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Sample records for gyrus ca3 ca1

  1. Deficits of neuronal density in CA1 and synaptic density in the dentate gyrus, CA3 and CA1, in a mouse model of Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kurt, M Ayberk; Kafa, M Ilker; Dierssen, Mara; Davies, D Ceri

    2004-10-01

    Ts65Dn mice are partially trisomic for the distal region of MMU16, which is homologous with the obligate segment of HSA21 triplicated in Down syndrome (DS). Ts65Dn mice are impaired in learning tasks that require an intact hippocampus. In order to investigate the neural basis of these deficits in this mouse model of Down syndrome, quantitative light and electron microscopy were used to compare the volume densities of neurons and synapses in the hippocampus of adult Ts65Dn (n=4) and diploid mice (n=4). Neuron density was significantly lower in the CA1 of Ts65Dn compared to diploid mice (p<0.01). Total synapse density was significantly lower in the dentate gyrus (DG; p<0.001), CA3 (p<0.05) and CA1 (p<0.001) of Ts65Dn compared to diploid mice. The synapse-to-neuron ratio was significantly lower in the DG (p<0.001), CA3 (p<0.01) and CA1 (p<0.001) of Ts65Dn compared to diploid mice. When the data were broken down by synapse type, asymmetric synapse density was found to be significantly lower in the DG (p<0.001), CA3 (p<0.05) and CA1 (p<0.001) of Ts65Dn compared to diploid mice, while such a difference in symmetric synapse density was only present in the DG (p<0.01). The asymmetric synapse-to-neuron ratio was significantly lower in the DG (p<0.001), CA3 (p<0.01) and CA1 (p<0.001) of Ts65Dn compared to diploid mice, but there were no such significant differences in symmetric synapse-to-neuron ratios. These results suggest that impaired synaptic connectivity in the hippocampus of Ts65Dn mice underlies, at least in part, their cognitive impairment.

  2. Synaptic remodeling in the dentate gyrus, CA3, CA1, subiculum, and entorhinal cortex of mice: effects of deprived rearing and voluntary running.

    PubMed

    Schaefers, Andrea T U; Grafen, Keren; Teuchert-Noodt, Gertraud; Winter, York

    2010-01-01

    Hippocampal cell proliferation is strongly increased and synaptic turnover decreased after rearing under social and physical deprivation in gerbils (Meriones unguiculatus). We examined if a similar epigenetic effect of rearing environment on adult neuroplastic responses can be found in mice (Mus musculus). We examined synaptic turnover rates in the dentate gyrus, CA3, CA1, subiculum, and entorhinal cortex. No direct effects of deprived rearing on rates of synaptic turnover were found in any of the studied regions. However, adult wheel running had the effect of leveling layer-specific differences in synaptic remodeling in the dentate gyrus, CA3, and CA1, but not in the entorhinal cortex and subiculum of animals of both rearing treatments. Epigenetic effects during juvenile development affected adult neural plasticity in mice, but seemed to be less pronounced than in gerbils.

  3. Prenatal nicotine and maternal deprivation stress de-regulate the development of CA1, CA3, and dentate gyrus neurons in hippocampus of infant rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong; Gondré-Lewis, Marjorie C

    2013-01-01

    Adverse experiences by the developing fetus and in early childhood are associated with profound effects on learning, emotional behavior, and cognition as a whole. In this study we investigated the effects of prenatal nicotine exposure (NIC), postnatal maternal deprivation (MD) or the combination of the two (NIC+MD) to determine if hippocampal neuron development is modulated by exposure to drugs of abuse and/or stress. Growth of rat offspring exposed to MD alone or NIC+MD was repressed until after weaning. In CA1 but not CA3 of postnatal day 14 (P14) pups, MD increased pyramidal neurons, however, in dentate gyrus (DG), decreased granule neurons. NIC had no effect on neuron number in CA1, CA3 or DG. Unexpectedly, NIC plus MD combined caused a synergistic increase in the number of CA1 or CA3 neurons. Neuron density in CA regions was unaffected by treatment, but in the DG, granule neurons had a looser packing density after NIC, MD or NIC+MD exposure. When septotemporal axes were analyzed, the synergism of stress and drug exposure in CA1 and CA3 was associated with rostral, whereas MD effects were predominantly associated with caudal neurons. TUNEL labeling suggests no active apoptosis at P14, and doublecortin positive neurons and mossy fibers were diminished in NIC+MD relative to controls. The laterality of the effect of nicotine and/or maternal deprivation in right versus left hippocampus was also analyzed and found to be insiginificant. We report for the first time that early life stressors such as postnatal MD and prenatal NIC exposure, when combined, may exhibit synergistic consequences for CA1 and CA3 pyramidal neuron development, and a potential antagonistic influence on developing DG neurons. These results suggest that early stressors may modulate neurogenesis, apoptosis, or maturation of glutamatergic neurons in the hippocampus in a region-specific manner during critical periods of neurodevelopment.

  4. Neuromodulation of the Feedforward Dentate Gyrus-CA3 Microcircuit

    PubMed Central

    Prince, Luke Y.; Bacon, Travis J.; Tigaret, Cezar M.; Mellor, Jack R.

    2016-01-01

    The feedforward dentate gyrus-CA3 microcircuit in the hippocampus is thought to activate ensembles of CA3 pyramidal cells and interneurons to encode and retrieve episodic memories. The creation of these CA3 ensembles depends on neuromodulatory input and synaptic plasticity within this microcircuit. Here we review the mechanisms by which the neuromodulators aceylcholine, noradrenaline, dopamine, and serotonin reconfigure this microcircuit and thereby infer the net effect of these modulators on the processes of episodic memory encoding and retrieval. PMID:27799909

  5. Distinct Roles for Dorsal CA3 and CA1 in Memory for Sequential Nonspatial Events

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farovik, Anja; Dupont, Laura M.; Eichenbaum, Howard

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that dorsal hippocampal areas CA3 and CA1 are both involved in representing sequences of events that compose unique episodes. However, it is uncertain whether the contribution of CA3 is restricted to spatial information, and it is unclear whether CA1 encodes order per se or contributes by an active maintenance of…

  6. Topographic specificity of functional connections from hippocampal CA3 to CA1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brivanlou, Iman H.; Dantzker, Jami L. M.; Stevens, Charles F.; Callaway, Edward M.

    2004-02-01

    The hippocampus is a cortical region thought to play an important role in learning and memory. Most of our knowledge about the detailed organization of hippocampal circuitry responsible for these functions is derived from anatomical studies. These studies present an incomplete picture, however, because the functional character and importance of connections are often not revealed by anatomy. Here, we used a physiological method (photostimulation with caged glutamate) to probe the fine pattern of functional connectivity between the CA3 and CA1 subfields in the mouse hippocampal slice preparation. We recorded intracellularly from CA1 and CA3 pyramidal neurons while scanning with photostimulation across the entire CA3 subfield with high spatial resolution. Our results show that, at a given septotemporal level, nearby CA1 neurons receive synaptic inputs from neighboring CA3 neurons. Thus, the CA3 to CA1 mapping preserves neighbor relations.

  7. Distinct roles for dorsal CA3 and CA1 in memory for sequential nonspatial events.

    PubMed

    Farovik, Anja; Dupont, Laura M; Eichenbaum, Howard

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that dorsal hippocampal areas CA3 and CA1 are both involved in representing sequences of events that compose unique episodes. However, it is uncertain whether the contribution of CA3 is restricted to spatial information, and it is unclear whether CA1 encodes order per se or contributes by an active maintenance of memories of sequential events. Here, we developed a new behavioral task that examines memory for the order of sequential nonspatial events presented as trial-unique odor pairings. When the interval between odors within a studied pair was brief (3 sec), bilateral dorsal CA3 lesions severely disrupted memory for their order, whereas dorsal CA1 lesions did not affect performance. However, when the inter-item interval was extended to 10 sec, CA1 lesions, as well as CA3 lesions, severely disrupted performance. These findings suggest that the role of CA3 in sequence memory is not limited to spatial information, but rather appears to be a fundamental property of CA3 function. In contrast, CA1 becomes involved when memories for events must be held or sequenced over long intervals. Thus, CA3 and CA1 are both involved in memory for sequential nonspatial events that compose unique experiences, and these areas play different roles that are distinguished by the duration of time that must be bridged between key events.

  8. Dissociated Signals in Human Dentate Gyrus and CA3 Predict Different Facets of Recognition Memory

    PubMed Central

    Reagh, Zachariah M.; Watabe, Joseph; Ly, Maria; Murray, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    A wealth of evidence has implicated the hippocampus and surrounding medial temporal lobe cortices in support of recognition memory. However, the roles of the various subfields of the hippocampus are poorly understood. In this study, we concurrently varied stimulus familiarization and repetition to engage different facets of recognition memory. Using high-resolution fMRI (1.5 mm isotropic), we observed distinct familiarity and repetition-related recognition signal profiles in the dentate gyrus (DG)/CA3 subfield in human subjects. The DG/CA3 demonstrated robust response suppression with repetition and familiarity-related facilitation. Both of these discrete responses were predictive of different aspects of behavioral performance. Consistent with previous work, we observed novelty responses in CA1 consistent with “match/mismatch detection,” as well as mixed recognition signaling distributed across medial temporal lobe cortices. Additional analyses indicated that the repetition and familiarity-related signals in the DG/CA3 were strikingly dissociated along the hippocampal longitudinal axis and that activity in the posterior hippocampus was strongly correlated with the retrosplenial cortex. These data provide novel insight into the roles of hippocampal subfields in support of recognition memory and further provide evidence of a functional heterogeneity in the human DG/CA3, particularly along the longitudinal axis. PMID:25274810

  9. Dissociated signals in human dentate gyrus and CA3 predict different facets of recognition memory.

    PubMed

    Reagh, Zachariah M; Watabe, Joseph; Ly, Maria; Murray, Elizabeth; Yassa, Michael A

    2014-10-01

    A wealth of evidence has implicated the hippocampus and surrounding medial temporal lobe cortices in support of recognition memory. However, the roles of the various subfields of the hippocampus are poorly understood. In this study, we concurrently varied stimulus familiarization and repetition to engage different facets of recognition memory. Using high-resolution fMRI (1.5 mm isotropic), we observed distinct familiarity and repetition-related recognition signal profiles in the dentate gyrus (DG)/CA3 subfield in human subjects. The DG/CA3 demonstrated robust response suppression with repetition and familiarity-related facilitation. Both of these discrete responses were predictive of different aspects of behavioral performance. Consistent with previous work, we observed novelty responses in CA1 consistent with "match/mismatch detection," as well as mixed recognition signaling distributed across medial temporal lobe cortices. Additional analyses indicated that the repetition and familiarity-related signals in the DG/CA3 were strikingly dissociated along the hippocampal longitudinal axis and that activity in the posterior hippocampus was strongly correlated with the retrosplenial cortex. These data provide novel insight into the roles of hippocampal subfields in support of recognition memory and further provide evidence of a functional heterogeneity in the human DG/CA3, particularly along the longitudinal axis.

  10. Ovarian Hormone Loss Impairs Excitatory Synaptic Transmission at Hippocampal CA3CA1 Synapses

    PubMed Central

    Bryant, Damani N.; Dorsa, Daniel M.; Adelman, John P.; Maylie, James

    2013-01-01

    Premature and long-term ovarian hormone loss following ovariectomy (OVX) is associated with cognitive impairment. This condition is prevented by estradiol (E2) therapy when initiated shortly following OVX but not after substantial delay. To determine whether these clinical findings are correlated with changes in synaptic functions, we used adult OVX rats to evaluate the consequences of short-term (7–10 d, OVXControl) and long-term (∼5 months, OVXLT) ovarian hormone loss, as well as subsequent in vivo E2 treatment, on excitatory synaptic transmission at the hippocampal CA3CA1 synapses important for learning and memory. The results show that ovarian hormone loss was associated with a marked decrease in synaptic strength. E2 treatment increased synaptic strength in OVXControl but not OVXLT rats, demonstrating a change in the efficacy for E2 5 months following OVX. E2 also had a more rapid effect: within minutes of bath application, E2 acutely increased synaptic strength in all groups except OVXLT rats that did not receive in vivo E2 treatment. E2's acute effect was mediated postsynaptically, and required Ca2+ influx through the voltage-gated Ca2+ channels. Despite E2's acute effect, synaptic strength of OVXLT rats remained significantly lower than that of OVXControl rats. Thus, changes in CA3CA1 synaptic transmission associated with ovarian hormone loss cannot be fully reversed with delayed E2 treatment. Given that synaptic strength at CA3CA1 synapses is related to the ability to learn hippocampus-dependent tasks, these findings provide additional insights for understanding cognitive impairment-associated long-term ovarian hormone loss and ineffectiveness for delayed E2 treatment to maintain cognitive functions. PMID:24107948

  11. Pycnogenol protects CA3-CA1 synaptic function in a rat model of traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Norris, Christopher M; Sompol, Pradoldej; Roberts, Kelly N; Ansari, Mubeen; Scheff, Stephen W

    2016-02-01

    Pycnogenol (PYC) is a patented mix of bioflavonoids with potent anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Previously, we showed that PYC administration to rats within hours after a controlled cortical impact (CCI) injury significantly protects against the loss of several synaptic proteins in the hippocampus. Here, we investigated the effects of PYC on CA3-CA1 synaptic function following CCI. Adult Sprague-Dawley rats received an ipsilateral CCI injury followed 15 min later by intravenous injection of saline vehicle or PYC (10 mg/kg). Hippocampal slices from the injured (ipsilateral) and uninjured (contralateral) hemispheres were prepared at seven and fourteen days post-CCI for electrophysiological analyses of CA3-CA1 synaptic function and induction of long-term depression (LTD). Basal synaptic strength was impaired in slices from the ipsilateral, relative to the contralateral, hemisphere at seven days post-CCI and susceptibility to LTD was enhanced in the ipsilateral hemisphere at both post-injury timepoints. No interhemispheric differences in basal synaptic strength or LTD induction were observed in rats treated with PYC. The results show that PYC preserves synaptic function after CCI and provides further rationale for investigating the use of PYC as a therapeutic in humans suffering from neurotrauma. PMID:26607913

  12. Encoding, consolidation, and retrieval of contextual memory: differential involvement of dorsal CA3 and CA1 hippocampal subregions.

    PubMed

    Daumas, Stéphanie; Halley, Hélène; Francés, Bernard; Lassalle, Jean-Michel

    2005-01-01

    Studies on human and animals shed light on the unique hippocampus contributions to relational memory. However, the particular role of each hippocampal subregion in memory processing is still not clear. Hippocampal computational models and theories have emphasized a unique function in memory for each hippocampal subregion, with the CA3 area acting as an autoassociative memory network and the CA1 area as a critical output structure. In order to understand the respective roles of the CA3- and CA1-hippocampal areas in the formation of contextual memory, we studied the effects of the reversible inactivation by lidocaine of the CA3 or CA1 areas of the dorsal hippocampus on acquisition, consolidation, and retrieval of a contextual fear conditioning. Whereas infusions of lidocaine never impaired elementary tone conditioning, their effects on contextual conditioning provided interesting clues about the role of these two hippocampal regions. They demonstrated first that the CA3 area is necessary for the rapid elaboration of a unified representation of the context. Secondly, they suggested that the CA1 area is rather involved in the consolidation process of contextual memory. Third, they showed that CA1 or CA3 inactivation during retention test has no effect on contextual fear retrieval when a recognition memory procedure is used. In conclusion, our findings point as evidence that CA1 and CA3 subregions of the dorsal hippocampus play important and different roles in the acquisition and consolidation of contextual fear memory, whereas they are not required for context recognition.

  13. How Informative Are Spatial CA3 Representations Established by the Dentate Gyrus?

    PubMed Central

    Cerasti, Erika; Treves, Alessandro

    2010-01-01

    In the mammalian hippocampus, the dentate gyrus (DG) is characterized by sparse and powerful unidirectional projections to CA3 pyramidal cells, the so-called mossy fibers. Mossy fiber synapses appear to duplicate, in terms of the information they convey, what CA3 cells already receive from entorhinal cortex layer II cells, which project both to the dentate gyrus and to CA3. Computational models of episodic memory have hypothesized that the function of the mossy fibers is to enforce a new, well separated pattern of activity onto CA3 cells, to represent a new memory, prevailing over the interference produced by the traces of older memories already stored on CA3 recurrent collateral connections. Can this hypothesis apply also to spatial representations, as described by recent neurophysiological recordings in rats? To address this issue quantitatively, we estimate the amount of information DG can impart on a new CA3 pattern of spatial activity, using both mathematical analysis and computer simulations of a simplified model. We confirm that, also in the spatial case, the observed sparse connectivity and level of activity are most appropriate for driving memory storage – and not to initiate retrieval. Surprisingly, the model also indicates that even when DG codes just for space, much of the information it passes on to CA3 acquires a non-spatial and episodic character, akin to that of a random number generator. It is suggested that further hippocampal processing is required to make full spatial use of DG inputs. PMID:20454678

  14. Preictal Activity of Subicular, CA1, and Dentate Gyrus Principal Neurons in the Dorsal Hippocampus before Spontaneous Seizures in a Rat Model of Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Satoshi; Toyoda, Izumi; Thamattoor, Ajoy K.

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies suggest that spontaneous seizures in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy might be preceded by increased action potential firing of hippocampal neurons. Preictal activity is potentially important because it might provide new opportunities for predicting when a seizure is about to occur and insight into how spontaneous seizures are generated. We evaluated local field potentials and unit activity of single, putative excitatory neurons in the subiculum, CA1, CA3, and dentate gyrus of the dorsal hippocampus in epileptic pilocarpine-treated rats as they experienced spontaneous seizures. Average action potential firing rates of neurons in the subiculum, CA1, and dentate gyrus, but not CA3, increased significantly and progressively beginning 2–4 min before locally recorded spontaneous seizures. In the subiculum, CA1, and dentate gyrus, but not CA3, 41–57% of neurons displayed increased preictal activity with significant consistency across multiple seizures. Much of the increased preictal firing of neurons in the subiculum and CA1 correlated with preictal theta activity, whereas preictal firing of neurons in the dentate gyrus was independent of theta. In addition, some CA1 and dentate gyrus neurons displayed reduced firing rates preictally. These results reveal that different hippocampal subregions exhibit differences in the extent and potential underlying mechanisms of preictal activity. The finding of robust and significantly consistent preictal activity of subicular, CA1, and dentate neurons in the dorsal hippocampus, despite the likelihood that many seizures initiated in other brain regions, suggests the existence of a broader neuronal network whose activity changes minutes before spontaneous seizures initiate. PMID:25505320

  15. Midbrain dopamine neurons bidirectionally regulate CA3-CA1 synaptic drive.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Zev B; Cheung, Stephanie; Siegelbaum, Steven A

    2015-12-01

    Dopamine (DA) is required for hippocampal-dependent memory and long-term potentiation (LTP) at CA1 Schaffer collateral (SC) synapses. It is therefore surprising that exogenously applied DA has little effect on SC synapses, but suppresses CA1 perforant path (PP) inputs. To examine DA actions under more physiological conditions, we used optogenetics to release DA from ventral tegmental area inputs to hippocampus. Unlike exogenous DA application, optogenetic release of DA caused a bidirectional, activity-dependent modulation of SC synapses, with no effect on PP inputs. Low levels of DA release, simulating tonic DA neuron firing, depressed the SC response through a D4 receptor-dependent enhancement of feedforward inhibition mediated by parvalbumin-expressing interneurons. Higher levels of DA release, simulating phasic firing, increased SC responses through a D1 receptor-dependent enhancement of excitatory transmission. Thus, tonic-phasic transitions in DA neuron firing in response to motivational demands may cause a modulatory switch from inhibition to enhancement of hippocampal information flow.

  16. Presynaptic ultrastructural plasticity along CA3CA1 axons during LTP in Mature Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Bourne, Jennifer N.; Chirillo, Michael A.; Harris, Kristen M.

    2013-01-01

    In area CA1 of the mature hippocampus, synaptogenesis occurs within 30 min after the induction of LTP; however, by 2 hr many small dendritic spines are lost, and those remaining have larger synapses. Little is known, however, about associated changes in presynaptic vesicles and axonal boutons. Axons in CA1 stratum radiatum were evaluated with three-dimensional reconstructions from serial section electron microscopy at 30 min and 2 hr after induction of LTP by theta-burst stimulation (TBS). The frequency of axonal boutons with a single postsynaptic partner was decreased by 33% at 2 hr, corresponding perfectly to the 33% loss specifically of small dendritic spines (head diameters <0.45 μm). Docked vesicles were reduced at 30 min and then returned to control levels by 2 hr following induction of LTP. By 2 hr there were fewer small synaptic vesicles overall in the presynaptic vesicle pool. Clathrin-mediated endocytosis was used as a marker of local activity, and axonal boutons containing clathrin-coated pits showed a more pronounced decrease in presynaptic vesicles at both 30 min and 2 hr after induction of LTP relative to control values. Putative transport packets, identified as a cluster of less than 10 axonal vesicles occurring between synaptic boutons, were stable at 30 min but markedly reduced by 2 hr after the induction of LTP. APV blocked these effects, suggesting that the loss of axonal boutons and presynaptic vesicles was dependent on NMDA receptor activation during LTP. These findings show that specific presynaptic ultrastructural changes complement postsynaptic ultrastructural plasticity during LTP. PMID:23784793

  17. Dissociating hippocampal subregions: double dissociation between dentate gyrus and CA1.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, P E; Kesner, R P; Lee, I

    2001-01-01

    This study presents a double dissociation between the dentate gyrus (DG) and CA1. Rats with either DG or CA1 lesions were tested on tasks requiring either spatial or spatial temporal order pattern separation. To assess spatial pattern separation, rats were trained to displace an object which covered a baited food-well. The rats were then allowed to choose between two identical objects: one covered the same well as the sample phase object (correct choice), and a second object covered a different unbaited well (incorrect choice). Spatial separations of 15-105 cm were used to separate the correct object from the incorrect object. To assess spatial temporal order pattern separation, rats were allowed to visit each arm of a radial eight-arm maze once in a randomly determined sequence. The rats were then presented with two arms and were required to choose the arm which occurred earliest in the sequence. The choice arms varied according to temporal separation (0, 2, 4, or 6) or the number of arms that occurred between the two choice arms in the sample phase sequence. On each task, once a preoperative criterion was reached, each rat was given either a DG, CA1, or control lesion and then retested. The results demonstrated that DG lesions resulted in a deficit on the spatial task but not the temporal task. In contrast, CA1 lesions resulted in a deficit on the temporal task but not the spatial task. Results suggest that the DG supports spatial pattern separation, whereas CA1 supports temporal pattern separation.

  18. Pharmacotherapy with Fluoxetine Restores Functional Connectivity from the Dentate Gyrus to Field CA3 in the Ts65Dn Mouse Model of Down Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Guidi, Sandra; Ciani, Elisabetta; Mangano, Chiara; Calzà, Laura; Bartesaghi, Renata

    2013-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is a high-incidence genetic pathology characterized by severe impairment of cognitive functions, including declarative memory. Impairment of hippocampus-dependent long-term memory in DS appears to be related to anatomo-functional alterations of the hippocampal trisynaptic circuit formed by the dentate gyrus (DG) granule cells - CA3 pyramidal neurons - CA1 pyramidal neurons. No therapies exist to improve cognitive disability in individuals with DS. In previous studies we demonstrated that pharmacotherapy with fluoxetine restores neurogenesis, granule cell number and dendritic morphology in the DG of the Ts65Dn mouse model of DS. The goal of the current study was to establish whether treatment rescues the impairment of synaptic connectivity between the DG and CA3 that characterizes the trisomic condition. Euploid and Ts65Dn mice were treated with fluoxetine during the first two postnatal weeks and examined 45–60 days after treatment cessation. Untreated Ts65Dn mice had a hypotrophyc mossy fiber bundle, fewer synaptic contacts, fewer glutamatergic contacts, and fewer dendritic spines in the stratum lucidum of CA3, the terminal field of the granule cell projections. Electrophysiological recordings from CA3 pyramidal neurons showed that in Ts65Dn mice the frequency of both mEPSCs and mIPSCs was reduced, indicating an overall impairment of excitatory and inhibitory inputs to CA3 pyramidal neurons. In treated Ts65Dn mice all these aberrant features were fully normalized, indicating that fluoxetine can rescue functional connectivity between the DG and CA3. The positive effects of fluoxetine on the DG-CA3 system suggest that early treatment with this drug could be a suitable therapy, possibly usable in humans, to restore the physiology of the hippocampal networks and, hence, memory functions. PMID:23620781

  19. Transition between fast and slow gamma modes in rat hippocampus area CA1 in vitro is modulated by slow CA3 gamma oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Pietersen, Alexander N J; Ward, Peter D; Hagger-Vaughan, Nicholas; Wiggins, James; Jefferys, John G R; Vreugdenhil, Martin

    2014-01-01

    AbstractHippocampal gamma oscillations have been associated with cognitive functions including navigation and memory encoding/retrieval. Gamma oscillations in area CA1 are thought to depend on the oscillatory drive from CA3 (slow gamma) or the entorhinal cortex (fast gamma). Here we show that the local CA1 network can generate its own fast gamma that can be suppressed by slow gamma-paced inputs from CA3. Moderate acetylcholine receptor activation induces fast (45 ± 1 Hz) gamma in rat CA1 minislices and slow (33 ± 1 Hz) gamma in CA3 minislices in vitro. Using pharmacological tools, current-source density analysis and intracellular recordings from pyramidal cells and fast-spiking stratum pyramidale interneurons, we demonstrate that fast gamma in CA1 is of the pyramidal–interneuron network gamma (PING) type, with the firing of principal cells paced by recurrent perisomal IPSCs. The oscillation frequency was only weakly dependent on IPSC amplitude, and decreased to that of CA3 slow gamma by reducing IPSC decay rate or reducing interneuron activation through tonic inhibition of interneurons. Fast gamma in CA1 was replaced by slow CA3-driven gamma in unlesioned slices, which could be mimicked in CA1 minislices by sub-threshold 35 Hz Schaffer collateral stimulation that activated fast-spiking interneurons but hyperpolarised pyramidal cells, suggesting that slow gamma frequency CA3 outputs can suppress the CA1 fast gamma-generating network by feed-forward inhibition and replaces it with a slower gamma oscillation driven by feed-forward inhibition. The transition between the two gamma oscillation modes in CA1 might allow it to alternate between effective communication with the medial entorhinal cortex and CA3, which have different roles in encoding and recall of memory. PMID:24277864

  20. Distinct pattern separation related transfer functions in human CA3/dentate and CA1 revealed using high-resolution fMRI and variable mnemonic similarity

    PubMed Central

    Lacy, Joyce W.; Yassa, Michael A.; Stark, Shauna M.; Muftuler, L. Tugan; Stark, Craig E.L.

    2011-01-01

    Producing and maintaining distinct (orthogonal) neural representations for similar events is critical to avoiding interference in long-term memory. Recently, our laboratory provided the first evidence for separation-like signals in the human CA3/dentate. Here, we extended this by parametrically varying the change in input (similarity) while monitoring CA1 and CA3/dentate for separation and completion-like signals using high-resolution fMRI. In the CA1, activity varied in a graded fashion in response to increases in the change in input. In contrast, the CA3/dentate showed a stepwise transfer function that was highly sensitive to small changes in input. PMID:21164173

  1. Adenosine A(2A) receptor modulation of hippocampal CA3-CA1 synapse plasticity during associative learning in behaving mice.

    PubMed

    Fontinha, Bruno M; Delgado-García, José M; Madroñal, Noelia; Ribeiro, Joaquim A; Sebastião, Ana M; Gruart, Agnès

    2009-06-01

    Previous in vitro studies have characterized the electrophysiological and molecular signaling pathways of adenosine tonic modulation on long-lasting synaptic plasticity events, particularly for hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP). However, it remains to be elucidated whether the long-term changes produced by endogenous adenosine in the efficiency of synapses are related to those required for learning and memory formation. Our goal was to understand how endogenous activation of adenosine excitatory A(2A) receptors modulates the associative learning evolution in conscious behaving mice. We have studied here the effects of the application of a highly selective A(2A) receptor antagonist, SCH58261, upon a well-known associative learning paradigm-classical eyeblink conditioning. We used a trace paradigm, with a tone as the conditioned stimulus (CS) and an electric shock presented to the supraorbital nerve as the unconditioned stimulus (US). A single electrical pulse was presented to the Schaffer collateral-commissural pathway to evoke field EPSPs (fEPSPs) in the pyramidal CA1 area during the CS-US interval. In vehicle-injected animals, there was a progressive increase in the percentage of conditioning responses (CRs) and in the slope of fEPSPs through conditioning sessions, an effect that was completely prevented (and lost) in SCH58261 (0.5 mg/kg, i.p.) -injected animals. Moreover, experimentally evoked LTP was impaired in SCH58261-injected mice. In conclusion, the endogenous activation of adenosine A(2A) receptors plays a pivotal effect on the associative learning process and its relevant hippocampal circuits, including activity-dependent changes at the CA3-CA1 synapse.

  2. The relationship between the field-shifting phenomenon and representational coherence of place cells in CA1 and CA3 in a cue-altered environment.

    PubMed

    Lee, Inah; Knierim, James J

    2007-11-01

    Subfields of the hippocampus display differential dynamics in processing a spatial environment, especially when changes are introduced to the environment. Specifically, when familiar cues in the environment are spatially rearranged, place cells in the CA3 subfield tend to rotate with a particular set of cues (e.g., proximal cues), maintaining a coherent spatial representation. Place cells in CA1, in contrast, display discordant behaviors (e.g., rotating with different sets of cues or remapping) in the same condition. In addition, on average, CA3 place cells shift their firing locations (measured by the center of mass, or COM) backward over time when the animal encounters the changed environment for the first time, but not after that first experience. However, CA1 displays an opposite pattern, in which place cells exhibit the backward COM-shift only from the second day of experience, but not on the first day. Here, we examined the relationship between the environment-representing behavior (i.e., rotation vs. remapping) and the COM-shift of place fields in CA1 and CA3. Both in CA1 and CA3, the backward (as well as forward) COM-shift phenomena occurred regardless of the rotating versus remapping of the place cell. The differential, daily time course of the onset/offset of backward COM-shift in the cue-altered environment in CA1 and CA3 (on day 1 in CA1 and from day 2 onward in CA3) stems from different population dynamics between the subfields. The results suggest that heterogeneous, complex plasticity mechanisms underlie the environment-representating behavior (i.e., rotate/remap) and the COM-shifting behavior of the place cell.

  3. Influence of slow oscillation on hippocampal activity and ripples through cortico-hippocampal synaptic interactions, analyzed by a cortical-CA3-CA1 network model

    PubMed Central

    Taxidis, Jiannis; Mizuseki, Kenji; Mason, Robert; Owen, Markus R.

    2013-01-01

    Hippocampal sharp wave-ripple complexes (SWRs) involve the synchronous discharge of thousands of cells throughout the CA3-CA1-subiculum-entorhinal cortex axis. Their strong transient output affects cortical targets, rendering SWRs a possible means for memory transfer from the hippocampus to the neocortex for long-term storage. Neurophysiological observations of hippocampal activity modulation by the cortical slow oscillation (SO) during deep sleep and anesthesia, and correlations between ripples and UP states, support the role of SWRs in memory consolidation through a cortico-hippocampal feedback loop. We couple a cortical network exhibiting SO with a hippocampal CA3-CA1 computational network model exhibiting SWRs, in order to model such cortico-hippocampal correlations and uncover important parameters and coupling mechanisms controlling them. The cortical oscillatory output entrains the CA3 network via connections representing the mossy fiber input, and the CA1 network via the temporoammonic pathway (TA). The spiking activity in CA3 and CA1 is shown to depend on the excitation-to-inhibition ratio, induced by combining the two hippocampal inputs, with mossy fiber input controlling the UP-state correlation of CA3 population bursts and corresponding SWRs, whereas the temporoammonic input affects the overall CA1 spiking activity. Ripple characteristics and pyramidal spiking participation to SWRs are shaped by the strength of the Schaffer collateral drive. A set of in vivo recordings from the rat hippocampus confirms a model-predicted segregation of pyramidal cells into subgroups according to the SO state where they preferentially fire and their response to SWRs. These groups can potentially play distinct functional roles in the replay of spike sequences. PMID:23386827

  4. Intrinsic Hippocampal Excitability Changes of Opposite Signs and Different Origins in CA1 and CA3 Pyramidal Neurons Underlie Aging-Related Cognitive Deficits.

    PubMed

    Oh, M Matthew; Simkin, Dina; Disterhoft, John F

    2016-01-01

    Aging-related cognitive deficits have been attributed to dysfunction of neurons due to failures at synaptic or intrinsic loci, or both. Given the importance of the hippocampus for successful encoding of memory and that the main output of the hippocampus is via the CA1 pyramidal neurons, much of the research has been focused on identifying the aging-related changes of these CA1 pyramidal neurons. We and others have discovered that the postburst afterhyperpolarization (AHP) following a train of action potentials is greatly enlarged in CA1 pyramidal neurons of aged animals. This enlarged postburst AHP is a significant factor in reducing the intrinsic excitability of these neurons, and thus limiting their activity in the neural network during learning. Based on these data, it has largely been thought that aging-related cognitive deficits are attributable to reduced activity of pyramidal neurons. However, recent in vivo and ex vivo studies provide compelling evidence that aging-related deficits could also be due to a converse change in CA3 pyramidal neurons, which show increased activity with aging. In this review, we will incorporate these recent findings and posit that an interdependent dynamic dysfunctional change occurs within the hippocampal network, largely due to altered intrinsic excitability in CA1 and CA3 hippocampal pyramidal neurons, which ultimately leads to the aging-related cognitive deficits. PMID:27375440

  5. Intrinsic Hippocampal Excitability Changes of Opposite Signs and Different Origins in CA1 and CA3 Pyramidal Neurons Underlie Aging-Related Cognitive Deficits

    PubMed Central

    Oh, M. Matthew; Simkin, Dina; Disterhoft, John F.

    2016-01-01

    Aging-related cognitive deficits have been attributed to dysfunction of neurons due to failures at synaptic or intrinsic loci, or both. Given the importance of the hippocampus for successful encoding of memory and that the main output of the hippocampus is via the CA1 pyramidal neurons, much of the research has been focused on identifying the aging-related changes of these CA1 pyramidal neurons. We and others have discovered that the postburst afterhyperpolarization (AHP) following a train of action potentials is greatly enlarged in CA1 pyramidal neurons of aged animals. This enlarged postburst AHP is a significant factor in reducing the intrinsic excitability of these neurons, and thus limiting their activity in the neural network during learning. Based on these data, it has largely been thought that aging-related cognitive deficits are attributable to reduced activity of pyramidal neurons. However, recent in vivo and ex vivo studies provide compelling evidence that aging-related deficits could also be due to a converse change in CA3 pyramidal neurons, which show increased activity with aging. In this review, we will incorporate these recent findings and posit that an interdependent dynamic dysfunctional change occurs within the hippocampal network, largely due to altered intrinsic excitability in CA1 and CA3 hippocampal pyramidal neurons, which ultimately leads to the aging-related cognitive deficits. PMID:27375440

  6. Encoding, Consolidation, and Retrieval of Contextual Memory: Differential Involvement of Dorsal CA3 and CA1 Hippocampal Subregions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daumas, Stephanie; Halley, Helene; Frances, Bernard; Lassalle, Jean-Michel

    2005-01-01

    Studies on human and animals shed light on the unique hippocampus contributions to relational memory. However, the particular role of each hippocampal subregion in memory processing is still not clear. Hippocampal computational models and theories have emphasized a unique function in memory for each hippocampal subregion, with the CA3 area acting…

  7. Repeating Spatial-Temporal Motifs of CA3 Activity Dependent on Engineered Inputs from Dentate Gyrus Neurons in Live Hippocampal Networks

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Aparajita; Desai, Harsh; DeMarse, Thomas B.; Wheeler, Bruce C.; Brewer, Gregory J.

    2016-01-01

    Anatomical and behavioral studies, and in vivo and slice electrophysiology of the hippocampus suggest specific functions of the dentate gyrus (DG) and the CA3 subregions, but the underlying activity dynamics and repeatability of information processing remains poorly understood. To approach this problem, we engineered separate living networks of the DG and CA3 neurons that develop connections through 51 tunnels for axonal communication. Growing these networks on top of an electrode array enabled us to determine whether the subregion dynamics were separable and repeatable. We found spontaneous development of polarized propagation of 80% of the activity in the native direction from DG to CA3 and different spike and burst dynamics for these subregions. Spatial-temporal differences emerged when the relationships of target CA3 activity were categorized with to the number and timing of inputs from the apposing network. Compared to times of CA3 activity when there was no recorded tunnel input, DG input led to CA3 activity bursts that were 7× more frequent, increased in amplitude and extended in temporal envelope. Logistic regression indicated that a high number of tunnel inputs predict CA3 activity with 90% sensitivity and 70% specificity. Compared to no tunnel input, patterns of >80% tunnel inputs from DG specified different patterns of first-to-fire neurons in the CA3 target well. Clustering dendrograms revealed repeating motifs of three or more patterns at up to 17 sites in CA3 that were importantly associated with specific spatial-temporal patterns of tunnel activity. The number of these motifs recorded in 3 min was significantly higher than shuffled spike activity and not seen above chance in control networks in which CA3 was apposed to CA3 or DG to DG. Together, these results demonstrate spontaneous input-dependent repeatable coding of distributed activity in CA3 networks driven by engineered inputs from DG networks. These functional configurations at measured times

  8. Repeating Spatial-Temporal Motifs of CA3 Activity Dependent on Engineered Inputs from Dentate Gyrus Neurons in Live Hippocampal Networks.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Aparajita; Desai, Harsh; DeMarse, Thomas B; Wheeler, Bruce C; Brewer, Gregory J

    2016-01-01

    Anatomical and behavioral studies, and in vivo and slice electrophysiology of the hippocampus suggest specific functions of the dentate gyrus (DG) and the CA3 subregions, but the underlying activity dynamics and repeatability of information processing remains poorly understood. To approach this problem, we engineered separate living networks of the DG and CA3 neurons that develop connections through 51 tunnels for axonal communication. Growing these networks on top of an electrode array enabled us to determine whether the subregion dynamics were separable and repeatable. We found spontaneous development of polarized propagation of 80% of the activity in the native direction from DG to CA3 and different spike and burst dynamics for these subregions. Spatial-temporal differences emerged when the relationships of target CA3 activity were categorized with to the number and timing of inputs from the apposing network. Compared to times of CA3 activity when there was no recorded tunnel input, DG input led to CA3 activity bursts that were 7× more frequent, increased in amplitude and extended in temporal envelope. Logistic regression indicated that a high number of tunnel inputs predict CA3 activity with 90% sensitivity and 70% specificity. Compared to no tunnel input, patterns of >80% tunnel inputs from DG specified different patterns of first-to-fire neurons in the CA3 target well. Clustering dendrograms revealed repeating motifs of three or more patterns at up to 17 sites in CA3 that were importantly associated with specific spatial-temporal patterns of tunnel activity. The number of these motifs recorded in 3 min was significantly higher than shuffled spike activity and not seen above chance in control networks in which CA3 was apposed to CA3 or DG to DG. Together, these results demonstrate spontaneous input-dependent repeatable coding of distributed activity in CA3 networks driven by engineered inputs from DG networks. These functional configurations at measured times

  9. Low-frequency trains of paired stimuli induce long-term depression in area CA1 but not in dentate gyrus of the intact rat.

    PubMed

    Doyère, V; Errington, M L; Laroche, S; Bliss, T V

    1996-01-01

    We have examined the efficacy of a recently introduced protocol for inducing homosynaptic long-term depression (LTD) in area CA1 of the anesthetized rat (Thiels et al. [1994] J Neurophysiol 72:3009-3116.). In area CA1 of the awake animal, this protocol, consisting of 200 pairs of pulses delivered at 0.5 Hz, with an interpulse interval of 25 ms, consistently produced LTD, provided the initial pulse was sufficiently strong to produce significant paired-pulse depression of the evoked response. We extended these experiments to the dentate gyrus, using either paired pulses given to the perforant path in the awake adult rat, or, in the anesthetized adult, a two-pathway pairing procedure, in which the first pulse was delivered to the commissural input to the dentate gyrus and the second to the perforant path. In both cases, the first pulse led to substantial suppression of the response evoked by the second pulse. With neither protocol, however, was there any evidence for LTD or depotentiation. Paired-pulse stimulation of the perforant path of young rats (10-11 days) also failed to induce LTD or depotentiation of the population excitatory postsynaptic potential (EPSP). Thus, the dentate gyrus in the intact animal appears to be less susceptible to LTD and depotentiation than area CA1, a conclusion consistent with previous experiments in which we found that stimulation at 1-5 Hz produced LTD/depotentiation in area CA1 of young (but not adult) rats in vivo but was ineffective at any age in the dentate gyrus. Our results do not rule out the possibility that other, untested protocols may produce homosynaptic LTD and/or depotentiation in the dentate gyrus in vivo.

  10. Summation in the Hippocampal CA3-CA1 Network Remains Robustly Linear Following Inhibitory Modulation and Plasticity, but Undergoes Scaling and Offset Transformations.

    PubMed

    Parameshwaran, Dhanya; Bhalla, Upinder S

    2012-01-01

    Many theories of neural network function assume linear summation. This is in apparent conflict with several known forms of non-linearity in real neurons. Furthermore, key network properties depend on the summation parameters, which are themselves subject to modulation and plasticity in real neurons. We tested summation responses as measured by spiking activity in small groups of CA1 pyramidal neurons using permutations of inputs delivered on an electrode array. We used calcium dye recordings as a readout of the summed spiking response of cell assemblies in the network. Each group consisted of 2-10 cells, and the calcium signal from each cell correlated with individual action potentials. We find that the responses of these small cell groups sum linearly, despite previously reported dendritic non-linearities and the thresholded responses of individual cells. This linear summation persisted when input strengths were reduced. Blockage of inhibition shifted responses up toward saturation, but did not alter the slope of the linear region of summation. Long-term potentiation of synapses in the slice also preserved the linear fit, with an increase in absolute response. However, in this case the summation gain decreased, suggesting a homeostatic process for preserving overall network excitability. Overall, our results suggest that cell groups in the CA3-CA1 network robustly follow a consistent set of linear summation and gain-control rules, notwithstanding the intrinsic non-linearities of individual neurons. Cell-group responses remain linear, with well-defined transformations following inhibitory modulation and plasticity. Our measures of these transformations provide useful parameters to apply to neural network analyses involving modulation and plasticity.

  11. CAPS1 stabilizes the state of readily releasable synaptic vesicles to fusion competence at CA3CA1 synapses in adult hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Shinoda, Yo; Ishii, Chiaki; Fukazawa, Yugo; Sadakata, Tetsushi; Ishii, Yuki; Sano, Yoshitake; Iwasato, Takuji; Itohara, Shigeyoshi; Furuichi, Teiichi

    2016-01-01

    Calcium-dependent activator protein for secretion 1 (CAPS1) regulates exocytosis of dense-core vesicles in neuroendocrine cells and of synaptic vesicles in neurons. However, the synaptic function of CAPS1 in the mature brain is unclear because Caps1 knockout (KO) results in neonatal death. Here, using forebrain-specific Caps1 conditional KO (cKO) mice, we demonstrate, for the first time, a critical role of CAPS1 in adult synapses. The amplitude of synaptic transmission at CA3CA1 synapses was strongly reduced, and paired-pulse facilitation was significantly increased, in acute hippocampal slices from cKO mice compared with control mice, suggesting a perturbation in presynaptic function. Morphological analysis revealed an accumulation of synaptic vesicles in the presynapse without any overall morphological change. Interestingly, however, the percentage of docked vesicles was markedly decreased in the Caps1 cKO. Taken together, our findings suggest that CAPS1 stabilizes the state of readily releasable synaptic vesicles, thereby enhancing neurotransmitter release at hippocampal synapses. PMID:27545744

  12. Activation of metabotropic glutamate receptors induce differential effects on synaptic transmission in the dentate gyrus and CA1 of the hippocampus in the anaesthetized rat.

    PubMed

    Davis, S; Laroche, S

    1996-03-01

    Activation of ACPD-sensitive metabotropic receptors induced differential effects on synaptic transmission and the induction of LTP in CA1 and the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus i.c.v. injections of (1.S,3R)-1-aminocyclopentane-1,3-dicarboxylic acid [(1S,3R)-ACPD] induced enduring potentiation of the fEPSP in CA1, which occluded tetanically induced LTP. In contrast, ACPD induced a dose-dependent biphasic effect on the fEPSP in the dentate gyrus, consisting of an initial short lasting potentiation, followed by enduring depression of the response, and blockade of LTP. These two effects are likely to be mediated by two different classes of the receptor as in the dentate gyrus the selective class I agonist, (RS)-3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine (DHPG) induced sustained potentiation of the fEPSP, whereas the mixed mGluR2 agonist-mGluR1 antagonist, (S)-4-carboxy-3-hydrophenylglycine((S)-4C3H-PG) induced only depression. Increasing the concentration of calcium directly in the dentate gyrus prior to, and in conjunction with, injections of ACPD induced sustained potentiation rather than depression. The differential effects indicate that the second messenger cascades the subtypes of receptors are linked with, mediate different forms of synaptic plasticity within the hippocampus and have important implications for their role in learning.

  13. Modulation of low-frequency-induced synaptic depression in the developing CA3-CA1 hippocampal synapses by NMDA and metabotropic glutamate receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Strandberg, Joakim; Wasling, Pontus; Gustafsson, Bengt

    2009-05-01

    Brief test-pulse stimulation (0.2-0.05 Hz) of naïve (previously nonstimulated) developing hippocampal CA3-CA1 synapses leads to a substantial synaptic depression, explained by alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) silencing. Using field recordings in hippocampal slices from P8 to P12 rats, we examined this depression of naïve synapses using more prolonged test-pulse stimulation as well as low-frequency (1 Hz) stimulation (LFS). We found that 900 stimuli produced depression during stimulation to approximately 40% of the naïve level independent of whether test-pulse stimulation or LFS was used. This result was also observed during combined blockade of N-methyl-d-aspartate/metabotropic glutamate receptors (NMDAR/mGluRs) although the depression was smaller (to approximately 55% of naïve level). Using separate blockade of either NMDARs or mGluRs, we found that this impairment of the depression resulted from the NMDAR, and not from the mGluR, blockade. In fact, during NMDAR blockade alone, depression was smaller even than that observed during combined blockade. We also found that mGluR blockade alone facilitated the LFS-induced depression. In conclusion, test-pulse stimulation produced as much depression as LFS when applied to naïve synapses even when allowing for NMDAR and mGluR activation. Our results seem in line with the notion that NMDARs and mGluRs may exert a bidirectional control on AMPA receptor recruitment to synapses.

  14. Prox1 postmitotically defines dentate gyrus cells by specifying granule cell identity over CA3 pyramidal cell fate in the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Iwano, Tomohiko; Masuda, Aki; Kiyonari, Hiroshi; Enomoto, Hideki; Matsuzaki, Fumio

    2012-08-01

    The brain is composed of diverse types of neurons that fulfill distinct roles in neuronal circuits, as manifested by the hippocampus, where pyramidal neurons and granule cells constitute functionally distinct domains: cornu ammonis (CA) and dentate gyrus (DG), respectively. Little is known about how these two types of neuron differentiate during hippocampal development, although a set of transcription factors that is expressed in progenitor cells is known to be required for the survival of granule cells. Here, we demonstrate in mice that Prox1, a transcription factor constitutively expressed in the granule cell lineage, postmitotically functions to specify DG granule cell identity. Postmitotic elimination of Prox1 caused immature DG neurons to lose the granule cell identity and in turn terminally differentiate into the pyramidal cell type manifesting CA3 neuronal identity. By contrast, Prox1 overexpression caused opposing effects on presumptive hippocampal pyramidal cells. These results indicate that the immature DG cell has the potential to become a granule cell or a pyramidal cell, and Prox1 defines the granule cell identity. This bi-potency is lost in mature DG cells, although Prox1 is still required for correct gene expression in DG granule cells. Thus, our data indicate that Prox1 acts as a postmitotic cell fate determinant for DG granule cells over the CA3 pyramidal cell fate and is crucial for maintenance of the granule cell identity throughout the life.

  15. Rapid compensatory changes in the expression of EAAT-3 and GAT-1 transporters during seizures in cells of the CA1 and dentate gyrus

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Epilepsy is a neurological disorder produced by an imbalance between excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission, in which transporters of both glutamate and GABA have been implicated. Hence, at different times after local administration of the convulsive drug 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) we analyzed the expression of EAAT-3 and GAT-1 transporter proteins in cells of the CA1 and dentate gyrus. Methods Dual immunofluorescence was used to detect the co-localization of transporters and a neuronal marker. In parallel, EEG recordings were performed and convulsive behavior was rated using a modified Racine Scale. Results By 60 min after 4-AP injection, EAAT-3/NeuN co-labelling had increased in dentate granule cells and decreased in CA1 pyramidal cells. In the latter, this decrease persisted for up to 180 min after 4-AP administration. In both the DG and CA1, the number of GAT-1 labeled cells increased 60 min after 4-AP administration, although by 180 min GAT-1 labeled cells decreased in the DG alone. The increase in EAAT-3/NeuN colabelling in DG was correlated with maximum epileptiform activity and convulsive behavior. Conclusions These findings suggest that a compensatory mechanism exists to protect against acute seizures induced by 4-AP, whereby EAAT-3/NeuN cells is rapidly up regulated in order to enhance the removal of glutamate from the extrasynaptic space, and attenuating seizure activity. PMID:22931236

  16. Distinct Pattern Separation Related Transfer Functions in Human CA3/Dentate and CA1 Revealed Using High-Resolution fMRI and Variable Mnemonic Similarity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lacy, Joyce W.; Yassa, Michael A.; Stark, Shauna M.; Muftuler, L. Tugan; Stark, Craig E. L.

    2011-01-01

    Producing and maintaining distinct (orthogonal) neural representations for similar events is critical to avoiding interference in long-term memory. Recently, our laboratory provided the first evidence for separation-like signals in the human CA3/dentate. Here, we extended this by parametrically varying the change in input (similarity) while…

  17. The Relationship between the Field-Shifting Phenomenon and Representational Coherence of Place Cells in CA1 and CA3 in a Cue-Altered Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Inah; Knierim, James J.

    2007-01-01

    Subfields of the hippocampus display differential dynamics in processing a spatial environment, especially when changes are introduced to the environment. Specifically, when familiar cues in the environment are spatially rearranged, place cells in the CA3 subfield tend to rotate with a particular set of cues (e.g., proximal cues), maintaining a…

  18. Differential paired-pulse responses between the CA1 region and the dentate gyrus are related to altered CLC-2 immunoreactivity in the pilocarpine-induced rat epilepsy model.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Sung-Eun; Kim, Ji-Eun; Kim, Duk-Soo; Won, Moo Ho; Lee, Hong Jin; Choi, Soo-Young; Kwon, Oh-Shin; Kim, Jin-Sang; Kang, Tae-Cheon

    2006-10-18

    The epileptic hippocampus shows differential paired-pulse responses between the dentate gyrus and the CA1 region. However, little data are available to explain this phenomenon. In the present study, we identified the relationship between regional differences of paired-pulse response and voltage gated Cl(-) channel 2 (CLC-2)/vesicular GABA transport (VGAT) expression in a pilocarpine-induced rat model. During epileptogenic periods, paired-pulse inhibitions in the dentate gyrus and the CA1 region were markedly reduced. After recurrent seizure onset, paired-pulse inhibition in the dentate gyrus was markedly enhanced, while that in the CA1 region more reduced. Unlike VGAT, CLC-2 immunoreactivity was markedly reduced in the hippocampus during epileptogenic periods and was re-enhanced only in the dentate gyrus after recurrent seizure onset. Linear regression analysis showed an inverse proportional relationship between alterations in CLC-2 immunoreactivity and changes in normalized population spike amplitude ratio within the CA1 region and the dentate gyrus. Therefore, our findings suggest that the regionally specific alterations in CLC-2 immunoreactivity after SE may determine the properties of paired-pulse responses in the hippocampus of the pilocarpine-induced rat epilepsy model.

  19. Differential regulation of synaptic transmission by mGlu2 and mGlu3 at the perforant path inputs to the dentate gyrus and CA1 revealed in mGlu2 -/- mice.

    PubMed

    Kew, James N C; Pflimlin, Marie-Claire; Kemp, John A; Mutel, Vincent

    2002-08-01

    Group II metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors can act as presynaptic autoinhibitory receptors at perforant path inputs to the hippocampus under conditions of high frequency synaptic activation. We have used mGlu2 -/- mice to examine the relative roles of mGlu2 and mGlu3 in the regulation of perforant path synaptic transmission mediated by both the selective group II receptor agonist, DCG-IV, and by synaptically released glutamate. Field excitatory postsynaptic potentials evoked by stimulation of either the perforant path inputs to the dentate gyrus mid-moleculare or the CA1 stratum lacunosum moleculare were inhibited by DCG-IV with IC(50) values and maximum percentage inhibition of: 169 nM (60%) and 41 nM (72%) in wild-type mice and 273 nM (19%) and 116 nM (49%) in mGlu2 -/- mice, respectively. Activation of presynaptic group II mGlu autoreceptors by synaptically released glutamate, as revealed by a LY341495-mediated increase in the relative amplitude of a test fEPSP evoked after a conditioning burst, was observed in both the dentate gyrus and the stratum lacunosum of wild-type, but not mGlu2 -/- mice. These observations demonstrate that activation of mGlu3 receptors can regulate synaptic transmission at perforant path synapses but suggest that mGlu2 is the major presynaptic group II autoreceptor activated by synaptically released glutamate. PMID:12213275

  20. Impaired spatial representation in CA1 after lesion of direct input from entorhinal cortex.

    PubMed

    Brun, Vegard Heimly; Leutgeb, Stefan; Wu, Hui-Qiu; Schwarcz, Robert; Witter, Menno P; Moser, Edvard I; Moser, May-Britt

    2008-01-24

    Place-specific firing in the hippocampus is determined by path integration-based spatial representations in the grid-cell network of the medial entorhinal cortex. Output from this network is conveyed directly to CA1 of the hippocampus by projections from principal neurons in layer III, but also indirectly by axons from layer II to the dentate gyrus and CA3. The direct pathway is sufficient for spatial firing in CA1, but it is not known whether similar firing can also be supported by the input from CA3. To test this possibility, we made selective lesions in layer III of medial entorhinal cortex by local infusion of the neurotoxin gamma-acetylenic GABA. Firing fields in CA1 became larger and more dispersed after cell loss in layer III, whereas CA3 cells, which receive layer II input, still had sharp firing fields. Thus, the direct projection is necessary for precise spatial firing in the CA1 place cell population.

  1. Impaired spatial representation in CA1 after lesion of direct input from entorhinal cortex.

    PubMed

    Brun, Vegard Heimly; Leutgeb, Stefan; Wu, Hui-Qiu; Schwarcz, Robert; Witter, Menno P; Moser, Edvard I; Moser, May-Britt

    2008-01-24

    Place-specific firing in the hippocampus is determined by path integration-based spatial representations in the grid-cell network of the medial entorhinal cortex. Output from this network is conveyed directly to CA1 of the hippocampus by projections from principal neurons in layer III, but also indirectly by axons from layer II to the dentate gyrus and CA3. The direct pathway is sufficient for spatial firing in CA1, but it is not known whether similar firing can also be supported by the input from CA3. To test this possibility, we made selective lesions in layer III of medial entorhinal cortex by local infusion of the neurotoxin gamma-acetylenic GABA. Firing fields in CA1 became larger and more dispersed after cell loss in layer III, whereas CA3 cells, which receive layer II input, still had sharp firing fields. Thus, the direct projection is necessary for precise spatial firing in the CA1 place cell population. PMID:18215625

  2. Status Epilepticus Induced Spontaneous Dentate Gyrus Spikes: In Vivo Current Source Density Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Flynn, Sean P.; Barrier, Sylvain; Scott, Rod C.; Lenck- Santini, Pierre-Pascal; Holmes, Gregory L.

    2015-01-01

    The dentate gyrus is considered to function as an inhibitory gate limiting excitatory input to the hippocampus. Following status epilepticus (SE), this gating function is reduced and granule cells become hyper-excitable. Dentate spikes (DS) are large amplitude potentials observed in the dentate gyrus (DG) of normal animals. DS are associated with membrane depolarization of granule cells, increased activity of hilar interneurons and suppression of CA3 and CA1 pyramidal cell firing. Therefore, DS could act as an anti-excitatory mechanism. Because of the altered gating function of the dentate gyrus following SE, we sought to investigate how DS are affected following pilocarpine-induced SE. Two weeks following lithium-pilocarpine SE induction, hippocampal EEG was recorded in male Sprague-Dawley rats with 16-channel silicon probes under urethane anesthesia. Probes were placed dorso-ventrally to encompass either CA1-CA3 or CA1-DG layers. Large amplitude spikes were detected from EEG recordings and subject to current source density analysis. Probe placement was verified histologically to evaluate the anatomical localization of current sinks and the origin of DS. In 9 of 11 pilocarpine-treated animals and two controls, DS were confirmed with large current sinks in the molecular layer of the dentate gyrus. DS frequency was significantly increased in pilocarpine-treated animals compared to controls. Additionally, in pilocarpine-treated animals, DS displayed current sinks in the outer, middle and/or inner molecular layers. However, there was no difference in the frequency of events when comparing between layers. This suggests that following SE, DS can be generated by input from medial and lateral entorhinal cortex, or within the dentate gyrus. DS were associated with an increase in multiunit activity in the granule cell layer, but no change in CA1. These results suggest that following SE there is an increase in DS activity, potentially arising from hyperexcitability along the

  3. Input-output relations in the entorhinal-hippocampal-entorhinal loop: entorhinal cortex and dentate gyrus.

    PubMed

    Bartesaghi, R; Gessi, T; Migliore, M

    1995-01-01

    The pattern of impulse transfer along the entorhinal-hippocampal-entorhinal loop has been analyzed in the guinea pig by field potential analysis. The loop was driven by impulse volleys conducted by presubicular commissural fibers, directly stimulated in the dorsal psalterium, which monosynaptically activated perforant path neurons in the medial entorhinal cortex. Perforant path volleys activated in sequence the dentate gyrus, field CA3, field CA1, subiculum, and entorhinal cortex. Input-output curves were reconstructed from responses simultaneously recorded from different stations along the loop. The entorhinal response to the presubicular volley was found to increase gradually with respect to its input. The population excitatory postsynaptic potential (EPSP) of the dentate gyrus granule cells had a similar behavior. By contrast, the input-output relation between the granule cell population spike and population EPSP was described by a very sleep sigmoid curve. The population spike of CA3 and CA1 pyramidal neurons as well as the response evoked in the entorhinal cortex by the hippocampal output had slightly higher threshold than the granule cell population spike and, like the latter, abruptly reached maximum amplitude. These findings show that the entorhinal-hippocampal-entorhinal loop transforms a linear input in a non-linear, almost all-or-none output and that the dentate gyrus is the critical site where the transformation occurs. Beyond the dentate gyrus, the loop appears very permeant to impulse traffic.

  4. Effects of age and insulin-like growth factor-1 on neuron and synapse numbers in area CA3 of hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Poe, B H; Linville, C; Riddle, D R; Sonntag, W E; Brunso-Bechtold, J K

    2001-01-01

    Age-related effects associated with the hippocampus include declines in numbers of neurons and synapses in the dentate gyrus and area CA1, and decreased cognitive ability as assessed with the Morris water maze. The present study quantified both neuron and synapse number in the same tissue block of area CA3 of the hippocampus. No investigations of both density of neurons and synapses together in area CA3 of hippocampus have been performed previously, despite its importance as the terminal field of dentate gyrus mossy fibers, the second synapse in the trisynaptic circuit in the hippocampus. Numerical density of neurons and synapses were assessed in 4-, 18-, and 29-month-old rats receiving infusions of saline into the lateral ventricle and in 29-month-old rats receiving infusions of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1). Numerical density of neurons of the stratum pyramidale of CA3 of hippocampus remained constant across the life span as did the numerical density of synapses in stratum lucidum of area CA3. Despite the reported role of IGF-1 in synaptogenesis and improvements in behavior with age, ventricular infusion of this growth factor did not affect the numerical density of neurons or synapses in 29-month-old rats when compared to saline-infused old rats. Further, reported effects of IGF-1 on adult neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus are not reflected in an IGF-1-related increase in synapse density in this region.

  5. Functional optical probing of the hippocampal trisynaptic circuit in vitro: network dynamics, filter properties, and polysynaptic induction of CA1 LTP.

    PubMed

    Stepan, Jens; Dine, Julien; Eder, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Decades of brain research have identified various parallel loops linking the hippocampus with neocortical areas, enabling the acquisition of spatial and episodic memories. Especially the hippocampal trisynaptic circuit [entorhinal cortex layer II → dentate gyrus (DG) → cornu ammonis (CA)-3CA1] was studied in great detail because of its seemingly simple connectivity and characteristic structures that are experimentally well accessible. While numerous researchers focused on functional aspects, obtained from a limited number of cells in distinct hippocampal subregions, little is known about the neuronal network dynamics which drive information across multiple synapses for subsequent long-term storage. Fast voltage-sensitive dye imaging in vitro allows real-time recording of activity patterns in large/meso-scale neuronal networks with high spatial resolution. In this way, we recently found that entorhinal theta-frequency input to the DG most effectively passes filter mechanisms of the trisynaptic circuit network, generating activity waves which propagate across the entire DG-CA axis. These "trisynaptic circuit waves" involve high-frequency firing of CA3 pyramidal neurons, leading to a rapid induction of classical NMDA receptor-dependent long-term potentiation (LTP) at CA3-CA1 synapses (CA1 LTP). CA1 LTP has been substantially evidenced to be essential for some forms of explicit learning in mammals. Here, we review data with particular reference to whole network-level approaches, illustrating how activity propagation can take place within the trisynaptic circuit to drive formation of CA1 LTP.

  6. Memory retrieval along the proximodistal axis of CA1.

    PubMed

    Nakazawa, Yuki; Pevzner, Aleksandr; Tanaka, Kazumasa Z; Wiltgen, Brian J

    2016-09-01

    The proximal and distal segments of CA1 are thought to perform distinct computations. Neurons in proximal CA1 are reciprocally connected with the medial entorhinal cortex (MEC) and exhibit precise spatial firing. In contrast, cells in distal CA1 communicate with the lateral entorhinal cortex (LEC), exhibit more diffuse spatial firing and are affected by the presence of objects in the environment. To determine if these segments make unique contributions to memory retrieval, we examined cellular activity along the proximodistal axis of CA1 using transgenic reporter mice. Neurons tagged during context learning in proximal CA1 were more likely to be reactivated during testing than those in distal CA1. This was true following context fear conditioning and after exposure to a novel environment. Reactivation was also higher in brain regions connected to proximal CA1 (MEC, distal CA3) than those connected to the distal segment (LEC, proximal CA3). To examine contributions to memory retrieval, we performed neurotoxic lesions of proximal or distal CA1 after training. Lesions of the proximal segment significantly impaired memory retrieval while damage to distal CA1 had no effect. These data suggest that context memories are retrieved by a hippocampal microcircuit that involves the proximal but not distal segment of CA1. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27068122

  7. Functional optical probing of the hippocampal trisynaptic circuit in vitro: network dynamics, filter properties, and polysynaptic induction of CA1 LTP

    PubMed Central

    Stepan, Jens; Dine, Julien; Eder, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Decades of brain research have identified various parallel loops linking the hippocampus with neocortical areas, enabling the acquisition of spatial and episodic memories. Especially the hippocampal trisynaptic circuit [entorhinal cortex layer II → dentate gyrus (DG) → cornu ammonis (CA)-3CA1] was studied in great detail because of its seemingly simple connectivity and characteristic structures that are experimentally well accessible. While numerous researchers focused on functional aspects, obtained from a limited number of cells in distinct hippocampal subregions, little is known about the neuronal network dynamics which drive information across multiple synapses for subsequent long-term storage. Fast voltage-sensitive dye imaging in vitro allows real-time recording of activity patterns in large/meso-scale neuronal networks with high spatial resolution. In this way, we recently found that entorhinal theta-frequency input to the DG most effectively passes filter mechanisms of the trisynaptic circuit network, generating activity waves which propagate across the entire DG-CA axis. These “trisynaptic circuit waves” involve high-frequency firing of CA3 pyramidal neurons, leading to a rapid induction of classical NMDA receptor-dependent long-term potentiation (LTP) at CA3-CA1 synapses (CA1 LTP). CA1 LTP has been substantially evidenced to be essential for some forms of explicit learning in mammals. Here, we review data with particular reference to whole network-level approaches, illustrating how activity propagation can take place within the trisynaptic circuit to drive formation of CA1 LTP. PMID:25999809

  8. Oscillatory dynamics in the hippocampus support dentate gyrus–CA3 coupling.

    PubMed

    Akam, Thomas; Oren, Iris; Mantoan, Laura; Ferenczi, Emily; Kullmann, Dimitri M

    2012-05-01

    Gamma oscillations in the dentate gyrus and hippocampal CA3 show variable coherence in vivo, but the mechanisms and relevance for information flow are unknown. We found that carbachol-induced oscillations in rat CA3 have biphasic phase-response curves, consistent with the ability to couple with oscillations in afferent projections. Differences in response to stimulation of either the intrinsic feedback circuit or the dentate gyrus were well described by varying an impulse vector in a two-dimensional dynamical system, representing the relative input to excitatory and inhibitory neurons. Responses to sinusoidally modulated optogenetic stimulation confirmed that the CA3 network oscillation can entrain to periodic inputs, with a steep dependence of entrainment phase on input frequency. CA3 oscillations are therefore suited to coupling with oscillations in the dentate gyrus over a broad range of frequencies. PMID:22466505

  9. Pattern Separation, Pattern Completion, and New Neuronal Codes within a Continuous CA3 Map

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leutgeb, Stefan; Leutgeb, Jill K.

    2007-01-01

    The hippocampal CA3 subregion is critical for rapidly encoding new memories, which suggests that neuronal computations are implemented in its circuitry that cannot be performed elsewhere in the hippocampus or in the neocortex. Recording studies show that CA3 cells are bound to a large degree to a spatial coordinate system, while CA1 cells can…

  10. Hippocampal CA1 Ripples as Inhibitory Transients

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Giri P; Fellous, Jean-Marc; Bazhenov, Maxim

    2016-01-01

    Memories are stored and consolidated as a result of a dialogue between the hippocampus and cortex during sleep. Neurons active during behavior reactivate in both structures during sleep, in conjunction with characteristic brain oscillations that may form the neural substrate of memory consolidation. In the hippocampus, replay occurs within sharp wave-ripples: short bouts of high-frequency activity in area CA1 caused by excitatory activation from area CA3. In this work, we develop a computational model of ripple generation, motivated by in vivo rat data showing that ripples have a broad frequency distribution, exponential inter-arrival times and yet highly non-variable durations. Our study predicts that ripples are not persistent oscillations but result from a transient network behavior, induced by input from CA3, in which the high frequency synchronous firing of perisomatic interneurons does not depend on the time scale of synaptic inhibition. We found that noise-induced loss of synchrony among CA1 interneurons dynamically constrains individual ripple duration. Our study proposes a novel mechanism of hippocampal ripple generation consistent with a broad range of experimental data, and highlights the role of noise in regulating the duration of input-driven oscillatory spiking in an inhibitory network. PMID:27093059

  11. The hippocampal CA3 region can generate two distinct types of sharp wave-ripple complexes, in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hofer, Katharina T; Kandrács, Ágnes; Ulbert, István; Pál, Ildikó; Szabó, Csilla; Héja, László; Wittner, Lucia

    2015-02-01

    Hippocampal sharp wave-ripples (SPW-Rs) occur during slow wave sleep and behavioral immobility and are thought to play an important role in memory formation. We investigated the cellular and network properties of SPW-Rs with simultaneous laminar multielectrode and intracellular recordings in a rat hippocampal slice model, using physiological bathing medium. Spontaneous SPW-Rs were generated in the dentate gyrus (DG), CA3, and CA1 regions. These events were characterized by a local field potential gradient (LFPg) transient, increased fast oscillatory activity and increased multiple unit activity (MUA). Two types of SPW-Rs were distinguished in the CA3 region based on their different LFPg and current source density (CSD) pattern. Type 1 (T1) displayed negative LFPg transient in the pyramidal cell layer, and the associated CSD sink was confined to the proximal dendrites. Type 2 (T2) SPW-Rs were characterized by positive LFPg transient in the cell layer, and showed CSD sinks involving both the apical and basal dendrites. In both types, consistent with the somatic CSD source, only a small subset of CA3 pyramidal cells fired, most pyramidal cells were hyperpolarized, while most interneurons increased firing rate before the LFPg peak. Different neuronal populations, with different proportions of pyramidal cells and distinct subsets of interneurons were activated during T1 and T2 SPW-Rs. Activation of specific inhibitory cell subsets-with the possible leading role of perisomatic interneurons-seems to be crucial to synchronize distinct ensembles of CA3 pyramidal cells finally resulting in the expression of different SPW-R activities. This suggests that the hippocampus can generate dynamic changes in its activity stemming from the same excitatory and inhibitory circuits, and so, might provide the cellular and network basis for an input-specific and activity-dependent information transmission. PMID:25209976

  12. Neural population evidence of functional heterogeneity along the CA3 transverse axis: Pattern completion vs. pattern separation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Heekyung; Wang, Cheng; Deshmukh, Sachin S.; Knierim, James J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Classical theories of associative memory model CA3 as a homogeneous attractor network because of its strong recurrent circuitry. However, anatomical gradients suggest a functional diversity along the CA3 transverse axis. We examined the neural population coherence along this axis, when the local and global spatial reference frames were put in conflict with each other. Proximal CA3 (near the dentate gyrus), where the recurrent collaterals are the weakest, showed degraded representations, similar to the pattern separation shown by the dentate gyrus. Distal CA3 (near CA2), where the recurrent collaterals are the strongest, maintained coherent representations in the conflict situation, resembling the classic attractor network system. CA2 also maintained coherent representations. This dissociation between proximal and distal CA3 provides strong evidence that the recurrent collateral system underlies the associative network functions of CA3, with a separate role of proximal CA3 in pattern separation. PMID:26298276

  13. Iterated function systems in the hippocampal CA1.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Shigeru; Fukushima, Yasuhiro; Yamaguti, Yutaka; Tsukada, Minoru; Tsuda, Ichiro

    2009-09-01

    How does the information of spatiotemporal sequence stemming from the hippocampal CA3 area affect the postsynaptic membrane potentials of the hippocampal CA1 neurons? In a recent study, we observed hierarchical clusters of the distribution of membrane potentials of CA1 neurons, arranged according to the history of input sequences (Fukushima et al Cogn Neurodyn 1(4):305-316, 2007). In the present paper, we deal with the dynamical mechanism generating such a hierarchical distribution. The recording data were investigated using return map analysis. We also deal with a collective behavior at population level, using a reconstructed multi-cell recording data set. At both individual cell and population levels, a return map of the response sequence of CA1 pyramidal cells was well approximated by a set of contractive affine transformations, where the transformations represent self-organized rules by which the input pattern sequences are encoded. These findings provide direct evidence that the information of temporal sequences generated in CA3 can be self-similarly represented in the membrane potentials of CA1 pyramidal cells.

  14. SNAP-25 in hippocampal CA3 region is required for long-term memory formation

    SciTech Connect

    Hou Qiuling; Gao Xiang; Lu Qi; Zhang Xuehan; Tu Yanyang; Jin Meilei; Zhao Guoping; Yu Lei; Jing Naihe; Li Baoming . E-mail: bmli@fudan.edu.cn

    2006-09-08

    SNAP-25 is a synaptosomal protein of 25 kDa, a key component of synaptic vesicle-docking/fusion machinery, and plays a critical role in exocytosis and neurotransmitter release. We previously reported that SNAP-25 in the hippocampal CA1 region is involved in consolidation of contextual fear memory and water-maze spatial memory (Hou et al. European J Neuroscience, 20: 1593-1603, 2004). SNAP-25 is expressed not only in the CA1 region, but also in the CA3 region, and the SNAP-25 mRNA level in the CA3 region is higher than in the CA1 region. Here, we provide evidence that SNAP-25 in the CA3 region is also involved in learning/memory. Intra-CA3 infusion of SNAP-25 antisense oligonucleotide impaired both long-term contextual fear memory and water-maze spatial memory, with short-term memory intact. Furthermore, the SNAP-25 antisense oligonucleotide suppressed the long-term potentiation (LTP) of field excitatory post-synaptic potential (fEPSP) in the mossy-fiber pathway (DG-CA3 pathway), with no effect on paired-pulse facilitation of the fEPSP. These results are consistent with the notion that SNAP-25 in the hippocampal CA3 region is required for long-term memory formation.

  15. Synaptic Proteins In Schizophrenia Hippocampus Indicate Increased Neuronal Activity in CA3

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Ghose, Subroto; Gleason, Kelly; Begovic’, Anita; Perez, Jessica; Bartko, John; Russo, Scott; Wagner, Anthony D.; Selemon, Lynn; Tamminga, Carol A.

    2015-01-01

    In schizophrenia, hippocampal perfusion is increased and declarative memory function is degraded. Based on a model of hippocampal dysfunction in schizophrenic psychosis, we postulated increased NMDA receptor signaling in CA3. Here we demonstrate that the GluN2B-containing NMDA receptors (GluN2B/GluN1) and its associated postsynaptic membrane protein PSD95 are both increased in human hippocampal CA3 from schizophrenia cases, but not in CA1 tissue. Quantitative analyses of Golgi-stained hippocampal neurons show an increase in spine density on CA3 pyramidal cell apical dendrites (stratum radiatum) and an increase in the number of thorny excrescences. AMPA receptor subunit proteins are not altered in CA3 or CA1 subfields, nor are several additional related signaling proteins. These hippocampal data are consistent with increased excitatory signaling in CA3 and/or with an elevation in silent synapses in CA3, a state which may contribute to development of long term potentiation with subsequent stimulation and ‘un-silencing’. These changes are plausibly associated with increased associational activity in CA3, degraded declarative memory function and with psychotic manifestations in schizophrenia. The influence of these hyperactive hippocampal projections onto targets in limbic neocortex could contribute to components of schizophrenia manifestations in other cerebral regions. PMID:25585032

  16. Simultaneous recording of the field-EPSP as well as the population spike in the CA1 region in freely moving rats by using a fixed "double"-recording electrode.

    PubMed

    Scherf, Thomas; Frey, Julietta U; Frey, Sabine

    2010-04-30

    The recording of field potentials in freely moving rats is a very appropriate and commonly used method to describe changes in cellular mechanisms underlying synaptic plasticity. Recently, we introduced a method for the simultaneous recording of both the field-EPSP as well as the population spike in the dentate gyrus of freely moving rats. We used self-made "double"-recording electrodes, consisting of two wires straighten together with a constant distance between both tips. This method was now further developed to obtain stable long-term recordings of CA1 field potentials. Rats were chronically implanted with a bipolar recording electrode; one tip of which reached the stratum radiatum to record the field-EPSP, the other tip was lowered into the stratum pyramidale of the same neuron population to record the population spike by stimulation of the contralateral CA3 (cCA3). In such prepared rats, simultaneously recorded field-EPSP as well as the population spike where thus obtained from their places of generation in a very reliable manner. This kind of preparation allowed a better standardization of stimulation intensities between different animals and stable electrophysiological recordings of both CA1-potentials over a time period of at least 24h in freely behaving animals. Furthermore, primed burst stimulation of the cCA3 (a single biphasic priming pulse was followed by a burst of 10 pulses (frequency of 100 Hz) 190 ms later; pulse duration per half-wave: 0.1 ms) resulted in an early-LTP of both measured parameters, the field-EPSP and the population spike in the CA1 region of freely moving rats.

  17. Ovarian hormones influence corticotropin releasing factor receptor colocalization with delta opioid receptors in CA1 pyramidal cell dendrites

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Tanya J.; Akama, Keith T.; Knudsen, Margarete G.; McEwen, Bruce S.; Milner, Teresa A.

    2011-01-01

    Stress interacts with addictive processes to increase drug use, drug seeking, and relapse. The hippocampal formation (HF) is an important site at which stress circuits and endogenous opioid systems intersect and likely plays a critical role in the interaction between stress and drug addiction. Our prior studies demonstrate that the stress-related neuropeptide corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and the delta-opioid receptor (DOR) colocalize in interneuron populations in the hilus of the dentate gyrus and stratum oriens of CA1 and CA3. While independent ultrastructural studies of DORs and CRF receptors suggest that each receptor is found in CA1 pyramidal cell dendrites and dendritic spines, whether DORs and CRF receptors colocalize in CA1 neuronal profiles has not been investigated. Here, hippocampal sections of adult male and proestrus female Sprague-Dawley rats were processed for dual label pre-embedding immunoelectron microscopy using well-characterized antisera directed against the DOR for immunoperoxidase and against the CRF receptor for immunogold. DOR-immunoreactivity (-ir) was found presynaptically in axons and axon terminals as well as postsynaptically in somata, dendrites and dendritic spines in stratum radiatum of CA1. In contrast, CRF receptor-ir was predominantly found postsynaptically in CA1 somata, dendrites, and dendritic spines. CRF receptor-ir frequently was observed in DOR-labeled dendritic profiles and primarily was found in the cytoplasm rather than at or near the plasma membrane. Quantitative analysis of CRF receptor-ir colocalization with DOR-ir in pyramidal cell dendrites revealed that proestrus females and males show comparable levels of CRF receptor-ir per dendrite and similar cytoplasmic density of CRF receptor-ir. In contrast, proestrus females display an increased number of dual-labeled dendritic profiles and increased membrane density of CRF receptor-ir in comparison to males. We further examined the functional consequences of CRF

  18. Long-term Potentiation at Temporoammonic Path-CA1 Synapses in Freely Moving Rats

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Jossina; Villarreal, Desiree M.; Morales, Isaiah S.; Derrick, Brian E.

    2016-01-01

    Hippocampal area CA1 receives direct entorhinal layer III input via the temporoammonic path (TAP) and recent studies implicate TAP-CA1 synapses are important for some aspects of hippocampal memory function. Nonetheless, as few studies have examined TAP-CA1 synaptic plasticity in vivo, the induction and longevity of TAP-CA1 long-term potentiation (LTP) has not been fully characterized. We analyzed CA1 responses following stimulation of the medial aspect of the angular bundle and investigated LTP at medial temporoammonic path (mTAP)-CA1 synapses in freely moving rats. We demonstrate monosynaptic mTAP-CA1 responses can be isolated in vivo as evidenced by observations of independent current sinks in the stratum lacunosum moleculare of both areas CA1 and CA3 following angular bundle stimulation. Contrasting prior indications that TAP input rarely elicits CA1 discharge, we observed mTAP-CA1 responses that appeared to contain putative population spikes in 40% of our behaving animals. Theta burst high frequency stimulation of mTAP afferents resulted in an input specific and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-dependent LTP of mTAP-CA1 responses in behaving animals. LTP of mTAP-CA1 responses decayed as a function of two exponential decay curves with time constants (τ) of 2.7 and 148 days to decay 63.2% of maximal LTP. In contrast, mTAP-CA1 population spike potentiation longevity demonstrated a τ of 9.6 days. To our knowledge, these studies provide the first description of mTAP-CA1 LTP longevity in vivo. These data indicate TAP input to area CA1 is a physiologically relevant afferent system that displays robust synaptic plasticity. PMID:26903815

  19. Involvement of the dopaminergic system in the consolidation of fear conditioning in hippocampal CA3 subregion.

    PubMed

    Wen, Jia-Ling; Xue, Li; Wang, Run-Hua; Chen, Zi-Xiang; Shi, Yan-Wei; Zhao, Hu

    2015-02-01

    The hippocampus, the primary brain structure related to learning and memory, receives sparse but comprehensive dopamine innervations and contains dopamine D1 and D2 receptors. Systematic hippocampal dopaminergic dysfunction can cause deficits in spatial working memory and impair consolidation of contextual fear memories. CA3 is involved in the rapid acquisition of new memories and has extensive nerve fibre connections with other brain structures such as CA1, the amygdala, and the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). A bidirectional fibrous connection between CA3 and the amygdala reflects the importance of CA3 in fear conditioning. The present study evaluated the effects of a 6-OHDA lesion in CA3 on the acquisition and expression of conditioned fear. The results showed CA3 involvement in the expression but not the acquisition of conditioned fear. Injection of SCH23390 and quinpirole into the bilateral CA3 attenuated a conditioned fear-related freezing response, whereas SKF38393 and sulpiride were not associated with this effect. The present study found that a 6-OHDA lesion in CA3 up-regulated the expression of GluR1 in BLA and down-regulated NR2B in CA1 and the basolateral amygdala (BLA). Our data suggest that dopamine depletion in hippocampal subdivision CA3 may not be necessary for the acquisition of conditioned fear, but the expression of conditioned fear is likely dependent on the integrity of mesohippocampal dopaminergic connections. It is probable that both D1 and D2 dopaminergic receptors modulate the expression of conditioned fear. Changes in the expression of NR2B and GluR1 indicate that CA3 may modulate the activities of other brain structures. PMID:25446753

  20. The single place fields of CA3 cells: a two-stage transformation from grid cells

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida, Licurgo; Idiart, Marco; Lisman, John E.

    2013-01-01

    Granule cells of the dentate gyrus (DG) generally have multiple place fields, whereas CA3 cells, which are second order, have only a single place field. Here, we explore the mechanisms by which the high selectivity of CA3 cells is achieved. Previous work showed that the multiple place fields of DG neurons could be quantitatively accounted for by a model based on the number and strength of grid cell inputs and a competitive network interaction in the DG that is mediated by gamma frequency feedback inhibition. We have now built a model of CA3 based on similar principles. CA3 cells receive input from an average of one active DG cell and from 1400 cortical grid cells. Based on experimental findings, we have assumed a linear interaction of the two pathways. The results show that simulated CA3 cells generally have a single place field, as observed experimentally. Thus, a two-step process based on simple rules (and that can occur without learning) is able to explain how grid cell inputs to the hippocampus give rise to cells having ultimate spatial selectivity. The CA3 processes that produce a single place depend critically on the competitive network processes and do not require the direct cortical inputs to CA3, which are therefore likely to perform some other unknown function. PMID:20928834

  1. A quantitative theory of the functions of the hippocampal CA3 network in memory.

    PubMed

    Rolls, Edmund T

    2013-01-01

    A quantitative computational theory of the operation of the hippocampal CA3 system as an autoassociation or attractor network used in episodic memory system is described. In this theory, the CA3 system operates as a single attractor or autoassociation network to enable rapid, one-trial, associations between any spatial location (place in rodents, or spatial view in primates) and an object or reward, and to provide for completion of the whole memory during recall from any part. The theory is extended to associations between time and object or reward to implement temporal order memory, also important in episodic memory. The dentate gyrus (DG) performs pattern separation by competitive learning to produce sparse representations suitable for setting up new representations in CA3 during learning, producing for example neurons with place-like fields from entorhinal cortex grid cells. The dentate granule cells produce by the very small number of mossy fiber (MF) connections to CA3 a randomizing pattern separation effect important during learning but not recall that separates out the patterns represented by CA3 firing to be very different from each other, which is optimal for an unstructured episodic memory system in which each memory must be kept distinct from other memories. The direct perforant path (pp) input to CA3 is quantitatively appropriate to provide the cue for recall in CA3, but not for learning. Tests of the theory including hippocampal subregion analyses and hippocampal NMDA receptor knockouts are described, and support the theory. PMID:23805074

  2. A quantitative theory of the functions of the hippocampal CA3 network in memory

    PubMed Central

    Rolls, Edmund T.

    2013-01-01

    A quantitative computational theory of the operation of the hippocampal CA3 system as an autoassociation or attractor network used in episodic memory system is described. In this theory, the CA3 system operates as a single attractor or autoassociation network to enable rapid, one-trial, associations between any spatial location (place in rodents, or spatial view in primates) and an object or reward, and to provide for completion of the whole memory during recall from any part. The theory is extended to associations between time and object or reward to implement temporal order memory, also important in episodic memory. The dentate gyrus (DG) performs pattern separation by competitive learning to produce sparse representations suitable for setting up new representations in CA3 during learning, producing for example neurons with place-like fields from entorhinal cortex grid cells. The dentate granule cells produce by the very small number of mossy fiber (MF) connections to CA3 a randomizing pattern separation effect important during learning but not recall that separates out the patterns represented by CA3 firing to be very different from each other, which is optimal for an unstructured episodic memory system in which each memory must be kept distinct from other memories. The direct perforant path (pp) input to CA3 is quantitatively appropriate to provide the cue for recall in CA3, but not for learning. Tests of the theory including hippocampal subregion analyses and hippocampal NMDA receptor knockouts are described, and support the theory. PMID:23805074

  3. NMDA Signaling in CA1 Mediates Selectively the Spatial Component of Episodic Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Place, Ryan; Lykken, Christy; Beer, Zachery; Suh, Junghyup; McHugh, Thomas J.; Tonegawa, Susumu; Eichenbaum, Howard; Sauvage, Magdalena M.

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies focusing on the memory for temporal order have reported that CA1 plays a critical role in the memory for the sequences of events, in addition to its well-described role in spatial navigation. In contrast, CA3 was found to principally contribute to the memory for the association of items with spatial or contextual information in…

  4. Input-to-output transformation in a model of the rat hippocampal CA1 network.

    PubMed

    Olypher, Andrey V; Lytton, William W; Prinz, Astrid A

    2012-01-01

    Here we use computational modeling to gain new insights into the transformation of inputs in hippocampal field CA1. We considered input-output transformation in CA1 principal cells of the rat hippocampus, with activity synchronized by population gamma oscillations. Prior experiments have shown that such synchronization is especially strong for cells within one millimeter of each other. We therefore simulated a one-millimeter ıt patch of CA1 with 23,500 principal cells. We used morphologically and biophysically detailed neuronal models, each with more than 1000 compartments and thousands of synaptic inputs. Inputs came from binary patterns of spiking neurons from field CA3 and entorhinal cortex (EC). On average, each presynaptic pattern initiated action potentials in the same number of CA1 principal cells in the patch. We considered pairs of similar and pairs of distinct patterns. In all the cases CA1 strongly separated input patterns. However, CA1 cells were considerably more sensitive to small alterations in EC patterns compared to CA3 patterns. Our results can be used for comparison of input-to-output transformations in normal and pathological hippocampal networks.

  5. DEVELOPMENTAL HYPOTHYROIDISM ALTERS SYNAPTIC TRANSMISSION IN DENTATE GYRUS AND AREA CA1 OF HIPPOCAMPUS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hypothyroidism during critical periods of brain developmental leads to learning deficits and alterations in hippocampal structure. Neurophysiological properties of the hippocampus, however, have not been well characterized. The present study examined field potentials evoked in...

  6. Conjunctive input processing drives feature selectivity in hippocampal CA1 neurons

    PubMed Central

    Bittner, Katie C.; Grienberger, Christine; Vaidya, Sachin P.; Milstein, Aaron D.; Macklin, John J.; Suh, Junghyup; Tonegawa, Susumu; Magee, Jeffrey C.

    2016-01-01

    Feature selective firing allows networks to produce representations of the external and internal environments. Despite its importance, the mechanisms generating neuronal feature selectivity are incompletely understood. In many cortical microcircuits the integration of two functionally distinct inputs occurs nonlinearly via generation of active dendritic signals that drive burst firing and robust plasticity. To examine the role of this processing in feature selectivity we recorded CA1 pyramidal neuron membrane potential and local field potential in mice running on a linear treadmill. We found that dendritic plateau potentials are produced by an interaction between properly timed input from entorhinal cortex (EC3) and hippocampal CA3. These conjunctive signals positively modulate the firing of previously established place fields and rapidly induce novel place field formation to produce feature selectivity in CA1 that is a function of both EC3 and CA3 input. Such selectivity could allow mixed network level representations that support context-dependent spatial maps. PMID:26167906

  7. Diversity of LFPs Activated in Different Target Regions by a Common CA3 Input.

    PubMed

    Martín-Vázquez, Gonzalo; Benito, Nuria; Makarov, Valeri A; Herreras, Oscar; Makarova, Julia

    2016-10-01

    Identifying the pathways contributing to local field potential (LFP) events and oscillations is essential to determine whether synchronous interregional patterns indicate functional connectivity. Here, we studied experimentally and numerically how different target structures receiving input from a common population shape their LFPs. We focused on the bilateral CA3 that sends gamma-paced excitatory packages to the bilateral CA1, the lateral septum, and itself (recurrent input). The CA3-specific contribution was isolated from multisite LFPs in target regions using spatial discrimination techniques. We found strong modulation of LFPs by target-specific features, including the morphology and population arrangement of cells, the timing of CA3 inputs, volume conduction from nearby targets, and co-activated inhibition. Jointly they greatly affect the LFP amplitude, profile, and frequency characteristics. For instance, ipsilateral (Schaffer) LFPs occluded contralateral ones, and septal LFPs arise mostly from remote sources while local contribution from CA3 input was minor. In the CA3 itself, gamma waves have dual origin from local networks: in-phase excitatory and nearly antiphase inhibitory. Also, waves may have different duration and varying phase in different targets. These results indicate that to explore the cellular basis of LFPs and the functional connectivity between structures, besides identifying the origin population/s, target modifiers should be considered.

  8. Effect of behavioral testing on spine density of basal dendrites in the CA1 region of the hippocampus modulated by (56)Fe irradiation.

    PubMed

    Raber, Jacob; Allen, Antiño R; Weber, Sydney; Chakraborti, Ayanabha; Sharma, Sourabh; Fike, John R

    2016-04-01

    A unique feature of the space radiation environment is the presence of high-energy charged particles, including (56)Fe ions, which can present a significant hazard to space flight crews during and following a mission. (56)Fe irradiation-induced cognitive changes often involve alterations in hippocampal function. These alterations might involve changes in spine morphology and density. In addition to irradiation, performing a cognitive task can also affect spine morphology. Therefore, it is often hard to determine whether changes in spine morphology and density are due to an environmental challenge or group differences in performance on cognitive tests. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that the ability of exploratory behavior to increase specific measures of hippocampal spine morphology and density is affected by (56)Fe irradiation. In sham-irradiated mice, exploratory behavior increased basal spine density in the CA1 region of the hippocampus and the enclosed blade of the dentate gyrus. These effects were not seen in irradiated mice. In addition, following exploratory behavior, there was a trend toward a decrease in the percent stubby spines on apical dendrites in the CA3 region of the hippocampus in (56)Fe-irradiated, but not sham-irradiated, mice. Other hippocampal regions and spine measures affected by (56)Fe irradiation showed comparable radiation effects in behaviorally naïve and cognitively tested mice. Thus, the ability of exploratory behavior to alter spine density and morphology in specific hippocampal regions is affected by (56)Fe irradiation. PMID:26801826

  9. Changes in glial fibrillary acidic protein immunoreactivity in the dentate gyrus and hippocampus proper of adult and aged dogs.

    PubMed

    Hwang, In Koo; Choi, Jung Hoon; Li, Hua; Yoo, Ki-Yeon; Kim, Dae Won; Lee, Choong Hyun; Yi, Sun Shin; Seong, Je Kyung; Lee, In Se; Yoon, Yeo Sung; Won, Moo-Ho

    2008-09-01

    Astrocytes perform neuron-supportive tasks, repair and scarring process in the central nervous system. In this study, we observed glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), a marker for astrocytes, immunoreactivity in the dentate gyrus and hippocampus proper (CA1-3 region) of adult (2-3 years of age) and aged (10-12 years of age) dogs. In the adult group, GFAP immunoreactive astrocytes were distributed in all layers of the dentate gyrus and CA1-3 region, except in the stratum pyramidale of the CA1-3 region. In the aged group, GFAP immunoreactivity decreased markedly in the molecular layer of the dentate gyrus. However, GFAP immunoreactivity in the CA1-3 region increased in all layers, and the cytoplasm of GFAP immunoreactive astrocytes was hypertrophied. GFAP protein levels in the aged dentate gyrus decreased; however, GFAP levels in the CA1-3 region increased. These results suggest that the morphology of astrocytes and GFAP protein levels in the hippocampal dentate gyrus and CA1 region are changed, respectively, with age.

  10. Associative Retrieval Processes in the Human Medial Temporal Lobe: Hippocampal Retrieval Success and CA1 Mismatch Detection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Janice; Olsen, Rosanna K.; Preston, Alison R.; Glover, Gary H.; Wagner, Anthony D.

    2011-01-01

    Hippocampal subfields CA3 and CA1 are hypothesized to differentially support the generation of associative predictions and the detection of associative mismatches, respectively. Using high-resolution functional MRI, we examined hippocampal subfield activation during associative retrieval and during subsequent comparisons of memory to matching or…

  11. Plasticity-dependent, full detonation at hippocampal mossy fiber–CA3 pyramidal neuron synapses

    PubMed Central

    Vyleta, Nicholas P; Borges-Merjane, Carolina; Jonas, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Mossy fiber synapses on CA3 pyramidal cells are 'conditional detonators' that reliably discharge postsynaptic targets. The 'conditional' nature implies that burst activity in dentate gyrus granule cells is required for detonation. Whether single unitary excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) trigger spikes in CA3 neurons remains unknown. Mossy fiber synapses exhibit both pronounced short-term facilitation and uniquely large post-tetanic potentiation (PTP). We tested whether PTP could convert mossy fiber synapses from subdetonator into detonator mode, using a recently developed method to selectively and noninvasively stimulate individual presynaptic terminals in rat brain slices. Unitary EPSPs failed to initiate a spike in CA3 neurons under control conditions, but reliably discharged them after induction of presynaptic short-term plasticity. Remarkably, PTP switched mossy fiber synapses into full detonators for tens of seconds. Plasticity-dependent detonation may be critical for efficient coding, storage, and recall of information in the granule cell–CA3 cell network. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17977.001 PMID:27780032

  12. Hippocampal CA3 Transcriptome Signature Correlates with Initial Precipitating Injury in Refractory Mesial Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Bando, Silvia Y.; Alegro, Maryana C.; Amaro, Edson; Silva, Alexandre V.; Castro, Luiz H. M.; Wen, Hung-Tzu; Lima, Leandro de A.; Brentani, Helena; Moreira-Filho, Carlos Alberto

    2011-01-01

    Background Prolonged febrile seizures constitute an initial precipitating injury (IPI) commonly associated with refractory mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (RMTLE). In order to investigate IPI influence on the transcriptional phenotype underlying RMTLE we comparatively analyzed the transcriptomic signatures of CA3 explants surgically obtained from RMTLE patients with (FS) or without (NFS) febrile seizure history. Texture analyses on MRI images of dentate gyrus were conducted in a subset of surgically removed sclerotic hippocampi for identifying IPI-associated histo-radiological alterations. Methodology/Principal Findings DNA microarray analysis revealed that CA3 global gene expression differed significantly between FS and NFS subgroups. An integrative functional genomics methodology was used for characterizing the relations between GO biological processes themes and constructing transcriptional interaction networks defining the FS and NFS transcriptomic signatures and its major gene-gene links (hubs). Co-expression network analysis showed that: i) CA3 transcriptomic profiles differ according to the IPI; ii) FS distinctive hubs are mostly linked to glutamatergic signalization while NFS hubs predominantly involve GABAergic pathways and neurotransmission modulation. Both networks have relevant hubs related to nervous system development, what is consistent with cell genesis activity in the hippocampus of RMTLE patients. Moreover, two candidate genes for therapeutic targeting came out from this analysis: SSTR1, a relevant common hub in febrile and afebrile transcriptomes, and CHRM3, due to its putative role in epilepsy susceptibility development. MRI texture analysis allowed an overall accuracy of 90% for pixels correctly classified as belonging to FS or NFS groups. Histological examination revealed that granule cell loss was significantly higher in FS hippocampi. Conclusions/Significance CA3 transcriptional signatures and dentate gyrus morphology fairly correlate with IPI

  13. Corruption of the dentate gyrus by "dominant" granule cells: Implications for dentate gyrus function in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Scharfman, Helen E; Myers, Catherine E

    2016-03-01

    The dentate gyrus (DG) and area CA3 of the hippocampus are highly organized lamellar structures which have been implicated in specific cognitive functions such as pattern separation and pattern completion. Here we describe how the anatomical organization and physiology of the DG and CA3 are consistent with structures that perform pattern separation and completion. We then raise a new idea related to the complex circuitry of the DG and CA3 where CA3 pyramidal cell 'backprojections' play a potentially important role in the sparse firing of granule cells (GCs), considered important in pattern separation. We also propose that GC axons, the mossy fibers, already known for their highly specialized structure, have a dynamic function that imparts variance--'mossy fiber variance'--which is important to pattern separation and completion. Computational modeling is used to show that when a subset of GCs become 'dominant,' one consequence is loss of variance in the activity of mossy fiber axons and a reduction in pattern separation and completion in the model. Empirical data are then provided using an example of 'dominant' GCs--subsets of GCs that develop abnormally and have increased excitability. Notably, these abnormal GCs have been identified in animal models of disease where DG-dependent behaviors are impaired. Together these data provide insight into pattern separation and completion, and suggest that behavioral impairment could arise from dominance of a subset of GCs in the DG-CA3 network. PMID:26391451

  14. Corruption of the dentate gyrus by "dominant" granule cells: Implications for dentate gyrus function in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Scharfman, Helen E; Myers, Catherine E

    2016-03-01

    The dentate gyrus (DG) and area CA3 of the hippocampus are highly organized lamellar structures which have been implicated in specific cognitive functions such as pattern separation and pattern completion. Here we describe how the anatomical organization and physiology of the DG and CA3 are consistent with structures that perform pattern separation and completion. We then raise a new idea related to the complex circuitry of the DG and CA3 where CA3 pyramidal cell 'backprojections' play a potentially important role in the sparse firing of granule cells (GCs), considered important in pattern separation. We also propose that GC axons, the mossy fibers, already known for their highly specialized structure, have a dynamic function that imparts variance--'mossy fiber variance'--which is important to pattern separation and completion. Computational modeling is used to show that when a subset of GCs become 'dominant,' one consequence is loss of variance in the activity of mossy fiber axons and a reduction in pattern separation and completion in the model. Empirical data are then provided using an example of 'dominant' GCs--subsets of GCs that develop abnormally and have increased excitability. Notably, these abnormal GCs have been identified in animal models of disease where DG-dependent behaviors are impaired. Together these data provide insight into pattern separation and completion, and suggest that behavioral impairment could arise from dominance of a subset of GCs in the DG-CA3 network.

  15. Anisomycin injection in area CA3 of the hippocampus impairs both short-term and long-term memories of contextual fear.

    PubMed

    Remaud, Jessica; Ceccom, Johnatan; Carponcy, Julien; Dugué, Laura; Menchon, Gregory; Pech, Stéphane; Halley, Helene; Francés, Bernard; Dahan, Lionel

    2014-05-15

    Protein synthesis is involved in the consolidation of short-term memory into long-term memory. Previous electrophysiological data concerning LTP in CA3 suggest that protein synthesis in that region might also be necessary for short-term memory. We tested this hypothesis by locally injecting the protein synthesis inhibitor anisomycin in hippocampal area CA1 or CA3 immediately after contextual fear conditioning. As previously shown, injections in CA1 impaired long-term memory but spared short-term memory. Conversely, injections in CA3 impaired both long-term and short-term memories. We conclude that early steps of experience-induced plasticity occurring in CA3 and underlying short-term memory require protein synthesis.

  16. Anisomycin injection in area CA3 of the hippocampus impairs both short-term and long-term memories of contextual fear.

    PubMed

    Remaud, Jessica; Ceccom, Johnatan; Carponcy, Julien; Dugué, Laura; Menchon, Gregory; Pech, Stéphane; Halley, Helene; Francés, Bernard; Dahan, Lionel

    2014-06-01

    Protein synthesis is involved in the consolidation of short-term memory into long-term memory. Previous electrophysiological data concerning LTP in CA3 suggest that protein synthesis in that region might also be necessary for short-term memory. We tested this hypothesis by locally injecting the protein synthesis inhibitor anisomycin in hippocampal area CA1 or CA3 immediately after contextual fear conditioning. As previously shown, injections in CA1 impaired long-term memory but spared short-term memory. Conversely, injections in CA3 impaired both long-term and short-term memories. We conclude that early steps of experience-induced plasticity occurring in CA3 and underlying short-term memory require protein synthesis. PMID:25171422

  17. Ca3Mn2O7.

    PubMed

    Guiblin, Nicolas; Grebille, Dominique; Leligny, Henri; Martin, Christine

    2002-01-01

    The tricalcium dimanganese heptaoxide (Ca3Mn2O7) member of the Ruddlesden-Popper series Ca(n+1)Mn(n)O(3n+1), i.e. with n = 2, was previously reported with an I-centred tetragonal lattice [a(t) = 3.68 and c(t) = 19.57 A] by Fawcett, Sunstrom, Greenblatt, Croft & Ramanujachary [Chem. Mater. (1998), 10, 3643-3651]. It is now found to be orthorhombic, with an A-centred lattice [a = 5.2347 (6), b = 5.2421 (2) and c = 19.4177 (19) A]. The structure has been refined in space group A2(1)am using X-ray single-crystal diffraction data and assuming the existence of twin domains related by the (1-10) plane. A comparison with the basic perovskite structure CaMnO3 (n = infinity) is proposed.

  18. Dentate gyrus–CA3 glutamate release/NMDA transmission mediates behavioral despair and antidepressant-like responses to leptin

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xuezhen; Zhang, Di; Lu, Xin-Yun

    2014-01-01

    Compelling evidence supports the important role of the glutamatergic system in the pathophysiology of major depression and also as a target for rapid-acting antidepressants. However, the functional role of glutamate release/transmission in behavioral processes related to depression and antidepressant efficacy remains to be elucidated. In this study, glutamate release and behavioral responses to tail suspension, a procedure commonly used for inducing behavioral despair, were simultaneously monitored in real time. The onset of tail suspension stress evoked a rapid increase in glutamate release in hippocampal field CA3, which declined gradually after its offset. Blockade of NMDA receptors by intra-CA3 infusion of MK-801, a non-competitive NMDA receptor antagonist, reversed behavioral despair. The CA3 was innervated by granule neurons expressing the leptin receptor (LepRb) in the dentate gyrus (DG), representing a subpopulation of granule neurons that were devoid of stress-induced activation. Leptin treatment dampened tail suspension-evoked glutamate release in CA3. On the other hand, intra-CA3 infusion of NMDA blocked the antidepressant-like effect of leptin in reversing behavioral despair in both the tail suspension and forced swim tests, which involved activation of Akt signaling in DG. Together, these results suggest that the DG-CA3 glutamatergic pathway is critical for mediating behavioral despair and antidepressant-like responses to leptin. PMID:25092243

  19. Site selectivity of dopant cations in Ca3(SiO4)Cl2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, M. R.

    2014-08-01

    A series of static lattice calculations were performed to determine the site selectivity of cations of differing size and valence when substituted onto the Ca sites of the calcium chlorosilicate (Ca3(SiO4)Cl2) lattice, a potential host phase for the immobilisation of halide-rich wastes arising from the pyrochemical reprocessing of plutonium. Atomic-scale simulations indicate that divalent cations are preferentially substituted onto the Ca1 site, whilst tri- and tetravalent cations are preferentially hosted on the Ca2 site, with the Ca1 site favoured for forming the vacancies necessary to charge-balance the lattice as a whole. Multi-defect calculations reveal that the site selectivity of the dopant cations is dependent on their ionic radii; as the ionic radii of the divalent cations increase, substitution onto the preferred site becomes more and more strongly favoured, whereas the inverse is true of the trivalent cations.

  20. Granule-like neurons at the hilar/CA3 border after status epilepticus and their synchrony with area CA3 pyramidal cells: functional implications of seizure-induced neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Scharfman, H E; Goodman, J H; Sollas, A L

    2000-08-15

    A group of neurons with the characteristics of dentate gyrus granule cells was found at the hilar/CA3 border several weeks after pilocarpine- or kainic acid-induced status epilepticus. Intracellular recordings from pilocarpine-treated rats showed that these "granule-like" neurons were similar to normal granule cells (i. e., those in the granule cell layer) in membrane properties, firing behavior, morphology, and their mossy fiber axon. However, in contrast to normal granule cells, they were synchronized with spontaneous, rhythmic bursts of area CA3 pyramidal cells that survived status epilepticus. Saline-treated controls lacked the population of granule-like cells at the hilar/CA3 border and CA3 bursts. In rats that were injected after status epilepticus with bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) to label newly born cells, and also labeled for calbindin D(28K) (because it normally stains granule cells), many double-labeled neurons were located at the hilar/CA3 border. Many BrdU-labeled cells at the hilar/CA3 border also were double-labeled with a neuronal marker (NeuN). Taken together with the recent evidence that granule cells that are born after seizures can migrate into the hilus, the results suggest that some newly born granule cells migrate as far as the CA3 cell layer, where they become integrated abnormally into the CA3 network, yet they retain granule cell intrinsic properties. The results provide insight into the physiological properties of newly born granule cells in the adult brain and suggest that relatively rigid developmental programs set the membrane properties of newly born cells, but substantial plasticity is present to influence their place in pre-existing circuitry.

  1. Running increases neurogenesis without retinoic acid receptor activation in the adult mouse dentate gyrus.

    PubMed

    Aberg, Elin; Perlmann, Thomas; Olson, Lars; Brené, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    Both vitamin A deficiency and high doses of retinoids can result in learning and memory impairments, depression as well as decreases in cell proliferation, neurogenesis and cell survival. Physical activity enhances hippocampal neurogenesis and can also exert an antidepressant effect. Here we elucidate a putative link between running, retinoid signaling, and neurogenesis in hippocampus. Adult transgenic reporter mice designed to detect ligand-activated retinoic acid receptors (RAR) or retinoid X receptors (RXR) were used to localize the distribution of activated RAR or RXR at the single-cell level in the brain. Two months of voluntary wheel-running induced an increase in hippocampal neurogenesis as indicated by an almost two-fold increase in doublecortin-immunoreactive cells. Running activity was correlated with neurogenesis. Under basal conditions a distinct pattern of RAR-activated cells was detected in the granule cell layer of the dentate gyrus (DG), thalamus, and cerebral cortex layers 3-4 and to a lesser extent in hippocampal pyramidal cell layers CA1-CA3. Running did not change the number of RAR-activated cells in the DG. There was no correlation between running and RAR activation or between RAR activation and neurogenesis in the DG of hippocampus. Only a few scattered activated retinoid X receptors were found in the DG under basal conditions and after wheel-running, but RXR was detected in other areas such as in the hilus region of hippocampus and in layer VI of cortex cerebri. RAR agonists affect mood in humans and reduce neurogenesis, learning and memory in animal models. In our study, long-term running increased neurogenesis but did not alter RAR ligand activation in the DG in individually housed mice. Thus, our data suggest that the effects of exercise on neurogenesis and other plasticity changes in the hippocampal formation are mediated by mechanisms that do not involve retinoid receptor activation.

  2. Integrity of mGluR-LTD in the associative/commissural inputs to CA3 correlates with successful aging in rats.

    PubMed

    Yang, Sunggu; Megill, Andrea; Ardiles, Alvaro O; Ransom, Sarah; Tran, Trinh; Koh, Ming Teng; Lee, Hey-Kyoung; Gallagher, Michela; Kirkwood, Alfredo

    2013-07-31

    The impact of aging on cognitive capabilities varies among individuals ranging from significant impairment to preservation of function on par with younger adults. Research on the neural basis for age-related memory decline has focused primarily on the CA1 region of the hippocampus. However, recent studies in elderly human and rodents indicate that individual differences in cognitive aging are more strongly tied to functional alterations in CA3 circuits. To examine synaptic plasticity in the CA3 region, we used aged rats behaviorally characterized in a hippocampal-dependent task to evaluate the status of long-term potentiation and long-term depression (LTP and LTD) in the associative/commissural pathway (A/C → CA3), which provides the majority of excitatory input to CA3 pyramidal neurons. We found that, unlike in CA1 synapses, in A/C → CA3 LTP is minimally affected by age. However, two forms of LTD, involving NMDA and metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR), are both greatly reduced in age-impaired rats. Age-unimpaired rats, in contrast, had intact mGluR LTD. These findings indicate that the integrity of mGluR-LTD at A/C → CA3 inputs may play a crucial role in maintaining the performance of CA3 circuitry in aging.

  3. Impaired retention of spatial memory after transection of longitudinally oriented axons of hippocampal CA3 pyramidal cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steffenach, Hill-Aina; Sloviter, Robert S.; Moser, Edvard I.; Moser, May-Britt

    2002-03-01

    Longitudinally oriented axon collaterals of CA3 pyramidal cells may be critical for integrating distributed information in the hippocampus. To investigate the possible role of this pathway in the retention of spatial memory, we made a single transversely oriented cut through the dorsal CA3 region of each hippocampus. Although the lesion involved <3% of the hippocampal volume, it nonetheless disrupted memory retention in a water maze in preoperatively trained rats. New learning in a different water maze was attenuated. No significant impairment occurred in rats with longitudinally oriented cuts, or in animals with ibotenic acid-induced lesions of similar magnitude. To characterize the effect of a focal lesion on the integrity of longitudinally projecting axons, we stained degenerating cells and fibers in rats with unilateral CA3 transections by using FluoroJade-B. Degenerating terminals were seen across a wide region posterior to the cut, and were present in the strata of areas CA3 and CA1 that are innervated by CA3 pyramidal cells. These results suggest that the integrity of longitudinally oriented, translamellar axons of CA3 pyramidal cells may be necessary for efficient acquisition and retention of spatial memory.

  4. Impaired retention of spatial memory after transection of longitudinally oriented axons of hippocampal CA3 pyramidal cells.

    PubMed

    Steffenach, Hill-Aina; Sloviter, Robert S; Moser, Edvard I; Moser, May-Britt

    2002-03-01

    Longitudinally oriented axon collaterals of CA3 pyramidal cells may be critical for integrating distributed information in the hippocampus. To investigate the possible role of this pathway in the retention of spatial memory, we made a single transversely oriented cut through the dorsal CA3 region of each hippocampus. Although the lesion involved <3% of the hippocampal volume, it nonetheless disrupted memory retention in a water maze in preoperatively trained rats. New learning in a different water maze was attenuated. No significant impairment occurred in rats with longitudinally oriented cuts, or in animals with ibotenic acid-induced lesions of similar magnitude. To characterize the effect of a focal lesion on the integrity of longitudinally projecting axons, we stained degenerating cells and fibers in rats with unilateral CA3 transections by using FluoroJade-B. Degenerating terminals were seen across a wide region posterior to the cut, and were present in the strata of areas CA3 and CA1 that are innervated by CA3 pyramidal cells. These results suggest that the integrity of longitudinally oriented, translamellar axons of CA3 pyramidal cells may be necessary for efficient acquisition and retention of spatial memory.

  5. Ischemic Preconditioning Mediates Neuroprotection against Ischemia in Mouse Hippocampal CA1 Neurons by Inducing Autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xuebin; Huang, Huiling; Wang, Jin; Wang, Yajing; Tong, Xiaoguang; Wang, Jinhuan; Wu, Jialing

    2015-01-01

    The hippocampal CA1 region is sensitive to hypoxic and ischemic injury but can be protected by ischemic preconditioning (IPC). However, the mechanism through which IPC protects hippocampal CA1 neurons is still under investigation. Additionally, the role of autophagy in determining the fate of hippocampal neurons is unclear. Here, we examined whether IPC induced autophagy to alleviate hippocampal CA1 neuronal death in vitro and in vivo with oxygen glucose deprivation (OGD) and bilateral carotid artery occlusion (BCCAO) models. Survival of hippocampal neurons increased from 51.5% ± 6.3% in the non-IPC group (55 min of OGD) to 77.3% ± 7.9% in the IPC group (15 min of OGD, followed by 55 min of OGD 24 h later). The number of hippocampal CA1 layer neurons increased from 182 ± 26 cells/mm2 in the non-IPC group (20 min of BCCAO) to 278 ± 55 cells/mm2 in the IPC group (1 min × 3 BCCAO, followed by 20 min of BCCAO 24 h later). Akt phosphorylation and microtubule-associated protein light chain 3 (LC3)-II/LC3-I expression were increased in the preconditioning group. Moreover, the protective effects of IPC were abolished only by inhibiting the activity of autophagy, but not by blocking the activation of Akt in vitro. Using in vivo experiments, we found that LC3 expression was upregulated, accompanied by an increase in neuronal survival in hippocampal CA1 neurons in the preconditioning group. The neuroprotective effects of IPC on hippocampal CA1 neurons were completely inhibited by treatment with 3-MA. In contrast, hippocampal CA3 neurons did not show changes in autophagic activity or beneficial effects of IPC. These data suggested that IPC may attenuate ischemic injury in hippocampal CA1 neurons through induction of Akt-independent autophagy. PMID:26325184

  6. The Role of the Direct Perforant Path Input to the CA1 Subregion of the Dorsal Hippocampus in Memory Retention and Retrieval

    PubMed Central

    Vago, David R.; Bevan, Adam; Kesner, Raymond P.

    2011-01-01

    Subregional analyses of the hippocampus have suggested a selective role for the CA1 subregion in intermediate/long-term spatial memory and consolidation, but not short-term acquisition or encoding processes. It remains unclear how the direct cortical projection to CA1 via the perforant path (pp) contributes to these CA1-dependent processes. It has been suggested that dopamine selectively modulates the pp projection to CA1 while having little to no effect on the Schaffer collateral (SC) projection to CA1. This series of behavioral and electro-physiological experiments takes advantage of this pharmacological dissociation to demonstrate that the direct pp inputs to CA1 are critical in CA1-dependent intermediate-term retention and retrieval function. Here we demonstrate that local infusion of the nonselective dopamine agonist, apomorphine (10, 15 μg), into the CA1 subregion of awake animals produces impairments in between-day retention and retrieval, sparing within-day encoding of a modified Hebb-Williams maze and contextual conditioning of fear. In contrast, apomorphine produces no deficits when infused into the CA3 subregion. To complement the behavioral analyses, electrophysiological data was collected. In anesthetized animals, local infusion of the same doses of apomorphine significantly modifies evoked responses in the distal dendrites of CA1 following angular bundle stimulation, but produces no significant effects in the more proximal dendritic layer following stimulation of the SC. These results support a modulatory role for dopamine in the EC-CA1, but not CA3-CA1 circuitry, and suggest the possibility of a more fundamental role for EC-CA1 synaptic transmission in terms of intermediate-term, but not short-term spatial memory. PMID:17604347

  7. Acute stress and hippocampal output: exploring dorsal CA1 and subicular synaptic plasticity simultaneously in anesthetized rats

    PubMed Central

    MacDougall, Matthew J; Howland, John G

    2013-01-01

    The Cornu Ammonis-1 (CA1) subfield and subiculum (SUB) serve as major output structures of the hippocampal formation. Exploring forms of synaptic plasticity simultaneously within these two output regions may improve understanding of the dynamics of hippocampal circuitry and information transfer between hippocampal and cortical brain regions. Using a novel dual-channel electrophysiological preparation in urethane-anesthetized adult male Sprague-Dawley rats in vivo, we examined the effects of acute restraint stress (30 min) on short- and long-term forms of synaptic plasticity in both CA1 and SUB by stimulating the CA3 region. Paired-pulse facilitation was disrupted in SUB but not CA1 in the dual-channel experiments following exposure to acute stress. Disruptions in CA1 PPF were evident in subsequent single-channel experiments with a more anterior recording site. Acute stress disrupted long-term potentiation induced by high-frequency stimulation (10 bursts of 20 pulses at 200 Hz) in both CA1 and SUB. Low-frequency stimulation (900 pulses at 1 Hz) did not alter CA1 plasticity while a late-developing potentiation was evident in SUB that was disrupted following exposure to acute stress. These findings highlight differences in the sensitivity to acute stress for distinct forms of synaptic plasticity within synapses in hippocampal output regions. The findings are discussed in relation to normal and aberrant forms of hippocampal-cortical information processing. PMID:24303119

  8. Nonspatial Sequence Coding in CA1 Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Timothy A.; Salz, Daniel M.; McKenzie, Sam

    2016-01-01

    The hippocampus is critical to the memory for sequences of events, a defining feature of episodic memory. However, the fundamental neuronal mechanisms underlying this capacity remain elusive. While considerable research indicates hippocampal neurons can represent sequences of locations, direct evidence of coding for the memory of sequential relationships among nonspatial events remains lacking. To address this important issue, we recorded neural activity in CA1 as rats performed a hippocampus-dependent sequence-memory task. Briefly, the task involves the presentation of repeated sequences of odors at a single port and requires rats to identify each item as “in sequence” or “out of sequence”. We report that, while the animals' location and behavior remained constant, hippocampal activity differed depending on the temporal context of items—in this case, whether they were presented in or out of sequence. Some neurons showed this effect across items or sequence positions (general sequence cells), while others exhibited selectivity for specific conjunctions of item and sequence position information (conjunctive sequence cells) or for specific probe types (probe-specific sequence cells). We also found that the temporal context of individual trials could be accurately decoded from the activity of neuronal ensembles, that sequence coding at the single-cell and ensemble level was linked to sequence memory performance, and that slow-gamma oscillations (20–40 Hz) were more strongly modulated by temporal context and performance than theta oscillations (4–12 Hz). These findings provide compelling evidence that sequence coding extends beyond the domain of spatial trajectories and is thus a fundamental function of the hippocampus. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The ability to remember the order of life events depends on the hippocampus, but the underlying neural mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here we addressed this issue by recording neural activity in hippocampal

  9. Pattern Separation of Emotional Information in Hippocampal Dentate and CA3

    PubMed Central

    Leal, Stephanie L.; Tighe, Sarah K.; Jones, Craig K.; Yassa, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Emotional arousal, mediated by the amygdala, is known to modulate episodic memories stored by the hippocampus, a region involved in pattern separation (the process by which similar representations are independently stored). While emotional modulation and pattern separation have been examined independently, the current study attempts to link the two areas of research to propose an alternative account for how emotion modulates episodic memory. We utilized an emotional discrimination task designed to tax pattern separation of emotional information by concurrently varying valence and similarity of stimuli. To examine emotional modulation of memory at the level of hippocampal subfields, we used high-resolution fMRI (1.5 mm isotropic) of the medial temporal lobe. Consistent with prior reports, we observed engagement of the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) and CA3 during accurate discrimination of highly similar items (i.e. pattern separation). Furthermore, we observed an emotional modulation of this signal (negative > neutral) specific to trials on which participants accurately discriminated similar emotional items. The amygdala was also modulated by emotion, regardless of the accuracy of discrimination. Additionally, we found aberrant amygdala-hippocampal network activity in a sample of adults with depressive symptoms. In this sample, amygdala activation was enhanced and DG/CA3 activation was diminished during emotional discrimination compared to those without depressive symptoms. Depressive symptom severity was also negatively correlated with DG/CA3 activity. This study suggests a novel mechanistic account for how emotional information is processed by hippocampal subfields as well as how this network may be altered in mood disorders. PMID:24796287

  10. Thermoelectric properties of antiperovskite calcium oxides Ca3PbO and Ca3SnO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Y.; Sakamaki, A.; Takenaka, K.

    2016-05-01

    We report the thermoelectric properties of polycrystalline samples of Ca3Pb1-xBixO (x = 0, 0.1, 0.2) and Ca3SnO, both crystallizing in a cubic antiperovskite-type structure. The Ca3SnO sample shows metallic resistivity and its thermoelectric power approaches 100 μV K-1 at room temperature, resulting in the thermoelectric power factor of Ca3SnO being larger than that of Ca3Pb1-xBixO. On the basis of Hall and Sommerfeld coefficients, the Ca3SnO sample is found to be a p-type metal with a carrier density of ˜1019 cm-3, a mobility of ˜80 cm2 V-1 s-1, both comparable to those in degenerated semiconductors, and a moderately large hole carrier effective mass. The coexistence of moderately high mobility and large effective mass observed in Ca3SnO, as well as possible emergence of a multivalley electronic structure with a small band gap at low-symmetry points in k-space, suggests that the antiperovskite Ca oxides have strong potential as a thermoelectric material.

  11. Neuronal migration and its disorders affecting the CA3 region

    PubMed Central

    Belvindrah, Richard; Nosten-Bertrand, Marika; Francis, Fiona

    2014-01-01

    In this review, we focus on CA3 neuronal migration disorders in the rodent. We begin by introducing the main steps of hippocampal development, and we summarize characteristic hippocampal malformations in human. We then describe various mouse mutants showing structural hippocampal defects. Notably, genes identified in human cortical neuronal migration disorders consistently give rise to a CA3 phenotype when mutated in the mouse. We successively describe their molecular, physiological and behavioral phenotypes that together contribute to a better understanding of CA3-dependent functions. We finally discuss potential factors underlying the CA3 vulnerability revealed by these mouse mutants and that may also contribute to other human neurological and psychiatric disorders. PMID:24624057

  12. Adolescent mice show anxiety- and aggressive-like behavior and the reduction of long-term potentiation in mossy fiber-CA3 synapses after neonatal maternal separation.

    PubMed

    Shin, S Y; Han, S H; Woo, R-S; Jang, S H; Min, S S

    2016-03-01

    Exposure to maternal separation (MS) during early life is an identified risk factor for emotional disorders such as anxiety and depression later in life. This study investigated the effects of neonatal MS on the behavior and long-term potentiation (LTP) as well as basic synaptic transmission at hippocampal CA3-CA1 and mossy fiber (MF)-CA3 synapses in adolescent mice for 19days. When mice were adolescents, we measured depression, learning, memory, anxious and aggressive behavior using the forced swimming test (FST), Y-maze, Morris water maze (MWM), elevated plus maze (EPM), three consecutive days of the open field test, the social interaction test, the tube-dominance test and the resident-intruder test. The results showed that there was no difference in FST, Y-maze, and MWM performance. However, MS mice showed more anxiety-like behavior in the EPM test and aggressive-like behavior in the tube-dominance and resident-intruder tests. In addition, the magnitude of LTP and release probability in the MF-CA3 synapses was reduced in the MS group but not in the CA3-CA1 synapse. Our results indicate that early life stress due to MS may induce anxiety- and aggressive-like behavior during adolescence, and these effects are associated with synaptic plasticity at the hippocampal MF-CA3 synapses.

  13. GABAA receptor-mediated feedforward and feedback inhibition differentially modulate the gain and the neural code transformation in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells.

    PubMed

    Jang, Hyun Jae; Park, Kyerl; Lee, Jaedong; Kim, Hyuncheol; Han, Kyu Hun; Kwag, Jeehyun

    2015-12-01

    Diverse variety of hippocampal interneurons exists in the CA1 area, which provides either feedforward (FF) or feedback (FB) inhibition to CA1 pyramidal cell (PC). However, how the two different inhibitory network architectures modulate the computational mode of CA1 PC is unknown. By investigating the CA3 PC rate-driven input-output function of CA1 PC using in vitro electrophysiology, in vitro-simulation of inhibitory network, and in silico computational modeling, we demonstrated for the first time that GABAA receptor-mediated FF and FB inhibition differentially modulate the gain, the spike precision, the neural code transformation and the information capacity of CA1 PC. Recruitment of FF inhibition buffered the CA1 PC spikes to theta-frequency regardless of the input frequency, abolishing the gain and making CA1 PC insensitive to its inputs. Instead, temporal variability of the CA1 PC spikes was increased, promoting the rate-to-temporal code transformation to enhance the information capacity of CA1 PC. In contrast, the recruitment of FB inhibition sub-linearly transformed the input rate to spike output rate with high gain and low spike temporal variability, promoting the rate-to-rate code transformation. These results suggest that GABAA receptor-mediated FF and FB inhibitory circuits could serve as network mechanisms for differentially modulating the gain of CA1 PC, allowing CA1 PC to switch between different computational modes using rate and temporal codes ad hoc. Such switch will allow CA1 PC to efficiently respond to spatio-temporally dynamic inputs and expand its computational capacity during different behavioral and neuromodulatory states in vivo.

  14. Synapse loss from chronically elevated glucocorticoids: relationship to neuropil volume and cell number in hippocampal area CA3.

    PubMed

    Tata, Despina A; Marciano, Veronica A; Anderson, Brenda J

    2006-09-20

    Individuals with clinical disorders associated with elevated plasma glucocorticoids, such as major depressive disorder and Cushing's syndrome, are reported to have smaller hippocampal volume. To understand how the hippocampus responds at the cellular and subcellular levels to glucocorticoids and how such changes are related to volume measures, we have undertaken a comprehensive study of glucocorticoid effects on hippocampal CA3 volume and identified elements in the neuropil including astrocytic volume and cell and synapse number and size. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were injected with corticosterone (40 mg/kg), the primary glucocorticoid in rodents, or vehicle for 60 days. The CA3 was further subdivided so that the two-thirds of CA3 (nearest the dentate gyrus) previously shown to be vulnerable to corticosterone could be analyzed as two separate subfields. Corticosterone had no effect on neuropil volume or glial volume in the proximal subfield but caused a strong tendency for astrocytic processes to make up a larger proportion of the tissue and for volume of tissue made of constituents other than glial cells (primarily neuronal processes) to be smaller in the middle subfield. Within the neuropil, there were no cellular or subcellular profiles that indicated degeneration, suggesting that corticosterone does not cause prolonged damage. Corticosterone did not reduce cell number or cell or nonperforated synapse size but did cause a pronounced loss of synapses. This loss occurred in both subfields and, therefore, was independent of volume loss. Together, the findings suggest that volume measures can underestimate corticosterone effects on neural structure.

  15. Aging-Related Hyperexcitability in CA3 Pyramidal Neurons Is Mediated by Enhanced A-Type K+ Channel Function and Expression

    PubMed Central

    Simkin, Dina; Hattori, Shoai; Ybarra, Natividad; Musial, Timothy F.; Buss, Eric W.; Richter, Hannah; Oh, M. Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Aging-related impairments in hippocampus-dependent cognition have been attributed to maladaptive changes in the functional properties of pyramidal neurons within the hippocampal subregions. Much evidence has come from work on CA1 pyramidal neurons, with CA3 pyramidal neurons receiving comparatively less attention despite its age-related hyperactivation being postulated to interfere with spatial processing in the hippocampal circuit. Here, we use whole-cell current-clamp to demonstrate that aged rat (29–32 months) CA3 pyramidal neurons fire significantly more action potentials (APs) during theta-burst frequency stimulation and that this is associated with faster AP repolarization (i.e., narrower AP half-widths and enlarged fast afterhyperpolarization). Using a combination of patch-clamp physiology, pharmacology, Western blot analyses, immunohistochemistry, and array tomography, we demonstrate that these faster AP kinetics are mediated by enhanced function and expression of Kv4.2/Kv4.3 A-type K+ channels, particularly within the perisomatic compartment, of CA3 pyramidal neurons. Thus, our study indicates that inhibition of these A-type K+ channels can restore the intrinsic excitability properties of aged CA3 pyramidal neurons to a young-like state. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Age-related learning deficits have been attributed, in part, to altered hippocampal pyramidal neuronal function with normal aging. Much evidence has come from work on CA1 neurons, with CA3 neurons receiving comparatively less attention despite its age-related hyperactivation being postulated to interfere with spatial processing. Hence, we conducted a series of experiments to identify the cellular mechanisms that underlie the hyperexcitability reported in the CA3 region. Contrary to CA1 neurons, we demonstrate that postburst afterhyperpolarization is not altered with aging and that aged CA3 pyramidal neurons are able to fire significantly more action potentials and that this is associated with

  16. Long-Term Potentiation at CA3CA1 Hippocampal Synapses with Special Emphasis on Aging, Disease, and Stress

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ashok

    2011-01-01

    Synaptic plasticity in the mammalian central nervous system has been the subject of intense investigation for the past four decades. Long-term potentiation (LTP), a major reflection of synaptic plasticity, is an activity-driven long-lasting increase in the efficacy of excitatory synaptic transmission following the delivery of a brief, high-frequency train of electrical stimulation. LTP is regarded as a principal candidate for the cellular mechanisms involved in learning and offers an attractive hypothesis of how memories are constructed. There are a number of exceptional full-length reviews published on LTP; the current review intends to present an overview of the research findings regarding hippocampal LTP with special emphasis on aging, diseases, and psychological insults. PMID:21647396

  17. Immediate-Early Gene Transcriptional Activation in Hippocampus Ca1 and Ca3 Does Not Accurately Reflect Rapid, Pattern Completion-Based Retrieval of Context Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pevzner, Aleksandr; Guzowski, John F.

    2015-01-01

    No studies to date have examined whether immediate-early gene (IEG) activation is driven by context memory recall. To address this question, we utilized the context preexposure facilitation effect (CPFE) paradigm. In CPFE, animals acquire contextual fear conditioning through hippocampus-dependent rapid retrieval of a previously formed contextual…

  18. GABA(A) receptors containing (alpha)5 subunits in the CA1 and CA3 hippocampal fields regulate ethanol-motivated behaviors: an extended ethanol reward circuitry.

    PubMed

    June, H L; Harvey, S C; Foster, K L; McKay, P F; Cummings, R; Garcia, M; Mason, D; Grey, C; McCane, S; Williams, L S; Johnson, T B; He, X; Rock, S; Cook, J M

    2001-03-15

    GABA receptors within the mesolimbic circuitry have been proposed to play a role in regulating alcohol-seeking behaviors in the alcohol-preferring (P) rat. However, the precise GABA(A) receptor subunit(s) mediating the reinforcing properties of EtOH remains unknown. We examined the capacity of intrahippocampal infusions of an alpha5 subunit-selective ( approximately 75-fold) benzodiazepine (BDZ) inverse agonist [i.e., RY 023 (RY) (tert-butyl 8-(trimethylsilyl) acetylene-5,6-dihydro-5-methyl-6-oxo-4H-imidazo [1,5a] [1,4] benzodiazepine-3-carboxylate)] to alter lever pressing maintained by concurrent presentation of EtOH (10% v/v) and a saccharin solution (0.05% w/v). Bilateral (1.5-20 microgram) and unilateral (0.01-40 microgram) RY dose-dependently reduced EtOH-maintained responding, with saccharin-maintained responding being reduced only with the highest doses (e.g., 20 and 40 microgram). The competitive BDZ antagonist ZK 93426 (ZK) (7 microgram) reversed the RY-induced suppression on EtOH-maintained responding, confirming that the effect was mediated via the BDZ site on the GABA(A) receptor complex. Intrahippocampal modulation of the EtOH-maintained responding was site-specific; no antagonism by RY after intra-accumbens [nucleus accumbens (NACC)] and intraventral tegmental [ventral tegmental area (VTA)] infusions was observed. Because the VTA and NACC contain very high densities of alpha1 and alpha2 subunits, respectively, we determined whether RY exhibited a "negative" or "neutral" pharmacological profile at recombinant alpha1beta3gamma2, alpha2beta3gamma2, and alpha5beta3gamma2 receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes. RY produced "classic" inverse agonism at all alpha receptor subtypes; thus, a neutral efficacy was not sufficient to explain the failure of RY to alter EtOH responding in the NACC or VTA. The results provide the first demonstration that the alpha5-containing GABA(A) receptors in the hippocampus play an important role in regulating EtOH-seeking behaviors. PMID:11245701

  19. Quantitative Morphometry of Electrophysiologically Identified CA3b Interneurons Reveals Robust Local Geometry and Distinct Cell Classes

    PubMed Central

    Ascoli, Giorgio A.; Brown, Kerry M.; Calixto, Eduardo; Card, J. Patrick; Galvan, E. J.; Perez-Rosello, T.; Barrionuevo, Germán

    2010-01-01

    The morphological and electrophysiological diversity of inhibitory cells in hippocampal area CA3 may underlie specific computational roles and is not yet fully elucidated. In particular, interneurons with somata in strata radiatum (R) and lacunosum-moleculare (L-M) receive converging stimulation from the dentate gyrus and entorhinal cortex as well as within CA3. Although these cells express different forms of synaptic plasticity, their axonal trees and connectivity are still largely unknown. We investigated the branching and spatial patterns, plus the membrane and synaptic properties, of rat CA3b R and L-M interneurons digitally reconstructed after intracellular labeling. We found considerable variability within but no difference between the two layers, and no correlation between morphological and biophysical properties. Nevertheless, two cell types were identified based on the number of dendritic bifurcations, with significantly different anatomical and electrophysiological features. Axons generally branched an order of magnitude more than dendrites. However, interneurons on both sides of the R/L-M boundary revealed surprisingly modular axo-dendritic arborizations with consistently uniform local branch geometry. Both axons and dendrites followed a lamellar organization, and axons displayed a spatial preference towards the fissure. Moreover, only a small fraction of the axonal arbor extended to the outer portion of the invaded volume, and tended to return towards the proximal region. In contrast, dendritic trees demonstrated more limited but isotropic volume occupancy. These results suggest a role of predominantly local feedforward and lateral inhibitory control for both R and L-M interneurons. Such role may be essential to balance the extensive recurrent excitation of area CA3 underlying hippocampal autoassociative memory function. PMID:19496174

  20. Up-regulation of GLT-1 severely impairs LTD at mossy fibre--CA3 synapses.

    PubMed

    Omrani, Azar; Melone, Marcello; Bellesi, Michele; Safiulina, Victoria; Aida, Tomomi; Tanaka, Kohishi; Cherubini, Enrico; Conti, Fiorenzo

    2009-10-01

    Glutamate transporters are responsible for clearing synaptically released glutamate from the extracellular space. By this action, they maintain low levels of ambient glutamate, thus preventing excitotoxic damage, and contribute to shaping synaptic currents. We show that up-regulation of the glutamate transporter GLT-1 by ceftriaxone severely impaired mGluR-dependent long-term depression (LTD), induced at rat mossy fibre (MF)-CA3 synapses by repetitive stimulation of afferent fibres. This effect involved GLT-1, since LTD was rescued by the selective GLT-1 antagonist dihydrokainate (DHK). DHK per se produced a modest decrease in fEPSP amplitude that rapidly regained control levels after DHK wash out. Moreover, the degree of fEPSP inhibition induced by the low-affinity glutamate receptor antagonist gamma-DGG was similar during basal synaptic transmission but not during LTD, indicating that in ceftriaxone-treated rats LTD induction did not alter synaptic glutamate transient concentration. Furthermore, ceftriaxone-induced GLT-1 up-regulation significantly reduced the magnitude of LTP at MF-CA3 synapses but not at Schaffer collateral-CA1 synapses. Postembedding immunogold studies in rats showed an increased density of gold particles coding for GLT-1a in astrocytic processes and in mossy fibre terminals; in the latter, gold particles were located near and within the active zones. In both CEF-treated and untreated GLT-1 KO mice used for verifying the specificity of immunostaining, the density of gold particles in MF terminals was comparable to background levels. The enhanced expression of GLT-1 at release sites may prevent activation of presynaptic receptors, thus revealing a novel mechanism by which GLT-1 regulates synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus.

  1. β1-and β2-adrenoceptors in hippocampal CA3 region are required for long-term memory consolidation in rats.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jian; Luo, Fei; Guo, Nan-nan; Cheng, Zong-yue; Li, Bao-ming

    2015-11-19

    The existence of β-adrenoceptors (ARs) in the hippocampus and the importance of β-ARs in regulating synaptic plasticity and learning/memory function are well documented. As known, β-ARs in area cornu ammonis 1 (CA1) are involved in regulating memory consolidation. However, little is known about the functional roles of the β-ARs subtypes, β1- and β2-ARs, in the hippocampal cornu ammonis 3 (CA3) region. To address this question, we firstly locally infused the β1- or β2-ARs antagonist into the CA3 region and observed that blockage of either β1-AR or β2-AR impaired long-term contextual fear memory and water-maze spatial memory. We also found that, following the contextual fear conditioning, the expression of β1-AR in the CA3 region significantly increased, whereas β2-AR was unchanged. Then intra-CA3 infusion of recombinant lentiviral RNAi vectors for β1 or β2-ARs also produced deficit in contextual memory consolidation. Taken together, the results suggested that the β1- and β2-ARs in the CA3 region were involved in hippocampus dependent memory consolidation.

  2. Region-specific roles of the prelimbic cortex, the dorsal CA1, the ventral DG and ventral CA1 of the hippocampus in the fear return evoked by a sub-conditioning procedure in rats.

    PubMed

    Fu, Juan; Xing, Xiaoli; Han, Mengfi; Xu, Na; Piao, Chengji; Zhang, Yue; Zheng, Xigeng

    2016-02-01

    The return of learned fear is an important issue in anxiety disorder research since an analogous process may contribute to long-term fear maintenance or clinical relapse. A number of studies demonstrate that mPFC and hippocampus are important in the modulation of post-extinction re-expression of fear memory. However, the region-specific role of these structures in the fear return evoked by a sub-threshold conditioning (SC) is not known. In the present experiments, we first examined specific roles of the prelimbic cortex (PL), the dorsal hippocampus (DH, the dorsal CA1 area in particular), the ventral hippocampus (the ventral dentate gyrus (vDG) and the ventral CA1 area in particular) in this fear return process. Then we examined the role of connections between PL and vCA1 with this behavioral approach. Rats were subjected to five tone-shock pairings (1.0-mA shock) to induce conditioned fear (freezing), followed by three fear extinction sessions (25 tone-alone trials each session). After a post-test for extinction memory, some rats were retrained with the SC procedure to reinstate tone-evoked freezing. Rat groups were injected with low doses of the GABAA agonist muscimol to selectively inactivate PL, DH, vDG, or vCA1 120 min before the fear return test. A disconnection paradigm with ipsilateral or contralateral muscimol injection of the PL and the vCA1 was used to examine the role of this pathway in the fear return. We found that transient inactivation of these areas significantly impaired fear return (freezing): inactivation of the prelimbic cortex blocked SC-evoked fear return in particular but did not influence fear expression in general; inactivation of the DH area impaired fear return, but had no effect on the extinction retrieval process; both ventral DG and ventral CA1 are required for the return of extinguished fear whereas only ventral DG is required for the extinction retrieval. These findings suggest that PL, DH, vDG, and vCA1 all contribute to the fear

  3. Measurement of CA1P and CA in leaves

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, B.d.; Kobza, J.; Seemann, J.R. )

    1990-05-01

    Carboxyarabinitol-1-phosphate (CA1P) and carboxyarabinitol (CA) were assayed in leaves by isotope dilution. {sup 14}C-labeled standards were synthesized from (2-{sup 14}C) CABP using acid (CA1P) or alkaline (CA) phosphatase. Either was added to boiling 80% EtOH along with liquid N{sub 2}-killed leaves. Each was largely purified by anion exchange chromatography. CA1P samples were subjected to 2D-TLE/TLC. The specific activity of the {sup 14}C-containing spot was measured using alkaline phosphatase. CA samples were run on an HPLC and the specific activity was determined using a UV monitor and a flow-through radioisotope detector. In 3 of the tested species, light/dark amount of CA1P (nmol/mg Chl) were kidney bean, 0.7/67; sugar beet, 0.8/33; and Alocasia, 0/3.4. Light/dark CA levels (nmol/mg Chl) in these respective species were 897/653, 3.2/3.5, and 5.7/4.6. These results support the hypothesis that CA is a product of CA1P metabolism in vivo under high light, but also indicate that CA is not the only intermediate involved in CA1P synthesis under low light/dark conditions.

  4. Imaging a memory trace over half a life-time in the medial temporal lobe reveals a time-limited role of CA3 neurons in retrieval

    PubMed Central

    Lux, Vanessa; Atucha, Erika; Kitsukawa, Takashi; Sauvage, Magdalena M

    2016-01-01

    Whether retrieval still depends on the hippocampus as memories age or relies then on cortical areas remains a major controversy. Despite evidence for a functional segregation between CA1, CA3 and parahippocampal areas, their specific role within this frame is unclear. Especially, the contribution of CA3 is questionable as very remote memories might be too degraded to be used for pattern completion. To identify the specific role of these areas, we imaged brain activity in mice during retrieval of recent, early remote and very remote fear memories by detecting the immediate-early gene Arc. Investigating correlates of the memory trace over an extended period allowed us to report that, in contrast to CA1, CA3 is no longer recruited in very remote retrieval. Conversely, we showed that parahippocampal areas are then maximally engaged. These results suggest a shift from a greater contribution of the trisynaptic loop to the temporoammonic pathway for retrieval. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11862.001 PMID:26880561

  5. Functional circuits of new neurons in the dentate gyrus

    PubMed Central

    Vivar, Carmen; van Praag, Henriette

    2013-01-01

    The hippocampus is crucial for memory formation. New neurons are added throughout life to the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG), a brain area considered important for differential storage of similar experiences and contexts. To better understand the functional contribution of adult neurogenesis to pattern separation processes, we recently used a novel synapse specific trans-neuronal tracing approach to identify the (sub) cortical inputs to new dentate granule cells (GCs). It was observed that newly born neurons receive sequential innervation from structures important for memory function. Initially, septal-hippocampal cells provide input to new neurons, including transient innervation from mature GCs as well as direct feedback from area CA3 pyramidal neurons. After about 1 month perirhinal (PRH) and lateral entorhinal cortex (LEC), brain areas deemed relevant to integration of novel sensory and environmental information, become substantial input to new GCs. Here, we review the developmental time-course and proposed functional relevance of new neurons, within the context of their unique neural circuitry. PMID:23443839

  6. A Role for Hilar Cells in Pattern Separation in the Dentate Gyrus: A Computational Approach

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Catherine E.; Scharfman, Helen E.

    2009-01-01

    We present a simple computational model of the dentate gyrus to evaluate the hypothesis that pattern separation, defined as the ability to transform a set of similar input patterns into a less-similar set of output patterns, is dynamically regulated by hilar neurons. Prior models of the dentate gyrus have generally fallen into two categories: simplified models that have focused on a single granule cell layer and its ability to perform pattern separation, and large-scale and biophysically realistic models of dentate gyrus, which include hilar cells, but which have not specifically addressed pattern separation. The present model begins to bridge this gap. The model includes two of the major subtypes of hilar cells: excitatory hilar mossy cells and inhibitory hilar interneurons that receive input from and project to the perforant path terminal zone (HIPP cells). In the model, mossy cells and HIPP cells provide a mechanism for dynamic regulation of pattern separation, allowing the system to upregulate and downregulate pattern separation in response to environmental and task demands. Specifically, pattern separation in the model can be strongly decreased by decreasing mossy cell function and/or by increasing HIPP cell function; pattern separation can be increased by the opposite manipulations. We propose that hilar cells may similarly mediate dynamic regulation of pattern separation in the dentate gyrus in vivo, not only because of their connectivity within the dentate gyrus, but also because of their modulation by brainstem inputs and by the axons that “backproject” from area CA3 pyramidal cells. PMID:18958849

  7. Role for MMP-9 in stress-induced downregulation of nectin-3 in hippocampal CA1 and associated behavioural alterations

    PubMed Central

    Grosse, Jocelyn; Zanoletti, Olivia; Fournier, Celine; Ganguly, Krishnendu; Kalita, Katarzyna; Kaczmarek, Leszek; Sandi, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Chronic stress is a risk factor for the development of psychopathologies characterized by cognitive dysfunction and deregulated social behaviours. Emerging evidence suggests a role for cell adhesion molecules, including nectin-3, in the mechanisms that underlie the behavioural effects of stress. We tested the hypothesis that proteolytic processing of nectins by matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), an enzyme family that degrades numerous substrates, including cell adhesion molecules, is involved in hippocampal effects induced by chronic restraint stress. A reduction in nectin-3 in the perisynaptic CA1, but not in the CA3, compartment is observed following chronic stress and is implicated in the effects of stress in social exploration, social recognition and a CA1-dependent cognitive task. Increased MMP-9-related gelatinase activity, involving N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor, is specifically found in the CA1 and involved in nectin-3 cleavage and chronic stress-induced social and cognitive alterations. Thus, MMP-9 proteolytic processing emerges as an important mediator of stress effects in brain function and behaviour. PMID:25232752

  8. Role for MMP-9 in stress-induced downregulation of nectin-3 in hippocampal CA1 and associated behavioural alterations.

    PubMed

    van der Kooij, Michael A; Fantin, Martina; Rejmak, Emilia; Grosse, Jocelyn; Zanoletti, Olivia; Fournier, Celine; Ganguly, Krishnendu; Kalita, Katarzyna; Kaczmarek, Leszek; Sandi, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Chronic stress is a risk factor for the development of psychopathologies characterized by cognitive dysfunction and deregulated social behaviours. Emerging evidence suggests a role for cell adhesion molecules, including nectin-3, in the mechanisms that underlie the behavioural effects of stress. We tested the hypothesis that proteolytic processing of nectins by matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), an enzyme family that degrades numerous substrates, including cell adhesion molecules, is involved in hippocampal effects induced by chronic restraint stress. A reduction in nectin-3 in the perisynaptic CA1, but not in the CA3, compartment is observed following chronic stress and is implicated in the effects of stress in social exploration, social recognition and a CA1-dependent cognitive task. Increased MMP-9-related gelatinase activity, involving N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor, is specifically found in the CA1 and involved in nectin-3 cleavage and chronic stress-induced social and cognitive alterations. Thus, MMP-9 proteolytic processing emerges as an important mediator of stress effects in brain function and behaviour. PMID:25232752

  9. Synapse-specific compartmentalization of signaling cascades for LTP induction in CA3 interneurons.

    PubMed

    Galván, E J; Pérez-Rosello, T; Gómez-Lira, G; Lara, E; Gutiérrez, R; Barrionuevo, G

    2015-04-01

    Inhibitory interneurons with somata in strata radiatum and lacunosum-molecular (SR/L-M) of hippocampal area CA3 receive excitatory input from pyramidal cells via the recurrent collaterals (RCs), and the dentate gyrus granule cells via the mossy fibers (MFs). Here we demonstrate that Hebbian long-term potentiation (LTP) at RC synapses on SR/L-M interneurons requires the concomitant activation of calcium-impermeable AMPARs (CI-AMPARs) and N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDARs). RC LTP was prevented by voltage clamping the postsynaptic cell during high-frequency stimulation (HFS; 3 trains of 100 pulses delivered at 100 Hz every 10s), with intracellular injections of the Ca(2+) chelator BAPTA (20mM), and with the NMDAR antagonist D-AP5. In separate experiments, RC and MF inputs converging onto the same interneuron were sequentially activated. We found that RC LTP induction was blocked by inhibitors of the calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII; KN-62, 10 μM or KN-93, 10 μM) but MF LTP was CaMKII independent. Conversely, the application of the protein kinase A (PKA) activators forskolin/IBMX (50 μM/25 μM) potentiated MF EPSPs but not RC EPSPs. Together these data indicate that the aspiny dendrites of SR/L-M interneurons compartmentalize synapse-specific Ca(2+) signaling required for LTP induction at RC and MF synapses. We also show that the two signal transduction cascades converge to activate a common effector, protein kinase C (PKC). Specifically, LTP at RC and MF synapses on the same SR/LM interneuron was blocked by postsynaptic injections of chelerythrine (10 μM). These data indicate that both forms of LTP share a common mechanism involving PKC-dependent signaling modulation. PMID:25637803

  10. Synapse-specific compartmentalization of signaling cascades for LTP induction in CA3 interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Galván, Emilio J; Pérez-Rosello, Tamara; Gómez-Lira, Gisela; Lara, Erika; Gutiérrez, Rafael; Barrionuevo, Germán

    2015-01-01

    Inhibitory interneurons with somata in strata radiatum and lacunosun-moleculare (SR/L-M) of hippocampal area CA3 receive excitatory input from pyramidal cells via the recurrent collaterals (RC), and the dentate gyrus granule cells via the mossy fibers (MFs). Here we demonstrate that Hebbian long-term potentiation (LTP) at RC synapses on SR/L-M interneurons requires the concomitant activation of calcium-impermeable AMPARs (CI- AMPARs) and NMDARs. RC LTP was prevented by voltage clamping the postsynaptic cell during high-frequency stimulation (HFS; 3 trains of 100 pulses delivered at 100 Hz every 10 s), with intracellular injections of the Ca2+ chelator BAPTA (20 mM), and with the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) antagonist D-AP5. In separate experiments, RC and MF inputs converging onto the same interneuron were sequentially activated. We found that RC LTP induction was blocked by inhibitors of the calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII; KN-62, 10 μM or KN-93, 10 μM) but MF LTP was CaMKII independent. Conversely, the application of the protein kinase A (PKA) activators forskolin/IBMX(50 μM/25 μM) potentiated MF EPSPs but not RC EPSPs. Together these data indicate that the aspiny dendrites of SR/L-M interneurons compartmentalize synaptic-specific Ca2+ signaling required for LTP induction at RC and MF synapses. We also show that the two signal transduction cascades converge to activate a common effector, protein kinase C (PKC). Specifically, LTP at RC and MF synapses on the same SR/LM interneuron was blocked by postsynaptic injections of chelerythrine (10 μM). These data indicate that both forms of LTP share a common mechanism involving PKC-dependent signaling modulation. PMID:25637803

  11. Long-term social isolation in the adulthood results in CA1 shrinkage and cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Pereda-Pérez, Inmaculada; Popović, Natalija; Otalora, Beatriz Baño; Popović, Miroljub; Madrid, Juan Antonio; Rol, Maria Angeles; Venero, César

    2013-11-01

    Social isolation in adulthood is a psychosocial stressor that can result in endocrinological and behavioral alterations in different species. In rodents, controversial results have been obtained in fear conditioning after social isolation at adulthood, while neural substrates underlying these differences are largely unknown. Neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) and its polysialylated form (PSA-NCAM) are prominent modulators of synaptic plasticity underlying memory processes in many tasks, including fear conditioning. In this study, we used adult female Octodon degus to investigate the effects of long-term social isolation on contextual and cued fear conditioning, and the possible modulation of the synaptic levels of NCAM and PSA-NCAM in the hippocampus. After 6½ months of social isolation, adult female degus showed a normal auditory-cued fear memory, but a deficit in contextual fear memory, a hippocampal dependent task. Subsequently, we observed reduced hippocampal synaptic levels of PSA-NCAM in isolated compared to grouped-housed female degus. No significant differences were found between experimental groups in hippocampal levels of the three main isoforms of NCAM (NCAM180, NCAM140 and NCAM120). Interestingly, social isolation reduced the volume of the hippocampal CA1 subfield, without affecting the volume of the CA3 subregion or the total hippocampus. Moreover, attenuated body weight gain and reduced number of granulocytes were detected in isolated animals. Our findings indicate for the first time, that long-term social isolation of adult female animals induces a specific shrinkage of CA1 and a decrease in synaptic levels of PSA-NCAM in the hippocampus. These effects may be related to the deficit in contextual fear memory observed in isolated female degus.

  12. Critical involvement of postsynaptic protein kinase activation in LTP at hippocampal mossy fiber synapses on CA3 interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Galván, Emilio J.; Cosgrove, Kathleen E.; Mauna, Jocelyn C.; Card, J. Patrick; Thiels, Edda; Meriney, Stephen D.; Barrionuevo, Germán

    2010-01-01

    Hippocampal mossy fiber (MF) synapses on area CA3 lacunosum-moleculare (L-M) interneurons are capable of undergoing a Hebbian form of NMDAR-independent LTP induced by the same type of high-frequency stimulation (HFS) that induces LTP at MF synapses on pyramidal cells. LTP of MF input to L-M interneurons occurs only at synapses containing mostly calcium impermeable (CI)-AMPARs. Here, we demonstrate that HFS-induced LTP at these MF-interneuron synapses requires postsynaptic activation of protein kinase A (PKA) and protein kinase C (PKC). Brief extracellular stimulation of PKA with forskolin (FSK) alone or in combination with 1-Methyl-3-isobutylxanthine (IBMX) induced a long-lasting synaptic enhancement at MF synapses predominantly containing CI-AMPARs. However, the FSK/IBMX-induced potentiation in cells loaded with the specific PKA inhibitor peptide PKI6–22 failed to be maintained. Consistent with these data, delivery of HFS to MFs synapsing onto L-M interneurons loaded with PKI6–22 induced posttetanic potentation (PTP) but not LTP. Hippocampal sections stained for the catalytic subunit of PKA revealed abundant immunoreactivity in interneurons located in strata radiatum and L-M of area CA3. We also found that extracellular activation of PKC with phorbol 12,13-diacetate induced a pharmacological potentiation of the isolated CI-AMPAR component of the MF EPSP. However, HFS delivered to MF synapses on cells loaded with the PKC inhibitor chelerythrine exhibited PTP followed by a significant depression. Together, our data indicate that MF LTP in L-M interneurons at synapses containing primarily CI-AMPARs requires some of the same signaling cascades as does LTP of glutamatergic input to CA3 or CA1 pyramidal cells. PMID:20181582

  13. Strong enhancement of s -wave superconductivity near a quantum critical point of Ca3Ir4Sn13

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, P. K.; Guguchia, Z.; Khasanov, R.; Chinotti, M.; Li, L.; Wang, Kefeng; Petrovic, C.; Morenzoni, E.

    2015-11-01

    We report microscopic studies by muon spin rotation/relaxation as a function of pressure of the Ca3Ir4Sn13 and Sr3Ir4Sn13 cubic compounds, which are members of the (Ca1-xSrx)3Ir4Sn13 system displaying superconductivity and a structural phase transition associated with the formation of a charge density wave (CDW). We find a strong enhancement of the superfluid density and a dramatic increase of the pairing strength above a pressure of ≈1.6 GPa, giving direct evidence of the presence of a quantum critical point separating a superconducting phase coexisting with CDW from a pure superconducting phase. The superconducting order parameter in both phases has the same s -wave symmetry. In spite of the conventional phonon-mediated BCS character of the weakly correlated (Ca1-xSrx)3Ir4Sn13 system, the dependence of the effective superfluid density on the critical temperature puts this compound in the "Uemura" plot close to unconventional superconductors. This system exemplifies that conventional BCS superconductors in the presence of competing orders or multiband structure can also display characteristics of unconventional superconductors.

  14. Memory Retrieval Time and Memory Capacity of the CA3 Network: Role of Gamma Frequency Oscillations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Almeida, Licurgo; Idiart, Marco; Lisman, John E.

    2007-01-01

    The existence of recurrent synaptic connections in CA3 led to the hypothesis that CA3 is an autoassociative network similar to the Hopfield networks studied by theorists. CA3 undergoes gamma frequency periodic inhibition that prevents a persistent attractor state. This argues against the analogy to Hopfield nets, in which an attractor state can be…

  15. Heteromodal conceptual processing in the angular gyrus

    PubMed Central

    Bonner, Michael F.; Peelle, Jonathan E.; Cook, Philip A.; Grossman, Murray

    2013-01-01

    Concepts bind together the features commonly associated with objects and events to form networks in long-term semantic memory. These conceptual networks are the basis of human knowledge and underlie perception, imagination, and the ability to communicate about experiences and the contents of the environment. Although it is often assumed that this distributed semantic information is integrated in higher-level heteromodal association cortices, open questions remain about the role and anatomic basis of heteromodal representations in semantic memory. Here we used combined neuroimaging evidence from functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to characterize the cortical networks underlying concept representation. Using a lexical decision task, we examined the processing of concepts in four semantic categories that varied on their sensory-motor feature associations (sight, sound, manipulation, and abstract). We found that the angular gyrus was activated across all categories regardless of their modality-specific feature associations, consistent with a heteromodal account for the angular gyrus. Exploratory analyses suggested that categories with weighted sensory-motor features additionally recruited modality-specific association cortices. Furthermore, DTI tractography identified white matter tracts connecting these regions of modality-specific functional activation with the angular gyrus. These findings are consistent with a distributed semantic network that includes a heteromodal, integrative component in the angular gyrus in combination with sensory-motor feature representations in modality-specific association cortices. PMID:23333416

  16. Spatial Reference Memory is Associated with Modulation of Theta-Gamma Coupling in the Dentate Gyrus.

    PubMed

    Bott, Jean-Bastien; Muller, Marc-Antoine; Jackson, Jesse; Aubert, Julien; Cassel, Jean-Christophe; Mathis, Chantal; Goutagny, Romain

    2016-09-01

    Spatial reference memory in rodents represents a unique opportunity to study brain mechanisms responsible for encoding, storage and retrieval of a memory. Even though its reliance on hippocampal networks has long been established, the precise computations performed by different hippocampal subfields during spatial learning are still not clear. To study the evolution of electrophysiological activity in the CA1-dentate gyrus axis of the dorsal hippocampus over an iterative spatial learning paradigm, we recorded local field potentials in behaving mice using a newly designed appetitive version of the Barnes maze. We first showed that theta and gamma oscillations as well as theta-gamma coupling are differentially modulated in particular hippocampal subfields during the task. In addition, we show that dentate gyrus networks, but not CA1 networks, exhibit a transient learning-dependent increase in theta-gamma coupling specifically at the vicinity of the target area in the maze. In contrast to previous immediate early-gene studies, our results point to a long-lasting involvement of dentate networks in navigational memory in the Barnes maze. Based on these findings, we propose that theta-gamma coupling might represent a mechanism by which hippocampal areas compute relevant information.

  17. TRH modulates glutamatergic synaptic inputs on CA1 neurons of the mouse hippocampus in a biphasic manner.

    PubMed

    Zarif, Hadi; Petit-Paitel, Agnès; Heurteaux, Catherine; Chabry, Joëlle; Guyon, Alice

    2016-11-01

    Thyrotropin Releasing Hormone (TRH) is a tripeptide that induces the release of Thyroid Stimulating Hormone (TSH) in the blood. Besides its role in the thyroid system, TRH has been shown to regulate several neuronal systems in the brain however its role in hippocampus remains controversial. Using electrophysiological recordings in acute mouse brain slices, we show that TRH depresses glutamate responses at the CA3-CA1 synapse through an action on NMDA receptors, which, as a consequence, decreases the ability of the synapse to establish a long term potentiation (LTP). TRH also induces a late increase in AMPA/kainate responses. Together, these results suggest that TRH plays an important role in the modulation of hippocampal neuronal activities, and they contribute to a better understanding of the mechanisms by which TRH impacts synaptic function underlying emotional states, learning and memory processes.

  18. Depletion of Polysialic Acid from Neural Cell Adhesion Molecule (PSA-NCAM) Increases CA3 Dendritic Arborization and Increases Vulnerability to Excitotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    McCall, Trudy; Weil, Zachary M.; Nacher, Juan; Bloss, Erik B.; El Marouf, Abderrahman; Rutishauser, Urs; McEwen, Bruce S.

    2012-01-01

    Chronic immobilization stress (CIS) shortens apical dendritic trees of CA3 pyramidal neurons in the hippocampus of the male rat, and dendritic length may be a determinant of vulnerability to stress. Expression of the polysialylated form of neural cell adhesion molecule (PSA-NCAM) in the hippocampal formation is increased by stress, while PSA removal by Endoneuraminidase-N (endo-N) is known to cause the mossy fibers to defasciculate and synapse ectopically in their CA3 target area. We show here that enzymatic removal of PSA produced a remarkable expansion of dendritic arbors of CA3 pyramidal neurons, with a lesser effect in CA1. This expansion eclipsed the CIS-induced shortening of CA3 dendrites, with the expanded dendrites of both no-stress-endo-N and CIS-endo-N rats being longer than those in no-stress-control rats and much longer than those in CIS-control rats. As predicted by the hypothesis that ENDO-N-induced dendritic expansion might increase vulnerability to excitotoxic challenge, systemic injection with kainic acid, showed markedly increased neuronal degeneration, as assessed by fluorojade B histochemistry, in rats that had been treated with ENDO-N compared to vehicle treated rats throughout the entire hippocampal formation. PSA removal also exacerbated the CIS-induced reduction in body weight and abolished effects of CIS on NPY and NR2B mRNA levels. These findings support the hypothesis that CA3 arbor plasticity plays a protective role during prolonged stress and clarify the role of PSA-NCAM in stress-induced dendritic plasticity. PMID:23219884

  19. Rapid synthesis and characterization of (Ca 1- xBa x) 3Co 4O 9 thin films using combinatorial methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minami, H.; Itaka, K.; Kawaji, H.; Wang, Q. J.; Koinuma, H.; Lippmaa, M.

    2002-09-01

    We have successfully fabricated high-quality thin film of Ca 3Co 4O 9, an oxide with superior thermoelectric properties, on a lattice matched TiO 2 (1 0 0) substrate using PLD. In order to investigate the effect of elemental substitution on thermoelectric properties, we fabricated a composition-spread library of (Ca 1- xBa x) 3Co 4O 9 (0≤ x≤0.2), having linear compositional variation x along one direction of the substrate surface. A pin-probe type multi-channel measurement system was developed to quickly measure the thermoelectric properties (Seebeck coefficient and electric conductivity) of the library for the rapid characterization. The good correspondence of the data for Ca 3Co 4O 9 film with those for bulk sample verifies that we can accelerate the exploration of thermoelectric oxides at least 10 times faster than the conventional one-by-one approach.

  20. Proteomic profiling of the epileptic dentate gyrus

    PubMed Central

    Li, Aiqing; Choi, Yun-Sik; Dziema, Heather; Cao, Ruifeng; Cho, Hee-Yeon; Jung, Yeon Joo; Obrietan, Karl

    2010-01-01

    The development of epilepsy is often associated with marked changes in central nervous system cell structure and function. Along these lines, reactive gliosis and granule cell axonal sprouting within the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus are commonly observed in individuals with temporal lobe epilepsy. Here we used the pilocarpine model of temporal lobe epilepsy in mice to screen the proteome and phosphoproteome of the dentate gyrus to identify molecular events that are altered as part of the pathogenic process. Using a two-dimensional gel electrophoresis-based approach, followed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, 24 differentially expressed proteins, including 9 phosphoproteins, were identified. Functionally, these proteins were organized into several classes, including synaptic physiology, cell structure, cell stress, metabolism and energetics. The altered expression of three proteins involved in synaptic physiology, actin, profilin 1 and α-synuclein, was validated by secondary methods. Interestingly, marked changes in protein expression were detected in the supragranular cell region, an area where robust mossy fibers sprouting occurs. Together, these data provide new molecular insights into the altered protein profile of the epileptogenic dentate gyrus and point to potential pathophysiologic mechanisms underlying epileptogenesis. PMID:20608933

  1. Ethanol neurotoxicity and dentate gyrus development.

    PubMed

    Miki, Takanori; Yokoyama, Toshifumi; Sumitani, Kazunori; Kusaka, Takashi; Warita, Katsuhiko; Matsumoto, Yoshiki; Wang, Zhi-Yu; Wilce, Peter A; Bedi, Kuldip S; Itoh, Susumu; Takeuchi, Yoshiki

    2008-09-01

    Maternal alcohol ingestion during pregnancy adversely affects the developing fetus, often leading to fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS). One of the most severe consequences of FAS is brain damage that is manifested as cognitive, learning, and behavioral deficits. The hippocampus plays a crucial role in such abilities; it is also known as one of the brain regions most vulnerable to ethanol-induced neurotoxicity. Our recent studies using morphometric techniques have further shown that ethanol neurotoxicity appears to affect the development of the dentate gyrus in a region-specific manner; it was found that early postnatal ethanol exposure causes a transitory deficit in the hilus volume of the dentate gyrus. It is strongly speculated that such structural modifications, even transitory ones, appear to result in developmental abnormalities in the brain circuitry and lead to the learning disabilities observed in FAS children. Based on reports on possible factors deciding ethanol neurotoxicity to the brain, we review developmental neurotoxicity to the dentate gyrus of the hippocampal formation.

  2. Dorsal hippocampus infusions of CNQX into the dentate gyrus disrupt expression of trace fear conditioning.

    PubMed

    Pierson, Jamie L; Pullins, Shane E; Quinn, Jennifer J

    2015-07-01

    The hippocampus is essential for the consolidation of some explicit long-term memories, including trace conditioning. Lesions and pharmacological manipulations of the dorsal hippocampus (DH) have provided strong evidence for its involvement in the acquisition and expression of trace fear memories. However, no studies have specifically targeted DH subregions [CA1 and dentate gyrus (DG)] to determine their involvement in trace fear conditioning. In the present study, rats received bilateral cannulation targeting either the DG or CA1 of the DH. Following surgery, animals were trace fear conditioned. Forty-eight hours following training, rats received bilateral infusions of the AMPA/kainate glutamate receptor antagonist, CNQX, or vehicle. Following the infusion, rats were placed in a novel context for the tone test. Rats that received CNQX into the DG froze significantly less during the tone and trace interval as compared to controls. Rats that received CNQX into the DH CA1 showed no difference in freezing during the tone or trace interval as compared to controls. These data support a role for the DG in the expression of trace tone fear conditioning.

  3. Strong enhancement of s-wave superconductivity near a quantum critical point of (Ca1-xSrx)3Ir4Sn13 and (Ca1-xSrx)3Rh4Sn13

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morenzoni, Elvezio; Biswas, Pabitra; Guguchia, Zurab; Khasanov, Rustem; Chinotti, Manuel; Krieger, Jonas; Li, L.; Wang, Kefeng; Petrovic, Cedomir; Pomjakushina, Ekaterina

    We report microscopic studies by muon spin rotation as a function of pressure of the (Ca1-xSrx)3Ir4Sn13 and (Ca1-xSrx)3Rh4Sn13 cubic compounds, which display superconductivity and a structural phase transition associated with the formation of a charge density wave (CDW). In Ca3Ir4Sn13 we find a strong enhancement of the superfluid density and a dramatic increase of the pairing strength above a pressure of ~ 1 . 6 GPa giving direct evidence of the presence of a quantum critical point separating a superconducting phase coexisting with CDW from a pure superconducting phase. The superconducting order parameter in both phases has the same s-wave symmetry. Similar behavior is found in the other family. In spite of the conventional phonon-mediated BCS character of these weakly correlated 3-4-13 systems, the dependence of the effective superfluid density on the critical temperature put these compounds in the ``Uemura'' plot close to unconventional superconductors. These systems exemplify that conventional BCS superconductors can also display characteristics of unconventional superconductors. Supported by the Swiss National Science Foundation and by the U.S. DOE under Contract No. DE-SC00112704.

  4. Urban air pollutants reduce synaptic function of CA1 neurons via an NMDA/NO• pathway in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Davis, David A.; Akopian, Garnik; Walsh, John P.; Sioutas, Constantinos; Morgan, Todd E.; Finch, Caleb E.

    2013-01-01

    Airborne particulate matter (PM) from urban vehicular aerosols altered glutamate receptor functions and induced glial inflammatory responses in rodent models after chronic exposure. Potential neurotoxic mechanisms were analyzed in vitro. In hippocampal slices, 2 h exposure to aqueous nanosized PM (nPM) selectively altered postsynaptic proteins in CA1 neurons: increased GluA1, GluN2A, and GluN2B, but not GluA2, GluN1 or mGlur5; increased PSD95 and spinophilin, but not synaptophysin, while dentate gyrus (DG) neurons were unresponsive. In hippocampal slices and neurons, MitoSOX red fluorescence was increased by nPM, implying free radical production. Specifically, NO• production by slices was increased within 15 min of exposure to nPM with dose dependence, 1–10 µg/ml. Correspondingly, CA1 neurons exhibited increased nitrosylation of the GluN2A receptor and dephosphorylation of GluN2B (S1303) and of GluA1 (S831 & S845). Again, DG neurons were unresponsive to nPM. The induction of NO• and nitrosylation were inhibited by AP5, an NMDA receptor antagonist, which also protects neurite outgrowth in vitro from inhibition by nPM. Membrane injury (EthidiumD-1 uptake) showed parallel specificity. Finally, nPM decreased evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) of CA1 neurons. These findings further document the selective impact of nPM on glutamatergic functions and identify novel responses of NMDA receptor-stimulated NO• production and nitrosylation reactions during nPM-mediated neurotoxicity. PMID:23927064

  5. Reduced tonic inhibition in the dentate gyrus contributes to chronic stress-induced impairments in learning and memory.

    PubMed

    Lee, Vallent; MacKenzie, Georgina; Hooper, Andrew; Maguire, Jamie

    2016-10-01

    It is well established that stress impacts the underlying processes of learning and memory. The effects of stress on memory are thought to involve, at least in part, effects on the hippocampus, which is particularly vulnerable to stress. Chronic stress induces hippocampal alterations, including but not limited to dendritic atrophy and decreased neurogenesis, which are thought to contribute to chronic stress-induced hippocampal dysfunction and deficits in learning and memory. Changes in synaptic transmission, including changes in GABAergic inhibition, have been documented following chronic stress. Recently, our laboratory demonstrated shifts in EGABA in CA1 pyramidal neurons following chronic stress, compromising GABAergic transmission and increasing excitability of these neurons. Interestingly, here we demonstrate that these alterations are unique to CA1 pyramidal neurons, since we do not observe shifts in EGABA following chronic stress in dentate gyrus granule cells. Following chronic stress, there is a decrease in the expression of the GABAA receptor (GABAA R) δ subunit and tonic GABAergic inhibition in dentate gyrus granule cells, whereas there is an increase in the phasic component of GABAergic inhibition, evident by an increase in the peak amplitude of spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sIPSCs). Given the numerous changes observed in the hippocampus following stress, it is difficult to pinpoint the pertinent contributing pathophysiological factors. Here we directly assess the impact of a reduction in tonic GABAergic inhibition of dentate gyrus granule cells on learning and memory using a mouse model with a decrease in GABAA R δ subunit expression specifically in dentate gyrus granule cells (Gabrd/Pomc mice). Reduced GABAA R δ subunit expression and function in dentate gyrus granule cells is sufficient to induce deficits in learning and memory. Collectively, these findings suggest that the reduction in GABAA R δ subunit-mediated tonic inhibition

  6. NR2A at CA1 Synapses Is Obligatory for the Susceptibility of Hippocampal Plasticity to Sleep Loss

    PubMed Central

    Longordo, Fabio; Kopp, Caroline; Mishina, Masayoshi; Luján, Rafael

    2009-01-01

    A loss in the necessary amount of sleep alters expression of genes and proteins implicated in brain plasticity, but key proteins that render neuronal circuits sensitive to sleep disturbance are unknown. We show that mild (4–6 h) sleep deprivation (SD) selectively augmented the number of NR2A subunits of NMDA receptors on postsynaptic densities of adult mouse CA1 synapses. The greater synaptic NR2A content facilitated induction of CA3-CA1 long-term depression in the theta frequency stimulation range and augmented the synaptic modification threshold. NR2A-knock-out mice maintained behavioral response to SD, including compensatory increase in post-deprivation resting time, but hippocampal synaptic plasticity was insensitive to sleep loss. After SD, the balance between synaptically activated and slowly recruited NMDA receptor pools during temporal summation was disrupted. Together, these results indicate that NR2A is obligatory for the consequences of sleep loss on hippocampal synaptic plasticity. These findings could advance pharmacological strategies aiming to sustain hippocampal function during sleep restriction. PMID:19605640

  7. Neonatal alcohol exposure and the hippocampus in developing male rats: effects on behaviorally induced CA1 c-Fos expression, CA1 pyramidal cell number, and contextual fear conditioning

    PubMed Central

    Murawski, Nathen J.; Klintsova, Anna Y.; Stanton, Mark E.

    2012-01-01

    Rats exposed to a high binge-like dose of alcohol over postnatal days (PD) 4-9 show reductions in CA1 pyramidal cells and impairments on behavioral tasks that depend on the hippocampus. We first examined hippocampal c-Fos expression as a marker of neuronal activity in normally developing rats following different phases of the context preexposure facilitation effect (CPFE) paradigm (Exp. 1). During the CPFE, preexposure to the training context facilitates contextual conditioning to an immediate shock given on a subsequent occasion. We then examined the relationship between CPFE impairment, hippocampal cell loss and c-Fos expression in rats exposed to alcohol over PD 4-9 (Exp. 2). Normally developing (Exp. 1), sham-intubated control (SI), and PD 4-9 alcohol-exposed (4.00g and 5.25g/kg/day; Exp. 2) juvenile male rats were trained on the CPFE. The CPFE occurs over three phases separated by 24h. Starting on PD 31, rats were preexposed to Context A or Context B for five minutes. 24h later, all rats received an immediate, 1.5 mA foot shock in Context A. Finally, rats were tested for contextual conditioning in Context A on PD 33. Normally developing and SI rats preexposed to Context A showed enhanced contextual fear compared to those preexposed to Context B (Exp. 1) or alcohol-exposed rats preexposed to Context A (Exp. 2). Rats were sacrificed 2h following different phases of the CPFE and processed for c-Fos immunohistochemistry (Exp. 1 and 2) and CA1 pyramidal cell quantification (Exp. 2). In Exp. 1, c-Fos+ cells in the DG were consistently high among rats preexposed to Context A (Pre), Context B (No Pre), or sacrificed directly from their home cage (Home) and did not differ across CPFE phases. CA3 and CA1 c-Fos+ cells were highest during preexposure and decreased across training phases, with Group No Pre showing greater numbers of c-Fos+ cells during training than Group Pre and Controls. In Exp. 2, SI rats had greater numbers of CA1 c-Fos+ cells compared alcohol

  8. Memory retrieval time and memory capacity of the CA3 network: role of gamma frequency oscillations.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, Licurgo; Idiart, Marco; Lisman, John E

    2007-11-01

    The existence of recurrent synaptic connections in CA3 led to the hypothesis that CA3 is an autoassociative network similar to the Hopfield networks studied by theorists. CA3 undergoes gamma frequency periodic inhibition that prevents a persistent attractor state. This argues against the analogy to Hopfield nets, in which an attractor state can be used for working memory. However, we show that such periodic inhibition allows one cycle of recurrent excitatory activity and that this is sufficient for memory retrieval (within milliseconds). Thus, gamma oscillations are compatible with a long-term autoassociative memory function for CA3. A second goal of our work was to evaluate previous methods for estimating the memory capacity (P) of CA3. We confirm the equation, P = c/a(2), where c is the probability that any two cells are recurrently connected and a is the fraction of cells representing a memory item. In applying this to CA3, we focus on CA3a, the subregion where recurrent connections are most numerous (c = 0.2) and approximate randomness. We estimate that a memory item is represented by approximately 225 of the 70,000 neurons in CA3a (a = 0.003) and that approximately 20,000 memory items can be stored. Our general conclusion is that the physiological and anatomical findings of CA3a are consistent with an autoassociative function. The nature of the information that is associated in CA3a is discussed. We also discuss how the autoassociative properties of CA3 and the heteroassociative properties of dentate synapses (linking sequential memories) form an integrated system for the storage and recall of item sequences. The recall process generates the phase precession in dentate, CA3, and entorhinal cortex.

  9. Memory retrieval time and memory capacity of the CA3 network: Role of gamma frequency oscillations

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida, Licurgo; Idiart, Marco; Lisman, John E.

    2007-01-01

    The existence of recurrent synaptic connections in CA3 led to the hypothesis that CA3 is an autoassociative network similar to the Hopfield networks studied by theorists. CA3 undergoes gamma frequency periodic inhibition that prevents a persistent attractor state. This argues against the analogy to Hopfield nets, in which an attractor state can be used for working memory. However, we show that such periodic inhibition allows one cycle of recurrent excitatory activity and that this is sufficient for memory retrieval (within milliseconds). Thus, gamma oscillations are compatible with a long-term autoassociative memory function for CA3. A second goal of our work was to evaluate previous methods for estimating the memory capacity (P) of CA3. We confirm the equation, P = c/a2, where c is the probability that any two cells are recurrently connected and a is the fraction of cells representing a memory item. In applying this to CA3, we focus on CA3a, the subregion where recurrent connections are most numerous (c = 0.2) and approximate randomness. We estimate that a memory item is represented by ∼225 of the 70,000 neurons in CA3a (a = 0.003) and that ∼20,000 memory items can be stored. Our general conclusion is that the physiological and anatomical findings of CA3a are consistent with an autoassociative function. The nature of the information that is associated in CA3a is discussed. We also discuss how the autoassociative properties of CA3 and the heteroassociative properties of dentate synapses (linking sequential memories) form an integrated system for the storage and recall of item sequences. The recall process generates the phase precession in dentate, CA3, and entorhinal cortex. PMID:18007022

  10. Symmetric spike timing-dependent plasticity at CA3CA3 synapses optimizes storage and recall in autoassociative networks

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Rajiv K.; Kim, Sooyun; Guzman, Segundo J.; Jonas, Peter

    2016-01-01

    CA3CA3 recurrent excitatory synapses are thought to play a key role in memory storage and pattern completion. Whether the plasticity properties of these synapses are consistent with their proposed network functions remains unclear. Here, we examine the properties of spike timing-dependent plasticity (STDP) at CA3CA3 synapses. Low-frequency pairing of excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) and action potentials (APs) induces long-term potentiation (LTP), independent of temporal order. The STDP curve is symmetric and broad (half-width ∼150 ms). Consistent with these STDP induction properties, AP–EPSP sequences lead to supralinear summation of spine [Ca2+] transients. Furthermore, afterdepolarizations (ADPs) following APs efficiently propagate into dendrites of CA3 pyramidal neurons, and EPSPs summate with dendritic ADPs. In autoassociative network models, storage and recall are more robust with symmetric than with asymmetric STDP rules. Thus, a specialized STDP induction rule allows reliable storage and recall of information in the hippocampal CA3 network. PMID:27174042

  11. Return of excitatory waves from field CA1 to the hippocampal formation is facilitated after tetanization of Schäffer collaterals during sleep.

    PubMed

    Zosimovskii, V A; Korshunov, V A

    2010-03-01

    Current concepts hold that during learning in waking animals, new information is transmitted from the neocortex to the hippocampus, where it leaves a temporary trace in the form of a mosaic of modified synapses. During sleep, reactivation of the neuron population initially activated by the new stimulus has the result that this information is returned to the neocortex, ensuring consolidation of a permanent memory trace. Exchange of information between the neocortex and hippocampal formation is mediated mainly by the entorhinal cortex, whose internal connections, in principle, allow "messages" from the output of the hippocampal formation to return to its inputs. Our experiments in awake and sleeping rabbits demonstrated that waves of excitation can return to hippocampal field CA1 and the dentate gyrus via fibers of the perforant path, these waves having initially entered field CA1 via potentiated synapses of Schäffer collaterals; during sleep, re-entrant waves of excitation reach a maximum and have a high probability of evoking discharges of dentate gyrus neurons. Thus, the new stimulus, potentiating synaptic connections in the hippocampus and, probably, the entorhinal cortex during waking, create conditions for reactivation of the corresponding hippocampal neuron populations during sleep by waves of excitation returning via the entorhinal cortex.

  12. The CA3 Network as a Memory Store for Spatial Representations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papp, Gergely; Witter, Menno P.; Treves, Alessandro

    2007-01-01

    Comparative neuroanatomy suggests that the CA3 region of the mammalian hippocampus is directly homologous with the medio-dorsal pallium in birds and reptiles, with which it largely shares the basic organization of primitive cortex. Autoassociative memory models, which are generically applicable to cortical networks, then help assess how well CA3

  13. Thermoelectric transport properties of Ca3Co4- x Ni x O9+ δ oxide materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, K.; Cha, J. S.; Nam, S. W.; Choi, S.-M.; Seo, W.-S.; Lee, S.; Lim, Y. S.

    2016-01-01

    Nano-sized Ca3Co4- x Ni x O9+ δ (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.3) thermoelectric powders are synthesized by using the solution combustion method, with aspartic acid as a combustion fuel. The synthesized Ca3Co4- x Ni x O9+ δ nano-sized powders exhibit a spherical-like shape and a smooth surface. Higher Ni content results in a smaller grain size and a higher porosity, resulting in a decrease in the electrical conductivity. However, the Seebeck coefficient of Ni-added Ca3Co4O9 is much higher than that of Ca3Co4O9. The highest power factor (1.4 × 10-4 Wm-1K-2), which is more than nine times larger than that of Ca3Co4O9, is attained for Ca3Co0.38Ni0.2O9+ δ at 800 °C. The addition of a small amount of Ni is highly effective in improving the thermoelectric properties of Ca3Co4O9. We believe that Ca3Co4- x Ni x O9+ δ is a potential p-type thermoelectric material for renewable energy conversion.

  14. Synaptic mechanisms of pattern completion in the hippocampal CA3 network.

    PubMed

    Guzman, Segundo Jose; Schlögl, Alois; Frotscher, Michael; Jonas, Peter

    2016-09-01

    The hippocampal CA3 region plays a key role in learning and memory. Recurrent CA3-CA3 synapses are thought to be the subcellular substrate of pattern completion. However, the synaptic mechanisms of this network computation remain enigmatic. To investigate these mechanisms, we combined functional connectivity analysis with network modeling. Simultaneous recording from up to eight CA3 pyramidal neurons revealed that connectivity was sparse, spatially uniform, and highly enriched in disynaptic motifs (reciprocal, convergence, divergence, and chain motifs). Unitary connections were composed of one or two synaptic contacts, suggesting efficient use of postsynaptic space. Real-size modeling indicated that CA3 networks with sparse connectivity, disynaptic motifs, and single-contact connections robustly generated pattern completion. Thus, macro- and microconnectivity contribute to efficient memory storage and retrieval in hippocampal networks. PMID:27609885

  15. A novel form of synaptic plasticity in field CA3 of hippocampus requires GPER1 activation and BDNF release

    PubMed Central

    Briz, Victor; Liu, Yan; Zhu, Guoqi; Bi, Xiaoning

    2015-01-01

    Estrogen is an important modulator of hippocampal synaptic plasticity and memory consolidation through its rapid action on membrane-associated receptors. Here, we found that both estradiol and the G-protein–coupled estrogen receptor 1 (GPER1) specific agonist G1 rapidly induce brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) release, leading to transient stimulation of activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated (Arc) protein translation and GluA1-containing AMPA receptor internalization in field CA3 of hippocampus. We also show that type-I metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) activation does not induce Arc translation nor long-term depression (LTD) at the mossy fiber pathway, as opposed to its effects in CA1, and it only triggers LTD after GPER1 stimulation. Furthermore, this form of mGluR-dependent LTD is associated with ubiquitination and proteasome-mediated degradation of GluA1, and is prevented by proteasome inhibition. Overall, our study identifies a novel mechanism by which estrogen and BDNF regulate hippocampal synaptic plasticity in the adult brain. PMID:26391661

  16. Strong enhancement of s -wave superconductivity near a quantum critical point of Ca3Ir4Sn13

    DOE PAGES

    Biswas, P. K.; Guguchia, Z.; Khasanov, R.; Chinotti, M.; Li, L.; Wang, Kefeng; Petrovic, C.; Morenzoni, E.

    2015-11-11

    We repormore » t microscopic studies by muon spin rotation/relaxation as a function of pressure of the Ca3Ir4Sn13 and Sr3Ir4Sn13 system displaying superconductivity and a structural phase transition associated with the formation of a charge density wave (CDW). Our findings show a strong enhancement of the superfluid density and a dramatic increase of the pairing strength above a pressure of ≈ 1.6 GPa giving direct evidence of the presence of a quantum critical point separating a superconducting phase coexisting with CDW from a pure superconducting phase. The superconducting order parameter in both phases has the same s-wave symmetry. In spite of the conventional phonon-mediated BCS character of the weakly correlated (Ca1-xSrx)3Ir4Sn13 system the dependence of the effective superfluid density on the critical temperature puts this compound in the “Uemura” plot close to unconventional superconductors. This system exemplifies that conventional BCS superconductors in the presence of competing orders or multi-band structure can also display characteristics of unconventional superconductors.« less

  17. Bidirectional NMDA receptor plasticity controls CA3 output and heterosynaptic metaplasticity

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, David L.; Puente, Nagore; Grandes, Pedro; Castillo, Pablo E.

    2013-01-01

    N–methyl–d–aspartate glutamate receptors (NMDARs) are classically known as coincidence detectors for the induction of long–term synaptic plasticity, and have been implicated in hippocampal CA3–dependent spatial memory functions that likely rely on dynamic cellular ensemble encoding of space. The unique functional properties of both NMDARs and mossy fiber (MF) projections to CA3 pyramidal cells place MF–NMDARs in a prime position to influence CA3 ensemble dynamics. By mimicking pre and postsynaptic activity patterns observed in–vivo, we report a burst timing–dependent paradigm for bidirectional long–term NMDAR plasticity at MF–CA3 synapses in rat hippocampal slices. This form of plasticity imparts bimodal control of MF–driven CA3 burst–firing and spike temporal fidelity. Moreover, we show that MF–NMDARs mediate heterosynaptic metaplasticity between MF and associational/commissural synapses. Thus, bidirectional NMDAR plasticity at MF–CA3 synapses could significantly contribute to the formation, storage, and recall of CA3 cell assembly patterns. PMID:23852115

  18. Changes in rat hippocampal CA1 synapses following imipramine treatment.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fenghua; Madsen, Torsten M; Wegener, Gregers; Nyengaard, Jens R

    2008-01-01

    Neuronal plasticity in hippocampus is hypothesized to play an important role in both the pathophysiology of depressive disorders and the treatment. In this study, we investigated the consequences of imipramine treatment on neuroplasticity (including neurogenesis, synaptogenesis, and remodelling of synapses) in subregions of the hippocampus by quantifying number of neurons and synapses. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were injected with imipramine or saline (i.p.) daily for 14 days. Unbiased stereological methods were used to quantify the number of neurons and synapses. No differences in the volume and number of neurons of hippocampal subregions following imipramine treatment were found. However, the number and percentage of CA1 asymmetric spine synapses increased significantly and, conversely, the percentage of asymmetric shaft synapses significantly decreased in the imipramine treated group. Our results indicate that administration of imipramine for 14 days in normal rats could significantly increase the excitatory spine synapses, and change the relative distribution of spine and shaft synapses. We speculate that the present findings may be explained by the establishment of new synaptic connections and by remodelling or transformation of existing synapses.

  19. Postsynaptic Target Specific Synaptic Dysfunctions in the CA3 Area of BACE1 Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hui; Megill, Andrea; Wong, Philip C.; Kirkwood, Alfredo; Lee, Hey-Kyoung

    2014-01-01

    Beta-amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1), a major neuronal β-secretase critical for the formation of β-amyloid (Aβ) peptide, is considered one of the key therapeutic targets that can prevent the progression of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Although a complete ablation of BACE1 gene prevents Aβ formation, we previously reported that BACE1 knockouts (KOs) display presynaptic deficits, especially at the mossy fiber (MF) to CA3 synapses. Whether the defect is specific to certain inputs or postsynaptic targets in CA3 is unknown. To determine this, we performed whole-cell recording from pyramidal cells (PYR) and the stratum lucidum (SL) interneurons in the CA3, both of which receive excitatory MF terminals with high levels of BACE1 expression. BACE1 KOs displayed an enhancement of paired-pulse facilitation at the MF inputs to CA3 PYRs without changes at the MF inputs to SL interneurons, which suggests postsynaptic target specific regulation. The synaptic dysfunction in CA3 PYRs was not restricted to excitatory synapses, as seen by an increase in the paired-pulse ratio of evoked inhibitory postsynaptic currents from SL to CA3 PYRs. In addition to the changes in evoked synaptic transmission, BACE1 KOs displayed a reduction in the frequency of miniature excitatory and inhibitory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs and mIPSCs) in CA3 PYRs without alteration in mEPSCs recorded from SL interneurons. This suggests that the impairment may be more global across diverse inputs to CA3 PYRs. Our results indicate that the synaptic dysfunctions seen in BACE1 KOs are specific to the postsynaptic target, the CA3 PYRs, independent of the input type. PMID:24637500

  20. Tetanus-induced re-activation of evoked spiking in the post-ischemic dentate gyrus.

    PubMed

    Henrich-Noack, P; Gorkin, A G; Krautwald, K; Pforte, C; Schröder, U H; Reymann, K G

    2005-01-01

    This study aimed at investigating and influencing the basic electrophysiological functions and neuronal plasticity in the dentate gyrus in freely moving rats at several time-points after global ischemia. Although neuronal death was induced selectively in the cornu ammonis, subfield 1 (CA1)-region of the hippocampus, we found an additional loss of the population spike in the dentate gyrus after stimulation of the perforant path. Input/output-measurements revealed that as early as 1 day post-ischemia population spike generation in the granular cell layer is greatly decreased when compared with pre-ischemic values and to sham-operated animals, despite an apparently intact morphology of granular cells as evidenced by Nissl-staining. In contrast, the synaptic transmission (excitatory postsynaptic field potential) shows no significant difference when comparing values before and after ischemia and ischemic and sham-operated animals. Despite reduced output function, indicated by very small population spike amplitudes, long lasting potentiation can be induced 10 days after ischemia. Surprisingly, even "silent" populations of neurons, which appear selectively post-ischemia and do not show any evoked population spike, can be re-activated by tetanisation which is followed by a normal appearing long-term potentiation. However, this functional recovery seems to be partial and transient under current conditions: population spike-values do not reach pre-ischemic values and return to the low pre-tetanic baseline values the next day. Electrophysiological measurements ex vivo after ischemia indicate that the neuronal dysfunction in the dentate gyrus is not due to locally destroyed structures but that the activity of granular cells is merely suppressed only under in vivo conditions. In summary, global ischemia leaves a neighboring morphologically intact input area, functionally impaired. However, neuronal function can be partially regenerated by electrophysiological tetanic

  1. Metaplastic Effects of Subanesthetic Ketamine on CA1 Hippocampal Function

    PubMed Central

    Izumi, Yukitoshi; Zorumski, Charles F.

    2014-01-01

    Ketamine is a non-competitive N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) antagonist of interest in neuropsychiatry. In the present studies, we examined the effects of subanesthetic, low micromolar ketamine on excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs), population spikes (PSs) and synaptic plasticity in the CA1 region of rat hippocampal slices. Ketamine acutely inhibited NMDAR-mediated synaptic responses with half-maximal effects near 10 µM. When administered for 15–30 min at 1–10 µM, ketamine had no effect on baseline dendritic AMPA receptor-mediated EPSPs, but persistently enhanced somatic EPSPs in the pyramidal cell body layer and augmented PS firing. Acute low micromolar ketamine also had no effect on the induction of long-term potentiation (LTP) but blocked long-term depression (LTD). Following 30 min administration of 1–10 µM ketamine, however, a slowly developing and persistent form of LTP inhibition was observed that took two hours following ketamine washout to become manifest. This LTP inhibition did not result from prolonged or enhanced NMDAR inhibition during drug washout. Effects of low ketamine on somatic EPSPs and LTP were not mimicked by a high ketamine concentration that completely inhibited NMDARs, and both of these effects were blocked by co-administration of low ketamine with a low concentration of the competitive NMDAR antagonist, 2-amino-5-phosphonovalerate or inhibitors of nitric oxide synthase. These results indicate that concentrations of ketamine relevant to psychotropic and psychotomimetic effects have complex metaplastic effects on hippocampal function that involve activation of unblocked NMDARs during ketamine exposure. PMID:25128848

  2. Active dendrites support efficient initiation of dendritic spikes in hippocampal CA3 pyramidal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sooyun; Guzman, Segundo J; Hu, Hua; Jonas, Peter

    2013-01-01

    CA3 pyramidal neurons are important for memory formation and pattern completion in the hippocampal network. It is generally thought that proximal synapses from the mossy fibers activate these neurons most efficiently, whereas distal inputs from the perforant path have a weaker modulatory influence. We used confocally targeted patch-clamp recording from dendrites and axons to map the activation of rat CA3 pyramidal neurons at the subcellular level. Our results reveal two distinct dendritic domains. In the proximal domain, action potentials initiated in the axon backpropagate actively with large amplitude and fast time course. In the distal domain, Na+ channel–mediated dendritic spikes are efficiently initiated by waveforms mimicking synaptic events. CA3 pyramidal neuron dendrites showed a high Na+-to-K+ conductance density ratio, providing ideal conditions for active backpropagation and dendritic spike initiation. Dendritic spikes may enhance the computational power of CA3 pyramidal neurons in the hippocampal network. PMID:22388958

  3. Combustion Synthesis of Ca3(PO4)2 Net-Shape Surgical Implants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ayers, Reed A.; Castillo, Martin; Gottoli, Guglielmo; Moore, John J.; Simske, Steven J.

    2006-01-01

    Self-propagating high-temperature combustion synthesis (SHS) is the basis of a method of making components of porous tricalcium phosphate [Ca3(PO4)2] and related compounds in net sizes and shapes for use as surgical implants that are compatible with bone. The SHS method offers advantages over prior methods of manufacturing Ca3(PO4)2-based surgical implants.

  4. Recurrent synapses and circuits in the CA3 region of the hippocampus: an associative network

    PubMed Central

    Le Duigou, Caroline; Simonnet, Jean; Teleñczuk, Maria T.; Fricker, Desdemona; Miles, Richard

    2014-01-01

    In the CA3 region of the hippocampus, pyramidal cells excite other pyramidal cells and interneurons. The axons of CA3 pyramidal cells spread throughout most of the region to form an associative network. These connections were first drawn by Cajal and Lorente de No. Their physiological properties were explored to understand epileptiform discharges generated in the region. Synapses between pairs of pyramidal cells involve one or few release sites and are weaker than connections made by mossy fibers on CA3 pyramidal cells. Synapses with interneurons are rather effective, as needed to control unchecked excitation. We examine contributions of recurrent synapses to epileptiform synchrony, to the genesis of sharp waves in the CA3 region and to population oscillations at theta and gamma frequencies. Recurrent connections in CA3, as other associative cortices, have a lower connectivity spread over a larger area than in primary sensory cortices. This sparse, but wide-ranging connectivity serves the functions of an associative network, including acquisition of neuronal representations as activity in groups of CA3 cells and completion involving the recall from partial cues of these ensemble firing patterns. PMID:24409118

  5. Molecular determinants for the strictly compartmentalized expression of kainate receptors in CA3 pyramidal cells

    PubMed Central

    Fièvre, Sabine; Carta, Mario; Chamma, Ingrid; Labrousse, Virginie; Thoumine, Olivier; Mulle, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Distinct subtypes of ionotropic glutamate receptors can segregate to specific synaptic inputs in a given neuron. Using functional mapping by focal glutamate uncaging in CA3 pyramidal cells (PCs), we observe that kainate receptors (KARs) are strictly confined to the postsynaptic elements of mossy fibre (mf) synapses and excluded from other glutamatergic inputs and from extrasynaptic compartments. By molecular replacement in organotypic slices from GluK2 knockout mice, we show that the faithful rescue of KAR segregation at mf-CA3 synapses critically depends on the amount of GluK2a cDNA transfected and on a sequence in the GluK2a C-terminal domain responsible for interaction with N-cadherin. Targeted deletion of N-cadherin in CA3 PCs greatly reduces KAR content in thorny excrescences and KAR-EPSCs at mf-CA3 synapses. Hence, multiple mechanisms combine to confine KARs at mf-CA3 synapses, including a stringent control of the amount of GluK2 subunit in CA3 PCs and the recruitment/stabilization of KARs by N-cadherins. PMID:27669960

  6. Crystal growth of Ca3SiO4Br2: New photoluminescence bromosilicate host

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Zhiguo; Li, Qiang; Li, Guowu; Xiong, Ming; Liao, Libing

    2011-03-01

    Single crystals of new bromosilicate compound Ca3SiO4Br2 were grown out of high-temperature Ca2SiO4/CaBr2 melts by the slow cooling process. Colorless, transparent and flaky crystals of Ca3SiO4Br2 were directly isolated from the final solid coagulation. The as-obtained crystals were investigated by energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDS), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and polarized light microscope (PLM). The structure of the new Ca3SiO4Br2 compound was determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, and it crystallized in the triclinic system, space group P-1 with unit cell parameters a=8.0051(18) Å, b=8.720(3) Å, c=11.749(3) Å, α=69.07(0)°, β=89.98(0)°, γ=75.46(0)° and V=737.88(196) Å3, Z=3. Interestingly, a significant amount of Eu2+ enters the Ca3SiO4Br2 phase, and the Eu2+-doped Ca3SiO4Br2 phosphor shows a strong blue emission band centered at 469 nm under 365 nm UV light, which demonstrates that Ca3SiO4Br2:Eu2+ is a promising blue phosphor for use in white light LEDs.

  7. Evolution of the mammalian dentate gyrus.

    PubMed

    Hevner, Robert F

    2016-02-15

    The dentate gyrus (DG), a part of the hippocampal formation, has important functions in learning, memory, and adult neurogenesis. Compared with homologous areas in sauropsids (birds and reptiles), the mammalian DG is larger and exhibits qualitatively different phenotypes: 1) folded (C- or V-shaped) granule neuron layer, concave toward the hilus and delimited by a hippocampal fissure; 2) nonperiventricular adult neurogenesis; and 3) prolonged ontogeny, involving extensive abventricular (basal) migration and proliferation of neural stem and progenitor cells (NSPCs). Although gaps remain, available data indicate that these DG traits are present in all orders of mammals, including monotremes and marsupials. The exception is Cetacea (whales, dolphins, and porpoises), in which DG size, convolution, and adult neurogenesis have undergone evolutionary regression. Parsimony suggests that increased growth and convolution of the DG arose in stem mammals concurrently with nonperiventricular adult hippocampal neurogenesis and basal migration of NSPCs during development. These traits could all result from an evolutionary change that enhanced radial migration of NSPCs out of the periventricular zones, possibly by epithelial-mesenchymal transition, to colonize and maintain nonperiventricular proliferative niches. In turn, increased NSPC migration and clonal expansion might be a consequence of growth in the cortical hem (medial patterning center), which produces morphogens such as Wnt3a, generates Cajal-Retzius neurons, and is regulated by Lhx2. Finally, correlations between DG convolution and neocortical gyrification (or capacity for gyrification) suggest that enhanced abventricular migration and proliferation of NSPCs played a transformative role in growth and folding of neocortex as well as archicortex.

  8. Microelastic mapping of the rat dentate gyrus

    PubMed Central

    Luque, Tomás; Schaffer, David V.; Kumar, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    The lineage commitment of many cultured stem cells, including adult neural stem cells (NSCs), is strongly sensitive to the stiffness of the underlying extracellular matrix. However, it remains unclear how well the stiffness ranges explored in culture align with the microscale stiffness values stem cells actually encounter within their endogenous tissue niches. To address this question in the context of hippocampal NSCs, we used atomic force microscopy to spatially map the microscale elastic modulus (E) of specific anatomical substructures within living slices of rat dentate gyrus in which NSCs reside during lineage commitment in vivo. We measured depth-dependent apparent E-values at locations across the hilus (H), subgranular zone (SGZ) and granule cell layer (GCL) and found a two- to threefold increase in stiffness at 500 nm indentation from the H (49 ± 7 Pa) and SGZ (58 ± 8 Pa) to the GCL (115 ± 18 Pa), a fold change in stiffness we have previously found functionally relevant in culture. Additionally, E exhibits nonlinearity with depth, increasing significantly for indentations larger than 1 µm and most pronounced in the GCL. The methodological advances implemented for these measurements allow the quantification of the elastic properties of hippocampal NSC niche at unprecedented spatial resolution. PMID:27152213

  9. A MRI study of fusiform gyrus in schizotypal personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Dickey, Chandlee C; McCarley, Robert W; Voglmaier, Martina M; Niznikiewicz, Margaret A; Seidman, Larry J; Frumin, Melissa; Toner, Sarah; Demeo, Susan; Shenton, Martha E

    2003-11-01

    The fusiform gyrus is important for face and object recognition, is abnormal in schizophrenia, but has not been studied in schizotypal personality disorder (SPD). Thin-slice MR images showed no differences, either in right, left or total fusiform gyri volumes, between subjects with SPD (N=21) and normal controls (N=19). However, there was a correlation between severity of illusions and magical thinking suffered by the SPD subjects and smaller right fusiform gyrus volumes. This suggests that future studies may be useful in determining the functional competence of this gyrus in SPD.

  10. Evolution of the mammalian dentate gyrus.

    PubMed

    Hevner, Robert F

    2016-02-15

    The dentate gyrus (DG), a part of the hippocampal formation, has important functions in learning, memory, and adult neurogenesis. Compared with homologous areas in sauropsids (birds and reptiles), the mammalian DG is larger and exhibits qualitatively different phenotypes: 1) folded (C- or V-shaped) granule neuron layer, concave toward the hilus and delimited by a hippocampal fissure; 2) nonperiventricular adult neurogenesis; and 3) prolonged ontogeny, involving extensive abventricular (basal) migration and proliferation of neural stem and progenitor cells (NSPCs). Although gaps remain, available data indicate that these DG traits are present in all orders of mammals, including monotremes and marsupials. The exception is Cetacea (whales, dolphins, and porpoises), in which DG size, convolution, and adult neurogenesis have undergone evolutionary regression. Parsimony suggests that increased growth and convolution of the DG arose in stem mammals concurrently with nonperiventricular adult hippocampal neurogenesis and basal migration of NSPCs during development. These traits could all result from an evolutionary change that enhanced radial migration of NSPCs out of the periventricular zones, possibly by epithelial-mesenchymal transition, to colonize and maintain nonperiventricular proliferative niches. In turn, increased NSPC migration and clonal expansion might be a consequence of growth in the cortical hem (medial patterning center), which produces morphogens such as Wnt3a, generates Cajal-Retzius neurons, and is regulated by Lhx2. Finally, correlations between DG convolution and neocortical gyrification (or capacity for gyrification) suggest that enhanced abventricular migration and proliferation of NSPCs played a transformative role in growth and folding of neocortex as well as archicortex. PMID:26179319

  11. Superior temporal gyrus, language function, and autism.

    PubMed

    Bigler, Erin D; Mortensen, Sherstin; Neeley, E Shannon; Ozonoff, Sally; Krasny, Lori; Johnson, Michael; Lu, Jeffrey; Provencal, Sherri L; McMahon, William; Lainhart, Janet E

    2007-01-01

    Deficits in language are a core feature of autism. The superior temporal gyrus (STG) is involved in auditory processing, including language, but also has been implicated as a critical structure in social cognition. It was hypothesized that subjects with autism would display different size-function relationships between the STG and intellectual-language-based abilities when compared to controls. Intellectual ability was assessed by either the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Third Edition (WISC-III) or Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Third Edition (WAIS-III), where three intellectual quotients (IQ) were computed: verbal (VIQ), performance (PIQ), and full-scale (FSIQ). Language ability was assessed by the Clinical Evaluation of Language Fundamentals-Third Edition (CELF-3), also divided into three index scores: receptive, expressive, and total. Seven to 19-year-old rigorously diagnosed subjects with autism (n = 30) were compared to controls (n = 39; 13 of whom had a deficit in reading) of similar age who were matched on education, PIQ, and head circumference. STG volumes were computed based on 1.5 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). IQ and CELF-3 performance were highly interrelated regardless of whether subjects had autism or were controls. Both IQ and CELF-3 ability were positively correlated with STG in controls, but a different pattern was observed in subjects with autism. In controls, left STG gray matter was significantly (r = .42, p < or = .05) related to receptive language on the CELF-3; in contrast, a zero order correlation was found with autism. When plotted by age, potential differences in growth trajectories related to language development associated with STG were observed between controls and those subjects with autism. Taken together, these findings suggest a possible failure in left hemisphere lateralization of language function involving the STG in autism.

  12. Network mechanisms of gamma oscillations in the CA3 region of the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Hájos, Norbert; Paulsen, Ole

    2009-10-01

    Neural networks of the brain display multiple patterns of oscillatory activity. Some of these rhythms are generated intrinsically within the local network, and can therefore be studied in isolated preparations. Here we discuss local-circuit mechanisms involved in hippocampal CA3 gamma oscillations, one of the best understood locally generated network patterns in the mammalian brain. Perisomatic inhibitory cells are crucial players in gamma oscillogenesis. They provide prominent rhythmic inhibition to CA3 pyramidal cells and are themselves synchronized primarily by excitatory synaptic inputs derived from the local collaterals of CA3 pyramidal cells. The recruitment of this recurrent excitatory-inhibitory feedback loop during hippocampal gamma oscillations suggests that local gamma oscillations not only control when, but also how many and which pyramidal cells will fire during each gamma cycle.

  13. Hybrid improper ferroelectricity in Ruddlesden-Popper Ca3(Ti,Mn)2O7 ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X. Q.; Wu, J. W.; Shi, X. X.; Zhao, H. J.; Zhou, H. Y.; Qiu, R. H.; Zhang, W. Q.; Chen, X. M.

    2015-05-01

    The hybrid improper ferroelectricity (HIF) has been proposed as a promising way to create multiferroic materials with strong magnetoelectric coupling by the first-principle calculation, and the experimental evidences of HIF in Ruddlesden-Poper Ca3(Ti1-xMnx)2O7 (x = 0, 0.05, 0.1, and 0.15) ceramics have been shown in the present work. The room temperature ferroelectric hysteresis loops are observed in these ceramics, and a polar orthorhombic structure with two oxygen tilting modes has been confirmed by the X-ray powder diffraction. A first-order phase transition around 1100 K in Ca3Ti2O7 was evidenced, and the temperatures of phase transitions decrease linearly with increasing of the contents of Mn4+ ions. Based on the result of first-principle calculations, the polarization should be reversed by switching through the mediated Amam phase in Ca3Ti2O7 ceramics.

  14. Directional solidification, thermo-mechanical and optical properties of (Mg(x)Ca(1-x))(3)Al(2)Si(3)O(12) glasses doped with Nd(3+) ions.

    PubMed

    Sola, D; Conejos, D; Martínez de Mendivil, J; Ortega-San-Martín, L; Lifante, G; Peña, J I

    2015-10-01

    In this work glass rods of (Mg(x)Ca(1-x))(3)Al(2)Si(3)O(12) (x = 0, 0.5 and 1) doped with 1 wt% Nd(2)O(3) were produced by the laser floating zone technique. Thermo-mechanical and spectroscopic properties have been evaluated. The three glass samples present good thermo-mechanical properties, with similar hardness, toughness and glass transition temperatures. The spectroscopic characterization shows spectral shifts in absorption and emission spectra. These spectral shifts together with Judd-Ofelt intensity parameters and ionic packing ratio have been used to investigate the local structure surrounding the Nd(3+) ions and the covalency of the Nd-O bond. All obtained results agree and confirm the higher covalency of the Nd-O bond in the Ca(3)Al(2)Si(3)O(12) glass.

  15. Directional solidification, thermo-mechanical and optical properties of (Mg(x)Ca(1-x))(3)Al(2)Si(3)O(12) glasses doped with Nd(3+) ions.

    PubMed

    Sola, D; Conejos, D; Martínez de Mendivil, J; Ortega-San-Martín, L; Lifante, G; Peña, J I

    2015-10-01

    In this work glass rods of (Mg(x)Ca(1-x))(3)Al(2)Si(3)O(12) (x = 0, 0.5 and 1) doped with 1 wt% Nd(2)O(3) were produced by the laser floating zone technique. Thermo-mechanical and spectroscopic properties have been evaluated. The three glass samples present good thermo-mechanical properties, with similar hardness, toughness and glass transition temperatures. The spectroscopic characterization shows spectral shifts in absorption and emission spectra. These spectral shifts together with Judd-Ofelt intensity parameters and ionic packing ratio have been used to investigate the local structure surrounding the Nd(3+) ions and the covalency of the Nd-O bond. All obtained results agree and confirm the higher covalency of the Nd-O bond in the Ca(3)Al(2)Si(3)O(12) glass. PMID:26480149

  16. Learning impairment induced by lesion of the CA1 field of the primate hippocampus: attempts to ameliorate the impairment by transplantation of fetal CA1 tissue.

    PubMed

    Ridley, R M; Pearson, C; Kershaw, T R; Hodges, H; Maclean, C J; Hoyle, C; Baker, H F

    1997-06-01

    Monkeys with bilateral excitotoxic lesion of the CA1 field of the hippocampus were severely impaired at learning visuospatial conditional tasks. This was not a general spatial impairment, because the animals were not impaired on serial spatial reversal, which requires response flexibility in the spatial domain; they were not impaired at learning to choose the position furthest away from a single stimulus, which requires analysis of spatial layout of the test area, and they were not impaired at discriminating between two patterns that differed only in orientation. CA1-lesioned monkeys were impaired at learning a visuospatial conditional task when trials of the two component types "if AA go left" and "if BB go right" were presented according to either a pseudorandom or alternating schedule; but they were not impaired if one component type of trial was presented until three consecutive correct responses were made, followed by the other type of trial, to three consecutive correct responses. In all cases testing continued until a criterion of 27 of 30 consecutive correct responses across both types of trial was achieved. Although this suggests that CA1-lesioned animals are particularly prone to interference effects, they had no difficulty in learning ten concurrent visual discriminations presented against either a uniform background or with each discrimination presented against its own distinctive background, a condition that might reduce interference in unoperated monkeys. Interference following hippocampal damage might occur at a deeper level than stimulus identification such that animals with hippocampal damage may be able to learn about many aspects of different stimuli in parallel but may be unable to learn about multiple related aspects of the same subject matter. Monkeys with grafts of fetal CA1 tissue in the lesioned CA1 field showed significant improvement relative to CA1-lesioned animals on those tasks on which CA1-lesioned animals were impaired, although they

  17. Evaluation of the genotoxicity and mutagenicity of Ca3SiO5-based cement.

    PubMed

    Nai, Gisele Alborghetti; Logar, Gustavo de Almeida; Mori, Graziela Garrido; Teixeira, Ligia Moraes; Silva, Bruna Camila Ferreira da; Moraes, Ana Elisa Maranho de; Cabral, Felipe André

    2016-01-01

    Ca3SiO5 is new cement based on the composition of Portland that has been developed to have superior physicochemical and biological properties. In a clinical evaluation, the cement did not appear to have cytotoxic properties and allowed for the proliferation of pulp cells and gingival fibroblasts. However, no previous studies have evaluated the genotoxicity or the mutagenicity of Ca3SiO5in vivo. Therefore, the goal of this study is to evaluate the genotoxic and mutagenic potential of Ca3SiO5-based cement in vivo. Twenty-four male Wistar rats were divided into 3 groups (n = 8). Group A rats received subcutaneous implantation of Ca3SiO5 in the dorsum. Group B rats received a single dose of cyclophosphamide (positive control). Group C rats received subcutaneous implantation of empty tubes in the dorsum (negative control). After 24 hours, all animals were euthanized and the bone marrow of the femurs was collected for use in the comet assay and the micronucleus test. The comet assay revealed that the Ca3SiO5 group had a tail intensity of 23.57 ± 7.70%, the cyclophosphamide group had a tail intensity of 27.43 ± 7.40%, and the negative control group had a tail intensity of 24.75 ± 5.55%. The average number of micronuclei was 6.25 (standard deviation, SD = 3.53) in the Ca3SiO5 group, 9.75 (SD = 2.49) in the cyclophosphamide group, and 0.75 (SD = 1.03) in the negative control group. There was an increase in the micronuclei frequency in the Ca3SiO5 group compared to that of the negative control group (p < 0.05). Our data showed that exposure to the Ca3SiO5-based cement resulted in an increase in the frequency of micronuclei, but no genotoxicity was detected according to the comet assay. PMID:27556557

  18. Post-weaning mice fed exclusively milk have deficits in induction of long-term depression in the CA1 hippocampal region and spatial learning and memory.

    PubMed

    Nishie, Hideaki; Miyata, Ryouhei; Fujikawa, Ryu; Kinoshita, Ken-ichi; Muroi, Yoshikage; Ishii, Toshiaki

    2012-08-01

    Previously, we have found that post-weaning mice fed exclusively milk display low-frequency exploratory behavior compared to mice fed a food pellet diet (Ishii et al., 2005a). Because cognitive functions play a key role in animal exploration, in the present study we examined the effect of an exclusively milk formula diet on spatial learning and memory in a water maze and also on induction of long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD) at the Schaffer collateral-CA1 synapse in the hippocampus. Exclusively milk-fed mice exhibited slower learning and memory deficits in hidden water maze tests as compared with pellet-fed mice. Moreover, milk-fed mice showed a significant inhibition of LTD but a normal induction of LTP. Despite these functional deficits, adult neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus, which has been proposed to have a causal relationship to spatial memory, was stimulated in milk-fed mice. These result suggest that an exclusively milk formula diet after weaning leads to a stimulation of hippocampal neurogenesis but causes deficits in the induction of LTD in the CA1 hippocampal region and impairment of spatial learning and memory.

  19. Smad3 deficiency inhibits dentate gyrus LTP by enhancing GABAA neurotransmission.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, M Dolores; Antolín-Vallespín, Mónica; Tapia-González, Silvia; Sánchez-Capelo, Amelia

    2016-04-01

    Transforming growth factor-β signaling through intracellular Smad3 has been implicated in Parkinson's disease (PD) and it fulfills an important role in the neurogenesis and synaptic plasticity that occurs in the adult dentate gyrus (DG). The long-term potentiation (LTP) induced in the DG by high-frequency stimulation of the medial perforant pathway is abolished in the DG of Smad3-deficient mice, but not in the CA1 hippocampal region. Here, we show that NMDA- and AMPA-type glutamate receptors do not participate in the inhibition of LTP associated with Smad3 deficiency. Moreover, there is no difference in the hippocampal GAD65 and GAD67 content, suggesting that GABA biosynthesis remains unaffected. Increased conductance and higher action potential firing thresholds were evident in intracellular recordings of granule cells from Smad3 deficient mice. Interestingly, phasic and tonic GABAA receptor (GABAA R)-mediated neurotransmission is enhanced in the DG of Smad3-deficient mice, and LTP induction can be rescued by inhibiting GABAA R with picrotoxin. Hence, Smad3 signaling in the DG appears to be necessary to induce LTP by regulating GABAA neurotransmission, suggesting a central role of this intracellular signaling pathway in the hippocampal brain plasticity related to learning and memory. Smad3 deficient mice represent a new and interesting model of Parkinson's disease, displaying hippocampal dysfunctions that include decreased neurogenesis and the failure to induce LTP in the dentate gyrus. Here we show that Smad3 deficiency inhibits LTP induction by enhancing phasic and tonic GABAA receptor-mediated neurotransmission, while LTP induction can be rescued with a GABAA receptor antagonist. Alteration of GABA neurotransmission is thought to produce hippocampal cognitive dysfunction in Down's syndrome or Alzheimer's disease, and here we provide new insights into the hippocampal changes in an animal model of Parkinson's disease. PMID:26826552

  20. Doublecortin knockout mice show normal hippocampal-dependent memory despite CA3 lamination defects.

    PubMed

    Germain, Johanne; Bruel-Jungerman, Elodie; Grannec, Gael; Denis, Cécile; Lepousez, Gabriel; Giros, Bruno; Francis, Fiona; Nosten-Bertrand, Marika

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in the human X-linked doublecortin gene (DCX) cause major neocortical disorganization associated with severe intellectual disability and intractable epilepsy. Although Dcx knockout (KO) mice exhibit normal isocortical development and architecture, they show lamination defects of the hippocampal pyramidal cell layer largely restricted to the CA3 region. Dcx-KO mice also exhibit interneuron abnormalities. As well as the interest of testing their general neurocognitive profile, Dcx-KO mice also provide a relatively unique model to assess the effects of a disorganized CA3 region on learning and memory. Based on its prominent anatomical and physiological features, the CA3 region is believed to contribute to rapid encoding of novel information, formation and storage of arbitrary associations, novelty detection, and short-term memory. We report here that Dcx-KO adult males exhibit remarkably preserved hippocampal- and CA3-dependant cognitive processes using a large battery of classical hippocampus related tests such as the Barnes maze, contextual fear conditioning, paired associate learning and object recognition. In addition, we show that hippocampal adult neurogenesis, in terms of proliferation, survival and differentiation of granule cells, is also remarkably preserved in Dcx-KO mice. In contrast, following social deprivation, Dcx-KO mice exhibit impaired social interaction and reduced aggressive behaviors. In addition, Dcx-KO mice show reduced behavioral lateralization. The Dcx-KO model thus reinforces the association of neuropsychiatric behavioral impairments with mouse models of intellectual disability.

  1. Doublecortin Knockout Mice Show Normal Hippocampal-Dependent Memory Despite CA3 Lamination Defects

    PubMed Central

    Grannec, Gael; Denis, Cécile; Lepousez, Gabriel; Giros, Bruno; Francis, Fiona; Nosten-Bertrand, Marika

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in the human X-linked doublecortin gene (DCX) cause major neocortical disorganization associated with severe intellectual disability and intractable epilepsy. Although Dcx knockout (KO) mice exhibit normal isocortical development and architecture, they show lamination defects of the hippocampal pyramidal cell layer largely restricted to the CA3 region. Dcx-KO mice also exhibit interneuron abnormalities. As well as the interest of testing their general neurocognitive profile, Dcx-KO mice also provide a relatively unique model to assess the effects of a disorganized CA3 region on learning and memory. Based on its prominent anatomical and physiological features, the CA3 region is believed to contribute to rapid encoding of novel information, formation and storage of arbitrary associations, novelty detection, and short-term memory. We report here that Dcx-KO adult males exhibit remarkably preserved hippocampal- and CA3-dependant cognitive processes using a large battery of classical hippocampus related tests such as the Barnes maze, contextual fear conditioning, paired associate learning and object recognition. In addition, we show that hippocampal adult neurogenesis, in terms of proliferation, survival and differentiation of granule cells, is also remarkably preserved in Dcx-KO mice. In contrast, following social deprivation, Dcx-KO mice exhibit impaired social interaction and reduced aggressive behaviors. In addition, Dcx-KO mice show reduced behavioral lateralization. The Dcx-KO model thus reinforces the association of neuropsychiatric behavioral impairments with mouse models of intellectual disability. PMID:24073232

  2. Transport and Thermoelectric Properties of Ca3Co4O9 Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yufeng; Si, Weidong; Sutter, Eli; Sabatini, Robert

    2005-03-01

    It has been discovered recently that cobaltates have very large thermoelectric power, which shows that cobaltates hold great promise to be potential integrated heating spreading solution, such as thermal management of microprocessors. Among the cobaltates, Ca3Co4O9 and Ca2Co2O5 are exhibiting best thermoelectric properties. The ZT value for these calcium-cobaltates reaches as high as 2.7 at T >= 873 K, which clearly challenges the best conventional thermoelectric materials found in intermetallic compounds, such as Bi2Te3/Sb2Te3 alloys. The purpose of this work is to study the transport and thermoelectric properties of Ca3Co4O9 thin films. We have successfully grown the Ca3Co4O9 c-axis orientated thin films using Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) technique on various substrates, including Si, LaAlO3, Al2O3. The resistivity and thermoelectric power measurements show that these films have superior thermoelectric properties, similar to that found in the bulk samples. The detailed transport and thermoelectric properties of Ca3Co4O9 thin films will be discussed. This work was supported by the U. S. Dept. of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Science, under contract No. DE-AC-02-98CH10886.

  3. The reduction of EPSC amplitude in CA1 pyramidal neurons by the peroxynitrite donor SIN-1 requires Ca2+ influx via postsynaptic non-L-type voltage gated calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Zhaowei, Liu; Yongling, Xie; Jiajia, Yang; Zhuo, Yang

    2014-02-01

    The peroxynitrite free radical (ONOO(-)) modulation of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs) and spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs) was investigated in rat CA1 pyramidal neurons using the whole-cell patch clamp technique. SIN-1(3-morpholino-sydnonimine), which can lead the simultaneous generation of superoxide anion and nitric oxide, and then form the highly reactive species ONOO(-), induced dose-dependent inhibition in amplitudes of both mEPSCs and sEPSCs. The SIN-1 action on mEPSC amplitude was completely blocked by U0126, a selective MEK inhibitor, suggesting that MEK contributed to the action of ONOO(-) on mEPSCs. The effect of SIN-1 was completely occluded either in the presence of the calcium chelator EGTA or the non-selective calcium channel antagonist Cd(2+). Furthermore, the application of nifedipine (20 μM), the L-type calcium channel blocker, had no effect on the ONOO(-)-induced decrease in mEPSC amplitude, excluding a role for L-type voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels in this process. SIN-1 inhibited the frequency of sEPSCs but had no effect on mEPSC frequency, which suggested a presynaptic action potential-dependent the action of ONOO(-) at CA1 pyramidal neuron synapses. The best-known glutamatergic input to CA1 pyramidal neurons is via Schaffer collaterals from CA3 area. However, no changes were observed in slices treated with SIN-1 on the spontaneous firing rates of CA3 pyramidal neurons. These findings suggested that SIN-1 inhibited glutamatergic synaptic transmission of CA1 pyramidal neurons by a postsynaptic non-L-type voltage gated calcium channel-dependent mechanism.

  4. Methylphenidate amplifies long-term potentiation in rat hippocampus CA1 area involving the insertion of AMPA receptors by activation of β-adrenergic and D1/D5 receptors.

    PubMed

    Rozas, C; Carvallo, C; Contreras, D; Carreño, M; Ugarte, G; Delgado, R; Zeise, M L; Morales, B

    2015-12-01

    Methylphenidate (MPH, Ritalin©) is widely used in the treatment of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder and recently as a drug of abuse. Although the effect of MPH has been studied in brain regions such as striatum and prefrontal cortex (PFC), the hippocampus has received relatively little attention. It is known that MPH increases the TBS-dependent Long Term Potentiation (LTP) in the CA1 area. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in this process are still unknown. Using field potential recordings and western blot analysis in rat hippocampal slices of young rats, we found that acute application of MPH enhances LTP in CA3-CA1 synapses in a dose-dependent manner with an EC50 of 73.44±6.32 nM. Using specific antagonists and paired-pulse facilitation protocols, we observed that the MPH-dependent increase of LTP involves not only β-adrenergic receptors activation but also post-synaptic D1/D5 dopamine receptors. The inhibition of PKA with PKI, suppressed the facilitation of LTP induced by MPH consistent with an involvement of the adenyl cyclase-cAMP-PKA dependent cascade downstream of the activation of D1/D5 receptors. In addition, samples of CA1 areas taken from slices potentiated with MPH presented an increase in the phosphorylation of the Ser845 residue of the GluA1 subunit of AMPA receptors compared to control slices. This effect was reverted by SCH23390, antagonist of D1/D5 receptors, and PKI. Moreover, we found an increase of surface-associated functional AMPA receptors. We propose that MPH increases TBS-dependent LTP in CA3-CA1 synapses through a polysynaptic mechanism involving activation of β-adrenergic and D1/D5 dopaminergic receptors and promoting the trafficking and insertion of functional AMPA receptors to the plasma membrane.

  5. Afferent-specific properties of interneuron synapses underlie selective long-term regulation of feedback inhibitory circuits in CA1 hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Croce, Ariane; Pelletier, Joe Guillaume; Tartas, Maylis; Lacaille, Jean-Claude

    2010-06-15

    Hebbian long-term potentiation (LTP) develops at specific synapses onto hippocampal CA1 oriens/alveus interneurons (OA-INs), suggesting selective regulation of distinct input pathways. Afferent-specific properties at interneuron synapses have been characterized extensively in CA3 stratum lucidum cells, but given interneuron diversity these rules of transmission and plasticity may not hold in other interneuron types. Here, we used paired recordings and demonstrate that CA2/3 pyramidal cell (PC) feedforward and CA1 PC feedback synapses onto OA-INs show distinct AMPA receptor rectification and Ca(2+) permeability, short-term plasticity and mGluR2/3-mediated inhibition. Only feedback synapses undergo Hebbian LTP. OA-IN firing during repeated synaptic stimulation displays onset-transient or late-persistent responses consistent with activation of feedforward and feedback inputs, respectively. Input-output functions are preserved after theta-burst stimulation, but late-persistent responses selectively show mGluR1-dependent long-term increases. Thus, cell type- and afferent-specific rules of transmission and plasticity underlie distinct OA-IN input-output functions, providing selective long-term regulation in feedback inhibitory networks.

  6. Ca3GeO4Cl2 with a norbergite-like structure.

    PubMed

    Redhammer, Günther J; Roth, Georg; Amthauer, Georg

    2007-08-01

    The title compound, tricalcium monogermanate dichloride, is orthorhombic and consists of one distinct Ge site on special position 4c, site symmetry m, and two different Ca sites, Ca1 and Ca2, one on general position 8d, site symmetry 1, and the other on special position 4c. Two of the O atoms occupy the 4c position (symmetry m); the third O atom is situated on the general 8d position, symmetry 1, as is the one distinct Cl position. By sharing common edges, the distorted Ca1 octahedra form infinite crankshaft-like chains parallel to the b direction. Along a and c, these chains are connected to one another via common corners, thereby forming a three-dimensional framework of edge- and corner-sharing Ca1O(4)Cl(2) octahedra. Triangular prisms of Ca2O(4)Cl(2) polyhedra and GeO(4) tetrahedra fill the interstitial space within the Ca1 polyhedral framework. Relationships between the structures of the title compound and the humite-type materials norbergite (Mg(3)SiO(4)F(2)) and Mn(3)SiO(4)F(2) are discussed. PMID:17675676

  7. Electronic and Optical Properties of Ca3MN (M = Ge, Sn, Pb, P, As, Sb and Bi) Antiperovskite Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iqbal, Samad; Murtaza, G.; Khenata, R.; Mahmood, Asif; Yar, Abdullah; Muzammil, M.; Khan, Matiullah

    2016-08-01

    The electronic and optical properties of cubic antiperovskites Ca3MN (M = Ge, Sn, Pb, P, As, Sb and Bi) were investigated by applying the full potential linearized augmented plane wave plus local orbitals (FP-LAPW + lo) scheme based on density functional theory. Different exchange correlation potentials were adopted for the calculations. The results of band structure and density of states show that, by changing the central anion of Ca3MN, the nature of the materials change from metallic (Ca3GeN, Ca3SnN, Ca3PbN) to semiconducting with small band gaps (Ca3SbN and Ca3BiN) to insulating (Ca3PN and Ca3AsN). The optical properties such as dielectric function, absorption coefficient, optical conductivity, reflectivity and refractive indices have also been calculated. The results reveal that all the studied compounds are optically active in the visible and ultraviolet energy regions, and therefore can be effectively utilized for optoelectronic devices.

  8. Normal body perception despite the loss of right fusiform gyrus.

    PubMed

    Susilo, Tirta; Yang, Hua; Potter, Zachary; Robbins, Rachel; Duchaine, Bradley

    2015-03-01

    Human extrastriate cortex contains functional regions that are selective for particular categories such as faces, bodies, and places, but it is unclear whether these category-selective regions are necessary for normal perception of their preferred stimuli. One of these regions is the right fusiform body area (FBA), which is selectively involved in body perception. Do loss of the right fusiform gyrus and the absence of the right FBA necessarily lead to deficits in body perception? Here we report the performance of Galen, a brain-damaged patient who lost the right fusiform gyrus and has no right FBA, on eight tasks of body perception. Despite his lesion, Galen showed normal performance on all tasks. Galen's results demonstrate that damage to the right fusiform gyrus and the lack of the right FBA do not necessarily lead to persisting deficits in body perception.

  9. Alpha2A adrenergic receptor activation inhibits epileptiform activity in the rat hippocampal CA3 region.

    PubMed

    Jurgens, Chris W D; Hammad, Hana M; Lichter, Jessica A; Boese, Sarah J; Nelson, Brian W; Goldenstein, Brianna L; Davis, Kylie L; Xu, Ke; Hillman, Kristin L; Porter, James E; Doze, Van A

    2007-06-01

    Norepinephrine has potent antiepileptic properties, the pharmacology of which is unclear. Under conditions in which GABAergic inhibition is blocked, norepinephrine reduces hippocampal cornu ammonis 3 (CA3) epileptiform activity through alpha(2) adrenergic receptor (AR) activation on pyramidal cells. In this study, we investigated which alpha(2)AR subtype(s) mediates this effect. First, alpha(2)AR genomic expression patterns of 25 rat CA3 pyramidal cells were determined using real-time single-cell reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, demonstrating that 12 cells expressed alpha(2A)AR transcript; 3 of the 12 cells additionally expressed mRNA for alpha(2C)AR subtype and no cells possessing alpha(2B)AR mRNA. Hippocampal CA3 epileptiform activity was then examined using field potential recordings in brain slices. The selective alphaAR agonist 6-fluoronorepinephrine caused a reduction of CA3 epileptiform activity, as measured by decreased frequency of spontaneous epileptiform bursts. In the presence of betaAR blockade, concentration-response curves for AR agonists suggest that an alpha(2)AR mediates this response, as the rank order of potency was 5-bromo-N-(4,5-dihydro-1H-imidazol-2-yl)-6-quinoxalinamine (UK-14304) >or= epinephrine >6-fluoronorepinephrine > norepinephrine > phenylephrine. Finally, equilibrium dissociation constants (K(b)) of selective alphaAR antagonists were functionally determined to confirm the specific alpha(2)AR subtype inhibiting CA3 epileptiform activity. Apparent K(b) values calculated for atipamezole (1.7 nM), MK-912 (4.8 nM), BRL-44408 (15 nM), yohimbine (63 nM), ARC-239 (540 nM), prazosin (4900 nM), and terazosin (5000 nM) correlated best with affinities previously determined for the alpha(2A)AR subtype (r = 0.99, slope = 1.0). These results suggest that, under conditions of impaired GABAergic inhibition, activation of alpha(2A)ARs is primarily responsible for the antiepileptic actions of norepinephrine in the rat hippocampal CA3

  10. Enhancement of Synaptic Potentials in Rabbit CA1 Pyramidal Neurons Following Classical Conditioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loturco, Joseph J.; Coulter, Douglas A.; Alkon, Daniel L.

    1988-03-01

    A synaptic potential elicited by high-frequency stimulation of the Schaffer collaterals was enhanced in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells from rabbits that were classically conditioned relative to cells from control rabbits. In addition, confirming previous reports, the after-hyperpolarization was reduced in cells from conditioned animals. We suggest that reduced after-hyperpolarization and enhanced synaptic responsiveness in cells from conditioned animals work in concert to contribute to the functioning of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells during classical conditioning.

  11. Parallel memory processing by the CA1 region of the dorsal hippocampus and the basolateral amygdala.

    PubMed

    Cammarota, Martín; Bevilaqua, Lia R; Rossato, Janine I; Lima, Ramón H; Medina, Jorge H; Izquierdo, Iván

    2008-07-29

    There is abundant literature on the role of the basolateral amygdala (BLA) and the CA1 region of the hippocampus in memory formation of inhibitory avoidance (IA) and other behaviorally arousing tasks. Here, we investigate molecular correlates of IA consolidation in the two structures and their relation to NMDA receptors (NMDArs) and beta-adrenergic receptors (beta-ADrs). The separate posttraining administration of antagonists of NMDAr and beta-ADr to BLA and CA1 is amnesic. IA training is followed by an increase of the phosphorylation of calcium and calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) and ERK2 in CA1 but only an increase of the phosphorylation of ERK2 in BLA. The changes are blocked by NMDAr antagonists but not beta-ADr antagonists in CA1, and they are blocked by beta-ADr but not NMDAr antagonists in BLA. In addition, the changes are accompanied by increased phosphorylation of tyrosine hydroxylase in BLA but not in CA1, suggesting that beta-AD modulation results from local catecholamine synthesis in the former but not in the latter structure. NMDAr blockers in CA1 do not alter the learning-induced neurochemical changes in BLA, and beta-ADr blockade in BLA does not hinder those in CA1. When put together with other data from the literature, the present findings suggest that CA1 and BLA play a role in consolidation, but they operate to an extent in parallel, suggesting that each is probably involved with different aspects of the task studied.

  12. UCP3 Regulates Single-Channel Activity of the Cardiac mCa1.

    PubMed

    Motloch, Lukas J; Gebing, Tina; Reda, Sara; Schwaiger, Astrid; Wolny, Martin; Hoppe, Uta C

    2016-08-01

    Mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake (mCa(2+) uptake) is thought to be mediated by the mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter (MCU). UCP2 and UCP3 belong to a superfamily of mitochondrial ion transporters. Both proteins are expressed in the inner mitochondrial membrane of the heart. Recently, UCP2 was reported to modulate the function of the cardiac MCU related channel mCa1. However, the possible role of UCP3 in modulating cardiac mCa(2+) uptake via the MCU remains inconclusive. To understand the role of UCP3, we analyzed cardiac mCa1 single-channel activity in mitoplast-attached single-channel recordings from isolated murine cardiac mitoplasts, from adult wild-type controls (WT), and from UCP3 knockout mice (UCP3(-/-)). Single-channel registrations in UCP3(-/-) confirmed a murine voltage-gated Ca(2+) channel, i.e., mCa1, which was inhibited by Ru360. Compared to WT, mCa1 in UCP3(-/-) revealed similar single-channel characteristics. However, in UCP3(-/-) the channel exhibited decreased single-channel activity, which was insensitive to adenosine triphosphate (ATP) inhibition. Our results suggest that beyond UCP2, UCP3 also exhibits regulatory effects on cardiac mCa1/MCU function. Furthermore, we speculate that UCP3 might modulate previously described inhibitory effects of ATP on mCa1/MCU activity as well.

  13. Sustained transcription of the immediate early gene Arc in the dentate gyrus after spatial exploration.

    PubMed

    Ramirez-Amaya, Victor; Angulo-Perkins, Arafat; Chawla, Monica K; Barnes, Carol A; Rosi, Susanna

    2013-01-23

    After spatial exploration in rats, Arc mRNA is expressed in ∼2% of dentate gyrus (DG) granule cells, and this proportion of Arc-positive neurons remains stable for ∼8 h. This long-term presence of Arc mRNA following behavior is not observed in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells. We report here that in rats ∼50% of granule cells with cytoplasmic Arc mRNA, induced some hours previously during exploration, also show Arc expression in the nucleus. This suggests that recent transcription can occur long after the exploration behavior that elicited it. To confirm that the delayed nuclear Arc expression was indeed recent transcription, Actinomycin D was administered immediately after exploration. This treatment resulted in inhibition of recent Arc expression both when evaluated shortly after exploratory behavior as well as after longer time intervals. Together, these data demonstrate a unique kinetic profile for Arc transcription in hippocampal granule neurons following behavior that is not observed in other cell types. Among a number of possibilities, this sustained transcription may provide a mechanism that ensures that the synaptic connection weights in the sparse population of granule cells recruited during a given behavioral event are able to be modified.

  14. Sustained transcription of the immediate early gene Arc in the dentate gyrus after spatial exploration.

    PubMed

    Ramirez-Amaya, Victor; Angulo-Perkins, Arafat; Chawla, Monica K; Barnes, Carol A; Rosi, Susanna

    2013-01-23

    After spatial exploration in rats, Arc mRNA is expressed in ∼2% of dentate gyrus (DG) granule cells, and this proportion of Arc-positive neurons remains stable for ∼8 h. This long-term presence of Arc mRNA following behavior is not observed in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells. We report here that in rats ∼50% of granule cells with cytoplasmic Arc mRNA, induced some hours previously during exploration, also show Arc expression in the nucleus. This suggests that recent transcription can occur long after the exploration behavior that elicited it. To confirm that the delayed nuclear Arc expression was indeed recent transcription, Actinomycin D was administered immediately after exploration. This treatment resulted in inhibition of recent Arc expression both when evaluated shortly after exploratory behavior as well as after longer time intervals. Together, these data demonstrate a unique kinetic profile for Arc transcription in hippocampal granule neurons following behavior that is not observed in other cell types. Among a number of possibilities, this sustained transcription may provide a mechanism that ensures that the synaptic connection weights in the sparse population of granule cells recruited during a given behavioral event are able to be modified. PMID:23345235

  15. Synthesis and photoluminescence properties of Ca3B2O6:Tb3+ nanophosphors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manhas, Mohit; Kumar, Vinay; Ntwaeaborwa, O. M.; Swart, H. C.

    2014-04-01

    The green light emitting Tb3+ doped Ca3B2O6 nanophosphors have been synthesized by combustion method at 600°C, and their luminescent properties have been studied. The formation of phosphors has been confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD). The photoluminescence (PL) spectra show four emission peaks at 491 nm, 544 nm, 587 and 621 nm. It exhibited a strong green emission located at 544 nm. The effect of different dopant concentrations on emission intensity has also been studied. The maximum photo emission intensity of the Ca3B2O6:Tb3+ was obtained at a dopant concentration of 1.5 mol% of Tb3+.

  16. Synthesis and characterization of a new ternary nitride, Ca 3VN 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vennos, Deborah A.; DiSalvo, F. J.

    1992-06-01

    We have synthesized a new ternary nitride, Ca 3VN 3, from the binary nitrides at high temperature. The refined structure was solved in the P2 1/ m space group with lattice constants a=6.717(2), b=5.064(2), c=6.720(3) Å, β=78.88(3)°, Z=2, R=3.2%, and R w=3.7%. The structure is related to the recently reported A3MN 3 compounds (D. A. Vennos, M. E. Badding, and F. J. DiSalvo, Inorg. Chem.29, 4059, 1990) with sheets of [VN 3] 6- trigonal planar units and calcium ions. Ca 3VN 3 is insulating with V 3+ in the low-spin state, S=0.

  17. Domains and ferroelectric switching pathways in Ca3Ti2O7 from first principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowadnick, Elizabeth A.; Fennie, Craig J.

    2016-09-01

    Hybrid improper ferroelectricity, where an electrical polarization can be induced via a trilinear coupling to two nonpolar structural distortions of different symmetries, recently was demonstrated experimentally in the n =2 Ruddlesden-Popper compound Ca3Ti2O7 . In this paper we use group theoretic methods and first-principles calculations to identify possible ferroelectric switching pathways in Ca3Ti2O7 . We identify low-energy paths that reverse the polarization direction by switching via an orthorhombic twin domain or via an antipolar structure. We also introduce a chemically intuitive set of local order parameters to give insight into how these paths are relevant to ferroelectric switching nucleated at domain walls. Our findings suggest that switching may proceed via more than one mechanism in this material.

  18. Optical spectroscopy and band gap analysis of hybrid improper ferroelectric Ca3Ti2O7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherian, Judy G.; Birol, Turan; Harms, Nathan C.; Gao, Bin; Cheong, Sang-Wook; Vanderbilt, David; Musfeldt, Janice L.

    2016-06-01

    We bring together optical absorption spectroscopy, photoconductivity, and first principles calculations to reveal the electronic structure of the room temperature ferroelectric Ca3Ti2O7. The 3.94 eV direct gap in Ca3Ti2O7 is charge transfer in nature and noticeably higher than that in CaTiO3 (3.4 eV), a finding that we attribute to dimensional confinement in the n = 2 member of the Ruddlesden-Popper series. While Sr substitution introduces disorder and broadens the gap edge slightly, oxygen deficiency reduces the gap to 3.7 eV and gives rise to a broad tail that persists to much lower energies.

  19. Destructive power dynamics of alpha-theta oscillations via spike and wave in CA3.

    PubMed

    Dong, Guoya; Chen, Xiaogang; Li, Wenwen; Cheng, Zhishuang; Ge, Manling

    2010-01-01

    The power dynamics of alpha-theta oscillations via inter-ictal spikes and waves (SWs) in CA3 is investigated by means of Hilbert transform and the statistical method based on CA3 channel of LFP(Local Field Potention) data sampled on total 6 rats in resting with sniffing and of iEEG data on total 10 patients in quiet wakefulness. The comparison of alpha-theta power is done between the inter-ictal groups and control groups. It is concluded that the inter-ictal SWs can disrupt the power of alpha-theta oscillations, leading to the decreased power after SW. Because the alpha-theta oscillations are related with the cognition, it is estimated that the inter-ictal SWs can negatively affecte the cognitive function during the inter-ictal dynamics, although the alpha-theta power will be recoverable in some days after injections, even exceed over the power level before injections.

  20. Bidirectional Hebbian Plasticity at Hippocampal Mossy Fiber Synapses on CA3 Interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Galván, Emilio J; Calixto, Eduardo; Barrionuevo, Germán

    2009-01-01

    Hippocampal area CA3 is critically involved in the formation of non-overlapping neuronal subpopulations (“pattern separation”) to store memory representations as distinct events. Efficient pattern separation relies on the strong and sparse excitatory input from the mossy fibers (MF) to pyramidal cells and feed-forward inhibitory interneurons. However, MF synapses on CA3 pyramidal cells undergo LTP, which, if unopposed, will degrade pattern separation as MF activation will now recruit additional CA3 pyramidal cells. Here we demonstrate MF LTP in stratum lacunosum-moleculare (L-M) interneurons induced by the same stimulation protocol that induces MF LTP in pyramidal cells. This LTP was NMDAR-independent, and occurred at MF Ca2+-impermeable (CI) AMPAR synapses. LTP was prevented by with voltage clamping the postsynaptic cell soma during HFS, intracellular injections of the Ca2+ chelator BAPTA (20 mM) or bath applications of the L-type Ca2+ channel blocker nimodipine (10 µM). We propose that MF LTP in L-M interneurons preserves the sparsity of pyramidal cell activation, thus allowing CA3 to maintain its role in pattern separation. In the presence of the mGluR1α antagonist LY367385 (100 µM) the same HFS that induces MF LTP in naïve slices triggered NMDAR-independent MF LTD. This LTD, like LTP, required activation of the L-type Ca2+ channel, and also was induced following blockade of IP3 receptors with heparin (4mg/mL) or the selective depletion of receptor-gated Ca2+ stores with ryanodine (10 or100 µM). We conclude that L-M interneurons are endowed with Ca2+ signaling cascades suitable for controlling the polarity of MF long-term plasticity induced by joint pre- and postsynaptic activities. PMID:19109487

  1. Ca3P2 and other topological semimetals with line nodes and drumhead surface states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Y.-H.; Chiu, Ching-Kai; Chou, M. Y.; Schnyder, Andreas P.

    2016-05-01

    As opposed to ordinary metals, whose Fermi surfaces are two dimensional, topological (semi)metals can exhibit protected one-dimensional Fermi lines or zero-dimensional Fermi points, which arise due to an intricate interplay between symmetry and topology of the electronic wave functions. Here, we study how reflection symmetry, time-reversal symmetry, SU(2) spin-rotation symmetry, and inversion symmetry lead to the topological protection of line nodes in three-dimensional semimetals. We obtain the crystalline invariants that guarantee the stability of the line nodes in the bulk and show that a quantized Berry phase leads to the appearance of protected surfaces states, which take the shape of a drumhead. By deriving a relation between the crystalline invariants and the Berry phase, we establish a direct connection between the stability of the line nodes and the drumhead surface states. Furthermore, we show that the dispersion minimum of the drumhead state leads to a Van Hove singularity in the surface density of states, which can serve as an experimental fingerprint of the topological surface state. As a representative example of a topological semimetal, we consider Ca3P2 , which has a line of Dirac nodes near the Fermi energy. The topological properties of Ca3P2 are discussed in terms of a low-energy effective theory and a tight-binding model, derived from ab initio DFT calculations. Our microscopic model for Ca3P2 shows that the drumhead surface states have a rather weak dispersion, which implies that correlation effects are enhanced at the surface of Ca3P2 .

  2. Terminal Field and Firing Selectivity of Cholecystokinin-Expressing Interneurons in the Hippocampal CA3 Area

    PubMed Central

    Lasztóczi, Bálint; Tukker, John J.; Somogyi, Peter; Klausberger, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Hippocampal oscillations reflect coordinated neuronal activity on many timescales. Distinct types of GABAergic interneuron participate in the coordination of pyramidal cells over different oscillatory cycle phases. In the CA3 area, which generates sharp waves and gamma oscillations, the contribution of identified GABAergic neurons remains to be defined. We have examined the firing of a family of cholecystokinin-expressing interneurons during network oscillations in urethane-anesthetized rats and compared them with firing of CA3 pyramidal cells. The position of the terminals of individual visualized interneurons was highly diverse, selective, and often spatially coaligned with either the entorhinal or the associational inputs to area CA3. The spike timing in relation to theta and gamma oscillations and sharp waves was correlated with the innervated pyramidal cell domain. Basket and dendritic-layer-innervating interneurons receive entorhinal and associational inputs and preferentially fire on the ascending theta phase, when pyramidal cell assemblies emerge. Perforant-path-associated cells, driven by recurrent collaterals of pyramidal cells fire on theta troughs, when established pyramidal cell assemblies are most active. In the CA3 area, slow and fast gamma oscillations occurred on opposite theta oscillation phases. Perforant-path-associated and some COUP-TFII-positive interneurons are strongly coupled to both fast and slow gamma oscillations, but basket and dendritic-layer-innervating cells are weakly coupled to fast gamma oscillations only. During sharp waves, different interneuron types are activated, inhibited, or remain unaffected. We suggest that specialization in pyramidal cell domain and glutamatergic input-specific operations, reflected in the position of GABAergic terminals, is the evolutionary drive underlying the diversity of cholecystokinin-expressing interneurons. PMID:22159120

  3. Phononic Structure Relationships in the Subgroup Phases of Ferroelectric Ca3Mn2O7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoko, Elvis; Al Dawood, Eman; Schwingenschlogl, Udo

    The Ruddlesden-Popper (RP) compound, Ca3Mn2O7, exhibits hybrid improper ferroelectric (FE) behavior in its A21am phase. However, a new phase (space group Acaa), co-existing with the FE phase (200-320 K) and exhibiting negative thermal expansion (NTE) was recently discovered. This discovery highlighted the complexity of the phase relationships in the subgroup structure of Ca3Mn2O7. Successful exploitation of RP compounds for FE applications depends on a clear understanding of the phononic relationships among the different relevant subgroup phases. Accordingly, we have used density functional theory (DFT) to map out the total energy landscape for the principal subgroup phases relative to the tetragonal phase. In order to elucidate the interrelationships of the soft phonon modes among the different subgroup phases, we performed lattice dynamics and quasi-harmonic approximation calculations. In addition, the latter calculations enabled us to extract mode Gruneisen parameters leading to new insights into the NTE behavior of Ca3Mn2O7. The implications of our findings are discussed in the context of the potential of RP compounds as FE materials.

  4. Palmitone prevents pentylenetetrazole-caused neuronal damage in the CA3 hippocampal region of prepubertal rats.

    PubMed

    Cano-Europa, E; González-Trujano, M E; Reyes-Ramírez, A; Hernández-García, A; Blas-Valdivia, V; Ortiz-Butrón, R

    2010-02-12

    Palmitone is a secondary metabolite of polyketide origin extracted from leaves of Annona diversifolia Saff. (Annonaceae). We found that palmitone possesses anticonvulsant properties against penicillin-, 4-AP-, and pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-caused seizure in adult animals. Some convulsants as PTZ cause neuronal damage in different brain regions such as the CA3 hippocampal region. Our objective was to evaluate if palmitone protects against PTZ-caused seizures and hippocampal neuronal damage in prepubertal rats. We used 32 prepubertal Wistar rats (30-35 days old) divided into four groups of 8 animals; group I was the control group, group II received a single PTZ dose of 50mg/kg ip, group III received a single palmitone dose of 50mg/kg ip, and group IV received a palmitone dose of 50mg/kg ip plus a PTZ dose of 50mg/kg ip. Ten days after administration, the animals were killed using pentobarbital anesthesia (35 mg/kg). The brains were removed and were embedded in paraffin. Coronal cuts of 7 microm were obtained from -2.8 to -3.3 from Bregma. Each section was stained with cresyl violet-eosin. We evaluated the number of normal and abnormal neurons in the CA3 hippocampal region in a 10,000 microm(2) section. It was observed that palmitone did not prevent the PTZ-caused seizure but palmitone prevents the PTZ-caused neuronal damage in the CA3 hippocampal region. PMID:20045039

  5. Effect of synthesis methods on the Ca3Co4O9 thermoelectric ceramic performances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotelo, A.; Rasekh, Sh.; Torres, M. A.; Bosque, P.; Madre, M. A.; Diez, J. C.

    2015-01-01

    Three different synthesis methods producing nanometric grain sizes, coprecipitation with ammonium carbonate, oxalic acid, and by attrition milling have been studied to produce Ca3Co4O9 ceramics and compared with the classical solid state route. These three processes have produced high reactive precursors and all the organic material and CaCO3·have been decomposed in a single thermal treatment. Coprecipitation leads to pure Ca3Co4O9 phase, while attrition milling and classical solid state produce small amounts of Ca3Co2O6 secondary phase. Power factor values are similar for all three samples, being slightly lower for the ones produced by attrition milling. These values are much higher than the obtained in samples prepared by the classical solid state method, used as reference. The maximum power factor values determined at 800 °C (~0.43 mW/K2 m) are slightly higher than the best reported values obtained in textured ones which also show much higher density values.

  6. Adult Neurogenesis in the Mammalian Hippocampus: Why the Dentate Gyrus?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drew, Liam J.; Fusi, Stefano; Hen, René

    2013-01-01

    In the adult mammalian brain, newly generated neurons are continuously incorporated into two networks: interneurons born in the subventricular zone migrate to the olfactory bulb, whereas the dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus integrates locally born principal neurons. That the rest of the mammalian brain loses significant neurogenic capacity…

  7. Anterior thalamic lesions reduce spine density in both hippocampal CA1 and retrosplenial cortex, but enrichment rescues CA1 spines only.

    PubMed

    Harland, Bruce C; Collings, David A; McNaughton, Neil; Abraham, Wickliffe C; Dalrymple-Alford, John C

    2014-10-01

    Injury to the anterior thalamic nuclei (ATN) may affect both hippocampus and retrosplenial cortex thus explaining some parallels between diencephalic and medial temporal lobe amnesias. We found that standard-housed rats with ATN lesions, compared with standard-housed controls, showed reduced spine density in hippocampal CA1 neurons (basal dendrites, -11.2%; apical dendrites, -9.6%) and in retrospenial granular b cortex (Rgb) neurons (apical dendrites, -20.1%) together with spatial memory deficits on cross maze and radial-arm maze tasks. Additional rats with ATN lesions were also shown to display a severe deficit on spatial working memory in the cross-maze, but subsequent enriched housing ameliorated their performance on both this task and the radial-arm maze. These enriched rats with ATN lesions also showed recovery of both basal and apical CA1 spine density to levels comparable to that of the standard-housed controls, but no recovery of Rgb spine density. Inspection of spine types in the CA1 neurons showed that ATN lesions reduced the density of thin spines and mushroom spines, but not stubby spines; while enrichment promoted recovery of thin spines. Comparison with enriched rats that received pseudo-training, which provided comparable task-related experience, but no explicit spatial memory training, suggested that basal CA1 spine density in particular was associated with spatial learning and memory performance. Distal pathology in terms of reduced integrity of hippocampal and retrosplenial microstructure provides clear support for the influence of the ATN lesions on the extended hippocampal system. The reversal by postoperative enrichment of this deficit in the hippocampus but not the retrosplenial cortex may indicate region-specific mechanisms of recovery after ATN injury.

  8. CA1 hippocampal network activity changes during sleep-dependent memory consolidation

    PubMed Central

    Ognjanovski, Nicolette; Maruyama, Daniel; Lashner, Nora; Zochowski, Michal; Aton, Sara J.

    2014-01-01

    A period of sleep over the first few hours following single-trial contextual fear conditioning (CFC) is essential for hippocampally-mediated memory consolidation. Recent studies have uncovered intracellular mechanisms required for memory formation which are affected by post-conditioning sleep and sleep deprivation. However, almost nothing is known about the circuit-level activity changes during sleep that underlie activation of these intracellular pathways. Here we continuously recorded from the CA1 region of freely-behaving mice to characterize neuronal and network activity changes occurring during active memory consolidation. C57BL/6J mice were implanted with custom stereotrode recording arrays to monitor activity of individual CA1 neurons, local field potentials (LFPs), and electromyographic activity. Sleep architecture and state-specific CA1 activity patterns were assessed during a 24 h baseline recording period, and for 24 h following either single-trial CFC or Sham conditioning. We find that consolidation of CFC is not associated with significant sleep architecture changes, but is accompanied by long-lasting increases in CA1 neuronal firing, as well as increases in delta, theta, and gamma-frequency CA1 LFP activity. These changes occurred in both sleep and wakefulness, and may drive synaptic plasticity within the hippocampus during memory formation. We also find that functional connectivity within the CA1 network, assessed through functional clustering algorithm (FCA) analysis of spike timing relationships among recorded neurons, becomes more stable during consolidation of CFC. This increase in network stability was not present following Sham conditioning, was most evident during post-CFC slow wave sleep (SWS), and was negligible during post-CFC wakefulness. Thus in the interval between encoding and recall, SWS may stabilize the hippocampal contextual fear memory (CFM) trace by promoting CA1 network stability. PMID:24860440

  9. Long-lasting spatial learning and memory impairments caused by chronic cerebral hypoperfusion associate with a dynamic change of HCN1/HCN2 expression in hippocampal CA1 region.

    PubMed

    Luo, Pan; Lu, Yun; Li, Changjun; Zhou, Mei; Chen, Cheng; Lu, Qing; Xu, Xulin; He, Zhi; Guo, Lianjun

    2015-09-01

    Chronic cerebral hypoperfusion (CCH) causes learning and memory impairments and increases the risk of Alzheimer disease (AD) and vascular dementia (VD) through several biologically plausible pathways, yet the mechanisms underlying the disease process remained unclear particularly in a temporal manner. We performed permanent bilateral occlusion of the common carotid arteries (two-vessel occlusion, 2VO) to induce CCH. To determine whether hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels are altered at different stages of cognitive impairment caused by CCH, adult male SD rats were randomly distributed into sham-operated 4, 8 and 12weeks group, 2VO 4, 8 and 12weeks group. Learning and memory performance were evaluated with Morris water maze (MWM) and long-term potentiation (LTP) was used to address the underlying synaptic mechanisms. Expression of NeuN, HCN1 and HCN2 in hippocampal CA1, DG and CA3 areas was quantified by immunohistochemistry and western blotting. Our data showed that CCH induced a remarkable spatial learning and memory deficits in rats of 2VO 4, 8, and 12weeks group although neuronal loss only occurred after 4weeks of 2VO surgery in CA1. In addition, a significant reduction of HCN1 surface expression in CA1 was observed in the group that suffered 4weeks ischemia but neither 8 nor 12weeks. However, HCN2 surface expression in CA1 increased throughout the ischemia time-scales (4, 8 and 12w). Our findings indicate spatial learning and memory deficits in the CCH model are associated with disturbed HCN1 and HCN2 surface expression in hippocampal CA1. The altered patterns of both HCN1 and HCN2 surface expression may be implicated in the early stage (4w) of spatial learning and memory impairments; and the stable and long-lasting impairments of spatial learning and memory may partially attribute to the up-regulated HCN2 surface expression.

  10. Continuous theta burst stimulation of angular gyrus reduces subjective recollection.

    PubMed

    Yazar, Yasemin; Bergström, Zara M; Simons, Jon S

    2014-01-01

    The contribution of lateral parietal regions such as the angular gyrus to human episodic memory has been the subject of much debate following widespread observations of left parietal activity in healthy volunteers during functional neuroimaging studies of memory retrieval. Patients with lateral parietal lesions are not amnesic, but recent evidence indicates that their memory abilities may not be entirely preserved. Whereas recollection appears intact when objective measures such as source accuracy are used, patients often exhibit reduced subjective confidence in their accurate recollections. When asked to recall autobiographical memories, they may produce spontaneous narratives that lack richness and specificity, but can remember specific details when prompted. Two distinct theoretical accounts have been proposed to explain these results: that the patients have a deficit in the bottom-up capturing of attention by retrieval output, or that they have an impairment in the subjective experience of recollection. The present study aimed to differentiate between these accounts using continuous theta burst stimulation (cTBS) in healthy participants to disrupt function of specific left parietal subregions, including angular gyrus. Inconsistent with predictions of the attentional theory, angular gyrus cTBS did not result in greater impairment of free recall than cued recall. Supporting predictions of the subjective recollection account, temporary disruption of angular gyrus was associated with highly accurate source recollection accuracy but a selective reduction in participants' rated source confidence. The findings are consistent with a role for angular gyrus in the integration of memory features into a conscious representation that enables the subjective experience of remembering. PMID:25333985

  11. Suggesting a possible role of CA1 histaminergic system in harmane-induced amnesia.

    PubMed

    Nasehi, Mohammad; Mashaghi, Elham; Khakpai, Fatemeh; Zarrindast, Mohammad-Reza

    2013-11-27

    A number of tremorogenic β-carboline alkaloids such as harmane are naturally present in the human food chain. They are derived from medicinal plants such as Peganum harmala that have been used as folk medicine in anticancer therapy. In the present study, effects of the histaminergic system of the dorsal hippocampus (CA1) on harmane-induced amnesia were examined. One-trial step-down was used to assess memory retention in adult male mice. The results showed that pre-training intra-CA1 administration of histamine (5μg/mouse), ranitidine (H2 receptor antagonist; at the doses of 0.25 and 0.5μg/mouse) and pyrilamine (H1 receptor antagonist; at the dose of 5μg/mouse) decreased memory formation. Pre-training intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of harmane (12mg/kg) also decreased memory formation. Moreover, pre-training intra-CA1 injection of a sub-threshold dose of histamine (2.5μg/mouse) could reverse harmane (12mg/kg, i.p.)-induced impairment of memory. On the other hand, pre-training intra-CA1 injection of sub-threshold doses of ranitidine (0.0625μg/mouse) and pyrilamine (2.5μg/mouse) increased harmane-induced impairment of memory. In conclusion, the present findings suggest the involvement of the CA1 histaminergic system in harmane-induced impairment of memory formation.

  12. Sublayer-Specific Coding Dynamics during Spatial Navigation and Learning in Hippocampal Area CA1.

    PubMed

    Danielson, Nathan B; Zaremba, Jeffrey D; Kaifosh, Patrick; Bowler, John; Ladow, Max; Losonczy, Attila

    2016-08-01

    The mammalian hippocampus is critical for spatial information processing and episodic memory. Its primary output cells, CA1 pyramidal cells (CA1 PCs), vary in genetics, morphology, connectivity, and electrophysiological properties. It is therefore possible that distinct CA1 PC subpopulations encode different features of the environment and differentially contribute to learning. To test this hypothesis, we optically monitored activity in deep and superficial CA1 PCs segregated along the radial axis of the mouse hippocampus and assessed the relationship between sublayer dynamics and learning. Superficial place maps were more stable than deep during head-fixed exploration. Deep maps, however, were preferentially stabilized during goal-oriented learning, and representation of the reward zone by deep cells predicted task performance. These findings demonstrate that superficial CA1 PCs provide a more stable map of an environment, while their counterparts in the deep sublayer provide a more flexible representation that is shaped by learning about salient features in the environment. VIDEO ABSTRACT. PMID:27397517

  13. Effect of silver doping on the surface of La5/8Ca3/8MnO3 epitaxial films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tselev, A.; Vasudevan, R. K.; Kalinin, S. V.; Baddorf, A. P.

    2014-09-01

    Thin film manganese oxides (manganites) display remarkable properties, such as colossal magnetoresistance and charge ordered phases, and became a focal point of research in the past two decades owing to potential applications ranging from oxide spintronics to resistive switching-based memories. LaxCa1-xMnO3 (LCMO), a widely studied manganite, is known to substantially improve its transport properties when doped with Ag. However, despite the abundance of studies on LCMO, the effect of silver on the surface structure is unknown. Here, through in-situ methods, scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) is performed on La5/8Ca3/8MnO3 films grown by pulsed laser deposition. Films doped by silver, as confirmed by in-situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, display large-scale reconstructions, interpreted as being of type (√10 × √10)R18.4°, while films lacking silver display a (√2 × √2)R45° reconstruction that may be associated with a surface charge-ordered state. It is posited that the possible cause of the varied reconstructions is due to a vacancy ordering on top of the existing (√2 × √2)R45° reconstruction. These studies highlight the influence of Ag on the surface structure, and therefore a route towards modifying the surface properties of manganites.

  14. Effect of silver doping on the surface of La5/8Ca3/8MnO3 epitaxial films

    SciTech Connect

    Tselev, Alexander; Vasudevan, Rama K; Kalinin, Sergei V; Baddorf, Arthur P

    2014-01-01

    Thin film manganese oxides (manganites) display remarkable properties such as colossal magnetoresistance and charge ordered phases, and became a focal point of research in the past two decades owing to potential applications ranging from oxide spintronics to resistive switching-based memories. LaxCa1-xMnO3 (LCMO), a widely studied manganite, is known to substantially improve its transport properties when doped with Ag. However, despite the abundance of studies on LCMO, the effect of silver on the surface structure is unknown. Here, through in-situ methods, scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) is performed on La5/8Ca3/8MnO3 films grown by pulsed laser deposition. Films doped by silver, as confirmed by in-situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), display large-scale reconstructions, interpreted as being of type ( 10 10)R18.4 , while films lacking silver display a ( 2 2)R45 reconstruction that may be associated with a surface charge-ordered state. It is posited that the possible cause of the varied reconstructions is due to a vacancy ordering on top of the existing ( 2 2)R45 reconstruction. These studies highlight the influence of Ag on the surface structure, and therefore a route towards modifying the surface properties of manganites.

  15. Prenatal stress induces learning deficits and is associated with a decrease in granules and CA3 cell dendritic tree size in rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Hosseini-Sharifabad, Mohammad; Hadinedoushan, Hossein

    2007-12-01

    Exposure to gestational stress impairs hippocampal-dependent learning in offspring. In spite of the known decisive role of hippocampal dendritic architecture in learning and memory, there has been no study to date that examines the effect of prenatal stress on the morphology of the hippocampal neurons. Therefore we performed a quantitative morphological analysis of the dendritic architecture of Golgi-impregnated hippocampal neurons in prenatally stressed rats. Subjects included male rat offspring (2 months old) for which the mothers had been restrained for 1 h/day during the last week of gestation. Spatial learning performance levels using Morris water maze and changes in the morphology of hippocampal dendritic trees were studied. Results indicated that the study group had lower spatial learning capabilities along with decreased length and number of dendritic segments, branching of granules and cornu ammonis (CA)3 pyramidal cells. There was no change in the dendritic morphology of CA1 pyramidal cells. These results suggest that prenatal stress in rat results in spatial learning deficits and profound alterations in the neurites of the hippocampal cells of male offspring.

  16. Membrane Potential Dynamics of CA1 Pyramidal Neurons during Hippocampal Ripples in Awake Mice.

    PubMed

    Hulse, Brad K; Moreaux, Laurent C; Lubenov, Evgueniy V; Siapas, Athanassios G

    2016-02-17

    Ripples are high-frequency oscillations associated with population bursts in area CA1 of the hippocampus that play a prominent role in theories of memory consolidation. While spiking during ripples has been extensively studied, our understanding of the subthreshold behavior of hippocampal neurons during these events remains incomplete. Here, we combine in vivo whole-cell and multisite extracellular recordings to characterize the membrane potential dynamics of identified CA1 pyramidal neurons during ripples. We find that the subthreshold depolarization during ripples is uncorrelated with the net excitatory input to CA1, while the post-ripple hyperpolarization varies proportionately. This clarifies the circuit mechanism keeping most neurons silent during ripples. On a finer timescale, the phase delay between intracellular and extracellular ripple oscillations varies systematically with membrane potential. Such smoothly varying delays are inconsistent with models of intracellular ripple generation involving perisomatic inhibition alone. Instead, they suggest that ripple-frequency excitation leading inhibition shapes intracellular ripple oscillations.

  17. Postsynaptic blockade of inhibitory postsynaptic currents by plasmin in CA1 pyramidal cells of rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Mizutani, A; Tanaka, T; Saito, H; Matsuki, N

    1997-06-27

    We have shown previously that plasmin facilitated the generation of long-term potentiation (LTP) in CA1 and dentate region of rat hippocampus. In the present study, we investigated the effects of plasmin on postsynaptic currents in CA1 pyramidal neurons of rat hippocampal slices. Plasmin (100 nM) had no effect on NMDA nor on non-NMDA receptor-mediated excitatory postsynaptic currents. However, plasmin significantly decreased GABA(A) receptor-mediated inhibitory postsynaptic currents. This effect of plasmin disappeared when intracellular Ca2+ was strongly chelated with BAPTA. Furthermore, plasmin attenuated the GABA-induced currents in CA1 pyramidal cells. These results suggest that the STP-enhancing effect of plasmin is due to a blockade of postsynaptic GABA(A) responses and that an increase in intracellular Ca2+ by plasmin may be involved in its mechanism.

  18. Thermoelectric properties of Zintl compound Ca1-xNaxMg2Bi1.98

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuai, Jing; Kim, Hee Seok; Liu, Zihang; He, Ran; Sui, Jiehe; Ren, Zhifeng

    2016-05-01

    Motivated by good thermoelectric performance of Bi-based Zintl compounds Ca1-xYbxMg2Biy, we further studied the thermoelectric properties of Zintl compound CaMg2Bi1.98 by doping Na into Ca as Ca1-xNaxMg2Bi1.98 via mechanical alloying and hot pressing. We found that the electrical conductivity, Seebeck coefficient, power factor, and carrier concentration can be effectively adjusted by tuning the Na concentration. Transport measurement and calculations revealed that an optimal doping of 0.5 at. % Na achieved better average ZT and efficiency. The enhancement in thermoelectric performance is attributed to the increased carrier concentration and power factor. The low cost and nontoxicity of Ca1-xNaxMg2Bi1.98 makes it a potentially promising thermoelectric material for power generation in the mid-temperature range.

  19. The effect of CA1 dopaminergic system in harmaline-induced amnesia.

    PubMed

    Nasehi, M; Ketabchi, M; Khakpai, F; Zarrindast, M-R

    2015-01-29

    In the present study, the effects of bilateral injections of dopaminergic drugs into the hippocampal CA1 regions (intra-CA1) on harmaline-induced amnesia were examined in male mice. A one-trial step-down passive avoidance task was used for the assessment of memory retention in adult male mice. Pre-training intra-peritoneal (i.p.) administration of harmaline (1 mg/kg) induced impairment of memory retention. Moreover, intra-CA1 administration of dopamine D1 receptor antagonist, SCH23390 (0.02 μg/mouse), dopamine D1 receptor agonist, SKF38393 (0.5 μg/mouse), dopamine D2 receptor antagonist, sulpiride (1 μg/mouse) and dopamine D2 receptor agonist, quinpirole (0.25 and 0.5 μg/mouse) suppressed the learning of a single-trial passive avoidance task. Also, pre-training intra-CA1 injection of subthreshold doses of SCH23390 (0.001 μg/mouse) or sulpiride (0.25 μg/mouse) with the administration of harmaline (1 mg/kg, i.p.) reversed impairment of memory formation. However, pre-training intra-CA1 injection of SKF38393 (0.1 μg/mouse) or quinpirole (0.1 μg/mouse) increased pre-training harmaline (0.25 and 0.5 mg/kg, i.p.)-induced retrieval impairment. Moreover, SKF Ca blocker (SKF) (0.01 μg/mouse) decrease the amnesia induced by harmaline (1 mg/kg), while co-administration of SKF (0.01 μg/mouse)/sulpiride (0.25 μg/mouse) or SCH23390 (0.001 μg/mouse)/sulpiride (0.25 μg/mouse) potentiate amnesia caused by harmaline. These findings implicate the involvement of CA1 dopaminergic mechanism in harmaline-induced impairment of memory acquisition.

  20. The effect of CA1 dopaminergic system in harmaline-induced amnesia.

    PubMed

    Nasehi, M; Ketabchi, M; Khakpai, F; Zarrindast, M-R

    2015-01-29

    In the present study, the effects of bilateral injections of dopaminergic drugs into the hippocampal CA1 regions (intra-CA1) on harmaline-induced amnesia were examined in male mice. A one-trial step-down passive avoidance task was used for the assessment of memory retention in adult male mice. Pre-training intra-peritoneal (i.p.) administration of harmaline (1 mg/kg) induced impairment of memory retention. Moreover, intra-CA1 administration of dopamine D1 receptor antagonist, SCH23390 (0.02 μg/mouse), dopamine D1 receptor agonist, SKF38393 (0.5 μg/mouse), dopamine D2 receptor antagonist, sulpiride (1 μg/mouse) and dopamine D2 receptor agonist, quinpirole (0.25 and 0.5 μg/mouse) suppressed the learning of a single-trial passive avoidance task. Also, pre-training intra-CA1 injection of subthreshold doses of SCH23390 (0.001 μg/mouse) or sulpiride (0.25 μg/mouse) with the administration of harmaline (1 mg/kg, i.p.) reversed impairment of memory formation. However, pre-training intra-CA1 injection of SKF38393 (0.1 μg/mouse) or quinpirole (0.1 μg/mouse) increased pre-training harmaline (0.25 and 0.5 mg/kg, i.p.)-induced retrieval impairment. Moreover, SKF Ca blocker (SKF) (0.01 μg/mouse) decrease the amnesia induced by harmaline (1 mg/kg), while co-administration of SKF (0.01 μg/mouse)/sulpiride (0.25 μg/mouse) or SCH23390 (0.001 μg/mouse)/sulpiride (0.25 μg/mouse) potentiate amnesia caused by harmaline. These findings implicate the involvement of CA1 dopaminergic mechanism in harmaline-induced impairment of memory acquisition. PMID:25446354

  1. Mossy fiber-evoked subthreshold responses induce timing-dependent plasticity at hippocampal CA3 recurrent synapses

    PubMed Central

    Brandalise, Federico; Gerber, Urs

    2014-01-01

    Dentate granule cells exhibit exceptionally low levels of activity and rarely elicit action potentials in targeted CA3 pyramidal cells. It is thus unclear how such weak input from the granule cells sustains adequate levels of synaptic plasticity in the targeted CA3 network. We report that subthreshold potentials evoked by mossy fibers are sufficient to induce synaptic plasticity between CA3 pyramidal cells, thereby complementing the sparse action potential discharge. Repetitive pairing of a CA3CA3 recurrent synaptic response with a subsequent subthreshold mossy fiber response induced long-term potentiation at CA3 recurrent synapses in rat hippocampus in vitro. Reversing the timing of the inputs induced long-term depression. The underlying mechanism depends on a passively conducted giant excitatory postsynaptic potential evoked by a mossy fiber that enhances NMDA receptor-mediated current at active CA3 recurrent synapses by relieving magnesium block. The resulting NMDA spike generates a supralinear depolarization that contributes to synaptic plasticity in hippocampal neuronal ensembles implicated in memory. PMID:24550458

  2. Novel nootropic dipeptide Noopept increases inhibitory synaptic transmission in CA1 pyramidal cells.

    PubMed

    Kondratenko, Rodion V; Derevyagin, Vladimir I; Skrebitsky, Vladimir G

    2010-05-31

    Effects of newly synthesized nootropic and anxiolytic dipeptide Noopept on inhibitory synaptic transmission in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells were investigated using patch-clamp technique in whole-cell configuration. Bath application of Noopept (1 microM) significantly increased the frequency of spike-dependant spontaneous IPSCs whereas spike-independent mIPSCs remained unchanged. It was suggested that Noopept mediates its effect due to the activation of inhibitory interneurons terminating on CA1 pyramidal cells. Results of current clamp recording of inhibitory interneurons residing in stratum radiatum confirmed this suggestion. PMID:20382202

  3. Synthesis and spectroscopic characterization of Yb3+ in Ca1-XYbXF2+X crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, M.; Goutaudier, C.; Guyot, Y.; Lebbou, K.; Fukuda, T.; Boulon, G.

    2004-11-01

    Ca1-XYbXF2+X crystals were grown by two different methods: simple melting under CF{4} atmosphere and laser heated pedestal growth (LHPG) method under Ar atmosphere. Spectroscopic characterization has been carried out to separate different crystallographic site in Ca1-XYbXF2+X crystals and to identify Stark's levels of Yb3+ transitions. Experimental decay time dependence of Yb3+ concentration was analyzed by using concentration gradient fiber in order to understand concentration quenching mechanisms. Energy transfer to unexpected rare earth impurities observed by up-conversion emission spectra in visible region under IR Yb3+ ion pumping seems to be an efficient process.

  4. Optical and magnetic properties of Ca3CoMnO6 thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Jitendra; Sharma, Gyaneshwar; Patnaik, Satyabrata; S Patnaik Team

    2015-03-01

    Ca3CoMnO6 is one of the initial one-dimensional Ising chain compounds that has shown large magnetoelectric coupling below its antiferromagnetic temperature (15 K). We report on the growth and characterization of Ca3CoMnO6 thin films deposited by pulse laser deposition. The films of thickness 220 nm are grown on 0001-oriented sapphire substrates at 750 °C. The band gap (~ 1.73eV) derived from UV visible absorption spectroscopy and temperature dependent resistivity is consistent with one another. It is seen that the films can be grown at various oxygen pressures but the optimal deposition pressure is found to be 5x10-2 mbar. The effect of oxygen pressure on the texture of the film and band gap indicates that the oxygen vacancies play a major role in the optical and electrical properties of the films. AFM measurements show a homogeneous growth of the films. Magnetization measurement shows that the transition temperature increased to 39 K, much above the bulk Neel temperature. The increase in magnetic transition is supposed to be due to stronger inter-chain interaction caused by tensile strain effected by lattice mismatch. CSIR and UGC Govt. of India are acknowledged for financial support.

  5. Active summation of excitatory postsynaptic potentials in hippocampal CA3 pyramidal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Urban, Nathaniel N.; Barrionuevo, German

    1998-01-01

    The manner in which the thousands of synaptic inputs received by a pyramidal neuron are summed is critical both to our understanding of the computations that may be performed by single neurons and of the codes used by neurons to transmit information. Recent work on pyramidal cell dendrites has shown that subthreshold synaptic inputs are modulated by voltage-dependent channels, raising the possibility that summation of synaptic responses is influenced by the active properties of dendrites. Here, we use somatic and dendritic whole-cell recordings to show that pyramidal cells in hippocampal area CA3 sum distal and proximal excitatory postsynaptic potentials sublinearly and actively, that the degree of nonlinearity depends on the magnitude and timing of the excitatory postsynaptic potentials, and that blockade of transient potassium channels linearizes summation. Nonlinear summation of synaptic inputs could have important implications for the computations performed by single neurons and also for the role of the mossy fiber and perforant path inputs to hippocampal area CA3. PMID:9736757

  6. Dopamine D3 Receptors Inhibit Hippocampal Gamma Oscillations by Disturbing CA3 Pyramidal Cell Firing Synchrony

    PubMed Central

    Lemercier, Clément E.; Schulz, Steffen B.; Heidmann, Karin E.; Kovács, Richard; Gerevich, Zoltan

    2016-01-01

    Cortical gamma oscillations are associated with cognitive processes and are altered in several neuropsychiatric conditions such as schizophrenia and Alzheimer’s disease. Since dopamine D3 receptors are possible targets in treatment of these conditions, it is of great importance to understand their role in modulation of gamma oscillations. The effect of D3 receptors on gamma oscillations and the underlying cellular mechanisms were investigated by extracellular local field potential and simultaneous intracellular sharp micro-electrode recordings in the CA3 region of the hippocampus in vitro. D3 receptors decreased the power and broadened the bandwidth of gamma oscillations induced by acetylcholine or kainate. Blockade of the D3 receptors resulted in faster synchronization of the oscillations, suggesting that endogenous dopamine in the hippocampus slows down the dynamics of gamma oscillations by activation of D3 receptors. Investigating the underlying cellular mechanisms for these effects showed that D3 receptor activation decreased the rate of action potentials (APs) during gamma oscillations and reduced the precision of the AP phase coupling to the gamma cycle in CA3 pyramidal cells. The results may offer an explanation how selective activation of D3 receptors may impair cognition and how, in converse, D3 antagonists may exert pro-cognitive and antipsychotic effects. PMID:26779018

  7. Neuronal dynamics during the learning of trace conditioning in a CA3 model of hippocampal function.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Blake T; Levy, William B

    2014-04-01

    The present article develops quantitative behavioral and neurophysiological predictions for rabbits trained on an air-puff version of the trace-interval classical conditioning paradigm. Using a minimal hippocampal model, consisting of 8,000 primary cells sparsely and randomly interconnected as a model of hippocampal region CA-3, the simulations identify conditions which produce a clear split in the number of trials individual animals should need to learn a criterion response. A trace interval that is difficult to learn, but still learnable by half the experimental population, produces a bimodal population of learners: an early learner group and a late learner group. The model predicts that late learners are characterized by two kinds of CA-3 neuronal activity fluctuations that are not seen in the early learners. As is typical in our minimal hippocampal models, the off-rate constant of the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor receptor gives a timescale to the model that leads to a temporally quantifiable behavior, the learnable trace interval.

  8. Liquid immiscibility in a CTGS (Ca3TaGa3Si2O14) melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nozawa, Jun; Zhao, Hengyu; Koyama, Chihiro; Maeda, Kensaku; Fujiwara, Kozo; Koizumi, Haruhiko; Uda, Satoshi

    2016-11-01

    Although many studies have indicated that Ca3TaGa3Si2O14 (CTGS) grows congruently from a stoichiometric melt when using the Czochralski (Cz) technique, the occurrence of a secondary phase during growth when using the micro-pulling down (μ-PD) technique has been reported. We have examined the detailed growth mechanism of μ-PD grown CTGS as well as its congruency. Differential thermal analysis (DTA) at an elevated temperature up to 1650 °C shows no peaks associated with the presence of a secondary phase, whereas a secondary phase related peak was detected at an elevated temperature up to 1490 °C with the same heating rate. Back-scattered electron images (BEIs) revealed the occurrence of Ca3Ta2Ga4O14 (CTG) as a secondary phase. The secondary phase appears at the very early stage of growth, which is not possible to explain by a eutectic reaction. The experimental results suggest that liquid immiscibility was present in the melt at around 1490 °C during the growth of s-CTGS. Liquid immiscibility produces Si-rich and Si-poor melts, from which different phases with different compositions are solidified. The μ-PD technique poses a more static environment in the melt than that of Cz technique due to low melt convection and the lack of stirring, which enables liquid immiscibility to emerge.

  9. Thermoelectric transport in the layered Ca3Co4-xRhxO9 single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, Yusuke; Saito, Kengo; Okazaki, Ryuji

    2016-06-01

    We have examined an isovalent Rh substitution effect on the transport properties of the thermoelectric oxide Ca3Co4O9 using single-crystalline form. With increasing Rh content x, both the electrical resistivity and the Seebeck coefficient change systematically up to x = 0.6 for Ca3Co4-xRhxO9 samples. In the Fermi-liquid regime where the resistivity behaves as ρ = ρ 0 + A T 2 around 120 K, the A value decreases with increasing Rh content, indicating that the correlation effect is weakened by Rh 4d electrons with extended orbitals. We find that, in contrast to such a weak correlation effect observed in the resistivity of Rh-substituted samples, the low-temperature Seebeck coefficient is increased with increasing Rh content, which is explained with a possible enhancement of a pseudogap associated with the short-range order of spin density wave. In high-temperature range above room temperature, we show that the resistivity is largely suppressed by Rh substitution while the Seebeck coefficient becomes almost temperature-independent, leading to a significant improvement of the power factor in Rh-substituted samples. This result is also discussed in terms of the differences in the orbital size and the associated spin state between Co 3d and Rh 4d electrons.

  10. Loss of Hippocampal CA3 Pyramidal Neurons in Mice Lacking STAM1

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Mitsuhiro; Takeshita, Toshikazu; Miura, Shigeto; Murata, Kazuko; Kimura, Yutaka; Ishii, Naoto; Nose, Masato; Sakagami, Hiroyuki; Kondo, Hisatake; Tashiro, Fumi; Miyazaki, Jun-Ichi; Sasaki, Hidetada; Sugamura, Kazuo

    2001-01-01

    STAM1, a member of the STAM (signal transducing adapter molecule) family, has a unique structure containing a Src homology 3 domain and ITAM (immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif). STAM1 was previously shown to be associated with the Jak2 and Jak3 tyrosine kinases and to be involved in the regulation of intracellular signal transduction mediated by interleukin-2 (IL-2) and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in vitro. Here we generated mice lacking STAM1 by using homologous recombination with embryonic stem cells. STAM1−/− mice were morphologically indistinguishable from their littermates at birth. However, growth retardation in the third week after birth was observed for the STAM1−/− mice. Unexpectedly, despite the absence of STAM1, hematopoietic cells, including T- and B-lymphocyte and other hematopoietic cell populations, developed normally and responded well to several cytokines, including IL-2 and GM-CSF. However, histological analyses revealed the disappearance of hippocampal CA3 pyramidal neurons in STAM1−/− mice. Furthermore, we observed that primary hippocampal neurons derived from STAM1−/− mice are vulnerable to cell death induced by excitotoxic amino acids or an NO donor. These data suggest that STAM1 is dispensable for cytokine-mediated signaling in lymphocytes but may be involved in the survival of hippocampal CA3 pyramidal neurons. PMID:11340172

  11. Effect of chronic stress on synaptic currents in rat hippocampal dentate gyrus neurons.

    PubMed

    Karst, Henk; Joëls, Marian

    2003-01-01

    We investigated the effect of chronic stress on synaptic responses of rat dentate granule cells to perforant path stimulation. Rats were subjected for 3 wk to unpredictable stressors twice daily or to control handling. One day after the last stressor, hippocampal slices were prepared and synaptic responses were determined with whole-cell recording. At that time, adrenal weight was found to be increased and thymus weight as well as gain in body weight were decreased in the stressed versus control animals, indicative of corticosterone hypersecretion during the stress period. In slices from rats with basal corticosteroid levels (at the circadian trough, under rest), no effect of prior stress exposure was observed on synaptic responses. However, synaptic responses of dentate granule cells from chronically stressed and control rats were differently affected by in vitro activation of glucocorticoid receptors, i.e., 1-4 h after administration of 100 nM corticosterone for 20 min. Thus the maximal response to synaptic activation of dentate cells at holding potential of -70 mV [when N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors are blocked by magnesium] was significantly enhanced after corticosterone administration in chronically stressed but not in control animals. In accordance, the amplitude of alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisolazole-4-propionic acid (AMPA) but not of NMDA receptor-mediated currents was increased by corticosterone in stressed rats, over the entire voltage range. Corticosterone treatment also decreased the time to peak of AMPA currents, but this effect did not depend on prior stress exposure. The data indicate that following chronic stress exposure synaptic excitation of dentate granule cells may be enhanced when corticosterone levels rise. This enhanced synaptic flow could contribute to enhanced excitation of projection areas of the dentate gyrus, most notably the CA3 hippocampal region.

  12. Selectivity for the human body in the fusiform gyrus.

    PubMed

    Peelen, Marius V; Downing, Paul E

    2005-01-01

    Functional neuroimaging studies have revealed human brain regions, notably in the fusiform gyrus, that respond selectively to images of faces as opposed to other kinds of objects. Here we use fMRI to show that the mid-fusiform gyrus responds with nearly the same level of selectivity to images of human bodies without faces, relative to tools and scenes. In a group-average analysis (n = 22), the fusiform activations identified by contrasting faces versus tools and bodies versus tools are very similar. Analyses of within-subjects regions of interest, however, show that the peaks of the two activations occupy close but distinct locations. In a second experiment, we find that the body-selective fusiform region, but not the face-selective region, responds more to stick figure depictions of bodies than to scrambled controls. This result further distinguishes the two foci and confirms that the body-selective response generalizes to abstract image formats. These results challenge accounts of the mid-fusiform gyrus that focus solely on faces and suggest that this region contains multiple distinct category-selective neural representations.

  13. Amygdala kindling alters protein kinase C activity in dentate gyrus.

    PubMed

    Chen, S J; Desai, M A; Klann, E; Winder, D G; Sweatt, J D; Conn, P J

    1992-11-01

    Kindling is a use-dependent form of synaptic plasticity and a widely used model of epilepsy. Although kindling has been widely studied, the molecular mechanisms underlying induction of this phenomenon are not well understood. We determined the effect of amygdala kindling on protein kinase C (PKC) activity in various regions of rat brain. Kindling stimulation markedly elevated basal (Ca(2+)-independent) and Ca(2+)-stimulated phosphorylation of an endogenous PKC substrate (which we have termed P17) in homogenates of dentate gyrus, assayed 2 h after kindling stimulation. The increase in P17 phosphorylation appeared to be due at least in part to persistent PKC activation, as basal PKC activity assayed in vitro using an exogenous peptide substrate was increased in kindled dentate gyrus 2 h after the last kindling stimulation. A similar increase in basal PKC activity was observed in dentate gyrus 2 h after the first kindling stimulation. These results document a kindling-associated persistent PKC activation and suggest that the increased activity of PKC could play a role in the induction of the kindling effect.

  14. Conditional ablation of the neural cell adhesion molecule reduces precision of spatial learning, long-term potentiation, and depression in the CA1 subfield of mouse hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Bukalo, Olena; Fentrop, Nikolas; Lee, Alan Y W; Salmen, Benedikt; Law, Janice W S; Wotjak, Carsten T; Schweizer, Michaela; Dityatev, Alexander; Schachner, Melitta

    2004-02-18

    NCAM, a neural cell adhesion molecule of the immunoglobulin superfamily, is involved in neuronal migration and differentiation, axon outgrowth and fasciculation, and synaptic plasticity. To dissociate the functional roles of NCAM in the adult brain from developmental abnormalities, we generated a mutant in which the NCAM gene is inactivated by cre-recombinase under the control of the calcium-calmodulin-dependent kinase II promoter, resulting in reduction of NCAM expression predominantly in the hippocampus. This mutant (NCAMff+) did not show the overt morphological and behavioral abnormalities previously observed in constitutive NCAM-deficient (NCAM-/-) mice. However, similar to the NCAM-/- mouse, a reduction in long-term potentiation (LTP) in the CA1 region of the hippocampus was revealed. Long-term depression was also abolished in NCAMff+ mice. The deficit in LTP could be rescued by elevation of extracellular Ca2+ concentrations from 1.5 or 2.0 to 2.5 mm, suggesting an involvement of NCAM in regulation of Ca2+-dependent signaling during LTP. Contrary to the NCAM-/- mouse, LTP in the CA3 region was normal, consistent with normal mossy fiber lamination in NCAMff+ as opposed to abnormal lamination in NCAM-/- mice. NCAMff+ mutants did not show general deficits in short- and long-term memory in global landmark navigation in the water maze but were delayed in the acquisition of precise spatial orientation, a deficit that could be overcome by training. Thus, mice conditionally deficient in hippocampal NCAM expression in the adult share certain abnormalities characteristic of NCAM-/- mice, highlighting the role of NCAM in the regulation of synaptic plasticity in the CA1 region.

  15. Paranoid schizophrenia may be caused by dopamine hyperactivity of CA1 hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Krieckhaus, E E; Donahoe, J W; Morgan, M A

    1992-03-15

    Explicit consolidation of memory, or fixation of declarative belief, appears to be physically represented in changes of synaptic conductances of neurons in the parietal-temporal-occipital association cortex (PTO) of the mammalian forebrain. This fixation of belief in PTO is postulated to be critically dependent on a diffuse reinforcement signal via the inferior temporal cortex (ITC) ultimately caused by an increased output of the CA1 pyramidal cells of hippocampus. Analogous to the reinforcing mechanisms of other forebrain systems, this updating of the connection weights of the neural nets in PTO by the output of the critical neurons in CA1 is directly related to concentrations of dopamine (DA). We propose that the delusions (i.e., unreasonable beliefs) of paranoid schizophrenia are caused by a hyperactivity of the same DA-sensitive CA1 neurons that are responsible for the fixation of normal beliefs. The dramatic reduction in delusions with administration of neuroleptics, as DA D2 blockers, in schizophrenics may thus be explained by their acting to ameliorate the hyperactivity of these CA1 DA D2 receptors.

  16. The effects of CA1 5HT4 receptors in MK801-induced amnesia and hyperlocomotion.

    PubMed

    Nasehi, Mohammad; Tabatabaie, Maryam; Khakpai, Fatemeh; Zarrindast, Mohammad-Reza

    2015-02-01

    In this study, the effects of 5-HT4 receptors of the CA1 on MK801-induced amnesia and hyperlocomotion were examined. One-trial step-down method was used to assess memory retention and then, the hole-board method to assess exploratory behaviors. The results showed that post-training intra-CA1 administration of RS67333 (62.5 and 625 ng/mouse) and RS23597 (1 and 10 ng/mouse) decreased memory consolidation, but it did not alter head-dip counts, head-dip latency and locomotor activity. Similarly, MK801 (0.5 and 1 μg/mouse) decreased memory consolidation, but had no effect on head-dip counts and head-dip latency. Interestingly, it increased locomotor activity. The results also showed that post-training intra-CA1 injection of a sub-threshold dose of RS67333 (6.25 ng/mouse) or RS23597 (0.1 ng/mouse) could heighten MK801 induced amnesia and decrease locomotor activity, but it did not alter head-dip counts and head-dip latency. In conclusion, our findings suggest that the CA1 5-HT4 receptors are involved in MK801-induced amnesia and hyperlocomotion.

  17. Circadian rhythm modulates long-term potentiation induced at CA1 in rat hippocampal slices.

    PubMed

    Nakatsuka, Hiroki; Natsume, Kiyohisa

    2014-03-01

    Circadian rhythm affects neuronal plasticity. Consistent with this, some forms of synaptic long-term potentiation (LTP) are modulated by the light/dark cycle (LD cycle). For example, this type of modulation is observed in hippocampal slices. In rodents, which are nocturnal, LTP is usually facilitated in the dark phase, but the rat hippocampal CA1 is an exception. The reason why LTP in the dark phase is suppressed in CA1 remains unknown. Previously, LTP was induced with high-frequency stimulation. In this study, we found that in the dark phase, theta-burst stimulation-induced LTP is indeed facilitated in CA1, similar to other regions in the rodent brain. Population excitatory postsynaptic potentials (pEPSP)-LTP and population spikes (PS)-LTP were recorded at CA1. The magnitude of PS-LTP in dark-phase slices was significantly larger than in light-phase slices, while that of pEPSP-LTP was unchanged. Using antidromic-orthodromic stimulation, we found that recurrent inhibition is suppressed in the dark phase. Local gabazine-application to stratum pyramidale in light-phase slices mimicked this disinhibition and facilitated LTP in dark-phase slices. These results suggest that the disinhibition of a GABAA recurrent inhibitory network can be induced in the dark phase, thereby facilitating LTP.

  18. Beyond the CA1 subfield: Local hippocampal shape changes in MRI-negative temporal lobe epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Maccotta, Luigi; Moseley, Emily D.; Benzinger, Tammie L.; Hogan, R. Edward

    2015-01-01

    Summary Objective Hippocampal atrophy in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) can indicate mesial temporal sclerosis and predict surgical success. Yet many TLE patients do not have significant atrophy (MRI-negative), presenting a diagnostic challenge. We used a new variant of high-dimensional large deformation mapping to assess whether patients with apparently normal hippocampi have local shape changes that mirror those of patients with significant hippocampal atrophy. Methods Forty-seven unilateral TLE patients and thirty-two controls underwent structural brain MRI. High-dimensional large deformation mapping provided hippocampal surface and volume estimates for each participant, dividing patients into low vs. high hippocampal atrophy groups. A vertex-level generalized linear model compared local shape changes between groups. Results Low atrophy TLE patients (MRI-negative) had significant local hippocampal shape changes compared to controls, similar to those in the contralateral hippocampus of high atrophy patients. These changes primarily involved the subicular and hilar/dentate regions, instead of the classically affected CA1 region. Disease duration instead covaried with lateral hippocampal atrophy, colocalizing with the CA1 subfield. Significance These findings show that “MRI-negative” TLE patients have regions of hippocampal atrophy that cluster medially, sparing the lateral regions (CA1) involved in high atrophy patients, suggesting an overall effect of temporal lobe seizures manifesting as bilateral medial hippocampal atrophy, and a more selective effect of hippocampal seizures leading to disease-proportional CA1 atrophy, potentially reflecting epileptogenesis. PMID:25809286

  19. Disappearance of Ising nature in Ca3ZnMnO6 studied by high-field ESR.

    PubMed

    Ruan, M Y; Ouyang, Z W; Guo, Y M; Cheng, J J; Sun, Y C; Xia, Z C; Rao, G H; Okubo, S; Ohta, H

    2014-06-11

    High-field electron spin resonance measurements of an antiferromagnet Ca3ZnMnO6 isostructure, with the Ising-chain multiferroic Ca3CoMnO6, have been carried out. Two distinct resonance modes were observed below TN = 25 K, which is well explained by conventional antiferromagnetic resonance theory with easy-plane anisotropy. The zero-field spin gap is derived to be about 166 GHz, originating from the easy-plane anisotropy and exchange interaction. Our result suggests that the Dzyaloshinsky-Moriya interaction, which may induce spin canting, is absent. Disappearance of Ising anisotropy in Ca3ZnMnO6 suggests that the Co(4+) ion, as well as the Co-Mn superexchange, plays an important role for the Ising nature in Ca3CoMnO6. PMID:24828049

  20. Energy transfer processes in Ca3Tb2-xEuxSi3O12 (x = 0-2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrasco, I.; Bartosiewicz, K.; Nikl, M.; Piccinelli, F.; Bettinelli, M.

    2015-10-01

    The luminescent properties of Tb3+ and Eu3+ have been studied in several silicates having a silico-carnotite-type structure. Fast energy migration among Tb3+ ions has been found in Ca3Tb2Si3O12 and Ca3Tb2-xEuxSi3O12 (x = 0-0.1). In the case of Ca3Tb2-xEuxSi3O12, Tb3+-Eu3+ energy transfer is observed upon excitation in the UV bands of Tb3+. The transfer gives rise to strong emission from Eu3+ in the red spectral region at 612 nm. The efficiency of the transfer at room temperature in Ca3Tb1.9Eu0.1Si3O12 has been evaluated. The temperature evolution of the luminescent properties of Ca3Tb2Si3O12 and Ca3Tb1.9Eu0.1Si3O12 has been studied at temperatures ranging from 8 to 330 K.

  1. Anisotropic laser properties of Yb:Ca3La2(BO3)4 disordered crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lisha; Xu, Honghao; Pan, Zhongben; Han, Wenjuan; Chen, Xiaowen; Liu, Junhai; Yu, Haohai; Zhang, Huaijin

    2016-08-01

    A study is carried out experimentally on the anisotropy in the laser action of Yb:Ca3La2(BO3)4 disordered crystal, demonstrated with the output coupling changed over a wide range from 0.5% to 40%. Complex polarization state variation with output coupling and evolution with pump power are observed in the laser operation achieved with a- and c-cut crystal samples. A maximum output power of 8.2 W is produced at wavelengths around 1043 nm, with an incident pump power of 24.9 W, the optical-to-optical efficiency being 33%. The polarized absorption and emission cross section spectra are also presented.

  2. Vortex fluctuation in HgBa 2Ca 3Cu 4O 10+δ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Mun-Seog; Kim, Wan-Seon; Lee, Sung-Ik; Yu, Seong-Cho; Itskevich, E. S.; Kuzemskaya, I.

    1997-08-01

    Reversible magnetization with the external magnetic fields of 1 T ≤ H ≤ 5 T parallel to the c-axis has been measured for the grain aligned HgBa2Ca3Cu4O10+δ. A strong vortex fluctuation effect was clearly observed and the magnetization is well described by the vortex fluctuation model. From this analysis, the penetration depth λab(0) = 1583 Å and the effective interlayer spacing s = 44.6 Å were estimated. However, the value of s is significantly larger than the lattice parameter c = 19 Å, which is different from the prediction of the vortex fluctuation model. From the model on superconducting fluctuations proposed by Koshelev, in which not only the critical fluctuations at the lowest Landau level but also the Gaussian fluctuations at higher Landau levels were considered, the different value of s = 15.4 Å was obtained.

  3. Spin-state crossover in multiferroic Ca3Co2-xMnxO6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flint, R.; Yi, H.-T.; Chandra, P.; Cheong, S.-W.; Kiryukhin, V.

    2010-03-01

    Ca3Co2-xMnxO6 (x˜0.96) is a multiferroic with spin-chains of alternating Co2+ and Mn4+ ions. The spin state of Co2+ remains unresolved due to a discrepancy between high-temperature x-ray absorption (S=(3)/(2)) and low-temperature neutron (S=(1)/(2)) measurements. Using a combination of magnetic modeling and crystal-field analysis, we show that the existing low temperature data cannot be reconciled within a high spin scenario by invoking spin-orbit or Jahn-Teller distortions. To unify the experimental results, we propose a spin-state crossover with specific experimental predictions.

  4. A vibrational spectroscopic study of the borate mineral takedaite Ca3(BO3)2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, Ray L.; López, Andrés; Xi, Yunfei; Graça, Leonardo M.; Scholz, Ricardo

    2014-11-01

    We have studied the mineral takedaite Ca3(BO3)2, a borate mineral of calcium using SEM with EDX and vibrational spectroscopy. Chemical analysis shows a homogeneous phase, composed of Ca. Boron was not detected. A very intense Raman band at 1087 cm-1 is assigned to the BO stretching vibration of BO3 units. Additional Raman bands may be due to isotopic splitting. In the infrared spectrum, bands at 1218 cm-1 and at 1163, 1262 and 1295 cm-1 are assigned to the trigonal borate stretching modes. Raman bands at 712 and 715 cm-1 are assigned to the in-plane bending modes of the BO3 units. Vibrational spectroscopy enables aspects of the molecular structure of takedaite to be assessed.

  5. Acute Seizures in Old Age Leads to a Greater Loss of CA1 Pyramidal Neurons, an Increased Propensity for Developing Chronic TLE and a Severe Cognitive Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Hattiangady, Bharathi; Kuruba, Ramkumar; Shetty, Ashok K

    2011-02-01

    The aged population displays an enhanced risk for developing acute seizure (AS) activity. However, it is unclear whether AS activity in old age would result in a greater magnitude of hippocampal neurodegeneration and inflammation, and an increased predilection for developing chronic temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and cognitive dysfunction. Therefore, we addressed these issues in young-adult (5-months old) and aged (22-months old) F344 rats after three-hours of AS activity, induced through graded intraperitoneal injections of kainic acid (KA), and terminated through a diazepam injection. During the three-hours of AS activity, both young adult and aged groups exhibited similar numbers of stage-V motor seizures but the numbers of stage-IV motor seizures were greater in the aged group. In both age groups, three-hour AS activity induced degeneration of 50-55% of neurons in the dentate hilus, 22-32% of neurons in the granule cell layer and 49-52% neurons in the CA3 pyramidal cell layer without showing any interaction between the age and AS activity. However, degeneration of neurons in the CA1 pyramidal cell layer showed a clear interaction between the age and AS activity (12% in the young adult group and 56% in the aged group), suggesting that an advanced age makes the CA1 pyramidal neurons more susceptible to die with AS activity. The extent of inflammation measured through the numbers of activated microglial cells was similar between the two age groups. Interestingly, the predisposition for developing chronic TLE at 2-3 months after AS activity was 60% for young adult rats but 100% for aged rats. Moreover, both frequency & intensity of spontaneous recurrent seizures in the chronic phase after AS activity were 6-12 folds greater in aged rats than in young adult rats. Furthermore, aged rats lost their ability for spatial learning even in a scrupulous eleven-session water maze learning paradigm after AS activity, in divergence from young adult rats which retained the

  6. THE QUADRUPLE PRE-MAIN-SEQUENCE SYSTEM LkCa 3: IMPLICATIONS FOR STELLAR EVOLUTION MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Torres, Guillermo; Latham, David W.; Ruiz-Rodriguez, Dary; Prato, L.; Wasserman, Lawrence H.; Badenas, Mariona; Schaefer, G. H.; Mathieu, Robert D.

    2013-08-10

    We report the discovery that the pre-main-sequence (PMS) object LkCa 3 in the Taurus-Auriga star-forming region is a hierarchical quadruple system of M stars. It was previously known to be a close ({approx}0.''5) visual pair, with one component being a moderately eccentric 12.94 day single-lined spectroscopic binary. A re-analysis of archival optical spectra complemented by new near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy shows both visual components to be double lined; the second one has a period of 4.06 days and a circular orbit. In addition to the orbital elements, we determine optical and NIR flux ratios, effective temperatures, and projected rotational velocities for all four stars. Using existing photometric monitoring observations of the system that had previously revealed the rotational period of the primary in the longer-period binary, we also detect the rotational signal of the primary in the 4.06 day binary, which is synchronized with the orbital motion. With only the assumption of coevality, a comparison of all of these constraints with current stellar evolution models from the Dartmouth series points to an age of 1.4 Myr and a distance of 133 pc, consistent with previous estimates for the region and suggesting that the system is on the near side of the Taurus complex. Similar comparisons of the properties of LkCa 3 and the well-known quadruple PMS system GG Tau with the widely used models from the Lyon series for a mixing length parameter of {alpha}{sub ML} = 1.0 strongly favor the Dartmouth models.

  7. Excitation/inhibition imbalance and impaired synaptic inhibition in hippocampal area CA3 of Mecp2 knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Calfa, Gaston; Li, Wei; Rutherford, John M; Pozzo-Miller, Lucas

    2015-02-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a neurodevelopment disorder associated with intellectual disabilities and caused by loss-of-function mutations in the gene encoding the transcriptional regulator Methyl-CpG-binding Protein-2 (MeCP2). Neuronal dysfunction and changes in cortical excitability occur in RTT individuals and Mecp2-deficient mice, including hippocampal network hyperactivity and higher frequency of spontaneous multiunit spikes in the CA3 cell body layer. Here, we describe impaired synaptic inhibition and an excitation/inhibition (E/I) imbalance in area CA3 of acute slices from symptomatic Mecp2 knockout male mice (referred to as Mecp2(-/y) ). The amplitude of TTX-resistant miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents (mIPSC) was smaller in CA3 pyramidal neurons of Mecp2(-/y) slices than in wildtype controls, while the amplitude of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSC) was significantly larger in Mecp2(-/y) neurons. Consistently, quantitative confocal immunohistochemistry revealed significantly lower intensity of the alpha-1 subunit of GABAA Rs in the CA3 cell body layer of Mecp2(-/y) mice, while GluA1 puncta intensities were significantly higher in the CA3 dendritic layers of Mecp2(-/y) mice. In addition, the input/output (I/O) relationship of evoked IPSCs had a shallower slope in CA3 pyramidal neurons Mecp2(-/y) neurons. Consistent with the absence of neuronal degeneration in RTT and MeCP2-based mouse models, the density of parvalbumin- and somatostatin-expressing interneurons in area CA3 was not affected in Mecp2(-/y) mice. Furthermore, the intrinsic membrane properties of several interneuron subtypes in area CA3 were not affected by Mecp2 loss. However, mEPSCs are smaller and less frequent in CA3 fast-spiking basket cells of Mecp2(-/y) mice, suggesting an impaired glutamatergic drive in this interneuron population. These results demonstrate that a loss-of-function mutation in Mecp2 causes impaired E/I balance onto CA3 pyramidal neurons, leading to a

  8. Excitation/Inhibition Imbalance and Impaired Synaptic Inhibition in Hippocampal Area CA3 of Mecp2 Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Calfa, Gaston; Li, Wei; Rutherford, John M.; Pozzo-Miller, Lucas

    2014-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a neurodevelopment disorder associated with intellectual disabilities and caused by loss-of-function mutations in the gene encoding the transcriptional regulator Methyl-CpG-binding Protein-2 (MeCP2). Neuronal dysfunction and changes in cortical excitability occur in RTT individuals and Mecp2-deficient mice, including hippocampal network hyperactivity and higher frequency of spontaneous multi-unit spikes in the CA3 cell body layer. Here, we describe impaired synaptic inhibition and an excitation/inhibition (E/I) imbalance in area CA3 of acute slices from symptomatic Mecp2 knockout male mice (referred to as Mecp2-/y). The amplitude of TTX-resistant miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents (mIPSC) was smaller in CA3 pyramidal neurons of Mecp2-/y slices than in wildtype controls, while the amplitude of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSC) was significantly larger in Mecp2-/y neurons. Consistently, quantitative confocal immunohistochemistry revealed significantly lower intensity of the alpha-1 subunit of GABAARs in the CA3 cell body layer of Mecp2-/y mice, while GluA1 puncta intensities were significantly higher in the CA3 dendritic layers of Mecp2-/y mice. In addition, the input/output (I/O) relationship of evoked IPSCs had a shallower slope in CA3 pyramidal neurons Mecp2-/y neurons. Consistent with the absence of neuronal degeneration in RTT and MeCP2-based mouse models, the density of parvalbumin- and somatostatin-expressing interneurons in area CA3 was not affected in Mecp2-/y mice. Furthermore, the intrinsic membrane properties of several interneuron subtypes in area CA3 were not affected by Mecp2 loss. However, mEPSCs are smaller and less frequent in CA3 fast-spiking basket cells of Mecp2-/y mice, suggesting an impaired glutamatergic drive in this interneuron population. These results demonstrate that a loss-of-function mutation in Mecp2 causes impaired E/I balance onto CA3 pyramidal neurons, leading to a hyperactive

  9. Cationic disorder and Mn3+/Mn4+ charge ordering in the B‧ and B″ sites of Ca3Mn2NbO9 perovskite: a comparison with Ca3Mn2WO9

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López, C. A.; Saleta, M. E.; Pedregosa, J. C.; Sánchez, R. D.; Alonso, J. A.; Fernández-Díaz, M. T.

    2014-02-01

    We describe the preparation, crystal structure determination, magnetic and transport properties of two novel Mn-containing perovskites, with a different electronic configuration for Mn atoms located in B site. Ca3Mn3+2WO9 and Ca3Mn3+/4+2NbO9 were synthesized by standard ceramic procedures; the crystallographic structure was studied from X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) and neutron powder diffraction (NPD). Both phases exhibit a monoclinic symmetry (S.G.: P21/n); Ca3Mn2WO9 presents a long-range ordering over the B sites, whereas Ca3Mn2NbO9 is strongly disordered. By “in-situ” NPD, the temperature evolution of the structure study presents an interesting evolution in the octahedral size () for Ca3Mn2NbO9, driven by a charge ordering effect between Mn3+ and Mn4+ atoms, related to the anomaly observed in the transport measurements at T≈160 K. Both materials present a magnetic order below TC=30 K and 40 K for W and Nb materials, respectively. The magneto-transport measurements display non-negligible magnetoresistance properties in the paramagnetic regime.

  10. 1H MRSI of middle frontal gyrus in pediatric ADHD.

    PubMed

    Tafazoli, Sharwin; O'Neill, Joseph; Bejjani, Anthony; Ly, Ronald; Salamon, Noriko; McCracken, James T; Alger, Jeffry R; Levitt, Jennifer G

    2013-04-01

    Neuroimaging studies in multiple modalities have implicated the left or right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (here, middle frontal gyrus) in attentional functions, in ADHD, and in dopamine agonist treatment of ADHD. The far lateral location of this cortex in the brain, however, has made it difficult to study with magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). We used the smaller voxel sizes of the magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) variant of MRS, acquired at a steep coronal-oblique angle to sample bilateral middle frontal gyrus in 13 children and adolescents with ADHD and 13 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. Within a subsample of the ADHD patients, aspects of attention were also assessed with the Trail Making Task. In right middle frontal gyrus only, mean levels of N-acetyl-aspartate + N-acetyl-aspartyl-glutamate (tNAA), creatine + phosphocreatine (Cr), choline-compounds (Cho), and myo-inositol (mI) were significantly lower in the ADHD than in the control sample. In the ADHD patients, lower right middle frontal Cr was associated with worse performance on Trails A and B (focused attention, concentration, set-shifting), while the opposite relationship held true for the control group on Trails B. These findings add to evidence implicating right middle frontal cortex in ADHD. Lower levels of these multiple species may reflect osmotic adjustment to elevated prefrontal cortical perfusion in ADHD and/or a previously hypothesized defect in astrocytic production of lactate in ADHD resulting in decelerated energetic metabolism (Cr), membrane synthesis (Cho, mI), and acetyl-CoA substrate for NAA synthesis. Lower Cr levels may indicate attentional or executive impairments. PMID:23273650

  11. Functional network changes in hippocampal CA1 after status epilepticus predict spatial memory deficits in rats.

    PubMed

    Tyler, Anna L; Mahoney, J Matthew; Richard, Gregory R; Holmes, Gregory L; Lenck-Santini, Pierre-Pascal; Scott, Rod C

    2012-08-15

    Status epilepticus (SE) is a common neurological emergency, which has been associated with subsequent cognitive impairments. Neuronal death in hippocampal CA1 is thought to be an important mechanism of these impairments. However, it is also possible that functional interactions between surviving neurons are important. In this study we recorded in vivo single-unit activity in the CA1 hippocampal region of rats while they performed a spatial memory task. From these data we constructed functional networks describing pyramidal cell interactions. To build the networks, we used maximum entropy algorithms previously applied only to in vitro data. We show that several months following SE pyramidal neurons display excessive neuronal synchrony and less neuronal reactivation during rest compared with those in healthy controls. Both effects predict rat performance in a spatial memory task. These results provide a physiological mechanism for SE-induced cognitive impairment and highlight the importance of the systems-level perspective in investigating spatial cognition.

  12. Caffeine and REM sleep deprivation: Effect on basal levels of signaling molecules in area CA1.

    PubMed

    Alkadhi, Karim A; Alhaider, Ibrahim A

    2016-03-01

    We have investigated the neuroprotective effect of chronic caffeine treatment on basal levels of memory-related signaling molecules in area CA1 of sleep-deprived rats. Animals in the caffeine groups were treated with caffeine in drinking water (0.3g/l) for four weeks before they were REM sleep-deprived for 24h in the Modified Multiple Platforms paradigm. Western blot analysis of basal protein levels of plasticity- and memory-related signaling molecules in hippocampal area CA1 showed significant down regulation of the basal levels of phosphorylated- and total-CaMKII, phosphorylated- and total-CREB as well as those of BDNF and CaMKIV in sleep deprived rats. All these changes were completely prevented in rats that chronically consumed caffeine. The present findings suggest an important neuroprotective property of caffeine in sleep deprivation.

  13. Mathematical model of the CA1 region of the rat hippocampus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, A. C. G.; Fernandes de Lima, V. M.; Infantosi, A. F. C.

    1998-09-01

    A mathematical transcription of the intrinsic circuit of the CA1 region of the rat dorsal hippocampus was made and the model parameters adjusted according to experimental data from intracellular recordings and single channel kinetics. This model was able to simulate well the profile of the field potentials recorded extracellularly and the well known phenomenon of the paired-pulse depression. The results suggest that the depression of the second pulse, often interpreted in the literature as resulting from inhibition, can also be due to `shunting' effects on the CA1 pyramids' membrane. The rhythmic oscillations of the field potential (EEG) was obtained as an emergent property of the network dynamics. The frequency of the field oscillation followed the main synaptic input in the region (Schaffer collaterals).

  14. Highly Expressed Genes within Hippocampal Sector CA1: Implications for the Physiology of Memory.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Michael A

    2014-04-22

    As the CA1 sector has been implicated to play a key role in memory formation, a dedicated search for highly expressed genes within this region was made from an on-line atlas of gene expression within the mouse brain (GENSAT). From a data base of 1013 genes, 16 were identified that had selective localization of gene expression within the CA1 region, and included Angpt2, ARHGEF6, CCK, Cntnap1, DRD3, EMP1, Epha2, Itm2b, Lrrtm2, Mdk, PNMT, Ppm1e, Ppp2r2d, RASGRP1, Slitrk5, and Sstr4. Of the 16 identified, the most selective and intense localization for both adult and post-natal day 7 was noted for ARHGEF6, which is known to be linked to non-syndromic mental retardation, and has also been localized to dendritic spines. Further research on the role played by ARHGEF6 in memory formation is strongly advocated. PMID:24987507

  15. Highly Expressed Genes within Hippocampal Sector CA1: Implications for the Physiology of Memory

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    As the CA1 sector has been implicated to play a key role in memory formation, a dedicated search for highly expressed genes within this region was made from an on-line atlas of gene expression within the mouse brain (GENSAT). From a data base of 1013 genes, 16 were identified that had selective localization of gene expression within the CA1 region, and included Angpt2, ARHGEF6, CCK, Cntnap1, DRD3, EMP1, Epha2, Itm2b, Lrrtm2, Mdk, PNMT, Ppm1e, Ppp2r2d, RASGRP1, Slitrk5, and Sstr4. Of the 16 identified, the most selective and intense localization for both adult and post-natal day 7 was noted for ARHGEF6, which is known to be linked to non-syndromic mental retardation, and has also been localized to dendritic spines. Further research on the role played by ARHGEF6 in memory formation is strongly advocated PMID:24987507

  16. Caffeine and REM sleep deprivation: Effect on basal levels of signaling molecules in area CA1.

    PubMed

    Alkadhi, Karim A; Alhaider, Ibrahim A

    2016-03-01

    We have investigated the neuroprotective effect of chronic caffeine treatment on basal levels of memory-related signaling molecules in area CA1 of sleep-deprived rats. Animals in the caffeine groups were treated with caffeine in drinking water (0.3g/l) for four weeks before they were REM sleep-deprived for 24h in the Modified Multiple Platforms paradigm. Western blot analysis of basal protein levels of plasticity- and memory-related signaling molecules in hippocampal area CA1 showed significant down regulation of the basal levels of phosphorylated- and total-CaMKII, phosphorylated- and total-CREB as well as those of BDNF and CaMKIV in sleep deprived rats. All these changes were completely prevented in rats that chronically consumed caffeine. The present findings suggest an important neuroprotective property of caffeine in sleep deprivation. PMID:26767416

  17. Effects of electromagnetic radiation on spatial memory and synapses in rat hippocampal CA1.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuhong; Shi, Changhua; Lu, Guobing; Xu, Qian; Liu, Shaochen

    2012-06-01

    In this study, we investigated the effects of mobile phone radiation on spatial learning, reference memory, and morphology in related brain regions. After the near-field radiation (0.52-1.08 W/kg) was delivered to 8-week-old Wistar rats 2 hours per day for 1 month, behavioral changes were examined using the Morris water maze. Compared with the sham-irradiated rats, the irradiated rats exhibited impaired performance. Morphological changes were investigated by examining synaptic ultrastructural changes in the hippocampus. Using the physical dissector technique, the number of pyramidal neurons, the synaptic profiles, and the length of postsynaptic densities in the CA1 region were quantified stereologically. The morphological changes included mitochondrial degenerations, fewer synapses, and shorter postsynaptic densities in the radiated rats. These findings indicate that mobile phone radiation can significantly impair spatial learning and reference memory and induce morphological changes in the hippocampal CA1 region.

  18. Evidence of mirror neurons in human inferior frontal gyrus.

    PubMed

    Kilner, James M; Neal, Alice; Weiskopf, Nikolaus; Friston, Karl J; Frith, Chris D

    2009-08-12

    There is much current debate about the existence of mirror neurons in humans. To identify mirror neurons in the inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) of humans, we used a repetition suppression paradigm while measuring neural activity with functional magnetic resonance imaging. Subjects either executed or observed a series of actions. Here we show that in the IFG, responses were suppressed both when an executed action was followed by the same rather than a different observed action and when an observed action was followed by the same rather than a different executed action. This pattern of responses is consistent with that predicted by mirror neurons and is evidence of mirror neurons in the human IFG.

  19. Vector Symbolic Spiking Neural Network Model of Hippocampal Subarea CA1 Novelty Detection Functionality.

    PubMed

    Agerskov, Claus

    2016-04-01

    A neural network model is presented of novelty detection in the CA1 subdomain of the hippocampal formation from the perspective of information flow. This computational model is restricted on several levels by both anatomical information about hippocampal circuitry and behavioral data from studies done in rats. Several studies report that the CA1 area broadcasts a generalized novelty signal in response to changes in the environment. Using the neural engineering framework developed by Eliasmith et al., a spiking neural network architecture is created that is able to compare high-dimensional vectors, symbolizing semantic information, according to the semantic pointer hypothesis. This model then computes the similarity between the vectors, as both direct inputs and a recalled memory from a long-term memory network by performing the dot-product operation in a novelty neural network architecture. The developed CA1 model agrees with available neuroanatomical data, as well as the presented behavioral data, and so it is a biologically realistic model of novelty detection in the hippocampus, which can provide a feasible explanation for experimentally observed dynamics. PMID:26890351

  20. Exercise preconditioning exhibits neuroprotective effects on hippocampal CA1 neuronal damage after cerebral ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Shamsaei, Nabi; Khaksari, Mehdi; Erfani, Sohaila; Rajabi, Hamid; Aboutaleb, Nahid

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence has suggested the neuroprotective effects of physical exercise on cerebral ischemic injury. However, the role of physical exercise in cerebral ischemia-induced hippocampal damage remains controversial. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of pre-ischemia treadmill training on hippocampal CA1 neuronal damage after cerebral ischemia. Male adult rats were randomly divided into control, ischemia and exercise + ischemia groups. In the exercise + ischemia group, rats were subjected to running on a treadmill in a designated time schedule (5 days per week for 4 weeks). Then rats underwent cerebral ischemia induction through occlusion of common carotids followed by reperfusion. At 4 days after cerebral ischemia, rat learning and memory abilities were evaluated using passive avoidance memory test and rat hippocampal neuronal damage was detected using Nissl and TUNEL staining. Pre-ischemic exercise significantly reduced the number of TUNEL-positive cells and necrotic cell death in the hippocampal CA1 region as compared to the ischemia group. Moreover, pre-ischemic exercise significantly prevented ischemia-induced memory dysfunction. Pre-ischemic exercise mighct prevent memory deficits after cerebral ischemia through rescuing hippocampal CA1 neurons from ischemia-induced degeneration. PMID:26487851

  1. Proline-induced inhibition of glutamate release in hippocampal area CA1.

    PubMed

    Cohen, S M; Nadler, J V

    1997-09-26

    Concentrations of proline typical of human CSF have been shown to potentiate transmission at Schaffer collateral-commissural synapses on CA1 pyramidal cells of the rat hippocampus. This study tested the hypothesis that proline enhances excitatory synaptic transmission by increasing glutamate release. Two concentrations of proline were used: a concentration typical of normal human CSF (3 microM) and a concentration typical of CSF in persons with the genetic disorder hyperprolinemia type II (30 microM). Continuous exposure of hippocampal slices to either concentration of proline potentiated Schaffer collateral-commissural synaptic transmission. Proline shifted the plot of field EPSP slope against fiber volley amplitude upward. Contrary to the original hypothesis, neither concentration of proline reduced paired-pulse facilitation; 30 microM proline enhanced paired-pulse facilitation, whereas 3 microM proline had no effect. In line with its enhancement of paired-pulse facilitation, 30 microM proline reduced both the K+-evoked release of glutamate and aspartate from CA1 slices and the release of glutamate and aspartate from CA1 synaptosomes evoked by 4-aminopyridine. These results suggest that the proline-induced potentiation of Schaffer collateral-commissural synaptic transmission probably involves a postsynaptic, rather than a presynaptic, mechanism. Concentrations of proline normally found in human CSF little affect glutamate release. However, proline-induced inhibition of glutamate release may contribute to the neuropsychiatric disorders associated with hyperprolinemia type II.

  2. Synaptic plasticity in the hippocampal area CA1-subiculum projection: implications for theories of memory.

    PubMed

    O'Mara, S M; Commins, S; Anderson, M

    2000-01-01

    This paper reviews investigations of synaptic plasticity in the major, and underexplored, pathway from hippocampal area CA1 to the subiculum. This brain area is the major synaptic relay for the majority of hippocampal area CA1 neurons, making the subiculum the last relay of the hippocampal formation prior to the cortex. The subiculum thus has a very major role in mediating hippocampal-cortical interactions. We demonstrate that the projection from hippocampal area CA1 to the subiculum sustains plasticity on a number of levels. We show that this pathway is capable of undergoing both long-term potentiation (LTP) and paired-pulse facilitation (PPF, a short-term plastic effect). Although we failed to induce long-term depression (LTD) of this pathway with low-frequency stimulation (LFS) and two-pulse stimulation (TPS), both protocols can induce a "late-developing" potentiation of synaptic transmission. We further demonstrate that baseline synaptic transmission can be dissociated from paired-pulse stimulation of the same pathway; we also show that it is possible, using appropriate protocols, to change PPF to paired-pulse depression, thus revealing subtle and previously undescribed mechanisms which regulate short-term synaptic plasticity. Finally, we successfully recorded from individual subicular units in the freely-moving animal, and provide a description of the characteristics of such neurons in a pellet-chasing task. We discuss the implications of these findings in relation to theories of the biological consolidation of memory.

  3. Sleep Fragmentation reduces Hippocampal CA1 Pyramidal Cell Excitability and Response to Adenosine

    PubMed Central

    Tartar, Jaime L.; McKenna, James T.; Ward, Christopher P.; McCarley, Robert W.; Strecker, Robert E.; Brown, Ritchie E.

    2009-01-01

    Sleep fragmentation (SF) impairs the restorative/cognitive benefits of sleep via as yet unidentified alterations in neural physiology. Previously, we found that hippocampal synaptic plasticity and spatial learning are impaired in a rat model of SF which utilizes a treadmill to awaken the animals every 2 min, mimicking the frequency of awakenings observed in human sleep apnea patients. Here, we investigated the cellular mechanisms responsible for these effects, using whole-cell patch-clamp recordings. 24h of SF decreased the excitability of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons via decreased input resistance, without alterations in other intrinsic membrane or action potential properties (when compared to cage controls, or to exercise controls that experienced the same total amount of treadmill movement as SF rats). Contrary to our initial prediction, the hyperpolarizing response to bath applied adenosine (30 µM) was reduced in the CA1 neurons of SF treated rats. Our initial prediction was based on evidence that sleep loss upregulates cortical adenosine A1 receptors; however, the present findings are consistent with a very recent report that hippocampal A1 receptors are not elevated by sleep loss. Thus, increased adenosinergic inhibition is unlikely to be responsible for reduced hippocampal long-term potentiation in SF rats. Instead, the reduced excitability of CA1 pyramidal neurons observed here may contribute to the loss of hippocampal long-term potentiation and hippocampus-dependent cognitive impairments associated with sleep disruption. PMID:19914331

  4. Selective Injection System into Hippocampus CA1 via Monitored Theta Oscillation

    PubMed Central

    Tsutajima, Jyoji; Kunitake, Takato; Wakazono, Yoshihiko; Takamiya, Kogo

    2013-01-01

    Methods of cell biology and electrophysiology using dissociated primary cultured neurons allow in vitro study of molecular functions; however, analysis of intact neuronal circuitry is often preferable. To investigate exogenous genes, viral vectors are most commonly injected using a pipette that is inserted from the top of the cortex. Although there are few reports that describe the success rate of injection in detail, it is sometimes difficult to locate the pipette tip accurately within the CA1 pyramidal cell layer because the pyramidal layer is only 0.1 mm thick. In the present study, we have developed a system to inject viral vectors accurately into the mouse hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cell layer using a stereotaxic injection system with simultaneous electrophysiological monitoring of theta oscillation. The pipette tip was positioned reliably based on integrated values of the theta oscillation in the hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cell layer. This approach allows accurate injection of solutions and provides an efficient method of gene transfer using viral vectors into the hippocampus, which can be a useful tool for studies involving the molecular mechanisms of neuronal functions. PMID:24358255

  5. Salicylate-induced changes in immediate-early genes in the hippocampal CA1 area.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hao; Xu, Feng-Lei; Yin, Yong; Da, Peng; You, Xiao-Dong; Xu, Hui-Min; Tang, Yan

    2015-08-01

    Studies have suggested that salicylate affects neuronal function via interactions with specific membrane channels/receptors. However, the effect of salicylate on activity and synaptic morphology of the hippocampal Cornu Ammonis (CA) 1 area remains to be elucidated. The activation of immediate-early genes (IEGs) was reported to correlate with neuronal activity, in particular activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein and early growth response gene 1. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the expression of these IEGs, as well that of N-methyl D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor subunit 2B in rats following acute and chronic salicylate treatment. Protein and messenger RNA levels of all three genes were increased in rats following chronic administration of salicylate (300 mg/kg for 10 days), returning to baseline levels 14 days post-cessation of treatment. The transient upregulation of gene expression following treatment was accompanied by ultrastructural alterations in hippocampal CA1 area synapses. An increase in synaptic interface curvature was observed as well as an increased number of presynaptic vesicles; in addition, postsynaptic densities thickened and lengthened. In conclusion, the results of the present study indicated that chronic exposure to salicylate may lead to structural alteration of hippocampal CA1 neurons, and it was suggested that this process occurs through induced expression of IEGs via NMDA receptor activation. PMID:25873216

  6. Electrophysiological analysis of synaptic distribution in CA1 of rat hippocampus after chronic ethanol exposure.

    PubMed

    Abraham, W C; Manis, P B; Hunter, B E; Zornetzer, S F; Walker, D W

    1982-04-01

    This study investigated the long-lasting effects of chronic ethanol consumption on the distribution of Schaffer collateral-commissural (SCH/COM) afferents within stratum radiatum of rat hippocampal CA1. Experimental animals were fed an ethanol-containing liquid diet for 20 weeks but were withdrawn from the special diet for at least 8 weeks prior to acute electrophysiological recordings. Field potential laminar analyses were performed by stepping the recording electrode in 25 microns increments through CA1 and sampling evoked potentials at each point. One-dimensional current-source density (CSD) was calculated from the field potential laminar profiles to enhance spatial resolution of current sources and sinks. Stimulation of the SCH/COM afferents elicits short-latency, negative field potentials throughout the synaptic terminal zone (stratum radiatum). CSD analysis in normal animals revealed that the synaptic currents generated in stratum radiatum concentrate into bimodal yet overlapping components, peaking 71.3 microns and 228.3 microns from the pyramidal cell layer. Chronic ethanol treatment produced: (1) a 13.2% shrinkage of the overall extent of current sinks in stratum radiatum; (2) a 37.4% reduction in the spatial extent of the sink proximal to the cell layer; and (3) an increase in the amplitude of the more distal sink. We tentatively propose the proximal and distal sinks to reflect a separation of the COM and SCH afferents, respectively. Chronic ethanol thus appeared to have selectively produced persistent damage to the COM-CA1 pathway.

  7. A novel short-term plasticity of intrinsic excitability in the hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Aguilera, A; Sánchez-Alonso, J L; Vicente-Torres, M A; Colino, A

    2014-01-01

    Changes in neuronal activity often trigger compensatory mechanisms aimed at regulating network activity homeostatically. Here we have identified and characterized a novel form of compensatory short-term plasticity of membrane excitability, which develops early after the eye-opening period in rats (P16–19 days) but not before that developmental stage (P9–12 days old). Holding the membrane potential of CA1 neurons right below the firing threshold from 15 s to several minutes induced a potentiation of the repolarizing phase of the action potentials that contributed to a decrease in the firing rate of CA1 pyramidal neurons in vitro. Furthermore, the mechanism for inducing this plasticity required the action of intracellular Ca2+ entering through T-type Ca2+ channels. This increase in Ca2+ subsequently activated the Ca2+ sensor K+ channel interacting protein 3, which led to the increase of an A-type K+ current. These results suggest that Ca2+ modulation of somatic A-current represents a new form of homeostatic regulation that provides CA1 pyramidal neurons with the ability to preserve their firing abilities in response to membrane potential variations on a scale from tens of seconds to several minutes. PMID:24756640

  8. Augmented Inhibition from Cannabinoid-Sensitive Interneurons Diminishes CA1 Output after Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Brian N.; Palmer, Chris P.; Bourgeois, Elliot B.; Elkind, Jaclynn A.; Putnam, Brendan J.; Cohen, Akiva S.

    2014-01-01

    The neurological impairments associated with traumatic brain injury include learning and memory deficits and increased risk of seizures. The hippocampus is critically involved in both of these phenomena and highly susceptible to damage by traumatic brain injury. To examine network activity in the hippocampal CA1 region after lateral fluid percussion injury, we used a combination of voltage-sensitive dye, field potential, and patch clamp recording in mouse hippocampal brain slices. When the stratum radiatum (SR) was stimulated in slices from injured mice, we found decreased depolarization in SR and increased hyperpolarization in stratum oriens (SO), together with a decrease in the percentage of pyramidal neurons firing stimulus-evoked action potentials. Increased hyperpolarization in SO persisted when glutamatergic transmission was blocked. However, we found no changes in SO responses when the alveus was stimulated to directly activate SO. These results suggest that the increased SO hyperpolarization evoked by SR stimulation was mediated by interneurons that have cell bodies and/or axons in SR, and form synapses in stratum pyramidale and SO. A low concentration (100 nM) of the synthetic cannabinoid WIN55,212-2, restored CA1 output in slices from injured animals. These findings support the hypothesis that increased GABAergic signaling by cannabinoid-sensitive interneurons contributes to the reduced CA1 output following traumatic brain injury. PMID:25565968

  9. Vector Symbolic Spiking Neural Network Model of Hippocampal Subarea CA1 Novelty Detection Functionality.

    PubMed

    Agerskov, Claus

    2016-04-01

    A neural network model is presented of novelty detection in the CA1 subdomain of the hippocampal formation from the perspective of information flow. This computational model is restricted on several levels by both anatomical information about hippocampal circuitry and behavioral data from studies done in rats. Several studies report that the CA1 area broadcasts a generalized novelty signal in response to changes in the environment. Using the neural engineering framework developed by Eliasmith et al., a spiking neural network architecture is created that is able to compare high-dimensional vectors, symbolizing semantic information, according to the semantic pointer hypothesis. This model then computes the similarity between the vectors, as both direct inputs and a recalled memory from a long-term memory network by performing the dot-product operation in a novelty neural network architecture. The developed CA1 model agrees with available neuroanatomical data, as well as the presented behavioral data, and so it is a biologically realistic model of novelty detection in the hippocampus, which can provide a feasible explanation for experimentally observed dynamics.

  10. Identification and two-photon imaging of oligodendrocyte in CA1 region of hippocampal slices

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Wei; Ge Wooping; Zeng Shaoqun; Duan Shumin; Luo Qingming . E-mail: qluo@mail.hust.edu.cn

    2007-01-19

    Oligodendrocyte (OL) plays a critical role in myelination and axon maintenance in central nervous system. Recent studies show that OL can also express NMDA receptors in development and pathological situations in white matter. There is still lack of studies about OL properties and function in gray matter of brain. Here we reported that some glial cells in CA1 region of rat hippocampal slices (P15-23) had distinct electrophysiological characteristics from the other glia cells in this region, while they displayed uniform properties with OL from white matter in previous report; therefore, they were considered as OL in hippocampus. By loading dye in recording pipette and imaging with two-photon laser scanning microscopy, we acquired the high spatial resolution, three-dimension images of these special cells in live slices. The OL in hippocampus shows a complex process-bearing shape and the distribution of several processes is parallel to Schaffer fiber in CA1 region. When stimulating Schaffer fiber, OL displays a long duration depolarization mediated by inward rectifier potassium channel. This suggested that the OL in CA1 region could sense the neuronal activity and contribute to potassium clearance.

  11. Salicylate-induced changes in immediate-early genes in the hippocampal CA1 area

    PubMed Central

    WU, HAO; XU, FENG-LEI; YIN, YONG; DA, PENG; YOU, XIAO-DONG; XU, HUI-MIN; TANG, YAN

    2015-01-01

    Studies have suggested that salicylate affects neuronal function via interactions with specific membrane channels/receptors. However, the effect of salicylate on activity and synaptic morphology of the hippocampal Cornu Ammonis (CA) 1 area remains to be elucidated. The activation of immediate-early genes (IEGs) was reported to correlate with neuronal activity, in particular activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein and early growth response gene 1. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the expression of these IEGs, as well that of N-methyl D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor subunit 2B in rats following acute and chronic salicylate treatment. Protein and messenger RNA levels of all three genes were increased in rats following chronic administration of salicylate (300 mg/kg for 10 days), returning to baseline levels 14 days post-cessation of treatment. The transient upregulation of gene expression following treatment was accompanied by ultrastructural alterations in hippocampal CA1 area synapses. An increase in synaptic interface curvature was observed as well as an increased number of presynaptic vesicles; in addition, postsynaptic densities thickened and lengthened. In conclusion, the results of the present study indicated that chronic exposure to salicylate may lead to structural alteration of hippocampal CA1 neurons, and it was suggested that this process occurs through induced expression of IEGs via NMDA receptor activation. PMID:25873216

  12. Involvement of the serotonergic system of the ventral hippocampus (CA3) on amnesia induced by ACPA in mice.

    PubMed

    Nasehi, Mohammad; Kafi, Faezeh; Khakpai, Fatemeh; Zarrindast, Mohammad-Reza

    2015-06-01

    Interactions between the cannabinoid and serotonin systems have been reported in many studies. In the present study, we investigated the influence of the serotonergic receptor agents on amnesia induced by the cannabinoid CB1 receptor agonist, arachydonilcyclopropylamide (ACPA). Bilateral guide-cannulae were implanted to allow intra-CA3 microinjection of the drugs. The results showed that the intra-peritoneal (i.p.) injection of ACPA induce amnesia but did not alter head dip latency, head dip counts, and locomotion. Moreover, intra-CA3 injection of M-Chlorophenylbiguanide (M-CHL, a 5-HT3 serotonin receptor agonist), Y-25130 (a 5-HT3 serotonin receptor antagonist), RS67333 (a 5-HT4 serotonin receptor agonist), and RS23597-190 (a 5-HT4 serotonin receptor antagonist) impaired memory but have no effect on head dip latency and locomotor activity. In addition, intra-CA3 injection of Y-25130, RS67333, and RS23597-190 heighten the ACPA-induced amnesia and head dip counts while did not alter head dip latency and locomotor activity. On the other hand, intra-CA3 microinjection of M-CHL could not modify the ACPA-induced amnesia, head dip latency and locomotor activity whereas increased head dip counts. It can be concluded that the amnesia induced by i.p. administration of ACPA is at least partly mediated through the serotonergic receptor mechanism in the CA3 area.

  13. Improvement in high-temperature thermoelectric properties by adding Mn for Co in Ca3Co4O9.

    PubMed

    Nam, S W; Choi, J W; Hwang, H K; Park, K

    2010-11-01

    Nano-sized Ca3Co(4-x)Mn(x)O9 (0 < or = x < or = 0.6) thermoelectric powders were synthesized by solution combustion method, using aspartic acid as fuel. The microstructure and high-temperature (500-800 degrees C) thermoelectric properties of the Ca3Co(4-x)Mn(x)O9 were investigated. The addition of Mn for Co in Ca3Co(4-x)Mn(x)O9 resulted in a decrease of the electrical conductivity and a significant increase of the Seebeck coefficient. Consequently, the power factor was remarkably enhanced by the addition of Mn. Ca3Co(3.7)Mn(0.3)O9 sample showed the highest value of the power factor (1.24 x 10(-4) Wm(-1) K(-2)) at 800 degrees C. We believe that the Ca3Co(4-x)Mn(x)O9 is strongly desirable as a novel high-temperature thermoelectric material for power generation.

  14. Kv1.2 mediates heterosynaptic modulation of direct cortical synaptic inputs in CA3 pyramidal cells

    PubMed Central

    Hyun, Jung Ho; Eom, Kisang; Lee, Kyu-Hee; Bae, Jin Young; Bae, Yong Chul; Kim, Myoung-Hwan; Kim, Sooyun; Ho, Won-Kyung; Lee, Suk-Ho

    2015-01-01

    A short high frequency stimulation of mossy fibres (MFs) induces long-term potentiation (LTP) of direct cortical or perforant path (PP) synaptic inputs in hippocampal CA3 pyramidal cells (CA3-PCs). However, the cellular mechanism underlying this heterosynaptic modulation remains elusive. Previously, we reported that repetitive somatic firing at 10 Hz downregulates Kv1.2 in the CA3-PCs. Here, we show that MF inputs induce similar somatic firing and downregulation of Kv1.2 in the CA3-PCs. The effect of Kv1.2 downregulation was specific to PP synaptic inputs that arrive at distal apical dendrites. We found that the somatodendritic expression of Kv1.2 is polarized to distal apical dendrites. Compartmental simulations based on this finding suggested that passive normalization of synaptic inputs and polarized distributions of dendritic ionic channels may facilitate the activation of dendritic Na+ channels preferentially at distal apical dendrites. Indeed, partial block of dendritic Na+ channels using 10 nm tetrodotoxin brought back the enhanced PP-evoked excitatory postsynaptic potentials (PP-EPSPs) to the baseline level. These results indicate that activity-dependent downregulation of Kv1.2 in CA3-PCs mediates MF-induced heterosynaptic LTP of PP-EPSPs by facilitating activation of Na+ channels at distal apical dendrites. PMID:26047212

  15. Protracted postnatal development of inhibitory synaptic transmission in rat hippocampal area CA1 neurons.

    PubMed

    Cohen, A S; Lin, D D; Coulter, D A

    2000-11-01

    In the CNS, inhibitory synaptic function undergoes profound transformation during early postnatal development. This is due to variations in the subunit composition of subsynaptic GABA(A) receptors (GABA(A)Rs) at differing developmental stages as well as other factors. These include changes in the driving force for chloride-mediated conductances as well as the quantity and/or cleft lifetime of released neurotransmitter. The present study was undertaken to investigate the nature and time course of developmental maturation of GABAergic synaptic function in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons. In neonatal [postnatal day (P) 1-7] and immature (P8-14) CA1 neurons, miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents (mIPSCs) were significantly larger, were less frequent, and had slower kinetics compared with mIPSCs recorded in more mature neurons. Adult mIPSC kinetics were achieved by the third postnatal week in CA1 neurons. However, despite this apparent maturation of mIPSC kinetics, significant differences in modulation of mIPSCs by allosteric agonists in adolescent (P15-21) neurons were still evident. Diazepam (1-300 nM) and zolpidem (200 nM) increased the amplitude of mIPSCs in adolescent but not adult neurons. Both drugs increased mIPSC decay times equally at both ages. These differential agonist effects on mIPSC amplitude suggest that in adolescent CA1 neurons, inhibitory synapses operate differently than adult synapses and function as if subsynaptic receptors are not fully occupied by quantal release of GABA. Rapid agonist application experiments on perisomatic patches pulled from adolescent neurons provided additional support for this hypothesis. In GABA(A)R currents recorded in these patches, benzodiazepine amplitude augmentation effects were evident only when nonsaturating GABA concentrations were applied. Furthermore nonstationary noise analysis of mIPSCs in P15-21 neurons revealed that zolpidem-induced mIPSC augmentation was not due to an increase in single

  16. Automatic and Controlled Semantic Retrieval: TMS Reveals Distinct Contributions of Posterior Middle Temporal Gyrus and Angular Gyrus

    PubMed Central

    Davey, James; Cornelissen, Piers L.; Thompson, Hannah E.; Sonkusare, Saurabh; Hallam, Glyn; Smallwood, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Semantic retrieval involves both (1) automatic spreading activation between highly related concepts and (2) executive control processes that tailor this activation to suit the current context or goals. Two structures in left temporoparietal cortex, angular gyrus (AG) and posterior middle temporal gyrus (pMTG), are thought to be crucial to semantic retrieval and are often recruited together during semantic tasks; however, they show strikingly different patterns of functional connectivity at rest (coupling with the “default mode network” and “frontoparietal control system,” respectively). Here, transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) was used to establish a causal yet dissociable role for these sites in semantic cognition in human volunteers. TMS to AG disrupted thematic judgments particularly when the link between probe and target was strong (e.g., a picture of an Alsatian with a bone), and impaired the identification of objects at a specific but not a superordinate level (for the verbal label “Alsatian” not “animal”). In contrast, TMS to pMTG disrupted thematic judgments for weak but not strong associations (e.g., a picture of an Alsatian with razor wire), and impaired identity matching for both superordinate and specific-level labels. Thus, stimulation to AG interfered with the automatic retrieval of specific concepts from the semantic store while stimulation of pMTG impaired semantic cognition when there was a requirement to flexibly shape conceptual activation in line with the task requirements. These results demonstrate that AG and pMTG make a dissociable contribution to automatic and controlled aspects of semantic retrieval. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT We demonstrate a novel functional dissociation between the angular gyrus (AG) and posterior middle temporal gyrus (pMTG) in conceptual processing. These sites are often coactivated during neuroimaging studies using semantic tasks, but their individual contributions are unclear. Using transcranial

  17. Functional organization of the fusiform gyrus revealed with connectivity profiles.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wen; Wang, Jiaojian; Fan, Lingzhong; Zhang, Yuanchao; Fox, Peter T; Eickhoff, Simon B; Yu, Chunshui; Jiang, Tianzi

    2016-08-01

    Within the object recognition-related ventral visual stream, the human fusiform gyrus (FG), which topographically connects the striate cortex to the inferior temporal lobe, plays a pivotal role in high-level visual/cognitive functions. However, though there are many previous investigations of distinct functional modules within the FG, the functional organization of the whole FG in its full functional heterogeneity has not yet been established. In the current study, a replicable functional organization of the FG based on distinct anatomical connectivity patterns was identified. The FG was parcellated into medial (FGm), lateral (FGl), and anterior (FGa) regions using diffusion tensor imaging. We validated the reasonability of such an organizational scheme from the perspective of resting-state whole brain functional connectivity patterns and the involvement of functional subnetworks. We found corroborating support for these three distinct modules, and suggest that the FGm serves as a transition region that combines multiple stimuli, the FGl is responsible for categorical recognition, and the FGa is involved in semantic understanding. These findings support two organizational functional transitions of the ventral temporal gyrus, a posterior/anterior direction of visual/semantic processing, and a media/lateral direction of high-level visual processing. Our results may facilitate a more detailed study of the human FG in the future. Hum Brain Mapp 37:3003-3016, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Schematic memory components converge within angular gyrus during retrieval

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Isabella C; van Buuren, Mariët; Kroes, Marijn CW; Gutteling, Tjerk P; van der Linden, Marieke; Morris, Richard G; Fernández, Guillén

    2015-01-01

    Mental schemas form associative knowledge structures that can promote the encoding and consolidation of new and related information. Schemas are facilitated by a distributed system that stores components separately, presumably in the form of inter-connected neocortical representations. During retrieval, these components need to be recombined into one representation, but where exactly such recombination takes place is unclear. Thus, we asked where different schema components are neuronally represented and converge during retrieval. Subjects acquired and retrieved two well-controlled, rule-based schema structures during fMRI on consecutive days. Schema retrieval was associated with midline, medial-temporal, and parietal processing. We identified the multi-voxel representations of different schema components, which converged within the angular gyrus during retrieval. Critically, convergence only happened after 24-hour-consolidation and during a transfer test where schema material was applied to novel but related trials. Therefore, the angular gyrus appears to recombine consolidated schema components into one memory representation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09668.001 PMID:26575291

  19. Schematic memory components converge within angular gyrus during retrieval.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Isabella C; van Buuren, Mariët; Kroes, Marijn C W; Gutteling, Tjerk P; van der Linden, Marieke; Morris, Richard G; Fernández, Guillén

    2015-01-01

    Mental schemas form associative knowledge structures that can promote the encoding and consolidation of new and related information. Schemas are facilitated by a distributed system that stores components separately, presumably in the form of inter-connected neocortical representations. During retrieval, these components need to be recombined into one representation, but where exactly such recombination takes place is unclear. Thus, we asked where different schema components are neuronally represented and converge during retrieval. Subjects acquired and retrieved two well-controlled, rule-based schema structures during fMRI on consecutive days. Schema retrieval was associated with midline, medial-temporal, and parietal processing. We identified the multi-voxel representations of different schema components, which converged within the angular gyrus during retrieval. Critically, convergence only happened after 24-hour-consolidation and during a transfer test where schema material was applied to novel but related trials. Therefore, the angular gyrus appears to recombine consolidated schema components into one memory representation. PMID:26575291

  20. Functional organization of the fusiform gyrus revealed with connectivity profiles.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wen; Wang, Jiaojian; Fan, Lingzhong; Zhang, Yuanchao; Fox, Peter T; Eickhoff, Simon B; Yu, Chunshui; Jiang, Tianzi

    2016-08-01

    Within the object recognition-related ventral visual stream, the human fusiform gyrus (FG), which topographically connects the striate cortex to the inferior temporal lobe, plays a pivotal role in high-level visual/cognitive functions. However, though there are many previous investigations of distinct functional modules within the FG, the functional organization of the whole FG in its full functional heterogeneity has not yet been established. In the current study, a replicable functional organization of the FG based on distinct anatomical connectivity patterns was identified. The FG was parcellated into medial (FGm), lateral (FGl), and anterior (FGa) regions using diffusion tensor imaging. We validated the reasonability of such an organizational scheme from the perspective of resting-state whole brain functional connectivity patterns and the involvement of functional subnetworks. We found corroborating support for these three distinct modules, and suggest that the FGm serves as a transition region that combines multiple stimuli, the FGl is responsible for categorical recognition, and the FGa is involved in semantic understanding. These findings support two organizational functional transitions of the ventral temporal gyrus, a posterior/anterior direction of visual/semantic processing, and a media/lateral direction of high-level visual processing. Our results may facilitate a more detailed study of the human FG in the future. Hum Brain Mapp 37:3003-3016, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27132874

  1. Newborn granule cells in the ageing dentate gyrus

    PubMed Central

    Morgenstern, Nicolás A; Lombardi, Gabriela; Schinder, Alejandro F

    2008-01-01

    The dentate gyrus of the hippocampus generates neurons throughout life, but adult neurogenesis exhibits a marked age-dependent decline. Although the decrease in the rate of neurogenesis has been extensively documented in the ageing hippocampus, the specific characteristics of dentate granule cells born in such a continuously changing environment have received little attention. We have used retroviral labelling of neural progenitor cells of the adult mouse dentate gyrus to study morphological properties of neurons born at different ages. Dendritic spine density was measured to estimate glutamatergic afferent connectivity. Fully mature neurons born at the age of 2 months display ∼2.3 spines μm−1 and maintain their overall morphology and spine density in 1-year-old mice. Surprisingly, granule cells born in 10-month-old mice, at which time the rate of neurogenesis has decreased by ∼40-fold, reach a density of dendritic spines similar to that of neurons born in young adulthood. Therefore, in spite of the sharp decline in cell proliferation, differentiation and overall neuronal number, the ageing hippocampus presents a suitable environment for new surviving neurons to reach a high level of complexity, comparable to that of all other dentate granule cells. PMID:18565998

  2. Diffeomorphic Metric Surface Mapping in Superior Temporal Gyrus

    PubMed Central

    Vaillant, Marc; Qiu, Anqi; Glaunès, Joan; Miller, Michael I.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the application of large deformation diffeomorphic metric mapping to cortical surfaces based on the shape and geometric properties of subregions of the superior temporal gyrus in the human brain. The anatomical surfaces of the cortex are represented as triangulated meshes. The diffeomorphic matching algorithm is implemented by defining a norm between the triangulated meshes, based on the algorithms of Vaillant and Glaunès. The diffeomorphic correspondence is defined as a flow of the extrinsic three dimensional coordinates containing the cortical surface that registers the initial and target geometry by minimizing the norm. The methods are demonstrated in 40 high resolution MRI cortical surfaces of planum temporale (PT) constructed from subsets of the superior temporal gyrus (STG). The effectiveness of the algorithm is demonstrated via the Euclidean positional distance, distance of normal vectors, and curvature before and after the surface matching as well as the comparison with a landmark matching algorithm. The results demonstrate that both the positional and shape variability of the anatomical configurations are being represented by the diffeomorphic maps. PMID:17185000

  3. Backbone and sidechain 1H, 15N and 13C assignments of the KSR1 CA1 domain

    PubMed Central

    Koveal, Dorothy; Pinheiro, Anderson S.; Peti, Wolfgang; Page, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    The backbone and side chain resonance assignments of the murine KSR1 CA1 domain have been determined based on triple-resonance experiments using uniformly [13C, 15N]-labeled protein. This assignment is the first step towards the determination of the three-dimensional structure of the unique KSR1 CA1 domain. PMID:20737253

  4. Opposite monosynaptic scaling of BLP-vCA1 inputs governs hopefulness- and helplessness-modulated spatial learning and memory.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ying; Wang, Zhi-Hao; Jin, Sen; Gao, Di; Liu, Nan; Chen, Shan-Ping; Zhang, Sinan; Liu, Qing; Liu, Enjie; Wang, Xin; Liang, Xiao; Wei, Pengfei; Li, Xiaoguang; Li, Yin; Yue, Chenyu; Li, Hong-Lian; Wang, Ya-Li; Wang, Qun; Ke, Dan; Xie, Qingguo; Xu, Fuqiang; Wang, Liping; Wang, Jian-Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Different emotional states lead to distinct behavioural consequences even when faced with the same challenging events. Emotions affect learning and memory capacities, but the underlying neurobiological mechanisms remain elusive. Here we establish models of learned helplessness (LHL) and learned hopefulness (LHF) by exposing animals to inescapable foot shocks or with anticipated avoidance trainings. The LHF animals show spatial memory potentiation with excitatory monosynaptic upscaling between posterior basolateral amygdale (BLP) and ventral hippocampal CA1 (vCA1), whereas the LHL show memory deficits with an attenuated BLP-vCA1 connection. Optogenetic disruption of BLP-vCA1 inputs abolishes the effects of LHF and impairs synaptic plasticity. By contrast, targeted BLP-vCA1 stimulation rescues the LHL-induced memory deficits and mimics the effects of LHF. BLP-vCA1 stimulation increases synaptic transmission and dendritic plasticity with the upregulation of CREB and intrasynaptic AMPA receptors in CA1. These findings indicate that opposite excitatory monosynaptic scaling of BLP-vCA1 controls LHF- and LHL-modulated spatial memory, revealing circuit-specific mechanisms linking emotions to memory. PMID:27411738

  5. Opposite monosynaptic scaling of BLP–vCA1 inputs governs hopefulness- and helplessness-modulated spatial learning and memory

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ying; Wang, Zhi-Hao; Jin, Sen; Gao, Di; Liu, Nan; Chen, Shan-Ping; Zhang, Sinan; Liu, Qing; Liu, Enjie; Wang, Xin; Liang, Xiao; Wei, Pengfei; Li, Xiaoguang; Li, Yin; Yue, Chenyu; Li, Hong-lian; Wang, Ya-Li; Wang, Qun; Ke, Dan; Xie, Qingguo; Xu, Fuqiang; Wang, Liping; Wang, Jian-Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Different emotional states lead to distinct behavioural consequences even when faced with the same challenging events. Emotions affect learning and memory capacities, but the underlying neurobiological mechanisms remain elusive. Here we establish models of learned helplessness (LHL) and learned hopefulness (LHF) by exposing animals to inescapable foot shocks or with anticipated avoidance trainings. The LHF animals show spatial memory potentiation with excitatory monosynaptic upscaling between posterior basolateral amygdale (BLP) and ventral hippocampal CA1 (vCA1), whereas the LHL show memory deficits with an attenuated BLP–vCA1 connection. Optogenetic disruption of BLP–vCA1 inputs abolishes the effects of LHF and impairs synaptic plasticity. By contrast, targeted BLP–vCA1 stimulation rescues the LHL-induced memory deficits and mimics the effects of LHF. BLP–vCA1 stimulation increases synaptic transmission and dendritic plasticity with the upregulation of CREB and intrasynaptic AMPA receptors in CA1. These findings indicate that opposite excitatory monosynaptic scaling of BLP–vCA1 controls LHF- and LHL-modulated spatial memory, revealing circuit-specific mechanisms linking emotions to memory. PMID:27411738

  6. Microstructure and Growth Mechanism of Ca3Co4O9 Thin Films on Si and Glass Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yufeng; Sutter, Eli; Si, Weidong; Li, Qiang

    2006-03-01

    It has been discovered recently that cobaltates have very large thermoelectric power, which shows that cobaltates hold great promise to be potential integrated heating spreading solution, such as thermal management of microprocessors. Among the cobaltates, Ca3Co4O9 is exhibiting best thermoelectric properties. We have successfully grown highly c-axis orientated Ca3Co4O9 thin films using Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) technique on amorphous substrates, such as glass. High-resolution electron microscopy (HREM), electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) and dispersive x-ray spectrometry (EDS) have been used to study the chemical composition and microstructure of the films. The detailed microstructure and growth mechanism of Ca3Co4O9 thin films will be discussed.

  7. In vitro remineralization of acid-etched human enamel with Ca 3SiO 5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Zhihong; Chang, Jiang; Deng, Yan; Joiner, Andrew

    2010-02-01

    Bioactive and inductive silicate-based bioceramics play an important role in hard tissue prosthetics such as bone and teeth. In the present study, a model was established to study the acid-etched enamel remineralization with tricalcium silicate (Ca 3SiO 5, C 3S) paste in vitro. After soaking in simulated oral fluid (SOF), Ca-P precipitation layer was formed on the enamel surface, with the prolonged soaking time, apatite layer turned into density and uniformity and thickness increasingly from 250 to 350 nm for 1 day to 1.7-1.9 μm for 7 days. Structure of apatite crystals was similar to that of hydroxyapatite (HAp). At the same time, surface smoothness of the remineralized layer is favorable for the oral hygiene. These results suggested that C 3S treated the acid-etched enamel can induce apatite formation, indicating the biomimic mineralization ability, and C 3S could be used as an agent of inductive biomineralization for the enamel prosthesis and protection.

  8. Tonic GABAA conductance bidirectionally controls interneuron firing pattern and synchronization in the CA3 hippocampal network

    PubMed Central

    Pavlov, Ivan; Savtchenko, Leonid P.; Song, Inseon; Koo, Jaeyeon; Pimashkin, Alexey; Rusakov, Dmitri A.; Semyanov, Alexey

    2014-01-01

    The spiking output of interneurons is key for rhythm generation in the brain. However, what controls interneuronal firing remains incompletely understood. Here we combine dynamic clamp experiments with neural network simulations to understand how tonic GABAA conductance regulates the firing pattern of CA3 interneurons. In baseline conditions, tonic GABAA depolarizes these cells, thus exerting an excitatory action while also reducing the excitatory postsynaptic potential (EPSP) amplitude through shunting. As a result, the emergence of weak tonic GABAA conductance transforms the interneuron firing pattern driven by individual EPSPs into a more regular spiking mode determined by the cell intrinsic properties. The increased regularity of spiking parallels stronger synchronization of the local network. With further increases in tonic GABAA conductance the shunting inhibition starts to dominate over excitatory actions and thus moderates interneuronal firing. The remaining spikes tend to follow the timing of suprathreshold EPSPs and thus become less regular again. The latter parallels a weakening in network synchronization. Thus, our observations suggest that tonic GABAA conductance can bidirectionally control brain rhythms through changes in the excitability of interneurons and in the temporal structure of their firing patterns. PMID:24344272

  9. Crystal structure and phonon softening in Ca3Ir4Sn13

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzone, D. G.; Gerber, S.; Gavilano, J. L.; Sibille, R.; Medarde, M.; Delley, B.; Ramakrishnan, M.; Neugebauer, M.; Regnault, L. P.; Chernyshov, D.; Piovano, A.; Fernández-Díaz, T. M.; Keller, L.; Cervellino, A.; Pomjakushina, E.; Conder, K.; Kenzelmann, M.

    2015-07-01

    We investigated the crystal structure and lattice excitations of the ternary intermetallic stannide Ca3Ir4Sn13 using neutron and x-ray scattering techniques. For T >T*≈38 K, the x-ray diffraction data can be satisfactorily refined using the space group P m 3 ¯n . Below T*, the crystal structure is modulated with a propagation vector of q ⃗=(1 /2 ,1 /2 ,0 ) . This may arise from a merohedral twinning in which three tetragonal domains overlap to mimic a higher symmetry, or from a doubling of the cubic unit cell. Neutron diffraction and neutron spectroscopy results show that the structural transition at T* is of a second-order, and that it is well described by mean-field theory. Inelastic neutron scattering data point towards a displacive structural transition at T* arising from the softening of a low-energy phonon mode with an energy gap of Δ (120 K)=1.05 meV. Using density functional theory, the soft phonon mode is identified as a "breathing" mode of the Sn12 icosahedra and is consistent with the thermal ellipsoids of the Sn2 atoms found by single-crystal diffraction data.

  10. Rosiglitazone attenuates inflammation and CA3 neuronal loss following traumatic brain injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hao; Rose, Marie E; Culver, Sherman; Ma, Xiecheng; Dixon, C Edward; Graham, Steven H

    2016-04-15

    Rosiglitazone, a potent peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-γ agonist, has been shown to confer neuroprotective effects in stroke and spinal cord injury, but its role in the traumatic brain injury (TBI) is still controversial. Using a controlled cortical impact model in rats, the current study was designed to determine the effects of rosiglitazone treatment (6 mg/kg at 5 min, 6 h and 24 h post injury) upon inflammation and histological outcome at 21 d after TBI. In addition, the effects of rosiglitazone upon inflammatory cytokine transcription, vestibulomotor behavior and spatial memory function were determined at earlier time points (24 h, 1-5 d, 14-20 d post injury, respectively). Compared with the vehicle-treated group, rosiglitazone treatment suppressed production of TNFα at 24 h after TBI, attenuated activation of microglia/macrophages and increased survival of CA3 neurons but had no effect on lesion volume at 21 d after TBI. Rosiglitazone-treated animals had improved performance on beam balance testing, but there was no difference in spatial memory function as determined by Morris water maze. In summary, this study indicates that rosiglitazone treatment in the first 24 h after TBI has limited anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective effects in rat traumatic injury. Further study using an alternative dosage paradigm and more sensitive behavioral testing may be warranted. PMID:26947332

  11. Stimulating the brain's language network: syntactic ambiguity resolution after TMS to the inferior frontal gyrus and middle temporal gyrus.

    PubMed

    Acheson, Daniel J; Hagoort, Peter

    2013-10-01

    The posterior middle temporal gyrus (MTG) and inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) are two critical nodes of the brain's language network. Previous neuroimaging evidence has supported a dissociation in language comprehension in which parts of the MTG are involved in the retrieval of lexical syntactic information and the IFG in unification operations that maintain, select, and integrate multiple sources of information over time. In the present investigation, we tested for causal evidence of this dissociation by modulating activity in IFG and MTG using an offline TMS procedure: continuous theta-burst stimulation. Lexical-syntactic retrieval was manipulated by using sentences with and without a temporarily word-class (noun/verb) ambiguity (e.g., run). In one group of participants, TMS was applied to the IFG and MTG, and in a control group, no TMS was applied. Eye movements were recorded and quantified at two critical sentence regions: a temporarily ambiguous region and a disambiguating region. Results show that stimulation of the IFG led to a modulation of the ambiguity effect (ambiguous-unambiguous) at the disambiguating sentence region in three measures: first fixation durations, total reading times, and regressive eye movements into the region. Both IFG and MTG stimulation modulated the ambiguity effect for total reading times in the temporarily ambiguous sentence region relative to the control group. The current results demonstrate that an offline repetitive TMS protocol can have influences at a different point in time during online processing and provide causal evidence for IFG involvement in unification operations during sentence comprehension.

  12. High-pressure crystal growth and electromagnetic properties of 5d double-perovskite Ca3OsO6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Hai Luke; Shi, Youguo; Guo, Yanfeng; Li, Jun; Sato, Akira; Sun, Ying; Wang, Xia; Yu, Shan; Sathish, Clastin I.; Yamaura, Kazunari

    2013-05-01

    Single crystals of the osmium-containing compound Ca3OsO6 have been successfully grown under high-pressure conditions, for the first time. The crystal structure of Ca3OsO6 were characterized as an ordered double-perovskite structure of space group P21/n with the Ca and Os atoms being fully ordered at the perovskite B-site. The electromagnetic analysis shows that the crystal exhibits a semiconductor-like behavior below 300 K and undergoes an antiferromagnetic transition at 50 K.

  13. Variations in the Structure of the Prelunate Gyrus in Old World Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Van der Gucht, Estel; Youakim, Michele; Arckens, Lutgarde; Hof, Patrick R.; Baizer, Joan S.

    2010-01-01

    Anatomical and electrophysiological studies have revealed a complex organization in the macaque prelunate gyrus. We investigated the morphology and architecture of the prelunate gyrus in Old World monkeys. In Macaca nemestrina, we observed a sulcus crossing the prelunate gyrus within 2 mm of the vertical meridian representation. In other macaque species and other cercopithecines, we observed substantial variations in sulcal morphology across the prelunate gyrus. We did not find a sulcus in all species, and the location and depth of that indentation on the gyrus varied among species. A deep sulcus was observed in all species that emerged earlier in evolution than macaques, like guenons, baboons, and colobines. We analyzed the regional and parcellation features of the prelunate gyrus in three macaque species, M. maura, M. mulatta and M. radiata, and in Erythrocebus patas, with emphasis on the relation of structure to the distribution of prelunate visual areas. Nonphosphorylated neurofilament protein immunoreactivity permitted the delineation of a novel area in the prelunate gyrus of Old World monkeys, located around the prelunate sulcus. Species-specific patterns were also observed in the prelunate gyrus of the patas monkey, compared to macaques. These observations, as well as a cladistic analysis of the data, suggest an expanded and diversified organization of the prelunate gyrus in some cercopithecoids that may reflect adaptation to specific ecological environments. It was however progressively lost in most macaques, being retained only in species that diverged early in the evolution of the genus Macaca, such as M. nemestrina and M. maura. PMID:16779809

  14. First principles study of the electronic structure and magnetic properties of spin chain compounds: Ca3ZnMnO6 and Ca3ZnCoO6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Jayita; Samanta, Subhasis; Nanda, B. R. K.; Dasgupta, I.

    2016-09-01

    We have studied the electronic structure and magnetism of the spin chain compounds Ca3ZnMnO6 and Ca3ZnCoO6 using density functional theory with generalised gradient approximation (GGA). In agreement with experiment our calculations reveal that high spin (HS) state for Mn4+ ion and low spin (LS) state for Co4+ ion stabilize the magnetic structure of the respective compounds. The magnetic exchange paths, calculated using Nth order muffin-tin orbital downfolding method, shows dominant intra-chain exchange interaction between the magnetic ions (Mn, Co) is antiferromagnetic for Ca3ZnMnO6 and ferromagnetic for Ca3ZnCoO6. The magnetic order of both the compounds is in accordance with the Goodenough-Kanamori-Anderson rules and is consistent with the experimental results. Finally we have investigated the importance of spin-orbit coupling (SOC) in these compounds. While SOC practically has no effect for the Mn system, it is strong enough to favor the spin quantization along the chain direction for the Co system in the LS state.

  15. First principles study of the electronic structure and magnetic properties of spin chain compounds: Ca3ZnMnO6 and Ca3ZnCoO6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Jayita; Samanta, Subhasis; Nanda, B. R. K.; Dasgupta, I.

    2016-09-01

    We have studied the electronic structure and magnetism of the spin chain compounds Ca3ZnMnO6 and Ca3ZnCoO6 using density functional theory with generalised gradient approximation (GGA). In agreement with experiment our calculations reveal that high spin (HS) state for Mn4+ ion and low spin (LS) state for Co4+ ion stabilize the magnetic structure of the respective compounds. The magnetic exchange paths, calculated using Nth order muffin-tin orbital downfolding method, shows dominant intra-chain exchange interaction between the magnetic ions (Mn, Co) is antiferromagnetic for Ca3ZnMnO6 and ferromagnetic for Ca3ZnCoO6. The magnetic order of both the compounds is in accordance with the Goodenough–Kanamori–Anderson rules and is consistent with the experimental results. Finally we have investigated the importance of spin–orbit coupling (SOC) in these compounds. While SOC practically has no effect for the Mn system, it is strong enough to favor the spin quantization along the chain direction for the Co system in the LS state.

  16. First principles study of the electronic structure and magnetic properties of spin chain compounds: Ca3ZnMnO6 and Ca3ZnCoO6.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Jayita; Samanta, Subhasis; Nanda, B R K; Dasgupta, I

    2016-09-21

    We have studied the electronic structure and magnetism of the spin chain compounds Ca3ZnMnO6 and Ca3ZnCoO6 using density functional theory with generalised gradient approximation (GGA). In agreement with experiment our calculations reveal that high spin (HS) state for Mn(4+) ion and low spin (LS) state for Co(4+) ion stabilize the magnetic structure of the respective compounds. The magnetic exchange paths, calculated using Nth order muffin-tin orbital downfolding method, shows dominant intra-chain exchange interaction between the magnetic ions (Mn, Co) is antiferromagnetic for Ca3ZnMnO6 and ferromagnetic for Ca3ZnCoO6. The magnetic order of both the compounds is in accordance with the Goodenough-Kanamori-Anderson rules and is consistent with the experimental results. Finally we have investigated the importance of spin-orbit coupling (SOC) in these compounds. While SOC practically has no effect for the Mn system, it is strong enough to favor the spin quantization along the chain direction for the Co system in the LS state. PMID:27419390

  17. Molecular evidence of synaptic pathology in the CA1 region in schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Matosin, Natalie; Fernandez-Enright, Francesca; Lum, Jeremy S; Engel, Martin; Andrews, Jessica L; Gassen, Nils C; Wagner, Klaus V; Schmidt, Mathias V; Newell, Kelly A

    2016-01-01

    Alterations of postsynaptic density (PSD)95-complex proteins in schizophrenia ostensibly induce deficits in synaptic plasticity, the molecular process underlying cognitive functions. Although some PSD95-complex proteins have been previously examined in the hippocampus in schizophrenia, the status of other equally important molecules is unclear. This is especially true in the cornu ammonis (CA)1 hippocampal subfield, a region that is critically involved in the pathophysiology of the illness. We thus performed a quantitative immunoblot experiment to examine PSD95 and several of its associated proteins in the CA1 region, using post mortem brain samples derived from schizophrenia subjects with age-, sex-, and post mortem interval-matched controls (n=20/group). Our results indicate a substantial reduction in PSD95 protein expression (−61.8%). Further analysis showed additional alterations to the scaffold protein Homer1 (Homer1a: +42.9%, Homer1b/c: −24.6%), with a twofold reduction in the ratio of Homer1b/c:Homer1a isoforms (P=0.011). Metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 (mGluR1) protein levels were significantly reduced (−32.7%), and Preso, a protein that supports interactions between Homer1 or PSD95 with mGluR1, was elevated (+83.3%). Significant reduction in synaptophysin (−27.8%) was also detected, which is a validated marker of synaptic density. These findings support the presence of extensive molecular abnormalities to PSD95 and several of its associated proteins in the CA1 region in schizophrenia, offering a small but significant step toward understanding how proteins in the PSD are altered in the schizophrenia brain, and their relevance to overall hippocampal and cognitive dysfunction in the illness. PMID:27430010

  18. Regulation of GABA Equilibrium Potential by mGluRs in Rat Hippocampal CA1 Neurons.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bo; Rajput, Padmesh S; Kumar, Ujendra; Sastry, Bhagavatula R

    2015-01-01

    The equilibrium potential for GABA-A receptor mediated currents (EGABA) in neonatal central neurons is set at a relatively depolarized level, which is suggested to be caused by a low expression of K+/Cl- co-transporter (KCC2) but a relatively high expression of Na+-K+-Cl- cotransporter (NKCC1). Theta-burst stimulation (TBS) in stratum radiatum induces a negative shift in EGABA in juvenile hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons. In the current study, the effects of TBS on EGABA in neonatal and juvenile hippocampal CA1 neurons and the underlying mechanisms were examined. Metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) are suggested to modulate KCC2 and NKCC1 levels in cortical neurons. Therefore, the involvement of mGluRs in the regulation of KCC2 or NKCC1 activity, and thus EGABA, following TBS was also investigated. Whole-cell patch recordings were made from Wistar rat hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons, in a slice preparation. In neonates, TBS induces a positive shift in EGABA, which was prevented by NKCC1 antisense but not NKCC1 sense mRNA. (RS)-a-Methyl-4-carboxyphenylglycine (MCPG), a group I and II mGluR antagonist, blocked TBS-induced shifts in both juvenile and neonatal hippocampal neurons. While blockade of mGluR1 or mGluR5 alone could interfere with TBS-induced shifts in EGABA in neonates, only a combined blockade could do the same in juveniles. These results indicate that TBS induces a negative shift in EGABA in juvenile hippocampal neurons but a positive shift in neonatal hippocampal neurons via corresponding changes in KCC2 and NKCC1 expressions, respectively. mGluR activation seems to be necessary for both shifts to occur while the specific receptor subtype involved seems to vary. PMID:26389591

  19. Frequency-dependent signal processing in apical dendrites of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, H; Tsubokawa, H; Tsukada, M; Aihara, T

    2014-10-10

    Depending on an animal's behavioral state, hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells receive distinct patterns of excitatory and inhibitory synaptic inputs. The time-dependent changes in the frequencies of these inputs and the nonuniform distribution of voltage-gated channels lead to dynamic fluctuations in membrane conductance. In this study, using a whole-cell patch-clamp method, we attempted to record and analyze the frequency dependencies of membrane responsiveness in Wistar rat hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells following noise current injection directly into dendrites and somata under pharmacological blockade of all synaptic inputs. To estimate the frequency-dependent properties of membrane potential, membrane impedance was determined from the voltage response divided by the input current in the frequency domain. The cell membrane of most neurons showed low-pass filtering properties in all regions. In particular, the properties were strongly expressed in the somata or proximal dendrites. Moreover, the data revealed nonuniform distribution of dendritic impedance, which was high in the intermediate segment of the apical dendritic shaft (∼220-260μm from the soma). The low-pass filtering properties in the apical dendrites were more enhanced by membrane depolarization than those in the somata. Coherence spectral analysis revealed high coherence between the input signal and the output voltage response in the theta-gamma frequency range, and large lags emerged in the distal dendrites in the gamma frequency range. Our results suggest that apical dendrites of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells integrate synaptic inputs according to the frequency components of the input signal along the dendritic segments receiving the inputs.

  20. Regulation of GABA Equilibrium Potential by mGluRs in Rat Hippocampal CA1 Neurons.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bo; Rajput, Padmesh S; Kumar, Ujendra; Sastry, Bhagavatula R

    2015-01-01

    The equilibrium potential for GABA-A receptor mediated currents (EGABA) in neonatal central neurons is set at a relatively depolarized level, which is suggested to be caused by a low expression of K+/Cl- co-transporter (KCC2) but a relatively high expression of Na+-K+-Cl- cotransporter (NKCC1). Theta-burst stimulation (TBS) in stratum radiatum induces a negative shift in EGABA in juvenile hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons. In the current study, the effects of TBS on EGABA in neonatal and juvenile hippocampal CA1 neurons and the underlying mechanisms were examined. Metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) are suggested to modulate KCC2 and NKCC1 levels in cortical neurons. Therefore, the involvement of mGluRs in the regulation of KCC2 or NKCC1 activity, and thus EGABA, following TBS was also investigated. Whole-cell patch recordings were made from Wistar rat hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons, in a slice preparation. In neonates, TBS induces a positive shift in EGABA, which was prevented by NKCC1 antisense but not NKCC1 sense mRNA. (RS)-a-Methyl-4-carboxyphenylglycine (MCPG), a group I and II mGluR antagonist, blocked TBS-induced shifts in both juvenile and neonatal hippocampal neurons. While blockade of mGluR1 or mGluR5 alone could interfere with TBS-induced shifts in EGABA in neonates, only a combined blockade could do the same in juveniles. These results indicate that TBS induces a negative shift in EGABA in juvenile hippocampal neurons but a positive shift in neonatal hippocampal neurons via corresponding changes in KCC2 and NKCC1 expressions, respectively. mGluR activation seems to be necessary for both shifts to occur while the specific receptor subtype involved seems to vary.

  1. Regulation of GABA Equilibrium Potential by mGluRs in Rat Hippocampal CA1 Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Bo; Rajput, Padmesh S.; Kumar, Ujendra; Sastry, Bhagavatula R.

    2015-01-01

    The equilibrium potential for GABA-A receptor mediated currents (EGABA) in neonatal central neurons is set at a relatively depolarized level, which is suggested to be caused by a low expression of K+/Cl- co-transporter (KCC2) but a relatively high expression of Na+-K+-Cl- cotransporter (NKCC1). Theta-burst stimulation (TBS) in stratum radiatum induces a negative shift in EGABA in juvenile hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons. In the current study, the effects of TBS on EGABA in neonatal and juvenile hippocampal CA1 neurons and the underlying mechanisms were examined. Metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) are suggested to modulate KCC2 and NKCC1 levels in cortical neurons. Therefore, the involvement of mGluRs in the regulation of KCC2 or NKCC1 activity, and thus EGABA, following TBS was also investigated. Whole-cell patch recordings were made from Wistar rat hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons, in a slice preparation. In neonates, TBS induces a positive shift in EGABA, which was prevented by NKCC1 antisense but not NKCC1 sense mRNA. (RS)-a-Methyl-4-carboxyphenylglycine (MCPG), a group I and II mGluR antagonist, blocked TBS-induced shifts in both juvenile and neonatal hippocampal neurons. While blockade of mGluR1 or mGluR5 alone could interfere with TBS-induced shifts in EGABA in neonates, only a combined blockade could do the same in juveniles. These results indicate that TBS induces a negative shift in EGABA in juvenile hippocampal neurons but a positive shift in neonatal hippocampal neurons via corresponding changes in KCC2 and NKCC1 expressions, respectively. mGluR activation seems to be necessary for both shifts to occur while the specific receptor subtype involved seems to vary. PMID:26389591

  2. Persistent Sodium Current Drives Conditional Pacemaking in CA1 Pyramidal Neurons under Muscarinic Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Yamada-Hanff, Jason

    2013-01-01

    Hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons are normally quiescent but can fire spontaneously when stimulated by muscarinic agonists. In brain slice recordings from mouse CA1 pyramidal neurons, we examined the ionic basis of this activity using interleaved current-clamp and voltage-clamp experiments. Both in control and after muscarinic stimulation, the steady-state current–voltage curve was dominated by inward TTX-sensitive persistent sodium current (INaP) that activated near −75 mV and increased steeply with depolarization. In control, total membrane current was net outward (hyperpolarizing) near −70 mV so that cells had a stable resting potential. Muscarinic stimulation activated a small nonselective cation current so that total membrane current near −70 mV shifted to become barely net inward (depolarizing). The small depolarization triggers regenerative activation of INaP, which then depolarizes the cell from −70 mV to spike threshold. We quantified the relative contributions of INaP, hyperpolarization-activated cation current (Ih), and calcium current to pacemaking by using the cell's own firing as a voltage command along with specific blockers. TTX-sensitive sodium current was substantial throughout the entire interspike interval, increasing as the membrane potential approached threshold, while both Ih and calcium current were minimal. Thus, spontaneous activity is driven primarily by activation of INaP in a positive feedback loop starting near −70 mV and providing increasing inward current to threshold. These results show that the pacemaking “engine” from INaP is an inherent property of CA1 pyramidal neurons that can be engaged or disengaged by small shifts in net membrane current near −70 mV, as by muscarinic stimulation. PMID:24048831

  3. Dithiothreitol elicits epileptiform activity in CA1 of the guinea pig hippocampal slice

    SciTech Connect

    Tolliver, J.M.; Pellmar, T.C.

    1987-01-01

    Dithiothreitol (DTT) is a sulfhydryl reducing agent used as a radioprotectant. Exposure of hippocampal slices, for 30 min to 0.5 micromoles DTT irreversibly increased the orthodromic population spike amplitude, promoted repetitive firing and induced spontaneous epileptiform activity in the CA1 subfield. The same concentration of the oxidized form of DTT did not increase hippocampal excitability. Although the slope of the population synaptic response to afferent stimulation (popPSP) was unchanged by DTT, the duration of the popPSP was prolonged. Recurrent inhibition was unaffected. DTT probably exerts its effects through an irreversible chemical reaction with cellular components. Possible mechanisms of DTT-induced epileptiform activity are discussed.

  4. Glutamate transporters alterations in the reorganizing dentate gyrus are associated with progressive seizure activity in chronic epileptic rats.

    PubMed

    Gorter, Jan A; Van Vliet, Erwin A; Proper, Evelien A; De Graan, Pierre N E; Ghijsen, Wim E J M; Lopes Da Silva, Fernando H; Aronica, Eleonora

    2002-01-21

    The expression of glial and neuronal glutamate transporter proteins was investigated in the hippocampal region at different time points after electrically induced status epilepticus (SE) in the rat. This experimental rat model for mesial temporal lobe epilepsy is characterized by cell loss, gliosis, synaptic reorganization, and chronic seizures after a latent period. Despite extensive gliosis, immunocytochemistry revealed only an up-regulation of both glial transporters localized at the outer aspect of the inner molecular layer (iml) in chronic epileptic rats. The neuronal EAAC1 transporter was increased in many somata of individual CA1-3 neurons and granule cells that had survived after SE; this up-regulation was still present in the chronic epileptic phase. In contrast, a permanent decrease of EAAC1 immunoreactivity was observed in the iml of the dentate gyrus. This permanent decrease in EAAC1 expression, which was only observed in rats that experienced progressive spontaneous seizure activity, could lead to abnormal glutamate levels in the iml once new abnormal glutamatergic synaptic contacts are formed by means of sprouted mossy fibers. Considering the steady growth of reorganizing mossy fibers in the iml, the absence of a glutamate reuptake mechanism in this region could contribute to progression of spontaneous seizure activity, which occurs with a similar time course.

  5. The chronic administration of cerebrolysin induces plastic changes in the prefrontal cortex and dentate gyrus in aged mice.

    PubMed

    Juárez, Ismael; González, Deniss Janeth; Mena, Raúl; Flores, Gonzalo

    2011-11-01

    Cerebrolysin (Cbl) is a mixture of neuropeptides with effects similar to the endogenous neurotrophic factors and is considered one of the best drugs used in the treatment of dementias such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). In brains with AD, morphological changes in the dendrites of pyramidal neurons of the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and hippocampus have been reported. These changes are reflected particularly in the decrement of both the dendritic tree and spine density. Here we evaluated the effect of this drug on the dendrites of pyramidal neurons of the PFC and CA1 dorsal hippocampus and granule cells from the dentate gyrus (DG) and medium spiny neurons of the nucleus accumbens (NAcc) of aged mice. Cbl (5 ml kg(-1) , i.p.) was administered daily for 60 days to 6-month-old mice. Dendritic morphology was studied by the Golgi-Cox stain procedure followed by Sholl analysis at 8 months ages. In all Cbl-treated mice a significant increase in dendritic spine density and dendritic length in pyramidal neurons of the PFC and granule cells of the DG was observed. Interestingly, the enhancement in dendritic length was close to the soma in pyramidal neurons of the PFC whereas in granule neurons of the DG the increase in dendritic length was further from the soma. Our results suggest that Cbl induces plastic modifications of dendritic morphology in the PFC and DG. These changes may explain the therapeutic effect seen in AD patients treated with Cbl.

  6. Evidence of Mirror Neurons in Human Inferior Frontal Gyrus

    PubMed Central

    Kilner, James M.; Neal, Alice; Weiskopf, Nikolaus; Friston, Karl J.; Frith, Chris D.

    2009-01-01

    There is much current debate about the existence of mirror neurons in humans. To identify mirror neurons in the inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) of humans we employed a repetition suppression paradigm while measuring neural activity with functional magnetic resonance imaging. Subjects either executed or observed a series of actions. Here we show that in the IFG, responses were suppressed both when an executed action was followed by the same rather than a different observed action and when an observed action was followed by the same rather than a different executed action. This pattern of responses is consistent with that predicted by mirror neurons and is evidence of mirror neurons in the human IFG. PMID:19675249

  7. Bidirectional communication between amygdala and fusiform gyrus during facial recognition.

    PubMed

    Herrington, John D; Taylor, James M; Grupe, Daniel W; Curby, Kim M; Schultz, Robert T

    2011-06-15

    Decades of research have documented the specialization of fusiform gyrus (FG) for facial information processes. Recent theories indicate that FG activity is shaped by input from amygdala, but effective connectivity from amygdala to FG remains undocumented. In this fMRI study, 39 participants completed a face recognition task. 11 participants underwent the same experiment approximately four months later. Robust face-selective activation of FG, amygdala, and lateral occipital cortex were observed. Dynamic causal modeling and Bayesian Model Selection (BMS) were used to test the intrinsic connections between these structures, and their modulation by face perception. BMS results strongly favored a dynamic causal model with bidirectional, face-modulated amygdala-FG connections. However, the right hemisphere connections diminished at time 2, with the face modulation parameter no longer surviving Bonferroni correction. These findings suggest that amygdala strongly influences FG function during face perception, and that this influence is shaped by experience and stimulus salience.

  8. Overexpression of SIRT6 in the hippocampal CA1 impairs the formation of long-term contextual fear memory

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Xi; Gao, Yuan; Shi, Hai-Shui; Song, Li; Wang, Jie-Chao; Shao, Juan; Geng, Xu-Hong; Xue, Gai; Li, Jian-Li; Hou, Yan-Ning

    2016-01-01

    Histone modifications have been implicated in learning and memory. Our previous transcriptome data showed that expression of sirtuins 6 (SIRT6), a member of Histone deacetylases (HDACs) family in the hippocampal cornu ammonis 1 (CA1) was decreased after contextual fear conditioning. However, the role of SIRT6 in the formation of memory is still elusive. In the present study, we found that contextual fear conditioning inhibited translational expression of SIRT6 in the CA1. Microinfusion of lentiviral vector-expressing SIRT6 into theCA1 region selectively enhanced the expression of SIRT6 and impaired the formation of long-term contextual fear memory without affecting short-term fear memory. The overexpression of SIRT6 in the CA1 had no effect on anxiety-like behaviors or locomotor activity. Also, we also found that SIRT6 overexpression significantly inhibited the expression of insulin-like factor 2 (IGF2) and amounts of proteins and/or phosphoproteins (e.g. Akt, pAkt, mTOR and p-mTOR) related to the IGF2 signal pathway in the CA1. These results demonstrate that the overexpression of SIRT6 in the CA1 impaired the formation of long-term fear memory, and SIRT6 in the CA1 may negatively modulate the formation of contextual fear memory via inhibiting the IGF signaling pathway. PMID:26732053

  9. Population genetic studies of the Philippine Negritos. III. Identification of the carbonic anhydrase-1 variant with CA1 Guam.

    PubMed Central

    Omoto, K; Ueda, S; Goriki, K; Takahashi, N; Misawa, S; Pagaran, I G

    1981-01-01

    Investigation of blood samples from 277 Mamanwas of northeastern Mindanao, Philippines, confirmed the concentration of the variant carbonic anhydrase-1 (CA1 3N) in this group. The frequency for the variant allele was estimated at .217 +/- .017. It occurs also in the Manobos, the Mongoloid indigenous inhabitants of the same district, although the frequency is low (.019 +/- .008). Survey of samples from other Philippine populations, including the Aeta and the Ifugao of Luzon, failed to find variants. This findings suggests different origins of the Aeta and the Mamanwa, although both are usually referred to as Negritos. The Ca1 3N protein was purified by affinity chromatography using azosulfonamide and rechromatography on a DEAE-Sephadex column. The tryptic peptide pattern of CA1 3N was similar to that of CA1 Guam already reported. Furthermore, amino acid analyses of the tryptic peptides indicated that CA1 3N is characterized by the substitution 253 Gly leads to Arg, confirming the identity of this variant with CA1 Guam. The widespread occurrence of CA1 3 variants in the Western Pacific suggests that this variant was once common in an aboriginal population of this region, from which it was scattered by gene flow. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:6781336

  10. Long-term potentiation increases tyrosine phosphorylation of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunit 2B in rat dentate gyrus in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Rosenblum, K; Dudai, Y; Richter-Levin, G

    1996-01-01

    Long-term potentiation (LTP) is a form of synaptic memory that may subserve developmental and behavioral plasticity. An intensively investigated form of LTP is dependent upon N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors and can be elicited in the dentate gyrus and hippocampal CA1. Induction of this type of LTP is triggered by influx of Ca2+ through activated NMDA receptors, but the downstream mechanisms of induction, and even more so of LTP maintenance, remain controversial. It has been reported that the function of NMDA receptor channel can be regulated by protein tyrosine kinases and protein phosphatases and that inhibition of protein tyrosine kinases impairs induction of LTP. Herein we report that LTP in the dentate gyrus is specifically correlated with tyrosine phosphorylation of the NMDA receptor subunit 2B in an NMDA receptor-dependent manner. The effect is observed with a delay of several minutes after LTP induction and persists in vivo for several hours. The potential relevance of this post-translational modification to mechanisms of LTP and circuit plasticity is discussed. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:8816822

  11. Modulation by adenine nucleotides of epileptiform activity in the CA3 region of rat hippocampal slices

    PubMed Central

    Ross, F M; Brodie, M J; Stone, T W

    1998-01-01

    Hippocampal slices (450 μm) generate epileptiform bursts of an interictal nature when perfused with a zero magnesium medium containing 4-aminopyridine (50 μM). The effect of adenine nucleotides on this activity was investigated.ATP and adenosine depressed this epileptiform activity in a concentration-dependent manner, with both purines being equipotent at concentrations above 10 μM.Adenosine deaminase 0.2 u ml−1, a concentration that annuls the effect of adenosine (50 μM), did not significantly alter the depression of activity caused by ATP (50 μM).8-Cyclopentyl-1, 3-dimethylxanthine (CPT), an A1 receptor antagonist, enhanced the discharge rate significantly and inhibited the depressant effect of both ATP and adenosine such that the net effect of ATP or adenosine plus CPT was excitatory.Several ATP analogues were also tested: α, β-methyleneATP (α, β-meATP), 2-methylthioATP (2-meSATP) and uridine triphosphate (UTP). Only α, β-meATP (10 μM) produced an increase in the frequency of spontaneous activity which suggests a lack of involvement of P2Y or P2U receptors.Suramin and pyridoxalphosphate-6-azophenyl-2′, 4′-disulphonic acid (PPADS), P2 receptor antagonists, failed to inhibit the depression produced by ATP (50 μM). The excitatory effect of α, β-meATP (10 μM) was inhibited by suramin (50 μM) and PPADS (5 μM).ATP therefore depresses epileptiform activity in this model in a manner which is not consistent with the activation of known P1 or P2 receptors, suggesting the involvement of a xanthine-sensitive nucleotide receptor. The results are also indicative of an excitatory P2X receptor existing in the hippocampal CA3 region. PMID:9484856

  12. Seizure induces activation of multiple subtypes of neural progenitors and growth factors in hippocampus with neuronal maturation confined to dentate gyrus

    SciTech Connect

    Indulekha, Chandrasekharan L.; Sanalkumar, Rajendran; Thekkuveettil, Anoopkumar; James, Jackson

    2010-03-19

    Adult hippocampal neurogenesis is altered in response to different physiological and pathological stimuli. GFAP{sup +ve}/nestin{sup +ve} radial glial like Type-1 progenitors are considered to be the resident stem cell population in adult hippocampus. During neurogenesis these Type-1 progenitors matures to GFAP{sup -ve}/nestin{sup +ve} Type-2 progenitors and then to Type-3 neuroblasts and finally differentiates into granule cell neurons. In our study, using pilocarpine-induced seizure model, we showed that seizure initiated activation of multiple progenitors in the entire hippocampal area such as DG, CA1 and CA3. Seizure induction resulted in activation of two subtypes of Type-1 progenitors, Type-1a (GFAP{sup +ve}/nestin{sup +ve}/BrdU{sup +ve}) and Type-1b (GFAP{sup +ve}/nestin{sup +ve}/BrdU{sup -ve}). We showed that majority of Type-1b progenitors were undergoing only a transition from a state of dormancy to activated form immediately after seizures rather than proliferating, whereas Type-1a showed maximum proliferation by 3 days post-seizure induction. Type-2 (GFAP{sup -ve}/nestin{sup +ve}/BrdU{sup +ve}) progenitors were few compared to Type-1. Type-3 (DCX{sup +ve}) progenitors showed increased expression of immature neurons only in DG region by 3 days after seizure induction indicating maturation of progenitors happens only in microenvironment of DG even though progenitors are activated in CA1 and CA3 regions of hippocampus. Also parallel increase in growth factors expression after seizure induction suggests that microenvironmental niche has a profound effect on stimulation of adult neural progenitors.

  13. Instability of spatial encoding by CA1 hippocampal place cells after peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Cardoso-Cruz, Helder; Lima, Deolinda; Galhardo, Vasco

    2011-06-01

    Several authors have shown that the hippocampus responds to painful stimulation and suggested that prolonged painful conditions could lead to abnormal hippocampal functioning. The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether the induction of persistent peripheral neuropathic pain would affect basic hippocampal processing such as the spatial encoding performed by CA1 place cells. These place cells fire preferentially in a certain spatial position in the environment, and this spatial mapping remains stable across multiple experimental sessions even when the animal is removed from the testing environment. To address the effect of prolonged pain on the stability of place cell encoding, we chronically implanted arrays of electrodes in the CA1 hippocampal region of adult rats and recorded the multichannel neuronal activity during a simple food-reinforced alternation task in a U-shaped runway. The activity of place cells was followed over a 3-week period before and after the establishment of an animal model of neuropathy, spared nerve injury. Our results show that the nerve injury increased the number of place fields encoded per cell and the mapping size of the place fields. In addition, there was an increase in in-field coherence while the amount of spatial information content that a single spike conveyed about the animal location decreased over time. Other measures of spatial tuning (in-field firing rate, firing peak and number of spikes) were unchanged between the experimental groups. These results demonstrate that the functioning of spatial place cells is altered during neuropathic pain conditions.

  14. Subicular and CA1 hippocampal projections to the accessory olfactory bulb.

    PubMed

    de la Rosa-Prieto, C; Ubeda-Banon, I; Mohedano-Moriano, A; Pro-Sistiaga, P; Saiz-Sanchez, D; Insausti, R; Martinez-Marcos, A

    2009-02-01

    The hippocampal formation is anatomically and functionally related to the olfactory structures especially in rodents. The entorhinal cortex (EC) receives afferent projections from the main olfactory bulb; this constitutes an olfactory pathway to the hippocampus. In addition to the olfactory system, most mammals possess an accessory olfactory (or vomeronasal) system. The relationships between the hippocampal formation and the vomeronasal system are virtually unexplored. Recently, a centrifugal projection from CA1 to the accessory olfactory bulb has been identified using anterograde tracers. In the study reported herein, experiments using anterograde tracers confirm this projection, and injections of retrograde tracers show the distribution and morphology of a population of CA1 and ventral subicular neurons projecting to the accessory olfactory bulb of rats. These results extend previous descriptions of hippocampal projections to the accessory olfactory bulb by including the ventral subiculum and characterizing the morphology, neurochemistry (double labeling with somatostatin), and distribution of such neurons. These data suggest feedback hippocampal control of chemosensory stimuli in the accessory olfactory bulb. Whether this projection processes spatial information on conspecifics or is involved in learning and memory processes associated with chemical stimuli remains to be elucidated.

  15. Cytomorphometric Changes in Hippocampal CA1 Neurons Exposed to Simulated Microgravity Using Rats as Model.

    PubMed

    Ranjan, Amit; Behari, Jitendra; Mallick, Birendra N

    2014-01-01

    Microgravity and sleep loss lead to cognitive and learning deficits. These behavioral alterations are likely to be associated with cytomorphological changes and loss of neurons. To understand the phenomenon, we exposed rats (225-275 g) to 14 days simulated microgravity (SMg) and compared its effects on CA1 hippocampal neuronal plasticity, with that of normal cage control rats. We observed that the mean area, perimeter, synaptic cleft, and length of active zone of CA1 hippocampal neurons significantly decreased while dendritic arborization and number of spines significantly increased in SMg group as compared with controls. The mean thickness of the postsynaptic density and total dendritic length remained unaltered. The changes may be a compensatory effect induced by exposure to microgravity; however, the effects may be transient or permanent, which need further study. These findings may be useful for designing effective prevention for those, including the astronauts, exposed to microgravity. Further, subject to confirmation, we propose that SMg exposure might be useful for recovery of stroke patients. PMID:24904521

  16. Charge ordering and magnetoresistance of Ca1-xCexMnO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Z.; Greenblatt, M.; Croft, M.

    2001-06-01

    The two-electron (2e) doped Ca1-xCexMnO3 (0<=x<=0.2) system was prepared by sol-gel method and investigated by x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), X-ray diffraction, and temperature and field dependent magnetic and transport measurements. The results are compared in detail to the one-electron (1e)-doped La1-yCayMnO3 system, facilitated by the analogous y=1-2x parametrization as Ca(1+y)/2Ce(1-y)/2MnO3 (0.6<=y<=1.0). The XAS results indicate: that the formal valence of cerium is Ce4+, thereby validating the charge transfer of 2e per doped Ce to Mn. The XAS also shows separate Mn3+ and Mn4+ spectral components, in dramatic contrast to results on 1e-doped systems. Low Ce doping (x=0.025 and 0.05) rapidly stabilizes a robust ferromagnetic component in addition to a persistent antiferromagnetic component in the ordered state. Higher Ce doping (0.075<=x<=0.20) induces a charge/orbital ordering transition that increases with composition to near 255 K. In different composition ranges the magnetoresistance manifests inter-grain-tunneling and a field coupling of the local charge/orbital order parameter mechanisms. The latter mechanism appears to induce a large magnetoresistance, as high as -72%, in Ca0.925Ce0.075MnO3.

  17. Determinants of different deep and superficial CA1 pyramidal cell dynamics during sharp-wave ripples

    PubMed Central

    Aguilar, Juan; Sanchez-Aguilera, Alberto; Viney, Tim J; Gomez-Dominguez, Daniel; Bellistri, Elisa; de la Prida, Liset Menendez

    2016-01-01

    Sharp-wave ripples represent a prominent synchronous activity pattern in the mammalian hippocampus during sleep and immobility. GABAergic interneuronal types are silenced or fire during these events, but the mechanism of pyramidal cell (PC) participation remains elusive. We found opposite membrane polarization of deep (closer to stratum oriens) and superficial (closer to stratum radiatum) rat CA1 PCs during sharp-wave ripples. Using sharp and multi-site recordings in combination with neurochemical profiling, we observed a predominant inhibitory drive of deep calbindin (CB)-immunonegative PCs that contrasts with a prominent depolarization of superficial CB-immunopositive PCs. Biased contribution of perisomatic GABAergic inputs, together with suppression of CA2 PCs, may explain the selection of CA1 PCs during sharp-wave ripples. A deep-superficial gradient interacted with behavioral and spatial effects to determine cell participation during sleep and awake sharp-wave ripples in freely moving rats. Thus, the firing dynamics of hippocampal PCs are exquisitely controlled at subcellular and microcircuit levels in a cell type–selective manner. PMID:26214372

  18. Increased dendritic extent in hippocampal CA1 neurons from aged F344 rats.

    PubMed

    Pyapali, G K; Turner, D A

    1996-01-01

    Age-related dendritic alterations were evaluated in F344 rats following a water maze assessment of spatial memory. Based on the probe trial times, 39% of the aged animals were designated impaired. CA1 pyramidal neurons were labeled intracellularly with neurobiotin in brain slices prepared from these animals. Neurons (aged: n = 15; young: n = 11) were reconstructed using a microscope-based three-dimensional system. Increased dendritic length was observed in the aged neurons both for basal dendrites (aged = 4.54 mm and young = 3.33 mm) and the entire neurons (aged = 14.8 mm and young = 10.8 mm). However, dendritic length values did not correlate with the individual animal's probe trial time. Sholl analysis revealed a diffuse increase in dendritic branch intersections in the cells from aged rats, which on branch order analysis was noted to be due to an increased number of distal branches. Mean electrotonic distance to dendritic terminals, a functional assessment of synaptic efficacy, was longer in the aged neurons (aged = 0.67 lambda and young = 0.55 lambda). These results suggest a lengthening and increased complexity of CA1 pyramidal neurons with successful aging, which may represent either an intrinsic response to aging or a reactive partial denervation response to a loss of afferent inputs.

  19. Facilitated CA1 hippocampal synaptic plasticity in dystrophin-deficient mice: role for GABAA receptors?

    PubMed

    Vaillend, Cyrille; Billard, Jean-Marie

    2002-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is associated with cognitive deficits that may result from a deficiency in the brain isoform of the cytoskeletal membrane-associated protein, dystrophin. CA1 hippocampal short-term potentiation (STP) of synaptic transmission is increased in dystrophin-deficient mdx mice, which has been attributed to a facilitated activation of NMDA receptors. In this study, extracellular recordings in the hippocampal slice preparation were used first to determine the consequences of this alteration on short-term depression (STD). STD induction was facilitated in mdx as compared with wild-type mice in a control medium. Because brain dystrophin deficiency results in a decreased number of gamma-aminobutyric acid A (GABAA)-receptor clusters, we tested the hypothesis that neuronal disinhibition contributes to the enhanced synaptic plasticity in mdx mice. We found that the GABAA receptor antagonist, bicuculline, increased basal neurotransmission in wild-type, but not in mdx mice and prevented the enhanced STP and STD in the CA1 area of slices from mdx mice. The possibility that altered GABA mechanisms underlie the facilitation of NMDA receptor-dependent synaptic plasticity in mdx mice is discussed.

  20. Developmental Changes in Hippocampal CA1 Single Neuron Firing and Theta Activity during Associative Learning

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jangjin; Goldsberry, Mary E.; Harmon, Thomas C.; Freeman, John H.

    2016-01-01

    Hippocampal development is thought to play a crucial role in the emergence of many forms of learning and memory, but ontogenetic changes in hippocampal activity during learning have not been examined thoroughly. We examined the ontogeny of hippocampal function by recording theta and single neuron activity from the dorsal hippocampal CA1 area while rat pups were trained in associative learning. Three different age groups [postnatal days (P)17-19, P21-23, and P24-26] were trained over six sessions using a tone conditioned stimulus (CS) and a periorbital stimulation unconditioned stimulus (US). Learning increased as a function of age, with the P21-23 and P24-26 groups learning faster than the P17-19 group. Age- and learning-related changes in both theta and single neuron activity were observed. CA1 pyramidal cells in the older age groups showed greater task-related activity than the P17-19 group during CS-US paired sessions. The proportion of trials with a significant theta (4–10 Hz) power change, the theta/delta ratio, and theta peak frequency also increased in an age-dependent manner. Finally, spike/theta phase-locking during the CS showed an age-related increase. The findings indicate substantial developmental changes in dorsal hippocampal function that may play a role in the ontogeny of learning and memory. PMID:27764172

  1. Serotonin excites hippocampal CA1 GABAergic interneurons at the stratum radiatum-stratum lacunosum moleculare border.

    PubMed

    Wyskiel, Daniel R; Andrade, Rodrigo

    2016-09-01

    The hippocampus receives robust serotonergic innervation that is thought to control the excitability of both pyramidal cells and GABAergic interneurons. Previous work has addressed serotonergic regulation of pyramidal cells but considerable gaps remain in our understanding of how serotonin regulates different interneuron subclasses. 5-HT2A receptors (5-HT2A Rs) appear to localize predominantly, if not solely, on interneurons in the hippocampus and have been implicated in the regulation of hippocampal function including mnemonic and novelty recognition processes. Interneurons are functionally diverse. Therefore in the current work, we have used a BAC transgenic mouse line expressing EGFP under the control of the 5-HT2A R promoter to identify the interneuron subtype(s) regulated by serotonin via 5-HT2A Rs. We find that EGFP expression in this mouse identifies a group of interneurons that resides predominantly along the border of the stratum radiatum (SR) and stratum lacunosum moleculare (SLM) of the CA1 region. We then show that these cells are depolarized and excited by serotonin acting through 5-HT2A Rs and appear to belong predominantly to the perforant pathway-associated and Schaffer collateral/commissural pathway-associated subtypes. These results indicate that serotonin interneurons expressing 5-HT2A Rs are localized primarily along the SR-SLM border of the CA1 region and represent a newly identified target for serotonin regulation in the hippocampus. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Space and time sequence and mosaicism of neurogenesis in hippocampal area CA1 in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Nazarevskaya, G.D.; Reznikov, K. Yu.

    1986-02-01

    The study of the times and sequence of neuron formation in various structures of the mammalian brain has made substantial progress thanks to the use of autoradiographic techniques, by which the germinative precursors of neurons can be tagged with tritium-thymidine and the subsequent fate of the labeled cells can be followed. The authors study the space and time sequence of neuron formation and look for the presence of mosaicism of neurogenesis in area CA1 of Ammon's horn of the mouse hippocampus, one of the most regularly arranged hippocampal areas. An analysis of the distribution of intensively labeled neurons in areas CA1 showed the presence of groups of intensively labeled neurons alternating with unlabeled and weakly labeled cells.. Mice receiving tritium-thymidine on the 13th-16th day of embryogenesis were most marked when the isotope was injected on the 14th-15th day of embroygeneisis. The investigation showed that a mosaic pattern of neurogenesis exists in the hippocampus, just as in the neocortex, and it can be regarded as the result of asynchronous production of neurons by local areas of the germinative zone, each of which constructs a radial segment of cortex.

  3. Simple, biologically-constrained CA1 pyramidal cell models using an intact, whole hippocampus context

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Katie A.; Huh, Carey Y. L.; Amilhon, Benedicte; Williams, Sylvain; Skinner, Frances K.

    2014-01-01

    The hippocampus is a heavily studied brain structure due to its involvement in learning and memory. Detailed models of excitatory, pyramidal cells in hippocampus have been developed using a range of experimental data. These models have been used to help us understand, for example, the effects of synaptic integration and voltage gated channel densities and distributions on cellular responses. However, these cellular outputs need to be considered from the perspective of the networks in which they are embedded. Using modeling approaches, if cellular representations are too detailed, it quickly becomes computationally unwieldy to explore large network simulations. Thus, simple models are preferable, but at the same time they need to have a clear, experimental basis so as to allow physiologically based understandings to emerge. In this article, we describe the development of simple models of CA1 pyramidal cells, as derived in a well-defined experimental context of an intact, whole hippocampus preparation expressing population oscillations. These models are based on the intrinsic properties and frequency-current profiles of CA1 pyramidal cells, and can be used to build, fully examine, and analyze large networks. PMID:25383182

  4. Serotonin excites hippocampal CA1 GABAergic interneurons at the stratum radiatum-stratum lacunosum moleculare border.

    PubMed

    Wyskiel, Daniel R; Andrade, Rodrigo

    2016-09-01

    The hippocampus receives robust serotonergic innervation that is thought to control the excitability of both pyramidal cells and GABAergic interneurons. Previous work has addressed serotonergic regulation of pyramidal cells but considerable gaps remain in our understanding of how serotonin regulates different interneuron subclasses. 5-HT2A receptors (5-HT2A Rs) appear to localize predominantly, if not solely, on interneurons in the hippocampus and have been implicated in the regulation of hippocampal function including mnemonic and novelty recognition processes. Interneurons are functionally diverse. Therefore in the current work, we have used a BAC transgenic mouse line expressing EGFP under the control of the 5-HT2A R promoter to identify the interneuron subtype(s) regulated by serotonin via 5-HT2A Rs. We find that EGFP expression in this mouse identifies a group of interneurons that resides predominantly along the border of the stratum radiatum (SR) and stratum lacunosum moleculare (SLM) of the CA1 region. We then show that these cells are depolarized and excited by serotonin acting through 5-HT2A Rs and appear to belong predominantly to the perforant pathway-associated and Schaffer collateral/commissural pathway-associated subtypes. These results indicate that serotonin interneurons expressing 5-HT2A Rs are localized primarily along the SR-SLM border of the CA1 region and represent a newly identified target for serotonin regulation in the hippocampus. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27328460

  5. Neural Androgen Receptor Deletion Impairs the Temporal Processing of Objects and Hippocampal CA1-Dependent Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Picot, Marie; Billard, Jean-Marie; Dombret, Carlos; Albac, Christelle; Karameh, Nida; Daumas, Stéphanie; Hardin-Pouzet, Hélène; Mhaouty-Kodja, Sakina

    2016-01-01

    We studied the role of testosterone, mediated by the androgen receptor (AR), in modulating temporal order memory for visual objects. For this purpose, we used male mice lacking AR specifically in the nervous system. Control and mutant males were gonadectomized at adulthood and supplemented with equivalent amounts of testosterone in order to normalize their hormonal levels. We found that neural AR deletion selectively impaired the processing of temporal information for visual objects, without affecting classical object recognition or anxiety-like behavior and circulating corticosterone levels, which remained similar to those in control males. Thus, mutant males were unable to discriminate between the most recently seen object and previously seen objects, whereas their control littermates showed more interest in exploring previously seen objects. Because the hippocampal CA1 area has been associated with temporal memory for visual objects, we investigated whether neural AR deletion altered the functionality of this region. Electrophysiological analysis showed that neural AR deletion affected basal glutamate synaptic transmission and decreased the magnitude of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) activation and high-frequency stimulation-induced long-term potentiation. The impairment of NMDAR function was not due to changes in protein levels of receptor. These results provide the first evidence for the modulation of temporal processing of information for visual objects by androgens, via AR activation, possibly through regulation of NMDAR signaling in the CA1 area in male mice.

  6. CA1-specific deletion of NMDA receptors induces abnormal renewal of a learned fear response.

    PubMed

    Hirsch, Silke J; Regmi, Nanda L; Birnbaum, Shari G; Greene, Robert W

    2015-11-01

    CA1 hippocampal N-methyl-d-aspartate-receptors (NMDARs) are necessary for contextually related learning and memory processes. Extinction, a form of learning, has been shown to require intact hippocampal NMDAR signalling. Renewal of fear expression can occur after fear extinction training, when the extinguished fear stimulus is presented in an environmental context different from the training context and thus, renewal is dependent on contextual memory. In this study, we show that a Grin1 knock-out (loss of the essential NR1 subunit for the NMDAR) restricted to the bilateral CA1 subfield of the dorsal hippocampus does not affect acquisition of learned fear, but does attenuate extinction of a cued fear response even when presented in the extinction-training context. We propose that failure to remember the (safe) extinction context is responsible for the abnormal fear response and suggest it is a dysfunctional renewal. The results highlight the difference in outcome of extinguished fear memory resulting from a partial rather than complete loss of function of the hippocampus and suggest a potential mechanism for abnormally increased fear expression in PTSD.

  7. High affinity group III mGluRs regulate mossy fiber input to CA3 interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Cosgrove, Kathleen E.; Meriney, Stephen D.; Barrionuevo, Germán

    2010-01-01

    Stratum lacunosum-moleculare interneurons (L-Mi) in hippocampal area CA3 target the apical dendrite of pyramidal cells providing feedforward inhibition. Here we report that selective activation of group III metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) 4/8 with L-(+)-2-amino-4-phosphnobytyric acid (L-AP4; 10 μM) decreased the probability of glutamate release from the mossy fiber (MF) terminals synapsing onto L-Mi. Consistent with this interpretation, application of L-AP4 in the presence of 3 mM strontium decreased the frequency of asynchronous MF EPSCs in L-Mi. Furthermore, the dose response curve showed that L-AP4 at 400 μM produced no further decrease in MF EPSC amplitude compared to 20 μM L-AP4, indicating the lack of mGluRs 7 at these MF terminals. We also found that one mechanism of mGluRs 4/8-mediated inhibition of release is linked to N-type voltage gated calcium channels at MF terminals. Application of the group III mGluR antagonist MSOP (100 μM) demonstrated that mGluRs 4/8 are neither tonically active nor activated by low and moderate frequencies of activity. However, trains of stimuli to the MF at 20 and 40Hz delivered during the application of MSOP revealed a relief of inhibition of transmitter release and an increase in the overall probability of action potential firing in the postsynaptic L-Mi. Interestingly, the time to first action potential was significantly shorter in the presence of MSOP, indicating that mGluR 4/8 activation delays L-Mi firing in response to MF activity. Taken together, our data demonstrate that the timing and probability of action potentials in L-Mi evoked by MF synaptic input is regulated by the activation of presynaptic high affinity group III mGluRs. PMID:20824730

  8. CA1 neurons in the human hippocampus are critical for autobiographical memory, mental time travel, and autonoetic consciousness

    PubMed Central

    Bartsch, Thorsten; Döhring, Juliane; Rohr, Axel; Jansen, Olav; Deuschl, Günther

    2011-01-01

    Autobiographical memories in our lives are critically dependent on temporal lobe structures. However, the contribution of CA1 neurons in the human hippocampus to the retrieval of episodic autobiographical memory remains elusive. In patients with a rare acute transient global amnesia, highly focal lesions confined to the CA1 field of the hippocampus can be detected on MRI. We studied the effect of these lesions on autobiographical memory using a detailed autobiographical interview including the remember/know procedure. In 14 of 16 patients, focal lesions in the CA1 sector of the hippocampal cornu ammonis were detected. Autobiographical memory was significantly affected over all time periods, including memory for remote periods. Impairment of episodic memory and autonoetic consciousness exhibited a strong temporal gradient extending 30 to 40 y into the past. These results highlight the distinct and critical role of human hippocampal CA1 neurons in autobiographical memory retrieval and for re-experiencing detailed episodic memories. PMID:21987814

  9. Breast Cancer 1 (BrCa1) May Be behind Decreased Lipogenesis in Adipose Tissue from Obese Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Ortega, Francisco J.; Moreno-Navarrete, José M.; Mayas, Dolores; García-Santos, Eva; Gómez-Serrano, María; Rodriguez-Hermosa, José I.; Ruiz, Bartomeu; Ricart, Wifredo; Tinahones, Francisco J.; Frühbeck, Gema; Peral, Belen; Fernández-Real, José M.

    2012-01-01

    Context Expression and activity of the main lipogenic enzymes is paradoxically decreased in obesity, but the mechanisms behind these findings are poorly known. Breast Cancer 1 (BrCa1) interacts with acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) reducing the rate of fatty acid biosynthesis. In this study, we aimed to evaluate BrCa1 in human adipose tissue according to obesity and insulin resistance, and in vitro cultured adipocytes. Research Design and Methods BrCa1 gene expression, total and phosphorylated (P-) BrCa1, and ACC were analyzed in adipose tissue samples obtained from a total sample of 133 subjects. BrCa1 expression was also evaluated during in vitro differentiation of human adipocytes and 3T3-L1 cells. Results BrCa1 gene expression was significantly up-regulated in both omental (OM; 1.36-fold, p = 0.002) and subcutaneous (SC; 1.49-fold, p = 0.001) adipose tissue from obese subjects. In parallel with increased BrCa1 mRNA, P-ACC was also up-regulated in SC (p = 0.007) as well as in OM (p = 0.010) fat from obese subjects. Consistent with its role limiting fatty acid biosynthesis, both BrCa1 mRNA (3.5-fold, p<0.0001) and protein (1.2-fold, p = 0.001) were increased in pre-adipocytes, and decreased during in vitro adipogenesis, while P-ACC decreased during differentiation of human adipocytes (p = 0.005) allowing lipid biosynthesis. Interestingly, BrCa1 gene expression in mature adipocytes was restored by inflammatory stimuli (macrophage conditioned medium), whereas lipogenic genes significantly decreased. Conclusions The specular findings of BrCa1 and lipogenic enzymes in adipose tissue and adipocytes reported here suggest that BrCa1 might help to control fatty acid biosynthesis in adipocytes and adipose tissue from obese subjects. PMID:22666314

  10. Doping-enhanced antiferromagnetism in Ca1 -xLaxFeAs2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawasaki, Shinji; Mabuchi, Tomosuke; Maeda, Satoki; Adachi, Tomoki; Mizukami, Tasuku; Kudo, Kazutaka; Nohara, Minoru; Zheng, Guo-qing

    2015-11-01

    In iron pnictides, high temperature superconductivity emerges after suppressing antiferromagnetism by doping. Here, we show that antiferromagnetism in Ca1 -xLaxFeAs2 is robust against and even enhanced by doping. Using 75As-nuclear magnetic resonance and nuclear quadrupole resonance techniques, we find that an antiferromagnetic order occurs below the Néel temperature TN=62 K at a high doping concentration (x =0.15 ) where superconductivity sets in at the transition temperature Tc=35 K. In the superconducting state coexisting with antiferromagnetism, the nuclear-spin-lattice relaxation rate 1 /T1 becomes proportional to T , indicating gapless excitations. Unexpectedly, TN is enhanced with increasing doping, rising up to TN=70 K at x =0.24 . The obtained phase diagram of this system enriches the physics of iron-based high-Tc superconductors.

  11. Axonal Filtering Allows Reliable Output during Dendritic Plateau-Driven Complex Spiking in CA1 Neurons.

    PubMed

    Apostolides, Pierre F; Milstein, Aaron D; Grienberger, Christine; Bittner, Katie C; Magee, Jeffrey C

    2016-02-17

    In CA1 pyramidal neurons, correlated inputs trigger dendritic plateau potentials that drive neuronal plasticity and firing rate modulation. Given the strong electrotonic coupling between soma and axon, the >25 mV depolarization associated with the plateau could propagate through the axon to influence action potential initiation, propagation, and neurotransmitter release. We examined this issue in brain slices, awake mice, and a computational model. Despite profoundly inactivating somatic and proximal axon Na(+) channels, plateaus evoked action potentials that recovered to full amplitude in the distal axon (>150 μm) and triggered neurotransmitter release similar to regular spiking. This effect was due to strong attenuation of plateau depolarizations by axonal K(+) channels, allowing full axon repolarization and Na(+) channel deinactivation. High-pass filtering of dendritic plateaus by axonal K(+) channels should thus enable accurate transmission of gain-modulated firing rates, allowing neuronal firing to be efficiently read out by downstream regions as a simple rate code. PMID:26833135

  12. Environmental enrichment restores CA1 hippocampal LTP and reduces severity of seizures in epileptic mice.

    PubMed

    Morelli, Emanuela; Ghiglieri, Veronica; Pendolino, Valentina; Bagetta, Vincenza; Pignataro, Annabella; Fejtova, Anna; Costa, Cinzia; Ammassari-Teule, Martine; Gundelfinger, Eckart D; Picconi, Barbara; Calabresi, Paolo

    2014-11-01

    We have analyzed the effects of environmental enrichment (EE) in a seizure-prone mouse model in which the genetic disruption of the presynaptic protein Bassoon leads to structural and functional alterations in the hippocampus and causes early spontaneous seizures mimicking human neurodevelopmental disorders. One-month EE starting at P21 reduced seizure severity, preserved long-term potentiation (LTP) and paired-pulse synaptic responses in the hippocampal CA1 neuronal population and prevented the reduction of spine density and dendrite branching of pyramidal neurons. These data demonstrate that EE exerts its therapeutic effect by normalizing multiple aspects of hippocampal function and provide experimental support for its use in the optimization of existent treatments.

  13. Electrical and optical stimulation of luminescence in Ca 1-xCd xS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viney, I. V. F.; Arterton, B. W.; Ray, B.; Brightwell, J. W.

    1994-04-01

    Mixtures of CaS and CdS treated at 1020°C for 2 h in a nitrogen atmosphere with an excess sulphur pressure have resulted in solid solutions, Ca 1- xCd xS up to x=0.41. Fluorescence emission studies have indicated massively enhanced broad band emission spectra for x between 0.01 and 0.10 at both 77 and 300 K. Electroluminescence studies of copper-coated powder-based samples under AC excitation conditions at x=0.05 have indicated significant emission intensities broadly aligned spectrally with those from photo-stimulation at the same composition. Further investigations are being directed at optimization of composition, particle size, layer thickness and excitation conditions for enhanced electroluminescence emission intensities.

  14. Spatial Organization of NG2 Glial Cells and Astrocytes in Rat Hippocampal CA1 Region

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Guangjin; Wang, Wei; Zhou, Min

    2014-01-01

    Similar to astrocytes, NG2 glial cells are uniformly distributed in the central nervous system (CNS). However, little is known about the interspatial relationship, nor the functional interactions between these two star-shaped glial subtypes. Confocal morphometric analysis showed that NG2 immunostained cells are spatially organized as domains in rat hippocampal CA1 region and that each NG2 glial domain occupies a spatial volume of ~ 178, 364 μm3. The processes of NG2 glia and astrocytes overlap extensively; each NG2 glial domain interlaces with the processes deriving from 5.8 ± 0.4 neighboring astrocytes, while each astrocytic domain accommodates processes stemming from 4.5 ± 0.3 abutting NG2 glia. In CA1 stratum radiatum, the cell bodies of morphologically identified glial cells often appear to make direct somatic-somata contact, termed as doublets. We used dual patch recording and post-recording NG2/GFAP double staining to determine the glial identities of these doublets. We show that among 44 doublets, 50% were NG2 glia-astrocyte pairs, while another 38.6% and 11.4% were astrocyte-astrocyte and NG2 glia-NG2 glia pairs, respectively. In dual patch recording, neither electrical coupling nor intercellular biocytin transfer was detected in astrocyte-NG2 glia or NG2 glia-NG2 glia doublets. Altogether, although NG2 glia and astrocytes are not gap junction coupled, their cell bodies and processes are interwoven extensively. The anatomical and physiological relationships revealed in this study should facilitate future studies to understand the metabolic coupling and functional communication between NG2 glia and astrocytes. PMID:24339242

  15. Neuroprotective effects of Withania coagulans root extract on CA1 hippocampus following cerebral ischemia in rats

    PubMed Central

    Sarbishegi, Maryam; Heidari, Zahra; Mahmoudzadeh- Sagheb, Hamidreza; Valizadeh, Moharram; Doostkami, Mahboobeh

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Oxygen free radicals may be implicated in the pathogenesis of ischemia reperfusion damage. The beneficial effects of antioxidant nutrients, as well as complex plant extracts, on cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injuries are well known. This study was conducted to determine the effects of the hydro-alcoholic root extract of Withania coagulans on CA1 hippocampus oxidative damages following global cerebral ischemia/reperfusion in rat. Materials and Methods: Male Wistar rats were randomly divided in five groups: control, sham operated, Ischemia/ Reperfiusion (IR), and Withania Coagulans Extract (WCE) 500 and 1000mg/kg + I/R groups. Ischemia was induced by ligation of bilateral common carotid arteries for 30 min after 30 days of WCE administration. Three days after, the animals were sacrificed, their brains were fixed for histological analysis (NISSL and TUNEL staining) and some samples were prepared for measurement of malondialdehyde (MDA) level and superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity in hippocampus. Results: WCE showed neuroprotective activity by significant decrease in MDA level and increase in the SOD, CAT and GPx activity in pretreated groups as compared to I/R groups (p<0.001). The number of intact neurons was increased while the number of TUNEL positive neurons in CA1 hippocampal region in pretreated groups were decreased as compared to I/R group (p<0.001). Conclusion: WCE showed potent neuroprotective activity against oxidative stress-induced injuries caused by global cerebral ischemia/ reperfusion in rats probably by radical scavenging and antioxidant activities. PMID:27516980

  16. Conditions sufficient for nonsynaptic epileptogenesis in the CA1 region of hippocampal slices.

    PubMed

    Bikson, Marom; Baraban, Scott C; Durand, Dominique M

    2002-01-01

    Nonsynaptic mechanisms exert a powerful influence on seizure threshold. It is well-established that nonsynaptic epileptiform activity can be induced in hippocampal slices by reducing extracellular Ca(2+) concentration. We show here that nonsynaptic epileptiform activity can be readily induced in vitro in normal (2 mM) Ca(2+) levels. Those conditions sufficient for nonsynaptic epileptogenesis in the CA1 region were determined by pharmacologically mimicking the effects of Ca(2+) reduction in normal Ca(2+) levels. Increasing neuronal excitability, by removing extracellular Mg(2+) and increasing extracellular K(+) (6-15 mM), induced epileptiform activity that was suppressed by postsynaptic receptor antagonists [D-(-)-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid, picrotoxin, and 6,7-dinitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione] and was therefore synaptic in nature. Similarly, epileptiform activity induced when neuronal excitability was increased in the presence of K(Ca) antagonists (verruculogen, charybdotoxin, norepinephrine, tetraethylammonium salt, and Ba(2+)) was found to be synaptic in nature. Decreases in osmolarity also failed to induce nonsynaptic epileptiform activity in the CA1 region. However, increasing neuronal excitability (by removing extracellular Mg(2+) and increasing extracellular K(+)) in the presence of Cd(2+), a nonselective Ca(2+) channel antagonist, or veratridine, a persistent sodium conductance enhancer, induced spontaneous nonsynaptic epileptiform activity in vitro. Both novel models were characterized using intracellular and ion-selective electrodes. The results of this study suggest that reducing extracellular Ca(2+) facilitates bursting by increasing neuronal excitability and inhibiting Ca(2+) influx, which might, in turn, enhance a persistent sodium conductance. Furthermore, these data show that nonsynaptic mechanisms can contribute to epileptiform activity in normal Ca(2+) levels. PMID:11784730

  17. Effect of acute fentanyl treatment on synaptic plasticity in the hippocampal CA1 region in rats

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Hai; Xu, Yueming; Liu, Fucun; Wang, Guowei; Hu, Sanjue

    2015-01-01

    Postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD), mainly characterized by short-term decline of learning and memory, occurs after operations under anesthesia. However, the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. The μ-opioid receptors (MOR) are highly expressed in interneurons of hippocampus, and is believed to be critical for the dysfunction of synaptic plasticity between hippocampal neurons. Therefore, we investigated the effect of fentanyl, a strong agonist of MOR and often used for anesthesia and analgesia in clinical settings, on hippocampal synaptic plasticity in the Schaffer-collateral CA1 pathway during acute exposure and washout in vitro. Our results revealed that acute fentanyl exposure (0.01, 0.1, 1 μM) dose-dependently increased the field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSPs), which was prevented by pre-administration of picrotoxin (50 μM) or MOR antagonist D-Phe-Cys-Tyr-D-Trp-Orn-Thr-Phe-Thr-NH2 (CTOP, 10 μM). While fentanyl exposure-increased fEPSPs amplitude was prevented by picrotoxin [an inhibitor of γ-aminobutyric acid receptor (GABAR)] treatment or fentanyl washout, pretreatment of picrotoxin failed to prevent the fentanyl-impaired long-term potentiation (LTP) of synaptic strength as well as the fentanyl-enhanced long-term depression (LTD). These results demonstrated that fentanyl acute exposure and washout increases hippocampal excitability in the Schaffer-collateral CA1 pathway, depending on disinhibiting interneurons after MOR activation. In addition, fentanyl acute exposure and washout modulated synaptic plasticity, but the inhibitory activation was not critical. Elucidating the detailed mechanisms for synaptic dysfunction after fentanyl exposure and washout may provide insights into POCD generation after fentanyl anesthesia. PMID:26578961

  18. Structural hemispheric asymmetries in the human precentral gyrus hand representation.

    PubMed

    Rose, S; Rowland, T; Pannek, K; Baumann, F; Coulthard, A; McCombe, P; Henderson, R

    2012-05-17

    The superior region of the precentral gyrus (preCG) is known to be actively involved with hand function and has been proposed as a possible neural correlate of handedness. To test this hypothesis, we used a combined voxel-based morphometric (VBM) asymmetry analysis of structural MRI, along with diffusion MRI (dMRI) tractography to investigate laterality indices of corticomotor white matter (WM) pathways, based on measures of fractional anisotropy (FA). The relationship between measures of motor performance and FA laterality indices was also investigated. In a cohort of 14 right-handed healthy participants, the VBM asymmetry analysis revealed an area within the preCG associated with hand representation. The tractography analysis revealed that this region possessed a number of major WM intrahemispheric connections to the brain stem, thalamus, cerebellum, postcentral, caudal middle and superior frontal, and superior and inferior parietal corticomotor regions. Within the corticospinal tracts, we found FA was significantly higher in the left hemisphere compared with the right. Furthermore, significant correlations were found between FA asymmetry measures projecting from this region, namely corticospinal tracts and those connecting the postcentral gyri, with grip strength and finger-tapping performance, respectively. A number of the motor pathways projecting from this region also exhibited leftward asymmetry of FA distributions. The findings from this study highlight the role of the left motor cortex in skilled motor performance and provide a framework for the study of the relationship between handedness and preCG hand representation in larger normative populations. PMID:22433295

  19. Effect of dentate gyrus disruption on remembering what happened where

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Woon Ryoung; Lee, Jong Won; Sun, Woong; Lee, Sung-Hyun; Choi, June-Seek; Jung, Min Whan

    2015-01-01

    Our previous studies using Bax knockout (Bax-KO) mice, in which newly generated granule cells continue to accumulate, disrupting neural circuitry specifically in the dentate gyrus (DG), suggest the involvement of the DG in binding the internally-generated spatial map with sensory information on external landmarks (spatial map-object association) in forming a distinct spatial context for each environment. In order to test whether the DG is also involved in binding the internal spatial map with sensory information on external events (spatial map-event association), we tested the behavior of Bax-KO mice in a delayed-non-match-to-place task. Performance of Bax-KO mice was indistinguishable from that of wild-type mice as long as there was no interruption during the delay period (tested up to 5 min), suggesting that on-line maintenance of working memory is intact in Bax-KO mice. However, Bax-KO mice showed profound performance deficits when they were removed from the maze during the delay period (interruption condition) with a sufficiently long (65 s) delay, suggesting that episodic memory was impaired in Bax-KO mice. Together with previous findings, these results suggest the role of the DG in binding spatial information derived from dead reckoning and nonspatial information, such as external objects and events, in the process of encoding episodic memory. PMID:26175676

  20. Decoding and disrupting left midfusiform gyrus activity during word reading.

    PubMed

    Hirshorn, Elizabeth A; Li, Yuanning; Ward, Michael J; Richardson, R Mark; Fiez, Julie A; Ghuman, Avniel Singh

    2016-07-19

    The nature of the visual representation for words has been fiercely debated for over 150 y. We used direct brain stimulation, pre- and postsurgical behavioral measures, and intracranial electroencephalography to provide support for, and elaborate upon, the visual word form hypothesis. This hypothesis states that activity in the left midfusiform gyrus (lmFG) reflects visually organized information about words and word parts. In patients with electrodes placed directly in their lmFG, we found that disrupting lmFG activity through stimulation, and later surgical resection in one of the patients, led to impaired perception of whole words and letters. Furthermore, using machine-learning methods to analyze the electrophysiological data from these electrodes, we found that information contained in early lmFG activity was consistent with an orthographic similarity space. Finally, the lmFG contributed to at least two distinguishable stages of word processing, an early stage that reflects gist-level visual representation sensitive to orthographic statistics, and a later stage that reflects more precise representation sufficient for the individuation of orthographic word forms. These results provide strong support for the visual word form hypothesis and demonstrate that across time the lmFG is involved in multiple stages of orthographic representation. PMID:27325763

  1. Dentate Gyrus Circuitry Features Improve Performance of Sparse Approximation Algorithms

    PubMed Central

    Petrantonakis, Panagiotis C.; Poirazi, Panayiota

    2015-01-01

    Memory-related activity in the Dentate Gyrus (DG) is characterized by sparsity. Memory representations are seen as activated neuronal populations of granule cells, the main encoding cells in DG, which are estimated to engage 2–4% of the total population. This sparsity is assumed to enhance the ability of DG to perform pattern separation, one of the most valuable contributions of DG during memory formation. In this work, we investigate how features of the DG such as its excitatory and inhibitory connectivity diagram can be used to develop theoretical algorithms performing Sparse Approximation, a widely used strategy in the Signal Processing field. Sparse approximation stands for the algorithmic identification of few components from a dictionary that approximate a certain signal. The ability of DG to achieve pattern separation by sparsifing its representations is exploited here to improve the performance of the state of the art sparse approximation algorithm “Iterative Soft Thresholding” (IST) by adding new algorithmic features inspired by the DG circuitry. Lateral inhibition of granule cells, either direct or indirect, via mossy cells, is shown to enhance the performance of the IST. Apart from revealing the potential of DG-inspired theoretical algorithms, this work presents new insights regarding the function of particular cell types in the pattern separation task of the DG. PMID:25635776

  2. Adult neurogenesis in the mammalian hippocampus: Why the dentate gyrus?

    PubMed Central

    Drew, Liam J.; Fusi, Stefano; Hen, René

    2013-01-01

    In the adult mammalian brain, newly generated neurons are continuously incorporated into two networks: interneurons born in the subventricular zone migrate to the olfactory bulb, whereas the dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus integrates locally born principal neurons. That the rest of the mammalian brain loses significant neurogenic capacity after the perinatal period suggests that unique aspects of the structure and function of DG and olfactory bulb circuits allow them to benefit from the adult generation of neurons. In this review, we consider the distinctive features of the DG that may account for it being able to profit from this singular form of neural plasticity. Approaches to the problem of neurogenesis are grouped as “bottom-up,” where the phenotype of adult-born granule cells is contrasted to that of mature developmentally born granule cells, and “top-down,” where the impact of altering the amount of neurogenesis on behavior is examined. We end by considering the primary implications of these two approaches and future directions. PMID:24255101

  3. MRI Assessment of Superior Temporal Gyrus in Williams Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sampaio, Adriana; Sousa, Nuno; Férnandez, Montse; Vasconcelos, Cristiana; Shenton, Martha E.; Gonçalves, Óscar F.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To evaluate volumes and asymmetry of superior temporal gyrus (STG) and correlate these measures with a neurocognitive evaluation of verbal performance in Williams syndrome (WS) and in a typically developing age-matched and sex-matched group. Background Despite initial claims of language strength in WS, recent studies suggest delayed language milestones. The STG is implicated in linguistic processing and is a highly lateralized brain region. Method Here, we examined STG volumes and asymmetry of STG in WS patients and in age-matched controls. We also correlated volume of STG with a subset of verbal measures. Magnetic resonance imaging scans were obtained on a GE 1.5-T magnet with 1.5-mm contiguous slices, and were used to measure whole gray matter, white matter, and cerebrospinal fluid volumes, and also STG volume. Results Results revealed significantly reduced intracranial volume in WS patients, compared with controls. Right and left STG were also significantly smaller in WS patients. In addition, compared with normal controls, a lack of normal left >right STG asymmetry was evident in WS. Also of note was the finding that, in contrast to controls, WS patients did not reveal a positive correlation between verbal intelligence quotient and left STG volume, which further suggests a disruption in this region of the brain. Conclusions In conclusion, atypical patterns of asymmetry and reduced STG volume in WS were observed, which may, in part, contribute to some of the linguistic impairments found in this cohort of WS patients. PMID:18797257

  4. Tractography-based Parcellation of the Human Middle Temporal Gyrus

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jinping; Wang, Jiaojian; Fan, Lingzhong; Li, Hai; Zhang, Wen; Hu, Qingmao; Jiang, Tianzi

    2015-01-01

    The middle temporal gyrus (MTG) participates in a variety of functions, suggesting the existence of distinct functional subregions. In order to further delineate the functions of this brain area, we parcellated the MTG based on its distinct anatomical connectivity profiles and identified four distinct subregions, including the anterior (aMTG), middle (mMTG), posterior (pMTG), and sulcus (sMTG). Both the anatomical connectivity patterns and the resting-state functional connectivity patterns revealed distinct connectivity profiles for each subregion. The aMTG was primarily involved in the default mode network, sound recognition, and semantic retrieval. The mMTG was predominantly involved in the semantic memory and semantic control networks. The pMTG seems to be a part of the traditional sensory language area. The sMTG appears to be associated with decoding gaze direction and intelligible speech. Interestingly, the functional connectivity with Brodmann’s Area (BA) 40, BA 44, and BA 45 gradually increased from the anterior to the posterior MTG, a finding which indicated functional topographical organization as well as implying that language processing is functionally segregated in the MTG. These proposed subdivisions of the MTG and its functions contribute to understanding the complex functions of the MTG at the subregional level. PMID:26689815

  5. The angular gyrus: multiple functions and multiple subdivisions.

    PubMed

    Seghier, Mohamed L

    2013-02-01

    There is considerable interest in the structural and functional properties of the angular gyrus (AG). Located in the posterior part of the inferior parietal lobule, the AG has been shown in numerous meta-analysis reviews to be consistently activated in a variety of tasks. This review discusses the involvement of the AG in semantic processing, word reading and comprehension, number processing, default mode network, memory retrieval, attention and spatial cognition, reasoning, and social cognition. This large functional neuroimaging literature depicts a major role for the AG in processing concepts rather than percepts when interfacing perception-to-recognition-to-action. More specifically, the AG emerges as a cross-modal hub where converging multisensory information is combined and integrated to comprehend and give sense to events, manipulate mental representations, solve familiar problems, and reorient attention to relevant information. In addition, this review discusses recent findings that point to the existence of multiple subdivisions in the AG. This spatial parcellation can serve as a framework for reporting AG activations with greater definition. This review also acknowledges that the role of the AG cannot comprehensibly be identified in isolation but needs to be understood in parallel with the influence from other regions. Several interesting questions that warrant further investigations are finally emphasized. PMID:22547530

  6. Decoding and disrupting left midfusiform gyrus activity during word reading

    PubMed Central

    Hirshorn, Elizabeth A.; Ward, Michael J.; Fiez, Julie A.; Ghuman, Avniel Singh

    2016-01-01

    The nature of the visual representation for words has been fiercely debated for over 150 y. We used direct brain stimulation, pre- and postsurgical behavioral measures, and intracranial electroencephalography to provide support for, and elaborate upon, the visual word form hypothesis. This hypothesis states that activity in the left midfusiform gyrus (lmFG) reflects visually organized information about words and word parts. In patients with electrodes placed directly in their lmFG, we found that disrupting lmFG activity through stimulation, and later surgical resection in one of the patients, led to impaired perception of whole words and letters. Furthermore, using machine-learning methods to analyze the electrophysiological data from these electrodes, we found that information contained in early lmFG activity was consistent with an orthographic similarity space. Finally, the lmFG contributed to at least two distinguishable stages of word processing, an early stage that reflects gist-level visual representation sensitive to orthographic statistics, and a later stage that reflects more precise representation sufficient for the individuation of orthographic word forms. These results provide strong support for the visual word form hypothesis and demonstrate that across time the lmFG is involved in multiple stages of orthographic representation. PMID:27325763

  7. Microglia engulf viable newborn cells in the epileptic dentate gyrus.

    PubMed

    Luo, Cong; Koyama, Ryuta; Ikegaya, Yuji

    2016-09-01

    Microglia, which are the brain's resident immune cells, engulf dead neural progenitor cells during adult neurogenesis in the subgranular zone (SGZ) of the dentate gyrus (DG). The number of newborn cells in the SGZ increases significantly after status epilepticus (SE), but whether and how microglia regulate the number of newborn cells after SE remain unclear. Here, we show that microglia rapidly eliminate newborn cells after SE by primary phagocytosis, a process by which viable cells are engulfed, thereby regulating the number of newborn cells that are incorporated into the DG. The number of newborn cells in the DG was increased at 5 days after SE in the adult mouse brain but rapidly decreased to the control levels within a week. During this period, microglia in the DG were highly active and engulfed newborn cells. We found that the majority of engulfed newborn cells were caspase-negative viable cells. Finally, inactivation of microglia with minocycline maintained the increase in the number of newborn cells after SE. Furthermore, minocycline treatment after SE induced the emergence of hilar ectopic granule cells. Thus, our findings suggest that microglia may contribute to homeostasis of the dentate neurogenic niche by eliminating excess newborn cells after SE via primary phagocytosis. GLIA 2016;64:1508-1517.

  8. Growth and polarized spectral properties of Sm3+ doped in Ca3La2(BO3)4 crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yeqing; Chen, Aixi; Tu, Chaoyang

    2015-09-01

    A Sm3+-doped Ca3La2(BO3)4 single crystal was grown by the Czochralski method. Its polarized absorption, emission spectra and fluorescence lifetime measurements were carried out at room temperature. Based on the Judd-Ofelt theory, the spectroscopic parameters Ωt (t = 2, 4, 6), radiative transition probabilities, radiative lifetime and fluorescence branching ratios were obtained. The stimulated emission cross section, the fluorescence lifetime and the quantum efficiency of the promising laser transition were also calculated and compared with other reported crystals. The results showed that Sm3+:Ca3La2(BO3)4 is a promising candidate for the orange-yellow laser emission.

  9. Ca3La2(BO3)4 crystal: a new candidate host material for the ytterbium ion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yeqing; You, Zhenyu; Zhu, Zhaojie; Xu, Jinlong; Li, Jianfu; Wang, Yan; Wang, Hongyan; Tu, Chaoyang

    2013-10-01

    A disordered laser crystal Yb3+-doped Ca3La2(BO3)4 crystal was grown by the Czochralski technique. The characterized room temperature polarized spectra, re-absorption possibility and laser performance showed that this crystal should be a promising gain material, not only suitable for diode pumping, but also a good candidate for the generation of tunable and short pulse lasers. End pumped by a diode laser at 976 nm in plano-concave and plano-plano cavity, a 3.65 W output power with a slope efficiency of 65% was achieved by using a c-cut Yb3+:Ca3La2(BO3)4 crystal. The output laser wavelength shifted from 1042 to 1062 nm.

  10. Altered patterning of dentate granule cell mossy fiber inputs onto CA3 pyramidal cells in limbic epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    McAuliffe, John J.; Bronson, Stefanie L.; Hester, Michael S.; Murphy, Brian L.; Dahlquist-Topalá, Renée; Richards, David A.; Danzer, Steve C.

    2009-01-01

    Impaired gating by hippocampal dentate granule cells may promote the development of limbic epilepsy by facilitating seizure spread through the hippocampal trisynaptic circuit. The second synapse in this circuit, the dentate granule cell≫CA3 pyramidal cell connection, may be of particular importance because pathological changes occurring within the dentate likely exert their principal effect on downstream CA3 pyramids. Here, we utilized GFP-expressing mice and immunolabeling for the zinc transporter ZnT-3 to reveal the pre- and postsynaptic components of granule cell≫CA3 pyramidal cell synapses following pilocarpine-epileptogenesis. Confocal analyses of these terminals revealed that while granule cell presynaptic giant boutons increased in size and complexity one month after status epilepticus, individual thorns making up the postsynaptic thorny excrescences of the CA3 pyramidal cells were reduced in number. This reduction, however, was transient, and three months after status, thorn density recovered. This recovery was accompanied by a significant change in the distribution of thorns along pyramidal cells dendrites. While thorns in control animals tended to be tightly clustered, thorns in epileptic animals were more evenly distributed. Computational modeling of thorn distributions predicted an increase in the number of boutons required to cover equivalent numbers of thorns in epileptic vs. control mice. Confirming this prediction, ZnT-3 labeling of presynaptic giant boutons apposed to GFP-expressing thorns revealed a near doubling in bouton density, while the number of individual thorns per bouton was reduced by half. Together, these data provide clear evidence of novel plastic changes occurring within the epileptic hippocampus. PMID:20014385

  11. Usp9x-deficiency disrupts the morphological development of the postnatal hippocampal dentate gyrus

    PubMed Central

    Oishi, Sabrina; Premarathne, Susitha; Harvey, Tracey J.; Iyer, Swati; Dixon, Chantelle; Alexander, Suzanne; Burne, Thomas H. J.; Wood, Stephen A.; Piper, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Within the adult mammalian brain, neurogenesis persists within two main discrete locations, the subventricular zone lining the lateral ventricles, and the hippocampal dentate gyrus. Neurogenesis within the adult dentate gyrus contributes to learning and memory, and deficiencies in neurogenesis have been linked to cognitive decline. Neural stem cells within the adult dentate gyrus reside within the subgranular zone (SGZ), and proteins intrinsic to stem cells, and factors within the niche microenvironment, are critical determinants for development and maintenance of this structure. Our understanding of the repertoire of these factors, however, remains limited. The deubiquitylating enzyme USP9X has recently emerged as a mediator of neural stem cell identity. Furthermore, mice lacking Usp9x exhibit a striking reduction in the overall size of the adult dentate gyrus. Here we reveal that the development of the postnatal SGZ is abnormal in mice lacking Usp9x. Usp9x conditional knockout mice exhibit a smaller hippocampus and shortened dentate gyrus blades from as early as P7. Moreover, the analysis of cellular populations within the dentate gyrus revealed reduced stem cell, neuroblast and neuronal numbers and abnormal neuroblast morphology. Collectively, these findings highlight the critical role played by USP9X in the normal morphological development of the postnatal dentate gyrus. PMID:27181636

  12. Spin frustration and magnetic ordering in triangular lattice antiferromagnet Ca3CoNb2O9

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Jia; Zhou, Ping; Wang, Peng-Shuai; Pang, Fei; Munsie, Tim J.; Luke, Graeme M.; Zhang, Jin-Shan; Yu, Wei-Qiang

    2015-12-01

    We synthesized a quasi-two-dimensional distorted triangular lattice antiferromagnet Ca3CoNb2O9, in which the effective spin of Co2+ is 1/2 at low temperatures, whose magnetic properties were studied by dc susceptibility and magnetization techniques. The x-ray diffraction confirms the quality of our powder samples. The large Weiss constant θCW˜ -55 K and the low Neel temperature TN˜ 1.45 K give a frustration factor f = | θCW/TN | ≈ 38, suggesting that Ca3CoNb2O9 resides in strong frustration regime. Slightly below TN, deviation between the susceptibility data under zero-field cooling (ZFC) and field cooling (FC) is observed. A new magnetic state with 1/3 of the saturate magnetization Ms is suggested in the magnetization curve at 0.46 K. Our study indicates that Ca3CoNb2O9 is an interesting material to investigate magnetism in triangular lattice antiferromagnets with weak anisotropy. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11374364 and 11222433), the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2011CBA00112). Research at McMaster University supported by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council. Work at North China Electric Power University supported by the Scientific Research Foundation for the Returned Overseas Chinese Scholars, State Education Ministry.

  13. Extremely large anisotropic transport caused by electronic phase separation in Ti-doped Ca3Ru2O7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Jin; Liu, J. Y.; Gu, Xiaomin; Zhou, Guotai; Wang, Wei; Hu, J.; Zhang, F. M.; Wu, X. S.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we reported an extremely large out-of-plane/in-plane anisotropic transport ({ρc}/{ρab} ~ 109) in double layer ruthenates. The mechanism that may be responsible for this phenomenon is also explored here. Distinct from previously well studied layered materials which show large out-of-plane/in-plane electronic anisotropy (103–106), the Ti-doped Ca3Ru2O7 single crystals not only form quasi-2D layered structure, but also show phase separation within the layers. We found that Ti doping in Ca3Ru2O7 induced electronic phase separation between the insulating phase and weak localized phase. The ratio of these two phases is very sensitive to the Ti concentration. At typical concentration, the weak localized phase may form a channel on the background of the insulating phase within the ab plane. However, the small volume of weak localized phase makes it less likely to overlap in different layers. This results in a much larger electronic anisotropy ratio than pristine compound Ca3Ru2O7. This new mechanism provides a route for further increase electronic anisotropy, which will remarkably reduce current leak and power consumption in electronic devices.

  14. Cryoannealing-induced space-group transition of crystals of the carbonic anhydrase psCA3.

    PubMed

    Pinard, Melissa A; Kurian, Justin J; Aggarwal, Mayank; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis; McKenna, Robert

    2016-07-01

    Cryoannealing has been demonstrated to improve the diffraction quality and resolution of crystals of the β-carbonic anhydrase psCA3 concomitant with a change in space group. After initial flash-cooling in a liquid-nitrogen cryostream an X-ray diffraction data set from a psCA3 crystal was indexed in space group P21212 and was scaled to 2.6 Å resolution, but subsequent cryoannealing studies revealed induced protein rearrangements in the crystal contacts, which transformed the space group to I222, with a corresponding improvement of 0.7 Å in resolution. Although the change in diffraction resolution was significant, only minor changes in the psCA3 structure, which retained its catalytic `open' conformation, were observed. These findings demonstrate that cryoannealing can be successfully utilized to induce higher diffraction-quality crystals while maintaining enzymatically relevant conformations and may be useful as an experimental tool for structural studies of other enzymes where the initial diffraction quality is poor. PMID:27380376

  15. Neonatal ethanol exposure results in dose-dependent impairments in the acquisition and timing of the conditioned eyeblink response and altered cerebellar interpositus nucleus and hippocampal CA1 unit activity in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Lindquist, Derick H; Sokoloff, Greta; Milner, Eric; Steinmetz, Joseph E

    2013-09-01

    Exposure to ethanol in neonatal rats results in reduced neuronal numbers in the cerebellar cortex and deep nuclei of juvenile and adult animals. This reduction in cell numbers is correlated with impaired delay eyeblink conditioning (EBC), a simple motor learning task in which a neutral conditioned stimulus (CS; tone) is repeatedly paired with a co-terminating unconditioned stimulus (US; periorbital shock). Across training, cell populations in the interpositus (IP) nucleus model the temporal form of the eyeblink-conditioned response (CR). The hippocampus, though not required for delay EBC, also shows learning-dependent increases in CA1 and CA3 unit activity. In the present study, rat pups were exposed to 0, 3, 4, or 5 mg/kg/day of ethanol during postnatal days (PD) 4-9. As adults, CR acquisition and timing were assessed during 6 training sessions of delay EBC with a short (280 ms) interstimulus interval (ISI; time from CS onset to US onset) followed by another 6 sessions with a long (880 ms) ISI. Neuronal activity was recorded in the IP and area CA1 during all 12 sessions. The high-dose rats learned the most slowly and, with the moderate-dose rats, produced the longest CR peak latencies over training to the short ISI. The low dose of alcohol impaired CR performance to the long ISI only. The 3E (3 mg/kg/day of ethanol) and 5E (5 mg/kg/day of ethanol) rats also showed slower-than-normal increases in learning-dependent excitatory unit activity in the IP and CA1. The 4E (4 mg/kg/day of ethanol) rats showed a higher rate of CR production to the long ISI and enhanced IP and CA1 activation when compared to the 3E and 5E rats. The results indicate that binge-like ethanol exposure in neonatal rats induces long-lasting, dose-dependent deficits in CR acquisition and timing and diminishes conditioning-related neuronal excitation in both the cerebellum and hippocampus.

  16. Effects of 4-weeks of treatment with lithium and olanzapine on long-term potentiation in hippocampal area CA1.

    PubMed

    Shim, Seong S; Hammonds, Michael D; Tatsuoka, Curtis; Feng, I Jung

    2012-08-22

    Neuroplastic theories propose that lithium has robust neuroprotective and neurotrophic actions leading to the up-regulation of synaptic plasticity, and this action may be associated with the efficacy of lithium in the treatment of bipolar disorder. Olanzapine, an atypical antipsychotic drug, is efficacious in the treatment of bipolar disorder. It has been suggested that olanzapine may also up-regulate synaptic plasticity by its neuroprotective and neurotrophic actions, and this action may be related to antipsychotic and anti-manic effects of the drug. However, few studies have directly examined whether these drugs alter synaptic plasticity. In the present study, to examine the effects of lithium and olanzapine on synaptic plasticity, we examined the effects of chronic treatment with lithium and olanzapine on long-term potentiation (LTP) and input and output (I/O) responses of field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSP) of CA1 pyramidal cells in hippocampal slices prepared from rats administered the drugs for 4 weeks. Our results show that 4 weeks of lithium treatment magnified LTP of CA1 pyramidal cells. However, the same treatment with olanzapine did not magnify LTP of CA1 pyramidal cells. Four weeks of treatment with lithium did not alter I/O responses of CA1 pyramidal cells. However, the same treatment with olanzapine increased I/O responses of CA1 pyramidal cells. The results suggest that lithium up-regulates synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus, and olanzapine increases synaptic transmission without apparent changes in LTP in the hippocampus.

  17. Reconstruction of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cell electrophysiology by computer simulation.

    PubMed

    Warman, E N; Durand, D M; Yuen, G L

    1994-06-01

    1. We have developed a 16-compartment model that reproduces most of the features of the CA1 pyramidal cell electrophysiology observed experimentally. The model was constructed using seven active ionic conductances: gNa, gCa, gDR, gCT, gA, gM, and gAHP whose kinetics have been, inferred, in most cases, from the available voltage-clamp data obtained from these cells. We focussed the simulation on the initial and late accommodation, the slow depolarization potential and the spike broadening during repetitive firing, because their mechanisms are not well understood. 2. Current-clamp records were reproduced by iterative adjustments to the ionic maximum conductances, scaling and/or "reshaping" of the gates' time constant within the experimental voltage-clamp data, and shifting the position of the steady-state gate opening. The final properties of the ionic channels were not significantly different from the voltage-clamp experiments. 3. The resulting model reproduces all four after-potentials that have been recorded to follow activation of the cell. The fast, medium, and slow after-hyperpolarization potentials (AHPs) were, respectively, generated by ICT, IM, and IAHP. Furthermore, the model suggests that the mechanisms underlying the depolarization after potential (DAP) is mostly due to passive recharging of the soma by the dendrites. 4. The model also reproduces most of the firing features experimentally observed during injection of long current pulses. Model responses showed a small initial decrease in the firing frequency during a slow underlying depolarization potential, followed by a more significant frequency decrease. Moreover, a gradual broadening of the action potential and loss of the fast AHP were also observed during the initial high-frequency firing, followed, as the firing frequency decreased, by a gradual recovery of the spikes' original width and fast AHP amplitude increase. 5. A large reduction of the K repolarizing current was required to reproduce the

  18. Diphenylhydantoin promotes proliferation in the subventricular zone and dentate gyrus

    PubMed Central

    Galvez-Contreras, Alma Y.; Gonzalez-Castaneda, Rocio E; Luquin, Sonia; Guzman-Muniz, Jorge; Moy-Lopez, Norma A.; Ramos-Zuniga, Rodrigo; Gonzalez-Perez, Oscar

    2012-01-01

    Problem statement Diphenylhydantoin (phenytoin) is an antiepileptic drug that generates hyperplasia in some tissue by stimulating Epidermal Growth Factor (EGFR) and Platelet-Derived Growth Factor beta (PDGFR-β) receptors and by increasing serum levels of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF, FGF2 or FGF-β). Neural stem cells in the adult brain have been isolated from three regions: the Subventricular Zone (SVZ) lining the lateral wall of the lateral ventricles, the Subgranular Zone (SGZ) in the dentate gyrus at the hippocampus and the Subgranular Zone (SZC) lining between the hippocampus and the corpus callosum. Neural stem cells actively respond to bFGF, PDGFR-β or EGF by increasing their proliferation, survival and differentiation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of phenytoin on proliferation and apoptosis in the three neurogenic niches in the adult brain. Approach We orally administrated phenytoin with an oropharyngeal cannula for 30 days: 0 mg kg−1 (controls), 1, 5, 10, 50 and 100 mg kg−1. To label proliferative cells, three injections of 100 mg kg−1 of BrdU was administrated every 12 h. Immunohistochemistry against BrdU or Caspase-3 active were performed to determine the number of proliferative or apoptotic cells. Results Our results showed that phenytoin induces proliferation in the SVZ and the SGZ in a dose-dependent manner. No statistically significant effects on cell proliferation in the SCZ neither in the apoptosis rate at the SVZ, SGZ and SCZ were found. Conclusion These data indicate that phenytoin promotes a dose-dependent proliferation in the SVZ and SGZ of the adult brain. The clinical relevance of these findings remain to be elucidated. PMID:24478822

  19. Estimating extracellular spike waveforms from CA1 pyramidal cells with multichannel electrodes.

    PubMed

    Molden, Sturla; Moldestad, Olve; Storm, Johan F

    2013-01-01

    Extracellular (EC) recordings of action potentials from the intact brain are embedded in background voltage fluctuations known as the "local field potential" (LFP). In order to use EC spike recordings for studying biophysical properties of neurons, the spike waveforms must be separated from the LFP. Linear low-pass and high-pass filters are usually insufficient to separate spike waveforms from LFP, because they have overlapping frequency bands. Broad-band recordings of LFP and spikes were obtained with a 16-channel laminar electrode array (silicone probe). We developed an algorithm whereby local LFP signals from spike-containing channel were modeled using locally weighted polynomial regression analysis of adjoining channels without spikes. The modeled LFP signal was subtracted from the recording to estimate the embedded spike waveforms. We tested the method both on defined spike waveforms added to LFP recordings, and on in vivo-recorded extracellular spikes from hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells in anaesthetized mice. We show that the algorithm can correctly extract the spike waveforms embedded in the LFP. In contrast, traditional high-pass filters failed to recover correct spike shapes, albeit produceing smaller standard errors. We found that high-pass RC or 2-pole Butterworth filters with cut-off frequencies below 12.5 Hz, are required to retrieve waveforms comparable to our method. The method was also compared to spike-triggered averages of the broad-band signal, and yielded waveforms with smaller standard errors and less distortion before and after the spike. PMID:24391714

  20. Heterosynaptic structural plasticity on local dendritic segments of hippocampal CA1 neurons

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Won Chan; Parajuli, Laxmi Kumar; Zito, Karen

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Competition between synapses contributes to activity-dependent refinement of the nervous system during development. Does local competition between neighboring synapses drive circuit remodeling during experience-dependent plasticity in the cerebral cortex? Here, we examined the role of activity-mediated competitive interactions in regulating dendritic spine structure and function on hippocampal CA1 neurons. We found that high-frequency glutamatergic stimulation at individual spines, which leads to input-specific synaptic potentiation, induces shrinkage and weakening of nearby unstimulated synapses. This heterosynaptic plasticity requires potentiation of multiple neighboring spines, suggesting that a local threshold of neural activity exists beyond which inactive synapses are punished. Notably, inhibition of calcineurin, IP3Rs, or group I mGluRs blocked heterosynaptic shrinkage without blocking structural potentiation, and inhibition of CaMKII blocked structural potentiation without blocking heterosynaptic shrinkage. Our results support a model in which activity-induced shrinkage signal, and not competition for limited structural resources, drives heterosynaptic structural and functional depression during neural circuit refinement. PMID:25558061

  1. Sleep deprivation causes memory deficits by negatively impacting neuronal connectivity in hippocampal area CA1.

    PubMed

    Havekes, Robbert; Park, Alan J; Tudor, Jennifer C; Luczak, Vincent G; Hansen, Rolf T; Ferri, Sarah L; Bruinenberg, Vibeke M; Poplawski, Shane G; Day, Jonathan P; Aton, Sara J; Radwańska, Kasia; Meerlo, Peter; Houslay, Miles D; Baillie, George S; Abel, Ted

    2016-01-01

    Brief periods of sleep loss have long-lasting consequences such as impaired memory consolidation. Structural changes in synaptic connectivity have been proposed as a substrate of memory storage. Here, we examine the impact of brief periods of sleep deprivation on dendritic structure. In mice, we find that five hours of sleep deprivation decreases dendritic spine numbers selectively in hippocampal area CA1 and increased activity of the filamentous actin severing protein cofilin. Recovery sleep normalizes these structural alterations. Suppression of cofilin function prevents spine loss, deficits in hippocampal synaptic plasticity, and impairments in long-term memory caused by sleep deprivation. The elevated cofilin activity is caused by cAMP-degrading phosphodiesterase-4A5 (PDE4A5), which hampers cAMP-PKA-LIMK signaling. Attenuating PDE4A5 function prevents changes in cAMP-PKA-LIMK-cofilin signaling and cognitive deficits associated with sleep deprivation. Our work demonstrates the necessity of an intact cAMP-PDE4-PKA-LIMK-cofilin activation-signaling pathway for sleep deprivation-induced memory disruption and reduction in hippocampal spine density. PMID:27549340

  2. Roller Coaster Scanning reveals spontaneous triggering of dendritic spikes in CA1 interneurons.

    PubMed

    Katona, Gergely; Kaszás, Attila; Turi, Gergely F; Hájos, Norbert; Tamás, Gábor; Vizi, E Sylvester; Rózsa, Balázs

    2011-02-01

    Inhibitory interneurons are considered to be the controlling units of neural networks, despite their sparse number and unique morphological characteristics compared with excitatory pyramidal cells. Although pyramidal cell dendrites have been shown to display local regenerative events--dendritic spikes (dSpikes)--evoked by artificially patterned stimulation of synaptic inputs, no such studies exist for interneurons or for spontaneous events. In addition, imaging techniques have yet to attain the required spatial and temporal resolution for the detection of spontaneously occurring events that trigger dSpikes. Here we describe a high-resolution 3D two-photon laser scanning method (Roller Coaster Scanning) capable of imaging long dendritic segments resolving individual spines and inputs with a temporal resolution of a few milliseconds. By using this technique, we found that local, NMDA receptor-dependent dSpikes can be observed in hippocampal CA1 stratum radiatum interneurons during spontaneous network activities in vitro. These NMDA spikes appear when approximately 10 spatially clustered inputs arrive synchronously and trigger supralinear integration in dynamic interaction zones. In contrast to the one-to-one relationship between computational subunits and dendritic branches described in pyramidal cells, here we show that interneurons have relatively small (∼14 μm) sliding interaction zones. Our data suggest a unique principle as to how interneurons integrate synaptic information by local dSpikes. PMID:21224413

  3. ToF-SIMS cluster ion imaging of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal rat neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francis, J. T.; Nie, H.-Y.; Taylor, A. R.; Walzak, M. J.; Chang, W. H.; MacFabe, D. F.; Lau, W. M.

    2008-12-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated the power of time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) cluster ion imaging to characterize biological structures, such as that of the rat central nervous system. A large number of the studies to date have been carried out on the "structural scale" imaging several mm 2 using mounted thin sections. In this work, we present our ToF-SIMS cluster ion imaging results on hippocampal rat brain neurons, at the cellular and sub-cellular levels. As a part of an ongoing investigation to examine gut linked metabolic factors in autism spectrum disorders using a novel rat model, we have observed a possible variation in hippocampal Cornu ammonis 1 (CA1) pyramidal neuron geometry in thin, paraformaldehyde fixed brain sections. However, the fixation process alters the tissue matrix such that much biochemical information appears to be lost. In an effort to preserve as much as possible this original information, we have established a protocol using unfixed thin brain sections, along with low dose, 500 eV Cs + pre-sputtering that allows imaging down to the sub-cellular scale with minimal sample preparation.

  4. Layer-specific potentiation of network GABAergic inhibition in the CA1 area of the hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Colavita, Michelangelo; Terral, Geoffrey; Lemercier, Clement E.; Drago, Filippo; Marsicano, Giovanni; Massa, Federico

    2016-01-01

    One of the most important functions of GABAergic inhibition in cortical regions is the tight control of spatiotemporal activity of principal neuronal ensembles. However, electrophysiological recordings do not provide sufficient spatial information to determine the spatiotemporal properties of inhibitory plasticity. Using Voltage Sensitive Dye Imaging (VSDI) in mouse hippocampal slices, we demonstrate that GABAA-mediated field inhibitory postsynaptic potentials undergo layer-specific potentiation upon activation of metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGlu). VSDI recordings allowed detection of pharmacologically isolated GABAA-dependent hyperpolarization signals. Bath-application of the selective group-I mGlu receptor agonist, (S)-3,5-Dihydroxyphenylglycine (DHPG), induces an enhancement of the GABAergic VSDI-recorded signal, which is more or less pronounced in different hippocampal layers. This potentiation is mediated by mGlu5 and downstream activation of IP3 receptors. Our results depict network GABAergic activity in the hippocampal CA1 region and its sub-layers, showing also a novel form of inhibitory synaptic plasticity tightly coupled to glutamatergic activity. PMID:27345695

  5. Dendritic Polyglycerol Sulfate Inhibits Microglial Activation and Reduces Hippocampal CA1 Dendritic Spine Morphology Deficits.

    PubMed

    Maysinger, Dusica; Gröger, Dominic; Lake, Andrew; Licha, Kai; Weinhart, Marie; Chang, Philip K-Y; Mulvey, Rose; Haag, Rainer; McKinney, R Anne

    2015-09-14

    Hyperactivity of microglia and loss of functional circuitry is a common feature of many neurological disorders including those induced or exacerbated by inflammation. Herein, we investigate the response of microglia and changes in hippocampal dendritic postsynaptic spines by dendritic polyglycerol sulfate (dPGS) treatment. Mouse microglia and organotypic hippocampal slices were exposed to dPGS and an inflammogen (lipopolysaccharides). Measurements of intracellular fluorescence and confocal microscopic analyses revealed that dPGS is avidly internalized by microglia but not CA1 pyramidal neurons. Concentration and time-dependent response studies consistently showed no obvious toxicity of dPGS. The adverse effects induced by proinflammogen LPS exposure were reduced and dendritic spine morphology was normalized with the addition of dPGS. This was accompanied by a significant reduction in nitrite and proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α and IL-6) from hyperactive microglia suggesting normalized circuitry function with dPGS treatment. Collectively, these results suggest that dPGS acts anti-inflammatory, inhibits inflammation-induced degenerative changes in microglia phenotype and rescues dendritic spine morphology. PMID:26218295

  6. Sleep deprivation causes memory deficits by negatively impacting neuronal connectivity in hippocampal area CA1

    PubMed Central

    Havekes, Robbert; Park, Alan J; Tudor, Jennifer C; Luczak, Vincent G; Hansen, Rolf T; Ferri, Sarah L; Bruinenberg, Vibeke M; Poplawski, Shane G; Day, Jonathan P; Aton, Sara J; Radwańska, Kasia; Meerlo, Peter; Houslay, Miles D; Baillie, George S; Abel, Ted

    2016-01-01

    Brief periods of sleep loss have long-lasting consequences such as impaired memory consolidation. Structural changes in synaptic connectivity have been proposed as a substrate of memory storage. Here, we examine the impact of brief periods of sleep deprivation on dendritic structure. In mice, we find that five hours of sleep deprivation decreases dendritic spine numbers selectively in hippocampal area CA1 and increased activity of the filamentous actin severing protein cofilin. Recovery sleep normalizes these structural alterations. Suppression of cofilin function prevents spine loss, deficits in hippocampal synaptic plasticity, and impairments in long-term memory caused by sleep deprivation. The elevated cofilin activity is caused by cAMP-degrading phosphodiesterase-4A5 (PDE4A5), which hampers cAMP-PKA-LIMK signaling. Attenuating PDE4A5 function prevents changes in cAMP-PKA-LIMK-cofilin signaling and cognitive deficits associated with sleep deprivation. Our work demonstrates the necessity of an intact cAMP-PDE4-PKA-LIMK-cofilin activation-signaling pathway for sleep deprivation-induced memory disruption and reduction in hippocampal spine density. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13424.001 PMID:27549340

  7. CA1 cell activity sequences emerge after reorganization of network correlation structure during associative learning

    PubMed Central

    Modi, Mehrab N; Dhawale, Ashesh K; Bhalla, Upinder S

    2014-01-01

    Animals can learn causal relationships between pairs of stimuli separated in time and this ability depends on the hippocampus. Such learning is believed to emerge from alterations in network connectivity, but large-scale connectivity is difficult to measure directly, especially during learning. Here, we show that area CA1 cells converge to time-locked firing sequences that bridge the two stimuli paired during training, and this phenomenon is coupled to a reorganization of network correlations. Using two-photon calcium imaging of mouse hippocampal neurons we find that co-time-tuned neurons exhibit enhanced spontaneous activity correlations that increase just prior to learning. While time-tuned cells are not spatially organized, spontaneously correlated cells do fall into distinct spatial clusters that change as a result of learning. We propose that the spatial re-organization of correlation clusters reflects global network connectivity changes that are responsible for the emergence of the sequentially-timed activity of cell-groups underlying the learned behavior. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01982.001 PMID:24668171

  8. The chemokine CXCL16 modulates neurotransmitter release in hippocampal CA1 area

    PubMed Central

    Di Castro, Maria Amalia; Trettel, Flavia; Milior, Giampaolo; Maggi, Laura; Ragozzino, Davide; Limatola, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Chemokines have several physio-pathological roles in the brain. Among them, the modulation of synaptic contacts and neurotransmission recently emerged as crucial activities during brain development, in adulthood, upon neuroinflammation and neurodegenerative diseases. CXCL16 is a chemokine normally expressed in the brain, where it exerts neuroprotective activity against glutamate-induced damages through cross communication with astrocytes and the involvement of the adenosine receptor type 3 (A3R) and the chemokine CCL2. Here we demonstrated for the first time that CXCL16 exerts a modulatory activity on inhibitory and excitatory synaptic transmission in CA1 area. We found that CXCL16 increases the frequency of the miniature inhibitory synaptic currents (mIPSCs) and the paired-pulse ratio (PPR) of evoked IPSCs (eIPSCs), suggesting a presynaptic modulation of the probability of GABA release. In addition, CXCL16 increases the frequency of the miniature excitatory synaptic currents (mEPSCs) and reduces the PPR of evoked excitatory transmission, indicating that the chemokine also modulates and enhances the release of glutamate. These effects were not present in the A3RKO mice and in WT slices treated with minocycline, confirming the involvement of A3 receptors and introducing microglial cells as key mediators of the modulatory activity of CXCL16 on neurons. PMID:27721466

  9. Suppressive Effects of Resveratrol Treatment on The Intrinsic Evoked Excitability of CA1 Pyramidal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Meftahi, Gholamhossein; Ghotbedin, Zohreh; Eslamizade, Mohammad Javad; Hosseinmardi, Narges; Janahmadi, Mahyar

    2015-01-01

    Objective Resveratrol, a phytoalexin, has a wide range of desirable biological actions. Despite a growing body of evidence indicating that resveratrol induces changes in neu- ronal function, little effort, if any, has been made to investigate the cellular effect of res- veratrol treatment on intrinsic neuronal properties. Materials and Methods This experimental study was performed to examine the acute effects of resveratrol (100 µM) on the intrinsic evoked responses of rat Cornu Ammonis (CA1) pyramidal neurons in brain slices, using whole cell patch clamp re- cording under current clamp conditions. Results Findings showed that resveratrol treatment caused dramatic changes in evoked responses of pyramidal neurons. Its treatment induced a significant (P<0.05) increase in the after hyperpolarization amplitude of the first evoked action potential. Resveratrol-treated cells displayed a significantly broader action potential (AP) when compared with either control or vehicle-treated groups. In addition, the mean instantaneous firing frequency between the first two action potentials was significantly lower in resveratrol-treated neurons. It also caused a significant reduction in the time to maximum decay of AP. The rheobase current and the utilization time were both significantly greater following resveratrol treatment. Neurons exhibited a significantly depolarized voltage threshold when exposed to resveratrol. Conclusion Results provide direct electrophysiological evidence for the inhibitory effects of resveratrol on pyramidal neurons, at least in part, by reducing the evoked neural activity. PMID:26464825

  10. Thermoluminescence studies of bismuth doped Ba xCa 1- xS nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Surender; Lochab, S. P.; Kumar, Ravi; Singh, Nafa

    2011-01-01

    Bismuth doped Ba 1- xCa xS:Bi ( x=0-1) nanocrystallities have been prepared by the solid state reaction method and characterized by XRD and TEM. X-ray diffraction analysis shows the formation of the compounds in cubic structure at room temperature. Only partial replacement of Ba is possible and we found that Ba 0.5Ca 0.5S:Bi could not be prepared due to the difference between ionic radii of barium and calcium. Thermoluminescence studies of these samples after exposure to UV radiation have been carried out. The TL glow curve of Ba xCa 1 -xS:Bi has been found to be a simple structure with a single peak at 405, 428 and 503 K for x=1, 0.8 and 0, respectively. The kinetic parameters at various heating rates namely activation energy ( E), order of kinetics ( b) and frequency factor ( s) of the Ba 1- xCa xS:Bi ( x=0.2) (0.4 mol%) sample have been determined using Chen’s method. The deconvolution of curve was done using the GCD function suggested by Kitis. The effect of different heating rates and different amount of dose has also been discussed.

  11. Assessing the role of IKCa channels in generating the sAHP of CA1 hippocampal pyramidal cells.

    PubMed

    Turner, Ray W; Asmara, Hadhimulya; Engbers, Jordan D T; Miclat, Jason; Rizwan, Arsalan P; Sahu, Giriraj; Zamponi, Gerald W

    2016-07-01

    Our previous work reported that KCa3.1 (IKCa) channels are expressed in CA1 hippocampal pyramidal cells and contribute to the slow afterhyperpolarization that regulates spike accommodation in these cells. The current report presents data from single cell RT-PCR that further reveals mRNA in CA1 cells that corresponds to the sequence of an IKCa channel from transmembrane segments 5 through 6 including the pore region, revealing the established binding sites for 4 different IKCa channel blockers. A comparison of methods to internally apply the IKCa channel blocker TRAM-34 shows that including the drug in an electrode from the onset of an experiment is unviable given the speed of drug action upon gaining access for whole-cell recordings. Together the data firmly establish IKCa channel expression in CA1 neurons and clarify methodological requirements to obtain a block of IKCa channel activity through internal application of TRAM-34. PMID:26950800

  12. The effects of anisomycin (a protein synthesis inhibitor) on spatial learning and memory in CA1 region of rats hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Naghdi, Nasser; Majlessi, Nahid; Bozorgmehr, Tahereh

    2003-02-17

    Inhibition of protein synthesis has been shown to affect long-term memory in a wide variety of animal species. But little is known regarding the neuroanatomical location of protein synthesis in different memory tasks. In this study, the effect of intrahippocampal injection of anisomycin, an inhibitor of brain protein synthesis on spatial memory was examined in Morris Water Maze. At first, rats were connulated bilaterally into the CA1 region and then different doses of anisomycin (1.25-2.5 micro g/0.5 micro l) on its vehicle (saline) were injected bilaterally into the CA1 region of rats hippocampus 20 min before training each day. The results showed dose-dependent increases in latencies to find the invisible platform and traveled distances in anisomycin received group compared to the control group. Therefore, it appears that protein synthesis inhibition in the CA1 region of hippocampus impair spatial learning in Morris Water Maze.

  13. Activation of Ih and TTX-sensitive sodium current at subthreshold voltages during CA1 pyramidal neuron firing.

    PubMed

    Yamada-Hanff, Jason; Bean, Bruce P

    2015-10-01

    We used dynamic clamp and action potential clamp techniques to explore how currents carried by tetrodotoxin-sensitive sodium channels and HCN channels (Ih) regulate the behavior of CA1 pyramidal neurons at resting and subthreshold voltages. Recording from rat CA1 pyramidal neurons in hippocampal slices, we found that the apparent input resistance and membrane time constant were strongly affected by both conductances, with Ih acting to decrease apparent input resistance and time constant and sodium current acting to increase both. We found that both Ih and sodium current were active during subthreshold summation of artificial excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) generated by dynamic clamp, with Ih dominating at less depolarized voltages and sodium current at more depolarized voltages. Subthreshold sodium current-which amplifies EPSPs-was most effectively recruited by rapid voltage changes, while Ih-which blunts EPSPs-was maximal for slow voltage changes. The combined effect is to selectively amplify rapid EPSPs. We did similar experiments in mouse CA1 pyramidal neurons, doing voltage-clamp experiments using experimental records of action potential firing of CA1 neurons previously recorded in awake, behaving animals as command voltages to quantify flow of Ih and sodium current at subthreshold voltages. Subthreshold sodium current was larger and subthreshold Ih was smaller in mouse neurons than in rat neurons. Overall, the results show opposing effects of subthreshold sodium current and Ih in regulating subthreshold behavior of CA1 neurons, with subthreshold sodium current prominent in both rat and mouse CA1 pyramidal neurons and additional regulation by Ih in rat neurons.

  14. Enhancement of Hippocampal CA3 Neuronal Dendritic Arborization by Glycyrrhiza glabra root extract Treatment in Wistar Albino Rats

    PubMed Central

    Chakravarthi, Kosuri Kalyan; Avadhani, Ramakrishna

    2014-01-01

    Background: In the traditional system of medicine, the roots and rhizomes of Glycyrrhiza glabra (Gg) (family: Leguminosae) have been in clinical use for centuries. Aim: In the present study, we investigated the role of aqueous extract of root of Gg treatment on the dendritic morphology of hippocampal Cornu Ammonis area three (CA3) neurons, one of the regions concerned with learning and memory, in 1- month- old male Wistar albino rats. Materials and Methods: The aqueous extract of root of Gg was administered orally in four doses (75, 150, 225 and 300 mg/kg) for 4 weeks. After the treatment period, all experimental animals were subjected to spatial learning (Morris water maze, Hebb-William's maze and elevated plus maze) tests. At the end of the spatial memory tests, the rats were deeply anesthetized with Pentobarbitone and killed their brains were removed rapidly and fixed in rapid Golgi fixative. Hippocampal CA3 neurons were traced using camera lucida, and dendritic arborization and intersections were quantified. These data were compared to those of age-matched control rats. Results: The aqueous root extract of Gg in the dose of 150 and 225 mg/kg/p.o showed a significant (P < 0.01) enhancement of dendritic arborization (dendritic branching points) and dendritic intersections along the length of both apical and basal dendrites in hippocampal (CA3) pyramidal neurons is comparable to control. Conclusion: Based on our results obtained, we conclude that constituents present in aqueous root extract of Gg have neuronal dendritic growth stimulating properties. PMID:24678192

  15. Input- and subunit-specific AMPA receptor trafficking underlying long-term potentiation at hippocampal CA3 synapses.

    PubMed

    Kakegawa, Wataru; Tsuzuki, Keisuke; Yoshida, Yukari; Kameyama, Kimihiko; Ozawa, Seiji

    2004-07-01

    Hippocampal CA3 pyramidal neurons receive synaptic inputs from both mossy fibres (MFs) and associational fibres (AFs). Long-term potentiation (LTP) at these synapses differs in its induction sites and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) dependence. Most evidence favours the presynaptic and postsynaptic mechanisms for induction of MF LTP and AF LTP, respectively. This implies that molecular and functional properties differ between MF and AF synapses at both presynaptic and postsynaptic sites. In this study, we focused on the difference in the postsynaptic trafficking of alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptors (AMPARs) between these synapses. To trace the subunit-specific trafficking of AMPARs at each synapse, GluR1 and GluR2 subunits were introduced into CA3 pyramidal neurons in hippocampal organotypic cultures using the Sindbis viral expression system. The electrophysiologically-tagged GluR2 AMPARs, produced by the viral-mediated transfer of the unedited form of GluR2 (GluR2Q), were inserted into both MF and AF postsynaptic sites in a neuronal activity-independent manner. Endogenous Ca(2+)-impermeable AMPARs at these synapses were replaced with exogenous Ca(2+)-permeable receptors, and Ca(2+) influx via the newly expressed postsynaptic AMPARs induced NMDAR-independent LTP at AF synapses. In contrast, no GluR1 AMPAR produced by the gene transfer was constitutively incorporated into AF postsynaptic sites, and only a small amount into MF postsynaptic sites. The synaptic trafficking of GluR1 AMPARs was triggered by the activity of Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent kinase II or high-frequency stimulation to induce LTP at AF synapses, but not at MF synapses. These results indicate that MF and AF postsynaptic sites possess distinct properties for AMPAR trafficking in CA3 pyramidal neurons.

  16. Manipulating Thermal Conductivity by Interfacial Modification of Misfit-Layered Cobaltites Ca3Co4O9

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Susumu; Yoshiya, Masato

    2016-03-01

    The phonon thermal conductivities of misfit-layered Ca3Co4O9, Sr3Co4O9, and Ba3Co4O9 were calculated using the perturbed molecular dynamics method to clarify the impact of lattice misfit on the phonon thermal conduction in misfit-layered cobaltites. Substitution of Sr and Ba for Ca substantially modified the magnitude of the lattice misfit between the CoO2 and rock salt (RS) layers, because of the different ionic radii, increasing overall phonon thermal conductivity. Further analyses with intentionally changed atomic masses of Ca, Sr, or Ba revealed that smaller ionic radius at the Ca site in the RS layer, instead of heavier atomic mass, is a critical factor suppressing the overall thermal conductivity of Ca3Co4O9, since it determines not only the magnitude of lattice misfit but also the dynamic interference between the two layers, which governs the phonon thermal conduction in the CoO2 and RS layers. This concept was demonstrated for Sr-doped Ca3Co4O9 as an example of atomistic manipulation for better thermoelectric properties. Phonon thermal conductivities not only in the RS layer but also in the CoO2 layer were reduced by the substitution of Sr for Ca. These results provide another strategy to improve the thermal conductivity of this class of misfit cobaltites, that is, to control the thermal conductivity of the CoO2 layer responsible for electronic and thermal conductivity by atomistic manipulation in the RS layer adjacent to the CoO2 layer.

  17. Calcium-activated afterhyperpolarizations regulate synchronization and timing of epileptiform bursts in hippocampal CA3 pyramidal neurons.

    PubMed

    Fernández de Sevilla, David; Garduño, Julieta; Galván, Emilio; Buño, Washington

    2006-12-01

    Calcium-activated potassium conductances regulate neuronal excitability, but their role in epileptogenesis remains elusive. We investigated in rat CA3 pyramidal neurons the contribution of the Ca(2+)-activated K(+)-mediated afterhyperpolarizations (AHPs) in the genesis and regulation of epileptiform activity induced in vitro by 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) in Mg(2+)-free Ringer. Recurring spike bursts terminated by prolonged AHPs were generated. Burst synchronization between CA3 pyramidal neurons in paired recordings typified this interictal-like activity. A downregulation of the medium afterhyperpolarization (mAHP) paralleled the emergence of the interictal-like activity. When the mAHP was reduced or enhanced by apamin and EBIO bursts induced by 4-AP were increased or blocked, respectively. Inhibition of the slow afterhyperpolarization (sAHP) with carbachol, t-ACPD, or isoproterenol increased bursting frequency and disrupted burst regularity and synchronization between pyramidal neuron pairs. In contrast, enhancing the sAHP by intracellular dialysis with KMeSO(4) reduced burst frequency. Block of GABA(A-B) inhibitions did not modify the abnormal activity. We describe novel cellular mechanisms where 1) the inhibition of the mAHP plays an essential role in the genesis and regulation of the bursting activity by reducing negative feedback, 2) the sAHP sets the interburst interval by decreasing excitability, and 3) bursting was synchronized by excitatory synaptic interactions that increased in advance and during bursts and decreased throughout the subsequent sAHP. These cellular mechanisms are active in the CA3 region, where epileptiform activity is initiated, and cooperatively regulate the timing of the synchronized rhythmic interictal-like network activity. PMID:16971683

  18. Prenatal Hypoxia-Ischemia Induces Abnormalities in CA3 Microstructure, Potassium Chloride Co-Transporter 2 Expression and Inhibitory Tone.

    PubMed

    Jantzie, Lauren L; Getsy, Paulina M; Denson, Jesse L; Firl, Daniel J; Maxwell, Jessie R; Rogers, Danny A; Wilson, Christopher G; Robinson, Shenandoah

    2015-01-01

    Infants who suffer perinatal brain injury, including those with encephalopathy of prematurity, are prone to chronic neurological deficits, including epilepsy, cognitive impairment, and behavioral problems, such as anxiety, inattention, and poor social interaction. These deficits, especially in combination, pose the greatest hindrance to these children becoming independent adults. Cerebral function depends on adequate development of essential inhibitory neural circuits and the appropriate amount of excitation and inhibition at specific stages of maturation. Early neuronal synaptic responses to γ-amino butyric acid (GABA) are initially excitatory. During the early postnatal period, GABAAR responses switch to inhibitory with the upregulation of potassium-chloride co-transporter KCC2. With extrusion of chloride by KCC2, the Cl(-) reversal potential shifts and GABA and glycine responses become inhibitory. We hypothesized that prenatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury chronically impairs the developmental upregulation of KCC2 that is essential for cerebral circuit formation. Following late gestation hypoxia-ischemia (HI), diffusion tensor imaging in juvenile rats shows poor microstructural integrity in the hippocampal CA3 subfield, with reduced fractional anisotropy and elevated radial diffusivity. The loss of microstructure correlates with early reduced KCC2 expression on NeuN-positive pyramidal neurons, and decreased monomeric and oligomeric KCC2 protein expression in the CA3 subfield. Together with decreased inhibitory post-synaptic currents during a critical window of development, we document for the first time that prenatal transient systemic HI in rats impairs hippocampal CA3 inhibitory tone. Failure of timely development of inhibitory tone likely contributes to a lower seizure threshold and impaired cognitive function in children who suffer perinatal brain injury. PMID:26388734

  19. Physiological origins of evoked magnetic fields and extracellular field potentials produced by guinea-pig CA3 hippocampal slices.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Shingo; Zhang, Tongsheng; Hirose, Akira; Okada, Yoshio C

    2002-10-01

    This study examined whether evoked magnetic fields and intra- and extracellular potentials from longitudinal CA3 slices of guinea-pig can be interpreted within a single theoretical framework that incorporates ligand- and voltage-sensitive conductances in the dendrites and soma of the pyramidal cells. The 1991 CA3 mathematical model of R. D. Traub is modified to take into account the asymmetric branching patterns of the apical and basal dendrites of the pyramidal cells. The revised model accounts for the magnitude and waveform of the bi- and triphasic magnetic fields evoked by somatic and apical stimulations, respectively, in the slice in the absence of fast inhibition (blocked by 0.1 mM picrotoxin). The revised model also accounts for selective effects of 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) and tetraethylammonium (TEA), which block the potassium channels of A and C type, respectively, on the slow wave of the magnetic fields. Furthermore, the model correctly predicts the laminar profiles of field potential as well as intracellular potentials in the pyramidal cells produced by two classes of cells - those directly activated and those indirectly (synaptically) activated by the applied external stimulus. The intracellular potentials in this validated model reveal that the spikes and slow waves of the magnetic fields are generated in or near the soma and apical dendrites, respectively. These results demonstrate that a single theoretical framework couched within the modern concepts of cellular physiology provides a unified account of magnetic fields outside the slice, extracellular potentials within the slice and intracellular potentials of the pyramidal cells for CA3.

  20. Prenatal Hypoxia–Ischemia Induces Abnormalities in CA3 Microstructure, Potassium Chloride Co-Transporter 2 Expression and Inhibitory Tone

    PubMed Central

    Jantzie, Lauren L.; Getsy, Paulina M.; Denson, Jesse L.; Firl, Daniel J.; Maxwell, Jessie R.; Rogers, Danny A.; Wilson, Christopher G.; Robinson, Shenandoah

    2015-01-01

    Infants who suffer perinatal brain injury, including those with encephalopathy of prematurity, are prone to chronic neurological deficits, including epilepsy, cognitive impairment, and behavioral problems, such as anxiety, inattention, and poor social interaction. These deficits, especially in combination, pose the greatest hindrance to these children becoming independent adults. Cerebral function depends on adequate development of essential inhibitory neural circuits and the appropriate amount of excitation and inhibition at specific stages of maturation. Early neuronal synaptic responses to γ-amino butyric acid (GABA) are initially excitatory. During the early postnatal period, GABAAR responses switch to inhibitory with the upregulation of potassium-chloride co-transporter KCC2. With extrusion of chloride by KCC2, the Cl− reversal potential shifts and GABA and glycine responses become inhibitory. We hypothesized that prenatal hypoxic–ischemic brain injury chronically impairs the developmental upregulation of KCC2 that is essential for cerebral circuit formation. Following late gestation hypoxia–ischemia (HI), diffusion tensor imaging in juvenile rats shows poor microstructural integrity in the hippocampal CA3 subfield, with reduced fractional anisotropy and elevated radial diffusivity. The loss of microstructure correlates with early reduced KCC2 expression on NeuN-positive pyramidal neurons, and decreased monomeric and oligomeric KCC2 protein expression in the CA3 subfield. Together with decreased inhibitory post-synaptic currents during a critical window of development, we document for the first time that prenatal transient systemic HI in rats impairs hippocampal CA3 inhibitory tone. Failure of timely development of inhibitory tone likely contributes to a lower seizure threshold and impaired cognitive function in children who suffer perinatal brain injury. PMID:26388734

  1. Formation of infinite-layered (Ca(1-x)Sr(x)) CuO2 and NaCuO2-type (Ca(1-y)Na(y))(0.85)CuO2 in tartrate route

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikkawa, Shinichi; Kato, Namie; Taya, Noriko; Tada, Masakazu; Kanamaru, Fumikazu

    1995-05-01

    Both NaCuO2-type Ca(0.85)CuO2 and infinite-layered (Ca(1 - x)Sr(x))CuO2 could be prepared much more easily by firing the dried solids from mixed acetate aqueous solutions titrated with tartaric acid than by normal calcination. The presence of a narrow solid-solution composition range of 0.10 less than x less than 0.16 was confirmed in infinite-layered (Ca(1 - x)Sr(x))CuO2 in the preparation using the tartrate route. The calcium could also be substituted by sodium in a range of y less than 0.15 in NaCuO2-type (Ca(1 - y)Na(y))(0.85)CuO(2) using the same route. Further substitution of Ca(2+)/ with Y(3+)/ might also be possible in infinite-layered (Ca(1 - x)Sr(x))CuO2, but resulted in the NaCuO2-type compound in the substitution with Na(+).

  2. 119Sn-NMR investigations on superconducting Ca3Ir4Sn13: Evidence for multigap superconductivity

    DOE PAGES

    Sarkar, R.; Petrovic, C.; Bruckner, F.; Gunther, M.; Wang, Kefeng; Biswas, P. K.; Luetkens, H.; Morenzoni, E.; Amato, A.; Klauss, H. -H.

    2015-09-25

    In this study, we report bulk superconductivity (SC) in Ca3Ir4Sn13 by means of 119Sn nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments. Two classical signatures of BCS superconductivity in spin-lattice relaxation rate (1/T1), namely the Hebel–Slichter coherence peak just below the Tc, and the exponential decay in the superconducting phase, are evident. The noticeable decrease of 119Sn Knight shift below Tc indicates spin-singlet superconductivity. The temperature dependence of the spin-lattice relaxation rate 119(1/T1) is convincingly described by the multigap isotropic superconducting gap. NMR experiments do not witness any sign of enhanced spin fluctuations.

  3. Switching effect in the magnetization response in a superconducting specimen of Ca3Rh4Sn13

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babu, M. Suresh; Thamizhavel, A.; Ramakrishnan, S.; Grover, A. K.; Pal, D.

    2016-05-01

    The isofield magnetization measurements in a superconducting single crystal of Ca3Rh4Sn13 show the paramagnetic magnetization response in a specific region of the magnetization curve while field cooling under various experimental conditions. Such a response in the specific region is found to be multivalued/metastable, which can be manipulated in a characteristics manner by altering the experimental conditions. The controlled switching of magnetization between widely differing values including the change in sign of magnetization, has application potential in magnetic switching and binary memory devices.

  4. Multiferroicity in Mn-deficient Ca3CoMnO6: The consequence of Fe substitution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, L.; Xie, Y. L.; Liu, M. F.; Guo, Y. J.; Yan, Z. B.; Liu, J.-M.

    2013-07-01

    We present careful experiments on the multiferroicity in Ca3CoMn0.92O6 by Fe substitution of Mn. It is revealed that a proper Fe substitution modulates the Co/Mn spin order, favoring the ferroelectricity. The multifold interactions between the intra-chain spins and inter-chain spins are analyzed. It is suggested that the Mn deficiency and Fe substitution can break the inter-chain interactions to some extent, resulting in the delicate competition between these mutual interactions. The modulation of the ionic (charge) disorder and spin frustration order is the core physics for improving the ferroelectric performance.

  5. Magnetic structure determination of Ca3LiOsO6 using neutron and x-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Calder, Stuart A; Lumsden, Mark D; Garlea, Vasile O; Kim, Jong-Woo; Shi, Y. G.; Yamaura, K.; Christianson, Andrew D

    2012-01-01

    We present a neutron and x-ray scattering investigation of Ca3LiOsO6, a material that has been predicted to host magnetic ordering through an extended superexchange pathway involving two anions. Despite the apparent 1D nature and triangular units of magnetic osmium ions the onset of magnetic correlations has been observed at a high temperature of 117 K in bulk measurements. We experimentally determine the magnetically ordered structure and show it to be long range and three dimensional. Our results support the model of extended superexchange interaction.

  6. 119Sn-NMR investigations on superconducting Ca3Ir4Sn13: Evidence for multigap superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, R.; Brückner, F.; Günther, M.; Wang, Kefeng; Petrovic, C.; Biswas, P. K.; Luetkens, H.; Morenzoni, E.; Amato, A.; Klauss, H.-H.

    2015-12-01

    We report bulk superconductivity (SC) in Ca3Ir4Sn13 by means of 119Sn nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments. Two classical signatures of BCS superconductivity in spin-lattice relaxation rate (1/T1), namely the Hebel-Slichter coherence peak just below the Tc, and the exponential decay in the superconducting phase, are evident. The noticeable decrease of 119Sn Knight shift below Tc indicates spin-singlet superconductivity. The temperature dependence of the spin-lattice relaxation rate 119(1/T1) is convincingly described by the multigap isotropic superconducting gap. NMR experiments do not witness any sign of enhanced spin fluctuations.

  7. Metabolism of cyclohexaneacetic acid and cyclohexanebutyric acid by Arthrobacter sp. strain CA1.

    PubMed Central

    Ougham, H J; Trudgill, P W

    1982-01-01

    A strain of Arthrobacter was isolated by enrichment culture with cyclohexaneacetate as the sole source of carbon and grew with a doubling time of 4.2 h. In addition to growing with cyclohexaneacetate, the organism also grew with cyclohexanebutyrate at concentrations not above 0.05%, and with a variety of alicyclic ketones and alcohols. Oxidation of cyclohexaneacetate proceeded through formation of the coenzyme A (CoA) ester followed by initiation of a beta-oxidation cycle. beta-Oxidation was blocked before the second dehydrogenation step due to the formation of a tertiary alcohol, and the side chain was eliminated as acetyl-CoA by the action of (1-hydroxycyclohexan-1-yl)acetyl-CoA lyase. The cyclohexanone thus formed was degraded by a well-described route that involves ring-oxygen insertion by a biological Baeyer-Villiger oxygenase. All enzymes of the proposed metabolic sequence were demonstrated in cell-free extracts. Arthrobacter sp. strain CA1 synthesized constitutive beta-oxidative enzymes, but further induction of enzymes active toward cyclohexaneacetate and its metabolites could occur during growth with the alicyclic acid. Other enzymes of the sequence, (1-hydroxycyclohexan-1-yl)acetyl-CoA lyase and enzymes of cyclohexanone oxidation, were present at negligible levels in succinate-grown cells but induced by growth with cyclohexaneacetate. The oxidation of cyclohexanebutyrate was integrated into the pathway for cyclohexaneacetate oxidation by a single beta-oxidation cycle. Oxidation of the compound could be divided into two phases. Initial oxidation to (1-hydroxycyclohexan-1-yl)acetate could be catalyzed by constitutive enzymes, whereas the further degradation of (1-hydroxycyclohexan-1-yl)acetate was dependent on induced enzyme synthesis which could be inhibited by chloramphenicol with the consequent accumulation of cyclohexaneacetate and (1-hydroxycyclohexan-1-yl)acetate. PMID:7076617

  8. Chronic glucocorticoids increase hippocampal vulnerability to neurotoxicity under conditions that produce CA3 dendritic retraction but fail to impair spatial recognition memory.

    PubMed

    Conrad, Cheryl D; McLaughlin, Katie J; Harman, James S; Foltz, Cainan; Wieczorek, Lindsay; Lightner, Elizabeth; Wright, Ryan L

    2007-08-01

    We previously found that chronic stress conditions producing CA3 dendritic retraction and spatial memory deficits make the hippocampus vulnerable to the neurotoxin ibotenic acid (IBO). The purpose of this study was to determine whether exposure to chronic corticosterone (CORT) under conditions that produce CA3 dendritic retraction would enhance CA3 susceptibility to IBO. Male Sprague Dawley rats were chronically treated for 21 d with CORT in drinking water (400 microg/ml), and half were given daily injections of phenytoin (40 mg/kg), an antiepileptic drug that prevents CA3 dendritic retraction. Three days after treatments stopped, IBO was infused into the CA3 region. Conditions producing CA3 dendritic retraction (CORT and vehicle) exacerbated IBO-induced CA3 damage compared with conditions in which CA3 dendritic retraction was not observed (vehicle and vehicle, vehicle and phenytoin, CORT and phenytoin). Additionally, spatial recognition memory was assessed using the Y-maze, revealing that conditions producing CA3 dendritic retraction failed to impair spatial recognition memory. Furthermore, CORT levels in response to a potentially mild stressor (injection and Y-maze exposure) stayed at basal levels and failed to differ among key groups (vehicle and vehicle, CORT and vehicle, CORT and phenytoin), supporting the interpretations that CORT levels were unlikely to have been elevated during IBO infusion and that the neuroprotective actions of phenytoin were not through CORT alterations. These data are the first to show that conditions with prolonged glucocorticoid elevations leading to structural changes in hippocampal dendritic arbors can make the hippocampus vulnerable to neurotoxic challenges. These findings have significance for many disorders with elevated glucocorticoids that include depression, schizophrenia, Alzheimer's disease, and Cushing's disease.

  9. Involvement of IP3 Receptors in LTP and LTD Induction in Guinea Pig Hippocampal CA1 Neurons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taufiq, Ahmed Mostafa; Fujii, Satoshi; Yamazaki, Yoshihiko; Sasaki, Hiroshi; Kaneko, Kenya; Li, Jianmin; Kato, Hiroshi; Mikoshiba, Katsuhiko

    2005-01-01

    The role of inositol 1, 4, 5-trisphosphate receptors (IP3Rs) in long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD) was studied in CA1 neurons in guinea pig hippocampal slices. In standard solution, short tetanic stimulation consisting of 15 pulses at 100 Hz induced LTP, while three short trains of low-frequency stimulation (LFS; 200…

  10. Caspase-6 activity in the CA1 region of the hippocampus induces age-dependent memory impairment

    PubMed Central

    LeBlanc, A C; Ramcharitar, J; Afonso, V; Hamel, E; Bennett, D A; Pakavathkumar, P; Albrecht, S

    2014-01-01

    Active Caspase-6 is abundant in the neuropil threads, neuritic plaques and neurofibrillary tangles of Alzheimer disease brains. However, its contribution to the pathophysiology of Alzheimer disease is unclear. Here, we show that higher levels of Caspase-6 activity in the CA1 region of aged human hippocampi correlate with lower cognitive performance. To determine whether Caspase-6 activity, in the absence of plaques and tangles, is sufficient to cause memory deficits, we generated a transgenic knock-in mouse that expresses a self-activated form of human Caspase-6 in the CA1. This Caspase-6 mouse develops age-dependent spatial and episodic memory impairment. Caspase-6 induces neuronal degeneration and inflammation. We conclude that Caspase-6 activation in mouse CA1 neurons is sufficient to induce neuronal degeneration and age-dependent memory impairment. These results indicate that Caspase-6 activity in CA1 could be responsible for the lower cognitive performance of aged humans. Consequently, preventing or inhibiting Caspase-6 activity in the aged may provide an efficient novel therapeutic approach against Alzheimer disease. PMID:24413155

  11. Pyramidal neurons in the septal and temporal CA1 field of the human and hedgehog tenrec hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Liagkouras, Ioannis; Michaloudi, Helen; Batzios, Christos; Psaroulis, Dimitrios; Georgiadis, Marios; Künzle, Heinz; Papadopoulos, Georgios C

    2008-07-01

    The present study examines comparatively the cellular density of disector-counted/Nissl-stained CA1 pyramidal neurons and the morphometric characteristics (dendritic number/length, spine number/density and Sholl-counted dendritic branch points/20 microm) of the basal and apical dendritic systems of Golgi-impregnated CA1 neurons, in the septal and temporal hippocampus of the human and hedgehog tenrec brain. The obtained results indicate that in both hippocampal parts the cellular density of the CA1 pyramidal neurons is lower in human than in tenrec. However, while the human pyramidal cell density is higher in the septal hippocampal part than in the temporal one, in the tenrec the density of these cells is higher in the temporal part. The dendritic tree of the CA1 pyramidal cells, more developed in the septal than in temporal hippocampus in both species studied, is in general more complex in the human hippocampus. The basal and the apical dendritic systems exhibit species related morphometric differences, while dendrites of different orders exhibit differences in their number and length, and in their spine density. Finally, in both species, as well as hippocampal parts and dendritic systems, changes of dendritic morphometric features along ascending dendritic orders fluctuate in a similar way, as do the number of dendritic branch points in relation to the distance from the neuron soma.

  12. Increased hippocampal CA1 density of serotonergic terminals in a triple transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease: an ultrastructural study

    PubMed Central

    Noristani, H N; Meadows, R S; Olabarria, M; Verkhratsky, A; Rodríguez, J J

    2011-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative pathology that deteriorates mnesic functions and associated brain regions including the hippocampus. Serotonin (5-HT) has an important role in cognition. We recently demonstrated an increase in 5-HT transporter (SERT) fibre density in the hippocampal CA1 in an AD triple transgenic mouse model (3xTg-AD). Here, we analyse the ultrastructural localisation, distribution and numerical density (Nv) of hippocampal SERT axons (SERT-Ax) and terminals (SERT-Te) and their relationship with SERT fibre sprouting and altered synaptic Nv in 3xTg-AD compared with non-transgenic control mice. 3xTg-AD animals showed a significant increase in SERT-Te Nv in CA1 at both, 3 (95%) and 18 months of age (144%), being restricted to the CA1 stratum moleculare (S. Mol; 227% at 3 and 180% at 18 months). 3xTg-AD animals also exhibit reduced Nv of perforated axospinous synapses (PS) in CA1 S. Mol (56% at 3 and 52% at 18 months). No changes were observed in the Nv of symmetric and asymmetrical synapses or SERT-Ax. Our results suggest that concomitant SERT-Te Nv increase and PS reduction in 3xTg-AD mice may act as a compensatory mechanism maintaining synaptic efficacy as a response to the AD cognitive impairment. PMID:21918544

  13. Expression of Bacillus thuringiensis Cytolytic Toxin (Cyt2Ca1) in citrus roots to control Diaprepes abbreviatus larvae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Diaprepes abbreviatus (L.) is an important pest of citrus in the USA. Currently, no effective management strategies of Diaprepes abbreviatus exist in citriculture. To protect citrus against Diaprepes abbreviatus a transgenic citrus rootstock expressing Bacillus thuringiensis Cyt2Ca1, an insect toxin...

  14. Cell-Type Specific Inactivation of Hippocampal CA1 Disrupts Location-Dependent Object Recognition in the Mouse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haettig, Jakob; Sun, Yanjun; Wood, Marcelo A.; Xu, Xiangmin

    2013-01-01

    The allatostatin receptor (AlstR)/ligand inactivation system enables potent regulation of neuronal circuit activity. To examine how different cell types participate in memory formation, we have used this system through Cre-directed, cell-type specific expression in mouse hippocampal CA1 in vivo and examined functional effects of inactivation of…

  15. ERK1/2 Activation Is Necessary for BDNF to Increase Dendritic Spine Density in Hippocampal CA1 Pyramidal Neurons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alonso, Mariana; Medina, Jorge H.; Pozzo-Miller, Lucas

    2004-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a potent modulator of synaptic transmission and plasticity in the CNS, acting both pre- and postsynaptically. We demonstrated recently that BDNF/TrkB signaling increases dendritic spine density in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons. Here, we tested whether activation of the prominent ERK (MAPK) signaling…

  16. Housing under the pyramid reduces susceptibility of hippocampal CA3 pyramidal neurons to prenatal stress in the developing rat offspring.

    PubMed

    Murthy, Krishna Dilip; George, Mitchel Constance; Ramasamy, Perumal; Mustapha, Zainal Arifin

    2013-12-01

    Mother-offspring interaction begins before birth. The foetus is particularly vulnerable to environmental insults and stress. The body responds by releasing excess of the stress hormone cortisol, which acts on glucocorticoid receptors. Hippocampus in the brain is rich in glucocorticoid receptors and therefore susceptible to stress. The stress effects are reduced when the animals are placed under a model wooden pyramid. The present study was to first explore the effects of prenatal restraint-stress on the plasma corticosterone levels and the dendritic arborisation of CA3 pyramidal neurons in the hippocampus of the offspring. Further, to test whether the pyramid environment would alter these effects, as housing under a pyramid is known to reduce the stress effects, pregnant Sprague Dawley rats were restrained for 9 h per day from gestation day 7 until parturition in a wire-mesh restrainer. Plasma corticosterone levels were found to be significantly increased. In addition, there was a significant reduction in the apical and the basal total dendritic branching points and intersections of the CA3 hippocampal pyramidal neurons. The results thus suggest that, housing in the pyramid dramatically reduces prenatal stress effects in rats.

  17. Magnetic phase separation in double layer ruthenates Ca3(Ru(1-x)Ti(x))2O7.

    PubMed

    Peng, Jin; Liu, J Y; Hu, J; Mao, Z Q; Zhang, F M; Wu, X S

    2016-01-01

    A phase transition from metallic AFM-b antiferromagnetic state to Mott insulating G-type antiferromagnetic (G-AFM) state was found in Ca3(Ru(1-x)Ti(x))2O7 at about x = 0.03 in our previous work. In the present, we focused on the study of the magnetic transition near the critical composition through detailed magnetization measurements. There is no intermediate magnetic phases between the AFM-b and G-AFM states, which is in contrasted to manganites where a similar magnetic phase transition takes place through the presence of several intermediate magnetic phases. The AFM-b-to-G-AFM transition in Ca3(Ru(1-x)Ti(x))2O7 happens through a phase separation process in the 2-5% Ti range, whereas similar magnetic transitions in manganites are tuned by 50-70% chemical substitutions. We discussed the possible origin of such an unusual magnetic transition and compared with that in manganites.

  18. Synthesis and structural properties of thermoelectric Ca3-xAgxCo4O9+δ powders.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyeongsoon; Hakeem, Deshmukh Abdul; Cha, Jae Sung

    2016-04-28

    A series of Ca3-xAgxCo4O9+δ (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.2) powders is prepared by the Pechini sol-gel method. The effect of dispersants on the size and morphology of the Ca2.9Ag0.1Co4O9+δ powders is investigated. The desired powders are obtained after calcinations of the dried powders at 800 °C for 12 h. The structural and morphological properties are studied with the help of XRD patterns, FE-SEM images, FT-IR spectra, Raman spectra, and XPS spectra. It is found that a mixed valence (+3 and +4) of Co exists in a CdI2-type CoO2 layer, while a mixed valence (+2, +3, and +4) exists in the CoO of a rock salt-type Ca2CoO3 layer. The mixed-valence state in the CoO2 layer can improve the high-temperature thermoelectric properties of Ca3Co4O9 systems. PMID:26988740

  19. Magnetic phase separation in double layer ruthenates Ca3(Ru1−xTix)2O7

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Jin; Liu, J. Y.; Hu, J.; Mao, Z. Q.; Zhang, F. M.; Wu, X. S.

    2016-01-01

    A phase transition from metallic AFM-b antiferromagnetic state to Mott insulating G-type antiferromagnetic (G-AFM) state was found in Ca3(Ru1−xTix)2O7 at about x = 0.03 in our previous work. In the present, we focused on the study of the magnetic transition near the critical composition through detailed magnetization measurements. There is no intermediate magnetic phases between the AFM-b and G-AFM states, which is in contrasted to manganites where a similar magnetic phase transition takes place through the presence of several intermediate magnetic phases. The AFM-b-to-G-AFM transition in Ca3(Ru1−xTix)2O7 happens through a phase separation process in the 2–5% Ti range, whereas similar magnetic transitions in manganites are tuned by 50–70% chemical substitutions. We discussed the possible origin of such an unusual magnetic transition and compared with that in manganites. PMID:26771083

  20. Synthesis and structural properties of thermoelectric Ca3-xAgxCo4O9+δ powders.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyeongsoon; Hakeem, Deshmukh Abdul; Cha, Jae Sung

    2016-04-28

    A series of Ca3-xAgxCo4O9+δ (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.2) powders is prepared by the Pechini sol-gel method. The effect of dispersants on the size and morphology of the Ca2.9Ag0.1Co4O9+δ powders is investigated. The desired powders are obtained after calcinations of the dried powders at 800 °C for 12 h. The structural and morphological properties are studied with the help of XRD patterns, FE-SEM images, FT-IR spectra, Raman spectra, and XPS spectra. It is found that a mixed valence (+3 and +4) of Co exists in a CdI2-type CoO2 layer, while a mixed valence (+2, +3, and +4) exists in the CoO of a rock salt-type Ca2CoO3 layer. The mixed-valence state in the CoO2 layer can improve the high-temperature thermoelectric properties of Ca3Co4O9 systems.

  1. Input-Output Features of Anatomically Identified CA3 Neurons during Hippocampal Sharp Wave/Ripple Oscillation In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Karlócai, Mária R.; Németh, Beáta; Ulbert, István; Monyer, Hannah; Szabó, Gábor; Erdélyi, Ferenc; Freund, Tamás F.; Gulyás, Attila I.

    2013-01-01

    Hippocampal sharp waves and the associated ripple oscillations (SWRs) are implicated in memory processes. These network events emerge intrinsically in the CA3 network. To understand cellular interactions that generate SWRs, we detected first spiking activity followed by recording of synaptic currents in distinct types of anatomically identified CA3 neurons during SWRs that occurred spontaneously in mouse hippocampal slices. We observed that the vast majority of interneurons fired during SWRs, whereas only a small portion of pyramidal cells was found to spike. There were substantial differences in the firing behavior among interneuron groups; parvalbumin-expressing basket cells were one of the most active GABAergic cells during SWRs, whereas ivy cells were silent. Analysis of the synaptic currents during SWRs uncovered that the dominant synaptic input to the pyramidal cell was inhibitory, whereas spiking interneurons received larger synaptic excitation than inhibition. The discharge of all interneurons was primarily determined by the magnitude and the timing of synaptic excitation. Strikingly, we observed that the temporal structure of synaptic excitation and inhibition during SWRs significantly differed between parvalbumin-containing basket cells, axoaxonic cells, and type 1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1)-expressing basket cells, which might explain their distinct recruitment to these synchronous events. Our data support the hypothesis that the active current sources restricted to the stratum pyramidale during SWRs originate from the synaptic output of parvalbumin-expressing basket cells. Thus, in addition to gamma oscillation, these GABAergic cells play a central role in SWR generation. PMID:23843535

  2. Inhibition of long-term potentiation in the schaffer-CA1 pathway by repetitive high-intensity sound stimulation.

    PubMed

    Cunha, A O S; de Oliveira, J A C; Almeida, S S; Garcia-Cairasco, N; Leão, R M

    2015-12-01

    High-intensity sound can induce seizures in susceptible animals. After repeated acoustic stimuli changes in behavioural seizure repertoire and epileptic EEG activity might be seen in recruited limbic and forebrain structures, a phenomenon known as audiogenic kindling. It is postulated that audiogenic kindling can produce synaptic plasticity events leading to the spread of epileptogenic activity to the limbic system. In order to test this hypothesis, we investigated if long-term potentiation (LTP) of hippocampal Schaffer-CA1 synapses and spatial navigation memory are altered by a repeated high-intensity sound stimulation (HISS) protocol, consisting of one-minute 120 dB broadband noise applied twice a day for 10 days, in normal Wistar rats and in audiogenic seizure-prone rats (Wistar Audiogenic Rats - WARs). After HISS all WARs exhibited midbrain seizures and 50% of these animals developed limbic recruitment, while only 26% of Wistar rats presented midbrain seizures and none of them had limbic recruitment. In naïve animals, LTP in hippocampal CA1 neurons was induced by 50- or 100-Hz high-frequency stimulation of Schaffer fibres in slices from both Wistar and WAR animals similarly. Surprisingly, HISS suppressed LTP in CA1 neurons in slices from Wistar rats that did not present any seizure, and inhibited LTP in slices from Wistar rats with only midbrain seizures. However HISS had no effect on LTP in CA1 neurons from slices of WARs. Interestingly HISS did not alter spatial navigation and memory in both strains. These findings show that repeated high-intensity sound stimulation prevent LTP of Schaffer-CA1 synapses from Wistar rats, without affecting spatial memory. This effect was not seen in hippocampi from audiogenic seizure-prone WARs. In WARs the link between auditory stimulation and hippocampal LTP seems to be disrupted which could be relevant for the susceptibility to seizures in this strain.

  3. Effect of ischemic preconditioning on antioxidant status in the gerbil hippocampal CA1 region after transient forebrain ischemia.

    PubMed

    Park, Seung Min; Park, Chan Woo; Lee, Tae-Kyeong; Cho, Jeong Hwi; Park, Joon Ha; Lee, Jae-Chul; Chen, Bai Hui; Shin, Bich-Na; Ahn, Ji Hyeon; Tae, Hyun-Jin; Shin, Myoung Cheol; Ohk, Taek Geun; Cho, Jun Hwi; Won, Moo-Ho; Choi, Soo Young; Kim, In Hye

    2016-07-01

    Ischemic preconditioning (IPC) is a condition of sublethal transient global ischemia and exhibits neuroprotective effects against subsequent lethal ischemic insult. We, in this study, examined the neuroprotective effects of IPC and its effects on immunoreactive changes of antioxidant enzymes including superoxide dismutase (SOD) 1 and SOD2, catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPX) in the gerbil hippocampal CA1 region after transient forebrain ischemia. Pyramidal neurons of the stratum pyramidale (SP) in the hippocampal CA1 region of animals died 5 days after lethal transient ischemia without IPC (8.6% (ratio of remanent neurons) of the sham-operated group); however, IPC prevented the pyramidal neurons from subsequent lethal ischemic injury (92.3% (ratio of remanent neurons) of the sham-operated group). SOD1, SOD2, CAT and GPX immunoreactivities in the sham-operated animals were easily detected in pyramidal neurons in the stratum pyramidale (SP) of the hippocampal CA1 region, while all of these immunoreactivities were rarely detected in the stratum pyramidale at 5 days after lethal transient ischemia without IPC. Meanwhile, their immunoreactivities in the sham-operated animals with IPC were similar to (SOD1, SOD2 and CAT) or higher (GPX) than those in the sham-operated animals without IPC. Furthermore, their immunoreactivities in the stratum pyramidale of the ischemia-operated animals with IPC were steadily maintained after lethal ischemia/reperfusion. Results of western blot analysis for SOD1, SOD2, CAT and GPX were similar to immunohistochemical data. In conclusion, IPC maintained or increased the expression of antioxidant enzymes in the stratum pyramidale of the hippocampal CA1 region after subsequent lethal transient forebrain ischemia and IPC exhibited neuroprotective effects in the hippocampal CA1 region against transient forebrain ischemia. PMID:27630689

  4. Repeated transcranial magnetic stimulation prevents kindling-induced changes in electrophysiological properties of rat hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons.

    PubMed

    Shojaei, A; Semnanian, S; Janahmadi, M; Moradi-Chameh, H; Firoozabadi, S M; Mirnajafi-Zadeh, J

    2014-11-01

    The mechanisms underlying antiepileptic or antiepileptogenic effects of repeated transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) are poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the effect of rTMS applied during rapid amygdala kindling on some electrophysiological properties of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons. Male Wistar rats were kindled by daily electrical stimulation of the basolateral amygdala in a semi-rapid manner (12 stimulations/day) until they achieved stage-5 seizure. One group (kindled+rTMS (KrTMS)) of animals received rTMS (1Hz for 4min) 5min after termination of daily kindling stimulations. Twenty four hours following the last kindling stimulation electrophysiological properties of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons were investigated using whole-cell patch-clamp technique. Amygdala kindling significantly depolarized the resting membrane potential and increased the input resistance, spontaneous firing activity, number of evoked spikes and half-width of the first evoked spike. Kindling also decreased the first-spike latency and amplitude significantly. Application of rTMS during kindling somehow prevented the development of seizures and protected CA1 pyramidal neurons of hippocampus against deleterious effect of kindling on both passive and active neuronal electrophysiological properties. Interestingly, application of rTMS alone enhanced the excitability of CA1 pyramidal neurons significantly. Based on the results of our study, it may be suggested that rTMS exerts its anticonvulsant effect, in part, through preventing the amygdala kindling-induced changes in electrophysiological properties of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons. It seems that rTMS exerts protective effects on the neural circuits involved in spreading the seizures from the focus to other parts of the brain.

  5. Postischemic, systemic administration of polyamine-modified superoxide dismutase reduces hippocampal CA1 neurodegeneration in rat global cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Wengenack, T M; Curran, G L; Poduslo, J F

    1997-04-18

    Antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase (SOD) have shown neuroprotective effects in animal models of cerebral ischemia, but only at very high doses. Modifications to increase the plasma half-life or blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability of SOD have resulted in limited neuroprotective effects. No one has demonstrated neuroprotection with postischemic administration. The specific aim of the present study was to administer systemically a polyamine-modified SOD, having increased BBB permeability and preserved enzymatic activity, following global cerebral ischemia in rats and analyze the effects on the selective vulnerability of CA1 hippocampal neurons. Following 12 min of four-vessel occlusion, global cerebral ischemia, male Wistar rats were dosed (i.v.) with either saline, native SOD (5000 U/kg), polyamine-modified SOD (5000 U/kg), or enzymatically inactive, polyamine-modified SOD (2.1 mg/kg) twice daily for 3 days. Neuroprotective effects on hippocampal CA1 neurons were assessed using standard histological methods. Saline-treated animals had very few remaining CA1 neurons (1.44 +/- 0.60 neurons/reticle; x +/- S.E.M.) compared to sham rats (58.57 +/- 0.69). Native (10.38 +/- 2.96) or inactive, polyamine-modified SOD (7.32 +/- 2.68) did not show significant neuroprotective effects. Polyamine-modified SOD, however, resulted in the survival of significantly more CA1 neurons (24.61 +/- 5.90; P < 0.01). Postischemic, systemic administration of polyamine-modified SOD, having increased BBB permeability and preserved enzymatic activity, significantly reduced hippocampal CA1 neuron loss following global cerebral ischemia. Similar modification of other antioxidant enzymes and neurotrophic factors with polyamines may provide a useful technique for the systemic delivery of therapeutic proteins across the BBB for the treatment of stroke and other neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:9134958

  6. Effect of ischemic preconditioning on antioxidant status in the gerbil hippocampal CA1 region after transient forebrain ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seung Min; Park, Chan Woo; Lee, Tae-Kyeong; Cho, Jeong Hwi; Park, Joon Ha; Lee, Jae-Chul; Chen, Bai Hui; Shin, Bich-Na; Ahn, Ji Hyeon; Tae, Hyun-Jin; Shin, Myoung Cheol; Ohk, Taek Geun; Cho, Jun Hwi; Won, Moo-Ho; Choi, Soo Young; Kim, In Hye

    2016-01-01

    Ischemic preconditioning (IPC) is a condition of sublethal transient global ischemia and exhibits neuroprotective effects against subsequent lethal ischemic insult. We, in this study, examined the neuroprotective effects of IPC and its effects on immunoreactive changes of antioxidant enzymes including superoxide dismutase (SOD) 1 and SOD2, catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPX) in the gerbil hippocampal CA1 region after transient forebrain ischemia. Pyramidal neurons of the stratum pyramidale (SP) in the hippocampal CA1 region of animals died 5 days after lethal transient ischemia without IPC (8.6% (ratio of remanent neurons) of the sham-operated group); however, IPC prevented the pyramidal neurons from subsequent lethal ischemic injury (92.3% (ratio of remanent neurons) of the sham-operated group). SOD1, SOD2, CAT and GPX immunoreactivities in the sham-operated animals were easily detected in pyramidal neurons in the stratum pyramidale (SP) of the hippocampal CA1 region, while all of these immunoreactivities were rarely detected in the stratum pyramidale at 5 days after lethal transient ischemia without IPC. Meanwhile, their immunoreactivities in the sham-operated animals with IPC were similar to (SOD1, SOD2 and CAT) or higher (GPX) than those in the sham-operated animals without IPC. Furthermore, their immunoreactivities in the stratum pyramidale of the ischemia-operated animals with IPC were steadily maintained after lethal ischemia/reperfusion. Results of western blot analysis for SOD1, SOD2, CAT and GPX were similar to immunohistochemical data. In conclusion, IPC maintained or increased the expression of antioxidant enzymes in the stratum pyramidale of the hippocampal CA1 region after subsequent lethal transient forebrain ischemia and IPC exhibited neuroprotective effects in the hippocampal CA1 region against transient forebrain ischemia. PMID:27630689

  7. First-principles study on the structural, electronic, and optical properties of Ca1- x Sr x Se alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadian, F.; Salary, A.

    2016-01-01

    The structural, electronic, and optical properties of binary CaSe and SrSe compounds and Ca1- x Sr x Se alloys were studied by using the full potential linearized augmented plane wave (FPLAPW) method within density functional theory (DFT). The band structure calculations showed that the CaSe and the SrSe binary compounds in the rocksalt (RS), zinc-blende (ZB) and wurtzite (WZ) phases were semiconductors while they had a metallic characteristic in the CsCl phase. The lattice constant and bulk modulus values for the Ca1- x Sr x Se alloys in the RS and the ZB phases at different concentrations were calculated and compared with those obtained by using Vegard's law. The energy band gap values in the RS and the ZB phases were estimated for different x values by using both define acronyms the Perdew, Burke, and Ernzerhof (PBE-GGA) and the Engel and Vosko (EV-GGA) schemes, and the results were compared with those obtained by using the empirical electronegativity expression. The band gap bowing parameters were calculated by using quadratic functions and the procedure of Bernard and Zunger to fit the non-linear variation of the band gaps. The static dielectric constant ɛ 1(0) was calculated at different concentrations. The energy loss function L( ω) for the Ca1- x Sr x Se alloys in the RS and the ZB phases has a main peak corresponding to the plasmon frequency. The values of the static refractive index ( n(0)) for the Ca1- x Sr x Se alloys were calculated and compared with the values predicted by using the Moss, Ravindra, and Vandamme models. Finally, the extinction indic incident photon energies. es ( k( ω)) and the reflectivities ( R( ω)) for the Ca1- x Sr x Se alloys were calculated within a wide range of incident photon energies.

  8. Effect of ischemic preconditioning on antioxidant status in the gerbil hippocampal CA1 region after transient forebrain ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seung Min; Park, Chan Woo; Lee, Tae-Kyeong; Cho, Jeong Hwi; Park, Joon Ha; Lee, Jae-Chul; Chen, Bai Hui; Shin, Bich-Na; Ahn, Ji Hyeon; Tae, Hyun-Jin; Shin, Myoung Cheol; Ohk, Taek Geun; Cho, Jun Hwi; Won, Moo-Ho; Choi, Soo Young; Kim, In Hye

    2016-01-01

    Ischemic preconditioning (IPC) is a condition of sublethal transient global ischemia and exhibits neuroprotective effects against subsequent lethal ischemic insult. We, in this study, examined the neuroprotective effects of IPC and its effects on immunoreactive changes of antioxidant enzymes including superoxide dismutase (SOD) 1 and SOD2, catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPX) in the gerbil hippocampal CA1 region after transient forebrain ischemia. Pyramidal neurons of the stratum pyramidale (SP) in the hippocampal CA1 region of animals died 5 days after lethal transient ischemia without IPC (8.6% (ratio of remanent neurons) of the sham-operated group); however, IPC prevented the pyramidal neurons from subsequent lethal ischemic injury (92.3% (ratio of remanent neurons) of the sham-operated group). SOD1, SOD2, CAT and GPX immunoreactivities in the sham-operated animals were easily detected in pyramidal neurons in the stratum pyramidale (SP) of the hippocampal CA1 region, while all of these immunoreactivities were rarely detected in the stratum pyramidale at 5 days after lethal transient ischemia without IPC. Meanwhile, their immunoreactivities in the sham-operated animals with IPC were similar to (SOD1, SOD2 and CAT) or higher (GPX) than those in the sham-operated animals without IPC. Furthermore, their immunoreactivities in the stratum pyramidale of the ischemia-operated animals with IPC were steadily maintained after lethal ischemia/reperfusion. Results of western blot analysis for SOD1, SOD2, CAT and GPX were similar to immunohistochemical data. In conclusion, IPC maintained or increased the expression of antioxidant enzymes in the stratum pyramidale of the hippocampal CA1 region after subsequent lethal transient forebrain ischemia and IPC exhibited neuroprotective effects in the hippocampal CA1 region against transient forebrain ischemia.

  9. Formation of the non-functional and functional pools of granule cells in the dentate gyrus: role of neurogenesis, LTP and LTD

    PubMed Central

    Lisman, John

    2011-01-01

    Some aspects of the function of the dentate gyrus (DG) and CA3 regions of the hippocampus are beginning to be understood, notably the way that grid cell inputs from the medial entorhinal cortex (MEC) are processed to form place cells in the dentate/CA3. However, one aspect of DG function remains very puzzling: more than 95% of the cells do not fire in any environment. Here, I propose a possible explanation for these non-functional cells. Because of the competition mediated by feedback inhibition, only the most excited DG cells fire. Cells that do not spike nevertheless receive excitatory input from the grid cells of the MEC (these cells fire nearly continuously because they represent a property (space) that is always being processed). Experiments suggest that synapses on such cells will undergo long-term depression (LTD). Cells that have their synapses weakened in this way are less likely to be winners in subsequent competitions. There may thus be a downward spiral in which losers eventually have no chance of winning and thus become non-functional. On the other hand, cells that fire get stronger synapses, making them more likely to be subsequent winners. Because the long-term potentiation (LTP) in these cells balances ongoing LTD, these cells will be relatively stable members of the functional pool. Although these pools are relatively stable, there will nevertheless be some chance that LTD converts a functional cell to a non-functional one; in contrast, the probability of a reverse transition is near zero. Thus, without additional processes, there would be a slow reduction in the size of the functional pool. I suggest that the ongoing generation of new cells by neurogenesis may be a solution to this problem. These cells are highly excitable and may thus win the competition to fire. In this way, the functional pool will be replenished. To test this and other theories about the DG requires an understanding of the role of the DG in memory. Recent experimental and

  10. Neuronal glutamate transporters regulate synaptic transmission in single synapses on CA1 hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Kondratskaya, Elena; Shin, Min-Chul; Akaike, Norio

    2010-01-15

    Glutamate is the major excitatory transmitter in CNS although it causes severe brain damage by pathologic excitotoxicity. Efficient neurotransmission is controlled by powerful protection and support afforded by specific high-affinity glutamate transporters in neurons and glia, clearing synaptic glutamate. While the role of glial cells in glutamate uptake is well defined, the role of neuronal transporters remains poorly understood. The evaluation of impact of neuronal transporters on spontaneous and evoked EPSC in hippocampal CA1 neurons within a model 'single bouton preparation' by pre- and postsynaptic uptake was addressed. In whole-cell patch clamp experiments the influence of blocking, pre- or both pre- and postsynaptic glutamate transporters (GluT) on spontaneous and evoked postsynaptic currents (sEPSC and eEPSC), was examined by manipulating the content of intracellular solution. Suppressing GluT by non-transportable inhibitor TBOA (10 microM) led to remarkable alteration of glutamate uptake process and was reflected in measurable changes of general properties of synaptic currents. Elimination of intracellular K(+) concentration required for glutamate transporter operation by using Cs(+)-based internal solution (postsynaptic GluTs are non-functional apriori), causes the deficient of presynaptic glutamate transporters. Applied in such conditions glutamate transporter inhibitor TBOA (10 microM) affected the occurrence of synaptic event and thus unregulated the transmitter release. eEPSCs were generally suppressed both in amplitude (to 48.73+/-7.03% vs. control) and in success rate (R(suc)) by TBOA (from 91.1+/-7.5% in control to 79.57+/-13.2%). In contrast, with K(+)-based solution in patch pipette (pre- and postsynaptic GluT are intact), amplitude of eEPSC was substantially potentiated by pre-treatment with TBOA (152.1+/-11%), whereas (R(suc)) was reduced to 79.8+/-8.3% in average. The identical reduction of event success rate as well as increased pair

  11. Observations of Co4+ in a higher spin state and the increase in the Seebeck coefficient of thermoelectric Ca3Co4O9.

    PubMed

    Klie, R F; Qiao, Q; Paulauskas, T; Gulec, A; Rebola, A; Öğüt, S; Prange, M P; Idrobo, J C; Pantelides, S T; Kolesnik, S; Dabrowski, B; Ozdemir, M; Boyraz, C; Mazumdar, D; Gupta, A

    2012-05-11

    Ca3Co4O9 has a unique structure that leads to exceptionally high thermoelectric transport. Here we report the achievement of a 27% increase in the room-temperature in-plane Seebeck coefficient of Ca3Co4O9 thin films. We combine aberration-corrected Z-contrast imaging, atomic-column resolved electron energy-loss spectroscopy, and density-functional calculations to show that the increase is caused by stacking faults with Co4+-ions in a higher spin state compared to that of bulk Ca3Co4O9. The higher Seebeck coefficient makes the Ca3Co4O9 system suitable for many high temperature waste-heat-recovery applications.

  12. Microinjection of histamine into the dentate gyrus produces antinociception in the formalin test in rats.

    PubMed

    Khalilzadeh, Emad; Tamaddonfard, Esmaeal; Farshid, Amir Abbas; Erfanparast, Amir

    2010-12-01

    The present study was aimed to investigate the effects of microinjection of histamine, chlorpheniramine (a histamine H(1) receptor antagonist), ranitidine (a histamine H(2) receptor antagonist) and thioperamide (a histamine H(3) receptor antagonist) into the dentate gyrus on the formalin-induced pain. A biphasic pattern (first phase: 0-5min and second phase: 15-60min) in nociceptive responses was induced after subcutaneous injection of formalin (50μl, 2.5%) into the ventral surface of the right hind paw. Microinjection of histamine (1 and 2μg) into the dentate gyrus decreased the intensity of nociceptive responses. Intra-dentate gyrus microinjection of chlorpheniramine and ranitidine at the same doses of 1 and 4μg had no effects, whereas thioperamide at a dose of 4μg suppressed both phases of formalin-induced pain. Pretreatments with chlorpheniramine and ranitidine at the same dose of 4μg prevented histamine (2μg)-induced antinociception, while thioperamide (4μg) increased histamine (2μg)-induced antinociception. These results indicated that activation of brain neuronal histamine at the levels of dentate gyrus produced antinociception. The post-synaptic H(1), H(2) receptors and pre-synaptic H(3) receptors of histamine may be involved in the histamine-induced antinociception at the level of the dentate gyrus.

  13. Converging evidence for the neuroanatomic basis of combinatorial semantics in the angular gyrus.

    PubMed

    Price, Amy R; Bonner, Michael F; Peelle, Jonathan E; Grossman, Murray

    2015-02-18

    Human thought and language rely on the brain's ability to combine conceptual information. This fundamental process supports the construction of complex concepts from basic constituents. For example, both "jacket" and "plaid" can be represented as individual concepts, but they can also be integrated to form the more complex representation "plaid jacket." Although this process is central to the expression and comprehension of language, little is known about its neural basis. Here we present evidence for a neuroanatomic model of conceptual combination from three experiments. We predicted that the highly integrative region of heteromodal association cortex in the angular gyrus would be critical for conceptual combination, given its anatomic connectivity and its strong association with semantic memory in functional neuroimaging studies. Consistent with this hypothesis, we found that the process of combining concepts to form meaningful representations specifically modulates neural activity in the angular gyrus of healthy adults, independent of the modality of the semantic content integrated. We also found that individual differences in the structure of the angular gyrus in healthy adults are related to variability in behavioral performance on the conceptual combination task. Finally, in a group of patients with neurodegenerative disease, we found that the degree of atrophy in the angular gyrus is specifically related to impaired performance on combinatorial processing. These converging anatomic findings are consistent with a critical role for the angular gyrus in conceptual combination.

  14. Early integrative processes physiologically observed in dentate gyrus during an olfactory associative training in rat.

    PubMed

    Truchet, B; Chaillan, F A; Soumireu-Mourat, B; Roman, F S

    2002-06-01

    Modifications of synaptic efficacy in the dentate gyrus were investigated during an olfactory associative task. A group of rats was trained to discriminate between a patterned electrical stimulation of the lateral olfactory tract, used as an artificial cue, associated with a water reward, and a natural odor associated with a flash of light. Monosynaptic field potential responses evoked by single electrical stimuli to the lateral perforant path were recorded in the granular layer of the ipsilateral dentate gyrus prior to and just after each training session. An early increase in this response was observed just after the first learning session but disappeared 24 hours later. Inversely, a synaptic depression developed across sessions, becoming significant at the onset of a last (fifth) session. When a group of naive animals was pseudo-conditioned, no increase was observed and the synaptic depression was noted since the onset of the second session. In a group of rats similarly trained for only one session, and in which EPSPs were recorded throughout the 24 hours that followed, it was demonstrated that the increase lasted at least two hours, while the significant synaptic depression started after the fourth hour. These results are consistent with the early involvement of the dentate gyrus in learning the association between the cues and their respective rewards. These early integrative processes physiologically observed in dentate gyrus suggest early hippocampal processing before dentate gyrus reactivation via entorhinal cortex which will allow long-term memory storage in cortical areas once the meaning of the olfactory cues is learned.

  15. An in vivo correlate of exercise-induced neurogenesis in the adult dentate gyrus.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Ana C; Huddleston, Dan E; Brickman, Adam M; Sosunov, Alexander A; Hen, Rene; McKhann, Guy M; Sloan, Richard; Gage, Fred H; Brown, Truman R; Small, Scott A

    2007-03-27

    With continued debate over the functional significance of adult neurogenesis, identifying an in vivo correlate of neurogenesis has become an important goal. Here we rely on the coupling between neurogenesis and angiogenesis and test whether MRI measurements of cerebral blood volume (CBV) provide an imaging correlate of neurogenesis. First, we used an MRI approach to generate CBV maps over time in the hippocampal formation of exercising mice. Among all hippocampal subregions, exercise was found to have a primary effect on dentate gyrus CBV, the only subregion that supports adult neurogenesis. Moreover, exercise-induced increases in dentate gyrus CBV were found to correlate with postmortem measurements of neurogenesis. Second, using similar MRI technologies, we generated CBV maps over time in the hippocampal formation of exercising humans. As in mice, exercise was found to have a primary effect on dentate gyrus CBV, and the CBV changes were found to selectively correlate with cardiopulmonary and cognitive function. Taken together, these findings show that dentate gyrus CBV provides an imaging correlate of exercise-induced neurogenesis and that exercise differentially targets the dentate gyrus, a hippocampal subregion important for memory and implicated in cognitive aging.

  16. Anodal transcranial direct current stimulation over the supramarginal gyrus facilitates pitch memory.

    PubMed

    Schaal, Nora K; Williamson, Victoria J; Banissy, Michael J

    2013-11-01

    Functional neuroimaging studies have shown activation of the supramarginal gyrus during pitch memory tasks. A previous transcranial direct current stimulation study using cathodal stimulation over the left supramarginal gyrus reported a detrimental effect on short-term pitch memory performance, indicating an important role of the supramarginal gyrus in pitch memory. The current study aimed to determine whether pitch memory could be improved following anodal stimulation of the left supramarginal gyrus. The performances of non-musicians on two pitch memory tasks (pitch recognition and recall) and a visual memory control task following anodal or sham transcranial direct current stimulation were compared. The results show that, post-stimulation, the anodal group but not the control group performed significantly better on both pitch memory tasks; performance did not differ on the face memory task. These findings provide strong support for the causal involvement of the left supramarginal gyrus in the pitch memory process, and highlight the potential efficacy of transcranial direct current stimulation as a tool to improve pitch memory.

  17. Influx of extracellular Zn(2+) into the hippocampal CA1 neurons is required for cognitive performance via long-term potentiation.

    PubMed

    Takeda, A; Suzuki, M; Tempaku, M; Ohashi, K; Tamano, H

    2015-09-24

    Physiological significance of synaptic Zn(2+) signaling was examined in the CA1 of young rats. In vivo CA1 long-term potentiation (LTP) was induced using a recording electrode attached to a microdialysis probe and the recording region was locally perfused with artificial cerebrospinal fluid (ACSF) via the microdialysis probe. In vivo CA1 LTP was inhibited under perfusion with CaEDTA and ZnAF-2DA, extracellular and intracellular Zn(2+) chelators, respectively, suggesting that the influx of extracellular Zn(2+) is required for in vivo CA1 LTP induction. The increase in intracellular Zn(2+) was chelated with intracellular ZnAF-2 in the CA1 1h after local injection of ZnAF-2DA into the CA1, suggesting that intracellular Zn(2+) signaling induced during learning is blocked with intracellular ZnAF-2 when the learning was performed 1h after ZnAF-2DA injection. Object recognition was affected when training of object recognition test was performed 1h after ZnAF-2DA injection. These data suggest that intracellular Zn(2+) signaling in the CA1 is required for object recognition memory via LTP. Surprisingly, in vivo CA1 LTP was affected under perfusion with 0.1-1μM ZnCl2, unlike the previous data that in vitro CA1 LTP was enhanced in the presence of 1-5μM ZnCl2. The influx of extracellular Zn(2+) into CA1 pyramidal cells has bidirectional action in CA1 LTP. The present study indicates that the degree of extracellular Zn(2+) influx into CA1 neurons is critical for LTP and cognitive performance. PMID:26204819

  18. Matrix metalloprotease activity shapes the magnitude of EPSPs and spike plasticity within the hippocampal CA3 network.

    PubMed

    Wójtowicz, Tomasz; Mozrzymas, Jerzy W

    2014-02-01

    Matrix metalloproteases (MMP) play a pivotal role in long-term synaptic plasticity, learning, and memory. The roles of different MMP subtypes are emerging, but the proteolytic activity of certain MMPs was shown to support these processes through the structural and functional modification of hippocampal Schaeffer collateral and mossy fiber (MF) synapses. However, certain patterns of synaptic activity are additionally associated with non-synaptic changes, such as the scaling of neuronal excitability. However, the extent to which MMPs affect this process remains unknown. We determined whether MMP activity interferes with excitatory post-synaptic potential EPSP-to-spike (E-S) coupling under conditions of varying synaptic activity. We evoked short- and long-term synaptic plasticity at associational/commissural (A/C) synapses of CA3 pyramidal neurons and simultaneously recorded population spikes (PSs) and EPSPs in acute rat (P30-60) brain slices in the presence of various MMP inhibitors. We found that MMP inhibition significantly reduced E-S coupling and shortened the PS latency associated with 4× 100 Hz stimulation or paired burst activity of MF-CA3 and A/C synapses. Moreover, MMP inhibition interfered with the scaling of amplitude of measured signals during high-frequency trains, thus affecting the induction of long-term potentiation (LTP). The inhibition of L-type voltage-gated calcium channels with 20 µM nifedipine or GABA-A receptors with 1-30 µM picrotoxin did not occlude the effects of MMP inhibitors. However, MMP inhibition significantly reduced the LTP of NMDA receptor-mediated EPSPs. Finally, the analysis of LTP saturation with multiple single (1× 100 Hz) or packed (4× 100 Hz) trains indicated that MMPs support E-S coupling evoked by selected synaptic activity patterns and set the ceiling for tetanically evoked E-S LTP. In conclusion, the activity of MMPs, particularly MMP-3, regulated the magnitude of EPSPs and spike plasticity in the CA3 network and may

  19. The maintenance of specific aspects of neuronal function and behavior is dependent on programmed cell death of adult-generated neurons in the dentate gyrus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Woon Ryoung; Park, Ok-Hee; Choi, Sukwoo; Choi, Se-Young; Park, Soon Kwon; Lee, Kea Joo; Rhyu, Im Joo; Kim, Hyun; Lee, Yeon Kyung; Kim, Hyun Taek; Oppenheim, Ronald W; Sun, Woong

    2009-04-01

    A considerable number of new neurons are generated daily in the dentate gyrus (DG) of the adult hippocampus, but only a subset of these survive, as many adult-generated neurons undergo programmed cell death (PCD). However, the significance of PCD in the adult brain for the functionality of DG circuits is not known. Here, we examined the electrophysiological and behavioral characteristics of Bax-knockout (Bax-KO) mice in which PCD of post-mitotic neurons is prevented. The continuous increase in DG cell numbers in Bax-KO mice resulted in the readjustment of afferent and efferent synaptic connections, represented by age-dependent reductions in the dendritic arborization of DG neurons and in the synaptic contact ratio of mossy fibers with CA3 dendritic spines. These neuroanatomical changes were associated with reductions in synaptic transmission and reduced performance in a contextual fear memory task in 6-month-old Bax-KO mice. These results suggest that the elimination of excess DG neurons via Bax-dependent PCD in the adult brain is required for the normal organization and function of the hippocampus.

  20. The maintenance of specific aspects of neuronal function and behavior is dependent on programmed cell death of adult-generated neurons in the dentate gyrus

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Woon Ryoung; Park, Ok-hee; Choi, Sukwoo; Choi, Se-Young; Park, Soon Kwon; Lee, Kea Joo; Rhyu, Im Joo; Kim, Hyun; Lee, Yeon Kyung; Kim, Hyun Taek; Oppenheim, Ronald W; Sun, Woong

    2009-01-01

    A considerable number of new neurons are generated daily in the dentate gyrus (DG) of the adult hippocampus, but only a subset of these survive, as many adult-generated neurons undergo programmed cell death (PCD). However, the significance of PCD in the adult brain for the functionality of DG circuits is not known. Here we examined the electrophysiological and behavioral characteristics of Bax-KO mice in which PCD of post-mitotic neurons is prevented. The continuous increase in DG cell numbers in Bax-KO mice, resulted in the readjustment of afferent and efferent synaptic connections, represented by age-dependent reductions in the dendritic arborization of DG neurons and in the synaptic contact ratio of mossy fibers (MF) with CA3 dendritic spines. These neuroanatomical changes were associated with reductions in synaptic transmission and reduced performance in a contextual fear memory task in 6-month old Bax-KO mice. These results suggest that the elimination of excess DG neurons via Bax-dependent PCD in the adult brain is required for the normal organization and function of the hippocampus. PMID:19519627

  1. Evaluation of Ca3Co2O6 as cathode material for high-performance solid-oxide fuel cell

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Tao; Huang, Yun-Hui; Zeng, Rui; Yuan, Li-Xia; Hu, Xian-Luo; Zhang, Wu-Xing; Jiang, Long; Yang, Jun-You; Zhang, Zhao-Liang

    2013-01-01

    A cobalt-based thermoelectric compound Ca3Co2O6 (CCO) has been developed as new cathode material with superior performance for intermediate-temperature (IT) solid-oxide fuel cell (SOFC). Systematic evaluation has been carried out. Measurement of thermal expansion coefficient (TEC), thermal-stress (σ) and interfacial shearing stress (τ) with the electrolyte show that CCO matches well with several commonly-used IT electrolytes. Maximum power density as high as 1.47 W cm−2 is attained at 800°C, and an additional thermoelectric voltage of 11.7 mV is detected. The superior electrochemical performance, thermoelectric effect, and comparable thermal and mechanical behaviors with the electrolytes make CCO to be a promising cathode material for SOFC. PMID:23350032

  2. Effects of Lu and Ni Substitution on Thermoelectric Properties of Ca3Co4O9+ δ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wenchao; Qian, Haoji; Gan, Jinyu; Wei, Wei; Wang, Zhihe; Tang, Guodong

    2016-08-01

    Effects of (Lu, Ni) co-doping on the thermoelectric properties of Ca3Co4O9+ δ (CCO) have been systematically investigated from 20 K to 350 K. The electrical resistivity and thermopower of (Lu, Ni) co-doped samples increase, while their thermal conductivity is significantly depressed as compared to that of pristine CCO. The figure of merit ( ZT) of co-doped samples is higher than those of Lu-doped samples and pristine CCO. A maximum ZT of 0.0185 is achieved at 350 K for Ca2.9Lu0.1Co3.9Ni0.1O9+ δ . We demonstrate that the simultaneous increase of spin entropy and phonon scattering induced by (Lu, Ni) co-doping boosts ZT of CCO. This study indicates that (Lu, Ni) co-doping may promise an effective way to improve thermoelectric properties of the CCO system.

  3. Piezoelectric Ca3NbGa3Si2O14 crystal: crystal growth, piezoelectric and acoustic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roshchupkin, Dmitry; Ortega, Luc; Plotitcyna, Olga; Erko, Alexei; Zizak, Ivo; Vadilonga, Simone; Irzhak, Dmitry; Emelin, Evgenii; Buzanov, Oleg; Leitenberger, Wolfram

    2016-08-01

    Ca3NbGa3Si2O14 (CNGS), a five-component crystal of lanthanum-gallium silicate group, was grown by the Czochralski method. The parameters of the elementary unit cell of the crystal were measured by powder diffraction. The independent piezoelectric strain coefficients d{}_{11} and d_{14} were determined by the triple-axis X-ray diffraction in the Bragg and Laue geometries. Excitation and propagation of surface acoustic waves (SAW) were studied by high-resolution X-ray diffraction at BESSY II synchrotron radiation source. The velocity of SAW propagation and power flow angles in the Y-, X- and yxl/{+}36°-cuts of the CNGS crystal were determined from the analysis of the diffraction spectra. The CNGS crystal was found practically isotropic by its acoustic properties.

  4. Complex Network Analysis of CA3 Transcriptome Reveals Pathogenic and Compensatory Pathways in Refractory Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Bando, Silvia Yumi; Silva, Filipi Nascimento; Costa, Luciano da Fontoura; Silva, Alexandre V.; Pimentel-Silva, Luciana R.; Castro, Luiz HM.; Wen, Hung-Tzu; Amaro, Edson; Moreira-Filho, Carlos Alberto

    2013-01-01

    We previously described – studying transcriptional signatures of hippocampal CA3 explants – that febrile (FS) and afebrile (NFS) forms of refractory mesial temporal lobe epilepsy constitute two distinct genomic phenotypes. That network analysis was based on a limited number (hundreds) of differentially expressed genes (DE networks) among a large set of valid transcripts (close to two tens of thousands). Here we developed a methodology for complex network visualization (3D) and analysis that allows the categorization of network nodes according to distinct hierarchical levels of gene-gene connections (node degree) and of interconnection between node neighbors (concentric node degree). Hubs are highly connected nodes, VIPs have low node degree but connect only with hubs, and high-hubs have VIP status and high overall number of connections. Studying the whole set of CA3 valid transcripts we: i) obtained complete transcriptional networks (CO) for FS and NFS phenotypic groups; ii) examined how CO and DE networks are related; iii) characterized genomic and molecular mechanisms underlying FS and NFS phenotypes, identifying potential novel targets for therapeutic interventions. We found that: i) DE hubs and VIPs are evenly distributed inside the CO networks; ii) most DE hubs and VIPs are related to synaptic transmission and neuronal excitability whereas most CO hubs, VIPs and high hubs are related to neuronal differentiation, homeostasis and neuroprotection, indicating compensatory mechanisms. Complex network visualization and analysis is a useful tool for systems biology approaches to multifactorial diseases. Network centrality observed for hubs, VIPs and high hubs of CO networks, is consistent with the network disease model, where a group of nodes whose perturbation leads to a disease phenotype occupies a central position in the network. Conceivably, the chance for exerting therapeutic effects through the modulation of particular genes will be higher if these genes

  5. Nitrous oxide directly inhibits action potential-dependent neurotransmission from single presynaptic boutons adhering to rat hippocampal CA3 neurons.

    PubMed

    Wakita, Masahito; Kotani, Naoki; Yamaga, Toshitaka; Akaike, Norio

    2015-09-01

    We evaluated the effects of N2O on synaptic transmission using a preparation of mechanically dissociated rat hippocampal CA3 neurons that allowed assays of single bouton responses evoked from native functional nerve endings. We studied the effects of N2O on GABAA, glutamate, AMPA and NMDA receptor-mediated currents (IGABA, IGlu, IAMPA and INMDA) elicited by exogenous application of GABA, glutamate, (S)-AMPA, and NMDA and spontaneous, miniature, and evoked GABAergic inhibitory and glutamatergic excitatory postsynaptic current (sIPSC, mIPSC, eIPSC, sEPSC, mEPSC and eEPSC) in mechanically dissociated CA3 neurons. eIPSC and eEPSC were evoked by focal electrical stimulation of a single bouton. Administration of 70% N2O altered neither IGABA nor the frequency and amplitude of both sIPSCs and mIPSCs. In contrast, N2O decreased the amplitude of eIPSCs, while increasing failure rates (Rf) and paired-pulse ratios (PPR) in a concentration-dependent manner. On the other hand, N2O decreased IGlu, IAMPA and INMDA. Again N2O did not change the frequency and amplitude of either sEPSCs of mEPSCs. N2O also decreased amplitudes of eEPSCs with increased Rf and PPR. The decay phases of all synaptic responses were unchanged. The present results indicated that N2O inhibits the activation of AMPA/KA and NMDA receptors and also that N2O preferentially depress the action potential-dependent GABA and glutamate releases but had little effects on spontaneous and miniature releases. PMID:26343381

  6. Exercise reduces diet-induced cognitive decline and increases hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor in CA3 neurons

    PubMed Central

    Noble, Emily E.; Mavanji, Vijayakumar; Little, Morgan R.; Billington, Charles J.; Kotz, Catherine M.; Wang, ChuanFeng

    2014-01-01

    Background Previous studies have shown that a western diet impairs, whereas physical exercise enhances hippocampus-dependent learning and memory. Both diet and exercise influence expression of hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), which is associated with improved cognition. We hypothesized that exercise reverses diet-induced cognitive decline while increasing hippocampal BDNF. Methods To test the effects of exercise on hippocampal-dependent memory, we compared cognitive scores of Sprague-Dawley rats exercised by voluntary running wheel (RW) access or forced treadmill (TM) to sedentary (Sed) animals. Memory was tested by two-way active avoidance test (TWAA), in which animals are exposed to a brief shock in a specific chamber area. When an animal avoids, escapes or has reduced latency to do either, this is considered a measure of memory. In a second experiment, rats were fed either a high-fat diet or control diet for 16 weeks, then randomly assigned to running wheel access or sedentary condition, and TWAA memory was tested once a week for seven weeks of exercise intervention. Results Both groups of exercised animals had improved memory as indicated by reduced latency to avoid and escape shock, and increased avoid and escape episodes (p<0.05). Exposure to a high-fat diet resulted in poor performance during both the acquisition and retrieval phases of the memory test as compared to controls. Exercise reversed high-fat diet-induced memory impairment, and increased brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in neurons of the hippocampal CA3 region. Conclusions These data suggest that exercise improves memory retrieval, particularly with respect to avoiding aversive stimuli, and may be beneficial in protecting against diet induced cognitive decline, likely via elevated BDNF in neurons of the CA3 region. PMID:24755094

  7. Gray Matter Volume of the Lingual Gyrus Mediates the Relationship between Inhibition Function and Divergent Thinking

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lijie; Qiao, Lei; Chen, Qunlin; Yang, Wenjing; Xu, Mengsi; Yao, Xiaonan; Qiu, Jiang; Yang, Dong

    2016-01-01

    Although previous research provides converging evidence for the role of posterior regions of the brain (including temporal, occipital, and parietal regions) involved in inhibition on creative thinking, it remains unclear as to how these regions influence individual differences in creative thinking. Thus, we explored the relationship between posterior regions (i.e., hippocampal, parahippocampal, lingual gyrus, precuneus, and cuneus), inhibition function, and divergent thinking (DT) in 128 healthy college students. The results revealed that lower inhibition was associated with larger gray matter volume (GMV) in the lingual gyrus, which in turn was associated with higher DT. In addition, GMV in the lingual gyrus mediated the association between inhibition and DT. These results provide new evidence for the role of inhibition in creative thinking. Inhibition may affect the amount of information stored in long-term memory, which, in turn influences DT. PMID:27752250

  8. Rapid erasure of hippocampal memory following inhibition of dentate gyrus granule cells

    PubMed Central

    Madroñal, Noelia; Delgado-García, José M.; Fernández-Guizán, Azahara; Chatterjee, Jayanta; Köhn, Maja; Mattucci, Camilla; Jain, Apar; Tsetsenis, Theodoros; Illarionova, Anna; Grinevich, Valery; Gross, Cornelius T.; Gruart, Agnès

    2016-01-01

    The hippocampus is critical for the acquisition and retrieval of episodic and contextual memories. Lesions of the dentate gyrus, a principal input of the hippocampus, block memory acquisition, but it remains unclear whether this region also plays a role in memory retrieval. Here we combine cell-type specific neural inhibition with electrophysiological measurements of learning-associated plasticity in behaving mice to demonstrate that dentate gyrus granule cells are not required for memory retrieval, but instead have an unexpected role in memory maintenance. Furthermore, we demonstrate the translational potential of our findings by showing that pharmacological activation of an endogenous inhibitory receptor expressed selectively in dentate gyrus granule cells can induce a rapid loss of hippocampal memory. These findings open a new avenue for the targeted erasure of episodic and contextual memories. PMID:26988806

  9. Rapid erasure of hippocampal memory following inhibition of dentate gyrus granule cells.

    PubMed

    Madroñal, Noelia; Delgado-García, José M; Fernández-Guizán, Azahara; Chatterjee, Jayanta; Köhn, Maja; Mattucci, Camilla; Jain, Apar; Tsetsenis, Theodoros; Illarionova, Anna; Grinevich, Valery; Gross, Cornelius T; Gruart, Agnès

    2016-01-01

    The hippocampus is critical for the acquisition and retrieval of episodic and contextual memories. Lesions of the dentate gyrus, a principal input of the hippocampus, block memory acquisition, but it remains unclear whether this region also plays a role in memory retrieval. Here we combine cell-type specific neural inhibition with electrophysiological measurements of learning-associated plasticity in behaving mice to demonstrate that dentate gyrus granule cells are not required for memory retrieval, but instead have an unexpected role in memory maintenance. Furthermore, we demonstrate the translational potential of our findings by showing that pharmacological activation of an endogenous inhibitory receptor expressed selectively in dentate gyrus granule cells can induce a rapid loss of hippocampal memory. These findings open a new avenue for the targeted erasure of episodic and contextual memories. PMID:26988806

  10. Low doses of alcohol potentiate GABA sub B inhibition of spontaneous activity of hippocampal CA1 neurons in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Criado, J.R.; Thies, R. )

    1991-03-11

    Low doses of alcohol facilitate firing of hippocampal neurons. Such doses also enhance the inhibitory actions of GABA. Alcohol is known to potentiate inhibition via GABA{sub A} receptors. However, the effects of alcohol on GABA{sub B} receptor function are not understood. Spontaneous activity of single units was recorded from CA1 neurons of male rats anesthetized with 1.0% halothane. Electrical recordings and local application of drugs were done with multi-barrel pipettes. CA1 pyramidal neurons fired spontaneous bursts of action potentials. Acute alcohol decreased the interval between bursts, a mild excitatory action. Alcohol also more than doubled the period of complete inhibition produced by local application of both GABA and baclofen. These data suggest that GABA{sub B}-mediated inhibition is also potentiated by low doses of alcohol.

  11. Over-expression of TSPO in the hippocampal CA1 area alleviates cognitive dysfunction caused by lipopolysaccharide in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Ma, Li; Yin, Yan-Ling; Dong, Lian-Qiang; Cheng, Gang-Ge; Ma, Ya-Qun; Li, Yun-Feng; Xu, Bai-Nan

    2016-09-01

    The translocator protein 18kDa (TSPO) is closely related to regulation of immune/inflammatory response. However, the putative role and signaling mechanisms of TSPO in regulation of neuroinflammation remain unclear. GV287 lentiviral vectors mediating TSPO over-expression were injected into bilateral hippocampal CA1 areas to test whether TSPO over-expression was neuroprotective in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced mice model. Finasteride, a blocker of allopregnanolone production, was used to test whether the protective effects were related to steroideogenesis. The results demonstrated that TSPO over-expression increased progesterone and allopregnanolone synthesis. TSPO over-expression in CA1 area improved LPS-induced cognitive deficiency in mice and this cognitive improvement was reversed by finasteride administration. These data suggest that up-regulation of TSPO level during neuroinflammation may be an adaptive response mechanism, a way to provide more neurosteroids. We confer that TSPO could be an attractive drug target for controlling neuroinflammation in the future.

  12. Electronic and magnetic properties of quadruple manganite Ca1-xSrxMn7O12 films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huon, Amanda; May, Steven

    We investigate the functional properties of epitaxial Ca1-xSrxMn7O12 films to better understand the underlying physical phenomenon in this perovskite system. We utilize oxide molecular beam epitaxy to fabricate Ca1-xSrxMn7O12 thin films. The epitaxial films were achieved through a two-step oxygen/ozone post-growth anneal. In parent x =0 films, we find bulk-like electronic and magnetic properties including an abrupt increase in resistivity at 425 K due to a nominal charge ordering transition and a net magnetization below 43 K likely arising from helical magnetic order. Finally, we will present on how tuning the Sr concentration alters the electronic and magnetic properties, providing a means to control the phase transition temperatures. The results highlight the scientific opportunities in heterostructures based on quadruple manganites.

  13. Unique expression patterns of cell fate molecules delineate sequential stages of dentate gyrus development.

    PubMed

    Pleasure, S J; Collins, A E; Lowenstein, D H

    2000-08-15

    The dentate gyrus of the hippocampus is uniquely organized with a displaced proliferative zone that continues to generate dentate granule cells throughout life. We have analyzed the expression of Notch receptors, Notch ligands, and basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) genes during dentate gyrus development to determine whether the need to maintain a pool of undifferentiated precursors is reflected in the patterns of expression of these genes. Many of these genes are expressed diffusely throughout the cortical neuroepithelium at embryonic days 16 and 17 in the rat, just preceding the migration of newly born granule cells and dentate precursor cells into the dentate anlage. However, at this time, Mash1, Math3, and Id3 expression are all concentrated in the area that specifically gives rise to granule cells and dentate precursor cells. Two days later, at the time of migration of the first granule cells and dentate precursor cells, cells expressing Mash1 are seen in the migratory route from the subventricular zone to the developing dentate gyrus. Newly born granule cells expressing NeuroD are also present in this migratory pathway. In the first postnatal week, precursor cells expressing Mash1 reside in the dentate hilus, and by the third postnatal week they have largely taken up their final position in the subgranular zone along the hilar side of the dentate granule cell layer. After terminal differentiation, granule cells born in the hilus or the subgranular zone begin to express NeuroD followed by NeuroD2. This study establishes that the expression patterns of bHLH mRNAs evolve during the formation of the dentate gyrus, and the precursor cells resident in the mature dentate gyrus share features with precursor cells found in development. Thus, many of the same mechanisms that are known to regulate cell fate and precursor pool size in other brain regions are likely to be operative in the dentate gyrus at all stages of development.

  14. GABAergic interneuronal loss and reduced inhibitory synaptic transmission in the hippocampal CA1 region after mild traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Almeida-Suhett, Camila P; Prager, Eric M; Pidoplichko, Volodymyr; Figueiredo, Taiza H; Marini, Ann M; Li, Zheng; Eiden, Lee E; Braga, Maria F M

    2015-11-01

    Patients that suffer mild traumatic brain injuries (mTBI) often develop cognitive impairments, including memory and learning deficits. The hippocampus shows a high susceptibility to mTBI-induced damage due to its anatomical localization and has been implicated in cognitive and neurological impairments after mTBI. However, it remains unknown whether mTBI cognitive impairments are a result of morphological and pathophysiological alterations occurring in the CA1 hippocampal region. We investigated whether mTBI induces morphological and pathophysiological alterations in the CA1 using the controlled cortical impact (CCI) model. Seven days after CCI, animals subjected to mTBI showed cognitive impairment in the passive avoidance test and deficits to long-term potentiation (LTP) of synaptic transmission. Deficiencies in inducing or maintaining LTP were likely due to an observed reduction in the activation of NMDA but not AMPA receptors. Significant reductions in the frequency and amplitude of spontaneous and miniature GABAA-receptor mediated inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) were also observed 7 days after CCI. Design-based stereology revealed that although the total number of neurons was unaltered, the number of GABAergic interneurons is significantly reduced in the CA1 region 7 days after CCI. Additionally, the surface expression of α1, ß2/3, and γ2 subunits of the GABAA receptor were reduced, contributing to a reduced mIPSC frequency and amplitude, respectively. Together, these results suggest that mTBI causes a significant reduction in GABAergic inhibitory transmission and deficits to NMDA receptor mediated currents in the CA1, which may contribute to changes in hippocampal excitability and subsequent cognitive impairments after mTBI.

  15. Tetanus toxin induces long-term changes in excitation and inhibition in the rat hippocampal CA1 area.

    PubMed

    Vreugdenhil, M; Hack, S P; Draguhn, A; Jefferys, J G R

    2002-01-01

    Intrahippocampal tetanus toxin induces a period of chronic recurrent limbic seizures in adult rats, associated with a failure of inhibition in the hippocampus. The rats normally gain remission from their seizures after 6-8 weeks, but show persistent cognitive impairment. In this study we assessed which changes in cellular and network properties could account for the enduring changes in this model, using intracellular and extracellular field recordings in hippocampal slices from rats injected with tetanus toxin or vehicle, 5 months previously. In CA1 pyramidal neurones from toxin-injected rats, the slope of the action potential upstroke was reduced by 32%, the fast afterhyperpolarisation by 32% and the slow afterhyperpolarisation by 54%, suggesting changes in voltage-dependent conductances. The excitatory postsynaptic potential slope was reduced by 60% and the population synaptic potential slope was reduced at all stimulus intensities, suggesting a reduced afferent input in CA1. Paired-pulse stimulation showed an increase of the excitability ratio and an increase of cellular excitability only for the second pulse, suggesting a reduced inhibition. The polysynaptic inhibitory postsynaptic potential was reduced by 34%, whereas neither the inhibitory postsynaptic potential at subthreshold stimulus intensities,nor the pharmacologically isolated monosynaptic inhibitory postsynaptic potential were different in toxin-injected rats, suggesting a reduced synaptic excitation of interneurones. Stratum radiatum stimuli in toxin-injected rats, and not in controls, evoked antidromic activation of CA1 neurones, demonstrating axonal sprouting into areas normally devoid of CA1 pyramidal cell axons.We conclude that this combination of enduring changes in cellular and network properties, both pro-epileptic (increased recurrent excitatory connectivity, reduced recurrent inhibition and reduced afterhyperpolarisations) and anti-epileptic (impaired firing and reduced excitation), reaches a

  16. Possible interaction between opioidergic and cholinergic systems of CA1 in cholestasis-induced amnesia in mice.

    PubMed

    Zarrindast, Mohammad Reza; Hoseindoost, Saereh; Nasehi, Mohammad

    2012-03-01

    Bile duct ligation (BDL) induces primary biliary cirrhosis characterized by cholestasis, impaired liver function and cognition including impairment of memory formation and anxiety-like behaviors. Endogenous opioid and acetylcholine levels are elevated in animal model of cholestasis. In addition, there is no data about the effects of interaction opioidergic and cholinergic systems of dorsal hippocampus (CA1) on amnesia-induced by cholestasis. Male mice weighing 25-35 g were used in this study. Cholestasis was induced by the ligation of the common bile duct. One-trial step-down and hole-board paradigms were used for the assessment of memory retrieval and anxiety-like behaviors respectively. All drugs injected intra-CA1. The data showed that cholestasis (24 days after BDL) decreased memory retrieval. Sole intra-CA1 injection of higher dose of mecamylamine (0.125, 0.25, 0.5 and 1 μg/mice) and scopolamine (0.125, 0.25, 0.5 1 and 2 μg/mice) but not all doses of naloxone (0.0125, 0.025 and 0.05 μg/mice) decreased memory retrieval in the sham operated BDL. The ineffective doses of naloxone (0.025 and 0.05 μg/mice), mecamylamine (0.5 μg/mice) and scopolamine (0.5 μg/mice) restored cholestasis-induced amnesia 24 days after BDL. Further, all cross co-administration ineffective doses of naloxone (0.0125 μg/mice), mecamylamine (0.125 μg/mice) and scopolamine (0.125 μg/mice) reversed cholestasis-induced amnesia. All doses of the drugs have no effect on exploratory behaviors. The data strongly revealed that synergistic effect between opioidergic and cholinergic systems of CA1 on the modulation of cholestasis-induced amnesia.

  17. Spatiotemporal Progression of Microcalcification in the Hippocampal CA1 Region following Transient Forebrain Ischemia in Rats: An Ultrastructural Study.

    PubMed

    Riew, Tae-Ryong; Shin, Yoo-Jin; Kim, Hong Lim; Cho, Jeong Min; Pak, Ha-Jin; Lee, Mun-Yong

    2016-01-01

    Calcification in areas of neuronal degeneration is a common finding in several neuropathological disorders including ischemic insults. Here, we performed a detailed examination of the onset and spatiotemporal profile of calcification in the CA1 region of the hippocampus, where neuronal death has been observed after transient forebrain ischemia. Histopathological examinations showed very little alizarin red staining in the CA1 pyramidal cell layer until day 28 after reperfusion, while prominent alizarin red staining was detected in CA1 dendritic subfields, particularly in the stratum radiatum, by 14 days after reperfusion. Electron microscopy using the osmium/potassium dichromate method and electron probe microanalysis revealed selective calcium deposits within the mitochondria of degenerating dendrites at as early as 7 days after reperfusion, with subsequent complete mineralization occurring throughout the dendrites, which then coalesced to form larger mineral conglomerates with the adjacent calcifying neurites by 14 days after reperfusion. Large calcifying deposits were frequently observed at 28 days after reperfusion, when they were closely associated with or completely engulfed by astrocytes. In contrast, no prominent calcification was observed in the somata of CA1 pyramidal neurons showing the characteristic features of necrotic cell death after ischemia, although what appeared to be calcified mitochondria were noted in some degenerated neurons that became dark and condensed. Thus, our data indicate that intrahippocampal calcification after ischemic insults initially occurs within the mitochondria of degenerating dendrites, which leads to the extensive calcification that is associated with ischemic injuries. These findings suggest that in degenerating neurons, the calcified mitochondria in the dendrites, rather than in the somata, may serve as the nidus for further calcium precipitation in the ischemic hippocampus. PMID:27414398

  18. Spatiotemporal Progression of Microcalcification in the Hippocampal CA1 Region following Transient Forebrain Ischemia in Rats: An Ultrastructural Study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hong Lim; Cho, Jeong Min; Pak, Ha-Jin; Lee, Mun-Yong

    2016-01-01

    Calcification in areas of neuronal degeneration is a common finding in several neuropathological disorders including ischemic insults. Here, we performed a detailed examination of the onset and spatiotemporal profile of calcification in the CA1 region of the hippocampus, where neuronal death has been observed after transient forebrain ischemia. Histopathological examinations showed very little alizarin red staining in the CA1 pyramidal cell layer until day 28 after reperfusion, while prominent alizarin red staining was detected in CA1 dendritic subfields, particularly in the stratum radiatum, by 14 days after reperfusion. Electron microscopy using the osmium/potassium dichromate method and electron probe microanalysis revealed selective calcium deposits within the mitochondria of degenerating dendrites at as early as 7 days after reperfusion, with subsequent complete mineralization occurring throughout the dendrites, which then coalesced to form larger mineral conglomerates with the adjacent calcifying neurites by 14 days after reperfusion. Large calcifying deposits were frequently observed at 28 days after reperfusion, when they were closely associated with or completely engulfed by astrocytes. In contrast, no prominent calcification was observed in the somata of CA1 pyramidal neurons showing the characteristic features of necrotic cell death after ischemia, although what appeared to be calcified mitochondria were noted in some degenerated neurons that became dark and condensed. Thus, our data indicate that intrahippocampal calcification after ischemic insults initially occurs within the mitochondria of degenerating dendrites, which leads to the extensive calcification that is associated with ischemic injuries. These findings suggest that in degenerating neurons, the calcified mitochondria in the dendrites, rather than in the somata, may serve as the nidus for further calcium precipitation in the ischemic hippocampus. PMID:27414398

  19. Herniation of uncus and parahippocampal gyrus: an accidental finding on magnetic resonance imaging of cerebrum.

    PubMed

    Yavarian, Yousef; Bayat, Michael; Brøndum Frøkjær, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic herniation of uncus and parahippocampal gyrus into the ambient cistern is a very rare entity, which could be mistaken for other pathology such as tumor. To the best of our knowledge, two prior cases of this kind of herniation have been described. One of these cases was with associated symptomatology and other abnormalities, and the other was characterized as idiopathic. In this case report, we report a case of accidental finding of a herniation of uncus and parahippocampal gyrus into the ambient cistern, without any other accompanying abnormalities, well depicted by magnetic resonance imaging without further necessity for surgical brain intervention.

  20. Effects of FK506 on Hippocampal CA1 Cells Following Transient Global Ischemia/Reperfusion in Wistar Rat

    PubMed Central

    Sharifi, Zahra-Nadia; Abolhassani, Farid; Zarrindast, Mohammad Reza; Movassaghi, Shabnam; Rahimian, Nasrin; Hassanzadeh, Gholamreza

    2012-01-01

    Transient global cerebral ischemia causes loss of pyramidal cells in CA1 region of hippocampus. In this study, we investigated the neurotrophic effect of the immunosuppressant agent FK506 in rat after global cerebral ischemia. Both common carotid arteries were occluded for 20 minutes followed by reperfusion. In experimental group 1, FK506 (6 mg/kg) was given as a single dose exactly at the time of reperfusion. In the second group, FK506 was administered at the beginning of reperfusion, followed by its administration intraperitoneally (IP) 6, 24, 48, and 72 hours after reperfusion. FK506 failed to show neurotrophic effects on CA1 region when applied as a single dose of 6 mg/kg. The cell number and size of the CA1 pyramidal cells were increased, also the number of cell death decreased in this region when FK506 was administrated 48 h after reperfusion. This work supports the possible use of FK506 in treatment of ischemic brain damage. PMID:21941688

  1. Hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons of Mecp2 mutant mice show a dendritic spine phenotype only in the presymptomatic stage.

    PubMed

    Chapleau, Christopher A; Boggio, Elena Maria; Calfa, Gaston; Percy, Alan K; Giustetto, Maurizio; Pozzo-Miller, Lucas

    2012-01-01

    Alterations in dendritic spines have been documented in numerous neurodevelopmental disorders, including Rett Syndrome (RTT). RTT, an X chromosome-linked disorder associated with mutations in MECP2, is the leading cause of intellectual disabilities in women. Neurons in Mecp2-deficient mice show lower dendritic spine density in several brain regions. To better understand the role of MeCP2 on excitatory spine synapses, we analyzed dendritic spines of CA1 pyramidal neurons in the hippocampus of Mecp2(tm1.1Jae) male mutant mice by either confocal microscopy or electron microscopy (EM). At postnatal-day 7 (P7), well before the onset of RTT-like symptoms, CA1 pyramidal neurons from mutant mice showed lower dendritic spine density than those from wildtype littermates. On the other hand, at P15 or later showing characteristic RTT-like symptoms, dendritic spine density did not differ between mutant and wildtype neurons. Consistently, stereological analyses at the EM level revealed similar densities of asymmetric spine synapses in CA1 stratum radiatum of symptomatic mutant and wildtype littermates. These results raise caution regarding the use of dendritic spine density in hippocampal neurons as a phenotypic endpoint for the evaluation of therapeutic interventions in symptomatic Mecp2-deficient mice. However, they underscore the potential role of MeCP2 in the maintenance of excitatory spine synapses.

  2. Low CA1 spine synapse density is further reduced by castration in male non-human primates.

    PubMed

    Leranth, Csaba; Prange-Kiel, Janine; Frick, Karyn M; Horvath, Tamas L

    2004-05-01

    The hippocampus plays a major role in learning and memory and its morphology and function are readily affected by gonadal hormones in female non-human primates. We sought to determine whether the gonads also affect pyramidal cell spine synapse density in the CA1 hippocampal area of male primates. Unbiased electron microscopic stereological calculations were performed to determine the volumetric density of pyramidal cell spine synapses and semiquantitative analyses on the surface density of glial fibrillary acidic protein-containing glia processes and the diameter of pyramidal cell apical dendrites in the CA1 area of intact and orchidectomized (1 month) St Kitts vervet monkeys (Chlorocebus aethiops sabaeus). The volumetric density (number of spine synapse/ micro m(3)) of spine synapses was significantly lower (40%) in the gonadectomized animals than in control monkeys; conversely, the density of glia processes was significantly higher (15%) and the diameter of dendritic shafts located in this area was also larger (30%) in the orchidectomized animals than in the controls. Strikingly, when compared to female values, intact male primates had lower spine synapse densities than either intact or ovariectomized females. Since the primate hippocampus is very similar to that of a human's, the present observations suggest that physiological levels of circulating androgen hormones are necessary to support normal spine synapse density in the CA1 stratum radiatum of human male hippocampus.

  3. Schaffer collateral and perforant path inputs activate different subtypes of NMDA receptors on the same CA1 pyramidal cell

    PubMed Central

    Arrigoni, Elda; Greene, Robert W

    2004-01-01

    The two major inputs to CA1 pyramidal neurons, the perforant pathway (PP) that terminates on distal dendrites and the Schaffer collaterals (SCH) that terminate on proximal dendrites, activate both AMPA and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors. In an in vitro slice preparation, the pharmacologically isolated NMDA receptor-mediated excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) (NMDA-EPSCs) of either pathway can be selectively activated onto a single CA1 pyramidal neuron. Analysis of the decay phase of PP and SCH NMDA-EPSCs revealed no significant difference in their time constants, suggesting no apparent different distribution in NR2-subunit composition in the NMDA receptors (NMDAR) activated by the two synaptic inputs. However, application of the NR2B-selective antagonist, ifenprodil, differently affected the NMDA-EPSCs activated by the PP and SCH inputs. The reduction of the PP responses was only 30% compared to 75% for the SCH responses. In addition, for both pathways, the ifenprodil-insensitive component of the NMDA-EPSCs had significantly more rapid decay kinetics than those prior to application of ifenprodil. Our results show a greater NR2B subunit contribution to the NMDA component of the SCH EPSC, compared to the NMDA component of the PP EPSC and that in single CA1 pyramidal neurons NMDA composition is anatomically specific to the afferent input. PMID:15155538

  4. Spatiotemporal profile of Map2 and microglial changes in the hippocampal CA1 region following pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus

    PubMed Central

    Schartz, Nicole D.; Herr, Seth A.; Madsen, Lauren; Butts, Sarah J.; Torres, Ceidy; Mendez, Loyda B.; Brewster, Amy L.

    2016-01-01

    Status epilepticus (SE) triggers pathological changes to hippocampal dendrites that may promote epileptogenesis. The microtubule associated protein 2 (Map2) helps stabilize microtubules of the dendritic cytoskeleton. Recently, we reported a substantial decline in Map2 that coincided with robust microglia accumulation in the CA1 hippocampal region after an episode of SE. A spatial correlation between Map2 loss and reactive microglia was also reported in human cortex from refractory epilepsy. New evidence supports that microglia modulate dendritic structures. Thus, to identify a potential association between SE-induced Map2 and microglial changes, a spatiotemporal profile of these events is necessary. We used immunohistochemistry to determine the distribution of Map2 and the microglia marker IBA1 in the hippocampus after pilocarpine-induced SE from 4 hrs to 35 days. We found a decline in Map2 immunoreactivity in the CA1 area that reached minimal levels at 14 days post-SE and partially increased thereafter. In contrast, maximal microglia accumulation occurred in the CA1 area at 14 days post-SE. Our data indicate that SE-induced Map2 and microglial changes parallel each other’s spatiotemporal profiles. These findings may lay the foundation for future mechanistic studies to help identify potential roles for microglia in the dendritic pathology associated with SE and epilepsy. PMID:27143585

  5. Region-specific age effects on AMPA sensitivity: electrophysiological evidence for loss of synaptic contacts in hippocampal field CA1.

    PubMed

    Barnes, C A; Rao, G; Foster, T C; McNaughton, B L

    1992-10-01

    The effects of aging on the responsiveness of hippocampal neurons to iontophoretic application of L-glutamate and AMPA were studied in vitro. There were no effects of age on neuronal responses to L-glutamate; however, CA1 pyramidal cells of old rats, but not granule cells in the fascia dentata, showed both a smaller reduction in extracellularly-recorded synaptic responses following application of AMPA (presumably mediated by depolarization), and smaller extracellular "DC" fields (measured by subtracting the DC potentials at the dendrite and soma following AMPA application in the dendrites). To examine the cellular bases of this age-related alteration in AMPA sensitivity, two additional electrophysiological approaches were used: (1) measurement of the amplitude ratios of extracellular EPSP and fiber potential components of the Schaffer collateral-CA1 response; (2) measurement of intracellularly recorded unitary EPSPs and quantal analysis of their fluctuations. The interpretations that would be placed on four hypothetical possible outcomes of such experiments are outlined and assessed in relation to the experimental data. The pattern of results obtained in the present experiments supports the following conclusions: In old rats, individual Schaffer collateral synapses do not appear to have altered AMPA receptor properties, as neither the mean size of the unitary synaptic response nor the apparent quantal size differs between age groups; however, the data do support the conclusion that there are fewer synapses per Schaffer collateral branch in old versus young CA1 pyramidal cells.

  6. Caffeine treatment prevents rapid eye movement sleep deprivation-induced impairment of late-phase long-term potentiation in the dentate gyrus.

    PubMed

    Alhaider, Ibrahim A; Alkadhi, Karim A

    2015-11-01

    The CA1 and dentate gyrus (DG) are physically and functionally closely related areas of the hippocampus, but they differ in various respects, including their reactions to different insults. The purpose of this study was to determine the protective effects of chronic caffeine treatment on late-phase long-term potentiation (L-LTP) and its signalling cascade in the DG area of the hippocampus of rapid eye movement sleep-deprived rats. Rats were chronically treated with caffeine (300 mg/L drinking water) for 4 weeks, after which they were sleep-deprived for 24 h. L-LTP was induced in in anaesthetized rats, and extracellular field potentials from the DG area were recorded in vivo. The levels of L-LTP-related signalling proteins were assessed by western blot analysis. Sleep deprivation markedly reduced L-LTP magnitude, and basal levels of total cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB), phosphorylated CREB (P-CREB), and calcium/calmodulin kinase IV (CaMKIV). Chronic caffeine treatment prevented the reductions in the basal levels of P-CREB, total CREB and CaMKIV in sleep-deprived rats. Furthermore, caffeine prevented post-L-LTP sleep deprivation-induced downregulation of P-CREB and brain-derived neurotrophic factor in the DG. The current findings show that caffeine treatment prevents acute sleep deprivation-induced deficits in brain function.

  7. Caffeine treatment prevents rapid eye movement sleep deprivation-induced impairment of late-phase long-term potentiation in the dentate gyrus.

    PubMed

    Alhaider, Ibrahim A; Alkadhi, Karim A

    2015-11-01

    The CA1 and dentate gyrus (DG) are physically and functionally closely related areas of the hippocampus, but they differ in various respects, including their reactions to different insults. The purpose of this study was to determine the protective effects of chronic caffeine treatment on late-phase long-term potentiation (L-LTP) and its signalling cascade in the DG area of the hippocampus of rapid eye movement sleep-deprived rats. Rats were chronically treated with caffeine (300 mg/L drinking water) for 4 weeks, after which they were sleep-deprived for 24 h. L-LTP was induced in in anaesthetized rats, and extracellular field potentials from the DG area were recorded in vivo. The levels of L-LTP-related signalling proteins were assessed by western blot analysis. Sleep deprivation markedly reduced L-LTP magnitude, and basal levels of total cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB), phosphorylated CREB (P-CREB), and calcium/calmodulin kinase IV (CaMKIV). Chronic caffeine treatment prevented the reductions in the basal levels of P-CREB, total CREB and CaMKIV in sleep-deprived rats. Furthermore, caffeine prevented post-L-LTP sleep deprivation-induced downregulation of P-CREB and brain-derived neurotrophic factor in the DG. The current findings show that caffeine treatment prevents acute sleep deprivation-induced deficits in brain function. PMID:26449851

  8. The neuron-astrocyte-microglia triad involvement in neuroinflammaging mechanisms in the CA3 hippocampus of memory-impaired aged rats.

    PubMed

    Lana, Daniele; Iovino, Ludovica; Nosi, Daniele; Wenk, Gary L; Giovannini, Maria Grazia

    2016-10-01

    We examined the effects of inflammaging on memory encoding, and qualitative and quantitative modifications on proinflammatory proteins, apoptosis, neurodegeneration and morphological changes of neuron-astrocyte-microglia triads in CA3 Stratum Pyramidale (SP), Stratum Lucidum (SL) and Stratum Radiatum (SR) of young (3months) and aged rats (20months). Aged rats showed short-term memory impairments in the inhibitory avoidance task, increased expression of iNOS and activation of p38MAPK in SP, increase of apoptotic neurons in SP and of ectopic neurons in SL, and decrease of CA3 pyramidal neurons. The number of astrocytes and their branches length decreased in the three CA3 subregions of aged rats, with morphological signs of clasmatodendrosis. Total and activated microglia increased in the three CA3 subregions of aged rats. In aged rats CA3, astrocytes surrounded ectopic degenerating neurons forming "micro scars" around them. Astrocyte branches infiltrated the neuronal cell body, and, together with activated microglia formed "triads". In the triads, significantly more numerous in CA3 SL and SR of aged rats, astrocytes and microglia cooperated in fragmentation and phagocytosis of ectopic neurons. Inflammaging-induced modifications of astrocytes and microglia in CA3 of aged rats may help clearing neuronal debris derived from low-grade inflammation and apoptosis. These events might be common mechanisms underlying many neurodegenerative processes. The frequency to which they appear might depend upon, or might be the cause of, the burden and severity of neurodegeneration. Targeting the triads may represent a therapeutic strategy which may control inflammatory processes and spread of further cellular damage to neighboring cells. PMID:27466072

  9. The neuron-astrocyte-microglia triad involvement in neuroinflammaging mechanisms in the CA3 hippocampus of memory-impaired aged rats.

    PubMed

    Lana, Daniele; Iovino, Ludovica; Nosi, Daniele; Wenk, Gary L; Giovannini, Maria Grazia

    2016-10-01

    We examined the effects of inflammaging on memory encoding, and qualitative and quantitative modifications on proinflammatory proteins, apoptosis, neurodegeneration and morphological changes of neuron-astrocyte-microglia triads in CA3 Stratum Pyramidale (SP), Stratum Lucidum (SL) and Stratum Radiatum (SR) of young (3months) and aged rats (20months). Aged rats showed short-term memory impairments in the inhibitory avoidance task, increased expression of iNOS and activation of p38MAPK in SP, increase of apoptotic neurons in SP and of ectopic neurons in SL, and decrease of CA3 pyramidal neurons. The number of astrocytes and their branches length decreased in the three CA3 subregions of aged rats, with morphological signs of clasmatodendrosis. Total and activated microglia increased in the three CA3 subregions of aged rats. In aged rats CA3, astrocytes surrounded ectopic degenerating neurons forming "micro scars" around them. Astrocyte branches infiltrated the neuronal cell body, and, together with activated microglia formed "triads". In the triads, significantly more numerous in CA3 SL and SR of aged rats, astrocytes and microglia cooperated in fragmentation and phagocytosis of ectopic neurons. Inflammaging-induced modifications of astrocytes and microglia in CA3 of aged rats may help clearing neuronal debris derived from low-grade inflammation and apoptosis. These events might be common mechanisms underlying many neurodegenerative processes. The frequency to which they appear might depend upon, or might be the cause of, the burden and severity of neurodegeneration. Targeting the triads may represent a therapeutic strategy which may control inflammatory processes and spread of further cellular damage to neighboring cells.

  10. A study on the sealing ability and antibacterial activity of Ca3SiO5/CaCl2 composite cement for dental applications.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaohong; Chang, Jiang; Hu, Sheng

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the sealing ability and antibacterial activity of Ca3SiO5/CaCl2 composite cement. Fifty maxillary anterior teeth were instrumented according to step-back technique and filled with experimental and control materials. To evaluate the sealing ability, a fluid transport model using glucose was employed for quantitative analysis of endodontic microleakage. To evaluate antibacterial activity, E. colias (ATCC 25922) was cultivated on agar plates. Results showed that the sealing ability of Ca3SiO5/CaCl2 composite cement and cortisomol paste were higher than that of zinc oxide-eugenol (ZOE) cement, and that no significant difference was observed between Ca3SiO5/CaCl2 composite cement and cortisomol paste. On antibacterial activity, Ca3SiO5/CaCl2 composite cements composed of varying amounts of CaCl2 (0-15%) exhibited similar levels of activity against E. coliasas calcium hydroxide cement, whereas cortisomol paste had little effect on E. colias. All these results suggested that Ca3SiO5/CaCl2 composite cement demonstrated good potential for root canal treatment applications.

  11. Mechanoluminescence, thermoluminescence, photoluminescence studies on Ca3Y2Si3O12:RE(3+) (RE(3+) = Dy(3+) and Eu(3+)) phosphors.

    PubMed

    Kadukar, Monali R; Yawalkar, P W; Choithrani, Renu; Dhoble, S J

    2015-12-01

    Dy(3+) and Eu(3+) activated Ca3Y2Si3O12 phosphors were synthesized by the solid-state synthesis method. The phosphors were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), mechanoluminescence (ML), thermoluminescence (TL) and photoluminescence (PL) to determine structure and luminescence. For ML glow curves, only one peak was observed, as only one type of luminescence centre was formed during irradiation. The Ca3Y2Si3O12:Dy(3+) TL glow curve showed a single peak at 151.55 °C and the Ca3Y2Si3O12:Eu(3+) TL glow curve peaked at 323 °C with a small peak at 192 °C, indicating that two types of traps were activated. The trapping parameters for both the samples were calculated using Chen's peak shape method. Dy(3+)-activated Ca3Y2Si3O12 showed emission at 482 and 574 nm when excited by a 351 nm excitation wavelength, whereas the Eu(3+)-activated Ca3 Y2Si3O12 phosphor PL emission spectra showed emission peaks at 613 nm, 591 nm, 580 nm when excited at 395 nm wavelength. When excited at 466 nm, prominent emission peaks were observed at their respective positions with very slight shifts.

  12. Electrical and Pharmacological Stimuli Reveal a Greater Susceptibility for CA3 Network Excitability in Hippocampal Slices from Aged vs. Adult Fischer 344 Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kanak, Daniel J.; Jones, Ryan T.; Tokhi, Ashish; Willingham, Amy L.; Zaveri, Hitten P.; Rose, Gregory M.; Patrylo, Peter R.

    2011-01-01

    Clinical data and experimental studies in rats have shown that the aged CNS is more susceptible to the proconvulsive effects of the excitotoxic glutamate analogues kainate (KA) and domoate (DA), which bind high-affinity receptors localized at mossy fiber (MF) synapses in the CA3 subregion of the hippocampus. Although decreased renal clearance appears to play a role in the hypersensitivity of the aged hippocampus to systemically-administered DA, it is unclear if the excitability of the CA3 network is also altered with age. Therefore, this study monitored CA3 field potential activity in hippocampal slices from aged and adult male Fischer 344 rats in response to electrical and pharmacological network stimulation targeted to the MF-CA3 circuit. Network challenges with repetitive hilar stimulation or bath application of nanomolar concentrations of KA more readily elicited excitable network activity (e.g. population spike facilitation, multiple population spikes, and epileptiform bursts) in slices from aged vs. adult rats, although basal network excitability was comparable between age groups. Additionally, exposure to 200 nM KA often abolished epileptiform activity and revealed theta or gamma oscillations instead. However, slices from aged rats were less sensitive to the rhythmogenic effects of 200 nM KA. Taken together, these findings suggest that aging decreases the capacity of the CA3 network to constrain the spread of excitability during focal excitatory network challenges. PMID:22396884

  13. The effects of stimulation of the anterior cingulate gyrus in cats with freedom of movement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dapres, G.; Cadilhac, J.; Passouant, P.

    1980-01-01

    Stimuli of varying strength, frequency and duration were applied to the anterior cingulate gyrus in unanesthetized cats with freedom of movement. The motor, vegetative and electrical effects of these stimuli, although inconstant, lead to a consideration of the role of this structure in the extrapyramidal control of motricity.

  14. TMS over the Left Angular Gyrus Impairs the Ability to Discriminate Left from Right

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirnstein, Marco; Bayer, Ulrike; Ellison, Amanda; Hausmann, Markus

    2011-01-01

    The underlying cognitive and neural mechanisms of the ability to discriminate left from right are hardly explored. Clinical studies from patients with impairments of left-right discrimination (LRD) and neuroimaging data suggest that the left angular gyrus is particularly involved in LRD. Moreover, it is argued that the often reported sex…

  15. Prominence vs. Aboutness in Sequencing: A Functional Distinction within the Left Inferior Frontal Gyrus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bornkessel-Schlesewsky, Ina; Grewe, Tanja; Schlesewsky, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    Prior research on the neural bases of syntactic comprehension suggests that activation in the left inferior frontal gyrus (lIFG) correlates with the processing of word order variations. However, there are inconsistencies with respect to the specific subregion within the IFG that is implicated by these findings: the pars opercularis or the pars…

  16. Lexical Retrieval Constrained by Sound Structure: The Role of the Left Inferior Frontal Gyrus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharp, David J.; Scott, Sophie K.; Cutler, Anne; Wise, Richard J. S.

    2005-01-01

    Positron emission tomography was used to investigate two competing hypotheses about the role of the left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) in word generation. One proposes a domain-specific organization, with neural activation dependent on the type of information being processed, i.e., surface sound structure or semantic. The other proposes a…

  17. Dentate Gyrus Is Necessary for Disambiguating Similar Object-Place Representations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Inah; Solivan, Frances

    2010-01-01

    Objects are often remembered with their locations, which is an important aspect of event memory. Despite the well-known involvement of the hippocampus in event memory, detailed intrahippocampal mechanisms are poorly understood. In particular, no experimental evidence has been provided in support of the role of the dentate gyrus (DG) in…

  18. Role of Dentate Gyrus in Aligning Internal Spatial Map to External Landmark

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Jong Won; Kim, Woon Ryoung; Sun, Woong; Jung, Min Whan

    2009-01-01

    Humans and animals form internal representations of external space based on their own body movement (dead reckoning) as well as external landmarks. It is poorly understood, however, how different types of information are integrated to form a unified representation of external space. To examine the role of dentate gyrus (DG) in this process, we…

  19. Calretinin expression in hilar mossy cells of the hippocampal dentate gyrus of nonhuman primates and humans.

    PubMed

    Seress, László; Abrahám, Hajnalka; Czéh, Boldizsár; Fuchs, Eberhard; Léránth, Csaba

    2008-01-01

    Mossy cells, the major excitatory neurons of the hilus of the dentate gyrus constitutively express calretinin in several rodent species, including mouse and hamster, but not in rats. Several studies suggest that mossy cells of the monkey dentate gyrus are calretinin-positive, but others have reported mossy cells in monkeys to be devoid of detectable calretinin-like immunoreactivity. In the present study, the hilar region was investigated throughout the entire longitudinal extent of the hippocampal dentate gyrus in both Old World and New World monkeys, as well as in humans. In the examined four monkey species, mossy cells were found to be calretinin-positive at the uncal pole and at variable length within the main body of the dentate gyrus but not in the tail part. The associational pathway, formed by axons of mossy cells in the inner dentate molecular layer was calretinin-positive in more caudal sections, suggesting that mossy cell axon terminals may contain calretinin, whereas mossy cell somata may contain calretinin in a concentration too low to be detected by immunocytochemistry. In contrast, human mossy cells appear to be devoid of calretinin immunoreactivity in both their somata and their axon terminals. Taken together, mossy cells of nonhuman primates and humans exhibit different expression pattern for calretinin whereas they show similarities in neurochemical content, such as the cocaine and amphetamine-related transcript peptide. PMID:18189312

  20. a-Band Oscillations in Intracellular Membrane Potentials of Dentate Gyrus Neurons in Awake Rodents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Ross W.; Strowbridge, Ben W.

    2014-01-01

    The hippocampus and dentate gyrus play critical roles in processing declarative memories and spatial information. Dentate granule cells, the first relay in the trisynaptic circuit through the hippocampus, exhibit low spontaneous firing rates even during locomotion. Using intracellular recordings from dentate neurons in awake mice operating a…

  1. Neurons in the Fusiform Gyrus are Fewer and Smaller in Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Kooten, Imke A. J.; Palmen, Saskia J. M. C.; von Cappeln, Patricia; Steinbusch, Harry W. M.; Korr, Hubert; Heinsen, Helmut; Hof, Patrick R.; van Engeland, Herman; Schmitz, Christoph

    2008-01-01

    Abnormalities in face perception are a core feature of social disabilities in autism. Recent functional magnetic resonance imaging studies showed that patients with autism could perform face perception tasks. However, the fusiform gyrus (FG) and other cortical regions supporting face processing in controls are hypoactive in patients with autism.…

  2. BOLD Response to Motion Verbs in Left Posterior Middle Temporal Gyrus during Story Comprehension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallentin, Mikkel; Nielsen, Andreas Hojlund; Vuust, Peter; Dohn, Anders; Roepstorff, Andreas; Lund, Torben Ellegaard

    2011-01-01

    A primary focus within neuroimaging research on language comprehension is on the distribution of semantic knowledge in the brain. Studies have shown that the left posterior middle temporal gyrus (LPMT), a region just anterior to area MT/V5, is important for the processing of complex action knowledge. It has also been found that motion verbs cause…

  3. Dissociating Linguistic and Task-Related Activity in the Left Inferior Frontal Gyrus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Paul; Randall, Billi; Marslen-Wilson, William D.; Tyler, Lorraine K.

    2011-01-01

    The left inferior frontal gyrus (LIFG) has long been claimed to play a key role in language function. However, there is considerable controversy as to whether regions within LIFG have specific linguistic or domain-general functions. Using fMRI, we contrasted linguistic and task-related effects by presenting simple and morphologically complex words…

  4. In vivo two-photon imaging of mouse hippocampal neurons in dentate gyrus using a light source based on a high-peak power gain-switched laser diode.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Ryosuke; Sawada, Kazuaki; Kusama, Yuta; Fang, Yi-Cheng; Kanazawa, Shinya; Kozawa, Yuichi; Sato, Shunichi; Yokoyama, Hiroyuki; Nemoto, Tomomi

    2015-03-01

    In vivo two-photon microscopy is an advantageous technique for observing the mouse brain at high resolution. In this study, we developed a two-photon microscopy method that uses a 1064-nm gain-switched laser diode-based light source with average power above 4 W, pulse width of 7.5-picosecond, repetition rate of 10-MHz, and a high-sensitivity photomultiplier tube. Using this newly developed two-photon microscope for in vivo imaging, we were able to successfully image hippocampal neurons in the dentate gyrus and obtain panoramic views of CA1 pyramidal neurons and cerebral cortex, regardless of age of the mouse. Fine dendrites in hippocampal CA1 could be imaged with a high peak-signal-to-background ratio that could not be achieved by titanium sapphire laser excitation. Finally, our system achieved multicolor imaging with neurons and blood vessels in the hippocampal region in vivo. These results indicate that our two-photon microscopy system is suitable for investigations of various neural functions, including the morphological changes undergone by neurons during physiological phenomena. PMID:25798313

  5. In vivo two-photon imaging of mouse hippocampal neurons in dentate gyrus using a light source based on a high-peak power gain-switched laser diode

    PubMed Central

    Kawakami, Ryosuke; Sawada, Kazuaki; Kusama, Yuta; Fang, Yi-Cheng; Kanazawa, Shinya; Kozawa, Yuichi; Sato, Shunichi; Yokoyama, Hiroyuki; Nemoto, Tomomi

    2015-01-01

    In vivo two-photon microscopy is an advantageous technique for observing the mouse brain at high resolution. In this study, we developed a two-photon microscopy method that uses a 1064-nm gain-switched laser diode-based light source with average power above 4 W, pulse width of 7.5-picosecond, repetition rate of 10-MHz, and a high-sensitivity photomultiplier tube. Using this newly developed two-photon microscope for in vivo imaging, we were able to successfully image hippocampal neurons in the dentate gyrus and obtain panoramic views of CA1 pyramidal neurons and cerebral cortex, regardless of age of the mouse. Fine dendrites in hippocampal CA1 could be imaged with a high peak-signal-to-background ratio that could not be achieved by titanium sapphire laser excitation. Finally, our system achieved multicolor imaging with neurons and blood vessels in the hippocampal region in vivo. These results indicate that our two-photon microscopy system is suitable for investigations of various neural functions, including the morphological changes undergone by neurons during physiological phenomena. PMID:25798313

  6. Developmental regulation of CB1-mediated spike-time dependent depression at immature mossy fiber-CA3 synapses

    PubMed Central

    Caiati, Maddalena D.; Sivakumaran, Sudhir; Lanore, Frederic; Mulle, Christophe; Richard, Elodie; Verrier, Dany; Marsicano, Giovanni; Miles, Richard; Cherubini, Enrico

    2012-01-01

    Early in postnatal life, mossy fibres (MF), the axons of granule cells in the dentate gyrus, release GABA which is depolarizing and excitatory. Synaptic currents undergo spike-time dependent long-term depression (STD-LTD) regardless of the temporal order of stimulation (pre versus post and viceversa). Here we show that at P3 but not at P21, STD-LTD, induced by negative pairing, is mediated by endocannabinoids mobilized from the postsynaptic cell during spiking-induced membrane depolarization. By diffusing backward, endocannabinoids activate cannabinoid type-1 (CB1) receptors probably expressed on MF. Thus, STD-LTD was prevented by CB1 receptor antagonists and was absent in CB1-KO mice. Consistent with these data, in situ hybridization experiments revealed detectable level of CB1 mRNA in the granule cell layer at P3 but not at P21. These results indicate that CB1 receptors are transiently expressed on immature MF terminals where they counteract the enhanced neuronal excitability induced by the excitatory action of GABA. PMID:22368777

  7. Specific marker of feigned memory impairment: The activation of left superior frontal gyrus.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zi-Xiang; Xue, Li; Liang, Chun-Yu; Wang, Li-Li; Mei, Wei; Zhang, Qiang; Zhao, Hu

    2015-11-01

    Faking memory impairment means normal people complain lots of memory problems without organic damage in forensic assessments. Using alternative forced-choice paradigm, containing digital or autobiographical information, previous neuroimaging studies have indicated that faking memory impairment could cause the activation in the prefrontal and parietal regions, and might involve a fronto-parietal-subcortical circuit. However, it is still unclear whether different memory types have influence on faking or not. Since different memory types, such as long-term memory (LTM) and short-term memory (STM), were found supported by different brain areas, we hypothesized that feigned STM or LTM impairment had distinct neural activation mapping. Besides that, some common neural correlates may act as the general characteristic of feigned memory impairment. To verify this hypothesis, the functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) combined with an alternative word forced-choice paradigm were used in this study. A total of 10 right-handed participants, in this study, had to perform both STW and LTM tasks respectively under answering correctly, answering randomly and feigned memory impairment conditions. Our results indicated that the activation of the left superior frontal gyrus and the left medial frontal gyrus was associated with feigned LTM impairment, whereas the left superior frontal gyrus, the left precuneus and the right anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) were highly activated while feigning STM impairment. Furthermore, an overlapping was found in the left superior frontal gyrus, and it suggested that the activity of the left superior frontal gyrus might be acting as a specific marker of feigned memory impairment. PMID:26479324

  8. Early natural stimulation through environmental enrichment accelerates neuronal development in the mouse dentate gyrus.

    PubMed

    Liu, Na; He, Shan; Yu, Xiang

    2012-01-01

    The dentate gyrus is the primary afferent into the hippocampal formation, with important functions in learning and memory. Granule cells, the principle neuronal type in the dentate gyrus, are mostly formed postnatally, in a process that continues into adulthood. External stimuli, including environmental enrichment, voluntary exercise and learning, have been shown to significantly accelerate the generation and maturation of dentate granule cells in adult rodents. Whether, and to what extent, such environmental stimuli regulate the development and maturation of dentate granule cells during early postnatal development is largely unknown. Furthermore, whether natural stimuli affect the synaptic properties of granule cells had been investigated neither in newborn neurons of the adult nor during early development. To examine the effect of natural sensory stimulation on the dentate gyrus, we reared newborn mice in an enriched environment (EE). Using immunohistochemistry, we showed that dentate granule cells from EE-reared mice exhibited earlier morphological maturation, manifested as faster peaking of doublecortin expression and elevated expression of mature neuronal markers (including NeuN, calbindin and MAP2) at the end of the second postnatal week. Also at the end of the second postnatal week, we found increased density of dendritic spines across the entire dentate gyrus, together with elevated levels of postsynaptic scaffold (post-synaptic density 95) and receptor proteins (GluR2 and GABA(A)Rγ2) of excitatory and inhibitory synapses. Furthermore, dentate granule cells of P14 EE-reared mice had lower input resistances and increased glutamatergic and GABAergic synaptic inputs. Together, our results demonstrate that EE-rearing promotes morphological and electrophysiological maturation of dentate granule cells, underscoring the importance of natural environmental stimulation on development of the dentate gyrus.

  9. Effect of atomic disorder and Ce doping on superconductivity of Ca3Rh4Sn13 : Electric transport properties under high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ślebarski, A.; Goraus, J.; Maśka, M. M.; Witas, P.; Fijałkowski, M.; Wolowiec, C. T.; Fang, Y.; Maple, M. B.

    2016-06-01

    We report the observation of a superconducting state below ˜8 K coexistent with a spin-glass state caused by atomic disorder in Ce substituted Ca3Rh4Sn13 . Measurements of specific heat, resistivity, and magnetism reveal the existence of inhomogeneous superconductivity in samples doped with Ce with superconducting critical temperatures Tc higher than those observed in the parent compound. For Ca3Rh4Sn13 , the negative value of the change in resistivity ρ with pressure P , d ρ /d P correlates well with the calculated decrease in the density of states (DOS) at the Fermi energy with P . Based on band-structure calculations performed under pressure, we demonstrate how the change in DOS would affect Tc of Ca3Rh4Sn13 under negative lattice pressure in samples that are strongly defected by quenching.

  10. Polarized spectra calculation and continuous wave laser operation of Yb-doped disordered Ca3La2(BO3)4 crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yeqing; Chen, Aixi; You, Zhenyu; Tu, Chaoyang

    2015-12-01

    A notable disorder crystal Yb:Ca3La2(BO3)4 crystal with Yb3+ ion doping concentration of 10 at.% was grown by the Czochralski method. The polarized absorption, polarized emission, and polarized gain cross sections were systematically calculated. The laser operations were investigated with Yb:Ca3La2(BO3)4 crystals cut along the a, b, and c crystallographic axes. The highest output power of 3.88 W was obtained by using the b-cut Yb:Ca3La2(BO3)4 crystal, with a slope efficiency of 62%. Additionally, it was confirmed that the output laser spectra were largely dependent on the output coupler.

  11. Comparison of actively Q-switched laser performance of disordered Yb:Ca3La2(BO3)4 crystals cut along the crystallographic axes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yeqing; Chen, Aixi; Tu, Chaoyang

    2015-03-10

    In this paper, actively Q-switched laser operation with an acousto-optic switch has been demonstrated by using Yb:Ca3La2(BO3)4 crystals cut along the a, b, and c crystallographic axes. The most efficient Q-switched laser operation was obtained by using b-cut Yb:Ca3La2(BO3)4 crystal with 1 kHz pulse repetition frequency, generating laser pulses of 0.5 mJ, 42.56 KW peak power and 9 ns pulse width, when the output couplings were 3%, 5%, and 5%, respectively. Pulse performances and output laser spectra of the a-, b-, and c-cut Yb:Ca3La2(BO3)4 crystals were compared under similar experimental conditions. PMID:25968384

  12. Site-sensitive energy transfer modes in Ca3Al2O6: Ce(3+)/Tb(3+)/Mn(2+) phosphors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jilin; He, Yani; Qiu, Zhongxian; Zhang, Weilu; Zhou, Wenli; Yu, Liping; Lian, Shixun

    2014-12-28

    Ce(3+)/Eu(2+), Tb(3+) and Mn(2+) co-doping in single-phase hosts is a common strategy to achieve white-light phosphors via energy transfer, which provides a high color rendering index (CRI) value and good color stability. However, not all hosts are suitable for white-light phosphors due to inefficient energy transfer. In this study, the site-sensitive energy transfer from different crystallographic sites of Ce(3+) to Tb(3+)/Mn(2+) in Ca3Al2O6 has been investigated in detail. The energy transfer from purplish-blue Ce(3+) to Tb(3+) is an electric dipole-dipole mode, and the calculated critical distance (Rc) suggests the existence of purplish-blue Ce(3+)-Tb(3+) clusters. No energy transfer is observed from purplish-blue Ce(3+) to Mn(2+). In co-doped phosphors based on greenish-blue Ce(3+), however, the radiative mode dominates the energy transfer from Ce(3+) to Tb(3+), and an electric dipole-quadrupole interaction is responsible for the energy transfer from Ce(3+) to Mn(2+). A detailed discussion on the site-sensitive energy transfer modes might provide a new aspect to discuss and understand the possibilities and mechanisms of energy transfer, according to certain crystallographic sites in a complex host with different cation sites, as well as provide a possible approach in searching for single-phase white-light-emitting phosphors.

  13. Characterization of L-type Voltage-Gated Ca2+ Channel Expression and Function in Developing CA3 Pyramidal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Morton, Russell A.; Norlin, Mackenzie S.; Vollmer, Cyndel C.; Valenzuela, C. Fernando

    2013-01-01

    Voltage gated calcium channels (VGCCs) play a major role during the development of the central nervous system (CNS). Ca2+ influx via VGCCs regulates axonal growth and neuronal migration as well as synaptic plasticity. Specifically, L-type VGCCs have been well characterized to be involved in the formation and refinement of the connections within the CA3 region of the hippocampus. The majority of the growth, formation, and refinement in the CNS occurs during the human third trimester. An equivalent developmental time period in rodents occurs during the first two weeks of post-natal life, and the expression pattern of L-type VGCCs during this time period has not been well characterized. In this study, we show that Cav1.2 channels are more highly expressed during this developmental period compared to adolescence (post-natal day 30) and that L-type VGCCs significantly contribute to the overall Ca2+ currents. These findings suggest that L-type VGCCs are functionally expressed during the crucial developmental period. PMID:23415785

  14. Advanced piezoelectric crystal Ca3TaGa3Si2O14: growth, crystal structure perfection, and acoustic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roshchupkin, Dmitry; Ortega, Luc; Plotitcyna, Olga; Erko, Alexei; Zizak, Ivo; Irzhak, Dmitry; Fahrtdinov, Rashid; Buzanov, Oleg

    2014-03-01

    A five-component crystal of the lanthanum-gallium silicate family Ca3TaGa3Si2O14 (CTGS) was grown by the Czochralski method. The CTGS crystal, like the langasite crystal (La3Ga5SiO14, LGS), possesses unique temperature properties and the fewer number of the Ga atoms in the unit cell makes the density much lower and, consequently, increases the velocity of acoustic wave propagation. The unit-cell parameters were determined by the powder diffraction technique. The defects in the CTGS crystal structure were studied by X-ray topography, which enables the visualization of growth banding characteristics of crystals grown by the Czochralski method. Surface acoustic wave (SAW) propagation in the CTGS crystal was investigated by the high-resolution X-ray diffraction method on the BESSY II synchrotron radiation source. The velocities of propagation and power flow angles of SAWs in the Y- and X-cuts of the CTGS crystal were determined from the X-ray diffraction spectra.

  15. Investigation of Ca3TaGa3Si2O14 piezoelectric crystals for high temperature sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Fapeng; Zhang, Shujun; Zhao, Xian; Yuan, Duorong; Qin, Lifeng; Wang, Qing-ming; Shrout, Thomas R.

    2011-06-01

    The dielectric and electromechanical properties of fully ordered Ca3TaGa3Si2O14 (CTGS) crystals were investigated over the temperature range of -60˜700 °C. The highest electromechanical coupling factor, k26 (18.9%) and piezoelectric coefficient, d26 (-11.5 pC/N) were obtained for (YXl)-25° cuts. The temperature dependent behavior of resonance frequency (fr) was investigated in single-rotated thickness shear mode (TSM) (YXl)θ cuts (θ = -35°˜10°). The turnover temperatures of resonance frequency were found to increase from 20 °C to 330 °C, as the rotation angle θ varied from -22.5° to -35°. Bulk acoustic wave (BAW) resonators based on Y(-30°) monolithic disks with a fundamental frequency ˜2.87 MHz were fabricated, where the in air mechanical quality factor Q was found to be on the order of 24000 and 10000 at 20 °C and 700 °C, respectively. The high coupling k26, high mechanical Q, and high electrical resistivity (16 MΩ.cm) at 700 °C, together with the near zero TCF characteristics at elevated temperatures, demonstrate the potential of CTGS crystals for high temperature sensor applications.

  16. HERC 1 Ubiquitin Ligase Mutation Affects Neocortical, CA3 Hippocampal and Spinal Cord Projection Neurons: An Ultrastructural Study

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, Rocío; Pérez-Villegas, Eva María; Bachiller, Sara; Rosa, José Luis; Armengol, José Angel

    2016-01-01

    The spontaneous mutation tambaleante is caused by the Gly483Glu substitution in the highly conserved N terminal RCC1-like domain of the HERC1 protein, which leads to the increase of mutated protein levels responsible for cerebellar Purkinje cell death by autophagy. Until now, Purkinje cells have been the only central nervous neurons reported as being targeted by the mutation, and their degeneration elicits an ataxic syndrome in adult mutant mice. However, the ultrastructural analysis performed here demonstrates that signs of autophagy, such as autophagosomes, lysosomes, and altered mitochondria, are present in neocortical pyramidal, CA3 hippocampal pyramidal, and spinal cord motor neurons. The main difference is that the reduction in the number of neurons affected in the tambaleante mutation in the neocortex, the hippocampus, and the spinal cord is not so evident as the dramatic loss of cerebellar Purkinje cells. Interestingly, signs of autophagy are absent in both interneurons and neuroglia cells. Affected neurons have in common that they are projection neurons which receive strong and varied synaptic inputs, and possess the highest degree of neuronal activity. Therefore, because the integrity of the ubiquitin-proteasome system is essential for protein degradation and hence, for normal protein turnover, it could be hypothesized that the deleterious effects of the misrouting of these pathways would depend directly on the neuronal activity. PMID:27147983

  17. HERC 1 Ubiquitin Ligase Mutation Affects Neocortical, CA3 Hippocampal and Spinal Cord Projection Neurons: An Ultrastructural Study.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Rocío; Pérez-Villegas, Eva María; Bachiller, Sara; Rosa, José Luis; Armengol, José Angel

    2016-01-01

    The spontaneous mutation tambaleante is caused by the Gly483Glu substitution in the highly conserved N terminal RCC1-like domain of the HERC1 protein, which leads to the increase of mutated protein levels responsible for cerebellar Purkinje cell death by autophagy. Until now, Purkinje cells have been the only central nervous neurons reported as being targeted by the mutation, and their degeneration elicits an ataxic syndrome in adult mutant mice. However, the ultrastructural analysis performed here demonstrates that signs of autophagy, such as autophagosomes, lysosomes, and altered mitochondria, are present in neocortical pyramidal, CA3 hippocampal pyramidal, and spinal cord motor neurons. The main difference is that the reduction in the number of neurons affected in the tambaleante mutation in the neocortex, the hippocampus, and the spinal cord is not so evident as the dramatic loss of cerebellar Purkinje cells. Interestingly, signs of autophagy are absent in both interneurons and neuroglia cells. Affected neurons have in common that they are projection neurons which receive strong and varied synaptic inputs, and possess the highest degree of neuronal activity. Therefore, because the integrity of the ubiquitin-proteasome system is essential for protein degradation and hence, for normal protein turnover, it could be hypothesized that the deleterious effects of the misrouting of these pathways would depend directly on the neuronal activity. PMID:27147983

  18. [Effects of beta-cypermethrin on voltage-gated potassium channels in rat hippocampal CA3 neurons].

    PubMed

    Fu, Zhi-Yan; DU, Chun-Yun; Yao, Yang; Liu, Chao-Wei; Tian, Yu-Tao; He, Bing-Jun; Zhang, Tao; Yang, Zhuo

    2007-02-25

    The effects of beta-cypermethrin (consisting of alpha-cypermethrin and theta-cypermethrin) on the transient outward potassium current (I(A)) and delayed rectifier potassium current (I(K)) in freshly dissociated hippocampal CA3 neurons of rats were studied using whole-cell patch-clamp technique. The results indicated that alpha-cypermethrin increased the value of I(A) and theta-cypermethrin decreased the value of I(A), though both of them shifted steady activation curve of I(A) towards negative potential. theta-cypermethrin contributed to the inactivation of I(A). The results also showed that alpha-cypermethrin and theta-cypermethrin decreased the value of I(K), and shifted the steady state activation curve of I(K) towards negative potential. Both alpha-cypermethrin and theta-cypermethrin had no obvious effects on the inactivation of I(K). theta-cypermethrin prolonged recovery process of I(K). These results imply that both transient outward potassium channels and delayed rectified potassium channels are the targets of beta-cypermethrin, which may explain the mechanism of toxical effects of beta-cypermethrin on mammalian neurons.

  19. Spin-on Bi4Sr3Ca3Cu4O(16+x) superconducting thin films from citrate precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furcone, S. L.; Chiang, Y.-M.

    1988-06-01

    Thin films in the Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O system have been synthesized from homogeneous liquid citrate precursors by a spin-coating and pyrolysis method. Films prepared on SrTiO3 substrates of 100-line orientation show strongly textured orientations with the c axis of the predominant Bi4Sr3Ca3Cu(4)O(16+x) phase normal to the film plane. In a single coating and firing, crack-free films of 0.2-0.5 thickness are obtained. For films fired to peak temperatures of 850-875 C, linearly decreasing resistance with temperature is observed. Clear onsets of superconductivity are observed at 90-100 K, with occasional films showing smaller resistant drops at 110-120 K. For all films, T(c) (R = 0) occurs in the range 70-75 K. High critical current densities at 4.2 K of 500,000-800,000 A/sq cm are measured by direct transport.

  20. A quantitative evaluation of the magnetic field generated by a CA3 pyramidal cell at EPSP and action potential stages.

    PubMed

    Sakatani, Seiichi; Hirose, Akira

    2002-04-01

    We evaluate quantitatively which behavioral stage dominantly generates magnetic field adjacent to a CA3 pyramidal cell by using a compartmental model with dendrites and an axon. Generally speaking, there are four stages in the potential behavior, i.e., excitatory and inhibitory postsynaptic potential, firing action potential, bursting action potential, if any, and after hyperpolarization potential stages. Calculated magnetic field also consists of corresponding four stages. We find, first, the dominant origin of the peaks of the magnetic field is counter propagating pulses at the firing and bursting stage at basal and apical dendrites. Second, the amplitude of the magnetic field changes to a great extent by the cancellation timing of the apical- and basal-originating fields depending on the calcium ionic channel spikes. Third, the field generated by the current flowing through the axon is significant enough when the temporal resolution of the measurement system becomes high. The results predict that the magnetic-field waveform measured in physiological experiments represents the dendritic configurations, channel density distributions, and bursting characteristics. These facts enable new investigations of neuronal activities in more detail through the observation of the magnetic-field waveform.

  1. The effects of aqueous extract of Boswellia Serrata on hippocampal region CA1 and learning deficit in kindled rats.

    PubMed

    Jalili, C; Salahshoor, M R; Pourmotabbed, A; Moradi, S; Roshankhah, Sh; Darehdori, A Shabanizadeh; Motaghi, M

    2014-01-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is a disorder of the central nervous system in which hippocampus is mostly involved and causes memory impairment. Kindling is a model of inducing epilepsy which is created through pentylenetetrazol (PTZ) administration. This study examines the role of the aqueous extract of Boswellia on the learning and development of brain (formation of dendritic branches and axons) of the PTZ-induced kindled rats. The study is conducted on sixty-four male rats divided into 8 groups. Kindling seizures are induced by three injections of 25 mg/kg of PTZ every 15 min. The aqueous extracts (0, 0.1, 0.5, 1 g/kg, i.p) are administrated to all animals for three consecutive days. Passive avoidance learning of animals is examined using shuttle box apparatus and step-through latency (STL) method. Rats are anesthetized and their brains are fixed by transcardial perfusion method and are analyzed by morphometric methods after applying Golgi and Cresyl violet staining methods. PTZ-induced kindling indicates a significant decrease in the number of pyramidal neurons and dendritic spines in hippocampal region cornu ammonis (CA1). The STL of the kindled rats is significantly reduced compared with control ones. Also, Boswellia extract dramatically increased the number of neuronal processes in CA1 region and improves passive-avoidance learning ability in both control and PTZ-kindled animals in 1 g/kg dose administration of Boswellia extract, especially at high doses can eliminate adverse effects of seizures on cognitive function in hippocampal area CA1 in rats. PMID:25657807

  2. Transcriptome analysis of the hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cell region after kainic acid-induced status epilepticus in juvenile rats.

    PubMed

    Laurén, Hanna B; Lopez-Picon, Francisco R; Brandt, Annika M; Rios-Rojas, Clarissa J; Holopainen, Irma E

    2010-01-01

    Molecular mechanisms involved in epileptogenesis in the developing brain remain poorly understood. The gene array approach could reveal some of the factors involved by allowing the identification of a broad scale of genes altered by seizures. In this study we used microarray analysis to reveal the gene expression profile of the laser microdissected hippocampal CA1 subregion one week after kainic acid (KA)-induced status epilepticus (SE) in 21-day-old rats, which are developmentally roughly comparable to juvenile children. The gene expression analysis with the Chipster software generated a total of 1592 differently expressed genes in the CA1 subregion of KA-treated rats compared to control rats. The KEGG database revealed that the identified genes were involved in pathways such as oxidative phosporylation (26 genes changed), and long-term potentiation (LTP; 18 genes changed). Also genes involved in Ca(2+) homeostasis, gliosis, inflammation, and GABAergic transmission were altered. To validate the microarray results we further examined the protein expression for a subset of selected genes, glial fibrillary protein (GFAP), apolipoprotein E (apo E), cannabinoid type 1 receptor (CB1), Purkinje cell protein 4 (PEP-19), and interleukin 8 receptor (CXCR1), with immunohistochemistry, which confirmed the transcriptome results. Our results showed that SE resulted in no obvious CA1 neuronal loss, and alterations in the expression pattern of several genes during the early epileptogenic phase were comparable to previous gene expression studies of the adult hippocampus of both experimental epileptic animals and patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). However, some changes seem to occur after SE specifically in the juvenile rat hippocampus. Insight of the SE-induced alterations in gene expression and their related pathways could give us hints for the development of new target-specific antiepileptic drugs that interfere with the progression of the disease in the juvenile age

  3. Stability and plasticity of intrinsic membrane properties in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons: effects of internal anions

    PubMed Central

    Kaczorowski, Catherine Cook; Disterhoft, John; Spruston, Nelson

    2007-01-01

    CA1 pyramidal neurons from animals that have acquired hippocampal tasks show increased neuronal excitability, as evidenced by a reduction in the postburst afterhyperpolarization (AHP). Studies of AHP plasticity require stable long-term recordings, which are affected by the intracellular solutions potassium methylsulphate (KMeth) or potassium gluconate (KGluc). Here we show immediate and gradual effects of these intracellular solutions on measurement of the AHP and basic membrane properties, and on the induction of AHP plasticity in CA1 pyramidal neurons from rat hippocampal slices. The AHP measured immediately after establishing whole-cell recordings was larger with KMeth than with KGluc. In general, the AHP in KMeth was comparable to the AHP measured in the perforated-patch configuration. However, KMeth induced time-dependent changes in the intrinsic membrane properties of CA1 pyramidal neurons. Specifically, input resistance progressively increased by 70% after 50 min; correspondingly, the current required to trigger an action potential and the fast afterdepolarization following action potentials gradually decreased by about 50%. Conversely, these measures were stable in KGluc. We also demonstrate that activity-dependent plasticity of the AHP occurs with physiologically relevant stimuli in KGluc. AHPs triggered with theta-burst firing every 30 s were progressively reduced, whereas AHPs elicited every 150 s were stable. Blockade of the apamin-sensitive AHP current (IAHP) was insufficient to block AHP plasticity, suggesting that plasticity is manifested through changes in the apamin-insensitive slow AHP current (sIAHP). These changes were observed in the presence of synaptic blockers, and therefore reflect changes in the intrinsic properties of the neurons. However, no AHP plasticity was observed using KMeth. In summary, these data show that KMeth produces time-dependent changes in basic membrane properties and prevents or obscures activity-dependent reduction of

  4. The effects of aqueous extract of Boswellia Serrata on hippocampal region CA1 and learning deficit in kindled rats

    PubMed Central

    Jalili, C.; Salahshoor, M.R.; Pourmotabbed, A.; Moradi, S.; Roshankhah, SH.; Darehdori, A. Shabanizadeh; Motaghi, M.

    2014-01-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is a disorder of the central nervous system in which hippocampus is mostly involved and causes memory impairment. Kindling is a model of inducing epilepsy which is created through pentylenetetrazol (PTZ) administration. This study examines the role of the aqueous extract of Boswellia on the learning and development of brain (formation of dendritic branches and axons) of the PTZ-induced kindled rats. The study is conducted on sixty-four male rats divided into 8 groups. Kindling seizures are induced by three injections of 25 mg/kg of PTZ every 15 min. The aqueous extracts (0, 0.1, 0.5, 1 g/kg, i.p) are administrated to all animals for three consecutive days. Passive avoidance learning of animals is examined using shuttle box apparatus and step-through latency (STL) method. Rats are anesthetized and their brains are fixed by transcardial perfusion method and are analyzed by morphometric methods after applying Golgi and Cresyl violet staining methods. PTZ-induced kindling indicates a significant decrease in the number of pyramidal neurons and dendritic spines in hippocampal region cornu ammonis (CA1). The STL of the kindled rats is significantly reduced compared with control ones. Also, Boswellia extract dramatically increased the number of neuronal processes in CA1 region and improves passive-avoidance learning ability in both control and PTZ-kindled animals in 1 g/kg dose administration of Boswellia extract, especially at high doses can eliminate adverse effects of seizures on cognitive function in hippocampal area CA1 in rats. PMID:25657807

  5. Synchrotron X-ray diffraction study of 112-type Ca1-xLaxFeAs2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katayama, N.; Sugawara, K.; Nakano, A.; Kitou, S.; Sugiyama, Y.; Kawaguchi, N.; Ito, H.; Higuchi, T.; Fujii, T.; Sawa, H.

    2015-11-01

    Synchrotron X-ray diffraction studies of Ca1-xLaxFeAs2 with monovalent arsenic zigzag chain layers are presented. While the crystal twins appear in all samples for the nominal composition of x = 0.25, we successfully obtained the samples without crystal twins for the nominal composition of x = 0.17. We present the structural parameters obtained using the synchrotron X-ray diffraction data and physical properties for the samples with x = 0.17. We further discuss the tactics for exploring novel 112-type iron arsenides without arsenic zigzag chains.

  6. Maintenance of anti-inflammatory cytokines and reduction of glial activation in the ischemic hippocampal CA1 region preconditioned with lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jia Tian; Lee, Choong Hyun; Yoo, Ki-Yeon; Choi, Jung Hoon; Li, Hua; Park, Ok Kyu; Yan, Bingchun; Hwang, In Koo; Kwon, Young-Guen; Kim, Young-Myeong; Won, Moo-Ho

    2010-09-15

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induces a strong immune response, and pretreatment with low dose of LPS suppresses the production of proinflammatory mediators. In the present study, we investigated the effect of LPS preconditioning on the delayed neuronal death in the gerbil hippocampal CA1 region after 5 min of transient cerebral ischemia. LPS preconditioning showed neuroprotective effects against ischemic damage in the hippocampal CA1 region after ischemic insult: about 92% of neurons in the CA1 region survived in the LPS-treated ischemia group. LPS preconditioning maintained anti-inflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin (IL)-4 and IL-13, in pyramidal neurons in the CA1 region after ischemia/reperfusion. In addition, IL-4 and IL-13 protein levels in the CA1 region of the LPS-treated ischemia group were similar to the vehicle-treated sham group. We found that reactive gliosis was markedly attenuated in the CA1 region of the LPS-treated ischemia group compared to the vehicle-treated ischemia group using immunohistochemistry of glial fibrillary acidic protein for astrocytes, and ionized calcium-binding adapter molecule 1 and isolectin B4 for microglia. These results indicate that LPS preconditioning may provide neuroprotection in the ischemic hippocampal CA1 region via maintenance of anti-inflammatory cytokines and suppression of glial activation.

  7. Activation of Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor 7 Is Required for Induction of Long-Term Potentiation at SC-CA1 Synapses in the Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Klar, Rebecca; Walker, Adam G.; Ghose, Dipanwita; Grueter, Brad A.; Engers, Darren W.; Hopkins, Corey R.; Lindsley, Craig W.; Xiang, Zixiu

    2015-01-01

    Of the eight metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptor subtypes, only mGlu7 is expressed presynaptically at the Schaffer collateral (SC)-CA1 synapse in the hippocampus in adult animals. Coupled with the inhibitory effects of Group III mGlu receptor agonists on transmission at this synapse, mGlu7 is thought to be the predominant autoreceptor responsible for regulating glutamate release at SC terminals. However, the lack of mGlu7-selective pharmacological tools has hampered direct testing of this hypothesis. We used a novel, selective mGlu7-negative allosteric modulator (NAM), ADX71743, and a newly described Group III mGlu receptor agonist, LSP4-2022, to elucidate the role of mGlu7 in modulating transmission in hippocampal area CA1 in adult C57BL/6J male mice. Interestingly, although mGlu7 agonists inhibit SC-CA1 EPSPs, we found no evidence for activation of mGlu7 by stimulation of SC-CA1 afferents. However, LSP4-2022 also reduced evoked monosynaptic IPSCs in CA1 pyramidal cells and, in contrast to its effect on SC-CA1 EPSPs, ADX71743 reversed the ability of high-frequency stimulation of SC afferents to reduce IPSC amplitudes. Furthermore, blockade of mGlu7 prevented induction of LTP at the SC-CA1 synapse and activation of mGlu7 potentiated submaximal LTP. Together, these data suggest that mGlu7 serves as a heteroreceptor at inhibitory synapses in area CA1 and that the predominant effect of activation of mGlu7 by stimulation of glutamatergic afferents is disinhibition, rather than reduced excitatory transmission. Furthermore, this mGlu7-mediated disinhibition is required for induction of LTP at the SC-CA1 synapse, suggesting that mGlu7 could serve as a novel therapeutic target for treatment of cognitive disorders. PMID:25972184

  8. Prolonged adenosine A1 receptor activation in hypoxia and pial vessel disruption focal cortical ischemia facilitates clathrin-mediated AMPA receptor endocytosis and long-lasting synaptic inhibition in rat hippocampal CA3-CA1 synapses: differential regulation of GluA2 and GluA1 subunits by p38 MAPK and JNK.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhicheng; Xiong, Cherry; Pancyr, Cassandra; Stockwell, Jocelyn; Walz, Wolfgang; Cayabyab, Francisco S

    2014-07-16

    Activation of presynaptic adenosine A1 receptors (A1Rs) causes substantial synaptic depression during hypoxia/cerebral ischemia, but postsynaptic actions of A1Rs are less clear. We found that A1Rs and GluA2-containing AMPA receptors (AMPARs) form stable protein complexes from hippocampal brain homogenates and cultured hippocampal neurons from Sprague Dawley rats. In contrast, adenosine A2A receptors (A2ARs) did not coprecipitate or colocalize with GluA2-containing AMPARs. Prolonged stimulation of A1Rs with the agonist N(6)-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA) caused adenosine-induced persistent synaptic depression (APSD) in hippocampal brain slices, and APSD levels were blunted by inhibiting clathrin-mediated endocytosis of GluA2 subunits with the Tat-GluA2-3Y peptide. Using biotinylation and membrane fractionation assays, prolonged CPA incubation showed significant depletion of GluA2/GluA1 surface expression from hippocampal brain slices and cultu