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Sample records for h1-experiment bei hera

  1. Computing at h1 - Experience and Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckerlin, G.; Gerhards, R.; Kleinwort, C.; KrÜNer-Marquis, U.; Egli, S.; Niebergall, F.

    The H1 experiment has now been successfully operating at the electron proton collider HERA at DESY for three years. During this time the computing environment has gradually shifted from a mainframe oriented environment to the distributed server/client Unix world. This transition is now almost complete. Computing needs are largely determined by the present amount of 1.5 TB of reconstructed data per year (1994), corresponding to 1.2 × 107 accepted events. All data are centrally available at DESY. In addition to data analysis, which is done in all collaborating institutes, most of the centrally organized Monte Carlo production is performed outside of DESY. New software tools to cope with offline computing needs include CENTIPEDE, a tool for the use of distributed batch and interactive resources for Monte Carlo production, and H1 UNIX, a software package for automatic updates of H1 software on all UNIX platforms.

  2. What HERA May Provide?

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Hannes; De Roeck, Albert; Bartels, Jochen; Behnke, Olaf; Blumlein, Johannes; Brodsky, Stanley; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; Deak, Michal; Devenish, Robin; Diehl, Markus; Gehrmann, Thomas; Grindhammer, Guenter; Gustafson, Gosta; Khoze, Valery; Knutsson, Albert; Klein, Max; Krauss, Frank; Kutak, Krzysztof; Laenen, Eric; Lonnblad, Leif; Motyka, Leszek; /Hamburg U., Inst. Theor. Phys. II /Birmingham U. /Southern Methodist U. /DESY /Piemonte Orientale U., Novara /CERN /Paris, LPTHE /Hamburg U. /Penn State U.

    2011-11-10

    More than 100 people participated in a discussion session at the DIS08 workshop on the topic What HERA may provide. A summary of the discussion with a structured outlook and list of desirable measurements and theory calculations is given. The HERA accelerator and the HERA experiments H1, HERMES and ZEUS stopped running in the end of June 2007. This was after 15 years of very successful operation since the first collisions in 1992. A total luminosity of {approx} 500 pb{sup -1} has been accumulated by each of the collider experiments H1 and ZEUS. During the years the increasingly better understood and upgraded detectors and HERA accelerator have contributed significantly to this success. The physics program remains in full swing and plenty of new results were presented at DIS08 which are approaching the anticipated final precision, fulfilling and exceeding the physics plans and the previsions of the upgrade program. Most of the analyses presented at DIS08 were still based on the so called HERA I data sample, i.e. data taken until 2000, before the shutdown for the luminosity upgrade. This sample has an integrated luminosity of {approx} 100 pb{sup -1}, and the four times larger statistics sample from HERA II is still in the process of being analyzed.

  3. Perturbative QCD at Hera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladilin, L. K.

    2015-06-01

    Recent measurements of proton structure, jet production cross sections, the strong coupling constant value, prompt photon production cross sections, charmed hadron production cross sections and the charm and beauty quark mass values, performed by the H1 and ZEUS collaborations at the e±p collider HERA, are presented.

  4. Nuclear effects at HERA

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, S.J.

    1996-07-01

    The development of a nuclear beam facility at HERA would allow the study of fundamental features of quark and gluon interactions in QCD. I briefly review the physics underlying nuclear shadowing and anti-shadowing as well as other diffractive and jet fragmentation processes that can be studies in high energy electron-nucleus collisions.

  5. Monitoring System for the GRID Monte Carlo Mass Production in the H1 Experiment at DESY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bystritskaya, Elena; Fomenko, Alexander; Gogitidze, Nelly; Lobodzinski, Bogdan

    2014-06-01

    The H1 Virtual Organization (VO), as one of the small VOs, employs most components of the EMI or gLite Middleware. In this framework, a monitoring system is designed for the H1 Experiment to identify and recognize within the GRID the best suitable resources for execution of CPU-time consuming Monte Carlo (MC) simulation tasks (jobs). Monitored resources are Computer Elements (CEs), Storage Elements (SEs), WMS-servers (WMSs), CernVM File System (CVMFS) available to the VO HONE and local GRID User Interfaces (UIs). The general principle of monitoring GRID elements is based on the execution of short test jobs on different CE queues using submission through various WMSs and directly to the CREAM-CEs as well. Real H1 MC Production jobs with a small number of events are used to perform the tests. Test jobs are periodically submitted into GRID queues, the status of these jobs is checked, output files of completed jobs are retrieved, the result of each job is analyzed and the waiting time and run time are derived. Using this information, the status of the GRID elements is estimated and the most suitable ones are included in the automatically generated configuration files for use in the H1 MC production. The monitoring system allows for identification of problems in the GRID sites and promptly reacts on it (for example by sending GGUS (Global Grid User Support) trouble tickets). The system can easily be adapted to identify the optimal resources for tasks other than MC production, simply by changing to the relevant test jobs. The monitoring system is written mostly in Python and Perl with insertion of a few shell scripts. In addition to the test monitoring system we use information from real production jobs to monitor the availability and quality of the GRID resources. The monitoring tools register the number of job resubmissions, the percentage of failed and finished jobs relative to all jobs on the CEs and determine the average values of waiting and running time for the

  6. Heavy Flavour Production at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plačakytė, Ringailė; H1; Zeus Collaborations

    2014-11-01

    Measurements of open charm and beauty production at HERA provide important input for stringent tests of quantum chromodynamics and are used to constrain the parton distribution functions of the proton. The recent results on the heavy flavour production obtained by the H1 and ZEUS experiments at HERA are reviewed in this contribution.

  7. Hard QCD and hadronic final state at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valkárová, Alice

    2017-03-01

    The production of inclusive jets, dijets and trijets was investigated with the high statistics HERA II DIS data. The H1 experiment has determined the corresponding cross sections with improved experimental precision and sophisticated method of unfolding, compared to previous measurements. The results were compared with NLO QCD and NNLO QCD calculations for the first time. Signals of QCD instanton-induced processes were searched for in neutral current deep-inelastic scattering with high momentum transfer Q2 by H1 collaboration. Compared to earlier publications, the limits were improved by an order of magnitude. A search for a narrow baryonic state in the p KS0 and p ¯KS0 system has been performed with the ZEUS detector. Measurements with the ZEUS data in DIS of isolated photons were reported, including studies of kinematic variables sensitive to the event dynamics. The measurements were compared to MC models and to theoretical calculations based on kt factorisation QCD approach.

  8. Physics at HERA

    SciTech Connect

    Derrick, M.

    1993-12-31

    HERA is the first electron-proton colliding beam facility and the big news about it is that it works, despite concerns both about the reproducibility of the magnetic field in the proton ring magnets at injection and about the e-p beam-beam interaction. It is, however, a complex accelerator facility that will take a few years to bring up to full and efficient operation. With the present center of mass energy of 296 GeV, it extends the energy range for photoproduction studies by an order of magnitude over fixed target experiments and deep-inelastic e-p scattering up to momentum transfer values approaching 10{sup 5} GeV{sup 2} in both neutral and charged current interactions. At reasonable Q{sup 2}, and so with the present luminosity, events with Bjorken x down to a few times 10{sup {minus}5} are being studied. Two powerful general-purpose detectors -- H1 and ZEUS -- have been constructed to address these physics challenges and both collaborations have made new and interesting measurements as presented at this and other recent HEP conferences. The experimental program started in July 1992 and we are on a steep learning curve both with HERA and with the detectors.

  9. The HERA Proton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habib, Shiraz

    2014-04-01

    The almost 1 fb-1 of ep data collected by the H1 and ZEUS collider experiments at HERA allows for a precise determination of the proton's parton distribution functions (PDFs). Measurements used to constrain the PDFs—inclusive and jet cross sections, charm contribution to the F2 proton structure function, F_2cbar c — are presented herein. The measurement process itself includes cataloguing the sensitivity of the cross sections to the various sources of correlated systematic uncertainties. In the jet measurement, correlations of a statistical nature are also quantified and catalogued. These correlations provide a basis to combine measurements of the same physical observable across different time periods, experiments and measurement methodology. The subsequent PDF fitting procedure also takes into account such correlations. The resulting HERAPDF1.5 set based on inclusive data as well as PDF sets derived from inclusive plus charm data are presented togeteher with their predictions for pp cross sections at the LHC.

  10. HERA: Illuminating Our Early Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeBoer, David

    2014-06-01

    The Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Arrays (HERA) roadmap is a staged plan for using the unique properties of the 21cm line from neutral hydrogen to probe our cosmic dawn, from the birth of the first stars and black holes, through the full reionization of the primordial intergalactic medium (IGM). HERA is a collaboration between the Precision Array Probing the Epoch of Reionization (PAPER), US-Murchison Widefield Array (MWA), and MIT Epoch of Reionization (MITEOR) teams.The first phase of the HERA roadmap entailed the operation of the PAPER and MWA telescopes to explore techniques and designs required to detect the primordial HI signal in the presence of radio continuum foreground emission some four orders of magnitude brighter. Studies with PAPER and the MWA have led to a new understanding of the interplay of foreground and instrumental systematics in the context of a three-dimensional cosmological intensity-mapping experiment. We are now able to remove foregrounds to the limits of our sensitivity with these instruments, culminating in the first physically meaningful upper limits on the power spectrum of 2 cm emission from reionization.Building on this understanding, the next stage of HERA entails a new 14m diameter antenna element that is optimized both for sensitivity and for minimizing foreground systematics. Arranging these elements in a compact hexagonal grid yields an array that facilitates calibration, leverages proven foreground removal techniques, and is scalable to large collecting areas. The HERA phase II will be located in the radio quiet environment of the SKA site in Karoo, South Africa, and have a sensitivity close to two orders of magnitude better than PAPER and the MWA, with broader frequency coverage, HERA can paint an uninterrupted picture through reionization, back to the end of the Dark Ages.This paper will present a summary of the current understanding of the signal characteristics and measurements and describe this planned HERA telescope to

  11. Recent Results from Hera Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levonian, Sergey

    2013-11-01

    HERA collaborations H1 and ZEUS are publishing final analyses based on complete e±p statistics of ~ 0.5 fb-1 per experiment and using combinations of their data sets. Here selected recent results are presented from three areas: structure of the proton, searches for new physics and investigations of QCD phenomena at low Bjorken x.

  12. Scalar electron productions at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsutsui, H.; Nishikawa, K.; Yamada, S.; Kuroda, M.

    1990-08-01

    The cross section of the process: ep-->e~Γ~X is calculated including resonance state productions and deep inelastic reactions. Comparison is made with the two body process: eq-->e~q~. It is found that some unexamined region of the selectron mass can be investigated at HERA. Permanent address: Department of Physics, Meiji-Gakuin University, Yokohama, Japan.

  13. Proton structure functions at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abt, Iris

    2014-05-01

    The "proton structure" is a wide field. Discussed are predominantly the precision measurements of the proton structure functions at HERA and some of their implications for the LHC measurements. In addition, a discussion of what a proton structure function represents is provided. Finally, a connection to nuclear physics is attempted. This contribution is an updated reprint of a contribution to "Deep Inelastic Scattering 2012".1

  14. Diffraction from HERA to the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, Paul

    2011-07-15

    Following a 15 year programme of intensive research into diffractive electron-proton scattering at HERA, it is important to transfer the knowledge and experience gained into the LHC programme. This contribution raises some current issues in diffraction at the LHC and suggests ways in which they might be addressed using HERA results.

  15. Superconducting magnet system for HERA

    SciTech Connect

    Meinke, R. )

    1991-03-01

    The HERA accelerator facility, is a collider for electrons and protons. It consists of two independent accelerators designed to store respectively 820 GeV protons and 30 GeV electrons. The two counter-rotating beams collide head on in up to four interaction regions which are distributed uniformly around the accelerator circumference of 6336 m. It is the first time that such a large number of superconducting magnets has been fabricated in industry. The experience of the series production and a detailed discussion of the magnet performance will be presented in this paper.

  16. Biogenic Emission Inventory System (BEIS)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Biogenic Emission Inventory System (BEIS) estimates volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from vegetation and nitric oxide (NO) emission from soils. Recent BEIS development has been restricted to the SMOKE system

  17. Inclusive Deep Inelastic Scattering at HERA

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, Paul

    2011-07-15

    Recent inclusive charged and neutral current scattering data from HERA are presented. Emphasis is placed on the resulting constraints on the proton parton densities and on the influence of low x proton structure on diffraction.

  18. Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array (HERA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeBoer, David R.; Parsons, Aaron R.; Aguirre, James E.; Alexander, Paul; Ali, Zaki S.; Beardsley, Adam P.; Bernardi, Gianni; Bowman, Judd D.; Bradley, Richard F.; Carilli, Chris L.; Cheng, Carina; de Lera Acedo, Eloy; Dillon, Joshua S.; Ewall-Wice, Aaron; Fadana, Gcobisa; Fagnoni, Nicolas; Fritz, Randall; Furlanetto, Steve R.; Glendenning, Brian; Greig, Bradley; Grobbelaar, Jasper; Hazelton, Bryna J.; Hewitt, Jacqueline N.; Hickish, Jack; Jacobs, Daniel C.; Julius, Austin; Kariseb, MacCalvin; Kohn, Saul A.; Lekalake, Telalo; Liu, Adrian; Loots, Anita; MacMahon, David; Malan, Lourence; Malgas, Cresshim; Maree, Matthys; Martinot, Zachary; Mathison, Nathan; Matsetela, Eunice; Mesinger, Andrei; Morales, Miguel F.; Neben, Abraham R.; Patra, Nipanjana; Pieterse, Samantha; Pober, Jonathan C.; Razavi-Ghods, Nima; Ringuette, Jon; Robnett, James; Rosie, Kathryn; Sell, Raddwine; Smith, Craig; Syce, Angelo; Tegmark, Max; Thyagarajan, Nithyanandan; Williams, Peter K. G.; Zheng, Haoxuan

    2017-04-01

    The Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array (HERA) is a staged experiment to measure 21 cm emission from the primordial intergalactic medium (IGM) throughout cosmic reionization (z = 6–12), and to explore earlier epochs of our Cosmic Dawn (z ∼ 30). During these epochs, early stars and black holes heated and ionized the IGM, introducing fluctuations in 21 cm emission. HERA is designed to characterize the evolution of the 21 cm power spectrum to constrain the timing and morphology of reionization, the properties of the first galaxies, the evolution of large-scale structure, and the early sources of heating. The full HERA instrument will be a 350-element interferometer in South Africa consisting of 14 m parabolic dishes observing from 50 to 250 MHz. Currently, 19 dishes have been deployed on site and the next 18 are under construction. HERA has been designated as an SKA Precursor instrument. In this paper, we summarize HERA’s scientific context and provide forecasts for its key science results. After reviewing the current state of the art in foreground mitigation, we use the delay-spectrum technique to motivate high-level performance requirements for the HERA instrument. Next, we present the HERA instrument design, along with the subsystem specifications that ensure that HERA meets its performance requirements. Finally, we summarize the schedule and status of the project. We conclude by suggesting that, given the realities of foreground contamination, current-generation 21 cm instruments are approaching their sensitivity limits. HERA is designed to bring both the sensitivity and the precision to deliver its primary science on the basis of proven foreground filtering techniques, while developing new subtraction techniques to unlock new capabilities. The result will be a major step toward realizing the widely recognized scientific potential of 21 cm cosmology.

  19. The HERA-B vertex detector system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, C.; Bräuer, M.; Glebe, T.; Hofmann, W.; Jagla, T.; Klefenz, F.; Knöpfle, K. T.; Pugatch, V.; Schmelling, M.; Schwingenheuer, B.; Sexauer, E.; Trunk, U.; Wanke, R.; Zurheide, F.; Abt, I.; Dressel, M.; Kisel, I.; Masciocchi, S.; Moshous, B.; Perschke, T.; Sang, M.; Schaller, S.; Wagner, W.

    2000-10-01

    The HERA-B experiment is being built to measure CP violation in the B-system using internal targets at the HERA proton storage ring at DESY. This paper presents an overview of its vertex detector which - apart from an additional superlayer - is realized by a system of 20 Roman pots containing seven superlayers of double-sided silicon microstrip detectors that are operated at 10 mm distance from the proton beam in a high-radiation environment.

  20. Precision QCD measurements at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirumov, Hayk

    2014-11-01

    A review of recent experimental results on perturbative QCD from the HERA experiments H1 and ZEUS is presented. All inclusive deep inelastic cross sections measured by the H1 and ZEUS collaborations in neutral and charged current unpolarised ep scattering are combined. They span six orders of magnitude in negative four-momentum-transfer squared, Q2, and in Bjorken x. This data set is used as the sole input to NLO and NNLO QCD analyses to determine new sets of parton distributions, HERAPDF2.0, with small experimental uncertainties and an estimate of model and parametrisation uncertainties. Also shown are new results on inclusive jet, dijet and trijet differential cross sections measured in neutral current deep inelastic scattering. The precision jet data is used to extract the strong coupling αs at NLO with small experimental errors.

  1. Capturing Control Room Simulator Data with the HERA Database

    SciTech Connect

    Ronald Boring; April Whaley; Bruce Hallbert; Karin Laumann; Per Oivind Braarud; Andreas Bye; Erasmia Lois; Yung Hsien James Chang

    2007-08-01

    The Human Event Repository and Analysis (HERA) system has been developed as a tool for classifying and recording human performance data extracted from primary data sources. This paper reviews the process of extracting data from simulator studies for use in HERA. Simulator studies pose unique data collection challenges, both in types and quality of data measures, but such studies are ideally suited to gather operator performance data, including the full spectrum of performance shaping factors used in a HERA analysis. This paper provides suggestions for obtaining relevant human performance data for a HERA analysis from a control room simulator study and for inputting those data in a format suitable for HERA.

  2. Hera - The HEASARC's New Data Analysis Service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pence, William

    2006-01-01

    Hera is the new computer service provided by the HEASARC at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center that enables qualified student and professional astronomical researchers to immediately begin analyzing scientific data from high-energy astrophysics missions. All the necessary resources needed to do the data analysis are freely provided by Hera, including: * the latest version of the hundreds of scientific analysis programs in the HEASARC's HEASOFT package, as well as most of the programs in the Chandra CIAO package and the XMM-Newton SAS package. * high speed access to the terabytes of data in the HEASARC's high energy astrophysics Browse data archive. * a cluster of fast Linw workstations to run the software * ample local disk space to temporarily store the data and results. Some of the many features and different modes of using Hera are illustrated in this poster presentation.

  3. Nuclei at HERA and heavy ion physics

    SciTech Connect

    Gavin, S.; Strikman, M.

    1995-12-31

    Copies of 16 viewgraph sets from a workshop held at Brookhaven National Laboratory, 17-18 November, 1995. Titles of talks: HERA: The Present; HERA: Potential with Nuclei; Review of Hadron-Lepton Nucleus Data; Fermilab E665: results in muon scattering; Interactions of Quarks and Gluons with Nuclear Matter; Rescattering in Nuclear Targets for Photoproduction and DIS; Structure Functions and Nuclear Effect at PHENIX; Probing Spin-Averaged and Spin-Dependent Parton Distributions Using the Solenoidal Tracker at RHIC (STAR); Jet Quenching in eA, pA, AA; Nuclear Gluon Shadowing via Continuum Lepton Pairs; What can we learn from HERA with a colliding heavy ion beam? The limiting curve of leading particles at infinite A; Coherent Production of Vector Mesons off Light Nuclei in DIS; A Model of High Parton Densities in PQCD; Gluon Production for Weizaecker-Williams Field in Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions; Summary Talk.

  4. Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array (HERA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeBoer, David R.; HERA

    2015-01-01

    The Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Arrays (HERA - reionization.org) roadmap uses the unique properties of the neutral hydrogen (HI) 21cm line to probe our cosmic dawn: from the birth of the first stars and black holes, through the full reionization of the primordial intergalactic medium (IGM). HERA is a collaboration between the Precision Array Probing the Epoch of Reionization (PAPER - eor.berkeley.edu), the US-based Murchison Widefield Array (MWA - mwatelescope.org), and MIT Epoch of Reionization (MITEOR) teams along with the South African SKA-SA, University of KwaZulu Natal and the University of Cambridge Cavendish Laborabory. HERA has recently been awarded a National Science Foundation Mid-Scale Innovation Program grant to begin the next phase.HERA leverages the operation of the PAPER and MWA telescopes to explore techniques and designs required to detect the primordial HI signal in the presence of systematics and radio continuum foreground emission some four orders of magnitude brighter. With this understanding, we are now able to remove foregrounds to the limits of our sensitivity, culminating in the first physically meaningful upper limits. A redundant calibration algorithm from MITEOR improves the sensitivity of the approach.Building on this, the next stage of HERA incorporates a 14m diameter antenna element that is optimized both for sensitivity and for minimizing foreground systematics. Arranging these elements in a compact hexagonal grid yields an array that facilitates calibration, leverages proven foreground removal techniques, and is scalable to large collecting areas. HERA will be located in the radio quiet environment of the SKA site in the Karoo region of South Africa (where PAPER is currently located). It will have a sensitivity close to two orders of magnitude better than PAPER and the MWA to ensure a robust detection. With its sensitivity and broader frequency coverage, HERA can paint an uninterrupted picture through reionization, back to the

  5. The Hera Saturn entry probe mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousis, O.; Atkinson, D. H.; Spilker, T.; Venkatapathy, E.; Poncy, J.; Frampton, R.; Coustenis, A.; Reh, K.; Lebreton, J.-P.; Fletcher, L. N.; Hueso, R.; Amato, M. J.; Colaprete, A.; Ferri, F.; Stam, D.; Wurz, P.; Atreya, S.; Aslam, S.; Banfield, D. J.; Calcutt, S.; Fischer, G.; Holland, A.; Keller, C.; Kessler, E.; Leese, M.; Levacher, P.; Morse, A.; Muñoz, O.; Renard, J.-B.; Sheridan, S.; Schmider, F.-X.; Snik, F.; Waite, J. H.; Bird, M.; Cavalié, T.; Deleuil, M.; Fortney, J.; Gautier, D.; Guillot, T.; Lunine, J. I.; Marty, B.; Nixon, C.; Orton, G. S.; Sánchez-Lavega, A.

    2016-10-01

    The Hera Saturn entry probe mission is proposed as an M-class mission led by ESA with a contribution from NASA. It consists of one atmospheric probe to be sent into the atmosphere of Saturn, and a Carrier-Relay spacecraft. In this concept, the Hera probe is composed of ESA and NASA elements, and the Carrier-Relay Spacecraft is delivered by ESA. The probe is powered by batteries, and the Carrier-Relay Spacecraft is powered by solar panels and batteries. We anticipate two major subsystems to be supplied by the United States, either by direct procurement by ESA or by contribution from NASA: the solar electric power system (including solar arrays and the power management and distribution system), and the probe entry system (including the thermal protection shield and aeroshell). Hera is designed to perform in situ measurements of the chemical and isotopic compositions as well as the dynamics of Saturn's atmosphere using a single probe, with the goal of improving our understanding of the origin, formation, and evolution of Saturn, the giant planets and their satellite systems, with extrapolation to extrasolar planets. Hera's aim is to probe well into the cloud-forming region of the troposphere, below the region accessible to remote sensing, to the locations where certain cosmogenically abundant species are expected to be well mixed. By leading to an improved understanding of the processes by which giant planets formed, including the composition and properties of the local solar nebula at the time and location of giant planet formation, Hera will extend the legacy of the Galileo and Cassini missions by further addressing the creation, formation, and chemical, dynamical, and thermal evolution of the giant planets, the entire solar system including Earth and the other terrestrial planets, and formation of other planetary systems.

  6. Information from leading neutrons at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoze, V. A.; Martin, A. D.; Ryskin, M. G.

    2006-12-01

    In principle, leading neutrons produced in photoproduction and deep-inelastic scattering at HERA have the potential to determine the pion structure function, the neutron absorptive cross section and the form of the pion flux. To explore this potential we compare theoretical predictions for the xL and pt spectra of leading neutrons and the Q2 dependence of the cross section with the existing ZEUS data.

  7. Charm, beauty and top at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behnke, O.; Geiser, A.; Lisovyi, M.

    2015-09-01

    Results on open charm and beauty production and on the search for top production in high-energy electron-proton collisions at HERA are reviewed. This includes a discussion of relevant theoretical aspects, a summary of the available measurements and measurement techniques, and their impact on improved understanding of QCD and its parameters, such as parton density functions and charm- and beauty-quark masses. The impact of these results on measurements at the LHC and elsewhere is also addressed.

  8. New results on proton structure from HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raičević, Nataša

    2016-03-01

    In this paper we show the new set of parton distribution functions (PDFs) determined using new combined H1 and ZEUS data on neutral and charged current inclusive cross sections from all running periods (1994-2007). The combined data are used as the sole input to NLO and NNLO QCD analyses. The new set of PDFs is termed as HERAPDF2.0. Also we show an extended QCD analysis at NLO including the combined data on jet and charm production which enables the simultaneous determination of PDFs (HERAPDF2.0Jets) and the strong coupling constant from HERA data alone.

  9. Measurements of Heavy Flavour Photoproduction at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mergelmeyer, Sebastian

    2013-12-01

    Recent measurements of open charm and beauty photoproduction with the H1 and ZEUS detectors at the e±p-collider HERA are presented. These measurements reveal valuable details about the inner structure of the proton and the photon, the fragmentation of quarks into jets, and allow tests of perturbative QCD. Various experimental techniques were employed to identify and extract the heavy-quark signal. Their results are discussed, and compared to each other and to NLO QCD calculations. In addition the determination of charm fragmentation fractions is presented.

  10. Jets and Heavy Flavors at HERA

    SciTech Connect

    Shehzadi, R.

    2011-07-15

    Recent results on jet cross sections and heavy-flavor production in photoproduction and neutral current deep inelastic ep scattering from the H1 and ZEUS Collaborations are presented. The jet measurements are used to perform stringent tests of perturbative QCD, to extract precise values of the strong coupling and to constrain further the proton and photon parton distribution functions. The measurement of beauty and charm production at HERA is an important testing ground for perturbative QCD and can provide information on the structure of the proton.

  11. Heavy Quark Production and Spectroscopy at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karshon, Uri

    2002-06-01

    Production of final states containing open charm (c) and beauty (b) quarks at HERA is reviewed. Photoproduction (PHP) of the charm meson resonances D*, D0 and Ds, as well as D* production in the deep inelastic scattering (DIS) regime, are measured and compared to QCD predictions. The excited charm mesons D1)0(2420, D2) *0(2460 and Ds1)+/-(2536) have been observed and the rates of charm quarks hadronising to these mesons were extracted. A search for radially excited charm mesons has been performed. PHP and DIS beauty cross sections are higher than expected in next-to-leading order (NLO) QCD.

  12. The Future is Hera! Analyzing Astronomical Over the Internet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valencic, L. A.; Chai, P.; Pence, W.; Shafer, R.; Snowden, S.

    2008-01-01

    Hera is the data processing facility provided by the High Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center (HEASARC) at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center for analyzing astronomical data. Hera provides all the pre-installed software packages, local disk space, and computing resources need to do general processing of FITS format data files residing on the users local computer, and to do research using the publicly available data from the High ENergy Astrophysics Division. Qualified students, educators and researchers may freely use the Hera services over the internet of research and educational purposes.

  13. The hadronic final state at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, Paul R.; Wing, Matthew

    2014-07-01

    The hadronic final state in electron-proton collisions at HERA has provided a rich testing ground for development of the theory of the strong force, QCD. In this review, over 200 publications from the H1 and ZEUS Collaborations are summarized. Short distance physics, the measurement of processes at high-energy scales, has provided rigorous tests of perturbative QCD and constrained the structure of the proton as well as allowing precise determinations of the strong coupling constant to be made. Nonperturbative or low-energy processes have also been investigated and results on hadronization interpreted together with those from other experiments. Searches for exotic QCD objects, such as pentaquarks, glueballs, and instantons, have been performed. The subject of diffraction has been reinvigorated through its precise measurement, such that it can now be described by perturbative QCD. After discussion of HERA, the H1 and ZEUS detectors, and the techniques used to reconstruct differing hadronic final states, the above subject areas are elaborated on. The major achievements are then condensed further in a final section summarizing what has been learned.

  14. Precision QCD measurements in DIS at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britzger, Daniel

    2016-08-01

    New and recent results on QCD measurements from the H1 and ZEUS experiments at the HERA ep collider are reviewed. The final results on the combined deep-inelastic neutral and charged current cross-sections are presented and their role in the extractions of parton distribution functions (PDFs) is studied. The PDF fits give insight into the compatibility of QCD evolution and heavy flavor schemes with the data as a function of kinematic variables such as the scale Q2. Measurements of jet production cross-sections in ep collisions provide direct proves of QCD and extractions of the strong coupling constants are performed. Charm and beauty cross-section measurements are used for the determination of the heavy quark masses. Their role in PDF fits is investigated. In the regime of diffractive DIS and photoproduction, dijet and prompt photon production cross-sections provide insights into the process of factorization and the nature of the diffractive exchange.

  15. Overview of the Human Exploration Research Analog (HERA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neigut, J.

    2015-01-01

    In 2013, the Human Research Program at NASA began developing a new confinement analog specifically for conducting research to investigate the effects of confinement on the human system. The HERA (Human Exploration Research Analog) habitat has been used for both 7 and 14 day missions to date to examine and mitigate exploration risks to enable safe, reliable and productive human space exploration. This presentation will describe how the Flight Analogs Project developed the HERA facility and the infrastructure to suit investigator requirements for confinement research and in the process developed a new approach to analog utilization and a new state of the art analog facility. Details regarding HERA operations will be discussed including specifics on the mission simulation utilized for the current 14-day campaign, the specifics of the facility (total volume, overall size, hardware), and the capabilities available to researchers. The overall operational philosophy, mission fidelity including timeline, schedule pressures and cadence, and development and implementation of mission stressors will be presented. Research conducted to date in the HERA has addressed risks associated with behavioral health and performance, human physiology, as well as human factors. This presentation will conclude with a discussion of future research plans for the HERA, including infrastructure improvements and additional research capabilities planned for the upcoming 30-day missions in 2016.

  16. Hera: Using NASA Astronomy Data in the Classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lochner, James C.; Mitchell, S.; Pence, W. D.

    2006-12-01

    Hera is a free internet-based tool that provides students access to both analysis software and data for studying astronomical objects such as black holes, binary star systems, supernovae, and galaxies. Students use a subset of the same software, and experience the same analysis process, that an astronomer follows in analyzing data obtained from an orbiting satellite observatory. Hera is accompanied by a web-based tutorial which steps students through the science background, procedures for accessing the data, and using the Hera software. The web pages include a lesson plan in which students explore data from a binary star system containing a normal star and a black hole. The objective of the lesson is for students to use plotting, estimation, and statistical techniques to determine the orbital period. Students may then apply these techniques to a number of data sets and draw conclusions on the natures of the systems (for example, students discover that one system is an eclipsing binary). The web page tutorial is self-guided and contains a number of exercises; students can work independently or in groups. Hera has been use with high school students and in introductory astronomy classes in community colleges. This poster describes Hera and its web-based tutorial. We outline the underlying software architecture, the development process, and its testing and classroom applications. We also describe the benefits to students in developing skills which extend basic science and math concepts into real applications.

  17. Open charm production at HERA-B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dujmic, Denis

    A proton beam with a momentum of 920 GeV/c is collided with a carbon wire target ( s = 42 GeV) at a rate of 2--5 MHz during the commissioning of the HERA-B experiment. Events that had a lepton candidate with a transverse momentum greater than 1 GeV/c (1.5 GeV/c) are reconstructed and written to tape. The analysis uses 2.6 million events triggered in the muon channel. Performance of the Ring Imaging Cerenkov detector is described in detail, as well as the algorithm for positive particle identification, its efficiency, and pion-kaon separation. Detection of charm decays is carried out in two decay channels: D0 → piK and D + → pipiK. Signals obtained in the measurement are statistically significant with cross sections for all xF of sD0+D¯ 0 = 80 +/- 27(stat) +/- 61(syst) mub/nucleon for D0 + D¯0, and sD++D- = 52 +/- 20(stat) +/- 39(syst) mub/nucleon for D+ + D-. For comparison with other experiments, these measurements are converted into the total forward cross section for cc¯ production scc¯ = 39 +/- 10(stat) +/- 21(syst) mub/nucleon for xF > 0. This value is consistent with an estimate based on QCD calculations and other measurements. The production cross sections for two control channels J/psi → mumu and KS → pipi are also measured. The reconstructed J/psi signal leads to a cross section of (420 +/- 80) nb/nucleon, with nuclear dependence taken as A0.92. KS signal has cross section of 19.1 +/- 1.8 mb/nucleon, with A 0.718. Both measurements are in a good agreement with expectations. A set of detected D mesons was used to search for additional vertices that belong to B meson decays. It allows setting a limit for bb¯ production at <150 nb. This work presents a contribution to the commissioning of the HERA-B experiment, and an extension of its research program to the physics of open charm decays.

  18. The Proton as Seen by the HERA Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abt, Iris

    2016-10-01

    Deep-inelastic electron-proton (ep) scattering at the HERA collider has been very important in the investigation of the partonic structure of the proton. The neutral- and charged-current cross sections, measured over a large kinematic range, are one of the legacies of the first and so far only ep collider. Here I discuss the combination of H1 and ZEUS data. The HERA data alone can provide parton distribution functions (PDFs) within the framework of perturbative QCD. I also discuss the family of sets of PDFs called HERAPDF2.0 as well as the interpretation of such proton PDFs that characterize proton interactions in momentum space. I then introduce other possible applications of the precision cross sections. In addition, some measurements at HERA provide hints about spatial aspects of the proton. Finally, I present a brief discussion of the connection to nuclear physics.

  19. Exclusive electroproduction of two pions at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramowicz, H.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.; Adamus, M.; Aggarwal, R.; Antonelli, S.; Antonioli, P.; Antonov, A.; Arneodo, M.; Ashery, D.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Bachynska, O.; Bamberger, A.; Barakbaev, A. N.; Barbagli, G.; Bari, G.; Barreiro, F.; Bartosik, N.; Bartsch, D.; Basile, M.; Behnke, O.; Behr, J.; Behrens, U.; Bellagamba, L.; Bertolin, A.; Bhadra, S.; Bindi, M.; Blohm, C.; Bokhonov, V.; Bołd, T.; Bondarenko, K.; Boos, E. G.; Borras, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bot, D.; Brock, I.; Brownson, E.; Brugnera, R.; Brümmer, N.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Brzozowska, B.; Bussey, P. J.; Bylsma, B.; Caldwell, A.; Capua, M.; Carlin, R.; Catterall, C. D.; Chekanov, S.; Chwastowski, J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Contin, A.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Coppola, N.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Costa, M.; D'Agostini, G.; Dal Corso, F.; del Peso, J.; Dementiev, R. K.; De Pasquale, S.; Derrick, M.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Dobur, D.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Dolinska, G.; Doyle, A. T.; Drugakov, V.; Durkin, L. S.; Dusini, S.; Eisenberg, Y.; Ermolov, P. F.; Eskreys, S.; Fang, S.; Fazio, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrero, M. I.; Figiel, J.; Forrest, M.; Foster, B.; Gach, G.; Galas, A.; Gallo, E.; Garfagnini, A.; Geiser, A.; Gialas, I.; Gladilin, L. K.; Gladkov, D.; Glasman, C.; Gogota, O.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Göttlicher, P.; Grabowska-Bołd, I.; Grebenyuk, J.; Gregor, I.; Grigorescu, G.; Grzelak, G.; Gueta, O.; Gurvich, E.; Guzik, M.; Gwenlan, C.; Haas, T.; Hain, W.; Hamatsu, R.; Hart, J. C.; Hartmann, H.; Hartner, G.; Hilger, E.; Hochman, D.; Hori, R.; Horton, K.; Hüttmann, A.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Iga, Y.; Ingbir, R.; Ishitsuka, M.; Jakob, H.-P.; Januschek, F.; Jones, T. W.; Jüngst, M.; Kadenko, I.; Kahle, B.; Kananov, S.; Kanno, T.; Karshon, U.; Karstens, F.; Katkov, I. I.; Kaur, M.; Kaur, P.; Keramidas, A.; Khein, L. A.; Kim, J. Y.; Kisielewska, D.; Kitamura, S.; Klanner, R.; Klein, U.; Koffeman, E.; Kooijman, P.; Korol, Ie.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kotański, A.; Kötz, U.; Kowalski, H.; Kuprash, O.; Kuze, M.; Lee, A.; Levchenko, B. B.; Levy, A.; Libov, V.; Limentani, S.; Ling, T. Y.; Lisovyi, M.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lohmann, W.; Löhr, B.; Lohrmann, E.; Long, K. R.; Longhin, A.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Maeda, J.; Magill, S.; Makarenko, I.; Malka, J.; Mankel, R.; Margotti, A.; Marini, G.; Martin, J. F.; Mastroberardino, A.; Mattingly, M. C. K.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Mergelmeyer, S.; Miglioranzi, S.; Mohamad Idris, F.; Monaco, V.; Montanari, A.; Morris, J. D.; Mujkic, K.; Musgrave, B.; Nagano, K.; Namsoo, T.; Nania, R.; Nigro, A.; Ning, Y.; Nobe, T.; Noor, U.; Notz, D.; Nowak, R. J.; Nuncio-Quiroz, A. E.; Oh, B. Y.; Okazaki, N.; Oliver, K.; Olkiewicz, K.; Onishchuk, Yu.; Papageorgiu, K.; Parenti, A.; Paul, E.; Pawlak, J. M.; Pawlik, B.; Pelfer, P. G.; Pellegrino, A.; Perlański, W.; Perrey, H.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Pluciński, P.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Polini, A.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Przybycień, M.; Raval, A.; Reeder, D. D.; Reisert, B.; Ren, Z.; Repond, J.; Ri, Y. D.; Robertson, A.; Roloff, P.; Rubinsky, I.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Salii, A.; Samson, U.; Sartorelli, G.; Savin, A. A.; Saxon, D. H.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenstedt, S.; Schleper, P.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schneekloth, U.; Schönberg, V.; Schörner-Sadenius, T.; Schwartz, J.; Sciulli, F.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Shehzadi, R.; Shimizu, S.; Singh, I.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Słomiński, W.; Smith, W. H.; Sola, V.; Solano, A.; Son, D.; Sosnovtsev, V.; Spiridonov, A.; Stadie, H.; Stanco, L.; Stern, A.; Stewart, T. P.; Stifutkin, A.; Stopa, P.; Suchkov, S.; Susinno, G.; Suszycki, L.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Szuba, D.; Szuba, J.; Tapper, A. D.; Tassi, E.; Terrón, J.; Theedt, T.; Tiecke, H.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomalak, O.; Tomaszewska, J.; Tsurugai, T.; Turcato, M.; Tymieniecka, T.; Vázquez, M.; Verbytskyi, A.; Viazlo, O.; Vlasov, N. N.; Volynets, O.; Walczak, R.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.; Whitmore, J. J.; Wiggers, L.; Wing, M.; Wlasenko, M.; Wolf, G.; Wolfe, H.; Wrona, K.; Yagües-Molina, A. G.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yoshida, R.; Youngman, C.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Zawiejski, L.; Zenaiev, O.; Zeuner, W.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Zhmak, N.; Zhou, C.; Zichichi, A.; Zolkapli, Z.; Zolko, M.; Zotkin, D. S.

    2012-01-01

    The exclusive electroproduction of two pions in the mass range 0.4< M ππ <2.5 GeV has been studied with the ZEUS detector at HERA using an integrated luminosity of 82 pb-1. The analysis was carried out in the kinematic range of 2< Q 2<80 GeV2, 32< W<180 GeV and | t|<0.6 GeV2, where Q 2 is the photon virtuality, W is the photon-proton centre-of-mass energy and t is the squared four-momentum transfer at the proton vertex. The two-pion invariant-mass distribution is interpreted in terms of the pion electromagnetic form factor, | F( M ππ )|, assuming that the studied mass range includes the contributions of the ρ, ρ' and ρ'' vector-meson states. The masses and widths of the resonances were obtained and the Q 2 dependence of the cross-section ratios σ( ρ'→ ππ)/ σ( ρ) and σ( ρ''→ ππ)/ σ( ρ) was extracted. The pion form factor obtained in the present analysis is compared to that obtained in e + e -→ π + π -.

  20. Parton distributions with the combined HERA charm production cross sections

    SciTech Connect

    Bertone, Valerio; Rojo, Juan

    2013-04-15

    Heavy quark structure functions from HERA provide a direct handle on the medium and small-x gluon PDF. In this contribution, we discuss ongoing progress on the implementation of the FONLL General-Mass scheme with running heavy quark masses, and of its benchmarking with the HOPPET and OpenQCDrad codes, and then present the impact of the recently released combined HERA charm production cross sections in the NNPDF 2.3 analysis. We find that the combined charm data contribute to constraining the gluon and quarks at small values of Bjorken-x.

  1. Trajektoriendichte bei Magnetic Particle Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knopp, Tobias; Sattel, Timo; Biederer, Sven; Weizenecker, Jürgen; Gleich, Bernhard; Borgert, Jörn; Buzug, Thorsten M.

    Magnetic Particle Imaging ist ein neues bilgebendes Verfahren zur Darstellung der räumlichen Verteilung von magnetisierbaren Nanopartikeln. In einer Simulationsstudie wurde zuletzt das Auflösungsvermögen und die Sensitivität dieser Methode untersucht. Die Abtast-trajektorie wurde dabei so gewählt, dass der Messbereich deutlich überabgetastet wurde. In dieser Arbeit wird in einer Simulationsstudie untersucht, welchen Einfluss die Dichte der Trajektorie auf die Bildqualität der rekonstruierten Bilder hat. Es wird gezeigt, dass die Auflösung in den rekonstruierten Bildern durch die Feldstärke des angelegten Magnetfeldes und die Trajektoriendichte beschränkt ist. Die Trajektorie kann bei konstanter Feldstärke bis zu einem gewissen Grad ausgedünnt werden. Der Simulation liegt dabei ein Model zu Grunde, welches das Signal entsprechend der Langevin-Theorie des Paramagnetismus approximiert.

  2. Proton structure and parton distribution functions from HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chekelian, Vladimir

    2016-11-01

    The H1 and ZEUS collaborations at the electron-proton collider HERA collected e± p scattering data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of about 1 fb-1. The data were taken at proton beam energies of 920, 820, 575 and 460 GeV and an electron beam energy of 27.5 GeV, with different electric charges and longitudinal polarisation of the electron beam. Using these data inclusive neutral and charged current deep inelastic cross sections were measured over six orders of magnitude in negative four-momentum-transfer squared, Q2, and Bjorken x. A combination of all inclusive cross sections, published by the H1 and ZEUS collaborations at HERA, was performed. Using these combined HERA data and the individual H1 and ZEUS data taken using the polarised electron beams, the proton structure functions F2, FγZ2, xFγZ3 and FL were obtained, and scaling violations, electroweak unification, and polarisation effects in the charged current process were demonstrated. The combined cross sections were used as a sole input to QCD analyses at leading, next-to-leading and next-to-next-to-leading orders, providing a new set of parton distribution functions, denoted as HERAPDF2.0. An extension of the analysis by including HERA data on charm and jet production allowed a simultaneous determination of parton distributions and the strong coupling.

  3. Diffractive PDF fits and factorisation tests at HERA

    SciTech Connect

    Solano, Ada

    2011-07-15

    A DGLAP next-to-leading-order QCD analysis to extract the diffractive parton distribution functions, using DIS inclusive and dijet diffractive HERA data, is presented. Predictions based on the extracted parton densities are compared to diffractive dijet photoproduction data to discuss factorisation.

  4. CTEQ-TEA parton distribution functions and HERA Run I and II combined data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Tie-Jiun; Dulat, Sayipjamal; Gao, Jun; Guzzi, Marco; Huston, Joey; Nadolsky, Pavel; Pumplin, Jon; Schmidt, Carl; Stump, Daniel; Yuan, C.-P.

    2017-02-01

    We analyze the impact of the recent HERA Run I +II combination of inclusive deep inelastic scattering cross-section data on the CT14 global analysis of parton distribution functions (PDFs). New PDFs at next-to-leading order and next-to-next-to-leading order, called CT14 HERA 2 , are obtained by a refit of the CT14 data ensembles, in which the HERA Run I combined measurements are replaced by the new HERA Run I +II combination. The CT14 functional parametrization of PDFs is flexible enough to allow good descriptions of different flavor combinations, so we use the same parametrization for CT14 HERA 2 but with an additional shape parameter for describing the strange quark PDF. We find that the HERA I +II data can be fit reasonably well, and both CT14 and CT14 HERA 2 PDFs can describe equally well the non-HERA data included in our global analysis. Because the CT14 and CT14 HERA 2 PDFs agree well within the PDF errors, we continue to recommend CT14 PDFs for the analysis of LHC Run 2 experiments.

  5. Prospects for HERMES-spin structure studies at HERA

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, H.E.

    1994-12-31

    HERMES (HERA Measurement of Spin), is a second generation experiment to study the spin structure of the nucleon by using polarized internal gas targets in the HERA 35-GeV electron storage ring. Scattered electrons and coincident hadrons will be detected in an open geometry spectrometer which will include particle identification. Measurements are planned for each of the inclusive structure functions, g{sub 1},(x), g{sub 2}(x), b{sub 1}(x) and A(x), as well as the study of semi-inclusive pion and kaon asymmetries. Targets of hydrogen, deuterium and {sup 3}He will be studied. The accuracy of data for the inclusive structure functions will equal or exceed that of current experiments. The semi-inclusive asymmetries will provide a unique and sensitive probe of the flavor dependence of quark helicity distributions and properties of the quark sea. Monte Carlo simulations of HERMES data for experiment asymmetries and polarized structure functions are discussed.

  6. The silicon vertex detector of HERA-B

    SciTech Connect

    Moshous, Basil

    1998-02-01

    HERA-B is an experiment to study CP violation in the B system using an internal target at the DESY HERA proton ring(820 GeV). The main goal is to measure the asymmetry in the 'gold plated' decays of B{sup 0}, B-bar{sup 0}{yields}J/{psi}K{sub s}{sup 0} yielding a measurement of the angle {beta} of the unitarity triangle. From the semileptonic decay channels of the b, b-bar-hadron produced in association with the B{sup 0},B-bar{sup 0} can be used to tag the flavor of the B{sup 0}. The purpose of the Vertex Detector System is to provide the track coordinates for reconstructing the J/{psi}{yields}e{sup +}e{sup -}, {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} secondary decay vertices and the impact parameters of all tagging particles.

  7. Search for first-generation leptoquarks at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramowicz, H.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.; Adamus, M.; Aggarwal, R.; Antonelli, S.; Antonioli, P.; Antonov, A.; Arneodo, M.; Arslan, O.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Bachynska, O.; Bamberger, A.; Barakbaev, A. N.; Barbagli, G.; Bari, G.; Barreiro, F.; Bartosik, N.; Bartsch, D.; Basile, M.; Behnke, O.; Behr, J.; Behrens, U.; Bellagamba, L.; Bertolin, A.; Bhadra, S.; Bindi, M.; Blohm, C.; Bokhonov, V.; Bołd, T.; Bondarenko, K.; Boos, E. G.; Borras, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bot, D.; Brock, I.; Brownson, E.; Brugnera, R.; Brümmer, N.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Brzozowska, B.; Bussey, P. J.; Bylsma, B.; Caldwell, A.; Capua, M.; Carlin, R.; Catterall, C. D.; Chekanov, S.; Chwastowski, J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Contin, A.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Coppola, N.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Costa, M.; D'Agostini, G.; Dal Corso, F.; del Peso, J.; Dementiev, R. K.; De Pasquale, S.; Derrick, M.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Dobur, D.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Dolinska, G.; Doyle, A. T.; Drugakov, V.; Durkin, L. S.; Dusini, S.; Eisenberg, Y.; Ermolov, P. F.; Eskreys, A.; Fang, S.; Fazio, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrero, M. I.; Figiel, J.; Forrest, M.; Foster, B.; Gach, G.; Galas, A.; Gallo, E.; Garfagnini, A.; Geiser, A.; Gialas, I.; Gizhko, A.; Gladilin, L. K.; Gladkov, D.; Glasman, C.; Gogota, O.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Göttlicher, P.; Grabowska-Bołd, I.; Grebenyuk, J.; Gregor, I.; Grigorescu, G.; Grzelak, G.; Gueta, O.; Guzik, M.; Gwenlan, C.; Haas, T.; Hain, W.; Hamatsu, R.; Hart, J. C.; Hartmann, H.; Hartner, G.; Hilger, E.; Hochman, D.; Hori, R.; Horton, K.; Hüttmann, A.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Iga, Y.; Ingbir, R.; Ishitsuka, M.; Jakob, H.-P.; Januschek, F.; Jones, T. W.; Jüngst, M.; Kadenko, I.; Kahle, B.; Kananov, S.; Kanno, T.; Karshon, U.; Karstens, F.; Katkov, I. I.; Kaur, M.; Kaur, P.; Keramidas, A.; Khein, L. A.; Kim, J. Y.; Kisielewska, D.; Kitamura, S.; Klanner, R.; Klein, U.; Koffeman, E.; Kondrashova, N.; Kononenko, O.; Kooijman, P.; Korol, Ie.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kotański, A.; Kötz, U.; Kowalski, H.; Kuprash, O.; Kuze, M.; Lee, A.; Levchenko, B. B.; Levy, A.; Libov, V.; Limentani, S.; Ling, T. Y.; Lisovyi, M.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lohmann, W.; Löhr, B.; Lohrmann, E.; Long, K. R.; Longhin, A.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Maeda, J.; Magill, S.; Makarenko, I.; Malka, J.; Mankel, R.; Margotti, A.; Marini, G.; Martin, J. F.; Mastroberardino, A.; Mattingly, M. C. K.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Mergelmeyer, S.; Miglioranzi, S.; Mohamad dris, F.; Monaco, V.; Montanari, A.; Morris, J. D.; Mujkic, K.; Musgrave, B.; Nagano, K.; Namsoo, T.; Nania, R.; Nigro, A.; Ning, Y.; Nobe, T.; Notz, D.; Nowak, R. J.; Nuncio-Quiroz, A. E.; Oh, B. Y.; Okazaki, N.; Oliver, K.; Olkiewicz, K.; Onishchuk, Yu.; Papageorgiu, K.; Parenti, A.; Paul, E.; Pawlak, J. M.; Pawlik, B.; Pelfer, P. G.; Pellegrino, A.; Perlański, W.; Perrey, H.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Pluciński, P.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Polini, A.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Przybycień, M.; Raval, A.; Reeder, D. D.; Reisert, B.; Ren, Z.; Repond, J.; Ri, Y. D.; Robertson, A.; Roloff, P.; Rubinsky, I.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Samson, U.; Sartorelli, G.; Savin, A. A.; Saxon, D. H.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenstedt, S.; Schleper, P.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schneekloth, U.; Schönberg, V.; Schörner-Sadenius, T.; Schwartz, J.; Sciulli, F.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Shehzadi, R.; Shimizu, S.; Singh, I.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Słomiński, W.; Smith, W. H.; Sola, V.; Solano, A.; Son, D.; Sosnovtsev, V.; Spiridonov, A.; Stadie, H.; Stanco, L.; Stefaniuk, N.; Stern, A.; Stewart, T. P.; Stifutkin, A.; Stopa, P.; Suchkov, S.; Susinno, G.; Suszycki, L.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Szuba, D.; Szuba, J.; Tapper, A. D.; Tassi, E.; Terrón, J.; Theedt, T.; Tiecke, H.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomaszewska, J.; Trusov, V.; Tsurugai, T.; Turcato, M.; Turkot, O.; Tymieniecka, T.; Vázquez, M.; Verbytskyi, A.; Viazlo, O.; Vlasov, N. N.; Walczak, R.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.; Whitmore, J. J.; Wichmann, K.; Wiggers, L.; Wing, M.; Wlasenko, M.; Wolf, G.; Wolfe, H.; Wrona, K.; Yagües-Molina, A. G.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yoshida, R.; Youngman, C.; Zabiegalov, O.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Zawiejski, L.; Zenaiev, O.; Zeuner, W.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Zhmak, N.; Zhou, C.; Zichichi, A.; Zolkapli, Z.; Zotkin, D. S.

    2012-07-01

    A search for first-generation leptoquarks was performed in electron-proton and positron-proton collisions recorded with the ZEUS detector at HERA in 2003-2007 using an integrated luminosity of 366pb-1. Final states with an electron and jets or with missing transverse momentum and jets were analyzed, searching for resonances or other deviations from the standard model predictions. No evidence for any leptoquark signal was found. The data were combined with data previously taken at HERA, resulting in a total integrated luminosity of 498pb-1. Limits on the Yukawa coupling, λ, of leptoquarks were set as a function of the leptoquark mass for different leptoquark types within the Buchmüller-Rückl-Wyler model. Leptoquarks with a coupling λ=0.3 are excluded for masses up to 699 GeV.

  8. Measurement of charm fragmentation fractions in photoproduction at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramowicz, H.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.; Adamus, M.; Aggarwal, R.; Antonelli, S.; Antonioli, P.; Antonov, A.; Arneodo, M.; Arslan, O.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Bachynska, O.; Bamberger, A.; Barakbaev, A. N.; Barbagli, G.; Bari, G.; Barreiro, F.; Bartosik, N.; Bartsch, D.; Basile, M.; Behnke, O.; Behr, J.; Behrens, U.; Bellagamba, L.; Bertolin, A.; Bhadra, S.; Bindi, M.; Blohm, C.; Bokhonov, V.; Bold, T.; Boos, E. G.; Borras, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bot, D.; Brock, I.; Brownson, E.; Brugnera, R.; Brümmer, N.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Brzozowska, B.; Bussey, P. J.; Bylsma, B.; Caldwell, A.; Capua, M.; Carlin, R.; Catterall, C. D.; Chekanov, S.; Chwastowski, J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Contin, A.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Coppola, N.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Costa, M.; D'Agostini, G.; Corso, F. Dal; del Peso, J.; Dementiev, R. K.; De Pasquale, S.; Derrick, M.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Dobur, D.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Dolinska, G.; Doyle, A. T.; Drugakov, V.; Durkin, L. S.; Dusini, S.; Eisenberg, Y.; Ermolov, P. F.; Eskreys, A.; Fang, S.; Fazio, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrero, M. I.; Figiel, J.; Foster, B.; Gach, G.; Galas, A.; Gallo, E.; Garfagnini, A.; Geiser, A.; Gialas, I.; Gizhko, A.; Gladilin, L. K.; Gladkov, D.; Glasman, C.; Gogota, O.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Göttlicher, P.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Grebenyuk, J.; Gregor, I.; Grigorescu, G.; Grzelak, G.; Gueta, O.; Guzik, M.; Gwenlan, C.; Haas, T.; Hain, W.; Hamatsu, R.; Hart, J. C.; Hartmann, H.; Hartner, G.; Hilger, E.; Hochman, D.; Hori, R.; Hüttmann, A.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Iga, Y.; Ingbir, R.; Ishitsuka, M.; Iudin, A.; Jakob, H.-P.; Januschek, F.; Jones, T. W.; Jüngst, M.; Kadenko, I.; Kahle, B.; Kananov, S.; Kanno, T.; Karshon, U.; Karstens, F.; Katkov, I. I.; Kaur, M.; Kaur, P.; Keramidas, A.; Khein, L. A.; Kim, J. Y.; Kisielewska, D.; Kitamura, S.; Klanner, R.; Klein, U.; Koffeman, E.; Kondrashova, N.; Kononenko, O.; Kooijman, P.; Korol, Ie.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kotanski, A.; Kötz, U.; Kovalchuk, N.; Kowalski, H.; Kuprash, O.; Kuze, M.; Lee, A.; Levchenko, B. B.; Levy, A.; Libov, V.; Limentani, S.; Ling, T. Y.; Lisovyi, M.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lohmann, W.; Löhr, B.; Lohrmann, E.; Long, K. R.; Longhin, A.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Maeda, J.; Magill, S.; Makarenko, I.; Malka, J.; Mankel, R.; Margotti, A.; Marini, G.; Martin, J. F.; Mastroberardino, A.; Mattingly, M. C. K.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Mergelmeyer, S.; Miglioranzi, S.; Mohamad Idris, F.; Monaco, V.; Montanari, A.; Morris, J. D.; Mujkic, K.; Musgrave, B.; Myronenko, V.; Nagano, K.; Namsoo, T.; Nania, R.; Nigro, A.; Ning, Y.; Nobe, T.; Notz, D.; Nowak, R. J.; Nuncio-Quiroz, A. E.; Oh, B. Y.; Okazaki, N.; Olkiewicz, K.; Onishchuk, Yu.; Papageorgiu, K.; Parenti, A.; Paul, E.; Pawlak, J. M.; Pawlik, B.; Pelfer, P. G.; Pellegrino, A.; Perlanski, W.; Perrey, H.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Plucinski, P.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Polini, A.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Przybycien, M.; Raval, A.; Reeder, D. D.; Reisert, B.; Ren, Z.; Repond, J.; Ri, Y. D.; Robertson, A.; Roloff, P.; Rubinsky, I.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Samson, U.; Sartorelli, G.; Savin, A. A.; Saxon, D. H.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenstedt, S.; Schleper, P.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schneekloth, U.; Schönberg, V.; Schörner-Sadenius, T.; Schwartz, J.; Sciulli, F.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Shehzadi, R.; Shevchenko, R.; Shimizu, S.; Shkola, O.; Singh, I.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Slominski, W.; Smith, W. H.; Sola, V.; Solano, A.; Son, D.; Sosnovtsev, V.; Spiridonov, A.; Stadie, H.; Stanco, L.; Stefaniuk, N.; Stern, A.; Stewart, T. P.; Stifutkin, A.; Stopa, P.; Suchkov, S.; Susinno, G.; Suszycki, L.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Szuba, D.; Szuba, J.; Tapper, A. D.; Tassi, E.; Terrón, J.; Theedt, T.; Tiecke, H.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomaszewska, J.; Trofymov, A.; Trusov, V.; Tsurugai, T.; Turcato, M.; Turkot, O.; Tymieniecka, T.; Vázquez, M.; Verbytskyi, A.; Viazlo, O.; Vlasov, N. N.; Walczak, R.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.; Whitmore, J. J.; Wichmann, K.; Wiggers, L.; Wing, M.; Wlasenko, M.; Wolf, G.; Wolfe, H.; Wrona, K.; Yagües-Molina, A. G.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yoshida, R.; Youngman, C.; Zakharchuk, N.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Zawiejski, L.; Zenaiev, O.; Zeuner, W.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Zhmak, N.; Zichichi, A.; Zolkapli, Z.; Zotkin, D. S.

    2013-09-01

    The production of D 0, D *+, D +, and charm hadrons and their antiparticles in ep scattering at HERA has been studied with the ZEUS detector, using a total integrated luminosity of 372 pb-1. The fractions of charm quarks hadronising into a particular charm hadron were derived. In addition, the ratio of neutral to charged D-meson production rates, the fraction of charged D mesons produced in a vector state, and the stangeness-suppression factor have been determined. The measurements have been performed in the photoproduction regime. The charm hadrons were reconstructed in the range of transverse momentum p T > 3 .8 GeV and pseudorapidity | η| < 1 .6. The charm fragmentation fractions are compared to previous results from HERA and from e + e - experiments. The data support the hypothesis that fragmentation is independent of the production process.

  9. Combined electroweak and QCD fit to HERA data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abt, I.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Foster, B.; Gwenlan, C.; Myronenko, V.; Turkot, O.; Wichmann, K.

    2016-09-01

    A simultaneous electroweak and QCD fit of electroweak parameters and parton distribution functions to HERA data on deep inelastic scattering is presented. The input data are neutral current and charged current inclusive cross sections measured by the H1 and ZEUS collaborations at the e p collider HERA. The polarization of the electron beam was taken into account for the ZEUS and H1 data recorded between 2004 and 2007. Results are presented on the vector and axial-vector couplings of the Z boson to u - and d -type quarks. The values are in agreement with Standard Model predictions. The results on au and vu represent the most precise measurements from a single process.

  10. The BEI hydrolysis process and reactor system refined engineering proto-type. BEI pilot-plant improvement and operations demonstrations

    SciTech Connect

    Brelsford, Donald L.

    1999-10-01

    This BEI project involves BEI-HP and RS's applications toward potential commercial validity demonstrations for dilute-acid corn-fiber cellulose-hydrolysis processing with an aim toward fuel ethanol production.

  11. Jet production and measurements of αs at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britzger, Daniel

    2015-05-01

    Results on the measurements of the hadronic final state in e± p collisions by the H1 and ZEUS experiments at HERA are presented. These are measurements on the production of prompt photons in photoproduction, inclusive jet, dijet and trijet production in deep-inelatic scattering and on the search for QCD instantons. The jet production data is employed for the extraction of the strong coupling constant αs(MZ).

  12. Dipole model analysis of high precision HERA data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luszczak, A.; Kowalski, H.

    2014-04-01

    We analyze, within a dipole model, the inclusive deep inelastic scattering cross section data, obtained from the combination of the measurements of the H1 and ZEUS experiments performed at the HERA collider. We show that these high precision data are very well described within the dipole model framework, which is complemented with valence quark structure functions. We discuss the properties of the gluon density obtained in this way.

  13. Tests of QCD at HERA: determination of the gluon density

    SciTech Connect

    Repond, J.

    1996-12-31

    An overview is given of the various methods available to the colliding beam experiments at HERA to determine the gluon density of the proton. The article includes a description of fits to the structure function F{sub 2}, of studies of dijet and open charm production in deep inelastic scattering, of elastic and inelastic {psi} photoproduction, and of inclusive diffractive scattering. 13 refs., 8 figs.

  14. BFKL equation with running QCD coupling and HERA data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, Eugene; Potashnikova, Irina

    2014-02-01

    In this paper we developed approach based on the BFKL evolution in ln( Q 2). We show that the simplest diffusion approximation with running QCD coupling is able to describe the HERA experimental data on the deep inelastic structure function with good χ2 /d .o .f . ≈ 1 .3. From our description of the experimental data we learned several lessons; (i) the non-perturbative physics at long distances started to show up at Q 2 = 0 .25 GeV2; (ii) the scattering amplitude at Q 2 = 0 .25 GeV2 cannot be written as sum of soft Pomeron and the secondary Reggeon but the Pomeron interactions should be taken into account; (iii) the Pomeron interactions can be reduced to the enhanced diagrams and, therefore, we do not see any needs for the shadowing corrections at HERA energies; and (iv) we demonstrated that the shadowing correction could be sizable at higher than HERA energies without any contradiction with our initial conditions.

  15. Open charm production in deep inelastic scattering at next-to-leading order at HERA.

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, B. W.

    1999-09-20

    An introduction and overview of charm production in deep inelastic scattering at HERA is given. The existing next-to-leading order perturbative QCD calculations are then reviewed, and key results are summarized. Finally, comparisons are made with the most recent HERA data, and unresolved issues are highlighted.

  16. The New Web-Based Hera Data Processing System at the HEASARC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pence, W.

    2011-01-01

    The HEASARC at NASA/GSFC has provide an on-line astronomical data processing system called Hera for several years. Hera provides a complete data processing environment, including installed software packages, local data storage, and the CPU resources needed to process the user's data. The original design of Hera, however, has 2 requirements that has limited it's usefulness for some users, namely, that 1) the user must download and install a small helper program on their own computer before using Hera, and 2) Hera requires that several computer ports/sockets be allowed to communicate through any local firewalls on the users machine. Both of these restrictions can be problematic for some users, therefore we are now migrating Hera into a purely Web based environment which only requires a standard Web browser. The first release of Web Hera is now publicly available at http://heasarc.gsfc.nasa.gov/webheara/. It currently provides a standard graphical interface for running hundreds of different data processing programs that are available in the HEASARC's ftools software package. Over the next year we to add more features to Web Hera, including an interactive command line interface, and more display and line capabilities.

  17. Commissioning and Science Forecasts for the Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array (HERA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, Aaron; HERA Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The HERA is a low-frequency radio interferometer aiming to make precise measurements of the power spectrum of fluctuations in 21cm emission from the Epoch of Reionization at z=13—6. This project was recently awarded development funding under the 2014 cycle of the National Science Foundation's Mid-Scale Innovations Program (MSIP). We present initial results from the commissioning and testing of the 19-element HERA prototype in South Africa, including measurements of the performance of HERA's 14-m dish and feed via reflectometry, beam mapping, and on-sky commissioning tests. We then forecast the science results that HERA will deliver once it reaches its full size of 352 elements. These forecasts include constraints on the 21cm power spectrum, the impact of these constraints on parametrized models of ionization, and their relevance to cosmological models. Construction of HERA-352 is pending the outcome of the 2016 NSF MSIP cycle.

  18. Validation of BeiDou Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Mowafy, Ahmed; Hu, Congwei

    2014-06-01

    This study presents validation of BeiDou measurements in un-differenced standalone mode and experimental results of its application for real data. A reparameterized form of the unknowns in a geometry-free observation model was used. Observations from each satellite are independently screened using a local modeling approach. Main advantages include that there is no need for computation of inter-system biases and no satellite navigation information are needed. Validation of the triple-frequency BeiDou data was performed in static and kinematic modes, the former at two continuously operating reference stations in Australia using data that span two consecutive days and the later in a walking mode for three hours. The use of the validation method parameters for numerical and graphical diagnostics of the multi-frequency BeiDou observations are discussed. The precision of the system’s observations was estimated using an empirical method that utilizes the characteristics of the validation statistics. The capability of the proposed method is demonstrated in detection and identification of artificial errors inserted in the static BeiDou data and when implemented in a single point positioning processing of the kinematic test.

  19. {J}/{ψ} production via fragmentation at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godbole, R. M.; Roy, D. P.; Sridhar, K.

    1996-02-01

    We compute the contributions to large- p T{J}/{ψ} production at DHEA coming from fragmentation of gluons and charm quarks. We find that the charm quark fragmentation contribution dominates over the direct production of {J}/{ψ} via photongluon fusion at large- p T, while the gluon fragmentation is negligibly small over the whole range of pT. An experimental study of pT distributions of {J}/{ψ} at HERA will providea direct probe of the charm quark fragmentation functions.

  20. Measurement of heavy-quark jet photoproduction at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramowicz, H.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.; Adamus, M.; Aggarwal, R.; Antonelli, S.; Antonioli, P.; Antonov, A.; Arneodo, M.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Bachynska, O.; Bamberger, A.; Barakbaev, A. N.; Barbagli, G.; Bari, G.; Barreiro, F.; Bartosik, N.; Bartsch, D.; Basile, M.; Behnke, O.; Behr, J.; Behrens, U.; Bellagamba, L.; Bertolin, A.; Bhadra, S.; Bindi, M.; Blohm, C.; Bokhonov, V.; Bołd, T.; Bolilyi, O.; Bondarenko, K.; Boos, E. G.; Borras, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bot, D.; Brock, I.; Brownson, E.; Brugnera, R.; Brümmer, N.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Brzozowska, B.; Bussey, P. J.; Bylsma, B.; Caldwell, A.; Capua, M.; Carlin, R.; Catterall, C. D.; Chekanov, S.; Chwastowski, J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Contin, A.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Coppola, N.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Costa, M.; D'Agostini, G.; Dal Corso, F.; Del Peso, J.; Dementiev, R. K.; de Pasquale, S.; Derrick, M.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Dobur, D.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Dolinska, G.; Doyle, A. T.; Drugakov, V.; Durkin, L. S.; Dusini, S.; Eisenberg, Y.; Ermolov, P. F.; Eskreys, A.; Fang, S.; Fazio, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrero, M. I.; Figiel, J.; Forrest, M.; Foster, B.; Fourletov, S.; Gach, G.; Galas, A.; Gallo, E.; Garfagnini, A.; Geiser, A.; Gialas, I.; Gladilin, L. K.; Gladkov, D.; Glasman, C.; Gogota, O.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Göttlicher, P.; Grabowska-Bołd, I.; Grebenyuk, J.; Gregor, I.; Grigorescu, G.; Grzelak, G.; Gueta, O.; Gwenlan, C.; Haas, T.; Hain, W.; Hamatsu, R.; Hart, J. C.; Hartmann, H.; Hartner, G.; Hilger, E.; Hochman, D.; Hori, R.; Horton, K.; Hüttmann, A.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Iga, Y.; Ingbir, R.; Ishitsuka, M.; Jakob, H.-P.; Januschek, F.; Jimenez, M.; Jones, T. W.; Jüngst, M.; Kadenko, I.; Kahle, B.; Kamaluddin, B.; Kananov, S.; Kanno, T.; Karshon, U.; Karstens, F.; Katkov, I. I.; Kaur, M.; Kaur, P.; Keramidas, A.; Khein, L. A.; Kim, J. Y.; Kisielewska, D.; Kitamura, S.; Klanner, R.; Klein, U.; Koffeman, E.; Kooijman, P.; Korol, I.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kotański, A.; Kötz, U.; Kowalski, H.; Kulinski, P.; Kuprash, O.; Kuze, M.; Lee, A.; Levchenko, B. B.; Levy, A.; Libov, V.; Limentani, S.; Ling, T. Y.; Lisovyi, M.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lohmann, W.; Löhr, B.; Lohrmann, E.; Long, K. R.; Longhin, A.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Łużniak, P.; Maeda, J.; Magill, S.; Makarenko, I.; Malka, J.; Mankel, R.; Margotti, A.; Marini, G.; Martin, J. F.; Mastroberardino, A.; Mattingly, M. C. K.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Mergelmeyer, S.; Miglioranzi, S.; Idris, F. Mohamad; Monaco, V.; Montanari, A.; Morris, J. D.; Mujkic, K.; Musgrave, B.; Nagano, K.; Namsoo, T.; Nania, R.; Nicholass, D.; Nigro, A.; Ning, Y.; Nobe, T.; Noor, U.; Notz, D.; Nowak, R. J.; Nuncio-Quiroz, A. E.; Oh, B. Y.; Okazaki, N.; Oliver, K.; Olkiewicz, K.; Onishchuk, Yu.; Papageorgiu, K.; Parenti, A.; Paul, E.; Pawlak, J. M.; Pawlik, B.; Pelfer, P. G.; Pellegrino, A.; Perlanski, W.; Perrey, H.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Plucinski, P.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Polini, A.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Przybycień, M.; Raval, A.; Reeder, D. D.; Reisert, B.; Ren, Z.; Repond, J.; Ri, Y. D.; Robertson, A.; Roloff, P.; Ron, E.; Rubinsky, I.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Salii, A.; Samson, U.; Sartorelli, G.; Savin, A. A.; Saxon, D. H.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenstedt, S.; Schleper, P.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schneekloth, U.; Schönberg, V.; Schörner-Sadenius, T.; Schwartz, J.; Sciulli, F.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Shehzadi, R.; Shimizu, S.; Singh, I.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Słomiński, W.; Smith, W. H.; Sola, V.; Solano, A.; Son, D.; Sosnovtsev, V.; Spiridonov, A.; Stadie, H.; Stanco, L.; Stern, A.; Stewart, T. P.; Stifutkin, A.; Stopa, P.; Suchkov, S.; Susinno, G.; Suszycki, L.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Szuba, D.; Szuba, J.; Tapper, A. D.; Tassi, E.; Terrón, J.; Theedt, T.; Tiecke, H.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomalak, O.; Tomaszewska, J.; Tsurugai, T.; Turcato, M.; Tymieniecka, T.; Uribe-Estrada, C.; Vázquez, M.; Verbytskyi, A.; Viazlo, O.; Vlasov, N. N.; Volynets, O.; Walczak, R.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.; Whitmore, J. J.; Whyte, J.; Wiggers, L.; Wing, M.; Wlasenko, M.; Wolf, G.; Wolfe, H.; Wrona, K.; Yagües-Molina, A. G.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yoshida, R.; Youngman, C.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Zawiejski, L.; Zenaiev, O.; Zeuner, W.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Zhmak, N.; Zhou, C.; Zichichi, A.; Zolko, M.; Zotkin, D. S.; Zulkapli, Z.

    2011-05-01

    Photoproduction of beauty and charm quarks in events with at least two jets has been measured with the ZEUS detector at HERA using an integrated luminosity of 133 pb-1. The fractions of jets containing b and c quarks were extracted using the invariant mass of charged tracks associated with secondary vertices and the decay-length significance of these vertices. Differential cross sections as a function of jet transverse momentum, pT^{jet}, and pseudorapidity, η jet, were measured. The data are compared with previous measurements and are well described by next-to-leading-order QCD predictions.

  1. Proceedings of the Ringberg Workshop New Trends in HERA Physics 2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grindhammer, G.; Ochs, W.; Kniehl, B. A.; Kramer, G.

    2006-04-01

    1. Proton structure. Proton structure measurements at high Q2 and large x / Katarzyna Wichmann. Electroweak physics at HERA / Joachim Meyer. Inclusive low Q2 measurements at HERA / Victor Lendermann. Resummed perturbative evolution at high energy / Richard Ball. Colour dipole phenomenology / Graham Shaw -- 2. Spin physics. Exclusive reactions at HERMES / Frank Ellinghaus. Transverse spin effects in single and double hadron electroproduction at HERMES / Benedikt Zihlmann. Present understanding of the nucleon spin structure in view of recent experiments / Andreas Metz -- 3. Production of Hadrons and Jets. Measurements of [symbol] and parton distribution functions using HERA jet data / Amanda Cooper-Sarkar. A new parton shower algorithm: shower evolution, matching at leading and next-to-leading order level / Zóltan Nagy. Jet production at HERA / Dan Traynor. Multi-jet production in lepton-proton scattering with next-to-leading order accuracy / Zóltan Trócsányi. Dijet rates with symmetric [symbol] cuts / Andrea Banfi. QCD dynamics from forward hadron and jet measurements / Lidia Goerlich. Light-hadron electroproduction at next-to-leading order and implications / Bernd Kniehl. Particle production and fragmentation / David Saxon. Soft gluon logarithmic resummation and hadron mass effects in single hadron inclusive production / Simon Albino -- 4. Heavy-flavour production. Heavy-flavour photo- and electroproduction at NLO / Ingo Schienbein. Physics with charm quarks at HERA / John Loizides. Beauty production at HERA / Olaf Behnke. J/[symbol] photoproduction at next-to-leading order / Luminita Mihaila. J/[symbol] photoproduction at large z in soft collinear effective theory / Sean Fleming -- 5. Diffractive ep Scattering. Exclusive and inclusive diffraction at HERA / Henri Kowalski. Diffractive production of vector mesons and the gluon at small x / Thomas Teubner. Inclusive diffraction / Laurent Favart. From factorization to its breaking in diffractive dijet production

  2. Impact of the HERA I+II combined data on the CT14 QCD global analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dulat, S.; Hou, T.-J.; Gao, J.; Guzzi, M.; Huston, J.; Nadolsky, P.; Pumplin, J.; Schmidt, C.; Stump, D.; Yuan, C.-P.

    2016-11-01

    A brief description of the impact of the recent HERA run I+II combination of inclusive deep inelastic scattering cross-section data on the CT14 global analysis of PDFs is given. The new CT14HERA2 PDFs at NLO and NNLO are illustrated. They employ the same parametrization used in the CT14 analysis, but with an additional shape parameter for describing the strange quark PDF. The HERA I+II data are reasonably well described by both CT14 and CT14HERA2 PDFs, and differences are smaller than the PDF uncertainties of the standard CT14 analysis. Both sets are acceptable when the error estimates are calculated in the CTEQ-TEA (CT) methodology and the standard CT14 PDFs are recommended to be continuously used for the analysis of LHC measurements.

  3. Production of Ξ- in deep inelastic scattering with ZEUS detector at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasir, N. Mohammad; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we discussed about the possible mechanism on how strange baryon are being produced. The discovery of strange quarks in cosmic rays before the quarks model being proposed makes the searches become more interesting, as it has long lifetimes. The inclusive deep inelastic scattering of Ξ- has been studied in electron-proton collisions with ZEUS detector at HERA. We also studied HERA kinematics and phase space.

  4. Production of Ξ{sup −} in deep inelastic scattering with ZEUS detector at HERA

    SciTech Connect

    Nasir, N. Mohammad Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.

    2016-01-22

    In this paper, we discussed about the possible mechanism on how strange baryon are being produced. The discovery of strange quarks in cosmic rays before the quarks model being proposed makes the searches become more interesting, as it has long lifetimes. The inclusive deep inelastic scattering of Ξ{sup −} has been studied in electron-proton collisions with ZEUS detector at HERA. We also studied HERA kinematics and phase space.

  5. Multi-Target Operation at the HERA-B Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Vassiliev, Yu.; Aushev, V.; Ehret, K.; Funcke, M.; Sever, S.I.; Pavlenko, Yu.; Pugatch, V.; Spratte, S.; Symalla, M.; Tkatch, N.; Wegener, D.

    2000-12-31

    The HERA-B internal target consists of eight target ribbons arranged around the beam. Each target can be moved in the radial direction independently in sub-micron steps, allowing to compensate relative beam shifts and to steer for the desired interaction rate. The experimental constraints require a stable interaction rate equally distributed over all inserted targets. The actual equalization is based on a measurement of charge originated from the beam-target interaction. The system shows a good linearity with the interaction rate and allows a reasonable distribution of the interaction rate among several wires. To cross check the performance of the multi-wire steering, the reconstructed tracks and primary vertices in the silicon vertex detector were used.

  6. Combined QCD and electroweak analysis of HERA data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramowicz, H.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.; Adamus, M.; Antonelli, S.; Aushev, V.; Behnke, O.; Behrens, U.; Bertolin, A.; Bhadra, S.; Bloch, I.; Boos, E. G.; Brock, I.; Brook, N. H.; Brugnera, R.; Bruni, A.; Bussey, P. J.; Caldwell, A.; Capua, M.; Catterall, C. D.; Chwastowski, J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Corradi, M.; Dementiev, R. K.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Dusini, S.; Foster, B.; Gach, G.; Gallo, E.; Garfagnini, A.; Geiser, A.; Gizhko, A.; Gladilin, L. K.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Grzelak, G.; Guzik, M.; Gwenlan, C.; Hain, W.; Hlushchenko, O.; Hochman, D.; Hori, R.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Iga, Y.; Ishitsuka, M.; Januschek, F.; Jomhari, N. Z.; Kadenko, I.; Kananov, S.; Karshon, U.; Kaur, P.; Kisielewska, D.; Klanner, R.; Klein, U.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kotański, A.; Kötz, U.; Kovalchuk, N.; Kowalski, H.; Krupa, B.; Kuprash, O.; Kuze, M.; Levchenko, B. B.; Levy, A.; Limentani, S.; Lisovyi, M.; Lobodzinska, E.; Löhr, B.; Lohrmann, E.; Longhin, A.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Makarenko, I.; Malka, J.; Mastroberardino, A.; Mohamad Idris, F.; Mohammad Nasir, N.; Myronenko, V.; Nagano, K.; Nobe, T.; Nowak, R. J.; Onishchuk, Yu.; Paul, E.; Perlański, W.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Polini, A.; Przybycień, M.; Roloff, P.; Ruspa, M.; Saxon, D. H.; Schioppa, M.; Schneekloth, U.; Schörner-Sadenius, T.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Shevchenko, R.; Shkola, O.; Shyrma, Yu.; Singh, I.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Słomiński, W.; Solano, A.; Stanco, L.; Stefaniuk, N.; Stern, A.; Stopa, P.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Tassi, E.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomaszewska, J.; Tsurugai, T.; Turcato, M.; Turkot, O.; Tymieniecka, T.; Verbytskyi, A.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.; Wichmann, K.; Wing, M.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Zakharchuk, N.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Zawiejski, L.; Zenaiev, O.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Zotkin, D. S.; ZEUS Collaboration

    2016-05-01

    A simultaneous fit of parton distribution functions (PDFs) and electroweak parameters to HERA data on deep inelastic scattering is presented. The input data are the neutral current and charged current inclusive cross sections which were previously used in the QCD analysis leading to the HERAPDF2.0 PDFs. In addition, the polarization of the electron beam was taken into account for the ZEUS data recorded between 2004 and 2007. Results on the vector and axial-vector couplings of the Z boson to u - and d -type quarks, on the value of the electroweak mixing angle and the mass of the W boson are presented. The values obtained for the electroweak parameters are in agreement with Standard Model predictions.

  7. HERA: an atmospheric probe to unveil the depths of Saturn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousis, Olivier; Atkinson, David H.; Amato, Michael; Aslam, Shahid; Atreya, Sushil K.; Blanc, Michel; Bolton, Scott J.; Brugger, Bastien; Calcutt, Simon; Cavalié, Thibault; Charnoz, Sébastien; Coustenis, Athena; DELEUIL, Magali; Ferri, Francesca; Fletcher, Leigh N.; Guillot, Tristan; Hartogh, Paul; Holland, Andrew; Hueso, Ricardo; Keller, Christoph; Kessler, Ernst; Lebreton, Jean-Pierre; leese, Mark; Lellouch, Emmanuel; Levacher, Patrick; Marty, Bernard; Morse, Andrew; Nixon, Conor; Reh, Kim R.; Renard, Jean-Baptiste; Sanchez-Lavega, Agustin; Schmider, François-Xavier; Sheridan, Simon; Simon, Amy A.; Snik, Frans; Spilker, Thomas R.; Stam, Daphne M.; Venkatapathy, Ethiraj; Vernazza, Pierre; Waite, J. Hunter; Wurz, Peter

    2016-10-01

    The Hera Saturn entry probe mission is proposed as an M-class mission led by ESA with a significant collaboration with NASA. It consists of a Saturn atmospheric probe and a Carrier-Relay spacecraft. Hera will perform in situ measurements of the chemical and isotopic compositions as well as the dynamics of Saturn's atmosphere, with the goal of improving our understanding of the origin, formation, and evolution of Saturn, the giant planets and their satellite systems, with extrapolation to extrasolar planets.The primary science objectives will be addressed by an atmospheric entry probe that would descend under parachute and carry out in situ measurements beginning in the stratosphere to help characterize the location and properties of the tropopause, and continue into the troposphere to pressures of at least 10 bars. All of the science objectives, except for the abundance of oxygen, which may be only addressed indirectly via observations of species whose abundances are tied to the abundance of water, can be achieved by reaching 10 bars. As in previous highly successful collaborative efforts between ESA and NASA, the proposed mission has a baseline concept based on a NASA-provided carrier/data relay spacecraft that would deliver the ESA-provided atmospheric probe to the desired atmospheric entry point at Saturn. ESA's proposed contribution should fit well into the M5 Cosmic Vision ESA call cost envelope.A nominal mission configuration would consist of a probe that detaches from the carrier one to several months prior to probe entry. Subsequent to probe release, the carrier trajectory would be deflected to optimize the over-flight phasing of the probe descent location for both probe data relay as well as performing carrier approach and flyby science, and would allow multiple retransmissions of the probe data for redundancy. The Saturn atmospheric entry probe would in many respects resemble the Jupiter Galileo probe. It is anticipated that the probe architecture for

  8. Overcoming the challenges of BeiDou receiver implementation.

    PubMed

    Bhuiyan, Mohammad Zahidul H; Söderholm, Stefan; Thombre, Sarang; Ruotsalainen, Laura; Kuusniemi, Heidi

    2014-11-21

    Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS)-based positioning is experiencing rapid changes. The existing GPS and the GLONASS systems are being modernized to better serve the current challenging applications under harsh signal conditions. These modernizations include increasing the number of transmission frequencies and changes to the signal components. In addition, the Chinese BeiDou Navigation Satellite system (BDS) and the European Galileo are currently under development for global operation. Therefore, in view of these new upcoming systems the research and development of GNSS receivers has been experiencing a new upsurge. In this article, the authors discuss the main functionalities of a GNSS receiver in view of BDS. While describing the main functionalities of a software-defined BeiDou receiver, the authors also highlight the similarities and differences between the signal characteristics of the BeiDou B1 open service signal and the legacy GPS L1 C/A signal, as in general they both exhibit similar characteristics. In addition, the authors implement a novel acquisition technique for long coherent integration in the presence of NH code modulation in BeiDou D1 signal. Furthermore, a simple phase-preserved coherent integration based acquisition scheme is implemented for BeiDou GEO satellite acquisition. Apart from the above BeiDou-specific implementations, a novel Carrier-to-Noise-density ratio estimation technique is also implemented in the software receiver, which does not necessarily require bit synchronization prior to estimation. Finally, the authors present a BeiDou-only position fix with the implemented software-defined BeiDou receiver considering all three satellite constellations from BDS. In addition, a true multi-GNSS position fix with GPS and BDS systems is also presented while comparing their performances for a static stand-alone code phase-based positioning.

  9. Overcoming the Challenges of BeiDou Receiver Implementation

    PubMed Central

    Bhuiyan, Mohammad Zahidul H.; Söderholm, Stefan; Thombre, Sarang; Ruotsalainen, Laura; Kuusniemi, Heidi

    2014-01-01

    Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS)-based positioning is experiencing rapid changes. The existing GPS and the GLONASS systems are being modernized to better serve the current challenging applications under harsh signal conditions. These modernizations include increasing the number of transmission frequencies and changes to the signal components. In addition, the Chinese BeiDou Navigation Satellite system (BDS) and the European Galileo are currently under development for global operation. Therefore, in view of these new upcoming systems the research and development of GNSS receivers has been experiencing a new upsurge. In this article, the authors discuss the main functionalities of a GNSS receiver in view of BDS. While describing the main functionalities of a software-defined BeiDou receiver, the authors also highlight the similarities and differences between the signal characteristics of the BeiDou B1 open service signal and the legacy GPS L1 C/A signal, as in general they both exhibit similar characteristics. In addition, the authors implement a novel acquisition technique for long coherent integration in the presence of NH code modulation in BeiDou D1 signal. Furthermore, a simple phase-preserved coherent integration based acquisition scheme is implemented for BeiDou GEO satellite acquisition. Apart from the above BeiDou-specific implementations, a novel Carrier-to-Noise-density ratio estimation technique is also implemented in the software receiver, which does not necessarily require bit synchronization prior to estimation. Finally, the authors present a BeiDou-only position fix with the implemented software-defined BeiDou receiver considering all three satellite constellations from BDS. In addition, a true multi-GNSS position fix with GPS and BDS systems is also presented while comparing their performances for a static stand-alone code phase-based positioning. PMID:25421735

  10. News from the proton - recent DIS results from HERA

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, K.

    1997-01-01

    Recent results from the two large general-purpose detectors H1 and ZEUS at HERA (DESY, Hamburg, Germany) are presented. Emphasis is given to the analysis of deep inelastic scattering defined by the observation of the scattered electron or positron in the main calorimeters. Results on purely inclusive cross sections lead to a determination of the charged (quarks) parton distribution F{sub 2}(x, Q{sup 2}). Access to the electrically neutral parton content (gluons) is obtained indirectly by an analysis of the expected scaling violation behavior of F{sub 2} or directly from multijet rates originating from well-defined initial parton configurations. Finally, the recently uncovered subclass of large rapidity gap (LRG) events has been analyzed in terms of F{sub 2}. The result supports the concept of a color neutral object (Pomeron IP) being probed by a hard scattering electron. Evidence for factorization of the Pomeron radiation process as well as for scaling in the inclusive IP structure functions has been found.

  11. The Hera mission: multiple near-earth asteroid sample return

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sears, Derek; Allen, Carl; Britt, Dan; Brownlee, Don; Franzen, Melissa; Gefert, Leon; Gorovan, Stephen; Pieters, Carle; Preble, Jeffrey; Scheeres, Dan; Scott, Ed

    2004-01-01

    The NEAR mission was a spectacular rehearsal for one of the most exciting and scientifically rewarding missions of the next decade, sample return from near-Earth asteroids. A unique source of information about the early solar system, the formation of the planets, and the connection between stars and our Sun, are meteorites and asteroids. Yet, studies of both are hindered by a lack of unequivocal and detailed information linking the two. Meteorites are rock samples of unknown provenance. We have no information about the geological context of their source. They are also highly non-representative sampling of primitive solar system material because the terrestrial meteorite population is dominated by the ejecta of stochastic impacts and because the atmosphere filters out all but the toughest rocks. Without sample return, asteroids are not amenable to the depth and breadth of techniques available in the laboratory, yet the NEAR images indicate that there are many processes occurring on asteroids - or that could have occurred in the past - that we must understand if the meteorite data are ever to yield a clear image of early solar system processes. Technical developments of the last few years and the discovery of large numbers of NEAs mean that sample return is now within small mission capability. A team of about 20 scientists and engineers from all relevant subject fields are now assembling a mission called Hera. This paper reviews the mission as of fall 2002.

  12. Real W and Z bosons production at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nobe, Takuya

    2014-04-01

    The production of real W and Z bosons has been studied in ep collisions at HERA. A combined analysis is performed with the data taken with the H1 and ZEUS detectors corresponding to 0.98 fb-1 of integrated luminosity to search for events containing an isolated electron or muon and missing transverse momentum, which is dominated by single W production. The total single W boson production cross section is measured as 1.06 ± 0.16(stat.) ± 0.07(sys.) pb, in agreement with the Standard Model (SM) expectation of 1.26 ± 0.19 pb. The production of Z bosons has been studied in the reaction ep → eZp(∗), where p(∗) stands for a proton or a low-mass nucleon resonance, using a data sample collected with the ZEUS detector amounting to 0.5 fb-1. The Z is measured in the hadronic decay mode. The cross section of the reaction ep → eZp(∗) is measured to be 0.13 ± 0.06(stat.) ± 0.01(syst.) pb, in agreement with the SM prediction of 0.16 pb.

  13. The HERA-B ring imaging Cherenkov counter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ariño, I.; Bastos, J.; Broemmelsiek, D.; Carvalho, J.; Chmeissani, M.; Conde, P.; Davila, J.; Dujmić, D.; Eckmann, R.; Garrido, L.; Gascon, D.; Hamacher, T.; Gorišek, A.; Ivaniouchenkov, I.; Ispirian, M.; Karabekian, S.; Kim, M.; Korpar, S.; Križan, P.; Kupper, S.; Lau, K.; Maas, P.; McGill, J.; Miquel, R.; Murthy, N.; Peralta, D.; Pestotnik, R.; Pyrlik, J.; Ramachandran, S.; Reeves, K.; Rosen, J.; Schmidt-Parzefall, W.; Schwarz, A.; Schwitters, R. F.; Siero, X.; Starič, M.; Stanovnik, A.; Škrk, D.; Živko, T.

    2004-01-01

    The HERA-B RICH uses a radiation path length of 2.8 m in C 4F 10 gas and a large 24 m2 spherical mirror for imaging Cherenkov rings. The photon detector consists of 2240 Hamamatsu multi-anode photomultipliers with about 27 000 channels. A 2:1 reducing two-lens telescope in front of each photomultiplier tube increases the sensitive area at the expense of increased pixel size, resulting in a contribution to the resolution which roughly matches that of dispersion. The counter was completed in January of 1999, and its performance has been steady and reliable over the years it has been in operation. The design performance of the Ring Imaging Cherenkov counter was fully reached: the average number of detected photons in the RICH for a β=1 particle was found to be 33 with a single-hit resolution of 0.7 and 1 mrad in the fine and coarse granularity regions, respectively.

  14. Bose-Einstein Fermi-Dirac Correlations at Lep and Hera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aracena, I.

    2005-04-01

    Bose-Einstein (BEC) and Fermi-Dirac Correlations (FDC) have been studied in hadronic decays from data collected by the LEP and HERA collaborations. Multidimensional analyses of BEC in charged pion pairs have been published by the LEP experiments and the ZEUS experiment at HERA, all showing an elongated shape of the pion emission region. In fully hadronic WW decays at LEP2 energies, BEC between pions stemming from different Ws (inter-W BEC) cannot be excluded a priori. Recent results of inter-W BEC analyses by the LEP collaborations are given.

  15. First experience and results from the HERA-/B vertex detector system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, C.; Baumann, I.; Bräuer, M.; Eberle, M.; Fallot-Burghardt, W.; Grigoriev, E.; Hofmann, W.; Hüpper, A.; Klefenz, F.; Knöpfle, K. T.; Leffers, G.; Perschke, T.; Rieling, J.; Schmelling, M.; Schwingenheuer, B.; Sexauer, E.; Seybold, L.; Spengler, J.; StDenis, R.; Trunk, U.; Wanke, R.; Abt, I.; Fox, H.; Moshous, B.; Riechmann, K.; Rietz, M.; Ruebsam, R.; Wagner, W.

    1998-11-01

    The HERA- B collaboration is building a detector to realize the ambitious goal of observing CP violation in decays of neutral B-mesons. A central element of the apparatus is the silicon vertex detector used to selectively trigger on these decays in a high charged particle multiplicity background environment and to reconstruct secondary vertices from such decays with high precision. The vertex detector, the supporting infrastructure and first results using prototype detectors are described. Results include imaging of the proton interaction region on the HERA- B target, hit distributions in the detector planes, and alignment of the detectors with each other and the target.

  16. Measurement of D*± production in deep inelastic scattering at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramowicz, H.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.; Adamus, M.; Aggarwal, R.; Antonelli, S.; Antonioli, P.; Antonov, A.; Arneodo, M.; Arslan, O.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Bachynska, O.; Bamberger, A.; Barakbaev, A. N.; Barbagli, G.; Bari, G.; Barreiro, F.; Bartosik, N.; Bartsch, D.; Basile, M.; Behnke, O.; Behr, J.; Behrens, U.; Bellagamba, L.; Bertolin, A.; Bhadra, S.; Bindi, M.; Blohm, C.; Bokhonov, V.; Bold, T.; Boos, E. G.; Borras, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bot, D.; Brock, I.; Brownson, E.; Brugnera, R.; Brümmer, N.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Brzozowska, B.; Bussey, P. J.; Bylsma, B.; Caldwell, A.; Capua, M.; Carlin, R.; Catterall, C. D.; Chekanov, S.; Chwastowski, J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Contin, A.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Coppola, N.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Costa, M.; D'Agostini, G.; Dal Corso, F.; del Peso, J.; Dementiev, R. K.; De Pasquale, S.; Derrick, M.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Dobur, D.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Dolinska, G.; Doyle, A. T.; Drugakov, V.; Durkin, L. S.; Dusini, S.; Eisenberg, Y.; Ermolov, P. F.; Eskreys, A.; Fang, S.; Fazio, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrero, M. I.; Figiel, J.; Foster, B.; Gach, G.; Galas, A.; Gallo, E.; Garfagnini, A.; Geiser, A.; Gialas, I.; Gizhko, A.; Gladilin, L. K.; Gladkov, D.; Glasman, C.; Gogota, O.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Göttlicher, P.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Grebenyuk, J.; Gregor, I.; Grigorescu, G.; Grzelak, G.; Gueta, O.; Guzik, M.; Gwenlan, C.; Haas, T.; Hain, W.; Hamatsu, R.; Hart, J. C.; Hartmann, H.; Hartner, G.; Hilger, E.; Hochman, D.; Hori, R.; Hüttmann, A.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Iga, Y.; Ingbir, R.; Ishitsuka, M.; Iudin, A.; Jakob, H.-P.; Januschek, F.; Jones, T. W.; Jüngst, M.; Kadenko, I.; Kahle, B.; Kananov, S.; Kanno, T.; Karshon, U.; Karstens, F.; Katkov, I. I.; Kaur, M.; Kaur, P.; Keramidas, A.; Khein, L. A.; Kim, J. Y.; Kisielewska, D.; Kitamura, S.; Klanner, R.; Klein, U.; Koffeman, E.; Kondrashova, N.; Kononenko, O.; Kooijman, P.; Korol, Ie.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kotanski, A.; Kötz, U.; Kovalchuk, N.; Kowalski, H.; Kuprash, O.; Kuze, M.; Lee, A.; Levchenko, B. B.; Levy, A.; Libov, V.; Limentani, S.; Ling, T. Y.; Lisovyi, M.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lohmann, W.; Löhr, B.; Lohrmann, E.; Long, K. R.; Longhin, A.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Maeda, J.; Magill, S.; Makarenko, I.; Malka, J.; Mankel, R.; Margotti, A.; Marini, G.; Martin, J. F.; Mastroberardino, A.; Mattingly, M. C. K.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Mergelmeyer, S.; Miglioranzi, S.; Mohamad Idris, F.; Monaco, V.; Montanari, A.; Morris, J. D.; Mujkic, K.; Musgrave, B.; Nagano, K.; Namsoo, T.; Nania, R.; Nigro, A.; Ning, Y.; Nobe, T.; Notz, D.; Nowak, R. J.; Nuncio-Quiroz, A. E.; Oh, B. Y.; Okazaki, N.; Olkiewicz, K.; Onishchuk, Yu.; Papageorgiu, K.; Parenti, A.; Paul, E.; Pawlak, J. M.; Pawlik, B.; Pelfer, P. G.; Pellegrino, A.; Perlanski, W.; Perrey, H.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Plucinski, P.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Polini, A.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Przybycien, M.; Raval, A.; Reeder, D. D.; Reisert, B.; Ren, Z.; Repond, J.; Ri, Y. D.; Robertson, A.; Roloff, P.; Rubinsky, I.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Samson, U.; Sartorelli, G.; Savin, A. A.; Saxon, D. H.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenstedt, S.; Schleper, P.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schneekloth, U.; Schönberg, V.; Schörner-Sadenius, T.; Schwartz, J.; Sciulli, F.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Shehzadi, R.; Shimizu, S.; Singh, I.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Slominski, W.; Smith, W. H.; Sola, V.; Solano, A.; Son, D.; Sosnovtsev, V.; Spiridonov, A.; Stadie, H.; Stanco, L.; Stefaniuk, N.; Stern, A.; Stewart, T. P.; Stifutkin, A.; Stopa, P.; Suchkov, S.; Susinno, G.; Suszycki, L.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Szuba, D.; Szuba, J.; Tapper, A. D.; Tassi, E.; Terrón, J.; Theedt, T.; Tiecke, H.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomaszewska, J.; Trofymov, A.; Trusov, V.; Tsurugai, T.; Turcato, M.; Turkot, O.; Tymieniecka, T.; Vázquez, M.; Verbytskyi, A.; Viazlo, O.; Vlasov, N. N.; Walczak, R.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.; Whitmore, J. J.; Wichmann, K.; Wiggers, L.; Wing, M.; Wlasenko, M.; Wolf, G.; Wolfe, H.; Wrona, K.; Yagües-Molina, A. G.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yoshida, R.; Youngman, C.; Zakharchuk, N.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Zawiejski, L.; Zenaiev, O.; Zeuner, W.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Zhmak, N.; Zichichi, A.; Zolkapli, Z.; Zotkin, D. S.

    2013-05-01

    The production of D *± mesons in deep inelastic ep scattering has been measured for exchanged photon virtualities 5 < Q 2 < 1000 GeV2, using an integrated luminosity of 363 pb-1 with the ZEUS detector at HERA. Differential cross sections have been measured and compared to next-to-leading-order QCD calculations. The cross-sections are used to extract the charm contribution to the proton structure functions, expressed in terms of the reduced charm cross section, σ_{red}^{{coverline{c}}} . Theoretical calculations based on fits to inclusive HERA data are compared to the results.

  17. Precise Point Positioning with the BeiDou Navigation Satellite System

    PubMed Central

    Li, Min; Qu, Lizhong; Zhao, Qile; Guo, Jing; Su, Xing; Li, Xiaotao

    2014-01-01

    By the end of 2012, China had launched 16 BeiDou-2 navigation satellites that include six GEOs, five IGSOs and five MEOs. This has provided initial navigation and precise pointing services ability in the Asia-Pacific regions. In order to assess the navigation and positioning performance of the BeiDou-2 system, Wuhan University has built up a network of BeiDou Experimental Tracking Stations (BETS) around the World. The Position and Navigation Data Analyst (PANDA) software was modified to determine the orbits of BeiDou satellites and provide precise orbit and satellite clock bias products from the BeiDou satellite system for user applications. This article uses the BeiDou/GPS observations of the BeiDou Experimental Tracking Stations to realize the BeiDou and BeiDou/GPS static and kinematic precise point positioning (PPP). The result indicates that the precision of BeiDou static and kinematic PPP reaches centimeter level. The precision of BeiDou/GPS kinematic PPP solutions is improved significantly compared to that of BeiDou-only or GPS-only kinematic PPP solutions. The PPP convergence time also decreases with the use of combined BeiDou/GPS systems. PMID:24406856

  18. Precise point positioning with the BeiDou navigation satellite system.

    PubMed

    Li, Min; Qu, Lizhong; Zhao, Qile; Guo, Jing; Su, Xing; Li, Xiaotao

    2014-01-08

    By the end of 2012, China had launched 16 BeiDou-2 navigation satellites that include six GEOs, five IGSOs and five MEOs. This has provided initial navigation and precise pointing services ability in the Asia-Pacific regions. In order to assess the navigation and positioning performance of the BeiDou-2 system, Wuhan University has built up a network of BeiDou Experimental Tracking Stations (BETS) around the World. The Position and Navigation Data Analyst (PANDA) software was modified to determine the orbits of BeiDou satellites and provide precise orbit and satellite clock bias products from the BeiDou satellite system for user applications. This article uses the BeiDou/GPS observations of the BeiDou Experimental Tracking Stations to realize the BeiDou and BeiDou/GPS static and kinematic precise point positioning (PPP). The result indicates that the precision of BeiDou static and kinematic PPP reaches centimeter level. The precision of BeiDou/GPS kinematic PPP solutions is improved significantly compared to that of BeiDou-only or GPS-only kinematic PPP solutions. The PPP convergence time also decreases with the use of combined BeiDou/GPS systems.

  19. Leading neutron production in e+p collisions at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chekanov, S.; Krakauer, D.; Magill, S.; Musgrave, B.; Pellegrino, A.; Repond, J.; Yoshida, R.; Mattingly, M. C. K.; Antonioli, P.; Bari, G.; Basile, M.; Bellagamba, L.; Boscherini, D.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Cara Romeo, G.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Contin, A.; Corradi, M.; De Pasquale, S.; Giusti, P.; Iacobucci, G.; Levi, G.; Margotti, A.; Nania, R.; Palmonari, F.; Pesci, A.; Sartorelli, G.; Zichichi, A.; Aghuzumtsyan, G.; Bartsch, D.; Brock, I.; Crittenden, J.; Goers, S.; Hartmann, H.; Hilger, E.; Irrgang, P.; Jakob, H.-P.; Kappes, A.; Katz, U. F.; Kerger, R.; Kind, O.; Paul, E.; Rautenberg, J.; Renner, R.; Schnurbusch, H.; Stifutkin, A.; Tandler, J.; Voss, K. C.; Weber, A.; Bailey, D. S.; Brook, N. H.; Cole, J. E.; Foster, B.; Heath, G. P.; Heath, H. F.; Robins, S.; Rodrigues, E.; Scott, J.; Tapper, R. J.; Wing, M.; Capua, M.; Mastroberardino, A.; Schioppa, M.; Susinno, G.; Kim, J. Y.; Kim, Y. K.; Lee, J. H.; Lim, I. T.; Pac, M. Y.; Caldwell, A.; Helbich, M.; Liu, X.; Mellado, B.; Paganis, S.; Schmidke, W. B.; Sciulli, F.; Chwastowski, J.; Eskreys, A.; Figiel, J.; Olkiewicz, K.; Przybycień, M. B.; Stopa, P.; Zawiejski, L.; Bednarek, B.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Jeleń, K.; Kisielewska, D.; Kowal, A. M.; Kowal, M.; Kowalski, T.; Mindur, B.; Przybycień, M.; Rulikowska-Zarȩbska, E.; Suszycki, L.; Szuba, D.; Szuba, J.; Kotański, A.; Słomiński, W.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Behrens, U.; Borras, K.; Chiochia, V.; Dannheim, D.; Derrick, M.; Drews, G.; Fourletova, J.; Fox-Murphy, A.; Fricke, U.; Geiser, A.; Goebel, F.; Göttlicher, P.; Gutsche, O.; Haas, T.; Hain, W.; Hartner, G. F.; Hillert, S.; Kötz, U.; Kowalski, H.; Labes, H.; Lelas, D.; Löhr, B.; Mankel, R.; Martínez, M.; Moritz, M.; Notz, D.; Pellmann, I.-A.; Petrucci, M. C.; Polini, A.; Schneekloth, U.; Selonke, F.; Surrow, B.; Wessoleck, H.; Wichmann, R.; Wolf, G.; Youngman, C.; Zeuner, W.; Lopez-Duran Viani, A.; Meyer, A.; Schlenstedt, S.; Barbagli, G.; Gallo, E.; Genta, C.; Pelfer, P. G.; Bamberger, A.; Benen, A.; Coppola, N.; Markun, P.; Raach, H.; Wölfle, S.; Bell, M.; Bussey, P. J.; Doyle, A. T.; Glasman, C.; Hanlon, S.; Lee, S. W.; Lupi, A.; McCance, G. J.; Saxon, D. H.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Gialas, I.; Bodmann, B.; Carli, T.; Holm, U.; Klimek, K.; Krumnack, N.; Lohrmann, E.; Milite, M.; Salehi, H.; Stonjek, S.; Wick, K.; Ziegler, A.; Ziegler, Ar; Collins-Tooth, C.; Foudas, C.; Gonçalo, R.; Long, K. R.; Metlica, F.; Miller, D. B.; Tapper, A. D.; Walker, R.; Cloth, P.; Filges, D.; Kuze, M.; Nagano, K.; Tokushuku, K.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Barakbaev, A. N.; Boos, E. G.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Lim, H.; Son, D.; Barreiro, F.; González, O.; Labarga, L.; del Peso, J.; Redondo, I.; Terrón, J.; Vázquez, M.; Barbi, M.; Bertolin, A.; Corriveau, F.; Ochs, A.; Padhi, S.; Stairs, D. G.; St-Laurent, M.; Tsurugai, T.; Antonov, A.; Bashkirov, V.; Danilov, P.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Gladkov, D.; Sosnovtsev, V.; Suchkov, S.; Dementiev, R. K.; Ermolov, P. F.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Katkov, I. I.; Khein, L. A.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Levchenko, B. B.; Lukina, O. Yu; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Vlasov, N. N.; Zotkin, S. A.; Bokel, C.; Engelen, J.; Grijpink, S.; Koffeman, E.; Kooijman, P.; Maddox, E.; Schagen, S.; Tassi, E.; Tiecke, H.; Tuning, N.; Velthuis, J. J.; Wiggers, L.; de Wolf, E.; Brümmer, N.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Gilmore, J.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Kim, C. L.; Ling, T. Y.; Boogert, S.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Ferrando, J.; Grzelak, G.; Matsushita, T.; Rigby, M.; Ruske, O.; Sutton, M. R.; Walczak, R.; Brugnera, R.; Carlin, R.; Dal Corso, F.; Dusini, S.; Garfagnini, A.; Limentani, S.; Longhin, A.; Parenti, A.; Posocco, M.; Stanco, L.; Turcato, M.; Adamczyk, L.; Heaphy, E. A.; Oh, B. Y.; Saull, P. R. B.; Whitmore, J. J.; Iga, Y.; D'Agostini, G.; Marini, G.; Nigro, A.; Cormack, C.; Hart, J. C.; McCubbin, N. A.; Heusch, C.; Park, I. H.; Pavel, N.; Abramowicz, H.; Dagan, S.; Gabareen, A.; Kananov, S.; Kreisel, A.; Levy, A.; Abe, T.; Fusayasu, T.; Kohno, T.; Umemori, K.; Yamashita, T.; Hamatsu, R.; Hirose, T.; Inuzuka, M.; Kitamura, S.; Matsuzawa, K.; Nishimura, T.; Arneodo, M.; Cartiglia, N.; Cirio, R.; Costa, M.; Ferrero, M. I.; Maselli, S.; Monaco, V.; Peroni, C.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Solano, A.; Staiano, A.; Fagerstroem, C.-P.; Galea, R.; Koop, T.; Martin, J. F.; Mirea, A.; Sabetfakhri, A.; Butterworth, J. M.; Gwenlan, C.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Jones, T. W.; Lane, J. B.; Lightwood, M. S.; Loizides, J. H.; West, B. J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Nowak, R. J.; Pawlak, J. M.; Smalska, B.; Sztuk, J.; Tymieniecka, T.; Ukleja, A.; Ukleja, J.; Zakrzewski, J. A.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Adamus, M.; Plucinski, P.; Eisenberg, Y.; Gladilin, L. K.; Hochman, D.; Karshon, U.; Kçira, D.; Lammers, S.; Li, L.; Reeder, D. D.; Savin, A. A.; Smith, W. H.; Deshpande, A.; Dhawan, S.; Hughes, V. W.; Straub, P. B.; Bhadra, S.; Catterall, C. D.; Fourletov, S.; Khakzad, M.; Menary, S.; Soares, M.; Standage, J.; ZEUS Collaboration

    2002-08-01

    The production of neutrons carrying at least 20% of the proton beam energy ( x L> 0.2 ) in e+p collisions has been studied with the ZEUS detector at HERA for a wide range of Q2, the photon virtuality, from photoproduction to deep inelastic scattering. The neutron-tagged cross section, ep→ e' Xn, is measured relative to the inclusive cross section, ep→ e' X, thereby reducing the systematic uncertainties. For xL> 0.3, the rate of neutrons in photoproduction is about half of that measured in hadroproduction, which constitutes a clear breaking of factorisation. There is about a 20% rise in the neutron rate between photoproduction and deep inelastic scattering, which may be attributed to absorptive rescattering in the γp system. For 0.64< xL<0.82, the rate of neutrons is almost independent of the Bjorken scaling variable x and Q2. However, at lower and higher xL values, there is a clear but weak dependence on these variables, thus demonstrating the breaking of limiting fragmentation. The neutron-tagged structure function, FLN(3)2( x, Q2, xL), rises at low values of x in a way similar to that of the inclusive F2( x, Q2) of the proton. The total γπ cross section and the structure function of the pion, Fπ2( xπ, Q2) where xπ= x/(1- xL), have been determined using a one-pion-exchange model, up to uncertainties in the normalisation due to the poorly understood pion flux. At fixed Q2, Fπ2 has approximately the same x dependence as F2 of the proton.

  20. Short-range and long-range correlations in DIS at HERA.

    SciTech Connect

    Chekanov, S. V.; Zawiejski, L.

    1999-09-23

    Correlations in deep-inelastic scattering (DIS) at HERA are investigated in order to test perturbative QCD and quark fragmentation universality. Two-particle correlations at small angular separations are measured in the Breit frame and compared to e{sup +}e{sup -} collisions. Also presented are the correlations between the current and target regions of the Breit frame.

  1. Instantaneous BeiDou-GPS attitude determination: A performance analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadarajah, Nandakumaran; Teunissen, Peter J. G.; Raziq, Noor

    2014-09-01

    The advent of modernized and new global navigation satellite systems (GNSS) has enhanced the availability of satellite based positioning, navigation, and timing (PNT) solutions. Specifically, it increases redundancy and yields operational back-up or independence in case of failure or unavailability of one system. Among existing GNSS, the Chinese BeiDou system (BDS) is being developed and will consist of geostationary (GEO) satellites, inclined geosynchronous orbit (IGSO) satellites, and medium-Earth-orbit (MEO) satellites. In this contribution, a BeiDou-GPS robustness analysis is carried out for instantaneous, unaided attitude determination. Precise attitude determination using multiple GNSS antennas mounted on a platform relies on the successful resolution of the integer carrier phase ambiguities. The constrained Least-squares AMBiguity Decorrelation Adjustment (C-LAMBDA) method has been developed for the quadratically constrained GNSS compass model that incorporates the known baseline length. In this contribution the method is used to analyse the attitude determination performance when using the GPS and BeiDou systems. The attitude determination performance is evaluated using GPS/BeiDou data sets from a real data campaign in Australia spanning several days. The study includes the performance analyses of both stand-alone and mixed constellation (GPS/BeiDou) attitude estimation under various satellite deprived environments. We demonstrate and quantify the improved availability and accuracy of attitude determination using the combined constellation.

  2. Working Group I: Parton distributions: Summary report for the HERA LHC Workshop Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Dittmar, M.; Forte, S.; Glazov, A.; Moch, S.; Alekhin, S.; Altarelli, G.; Andersen, Jeppe R.; Ball, R.D.; Blumlein, J.; Bottcher, H.; Carli, T.; Ciafaloni, M.; Colferai, D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A.; Corcella, G.; Del Debbio, L.; Dissertori, G.; Feltesse, J.; Guffanti, A.; Gwenlan, C.; Huston, J.; /Zurich, ETH /DESY, Zeuthen /Serpukhov, IHEP /CERN /Rome III U. /INFN, Rome3 /Cambridge U. /Edinburgh U. /Florence U. /INFN, Florence /Oxford U. /DSM, DAPNIA, Saclay /Michigan State U. /Uppsala U. /Barcelona U., ECM /Podgorica U. /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Harish-Chandra Res. Inst. /Fermilab /Hamburg U., Inst. Theor. Phys. II

    2005-11-01

    We provide an assessment of the impact of parton distributions on the determination of LHC processes, and of the accuracy with which parton distributions (PDFs) can be extracted from data, in particular from current and forthcoming HERA experiments. We give an overview of reference LHC processes and their associated PDF uncertainties, and study in detail W and Z production at the LHC.We discuss the precision which may be obtained from the analysis of existing HERA data, tests of consistency of HERA data from different experiments, and the combination of these data. We determine further improvements on PDFs which may be obtained from future HERA data (including measurements of F{sub L}), and from combining present and future HERA data with present and future hadron collider data. We review the current status of knowledge of higher (NNLO) QCD corrections to perturbative evolution and deep-inelastic scattering, and provide reference results for their impact on parton evolution, and we briefly examine non-perturbative models for parton distributions. We discuss the state-of-the art in global parton fits, we assess the impact on them of various kinds of data and of theoretical corrections, by providing benchmarks of Alekhin and MRST parton distributions and a CTEQ analysis of parton fit stability, and we briefly presents proposals for alternative approaches to parton fitting. We summarize the status of large and small x resummation, by providing estimates of the impact of large x resummation on parton fits, and a comparison of different approaches to small x resummation, for which we also discuss numerical techniques.

  3. Development and Evaluation of the Biogenic Emissions Inventory System (BEIS) Model v3.6

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have developed new canopy emission algorithms and land use data for BEIS v3.6. Simulations with BEIS v3.4 and BEIS v3.6 in CMAQ v5.0.2 are compared these changes to the Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature (MEGAN) and evaluated the simulations against observati...

  4. Teaching Pablo Neruda and Bei Dao: The Lens of Leaving.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lichtenstein, Amanda Leigh

    2003-01-01

    Explains how the author invites young poets to tromp through the landscape of their minds in search of all things broken by using two of her favorite poems: Pablo Neruda's "Ode to Broken Things" and Bei Dao's "Comet." Outlines how the students write their own poems dealing with loss. Notes that for poets, a heap of broken images becomes an immense…

  5. BeiDou Time Transfer With the Standard CGGTTS.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei; Defraigne, Pascale

    2016-07-01

    The R2CGGTTS software tool developed at the Royal Observatory of Belgium (ROB) to provide clock solutions in the standard Common GNSS Generic Time Transfer Standard (CGGTTS) has been extended to BeiDou Navigation Satellite System (BDS). The BDS includes satellites in three different orbits: 1) Medium Earth Orbit (MEO); 2) Inclined Geosynchronous Satellite Orbit (IGSO); and 3) Geostationary Earth Orbit (GEO). This paper presents first results obtained with this upgraded software, and a comparison between common view (CV) time transfer solutions obtained with either BDS, or GPS or Galileo. These preliminary results indicate that the BeiDou MEO satellites give time transfer results with a higher noise than the GPS results. This additional noise is shown to be due to some elevation-dependent delay in the BDS code measurements. Some biases were furthermore pointed out between the CV results obtained with the different BeiDou MEO satellites when the receivers used in the two stations are of different make. These biases may reach some nanoseconds, and find most probably their origin in the receiver hardware or firmware. It is shown additionally that using the BeiDou IGSO satellites and the GEO satellites, although increasing the number of observations, especially in the Asia-Pacific region, introduces a significant time transfer noise in the CV results.

  6. Extended study of prompt photon photoproduction at HERA with kT-factorization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipatov, A. V.; Malyshev, M. A.; Zotov, N. P.

    2013-10-01

    We reconsider prompt photon photoproduction at HERA in the framework of the kT-factorization QCD approach. The proposed method is based on the O(α2αs) amplitudes for γq→γgq and γg*→γqq¯ partonic subprocesses. Additionally, we take into account the O(α2αs2) box contributions γg→γg to the production cross sections. The unintegrated (or transverse momentum dependent) parton densities in the proton are determined using the Kimber-Martin-Ryskin prescription. Our consideration covers both inclusive and jet associated prompt photon photoproduction rates. We find that our numerical predictions agree well with the recent data taken by H1 and ZEUS Collaborations at HERA. We demonstrate that the box contributions are sizable and amount to up to ˜15% of the calculated total cross section.

  7. Review of searches for rare processes and physics beyond the Standard Model at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    South, David M.; Turcato, Monica

    2016-06-01

    The electron-proton collisions collected by the H1 and ZEUS experiments at HERA comprise a unique particle physics data set, and a comprehensive range of measurements has been performed to provide new insight into the structure of the proton. The high centre of mass energy at HERA has also allowed rare processes to be studied, including the production of W and Z0 bosons and events with multiple leptons in the final state. The data have also opened up a new domain to searches for physics beyond the Standard Model including contact interactions, leptoquarks, excited fermions and a number of supersymmetric models. This review presents a summary of such results, where the analyses reported correspond to an integrated luminosity of up to 1 fb^{-1}, representing the complete data set recorded by the H1 and ZEUS experiments.

  8. Human events reference for ATHEANA (HERA) database description and preliminary user`s manual

    SciTech Connect

    Auflick, J.L.; Hahn, H.A.; Pond, D.J.

    1998-05-27

    The Technique for Human Error Analysis (ATHEANA) is a newly developed human reliability analysis (HRA) methodology that aims to facilitate better representation and integration of human performance into probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) modeling and quantification by analyzing risk-significant operating experience in the context of existing behavioral science models. The fundamental premise of ATHEANA is that error-forcing contexts (EFCs), which refer to combinations of equipment/material conditions and performance shaping factors (PSFs), set up or create the conditions under which unsafe actions (UAs) can occur. Because ATHEANA relies heavily on the analysis of operational events that have already occurred as a mechanism for generating creative thinking about possible EFCs, a database, called the Human Events Reference for ATHEANA (HERA), has been developed to support the methodology. This report documents the initial development efforts for HERA.

  9. Human Events Reference for ATHEANA (HERA) Database Description and Preliminary User's Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Auflick, J.L.

    1999-08-12

    The Technique for Human Error Analysis (ATHEANA) is a newly developed human reliability analysis (HRA) methodology that aims to facilitate better representation and integration of human performance into probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) modeling and quantification by analyzing risk-significant operating experience in the context of existing behavioral science models. The fundamental premise of ATHEANA is that error forcing contexts (EFCs), which refer to combinations of equipment/material conditions and performance shaping factors (PSFs), set up or create the conditions under which unsafe actions (UAs) can occur. Because ATHEANA relies heavily on the analysis of operational events that have already occurred as a mechanism for generating creative thinking about possible EFCs, a database (db) of analytical operational events, called the Human Events Reference for ATHEANA (HERA), has been developed to support the methodology. This report documents the initial development efforts for HERA.

  10. Search for Pentaquarks in 920 GeV Proton-Nucleus Collisions at HERA-B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medinnis, M.

    2005-04-01

    HERA-B has searched in vain for evidence of the production of two recently reported states which have been identified as possible pentaquarks: the Θ+(1540), decaying into pKs0, and the Ξ3/2--, decaying into Ξ-π-. Upper limits on production cross sections at mid-rapidity and on ratios of the production cross sections to those of well-known resonances in 920 GeV proton-nucleus interactions are reported.

  11. Search for Pentaquarks in 920 GEV Proton-Nucleus Collisions with Hera-B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medinnis, M.

    2005-04-01

    HERA-B has searched in vain for evidence of the production of two recently reported states which have been identified as possible pentaquarks: the Θ+(1540), decaying into pKs0, and the Xi_{3/2}^{-}$, decaying into Ξ-π-. Upper limits on production cross sections at mid-rapidity and on ratios of the production cross sections to those of well-known resonances in 920 GeV proton-nucleus interactions are reported.

  12. Asymmetry distributions and mass effects in dijet events at a polarized HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maul, M.; Schäfer, A.; Mirkes, E.; Rädel, G.

    1998-09-01

    The asymmetry distributions for several kinematic variables are considered for finding a systematic way to maximize the signal for the extraction of the polarized gluon density. The relevance of mass effects for the corresponding dijet cross section is discussed and the different approximations for including mass effects are compared. We also compare via the programs Pepsi and Mepjet two different Monte Carlo (MC) approaches for simulating the expected signal in the dijet asymmetry at a polarized HERA.

  13. Rates for inclusive deep-inelastic electroproduction of charm quarks at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riemersma, S.; Smith, J.; van Neerven, W. L.

    1995-02-01

    The coefficient functions for heavy flavour production in deeply inelastic electron hadron scattering have been calculated previously. These functions are so long that no analytic expressions could be published. Therefore we have tabulated them as two-dimensional arrays as is often done for the scale dependent parton densities. Using this computer program we present event rates for charm production at HERA in bins of x and Q2. These rates are insensitive to variations in the factorization and renormalization scale μ.

  14. Prompt photon photoproduction at HERA with non-collinear parton dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Lipatov, A. V.; Zotov, N. P.

    2011-07-15

    We investigate the prompt photon photoproduction at HERA within the framework of the k{sub T}-factorization approach to QCD. Our consideration is based on the off-shell matrix elements for the underlying partonic subprocesses and the Kimber-Martin-Ryskin (KMR) unintegrated parton densities in the proton. We also use the Ciafaloni-Catani-Fiorani-Marchesini (CCFM) unintegrated gluon as well as valence and sea quark distributions.

  15. The Hera Entry Probe Mission to Saturn, an ESA M-class mission proposal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousis, O.; Atkinson, D. H.; Spilker, T.; Venkatapathy, E.; Poncy, J.; Coustenis, A.; Reh, K.

    2015-10-01

    A fundamental goal of solar system exploration is to understand the origin of the solar system, the initial stages, conditions, and processes by which the solar system formed, how the formation process was initiated, and the nature of the interstellar seed material from which the solar system was born. Key to understanding solar system formation and subsequent dynamical and chemical evolution is the origin and evolution of the giant planets and their atmospheres. Additionally, the atmospheres of the giant planets serve as laboratories to better understand the atmospheric chemistries, dynamics, processes, and climates on all planets in the solar system including Earth, offer a context and provide a ground truth for exoplanets and exoplanetary systems,and have long been thought to play a critical role in the development of potentially habitable planetary systems. Remote sensing observations are limited when used to study the bulk atmospheric composition of the giant planets of our solar system. A remarkable example of the value of in situ probe measurements is illustrated by the exploration of Jupiter, where key measurements such as noble gases abundances and the precise measurement of the helium mixing ratio have only been made available through in situ measurements by the Galileo probe. Representing the only method providing ground-truth to connect the remote sensing inferences with physical reality, in situ measurements have only been accomplished twice in the history of outer solar system exploration, via the Galileo probe for Jupiter and the Huygens probe for Titan. In situ measurements provide access to atmospheric regions that are beyond the reach of remote sensing, enabling the dynamical, chemical and aerosol-forming processes at work from the thermosphere to the troposphere below the cloud decks to be studied. A proposal for a Saturn entry probe mission named Hera was recently submitted to the European Space Agency Medium Class mission announcement of

  16. Epigenetische Aspekte bei Karzinomen der Kopf-Hals-Region

    PubMed Central

    Schmezer, Peter; Plass, Christoph

    2009-01-01

    Zusammenfassung Plattenepithelkarzinome der Kopf-Hals-Region (HNSCC) zählen seit Jahren zu den weltweit häufigsten Krebsarten. Trotz vieler Bemühungen hat sich das 5-Jahres-Überleben bei Patienten mit HNSCC kaum verbessert. Um einen Fortschritt zu erzielen, ist es notwendig, die der Erkrankung zugrunde liegenden biologischen Prozesse besser zu verstehen. Neben den bekannten genetischen Veränderungen haben molekular-zytogenetische Untersuchungen bei HNSCC gezeigt, dass es weitere Veränderungen gibt, die mit Vermehrung und Verlust chromosomaler Bereiche einhergehen, für die jedoch die krankheitsverursachenden Gene bisher nicht identifiziert wurden. Darüberhinaus haben jüngste Forschungsergebnisse verdeutlicht, dass epigenetische Modifikationen wie die DNA Methylierung eine wichtige Rolle spielen. So konnte gezeigt werden, dass bei HNSCC eine Reihe von Genen (z.B. das Tumorsuppressorgen CDKN2A sowie DAPK1, MGMT, TIMP3, TCF21, und C/EBPα) hypermethylierte Bereiche in regulatorischen DNA Sequenzen aufweisen, wodurch ihre Expression verringert oder unterbunden wird. Die Hypermethylierung solcher Gene könnte als Biomarker zur Früherkennung von HNSCC genutzt werden und nicht zuletzt dadurch zur Verbesserung von Prävention und Therapieerfolg beitragen. PMID:18483718

  17. Deep Inelastic Scattering results from the first year of HERA operation

    SciTech Connect

    Magill, S.R.

    1993-12-31

    The first year of operation of the HERA electron-proton collider has resulted in Deep Inelastic Scattering (DIS) Physics results from both the H1 and ZEUS experiments. Reported here are the H1 and ZEUS measurements of the proton structure function F{sub 2} at higher Q{sup 2} and lower x than previously reported from fixed target experiments. Also included are the results of QCD studies on hadronic final states and jets, and the observation of high Q{sup 2} charged current events from both experiments. Finally, the observation of events with large rapidity gaps by the ZEUS collaboration is also reported.

  18. Hera - an ESA M-class Saturn Entry Probe Mission Proposal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkinson, D. H.; Mousis, O.; Spilker, T. R.; Venkatapathy, E.; Poncy, J.; Coustenis, A.; Reh, K. R.

    2015-12-01

    A fundamental goal of solar system exploration is to understand the origin of the solar system, the initial stages, conditions, and processes by which the solar system formed, how the formation process was initiated, and the nature of the interstellar seed material from which the solar system was born. Key to understanding solar system formation and subsequent dynamical and chemical evolution is the origin and evolution of the giant planets and their atmospheres. Additionally, the atmospheres of the giant planets serve as laboratories to better understand the atmospheric chemistries, dynamics, processes, and climates on all planets in the solar system including Earth, offer a context and provide a ground truth for exoplanets and exoplanetary systems, and have long been thought to play a critical role in the development of potentially habitable planetary systems. Remote sensing observations are limited when used to study the bulk atmospheric composition of the giant planets of our solar system. A remarkable example of the value of in situ measurements is provided by measurements of Jupiter's noble gas abundances and helium mixing ratio by the Galileo probe. In situ measurements provide direct access to atmospheric regions that are beyond the reach of remote sensing, enabling the dynamical, chemical and aerosol-forming processes at work from the thermosphere to the troposphere below the cloud decks to be studied. Studies for a newly proposed Saturn atmospheric entry probe mission named Hera is being prepared for the upcoming European Space Agency Medium Class (M5) mission announcement of opportunity. A solar powered mission, Hera will take approximately 8 years to reach Saturn and will carry instruments to measure the composition, structure, and dynamics of Saturn's atmosphere. In the context of giant planet science provided by the Galileo, Juno, and Cassini missions to Jupiter and Saturn, the Hera Saturn probe will provide critical measurements of composition

  19. Measurement of exclusive dijet production in diffractive DIS with the ZEUS detector at HERA

    SciTech Connect

    Gach, Grzegorz

    2015-04-10

    The exclusive production of dijets in diffractive deep inelastic lepton–proton scattering has been measured with the ZEUS detector at HERA with an integrated luminosity of 372 pb{sup −1}. Jets have been reconstructed in the photon–Pomeron rest frame using the exclusive k{sub T} algorithm. The shape of the differential cross-section as a function of the angle between the plane spanned by the incoming and scattered lepton momenta and the plane spanned by the virtual photon and jets momenta is presented. The shape is determined by the jet production mechanism and provides information about the Pomeron structure.

  20. Measurement of exclusive dijet production in diffractive DIS with the ZEUS detector at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gach, Grzegorz

    2015-04-01

    The exclusive production of dijets in diffractive deep inelastic lepton-proton scattering has been measured with the ZEUS detector at HERA with an integrated luminosity of 372 pb-1. Jets have been reconstructed in the photon-Pomeron rest frame using the exclusive kT algorithm. The shape of the differential cross-section as a function of the angle between the plane spanned by the incoming and scattered lepton momenta and the plane spanned by the virtual photon and jets momenta is presented. The shape is determined by the jet production mechanism and provides information about the Pomeron structure.

  1. On the determination of {alpha}{sub s} from differential jet rates at HERA

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, Marc

    1997-04-20

    A measurement of the differential 2+1 jet rate in deep inelastic scattering at HERA in the kinematic range Q{sup 2}>200 GeV{sup 2} is presented. The jets are found using the JADE jet algorithm. Jet distributions measured with the H1 detector are compared to QCD model expectations. The differential 2+1 jet rate is unfolded to remove hadronization and detector effects, and is compared to next-to-leading order QCD calculations. The value of the strong coupling constant {alpha}{sub s} is extracted, and contributions to its systematic error are discussed.

  2. High-spin research with HERA (High Energy-Resolution Array)

    SciTech Connect

    Diamond, R.M.

    1987-06-01

    The topic of this report is high spin research with the High Energy Resolution Array (HERA) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. This is a 21 Ge detector system, the first with bismuth germanate (BGO) Compton suppression. The array is described briefly and some of the results obtained during the past year using this detector facility are discussed. Two types of studies are described: observation of superdeformation in the light Nd isotopes, and rotational damping at high spin and excitation energy in the continuum gamma ray spectrum.

  3. Measurement of the proton structure function F 2 from the 1993 HERA data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derrick, M.; Krakauer, D.; Magill, S.; Musgrave, B.; Repond, J.; Schlereth, J.; Stanek, R.; Talaga, R. L.; Thron, J.; Arzarello, F.; Ayad, R.; Bari, G.; Basile, M.; Bellagamba, L.; Boscherini, D.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruni, P.; Cara Romeo, G.; Castellini, G.; Chiarini, M.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Ciralli, F.; Contin, A.; D'Auria, S.; Frasconi, F.; Giusti, P.; Iacobucci, G.; Laurenti, G.; Levi, G.; Margotti, A.; Massam, T.; Nania, R.; Nemoz, C.; Palmonari, F.; Polini, A.; Sartorelli, G.; Timellini, R.; Zamora Garcia, Y.; Zichichi, A.; Bargende, A.; Crittenden, J.; Desch, K.; Diekmann, B.; Doeker, T.; Feld, L.; Frey, A.; Geerts, M.; Geitz, G.; Grothe, M.; Hartmann, H.; Haun, D.; Heinloth, K.; Hilger, E.; Jakob, H.-P.; Katz, U. F.; Mari, S. M.; Mass, A.; Mengel, S.; Mollen, J.; Paul, E.; Rembser, Ch.; Schattevoy, R.; Schneider, J.-L.; Schramm, D.; Stamm, J.; Wedemeyer, R.; Campbell-Robson, S.; Cassidy, A.; Dyce, N.; Foster, B.; George, S.; Gilmore, R.; Heath, G. P.; Heath, H. F.; Llewellyn, T. J.; Morgado, C. J. S.; Norman, D. J. P.; O'Mara, J. A.; Tapper, R. J.; Wilson, S. S.; Yoshida, R.; Rau, R. R.; Arneodo, M.; Iannotti, L.; Schioppa, M.; Susinno, G.; Bernstein, A.; Caldwell, A.; Gialas, I.; Parsons, J. A.; Ritz, S.; Sciulli, F.; Straub, P. B.; Wai, L.; Yang, S.; Borzemski, P.; Chwastowski, J.; Eskreys, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Zachara, M.; Zawiejski, L.; Adamczyk, L.; Bednarek, B.; Eskreys, K.; Jeleń, K.; Kisielewska, D.; Kowalski, T.; Rulikowska-Zarębska, E.; Suszycki, L.; Zając, J.; Kędzierski, T.; Kotański, A.; Przybycień, M.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Behrens, U.; Bienlein, J. K.; Böttcher, S.; Coldewey, C.; Drews, G.; Flasiński, M.; Gilkinson, D. J.; Göttlicher, P.; Gutjahr, B.; Haas, T.; Hagge, L.; Hain, W.; Hasell, D.; Heßling, H.; Hultschig, H.; Iga, Y.; Joos, P.; Kasemann, M.; Klanner, R.; Koch, W.; Köpke, L.; Kötz, U.; Kowalski, H.; Kröger, W.; Krüger, J.; Labs, J.; Ladage, A.; Löhr, B.; Löwe, M.; Lüke, D.; Mainusch, J.; Mańczak, O.; Ng, J. S. T.; Nickel, S.; Notz, D.; Ohrenberg, K.; Roco, M.; Rohde, M.; Roldán, J.; Schneekloth, U.; Schulz, W.; Selonke, F.; Stiliaris, E.; Voß, T.; Westphal, D.; Wolf, G.; Youngman, C.; Grabosch, H. J.; Leich, A.; Meyer, A.; Rethfeldt, C.; Schlenstedt, S.; Barbagli, G.; Pelfer, P.; Anzivino, G.; Maccarrone, G.; de Pasquale, S.; Qian, S.; Votano, L.; Bamberger, A.; Freidhof, A.; Poser, T.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Schroeder, J.; Theisen, G.; Trefzger, T.; Brook, N. H.; Bussey, P. J.; Doyle, A. T.; Fleck, I.; Jamieson, V. A.; Saxon, D. H.; Utley, M. L.; Wilson, A. S.; Dannemann, A.; Holm, U.; Horstmann, D.; Kammerlocher, H.; Krebs, B.; Neumann, T.; Sinkus, R.; Wick, K.; Badura, E.; Burow, B. D.; Fürtjes, A.; Lohrmann, E.; Milewski, J.; Nakahata, M.; Pavel, N.; Poelz, G.; Schott, W.; Terron, J.; Zetsche, F.; Bacon, T. C.; Beuselinck, R.; Butterworth, I.; Gallo, E.; Harris, V. L.; Hung, B. H.; Long, K. R.; Miller, D. B.; Morawitz, P. P. O.; Prinias, A.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Whitfield, A. F.; Mallik, U.; McCliment, E.; Wang, M. Z.; Zhang, Y.; Cloth, P.; Filges, D.; An, S. H.; Hong, S. M.; Nam, S. W.; Park, S. K.; Suh, M. H.; Yon, S. H.; Imlay, R.; Kartik, S.; Kim, H.-J.; McNeil, R. R.; Metcalf, W.; Nadendla, V. K.; Barreiro, F.; Cases, G.; Graciani, R.; Hernández, J. M.; Hervás, L.; Labarga, L.; Del Peso, J.; Puga, J.; de Trocóniz, J. F.; Ikraiam, F.; Mayer, J. K.; Smith, G. R.; Corriveau, F.; Hanna, D. S.; Hartmann, J.; Hung, L. W.; Lim, J. N.; Matthews, C. G.; Mitchell, J. W.; Patel, P. M.; Sinclair, L. E.; Stairs, D. G.; St. Laurent, M.; Ullmann, R.; Bashkirov, V.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Stifutkin, A.; Bashindzhagyan, G. L.; Ermolov, P. F.; Gladilin, L. K.; Golubkov, Y. A.; Kobrin, V. D.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Savin, A. A.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Solomin, A. N.; Zotov, N. P.; Bentvelsen, S.; Botje, M.; Chlebana, F.; Dake, A.; Engelen, J.; de Jong, P.; de Kamps, M.; Kooijman, P.; Kruse, A.; O'Dell, V.; Tenner, A.; Tiecke, H.; Verkerke, W.; Vreeswijk, M.; Wiggers, L.; de Wolf, E.; van Woudenberg, R.; Acosta, D.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Honscheid, K.; Li, C.; Ling, T. Y.; McLean, K. W.; Murray, W. N.; Park, I. H.; Romanowski, T. A.; Seidlein, R.; Bailey, D. S.; Blair, G. A.; Byrne, A.; Cashmore, R. J.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Daniels, D.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Harnew, N.; Lancaster, M.; Luffman, P. E.; Lindemann, L.; McFall, J.; Nath, C.; Quadt, A.; Uijterwaal, H.; Walczak, R.; Wilson, F. F.; Yip, T.; Abbiendi, G.; Bertolin, A.; Brugnera, R.; Carlin, R.; Dal Corso, F.; de Giorgi, M.; Dosselli, U.; Gasparini, F.; Limentani, S.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Stanco, L.; Stroili, R.; Voci, C.; Bulmahn, J.; Butterworth, J. M.; Feild, R. G.; Oh, B. Y.; Whitmore, J. J.; D'Agostini, G.; Iori, M.; Marini, G.; Mattioli, M.; Nigro, A.; Tassi, E.; Hart, J. C.; McCubbin, N. A.; Prytz, K.; Shah, T. P.; Short, T. L.; Barberis, E.; Cartiglia, N.; Dubbs, T.; Heusch, C.; van Hook, M.; Hubbard, B.; Lockman, W.; Rahn, J. T.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Seiden, A.; Biltzinger, J.; Seifert, R. J.; Walenta, A. H.; Zech, G.; Abramowicz, H.; Briskin, G.; Dagan, S.; Levy, A.; Hasegawa, T.; Hazumi, M.; Ishii, T.; Kuze, M.; Mine, S.; Nagasawa, Y.; Nagira, T.; Nakao, M.; Suzuki, I.; Tokushuku, K.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Chiba, M.; Hamatsu, R.; Hirose, T.; Homma, K.; Kitamura, S.; Nagayama, S.; Nakamitsu, Y.; Cirio, R.; Costa, M.; Ferrero, M. I.; Lamberti, L.; Maselli, S.; Peroni, C.; Sacchi, R.; Solano, A.; Staiano, A.; Dardo, M.; Bandyopadhyay, D.; Benard, F.; Brkic, M.; Crombie, M. B.; Gingrich, D. M.; Hartner, G. F.; Joo, K. K.; Levman, G. M.; Martin, J. F.; Orr, R. S.; Sampson, C. R.; Teuscher, R. J.; Catterall, C. D.; Jones, T. W.; Kaziewicz, P. B.; Lane, J. B.; Saunders, R. L.; Shulman, J.; Blankenship, K.; Kochocki, J.; Lu, B.; Mo, L. W.; Bogusz, W.; Charchula, K.; Ciborowski, J.; Gajewski, J.; Grzelak, G.; Kasprzak, M.; Krzyżanowski, M.; Muchorowski, K.; Nowak, R. J.; Pawlak, J. M.; Tymieniecka, T.; Wróblewski, A. K.; Zakrzewski, J. A.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Adamus, M.; Eisenberg, Y.; Glasman, C.; Karshon, U.; Revel, D.; Shapira, A.; Ali, I.; Behrens, B.; Dasu, S.; Fordham, C.; Foudas, C.; Goussiou, A.; Loveless, R. J.; Reeder, D. D.; Silverstein, S.; Smith, W. H.; Tsurugai, T.; Bhadra, S.; Frisken, W. R.; Furutani, K. M.

    1995-09-01

    The ZEUS detector has been used to measure the proton structure function F 2. During 1993 HERA collided 26.7 GeV electrons on 820 GeV protons. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 0.54 pb-1, representing a twenty fold increase in statistics compared to that of 1992. Results are presented for 7< Q 2<104 GeV2 and x values as low as 3×10-4. The rapid rise in F 2 as x decreases observed previously is now studied in greater detail and persists for Q 2 values up to 500 GeV2.

  4. A search for excited fermions in electron-proton collisions at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derrick, M.; Krakauer, D.; Magill, S.; Musgrave, B.; Repond, J.; Schlereth, J.; Stanek, R.; Talaga, R. L.; Thron, J.; Arzarello, F.; Ayad, R.; Bari, G.; Basile, M.; Bellagamba, L.; Boscherini, D.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruni, P.; Romeo, G. Cara; Castellini, G.; Chiarini, M.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Ciralli, F.; Contin, A.; D'Auria, S.; Frasconi, F.; Gialas, I.; Giusti, P.; Iacobucci, G.; Laurenti, G.; Levi, G.; Margotti, A.; Massam, T.; Nania, R.; Nemoz, C.; Palmonari, F.; Polini, A.; Sartorelli, G.; Timellini, R.; Garcia, Y. Zamora; Zichichi, A.; Bargende, A.; Crittenden, J.; Desch, K.; Diekmann, B.; Doeker, T.; Eckart, M.; Feld, L.; Frey, A.; Geerts, M.; Geitz, G.; Grothe, M.; Hartmann, H.; Haun, D.; Heinloth, K.; Hilger, E.; Jakob, H.-P.; Katz, U. F.; Mari, S. M.; Mass, A.; Mengel, S.; Mollen, J.; Paul, E.; Rembser, Ch.; Schattevoy, R.; Schneider, J.-L.; Schramm, D.; Stamm, J.; Wedemeyer, R.; Campbell-Robson, S.; Cassidy, A.; Dyce, N.; Foster, B.; George, S.; Gilmore, R.; Heath, G. P.; Heath, H. F.; Llewellyn, T. J.; Morgado, C. J. S.; Norman, D. J. P.; O'Mara, J. A.; Tapper, R. J.; Wilson, S. S.; Yoshida, R.; Rau, R. R.; Arneodo, M.; Iannotti, L.; Schioppa, M.; Susinno, G.; Bernstein, A.; Caldwell, A.; Parsons, J. A.; Ritz, S.; Sciulli, F.; Straub, P. B.; Wai, L.; Yang, S.; Borzemski, P.; Chwastowski, J.; Eskreys, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Zachara, M.; Zawiejski, L.; Adamczyk, L.; Bednarek, B.; Eskreys, K.; Jeleń, K.; Kisielewska, D.; Kowalski, T.; Rulikowska-Zarebska, E.; Suszycki, L.; Zajac, J.; Kedzierski, T.; Kotański, A.; Przybycień, M.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Behrens, U.; Bienlein, J. K.; Böttcher, S.; Coldewey, C.; Drews, G.; Flasiński, M.; Gilkinson, D. J.; Göttlicher, P.; Gutjahr, B.; Haas, T.; Hain, W.; Hasell, D.; Heßling, H.; Hultschig, H.; Iga, Y.; Joos, P.; Kasemann, M.; Klanner, R.; Koch, W.; Köpke, L.; Kötz, U.; Kowalski, H.; Kroger, W.; Krüger, J.; Labs, J.; Ladage, A.; Löhr, B.; Löwe, M.; Lüke, D.; Mańczak, O.; Ng, J. S. T.; Nickel, S.; Notz, D.; Ohrenberg, K.; Roco, M.; Rohde, M.; Roldán, J.; Schneekloth, U.; Schulz, W.; Selonke, F.; Stiliaris, E.; Voß, T.; Westphal, D.; Wolf, G.; Youngman, C.; Grabosch, H. J.; Leich, A.; Meyer, A.; Rethfeldt, C.; Schlenstedt, S.; Barbagli, G.; Pelfer, P.; Anzivino, G.; Maccarrone, G.; de Pasquale, S.; Qian, S.; Votano, L.; Bamberger, A.; Freidhof, A.; Poser, T.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Schroeder, J.; Theisen, G.; Trefzger, T.; Brook, N. H.; Bussey, P. J.; Doyle, A. T.; Fleck, I.; Jamieson, V. A.; Saxon, D. H.; Utley, M. L.; Wilson, A. S.; Dannemann, A.; Holm, U.; Horstmann, D.; Kammerlocher, H.; Krebs, B.; Neumann, T.; Sinkus, R.; Wick, K.; Badura, E.; Burow, B. D.; Fürtjes, A.; Hagge, L.; Lohrmann, E.; Mainusch, J.; Milewski, J.; Nakahata, M.; Pavel, N.; Poelz, G.; Schott, W.; Terron, J.; Zetsche, F.; Bacon, T. C.; Beuselinck, R.; Butterworth, I.; Gallo, E.; Harris, V. L.; Hung, B. H.; Long, K. R.; Miller, D. B.; Morawitz, P. P. O.; Prinias, A.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Whitfield, A. F.; Mallik, U.; McCliment, E.; Wang, M. Z.; Wang, S. M.; Wu, J. T.; Zhang, Y.; Cloth, P.; Filges, D.; An, S. H.; Hong, S. M.; Nam, S. W.; Park, S. K.; Suh, M. H.; Yon, S. H.; Imlay, R.; Kartik, S.; Kim, H.-J.; McNeil, R. R.; Metcalf, W.; Nadendla, V. K.; Barreiro, F.; Cases, G.; Graciani, R.; Hernández, J. M.; Hervás, L.; Labarga, L.; Del Peso, J.; Puga, J.; de Trocóniz, J. F.; Ikraiam, F.; Mayer, J. K.; Smith, G. R.; Corriveau, F.; Hanna, D. S.; Hartmann, J.; Hung, L. W.; Lim, J. N.; Matthews, C. G.; Patel, P. M.; Sinclair, L. E.; Stairs, D. G.; St. Laurent, M.; Ullmann, R.; Zacek, G.; Bashkirov, V.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Stifutkin, A.; Bashindzhagyan, G. L.; Ermolov, P. F.; Gladilin, L. K.; Golubkov, Y. A.; Kobrin, V. D.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Savin, A. A.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Solomin, A. N.; Zotov, N. P.; Bentvelsen, S.; Botje, M.; Chlebana, F.; Dake, A.; Engelen, J.; de Jong, P.; de Kamps, M.; Kooijman, P.; Kruse, A.; O'Dell, V.; Tenner, A.; Tiecke, H.; Verkerke, W.; Vreeswijk, M.; Wiggers, L.; de Wolf, E.; van Woudenberg, R.; Acosta, D.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Honscheid, K.; Li, C.; Ling, T. Y.; McLean, K. W.; Murray, W. N.; Park, I. H.; Romanowski, T. A.; Seidlein, R.; Bailey, D. S.; Blair, G. A.; Byrne, A.; Cashmore, R. J.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Daniels, D.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Harnew, N.; Lancaster, M.; Luffman, P. E.; Lindemann, L.; McFall, J.; Nath, C.; Quadt, A.; Uijterwaal, H.; Walczak, R.; Wilson, F. F.; Yip, T.; Abbiendi, G.; Bertolin, A.; Brugnera, R.; Carlin, R.; Dal Corso, F.; de Giorgi, M.; Dosselli, U.; Limentani, S.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Stanco, L.; Stroili, R.; Voci, C.; Bulmahn, J.; Butterworth, J. M.; Feild, R. G.; Oh, B. Y.; Whitmore, J. J.; D'Agostini, G.; Iori, M.; Marini, G.; Mattioli, M.; Nigro, A.; Tassi, E.; Hart, J. C.; McCubbin, N. A.; Prytz, K.; Shah, T. P.; Short, T. L.; Barberis, E.; Cartiglia, N.; Dubbs, T.; Heusch, C.; van Hook, M.; Hubbard, B.; Lockman, W.; Rahn, J. T.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Seiden, A.; Biltzinger, J.; Seifert, R. J.; Walenta, A. H.; Zech, G.; Abramowicz, H.; Briskin, G.; Dagan, S.; Levy, A.; Hasegawa, T.; Hazumi, M.; Ishii, T.; Kuze, M.; Mine, S.; Nagasawa, Y.; Nagira, T.; Nakao, M.; Suzuki, I.; Tokushuku, K.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Chiba, M.; Hamatsu, R.; Hirose, T.; Homma, K.; Kitamura, S.; Nagayama, S.; Nakamitsu, Y.; Cirio, R.; Costa, M.; Ferrero, M. I.; Lamberti, L.; Maselli, S.; Peroni, C.; Sacchi, R.; Solano, A.; Staiano, A.; Dardo, M.; Bailey, D. C.; Bandyopadhyay, D.; Benard, F.; Brkic, M.; Crombie, M. B.; Gingrich, D. M.; Hartner, G. F.; Joo, K. K.; Levman, G. M.; Martin, J. F.; Orr, R. S.; Sampson, C. R.; Teuscher, R. J.; Catterall, C. D.; Jones, T. W.; Kaziewicz, P. B.; Lane, J. B.; Saunders, R. L.; Shulman, J.; Blankenship, K.; Kochocki, J.; Lu, B.; Mo, L. W.; Bogusz, W.; Charchula, K.; Ciborowski, J.; Gajewski, J.; Grzelak, G.; Kasprazak, M.; Krzyżanowski, M.; Muchorowski, K.; Nowak, R. J.; Pawlak, J. M.; Tymieniecka, T.; Wróblewski, A. K.; Zakrzewski, J. A.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Adamus, M.; Eisenberg, Y.; Glasman, C.; Karshon, U.; Revel, D.; Shapira, A.; Ali, I.; Behrens, B.; Dasu, S.; Fordham, C.; Foudas, C.; Goussiou, A.; Loveless, R. J.; Reeder, D. D.; Silverstein, S.; Smith, W. H.; Tsurugai, T.; Bhadra, S.; Frisken, W. R.; Furutani, K. M.

    1995-12-01

    A search for excited states of the standard model fermions was performed using the ZEUS detector at the HERA electron-proton collider, operating at a centre of mass energy of 296 GeV. In a sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 0.55 pb-1, no evidence was found for any resonant state decaying into final states composed of a fermion and a gauge boson. Limits on the coupling strength times branching ratio of excited fermions are presented for masses between 50 GeV and 250 GeV, extending previous search regions significantly.

  5. Measurement of the energy dependence of the total photon-proton cross section at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ZEUS Collaboration; Abramowicz, H.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.; Adamus, M.; Aggarwal, R.; Antonelli, S.; Antonioli, P.; Antonov, A.; Arneodo, M.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Bachynska, O.; Bamberger, A.; Barakbaev, A. N.; Barbagli, G.; Bari, G.; Barreiro, F.; Bartsch, D.; Basile, M.; Behnke, O.; Behr, J.; Behrens, U.; Bellagamba, L.; Bertolin, A.; Bhadra, S.; Bindi, M.; Blohm, C.; Bokhonov, V.; Bołd, T.; Boos, E. G.; Borras, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bot, D.; Boutle, S. K.; Brock, I.; Brownson, E.; Brugnera, R.; Brümmer, N.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Brzozowska, B.; Bussey, P. J.; Butterworth, J. M.; Bylsma, B.; Caldwell, A.; Capua, M.; Carlin, R.; Catterall, C. D.; Chekanov, S.; Chwastowski, J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Contin, A.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Coppola, N.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Costa, M.; D'Agostini, G.; Dal Corso, F.; Del Peso, J.; Dementiev, R. K.; de Pasquale, S.; Derrick, M.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Dobur, D.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Dolinska, G.; Doyle, A. T.; Drugakov, V.; Durkin, L. S.; Dusini, S.; Eisenberg, Y.; Ermolov, P. F.; Eskreys, A.; Fang, S.; Fazio, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrero, M. I.; Figiel, J.; Forrest, M.; Foster, B.; Fourletov, S.; Gach, G.; Galas, A.; Gallo, E.; Garfagnini, A.; Geiser, A.; Gialas, I.; Gladilin, L. K.; Gladkov, D.; Glasman, C.; Gogota, O.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Göttlicher, P.; Grabowska-Bołd, I.; Grebenyuk, J.; Gregor, I.; Grigorescu, G.; Grzelak, G.; Gueta, O.; Gwenlan, C.; Haas, T.; Hain, W.; Hamatsu, R.; Hart, J. C.; Hartmann, H.; Hartner, G.; Hilger, E.; Hochman, D.; Hori, R.; Horton, K.; Hüttmann, A.; Iacobucci, G.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Iga, Y.; Ingbir, R.; Ishitsuka, M.; Jakob, H.-P.; Januschek, F.; Jimenez, M.; Jones, T. W.; Jüngst, M.; Kadenko, I.; Kahle, B.; Kamaluddin, B.; Kananov, S.; Kanno, T.; Karshon, U.; Karstens, F.; Katkov, I. I.; Kaur, M.; Kaur, P.; Keramidas, A.; Khein, L. A.; Kim, J. Y.; Kisielewska, D.; Kitamura, S.; Klanner, R.; Klein, U.; Koffeman, E.; Kooijman, P.; Korol, Ie.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kotański, A.; Kötz, U.; Kowalski, H.; Kulinski, P.; Kuprash, O.; Kuze, M.; Lee, A.; Levchenko, B. B.; Levy, A.; Libov, V.; Limentani, S.; Ling, T. Y.; Lisovyi, M.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lohmann, W.; Löhr, B.; Lohrmann, E.; Loizides, J. H.; Long, K. R.; Longhin, A.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Łużniak, P.; Maeda, J.; Magill, S.; Makarenko, I.; Malka, J.; Mankel, R.; Margotti, A.; Marini, G.; Martin, J. F.; Mastroberardino, A.; Mattingly, M. C. K.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Miglioranzi, S.; Idris, F. Mohamad; Monaco, V.; Montanari, A.; Morris, J. D.; Mujkic, K.; Musgrave, B.; Nagano, K.; Namsoo, T.; Nania, R.; Nicholass, D.; Nigro, A.; Ning, Y.; Noor, U.; Notz, D.; Nowak, R. J.; Nuncio-Quiroz, A. E.; Oh, B. Y.; Okazaki, N.; Oliver, K.; Olkiewicz, K.; Onishchuk, Yu.; Papageorgiu, K.; Parenti, A.; Paul, E.; Pawlak, J. M.; Pawlik, B.; Pelfer, P. G.; Pellegrino, A.; Perlanski, W.; Perrey, H.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Plucinski, P.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Polini, A.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Przybycień, M.; Raval, A.; Reeder, D. D.; Reisert, B.; Ren, Z.; Repond, J.; Ri, Y. D.; Robertson, A.; Roloff, P.; Ron, E.; Rubinsky, I.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Salii, A.; Samson, U.; Sartorelli, G.; Savin, A. A.; Saxon, D. H.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenstedt, S.; Schleper, P.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schneekloth, U.; Schönberg, V.; Schörner-Sadenius, T.; Schwartz, J.; Sciulli, F.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Shehzadi, R.; Shimizu, S.; Singh, I.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Słomiński, W.; Smith, W. H.; Sola, V.; Solano, A.; Son, D.; Sosnovtsev, V.; Spiridonov, A.; Stadie, H.; Stanco, L.; Stern, A.; Stewart, T. P.; Stifutkin, A.; Stopa, P.; Suchkov, S.; Susinno, G.; Suszycki, L.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Szuba, D.; Szuba, J.; Tapper, A. D.; Tassi, E.; Terrón, J.; Theedt, T.; Tiecke, H.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomalak, O.; Tomaszewska, J.; Tsurugai, T.; Turcato, M.; Tymieniecka, T.; Uribe-Estrada, C.; Vázquez, M.; Verbytskyi, A.; Viazlo, O.; Vlasov, N. N.; Volynets, O.; Walczak, R.; Abdullah, W. A. T. Wan; Whitmore, J. J.; Whyte, J.; Wiggers, L.; Wing, M.; Wlasenko, M.; Wolf, G.; Wolfe, H.; Wrona, K.; Yagües-Molina, A. G.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yoshida, R.; Youngman, C.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Zawiejski, L.; Zenaiev, O.; Zeuner, W.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Zhmak, N.; Zhou, C.; Zichichi, A.; Zolko, M.; Zotkin, D. S.; Zulkapli, Z.

    2011-03-01

    The energy dependence of the photon-proton total cross section, σtotγp, was determined from e+p scattering data collected with the ZEUS detector at HERA at three values of the center-of-mass energy, W, of the γp system in the range 194

  6. Measurement of the energy dependence of the total photon-proton cross section at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramowicz, H.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.; Adamus, M.; Aggarwal, R.; Antonelli, S.; Antonioli, P.; Antonov, A.; Arneodo, M.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Bachynska, O.; Bamberger, A.; Barakbaev, A. N.; Barbagli, G.; Bari, G.; Barreiro, F.; Bartsch, D.; Basile, M.; Behnke, O.; Behr, J.; Behrens, U.; Bellagamba, L.; Bertolin, A.; Bhadra, S.; Bindi, M.; Blohm, C.; Bokhonov, V.; Bołd, T.; Boos, E. G.; Borras, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bot, D.; Boutle, S. K.; Brock, I.; Brownson, E.; Brugnera, R.; Brümmer, N.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Brzozowska, B.; Bussey, P. J.; Butterworth, J. M.; Bylsma, B.; Caldwell, A.; Capua, M.; Carlin, R.; Catterall, C. D.; Chekanov, S.; Chwastowski, J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Contin, A.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Coppola, N.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Costa, M.; D'Agostini, G.; Dal Corso, F.; del Peso, J.; Dementiev, R. K.; De Pasquale, S.; Derrick, M.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Dobur, D.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Dolinska, G.; Doyle, A. T.; Drugakov, V.; Durkin, L. S.; Dusini, S.; Eisenberg, Y.; Ermolov, P. F.; Eskreys, A.; Fang, S.; Fazio, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrero, M. I.; Figiel, J.; Forrest, M.; Foster, B.; Fourletov, S.; Gach, G.; Galas, A.; Gallo, E.; Garfagnini, A.; Geiser, A.; Gialas, I.; Gladilin, L. K.; Gladkov, D.; Glasman, C.; Gogota, O.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Göttlicher, P.; Grabowska-Bołd, I.; Grebenyuk, J.; Gregor, I.; Grigorescu, G.; Grzelak, G.; Gueta, O.; Gwenlan, C.; Haas, T.; Hain, W.; Hamatsu, R.; Hart, J. C.; Hartmann, H.; Hartner, G.; Hilger, E.; Hochman, D.; Hori, R.; Horton, K.; Hüttmann, A.; Iacobucci, G.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Iga, Y.; Ingbir, R.; Ishitsuka, M.; Jakob, H.-P.; Januschek, F.; Jimenez, M.; Jones, T. W.; Jüngst, M.; Kadenko, I.; Kahle, B.; Kamaluddin, B.; Kananov, S.; Kanno, T.; Karshon, U.; Karstens, F.; Katkov, I. I.; Kaur, M.; Kaur, P.; Keramidas, A.; Khein, L. A.; Kim, J. Y.; Kisielewska, D.; Kitamura, S.; Klanner, R.; Klein, U.; Koffeman, E.; Kooijman, P.; Korol, Ie.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kotański, A.; Kötz, U.; Kowalski, H.; Kulinski, P.; Kuprash, O.; Kuze, M.; Lee, A.; Levchenko, B. B.; Levy, A.; Libov, V.; Limentani, S.; Ling, T. Y.; Lisovyi, M.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lohmann, W.; Löhr, B.; Lohrmann, E.; Loizides, J. H.; Long, K. R.; Longhin, A.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Łużniak, P.; Maeda, J.; Magill, S.; Makarenko, I.; Malka, J.; Mankel, R.; Margotti, A.; Marini, G.; Martin, J. F.; Mastroberardino, A.; Mattingly, M. C. K.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Miglioranzi, S.; Idris, F. Mohamad; Monaco, V.; Montanari, A.; Morris, J. D.; Mujkic, K.; Musgrave, B.; Nagano, K.; Namsoo, T.; Nania, R.; Nicholass, D.; Nigro, A.; Ning, Y.; Noor, U.; Notz, D.; Nowak, R. J.; Nuncio-Quiroz, A. E.; Oh, B. Y.; Okazaki, N.; Oliver, K.; Olkiewicz, K.; Onishchuk, Yu.; Papageorgiu, K.; Parenti, A.; Paul, E.; Pawlak, J. M.; Pawlik, B.; Pelfer, P. G.; Pellegrino, A.; Perlanski, W.; Perrey, H.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Plucinski, P.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Polini, A.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Przybycień, M.; Raval, A.; Reeder, D. D.; Reisert, B.; Ren, Z.; Repond, J.; Ri, Y. D.; Robertson, A.; Roloff, P.; Ron, E.; Rubinsky, I.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Salii, A.; Samson, U.; Sartorelli, G.; Savin, A. A.; Saxon, D. H.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenstedt, S.; Schleper, P.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schneekloth, U.; Schönberg, V.; Schörner-Sadenius, T.; Schwartz, J.; Sciulli, F.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Shehzadi, R.; Shimizu, S.; Singh, I.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Słomiński, W.; Smith, W. H.; Sola, V.; Solano, A.; Son, D.; Sosnovtsev, V.; Spiridonov, A.; Stadie, H.; Stanco, L.; Stern, A.; Stewart, T. P.; Stifutkin, A.; Stopa, P.; Suchkov, S.; Susinno, G.; Suszycki, L.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Szuba, D.; Szuba, J.; Tapper, A. D.; Tassi, E.; Terrón, J.; Theedt, T.; Tiecke, H.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomalak, O.; Tomaszewska, J.; Tsurugai, T.; Turcato, M.; Tymieniecka, T.; Uribe-Estrada, C.; Vázquez, M.; Verbytskyi, A.; Viazlo, O.; Vlasov, N. N.; Volynets, O.; Walczak, R.; Abdullah, W. A. T. Wan; Whitmore, J. J.; Whyte, J.; Wiggers, L.; Wing, M.; Wlasenko, M.; Wolf, G.; Wolfe, H.; Wrona, K.; Yagües-Molina, A. G.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yoshida, R.; Youngman, C.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Zawiejski, L.; Zenaiev, O.; Zeuner, W.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Zhmak, N.; Zhou, C.; Zichichi, A.; Zolko, M.; Zotkin, D. S.; Zulkapli, Z.; ZEUS Collaboration

    2011-03-01

    The energy dependence of the photon-proton total cross section, σtotγp, was determined from ep scattering data collected with the ZEUS detector at HERA at three values of the center-of-mass energy, W, of the γp system in the range 194

  7. Deep inelastic cross-section measurements at large y with the ZEUS detector at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramowicz, H.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.; Adamus, M.; Aggarwal, R.; Antonelli, S.; Arslan, O.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Bachynska, O.; Barakbaev, A. N.; Bartosik, N.; Behnke, O.; Behr, J.; Behrens, U.; Bertolin, A.; Bhadra, S.; Bloch, I.; Bokhonov, V.; Boos, E. G.; Borras, K.; Brock, I.; Brugnera, R.; Bruni, A.; Brzozowska, B.; Bussey, P. J.; Caldwell, A.; Capua, M.; Catterall, C. D.; Chwastowski, J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; D'Agostini, G.; Dementiev, R. K.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Dolinska, G.; Drugakov, V.; Dusini, S.; Ferrando, J.; Figiel, J.; Foster, B.; Gach, G.; Garfagnini, A.; Geiser, A.; Gizhko, A.; Gladilin, L. K.; Gogota, O.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Grebenyuk, J.; Gregor, I.; Grzelak, G.; Gueta, O.; Guzik, M.; Hain, W.; Hartner, G.; Hochman, D.; Hori, R.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Iga, Y.; Ishitsuka, M.; Iudin, A.; Januschek, F.; Kadenko, I.; Kananov, S.; Kanno, T.; Karshon, U.; Kaur, M.; Kaur, P.; Khein, L. A.; Kisielewska, D.; Klanner, R.; Klein, U.; Kondrashova, N.; Kononenko, O.; Korol, Ie.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kotański, A.; Kötz, U.; Kovalchuk, N.; Kowalski, H.; Kuprash, O.; Kuze, M.; Levchenko, B. B.; Levy, A.; Libov, V.; Limentani, S.; Lisovyi, M.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lohmann, W.; Löhr, B.; Lohrmann, E.; Longhin, A.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Maeda, J.; Makarenko, I.; Malka, J.; Martin, J. F.; Mergelmeyer, S.; Mohamad Idris, F.; Mujkic, K.; Myronenko, V.; Nagano, K.; Nigro, A.; Nobe, T.; Notz, D.; Nowak, R. J.; Olkiewicz, K.; Onishchuk, Yu.; Paul, E.; Perlański, W.; Perrey, H.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Przybycień, M.; Raval, A.; Roloff, P.; Rubinsky, I.; Ruspa, M.; Samojlov, V.; Saxon, D. H.; Schioppa, M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schneekloth, U.; Schörner-Sadenius, T.; Schwartz, J.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Shevchenko, R.; Shkola, O.; Singh, I.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Słomiński, W.; Sola, V.; Solano, A.; Spiridonov, A.; Stanco, L.; Stefaniuk, N.; Stern, A.; Stewart, T. P.; Stopa, P.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Szuba, D.; Szuba, J.; Tassi, E.; Temiraliev, T.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomaszewska, J.; Trofymov, A.; Trusov, V.; Tsurugai, T.; Turcato, M.; Turkot, O.; Tymieniecka, T.; Verbytskyi, A.; Viazlo, O.; Walczak, R.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.; Wichmann, K.; Wing, M.; Wolf, G.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Zakharchuk, N.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Zawiejski, L.; Zenaiev, O.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Zhmak, N.; Zotkin, D. S.; ZEUS Collaboration

    2014-10-01

    The reduced cross sections for e+p deep inelastic scattering have been measured with the ZEUS detector at HERA at three different center-of-mass energies, 318, 251 and 225 GeV. The cross sections, measured double differentially in Bjorken x and the virtuality, Q2, were obtained in the region 0.13≤y ≤0.75, where y denotes the inelasticity and 5≤Q2≤110 GeV2. The proton structure functions F2 and FL were extracted from the measured cross sections.

  8. "Updates to Model Algorithms & Inputs for the Biogenic Emissions Inventory System (BEIS) Model"

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have developed new canopy emission algorithms and land use data for BEIS. Simulations with BEIS v3.4 and these updates in CMAQ v5.0.2 are compared these changes to the Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature (MEGAN) and evaluated the simulations against observatio...

  9. Lessons Learned from Dependency Usage in HERA: Implications for THERP-Related HRA Methods

    SciTech Connect

    April M. Whaley; Ronald L. Boring; Harold S. Blackman; Patrick H. McCabe; Bruce P. Hallbert

    2007-08-01

    Dependency occurs when the probability of success or failure on one action changes the probability of success or failure on a subsequent action. Dependency may serve as a modifier on the human error probabilities (HEPs) for successive actions in human reliability analysis (HRA) models. Discretion should be employed when determining whether or not a dependency calculation is warranted: dependency should not be assigned without strongly grounded reasons. Human reliability analysts may sometimes assign dependency in cases where it is unwarranted. This inappropriate assignment is attributed to a lack of clear guidance to encompass the range of scenarios human reliability analysts are addressing. Inappropriate assignment of dependency produces inappropriately elevated HEP values. Lessons learned about dependency usage in the Human Event Repository and Analysis (HERA) system may provide clarification and guidance for analysts using first-generation HRA methods. This paper presents the HERA approach to dependency assessment and discusses considerations for dependency usage in HRA, including the cognitive basis for dependency, direction for determining when dependency should be assessed, considerations for determining the dependency level, temporal issues to consider when assessing dependency, (e.g., considering task sequence versus overall event sequence, and dependency over long periods of time), and diagnosis and action influences on dependency.

  10. Development of a Net Flux Radiometer for the Hera Saturn Probe Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslam, Shahid; Amato, Michael; Atkinson, David; Mousis, Olivier; Nixon, Conor; Simon, Amy A.; Hera Probe Mission Team

    2016-10-01

    In situ exploration of all the giant planets in the outer solar system is an imperative and a Saturn probe is the next compelling step beyond Galileo's in situ exploration of Jupiter, the remote investigation of its interior, gravity, and magnetic fields by the Juno mission, and the Cassini spacecraft's similar orbital reconnaissance of Saturn. One such proposed future mission is "HERA: an international atmospheric probe to unveil the depths of Saturn" a nominal configuration is a combined ESA/Class-M probe mission accompanied by a launch vehicle and carrier relay spacecraft provided by NASA. One of the instruments being considered for inclusion on the probe is a Net Flux Radiometer (NFR) to unravel the vertical structure and properties of Saturn's cloud and haze layers. A NFR concept is presented that can be included in an atmospheric structure instrument suite for the Hera mission. The current design has two spectral channels i.e., a solar channel (0.4-to-5 µm) and a thermal channel (4-to-50 µm). The NFR is capable of viewing five distinct viewing angles during the descent. Non-imaging Winston cones with window and filter combinations define the spectral channels with a 5° Field-Of View (FOV). Uncooled thermopile detectors are used in each spectral channel and are read out using a custom designed radiation-hard Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC).

  11. Observation of a periodic pattern in the persistent-current fields of the superconducting HERA magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Brueck, H.; Gall, D.; Krzywinski, J.; Meinke, R.; Preissner, H. , Hamburg ); Halemeyer, M.; Schmueser, P.; Stolzenburg, C. . 2. Inst. fuer Experimentalphysik); Stiening, R. ); ter Avest, D.; van de Klundert, L.J.M. (Technische Hogeschool Twente, Enschede (Netherlands

    1991-05-01

    The time dependence of persistent current multipoles in superconducting magnets is still unexplained. The decay is too large to be accounted for by flux creep and it does not show the expected dependence on temperature. Furthermore the decay is influenced by a preceding field sweep in the magnet, it becomes more pronounced if the magnet was previously excited to its maximum field. For a detailed study of the decay mechanism a special sensor has been developed which allows to record small sexupole components in superconducting dipole magnets. During an experimental study of the time dependence of a HERA dipole it was found that the sextupole field exhibits a sinusoidal structure along the axis of the magnet. A similar periodic structure was found for the main dipole field with the help of a nuclear magnetic resonance probe. The wavelength of the periodic pattern is compatible with the transposition pitch of the Rutherford-type cable in the magnet coils. The structure was found to exist in all HERA dipoles measured afterwards and also in a superconducting coil without iron yoke. With a specially developed 2 cm long pickup coil it was found that all accessible multipole components in dipole and quadrupole magnets are modulated along their axis. 3 refs., 6 figs.

  12. Bedeutung der Informationsqualität bei Kaufentscheidungen im Internet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gräfe, Gernot; Maaß, Christian

    Bei Kauf- und Verkaufsentscheidungen ist das Internet eine bedeutende Informationsquelle für Anbieter und Nachfrager. Während Anbieter ihre Produkte und Dienstleistungen sehr gut kennen und dazu Informationen bereitstellen, sehen sich Nachfrager oft mit einem Informationsdefizit konfrontiert. Sie haben unvollständige Kenntnisse über die Anbieter, ihre Produkte, Preise und weitere Geschäftsbedingungen und informieren sich daher im Internet. Die unausgewogene Informationsverteilung zwischen beiden Parteien wird als Informationsasymmetrie bezeichnet [Kaas 1991, S. 360], [Kleinaltenkamp 1992, S. 812], [Rohrbach 1997, S. 49].

  13. Effective pressure law for permeability of E-bei sandstones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, M.; Bernabé, Y.; Xiao, W.-I.; Chen, Z.-Y.; Liu, Z.-Q.

    2009-07-01

    Laboratory experiments were conducted to determine the effective pressure law for permeability of tight sandstone rocks from the E-bei gas reservoir, China. The permeability k of five core samples was measured while cycling the confining pressure pc and fluid pressure pf. The permeability data were analyzed using the response-surface method, a statistical model-building approach yielding a representation of k in (pc, pf) space that can be used to determine the effective pressure law, i.e., peff = pc - κpf. The results show that the coefficient κ of the effective pressure law for permeability varies with confining pressure and fluid pressure as well as with the loading or unloading cycles (i.e., hysteresis effect). Moreover, κ took very small values in some of the samples, even possibly lower than the value of porosity, in contradiction with a well-accepted theoretical model. We also reanalyzed a previously published permeability data set on fissured crystalline rocks and found again that the κ varies with pc but did not observe κ values lower than 0.4, a value much larger than porosity. Analysis of the dependence of permeability on effective pressure suggests that the occurrence of low κ values may be linked to the high-pressure sensitivity of E-bei sandstones.

  14. An intercomparison of biogenic emissions estimates from BEIS2 and BIOME: Reconciling the differences

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkinson, J.G.; Emigh, R.A.; Pierce, T.E.

    1996-12-31

    Biogenic emissions play a critical role in urban and regional air quality. For instance, biogenic emissions contribute upwards of 76% of the daily hydrocarbon emissions in the Atlanta, Georgia airshed. The Biogenic Emissions Inventory System-Version 2.0 (BEIS2) and the Biogenic Model for Emissions (BIOME) are two models that compute biogenic emissions estimates. BEIS2 is a FORTRAN-based system, and BIOME is an ARC/INFO{reg_sign} - and SAS{reg_sign}-based system. Although the technical formulations of the models are similar, the models produce different biogenic emissions estimates for what appear to be essentially the same inputs. The goals of our study are the following: (1) Determine why BIOME and BEIS2 produce different emissions estimates; (2) Attempt to understand the impacts that the differences have on the emissions estimates; (3) Reconcile the differences where possible; and (4) Present a framework for the use of BEIS2 and BIOME. In this study, we used the Coastal Oxidant Assessment for Southeast Texas (COAST) biogenics data which were supplied to us courtesy of the Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission (TNRCC), and we extracted the BEIS2 data for the same domain. We compared the emissions estimates of the two models using their respective data sets BIOME Using TNRCC data and BEIS2 using BEIS2 data.

  15. The exclusive production of Rho mesons in deep inelastic scattering at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulmahn, Jeffrey W.

    1997-11-01

    The exclusive production of ρ0 mesons in deep inelastic scattering (DIS) was studied using data obtained with the ZEUS detector from the 1994 HERA run. The cross section for this process has been determined in the range 3 < Q2 < 30 [ GeV2] and 42 < W < 141 [ GeV], subject to the restrictions pT2 < 0.6 [ GeV2] and 0.4 < M/piπ/

  16. Measurement of the luminosity in the ZEUS experiment at HERA II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamczyk, L.; Andruszkow, J.; Bold, T.; Borzemski, P.; Buettner, C.; Caldwell, A.; Chwastowski, J.; Daniluk, W.; Drugakov, V.; Eskreys, A.; Figiel, J.; Galas, A.; Gil, M.; Helbich, M.; Januschek, F.; Jurkiewicz, P.; Kisielewska, D.; Klein, U.; Kotarba, A.; Lohmann, W.; Ning, Y.; Oliwa, K.; Olkiewicz, K.; Paganis, S.; Pieron, J.; Przybycien, M.; Ren, Z.; Ruchlewicz, W.; Schmidke, W.; Schneekloth, U.; Sciulli, F.; Stopa, P.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Suszycki, L.; Sutiak, J.; Wierba, W.; Zawiejski, L.

    2014-04-01

    The luminosity in the ZEUS detector was measured using photons from electron bremsstrahlung off protons. In 2001 the HERA collider was upgraded for operation at higher luminosity. At the same time the luminosity-measuring system of the ZEUS experiment was modified to tackle the expected higher photon rate and synchrotron radiation. The existing lead-scintillator calorimeter was equipped with radiation hard scintillator tiles and shielded against synchrotron radiation. In addition, a magnetic spectrometer was installed to measure the luminosity independently using photons converted in the beam-pipe exit window. The redundancy provided a reliable and robust luminosity determination with a systematic uncertainty of 1.7%. The experimental setup, the techniques used for luminosity determination and the estimate of the systematic uncertainty are reported.

  17. New measurement of inclusive deep inelastic scattering cross sections at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picuric, Ivana

    2016-03-01

    A combined measurement is presented of all inclusive deep inelastic cross sections measured by the H1 and ZEUS collaborations in neutral and charged current unpolarised e±p scattering at HERA. The H1 and ZEUS collaborations collected total integrated luminosities of approximately 500 pb-1 each, divided about equally between e+p and e-p scattering. They include data taken at electron (positron) beam energy of 27.5 GeV and proton beam energies of 920, 820, 575 and 460 GeV corresponding to centre-of-mass energy of 320, 300, 251 and 225 GeV respectively. This enabled the two collaborations to explore a large phase space in Bjorken x and negative four-momentum-transfer squared, Q2. The combination method takes the correlations of the systematic uncertainties into account, resulting in improved accuracy.

  18. Prompt-photon plus jet associated photoproduction at HERA in the parton Reggeization approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kniehl, B. A.; Nefedov, M. A.; Saleev, V. A.

    2014-06-01

    We study the photoproduction of isolated prompt photons associated with hadron jets in the framework of the parton Reggeization approach. The cross section distributions in the transverse energies and pseudorapidities of the prompt photon and the jet as well as the azimuthal-decorrelation variables measured by the H1 and ZEUS collaborations at DESY HERA are nicely described by our predictions. The main improvements with respect to previous studies in the kT-factorization framework include the application of the Reggeized-quark formalism, the generation of exactly gauge-invariant amplitudes with off-shell initial-state quarks, and the exact treatment of the γR→γg box contribution with off-shell initial-state gluons.

  19. Resummation of double collinear logs in BK evolution versus HERA data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albacete, Javier L.

    2017-01-01

    We present a global fit to HERA data on the reduced cross section measured in electron-proton collisions in the region of small Bjorken-x: x ≤x0 =10-2 and moderate to high values of the virtuality Q2

  20. Recent results from low-x and forward physics at HERA

    SciTech Connect

    Goerlich, Lidia; Collaboration: H1 Collaboration

    2013-04-15

    The production of forward jets in inclusive as well as diffractive deep inelastic scattering at HERA is studied with the H1 detector. For inclusive DIS events at low Q{sup 2} with a forward jet, produced close to the proton remnant, differential cross sections and normalised distributions are measured as a function of the azimuthal angle difference between the forward jet and the scattered positron. Results on dijet production cross sections are also presented for diffractive DIS events in which the final state proton is tagged in the H1 Forward Proton Spectrometer. Two topologies are investigated by either requiring the two jets being produced centrally or by requiring that one of the jets is going in the forward direction. The data are compared with NLO QCD predictions as well as leading order Monte Carlo models.

  1. Photoproduction of isolated photons, inclusively and with a jet, at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramowicz, H.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.; Adamus, M.; Aggarwal, R.; Antonelli, S.; Arslan, O.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Bachynska, O.; Barakbaev, A. N.; Bartosik, N.; Behnke, O.; Behr, J.; Behrens, U.; Bertolin, A.; Bhadra, S.; Bloch, I.; Bokhonov, V.; Boos, E. G.; Borras, K.; Brock, I.; Brugnera, R.; Bruni, A.; Brzozowska, B.; Bussey, P. J.; Caldwell, A.; Capua, M.; Catterall, C. D.; Chwastowski, J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; D'Agostini, G.; Dementiev, R. K.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Dolinska, G.; Drugakov, V.; Dusini, S.; Ferrando, J.; Figiel, J.; Foster, B.; Gach, G.; Garfagnini, A.; Geiser, A.; Gizhko, A.; Gladilin, L. K.; Gogota, O.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Grebenyuk, J.; Gregor, I.; Grzelak, G.; Gueta, O.; Guzik, M.; Hain, W.; Hartner, G.; Hochman, D.; Hori, R.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Iga, Y.; Ishitsuka, M.; Iudin, A.; Januschek, F.; Kadenko, I.; Kananov, S.; Kanno, T.; Karshon, U.; Kaur, M.; Kaur, P.; Khein, L. A.; Kisielewska, D.; Klanner, R.; Klein, U.; Kondrashova, N.; Kononenko, O.; Korol, Ie.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kotański, A.; Kötz, U.; Kovalchuk, N.; Kowalski, H.; Kuprash, O.; Kuze, M.; Levchenko, B. B.; Levy, A.; Libov, V.; Limentani, S.; Lisovyi, M.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lohmann, W.; Löhr, B.; Lohrmann, E.; Longhin, A.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Maeda, J.; Makarenko, I.; Malka, J.; Martin, J. F.; Mergelmeyer, S.; Mohamad Idris, F.; Mujkic, K.; Myronenko, V.; Nagano, K.; Nigro, A.; Nobe, T.; Notz, D.; Nowak, R. J.; Olkiewicz, K.; Onishchuk, Yu.; Paul, E.; Perlański, W.; Perrey, H.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Przybycień, M.; Raval, A.; Roloff, P.; Rubinsky, I.; Ruspa, M.; Samojlov, V.; Saxon, D. H.; Schioppa, M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schneekloth, U.; Schörner-Sadenius, T.; Schwartz, J.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Shevchenko, R.; Shkola, O.; Singh, I.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Słomiński, W.; Sola, V.; Solano, A.; Spiridonov, A.; Stanco, L.; Stefaniuk, N.; Stern, A.; Stewart, T. P.; Stopa, P.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Szuba, D.; Szuba, J.; Tassi, E.; Temiraliev, T.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomaszewska, J.; Trofymov, A.; Trusov, V.; Tsurugai, T.; Turcato, M.; Turkot, O.; Tymieniecka, T.; Verbytskyi, A.; Viazlo, O.; Walczak, R.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.; Wichmann, K.; Wing, M.; Wolf, G.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Zakharchuk, N.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Zawiejski, L.; Zenaiev, O.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Zhmak, N.; Zotkin, D. S.

    2014-03-01

    The photoproduction of isolated photons, both inclusive and together with a jet, has been measured with the ZEUS detector at HERA using an integrated luminosity of 374 pb. Differential cross sections are presented in the isolated-photon transverse-energy and pseudorapidity ranges 6

  2. Measurement of the t dependence in exclusive photoproduction of ϒ(1S) mesons at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ZEUS Collaboration; Abramowicz, H.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.; Adamus, M.; Aggarwal, R.; Antonelli, S.; Antonioli, P.; Antonov, A.; Arneodo, M.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Bachynska, O.; Bamberger, A.; Barakbaev, A. N.; Barbagli, G.; Bari, G.; Barreiro, F.; Bartosik, N.; Bartsch, D.; Basile, M.; Behnke, O.; Behr, J.; Behrens, U.; Bellagamba, L.; Bertolin, A.; Bhadra, S.; Bindi, M.; Blohm, C.; Bokhonov, V.; Bołd, T.; Bondarenko, K.; Boos, E. G.; Borras, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bot, D.; Brock, I.; Brownson, E.; Brugnera, R.; Brümmer, N.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Brzozowska, B.; Bussey, P. J.; Bylsma, B.; Caldwell, A.; Capua, M.; Carlin, R.; Catterall, C. D.; Chekanov, S.; Chwastowski, J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Contin, A.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Coppola, N.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Costa, M.; D'Agostini, G.; Dal Corso, F.; del Peso, J.; Dementiev, R. K.; De Pasquale, S.; Derrick, M.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Dobur, D.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Dolinska, G.; Doyle, A. T.; Drugakov, V.; Durkin, L. S.; Dusini, S.; Eisenberg, Y.; Ermolov, P. F.; Eskreys, A.; Fang, S.; Fazio, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrero, M. I.; Figiel, J.; Forrest, M.; Foster, B.; Gach, G.; Galas, A.; Gallo, E.; Garfagnini, A.; Geiser, A.; Gialas, I.; Gladilin, L. K.; Gladkov, D.; Glasman, C.; Gogota, O.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Göttlicher, P.; Grabowska-Bołd, I.; Grebenyuk, J.; Gregor, I.; Grigorescu, G.; Grzelak, G.; Gueta, O.; Guzik, M.; Gwenlan, C.; Haas, T.; Hain, W.; Hamatsu, R.; Hart, J. C.; Hartmann, H.; Hartner, G.; Hilger, E.; Hochman, D.; Hori, R.; Horton, K.; Hüttmann, A.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Iga, Y.; Ingbir, R.; Ishitsuka, M.; Jakob, H.-P.; Januschek, F.; Jones, T. W.; Jüngst, M.; Kadenko, I.; Kahle, B.; Kananov, S.; Kanno, T.; Karshon, U.; Karstens, F.; Katkov, I. I.; Kaur, M.; Kaur, P.; Keramidas, A.; Khein, L. A.; Kim, J. Y.; Kisielewska, D.; Kitamura, S.; Klanner, R.; Klein, U.; Koffeman, E.; Kooijman, P.; Korol, Ie.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kotański, A.; Kötz, U.; Kowalski, H.; Kuprash, O.; Kuze, M.; Lee, A.; Levchenko, B. B.; Levy, A.; Libov, V.; Limentani, S.; Ling, T. Y.; Lisovyi, M.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lohmann, W.; Löhr, B.; Lohrmann, E.; Long, K. R.; Longhin, A.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Maeda, J.; Magill, S.; Makarenko, I.; Malka, J.; Mankel, R.; Margotti, A.; Marini, G.; Martin, J. F.; Mastroberardino, A.; Mattingly, M. C. K.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Mergelmeyer, S.; Miglioranzi, S.; Mohamad Idris, F.; Monaco, V.; Montanari, A.; Morris, J. D.; Mujkic, K.; Musgrave, B.; Nagano, K.; Namsoo, T.; Nania, R.; Nigro, A.; Ning, Y.; Nobe, T.; Noor, U.; Notz, D.; Nowak, R. J.; Nuncio-Quiroz, A. E.; Oh, B. Y.; Okazaki, N.; Oliver, K.; Olkiewicz, K.; Onishchuk, Yu.; Papageorgiu, K.; Parenti, A.; Paul, E.; Pawlak, J. M.; Pawlik, B.; Pelfer, P. G.; Pellegrino, A.; Perlański, W.; Perrey, H.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Pluciński, P.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Polini, A.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Przybycień, M.; Raval, A.; Reeder, D. D.; Reisert, B.; Ren, Z.; Repond, J.; Ri, Y. D.; Robertson, A.; Roloff, P.; Rubinsky, I.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Salii, A.; Samson, U.; Sartorelli, G.; Savin, A. A.; Saxon, D. H.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenstedt, S.; Schleper, P.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schneekloth, U.; Schönberg, V.; Schörner-Sadenius, T.; Schwartz, J.; Sciulli, F.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Shehzadi, R.; Shimizu, S.; Singh, I.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Słomiński, W.; Smith, W. H.; Sola, V.; Solano, A.; Son, D.; Sosnovtsev, V.; Spiridonov, A.; Stadie, H.; Stanco, L.; Stern, A.; Stewart, T. P.; Stifutkin, A.; Stopa, P.; Suchkov, S.; Susinno, G.; Suszycki, L.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Szuba, D.; Szuba, J.; Tapper, A. D.; Tassi, E.; Terrón, J.; Theedt, T.; Tiecke, H.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomalak, O.; Tomaszewska, J.; Tsurugai, T.; Turcato, M.; Tymieniecka, T.; Vázquez, M.; Verbytskyi, A.; Viazlo, O.; Vlasov, N. N.; Volynets, O.; Walczak, R.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.; Whitmore, J. J.; Wiggers, L.; Wing, M.; Wlasenko, M.; Wolf, G.; Wolfe, H.; Wrona, K.; Yagües-Molina, A. G.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yoshida, R.; Youngman, C.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Zawiejski, L.; Zenaiev, O.; Zeuner, W.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Zhmak, N.; Zhou, C.; Zichichi, A.; Zolkapli, Z.; Zolko, M.; Zotkin, D. S.

    2012-02-01

    The exclusive photoproduction reaction γp→ϒ(1S)p has been studied with the ZEUS detector in ep collisions at HERA using an integrated luminosity of 468 pb. The measurement covers the kinematic range 60

  3. Angular correlations in three-jet events in ep collisions at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramowicz, H.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.; Adamus, M.; Aggarwal, R.; Antonelli, S.; Antonioli, P.; Antonov, A.; Arneodo, M.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Bachynska, O.; Bamberger, A.; Barakbaev, A. N.; Barbagli, G.; Bari, G.; Barreiro, F.; Bartosik, N.; Bartsch, D.; Basile, M.; Behnke, O.; Behr, J.; Behrens, U.; Bellagamba, L.; Bertolin, A.; Bhadra, S.; Bindi, M.; Blohm, C.; Bokhonov, V.; Bołd, T.; Bondarenko, K.; Boos, E. G.; Borras, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bot, D.; Brock, I.; Brownson, E.; Brugnera, R.; Brümmer, N.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Brzozowska, B.; Bussey, P. J.; Bylsma, B.; Caldwell, A.; Capua, M.; Carlin, R.; Catterall, C. D.; Chekanov, S.; Chwastowski, J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Contin, A.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Coppola, N.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Costa, M.; D'Agostini, G.; Corso, F. Dal; del Peso, J.; Dementiev, R. K.; De Pasquale, S.; Derrick, M.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Dobur, D.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Dolinska, G.; Doyle, A. T.; Drugakov, V.; Durkin, L. S.; Dusini, S.; Eisenberg, Y.; Ermolov, P. F.; Eskreys, A.; Fang, S.; Fazio, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrero, M. I.; Figiel, J.; Forrest, M.; Foster, B.; Gach, G.; Galas, A.; Gallo, E.; Garfagnini, A.; Geiser, A.; Gialas, I.; Gladilin, L. K.; Gladkov, D.; Glasman, C.; Gogota, O.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Göttlicher, P.; Grabowska-Bołd, I.; Grebenyuk, J.; Gregor, I.; Grigorescu, G.; Grzelak, G.; Gueta, O.; Guzik, M.; Gwenlan, C.; Haas, T.; Hain, W.; Hamatsu, R.; Hart, J. C.; Hartmann, H.; Hartner, G.; Hilger, E.; Hochman, D.; Hori, R.; Horton, K.; Hüttmann, A.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Iga, Y.; Ingbir, R.; Ishitsuka, M.; Jakob, H.-P.; Januschek, F.; Jimenez, M.; Jones, T. W.; Jüngst, M.; Kadenko, I.; Kahle, B.; Kananov, S.; Kanno, T.; Karshon, U.; Karstens, F.; Katkov, I. I.; Kaur, M.; Kaur, P.; Keramidas, A.; Khein, L. A.; Kim, J. Y.; Kisielewska, D.; Kitamura, S.; Klanner, R.; Klein, U.; Koffeman, E.; Kooijman, P.; Korol, Ie.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kotański, A.; Kötz, U.; Kowalski, H.; Kuprash, O.; Kuze, M.; Lee, A.; Levchenko, B. B.; Levy, A.; Libov, V.; Limentani, S.; Ling, T. Y.; Lisovyi, M.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lohmann, W.; Löhr, B.; Lohrmann, E.; Long, K. R.; Longhin, A.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Maeda, J.; Magill, S.; Makarenko, I.; Malka, J.; Mankel, R.; Margotti, A.; Marini, G.; Martin, J. F.; Mastroberardino, A.; Mattingly, M. C. K.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Mergelmeyer, S.; Miglioranzi, S.; Mohamad Idris, F.; Monaco, V.; Montanari, A.; Morris, J. D.; Mujkic, K.; Musgrave, B.; Nagano, K.; Namsoo, T.; Nania, R.; Nigro, A.; Ning, Y.; Nobe, T.; Noor, U.; Notz, D.; Nowak, R. J.; Nuncio-Quiroz, A. E.; Oh, B. Y.; Okazaki, N.; Oliver, K.; Olkiewicz, K.; Onishchuk, Yu.; Papageorgiu, K.; Parenti, A.; Paul, E.; Pawlak, J. M.; Pawlik, B.; Pelfer, P. G.; Pellegrino, A.; Perlański, W.; Perrey, H.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Pluciński, P.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Polini, A.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Przybycień, M.; Raval, A.; Reeder, D. D.; Reisert, B.; Ren, Z.; Repond, J.; Ri, Y. D.; Robertson, A.; Roloff, P.; Rubinsky, I.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Salii, A.; Samson, U.; Sartorelli, G.; Savin, A. A.; Saxon, D. H.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenstedt, S.; Schleper, P.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schneekloth, U.; Schönberg, V.; Schörner-Sadenius, T.; Schwartz, J.; Sciulli, F.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Shehzadi, R.; Shimizu, S.; Singh, I.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Słomiński, W.; Smith, W. H.; Sola, V.; Solano, A.; Son, D.; Sosnovtsev, V.; Spiridonov, A.; Stadie, H.; Stanco, L.; Stern, A.; Stewart, T. P.; Stifutkin, A.; Stopa, P.; Suchkov, S.; Susinno, G.; Suszycki, L.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Szuba, D.; Szuba, J.; Tapper, A. D.; Tassi, E.; Terrón, J.; Theedt, T.; Tiecke, H.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomalak, O.; Tomaszewska, J.; Tsurugai, T.; Turcato, M.; Tymieniecka, T.; Vázquez, M.; Verbytskyi, A.; Viazlo, O.; Vlasov, N. N.; Volynets, O.; Walczak, R.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.; Whitmore, J. J.; Wiggers, L.; Wing, M.; Wlasenko, M.; Wolf, G.; Wolfe, H.; Wrona, K.; Yagües-Molina, A. G.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yoshida, R.; Youngman, C.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Zawiejski, L.; Zenaiev, O.; Zeuner, W.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Zhmak, N.; Zhou, C.; Zichichi, A.; Zolkapli, Z.; Zolko, M.; Zotkin, D. S.

    2012-03-01

    Three-jet production in deep inelastic ep scattering and photoproduction was investigated with the ZEUS detector at HERA using an integrated luminosity of up to 127pb-1. Measurements of differential cross sections are presented as functions of angular correlations between the three jets in the final state and the proton-beam direction. These correlations provide a stringent test of perturbative QCD and show sensitivity to the contributions from different color configurations. Fixed-order perturbative calculations assuming the values of the color factors CF, CA, and TF as derived from a variety of gauge groups were compared to the measurements to study the underlying gauge group symmetry. The measured angular correlations in the deep inelastic ep scattering and photoproduction regimes are consistent with the admixture of color configurations as predicted by SU(3) and disfavour other symmetry groups, such as SU(N) in the limit of large N.

  4. Production of the excited charm mesons D1 and D2* at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramowicz, H.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.; Adamus, M.; Aggarwal, R.; Antonelli, S.; Antonioli, P.; Antonov, A.; Arneodo, M.; Arslan, O.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Bachynska, O.; Bamberger, A.; Barakbaev, A. N.; Barbagli, G.; Bari, G.; Barreiro, F.; Bartosik, N.; Bartsch, D.; Basile, M.; Behnke, O.; Behr, J.; Behrens, U.; Bellagamba, L.; Bertolin, A.; Bhadra, S.; Bindi, M.; Blohm, C.; Bokhonov, V.; Bołd, T.; Bondarenko, K.; Boos, E. G.; Borras, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bot, D.; Brock, I.; Brownson, E.; Brugnera, R.; Brümmer, N.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Brzozowska, B.; Bussey, P. J.; Bylsma, B.; Caldwell, A.; Capua, M.; Carlin, R.; Catterall, C. D.; Chekanov, S.; Chwastowski, J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Contin, A.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Coppola, N.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Costa, M.; D'Agostini, G.; Dal Corso, F.; del Peso, J.; Dementiev, R. K.; De Pasquale, S.; Derrick, M.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Dobur, D.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Dolinska, G.; Doyle, A. T.; Drugakov, V.; Durkin, L. S.; Dusini, S.; Eisenberg, Y.; Ermolov, P. F.; Eskreys, A.; Fang, S.; Fazio, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrero, M. I.; Figiel, J.; Foster, B.; Gach, G.; Galas, A.; Gallo, E.; Garfagnini, A.; Geiser, A.; Gialas, I.; Gizhko, A.; Gladilin, L. K.; Gladkov, D.; Glasman, C.; Gogota, O.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Göttlicher, P.; Grabowska-Bołd, I.; Grebenyuk, J.; Gregor, I.; Grigorescu, G.; Grzelak, G.; Gueta, O.; Guzik, M.; Gwenlan, C.; Haas, T.; Hain, W.; Hamatsu, R.; Hart, J. C.; Hartmann, H.; Hartner, G.; Hilger, E.; Hochman, D.; Hori, R.; Hüttmann, A.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Iga, Y.; Ingbir, R.; Ishitsuka, M.; Jakob, H.-P.; Januschek, F.; Jones, T. W.; Jüngst, M.; Kadenko, I.; Kahle, B.; Kananov, S.; Kanno, T.; Karshon, U.; Karstens, F.; Katkov, I. I.; Kaur, M.; Kaur, P.; Keramidas, A.; Khein, L. A.; Kim, J. Y.; Kisielewska, D.; Kitamura, S.; Klanner, R.; Klein, U.; Koffeman, E.; Kondrashova, N.; Kononenko, O.; Kooijman, P.; Korol, Ie.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kotański, A.; Kötz, U.; Kowalski, H.; Kuprash, O.; Kuze, M.; Lee, A.; Levchenko, B. B.; Levy, A.; Libov, V.; Limentani, S.; Ling, T. Y.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lohmann, W.; Löhr, B.; Lohrmann, E.; Long, K. R.; Longhin, A.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Maeda, J.; Magill, S.; Makarenko, I.; Malka, J.; Mankel, R.; Margotti, A.; Marini, G.; Martin, J. F.; Mastroberardino, A.; Mattingly, M. C. K.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Mergelmeyer, S.; Miglioranzi, S.; Mohamad Idris, F.; Monaco, V.; Montanari, A.; Morris, J. D.; Mujkic, K.; Musgrave, B.; Nagano, K.; Namsoo, T.; Nania, R.; Nigro, A.; Ning, Y.; Nobe, T.; Notz, D.; Nowak, R. J.; Nuncio-Quiroz, A. E.; Oh, B. Y.; Okazaki, N.; Olkiewicz, K.; Onishchuk, Yu.; Papageorgiu, K.; Parenti, A.; Paul, E.; Pawlak, J. M.; Pawlik, B.; Pelfer, P. G.; Pellegrino, A.; Perlański, W.; Perrey, H.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Pluciński, P.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Polini, A.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Przybycień, M.; Raval, A.; Reeder, D. D.; Reisert, B.; Ren, Z.; Repond, J.; Ri, Y. D.; Robertson, A.; Roloff, P.; Rubinsky, I.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Samson, U.; Sartorelli, G.; Savin, A. A.; Saxon, D. H.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenstedt, S.; Schleper, P.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schneekloth, U.; Schönberg, V.; Schörner-Sadenius, T.; Schwartz, J.; Sciulli, F.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Shehzadi, R.; Shimizu, S.; Singh, I.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Słomiński, W.; Smith, W. H.; Sola, V.; Solano, A.; Son, D.; Sosnovtsev, V.; Spiridonov, A.; Stadie, H.; Stanco, L.; Stefaniuk, N.; Stern, A.; Stewart, T. P.; Stifutkin, A.; Stopa, P.; Suchkov, S.; Susinno, G.; Suszycki, L.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Szuba, D.; Szuba, J.; Tapper, A. D.; Tassi, E.; Terrón, J.; Theedt, T.; Tiecke, H.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomaszewska, J.; Trusov, V.; Tsurugai, T.; Turcato, M.; Turkot, O.; Tymieniecka, T.; Vázquez, M.; Verbytskyi, A.; Viazlo, O.; Vlasov, N. N.; Walczak, R.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.; Whitmore, J. J.; Wichmann, K.; Wiggers, L.; Wing, M.; Wlasenko, M.; Wolf, G.; Wolfe, H.; Wrona, K.; Yagües-Molina, A. G.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yoshida, R.; Youngman, C.; Zabiegalov, O.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Zawiejski, L.; Zenaiev, O.; Zeuner, W.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Zhmak, N.; Zichichi, A.; Zolkapli, Z.; Zotkin, D. S.; ZEUS Collaboration

    2013-01-01

    The production of the excited charm mesons D1(2420) and D2*(2460) in ep collisions has been measured with the ZEUS detector at HERA using an integrated luminosity of 373 pb. The masses of the neutral and charged states, the widths of the neutral states, and the helicity parameter of D1(2420 were determined and compared with other measurements and with theoretical expectations. The measured helicity parameter of the D10 allows for some mixing of S- and D-waves in its decay to Dπ∓. The result is also consistent with a pure D-wave decay. Ratios of branching fractions of the two decay modes of the D2*(2460 and D2*(2460 states were measured and compared with previous measurements. The fractions of charm quarks hadronising into D1 and D2* were measured and are consistent with those obtained in e+e- annihilations.

  5. Measurement of beauty production in deep inelastic scattering at HERA using decays into electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramowicz, H.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.; Adamus, M.; Aggarwal, R.; Antonelli, S.; Antonioli, P.; Antonov, A.; Arneodo, M.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Bachynska, O.; Bamberger, A.; Barakbaev, A. N.; Barbagli, G.; Bari, G.; Barreiro, F.; Bartosik, N.; Bartsch, D.; Basile, M.; Behnke, O.; Behr, J.; Behrens, U.; Bellagamba, L.; Bertolin, A.; Bhadra, S.; Bindi, M.; Blohm, C.; Bokhonov, V.; Bołd, T.; Bolilyi, O.; Boos, E. G.; Borras, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bot, D.; Boutle, S. K.; Brock, I.; Brownson, E.; Brugnera, R.; Brümmer, N.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Brzozowska, B.; Bussey, P. J.; Butterworth, J. M.; Bylsma, B.; Caldwell, A.; Capua, M.; Carlin, R.; Catterall, C. D.; Chekanov, S.; Chwastowski, J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Contin, A.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Coppola, N.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Costa, M.; D'Agostini, G.; Dal Corso, F.; del Peso, J.; Dementiev, R. K.; De Pasquale, S.; Derrick, M.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Dobur, D.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Dolinska, G.; Doyle, A. T.; Drugakov, V.; Durkin, L. S.; Dusini, S.; Eisenberg, Y.; Ermolov, P. F.; Eskreys, A.; Fang, S.; Fazio, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrero, M. I.; Figiel, J.; Forrest, M.; Foster, B.; Fourletov, S.; Gach, G.; Galas, A.; Gallo, E.; Garfagnini, A.; Geiser, A.; Gialas, I.; Gladilin, L. K.; Gladkov, D.; Glasman, C.; Gogota, O.; Golubkov, Y. A.; Göttlicher, P.; Grabowska-Bołd, I.; Grebenyuk, J.; Gregor, I.; Grigorescu, G.; Grzelak, G.; Gueta, O.; Gwenlan, C.; Haas, T.; Hain, W.; Hamatsu, R.; Hart, J. C.; Hartmann, H.; Hartner, G.; Hilger, E.; Hochman, D.; Hori, R.; Horton, K.; Hüttmann, A.; Iacobucci, G.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Iga, Y.; Ingbir, R.; Ishitsuka, M.; Jakob, H.-P.; Januschek, F.; Jimenez, M.; Jones, T. W.; Jüngst, M.; Kadenko, I.; Kahle, B.; Kamaluddin, B.; Kananov, S.; Kanno, T.; Karshon, U.; Karstens, F.; Katkov, I. I.; Kaur, M.; Kaur, P.; Keramidas, A.; Khein, L. A.; Kim, J. Y.; Kisielewska, D.; Kitamura, S.; Klanner, R.; Klein, U.; Koffeman, E.; Kooijman, P.; Korol, I.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kotański, A.; Kötz, U.; Kowalski, H.; Kulinski, P.; Kuprash, O.; Kuze, M.; Lee, A.; Levchenko, B. B.; Levy, A.; Libov, V.; Limentani, S.; Ling, T. Y.; Lisovyi, M.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lohmann, W.; Löhr, B.; Lohrmann, E.; Loizides, J. H.; Long, K. R.; Longhin, A.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lukina, O. Y.; Łużniak, P.; Maeda, J.; Magill, S.; Makarenko, I.; Malka, J.; Mankel, R.; Margotti, A.; Marini, G.; Martin, J. F.; Mastroberardino, A.; Mattingly, M. C. K.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Mergelmeyer, S.; Miglioranzi, S.; Mohamad Idris, F.; Monaco, V.; Montanari, A.; Morris, J. D.; Mujkic, K.; Musgrave, B.; Nagano, K.; Namsoo, T.; Nania, R.; Nicholass, D.; Nigro, A.; Ning, Y.; Noor, U.; Notz, D.; Nowak, R. J.; Nuncio-Quiroz, A. E.; Oh, B. Y.; Okazaki, N.; Oliver, K.; Olkiewicz, K.; Onishchuk, Y.; Papageorgiu, K.; Parenti, A.; Paul, E.; Pawlak, J. M.; Pawlik, B.; Pelfer, P. G.; Pellegrino, A.; Perlanski, W.; Perrey, H.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Plucinski, P.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Polini, A.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Przybycień, M.; Raval, A.; Reeder, D. D.; Reisert, B.; Ren, Z.; Repond, J.; Ri, Y. D.; Robertson, A.; Roloff, P.; Ron, E.; Rubinsky, I.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Salii, A.; Samson, U.; Sartorelli, G.; Savin, A. A.; Saxon, D. H.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenstedt, S.; Schleper, P.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schneekloth, U.; Schönberg, V.; Schörner-Sadenius, T.; Schwartz, J.; Sciulli, F.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Shehzadi, R.; Shimizu, S.; Singh, I.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Słomiński, W.; Smith, W. H.; Sola, V.; Solano, A.; Son, D.; Sosnovtsev, V.; Spiridonov, A.; Stadie, H.; Stanco, L.; Stern, A.; Stewart, T. P.; Stifutkin, A.; Stopa, P.; Suchkov, S.; Susinno, G.; Suszycki, L.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Szuba, D.; Szuba, J.; Tapper, A. D.; Tassi, E.; Terrón, J.; Theedt, T.; Tiecke, H.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomalak, O.; Tomaszewska, J.; Tsurugai, T.; Turcato, M.; Tymieniecka, T.; Uribe-Estrada, C.; Vázquez, M.; Verbytskyi, A.; Viazlo, O.; Vlasov, N. N.; Volynets, O.; Walczak, R.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.; Whitmore, J. J.; Whyte, J.; Wiggers, L.; Wing, M.; Wlasenko, M.; Wolf, G.; Wolfe, H.; Wrona, K.; Yagües-Molina, A. G.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yoshida, R.; Youngman, C.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Zawiejski, L.; Zenaiev, O.; Zeuner, W.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Zhmak, N.; Zhou, C.; Zichichi, A.; Zolko, M.; Zotkin, D. S.; Zulkapli, Z.

    2011-02-01

    The production of beauty quarks in ep interactions has been studied with the ZEUS detector at HERA for exchanged four-momentum squared Q 2>10 GeV2, using an integrated luminosity of 363 pb-1. The beauty events were identified using electrons from semileptonic b decays with a transverse momentum 0.9 < pTe < 8 GeV and pseudorapidity | η e |<1.5. Cross sections for beauty production were measured and compared with next-to-leading-order QCD calculations. The beauty contribution to the proton structure function F 2 was extracted from the double-differential cross section as a function of Bjorken- x and Q 2.

  6. Search for single-top production in ep collisions at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ZEUS Collaboration; Abramowicz, H.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.; Adamus, M.; Aggarwal, R.; Antonelli, S.; Antonioli, P.; Antonov, A.; Arneodo, M.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Bachynska, O.; Bamberger, A.; Barakbaev, A. N.; Barbagli, G.; Bari, G.; Barreiro, F.; Bartosik, N.; Bartsch, D.; Basile, M.; Behnke, O.; Behr, J.; Behrens, U.; Bellagamba, L.; Bertolin, A.; Bhadra, S.; Bindi, M.; Blohm, C.; Bokhonov, V.; Bołd, T.; Bondarenko, K.; Boos, E. G.; Borras, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bot, D.; Brock, I.; Brownson, E.; Brugnera, R.; Brümmer, N.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Brzozowska, B.; Bussey, P. J.; Bylsma, B.; Caldwell, A.; Capua, M.; Carlin, R.; Catterall, C. D.; Chekanov, S.; Chwastowski, J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Contin, A.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Coppola, N.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Costa, M.; D'Agostini, G.; Corso, F. Dal; del Peso, J.; Dementiev, R. K.; De Pasquale, S.; Derrick, M.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Dobur, D.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Dolinska, G.; Doyle, A. T.; Drugakov, V.; Durkin, L. S.; Dusini, S.; Eisenberg, Y.; Ermolov, P. F.; Eskreys, A.; Fang, S.; Fazio, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrero, M. I.; Figiel, J.; Forrest, M.; Foster, B.; Gach, G.; Galas, A.; Gallo, E.; Garfagnini, A.; Geiser, A.; Gialas, I.; Gladilin, L. K.; Gladkov, D.; Glasman, C.; Gogota, O.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Göttlicher, P.; Grabowska-Bołd, I.; Grebenyuk, J.; Gregor, I.; Grigorescu, G.; Grzelak, G.; Gueta, O.; Guzik, M.; Gwenlan, C.; Haas, T.; Hain, W.; Hamatsu, R.; Hart, J. C.; Hartmann, H.; Hartner, G.; Hilger, E.; Hochman, D.; Hori, R.; Horton, K.; Hüttmann, A.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Iga, Y.; Ingbir, R.; Ishitsuka, M.; Jakob, H.-P.; Januschek, F.; Jones, T. W.; Jüngst, M.; Kadenko, I.; Kahle, B.; Kananov, S.; Kanno, T.; Karshon, U.; Karstens, F.; Katkov, I. I.; Kaur, M.; Kaur, P.; Keramidas, A.; Khein, L. A.; Kim, J. Y.; Kisielewska, D.; Kitamura, S.; Klanner, R.; Klein, U.; Koffeman, E.; Kooijman, P.; Korol, Ie.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kotański, A.; Kötz, U.; Kowalski, H.; Kuprash, O.; Kuze, M.; Lee, A.; Levchenko, B. B.; Levy, A.; Libov, V.; Limentani, S.; Ling, T. Y.; Lisovyi, M.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lohmann, W.; Löhr, B.; Lohrmann, E.; Long, K. R.; Longhin, A.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Maeda, J.; Magill, S.; Makarenko, I.; Malka, J.; Mankel, R.; Margotti, A.; Marini, G.; Martin, J. F.; Mastroberardino, A.; Mattingly, M. C. K.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Mergelmeyer, S.; Miglioranzi, S.; Idris, F. Mohamad; Monaco, V.; Montanari, A.; Morris, J. D.; Mujkic, K.; Musgrave, B.; Nagano, K.; Namsoo, T.; Nania, R.; Nigro, A.; Ning, Y.; Nobe, T.; Noor, U.; Notz, D.; Nowak, R. J.; Nuncio-Quiroz, A. E.; Oh, B. Y.; Okazaki, N.; Oliver, K.; Olkiewicz, K.; Onishchuk, Yu.; Papageorgiu, K.; Parenti, A.; Paul, E.; Pawlak, J. M.; Pawlik, B.; Pelfer, P. G.; Pellegrino, A.; Perlański, W.; Perrey, H.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Pluciński, P.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Polini, A.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Przybycień, M.; Raval, A.; Reeder, D. D.; Reisert, B.; Ren, Z.; Repond, J.; Ri, Y. D.; Robertson, A.; Roloff, P.; Rubinsky, I.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Salii, A.; Samson, U.; Sartorelli, G.; Savin, A. A.; Saxon, D. H.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenstedt, S.; Schleper, P.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schneekloth, U.; Schönberg, V.; Schörner-Sadenius, T.; Schwartz, J.; Sciulli, F.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Shehzadi, R.; Shimizu, S.; Singh, I.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Słomiński, W.; Smith, W. H.; Sola, V.; Solano, A.; Son, D.; Sosnovtsev, V.; Spiridonov, A.; Stadie, H.; Stanco, L.; Stern, A.; Stewart, T. P.; Stifutkin, A.; Stopa, P.; Suchkov, S.; Susinno, G.; Suszycki, L.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Szuba, D.; Szuba, J.; Tapper, A. D.; Tassi, E.; Terrón, J.; Theedt, T.; Tiecke, H.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomalak, O.; Tomaszewska, J.; Tsurugai, T.; Turcato, M.; Tymieniecka, T.; Vázquez, M.; Verbytskyi, A.; Viazlo, O.; Vlasov, N. N.; Volynets, O.; Walczak, R.; Abdullah, W. A. T. Wan; Whitmore, J. J.; Wiggers, L.; Wing, M.; Wlasenko, M.; Wolf, G.; Wolfe, H.; Wrona, K.; Yagües-Molina, A. G.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yoshida, R.; Youngman, C.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Zawiejski, L.; Zenaiev, O.; Zeuner, W.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Zhmak, N.; Zhou, C.; Zichichi, A.; Zolkapli, Z.; Zolko, M.; Zotkin, D. S.

    2012-02-01

    A search for single-top production, ep→etX, has been performed with the ZEUS detector at HERA using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 0.37 fb. No evidence for top production was found, consistent with the expectation from the Standard Model. Limits were computed for single-top production via flavour changing neutral current transitions involving a neutral electroweak vector boson, γ or Z. The result was combined with a previous ZEUS result yielding a total luminosity of 0.50 fb. A 95% credibility level upper limit of 0.13 pb was obtained for the cross section at the centre-of-mass energy of s=315 GeV.

  7. Further studies of the photoproduction of isolated photons with a jet at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramowicz, H.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.; Adamus, M.; Aggarwal, R.; Antonelli, S.; Arslan, O.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Bachynska, O.; Barakbaev, A. N.; Bartosik, N.; Behnke, O.; Behr, J.; Behrens, U.; Bertolin, A.; Bhadra, S.; Bloch, I.; Bokhonov, V.; Boos, E. G.; Borras, K.; Brock, I.; Brugnera, R.; Bruni, A.; Brzozowska, B.; Bussey, P. J.; Caldwell, A.; Capua, M.; Catterall, C. D.; Chwastowski, J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; D'Agostini, G.; Dementiev, R. K.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Dolinska, G.; Drugakov, V.; Dusini, S.; Ferrando, J.; Figiel, J.; Foster, B.; Gach, G.; Garfagnini, A.; Geiser, A.; Gizhko, A.; Gladilin, L. K.; Gogota, O.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Grebenyuk, J.; Gregor, I.; Grzelak, G.; Gueta, O.; Guzik, M.; Hain, W.; Hartner, G.; Hochman, D.; Hori, R.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Iga, Y.; Ishitsuka, M.; Iudin, A.; Januschek, F.; Kadenko, I.; Kananov, S.; Kanno, T.; Karshon, U.; Kaur, M.; Kaur, P.; Khein, L. A.; Kisielewska, D.; Klanner, R.; Klein, U.; Kondrashova, N.; Kononenko, O.; Korol, Ie.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kotanski, A.; Kötz, U.; Kovalchuk, N.; Kowalski, H.; Kuprash, O.; Kuze, M.; Levchenko, B. B.; Levy, A.; Libov, V.; Limentani, S.; Lisovyi, M.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lohmann, W.; Löhr, B.; Lohrmann, E.; Longhin, A.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Maeda, J.; Makarenko, I.; Malka, J.; Martin, J. F.; Mergelmeyer, S.; Idris, F. Mohamad; Mujkic, K.; Myronenko, V.; Nagano, K.; Nigro, A.; Nobe, T.; Notz, D.; Nowak, R. J.; Olkiewicz, K.; Onishchuk, Yu.; Paul, E.; Perlanski, W.; Perrey, H.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Przybycien, M.; Raval, A.; Roloff, P.; Rubinsky, I.; Ruspa, M.; Samojlov, V.; Saxon, D. H.; Schioppa, M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schneekloth, U.; Schörner-Sadenius, T.; Schwartz, J.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Shevchenko, R.; Shkola, O.; Singh, I.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Slominski, W.; Sola, V.; Solano, A.; Spiridonov, A.; Stanco, L.; Stefaniuk, N.; Stern, A.; Stewart, T. P.; Stopa, P.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Szuba, D.; Szuba, J.; Tassi, E.; Temiraliev, T.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomaszewska, J.; Trofymov, A.; Trusov, V.; Tsurugai, T.; Turcato, M.; Turkot, O.; Tymieniecka, T.; Verbytskyi, A.; Viazlo, O.; Walczak, R.; Abdullah, W. A. T. Wan; Wichmann, K.; Wing, M.; Wolf, G.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Zakharchuk, N.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Zawiejski, L.; Zenaiev, O.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Zhmak, N.; Zotkin, D. S.

    2014-08-01

    In this extended analysis using the ZEUS detector at HERA, the photoproduction of isolated photons together with a jet is measured for different ranges of the fractional photon energy, x {/γ meas}, contributing to the photon-jet final state. Cross sections are evaluated in the photon transverse-energy and pseudorapidity ranges 6 < E {/T γ } < 15 GeV and -0 .7 < η γ < 0 .9, and for jet transverse-energy and pseudorapidity ranges 4 < E {/T jet} < 35 GeV and -1 .5 < η jet < 1 .8, for an integrated luminosity of 374 pb-1. The kinematic observables studied comprise the transverse energy and pseudorapidity of the photon and the jet, the azimuthal difference between them, the fraction of proton energy taking part in the interaction, and the difference between the pseudorapidities of the photon and the jet. Higher-order theoretical calculations are compared to the results.

  8. Limits on the effective quark radius from inclusive ep scattering at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramowicz, H.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.; Adamus, M.; Antonelli, S.; Aushev, V.; Behnke, O.; Behrens, U.; Bertolin, A.; Bhadra, S.; Bloch, I.; Boos, E. G.; Brock, I.; Brook, N. H.; Brugnera, R.; Bruni, A.; Bussey, P. J.; Caldwell, A.; Capua, M.; Catterall, C. D.; Chwastowski, J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Corradi, M.; Dementiev, R. K.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Dusini, S.; Foster, B.; Gach, G.; Gallo, E.; Garfagnini, A.; Geiser, A.; Gizhko, A.; Gladilin, L. K.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Grzelak, G.; Guzik, M.; Gwenlan, C.; Hain, W.; Hlushchenko, O.; Hochman, D.; Hori, R.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Iga, Y.; Ishitsuka, M.; Januschek, F.; Jomhari, N. Z.; Kadenko, I.; Kananov, S.; Karshon, U.; Kaur, P.; Kisielewska, D.; Klanner, R.; Klein, U.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kotański, A.; Kötz, U.; Kovalchuk, N.; Kowalski, H.; Krupa, B.; Kuprash, O.; Kuze, M.; Levchenko, B. B.; Levy, A.; Limentani, S.; Lisovyi, M.; Lobodzinska, E.; Löhr, B.; Lohrmann, E.; Longhin, A.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Makarenko, I.; Malka, J.; Mastroberardino, A.; Mohamad Idris, F.; Mohammad Nasir, N.; Myronenko, V.; Nagano, K.; Nobe, T.; Nowak, R. J.; Onishchuk, Yu.; Paul, E.; Perlański, W.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Polini, A.; Przybycień, M.; Roloff, P.; Ruspa, M.; Saxon, D. H.; Schioppa, M.; Schneekloth, U.; Schörner-Sadenius, T.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Shevchenko, R.; Shkola, O.; Shyrma, Yu.; Singh, I.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Słomiński, W.; Solano, A.; Stanco, L.; Stefaniuk, N.; Stern, A.; Stopa, P.; Sukhonos, D.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Tassi, E.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomaszewska, J.; Tsurugai, T.; Turcato, M.; Turkot, O.; Tymieniecka, T.; Verbytskyi, A.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.; Wichmann, K.; Wing, M.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Zakharchuk, N.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Zawiejski, L.; Zenaiev, O.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Zotkin, D. S.

    2016-06-01

    The high-precision HERA data allows searches up to TeV scales for beyond the Standard Model contributions to electron-quark scattering. Combined measurements of the inclusive deep inelastic cross sections in neutral and charged current ep scattering corresponding to a luminosity of around 1 fb-1 have been used in this analysis. A new approach to the beyond the Standard Model analysis of the inclusive ep data is presented; simultaneous fits of parton distribution functions together with contributions of "new physics" processes were performed. Results are presented considering a finite radius of quarks within the quark form-factor model. The resulting 95% C.L. upper limit on the effective quark radius is 0.43 ṡ10-16 cm.

  9. Production of exclusive dijets in diffractive deep inelastic scattering at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramowicz, H.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.; Adamus, M.; Antonelli, S.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Behnke, O.; Behrens, U.; Bertolin, A.; Bloch, I.; Boos, E. G.; Borras, K.; Brock, I.; Brook, N. H.; Brugnera, R.; Bruni, A.; Bussey, P. J.; Caldwell, A.; Capua, M.; Catterall, C. D.; Chwastowski, J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Dementiev, R. K.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Dolinska, G.; Dusini, S.; Figiel, J.; Foster, B.; Gach, G.; Gallo, E.; Garfagnini, A.; Geiser, A.; Gizhko, A.; Gladilin, L. K.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Grebenyuk, J.; Gregor, I.; Grzelak, G.; Gueta, O.; Guzik, M.; Hain, W.; Hochman, D.; Hori, R.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Iga, Y.; Ishitsuka, M.; Iudin, A.; Januschek, F.; Jomhari, N. Z.; Kadenko, I.; Kananov, S.; Karshon, U.; Kaur, M.; Kaur, P.; Kisielewska, D.; Klanner, R.; Klein, U.; Kondrashova, N.; Kononenko, O.; Korol, Ie.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kotański, A.; Kötz, U.; Kovalchuk, N.; Kowalski, H.; Krupa, B.; Kuprash, O.; Kuze, M.; Levchenko, B. B.; Levy, A.; Libov, V.; Limentani, S.; Lisovyi, M.; Lobodzinska, E.; Löhr, B.; Lohrmann, E.; Longhin, A.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Makarenko, I.; Malka, J.; Mergelmeyer, S.; Mohamad Idris, F.; Mohammad Nasir, N.; Myronenko, V.; Nagano, K.; Nobe, T.; Notz, D.; Nowak, R. J.; Onishchuk, Yu.; Paul, E.; Perlański, W.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Przybycień, M.; Roloff, P.; Rubinsky, I.; Ruspa, M.; Saxon, D. H.; Schioppa, M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schneekloth, U.; Schörner-Sadenius, T.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Shevchenko, R.; Shkola, O.; Shyrma, Yu.; Singh, I.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Słomiński, W.; Solano, A.; Stanco, L.; Stefaniuk, N.; Stern, A.; Stopa, P.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Szuba, D.; Szuba, J.; Tassi, E.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomaszewska, J.; Trofymov, A.; Tsurugai, T.; Turcato, M.; Turkot, O.; Tymieniecka, T.; Verbytskyi, A.; Viazlo, O.; Walczak, R.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.; Wichmann, K.; Wing, M.; Wolf, G.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Zakharchuk, N.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Zawiejski, L.; Zenaiev, O.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Zhmak, N.; Zotkin, D. S.

    2016-01-01

    Production of exclusive dijets in diffractive deep inelastic e^± p scattering has been measured with the ZEUS detector at HERA using an integrated luminosity of 372 pb^{-1}. The measurement was performed for γ ^{*}- p centre-of-mass energies in the range 90< W < {250} {GeV} and for photon virtualities Q^2 > {25} {GeV2}. Energy flows around the jet axis are presented. The cross section is presented as a function of β and φ , where β =x/x_IP, x is the Bjorken variable and x_IP is the proton fractional longitudinal momentum loss. The angle φ is defined by the γ ^{*}-dijet plane and the γ ^{*}-e^± plane in the rest frame of the diffractive final state. The φ cross section is measured in bins of β . The results are compared to predictions from models based on different assumptions about the nature of the diffractive exchange.

  10. RadWorks Project. ISS REM - to - BIRD - to - HERA: The Evolution of a Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McLeod, Catherine D.

    2015-01-01

    The advancement of particle detectors based on technologies developed for use in high-energy physics applications has enabled the development of a completely new generation of compact low-power active dosimeters and area monitors for use in space radiation environments. One such device, the TimePix, is being developed at CERN, and is providing the technology basis for the most recent line of radiation detection devices being developed by the NASA AES RadWorks project. The most fundamental of these devices, an ISS-Radiation Environment Monitor (REM), is installed as a USB device on ISS where it is monitoring the radiation environment on a perpetual basis. The second generation of this TimePix technology, the BIRD (Battery-operated Independent Radiation Detector), was flown on the NASA EFT-1 flight in December 2014. Data collected by BIRD was the first data made available from the Trapped Belt region of the Earth's atmosphere in over 40 years. The 3rdgeneration of this technology, the HERA (Hybrid Electronic Radiation Assessor), is planned to be integrated into the Orion EM-1, and EM-2 vehicles where it will monitor the radiation environment. For the EM-2 flight, HERA will provide Caution and Warning notification for SPEs as well as real time dose measurements for crew members. The development of this line of radiation detectors provide much greater information and characterization of charged particles in the space radiation environment than has been collected in the past, and in the process provide greater information to inform crew members of radiation related risks, while being very power and mass efficient.

  11. Using ASD8 as readout of multianode photomultipliers for single photoelectron discrimination in the HERA-B RICH detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ariño, I.; Chmeissani, M.; Conde, P.; Garrido, L.; Gascon, D.; Miquel, R.; Peralta, D.; Sieiro, J.

    2001-01-01

    ASD8 is the analog front end chosen to read out the photodetectors of the HERA-B RICH. A test of 1791 boards was performed to study which were the best operating conditions, to make a quality assessment and to optimize the distribution of the boards on the RICH focal plane. Nevertheless, some drawbacks are apparent when a board designed for tracker detectors is employed to convert a photomultiplier signal.

  12. Research Article. Improved Dual Frequency PPP Model Using GPS and BeiDou Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afifi, A.; El-Rabbany, A.

    2017-02-01

    This paper introduces a new dual-frequency precise point positioning (PPP) model, which combines GPS and BeiDou observations. Combining GPS and BeiDou observations in a PPP model offers more visible satellites to the user, which is expected to enhance the satellite geometry and the overall PPP solution in comparison with GPSonly PPP solution. However, combining different GNSS constellations introduces additional biases, which require rigorous modelling, including GNSS time offset and hardware delays. In this research, ionosphere-free linear combination PPP model is developed. The additional biases, which result from combining the GPS and BeiDou observables, are lumped into a new unknown parameter identified as the inter-system bias. Natural Resources Canada's GPSPace PPP software is modified to enable a combined GPS/BeiDou PPP solution and to handle the newly introduced biases. A total of four data sets at four IGS stations are processed to verify the developed PPP model. Precise satellite orbit and clock products from the IGS-MGEX network are used to correct both of the GPS and BeiDou measurements. It is shown that a sub-decimeter positioning accuracy level and 25% reduction in the solution convergence time can be achieved with combining GPS and Bei-Dou observables in a PPP model, in comparison with the GPS-only PPP solution.

  13. BeiDou inter-satellite-type bias evaluation and calibration for mixed receiver attitude determination.

    PubMed

    Nadarajah, Nandakumaran; Teunissen, Peter J G; Raziq, Noor

    2013-07-22

    The Chinese BeiDou system (BDS), having different types of satellites, is an important addition to the ever growing system of Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS). It consists of Geostationary Earth Orbit (GEO) satellites, Inclined Geosynchronous Satellite Orbit (IGSO) satellites and Medium Earth Orbit (MEO) satellites. This paper investigates the receiver-dependent bias between these satellite types, for which we coined the name "inter-satellite-type bias" (ISTB), and its impact on mixed receiver attitude determination. Assuming different receiver types may have different delays/biases for different satellite types, we model the differential ISTBs among three BeiDou satellite types and investigate their existence and their impact on mixed receiver attitude determination. Our analyses using the real data sets from Curtin's GNSS array consisting of different types of BeiDou enabled receivers and series of zero-baseline experiments with BeiDou-enabled receivers reveal the existence of non-zero ISTBs between different BeiDou satellite types. We then analyse the impact of these biases on BeiDou-only attitude determination using the constrained (C-)LAMBDA method, which exploits the knowledge of baseline length. Results demonstrate that these biases could seriously affect the integer ambiguity resolution for attitude determination using mixed receiver types and that a priori correction of these biases will dramatically improve the success rate.

  14. Photochemical modeling of the Ozark isoprene volcano: MEGAN, BEIS, and their impacts on air quality predictions.

    PubMed

    Carlton, Annmarie G; Baker, Kirk R

    2011-05-15

    Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) contribute substantially to atmospheric carbon, exerting influence on air quality and climate. Two widely used models, the Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature (MEGAN) and the Biogenic Emission Inventory System (BEIS) are employed to generate emissions for application in the CMAQ air quality model. Predictions of isoprene, monoterpenes, ozone, formaldehyde, and secondary organic carbon (SOC) are compared to surface and aloft measurements made during an intensive study in the Ozarks, a large isoprene emitting region. MEGAN and BEIS predict spatially similar emissions but magnitudes differ. The total VOC reactivity of the emissions, as developed for the CB05 gas-phase chemical mechanism, is a factor of 2 different between the models. Isoprene estimates by CMAQ-MEGAN are higher and more variable than surface and aloft measurements, whereas CMAQ-BEIS predictions are lower. CMAQ ozone predictions are similar and compare well with measurements using either MEGAN or BEIS. However, CMAQ-MEGAN overpredicts formaldehyde. CMAQ-BEIS SOC predictions are lower than observational estimates for every sample. CMAQ-MEGAN underpredicts SOC ∼ 80% of the time, despite overprediction of precursor VOCs. CMAQ-MEGAN isoprene predictions improve when prognostically predicted solar radiation is replaced with the GEWEX satellite product. CMAQ-BEIS does not exhibit similar photosensitivity.

  15. Electron deuteron scattering with HERA, a letter of intent for an experimental programme with the H1 detector

    SciTech Connect

    T. Alexopoulos; et. al.

    2003-12-01

    This document outlines the case for a program of electron-deuteron scattering measurements at HERA using the H1 detector. The goals of the e D program are to map the partonic structure of the nucleon at large Q2 and low x, to explore the valence quark distributions at the highest x values, to provide a precise measurement of the strong coupling constant and to investigate the parton recombination phenomena revealed in shadowing and their relationship to diffraction. The importance of these measurements for the understanding of the perturbative and non-perturbative aspects of QCD thought to be responsible for nucleon structure is discussed, as is the significance of the measurements for future experimental programs. Some modifications to both the H1 apparatus and the HERA accelerator are necessary to realize this program; these are presented in the document. Mention is also made of questions that will remain unanswered following the completion of the above program and the potential role of HERA and of H1 in investigating these questions is outlined. Physicists and Institutes interested in supporting this project are asked to inform Max Klein (klein@ifh.de) and Tim Greenshaw (green@hep.ph.liv.ac.uk) that they would like to have their names on the Letter of Intent by Wednesday 30th April 2003.

  16. Precise orbit determination of BeiDou constellation based on BETS and MGEX network

    PubMed Central

    Lou, Yidong; Liu, Yang; Shi, Chuang; Yao, Xiuguang; Zheng, Fu

    2014-01-01

    Chinese BeiDou Navigation Satellite System is officially operational as a regional constellation with five Geostationary Earth Orbit (GEO) satellites, five Inclined Geosynchronous Satellite Orbit (IGSO) satellites and four Medium Earth Orbit (MEO) satellites. Observations from the BeiDou Experimental Tracking Stations (BETS) and the IGS Multi-GNSS Experiment (MGEX) network from 1 January to 31 March 2013 are processed for orbit determination of the BeiDou constellation. Various arc lengths and solar radiation pressure parameters are investigated. The reduced set of ECOM five-parameter model produces better performance than the full set of ECOM nine-parameter model for BeiDou IGSO and MEO. The orbit overlap for the middle days of 3-day arc solutions is better than 20 cm and 14 cm for IGSO and MEO in RMS, respectively. Satellite laser ranging residuals are better than 10 cm for both IGSO and MEO. For BeiDou GEO, the orbit overlap of several meters and satellite laser ranging residuals of several decimetres can be achieved. PMID:24733025

  17. Precise orbit determination of BeiDou constellation based on BETS and MGEX network.

    PubMed

    Lou, Yidong; Liu, Yang; Shi, Chuang; Yao, Xiuguang; Zheng, Fu

    2014-04-15

    Chinese BeiDou Navigation Satellite System is officially operational as a regional constellation with five Geostationary Earth Orbit (GEO) satellites, five Inclined Geosynchronous Satellite Orbit (IGSO) satellites and four Medium Earth Orbit (MEO) satellites. Observations from the BeiDou Experimental Tracking Stations (BETS) and the IGS Multi-GNSS Experiment (MGEX) network from 1 January to 31 March 2013 are processed for orbit determination of the BeiDou constellation. Various arc lengths and solar radiation pressure parameters are investigated. The reduced set of ECOM five-parameter model produces better performance than the full set of ECOM nine-parameter model for BeiDou IGSO and MEO. The orbit overlap for the middle days of 3-day arc solutions is better than 20 cm and 14 cm for IGSO and MEO in RMS, respectively. Satellite laser ranging residuals are better than 10 cm for both IGSO and MEO. For BeiDou GEO, the orbit overlap of several meters and satellite laser ranging residuals of several decimetres can be achieved.

  18. Measurement of the diffractive structure function in deep inelastic scattering at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derrick, M.; Krakauer, D.; Magill, S.; Mikunas, D.; Musgrave, B.; Repond, J.; Stanek, R.; Talaga, R. L.; Zhang, H.; Ayad, R.; Bari, G.; Basile, M.; Bellagamba, L.; Boscherini, D.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruni, P.; Cara Romeo, G.; Castellini, G.; Chiarini, M.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Contin, A.; Corradi, M.; Gialas, I.; Giusti, P.; Iacobucci, G.; Laurenti, G.; Levi, G.; Margotti, A.; Massam, T.; Nania, R.; Nemoz, C.; Palmonari, F.; Polini, A.; Sartorelli, G.; Timellini, R.; Zamora Garcia, Y.; Zichichi, A.; Bargende, A.; Crittenden, J.; Desch, K.; Diekmann, B.; Doeker, T.; Eckert, M.; Feld, L.; Frey, A.; Geerts, M.; Geitz, G.; Grothe, M.; Hartmann, H.; Heinloth, H.; Hilger, E.; Jakob, H.-P.; Katz, U. F.; Mari, S. M.; Mass, A.; Mengel, S.; Mollen, J.; Paul, E.; Rembser, Ch.; Schramm, D.; Stamm, J.; Wedemeyer, R.; Campbell-Robson, S.; Cassidy, A.; Dyce, N.; Foster, B.; George, S.; Gilmore, R.; Heath, G. P.; Heath, H. F.; Llewellyn, T. J.; Morgado, C. J. S.; Norman, D. J. P.; O'Mara, J. A.; Tapper, R. J.; Wilson, S. S.; Yoshida, R.; Rau, R. R.; Arneodo, M.; Capua, M.; Garfagnini, A.; Iannotti, L.; Schioppa, M.; Susinno, G.; Bernstein, A.; Caldwell, A.; Cartiglia, N.; Parsons, J. A.; Ritz, S.; Sciulli, F.; Straub, P. B.; Wai, L.; Yang, S.; Zhu, Q.; Borzemski, P.; Chwastowski, J.; Eskreys, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Zachara, M.; Zawiejski, L.; Adamczyk, L.; Bednarek, B.; Jeleń, K.; Kisielewska, D.; Kowalski, T.; Rulikowska-Zarębska, E.; Suszycki, L.; Zając, J.; Kotański, A.; Przybycień, M.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Behrens, U.; Beier, H.; Bienlein, J. K.; Coldewey, C.; Deppe, O.; Desler, K.; Drews, G.; Flasiński, M.; Gilkinson, D. J.; Glasman, C.; Göttlicher, P.; Große-Knetter, J.; Gutjahr, B.; Haas, T.; Hain, W.; Hasell, D.; Heßling, H.; Iga, Y.; Joos, P.; Kasemann, M.; Klanner, R.; Koch, W.; Köpke, L.; Kötz, U.; Kowalski, H.; Labs, J.; Ladage, A.; Löhr, B.; Löwe, M.; Lüke, D.; Mainusch, J.; Mańczak, O.; Monteiro, T.; Ng, J. S. T.; Nickel, S.; Notz, D.; Ohrenberg, K.; Roco, M.; Rohde, M.; Roldán, J.; Schneekloth, U.; Schulz, W.; Selonke, F.; Stiliaris, E.; Surrow, B.; Voß, T.; Westphal, D.; Wolf, G.; Youngman, C.; Zhou, J. F.; Grabosch, H. J.; Kharchilava, A.; Leich, A.; Mattingly, M. C. K.; Meyer, A.; Schlenstedt, S.; Wulff, N.; Barbagli, G.; Pelfer, P.; Anzivino, G.; Maccarrone, G.; de Pasquale, S.; Votano, L.; Bamberger, A.; Eisenhardt, S.; Freidhof, A.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Schroeder, J.; Trefzger, T.; Brook, N. H.; Bussey, P. J.; Doyle, A. T.; Fleck, J. I.; Saxon, D. H.; Utley, M. L.; Wilson, A. S.; Dannemann, A.; Holm, U.; Horstmann, D.; Neumann, T.; Sinkus, R.; Wick, K.; Badura, E.; Burow, B. D.; Hagge, L.; Lohrmann, E.; Milewski, J.; Nakahata, M.; Pavel, N.; Poelz, G.; Schott, W.; Zetsche, F.; Bacon, T. C.; Butterworth, I.; Gallo, E.; Harris, V. L.; Hung, B. Y. H.; Long, K. R.; Miller, D. B.; Morawitz, P. P. O.; Prinias, A.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Whitfield, A. F.; Mallik, U.; McCliment, E.; Wang, M. Z.; Wang, S. M.; Wu, J. T.; Zhang, Y.; Cloth, P.; Filges, D.; An, S. H.; Hong, S. M.; Nam, S. W.; Park, S. K.; Suh, M. H.; Yon, S. H.; Imlay, R.; Kartik, S.; Kim, H.-J.; McNeil, R. R.; Metcalf, W.; Nadendla, V. K.; Barreiro, F.; Cases, G.; Fernandez, J. P.; Graciani, R.; Hernández, J. M.; Hervás, L.; Labarga, L.; Martinez, M.; Del Peso, J.; Puga, J.; Terron, J.; de Trocóniz, J. F.; Smith, G. R.; Corriveau, F.; Hanna, D. S.; Hartmann, J.; Hung, L. W.; Lim, J. N.; Matthews, C. G.; Patel, P. M.; Sinclair, L. E.; Stairs, D. G.; St. Laurent, M.; Ullmann, R.; Zacek, G.; Bashkirov, V.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Stifutkin, A.; Bashindzhagyan, G. L.; Ermolov, P. F.; Gladilin, L. K.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Kobrin, V. D.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Savin, A. A.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Solomin, A. N.; Zotov, N. P.; Botje, M.; Chlebana, F.; Dake, A.; Engelen, J.; de Kamps, M.; Kooijman, P.; Kruse, A.; Tiecke, H.; Verkerke, W.; Vreeswijk, M.; Wiggers, L.; de Wolf, E.; van Woudenberg, R.; Acosta, D.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Honscheid, K.; Li, C.; Ling, T. Y.; McLean, K. W.; Murray, W. N.; Park, I. H.; Romanowski, T. A.; Seidlein, R.; Bailey, D. S.; Byrne, A.; Cashmore, R. J.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Harnew, N.; Lancaster, M.; Lindemann, L.; McFall, J. D.; Nath, C.; Noyes, V. A.; Quadt, A.; Tickner, J. R.; Uijterwaal, H.; Walczak, R.; Waters, D. S.; Wilson, F. F.; Yip, T.; Abbiendi, G.; Bertolin, A.; Brugnera, R.; Carlin, R.; Dal Corso, F.; de Giorgi, M.; Dosselli, U.; Limentani, S.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Stanco, L.; Stroili, R.; Voci, C.; Bulmahn, J.; Butterworth, J. M.; Feild, R. G.; Oh, B. Y.; Whitmore, J. J.; D'Agostini, G.; Marini, G.; Nigro, A.; Tassi, E.; Hart, J. C.; McCubbin, N. A.; Prytz, K.; Shah, T. P.; Short, T. L.; Barberis, E.; Dubbs, T.; Heusch, C.; van Hook, M.; Hubbard, B.; Lockman, W.; Rahn, J. T.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Seiden, A.; Biltzinger, J.; Seifert, R. J.; Schwarzer, O.; Walenta, A. H.; Zech, G.; Abramowicz, H.; Briskin, G.; Dagan, S.; Levy, A.; Hasegawa, T.; Hazumi, M.; Ishii, T.; Kuze, M.; Mine, S.; Nagasawa, Y.; Nakao, M.; Suzuki, I.; Tokushuku, K.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Chiba, M.; Hamatsu, R.; Hirose, T.; Homma, K.; Kitamura, S.; Nakamitsu, Y.; Yamauchi, K.; Cirio, R.; Costa, M.; Ferrero, M. I.; Lamberti, L.; Maselli, S.; Peroni, C.; Sacchi, R.; Solano, A.; Staiano, A.; Dardo, M.; Bailey, D. C.; Bandyopadhyay, D.; Benard, F.; Brkic, M.; Crombie, M. B.; Gingrich, D. M.; Hartner, G. F.; Joo, K. K.; Levman, G. M.; Martin, J. F.; Orr, R. S.; Sampson, C. R.; Teuscher, R. J.; Catterall, C. D.; Jones, T. W.; Kaziewicz, P. B.; Lane, J. B.; Saunders, R. L.; Shulman, J.; Blankenship, K.; Lu, B.; Mo, L. W.; Bogusz, W.; Charchula, K.; Ciborowski, J.; Gajewski, J.; Grzelak, G.; Kasprzak, M.; Krzyżanowski, M.; Muchorowski, K.; Nowak, R. J.; Pawlak, J. M.; Tymieniecka, T.; Wróblewski, A. K.; Zakrzewski, J. A.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Adamus, M.; Eisenberg, Y.; Karshon, U.; Revel, D.; Zer-Zion, D.; Ali, I.; Badgett, W. F.; Behrens, B.; Dasu, S.; Fordham, C.; Foudas, C.; Goussiou, A.; Loveless, R. J.; Reeder, D. D.; Silverstein, S.; Smith, W. H.; Vaiciulis, A.; Wodarczyk, M.; Tsurugai, T.; Bhadra, S.; Cardy, M. L.; Fagerstroem, C.-P.; Frisken, W. R.; Furutani, K. M.; Khakzad, M.; Schmidke, W. B.

    1995-12-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the inclusive properties of diffractive deep inelastic scattering events produced in ep interactions at HERA. The events are characterised by a rapidity gap between the outgoing proton system and the remaining hadronic system. Inclusive distributions are presented and compared with Monte Carlo models for diffractive processes. The data are consistent with models where the pomeron structure function has a hard and a soft contribution. The diffractive structure function is measured as a function of x ℙ, the momentum fraction lost by the proton, of β, the momentum fraction of the struck quark with respect to x ℙ, and of Q 2 in the range 6.3·10-4< x ℙ <10-2, 0.1<β<0.8 and 8< Q 2<100 GeV2. The dependence is consistent with the form x ℙ where a=1.30±0.08(stat) {-0.14/+0.08} (sys) in all bins of β and Q 2. In the measured Q 2 range, the diffractive structure function approximately scales with Q 2 at fixed β. In an Ingelman-Schlein type model, where commonly used pomeron flux factor normalisations are assumed, it is found that the quarks within the pomeron do not saturate the momentum sum rule.

  19. Prompt photon photoproduction at HERA within the framework of the quark Reggeization hypothesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleev, V. A.

    2008-12-01

    We study the inclusive production of isolated prompt photons within the framework of the quasi-multi-Regge-kinematic approach, applying the quark Reggeization hypothesis. We describe accurately and without free parameters the transverse momentum and pseudorapidity spectra of prompt photons in the inclusive photoproduction at the HERA Collider. It is shown that the main mechanism of the inclusive prompt photon production in the γp collisions is the fusion of a Reggeized quark (antiquark) from the proton and a collinear antiquark (quark) from the photon into a photon, via the effective Reggeon-quark-gamma vertex. The fragmentation of the quark, which is produced via the gamma-Reggeon-quark and quark-Reggeon-quark vertices, into a photon is strongly suppressed by the isolation cone condition and it gives a significant contribution in the region of a large negative pseudorapidity only. At the stage of numerical calculations we use the Kimber-Martin-Ryskin prescription for unintegrated quark and gluon distribution functions, with the following collinear parton densities as input: Martin-Roberts-Stirling-Thorne for a proton and Glück-Reya-Vogt for a photon.

  20. Measurement of inelastic J/ψ and ψ' photoproduction at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramowicz, H.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.; Adamus, M.; Aggarwal, R.; Antonelli, S.; Antonioli, P.; Antonov, A.; Arneodo, M.; Arslan, O.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Bachynska, O.; Bamberger, A.; Barakbaev, A. N.; Barbagli, G.; Bari, G.; Barreiro, F.; Bartosik, N.; Bartsch, D.; Basile, M.; Behnke, O.; Behr, J.; Behrens, U.; Bellagamba, L.; Bertolin, A.; Bhadra, S.; Bindi, M.; Blohm, C.; Bokhonov, V.; Bold, T.; Bondarenko, K.; Boos, E. G.; Borras, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bot, D.; Brock, I.; Brownson, E.; Brugnera, R.; Brümmer, N.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Brzozowska, B.; Bussey, P. J.; Bylsma, B.; Caldwell, A.; Capua, M.; Carlin, R.; Catterall, C. D.; Chekanov, S.; Chwastowski, J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Contin, A.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Coppola, N.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Costa, M.; D'Agostini, G.; Dal Corso, F.; del Peso, J.; Dementiev, R. K.; De Pasquale, S.; Derrick, M.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Dobur, D.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Dolinska, G.; Doyle, A. T.; Drugakov, V.; Durkin, L. S.; Dusini, S.; Eisenberg, Y.; Ermolov, P. F.; Eskreys, A.; Fang, S.; Fazio, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrero, M. I.; Figiel, J.; Foster, B.; Gach, G.; Galas, A.; Gallo, E.; Garfagnini, A.; Geiser, A.; Gialas, I.; Gizhko, A.; Gladilin, L. K.; Gladkov, D.; Glasman, C.; Gogota, O.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Göttlicher, P.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Grebenyuk, J.; Gregor, I.; Grigorescu, G.; Grzelak, G.; Gueta, O.; Guzik, M.; Gwenlan, C.; Haas, T.; Hain, W.; Hamatsu, R.; Hart, J. C.; Hartmann, H.; Hartner, G.; Hilger, E.; Hochman, D.; Hori, R.; Hüttmann, A.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Iga, Y.; Ingbir, R.; Ishitsuka, M.; Jakob, H.-P.; Januschek, F.; Jones, T. W.; Jüngst, M.; Kadenko, I.; Kahle, B.; Kananov, S.; Kanno, T.; Karshon, U.; Karstens, F.; Katkov, I. I.; Kaur, M.; Kaur, P.; Keramidas, A.; Khein, L. A.; Kim, J. Y.; Kisielewska, D.; Kitamura, S.; Klanner, R.; Klein, U.; Koffeman, E.; Kondrashova, N.; Kononenko, O.; Kooijman, P.; Korol, Ie.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kotanski, A.; Kötz, U.; Kowalski, H.; Kuprash, O.; Kuze, M.; Lee, A.; Levchenko, B. B.; Levy, A.; Libov, V.; Limentani, S.; Ling, T. Y.; Lisovyi, M.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lohmann, W.; Löhr, B.; Lohrmann, E.; Long, K. R.; Longhin, A.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Maeda, J.; Magill, S.; Makarenko, I.; Malka, J.; Mankel, R.; Margotti, A.; Marini, G.; Martin, J. F.; Mastroberardino, A.; Mattingly, M. C. K.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Mergelmeyer, S.; Miglioranzi, S.; Mohamad Idris, F.; Monaco, V.; Montanari, A.; Morris, J. D.; Mujkic, K.; Musgrave, B.; Nagano, K.; Namsoo, T.; Nania, R.; Nigro, A.; Ning, Y.; Nobe, T.; Notz, D.; Nowak, R. J.; Nuncio-Quiroz, A. E.; Oh, B. Y.; Okazaki, N.; Olkiewicz, K.; Onishchuk, Yu.; Papageorgiu, K.; Parenti, A.; Paul, E.; Pawlak, J. M.; Pawlik, B.; Pelfer, P. G.; Pellegrino, A.; Perlanski, W.; Perrey, H.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Plucinski, P.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Polini, A.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Przybycien, M.; Raval, A.; Reeder, D. D.; Reisert, B.; Ren, Z.; Repond, J.; Ri, Y. D.; Robertson, A.; Roloff, P.; Rubinsky, I.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Samson, U.; Sartorelli, G.; Savin, A. A.; Saxon, D. H.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenstedt, S.; Schleper, P.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schneekloth, U.; Schönberg, V.; Schörner-Sadenius, T.; Schwartz, J.; Sciulli, F.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Shehzadi, R.; Shimizu, S.; Singh, I.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Slominski, W.; Smith, W. H.; Sola, V.; Solano, A.; Son, D.; Sosnovtsev, V.; Spiridonov, A.; Stadie, H.; Stanco, L.; Stefaniuk, N.; Stern, A.; Stewart, T. P.; Stifutkin, A.; Stopa, P.; Suchkov, S.; Susinno, G.; Suszycki, L.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Szuba, D.; Szuba, J.; Tapper, A. D.; Tassi, E.; Terrón, J.; Theedt, T.; Tiecke, H.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomaszewska, J.; Trusov, V.; Tsurugai, T.; Turcato, M.; Turkot, O.; Tymieniecka, T.; Vázquez, M.; Verbytskyi, A.; Viazlo, O.; Vlasov, N. N.; Walczak, R.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.; Whitmore, J. J.; Wichmann, K.; Wiggers, L.; Wing, M.; Wlasenko, M.; Wolf, G.; Wolfe, H.; Wrona, K.; Yagües-Molina, A. G.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yoshida, R.; Youngman, C.; Zabiegalov, O.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Zawiejski, L.; Zenaiev, O.; Zeuner, W.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Zhmak, N.; Zichichi, A.; Zolkapli, Z.; Zotkin, D. S.

    2013-02-01

    The cross sections for inelastic photoproduction of J/ψ and ψ' mesons have been measured in ep collisions with the ZEUS detector at HERA, using an integrated luminosity of 468 pb-1 collected in the period 1996-2007. The ψ' to J/ψ cross section ratio was measured in the range 0 .55 < z < 0 .9 and 60 < W < 190 GeV as a function of W, z and p T . Here W denotes the photon-proton centre-of-mass energy, z is the fraction of the incident photon energy carried by the meson and p T is the transverse momentum of the meson with respect to the beam axis. The J/ψ cross sections were measured for 0 .1 < z < 0 .9, 60 < W < 240 GeV and p T > 1 GeV. Theoretical predictions within the non-relativistic QCD framework including NLO colour-singlet and colour-octet contributions were compared to the data, as were predictions based on the k T -factorisation approach.

  1. Production of Z0 bosons in elastic and quasi-elastic ep collisions at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ZEUS Collaboration; Abramowicz, H.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.; Adamus, M.; Aggarwal, R.; Antonelli, S.; Antonioli, P.; Antonov, A.; Arneodo, M.; Arslan, O.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Bachynska, O.; Bamberger, A.; Barakbaev, A. N.; Barbagli, G.; Bari, G.; Barreiro, F.; Bartosik, N.; Bartsch, D.; Basile, M.; Behnke, O.; Behr, J.; Behrens, U.; Bellagamba, L.; Bertolin, A.; Bhadra, S.; Bindi, M.; Blohm, C.; Bokhonov, V.; Bołd, T.; Bondarenko, K.; Boos, E. G.; Borras, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bot, D.; Brock, I.; Brownson, E.; Brugnera, R.; Brümmer, N.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Brzozowska, B.; Bussey, P. J.; Bylsma, B.; Caldwell, A.; Capua, M.; Carlin, R.; Catterall, C. D.; Chekanov, S.; Chwastowski, J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Contin, A.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Coppola, N.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Costa, M.; D'Agostini, G.; Dal Corso, F.; del Peso, J.; Dementiev, R. K.; De Pasquale, S.; Derrick, M.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Dobur, D.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Dolinska, G.; Doyle, A. T.; Drugakov, V.; Durkin, L. S.; Dusini, S.; Eisenberg, Y.; Ermolov, P. F.; Eskreys, A.; Fang, S.; Fazio, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrero, M. I.; Figiel, J.; Foster, B.; Gach, G.; Galas, A.; Gallo, E.; Garfagnini, A.; Geiser, A.; Gialas, I.; Gizhko, A.; Gladilin, L. K.; Gladkov, D.; Glasman, C.; Gogota, O.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Göttlicher, P.; Grabowska-Bołd, I.; Grebenyuk, J.; Gregor, I.; Grigorescu, G.; Grzelak, G.; Gueta, O.; Guzik, M.; Gwenlan, C.; Haas, T.; Hain, W.; Hamatsu, R.; Hart, J. C.; Hartmann, H.; Hartner, G.; Hilger, E.; Hochman, D.; Hori, R.; Hüttmann, A.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Iga, Y.; Ingbir, R.; Ishitsuka, M.; Jakob, H.-P.; Januschek, F.; Jones, T. W.; Jüngst, M.; Kadenko, I.; Kahle, B.; Kananov, S.; Kanno, T.; Karshon, U.; Karstens, F.; Katkov, I. I.; Kaur, M.; Kaur, P.; Keramidas, A.; Khein, L. A.; Kim, J. Y.; Kisielewska, D.; Kitamura, S.; Klanner, R.; Klein, U.; Koffeman, E.; Kondrashova, N.; Kononenko, O.; Kooijman, P.; Korol, Ie.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kotański, A.; Kötz, U.; Kowalski, H.; Kuprash, O.; Kuze, M.; Lee, A.; Levchenko, B. B.; Levy, A.; Libov, V.; Limentani, S.; Ling, T. Y.; Lisovyi, M.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lohmann, W.; Löhr, B.; Lohrmann, E.; Long, K. R.; Longhin, A.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Maeda, J.; Magill, S.; Makarenko, I.; Malka, J.; Mankel, R.; Margotti, A.; Marini, G.; Martin, J. F.; Mastroberardino, A.; Mattingly, M. C. K.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Mergelmeyer, S.; Miglioranzi, S.; Mohamad Idris, F.; Monaco, V.; Montanari, A.; Morris, J. D.; Mujkic, K.; Musgrave, B.; Nagano, K.; Namsoo, T.; Nania, R.; Nigro, A.; Ning, Y.; Nobe, T.; Notz, D.; Nowak, R. J.; Nuncio-Quiroz, A. E.; Oh, B. Y.; Okazaki, N.; Olkiewicz, K.; Onishchuk, Yu.; Papageorgiu, K.; Parenti, A.; Paul, E.; Pawlak, J. M.; Pawlik, B.; Pelfer, P. G.; Pellegrino, A.; Perlański, W.; Perrey, H.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Pluciński, P.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Polini, A.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Przybycień, M.; Raval, A.; Reeder, D. D.; Reisert, B.; Ren, Z.; Repond, J.; Ri, Y. D.; Robertson, A.; Roloff, P.; Rubinsky, I.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Samson, U.; Sartorelli, G.; Savin, A. A.; Saxon, D. H.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenstedt, S.; Schleper, P.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schneekloth, U.; Schönberg, V.; Schörner-Sadenius, T.; Schwartz, J.; Sciulli, F.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Shehzadi, R.; Shimizu, S.; Singh, I.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Słomiński, W.; Smith, W. H.; Sola, V.; Solano, A.; Son, D.; Sosnovtsev, V.; Spiridonov, A.; Stadie, H.; Stanco, L.; Stefaniuk, N.; Stern, A.; Stewart, T. P.; Stifutkin, A.; Stopa, P.; Suchkov, S.; Susinno, G.; Suszycki, L.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Szuba, D.; Szuba, J.; Tapper, A. D.; Tassi, E.; Terrón, J.; Theedt, T.; Tiecke, H.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomaszewska, J.; Trusov, V.; Tsurugai, T.; Turcato, M.; Turkot, O.; Tymieniecka, T.; Vázquez, M.; Verbytskyi, A.; Viazlo, O.; Vlasov, N. N.; Walczak, R.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.; Whitmore, J. J.; Wichmann, K.; Wiggers, L.; Wing, M.; Wlasenko, M.; Wolf, G.; Wolfe, H.; Wrona, K.; Yagües-Molina, A. G.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yoshida, R.; Youngman, C.; Zabiegalov, O.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Zawiejski, L.; Zenaiev, O.; Zeuner, W.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Zhmak, N.; Zichichi, A.; Zolkapli, Z.; Zotkin, D. S.

    2013-01-01

    The production of Z0 bosons in the reaction ep→eZ0p, where p stands for a proton or a low-mass nucleon resonance, has been studied in ep collisions at HERA using the ZEUS detector. The analysis is based on a data sample collected between 1996 and 2007, amounting to 496 pb of integrated luminosity. The Z0 was measured in the hadronic decay mode. The elasticity of the events was ensured by a cut on ηmax<3.0, where ηmax is the maximum pseudorapidity of energy deposits in the calorimeter defined with respect to the proton beam direction. A signal was observed at the Z0 mass. The cross section of the reaction ep→eZ0p was measured to be σ(ep→eZ0p)=0.13±0.06(stat.)±0.01(syst.) pb, in agreement with the Standard Model prediction of 0.16 pb. This is the first measurement of Z0 production in ep collisions.

  2. Production of Z0 bosons in elastic and quasi-elastic ep collisions at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramowicz, H.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.; Adamus, M.; Aggarwal, R.; Antonelli, S.; Antonioli, P.; Antonov, A.; Arneodo, M.; Arslan, O.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Bachynska, O.; Bamberger, A.; Barakbaev, A. N.; Barbagli, G.; Bari, G.; Barreiro, F.; Bartosik, N.; Bartsch, D.; Basile, M.; Behnke, O.; Behr, J.; Behrens, U.; Bellagamba, L.; Bertolin, A.; Bhadra, S.; Bindi, M.; Blohm, C.; Bokhonov, V.; Bołd, T.; Bondarenko, K.; Boos, E. G.; Borras, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bot, D.; Brock, I.; Brownson, E.; Brugnera, R.; Brümmer, N.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Brzozowska, B.; Bussey, P. J.; Bylsma, B.; Caldwell, A.; Capua, M.; Carlin, R.; Catterall, C. D.; Chekanov, S.; Chwastowski, J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Contin, A.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Coppola, N.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Costa, M.; D'Agostini, G.; Dal Corso, F.; del Peso, J.; Dementiev, R. K.; De Pasquale, S.; Derrick, M.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Dobur, D.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Dolinska, G.; Doyle, A. T.; Drugakov, V.; Durkin, L. S.; Dusini, S.; Eisenberg, Y.; Ermolov, P. F.; Eskreys, A.; Fang, S.; Fazio, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrero, M. I.; Figiel, J.; Foster, B.; Gach, G.; Galas, A.; Gallo, E.; Garfagnini, A.; Geiser, A.; Gialas, I.; Gizhko, A.; Gladilin, L. K.; Gladkov, D.; Glasman, C.; Gogota, O.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Göttlicher, P.; Grabowska-Bołd, I.; Grebenyuk, J.; Gregor, I.; Grigorescu, G.; Grzelak, G.; Gueta, O.; Guzik, M.; Gwenlan, C.; Haas, T.; Hain, W.; Hamatsu, R.; Hart, J. C.; Hartmann, H.; Hartner, G.; Hilger, E.; Hochman, D.; Hori, R.; Hüttmann, A.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Iga, Y.; Ingbir, R.; Ishitsuka, M.; Jakob, H.-P.; Januschek, F.; Jones, T. W.; Jüngst, M.; Kadenko, I.; Kahle, B.; Kananov, S.; Kanno, T.; Karshon, U.; Karstens, F.; Katkov, I. I.; Kaur, M.; Kaur, P.; Keramidas, A.; Khein, L. A.; Kim, J. Y.; Kisielewska, D.; Kitamura, S.; Klanner, R.; Klein, U.; Koffeman, E.; Kondrashova, N.; Kononenko, O.; Kooijman, P.; Korol, Ie.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kotański, A.; Kötz, U.; Kowalski, H.; Kuprash, O.; Kuze, M.; Lee, A.; Levchenko, B. B.; Levy, A.; Libov, V.; Limentani, S.; Ling, T. Y.; Lisovyi, M.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lohmann, W.; Löhr, B.; Lohrmann, E.; Long, K. R.; Longhin, A.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Maeda, J.; Magill, S.; Makarenko, I.; Malka, J.; Mankel, R.; Margotti, A.; Marini, G.; Martin, J. F.; Mastroberardino, A.; Mattingly, M. C. K.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Mergelmeyer, S.; Miglioranzi, S.; Mohamad Idris, F.; Monaco, V.; Montanari, A.; Morris, J. D.; Mujkic, K.; Musgrave, B.; Nagano, K.; Namsoo, T.; Nania, R.; Nigro, A.; Ning, Y.; Nobe, T.; Notz, D.; Nowak, R. J.; Nuncio-Quiroz, A. E.; Oh, B. Y.; Okazaki, N.; Olkiewicz, K.; Onishchuk, Yu.; Papageorgiu, K.; Parenti, A.; Paul, E.; Pawlak, J. M.; Pawlik, B.; Pelfer, P. G.; Pellegrino, A.; Perlański, W.; Perrey, H.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Pluciński, P.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Polini, A.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Przybycień, M.; Raval, A.; Reeder, D. D.; Reisert, B.; Ren, Z.; Repond, J.; Ri, Y. D.; Robertson, A.; Roloff, P.; Rubinsky, I.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Samson, U.; Sartorelli, G.; Savin, A. A.; Saxon, D. H.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenstedt, S.; Schleper, P.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schneekloth, U.; Schönberg, V.; Schörner-Sadenius, T.; Schwartz, J.; Sciulli, F.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Shehzadi, R.; Shimizu, S.; Singh, I.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Słomiński, W.; Smith, W. H.; Sola, V.; Solano, A.; Son, D.; Sosnovtsev, V.; Spiridonov, A.; Stadie, H.; Stanco, L.; Stefaniuk, N.; Stern, A.; Stewart, T. P.; Stifutkin, A.; Stopa, P.; Suchkov, S.; Susinno, G.; Suszycki, L.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Szuba, D.; Szuba, J.; Tapper, A. D.; Tassi, E.; Terrón, J.; Theedt, T.; Tiecke, H.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomaszewska, J.; Trusov, V.; Tsurugai, T.; Turcato, M.; Turkot, O.; Tymieniecka, T.; Vázquez, M.; Verbytskyi, A.; Viazlo, O.; Vlasov, N. N.; Walczak, R.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.; Whitmore, J. J.; Wichmann, K.; Wiggers, L.; Wing, M.; Wlasenko, M.; Wolf, G.; Wolfe, H.; Wrona, K.; Yagües-Molina, A. G.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yoshida, R.; Youngman, C.; Zabiegalov, O.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Zawiejski, L.; Zenaiev, O.; Zeuner, W.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Zhmak, N.; Zichichi, A.; Zolkapli, Z.; Zotkin, D. S.; ZEUS Collaboration

    2013-01-01

    The production of Z0 bosons in the reaction ep → eZ0p (*), where p (*) stands for a proton or a low-mass nucleon resonance, has been studied in ep collisions at HERA using the ZEUS detector. The analysis is based on a data sample collected between 1996 and 2007, amounting to 496 pb-1 of integrated luminosity. The Z0 was measured in the hadronic decay mode. The elasticity of the events was ensured by a cut on ηmax < 3.0, where ηmax is the maximum pseudorapidity of energy deposits in the calorimeter defined with respect to the proton beam direction. A signal was observed at the Z0 mass. The cross section of the reaction ep → eZ0p (*) was measured to be σ (ep → eZ0p (*)) = 0.13 ± 0.06 (stat.) ± 0.01 (syst.) pb, in agreement with the Standard Model prediction of 0.16 pb. This is the first measurement of Z0 production in ep collisions.

  3. Hydropower and Environmental Resource Assessment (HERA): a computational tool for the assessment of the hydropower potential of watersheds considering engineering and socio-environmental aspects.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, T. M.; Kelman, R.; Metello, M.; Ciarlini, A.; Granville, A. C.; Hespanhol, P.; Castro, T. L.; Gottin, V. M.; Pereira, M. V. F.

    2015-12-01

    The hydroelectric potential of a river is proportional to its head and water flows. Selecting the best development alternative for Greenfield projects watersheds is a difficult task, since it must balance demands for infrastructure, especially in the developing world where a large potential remains unexplored, with environmental conservation. Discussions usually diverge into antagonistic views, as in recent projects in the Amazon forest, for example. This motivates the construction of a computational tool that will support a more qualified debate regarding development/conservation options. HERA provides the optimal head division partition of a river considering technical, economic and environmental aspects. HERA has three main components: (i) pre-processing GIS of topographic and hydrologic data; (ii) automatic engineering and equipment design and budget estimation for candidate projects; (iii) translation of division-partition problem into a mathematical programming model. By integrating an automatic calculation with geoprocessing tools, cloud computation and optimization techniques, HERA makes it possible countless head partition division alternatives to be intrinsically compared - a great advantage with respect to traditional field surveys followed by engineering design methods. Based on optimization techniques, HERA determines which hydro plants should be built, including location, design, technical data (e.g. water head, reservoir area and volume, engineering design (dam, spillways, etc.) and costs). The results can be visualized in the HERA interface, exported to GIS software, Google Earth or CAD systems. HERA has a global scope of application since the main input data area a Digital Terrain Model and water inflows at gauging stations. The objective is to contribute to an increased rationality of decisions by presenting to the stakeholders a clear and quantitative view of the alternatives, their opportunities and threats.

  4. User's guide to the Personal Computer version of the Biogenic Emissions Inventory System (PC-BEIS)

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, T.E.; Baugues, K.A.

    1991-07-01

    The Personal Computer version of the Biogenic Emissions Inventory System (PC-BEIS) has been developed to allow users to estimate hourly emissions of biogenic non-methane hydrocarbon emissions for any county in the contiguous United States. PC-BEIS has been compiled using Microsoft FORTRAN and tested on IBM-compatible personal computers. The source code was written in ANSI FORTRAN 77 and should be transportable to most other computers. Emission rates depend on land use, leaf biomass, and emission factors. PC-BEIS also includes adjustments due to temperature and sunglight. A simple leaf energy balance module is included to allow more refined calculations of leaf temperature and sunlight through forest canopies. The user's guide briefly describes the technical background, provides an overview of computer aspects, and shows an example test case.

  5. Exclusive ρ0 meson photoproduction with a leading neutron at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goerlich, Lidia

    2016-11-01

    A first measurement is presented of exclusive photoproduction of ρ0 mesons associated with leading neutrons at HERA. The data were taken with the H1 detector in the years 2006 and 2007 at a centre-of-mass energy of √s = 319 GeV and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 1.16pb-1. The ρ0 mesons with transverse momenta pT < 1 GeV are reconstructed from their decays to charged pions, while leading neutrons carrying a large fraction of the incoming proton momentum, xL > 0.35, are detected in the Forward Neutron Calorimeter. The phase space of the measurement is defined by the photon virtuality Q2 < 2 GeV2, the total energy of the photon-proton system 20 < Wγp < 100 GeV and the polar angle of the leading neutron θn < 0.75 mrad. The cross section of the reaction γp → ρ0nπ+ is measured as a function of several variables. The data are interpreted in terms of a double peripheral process, involving pion exchange at the proton vertex followed by elastic photoproduction of a ρ0 meson on the virtual pion. In the framework of one-pion-exchange dominance the elastic cross section of photon-pion scattering, σel(γπ+ → ρ°π+), is extracted. The value of this cross section indicates significant absorptive corrections for the exclusive reaction γp → ρ°nπ+.

  6. Exclusive ρ ^0 meson photoproduction with a leading neutron at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, V.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Begzsuren, K.; Belousov, A.; Bolz, A.; Boudry, V.; Brandt, G.; Brisson, V.; Britzger, D.; Buniatyan, A.; Bylinkin, A.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A. J.; Cantun Avila, K. B.; Cerny, K.; Chekelian, V.; Contreras, J. G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J. B.; Daum, K.; Diaconu, C.; Dobre, M.; Dodonov, V.; Eckerlin, G.; Egli, S.; Elsen, E.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Feltesse, J.; Ferencei, J.; Fleischer, M.; Fomenko, A.; Gabathuler, E.; Gayler, J.; Ghazaryan, S.; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grab, C.; Grebenyuk, A.; Greenshaw, T.; Grindhammer, G.; Haidt, D.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Hladkỳ, J.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hreus, T.; Huber, F.; Jacquet, M.; Janssen, X.; Jung, H.; Kapichine, M.; Kiesling, C.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Kogler, R.; Kostka, P.; Kretzschmar, J.; Krüger, K.; Landon, M. P. J.; Lange, W.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Levonian, S.; Lipka, K.; List, B.; List, J.; Lobodzinski, B.; Malinovski, E.; Martyn, H.-U.; Maxfield, S. J.; Mehta, A.; Meyer, A. B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Mikocki, S.; Morozov, A.; Müller, K.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, P. R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nowak, G.; Olsson, J. E.; Ozerov, D.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G. D.; Perez, E.; Petrukhin, A.; Picuric, I.; Pirumov, H.; Pitzl, D.; Plačakytė, R.; Pokorny, B.; Polifka, R.; Povh, B.; Radescu, V.; Raicevic, N.; Ravdandorj, T.; Reimer, P.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rotaru, M.; Rusakov, S.; Šálek, D.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sauter, M.; Sauvan, E.; Schmitt, S.; Schoeffel, L.; Schöning, A.; Sefkow, F.; Shushkevich, S.; Soloviev, Y.; Sopicki, P.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, A.; Steder, M.; Stella, B.; Straumann, U.; Sykora, T.; Thompson, P. D.; Traynor, D.; Truöl, P.; Tsakov, I.; Tseepeldorj, B.; Turnau, J.; Valkárová, A.; Vallée, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vazdik, Y.; Wegener, D.; Wünsch, E.; Žáček, J.; Zhang, Z.; Žlebčík, R.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.

    2016-01-01

    A first measurement is presented of exclusive photoproduction of ρ ^0 mesons associated with leading neutrons at HERA. The data were taken with the H1 detector in the years 2006 and 2007 at a centre-of-mass energy of √{s}=319 GeV and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 1.16 pb^{-1}. The ρ ^0 mesons with transverse momenta p_T<1 GeV are reconstructed from their decays to charged pions, while leading neutrons carrying a large fraction of the incoming proton momentum, x_L>0.35, are detected in the Forward Neutron Calorimeter. The phase space of the measurement is defined by the photon virtuality Q^2 < 2 GeV^2, the total energy of the photon-proton system 20 < W_{γ p}< 100 GeV and the polar angle of the leading neutron θ _n < 0.75 mrad. The cross section of the reaction γ p → ρ ^0 n π ^+ is measured as a function of several variables. The data are interpreted in terms of a double peripheral process, involving pion exchange at the proton vertex followed by elastic photoproduction of a ρ ^0 meson on the virtual pion. In the framework of one-pion-exchange dominance the elastic cross section of photon-pion scattering, σ ^el(γ π ^+ → ρ ^0π ^+), is extracted. The value of this cross section indicates significant absorptive corrections for the exclusive reaction γ p → ρ ^0 n π ^+.

  7. Inclusive-jet photoproduction at HERA and determination of αs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramowicz, H.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.; Adamus, M.; Aggarwal, R.; Antonelli, S.; Antonioli, P.; Antonov, A.; Arneodo, M.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Bachynska, O.; Bamberger, A.; Barakbaev, A. N.; Barbagli, G.; Bari, G.; Barreiro, F.; Bartosik, N.; Bartsch, D.; Basile, M.; Behnke, O.; Behr, J.; Behrens, U.; Bellagamba, L.; Bertolin, A.; Bhadra, S.; Bindi, M.; Blohm, C.; Bokhonov, V.; Bołd, T.; Bondarenko, K.; Boos, E. G.; Borras, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bot, D.; Brock, I.; Brownson, E.; Brugnera, R.; Brümmer, N.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Brzozowska, B.; Bussey, P. J.; Bylsma, B.; Caldwell, A.; Capua, M.; Carlin, R.; Catterall, C. D.; Chekanov, S.; Chwastowski, J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Contin, A.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Coppola, N.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Costa, M.; D'Agostini, G.; Dal Corso, F.; del Peso, J.; Dementiev, R. K.; De Pasquale, S.; Derrick, M.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Dobur, D.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Dolinska, G.; Doyle, A. T.; Drugakov, V.; Durkin, L. S.; Dusini, S.; Eisenberg, Y.; Ermolov, P. F.; Eskreys, A.; Fang, S.; Fazio, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrero, M. I.; Figiel, J.; Forrest, M.; Foster, B.; Gach, G.; Galas, A.; Gallo, E.; Garfagnini, A.; Geiser, A.; Gialas, I.; Gizhko, A.; Gladilin, L. K.; Gladkov, D.; Glasman, C.; Gogota, O.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Göttlicher, P.; Grabowska-Bołd, I.; Grebenyuk, J.; Gregor, I.; Grigorescu, G.; Grzelak, G.; Gueta, O.; Guzik, M.; Gwenlan, C.; Haas, T.; Hain, W.; Hamatsu, R.; Hart, J. C.; Hartmann, H.; Hartner, G.; Hilger, E.; Hochman, D.; Hori, R.; Horton, K.; Hüttmann, A.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Iga, Y.; Ingbir, R.; Ishitsuka, M.; Jakob, H.-P.; Januschek, F.; Jones, T. W.; Jüngst, M.; Kadenko, I.; Kahle, B.; Kananov, S.; Kanno, T.; Karshon, U.; Karstens, F.; Katkov, I. I.; Kaur, M.; Kaur, P.; Keramidas, A.; Khein, L. A.; Kim, J. Y.; Kisielewska, D.; Kitamura, S.; Klanner, R.; Klein, U.; Koffeman, E.; Kondrashova, N.; Kononeko, O.; Kooijman, P.; Korol, Ie.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kotański, A.; Kötz, U.; Kowalski, H.; Kuprash, O.; Kuze, M.; Lee, A.; Levchenko, B. B.; Levy, A.; Libov, V.; Limentani, S.; Ling, T. Y.; Lisovyi, M.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lohmann, W.; Löhr, B.; Lohrmann, E.; Long, K. R.; Longhin, A.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Maeda, J.; Magill, S.; Makarenko, I.; Malka, J.; Mankel, R.; Margotti, A.; Marini, G.; Martin, J. F.; Mastroberardino, A.; Mattingly, M. C. K.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Mergelmeyer, S.; Miglioranzi, S.; Mohamad Idris, F.; Monaco, V.; Montanari, A.; Morris, J. D.; Mujkic, K.; Musgrave, B.; Nagano, K.; Namsoo, T.; Nania, R.; Nigro, A.; Ning, Y.; Nobe, T.; Noor, U.; Notz, D.; Nowak, R. J.; Nuncio-Quiroz, A. E.; Oh, B. Y.; Okazaki, N.; Oliver, K.; Olkiewicz, K.; Onishchuk, Yu.; Papageorgiu, K.; Parenti, A.; Paul, E.; Pawlak, J. M.; Pawlik, B.; Pelfer, P. G.; Pellegrino, A.; Perlański, W.; Perrey, H.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Pluciński, P.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Polini, A.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Przybycień, M.; Raval, A.; Reeder, D. D.; Reisert, B.; Ren, Z.; Repond, J.; Ri, Y. D.; Robertson, A.; Roloff, P.; Rubinsky, I.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Samson, U.; Sartorelli, G.; Savin, A. A.; Saxon, D. H.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenstedt, S.; Schleper, P.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schneekloth, U.; Schönberg, V.; Schörner-Sadenius, T.; Schwartz, J.; Sciulli, F.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Shehzadi, R.; Shimizu, S.; Singh, I.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Słomiński, W.; Smith, W. H.; Sola, V.; Solano, A.; Son, D.; Sosnovtsev, V.; Spiridonov, A.; Stadie, H.; Stanco, L.; Stefaniuk, N.; Stern, A.; Stewart, T. P.; Stifutkin, A.; Stopa, P.; Suchkov, S.; Susinno, G.; Suszycki, L.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Szuba, D.; Szuba, J.; Tapper, A. D.; Tassi, E.; Terrón, J.; Theedt, T.; Tiecke, H.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomaszewska, J.; Trusov, V.; Tsurugai, T.; Turcato, M.; Turkot, O.; Tymieniecka, T.; Vázquez, M.; Verbytskyi, A.; Viazlo, O.; Vlasov, N. N.; Walczak, R.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.; Whitmore, J. J.; Wiggers, L.; Wing, M.; Wlasenko, M.; Wolf, G.; Wolfe, H.; Wrona, K.; Yagües-Molina, A. G.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yoshida, R.; Youngman, C.; Zabiegalov, O.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Zawiejski, L.; Zenaiev, O.; Zeuner, W.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Zhmak, N.; Zhou, C.; Zichichi, A.; Zolkapli, Z.; Zotkin, D. S.; ZEUS Collaboration

    Inclusive-jet cross sections have been measured in the reaction ep→e+jet+X for photon virtuality Q2<1 GeV and γp centre-of-mass energies in the region 142HERA using an integrated luminosity of 300 pb. Jets were identified using the kT, anti-kT or SIScone jet algorithms in the laboratory frame. Single-differential cross sections are presented as functions of the jet transverse energy, ETjet, and pseudorapidity, ηjet, for jets with ETjet>17 GeV and -1<ηjet<2.5. In addition, measurements of double-differential inclusive-jet cross sections are presented as functions of ETjet in different regions of ηjet. Next-to-leading-order QCD calculations give a good description of the measurements, except for jets with low ETjet and high ηjet. The influence of non-perturbative effects not related to hadronisation was studied. Measurements of the ratios of cross sections using different jet algorithms are also presented; the measured ratios are well described by calculations including up to O(αs2) terms. Values of αs(MZ) were extracted from the measurements and the energy-scale dependence of the coupling was determined. The value of αs(MZ) extracted from the measurements based on the kT jet algorithm is αs(MZ)=0.1206-0.0022+0.0023(exp.)-0.0035+0.0042(th.); the results from the anti-kT and SIScone algorithms are compatible with this value and have a similar precision.

  8. Inclusive-jet photoproduction at HERA and determination of αs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ZEUS Collaboration; Abramowicz, H.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.; Adamus, M.; Aggarwal, R.; Antonelli, S.; Antonioli, P.; Antonov, A.; Arneodo, M.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Bachynska, O.; Bamberger, A.; Barakbaev, A. N.; Barbagli, G.; Bari, G.; Barreiro, F.; Bartosik, N.; Bartsch, D.; Basile, M.; Behnke, O.; Behr, J.; Behrens, U.; Bellagamba, L.; Bertolin, A.; Bhadra, S.; Bindi, M.; Blohm, C.; Bokhonov, V.; Bołd, T.; Bondarenko, K.; Boos, E. G.; Borras, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bot, D.; Brock, I.; Brownson, E.; Brugnera, R.; Brümmer, N.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Brzozowska, B.; Bussey, P. J.; Bylsma, B.; Caldwell, A.; Capua, M.; Carlin, R.; Catterall, C. D.; Chekanov, S.; Chwastowski, J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Contin, A.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Coppola, N.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Costa, M.; D'Agostini, G.; Dal Corso, F.; del Peso, J.; Dementiev, R. K.; De Pasquale, S.; Derrick, M.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Dobur, D.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Dolinska, G.; Doyle, A. T.; Drugakov, V.; Durkin, L. S.; Dusini, S.; Eisenberg, Y.; Ermolov, P. F.; Eskreys, A.; Fang, S.; Fazio, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrero, M. I.; Figiel, J.; Forrest, M.; Foster, B.; Gach, G.; Galas, A.; Gallo, E.; Garfagnini, A.; Geiser, A.; Gialas, I.; Gizhko, A.; Gladilin, L. K.; Gladkov, D.; Glasman, C.; Gogota, O.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Göttlicher, P.; Grabowska-Bołd, I.; Grebenyuk, J.; Gregor, I.; Grigorescu, G.; Grzelak, G.; Gueta, O.; Guzik, M.; Gwenlan, C.; Haas, T.; Hain, W.; Hamatsu, R.; Hart, J. C.; Hartmann, H.; Hartner, G.; Hilger, E.; Hochman, D.; Hori, R.; Horton, K.; Hüttmann, A.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Iga, Y.; Ingbir, R.; Ishitsuka, M.; Jakob, H.-P.; Januschek, F.; Jones, T. W.; Jüngst, M.; Kadenko, I.; Kahle, B.; Kananov, S.; Kanno, T.; Karshon, U.; Karstens, F.; Katkov, I. I.; Kaur, M.; Kaur, P.; Keramidas, A.; Khein, L. A.; Kim, J. Y.; Kisielewska, D.; Kitamura, S.; Klanner, R.; Klein, U.; Koffeman, E.; Kondrashova, N.; Kononeko, O.; Kooijman, P.; Korol, Ie.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kotański, A.; Kötz, U.; Kowalski, H.; Kuprash, O.; Kuze, M.; Lee, A.; Levchenko, B. B.; Levy, A.; Libov, V.; Limentani, S.; Ling, T. Y.; Lisovyi, M.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lohmann, W.; Löhr, B.; Lohrmann, E.; Long, K. R.; Longhin, A.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Maeda, J.; Magill, S.; Makarenko, I.; Malka, J.; Mankel, R.; Margotti, A.; Marini, G.; Martin, J. F.; Mastroberardino, A.; Mattingly, M. C. K.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Mergelmeyer, S.; Miglioranzi, S.; Mohamad Idris, F.; Monaco, V.; Montanari, A.; Morris, J. D.; Mujkic, K.; Musgrave, B.; Nagano, K.; Namsoo, T.; Nania, R.; Nigro, A.; Ning, Y.; Nobe, T.; Noor, U.; Notz, D.; Nowak, R. J.; Nuncio-Quiroz, A. E.; Oh, B. Y.; Okazaki, N.; Oliver, K.; Olkiewicz, K.; Onishchuk, Yu.; Papageorgiu, K.; Parenti, A.; Paul, E.; Pawlak, J. M.; Pawlik, B.; Pelfer, P. G.; Pellegrino, A.; Perlański, W.; Perrey, H.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Pluciński, P.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Polini, A.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Przybycień, M.; Raval, A.; Reeder, D. D.; Reisert, B.; Ren, Z.; Repond, J.; Ri, Y. D.; Robertson, A.; Roloff, P.; Rubinsky, I.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Samson, U.; Sartorelli, G.; Savin, A. A.; Saxon, D. H.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenstedt, S.; Schleper, P.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schneekloth, U.; Schönberg, V.; Schörner-Sadenius, T.; Schwartz, J.; Sciulli, F.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Shehzadi, R.; Shimizu, S.; Singh, I.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Słomiński, W.; Smith, W. H.; Sola, V.; Solano, A.; Son, D.; Sosnovtsev, V.; Spiridonov, A.; Stadie, H.; Stanco, L.; Stefaniuk, N.; Stern, A.; Stewart, T. P.; Stifutkin, A.; Stopa, P.; Suchkov, S.; Susinno, G.; Suszycki, L.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Szuba, D.; Szuba, J.; Tapper, A. D.; Tassi, E.; Terrón, J.; Theedt, T.; Tiecke, H.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomaszewska, J.; Trusov, V.; Tsurugai, T.; Turcato, M.; Turkot, O.; Tymieniecka, T.; Vázquez, M.; Verbytskyi, A.; Viazlo, O.; Vlasov, N. N.; Walczak, R.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.; Whitmore, J. J.; Wiggers, L.; Wing, M.; Wlasenko, M.; Wolf, G.; Wolfe, H.; Wrona, K.; Yagües-Molina, A. G.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yoshida, R.; Youngman, C.; Zabiegalov, O.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Zawiejski, L.; Zenaiev, O.; Zeuner, W.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Zhmak, N.; Zhou, C.; Zichichi, A.; Zolkapli, Z.; Zotkin, D. S.

    2012-11-01

    Inclusive-jet cross sections have been measured in the reaction ep→e+jet+X for photon virtuality Q2<1 GeV and γp centre-of-mass energies in the region 142HERA using an integrated luminosity of 300 pb. Jets were identified using the kT, anti-kT or SIScone jet algorithms in the laboratory frame. Single-differential cross sections are presented as functions of the jet transverse energy, ETjet, and pseudorapidity, ηjet, for jets with ETjet>17 GeV and -1<ηjet<2.5. In addition, measurements of double-differential inclusive-jet cross sections are presented as functions of ETjet in different regions of ηjet. Next-to-leading-order QCD calculations give a good description of the measurements, except for jets with low ETjet and high ηjet. The influence of non-perturbative effects not related to hadronisation was studied. Measurements of the ratios of cross sections using different jet algorithms are also presented; the measured ratios are well described by calculations including up to O(αs2) terms. Values of αs(MZ) were extracted from the measurements and the energy-scale dependence of the coupling was determined. The value of αs(MZ) extracted from the measurements based on the kT jet algorithm is αs(MZ)=0.1206-0.0022+0.0023(exp.)-0.0035+0.0042(th.); the results from the anti-kT and SIScone algorithms are compatible with this value and have a similar precision.

  9. NurA Is Endowed with Endo- and Exonuclease Activities that Are Modulated by HerA: New Insight into Their Role in DNA-End Processing

    PubMed Central

    De Falco, Mariarosaria; Catalano, Federico; Rossi, Mosè; Ciaramella, Maria; De Felice, Mariarita

    2015-01-01

    The nuclease NurA and the ATPase HerA are present in all known thermophilic archaea and cooperate with the highly conserved MRE11/RAD50 proteins to facilitate efficient DNA double-strand break end processing during homologous recombinational repair. However, contradictory results have been reported on the exact activities and mutual dependence of these two enzymes. To understand the functional relationship between these two enzymes we deeply characterized Sulfolobus solfataricus NurA and HerA proteins. We found that NurA is endowed with exo- and endonuclease activities on various DNA substrates, including linear (single-stranded and double stranded) as well as circular molecules (single stranded and supercoiled double-stranded). All these activities are not strictly dependent on the presence of HerA, require divalent ions (preferably Mn2+), and are inhibited by the presence of ATP. The endo- and exonculease activities have distinct requirements: whereas the exonuclease activity on linear DNA fragments is stimulated by HerA and depends on the catalytic D58 residue, the endonuclease activity on circular double-stranded DNA is HerA-independent and is not affected by the D58A mutation. On the basis of our results we propose a mechanism of action of NurA/HerA complex during DNA end processing. PMID:26560692

  10. Measurement of the cross-section ratio σψ(2S)/σJ/ψ(1S) in deep inelastic exclusive ep scattering at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramowicz, H.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.; Adamus, M.; Antonelli, S.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Behnke, O.; Behrens, U.; Bertolin, A.; Bloch, I.; Boos, E. G.; Borras, K.; Brock, I.; Brook, N. H.; Brugnera, R.; Bruni, A.; Bussey, P. J.; Caldwell, A.; Capua, M.; Catterall, C. D.; Chwastowski, J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Dementiev, R. K.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Dolinska, G.; Dusini, S.; Figiel, J.; Foster, B.; Gach, G.; Gallo, E.; Garfagnini, A.; Geiser, A.; Gizhko, A.; Gladilin, L. K.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Grebenyuk, J.; Gregor, I.; Grzelak, G.; Gueta, O.; Guzik, M.; Hain, W.; Hochman, D.; Hori, R.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Iga, Y.; Ishitsuka, M.; Iudin, A.; Januschek, F.; Jomhari, N. Z.; Kadenko, I.; Kananov, S.; Karshon, U.; Kaur, M.; Kaur, P.; Kisielewska, D.; Klanner, R.; Klein, U.; Kondrashova, N.; Kononenko, O.; Korol, Ie.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kotański, A.; Kötz, U.; Kovalchuk, N.; Kowalski, H.; Krupa, B.; Kuprash, O.; Kuze, M.; Levchenko, B. B.; Levy, A.; Libov, V.; Limentani, S.; Lisovyi, M.; Lobodzinska, E.; Löhr, B.; Lohrmann, E.; Longhin, A.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Makarenko, I.; Malka, J.; Mergelmeyer, S.; Mohamad Idris, F.; Mohammad Nasir, N.; Myronenko, V.; Nagano, K.; Nobe, T.; Notz, D.; Nowak, R. J.; Onishchuk, Yu.; Paul, E.; Perlański, W.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Przybycień, M.; Roloff, P.; Rubinsky, I.; Ruspa, M.; Saxon, D. H.; Schioppa, M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schneekloth, U.; Schörner-Sadenius, T.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Shevchenko, R.; Shkola, O.; Shyrma, Yu.; Singh, I.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Słomiński, W.; Solano, A.; Stanco, L.; Stefaniuk, N.; Stern, A.; Stopa, P.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Szuba, D.; Szuba, J.; Tassi, E.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomaszewska, J.; Trofymov, A.; Tsurugai, T.; Turcato, M.; Turkot, O.; Tymieniecka, T.; Verbytskyi, A.; Viazlo, O.; Walczak, R.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.; Wichmann, K.; Wing, M.; Wolf, G.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Zakharchuk, N.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Zawiejski, L.; Zenaiev, O.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Zhmak, N.; Zotkin, D. S.

    2016-08-01

    The exclusive deep inelastic electroproduction of ψ (2 S) and J / ψ (1 S) at an ep centre-of-mass energy of 317 GeV has been studied with the ZEUS detector at HERA in the kinematic range 2 HERA I running period and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 114 pb-1. The data for 5 HERA I and HERA II periods and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 468 pb-1. The decay modes analysed were μ+μ- and J / ψ (1 S)π+π- for the ψ (2 S) and μ+μ- for the J / ψ (1 S). The cross-section ratio σ ψ (2 S) /σ J / ψ (1 S) has been measured as a function of Q2 , W and t. The results are compared to predictions of QCD-inspired models of exclusive vector-meson production.

  11. Kub5-Hera, the human Rtt103 homolog, plays dual functional roles in transcription termination and DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Morales, Julio C; Richard, Patricia; Rommel, Amy; Fattah, Farjana J; Motea, Edward A; Patidar, Praveen L; Xiao, Ling; Leskov, Konstantin; Wu, Shwu-Yuan; Hittelman, Walter N; Chiang, Cheng-Ming; Manley, James L; Boothman, David A

    2014-04-01

    Functions of Kub5-Hera (In Greek Mythology Hera controlled Artemis) (K-H), the human homolog of the yeast transcription termination factor Rtt103, remain undefined. Here, we show that K-H has functions in both transcription termination and DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair. K-H forms distinct protein complexes with factors that repair DSBs (e.g. Ku70, Ku86, Artemis) and terminate transcription (e.g. RNA polymerase II). K-H loss resulted in increased basal R-loop levels, DSBs, activated DNA-damage responses and enhanced genomic instability. Significantly lowered Artemis protein levels were detected in K-H knockdown cells, which were restored with specific K-H cDNA re-expression. K-H deficient cells were hypersensitive to cytotoxic agents that induce DSBs, unable to reseal complex DSB ends, and showed significantly delayed γ-H2AX and 53BP1 repair-related foci regression. Artemis re-expression in K-H-deficient cells restored DNA-repair function and resistance to DSB-inducing agents. However, R loops persisted consistent with dual roles of K-H in transcription termination and DSB repair.

  12. Measurement of beauty and charm production in deep inelastic scattering at HERA and measurement of the beauty-quark mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramowicz, H.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.; Adamus, M.; Aggarwal, R.; Antonelli, S.; Arslan, O.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Bachynska, O.; Barakbaev, A. N.; Bartosik, N.; Behnke, O.; Behr, J.; Behrens, U.; Bertolin, A.; Bhadra, S.; Bloch, I.; Bokhonov, V.; Boos, E. G.; Borras, K.; Brock, I.; Brugnera, R.; Bruni, A.; Brzozowska, B.; Bussey, P. J.; Caldwell, A.; Capua, M.; Catterall, C. D.; Chwastowski, J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; D'Agostini, G.; Dementiev, R. K.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Dolinska, G.; Drugakov, V.; Dusini, S.; Ferrando, J.; Figiel, J.; Foster, B.; Gach, G.; Garfagnini, A.; Geiser, A.; Gizhko, A.; Gladilin, L. K.; Gogota, O.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Grebenyuk, J.; Gregor, I.; Grzelak, G.; Gueta, O.; Guzik, M.; Hain, W.; Hartner, G.; Hochman, D.; Hori, R.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Iga, Y.; Ishitsuka, M.; Iudin, A.; Januschek, F.; Kadenko, I.; Kananov, S.; Kanno, T.; Karshon, U.; Kaur, M.; Kaur, P.; Khein, L. A.; Kisielewska, D.; Klanner, R.; Klein, U.; Kondrashova, N.; Kononenko, O.; Korol, Ie.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kotanski, A.; Kötz, U.; Kovalchuk, N.; Kowalski, H.; Kuprash, O.; Kuze, M.; Levchenko, B. B.; Levy, A.; Libov, V.; Limentani, S.; Lisovyi, M.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lohmann, W.; Löhr, B.; Lohrmann, E.; Longhin, A.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Maeda, J.; Makarenko, I.; Malka, J.; Martin, J. F.; Mergelmeyer, S.; Mohamad Idris, F.; Mujkic, K.; Myronenko, V.; Nagano, K.; Nigro, A.; Nobe, T.; Notz, D.; Nowak, R. J.; Olkiewicz, K.; Onishchuk, Yu.; Paul, E.; Perlanski, W.; Perrey, H.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Przybycien, M.; Raval, A.; Roloff, P.; Rubinsky, I.; Ruspa, M.; Samojlov, V.; Saxon, D. H.; Schioppa, M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schneekloth, U.; Schörner-Sadenius, T.; Schwartz, J.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Shehzadi, R.; Shevchenko, R.; Shkola, O.; Singh, I.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Slominski, W.; Sola, V.; Solano, A.; Spiridonov, A.; Stanco, L.; Stefaniuk, N.; Stern, A.; Stewart, T. P.; Stopa, P.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Szuba, D.; Szuba, J.; Tassi, E.; Temiraliev, T.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomaszewska, J.; Trofymov, A.; Trusov, V.; Tsurugai, T.; Turcato, M.; Turkot, O.; Tymieniecka, T.; Verbytskyi, A.; Viazlo, O.; Walczak, R.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.; Wichmann, K.; Wing, M.; Wolf, G.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Zakharchuk, N.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Zawiejski, L.; Zenaiev, O.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Zhmak, N.; Zotkin, D. S.

    2014-09-01

    The production of beauty and charm quarks in ep interactions has been studied with the ZEUS detector at HERA for exchanged four-momentum squared 5 < Q 2 < 1000 GeV2 using an integrated luminosity of 354 pb-1. The beauty and charm content in events with at least one jet have been extracted using the invariant mass of charged tracks associated with secondary vertices and the decay-length significance of these vertices. Differential cross sections as a function of Q 2, Bjorken x, jet trans- verse energy and pseudorapidity were measured and compared with next-to-leading-order QCD calculations. The beauty and charm contributions to the proton structure functions were extracted from the double-differential cross section as a function of x and Q 2. The running beauty-quark mass, m b at the scale m b , was determined from a QCD fit at next-to-leading order to HERA data for the first time and found to be m b ( m b ) = 4.07 ± 0.14 (fit){-/0.07 + 0.01}(mod.){-/0.00 + 0.05}(param.){-/0.05 + 0.08}(theo.) GeV.

  13. Measurement of beauty and charm production in deep inelastic scattering at HERA and measurement of the beauty-quark mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramowicz, H.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.; Adamus, M.; Aggarwal, R.; Antonelli, S.; Arslan, O.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Bachynska, O.; Barakbaev, A. N.; Bartosik, N.; Behnke, O.; Behr, J.; Behrens, U.; Bertolin, A.; Bhadra, S.; Bloch, I.; Bokhonov, V.; Boos, E. G.; Borras, K.; Brock, I.; Brugnera, R.; Bruni, A.; Brzozowska, B.; Bussey, P. J.; Caldwell, A.; Capua, M.; Catterall, C. D.; Chwastowski, J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; D'Agostini, G.; Dementiev, R. K.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Dolinska, G.; Drugakov, V.; Dusini, S.; Ferrando, J.; Figiel, J.; Foster, B.; Gach, G.; Garfagnini, A.; Geiser, A.; Gizhko, A.; Gladilin, L. K.; Gogota, O.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Grebenyuk, J.; Gregor, I.; Grzelak, G.; Gueta, O.; Guzik, M.; Hain, W.; Hartner, G.; Hochman, D.; Hori, R.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Iga, Y.; Ishitsuka, M.; Iudin, A.; Januschek, F.; Kadenko, I.; Kananov, S.; Kanno, T.; Karshon, U.; Kaur, M.; Kaur, P.; Khein, L. A.; Kisielewska, D.; Klanner, R.; Klein, U.; Kondrashova, N.; Kononenko, O.; Korol, Ie.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kotanski, A.; Kötz, U.; Kovalchuk, N.; Kowalski, H.; Kuprash, O.; Kuze, M.; Levchenko, B. B.; Levy, A.; Libov, V.; Limentani, S.; Lisovyi, M.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lohmann, W.; Löhr, B.; Lohrmann, E.; Longhin, A.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Maeda, J.; Makarenko, I.; Malka, J.; Martin, J. F.; Mergelmeyer, S.; Mohamad Idris, F.; Mujkic, K.; Myronenko, V.; Nagano, K.; Nigro, A.; Nobe, T.; Notz, D.; Nowak, R. J.; Olkiewicz, K.; Onishchuk, Yu.; Paul, E.; Perlanski, W.; Perrey, H.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Przybycien, M.; Raval, A.; Roloff, P.; Rubinsky, I.; Ruspa, M.; Samojlov, V.; Saxon, D. H.; Schioppa, M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schneekloth, U.; Schörner-Sadenius, T.; Schwartz, J.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Shehzadi, R.; Shevchenko, R.; Shkola, O.; Singh, I.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Slominski, W.; Sola, V.; Solano, A.; Spiridonov, A.; Stanco, L.; Stefaniuk, N.; Stern, A.; Stewart, T. P.; Stopa, P.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Szuba, D.; Szuba, J.; Tassi, E.; Temiraliev, T.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomaszewska, J.; Trofymov, A.; Trusov, V.; Tsurugai, T.; Turcato, M.; Turkot, O.; Tymieniecka, T.; Verbytskyi, A.; Viazlo, O.; Walczak, R.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.; Wichmann, K.; Wing, M.; Wolf, G.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Zakharchuk, N.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Zawiejski, L.; Zenaiev, O.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Zhmak, N.; Zotkin, D. S.

    2014-10-01

    The production of beauty and charm quarks in ep interactions has been studied with the ZEUS detector at HERA for exchanged four-momentum squared 5 < Q 2 < 1000 GeV2 using an integrated luminosity of 354 pb-1. The beauty and charm content in events with at least one jet have been extracted using the invariant mass of charged tracks associated with secondary vertices and the decay-length significance of these vertices. Differential cross sections as a function of Q 2, Bjorken x, jet trans- verse energy and pseudorapidity were measured and compared with next-to-leading-order QCD calculations. The beauty and charm contributions to the proton structure functions were extracted from the double-differential cross section as a function of x and Q 2. The running beauty-quark mass, m b at the scale m b , was determined from a QCD fit at next-to-leading order to HERA data for the first time and found to be m b ( m b ) = 4.07 ± 0.14 (fit){-/0.07 + 0.01}(mod.){-/0.00 + 0.05}(param.){-/0.05 + 0.08}(theo.) GeV.

  14. Combination and QCD analysis of charm production cross section measurements in deep-inelastic ep scattering at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramowicz, H.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.; Adamus, M.; Aggarwal, R.; Alexa, C.; Andreev, V.; Antonelli, S.; Antonioli, P.; Antonov, A.; Arneodo, M.; Arslan, O.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Bachynska, O.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Baghdasaryan, S.; Bamberger, A.; Barakbaev, A. N.; Barbagli, G.; Bari, G.; Barreiro, F.; Bartel, W.; Bartosik, N.; Bartsch, D.; Basile, M.; Begzsuren, K.; Behnke, O.; Behr, J.; Behrens, U.; Bellagamba, L.; Belousov, A.; Belov, P.; Bertolin, A.; Bhadra, S.; Bindi, M.; Blohm, C.; Bokhonov, V.; Bondarenko, K.; Boos, E. G.; Borras, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bot, D.; Boudry, V.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bołd, T.; Brümmer, N.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, G.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Britzger, D.; Brock, I.; Brownson, E.; Brugnera, R.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Brzozowska, B.; Bunyatyan, A.; Bussey, P. J.; Bylinkin, A.; Bylsma, B.; Bystritskaya, L.; Caldwell, A.; Campbell, A. J.; Cantun Avila, K. B.; Capua, M.; Carlin, R.; Catterall, C. D.; Ceccopieri, F.; Cerny, K.; Chekanov, S.; Chekelian, V.; Chwastowski, J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Contin, A.; Contreras, J. G.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Coppola, N.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Costa, M.; Cvach, J.; D'Agostini, G.; Dainton, J. B.; Dal Corso, F.; Daum, K.; Delvax, J.; Dementiev, R. K.; Derrick, M.; Devenish, R. C. E.; De Pasquale, S.; De Wolf, E. A.; del Peso, J.; Diaconu, C.; Dobre, M.; Dobur, D.; Dodonov, V.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Dolinska, G.; Dossanov, A.; Doyle, A. T.; Drugakov, V.; Durkin, L. S.; Dusini, S.; Eckerlin, G.; Egli, S.; Eisenberg, Y.; Elsen, E.; Ermolov, P. F.; Eskreys, A.; Fang, S.; Favart, L.; Fazio, S.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Feltesse, J.; Ferencei, J.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrero, M. I.; Figiel, J.; Fischer, D.-J.; Fleischer, M.; Fomenko, A.; Foster, B.; Gabathuler, E.; Gach, G.; Galas, A.; Gallo, E.; Garfagnini, A.; Gayler, J.; Geiser, A.; Ghazaryan, S.; Gialas, I.; Gizhko, A.; Gladilin, L. K.; Gladkov, D.; Glasman, C.; Glazov, A.; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Gogota, O.; Golubkov, Y. A.; Göttlicher, P.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grab, C.; Grabowska-Bołd, I.; Grebenyuk, A.; Grebenyuk, J.; Greenshaw, T.; Gregor, I.; Grigorescu, G.; Grindhammer, G.; Grzelak, G.; Gueta, O.; Guzik, M.; Gwenlan, C.; Hüttmann, A.; Haas, T.; Habib, S.; Haidt, D.; Hain, W.; Hamatsu, R.; Hart, J. C.; Hartmann, H.; Hartner, G.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Hennekemper, E.; Henschel, H.; Herbst, M.; Herrera, G.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hilger, E.; Hiller, K. H.; Hladký, J.; Hochman, D.; Hoffmann, D.; Hori, R.; Horisberger, R.; Hreus, T.; Huber, F.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Iga, Y.; Ingbir, R.; Ishitsuka, M.; Jacquet, M.; Jakob, H.-P.; Janssen, X.; Januschek, F.; Jones, T. W.; Jönsson, L.; Jüngst, M.; Jung, A. W.; Jung, H.; Kadenko, I.; Kahle, B.; Kananov, S.; Kanno, T.; Kapichine, M.; Karshon, U.; Karstens, F.; Katkov, I. I.; Kaur, P.; Kaur, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Keramidas, A.; Khein, L. A.; Kiesling, C.; Kim, J. Y.; Kisielewska, D.; Kitamura, S.; Klanner, R.; Klein, M.; Klein, U.; Kleinwort, C.; Kötz, U.; Koffeman, E.; Kogler, R.; Kondrashova, N.; Kononenko, O.; Kooijman, P.; Korol, I.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kostka, P.; Kotański, A.; Kowalski, H.; Krämer, M.; Kretzschmar, J.; Krüger, K.; Kuprash, O.; Kuze, M.; Landon, M. P. J.; Lange, W.; Laštovička-Medin, G.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, A.; Lendermann, V.; Levchenko, B. B.; Levonian, S.; Levy, A.; Libov, V.; Limentani, S.; Ling, T. Y.; Lipka, K.; Lisovyi, M.; List, B.; List, J.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lobodzinski, B.; Löhr, B.; Lohmann, W.; Lohrmann, E.; Long, K. R.; Longhin, A.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Lubimov, V.; Lukina, O. Y.; Maeda, J.; Magill, S.; Makarenko, I.; Malinovski, E.; Malka, J.; Mankel, R.; Margotti, A.; Marini, G.; Martin, J. F.; Martyn, H.-U.; Mastroberardino, A.; Mattingly, M. C. K.; Maxfield, S. J.; Mehta, A.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Mergelmeyer, S.; Meyer, A. B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Miglioranzi, S.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Mohamad Idris, F.; Monaco, V.; Montanari, A.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J. V.; Morris, J. D.; Mujkic, K.; Müller, K.; Musgrave, B.; Nagano, K.; Namsoo, T.; Nania, R.; Naumann, T.; Newman, P. R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nigro, A.; Nikitin, D.; Ning, Y.; Nobe, T.; Notz, D.; Nowak, G.; Nowak, K.; Nowak, R. J.; Nuncio-Quiroz, A. E.; Oh, B. Y.; Okazaki, N.; Olkiewicz, K.; Olsson, J. E.; Onishchuk, Y.; Ozerov, D.; Pahl, P.; Palichik, V.; Pandurovic, M.; Papageorgiu, K.; Parenti, A.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G. D.; Paul, E.; Pawlak, J. M.; Pawlik, B.; Pelfer, P. G.; Pellegrino, A.; Perez, E.; Perlański, W.; Perrey, H.; Petrukhin, A.; Picuric, I.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Pirumov, H.; Pitzl, D.; Plačakytė, R.; Pluciński, P.; Pokorny, B.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Polifka, R.; Polini, A.; Povh, B.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Przybycień, M.; Radescu, V.; Raicevic, N.; Raval, A.; Ravdandorj, T.; Reeder, D. D.; Reimer, P.; Reisert, B.; Ren, Z.; Repond, J.; Ri, Y. D.; Rizvi, E.; Robertson, A.; Robmann, P.; Roloff, P.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rotaru, M.; Rubinsky, I.; Ruiz Tabasco, J. E.; Rusakov, S.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Šálek, D.; Samson, U.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sartorelli, G.; Sauter, M.; Sauvan, E.; Savin, A. A.; Saxon, D. H.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenstedt, S.; Schleper, P.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitt, S.; Schneekloth, U.; Schoeffel, L.; Schönberg, V.; Schöning, A.; Schörner-Sadenius, T.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Schwartz, J.; Sciulli, F.; Sefkow, F.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Shehzadi, R.; Shimizu, S.; Shushkevich, S.; Singh, I.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Słomiński, W.; Smith, W. H.; Sola, V.; Solano, A.; Soloviev, Y.; Son, D.; Sopicki, P.; Sosnovtsev, V.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, A.; Spiridonov, A.; Stadie, H.; Stanco, L.; Staykova, Z.; Steder, M.; Stefaniuk, N.; Stella, B.; Stern, A.; Stewart, T. P.; Stifutkin, A.; Stoicea, G.; Stopa, P.; Straumann, U.; Suchkov, S.; Susinno, G.; Suszycki, L.; Sykora, T.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Szuba, J.; Szuba, D.; Tapper, A. D.; Tassi, E.; Terrón, J.; Theedt, T.; Thompson, P. D.; Tiecke, H.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomaszewska, J.; Tran, T. H.; Traynor, D.; Truöl, P.; Trusov, V.; Tsakov, I.; Tseepeldorj, B.; Tsurugai, T.; Turcato, M.; Turkot, O.; Turnau, J.; Tymieniecka, T.; Vázquez, M.; Valkárová, A.; Vallée, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vazdik, Y.; Verbytskyi, A.; Viazlo, O.; Vlasov, N. N.; Walczak, R.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.; Wegener, D.; Whitmore, J. J.; Wichmann, K.; Wiggers, L.; Wing, M.; Wlasenko, M.; Wolf, G.; Wolfe, H.; Wrona, K.; Wünsch, E.; Yagües-Molina, A. G.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yoshida, R.; Youngman, C.; Zabiegalov, O.; Žáček, J.; Zálešák, J.; Zenaiev, O.; Zeuner, W.; Zhang, Z.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Zhmak, N.; Zichichi, A.; Žlebčík, R.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zolkapli, Z.; Zomer, F.; Zotkin, D. S.; Żarnecki, A. F.

    2013-02-01

    Measurements of open charm production cross sections in deep-inelastic ep scattering at HERA from the H1 and ZEUS Collaborations are combined. Reduced cross sections σ_red^{cbar{c}} for charm production are obtained in the kinematic range of photon virtuality 2.5≤ Q 2≤2000 GeV2 and Bjorken scaling variable 3ṡ10-5≤ x≤5ṡ10-2. The combination method accounts for the correlations of the systematic uncertainties among the different data sets. The combined charm data together with the combined inclusive deep-inelastic scattering cross sections from HERA are used as input for a detailed NLO QCD analysis to study the influence of different heavy flavour schemes on the parton distribution functions. The optimal values of the charm mass as a parameter in these different schemes are obtained. The implications on the NLO predictions for W ± and Z production cross sections at the LHC are investigated. Using the fixed flavour number scheme, the running mass of the charm quark is determined.

  15. Stochastic modeling of triple-frequency BeiDou signals: estimation, assessment and impact analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bofeng

    2016-07-01

    Stochastic models are important in global navigation satellite systems (GNSS) estimation problems. One can achieve reliable ambiguity resolution and precise positioning only by use of a suitable stochastic model. The BeiDou system has received increased research focus, but based only on empirical stochastic models from the knowledge of GPS. In this paper, we will systematically study the estimation, assessment and impacts of a triple-frequency BeiDou stochastic model. In our estimation problem, a single-difference, geometry-free functional model is used to extract pure random noise. A very sophisticated structure of unknown variance matrix is designed to allow the estimation of satellite-specific variances, cross correlations between two arbitrary frequencies, as well as the time correlations for phase and code observations per frequency. In assessing the stochastic models, six data sets with four brands of BeiDou receivers on short and zero-length baselines are processed, and the results are compared. In impact analysis of stochastic model, the performance of integer ambiguity resolution and positioning are numerically demonstrated using a realistic stochastic model. The results from ultrashort (shorter than 10 m) and zero-length baselines indicate that BeiDou stochastic models are affected by both observation and receiver brands. The observation variances have been modeled by an elevation-dependent function, but the modeling errors for geostationary earth orbit (GEO) satellites are larger than for inclined geosynchronous satellite orbit (IGSO) and medium earth orbit (MEO) satellites. The stochastic model is governed by both the internal errors of the receiver and external errors at the site. Different receivers have different capabilities for resisting external errors. A realistic stochastic model is very important for achieving ambiguity resolution with a high success rate and small false alarm and for determining realistic variances for position estimates. To

  16. Precise Point Positioning Model Using Triple GNSS Constellations: GPS, Galileo and BeiDou

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afifi, Akram; El-Rabbany, Ahmed

    2016-12-01

    This paper introduces a comparison between dual-frequency precise point positioning (PPP) post-processing model, which combines the observations of three different GNSS constellations, namely GPS, Galileo, and BeiDou and real-time PPP model. A drawback of a single GNSS system such as GPS, however, is the availability of sufficient number of visible satellites in urban areas. Combining GNSS observations offers more visible satellites to users, which in turn is expected to enhance the satellite geometry and the overall positioning solution. However, combining several GNSS observables introduces additional biases, which require rigorous modelling, including the GNSS time offsets and hardware delays. In this paper, a GNSS post-processing PPPP model is developed using ionosphere-free linear combination. The additional biases of the GPS, Galileo, and BeiDou combination are accounted for through the introduction of a new unknown parameter, which is identified as the inter-system bias, in the PPP mathematical model. Natural Resources Canada's GPSPace PPP software is modified to enable a combined GPS / Galileo / BeiDou PPP solution and to handle the newly inter-system bias. A total of four data sets at four IGS stations are processed to verify the developed PPP model. Precise satellite orbit and clock products from the IGS-MGEX network are used to correct of the GPS, Galileo and BeiDou measurements. For the real-time PPP model the corrections of the satellites orbit and clock are obtained through the international GNSS service (IGS) real-time service (RTS). GPS and Galileo Observations are used for the GNSS RTS-IGS PPP model as the RTS-IGS satellite products are not available for BeiDou satellites. This paper provides the GNSS RTS-IGS PPP model using different satellite clock corrections namely: IGS01, IGC01, IGS01, and IGS03. All PPP models results of convergence time and positioning precision are compared to the traditional GPS-only PPP model. It is shown that combining

  17. Search for QCD instanton-induced processes at HERA in the high-±b {Q^2} domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, V.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Begzsuren, K.; Belousov, A.; Bolz, A.; Boudry, V.; Brandt, G.; Brisson, V.; Britzger, D.; Buniatyan, A.; Bylinkin, A.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A. J.; Cantun Avila, K. B.; Cerny, K.; Chekelian, V.; Contreras, J. G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J. B.; Daum, K.; Diaconu, C.; Dobre, M.; Dodonov, V.; Eckerlin, G.; Egli, S.; Elsen, E.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Feltesse, J.; Ferencei, J.; Fleischer, M.; Fomenko, A.; Gabathuler, E.; Gayler, J.; Ghazaryan, S.; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grab, C.; Grebenyuk, A.; Greenshaw, T.; Grindhammer, G.; Haidt, D.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Hladkỳ, J.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hreus, T.; Huber, F.; Jacquet, M.; Janssen, X.; Jung, H.; Kapichine, M.; Katzy, J.; Kiesling, C.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Kogler, R.; Kostka, P.; Kretzschmar, J.; Krücker, D.; Krüger, K.; Landon, M. P. J.; Lange, W.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Levonian, S.; Lipka, K.; List, B.; List, J.; Lobodzinski, B.; Malinovski, E.; Martyn, H.-U.; Maxfield, S. J.; Mehta, A.; Meyer, A. B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Mikocki, S.; Morozov, A.; Müller, K.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, P. R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nowak, G.; Olsson, J. E.; Ozerov, D.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G. D.; Perez, E.; Petrukhin, A.; Picuric, I.; Pirumov, H.; Pitzl, D.; Plačakytė, R.; Pokorny, B.; Polifka, R.; Radescu, V.; Raicevic, N.; Ravdandorj, T.; Reimer, P.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rotaru, M.; Rusakov, S.; Šálek, D.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sauter, M.; Sauvan, E.; Schmitt, S.; Schoeffel, L.; Schöning, A.; Sefkow, F.; Shushkevich, S.; Soloviev, Y.; Sopicki, P.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, A.; Steder, M.; Stella, B.; Straumann, U.; Sykora, T.; Thompson, P. D.; Traynor, D.; Truöl, P.; Tsakov, I.; Tseepeldorj, B.; Turnau, J.; Valkárová, A.; Vallée, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vazdik, Y.; Wegener, D.; Wünsch, E.; Žáček, J.; Zhang, Z.; Žlebčík, R.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.

    2016-07-01

    Signals of QCD instanton-induced processes are searched for in neutral current deep-inelastic scattering at the electron-proton collider HERA in the kinematic region defined by the Bjorken-scaling variable x > 10^{-3}, the inelasticity 0.2< y < 0.7 and the photon virtuality 150< Q^2 < 15000 GeV^2. The search is performed using H1 data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 351 pb^{-1}. No evidence for the production of QCD instanton-induced events is observed. Upper limits on the cross section for instanton-induced processes between 1.5 and 6 pb, at 95 % confidence level, are obtained depending on the kinematic domain in which instantons could be produced. Compared to earlier publications, the limits are improved by an order of magnitude and for the first time are challenging predictions.

  18. Combination of differential D∗± cross-section measurements in deep-inelastic ep scattering at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramowicz, H.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.; Adamus, M.; Andreev, V.; Antonelli, S.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Begzsuren, K.; Behnke, O.; Behrens, U.; Belousov, A.; Bertolin, A.; Bloch, I.; Boos, E. G.; Borras, K.; Boudry, V.; Brandt, G.; Brisson, V.; Britzger, D.; Brock, I.; Brook, N. H.; Brugnera, R.; Bruni, A.; Buniatyan, A.; Bussey, P. J.; Bylinkin, A.; Bystritskaya, L.; Caldwell, A.; Campbell, A. J.; Avila, K. B. Cantun; Capua, M.; Catterall, C. D.; Ceccopieri, F.; Cerny, K.; Chekelian, V.; Chwastowski, J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Contreras, J. G.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J. B.; Daum, K.; Dementiev, R. K.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Diaconu, C.; Dobre, M.; Dodonov, V.; Dolinska, G.; Dusini, S.; Eckerlin, G.; Egli, S.; Elsen, E.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Feltesse, J.; Ferencei, J.; Figiel, J.; Fleischer, M.; Fomenko, A.; Foster, B.; Gabathuler, E.; Gach, G.; Gallo, E.; Garfagnini, A.; Gayler, J.; Geiser, A.; Ghazaryan, S.; Gizhko, A.; Gladilin, L. K.; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grab, C.; Grebenyuk, A.; Grebenyuk, J.; Greenshaw, T.; Gregor, I.; Grindhammer, G.; Grzelak, G.; Gueta, O.; Guzik, M.; Haidt, D.; Hain, W.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Hladky, J.; Hochman, D.; Hoffmann, D.; Hori, R.; Horisberger, R.; Hreus, T.; Huber, F.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Iga, Y.; Ishitsuka, M.; Iudin, A.; Jacquet, M.; Janssen, X.; Januschek, F.; Jomhari, N. Z.; Jung, A. W.; Jung, H.; Kadenko, I.; Kananov, S.; Kapichine, M.; Karshon, U.; Kaur, M.; Kaur, P.; Kiesling, C.; Kisielewska, D.; Klanner, R.; Klein, M.; Klein, U.; Kleinwort, C.; Kogler, R.; Kondrashova, N.; Kononenko, O.; Korol, Ie.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kostka, P.; Kotanski, A.; Kötz, U.; Kovalchuk, N.; Kowalski, H.; Kretzschmar, J.; Krüger, K.; Krupa, B.; Kuprash, O.; Kuze, M.; Landon, M. P. J.; Lange, W.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Levchenko, B. B.; Levonian, S.; Levy, A.; Libov, V.; Limentani, S.; Lipka, K.; Lisovyi, M.; List, B.; List, J.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lobodzinski, B.; Löhr, B.; Lohrmann, E.; Longhin, A.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Makarenko, I.; Malinovski, E.; Malka, J.; Martyn, H.-U.; Maxfield, S. J.; Mehta, A.; Mergelmeyer, S.; Meyer, A. B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Mikocki, S.; Mohamad Idris, F.; Morozov, A.; Muhammad Nasir, N.; Müller, K.; Myronenko, V.; Nagano, K.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, P. R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nobe, T.; Notz, D.; Nowak, G.; Nowak, R. J.; Olsson, J. E.; Onishchuk, Yu.; Ozerov, D.; Pahl, P.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G. D.; Paul, E.; Perez, E.; Perlanski, W.; Petrukhin, A.; Picuric, I.; Pirumov, H.; Pitzl, D.; Plačakytė, R.; Pokorny, B.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Polifka, R.; Przybycien, M.; Radescu, V.; Raicevic, N.; Ravdandorj, T.; Reimer, P.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roloff, P.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rotaru, M.; Rubinsky, I.; Rusakov, S.; Ruspa, M.; Šálek, D.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sauter, M.; Sauvan, E.; Saxon, D. H.; Schioppa, M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitt, S.; Schneekloth, U.; Schoeffel, L.; Schöning, A.; Schörner-Sadenius, T.; Sefkow, F.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Shevchenko, R.; Shkola, O.; Shushkevich, S.; Shyrma, Yu.; Singh, I.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Slominski, W.; Solano, A.; Soloviev, Y.; Sopicki, P.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, A.; Stanco, L.; Steder, M.; Stefaniuk, N.; Stern, A.; Stopa, P.; Straumann, U.; Sykora, T.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Szuba, D.; Szuba, J.; Tassi, E.; Thompson, P. D.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomaszewska, J.; Traynor, D.; Trofymov, A.; Truöl, P.; Tsakov, I.; Tseepeldorj, B.; Tsurugai, T.; Turcato, M.; Turkot, O.; Turnau, J.; Tymieniecka, T.; Valkárová, A.; Vallée, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vazdik, Y.; Verbytskyi, A.; Viazlo, O.; Walczak, R.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.; Wegener, D.; Wichmann, K.; Wing, M.; Wolf, G.; Wünsch, E.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Žáček, J.; Zakharchuk, N.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Zawiejski, L.; Zenaiev, O.; Zhang, Z.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Zhmak, N.; Žlebčík, R.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.; Zotkin, D. S.

    2015-09-01

    H1 and ZEUS have published single-differential cross sections for inclusive D ∗±-meson production in deep-inelastic ep scattering at HERA from their respective final data sets. These cross sections are combined in the common visible phase-space region of photon virtuality Q 2 > 5 GeV2, electron inelasticity 0 .02 < y < 0 .7 and the D ∗± meson's transverse momentum p T( D ∗) > 1 .5 GeV and pseudorapidity | η( D ∗)| < 1 .5. The combination procedure takes into account all correlations, yielding significantly reduced experimental uncertainties. Double-differential cross sections d2 σ/d Q 2d y are combined with earlier D ∗± data, extending the kinematic range down to Q 2 > 1 .5 GeV2. Perturbative next-to-leading-order QCD predictions are compared to the results.

  19. Combined inclusive diffractive cross sections measured with forward proton spectrometers in deep inelastic ep scattering at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaron, F. D.; Abramowicz, H.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.; Adamus, M.; Aggarwal, R.; Alexa, C.; Andreev, V.; Antonelli, S.; Antonioli, P.; Antonov, A.; Arneodo, M.; Arslan, O.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Bachynska, O.; Backovic, S.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Baghdasaryan, S.; Bamberger, A.; Barakbaev, A. N.; Barbagli, G.; Bari, G.; Barreiro, F.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Bartosik, N.; Bartsch, D.; Basile, M.; Begzsuren, K.; Behnke, O.; Behr, J.; Behrens, U.; Bellagamba, L.; Belousov, A.; Belov, P.; Bertolin, A.; Bhadra, S.; Bindi, M.; Bizot, J. C.; Blohm, C.; Bokhonov, V.; Bondarenko, K.; Boos, E. G.; Borras, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bot, D.; Boudry, V.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bołd, T.; Brümmer, N.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, G.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Britzger, D.; Brock, I.; Brownson, E.; Brugnera, R.; Bruncko, D.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Brzozowska, B.; Bunyatyan, A.; Bussey, P. J.; Bylinkin, A.; Bylsma, B.; Bystritskaya, L.; Caldwell, A.; Campbell, A. J.; Cantun Avila, K. B.; Capua, M.; Carlin, R.; Catterall, C. D.; Ceccopieri, F.; Cerny, K.; Cerny, V.; Chekanov, S.; Chekelian, V.; Chwastowski, J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Contin, A.; Contreras, J. G.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Coppola, N.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Costa, M.; Coughlan, J. A.; Cvach, J.; D'Agostini, G.; Dainton, J. B.; Dal Corso, F.; Daum, K.; Delcourt, B.; Delvax, J.; Dementiev, R. K.; Derrick, M.; Devenish, R. C. E.; De Pasquale, S.; De Wolf, E. A.; del Peso, J.; Diaconu, C.; Dobre, M.; Dobur, D.; Dodonov, V.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Dolinska, G.; Dossanov, A.; Doyle, A. T.; Drugakov, V.; Dubak, A.; Durkin, L. S.; Dusini, S.; Eckerlin, G.; Egli, S.; Eisenberg, Y.; Eliseev, A.; Elsen, E.; Ermolov, P. F.; Eskreys, A.; Fang, S.; Favart, L.; Fazio, S.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Feltesse, J.; Ferencei, J.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrero, M. I.; Figiel, J.; Fischer, D.-J.; Fleischer, M.; Fomenko, A.; Forrest, M.; Foster, B.; Gabathuler, E.; Gach, G.; Galas, A.; Gallo, E.; Garfagnini, A.; Gayler, J.; Geiser, A.; Ghazaryan, S.; Gialas, I.; Gizhko, A.; Gladilin, L. K.; Gladkov, D.; Glasman, C.; Glazov, A.; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Gogota, O.; Golubkov, Y. A.; Göttlicher, P.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grab, C.; Grabowska-Bołd, I.; Grebenyuk, A.; Grebenyuk, J.; Greenshaw, T.; Gregor, I.; Grigorescu, G.; Grindhammer, G.; Grzelak, G.; Gueta, O.; Guzik, M.; Gwenlan, C.; Hüttmann, A.; Haas, T.; Habib, S.; Haidt, D.; Hain, W.; Hamatsu, R.; Hart, J. C.; Hartmann, H.; Hartner, G.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Hennekemper, E.; Henschel, H.; Herbst, M.; Herrera, G.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hilger, E.; Hiller, K. H.; Hladký, J.; Hochman, D.; Hoffmann, D.; Hori, R.; Horisberger, R.; Hreus, T.; Huber, F.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Iga, Y.; Ingbir, R.; Ishitsuka, M.; Jacquet, M.; Jakob, H.-P.; Janssen, X.; Januschek, F.; Jones, T. W.; Jönsson, L.; Jüngst, M.; Jung, H.; Kadenko, I.; Kahle, B.; Kananov, S.; Kanno, T.; Kapichine, M.; Karshon, U.; Karstens, F.; Katkov, I. I.; Kaur, P.; Kaur, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Keramidas, A.; Khein, L. A.; Kiesling, C.; Kim, J. Y.; Kisielewska, D.; Kitamura, S.; Klanner, R.; Klein, M.; Klein, U.; Kleinwort, C.; Koffeman, E.; Kogler, R.; Kondrashova, N.; Kononenko, O.; Kooijman, P.; Korol, I.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kostka, P.; Kotański, A.; Kötz, U.; Kowalski, H.; Krämer, M.; Kretzschmar, J.; Krüger, K.; Kuprash, O.; Kuze, M.; Landon, M. P. J.; Lange, W.; Laštovička-Medin, G.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, A.; Lendermann, V.; Levchenko, B. B.; Levonian, S.; Levy, A.; Libov, V.; Limentani, S.; Ling, T. Y.; Lipka, K.; Lisovyi, M.; List, B.; List, J.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lobodzinski, B.; Lohmann, W.; Löhr, B.; Lohrmann, E.; Long, K. R.; Longhin, A.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Lubimov, V.; Lukina, O. Y.; Maeda, J.; Magill, S.; Makarenko, I.; Malinovski, E.; Malka, J.; Mankel, R.; Margotti, A.; Marini, G.; Martin, J. F.; Martyn, H.-U.; Mastroberardino, A.; Mattingly, M. C. K.; Maxfield, S. J.; Mehta, A.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Mergelmeyer, S.; Meyer, A. B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Miglioranzi, S.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Mohamad Idris, F.; Monaco, V.; Montanari, A.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J. V.; Morris, J. D.; Mujkic, K.; Müller, K.; Musgrave, B.; Nagano, K.; Namsoo, T.; Nania, R.; Naumann, T.; Newman, P. R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nigro, A.; Nikitin, D.; Ning, Y.; Nobe, T.; Notz, D.; Nowak, G.; Nowak, K.; Nowak, R. J.; Nuncio-Quiroz, A. E.; Oh, B. Y.; Okazaki, N.; Olkiewicz, K.; Olsson, J. E.; Onishchuk, Y.; Ozerov, D.; Pahl, P.; Palichik, V.; Pandurovic, M.; Papageorgiu, K.; Parenti, A.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G. D.; Paul, E.; Pawlak, J. M.; Pawlik, B.; Pelfer, P. G.; Pellegrino, A.; Perez, E.; Perlański, W.; Perrey, H.; Petrukhin, A.; Picuric, I.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Pirumov, H.; Pitzl, D.; Plačakytė, R.; Pluciński, P.; Pokorny, B.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Polifka, R.; Polini, A.; Povh, B.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Przybycień, M.; Radescu, V.; Raicevic, N.; Raval, A.; Ravdandorj, T.; Reeder, D. D.; Reimer, P.; Reisert, B.; Ren, Z.; Repond, J.; Ri, Y. D.; Rizvi, E.; Robertson, A.; Robmann, P.; Roloff, P.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rotaru, M.; Rubinsky, I.; Ruiz Tabasco, J. E.; Rusakov, S.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Šálek, D.; Samson, U.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sartorelli, G.; Sauter, M.; Sauvan, E.; Savin, A. A.; Saxon, D. H.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenstedt, S.; Schleper, P.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitt, S.; Schneekloth, U.; Schoeffel, L.; Schönberg, V.; Schöning, A.; Schörner-Sadenius, T.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Schwartz, J.; Sciulli, F.; Sefkow, F.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Shehzadi, R.; Shimizu, S.; Shtarkov, L. N.; Shushkevich, S.; Singh, I.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Słomiński, W.; Sloan, T.; Smith, W. H.; Sola, V.; Solano, A.; Soloviev, Y.; Son, D.; Sopicki, P.; Sosnovtsev, V.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, A.; Spiridonov, A.; Stadie, H.; Stanco, L.; Staykova, Z.; Steder, M.; Stefaniuk, N.; Stella, B.; Stern, A.; Stewart, T. P.; Stifutkin, A.; Stoicea, G.; Stopa, P.; Straumann, U.; Suchkov, S.; Susinno, G.; Suszycki, L.; Sykora, T.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Szuba, J.; Szuba, D.; Tapper, A. D.; Tassi, E.; Terrón, J.; Theedt, T.; Thompson, P. D.; Tiecke, H.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomaszewska, J.; Tran, T. H.; Traynor, D.; Truöl, P.; Trusov, V.; Tsakov, I.; Tseepeldorj, B.; Tsurugai, T.; Turcato, M.; Turkot, O.; Turnau, J.; Tymieniecka, T.; Vázquez, M.; Valkárová, A.; Vallée, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vazdik, Y.; Verbytskyi, A.; Viazlo, O.; Vlasov, N. N.; Walczak, R.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.; Wegener, D.; Whitmore, J. J.; Wichmann, K.; Wiggers, L.; Wing, M.; Wlasenko, M.; Wolf, G.; Wolfe, H.; Wrona, K.; Wünsch, E.; Yagües-Molina, A. G.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yoshida, R.; Youngman, C.; Zabiegalov, O.; Žáček, J.; Zálešák, J.; Zawiejski, L.; Zenaiev, O.; Zeuner, W.; Zhang, Z.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Zhmak, N.; Zhokin, A.; Zichichi, A.; Žlebčík, R.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zolkapli, Z.; Zomer, F.; Zotkin, D. S.; Żarnecki, A. F.

    2012-10-01

    A combination of the inclusive diffractive cross section measurements made by the H1 and ZEUS Collaborations at HERA is presented. The analysis uses samples of diffractive deep inelastic ep scattering data at a centre-of-mass energy sqrt{s}=318 GeV where leading protons are detected by dedicated spectrometers. Correlations of systematic uncertainties are taken into account, resulting in an improved precision of the cross section measurement which reaches 6 % for the most precise points. The combined data cover the range 2.5< Q 2<200 GeV2 in photon virtuality, 0.00035 < {x_{{P}}}< 0.09 in proton fractional momentum loss, 0.09<| t|<0.55 GeV2 in squared four-momentum transfer at the proton vertex and 0.0018< β<0.816 in β=x/{x_{{P}}}, where x is the Bjorken scaling variable.

  20. Sensitivity Enhancement of Bead-based Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (BEIS) biosensor by electric field-focusing in microwells.

    PubMed

    Shin, Kyeong-Sik; Ji, Jae Hoon; Hwang, Kyo Seon; Jun, Seong Chan; Kang, Ji Yoon

    2016-11-15

    This paper reports a novel electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) biosensors that uses magnetic beads trapped in a microwell array to improve the sensitivity of conventional bead-based EIS (BEIS) biosensors. Unloading the previously measured beads by removing the magnetic bar enables the BEIS sensor to be used repeatedly by reloading it with new beads. Despite its recyclability, the sensitivity of conventional BEIS biosensors is so low that it has not attracted much attentions from the biosensor industry. We significantly improved the sensitivity of the BEIS system by introducing of a microwell array that contains two electrodes (a working electrode and a counter electrode) to concentrate the electric field on the surfaces of the beads. We confirmed that the performance of the BEIS sensor in a microwell array using an immunoassay of prostate specific antigen (PSA) in PBS buffer and human plasma. The experimental results showed that a low concentration of PSA (a few tens or hundreds of fg/mL) were detectable as a ratio of the changes in the impedance of the PBS buffer or in human plasma. Therefore, our BEIS sensor with a microwell array could be a promising platform for low cost, high-performance biosensors for applications that require high sensitivity and recyclability.

  1. A new empirical solar radiation pressure model for BeiDou GEO satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Junhong; Gu, Defeng; Ju, Bing; Shen, Zhen; Lai, Yuwang; Yi, Dongyun

    2016-01-01

    Two classic empirical solar radiation pressure (SRP) models, the Extended Center for Orbit Determination in Europe (CODE) Orbit Model ECOM 5 and ECOM 9 have been widely used for Global Positioning System (GPS) Medium Earth Orbit (MEO) satellites precise orbit determination (POD). However, these two models are not suitable for BeiDou Geostationary Earth Orbit (GEO) satellites due to their special attitude control mode. With the experimental design method this paper proposes a new empirical SRP model for BeiDou GEO satellites, which is featured by three constant terms in DYX directions, two sine terms in DX directions and one cosine term in the Y direction. It is the first time to reveal that the periodic terms in the D direction are more important than those in YX directions for BeiDou GEO satellites. Compared with ECOM 5 and ECOM 9, the BeiDou GEO satellite orbits are significantly stabilized with the new SRP force model. The average orbit overlapping root mean square (RMS) achieved by the proposed model is 7.5 cm in the radial component, which is evidently improved over those of 37.4 and 13.2 cm for ECOM 5 and ECOM 9, respectively. In addition, the correlation coefficients between GEO orbit overlaps precision and the elevation angle of the Sun have been decreased to -0.12, 0.21, and -0.03 in radial, along-track and cross-track components by using the proposed model, while they are -0.94, -0.79 and -0.29 for ECOM 5 and -0.70, 0.21 and 0.10 for ECOM 9. Moreover, the standard deviation (STD) of Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) data residuals for the GEO satellite C01 is reduced by 37.4% and 16.1% compared with those of ECOM 5 and ECOM 9 SRP models.

  2. Experimental study on the precise orbit determination of the BeiDou navigation satellite system.

    PubMed

    He, Lina; Ge, Maorong; Wang, Jiexian; Wickert, Jens; Schuh, Harald

    2013-03-01

    The regional service of the Chinese BeiDou satellite navigation system is now in operation with a constellation including five Geostationary Earth Orbit satellites (GEO), five Inclined Geosynchronous Orbit (IGSO) satellites and four Medium Earth Orbit (MEO) satellites. Besides the standard positioning service with positioning accuracy of about 10 m, both precise relative positioning and precise point positioning are already demonstrated. As is well known, precise orbit and clock determination is essential in enhancing precise positioning services. To improve the satellite orbits of the BeiDou regional system, we concentrate on the impact of the tracking geometry and the involvement of MEOs, and on the effect of integer ambiguity resolution as well. About seven weeks of data collected at the BeiDou Experimental Test Service (BETS) network is employed in this experimental study. Several tracking scenarios are defined, various processing schemata are designed and carried out; and then, the estimates are compared and analyzed in detail. The results show that GEO orbits, especially the along-track component, can be significantly improved by extending the tracking network in China along longitude direction, whereas IGSOs gain more improvement if the tracking network extends in latitude. The involvement of MEOs and ambiguity-fixing also make the orbits better.

  3. A new analytical solar radiation pressure model for current BeiDou satellites: IGGBSPM.

    PubMed

    Tan, Bingfeng; Yuan, Yunbin; Zhang, Baocheng; Hsu, Hou Ze; Ou, Jikun

    2016-09-06

    An analytical solar radiation pressure (SRP) model, IGGBSPM (an abbreviation for Institute of Geodesy and Geophysics BeiDou Solar Pressure Model), has been developed for three BeiDou satellite types, namely, geostationary orbit (GEO), inclined geosynchronous orbit (IGSO) and medium earth orbit (MEO), based on a ray-tracing method. The performance of IGGBSPM was assessed based on numerical integration, SLR residuals and analyses of empirical SRP parameters (except overlap computations). The numerical results show that the integrated orbit resulting from IGGBSPM differs from the precise ephemerides by approximately 5 m and 2 m for GEO and non-GEO satellites, respectively. Moreover, when IGGBSPM is used as an a priori model to enhance the ECOM (5-parameter) model with stochastic pulses, named ECOM + APR, for precise orbit determination, the SLR RMS residual improves by approximately 20-25 percent over the ECOM-only solution during the yaw-steering period and by approximately 40 percent during the yaw-fixed period. For the BeiDou GEO01 satellite, improvements of 18 and 32 percent can be achieved during the out-of-eclipse season and during the eclipse season, respectively. An investigation of the estimated ECOM D0 parameters indicated that the β-angle dependence that is evident in the ECOM-only solution is no longer present in the ECOM + APR solution.

  4. A new analytical solar radiation pressure model for current BeiDou satellites: IGGBSPM

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Bingfeng; Yuan, Yunbin; Zhang, Baocheng; Hsu, Hou Ze; Ou, Jikun

    2016-01-01

    An analytical solar radiation pressure (SRP) model, IGGBSPM (an abbreviation for Institute of Geodesy and Geophysics BeiDou Solar Pressure Model), has been developed for three BeiDou satellite types, namely, geostationary orbit (GEO), inclined geosynchronous orbit (IGSO) and medium earth orbit (MEO), based on a ray-tracing method. The performance of IGGBSPM was assessed based on numerical integration, SLR residuals and analyses of empirical SRP parameters (except overlap computations). The numerical results show that the integrated orbit resulting from IGGBSPM differs from the precise ephemerides by approximately 5 m and 2 m for GEO and non-GEO satellites, respectively. Moreover, when IGGBSPM is used as an a priori model to enhance the ECOM (5-parameter) model with stochastic pulses, named ECOM + APR, for precise orbit determination, the SLR RMS residual improves by approximately 20–25 percent over the ECOM-only solution during the yaw-steering period and by approximately 40 percent during the yaw-fixed period. For the BeiDou GEO01 satellite, improvements of 18 and 32 percent can be achieved during the out-of-eclipse season and during the eclipse season, respectively. An investigation of the estimated ECOM D0 parameters indicated that the β-angle dependence that is evident in the ECOM-only solution is no longer present in the ECOM + APR solution. PMID:27595795

  5. Experimental Study on the Precise Orbit Determination of the BeiDou Navigation Satellite System

    PubMed Central

    He, Lina; Ge, Maorong; Wang, Jiexian; Wickert, Jens; Schuh, Harald

    2013-01-01

    The regional service of the Chinese BeiDou satellite navigation system is now in operation with a constellation including five Geostationary Earth Orbit satellites (GEO), five Inclined Geosynchronous Orbit (IGSO) satellites and four Medium Earth Orbit (MEO) satellites. Besides the standard positioning service with positioning accuracy of about 10 m, both precise relative positioning and precise point positioning are already demonstrated. As is well known, precise orbit and clock determination is essential in enhancing precise positioning services. To improve the satellite orbits of the BeiDou regional system, we concentrate on the impact of the tracking geometry and the involvement of MEOs, and on the effect of integer ambiguity resolution as well. About seven weeks of data collected at the BeiDou Experimental Test Service (BETS) network is employed in this experimental study. Several tracking scenarios are defined, various processing schemata are designed and carried out; and then, the estimates are compared and analyzed in detail. The results show that GEO orbits, especially the along-track component, can be significantly improved by extending the tracking network in China along longitude direction, whereas IGSOs gain more improvement if the tracking network extends in latitude. The involvement of MEOs and ambiguity-fixing also make the orbits better. PMID:23529116

  6. Tail-suspended mice lacking calponin H1 experience decreased bone loss.

    PubMed

    Yotsumoto, Naoki; Takeoka, Michiko; Yokoyama, Minesuke

    2010-07-01

    Calponin h1 (CNh1) is an actin-binding protein originally isolated from vascular smooth muscle and has been reported to suppress bone formation. We are therefore curious how CNh1 is involved in bone loss that is caused by space flight in microgravity. We assessed the effects of tail suspension (TS) in C57BL/6J wild (CN+/+) and CNh1-deleted (CN-/-) mice to elucidate the role of CNh1 in bone loss under weightless conditions. Bone mineral density (BMD) of tibiae was measured by single energy X-ray absorptiometry, and bone volume fraction (BV/TV), mineral apposition rate (MAR), and bone formation rate (BFR/BS) were measured by bone histomorphometry. BMD, BV/TV, MAR, and BFR/BS were lower in CN+/+ mice with TS than in those without. In the CN-/- group, however, the decrease in each of these parameters by TS was ameliorated. Decreases in serum osteocalcin levels by TS in CN+/+ mice were attenuated in CN-/- mice. Furthermore, urinary deoxypyridinolin (DPD), an indicator of bone resorption, was increased in CN+/+ mice following TS, but not in CN-/- mice. In transfection experiments, the degree of induction of bone formation markers, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-4 mRNA expression, under stimulation with BMP-2, was lower in MC3T3-E1 mouse osteoblast-like cells expressing CNh1 than that in mock transfected cells. Notably, the BMP-2-induced ALP activity was decreased by CNh1 expression, which was partially rescued by treatment with the Rho kinase inhibitor Y27632. Taken together, these results indicate that CNh1 is responsible for weightlessness-induced bone loss in part through Rho signaling pathway.

  7. Improving BeiDou real-time precise point positioning with numerical weather models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Cuixian; Li, Xingxing; Zus, Florian; Heinkelmann, Robert; Dick, Galina; Ge, Maorong; Wickert, Jens; Schuh, Harald

    2017-02-01

    Precise positioning with the current Chinese BeiDou Navigation Satellite System is proven to be of comparable accuracy to the Global Positioning System, which is at centimeter level for the horizontal components and sub-decimeter level for the vertical component. But the BeiDou precise point positioning (PPP) shows its limitation in requiring a relatively long convergence time. In this study, we develop a numerical weather model (NWM) augmented PPP processing algorithm to improve BeiDou precise positioning. Tropospheric delay parameters, i.e., zenith delays, mapping functions, and horizontal delay gradients, derived from short-range forecasts from the Global Forecast System of the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) are applied into BeiDou real-time PPP. Observational data from stations that are capable of tracking the BeiDou constellation from the International GNSS Service (IGS) Multi-GNSS Experiments network are processed, with the introduced NWM-augmented PPP and the standard PPP processing. The accuracy of tropospheric delays derived from NCEP is assessed against with the IGS final tropospheric delay products. The positioning results show that an improvement in convergence time up to 60.0 and 66.7% for the east and vertical components, respectively, can be achieved with the NWM-augmented PPP solution compared to the standard PPP solutions, while only slight improvement in the solution convergence can be found for the north component. A positioning accuracy of 5.7 and 5.9 cm for the east component is achieved with the standard PPP that estimates gradients and the one that estimates no gradients, respectively, in comparison to 3.5 cm of the NWM-augmented PPP, showing an improvement of 38.6 and 40.1%. Compared to the accuracy of 3.7 and 4.1 cm for the north component derived from the two standard PPP solutions, the one of the NWM-augmented PPP solution is improved to 2.0 cm, by about 45.9 and 51.2%. The positioning accuracy for the up component

  8. Monte Carlo estimation of uncertainties in BEIS3 emission outputs and their effects on uncertainties in chemical transport model predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanna, S. R.; Russell, A. G.; Wilkinson, J. G.; Vukovich, J.; Hansen, D. A.

    2005-01-01

    A Monte Carlo (MC) probabilistic approach is used to estimate uncertainties in the emissions outputs of the Biogenics Emission Inventory System Version 3 (BEIS3) model and subsequent ozone outputs of three Chemical Transport Models (CTMs) due to uncertainties in many key BEIS3 biogenics emissions model parameters and inputs. BEIS3 was developed by the Environmental Protection Agency to estimate emissions of biogenic substances such as isoprene, monoterpenes, oxygenated and other volatile organic compounds (OVOCs), and biogenic nitric oxide (BNO). Uncertainties are investigated for three time periods, 24-29 May, 11-15 July, and 4-9 September 1995, which are ozone episodes that have been extensively studied by others as part of emissions control planning exercises. In the MC approach, 1000 samples are drawn randomly and independently from seventeen BEIS3 parameters and inputs, whose distribution shapes and variances are determined from literature reviews. The 95% confidence range on the calculated uncertainties in isoprene and BNO emissions cover approximately an order of magnitude. On the other hand, the 95% confidence ranges on the calculated uncertainties in monoterpenes and OVOC emissions are much smaller: about ±20%. Correlations are calculated between the 1000 MC samples of pairs of variations in model parameters or inputs and variations in BEIS3 daily emissions estimates for individual grid squares. A few significant correlations are found for some of the assumed model parameters. The MC uncertainties in the CTM-predicted 1- and 8-hour averaged ozone concentrations were studied by drawing 20 random samples from the 1000 sets of BEIS3 outputs and running each CTM (MAQSIP, UAM-V, and URM) 20 times for the three episodes. The estimated total uncertainties of ±15 to 20% are found to be nearly the same for the three CTMs over the three time periods, for 1- and 8-hour averages.

  9. Deeply virtual Compton scattering and its beam charge asymmetry in e±p collisions at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    H1 Collaboration; Aaron, F. D.; Martin, M. Aldaya; Alexa, C.; Alimujiang, K.; Andreev, V.; Antunovic, B.; Backovic, S.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Begzsuren, K.; Belousov, A.; Bizot, J. C.; Boudry, V.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, G.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Bruncko, D.; Bunyatyan, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A. J.; Cantun Avila, K. B.; Cerny, K.; Cerny, V.; Chekelian, V.; Cholewa, A.; Contreras, J. G.; Coughlan, J. A.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J. B.; Daum, K.; Deák, M.; de Boer, Y.; Delcourt, B.; Del Degan, M.; Delvax, J.; de Wolf, E. A.; Diaconu, C.; Dodonov, V.; Dossanov, A.; Dubak, A.; Eckerlin, G.; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eliseev, A.; Elsen, E.; Falkiewicz, A.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Feltesse, J.; Ferencei, J.; Fischer, D.-J.; Fleischer, M.; Fomenko, A.; Gabathuler, E.; Gayler, J.; Ghazaryan, S.; Glazov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grab, C.; Greenshaw, T.; Grell, B. R.; Grindhammer, G.; Habib, S.; Haidt, D.; Helebrant, C.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Hennekemper, E.; Henschel, H.; Herbst, M.; Herrera, G.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hiller, K. H.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hreus, T.; Jacquet, M.; Janssen, M. E.; Janssen, X.; Jönsson, L.; Jung, A. W.; Jung, H.; Kapichine, M.; Katzy, J.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kiesling, C.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Kluge, T.; Knutsson, A.; Kogler, R.; Kostka, P.; Kraemer, M.; Krastev, K.; Kretzschmar, J.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Krüger, K.; Kutak, K.; Landon, M. P. J.; Lange, W.; Laštovička-Medin, G.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Leibenguth, G.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Li, G.; Lipka, K.; Liptaj, A.; List, B.; List, J.; Loktionova, N.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Lubimov, V.; Makankine, A.; Malinovski, E.; Marage, P.; Marti, Ll.; Martyn, H.-U.; Maxfield, S. J.; Mehta, A.; Meyer, A. B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Michels, V.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J. V.; Mozer, M. U.; Mudrinic, M.; Müller, K.; Murín, P.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, P. R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikiforov, A.; Nikitin, D.; Nowak, G.; Nowak, K.; Nozicka, M.; Olivier, B.; Olsson, J. E.; Osman, S.; Ozerov, D.; Palichik, V.; Panagoulias, I.; Pandurovic, M.; Papadopoulou, Th.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G. D.; Pejchal, O.; Perez, E.; Petrukhin, A.; Picuric, I.; Piec, S.; Pitzl, D.; Plačakytė, R.; Pokorny, B.; Polifka, R.; Povh, B.; Radescu, V.; Rahmat, A. J.; Raicevic, N.; Raspiareza, A.; Ravdandorj, T.; Reimer, P.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roland, B.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rotaru, M.; Ruiz Tabasco, J. E.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakov, S.; Šálek, D.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sauter, M.; Sauvan, E.; Schmitt, S.; Schoeffel, L.; Schöning, A.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Sefkow, F.; Shaw-West, R. N.; Shtarkov, L. N.; Shushkevich, S.; Sloan, T.; Smiljanic, I.; Soloviev, Y.; Sopicki, P.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, A.; Staykova, Z.; Steder, M.; Stella, B.; Stoicea, G.; Straumann, U.; Sunar, D.; Sykora, T.; Tchoulakov, V.; Thompson, G.; Thompson, P. D.; Toll, T.; Tomasz, F.; Tran, T. H.; Traynor, D.; Trinh, T. N.; Truöl, P.; Tsakov, I.; Tseepeldorj, B.; Turnau, J.; Urban, K.; Valkárová, A.; Vallée, C.; van Mechelen, P.; Vargas Trevino, A.; Vazdik, Y.; Vinokurova, S.; Volchinski, V.; von den Driesch, M.; Wegener, D.; Wissing, Ch.; Wünsch, E.; Žáček, J.; Zálešák, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhokin, A.; Zimmermann, T.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.; Zus, R.

    2009-11-01

    A measurement of elastic deeply virtual Compton scattering γ∗p→γp using e+p and e-p collision data recorded with the H1 detector at HERA is presented. The analysed data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 306 pb-1, almost equally shared between both beam charges. The cross section is measured as a function of the virtuality Q2 of the exchanged photon and the centre-of-mass energy W of the γ∗p system in the kinematic domain 6.5

  10. Proposal to measure spin-structure functions and semi-exclusive asymmetries for the proton and neutron at HERA

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, H.E.; Hansen, J.O.; Jones, C.E.

    1995-08-01

    Nucleon spin physics will be studied in the HERMES experiment, that will use polarized internal targets of essentially pure atomic H, D, and {sup 3}He in the HERA electron storage ring at DESY. A series of measurements of spin-dependent properties of the nucleon and few-body nuclei will be made; the spin structure function g{sub 1}(x) of the proton and neutron will be measured to test the Bjorken sum rule and study the fraction of the nucleon spin carried by quarks; the spin structure function g{sub 2}W, sensitive to quark-gluon correlations, and the structure functions b{sub 1}(x), and {Delta}(x), sensitive to nuclear binding effects, will be measured; and, using the particle identification capability of the HERMES detector, pions will be detected in coincidence with the scattered electrons. The coincident hadron measurements represent the most important extension that can be made at this time to the existing measurements on the nucleon spin structure functions because they provide information about the flavor-dependence of the quark spin distribution in the nucleon. Argonne is providing the Cerenkov counter to be used for particle identification and developing the drifilm coating technique for the ultrathin target cell required for this experiment. The HERMES collaboration intends to use polarized targets with the highest available figures of merit, and the Argonne laser-driven source offers the most promise for a significant advance in present-day targets.

  11. Scaled momentum distributions for K_S^0 KS and Λ /bar{Λ } in DIS at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramowicz, H.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.; Adamus, M.; Aggarwal, R.; Antonelli, S.; Antonioli, P.; Antonov, A.; Arneodo, M.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Bachynska, O.; Bamberger, A.; Barakbaev, A. N.; Barbagli, G.; Bari, G.; Barreiro, F.; Bartosik, N.; Bartsch, D.; Basile, M.; Behnke, O.; Behr, J.; Behrens, U.; Bellagamba, L.; Bertolin, A.; Bhadra, S.; Bindi, M.; Blohm, C.; Bokhonov, V.; Bold, T.; Bondarenko, K.; Boos, E. G.; Borras, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bot, D.; Brock, I.; Brownson, E.; Brugnera, R.; Brümmer, N.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Brzozowska, B.; Bussey, P. J.; Bylsma, B.; Caldwell, A.; Capua, M.; Carlin, R.; Catterall, C. D.; Chekanov, S.; Chwastowski, J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Contin, A.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Coppola, N.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Costa, M.; D'Agostini, G.; Corso, F. Dal; del Peso, J.; Dementiev, R. K.; De Pasquale, S.; Derrick, M.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Dobur, D.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Dolinska, G.; Doyle, A. T.; Drugakov, V.; Durkin, L. S.; Dusini, S.; Eisenberg, Y.; Ermolov, P. F.; Eskreys, A.; Fang, S.; Fazio, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrero, M. I.; Figiel, J.; Forrest, M.; Foster, B.; Gach, G.; Galas, A.; Gallo, E.; Garfagnini, A.; Geiser, A.; Gialas, I.; Gladilin, L. K.; Gladkov, D.; Glasman, C.; Gogota, O.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Göttlicher, P.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Grebenyuk, J.; Gregor, I.; Grigorescu, G.; Grzelak, G.; Gueta, O.; Guzik, M.; Gwenlan, C.; Haas, T.; Hain, W.; Hamatsu, R.; Hart, J. C.; Hartmann, H.; Hartner, G.; Hilger, E.; Hochman, D.; Hori, R.; Horton, K.; Hüttmann, A.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Iga, Y.; Ingbir, R.; Ishitsuka, M.; Jakob, H.-P.; Januschek, F.; Jones, T. W.; Jüngst, M.; Kadenko, I.; Kahle, B.; Kananov, S.; Kanno, T.; Karshon, U.; Karstens, F.; Katkov, I. I.; Kaur, M.; Kaur, P.; Keramidas, A.; Khein, L. A.; Kim, J. Y.; Kisielewska, D.; Kitamura, S.; Klanner, R.; Klein, U.; Koffeman, E.; Kooijman, P.; Korol, Ie.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kotanski, A.; Kötz, U.; Kowalski, H.; Kuprash, O.; Kuze, M.; Lee, A.; Levchenko, B. B.; Levy, A.; Libov, V.; Limentani, S.; Ling, T. Y.; Lisovyi, M.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lohmann, W.; Löhr, B.; Lohrmann, E.; Long, K. R.; Longhin, A.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Maeda, J.; Magill, S.; Makarenko, I.; Malka, J.; Mankel, R.; Margotti, A.; Marini, G.; Martin, J. F.; Mastroberardino, A.; Mattingly, M. C. K.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Mergelmeyer, S.; Miglioranzi, S.; Idris, F. Mohamad; Monaco, V.; Montanari, A.; Morris, J. D.; Mujkic, K.; Musgrave, B.; Nagano, K.; Namsoo, T.; Nania, R.; Nigro, A.; Ning, Y.; Nobe, T.; Noor, U.; Notz, D.; Nowak, R. J.; Nuncio-Quiroz, A. E.; Oh, B. Y.; Okazaki, N.; Oliver, K.; Olkiewicz, K.; Onishchuk, Yu.; Papageorgiu, K.; Parenti, A.; Paul, E.; Pawlak, J. M.; Pawlik, B.; Pelfer, P. G.; Pellegrino, A.; Perlanski, W.; Perrey, H.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Plucinski, P.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Polini, A.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Przybycien, M.; Raval, A.; Reeder, D. D.; Reisert, B.; Ren, Z.; Repond, J.; Ri, Y. D.; Robertson, A.; Roloff, P.; Rubinsky, I.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Salii, A.; Samson, U.; Sartorelli, G.; Savin, A. A.; Saxon, D. H.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenstedt, S.; Schleper, P.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schneekloth, U.; Schönberg, V.; Schörner-Sadenius, T.; Schwartz, J.; Sciulli, F.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Shehzadi, R.; Shimizu, S.; Singh, I.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Slominski, W.; Smith, W. H.; Sola, V.; Solano, A.; Son, D.; Sosnovtsev, V.; Spiridonov, A.; Stadie, H.; Stanco, L.; Stern, A.; Stewart, T. P.; Stifutkin, A.; Stopa, P.; Suchkov, S.; Susinno, G.; Suszycki, L.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Szuba, D.; Szuba, J.; Tapper, A. D.; Tassi, E.; Terrón, J.; Theedt, T.; Tiecke, H.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomalak, O.; Tomaszewska, J.; Tsurugai, T.; Turcato, M.; Tymieniecka, T.; Vázquez, M.; Verbytskyi, A.; Viazlo, O.; Vlasov, N. N.; Volynets, O.; Walczak, R.; Abdullah, W. A. T. Wan; Whitmore, J. J.; Wiggers, L.; Wing, M.; Wlasenko, M.; Wolf, G.; Wolfe, H.; Wrona, K.; Yagües-Molina, A. G.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yoshida, R.; Youngman, C.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Zawiejski, L.; Zenaiev, O.; Zeuner, W.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Zhmak, N.; Zhou, C.; Zichichi, A.; Zolkapli, Z.; Zolko, M.; Zotkin, D. S.

    2012-03-01

    Scaled momentum distributions for the strange hadrons K_{text{S}}^0 and Λ /bar{Λ } were measured in deep inelastic ep scattering with the ZEUS detector at HERA using an integrated luminosity of 330 pb-1. The evolution of these distributions with the photon virtuality, Q 2, was studied in the kinematic region 10 < Q 2 < 40000 GeV2 and 0 .001 < x < 0 .75, where x is the Bjorken scaling variable. Clear scaling violations are observed. Predictions based on different approaches to fragmentation were compared to the measurements. Leading-logarithm parton-shower Monte Carlo calculations interfaced to the Lund string fragmentation model describe the data reasonably well in the whole range measured. Next-to-leading-order QCD calculations based on fragmentation functions, FFs, extracted from e + e - data alone, fail to describe the measurements. The calculations based on FFs extracted from a global analysis including e + e -, ep and pp data give an improved description. The measurements presented in this paper have the potential to further constrain the FFs of quarks, anti-quarks and gluons yielding K_{text{S}}^0 and Λ /bar{Λ } strange hadrons.

  12. Global Ionospheric Modelling using Multi-GNSS: BeiDou, Galileo, GLONASS and GPS.

    PubMed

    Ren, Xiaodong; Zhang, Xiaohong; Xie, Weiliang; Zhang, Keke; Yuan, Yongqiang; Li, Xingxing

    2016-09-15

    The emergence of China's Beidou, Europe's Galileo and Russia's GLONASS satellites has multiplied the number of ionospheric piercing points (IPP) offered by GPS alone. This provides great opportunities for deriving precise global ionospheric maps (GIMs) with high resolution to improve positioning accuracy and ionospheric monitoring capabilities. In this paper, the GIM is developed based on multi-GNSS (GPS, GLONASS, BeiDou and Galileo) observations in the current multi-constellation condition. The performance and contribution of multi-GNSS for ionospheric modelling are carefully analysed and evaluated. Multi-GNSS observations of over 300 stations from the Multi-GNSS Experiment (MGEX) and International GNSS Service (IGS) networks for two months are processed. The results show that the multi-GNSS GIM products are better than those of GIM products based on GPS-only. Differential code biases (DCB) are by-products of the multi-GNSS ionosphere modelling, the corresponding standard deviations (STDs) are 0.06 ns, 0.10 ns, 0.18 ns and 0.15 ns for GPS, GLONASS, BeiDou and Galileo, respectively in satellite, and the STDs for the receiver are approximately 0.2~0.4 ns. The single-frequency precise point positioning (SF-PPP) results indicate that the ionospheric modelling accuracy of the proposed method based on multi-GNSS observations is better than that of the current dual-system GIM in specific areas.

  13. An improved method for eliminating BeiDou satellite induced code bias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xin; Li, Xin; Zhang, Xiaohong; Pan, Lin

    2016-04-01

    The BeiDou satellite induced code biases have serious impact on precise positioning which use code measurements. According to the characteristic of code biases which have been confirmed orbit type-, frequency-, and elevation-dependent, an improved method is proposed in this contribution by processing the data from 12 months in 2015 to reduce their adverse effects. Different from the model put forward by Wanninger and Beer (2015),more data sets were used to produce the correction values as weighted least squares and robust estimation were used to build up more accurate model for all IGSO satellites and MEO satellites. The additional method for GEO satellites is applying sidereal filtering to help minimize the code biases. The result of improved method shows that the systematic variations have been eliminated more clearly and the positioning accuracy of PPP solution were better than using traditional model proposed by Wanninger and Beer as well as convergence speed. In addition, the systematic variations in MW combination which serve for ambiguity fixing were removed as well. Morever, after application of the code bias correction method, the convergence time of MW combinations and the fixing rate of DD wide-lane ambiguity resolution have been improved. Key words: BeiDou; code bias; weighted least squares ; robust estimation; Precise Positioning; MW combination; ambiguity resolution

  14. Comparison and Analysis of BeiDou Satellite Single-system Precise Orbit Determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, W. P.; Hao, J. M.; Deng, K.; Chen, Y. L.

    2016-09-01

    The method of double-difference dynamic precise orbit determination for BeiDou satellites by using both carrier phase and smoothed pseudo-range is presented. The data processing flows of zero-difference and double-difference dynamic precise orbit determination for BeiDou satellites are presented. And the two methods are analyzed. The precision of two methods is compared based on the real data. The results show that in the condition of stations layout and by using the two methods, the three-dimension precision of GEO (Geostationary Earth Orbit Satellite) can reach about 1 m, and those of IGSO (Inclined Geosynchronous Earth Orbit Satellite) and MEO (Medium Earth Orbit Satellite) can be better than 0.5 m. And the radial precision of the three kinds of orbit satellites can be all better than 10 cm. Compared with the zero-difference dynamic method, the orbit precision of GEO is better with the double-difference dynamic method, and that of IGSO is comparable, but that of MEO is worse.

  15. Untersuchung der Störwirkung von LTE auf SRD Anwendungen bei 868 MHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welpot, M.; Wunderlich, S.; Gaspard, I.

    2014-11-01

    Moderne Hausautomatisierungssysteme, Alarmanlagen oder auch Funk-Zugangssysteme in Haus und Automobil setzen auf frei nutzbare Frequenzen in ISM/SRD-Bändern. Die rasante Zunahme an privaten und kommerziell genutzten Applikationen im SRD-Band bei 868 MHz und der Ausbau der LTE-Mobilfunknetze im Frequenzbereich unterhalb von 1 GHz ("Digital Dividend") wirft zunehmend die Frage nach der Funkverträglichkeit dieser Systeme untereinander auf. Während die SRD-Funkmodule auf eine geringe Sendeleistung von ~ +14 dBm beschränkt sind (Ralf and Thomas, 2009), beträgt die maximale LTE-Sendeleistung im Uplink nach (ETSI-Norm, 2011) +23 dBm. Zusammen mit der Einführung von LTE im Frequenzbereich unterhalb 1 GHz als DSL-Ersatz vor allem in ländlichen Gebieten, ergibt sich damit als mögliches Störszenario, dass durch die Aussendung des LTE-Endgerätes im Bereich von ca. 850 MHz die SRD-Funkverbindungen bei 868 MHz insbesondere dann gestört werden, wenn die Antennen beider Funksysteme räumlich nahe zueinander angeordnet sind und folglich nur eine geringe zusätzliche Entkopplung der Systeme bieten. In der vorliegenden Arbeit wird das LTE-Störpotential auf SRD-Empfänger praxisnah untersucht.

  16. Study of HERA e p data at low Q2 and low xBj and the need for higher-twist corrections to standard perturbative QCD fits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abt, I.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Foster, B.; Myronenko, V.; Wichmann, K.; Wing, M.

    2016-08-01

    A detailed comparison of HERA data at low Bjorken-x and low four-momentum-transfer squared, Q2, with predictions based on ln Q2 evolution (DGLAP) in perturbative quantum chromodynamics suggests inadequacies of this framework. The standard DGLAP evolution was augmented by including an additional higher-twist term in the description of the longitudinal structure function, FL. This additional term, FLALHT/Q2 , improves the description of the reduced cross sections significantly. The resulting predictions for FL suggest that further corrections are required for Q2 less than about 2 GeV2 .

  17. USER'S GUIDE TO THE PERSONAL COMPUTER VERSION OF THE BIOGENIC EMISSIONS INVENTORY SYSTEM (PC-BEIS2)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The document is a user's guide for an updated Personal Computer version of the Biogenic Emissions Inventory System (PC-BEIS2), allowing users to estimate hourly emissions of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) and soil nitrogen oxide emissions for any county in the contig...

  18. INTEGRATION OF THE BIOGENIC EMISSIONS INVENTORY SYSTEM (BEIS3) INTO THE COMMUNITY MULTISCALE AIR QUALITY MODELING SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The importance of biogenic emissions for regional air quality modeling is generally recognized [Guenther et al., 2000]. Since the 1980s, biogenic emission estimates have been derived from algorithms such as the Biogenic Emissions Inventory System (BEIS) [Pierce et. al., 1998]....

  19. Analysis on coverage ability of BeiDou navigation satellite system for manned spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Sihao; Yao, Zheng; Zhuang, Xuebin; Lu, Mingquan

    2014-12-01

    To investigate the service ability of the BeiDou Navigation Satellite System (BDS) for manned spacecraft, both the current regional and the future-planned global constellations of BDS are introduced and simulated. The orbital parameters of the International Space Station and China's Tiangong-1 spacelab are used to create the simulation scenario and evaluate the performance of the BDS constellations. The number of visible satellites and the position dilution (PDOP) of precision at the spacecraft-based receiver are evaluated. Simulation and analysis show quantitative results on the coverage ability and time percentages of both the current BDS regional and future global constellations for manned-space orbits which can be a guideline to the applications and mission design of BDS receivers on manned spacecraft.

  20. Preface: BeiDou Navigation Satellite System (BDS)/GNSS+: Recent progress and new applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Shuanggen

    2017-02-01

    Nowadays, the new China's BeiDou Navigation Satellite System (BDS) has been developed well. At the end of 2016, over 23 BDS satellites were launched, including five geostationary Earth orbit (GEO) satellites, five inclined geosynchronous orbit (IGSO) satellites and nine medium Earth orbit (MEO) satellites. The current BDS service covers China and most Asia-Pacific regions with accuracy of better than 10 m in positioning, 0.2 m/s in velocity and 50 ns in timing. The BDS with global coverage will be completely established by 2020 with five GEO satellites and 30 MEO satellites. The main function of BDS is the positioning, navigation and timing (PNT) as well as short message communications. Together with the United States' GPS, Russia's GLONASS and the European Union's Galileo system as well as other regional augmentation systems, more new applications of multi-Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) will be exploited and realized in the next decades.

  1. Min Bei Irradiation Center Food and Agriculture Organization project experience Jianou, Fujian Province, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Bruce John; Dan, Xu; Jingzhang, Ren

    1993-07-01

    The Food and Agriculture Organization(FAO), a Unitede Nations Organization, in an effort to increase food supplies by post harvest irradiation treatment participated in the development of the Min Bei Irradiation Center(MBIC) Located in Fujian Province, China. FAO inconjunction with Shanghai Nuclear Energy Research and Design Institute(SNERDI), MBIC staff, and the Ministry of Agriculture completed Project TCP CPR 6763/8961 culminating in the recent comissioning of one of China's nesest irradiation facilities. From the feasibility phase initiated in 1986, through the construction period and the eventual commissioning in 1991 FAO participated in the technical overview of the irradiation center. MBIC was developed both as a research and development center as well as a production irradiation facility for the primary purposes of reduction of post harvest food loss in Fujian Province. This retrospective review of the project provides a hindsight view for the development of MBIC.

  2. Real-time retrieval of precipitable water vapor from GPS and BeiDou observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Cuixian; Li, Xingxing; Nilsson, Tobias; Ning, Tong; Heinkelmann, Robert; Ge, Maorong; Glaser, Susanne; Schuh, Harald

    2015-09-01

    The rapid development of the Chinese BeiDou Navigation Satellite System (BDS) brings a promising prospect for the real-time retrieval of zenith tropospheric delays (ZTD) and precipitable water vapor (PWV), which is of great benefit for supporting the time-critical meteorological applications such as nowcasting or severe weather event monitoring. In this study, we develop a real-time ZTD/PWV processing method based on Global Positioning System (GPS) and BDS observations. The performance of ZTD and PWV derived from BDS observations using real-time precise point positioning (PPP) technique is carefully investigated. The contribution of combining BDS and GPS for ZTD/PWV retrieving is evaluated as well. GPS and BDS observations of a half-year period for 40 globally distributed stations from the International GNSS Service Multi-GNSS Experiment and BeiDou Experiment Tracking Network are processed. The results show that the real-time BDS-only ZTD series agree well with the GPS-only ZTD series in general: the RMS values are about 11-16 mm (about 2-3 mm in PWV). Furthermore, the real-time ZTD derived from GPS-only, BDS-only, and GPS/BDS combined solutions are compared with those derived from the Very Long Baseline Interferometry. The comparisons show that the BDS can contribute to real-time meteorological applications, slightly less accurately than GPS. More accurate and reliable water vapor estimates, about 1.3-1.8 mm in PWV, can be obtained if the BDS observations are combined with the GPS observations in the real-time PPP data processing. The PWV comparisons with radiosondes further confirm the performance of BDS-derived real-time PWV and the benefit of adding BDS to standard GPS processing.

  3. Global Ionospheric Modelling using Multi-GNSS: BeiDou, Galileo, GLONASS and GPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Xiaodong; Zhang, Xiaohong; Xie, Weiliang; Zhang, Keke; Yuan, Yongqiang; Li, Xingxing

    2016-09-01

    The emergence of China’s Beidou, Europe’s Galileo and Russia’s GLONASS satellites has multiplied the number of ionospheric piercing points (IPP) offered by GPS alone. This provides great opportunities for deriving precise global ionospheric maps (GIMs) with high resolution to improve positioning accuracy and ionospheric monitoring capabilities. In this paper, the GIM is developed based on multi-GNSS (GPS, GLONASS, BeiDou and Galileo) observations in the current multi-constellation condition. The performance and contribution of multi-GNSS for ionospheric modelling are carefully analysed and evaluated. Multi-GNSS observations of over 300 stations from the Multi-GNSS Experiment (MGEX) and International GNSS Service (IGS) networks for two months are processed. The results show that the multi-GNSS GIM products are better than those of GIM products based on GPS-only. Differential code biases (DCB) are by-products of the multi-GNSS ionosphere modelling, the corresponding standard deviations (STDs) are 0.06 ns, 0.10 ns, 0.18 ns and 0.15 ns for GPS, GLONASS, BeiDou and Galileo, respectively in satellite, and the STDs for the receiver are approximately 0.2~0.4 ns. The single-frequency precise point positioning (SF-PPP) results indicate that the ionospheric modelling accuracy of the proposed method based on multi-GNSS observations is better than that of the current dual-system GIM in specific areas.

  4. The Ionospheric Scintillation Effects on the BeiDou Signal Receiver.

    PubMed

    He, Zhijun; Zhao, Hongbo; Feng, Wenquan

    2016-11-09

    Irregularities in the Earth's ionosphere can make the amplitude and phase of radio signals fluctuate rapidly, which is known as ionospheric scintillation. Severe ionospheric scintillation could affect the performance of the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS). Currently, the Multiple Phase Screen (MPS) technique is widely used in solving problems caused by weak and strong scintillations. Considering that Southern China is mainly located in the area where moderate and intense scintillation occur frequently, this paper built a model based on the MPS technique and discussed the scintillation impacts on China's BeiDou navigation system. By using the BeiDou B1I signal, this paper analyzed the scintillation effects on the receiver, which includes the acquisition and tracking process. For acquisition process, this paper focused on the correlation peak and acquisition probability. For the tracking process, this paper focused on the carrier tracking loop and the code tracking loop. Simulation results show that under high scintillation intensity, the phase fluctuation could be -1.13 ± 0.087 rad to 1.40 ± 0.087 rad and the relative amplitude fluctuation could be -10 dB to 8 dB. As the scintillation intensity increased, the average correlation peak would decrease more than 8%, which could thus degrade acquisition performance. On the other hand, when the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is comparatively lower, the influence of strong scintillation on the phase locked loop (PLL) is much higher than that of weak scintillation. As the scintillation becomes more intense, PLL variance could consequently results in an error of more than 2.02 cm in carrier-phase based ranging. In addition, the delay locked loop (DLL) simulation results indicated that the pseudo-range error caused by strong scintillation could be more than 4 m and the consequent impact on positioning accuracy could be more than 6 m.

  5. Global Ionospheric Modelling using Multi-GNSS: BeiDou, Galileo, GLONASS and GPS

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Xiaodong; Zhang, Xiaohong; Xie, Weiliang; Zhang, Keke; Yuan, Yongqiang; Li, Xingxing

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of China’s Beidou, Europe’s Galileo and Russia’s GLONASS satellites has multiplied the number of ionospheric piercing points (IPP) offered by GPS alone. This provides great opportunities for deriving precise global ionospheric maps (GIMs) with high resolution to improve positioning accuracy and ionospheric monitoring capabilities. In this paper, the GIM is developed based on multi-GNSS (GPS, GLONASS, BeiDou and Galileo) observations in the current multi-constellation condition. The performance and contribution of multi-GNSS for ionospheric modelling are carefully analysed and evaluated. Multi-GNSS observations of over 300 stations from the Multi-GNSS Experiment (MGEX) and International GNSS Service (IGS) networks for two months are processed. The results show that the multi-GNSS GIM products are better than those of GIM products based on GPS-only. Differential code biases (DCB) are by-products of the multi-GNSS ionosphere modelling, the corresponding standard deviations (STDs) are 0.06 ns, 0.10 ns, 0.18 ns and 0.15 ns for GPS, GLONASS, BeiDou and Galileo, respectively in satellite, and the STDs for the receiver are approximately 0.2~0.4 ns. The single-frequency precise point positioning (SF-PPP) results indicate that the ionospheric modelling accuracy of the proposed method based on multi-GNSS observations is better than that of the current dual-system GIM in specific areas. PMID:27629988

  6. Ionenquelle mit Plasma-Anregung durch Mikrowellen bei Elektronen-Zyklotron-Resonanz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, K.; Weissmantel, C.

    Mit der Mikrowellen-Entladung bei Zyklotron-Resonanz ist eine effektive Plasma-Anregung möglich; es lassen sich Ionisationsgrade um 0,1 in Edel- und Reaktivgasen erreichen. Die Nutzung für Ionenquellen bietet gegenüber der unselbständigen Niederdruck-Bogenentladung eine Reihe von Vorteilen, insbesondere durch den Wegfall der Glühkatode. Es wird eine Breitstrahl-Ionenquelle beschrieben, die bei einer Extraktionsspannung von 1 kV Ionenströme bis zu 150 mA liefert. Die Ionenstromdichte läßt sich über einen Strahldurchmesser von 150 mm weitgehend konstant halten. Damit erfüllt die Mikrowellen-Ionenquelle Forderungen, wie sie beim Einsatz von Ionenstrahlverfahren in der Mikroelektronik gestellt werden.Translated AbstractIon Source with Plasma Generation by Microwaves in Electron Cyclotron ResonanceThe microwave discharge operated at cyclotron resonance allows to achieve an effective plasma generation; degrees of ionization of about 0,1 are feasible. The utilization in ion sources offers compared with non-selfsustained are discharges several advantages, in particular because the hot cathode is emitted. A broad-beam ion source is described which yields ion currents up to 150 mA at an extraction voltage of 1 kV. The ion current density could be maintained nearly constant over a beam diameter of 150 mm. Hence, the microwave ion source is shown to match the requirements for applications of ion beam processes in microelectronics.

  7. The Ionospheric Scintillation Effects on the BeiDou Signal Receiver

    PubMed Central

    He, Zhijun; Zhao, Hongbo; Feng, Wenquan

    2016-01-01

    Irregularities in the Earth’s ionosphere can make the amplitude and phase of radio signals fluctuate rapidly, which is known as ionospheric scintillation. Severe ionospheric scintillation could affect the performance of the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS). Currently, the Multiple Phase Screen (MPS) technique is widely used in solving problems caused by weak and strong scintillations. Considering that Southern China is mainly located in the area where moderate and intense scintillation occur frequently, this paper built a model based on the MPS technique and discussed the scintillation impacts on China’s BeiDou navigation system. By using the BeiDou B1I signal, this paper analyzed the scintillation effects on the receiver, which includes the acquisition and tracking process. For acquisition process, this paper focused on the correlation peak and acquisition probability. For the tracking process, this paper focused on the carrier tracking loop and the code tracking loop. Simulation results show that under high scintillation intensity, the phase fluctuation could be −1.13 ± 0.087 rad to 1.40 ± 0.087 rad and the relative amplitude fluctuation could be −10 dB to 8 dB. As the scintillation intensity increased, the average correlation peak would decrease more than 8%, which could thus degrade acquisition performance. On the other hand, when the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is comparatively lower, the influence of strong scintillation on the phase locked loop (PLL) is much higher than that of weak scintillation. As the scintillation becomes more intense, PLL variance could consequently results in an error of more than 2.02 cm in carrier-phase based ranging. In addition, the delay locked loop (DLL) simulation results indicated that the pseudo-range error caused by strong scintillation could be more than 4 m and the consequent impact on positioning accuracy could be more than 6 m. PMID:27834867

  8. Reduktion der Invasivität bei nadelbasierter Bewegungskompensation für navigierte Eingriffe im Abdomen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier-Hein, L.; Tekbas, A.; Franz, A. M.; Tetzlaff, R.; Müller, S. A.; Pianka, F.; Wolf, I.; Kauczor, H.-U.; Schmied, B. M.; Meinzer, H.-P.

    Diese Arbeit stellt eine in-vivo Genauigkeitsstudie über das Kombinieren interner und externer Marker für die Bewegungskompensation bei Leberinterventionen vor. Abhängig von der Anzahl und Anordnung der verwendeten Marker sowie der angewandten Echtzeittransformation wurde bei kontinuierlicher Atmung eine Schätzgenauigkeit der Zielposition zwischen 1 und 5 mm erreicht. Das Hinzufügen einer einzigen Hilfsnadel zu einer Menge von Hautmarkern führte zu einer Fehlerreduktion von über 50%. Die Ergebnisse dieser Studie können in der Praxis verwendet werden, um basierend auf dem Tradeoff zwischen geringer Invasivität und hoher Genauigkeit eine geeignete Kombination von internen und externen Markern für eine gegebene Fragestellung zu wählen.

  9. Impact of updated HER2 testing guidelines in breast cancer--re-evaluation of HERA trial fluorescence in situ hybridization data.

    PubMed

    Stoss, Oliver C; Scheel, Andreas; Nagelmeier, Iris; Schildhaus, Hans-Ulrich; Henkel, Thomas; Viale, Giuseppe; Jasani, Bharat; Untch, Michael; Rüschoff, Josef

    2015-12-01

    Recently the American Society of Clinical Oncology and the College of American Pathologists have updated their clinical practice guidelines for HER2 testing in breast cancer. In order to evaluate these new recommendations, we have re-assessed the HER2 status of 6018 breast cancer cases of the screening population for the HERceptin adjuvant (HERA) trial that were originally centrally tested by fluorescence in situ hybridization based on the FDA-released test guidelines. According to the most recent 2013 ASCO/CAP recommendations, 3380 (56.2%) cases were classified as HER2 positive compared with 3359 (55.8%) applying the HERA/FDA scheme and 3339 (55.5%) applying the 2007 ASCO/CAP guidelines. Twenty-one cases switched from negative (HERA/FDA scheme) to positive (2013 ASCO/CAP guidelines). This group is characterized by a mean HER2 gene copy number of ≥6.0, polysomy or co-amplification of CEP17 with an average CEP17 count of 5, and with HER2 receptor overexpression in 75% of cases. On the basis of the HER2 gene copy number alone, we observe 494 cases (8.2%) that are in the equivocal range. Most of these cases (>80%) were also nondecisive by immunohistochemistry (score 2+) irrespective of whether ratio was <2.0>. The number of equivocal cases that would require HER2 reflex testing decreases to 113 (1.9%) if in addition to the HER2 gene copy number also the ratio of HER2 and CEP17 copy numbers is considered via dual-color in situ hybridization. The combination of applying the HER2 mean gene copy number as well as the HER2/CEP17 ratio to define equivocal test decisions by fluorescence in situ hybridization as proposed by the current ASCO/CAP guidelines appears to be a more optimum approach to adopt in order to avoid or minimize reporting of false negative results. Using the mean HER2 gene copy number alone for decision making results in a significant increase of equivocal cases.

  10. Evaluation of improved land use and canopy representation in BEIS v3.61 with biogenic VOC measurements in California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bash, Jesse O.; Baker, Kirk R.; Beaver, Melinda R.

    2016-06-01

    Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC) participate in reactions that can lead to secondarily formed ozone and particulate matter (PM) impacting air quality and climate. BVOC emissions are important inputs to chemical transport models applied on local to global scales but considerable uncertainty remains in the representation of canopy parameterizations and emission algorithms from different vegetation species. The Biogenic Emission Inventory System (BEIS) has been used to support both scientific and regulatory model assessments for ozone and PM. Here we describe a new version of BEIS which includes updated input vegetation data and canopy model formulation for estimating leaf temperature and vegetation data on estimated BVOC. The Biogenic Emission Landuse Database (BELD) was revised to incorporate land use data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) land product and 2006 National Land Cover Database (NLCD) land coverage. Vegetation species data are based on the US Forest Service (USFS) Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) version 5.1 for 2002-2013 and US Department of Agriculture (USDA) 2007 census of agriculture data. This update results in generally higher BVOC emissions throughout California compared with the previous version of BEIS. Baseline and updated BVOC emission estimates are used in Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) Model simulations with 4 km grid resolution and evaluated with measurements of isoprene and monoterpenes taken during multiple field campaigns in northern California. The updated canopy model coupled with improved land use and vegetation representation resulted in better agreement between CMAQ isoprene and monoterpene estimates compared with these observations.

  11. Measurement of D{plus-minus} and D{sup 0} production in deep Inelastic scattering using a lifetime tag at HERA.

    SciTech Connect

    Chekanov, S.; Derrick, M.; Magill, S.; Musgrave, B.; Repond, J.; Yoshida, R.; Nicholass, D.; High Energy Physics; ZEUS Collboration

    2009-10-01

    The production of D{sup {+-}}- and D{sup 0}-mesons has been measured with the ZEUS detector at HERA using an integrated luminosity of 133.6 pb{sup -1}. The measurements cover the kinematic range 5 < Q{sup 2} < 1000 GeV{sup 2}, 0.02 < y < 0.7, 1.5 < p T{sup D} < 15 GeV and |{eta}{sup D}| < 1.6. Combinatorial background to the D-meson signals is reduced by using the ZEUS microvertex detector to reconstruct displaced secondary vertices. Production cross sections are compared with the predictions of next-to-leading-order QCD, which is found to describe the data well. Measurements are extrapolated to the full kinematic phase space in order to obtain the open-charm contribution, F{sub 2}{sup c{bar c}} to the proton structure function, F{sub 2}.

  12. Search for a narrow baryonic state decaying to p KS0 and p ‾ KS0 in deep inelastic scattering at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramowicz, H.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.; Adamus, M.; Antonelli, S.; Aushev, V.; Behnke, O.; Behrens, U.; Bertolin, A.; Bhadra, S.; Bloch, I.; Boos, E. G.; Brock, I.; Brook, N. H.; Brugnera, R.; Bruni, A.; Bussey, P. J.; Caldwell, A.; Capua, M.; Catterall, C. D.; Chwastowski, J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Corradi, M.; Dementiev, R. K.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Dusini, S.; Foster, B.; Gach, G.; Gallo, E.; Garfagnini, A.; Geiser, A.; Gizhko, A.; Gladilin, L. K.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Grzelak, G.; Guzik, M.; Gwenlan, C.; Hain, W.; Hlushchenko, O.; Hochman, D.; Hori, R.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Iga, Y.; Ishitsuka, M.; Januschek, F.; Jomhari, N. Z.; Kadenko, I.; Kananov, S.; Karshon, U.; Kaur, P.; Kisielewska, D.; Klanner, R.; Klein, U.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kotański, A.; Kötz, U.; Kovalchuk, N.; Kowalski, H.; Krupa, B.; Kuprash, O.; Kuze, M.; Levchenko, B. B.; Levy, A.; Limentani, S.; Lisovyi, M.; Lobodzinska, E.; Löhr, B.; Lohrmann, E.; Longhin, A.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Makarenko, I.; Malka, J.; Mastroberardino, A.; Mohamad Idris, F.; Mohammad Nasir, N.; Myronenko, V.; Nagano, K.; Nobe, T.; Nowak, R. J.; Onishchuk, Yu.; Paul, E.; Perlański, W.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Polini, A.; Przybycień, M.; Roloff, P.; Ruspa, M.; Saxon, D. H.; Schioppa, M.; Schneekloth, U.; Schörner-Sadenius, T.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Shevchenko, R.; Shkola, O.; Shyrma, Yu.; Singh, I.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Słomiński, W.; Solano, A.; Stanco, L.; Stefaniuk, N.; Stern, A.; Stopa, P.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Tassi, E.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomaszewska, J.; Tsurugai, T.; Turcato, M.; Turkot, O.; Tymieniecka, T.; Verbytskyi, A.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.; Wichmann, K.; Wing, M.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Zakharchuk, N.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Zawiejski, L.; Zenaiev, O.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Zotkin, D. S.

    2016-08-01

    A search for a narrow baryonic state in the p KS0 and p ‾ KS0 system has been performed in ep collisions at HERA with the ZEUS detector using an integrated luminosity of 358pb-1 taken in 2003-2007. The search was performed with deep inelastic scattering events at an ep centre-of-mass energy of 318GeV for exchanged photon virtuality, Q2, between 20 and 100GeV2. Contrary to evidence presented for such a state around 1.52 GeV in a previous ZEUS analysis using a sample of 121 pb-1 taken in 1996-2000, no resonance peak was found in the p (p ‾) KS0 invariant-mass distribution in the range 1.45-1.7 GeV. Upper limits on the production cross section are set.

  13. Combination of measurements of inclusive deep inelastic {e^{± }p} scattering cross sections and QCD analysis of HERA data. H1 and ZEUS Collaborations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramowicz, H.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.; Adamus, M.; Andreev, V.; Antonelli, S.; Antunović, B.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Begzsuren, K.; Behnke, O.; Behrendt Dubak, A.; Behrens, U.; Belousov, A.; Belov, P.; Bertolin, A.; Bloch, I.; Boos, E. G.; Borras, K.; Boudry, V.; Brandt, G.; Brisson, V.; Britzger, D.; Brock, I.; Brook, N. H.; Brugnera, R.; Bruni, A.; Buniatyan, A.; Bussey, P. J.; Bylinkin, A.; Bystritskaya, L.; Caldwell, A.; Campbell, A. J.; Cantun Avila, K. B.; Capua, M.; Catterall, C. D.; Ceccopieri, F.; Cerny, K.; Chekelian, V.; Chwastowski, J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Contreras, J. G.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J. B.; Daum, K.; Dementiev, R. K.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Diaconu, C.; Dobre, M.; Dodonov, V.; Dolinska, G.; Dusini, S.; Eckerlin, G.; Egli, S.; Elsen, E.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Feltesse, J.; Ferencei, J.; Figiel, J.; Fleischer, M.; Fomenko, A.; Foster, B.; Gabathuler, E.; Gach, G.; Gallo, E.; Garfagnini, A.; Gayler, J.; Geiser, A.; Ghazaryan, S.; Gizhko, A.; Gladilin, L. K.; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grab, C.; Grebenyuk, A.; Grebenyuk, J.; Greenshaw, T.; Gregor, I.; Grindhammer, G.; Grzelak, G.; Gueta, O.; Guzik, M.; Gwenlan, C.; Haidt, D.; Hain, W.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Henkenjohann, P.; Hladkỳ, J.; Hochman, D.; Hoffmann, D.; Hori, R.; Horisberger, R.; Hreus, T.; Huber, F.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Iga, Y.; Ishitsuka, M.; Iudin, A.; Jacquet, M.; Janssen, X.; Januschek, F.; Jomhari, N. Z.; Jung, H.; Kadenko, I.; Kananov, S.; Kapichine, M.; Karshon, U.; Katzy, J.; Kaur, M.; Kaur, P.; Kiesling, C.; Kisielewska, D.; Klanner, R.; Klein, M.; Klein, U.; Kleinwort, C.; Kogler, R.; Kondrashova, N.; Kononenko, O.; Korol, Ie.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kostka, P.; Kotański, A.; Kötz, U.; Kovalchuk, N.; Kowalski, H.; Kretzschmar, J.; Krücker, D.; Krüger, K.; Krupa, B.; Kuprash, O.; Kuze, M.; Landon, M. P. J.; Lange, W.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Levchenko, B. B.; Levonian, S.; Levy, A.; Libov, V.; Limentani, S.; Lipka, K.; Lisovyi, M.; List, B.; List, J.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lobodzinski, B.; Löhr, B.; Lohrmann, E.; Longhin, A.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Makarenko, I.; Malinovski, E.; Malka, J.; Martyn, H.-U.; Maxfield, S. J.; Mehta, A.; Mergelmeyer, S.; Meyer, A. B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Mikocki, S.; Mohamad Idris, F.; Morozov, A.; Muhammad Nasir, N.; Müller, K.; Myronenko, V.; Nagano, K.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, P. R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikiforov, A.; Nobe, T.; Notz, D.; Nowak, G.; Nowak, R. J.; Olsson, J. E.; Onishchuk, Yu.; Ozerov, D.; Pahl, P.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G. D.; Paul, E.; Perez, E.; Perlański, W.; Petrukhin, A.; Picuric, I.; Pirumov, H.; Pitzl, D.; Pokorny, B.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Polifka, R.; Przybycień, M.; Radescu, V.; Raicevic, N.; Ravdandorj, T.; Reimer, P.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roloff, P.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rotaru, M.; Rubinsky, I.; Rusakov, S.; Ruspa, M.; Šálek, D.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sauter, M.; Sauvan, E.; Saxon, D. H.; Schioppa, M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitt, S.; Schneekloth, U.; Schoeffel, L.; Schöning, A.; Schörner-Sadenius, T.; Sefkow, F.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Shevchenko, R.; Shkola, O.; Shushkevich, S.; Shyrma, Yu.; Singh, I.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Słomiński, W.; Solano, A.; Soloviev, Y.; Sopicki, P.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, A.; Stanco, L.; Steder, M.; Stefaniuk, N.; Stella, B.; Stern, A.; Stopa, P.; Straumann, U.; Sykora, T.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Szuba, D.; Szuba, J.; Tassi, E.; Thompson, P. D.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomaszewska, J.; Traynor, D.; Trofymov, A.; Truöl, P.; Tsakov, I.; Tseepeldorj, B.; Tsurugai, T.; Turcato, M.; Turkot, O.; Turnau, J.; Tymieniecka, T.; Valkárová, A.; Vallée, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vazdik, Y.; Verbytskyi, A.; Viazlo, O.; Walczak, R.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.; Wegener, D.; Wichmann, K.; Wing, M.; Wolf, G.; Wünsch, E.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Žáček, J.; Zakharchuk, N.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Zawiejski, L.; Zenaiev, O.; Zhang, Z.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Zhmak, N.; Žlebčík, R.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.; Zotkin, D. S.

    2015-12-01

    A combination is presented of all inclusive deep inelastic cross sections previously published by the H1 and ZEUS collaborations at HERA for neutral and charged current e^{± }p scattering for zero beam polarisation. The data were taken at proton beam energies of 920, 820, 575 and 460 GeV and an electron beam energy of 27.5 GeV. The data correspond to an integrated luminosity of about 1 fb^{-1} and span six orders of magnitude in negative four-momentum-transfer squared, Q^2, and Bjorken x. The correlations of the systematic uncertainties were evaluated and taken into account for the combination. The combined cross sections were input to QCD analyses at leading order, next-to-leading order and at next-to-next-to-leading order, providing a new set of parton distribution functions, called HERAPDF2.0. In addition to the experimental uncertainties, model and parameterisation uncertainties were assessed for these parton distribution functions. Variants of HERAPDF2.0 with an alternative gluon parameterisation, HERAPDF2.0AG, and using fixed-flavour-number schemes, HERAPDF2.0FF, are presented. The analysis was extended by including HERA data on charm and jet production, resulting in the variant HERAPDF2.0Jets. The inclusion of jet-production cross sections made a simultaneous determination of these parton distributions and the strong coupling constant possible, resulting in α _s(M_Z^2)=0.1183 ± 0.0009 (exp) ± 0.0005(model/parameterisation) ± 0.0012(hadronisation) ^{+0.0037}_{-0.0030}(scale). An extraction of xF_3^{γ Z} and results on electroweak unification and scaling violations are also presented.

  14. The action characterization matrix: A link between HERA (Human Events Reference for ATHEANA) and ATHEANA (a technique for human error analysis)

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, H.A.

    1997-12-22

    The Technique for Human Error Analysis (ATHEANA) is a newly developed human reliability analysis (HRA) methodology that aims to facilitate better representation and integration of human performance into probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) modeling and quantification by analyzing risk-significant operating experience in the context of existing behavior science models. The fundamental premise of ATHEANA is that error-forcing contexts (EFCs), which refer to combinations of equipment/material conditions and performance shaping factors (PSFs), set up or create the conditions under which unsafe actions (UAs) can occur. ATHEANA is being developed in the context of nuclear power plant (NPP) PRAs, and much of the language used to describe the method and provide examples of its application are specific to that industry. Because ATHEANA relies heavily on the analysis of operational events that have already occurred as a mechanism for generating creative thinking about possible EFCs, a database, called the Human Events Reference for ATHEANA (HERA), has been developed to support the methodology. Los Alamos National Laboratory`s (LANL) Human Factors Group has recently joined the ATHEANA project team; LANL is responsible for further developing the database structure and for analyzing additional exemplar operational events for entry into the database. The Action Characterization Matrix (ACM) is conceived as a bridge between the HERA database structure and ATHEANA. Specifically, the ACM allows each unsafe action or human failure event to be characterized according to its representation along each of six different dimensions: system status, initiator status, unsafe action mechanism, information processing stage, equipment/material conditions, and performance shaping factors. This report describes the development of the ACM and provides details on the structure and content of its dimensions.

  15. Studies of aging and HV break down problems during development and operation of MSGC and GEM detectors for the inner tracking system of HERA-B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagaturia, Y.; Baruth, O.; Dreis, H. B.; Eisele, F.; Gorbunov, I.; Gradl, S.; Gradl, W.; Hausmann, S.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hott, T.; Keller, S.; Krauss, C.; Lomonosov, B.; Negodaev, M.; Richter, C.; Robmann, P.; Schmidt, B.; Straumann, U.; Truöl, P.; Visbeck, S.; Walter, T.; Werner, C.; Werthenbach, U.; Zech, G.; Zeuner, T.; Ziegler, M.

    2002-09-01

    The results of 5 years of development of the inner tracking system of the HERA-B experiment and first experience from the data taking period of the year 2000 are reported. The system contains 184 chambers, covering a sensitive area of about (20×20) cm2 each. The detector is based on microstrip gas counters (MSGCs) with diamond-like coated (DLC) glass wafers and gas electron multipliers (GEMs). The main problems in the development phase were gas discharges in intense hadron beams and aging in a high radiation dose environment. The observation of gas discharges which damage the electrode structure of the MSGC led to the addition of the GEM as a first amplification step. Spurious sparking at the GEM cannot be avoided completely. It does not affect the GEM itself but can produce secondary damage of the MSGC if the electric field between the GEM and the MSGC is above a threshold depending on the operation conditions. We observed that aging does not only depend on the dose but also on the spot size of the irradiated area. Ar-DME mixtures had to be abandoned whereas a mixture of 70% Ar and 30% CO 2 showed no serious aging effects up to about 40 mC/cm deposited charge on the anodes. X-ray measurements indicate that the DLC of the MSGC is deteriorated by the gas amplification process. As a consequence, long-term gain variations are expected. The Inner Tracker has successfully participated in the data taking at HERA-B during summer 2000.

  16. Accuracy and reliability of multi-GNSS real-time precise positioning: GPS, GLONASS, BeiDou, and Galileo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xingxing; Ge, Maorong; Dai, Xiaolei; Ren, Xiaodong; Fritsche, Mathias; Wickert, Jens; Schuh, Harald

    2015-06-01

    In this contribution, we present a GPS+GLONASS+BeiDou+Galileo four-system model to fully exploit the observations of all these four navigation satellite systems for real-time precise orbit determination, clock estimation and positioning. A rigorous multi-GNSS analysis is performed to achieve the best possible consistency by processing the observations from different GNSS together in one common parameter estimation procedure. Meanwhile, an efficient multi-GNSS real-time precise positioning service system is designed and demonstrated by using the multi-GNSS Experiment, BeiDou Experimental Tracking Network, and International GNSS Service networks including stations all over the world. The statistical analysis of the 6-h predicted orbits show that the radial and cross root mean square (RMS) values are smaller than 10 cm for BeiDou and Galileo, and smaller than 5 cm for both GLONASS and GPS satellites, respectively. The RMS values of the clock differences between real-time and batch-processed solutions for GPS satellites are about 0.10 ns, while the RMS values for BeiDou, Galileo and GLONASS are 0.13, 0.13 and 0.14 ns, respectively. The addition of the BeiDou, Galileo and GLONASS systems to the standard GPS-only processing, reduces the convergence time almost by 70 %, while the positioning accuracy is improved by about 25 %. Some outliers in the GPS-only solutions vanish when multi-GNSS observations are processed simultaneous. The availability and reliability of GPS precise positioning decrease dramatically as the elevation cutoff increases. However, the accuracy of multi-GNSS precise point positioning (PPP) is hardly decreased and few centimeter are still achievable in the horizontal components even with 40 elevation cutoff. At 30 and 40 elevation cutoffs, the availability rates of GPS-only solution drop significantly to only around 70 and 40 %, respectively. However, multi-GNSS PPP can provide precise position estimates continuously (availability rate is more than 99

  17. Assessment of BeiDou differential code bias variations from multi-GNSS network observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, S. G.; Jin, R.; Li, D.

    2016-02-01

    The differential code bias (DCB) of global navigation satellite systems (GNSSs) affects precise ionospheric modeling and applications. In this paper, daily DCBs of the BeiDou Navigation Satellite System (BDS) are estimated and investigated from 2-year multi-GNSS network observations (2013-2014) based on global ionospheric maps (GIMs) from the Center for Orbit Determination in Europe (CODE), which are compared with Global Positioning System (GPS) results. The DCB of BDS satellites is a little less stable than GPS solutions, especially for geostationary Earth orbit (GEO) satellites. The BDS GEO observations decrease the precision of inclined geosynchronous satellite orbit (IGSO) and medium Earth orbit (MEO) DCB estimations. The RMS of BDS satellites DCB decreases to about 0.2 ns when we remove BDS GEO observations. Zero-mean condition effects are not the dominant factor for the higher RMS of BDS satellites DCB. Although there are no obvious secular variations in the DCB time series, sub-nanosecond variations are visible for both BDS and GPS satellites DCBs during 2013-2014. For satellites in the same orbital plane, their DCB variations have similar characteristics. In addition, variations in receivers DCB in the same region are found with a similar pattern between BDS and GPS. These variations in both GPS and BDS DCBs are mainly related to the estimated error from ionospheric variability, while the BDS DCB intrinsic variation is in sub-nanoseconds.

  18. Using BeiDou system for precise positioning in central Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwasniak, Dawid; Cellmer, Slawomir; Nowel, Krzysztof

    2016-04-01

    In 2012 the Chinese navigation satellite system called BeiDou System (BDS) has reached the regional operational capabilities over the area of East Asia. Currently the BDS system consists of 5 medium orbit satellites MEO, 6 geosynchronous satellites IGSO and 5 geostationary satellites GEO and provides regional coverage by its navigation signals. Also in Europe BDS satellites can be used to determine position. In 2015 the third phase of BSD system development has started, aimed at providing global coverage and compatibility with other GNSS systems. As a result, BDS will broadcast signals at the same frequency as GPS L1 and L5 and Galileo E1, E5a and E5b. In the presented research we carried out relative positioning using the MAFA method. This was the first time when this method was applied to process BDS signals. The results show that it is possible to obtain precise position in central Europe using BDS signals only. However, with its current constellation, this is not possible 24/7, but in periodic time windows.

  19. Impact of tracking station distribution structure on BeiDou satellite orbit determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Qin; Huang, Guanwen; Wang, Le; Qu, Wei

    2015-11-01

    The racking station distribution structure plays an important role in GNSS satellite orbit determination. Due to the current satellite distribution of the BeiDou satellite navigation system (BDS), the problem how to construct a reasonable distribution of tracking stations to obtain BDS satellite orbits with high precision has become a highly imperative issue. Based on the theory of dynamic orbit determination, two different station distributions were analyzed to study their impact on BDS precise and real-time orbit determination. Subsequently, the impact of Satellite Position Dilution of Precision (SPDOP) values on orbit determination was analyzed. Finally, an improved scheme for the tracking station distribution was designed based on the original scheme. The numerical results show that the SPDOP value can be used to evaluate the contribution of the tracking stations distribution on the BDS IGSO and MEO satellites orbit determination. In addition, the tracking stations which focus on the Asia-Pacific region play a key role in current BDS orbit determination.

  20. BeiDou Signal Acquisition with Neumann–Hoffman Code Modulation in a Degraded Channel

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Lin; Liu, Aimeng; Ding, Jicheng; Wang, Jing

    2017-01-01

    With the modernization of global navigation satellite systems (GNSS), secondary codes, also known as the Neumann–Hoffman (NH) codes, are modulated on the satellite signal to obtain a better positioning performance. However, this leads to an attenuation of the acquisition sensitivity of classic integration algorithms because of the frequent bit transitions that refer to the NH codes. Taking weak BeiDou navigation satellite system (BDS) signals as objects, the present study analyzes the side effect of NH codes on acquisition in detail and derives a straightforward formula, which indicates that bit transitions decrease the frequency accuracy. To meet the requirement of carrier-tracking loop initialization, a frequency recalculation algorithm is proposed based on verified fast Fourier transform (FFT) to mitigate the effect, meanwhile, the starting point of NH codes is found. Then, a differential correction is utilized to improve the acquisition accuracy of code phase. Monte Carlo simulations and real BDS data tests demonstrate that the new structure is superior to the conventional algorithms both in detection probability and frequency accuracy in a degraded channel. PMID:28208776

  1. Airborne pseudolite aiding BeiDou system to improve positioning precision in low latitude areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Weihua; Yuan, Jianping; Luo, Jianjun

    2005-11-01

    The BeiDou System (BDS), which has three satellites in Geostationary Earth Orbit (GEO), is a regional satellite navigation system of China and its positioning performance is notorious in low latitude areas. The two mending plans using Airborne Pseudolite (APL) aiding BDS to improve navigation precision in such areas are put forward. Plan I uses three BDS satellites and one APS to supply navigation data and Plan II employs two BDS satellites, one APS and altimeter to work. Both of the plans adopt point positioning with code pseudo-range algorithm. Geometric Dilution of Precision (GDOP), which is calculated by Positioning Error Transfer Coefficient Matrix (PETCM), is used to evaluate the positioning performance of new plans. PETCM is predigested when user is in low latitude areas. The key elements of predigested PETCM that effect the Geometric Dilution of Precision (GDOP) are analyzed. The character of GDOP is forecasted easily with the predigested PETCM. The simulations show that the precision of plans are expected to be hundreds of meters except some region where the latitudes of user and APL are close to each other and Plan II is better than plan I. The phenomenal consists with the theoretical analysis.

  2. Inclusive diffraction at HERA

    SciTech Connect

    Favart, Laurent

    2011-07-15

    Results are reported on recent measurements, performed by the H1 and ZEUS Collaborations, of the cross section of the diffractive deep-inelastic process ep{yields}eXp using different experimental methods. In particular, first results using the Very Forward Proton Spectrometer of H1 are discussed.

  3. User's guide to the Personal Computer Version of the Biogenic Emissions Inventory System (PC-BEIS). Final report, June 1989-December 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, T.

    1991-01-01

    The Personal Computer Version of the Biogenic Emissions Inventory System (PC-BEIS) has been developed to allow users to estimate hourly emissions of biogenic non-methane hydrocarbon emissions for any county in the contiguous United States. PC-BEIS has been compiled using Microsoft FORTRAN and tested on IBM-compatible personal computers. The source code was written in ANSI FORTRAN 77 and should be transportable to most other computers. Emission rates depend on land use, leaf biomass, and emission factors. PC-BEIS also includes adjustments due to temperature and sunlight. A simple leaf energy balance module is included to allow more refined calculations of leaf temperature and sunlight through forest canopies. The user's guide briefly describes the technical background, provides an overview of computer aspects, and shows an example test case.

  4. Applications of two-way satellite time and frequency transfer in the BeiDou navigation satellite system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, ShanShi; Hu, XiaoGong; Liu, Li; Guo, Rui; Zhu, LingFeng; Chang, ZhiQiao; Tang, ChengPan; Gong, XiuQiang; Li, Ran; Yu, Yang

    2016-10-01

    A two-way satellite time and frequency transfer (TWSTFT) device equipped in the BeiDou navigation satellite system (BDS) can calculate clock error between satellite and ground master clock. TWSTFT is a real-time method with high accuracy because most system errors such as orbital error, station position error, and tropospheric and ionospheric delay error can be eliminated by calculating the two-way pseudorange difference. Another method, the multi-satellite precision orbit determination (MPOD) method, can be applied to estimate satellite clock errors. By comparison with MPOD clock estimations, this paper discusses the applications of the BDS TWSTFT clock observations in satellite clock measurement, satellite clock prediction, navigation system time monitor, and satellite clock performance assessment in orbit. The results show that with TWSTFT clock observations, the accuracy of satellite clock prediction is higher than MPOD. Five continuous weeks of comparisons with three international GNSS Service (IGS) analysis centers (ACs) show that the reference time difference between BeiDou time (BDT) and golbal positoning system (GPS) time (GPST) realized IGS ACs is in the tens of nanoseconds. Applying the TWSTFT clock error observations may obtain more accurate satellite clock performance evaluation in the 104 s interval because the accuracy of the MPOD clock estimation is not sufficiently high. By comparing the BDS and GPS satellite clock performance, we found that the BDS clock stability at the 103 s interval is approximately 10-12, which is similar to the GPS IIR.

  5. Ground track maintenance for BeiDou IGSO satellites subject to tesseral resonances and the luni-solar perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Li; Jiang, Chao; Hu, Min

    2017-02-01

    Eight inclined geosynchronous satellite orbit (IGSO) satellites in the Chinese BeiDou Navigation Satellite System (BDS) have been put in orbit until now. IGSO is a special class of geosynchronous circular orbit, with the inclination not equal to zero. It can provide high elevation angle coverage to high-latitude areas. The geography longitude of the ground track cross node is the main factor to affect the ground coverage areas of the IGSO satellites. In order to ensure the navigation performance of the IGSO satellites, the maintenance control of the ground track cross node is required. Considering the tesseral resonances and the luni-solar perturbations, a control approach is proposed to maintain the ground track for the long-term evolution. The drifts of the ground track cross node of the IGSO satellites are analyzed, which is formulated as a function of the bias of the orbit elements and time. Based on the derived function, a method by offsetting the semi-major axis is put forward to maintain the longitude of the ground track cross node, and the offset calculation equation is presented as well. Moreover, the orbit inclination is adjusted to maintain the location angle intervals between each two IGSO satellites. Finally, the precision of the offset calculation equation is analyzed to achieve the operational deployment. Simulation results show that the semi-major axis offset method is effective, and its calculation equation is accurate. The proposed approach has been applied to the maintenance control of BeiDou IGSO satellites.

  6. The influence of different types of satellite exiting in system RAIM performance in BeiDou Satellite Navigation System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shi-tai; Peng, Jun-huan

    2015-12-01

    The space constellation of BeiDou Navigation Satellite System(BDS)has three main components, Geostationary Earth Orbits (GEOs), Medium Earth Orbits (MEOs) and Inclined Geosynchronous Satellite Orbits(IGSOs).This paper selected 6 satellite respectively in three types to simulate their exiting service, and used the statistical methods to assess receiver autonomous integrity monitoring RAIM availability and fault detection FD capability of BeiDou14 Phase with 14 satellites under the circumstances. This paper assessed RAIM availability performance from satellites and constellation geometry configuration by the number of visible satellites (NVS, NVS>~5) and position dilution of precision (PDOP, PDOP<=6) together. The FD capability of RAIM is assessed by the maximum minimal detectable bias (MDB) and the maximum minimal detectable effect (MDE). The analyses of simulation results testify that the exiting of single MEO or IGSO satellite have no obvious effect on RAIM availability and error detection ability. However GEO satellite's exiting can make the number of points in where the constellation geometry is not available and maximum minimum detectable deviation and maximum minimum detectable influence significantly increase. Relative to other two satellites, GEO satellites' health have a significant impact on the RAIM performance of BDS.

  7. Ambiguity resolved precise point positioning with GPS and BeiDou

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Li; Xiaohong, Zhang; Fei, Guo

    2017-01-01

    This paper focuses on the contribution of the global positioning system (GPS) and BeiDou navigation satellite system (BDS) observations to precise point positioning (PPP) ambiguity resolution (AR). A GPS + BDS fractional cycle bias (FCB) estimation method and a PPP AR model were developed using integrated GPS and BDS observations. For FCB estimation, the GPS + BDS combined PPP float solutions of the globally distributed IGS MGEX were first performed. When integrating GPS observations, the BDS ambiguities can be precisely estimated with less than four tracked BDS satellites. The FCBs of both GPS and BDS satellites can then be estimated from these precise ambiguities. For the GPS + BDS combined AR, one GPS and one BDS IGSO or MEO satellite were first chosen as the reference satellite for GPS and BDS, respectively, to form inner-system single-differenced ambiguities. The single-differenced GPS and BDS ambiguities were then fused by partial ambiguity resolution to increase the possibility of fixing a subset of decorrelated ambiguities with high confidence. To verify the correctness of the FCB estimation and the effectiveness of the GPS + BDS PPP AR, data recorded from about 75 IGS MGEX stations during the period of DOY 123-151 (May 3 to May 31) in 2015 were used for validation. Data were processed with three strategies: BDS-only AR, GPS-only AR and GPS + BDS AR. Numerous experimental results show that the time to first fix (TTFF) is longer than 6 h for the BDS AR in general and that the fixing rate is usually less than 35 % for both static and kinematic PPP. An average TTFF of 21.7 min and 33.6 min together with a fixing rate of 98.6 and 97.0 % in static and kinematic PPP, respectively, can be achieved for GPS-only ambiguity fixing. For the combined GPS + BDS AR, the average TTFF can be shortened to 16.9 min and 24.6 min and the fixing rate can be increased to 99.5 and 99.0 % in static and kinematic PPP, respectively. Results also show that GPS + BDS PPP AR outperforms

  8. Measurement of the cross section ratio σψ(2S)/σJ/ψ(1S) in deep inelastic exclusive ep scattering at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciborowsk, Jacek

    2016-11-01

    The exclusive deep inelastic electroproduction of ψ (2S) and J/ψ (1S) at an ep centre-of-mass energy of 317 GeV has been studied with the ZEUS detector at HERA in the kinematic range 2 < Q2 < 80 GeV2, 30 < W < 210 GeV and |t| < 1 GeV2, where Q2 is the photon virtuality, W is the photon-proton centre-of-mass energy and t is the squared four-momentum transfer at the proton vertex. The data for 2 < Q2 < 5 GeV2 were taken in the HERAI running period and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 114 pb-1. The data for 5 < Q2 < 80 GeV2 are from both HERAI and HERAII periods and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 468 pb-1. The decay modes analysed were μ+ μ- and J/ψ (1S) π+ π- for the ψ (2S) and μ+ μ- for the J/ψ(1S). The cross-section ratio σψ(2S)/σJ/ψ(1S) has been measured as a function of Q2; W and t. The results are compared to predictions of QCD-inspired models of exclusive vector-meson production.

  9. Sample Collection from Small Airless Bodies: Examination of Temperature Constraints for the TGIP Sample Collector for the Hera Near-Earth Asteroid Sample Return Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franzen, M. A.; Roe, L. A.; Buffington, J. A.; Sears, D. W. G.

    2005-01-01

    There have been a number of missions that have explored the solar system with cameras and other instruments but profound questions remain that can only be addressed through the analysis of returned samples. However, due to lack of appropriate technology, high cost, and high risk, sample return has only recently become a feasible part of robotic solar system exploration. One specific objective of the President s new vision is that robotic exploration of the solar system should enhance human exploration as it discovers and understands the the solar system, and searches for life and resources [1]. Missions to small bodies, asteroids and comets, will partially fill the huge technological void between missions to the Moon and missions to Mars. However, such missions must be low cost and inherently simple, so they can be applied routinely to many missions. Sample return from asteroids, comets, Mars, and Jupiter s moons will be an important and natural part of the human exploration of space effort. Here we describe the collector designed for the Hera Near-Earth Asteroid Sample Return Mission. We have built a small prototype for preliminary evaluation, but expect the final collector to gather approx.100 g of sample of dust grains to centimeter sized clasts on each application to the surface of the asteroid.

  10. Measurement of high-Q2 neutral current deep inelastic e+p scattering cross sections with a longitudinally polarized positron beam at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramowicz, H.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.; Adamus, M.; Aggarwal, R.; Antonelli, S.; Antonioli, P.; Antonov, A.; Arneodo, M.; Arslan, O.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Bachynska, O.; Bamberger, A.; Barakbaev, A. N.; Barbagli, G.; Bari, G.; Barreiro, F.; Bartosik, N.; Bartsch, D.; Basile, M.; Behnke, O.; Behr, J.; Behrens, U.; Bellagamba, L.; Bertolin, A.; Bhadra, S.; Bindi, M.; Blohm, C.; Bokhonov, V.; Bołd, T.; Bondarenko, K.; Boos, E. G.; Borras, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bot, D.; Brock, I.; Brownson, E.; Brugnera, R.; Brümmer, N.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Brzozowska, B.; Bussey, P. J.; Bylsma, B.; Caldwell, A.; Capua, M.; Carlin, R.; Catterall, C. D.; Chekanov, S.; Chwastowski, J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Contin, A.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Coppola, N.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Costa, M.; D'Agostini, G.; Dal Corso, F.; del Peso, J.; Dementiev, R. K.; De Pasquale, S.; Derrick, M.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Dobur, D.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Dolinska, G.; Doyle, A. T.; Drugakov, V.; Durkin, L. S.; Dusini, S.; Eisenberg, Y.; Ermolov, P. F.; Eskreys, A.; Fang, S.; Fazio, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrero, M. I.; Figiel, J.; Foster, B.; Gach, G.; Galas, A.; Gallo, E.; Garfagnini, A.; Geiser, A.; Gialas, I.; Gizhko, A.; Gladilin, L. K.; Gladkov, D.; Glasman, C.; Gogota, O.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Göttlicher, P.; Grabowska-Bołd, I.; Grebenyuk, J.; Gregor, I.; Grigorescu, G.; Grzelak, G.; Gueta, O.; Guzik, M.; Gwenlan, C.; Haas, T.; Hain, W.; Hamatsu, R.; Hart, J. C.; Hartmann, H.; Hartner, G.; Hilger, E.; Hochman, D.; Hori, R.; Hüttmann, A.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Iga, Y.; Ingbir, R.; Ishitsuka, M.; Jakob, H.-P.; Januschek, F.; Jones, T. W.; Jüngst, M.; Kadenko, I.; Kahle, B.; Kananov, S.; Kanno, T.; Karshon, U.; Karstens, F.; Katkov, I. I.; Kaur, M.; Kaur, P.; Keramidas, A.; Khein, L. A.; Kim, J. Y.; Kisielewska, D.; Kitamura, S.; Klanner, R.; Klein, U.; Koffeman, E.; Kondrashova, N.; Kononenko, O.; Kooijman, P.; Korol, Ie.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kotański, A.; Kötz, U.; Kowalski, H.; Kuprash, O.; Kuze, M.; Lee, A.; Levchenko, B. B.; Levy, A.; Libov, V.; Limentani, S.; Ling, T. Y.; Lisovyi, M.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lohmann, W.; Löhr, B.; Lohrmann, E.; Long, K. R.; Longhin, A.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Maeda, J.; Magill, S.; Makarenko, I.; Malka, J.; Mankel, R.; Margotti, A.; Marini, G.; Martin, J. F.; Mastroberardino, A.; Mattingly, M. C. K.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Mergelmeyer, S.; Miglioranzi, S.; Mohamad Idris, F.; Monaco, V.; Montanari, A.; Morris, J. D.; Mujkic, K.; Musgrave, B.; Nagano, K.; Namsoo, T.; Nania, R.; Nigro, A.; Ning, Y.; Nobe, T.; Notz, D.; Nowak, R. J.; Nuncio-Quiroz, A. E.; Oh, B. Y.; Okazaki, N.; Olkiewicz, K.; Onishchuk, Yu.; Papageorgiu, K.; Parenti, A.; Paul, E.; Pawlak, J. M.; Pawlik, B.; Pelfer, P. G.; Pellegrino, A.; Perlański, W.; Perrey, H.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Pluciński, P.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Polini, A.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Przybycień, M.; Raval, A.; Reeder, D. D.; Reisert, B.; Ren, Z.; Repond, J.; Ri, Y. D.; Robertson, A.; Roloff, P.; Rubinsky, I.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Samson, U.; Sartorelli, G.; Savin, A. A.; Saxon, D. H.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenstedt, S.; Schleper, P.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schneekloth, U.; Schönberg, V.; Schörner-Sadenius, T.; Schwartz, J.; Sciulli, F.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Shehzadi, R.; Shimizu, S.; Singh, I.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Słomiński, W.; Smith, W. H.; Sola, V.; Solano, A.; Son, D.; Sosnovtsev, V.; Spiridonov, A.; Stadie, H.; Stanco, L.; Stefaniuk, N.; Stern, A.; Stewart, T. P.; Stifutkin, A.; Stopa, P.; Suchkov, S.; Susinno, G.; Suszycki, L.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Szuba, D.; Szuba, J.; Tapper, A. D.; Tassi, E.; Terrón, J.; Theedt, T.; Tiecke, H.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomaszewska, J.; Trusov, V.; Tsurugai, T.; Turcato, M.; Turkot, O.; Tymieniecka, T.; Vázquez, M.; Verbytskyi, A.; Viazlo, O.; Vlasov, N. N.; Walczak, R.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.; Whitmore, J. J.; Wichmann, K.; Wiggers, L.; Wing, M.; Wlasenko, M.; Wolf, G.; Wolfe, H.; Wrona, K.; Yagües-Molina, A. G.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yoshida, R.; Youngman, C.; Zabiegalov, O.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Zawiejski, L.; Zenaiev, O.; Zeuner, W.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Zhmak, N.; Zichichi, A.; Zolkapli, Z.; Zotkin, D. S.

    2013-03-01

    Measurements of neutral current cross sections for deep inelastic scattering in e+p collisions at HERA with a longitudinally polarized positron beam are presented. The single-differential cross-sections dσ/dQ2, dσ/dx and dσ/dy and the reduced cross section σ˜ are measured in the kinematic region Q2>185GeV2 and y<0.9, where Q2 is the four-momentum transfer squared, x the Bjorken scaling variable and y the inelasticity of the interaction. The measurements are performed separately for positively and negatively polarized positron beams. The measurements are based on an integrated luminosity of 135.5pb-1 collected with the ZEUS detector in 2006 and 2007 at a center-of-mass energy of 318 GeV. The structure functions F˜3 and F3γZ are determined by combining the e+p results presented in this paper with previously published e-p neutral current results. The asymmetry parameter A+ is used to demonstrate the parity violation predicted in electroweak interactions. The measurements are well described by the predictions of the Standard Model.

  11. Precise positioning with current multi-constellation Global Navigation Satellite Systems: GPS, GLONASS, Galileo and BeiDou

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xingxing; Zhang, Xiaohong; Ren, Xiaodong; Fritsche, Mathias; Wickert, Jens; Schuh, Harald

    2015-01-01

    The world of satellite navigation is undergoing dramatic changes with the rapid development of multi-constellation Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSSs). At the moment more than 70 satellites are already in view, and about 120 satellites will be available once all four systems (BeiDou + Galileo + GLONASS + GPS) are fully deployed in the next few years. This will bring great opportunities and challenges for both scientific and engineering applications. In this paper we develop a four-system positioning model to make full use of all available observations from different GNSSs. The significant improvement of satellite visibility, spatial geometry, dilution of precision, convergence, accuracy, continuity and reliability that a combining utilization of multi-GNSS brings to precise positioning are carefully analyzed and evaluated, especially in constrained environments. PMID:25659949

  12. Heavy Metals in Sediment from Bei Shan River: Distribution, Relationship with Soil Characteristics and Multivariate Assessment of Contamination Sources.

    PubMed

    Xun, Yan; Xuegang, Luo

    2015-07-01

    The concentrations and correlation between some heavy metals (Mn, Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Zn and Pb) measured in sediments in part of Bei shan River near uranium mill tailings were studied. The mean concentration of Cr (57.7 mg/g) was more than the mean values established for uncultivated areas worldwide (46.3 mg/g). Negative correlations with pH and positive correlations with organic matter have been observed for most of elements analyzed in this study. Correlation analysis showed that all metals except Cr are highly correlated (p ≤ 0.01, p ≤ 0.05). This may indicate the different origin or controlling factors of Cr in analyzed sediments. Cluster analysis highlighted the lithogenic origin of heavy metals (Mn, Cd, Cu, Ni, Zn and Pb) and pointed out the primary input of Cr from anthropogenic sources.

  13. Carrier-Doppler-based real-time two way satellite frequency transfer and its application in BeiDou system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zengjun; Gong, Hang; Yang, Wenke; Zhu, Xiangwei; Ou, Gang

    2014-09-01

    Two-way satellite time and frequency transfer (TWSTFT) method is valuable for precise time and frequency transfer. The frequency could be directly transferred by utilizing two-way carrier Doppler measurement. This method requires each station observing both its own and associated station’s transponder signals transferred by satellite. In BeiDou system (BDS), the reference station and the field station construct a two-way link via a GEO satellite, and the field station sends pseudorange and carrier phase information to the reference station by transmission signal, in order to achieve real time TWSTFT. This paper analyzes the theory of carrier Doppler based TWSTFT (called CD-TWSTFT), and validates it by using on line data of BDS. The results demonstrated that the performance of CD TWSTFT is much better than code based TWSTFT in short-term frequency transfer and almost same at long-term frequency transfer.

  14. Precise positioning with current multi-constellation Global Navigation Satellite Systems: GPS, GLONASS, Galileo and BeiDou.

    PubMed

    Li, Xingxing; Zhang, Xiaohong; Ren, Xiaodong; Fritsche, Mathias; Wickert, Jens; Schuh, Harald

    2015-02-09

    The world of satellite navigation is undergoing dramatic changes with the rapid development of multi-constellation Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSSs). At the moment more than 70 satellites are already in view, and about 120 satellites will be available once all four systems (BeiDou + Galileo + GLONASS + GPS) are fully deployed in the next few years. This will bring great opportunities and challenges for both scientific and engineering applications. In this paper we develop a four-system positioning model to make full use of all available observations from different GNSSs. The significant improvement of satellite visibility, spatial geometry, dilution of precision, convergence, accuracy, continuity and reliability that a combining utilization of multi-GNSS brings to precise positioning are carefully analyzed and evaluated, especially in constrained environments.

  15. The contribution of Cu2+, Fe 2+, Fe 3+ to bluish green color of HuBei turquoise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Ying; Jin, Lili; Sun, Hongjuan

    2010-11-01

    Cu2+, Fe2+ and Fe3+ of 146 pieces of turquoises from ZhuShan, HuBei province are researched of their contribution to the color of bluish green. Without consideration of its mineral water on the effects of color chroma, the content of these three cations are confirmed by chemical composition analysis, and then their specific contribution to lightness, chroma and hue are quantified within the uniform color space CIE L*a*b*. Consequently, it is considered that Cu2+ determines turquoise's vivid blue, and Fe2+ makes color changed to green and improves the chroma slightly, as a result it enhances the visual appearance a little too; while Fe3+ leads to red and yellow tone and makes chroma descended simultaneously, with its increment, the color appears low saturated brown, and then the color quality reduced.

  16. BeiDou satellite's differential code biases estimation based on uncombined precise point positioning with triple-frequency observable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Lei; Li, Min; Wang, Cheng; Shi, Chuang

    2017-02-01

    The differential code bias (DCB) of BeiDou satellite is an important topic to make better use of BeiDou system (BDS) for many practical applications. This paper proposes a new method to estimate the BDS satellite DCBs based on triple-frequency uncombined precise point positioning (UPPP). A general model of both triple-frequency UPPP and Geometry-Free linear combination of Phase-Smoothed Range (GFPSR) is presented, in which, the ionospheric observable and the combination of triple-frequency satellite and receiver DCBs (TF-SRDCBs) are derived. Then the satellite and receiver DCBs (SRDCBs) are estimated together with the ionospheric delay that is modeled at each individual station in a weighted least-squares estimator, and the satellite DCBs are determined by introducing the zero-mean condition of all available BDS satellites. To validate the new method, 90 day's real tracking GNSS data (from January to March in 2014) collected from 9 Multi-GNSS Experiment (MGEX) stations (equipped with Trimble NETR9 receiver) is used, and the BDS satellite DCB products from German Aerospace Center (DLR) are taken as reference values for comparison. Results show that the proposed method is able to precisely estimate BDS satellite DCBs: (1) the mean value of the day-to-day scattering for all available BDS satellites is about 0.24 ns, which is reduced in average by 23% when compared with the results derived by only GFPSR. Moreover, the mean value of the day-to-day scattering of IGSO satellites is lower than that of GEO and MEO satellites; (2) the mean value of RMS of the difference with respect to DLR DCB products is about 0.39 ns, which is improved by an average of 11% when compared with the results derived by only GFPSR. Besides, the RMS of IGSO and MEO satellites is at the same level which is better than that of GEO satellites.

  17. Use of hardware-in-the-loop (HWIL) testing from early software development through final system test to mitigate risk and to assure mission success for the Hera targets program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcin, Michael, Jr.

    1996-05-01

    The CRC Hera targets program integrates Government Furnished Equipment, that includes Pershing II flight computers and Minuteman boosters, to provide threat representative targets to the U.S. Government in support of theater missile defense interceptor test programs. Hardware-in-the-Loop (HWIL) and Computer-in-the-Loop (CIL) testing is used, from initial software development through system and software qualification, to evaluate Hera target vehicle performance. The CIL and HWIL closed loop test methods differ not only in the amount of hardware needed for the test but also in the level of system validation. CIL flights using only a real- time simulation computer and a flight computer to create a closed loop test environment for the airborne software. We use this method for the development, validation and certification of the flight software. HWIL flight testing employs both actual missile flight computers and inert booster motors with actuators. The flight computer, actuator controller, and two reaction control systems from the actual flight missile are connected to lab shop queen equipment. This equipment includes first and second stage motor nozzle actuators, battery and ordnance simulators, raceway cables and the telemetry system. The HWIL test not only verifies proper airborne software operation but also verifies the flight computer interfaces with raceway cabling and the missile subsystems. The HWIL test demonstrates the flight readiness of the airborne software and several key pieces of flight hardware. Both nominal and stacked tolerance simulation runs are used to validate the flight code and to provide stressful conditions to verify the robustness of the flight control system. Monte Carlo runsets using known CIL/HWIL interface errors, such as scale factor, bias and noise, are used to create minimum-maximum boundary value plots. These boundary value plots provide guidelines to verify and validate the airborne software tested by the CIL/HWIL simulated flights

  18. Instantaneous Real-Time Kinematic Decimeter-Level Positioning with BeiDou Triple-Frequency Signals over Medium Baselines

    PubMed Central

    He, Xiyang; Zhang, Xiaohong; Tang, Long; Liu, Wanke

    2015-01-01

    Many applications, such as marine navigation, land vehicles location, etc., require real time precise positioning under medium or long baseline conditions. In this contribution, we develop a model of real-time kinematic decimeter-level positioning with BeiDou Navigation Satellite System (BDS) triple-frequency signals over medium distances. The ambiguities of two extra-wide-lane (EWL) combinations are fixed first, and then a wide lane (WL) combination is reformed based on the two EWL combinations for positioning. Theoretical analysis and empirical analysis is given of the ambiguity fixing rate and the positioning accuracy of the presented method. The results indicate that the ambiguity fixing rate can be up to more than 98% when using BDS medium baseline observations, which is much higher than that of dual-frequency Hatch-Melbourne-Wübbena (HMW) method. As for positioning accuracy, decimeter level accuracy can be achieved with this method, which is comparable to that of carrier-smoothed code differential positioning method. Signal interruption simulation experiment indicates that the proposed method can realize fast high-precision positioning whereas the carrier-smoothed code differential positioning method needs several hundreds of seconds for obtaining high precision results. We can conclude that a relatively high accuracy and high fixing rate can be achieved for triple-frequency WL method with single-epoch observations, displaying significant advantage comparing to traditional carrier-smoothed code differential positioning method. PMID:26703614

  19. Analysis of BeiDou Satellite Measurements with Code Multipath and Geometry-Free Ionosphere-Free Combinations.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qile; Wang, Guangxing; Liu, Zhizhao; Hu, Zhigang; Dai, Zhiqiang; Liu, Jingnan

    2016-01-20

    Using GNSS observable from some stations in the Asia-Pacific area, the carrier-to-noise ratio (CNR) and multipath combinations of BeiDou Navigation Satellite System (BDS), as well as their variations with time and/or elevation were investigated and compared with those of GPS and Galileo. Provided the same elevation, the CNR of B1 observables is the lowest among the three BDS frequencies, while B3 is the highest. The code multipath combinations of BDS inclined geosynchronous orbit (IGSO) and medium Earth orbit (MEO) satellites are remarkably correlated with elevation, and the systematic "V" shape trends could be eliminated through between-station-differencing or modeling correction. Daily periodicity was found in the geometry-free ionosphere-free (GFIF) combinations of both BDS geostationary Earth orbit (GEO) and IGSO satellites. The variation range of carrier phase GFIF combinations of GEO satellites is -2.0 to 2.0 cm. The periodicity of carrier phase GFIF combination could be significantly mitigated through between-station differencing. Carrier phase GFIF combinations of BDS GEO and IGSO satellites might also contain delays related to satellites. Cross-correlation suggests that the GFIF combinations' time series of some GEO satellites might vary according to their relative geometries with the sun.

  20. Sea level change from BeiDou Navigation Satellite System-Reflectometry (BDS-R): First results and evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Shuanggen; Qian, Xiaodong; Wu, X.

    2017-02-01

    Sea level changes affect human living environments, particularly ocean coasts. The tide gauges (TG) can measure sea level change, while it is the relative variations with respect to the land. Recently, GPS-Reflectometry (GPS-R) has been demonstrated to measure sea level change as an altimetry. With the rapid development of China's BeiDou Navigation Satellite System (BDS), it may provide a new possible opportunity to monitor sea level changes with three frequencies (L2, L6 and L7). In this paper, BDS-Reflectometry (BDS-R) is the first time used to estimate the sea level changes based on Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) data and triple-frequency phase and code combinations, which are compared to tide gauge observations. Results show that sea level changes from BDS SNR and phase combination have a good agreement with correlation coefficients of 0.83-0.91 and RMSEs of less than 0.6 m, while BDS code combination is not as good as others. Furthermore, a new negative linear model between phase and code peak frequencies and tide gauge observations is further obtained and analyzed, which improves the results from three-frequency phase and code combinations with the RMSE of about 10 cm and 18 cm.

  1. Assessment of the Contribution of BeiDou GEO, IGSO, and MEO Satellites to PPP in Asia-Pacific Region.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qile; Wang, Chen; Guo, Jing; Liu, Xianglin

    2015-12-01

    In contrast to the US Global Positioning System (GPS), the Russian Global Navigation Satellite System (GLONASS) and the European Galileo, the developing Chinese BeiDou satellite navigation system (BDS) consists of not only Medium Earth Orbit (MEO), but also Geostationary Orbit (GEO) as well as Inclined Geosynchronous Orbit (IGSO) satellites. In this study, the Precise Point Positioning (PPP) and PPP with Integer Ambiguity Resolution (IAR) are obtained. The contributions of these three different types of BDS satellites to PPP in Asia-Pacific region are assessed using data from selected 20 sites over more than four weeks. By using various PPP cases with different satellite combinations, in general, the largest contribution of BDS IGSO among the three kinds of BDS satellites to the reduction of convergence time and the improvement of positioning accuracy, particularly in the east direction, is identified. These PPP cases include static BDS only solutions and static/kinematic ambiguity-float and -fixed PPP with the combination of GPS and BDS. The statistical results demonstrate that the inclusion of BDS GEO and MEO satellites can improve the observation condition and result in better PPP performance as well. When combined with GPS, the contribution of BDS to the reduction of convergence time is, however, not as significant as that of GLONASS. As far as the positioning accuracy is concerned, GLONASS improves the accuracy in vertical component more than BDS does, whereas similar improvement in horizontal component can be achieved by inclusion of BDS IGSO and MEO as GLONASS.

  2. Analysis of BeiDou Satellite Measurements with Code Multipath and Geometry-Free Ionosphere-Free Combinations

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Qile; Wang, Guangxing; Liu, Zhizhao; Hu, Zhigang; Dai, Zhiqiang; Liu, Jingnan

    2016-01-01

    Using GNSS observable from some stations in the Asia-Pacific area, the carrier-to-noise ratio (CNR) and multipath combinations of BeiDou Navigation Satellite System (BDS), as well as their variations with time and/or elevation were investigated and compared with those of GPS and Galileo. Provided the same elevation, the CNR of B1 observables is the lowest among the three BDS frequencies, while B3 is the highest. The code multipath combinations of BDS inclined geosynchronous orbit (IGSO) and medium Earth orbit (MEO) satellites are remarkably correlated with elevation, and the systematic “V” shape trends could be eliminated through between-station-differencing or modeling correction. Daily periodicity was found in the geometry-free ionosphere-free (GFIF) combinations of both BDS geostationary Earth orbit (GEO) and IGSO satellites. The variation range of carrier phase GFIF combinations of GEO satellites is −2.0 to 2.0 cm. The periodicity of carrier phase GFIF combination could be significantly mitigated through between-station differencing. Carrier phase GFIF combinations of BDS GEO and IGSO satellites might also contain delays related to satellites. Cross-correlation suggests that the GFIF combinations’ time series of some GEO satellites might vary according to their relative geometries with the sun. PMID:26805831

  3. Accuracy analysis of continuous deformation monitoring using BeiDou Navigation Satellite System at middle and high latitudes in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Weiping; Xi, Ruijie; Chen, Hua; Xiao, Yugang

    2017-02-01

    As BeiDou Navigation Satellite System (BDS) has been operational in the whole Asia-Pacific region, it means a new GNSS system with a different satellite orbit structure will become available for deformation monitoring in the future. Conversely, GNSS deformation monitoring data are always processed with a regular interval to form displacement time series for deformation analysis, where the interval can neither be too long from the time perspective nor too short from the precision of determined displacements angle. In this paper, two experimental platforms were designed, with one being at mid-latitude and another at higher latitude in China. BDS data processing software was also developed for investigating the accuracy of continuous deformation monitoring using current in-orbit BDS satellites. Data over 20 days at both platforms were obtained and were processed every 2, 4 and 6 h to generate 3 displacement time series for comparison. The results show that with the current in-orbit BDS satellites, in the mid-latitude area it is easy to achieve accuracy of 1 mm in horizontal component and 2-3 mm in vertical component; the accuracy could be further improved to approximately 1 mm in both horizontal and vertical directions when combined BDS/GPS measurements are employed. At higher latitude, however, the results are not as good as expected due to poor satellite geometry, even the 6 h solutions could only achieve accuracy of 4-6 and 6-10 mm in horizontal and vertical components, respectively, which implies that it may not be applicable to very high-precision deformation monitoring at high latitude using the current BDS. With the integration of BDS and GPS observations, however, in 4-h session, the accuracy can achieve 2 mm in horizontal component and 4 mm in vertical component, which would be an optimal choice for high-accuracy structural deformation monitoring at high latitude.

  4. Mitigating BeiDou Satellite-Induced Code Bias: Taking into Account the Stochastic Model of Corrections

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Fei; Li, Xin; Liu, Wanke

    2016-01-01

    The BeiDou satellite-induced code biases have been confirmed to be orbit type-, frequency-, and elevation-dependent. Such code-phase divergences (code bias variations) severely affect absolute precise applications which use code measurements. To reduce their adverse effects, an improved correction model is proposed in this paper. Different from the model proposed by Wanninger and Beer (2015), more datasets (a time span of almost two years) were used to produce the correction values. More importantly, the stochastic information, i.e., the precision indexes, were given together with correction values in the improved model. However, only correction values were given while the precision indexes were completely missing in the traditional model. With the improved correction model, users may have a better understanding of their corrections, especially the uncertainty of corrections. Thus, it is helpful for refining the stochastic model of code observations. Validation tests in precise point positioning (PPP) reveal that a proper stochastic model is critical. The actual precision of the corrected code observations can be reflected in a more objective manner if the stochastic model of the corrections is taken into account. As a consequence, PPP solutions with the improved model outperforms the traditional one in terms of positioning accuracy, as well as convergence speed. In addition, the Melbourne-Wübbena (MW) combination which serves for ambiguity fixing were verified as well. The uncorrected MW values show strong systematic variations with an amplitude of half a wide-lane cycle, which prevents precise ambiguity determination and successful ambiguity resolution. After application of the code bias correction models, the systematic variations can be greatly removed, and the resulting wide lane ambiguities are more likely to be fixed. Moreover, the code residuals show more reasonable distributions after code bias corrections with either the traditional or the improved model

  5. Mitigating BeiDou Satellite-Induced Code Bias: Taking into Account the Stochastic Model of Corrections.

    PubMed

    Guo, Fei; Li, Xin; Liu, Wanke

    2016-06-18

    The BeiDou satellite-induced code biases have been confirmed to be orbit type-, frequency-, and elevation-dependent. Such code-phase divergences (code bias variations) severely affect absolute precise applications which use code measurements. To reduce their adverse effects, an improved correction model is proposed in this paper. Different from the model proposed by Wanninger and Beer (2015), more datasets (a time span of almost two years) were used to produce the correction values. More importantly, the stochastic information, i.e., the precision indexes, were given together with correction values in the improved model. However, only correction values were given while the precision indexes were completely missing in the traditional model. With the improved correction model, users may have a better understanding of their corrections, especially the uncertainty of corrections. Thus, it is helpful for refining the stochastic model of code observations. Validation tests in precise point positioning (PPP) reveal that a proper stochastic model is critical. The actual precision of the corrected code observations can be reflected in a more objective manner if the stochastic model of the corrections is taken into account. As a consequence, PPP solutions with the improved model outperforms the traditional one in terms of positioning accuracy, as well as convergence speed. In addition, the Melbourne-Wübbena (MW) combination which serves for ambiguity fixing were verified as well. The uncorrected MW values show strong systematic variations with an amplitude of half a wide-lane cycle, which prevents precise ambiguity determination and successful ambiguity resolution. After application of the code bias correction models, the systematic variations can be greatly removed, and the resulting wide lane ambiguities are more likely to be fixed. Moreover, the code residuals show more reasonable distributions after code bias corrections with either the traditional or the improved model.

  6. [The classification method of syndromes in the Bei ji qian jin yao fang (Essential Recipes for Emergent Use Worth A Thousand Gold)].

    PubMed

    Shen, Xiaowei; Zheng, Wenjie; Ma, Mingyue; Zhang, Zhibin

    2014-03-01

    Bei ji qian jin yao fang (Essential Recipes for Emergent Use Worth A Thousand Gold) epitomizes the medical achievements of the Tang Dynasty with an extensive coverage. The classification method of syndromes in this book is derived from Nei jing (Inner Canon), Nan jing (Classic of Questioning), Shang han za bing lun (Treatise on Cold Pathogenic and Miscellaneous Diseases), Zhu bing yuan hou lun (General Treatise on Causes and Manifestations of All Diseases), and enlightens the later generation with many unique characteristics, reflecting the mature recognition of the diseases in the contemporary clinical medicine from one side. It is still of great significance for understanding the diseases and exploring its pathogenesis even today.

  7. Heavy flavour production at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brugnera, Riccardo

    2014-11-01

    In this brief review, recent experimental results from the H1 and ZEUS collaborations on heavy flavour production in deep inelastic scattering and photoproduction regimes are summarized. The results cover charm fragmentation fractions, charm and beauty cross sections, F2cc¯ and F2bb¯ proton structure functions and the running charm- and beauty-quark masses.

  8. Assessment of precipitable water vapor derived from ground-based BeiDou observations with Precise Point Positioning approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Min; Li, Wenwen; Shi, Chuang; Zhao, Qile; Su, Xing; Qu, Lizhong; Liu, Zhizhao

    2015-01-01

    Precipitable water vapor (PWV) estimation from Global Positioning System (GPS) has been extensively studied and used for meteorological applications. However PWV estimation using the emerging BeiDou Navigation Satellite System (BDS) is very limited. In this paper the PWV estimation strategy and the evaluation of the results inferred from ground-based BDS observations using Precise Point Positioning (PPP) method are presented. BDS and GPS data from 10 stations distributed in the Asia-Pacific and West Indian Ocean regions during the year 2013 are processed using the PANDA (Position and Navigation Data Analyst) software package. The BDS-PWV and GPS-PWV are derived from the BDS-only and GPS-only observations, respectively. The PPP positioning differences between BDS-only and GPS-only show a standard deviation (STD) <1 cm in the east and north components and 1-3 cm in vertical component. The BDS-PWV and GPS-PWV at the HKTU station (Hong Kong, China) is compared with PWV derived from a radiosonde station (about 1 km distance) over a 6-month period. The GPS-PWV shows a good agreement with radiosonde-PWV with a bias of 0.002 mm and a STD of 2.49 mm while BDS-PWV has with a bias of -2.04 mm and STD 2.68 mm with respect to radiosonde-PWV. This indicates that the PWV estimated from the BDS can achieve similar precision as PWV from GPS. The BDS-PWV is compared to GPS-PWV at 10 stations. The mean bias and STD of their differences at 10 stations are 0.78 mm and 1.77 mm, respectively. The mean root mean square (RMS) value is 2.00 mm by considering the GPS-PWV as reference truth. This again confirms that the BDS-PWV has a good agreement with the GPS-PWV. It clearly indicates that the BDS is ready for the high precision meteorological applications in the Asia-Pacific and West Indian Ocean regions and that BDS alone can be used for PWV estimation with an accuracy comparable to GPS.

  9. BeiDou phase bias estimation and its application in precise point positioning with triple-frequency observable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Shengfeng; Lou, Yidong; Shi, Chuang; Liu, Jingnan

    2015-10-01

    At present, the BeiDou system (BDS) enables the practical application of triple-frequency observable in the Asia-Pacific region, of many possible benefits from the additional signal; this study focuses on exploiting the contribution of zero difference (ZD) ambiguity resolution (AR) to the precise point positioning (PPP). A general modeling strategy for multi-frequency PPP AR is presented, in which, the least squares ambiguity decorrelation adjustment (LAMBDA) method is employed in ambiguity fixing based on the full variance-covariance ambiguity matrix generated from the raw data processing model. Because of the reliable fixing of BDS L1 ambiguity faces more difficulty, the LAMBDA method with partial ambiguity fixing is proposed to enable the independent and instantaneous resolution of extra wide-lane (EWL) and wide-lane (WL). This mechanism of sequential ambiguity fixing is demonstrated for resolving ZD satellite phase bias and performing triple-frequency PPP AR with two reference station networks with a typical baseline of up to 400 and 800 km, respectively. Tests show that about of the EWL and WL phase bias of BDS has a consistency of better than 0.1 cycle, and this value decreases to 80 % for L1 phase bias for Experiment I, while all the solutions of Experiment II have a similar RMS of about 0.12 cycles. In addition, the repeatability of the daily mean phase bias agree to 0.093 cycles and 0.095 cycles for EWL and WL on average, which is much smaller than 0.20 cycles of L1. To assess the improvement of fixed PPP brought by applying the third frequency signal as well as the above phase bias, various ambiguity fixing strategy are considered in the numerical demonstration. It is shown that the impact of the additional signal is almost negligible when only float solution involved. It is also shown that by fixing EWL and WL together, as opposed to the single ambiguity fixing, will leads to an improvement in PPP accuracy by about on average. Attributed to the efficient

  10. Comprehensive Comparisons of Satellite Data, Signals, and Measurements between the BeiDou Navigation Satellite System and the Global Positioning System †

    PubMed Central

    Jan, Shau-Shiun; Tao, An-Lin

    2016-01-01

    The Chinese BeiDou navigation satellite system (BDS) aims to provide global positioning service by 2020. The combined use of BDS and Global Positioning System (GPS) is proposed to provide navigation service with more stringent requirements. Actual satellite data, signals and measurements were collected for more than one month to analyze the positioning service qualities from both BDS and GPS. In addition to the conversions of coordinate and timing system, five data quality analysis (DQA) methods, three signal quality analysis (SQA) methods, and four measurement quality analysis (MQA) methods are proposed in this paper to improve the integrated positioning performance of BDS and GPS. As shown in the experiment results, issues related to BDS and GPS are resolved by the above proposed quality analysis methods. Thus, the anomalies in satellite data, signals and measurements can be detected by following the suggested resolutions to enhance the positioning performance of the combined use of BDS and GPS in the Asia Pacific region. PMID:27187403

  11. Comprehensive Comparisons of Satellite Data, Signals, and Measurements between the BeiDou Navigation Satellite System and the Global Positioning System.

    PubMed

    Jan, Shau-Shiun; Tao, An-Lin

    2016-05-13

    The Chinese BeiDou navigation satellite system (BDS) aims to provide global positioning service by 2020. The combined use of BDS and Global Positioning System (GPS) is proposed to provide navigation service with more stringent requirements. Actual satellite data, signals and measurements were collected for more than one month to analyze the positioning service qualities from both BDS and GPS. In addition to the conversions of coordinate and timing system, five data quality analysis (DQA) methods, three signal quality analysis (SQA) methods, and four measurement quality analysis (MQA) methods are proposed in this paper to improve the integrated positioning performance of BDS and GPS. As shown in the experiment results, issues related to BDS and GPS are resolved by the above proposed quality analysis methods. Thus, the anomalies in satellite data, signals and measurements can be detected by following the suggested resolutions to enhance the positioning performance of the combined use of BDS and GPS in the Asia Pacific region.

  12. Nqrs Data for BeH14I4O18 [BeI2O6·2(HIO3)·6(H2O)] (Subst. No. 0389)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chihara, H.; Nakamura, N.

    This document is part of Subvolume A `Substances Containing Ag … C10H15' of Volume 48 `Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance Spectroscopy Data' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group III `Condensed Matter'. It contains an extract of Section `3.2 Data tables' of the Chapter `3 Nuclear quadrupole resonance data' providing the NQRS data for BeH14I4O18 [BeI2O6·2(HIO3)·6(H2O)] (Subst. No. 0389)

  13. Real-Time seismic waveforms monitoring with BeiDou Navigation Satellite System (BDS) observations for the 2015 Mw 7.8 Nepal earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, T.

    2015-12-01

    Nowadays more and more high-rate Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) data become available in real time, which provide more opportunities to monitor the seismic waveforms. China's GNSS, BeiDou Navigation Satellite System (BDS), has already satisfied the requirement of stand-alone precise positioning in Asia-Pacific region with 14 in-orbit satellites, which promisingly suggests that BDS could be applied to the high-precision earthquake monitoring as GPS. In the present paper, real-time monitoring of seismic waveforms using BDS measurements is assessed. We investigate a so-called "variometric" approach to measure real-time seismic waveforms with high-rate BDS observations. This approach is based on time difference technique and standard broadcast products which are routinely available in real time. The 1HZ BDS data recorded by Beidou Experimental Tracking Stations (BETS) during the 2015 Mw 7.8 Nepal earthquake is analyzed. The results indicate that the accuracies of velocity estimation from BDS are 2-3 mm/s in horizontal components and 8-9 mm/s in vertical component, respectively, which are consistent with GPS. The seismic velocity waveforms during earthquake show good agreement between BDS and GPS. Moreover, the displacement waveforms is reconstructed by an integration of velocity time series with trend removal. The displacement waveforms with the accuracy of 1-2 cm are derived by comparing with post-processing GPS precise point positioning (PPP).

  14. The Open Service Signal in Space Navigation Data Comparison of the Global Positioning System and the BeiDou Navigation Satellite System

    PubMed Central

    Jan, Shau-Shiun; Tao, An-Lin

    2014-01-01

    More and more Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSSs) have been developed and are in operation. Before integrating information on various GNSSs, the differences between the various systems must be studied first. This research focuses on analyzing the navigation data differences between the Chinese BeiDou Navigation Satellite System (BDS) and the United States' Global Positioning System (GPS). In addition to explaining the impact caused by these two different coordinate and time systems, this research uses an actual open service signal in space (SIS) for both GPS and BDS to analyze their current system performance. Five data quality analysis (DQA) mechanisms are proposed in this research to validate both systems' SIS navigation data. These five DQAs evaluate the differences in ephemeris and almanac messages from both systems for stability and accuracy. After all of the DQAs, the different issues related to GPS and BDS satellite information are presented. Finally, based on these DQA results, this research provides suggested resolutions for the combined use of GPS and BDS for navigation and guidance. PMID:25195848

  15. [Effects of compound Zhe-Bei granule (CZBG) combined with doxorubicin on expression of membrane transport proteins in K562/A02 cell xenografts].

    PubMed

    Li, Dong-Yun; Zheng, Zhi; Hou, Li; Jiang, Miao; Dong, Qing; Tian, Shao-Dan; Ma, Wei; Chen, Ju; Wang, Jing; Chen, Xin-Yi

    2010-02-01

    This study was purposed to investigate the effects of compound Zhe-Bei granule (CZBG) combined with doxorubicin on expressions of P-gp, MRP, LRP in K562/A02 cell xenografts. Tumor xenograft model were established by injecting the multidrug resistant cell line K562/A02 in the axillary flank of BALB/c-nu-nu mice. CZBG-intragastric administration and doxorubicin-intraperitoneal injection in combination were given to the BALB/c-nu nude mice. The tumor xenografts were made into slice after the dissection, and the expression of P-gp, MRP, LRP in K562/A02 tumor xenografts in mice were investigated by immunohistochemical technique. The integral optical density (IOD) of P-gp, MRP, LRP in K562/A02 tumor xenografts were measured by Image Pro Plus 6.0. The results showed that as compared with the doxorubicin alone, the combination of the doxorubicin and CZBG with high, middle and low dosage could decrease IOD of P-gp, MRP in K562/A02 tumor xenografts with statistical significance (p < 0.05). The LRP expression in K562/A02 tumor xenografts was not observed in five groups. It is concluded that the combination of CZBG with doxorubicin decreases the expressions of P-gp, MRP in K562/A02 tumor xenografts of mice.

  16. The open service signal in space navigation data comparison of the Global Positioning System and the BeiDou Navigation Satellite System.

    PubMed

    Jan, Shau-Shiun; Tao, An-Lin

    2014-08-19

    More and more Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSSs) have been developed and are in operation. Before integrating information on various GNSSs, the differences between the various systems must be studied first. This research focuses on analyzing the navigation data differences between the Chinese BeiDou Navigation Satellite System (BDS) and the United States' Global Positioning System (GPS). In addition to explaining the impact caused by these two different coordinate and time systems, this research uses an actual open service signal in space (SIS) for both GPS and BDS to analyze their current system performance. Five data quality analysis (DQA) mechanisms are proposed in this research to validate both systems' SIS navigation data. These five DQAs evaluate the differences in ephemeris and almanac messages from both systems for stability and accuracy. After all of the DQAs, the different issues related to GPS and BDS satellite information are presented. Finally, based on these DQA results, this research provides suggested resolutions for the combined use of GPS and BDS for navigation and guidance.

  17. Effekt einer ad libitum verzehrten fettreduzierten Kost, reich an Obst, Gemüse und Milchprodukten auf den Blutdruck bei Borderline-Hypertonikern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Möseneder, Jutta M.

    2002-01-01

    In der randomisierten, multizentrischen DASH-Studie (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hy-pertension), die unter kontrollierten Bedingungen stattfand, führte eine fettreduzierte Mischkost, reich an Obst, Gemüse und Milchprodukten, bei Borderline-Hypertonikern zu einer signifikanten Blutdrucksenkung. Während der Studienphase wurden Körpermasse, Natrium-Aufnahme sowie Alkoholzufuhr aufgrund der bekannten Einflussnahme auf den Blutdruck konstant gehalten. In der eigenen Pilot-Studie sollte untersucht werden, ob das Ergebnis der DASH-Studie (i) mit deutschen Hypertonikern und (ii) unter habituellen Ernährungs- und Lebensbedingungen mit regelmäßig durchgeführter Ernährungsberatung und ad libitum Verzehr anstelle des streng kontrollierten Studienansatzes bestätigt werden kann. Eine Konstanz der Körpermasse, der Natrium-Urinausscheidung (unter diesem Studienansatz valider als die Aufnahme) und des Alkoholkonsums wurde vorausgesetzt. Die Studienpopulation setzte sich aus 53 übergewichtigen Probanden mit einer nicht medikamentös therapierten Borderline-Hypertonie und ohne Stoffwechselerkrankungen zusammen. Die Studienteilnehmer wurden randomisiert entweder der Idealgruppe mit einer fettarmen Kost reich an Milchprodukten, Obst und Gemüse (ähnlich der DASH-Idealgruppe) oder der Kontrollgruppe mit habitueller Ernährungsweise zugeteilt. Über einen Zeitraum von fünf Wochen wurde den Probanden etwa 50% ihres täglichen Lebensmittelbedarfes entsprechend ihrer Gruppenzugehörigkeit kostenfrei zur Verfügung gestellt. Gelegenheitsblutdruckmessungen und 24h-Blutdruckmessungen, Ernährungs- und Aktivitätsprotokolle, Blut- und Urinproben sowie anthropometrische Messungen wurden vor, während und fünf Wochen nach der Interventionsphase durchgeführt. Die Ergebnisse zeigen, dass in der Idealgruppe keine signifikante Blutdrucksenkung beobachtet werden konnte. Dies lässt sich durch die Tatsache erklären, dass die Lebens-mittel- und Nährstoffaufnahme der deutschen

  18. H1 search for a narrow baryonic resonance decaying to K{sub S}{sup 0}p(p-bar)

    SciTech Connect

    Risler, Christiane

    2005-10-06

    Preliminary results from the H1 experiment on the search for the production of a candidate for the strange pentaquark in the decay channel {theta}{sup +} {yields} K{sub s}{sup 0}p and its antiparticle in the invariant mass combinations of K{sub s}{sup 0} mesons with protons and antiprotons in deep-inelastic ep-scattering at HERA are presented.

  19. A Geometry-Based Cycle Slip Detection and Repair Method with Time-Differenced Carrier Phase (TDCP) for a Single Frequency Global Position System (GPS) + BeiDou Navigation Satellite System (BDS) Receiver

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Chuang; Liu, Hui; Zhang, Ming; Shu, Bao; Xu, Longwei; Zhang, Rufei

    2016-01-01

    As the field of high-precision applications based on carriers continues to expand, the development of low-cost, small, modular receivers and their application in diverse scenarios and situations with complex data quality has increased the requirements of carrier-phase data preprocessing. A new geometry-based cycle slip detection and repair method based on Global Position System (GPS) + BeiDou Navigation Satellite System (BDS) is proposed. The method uses a Time-differenced Carrier Phase (TDCP) model, which eliminates the Inner-System Bias (ISB) between GPS and BDS, and it is conducive to the effective combination of GPS and BDS. It avoids the interference of the noise of the pseudo-range with cycle slip detection, while the cycle slips are preserved as integers. This method does not limit the receiver frequency number, and it is applicable to single-frequency data. The process is divided into two steps to detect and repair cycle slip. The first step is cycle slip detection, using the Improved Local Analysis Method (ILAM) to find satellites that have cycle slips; The second step is to repair the cycle slips, including estimating the float solution of changes in ambiguities at the satellites that have cycle slips with the least squares method and the integer solution of the cycle slips by rounding. In the process of rounding, in addition to the success probability, a decimal test is carried out to validate the result. Finally, experiments with filed test data are carried out to prove the effectiveness of this method. The results show that the detectable cycle slips number with GPS + BDS is much greater than that with GPS. The method can also detect the non-integer outliers while fixing the cycle slip. The maximum decimal bias in repair is less than that with GPS. It implies that this method takes full advantages of multi-system. PMID:27929390

  20. A Geometry-Based Cycle Slip Detection and Repair Method with Time-Differenced Carrier Phase (TDCP) for a Single Frequency Global Position System (GPS) + BeiDou Navigation Satellite System (BDS) Receiver.

    PubMed

    Qian, Chuang; Liu, Hui; Zhang, Ming; Shu, Bao; Xu, Longwei; Zhang, Rufei

    2016-12-05

    As the field of high-precision applications based on carriers continues to expand, the development of low-cost, small, modular receivers and their application in diverse scenarios and situations with complex data quality has increased the requirements of carrier-phase data preprocessing. A new geometry-based cycle slip detection and repair method based on Global Position System (GPS) + BeiDou Navigation Satellite System (BDS) is proposed. The method uses a Time-differenced Carrier Phase (TDCP) model, which eliminates the Inner-System Bias (ISB) between GPS and BDS, and it is conducive to the effective combination of GPS and BDS. It avoids the interference of the noise of the pseudo-range with cycle slip detection, while the cycle slips are preserved as integers. This method does not limit the receiver frequency number, and it is applicable to single-frequency data. The process is divided into two steps to detect and repair cycle slip. The first step is cycle slip detection, using the Improved Local Analysis Method (ILAM) to find satellites that have cycle slips; The second step is to repair the cycle slips, including estimating the float solution of changes in ambiguities at the satellites that have cycle slips with the least squares method and the integer solution of the cycle slips by rounding. In the process of rounding, in addition to the success probability, a decimal test is carried out to validate the result. Finally, experiments with filed test data are carried out to prove the effectiveness of this method. The results show that the detectable cycle slips number with GPS + BDS is much greater than that with GPS. The method can also detect the non-integer outliers while fixing the cycle slip. The maximum decimal bias in repair is less than that with GPS. It implies that this method takes full advantages of multi-system.

  1. Unverstandene Horaz-Zitate bei Nicolaus Copernicus.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krafft, F.

    Being a Renaissance Humanist, Copernicus takes care to demonstrate his education also by quotations from classical authors which however are concealed in a way that they are recognized and understood in their meaning only by equally educated persons. Three such quotations from the Ars poetica by Horace are represented. These not only enable completely new insights into the dating of certain phases of his writing the main work De revolutionibus (especially book III) but also mark his characterization of "good" and "bad" astronomers (and astronomies). Furthermore they give evidence that T.S. Kuhn's "Structure of Scientific Revolutions" cannot apply to the Copernican turning point of astronomy called revolution.

  2. Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering at HERA and perspectives at CERN

    SciTech Connect

    Schoeffel, Laurent

    2008-10-13

    Standard parton distribution functions contain neither information on the correlations between partons nor on their transverse motion, then a vital knowledge about the three dimensional structure of the nucleon is lost. Hard exclusive processes, in particular DVCS, are essential reactions to go beyond this standard picture. In the following, we examine the most recent data in view of the dipole model predictions and their implication on the quarks/gluons imaging (tomography) of the nucleon.

  3. Leading neutron production at HERA in the color dipole approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, F.; Gonçalves, V. P.; Spiering, D.; Navarra, F. S.

    2016-03-01

    In this work we study leading neutron production in e + p → e + n + X collisions at high energies and calculate the Feynman xL distribution of these neutrons. The differential cross section is written in terms of the pion flux and of the photon-pion total cross section. We describe this process using the color dipole formalism and, assuming the validity of the additive quark model, we relate the dipole-pion with the well determined dipoleproton cross section. In this formalism we can estimate the impact of the QCD dynamics at high energies as well as the contribution of gluon saturation effects to leading neutron production. With the parameters constrained by other phenomenological information, we are able to reproduce the basic features of the recently released H1 leading neutron spectra.

  4. Silicon tracker data acquisition

    SciTech Connect

    Haynes, W.J.

    1997-12-31

    Large particle physics experiments are making increasing technological demands on the design and implementation of real-time data acquisition systems. The LHC will have bunch crossing intervals of 25 nanoseconds and detectors, such as CMS, will contain over 10 million electronic channels. Readout systems will need to cope with 100 kHz rates of 1 MByte-sized events. Over 70% of this voluminous flow will stem from silicon tracker and MSGC devices. This paper describes the techniques currently being harnessed from ASIC devices through to modular microprocessor-based architectures around standards such as VMEbus and PCI. In particular, the experiences gained at the HERA H1 experiment are highlighted where many of the key technological concepts have already been im implemented.

  5. New DIS and collider results on PDFs

    SciTech Connect

    Rizvi, E.

    2015-05-15

    The HERA ep collider experiments have measured the proton structure functions over a wide kinematic range. New data from the H1 experiment now extend the range to higher 4-momentum transfer (√(Q{sup 2})) over which a precision of ∼ 2% is achieved in the neutral current channel. A factor of two reduction in the systematic uncertainties over previous measurement is attained. The charged current structure function measurements are also significantly improved in precision. These data, when used in QCD analyses of the parton density functions (PDFs) reduce the PDF uncertainties particularly at high momentum fractions x which is relevant to low energy neutrino scattering cross sections. New data from the LHC pp collider experiments may also offer significant high x PDF improvements as the experimental uncertainties improve.

  6. Bei: Intraclausal Coherence Relations Illustrated with a German Preposition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grabski, Michael; Stede, Manfred

    2006-01-01

    Coherence relations are typically taken to link two clauses or larger units and to be signaled at the text surface by conjunctions and certain adverbials. Relations, however, also can hold within clauses, indicated by prepositions like despite, due to, or in case of, when these have an internal argument denoting an eventuality. Although these…

  7. Astronomen bei der Arbeit - Live-Konferenz mit La Palma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Paul G.

    2012-02-01

    "Wie kann man sich die nächtliche Arbeit eines Astronomen am Teleskop vorstellen?" Diese Frage stellen sich viele wissenschaftlich interessierte Menschen, die noch kein professionelles Observatorium besuchen konnten. Das multimediale Experiment "Call a Scientist" verband Besucher einer österreichischen Amateursternwarte live mit dem Großobservatorium in La Palma und brachte damit einer interessierten Öffentlichkeit seltene Einblicke in die Arbeitsweise der modernen Astronomie nahe.

  8. 78 FR 16680 - Shu Bei Yuan: Debarment Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-18

    ... debarment to the Division of Dockets Management (HFA-305), Food and Drug Administration, 5630 Fishers Lane... between 9 a.m. and 4 p.m., Monday through Friday. Dated: February 28, 2013. Melinda K. Plaisier,...

  9. Langfristige Performance mit Thin Clients bei HSBC Trinkaus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    HSBC Trinkaus nutzt Thin Clients als grafikstarke Desktops einer Citrix-basierenden Server Based Computing-Umgebung. Die neuen Dualview-Arbeitsplätze sind zuverlässiger, pflegeleichter und stromsparender als die bisherigen Terminal-PCs. Selbst die Administration erfolgt im Zweibildschirmbetrieb.

  10. Kalkbohrende Mikrothalli bei Helminthocladia und Scinaia (Nemaliales, Rhodophyta)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornmann, P.; Sahling, P.-H.

    1980-03-01

    Shell-boring microthalli in Helminthocladia and Scinaia (Nemaliales, Rhodophyta). Spores shed from pink mussel shells were shown to develop into branched monosiphonous thalli, their filaments penetrating into shell fragments. Isolates from four single germlings were cultivated. Two of these produced gametophytes of Helminthocladia and Scinaia; the others have so far only reproduced by tetraspores or monospores. Evidently the microthalli of some genera of the Nemaliales — which are, with the exception of Nemalion multifidum, known only from cultures — are shell-inhabiting and have therefore not been found in nature. The adult algae occur mainly on shells and CaCO3 substrates. Until the beginning of the century, Helminthocladia and Scinaia frequently occurred at Helgoland, but they have not been found there for more than 50 years. Their microthalli, however, are still present as shell-boring algae. This study is intended to stimulate similar ones in other genera of the Nemaliales so as to obtain a broader basis for discussion of systematic and phylogenetic relationships.

  11. Radio occultation based on BeiDou satellite navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Hu; Hu, Haiying; Shen, Xue-min; Gong, Wenbin; Zhang, Yonghe

    2014-11-01

    With the development of GNSS systems, it has become a tendency that radio occultation is used to sense the Earth's atmosphere. By this means, the moisture, temperature, pressure, and total electron content can be derived. Based on the sensing results, more complicated models for atmosphere might come into being. Meteorology well benefits from this technology. As scheduled, the BD satellite navigation system will have a worldwide coverage by the end of 2020. Radio occultation studies in China have been highlighted in the recent decade. More and more feasibilities reports have been published in either domestic or international journals. Herein, some scenarios are proposed to assess the coverage of radio occultation based on two different phases of BD satellite navigation system. Phase one for BD is composed of GEO,IGSO and several MEO satellites. Phase two for BD consists mostly of 24 MEO satellites, some GEO and IGSO satellites. The characteristics of radio occultation based on these two phases are presented respectively.

  12. Test of factorization in diffractive deep inelastic scattering and photoproduction at HERA

    SciTech Connect

    Polifka, Richard

    2015-04-10

    The QCD factorization theorem in diffraction is tested by comparing diffractive jet production data to QCD predictions based on fits to inclusive diffractive cross section data. H1 measured dijet production with a leading proton detected in the Very Forward Proton Spectrometer (VFPS), both in deep-inelastic scattering and in photoproduction. The DIS measurements are complemented by measurements of dijet production with an associated rapidity gap and in a data sample selected with a leading proton in the Forward Proton Spectrometer (FPS)

  13. Measurement of D ± production in deep inelastic ep scattering with the ZEUS detector at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramowicz, H.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.; Adamus, M.; Aggarwal, R.; Antonelli, S.; Antonioli, P.; Antonov, A.; Arneodo, M.; Arslan, O.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Bachynska, O.; Bamberger, A.; Barakbaev, A. N.; Barbagli, G.; Bari, G.; Barreiro, F.; Bartosik, N.; Bartsch, D.; Basile, M.; Behnke, O.; Behr, J.; Behrens, U.; Bellagamba, L.; Bertolin, A.; Bhadra, S.; Bindi, M.; Blohm, C.; Bokhonov, V.; Bold, T.; Boos, E. G.; Borras, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bot, D.; Brock, I.; Brownson, E.; Brugnera, R.; Brümmer, N.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Brzozowska, B.; Bussey, P. J.; Bylsma, B.; Caldwell, A.; Capua, M.; Carlin, R.; Catterall, C. D.; Chekanov, S.; Chwastowski, J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Contin, A.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Coppola, N.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Costa, M.; D'Agostini, G.; Corso, F. Dal; del Peso, J.; Dementiev, R. K.; De Pasquale, S.; Derrick, M.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Dobur, D.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Dolinska, G.; Doyle, A. T.; Drugakov, V.; Durkin, L. S.; Dusini, S.; Eisenberg, Y.; Ermolov, P. F.; Eskreys, A.; Fang, S.; Fazio, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrero, M. I.; Figiel, J.; Foster, B.; Gach, G.; Galas, A.; Gallo, E.; Garfagnini, A.; Geiser, A.; Gialas, I.; Gizhko, A.; Gladilin, L. K.; Gladkov, D.; Glasman, C.; Gogota, O.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Göttlicher, P.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Grebenyuk, J.; Gregor, I.; Grigorescu, G.; Grzelak, G.; Gueta, O.; Guzik, M.; Gwenlan, C.; Haas, T.; Hain, W.; Hamatsu, R.; Hart, J. C.; Hartmann, H.; Hartner, G.; Hilger, E.; Hochman, D.; Hori, R.; Hüttmann, A.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Iga, Y.; Ingbir, R.; Ishitsuka, M.; Iudin, A.; Jakob, H.-P.; Januschek, F.; Jones, T. W.; Jüngst, M.; Kadenko, I.; Kahle, B.; Kananov, S.; Kanno, T.; Karshon, U.; Karstens, F.; Katkov, I. I.; Kaur, M.; Kaur, P.; Keramidas, A.; Khein, L. A.; Kim, J. Y.; Kisielewska, D.; Kitamura, S.; Klanner, R.; Klein, U.; Koffeman, E.; Kondrashova, N.; Kononenko, O.; Kooijman, P.; Korol, Ie.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kotanski, A.; Kötz, U.; Kovalchuk, N.; Kowalski, H.; Kuprash, O.; Kuze, M.; Lee, A.; Levchenko, B. B.; Levy, A.; Libov, V.; Limentani, S.; Ling, T. Y.; Lisovyi, M.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lohmann, W.; Löhr, B.; Lohrmann, E.; Long, K. R.; Longhin, A.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Maeda, J.; Magill, S.; Makarenko, I.; Malka, J.; Mankel, R.; Margotti, A.; Marini, G.; Martin, J. F.; Mastroberardino, A.; Mattingly, M. C. K.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Mergelmeyer, S.; Miglioranzi, S.; Idris, F. Mohamad; Monaco, V.; Montanari, A.; Morris, J. D.; Mujkic, K.; Musgrave, B.; Nagano, K.; Namsoo, T.; Nania, R.; Nigro, A.; Ning, Y.; Nobe, T.; Notz, D.; Nowak, R. J.; Nuncio-Quiroz, A. E.; Oh, B. Y.; Okazaki, N.; Olkiewicz, K.; Onishchuk, Yu.; Papageorgiu, K.; Parenti, A.; Paul, E.; Pawlak, J. M.; Pawlik, B.; Pelfer, P. G.; Pellegrino, A.; Perlanski, W.; Perrey, H.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Plucinski, P.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Polini, A.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Przybycien, M.; Raval, A.; Reeder, D. D.; Reisert, B.; Ren, Z.; Repond, J.; Ri, Y. D.; Robertson, A.; Roloff, P.; Rubinsky, I.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Samson, U.; Sartorelli, G.; Savin, A. A.; Saxon, D. H.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenstedt, S.; Schleper, P.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schneekloth, U.; Schönberg, V.; Schörner-Sadenius, T.; Schwartz, J.; Sciulli, F.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Shehzadi, R.; Shimizu, S.; Singh, I.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Slominski, W.; Smith, W. H.; Sola, V.; Solano, A.; Son, D.; Sosnovtsev, V.; Spiridonov, A.; Stadie, H.; Stanco, L.; Stefaniuk, N.; Stern, A.; Stewart, T. P.; Stifutkin, A.; Stopa, P.; Suchkov, S.; Susinno, G.; Suszycki, L.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Szuba, D.; Szuba, J.; Tapper, A. D.; Tassi, E.; Terrón, J.; Theedt, T.; Tiecke, H.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomaszewska, J.; Trofymov, A.; Trusov, V.; Tsurugai, T.; Turcato, M.; Turkot, O.; Tymieniecka, T.; Vázquez, M.; Verbytskyi, A.; Viazlo, O.; Vlasov, N. N.; Walczak, R.; Abdullah, W. A. T. Wan; Whitmore, J. J.; Wichmann, K.; Wiggers, L.; Wing, M.; Wlasenko, M.; Wolf, G.; Wolfe, H.; Wrona, K.; Yagües-Molina, A. G.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yoshida, R.; Youngman, C.; Zakharchuk, N.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Zawiejski, L.; Zenaiev, O.; Zeuner, W.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Zhmak, N.; Zichichi, A.; Zolkapli, Z.; Zotkin, D. S.

    2013-05-01

    Charm production in deep inelastic ep scattering was measured with the ZEUS detector using an integrated luminosity of 354 pb-1. Charm quarks were identified by reconstructing D ± mesons in the D ± → K ∓π±π± decay channel. Lifetime information was used to reduce combinatorial background substantially. Differential cross sections were measured in the kinematic region 5 < Q 2 < 1000 GeV2, 0 .02 < y < 0 .7, 1 .5 < p T ( D ±) < 15 GeV and | η( D ±)| < 1 .6, where Q 2 is the photon virtuality, y is the inelasticity, and p T ( D ±) and η( D ±) are the transverse momentum and the pseudorapidity of the D ± meson, respectively. Next-to-leading-order QCD predictions are compared to the data. The charm contribution, F_2^{{coverline{c}}} , to the proton structure-function F 2 was extracted.

  14. Trastuzumab re-treatment following adjuvant trastuzumab and the importance of distant disease-free interval: the HERA trial experience.

    PubMed

    Metzger-Filho, Otto; de Azambuja, Evandro; Procter, Marion; Krieguer, Magalie; Smith, Ian; Baselga, Jose; Cameron, David; Untch, Michael; Jackisch, Christian; Bell, Richard; Gianni, Luca; Goldhirsch, Aron; Piccart, Martine; Gelber, Richard D

    2016-01-01

    This retrospective analysis conducted using data from patients enrolled onto the Herceptin Adjuvant has two objectives: The first is to evaluate the impact of the time interval between the end of adjuvant trastuzumab and distant recurrence (TDRI) upon overall survival (OS). The second is to describe the duration of trastuzumab-based regimens in the metastatic setting for patients previously treated with adjuvant trastuzumab. The first objective included 187 patients treated with adjuvant trastuzumab and diagnosed with distant recurrence at 4-year median follow-up. The second objective included data from questionnaires sent to investigators retreating patients with trastuzumab upon distant recurrence: 144 of 156 questionnaires were returned (93 %), and 90 patients were selected based on available clinical information and consent for subsequent studies. There was no statistically significant relationship between TDRI following 1 year of adjuvant trastuzumab and OS from distant recurrence: hazard ratio 0.991, p = 0.46. The median OS from distant recurrence was numerically longer among patients with a TDRI of ≥12 months (n = 103) than <12 months (n = 84) but not statistically significant (23.7 vs. 17.8 months, p = 0.47). The median duration of first-line trastuzumab-based regimens for patients previously treated with adjuvant trastuzumab and diagnosed with distant disease recurrence was 8.8 months (n = 88). This retrospective, exploratory study suggests that TDRI did not impact on OS measured from distant recurrence. We argue that prospective collection of treatment information beyond disease progression should be included in future clinical studies.

  15. 77 FR 28741 - The Housing and Economic Recovery Act of 2008 (HERA): Changes to the Section 8 Tenant-Based...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-15

    ... (PHA) plan; the voucher program; and the capital and operating funds with respect to emergency funds... discretion to decide whether to operate a PBV program (and this rule does not remove that authority), the PHA... housing and voucher programs are intended to operate as separate, and mutually exclusive, subsidy...

  16. Confronting fragmentation function universality with single hadron inclusive production at HERA and e{sup +}e{sup -} colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Albino, S.; Kniehl, B. A.; Kramer, G.; Sandoval, C.

    2007-02-01

    Predictions for light charged hadron production data in the current fragmentation region of deeply inelastic scattering from the H1 and ZEUS experiments are calculated using perturbative quantum chromodynamics at next-to-leading order, and using fragmentation functions obtained by fitting to similar data from e{sup +}e{sup -} reactions. General good agreement is found when the magnitude Q{sup 2} of the hard photon's virtuality is sufficiently large. The discrepancy at low Q and small scaled momentum x{sub p} is reduced by incorporating mass effects of the detected hadron. By performing quark tagging, the contributions to the overall fragmentation from the various quark flavours in the ep reactions are studied and compared to the contributions in e{sup +}e{sup -} reactions. The yields of the various hadron species are also calculated.

  17. The H1 Trigger with Emphasis on Tracking Triggers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedlberger, J.

    1995-11-01

    Since the commissioning of the electron proton collider HERA in 1992 at DESY the H1 experiment collected data with stable performance. The collision frequency of 10.4 MHz necessitates a pipelined design of the data acquisition and the trigger. A multilevel trigger is used to provide the required selectivity on physics processes and to allow for fast rejection of background events. Subdetector-based, deadtime-free triggers are combined to produce a first level trigger. The dcr φ trigger described herein, extracts its data from the central driftchamber. The drifttime of the signals is measured online and logical functions are applied on the digitized time measurements. To account for different performance parameters of the driftchamber the hardware demands a high flexibility, thus leading to a design with Programmable Gate Arrays (XILINX). Track-finding is achieved by means of ten thousand look-up tables, each with typically 20 inputs. Although the signals for one event will arrive within 1.1 μs, it is possible to determine the timing of the event online within one bunchcrossing (0.096 μs).

  18. Die Aufnahme partikulärer Nahrung bei Reniera sp. (Porifera)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langenbruch, Paul-Friedrich

    1985-09-01

    The choanocyte chambers of the marine sponge Reniera sp. protrude with their curved outer surface free into the incurrent canals. The water is sucked into the chambers by cavities between the choanocytes. Particles up to 1 µm in diameter may enter the chambers with the water current. These particles are trapped on the outer surface of the choanocyte collars and are ingested by the choanocytes and processes of the pinacocyte epithelium of the incurrent canal system, which project into the chambers. Bigger particles are retained in the incurrent canals mainly on the outer surface of the choanocyte chambers. They are ingested by pinacocytes of the canal wall and transported to cells of the mesenchyme. The present investigation shows the great importance of the pinacocyte epithelium of the incurrent canal system for suspension feeding in Reniera sp.

  19. Johann Christoph Sturm's universal mathematics and metaphysics (German Title: Universalmathematik und Metaphysik bei Johann Christoph Sturm)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leinsle, Ulrich G.

    In order to understand Sturm's concept of a universal mathematics as a replacement or complement of metaphysics, one first has to examine the evolution of the idea of a mathesis universalis up to Sturm, and his concept of metaphysics. According to the understanding of those times, natural theology belongs to metaphysics. The last section is concerned with Sturm's statements on the existence of God and his assessments for a physico-theology.

  20. Timing group delay and differential code bias corrections for BeiDou positioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Fei; Zhang, Xiaohong; Wang, Jinling

    2015-05-01

    This article first clearly figures out the relationship between parameters of timing group delay (TGD) and differential code bias (DCB) for BDS, and demonstrates the equivalence of TGD and DCB correction models combining theory with practice. The TGD/DCB correction models have been extended to various occasions for BDS positioning, and such models have been evaluated by real triple-frequency datasets. To test the effectiveness of broadcast TGDs in the navigation message and DCBs provided by the Multi-GNSS Experiment (MGEX), both standard point positioning (SPP) and precise point positioning (PPP) tests are carried out for BDS signals with different schemes. Furthermore, the influence of differential code biases on BDS positioning estimates such as coordinates, receiver clock biases, tropospheric delays and carrier phase ambiguities is investigated comprehensively. Comparative analysis show that the unmodeled differential code biases degrade the performance of BDS SPP by a factor of two or more, whereas the estimates of PPP are subject to varying degrees of influences. For SPP, the accuracy of dual-frequency combinations is slightly worse than that of single-frequency, and they are much more sensitive to the differential code biases, particularly for the B2B3 combination. For PPP, the uncorrected differential code biases are mostly absorbed into the receiver clock bias and carrier phase ambiguities and thus resulting in a much longer convergence time. Even though the influence of the differential code biases could be mitigated over time and comparable positioning accuracy could be achieved after convergence, it is suggested to properly handle with the differential code biases since it is vital for PPP convergence and integer ambiguity resolution.

  1. Verminderte Tiefbrunnenergiebigkeit durch Versandung und Versinterung bei Veränderung der Grundwasserchemie

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knuth, Christoph; Wisotzky, Frank; Becke, Norbert

    2017-01-01

    In three deep wells of a water works in the Lower Rhine Valley (Germany) decreasing well yield has been observed. To investigate the reasons for this decline, solids analysis (microscopy, Cinorg measurements, XRD-, SEM-analysis) was completed and hydrogeochemical calculations were carried out. The samples examined from the bottom of the wells indicate both hydromechanical entry of sand from the aquifer into the well, and formation of incrustations in the form of calcite within the well. The water analysis results show that almost all measured ion concentrations have increased over the past 10 years, which indicates a general change of the hydrochemical conditions of the aquifer. Hydrogeochemical models suggest that oversaturation exists regarding the mineral phases iron hydroxide and calcium carbonate, and therefore the formation of incrustations is possible.

  2. Erfahrungen bei der Arbeit am russischen Wortschatz (Experiences in Work on the Russian Vocabulary)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kruechten, Christa von

    1975-01-01

    Reports on experiences with vocabulary booklets written by the students from Grade 5 through Grade 10. These included vocabularies grouped as to subject matter; special attention was given to vocabularies which would have a bearing on the whole school career and on developing free speaking ability. (Text is in German.) (IFS/WGA)

  3. Oszillationen der reaktionsgeschwindigkeit bei der reaktion von NO MIT CO an platin im Knudsengebiet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adlhoch, Wolfgang; Lintz, Hans-Günther; Weisker, Tilman

    1981-02-01

    The reduction of NO by CO on a polycrystalline platinum ribbon is studied in a open system at pressures less than 5 × 10 -4Torr (6.7 × 10 -2Pa). In the temperature range 440 < T/K < 520 one can initiate sustained oscillations of the reaction rate in an oxidizing atmosphere (1 < pNO/ pCO < 4). At constant feed of gas to the reactor this can be obtained by a temperature jump, at constant temperature of the catalyst these oscillations may be created by the variation of the partial pressure of one of the reactants. As the oscillations arise isothermally under Knudsen conditions they cannot be due to the coupling of transport phenomena and reactions at the catalyst surface. The interaction between adsorbed gases and the surface structure must play the determinant roll.

  4. "Hirnsymptome bei Carcinomatose" - Hermann Oppenheim and an Early Description of a Paraneoplastic Neurological Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Paulina; Prüss, Harald

    2015-01-01

    Paraneoplastic neurological syndromes belong to the most enigmatic and fascinating disorders. Their remarkable clinical spectrum ranges from sensory neuronopathy to cerebellar degeneration or limbic encephalitis. We retrace the clinical and pathological description of a forgotten case published by Hermann Oppenheim in 1888, which to our knowledge represents the first report of a paraneoplastic neurological syndrome. The young Oppenheim used thorough observation and good clinical judgment to suggest a causal link between the seemingly mere association of an underlying malignancy and a neurological syndrome, decades before Denny-Brown's identification of sensory neuronopathy in 1948 and a century before the discovery of "anti-Hu" antibodies. Oppenheim anticipated that scientific progress was required to prove this link, and he indicated his finding as "a pointer for future observers." In this way, he leaves the reader with the fascinating question of which observations during our current neurology practice could be the next "pointers" in medical research.

  5. Misunderstood citations of Horace by Nicolaus Copernicus. (German Title: Unverstandene Horaz-Zitate bei Nicolaus Copernicus)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krafft, Fritz

    Being a Renaissance humanist, Copernicus takes care to demonstrate his education also by quotations from classical authors which however are concealed in a way that they are recognized and understood in their meaning only by equally educated persons. Three such quotations from the Ars poetica by Horace are represented. These not only enable completely new insights into the dating of certain phases of his writing the main work De revolutionibus (especially book III) but also mark his characterization of 'good' and 'bad' astronomers (and astronomies). Furthermore they give evidence that T.S. Kuhn's ``Structure of Scientific Revolutions'' cannot apply to the Copernican turning point of astronomy called revolution.

  6. Verminderte Tiefbrunnenergiebigkeit durch Versandung und Versinterung bei Veränderung der Grundwasserchemie

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knuth, Christoph; Wisotzky, Frank; Becke, Norbert

    2017-03-01

    In three deep wells of a water works in the Lower Rhine Valley (Germany) decreasing well yield has been observed. To investigate the reasons for this decline, solids analysis (microscopy, Cinorg measurements, XRD-, SEM-analysis) was completed and hydrogeochemical calculations were carried out. The samples examined from the bottom of the wells indicate both hydromechanical entry of sand from the aquifer into the well, and formation of incrustations in the form of calcite within the well. The water analysis results show that almost all measured ion concentrations have increased over the past 10 years, which indicates a general change of the hydrochemical conditions of the aquifer. Hydrogeochemical models suggest that oversaturation exists regarding the mineral phases iron hydroxide and calcium carbonate, and therefore the formation of incrustations is possible.

  7. Geologic and morphological description of the region of Sulci Tomem and Sulci Herae (a photographic map of the surface of Venus, Plate V-22)

    SciTech Connect

    Sukhanov, A.L.; Burba, G.A.; Shashkina, V.P.; Tyuflin, Yu.S.; Ostrovskii, M.V.; Kotel'nikov, V.A.; Rzhiga, O.N.; Petrov, G.M.; Sidorenko, A.I.; Aleksandrov, Yu.N.; Krymov, A.A.

    1987-07-01

    The region between Sedna Planitia and the Bell rise is covered by extensive fields of magmatic dikes, which form low ridges on the surface. They were formed in fissured state zones along large faults and, probably, over sections of buried parquet. The volcanic forms are represented by extrusive and effusive domes, which form large clusters in the center of the territory, and by volcanic and tectonic complexes of a central type.

  8. High Energy Research and Applications (HERA) Pulsed Power and Pulsed Power Systems R&D for Magnetized Target Fusion Using Field Reversed Configurations (MTF-FRC)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-12

    184. FIBERGLASS PLATFORM SUPPORTING THE RECEIVE FIBER COUPLER AND ITS TURNING MIRROR ............. 219 FIGURE 185. SINGLE-CHORD FIBER-PROBE...ratio in the final experimental setup could be slightly lower; thus, there is somewhat of a buffer built into this coil-set design. Once this design...transported over such distances when tests are performed under the center section of Shiva Star.) The fiber- coupler mount for the single-mode fiber is

  9. A Novel C-Terminal Domain of RecJ is Critical for Interaction with HerA in Deinococcus radiodurans

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Kaiying; Zhao, Ye; Chen, Xuanyi; Li, Tao; Wang, Liangyan; Xu, Hong; Tian, Bing; Hua, Yuejin

    2015-01-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) generates error-free repair products, which plays an important role in double strand break repair and replication fork rescue processes. DNA end resection, the critical step in HR, is usually performed by a series of nuclease/helicase. RecJ was identified as a 5′-3′ exonuclease involved in bacterial DNA end resection. Typical RecJ possesses a conserved DHH domain, a DHHA1 domain, and an oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide-binding (OB) fold. However, RecJs from Deinococcus-Thermus phylum, such as Deinococcus radiodurans RecJ (DrRecJ), possess an extra C-terminal domain (CTD), of which the function has not been characterized. Here, we showed that a CTD-deletion of DrRecJ (DrRecJΔC) could not restore drrecJ mutant growth and mitomycin C (MMC)-sensitive phenotypes, indicating that this domain is essential for DrRecJ in vivo. DrRecJΔC displayed reduced DNA nuclease activity and DNA binding ability. Direct interaction was identified between DrRecJ-CTD and DrHerA, which stimulates DrRecJ nuclease activity by enhancing its DNA binding affinity. Moreover, DrNurA nuclease, another partner of DrHerA, inhibited the stimulation of DrHerA on DrRecJ nuclease activity by interaction with DrHerA. Opposing growth and MMC-resistance phenotypes between the recJ and nurA mutants were observed. A novel modulation mechanism among DrRecJ, DrHerA, and DrNurA was also suggested. PMID:26648913

  10. Evaluation of improved land use and canopy representation in BEIS v3.61 with biogenic VOC measurements in California

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC) participate in reactions that can lead to secondarily formed ozone and particulate matter (PM) impacting air quality and climate. BVOC emissions are important inputs to chemical transport models applied on local to global scales but cons...

  11. Evaluation of Baroreflex Effectiveness Index during Real and Simulated Microgravity: Relation to Orthostatic Intolerance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Rachel; Stenger, Michael; Platts, Steven; Lee, Stuart

    2013-01-01

    Bed Rest and Space Flight cause a significant decrease in BEI. BR causes similar changes to BEI as SF. BEI may not correlate with subjects experiencing presyncope, but error is high and n is low. Compression Garments have the potential to restore BEI after short duration BR, but do not prevent recovery.

  12. Die Temperaturabhängigkeit semilunarer und diurnaler Schlüpfrhythmen bei der intertidalen Mücke Clunio marinus (Diptera, Chironomidae)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krüger, M.; Neumann, D.

    1983-12-01

    On Helgoland (North Sea), the imagines of Clunio emerge during two seasonal periods (late spring and summer) from water temperatures of 8° 18 °C. The temperature dependence of the known semilunar eclosion rhythm of Clunio (correlated in nature with the spring tides every 14 15 days) was tested in the laboratory. Between 15° and 23 °C the semilunar eclosion maxima varied by only one day within the artifical 15-day zeitgebercycle, below 15 °C they were delayed up to 8 days at 8 °C. However, the days of pupation were approximately independent of the temperature level. One can conclude the existence of a temperature-independent physiological switch inducing the pupation only within a few days of the semilunar zeitgeber-cycle. Moreover, a semilunar synchronized differentiation of the imaginal discs already starts in the preceding larval instar, indicating an additional physiological switch. A model is suggested in which the semilunar eclosion rhythm and its relatively slight temperature dependence is explained by the action of two physiological switches which are coupled with the endogenous temperature-compensated lunar timing mechanism on the same days of the 15-day zeitgeber-cycle. In the laboratory, the diurnal eclosion and its underlying circadian timing mechanism (correlated on Helgoland with the time of spring low water in the late afternoon) also proved to be temperature independent between 12° and 20 °C. A comparison of field and laboratory data showed very similar results at temperatures around 18 °C (summer swarming period). In contrast, the midges emerged on all days of the semimonthly cycle of springs and neaps during the spring swarming period. This lack of semilunar synchronization may be the consequence of fluctuating temperatures during the larval and pupal development in spring time due to a general rise in the water temperature (4° 8 °C) and to short temperature rises up to 18 °C during exposure of the intertidal habitat at about low tide. Since some higher parts of the Clunio habitat suitable for egg deposition are exposed on almost every day of the semimonthly cycle, even such animals that undergo lunar unsynchronized metamorphosis can reproduce within the short imaginal life duration (ca 2 h) if they emerge just about the time of low water. In correspondence with the daily delay in the times of low water by about 50 min, the diurnal eclosion rhythm was in fact modified with the tides during the spring period resulting in shifts of the diurnal eclosion time of up to 12 hours within the semimonthly cycle of springs and neaps.

  13. Drei Wochen bei den Internationalen Sommerkursen in Erfurt, 22. Juli-11. August 1968 (Three Weeks at the International Summer Courses in Erfurt).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayer, Elizabeth M.

    This paper discusses life in East Germany as observed by the author during a three-week program of summer courses in Erfurt. Background information includes a description of Erfurt, a brief review of its history, and analysis of the daily life of East Germans--their attitudes towards the state, physical appearance, salary structure, and…

  14. Molekülinterne Dipolorientierung und dielektrische Absorption in verdünnter Lösung bei Mikro-und Submillimeterwellen. V.Acetyl-Verbindungen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klages, Gerhard

    1989-09-01

    The dielectric loss of sixteen molecules, eleven with the acetyle group in aromatic bonds and five in aliphatic bonds, has been measured in very dilute solutions of cyclohexene at 20 °C. Five of these molecules are investigated in decalene solutions, too. The measurements have been made at wavenumbers in the range 0.08 to 140 cm -1 above 8 cm -1 making use of a pumped molecular laser. They are supplemented by the data of a Fourier transform spectrometer up to 300 cm -1. All microwave spectra of loss factor ɛ″ are analysed in terms of three absorption areas using the two variable Mori formalism. On the other hand, Lorentz curves are fitted to the FIR absorption spectra of α(v¯). The fast relaxation process of the aliphatic compounds is suggested to be due to intramolecular reorientation of the acetyle group itself, since in acetyle cyclohexene the remaining part of the molecule is rigid. To the contrary, the acetyle group is not able to reorientate swiftly, if bounded to aromatic rings. Presumably, it is fixed by mesomeric interaction with the dipole in the plain of the ring. However, 2-methyl acetophenone and 1-acetyle naphthone show some quick dipole reorientation, which coincides with a steric hindrance of the group in entering the plain of the ring.

  15. Sozialindex und gewichtenregeling . Berücksichtigung von sozialräumlichen Rahmenbedingungen bei der Mittelvergabe an Schulen am Beispiel Nordrhein-Westfalens und den Niederlanden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terpoorten, Tobias

    2016-12-01

    In Germany and the Netherlands spatial information about the social structure of the inhabitants is used for the coordination of financial and human resources in the local school-system. The aim is to reduce educational inequalities by taking the social context of the schools into account. The article explains two approaches. In North Rhine-Westphalia (Germany) a so called Sozialindex is used to distribute additional teachers to municipalities with difficult social surroundings. The Dutch government uses an instrument to give each pupil a weight (gewichtenregeling) depending on the specific educational background. Combined with an evaluation of the school location an additional budget, if necessary, will be payed.

  16. Eichfunktion und analysenfehler in der spektrochemischen Analytik—I. Regression bei konstanter standardabweichung für die meßgröße

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klockenkämper, R.; Bubert, H.

    For spectrochemical analyses, calibration is a basic operation generally necessary for quantitative determinations. It yields the calibration function and by inversion the analytical function which is not directly accessible.—In the following, a scheme is developed in order to find-according to different methods of analysis-the respective suitable calibration function: it should give an expectable standard deviation as small as possible for the estimated content, it should, if possible, be linear and it should be applicable in a range of content as large as possible. The condition of Part I of this paper is the constant standard deviation for the measuring quantity in this range.-The scheme is examined by five analytical examples: for trace analyses (OES-ICP and AAS) the simple relationship between the intensity I and the concentration c is linear anyhow and yields a constant absolute standard deviation not dependent on the trace content. For analyses over a large range of concentration, a double-logarithmic transformation leads to linearity and constant relative standard deviation (OES with Laser). If physical matrix effects are existing, for example in surface analysis (ISS) the 'binary-ratio method' is recommended; in this case, the relative standard deviation is proportional to (1 - c). For XRF of main and additional components, the non-linear regression of the equation of Beattie and Brissey is to be realized with √ I-values.

  17. [Qualitätsmessung bei der Behandlung von Kindern und Jugendlichen mit Entwicklungsstörungen - Eine Machbarkeitsstudie am Beispiel ADHS].

    PubMed

    Ulusoy, Marta; Borusiak, Peter; Hameister, Karin A; Geraedts, Max

    2017-04-03

    The question of a possible presence of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is raised with increasing frequency in pediatric practice. There are guidelines and expert recommendations for diagnostic approaches. But there are no instruments available to evaluate the structural, process and outcome quality. In this pilot study, a set of quality indicators on the treatment quality of ADHD was analyzed in terms of their feasibility in tertiary referral centers.A set of 39 quality indicators (QI) on ADHD developed in advance in a multistage procedure was assessed at 9 tertiary referral centers, with a focus on process verifiability and feasibility. QI values were calculated as ratios for individual centers as well as across centers, followed by an explorative analysis to assess feasibility under due consideration of possible influencing factors.QI assessment is possible but highly complex and expensive in practice. Calculated QI values showed a high degree of heterogeneity between facilities as well as between institutions, which was mainly due to a lack of standardization in the documentation of required data.Basically, it is possible to assess the quality of ADHD treatment via QIs. The approach described here in assessing QIs may be also applied to other types of developmental disorders.

  18. A comparison of risk modeling tools and a case study for human health risk assessment of volatile organic compounds in contaminated groundwater.

    PubMed

    Han, Lu; Qian, Linbo; Yan, Jingchun; Liu, Rongqin; Du, Yihua; Chen, Mengfang

    2016-01-01

    In order to promote the risk-based strategy in the investigation, assessment, and remediation of Chinese brownfield sites, the Health and Environmental Risk Assessment (HERA) software was developed. It is vital to validate the HERA model and compare the inter-model differences of HERA model against other available risk assessment tools. This paper discusses the similarities and differences between the Risk-Based Corrective Action (RBCA) Tool Kit and the HERA model by evaluating the health risk of organic contaminated groundwater sources for a chemical works in China for the first time. Consequently, the HERA and RBCA models yielded the identical results for Site-Specific Assessment Criteria (SSAC) under the commercial redevelopment. However, the HERA estimated more conservative and stringent SSACs under the residential scenario based on the different exposure calculations. The inhalation of indoor vapors was the most predominated exposure pathway for all the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) determined using the RBCA and HERA models. According to the HERA model, inhalation of chloroform may cause the highest unacceptable carcinogenic risk at 2.31 × 10(-3) under the residential scenario. Therefore, it is recommended that a risk-based remedial strategy be developed to ensure the safe and sustainable redevelopment of the site.

  19. Final ep DIS cross sections from H1 and ZEUS and HERAPDF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abt, Iris

    2016-07-01

    HERA was the first and only ep collider. It was in operation from 1992 to 2007 and the two collaborations ZEUS and H1 collected about 0.5 fb-1 of integrated luminosity each. Inclusive data from both collaborations were combined and used to determine the set of parton distribution functions called HERAPDF2.0. The history of HERA is presented as well as the long path to the final data combination and HERAPDF2.0. The proton remains full of wonders and parton distribution functions might have nothing to do with them. The legacy of HERA are the precise ep data which can be plotted as legacy plots.

  20. 360 View: See Inside Habitat Simulating Deep Space Mission for Astronauts

    NASA Video Gallery

    Johnson Space Center in Houston brings crews to an asteroid without ever leaving the building. HERA – the Human Exploration Research Analog – is one of several analogs used by the Human Research Pr...

  1. Comment on ‘Lorentz transformations and the wave equation’

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Rocco, Héctor O.

    2017-01-01

    In this comment we make some clarifications with respect to certain asumptions and demands required by Ricardo Heras in his paper entitled ‘Lorentz transformations and the wave equation’ (2016 Eur. J. Phys. 37 025603).

  2. 78 FR 4157 - Notice of Proposed Information Collection for Public Comment: Survey of Manufactured (Mobile...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-18

    ... serves as the basis for HUD's mandated indexing of loan limits. Section 2145 (b) of the Housing and Economic Recovery Act (HERA) of 2008 requires HUD to develop a method of indexing to annually adjust...

  3. 360 View: Habitat Simulates Deep Space Mission For Astronauts

    NASA Video Gallery

    Johnson Space Center in Houston brings crews to an asteroid without ever leaving the building. HERA – the Human Exploration Research Analog – is one of several analogs used by the Human Research Pr...

  4. Quarkonium production

    SciTech Connect

    Arnd Meyer

    2001-03-28

    Results on the production of heavy Quarkonia ({psi} and {Upsilon} families) from the HERA and Tevatron colliders are presented. The interpretation of the measurements in terms of perturbative QCD is critically reviewed.

  5. WHAT IS NEW AT SMALL X*

    SciTech Connect

    VENUGOPALAN,R.

    2000-01-03

    The authors discuss some recent developments in small x physics. Current understanding of small x physics is that pQCD works at HERA and the Tevatron, but perhaps even better than expected. There is much flexibility in parton distributions to hide interesting new effects. Indeed, there are strong hints from HERA that one is on the threshold of a new regime of truly high parton densities, where one may expect qualitative changes in the behavior of distributions.

  6. Estimating Noise in the Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Englund Mathieu, Philip; HERA Team

    2017-01-01

    The Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array (HERA) is a radio telescope dedicated to observing large scale structure during and prior to the epoch of reionization. Once completed, HERA will have unprecedented sensitivity to the 21-cm signal from hydrogen reionization. This poster will present time- and frequency-subtraction methods and results from a preliminary analysis of the noise characteristics of the nineteen-element pathfinder array.

  7. Data acqusition for the Zeus central tracking detector

    SciTech Connect

    Quinton, S.

    1989-04-01

    The Zeus experiment is being installed on the Hera electron-proton collider being built at the Desy laboratory in Hamburg. The high beam crossover rate of the Hera machine will provide experience in data acquisition and triggering relevant to the SSC environment. This paper describes the Transputer based data acquisition for the Zeus Central Tracking Detector, and outlines some proposed development work on the use of parallel processing techniques in this field.

  8. Vector meson production in ultra-peripheral collisions at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Fiore, R.; Jenkovszky, L.; Salii, A.; Libov, V.; Machado, M. V. T.

    2015-04-10

    By using a Regge-pole model for vector meson production (VMP), that successfully describes the HERA data, we analyse the connection of VMP cross sections in photon-induced reactions at HERA with those in ultra-peripheral collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The role of the low-energy behaviour of VMP cross sections in γp collisions is scrutinized.

  9. Kongenitale Chagas. Einfluss einer Trypanosoma Cruzi-Infektion auf die Embryonalentwicklung bei Traechtigen Maeusen (Congenital Chagas Diseases. Effect of ’Trypanosoma cruzi’ Infection on Embryogeny in Gravid Mice),

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Congenital Chagas’ disease in man and animals entailing abortion , premature delivery and deformation has been reported in the literature, although...the effect of T. cruzi infection on the fetal development of mice has been investigated after inoculating three different strains of T. cruzi in...in either early death or retarded growth of the embryos and fetuses, although trypanosomes were not demonstrable in injured fetuses (however

  10. Wiederholungswochen bei integriertem Fernsehkurs Englisch. Dargestellt an Beispielen aus English for you 2 (Review Weeks in the Integrated Television Course in English. Presented through Examples from "English for You 2")

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Festag, Ewald

    1974-01-01

    Discusses the following: designing the review for the end of the school year using the example of "English for You 2," lessons 61 and 62; exercises in vocabulary review and orthography; and hints on written language practice and grammar review. (Text is in German.) (IFS/WGA)

  11. Probing small parton densities in ultraperipheral A A and pA collisions at the CERN large Hadron Collider.

    PubMed

    Strikman, Mark; Vogt, Ramona; White, Sebastian

    2006-03-03

    We calculate photoproduction rates for several hard processes in ultraperipheral proton-lead and lead-lead collisions at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) with square root of sNN = 8.8 and 5.5 TeV, respectively, which could be triggered in the large LHC detectors. We use ATLAS as an example. The lead ion is treated as a source of (coherently produced) photons with energies and intensities greater than those of equivalent ep collisions at the DESY collider HERA. We find very large rates for both inclusive and diffractive production that will extend the HERA x range by nearly an order of magnitude for similar virtualities. We demonstrate that it is possible to reach the kinematic regime where nonlinear effects are larger than at HERA.

  12. The Political Views of Students at the Universities of the Armed Forces in Comparison to Those of Students at Public Institutions (Die politischen Orientierungen der Studenten an den Universitaeten der Bundeswehr im Vergleich zu den Studenten an oeffentlichen Hochschulen)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-12-01

    zu sein scheint" ( Noelle - Neumann , E. und Petersen, Th., S. 40).5 4 Gerade auch bei den rasant zunehmenden Aufgaben der Bundeswehr bei...Bonnemann A., Hoffmann-Broll U., 1999 Studentische Orientierungen zwischen akademischer und soldatischer Lebenswelt. Noelle - Neumann E., Petersen Th

  13. Implementation of a Biomass Energy Island for a Forested Air Force Installation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-01

    pine (CSP) plantations on Eglin AFB to establish Eglin as a Biomass Energy Island (BEI). Previous studies have demonstrated: (1) the feasibility of...AFB as a Biomass Energy Island (BEI). As such, Eglin would satisfy all energy needs of the facility by using 540,000 green tons of wood chips harvested

  14. [Prevalence and intensity of nightmares in traumatized versus non-traumatized children and adolescents].

    PubMed

    Ossa, Fanny Carina; Bering, Robert; Pietrowsky, Reinhard

    2013-09-01

    Fragestellung: Alpträume können bei Kindern, wie auch bei Erwachsenen, als Symptom für eine Traumatisierung gelten. Daher ist zu vermuten, dass bei traumatisierten Kindern und Jugendlichen die Alptraumbelastung höher ist als bei nicht traumatisierten Kindern und Jugendlichen. Methodik: Insgesamt nahmen 38 traumatisierte und 40 nicht traumatisierte Kinder und Jugendliche an der Untersuchung teil. Anhand eines Fragebogens wurde die Alptraumbelastung (u. a. die Alptraumhäufigkeit und die empfundene Intensität) erfasst. Ergebnisse: Die Ergebnisse zeigen, dass traumatisierte Kinder und Jugendliche signifikant mehr Alpträume berichten (9.7 Alpträume pro Monat) und diese als intensiver und furchtauslösender bewerten als die Teilnehmer der Kontrollgruppe (1.7 Alpträume pro Monat). Die Anzahl der Alpträume bei traumatisierten Mädchen ist im Vergleich zu der Anzahl der Alpträume bei traumatisierten Jungen doppelt so hoch. Zudem geben traumatisierte Kinder und Jugendliche signifikant häufiger an, Angst vor einer Traumwiederholung zu haben, sich während des Alptraums hilflos und sich am Tag durch den Traum nachhaltig beeinträchtigt zu fühlen. Schlussfolgerung: Patienten mit einer Traumatisierung erleben in ihren Träumen mehr Gewalt und Lebensbedrohung. Eine erhöhte Alptraumbelastung ist damit auch bei Kindern und Jugendlichen ein Merkmal einer vorausgegangenen Traumatisierung.

  15. Research in elementary particle physics. [Ohio State Univ. , Columbus

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical work on high energy physics is reviewed. Included are preparations to study high-energy electron-proton interactions at HERA, light-cone QCD, decays of charm and beauty particles, neutrino oscillation, electron-positron interactions at CLEO II, detector development, and astrophysics and cosmology.

  16. Research in elementary particle physics. Annual report, January 1--October 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-11-01

    Experimental and theoretical work on high energy physics is reviewed. Included are preparations to study high-energy electron-proton interactions at HERA, light-cone QCD, decays of charm and beauty particles, neutrino oscillation, electron-positron interactions at CLEO II, detector development, and astrophysics and cosmology.

  17. Geometry of multihadron production

    SciTech Connect

    Bjorken, J.D.

    1994-10-01

    This summary talk only reviews a small sample of topics featured at this symposium: Introduction; The Geometry and Geography of Phase space; Space-Time Geometry and HBT; Multiplicities, Intermittency, Correlations; Disoriented Chiral Condensate; Deep Inelastic Scattering at HERA; and Other Contributions.

  18. 77 FR 71610 - Survey of New Manufactured (Mobile) Home Placements

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-03

    ... price information for the Nation, census regions, states, and selected metropolitan areas and to monitor...) of the Housing and Economic Recovery Act (HERA) of 2008 requires HUD to develop a method of indexing... HUD to collect and report manufactured home sales and price information for the Nation, census...

  19. Effects of Antenna Beam Chromaticity on Redshifted 21 cm Power Spectrum and Implications for Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thyagarajan, Nithyanandan; Parsons, Aaron R.; DeBoer, David R.; Bowman, Judd D.; Ewall-Wice, Aaron M.; Neben, Abraham R.; Patra, Nipanjana

    2016-07-01

    Unaccounted for systematics from foregrounds and instruments can severely limit the sensitivity of current experiments from detecting redshifted 21 cm signals from the Epoch of Reionization (EoR). Upcoming experiments are faced with a challenge to deliver more collecting area per antenna element without degrading the data with systematics. This paper and its companions show that dishes are viable for achieving this balance using the Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array (HERA) as an example. Here, we specifically identify spectral systematics associated with the antenna power pattern as a significant detriment to all EoR experiments which causes the already bright foreground power to leak well beyond ideal limits and contaminate the otherwise clean EoR signal modes. A primary source of this chromaticity is reflections in the antenna-feed assembly and between structures in neighboring antennas. Using precise foreground simulations taking wide-field effects into account, we provide a generic framework to set cosmologically motivated design specifications on these reflections to prevent further EoR signal degradation. We show that HERA will not be impeded by such spectral systematics and demonstrate that even in a conservative scenario that does not perform removal of foregrounds, HERA will detect the EoR signal in line-of-sight k-modes, {k}\\parallel ≳ 0.2 h Mpc-1, with high significance. Under these conditions, all baselines in a 19-element HERA layout are capable of detecting EoR over a substantial observing window on the sky.

  20. The Technical Division (of the Werner Heisenberg Institute of Physics)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmuecker, H.

    1990-12-01

    The organization of the technical division, whose task is to design and build devices and appliances for physical experiments, is presented. From Oct. 1989 to Sep. 1990, the tasks covered the H detector for HERA, the ALEPH minivertex detector, the Time Projection Chamber (TPC), and the High Energy Gamma Ray Astronomy (HEGRA) detectors. The tasks carried out in coooperation with industrial companies are reported.

  1. Trastuzumab after Chemotherapy Is Effective in HER2-Positive Breast Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Treatment with trastuzumab for 1 year following standard chemotherapy improved disease-free survival in women with HER2-positive early breast cancer, according to 4-year follow-up results of the Herceptin Adjuvant (HERA) trial reported February 25, 2011,

  2. Radio frequency systems for present and future accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Raka, E.C.

    1987-01-01

    Rf systems are described for the FNAL Main Ring and Tevatron Ring, CERN SPS and LEP, and HERA proton acceleration system, CERN PS e/sup +/e/sup minus/ acceleration system, and CERN EPA monochromatic cavity. Low impedance rf systems in CERN ISR, the Brookhaven CBA, and SSC are also discussed.

  3. Exploring Klein Bottles through Pottery: A STEAM Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Christopher E.; Paré, Jana N.

    2016-01-01

    While one author was reading "The Simpsons and Their Mathematical Secrets by Simon Singh" (2013) in preparation for a presentation, the second author asked what in the book would be interesting to discuss. The topic of Klein bottles was on the first author's mind at that moment, so he tried to describe and explain the form to her--a real…

  4. 75 FR 41180 - Notice of Order: Revisions to Enterprise Public Use Database

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-15

    ... certain changes required by HERA to the Enterprises' mortgage loan data reporting and the disclosure of such data in the PUDB. The Order also makes technical changes to the single-family and multifamily data... Order with accompanying Appendix containing the revised matrices, and describes the changes made to...

  5. GENERATION OF TWO STABLE CELL LINES THAT EXPRESS HER-ALPHA OR HER-ALPHA AND -BETA AND FIREFLY LUCIFERASE GENES FOR ENDOCRINE SCREENING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Generation of Two Stable Cell Lines that Express hERa or
    hERa and b and Firefly Luciferase Genes for Endocrine Screening

    K.L. Bobseine*1, W.R. Kelce2, P.C. Hartig*1, and L.E. Gray, Jr.1

    1USEPA, NHEERL, Reproductive Toxicology Division, RTP, NC, 2Searle, Reprod...

  6. Molecular architecture of the HerA-NurA DNA double-strand break resection complex.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Robert Thomas; Schuller, Jan Michael; Unverdorben, Pia; Förster, Friedrich; Hopfner, Karl-Peter

    2014-12-20

    DNA double-strand breaks can be repaired by homologous recombination, during which the DNA ends are long-range resected by helicase-nuclease systems to generate 3' single strand tails. In archaea, this requires the Mre11-Rad50 complex and the ATP-dependent helicase-nuclease complex HerA-NurA. We report the cryo-EM structure of Sulfolobus solfataricus HerA-NurA at 7.4Å resolution and present the pseudo-atomic model of the complex. HerA forms an ASCE hexamer that tightly interacts with a NurA dimer, with each NurA protomer binding three adjacent HerA HAS domains. Entry to NurA's nuclease active sites requires dsDNA to pass through a 23Å wide channel in the HerA hexamer. The structure suggests that HerA is a dsDNA translocase that feeds DNA into the NurA nuclease sites.

  7. s-Channel Unitarity Signatures and their Experimental Implications

    SciTech Connect

    Maor, Uri

    2008-10-13

    Recent calculations of soft scattering in exceedingly high energies are summarized with emphasize on the roll of unitarity and the consequent survival probabilities of hard diffractive processes. Updated theoretical concepts and models are compared aiming to assess their validity in anticipation for HERA and AUGER first generation resul0008.

  8. 76 FR 60031 - Notice of Order: Revisions to Enterprise Public Use Database Incorporating High-Cost Single...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-28

    ... that implements the changes required by HERA by revising the single-family matrix in FHFA's Public Use... and multifamily data matrices of the PUDB, effective for 2010 and beyond, to conform the data fields... Order with accompanying Appendix containing the revised single-family and multifamily matrices,...

  9. A Critical Analysis of the Generalship of General Douglas Macarthur as Theatre Commander in the Pacific during World War II

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-02-01

    imperative the broadenin9 of the concept of Philippine defense, and the str-ength and composition of defense forces hera_? arta believed to be sufficient...war." (13,127) What he apparently never realized was that his insistence on switching to his plan so close to the anticipated beginning of hoti litis

  10. 78 FR 6045 - Information Sharing Among Federal Home Loan Banks

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-29

    ...Section 1207 of the Housing and Economic Recovery Act of 2008 (HERA) amended the Federal Home Loan Bank Act (Bank Act) to require the Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA) to make available to each Federal Home Loan Bank (Bank) information relating to the financial condition of all other Banks. Section 1207 also requires FHFA to promulgate regulations to facilitate the sharing of such......

  11. 75 FR 26756 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-12

    ... ``Federal Housing Finance Regulatory Reform Act of 2008,'' Tit. I, section 1101 of HERA. The information... calculate the interest rate on adjustable-rate mortgages (ARMs) remain available. See FIRREA, tit. IV... rates); Wis. Stat. Sec. 138.056 (variable loan rates); V.I. Code Ann. tit. 11, Sec. 951 (legal rate...

  12. 75 FR 52747 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-27

    ... 2008,'' tit. I, section 1101 of HERA. The information collection is used by FHFA to produce the MIRS... available. See FIRREA, tit. IV, section 402, paragraphs (e)(3)-(4), 103 Stat. 183, codified at 12 U.S.C....I. Code Ann. tit. 11, Sec. 951 (legal rate of interest). The respondents include a sample of...

  13. F{sub 2}{sup c} at low x

    SciTech Connect

    Illarionov, A. Yu.; Kotikov, A. V.

    2012-10-15

    We study the heavy-quark contributions to the proton structure function F{sub 2}(x,Q{sup 2}) at next-to-leading order using compact formulas at small values of Bjorken's x variable. The formulas provide a good agreement with the modern HERA data for F{sub 2}{sup c} (x,Q{sup 2}).

  14. 75 FR 9033 - 2010-2011 Enterprise Affordable Housing Goals; Enterprise Book-Entry Procedures

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-26

    ...Section 1128(b) of the Housing and Economic Recovery Act of 2008 (HERA) amended the Federal Housing Enterprises Financial Safety and Soundness Act of 1992 (Safety and Soundness Act) to provide for the establishment, monitoring and enforcement of new affordable housing goals effective for 2010 and 2011 for the Federal National Mortgage Association (Fannie Mae) and the Federal Home Loan Mortgage......

  15. Can We Execute a Strategy for Increasing Competitiveness? The Athenian Paradigm and Civic Culture

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-04-01

    adjustments in his plans for the Greeks and Trojans to accommodate the unpredictable and uncontrollable interference from Athena , Hera, and Aphrodite. This...king, as John was forced to acknowledge in the Magna Carta . In its turn, it will shape both the operations of our own Constitutioual Convention and the

  16. The Forty-Third Amy Morris Homans Commemorative Lecture 2009: It's All about the -ing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rintala, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Edith Betts (1983) presented an Amy Morris Homans lecture entitled "Keepers of the Crown Jewels." During her lecture, Betts told a story of a queen who had some beautiful crown jewels. There were four that were particularly precious to her--a ruby, a pearl, a sapphire, and an emerald. As the story evolved, the queen noticed that after she left the…

  17. Soft color screening effects in diffractive DIS

    SciTech Connect

    Pasechnik, Roman; Enberg, Rikard; Ingelman, Gunnar

    2011-07-15

    We construct a QCD-based model where soft gluon rescattering between final state partons in deep inelastic scattering leads to events with large rapidity gaps and a leading proton. The model successfully describes the precise HERA data on the diffractive deep inelastic structure function in the whole available kinematical range.

  18. 78 FR 24420 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-25

    ... is required to collect data on: the sales price of the mortgaged property; the loan-to-value ratio of... Mae or Freddie Mac.\\1\\ The stated purposes of the monthly mortgage survey required under HERA are to... Freddie Mac relative to the rest of the market for the Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs...

  19. Institutional Autonomy for Higher Education in Vietnam

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayden, Martin; Thiep, Lam Quang

    2007-01-01

    Vietnam has recently accepted the need for a comprehensive transformation of its higher education system. In 2005, the Ministry of Education and Training developed a Higher Education Reform Agenda (HERA), a blueprint for reform of the system by 2020. The Government of Vietnam recently approved the main elements of the Agenda, including a proposal…

  20. Early Science from the Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Daniel; HERA Team

    2017-01-01

    The Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array (HERA) is a radio interferometer targeting 21cm emission from the primordial intergalactic medium. Observing across a broad redshift range HERA will directly measure the IGM as it is heated and ionized by the first galaxies and black holes. HERA is tuned to make a precision measurement of the HI power spectrum through redshifts 6 to 12, capturing, at high significance, the spatial and temporal pattern of fluctuations imprinted by early objects and will explore beyond to redshift 20 to epochs driven by the very first objects. When completed, the array will have 250 14m dishes packed into a regular hexagonal pattern for roughly 10 times the sensitivity of previous such arrays. HERA is an official Square Kilometer Array precursor operated out of the South African SKA site. It is a staged experimental program that is building out in steps; 19 dishes are operating at the , the next expansion to 37 is under way in parallel with commissioning experiments. Here we report on these tests which have focused on optimizing feed design and calibration techniques and discuss their impact on isolation of foreground emission.

  1. 75 FR 41225 - Federal Housing Administration (FHA) First Look Sales Method for Grantees, Nonprofit...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-15

    ... Stabilization Program (NSP). HERA authorizes the Secretary to specify alternative requirements to any provision... Method may fall under the voluntary acquisition exclusion at 49 CFR 24.101(b)(3). That provision exempts.... Eligible NSP purchasers are required to document compliance with the tenant protection provisions of...

  2. Biochemical and Functional Characterization of the NurA-HerA Complex from Deinococcus radiodurans

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Kaiying; Chen, Xuanyi; Xu, Guangzhi; Wang, Liangyan; Xu, Hong; Yang, Su

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT In archaea, the NurA nuclease and HerA ATPase/helicase, together with the Mre11-Rad50 complex, function in 3′ single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) end processing during homologous recombination (HR). However, bacterial homologs of NurA and HerA have not been characterized. From Deinococcus radiodurans, we identified the manganese-dependent 5′-to-3′ ssDNA/double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) exonuclease/endonuclease NurA (DrNurA) and the ATPase HerA (DrHerA). These two proteins stimulated each other's activity through direct protein-protein interactions. The N-terminal HAS domain of DrHerA was the key domain for this interaction. Several critical residues of DrNurA and DrHerA were verified by site-directed mutational analysis. Temperature-dependent activity assays confirmed that the two proteins had mesophilic features, with optimum activity temperatures 10°C to 15°C higher than their optimum growth temperatures. Knocking out either nurA or herA affected cell proliferation by shortening the growth phase, especially for growth at a high temperature (37°C). In addition, both mutant strains displayed almost 10-fold-reduced intermolecular recombination efficiency, indicating that DrNurA and DrHerA might be involved in homologous recombination in vivo. However, single- and double-gene deletions did not show significantly decreased radioresistance. Our results confirmed that the biochemical activities of bacterial NurA and HerA proteins were conserved with archaea. Our phenotypical results suggested that these proteins might have different functions in bacteria. IMPORTANCE Deinococcus radiodurans NurA (DrNurA) was identified as a manganese-dependent 5′-to-3′ ssDNA/dsDNA exonuclease/endonuclease, and Deinococcus radiodurans HerA (DrHerA) was identified as an ATPase. Physical interactions between DrNurA and DrHerA explained mutual stimulation of their activities. The N-terminal HAS domain on DrHerA was identified as the interaction domain. Several essential functional

  3. Schichtübergreifende Früherkennung von Verbindungsausfällen in drahtlosen Mesh-Netzwerken

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindhorst, Timo

    Drahtlose Mesh-Netzwerke (WMNs) bilden aufgrund ihrer Selbstorganisation ein flexibles Kommunikationssystem. Bei der Erkennung einzelner Verbindungsausfälle, die bei der Integration mobiler Teilnehmer unvermeidbar sind, ist bei aktuellen Routingprotokollen die Kommunikation jedoch für mehrere Sekunden unterbrochen. In dieser Arbeit wird gezeigt, wie durch Nutzung von Informationen aus der MAC-Schicht ein Ausfall frühzeitig erkannt und dadurch die Anzahl der Paketverluste von mehreren Hundert auf maximal vier reduziert werden kann. Hierdurch wird die Zuverlässigkeit und Verfügbarkeit von WMNs erhöht und ihr Einsatz für Echtzeit-Anwendungen ermöglicht.

  4. Combined Therapy of Septicemia with Ofloxacin and/or Synthetic Trehalose Dicorynomycolate (S-TDCM) in Irradiated and Wounded Mice (Die Kombinierte Therapie der Septikaemie mit Ofloxacin und/oder Synthetischem Trehalose- Dicorynomycolat (S-TDCM) bei Bestrahlten und Verwundeten Maeusen)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-01

    for effective therapy of polymicrobic infections in irradiated/wounded mice. ZUSAMMENFASSUNG Im Gefolge letaler Bestrahlung fallen MAuse normalerweise...durch die Inhalation von Methoxyfluran andsthetisiert wurden. Eine Stunde nach 8.0 G.- Germma- Bestrahlung wurden dorsal Haut- und Muskelgewebe in Ent

  5. The void comprises everything - natural philosophy and science in Otto von Guericke's proof of existence of empty and infinite space. (German Title: Alles umfasst es, das Nichts - Naturphilosophie und Naturwissenschaft im Existenzbeweis des leeren und unendlichen Weltraums bei Otto von Guericke)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabriel, Peter

    Otto von Guericke showed in his book Experimenta nova (ut vocantur) Magdeburgica de vacuo spatio that space is an infinite void. This contribution illustrates how Guericke mixed natural philosophy and natural science in his argumentation with each other.

  6. Combined therapy of septicemia with ofloxacin and/or synthetic trehalose dicorynomycolate (S-TDCM) in irradiated and wounded mice (kombinierte therapie der septikaemie mit ofloxacin und/oder synthetischem trehalose-dicorynomycolat (s-tdcm) bei bestrahlten und verwundeten maeusen)

    SciTech Connect

    Madonna, G.S.; Moore, M.M.; Ledney, G.D.; Elliot, T.B.; Brook, I.

    1989-01-01

    Following lethal irradiation, mice usually succumb to sepsis as a result of translocation of intestinal bacteria and impairment of the host defense system. Additional trauma in these immunocompromised mice further increases susceptibility to bacterial infection from either endogenous or exogenous origin. Treatment with ofloxacin or synthetic trehalose dicorynemycolate (S-TDCM) was evaluated in mice, which were lethally irradiated and wounded, and which died with sepsis within six days. Wounding was performed on C3H/HeN mice anesthetized by inhalation of methoxyfurane. Dorsal skin and muscle equal to 30% total body surface was removed 1 h after 8.0 Gy gamma radiation. S-TDCM, which augments nonspecific resistance to infection in irradiated mice, was given once i.p. immediately after wounding. Oxfloxacin was injected s.c. daily from day 0 to day 10. Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus faecium, and Escherichia coli were isolated from both the livers and wound sites of moribund, untreated mice 4 and 5 days postirradiation.

  7. On the size of the ptolemaic system of the world - a study based on two figures by Johannes Kepler. (German Title: Über die Gröszlig;e des ptolemäischen Weltsystems - Eine Studie, veranlasst durch zwei Bilder bei Johannes Kepler)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberschelp, Arnold

    It is well known that the geocentric system according to Ptolemy is almost twice as large as the heliocentric planetary system of Copernicus. There are, however, two pictures, given by Kepler in his «Mysterium Cosmographicum» of 1596 which - at first glance - seem to contradict this. The first picture of the heliocentric system is drawn to scale. The second picture shows a geocentric system, which seems to be too small. The puzzle about the size is solved rather trivially by the fact - which is not mentioned by Kepler and which may be overlooked - that the geocentric picture is not drawn to scale and that the angles do not correspond to the degrees noted at them. In order to get a geocentric picture drawn to scale - taking Kepler's degrees for granted - it is necessary to discuss some details of the ptolemaic system. The result is, however, a geocentric system which is too big. The solution of this new puzzle is not obvious. It turns out that one of Keplers degrees (for Mars) does not correspond to the parameters of Ptolemy. Actually, in his book of 1596, Kepler's topic is not the ptolemaic system nor the copernican distances, but his heliocentric model with the five regular polyhedra. While it is interesting to note all these facts, Kepler's pictures and degrees, for the size of the ptolemaic system, lead to a dead end. Using the parameters from the «Almagest» and the principle of nested spheres from the «Planetary Hypotheses» a distance scale (Tab. 10) for the geocentric system is derived. This distance scale, however, is somewhat different from the well known ptolemaic distance scale (Tab. 1). This puzzle is not resolved, but due to the fact that different sources («Almagest» and «Planetary Hypotheses») of Ptolemy are involved. The distances of Tab. 10 correspond better to the ptolemaic system, since the relative thickness of the spheres is computed from the rather precise parameters (eccentricities and epicycle radii) of the «Almagest». The distances of Tab. I, given in the «Planetary Hypotheses», use values for the relative thicknesses of the spheres which are rounded off. Since the pictures of Kepler, when viewed together, are misleading, two new pictures of the copernican and ptolemaic planetary systems are given drawn to the same scale. A final remark is about the radius of the «tychonic system».

  8. Meine Arbeit an der Entwicklung des Sprechens bei integriertem Fernsehkurs Russisch (1). Dargestellt am Beispiel der Lektion 3 - Klasse 10 (My Work in the Development of Speaking, in the Integrated Television Course in Russian (1). Presented Using as Example Lesson 3 - Grade 10)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mueller, Renate

    1974-01-01

    Presents among other things the didactic-methodological procedure in Teaching Units 3 and 4, Grade 10; the development of (predominantly monologue) speaking proficiency and proper translation into the foreign language, with special attention to measures to be taken immediately before and after watching the television program. (Text is in German.)…

  9. 78 FR 32699 - Shipping Coordinating Committee; Notice of Committee Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-31

    ... --Application of the satellite navigation system ``BeiDou'' in the maritime field --International Telecommunication Union (ITU) matters, including Radiocommunication ITU-R Study Group matters --Development of an...

  10. Sustainability Indicators and Metrics

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sustainability is about preserving human existence. Indicators and metrics are absolutely necessary to provide at least a semi-quantitative assessment of progress towards or away from sustainability. Otherwise, it becomes impossible to objectively assess whether progress is bei...

  11. 76 FR 585 - In the Matter of Certain Handbags, Luggage, Accessories and Packaging Thereof; Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-05

    .... Golden West Avenue, Arcadia, CA 91007-6563. Alice Bei Wang (a/k/a Alice B. Wang), 886 S. Golden West..., SW., Suite 401, Washington, DC 20436; and (3) For the investigation so instituted, the Honorable...

  12. Laboratory Connections: Review of Two Commercial Interfacing Packages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powers, Michael H.

    1989-01-01

    Evaluates two Apple II interfacing packages designed to measure pH: (1) "Experiments in Chemistry" by HRM Software and (2) "Voltage Plotter III" by Vernier Software. Provides characteristics and screen dumps of each package. Reports both systems are suitable for high school or beginning college laboratories. (MVL)

  13. Monitoring the Brain-Stem State Through the Assessment of the Baroreceptor-Heart Rate Reflex in Critically Brain-Injured Patients

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-10-25

    death . We estimated during impending brain death in 11 comatose patients hospitalized in ICU 1) spontaneous variability of systolic and diastolic...and baroreflex effectiveness index (BEI) by the sequence technique. Brain death was associated with significant spectral changes, including a...generalized reduction in PI spectra and a decrease of the 0,1 Hz power in SBP and DBP spectra, BRS and BEI, close to normal values just before brain death , dropped

  14. [Agreement between self-report and clinician's assessment in depressed adolescents, using the example of BDI-II and CDRS-R].

    PubMed

    Straub, Joana; Plener, Paul L; Koelch, Michael; Keller, Ferdinand

    2014-07-01

    Fragestellung: Vorhergehende Studien zeigen eine hohe Übereinstimmung von Selbst- und Klinikerurteil bei der Erfassung von Depressivität. Die Übereinstimmung auf Summen-, Subskalen- und Einzelitemebene wurde aber bisher nicht bei einer psychiatrischen jugendlichen Stichprobe untersucht. Der Einfluss von Drittvariablen, wie Alter, Geschlecht, IQ und Behandlungssetting wurde bei Jugendlichen bisher unzureichend überprüft. Methodik: Untersucht wurden 105 depressive Jugendliche (mittleres Alter = 15.94) bei welchen innerhalb einer Woche das BDI-II und CDRS-R durchgeführt wurde. Korrelationsanalysen erfolgten auf Ebene der Summenwerte, Subskalen und Einzelitems. Ergebnisse: Es zeigte sich eine hohe Korrelation zwischen Selbst- und Klinikerurteil (r = .67). Auf Subskalen-Ebene zeigten Items, die somatische Inhalte erfassen, keine höhere Konkordanz als Subskalen, die kognitive oder affektive Inhalte messen. Auf Symptom-Ebene zeigte sich die höchste Übereinstimmung bei dem Item Selbstmordgedanken. Drittvariablen hatten keinen signifikanten Einfluss auf die Höhe der Korrelation aber Jugendliche mit einem eher hohen IQ und ambulant Behandelte neigten zur relativen Überschätzung ihrer Symptomatik. Schlussfolgerungen: Die Gesamtkorrelation war hoch und unterschied sich nicht von Ergebnissen vergleichbarer Korrelationsstudien. Die höchste Übereinstimmung bei dem Item «Selbstmordgedanken» spricht für die gute Erfassbarkeit von Suizidalität auch im Klinikerurteil. Der Fragebogen kann somit deutliche Hinweise auf das Vorliegen einer Depression liefern, jedoch sollte trotz hoher Korrelationen nicht ein Verfahren durch ein anderes ersetzt werden.

  15. Resummation

    SciTech Connect

    Banfi, A.; Corcella, G.; Dasgupta, M.; Delenda, Y.; Salam, G.P.; Zanderighi, G.; /Fermilab

    2005-08-01

    We review the work discussed and developed under the topic ''Resummation'' at Working Group 2 ''Multijet final states and energy flow'', of the HERALHC Workshop. We emphasize the role played by HERA observables in the development of resummation tools via, for instance, the discovery and resummation of non-global logarithms. We describe the event-shapes subsequently developed for hadron colliders and present resummed predictions for the same using the automated resummation program CAESAR. We also point to ongoing studies at HERA which can be of benefit for future measurements at hadron colliders such as the LHC, specifically dijet E{sub t} and angular spectra and the transverse momentum of the Breit current hemisphere.

  16. Charmonium production at high energy in the kT-factorization approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kniehl, B. A.; Vasin, D. V.; Saleev, V. A.

    2006-04-01

    We study charmonium production at high-energy colliders (Tevatron, HERA, and LEP2) in the framework of the kT-factorization approach and the factorization formalism of nonrelativistic quantum chromodynamics at leading order in the strong-coupling constant αs and the relative velocity v. The transverse-momentum distributions of direct and prompt J/ψ-meson production measured at the Fermilab Tevatron are fitted to obtain the nonperturbative long-distance matrix elements for different choices of unintegrated gluon distribution functions in the proton. Using the matrix elements thus obtained, we predict charmonium production rates in γγ, γp, and deep-inelastic ep collisions including the contributions from both direct and resolved photons. The results are compared with the known ones obtained in the conventional parton model and with recent experimental data from HERA and LEP2.

  17. BFKL evolution and the growth with energy of exclusive J /Ψ and ϒ photoproduction cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bautista, I.; Fernandez Tellez, A.; Hentschinski, M.

    2016-09-01

    We investigate whether the Balitsky-Fadin-Kuraev-Lipatov (BFKL) low x evolution equation is capable to describe the energy dependence of the exclusive photo-production cross-section of vector mesons J /Ψ and ϒ on protons. Such cross-sections have been measured by both HERA experiments H1 and ZEUS in electron-proton collisions and by LHC experiments ALICE, CMS and LHCb in ultra-peripheral proton-proton and ultra-peripheral proton-lead collisions. Our approach provides a perturbative description of the rise with energy and relies only on a fit of the initial transverse momentum profile of the proton impact factor, which can be extracted from BFKL fits to inclusive HERA data. We find that BFKL evolution is capable to provide a very good description of the energy dependence of the current data set, while the available fits of the proton impact factor require an adjustment in the overall normalization.

  18. Deeply virtual Compton scattering from gauge/gravity duality

    SciTech Connect

    Costa, Miguel S.; Djuric, Marko

    2013-04-15

    We use gauge/gravity duality to study deeply virtual Compton scattering (DVCS) in the limit of high center of mass energy at fixed momentum transfer, corresponding to the limit of low Bjorken x, where the process is dominated by the exchange of the pomeron. At strong coupling, the pomeron is described as the graviton Regge trajectory in AdS space, with a hard wall to mimic confinement effects. This model agrees with HERA data in a large kinematical range. The behavior of the DVCS cross section for very high energies, inside saturation, can be explained by a simple AdS black disk model. In a restricted kinematical window, this model agrees with HERA data as well.

  19. High energy physics at the University of Iowa. Progress report, 1 September 1992--30 September 1993

    SciTech Connect

    McCliment, E.R.; Mallik, U.; Newsom, C.R.; Onel, Y.

    1993-11-01

    Efforts were devoted to three tasks: a study of electron proton physics with ZEUS at HERA (the ZEUS detector, the J/{psi} search, future upgrades), fixed-target experiments at Fermilab (Coulomb-nuclear interference measurement, inclusive {Lambda} measurements, hyperon radiative decay, charmed baryon studies at CERN and at Fermilab--detector status), and R&D related to Superconducting Supercollider (SSC) detector development with the GEM collaboration.

  20. Comparison of two-dimensional and three-dimensional MHD equilibrium and stability codes

    SciTech Connect

    Herrnegger, F.; Merkel, P.; Johnson, J.L.

    1986-02-01

    Stability results obtained with the fully three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic code BETA, the helically invariant code HERA, and the asymptotic stellarator expansion code STEP agree well for a straight l = 2, M = 5 stellarator model. This good agreement between the BETA and STEP codes persists as toroidal curvature is introduced. This validation provides justification for confidence in work with these models. 20 refs., 11 figs.

  1. Search for Higgs and new phenomena at colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Lammel, Stephan; /Fermilab

    2006-01-01

    The present status of searches for the Higgs boson(s) and new phenomena is reviewed. The focus is on analyses and results from the current runs of the HERA and Tevatron experiments. The LEP experiments have released their final combined MSSM Higgs results for this conference. Also included are results from sensitivity studies of the LHC experiments and lepton flavor violating searches from the B factories, KEKB and PEP-II.

  2. Summary of “Future of DIS” Working Group Session

    SciTech Connect

    Lamont M.; Guzey, V.; Polini, A.

    2011-04-11

    Despite the closure of the HERA accelerator in the past few years, much physics still remains to be understood, from the quark and gluon content of the nucleon/nucleus across all x to the still unknown spin structure of the proton. The 'Future of DIS' working group was dedicated to discussions on these and many other subjects. This paper represents a brief overview of the discussions. For further details, please refer to individual contributions.

  3. pH-Responsive Layer-by-Layer Nanoshells for Direct Regulation of Cell Activity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    nanoparticle standards and performing deconvolution calculation using custom-made MMA processing software.80 Data processing and evaluation of the...ials 2009, 30, 1827–1850. 3. De Las Heras Alarcon, C.; Pennadam, S.; Alexander, C. Stimuli Responsive Polymers for Biomedical Applications . Chem... Applications of Stimuli-Responsive Polymer Materials. Nat. Mater. 2010, 9, 101–113. 7. Luzinov, I.; Minko, S.; Tsukruk, V. V. Adaptive and Respon- sive Surfaces

  4. The 1993 European school of high-energy physis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, N.

    1994-06-01

    The European School of High-Energy Physics is intended to give young experimental physicists an introduction to the theoretical aspects of recent advances in elementary particle physics. These proceedings contain lectures on quantum field theory, quantum chromodynamics, CP violation, radiative corrections, cosmology, particle detectors and e(+)e(-) accelerators, as well as reports on results from Hadron - Electron - Ring - Accelerator (HERA) and Laboratory for Extraterrestial Physics (LEP) and accounts of particle physics research at CERN and in Poland and Russia.

  5. Q2-evolution of parton densities at small x values and H1 and ZEUS experimental data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotikov, A. V.; Shaikhatdenov, B. G.

    2014-07-01

    It is shown that in the leading twist approximation of the Wilson operator product expansion with "frozen" and analytic strong coupling constants, considering the Bessel-inspired behavior of the structure functions F2 and the derivative ∂lnF2/∂ln(1/x) at small x values, obtained for a flat initial condition in the DGLAP evolution equations, leads to a good agreement with the deep inelastic scattering H1 and ZEUS experimental data from HERA.

  6. Isolated Photons + Jets in DIS and Photoproduction at ZEUS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuprash, Oleg

    2013-12-01

    In this report, recent measurements of the production of isolated photons accompanied by jets in DIS and photo-production at HERA are presented. The measurements are compared to the perturbative QCD calculations and to the predictions made within the kT-factorisation QCD approach. A reasonable level of agreement between data and the predictions of both types is observed, however there is still room for the theories to be improved.

  7. Proton structure functions at small x

    SciTech Connect

    Hentschinski, Martin

    2015-11-03

    Proton structure functions are measured in electron-proton collision through inelastic scattering of virtual photons with virtuality Q on protons; x denotes the momentum fraction carried by the struck parton. Proton structure functions are currently described with excellent accuracy in terms of scale dependent parton distribution functions, defined in terms of collinear factorization and DGLAP evolution in Q. With decreasing x however, parton densities increase and are ultimately expected to saturate. In this regime DGLAP evolution will finally break down and non-linear evolution equations w.r.t x are expected to take over. In the first part of the talk we present recent result on an implementation of physical DGLAP evolution. Unlike the conventional description in terms of parton distribution functions, the former describes directly the Q dependence of the measured structure functions. It is therefore physical insensitive to factorization scheme and scale ambiguities. It therefore provides a more stringent test of DGLAP evolution and eases the manifestation of (non-linear) small x effects. It however requires a precise measurement of both structure functions F2 and FL, which will be only possible at future facilities, such as an Electron Ion Collider. In the second part we present a recent analysis of the small x region of the combined HERA data on the structure function F2. We demonstrate that (linear) next-to-leading order BFKL evolution describes the effective Pomeron intercept, determined from the combined HERA data, once a resummation of collinear enhanced terms is included and the renormalization scale is fixed using the BLM optimal scale setting procedure. We also provide a detailed description of the Q and x dependence of the full structure functions F2 in the small x region, as measured at HERA. As a result, predictions for the structure function FL are found to be in agreement with the existing HERA

  8. Leptoquarks: pride and prejudice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzo, T. G.

    Attempts to understand the recent observation of an excess of events in the neutral and charged current channels at high$-Q^2$ at HERA has provided an excellent example of how experiments at both low and high energies can be used to simultaneously constrain scenarios which predict new physics beyond the Standard Model. In this talk I will discuss this subject from the point of view of the construction of new models of leptoquarks.

  9. Leptoquarks: Pride and prejudice

    SciTech Connect

    Rizzo, T.G.

    1997-09-01

    Attempts to understand the recent observation of an excess of events in the neutral and charged current channels at high-Q{sup 2} at HERA has provided an excellent example of how experiments at both low and high energies can be used to simultaneously constrain scenarios which predict new physics beyond the Standard Model. In this talk the author discusses this subject from the point of view of the construction of new models of leptoquarks.

  10. Diffractive Higgs boson production at the Fermilab Tevatron and the CERN Large Hadron Collider.

    PubMed

    Enberg, R; Ingelman, G; Kissavos, A; Tîmneanu, N

    2002-08-19

    Improved possibilities to find the Higgs boson in diffractive events, having less hadronic activity, depend on whether the cross section is large enough. Based on the soft color interaction models that successfully describe diffractive hard scattering at DESY HERA and the Fermilab Tevatron, we find that only a few diffractive Higgs events may be produced at the Tevatron, but we predict a substantial rate at the CERN Large Hadron Collider.

  11. Speech Alarms Pilot Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandor, Aniko; Moses, Haifa

    2016-01-01

    Speech alarms have been used extensively in aviation and included in International Building Codes (IBC) and National Fire Protection Association's (NFPA) Life Safety Code. However, they have not been implemented on space vehicles. Previous studies conducted at NASA JSC showed that speech alarms lead to faster identification and higher accuracy. This research evaluated updated speech and tone alerts in a laboratory environment and in the Human Exploration Research Analog (HERA) in a realistic setup.

  12. Latest on polarization in electron storage rings

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, A.W.

    1983-01-01

    The field of beam polarization in electron storage rings is making rapid progress in recent several years. This report is an attempt to summarize some of these developments concerning how to produce and maintain a high level of beam polarization. Emphasized will be the ideas and current thoughts people have on what should and could be done on electron rings being designed at present such as HERA, LEP and TRISTAN. 23 references.

  13. LOW-x Dynamics Through Jet Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferencei, Jozef; H1; ZEUS Collaborations

    One of the most challenging aspects of low x proton structure is the study of QCD dynamics - the evolution of partons between different kinematic regimes. In electron-proton deep-inelastic scattering, this can be investigated by studying processes in the target region of the proton - forward going jets. In this paper various measurements made at HERA by the H1 and ZEUS experiments are presented and compared to Monte Carlo models and fixed-order QCD calculations.

  14. Proton structure functions at small x

    DOE PAGES

    Hentschinski, Martin

    2015-11-03

    Proton structure functions are measured in electron-proton collision through inelastic scattering of virtual photons with virtuality Q on protons; x denotes the momentum fraction carried by the struck parton. Proton structure functions are currently described with excellent accuracy in terms of scale dependent parton distribution functions, defined in terms of collinear factorization and DGLAP evolution in Q. With decreasing x however, parton densities increase and are ultimately expected to saturate. In this regime DGLAP evolution will finally break down and non-linear evolution equations w.r.t x are expected to take over. In the first part of the talk we present recentmore » result on an implementation of physical DGLAP evolution. Unlike the conventional description in terms of parton distribution functions, the former describes directly the Q dependence of the measured structure functions. It is therefore physical insensitive to factorization scheme and scale ambiguities. It therefore provides a more stringent test of DGLAP evolution and eases the manifestation of (non-linear) small x effects. It however requires a precise measurement of both structure functions F2 and FL, which will be only possible at future facilities, such as an Electron Ion Collider. In the second part we present a recent analysis of the small x region of the combined HERA data on the structure function F2. We demonstrate that (linear) next-to-leading order BFKL evolution describes the effective Pomeron intercept, determined from the combined HERA data, once a resummation of collinear enhanced terms is included and the renormalization scale is fixed using the BLM optimal scale setting procedure. We also provide a detailed description of the Q and x dependence of the full structure functions F2 in the small x region, as measured at HERA. As a result, predictions for the structure function FL are found to be in agreement with the existing HERA data.« less

  15. Single-diffractive Drell-Yan pair production at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceccopieri, Federico Alberto

    2017-01-01

    We present predictions for single-diffractive low-mass Drell-Yan pair production in pp collisions at the LHC at √{s}=13 TeV. Predictions are obtained adopting a factorised form for the relevant cross sections and are based on a new set of diffractive parton distributions resulting from the QCD analysis of combined HERA leading proton data. We discuss a number of observables useful to characterise the expected factorisation breaking effects.

  16. Federal Research: Super Collider Estimates and Germany’s Industrially Produced Magnets

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-02-12

    DESY Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DOE Department of Energy GeV billion electron volts HEPAP High Energy Physics Advisory Panel HERA Hadron Electron...Advisory Panel ( HEPAP ) report indicated that reducing the energy would risk losing important physics. The panel fully endorsed the design as well as the...the Laboratory’s work. Two DOE reviews were completed by OER and ICE staff. At DOE’s request, the third independent review was conducted by the HEPAP

  17. Heavy quark photoproduction in pp coherent interactions at LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonçalves, V. P.; Machado, M. V. T.; Meneses, A. R.

    2010-02-01

    In this work we analyze the possibility of constraining the QCD dynamics at high energies studying the heavy quark photoproduction at LHC in coherent interactions. The rapidity distribution and total cross section for charm and bottom production are estimated using three different phenomenological saturation models which successfully describe the HERA data. Our results indicate that the experimental study of the inclusive heavy quark photoproduction can be very useful to discriminate between the classical and quantum versions of the Color Glass Condensate (CGC) formalism.

  18. Journals Find Many Images in Research Are Faked

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Jeffrey R.

    2008-01-01

    Kristin Roovers was a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Pennsylvania with a bright career ahead of her--a trusted member of a research laboratory at the medical school studying the role of cell growth in diabetes. When an editor of "The Journal of Clinical Investigation" did a spot-check on one of her images for an article in 2005, Roovers'…

  19. Structure functions and parton distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, A.D.; Stirling, W.J.; Roberts, R.G.

    1995-07-01

    The MRS parton distribution analysis is described. The latest sets are shown to give an excellent description of a wide range of deep-inelastic and other hard scattering data. Two important theoretical issues-the behavior of the distributions at small x and the flavor structure of the quark sea-are discussed in detail. A comparison with the new structure function data from HERA is made, and the outlook for the future is discussed.

  20. 75 FR 29947 - Federal Home Loan Bank Housing Goals

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-28

    ...Section 1205 of the Housing and Economic Recovery Act of 2008 (HERA) amended the Federal Home Loan Bank Act (Bank Act) by adding a new section 10C(a) that requires the Director of the Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA) to establish housing goals with respect to the Federal Home Loan Banks' (Banks) purchase of mortgages, if any. Section 10C(b) provides that the Banks' housing goals are to be......

  1. The Ballistic Missile Defense Organization’s Consolidated Targets Program,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    specific properties of each threat including basic projectile properties like mass, trajectory , and spatial size, and more complex properties like radar... trajectory control available. Similarly, the Strategic Target System (STARS) uses decommissioned Polaris A-3 boosters and a commercially developed ORBUS-1...various radar and infrared signatures. With a range of up to 1,173 km, the Hera target delivery system is capable of flying trajectories that

  2. The Nitty Gritty: How We Make Analogs Work

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Self, A. L.; Huppman, S. R.; Spence, L. A.

    2017-01-01

    NASA's Human Research Program (HRP) is becoming increasingly reliant on Isolated, Confined and Controlled (ICC) analogs to accomplish many of its research objectives. Compared to other research platforms, ICC analogs present a unique set of operational challenges that must be addressed in order to ensure a high fidelity research environment. In particular, the Human Exploration Research Analog (HERA) habitat, which is classified as an ICC environment, has been developed over the past three years to accommodate the operational needs of research investigations from each of the HRP Elements. During the development period, various types of requirements have contributed to the current operational model, which strives to achieve the highest possible level of mission fidelity with limited resources. This presentation will focus on the operational aspects of the HERA habitat, with emphasis on how we develop the analog research environment to meet researchers' needs. Specific discussion topics include mission scenario development, operational tasks, mission timeline integration, stressor implementation, console support, and improvements based on lessons learned. The information is intended to help investigators better understand the details behind HERA operations and the benefits to their research goals.

  3. The Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array Dish. I. Beam Pattern Measurements and Science Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neben, Abraham R.; Bradley, Richard F.; Hewitt, Jacqueline N.; DeBoer, David R.; Parsons, Aaron R.; Aguirre, James E.; Ali, Zaki S.; Cheng, Carina; Ewall-Wice, Aaron; Patra, Nipanjana; Thyagarajan, Nithyanandan; Bowman, Judd; Dickenson, Roger; Dillon, Joshua S.; Doolittle, Phillip; Egan, Dennis; Hedrick, Mike; Jacobs, Daniel C.; Kohn, Saul A.; Klima, Patricia J.; Moodley, Kavilan; Saliwanchik, Benjamin R. B.; Schaffner, Patrick; Shelton, John; Taylor, H. A.; Taylor, Rusty; Tegmark, Max; Wirt, Butch; Zheng, Haoxuan

    2016-08-01

    The Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array (HERA) is a radio interferometer aiming to detect the power spectrum of 21 cm fluctuations from neutral hydrogen from the epoch of reionization (EOR). Drawing on lessons from the Murchison Widefield Array and the Precision Array for Probing the EOR, HERA is a hexagonal array of large (14 m diameter) dishes with suspended dipole feeds. The dish not only determines overall sensitivity, but also affects the observed frequency structure of foregrounds in the interferometer. This is the first of a series of four papers characterizing the frequency and angular response of the dish with simulations and measurements. In this paper, we focus on the angular response (i.e., power pattern), which sets the relative weighting between sky regions of high and low delay and thus apparent source frequency structure. We measure the angular response at 137 MHz using the ORBCOMM beam mapping system of Neben et al. We measure a collecting area of 93 m2 in the optimal dish/feed configuration, implying that HERA-320 should detect the EOR power spectrum at z ˜ 9 with a signal-to-noise ratio of 12.7 using a foreground avoidance approach with a single season of observations and 74.3 using a foreground subtraction approach. Finally, we study the impact of these beam measurements on the distribution of foregrounds in Fourier space.

  4. Retrospective analysis of a VACM (vacuum-assisted closure and mesh-mediated fascial traction) treatment manual for temporary abdominal wall closure - results of 58 consecutive patients.

    PubMed

    Beltzer, Christian; Eisenächer, Alexander; Badendieck, Steffen; Doll, Dietrich; Küper, Markus; Lenz, Stefan; Krapohl, Björn Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Einleitung: Das optimale Behandlungskonzept eines temporären Bauchdeckenverschlusses (temporary abdominal closure, TAC) bei kritisch kranken viszeralchirurgischen Patienten mit offenem Abdomen („open abdomen“, OA) ist weiterhin unklar. Durch eine VACM-Therapie (vacuum-assisted closure and mesh-mediated fascial traction) scheinen sich gegenüber anderen Verfahren des TAC höhere Faszienverschlussraten (delayed primary fascial closure rate, FCR) realisieren zu lassen. Material und Methoden: Patienten unserer Klinik (n=58), welche in den Jahren 2005 bis 2008 mittels eines VAC/VACM-Behandlungsmanuals behandelt wurden, wurden retrospektiv analysiert. Ergebnisse: Die FCR aller Patienten betrug insgesamt 48,3% (95%-Konfidenzintervall: 34,95–61,78). Bei Patienten, bei denen im Verlauf ein Vicryl-Netz auf Faszienebene implantiert wurde (VACM-Therapie), konnte eine FCR von 61,3% realisiert werden. Die Letalität der mittels VACM therapierten Patienten betrug 45,2% (95%-KI: 27,32–63,97).Schlussfolgerung: Die Ergebnisse der eigenen Untersuchung bestätigen bisherige Studienergebnisse, die eine akzeptable FCR bei non-trauma-Patienten durch Anwendung der VACM-Therapie zeigen konnten. Die VACM-Therapie scheint aktuell Therapiekonzept der ersten Wahl bei Patienten mit OA und Indikation zum TAC zu sein.

  5. Studioakustik

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, Peter

    Tonstudios zählen zu den Gebäuden und Räumen mit den höchsten Ansprüchen an die akustische Gestaltung. Die Akustik, die bei Gebäuden für Wohn- oder Büronutzung häufig eher nebensächlich behandelt wird, wird im Studiobau zu einem zentralen Bestandteil der Funktion. Daher spielen in der Planung von Studios einerseits Schallschutz und Bauakustik, also die Schallübertragung zwischen Räumen innerhalb eines Gebäudes, die Schallabstrahlung durch ein Gebäude und die Schalleinwirkung von außen, vor allem aber die Raumakustik, also die Schallübertragung innerhalb eines Raumes eine wichtige Rolle. Bei bauakustischen Aufgabenstellungen unterscheidet sich die Vorgehensweise im Studiobau grundsätzlich nur wenig von der im Bereich "ziviler“ Bauten, wenngleich die Anforderungen bei weitem höher liegen, die Konstruktionen aufwändiger sind, und die Qualität der Ausführung von erheblich größerer Bedeutung ist. In der Raumakustik dagegen weichen die Zielsetzungen im Studiobau so weit von denen beim Bau von Wohn-, Büro- und Konferenzräumen und selbst Theater- und Konzertsälen ab, dass bei der Planung völlig andere Sichtweisen und Beschreibungsformen auftreten und bei deren Umsetzung Konstruktionen notwendig werden, wie man sie kaum in anderen Bauten wiederfinden wird.

  6. Preliminary Analyses of Beidou Signal-In Anomaly Since 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Y.; Ren, J.; Liu, W.

    2016-06-01

    As BeiDou navigation system has been operational since December 2012. There is an increasing desire to use multiple constellation to improve positioning performance. The signal-in-space (SIS) anomaly caused by the ground control and the space vehicle is one of the major threats to affect the integrity. For a young Global Navigation Satellite System, knowledge about SIS anomalies in history is very important for not only assessing the SIS integrity performance of a constellation but also providing the assumption for ARAIM (Advanced Receiver Autonomous Integrity Monitoring). In this paper, the broadcast ephemerides and the precise ones are pre-processed for avoiding the false anomaly identification. The SIS errors over the period of Mar. 2013-Feb. 2016 are computed by comparing the broadcast ephemerides with the precise ones. The time offsets between GPST (GPS time) and BDT (BeiDou time) are estimated and removed by an improved estimation algorithm. SIS worst-UREs are computed and a RMS criteria are investigated to identify the SIS anomalies. The results show that the probability of BeiDou SIS anomalies is in 10-3 level in last three years. Even though BeiDou SIS integrity performance currently cannot match the GPS integrity performances, the result indicates that BeiDou has a tendency to improve its integrity performance.

  7. Regenerative Energieträger im Aufwind: Entwicklung der erneuerbaren Energien

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohl, Harald

    2006-05-01

    2005 kam 4,6 % des deutschen Primär-Energieverbrauchs aus erneuerbaren Energiequellen, bei der Stromproduktion lag ihr Anteil bei 10,2 %. Wesentliche Ursache ist der Boom bei der Windkraft, die vor allem durch Offshore-Windparks auf See weiter ausbaubar ist. Die Wasserkraft lieferte in Deutschland traditionell einen großen Beitrag zur Stromerzeugung, doch ihr Ausbaupotenzial ist gering. Die Photovoltaik, die solar- und die geothermische Stromerzeugung spielen derzeit noch eine kleine Rolle. Den deutschen Bedarf an Wärmeenergie deckten 2004 die erneuerbaren Energien zu 5,4 %, vor allem aus Biomasse. Die solarthermische Wärmeerzeugung hat sich gegenüber 2000 mehr als verdoppelt. Im Straßenverkehr spielen biogene Kraftstoffe mit 5,4 % noch eine untergeordnete Rolle. Bis 2050 könnte in Deutschland der Anteil regenerativer Energien am Primär-Energieverbrauch die Fünfzigprozentmarke überschreiten.

  8. The Moral Career of ‘Outmates’: Towards a History of Manufactured Mental Disorders in Post-Socialist China

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Harry Yi-Jui

    2016-01-01

    This study focuses on ‘manufactured mentally ill’ (bei jingshenbing, 被精神病) individuals in post-socialist China. In Chinese society, bei jingshenbing is a neologistic catchphrase that refers to someone who has been misidentified as exhibiting symptoms of mental illness and has been admitted to a mental hospital. Specifically, it refers to those individuals who were subjected to unnecessary psychiatric treatment during the first decade of the twenty-first century. Based on archival analysis and ethnographic fieldwork, this study addresses the ways in which the voices of bei jingshenbing victims and those who support them reveal China’s experiences with psychiatric modernity. It also discusses the active role of these individuals in knowledge production, medical policymaking, and the implications for reforming the psychiatric and mental health systems in post-socialist China. PMID:26651190

  9. Gewebe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah-Derler, Brigitte; Wintermantel, Erich; Ha, Suk-Woo

    Als Gewebe wird ein durch spezifische Leistungen gekennzeichneter Verband gleichartig differenzierter Zellen bezeichnet. Gewebe entstehen aus jungen, noch nicht differenzierten Zellen, die sich ihrer künftigen Funktion entsprechend umwandeln. Gewebe aus differenzierten Zellen wird als Dauergewebe bezeichnet. Verschiedene Gewebe haben allerdings eine mehr oder weniger starke Potenz, sich neu aufzubauen. Beim Menschen unterscheidet man diesbezüglich zwischen labilem Gewebe, bei dem die Bildung und der Aufbau der Zellen rasch erfolgt, stabilem Gewebe, bei dem der Zellumsatz sehr langsam geschieht und permanentem Gewebe, bei dem absterbende Zellen nicht mehr ersetzt werden können (Tabelle 8.1). Es gibt vier Grundtypen von Geweben: Epithelgewebe, Binde- und Stützgewebe, Muskelgewebe und Nervengewebe. Im Körper treten in der Regel verschiedene Gewebe funktionell zusammen (z. B. Muskeln und Sehnen des Bindegewebes).

  10. [Helpful and stressful factors in coping with COPD in patients and their partners - a qualitative study].

    PubMed

    Binder, Marielle; Mörgeli, Hanspeter; Meier, Caroline; Witzemann, Lucia; Drabe, Natalie; Jenewein, Josef

    2014-01-15

    Zielsetzung: Eine Analyse der hilfreichen und belastenden Faktoren im Umgang mit COPD (chronisch-obstruktive Lungenkrankheit) bei Patienten und deren Partner. Methode: Neun COPD-Patienten und deren Partner wurden in einem semistrukturierten Interview befragt. Mittels qualitativer Inhaltsanalyse wurden die transkribierten Antworten ausgewertet. Resultate: Die professionelle Unterstützung erleben Patienten und Partner als hilfreich. Die Unterstützung durch den Partner scheint für die Patienten besonders hilfreich. Als belastender Faktor wurden von Patienten und Partnern häufig psychische Probleme genannt. Bei den Patienten standen zudem körperliche Einschränkungen im Vordergrund. Partner erwähnten ausserdem Konflikte mit dem Patienten. Schlussfolgerung: Partner von COPD-Patienten scheinen bei der Bewältigung eine wichtige Rolle zu spielen, sind gleichzeitig aber auch selbst häufig psychisch belastet. Sie sollten deshalb vermehrt in die Behandlung miteinbezogen werden.

  11. Hyperhomocysteinaemia, low folate concentrations and MTHFR C677T mutation in abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Cao, Hui; Hu, Xinhua; Zhang, Qiang; Li, Jun; Liu, Bing; Wang, Junpeng; Shao, Yang; Zhang, Zhishen; Liu, Chengwei; Hu, Haidi; Zhang, Jian; Xin, Shijie

    2014-05-01

    Hintergrund: Homocystein (Hcy) wurde mit dem Bauchaortenaneurysma (AAA) in Verbindung gebracht. Allerdings wurde der Zusammenhang von Hcy, Vitamin B12 und Folsäure bei Patienten mit AAA bislang nicht in unserer Population untersucht. Patienten und Methoden: 463 Patienten mit einem AAA wurden in die Studie eingeschlossen. 463 Probanden waren nach Alter und Geschlecht mit den Patienten abgestimmt. Wir untersuchten bei allen den Plasmaspiegel von Hcy, Vitamin B12, Folsäure und die Verteilung der C677T Methylentetrahydrofolat Reduktase (MTHFR) Gen-Mutation. Ergebnisse: Die mittlere Plasma- Hcy Konzentrationen waren bei Patienten mit AAA im Vergleich zur Kontrollgruppe signifikant höher (18,37 ± 6,97 vs 12,89 ± 4,08 umol/l, P < 0,001). Die Häufigkeit des homozygoten (TT) Genotyps der MTHFR C677T Mutation war bei Patienten mit AAA signifikant höher als in der Kontrollgruppe (19,4 % vs 11,9 %, P = 0,002). Nüchtern Hcy korrelierte negativ mit Folsäure (AAA: r = - 0,311, P < 0,01; Kontrolle: r = - 0,348, P < 0,01). Die Aneurysmen waren signifikant größer (p < 0,001) bei Patienten mit Hyperhomocysteinämie als bei Patienten mit normalen Hcy Plasmaspiegel. Die Größe des AAA korrelierte linear mit dem Plasma- Hcy Spiegel (r = 0,286, p < 0,001). Schlussfolgerungen: Serum Folsäuremangel und Hyperhomocysteinämie waren mit einem erhöhten Risiko von AAA assoziiert. Der homozygote (TT) Genotyp des MTHFR Genmutation kann ein entscheidender erblicher Risikofaktor für AAA sein.

  12. Abgasnachbehandlung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wirth, Ralf; Raatz, Thorsten

    Bisher wurde die Emissionsminderung beim Dieselmotor vorwiegend durch inner motorische Maßnahmen bewirkt. Bei vielen Diesel-Fahrzeugen werden die vom Motor freigesetzten Emissionen (Rohemissionen) jedoch die zukünftig in Europa, den USA und Japan geltenden Emissionsgrenzwerte überschreiten. Die erforderlichen hohen Minderungsraten lassen sich voraussichtlich nur durch eine effiziente Kombination von innermotorischen und nachmotorischen Maßnahmen erreichen. Analog zur bewährten Vorgehensweise bei Benzinfahrzeugen werden deshalb auch für Dieselfahrzeuge verstärkt Systeme zur Abgas - nachbehandlung (nachmotorische Emis sions minderung) entwickelt.

  13. Qualitätszentrierte Softwareentwicklung in wissenschaftlichen Arbeitsgruppen Auf dem Weg vom Prototypen zum Produkt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maleike, D.; Neuhaus, J.; Heimann, T.; Nolden, M.; Poxleitner, J.; Schöbinger, M.; Schwarz, T.; Seitel, M.; Wegner, I.; Wolber, P.; Meinzer, H.-P.; Wolf, I.

    Neue Bildverarbeitungsmethoden werden häufig hauptsächlich für Publikationszwecke entwickelt. DieWeiterentwicklung bis zur Verwendbarkeit für klinische Anwender erfordert zusätzlichen Aufwand und wird daher oft nicht weiter verfolgt. In dieser Arbeit wurden mehrere Bildanalyseverfahren unserer Abteilung konsequent zu einem stabilen und benutzbaren Softwareprodukt weiter entwickelt, so dass es für den Einsatz bei klinischen Partnern und als Demonstrationssoftware auf Messen verwendbar ist. Wir beschreiben das Vorgehen bei der Weiterentwicklung, welche Erfahrungen gemacht wurden und welcher zusätzliche Aufwand damit verbunden ist.

  14. Werkzeugverschleißdetektion beim Fräsen mittels Infrarotmesstechnik

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pittner, Walter

    Heute ist es praxisüblich, bei der spanenden Bearbeitung mittels definierter Schneide die Werkzeuge aus Gründen der Qualitätssicherung vorzeitig, im Allgemeinen nach Ermessen des Maschinenbedieners, zu wechseln. Dadurch entstehen zwangsläufig höhere Werkzeugkosten als notwendig, die dann an den Verbraucher weitergegeben werden. Wird jedoch ein rechtzeitiger Werkzeugwechsel verpasst, so entstehen insbesondere bei Hochleistungsbearbeitungsprozessen hohe Ausschussraten. Daher sollte die Entscheidung zum Werkzeugwechsel nicht mehr dem Maschinenbediener allein überlassen werden [1, 2].

  15. Modellgestützte Hybrid Systementwicklung - Modellierung und Optimierung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, Thomas

    Im Bereich der Hybridfahrzeugentwicklung wird nach wie vor intensiv an Konzepten zur Verbrauchseinsparung und Reduzierung von Emissionen gearbeitet. Gleichzeitig sollen "Fahrspaß" und Komfort solcher Fahrzeuge verbessert werden. Für verschiedene Anwendungen sind unterschiedlichste Hybridkonzepte denkbar und sinnvoll. Trotz dieser Variantenvielfalt und den daraus resultierenden technischen Anforderungen sind die Kosten eines Hybridfahrzeugs zu minimieren, wobei ein wesentlicher Aspekt bei der Kostenreduzierung die Stückzahl ist. Bei der Entwicklung von Komponenten steht daher, neben den technischen Anforderungen, deren vielseitige Einsetzbarkeit im Vordergrund.

  16. G-protein coupled receptor auto-antibodies in thromboangiitis obliterans (Buerger's disease) and their removal by immunoadsorption.

    PubMed

    Klein-Weigel, Peter F; Bimmler, Marion; Hempel, Petra; Schöpp, Sebastian; Dreusicke, Siegrid; Valerius, Jana; Bohlen, Anne; Boehnlein, Joana M; Bestler, Daniel; Funk, Stephanie; Elitok, Saban

    2014-09-01

    Hintergrund: Histopathologische und serologische Befunde sprechen für eine Immunpathogenese der Thromboangiitis obliterans (TAO, Buerger’sche Erkrankung). Autoantikörper scheinen eine wichtige Rolle im Krankheitsgeschehen zu spielen. Es wurden wiederholt positive therapeutische Effekte durch eine Immunadsorption (IA) gezeigt. Wir analysierten agonistische Autoantikörper (agAAK), die gegen G-Protein gekoppelte Rezeptoren (GPCR) gerichtet sind und analysierten, ob diese durch eine IA effektiv beseitigt werden können. Patienten und Methoden: Zwischen Dezember 2012 und Mai 2014 wurden 11 Patienten mittels IA über 5 konsekutive Tage behandelt. Die agAAK wurden unter Verwendung spezifischer ELISA-Techniken bestimmt. Ergebnisse: AgAAK wurden bei 9 von 11 Patienten (81.8 %) gefunden. Multiple agAAK waren bei 7 Patienten (63.6 %) nachweisbar. Darüber hinaus wurde ein agAAK-Cluster entdeckt, das sich gegen Loop1 des adrenergen α1-Rezeptors und Loop1 des Endothelin A (ETA)-Rezeptors richtet, und sich bei 72.7 % respektive 54.5 % der TAO-Patienten nachweisen ließ. AgAAK gegen Epitop 1 oder 2 des Angiotensin-1-Rezeptors wurden bei 3 Patienten, agAAK gegen Loop1/2 des Proteinase-aktivierten Rezeptor (PAR) wurden bei 2 Patienten nachgewiesen. AgAAK gegen den ETA-Rezeptor traten niemals ohne gleichzeitigen Nachweis von agAAK gegen den α1-adrenergen Rezeptor auf und waren immer gegen Loop1 gerichtet. Unmittelbar nach Beendigung der IA ließen sich bei 81.8 % aller Patienten und bei 77.8 % aller Fälle mit positiven agAAK vor der IA keine agAAK mehr nachgewiesen. Schlussfolgerungen: Wir konnten bei Patienten mit aktiver TAO agAAK gegen GPCR und darüber hinaus ein Antikörper-Cluster nachweisen, das sich bevorzugt gegen Loop1 des α-1-adrenergen Rezeptors und Loop1 des ETA-Rezeptors richtet. Die agAAK wurden mehrheitlich erfolgreich durch die IA eliminiert. Wir sind der Auffassung, dass gegen GPCR-gerichtete agAAK eine wichtige Rolle in der Pathogenese der TAO spielen und

  17. Indikatorenbasierte Bewertung von Entwurfsentscheidungen auf Systemebene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freier, M.; Wenzler, A.; Mayer, T.; Gerlach, J.; Rosenstiel, W.

    2013-07-01

    Bei dem Entwurf von anwendungsspezifischen integrierten Schaltungen muss ein Entwickler zusätzliche Funktionen integrieren und die zunehmende Komplexität bewältigen. Für die Reduzierung der Kosten bleibt weiterhin die Verkürzung der benötigten Entwicklungszeit ein Ziel. Ein entscheidender Faktor dabei ist die zuverlässige Absicherung von Entwurfsentscheidungen in einer frühen Entwurfsphase. In der vorliegenden Arbeit wird eine Methode vorgestellt, die eine Bewertung von Entwurfsentscheidungen bei Systemmodellen mittels automatisch ermittelter Indikatoren ermöglichen soll. Die Systemmodelle können mit der Entwurfsumgebung MATLAB/Simulink oder in SystemC beschrieben sein.

  18. Security in Logistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cempírek, Václav; Nachtigall, Petr; Široký, Jaromír

    2016-12-01

    This paper deals with security of logistic chains according to incorrect declaration of transported goods, fraudulent transport and forwarding companies and possible threats caused by political influences. The main goal of this paper is to highlight possible logistic costs increase due to these fraudulent threats. An analysis of technological processes will beis provided, and an increase of these transport times considering the possible threatswhich will beis evaluated economic costs-wise. In the conclusion, possible threat of companies'` efficiency in logistics due to the costs`, means of transport and increase in human resources` increase will beare pointed out.

  19. Airbag-Systeme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, Florian

    Heutige Pkw sind zum Schutz der Insassen bei Frontalkollisionen zu etwa 90 % fahrerseitig und zu ca. 70 % auf der Beifahrerseite mit Airbags ausgestattet, während die Seiten-Airbags zum Schutz des Kopfes und des Thorax von Insassen bei Seitenkollisionen nur mit ungefähr 40 bis 50% vertreten sind [1]. Weitere Schutzmaßnahmen wie Fuß- und Fond-Airbags befinden sich im Entwicklungsstadium, ihr Einsatz in der Serie ist umstritten und wird sich, wenn überhaupt, nur in Einzelfällen durchsetzen. In Bild C3-1 sind Airbags dargestellt, die heute serienmäßig in Pkw anzutreffen sind.

  20. Use of NTRIP for optimizing the decoding algorithm for real-time data streams.

    PubMed

    He, Zhanke; Tang, Wenda; Yang, Xuhai; Wang, Liming; Liu, Jihua

    2014-10-10

    As a network transmission protocol, Networked Transport of RTCM via Internet Protocol (NTRIP) is widely used in GPS and Global Orbiting Navigational Satellite System (GLONASS) Augmentation systems, such as Continuous Operational Reference System (CORS), Wide Area Augmentation System (WAAS) and Satellite Based Augmentation Systems (SBAS). With the deployment of BeiDou Navigation Satellite system(BDS) to serve the Asia-Pacific region, there are increasing needs for ground monitoring of the BeiDou Navigation Satellite system and the development of the high-precision real-time BeiDou products. This paper aims to optimize the decoding algorithm of NTRIP Client data streams and the user authentication strategies of the NTRIP Caster based on NTRIP. The proposed method greatly enhances the handling efficiency and significantly reduces the data transmission delay compared with the Federal Agency for Cartography and Geodesy (BKG) NTRIP. Meanwhile, a transcoding method is proposed to facilitate the data transformation from the BINary EXchange (BINEX) format to the RTCM format. The transformation scheme thus solves the problem of handing real-time data streams from Trimble receivers in the BeiDou Navigation Satellite System indigenously developed by China.

  1. Ermüdungs- und Wachsamkeitsmanagement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebermann, Hans-Joachim; Murtha, Maria-Pascaline

    1994 wurde erstmals Ermüdung (Fatigue) durch die amerikanische Unfalluntersuchungsbehörde NTSB (National Transportation Safety Board) offiziell als Hauptursache für einen Unfall in der Luftfahrt erklärt. Seitdem wird Müdigkeit bei der Untersuchung von Unfällen systematisch abgefragt.

  2. Physik gestern und heute Suprafluidität - Von den Schwierigkeiten einer Messung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sichau, Christian

    2003-03-01

    Der Vater der Tieftemperaturphysik, Heike Kammerlingh Onnes, benötigte zu Beginn des 20. Jahrhunderts für die Verflüssigung von wenigen Litern Heliums noch mehrere Jahre, eine riesige Apparatur und viel Geld. Heute gelingt dies routinemäßig. Die Untersuchung der Materie bei tiefen Temperaturen, insbesondere zur Suprafluidität, bietet viele Überraschungen.

  3. The Career Transition Cycle: Antecedents and Consequences of Career Events

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-03-01

    changes resulting from stress (e.g., serum uric acid and cholesterol levels). The longitudinal design of this study was also noteworthy. Measures of...in any way. It will beI - Piease do nc mame stra., maris Of airy kind us- eby the Navy Personnel Research and Development Center for INflORECT MARKS

  4. Use of NTRIP for Optimizing the Decoding Algorithm for Real-Time Data Streams

    PubMed Central

    He, Zhanke; Tang, Wenda; Yang, Xuhai; Wang, Liming; Liu, Jihua

    2014-01-01

    As a network transmission protocol, Networked Transport of RTCM via Internet Protocol (NTRIP) is widely used in GPS and Global Orbiting Navigational Satellite System (GLONASS) Augmentation systems, such as Continuous Operational Reference System (CORS), Wide Area Augmentation System (WAAS) and Satellite Based Augmentation Systems (SBAS). With the deployment of BeiDou Navigation Satellite system (BDS) to serve the Asia-Pacific region, there are increasing needs for ground monitoring of the BeiDou Navigation Satellite system and the development of the high-precision real-time BeiDou products. This paper aims to optimize the decoding algorithm of NTRIP Client data streams and the user authentication strategies of the NTRIP Caster based on NTRIP. The proposed method greatly enhances the handling efficiency and significantly reduces the data transmission delay compared with the Federal Agency for Cartography and Geodesy (BKG) NTRIP. Meanwhile, a transcoding method is proposed to facilitate the data transformation from the BINary EXchange (BINEX) format to the RTCM format. The transformation scheme thus solves the problem of handing real-time data streams from Trimble receivers in the BeiDou Navigation Satellite System indigenously developed by China. PMID:25310474

  5. Evaluating Theobroma grandiflorum for comparative genomic studies with Theobroma cacao

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The seeds of Theobroma cacao (cacao) are the source of cocoa, the raw material for the multi-billion dollar chocolate industry. Cacao’s two most important traits are its unique seed storage triglyceride (cocoa butter) and the flavor of its fermented beans (chocolate). The genome of T. cacao is bei...

  6. Infection control: Knowledge and compliance among Saudi undergraduate dental students.

    PubMed

    Al-Maweri, Sadeq Ali; Tarakji, Bassel; Shugaa-Addin, Bassam; Al-Shamiri, Hashem M; Alaizari, Nader Ahmed; AlMasri, Ousamah

    2015-01-01

    Zielsetzung: In der Studie sollten die Kenntnisse, die Einstellung und die praktische Umsetzung infektionspräventiver Maßnahmen bei Studenten der Zahnmedizin analysiert werden.Methode: In einer Querschnittsstudie wurde ein selbst zu beantwortender Fragebogen zur Erfassung des Impfstatus, der Kenntnisse und der Einstellung zur Infektionsprävention an 600 Studenten im 4., 5. und 6. Ausbildungsjahr des Al-Farabi College für Dentistry und Nursing, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, verschickt. Die Daten wurden mittels SPSS analysiert. Das Signifikanzniveau wurde mit p<0,05 festgelegt.Ergebnisse: Die Responserate betrug 85% (512 von 600). Während die Mehrzahl der Studenten (90%) gegen Hepatitis B geimpft war, war nur bei 37,4% anti-HBs bestimmt worden. 98,8% bzw. 90,8% trugen stets Schutzhandschuhe bzw. Mund-Nasen-Schutz bei der zahnärztlichen Behandlung, während das Tragen einer Schutzbrille nur in 29,2% angegeben wurde. Ein signifikant höherer Anteil der Studenten zeigte im 6. Ausbildungsjahr eine positive Einstellung zur Behandlung von Patienten mit Infektionskrankheiten im Vergleich zum 4. und 5. Ausbildungsjahr. Etwa ein Drittel der Studenten gab an, dass sich ein oder mehrere arbeitsbedingte Verletzungen bei der Patientenbehandlung ereignet hatten.Schlussfolgerung: Obwohl die Studenten ein solides Wissen und eine gute Einstellung zur Infektionsprävention hatten, war die Compliance zur praktischen Umsetzung gering. Die Ergebnisse unterstreichen die Notwendigkeit der kontinuierlichen Erziehung Saudischer Zahnmedizinstudenten zur Infektionsprävention.

  7. On the Resonance Concept in Systems of Linear and Nonlinear Ordinary Differential Equations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1965-11-01

    Determinanten und Matrizen mit Anwen- dungen in Physik und Technik). Berlin: Akademie-Verlag 1949. The author wishes to express his thanks to Prof.Dr.R.Iglisch...Case in the System of Ordinary Linear Differential Equations, Part III ( Studium des Resonanzfalles bei Systemen linearer gew6hnlicher

  8. Meeting ESL Needs at Home and at Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Archer, Carol M.

    This paper presents several aspects of the English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) program for refugees as it was developed at the Bilingual Educational Institute (BEI), an organization that provides refugee and ESL services in the Houston, Texas area. Background information is provided on the development of the current RSS and ESL classes and the…

  9. Genome Sequences of 11 Human Vaginal Actinobacteria Strains.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Amanda L; Deitzler, Grace E; Ruiz, Maria J; Weimer, Cory; Park, SoEun; Robinson, Lloyd S; Hallsworth-Pepin, Kymberlie; Wollam, Aye; Mitreva, Makedonka; Lewis, Warren G

    2016-09-29

    The composition of the vaginal microbiota is an important health determinant. Several members of the phylum Actinobacteria have been implicated in bacterial vaginosis, a condition associated with many negative health outcomes. Here, we present 11 strains of vaginal Actinobacteria (now available through BEI Resources) along with draft genome sequences.

  10. Mol-Gastronomie Von Schäumen und Träumen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilgis, Thomas A.

    2005-01-01

    Traumhafte Souffles, köstliches Schokoladenmus, süße Meringuen, lockere Biskuits, wem läuft bei diesen Kulinarien nicht das Wasser im Munde zusammen. In Abwandlung des Sprichworts erweisen sich solche Schäume tatsächlich als Träume, jedenfalls zu Tisch.

  11. Constraints on mountain building in the northeastern Tibet: Detrital zircon records from synorogenic deposits in the Yumen Basin.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weitao; Zhang, Peizhen; Yu, Jingxing; Wang, Yizhou; Zheng, Dewen; Zheng, Wenjun; Zhang, Huiping; Pang, Jianzhang

    2016-06-09

    The Cenozoic basins and ranges form the high topography of the northeastern Tibet that resulted from the India-Eurasia collision. Sedimentary rocks in the basins provide direct insight into the exhumation history of the ranges and the tectonic processes that led to the northeastward growth of the Tibetan Plateau. In this study, we analyzed and compared detrital zircon U-Pb ages from sands of modern rivers draining the Bei Shan, and North Qilian Shan and sandstones from the Yumen Basin. The zircon age distributions indicate that the strata dated to 24.2-16.7 Ma in the basin were derived from the Bei Shan, and the basin provenance changed rapidly to the North Qilian Shan terrane at ~16 Ma. These results suggest that an early stage of deformation along the Bei Shan at ~24 Ma was replaced by the growth of the North Qilian Shan at ~16 Ma. We conclude that the far-field effect associated with the Indo-Asian collision may result from Oligocene deformation in the Bei Shan, but the emergence of the North Qilian Shan at ~16 Ma could reflect the most recent outward growth of the Tibetan Plateau that may have been caused by the removal of some lithospheric mantle beneath central Tibet.

  12. Anti-Inflammatory Activity of N-Butanol Extract from Ipomoea stolonifera In Vivo and In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Shuping; Ji, Bin; Wang, Jinzhi; Bai, Xueting; Shi, Ganggang

    2014-01-01

    Ipomoea stolonifera (I. stolonifera) has been used for the treatment of inflammatory diseases including rheumatism and rheumatoid arthritis in Chinese traditional medicine. However, the anti-inflammatory activity of I. stolonifera has not been elucidated. For this reason, the anti-inflammatory activity of n-butanol extract of I. stolonifera (BE-IS) was evaluated in vivo by using acute models (croton oil-induced mouse ear edema, carrageenan-induced rat paw edema, and carrageenan-induced rat pleurisy) and chronic models (cotton pellet-induced rat granuloma, and complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA)-induced rat arthritis). Results indicated that oral administration of BE-IS significantly attenuated croton oil-induced ear edema, decreased carrageenan-induced paw edema, reduced carrageenan-induced exudates and cellular migration, inhibited cotton pellet-induced granuloma formation and improved CFA-induced arthritis. Preliminary mechanism studies demonstrated that BE-IS decreased the levels of myeloperoxidase (MPO) and malondialdehyde (MDA), increased the activity of anti-oxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase (SOD) in vivo, and reduced the production of nitric oxide (NO), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6 in lipopolysaccharide-activated RAW264.7 macrophages in vitro. Results obtained in vivo and in vitro demonstrate that BE-IS has considerable anti-inflammatory potential, which provided experimental evidences for the traditional application of Ipomoea stolonifera in inflammatory diseases. PMID:24752203

  13. Genome Sequences of Nine Gram-Negative Vaginal Bacterial Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Deitzler, Grace E.; Ruiz, Maria J.; Lu, Wendy; Weimer, Cory; Park, SoEun; Robinson, Lloyd S.; Hallsworth-Pepin, Kymberlie; Wollam, Aye; Mitreva, Makedonka

    2016-01-01

    The vagina is home to a wide variety of bacteria that have great potential to impact human health. Here, we announce reference strains (now available through BEI Resources) and draft genome sequences for 9 Gram-negative vaginal isolates from the taxa Citrobacter, Klebsiella, Fusobacterium, Proteus, and Prevotella. PMID:27688330

  14. Grundlagen des Tissue Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, Jörg; Blum, Janaki; Wintermantel, Erich

    Die Organtransplantation stellt eine verbreitete Therapie dar, um bei krankheitsoder unfallbedingter Schädigung eines Organs die Gesamtheit seiner Funktionen wieder herzustellen, indem es durch ein Spenderorgan ersetzt wird. Organtransplantationen werden für die Leber, die Niere, die Lunge, das Herz oder bei schweren grossflächigen Verbrennungen der Haut vorgenommen. Der grosse apparative, personelle und logistische Aufwand und die Risiken der Transplantationschirurgie (Abstossungsreaktionen) sowie die mangelnde Verfügbarkeit von immunologisch kompatiblen Spenderorganen führen jedoch dazu, dass der Bedarf an Organtransplantaten nur zu einem sehr geringen Teil gedeckt werden kann. Sind Spenderorgane nicht verfügbar, können in einzelnen Fällen lebenswichtige Teilfunktionen, wie beispielsweise die Filtrationsfunktion der Niere durch die Blutreinigung mittels Dialyse ersetzt oder, bei mangelnder Funktion der Bauchspeicheldrüse (Diabetes), durch die Verabreichung von Insulin ein normaler Zustand des Gesamtorganismus auch über Jahre hinweg erhalten werden. Bei der notwendigen lebenslangen Anwendung apparativer oder medikamentöser Therapie können für den Patienten jedoch häufig schwerwiegende, möglicherweise lebensverkürzende Nebenwirkungen entstehen. Daher werden in der Forschung Alternativen gesucht, um die Funktionen des ausgefallenen Organs durch die Implantation von Zellen oder in vitro gezüchteten Geweben möglichst umfassend wieder herzustellen. Dies erfordert biologisch aktive Implantate, welche die für den Stoffwechsel des Organs wichtigen Zellen enthalten und einen organtypischen Stoffwechsel entfalten.

  15. Geräuschgestaltung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfäfflin, Bernhard; Gerhard, Hans-Martin; Ehinger, Peter; Herrmann, Rudolf; Bathelt, Hartmut; Scheinhardt, Michael; Krüger, Jan

    Neben technischen und wirtschaftlichen Gesichtspunkten spielen beim Kauf eines Automobils auch emotionale Aspekte eine erhebliche Rolle. Bei hochwertigen Produkten insbesondere mit ausgeprägt sportlichem Charakter kommt daher neben der Optik und Haptik auch dem "Sound“ eine wesentliche Bedeutung zu (Genuit et al. 1998), Zintel u. Unbehaun 2005).

  16. Development and Validation of Evaluation Indicators for Teaching Competency in STEAM Education in Korea

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Bang-Hee; Kim, Jinsoo

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop and validate the evaluation indicators of teaching competency in STEAM education. The teaching competencies in STEAM education were drawn up utilizing both behavioral event interview (BEI) and a literature review. The initial evaluation indicators were then reviewed by 15 experts and two pilot tests were…

  17. Data Migration Strategy and Information Assurance for the Business Enterprise Information Services

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-07-30

    BTG Business Transformation Guidance CA Certifying Authority DAA Designated Accrediting Authority DCAS Defense Cash Accountability System DCD/ DCW ...B). The BEIS current family of systems included the Defense Corporate Database/Defense Corporate Warehouse (DCD/ DCW ), the Defense Departmental...required for reporting. DCW contains data repositories that assist in data consolidation, standardization, and simplification and that improve the

  18. Grundlagen des Dieselmotors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raatz, Thorsten

    Der Dieselmotor ist ein Selbstzündungsmotor mit innerer Gemischbildung. Die für die Verbrennung benötigte Luft wird im Brennraum hoch verdichtet. Dabei entstehen hohe Temperaturen, bei denen sich der eingespritzte Dieselkraftstoff selbst ent zündet. Die im Dieselkraftstoff enthaltene chemische Energie wird vom Dieselmotor über Wärme in mechanische Arbeit um gesetzt.

  19. Industry-Oriented Competency Requirements for Mechatronics Technology in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shyr, Wen-Jye

    2012-01-01

    This study employed a three-phase empirical method to identify competency indicators for mechatronics technology according to industry-oriented criteria. In Phase I, a list of required competencies was compiled using Behavioral Event Interviews (BEI) with three engineers specializing in the field of mechatronics technology. In Phase II, the Delphi…

  20. ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Are you healthy? Is your environment healthy for you? What does it mean to be healthy? Does it mean you're not achy, or that you are not visibly sick? The World Health Organization defines health broadly as a state of physical, mental, and social well-being. This means that bei...

  1. Commercial Fastener Coatings Doerken

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    Phosphating* *partly recommended Dip Spinning Dipping Spraying Spin coating Conveyor oven box oven Inductive drying Pretreatment Coating Preheating...Curing Cooling Application Techniques - Dip Spin Coating Gurtbnd Cross BarTranspo" Band beiCifteiE Vo12one Vent llated Pre .Zone Cros~ Bar T ransrt

  2. Constraints on mountain building in the northeastern Tibet: Detrital zircon records from synorogenic deposits in the Yumen Basin

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Weitao; Zhang, Peizhen; Yu, Jingxing; Wang, Yizhou; Zheng, Dewen; Zheng, Wenjun; Zhang, Huiping; Pang, Jianzhang

    2016-01-01

    The Cenozoic basins and ranges form the high topography of the northeastern Tibet that resulted from the India-Eurasia collision. Sedimentary rocks in the basins provide direct insight into the exhumation history of the ranges and the tectonic processes that led to the northeastward growth of the Tibetan Plateau. In this study, we analyzed and compared detrital zircon U-Pb ages from sands of modern rivers draining the Bei Shan, and North Qilian Shan and sandstones from the Yumen Basin. The zircon age distributions indicate that the strata dated to 24.2-16.7 Ma in the basin were derived from the Bei Shan, and the basin provenance changed rapidly to the North Qilian Shan terrane at ~16 Ma. These results suggest that an early stage of deformation along the Bei Shan at ~24 Ma was replaced by the growth of the North Qilian Shan at ~16 Ma. We conclude that the far-field effect associated with the Indo-Asian collision may result from Oligocene deformation in the Bei Shan, but the emergence of the North Qilian Shan at ~16 Ma could reflect the most recent outward growth of the Tibetan Plateau that may have been caused by the removal of some lithospheric mantle beneath central Tibet. PMID:27277834

  3. Genome Sequences of 11 Human Vaginal Actinobacteria Strains

    PubMed Central

    Deitzler, Grace E.; Ruiz, Maria J.; Weimer, Cory; Park, SoEun; Robinson, Lloyd S.; Hallsworth-Pepin, Kymberlie; Wollam, Aye; Mitreva, Makedonka

    2016-01-01

    The composition of the vaginal microbiota is an important health determinant. Several members of the phylum Actinobacteria have been implicated in bacterial vaginosis, a condition associated with many negative health outcomes. Here, we present 11 strains of vaginal Actinobacteria (now available through BEI Resources) along with draft genome sequences. PMID:27688328

  4. Means of Production

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raths, David

    2012-01-01

    No one who's worked in higher education will ever confuse the experience with working in the corporate sector. Colleges and universities are simply not geared for the business of manufacturing or marketing products. The focus--as it should be--is on teaching and research. Given the wealth of talent among IT staff and faculty, however, higher ed…

  5. Presence of exoY, exoS, exoU and exoT genes, antibiotic resistance and biofilm production among Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates in Northwest Iran.

    PubMed

    Azimi, Somayeh; Kafil, Hossein Samadi; Baghi, Hossein Bannazadeh; Shokrian, Saeed; Najaf, Khadijeh; Asgharzadeh, Mohammad; Yousefi, Mehdi; Shahrivar, Firooz; Aghazadeh, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Hintergrund:Pseudomonas aeruginosa, ein Gram-negatives Stäbchenbakterium, besitzt eine wichtige Rolle als Krankheitserreger. Daher untersuchten wir Pseudomonas aeruginosa-Isolate im Nordwestiran auf das Vorkommen von exo-Genen und Biofilmbildnern. Material und Methode: 160 P. aeruginosa-Isolate wurden biochemisch identifiziert und die Antibiotikaresistenz charakterisiert. Die Fähigkeit zur Biofilmbildung wurde im Mikrotiterplatten-Assay, das Vorkommen von exo-Genen mit Allel-spezifischer PCR (Polymerase-Kettenreaktion) analysiert. Zur statistischen Analyse wurde der Chi-Quadrat-Test eingesetzt.Ergebnisse: Als effektivste Antibiotika erwiesen sich Colistin und Polymyxin B. 87% der Isolate waren Biofilmbildner, davon 69% mit massiver Biofilmbildung. In 55% der Isolate wurden exoY, in 52% exoU, in 26,3% exoS und in 5% exoT nachgewiesen. Schlussfolgerung: Die Analyse ergab eine unterschiedliche Verteilung der exo-Gene bei klinischen Isolaten von P. aeruginosa im Nordwestiran. ExoS und exoU kamen häufiger bei nicht biofilmbildenen Isolaten, exoY häufiger bei Biofilmbildnern vor. Die Ergebnisse können ein Hinweis auf die Bedeutung von exoY bei Biofilm bildenden Pseudomonas aeruginosa-Isolaten sein.

  6. Networking as a Seismograph for Social Development. A Contribution to the Function Expansion of Networks Using the Example of Health Promotion of the Socially Disadvantaged (Netzwerkbildung als Seismograph gesellschaftlicher Entwicklungen: Ein Beitrag zur Funktionserweiterung von Netzwerken am Beispiel der Gesundheitsfoerderung von sozial Benachteiligten)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    vollzieht sich in den letzten Jahren Ober eine Vielzahl von Netzwerken, uber die sich unterschiedlichste Akteure miteinander verknQ~pft haben. In...indirekt, politische 2 Akteure zu adressieren und bisherige Handlungsdefizite der Gesundheitsf6rderung bei sozial Benachteiligten auch uber neue...klassischen Sinne der Korporatismusanalyse impliziert, sondern gar eine Form der Einwandvorwegnahme darsteilt. Auf der Grundlage der durch die bislang uber

  7. "In Mathe war ich immer schlecht"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beutelspacher, Albrecht

    Genauso wie bei vielen anderen Er scheinungsformen des Lebens (Philosophie, Musik, Liebe) kann Mathematik nicht eindeutig definiert werden. Jede Definition wäre entweder nichtssagend oder zu einengend. Man kann aber versuchen, Mathematik von verschiedenen Seiten zu beleuchten. Dabei offenbaren sich überraschende und tiefe Einblicke in das Wesen der Mathematik.

  8. Accounting for windbreak's climate change contributions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Regional climate change (CC) scenarios call for increased frequency and intensity of drought and storm events. For the North American Great Plains Region this means producers will be even more at the whim of shifting weather patterns and other stressors that may be exacerbated by CC. Options are bei...

  9. Professional Relevance in a Multilingual World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silver, Rita

    2009-01-01

    In renewing her TESOL membership for 2008, the author noted that the membership letter stated that TESOL is a "global professional organization for English language educators." This was of particular interest as she prepared for TESOL's Bilingual Education Interest Section (BEIS) 2008 session titled "Imagining Multilingual…

  10. Plasmids containing small subunit ribosomal RNA gene fragments from Babesia bovis and Babesia bigemina

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    BEI Resources was developed by NIAID as a centralized biological resource center for research reagents to the scientific community (http://www.beiresources.org/). They have a considerable amount of reagents and isolates for parasitologists working with Entamoeba histolytica, Giardia, Toxoplasma, and...

  11. Protection Without Detection: A Threat Mitigation Technique

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-23

    international conference on Advances in Machine Learning and Cybernetics (ICMLC󈧉), Daniel S. Yeung, Zhi - Qiang Liu, Xi-Zhao Wang , and Hong Yan (Eds...Junchang Wang , Haipeng Cheng, Bei Hua, and Xinan Tang. 2009. Practice of parallelizing network applications on multi-core architectures. In Proceedings

  12. Tracking Student Progress Through an On-Line Astro101 Module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, W. H., II; Hufnagel, B.

    2004-05-01

    We present an on-line module that helps introductory-level, non-science undergraduates extract information about neutron star binary star systems from X-ray light curves. The students interface directly with the High Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center (HEASARC) data through CollegeHera. Hera is a new service offered by HEASARC that enables complete interactive analysis of archived data products (see the separate Lochner & Pence paper this meeting). One of the innovative features of this module is that it records detailed student progress and automatically reports this to the professor. As the student moves through the module, student answers to multiple choice and free response questions are recorded in a personal file on the server. This is an authenticated process. The student must fill out a registration form that includes their name, course, email, professor, and professor's email. This creates a session cookie for the student that stores the unique ID given to the user by the server. In turn, the unique ID is linked to the one file that records the student's responses. When the module is completed, a brief confirmation email is sent to the student, excluding the student's unique answers to discourage sharing with other students. Simultaneously, the professor entered during the registration receives an email with the student responses and their time of entry. PERL is used for all server-side programming, and form validation functions were written in JavaScript. A laptop with internet access will be available at the poster for participants to explore the module. Learning goals and other education information for the module are at a related paper in this meeting, Hufnagel, Lochner & Howard. This module required extensive cooperation with the Hera team, and was based on a module developed by James Lochner. Irina Nelson, formerly of the Office of University Programs at GSFC, conceived the overall project. Support for this work was provided by the

  13. The Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array Dish. II. Characterization of Spectral Structure with Electromagnetic Simulations and Its Science Implications.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewall-Wice, Aaron; Bradley, Richard; Deboer, David; Hewitt, Jacqueline; Parsons, Aaron; Aguirre, James; Ali, Zaki S.; Bowman, Judd; Cheng, Carina; Neben, Abraham R.; Patra, Nipanjana; Thyagarajan, Nithyanandan; Venter, Mariet; de Lera Acedo, Eloy; Dillon, Joshua S.; Dickenson, Roger; Doolittle, Phillip; Egan, Dennis; Hedrick, Mike; Klima, Patricia; Kohn, Saul; Schaffner, Patrick; Shelton, John; Saliwanchik, Benjamin; Taylor, H. A.; Taylor, Rusty; Tegmark, Max; Wirt, Butch

    2016-11-01

    We use time-domain electromagnetic simulations to determine the spectral characteristics of the Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Arrays (HERA) antenna. These simulations are part of a multi-faceted campaign to determine the effectiveness of the dish’s design for obtaining a detection of redshifted 21 cm emission from the epoch of reionization. Our simulations show the existence of reflections between HERA’s suspended feed and its parabolic dish reflector that fall below -40 dB at 150 ns and, for reasonable impedance matches, have a negligible impact on HERA’s ability to constrain EoR parameters. It follows that despite the reflections they introduce, dishes are effective for increasing the sensitivity of EoR experiments at a relatively low cost. We find that electromagnetic resonances in the HERA feed’s cylindrical skirt, which is intended to reduce cross coupling and beam ellipticity, introduces significant power at large delays (-40 dB at 200 ns), which can lead to some loss of measurable Fourier modes and a modest reduction in sensitivity. Even in the presence of this structure, we find that the spectral response of the antenna is sufficiently smooth for delay filtering to contain foreground emission at line-of-sight wave numbers below k ∥ ≲ 0.2 h Mpc-1, in the region where the current PAPER experiment operates. Incorporating these results into a Fisher Matrix analysis, we find that the spectral structure observed in our simulations has only a small effect on the tight constraints HERA can achieve on parameters associated with the astrophysics of reionization.

  14. A vectorized heat transfer model for solid reactor cores

    SciTech Connect

    Rider, W.J.; Cappiello, M.W.; Liles, D.R.

    1990-01-01

    The new generation of nuclear reactors includes designs that are significantly different from light water reactors. Among these new reactor designs is the Modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR). In addition, nuclear thermal rockets share a number of similarities with terrestrial HTGRs and would be amenable to similar types of analyses. In these reactors, the heat transfer in the solid core mass is of primary interest in design and safety assessment. One significant safety feature of these reactors is the capability to withstand a loss of pressure and forced cooling in the primary system and still maintain peak fuel temperatures below the safe threshold for retaining the fission products. To accurately assess the performance of gas-cooled reactors during these types of transients, a Helium/Hydrogen Cooled Reactor Analysis (HERA) computer code has been developed. HERA has the ability to model arbitrary geometries in three dimensions, which allows the user to easily analyze reactor cores constructed of prismatic graphite elements. The code accounts for heat generation in the fuel, control rods and other structures; conduction and radiation across gaps; convection to the coolant; and a variety of boundary conditions. The numerical solution scheme has been optimized for vector computers, making long transient analyses economical. Time integration is either explicit or implicit, which allows the use of the model to accurately calculate both short- or long-term transients with an efficient use of computer time. Both the basic spatial and temporal integration schemes have been benchmarked against analytical solutions. Also, HERA has been used to analyze a depressurized loss of forced cooling transient in a HTGR with a very detailed three-dimensional input model. The results compare favorably with other means of analysis and provide further validation of the models and methods. 18 refs., 11 figs.

  15. Health and quality of life in patients with primary and secondary lymphedema of the lower extremity.

    PubMed

    Huggenberger, Kai; Wagner, Stephan; Lehmann, Susanne; Aeschlimann, André; Amann-Vesti, Beatrice; Angst, Felix

    2015-03-01

    Hintergrund: Es gibt wenig Daten über Gesundheit und Lebensqualität bei Patienten mit primärem oder sekundärem Lymphödem der unteren Extremitäten. Ziel dieser Studie war es, Gesundheit und Lebensqualität bei Patienten mit primärem und sekundärem Lymphödemen zu quantifizieren und mit Normdaten aus der Bevölkerung, stratifiziert nach Alter, Geschlecht und Vorhandensein von Komorbiditäten, zu vergleichen. Patienten und Methoden: Querschnittstudie mit konsekutiv zugewiesen Patienten an die angiolgische Abteilung einer schweizerischen Rehabilitationsklinik. Selbstbeurteilung mit dem Short Form 36 (SF-36) sowie zwei beschwerde-spezifischen Fragebogen. Ergebnisse: Patienten mit primärem Lymphödem der unteren Extremitäten (n = 52), 75 % weiblich, Durchschnittsalter 47.1 Jahre) gaben mit der Norm vergleichbare Werte an. Zum Beispiel SF-36 körperliche Funktion 80.4 (Mittelwert; Norm 84.1, p = 0.512) und SF-36 Vitalität 62.7 (Norm 59.7, p = 0.117) (100 = bester Wert). Patienten mit sekundärem Lymphödem (n = 60, 68 % weiblich, Durchschnittsalter 60.6 Jahre) erreichten in denselben Skalen 68.1 (73.9, p = 0.049) und 55.2 (56.2, p = 0.800) Punkte. Die mittleren Scores der Symptom- und Funktionsskalen der spezifischen Fragebogen erzielten Werte zwischen 70.0 und 83.1 bei den primären Lymphödemen (100 = bester Wert) und 63.3 bis 80.6 bei sekundären Lymphödemen. Die SF-36 Dimensionen Funktion und Vitalität waren höher bei Patienten mit primärem Lymphödem als bei sekundärem Lymphödem der unteren Extremitäten (Mittelwerte SF-36, Vitalität 62.7 versus 55.2, p = 0.035). Schlussfolgerungen: Bei Patienten mit primärem Lymphödem war die allgemeine Gesundheit und Lebensqualität hoch und mit der Normalbevölkerung vergleichbar. Dasselbe galt in den meisten psychosozialen Dimensionen auch für Patienten mit sekundärem Lymphödem. Diese gaben hingegen im funktionellen Bereich Defizite an. Eine Krebserkrankung, häufigste Ursache für ein sekundäres Lymph

  16. Determination of the Strange-Quark Density of the Proton from ATLAS Measurements of the W→ℓν and Z→ℓℓ Cross Sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Abdesselam, A.; Abdinov, O.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Acerbi, E.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Addy, T. N.; Adelman, J.; Aderholz, M.; Adomeit, S.; Adragna, P.; Adye, T.; Aefsky, S.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Aharrouche, M.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahles, F.; Ahmad, A.; Ahsan, M.; Aielli, G.; Akdogan, T.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Akiyama, A.; Alam, M. S.; Alam, M. A.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alessandria, F.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexandre, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Aliyev, M.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allport, P. P.; Allwood-Spiers, S. E.; Almond, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alon, R.; Alonso, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amako, K.; Amaral, P.; Amelung, C.; Ammosov, V. V.; Amorim, A.; Amorós, G.; Amram, N.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Andrieux, M.-L.; Anduaga, X. S.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonaki, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoun, S.; Aperio Bella, L.; Apolle, R.; Arabidze, G.; Aracena, I.; Arai, Y.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arfaoui, S.; Arguin, J.-F.; Arik, E.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnault, C.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Arutinov, D.; Asai, S.; Asfandiyarov, R.; Ask, S.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astbury, A.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Aubert, B.; Auge, E.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Avramidou, R.; Axen, D.; Ay, C.; Azuelos, G.; Azuma, Y.; Baak, M. A.; Baccaglioni, G.; Bacci, C.; Bach, A. M.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Badescu, E.; Bagnaia, P.; Bahinipati, S.; Bai, Y.; Bailey, D. C.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baker, M. D.; Baker, S.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, P.; Banerjee, Sw.; Banfi, D.; Bangert, A.; Bansal, V.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Baranov, S. P.; Barashkou, A.; Barbaro Galtieri, A.; Barber, T.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Bardin, D. Y.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Barrillon, P.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartsch, V.; Bates, R. L.; Batkova, L.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, A.; Battistin, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beale, S.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, S.; Beckingham, M.; Becks, K. H.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bedikian, S.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Begel, M.; Behar Harpaz, S.; Behera, P. K.; Beimforde, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, P. J.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellina, F.; Bellomo, M.; Belloni, A.; Beloborodova, O.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Ben Ami, S.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Benchouk, C.; Bendel, M.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Benoit, M.; Bensinger, J. R.; Benslama, K.; Bentvelsen, S.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Berglund, E.; Beringer, J.; Bernat, P.; Bernhard, R.; Bernius, C.; Berry, T.; Bertella, C.; Bertin, A.; Bertinelli, F.; Bertolucci, F.; Besana, M. I.; Besson, N.; Bethke, S.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Bieniek, S. P.; Bierwagen, K.; Biesiada, J.; Biglietti, M.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biscarat, C.; Bitenc, U.; Black, K. M.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blanchot, G.; Blazek, T.; Blocker, C.; Blocki, J.; Blondel, A.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. B.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Boddy, C. R.; Boehler, M.; Boek, J.; Boelaert, N.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogdanchikov, A.; Bogouch, A.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Bolnet, N. M.; Bona, M.; Bondarenko, V. G.; Bondioli, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Booth, C. N.; Bordoni, S.; Borer, C.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borjanovic, I.; Borri, M.; Borroni, S.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boterenbrood, H.; Botterill, D.; Bouchami, J.; Boudreau, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozhko, N. I.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Braem, A.; Branchini, P.; Brandenburg, G. W.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Brelier, B.; Bremer, J.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Britton, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Brodbeck, T. J.; Brodet, E.; Broggi, F.; Bromberg, C.; Bronner, J.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, W. K.; Brown, G.; Brown, H.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Brunet, S.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.

    2012-07-01

    A QCD analysis is reported of ATLAS data on inclusive W± and Z boson production in pp collisions at the LHC, jointly with ep deep-inelastic scattering data from HERA. The ATLAS data exhibit sensitivity to the light quark sea composition and magnitude at Bjorken x˜0.01. Specifically, the data support the hypothesis of a symmetric composition of the light quark sea at low x. The ratio of the strange-to-down sea quark distributions is determined to be 1.00-0.28+0.25 at absolute four-momentum transfer squared Q2=1.9GeV2 and x=0.023.

  17. Aging and rejuvenation of a TMAE + methane multiwire photon detector

    SciTech Connect

    Korpar, S. |; Krizan, P.; Stanovnik, A. |; Staric, M.; Skrk, D.

    1999-06-01

    A UV sensitive multiwire photon detector has been tested as a possible candidate for the HERA-B RICH detector. The main obstacle to using such a TMAE+Methane filled gas detector in a high rate experiment appears to be rapid aging in the form of prohibitive loss of chamber gas gain. A special circuit has been designed for heating the anode wires in-situ with elevated currents, thus evaporating the polymer deposits. Heating almost completely recovers the initial gain, but this rejuvenation is unfortunately of short duration. Nevertheless, the cells exposed to periodic heat treatments have an average gain considerably higher than the non-heated cells.

  18. Beam tests of a MWPC with CsI photocathode for Cherenkov Ring Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Krizan, P.; Staric, M.; Stanovnik, A.; Cindro, M.; Skrk, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Korpar, S.; Hamacher, T.; Michel, E.

    1995-08-01

    A 24 x 24 cm{sup 2} asymmetric multiwire proportional chamber, with 7.5 x 7.5 mm{sup 2} photosensitive CsI pads, has been tested with Cherenkov radiation of 3 GeV/c electrons in the T24 test beam at DESY. The performance of the chamber with specially designed low-noise, charge-sensitive preamplifiers is described. The parameters of the CsI-MWPC are compared to those of a TMAE photon detector in order to evaluate their potential as Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) counters for the HERA-B experiment at DESY.

  19. Training in test samples of superconducting cables for accelerator magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, A.K.; Garber, M.; Robins, K.E.; Sampson, W.B.

    1988-08-22

    In the critical current measurement of some high current NbTi cables, the samples have to be ''trained'' by repeated quenching in order to obtain a usable voltage-current curve for I/sub c/ determination. This training behavior is most pronounced when the applied field is perpendicular to the wide face of the conductor and is strongly dependent on the copper-to-superconductor ratio and the clamping pressure. Data are given for SSC prototype cables as well as for HERA production conductors. Although a quantitative understanding of the experimental data is still lacking, some speculations regarding stability are presented. 8 refs., 7 figs.

  20. Diffractive hadroproduction of W{sup {+-}} and Z{sup 0} bosons at high energies

    SciTech Connect

    Gay Ducati, M. B.; Machado, M. M.; Machado, M. V. T.

    2007-06-01

    Results from a phenomenological analysis of W and Z hard diffractive hadroproduction at high energies are reported. Using the Regge factorization approach, we consider the recent diffractive parton density functions extracted by the H1 Collaboration at DESY-HERA. In addition, we take into account multiple Pomeron exchange corrections considering a gap survival probability factor. It is found that the ratio of diffractive to nondiffractive boson production is in good agreement with the CDF and D0 data. We make predictions which could be compared to future measurements at the LHC.

  1. STUDY OF THE STABILITY OF PARTICLE MOTION IN STORAGE RINGS. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Jack J. Shi

    2012-09-07

    During this period, our research was concentrated on the study of beam-beam effects in large storage-ring colliders and coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) effect in light sources. Our group was involved in and made significant contribution to several international accelerator projects such as the US-LHC project for the design of the LHC interaction regions, the luminosity upgrade of Tevatron and HERA, the design of eRHIC, and the U.S. LHC Accelerator Research Program (LARP) for the future LHC luminosity upgrade.

  2. Physics at the Tevatron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Field, R.

    2008-10-01

    The theme of the XXXIV International Meeting on Fundamental Physics on April 27, 2006 was "From HERA and the TEVATRON to the LHC". At that meeting I presented four lectures on "Physics at the Tevatron". This is a summary of two lectures on "Physics at the Tevatron: IMFP06 IMFP08" presented at the XXXVI International Meeting on Fundamental Physics held in Baeza, Spain on February 4-8, 2008. These two lectures are an attempt to highlight what we have learned at the Tevatron since my lectures in 2006. I will also look back at the "old days" of Feynman-Field collider phenomenology.

  3. NLO QCD corrections to graviton induced deep inelastic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stirling, W. J.; Vryonidou, E.

    2011-06-01

    We consider Next-to-Leading-Order QCD corrections to ADD graviton exchange relevant for Deep Inelastic Scattering experiments. We calculate the relevant NLO structure functions by calculating the virtual and real corrections for a set of graviton interaction diagrams, demonstrating the expected cancellation of the UV and IR divergences. We compare the NLO and LO results at the centre-of-mass energy relevant to HERA experiments as well as for the proposed higher energy lepton-proton collider, LHeC, which has a higher fundamental scale reach.

  4. Inclusive photoproduction of bottom quarks for low and medium pT in the general-mass variable-flavour-number scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, G.; Spiesberger, H.

    2016-02-01

    We present predictions for b-quark production in photoproduction and compare with experimental data from HERA. Our theoretical predictions are obtained at next-to-leading-order in the general-mass variable-flavor-number scheme, an approach which takes into account the finite mass of the b quarks. We use realistic evolved nonperturbative fragmentation functions obtained from fits to e+e- data. We find in general good agreement of data with both the GM-VFNS and the FFNS calculations, while the more precise ZEUS data seem to prefer the GM-VFNS predictions.

  5. QCD analysis of $W$- and $Z$-boson production at Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Camarda, S.; Belov, P.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Diaconu, C.; Glazov, A.; Guffanti, A.; Jung, A.; Kolesnikov, V.; Lohwasser, K.; Myronenko, V.; Olness, F.; Pirumov, H.; Placakyte, R.; Radescu, V.; Sapronov, A.; Slominski, W.; Starovoitov, P.; Sutton, M.

    2015-09-28

    Recent measurements of the W-boson charge asymmetry and of the Z-boson production cross sections, performed at the Tevatron collider in Run II by the D0 and CDF collaborations, are studied using the HERAFitter framework to assess their impact on the proton parton distribution functions (PDFs). Thus, the Tevatron measurements, together with deep-inelastic scattering data from HERA, are included in a QCD analysis performed at next-to-leading order, and compared to the predictions obtained using other PDF sets from different groups. Good agreement between measurements and theoretical predictions is observed. The Tevatron data provide significant constraints on the d-valence quark distribution.

  6. Diffractive hadroproduction of W{sup {+-}} and Z{sup 0} bosons at high energies

    SciTech Connect

    Ducati, M. B. Gay; Machado, M. M.; Machado, M. V. T.

    2008-10-13

    An analysis of W{sup {+-}} and Z{sup 0} hard diffractive hadroproduction at high energies is presented obtained using the simple assumption of Regge factorization and considering the recent diffractive parton density functions extracted by the H1 Collaboration at DESY-HERA. The corresponding multiple Pomeron exchange corrections to the single Pomeron one is considered by taking into account by a gap survival probability factor. It is shown that the ratio of diffractive to nondiffractive boson production is in good agreement with the Tevatron data. Estimations which are relevant for the incoming measurements at the LHC are discussed.

  7. Hot waste-to-energy flue gas treatment using an integrated fluidised bed reactor.

    PubMed

    Bianchini, A; Pellegrini, M; Saccani, C

    2009-04-01

    This paper describes an innovative process to increase superheated steam temperatures in waste-to-energy (WTE) plants. This solution is mainly characterised by a fluidised bed reactor in which hot flue gas is treated both chemically and mechanically. This approach, together with gas recirculation, increases the energy conversion efficiency, and raises the superheated steam temperature without decreasing the useful life of the superheater. This paper presents new experimental data obtained from the test facility installed at the Hera S.p.A. WTE plant in Forlì, Italy; discusses changes that can be implemented to increase the duration of experimental testing; offers suggestions for the design of an industrial solution.

  8. Summary of the electron accelerators session

    SciTech Connect

    Prescott, C.Y. )

    1989-05-05

    Since the last High Energy Physics Symposium, there has been considerable progress in the field of polarized electron accelerators. Projects well into construction include the SLC, HERA, and LEP. The status of polarized beams for these projects is discussed in this session. Semiclassical and quantum mechanical calculations of polarizing and depolarizing effects are discussed, for both linear colliders and for storage rings. Substantial progress is continuing in the understanding of depolarizing mechanisms for circular machines. Modelling of these machines is underway. Activities with polarized electron beams at Novosibirsk are described.

  9. Summary of the electron accelerators session

    SciTech Connect

    Prescott, C.Y.

    1988-10-01

    Since the last High Energy Physics Symposium, there has been considerable progress in the field of polarized electron accelerators. Projects well into construction include the SLC, HERA, and LEP. The status of polarized beams for these projects is discussed in this session. Semiclassical and quantum mechanical calculations of polarizing and depolarizing effects are discussed, for both linear colliders and for storage rings. Substantial progress is continuing in the understanding of depolarizing mechanisms for circular machines. Modelling of these machines is underway. Activities with polarized electron beams at Novosibirsk are described. 8 refs.

  10. γZ corrections to forward-angle parity-violating ep scattering

    DOE PAGES

    Alex Sibirtsev; Blunden, Peter G.; Melnitchouk, Wally; ...

    2010-07-30

    We use dispersion relations to evaluate the γZ box contribution to parity-violating electron scattering in the forward limit, taking into account constraints from recent JLab data on electroproduction in the resonance region as well as high energy data from HERA. The correction to the asymmetry is found to be 1.2 +- 0.2% at the kinematics of the JLab Qweak experiment, which is well within the limits required to achieve a 4% measurement of the weak charge of the proton.

  11. Force/torque and tactile sensors for sensor-based manipulator control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanbrussel, H.; Belieen, H.; Bao, Chao-Ying

    1989-01-01

    The autonomy of manipulators, in space and in industrial environments, can be dramatically enhanced by the use of force/torque and tactile sensors. The development and future use of a six-component force/torque sensor for the Hermes Robot Arm (HERA) Basic End-Effector (BEE) is discussed. Then a multifunctional gripper system based on tactile sensors is described. The basic transducing element of the sensor is a sheet of pressure-sensitive polymer. Tactile image processing algorithms for slip detection, object position estimation, and object recognition are described.

  12. The ratio of the beauty structure functions Rb=FLb/F2b at low x

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boroun, G. R.

    2014-07-01

    We study the structure functions Fkb(x,Q2) (k=2,L) and the reduced cross section σrb(x,Q2) for small values of Bjorken's x variable with respect to the hard (Lipatov) pomeron for the gluon distribution and provide a compact formula for the ratio Rb that is useful to extract the beauty structure function from the beauty reduced cross section, in particular at DESY HERA. Also we show that the effects of the nonlinear corrections to the gluon distribution tame the behavior of the beauty structure function and the beauty reduced cross section at low x.

  13. Measurement of Charged and Neutral Current e-p Deep Inelastic Scattering Cross Sections at High Q2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derrick, M.; Krakauer, D.; Magill, S.; Mikunas, D.; Musgrave, B.; Repond, J.; Stanek, R.; Talaga, R. L.; Zhang, H.; Ayad, R.; Bari, G.; Basile, M.; Bellagamba, L.; Boscherini, D.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruni, P.; Cara Romeo, G.; Castellini, G.; Chiarini, M.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Contin, A.; Corradi, M.; Gialas, I.; Giusti, P.; Iacobucci, G.; Laurenti, G.; Levi, G.; Margotti, A.; Massam, T.; Nania, R.; Nemoz, C.; Palmonari, F.; Polini, A.; Sartorelli, G.; Timellini, R.; Zamora Garcia, Y.; Zichichi, A.; Bargende, A.; Crittenden, J.; Desch, K.; Diekmann, B.; Doeker, T.; Eckert, M.; Feld, L.; Frey, A.; Geerts, M.; Geitz, G.; Grothe, M.; Haas, T.; Hartmann, H.; Haun, D.; Heinloth, K.; Hilger, E.; Jakob, H.-P.; Katz, U. F.; Mari, S. M.; Mass, A.; Mengel, S.; Mollen, J.; Paul, E.; Rembser, Ch.; Schattevoy, R.; Schramm, D.; Stamm, J.; Wedemeyer, R.; Campbell-Robson, S.; Cassidy, A.; Dyce, N.; Foster, B.; George, S.; Gilmore, R.; Heath, G. P.; Heath, H. F.; Llewellyn, T. J.; Morgado, C. J.; Norman, D. J.; O'Mara, J. A.; Tapper, R. J.; Wilson, S. S.; Yoshida, R.; Rau, R. R.; Arneodo, M.; Iannotti, L.; Schioppa, M.; Susinno, G.; Bernstein, A.; Caldwell, A.; Cartiglia, N.; Parsons, J. A.; Ritz, S.; Sciulli, F.; Straub, P. B.; Wai, L.; Yang, S.; Zhu, Q.; Borzemski, P.; Chwastowski, J.; Eskreys, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Zachara, M.; Zawiejski, L.; Adamczyk, L.; Bednarek, B.; Jeleń, K.; Kisielewska, D.; Kowalski, T.; Rulikowska-Zarȩbska, E.; Suszycki, L.; ZajaÇ, J.; Kotański, A.; Przybycień, M.; Bauerdick, L. A.; Behrens, U.; Beier, H.; Bienlein, J. K.; Coldewey, C.; Deppe, O.; Desler, K.; Drews, G.; Flasiński, M.; Gilkinson, D. J.; Glasman, C.; Göttlicher, P.; Grosse-Knetter, J.; Gutjahr, B.; Hain, W.; Hasell, D.; Hessling, H.; Hultschig, H.; Iga, Y.; Joos, P.; Kasemann, M.; Klanner, R.; Koch, W.; Köpke, L.; Kötz, U.; Kowalski, H.; Labs, J.; Ladage, A.; Löhr, B.; Löwe, M.; Lüke, D.; Mańczak, O.; Ng, J. S.; Nickel, S.; Notz, D.; Ohrenberg, K.; Roco, M.; Rohde, M.; Roldán, J.; Schneekloth, U.; Schulz, W.; Selonke, F.; Stiliaris, E.; Surrow, B.; Voss, T.; Westphal, D.; Wolf, G.; Youngman, C.; Zhou, J. F.; Grabosch, H. J.; Kharchilava, A.; Leich, A.; Mattingly, M.; Meyer, A.; Schlenstedt, S.; Wulff, N.; Barbagli, G.; Pelfer, P.; Anzivino, G.; Maccarrone, G.; de Pasquale, S.; Votano, L.; Bamberger, A.; Eisenhardt, S.; Freidhof, A.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Schroeder, J.; Trefzger, T.; Brook, N. H.; Bussey, P. J.; Doyle, A. T.; Fleck, J. I.; Saxon, D. H.; Utley, M. L.; Wilson, A. S.; Dannemann, A.; Holm, U.; Horstmann, D.; Neumann, T.; Sinkus, R.; Wick, K.; Badura, E.; Burow, B. D.; Hagge, L.; Lohrmann, E.; Mainusch, J.; Milewski, J.; Nakahata, M.; Pavel, N.; Poelz, G.; Schott, W.; Zetsche, F.; Bacon, T. C.; Butterworth, I.; Gallo, E.; Harris, V. L.; Hung, B. Y.; Long, K. R.; Miller, D. B.; Morawitz, P. P.; Prinias, A.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Whitfield, A. F.; Mallik, U.; McCliment, E.; Wang, M. Z.; Wang, S. M.; Wu, J. T.; Zhang, Y.; Cloth, P.; Filges, D.; An, S. H.; Hong, S. M.; Nam, S. W.; Park, S. K.; Suh, M. H.; Yon, S. H.; Imlay, R.; Kartik, S.; Kim, H.-J.; McNeil, R. R.; Metcalf, W.; Nadendla, V. K.; Barreiro, F.; Cases, G.; Graciani, R.; Hernández, J. M.; Hervás, L.; Labarga, L.; del Peso, J.; Puga, J.; Terron, J.; de Trocóniz, J. F.; Smith, G. R.; Corriveau, F.; Hanna, D. S.; Hartmann, J.; Hung, L. W.; Lim, J. N.; Matthews, C. G.; Patel, P. M.; Sinclair, L. E.; Stairs, D. G.; St. Laurent, M.; Ullmann, R.; Zacek, G.; Bashkirov, V.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Stifutkin, A.; Bashindzhagyan, G. L.; Ermolov, P. F.; Gladilin, L. K.; Golubkov, Y. A.; Kobrin, V. D.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Savin, A. A.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Solomin, A. N.; Zotov, N. P.; Botje, M.; Chlebana, F.; Dake, A.; Engelen, J.; de Kamps, M.; Kooijman, P.; Kruse, A.; Tiecke, H.; Verkerke, W.; Vreeswijk, M.; Wiggers, L.; de Wolf, E.; van Woudenberg, R.; Acosta, D.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Honscheid, K.; Li, C.; Ling, T. Y.; McLean, K. W.; Murray, W. N.; Park, I. H.; Romanowski, T. A.; Seidlein, R.; Bailey, D. S.; Blair, G. A.; Byrne, A.; Cashmore, R. J.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Daniels, D.; Devenish, R. C.; Harnew, N.; Lancaster, M.; Luffman, P. E.; Lindemann, L.; McFall, J. D.; Nath, C.; Noyes, V. A.; Quadt, A.; Uijterwaal, H.; Walczak, R.; Wilson, F. F.; Yip, T.; Abbiendi, G.; Bertolin, A.; Brugnera, R.; Carlin, R.; dal Corso, F.; de Giorgi, M.; Dosselli, U.; Limentani, S.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Stanco, L.; Stroili, R.; Voci, C.; Bulmahn, J.; Butterworth, J. M.; Feild, R. G.; Oh, B. Y.; Whitmore, J. J.; D'Agostini, G.; Marini, G.; Nigro, A.; Tassi, E.; Hart, J. C.; McCubbin, N. A.; Prytz, K.; Shah, T. P.; Short, T. L.; Barberis, E.; Dubbs, T.; Heusch, C.; van Hook, M.; Hubbard, B.; Lockman, W.; Rahn, J. T.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Seiden, A.; Biltzinger, J.; Schwarzer, O.; Seifert, R. J.; Walenta, A. H.; Zech, G.; Abramowicz, H.; Briskin, G.; Dagan, S.; Levy, A.; Hasegawa, T.; Hazumi, M.; Ishii, T.; Kuze, M.; Mine, S.; Nagasawa, Y.; Nakao, M.; Suzuki, I.; Tokushuku, K.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Chiba, M.; Hamatsu, R.; Hirose, T.; Homma, K.; Kitamura, S.; Nakamitsu, Y.; Yamauchi, K.; Cirio, R.; Costa, M.; Ferrero, M. I.; Lamberti, L.; Maselli, S.; Peroni, C.; Sacchi, R.; Solano, A.; Staiano, A.; Dardo, M.; Bailey, D. C.; Bandyopadhyay, D.; Benard, F.; Brkic, M.; Crombie, M. B.; Gingrich, D. M.; Hartner, G. F.; Joo, K. K.; Levman, G. M.; Martin, J. F.; Orr, R. S.; Sampson, C. R.; Teuscher, R. J.; Catterall, C. D.; Jones, T. W.; Kaziewicz, P. B.; Lane, J. B.; Saunders, R. L.; Shulman, J.; Blankenship, K.; Kochocki, J.; Lu, B.; Mo, L. W.; Bogusz, W.; Charchuła, K.; Ciborowski, J.; Gajewski, J.; Grzelak, G.; Kasprzak, M.; Krzyżanowski, M.; Muchorowski, K.; Nowak, R. J.; Pawlak, J. M.; Tymieniecka, T.; Wróblewski, A. K.; Zakrzewski, J. A.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Adamus, M.; Eisenberg, Y.; Karshon, U.; Revel, D.; Zer-Zion, D.; Ali, I.; Badgett, W. F.; Behrens, B.; Dasu, S.; Fordham, C.; Foudas, C.; Goussiou, A.; Loveless, R. J.; Reeder, D. D.; Silverstein, S.; Smith, W. H.; Vaiciulis, A.; Wodarczyk, M.; Tsurugai, T.; Bhadra, S.; Cardy, M. L.; Fagerstroem, C.-P.; Frisken, W. R.; Furutani, K. M.; Khakzad, M.; Schmidke, W. B.

    1995-08-01

    Deep inelastic e-p scattering has been studied in both the charged current (CC) and neutral current (NC) reactions at momentum transfers squared Q2 above 400 GeV2 using the ZEUS detector at the HERA ep collider. The CC and NC total cross sections, the NC to CC cross section ratio, and the differential cross sections dσ/dQ2 are presented. From the Q2 dependence of the CC cross section, the mass term in the CC propagator is determined to be MW = 76+/-16+/-13 GeV.

  14. Heavy quark photoproduction in coherent interactions at high energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonçalves, V. P.; Machado, M. V. T.; Meneses, A. R.

    2009-08-01

    We calculate the inclusive and diffractive photoproduction of heavy quarks in proton-proton collisions at Tevatron and CERN LHC energies, where the photon reaches energies larger than those ones accessible at DESY-HERA. The integrated cross section and the rapidity distributions for charm and bottom production are computed within the color dipole picture employing three phenomenological saturation models based on the color glass condensate formalism. Our results demonstrate that the experimental analyses of these reactions are feasible and that the cross sections are sensitive to the underlying parton dynamics.

  15. /J/ψ production via χc decays in 920 GeV /pA interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hera-B Collaboration; Abt, I.; Abyzov, A.; Adams, M.; Albrecht, H.; Amaral, V.; Amorim, A.; Aplin, S. J.; Arefiev, A.; Arin~O, I.; Atiya, M.; Aushev, V.; Bagaturia, Y.; Baghshetsyan, R.; Balagura, V.; Bargiotti, M.; Barsuk, S.; Barsukova, O.; Bassetti, V.; Bastos, J.; Bauer, C.; Bauer, Th. S.; Beck, M.; Belkov, A.; Belkov, Ar.; Belotelov, I.; Belyaev, I.; Berkhan, K.; Bertin, A.; Bobchenko, B.; Böcker, M.; Bogatyrev, A.; Bohm, G.; Borgmeier, C.; Bräuer, M.; Broemmelsiek, D.; Bruinsma, M.; Bruschi, M.; Buchholz, P.; Buchler, M.; Buran, T.; Capeáns, M.; Capponi, M.; Carvalho, J.; Chamanina, J.; Chen, B. X.; Chistov, R.; Chmeissani, M.; Christensen, A.; Conde, P.; Cruse, C.; Dam, M.; Danielsen, K. M.; Danilov, M.; de Castro, S.; Deckers, H.; Dehmelt, K.; Deppe, H.; Dolgoshein, B.; Dong, X.; Dreis, H. B.; Dressel, M.; Dujmic, D.; Eckmann, R.; Egorytchev, V.; Ehret, K.; Eiges, V.; Eisele, F.; Emeliyanov, D.; Erhan, S.; Essenov, S.; Fabbri, L.; Faccioli, P.; Fallot-Burghardt, W.; Feuerstack-Raible, M.; Flammer, J.; Fleckenstein, H.; Fominykh, B.; Fourletov, S.; Fuljahn, T.; Funcke, M.; Galli, D.; Garcia, A.; Garrido, Ll.; Gascon, D.; Gellrich, A.; Gerndt, K. E. K.; Giacobbe, B.; Gläß, J.; Glebe, T.; Goloubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Golutvin, I.; Gorbounov, I.; Gorišek, A.; Gouchtchine, O.; Goulart, D. C.; Gradl, S.; Gradl, W.; Guilitsky, Yu.; Hamacher, T.; Hansen, J. D.; Harr, R.; Hast, C.; Hausmann, S.; Hernández, J. M.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hölscher, A.; Höpfner, K.; Hofmann, W.; Hohlmann, M.; Hott, T.; Hulsbergen, W.; Husemann, U.; Igonkina, O.; Ispiryan, M.; Işsever, S.; Itterbeck, H.; Ivarsson, J.; Jagla, T.; Jia, Y.; Jiang, C.; Kaoukher, A.; Kapitza, H.; Karabekyan, S.; Karchin, P.; Karpenko, N.; Ke, Z.; Keller, S.; Khasanov, F.; Kim, H.; Kiryushin, Yu.; Kisel, I.; Klefenz, F.; Knöpfle, K. T.; Kochetkov, V.; Kolanoski, H.; Korpar, S.; Krauss, C.; Kreuzer, P.; Križan, P.; Krücker, D.; Kvaratskheliia, T.; Lange, A.; Lanyov, A.; Lau, K.; Leffers, G.; Legrand, I.; Lewendel, B.; Liu, Y. Q.; Lohse, T.; Loke, R.; Lomonosov, B.; Lüdemann, J.; Männer, R.; Mankel, R.; Marconi, U.; Masciocchi, S.; Massa, I.; Matchikhilian, I.; Medin, G.; Medinnis, M.; Mevius, M.; Michetti, A.; Mikhailov, Yu.; Miquel, R.; Mizuk, R.; Mohapatra, A.; Moshkin, A.; Moshous, B.; Muresan, R.; Nam, S.; Negodaev, M.; Négri, I.; Nörenberg, M.; Nowak, S.; Nún~Ez Pardo de Vera, M. T.; Oest, T.; Oliveira, A.; Ouchrif, M.; Ould-Saada, F.; Padilla, C.; Pakhlov, P.; Pavlenko, Yu.; Peralta, D.; Pernack, R.; Perschke, T.; Pestotnik, R.; Petersen, B. A.; Piccinini, M.; Pleier, M. A.; Poli, M.; Popov, V.; Pose, A.; Pose, D.; Pugatch, V.; Pylypchenko, Y.; Pyrlik, J.; Ramachandran, S.; Ratnikov, F.; Reeves, K.; Reßing, D.; Riechmann, K.; Rieling, J.; Rietz, M.; Riu, I.; Robmann, P.; Rosen, J.; Rothe, Ch.; Ruckstuhl, W.; Rusinov, V.; Rybnikov, V.; Ryzhikov, D.; Saadi-Lüdemann, F.; Samtleben, D.; Sánchez, F.; Sang, M.; Saveliev, V.; Sbrizzi, A.; Schaller, S.; Schlein, P.; Schmelling, M.; Schmidt, B.; Schmidt, S.; Schmidt-Parzefall, W.; Schreiner, A.; Schröder, H.; Schultz, H. D.; Schwanke, U.; Schwartz, A. J.; Schwarz, A. S.; Schwenninger, B.; Schwingenheuer, B.; Schwitters, R.; Sciacca, F.; Semenov, S.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Sexauer, E.; Seybold, L.; Shiu, J.; Shuvalov, S.; Siccama, I.; Škrk, D.; Sözüer, L.; Soldatov, A.; Solunin, S.; Somov, A.; Somov, S.; Souvorov, V.; Spahn, M.; Spengler, J.; Spighi, R.; Spiridonov, A.; Spratte, S.; Stanovnik, A.; Starič, M.; Stdenis, R.; Stegmann, C.; Steinbeck, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stieler, D.; Straumann, U.; Sun, F.; Sun, H.; Symalla, M.; Takach, S.; Tesch, N.; Thurn, H.; Tikhomirov, I.; Titov, M.; Trunk, U.; Truöl, P.; Tsakov, I.; Uwer, U.; Vagnoni, V.; van Eldik, C.; van Staa, R.; Vassiliev, Yu.; Villa, M.; Vitale, A.; Vukotic, I.; Wagner, G.; Wagner, W.; Wahlberg, H.; Walenta, A. H.; Walter, M.; Walter, T.; Wang, J. J.; Wang, Y. M.; Wanke, R.; Wegener, D.; Werthenbach, U.; Weyers, P. J.; Wolters, H.; Wurth, R.; Wurz, A.; Xella-Hansen, S.; Yang, J.; Zaitsev, Yu.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zech, G.; Zeuner, T.; Zhelezov, A.; Zheng, Z.; Zhu, Z.; Zimmermann, R.; Živko, T.; Zoccoli, A.; Zweizig, J.

    2003-05-01

    Using data collected by the HERA-/B experiment, we have measured the fraction of /J/ψ's produced via radiative χc decays in interactions of /920 GeV protons with carbon and titanium targets. We obtained Rχc=0.32+/-0.06stat+/-0.04sys for the fraction of /J/ψ from χc decays averaged over proton-carbon and proton-titanium collisions. This result is in agreement with previous measurements and is compared with theoretical predictions.

  16. APOLLON at DESY: Spin-dependent photoproduction of charm

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, C. A.

    1998-01-20

    APOLLON is a proposal to measure the polarization asymmetry of J/{psi} photoproduction in a fixed target experiment at HERA in an effort to provide information on the gluon spin distribution in the nucleon. Inelastic production will be identified via the {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} decay channel, resulting in a statistical precision of {delta}A=0.05 in a 12 month run. In the LO CSM, the corresponding precision in {delta}G(x)/G(x) is 0.15 at x{approx}0.4.

  17. Higgs boson photoproduction at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Ducati, M. B. Gay; Silveira, G. G.

    2011-07-15

    We present the current development of the photoproduction approach for the Higgs boson with its application to pp and pA collisions at the LHC. We perform a different analysis for the Gap Survival Probability, where we consider a probability of 3% and also a more optimistic value of 10% based on the HERA data for dijet production. As a result, the cross section for the exclusive Higgs boson production is about 2 fb and 6 fb in pp collisions and 617 and 2056 fb for pPb collisions, considering the gap survival factor of 3% and 10%, respectively.

  18. Hard Exclusive Vector Meson Leptoproduction At HERMES

    SciTech Connect

    Golembiovskaya, M.

    2011-07-15

    The HERMES experiment at DESY, Hamburg collected a set of data on hard exclusive vector meson ({rho}{sup 0}{phi},{omega}) leptoproduction using the 27.6 GeV longitudinally polarized lepton beam of HERA accelerator and longitudinally or transversely polarized or unpolarized gas targets. Measurements of exclusive vector meson production provide access to the structure of the nucleon since the process can be described in terms of Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs). An overview of the HERMES results on exclusive vector mesons production is presented.

  19. Comparison of calculated with measured dynamic aperture

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmermann, F.

    1994-06-01

    The measured dynamic aperture of the HERA proton ring and the value expected from simulation studies agree within a factor of 2. A better agreement is achieved if a realistic tune modulation is included in the simulation. The approximate threshold of tune-modulation induced diffusion can be calculated analytically. Its value is in remarkable agreement with the dynamic aperture measured. The calculation is based on parameters of resonances through order 11 which are computed using differential-algebra methods and normal-form algorithms. Modulational diffusion in conjunction with drifting machine parameters appears to be the most important transverse diffusion process.

  20. Tissue plasminogen activator as a novel diagnostic aid in acute pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Flores, Julio; García-Avello, Angel; Alonso, Esther; Ruíz, Antonio; Navarrete, Olga; Alvarez, Concepción; Lozano, Cristina; Arribas, Ignacio

    2014-11-01

    Hintergrund: Wir haben die diagnostische Wertigkeit des Gewebeplasminogen Aktivators (tPA) bei akuter Lungenembolie (PE) mit einer ELISA Methode untersucht und sie mit einem ELISA D-dimer (VIDAS D-dimer) verglichen. Patienten und Methoden: 127 aufeinander folgende ambulante Patienten mit klinischem Verdacht auf PE wurden getestet. Die Diagnose einer PE basierte auf dem klinischen Wahrscheinlichkeitsvortest und einem strengen Bildgebungsprotokoll. Plasmaproben wurden bei der Registrierung entnommen. Die diagnostische Genauigkeit für tPA und D-dimer wurde durch die Fläche unter der Kurve (ROC) bestimmt. Die Empfindlichkeit, Genauigkeit und Voraussagewahrscheinlichkeit wurden berechnet. Ergebnisse: PE wurde bei 41 Patienten (32 %) bestätigt. Die Flächen unter den ROC-Kurven waren 0.86 für D-dimer und 0.71 für tPA. Positive und negative prädiktive Werte für D-dimer bei einem Cut off Wert von 500 ng/mL und tPA bei einem Cut off Wert von 8.5 ng/mL waren 95 % (95 % CI, 88–100 %)/95 und 95 % (95 % CI, 88–100 %)/94 % (95 % CI, 86–100 %). Die diagnostische Brauchbarkeit, um eine PE auszuschließen, war 28.3 % (95 % CI, 21–37 %) für D-dimer und 24.4 % (95 % CI, 17–33 %) für tPA. Schlussfolgerungen: Der tPA mit einem Cut off Wert von 8.5 ng/mL hat eine hohe Empfindlichkeit und einen negativen Vorhersagewert für den Ausschluss einer PE, der einem VIDAS D-dimer mit einem Cut off Wert von 500 ng/mL ähnlich ist, obwohl der diagnostische Nutzen für den D-dimer etwas höher war.

  1. Onychomycosis is associated with subclinical atherosclerosis in patients with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Onalan, Orhan; Adar, Adem; Keles, Hakan; Ertugrul, Goksen; Ozkan, Nurhayat; Aktas, Habibullah; Karakaya, Ekrem

    2015-01-01

    Hintergrund: Wir haben die Beziehung der Onychomykose an den Fuβnägeln mit der subklinischen Arteriosklerose bei Patienten mit Diabetes untersucht. Patienten und Methoden: Aufeinanderfolgende Diabetiker, die wir ambulant gesehen haben, wurden registriert. Die Intima-Media Dicke der Arteria carotis (CIMT) wurde bewertet. Die Fuβnagelonychomykose wurde mikroskopisch diagnostiziert. Ergebnisse: Wir haben 127 Patienten untersucht. Bei 48 (37,8 %) fanden wir eine Fuβnagelonychomykose. Von den 127 Patienten hatten 60 (47,2 %) eine subklinische Arteriosklerose (CIMT > 1 mm). Das männliche Geschlecht (43,3 % vs. 22,4 %, p = 0,012) und die Onychomykose (53,3 % vs. 23,9 %, p = 0,001) waren bei Paitenten mit subklinischer Arteriosklerose signifikant häufiger. Unter den biochemischen Parametern war das LDL Cholesterin (122+38 mg/dl vs. 108+36 mg/dl, p = 0,039) und das glykolisierte Hämoglobin (median 8.4 %, IQR: 2.1 % vs. median 7.5 %, IQR: 1.6 %, p = 0,002) bei Patienten mit subklinischer Arteriosklerose signifikant höher. Die Gruppen waren im Hinblick auf alle anderen demografischen, klinischen, und laborchemischen Parametern ähnlich. Nach Adjustierung für alle potentiellen Einflussgrössen war die Existenz der Onychomykose in der multivariaten Regressionsanalyse eigenständig mit der subklinischen Arteriosklerose (OR 2.77, 95 % CI 1.16 bis 6.30) vergesellschaftet. Schlussfolgerungen: Onychomychose kann ein Marker der Arteriosklerose bei Diabetikern sein.

  2. The reliability of the pass/fail decision for assessments comprised of multiple components.

    PubMed

    Möltner, Andreas; Tımbıl, Sevgi; Jünger, Jana

    2015-01-01

    Zielsetzung: Die gravierendsten Konsequenzen für einen Studierenden bei einer Prüfung besitzt die Entscheidung über „bestanden“ oder „durchgefallen“. Wie die Messzuverlässigkeit der Punktwerte muss bei qualitativ hochwertigen Prüfungen deshalb auch die Zuverlässigkeit der Entscheidung „bestanden“ oder „durchgefallen“ bestimmt werden.Oft setzen sich Prüfungen eines Fachs (Leistungsnachweise) aus mehreren Teilprüfungen zusammen, die z. B. unabhängig voneinander bestanden werden müssen. In diesem Fall einer „konjunktiven“ Verknüpfung der Einzelentscheidungen „bestanden/durchgefallen“ wie auch bei anderen komplexen Bestehensregelungen sind zur Abschätzung der Genauigkeit und Konsistenz der Entscheidung „bestanden/durchgefallen“ adäquate Auswertungsverfahren erforderlich. Bislang liegen zu dieser Problemstellung nur wenige Arbeiten vor, ein allgemein verwendbares Verfahren wurde 2010 von Douglas und Mislevy publiziert.In der Studie soll am exemplarischen Beispiel einer zusammengesetzten Prüfung, bei der mehrere Teilprüfungen unabhängig voneinander bestanden werden müssen, eine Analyse der Zuverlässigkeit der Entscheidung „bestanden/durchgefallen“ durchgeführt und Konsequenzen für eine verbesserte Methodik zur Identifikation von Studierenden, die die gestellten Mindestanforderungen nicht erfüllen, diskutiert werden.Methodik: Untersucht wird die Entscheidungsgenauigkeit und -konsistenz von „bestanden/durchgefallen“ des Leistungsnachweises Innere Medizin/Allgemeinmedizin/Klinische Chemie der medizinischen Fakultät Heidelberg. Für diesen müssen drei Teilprüfungen (zwei Klausuren und ein OSCE) unabhängig voneinander bestanden werden, wobei jede Teilprüfung für sich zweimal wiederholt werden kann. Die Analyse erfolgt mit dem Verfahren von Douglas und Mislevy.Ergebnisse: Auch bei hohen Reliabilitäten von Teilprüfungen lässt sich bei komplexen logischen Verknüpfungen der Einzelentscheidungen

  3. Momentum space dipole amplitude for DIS and inclusive hadron production

    SciTech Connect

    Basso, E. A.; Gay Ducati, M. B.; De Oliveira, E. G.

    2013-03-25

    We show how the AGBS model, originally developed for deep inelastic scattering applied to HERA data on the proton structure function, can also describe the RHIC data on single inclusive hadron yield for d+Au and p+p collisions through a new simultaneous fit. The single inclusive hadron production is modeled through the color glass condensate, which uses the quark(and gluon) condensate amplitudes in momentum space. The AGBS model is also a momentum space model based on the asymptotic solutions of the BK equation, although a different definition of the Fourier transform is used. This description entirely in transverse momentum of both processes arises for the first time. The small difference between the simultaneous fit and the one for HERA data alone suggests that the AGBS model describes very well both kind of processes and thus emerges as a good tool to investigate the inclusive hadron production data. We use this model for predictions at LHC energies, which agree quite well with available experimental data.

  4. a Measurement of the Total Photon-Proton Cross Section in the Center of Mass Energy Range 167 TO 194 GEV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burow, Burkhard Dietrich

    The thesis is a complete presentation of a total photon-proton (gamma p) cross section measurement using the ZEUS detector at the recently commissioned HERA electron-proton (ep) collider. A measurement of gamma p interactions using the exchanged virtual photon of ep collisions is shown to be justified and the correct flux of photons is determined. HERA and ZEUS are introduced, with an emphasis on the components used in the measurement. The data was collected during the fall of 1992 for which the experimental conditions are described, including the determination of the 13 nb ^{-1} of integrated ep luminosity which provided the event sample. The treatment of background events is described, as are event losses due to inefficiencies in their identification by the trigger and in their subsequent analysis. The observed number of events is corrected for the acceptance of the experiment using Monte Carlo simulations of gamma p interactions tuned to match characteristics of the observed events. Radiative corrections to the measurement are shown to be small and the calculation is corroborated by a measurement of the number of radiative events. In the gamma p center of mass energy range 167 < W < 194 GeV, the total gamma p cross section is sigma _sp{rm tot}{gamma p} = 143 +/- 3 (stat.) +/- 18 (syst.) mub.

  5. Voyager 1 View of Callisto

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Voyager 1 took this picture of Callisto during Voyager's approach to Jupiter's outer large satellite in 1979. Both Galileo and Marius discovered Callisto in 1610. In Greek mythology, Callisto was a nymph loved by Zeus and thus hated by Hera. Hera turned her into a bear, which Zeus placed in the heavens as the constellation Ursa Major. Voyager was 350,000 kilometers from Callisto and took this picture that shows features about seven kilometers wide across the surface. Callisto is a little smaller than Ganymede (Callisto is about the size of Mercury) and it seems that it is composed of a mixture of ice and rock (about 40 percent ice and 60 percent rock and iron). The darker color of Callisto (about half as reflective as Ganymede but still twice as bright as the Moon) implies that the upper surface is 'dirty ice' or water- rich rock frozen on Callisto's cold surface (approximately -243 Fahrenheit degrees at the equator). Callisto's atmosphere is mostly carbon dioxide. Far more craters appear on the surface of Callisto than on the surface of Ganymede, leading scientists to believe that Callisto is the oldest of the Galilean satellites. Callisto could date back as far as four billion years ago and has remained relatively unchanged in the history of space.

  6. Spin structure in high energy processes: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    DePorcel, L.; Dunwoodie, C.

    1994-12-01

    This report contains papers as the following topics: Spin, Mass, and Symmetry; physics with polarized Z{sup 0}s; spin and precision electroweak physics; polarized electron sources; polarization phenomena in quantum chromodynamics; polarized lepton-nucleon scattering; polarized targets in high energy physics; spin dynamics in storage rings and linear accelerators; spin formalism and applications to new physics searches; precision electroweak physics at LEP; recent results on heavy flavor physics from LEP experiments using 1990--1992 data; precise measurement of the left-right cross section asymmetry in Z boson production by electron-positron collisions; preliminary results on heavy flavor physics at SLD; QCD tests with SLD and polarized beams; recent results from TRISTAN at KEK; recent B physics results from CLEO; searching for the H dibaryon at Brookhaven; recent results from the compton observatory; the spin structure of the deuteron; spin structure of the neutron ({sup 3}HE) and the Bjoerken sum rule; a consumer`s guide to lattice QCD results; top ten models constrained by b {yields} sy; a review of the Fermilab fixed target program; results from the D0 experiment; results from CDF at FNAL; quantum-mechanical suppression of bremsstrahlung; report from the ZEUS collaboration at HERA; physics from the first year of H1 at HERA, and hard diffraction. These papers have been cataloged separately elsewhere.

  7. Overview of recent DVCS results from HERMES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaschenko, Sergey; Hermes Collaboration

    2012-09-01

    Hard exclusive leptoproduction of real photons on nucleons and nuclei, Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS), is one of the theoretically cleanest ways to access Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs). The theoretical framework of GPDs includes parton distribution functions and form factors as limiting cases and as moments of GPDs, respectively, and can provide a multidimensional representation of the structure of hadrons at the partonic level. The HERMES experiment at DESY, Hamburg, collected a wealth of data on DVCS utilizing the HERA polarized electron or positron beams with an energy of 27.6 GeV and longitudinally and transversely polarized or unpolarized gas targets (H, D or heavier nuclei). The azimuthal asymmetries measured in the DVCS process allow access to the imaginary and/or real part of certain combinations of GPDs. For the last two years of HERA running, the HERMES collaboration installed a recoil detector to improve the selection of DVCS events by direct measurement of the recoil protons. An overview of recent HERMES results on DVCS including first results obtained with the recoil detector is presented.

  8. Assessment of hormone-like activities in Ginkgo biloba, Elettaria cardamomum and Plantago ovata extracts using in vitro receptor-specific bioassays.

    PubMed

    Real, Macarena; Molina-Molina, José-Manuel; Jimenez, Jesús; Diéguez, Horacio R; Fernández, Mariana F; Olea, Nicolás

    2015-01-01

    Medicinal plants are widely used for the treatment of diseases and for the development of new drugs. This study was designed to determine the presence of hormone-like activities dependent on the activation of human estrogen receptor alpha (hERa) and/or androgen receptor (hAR) in methanol extracts prepared from three medicinal plants historically and currently used for therapeutic purposes: Ginkgo biloba leaves (GBL), Elettaria cardamomum seeds (ECS) and Plantago ovata seeds (POS). After a solid-liquid extraction (SLE) step, their effects on hERa function were assessed in MCF-7 breast cancer cells using the E-Screen bioassay, and their ability to induce hAR-mediated reporter gene expression was evaluated using the androgen-sensitive stable prostatic PALM cell line. Unlike POS extracts, GBL and ECS extracts showed estrogenic (0.07 and 0.20 nM E2Eq mg(-1), respectively) and anti-estrogenic (0.01 and 0.02 μM ICI182780Eq mg(-1), respectively) activities. ECS extracts evidenced androgenic activity (0.30 nM R1881Eq mg(-1)) and POS extracts anti-androgenic activity (22.30 μM ProcEq mg(-1)). According to these findings, these plant extracts may interfere with the endocrine system via one or more hormonal receptors, and further investigation is warranted into their role as endocrine disrupters in humans.

  9. Diffractive deep inelastic scattering in an AdS/CFT inspired model: A phenomenological study

    SciTech Connect

    Betemps, M. A.; Goncalves, V. P.; Santana Amaral, J. T. de

    2010-05-01

    The analytical treatment of the nonperturbative QCD dynamics is one of the main open questions of the strong interactions. Currently, it is only possible to get some qualitative information about this regime considering other QCD-like theories, as, for example, the N=4 super Yang-Mills theory, where one can perform calculations in the nonperturbative limit of large 't Hooft coupling using the anti-de Sitter space/conformal field theory (AdS/CFT). Recently, the high energy scattering amplitude was calculated in the AdS/CFT approach, applied to deep-inelastic scattering and confronted with the F{sub 2} HERA data. In this work we extend the nonperturbative AdS/CFT inspired model for diffractive processes and compare its predictions with a perturbative approach based on the Balitsky-Kovchegov equation. We demonstrate that the AdS/CFT inspired model is not able to describe the current F{sub 2}{sup D(3)} HERA data and predicts a similar behavior to that from the Balitsky-Kovchegov equation in the range 10{sup -7} < or approx. x{sub P} < or approx. 10{sup -4}. At smaller values of x{sub P} the diffractive structure function is predicted to be energy independent.

  10. Development of a knowledge management system for complex domains.

    PubMed

    Perott, André; Schader, Nils; Bruder, Ralph; Leonhardt, Jörg

    2012-01-01

    Deutsche Flugsicherung GmbH, the German Air Navigation Service Provider, follows a systematic approach, called HERA, for investigating incidents. The HERA analysis shows a distinctive occurrence of incidents in German air traffic control in which the visual perception of information plays a key role. The reasons can be partially traced back to workstation design, where basic ergonomic rules and principles are not sufficiently followed by the designers in some cases. In cooperation with the Institute of Ergonomics in Darmstadt the DFS investigated possible approaches that may support designers to implement ergonomic systems. None of the currently available tools were found to be able to meet the identified user requirements holistically. Therefore it was suggested to develop an enhanced software tool called Design Process Guide. The name Design Process Guide indicates that this tool exceeds the classic functions of currently available Knowledge Management Systems. It offers "design element" based access, shows processual and content related topics, and shows the implications of certain design decisions. Furthermore, it serves as documentation, detailing why a designer made to a decision under a particular set of conditions.

  11. Eliminating Polarized Leakage as a Systematic for 21 cm Epoch of Reionization Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguirre, James E.; HERA Collaboration, PAPER Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Because of the extreme brightness of foreground emission relative to the desired signal, experiments seeking the 21 cm HI signal from the epoch of reionization must employ foreground removal or avoidance strategies with high dynamic range. Almost all of these techniques rely on the spectral smoothness of the foreground emission, which is dominated by synchrotron emission. The polarized component of such emission can suffer Faraday rotation through the interstellar medium of the Milky Way, thereby inducing frequency structure which can be mistaken for real reionization signal. Therefore, it is of great importance for such experiments to eliminate leakage of Faraday-rotated, polarized emission into the unpolarized (Stokes I) component where the reionization signal lives. We discuss a number of approaches under investigation for mitigating this leakage in the PAPER and HERA experiments, including calibration and careful instrument design. Importantly, however, we show that the ionosphere may provide a very strong suppression of the polarized signal, when averaged over the integration times required for EoR experiments, by scrambling the phase of polarized sources. Moreover, this attenuation comes with very little suppression of the desired unpolarized signal. We consider the implications of this strategy for PAPER and HERA.

  12. Constraining high-redshift X-ray sources with next generation 21-cm power spectrum measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewall-Wice, Aaron; Hewitt, Jacqueline; Mesinger, Andrei; Dillon, Joshua S.; Liu, Adrian; Pober, Jonathan

    2016-05-01

    We use the Fisher matrix formalism and seminumerical simulations to derive quantitative predictions of the constraints that power spectrum measurements on next-generation interferometers, such as the Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array (HERA) and the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), will place on the characteristics of the X-ray sources that heated the high-redshift intergalactic medium. Incorporating observations between z = 5 and 25, we find that the proposed 331 element HERA and SKA phase 1 will be capable of placing ≲ 10 per cent constraints on the spectral properties of these first X-ray sources, even if one is unable to perform measurements within the foreground contaminated `wedge' or the FM band. When accounting for the enhancement in power spectrum amplitude from spin temperature fluctuations, we find that the observable signatures of reionization extend well beyond the peak in the power spectrum usually associated with it. We also find that lower redshift degeneracies between the signatures of heating and reionization physics lead to errors on reionization parameters that are significantly greater than previously predicted. Observations over the heating epoch are able to break these degeneracies and improve our constraints considerably. For these two reasons, 21-cm observations during the heating epoch significantly enhance our understanding of reionization as well.

  13. Momentum space saturation model for deep inelastic scattering and single inclusive hadron production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basso, E. A. F.; Gay Ducati, M. B.; de Oliveira, E. G.

    2011-08-01

    We show how the Santana Amaral-Gay Ducati-Betemps-Soyez (AGBS) model, originally developed for deep inelastic scattering applied to HERA data on the proton structure function, can also describe the RHIC data on single inclusive hadron yield for d+Au and p+p collisions through a new simultaneous fit. The single inclusive hadron production is modeled through the color glass condensate, which uses the quark (and gluon) condensate amplitudes in momentum space. The AGBS model is also a momentum space model based on the asymptotic solutions of the Balitsky-Kovchegov equation, although a different definition of the Fourier transform is used. This aspect is overcome, and a description entirely in transverse momentum of both processes arises for the first time. The small difference between the simultaneous fit and the one for HERA data alone suggests that the AGBS model describes very well both kinds of processes and thus emerges as a good tool to investigate the inclusive hadron production data. We use this model for predictions at LHC energies, which agrees very well with available experimental data.

  14. QCD studies in ep collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, W.H.

    1997-06-01

    These lectures describe QCD physics studies over the period 1992--1996 from data taken with collisions of 27 GeV electrons and positrons with 820 GeV protons at the HERA collider at DESY by the two general-purpose detectors H1 and ZEUS. The focus of these lectures is on structure functions and jet production in deep inelastic scattering, photoproduction, and diffraction. The topics covered start with a general introduction to HERA and ep scattering. Structure functions are discussed. This includes the parton model, scaling violation, and the extraction of F{sub 2}, which is used to determine the gluon momentum distribution. Both low and high Q{sup 2} regimes are discussed. The low Q{sup 2} transition from perturbative QCD to soft hadronic physics is examined. Jet production in deep inelastic scattering to measure {alpha}{sub s}, and in photoproduction to study resolved and direct photoproduction, is also presented. This is followed by a discussion of diffraction that begins with a general introduction to diffraction in hadronic collisions and its relation to ep collisions, and moves on to deep inelastic scattering, where the structure of diffractive exchange is studied, and in photoproduction, where dijet production provides insights into the structure of the Pomeron. 95 refs., 39 figs.

  15. Effect of veneering materials and curing methods on resin cement knoop hardness.

    PubMed

    Tango, Rubens Nisie; Sinhoreti, Mário Alexandre Coelho; Correr, Américo Bortolazzo; Correr-Sobrinho, Lourenço; Consani, Rafael Leonardo Xediek

    2007-01-01

    This study evaluated the Knoop hardness of Enforce resin cement activated by the either chemical/physical or physical mode, and light cured directly and through ceramic (HeraCeram) or composite resin (Artglass). Light curing were performed with either conventional halogen light (QTH; XL2500) for 40 s or xenon plasma arc (PAC; Apollo 95E) for 3 s. Bovine incisors had their buccal surfaces flattened and hybridized. On these surfaces a mold was seated and filled with cement. A 1.5-mm-thick disc of the veneering material was seated over this set for light curing. After storage (24 h/37 masculineC), specimens (n=10) were sectioned for hardness (KHN) measurements in a micro-hardness tester (50 gf load/ 15 s). Data were submitted to ANOVA and Tukey's test (alpha=0.05). It was observed that the dual cure mode yielded higher hardness compared to the physical mode alone, except for direct light curing with the QTH unit and through Artglass. Higher hardness was observed with QTH compared to PAC, except for Artglass/dual groups, in which similar hardness means were obtained. Low KHN means were obtained with PAC for both Artglass and HeraCeram. It may be concluded that the hardness of resin cements may be influenced by the presence of an indirect restorative material and the type of light-curing unit.

  16. Exclusive production of vector mesons in pp and pp-bar collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Cisek, Anna; Schaefer, Wolfgang; Szczurek, Antoni

    2011-07-15

    Protons and antiprotons at collider energies are a source of high energy Weizsaecker-Williams photons. This opens up a possibility to study at the LHC exclusive photoproduction of heavy vector mesons at energies much larger than possible at the HERA accelerator.We present selected results on the production of vector mesons {rho}, {omega}, {phi}, J/{Psi} and {Upsilon}. We show distributions in rapidity, transverse momentum of mesons and azimuthal angle between outgoing protons for RHIC, Tevatron and LHC energies. The absorption effects are discussed.The amplitude for {gamma}p{yields}Vp is calculated in a pQCD k{sub T}-factorization approach with an unintegrated gluon distribution constrained by inclusive deep-inelastic structure function. The total cross section for diffractive meson (virtual) photo-production as a function of energy and photon virtuality is calculated and compared to HERA data. We also discuss the ratio of the first radial excitation state (2S) to the ground state (1S) in diffractive J/{Psi} and {Upsilon} production.

  17. Exclusive J /ψ Photoproduction off Protons in Ultraperipheral p -Pb Collisions at √{sNN }=5.02 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abelev, B.; Adam, J.; Adamová, D.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Agnello, M.; Agostinelli, A.; Agrawal, N.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahmad, N.; Ahmed, I.; Ahn, S. U.; Ahn, S. A.; Aimo, I.; Aiola, S.; Ajaz, M.; Akindinov, A.; Alam, S. N.; Aleksandrov, D.; Alessandro, B.; Alexandre, D.; Alici, A.; Alkin, A.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Altinpinar, S.; Altsybeev, I.; Alves Garcia Prado, C.; Andrei, C.; Andronic, A.; Anguelov, V.; Anielski, J.; Antičić, T.; Antinori, F.; Antonioli, P.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelshäuser, H.; Arcelli, S.; Armesto, N.; Arnaldi, R.; Aronsson, T.; Arsene, I. C.; Arslandok, M.; Augustinus, A.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmi, M. D.; Bach, M.; Badalà, A.; Baek, Y. W.; Bagnasco, S.; Bailhache, R.; Bala, R.; Baldisseri, A.; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F.; Baral, R. C.; Barbera, R.; Barile, F.; Barnaföldi, G. G.; Barnby, L. S.; Barret, V.; Bartke, J.; Basile, M.; Bastid, N.; Basu, S.; Bathen, B.; Batigne, G.; Batista Camejo, A.; Batyunya, B.; Batzing, P. C.; Baumann, C.; Bearden, I. G.; Beck, H.; Bedda, C.; Behera, N. K.; Belikov, I.; Bellini, F.; Bellwied, R.; Belmont-Moreno, E.; Belmont, R.; Belyaev, V.; Bencedi, G.; Beole, S.; Berceanu, I.; Bercuci, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Berenyi, D.; Berger, M. E.; Bertens, R. A.; Berzano, D.; Betev, L.; Bhasin, A.; Bhat, I. R.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattacharjee, B.; Bhom, J.; Bianchi, L.; Bianchi, N.; Bianchin, C.; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, J.; Bilandzic, A.; Bjelogrlic, S.; Blanco, F.; Blau, D.; Blume, C.; Bock, F.; Bogdanov, A.; Bøggild, H.; Bogolyubsky, M.; Böhmer, F. V.; Boldizsár, L.; Bombara, M.; Book, J.; Borel, H.; Borissov, A.; Bossú, F.; Botje, M.; Botta, E.; Böttger, S.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Bregant, M.; Breitner, T.; Broker, T. A.; Browning, T. A.; Broz, M.; Bruna, E.; Bruno, G. E.; Budnikov, D.; Buesching, H.; Bufalino, S.; Buncic, P.; Busch, O.; Buthelezi, Z.; Caffarri, D.; Cai, X.; Caines, H.; Calero Diaz, L.; Caliva, A.; Calvo Villar, E.; Camerini, P.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Castillo Castellanos, J.; Casula, E. A. R.; Catanescu, V.; Cavicchioli, C.; Ceballos Sanchez, C.; Cepila, J.; Cerello, P.; Chang, B.; Chapeland, S.; Charvet, J. L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chelnokov, V.; Cherney, M.; Cheshkov, C.; Cheynis, B.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Chinellato, D. D.; Chochula, P.; Chojnacki, M.; Choudhury, S.; Christakoglou, P.; Christensen, C. H.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, S. U.; Cicalo, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Cleymans, J.; Colamaria, F.; Colella, D.; Collu, A.; Colocci, M.; Conesa Balbastre, G.; Conesa Del Valle, Z.; Connors, M. E.; Contreras, J. G.; Cormier, T. M.; Corrales Morales, Y.; Cortese, P.; Cortés Maldonado, I.; Cosentino, M. R.; Costa, F.; Crochet, P.; Cruz Albino, R.; Cuautle, E.; Cunqueiro, L.; Dainese, A.; Dang, R.; Danu, A.; Das, D.; Das, I.; Das, K.; Das, S.; Dash, A.; Dash, S.; de, S.; Delagrange, H.; Deloff, A.; Dénes, E.; D'Erasmo, G.; de Caro, A.; de Cataldo, G.; de Cuveland, J.; de Falco, A.; de Gruttola, D.; De Marco, N.; de Pasquale, S.; de Rooij, R.; Diaz Corchero, M. A.; Dietel, T.; Dillenseger, P.; Divià, R.; di Bari, D.; di Liberto, S.; di Mauro, A.; di Nezza, P.; Djuvsland, Ø.; Dobrin, A.; Dobrowolski, T.; Domenicis Gimenez, D.; Dönigus, B.; Dordic, O.; Dørheim, S.; Dubey, A. K.; Dubla, A.; Ducroux, L.; Dupieux, P.; Dutta Majumdar, A. K.; Hilden, T. E.; Ehlers, R. J.; Elia, D.; Engel, H.; Erazmus, B.; Erdal, H. A.; Eschweiler, D.; Espagnon, B.; Esposito, M.; Estienne, M.; Esumi, S.; Evans, D.; Evdokimov, S.; Fabris, D.; Faivre, J.; Falchieri, D.; Fantoni, A.; Fasel, M.; Fehlker, D.; Feldkamp, L.; Felea, D.; Feliciello, A.; Feofilov, G.; Ferencei, J.; Fernández Téllez, A.; Ferreiro, E. G.; Ferretti, A.; Festanti, A.; Figiel, J.; Figueredo, M. A. S.; Filchagin, S.; Finogeev, D.; Fionda, F. M.; Fiore, E. M.; Floratos, E.; Floris, M.; Foertsch, S.; Foka, P.; Fokin, S.; Fragiacomo, E.; Francescon, A.; Frankenfeld, U.; Fuchs, U.; Furget, C.; Furs, A.; Fusco Girard, M.; Gaardhøje, J. J.; Gagliardi, M.; Gago, A. M.; Gallio, M.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganoti, P.; Gao, C.; Garabatos, C.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Gargiulo, C.; Garishvili, I.; Gerhard, J.; Germain, M.; Gheata, A.; Gheata, M.; Ghidini, B.; Ghosh, P.; Ghosh, S. K.; Gianotti, P.; Giubellino, P.; Gladysz-Dziadus, E.; Glässel, P.; Gomez Ramirez, A.; González-Zamora, P.; Gorbunov, S.; Görlich, L.; Gotovac, S.; Graczykowski, L. K.; Grelli, A.; Grigoras, A.; Grigoras, C.; Grigoriev, V.; Grigoryan, A.; Grigoryan, S.; Grinyov, B.; Grion, N.; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J. F.; Grossiord, J.-Y.; Grosso, R.; Guber, F.; Guernane, R.; Guerzoni, B.; Guilbaud, M.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gulkanyan, H.; Gumbo, M.; Gunji, T.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, R.; Khan, K. H.; Haake, R.; Haaland, Ø.; Hadjidakis, C.; Haiduc, M.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamar, G.; Hanratty, L. D.; Hansen, A.; Harris, J. W.; Hartmann, H.; Harton, A.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hayashi, S.; Heckel, S. T.; Heide, M.; Helstrup, H.; Herghelegiu, A.; Herrera Corral, G.; Hess, B. A.; Hetland, K. F.; Hippolyte, B.; Hladky, J.; Hristov, P.; Huang, M.; Humanic, T. J.; Hussain, N.; Hutter, D.; Hwang, D. S.; Ilkaev, R.; Ilkiv, I.; Inaba, M.; Innocenti, G. M.; Ionita, C.; Ippolitov, M.; Irfan, M.; Ivanov, M.; Ivanov, V.; Jachołkowski, A.; Jacobs, P. M.; Jahnke, C.; Jang, H. J.; Janik, M. A.; Jayarathna, P. H. S. Y.; Jena, C.; Jena, S.; Jimenez Bustamante, R. T.; Jones, P. G.; Jung, H.; Jusko, A.; Kadyshevskiy, V.; Kalcher, S.; Kalinak, P.; Kalweit, A.; Kamin, J.; Kang, J. H.; Kaplin, V.; Kar, S.; Karasu Uysal, A.; Karavichev, O.; Karavicheva, T.; Karpechev, E.; Kebschull, U.; Keidel, R.; Keijdener, D. L. D.; Keil Svn, M.; Khan, M. M.; Khan, P.; Khan, S. A.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kharlov, Y.; Kileng, B.; Kim, B.; Kim, D. W.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, J. S.; Kim, M.; Kim, M.; Kim, S.; Kim, T.; Kirsch, S.; Kisel, I.; Kiselev, S.; Kisiel, A.; Kiss, G.; Klay, J. L.; Klein, J.; Klein-Bösing, C.; Kluge, A.; Knichel, M. L.; Knospe, A. G.; Kobdaj, C.; Kofarago, M.; Köhler, M. K.; Kollegger, T.; Kolojvari, A.; Kondratiev, V.; Kondratyeva, N.; Konevskikh, A.; Kovalenko, V.; Kowalski, M.; Kox, S.; Koyithatta Meethaleveedu, G.; Kral, J.; Králik, I.; Kravčáková, A.; Krelina, M.; Kretz, M.; Krivda, M.; Krizek, F.; Kryshen, E.; Krzewicki, M.; Kučera, V.; Kucheriaev, Y.; Kugathasan, T.; Kuhn, C.; Kuijer, P. G.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, J.; Kurashvili, P.; Kurepin, A.; Kurepin, A. B.; Kuryakin, A.; Kushpil, S.; Kweon, M. J.; Kwon, Y.; Ladron de Guevara, P.; Lagana Fernandes, C.; Lakomov, I.; Langoy, R.; Lara, C.; Lardeux, A.; Lattuca, A.; La Pointe, S. L.; La Rocca, P.; Lea, R.; Leardini, L.; Lee, G. R.; Legrand, I.; Lehnert, J.; Lemmon, R. C.; Lenti, V.; Leogrande, E.; Leoncino, M.; León Monzón, I.; Lévai, P.; Li, S.; Lien, J.; Lietava, R.; Lindal, S.; Lindenstruth, V.; Lippmann, C.; Lisa, M. A.; Ljunggren, H. M.; Lodato, D. F.; Loenne, P. I.; Loggins, V. R.; Loginov, V.; Lohner, D.; Loizides, C.; Lopez, X.; López Torres, E.; Lu, X.-G.; Luettig, P.; Lunardon, M.; Luparello, G.; Ma, R.; Maevskaya, A.; Mager, M.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Mahmood, S. M.; Maire, A.; Majka, R. D.; Malaev, M.; Maldonado Cervantes, I.; Malinina, L.; Mal'Kevich, D.; Malzacher, P.; Mamonov, A.; Manceau, L.; Manko, V.; Manso, F.; Manzari, V.; Marchisone, M.; Mareš, J.; Margagliotti, G. V.; Margotti, A.; Marín, A.; Markert, C.; Marquard, M.; Martashvili, I.; Martin, N. A.; Martinengo, P.; Martínez, M. I.; Martínez García, G.; Martin Blanco, J.; Martynov, Y.; Mas, A.; Masciocchi, S.; Masera, M.; Masoni, A.; Massacrier, L.; Mastroserio, A.; Matyja, A.; Mayer, C.; Mazer, J.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Meddi, F.; Menchaca-Rocha, A.; Meninno, E.; Mercado Pérez, J.; Meres, M.; Miake, Y.; Mikhaylov, K.; Milano, L.; Milosevic, J.; Mischke, A.; Mishra, A. N.; Miśkowiec, D.; Mitra, J.; Mitu, C. M.; Mlynarz, J.; Mohammadi, N.; Mohanty, B.; Molnar, L.; Montaño Zetina, L.; Montes, E.; Morando, M.; Moreira de Godoy, D. A.; Moretto, S.; Morreale, A.; Morsch, A.; Muccifora, V.; Mudnic, E.; Mühlheim, D.; Muhuri, S.; Mukherjee, M.; Müller, H.; Munhoz, M. G.; Murray, S.; Musa, L.; Musinsky, J.; Nandi, B. K.; Nania, R.; Nappi, E.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, K.; Nayak, T. K.; Nazarenko, S.; Nedosekin, A.; Nicassio, M.; Niculescu, M.; Nielsen, B. S.; Nikolaev, S.; Nikulin, S.; Nikulin, V.; Nilsen, B. S.; Noferini, F.; Nomokonov, P.; Nooren, G.; Norman, J.; Nyanin, A.; Nystrand, J.; Oeschler, H.; Oh, S.; Oh, S. K.; Okatan, A.; Olah, L.; Oleniacz, J.; Oliveira da Silva, A. C.; Onderwaater, J.; Oppedisano, C.; Ortiz Velasquez, A.; Oskarsson, A.; Otwinowski, J.; Oyama, K.; Ozdemir, M.; Sahoo, P.; Pachmayer, Y.; Pachr, M.; Pagano, P.; Paić, G.; Painke, F.; Pajares, C.; Pal, S. K.; Palmeri, A.; Pant, D.; Papikyan, V.; Pappalardo, G. S.; Pareek, P.; Park, W. J.; Parmar, S.; Passfeld, A.; Patalakha, D. I.; Paticchio, V.; Paul, B.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Pereira da Costa, H.; Pereira de Oliveira Filho, E.; Peresunko, D.; Pérez Lara, C. E.; Pesci, A.; Peskov, V.; Pestov, Y.; Petráček, V.; Petran, M.; Petris, M.; Petrovici, M.; Petta, C.; Piano, S.; Pikna, M.; Pillot, P.; Pinazza, O.; Pinsky, L.; Piyarathna, D. B.; Płoskoń, M.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Pochybova, S.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Poghosyan, M. G.; Pohjoisaho, E. H. O.; Polichtchouk, B.; Poljak, N.; Pop, A.; Porteboeuf-Houssais, S.; Porter, J.; Potukuchi, B.; Prasad, S. K.; Preghenella, R.; Prino, F.; Pruneau, C. A.; Pshenichnov, I.; Puddu, G.; Pujahari, P.; Punin, V.; Putschke, J.; Qvigstad, H.; Rachevski, A.; Raha, S.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ramello, L.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Räsänen, S. S.; Rascanu, B. T.; Rathee, D.; Rauf, A. W.; Razazi, V.; Read, K. F.; Real, J. S.; Redlich, K.; Reed, R. J.; Rehman, A.; Reichelt, P.; Reicher, M.; Reidt, F.; Renfordt, R.; Reolon, A. R.; Reshetin, A.; Rettig, F.; Revol, J.-P.; Reygers, K.; Riabov, V.; Ricci, R. A.; Richert, T.; Richter, M.; Riedler, P.; Riegler, W.; Riggi, F.; Rivetti, A.; Rocco, E.; Rodríguez Cahuantzi, M.; Rodriguez Manso, A.; Røed, K.; Rogochaya, E.; Rohni, S.; Rohr, D.; Röhrich, D.; Romita, R.; Ronchetti, F.; Ronflette, L.; Rosnet, P.; Rossi, A.; Roukoutakis, F.; Roy, A.; Roy, C.; Roy, P.; Rubio Montero, A. J.; Rui, R.; Russo, R.; Ryabinkin, E.; Ryabov, Y.; Rybicki, A.; Sadovsky, S.; Šafařík, K.; Sahlmuller, B.; Sahoo, R.; Sahu, P. K.; Saini, J.; Sakai, S.; Salgado, C. A.; Salzwedel, J.; Sambyal, S.; Samsonov, V.; Sanchez Castro, X.; Sánchez Rodríguez, F. J.; Šándor, L.; Sandoval, A.; Sano, M.; Santagati, G.; Sarkar, D.; Scapparone, E.; Scarlassara, F.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schiaua, C.; Schicker, R.; Schmidt, C.; Schmidt, H. R.; Schuchmann, S.; Schukraft, J.; Schulc, M.; Schuster, T.; Schutz, Y.; Schwarz, K.; Schweda, K.; Scioli, G.; Scomparin, E.; Scott, R.; Segato, G.; Seger, J. E.; Sekiguchi, Y.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seo, J.; Serradilla, E.; Sevcenco, A.; Shabetai, A.; Shabratova, G.; Shahoyan, R.; Shangaraev, A.; Sharma, N.; Sharma, S.; Shigaki, K.; Shtejer, K.; Sibiriak, Y.; Siddhanta, S.; Siemiarczuk, T.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Simatovic, G.; Singaraju, R.; Singh, R.; Singha, S.; Singhal, V.; Sinha, B. C.; Sinha, T.; Sitar, B.; Sitta, M.; Skaali, T. B.; Skjerdal, K.; Slupecki, M.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R. J. M.; Søgaard, C.; Soltz, R.; Song, J.; Song, M.; Soramel, F.; Sorensen, S.; Spacek, M.; Spiriti, E.; Sputowska, I.; Spyropoulou-Stassinaki, M.; Srivastava, B. K.; Stachel, J.; Stan, I.; Stefanek, G.; Steinpreis, M.; Stenlund, E.; Steyn, G.; Stiller, J. H.; Stocco, D.; Stolpovskiy, M.; Strmen, P.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Sugitate, T.; Suire, C.; Suleymanov, M.; Sultanov, R.; Šumbera, M.; Susa, T.; Symons, T. J. M.; Szabo, A.; Szanto de Toledo, A.; Szarka, I.; Szczepankiewicz, A.; Szymanski, M.; Takahashi, J.; Tangaro, M. A.; Tapia Takaki, J. D.; Tarantola Peloni, A.; Tarazona Martinez, A.; Tarzila, M. G.; Tauro, A.; Tejeda Muñoz, G.; Telesca, A.; Terrevoli, C.; Thäder, J.; Thomas, D.; Tieulent, R.; Timmins, A. R.; Toia, A.; Trubnikov, V.; Trzaska, W. H.; Tsuji, T.; Tumkin, A.; Turrisi, R.; Tveter, T. S.; Ullaland, K.; Uras, A.; Usai, G. L.; Vajzer, M.; Vala, M.; Valencia Palomo, L.; Vallero, S.; Vande Vyvre, P.; van der Maarel, J.; van Hoorne, J. W.; van Leeuwen, M.; Vargas, A.; Vargyas, M.; Varma, R.; Vasileiou, M.; Vasiliev, A.; Vechernin, V.; Veldhoen, M.; Velure, A.; Venaruzzo, M.; Vercellin, E.; Vergara Limón, S.; Vernet, R.; Verweij, M.; Vickovic, L.; Viesti, G.; Viinikainen, J.; Vilakazi, Z.; Villalobos Baillie, O.; Vinogradov, A.; Vinogradov, L.; Vinogradov, Y.; Virgili, T.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vodopyanov, A.; Völkl, M. A.; Voloshin, K.; Voloshin, S. A.; Volpe, G.; von Haller, B.; Vorobyev, I.; Vranic, D.; Vrláková, J.; Vulpescu, B.; Vyushin, A.; Wagner, B.; Wagner, J.; Wagner, V.; Wang, M.; Wang, Y.; Watanabe, D.; Weber, M.; Wessels, J. P.; Westerhoff, U.; Wiechula, J.; Wikne, J.; Wilde, M.; Wilk, G.; Wilkinson, J.; Williams, M. C. S.; Windelband, B.; Winn, M.; Yaldo, C. G.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yang, H.; Yang, P.; Yang, S.; Yano, S.; Yasnopolskiy, S.; Yi, J.; Yin, Z.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yushmanov, I.; Zaccolo, V.; Zach, C.; Zaman, A.; Zampolli, C.; Zaporozhets, S.; Zarochentsev, A.; Závada, P.; Zaviyalov, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zgura, I. S.; Zhalov, M.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhigareva, N.; Zhou, D.; Zhou, F.; Zhou, Y.; Zhou, Zhuo; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, X.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, A.; Zimmermann, M. B.; Zinovjev, G.; Zoccarato, Y.; Zyzak, M.; Alice Collaboration

    2014-12-01

    We present the first measurement at the LHC of exclusive J /ψ photoproduction off protons, in ultraperipheral proton-lead collisions at √{sNN }=5.02 TeV . Events are selected with a dimuon pair produced either in the rapidity interval, in the laboratory frame, 2.5 HERA. The data are consistent with a power law dependence of the J / ψ photoproduction cross section in γ p energies from about 20 to 700 GeV, or equivalently, from Bjorken x scaling variable between ˜2 ×10-2 and ˜2 ×10-5, thus indicating no significant change in the gluon density behavior of the proton between HERA and LHC energies.

  18. Gluon saturation and Feynman scaling in leading neutron production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, F.; Gonçalves, V. P.; Spiering, D.; Navarra, F. S.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we extend the color dipole formalism for the study of leading neutron production in e + p → e + n + X collisions at high energies and estimate the related observables which were measured at HERA and could be analyzed in future electron-proton (ep) colliders. In particular, we calculate the Feynman xF distribution of leading neutrons, which is expressed in terms of the pion flux and the photon-pion total cross section. In the color dipole formalism, the photon-pion cross section is described in terms of the dipole-pion scattering amplitude, which contains information about the QCD dynamics at high energies and gluon saturation effects. We consider different models for the scattering amplitude, which have been used to describe the inclusive and diffractive ep HERA data. Moreover, the model dependence of our predictions with the description of the pion flux is analyzed in detail. We demonstrate the recently released H1 leading neutron spectra can be described using the color dipole formalism and that these spectra could help us to observe more clearly gluon saturation effects in future ep colliders.

  19. Exclusive J/ψ photoproduction off protons in ultraperipheral p-Pb collisions at √(s(NN))=5.02 TeV.

    PubMed

    Abelev, B; Adam, J; Adamová, D; Aggarwal, M M; Aglieri Rinella, G; Agnello, M; Agostinelli, A; Agrawal, N; Ahammed, Z; Ahmad, N; Ahmed, I; Ahn, S U; Ahn, S A; Aimo, I; Aiola, S; Ajaz, M; Akindinov, A; Alam, S N; Aleksandrov, D; Alessandro, B; Alexandre, D; Alici, A; Alkin, A; Alme, J; Alt, T; Altinpinar, S; Altsybeev, I; Alves Garcia Prado, C; Andrei, C; Andronic, A; Anguelov, V; Anielski, J; Antičić, T; Antinori, F; Antonioli, P; Aphecetche, L; Appelshäuser, H; Arcelli, S; Armesto, N; Arnaldi, R; Aronsson, T; Arsene, I C; Arslandok, M; Augustinus, A; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmi, M D; Bach, M; Badalà, A; Baek, Y W; Bagnasco, S; Bailhache, R; Bala, R; Baldisseri, A; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F; Baral, R C; Barbera, R; Barile, F; Barnaföldi, G G; Barnby, L S; Barret, V; Bartke, J; Basile, M; Bastid, N; Basu, S; Bathen, B; Batigne, G; Batista Camejo, A; Batyunya, B; Batzing, P C; Baumann, C; Bearden, I G; Beck, H; Bedda, C; Behera, N K; Belikov, I; Bellini, F; Bellwied, R; Belmont-Moreno, E; Belmont, R; Belyaev, V; Bencedi, G; Beole, S; Berceanu, I; Bercuci, A; Berdnikov, Y; Berenyi, D; Berger, M E; Bertens, R A; Berzano, D; Betev, L; Bhasin, A; Bhat, I R; Bhati, A K; Bhattacharjee, B; Bhom, J; Bianchi, L; Bianchi, N; Bianchin, C; Bielčík, J; Bielčíková, J; Bilandzic, A; Bjelogrlic, S; Blanco, F; Blau, D; Blume, C; Bock, F; Bogdanov, A; Bøggild, H; Bogolyubsky, M; Böhmer, F V; Boldizsár, L; Bombara, M; Book, J; Borel, H; Borissov, A; Bossú, F; Botje, M; Botta, E; Böttger, S; Braun-Munzinger, P; Bregant, M; Breitner, T; Broker, T A; Browning, T A; Broz, M; Bruna, E; Bruno, G E; Budnikov, D; Buesching, H; Bufalino, S; Buncic, P; Busch, O; Buthelezi, Z; Caffarri, D; Cai, X; Caines, H; Calero Diaz, L; Caliva, A; Calvo Villar, E; Camerini, P; Carena, F; Carena, W; Castillo Castellanos, J; Casula, E A R; Catanescu, V; Cavicchioli, C; Ceballos Sanchez, C; Cepila, J; Cerello, P; Chang, B; Chapeland, S; Charvet, J L; Chattopadhyay, S; Chattopadhyay, S; Chelnokov, V; Cherney, M; Cheshkov, C; Cheynis, B; Chibante Barroso, V; Chinellato, D D; Chochula, P; Chojnacki, M; Choudhury, S; Christakoglou, P; Christensen, C H; Christiansen, P; Chujo, T; Chung, S U; Cicalo, C; Cifarelli, L; Cindolo, F; Cleymans, J; Colamaria, F; Colella, D; Collu, A; Colocci, M; Conesa Balbastre, G; Conesa Del Valle, Z; Connors, M E; Contreras, J G; Cormier, T M; Corrales Morales, Y; Cortese, P; Cortés Maldonado, I; Cosentino, M R; Costa, F; Crochet, P; Cruz Albino, R; Cuautle, E; Cunqueiro, L; Dainese, A; Dang, R; Danu, A; Das, D; Das, I; Das, K; Das, S; Dash, A; Dash, S; De, S; Delagrange, H; Deloff, A; Dénes, E; D'Erasmo, G; De Caro, A; de Cataldo, G; de Cuveland, J; De Falco, A; De Gruttola, D; De Marco, N; De Pasquale, S; de Rooij, R; Diaz Corchero, M A; Dietel, T; Dillenseger, P; Divià, R; Di Bari, D; Di Liberto, S; Di Mauro, A; Di Nezza, P; Djuvsland, Ø; Dobrin, A; Dobrowolski, T; Domenicis Gimenez, D; Dönigus, B; Dordic, O; Dørheim, S; Dubey, A K; Dubla, A; Ducroux, L; Dupieux, P; Dutta Majumdar, A K; Hilden, T E; Ehlers, R J; Elia, D; Engel, H; Erazmus, B; Erdal, H A; Eschweiler, D; Espagnon, B; Esposito, M; Estienne, M; Esumi, S; Evans, D; Evdokimov, S; Fabris, D; Faivre, J; Falchieri, D; Fantoni, A; Fasel, M; Fehlker, D; Feldkamp, L; Felea, D; Feliciello, A; Feofilov, G; Ferencei, J; Fernández Téllez, A; Ferreiro, E G; Ferretti, A; Festanti, A; Figiel, J; Figueredo, M A S; Filchagin, S; Finogeev, D; Fionda, F M; Fiore, E M; Floratos, E; Floris, M; Foertsch, S; Foka, P; Fokin, S; Fragiacomo, E; Francescon, A; Frankenfeld, U; Fuchs, U; Furget, C; Furs, A; Fusco Girard, M; Gaardhøje, J J; Gagliardi, M; Gago, A M; Gallio, M; Gangadharan, D R; Ganoti, P; Gao, C; Garabatos, C; Garcia-Solis, E; Gargiulo, C; Garishvili, I; Gerhard, J; Germain, M; Gheata, A; Gheata, M; Ghidini, B; Ghosh, P; Ghosh, S K; Gianotti, P; Giubellino, P; Gladysz-Dziadus, E; Glässel, P; Gomez Ramirez, A; González-Zamora, P; Gorbunov, S; Görlich, L; Gotovac, S; Graczykowski, L K; Grelli, A; Grigoras, A; Grigoras, C; Grigoriev, V; Grigoryan, A; Grigoryan, S; Grinyov, B; Grion, N; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J F; Grossiord, J-Y; Grosso, R; Guber, F; Guernane, R; Guerzoni, B; Guilbaud, M; Gulbrandsen, K; Gulkanyan, H; Gumbo, M; Gunji, T; Gupta, A; Gupta, R; Khan, K H; Haake, R; Haaland, Ø; Hadjidakis, C; Haiduc, M; Hamagaki, H; Hamar, G; Hanratty, L D; Hansen, A; Harris, J W; Hartmann, H; Harton, A; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hayashi, S; Heckel, S T; Heide, M; Helstrup, H; Herghelegiu, A; Herrera Corral, G; Hess, B A; Hetland, K F; Hippolyte, B; Hladky, J; Hristov, P; Huang, M; Humanic, T J; Hussain, N; Hutter, D; Hwang, D S; Ilkaev, R; Ilkiv, I; Inaba, M; Innocenti, G M; Ionita, C; Ippolitov, M; Irfan, M; Ivanov, M; Ivanov, V; Jachołkowski, A; Jacobs, P M; Jahnke, C; Jang, H J; Janik, M A

    2014-12-05

    We present the first measurement at the LHC of exclusive J/ψ photoproduction off protons, in ultraperipheral proton-lead collisions at sqrt[s_{NN}]=5.02  TeV. Events are selected with a dimuon pair produced either in the rapidity interval, in the laboratory frame, 2.5HERA. The data are consistent with a power law dependence of the J/ψ photoproduction cross section in γp energies from about 20 to 700 GeV, or equivalently, from Bjorken x scaling variable between ∼2×10^{-2} and ∼2×10^{-5}, thus indicating no significant change in the gluon density behavior of the proton between HERA and LHC energies.

  20. Status and commissioning results of the helium refrigerator plant for the European XFEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blum, L.; Wilhelm, H.; Petersen, B.; Schnautz, T.

    2015-12-01

    The European XFEL project is under construction at DESY in Germany. The superconducting XFEL linac is supplied by the XFEL helium refrigerator plant. This plant consists of two existing refrigerators, which were in service for the HERA storage ring until 2007. Since the XFEL linear accelerator requires cryogenic cooling at 2K, the existing cryogenic infrastructure had to be modified. Two of the three existing HERA helium refrigerators were required to cover the design heat load of the XFEL-linac. The refrigerator infrastructure was extended by a 2 K cooling loop, whose main component consists of a string of four cold compressors generating approximately 1.7 kW isothermal cooling capacity at 2K. The step by step commissioning and extension of the accelerator as well as the future upgrade option of the heat load demanded an extremely high turn down ability, a particular challenge for 2K cold compressor strings. The commissioning of the helium refrigerator infrastructure is underway and should be completed soon. The current status of this project, commissioning results and particular challenges are presented.

  1. Precise Point Positioning Using Triple GNSS Constellations in Various Modes.

    PubMed

    Afifi, Akram; El-Rabbany, Ahmed

    2016-05-28

    This paper introduces a new dual-frequency precise point positioning (PPP) model, which combines the observations from three different global navigation satellite system (GNSS) constellations, namely GPS, Galileo, and BeiDou. Combining measurements from different GNSS systems introduces additional biases, including inter-system bias and hardware delays, which require rigorous modelling. Our model is based on the un-differenced and between-satellite single-difference (BSSD) linear combinations. BSSD linear combination cancels out some receiver-related biases, including receiver clock error and non-zero initial phase bias of the receiver oscillator. Forming the BSSD linear combination requires a reference satellite, which can be selected from any of the GPS, Galileo, and BeiDou systems. In this paper three BSSD scenarios are tested; each considers a reference satellite from a different GNSS constellation. Natural Resources Canada's GPSPace PPP software is modified to enable a combined GPS, Galileo, and BeiDou PPP solution and to handle the newly introduced biases. A total of four data sets collected at four different IGS stations are processed to verify the developed PPP model. Precise satellite orbit and clock products from the International GNSS Service Multi-GNSS Experiment (IGS-MGEX) network are used to correct the GPS, Galileo, and BeiDou measurements in the post-processing PPP mode. A real-time PPP solution is also obtained, which is referred to as RT-PPP in the sequel, through the use of the IGS real-time service (RTS) for satellite orbit and clock corrections. However, only GPS and Galileo observations are used for the RT-PPP solution, as the RTS-IGS satellite products are not presently available for BeiDou system. All post-processed and real-time PPP solutions are compared with the traditional un-differenced GPS-only counterparts. It is shown that combining the GPS, Galileo, and BeiDou observations in the post-processing mode improves the PPP convergence

  2. Guillain-Barré syndrome: clinical profile and management.

    PubMed

    Sudulagunta, Sreenivasa Rao; Sodalagunta, Mahesh Babu; Sepehrar, Mona; Khorram, Hadi; Bangalore Raja, Shiva Kumar; Kothandapani, Shyamala; Noroozpour, Zahra; Aheta Sham, Mohammed; Prasad, Nagendra; Sunny, Sony Parethu; Mohammed, Munawar Dhanish; Gangadharappa, Rekha; Nidsale Sudarshan, Ranjitha

    2015-01-01

    Einführung: Das Guillain-Barré-Syndrom (GBS) ist eine fulminant verlaufende Polyradiculoneuropathie, die akut, meist schwer verlaufend, auf der Basis eines Autoimmunprozesses auftritt. Die Ätiologie der Erkrankung wird nicht ganz verstanden, die Prognose ist bei früher Diagnose und Therapie gewöhnlich gut. Eine retrospektive Studie wurde durchgeführt, um das klinische Profil, die Epidemiologie, die Laborwerte, die Elektrodiagnose, die Behandlungsarten und die Prognose von Patienten mit GBS auszuwerten.Methode: Die klinischen Daten von 1.166 Patienten, die zwischen Januar 2003 und Januar 2014 mit GBS überwiesen oder in den Ambulanzen vorgestellt wurden, wurden ausgewertet. Ergebnisse: Geschlechtsspezifische Unterschiede wurden nicht beobachtet. Etwa 35% der Patienten waren älter als 50 Jahre. Die Analyse zeigte schlecht eingestellten Diabetes mellitus (HBA1c = 8,1 ± 2,11%). Die saisonale Abhängigkeit der GBS ist deutlich, im Winter wurden 484 (41,5%) gefunden und 449 (38,5%) Patienten mit GBS wurden künstlich beatmet. 48 (4,11%) der Patienten verstarben an GBS. Die neurologischen Untersuchungen ergaben bei 407 (34,9%) der Patienten Beteiligung der cranialen Nerven, faciale Lähmungen bei 401 (34,39%) und Ataxien bei 88 (7,54%) der Patienten. Die meisten Patienten, die mit Plasmapherese behandelt wurden, hatten einen niedrigeren sozioökonomischen Status. Die mittlere Proteinkonzentration im Liquor war 113,8 ± 11,8 mg/dl. Störungen der Nervenleitung, indirekt bestimmt über den H-Reflex, wurden bei 891 (90,64%) der Patienten beobachtet. Keine Unterschiede hinsichtlich Komplikationen und Endergebnis wurden festgestellt zwischen den Behandlungen mit intravenöser Gabe von Immunglobulinen und Plasmaaustausch.Schlussfolgerung: GBS tritt vorwiegend in den Wintermonaten auf, der „Peak-Flow-Test“ kann ein Indikator für eine erforderliche künstliche Beatmung und für die Prognose sein. Eine Verminderung oder Blockierung der Nervenleitung ist die

  3. Training based on ligand efficiency improves prediction of bioactivities of ligands and drug target proteins in a machine learning approach.

    PubMed

    Sugaya, Nobuyoshi

    2013-10-28

    Machine learning methods based on ligand-protein interaction data in bioactivity databases are one of the current strategies for efficiently finding novel lead compounds as the first step in the drug discovery process. Although previous machine learning studies have succeeded in predicting novel ligand-protein interactions with high performance, all of the previous studies to date have been heavily dependent on the simple use of raw bioactivity data of ligand potencies measured by IC50, EC50, K(i), and K(d) deposited in databases. ChEMBL provides us with a unique opportunity to investigate whether a machine-learning-based classifier created by reflecting ligand efficiency other than the IC50, EC50, K(i), and Kd values can also offer high predictive performance. Here we report that classifiers created from training data based on ligand efficiency show higher performance than those from data based on IC50 or K(i) values. Utilizing GPCRSARfari and KinaseSARfari databases in ChEMBL, we created IC50- or K(i)-based training data and binding efficiency index (BEI) based training data then constructed classifiers using support vector machines (SVMs). The SVM classifiers from the BEI-based training data showed slightly higher area under curve (AUC), accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity in the cross-validation tests. Application of the classifiers to the validation data demonstrated that the AUCs and specificities of the BEI-based classifiers dramatically increased in comparison with the IC50- or K(i)-based classifiers. The improvement of the predictive power by the BEI-based classifiers can be attributed to (i) the more separated distributions of positives and negatives, (ii) the higher diversity of negatives in the BEI-based training data in a feature space of SVMs, and (iii) a more balanced number of positives and negatives in the BEI-based training data. These results strongly suggest that training data based on ligand efficiency as well as data based on classical IC50

  4. Polymorphisms XbaI (rs693) and EcoRI (rs1042031) of the ApoB gene are associated with carotid plaques but not with carotid intima-media thickness in patients with diabetes mellitus type 2.

    PubMed

    Nikolajevic Starcevic, Jovana; Santl Letonja, Marija; Praznikar, Zala J; Makuc, Jana; Vujkovac, Andreja C; Petrovic, Daniel

    2014-05-01

    Hintergrund: Apolipoprotein B ist eine wichtige strukturelle Komponente der atherogenetischen Lipoproteine (LDL, VLDL und IDL). Genetische Variationen des ApoB-Gens können verschiedene Effekte auf Plasmakonzentrationen des ApoB und auf den Lipidspiegel haben, was dann die Atherogenese beeinflusst. Primäres Ziel der Studie war die Analyse der Assoziation der Polymorphismen XbaI (rs693) und EcoRI (rs1042031) mit Plasmakonzentrationen von ApoB, dem Lipidspiegel und verschiedenen atherosklerotischen Phänotypen bei Patienten mit Diabetes mellitus Typ 2. Patienten und Methoden: 595 Patienten mit Diabetes mellitus Typ 2 (399 mit Statin-Therapie und 196 Patienten ohne Statin-Therapie) und 200 Personen ohne Diabetes mellitus Typ 2 (Kontrollgruppe). Die Intima-Media-Dicke (IMD) der A. carotis und die Charakteristika der atherosklerotischen Plaques wurden mit Ultraschall analysiert. Biochemische Untersuchungen wurden mit standardmäßigen biochemischen Methoden durchgeführt. Die XbaI (rs693) und EcoRI (rs1042031) Genotypen wurden mittels Real-Time PCR analysiert. Ergebnisse: Die Genotyp-Verteilung und die allelische Häufigkeit von XbaI und EcoRI Polymorphismen unterschieden sich nicht zwischen Patienten mit und ohne Diabetes mellitus. Es wurden keine signifikanten Unterschiede der Plasmakonzentrationen von ApoA1, ApoB, Cholesterinspiegel, hs-CRP, Fibrinogen und der IMD bei Patienten mit Diabetes mellitus Typ 2 mit verschiedenen Genotypen festgestellt, auch unter Berücksichtigung der Statintherapie. Das Risiko der Atherosklerose der Karotiden wird bei Patienten mit X + X + Genotyp im Vergleich zu Patienten ohne diesen Genotyp (OR = 1.74, p = 0.03)höher und bei Diabetiker mit E-Allelen (OR = 0.48, p = 0.02) niedriger. Es gab keine Assoziation zwischen XbaI / EcoRI Polymorphismen und IMD oder instabilen atherosklerotischen Plaques bei Patienten mit Diabetes mellitus Typ 2. Schlussfolgerungen: Das Risiko der Atherosklerose der Karotiden wird höher bei Patienten mit

  5. Precise Point Positioning Using Triple GNSS Constellations in Various Modes

    PubMed Central

    Afifi, Akram; El-Rabbany, Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    This paper introduces a new dual-frequency precise point positioning (PPP) model, which combines the observations from three different global navigation satellite system (GNSS) constellations, namely GPS, Galileo, and BeiDou. Combining measurements from different GNSS systems introduces additional biases, including inter-system bias and hardware delays, which require rigorous modelling. Our model is based on the un-differenced and between-satellite single-difference (BSSD) linear combinations. BSSD linear combination cancels out some receiver-related biases, including receiver clock error and non-zero initial phase bias of the receiver oscillator. Forming the BSSD linear combination requires a reference satellite, which can be selected from any of the GPS, Galileo, and BeiDou systems. In this paper three BSSD scenarios are tested; each considers a reference satellite from a different GNSS constellation. Natural Resources Canada’s GPSPace PPP software is modified to enable a combined GPS, Galileo, and BeiDou PPP solution and to handle the newly introduced biases. A total of four data sets collected at four different IGS stations are processed to verify the developed PPP model. Precise satellite orbit and clock products from the International GNSS Service Multi-GNSS Experiment (IGS-MGEX) network are used to correct the GPS, Galileo, and BeiDou measurements in the post-processing PPP mode. A real-time PPP solution is also obtained, which is referred to as RT-PPP in the sequel, through the use of the IGS real-time service (RTS) for satellite orbit and clock corrections. However, only GPS and Galileo observations are used for the RT-PPP solution, as the RTS-IGS satellite products are not presently available for BeiDou system. All post-processed and real-time PPP solutions are compared with the traditional un-differenced GPS-only counterparts. It is shown that combining the GPS, Galileo, and BeiDou observations in the post-processing mode improves the PPP convergence

  6. Effects of Three Types of Inactivation Agents on the Antibody Response and Immune Protection of Inactivated IHNV Vaccine in Rainbow Trout.

    PubMed

    Tang, Lijie; Kang, Haiyan; Duan, Kexin; Guo, Mengting; Lian, Gaihong; Wu, Yang; Li, Yijing; Gao, Shuai; Jiang, Yanping; Yin, Jiyuan; Liu, Min

    2016-09-01

    Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) infects salmonid fish, resulting in high mortality and serious economic losses to salmonid aquaculture. Therefore, an effective IHNV vaccine is urgently needed. To select an inactivation agent for the preparation of an effective IHNV vaccine, rainbow trout were immunized with mineral oil emulsions of IHNV vaccines inactivated by formaldehyde, binary ethylenimine (BEI), or β-propiolactone (BPL). The fish were challenged 8 weeks after vaccination, and their IgM antibody response and relative percent survival (RPS) were evaluated. The results show that formaldehyde, BEI, and BPL abolished IHNV HLJ-09 infectivity within 24, 48, and 24 h at final concentrations of 0.2%, 0.02%, and 0.01%, respectively. The mean levels of specific IgM, both in serum and mucus (collected from the skin surface and gills), for the three immunized groups (from high to low) ranked as follows: the BPL group, BEI group, and formaldehyde group. From weeks 5 to 9, the mean log2 serum titers of IgM in the BPL group were significantly higher compared with those of the other groups (p < 0.05) during the 9 weeks of observation after vaccination (immunized at weeks 0 and6). Mucus OD490 values of the BPL group were significantly higher compared with those of the other groups (p < 0.05) when reaching their peak at weeks 5 and 8, but the difference between the formaldehyde and BEI groups was not significant (p > 0.05). The BPL-inactivated whole-virus vaccine had the greatest protective effect on the rainbow trout after challenge by an intraperitoneal injection of live IHNV, with an RPS rate of 91.67%, which was significantly higher compared with the BEI (83.33%) and formaldehyde (79.17%) groups. These results indicate that the BPL-inactivated IHNV oil-adjuvant vaccine was more effective than the formaldehyde- or BEI-inactivated vaccines. The results of this study provide an important foundation for further studies on inactivated IHNV vaccines.

  7. Campus Single Sign-On und hochschulübergreifendes Identity Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hommel, Wolfgang

    Das im Rahmen von IntegraTUM für die TUM geschaffene Identity & Access Management System setzt das Paradigma unified login um, d. h. ein Benutzer kann alle für ihn relevanten Dienste innerhalb der Hochschule mit derselben Loginname-/Passwortkombination nutzen. Dieser Artikel zeigt, wie auf Basis der Software Shibboleth und der deutschlandweiten Hochschulföderation DFN-AAI als weitere Mehrwerte das campusweite web single sign-on und die nahtlose Nutzung zahlreicher externer Web-Anwendungen erreicht werden. Als Beispiel für die Abläufe bei der Erschließung neuer Dienste für die hochschulübergreifende Nutzung wird die Anbindung von Learning Management Systemen auf Basis des DFN-AAI E-Learning-Profils diskutiert. Den umfassenden Vorteilen werden schließlich die aktuellen technischen Grenzen bei der Umsetzung des hochschulübergreifenden Identity Management gegenübergestellt.

  8. [Caplan's syndrome: rarely presenting as syndrome].

    PubMed

    Nowak, Albina; Göhner, Katja; Cohen, Clemens D

    2014-02-26

    Ein 59-jähriger Spezialtiefbauarbeiter, ehemaliger Uranbergbauarbeiter, präsentierte sich mit Hämoptoe und asymmetrischen Arthritiden. Labortests ergaben Mikrohämaturie und anti-neutrophile zytoplasmatische Antikörper. Computertomographisch bestanden bilateral disseminierte Thorax-Rundherde. Thorakoskopische Lungenkeilresektion zeigte Granulome mit Anthrakose und Silikose-Material im nekrotischen Zentrum. Die Diagnose eines Caplan-Syndroms wurde gestellt. Die Beschwerden besserten sich unter der Steroid-Therapie. Weitere Abklärung der Mikrohämaturie erbrachte die Diagnose eines klarzelligen Nierenzellkarzinoms. Bei diesem Patienten mit «pulmorenalem Syndrom» war das Nierenzellkarzinom, das bei Minenarbeitern im Uranbergbau ebenfalls vermehrt auftritt, ursächlich für die Mikrohämaturie.

  9. Stein-Schere-Papier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Springborn, Boris

    Wie gewinnt man im Spiel? Die Analyse von Strategien bei Gesellschaftsspielen ist ein Thema der mathematischen Spieltheorie. Mit ihren Methoden kann man aber nicht nur Spiele wie Schach oder Skat untersuchen, sondern auch verschiedenste Konfliktsituationen, bei denen das Schicksal jedes einzelnen Akteurs nicht nur vom eigenen Verhalten abhängt, sondern auch vom Verhalten der anderen, die ebenso wie er versuchen, ein für sie selbst möglichst positives Ergebnis herauszuschlagen. Die Spieltheorie hat großen Einfluss in den Wirtschaftswissenschaften. Auch in der Psychologie, Soziologie, Biologie und der Militärwissenschaft findet sie Anwendung. In der folgenden Aufgabe geht es aber tatsächlich um ein Spiel, und zwar um ein sehr einfaches, das jeder kennt. Trotzdem ist die Lösung nicht ganz einfach, und wer sie findet, hat schon die eine oder andere grundlegende Idee der Spieltheorie verstanden.

  10. Ejnar Hertzsprung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrmann, Dieter B.

    Mit diesem Werk von D.B. Herrmann, dem bekannten Astronomiehistoriker und Direktor der Archenhold-Sternwarte und des Zeiss-Großplanetariums in Berlin, liegt zum ersten Mal eine umfassende Biographie des großen Astronomen Ejnar Hertzsprung vor. Ejnar Hertzsprung (1873-1967) verdanken wir die Entdeckung der Riesen- und Zwergsterne, Grundlage für das sog. Hertzsprung-Russel-Diagramm, das eine zentrale Rolle bei der Erforschung der Sternentwicklung spielt. Er bearbeitete erfolgreich Doppelsterne und Veränderliche Sterne und trug Entscheidendes zur modernen Astrophysik bei. Wenig bekannt ist sein Leben, das hier unter Benutzung von Arbeitsmaterial, Interviews mit Zeitgenossen, des Familienarchivs und von Sekundärliteratur von einem kundigen Fachmann beschrieben wird. In D.B. Herrmanns Buch wird nicht nur Persönlichkeit und Werk von Hertzsprung lebendig, sondern auch die astronomische Forschung seiner Zeit. Dieser wertvolle Beitrag zur Wissenschaftsgeschichte wendet sich auch an eine breite allgemeine Leserschaft.

  11. [Educational competence of parents with children participating in youth welfare measures].

    PubMed

    Rücker, Stefan; Büttner, Peter; Petermann, Ulrike; Petermann, Franz

    2013-07-01

    Fragestellung: In der vorliegenden Studie wird der Einfluss ausgewählter Risiken auf das Erziehungsverhalten von Eltern am Beginn einer Jugendhilfe-Maßnahme analysiert. Methodik: Familiäre Belastungen sowie Erziehungsdimensionen wurden anhand standardisierter Erhebungsverfahren bei N = 74 Eltern erfasst. Ergebnisse: In Abhängigkeit des Belastungsausmaßes konnten drei Gruppen gebildet werden. Die Befragungsergebnisse wurden im Querschnitt varianzanalytisch ausgewertet. Familien mit spezifischen Risiken, wie materielle Belastungen, psychisch erkrankte Elternteile oder einen Alleinerziehendenstatus weisen signifikant ungünstigere Werte bei Erziehungsmerkmalen auf. In negativen Erziehungsmerkmalen kann der Einfluss spezifischer Risiken statistisch nicht abgesichert werden. Schlussfolgerungen: Spezifisch belastete Eltern in Jugendhilfe-Maßnahmen benötigen eventuell ein spezielles Training zur Steigerung ihrer Erziehungskompetenz. Dies gilt vor allem dann, wenn Prä-Post-Vergleiche am Ende der Maßnahme ein geringeres Erziehungs-Outcome in der spezifisch belasteten Gruppe offenbaren.

  12. Methodik und Qualität statistischer Erhebungen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krug, Walter; Schmidt, Jürgen; Wiegert, Rolf

    Kapitel 8 wirft einen Blick hinter die Kulissen statistischer Arbeit und ihrer Methoden, insbesondere auch hinter die der amtlichen Statistik: Wie kommen die Myriaden von Zahlen zustande, die heute aus statistischen Quellenwerken aller Art und aus Datenbanken abgerufen werden können? Dabei wird deutlich, welche Schwierigkeiten bei Erhebungen, insbesondere bei Stichprobenerhebungen, zu überwinden sind, wie man Antwortverweigerer kooperativer stimmt, wie sich auch aus kleinen Stichproben auf intelligente Weise verlässliche Ergebnisse erzielen lassen und wie Großstichproben auf europäischer Ebene harmonisiert werden. Am Beispiel des Zensus 2011 wird gezeigt, wie sich eine Kombination von Stichproben und Registerauswertungen als Ersatz für eine Volkszählung nutzen lässt. Mitglieder der Deutschen Statistischen Gesellschaft waren daran kooperativ beteiligt.

  13. Impact of a modified Broviac maintenance care bundle on bloodstream infections in paediatric cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Furtwängler, Rhoikos; Laux, Carolin; Graf, Norbert; Simon, Arne

    2015-01-01

    Hintergrund: Während der intensiven Chemotherapie sind bei Kindern mit Krebserkrankungen Blutstrominfektionen (BSI) eine potentiell lebensbedrohliche Komplikation. Die meisten Patienten haben einen dauerhaft implantierten oder getunnelten zentralen Venenkatheter (CVAD, z.B. Broviac). Ein verbessertes Protokoll der Erhaltungspflege kann möglicherweise die Rate von BSI senken. Methode: Interventionsstudie zum Nutzen eines modifizierten Präventionsbündels in zwei prospektiven Beobachtungszeiträumen (P1: bis 05-2011; P2: 09-2011 bis 05-2013); prospektive Surveillance aller mikrobiologisch gesicherten BSI. In P2 wurden fertig konfektionierte NaCl 0.9% Spritzen (10 ml) zum Spülen des Broviacs verwendet. Außerdem wurden alle Konnektions- und Zuspritzstellen (Dreiwegehähne) mit Octenidin/Propanol desinfiziert.Ergebnisse: Während P1 wurden 84 Patienten und während P2 81 eingeschlossen. Die beiden Patientenpopulationen zeigten keine signifikanten Unterschiede in Bezug auf das Alter, die Grunderkrankung oder ihren Status (Anteil mit Rezidiv). Praktisch alle CVAD waren Broviac-Katheter. Die mediane Nutzungsdauer lag in P1 bei 192 d (Interquartile-Range (IQR); 110–288 Tage) und in P2 bei 191 d (IQR; 103–270 Tage). In P1 wurden insgesamt 28 BSI bei 22 Patienten diagnostiziert (Inzidenz für mind. 1 BSI 26%), in P2 waren es nur 15 BSI bei 12 Patienten in P2 (Inzidenz 15%). Die entsprechenden Ergebnisse für die Inzidenzdichte lagen bei 0.44 (CI95 0.29–0.62) BSI pro 100 stationäre Patiententage für P1 vs. 0.34 (0.19–0.53) für P2. Die Inzidenzrate (IR) pro 1.000 stationäre Anwendungstage lag bei 7.76 (5.16–10.86) für P1 vs. 4.75 (2.66–7.43) für P2. Während in P1 9 BSI durch CoNS detektiert wurden, waren es in P2 nur 2 (IR 2.49; CI95 0.17–4.17 vs. 0.63; CI95 0.08–1.72). Fazit: Das modifizierte Präventionsbündel führte zu einer Reduktion von BSI bei pädiatrisch onkologischen Patenten mit Broviac Katheter. Wie in einigen Studien U

  14. Bewegungsapparat: Postcraniales Skelett und Muskulatur

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Martin S.

    Der Bewegungsapparat bestimmt die Form des Wirbeltierkörpers. So lässt sich z. B. aus der Gestalt eines Fisches auf seine bevorzugt e Schwimmweise schließen (S. 61). Bei den aquatisch en Schädeltieren dominiert die Fortbewegung mit axialem Antrieb; bei den meisten Tetrapoda findet sich eine Kombination aus axialem Antrieb und Bewegung durch Gliedmaßen. Selbst beim höchst spezialisierten Gang, der bipeden Bewegung des Menschen, sind Torsionsbewegungen des Rumpfes noch maßgeblich und bestimmen auch die Grundform des menschlichen Körpers (z. B. die Taille). Obwohl die verschiedenen Antriebsmechanismen eine funktionelle Einheit bilden, werden im Folgenden das Axialskelett sowie der Schulter- und Beckengürtel mit den zugehörigen Extremitäten getrennt besprochen.

  15. The biological exposure indices: a key component in protecting workers from toxic chemicals.

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, M S

    1997-01-01

    Biological monitoring of exposure to chemicals in the workplace is an important component of exposure assessment and prevention of adverse health effects. It should be employed in conjunction with ambient air monitoring to provide information on the absorbed dose of a chemical agent and the effect of all routes of exposure. Judgments regarding the acceptable level of a chemical or its metabolite in biological samples are facilitated by comparison to a reference value. The American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists has established a series of recommended reference values called the Biological Exposure Indices (BEI). The history and characteristics of the BEI are reviewed, and their suitability for use by occupational health specialists is examined. A number of challenges and stimuli to the continued development and improvement of these reference values are described, and the impact of recent advances in macromolecular biology is assessed. PMID:9114280

  16. The Potential of Micro Electro Mechanical Systems and Nanotechnology for the U.S. Army

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-05-01

    Quantitative Structure Activity Relationship ( QSAR ) model . The QSAR model calculates the proper composition of the polymer-carbon black matrix...example, the BEI Gyrochip Model QRS11 from Systron Donner Inertial Division has a startup time of less than 1 second, a Mean Time Between Failure (MTBF... modeling from many equations per atom to a few lines of code. This approach is amenable to parallel processing. Nevertheless, their programs require

  17. Finanzierung des Studiums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domnick, Ivonne

    "Das liebe Geld“ - ein Thema, das Sie durch das ganze Studium begleitet und auch in der Examensphase und bei der späteren Berufswahl eine entscheidende Rolle spielen wird. Naturwissenschaftler und Ingenieure haben auf dem Arbeitsmarkt sicher derzeit die Nase vorn und brauchen sich über ihre berufliche Zukunft nicht so große Gedanken machen. Doch vor der Karriere muss zunächst einmal eine sichere Studienfinanzierung auf die Beine gestellt werden.

  18. Physik gestern und heute Von der Metallstange zum Hochenergielaser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heering, Peter

    2002-05-01

    Im Mai 1752 wurde in Marly bei Paris auf Anregung des amerikanischen Forschers und Politikers Benjamin Franklin erstmals die elektrische Natur des Blitzes nachgewiesen. Damals beschrieb Franklin auch eine technische Vorrichtung, die als Schutz von Gebäuden vor Blitzschlägen dienen sollte: den Blitzableiter. Diese aus heutiger Sicht scheinbar triviale Vorrichtung wurde aber keineswegs unmittelbar akzeptiert. Und bis heute ist die Forschung zum Schutz von Einrichtungen vor Blitzschlägen nicht abgeschlossen.

  19. Engineering and Services Laboratory FY85 Technical Objectives Document

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-12-01

    Biomass Energy -" Island (BEI) concept on a forested Air Force installation were developed (ESL- .T-83-04). This concept describes the ability of an...quantities of wood required. to support basewide biomass energy systems. This investigation provided a com- prehensive technical-economic scenario for...land on an airbase so that wood fuel can be provided to support a basewide biomass energy system. If found feasible, such a secure, renewable, local

  20. Modern Aspects of Halophilism: The Edmond de Rothschild School in Molecular Biophysics (12th) Held in Israel on March 26-April 5, 1989. Program and Abstracts

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-04-01

    overproduction mutations will be useful for industrial applications. This salt tolerant strain also possess a 3Kb indigenous plasmid which provided a...Trends in Biochem. Sci. 11: 5-6. Ben-Amotz, A. and M. Avron. 1983. Accumulation of metabolites by halotolerant algae and its industrial potential. Ann. Rev...ULRIKE Univeisidad do Alicante Max Planck Institut fflr Biochemie Facultad do Medicina, 8033 Martinsried bei Mfinchen a Division de Microbiologia F.R

  1. The New Chemistry of C2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-01

    organizations must be agile. In the words of former General Electric CEO Jack Welch, “An organization’s ability to learn, and translate that...adapted with permission from the Kettle Creek Corporation). On the battlefield after next, the human processing speed may be too slow to be...is the ultimate competitive advantage.” -- Jack Welch former General Electric CEO Need for Agile Organizations Adaptability: the capability to

  2. 25 Jahre - Institut fuer Geodaesie, Teil 3: Aus dem Leben des Instituts (25 Years - Institute of Geodesy, Part 3: The Life of the Institute)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-01-01

    seit 1995 Dezernatsleiter fOr digitale Kartographie am Landesvermessungsarnt Thiringen in Erfurt Dipl.-Ing. Chengzu Li * geboren 1946 in Chengdu, VR...UniversitUit Berlin, geleiteten Projekte Dl1, D2 und D6 des DFG-Sonderforschungsbereichs 69 waren Dl: die digitale Bildklassifizierung und -interpretation...Messkampagne bei der Einrichtung eines ganz SUid- amerika Oberdeckenden geodditischen Bezugssystems ( Sistema de Referencia Geocentrico para America del

  3. Proceedings of the International Conference on The Performance of Off-Road Vehicles and Machines (8th). Volume 1. Held at Cambridge England, on August 5-11, 1984.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-08-01

    angewendet. Ausgehend von den ma- thematischen 1Modeilformulierungen. fUr die Teilsysteme " Fahr - zeug* und "Aktiv-Federung", die jeweila auf den Daten...Effektivwerte der vertika--770 len Beschleunigung verwen- _____j det. 01 1 10 ’ 100 FREQUENZ Bild 5 gibt die bei Fahr - geschwindiqkeiten von 12,5 Buld 4...Abstutzung emn Feder-Dimpfer-Element emn- gefUgt wird. Die Auswirkungen dieses Schwingungsabsorbers auf die Fahr - Ssicherheit, die

  4. Fußball mit Wissenschaftlichem Maß: Bananenflanken, Flatterbälle, Kopfballkämpfe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathelitsch, Leopold; Thaller, Sigrid

    2006-05-01

    Die physikalische Betrachtung des Fußballs liefert spannende Resultate. Wegen der geringen Torzahl spielt der Zufall bei Sieg oder Niederlage stärker mit als in anderen Sportarten. Fußball ist daher mit gewissen statistischen Eigenschaften radioaktiver Quellen vergleichbar. Gleich mehrere physikalische Effekte beeinflussen die Flugbahn des Balls. Der Magnus-Effekt zum Beispiel ermöglicht erst Bananenflanken. Pfeift ein Schiedsrichter falsch, dann wird er nicht selten von seiner Sehperspektive getäuscht.

  5. Verfügbarkeit von Montagesystemen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiendahl, Hans-Peter; Hegenscheidt, Matthias

    Im Vergleich zur Teileherstellung wird bei einer Montageanlage eine ungleich größere Anzahl verschiedener Teile in verketteten Stationen mit Taktzeiten im Sekundenbereich verarbeitet. Weiterhin sind viele unterschiedliche Füge- and Handhabungsfunktionen zur Montage and Prüfung der teilweise empfindlichen Teile erforderlich. Und schließlich erfordert die Verkettung and Speicherung der Teile and Zwischenprodukte umfangreiche Transport- and Speichereinrichtungen. In der Praxis treten daher vergleichsweise oft Unterbrechungen unterschiedlicher Dauer auf.

  6. Der II. Hauptsatz der Wärmelehre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heintze, Joachim

    Wir haben in (4.44) den II. Hauptsatz als empirische Tatsache folgendermaßen formuliert: (i) Wärmeenergie geht von selbst nur von einem wärmeren Körper auf einen kälteren über, niemals in der umgekehrten Richtung. Nun werden wir beweisen, dass sich aus diesem Prinzip folgende äquivalente Formulierungen für den II. Hauptsatz ableiten lassen: (ii) Es ist unmöglich, ein Perpetuum mobile zweiter Art zu bauen, d. h. eine Maschine, die fortlaufend Wärmeenergie vollständig in mechanische Arbeit umsetzen kann. Eine Wärmekraftmaschine, die einen Kreisprozess mit der höchsten Temperatur Tw und der niedrigsten Temperatur Tk durchläuft, hat höchstens den Carnotschen Wirkungsgrad c = (Tw - Tk)/Tw. Wenn in der Maschine nur reversible Prozesse ablaufen, die gesamte Wärmezufuhr bei der Temperatur Tw erfolgt und ausschließlich bei der Temperatur Tw gekühlt wird, ist ihr Wirkungsgrad = C. Es gibt keine Wärmekraftmaschine, die eine bessere Ausnutzung der Wärmeenergie ermöglicht. (iv) In jedem thermodynamischen System existiert die Zustandsgröße Entropie, definiert durch ihr Differential dS = (dQrev)/T . Entropie kann erzeugt, aber nicht vernichtet werden. Bei Zustandsänderungen, die in einem abgeschlossenen System ablaufen, nimmt die Entropie entweder zu (irreversible Prozesse), oder sie bleibt konstant (reversible Prozesse). Im Anschluss an (iii) werden wir zur Definition der thermodynamischen Temperatur und bei der Diskussion von (iv) zu einem tieferen Verständnis der Entropie gelangen. Es zeigt sich, dass die Entropie das eigentliche Bindeglied zwischen Mechanik und Wärmelehre darstellt. Am Ende des Kapitels werden wir einige Anwendungen des II. Hauptsatzes betrachten.

  7. Kamera-basierte Erkennung von Geschwindigkeitsbeschränkungen auf deutschen Straen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nienhüser, Dennis; Ziegenmeyer, Marco; Gumpp, Thomas; Scholl, Kay-Ulrich; Zöllner, J. Marius; Dillmann, Rüdiger

    An Fahrerassistenzsysteme im industriellen Einsatz werden hohe Anforderungen bezüglich Zuverlässigkeit und Robustheit gestellt. In dieser Arbeit wird die Kombination robuster Verfahren wie der Hough-Transformation und Support-Vektor-Maschinen zu einem Gesamtsystem zur Erkennung von Geschwindigkeitsbeschränkungen beschrieben. Es setzt eine Farbvideokamera als Sensorik ein. Die Evaluation auf Testdaten bestätigt durch die ermittelte hohe Korrektklassifikationsrate bei gleichzeitig geringer Zahl Fehlalarme die Zuverlässigkeit des Systems.

  8. Project CHECO Southeast Asia Report. PAVE AEGIS Weapon System (AC-130E Gunship)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1973-07-30

    enemy from the bunkers to bei7I killed by air or by running into the claymore mines. An equally successful tactic was tried near Dak Pek on 10 June. The 3...ea) 3 105MM Gun Systems (1 ea) II luminators 3 Platform Assembly, LAU -74A i Searchlight Set AN/AVQ-17 Laser Target Designator/Ranger, AN/A.VQ-19 m

  9. Algorithm for Triangulating Visual Landmarks and Determining Their Covariance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    gyroscopes ........................................ 22 1 1. INTRODUCTION The work described in this report has to do with the problem of vision ...the image must be known. The camera calibration matrix is used when modeling the projection of a scene onto an image sensor . This projection can be...is much larger than the gyro noise from tactical- grade inertial measurement units. For example, if triangulation for a visual landmark is performed

  10. Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance (ISR) Acquisition: Issues for Congress

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-16

    vehicle that does not carry a human operation, uses aerodynamic forces to provide vehicle life, can fly autonomously or be piloted remotely, can be...is beyond doubt. Since passage of the Land Remote Sensing Policy Act of 1992 (P.L. 102-555), commercial imaging satellites have been launched, and...Announces Plan for the Next Generation of Electro- Optical Satellites,” ODNI News Release No. 12-09, April 7, 2009. Intelligence, Surveillance, and

  11. GPS Spectrum Management (Briefing Charts)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-29

    Satellite-Based Augmentations - WAAS (3) - US - MSAS (2) -Japan - EGNOS (3) - Europe - GAGAN (3) - India - SDCM (3)- Russia - ALSATCOM (1...China (BeiOou) augmentation systems now (eventually 160+ satellites) share the U A (\\., o o ,.!\\ o L__j . 35 svs same spectrum for civil and military...9 SVs I (\\ ! Augmentation Sys L-. -------"-’" n-"----"-[\\,_,_11 -------’· 1 0+ SVs - Prevented UK patent claim from impacting L 1 C receiver

  12. Controlling Inelastic Light Scattering Quantum Pathways in Graphene

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-31

    applications. METHODS SUMMARY In this study we use large area graphene grown by chemical vapour deposition30. Graphene is grown on copper films using...the copper film by FeCl3. The PMMA support is dissolved in acetone solution. Subsequently, Ti (10 nm) and Au (40nm) were deposited in vacuum through...change of wave-length in light scattering.Nature 121, 619 (1928). 2. Landsberg, G. & Mandelstam, L. Eine neue Erscheinung bei der Lichtzerstreuung in

  13. Imaging Disk Distortion of Be Binary System Delta Scorpii Near Periastron

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-20

    Mount Pleasant, MI 48859, USA 3 US Naval Observatory , Flagstaff Station, 10391 West Naval Observatory Road, Flagstaff, AZ 86001, USA 4 European ... Southern Observatory , Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 2, 85748 Garching bei München, Germany 5 The CHARA Array of Georgia State University, Mount Wilson, CA 91023...USA 6 National Optical Astronomy Observatory , NOAO, Tucson, AZ, USA Received 2012 April 26; accepted 2012 July 18; published 2012 August 31 ABSTRACT

  14. Improved MEGAN predictions of biogenic isoprene in the contiguous United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Peng; Schade, Gunnar; Estes, Mark; Ying, Qi

    2017-01-01

    Isoprene emitted from biogenic sources significantly contributes to ozone and secondary organic aerosol formation in the troposphere. The Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature (MEGAN) has been widely used to estimate isoprene emissions from local to global scales. However, previous studies have shown that MEGAN significantly over-predicts isoprene emissions in the contiguous United States (US). In this study, ambient isoprene concentrations in the US were simulated by the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model (v5.0.1) using biogenic emissions estimated by MEGAN v2.10 with several different gridded isoprene emission factor (EF) fields. Best isoprene predictions were obtained with the EF field based on the Biogenic Emissions Landcover Database v4 (BELD4) from US EPA for its Biogenic Emission Inventory System (BEIS) model v3.61 (MEGAN-BEIS361). A seven-month simulation (April to October 2011) of isoprene emissions with MEGAN-BEIS361 and ambient concentrations using CMAQ shows that observed spatial and temporal variations (both diurnal and seasonal) of isoprene concentrations can be well predicted at most non-urban monitors using isoprene emission estimation from the MEGAN-BEIS361 without significant biases. The predicted monthly average vertical column density of formaldehyde (HCHO), a reactive volatile organic compound with significant contributions from isoprene oxidation, generally agree with the spatial distribution of HCHO column density derived using satellite data collected by the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI), although summer month vertical column densities in the southeast US were overestimated, which suggests that isoprene emission might still be overestimated in that region. The agreement between observation and prediction may be further improved if more accurate PAR values, such as those derived from satellite-based observations, were used in modeling the biogenic emissions.

  15. Uran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bechtel, H.; Bulian, W.; Bungardt, K.; Gürs, K.; Gürs, U.; Helling, W.; Kyri, H.; Laue, H. J.; Mahler, W.; Matting, A.; Meyer, F. R.; Mialki, W.; Ritter, F.; Ruge, J.; Saur, G.; Simon, W.; Strnat, K.; Weber, R.; Weigand, H. H.; Weik, H.; Ziesler, H.; Borchers, Heinz; Schmidt, Ernst

    Bei allen in Tab. 1 angeführten Gewinnungsverfahren [B 23, G 8, W 14] fällt das Uran als Pulver mit einer Teilchengröße von weniger als 0,05 mm an. Die Schmelzflußelektrolyse kann auch zur Nachraffination benutzt werden [A 14]. Hochreines Uran mit besonders niedrigen Gehalten an Eisen, Nickel, Kobalt, Silizium, Bor, Ruthenium, Vanadium, Mangan und Chrom kann durch Zonenschmelzen gewonnen warden [A 11, A 14].

  16. Algorithmic Approaches for Place Recognition in Featureless, Walled Environments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    use a receiver for a global navigation satellite system (GNSS), such as global positioning system (GPS), Globalnaya Navigatsionnaya Sputnikovaya...Sistema (GLONASS - a Russian satellite -based navigation system), Galileo, and/or Bei Dou. In addition to GNSS receivers, commonly used sensors are...could be implemented on a computationally constrained platform, perhaps even a smartphone , since the data it uses is very simple. On the other hand

  17. Vaccination of children with a live-attenuated, intranasal influenza vaccine - analysis and evaluation through a Health Technology Assessment.

    PubMed

    Andersohn, Frank; Bornemann, Reinhard; Damm, Oliver; Frank, Martin; Mittendorf, Thomas; Theidel, Ulrike

    2014-01-01

    Hintergrund: Die Influenza ist eine weltweit verbreitete Infektionskrankheit der Atemwege, die jährlich in Deutschland zu hoher Morbidität und Mortalität führt. Influenza ist impfpräventabel, zudem wird die Impfung von der Ständigen Impfkommission (STIKO) als Standardimpfung für über Sechzigjährige empfohlen. Bislang kam dafür fast ausschließlich ein per Injektion zu verabreichender trivalenter inaktivierter Impfstoff (TIV) zum Einsatz. Seit 2011 ist zusätzlich ein nasal zu verabreichender lebend-attenuierter inaktivierter Impfstoff (LAIV) zugelassen, der seit 2013 von der STIKO – im Rahmen der Indikationsimpfung – neben TIV für die Impfung der Altersgruppe von zwei bis 17 Jahren empfohlen wird. LAIV soll dabei bevorzugt in der Altersgruppe zwei bis sechs angewendet werden. Ziel dieses Health Technology Assessment (HTA) war die Beantwortung verschiedener Forschungsfragen zur Impfung mit LAIV, insbesondere bei Kindern, aus medizinischer, epidemiologischer und gesundheitsökonomischer sowie aus ethischer, sozialer und juristischer Perspektive.Methode: Die für die Bewertung relevanten Informationen wurden mittels einer systematischen Datenbankrecherche sowie einer ergänzenden Handrecherche ermittelt. Die gefundene Literatur wurde auf Basis vorgegebener Ein- bzw. Ausschlusskriterien von jeweils zwei unabhängigen Gutachtern durchgesehen und inhaltlich ausgewertet. Eingeschlossene Literatur wurde mittels anerkannter Standards bewertet. Die höchste Bewertung (1++) wurde Primärstudien nur dann zugesprochen, wenn diese die strengen Qualitätsanforderungen an eine pivotale Studie im Sinne der European Medicines Agency (EMA)-Guidance Points to consider on applications with 1. meta-analyses; 2. one pivotal study erfüllten. Ergebnisse: Für den medizinischen Teil liegt die Altersverteilung von Studienteilnehmern bei sechs Monaten bis 17 Jahren. Hinsichtlich der Wirksamkeit (Efficacy) ist LAIV bei Kindern von sechs Monaten bis ≤7 Jahren sowohl Placebo

  18. Strengthening Understanding and Engagement with China’s Air Force

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-02-01

    our friends and allies that a constructive relationship between the United States and China is fundamental to the continued stability and prosper...then to Hong Kong via Shenzhen . While in Bei- jing, we held meetings at the Ministry of Defense and visited the PLA’s Aviation Museum, Aviation...welcomes the continuing peaceful rise of a China that plays a stabilizing and responsible role not just in the Asia Pacific but around the world.2 Our

  19. Occupational Attitude Inventory: Use in Predictions of Job Satisfaction, Reenlistment Intent, and Reenlistment Behavior.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-10-01

    have to enlist from tile other 6W0.000. Full enlistment of those remaining is doubtful since the services will be in direct competition with civilian...listmnent betweetn eligible- inteligible and eligible ony leerlier reported pattern con tiinued. namtely that prediction appeared to bei better aniong...provided iy the surrounding community. 175. The amount of competition among your co-workers 176. The cost of TI)Y versus the payment received. 177

  20. Genome Sequences of 14 Firmicutes Strains Isolated from the Human Vagina

    PubMed Central

    Deitzler, Grace E.; Ruiz, Maria J.; Weimer, Cory; Park, SoEun; Robinson, Lloyd; Hallsworth-Pepin, Kymberlie; Wollam, Aye; Mitreva, Makedonka

    2016-01-01

    Research on vaginal infections is currently limited by a lack of available fully sequenced bacterial reference strains. Here, we present strains (now available through BEI Resources) and genome sequences for a set of 14 vaginal isolates from the phylum Firmicutes. These genome sequences provide a valuable resource for future research in understanding the role of Gram-positive bacteria in vaginal health and disease. PMID:27688329