaching of trace elements was below the leaching limit values. These boards can be considered as suitable to be used in building applications as partitions.

  13. Geophysical observations and structural models of shallow caves in gypsum/anhydrite-bearing rocks in Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufmann, Georg; Romanov, Douchko

    2016-04-01

    In northern Germany, the evaporitic sequence of Zechstein rocks outcrops at several locations, offering insight into both surface and sub-surface morphology of the soluble rocks. We discuss two field sites, an active shallow gypsum cave in the southern Harz Mountains, and an active shallow anhydrite/gypsum cave close to Bad Segeberg, which both have been explored from the surface by geophysical surveys. The overburden of the caves varies from 5-40 meter, and the caves are characterised by both small passages and larger breakdown chambers. We relate the indirect geophysical measurements to parts of the known cave systems, and present structural models describing both geometry and groundwater flow in these caves with the help of numerical tools.

  14. Preparation and evaluation of lignosulfonates as a dispersant for gypsum paste from acid hydrolysis lignin.

    PubMed

    Matsushita, Yasuyuki; Yasuda, Seiichi

    2005-03-01

    In order to effectively utilize a by-product of the acid saccharification process of woody materials, the chemical conversion of guaiacyl sulfuric acid lignin (SAL), one of the acid hydrolysis lignins, into water-soluble sulfonated products with high dispersibitity was investigated. At first, SAL was phenolated (P-SAL) to enhance the solubility and reactivity. Lignosulfonates were prepared from P-SAL by three methods of hydroxymethylation followed by neutral sulfonation (two-step method), sulfomethylation (one-step method) and arylsulfonation. Surprisingly, all prepared lignosulfonates possessed 30 to 70% higher dispersibility for gypsum paste than the commercial lignosulfonate. Evaluation of the preparations for gypsum paste suggested that the higher molecular weights and sulfur contents of the preparations increased their dispersibility.

  15. Accuracy of Gypsum Casts after Different Impression Techniques and Double Pouring

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Stephania Caroline Rodolfo; Messias, Aion Mangino; Abi-Rached, Filipe de Oliveira; de Souza, Raphael Freitas; Reis, José Maurício dos Santos Nunes

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the accuracy of gypsum casts after different impression techniques and double pouring. Ten patients were selected and for each one it was obtained 5 partial putty/wash impressions with vinyl polysiloxane (VPS) material from teeth #13 to #16 with partial metal stock trays. The following techniques were performed: (1) one-step; two-step relief with: (2) PVC film; (3) slow-speed tungsten carbide bur and scalpel blade, (4) small movements of the tray and (5) without relief—negative control. The impressions were disinfected with 0.5% sodium hypochlorite for 10 minutes and stored during 110 and 230 minutes for the first and second pouring, respectively, with type IV gypsum. Three intra-oral lateral photographs of each patient were taken using a tripod and a customized radiographic positioner. The images were imported into ImageJ software and the total area of the buccal surface from teeth #13 to #16 was measured. A 4.0% coefficient of variance was criterion for using these measurements as Baseline values. The casts were photographed and analyzed using the same standardization for the clinical images. The area (mm2) obtained from the difference between the measurements of each gypsum cast and the Baseline value of the respective patient were calculated and analyzed by repeated-measures two way-ANOVA and Mauchly’s Sphericity test (α = 0.05). No significant effect was observed for Impression technique (P = 0.23), Second pouring (P = 0.99) and their interaction (P = 0.25). The impression techniques and double pouring did not influence the accuracy of the gypsum casts. PMID:27736967

  16. Accuracy of Gypsum Casts after Different Impression Techniques and Double Pouring.

    PubMed

    Silva, Stephania Caroline Rodolfo; Messias, Aion Mangino; Abi-Rached, Filipe de Oliveira; de Souza, Raphael Freitas; Reis, José Maurício Dos Santos Nunes

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the accuracy of gypsum casts after different impression techniques and double pouring. Ten patients were selected and for each one it was obtained 5 partial putty/wash impressions with vinyl polysiloxane (VPS) material from teeth #13 to #16 with partial metal stock trays. The following techniques were performed: (1) one-step; two-step relief with: (2) PVC film; (3) slow-speed tungsten carbide bur and scalpel blade, (4) small movements of the tray and (5) without relief-negative control. The impressions were disinfected with 0.5% sodium hypochlorite for 10 minutes and stored during 110 and 230 minutes for the first and second pouring, respectively, with type IV gypsum. Three intra-oral lateral photographs of each patient were taken using a tripod and a customized radiographic positioner. The images were imported into ImageJ software and the total area of the buccal surface from teeth #13 to #16 was measured. A 4.0% coefficient of variance was criterion for using these measurements as Baseline values. The casts were photographed and analyzed using the same standardization for the clinical images. The area (mm2) obtained from the difference between the measurements of each gypsum cast and the Baseline value of the respective patient were calculated and analyzed by repeated-measures two way-ANOVA and Mauchly's Sphericity test (α = 0.05). No significant effect was observed for Impression technique (P = 0.23), Second pouring (P = 0.99) and their interaction (P = 0.25). The impression techniques and double pouring did not influence the accuracy of the gypsum casts.

  17. The effect of gypsum products and separating materials on the typography of denture base materials.

    PubMed

    Firtell, D N; Walsh, J F; Elahi, J M

    1980-09-01

    The typography of polymethyl methacrylate processed against various gypsum products coated with various separating materials was studied under an SEM. Tinfoil and two commercial tin foil substitutes were used as separating material during processing, and the surfaces of the resulting acrylic resin forms were studied for topographical differences. Tinfoil and alpha 2 hemihydrates produced the smoothest surfaces. As a practical solution, a good quality tinfoil substitute and alpha 1 hemihydrate could be used when processing polymethyl methacrylate resin.

  18. Fate of mercury in flue gas desulfurization gypsum determined by Temperature Programmed Decomposition and Sequential Chemical Extraction.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhenwu; Zhuo, Yuqun; Fan, Yaming; Wang, Zhipeng

    2016-05-01

    A considerable amount of Hg is retained in flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum from Wet Flue Gas Desulfurization (WFGD) systems. For this reason, it is important to determine the species of Hg in FGD gypsum not only to understand the mechanism of Hg removal by WFGD systems but also to determine the final fate of Hg when FGD gypsum is disposed. In this study, Temperature Programmed Decomposition (TPD) and Sequential Chemical Extraction (SCE) were applied to FGD gypsum to identify the Hg species in it. The FGD gypsum samples were collected from seven coal-fired power plants in China, with Hg concentrations ranging from 0.19 to 3.27μg/g. A series of pure Hg compounds were used as reference materials in TPD experiments and the results revealed that the decomposition temperatures of different Hg compounds increase in the order of Hg2Cl2gypsums identified by TPD included HgCl2, Hg2Cl2, Hg2SO4, black HgS and red HgS, of which mercury sulfides were the primary compounds. The results of SCE indicated that Hg was mainly distributed in the strongly complexed phase. The low Hg content in FGD gypsum increases the ambiguity of assigning extraction fractions to certain Hg species by SCE. The fact that the primary compounds in FGD gypsum are HgS phases leads the leaching of Hg in the natural environment to be quite low, but a considerable amount of Hg may be released during the industrial heating process.

  19. Do Ca2+-adsorbing ceramics reduce the release of calcium ions from gypsum-based biomaterials?

    PubMed

    Belcarz, Anna; Zalewska, Justyna; Pałka, Krzysztof; Hajnos, Mieczysław; Ginalska, Grazyna

    2015-02-01

    Bone implantable materials based on calcium sulfate dihydrate dissolve quickly in tissue liquids and release calcium ions at very high levels. This phenomenon induces temporary toxicity for osteoblasts, may cause local inflammation and delay the healing process. Reduction in the calcium ion release rate by gypsum could be therefore beneficial for the healing of gypsum-filled bone defects. The aim of this study concerned the potential use of calcium phosphate ceramics of various porosities for the reduction of high Ca(2+) ion release from gypsum-based materials. Highly porous ceramics failed to reduce the level of Ca(2+) ions released to the medium in a continuous flow system. However, it succeeded to shorten the period of high calcium level. It was not the phase composition but the high porosity of ceramics that was found crucial for both the shortening of the Ca(2+) release-related toxicity period and intensification of apatite deposition on the composite. Nonporous ceramics was completely ineffective for this purpose and did not show any ability to absorb calcium ions at a significant level. Moreover, according to our observations, complex studies imitating in vivo systems, rather than standard tests, are essential for the proper evaluation of implantable biomaterials.

  20. Process for the conversion of coal and gypsum to valuable products

    SciTech Connect

    Marten, J.H.; Kendron, T.J.

    1988-05-17

    A process for the coproduction of a combustible first gas stream usable as an energy source and a sulfur-containing second gas stream useable as a feedstock for the production of sulfuric acid is described comprising the steps of: (a) heating coal in the presence of an oxygen-lean atmosphere under partial coal-gasifying conditions to produce a sold carbonaceous char and a crude gas stream containing gaseous sulfur-containing compounds; (b) separating the gaseous sulfur-containing compounds from the crude gas stream to produce a combustible first gas stream and converting the separated sulfur-containing compounds to a solid sulfur-containing material; (c) forming a feed mixture by combining the solid carbonaceous char from step (a) and the solid sulfur-containing material from step (b) with gypsum in proportions such that the non-gypsum portion of the feed mixture contains sufficient reducing potential to reduce sulfur in the gypsum to gaseous compounds of sulfur in +4 or lower oxidation state; (d) heating the feed mixture from step (c) under reducing conditions to produce a sulfur-containing second gas stream.

  1. Histological Comparison in Rats between Carbonate Apatite Fabricated from Gypsum and Sintered Hydroxyapatite on Bone Remodeling.

    PubMed

    Ayukawa, Yasunori; Suzuki, Yumiko; Tsuru, Kanji; Koyano, Kiyoshi; Ishikawa, Kunio

    2015-01-01

    Carbonate apatite (CO3Ap), the form of apatite found in bone, has recently attracted attention. The purpose of the present study was to histologically evaluate the tissue/cellular response toward the low-crystalline CO3Ap fabricated using a dissolution-precipitation reaction with set gypsum as a precursor. When set gypsum was immersed in a 100°C 1 mol/L Na3PO4 aqueous solution for 24 h, the set gypsum transformed into CO3Ap. Both CO3Ap and sintered hydroxyapatite (s-HAp), which was used as a control, were implanted into surgically created tibial bone defects of rats for histological evaluation. Two and 4 weeks after the implantation, histological sections were created and observed using light microscopy. The CO3Ap granules revealed both direct apposition of the bone matrix by osteoblasts and osteoclastic resorption. In contrast, the s-HAp granules maintained their contour even after 4 weeks following implantation which implied that there was a lack of replacement into the bone. The s-HAp granules were sometimes encapsulated with fibrous tissue, and macrophage polykaryon was occasionally observed directly apposed to the implanted granules. From the viewpoint of bone remodeling, the CO3Ap granules mimicked the bone matrix, suggesting that CO3Ap may be an appropriate bone substitute.

  2. Developing biodiversity indicators on a stakeholders' opinions basis: the gypsum industry Key Performance Indicators framework.

    PubMed

    Pitz, Carline; Mahy, Grégory; Vermeulen, Cédric; Marlet, Christine; Séleck, Maxime

    2016-07-01

    This study aims to establish a common Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) framework for reporting about the gypsum industry biodiversity at the European level. In order to integrate different opinions and to reach a consensus framework, an original participatory process approach has been developed among different stakeholder groups: Eurogypsum, European and regional authorities, university scientists, consulting offices, European and regional associations for the conservation of nature, and the extractive industry. The strategy is developed around four main steps: (1) building of a maximum set of indicators to be submitted to stakeholders based on the literature (Focus Group method); (2) evaluating the consensus about indicators through a policy Delphi survey aiming at the prioritization of indicator classes using the Analytic Hierarchy Process method (AHP) and of individual indicators; (3) testing acceptability and feasibility through analysis of Environmental Impact Assessments (EIAs) and visits to three European quarries; (4) Eurogypsum final decision and communication. The resulting framework contains a set of 11 indicators considered the most suitable for all the stakeholders. Our KPIs respond to European legislation and strategies for biodiversity. The framework aims at improving sustainability in quarries and at helping to manage biodiversity as well as to allow the creation of coherent reporting systems. The final goal is to allow for the definition of the actual biodiversity status of gypsum quarries and allow for enhancing it. The framework is adaptable to the local context of each gypsum quarry.

  3. Mechanical properties of simulated Mars materials: gypsum-rich sandstones and lapilli tuff

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morrow, Carolyn; Lockner, David; Okubo, Chris

    2013-01-01

    Observations by the Mars Exploration Rover (MER) Opportunity, and other recent studies on diagenesis in the extensive equatorial layered deposits on Mars, suggest that the likely lithologies of these deposits are gypsum-rich sandstones and tuffaceous sediments (for example, Murchie and others, 2009; Squyres and others, 2012; Zimbelman and Scheidt, 2012). Of particular interest is how the diagenesis history of these sediments (degree of cementation and composition) influences the strength and brittle behavior of the material. For instance, fractures are more common in lower porosity materials under strain, whereas deformation bands, characterized by distributed strain throughout a broader discontinuity in a material, are common in higher porosity sedimentary materials. Such discontinuities can either enhance or restrict fluid flow; hence, failure mode plays an important role in determining the mechanics of fluid migration through sediments (Antonellini and Aydin, 1994; 1995; Taylor and Pollard, 2000; Ogilvie and Glover, 2001). As part of a larger study to characterize processes of fault-controlled fluid flow in volcaniclastic and gypsum-rich sediments on Mars, we have completed a series of laboratory experiments to focus on how gypsum clast content and degree of authigenic cementation affects the strength behavior of simulated Mars rocks. Both axial deformation and hydrostatic pressure tests were done at room temperature under dry conditions.

  4. In Situ Observation of Gypsum-Anhydrite Transition at High Pressure and High Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chuan-Jiang; Zheng, Hai-Fei

    2012-04-01

    An in-situ Raman spectroscopic study of gypsum-anhydrite transition under a saturated water condition at high pressure and high temperature is performed using a hydrothermal diamond anvil cell (HDAC). The experimental results show that gypsum dissolvs in water at ambient temperature and above 496 MPa. With increasing temperature, the anhydrite (CaSO4) phase precipitates at 250-320°C in the pressure range of 1.0-1.5GPa, indicating that under a saturated water condition, both stable conditions of pressure and temperature and high levels of Ca and SO4 ion concentrations in aqueous solution are essential for the formation of anhydrite. A linear relationship between the pressure and temperature for the precipitation of anhydrite is established as P(GPa) = 0.0068T-0.7126 (250°C<=T<=320°C). Anhydrite remained stable during rapid cooling of the sample chamber, showing that the gypsum-anhydrite transition involving both dissolution and precipitation processes is irreversible at high pressure and high temperature.

  5. Modularity Reveals the Tendency of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi To Interact Differently with Generalist and Specialist Plant Species in Gypsum Soils

    PubMed Central

    Torrecillas, Emma; del Mar Alguacil, Maria; Roldán, Antonio; Díaz, Gisela; Montesinos-Navarro, Alicia

    2014-01-01

    Patterns in plant–soil biota interactions could be influenced by the spatial distribution of species due to soil conditions or by the functional traits of species. Gypsum environments usually constitute a mosaic of heterogeneous soils where gypsum and nongypsum soils are imbricated at a local scale. A case study of the interactions of plants with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) in gypsum environments can be illustrative of patterns in biotic interactions. We hypothesized that (i) soil characteristics might affect the AMF community and (ii) there are differences between the AMF communities (modules) associated with plants exclusive to gypsum soils (gypsophytes) and those associated with plants that show facultative behavior on gypsum and/or marly-limestone soils (gypsovags). We used indicator species and network analyses to test for differences between the AMF communities harbored in gypsophyte and gypsovag plants. We recorded 46 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) belonging to nine genera of Glomeromycota. The indicator species analysis showed two OTUs preferentially associating with gypsum soils and three OTUs preferentially associating with marly-limestone soils. Modularity analysis revealed that soil type can be a major factor shaping AMF communities, and some AMF groups showed a tendency to interact differently with plants that had distinct ecological strategies (gypsophytes and gypsovags). Characterization of ecological networks can be a valuable tool for ascertaining the potential influence of above- and below-ground biotic interactions (plant-AMF) on plant community composition. PMID:24973074

  6. Biological influences on modern sulfates: Textures and composition of gypsum deposits from Guerrero Negro, Baja California Sur, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, Marilyn B.; Des Marais, David J.; Parenteau, Mary N.; Jahnke, Linda L.; Turk, Kendra A.; Kubo, Michael D. Y.

    2010-01-01

    Gypsum (CaSO 4·2H 2O) deposits from a range of sedimentary environments at Guerrero Negro, Baja California Sur, Mexico were investigated for microscale texture and composition in order to differentiate features formed under substantial microbial influence from those for which microbial effects were relatively minor or absent. Gypsum deposits were classified according to their sedimentary environment, textures, crystal habit, brine composition and other geochemical factors. The environments studied included subaqueous sediments in anchialine pools and in solar salterns, as well as subsurface sediments of mudflats and saltpans. Gypsum that developed in the apparent absence of biofilms included crystals precipitated in the water column and subsedimentary discs that precipitated from phreatic brines. Subsedimentary gypsum developed in sabkha environments exhibited a sinuous microtexture and poikilitically enclosed detrital particles. Water column precipitates had euhedral prismatic habits and extensive penetrative twinning. Gypsum deposits influenced by biofilms included bottom nucleated crusts and gypsolites developing in anchialine pools and saltern ponds. Gypsum precipitating within benthic biofilms, and in biofilms within subaerial sediment surfaces provided compelling evidence of biological influences on crystal textures and habits. This evidence included irregular, high relief surface textures, accessory minerals (S°, Ca-carbonate, Sr/Ca-sulfate and Mg-hydroxide) and distinctive crystal habits such as equant forms and crystals having distorted prism faces.

  7. SMART Boards Rock

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giles, Rebecca M.; Shaw, Edward L.

    2011-01-01

    SMART Board is a technology that combines the functionality of a whiteboard, computer, and projector into a single system. The interactive nature of the SMART Board offers many practical uses for providing an introduction to or review of material, while the large work area invites collaboration through social interaction and communication. As a…

  8. Air Force Studies Board

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-09

    Turbyfill resigned as Deputy Director, AFSB and Dr. Alan Shaw was hired as his replacement. The follow-on Board, remainder of the Block 00, and new...Deputy Director, AFSB and Dr. Alan Shaw was hired as his replacement. The follow-on Board, remainder of the Block 00, and new Study Support grants will

  9. Holding Effective Board Meetings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association of School Administrators, Arlington, VA.

    Advice and tested methods for management of meetings from superintendents and board members are combined in this reference book on conducting effective school board meetings. Intended for a wide readership, it contains three chapters and an exhibit section comprising over one-third of the document. Following a brief introduction, chapter 1,…

  10. Display and Presentation Boards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Midgley, Thomas Keith

    The use of display and presentation boards as tools to help teachers/trainers convey messages more clearly is briefly discussed, and 24 different types of display and presentation boards are described and illustrated; i.e., chalk, paste-up, hook-n-loop, electric, flannel, scroll, communication planning, acetate pocket, slot, pin-tack, preview,…

  11. Boards vs. Superboards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corson, John J.

    1979-01-01

    By their blind advocacy of institutional interests as advanced by faculty and administrators, many college and university governing boards are assuring their gradual displacement by stronger coordinating councils or super boards governing a state system of public higher education. (Author/JMD)

  12. Arctic Gypsum Endoliths: a biogeochemical characterization of a viable and active microbial community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziolkowski, L. A.; Mykytczuk, N. C. S.; Omelon, C. R.; Johnson, H.; Whyte, L. G.; Slater, G. F.

    2013-02-01

    Extreme environmental conditions such as those found in the polar regions on Earth are thought to test the limits of life. Microorganisms living in these environments often seek protection from environmental stresses such as high UV exposure, desiccation and rapid temperature fluctuations, with one protective habitat found within rocks. Such endolithic microbial communities, which often consist of bacteria, fungi, algae and lichens, are small-scale ecosystems comprised of both producers and consumers. However, the harsh environmental conditions experienced by polar endolithic communities are thought to limit microbial diversity and the rate at which they cycle carbon. In this study, we characterized the microbial community diversity, turnover, and microbe-mineral interactions of a gypsum-based endolithic community in the polar desert of the Canadian high Arctic. 16S/18S rRNA pyrotag sequencing demonstrated the presence of a diverse community of phototrophic and heterotrophic bacteria, algae and fungi. Stable carbon isotope analysis of the viable microbial membranes, as phospholipid fatty acids and glycolipid fatty acids, confirmed the diversity observed by molecular techniques and indicated that atmospheric carbon is assimilated into the microbial community biomass. Uptake of radiocarbon from atmospheric radioweapons testing during the 1960s into microbial lipids was used as a pulse label to determine that the microbial community turns over carbon on the order of 10 yr, equivalent to 4.4 g C m-2 yr-1 gross primary productivity. SEM micrographs indicated that mechanical weathering of gypsum by freeze-thaw cycles leads to increased porosity, which ultimately increases the habitability of the rock. In addition, while bacteria were adhered to these mineral surfaces there was little evidence for microbial alteration of minerals, which contrasts with other gypsum endolithic habitats. While it is possible that these communities turn over carbon quickly and leave little

  13. Reforestation and landscape reconstruction in gypsum mine area from the semiarid region of NE Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bittar, S. M. B.; Straaten, P. V.; de Araujo Vieura Santos, M. de Fatima; Agra Bezerra da Silva, Y. J.; da Silva, M.; Saraiva de Melo Pinheiro, T.; Gusmao Didier de Moraes, F.; de Aguiar Accioly, A. M.; Alves de Santana, S. R.; dos Santos, H. A.; de Carvalho, D. M.; de Lima Ferreira, G.; de Carvalho Santos, C.

    2012-04-01

    In the Araripe region, Northeast Brazil, exist the world's second largest reserve of gypsum, estimated at over than one billion tons, which accounts for 95% of the Brazilian production and constitutes an important segment of the regional economy. The gypsum deposit occurs in the Lower Cretaceous Santana Formation of the Araripe basin, which is constituted by siltstones, marls, limestones, shales and gypsum layers. The ore extraction is from an open pit, on simple benches with a height of about 15 meters. Activities in mining operations involve stripping, drilling, loading explosives, blast, fragmentation and block loading / transport. Currently, gypsum mining and processing results in major changes in the landscape (pits and wastes heaps sedimentary rocks and soil mixture), deforestation of the "caatinga" ecosystem for use as firewood in small calcinations, dust pollution and changes in hydrology. To promote environmental remediation of this area, a multidisciplinary research has being done with the aim to support reforestation at the wastes heaps. The study involved the following activities: collection and physical, chemical and mineralogical characterization of mine waste materials; a floristic survey around the mines (botanical identification and measuring physical parameters in 16 plots, in order to identify which species are best suited to the conditions of the substrate at the mine site); an experiment (randomized block design) developed in a greenhouse, where seedlings of various native tree species were grown in a "constructed soil" made up of gypsum waste combined with chicken, goat and cattle manure, aimed to select tree species and soil treatment to be used in a waste heap; and an assessment of water quality for irrigation of the reforestation areas. The waste materials consist of large clayey aggregates, which may present physical/chemical properties unfavorable for plant development. The mineralogy of the sand fraction (> 85% quartz, gypsum and

  14. Microbial characterization of microbial ecosystems associated to evaporites domes of gypsum in Salar de Llamara in Atacama desert.

    PubMed

    Rasuk, Maria Cecilia; Kurth, Daniel; Flores, Maria Regina; Contreras, Manuel; Novoa, Fernando; Poire, Daniel; Farias, Maria Eugenia

    2014-10-01

    The Central Andes in northern Chile contains a large number of closed basins whose central depression is occupied by saline lakes and salt crusts (salars). One of these basins is Salar de Llamara (850 m a.s.l.), where large domed structures of seemingly evaporitic origin forming domes can be found. In this work, we performed a detailed microbial characterization of these domes. Mineralogical studies revealed gypsum (CaSO(4)) as a major component. Microbial communities associated to these structures were analysed by 454 16S rDNA amplicon sequencing and compared between winter and summer seasons. Bacteroidetes Proteobacteria and Planctomycetes remained as the main phylogenetic groups, an increased diversity was found in winter. Comparison of the upper air-exposed part and the lower water-submerged part of the domes in both seasons showed little variation in the upper zone, showing a predominance of Chromatiales (Gammaproteobacteria), Rhodospirillales (Alphaproteobacteria), and Sphingobacteriales (Bacteroidetes). However, the submerged part showed marked differences between seasons, being dominated by Proteobacteria (Alpha and Gamma) and Verrucomicrobia in summer, but with more diverse phyla found in winter. Even though not abundant by sequence, Cyanobacteria were visually identified by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), which also revealed the presence of diatoms. Photosynthetic pigments were detected by high-performance liquid chromatography, being more diverse on the upper photosynthetic layer. Finally, the system was compared with other endoevaporite, mats microbialite and Stromatolites microbial ecosystems, showing higher similitude with evaporitic ecosystems from Atacama and Guerrero Negro. This environment is of special interest for extremophile studies because microbial life develops associated to minerals in the driest desert all over the world. Nevertheless, it is endangered by mining activity associated to copper and lithium extraction; thus, its

  15. Characteristics of effective boards.

    PubMed

    Prybil, Lawrence D

    2006-03-01

    High-performing boards in all business sectors share many common traits: ongoing development; efficient, prioritized agendas; and solid structure and processes. Most important of all, however, is strong support from the top.

  16. Environmental Laboratory Advisory Board

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Environmental Laboratory Advisory Board (ELAB) was established to provide consensus advice, information and recommendations on issues related to EPA measurement programs, and operation of the national accreditation program

  17. American Board of Pediatrics

    MedlinePlus

    ... QUICK LINKS Search form Search LOG OUT ABP PORTFOLIO LOG IN ABP PORTFOLIO THE AMERICAN BOARD of PEDIATRICS Certifying excellence in ... Overview MOCA-Peds Pilot MOC for Residents ABP Portfolio FAQs APPLY FOR EXAM How to Apply Certification ...

  18. Channel Flow Cell Studies of the Inhibiting Action of Gypsum on the Dissolution Kinetics of Calcite: A Laboratory Approach with Implications for Field Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Wilkins, Shelley J.; Compton, Richard G.; Taylor, Mark A.; Viles, Heather A.

    2001-04-15

    The rate of dissolution of surface-treated calcite crystals in aqueous acidic solution has been studied using an adaptation of the channel flow cell method with microdisc electrode detection. Surface treatments of calcite with sulfuric acid lead to the nucleation of gypsum overgrowths, which reduce the rate of dissolution of calcite. Rate constants for untreated calcite and calcite pretreated with sulfuric acid conditions of 0.01 M for 1 h, 0.05 M for 5 h, and 0.1 M for 21 h are found to be 0.035, 0.018, 0.006, and 0.004 cm s(-1), respectively. Deterioration of calcite materials caused by acid deposition was investigated by field exposure of untreated and sulfate pretreated calcite rocks under urban conditions for 12 months. The rate constant for both pretreated and untreated calcite exposed to weathering is 0.003 cm s(-1). This suggests that calcite self-passivates the surface from further reaction when exposed to acid deposition. However, surface studies indicate that the surface undergoes erosion and dissolution before passivation. Pretreatment of the surface with sulfate protects the surface from acid deposition so it remains less reactive toward acid compared with untreated calcite. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  19. GyPSuM: A Detailed Tomographic Model of Mantle Density and Seismic Wave Speeds

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, N A; Forte, A M; Boschi, L; Grand, S P

    2010-03-30

    GyPSuM is a tomographic model fo mantle seismic shear wave (S) speeds, compressional wave (P) speeds and detailed density anomalies that drive mantle flow. the model is developed through simultaneous inversion of seismic body wave travel times (P and S) and geodynamic observations while considering realistic mineral physics parameters linking the relative behavior of mantle properties (wave speeds and density). Geodynamic observations include the (up to degree 16) global free-air gravity field, divergence of the tectonic plates, dynamic topography of the free surface, and the flow-induced excess ellipticity of the core-mantle boundary. GyPSuM is built with the philosophy that heterogeneity that most closely resembles thermal variations is the simplest possible solution. Models of the density field from Earth's free oscillations have provided great insight into the density configuration of the mantle; but are limited to very long-wavelength solutions. Alternatively, simply scaling higher resolution seismic images to density anomalies generates density fields that do not satisfy geodynamic observations. The current study provides detailed density structures in the mantle while directly satisfying geodynamic observations through a joint seismic-geodynamic inversion process. Notable density field observations include high-density piles at the base of the superplume structures, supporting the fundamental results of past normal mode studies. However, these features are more localized and lower amplitude than past studies would suggest. When we consider all seismic anomalies in GyPSuM, we find that P and S-wave speeds are strongly correlated throughout the mantle. However, correlations between the high-velocity S zones in the deep mantle ({approx} 2000 km depth) and corresponding P-wave anomalies are very low suggesting a systematic divergence from simplified thermal effects in ancient subducted slab anomalies. Nevertheless, they argue that temperature variations are the

  20. Boarding school rules.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Matt

    2017-01-04

    Ofsted inspects and regulates services that care for children and young people, including boarding facilities. Medication management is an integral part of caring for children in boarding schools, and robust systems must be in place to pass inspection. These systems must cover how medicines are dispensed, administered and stored at the facility, risk assessments, identifying which pupils can manage their own medicines and the individual health needs of boarders, so that care plans can be put in place for children with specific needs.

  1. Battery Review Board

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughn, Chester

    1993-01-01

    The topics covered are presented in viewgraph form: NASA Battery Review Board Charter; membership, board chronology; background; statement of problem; summary of problems with 50 AH standard Ni-Cd; activities for near term programs utilizing conventional Ni-Cd; present projects scheduled to use NASA standard Ni-Cd; other near-term NASA programs requiring secondary batteries; recommended direction for future programs; future cell/battery procurement strategy; and the NASA Battery Program.

  2. Gypsum crystal size distribution in four continuous flow stirred slurry boric acid reactors in series compared with the batch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çakal, G. Ö.; Eroğlu, İ.; Özkar, S.

    2006-04-01

    Colemanite, one of the important boron minerals, is dissolved in aqueous sulfuric acid to produce boric acid. In this reaction, gypsum is obtained as a by-product. Gypsum crystals are in the shape of thin needles. These crystals should be grown to an easily filterable size in order to increase the production yield and purity of boric acid. In this paper, the particle size distributions and the volume-weighted mean diameters of the gypsum crystals obtained in batch and continuous flow systems were compared. Experiments in both batch and continuous reactors were performed at a temperature of 85 °C, a stirring rate of 400 rpm, and the inlet CaO to SO42- molar ratio of 1.0 using colemanite mineral in particle size smaller than 150 μm. The average diameter of the gypsum crystals obtained at 3.5 h from the batch reactor was found to be 37-41 μm. This value for the continuous system at steady state was observed to change between 44-163 μm. The particle size of the gypsum crystals was found to increase with the residence time of the solid in the continuous system.

  3. Climatic control on the growth of gigantic gypsum crystals within hypogenic caves (Naica mine, Mexico)?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garofalo, Paolo S.; Fricker, Mattias B.; Günther, Detlef; Forti, Paolo; Mercuri, Anna-Maria; Loreti, Mara; Capaccioni, Bruno

    2010-01-01

    Three hypogenic caves within the Naica mine of Mexico ( Cueva de los Cristales — CLC, Ojo de la Reina — OR, and Cueva de las Velas — CLV) host spectacular gypsum crystals up to 11 m in length. These caves are close to another shallow cave of the area ( Cueva de las Espadas — CLE), with which they cover a 160 m-deep vertical section of the local drainage basin. Similar to other hypogenic caves, all these caves lack a direct connection with the land surface and should be unrelated with climate. A record of multi-technique fluid inclusion data and pollen spectra from cave and mine gypsum indicates surprisingly that climatic changes occurring at Naica could have controlled fluid composition in these caves, and hence crystal growth. Microthermometry and LA-ICP-Mass Spectrometry of fluid inclusions indicate that the shallow, chemically peculiar, saline fluid (up to 7.7 eq. wt.%NaCl) of CLE could have formed from evaporation, during a dry and hot climatic period. The fluid of the deep caves was instead of low salinity (˜ 3.5 eq. wt.% NaCl) and chemically homogeneous, and was poorly affected by evaporation. We propose that mixing of these two fluids, generated at different depths of the Naica drainage basin, determined the stable supersaturation conditions for the gigantic gypsum crystals to grow. Fluid mixing was controlled by the hydraulic communication between CLE and the other deep caves, and must have taken place during cycles of warm-dry and fresh-wet climatic periods, which are known to have occurred in the region. Pollen grains from a 35 ka-old gypsum crystal of CLC corresponds to a fairly homogenous catchment basin made of a mixed broadleaf wet forest, which suggests precipitation during a fresh-wet climatic period and confirms our interpretation of the fluid inclusion data. The unusual combination of geological and geochemical factors of Naica suggests that other hypogenic caves found elsewhere may not host similar crystals. However, this work shows that

  4. Arctic gypsum endoliths: a biogeochemical characterization of a viable and active microbial community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziolkowski, L. A.; Mykytczuk, N. C. S.; Omelon, C. R.; Johnson, H.; Whyte, L. G.; Slater, G. F.

    2013-11-01

    Extreme environmental conditions such as those found in the polar regions on Earth are thought to test the limits of life. Microorganisms living in these environments often seek protection from environmental stresses such as high UV exposure, desiccation and rapid temperature fluctuations, with one protective habitat found within rocks. Such endolithic microbial communities, which often consist of bacteria, fungi, algae and lichens, are small-scale ecosystems comprised of both producers and consumers. However, the harsh environmental conditions experienced by polar endolithic communities are thought to limit microbial diversity and therefore the rate at which they cycle carbon. In this study, we characterized the microbial community diversity, turnover rate and microbe-mineral interactions of a gypsum-based endolithic community in the polar desert of the Canadian high Arctic. 16S/18S/23S rRNA pyrotag sequencing demonstrated the presence of a diverse community of phototrophic and heterotrophic bacteria, archaea, algae and fungi. Stable carbon isotope analysis of the viable microbial membranes, as phospholipid fatty acids and glycolipid fatty acids, confirmed the diversity observed by molecular techniques and indicated that present-day atmospheric carbon is assimilated into the microbial community biomass. Uptake of radiocarbon from atmospheric nuclear weapons testing during the 1960s into microbial lipids was used as a pulse label to determine that the microbial community turns over carbon on the order of 10 yr, equivalent to 4.4 g C m-2 yr-1 gross primary productivity. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) micrographs indicated that mechanical weathering of gypsum by freeze-thaw cycles leads to increased porosity, which ultimately increases the habitability of the rock. In addition, while bacteria were adhered to these mineral surfaces, chemical analysis by micro-X-ray fluorescence (μ-XRF) spectroscopy suggests little evidence for microbial alteration of minerals

  5. Utilization of the gypsum from a wet limestone flue gas desulfurization process

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chou, I.-Ming; Patel, V.; Lytle, J.M.; Chou, S.J.; Carty, R.H.

    1999-01-01

    The authors have been developing a process which converts FGD-gypsum to ammonium sulfate fertilizer with precipitated calcium carbonate as a by-product during the conversion. Preliminary cost estimates suggest that the process is economically feasible when ammonium sulfate crystals are produced in a granular size (1.2 to 3.3 mm), instead of a powder form. However, if additional revenue from the sale of the PCC for higher-value commercial application is applicable, this could further improve the economics of the process. Ammonium sulfate is known to be an excellent source of nitrogen and sulfur in fertilizer for corn and wheat production. It was not known what impurities might co-exist in ammonium sulfate derived from scrubber gypsum. Before the product could be recommended for use on farm land, the impurities and their impact on soil productivity had to be assessed. The objectives of this phase of the study were to evaluate the chemical properties of ammonium sulfate made from the FGD-gypsum, to estimate its effects on soil productivity, and to survey the marketability of the two products. The results of this phase of the study indicated that the impurities in the ammonium sulfate produced would not impose any practical limitations on its use at application levels used by farmers. The market survey showed that the sale price of solid ammonium sulfate fertilizer increased significantly from 1974 at $110/ton to 1998 at $187/ton. Utilities currently pay $16 to $20/ton for the calcium carbonate they use in their flue gas scrubber system. The industries making animal-feed grade calcium supplement pay $30/ton to $67/m-ton for their source of calcium carbonate. Paper, paint, and plastic industries pay as much as $200 to $300/ton for their calcium carbonate filers. The increased sale price of solid ammonium sulfate fertilizer and the possible additional revenue from the sale of the PCC by-product could further improve the economics of producing ammonium sulfate from FGD-gypsum.

  6. Constraints from sulfur isotopes on the origin of gypsum at concrete/claystone interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerouge, Catherine; Claret, Francis; Tournassat, Christophe; Grangeon, Sylvain; Gaboreau, Stéphane; Boyer, Bernard; Borschnek, Daniel; Linard, Yannick

    Two in situ concrete/claystone interfaces were sampled at the laboratory level in the Andra Meuse/Haute Marne (France) Underground Research Laboratory (URL) in order to study five years of interactions between Callovian-Oxfordian (COx) claystone and two cementitious materials (concrete bottom slab and shotcrete on the walls of the main gallery), with a specific focus on sulfur. Combined mineralogical, chemical and sulfur isotopic investigations were carried out to define the degree of the perturbation of the sulfur system in the claystone and in both the cementitious materials. At both interfaces, results show that the main perturbation on the claystone side is the formation of scarce μm-sized gypsum, the sulfur content of which is essentially derived from pyrite oxidation. The distribution of gypsum is highly correlated with the fissure network of the damaged zone due to excavation of the gallery. Its presence is also often associated with a loss of cohesion of the concrete/claystone interface. Due to the small amounts of gypsum and its μm-size, measurements were performed by ion microprobe. Adaptations were needed on account of the reactivity of gypsum and sulfates in general under the beam. The use of ion microprobe analysis provided evidence of high local isotopic heterogeneity that could be attributed to kinetic fractionation effects. Some analyses suggest a minor contribution of dissolved sulfates in pore water of claystone and possibly of concrete. The perturbation on the concrete side is marked by a significant increase in the bulk sulfur content within three millimeters of the interface with the claystone, showing a sulfur gradient from claystone to concrete. The main objective of this work was to define the extent of the chemical and mineralogical perturbations, taking into account in situ URL conditions, i.e. hydrodynamic conditions (shotcrete sprayed on the gallery walls and subjected to ventilation of the galleries), damaged zone of claystone induced

  7. Coupled measurement of δ18O/δD in gypsum hydration water and salinity of fluid inclusions in gypsum: A novel tool for reconstructing parent water chemistry and depositional environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Nick; Gázquez, Fernando; Turchyn, Alexandra; Chapman, Hazel; Hodell, David

    2015-04-01

    The measurement of oxygen and hydrogen isotopes in gypsum hydration water (CaSO4•2H2O) is a powerful tool to determine the isotopic composition of the parent fluid from which gypsum precipitated. To be useful, however, the hydration water must retain its original isotope signal and not have undergone postdepositional exchange. We developed a novel method to ascertain whether hydration waters have secondarily exchanged by coupling oxygen and hydrogen isotopes of gypsum hydration water with the salinities of fluid inclusions. Salinity is obtained through microthermometric analysis of the same gypsum crystals measured for hydration water by freezing the sample and then measuring the melting point of the fluid inclusions. We apply the method to Messinian gypsum deposits of Cycle 6 within the Yesares Member, Río de Aguas section, Sorbas Basin (SE Spain). After correction of oxygen and hydrogen isotopes of gypsum hydration water for fractionation factors, the estimated range of the mother water is -1.8o to 2.8o for δ18O and -12.5o to 16.3o for δD. In the same samples, estimated salinity of primary fluid inclusions range from 18 to 51ppt. Salinity is highly correlated with δ18O and δD, yielding an r2 of 0.88 and 0.87, respectively. The intercepts of the regression equations (i.e., at zero salinity) define the isotope composition of the freshwater endmember, and average -4.4±1.3o for δ18O and -28.9±8.7o for δD. These values are within error of the average isotope composition of precipitation and groundwater data from the local region of Almería today (-4.3o and -22.2o for δ18O and δD, respectively). This agreement provides strong evidence that the gypsum hydration water has retained its isotope composition and has not undergone postdepositional exchange. Furthermore, the isotope and salinity values indicate a significant contribution of meteoric water during gypsum deposition. This observation contrasts with sulfur and oxygen isotopes in sulfate (21.9 > δ34S

  8. Board Certification in Counseling Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crowley, Susan L.; Lichtenberg, James W.; Pollard, Jeffrey W.

    2012-01-01

    Although specialty board certification by the American Board of Professional Psychology (ABPP) has been a valued standard for decades, the vast majority of counseling psychologists do not pursue board certification in the specialty. The present article provides a brief history of board certification in general and some historical information about…

  9. Handbook of Effective Board Leadership.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simon, Toby R., Ed.

    This publication, a resource for board of education presidents in the State of New Jersey, covers a wide range of topics pertaining to the board president's duties. Separate sections are devoted to the following: (1) the code of ethics for New Jersey board members; (2) statutory responsibilities of a board of education president; (3) an opinion…

  10. School Boards: Emerging Governance Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradshaw, Patricia; Osborne, Rachel

    2010-01-01

    The governance role of school boards is not new. Local school boards have governed education in Canada since the 19th century. However, significant forces are impacting on school boards and how they enact their roles and responsibilities. In this article, the authors want to look at the growing pressures on school boards, to actively acknowledge…

  11. Fundamentals of School Board Membership.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simon, Toby R.

    This book provides basic information for new board of education members on a wide range of issues that have turned up on board of education agendas in New Jersey over the past 10 years. Separate sections are devoted to the following: (1) the New Jersey School Boards Association's code of ethics for board members; (2) the governance of New Jersey…

  12. PowerChip{reg_sign} gypsum: A new commercial product from the combustion of high sulfur coals and Orimulsion{reg_sign}

    SciTech Connect

    Welliver, W.R.; Roth, T.J.; Brown, J.R.; Hudson, M.S.; Colijn, H.

    1996-12-31

    In order to meet with the SO{sub 2} reduction provisions of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments, US utilities are faced with several compliance options. One of these is the installation of flue gas desulfurization facilities which produce either a by-product calcium sulfite sludge which must be landfilled, or a forced oxidized industrial gypsum. This gypsum can be difficult and time consuming to unload from railcars or trucks due to the fact that it has poor flowability. After 5 years of development, a technology now exists and is being commercially demonstrated which agglomerates industrial FGD gypsum into a physical form which may be directly compatible with the currently installed equipment traditionally used to handle natural rock gypsums in wallboard and cement plants. This technology uses pressure roll forced compaction to agglomerate the wet finely divided powder gypsum into a durable chip form of industrial gypsum. This novel technology known as PowerChip{reg_sign} gypsum has been developed and patented by Pure Air of Allentown, Pennsylvania, US. A pilot commercialization and demonstration is ongoing at Pure Air`s Bailly Plant in Chesterton, Indiana. The results, data and performance of the product from this demonstration unit will be discussed. Flowability tests were undertaken to evaluate handling properties of the Powder-Chip gypsum and suggestions for handling equipment will be discussed and compared to the traditional powder form or wet filter cake gypsum and natural gypsum rock. In essence, current FGD technology enables continued burning of high sulfur coal, or Orimulsion{reg_sign} in compliance with environmental regulations, while producing an industrial gypsum product.

  13. Recycling flue gas desulphurization (FGD) gypsum for removal of Pb(II) and Cd(II) from wastewater.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yubo; Li, Qiao; Sun, Xiuyun; Ren, Zhiyuan; He, Fei; Wang, Yalun; Wang, Lianjun

    2015-11-01

    The present study aims to verify the feasibility of directly reusing the flue gas desulphurization (FGD) gypsum generated from coal-fired power plants to adsorptively remove Pb(II) and Cd(II) from wastewater. The Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) test was conducted to evaluate the leachability of toxic heavy metals from FGD gypsum. The adsorption behaviors of FGD gypsum for Pb(II) and Cd(II) such as pH impact, sorption kinetics, sorption isotherms and sorption thermodynamics were studied in a series of batch experiments. The pH studies indicated that the adsorption of Pb(II) and Cd(II) had their best adsorption amounts both at the pH values from 5.0 to 7.0. The kinetic analysis displayed that the adsorption processes both followed the pseudo-second order model well, and the FGD gypsum provided a higher sorption rate for Pb(II). Equilibrium studies showed that the adsorption of Pb(II) and Cd(II) could be properly described by Langmuir isotherms model, and the predicted maximum adsorption capacities were even greater than some specially prepared adsorbents. The thermodynamic investigation confirmed that the removal of Pb(II) and Cd(II) from aqueous medium could carry out spontaneously, and the higher temperature favored the processes. The instrument analysis techniques were also employed to deeply understand the mechanism involved in Pb(II) and Cd(II) removal by FGD gypsum. Overall, good sorption performance together with cost-effective characteristic makes FGD gypsum potentially attractive material for the Pb(II) and Cd(II) removal in industrial wastewater.

  14. A win/win solution for FGD-gypsum: researches discover beneficial applications for by-product in agriculture

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsier, C.; Norton, D.

    2006-07-01

    Research at the Ohio State University and the USDA-ARS National Soil Erosion Research Lab at Purdue University has uncovered some viable new reasons for using FGD-gypsum as a regular part of production agriculture. Work has centered on FGD gypsum or calcium sulfite and to a much lesser extent on fly ash. Researchers have found three agronomically valuable functions of these materials. First, and most obvious, is the fertilizer value of these materials. Gypsum applications to the soil surface provide the rainfall with an alternative source of electrolyte which prevents soil crushing, thus keeping the soil open and permeable to rainwater and air. Gypsum is more effective than liming materials atremediation of sub-soil acidity by detoxifying the excess exchangeable aluminium, which causes low pH. One proven way to sequester carbon is to fix it as organic matter in soil. 90% of the carbon in roots is converted to soil organic matter, whereas 90% of surface residue is oxide and the carbon returned to the atmosphere. Therefore, more carbon is sequestered by increasing root growth. Improved soil water management also reduces nitrous oxide emissions from soils. The utility's world is improved since the highest quality and lowest cost material is generated by an emission control scrubber as FGD-gypsum. There are more than 175 million crop acres in the US alone. Each acre would require 0.5 ton per year to prevent surface sealing. This means that the potential for FGD-gypsum use is more than 80 million tons per year. 4 photos.

  15. Probing microstructure evolution during the hardening of gypsum by proton NMR relaxometry.

    PubMed

    Jaffel, Hamouda; Korb, Jean-Pierre; Ndobo-Epoy, Jean-Philippe; Morin, Vincent; Guicquero, Jean-Pierre

    2006-04-13

    We report a comprehensive proton NMR relaxation study of the water confined in the evolving porous structure of hardened gypsum prepared with different water-to-plaster ratios (w/p) and increasing additions of crushed gypsum. This study gives some new information on the microstructure, the water distribution, and the hydration kinetics without any drying or perturbing preparation. The bi-exponential transverse magnetization decay reveals the existence of two water populations in slow exchange. However, the different behaviors of these populations during saturation and desaturation experiments show evidence of a fast exchange of each population with the surface. Two modes of organization of the microstructure of this material are identified through an original model of exchange as a function of the water-to-plaster ratio (0.4 < or = w/p < or = 0.6 and 0.7 < or = w/p < or = 1). A clear gap is shown in the exchange rate value above w/p = 0.6 that could be representative of a percolation threshold. Both the method and the theory presented can be applied more widely to other porous media with reactive surface areas.

  16. Reducing phosphorus release from paddy soils by a fly ash-gypsum mixture.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chang Hoon; Lee, Yong Bok; Lee, Hyup; Kim, Pil Joo

    2007-07-01

    A mixture of fly ash and phospho-gypsum (50:50, wtwt(-1)) was selected to study its potential to supply Ca and Si to rice while reducing B toxicity. We expected that the high Ca content in this mixture might convert water-soluble P to less soluble forms and thereby reduce the loss of soil P to surface runoff. The mixture was applied at rates of 0, 20, 40, and 60 Mgha(-1) in two paddy soils of contrasting textures (silt loam in Yehari and loamy sand in Daegok). The mixture significantly reduced water-soluble phosphate (W-P) in the surface soils by shifting from W-P and iron bound-P (Fe-P) to calcium bound-P (Ca-P) and aluminum bound-P (Al-P) during rice cultivation in both soils. Lancaster and Mehlich 3 extractable P increased significantly with application rate due to high contents of P and Si in the mixture. Mixtures of fly ash and phospho-gypsum should reduce P loss from rice paddy soils and increase soil fertility.

  17. Investigation of Dynamic Crack Coalescence Using a Gypsum-Like 3D Printing Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Chao; Zhao, Gao-Feng; Zhu, Jianbo; Zhao, Yi-Xin; Shen, Luming

    2016-10-01

    Dynamic crack coalescence attracts great attention in rock mechanics. However, specimen preparation in experimental study is a time-consuming and difficult procedure. In this work, a gypsum-like material by powder bed and inkjet 3D printing technique was applied to produce specimens with preset cracks for split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) test. From micro X-ray CT test, it was found that the 3D printing technique could successfully prepare specimens that contain preset cracks with width of 0.2 mm. Basic mechanical properties of the 3D printing material, i.e., the elastic modulus, the Poisson's ratio, the density, the compressive strength, the indirect tensile strength, and the fracture toughness, were obtained and reported. Unlike 3D printed specimens using polylactic acid, these gypsum-like specimens can produce failure patterns much closer to those observed in classical rock mechanical tests. Finally, the dynamic crack coalescence of the 3D printed specimens with preset cracks were captured using a high-speed camera during SHPB tests. Failure patterns of these 3D printed specimens are similar to the specimens made by Portland cement concrete. Our results indicate that sample preparation by 3D printing is highly competitive due to its quickness in prototyping, precision and flexibility on the geometry, and high material homogeneity.

  18. AN INNOVATIVE INTEGRATED APPROACH TO MINIMIZING GYPSUM AND PYRITE WASTES BY CONVERSION TO MARKETABLE PRODUCTS

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel Tao

    2000-06-27

    The objective of this research program is to develop a novel integrated process to eliminate millions of tons of gypsum and pyrite wastes generated annually by the U.S. energy industries and reduce the emission of millions of tons of greenhouse gas carbon dioxide. This was accomplished by converting gypsum and pyrite wastes to marketable products such as lime, direct reduced iron (DRI), and sulfur products and obviating the need to calcine millions of tons of limestone for use in utility scrubbers. Specific objectives included: (1) Develop a novel, integrated process for utilizing two major wastes generated by mining and energy industries to produce lime for recycling and other marketable products. (2) Study individual chemical reactions involved in pyrite decomposition, DRI production, and Muller-Kuhne process for lime regeneration to determine optimum process variables such as temperature, time, and reactant composition. (3) Investigate techniques for effective concentration of pyrite from tailing waste and methods for effective separation of DRI from calcium sulfide.

  19. Evolution of microstructure and elastic wave velocities in dehydrated gypsum samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milsch, Harald; Priegnitz, Mike

    2012-12-01

    We report on changes in P and S-wave velocities and rock microstructure induced by devolatilization reactions using gypsum as a reference analog material. Cylindrical samples of natural alabaster were dehydrated in air, at ambient pressure, and temperatures between 378 and 423 K. Dehydration did not proceed homogeneously but via a reaction front moving sample inwards separating an outer highly porous rim from the remaining gypsum which, above approximately 393 (±5) K, concurrently decomposed into hemihydrate. Overall porosity was observed to continuously increase with reaction progress from approximately 2% for fully hydrated samples to 30% for completely dehydrated ones. Concurrently, P and S-wave velocities linearly decreased with porosity from 5.2 and 2.7 km/s to 1.0 and 0.7 km/s, respectively. It is concluded that a linearized empirical Raymer-type model extended by a critical porosity term and based on the respective time dependent mineral and pore volumes reasonably replicates the P and S-wave data in relation to reaction progress and porosity.

  20. The dehydration kinetics of gypsum at high pressure and high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chuanjiang; Zheng, Haifei; Wang, Duojun

    2015-07-01

    An in situ dehydration kinetics study of gypsum under water-saturated condition was performed in the temperature and pressure ranges of 383-423 K and 343-1085 MPa by using a hydrothermal diamond anvil cell and Raman spectroscopy. Kinetic analysis shows that the dehydration rate k increases with pressure, suggesting a negative pressure dependence on dehydration rate. The elevation of temperature can contribute to the dehydration. The n values increase with pressure, indicating that the nucleation process becomes slower relative to the growth process. According to the n values of ∼1.0, the dehydration of gypsum is dominated by an instantaneous nucleation and diffusion-controlled growth mechanism. The obtained average activation volume ▵V is equal to 5.69 cm3/mol and the calculated activation energy Ea and the pre-exponential factor A are 66.9 kJ/mol and 4.66 × 105 s-1. The activation energy may be dependent upon grain size, shape, temperature and pressure, and surrounding water.

  1. Potential Agricultural Uses of Flue Gas Desulfurization Gypsum in the Northern Great Plains

    SciTech Connect

    DeSutter, T.M.; Cihacek, L.J.

    2009-07-15

    Flue gas desulfurization gypsum (FGDG) is a byproduct from the combustion of coal for electrical energy production. Currently, FGDG is being produced by 15 electrical generating stations in Alabama, Florida, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Ohio, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, and Wisconsin. Much of this byproduct is used in the manufacturing of wallboard. The National Network for Use of FGDG in Agriculture was initiated to explore alternative uses of this byproduct. In the northern Great Plains (North Dakota, South Dakota, and Montana), FGDG has the potential to be used as a Ca or S fertilizer, as an acid soil ameliorant, and for reclaiming or mitigating sodium-affected soils. Greater than 1.4 million Mg of FGDG could initially be used in these states for these purposes. Flue gas desulfurization gypsum can be an agriculturally important resource for helping to increase the usefulness of problem soils and to increase crop and rangeland production. Conducting beneficial use audits would increase the public awareness of this product and help identify to coal combustion electrical generating stations the agriculturally beneficial outlets for this byproduct.

  2. Arsenic uptake by gypsum and calcite: Modelling and probing by neutron and X-ray scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Martínez, A.; Román-Ross, G.; Cuello, G. J.; Turrillas, X.; Charlet, L.; Johnson, M. R.; Bardelli, F.

    2006-11-01

    Uptaking of contaminants by solid phases is relevant to many issues in environmental science as this process can remove them from solutions and retard their transport into the hydrosphere. Here we report on two structural studies performed on As-doped gypsum (CaSO 4 2H 2O) and calcite (CaCO 3), using neutron (D20-ILL) and X-ray (ID11-ESRF) diffraction data and EXAFS (BM8-ESRF). The aim of this study is to determine whether As gets into the bulk of gypsum and calcite structures or is simply adsorbed on the surface. Different mechanisms of substitution are used as hypotheses. The combined Rietveld analysis of neutron and X-ray diffraction data shows an expansion of the unit cell volume proportional to the As concentration within the samples. DFT-based simulations confirm the increase of the unit cell volume proportional to the amount of carbonate or sulphate groups substituted. Interpolation of the experimental Rietveld data allows us to distinguish As substituted within the structure from that adsorbed on the surface of both minerals. Results obtained by EXAFS analysis from calcite samples show good agreement with the hypothesis of replacement of As into the C crystallographic site.

  3. Manufacture of ammonium sulfate fertilizer from FGD-gypsum. Quarterly report, 1 December 1994--28 February 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, M.I.M.; Rostam-Abadi, M.; Lytle, J.M.; Bruinius, J.A.; Hoeft, R.; Dewey, S.; Achorn, F.

    1995-12-31

    The overall goal of this project is to assess the technical and economic feasibility for producing feasibility-grade ammonium sulfate from gypsum produced as part of limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) processes. This is a cooperative effort among the ISGS, the UIUC, AlliedSignal, SE-ME, Henry Fertilizer, Illinois Power Co. (IP), and Central Illinois Public Services (CIPS). Bench-scale experiments will be conducted to obtain process engineering data for the manufacture of ammonium sulfate from FGD-gypsum and to help evaluate technical and economic feasibility of the process. Controlled greenhouse experiments will be conducted at UIUC to evaluate the chemical impact of coal-derived impurities in ammonium sulfate produced from FGD-gypsum on soil properties. A process flow sheet will be proposed and market demand for the products will be established. An engineering team at IP will provide an independent review of the economics of the process. AlliedSignal will be involved in testing and quality evaluation of ammonium sulfate samples and is interested in an agreement to market the finished product. CIPS will provide technical assistance and samples of FGD -gypsum for the project. In this quarter, with an exception of the neutron activation analysis, analyses of FGD-gypsum samples that were generated by two power stations were completed. The high quality FGD-gypsum sample produced from the Abbott power plant in Champaign, IL was 98.36% gypsum, CaSO{sub 4}{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O, and less than 0.01% calcium`` sulfite, CaSO{sub 3}. The low quality sample from CIPS`s Newton Power Plant at Jasper, Illinois, was only 7.36% of gypsum. It was 87.54% calcium sulfite. A literature search provided the information to set up a batch, bench-scale reactor system. Reactions were conducted at 70{degrees}C for a range of times which resulted in 82% conversion of calcium sulfate to ammonium sulfate.

  4. Evaluating the fate of mercury and other metals across the life-cycle stages from the use of FGD gypsum for wallboard production

    EPA Science Inventory

    In 2007, 12.3 million tons of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum was produced due to air emission controls at coal-fired power plants. With increasing use of wet scrubbers in response to more stringent air pollution control requirements, FGD gypsum production is expected to in...

  5. Populations of some molds in water-damaged homes may differ if the home was constructed with gypsum drywall compared to plaster

    EPA Science Inventory

    Starting in the 1940s, gypsum drywall began replacing plaster and lathe in the U.S. home construction industry. Our goal was to evaluate whether some mold populations differ in water- damaged homes primarily constructed with gypsum drywall compared to plaster. The dust samples fr...

  6. Space Studies Board, 1994

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This 1994 report of the Space Studies Board of the National Research Council summarizes the charter and organization of the board, activities and membership, major and short reports, and congressional testimony. A cumulative bibliography of the Space Studies (formerly Space Science) Board and its committees is provided. An appendix contains reports of the panel to review Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) plans. Major reports cover scientific opportunities in the human exploration of space, the dichotomy between funding and effectiveness in space physics, an integrated strategy for the planetary sciences for the years 1995-2010, and Office of Naval Research (ONR) research opportunities in upper atmospheric sciences. Short reports cover utilization of the space station, life and microgravity sciences and the space station program, Space Infrared Telescope Facility and the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy, and the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility and Cassini Saturn Probe.

  7. WeaselBoard :

    SciTech Connect

    Mulder, John C.; Schwartz, Moses Daniel; Berg, Michael J.; Van Houten, Jonathan Roger; Urrea, Jorge Mario; King, Michael Aaron; Clements, Abraham Anthony; Jacob, Joshua A.

    2013-10-01

    Critical infrastructures, such as electrical power plants and oil refineries, rely on programmable logic controllers (PLCs) to control essential processes. State of the art security cannot detect attacks on PLCs at the hardware or firmware level. This renders critical infrastructure control systems vulnerable to costly and dangerous attacks. WeaselBoard is a PLC backplane analysis system that connects directly to the PLC backplane to capture backplane communications between modules. WeaselBoard forwards inter-module traffic to an external analysis system that detects changes to process control settings, sensor values, module configuration information, firmware updates, and process control program (logic) updates. WeaselBoard provides zero-day exploit detection for PLCs by detecting changes in the PLC and the process. This approach to PLC monitoring is protected under U.S. Patent Application 13/947,887.

  8. Visible and Mid-Infrared Gypsum Optical Constants for Modeling of Martian Deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roush, Ted L.; Esposito, Francesca; Rossmann, George R.; Colangeli, Luigi

    2007-08-01

    Introduction: Recent and on-going remote and in situ observations indicate that sulfates are present in significant abundances at various locations on Mars [1-7]. The Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) imaging spectrometer (CRISM) is returning hyperspectral data at higher spatial resolution [8] than the OMEGA instrument on the Mars Express Mission [3]. Data from both OMEGA and CRISM have provided spectral evidence for the presence of gypsum and various hydrated sulfates on the Martian surface [e.g. 3-7] Thus, the optical properties of sulfates, in general, are of interest to quantitative interpretation of this increasing volume of remotely sensed data. This is because optical constants describe how a material interacts with electromagnetic radiation and represent the fundamental values used in radiative transfer calculations describing a variety of physical environments. Such environments include atmospheres where aerosols are present, planetary and satellite regoliths, and circumstellar dust clouds. Here we focus upon gypsum because of its applicability due to its identification on Mars. Also, gypsum is a mineral that is readily available in samples sizes that are suitable for study using a variety of spectral measurements. In the infrared (>5 μm) several studies reporting the optical constants of gypsum can be used in evaluating the approach used here. Most importantly, there is a general lack of data regarding the optical constants for gypsum at visible and mid-infrared wavelengths (0.4-5 μm) that are being observed by OMEGA and CRISM. Background: In the infrared, there have been several studies focused at determining the optical constants of gypsum using classical dispersion models [9-11]. These have used a variety of samples including; crystals, compressed pellets of pure materials, and grains suspended in a KBr matrix. Spectral measurements of gypsum, and other sulfates, have existed for about 100 years at visible and mid-infrared wavelengths (0.4-5 μm) [e

  9. 78 FR 53147 - Subcommittee for Dose Reconstruction Reviews (SDRR), Advisory Board on Radiation and Worker...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-28

    ... (SDRR), Advisory Board on Radiation and Worker Health (ABRWH or the Advisory Board), National Institute... employees at any Department of Energy facility who were exposed to radiation but for whom it is not feasible to estimate their radiation dose, and on whether there is reasonable likelihood that such...

  10. 78 FR 14303 - Subcommittee for Dose Reconstruction Reviews (SDRR), Advisory Board on Radiation and Worker...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-05

    ... (SDRR), Advisory Board on Radiation and Worker Health (ABRWH or the Advisory Board), National Institute... employees at any Department of Energy facility who were exposed to radiation but for whom it is not feasible to estimate their radiation dose, and on whether there is reasonable likelihood that such...

  11. Lipid and Phylogenetic Analysis of a Gypsum-hosted Endoevaporitic Microbial Community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turk, K. A.; Jahnke, L. L.; Green, S. J.; Kubo, M. D.; Vogel, M. B.; Des Marais, D. J.

    2007-12-01

    Gypsum evaporites host diverse, productive and volumetrically significant microbial communities and are relevant modern-day analogs to both Precambrian sabkha deposits and, potentially, Martian evaporites. Extensive evaporites form in subaqueous environments of high salinity ponds (>150 permil) maintained by the Exportadora de Sal, S. A. (ESSA) in Guerrero Negro, B.C.S., Mexico. A gypsarenite (reworked clastic gypsum) crust found along the southeast margin of ESSA's Pond 9 was collected in February 2004 and each vibrantly colored layer in the top centimeter was sampled. Extant microbial communities from each layer were characterized using complementary culture-independent molecular techniques, lipid biomarker analysis, and compound specific isotopic analysis. Coupling molecular analysis with lipid biomarker analysis revealed that oxygenic photosynthetic organisms dominate the surface layers (top 3 mm). Polar lipids from the surface layers consisted predominantly of glycolipids, which are characteristic of algae, cyanobacteria and green anoxygenic photosynthetic bacteria. Consistent with prior analyses of gypsum evaporites, 16S rRNA gene clone libraries indicate that cyanobacterial populations belong primarily to the genus Cyanothece. The bacterial community below the surface layers is more diverse and dominated by anaerobic organisms. Phototrophic purple sulfur bacteria, sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB), and Bacteroidetes were particularly abundant. The relative abundances of SRB increased with depth; Desulfobacteraceae clones were distributed throughout the crust, but not at the surface, while Desulfovibrionaceae clones were found predominantly in the deepest layers. These molecular results are consistent with fatty acid biomarker analysis. δ13C values of major lipid classes in the crust and sediment range from 14 to 36‰, which is considerably lower than corresponding values for benthic Microcoleus-dominated cyanobacterial mats found at lower salinities at ESSA

  12. Permeability control on transient slip weakening during gypsum dehydration: Implications for earthquakes in subduction zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leclère, Henri; Faulkner, Daniel; Wheeler, John; Mariani, Elisabetta

    2016-05-01

    A conflict has emerged from recent laboratory experiments regarding the question of whether or not dehydration reactions can promote unstable slip in subduction zones leading to earthquakes. Although reactions produce mechanical weakening due to pore-fluid pressure increase, this weakening has been associated with both stable and unstable slip. Here, new results monitoring strength, permeability, pore-fluid pressure, reaction progress and microstructural evolution during dehydration reactions are presented to identify the conditions necessary for mechanical instability. Triaxial experiments are conducted using gypsum and a direct shear sample assembly with constant normal stress that allows the measurement of permeability during sliding. Tests are conducted with temperature ramp from 70 to 150 °C and with different effective confining pressures (50, 100 and 150 MPa) and velocities (0.1 and 0.4 μm s-1). Results show that gypsum dehydration to bassanite induces transient stable-slip weakening that is controlled by pore-fluid pressure and permeability evolution. At the onset of dehydration, the low permeability promoted by pore compaction induces pore-fluid pressure build-up and stable slip weakening. The increase of bassanite content during the reaction shows clear evidence of dehydration related with the development of R1 Riedel shears and P foliation planes where bassanite is preferentially localized along these structures. The continued production of bassanite, which is stronger than gypsum, provides a supporting framework for newly formed pores, thus resulting in permeability increase, pore-fluid pressure drop and fault strength increase. After dehydration reaction, deformation is characterized by unstable slip on the fully dehydrated reaction product, controlled by the transition from velocity-strengthening to velocity-weakening behaviour of bassanite at temperature above ∼140 °C and the localization of deformation along narrow Y-shear planes. This study

  13. Preparation of pure calcium carbonate by mineral carbonation using industrial byproduct FGD gypsum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, K.; Kim, W.; Bang, J. H.; Park, S.; Jeon, C. W.

    2015-12-01

    Mineral carbonation is one of the geological approaches for the sequestration of anthropogenic CO2 gas. Its concept is based on the natural weathering processes in which silicate minerals containing divalent cations such as Ca or Mg are carbonated to CaCO3 or MgCO3 in the reaction with CO2gas. Raw materials for the mineral carbonation have been extended to various industrial solid wastes such as steel slag, ashes, or FGD (flue gas desulfurization) gypsum which are rich in divalent cations. These materials have economic advantages when they are produced in CO2 emission sites. Flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum is such a byproduct obtained in at coal-fired power plants. Recently, we carried out a research on the direct mineral carbonation of FGD gypsum for CO2sequestration. It showed high carbonation reactivity under ambient conditions and the process can be described as follows: CaSO4·2H2O + CO2(g) + 2NH4OH(aq) → CaCO3(s) + (NH4)2SO4(aq) (1) At the early stage of the process, calcium carbonate (CaCO3) exists as a dissolved ion pair during the induction period. High-purity CaCO3 could be precipitated from dissolved calcium carbonate solution extracted during the induction period. The effect of experimental parameters on pure CaCO3 was evaluated: CO2 flow rate (1-3 L/min), ammonia content (4-12%), and solid-to-liquid (S/L) ratio (5-300 g/L). FE-SEM (field-emission scanning electron microscopy) and XRD (X-ray diffraction) study revealed that the precipitated CaCO3 was round-shaped vaterite crystals. The induction time was inversely proportional to the CO2 flow rate and the yield for pure CaCO3 increased with the ammonia content. The formation efficiency for pure CaCO3 decreased with S/L (solid/liquid) ratio. It was 90% (mol/mol) when the S/L ratio was 5 g/L. However, S/L ratio didn't affect the maximum solubility limit of dissolved CaCO3.

  14. Strengthening Urban Boards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAdams, Donald R.

    2002-01-01

    Argues that urban school boards must understand and practice good governance and reform leadership to create functional, effective school districts. Describes how this can be accomplished by adopting high expectations for student performance, becoming leaders in the community, practicing the fundamentals of good governance, and formulating a…

  15. The Electronic Board Meeting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gragg, Bob

    2000-01-01

    The Southern Oklahoma Technology Center, a vocational and technical school district, recently spearheaded an initiative to allow members to use laptops at home and during meetings to process board agenda items, receive video and multimedia presentations, and access the school's local-area network and the Internet. (MLH)

  16. Bulletin Board Ideas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kentucky State Dept. of Education, Frankfort.

    This compilation of ideas submitted by Kentucky teachers includes over 100 8-1/2 x 5 black and white designs for bulletin board displays, as well as a list of suggested materials, design tips, special techniques, and a bibliography of ERIC articles and documents. Subject areas covered include language arts, reading and library, math, social…

  17. Web Operational Status Boards

    SciTech Connect

    Millard, W. David; Stoops, LaMar R.; Dorow, Kevin E.

    2004-04-16

    Web Operational Status Boards (WebOSB)is a web-based application designed to acquire, display, and update highly dynamic status information between multiple users and jurisdictions. WebOSB is able to disseminate real-time status information—support the timely sharing of information—with constant, dynamic updates via personal computers and the Internet between emergency operations centers (EOCs), incident command centers, and to users outside the EOC who need to know the information (hospitals, shelters, schools). The WebOSB application far exceeds outdated information-sharing methods used by emergency workers: whiteboards, Word and Excel documents, or even locality-specific Web sites. WebOSB’s capabilities include the following elements: - Secure access. Multiple users can access information on WebOSB from any personal computer with Internet access and a secure ID. Privileges are use to control access and distribution of status information and to identify users who are authorized to add or edit information. - Simultaneous update. WebOSB provides options for users to add, display, and update dynamic information simultaneously at all locations involved in the emergency management effort, A single status board can be updated from multiple locations enabling shelters and hospitals to post bed availability or list decontamination capability. - On-the-fly modification. Allowing the definition of an existing status board to be modified on-the-fly can be an asset during an emergency, where information requirements can change quickly. The status board designer feature allows an administrator to quickly define, modi,, add to, and implement new status boards in minutes without needing the help of Web designers and computer programmers. - Publisher/subscriber notification. As a subscriber, each user automatically receives notification of any new information relating to specific status boards. The publisher/subscriber feature automatically notified each user of any new

  18. Influence of flue gas desulfurization gypsum on reducing soluble phosphorus in successive runoff events from a coastal plain bermudagrass pasture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Controlling the potential threat that pasture systems which have been intensively fertilized with poultry litter (PL) pose to accelerate eutrophication of surface waters has become a major issue in the southeastern U.S. Gypsum has been identified as a promising management tool for ameliorating the ...

  19. Impact of Leaching Conditions on Constituents Release from Flue Gas Desulfurization Gypsum (FGDG) and FGDG-Soil Mixture

    EPA Science Inventory

    The interest in using Flue Gas Desulfurization Gypsum(FGDG) has increased recently. This study evaluates the leaching characteristics of trace elements in "modern" FGDG (produced after fly ash removal) and FGDG-mixed soil (SF) under different environmental conditions using rece...

  20. Effects of biosolids and FGD-gypsum amended soil on metal uptake by lettuce and Edamame soybean and nodules development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biosolids and flue gas desulfurization (FGD)-gypsum amended soils are a rich nutrient source for plant growth and could reduce soil contamination by synthetic fertilizers. According to previous studies, these soil amendments have also enhanced some rhizobacteria (Bradyrhizobium japonicum) in the rh...

  1. Use of animal waste and flue gas desulfurized gypsum to improve forage production on reclaimed mine soil in Mississippi

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Reclaimed mine soils amended with flue gas desulfurized (FGD) gypsum may tolerate higher levels of animal manure, and would therefore be more productive in the long-term. Studies were conducted in respread soil during the first year of land reclamation at Red Hills Mine, a surface lignite mine in no...

  2. Three annual flue gas desulfurization gypsum applications on macronutrient and micronutrient losses in runoff from bermudagrass fertilized with poultry litter

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Considerable amounts of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum are being produced as a by-product of generating electricity. As a result, beneficial reuse of this by-product is being sought to reduce landfilling and its associated cost. The use of this byproduct as a low-cost soil amendment for suppl...

  3. Flue-Gas Desulfurization Gypsum Effects on Urea-Degrading Bacteria and Ammonia Volatilization From Broiler Litter

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A major concern of the broiler industry is the volatilization of ammonia (NH3) from the mixture of bedding material and broiler excretion that covers the floor of broiler houses. Gypsum has been proposed as a litter amendment to reduce NH3 volatilization, but reports of NH3 abatement vary among stu...

  4. Fabrication of carbonate apatite blocks from set gypsum based on dissolution-precipitation reaction in phosphate-carbonate mixed solution.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Shunsuke; Tsuru, Kanji; Maruta, Michito; Matsuya, Shigeki; Takahashi, Ichiro; Ishikawa, Kunio

    2014-01-01

    Carbonate apatite (CO3Ap), fabricated by dissolution-precipitation reaction based on an appropriate precursor, is expected to be replaced by bone according to bone remodeling cycle. One of the precursor candidates is gypsum because it shows self-setting ability, which then enables it to be shaped and molded. The aim of this study, therefore, was to fabricate CO3Ap blocks from set gypsum. Set gypsum was immersed in a mixed solution of 0.4 mol/L disodium hydrogen phosphate (Na2HPO4) and 0.4 mol/L sodium hydrogen carbonate (NaHCO3) at 80-200°C for 6-48 h. Powder X-ray diffraction patterns and Fourier transform infrared spectra showed that CO3Ap block was fabricated by dissolution-precipitation reaction in Na2HPO4-NaHCO3 solution using set gypsum in 48 h when the temperature was 100°C or higher. Conversion rate to CO3Ap increased with treatment temperature. CO3Ap block containing a larger amount of carbonate was obtained when treated at lower temperature.

  5. The Board's Role in Fund-Raising. Board Basics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Legon, Richard D.

    2003-01-01

    Fund-raising is one of a board's most basic and important responsibilities. Virtually all higher education institutions seek private support, and virtually all institutional leaders call upon key volunteers--including members of governing boards, public institution foundation boards, and advisory councils in many institutions--to give generously…

  6. 76 FR 71567 - Advisory Board on Radiation and Worker Health (ABRWH or Advisory Board), National Institute for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-18

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Advisory Board on Radiation and Worker Health... employees at any Department of Energy facility who were exposed to radiation but for whom it is not feasible to estimate their radiation dose, and on whether there is reasonable likelihood that such...

  7. 77 FR 52335 - Advisory Board on Radiation and Worker Health (ABRWH or Advisory Board), National Institute for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-29

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Advisory Board on Radiation and Worker Health... exposed to radiation but for whom it is not feasible to estimate their radiation dose, and on whether there is reasonable likelihood that such radiation doses may have endangered the health of members...

  8. 78 FR 11650 - Advisory Board on Radiation and Worker Health (ABRWH or Advisory Board), National Institute for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Advisory Board on Radiation and Worker Health... there is a class of employees at any Department of Energy facility who were exposed to radiation but for whom it is not feasible to estimate their radiation dose, and on whether there is reasonable...

  9. 75 FR 81277 - Advisory Board on Radiation and Worker Health (ABRWH or Advisory Board), National Institute for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-27

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Advisory Board on Radiation and Worker Health... facility who were exposed to radiation but for whom it is not feasible to estimate their radiation dose, and on whether there is reasonable likelihood that such radiation doses may have endangered the...

  10. 75 FR 57281 - Advisory Board on Radiation and Worker Health (ABRWH or Advisory Board), National Institute for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-20

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Advisory Board on Radiation and Worker Health... whether there is a class of employees at any Department of Energy facility who were exposed to radiation but for whom it is not feasible to estimate their radiation dose, and on whether there is...

  11. 78 FR 21370 - Advisory Board on Radiation and Worker Health (ABRWH or Advisory Board), National Institute for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-10

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Advisory Board on Radiation and Worker Health... facility who were exposed to radiation but for whom it is not feasible to estimate their radiation dose, and on whether there is reasonable likelihood that such radiation doses may have endangered the...

  12. 78 FR 44954 - Advisory Board on Radiation and Worker Health (ABRWH or Advisory Board), National Institute for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-25

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Advisory Board on Radiation and Worker Health... facility who were exposed to radiation but for whom it is not feasible to estimate their radiation dose, and on whether there is reasonable likelihood that such radiation doses may have endangered the...

  13. 78 FR 38347 - Advisory Board on Radiation and Worker Health (ABRWH or Advisory Board), National Institute for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-26

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Advisory Board on Radiation and Worker Health... employees at any Department of Energy facility who were exposed to radiation but for whom it is not feasible to estimate their radiation dose, and on whether there is reasonable likelihood that such...

  14. 78 FR 69682 - Advisory Board on Radiation and Worker Health (ABRWH or Advisory Board), National Institute for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-20

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Advisory Board on Radiation and Worker... whether there is a class of employees at any Department of Energy facility who were exposed to radiation but for whom it is not feasible to estimate their radiation dose, and on whether there is...

  15. 77 FR 43090 - Advisory Board on Radiation and Worker Health (ABRWH or Advisory Board), National Institute for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Advisory Board on Radiation and Worker Health... facility who were exposed to radiation but for whom it is not feasible to estimate their radiation dose, and on whether there is reasonable likelihood that such radiation doses may have endangered the...

  16. 75 FR 11186 - Advisory Board on Radiation and Worker Health (ABRWH or Advisory Board), National Institute for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-10

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Advisory Board on Radiation and Worker Health... facility who were exposed to radiation but for whom it is not feasible to estimate their radiation dose, and on whether there is reasonable likelihood that such radiation doses may have endangered the...

  17. 77 FR 69486 - Advisory Board on Radiation and Worker Health (ABRWH or Advisory Board), National Institute for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Advisory Board on Radiation and Worker Health... employees at any Department of Energy facility who were exposed to radiation but for whom it is not feasible to estimate their radiation dose, and on whether there is reasonable likelihood that such...

  18. 76 FR 61364 - Advisory Board on Radiation and Worker Health (ABRWH or Advisory Board), National Institute for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-04

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Advisory Board on Radiation and Worker Health... whether there is a class of employees at any Department of Energy facility who were exposed to radiation but for whom it is not feasible to estimate their radiation dose, and on whether there is...

  19. 78 FR 732 - Advisory Board on Radiation and Worker Health (ABRWH or Advisory Board), National Institute for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-04

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Advisory Board on Radiation and Worker Health... facility who were exposed to radiation but for whom it is not feasible to estimate their radiation dose, and on whether there is reasonable likelihood that such radiation doses may have endangered the...

  20. 76 FR 26301 - Advisory Board on Radiation and Worker Health (ABRWH or Advisory Board), National Institute for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-06

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Advisory Board on Radiation and Worker Health... employees at any Department of Energy (DOE) facility who were exposed to radiation but for whom it is not feasible to estimate their radiation dose, and on whether there is reasonable likelihood that...

  1. 78 FR 58543 - Advisory Board on Radiation and Worker Health (ABRWH or Advisory Board), National Institute for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-24

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Advisory Board on Radiation and Worker Health... there is a class of employees at any Department of Energy facility who were exposed to radiation but for whom it is not feasible to estimate their radiation dose, and on whether there is reasonable...

  2. 75 FR 22607 - Advisory Board on Radiation and Worker Health (ABRWH or Advisory Board), National Institute for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-29

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Advisory Board on Radiation and Worker Health... there is a class of employees at any Department of Energy facility who were exposed to radiation but for whom it is not feasible to estimate their radiation dose, and on whether there is reasonable...

  3. 75 FR 35496 - Advisory Board on Radiation and Worker Health (ABRWH or Advisory Board), National Institute for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-22

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Advisory Board on Radiation and Worker Health... facility who were exposed to radiation but for whom it is not feasible to estimate their radiation dose, and on whether there is reasonable likelihood that such radiation doses may have endangered the...

  4. 76 FR 16787 - Advisory Board on Radiation and Worker Health (ABRWH or Advisory Board), National Institute for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-25

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Advisory Board on Radiation and Worker Health... facility who were exposed to radiation but for whom it is not feasible to estimate their radiation dose, and on whether there is reasonable likelihood that such radiation doses may have endangered the...

  5. Calibration of a hysteretic model for glass fiber reinforced gypsum wall panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janardhana, Maganti; Robin Davis, P.; Ravichandran, S. S.; Prasad, A. M.; Menon, D.

    2014-06-01

    Glass fiber reinforced gypsum (GFRG) wall panels are prefabricated panels with hollow cores, originally developed in Australia and subsequently adopted by India and China for use in buildings. This paper discusses identification and calibration of a suitable hysteretic model for GFRG wall panels filled with reinforced concrete. As considerable pinching was observed in the experimental results, a suitable hysteretic model with pinched hysteretic rule is used to conduct a series of quasi-static as inelastic hysteretic response analyses of GFRG panels with two different widths. The calibration of the pinching model parameters was carried out to approximately match the simulated and experimental responses up to 80% of the peak load in the post peak region. Interestingly, the same values of various parameters (energy dissipation and pinching related parameters) were obtained for all five test specimens.

  6. Age and speleogenesis of epigenic gypsum caves in the northern Apennines (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Columbu, Andrea; Chiarini, Veronica; De Waele, Jo; Drysdale, Russell; Forti, Paolo; Hellstrom, John; Woodhead, Jon

    2016-04-01

    Triassic and Messinian gypsum beds host the majority of the caves in the eastern flank of the northern Apennines. To date, more than six hundreds voids have been mapped, including the longest known epigenic gypsum cave system in the world (Spipola-Acquafredda, ~11 km of tunnels) (De Waele et al., 2013). Superimposed caves are typically sub-horizontal (Klimchouk, 2000) and connected through vertical shafts, reflecting the palaeo base-level variations. When preserved, river terraces at the surface lie at the same palaeo altitude of the base level and horizontal cave passages. Notwithstanding the well-known geology of the area known (Vai and Martini, 2001), the age of these caves has been greatly underestimated in the past. Considering the rapid dissolution of the gypsum and uplifting of the area, the start of speleogenesis activity was considered to have occurred during the last glacial age. The age of karst voids can be only indirectly estimated by the dating of the infilling sediments. U-Th dating on carbonate speleothems provides high-precision and accurate ages (Hellstrom, 2003; Scholz and Hoffmann, 2008). We thus applied this methodology to 20 speleothems coming from 14 different caves belonging to the Monte Tondo, Spipola Acquafredda, Castelnuovo, Stella-Rio Basino and Brisighella systems. The results show that: i) caves were forming since at least ~300 ka; ii) the peak of speleogenesis was reached during relatively cold climate stages, when rivers formed terraces at the surface and aggradation caused paragenesis in the stable cave levels (Columbu et al., 2015). Besides the significant contribution to the understanding of the Apennines evaporite karst evolution, this study (and its further advancement) may also refine knowledge of the local vs regional uplifting rates and base-level variations since the late Pleistocene (Wegmann and Pazzaglia, 2009). References Columbu, A., De Waele, J., Forti, P., Montagna, P., Picotti, V., Pons-Branchu, E., Hellstrom, J

  7. Calcium bisulfite oxidation rate in the wet limestone-gypsum flue gas desulfurization process

    SciTech Connect

    Lancia, A.; Musmarra, D.

    1999-06-01

    In this paper oxidation of calcium bisulfite in aqueous solutions was studied, in connection with the limestone-gypsum flue gas desulfurization process. Experimental measurements of the oxidation rate were carried out in a laboratory scale stirred reactor with continuous feeding of both gas and liquid phase. A calcium bisulfite clear solution was used as liquid phase, and pure oxygen or mixtures of oxygen and nitrogen were used as gas phase. Experiments were carried out at T = 45 C varying the composition of the liquid phase and the oxygen partial pressure. Manganous sulfate was used as catalyst. The analysis of the experimental results showed that the kinetics of bisulfite oxidation in the presence of MnSO{sub 4} follow a parallel reaction mechanism, in which the overall reaction rate can be calculated as the sum between the uncatalyzed rate (3/2 order in bisulfite ion) and the catalyzed reaction rate (first order in manganous ion).

  8. Porosity of dental gypsum-bonded investments in setting and heating process.

    PubMed

    Asaoka, Kenzo; Bae, Ji-Young; Lee, Hae-Hyoung

    2012-02-03

    The porosity of gypsum-bonded investments for set and heated compacts was measured and theoretically computed quantitatively, because porosity is an effective factor for determining the strength, setting/heating expansion, and permeability of compacts at casting. A helium gas pycnometer was used to measure the solid volume of fine powders, powder-water mixtures, and porous compacts. The compositions of the conventional cristobalite investment and rapid-heating type investment were estimated from the measured solid densities of the as-received powders and the set investments. The porosity and water content of the set investments were determined from the experimental data. Excess water content in the set investment was calculated in relation to the elapsed time from the start of mixing with water. The experimental porosities of the set and heated investments were about 40% for dry set >compacts and about 50% for fired compacts, which well agreed with the numerically computed estimations, respectively.

  9. 78 FR 4847 - Board Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-23

    ... meeting of the Board will be held at the offices of the Farm Credit Administration in McLean, Virginia, on... Drive, McLean, Virginia 22102. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: This meeting of the Board will be open to...

  10. Hands-On Bulletin Boards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henneman, Dawn

    1984-01-01

    Patterns and directions are given for making bulletin boards that teach language arts and mathematics skills through hands-on student involvement. The boards help teach multiplication tables, word contractions, letter sounds, homonyms, compound words, alphabetization, and other skills. (PP)

  11. Comparison of the accuracy of digitally fabricated polyurethane model and conventional gypsum model

    PubMed Central

    Kim, So-Yeun; Lee, So-Hyoun; Cho, Seong-Keun; Jeong, Chang-Mo; Jeon, Young-Chan; Yun, Mi-Jung

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE The accuracy of a gypsum model (GM), which was taken using a conventional silicone impression technique, was compared with that of a polyurethane model (PM), which was taken using an iTero™ digital impression system. MATERIALS AND METHODS The maxillary first molar artificial tooth was selected as the reference tooth. The GMs were fabricated through a silicone impression of a reference tooth, and PMs were fabricated by a digital impression (n=9, in each group). The reference tooth and experimental models were scanned using a 3 shape convince™ scan system. Each GM and PM image was superimposed on the registered reference model (RM) and 2D images were obtained. The discrepancies of the points registered on the superimposed images were measured and defined as GM-RM group and PM-RM group. Statistical analysis was performed using a Student's T-test (α=0.05). RESULTS A comparison of the absolute value of the discrepancy revealed a significant difference between the two groups only at the occlusal surface. The GM group showed a smaller mean discrepancy than the PM group. Significant differences in the GM-RM group and PM-RM group were observed in the margins (point a and f), mesial mid-axial wall (point b) and occlusal surfaces (point c and d). CONCLUSION Under the conditions examined, the digitally fabricated polyurethane model showed a tendency for a reduced size in the margin than the reference tooth. The conventional gypsum model showed a smaller discrepancy on the occlusal surface than the polyurethane model. PMID:24605199

  12. Hydration effects on gypsum dissolution revealed by in situ nanoscale atomic force microscopy observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgos-Cara, A.; Putnis, C. V.; Rodriguez-Navarro, C.; Ruiz-Agudo, E.

    2016-04-01

    Recent work has suggested that the rates of mineral dissolution in aqueous solutions are dependent on the kinetics of dehydration of the ions building the crystal. Dehydration kinetics will be ultimately determined by the competition between ion-water and water-water interactions, which can be significantly modified by the presence of background ions in solution. At low ionic strength, the effect of electrolytes on ion-water (electrostatic) interactions will dominate (Kowacz et al., 2007). By performing macroscopic and in situ, microscopic (atomic force microscopy) dissolution experiments, the effect of background electrolytes on the dissolution kinetics of gypsum (CaSO4·2H2O) {0 1 0} cleavage surfaces is tested at constant, low ionic strength (IS = 0.05) and undersaturation (saturation index, SI = -0.045). Dissolution rates are systematically lower in the presence of 1:1 background electrolytes than in an electrolyte-free solution, regardless of the nature of the electrolyte tested. We hypothesize that stabilization of the hydration shell of calcium by the presence of background ions can explain this result, based on the observed correlations in dissolution rates with the ionic surface tension increment of the background ion in solution. Stabilization of the cation hydration shell should favor dissolution. However, in the case of strongly hydrated ions such as Ca2+, this has a direct entropic effect that reduces the overall ΔG of the system, so that dissolution is energetically less favorable. Overall, these results provide new evidence that supports cation dehydration being the rate-controlling step for gypsum dissolution, as proposed for other minerals such as barite, dolomite and calcite.

  13. Analysis of naturally-occurring radionuclides in coal combustion fly ash, gypsum, and scrubber residue samples.

    PubMed

    Roper, Angela R; Stabin, Michael G; Delapp, Rossane C; Kosson, David S

    2013-03-01

    Coal combustion residues from coal-fired power plants can be advantageous for use in building and construction materials. These by-products contain trace quantities of naturally occurring radionuclides from the uranium and thorium series, as well as other naturally occurring radionuclides such as K. Analysis was performed on samples of coal fly ash, flue gas desulfurization, gypsum and scrubber sludges, fixated scrubber sludges, and waste water filter cakes sampled from multiple coal-fired power plants in the United States. The radioactive content of U and Th decay series nuclides was determined using gamma photopeaks from progeny Pb at 352 keV and Tl at 583 keV, respectively; K specific activities were determined using the 1,461 keV photopeak. The samples were hermetically sealed to allow for secular equilibrium between the radium parents and the radon and subsequent progeny. Samples were analyzed in a common geometry using two high purity germanium photon detectors with low energy detection capabilities. The specific activities (Bq kg) were compared to results from literature studies including different building materials and fly ash specific activities. Fly ash from bituminous and subbituminous coals had U specific activities varying from 30-217 Bq kg (mean + 1 s.d. 119 ± 45 Bq kg) and 72-209 Bq kg (115 ± 40 Bq kg), respectively; Th specific activities from 10-120 Bq kg (73 ± 26 Bq kg) and 53-110 Bq kg (81 ± 18 Bq kg), respectively; and K specific activities from 177 to 928 Bq kg (569 ± 184 Bq kg) and 87-303 Bq kg (171 ± 69 Bq kg), respectively. Gypsum samples had U, Th, and K specific activities approximately one order of magnitude less than measured for fly ash samples.

  14. Carbon and sulfur cycling by microbial communities in a gypsum-treated oil sands tailings pond.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Padrón, Esther; Bordenave, Sylvain; Lin, Shiping; Bhaskar, Iyswarya Mani; Dong, Xiaoli; Sensen, Christoph W; Fournier, Joseph; Voordouw, Gerrit; Gieg, Lisa M

    2011-01-15

    Oil sands tailings ponds receive and store the solid and liquid waste from bitumen extraction and are managed to promote solids densification and water recycling. The ponds are highly stratified due to increasing solids content as a function of depth but can be impacted by tailings addition and removal and by convection due to microbial gas production. We characterized the microbial communities in relation to microbial activities as a function of depth in an active tailings pond routinely treated with gypsum (CaSO(4)·2H(2)O) to accelerate densification. Pyrosequencing of 16S rDNA gene sequences indicated that the aerobic surface layer, where the highest level of sulfate (6 mM) but no sulfide was detected, had a very different community profile than the rest of the pond. Deeper anaerobic layers were dominated by syntrophs (Pelotomaculum, Syntrophus, and Smithella spp.), sulfate- and sulfur-reducing bacteria (SRB, Desulfocapsa and Desulfurivibrio spp.), acetate- and H(2)-using methanogens, and a variety of other anaerobes that have been implicated in hydrocarbon utilization or iron and sulfur cycling. The SRB were most abundant from 10 to 14 mbs, bracketing the zone where the sulfate reduction rate was highest. Similarly, the most abundant methanogens and syntrophs identified as a function of depth closely mirrored the fluctuating methanogenesis rates. Methanogenesis was inhibited in laboratory incubations by nearly 50% when sulfate was supplied at pond-level concentrations suggesting that in situ sulfate reduction can substantially minimize methane emissions. Based on our data, we hypothesize that the emission of sulfide due to SRB activity in the gypsum treated pond is also limited due to its high solubility and oxidation in surface waters.

  15. The Scoop on Board Diversity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holland, Robert, Jr.

    1996-01-01

    In an interview, a prominent college trustee discusses strategies for increasing ethnic and cultural diversity on governing boards, the relationship between board diversity and institutional policies, effects on the student body, the responsibility of the board, and the challenges and rewards of trusteeship. (MSE)

  16. Nonlinear optical Galton board

    SciTech Connect

    Navarrete-Benlloch, C.; Perez, A.; Roldan, Eugenio

    2007-06-15

    We generalize the concept of optical Galton board (OGB), first proposed by Bouwmeester et al. [Phys. Rev. A 61, 013410 (2000)], by introducing the possibility of nonlinear self-phase modulation on the wave function during the walker evolution. If the original Galton board illustrates classical diffusion, the OGB, which can be understood as a grid of Landau-Zener crossings, illustrates the influence of interference on diffusion, and is closely connected with the quantum walk. Our nonlinear generalization of the OGB shows new phenomena, the most striking of which is the formation of nondispersive pulses in the field distribution (solitonlike structures). These exhibit a variety of dynamical behaviors, including ballistic motion, dynamical localization, nonelastic collisions, and chaotic behavior, in the sense that the dynamics is very sensitive to the nonlinearity strength.

  17. 76 FR 52662 - Good Neighbor Environmental Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Good Neighbor Environmental Board AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice of... meeting of the Good Neighbor Environmental Board (Board). The Board usually meets three times...

  18. 76 FR 31328 - Good Neighbor Environmental Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-31

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Good Neighbor Environmental Board AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice of... meeting of the Good Neighbor Environmental Board (Board). The Board usually meets three times...

  19. 76 FR 76973 - Good Neighbor Environmental Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Good Neighbor Environmental Board AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice of... meeting of the Good Neighbor Environmental Board (Board). The Board usually meets three times...

  20. 76 FR 12731 - Good Neighbor Environmental Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-08

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Good Neighbor Environmental Board AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice of... meeting of the Good Neighbor Environmental Board (Board). The Board usually meets three times...

  1. 75 FR 8699 - Good Neighbor Environmental Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Good Neighbor Environmental Board AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice of... meeting of the Good Neighbor Environmental Board (Board). The Board usually meets three times...

  2. 76 FR 73631 - Good Neighbor Environmental Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Good Neighbor Environmental Board AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice of... meeting of the Good Neighbor Environmental Board (Board). The Board usually meets three times...

  3. The Board's missing link.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Cynthia A; Kaufman, Rhonda

    2003-03-01

    If a dam springs several leaks, there are various ways to respond. One could assiduously plug the holes, for instance. Or one could correct the underlying weaknesses, a more sensible approach. When it comes to corporate governance, for too long we have relied on the first approach. But the causes of many governance problems lie well below the surface--specifically, in critical relationships that are not structured to support the players involved. In other words, the very foundation of the system is flawed. And unless we correct the structural problems, surface changes are unlikely to have a lasting impact. When shareholders, management, and the board of directors work together as a system, they provide a powerful set of checks and balances. But the relationship between shareholders and directors is fraught with weaknesses, undermining the entire system's equilibrium. As the authors explain, the exchange of information between these two players is poor. Directors, though elected by shareholders to serve as their agents, aren't individually accountable to the investors. And shareholders--for a variety of reasons--have failed to exert much influence over boards. In the end, directors are left with the Herculean task of faithfully representing shareholders whose preferences are unclear, and shareholders have little say about who represents them and few mechanisms through which to create change. The authors suggest several ways to improve the relationship between shareholders and directors: Increase board accountability by recording individual directors' votes on key corporate resolutions; separate the positions of chairman and CEO; reinvigorate shareholders; and give boards funding to pay for outside experts who can provide perspective on crucial issues.

  4. Mould filling of Ag-Pd-Cu-Au and Ag-Zn-Sn-In alloy castings made using a rapidly prepared gypsum-bonded investment material.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Hiroshi; Inoue, Shoko; Miyauchi, Hideaki; Watanabe, Kouichi; Takahashi, Yutaka

    2008-12-01

    Mandibular premolar-shaped wax patterns of full crowns with a marginal angle of 300 were prepared. Two semiprecious alloys were cast using a rapidly prepared gypsum-bonded investment material or a conventional gypsum-bonded investment. A precise impression was taken and cut into four segments. Scanning electron microscopy was used to evaluate the mould filling of each segment. The mould filling of the silver-palladium-copper-gold alloy was worse than that of the silver-zinc-tin-indium alloy. The mould filling of both alloys cast with the rapidly prepared gypsum-bonded investment material was superior to that using the conventional investment.

  5. 78 FR 60321 - SES Performance Review Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-01

    ... SAFETY BOARD SES Performance Review Board AGENCY: National Transportation Safety Board. ACTION: Notice..., Performance Review Board (PRB). FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Emily T. Carroll, Chief, Human Resources... by the Office of Personnel Management, one or more SES Performance Review Boards. The board...

  6. 76 FR 70169 - SES Performance Review Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-10

    ... SAFETY BOARD SES Performance Review Board AGENCY: National Transportation Safety Board. ACTION: Notice..., Performance Review Board (PRB). FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Emily T. Carroll, Chief, Human Resources... by the Office of Personnel Management, one or more SES Performance Review Boards. The board...

  7. Origin and diagenetic evolution of gypsum and microbialitic carbonates in the Late Sag of the Namibe Basin (SW Angola)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurent, Gindre-Chanu; Edoardo, Perri; Ian, Sharp R.; Peacock, D. C. P.; Roger, Swart; Ragnar, Poulsen; Hercinda, Ferreira; Vladimir, Machado

    2016-08-01

    Ephemeral evaporitic conditions developed within the uppermost part of the transgressive Late Sag sequence in the Namibe Basin (SW Angola), leading to the formation of extensive centimetre- to metre-thick sulphate-bearing deposits and correlative microbialitic carbonates rich in pseudomorphs after evaporite crystals. The onshore pre-salt beds examined in this study are located up to 25 m underneath the major mid-Aptian evaporitic succession, which is typified at the outcrop by gypsiferous Bambata Formation and in the subsurface by the halite-dominated Loeme Formation. Carbonate-evaporite cycles mostly occur at the top of metre-thick regressive parasequences, which progressively onlap and overstep landward the former faulted (rift) topography, or fill major pre-salt palaeo-valleys. The sulphate beds are made up of alabastrine gypsum associated with embedded botryoidal nodules, dissolution-related gypsum breccia, and are cross-cut by thin satin-spar gypsum veins. Nodular and fine-grained fabrics are interpreted as being diagenetic gypsum deposits resulting from the dissolution and recrystallisation of former depositional subaqueous sulphates, whereas gypsum veins and breccia result from telogenetic processes. The carbonates display a broader diversity of facies, characterised by rapid lateral variations along strike. Thin dolomitic and calcitic bacterial-mediated filamentous microbialitic boundstones enclose a broad variety of evaporite pseudomorphs and can pass laterally over a few metres into sulphate beds. Dissolution-related depositional breccias are also common and indicate early dissolution of former evaporite layers embedded within the microbialites. Sulphate and carbonate units are interpreted as being concomitantly deposited along a tide-dominated coastal supra- to intertidal- sabkha and constitute high-frequency hypersaline precursor events, prior to the accumulation of the giant saline mid-Aptian Bambata and Loeme Formations. Petrographic and geochemical

  8. Pseudomorphs of Neotethyan Evaporites in Anatolia's HP/LT belts - Aptian basin-wide pelagic gypsum deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheffler, Franziska; Oberhänsli, Roland; Pourteau, Amaury; Immenhauser, Adrian; Candan, Osman

    2015-04-01

    Rosetta Marble was defined in SW Anatolia as 3D-radiating textures of dm-to-m-long calcite rods in the HP/LT metamorphosed Mid-Cretaceous pelagic carbonate sequence of the Ören Unit. Rosetta Marble in the type locality are interbedded with meta-chert beds, and may constitute entire carbonate beds. Rare aragonite relicts and Sr-rich, fibrous calcite pseudomorphs after aragonite witness the HP metamorphic imprint of this sequence during the closure of a Neotethyan oceanic domain during latest Cretaceous-Palaeocene times. We investigated the Rosetta Marble of the Ören Unit, as well as other known and newly found localities in the Tavşanlı and Afyon zones, and the Alanya Massif and Malatya area, to decipher the metamorphic, diagenetic and sedimentologic significance of these uncommon textures. Based on field, petrographic and geochemical investigations, we document a wide variety of Rosetta-type textures. A striking resemblance with well-known gypsum morphologies (e.g. shallow-tail, palm-tree textures) leads us to argue that Rosetta Marble was initially composed of giant gypsum crystals (selenite). The absence of anhydrite relicts of pseudomorphs indicate that gypsum transformed into calcite soon after the deposition by the mean of a sulphate reduction reaction. The gypsum-to-calcite transformation requires that organic matter intervened as a reactant phase. Mid Cretaceous oceanic domains in the Tethyan realm are characterised by overall anoxic conditions that allowed the preservation of organic material. Rosetta Marble exposures are widely distributed over 600 km along the Neotethyan suture zone. During deepening of the Neotethyan ocean in Mid Cretaceous times, basin-wide and cyclic sedimentation of gypsum and radiolarite occurred. The origin of high-salinity waters needed for gypsum precipitation was located at shelf levels. Density and gravity effects forced the brines to cascade downwards into the deep ocean. Favorable climatic conditions trigger the formation

  9. VNIR reflectance spectra of gypsum mixtures for comparison with White Sands National Monument, New Mexico (WSNM) dune samples as an analog study of the Olympia Undae region of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, S. J.; Bishop, J. L.; Fenton, L. K.; Lafuente, B.; Garcia, G. C.; Horgan, B. H.

    2013-12-01

    Dunes at WSNM are being used as an analog study area for gypsum-rich dunes near the northern polar region of Mars. Samples were collected from 4 dunes at WSNM for this study. In order to determine abundances of the gypsum, quartz and dolomite present in the dune sand, size separates (<45, 45-90, 90-150, 150-250, >250 μm) were prepared for gypsum, quartz and dolomite, mixtures were prepared using the 90-150 μm size fraction, and all samples were characterized in the lab. Analyses of the VNIR spectral data are presented here (Figs. 1-2) and analyses of the XRD data are presented in a companion abstract [1]. The majority of the dune sand is dominated by gypsum, while the coarse grains at some ripples are largely dolomite. Mid-IR spectra will be evaluated as well. Gypsum/Dolomite Mixtures (Fig. 1) There is a clear progression of albedo and band strength in these mixture spectra as one mineral is increased and the other decreased. The mixture spectra are dominated by the gypsum bands for mixtures that are gypsum rich (≥50wt.% gypsum) including a triplet at 1.446-1.535 μm, plus bands at 1.749, 1.945, 2.217 and 2.267 μm. When mixtures become predominantly dolomite (10/90 & 20/80 mixtures), the gypsum bands are significantly weaker, while the dolomite band at 2.322 becomes much more visible. Gypsum/Quartz Mixtures (Fig. 2) The gypsum/quartz mixture spectra are dominated to an even greater extent by gypsum, resulting in readily observable gypsum features for spectra of samples with only 10 wt.% gypsum. [1] Lafuente et al. (2013) AGU, submitted.

  10. Gypsum dissolution risk analysis in the Prealpine part of the Vaud County (Western Switzerland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolet, Pierrick; Choffet, Marc; Bohren, Delphine; Derron, Marc-Henri; Jaboyedoff, Michel; Lauraux, Bertrand; Lance, Jean-Marc; Champod, Eric

    2013-04-01

    Subsidence or collapse due to bedrock dissolution is a relatively common phenomenon in Vaud County (Western Switzerland). Indeed, soluble rocks are present in the Jura and Prealpine parts. Solubility is significantly higher in evaporitic rocks (such as gypsum) than in Limestones, resulting in possibly important dissolution during a building's lifetime. In Limestone, subsidence results mainly from cover collapse over existing voids. This study aims at evaluating the cost of this phenomenon for the building portfolio of the region in which gypsum occurs. Currently, 2.5% of the portfolio value is located over gypsum-bearing formations and is therefore potentially affected. Since this phenomenon is not covered by the public building insurance yet, no centralized event record exists. Therefore, a survey has been conducted with the affected communities to estimate the events frequency and damage severity. Some records from the archives of BERTAND LAURAUX SA have been added and allow to compare reparation costs with insured values. From these cases, a frequency and a buildings vulnerability distribution are established. The vulnerability distribution is considered to represent the reality, whereas the frequency is corrected to take into account the different amount of information gathered in the different municipalities and the incompleteness of the inventory, even in the communities with more information. Assuming that the distribution of collapse events occurs with a constant average frequency and is time-independent, insurance financial years are modeled with a number of cases assigned randomly following a Poisson distribution. A Monte Carlo simulation is performed, where the affected buildings value is chosen among the potentially affected portfolio and its corresponding damage rate is assigned following the distribution previously established. The maximum damage for each building is limited to CHF 1,000,000 (EUR 827,000), to ignore unrealistic values. Thus, a cost

  11. What makes great boards great.

    PubMed

    Sonnenfeld, Jeffrey A

    2002-09-01

    In the wake of meltdowns at WorldCom, Tyco, and Enron, enormous attention has been focused on the companies' boards. It seems inconceivable that business disasters of such magnitude could happen without gross or even criminal negligence on the part of board members. And yet a close examination of those boards reveals no broad pattern of incompetence or corruption. In fact, they followed most of the accepted standards for board operations: Members showed up for meetings; they had money invested in the company; audit committees, compensation committees, and codes of ethics were in place; the boards weren't too small or too big, nor were they dominated by insiders. In other words, they passed the tests that would normally be applied to determine whether a board of directors was likely to do a good job. And that's precisely what's so scary, according to corporate governance expert Jeffrey Sonnenfeld, who suggests that it's time for some new thinking about how corporate boards operate and are evaluated. He proposes thinking not only about how to structure the board's work but also about how to manage it as a social system. Good boards are, very simply, high-functioning work groups. They're distinguished by a climate of respect, trust, and candor among board members and between the board and management. Information is shared openly and on time; emergent political factions are quickly eliminated. Members feel free to challenge one another's assumptions and conclusions, and management encourages lively discussion of strategic issues. Directors feel a responsibility to contribute meaningfully to the board's performance. In addition, good boards assess their own performance, both collectively and individually.

  12. Radioactivity levels of limestone and gypsum used as building raw materials in Turkey and estimation of exposure doses.

    PubMed

    Turhan, Seref

    2010-08-01

    The natural radionuclide contents of limestone and gypsum samples used as building raw materials in Turkey were measured by means of gamma spectrometer system with HPGe detector. The measured activity concentrations of (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K radionuclide were compared with the reported data from other countries. Radium equivalent activity and internal hazard index, absorbed gamma dose rate in indoor due to the external exposure and corresponding annual effective dose were determined to estimate the exposure risk arising due to the use of these raw materials. This study has shown that examined gypsum and limestone raw materials do not pose any excess radiological health problem and are safe for use in the construction of buildings.

  13. Composting of waste paint sludge containing melamine resin as affected by nutrients and gypsum addition and microbial inoculation.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yongqiang; Chen, Liming; Gao, Lihong; Michel, Frederick C; Wan, Caixia; Li, Yebo; Dick, Warren A

    2012-03-01

    Melamine formaldehyde resins have hard and durable properties and are found in many products, including automobile paints. These resins contain high concentrations of nitrogen and, if properly composted, can yield valuable products. We evaluated the effects of starter compost, nutrients, gypsum and microbial inoculation on composting of paint sludge containing melamine resin. A bench-scale composting experiment was conducted at 55 °C for 91 days and then at 30 °C for an additional 56 days. After 91 days, the composts were inoculated with a mixed population of melamine-degrading microorganisms. Melamine resin degradation after the entire 147 days of composting varied between 73 and 95% for the treatments with inoculation of microorganisms compared to 55-74% for the treatments without inoculation. Degradation was also enhanced by nutrients and gypsum additions. Our results infer that large scale composting of melamine resins in paint sludge is possible.

  14. Possible utilization of flue-gas desulfurization gypsum and fly ash for citrus production: Evaluation of crop growth response

    SciTech Connect

    Alva, A.K. . Citrus Research and Education Center)

    1994-01-01

    The application of industrial by-products to agricultural land has been a topic of considerable interest during recent years. For the industries, this is an attractive avenue to utilize the by-products rather than land filling. Agriculturists/horticulturists are faced with a new challenge to evaluate the potential advantages of this practice in terms of crop growth, production, and quality as well as effects of such practices on environmental quality. Fly ash and flue-gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum are by-products produced from coal-fired electric power generation plants. There is a growing interest in evaluation of potential benefits of land application of coal combustion by products mixed with organic by-products. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of application of FGD gypsum, fly ash or chicken manure,, or application of the former two in combination with the latter, on soil properties as well as on growth and mineral nutrition of Cleopatra mandarin and Swingle citrumelo rootstock seedlings grown on a Myakka sand. The growth of seedlings of either rootstock improved significantly in soils amended with either FGD gypsum, fly ash, or chicken manure, individually or in combination of either by-product with chicken manure. However, the ranking of various amendments in relation to growth response differed between the two rootstocks. The combined application of all three amendments decreased the growth of both rootstock seedlings significantly as compared to that of seedlings in unamended soil. The application of either FGD gypsum, fly ash, or chicken manure each at 2 g/kg soil increased the concentration of Ca, Ca and K, and Ca and P in the leaves of seedlings, respectively.

  15. Synthesis of high-purity precipitated calcium carbonate during the process of recovery of elemental sulphur from gypsum waste.

    PubMed

    de Beer, M; Doucet, F J; Maree, J P; Liebenberg, L

    2015-12-01

    We recently showed that the production of elemental sulphur and calcium carbonate (CaCO3) from gypsum waste by thermally reducing the waste into calcium sulphide (CaS) followed by its direct aqueous carbonation yielded low-grade carbonate products (i.e. <90 mass% as CaCO3). In this study, we used the insight gained from our previous work and developed an indirect aqueous CaS carbonation process for the production of high-grade CaCO3 (i.e. >99 mass% as CaCO3) or precipitated calcium carbonate (PCC). The process used an acid gas (H2S) to improve the aqueous dissolution of CaS, which is otherwise poorly soluble. The carbonate product was primarily calcite (99.5%) with traces of quartz (0.5%). Calcite was the only CaCO3 polymorph obtained; no vaterite or aragonite was detected. The product was made up of micron-size particles, which were further characterised by XRD, TGA, SEM, BET and true density. Results showed that about 0.37 ton of high-grade PCC can be produced from 1.0 ton of gypsum waste, and generates about 0.19 ton of residue, a reduction of 80% from original waste gypsum mass to mass of residue that needs to be discarded off. The use of gypsum waste as primary material in replacement of mined limestone for the production of PPC could alleviate waste disposal problems, along with converting significant volumes of waste materials into marketable commodities.

  16. Measurements of radon concentration and the role of earth tides in a gypsum mine in Walferdange, Luxembourg.

    PubMed

    Lenzen, M; Neugebauer, H J

    1999-08-01

    Measurements of the 222Rn and 220Rn concentration in air, the atmospheric pressure, and the air sample temperature were carried out in an abandoned gypsum mine in Walferdange, Luxembourg. The 222Rn concentration shows a negative correlation with the atmospheric pressure and a tentative positive correlation with gravity variations. The results suggest a porous flow of radon bearing gas across the rock-air interface, which is induced by tidal stresses.

  17. Checker Board Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lach, Theodore

    2008-04-01

    The Checker Board Model (CBM) is a 2D model of the nucleus that proposes that the synchronization of two outer rotating quarks in the nucleons accounts for magnetic moment of the nucleons and that the resulting magnetic flux couples (weaves) into the 2D checker board array structures and this 2D magnetic coupling in addition to electrostatic forces of the two rotating and one stationary quark accounts for the apparent strong nuclear force. The symmetry of the He nucleus helps explain why this 2D structure is stable. This model explain the mass of the proton and neutron, along with their magnetic moments and their absolute and relative sizes and predict the masses of two newly proposed quarks ^(1): the ``up'' and the ``dn'' quarks. Since the masses of the ``up'' and ``dn'' quark determined by the CBM (237.31 MeV and 42.392 MeV respectively) did not fit within the standard model as candidates for u and d, a new model (New Physics) had to be invented. The details of this new nuclear physics model can be found at: http://checkerboard.dnsalias.net/ (1). T.M. Lach, Checkerboard Structure of the Nucleus, Infinite Energy, Vol. 5, issue 30, (2000). (2). T.M. Lach, Masses of the Sub-Nuclear Particles, nucl-th/0008026, @http://xxx.lanl.gov/

  18. Checker Board Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lach, Theodore

    2009-05-01

    The Checker Board Model (CBM) is a 2D model of the nucleus that proposes that the synchronization of two outer rotating quarks in the nucleons accounts for magnetic moment of the nucleons and that the resulting magnetic flux couples (weaves) into the 2D checker board array structures and this 2D magnetic coupling in addition to electrostatic forces of the two rotating and one stationary quark accounts for the apparent strong nuclear force. The symmetry of the He nucleus helps explain why this 2D structure is stable. This model explain the mass of the proton and neutron, along with their magnetic moments and their absolute and relative sizes and predict the masses of two newly proposed quarks ^(1): the ``up'' and the ``dn'' quarks. Since the masses of the ``up'' and ``dn'' quark determined by the CBM (237.31 MeV and 42.392 MeV respectively) did not fit within the standard model as candidates for u and d, a new model (New Physics) had to be invented. The details of this new nuclear physics model can be found at: http://checkerboard.dnsalias.net/ (1). T.M. Lach, Checkerboard Structure of the Nucleus, Infinite Energy, Vol. 5, issue 30, (2000). (2). T.M. Lach, Masses of the Sub-Nuclear Particles, nucl-th/0008026, @http://xxx.lanl.gov/

  19. Checker Board Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lach, Thedore

    2007-04-01

    The Checker Board Model (CBM) is a 2D model of the nucleus that proposes that the synchronization of two outer rotating quarks in the nucleons accounts for magnetic moment of the nucleons and that the resulting magnetic flux couples (weaves) into the 2D checker board array structures and this 2D magnetic coupling in addition to electrostatic forces of the two rotating and one stationary quark accounts for the apparent strong nuclear force. The symmetry of the He nucleus helps explain why this 2D structure is stable. This model explain the mass of the proton and neutron, along with their magnetic moments and their absolute and relative sizes and predict the masses of two newly proposed quarks ^(1): the ``up'' and the ``dn'' quarks. Since the masses of the ``up'' and ``dn'' quark determined by the CBM (237.31 MeV and 42.392 MeV respectively) did not fit within the standard model as candidates for u and d, a new model (New Physics) had to be invented. The details of this new nuclear physics model can be found at: http://checkerboard.dnsalias.net/ (1). T.M. Lach, Checkerboard Structure of the Nucleus, Infinite Energy, Vol. 5, issue 30, (2000). (2). T.M. Lach, Masses of the Sub-Nuclear Particles, nucl-th/0008026, @http://xxx.lanl.gov/

  20. CENTER AISLE, WEST STORAGE AREA, FROM EAST, SHOWING ADDED WIRE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CENTER AISLE, WEST STORAGE AREA, FROM EAST, SHOWING ADDED WIRE MESH, GYPSUM BOARD PARTITIONS, AND EXPOSED CEILING FRAMING - Fort Huachuca, Cavalry Stable, Clarkson Road, Sierra Vista, Cochise County, AZ

  1. Recovery and utilization of gypsum and limestone from scrubber sludge. [Quarterly] technical report, March 1, 1993--May 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Kawatra, S.K.; Eisele, T.C.

    1993-09-01

    Wet flue-gas desulfurization units in coal-fired power plants produce a large amount of sludge which must be disposed of, and which is currently landfilled in most cases. Increasing landfill costs are gradually forcing utilities to find other alternatives. In principle, this sludge can be used to make gypsum (CaSO{sub 4}-2H{sub 2}O) for products such as plaster-of-Paris and wallboard, but only if impurities such as unreacted limestone and soluble salts are removed, and the calcium sulfite (CaSO{sub 3}) is oxidized to calcium sulfate (CaSO{sub 4}). This project is investigating methods for removing the impurities from the sludge so that high-quality, salable gypsum products can be made. Work done in the previous quarter concentrated on developing a low-cost froth flotation process that could remove limestone, unburned carbon, and related contaminants from the sludge while recovering the bulk of the calcium sulfite and gypsum. In the current quarter, experiments to remove impurities from the sludge using a water-only cyclone were conducted. The cyclone has been found to be effective for removing the coarser limestone impurities, as well as removing contaminants such as fine gravel and grinding-ball chips. These results show that the cyclone will be very complementary with froth flotation, which mainly removes the very fine impurities.

  2. Potential of soil amendments (Biochar and Gypsum) in increasing water use efficiency of Abelmoschus esculentus L. Moench

    PubMed Central

    Batool, Aniqa; Taj, Samia; Rashid, Audil; Khalid, Azeem; Qadeer, Samia; Saleem, Aansa R.; Ghufran, Muhammad A.

    2015-01-01

    Water being an essential component for plant growth and development, its scarcity poses serious threat to crops around the world. Climate changes and global warming are increasing the temperature of earth hence becoming an ultimate cause of water scarcity. It is need of the day to use potential soil amendments that could increase the plants’ resistance under such situations. Biochar and gypsum were used in the present study to improve the water use efficiency (WUE) and growth of Abelmoschus esculentus L. Moench (Lady’s Finger). A 6 weeks experiment was conducted under greenhouse conditions. Stress treatments were applied after 30 days of sowing. Plant height, leaf area, photosynthesis, transpiration rate (Tr), stomatal conductance and WUE were determined weekly under stressed [60% field capacity (F.C.)] and non-stressed (100% F.C.) conditions. Stomatal conductance and Tr decreased and reached near to zero in stressed plants. Stressed plants also showed resistance to water stress upto 5 weeks and gradually perished at sixth week. On the other hand, WUE improved in stressed plants containing biochar and gypsum as compared to untreated plants. Biochar alone is a better strategy to promote plant growth and WUE specifically of A. esculentus, compared to its application in combination with gypsum. PMID:26442046

  3. Recovery and utilization of gypsum and limestone from scrubber sludge. Technical report, December 1, 1992--February 28, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Kawatra, S.K.; Eisele, T.C.; Banerjee, D.

    1993-05-01

    Wet flue-gas desulfurization units in coal-fired power plants produce a large amount of sludge which must be disposed of, and which is currently landfilled in most cases. Increasing landfill costs are gradually forcing utilities to find other alternatives. In principle, this sludge can be used to make gypsum (CaSO{sub 4}-2H{sub 2}O) for products such as plaster-of-Paris and wallboard, but only if impurities such as unreacted limestone and soluble salts are removed, and the calcium sulfite (CaSO{sub 3}) is oxidized to calcium sulfate (CaSO{sub 4}). This project is investigating methods for removing the impurities from the sludge so that high-quality, salable gypsum products can be made. Work done in the previous quarter concentrated on developing a dependable technique for analysis of scrubber sludge, so that it would be possible to determine exactly how well a particular purification process was working. This technique was then used to characterize the sludge from a particular Illinois power station. In the current quarter, studies were carried out using froth flotation to produce a product that could be oxidized to high-purity gypsum. These experiments have been quite successful, due to certain properties of the limestone impurity that makes it easier to remove by this method than was expected.

  4. Contribution study to the thermal insulation of the builders in the desert regions of exploiting gypsum fiber reinforced palm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafsi, Fouad; Kriker, Abdelouahed; Abani, Said

    2017-02-01

    Algerian Desert areas were characterized by very hot climate in summer and very cold in winter. The most widely used building material in these areas are concrete, mortar cement, which has a bad thermal insulation, causing a significant increase in cooling and heating costs; in order to avoid this problem it become a must to replace these materials with a good thermal isolation material and lower production cost. This work is part of the evaluation of local materials by improving their performance in the field of thermal insulation, which is considered a first step in the development of new local materials to be used in the construction field, the material used in this study is the gypsum reinforced with date palm fiber. In fact, Algeria has extraordinary resources in natural fibers (from Palm, Abaca, Hemp…) but without any large valorization in building materials. The aim of this work is then to characterization of those date palm fibers in new building materials approved for use in the construction of buildings in the desert areas. The date palm fibers were added to samples of the gypsum material in the form of cutting layers at different volume fraction, so as to determine the extent of their impact in the improvement of the thermal performance. The results were very satisfactory, reaching improvement rate of 16% for samples gypsum reinforced with single cut fiber form, and 32% of the samples reinforced with fiber in the form of layers.

  5. The effects of a liquid dispersing agent and a microcrystalline additive on the physical properties of type IV gypsum.

    PubMed

    Zakaria, M R; Johnston, W M; Reisbick, M H; Campagni, W V

    1988-11-01

    This study evaluated the effects of a liquid dispersing agent (LDA) and a microcrystalline additive (MCA) on selected physical properties of type IV gypsum. Working consistency, setting time, setting expansion, and compressive strength (1 hour and 7 days) were determined, following ADA Specification No. 25, on a standard, LDA (0.5, 1, 1.5, and 2 mL), MCA (21.1, 24.1, and 27.1 gm), and combination (LDA 0.75 mL + MCA 12.05 gm) mixes per 300 gm of gypsum. Results indicate that the additives affect the consistency of the mix, but consistency can be kept close to that of the standard by lowering the water/powder ratio. Statistical analysis of the data indicated that the additives significantly affected the setting time, setting expansion, and both the 1-hour and the 7-day compressive strengths. SEM examination of fractured surfaces of test mixes indicated improved crystal packing. The properties of type IV gypsum can be improved by optimizing the amount of LDA and MCA additives.

  6. New insights into the transformation of calcium sulfate hemihydrate to gypsum using time-resolved cryogenic transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Saha, Amitesh; Lee, Jinkee; Pancera, Sabrina M; Bräeu, Michael F; Kempter, Andreas; Tripathi, Anubhav; Bose, Arijit

    2012-07-31

    We use time-resolved cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (TR-cryo-TEM) on a supersaturated solution of calcium sulfate hemihydrate to examine the early stages of particle formation during the hydration of the hemihydrate. As hydration proceeds, we observe nanoscale amorphous clusters that evolve to amorphous particles and then reorganize to crystalline gypsum within tens of seconds. Our results indicate that a multistep particle formation model, where an amorphous phase forms first, followed by the transformation into a crystalline product, is applicable even at time scales of the order of tens of seconds for this system. The addition of a small amount of citric acid significantly delays the reorganization to gypsum crystals. We hypothesize that available calcium ions form complexes with the acid by binding to the carboxylic groups. Their incorporation into a growing particle produces disorder and extends the time over which the amorphous phase exists. We see evidence of patches of "trapped" amorphous phase within the growing gypsum crystals at time scales of the order of 24 h. This is confirmed by complementary X-ray diffraction experiments. Direct imaging of nanoscale samples by TR-cryo-TEM is a powerful technique for a fundamental understanding of crystallization and many other evolving systems.

  7. Simulation and Prediction of Ion Transport in the Reclamation of Sodic Soils with Gypsum Based on the Support Vector Machine

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jinman; Bai, Zhongke; Yang, Peiling

    2014-01-01

    The effect of gypsum on the physical and chemical characteristics of sodic soils is nonlinear and controlled by multiple factors. The support vector machine (SVM) is able to solve practical problems such as small samples, nonlinearity, high dimensions, and local minima points. This paper reports the use of the SVM regression method to predict changes in the chemical properties of sodic soils under different gypsum application rates in a soil column experiment and to evaluate the effect of gypsum reclamation on sodic soils. The research results show that (1) the SVM soil solute transport model using the Matlab toolbox represents the change in Ca2+ and Na+ in the soil solution and leachate well, with a high prediction accuracy. (2) Using the SVM model to predict the spatial and temporal variations in the soil solute content is feasible and does not require a specific mathematical model. The SVM model can take full advantage of the distribution characteristics of the training sample. (3) The workload of the soil solute transport prediction model based on the SVM is greatly reduced by not having to determine the hydrodynamic dispersion coefficient and retardation coefficient, and the model is thus highly practical. PMID:24757438

  8. Combination of simvastatin, calcium silicate/gypsum, and gelatin and bone regeneration in rabbit calvarial defects.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Wang, Huiming; Shi, Jue; Wang, Ying; Lai, Kaichen; Yang, Xianyan; Chen, Xiaoyi; Yang, Guoli

    2016-03-21

    The present study was performed to determine whether simvastatin improves bone regeneration when combined with calcium silicate/gypsum and gelatin (CS-GEL). The surface morphology was determined using field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FSEM). Degradation in vitro was evaluated by monitoring the weight change of the composites soaked in phosphate buffered saline (PBS). Drug release was evaluated using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Cytotoxicity testing was performed to assess the biocompatibility of composites. Four 5 mm-diameter bone defects were created in rabbit calvaria. Three sites were filled with CS-GEL, 0.5 mg simvastatin-loaded CS-GEL (SIM-0.5) and 1.0 mg simvastatin-loaded CS-GEL (SIM-1.0), respectively, and the fourth was left empty as the control group. Micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) and histological analysis were carried out at 4 and 12 weeks postoperatively. The composites all exhibited three-dimensional structures and showed the residue with nearly 80% after 4 weeks of immersion. Drug release was explosive on the first day and then the release rate remained stable. The composites did not induce any cytotoxicity. The results in vivo demonstrated that the new bone formation and the expressions of BMP-2, OC and type I collagen were improved in the simvastatin-loaded CS-GEL group. It was concluded that the simvastatin-loaded CS-GEL may improve bone regeneration.

  9. Combination of simvastatin, calcium silicate/gypsum, and gelatin and bone regeneration in rabbit calvarial defects

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing; Wang, Huiming; Shi, Jue; Wang, Ying; Lai, Kaichen; Yang, Xianyan; Chen, Xiaoyi; Yang, Guoli

    2016-01-01

    The present study was performed to determine whether simvastatin improves bone regeneration when combined with calcium silicate/gypsum and gelatin (CS-GEL). The surface morphology was determined using field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FSEM). Degradation in vitro was evaluated by monitoring the weight change of the composites soaked in phosphate buffered saline (PBS). Drug release was evaluated using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Cytotoxicity testing was performed to assess the biocompatibility of composites. Four 5 mm-diameter bone defects were created in rabbit calvaria. Three sites were filled with CS-GEL, 0.5 mg simvastatin-loaded CS-GEL (SIM-0.5) and 1.0 mg simvastatin-loaded CS-GEL (SIM-1.0), respectively, and the fourth was left empty as the control group. Micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) and histological analysis were carried out at 4 and 12 weeks postoperatively. The composites all exhibited three-dimensional structures and showed the residue with nearly 80% after 4 weeks of immersion. Drug release was explosive on the first day and then the release rate remained stable. The composites did not induce any cytotoxicity. The results in vivo demonstrated that the new bone formation and the expressions of BMP-2, OC and type I collagen were improved in the simvastatin-loaded CS-GEL group. It was concluded that the simvastatin-loaded CS-GEL may improve bone regeneration. PMID:26996657

  10. Impact of surface roughness of gypsum materials on adaptation of zirconia cores

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ki-Baek; Kim, Sa-Hak

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE The present study investigated the influences of various gypsum materials on the precision of fit of CAD/CAM-fabricated prostheses and analyzed their correlation with surface roughness. MATERIALS AND METHODS The master model of the mandibular right first molar was replicated, and four experimental groups based on two types of Type IV stone (GC Fujirock EP, Die keen) and two types of scannable stone (Aesthetic-Basegold, Everest Rock) were created to include a total of 40 specimens, 10 in each group. The surface roughness of the working models for the respective experimental groups was measured. Once the zirconia cores had been fabricated, the marginal and internal fits were measured with a digital microscope using the silicone replica technique. The mean and standard deviation of the respective points of measurement were computed and analyzed through the one-way ANOVA and Tukey's HSD test. The correlation between surface roughness and the precision of fit of the zirconia core was analyzed using the Pearson correlation analysis (α=.05). RESULTS The zirconia cores fabricated from the scannable stone working models exhibited a superior precision of fit as compared to those fabricated from the Type IV stone working models. The correlation analysis results showed a clear positive correlation between surface roughness and the precision of fit of zirconia cores in all of the experimental groups (P<.05). CONCLUSION The results confirmed that the surface roughness of dental working models has a decisive influence on the precision of fit of zirconia cores. PMID:26140171

  11. Economic evaluation of advanced limestone, Davy S-H, and Dowa Gypsum-producing FGD processes

    SciTech Connect

    Dotson, R.L.; Maxwell, J.D.; Burnett, T.A.

    1984-02-01

    Economic evaluations were made of three gypsum-producing FGD processes: advanced limestone (in-loop forced oxidation with adipic acid additive), Davy S-H (lime), and Dowa (aluminum sulfate, limestone). For a 500-MW power unit burning 3.5% sulfur coal and meeting the 1979 NSPS, capital investments in 1982 costs are 93 M$ (186 $/kW) for the advanced limestone process, 116 M$ (231 $/kW) for the Davy S-H process, and 121 M$ (243 $/kW) for the Dowa process. First-year annual revenue requirements in 1984 costs for these processes are 26, 33, and 32 M$ (9.4, 11.9, and 11.7 mills/kWh), respectively. The lower capital investment and annual revenue requirements of the advanced limestone process is due in part to the use of adipic acid, which allows partial scrubbing at 95% removal. The Davy S-H has slightly higher annual revenue requirements than the Dowa process because lime rather than limestone is used. Changes in power unit size and coal sulfur content affect the costs of all three processes similarly. The Davy S-H process is more sensitive to raw material costs because lime is used. Landfill waste disposal is a minor cost element in all three processes. 103 references, 26 figures, 30 tables.

  12. Slurry nebulization for the analysis of gypsum and cement by inductively coupled plasma spectrometry.

    PubMed

    McCrindle, Robert I; Marjanovic, Ljiljana

    2002-12-01

    The usual form of presentation for a sample to be analyzed by an inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometer is in the form of a liquid. For the analysis of solids, this involves a dissolution step and in the case of complex matrices this may be long and difficult. Should it be possible to analyse the sample without prior dissolution, then the problems associated with obtaining a solution would be resolved. A method for analyzing samples is to make use of slurry nebulization. Samples with complex matrices, such as cement and gypsum were selected and analysed as in the form of a slurry. Using different concentrations of a certified reference materials, calibration curves were obtained, from which the unknown samples could be determined directly. Use of aqueous solutions for calibration was also investigated. The method was evaluated using other reference materials or results obtained by an independent laboratory using different technique for the analysis. The slurry method was found to be accurate and precise.

  13. Production of an Extracellular Matrix as an Isotropic Growth Phase of Penicillium rubens on Gypsum

    PubMed Central

    Bekker, M.; Adan, O. C. G.; Samson, R. A.; Wyatt, T.; Dijksterhuis, J.

    2012-01-01

    Indoor mold represents an important environmental concern, but a fundamental knowledge of fungal growth stages is needed to limit indoor fungal proliferation on finishing materials used in buildings. The present study focused on the succession of germination stages of the common indoor fungus Penicillium rubens on a gypsum substrate. This substrate is used as a model system representing porous materials that are widely used in indoor environments. Imaging with cryo-scanning electron microscopy showed that the formation of an extracellular matrix (ECM) is a phase of the isotropic growth of P. rubens that is uniquely related to germinating conidia. Furthermore, the ECM is observed only when a dry-state inoculation of the surface is applied, i.e., applying conidia directly from a 7-day-old colony, mimicking airborne contamination of the surface. When inoculation is done by spraying an aqueous conidial suspension, no ECM is observed. Moreover, it is concluded that the formation of an ECM requires active processes in the fungal cell. The porosity of the substrate proved that the ECM substance has high-viscosity characteristics. The present results stress that studies of indoor fungal growth should consider the method of inoculation, knowing that the common aqueous suspension may obscure specific stages in the initial phases of germination. PMID:22843536

  14. Ribosomal RNA gene fragments from fossilized cyanobacteria identified in primary gypsum from the late Miocene, Italy.

    PubMed

    Panieri, G; Lugli, S; Manzi, V; Roveri, M; Schreiber, B C; Palinska, K A

    2010-03-01

    Earth scientists have searched for signs of microscopic life in ancient samples of permafrost, ice, deep-sea sediments, amber, salt and chert. Until now, evidence of cyanobacteria has not been reported in any studies of ancient DNA older than a few thousand years. Here, we investigate morphologically, biochemically and genetically primary evaporites deposited in situ during the late Miocene (Messinian) Salinity Crisis from the north-eastern Apennines of Italy. The evaporites contain fossilized bacterial structures having identical morphological forms as modern microbes. We successfully extracted and amplified genetic material belonging to ancient cyanobacteria from gypsum crystals dating back to 5.910-5.816 Ma, when the Mediterranean became a giant hypersaline brine pool. This finding represents the oldest ancient cyanobacterial DNA to date. Our clone library and its phylogenetic comparison with present cyanobacterial populations point to a marine origin for the depositional basin. This investigation opens the possibility of including fossil cyanobacterial DNA into the palaeo-reconstruction of various environments and could also be used to quantify the ecological importance of cyanobacteria through geological time. These genetic markers serve as biosignatures providing important clues about ancient life and begin a new discussion concerning the debate on the origin of late Miocene evaporites in the Mediterranean.

  15. Investigation on mercury reemission from limestone-gypsum wet flue gas desulfurization slurry.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chuanmin; Liu, Songtao; Gao, Yang; Liu, Yongchao

    2014-01-01

    Secondary atmospheric pollutions may result from wet flue gas desulfurization (WFGD) systems caused by the reduction of Hg(2+) to Hg(0) and lead to a damping of the cobenefit mercury removal efficiency by WFGD systems. The experiment on Hg(0) reemission from limestone-gypsum WFGD slurry was carried out by changing the operating conditions such as the pH, temperature, Cl(-) concentrations, and oxygen concentrations. The partitioning behavior of mercury in the solid and liquid byproducts was also discussed. The experimental results indicated that the Hg(0) reemission rate from WFGD slurry increased as the operational temperatures and pH values increased. The Hg(0) reemission rates decreased as the O2 concentration of flue gas and Cl(-) concentration of WFGD slurry increased. The concentrations of O2 in flue gas have an evident effect on the mercury retention in the solid byproducts. The temperature and Cl(-) concentration have a slight effect on the mercury partitioning in the byproducts. No evident relation was found between mercury retention in the solid byproducts and the pH. The present findings could be valuable for industrial application of characterizing and optimizing mercury control in wet FGD systems.

  16. Investigation on Mercury Reemission from Limestone-Gypsum Wet Flue Gas Desulfurization Slurry

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Songtao; Liu, Yongchao

    2014-01-01

    Secondary atmospheric pollutions may result from wet flue gas desulfurization (WFGD) systems caused by the reduction of Hg2+ to Hg0 and lead to a damping of the cobenefit mercury removal efficiency by WFGD systems. The experiment on Hg0 reemission from limestone-gypsum WFGD slurry was carried out by changing the operating conditions such as the pH, temperature, Cl− concentrations, and oxygen concentrations. The partitioning behavior of mercury in the solid and liquid byproducts was also discussed. The experimental results indicated that the Hg0 reemission rate from WFGD slurry increased as the operational temperatures and pH values increased. The Hg0 reemission rates decreased as the O2 concentration of flue gas and Cl− concentration of WFGD slurry increased. The concentrations of O2 in flue gas have an evident effect on the mercury retention in the solid byproducts. The temperature and Cl− concentration have a slight effect on the mercury partitioning in the byproducts. No evident relation was found between mercury retention in the solid byproducts and the pH. The present findings could be valuable for industrial application of characterizing and optimizing mercury control in wet FGD systems. PMID:24737981

  17. Inhibition of hydrogen sulfide generation from disposed gypsum drywall using chemical inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qiyong; Townsend, Timothy; Bitton, Gabriel

    2011-07-15

    Disposal of gypsum drywall in landfills has been demonstrated to elevate hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) concentrations in landfill gas, a problem with respect to odor, worker safety, and deleterious effect on gas-to-energy systems. Since H(2)S production in landfills results from biological activity, the concept of inhibiting H(2)S production through the application of chemical agents to drywall during disposal was studied. Three possible inhibition agents - sodium molybdate (Na(2)MoO(4)), ferric chloride (FeCl(3)), and hydrated lime (Ca(OH)(2)) - were evaluated using flask and column experiments. All three agents inhibited H(2)S generation, with Na(2)MoO(4) reducing H(2)S generation by interrupting the biological sulfate reduction process and Ca(OH)(2) providing an unfavorable pH for biological growth. Although FeCl(3) was intended to provide an electron acceptor for a competing group of bacteria, the mechanism found responsible for inhibiting H(2)S production in the column experiment was a reduction in pH. Application of both Na(2)MoO(4) and FeCl(3) inhibited H(2)S generation over a long period (over 180 days), but the impact of Ca(OH)(2) decreased with time as the alkalinity it contributed was neutralized by the generated H(2)S. Practical application and potential environmental implications need additional exploration.

  18. Combination of simvastatin, calcium silicate/gypsum, and gelatin and bone regeneration in rabbit calvarial defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jing; Wang, Huiming; Shi, Jue; Wang, Ying; Lai, Kaichen; Yang, Xianyan; Chen, Xiaoyi; Yang, Guoli

    2016-03-01

    The present study was performed to determine whether simvastatin improves bone regeneration when combined with calcium silicate/gypsum and gelatin (CS-GEL). The surface morphology was determined using field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FSEM). Degradation in vitro was evaluated by monitoring the weight change of the composites soaked in phosphate buffered saline (PBS). Drug release was evaluated using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Cytotoxicity testing was performed to assess the biocompatibility of composites. Four 5 mm-diameter bone defects were created in rabbit calvaria. Three sites were filled with CS-GEL, 0.5 mg simvastatin-loaded CS-GEL (SIM-0.5) and 1.0 mg simvastatin-loaded CS-GEL (SIM-1.0), respectively, and the fourth was left empty as the control group. Micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) and histological analysis were carried out at 4 and 12 weeks postoperatively. The composites all exhibited three-dimensional structures and showed the residue with nearly 80% after 4 weeks of immersion. Drug release was explosive on the first day and then the release rate remained stable. The composites did not induce any cytotoxicity. The results in vivo demonstrated that the new bone formation and the expressions of BMP-2, OC and type I collagen were improved in the simvastatin-loaded CS-GEL group. It was concluded that the simvastatin-loaded CS-GEL may improve bone regeneration.

  19. A comparative study of AMF diversity in annual and perennial plant species from semiarid gypsum soils.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alguacil, M. M.; Torrecillas, E.; Roldán, A.; Díaz, G.; Torres, P.

    2012-04-01

    The arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) communities composition regulate plant interactions and determine the structure of plant communities. In this study we analysed the diversity of AMF in the roots of two perennial gypsophyte plant species, Herniaria fruticosa and Senecio auricula, and an annual herbaceous species, Bromus rubens, growing in a gypsum soil from a semiarid area. The objective was to determine whether perennial and annual host plants support different AMF communities in their roots and whether there are AMF species that might be indicators of specific functional plant roles in these ecosystems. The roots were analysed by nested PCR, cloning, sequencing of the ribosomal DNA small subunit region and phylogenetic analysis. Twenty AMF sequence types, belonging to the Glomus group A, Glomus group B, Diversisporaceae, Acaulosporaceae, Archaeosporaceae and Paraglomeraceae, were identified. Both gypsophyte perennial species had differing compositions of the AMF community and higher diversity when compared with the annual species, showing preferential selection by specific AMF sequences types. B. rubens did not show host specificity, sharing the full composition of its AMF community with both perennial plant species. Seasonal variations in the competitiveness of AM fungi could explain the observed differences in AMF community composition, but this is still a working hypothesis that requires the analysis of further data obtained from a higher number of both annual and perennial plant species in order to be fully tested.

  20. Coating Circuit Boards With Silicone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaudiano, S.

    1986-01-01

    Techniques appropriate to boards containing CMOS circuits detailed. Document presents procedure for applying thin conformal coating to such electronic assemblies as printed-circuit boards and wire-wrapped boards. Coating is from 1 to 7 mils (25 to 178 micrometers) thick and composed of room-temperature-vulcanizing (RTV) silicone. Specifies materials, equipment, spraying method, and quality requirements. Takes into account special needs of circuits made with complementary metal-oxide/semiconductor (CMOS) devices on circuit boards. Special attention given to preventing damage by electrostatic discharge, to which CMOS circuits especially sensitive.

  1. School Boards and School Board Problems, a Clinical Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seager, Roger C., Ed.; Philipson, Richard L., Ed.

    This document reproduces a series of presentations made at clinics for school board presidents and school superintendents at the University of Wisconsin and Wisconsin State University. Although school board members are usually drawn from the more able segments of society, they approach increasingly difficult problems (new educational demands,…

  2. 78 FR 66785 - SES Performance Review Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-06

    ... SAFETY BOARD SES Performance Review Board AGENCY: National Transportation Safety Board. ACTION: Notice... of the appointment of members of the National Transportation Safety Board, Performance Review Board... with regulations prescribed by the Office of Personnel Management, one or more SES Performance...

  3. 25 CFR 81.8 - Election board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Election board. 81.8 Section 81.8 Indians BUREAU OF... STATUTE § 81.8 Election board. (a) There shall be an election board consisting of the officer in charge... the board. (b) It shall be the duty of the board to conduct elections in compliance with...

  4. School Board Training: Local Control. Reference Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iliff, Alice

    This reference guide, designed for school board members in the state of Alaska, provides overall information about school boards, board members, and board meetings, as they are defined by Alaska state legislation. The first section, "An Overview of Your School Board," provides general definitions, an overall description, and the formal…

  5. Governing Board Meeting Management Checklist.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halverson, Don E.

    This checklist is intended to give school governing board members a means of assessing their meeting practices. The checklist contains five categories, with a total of 80 questions, pertaining to meeting-management variables common to all governing boards. The categories include: (1) preparation for the meetings; (2) operation of the meetings; (3)…

  6. Picasso Meets the School Board.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biskar, Peggy; Crosier, Ron

    1985-01-01

    To build public support for art education, the conference chairperson from the Portland (Oregon) Public School's Board of Education invited Portland students to provide table decorations for a banquet to be held at the board's annual state conference. A portrait sculpture inspired by Picasso's work was the result. (RM)

  7. Quick and Easy Bulletin Boards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soltow, Willow

    1988-01-01

    Provides 12 ideas for bulletin boards that can be used to teach basic skills while at the same time help students understand more about animals. Describes the activities that can be done with each bulletin board, along with a list of materials and instruction. (TW)

  8. General purpose programmable accelerator board

    DOEpatents

    Robertson, Perry J.; Witzke, Edward L.

    2001-01-01

    A general purpose accelerator board and acceleration method comprising use of: one or more programmable logic devices; a plurality of memory blocks; bus interface for communicating data between the memory blocks and devices external to the board; and dynamic programming capabilities for providing logic to the programmable logic device to be executed on data in the memory blocks.

  9. Reflections of a Board Chair.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dudgeon, Paul J.

    In the mid-1990s the Board of Directors at the Saskatchewan Institute of Applied Science and Technology (SIAST) fused four separate institutes and an administrative center to form a single postsecondary institute with a broad Provincial focus. From this experience, the Board of Directors formed a governance strategy of policy and procedure…

  10. An Olive Branch for Boards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrington-Lueker, Donna

    1993-01-01

    Peacekeeping strategies for school-board meetings include developing a code of conduct that spells out guidelines for behavior and then enforcing it; bringing in a neutral observer to help board members work through what is really worrying them; and concentrating on policy. (MLF)

  11. Does School Board Leadership Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shober, Arnold F.; Hartney, Michael T.

    2014-01-01

    Are the nation's 90,000-plus school board members critical players in enhancing student learning? Are they part of the problem? Are they harmless bystanders? Among the takeaways are the following: (1) Board members, by and large, possess accurate information about their districts when it comes to finance, teacher pay, collective bargaining, and…

  12. Demonstration of energy conservation for multi-deck board dryers. Phase I. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-02-08

    A study was made to determine the feasibility of recover and reuse of low level heat from the exhausts of multi-deck dryers used to dry boards in the building materials industry. There are approximately 1000 dryers of this type in the USA, with no heat recovery equipment. These dryers are used in the manufacture of: roof insulation board, ceiling tile and panel stock, wood fiber sheathing, gypsum board, and veneer plywood. Pilot scale tests and analyses show that heat recovery designs utilizing several types of heat exchange equipment are feasible. These include the following: indirect contact air-to-air heat exchangers for preheating combustion air for the dryer furnaces; direct contact air-to-water heat exchangers using water sprays to heat process water; and indirect contact air-to-liquid heat exchangers to heat recirculating liquid in a plant building heating system. The systems recommended for design and installation at the Rockdale plant include all three of the types of heat exchangers. The preliminary estimate for the installed cost for these systems at the Rockdale plant is $565,000 (1979 dllars). Annual heat recovery of 186,000 million Btu is projected with a value of $545,000 using gas costs of $3.00 per million Btu. Payback based on a discounted cash flow analysis using ten year depreciation is about two years.

  13. 78 FR 73586 - Senior Executive Service Performance Review Board (PRB) and Executive Resources Board (ERB...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Surface Transportation Board Senior Executive Service Performance Review Board (PRB) and Executive Resources Board (ERB) Membership AGENCY: Surface Transportation Board, DOT. ACTION: Senior Executive...

  14. Exposure to and acute effects of medium-density fiber board dust.

    PubMed

    Priha, Eero; Pennanen, Sirpa; Rantio, Tiina; Uitti, Jukka; Liesivuori, Jyrki

    2004-11-01

    The goals of this study were (1) to investigate workers' exposure to medium-density fiber (MDF) dust (inhalable dust, particle size),formaldehyde, and volatile organic compounds; (2) to study the possible inflammatory nasal reactions caused by exposure to MDF board dust; and (3) to determine the occurrence of irritative symptoms among exposed workers. Nasal lavage fluid was analyzed for cytokines and nitric oxide/nitrite. and inflammatory cells were counted. The time-weighted average of MDF dust was 1.4 mg/m3 in the workers' breathing zones. MDF board dust was composed mainly of particles exceeding 10 microm in diameter. The MDF board dust released formaldehyde in concentration of about 1000 microg/g when extracted with water for 6 hours at 37 degrees C. The cell counts and cytokine levels of the nasal lavage fluid samples did not show statistically significant differences between the workers exposed to MDF board dust and those exposed to other wood dusts. Nevertheless, two MDF-exposed workers had a considerable increase in the proportion of eosinophils and cytokine levels. Several workers exposed to MDF and wood dusts experienced nasal, eye, and skin symptoms at the end of a work shift. Both exposed groups had significantly more nasal symptoms, although the median dust level was only 1.2 mg/m3, considerably less than the occupational exposure limit for wood dust in Finland. Nasal symptoms were more frequent among workers exposed to MDF board dust and did not correlate with smoking. Our results suggest that the occupational exposure limit of 5 mg/m3 is probably too high for MDF board dust.

  15. Natural and human-induced sinkholes in gypsum terrain and associated environmental problems in NE Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benito, G.; Del Campo, P. Pérez; Gutiérrez-Elorza, M.; Sancho, C.

    1995-04-01

    The central Ebro Basin comprises thick evaporite materials whose high solubility produces typically karstic landforms. The sinkhole morphology developed in the overlying alluvium has been studied using gravimetry and ground-penetrating radar (GPR) on stream terraces, as well as analyzing the evolution of sinkhole morphologies observed in aerial photographs taken in 1928, 1957, and 1985. The sinkhole morphologies give some idea of possible subsurface processes as well as an indication of the final mechanisms involve in sinkhole development. On stream terraces and cover pediments the most commonly encountered dolines are bowl-shaped in their morphology with both diffuse and scarped edges. In contrast, dolines developed in the gypsiferous silt infilled valleys have a funnel and well-shaped morphology. The diffuse-edged bowl-shaped dolines are developed through the progressive subsidence of the alluvial cover, due to washing down of alluvial particles through small voids and cracks into deeper subsurface caves, resulting in a decrease alluvial density. Future compaction of the alluvial cover will produce surface subsidences. This type of dolines are associated with negative gravity anomalies. In contrast, the scarped-edge dolines are formed by the sudden collapse of a cavity roof. The cavities and cracks formed in the gypsum karst may migrate to the surface through the alluvial deposits by piping, and they may subsequently collapse. In this instance, the cavities can be detected by both gravity and GPR anomalies where the voids are not deeper than 4 5 m from the surface. These processes forming sinkholes can be enhanced by man-induced changes in the groundwater hydrologic regime by both inflows, due to irrigation, ditch losses, or pipe leakages, and by outflows from pumping activities.

  16. Soil seed bank recovery occurs more rapidly than expected in semi-arid Mediterranean gypsum vegetation

    PubMed Central

    Olano, J. M.; Caballero, I.; Escudero, A.

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims Seed banks are critical in arid ecosystems and ensure the persistence of species. Despite the importance of seed banks, knowledge about their formation and the extent to which a seed bank can recover after severe perturbation remains scarce. If undisturbed, soil seed banks reflect a long vegetation history; therefore, we would expect that new soil seed banks and those of undisturbed soils require long periods to become similar with respect to both density and composition. In contrast, if soil seed banks are only a short- to mid-term reservoir in which long-term accumulation constitutes only a tiny fraction, they will recover rapidly from the vegetation. To shed light on this question, we evaluated seed bank formation in a semi-arid gypsum community. Methods Soils from 300 plots were replaced with sterilized soil in an undisturbed semi-arid Mediterranean community. Seasonal changes in seed bank density and composition were monitored for 3 years by comparing paired sterilized and control soil samples at each plot. Key Results Differences in seed bank density between sterilized and control soil disappeared after 18 months. The composition of sterilized seed banks was correlated with that of the control plots from the first sampling date, and both were highly correlated with vegetation. Nearly 24 % of the seed bank density could be attributed to secondary dispersal. Most seeds died before emergence (66·41–71·33 %), whereas the rest either emerged (14·08–15·48 %) or persisted in the soil (14·59–18·11 %). Conclusions Seed banks can recover very rapidly even under the limiting and stressful conditions of semi-arid environments. This recovery is based mainly on the seed rain at small scales together with secondary dispersal from intact seed banks in the vicinity. These results emphasize the relevance of processes occurring on short spatial scales in determining community structure. PMID:22003238

  17. Interaction of gypsum and the rhizome of Anemarrhena asphodeloides plays an important role in anti-allergic effects of byakkokakeishito in mice.

    PubMed

    Makino, Toshiaki; Shiraki, Yusaku; Mizukami, Hajime

    2014-07-01

    Gypsum is a crude mineral drug used in the formulas of Japanese kampo medicine and traditional Chinese medicine. The present study aimed to evaluate the anti-allergic effect of byakkokakeishito extract (BKT), which consists of gypsum (natural hydrous calcium sulfate), Anemarrhena Rhizome (rhizome of Anemarrhena asphodeloides), Cinnamon Bark (bark of trunk of Cinnamomum cassia), Oriza Seed (seed of Oryza sativa), and Glycyrrhiza (root and stolon of Glycyrrhiza uralensis), and to clarify the role of gypsum in the formula. We prepared BKT by boiling a mixture of various quantities of gypsum and fixed amounts of the other four crude drugs in water. We evaluated the anti-allergic activity of the formulations using three different murine models of allergy: contact dermatitis induced by painting hapten onto skin; allergic dermatitis-like symptoms induced by cutaneous injection of mite-antigen; and skin passive cutaneous anaphylaxis (PCA) reaction using ovalbumin as antigen. The calcium content in the various BKT samples was dose-dependently increased up to 60 g/day of human dosage. BKT significantly suppressed the allergic symptoms in the three different experimental models. The effect of BKT was augmented by increasing the gypsum dosage only in the PCA reaction model. The extract prepared from a mixture of Anemarrhena Rhizome and gypsum exhibited an effect comparable to that of BKT. BKT exhibits an anti-allergic effect in several animal models, which may provide experimental evidence for the clinical use of BKT in allergic diseases. Gypsum may augment the anti-allergic activity of BKT, presumably through increasing intestinal absorption of Anemarrhena Rhizome-derived active constituents.

  18. The potential leaching and mobilization of trace elements from FGD-gypsum of a coal-fired power plant under water re-circulation conditions.

    PubMed

    Córdoba, Patricia; Castro, Iria; Maroto-Valer, Mercedes; Querol, Xavier

    2015-06-01

    Experimental and geochemical modelling studies were carried out to identify mineral and solid phases containing major, minor, and trace elements and the mechanism of the retention of these elements in Flue Gas Desulphurisation (FGD)-gypsum samples from a coal-fired power plant under filtered water recirculation to the scrubber and forced oxidation conditions. The role of the pH and related environmental factors on the mobility of Li, Ni, Zn, As, Se, Mo, and U from FGD-gypsums for a comprehensive assessment of element leaching behaviour were also carried out. Results show that the extraction rate of the studied elements generally increases with decreasing the pH value of the FGD-gypsum leachates. The increase of the mobility of elements such as U, Se, and As in the FGD-gypsum entails the modification of their aqueous speciation in the leachates; UO2SO4, H2Se, and HAsO2 are the aqueous complexes with the highest activities under acidic conditions. The speciation of Zn, Li, and Ni is not affected in spite of pH changes; these elements occur as free cations and associated to SO4(2) in the FGD-gypsum leachates. The mobility of Cu and Mo decreases by decreasing the pH of the FGD-gypsum leachates, which might be associated to the precipitation of CuSe2 and MoSe2, respectively. Time-of-Flight mass spectrometry of the solid phase combined with geochemical modelling of the aqueous phase has proved useful in understanding the mobility and geochemical behaviour of elements and their partitioning into FGD-gypsum samples.

  19. Residual effects of monoammonium phosphate, gypsum and elemental sulfur on cadmium phytoavailability and translocation from soil to wheat in an effluent irrigated field.

    PubMed

    Qayyum, Muhammad Farooq; Rehman, Muhammad Zia Ur; Ali, Shafaqat; Rizwan, Muhammad; Naeem, Asif; Maqsood, Muhammad Aamer; Khalid, Hinnan; Rinklebe, Jörg; Ok, Yong Sik

    2017-05-01

    Cadmium (Cd) accumulation in agricultural soils is one of the major threats to food security. The application of inorganic amendments such as mono-ammonium phosphate (MAP), gypsum and elemental sulfur (S) could alleviate the negative effects of Cd in crops. However, their long-term residual effects on decreasing Cd uptake in latter crops remain unclear. A field that had previously been applied with treatments including control and 0.2, 0.4 and 0.8% by weight of each MAP, gypsum and S, and grown with wheat and rice and thereafter wheat in the rotation was selected for this study. Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) was grown in the same field as the third crop without further application of amendments to evaluate the residual effects of the amendments on Cd uptake by wheat. Plants were harvested at maturity and grain, and straw yield along with Cd concentration in soil, straw, and grains was determined. The addition of MAP and gypsum significantly increased wheat growth and yield and decreased Cd accumulation in straw and grains compared to control while the reverse was found in S application. Both MAP and gypsum decreased AB-DTPA extractable Cd in soil while S increased the bioavailable Cd in soil. Both MAP and gypsum increased the Cd immobilization in the soil and S decreased Cd immobilization in a dose-additive manner. We conclude that MAP and gypsum had a significant residual effect on decreasing Cd uptake in wheat. The cost-benefit ratio revealed that gypsum is an effective amendment for decreasing Cd concentration in plants.

  20. 7 CFR 1221.2 - Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SORGHUM PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION ORDER Sorghum Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1221.2 Board. Board or Sorghum Promotion, Research, and Information Board means the administrative body established pursuant...

  1. 7 CFR 1221.2 - Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SORGHUM PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION ORDER Sorghum Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1221.2 Board. Board or Sorghum Promotion, Research, and Information Board means the administrative body established pursuant...

  2. 7 CFR 1221.2 - Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SORGHUM PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION ORDER Sorghum Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1221.2 Board. Board or Sorghum Promotion, Research, and Information Board means the administrative body established pursuant...

  3. 7 CFR 1221.2 - Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SORGHUM PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION ORDER Sorghum Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1221.2 Board. Board or Sorghum Promotion, Research, and Information Board means the administrative body established pursuant...

  4. 7 CFR 1221.2 - Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SORGHUM PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION ORDER Sorghum Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1221.2 Board. Board or Sorghum Promotion, Research, and Information Board means the administrative body established pursuant...

  5. 77 FR 65552 - SES Performance Review Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-29

    ... ADMINISTRATION SES Performance Review Board AGENCY: General Services Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY... Executive Service Performance Review Board. The Performance Review Board assures consistency, stability, and objectivity in the performance appraisal process. DATES: Effective Date: October 29, 2012. FOR...

  6. 7 CFR 981.22 - Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ALMONDS GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 981.22 Board. Board means the Almond Board of California which is the...

  7. 7 CFR 981.22 - Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ALMONDS GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 981.22 Board. Board means the Almond Board of California which is the...

  8. 7 CFR 981.22 - Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ALMONDS GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 981.22 Board. Board means the Almond Board of California which is the...

  9. 7 CFR 981.22 - Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ALMONDS GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 981.22 Board. Board means the Almond Board of California which is the...

  10. 7 CFR 981.22 - Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ALMONDS GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 981.22 Board. Board means the Almond Board of California which is the...

  11. 7 CFR 930.2 - Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE TART CHERRIES GROWN IN THE STATES OF... Definitions § 930.2 Board. Board means the Cherry Industry Administrative Board established pursuant to §...

  12. 77 FR 39677 - Performance Review Board Membership

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-05

    ... [Federal Register Volume 77, Number 129 (Thursday, July 5, 2012)] [Notices] [Page 39677] [FR Doc No: 2012-16331] ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD Performance Review Board Membership AGENCY: Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board. ACTION: Notice....

  13. 7 CFR 984.6 - Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE WALNUTS GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 984.6 Board. Board means the California Walnut Board established pursuant to §...

  14. 7 CFR 984.6 - Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE WALNUTS GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 984.6 Board. Board means the California Walnut Board established pursuant to §...

  15. 7 CFR 984.6 - Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE WALNUTS GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 984.6 Board. Board means the California Walnut Board established pursuant to §...

  16. 7 CFR 984.6 - Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE WALNUTS GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 984.6 Board. Board means the California Walnut Board established pursuant to §...

  17. 7 CFR 984.6 - Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE WALNUTS GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 984.6 Board. Board means the California Walnut Board established pursuant to §...

  18. 7 CFR 1210.304 - Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE WATERMELON RESEARCH AND PROMOTION PLAN Watermelon Research and Promotion Plan Definitions § 1210.304 Board. Board means the National Watermelon Promotion Board, hereinafter established pursuant to § 1210.320....

  19. 7 CFR 1210.304 - Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE WATERMELON RESEARCH AND PROMOTION PLAN Watermelon Research and Promotion Plan Definitions § 1210.304 Board. Board means the National Watermelon Promotion Board, hereinafter established pursuant to § 1210.320....

  20. 7 CFR 1210.304 - Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE WATERMELON RESEARCH AND PROMOTION PLAN Watermelon Research and Promotion Plan Definitions § 1210.304 Board. Board means the National Watermelon Promotion Board, hereinafter established pursuant to § 1210.320....

  1. 7 CFR 1210.304 - Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE WATERMELON RESEARCH AND PROMOTION PLAN Watermelon Research and Promotion Plan Definitions § 1210.304 Board. Board means the National Watermelon Promotion Board, hereinafter established pursuant to § 1210.320....

  2. 7 CFR 1210.304 - Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE WATERMELON RESEARCH AND PROMOTION PLAN Watermelon Research and Promotion Plan Definitions § 1210.304 Board. Board means the National Watermelon Promotion Board, hereinafter established pursuant to § 1210.320....

  3. 7 CFR 930.2 - Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE TART CHERRIES GROWN IN THE STATES OF... Definitions § 930.2 Board. Board means the Cherry Industry Administrative Board established pursuant to §...

  4. 7 CFR 930.2 - Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE TART CHERRIES GROWN IN THE STATES OF... Definitions § 930.2 Board. Board means the Cherry Industry Administrative Board established pursuant to §...

  5. 78 FR 54629 - Consumer Advisory Board meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office CONSUMER FINANCIAL PROTECTION BUREAU Consumer Advisory Board meeting AGENCY: Bureau of Consumer Financial Protection. ACTION... Consumer Advisory Board (``CAB'' or ``Board'') of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (Bureau)....

  6. Influence of ammonia and carbon dioxide on the sorption of a basic organic pollutant to carpet and latex-painted gypsum board.

    PubMed

    Ongwandee, Maneerat; Morrison, Glenn C

    2008-08-01

    Sorptive interactions with indoor surfaces strongly influence indoor exposure to organic pollutants. Adsorption itself may be influenced by indoor levels of common indoor gases such as CO2, NH3, and H2O. We quantified sorption characteristics of trimethylamine (TMA) on carpet and painted wallboard, while challenging the surface with gas-phase CO2, NH3 and H2O. We show that the capacity of the carpet to sorb TMA, doubles when the CO2 mixing ratio is increased from 0 to 1000 ppm CO2 at 90% relative humidity. In contrast, NH3 decreases the surface capacity of both carpet and latex paint. Sorption of TMA to these indoor materials is primarily caused by interactions at one or more interfaces. Dissolution of TMA and aqueous acid-base chemistry appear to also contribute to the overall sorptive capacity of carpet at high relative humidity. The reduction in the distribution coefficient, k(e), in the presence of NH3 is explained by competition between TMA and NH3 molecules for sites on the substrates at low-to-medium relative humidity conditions.

  7. Institutional Review Boards

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Institutional review boards (IRBs) or research ethics committees provide a core protection for human research participants through advance and periodic independent review of the ethical acceptability of proposals for human research. IRBs were codified in US regulation just over three decades ago and are widely required by law or regulation in jurisdictions globally. Since the inception of IRBs, the research landscape has grown and evolved, as has the system of IRB review and oversight. Evidence of inconsistencies in IRB review and in application of federal regulations has fueled dissatisfaction with the IRB system. Some complain that IRB review is time-consuming and burdensome without clear evidence of effectiveness at protecting human subjects. Multiple proposals have been offered to reform or update the current IRB system, and many alternative models are currently being tried. Current focus on centralizing and sharing reviews requires more attention and evidence. Proposed changes to the US federal regulations may bring more changes. Data and resourcefulness are needed to further develop and test review and oversight models that provide adequate and respectful protections of participant rights and welfare and that are appropriate, efficient, and adaptable for current and future research. PMID:26042632

  8. 7 CFR 1260.103 - Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE BEEF PROMOTION AND RESEARCH Beef Promotion and Research Order Definitions § 1260.103 Board. Board means the Cattlemen's Beef Promotion...

  9. 7 CFR 1206.2 - Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MANGO PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION Mango Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1206.2 Board. Board or National...

  10. 7 CFR 1206.2 - Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MANGO PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION Mango Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1206.2 Board. Board or National...

  11. 7 CFR 1206.2 - Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MANGO PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION Mango Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1206.2 Board. Board or National...

  12. 7 CFR 1206.2 - Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MANGO PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION Mango Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1206.2 Board. Board or National...

  13. 7 CFR 1206.2 - Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MANGO PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION Mango Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1206.2 Board. Board or National...

  14. To the Die Smartly: Heavy Ion Testing of PEMs on COTS Boards Through the Plastic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wert, J. L.; Normand, E.; Oberg, D. L.; Stevens, L.; Blumer, J.; Fisher, E.; Wode, G.

    1999-01-01

    Seven commercial off the shelf (COTS) boards containing electronic devices (all in plastic packages, PEMS), under consideration for use in a spacecraft subsystem, were exposed to beams of very high energy ions at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (MSU). The ion energies were high enough that an entire board could be exposed in air, and it could still penetrate through the plastic and reach the silicon die. A total of about 300 runs were made, and for each, the LET of the ion entering the silicon die had to be determined, based on the thickness of the plastic lid and the thickness of overlaying materials (e.g., aluminum degraders). Single event latchup (SEL) and functional interrupt (SEFI) were determined during each run, the SEFI by means of simple programs being continuously written to and read from the boards to monitor functionality, while each part was being exposed to the heavy ions.

  15. Carbon and nitrogen stable isotope measurements and X-ray photoabsorption spectroscopy of microbial-mat-containing gypsum crust in modern saline pan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaji, Yuta; Kawahata, Hodaka; Yoshimura, Toshihiro; Kuroda, Junichiro; Ogawa, Nanako O.; Jimenez-Espejo, Francis J.; Lugli, Stefano; Manzi, Vinicio; Roveri, Marco; Tamenori, Yusuke; Ohkouchi, Naohiko

    2015-04-01

    A gypsum crust collected from the Sosalt commercial salt work at Trapani (western Sicily, Italy), which was deposited in several years, has a remarkable layered structure with different colors and physical appearance (from the top to the bottom: transparent gypsum, green layer, and granulous layer containing black particles), each color representing a different microbial community. Previous studies suggest that the colored layers consist of different cyanobacterial communities, purple sulfur bacteria and sulfur reducing bacteria, respectively, and that their biochemical processes are intimately connected (e.g. Caumette et al., 1994; Canfield et al., 2004). In this study we performed stable carbon and nitrogen isotope measurements, elemental mapping, and bulk chemical analyses to describe geochemical characteristics of this layered evaporite deposit. Lower values of δ13C and δ15N in the colored layers compared to the topmost transparent layer indicate active biochemical processes by the bacterial communities, as expected. To further describe the differences between the layers, a synchrotron based micro-X-ray fluorescence (μ-XRF) was used to acquire the spatial distributions of Na, Mg, Sr, S, Cl, and P in the each layer of different color. The elemental mapping combined with chemical speciation of S K-edge X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectra of the gypsum crust showed that the transparent and the green layers were uniformly filled with gypsum crystals, while a somewhat high concentration of elements other than sulfur were observed in the interparticle realm of the bottom gypsum layer. This indicates an earliest alteration at the bottom layer probably as a result of sulfur reduction by sulfur reducing bacteria inhabiting the interparticle realm. It is noteworthy that no reduced sulfur compounds, except for gypsum, was detected in the sample by μ-XANES analysis, despite the presence of a layer inhabited by sulfur reducing bacteria. Since gypsum is

  16. Behavior of aluminum, arsenic, and vanadium during the neutralization of red mud leachate by HCl, gypsum, or seawater.

    PubMed

    Burke, Ian T; Peacock, Caroline L; Lockwood, Cindy L; Stewart, Douglas I; Mortimer, Robert J G; Ward, Michael B; Renforth, Philip; Gruiz, Katalin; Mayes, William M

    2013-06-18

    Red mud leachate (pH 13) collected from Ajka, Hungary is neutralized to < pH 10 by HCl, gypsum, or seawater addition. During acid neutralization >99% Al is removed from solution during the formation of an amorphous boehmite-like precipitate and dawsonite. Minor amounts of As (24%) are also removed from solution via surface adsorption of As onto the Al oxyhydroxides. Gypsum addition to red mud leachate results in the precipitation of calcite, both in experiments and in field samples recovered from rivers treated with gypsum after the October 2010 red mud spill. Calcite precipitation results in 86% Al and 81% As removal from solution, and both are nonexchangeable with 0.1 mol L(-1) phosphate solution. Contrary to As associated with neoformed Al oxyhydroxides, EXAFS analysis of the calcite precipitates revealed only isolated arsenate tetrahedra with no evidence for surface adsorption or incorporation into the calcite structure, possibly as a result of very rapid As scavenging by the calcite precipitate. Seawater neutralization also resulted in carbonate precipitation, with >99% Al and 74% As removed from solution during the formation of a poorly ordered hydrotalcite phase and via surface adsorption to the neoformed precipitates, respectively. Half the bound As could be remobilized by phosphate addition, indicating that As was weakly bound, possibly in the hydrotalcite interlayer. Only 5-16% V was removed from solution during neutralization, demonstrating a lack of interaction with any of the neoformed precipitates. High V concentrations are therefore likely to be an intractable problem during the treatment of red mud leachates.

  17. Coal fly ash and phospho-gypsum mixture as an amendment to improve rice paddy soil fertility

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.B.; Ha, H.S.; Lee, C.H.; Kim, P.J.

    2008-04-15

    Rice is a plant that requires high levels of silica (Si). As a silicate NOD source to rice, coal fly ash (hereafter, fly ash), which has an alkaline pH and high available silicate and boron (B) contents, was mixed with phosphor-gypsum (hereafter, gypsum, 50%, wt wt{sup -1}), a by-product from the production of phosphate fertilizer, to improve the fly ash limitation. Field experiments were carried out to evaluate the effect of the mixture on soil properties and rice (Oryza sativa) productivity in silt loam (SiL) and loamy sand (LS) soils to which 0 (FG 0), 20 (FG 20), 40 (FG 40), and 60 (FG 60) Mg ha{sup -1} were added. The mixture increased the amount of available silicate and exchangeable calcium (Ca) contents in the soils and the uptake of silicate by rice plant. The mixture did not result in accumulation of heavy metals in soil and an excessive uptake of heavy metals by the rice grain. The available boron content in soil increased with the mixture application levels up to 1.42 mg kg{sup -1} following the application of 60 Mg ha{sup -1} but did not show toxicity. The mixture increased significantly rice yield and showed the highest yields following the addition of 30-40 Mg ha{sup -1} in two soils. It is concluded that the fly ash and gypsum mixture could be a good source of inorganic soil amendments to restore the soil nutrient balance in rice paddy soil.

  18. Estimating mineral abundances of clay and gypsum mixtures using radiative transfer models applied to visible-near infrared reflectance spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, K. M.; Milliken, R. E.; Li, S.

    2016-10-01

    Quantitative mineral abundances of lab derived clay-gypsum mixtures were estimated using a revised Hapke VIS-NIR and Shkuratov radiative transfer model. Montmorillonite-gypsum mixtures were used to test the effectiveness of the model in distinguishing between subtle differences in minor absorption features that are diagnostic of mineralogy in the presence of strong H2O absorptions that are not always diagnostic of distinct phases or mineral abundance. The optical constants (k-values) for both endmembers were determined from bi-directional reflectance spectra measured in RELAB as well as on an ASD FieldSpec3 in a controlled laboratory setting. Multiple size fractions were measured in order to derive a single k-value from optimization of the optical path length in the radiative transfer models. It is shown that with careful experimental conditions, optical constants can be accurately determined from powdered samples using a field spectrometer, consistent with previous studies. Variability in the montmorillonite hydration level increased the uncertainties in the derived k-values, but estimated modal abundances for the mixtures were still within 5% of the measured values. Results suggest that the Hapke model works well in distinguishing between hydrated phases that have overlapping H2O absorptions and it is able to detect gypsum and montmorillonite in these simple mixtures where they are present at levels of ∼10%. Care must be taken however to derive k-values from a sample with appropriate H2O content relative to the modeled spectra. These initial results are promising for the potential quantitative analysis of orbital remote sensing data of hydrated minerals, including more complex clay and sulfate assemblages such as mudstones examined by the Curiosity rover in Gale crater.

  19. Determination of trace elements in dolomite and gypsum by atomic absorption spectrometry: overcoming the matrix interference by flotation separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stafilov, Trajče; Zendelovska, Dragica; Pavlovska, Gorica; Čundeva, Katarina

    2002-05-01

    The interferences of Ca and Mg as matrix elements in dolomite and gypsum on Ag, Cd, Cr, Mn, Tl and Zn absorbances during their electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometric (ETAAS) determination are investigated. The results reveal that Ca and Mg do not interfere on Zn and Mn, tend to decrease absorbances of Ag, Cd and Cr, while Tl suffers the most significant influence. A flotation separation method is proposed to eliminate matrix interferences. Hydrated iron(III) oxide, Fe 2O 3· xH 2O, and iron(III) hexamethylenedithiocarbamate, Fe(HMDTC) 3, are applied as flotation collectors. The influence of hydrophobic dithiocarbamate anion, HMDTC, on flotation recoveries of each analyte is studied. The most suitable concentrations of dolomite and gypsum solutions for flotation are determined. To avoid flotation suppression due to the reaction of Ca 2+ and Mg 2+ with surfactant ions, a fit foaming agent was selected. The elements present in dolomite and gypsum as traces have been analyzed by ETAAS. Their ETAAS limits of detection following flotation are found to be 0.021 μg·g -1 for Ag, 0.019 μg·g -1 for Cd, 0.014 μg·g -1 for Cr and 0.11 μg·g -1 for Tl. The determination of Mn and Zn can be performed by flame AAS (FAAS). The limit of detection for Mn is 1.5 μg·g -1, while for Zn 0.8 μg·g -1.

  20. CO2-C emissions associated to soil tillage, liming and gypsum applications in sugarcane areas under green and burned harvest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueiredo, E. B.; Panosso, A. R.; La Scala, N., Jr.

    2012-04-01

    Debate regarding the potential of bioenergy crops to substitute fossil fuel in an efficient way is still opened. New management strategies from agricultural crops should be identified to increase their potential contributing to avoid the climate changes. This study quantified the impact of sugarcane harvest systems and other management practices on CO2-C fluxes following crop replanting. Two agricultural systems were considered: burned and green harvest, in plots where residues were left or removed from soil surface, from no till and after conventional tillage, with or without dolomite and agricultural gypsum applications. Soil CO2 emission, moisture and soil temperature were taken since 24 hours after tillage, totalizing 25 days after tillage with 18 measuring days. NT plots emissions were kept lower than others during the whole period studied, presenting in some cases fluctuations which were mostly related to changes in soil moisture associated to the occurrence of rain precipitations. Changes in CO2-C emission, in each of the harvest systems can be clearly seen when tillage, dolomite or gypsum were applied. The removal of sugarcane residues from soil surface resulted in almost immediate reduction of soil moisture (6% in volume) following an increase in soil NT CO2 emission of + 64%. The additional soil carbon emission due to the simple operation of removing the crop residues from soil surface was 252.4 kg CO2-C ha-1, as higher as the soil CO2 losses induced by tillage operation. Dolomite and agricultural gypsum applications did not always result in higher emissions, especially when applied at the presence of crop residues on soil surface. Reducing tillage frequency in green harvested sugarcane areas could reduce CO2 emissions and probably increasing the soil carbon stock considering long-term period crop system, while maintaining the sugarcane crop residues on soil surface has shown to be also a GHG mitigation option.

  1. Bacterial communities and the nitrogen cycle in the gypsum soils of Cuatro Ciénegas Basin, coahuila: a Mars analogue.

    PubMed

    López-Lozano, Nguyen E; Eguiarte, Luis E; Bonilla-Rosso, Germán; García-Oliva, Felipe; Martínez-Piedragil, Celeste; Rooks, Christine; Souza, Valeria

    2012-07-01

    The OMEGA/Mars Express hyperspectral imager identified gypsum at several sites on Mars in 2005. These minerals constitute a direct record of past aqueous activity and are important with regard to the search of extraterrestrial life. Gale Crater was chosen as Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity's landing site because it is rich in gypsum, as are some desert soils of the Cuatro Ciénegas Basin (CCB) (Chihuahuan Desert, Mexico). The gypsum of the CCB, which is overlain by minimal carbonate deposits, was the product of magmatic activity that occurred under the Tethys Sea. To examine this Mars analogue, we retrieved gypsum-rich soil samples from two contrasting sites with different humidity in the CCB. To characterize the site, we obtained nutrient data and analyzed the genes related to the N cycle (nifH, nirS, and nirK) and the bacterial community composition by using 16S rRNA clone libraries. As expected, the soil content for almost all measured forms of carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus were higher at the more humid site than at the drier site. What was unexpected is the presence of a rich and divergent community at both sites, with higher taxonomic diversity at the humid site and almost no taxonomic overlap. Our results suggest that the gypsum-rich soils of the CCB host a unique microbial ecosystem that includes novel microbial assemblies.

  2. Relative Shock Effects in Mixed Powders of Calcite, Gypsum, and Quartz: A Calibration Scheme from Shock Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, Mary S.

    2009-01-01

    The shock behavior of calcite and gypsum is important in understanding the Cretaceous/Tertiary event and other terrestrial impacts that contain evaporite sediments in their targets. Most interest focuses on issues of devolatilization to quantify the production of CO2 or SO2 to better understand their role in generating a temporary atmosphere and its effects on climate and biota [e.g., papers in 1,2,3,4]. Devolatilization of carbonate is also important because the dispersion and fragmentation of ejecta is strongly controlled by the expansion of large volumes of gas during the impact process as well [5,6]. Shock recovery experiments for calcite yield seemingly conflicting results: early experimental devolatilization studies [7,8,9] suggested that calcite was substantially outgassed at 30 GPa (> 50%). However, the recent petrographic work of [10,11,12] presented evidence that essentially intact calcite is recovered from 60 GPa experiments. [13] reported results of shock experiments on anhydrite, gypsum, and mixtures of those phases with silica. Their observations indicate little or no devolatilization of anhydrite shocked to 42 GPa and that the fraction of sulfur, by mass, that degassed is approx.10(exp -2) of theoretical prediction. In another (preliminary) report of shock experiments on calcite, anhydrite, and gypsum, [14] observe calcite recrystallization when shock loaded at 61 GPa, only intensive plastic deformation in anhydrite shock loaded at 63 GPa, and gypsum converted to anhydrite when shock loaded at 56 GPa. [15] shock loaded anhydrite and quartz to a peak pressure of 60 GPa. All of the quartz grains were trans-formed to glass and the platy anhydrite grains were completely pseudomorphed by small crystallized anhydrite grains. However, no evidence of interaction between the two phases could be observed and they suggest that recrystallization of anhydrite grains is the result of a solid state transformation. [16] reanalyzed the calcite and anhydrite shock

  3. Effects of magnesia and potassium sulfate on gypsum-bonded alumina dental investment for high-fusing casting.

    PubMed

    Yan, M; Takahashi, H

    1998-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to improve the characteristics of gypsum-bonded alumina investments using magnesia and potassium sulfate as chemical additives. Magnesia content improved fluidity, delayed setting reaction, increased green strength, and decreased setting expansion, when mixed with distilled water. When the investment was mixed with potassium sulfate, the setting time and setting expansion were reduced, and the thermal expansion increased, however, the green strength decreased. Therefore, the investment with a small amount of magnesia mixed with potassium sulfate was considered a suitable composition, having adequate setting behavior, enough green strength and sufficient compensate expansion for casting.

  4. Checker Board Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lach, Theodore

    2012-03-01

    The Checker Board Model (CBM) is a 2D model of the nucleus that proposes that the synchronization of the 2 outer orbiting quarks in the proton and neutron accounts for magnetic moment of the nucleons and that the magnetic flux from the nucleons couples (weaves) in the third dimension to form a flat 2D nucleus. The 2D symmetry of the He nucleus helps explain why this structure is so stable. This model explain the mass of the proton and neutron, along with their magnetic moments and their absolute and relative sizes in terms of the above structure and predict the masses of two newly proposed quarksfootnotetextT.M. Lach, Checkerboard Structure of the Nucleus, Infinite Energy, Vol. 5, issue 30, (2000).: the ``up'' and the ``dn'' quarks. Since the masses of the ``up'' and ``dn'' quark determined by the CBM (237.31 MeV and 42.392 MeV respectively). These masses do not fit within the standard model as candidates for u and d quarks, so a new model (New Physics) had to be invented. This new particle physics modelfootnotetextT.M. Lach, Masses of the Sub-Nuclear Particles, nucl-th/0008026, @http://xxx.lanl.gov/ predicts that nature has 5 generations not 3. One independent check of this model is that the wavelength of the up quark orbiting inside the proton turns out to be exactly one DeBroglie wavelength. Details of this model can be found on the web at: http://checkerboard.dnsalias.net/

  5. Removal of phosphorus, fluoride and metals from a gypsum mining leachate using steel slag filters.

    PubMed

    Claveau-Mallet, Dominique; Wallace, Scott; Comeau, Yves

    2013-03-15

    The objective of this work was to evaluate the capacity of steel slag filters to treat a gypsum mining leachate containing 11-107 mg P/L ortho-phosphates, 9-37 mg/L fluoride, 0.24-0.83 mg/L manganese, 0.20-3.3 zinc and 1.7-8.2 mg/L aluminum. Column tests fed with reconstituted leachates were conducted for 145-222 days and sampled twice a week. Two types of electric arc furnace (EAF) slags and three filter sequences were tested. The voids hydraulic retention time (HRT(v)) of columns ranged between 4.3 and 19.2 h. Precipitates of contaminants present in columns were sampled and analyzed with X-ray diffraction at the end of tests. The best removal efficiencies over a period of 179 days were obtained with sequential filters that were composed of Fort Smith EAF slag operated at a total HRT(v) of 34 h which removed 99.9% of phosphorus, 85.3% of fluoride, 98.0% of manganese and 99.3% of zinc. Mean concentration at this system's effluent was 0.04 mg P/L ortho-phosphates, 4 mg/L fluoride, 0.02 mg/L manganese, 0.02 zinc and 0.5 mg/L aluminum. Thus, slag filters are promising passive and economical systems for the remediation of mining effluents. Phosphorus was removed by the formation of apatite (hydroxyapatite, Ca(5)(PO(4))(3)OH or fluoroapatite, Ca(5)(PO(4))(3)F) as confirmed by visual and X-ray diffraction analyses. The growth rate of apatite was favored by a high phosphorus concentration. Calcite crystals were present in columns and appeared to be competing for calcium and volume needed for apatite formation. The calcite crystal growth rate was higher than that of apatite crystals. Fluoride was removed by precipitation of fluoroapatite and its removal was favored by a high ratio of phosphorus to fluoride in the wastewater.

  6. Evolution of microstructure and elastic wave velocities in dehydrated gypsum samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milsch, H.; Priegnitz, M.

    2012-04-01

    This study aims at contributing to the experimental database of changes in rock physical properties, particularly elastic wave velocities, induced by devolatilization reactions. Cylindrical samples of natural gypsum were dehydrated in air for up to 800 h at ambient pressure and temperatures between 378 and 423 K. Subsequently, the transformation kinetics, reaction induced changes in microstructure and porosity and the concurrent evolution of the sample P and S-wave velocities were constrained. Weighing the heated samples in predefined time intervals yielded the reaction progress where the stoichiometric mass balance indicated an ultimate dehydration to anhydrite regardless of temperature. Porosity was observed to continuously increase with reaction progress from approximately 2 % for fully hydrated samples to 30 % for completely dehydrated ones, whilst the initial bulk volume was preserved. In a first set, P-wave velocity was measured at ambient conditions with ultrasonic transducers indicating a linear decrease with porosity from 5.2 km/s at 2 % to 1.0 km/s at 30 %. Results of a second set of ultrasonic measurements for both P and S-waves will be presented as well aiming at a spatially resolved wave velocity dependence on microstructure. For P-waves three different effective medium models - Voigt, Wyllie (Reuss), and Nur - were compared to the data. The linear dependence of P-wave velocity on porosity observed is best represented by the Voigt bound. The Voigt bound, however, overestimates the measured values significantly. The Wyllie-Equation (the Reuss bound) does not replicate the linear decrease in P-wave velocity with porosity and generally underestimates the data. However, at porosities above approximately 25 % the agreement with measured values is excellent. The Nur-Model yields a nonlinear dependence but replicates the data best for model-inherent critical porosities between 0.25 and 0.3. Thin section micrographs taken on selected samples reveal a sharp

  7. Moisture parameters and fungal communities associated with gypsum drywall in buildings.

    PubMed

    Dedesko, Sandra; Siegel, Jeffrey A

    2015-12-08

    Uncontrolled excess moisture in buildings is a common problem that can lead to changes in fungal communities. In buildings, moisture parameters can be classified by location and include assessments of moisture in the air, at a surface, or within a material. These parameters are not equivalent in dynamic indoor environments, which makes moisture-induced fungal growth in buildings a complex occurrence. In order to determine the circumstances that lead to such growth, it is essential to have a thorough understanding of in situ moisture measurement, the influence of building factors on moisture parameters, and the levels of these moisture parameters that lead to indoor fungal growth. Currently, there are disagreements in the literature on this topic. A literature review was conducted specifically on moisture-induced fungal growth on gypsum drywall. This review revealed that there is no consistent measurement approach used to characterize moisture in laboratory and field studies, with relative humidity measurements being most common. Additionally, many studies identify a critical moisture value, below which fungal growth will not occur. The values defined by relative humidity encompassed the largest range, while those defined by moisture content exhibited the highest variation. Critical values defined by equilibrium relative humidity were most consistent, and this is likely due to equilibrium relative humidity being the most relevant moisture parameter to microbial growth, since it is a reasonable measure of moisture available at surfaces, where fungi often proliferate. Several sources concur that surface moisture, particularly liquid water, is the prominent factor influencing microbial changes and that moisture in the air and within a material are of lesser importance. However, even if surface moisture is assessed, a single critical moisture level to prevent fungal growth cannot be defined, due to a number of factors, including variations in fungal genera and

  8. Baker nominated to Science Board

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    President Ronald Reagan has announced his intention to nominate Warren J. Baker to the National Science Board (NSB), according to an announcement by the National Science Foundation (NSF). Baker is the president of California Polytechnic State University in San Luis Obispo. A civil engineer by training, his research specialty is soil dynamics.The 24-member NSB is the policy-making body of the NSF. Provided that the Senate confirms his appointment, Baker will serve on the board until May 1988.

  9. Vibration on board and health effects.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Anker; Jepsen, Jørgen Riis

    2014-01-01

    There is only limited knowledge of the exposure to vibrations of ships' crews and their risk of vibration-induced health effects. Exposure to hand-arm vibrations from the use of vibrating tools at sea does not differ from that in the land-based trades. However, in contrast to most other work places, seafarers are also exposed to vibrations to the feet when standing on vibrating surfaces on board. Anecdotal reports have related the development of "white feet" to local exposure to vibration, e.g. in mining, but this connection has not been investigated in the maritime setting. As known from studies of the health consequences of whole body vibrations in land-transportation, such exposure at sea may affect ships' passengers and crews. While the relation of back disorders to high levels of whole body vibration has been demonstrated among e.g. tractor drivers, there are no reported epidemiological evidence for such relation among seafarers except for fishermen, who, however, are also exposed to additional recognised physical risk factors at work. The assessment and reduction of vibrations by naval architects relates to technical implications of this impact for the ships' construction, but has limited value for the estimation of health risks because they express the vibration intensity differently that it is done in a medical context.

  10. Changes in the properties and biological activity of crusty solonetzes in the Baraba Lowland under the long-term impact of gypsum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semendyaeva, N. V.; Korobova, L. N.; Elizarov, N. V.

    2014-11-01

    A single application of gypsum to crusty hydromorphic low- and high-sodium solonetzes led to the destruction of the columnar structure and the formation of a valuable crumb-granular structure after 25 years. The surface crust disappeared from the reclaimed solonetzes, whereas its thickness in the control soils was about 10 cm. The long-term impact of gypsum also resulted in lower bulk density values in the upper soil meter, especially in the high-sodium solonetz. The number of microorganisms accumulating available nitrogen- and carbon-bearing compounds increased, and the urease and proteolytic activities of the soil became more pronounced. In the upper 20 cm of the reclaimed solonetzes, the microbiological transformation of the plant remains into the soil organic matter became more intensive, thus attesting to the development of the soddy process. The favorable effects of gypsum increased with an increase in the rate of its application.

  11. Presidential Search: An Overview for Board Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of Governing Boards of Universities and Colleges, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The selection of a president is a governing board's most important responsibility, and the search process is the board's best opportunity to help guide its institution into a successful new era. This guide outlines the leadership roles during a search (those of the board, the board chair, the search committee, and others), briefs board…

  12. 49 CFR 1011.2 - The Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false The Board. 1011.2 Section 1011.2 Transportation... TRANSPORTATION GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS BOARD ORGANIZATION; DELEGATIONS OF AUTHORITY § 1011.2 The Board. (a) The Board reserves to itself for consideration and disposition: (1) All rulemaking and...

  13. 4 CFR 27.1 - The Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 4 Accounts 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false The Board. 27.1 Section 27.1 Accounts GOVERNMENT... § 27.1 The Board. The Government Accountability Office Personnel Appeals Board, hereinafter the Board, is composed of five members appointed by the Comptroller General, in accordance with the...

  14. 78 FR 22545 - Performance Review Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-16

    ... Performance Review Board AGENCY: Federal Maritime Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given of the names of the members of the Performance Review Board. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT... Management, one or more performance review boards. The board shall review and evaluate the initial...

  15. 75 FR 57987 - SES Performance Review Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-23

    ... ARTS AND HUMANITIES SES Performance Review Board AGENCY: National Endowment for the Arts. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given of the names of members of the Performance Review Board for the... Management, one or more SES Performance Review Boards. The Board shall review and evaluate the...

  16. 75 FR 69706 - SES Performance Review Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-15

    ... Doc No: 2010-28652] NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD SES Performance Review Board AGENCY: National... National Transportation Safety Board Performance Review Board (PRB). FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Emily... accordance with regulations prescribed by the Office of Personnel Management, one or more SES...

  17. 75 FR 80051 - Performance Review Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-21

    ... Performance Review Board AGENCY: Federal Maritime Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given of the names of the members of the Performance Review Board. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT... Personnel Management, one or more performance review boards. The board shall review and evaluate the...

  18. 22 CFR 902.3 - Board staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Board staff. 902.3 Section 902.3 Foreign Relations FOREIGN SERVICE GRIEVANCE BOARD ORGANIZATION § 902.3 Board staff. The chairperson shall select the Board's executive secretary and other staff provided for in the Act. The executive secretary and...

  19. Developing Effective Boards, Councils and Commissions. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dyer, Delwyn A.; Williams, Oscar M.

    Effective board operations are an art as well as a science. Local advisory boards or governing boards/councils refer to active, duly organized, and representative bodies that hold regular meetings and make decisions on behalf of the membership, and whose members serve without pay. Advisory boards assist those who make organizational decisions but…

  20. 22 CFR 908.3 - Board recommendations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Board recommendations. 908.3 Section 908.3 Foreign Relations FOREIGN SERVICE GRIEVANCE BOARD REMEDIES § 908.3 Board recommendations. (a) If the Board... disciplinary action against any employee of an Agency, it shall make an appropriate recommendation to the...

  1. 22 CFR 908.3 - Board recommendations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2011-04-01 2009-04-01 true Board recommendations. 908.3 Section 908.3 Foreign Relations FOREIGN SERVICE GRIEVANCE BOARD REMEDIES § 908.3 Board recommendations. (a) If the Board... disciplinary action against any employee of an Agency, it shall make an appropriate recommendation to the...

  2. 22 CFR 908.3 - Board recommendations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2012-04-01 2009-04-01 true Board recommendations. 908.3 Section 908.3 Foreign Relations FOREIGN SERVICE GRIEVANCE BOARD REMEDIES § 908.3 Board recommendations. (a) If the Board... disciplinary action against any employee of an Agency, it shall make an appropriate recommendation to the...

  3. 22 CFR 909.3 - Board recommendation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Board recommendation. 909.3 Section 909.3 Foreign Relations FOREIGN SERVICE GRIEVANCE BOARD DECISIONMAKING § 909.3 Board recommendation. Where the Board's decision is a recommendation, it shall be directed to the head of the Agency. A copy of...

  4. 22 CFR 909.3 - Board recommendation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2012-04-01 2009-04-01 true Board recommendation. 909.3 Section 909.3 Foreign Relations FOREIGN SERVICE GRIEVANCE BOARD DECISIONMAKING § 909.3 Board recommendation. Where the Board's decision is a recommendation, it shall be directed to the head of the Agency. A copy of...

  5. 22 CFR 909.3 - Board recommendation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2011-04-01 2009-04-01 true Board recommendation. 909.3 Section 909.3 Foreign Relations FOREIGN SERVICE GRIEVANCE BOARD DECISIONMAKING § 909.3 Board recommendation. Where the Board's decision is a recommendation, it shall be directed to the head of the Agency. A copy of...

  6. 22 CFR 908.3 - Board recommendations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2013-04-01 2009-04-01 true Board recommendations. 908.3 Section 908.3 Foreign Relations FOREIGN SERVICE GRIEVANCE BOARD REMEDIES § 908.3 Board recommendations. (a) If the Board... disciplinary action against any employee of an Agency, it shall make an appropriate recommendation to the...

  7. 22 CFR 909.3 - Board recommendation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2013-04-01 2009-04-01 true Board recommendation. 909.3 Section 909.3 Foreign Relations FOREIGN SERVICE GRIEVANCE BOARD DECISIONMAKING § 909.3 Board recommendation. Where the Board's decision is a recommendation, it shall be directed to the head of the Agency. A copy of...

  8. 22 CFR 908.3 - Board recommendations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Board recommendations. 908.3 Section 908.3 Foreign Relations FOREIGN SERVICE GRIEVANCE BOARD REMEDIES § 908.3 Board recommendations. (a) If the Board... disciplinary action against any employee of an Agency, it shall make an appropriate recommendation to the...

  9. 22 CFR 909.3 - Board recommendation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Board recommendation. 909.3 Section 909.3 Foreign Relations FOREIGN SERVICE GRIEVANCE BOARD DECISIONMAKING § 909.3 Board recommendation. Where the Board's decision is a recommendation, it shall be directed to the head of the Agency. A copy of...

  10. 32 CFR 1602.6 - Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Board. 1602.6 Section 1602.6 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense SELECTIVE SERVICE SYSTEM DEFINITIONS § 1602.6 Board. The word board when used alone, unless the context otherwise indicates, includes a local board,...

  11. 76 FR 70428 - Performance Review Board Membership

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-14

    ... Department of the Army Performance Review Board Membership AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Notice is given of the names of members of a Performance Review Board for the Department... accordance with regulations, one or more Senior Executive Service performance review boards. The boards...

  12. Getting Good Board Members and Holding Them.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goble, Nick

    Although serving on a school board is frequently a thankless and difficult task, good board members must be recruited, since the elected school board is a cornerstone of our representative form of government and is a central element of local control. A recent increase in board member turnover is assignable to the large amount of time it takes to…

  13. 22 CFR 902.2 - Board operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Board operations. 902.2 Section 902.2 Foreign Relations FOREIGN SERVICE GRIEVANCE BOARD ORGANIZATION § 902.2 Board operations. (a) The Board may operate either as a whole, or through panels or individual members designated by the chairperson. (b)...

  14. 7 CFR 1160.105 - Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Board. 1160.105 Section 1160.105 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... Definitions § 1160.105 Board. Board means the National Processor Advertising and Promotion Board...

  15. 49 CFR 1011.2 - The Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 8 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false The Board. 1011.2 Section 1011.2 Transportation... TRANSPORTATION GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS BOARD ORGANIZATION; DELEGATIONS OF AUTHORITY § 1011.2 The Board. (a) The Board reserves to itself for consideration and disposition: (1) All rulemaking and...

  16. 4 CFR 27.1 - The Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 4 Accounts 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false The Board. 27.1 Section 27.1 Accounts GOVERNMENT... § 27.1 The Board. The Government Accountability Office Personnel Appeals Board, hereinafter the Board, is composed of five members appointed by the Comptroller General, in accordance with the...

  17. 4 CFR 27.1 - The Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 4 Accounts 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false The Board. 27.1 Section 27.1 Accounts GOVERNMENT... § 27.1 The Board. The Government Accountability Office Personnel Appeals Board, hereinafter the Board, is composed of five members appointed by the Comptroller General, in accordance with the...

  18. 4 CFR 27.1 - The Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 4 Accounts 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false The Board. 27.1 Section 27.1 Accounts GOVERNMENT... § 27.1 The Board. The Government Accountability Office Personnel Appeals Board, hereinafter the Board, is composed of five members appointed by the Comptroller General, in accordance with the...

  19. 49 CFR 1011.2 - The Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 8 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false The Board. 1011.2 Section 1011.2 Transportation... TRANSPORTATION GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS BOARD ORGANIZATION; DELEGATIONS OF AUTHORITY § 1011.2 The Board. (a) The Board reserves to itself for consideration and disposition: (1) All rulemaking and...

  20. 4 CFR 27.1 - The Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 4 Accounts 1 2014-01-01 2013-01-01 true The Board. 27.1 Section 27.1 Accounts GOVERNMENT... § 27.1 The Board. The Government Accountability Office Personnel Appeals Board, hereinafter the Board, is composed of five members appointed by the Comptroller General, in accordance with the...

  1. 7 CFR 930.2 - Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Board. 930.2 Section 930.2 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and... Definitions § 930.2 Board. Board means the Cherry Industry Administrative Board established pursuant to §...

  2. 7 CFR 982.18 - Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 982.18 Board. Board means the Hazelnut Marketing Board... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Board. 982.18 Section 982.18 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements...

  3. 32 CFR 1602.6 - Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Board. 1602.6 Section 1602.6 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense SELECTIVE SERVICE SYSTEM DEFINITIONS § 1602.6 Board. The word board when used alone, unless the context otherwise indicates, includes a local board,...

  4. 7 CFR 1217.4 - Board foot.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Board foot. 1217.4 Section 1217.4 Agriculture..., and Industry Information Order Definitions § 1217.4 Board foot. Board foot or BF means a unit of... cubic equivalent. A board foot calculation for softwood lumber 1 inch or more in thickness is based...

  5. 7 CFR 1217.4 - Board foot.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Board foot. 1217.4 Section 1217.4 Agriculture..., and Industry Information Order Definitions § 1217.4 Board foot. Board foot or BF means a unit of... cubic equivalent. A board foot calculation for softwood lumber 1 inch or more in thickness is based...

  6. 7 CFR 1217.4 - Board foot.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Board foot. 1217.4 Section 1217.4 Agriculture..., and Industry Information Order Definitions § 1217.4 Board foot. Board foot or BF means a unit of... cubic equivalent. A board foot calculation for softwood lumber 1 inch or more in thickness is based...

  7. Bacterial Communities and the Nitrogen Cycle in the Gypsum Soils of Cuatro Ciénegas Basin, Coahuila: A Mars Analogue

    PubMed Central

    López-Lozano, Nguyen E.; Eguiarte, Luis E.; Bonilla-Rosso, Germán; García-Oliva, Felipe; Martínez-Piedragil, Celeste; Rooks, Christine

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The OMEGA/Mars Express hyperspectral imager identified gypsum at several sites on Mars in 2005. These minerals constitute a direct record of past aqueous activity and are important with regard to the search of extraterrestrial life. Gale Crater was chosen as Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity's landing site because it is rich in gypsum, as are some desert soils of the Cuatro Ciénegas Basin (CCB) (Chihuahuan Desert, Mexico). The gypsum of the CCB, which is overlain by minimal carbonate deposits, was the product of magmatic activity that occurred under the Tethys Sea. To examine this Mars analogue, we retrieved gypsum-rich soil samples from two contrasting sites with different humidity in the CCB. To characterize the site, we obtained nutrient data and analyzed the genes related to the N cycle (nifH, nirS, and nirK) and the bacterial community composition by using 16S rRNA clone libraries. As expected, the soil content for almost all measured forms of carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus were higher at the more humid site than at the drier site. What was unexpected is the presence of a rich and divergent community at both sites, with higher taxonomic diversity at the humid site and almost no taxonomic overlap. Our results suggest that the gypsum-rich soils of the CCB host a unique microbial ecosystem that includes novel microbial assemblies. Key Words: Cuatro Ciénegas Basin—Gale Crater—Gypsum soil microbial diversity—Molecular ecology—Nitrogen cycle. Astrobiology 12, 699–709. PMID:22920518

  8. Successful lichen translocation on disturbed gypsum areas: A test with adhesives to promote the recovery of biological soil crusts.

    PubMed

    Ballesteros, M; Ayerbe, J; Casares, M; Cañadas, E M; Lorite, J

    2017-04-03

    The loss of biological soil crusts represents a challenge for the restoration of disturbed environments, specifically in particular substrates hosting unique lichen communities. However, the recovery of lichen species affected by mining is rarely addressed in restoration projects. Here, we evaluate the translocation of Diploschistes diacapsis, a representative species of gypsum lichen communities affected by quarrying. We tested how a selection of adhesives could improve thallus attachment to the substrate and affect lichen vitality (as CO2 exchange and fluorescence) in rainfall-simulation and field experiments. Treatments included: white glue, water, hydroseeding stabiliser, gum arabic, synthetic resin, and a control with no adhesive. Attachment differed only in the field, where white glue and water performed best. Adhesives altered CO2 exchange and fluorescence yield. Notably, wet spoils allowed thalli to bind to the substrate after drying, revealing as the most suitable option for translocation. The satisfactory results applying water on gypsum spoils are encouraging to test this methodology with other lichen species. Implementing these measures in restoration projects would be relatively easy and cost-effective. It would help not only to recover lichen species in the disturbed areas but also to take advantage of an extremely valuable biological material that otherwise would be lost.

  9. Successful lichen translocation on disturbed gypsum areas: A test with adhesives to promote the recovery of biological soil crusts

    PubMed Central

    Ballesteros, M.; Ayerbe, J.; Casares, M.; Cañadas, E. M.; Lorite, J.

    2017-01-01

    The loss of biological soil crusts represents a challenge for the restoration of disturbed environments, specifically in particular substrates hosting unique lichen communities. However, the recovery of lichen species affected by mining is rarely addressed in restoration projects. Here, we evaluate the translocation of Diploschistes diacapsis, a representative species of gypsum lichen communities affected by quarrying. We tested how a selection of adhesives could improve thallus attachment to the substrate and affect lichen vitality (as CO2 exchange and fluorescence) in rainfall-simulation and field experiments. Treatments included: white glue, water, hydroseeding stabiliser, gum arabic, synthetic resin, and a control with no adhesive. Attachment differed only in the field, where white glue and water performed best. Adhesives altered CO2 exchange and fluorescence yield. Notably, wet spoils allowed thalli to bind to the substrate after drying, revealing as the most suitable option for translocation. The satisfactory results applying water on gypsum spoils are encouraging to test this methodology with other lichen species. Implementing these measures in restoration projects would be relatively easy and cost-effective. It would help not only to recover lichen species in the disturbed areas but also to take advantage of an extremely valuable biological material that otherwise would be lost. PMID:28367957

  10. Assessment of natural radiation exposure levels and mass attenuation coefficients of lime and gypsum samples used in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Damla, Nevzat; Cevik, Uğur; Kobya, Ali Ihsan; Celik, Ahmet; Celik, Necati

    2010-11-01

    The activity concentrations of 226Ra, 232Th, and 40K in lime and gypsum samples used as building materials in Turkey were measured using gamma spectrometry. The mean activity concentrations of 226Ra, 232Th, and 40K were found to be 38±16, 20±9, and 156±54 Bq kg(-1) for lime and found to be 17±6, 13±5, and 429±24 Bq kg(-1) for gypsum, respectively. The radiological hazards due to the natural radioactivity in the samples were inferred from calculations of radium equivalent activities (Raeq), indoor absorbed dose rate in the air, the annual effective dose, and gamma and alpha indices. These radiological parameters were evaluated and compared with the internationally recommended limits. The experimental mass attenuation coefficients (μ/ρ) of the samples were determined in the energy range 81-1,332 keV. The experimental mass attenuation coefficients were compared with theoretical values obtained using XCOM. It is found that the calculated values and the experimental results are in good agreement.

  11. [Application of gypsum-bonded investment containing niobium carbide on casting of alloy for metal-ceramic restoration].

    PubMed

    Tsuruta, S; Ban, S; Hasegawa, J; Hayashi, S; Iiyama, K; Yamamura, Y

    1990-07-01

    Experimental gypsum-bonded investments containing 0.5-5.0 wt% NbC were prepared by mechanical mixing of each powder. Setting and thermal expansion measurement, compressive strength and casting accuracy for Ni-Cr alloy for metal-ceramic restoration were investigated. Analysis of NbC during heating was carried out by X-ray diffraction, TG-DTA and SEM. NbC was oxidized to Nb2O5 with a volume change between 300-600 degrees C, as in the following equation: 2NbC + 4 1/2O2----Nb2O5 + 2CO2 The theoretical volume of 1/2Nb2O5 calculated from the lattice constants according to JCPDS file was approximately 4 times larger than that of NbC. The experimental investments of 70 wt% cristobalite and 30 wt% gypsum containing 2.0, 3.0 and 5.0 wt% NbC showed large thermal expansion of 7.0, 10.0 and 13.0% respectively. The investment containing 2.0 wt% NbC showed nearly the same casting accuracy for Ni-Cr alloys for metal-ceramic restoration as the commercial phosphate-bonded investment.

  12. Gypsum-based biomaterials: Evaluation of physical and mechanical properties, cellular effects and its potential as a pulp liner.

    PubMed

    Low, Amy; Mohd Yusof, Hamidah; Reza, Fazal; Abdullah Nurul, Asma; Sritharan, Shaminea; Haania Zain Ali, Niswathul; Subhi Azeez, Hasan; Husein, Adam

    2015-01-01

    This in vitro study aimed to evaluate setting time and compressive strength of gypsum-based chitosan biomaterials and its effect on proliferation of stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHED) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity. Pure-GYP was mixed with water (2.5 g: 1.9 mL); Gyp-CHT was prepared with gypsum, chitosan, and water (2.5 g: 0.285 g: 1.9 mL). Cell viability and ALP activity were assessed at different periods. Data were analyzed using SPSS (p<0.05). The setting times were 2.7 min and 2.8 min for pure-GYP and Gyp-CHT, respectively. Significantly higher compressive strength was observed with Gyp-CHT. SHED treatments with both materials were not cytotoxic. ALP was consistently higher in the treated groups compared with the control. Cellular attachments were evident with SEM. Excellent cellular viability with pure-GYP and Gyp-CHT, as well as increased ALP activities, suggested the possibility of tertiary dentin formation. Further studies are necessary to evaluate the biomaterials for its pulp protective potentialities.

  13. Recovery and utilization of gypsum and limestone from scrubber sludge. Final technical report, September 1, 1992--August 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Kawatra, S.K.; Eisele, T.C.

    1993-12-31

    Wet flue-gas desulfurization units in coal-fired power plants produce a large amount of sludge which must be disposed of, and which is currently landfilled in most cases. Increasing landfill costs are gradually forcing utilities to find other alternatives. In principle, this sludge can be used to make gypsum (CaSO{sub 4}{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O) for products such as plaster-of-Paris and wallboard, but only if impurities such as unreacted limestone and soluble salts are removed, and the calcium sulfite (CaSO{sub 3}) is oxidized to calcium sulfate (CaSO{sub 4}). This project investigated methods for removing the impurities from the sludge so that high-quality, salable gypsum products can be made. Two processes were studied, both separately and in combination: Water-only cycloning, and froth flotation. A large fraction (30--40%) of the impurities in the sludge are contained in the coarser, higher-density particles, which are readily removed using a water-only cyclone. Much of the remaining impurities are hydrophobic, and can be removed by froth flotation. A combined cyclone/froth flotation process has been found to be suitable for producing a high-purity product from scrubber sludge at low cost.

  14. A new method for the characterization of the degree of fire damage to gypsum wallboard for use in fire investigations.

    PubMed

    Gorbett, Gregory E; Morris, Sarah M; Meacham, Brian J; Wood, Christopher B

    2015-01-01

    A new method to characterize the degree of fire damage to gypsum wallboard is introduced, implemented, and tested to determine the efficacy of its application among novices. The method was evaluated by comparing degree of fire damage assessments of novices with and without the method. Thirty-nine "novice" raters assessed damage to a gypsum wallboard surface, completing 66 ratings, first without the method, and then again using the method. The inter-rater reliability was evaluated for ratings of damage without and with the method. For novice fire investigators rating degree of damage without the aid of the method, ICC(1,2) = 0.277 with 95% CI (0.211, 0.365), and with the method, ICC(2,1) = 0.593 with 95% CI (0.509, 0.684). Results indicate that the raters were more reliable in their analysis of the degree of fire damage when using the method, which support the use of standardized processes to decrease the variability in data collection and interpretation.

  15. Mercury vapor pressure of flue gas desulfurization scrubber suspensions: effects of pH level, gypsum, and iron.

    PubMed

    Schuetze, Jan; Kunth, Daniel; Weissbach, Sven; Koeser, Heinz

    2012-03-06

    Calcium-based scrubbers designed to absorb HCl and SO(2) from flue gases can also remove oxidized mercury. Dissolved mercury halides may have an appreciable partial vapor pressure. Chemical reduction of the dissolved mercury may increase the Hg emission, thereby limiting the coremoval of mercury in the wet scrubbing process. In this paper we evaluate the effects of the pH level, different gypsum qualities, and iron in flue gas desulfurization (FGD) scrubber suspensions. The impact of these parameters on mercury vapor pressure was studied under controlled laboratory conditions in model scrubber suspensions. A major influence is exerted by pH values above 7, considerably amplifying the mercury concentration in the vapor phase above the FGD scrubber suspension. Gypsum also increases the mercury re-emission. Fe(III) decreases and Fe(II) increases the vapor pressure significantly. The consequences of the findings for a reliable coremoval of mercury in FGD scrubbers are discussed. It is shown that there is an increased risk of poor mercury capture in lime-based FGD scrubbers in comparison to limestone FGD scrubbers.

  16. 78 FR 67147 - Senior Executive Service Performance Review Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-08

    ... INVESTMENT BOARD Senior Executive Service Performance Review Board AGENCY: Federal Retirement Thrift... Executive Service Performance Review Boards for the Federal Retirement Thrift Investment Board. The purpose of the Performance Review Boards is to view and make recommendations concerning proposed...

  17. 76 FR 78257 - Senior Executive Service Performance Review Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-16

    ... INVESTMENT BOARD Senior Executive Service Performance Review Board AGENCY: Federal Retirement Thrift... Executive Service Performance Review Boards for the Federal Retirement Thrift Investment Board. The purpose of the Performance Review Boards is to view and make ] recommendations concerning...

  18. The cytotoxic effect of wastewater from the phosphoric gypsum depot on common oak (Quercus robur L.) and shallot (Allium cepa var. ascalonicum).

    PubMed

    Pavlica, M; Besendorfer, V; Rosa, J; Papes, D

    2000-11-01

    The effect of wastewater from a phosphoric gypsum depot on common oak, Quercus robur L., at cytogenetical level was studied. Allium-test was used as a control. The treatment of common oak seedlings with wastewater under laboratory conditions caused mitodepressive effect. Chromosome aberrations and mitotic irregularities were found. Cytogenetic analysis of common oak seedlings grown from acorns collected near the depot did not show changes in mitotic activity in comparison to control but the number of aberrations was higher than in control. In comparison to Alliumtest common oak was found to be more tolerant to wastewater from the phosphoric gypsum depot.

  19. Incorporation of gypsum waste in ceramic block production: Proposal for a minimal battery of tests to evaluate technical and environmental viability of this recycling process.

    PubMed

    Godinho-Castro, Alcione P; Testolin, Renan C; Janke, Leandro; Corrêa, Albertina X R; Radetski, Claudemir M

    2012-01-01

    Civil engineering-related construction and demolition debris is an important source of waste disposed of in municipal solid waste landfills. After clay materials, gypsum waste is the second largest contributor to the residential construction waste stream. As demand for sustainable building practices grows, interest in recovering gypsum waste from construction and demolition debris is increasing, but there is a lack of standardized tests to evaluate the technical and environmental viability of this solid waste recycling process. By recycling gypsum waste, natural deposits of gypsum might be conserved and high amounts of the waste by-product could be reused in the civil construction industry. In this context, this paper investigates a physical property (i.e., resistance to axial compression), the chemical composition and the ecotoxicological potential of ceramic blocks constructed with different proportions of clay, cement and gypsum waste, and assesses the feasibility of using a minimal battery of tests to evaluate the viability of this recycling process. Consideration of the results for the resistance to axial compression tests together with production costs revealed that the best formulation was 35% of plastic clay, 35% of non-plastic clay, 10% of Portland cement and 20% of gypsum waste, which showed a mean resistance of 4.64MPa. Energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry showed calcium and sulfur to be the main elements, while quartz, gypsum, ettringite and nacrite were the main crystalline compounds found in this formulation. Ecotoxicity tests showed that leachate from this formulation is weakly toxic toward daphnids and bacteria (EC(20%)=69.0 and 75.0, respectively), while for algae and fish the leachate samples were not toxic at the EC(50%) level. Overall, these results show that the addition of 20% of gypsum waste to the ceramic blocks could provide a viable substitute for clay in the ceramics industry and the tests applied in this study proved to be a useful tool

  20. Evidence for micro-biological induction of {101} montmartre twinning of gypsum (CaSO 4 ⋯ 2H 2O)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cody, A. M.; Cody, R. D.

    1989-12-01

    Natural gypsum crystals twinned on d{101} have been found almost exclusively in deposits from saline lakes and secondary mine alterations. The presence of α-amylase, an enzyme excreted into soils and water by bacteria, fungi, algae, and plant roots, was found to induce d{101} twinning of gypsum crystals formed by diffusion in laboratory growth experiments. From this evidence, extensive deposits of d{101} twinned crystals such as those of the Paris Basin are proposed to form in the α-amylase concentrations that results from certain microbial blooms.

  1. 76 FR 52997 - Public Company Accounting Oversight Board; Order Approving Proposed Board Funding Final Rules for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-24

    ... COMMISSION Public Company Accounting Oversight Board; Order Approving Proposed Board Funding Final Rules for Allocation of the Board's Accounting Support Fee Among Issuers, Brokers, and Dealers, and Other Amendments to... Accounting Oversight Board (the ``Board'' or the ``PCAOB'') filed with the Securities and Exchange...

  2. The Affect of the Space Environment on the Survival of Halorubrum Chaoviator and Synechococcus (Nageli): Data from the Space Experiment OSMO on EXPOSE-R

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mancinelli, R. L.

    2014-01-01

    We have shown using ESA's Biopan facility flown in Earth orbit that when exposed to the space environment for 2 weeks the survival rate of Synechococcus (Nageli), a halophilic cyanobacterium isolated from the evaporitic gypsum-halite crusts that form along the marine intertidal, and Halorubrum chaoviator a member of the Halobacteriaceae isolated from an evaporitic NaCl crystal obtained from a salt evaporation pond, were higher than all other test organisms except Bacillus spores. These results led to the EXPOSE-R mission to extend and refine these experiments as part of the experimental package for the external platform space exposure facility on the ISS. The experiment was flown in February 2009 and the organisms were exposed to low-Earth orbit for nearly 2 years. Samples were either exposed to solar ultraviolet (UV)-radiation (lambda is greater than 110 nm or lambda is greater than 200 nm, cosmic radiation (dosage range 225-320 mGy), or kept in darkness shielded from solar UV-radiation. Half of each of the UV-radiation exposed samples and dark samples were exposed to space vacuum and half kept at 105 pascals in argon. Duplicate samples were kept in the laboratory to serve as unexposed controls. Ground simulation control experiments were also performed. After retrieval, organism viability was tested using Molecular Probes Live-Dead Bac-Lite stain and by their reproduction capability. Samples kept in the dark, but exposed to space vacuum had a 90 +/- 5% survival rate compared to the ground controls. Samples exposed to full UV-radiation for over a year were bleached and although results from Molecular Probes Live-Dead stain suggested approximately 10% survival, the data indicate that no survival was detected using cell growth and division using the most probable number method. Those samples exposed to attenuated UV-radiation exhibited limited survival. Results from of this study are relevant to understanding adaptation and evolution of life, the future of life

  3. The affect of the space environment on the survival of Halorubrum chaoviator and Synechococcus (Nägeli): data from the Space Experiment OSMO on EXPOSE-R

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancinelli, R. L.

    2015-01-01

    We have shown using ESA's Biopan facility flown in Earth orbit that when exposed to the space environment for 2 weeks the survival rate of Synechococcus (Nägeli), a halophilic cyanobacterium isolated from the evaporitic gypsum-halite crusts that form along the marine intertidal, and Halorubrum chaoviator a member of the Halobacteriaceae isolated from an evaporitic NaCl crystal obtained from a salt evaporation pond, were higher than all other test organisms except Bacillus spores. These results led to the EXPOSE-R mission to extend and refine these experiments as part of the experimental package for the external platform space exposure facility on the ISS. The experiment was flown in February 2009 and the organisms were exposed to low-Earth orbit for nearly 2 years. Samples were either exposed to solar ultraviolet (UV)-radiation (λ > 110 nm or λ > 200 nm, cosmic radiation (dosage range 225-320 mGy), or kept in darkness shielded from solar UV-radiation. Half of each of the UV-radiation exposed samples and dark samples were exposed to space vacuum and half kept at 105 pascals in argon. Duplicate samples were kept in the laboratory to serve as unexposed controls. Ground simulation control experiments were also performed. After retrieval, organism viability was tested using Molecular Probes Live-Dead Bac-Lite stain and by their reproduction capability. Samples kept in the dark, but exposed to space vacuum had a 90 +/- 5% survival rate compared to the ground controls. Samples exposed to full UV-radiation for over a year were bleached and although results from Molecular Probes Live-Dead stain suggested ~10% survival, the data indicate that no survival was detected using cell growth and division using the most probable number method. Those samples exposed to attenuated UV-radiation exhibited limited survival. Results from of this study are relevant to understanding adaptation and evolution of life, the future of life beyond earth, the potential for interplanetary

  4. EXPOSE-R on Mission on the ISS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panitz, Corinna; Rabbow, Elke; Rettberg, Petra; Barczyk, Simon; Kloss, Maria; Reitz, Guenther

    Currently EXPOSE-R is on mission! This astrobiological exposure facility was accommodated at the universal workplace URM-D Zenith payload site, located outside the Russian Svezda Module of the International Space Station (ISS) by extravehicular activity (EVA) on March 10th 2009. It contains 3 trays accommodating 12 sample compartments with sample carriers in three levels either open to space vacuum or kept in a defined gas environment. In its 8 experiments of biological and chemical content, more than 1200 individual samples are exposed to solar ultraviolet (UV) radiations, vacuum, cosmic rays or extreme temperature variations. In their different experiments the involved scientists are studying the question of life's origin on Earth and the results of their experiments are contributing to different aspects of the evolution and distribution of life in the Universe. Additionally integrated into the EXPOSE-R facility are several dosimeters monitoring the ionising and the solar UV-radiation during the mission to deliver useful information to complement the sample analysis. In close cooperation with the DLR and the Technical University Munich (TUM), the Rheinisch -Westfülische Technischen Hochschule Aachen (RWTH Aachen) operates the experiment "Spores". a This is one of the 6 astrobiological experiments of the ROSE-Consortium" (Response of Or-ganisms to Space Environment) of the EXPOSE-R mission. In these experiments spores of bacteria, fungi and ferns are being over layered or mixed with meteorite material. The analysis of the effect of the space parameters on different biological endpoints of the spores of the mi-croorganism Bacillus subtilis will be performed after the retrieval of the experiment scheduled for the end of 2010. Parallel to the space mission an identical set of samples was accommodated into EXPOSE-R trays identical in construction to perform the Mission Ground Reference (MGR) Test. Currently this MGR Test is carried out in the Planetary and Space

  5. The Board's Role in Financial Oversight. AGB Board Essentials Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krawitz, Natalie

    2015-01-01

    An often-volatile economy, changing demographics, and technological innovations in educational delivery are among the dramatic changes across higher education that have forced boards and institutions to question the viability of the existing business model. Flat or declining state support in real terms, lower investment returns in some years,…

  6. Impact of flue gas desulfurization-calcium sulfite and gypsum on soil microbial activity and wheat growth

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.B.; Bigham, J.M.; Dick, W.A.; Kim, P.J.

    2008-08-15

    We conducted greenhouse tests to evaluate the effects of FGD-CaSO{sub 3} applied at rates of 0, 2.2, 4.4, and 8.8 Mg ha(-1) on wheat growth, soil enzyme activities, and the chemical properties of two soils with differing pH (4.0 vs. 6.2). A gypsum treatment applied at the rate of 2.2 Mg ha{sup -1} was used as a positive control. Exchangeable Ca{sup 2+} and water-extractable Ca{sup 2+} and SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} increased significantly with increasing FGD-CaSO{sub 3} application. SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} increased in both soils, indicating rapid oxidation of SO{sub 3}{sup 2-} to SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} when neither water nor oxygen was limiting. No changes in soil pH were measured. Applications of 2.2, 4.4, or 8.8 Mg CaSO{sub 3} ha{sup -1} to the pH 6.2 soil produced no effect on wheat growth or the uptake of N, P, Ca{sup 2+}, and Mg{sup 2+}. The uptake of SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} -S increased, whereas K uptake decreased. No significant differences in the activities of urease, {beta}-glucosidase, alkaline phosphatase, or arylsulfatase were observed relative to a control. In the acid soil, an application of 2.2 Mg ha{sup -1} FGD-CaSO{sub 3} increased wheat root growth and dry matter yield compared with an untreated control. The uptake of N, P, Ca{sup 2+}, and K{sup +} also increased presumably because of enhanced root development resulting from decreases in exchangeable Al{sup 3+} and increases in soluble Ca{sup 2+}. Wheat growth and alkaline phosphatase and arylsulfatase activities were significantly inhibited by addition of 8.8 Mg ha{sup -1} of FGD-CaSO{sub 3} compared with the untreated control or the same soil receiving 2.2 Mg ha{sup -1} gypsum. We conclude that surface applications of FGD-CaSO{sub 3} may be as effective as gypsum for inhibiting soil crusting, improving water infiltration, and promoting the movement of Ca{sup 2+} into acid subsoils. Moreover, application rates of equal to or less than 4.4 Mg ha-1 should have no negative impact on soil microbial activities or plant growth.

  7. Gypsum, jarosite, and hydrous iron-phosphate in Martian meteorite Roberts Massif 04262: Implications for sulfate geochemistry on Mars.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenwood, J. P.

    2008-12-01

    Gypsum has been identified on Mars by MEX OMEGA [1] and jarosite identified via MER-B lander [2] and both minerals are examples of the importance of calcium and iron sulfates in Martian weathering processes. The weathering of Martian basalt to form Ca and iron sulfates should be an important process on Mars. Martian jarosite has been identified in MIL 03346 [3] and Ca-sulfate has been identified in EETA 79001 [4], but both phases have yet to be identified in the same Martian sample. In Roberts Massif 04262, an olivine-phyric shergottite, iron-sulfide and calcium-phosphate minerals are undergoing reaction (dissolution and reprecipitation?) to form gypsum, jarosite, and an iron-phosphate phase, presumably during the meteorite's residence in Antarctica. If true, then an acidic and oxidizing fluid was present in this meteorite, due to the formation of jarosite which requires fluid of this type to form [5]. The weathering of iron-sulfides on Earth to form acidic and oxidizing fluids is common, thus this can be reconciled with the formation of an acidic fluid in a basic rock. Presumably, under more extensive weathering of silicate minerals in Martian basalt, the pH would be raised to values where jarosite would not be stable. While the weathering of RBT 04262 is likely occurring in Antarctica, a similar susceptibility of the apatite and pyrrhotite to incipient weathering on Mars may be expected. Oxidizing crustal fluids on Mars may attack iron- sulfides first in Martian basalts. The weathering of iron-sulfides leads to increasing acidity of fluids, which would enhance the dissolution of the calcium-phosphate minerals [6]. The formation of jarosite, gypsum, and iron-phosphate minerals during the early stages of weathering of Martian basalts may be an important process on Mars globally. [1] Gendrin, A. et al. (2005) Science, 307, 1587-1591. [2] Klingelhöfer et al. (2004) Science, 306, 1740- 1745. [3] Vicenzi E. P. et al. (2007) LPSC XXXVIII, Abstract 2335. [4] Gooding J

  8. Comparison of Four Strong Acids on the Precipitation Potential of Gypsum in Brines During Distillation of Pretreated, Augmented Urine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muirhead, Dean; Carrier, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    In this study, three different mineral acids were substituted for sulfuric acid (H2SO4) in the urine stabilizer solution to eliminate the excess of sulfate ions in pretreated urine and assess the impact on maximum water recovery to avoid precipitation of minerals during distillation. The study evaluated replacing 98% sulfuric acid with 85% phosphoric acid (H3PO4), 37% hydrochloric acid (HCl), or 70% nitric acid (HNO3). The effect of lowering the oxidizer concentration in the pretreatment formulation also was studied. This paper summarizes the test results, defines candidate formulations for further study, and specifies the injection masses required to stabilize urine and minimize the risk of mineral precipitation during distillation. In the first test with a brine ersatz acidified with different acids, the solubility of calcium in gypsum saturated solutions was measured. The solubility of gypsum was doubled in the brines acidified with the alternative acids compared to sulfuric acid. In a second series of tests, the alternative acid pretreatment concentrations were effective at preventing precipitation of gypsum and other minerals up to 85% water recovery from 95th-percentile pretreated, augmented urine. Based on test results, phosphoric acid is recommended as the safest alternative to sulfuric acid. It also is recommended that the injected mass concentration of chromium trioxide solution be reduced by 75% to minimize liquid resupply mass by about 50%, reduce toxicity of brines, and reduce the concentration of organic acids in distillate. The new stabilizer solution formulations and required doses to stabilize urine and prevent precipitation of minerals up to 85% water recovery are given. The formulations in this study were tested on a limited number of artificially augmented urine batches collected from employees at the Johnson Space Center (JSC). This study successfully demonstrated that the desired physical and chemical stability of pretreated urine and brines

  9. Pharmacological properties of traditional medicines. XXV. Effects of ephedrine, amygdalin, glycyrrhizin, gypsum and their combinations on body temperature and body fluid.

    PubMed

    Yuan, D; Komatsu, K; Cui, Z; Kano, Y

    1999-02-01

    Effects of ephedrine, amygdalin, glycyrrhizin, gypsum and their combinations on body temperature and body fluid were studied in rats using the method developed in our previous reports. Ephedrine significantly increased respiratory evaporative water loss and heat loss in response to a marked elevation of body temperature. There was a small but significant increase in body temperature when amygdalin was orally given rats at a dose of 46.32 mg/kg. Glycyrrhizin and gypsum were unable to affect body temperature. However, gypsum was able to prevent the increased action of ephedrine on body temperature, amygdalin exhibited a preventive tendency to it, and glycyrrhizin did not affect it. The results are in good agreement with classical claims of Makyo-kanseki-to and the related crude drugs in traditional medicine. Moreover, a combination of the four components reproduced the effects of Makyo-kanseki-to on body temperature and body fluid. This report suggests that the co-administration of ephedrine and gypsum is physiologically more desirable than ephedrine alone for dry-type asthmatic patients with a fever. Also, it experimentally supports the clinical efficacy of Makyo-kanseki-to.

  10. Gypsum (CaSO4·2H2O) Scaling on Polybenzimidazole and Cellulose Acetate Hollow Fiber Membranes under Forward Osmosis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Si Cong; Su, Jincai; Fu, Feng-Jiang; Mi, Baoxia; Chung, Tai-Shung

    2013-01-01

    We have examined the gypsum (CaSO4·2H2O) scaling phenomena on membranes with different physicochemical properties in forward osmosis (FO) processes. Three hollow fiber membranes made of (1) cellulose acetate (CA), (2) polybenzimidazole (PBI)/polyethersulfone (PES) and (3) PBI-polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS)/polyacrylonitrile (PAN) were studied. For the first time in FO processes, we have found that surface ionic interactions dominate gypsum scaling on the membrane surface. A 70% flux reduction was observed on negatively charged CA and PBI membrane surfaces, due to strong attractive forces. The PBI membrane surface also showed a slightly positive charge at a low pH value of 3 and exhibited a 30% flux reduction. The atomic force microscopy (AFM) force measurements confirmed a strong repulsive force between gypsum and PBI at a pH value of 3. The newly developed PBI-POSS/PAN membrane had ridge morphology and a contact angle of 51.42° ± 14.85° after the addition of hydrophilic POSS nanoparticles and 3 min thermal treatment at 95 °C. Minimal scaling and an only 1.3% flux reduction were observed at a pH value of 3. Such a ridge structure may reduce scaling by not providing a locally flat surface to the crystallite at a pH value of 3; thus, gypsum would be easily washed away from the surface. PMID:24957062

  11. Estimation of radioactivity level and associated radiological hazards of limestone and gypsum used as raw building materials in Rawalpindi/Islamabad region of Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Gul, Rahmat; Ali, Safdar; Hussain, Manzur

    2014-01-01

    This study was undertaken to asses the radioactivity level of limestone and gypsum and its associated radiological hazard due to the presence of naturally occurring radioactive materials. Representative samples of limestone and gypsum were collected from cement factories located in the Rawalpindi/Islamabad region of Pakistan and were analysed by using an N-type high-purity germanium detector of 80 % relative efficiency. The average activity concentration of (40)K, (226)Ra and (232)Th were 60.22±3.47, 29.25±5.23 and 4.07±3.31 Bq kg(-1), respectively, in limestone and 70.86±4.1, 5.01±2.10 and 4.49±3.1 Bq kg(-1), respectively, in gypsum. The radiological hazard parameters radium equivalent activities, absorbed dose rate in air, external hazard index, internal hazard index, annual effective dose equivalent, gamma index and alpha index were computed. The results of the average activity concentrations of (40)K, (226)Ra and (232)Th and radiological hazard parameters were within the range of the reported average worldwide/United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effect of Atomic Radiation values. It is concluded that limestone and gypsum used in the Rawalpindi/Islamabad region does not pose any excessive radiological health hazard as a building raw materials and in industrial uses.

  12. Soil and broccoli head sulfur levels but not yields are improved by the application of gypsum to a light textured soil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Light textured soils in semi-arid areas can be deficient in sulfur (S). Thus, the objective of the present study was to evaluate the effects of cultivar type (open pollinated vs. hybrid), minimum (strip-tillage) vs. conventional (bedded) tilling practices, and gypsum rate (0, 500, 1000 and 2000 kg/...

  13. Gypsum (CaSO4·2H2O) Scaling on Polybenzimidazole and Cellulose Acetate Hollow Fiber Membranes under Forward Osmosis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Si Cong; Su, Jincai; Fu, Feng-Jiang; Mi, Baoxia; Chung, Tai-Shung

    2013-11-08

    We have examined the gypsum (CaSO4·2H2O) scaling phenomena on membranes with different physicochemical properties in forward osmosis (FO) processes. Three hollow fiber membranes made of (1) cellulose acetate (CA), (2) polybenzimidazole (PBI)/polyethersulfone (PES) and (3) PBI-polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS)/polyacrylonitrile (PAN) were studied. For the first time in FO processes, we have found that surface ionic interactions dominate gypsum scaling on the membrane surface. A 70% flux reduction was observed on negatively charged CA and PBI membrane surfaces, due to strong attractive forces. The PBI membrane surface also showed a slightly positive charge at a low pH value of 3 and exhibited a 30% flux reduction. The atomic force microscopy (AFM) force measurements confirmed a strong repulsive force between gypsum and PBI at a pH value of 3. The newly developed PBI-POSS/PAN membrane had ridge morphology and a contact angle of 51.42° ± 14.85° after the addition of hydrophilic POSS nanoparticles and 3 min thermal treatment at 95 °C. Minimal scaling and an only 1.3% flux reduction were observed at a pH value of 3. Such a ridge structure may reduce scaling by not providing a locally flat surface to the crystallite at a pH value of 3; thus, gypsum would be easily washed away from the surface.

  14. A low-temperature ductile shear zone: The gypsum-dominated western extension of the brittle Fella-Sava Fault, Southern Alps

    PubMed Central

    Bartel, Esther Maria; Neubauer, Franz; Heberer, Bianca; Genser, Johann

    2014-01-01

    Based on structural and fabric analyses at variable scales we investigate the evaporitic gypsum-dominated Comeglians-Paularo shear zone in the Southern Alps (Friuli). It represents the lateral western termination of the brittle Fella-Sava Fault. Missing dehydration products of gypsum and the lack of annealing indicate temperatures below 100 °C during development of the shear zone. Despite of such low temperatures the shear zone clearly exhibits mylonitic flow, thus evidencing laterally coeval activity of brittle and viscous deformation. The dominant structures within the gypsum rocks of the Lower Bellerophon Formation are a steeply to gently S-dipping foliation, a subhorizontal stretching lineation and pure shear-dominated porphyroclast systems. A subordinate simple shear component with dextral displacement is indicated by scattered σ-clasts. Both meso- and microscale structures are characteristic of a subsimple shear type of deformation with components of both coaxial and non-coaxial strain. Shortening in a transpressive regime was accommodated by right-lateral displacement and internal pure shear deformation within the Comeglians-Paularo shear zone. The shear zone shows evidence for a combination of two stretching faults, where stretching occurred in the rheologically weaker gypsum member and brittle behavior in enveloping lithologies. PMID:26523080

  15. 78 FR 78963 - Subcommittee on Procedures Review, Advisory Board on Radiation and Worker Health (ABRWH...

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