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Sample records for h2 gas separations

  1. Evaluation of an electrochemical N2/H2 gas separator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, R. D.; Wynveen, R. A.; Carlson, J. N.

    1973-01-01

    A program was successfully completed to evaluate an electrochemical nitrogen/hydrogen (N2/H2) separator for use in a spacecraft nitrogen (N2) generator. Based on the technical data obtained a N2/H2 separator subsystem consisting of an organic polymer gas permeator first stage and an electrochemical second and third stage was estimated to have the lowest total spared equivalent weight, 257 kg (566 lb), for a 15 lb/day N2 generation rate. A pre-design analysis of the electrochemical N2/H2 separator revealed that its use as a first stage resulted in too high a power requirement to be competitive with the organic polymer membrane and the palladium-silver membrane separation methods. As a result, program emphasis was placed on evaluating the electrochemical. A parametric test program characterized cell performance and established second- and third-stage electrochemical N2/H2 separator operating conditions. A design verification test was completed on the second and third stages. The second stage was then successfully endurance tested for 200 hours.

  2. Separation of H2, HD and D2 using Low Temperature Gas Chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whisnant, C. Steven; Kelley, Travis; Burke, Ryan; Hansen, Patrick

    2008-10-01

    The frozen spin HD target developed for the study of photonuclear physics by the LEGS collaboration at Brookhaven National Laboratory (and now moved to JLab) requires high purity HD gas to produce targets with spin relaxation times on the order of months. Since this purity is not available commercially, the gas is distilled at low temperature to reduce the residual H2 and D2 contamination. Quantifying the remaining amount of these contaminants is important for preparing a target that obtains the desired polarization and spin relaxation time. To measure the relative concentrations of H2 and D2, a gas chromatography system has been developed that separates the isotopes of hydrogen. The system uses a 50 meter porous-layer open-tabular (PLOT) 5å carbon molsieve column with an inner diameter of 0.53 mm held at temperatures near 150K. The carrier gas is neon. The signal is produced by measuring differences in thermal conductivity between hydrogen and neon. Under these conditions, not only are H2 and D2 separated from HD, but o-H2 and p-H2 are also well separated from one another. The resulting chromatograms are fit to extract areas and corrected for isotopic differences in thermal conductivity to produce relative concentrations. The analysis of several gas samples will be presented and the status of the method discussed.

  3. Gas separating

    DOEpatents

    Gollan, Arye

    1988-01-01

    Feed gas is directed tangentially along the non-skin surface of gas separation membrane modules comprising a cylindrical bundle of parallel contiguous hollow fibers supported to allow feed gas to flow from an inlet at one end of a cylindrical housing through the bores of the bundled fibers to an outlet at the other end while a component of the feed gas permeates through the fibers, each having the skin side on the outside, through a permeate outlet in the cylindrical casing.

  4. Gas separating

    DOEpatents

    Gollan, Arye Z. [Newton, MA

    1990-12-25

    Feed gas is directed tangentially along the non-skin surface of gas separation membrane modules comprising a cylindrical bundle of parallel contiguous hollow fibers supported to allow feed gas to flow from an inlet at one end of a cylindrical housing through the bores of the bundled fibers to an outlet at the other end while a component of the feed gas permeates through the fibers, each having the skin side on the outside, through a permeate outlet in the cylindrical casing.

  5. Gas separating

    DOEpatents

    Gollan, A.

    1988-03-29

    Feed gas is directed tangentially along the non-skin surface of gas separation membrane modules comprising a cylindrical bundle of parallel contiguous hollow fibers supported to allow feed gas to flow from an inlet at one end of a cylindrical housing through the bores of the bundled fibers to an outlet at the other end while a component of the feed gas permeates through the fibers, each having the skin side on the outside, through a permeate outlet in the cylindrical casing. 3 figs.

  6. Gas separating

    DOEpatents

    Gollan, A.Z.

    1990-12-25

    Feed gas is directed tangentially along the non-skin surface of gas separation membrane modules comprising a cylindrical bundle of parallel contiguous hollow fibers supported to allow feed gas to flow from an inlet at one end of a cylindrical housing through the bores of the bundled fibers to an outlet at the other end while a component of the feed gas permeates through the fibers, each having the skin side on the outside, through a permeate outlet in the cylindrical casing. 3 figs.

  7. Mixed-Matric Membranes for CO2 and H2 Gas Separations Using Metal-Organic Framework and Mesoporus Hybrid Silicas

    SciTech Connect

    Inga Musselman; Kenneth Balkus, Jr.; John Ferraris

    2009-01-07

    In this work, we have investigated the separation performance of polymer-based mixed-matrix membranes containing metal-organic frameworks and mesoporous hybrid silicas. The MOF/Matrimid{reg_sign} and MOP-18/Matrimid{reg_sign} membranes exhibited improved dispersion and mechanical strength that allowed high additive loadings with reduced aggregation, as is the case of the 80 wt% MOP-18/Matrimid{reg_sign} and the 80% (w/w) Cu-MOF/Matrimid{reg_sign} membranes. Membranes with up to 60% (w/w) ZIF-8 content exhibited similar mechanical strength and improved dispersion. The H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} separation properties of MOF/Matrimid{reg_sign} mixed-matrix membranes was improved by either keeping the selectivity constant and increasing the permeability (MOF-5, Cu-MOF) or by improving both selectivity and permeability (ZIF-8). In the case of MOF-5/Matrimid{reg_sign} mixed-matrix membranes, the H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} selectivity was kept at 2.6 and the H{sub 2} permeability increased from 24.4 to 53.8 Barrers. For the Cu-MOF/Matrimid{reg_sign} mixed-matrix membranes, the H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} selectivity was kept at 2.05 and the H{sub 2} permeability increased from 17.1 to 158 Barrers. These two materials introduced porosity and uniform paths that enhanced the gas transport in the membranes. When ZIF-8/Matrimid{reg_sign} mixed-matrix membranes were studied, the H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} selectivity increased from 2.9 to 4.4 and the permeability of H{sub 2} increased from 26.5 to 35.8 Barrers. The increased H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} selectivity in ZIF-8/Matrimid{reg_sign} membranes was explained by the sieving effect introduced by the ZIF-8 crystals (pore window 0.34 nm) that restricted the transport of molecules larger than H{sub 2}. Materials with microporous and/or mesoporous cavities like carbon aerogel composites with zeolite A and zeolite Y, and membranes containing mesoporous ZSM-5 showed sieving effects for small molecules (e.g. H{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}), however, the membranes were most

  8. Ni-H2 cell separator matrix engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, W. E.

    1992-01-01

    This project was initiated to develop alternative separator materials to the previously used asbestos matrices which were removed from the market for health and environmental reasons. The objective of the research was to find a material or combination of materials that had the following characteristics: (1) resistant to the severe conditions encountered in Ni-H2 cells; (2) satisfactory electrical, electrolyte management, and thermal management properties to function properly; (3) environmentally benign; and (4) capable of being manufactured into a separator matrix. During the course of the research it was discovered that separators prepared from wettable polyethylene fibers along and in combination with potassium titanate pigment performed satisfactory in preliminary characterization tests. Further studies lead to the optimization of the separator composition and manufacturing process. Single ply separator sheets were manufactured with 100 percent polyethylene fibers and also with a combination of polyethylene fibers and potassium titanate pigment (PKT) in the ratio of 60 percent PKT and 40 percent fibers. A pilot paper machine was used to produce the experimental separator material by a continuous, wet laid process. Both types of matrices were produced at several different area densities (grams/sq m).

  9. Highly Selective H2 Separation Zeolite Membranes for Coal Gasification Membrane Reactor Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Mei Hong; Richard Noble; John Falconer

    2007-09-24

    Zeolite membranes are thermally, chemically, and mechanically stable. They also have tunable molecular sieving and catalytic ability. These unique properties make zeolite membrane an excellent candidate for use in catalytic membrane reactor applications related to coal conversion and gasification, which need high temperature and high pressure range separation in chemically challenging environment where existing technologies are inefficient or unable to operate. Small pore, good quality, and thin zeolite membranes are needed for highly selective H2 separation from other light gases (CO2, CH4, CO). However, current zeolite membranes have either too big zeolite pores or a large number of defects and have not been successful for H2 separation from light gases. The objective of this study is to develop zeolite membranes that are more suitable for H2 separation. In an effort to tune the size of zeolite pores and/or to decrease the number of defects, medium-pore zeolite B-ZSM-5 (MFI) membranes were synthesized and silylated. Silylation on B-ZSM-5 crystals reduced MFI-zeolite pore volume, but had little effect on CO2 and CH4 adsorption. Silylation on B-ZSM-5 membranes increased H2 selectivity both in single component and in mixtures with CO2, CH4, or N2. Single gas and binary mixtures of H2/CO2 and H2/CH4 were permeated through silylated B-ZSM-5 membranes at feed pressures up to 1.7 MPa and temperatures up to 773 K. For one B-ZSM-5 membrane after silylation, the H2/CO2 separation selectivity at 473 K increased from 1.4 to 37, whereas the H2/CH4 separation selectivity increased from 1.6 to 33. Hydrogen permeance through a silylated BZSM-5 membrane was activated with activation energy of {approx}10 kJ/mol, but the CO2 and CH4 permeances decreased slightly with temperature in both single gas and in mixtures. Therefore, the H2 permeance and H2/CO2 and H2/CH4 separation selectivities increased with temperature. At 673 K, the H2 permeance was 1.0x10-7 mol{center_dot}m-2{center

  10. CO2/H2 separation using a highly permeable polyurethane membrane: Molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azizi, Morteza; Mousavi, Seyyed Abbas

    2015-11-01

    In this study, Molecular Dynamics (MD) and Grand Canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) simulations were conducted to investigate the diffusivity, solubility, and permeability of CO2, CO, H2, and H2O in a polyurethane membrane at three different temperatures. The characterization of the simulated structures was carried out using XRD, FFV, Tg and density calculation, and cavity size distribution. The obtained results were within the expectations reported data in the literature based on the experimental approach, indicating the authenticity of approached in this work. The results showed that the highest diffusivity and permeability coefficients were observed for H2; while the highest values of solubility coefficient were found for H2O and CO2 gases. The increase of operating temperature from 298 K to 318 K has a positive effect on the permeation of all gases and a corresponding negative effect on the selectivity of the gas pair CO2/H2. Also, the results vividly showed that CO2 and H2O gases have a profound affinity with hard phase of polyurethane, while H2 and CO were conversely adsorbed by soft one. Moreover, the enhancement of permeability and permselectivity of CO2/H2 pair confirmed using Robeson Upper-Bond graph showed its good capacity for CO2/H2 separation application.

  11. H2S Analysis in Biological Samples Using Gas Chromatography with Sulfur Chemiluminescence Detection

    PubMed Central

    Vitvitsky, Victor; Banerjee, Ruma

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a metabolite and signaling molecule in biological tissues that regulates many physiological processes. Reliable and sensitive methods for H2S analysis are necessary for a better understanding of H2S biology and for the pharmacological modulation of H2S levels in vivo. In this chapter, we describe the use of gas chromatography coupled to sulfur chemiluminescence detection to measure the rates of H2S production and degradation by tissue homogenates at physiologically relevant concentrations of substrates. This method allows separation of H2S from other sulfur compounds and provides sensitivity of detection to ~15 pg (or 0.5 pmol) of H2S per injected sample. PMID:25725519

  12. NOVEL NANOCOMPOSITE MEMBRANE STRUCTURES FOR H2 SEPARATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Benny D. Freeman

    2005-03-31

    This report explores possible methods of improving CO{sub 2} selectivity in polymer based membranes. The first method investigated using basic nanoparticles to enhance the solubility of acid gases in nanocomposite membranes, thus enhancing the overall acid gas/light gas selectivity (e.g., CO{sub 2}/H{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}/CH{sub 4}, etc.). The influence of nanoparticle surface chemistry on nanocomposite morphology and transport properties will be determined experimentally in a series of poly(1-trimethylsilyl-1-propyne). Additional factors (e.g., chemical reaction of the particles with the polymers) have been considered, as necessary, during the course of the investigation. The second method investigated using polar polymers such as crosslinked poly(ethylene oxide) and poly(ether-b-amide) to improve CO{sub 2} sorption and thereby increase CO{sub 2} permeability and CO{sub 2}/light gas selectivity. For both types of materials, CO{sub 2} and light gas permeabilities have been characterized. The overall objective was to improve the understanding of materials design strategies to improve acid gas transport properties of membranes.

  13. Highly Selective H2 Separation Zeolite Membranes for Coal Gasification Membrane Reactor Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Mei Hong; Richard D. Noble; John L. Falconer

    2006-09-24

    Zeolite membranes are thermally, chemically, and mechanically stable. They also have tunable molecular sieving and catalytic ability. These unique properties make zeolite membrane an excellent candidate for use in catalytic membrane reactor applications related to coal conversion and gasification, which need high temperature and high pressure range separation in chemically challenging environment where existing technologies are inefficient or unable to operate. Small pore, good quality, and thin zeolite membranes are needed for highly selective H{sub 2} separation from other light gases (CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, CO). However, zeolite membranes have not been successful for H{sub 2} separation from light gases because the zeolite pores are either too big or the membranes have a large number of defects. The objective of this study is to develop zeolite membranes that are more suitable for H{sub 2} separation. In an effort to tune the size of zeolite pores and/or to decrease the number of defects, medium-pore zeolite B-ZSM-5 (MFI) membranes were synthesized and silylated. Silylation on B-ZSM-5 crystals reduced MFI-zeolite pore volume, but had little effect on CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} adsorption. Silylation on B-ZSM-5 membranes increased H{sub 2} selectivity both in single component and in mixtures with CO{sub 2}CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, or N2. Single gas and binary mixtures of H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} were separated through silylated B-ZSM-5 membranes at feed pressures up to 1.7 MPa and temperatures up to 773 K. For one BZSM-5 membrane after silylation, the H2/CO{sub 2} separation selectivity at 473 K increased from 1.4 to 37, whereas the H{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} separation selectivity increased from 1.6 to 33. Hydrogen permeance through a silylated B-ZSM-5 membrane was activated, but the CO{sub 2} and CH4 permeances decreased slightly with temperature in both single gas and in mixtures. Therefore, the H{sub 2} permeance and H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} and H{sup 2} /CH{sub 4

  14. Enhanced membrane gas separations

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, R.

    1993-07-13

    An improved membrane gas separation process is described comprising: (a) passing a feed gas stream to the non-permeate side of a membrane system adapted for the passage of purge gas on the permeate side thereof, and for the passage of the feed gas stream in a counter current flow pattern relative to the flow of purge gas on the permeate side thereof, said membrane system being capable of selectively permeating a fast permeating component from said feed gas, at a feed gas pressure at or above atmospheric pressure; (b) passing purge gas to the permeate side of the membrane system in counter current flow to the flow of said feed gas stream in order to facilitate carrying away of said fast permeating component from the surface of the membrane and maintaining the driving force for removal of the fast permeating component through the membrane from the feed gas stream, said permeate side of the membrane being maintained at a subatmospheric pressure within the range of from about 0.1 to about 5 psia by vacuum pump means; (c) recovering a product gas stream from the non-permeate side of the membrane; and (d) discharging purge gas and the fast permeating component that has permeated the membrane from the permeate side of the membrane, whereby the vacuum conditions maintained on the permeate side of the membrane by said vacuum pump means enhance the efficiency of the gas separation operation, thereby reducing the overall energy requirements thereof.

  15. Gas-separation process

    DOEpatents

    Toy, Lora G.; Pinnau, Ingo; Baker, Richard W.

    1994-01-01

    A process for separating condensable organic components from gas streams. The process makes use of a membrane made from a polymer material that is glassy and that has an unusually high free volume within the polymer material.

  16. Gas separation membranes

    DOEpatents

    Schell, William J.

    1979-01-01

    A dry, fabric supported, polymeric gas separation membrane, such as cellulose acetate, is prepared by casting a solution of the polymer onto a shrinkable fabric preferably formed of synthetic polymers such as polyester or polyamide filaments before washing, stretching or calendering (so called griege goods). The supported membrane is then subjected to gelling, annealing, and drying by solvent exchange. During the processing steps, both the fabric support and the membrane shrink a preselected, controlled amount which prevents curling, wrinkling or cracking of the membrane in flat form or when spirally wound into a gas separation element.

  17. Corrosion of 310 stainless steel in H2-H2O-H2S gas mixtures: Studies at constant temperature and fixed oxygen potential

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, D. B.; Jacob, K. T.; Nelson, H. G.

    1981-01-01

    Corrosion of SAE 310 stainless steel in H2-H2O-H2S gas mixtures was studied at a constant temperature of 1150 K. Reactive gas mixtures were chosen to yield a constant oxygen potential of approximately 6 x 10 to the minus 13th power/cu Nm and sulfur potentials ranging from 0.19 x 10 to the minus 2nd power/cu Nm to 33 x 10 to the minus 2nd power/cu Nm. The kinetics of corrosion were determined using a thermobalance, and the scales were analyzed using metallography, scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray analysis. Two corrosion regimes, which were dependent on sulfur potential, were identified. At high sulfur potentials (p sub S sub 2 less than or equal to 2.7 x 10 to the minus 2nd power/cu Nm) the corrosion rates were high, the kinetics obeyed a linear rate equation, and the scales consisted mainly of sulfide phases similar to those observed from pure sulfication. At low sulfur potentials (P sub S sub 2 less than or equal to 0.19 x 10 to the minus 2nd power/cu Nm) the corrosion rates were low, the kinetics obeyed a parabolic rate equation, and scales consisted mainly of oxide phases.

  18. Gas-separation process

    DOEpatents

    Toy, L.G.; Pinnau, I.; Baker, R.W.

    1994-01-25

    A process is described for separating condensable organic components from gas streams. The process makes use of a membrane made from a polymer material that is glassy and that has an unusually high free volume within the polymer material. 6 figures.

  19. Polymide gas separation membranes

    DOEpatents

    Ding, Yong; Bikson, Benjamin; Nelson, Joyce Katz

    2004-09-14

    Soluble polyamic acid salt (PAAS) precursors comprised of tertiary and quaternary amines, ammonium cations, sulfonium cations, or phosphonium cations, are prepared and fabricated into membranes that are subsequently imidized and converted into rigid-rod polyimide articles, such as membranes with desirable gas separation properties. A method of enhancing solubility of PAAS polymers in alcohols is also disclosed.

  20. Phase Separation Kinetics in Isopycnic Mixtures of H2O/CO2/Ethoxylated Alcohol Surfactants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lesemann, Markus; Paulaitis, Michael E.; Kaler, Eric W.

    1999-01-01

    Ternary mixtures of H2O and CO2 with ethoxylated alcohol (C(sub i)E(sub j)) surfactants form three coexisting liquid phases at conditions where two of the phases have equal densities (isopycnic phases). Isopycnic phase behavior has been observed for mixtures containing C8E5, C10E6, and C12E6 surfactants, but not for those mixtures containing either C4E1 or C8E3 surfactants. Pressure-temperature (PT) projections for this three-phase equilibrium were determined for H2O/CO2/C8E5 and H2O/CO2/C10E6 mixtures at temperatures from approximately 25 to 33 C and pressures between 90 and 350 bar. Measurements of the microstructure in H2O/CO2/C12E6 mixtures as a function of temperature (25-31 C), pressure (63.1-90.7 bar), and CO2 composition (0-3.9 wt%) have also been carried out to show that while micellar structure remains essentially un-changed, critical concentration fluctuations increase as the phase boundary and plait point are approached. In this report, we present our first measurements of the kinetics of isopycnic phase separation for ternary mixtures of H2O/CO2/C8E5.

  1. Gas separation membrane module assembly

    DOEpatents

    Wynn, Nicholas P; Fulton, Donald A.

    2009-03-31

    A gas-separation membrane module assembly and a gas-separation process using the assembly. The assembly includes a set of tubes, each containing gas-separation membranes, arranged within a housing. The housing contains a tube sheet that divides the space within the housing into two gas-tight spaces. A permeate collection system within the housing gathers permeate gas from the tubes for discharge from the housing.

  2. Update on DOE Advanced IGCC/H2 Gas Turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chupp, Ray

    2009-01-01

    Cooling Flow Reduction: a) Focus on improving turbine hot gas path part cooling efficiency. b) Applicable to current metallic turbine components and synergistic with advanced materials. c) Address challenges of IGCC/hydrogen fuel environment (for example, possible cooling hole plugging). Leakage Flow Reduction: a) Focus on decreasing turbine parasitic leakages, i.e. between static-to-static, static-to-rotating turbine parts. b) Develop improved seal designs in a variety of important areas. Purge Flow Reduction: a) Focus on decreasing required flows to keep rotor disk cavities within temperature limits. b) Develop improved sealing at the cavity rims and modified flow geometries to minimize hot gas ingestion and aerodynamic impact.

  3. Microporous metal organic framework [M2(hfipbb)2(ted)] (M=Zn, Co; H2hfipbb=4,4-(hexafluoroisopropylidene)-bis(benzoic acid); ted=triethylenediamine): Synthesis, structure analysis, pore characterization, small gas adsorption and CO2/N2 separation properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, William W.; Pramanik, Sanhita; Zhang, Zhijuan; Emge, Thomas J.; Li, Jing

    2013-04-01

    Carbon dioxide is a greenhouse gas that is a major contributor to global warming. Developing methods that can effectively capture CO2 is the key to reduce its emission to the atmosphere. Recent research shows that microporous metal organic frameworks (MOFs) are emerging as a promising family of adsorbents that may be promising for use in adsorption based capture and separation of CO2 from power plant waste gases. In this work we report the synthesis, crystal structure analysis and pore characterization of two microporous MOF structures, [M2(hfipbb)2(ted)] (M=Zn (1), Co (2); H2hfipbb=4,4-(hexafluoroisopropylidene)-bis(benzoic acid); ted=triethylenediamine). The CO2 and N2 adsorption experiments and IAST calculations are carried out on [Zn2(hfipbb)2(ted)] under conditions that mimic post-combustion flue gas mixtures emitted from power plants. The results show that the framework interacts with CO2 strongly, giving rise to relatively high isosteric heats of adsorption (up to 28 kJ/mol), and high adsorption selectivity for CO2 over N2, making it promising for capturing and separating CO2 from CO2/N2 mixtures.

  4. Towards H2-rich gas production from unmixed steam reforming of methane: Thermodynamic modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima da Silva, Aline; Müller, Iduvirges Lourdes

    2011-10-01

    In this work, the Gibbs energy minimization method is applied to investigate the unmixed steam reforming (USR) of methane to generate hydrogen for fuel cell application. The USR process is an advanced reforming technology that relies on the use of separate air and fuel/steam feeds to create a cyclic process. Under air flow (first half of the cycle), a bed of Ni-based material is oxidized, providing the heat necessary for the steam reforming that occurs subsequently during fuel/steam feed stage (second half of the cycle). In the presence of CaO sorbent, high purity hydrogen can be produced in a single reactor. In the first part of this work, it is demonstrated that thermodynamic predictions are consistent with experimental results from USR isothermal tests under fuel/steam feed. From this, it is also verified that the reacted NiO to CH4 (NiOreacted/CH4) molar ratio is a very important parameter that affects the product gas composition and decreases with time. At the end of fuel/steam flow, the reforming reaction is the most important chemical mechanism, with H2 production reaching ∼75 mol%. On the other hand, at the beginning of fuel/steam feed stage, NiO reduction reactions dominate the equilibrium system, resulting in high CO2 selectivity, negative steam conversion and low concentrations of H2. In the second part of this paper, the effect of NiOreacted/CH4 molar ratio on the product gas composition and enthalpy change during fuel flow is investigated at different temperatures for inlet H2O/CH4 molar ratios in the range of 1.2-4, considering the USR process operated with and without CaO sorbent. During fuel/steam feed stage, the energy demand increases as time passes, because endothermic reforming reaction becomes increasingly important as this stage nears its end. Thus, the duration of the second half of the cycle is limited by the conditions under which auto-thermal operation can be achieved. In absence of CaO, H2 at concentrations of approximately 73 mol% can

  5. Application of a quantum cascade laser for time-resolved, in situ probing of CH4/H2 and C2H2/H2 gas mixtures during microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of diamond.

    PubMed

    Cheesman, A; Smith, J A; Ashfold, M N R; Langford, N; Wright, S; Duxbury, G

    2006-03-01

    First illustrations of the utility of pulsed quantum cascade lasers for in situ probing of the chemistry prevailing in microwave plasma activated hydrocarbon/Ar/H2 gas mixtures used for diamond thin film growth are reported. CH4 and C2H2 molecules, and their interconversion, have been monitored by line-of-sight single pass absorption methods, as a function of process conditions (e.g., choice of input hydrocarbon (CH4 or C2H2), hydrocarbon mole fraction, total gas pressure, and applied microwave power). The observed trends can be rationalized, qualitatively, within the framework of the previously reported modeling of the gas-phase chemistry prevailing in hot filament activated hydrocarbon/H2 gas mixtures (Ashfold et al. Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 2001, 3, 3471). Column densities of vibrationally excited C2H2(v5=1) molecules at low input carbon fractions are shown to be far higher than expected on the basis of local thermodynamic equilibrium. The presence of vibrationally excited C2H2 molecules (C2H2(double dagger)) can be attributed to the exothermicity of the C2H3 + H <==> C2H2 + H2 elementary reaction within the overall multistep CH4 --> C2H2 conversion. Diagnostic methods that sample just C2H2(v=0) molecules thus run the risk of underestimating total C2H2 column densities in hydrocarbon/H2 mixtures operated under conditions where the production rate of C2H2(double dagger) molecules exceeds their vibrational relaxation (and thermal equilibration) rates.

  6. C+/H2 gas in star-forming clouds and galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordon, Raanan; Sternberg, Amiel

    2016-11-01

    We present analytic theory for the total column density of singly ionized carbon (C+) in the optically thick photon dominated regions (PDRs) of far-UV irradiated (star-forming) molecular clouds. We derive a simple formula for the C+ column as a function of the cloud (hydrogen) density, the far-UV field intensity, and metallicity, encompassing the wide range of galaxy conditions. When assuming the typical relation between UV and density in the cold neutral medium, the C+ column becomes a function of the metallicity alone. We verify our analysis with detailed numerical PDR models. For optically thick gas, most of the C+ column is mixed with hydrogen that is primarily molecular (H2), and this `C+/H2' gas layer accounts for almost all of the `CO-dark' molecular gas in PDRs. The C+/H2 column density is limited by dust shielding and is inversely proportional to the metallicity down to ˜0.1 solar. At lower metallicities, H2 line blocking dominates and the C+/H2 column saturates. Applying our theory to CO surveys in low-redshift spirals, we estimate the fraction of C+/H2 gas out of the total molecular gas to be typically ˜0.4. At redshifts 1 < z < 3 in massive disc galaxies the C+/H2 gas represents a very small fraction of the total molecular gas (≲ 0.16). This small fraction at high redshifts is due to the high gas surface densities when compared to local galaxies.

  7. Gas-phase H2O and CO2 towards massive protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boonman, A. M. S.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Lahuis, F.; Wright, C. M.; Doty, S. D.

    2000-11-01

    We present a study of gas-phase H2O and CO2 towards a sample of 14 massive protostars with the ISO-SWS. Modeling of the H2O spectra using a homogeneous model with a constant excitation temperature Tex shows that the H2O abundances increase with temperature, up to a few times 10-5 with respect to H2 for the hottest sources (Tex~ 500 K). This is still a factor of 10 lower than the H2O ice abundances observed towards cold sources in which evaporation is not significant (Keane et al. 2000). Gas-phase CO2 is not abundant in our sources. The abundances are nearly constant for Tex >~ 100 K at a value of a few times 10-7, much lower than the solid-state abundances of ~1-3× 10-6 (Gerakines et al. 1999). Gas/solid ratios have been determined, using the solid-state features of H2O (Keane et al. 2000) and CO2 (Gerakines et al. 1999) as observed with ISO-SWS towards the same objects. For both H2O and CO2 the gas/solid ratio increases with temperature, but the increase is much stronger for H2O than for CO2, suggesting a different type of chemistry. In addition to the homogeneous models, a power law model has been developed for one of our sources, based on the physical structure of this region as determined from submillimeter data by van der Tak et al. (1999). The resulting H2O model spectrum gives a good fit to the data.

  8. Separation of enantiomers by ultraviolet laser pulses in H2POSH: π pulses versus adiabatic transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, Leticia; Kröner, Dominik; Solá, Ignacio R.

    2001-08-01

    Different strategies to separate enantiomers from a racemate using analytical laser pulses in the ultraviolet frequency domain are proposed for the prototype model system H2POSH. Wave-packet propagations on ab initio ground- and electronic-excited state potentials show that it is possible to produce 100% of enantiomeric excess in a sub-picosecond time scale using a sequence of π and half-π pulses. Alternatively, the previous transitions can be substituted by adiabatic counterparts, using chirped laser pulses and a half-STIRAP (stimulated Raman adiabatic passage) method which only transfers half of the population between appropriate levels. Such an overall adiabatic mechanism gains stability concerning the pulse areas and frequencies at the expense of introducing new control variables, like the chirp and time delay.

  9. Defect-free thin film membranes for H2 separation and isolation.

    SciTech Connect

    Nenoff, Tina Maria; Keller, Jay O.; Welk, Margaret Ellen

    2004-05-01

    There is a great need for robust, defect-free, highly selective molecular sieve (zeolite) thin film membranes for light gas molecule separations in hydrogen fuel production from CH{sub 4} or H{sub 2}O sources. In particular, we are interested in (1) separating and isolating H{sub 2} from H{sub 2}O and CH{sub 4}, CO, CO{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, N{sub 2} gases; (2) water management in PEMs and (3) as a replacement for expensive Pt catalysts needed for PEMs. Current hydrogen separation membranes are based on Pd alloys or on chemically and mechanically unstable organic polymer membranes. The use of molecular sieves brings a stable (chemically and mechanically stable) inorganic matrix to the membrane [1-3]. The crystalline frameworks have 'tunable' pores that are capable of size exclusion separations. The frameworks are made of inorganic oxides (e.g., silicates, aluminosilicates, and phosphates) that bring different charge and electrostatic attraction forces to the separation media. The resultant materials have high separation abilities plus inherent thermal stability over 600 C and chemical stability. Furthermore, the crystallographically defined (<1 {angstrom} deviation) pore sizes and shapes allow for size exclusion of very similarly sized molecules. In contrast, organic polymer membranes are successful based on diffusion separations, not size exclusion. We envision the impact of positive results from this project in the near term with hydrocarbon fuels, and long term with biomass fuels. There is a great need for robust, defect-free, highly selective molecular sieve (zeolite) thin film membranes for light gas molecule separations in hydrogen fuel production from CH{sub 4} or H{sub 2}O sources. They contain an inherent chemical, thermal and mechanical stability not found in conventional membrane materials. Our goal is to utilize those zeolitic qualities in membranes for the separation of light gases, and to eventually partner with industry to commercialize the membranes. To

  10. Lighting the Dark Molecular Gas: H2 as a Direct Tracer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Togi, Aditya; Smith, J. D. T.

    2016-10-01

    Robust knowledge of molecular gas mass is critical for understanding star formation in galaxies. The {{{H}}}2 molecule does not emit efficiently in the cold interstellar medium, hence the molecular gas content of galaxies is typically inferred using indirect tracers. At low metallicity and in other extreme environments, these tracers can be subject to substantial biases. We present a new method of estimating total molecular gas mass in galaxies directly from pure mid-infrared rotational {{{H}}}2 emission. By assuming a power-law distribution of {{{H}}}2 rotational temperatures, we can accurately model {{{H}}}2 excitation and reliably obtain warm (T ≳ 100 K) {{{H}}}2 gas masses by varying only the power law’s slope. With sensitivities typical of Spitzer/IRS, we are able to directly probe the {{{H}}}2 content via rotational emission down to ∼80 K, accounting for ∼15% of the total molecular gas mass in a galaxy. By extrapolating the fitted power-law temperature distributions to a calibrated single lower cutoff temperature, the model also recovers the total molecular content within a factor of ∼2.2 in a diverse sample of galaxies, and a subset of broken power-law models performs similarly well. In ULIRGs, the fraction of warm {{{H}}}2 gas rises with dust temperature, with some dependency on α CO. In a sample of five low-metallicity galaxies ranging down to 12+{log}[{{O}}/{{H}}]=7.8, the model yields molecular masses up to ∼100× larger than implied by CO, in good agreement with other methods based on dust mass and star formation depletion timescale. This technique offers real promise for assessing molecular content in the early universe where CO and dust-based methods may fail.

  11. Effect of H2 and CO contents in syngas during combustion using Micro Gas Turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Othman, N. F.; Boosroh, M. H.

    2016-03-01

    Synthetic gas or syngas is produced from the gasification process. Its main compositions are hydrogen, H2; carbon monoxide, CO; methane, CH4; carbon dioxide, CO2 and nitrogen, N2. Syngas is a substitute for the depleting natural gas (80-90%.vol. CH4). Natural gas is combusted in gas turbine in gas-fired power plant to produce electricity. However, combustion of syngas using gas turbine is expected to show different behavior compared to natural gas combustion. This is because of H2 and CO contents in syngas have higher adiabatic flame temperature than CH4. In this study, different quality of syngas with different contents of H2 (0.6-0.8 %.vol.) and CO (1-3 %.vol.) were combusted using 30kW Micro Gas Turbine (MGT). Performances of different syngas quality were studied using NOx, CO, CO2 emissions and combustion efficiency parameters. NOx and CO are the main pollutants from the combustion process. NOx emissions were the highest for syngas with H2 contents of 0.8 %.vol. and CO contents of 3 %.vol. CO emissions were in the range of 220-310 ppm for all the tested syngas. While, CO2 emissions were in the range of 0.96-1.06 % for all the tested syngas. Combustion efficiencies were reduced for syngas with CO contents of 1 %.vol. and H2 contents of 0.6-0.8 %.vol. This is most probably due to the dilution effect of N2 in syngas.

  12. Highly porous ionic rht metal-organic framework for H2 and CO2 storage and separation: a molecular simulation study.

    PubMed

    Babarao, R; Eddaoudi, M; Jiang, J W

    2010-07-01

    The storage and separation of H2 and CO2 are investigated in a highly porous ionic rht metal-organic framework (rht-MOF) using molecular simulation. The rht-MOF possesses a cationic framework and charge-balancing extraframework NO3(-) ions. Three types of unique open cages exist in the framework: rhombicuboctahedral, tetrahedral, and cuboctahedral cages. The NO3(-) ions exhibit small mobility and are located at the windows connecting the tetrahedral and cuboctahedral cages. At low pressures, H2 adsorption occurs near the NO3(-) ions that act as preferential sites. With increasing pressure, H2 molecules occupy the tetrahedral and cuboctahedral cages and the intersection regions. The predicted isotherm of H2 at 77 K agrees well with the experimental data. The H2 capacity is estimated to be 2.4 wt % at 1 bar and 6.2 wt % at 50 bar, among the highest in reported MOFs. In a four-component mixture (15:75:5:5 CO2/H2/CO/CH4) representing a typical effluent gas of H2 production, the selectivity of CO2/H2 in rht-MOF decreases slightly with increasing pressure, then increases because of cooperative interactions, and finally decreases as a consequence of entropy effect. By comparing three ionic MOFs (rht-MOF, soc-MOF, and rho-ZMOF), we find that the selectivity increases with increasing charge density or decreasing free volume. In the presence of a trace amount of H2O, the interactions between CO2 and NO3(-) ions are significantly shielded by H2O; consequently, the selectivity of CO2/H2 decreases substantially.

  13. Gas Separations using Ceramic Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Paul KT Liu

    2005-01-13

    This project has been oriented toward the development of a commercially viable ceramic membrane for high temperature gas separations. A technically and commercially viable high temperature gas separation membrane and process has been developed under this project. The lab and field tests have demonstrated the operational stability, both performance and material, of the gas separation thin film, deposited upon the ceramic membrane developed. This performance reliability is built upon the ceramic membrane developed under this project as a substrate for elevated temperature operation. A comprehensive product development approach has been taken to produce an economically viable ceramic substrate, gas selective thin film and the module required to house the innovative membranes for the elevated temperature operation. Field tests have been performed to demonstrate the technical and commercial viability for (i) energy and water recovery from boiler flue gases, and (ii) hydrogen recovery from refinery waste streams using the membrane/module product developed under this project. Active commercializations effort teaming with key industrial OEMs and end users is currently underway for these applications. In addition, the gas separation membrane developed under this project has demonstrated its economical viability for the CO2 removal from subquality natural gas and landfill gas, although performance stability at the elevated temperature remains to be confirmed in the field.

  14. State-to-state, multi-collision, energy transfer in H-H2 gas ensembles.

    PubMed

    McCaffery, Anthony J; Marsh, Richard J

    2013-12-21

    We use our recently developed computational model of energy flow in gas ensembles to study translation-to-internal energy conversion in an ensemble consisting of H2(0; 0) in a bath of H atoms. This mixture is found in plasmas of industrial importance and also in interstellar clouds. The storage of energy of relative motion as rovibrational energy of H2 represents a potential mechanism for cooling translation. This may have relevance in astrophysical contexts such as the post-recombination epoch of the early universe when hydrogenic species dominated and cooling was a precondition for the formation of structured objects. We find that conversion of translational motion to H2 vibration and rotation is fast and, in our closed system, is complete within around 100 cycles of ensemble collisions. Large amounts of energy become stored as H2 vibration and a tentative mechanism for this unequal energy distribution is suggested. The "structured dis-equilibrium" we observe is found to persist through many collision cycles. In contrast to the rapidity of excitation, the relaxation of H2(6; 10) in H is very slow and not complete after 10(5) collision cycles. The quasi-equilibrium modal temperatures of translation, rotation, and vibration are found to scale linearly with collision energy but at different rates. This may be useful in estimating the partitioning of energy within a given H + H2 ensemble.

  15. Intramolecular bond length dependence of the anisotropic dispersion coefficients for H2-rare gas interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wormer, Paul E. S.; Hettema, Hinne; Thakkar, Ajit J.

    1993-05-01

    Effective states arising from variational perturbation calculations in a full configuration interaction basis are used to calculate dynamic multipole polarizabilities for H2 at seven different bond lengths. These are combined with previously calculated dynamic polarizabilities for rare gas atoms to obtain the intramolecular bond length dependence of the anisotropic C6, C8, and C10 dispersion coefficients for H2-X (X=He, Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe) interactions. The results are generally in good agreement with previous semiempirical estimates where available.

  16. Gas-Phase Condensation Reactions of SixOyHz- Oxyanions with H2O

    SciTech Connect

    Groenewold, Gary Steven; Scott, Jill Rennee; Gianotto, Anita Kay; Hodges, Brittany DM; Kessinger, Glen Frank; Benson, Michael Timothy; Wright, J. B.

    2001-09-01

    Water was reacted with gas-phase oxyanions having the general composition SixOyHz- that were formed and isolated in an ion trap-secondary ion mass spectrometer (IT-SIMS). The radical SiO2- reacted slowly with H2O to abstract HO, forming SiO3H-, at a rate of 8 × 10-13 cm3 molecule-1 s-1, corresponding to an efficiency of about 0.03% compared with the theoretical collision rate constant (average dipole orientation). The product ion SiO3H- underwent a consecutive condensation reaction with H2O to form SiO4H3- at a rate that was approximately 0.4-0.7% efficient. SiO4H3- did not undergo further reaction with water. The multiple reaction pathways by which radical SiO3- reacted with H2O were kinetically modeled using a stochastic approach. SiO3- reacted with water by three parallel reaction pathways: (1) abstraction of a radical H to form SiO3H-, which then reacted with a second H2O to form SiO4H3-; (2) abstraction of a radical OH to form SiO4H-, which further reacted by consecutive H abstractions to form SiO4H2- and then SiO4H3-; and (3) condensation with H2O to form SiO4H2-, which subsequently abstracted a radical H from a second H2O to form SiO4H3-. In all of these reactions, the rate constants were determined to be very slow, as determined by both direct measurement and stochastic modeling. For comparison, the even electron ion Si2O5H- was also investigated: it underwent condensation with H2O to form Si2O6H3-, with a rate constant corresponding to 50% efficiency. The reactions were also modeled using ab initio calculations at the UB3LYP/6-311+G(2d,p) level. Addition of H2O to SiO3-, SiO3H-, and Si2O5H- was calculated to be approximately 42, 45, and 55 kcal mol-1 exothermic, respectively, and encountered low activation barriers. Modeling of SiO2- and SiO3- reactions with H2O failed to produce radical abstraction reaction pathways observed in the IT-SIMS, possibly indicating that alternative reaction mechanisms are operative.

  17. Gas separations using inorganic membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Egan, B.Z.; Singh, S.P.N. ); Fain, D.E.; Roettger, G.E.; White, D.E. )

    1992-04-01

    This report summarizes the results from a research and development program to develop, fabricate, and evaluate inorganic membranes for separating gases at high temperatures and pressures in hostile process environments encountered in fossil energy conversion processes such as coal gasification. The primary emphasis of the research was on the separation and recovery of hydrogen from synthesis gas. Major aspects of the program included assessment of the worldwide research and development activity related to gas separations using inorganic membranes, identification and selection of candidate membrane materials, fabrication and characterization of membranes using porous membrane technology developed at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site, and evaluation of the separations capability of the fabricated membranes in terms of permeabilities and fluxes of gases.

  18. Asymmetric membranes for gas separations

    SciTech Connect

    Finken, H.

    1985-01-01

    Recent membrane developments for gaseous mixture separations are compared to the development of reverse osmosis membranes for water desalination. The goals of these developments have been the search for ideal permselective polymeric materials, techniques for producing ultrathin membrane layers free of imperfections and transforming gelled reverse osmosis membranes into solid gas permeation membranes. A novel approach to meeting the basic requirements of high permselectivity is attempted by altering the physical polymer structure within the membrane prior to application for gas separation. The influence of these physical interactions on membrane properties is presented. 47 references, 11 figures, 6 tables.

  19. Lighting the Dark Molecular Gas Using the Mid Infrared H2 Rotational Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Togi, Aditya; Smith, JD

    2014-06-01

    The knowledge of molecular gas distribution is necessary to understand star formation in galaxies. The molecular gas content of galaxies must be inferred using indirect tracers since H2 which forms a major component of molecular gas in galaxies is not observable under typical conditions of interstellar medium. Physical processes causing enhancement and reduction of these tracers can cause misleading estimates of the molecular gas content in galaxies. We have devised a new method to measure molecular gas mass using quadrupole rotational lines of H2 found in the mid infrared spectra of various types of galaxies. We apply our model to derive the amount of molecular gas even in low metallicity galaxies where indirect tracers are unable to estimate the dark molecular gas mass. Bigiel, F., Leroy, A., Walter, F., et al. 2008, The Astronomical Journal, 136, 2846 (2008) Solomon, P. M., Rivolo, A. R., Barett, J., and Yahil, A. The Astrophysical Journal, 319, 730 (1987) Wolfire, M. G., Hollenbach, D., and McKee, C. F. The Astrophysical Journal, 716, 1191 (2010)

  20. Phosphazene membranes for gas separations

    DOEpatents

    Stewart, Frederick F.; Harrup, Mason K.; Orme, Christopher J.; Luther, Thomas A.

    2006-07-11

    A polyphosphazene having a glass transition temperature ("T.sub.g") of approximately -20.degree. C. or less. The polyphosphazene has at least one pendant group attached to a backbone of the polyphosphazene, wherein the pendant group has no halogen atoms. In addition, no aromatic groups are attached to an oxygen atom that is bound to a phosphorus atom of the backbone. The polyphosphazene may have a T.sub.g ranging from approximately -100.degree. C. to approximately -20.degree. C. The polyphosphazene may be selected from the group consisting of poly[bis-3-phenyl-1-propoxy)phosphazene], poly[bis-(2-phenyl-1-ethoxy)phosphazene], poly[bis-(dodecanoxypolyethoxy)-phosphazene], and poly[bis-(2-(2-(2-.omega.-undecylenyloxyethoxy)ethoxy)ethoxy)phosphazene]- . The polyphosphazene may be used in a separation membrane to selectively separate individual gases from a gas mixture, such as to separate polar gases from nonpolar gases in the gas mixture.

  1. Supported Ionic Liquid Membranes for Gas Separation

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, C.R.; Ilconich, J.B.; Pennline, H.W.; Luebke, D.R.

    2007-08-01

    Ionic liquids have been rapidly gaining attention for various applications including solvent separation and gas capture. These substances are noted for extremely low vapor pressure and high CO2 solubility making them ideal as transport or capture media for CO2 abatement in power generation applications. Ionic liquids, combined with various supports to form membranes, have been proven selective in CO2 separation. Several ionic liquids and a variety of polymer supports have been studied over a temperature range from 37°C to 300°C and have been optimized for stability. The membranes have demonstrated high permeability and high selectivity since the supported ionic liquid membranes incorporate functionality capable of chemically complexing CO2. A study aimed at improving supported ionic liquid membranes will examine their durability with greater transmembrane pressures and the effects on CO2 permeance, CO2/H2 selectivity and thermal stability.

  2. Highly sensitive hydrogen sulfide (H2 S) gas sensors from viral-templated nanocrystalline gold nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Chung Hee; Zhang, Miluo; Myung, Nosang V.; Haberer, Elaine D.

    2014-04-01

    A facile, site-specific viral-templated assembly method was used to fabricate sensitive hydrogen sulfide (H2S) gas sensors at room temperature. A gold-binding M13 bacteriophage served to organize gold nanoparticles into linear arrays which were used as seeds for subsequent nanowire formation through electroless deposition. Nanowire widths and densities within the sensors were modified by electroless deposition time and phage concentration, respectively, to tune device resistance. Chemiresistive H2S gas sensors with superior room temperature sensing performance were produced with sensitivity of 654%/ppmv, theoretical lowest detection limit of 2 ppbv, and 70% recovery within 9 min for 0.025 ppmv. The role of the viral template and associated gold-binding peptide was elucidated by removing organics using a short O2 plasma treatment followed by an ethanol dip. The template and gold-binding peptide were crucial to electrical and sensor performance. Without surface organics, the resistance fell by several orders of magnitude, the sensitivity dropped by more than a factor of 100 to 6%/ppmv, the lower limit of detection increased, and no recovery was detected with dry air flow. Viral templates provide a novel, alternative fabrication route for highly sensitive, nanostructured H2S gas sensors.

  3. Probabilistic modelling for estimating gas kinetics and decompression sickness risk in pigs during H2 biochemical decompression.

    PubMed

    Fahlman, Andreas; Kayar, Susan R

    2003-07-01

    We modelled the kinetics of H2 flux during gas uptake and elimination in conscious pigs exposed to hyperbaric H2. The model used a physiological description of gas flux fitted to the observed decompression sickness (DCS) incidence in two groups of pigs: untreated controls, and animals that had received intestinal injections of H2-metabolizing microbes that biochemically eliminated some of the H2 stored in the pigs' tissues. To analyse H2 flux during gas uptake, animals were compressed in a dry chamber to 24 atm (ca 88% H2, 9% He, 2% O2, 1% N2) for 30-1440 min and decompressed at 0.9 atm min(-1) (n = 70). To analyse H2 flux during gas elimination, animals were compressed to 24 atm for 3 h and decompressed at 0.45-1.8 atm min(-1) (n = 58). Animals were closely monitored for 1 h post-decompression for signs of DCS. Probabilistic modelling was used to estimate that the exponential time constant during H2 uptake (tau(in)) and H2 elimination (tau(out)) were 79 +/- 25 min and 0.76 +/- 0.14 min, respectively. Thus, the gas kinetics affecting DCS risk appeared to be substantially faster for elimination than uptake, which is contrary to customary assumptions of gas uptake and elimination kinetic symmetry. We discuss the possible reasons for this asymmetry, and why absolute values of H2 kinetics cannot be obtained with this approach.

  4. Highly Excited H2 in Herbig-Haro 7: Formation Pumping in Shocked Molecular Gas?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pike, R. E.; Geballe, T. R.; Burton, M. G.; Chrysostomou, A.

    2016-05-01

    We have obtained K-band spectra at R ˜ 5000 and an angular resolution of 0.″3 of a section of the Herbig-Haro 7 (HH7) bow shock, using the Near-Infrared Integral Field Spectrograph at Gemini North. Present in the portion of the data cube corresponding to the brightest part of the bow shock are emission lines of H2 with upper state energies ranging from ˜6000 K to the dissociation energy of H2, ˜50,000 K. Because of low signal-to-noise ratios, the highest excitation lines cannot be easily seen elsewhere in the observed region. However, excitation temperatures, measured throughout much of the observed region using lines from levels as high as 25,000 K, are a strong function of upper level energy, indicating that the very highest levels are populated throughout. The level populations in the brightest region are well fit by a two-temperature model, with 98.5% of the emitting gas at T = 1800 K and 1.5% at T = 5200 K. The bulk of the H2 line emission in HH7, from the 1800 K gas, has previously been well-modeled by a continuous shock, but the 5200 K cozmponent is inconsistent with standalone standard continuous shock models. We discuss various possible origins for the hot component and suggest that this component is H2 newly reformed on dust grains and then ejected from them, presumably following dissociation of some of the H2 by the shock.

  5. Insights into the H2/CH4 Separation Through Two-Dimensional Graphene Channels: Influence of Edge Functionalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jing; Sang, Pengpeng; Xing, Wei; Shi, Zemin; Zhao, Lianming; Guo, Wenyue; Yan, Zifeng

    2015-12-01

    A molecular simulation technique is employed to investigate the transport of H2/CH4 mixture through the two-dimensional (2D) channel between adjacent graphene layers. Pristine graphene membrane (GM) with pore width of 0.515~0.6 nm is found to only allow H2 molecules to enter rather than CH4, forming a molecular sieve. At pore widths of 0.64~1.366 nm, both H2 and CH4 molecules could fill into the GM channel, where the permeability of methane is more preferential than that of hydrogen with the largest CH4/H2 selectivity (1.89) at 0.728 nm. The edge functionalization by -H, -F, -OH, -NH2, and -COOH groups could significantly alter gas permeability by modifying the active surface area of the pore and tuning attractive and/or repulsive interaction with molecules at the entrance of channel. At the pore width of 0.6 nm, the H2 permeability of molecular sieve is enhanced by -H, -F, and -OH groups but restrained by -NH2, especially -COOH with a passing rate of zero. At pore widths of 0.64 and 0.728 nm, both -H and -F edge-functionalized GMs show a preferential selectivity of methane over hydrogen, while the favorable transport for GM-OH is changed from H2 molecules at 0.64 nm to CH4 molecules at 0.728 nm. For GM-NH2, it exhibits an excellent hydrogen molecular sieve at 0.64 nm and then turns into a significant H2/CH4 selectivity at 0.728 nm. Meanwhile, small H2 molecules start to enter the channel of GM-COOH at the pore width up to 0.728 nm. For the largest pore width of 1.336 nm, the influence of edge functionalization becomes small, and a comparable CH4/H2 selectivity is observed for all the considered membranes.

  6. Gas-phase CO2, C2H2, and HCN toward Orion-KL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boonman, A. M. S.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Lahuis, F.; Doty, S. D.; Wright, C. M.; Rosenthal, D.

    2003-03-01

    The infrared spectra toward Orion-IRc2, Peak 1 and Peak 2 in the 13.5-15.5 mu m wavelength range are presented, obtained with the Short Wavelength Spectrometer on board the Infrared Space Observatory. The spectra show absorption and emission features of the vibration-rotation bands of gas-phase CO2, HCN, and C2H2, respectively. Toward the deeply embedded massive young stellar object IRc2 all three bands appear in absorption, while toward the shocked region Peak 2 CO2, HCN, and C2H2 are seen in emission. Toward Peak 1 only CO2 has been detected in emission. Analysis of these bands shows that the absorption features toward IRc2 are characterized by excitation temperatures of ~ 175-275 K, which can be explained by an origin in the shocked plateau gas. HCN and C2H2 are only seen in absorption in the direction of IRc2, whereas the CO2 absorption is probably more widespread. The CO2 emission toward Peak 1 and 2 is best explained with excitation by infrared radiation from dust mixed with the gas in the warm component of the shock. The similarity of the CO2 emission and absorption line shapes toward IRc2, Peak 1 and Peak 2 suggests that the CO2 is located in the warm component of the shock (T ~ 200 K) toward all three positions. The CO2 abundances of ~ 10-8 for Peak 1 and 2, and of a few times 10-7 toward IRc2 can be explained by grain mantle evaporation and/or reformation in the gas-phase after destruction by the shock. The HCN and C2H2 emission detected toward Peak 2 is narrower (T ~ 50-150 K) and originates either in the warm component of the shock or in the extended ridge. In the case of an origin in the warm component of the shock, the low HCN and C2H2 abundances of ~ 10-9 suggest that they are destroyed by the shock or have only been in the warm gas for a short time (t <~ 104 yr). In the case of an origin in the extended ridge, the inferred abundances are much higher and do not agree with predictions from current chemical models at low temperatures. Based on

  7. Gas separations using ceramic membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, P.K.T.; Lin, C.L.; Flowers, D.L.; Wu, J.C.S.; Smith, G.W.

    1992-12-01

    Alcoa`s commercial membrane with 40{Angstrom} pore diameter has been identified as one of the potential candidates for high temperature gas separations. This asymmetric multiple layer membrane have been well characterized and evaluated. It has excellent thermal stability and acceptably hydrothermal stability at {approximately}650{degree}C or above. Gas separations with this membrane follow Knudsen diffusion. Its selectivity is suitable for bulk separations, or for reduction/elimination of H{sub 2}S and NH{sub 3} via selective removal of hydrogen. An improved separation efficiency with this membrane is highly desirable for applications involving hydrogen separation, and the removal of trace contaminants, such as H{sub 2}S and NH{sub 3}. One of the effective avenues in improving the efficiency of the existing membrane is to narrow its pore size through surface modifications. Thus membranes with a smaller pore size can be readily available through minor modifications of the existing commercial product. In this paper focus is on the morphological characterization and performance evaluation of hydrogen-selective and zeolitic membranes developed from existing commercial membranes.

  8. Polyethylene/Potassium Titanate Separators For Ni/H2 Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, William E.

    1995-01-01

    Experimental separators fabricated on paper-making machine. Two-layer, paperlike composite of polyethylene fibers and potassium titanate pigment shows promise for replacing asbestos as separator material in nickel/hydrogen electrochemical cells.

  9. Separation of H2S and NH3 gases from tofu waste water-based biogas using activated carbon adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harihastuti, Nani; Purwanto, P.; Istadi, I.

    2015-12-01

    Research on the separation of H2S and NH3 gases from tofu waste water-based biogas has been conducted to improve the content of CH4 of biogas in order to increase calorific value. Biogas from tofu waste water contained many kinds of gases such as: CH4 of 53-64%, CO2 of 36-45%, H2S of 3,724-5,880 mg/Nm3, NH3 of 0.19-70.36 mg/Nm3, and H2O of 33,800-19,770,000 mg/Nm3. In fact, CO2, H2S, NH3, and moisture are impurities that have disturbance to human and environment, so that they are necessary to be separated from biogas. Particularly, H2S and NH3 have high toxicity to people, particularly the workers in the tofu industry. Therefore, separation of H2S and NH3 from biogas to increase calorific value is the focus of this research. The method used in this research is by adsorption of H2S and NH3 gases using activated carbon as adsorbent. It also used condensation as pretreatment to remove moisture content in biogas. Biogas was flowed to adsorption column (70 cm height and 9 cm diameter containing activated carbon as much as 500 g) so that the H2S and NH3 gases were adsorbed. This research was conducted by varying flow rate and flow time of biogas. From this experiment, it was found that the optimum adsorption conditions were flow rate of 3.5 l/min and 4 hours flow time. This condition could reach 99.95% adsorption efficiency of H2S from 5,879.50 mg/Nm3 to 0.67 mg/Nm3, and 74.96% adsorption efficiency of NH3 from 2.93 mg/Nm3 to 0.73 mg/Nm3. The concentration of CH4 increased from 63.88% to 76.24% in the biogas.

  10. Theoretical calculations of pressure broadening coefficients for H2O perturbed by hydrogen or helium gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gamache, Robert R.; Pollack, James B.

    1995-01-01

    Halfwidths were calculated for H2O with H2 as a broadening gas and were estimated for He as the broadening species. The calculations used the model of Robert and Bonamy with parabolic trajectories and all relevant terms in the interaction potential. The calculations investigated the dependence of the halfwidth on the order of the atom-atom expansion, the rotational states, and the temperature in the range 200 to 400K. Finally, calculations were performed for many transitions of interest in the 5 micrometer window region of the spectrum. The resulting data will be supplied to Dr. R. Freedman for extracting accurate water mixing ratios from the analysis of the thermal channels for the Net Flux experiment on the Galileo probe.

  11. Possible microwave absorption by H2S gas in Uranus' and Neptune's atmospheres

    SciTech Connect

    De pater, Imke; Romani, P.N.; Atreya, S.K. Science Systems and Applications, Inc., Seabrook, MD Michigan, Univ., Ann Arbor )

    1991-06-01

    The disk-averaged brightness temperatures of the present 3.55 and 20.1 cm VLA observations are consistent with the planet's thermal spectra. It is estimated, on the basis of calculations which encompass microwave absorption by H2S, that the H2S mixing ratio on both Uranus and Neptune is probably enhanced by a factor of 10-30 above the elemental sulfur solar ratio. There is also more microwave opacity in the Neptune atmosphere than that of Uranus; this may be due to the presence of NH3 gas above the NH4SH cloud layer. Radio occultation data comparisons indicate the probability of NH3's supersaturation in the Neptune atmosphere. 42 refs.

  12. Direct Observation of a Gas Molecule (H2, Ar) Swallowed by C60

    SciTech Connect

    Sawa, H.; Kakiuchi, T.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Murata, Y.; Murata, M.; Komatsu, K.; Yakigaya, K.; Takagi, H.; Dragoe, N.

    2007-01-19

    Various types of endohedral fullerene complexes are known to date. The well known metallofullerenes are generally produced by arc-discharge method, but the use of such extremely drastic conditions is apparently not suitable for encapsulation of unstable molecules or gases. We recently succeeded in incorporation of a H2 molecule or an Ar atom in 100% into a C60. In order to observe the endohedral gas molecule directly, the X-ray diffraction analysis using synchrotron radiation were carried out. We observed a gas molecule encapsulated in each fullerene cage using structure analysis and the maximum entropy method. These gas molecules are floating inside of the hollow cavities and are completely isolated from the outside.

  13. Plasma nitriding using high H2 content gas mixtures for a cavitation erosion resistant steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allenstein, A. N.; Lepienski, C. M.; Buschinelli, A. J. A.; Brunatto, S. F.

    2013-07-01

    Plasma nitriding using high H2 content gas mixtures in CA-6NM martensitic stainless steel was studied in the present work. Nitriding was performed in H2 + N2 gas mixtures for 5, 10 and 20% N2, in volume, at 773 K (500 °C), during 2 h. Changes in the surface morphology and nitrided layer constitution were characterized by SEM, XRD, roughness analysis, and nanoindentation technique. Cavitation erosion behavior of the nitrided samples was also investigated by means of a 20 kHz ultrasonic vibrator. The study was emphasized for the three first cavitation stages (incubation, acceleration, and maximum erosion rate stage) of the cumulative erosion-time curve. Results indicate that the gas mixture nitrogen content strongly influences the phases' formation and its distribution on the nitrided layer. Better cavitation erosion resistance which was attributed to the finer and more homogeneous distribution of the nitrided layer phases was verified for samples treated at 5% N2. Otherwise, worse cavitation erosion behavior for samples nitrided at 20% N2 is supposed to be due to the formation of multiphase compound layer constituted by Fe4N + Fe2-3N + CrN, which can infer residual stress in treated surface.

  14. High Speed H2O Concentration Measurements Using Absorption Spectroscopy to Monitor Exhaust Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Kranendonk, Laura; Parks, II, James E; Prikhodko, Vitaly Y; Partridge Jr, William P

    2008-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the potential for fast absorption spectroscopy measurements in diesel-engine exhaust to track H2O concentration transients. Wavelength-agile absorption spectroscopy is an optical technique that measures broadband absorption spectra between 10kHz and 100 MHz. From these measured spectra, gas temperature and absorber concentration can be determined. The Fourier-domain mode-locking (FDML) laser is becoming recognized as one of the most robust and reliable wavelength-agile sources available. H2O concentration measurements during combustion events at crank angle resolved speeds are beneficial for a wide variety of applications, such as product improvements for industry, control and reliability checks for experimental researchers, and measures of fit for numerical simulations. The difficulties associated with measuring diesel exhaust compared to in-cylinder measurements are discussed. A full description of the experimental configuration and data processing is explained. Measurements of engine exhaust H2O transients with 10- s temporal resolution are presented for a range of engine conditions.

  15. State-to-state vibrational kinetics of H2 and H_2^+ in a post-shock cooling gas with primordial composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppola, C. M.; Mizzi, G.; Bruno, D.; Esposito, F.; Galli, D.; Palla, F.; Longo, S.

    2016-04-01

    The radiative cooling of shocked gas with primordial chemical composition is an important process relevant to the formation of the first stars and structures, as well as taking place also in high-velocity cloud collisions and supernovae explosions. Among the different processes that need to be considered, the formation kinetics and cooling of molecular hydrogen are of prime interest, since they provide the only way to lower the gas temperature to values well below ˜104 K. In previous works, the internal energy level structure of H2 and its cation has been treated in the approximation of ro-vibrational ground state at low densities, or trying to describe the dynamics using some arbitrary v > 0 H2 level that is considered representative of the excited vibrational manifold. In this study, we compute the vibrationally resolved kinetics for the time-dependent chemical and thermal evolution of the post-shock gas in a medium of primordial composition. The calculated non-equilibrium distributions are used to evaluate effects on the cooling function of the gas and on the cooling time. Finally, we discuss the dependence of the results to different initial values of the shock velocity and redshift.

  16. Online analysis of H2S and SO2 via advanced mid-infrared gas sensors.

    PubMed

    Petruci, João Flavio da Silveira; Wilk, Andreas; Cardoso, Arnaldo Alves; Mizaikoff, Boris

    2015-10-01

    Volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs) are among the most prevalent emitted pollutants in urban and rural atmospheres. Mainly because of the versatility of sulfur regarding its oxidation state (2- to 6+), VSCs are present in a wide variety of redox-environments, concentration levels, and molar ratios. Among the VSCs, hydrogen sulfide and sulfur dioxide are considered most relevant and have simultaneously been detected within naturally and anthropogenically caused emission events (e.g., volcano emissions, food production and industries, coal pyrolysis, and various biological activities). Next to their presence as pollutants, changes within their molar ratio may also indicate natural anomalies. Prior to analysis, H2S- and SO2-containing samples are usually preconcentrated via solid sorbents and are then detected by gas chromatographic techniques. However, such analytical strategies may be of limited selectivity, and the dimensions and operation modalities of the involved instruments prevent routine field usage. In this contribution, we therefore describe an innovative portable mid-infrared chemical sensor for simultaneously determining and quantifying gaseous H2S and SO2 via coupling a substrate-integrated hollow waveguides (iHWG) serving as a highly miniaturized mid-infrared photon conduit and gas cell with a custom-made preconcentration tube and an in-line UV-converter device. Both species were collected onto a solid sorbent within the preconcentrator and then released by thermal desorption into the UV-device. Hydrogen sulfide is detected by UV-assisted quantitative conversion of the rather weak IR-absorber H2S into SO2, which provides a significantly more pronounced and distinctively detectable rovibrational signature. Modulation of the UV-device system (i.e., UV-lamp on/off) enables discriminating between SO2 generated from H2S conversion and abundant SO2 signals. After optimization of the operational parameters, calibrations in the range of 0.75-10 ppmv with a limit

  17. Online analysis of H2S and SO2 via advanced mid-infrared gas sensors.

    PubMed

    Petruci, João Flavio da Silveira; Wilk, Andreas; Cardoso, Arnaldo Alves; Mizaikoff, Boris

    2015-10-01

    Volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs) are among the most prevalent emitted pollutants in urban and rural atmospheres. Mainly because of the versatility of sulfur regarding its oxidation state (2- to 6+), VSCs are present in a wide variety of redox-environments, concentration levels, and molar ratios. Among the VSCs, hydrogen sulfide and sulfur dioxide are considered most relevant and have simultaneously been detected within naturally and anthropogenically caused emission events (e.g., volcano emissions, food production and industries, coal pyrolysis, and various biological activities). Next to their presence as pollutants, changes within their molar ratio may also indicate natural anomalies. Prior to analysis, H2S- and SO2-containing samples are usually preconcentrated via solid sorbents and are then detected by gas chromatographic techniques. However, such analytical strategies may be of limited selectivity, and the dimensions and operation modalities of the involved instruments prevent routine field usage. In this contribution, we therefore describe an innovative portable mid-infrared chemical sensor for simultaneously determining and quantifying gaseous H2S and SO2 via coupling a substrate-integrated hollow waveguides (iHWG) serving as a highly miniaturized mid-infrared photon conduit and gas cell with a custom-made preconcentration tube and an in-line UV-converter device. Both species were collected onto a solid sorbent within the preconcentrator and then released by thermal desorption into the UV-device. Hydrogen sulfide is detected by UV-assisted quantitative conversion of the rather weak IR-absorber H2S into SO2, which provides a significantly more pronounced and distinctively detectable rovibrational signature. Modulation of the UV-device system (i.e., UV-lamp on/off) enables discriminating between SO2 generated from H2S conversion and abundant SO2 signals. After optimization of the operational parameters, calibrations in the range of 0.75-10 ppmv with a limit

  18. Yield of H2O2 in Gas-Liquid Phase with Pulsed DBD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Song; Wen, Yiyong; Liu, Kefu

    2014-01-01

    Electric discharge in water can generate a large number of oxidants such as ozone, hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl radicals. In this paper, a non-thermal plasma processing system was established by means of pulsed dielectric barrier discharge in gas-liquid phase. The electrodes of discharge reactor were staggered. The yield of H2O2 was enhanced after discharge. The effects of discharge time, discharge voltage, frequency, initial pH value, and feed gas were investigated. The concentration of hydrogen peroxide and ozone was measured after discharge. The experimental results were fully analyzed. The chemical reaction equations in water were given as much as possible. At last, the water containing Rhodamine B was tested in this system. The degradation rate came to 94.22% in 30 min.

  19. Integrated vacuum absorption steam cycle gas separation

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Shiaguo; Lu, Yonggi; Rostam-Abadi, Massoud

    2011-11-22

    Methods and systems for separating a targeted gas from a gas stream emitted from a power plant. The gas stream is brought into contact with an absorption solution to preferentially absorb the targeted gas to be separated from the gas stream so that an absorbed gas is present within the absorption solution. This provides a gas-rich solution, which is introduced into a stripper. Low pressure exhaust steam from a low pressure steam turbine of the power plant is injected into the stripper with the gas-rich solution. The absorbed gas from the gas-rich solution is stripped in the stripper using the injected low pressure steam to provide a gas stream containing the targeted gas. The stripper is at or near vacuum. Water vapor in a gas stream from the stripper is condensed in a condenser operating at a pressure lower than the stripper to concentrate the targeted gas. Condensed water is separated from the concentrated targeted gas.

  20. Mud/gas separator sizing and evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    MacDougall, G.R. )

    1991-12-01

    Recent wellsite disasters have led to an increased emphasis on properly sized mud/gas separators. This paper reviews and analyzes existing mud/gas separator technology and recommends separator configuration, components, design considerations, and a sizing procedure. A simple method of evaluating mud/gas separation within the separator vessel has been developed as a basis for the sizing procedure. A mud/gas separator sizing worksheet will assist drilling personnel with the sizing calculations. The worksheet provides a quick and easy evaluation of most mud/gas separators for a specific well application. A brief discussion of other mud/gas separator considerations is provided, including separator components, testing, materials, and oil-based-mud considerations.

  1. Hot Gas in SMC SNR 0057-7226 and the Giant H 2 Region N66

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danforth, C. W.; Hoopes, C. G.; Sankrit, R.; Chu, Y.-H.; Sembach, K. R.; Blair, W. P.

    2001-12-01

    The supernova remnant SNR 0057-7226 and the dense, young cluster NGC 346 lie within the giant H 2 region N66, the most active star formation site in the SMC. Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) observations of the Wolf-Rayet binary system HD 5980, which lies behind the SNR, show high velocity, O 6 and C 3 absorption associated with the far side of the remnant (Hoopes et al 2001, ApJ, 558, L35). Chandra ACIS-I and ROSAT HRI images of N66 show the diffuse X-ray emission associated with the SNR, but little or no diffuse emission around the core of the central cluster. We present high-dispersion, long-slit optical echelle observations of five positions within N66 including positions across the SNR 0057-7226 and NGC 346. These data show bright Hα emission at the SMC rest velocity (v ~155 km s-1). Where the spectrograph slits intersect the SNR, faint Hα emission at high (v ~300 km s-1) and low (v ~50 km s-1) velocities reveals clumps of material on the back and front sides of the SNR shell. Ten FUSE observations of sight lines toward stars in N66--including four toward NGC 346 cluster stars--provide sensitive absorption-line measurements of several ionic species including O 6 which traces hot (T ~3*E5 K), highly-ionized gas and Fe 2 which traces cooler (T ~104 K), ionized and neutral gas. We also present ground based optical narrowband images in Hα , [S 2], and [O 3] which show the morphology of the H 2 region. We use this data set to study the kinematics of the gas in this complex region and to model the properties of the SNR-ISM interaction. This work is supported by NASA Contract NAS5-32985 to the Johns Hopkins University.

  2. 30 CFR 250.1164 - What are the requirements for flaring or venting gas containing H2S?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What are the requirements for flaring or venting gas containing H2S? 250.1164 Section 250.1164 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT... Supervisor will use information provided in the lessee's H2S Contingency Plan (§ 250.490(f)),...

  3. Absolute Infrared Cross Sections of Gas-Phase H2O2 Using Fourier Transform Mid-Infrared Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Timothy J.; Blake, Thomas A.; Sams, Robert L.; Burton, Sarah D.

    2010-01-29

    We report quantitative spectra of pressure-broadened H2O2 vapor. An 83% solution was flowed into a disseminator and diluted with N2 gas; water lines were subtracted. The H2O2 spectrum spans the IR and compares well with HITRAN values for ν6 band.

  4. Anisotropic membranes for gas separation

    DOEpatents

    Gollan, A.Z.

    1987-07-21

    A gas separation membrane has a dense separating layer about 10,000 Angstroms or less thick and a porous support layer 10 to 400 microns thick that is an integral unit with gradually and continuously decreasing pore size from the base of the support layer to the surface of the thin separating layer and is made from a casting solution comprising ethyl cellulose and ethyl cellulose-based blends, typically greater than 47.5 ethoxyl content ethyl cellulose blended with compatible second polymers, such as nitrocellulose. The polymer content of the casting solution is from about 10% to about 35% by weight of the total solution with up to about 50% of this polymer weight a compatible second polymer to the ethyl cellulose in a volatile solvent such as isopropanol, methylacetate, methanol, ethanol, and acetone. Typical nonsolvents for the casting solutions include water and formamide. The casting solution is cast in air from about zero to 10 seconds to allow the volatile solvent to evaporate and then quenched in a coagulation bath, typically water, at a temperature of 7--25 C and then air dried at ambient temperature, typically 10--30 C. 2 figs.

  5. Anisotropic membranes for gas separation

    DOEpatents

    Gollan, Arye Z.

    1987-01-01

    A gas separation membrane has a dense separating layer about 10,000 Angstroms or less thick and a porous support layer 10 to 400 microns thick that is an integral unit with gradually and continuously decreasing pore size from the base of the support layer to the surface of the thin separating layer and is made from a casting solution comprising ethyl cellulose and ethyl cellulose-based blends, typically greater than 47.5 ethoxyl content ethyl cellulose blended with compatible second polymers, such as nitrocellulose. The polymer content of the casting solution is from about 10% to about 35% by weight of the total solution with up to about 50% of this polymer weight a compatible second polymer to the ethyl cellulose in a volatile solvent such as isopropanol, methylacetate, methanol, ethanol, and acetone. Typical nonsolvents for the casting solutions include water and formamide. The casting solution is cast in air from about zero to 10 seconds to allow the volatile solvent to evaporate and then quenched in a coagulation bath, typically water, at a temperature of 7.degree.-25.degree. C. and then air dried at ambient temperature, typically 10.degree.-30.degree. C.

  6. Efficient Light-driven Long Distance Charge Separation and H2 Generation in Semiconductor Quantum Rods and Nanoplatelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lian, Tianquan

    Quantum confined semiconductor nanocrystals (0D quantum dots, 1D quantum rods and 2D quantum platlets) have been intensively investigated as light harvesting and charge separation materials for photovoltaic and photocatalytic applications. The efficiency of these semiconductor nanocrystal-based devices depends on many fundamental processes, including light harvesting, carrier relaxation, exciton localization and transport, charge separation and charge recombination. The competition between these processes determines the overall solar energy conversion (solar to electricity or fuel) efficiency. Semiconductor nano-heterostructures, combining two or more material components, offer unique opportunities to control their charge separation properties by tailoring their compositions, dimensions and spatial arrangement. Further integration of catalysts (heterogeneous or homogeneous) to these materials form multifunctional nano-heterostructures. Using 0D, 1D and 2D CdSe/CdS/Pt heterostructures as model systems, we directly probe the above-mentioned fundamental exciton and carrier processes by transient absorption and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. We are examining how to control these fundamental processes through the design of heterostructures to achieve long-lived charge separation and efficient H2 generation. In this talk, we will discuss a new model for exciton dissociation by charge transfer in quantum dots (i.e. Auger assisted electron transfer), mechanism of 1D and 2D exciton transport and dissociation in nanorods, and key factors limiting H2 generation efficiency in CdSe/CdS/Pt nanorod heterostructures.

  7. Passive gas separator and accumulator device

    DOEpatents

    Choe, H.; Fallas, T.T.

    1994-08-02

    A separation device employing a gas separation filter and swirler vanes for separating gas from a gas-liquid mixture is provided. The cylindrical filter utilizes the principle that surface tension in the pores of the filter prevents gas bubbles from passing through. As a result, the gas collects in the interior region of the filter and coalesces to form larger bubbles in the center of the device. The device is particularly suited for use in microgravity conditions since the swirlers induce a centrifugal force which causes liquid to move from the inner region of the filter, pass the pores, and flow through the outlet of the device while the entrained gas is trapped by the filter. The device includes a cylindrical gas storage screen which is enclosed by the cylindrical gas separation filter. The screen has pores that are larger than those of the filters. The screen prevents larger bubbles that have been formed from reaching and interfering with the pores of the gas separation filter. The device is initially filled with a gas other than that which is to be separated. This technique results in separation of the gas even before gas bubbles are present in the mixture. Initially filling the device with the dissimilar gas and preventing the gas from escaping before operation can be accomplished by sealing the dissimilar gas in the inner region of the separation device with a ruptured disc which can be ruptured when the device is activated for use. 3 figs.

  8. Passive gas separator and accumulator device

    DOEpatents

    Choe, Hwang; Fallas, Thomas T.

    1994-01-01

    A separation device employing a gas separation filter and swirler vanes for separating gas from a gasliquid mixture is provided. The cylindrical filter utilizes the principle that surface tension in the pores of the filter prevents gas bubbles from passing through. As a result, the gas collects in the interior region of the filter and coalesces to form larger bubbles in the center of the device. The device is particularly suited for use in microgravity conditions since the swirlers induce a centrifugal force which causes liquid to move from the inner region of the filter, pass the pores, and flow through the outlet of the device while the entrained gas is trapped by the filter. The device includes a cylindrical gas storage screen which is enclosed by the cylindrical gas separation filter. The screen has pores that are larger than those of the filters. The screen prevents larger bubbles that have been formed from reaching and interfering with the pores of the gas separation filter. The device is initially filled with a gas other than that which is to be separated. This technique results in separation of the gas even before gas bubbles are present in the mixture. Initially filling the device with the dissimilar gas and preventing the gas from escaping before operation can be accomplished by sealing the dissimilar gas in the inner region of the separation device with a ruptured disc which can be ruptured when the device is activated for use.

  9. Reaction mechanism for the thermal decomposition of BCl3/CH4/H2 gas mixtures.

    PubMed

    Reinisch, Guillaume; Vignoles, Gérard L; Leyssale, Jean-Marc

    2011-10-27

    This paper presents an ab initio study of the B/C/Cl/H gas phase mechanism, featuring 10 addition-elimination reactions involving BH(i)Cl(j) (i + j ≤ 3) species and a first description of the chemical interaction between the carbon-containing and boron-containing subsystems through the three reactions BCl(3) + CH(4) ⇌ BCl(2)CH(3) + HCl, BHCl(2) + CH(4) ⇌ BCl(2)CH(3) + H(2), and BCl(2) + CH(4) ⇌ BHCl(2) + CH(3). A reaction mechanism is then proposed and used to perform some illustrative equilibrium and kinetic calculations in the context of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of boron carbide. Our results show that the new addition-elimination reaction paths play a crucial role by lowering considerably the activation barrier with respect to previous theoretical evaluations; they also confirm that BCl(2)CH(3) is an important species in the mechanism.

  10. Hyperthin Organic Membranes for Gas Separations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Minghui

    selectivities, because a single PAA-glued LB bilayer made of a nonporous polymeric surfactant (ca. 7 nm) was found to exhibit a much higher H2/CO2 selectivity (200), which reached the "upper bound". The key factors that are likely to affect the quality of the glued LB bilayers were: (i) the degree of ionic crosslinking between surfactants and polyelectrolytes, (ii) charge repulsion and (iii) hydrogen bonding among the polyelectrolyte chains. In principle, employing a surfactant bearing a large number of ionic sites (e.g., a polymeric surfactant) that can increase the degree of ionic crosslinking and a weak polyelectrolyte (e.g., PAA) that can be optimized to minimize the charge repulsion and maximize the hydrogen bonding should afford glued LB films with high gas selectivities. The current finding also indicated that the PAA layer filled in between two surfactant monolayers served as the main gas barrier. In a related study, polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEMs) (ca. 14 nm in thickness), which were made from structurally matched (i.e., two oppositely charged polyelectrolytes having identical backbones) and unmatched polyelectrolytes pairs, both showed high CO2/N 2 selectivities (ca. 100-150). However, the permeabilities of PEMs derived from structurally matched polyelectrolytes were significantly higher than that from an unmatched pair. The larger solubility of CO 2 with respect to N2 in these PEMs should be the reason lead to the high CO2/N2 permeation selectivities.

  11. Ribonuclease H2 mutations induce a cGAS/STING-dependent innate immune response.

    PubMed

    Mackenzie, Karen J; Carroll, Paula; Lettice, Laura; Tarnauskaitė, Žygimantė; Reddy, Kaalak; Dix, Flora; Revuelta, Ailsa; Abbondati, Erika; Rigby, Rachel E; Rabe, Björn; Kilanowski, Fiona; Grimes, Graeme; Fluteau, Adeline; Devenney, Paul S; Hill, Robert E; Reijns, Martin Am; Jackson, Andrew P

    2016-04-15

    Aicardi-Goutières syndrome (AGS) provides a monogenic model of nucleic acid-mediated inflammation relevant to the pathogenesis of systemic autoimmunity. Mutations that impair ribonuclease (RNase) H2 enzyme function are the most frequent cause of this autoinflammatory disorder of childhood and are also associated with systemic lupus erythematosus. Reduced processing of eitherRNA:DNAhybrid or genome-embedded ribonucleotide substrates is thought to lead to activation of a yet undefined nucleic acid-sensing pathway. Here, we establishRnaseh2b(A174T/A174T)knock-in mice as a subclinical model of disease, identifying significant interferon-stimulated gene (ISG) transcript upregulation that recapitulates theISGsignature seen inAGSpatients. The inflammatory response is dependent on the nucleic acid sensor cyclicGMP-AMPsynthase (cGAS) and its adaptorSTINGand is associated with reduced cellular ribonucleotide excision repair activity and increasedDNAdamage. This suggests thatcGAS/STINGis a key nucleic acid-sensing pathway relevant toAGS, providing additional insight into disease pathogenesis relevant to the development of therapeutics for this childhood-onset interferonopathy and adult systemic autoimmune disorders. PMID:26903602

  12. From O2 to H2S: a landscape view of gas biology.

    PubMed

    Kashiba, Misato; Kajimura, Mayumi; Goda, Nobuhito; Suematsu, Makoto

    2002-03-01

    The majority of molecular oxygen (O2) consumed in the body is used as a substrate of cytochrome c oxidase to maintain oxidative phosphorylation for ATP synthesis. Rest of the O2 is used for oxidative biosynthesis including synthesis of vasoactive substances such as prostaglandins and secondary gaseous mediators such as nitric oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO). Thus, O2 is not only used for maintenance of energy supply but also for regulating blood supply into tissues. Nitrous oxide (N2O), laughing gas for anesthesia, is generated endogenously through NO reductase in bacteria and fungi, and has recently been shown to modulate N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor function. A number of other biologically active gases could participate in regulation of cell and tissue functions. Carbon dioxide (CO2) is generated mainly through the Krebs cycle as a result of glucose oxidation and serves as a potent vasodilator, and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) synthesized through degradation of cysteine has recently been postulated to be a neuromodulator, although their receptor proteins for signaling have not been verified as a discernible molecular entity. Easy penetration allow these gases to access the inner space of receptor proteins and to execute their biological actions. These gases are generated and consumed in anaerobic bacteria through varied reactions distinct from those in mammals. This review summarizes recent information on mechanisms for gas generation and reception in biological systems. PMID:11951372

  13. Recirculating gas separator for electric submersible

    SciTech Connect

    Powers, M.L.

    1991-01-01

    This patent describes a gas separator apparatus for a submersible well pump. It comprises: a rotary gas separator means; and recirculating means for recirculating a portion of the liquid discharged from the discharge outlet back to the separating chamber so that a gas-to-liquid ratio in the separator means is substantially lower than a gas-to-liquid ratio of well fluid entering the well fluid inlet wherein the recirculating means. This patent also describes a method of pumping liquid from a well producing well fluids having a relatively high gas-to-liquid ratio. It comprises: centrifugally separating the well fluid into a liquid and a gas with a separator located downhole in the well; directing the separated liquid toward an inlet of a submersible well pump; recycling a portion of the separated liquid to the separator; and providing an effective gas-to-liquid ratio in the separator substantially lower than a gas-to-liquid ratio of the well fluid prior to separation.

  14. Downhole oil/gas separator and method of separating oil and gas downhole

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, J. E.

    1985-07-30

    For low pressure gaseous wells, an oil/gas separator is mounted at the end of a production string to provide a continuous upwardly spiralling separating velocity to the oil/gas entering the tool in order to separate outwardly at least sufficient gas to reduce gas lock in the sucker rod pump mounted in the production string. The oil/gas separator of this invention includes a separation chamber having a continuously upwardly spiralling ramp and an internal collection tube to collect the separated gas and move the gas upwardly and out of the tool and into the annulus of the oil well. The method of this invention is practiced by directing an oil/gas mixture from a producing zone in a helical direction to impart centrifugal separating velocity at varying levels to the mixture to cause gas to separate from the mixture.

  15. Pt-decorated GaN nanowires with significant improvement in H2 gas-sensing performance at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Abdullah, Q N; Yam, F K; Hassan, Z; Bououdina, M

    2015-12-15

    Superior sensitivity towards H2 gas was successfully achieved with Pt-decorated GaN nanowires (NWs) gas sensor. GaN NWs were fabricated via chemical vapor deposition (CVD) route. Morphology (field emission scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy) and crystal structure (high resolution X-ray diffraction) characterizations of the as-synthesized nanostructures demonstrated the formation of GaN NWs having a wurtzite structure, zigzaged shape and an average diameter of 30-166nm. The Pt-decorated GaN NWs sensor shows a high response of 250-2650% upon exposure to H2 gas concentration from 7 to 1000ppm respectively at room temperature (RT), and then increases to about 650-4100% when increasing the operating temperature up to 75°C. The gas-sensing measurements indicated that the Pt-decorated GaN NWs based sensor exhibited efficient detection of H2 at low concentration with excellent sensitivity, repeatability, and free hysteresis phenomena over a period of time of 100min. The large surface-to-volume ratio of GaN NWs and the catalytic activity of Pt metal are the most influential factors leading to the enhancement of H2 gas-sensing performances through the improvement of the interaction between the target molecules (H2) and the sensing NWs surface. The attractive low-cost, low power consumption and high-performance of the resultant decorated GaN NWs gas sensor assure their uppermost potential for H2 gas sensor working at low operating temperature.

  16. Micro-structural optimization of polybenzimidazole-based membranes for H2/CO2 separation at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Rajinder P; Li, Xin; Dudeck, Kevin W; Benicewicz, Brian C; Berchtold, Kathryn A

    2012-06-12

    There is compelling need to develop novel separation methods to improve the energy efficiency of synthesis (syn) gas processing operations including H{sub 2} and H{sub 2}/CO production to meet power, chemicals, and fuel producer needs, as well as carbon capture and removal of other undesirable syngas impurities. To be technically and economically viable, a successful separation method must be applicable to industrially relevant gas streams at realistic process conditions and compatible with large gas volumes. H{sub 2} selective membrane technology is a promising method for syngas separations at elevated temperatures (>150 C) that could be positioned upstream or downstream of one or more of the water-gas-shift reactors (WGSRs) or integrated with a WGSR depending on application specific syngas processing. Polybenzimidazole (PBI)-based polymer chemistries are exceptional candidates for H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} separations at elevated temperatures. In general, these materials possess excellent chemical resistance, very high glass transition temperatures (> 400 C), good mechanical properties, and an appropriate level of processability. Although commercially available PBI polymers have demonstrated commercially attractive H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} selectivity, their H{sub 2} permeability is low. Our team s employing structural and chemical manipulations to tailor the polymer free-volume achitecture with the ultimate goal of enhancing H{sub 2} permselectivity while retaining the inherent hermochemical stability characteristics of PBI. We will discuss our synthetic approaches and their influences on the gas transport behavior of these PBI-based materials. In general, a decrease in H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} selectivity was observed with an increase in H{sub 2} permeability. H{sub 2} permeability and H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} selectivity at 250 C ranged from 50 to 1000 barrer and 5 to 45, respectively.

  17. A feasibility study on the bioconversion of CO2 and H2 to biomethane by gas sparging through polymeric membranes.

    PubMed

    Díaz, I; Pérez, C; Alfaro, N; Fdz-Polanco, F

    2015-06-01

    In this study, the potential of a pilot hollow-fiber membrane bioreactor for the conversion of H2 and CO2 to CH4 was evaluated. The system transformed 95% of H2 and CO2 fed at a maximum loading rate of 40.2 [Formula: see text] and produced 0.22m(3) of CH4 per m(3) of H2 fed at thermophilic conditions. H2 mass transfer to the liquid phase was identified as the limiting step for the conversion, and kLa values of 430h(-1) were reached in the bioreactor by sparging gas through the membrane module. A simulation showed that the bioreactor could upgrade biogas at a rate of 25m(3)/mR(3)d, increasing the CH4 concentration from 60 to 95%v. This proof-of-concept study verified that gas sparging through a membrane module can efficiently transfer H2 from gas to liquid phase and that the conversion of H2 and CO2 to biomethane is feasible on a pilot scale at noteworthy load rates.

  18. A feasibility study on the bioconversion of CO2 and H2 to biomethane by gas sparging through polymeric membranes.

    PubMed

    Díaz, I; Pérez, C; Alfaro, N; Fdz-Polanco, F

    2015-06-01

    In this study, the potential of a pilot hollow-fiber membrane bioreactor for the conversion of H2 and CO2 to CH4 was evaluated. The system transformed 95% of H2 and CO2 fed at a maximum loading rate of 40.2 [Formula: see text] and produced 0.22m(3) of CH4 per m(3) of H2 fed at thermophilic conditions. H2 mass transfer to the liquid phase was identified as the limiting step for the conversion, and kLa values of 430h(-1) were reached in the bioreactor by sparging gas through the membrane module. A simulation showed that the bioreactor could upgrade biogas at a rate of 25m(3)/mR(3)d, increasing the CH4 concentration from 60 to 95%v. This proof-of-concept study verified that gas sparging through a membrane module can efficiently transfer H2 from gas to liquid phase and that the conversion of H2 and CO2 to biomethane is feasible on a pilot scale at noteworthy load rates. PMID:25770473

  19. Measurement of dissolved H2, O2, and CO2 in groundwater using passive samplers for gas chromatographic analyses.

    PubMed

    Spalding, B P; Watson, D B

    2006-12-15

    A simple in-situ passive dissolved gas groundwater sampler, comprised of a short length of silicone tubing attached to a gastight or other syringe, was adapted and tested for in-situ collection of equilibrium gas samples. Sampler retrieval after several days of immersion in groundwater allowed the direct injection of the sample onto a gas chromatograph (GC), simplifying field collection and sample handling over the commonly used "bubble stripping" method for H2 analyses. A GC was modified by sequencing a thermal conductivity (TC) detector followed by a reductive gas (RG) detector so that linear calibration of H2 over the range 0.2-200,000 ppmv was attained using a 0.5-mL gas sample; inclusion of the TC detector allowed the simultaneous quantification of other fixed gases (O2, CO2, He, and Ne) to which the RG detector was not responsive. Uptake kinetics for H2 and He indicated that the passive sampler reached equilibrium within 12 h of immersion in water. Field testing of these passive samplers revealed unusually large equilibrium gas-phase H2 concentrations in groundwater, ranging from 0.1 to 13.9%, by volume, in 11 monitoring wells surrounding four former radiological wastewater disposal ponds at the Y-12 plant in Oak Ridge, Tennessee.

  20. Field evaluation of a solid-based H2S scavenger for treating sour natural gas. Topical report

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, K.S.; Shires, T.M.

    1995-08-01

    The Gas Research Institute (GRI) is sponsoring an evaluation program for H2S scavenging technologies as part of an overall sulfur removal/recovery research program. The evaluation of a solid-based scavenger (Sulfa Treat) is the second in a series of full-scale field evaluations. The report presents the results of the evaluation conducted at a production plant in central Texas treating approximately 17 MMscfd of natural gas with 7 to 9 ppmv of H2S and 2.8% CO2 at 500 to 900 psig.

  1. Mars Atmospheric Capture and Gas Separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muscatello, Anthony; Santiago-Maldonado, Edgardo; Gibson, Tracy; Devor, Robert; Captain, James

    2011-01-01

    The Mars atmospheric capture and gas separation project is selecting, developing, and demonstrating techniques to capture and purify Martian atmospheric gases for their utilization for the production of hydrocarbons, oxygen, and water in ISRU systems. Trace gases will be required to be separated from Martian atmospheric gases to provide pure C02 to processing elements. In addition, other Martian gases, such as nitrogen and argon, occur in concentrations high enough to be useful as buffer gas and should be captured as welL To achieve these goals, highly efficient gas separation processes will be required. These gas separation techniques are also required across various areas within the ISRU project to support various consumable production processes. The development of innovative gas separation techniques will evaluate the current state-of-the-art for the gas separation required, with the objective to demonstrate and develop light-weight, low-power methods for gas separation. Gas separation requirements include, but are not limited to the selective separation of: (1) methane and water from un-reacted carbon oxides (C02- CO) and hydrogen typical of a Sabatier-type process, (2) carbon oxides and water from unreacted hydrogen from a Reverse Water-Gas Shift process, (3) carbon oxides from oxygen from a trash/waste processing reaction, and (4) helium from hydrogen or oxygen from a propellant scavenging process. Potential technologies for the separations include freezers, selective membranes, selective solvents, polymeric sorbents, zeolites, and new technologies. This paper and presentation will summarize the results of an extensive literature review and laboratory evaluations of candidate technologies for the capture and separation of C02 and other relevant gases.

  2. A Microporous Metal-Organic Framework with Lewis Basic Nitrogen Sites for High C2H2 Storage and Significantly Enhanced C2H2/CO2 Separation at Ambient Conditions.

    PubMed

    Wen, Hui-Min; Wang, Huizhen; Li, Bin; Cui, Yuanjing; Wang, Hailong; Qian, Guodong; Chen, Banglin

    2016-08-01

    A novel metal-organic framework (MOF), [Cu2L(H2O)2]·7DMF·4H2O [ZJU-40; H4L = 5,5'-(pyrazine-2,5-diyl)diisophthalic acid], with Lewis basic nitrogen sites has been constructed and structurally characterized. Owing to the combined features of high porosity, moderate pore sizes, and immobilized Lewis basic nitrogen sites, the activated ZJU-40a exhibits the second-highest gravimetric C2H2 uptake of 216 cm(3) g(-1) (at 298 K and 1 bar) among all of the reported MOFs so far. This value is not only much higher than that of the isoreticular NOTT-101a (184 cm(3) g(-1)), but also superior to those of two very promising MOFs, known as HKUST-1 (201 cm(3) g(-1)) and Co-MOF-74 (197 cm(3) g(-1)). Interestingly, the immobilized nitrogen sites in ZJU-40a have nearly no effect on the CO2 uptake, so ZJU-40a adsorbs a similar amount of CO2 (87 cm(3) g(-1)) compared with NOTT-101a (84 cm(3) g(-1)) at 298 K and 1 bar. As a result, ZJU-40a shows significantly enhanced adsorption selectivity for C2H2/CO2 separation (17-11.5) at ambient temperature compared to that of NOTT-101a (8-9), leading to a superior MOF material for highly selective C2H2/CO2 separation.

  3. Monitoring of CO2/H2S gas mixture injection in basaltic rocks at Hellisheiði Geothermal Power Plant, Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Deirdre E.; Gunnarsson, Ingvi; Aradóttir, Edda S.; Gunnlaugsson, Einar; Júlíusson, Bjarni M.; Matter, Juerg M.; Stute, Martin; Oelkers, Eric H.; Snæbjörnsdóttir, Sandra Ó.; Gíslason, Sigurður R.

    2016-04-01

    Hellisheiði geothermal power plant emits about 41,000 tonnes of CO2 and 10,000 tonnes of H2S per year as a by-product of geothermal energy production. Icelandic regulations, stricter than WHO guidelines, have been in effect in order to reduce H2S emissions of the geothermal industry, while carbon capture and storage (CCS) is one method recommended to minimise the amount of CO2 released into the atmosphere. The overall cost of CCS is dominated by that of capture and gas separation. This capture cost could be lowered by injecting gas mixtures into rocks as is now being tested at Hellisheiði geothermal power plant in SW-Iceland. There, a gas mixture of 60% CO2 and 40% H2S is dissolved in water from the plant and injected into the basaltic rocks. The CarbFix and SulFix pilot projects demonstrated solubility storage of the pure separate gases in a few minutes [1,2] and that more than 80% of the injected CO2 into basaltic rocks was mineralised within a year from its injection at 20-50°C [3]. The first phase of the gas mixture injection began on 3 June 2014, while tracer tests started three weeks later. By the end of the year 2015, approximately 6280 tonnes of CO2 and 3520 tonnes of H2S had been injected. The gases are dissolved in condensation water, mixed with waste water and injected to 750 m depth into a high temperature reservoir of 200-270°C. Water and gas samples were collected from four monitoring wells. There is a minor increase in CO2 (total dissolved carbon) and H2S (total dissolved sulphite), while the majority of major and minor elements are relatively stable. The data from monitoring wells therefore suggests that some of the injected gas mixture is already stored as minerals in the basaltic reservoir. [1] Sigfusson et al. (2015) Int. J. of Greenh. Gas Control 37, 213-219. [2] Gunnarsson et al. (2013) GRC Transactions 37, 785-789. [3] Matter et al. (2014) Energy Procedia 63, 4180-4185.

  4. Global rate and distribution of H2 gas produced by serpentinization within oceanic lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worman, Stacey L.; Pratson, Lincoln F.; Karson, Jeffrey A.; Klein, Emily M.

    2016-06-01

    It has recently been estimated that serpentinization within continental lithosphere produces H2 at rates comparable to oceanic lithosphere (both are ~1011 mol H2/yr). Here we present a simple model that suggests that H2 production rates along the mid-oceanic ridge alone (i.e., excluding other marine settings) may exceed continental production by an order of magnitude (~1012 mol H2/yr). In our model, H2 production rates increase with spreading rate and the net thickness of serpentinizing peridotite (S-P) in a column of lithosphere. Lithosphere with a faster spreading rate therefore requires a relatively smaller net thickness of S-P to produce H2 at the same rate as lithosphere with a slower rate and greater thickness of S-P. We apply our model globally, incorporating an inverse relationship between spreading rate and net thickness of S-P to be consistent with observations that serpentinization is more common within lithosphere spreading at slower rates.

  5. Selective Plasmonic Gas Sensing: H2, NO2, and CO Spectral Discrimination by a Single Au-CeO2 Nanocomposite Film

    SciTech Connect

    Joy, N.; Nandasiri, Manjula I.; Rogers, Phillip H.; Jiang, Weilin; Varga, Tamas; Kuchibhatla, Satyanarayana V N T; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Carpenter, Michael A.

    2012-06-05

    A Au-CeO2 nanocomposite film has been investigated as a potential sensing element for high-temperature plasmonic sensing of H2, CO, and NO2 in an oxygen containing environment. The CeO2 thin film was deposited by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) and Au was implanted into the as-grown film at an elevated temperature followed by high temperature annealing to form well-defined Au nanoclusters. The Au-CeO2 nanocomposite film was characterized by x-ray diffraction (XRD) and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS). For the gas sensing experiments, separate exposures to varying concentrations of H2, CO, and NO2 were performed at a temperature of 500°C in oxygen backgrounds of 5.0, 10, and ~21% O2. Changes in the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) absorption peak were monitored during gas exposures and are believed to be the result of oxidation-reduction processes that fill or create oxygen vacancies in the CeO2. This process affects the LSPR peak position either by charge exchange with the Au nanoparticles or by changes in the dielectric constant surrounding the particles. Multivariate analysis was used to gauge the inherent selectivity of the film between the separate analytes. From principal component analysis (PCA), unique and identifiable responses were seen for each of the analytes. Linear discriminant analysis (LDA) was also used and showed separation between analytes as well as trends in gas concentration. Results indicate that the Au-CeO2 thin film is selective to O2, H2, CO, and NO2 in separate exposures. Combined with the observed stability over long exposure periods, the Au-CeO2 film shows good potential as an optical sensing element for harsh environmental conditions.

  6. Gas separation performance of inorganic polyphosphazene membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, M.L.

    1995-07-01

    The objective of this research program was to develop, characterize, and evaluate the potential of phosphazene polymers for separations performed in harsh environments. The program was divided into two general areas, gas separations and metal ion separations involving aqueous solutions. Each of these two areas is the subject of a topical report; this report deals with the gas separations. Throughout the world, there is rapidly growing interest in membrane separation as an energy efficient way to separate components of a process stream or waste stream, such as in desalination of water or clarification of fruit juices. In some cases membranes perform separations that are otherwise very difficult, such as breaking azeotropes. In the early stages of the work reported here, there was interest in separating acid gases from process flue gases and in natural gas sweetening. As a result, research was undertaken to characterize membrane performance. First, a pure gas test apparatus was developed to determine the permeabilities of a number of gases through various membranes at a variety of temperatures. Second, an automated mixed gas test cell was developed in which membranes could be exposed to mixtures of pairs of gases. Each of these approaches has its advantages and each will be discussed separately.

  7. Photocatalytic oxidation of H2S in the gas phase over TiO2-coated glass fiber filter.

    PubMed

    Brancher, Marlon; Franco, Davide; de Melo Lisboa, Henrique

    2016-11-01

    To promote the photocatalytic oxidation (PCO) of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) in the gas phase, TiO2-coated glass fiber filters were packed in an annular photoreactor. Glass fibers coated with TiO2 thin films were characterized structurally and morphologically by field emission gun scanning electron microscopy (FEG-SEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffractometry (XRD). Flow rate and H2S inlet concentration were evaluated to determine the performance of the reactor. Removal efficiencies up to 99% were achieved for flow rate of 25 L h(-1) (residence time of 121 s) and H2S inlet concentration from 12 to 14 ppmv. The long-term experiment presented H2S removal of 89% for 16 h. After 28 h of continuous use, H2S degradation was observed at 64%, which suggests that the photocatalyst was losing activity due to deactivation. Moreover, the kinetics of the PCO of H2S according to the Langmuir-Hinshelwood (L-H) approach along with the mass balance of a plug-flow reactor was modeled. The reaction constant (k) was calculated at approximately 10.5 μmol m(-3) s(-1) and the adsorption constant (K) of approximately 5263 m(-3) mol with linearity (R2) of 0.98.

  8. Radioactive-gas separation technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haney, R.; King, K. J.; Nellis, D. O.; Nisson, R. S.; Robling, P.; Womack, W.

    1977-01-01

    Cryogenic technique recovers gases inexpensively. Method uses differences in vapor pressures, melting points, and boiling points of components in gaseous mixture. Series of temperature and pressure variations converts gases independently to solid and liquid states, thereby simplifying separation. Apparatus uses readily available cryogen and does not require expensive refrigeration equipment.

  9. Interfacial Design of Mixed Matrix Membranes for Improved Gas Separation Performance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhenggong; Wang, Dong; Zhang, Shenxiang; Hu, Liang; Jin, Jian

    2016-05-01

    High-performance metal-organic framework (MOF)/polyimide (PI) mixed matrix membranes (MMMs) are fabricated by a facile strategy by designing the MOF/PI matrix interface via poly dopamine coating. The overall separation performance of the designed MMMs surpasses the state-of-the-art 2008 Robeson upper bound for the H2 /CH4 and H2 /N2 gas pairs and approaches the 2008 upper bound for the O2 /N2 gas pair. PMID:26936293

  10. H2S gas biological removal efficiency and bacterial community diversity in biofilter treating wastewater odor.

    PubMed

    Omri, Ilhem; Bouallagui, Hassib; Aouidi, Fathia; Godon, Jean-Jacques; Hamdi, Moktar

    2011-11-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the feasibility of using a biofilter system to treat hydrogen sulfide (H2S) contaminated air and to characterize its microbial community. The biofilter system was packed with peat. During the experimental work, the peat was divided in three layers (down, middle, and up). Satisfactory removal efficiencies of H2S were proved and reached 99% for the majority of the run time at an empty bed retention time (EBRT) of 60 s. The polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) method was used to uncover the changes in the microbial community between the different layers. Analysis of SSCP profiles demonstrated significant differences in community structure from a layer to another with a strong decrease in species diversity towards the up layer. It was found that the used support was suitable for microorganism growth, and may have a potential application in H2S biofiltration system. PMID:21945209

  11. Method for improved gas-solids separation

    DOEpatents

    Kusik, C.L.; He, B.X.

    1990-11-13

    Methods are disclosed for the removal of particulate solids from a gas stream at high separation efficiency, including the removal of submicron size particles. The apparatus includes a cyclone separator type of device which contains an axially mounted perforated cylindrical hollow rotor. The rotor is rotated at high velocity in the same direction as the flow of an input particle-laden gas stream to thereby cause enhanced separation of particulate matter from the gas stream in the cylindrical annular space between the rotor and the sidewall of the cyclone vessel. Substantially particle-free gas passes through the perforated surface of the spinning rotor and into the hollow rotor, from where it is discharged out of the top of the apparatus. Separated particulates are removed from the bottom of the vessel. 4 figs.

  12. Method for improved gas-solids separation

    DOEpatents

    Kusik, Charles L.; He, Bo X.

    1990-01-01

    Methods are disclosed for the removal of particulate solids from a gas stream at high separation efficiency, including the removal of submicron size particles. The apparatus includes a cyclone separator type of device which contains an axially mounted perforated cylindrical hollow rotor. The rotor is rotated at high velocity in the same direction as the flow of an input particle-laden gas stream to thereby cause enhanced separation of particulate matter from the gas stream in the cylindrical annular space between the rotor and the sidewall of the cyclone vessel. Substantially particle-free gas passes through the perforated surface of the spinning rotor and into the hollow rotor, from when it is discharged out of the top of the apparatus. Separated particulates are removed from the bottom of the vessel.

  13. Simulation of Ultrasonic-driven Gas Separations

    SciTech Connect

    Rector, David R.; Greenwood, Margaret S.; Ahmed, Salahuddin; Doctor, Steven R.; Posakony, Gerald J.; Stenkamp, Victoria S.

    2007-06-01

    The separation of components in a gas mixture is important for a wide range of applications. One method for achieving this separation is by passing a traveling acoustic wave through the gas mixture, which creates a flux of the lighter components away from the transducer. A series of simulation were performed to assess the effectiveness of this method for separating a binary mixture of argon and helium using the lattice kinetics method. The energy transport equation was modified to account for adiabatic expansion and compression. The species transport equation was modified to include a barodiffusion term. Simulations were performed on two different scales; detailed acoustic wave simulations to determine the net component flux as a function of local concentration, pressure, etc., and device scale simulations to predict the gas composition as a function of time inside a gas separation cylinder. The method is first validated using data from literature and then applied to mixtures of argon and helium. Results are presented and discussed.

  14. Simulation of ultrasonic-driven gas separations.

    PubMed

    Rector, David R; Greenwood, Margaret S; Ahmed, Salahuddin; Doctor, Steven R; Posakony, Gerry J; Stenkamp, V Susan

    2007-06-01

    The separation of components in a gas mixture is important for a wide range of applications. One method for achieving this separation is by passing a traveling acoustic wave through the gas mixture, which creates a flux of the lighter components away from the transducer. A series of simulations was performed to assess the effectiveness of this method for separating a binary mixture of argon and helium using the lattice kinetics method. The energy transport equation was modified to account for adiabatic expansion and compression. The species transport equation was modified to include a barodiffusion term. Simulations were performed on two different scales; detailed acoustic wave simulations to determine the net component flux as a function of local concentration, pressure, etc. and device scale simulations to predict the gas composition as a function of time inside a gas separation cylinder. The method is first validated using data from literature and then applied to mixtures of argon and helium. Results are presented and discussed.

  15. Mesoporous Carbon Membranes for Selective Gas Separations

    SciTech Connect

    2009-04-01

    This factsheet describes a study whose focus is on translating a novel class of material developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory—selfassembled mesoporous carbon—into robust, efficient membrane systems for selective industrial gas separations.

  16. Ion-Molecule Reaction of Gas-Phase Chromium Oxyanions: CrxOyHz- + H2O

    SciTech Connect

    Gianotto, Anita Kay; Hodges, Brittany DM; Benson, Michael Timothy; Harrington, Peter Boves; Appelhans, Anthony David; Olson, John Eric; Groenewold, Gary Steven

    2003-08-01

    Chromium oxyanions having the general formula CrxOyHz- play a key role in many industrial, environmental, and analytical processes, which motivated investigations of their intrinsic reactivity. Reactions with water are perhaps the most significant, and were studied by generating CrxOyHz- in the gas phase using a quadrupole ion trap secondary ion mass spectrometer. Of the ions in the Cr1OyHz envelope (y = 2, 3, 4; z = 0, 1), only CrO2- was observed to react with H2O, producing the hydrated CrO3H2- at a slow rate (~0.07% of the ion-molecule collision constant at 310 K). CrO3-, CrO4-, and CrO4H- were unreactive. In contrast, Cr2O4-, Cr2O5-, and Cr2O5H2- displayed a considerable tendency to react with H2O. Cr2O4- underwent sequential reactions with H2O, initially producing Cr2O5H2- at a rate that was ~7% efficient. Cr2O5H2- then reacted with a second H2O by addition to form Cr2O6H4- (1.8% efficient) and by OH abstraction to form Cr2O6H3- (0.6% efficient). The reactions of Cr2O5- were similar to those of Cr2O5H2-: Cr2O5- underwent addition to form Cr2O6H2- (3% efficient) and OH abstraction to form Cr2O6H- (<1% efficient). By comparison, Cr2O6- was unreactive with H2O, and in fact, no further H2O addition could be observed for any of the Cr2O6Hz- anions. Hartree-Fock ab initio calculations showed that reactive CrxOyHz- species underwent nucleophilic attack by the incoming H2O molecules, which produced an initially formed adduct in which the water O was bound to a Cr center. The experimental and computational studies suggested that Cr2OyHz- species that have bi- or tricoordinated Cr centers are susceptible to attack by H2O; however, when the metal becomes tetracoordinate, reactivity stops. For the Cr2OyHz- anions the lowest energy structures all contained rhombic Cr2O2 rings with pendant O atoms and/or OH groups. The initially formed [Cr2Oy- + H2O] adducts underwent H rearrangement to a gem O atom to produce stable dihydroxy structures. The calculations indicated that

  17. Gas separation using porous cement membrane.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weiqi; Gaggl, Maria; Gluth, Gregor J G; Behrendt, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Gas separation is a key issue in various industrial fields. Hydrogen has the potential for application in clean fuel technologies. Therefore, the separation and purification of hydrogen is an important research subject. CO2 capture and storage have important roles in "green chemistry". As an effective clean technology, gas separation using inorganic membranes has attracted much attention in the last several decades. Membrane processes have many applications in the field of gas separation. Cement is one type of inorganic material, with the advantages of a lower cost and a longer lifespan. An experimental setup has been created and improved to measure twenty different cement membranes. The purpose of this work was to investigate the influence of gas molecule properties on the material transport and to explore the influence of operating conditions and membrane composition on separation efficiency. The influences of the above parameters are determined, the best conditions and membrane type are found, it is shown that cementitious material has the ability to separate gas mixtures, and the gas transport mechanism is studied. PMID:24649699

  18. First accurate experimental study of Mu reactivity from a state-selected reactant in the gas phase: the Mu + H2{1} reaction rate at 300 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakule, Pavel; Sukhorukov, Oleksandr; Ishida, Katsuhiko; Pratt, Francis; Fleming, Donald; Momose, Takamasa; Matsuda, Yasuyuki; Torikai, Eiko

    2015-02-01

    This paper reports on the experimental background and methodology leading to recent results on the first accurate measurement of the reaction rate of the muonium (Mu) atom from a state-selected reactant in the gas phase: the Mu + H2\\{1\\}\\to MuH + H reaction at 300 K, and its comparison with rigorous quantum rate theory, Bakule et al (2012 J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 3 2755). Stimulated Raman pumping, induced by 532 nm light from the 2nd harmonic of a Nd:YAG laser, was used to produce H2 in its first vibrational (v = 1) state, H2\\{1\\}, in a single Raman/reaction cell. A pulsed muon beam (from ‘ISIS’, at 50 Hz) matched the 25 Hz repetition rate of the laser, allowing data taking in equal ‘Laser-On/Laser-Off’ modes of operation. The signal to noise was improved by over an order of magnitude in comparison with an earlier proof-of-principle experiment. The success of the present experiment also relied on optimizing the overlap of the laser profile with the extended stopping distribution of the muon beam at 50 bar H2 pressure, in which Monte Carlo simulations played a central role. The rate constant, found from the analysis of three separate measurements, which includes a correction for the loss of {{H}2}\\{1\\} concentration due to collisional relaxation with unpumped H2 during the time of each measurement, is {{k}Mu}\\{1\\} = 9.9[(-1.4)(+1.7)] × 10-13 cm3 s-1 at 300 K. This is in good to excellent agreement with rigorous quantum rate calculations on the complete configuration interaction/Born-Huang surface, as reported earlier by Bakule et al, and which are also briefly commented on herein.

  19. Isotope Separation in Concurrent Gas Centrifuges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogovalov, S. V.; Borman, V. D.

    An analytical equation defining separative power of an optimized concurrent gas centrifuge is obtained for an arbitrary binary mixture of isotopes. In the case of the uranium isotopes the equation gives δU= 12.7(V/700 m/s)2(300 K/T)L, kg SWU/yr, where L and V are the length and linear velocity of the rotor of the gas centrifuge, T is the temperature. This formula well agrees with an empirical separative power of counter current gas centrifuges.

  20. Optimization of operating parameters for gas-phase photocatalytic splitting of H2S by novel vermiculate packed tubular reactor.

    PubMed

    Preethi, V; Kanmani, S

    2016-10-01

    Hydrogen production by gas-phase photocatalytic splitting of Hydrogen Sulphide (H2S) was investigated on four semiconductor photocatalysts including CuGa1.6Fe0.4O2, ZnFe2O3, (CdS + ZnS)/Fe2O3 and Ce/TiO2. The CdS and ZnS coated core shell particles (CdS + ZnS)/Fe2O3 shows the highest rate of hydrogen (H2) production under optimized conditions. Packed bed tubular reactor was used to study the performance of prepared photocatalysts. Selection of the best packing material is a key for maximum removal efficiency. Cheap, lightweight and easily adsorbing vermiculate materials were used as a novel packing material and were found to be effective in splitting H2S. Effect of various operating parameters like flow rate, sulphide concentration, catalyst dosage, light irradiation were tested and optimized for maximum H2 conversion of 92% from industrial waste H2S. PMID:27562700

  1. A thermodynamical model for the surface tension of silicate melts in contact with H2O gas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Colucci, Simone; Battaglia, Maurizio; Trigila, Raffaello

    2016-01-01

    Surface tension plays an important role in the nucleation of H2O gas bubbles in magmatic melts and in the time-dependent rheology of bubble-bearing magmas. Despite several experimental studies, a physics based model of the surface tension of magmatic melts in contact with H2O is lacking. This paper employs gradient theory to develop a thermodynamical model of equilibrium surface tension of silicate melts in contact with H2O gas at low to moderate pressures. In the last decades, this approach has been successfully applied in studies of industrial mixtures but never to magmatic systems. We calibrate and verify the model against literature experimental data, obtained by the pendant drop method, and by inverting bubble nucleation experiments using the Classical Nucleation Theory (CNT). Our model reproduces the systematic decrease in surface tension with increased H2O pressure observed in the experiments. On the other hand, the effect of temperature is confirmed by the experiments only at high pressure. At atmospheric pressure, the model shows a decrease of surface tension with temperature. This is in contrast with a number of experimental observations and could be related to microstructural effects that cannot be reproduced by our model. Finally, our analysis indicates that the surface tension measured inverting the CNT may be lower than the value measured by the pendant drop method, most likely because of changes in surface tension controlled by the supersaturation.

  2. Molecular gas in low-metallicity starburst galaxies:. Scaling relations and the CO-to-H2 conversion factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amorín, R.; Muñoz-Tuñón, C.; Aguerri, J. A. L.; Planesas, P.

    2016-04-01

    Context. Tracing the molecular gas-phase in low-mass star-forming galaxies becomes extremely challenging due to significant UV photo-dissociation of CO molecules in their low-dust, low-metallicity ISM environments. Aims: We aim to study the molecular content and the star-formation efficiency of a representative sample of 21 blue compact dwarf galaxies (BCDs), previously characterized on the basis of their spectrophotometric properties. Methods: We present CO (1-0) and (2-1) observations conducted at the IRAM-30m telescope. These data are further supplemented with additional CO measurements and multiwavelength ancillary data from the literature. We explore correlations between the derived CO luminosities and several galaxy-averaged properties. Results: We detect CO emission in seven out of ten BCDs observed. For two galaxies these are the first CO detections reported so far. We find the molecular content traced by CO to be correlated with the stellar and Hi masses, star formation rate (SFR) tracers, the projected size of the starburst, and its gas-phase metallicity. BCDs appear to be systematically offset from the Schmidt-Kennicutt (SK) law, showing lower average gas surface densities for a given ΣSFR, and therefore showing extremely low (≲0.1 Gyr) H2 and H2 +Hi depletion timescales. The departure from the SK law is smaller when considering H2 +Hi rather than H2 only, and is larger for BCDs with lower metallicity and higher specific SFR. Thus, the molecular fraction (ΣH2/ ΣHI) and CO depletion timescale (ΣH2/ ΣSFR) of BCDs is found to be strongly correlated with metallicity. Using this, and assuming that the empirical correlation found between the specific SFR and galaxy-averaged H2 depletion timescale of more metal-rich galaxies extends to lower masses, we derive a metallicity-dependent CO-to-H2 conversion factor αCO,Z ∝ (Z/Z⊙)- y, with y = 1.5(±0.3)in qualitative agreement with previous determinations, dust-based measurements, and recent model

  3. Measurement and model results for gas phase OH and H2SO4 during PROPHET 2001.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanner, D.; Sjostedt, S.; Huey, G.; Slusher, D.; Chen, G.; Lefer, B.; Shetter, R.; Carroll, M.; Hengel, S.; Fortner, E.; Young, V.

    2002-12-01

    During the summer of 2001 a Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (CIMS) was installed on top of the PROPHET tower to measure OH and H2SO4. Both OH and H2SO4 have a strong diurnal variation and correlate well with the measured ozone photolysis rate. Typical OH nighttime values are below the detection limit of 3e5 molecules cm-3. The maximum daytime value varied from 1-5 e6 molecules cm-3 with the highest OH levels corresponding to the lowest isoprene mixing ratios. The nighttime results are inconsistent with previous LIF measurements of high nighttime OH levels at this site and may indicate a systematic difference between the two techniques. However, the midday measured OH data is approximately 50% higher than the preliminary midday model values and is in accord with the previous LIF observations. A more detailed comparison of constrained photochemical models predictions to the observed OH levels will be presented. The daytime H2SO4 concentrations were highly variable and exceeded 5e7 molecules cm-3 on two days under "clean" northerly flow conditions. Evidence will be presented that suggest the source of the relatively high sulfuric acid concentrations is a large nickel smelting operation in Sudbury, Ontario. The nighttime levels of sulfuric acid were typically below the detection limit of the instrument of approximately 1e5 molecules cm-3. This data is consistent with the measured OH and suggests that large nighttime sources of radicals are not present in this environment.

  4. [Performance of cross flow trickling filter for H2S gas treatment].

    PubMed

    Liu, Chun-Jing; Li, Jian; Liu, Jia; Peng, Shu-Jing; Li, Chao; Chen, Ying; He, Hong

    2012-09-01

    A grading cross bio-trickling filter was designed for H2S removal. Mixed microorganisms domesticated from the former experiment were immobilized to start up the trickling filter. Removal performances during starting up period and different loadings were investigated. Results showed that the immobilization of the trickling filter was completed within 3 d. The removal efficiency was higher than 99% when the inlet concentration was in the range of 110 mg x m(-3) to 230 mg x m(-3) (EBRT 30 s). At low inlet loadings, the front part of the trickling filter played a major role in H2S degradation, accounting for about 85%. Microbial diversity and population of the front part were superior to the tail one. At higher loadings, microbial diversity and population of the tail part increased significantly, from 4.5 x 10(7) cells x g (-1) to 5.17 x 10(8) cells x g(-1), and the elimination capacity was also improved,from 0.04 g x h(-1) to 0.67 g x h(-1). Rod-shaped bacteria were the dominant microorganisms on the surface of ceramics in the steady state as observed by SEM. The surfaces of ceramics were covered by a lot of microbial metabolites at high loadings. Analysis of the metabolites indicated that the majority of H2S was oxidized to sulfur and only a small portion was converted to sulfate.

  5. SEPARATION OF GAS MIXTURES BY THERMOACOUSTIC WAVES

    SciTech Connect

    G.W. SWIFT; D.A. GELLER; P.S. SPOOR

    2001-06-01

    Imposing sound on a binary gas mixture in a duct separates the two gases along the acoustic-propagation axis. Mole-fraction differences as large as 10% and separation fluxes as high as 0.001 M-squared c, where M is Mach number and c is sound speed, are easily observed. We describe the accidental discovery of this phenomenon in a helium-xenon mixture, subsequent experiments with a helium-argon mixture, and theoretical developments. The phenomenon occurs because a thin layer of the gas adjacent to the wall is immobilized by viscosity while the rest of the gas moves back and forth with the wave, and the heat capacity of the wall holds this thin layer of the gas at constant temperature while the rest of the gas experiences temperature oscillations due to the wave's oscillating pressure. The oscillating temperature gradient causes the light and heavy atoms in the gas to take turns diffusing into and out of the immobilized layer, so that the oscillating motion of the wave outside the immobilized layer tends to carry light-enriched gas in one direction and heavy-enriched gas in the opposite direction. Experiment and theory are in very good agreement for the initial separation fluxes and the saturation mole-fraction differences.

  6. Optimization of an enclosed gas analyzer sampling system for measuring eddy covariance fluxes of H2O and CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzger, Stefan; Burba, George; Burns, Sean P.; Blanken, Peter D.; Li, Jiahong; Luo, Hongyan; Zulueta, Rommel C.

    2016-03-01

    Several initiatives are currently emerging to observe the exchange of energy and matter between the earth's surface and atmosphere standardized over larger space and time domains. For example, the National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) and the Integrated Carbon Observing System (ICOS) are set to provide the ability of unbiased ecological inference across ecoclimatic zones and decades by deploying highly scalable and robust instruments and data processing. In the construction of these observatories, enclosed infrared gas analyzers are widely employed for eddy covariance applications. While these sensors represent a substantial improvement compared to their open- and closed-path predecessors, remaining high-frequency attenuation varies with site properties and gas sampling systems, and requires correction. Here, we show that components of the gas sampling system can substantially contribute to such high-frequency attenuation, but their effects can be significantly reduced by careful system design. From laboratory tests we determine the frequency at which signal attenuation reaches 50 % for individual parts of the gas sampling system. For different models of rain caps and particulate filters, this frequency falls into ranges of 2.5-16.5 Hz for CO2, 2.4-14.3 Hz for H2O, and 8.3-21.8 Hz for CO2, 1.4-19.9 Hz for H2O, respectively. A short and thin stainless steel intake tube was found to not limit frequency response, with 50 % attenuation occurring at frequencies well above 10 Hz for both H2O and CO2. From field tests we found that heating the intake tube and particulate filter continuously with 4 W was effective, and reduced the occurrence of problematic relative humidity levels (RH > 60 %) by 50 % in the infrared gas analyzer cell. No further improvement of H2O frequency response was found for heating in excess of 4 W. These laboratory and field tests were reconciled using resistor-capacitor theory, and NEON's final gas sampling system was developed on this

  7. Improving the H2 Gas Sensitivity of ZnO Thin Films by Modifying the Annealing Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khojier, K.; Savaloni, H.

    2015-10-01

    This paper explains the influence of annealing conditions on the sensing properties of ZnO thin films that can be used for the development of H2 gas sensors. Zn thin films were deposited by the e-beam deposition technique and subsequently annealed using different temperatures (400°C and 500°C), times (30 min and 60 min), and environments (air and oxygen flow). Detailed morphological, chemical, and structural investigations were carried out on all samples by field-emission scanning electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction analysis. The electrical response of the ZnO films was tested for H2 gas (40 ppm, 80 ppm, and 120 ppm concentrations) in the temperature range of 200°C to 450°C. Results showed that the maximum response for all samples was reached at operating temperature of 400°C and variation of the annealing conditions resulted in improvement of the H2 gas sensitivity of the ZnO thin films due to a change in the concentration of carriers.

  8. Polymer film-based optical access to enclosed gas: demonstration of H2O absorption tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ze; Anderson, Mark H.; Sanders, Scott T.

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate the use of a film to enable optical access to enclosed gases. We use absorption tomography to image H2O in a 101.6-mm-diameter duct with 2-mm spatial resolution. Considering the central 94 mm, the standard deviation of the image is 1.6 %, and the average mole fraction error is -0.008 %. A polybenzimidazole film is identified to be a candidate for extending the technique to enable NH3 imaging in a diesel aftertreatment system.

  9. An approach for estimating toxic releases of H2S-containing natural gas.

    PubMed

    Jianwen, Zhang; Da, Lei; Wenxing, Feng

    2014-01-15

    China is well known being rich in sulfurous natural gas with huge deposits widely distributed all over the country. Due to the toxic nature, the release of hydrogen sulfide-containing natural gas from the pipelines intends to impose serious threats to the human, society and environment around the release sources. CFD algorithm is adopted to simulate the dispersion process of gas, and the results prove that Gaussian plume model is suitable for determining the affected region of the well blowout of sulfide hydrogen-containing natural gas. In accordance with the analysis of release scenarios, the present study proposes a new approach for estimating the risk of hydrogen sulfide poisoning hazards, as caused by sulfide-hydrogen-containing natural gas releases. Historical accident-statistical data from the EGIG (European Gas Pipeline Incident Data Group) and the Britain Gas Transco are integrated into the approach. Also, the dose-load effect is introduced to exploit the hazards' effects by two essential parameters - toxic concentration and exposure time. The approach was applied to three release scenarios occurring on the East-Sichuan Gas Transportation Project, and the individual risk and societal risk are classified and discussed. Results show that societal risk varies significantly with different factors, including population density, distance from pipeline, operating conditions and so on. Concerning the dispersion process of hazardous gas, available safe egress time was studied from the perspective of individual fatality risks. The present approach can provide reliable support for the safety management and maintenance of natural gas pipelines as well as evacuations that may occur after release incidents.

  10. Optimization of a gas sampling system for measuring eddy-covariance fluxes of H2O and CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzger, S.; Burba, G.; Burns, S. P.; Blanken, P. D.; Li, J.; Luo, H.; Zulueta, R. C.

    2015-10-01

    Several initiatives are currently emerging to observe the exchange of energy and matter between the earth's surface and atmosphere standardized over larger space and time domains. For example, the National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) and the Integrated Carbon Observing System (ICOS) will provide the ability of unbiased ecological inference across eco-climatic zones and decades by deploying highly scalable and robust instruments and data processing. In the construction of these observatories, enclosed infrared gas analysers are widely employed for eddy-covariance applications. While these sensors represent a substantial improvement compared to their open- and closed-path predecessors, remaining high-frequency attenuation varies with site properties, and requires correction. Here, we show that the gas sampling system substantially contributes to high-frequency attenuation, which can be minimized by careful design. From laboratory tests we determine the frequency at which signal attenuation reaches 50 % for individual parts of the gas sampling system. For different models of rain caps and particulate filters, this frequency falls into ranges of 2.5-16.5 Hz for CO2, 2.4-14.3 Hz for H2O, and 8.3-21.8 Hz for CO2, 1.4-19.9 Hz for H2O, respectively. A short and thin stainless steel intake tube was found to not limit frequency response, with 50 % attenuation occurring at frequencies well above 10 Hz for both H2O and CO2. From field tests we found that heating the intake tube and particulate filter continuously with 4 W was effective, and reduced the occurrence of problematic relative humidity levels (RH > 60 %) by 50 % in the infrared gas analyser cell. No further improvement of H2O frequency response was found for heating in excess of 4 W. These laboratory and field tests were reconciled using resistor-capacitor theory, and NEON's final gas sampling system was developed on this basis. The design consists of the stainless steel intake tube, a pleated mesh

  11. UPGRADING NATURAL GAS VIA MEMBRANE SEPARATION PROCESSES

    SciTech Connect

    S.A.Stern; P.A. Rice; J. Hao

    2000-03-01

    The objective of the present study is to assess the potential usefulness of membrane separation processes for removing CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S from low-quality natural gas containing substantial amounts of both these ''acid'' gases, e.g., up to 40 mole-% CO{sub 2} and 10 mole-% H{sub 2}S. The membrane processes must be capable of upgrading the crude natural gas to pipeline specifications ({le} 2 mole-% CO{sub 2}, {le} 4 ppm H{sub 2}S). Moreover, these processes must also be economically competitive with the conventional separation techniques, such as gas absorption, utilized for this purpose by the gas industry.

  12. The RealGas and RealGasH2O options of the TOUGH+ code for the simulation of coupled fluid and heat flow in tight/shale gas systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    We developed two new EOS additions to the TOUGH+ family of codes, the RealGasH2O and RealGas. The RealGasH2O EOS option describes the non-isothermal two-phase flow of water and a real gas mixture in gas reservoirs, with a particular focus in ultra-tight (such as tight-sand and sh...

  13. Crosslinked Polybenzimidazole Membrane For Gas Separation

    DOEpatents

    Jorgensen, Betty S.; Young, Jennifer S.; Espinoza, Brent F.

    2005-09-20

    A cross-linked, supported polybenzimidazole membrane for gas separation is prepared by layering a solution of polybenzimidazole (PBI) and a,a'dibromo-p-xylene onto a porous support and evaporating solvent. A supported membrane of cross-linked poly-2,2'-(m-phenylene)-5,5'-bibenzimidazole unexpectedly exhibits an enhanced gas permeability compared to the non-cross linked analog at temperatures over 265° C.

  14. KINETICS OF DIRECT OXIDATION OF H2S IN COAL GAS TO ELEMENTAL SULFUR

    SciTech Connect

    K.C. Kwon

    2002-02-01

    Removal of hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) from coal gasifier gas and sulfur recovery are key steps in the development of Department of Energy's (DOE's) advanced Vision 21 plants that employ coal and natural gas and produce electric power and clean transportation fuels. These Vision 21 plants will require highly clean coal gas with H{sub 2}S below 1 ppm and negligible amounts of trace contaminants such as hydrogen chloride, ammonia, alkali, heavy metals, and particulate. The conventional method of sulfur removal and recovery employing amine, Claus, and tail-gas treatment is very expensive. A second generation approach developed under DOE's sponsorship employs hot-gas desulfurization (HGD) using regenerable metal oxide sorbents followed by Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP). However, this process sequence does not remove trace contaminants and is targeted primarily towards the development of advanced integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plants that produce electricity (not both electricity and transportation fuels). There is an immediate as well as long-term need for the development of cleanup processes that produce highly clean coal gas for next generation Vision 21 plants. To this end, a novel process is now under development at Research Triangle Institute (RTI) in which the H{sub 2}S in coal gas is directly oxidized to elemental sulfur over a selective catalyst. Such a process is ideally suited for coal gas from commercial gasifiers with a quench system to remove essentially all the trace contaminants except H{sub 2}S. This direct oxidation process has the potential to produce a super clean coal gas more economically than both conventional amine-based processes and HGD/DSRP. The objective of this research is to support the near- and long-term DOE efforts to commercialize this direct oxidation technology. Specifically, we aim to: Measure the kinetics of direct oxidation of H{sub 2}S to elemental sulfur over selective catalysts in the presence of major

  15. Growth conditions effects on the H2 and CO2 gas sensing properties of Indium Tin Oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isik, S.; Coban, O.; Shafai, C.; Tuzemen, S.; Gur, E.

    2016-04-01

    Indium Tin Oxide (ITO) thin films are transparent conducting wide bandgap oxide. In this study investigated optical, structural and morphological properties of sputtered ITO thin films using X-ray diffraction spectroscopy (XRD), Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDX) and optical absorption techniques. These measurements revealed that the oxygen gas percentage present in the ITO film deposited by RF magnetron sputter deposition showed systematic variation of its band gap, crystal orientation, growth rate, figure of merit (FOM) and dominant XRD peaks. All the thin films deposited at room temperature (RT). Once characterization of the films carried out, H2 and CO2 resistive gas sensors fabricated by depositing the ITO film on top of aluminium interdigitated contacts/electrode (IDE), that fabricated following lithography and etching processes. These devices showed reasonable sensitivity for pure H2 and CO2 at elevated temperature. A correlation found between the thin film properties of the ITO and its sensing capability for H2 and CO2, which these gases are important in many fields such as automotive, energy, biological and health-related applications.

  16. Cryogenic system with GM cryocooler for krypton, xenon separation from hydrogen-helium purge gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, X. X.; Zhang, M. M.; Zhang, D. X.; Xu, D.; Qian, Y.; Liu, W.

    2014-01-01

    In the thorium molten salt reactor (TMSR), fission products such as krypton, xenon and tritium will be produced continuously in the process of nuclear fission reaction. A cryogenic system with a two stage GM cryocooler was designed to separate Kr, Xe, and H2 from helium purge gas. The temperatures of two stage heat exchanger condensation tanks were maintained at about 38 K and 4.5 K, respectively. The main fluid parameters of heat transfer were confirmed, and the structural heat exchanger equipment and cold box were designed. Designed concentrations after cryogenic separation of Kr, Xe and H2 in helium recycle gas are less than 1 ppb.

  17. Metal oxide membranes for gas separation

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, M.A.; Webster, E.T.; Xu, Q.

    1994-08-30

    A method for formation of a microporous ceramic membrane onto a porous support includes placing a colloidal suspension of metal oxide particles on one side of the porous support and exposing the other side of the porous support to a drying stream of gas or a reactive gas stream so that the particles are deposited on the drying side of the support as a gel. The gel so deposited can be sintered to form a supported ceramic membrane having mean pore sizes less than 30 Angstroms and useful for ultrafiltration, reverse osmosis, or gas separation. 4 figs.

  18. Metal oxide membranes for gas separation

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Marc A.; Webster, Elizabeth T.; Xu, Qunyin

    1994-01-01

    A method for permformation of a microporous ceramic membrane onto a porous support includes placing a colloidal suspension of metal oxide particles on one side of the porous support and exposing the other side of the porous support to a drying stream of gas or a reactive gas stream so that the particles are deposited on the drying side of the support as a gel. The gel so deposited can be sintered to form a supported ceramic membrane having mean pore sizes less than 30 Angstroms and useful for ultrafiltration, reverse osmosis, or gas separation.

  19. Gas separation using ultrasound and light absorption

    DOEpatents

    Sinha, Dipen N.

    2012-07-31

    An apparatus and method for separating a chosen gas from a mixture of gases having no moving parts and utilizing no chemical processing is described. The separation of particulates from fluid carriers thereof has been observed using ultrasound. In a similar manner, molecular species may be separated from carrier species. It is also known that light-induced drift may separate light-absorbing species from carrier species. Therefore, the combination of temporally pulsed absorption of light with ultrasonic concentration is expected to significantly increase the efficiency of separation by ultrasonic concentration alone. Additionally, breaking the spatial symmetry of a cylindrical acoustic concentrator decreases the spatial distribution of the concentrated particles, and increases the concentration efficiency.

  20. Synthesis of activated carbon from oil fly ash for removal of H2S from gas stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslam, Zaheer; Shawabkeh, Reyad A.; Hussein, Ibnelwaleed A.; Al-Baghli, Nadhir; Eic, Mladen

    2015-02-01

    Activated carbon (AC) is made from waste oil fly ash (OFA) which is produced in large quantities from power generation plants through combustion of heavy fuel oil. OFA contains ∼80% carbon that makes it suitable for producing AC by physicochemical treatments using a mixture of HNO3, H2SO4, and H3PO4 acids to remove non-carbonaceous impurities. The acid treated OFA is then activated by CO2 at 990 °C. The physico-chemical treatments of OFA have increased the surface area from 4 to 375 m2/g. Surface morphology and pore volume of AC are characterized by combined SEM and EDX techniques. Elemental analysis shows that sulfur content is reduced from 7.1 wt% in untreated OFA to 0.51 wt% for the treated OFA. The AC is further treated with HNO3 and NH4OH solutions in order to attach the carboxylic and amine groups on the surface, respectively. FTIR characterization is used to confirm the presence of the functional groups on the surface of AC at different stages of its development. The performance of functionalized AC samples is tested for the removal of H2S from a synthetic natural gas by carrying out breakthrough experiments. The results from these tests have shown maximum adsorption capacity of 0.3001 mg/g for NH4OH functionalized activated carbon with 86.43% regeneration efficiency. The ammonium hydroxide treated AC is found to be more effective for H2S removal than acid treated AC as confirmed by breakthrough experiments. The results indicate that the presence of more acidic functionalities on the surface reduces the H2S adsorption efficiency from the gas mixture.

  1. Kinetics of Direct Oxidation of H2S in Coal Gas to Elemental Sulfur

    SciTech Connect

    K.C. Kwon

    2005-11-01

    Removal of hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) from coal gasifier gas and sulfur recovery are key steps in the development of Department of Energy's (DOE's) advanced Vision 21 plants that produce electric power and clean transportation fuels with coal and natural gas. These Vision 21 plants will require highly clean coal gas with H{sub 2}S below 1 ppm and negligible amounts of trace contaminants such as hydrogen chloride, ammonia, alkali, heavy metals, and particulate. The conventional method of sulfur removal and recovery employing amine, Claus, and tail-gas treatment is very expensive. A second generation approach developed under DOE's sponsorship employs hot-gas desulfurization (HGD) using regenerable metal oxide sorbents followed by Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP). However, this process sequence does not remove trace contaminants and is targeted primarily towards the development of advanced integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plants that produce electricity (not both electricity and transportation fuels). There is an immediate as well as long-term need for the development of cleanup processes that produce highly clean coal gas for next generation Vision 21 plants. To this end, a novel process is now under development at several research organizations in which the H{sub 2}S in coal gas is directly oxidized to elemental sulfur over a selective catalyst. Such a process is ideally suited for coal gas from commercial gasifiers with a quench system to remove essentially all the trace contaminants except H{sub 2}S. The direct oxidation of H{sub 2}S to elemental sulfur in the presence of SO{sub 2} is ideally suited for coal gas from commercial gasifiers with a quench system to remove essentially all the trace contaminants except H{sub 2}S. This direct oxidation process has the potential to produce a super clean coal gas more economically than both conventional amine-based processes and HGD/DSRP. The objectives of this research are to measure kinetics of direct

  2. Evaluation and Characterization of Membranes for H2SO4/Water and I2/HI/H2O Water Separation and Hydrogen Permeation for the S-I Cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Frederick R. Stewart

    2006-10-01

    In this report are the findings into three membrane separation studies for potential application to the Sulfur-Iodine (S-I) thermochemical cycle. The first is the removal of water from hydriodic acid/iodine mixtures. In the S-I cycle, iodine is added to the product of the Bunsen reaction to facilitate the separation of sulfuric acid (H2SO4) from hydriodic acid (HI). The amount of iodine can be as high as 83% of the overall mass load of the Bunsen product stream, which potentially introduces a large burden on the cycle’s efficiency. Removal of water from the HI and iodine mixture would substantially reduce the amount of required additional iodine. In this work, performance data for Nafion® and sulfonated poly (ether ether ketone) (SPEEK) membranes is shown.

  3. A comparison of TiO2 nanoparticles and nanotubes for catalytic gas phase destruction of H2S gas at high temperatures.

    PubMed

    Shahzad, Naeem; Hussain, Syed Tajammul; Siddiqua, Asima; Baig, Muhammad Anwar

    2012-06-01

    Reduction of H2S gas over Sulphur doped TiO2 nanoparticles and TiO2 nanotubes was studied in this work. Fixed bed catalytic system was used for the catalytic reduction of H2S gas at a high temperature of 450 degrees C under laboratory conditions. 99.97% reduction was achieved using S-doped TiO2. 2.89% Sulphur was adsorbed on S-doped TiO2 nanoparticles in the form of Ti(SO4)2, while 95.6% reduction was achieved in case of TiO2 nanotubes and the sulphur adsorption was 2.67%. The XRD, SEM, and EDX techniques were carried out to characterize the nanoparticles and nanotubes, while gas reduction analysis was carried out using GC-MS for gas samples. PMID:22905577

  4. Strong H(2) binding and selective gas adsorption within the microporous coordination solid Mg(3)(O(2)C-C(10)H(6)-CO(2))(3).

    PubMed

    Dinca, Mircea; Long, Jeffrey R

    2005-07-01

    The synthesis of Mg3(NDC)3(DEF)4 (NDC = 2,6-naphthalenedicarboxylate, DEF = N,N-diethylformamide, 1), the first porous metal-organic framework solid incorporating Mg2+ ions, is reported. Its structure consists of linear Mg3 units linked via NDC bridges to form a three-dimensional framework, featuring one-dimensional channels filled with DEF molecules. Significantly, its framework is fully analogous to that observed within Zn3(NDC)3(CH3OH)2.2DMF.H2O (2), demonstrating that Mg2+ ions can directly substitute for the heavier Zn2+ ions. Compound 1 is readily desolvated by heating at 190 degrees C to give the microporous solid Mg3(NDC)3, exhibiting a BET surface area of 190 m2/g. Adsorption isotherms measured at 77 and 87 K indicate high H2 adsorption enthalpies in the range 7.0-9.5 kJ/mol, depending on the degree of loading. In addition, the material displays selective adsorption of H2 or O2 over N2 or CO, suggesting possible applications in gas separation technologies.

  5. [Regulation of Ovarian Function: Part of the Gas Transmitters NO, CO and H2S].

    PubMed

    Chertok, V M; Zenkina, V G

    2015-01-01

    This review discusses the management of ovarian function and participation in the process of a new class of cellular regulators--Gasotransmitters (NO, CO and H2S). According to modern concepts in regulatory processes, in addition to hypothalamic-pituitary mechanisms involved a large and diverse group of ovary cells (interstitial, internal theca and atretic bodies, follicular epithelium, teka-luteal and granulosa-luteal cells of the corpus luteum), which not only mediate the gonadotropic stimulation, but satisfy the for the production of a wide range of biologically active substances. These materials are expected to participate in all these processes gaseous mediators. However, our knowledge of topochemistry, mechanisms and the role of these substances in the important organs of the reproductive system-ovary, fragmentary and do not allow to form a holistic understanding of the cellular mechanisms by which Gasotransmitters have a regulating effect on the individual structures of the ovary in normal functioning of the body and disease. Creation of an experimental model for studying the mechanisms of gaseous mediators in different cell types of ovarian, including endothelial and smooth muscle cells of blood vessels, in which the functional significance of these substances may be particularly significant, will provide fundamental knowledge for the development of new approaches to the treatment of diseases of the reproductive system. PMID:27183785

  6. KINETICS OF DIRECT OXIDATION OF H2S IN COAL GAS TO ELEMENTAL SULFUR

    SciTech Connect

    K.C. Kwon

    2004-01-01

    The direct oxidation of H{sub 2}S to elemental sulfur in the presence of SO{sub 2} is ideally suited for coal gas from commercial gasifiers with a quench system to remove essentially all the trace contaminants except H{sub 2}S. This direct oxidation process has the potential to produce a super clean coal gas more economically than both conventional amine-based processes and the hot-gas desulfurization using regenerable metal oxide sorbents followed by Direct Sulfur Recovery Process. The objective of this research is to support the near- and long-term process development efforts to commercialize this direct oxidation technology. The objectives of this research are to measure kinetics of direct oxidation of H{sub 2}S to elemental sulfur in the presence of a simulated coal gas mixture containing SO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}, and moisture, using 160-{micro}m C-500-04 alumina catalyst particles and a micro bubble reactor, and to develop kinetic rate equations and model the direct oxidation process to assist in the design of large-scale plants. This heterogeneous catalytic reaction has gaseous reactants such as H{sub 2}S and SO{sub 2}. However, this heterogeneous catalytic reaction has heterogeneous products such as liquid elemental sulfur and steam. To achieve the above-mentioned objectives, experiments on conversion of hydrogen sulfide into liquid elemental sulfur were carried out for the space time range of 1-6 milliseconds at 125-155 C to evaluate effects of reaction temperature, moisture concentration, reaction pressure on conversion of hydrogen sulfide into liquid elemental sulfur. Simulated coal gas mixtures consist of 70 v% hydrogen, 2,500-7,500-ppmv hydrogen sulfide, 1,250-3,750 ppmv sulfur dioxide, and 0-15 vol% moisture, and nitrogen as remainder. Volumetric feed rates of a simulated coal gas mixture to a micro bubble reactor are 100 cm{sup 3}/min at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. The temperature of the reactor is controlled in an oven at 125-155 C. The

  7. KINETICS OF DIRECT OXIDATION OF H2S IN COAL GAS TO ELEMENTAL SULFUR

    SciTech Connect

    K.C. Kwon

    2005-01-01

    The direct oxidation of H{sub 2}S to elemental sulfur in the presence of SO{sub 2} is ideally suited for coal gas from commercial gasifiers with a quench system to remove essentially all the trace contaminants except H{sub 2}S. This direct oxidation process has the potential to produce a super clean coal gas more economically than both conventional amine-based processes and the hot-gas desulfurization using regenerable metal oxide sorbents followed by Direct Sulfur Recovery Process. The objective of this research is to support the near- and long-term process development efforts to commercialize this direct oxidation technology. The objectives of this research are to measure kinetics of direct oxidation of H{sub 2}S to elemental sulfur in the presence of a simulated coal gas mixture containing SO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}, and moisture, using 160-{micro}m C-500-04 alumina catalyst particles and a micro bubble reactor, and to develop kinetic rate equations and model the direct oxidation process to assist in the design of large-scale plants. This heterogeneous catalytic reaction has gaseous reactants such as H{sub 2}S and SO{sub 2}. However, this heterogeneous catalytic reaction has heterogeneous products such as liquid elemental sulfur and steam. To achieve the above-mentioned objectives, experiments on conversion of hydrogen sulfide into liquid elemental sulfur were carried out for the space time range of 0.059-0.87 seconds at 125-155 C to evaluate effects of reaction temperature, H{sub 2}S concentration, reaction pressure, and catalyst loading on conversion of hydrogen sulfide into liquid elemental sulfur. Simulated coal gas mixtures consist of 62-78 v% hydrogen, 3,000-7,000-ppmv hydrogen sulfide, 1,500-3,500 ppmv sulfur dioxide, and 10 vol % moisture, and nitrogen as remainder. Volumetric feed rates of a simulated coal gas mixture to a micro bubble reactor are 50 cm{sup 3}/min at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. The temperature of the reactor is controlled in an

  8. Selectivity trend of gas separation through nanoporous graphene

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Liu, Hongjun; Chen, Zhongfang; Dai, Sheng; Jiang, De-en

    2014-01-29

    We demonstrate that porous graphene can efficiently separate gases according to their molecular sizes using molecular dynamic (MD) simulations,. The flux sequence from the classical MD simulation is H2>CO2>>N2>Ar>CH4, which generally follows the trend in the kinetic diameters. Moreover, this trend is also confirmed from the fluxes based on the computed free energy barriers for gas permeation using the umbrella sampling method and kinetic theory of gases. Both brute-force MD simulations and free-energy calcualtions lead to the flux trend consistent with experiments. Case studies of two compositions of CO2/N2 mixtures further demonstrate the separation capability of nanoporous graphene.

  9. KINETICS OF DIRECT OXIDATION OF H2S IN COAL GAS TO ELEMENTAL SULFUR

    SciTech Connect

    K.C. Kwon

    2003-01-01

    The direct oxidation of H{sub 2}S to elemental sulfur in the presence of SO{sub 2} is ideally suited for coal gas from commercial gasifiers with a quench system to remove essentially all the trace contaminants except H{sub 2}S. This direct oxidation process has the potential to produce a super clean coal gas more economically than both conventional amine-based processes and HGD/DSRP. The objective of this research is to support the near- and long-term DOE efforts to commercialize this direct oxidation technology. The objectives of this research are to measure kinetics of direct oxidation of H{sub 2}S to elemental sulfur in the presence of a simulated coal gas mixture containing SO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}, and moisture, using 60-{micro}m C-500-04 alumina catalyst particles and a PFA differential fixed-bed micro reactor, and to develop kinetic rate equations and model the direct oxidation process to assist in the design of large-scale plants. To achieve the above-mentioned objectives, experiments on conversion of hydrogen sulfide into elemental sulfur were carried out for the space time range of 0.01-0.047 seconds at 125-155 C to evaluate effects of reaction temperatures, moisture concentrations, reaction pressures on conversion of hydrogen sulfide into elemental sulfur. Simulated coal gas mixtures consist of 61-89 v% hydrogen, 2,300-9,200-ppmv hydrogen sulfide, 1,600-4,900 ppmv sulfur dioxide, and 2.6-13.7 vol % moisture, and nitrogen as remainder. Volumetric feed rates of a simulated coal gas mixture to the reactor are 100-110 cm{sup 3}/min at room temperature and atmospheric pressure (SCCM). The temperature of the reactor is controlled in an oven at 125-155 C. The pressure of the reactor is maintained at 28-127 psia. The following results were obtained based on experimental data generated from the differential reactor system, and their interpretations, (1) Concentration of moisture and concentrations of both H{sub 2}S and SO{sub 2} appear to affect slightly reaction

  10. Muonium Addition Reactions and Kinetic Isotope Effects in the Gas Phase: k∞ Rate Constants for Mu + C2H2.

    PubMed

    Arseneau, Donald J; Garner, David M; Reid, Ivan D; Fleming, Donald G

    2015-07-16

    The kinetics of the addition reaction of muonium (Mu) to acetylene have been studied in the gas phase at N2 moderator pressures mainly from ∼800 to 1000 Torr and over the temperature range from 168 to 446 K, but also down to 200 Torr at 168 K and over a much higher range of pressures, from 10 to 44 bar at 295 K, demonstrating pressure-independent rate constants, kMu(T). Even at 200 Torr moderator pressure, the kinetics for Mu + C2H2 addition behave as if effectively in the high-pressure limit, giving k∞ = kMu due to depolarization of the muon spin in the MuC2H2 radical formed in the addition step. The rate constants kMu(T) exhibit modest Arrhenius curvature over the range of measured temperatures. Comparisons with data and with calculations for the corresponding H(D) + C2H2 addition reactions reveal a much faster rate for the Mu reaction at the lowest temperatures, by 2 orders of magnitude, in accord with the propensity of Mu to undergo quantum tunneling. Moreover, isotopic atom exchange, which contributes in a major way to the analogous D atom reaction, forming C2HD + H, is expected to be unimportant in the case of Mu addition, a consequence of the much higher zero-point energy and hence weaker C-Mu bond that would form, meaning that the present report of the Mu + C2H2 reaction is effectively the only experimental study of kinetic isotope effects in the high-pressure limit for H-atom addition to acetylene.

  11. Muonium Addition Reactions and Kinetic Isotope Effects in the Gas Phase: k∞ Rate Constants for Mu + C2H2.

    PubMed

    Arseneau, Donald J; Garner, David M; Reid, Ivan D; Fleming, Donald G

    2015-07-16

    The kinetics of the addition reaction of muonium (Mu) to acetylene have been studied in the gas phase at N2 moderator pressures mainly from ∼800 to 1000 Torr and over the temperature range from 168 to 446 K, but also down to 200 Torr at 168 K and over a much higher range of pressures, from 10 to 44 bar at 295 K, demonstrating pressure-independent rate constants, kMu(T). Even at 200 Torr moderator pressure, the kinetics for Mu + C2H2 addition behave as if effectively in the high-pressure limit, giving k∞ = kMu due to depolarization of the muon spin in the MuC2H2 radical formed in the addition step. The rate constants kMu(T) exhibit modest Arrhenius curvature over the range of measured temperatures. Comparisons with data and with calculations for the corresponding H(D) + C2H2 addition reactions reveal a much faster rate for the Mu reaction at the lowest temperatures, by 2 orders of magnitude, in accord with the propensity of Mu to undergo quantum tunneling. Moreover, isotopic atom exchange, which contributes in a major way to the analogous D atom reaction, forming C2HD + H, is expected to be unimportant in the case of Mu addition, a consequence of the much higher zero-point energy and hence weaker C-Mu bond that would form, meaning that the present report of the Mu + C2H2 reaction is effectively the only experimental study of kinetic isotope effects in the high-pressure limit for H-atom addition to acetylene. PMID:25664674

  12. Adsorption Model for Off-Gas Separation

    SciTech Connect

    Veronica J. Rutledge

    2011-03-01

    The absence of industrial scale nuclear fuel reprocessing in the U.S. has precluded the necessary driver for developing the advanced simulation capability now prevalent in so many other countries. Thus, it is essential to model complex series of unit operations to simulate, understand, and predict inherent transient behavior and feedback loops. A capability of accurately simulating the dynamic behavior of advanced fuel cycle separation processes will provide substantial cost savings and many technical benefits. The specific fuel cycle separation process discussed in this report is the off-gas treatment system. The off-gas separation consists of a series of scrubbers and adsorption beds to capture constituents of interest. Dynamic models are being developed to simulate each unit operation involved so each unit operation can be used as a stand-alone model and in series with multiple others. Currently, an adsorption model has been developed in gPROMS software. Inputs include gas stream constituents, sorbent, and column properties, equilibrium and kinetic data, and inlet conditions. It models dispersed plug flow in a packed bed under non-isothermal and non-isobaric conditions for a multiple component gas stream. The simulation outputs component concentrations along the column length as a function of time from which the breakthrough data is obtained. It also outputs temperature along the column length as a function of time and pressure drop along the column length. Experimental data will be input into the adsorption model to develop a model specific for iodine adsorption on silver mordenite as well as model(s) specific for krypton and xenon adsorption. The model will be validated with experimental breakthrough curves. Another future off-gas modeling goal is to develop a model for the unit operation absorption. The off-gas models will be made available via the server or web for evaluation by customers.

  13. Water-Stable Anionic Metal-Organic Framework for Highly Selective Separation of Methane from Natural Gas and Pyrolysis Gas.

    PubMed

    Li, Lan; Wang, Xusheng; Liang, Jun; Huang, Yuanbiao; Li, Hongfang; Lin, Zujin; Cao, Rong

    2016-04-20

    A 3D water-stable anionic metal-organic framework [Zn4(hpdia)2]·[NH2(CH3)2]·3DMF·4H2O (FJI-C4) was constructed based on an elaborate phosphorus-containing ligand 5,5'-(hydroxyphosphoryl)diisophthalic acid (H5hpdia). FJI-C4 with narrow one-dimensional (1D) pore channels exhibits high selectivity of C3H8/CH4 and C2H2/CH4. It is the first time for the MOF which contains phosphorus for selective separation of methane from natural gas and pyrolysis gas.

  14. ASU nitrogen sweep gas in hydrogen separation membrane for production of HRSG duct burner fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Panuccio, Gregory J.; Raybold, Troy M.; Jamal, Agil; Drnevich, Raymond Francis

    2013-04-02

    The present invention relates to the use of low pressure N2 from an air separation unit (ASU) for use as a sweep gas in a hydrogen transport membrane (HTM) to increase syngas H2 recovery and make a near-atmospheric pressure (less than or equal to about 25 psia) fuel for supplemental firing in the heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) duct burner.

  15. Four-port gas separation membrane module assembly

    DOEpatents

    Wynn, Nicholas P.; Fulton, Donald A.; Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A.; Kaschemekat, Jurgen

    2010-07-20

    A gas-separation membrane assembly, and a gas-separation process using the assembly. The assembly incorporates multiple gas-separation membranes in an array within a single vessel or housing, and is equipped with two permeate ports, enabling permeate gas to be withdrawn from both ends of the membrane module permeate pipes.

  16. A fast response & recovery H2S gas sensor based on α-Fe2O3 nanoparticles with ppb level detection limit.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhijie; Huang, Yanwu; Zhang, Shouchao; Chen, Weimei; Kuang, Zhong; Ao, Dongyi; Liu, Wei; Fu, Yongqing

    2015-12-30

    H2S gas sensor based on α-Fe2O3 nanoparticles was fabricated by post-thermal annealing of Fe3O4 precursor which was synthesized using a facile hydrothermal route. The characteristic techniques including X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were adopted to characterize the chemical composition and microstructure of the obtained samples. Gas-sensing performance of the sensor was investigated at different operation temperatures from 100°C to 400°C. Results showed that the sensor exhibited the best sensitivity, reproducibility and long-term stability for detecting H2S gas at an operating temperature of 300°C. The detection limit towards H2S gas was 0.05 ppm, and the response time and recovery time was 30s and 5s, respectively. In addition, sensing mechanism of the sensor towards H2S was discussed. PMID:26177493

  17. Gas storage and separation by electric field swing adsorption

    SciTech Connect

    Currier, Robert P; Obrey, Stephen J; Devlin, David J; Sansinena, Jose Maria

    2013-05-28

    Gases are stored, separated, and/or concentrated. An electric field is applied across a porous dielectric adsorbent material. A gas component from a gas mixture may be selectively separated inside the energized dielectric. Gas is stored in the energized dielectric for as long as the dielectric is energized. The energized dielectric selectively separates, or concentrates, a gas component of the gas mixture. When the potential is removed, gas from inside the dielectric is released.

  18. An open path H2O/CO2 gas analyzer for eddy correlation systems: theory and design.

    PubMed

    Kidd, Gary

    2002-09-01

    A fast response, open path tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy H2O/CO2 gas analyzer suitable for eddy correlation concentration measurements in near surface turbulent environments is presented. The turbulent temperature characteristics, analysis theory, analysis methods, design structure and specifications of this dual laser analyzer are described. A fiber connected optical head with folded optical path is used to extend the resolution to ppb levels for H2O at 1.3964 microm and CO2 at 2.014 microm. The Fourier (discrete cosine) transform absorbance ratio analysis methods are outlined along with the modifications for temperature and pressure measurements in turbulent flows. Synthesis of the reference absorbance function using measured temperature, pressure and the Hitran parameters is extended with incorporation of the Hitran parameters n, gamma temperature exponent and E'', lower state energy. Additionally, the mole fraction equation developed for this Hitran model is presented and an absolute calibration technique is outlined along with methods of calibration retention. Simulation results on mole fraction estimations and errors are presented for synthetic temperature and laser noise processes and are used to verify the specifications. PMID:12353686

  19. Time-Resolved Emission Spectroscopy of High-Pressure Discharge Plasmas in Ne and Ne/H2 Gas Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurunczi, Peter; Becker, Kurt

    2001-10-01

    Microhollow cathode discharge (MHCD) plasmas in pure rare gases at or near atmospheric pressure are known to be efficient sources of excimer radiation. We also demonstrated that a high-pressure MHCD plasma in Ne with a trace admixture of H2 gives rise to very intense, monochromatic H Lyman-a emission at 121.6 nm. This is the result of a very efficient near-resonant energy transfer process between the Ne excimer and the H2 molecule. Time-resolved emission spectroscopic studies of the Ne excimer radiation at 84 nm and of the H Lyman-a radiation at 121.6 nm were carried out in an effort to elucidate the microscopic details of the excimer formation process and the near-resonant energy transfer reaction. We report results of the determination of the rate constant of the near-resonant energy transfer process and its dependence on the gas temperature in the MHCD plasma. Work supported by NSF and DARPA.

  20. Parameterization of a coupled CO2 and H2O gas exchange model at the leaf scale of Populus euphratica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, G. F.; Li, X.; Su, Y. H.; Huang, C. L.

    2010-03-01

    The following two models were combined to simultaneously predict CO2 and H2O gas exchange at the leaf scale of Populus euphratica: a Farquhar et al. type biochemical sub-model of photosynthesis (Farquhar et al., 1980) and a Ball et al. type stomatal conductance sub-model (Ball et al., 1987). The photosynthesis parameters [including maximum carboxylation rate allowed by ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) carboxylation rate (Vcmax), potential light-saturated electron transport rate (Jmax), triose phosphate utilization (TPU) and day respiration (Rd)] were determined by using the genetic algorithm (GA) method based on A/Ci data. Values of Vcmax and Jmax standardized at 25 °C were 75.09±1.36 (mean ± standard error), 117.27±2.47, respectively. The stomatal conductance sub-model was calibrated independently. Prediction of net photosynthesis by the coupled model agreed well with the validation data, but the model tended to underestimate transpiration rates. Overall, the combined model generally captured the diurnal patterns of CO2 and H2O exchange resulting from variation in temperature and irradiation.

  1. Gas separation by adsorption in carbon nanohorns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nekhai, Anton; Gatica, Silvina

    Gas separation by adsorption can be accomplished by three basic physical mechanisms: equilibria, kinetics, and steric effects. Equilibrium mechanisms rely on the strength of attraction between gas molecules and their substrate. For example, CO2 possesses the strongest, attractive interactions with its substrate. As a result, the equilibrium mechanism presents the most plausible strategy to separate carbon dioxide from mixtures. The specification of a sound adsorbent is the key for separation by adsorption. In this paper we investigate carbon nanohrons for selectivity of carbon dioxide over methane. Carbon Nanohorns resemble short, wide, highly defected single-wall nanotubes that end in conical tips (``horns''). In contrast to regular nanotubes that assemble into parallel bundles, nanohorns form spherical aggregates with the nanohorns arranged along radial directions. Using the simulation technique Grand Canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) we obtained the adsorption isotherms of CH4 and CO2 in a 2D array of carbon nanohorns. We estimated the selectivity based on the IAST approximation. We also study the adsorption of argon and neon and compare with experimental results. We acknowledge support from the Partnership for Reduced Dimension Materials (PRDM), NSF Grant No. DMR1205608.

  2. HD/H2 as a Probe of the Roles of Gas, Dust, Light, Metallicity, and Cosmic Rays in Promoting the Growth of Molecular Hydrogen in the Diffuse Interstellar Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liszt, H. S.

    2015-01-01

    We modeled recent observations of UV absorption of HD and {H_2} in the Milky Way and toward damped/subdamped Lyα systems at z = 0.18 and z >1.7. N(HD)/N({H_2}) ratios reflect the separate self-shieldings of HD and {H_2} and the coupling introduced by deuteration chemistry. Locally, observations are explained by diffuse molecular gas with 16 cm-3 <~ n(H) <~ 128 cm-3 if the cosmic-ray ionization rate per H nucleus ζ H =2 × 10-16 s-1, as inferred from H3 + and OH+. The dominant influence on N(HD)/N({H_2}) is the cosmic-ray ionization rate with a much weaker downward dependence on n(H) at solar metallicity, but dust extinction can drive N(HD) higher as with N({H_2}). At z > 1.7, N(HD) is comparable to the Galaxy but with 10 times smaller N({H_2}) and somewhat smaller N({H_2})/N(H I). Comparison of our Galaxy with the Magellanic Clouds shows that smaller {H_2}/H is expected at subsolar metallicity, and we show by modeling that HD/{H_2} increases with density at low metallicity, opposite to the Milky Way. Observations of HD would be explained with higher n(H) at low metallicity, but high-z systems have high HD/{H_2} at metallicity 0.04 <~ Z <~ 2 solar. In parallel, we trace dust extinction and self-shielding effects. The abrupt {H_2} transition to {H_2}/H ≈ 1%-10% occurs mostly from self-shielding, although it is assisted by extinction for n(H) <~ 16 cm-3. Interior {H_2} fractions are substantially increased by dust extinction below <~ 32 cm-3. At smaller n(H), ζ H , small increases in {H_2} triggered by dust extinction can trigger abrupt increases in N(HD).

  3. Permeable polyaniline articles for gas separation

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Hsing-Lin; Mattes, Benjamin R.

    2004-09-28

    Immersion precipitation of solutions having 15%-30% (w/w) and various molecular weights of the emeraldine base form of polyaniline in polar aprotic solvents are shown to form integrally skinned asymmetric membranes and fibers having skin layers <1 .mu.m thick which exhibit improved rates of gas transport while preserving good selectivity. These membranes can be further transformed by an acid doping process after fabrication to achieve excellent permeation rates and high selectivities for particular gas separations. Prior to the use of concentrated EB solutions, the formation of integrally skinned asymmetric membranes was not possible, since films and fibers made from <5% w/w polyaniline solutions were found to disintegrate during the IP process.

  4. Permeable polyaniline articles for gas separation

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Hsing-Lin; Mattes, Benjamin R.

    2009-07-21

    Immersion precipitation of solutions having 15%-30% (w/w) and various molecular weights of the emeraldine base form of polyaniline in polar aprotic solvents are shown to form integrally skinned asymmetric membranes and fibers having skin layers <1 .mu.m thick which exhibit improved rates of gas transport while preserving good selectivity. These membranes can be further transformed by an acid doping process after fabrication to achieve excellent permeation rates and high selectivities for particular gas separations. Prior to the use of concentrated EB solutions, the formation of integrally skinned asymmetric membranes was not possible, since films and fibers made from <5% w/w polyaniline solutions were found to disintegrate during the IP process.

  5. Photoionization-induced water migration in the amide group of trans-acetanilide-(H2O)1 in the gas phase.

    PubMed

    Sakota, Kenji; Harada, Satoshi; Shimazaki, Yuiga; Sekiya, Hiroshi

    2011-02-10

    IR-dip spectra of trans-acetanilide-water 1:1 cluster, AA-(H(2)O)(1), have been measured for the S(0) and D(0) state in the gas phase. Two structural isomers, where a water molecule binds to the NH group or the CO group of AA, AA(NH)-(H(2)O)(1) and AA(CO)-(H(2)O)(1), are identified in the S(0) state. One-color resonance-enhanced two-photon ionization, (1 + 1) RE2PI, of AA(NH)-(H(2)O)(1) via the S(1)-S(0) origin generates [AA(NH)-(H(2)O)(1)](+) in the D(0) state, however, photoionization of [AA(CO)-(H(2)O)(1)] does not produce [AA(CO)-(H(2)O)(1)](+), leading to [AA(NH)-(H(2)O)(1)](+). This observation explicitly indicates that the water molecule in [AA-(H(2)O)(1)](+) migrates from the CO group to the NH group in the D(0) state. The reorganization of the charge distribution from the neutral to the D(0) state of AA induces the repulsive force between the water molecule and the CO group of AA(+), which is the trigger of the water migration in [AA-(H(2)O)(1)](+). PMID:21235222

  6. Numerical modeling of gas mixing and bio-chemical transformations during underground hydrogen storage within the project H2STORE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagemann, B.; Feldmann, F.; Panfilov, M.; Ganzer, L.

    2015-12-01

    The change from fossil to renewable energy sources is demanding an increasing amount of storage capacities for electrical energy. A promising technological solution is the storage of hydrogen in the subsurface. Hydrogen can be produced by electrolysis using excessive electrical energy and subsequently converted back into electricity by fuel cells or engine generators. The development of this technology starts with adding small amounts of hydrogen to the high pressure natural gas grid and continues with the creation of pure underground hydrogen storages. The feasibility of hydrogen storage in depleted gas reservoirs is investigated in the lighthouse project H2STORE financed by the German Ministry for Education and Research. The joint research project has project members from the University of Jena, the Clausthal University of Technology, the GFZ Potsdam and the French National Center for Scientic Research in Nancy. The six sub projects are based on laboratory experiments, numerical simulations and analytical work which cover the investigation of mineralogical, geochemical, physio-chemical, sedimentological, microbiological and gas mixing processes in reservoir and cap rocks. The focus in this presentation is on the numerical modeling of underground hydrogen storage. A mathematical model was developed which describes the involved coupled hydrodynamic and microbiological effects. Thereby, the bio-chemical reaction rates depend on the kinetics of microbial growth which is induced by the injection of hydrogen. The model has been numerically implemented on the basis of the open source code DuMuX. A field case study based on a real German gas reservoir was performed to investigate the mixing of hydrogen with residual gases and to discover the consequences of bio-chemical reactions.

  7. Development of inorganic membranes for gas separation

    SciTech Connect

    Egan, B.Z.; Fain, D.E.

    1990-01-01

    Hydrogen for commercial coal liquefaction processes may be provided by a coal gasification plant operated to maximize hydrogen production. Hydrogen is a major chemical requirement for coal liquefaction, and the use of liquefaction by-products such as mineral ash residue as feed to the gasifier can improve the overall process efficiency and economics. Also, recovery of hydrogen from gaseous streams in the coal liquefaction plant can have a significant impact on coal liquefaction process economics. In these hydrogen production scenarios, there is a need to improve the quality of the hydrogen produced by separating the other impurity gases from it. The DOE-Fossil Energy AR TD Materials Program is presently developing inorganic membranes for gas separation, including the recovery of valuable resources such as hydrogen from hot-gas streams. A summary of efforts to produce alumina membranes with mean pore radii <5 {angstrom} is presented as well as a status report on declassification of this important technology. 2 refs., 7 figs.

  8. Mass-independent fractionation of oxygen isotopes during H2O2 formation by gas-phase discharge from water vapour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velivetskaya, Tatiana A.; Ignatiev, Alexander V.; Budnitskiy, Sergey Y.; Yakovenko, Victoria V.; Vysotskiy, Sergey V.

    2016-11-01

    Hydrogen peroxide is an important atmospheric component involved in various gas-phase and aqueous-phase transformation processes in the Earth's atmosphere. A study of mass-independent 17O anomalies in H2O2 can provide additional insights into the chemistry of the modern atmosphere and, possibly, of the ancient atmosphere. Here, we report the results of laboratory experiments to study the fractionation of three oxygen isotopes (16O, 17O, and 18O) during H2O2 formation from products of water vapour dissociation. The experiments were carried out by passing an electrical discharge through a gaseous mixture of helium and water at atmospheric pressure. The effect of the presence of O2 in the gas mixture on the isotopic composition of H2O2 was also investigated. All of the experiments showed that H2O2 produced under two different conditions (with or without O2 added in the gas mixtures) was mass-independently fractionated (MIF). We found a positive MIF signal (∼1.4‰) in the no-O2 added experiments, and this signal increased to ∼2.5‰ once O2 was added (1.6% mixing ratio). We suggest that if O2 concentrations are very low, the hydroxyl radical recombination reaction is the dominant pathway for H2O2 formation and is the source of MIF in H2O2. Although H2O2 formation via a hydroxyl radical recombination process is limited in the modern atmosphere, it would be possible in the Archean atmosphere when O2 was a trace constituent, and H2O2 would be mass-independently fractionated. The anomalous 17O excess, which was observed in H2O2 produced by spark discharge experiments, may provide useful information about the radical chemistry of the ancient atmosphere and the role of H2O2 in maintaining and controlling the atmospheric composition.

  9. CO 2 and H 2O gas exchange of a triticale field: I. Leaf level porometry and upscaling to canopy level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busch, J.; Lösch, R.; Meixner, F. X.; Ammann, C.

    1996-05-01

    Within the frame of an extended field experiment the CO 2 and H 2O gas exchange between a triticale field and the atmosphere was measured during the period between heading and harvest in the summer of 1995. Diurnal courses of H 2O loss, CO 2 gain and leaf conductance were obtained together with microclimatic parameters for leaves of different insertion levels. Patterns of dependence of leaf gas exchange on microclimatic conditions were determined. Based on the results of porometric measurements and crop structural parameters (LAI) gas exchange was scaled up to canopy level.

  10. Phase separation in H2O:N2 mixture - molecular dynamics simulations using atomistic force fields

    SciTech Connect

    Maiti, A; Gee, R; Bastea, S; Fried, L

    2006-09-25

    A class II atomistic force field with Lennard-Jones 6-9 nonbond interactions is used to investigate equations of state (EOS) for important high explosive detonation products N{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O in the temperature range 700-2500 K and pressure range 0.1-10 GPa. A standard 6th order parameter-mixing scheme is then employed to study a 2:1 (molar) H{sub 2}O:N{sub 2} mixture, to investigate in particular the possibility of phase-separation under detonation conditions. The simulations demonstrate several important results, including: (1) the accuracy of computed EOS for both N{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O over the entire range of temperature and pressure considered; (2) accurate mixing-demixing phase boundary as compared to experimental data; and (3) the departure of mixing free energy from that predicted by ideal mixing law. The results provide comparison and guidance to state-of-the-art chemical kinetic models.

  11. Improved sensitivity and selectivity of pristine zinc oxide nanostructures to H2S gas: Detailed study on the synthesis reaction time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motaung, David E.; Mhlongo, Gugu H.; Bolokang, Amogelang S.; Dhonge, Baban P.; Swart, Hendrik C.; Sinha Ray, Suprakas

    2016-11-01

    The gas sensing properties of ZnO nanostructures synthesized at various reaction times are reported in this study. The response of ZnO nanostructures to H2, NH3, H2S and NO2 gases was investigated at different operating temperatures and gas concentrations. Surface morphology analyses showed that the geometry of the nanostructures transforms with the synthesis reaction time. Topography analyses demonstrated a surface roughness of approximately 68.25, 70.31, 74.75 nm for the samples synthesized for 24, 48 and 72 h, respectively. The dependence of the morphology on the H2, NH3, NO2 and H2S gas sensing performance was observed. The alteration of the nanostructures diameter/geometry demonstrated a change in both the magnitude and temperature of the maximum sensor response. The 72 h ZnO sensing material revealed improved response and higher sensitivity and selectivity to H2S gas, while the 24 h sensing material revealed enhanced response and selectivity to NO2 gas at 300 °C. Moreover, the 72 h sensing material exhibited a higher sensitivity of 144.22 ppm-1 at 300 °C. These findings disclosed that by varying the synthesis reaction time, the sensing properties, such as the response, sensitivity and selectivity of the ZnO nanostructures could be tuned.

  12. Immobilized fluid membranes for gas separation

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wei; Canfield, Nathan L; Zhang, Jian; Li, Xiaohong Shari; Zhang, Jiguang

    2014-03-18

    Provided herein are immobilized liquid membranes for gas separation, methods of preparing such membranes and uses thereof. In one example, the immobilized membrane includes a porous metallic host matrix and an immobilized liquid fluid (such as a silicone oil) that is immobilized within one or more pores included within the porous metallic host matrix. The immobilized liquid membrane is capable of selective permeation of one type of molecule (such as oxygen) over another type of molecule (such as water). In some examples, the selective membrane is incorporated into a device to supply oxygen from ambient air to the device for electrochemical reactions, and at the same time, to block water penetration and electrolyte loss from the device.

  13. Separative recovery with lime of phosphate and fluoride from an acidic effluent containing H3PO4, HF and/or H2SiF6.

    PubMed

    Gouider, Mbarka; Feki, Mongi; Sayadi, Sami

    2009-10-30

    Fluoride content and flow-rate of fertilizer plant wastewater from phosphoric acid and/or triple superphosphate (TSP) production lead to the discharge of several thousand tons of fluoride (F(-)) per year and even more for phosphate (PO4(3-)). Since sustainability is an important environmental concern, the removal methods should allow phosphorus and fluoride to be recycled as a sustainable products for use as raw materials either in agricultural or industrial applications. In the present work, separative recovery with lime of these two target species was investigated. A preliminary speciation study, carried out on the crude effluent, showed that two forms of fluoride: HF and H2SiF6 are present in a highly acidic medium (pH approximately 2). Evidence that fluoride is present under both free (HF) and combined (H2SiF6) forms, in the phosphate-containing effluent, was provided by comparing potentiometric titration curves of a crude wastewater sample and synthetic acid mixtures containing H3PO4, HF and H2SiF6. In a second step synthetic effluent containing mixtures of the following acids: HF, H2SiF6 and H3PO4, were treated with lime. The behaviour of these compounds under lime treatment was analysed. The data showed that fluoride has a beneficial effect on phosphate removal. Moreover, by acting on the precipitation pH, a "selective" recovery of fluoride and phosphate ions was possible either from phosphoric acid/hydrofluoric acid or phosphoric acid/hexafluorosilicic acid mixtures. Indeed, the first stage of the separative recovery, led to a fluoride removal efficiency of 97-98% from phosphoric acid/hydrofluoric acid mixture. It was of 93-95% from phosphoric acid/hexafluorosilicic acid mixture. During the second stage, the phosphate precipitation reached 99.8% from both acidic mixtures whereas it did not exceed 82% from a solution containing H3PO4 alone. The XRD and IR analyses showed that during lime treatment, a H2SiF6 hydrolysis occurred, instead of CaSiF6 solid

  14. Gas-liquid separator and method of operation

    DOEpatents

    Soloveichik, Grigorii Lev; Whitt, David Brandon

    2009-07-14

    A system for gas-liquid separation in electrolysis processes is provided. The system includes a first compartment having a liquid carrier including a first gas therein and a second compartment having the liquid carrier including a second gas therein. The system also includes a gas-liquid separator fluidically coupled to the first and second compartments for separating the liquid carrier from the first and second gases.

  15. Herschel Observations of EXtra-Ordinary Sources: H2S as a Probe of Dense Gas and Possibly Hidden Luminosity Toward the Orion KL Hot Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crockett, N. R.; Bergin, E. A.; Neill, J. L.; Black, J. H.; Blake, G. A.; Kleshcheva, M.

    2014-02-01

    We present Herschel/HIFI observations of the light hydride H2S obtained from the full spectral scan of the Orion Kleinmann-Low nebula (Orion KL) taken as part of the Herschel Observations of EXtra-Ordinary Sources GT (guaranteed time) key program. In total, we observe 52, 24, and 8 unblended or slightly blended features from H2 32S, H2 34S, and H2 33S, respectively. We only analyze emission from the so-called hot core, but emission from the plateau, extended ridge, and/or compact ridge are also detected. Rotation diagrams for ortho and para H2S follow straight lines given the uncertainties and yield T rot = 141 ± 12 K. This indicates H2S is in local thermodynamic equilibrium and is well characterized by a single kinetic temperature or an intense far-IR radiation field is redistributing the population to produce the observed trend. We argue the latter scenario is more probable and find that the most highly excited states (E up >~ 1000 K) are likely populated primarily by radiation pumping. We derive a column density, N tot(H2 32S) = 9.5 ± 1.9 × 1017 cm-2, gas kinetic temperature, T kin = 120+/- ^{13}_{10} K, and constrain the H2 volume density, n_H_2 >~ 9 × 10 7 cm-3, for the H2S emitting gas. These results point to an H2S origin in markedly dense, heavily embedded gas, possibly in close proximity to a hidden self-luminous source (or sources), which are conceivably responsible for Orion KL's high luminosity. We also derive an H2S ortho/para ratio of 1.7 ± 0.8 and set an upper limit for HDS/H2S of <4.9 × 10 -3. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  16. Kinetics of thermal reaction HOCl ⇄ H(2 S) + OCl( X 2Π i ) in gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Begović, N.; Marković, Z.; Anić, S.

    2011-12-01

    The kinetics of gas reaction HOCl\\underset{{k_r }}{overset{{k_f }}{longleftrightarrow}}H(^2 S) + OCl(X^2 Pi _i ) was analyzed by the MP4 method. In the temperature range of 100-373 K the rate constants k f and k r and equilibrium constant K were changed from 1.10 × 10-220 to 1.17 × 10-52 s-1, from 2.89 × 10-16 to 1.68 × 10-5s-1 and from 3.80 × 10-205 to 6.96 × 10-48 respectively. In the above temperature range, the activation energy of the forward reaction ( E f) is 105.05 kcal/mol. In the same temperature interval there are two kinetic domains for the reverse reaction with activation energies ( E r1 = 5.53 kcal/mol when T is 100-273 K and E r2 = 14.50 kcal/mol when T is 273-373 K, respectively.

  17. Measurements of Flow Distortion within the IRGASON Integrated Sonic Anemometer and CO_2/H_2O Gas Analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horst, T. W.; Vogt, R.; Oncley, S. P.

    2016-07-01

    Wind-tunnel and field measurements are analyzed to investigate flow distortion within the IRGASON integrated sonic anemometer and CO_2/H_2O gas analyzer as a function of wind speed, wind direction and attack angle. The wind-tunnel measurements are complimentary to the field measurements, and the dependence of the wind-tunnel mean-wind-component flow-distortion errors on wind direction agrees well with that of the field measurements. The field measurements exhibit significant overestimation of the crosswind variance and underestimation of the momentum flux with respect to an adjacent CSAT3 sonic, as well as a transfer of turbulent kinetic energy from the streamwise wind component to the cross-stream wind components. In contrast, we find attenuation of only a few percent in the vertical velocity variance and the vertical flux of sonic temperature. The attenuation of the fluxes appears to be caused to a large extent by decorrelation between the horizontal and vertical-velocity components and between the vertical velocity and sonic temperature. Additional flow distortion due to transducer shadowing reduces to some extent the overestimation, but also increases the underestimation of the IRGASON turbulence statistics.

  18. Separation of gas mixtures by supported complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Lilga, M.A.

    1987-05-29

    The current project centers on the preparation and characterization of complexes that can be used to separate H/sub 2/ from gas mixtures. Of interest are complexes which are inexpensive and which reversibly bind H/sub 2/. In particular, dimeric complexes of chromium, ((C/sub 5/H/sub 4/R)Cr(CO)/sub 3/)/sub 2/ (R = H, CO/sub 2/CH/sub 3/, alkyl), are being studied in this project. The basic methodology used is to prepare various derivatives containing substitution on the cyclopentadienyl ligand and to screen these derivatives for reversible reaction with H/sub 2/. Once reversibility is achieved, kinetic and equilibrium data will be collected to fully characterize the system and possibly elucidate the effects of substituents on H/sub 2/ binding. Also of interest are complexes which reversibly and catalytically incorporate H/sub 2/ into an organic ketone substrate. An Rh/Sn complex which reversibly hydrogenates/dehydrogenates cyclohexanone will be discussed. Although Rh is not inexpensive, it is present in very low concentration and represents a potentially inexpensive yet selective H/sub 2/ separation method. 5 refs.

  19. Optimisation of the Fischer-Tropsch process using zeolites for tail gas separation.

    PubMed

    Perez-Carbajo, J; Gómez-Álvarez, P; Bueno-Perez, R; Merkling, P J; Calero, S

    2014-03-28

    This work is aimed at optimizing a Fischer-Tropsch Gas To Liquid (GTL) process by recycling compounds of the expelled gas mixture using zeolites for the separation. To that end, we have performed a computational study on four structures widely used in industry. A range of Si/Al ratios have been explored and the effects of their distribution assessed. The ability of the considered force fields and molecular models to reproduce experimental results has been widely proved in previously reported studies. Since this tail gas is formed by a five-component mixture, namely carbon dioxide, methane, carbon monoxide, nitrogen and hydrogen, molecular simulations present clear advantages over experiments. In addition, the viability of the Ideal Adsorption Solution Theory (IAST) has been evaluated to easily handle further separation steps. On the basis of the obtained results, we provide a separation scheme to perform sequentially the separation of CO2, CH4, CO, N2 and H2.

  20. Giant enhancement of H2S gas response by decorating n-type SnO2 nanowires with p-type NiO nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Hieu, Nguyen; Thi Hong Van, Phung; Tien Nhan, Le; Van Duy, Nguyen; Duc Hoa, Nguyen

    2012-12-01

    Metal oxide nanowires (NWs) are widely considered as promising materials for gas sensor applications. Here, we demonstrate that by decorating NiO nanoparticles on SnO2 NWs, the gas response to 10 ppm H2S increased up to ˜351-fold. The response of the NiO-decorated SnO2 NWs sensor to 10 ppm H2S at 300 °C reached ˜1372, whereas the cross-gas responses to 5 ppm NH3, 200 ppm C2H5OH, and 1 ppm NO2 were negligible (1.8 to 2.9). The enhanced H2S sensing performance was attributed by the catalytic effect of NiO and the formation of a continuous chain of n-p-n-p junctions.

  1. Separation Of Liquid And Gas In Zero Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Frank S.; Fraser, Wilson S.

    1991-01-01

    Pair of reports describe scheme for separating liquid from gas so liquid could be pumped. Designed to operate in absence of gravitation. Jet of liquid, gas, or liquid/gas mixture fed circumferentially into cylindrical tank filled with liquid/gas mixture. Jet starts liquid swirling. Swirling motion centrifugally separates liquid from gas. Liquid then pumped from tank at point approximately diametrically opposite point of injection of jet. Vortex phase separator replaces such devices as bladders and screens. Requires no components inside tank. Pumps for gas and liquid outside tank and easily accessible for maintenance and repairs.

  2. Supermassive black hole formation by direct collapse: keeping protogalactic gas H2 free in dark matter haloes with virial temperatures Tvir > rsim 104 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Cien; Bryan, Greg L.; Haiman, Z.

    2010-02-01

    In the absence of H2 molecules, the primordial gas in early dark matter haloes with virial temperatures just above Tvir >~ 104K cools by collisional excitation of atomic H. Although it cools efficiently, this gas remains relatively hot, at a temperature near T ~ 8000 K, and consequently might be able to avoid fragmentation and collapse directly into a supermassive black hole. In order for H2 formation and cooling to be strongly suppressed, the gas must be irradiated by a sufficiently intense ultraviolet (UV) flux. We performed a suite of three-dimensional hydrodynamical adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) simulations of gas collapse in three different protogalactic haloes with Tvir >~ 104K, irradiated by a UV flux with various intensities and spectra. We determined the critical specific intensity, Jcrit21, required to suppress H2 cooling in each of the three haloes. For a hard spectrum representative of metal-free stars, we find (in units of 10-21ergs-1Hz-1sr-1cm-2) 104 < Jcrit21 < 105, while for a softer spectrum, which is characteristic of a normal stellar population, and for which H- dissociation is important, we find 30 < Jcrit21 < 300. These values are a factor of 3-10 lower than previous estimates. We attribute the difference to the higher, more accurate H2 collisional dissociation rate we adopted. The reduction in Jcrit21 exponentially increases the number of rare haloes exposed to supercritical radiation. When H2 cooling is suppressed, gas collapse starts with a delay, but it ultimately proceeds more rapidly. The infall velocity is near the increased sound speed, and an object as massive as M ~ 105Msolar may form at the centre of these haloes, compared to the M ~ 102Msolar stars forming when H2 cooling is efficient.

  3. Hydrothermal synthesis of WO3·H2O with different nanostructures from 0D to 3D and their gas sensing properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yangchun; Zeng, Wen; Xu, Mengxue; Peng, Xianghe

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, WO3·H2O with different nanostructures from 0D to 3D were successfully synthesized via a simple yet cost-effective hydrothermal method with the assistance of surfactants. The structures and morphologies of products were investigated by XRD and SEM. Besides, we systematically explained the evolution process and formation mechanisms of different WO3·H2O morphologies. It is noted that both the kinds and amounts of surfactants strongly affect the formation of WO3·H2O crystals, as reflected in the tailoring of WO3·H2O morphologies. Furthermore, the gas sensing performance of the as-prepared samples towards methanol was also investigated. 3D flower-like hierarchical architecture displayed outstanding response to target gas among the four samples. We hoped our results could be of great benefit to further investigations of synthesizing different dimensional WO3·H2O nanostructures and their gas sensing applications.

  4. Mathematical modeling of synthesis gas fueled electrochemistry and transport including H2/CO co-oxidation and surface diffusion in solid oxide fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Cheng; Jiang, Zeyi; Zhang, Xinxin

    2015-10-01

    Fuel flexibility is a significant advantage of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). A comprehensive macroscopic framework is proposed for synthesis gas (syngas) fueled electrochemistry and transport in SOFC anode with two main novelties, i.e. analytical H2/CO electrochemical co-oxidation, and correction of gas species concentration at triple phase boundary considering competitive absorption and surface diffusion. Staring from analytical approximation of the decoupled charge and mass transfer, we present analytical solutions of two defined variables, i.e. hydrogen current fraction and enhancement factor. Giving explicit answer (rather than case-by-case numerical calculation) on how many percent of the current output contributed by H2 or CO and on how great the water gas shift reaction plays role on, this approach establishes at the first time an adaptive superposition mechanism of H2-fuel and CO-fuel electrochemistry for syngas fuel. Based on the diffusion equivalent circuit model, assuming series-connected resistances of surface diffusion and bulk diffusion, the model predicts well at high fuel utilization by keeping fixed porosity/tortuosity ratio. The model has been validated by experimental polarization behaviors in a wide range of operation on a button cell for H2-H2O-CO-CO2-N2 fuel systems. The framework could be helpful to narrow the gap between macro-scale and meso-scale SOFC modeling.

  5. Evaluation and Characterization of Membranes for HI/H2O/I2 Water Separation for the S-I Cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Frederick F. Stewart

    2005-09-01

    In the Sulfur-Iodine (S-I) thermochemical cycle, iodine is added to the product of the Bunsen reaction to facilitate the separation of sulfuric acid (H2SO4) from hydriodic acid (HI). The amount of iodine can be as high as 83% of the overall mass load of the Bunsen product stream, which potentially introduces a large burden on the cycle’s efficiency. Removal of water from the HI and I2 mixture would substantially reduce the amount of required additional iodine. In this work, Nafion® membranes have been studied for their use as de-watering membranes. Specifically, two thicknesses of Nafion membranes have been found to be effective in this application. The thicker membrane, Nafion-117®, produces moderate fluxes of water with very high separation factors. On the other hand, the thinner membrane, Nafion-112®, yielded very large fluxes of water, however with smaller separation factors. All membranes were found to be durable and did not degrade in contact with the feed stream over periods of time up to three months.

  6. Single-walled carbon nanotubes as stationary phase in gas chromatographic separation and determination of argon, carbon dioxide and hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Safavi, Afsaneh; Maleki, Norooz; Doroodmand, Mohammad Mahdi

    2010-08-24

    A chromatographic technique is introduced based on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) as stationary phase for separation of Ar, CO(2) and H(2) at parts per million (ppm) levels. The efficiency of SWCNTs was compared with solid materials such as molecular sieve, charcoal, multi-walled carbon nanotubes and carbon nanofibers. The morphology of SWCNTs was optimized for maximum adsorption of H(2), CO(2) and Ar and minimum adsorption of gases such as N(2), O(2), CO and H(2)O vapour. To control temperature of the gas chromatography column, peltier cooler was used. Mixtures of Ar, CO(2) and H(2) were separated according to column temperature program. Relative standard deviation for nine replicate analyses of 0.2 mL H(2) containing 10 microL of each Ar or CO(2) was 2.5% for Ar, 2.8% for CO(2) and 3.6% for H(2). The interfering effects of CO, and O(2) were investigated. Working ranges were evaluated as 40-600 ppm for Ar, 30-850 ppm for CO(2) and 10-1200 ppm for H(2). Significant sensitivity, small relative standard deviation (RSD) and acceptable limit of detection (LOD) were obtained for each analyte, showing capability of SWCNTs for gas separation and determination processes. Finally, the method was used to evaluate the contents of CO(2) in air sample.

  7. Oil/gas collector/separator for underwater oil leaks

    DOEpatents

    Henning, Carl D.

    1993-01-01

    An oil/gas collector/separator for recovery of oil leaking, for example, from an offshore or underwater oil well. The separator is floated over the point of the leak and tethered in place so as to receive oil/gas floating, or forced under pressure, toward the water surface from either a broken or leaking oil well casing, line, or sunken ship. The separator is provided with a downwardly extending skirt to contain the oil/gas which floats or is forced upward into a dome wherein the gas is separated from the oil/water, with the gas being flared (burned) at the top of the dome, and the oil is separated from water and pumped to a point of use. Since the density of oil is less than that of water it can be easily separated from any water entering the dome.

  8. Tunable Composite Membranes for Gas Separations.

    SciTech Connect

    Ferraris, J.P.; Balkus, K.J. Jr.; Musselman, I.H.

    1997-07-01

    Solution cast membranes of poly(3-dodecylthiophene) (PDDT) were studied for the room temperature separation of N{sub 2}, 0{sub 2}, and C0{sub 2} procedure for fabricating reproducible, smooth, uniformly thick (-35-pm), defect-free membranes was established. Permeability values were measured for as-cast PDDT membranes (PO{sub 2} = 9.4, PN{sub 2} = 20.2, PCO{sub 2} = 88. 2 Barrers) and selectivity values were calculated (XO{sub 2}/N{sub 2} = 2.2, XC0{sub 2}/N{sub 2} = 9.4). Chemically induced doping (-23%) with SbCI5 resulte in a decrease in permeability (PN{sub 2} = 3.5, P0{sub 2} =10.5, PCO{sub 2} = 48.5 Barrers) and a corresponding increase in permselectivity (X 0{sub 2}/N{sub 2} = 0, (xCO{sub 2}/N{sub 2} =14.0)). Membrane undoping with hydrazine partially reversed these trends (PN{sub 2} = 5.4, P0{sub 2} = 15.1, PCO{sub 2} = 62.9 Barrers), (XO{sub 2}/N{sub 2} = 2.8), (XCO{sub 2}/N{sub 2} =I 1. 6). The chemical composition cast, doped, and undoped PDDT membranes were determined using elemental analysis and energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry. Membrane microstructure was investigated by optical microscopy, TappingModeTM atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The composition and microscopy results were correlated with changes in gas-transport properties. Two papers were presented at the Meeting of the North American Membranes Society, (June 2-4,1997, Baltimore, MD).

  9. Separate low pressure gas storage system

    SciTech Connect

    Hallen, W.R.

    1990-02-20

    This patent describes a gas storage system. It comprises: a floor; anchor means surround the floor; a flexible floor membrane positioned upon the floor and having a periphery being substantially co-extensive with the anchor means; a flexible gas storage membrane overlying the flexible floor membrane and having a periphery sealingly secured to the periphery of the flexible floor membrane. The flexible gas storage membrane and the floor membrane forming a flexible gas storage chamber therebetween; gas inlet and outlet means connecting the gas storage chamber to a supply of gas; a flexible air membrane having an exterior and encompassing the gas storage membrane and having a periphery sealingly secured to the periphery of the flexible gas storage membrane. The flexible air membrane overlying the flexible gas storage membrane to form a flexible cover over the flexible gas storage membrane and to form an air chamber over the gas storage chamber; air supply means; air inlet means connecting the air chamber with the air supply means; air outlet means for venting air from the air chamber; and a plurality of flexible restraining members extending over the flexible air membrane for restraining the inflated flexible air membrane.

  10. H2 Detection via Polarography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominquez, Jesus; Barile, Ron

    2006-01-01

    Polarography is the measurement of the current that flows in solution as a function of an applied voltage. The actual form of the observed polarographic current depends upon the manner in which the voltage is applied and on the characteristics of the working electrode. The new gas polarographic H2 sensor shows a current level increment with concentration of the gaseous H2 similar to those relating to metal ions in liquid electrolytes in well-known polarography. This phenomenon is caused by the fact that the diffusion of the gaseous H2 through a gas diffusion hole built in the sensor is a rate-determining step in the gaseous-hydrogen sensing mechanism. The diffusion hole artificially limits the diffusion of the gaseous H2 toward the electrode located at the sensor cavity. This gas polarographic H2 sensor is actually an electrochemical-pumping cell since the gaseous H2 is in fact pumped via the electrochemical driving force generated between the electrodes. Gaseous H2 enters the diffusion hole and reaches the first electrode (anode) located in the sensor cavity to be transformed into an H ions or protons; H ions pass through the electrolyte and reach the second electrode (cathode) to be reformed to gaseous H2. Gas polarographic O2 sensors are commercially available; a gas polarographic O2 sensor was used to prove the feasibility of building a new gas polarographic H2 sensor.

  11. First experimental determination of the absolute gas-phase rate coefficient for the reaction of OH with 4-hydroxy-2-butanone (4H2B) at 294 K by vapor pressure measurements of 4H2B.

    PubMed

    El Dib, Gisèle; Sleiman, Chantal; Canosa, André; Travers, Daniel; Courbe, Jonathan; Sawaya, Terufat; Mokbel, Ilham; Chakir, Abdelkhaleq

    2013-01-10

    The reaction of the OH radicals with 4-hydroxy-2-butanone was investigated in the gas phase using an absolute rate method at room temperature and over the pressure range 10-330 Torr in He and air as diluent gases. The rate coefficients were measured using pulsed laser photolysis (PLP) of H(2)O(2) to produce OH and laser induced fluorescence (LIF) to measure the OH temporal profile. An average value of (4.8 ± 1.2) × 10(-12) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) was obtained. The OH quantum yield following the 266 nm pulsed laser photolysis of 4-hydroxy-2-butanone was measured for the first time and found to be about 0.3%. The investigated kinetic study required accurate measurements of the vapor pressure of 4-hydroxy-2-butanone, which was measured using a static apparatus. The vapor pressure was found to range from 0.056 to 7.11 Torr between 254 and 323 K. This work provides the first absolute rate coefficients for the reaction of 4-hydroxy-2-butanone with OH and the first experimental saturated vapor pressures of the studied compound below 311 K. The obtained results are compared to those of the literature and the effects of the experimental conditions on the reactivity are examined. The calculated tropospheric lifetime obtained in this work suggests that once emitted into the atmosphere, 4H2B may contribute to the photochemical pollution in a local or regional scale.

  12. Spectroscopic and modeling investigations of the gas phase chemistry and composition in microwave plasma activated B2H6/CH4/Ar/H2 mixtures.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jie; Richley, James C; Davies, David R W; Ashfold, Michael N R

    2010-09-23

    A comprehensive study of microwave (MW) activated B2H6/CH4/Ar/H2 plasmas used for the chemical vapor deposition of B-doped diamond is reported. Absolute column densities of ground state B atoms, electronically excited H(n = 2) atoms, and BH, CH, and C2 radicals have been determined by cavity ring down spectroscopy, as functions of height (z) above a molybdenum substrate and of the plasma process conditions (B2H6, CH4, and Ar partial pressures; total pressure, p; and supplied MW power, P). Optical emission spectroscopy has also been used to explore variations in the relative densities of electronically excited H atoms, H2 molecules, and BH, CH, and C2 radicals, as functions of the same process conditions. These experimental data are complemented by extensive 2D(r, z) modeling of the plasma chemistry, which result in substantial refinements to the existing B/C/H/O thermochemistry and chemical kinetics. Comparison with the results of analogous experimental/modeling studies of B2H6/Ar/H2 and CH4/Ar/H2 plasmas in the same MW reactor show that: (i) trace B2H6 additions have negligible effect on a pre-established CH4/Ar/H2 plasma; (ii) the spatial extent of the B and BH concentration profiles in a B2H6/CH4/Ar/H2 plasma is smaller than in a hydrocarbon-free B2H6/Ar/H2 plasma operating at the same p, P, etc.; (iii) B/C coupling reactions (probably supplemented by reactions involving trace O2 present as air impurity in the process gas mixture) play an important role in determining the local BHx (x = 0-3) radical densities; and (iv) gas phase B atoms are the most likely source of the boron that incorporates into the growing B-doped diamond film. PMID:20735120

  13. An Experimental Study of Atmospheric Homogeneous Nucleation: Cluster Growth and Gas-Particle Reactions of H2SO4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eisele, F. L.

    1996-01-01

    The work proposed on this project included both field and laboratory studies. The laboratory studies were to consist of measurements of H2SO4 uptake and evaporation from aerosols of varying chemical composition, while the field component would include measurements of H2SO4 and other compounds which would be conducted as part of a large field campaign. By chance, the opportunity to conduct such an H2SO4/aerosol/ultrafine particle study in conjunction with an OH intercomparison/photochemistry study became available very early in this project (September 1993). This study was conducted at Caribou, Colorado in conjunction with several other groups from NCAR, NOAA and a number of universities. Our group measured OH, H2SO4, SO2, and H20, while Dr. McMurfy's group measured ultrafine particles, and total particle number and size distribution. In addition measurements of HO2/RO2, O3, NO, NO2, NO(y) CO, hydrocarbons, CH2O, and other chemical compounds and meteorological parameters were performed by the other participants and a new laser oblation/mass spectrometry technique was also employed by the NOAA Aeronomy Laboratory to study aerosol composition. The study of aerosol production and growth in conjunction with photochemical measurements is highly advantageous because particle growth precursors such as H2SO4.or MSA are formed by OH initiated sulfur oxidation. The large number of hydrocarbon measurements included in this study were also important in understanding particle growth.

  14. CO/H2, C/CO, OH/CO, and OH/O2 in dense interstellar gas: from high ionization to low metallicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bialy, Shmuel; Sternberg, Amiel

    2015-07-01

    We present numerical computations and analytic scaling relations for interstellar ion-molecule gas-phase chemistry down to very low metallicities (10-3 × solar), and/or up to high driving ionization rates. Relevant environments include the cool interstellar medium (ISM) in low-metallicity dwarf galaxies, early enriched clouds at the reionization and Pop-II star formation era, and in dense cold gas exposed to intense X-ray or cosmic ray sources. We focus on the behaviour for H2, CO, CH, OH, H2O and O2, at gas temperatures ˜100 K, characteristic of a cooled ISM at low metallicities. We consider shielded or partially shielded one-zone gas parcels, and solve the gas-phase chemical rate equations for the steady-state `metal-molecule abundances for a wide range of ionization parameters, ζ/n, and metallicties, Z '. We find that the OH abundances are always maximal near the H-to-H2 conversion points, and that large OH abundances persist at very low metallicities even when the hydrogen is predominantly atomic. We study the OH/O2, C/CO and OH/CO abundance ratios, from large to small, as functions of ζ/n and Z '. Much of the cold dense ISM for the Pop-II generation may have been OH-dominated and atomic rather than CO-dominated and molecular.

  15. Oil/gas separator for installation at burning wells

    DOEpatents

    Alonso, C.T.; Bender, D.A.; Bowman, B.R.; Burnham, A.K.; Chesnut, D.A.; Comfort, W.J. III; Guymon, L.G.; Henning, C.D.; Pedersen, K.B.; Sefcik, J.A.; Smith, J.A.; Strauch, M.S.

    1993-03-09

    An oil/gas separator is disclosed that can be utilized to return the burning wells in Kuwait to production. Advantageously, a crane is used to install the separator at a safe distance from the well. The gas from the well is burned off at the site, and the oil is immediately pumped into Kuwait's oil gathering system. Diverters inside the separator prevent the oil jet coming out of the well from reaching the top vents where the gas is burned. The oil falls back down, and is pumped from an annular oil catcher at the bottom of the separator, or from the concrete cellar surrounding the well.

  16. Oil/gas separator for installation at burning wells

    DOEpatents

    Alonso, Carol T.; Bender, Donald A.; Bowman, Barry R.; Burnham, Alan K.; Chesnut, Dwayne A.; Comfort, III, William J.; Guymon, Lloyd G.; Henning, Carl D.; Pedersen, Knud B.; Sefcik, Joseph A.; Smith, Joseph A.; Strauch, Mark S.

    1993-01-01

    An oil/gas separator is disclosed that can be utilized to return the burning wells in Kuwait to production. Advantageously, a crane is used to install the separator at a safe distance from the well. The gas from the well is burned off at the site, and the oil is immediately pumped into Kuwait's oil gathering system. Diverters inside the separator prevent the oil jet coming out of the well from reaching the top vents where the gas is burned. The oil falls back down, and is pumped from an annular oil catcher at the bottom of the separator, or from the concrete cellar surrounding the well.

  17. Oil/gas separator for installation at burning wells

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso, C.T.; Bender, D.A.; Bowman, B.R.

    1991-12-31

    An oil/gas separator is disclosed that can be utilized to return the burning wells in Kuwait to production. Advantageously, a crane is used to install the separator at a safe distance from the well. The gas from the well is burned off at the site, and the oil is immediately pumped into Kuwait`s oil gathering system. Diverters inside the separator prevent the oil jet coming out of the well from reaching the top vents where the gas is burned. The oil falls back down, and is pumped from an annular oil catcher at the bottom of the separator, or from the concrete cellar surrounding the well.

  18. Adsorption separation of carbon dioxide from flue gas by a molecularly imprinted adsorbent.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yi; Shen, Yanmei; Ma, Guoyi; Hao, Rongjie

    2014-01-01

    CO2 separation by molecularly imprinted adsorbent from coal-fired flue gas after desulfurization system has been studied. The adsorbent was synthesized by molecular imprinted technique, using ethanedioic acid, acrylamide, and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate as the template, functional monomer, and cross-linker, respectively. According to the conditions of coal-fired flue gas, the influencing factors, including adsorption temperature, desorption temperature, gas flow rate, and concentrations of CO2, H2O, O2, SO2, and NO, were studied by fixed bed breakthrough experiments. The experimental conditions were optimized to gain the best adsorption performance and reduce unnecessary energy consumption in future practical use. The optimized adsorption temperature, desorption temperature, concentrations of CO2, and gas flow rate are 60 °C, 80 °C, 13%, and 170 mL/min, respectively, which correspond to conditions of practical flue gases to the most extent. The CO2 adsorption performance was nearly unaffected by H2O, O2, and NO in the flue gas, and was promoted by SO2 within the emission limit stipulated in the Chinese emission standards of air pollutants for a thermal power plant. The maximum CO2 adsorption capacity, 0.57 mmol/g, was obtained under the optimized experimental conditions, and the SO2 concentration was 150 mg/m(3). The influence mechanisms of H2O, O2, SO2, and NO on CO2 adsorption capacity were investigated by infrared spectroscopic analysis. PMID:24410306

  19. Numerical investigation of gas separation in T-junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pao, William; Hashim, Fakhruldin M.; Ming, Low Huei

    2015-05-01

    T-junctions are commonly used in distributing two-phase flow by piping networks especially in oil and gas industries. Understanding the behavior of two-phase flow through a T-junction is very important as it has significant effect on the operation, maintenance and efficiency of the components downstream from the junction. The objective of this paper is to determine the effect of ratio of side arm to main arm diameters, initial inlet gas saturation and gas density variation on passive separation performance in T-junction. Via computational fluid dynamics tool, preliminary investigation found that separation efficiency is proportional to diameter ratio in between 0.5-0.75. Beyond diameter ratio 0.75, there is a flattening of separation efficiency. The change of fraction of gas taken off is inversely proportional to initial inlet gas saturation and the trend is almost inversely linear for diameter ratio 0.5. Beyond that, the relationship between initial inlet gas saturation and separation efficiency exhibits mild non-linearity behavior. For diameter ratios 0.75-1.0, the fraction of gas taken off is almost similar as far as the initial gas saturation is concerned. Gas density affects phase separation efficiency when the initial gas saturation is low. Interestingly, the effects of the inlet flow velocity and gravity distribution is almost negligible relative to the mass split ratio, side to main arm diameter ratio, initial gas saturation and density differential.

  20. Why do the HIghMass Galaxies Have so Much Gas?: Studying Massive, Gas-Rich Galaxies at z~0 with Resolved HI and H2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallenbeck, Gregory L.; HIghMass Team

    2016-01-01

    In the standard ΛCDM cosmology, galaxies form via mergers of many smaller dark matter halos. Because mergers drive star formation, the most massive galaxies should also be the ones which have been the most efficient at converting their gas reservoirs into stars. This trend is seen observationally: in general, as stellar mass increases, gas fraction (GF = MHI/M*) decreases. Galaxies which have large reservoirs of atomic hydrogen (HI) are thus expected to be extremely rare, which was seemingly supported by earlier blind HI surveys.In seeming contradiction, ALFALFA, the Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA Survey has observed a sample of 34 galaxies which are both massive (MHI>1010 M⊙) and have unusually high gas fractions (all ≥ 0.3; half are > 1). We call this sample HighMass. Unlike other extremely HI-massive samples, such galaxies are neither low surface brightness galaxies nor are they simply "scaled up" spirals. Could this gas be recently acquired, either from accreting small companions or directly from the cosmic web? Or is it primordial, and has been kept from forming stars, possibly because of an unusually high dark matter halo spin parameter?We present resolved HI, H2, and star formation properties of three of these HIghMass galaxies, and compare them with two HIghMass galaxies previously discussed in Hallenbeck et al. (2014). One of these galaxies, UGC 6168, appears in the process of transitioning from a quiescent to star-forming phase, as indicated by its bar and potential non-circular flows. A second, UGC 7899, has a clear warp, which could be evidence of recently accreted gas—but the presence of a warp is far from conclusive evidence. Both have moderately high dark matter halo spin parameters (λ' = 0.09), similar to the previously studied UGC 9037. The third, NGC 5230, looks undisturbed both optically and in its radio emission, but is in a group full of extragalactic gas. A neighboring galaxy has been significantly disrupted, and NGC 5230 may be in the

  1. Gas separation using membranes. 1: Optimization of the separation process using new cost parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Hinchliffe, A.B.; Porter, K.E.

    1997-03-01

    This is the first in a series of papers presenting new concepts for the development of membranes for gas separation. In this paper two new cost parameters, which are useful for costing and optimization of membrane gas separation systems, are described. The new parameters, cost permeability and effective selectivity, can be used to show the direction to be taken in membrane research and development. The new parameters are shown to predict accurately the cost of membrane separation plant by correlating bids from membrane plant suppliers using the new parameters with cross-flow design equations. The parameters are used to optimize the membrane gas separation of hydrogen and carbon monoxide for two commercially available membrane systems. The membrane separation is compared with the currently used method, cryogenic flash distillation. Economic evaluation methods are developed to compare different separation methods so that the process as a whole can be optimized. The evaluation shows that, for membrane gas separation, it is important to find the optimum degree of separation; when membrane separation is evaluated at the separation specification for the established cryogenic method, membranes are not competitive; however, when the process is optimized for membrane separation, the cost of separation reduces to less than 60% of the cryogenic separation.

  2. Highly selective quantum sieving of D2 from H2 by a metal-organic framework as determined by gas manometry and infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    FitzGerald, Stephen A; Pierce, Christopher J; Rowsell, Jesse L C; Bloch, Eric D; Mason, Jarad A

    2013-06-26

    The quantum sieving effect between D2 and H2 is examined for a series of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) over the temperature range 77-150 K. Isothermal adsorption measurements demonstrate a consistently larger isosteric heat of adsorption for D2 vs H2, with the largest difference being 1.4 kJ/mol in the case of Ni-MOF-74. This leads to a low-pressure selectivity for this material that increases from 1.5 at 150 K to 5.0 at 77 K. Idealized adsorption solution theory indicates that the selectivity decreases with increasing pressure, but remains well above unity at ambient pressure. Infrared measurements on different MOF materials show a strong correlation between selectivity and the frequency of the adsorbed H2 translational band. This confirms that the separation is predominantly due to the difference in the zero-point energies of the adsorbed isotopologues.

  3. The RealGas and RealGasH2O Options of the TOUGH+ Code for the Simulation of Coupled Fluid and Heat Flow in Tight/Shale Gas Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Moridis, George; Freeman, Craig

    2013-09-30

    We developed two new EOS additions to the TOUGH+ family of codes, the RealGasH2O and RealGas . The RealGasH2O EOS option describes the non-isothermal two-phase flow of water and a real gas mixture in gas reservoirs, with a particular focus in ultra-tight (such as tight-sand and shale gas) reservoirs. The gas mixture is treated as either a single-pseudo-component having a fixed composition, or as a multicomponent system composed of up to 9 individual real gases. The RealGas option has the same general capabilities, but does not include water, thus describing a single-phase, dry-gas system. In addition to the standard capabilities of all members of the TOUGH+ family of codes (fully-implicit, compositional simulators using both structured and unstructured grids), the capabilities of the two codes include: coupled flow and thermal effects in porous and/or fractured media, real gas behavior, inertial (Klinkenberg) effects, full micro-flow treatment, Darcy and non-Darcy flow through the matrix and fractures of fractured media, single- and multi-component gas sorption onto the grains of the porous media following several isotherm options, discrete and fracture representation, complex matrix-fracture relationships, and porosity-permeability dependence on pressure changes. The two options allow the study of flow and transport of fluids and heat over a wide range of time frames and spatial scales not only in gas reservoirs, but also in problems of geologic storage of greenhouse gas mixtures, and of geothermal reservoirs with multi-component condensable (H2O and CH4) and non-condensable gas mixtures. The codes are verified against available analytical and semi-analytical solutions. Their capabilities are demonstrated in a series of problems of increasing complexity, ranging from isothermal flow in simpler 1D and 2D conventional gas reservoirs, to non-isothermal gas flow in 3D fractured shale gas reservoirs involving 4 types of fractures, micro-flow, non-Darcy flow and gas

  4. The RealGas and RealGasH2O options of the TOUGH+ code for the simulation of coupled fluid and heat flow in tight/shale gas systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moridis, George J.; Freeman, Craig M.

    2014-04-01

    We developed two new EOS additions to the TOUGH+ family of codes, the RealGasH2O and RealGas. The RealGasH2O EOS option describes the non-isothermal two-phase flow of water and a real gas mixture in gas reservoirs, with a particular focus in ultra-tight (such as tight-sand and shale gas) reservoirs. The gas mixture is treated as either a single-pseudo-component having a fixed composition, or as a multicomponent system composed of up to 9 individual real gases. The RealGas option has the same general capabilities, but does not include water, thus describing a single-phase, dry-gas system. In addition to the standard capabilities of all members of the TOUGH+ family of codes (fully-implicit, compositional simulators using both structured and unstructured grids), the capabilities of the two codes include coupled flow and thermal effects in porous and/or fractured media, real gas behavior, inertial (Klinkenberg) effects, full micro-flow treatment, Darcy and non-Darcy flow through the matrix and fractures of fractured media, single- and multi-component gas sorption onto the grains of the porous media following several isotherm options, discrete and fracture representation, complex matrix-fracture relationships, and porosity-permeability dependence on pressure changes. The two options allow the study of flow and transport of fluids and heat over a wide range of time frames and spatial scales not only in gas reservoirs, but also in problems of geologic storage of greenhouse gas mixtures, and of geothermal reservoirs with multi-component condensable (H2O and CH4) and non-condensable gas mixtures. The codes are verified against available analytical and semi-analytical solutions. Their capabilities are demonstrated in a series of problems of increasing complexity, ranging from isothermal flow in simpler 1D and 2D conventional gas reservoirs, to non-isothermal gas flow in 3D fractured shale gas reservoirs involving 4 types of fractures, micro-flow, non-Darcy flow and gas

  5. Fiber-Amplifier-Enhanced QEPAS Sensor for Simultaneous Trace Gas Detection of NH3 and H2S

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hongpeng; Dong, Lei; Liu, Xiaoli; Zheng, Huadan; Yin, Xukun; Ma, Weiguang; Zhang, Lei; Yin, Wangbao; Jia, Suotang

    2015-01-01

    A selective and sensitive quartz enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS) sensor, employing an erbium-doped fiber amplifier (EDFA), and a distributed feedback (DFB) laser operating at 1582 nm was demonstrated for simultaneous detection of ammonia (NH3) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S). Two interference-free absorption lines located at 6322.45 cm−1 and 6328.88 cm−1 for NH3 and H2S detection, respectively, were identified. The sensor was optimized in terms of current modulation depth for both of the two target gases. An electrical modulation cancellation unit was equipped to suppress the background noise caused by the stray light. An Allan-Werle variance analysis was performed to investigate the long-term performance of the fiber-amplifier-enhanced QEPAS sensor. Benefitting from the high power boosted by the EDFA, a detection sensitivity (1σ) of 52 parts per billion by volume (ppbv) and 17 ppbv for NH3 and H2S, respectively, were achieved with a 132 s data acquisition time at atmospheric pressure and room temperature. PMID:26506351

  6. Molecular dynamics investigation of separation of hydrogen sulfide from acidic gas mixtures inside metal-doped graphite micropores.

    PubMed

    Huang, Pei-Hsing

    2015-09-21

    The separation of poisonous compounds from various process fluids has long been highly intractable, motivating the present study on the dynamic separation of H2S in acidic-gas-mixture-filled micropores. The molecular dynamics approach, coupled with the isothermal-isochoric ensemble, was used to model the molecular interactions and adsorption of H2S/CO2/CO/H2O mixtures inside metal-doped graphite slits. Due to the difference in the adsorption characteristics between the two distinct adsorbent materials, the metal dopant in the graphitic micropores leads to competitive adsorption, i.e. the Au and graphite walls compete to capture free adsorbates. The effects of competitive adsorption, coupled with changes in the gas temperature, concentration, constituent ratio and slit width on the constituent separation of mixtures were systematically studied. The molecule-wall binding energies calculated in this work (those of H2S, H2O and CO on Au walls and those of H2O, CO and CO2 on graphite walls) show good agreement with those obtained using density functional theory (DFT) and experimental results. The z-directional self-diffusivities (Dz) for adsorbates inside the slit ranged from 10(-9) to 10(-7) m(2) s(-1) as the temperature was increased from 10 to 500 K. The values are comparable with those for a typical microporous fluid (10(-8)-10(-9) m(2) s(-1) in a condensed phase and 10(-6)-10(-7) m(2) s(-1) in the gaseous state). The formation of H-bonding networks and hydrates of H2S is disadvantageous for the separation of mixtures. The results indicate that H2S can be efficiently separated from acidic gas mixtures onto the Au(111) surface by (i) reducing the mole fraction of H2S and H2O in the mixtures, (ii) raising the gas temperature to the high temperature limit (≥400 K), and (iii) lowering the slit width to below the threshold dimension (≤23.26 Å).

  7. CuO-Decorated ZnO Hierarchical Nanostructures as Efficient and Established Sensing Materials for H2S Gas Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Vuong, Nguyen Minh; Chinh, Nguyen Duc; Huy, Bui The; Lee, Yong-Ill

    2016-01-01

    Highly sensitive hydrogen sulfide (H2S) gas sensors were developed from CuO-decorated ZnO semiconducting hierarchical nanostructures. The ZnO hierarchical nanostructure was fabricated by an electrospinning method following hydrothermal and heat treatment. CuO decoration of ZnO hierarchical structures was carried out by a wet method. The H2S gas-sensing properties were examined at different working temperatures using various quantities of CuO as the variable. CuO decoration of the ZnO hierarchical structure was observed to promote sensitivity for H2S gas higher than 30 times at low working temperature (200 °C) compared with that in the nondecorated hierarchical structure. The sensing mechanism of the hybrid sensor structure is also discussed. The morphology and characteristics of the samples were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), UV-vis absorption, photoluminescence (PL), and electrical measurements. PMID:27231026

  8. CuO-Decorated ZnO Hierarchical Nanostructures as Efficient and Established Sensing Materials for H2S Gas Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vuong, Nguyen Minh; Chinh, Nguyen Duc; Huy, Bui The; Lee, Yong-Ill

    2016-05-01

    Highly sensitive hydrogen sulfide (H2S) gas sensors were developed from CuO-decorated ZnO semiconducting hierarchical nanostructures. The ZnO hierarchical nanostructure was fabricated by an electrospinning method following hydrothermal and heat treatment. CuO decoration of ZnO hierarchical structures was carried out by a wet method. The H2S gas-sensing properties were examined at different working temperatures using various quantities of CuO as the variable. CuO decoration of the ZnO hierarchical structure was observed to promote sensitivity for H2S gas higher than 30 times at low working temperature (200 °C) compared with that in the nondecorated hierarchical structure. The sensing mechanism of the hybrid sensor structure is also discussed. The morphology and characteristics of the samples were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), UV-vis absorption, photoluminescence (PL), and electrical measurements.

  9. A study of Zn-Mn based sorbent for the high-temperature removal of H2S from coal-derived gas.

    PubMed

    Ko, Tzu-Hsing; Chu, Hsin; Liou, Ya-Jing

    2007-08-17

    Zn-Mn based sorbents supported on SiO2, gamma-Al(2)O(3) and ZrO2, prepared by the incipient wetness impregnation method with calcination at 973 K were investigated for the removal of H(2)S from coal derived gas at the temperature ranges of 773-973 K. Results reveal that the SiO2 and ZrO2 supports exhibit the better performance because better removal efficiency. The addition of manganese effectually improves the vaporization of zinc. In addition, some operating parameters were also considered in order to understand as well as screen the suitable conditions for the development of Zn-Mn based sorbents on the removal of H(2)S. Over 98% sorbent utilization was established for the use of SiO2 at 873 K. On the other hand, within the 5-15 wt% of Zn-Mn oxides, no significant change in the sorbent utilization was observed. Up to 30 wt% the sorbent utilization decreased slightly compared to lower contents, which may be attributed to the deficient dispersion. With increasing the H2 concentration, the sorbent utilization decreases and an adverse result is observed in the case of increasing CO concentration. The relationship between CO and H2 could be explained via the water-gas shift reaction. Moreover, the apparent activation energy and frequency factor as well as the predicted results were studied with a deactivation model. The results of regression fitting reveal the accurate prediction breakthrough behaviors for the removal of H(2)S.

  10. Improving Hydrocarbon Separation In Gas Chromatography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollock, G. E.; Woeller, F.; Kojiro, D. R.

    1983-01-01

    Modified solica spheres enhance chromatographic separation. Commercially available silica spheres are modified by reacting them with molecules containing isocyante and isothiocyanate groups. Applications of surface derivatized spheres that result from reaction include analysis of samples prouced by atmospheric or soil probes.

  11. In-Situ XAFS Characterization for Nitriding Process of Silica Supported Nb Catalysts Under N2-H2 Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Ichikuni, Nobuyuki; Matsumoto, Hiroari; Haneishi, Hidenori; Shimazu, Shogo; Bando, Kyoko K.

    2007-02-02

    Fe-Nb/SiO2 catalyst was prepared from NbCl5 or peroxoniobic acid as Nb precursors. These precursor catalysts were nitrided by the TPR method under N2-H2 passage (without using NH3). Nb K-edge in-situ XAFS measurements were carried out during the nitriding process and revealed that the Nb species was more nitrided in the Fe-Nb/SiO2 catalyst prepared from peroxoniobic acid than in that prepared from NbCl5 as Nb precursor.

  12. In-Situ XAFS Characterization for Nitriding Process of Silica Supported Nb Catalysts Under N2-H2 Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichikuni, Nobuyuki; Matsumoto, Hiroari; Haneishi, Hidenori; Bando, Kyoko K.; Shimazu, Shogo

    2007-02-01

    Fe-Nb/SiO2 catalyst was prepared from NbCl5 or peroxoniobic acid as Nb precursors. These precursor catalysts were nitrided by the TPR method under N2-H2 passage (without using NH3). Nb K-edge in-situ XAFS measurements were carried out during the nitriding process and revealed that the Nb species was more nitrided in the Fe-Nb/SiO2 catalyst prepared from peroxoniobic acid than in that prepared from NbCl5 as Nb precursor.

  13. Liquid absorbent solutions for separating nitrogen from natural gas

    DOEpatents

    Friesen, Dwayne T.; Babcock, Walter C.; Edlund, David J.; Lyon, David K.; Miller, Warren K.

    2000-01-01

    Nitrogen-absorbing and -desorbing compositions, novel ligands and transition metal complexes, and methods of using the same, which are useful for the selective separation of nitrogen from other gases, especially natural gas.

  14. Gas-Liquid Flows and Phase Separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McQuillen, John

    2004-01-01

    Common issues for space system designers include:Ability to Verify Performance in Normal Gravity prior to Deployment; System Stability; Phase Accumulation & Shedding; Phase Separation; Flow Distribution through Tees & Manifolds Boiling Crisis; Heat Transfer Coefficient; and Pressure Drop.The report concludes:Guidance similar to "A design that operates in a single phase is less complex than a design that has two-phase flow" is not always true considering the amount of effort spent on pressurizing, subcooling and phase separators to ensure single phase operation. While there is still much to learn about two-phase flow in reduced gravity, we have a good start. Focus now needs to be directed more towards system level problems .

  15. Modeling mass transfer in solid oxide fuel cell anode: II. H2/CO co-oxidation and surface diffusion in synthesis-gas operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Cheng; Jiang, Zeyi; Zhang, Xinxin

    2016-08-01

    Following the previous work on comparing performance of Fickian, Stefan-Maxwell and dusty-gas model for mass transfer in single fuel system, this article is focused on the electrochemistry and transport in the anode of solid oxide fuel cell using H2sbnd H2Osbnd COsbnd CO2sbnd N2 hybrid fuel. Under the standard framework of the dusty-gas model combined with the Butler-Volmer equation, it carries out a macroscopic area-specific modeling work. More specifically, two variables of hydrogen current fraction and enhancement factor are well defined and solved for the electrochemical co-oxidation of H2 and CO, and the diffusion equivalent circuit model is introduced to describe more comprehensively the resistance of mass transfer including molecular/Knudsen diffusion and surface diffusion. The model has been validated well in full region of Vsbnd I performance of an experimental anode-supported button cell. An approximate analytical solution of the hydrogen current fraction is also presented for explicit computation. Comparison between the results by different approaches for the effective diffusivity shows the importance of right mass-transfer modeling.

  16. Computational study of the I2O5 + H2O = 2 HOIO2 gas-phase reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khanniche, Sarah; Louis, Florent; Cantrel, Laurent; Černušák, Ivan

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents the mechanism and the kinetics of the I2O5 (g) + H2O (g) = 2 HOIO2 (g) reaction. The potential energy surface was explored with the B3LYP and MP2 methods with the aug-cc-pVTZ basis set. The rate constants were computed as a function of temperature (250-750 K) using transition state theory. At the CCSD(T)/CBS level, the rate constants were estimated to be: (k in cm3 molecule-1 s-1) kforward(T) = 3.61 × 10-22 × T2.05 exp (-32.3 (kJ mol-1)/RT) and kreverse (T) = 6.73 × 10-27 × T2.90 exp (-24.5 (kJ mol-1)/RT). Implications for atmospheric chemistry and nuclear safety issues are discussed.

  17. Functionalized inorganic membranes for gas separation

    DOEpatents

    Ku, Anthony Yu-Chung; Ruud, James Anthony; Molaison, Jennifer Lynn; Schick, Louis Andrew ,; Ramaswamy, Vidya

    2008-07-08

    A porous membrane for separation of carbon dioxide from a fluid stream at a temperature higher than about 200.degree. C. with selectivity higher than Knudsen diffusion selectivity. The porous membrane comprises a porous support layer comprising alumina, silica, zirconia or stabilized zirconia; a porous separation layer comprising alumina, silica, zirconia or stabilized zirconia, and a functional layer comprising a ceramic oxide contactable with the fluid stream to preferentially transport carbon dioxide. In particular, the functional layer may be MgO, CaO, SrO, BaO, La.sub.2O.sub.3, CeO.sub.2, ATiO.sub.3, AZrO.sub.3, AAl.sub.2O.sub.4, A.sup.1FeO.sub.3, A.sup.1MnO.sub.3, A.sup.1CoO.sub.3, A.sup.1NiO.sub.3, A.sup.2HfO.sub.3, A.sup.3CeO.sub.3, Li.sub.2ZrO.sub.3, Li.sub.2SiO.sub.3, Li.sub.2TiO.sub.3 or a mixture thereof; wherein A is Mg, Ca, Sr or Ba; A.sup.1 is La, Ca, Sr or Ba; A.sup.2 is Ca, Sr or Ba; and A.sup.3 is Sr or Ba.

  18. Evaluation of Mars CO2 Capture and Gas Separation Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muscatello, Anthony C.; Santiago-Maldonado, Edgardo; Gibson, Tracy; Devor, Robert; Captain, James

    2011-01-01

    Recent national policy statements have established that the ultimate destination of NASA's human exploration program is Mars. In Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) is a key technology required to ,enable such missions and it is appropriate to review progress in this area and continue to advance the systems required to produce rocket propellant, oxygen, and other consumables on Mars using the carbon dioxide atmosphere and other potential resources. The Mars Atmospheric Capture and Gas separation project is selecting, developing, and demonstrating techniques to capture and purify Martian atmospheric gases for their utilization for the production of hydrocarbons, oxygen, and water in ISRU systems. Trace gases will be required to be separated from Martian atmospheric gases to provide pure CO2 to processing elements. In addition, other Martian gases, such as nitrogen and argon, occur in concentrations high enough to be useful as buffer gas and should be captured as well. To achieve these goals, highly efficient gas separation processes will be required. These gas separation techniques are also required across various areas within the ISRU project to support various consumable production processes. The development of innovative gas separation techniques will evaluate the current state-of-the-art for the gas separation required, with the objective to demonstrate and develop light-weight, low-power methods for gas separation. Gas separation requirements include, but are not limited to the selective separation of: (1) methane and water from unreacted carbon oxides (C02-CO) and hydrogen typical of a Sabatier-type process, (2) carbon oxides and water from unreacted hydrogen from a Reverse Water-Gas Shift process, (3)/carbon oxides from oxygen from a trash/waste processing reaction, and (4) helium from hydrogen or oxygen from a propellant scavenging process. Potential technologies for the separations include' freezers, selective membranes, selective solvents, polymeric sorbents

  19. Parameterization of the coupling CO2 and H2O gas exchange model at the leaf scale of Populus euphratica tree

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, G.; Li, X.; Su, Y.; Huang, C.

    2009-10-01

    The following two models were combined to predict simultaneously CO2 and H2O gas exchange at the leaf scale of Populus euphratica: a Farquhar et al. type biochemical sub-model of photosynthesis (Farquhar et al., 1980) and a Ball et al. type stomatal conductance sub-model (Ball et al., 1987). The photosynthesis parameters, Vcmax, Jmax, TPU, and Rd (maximum carboxylation rate allowed by ribulose 1·5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco), rate of phosynthetic electron transport, triose phosphate use, and day respiration) at the measurement temperature were determined by using the genetic algorithm (GA) method based on A/Ci data sets. The stomatal conductance sub-model was calibrated independently. Prediction of net photosynthesis by the coupled model agreed well with the validation data, but the model tended to underestimate rates of transpiration. Overall, the combined model generally captured the diurnal patterns of CO2and H2O exchange resulting from variation in temperature and irradiation.

  20. Electronic spectrum of C 6H: 2Π- X2Π in the gas-phase detected by cavity ringdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotterer, Markus; Maier, John P.

    1997-02-01

    The 2Π- X2Π electronic transition of the carbon chain C 6H has been detected in the gas-phase. The radical is generated in a hollow cathode discharge of acetylene in helium, and cavity ringdown spectroscopy is used as a sensitive means to observed the band system in absorption. This is the first result aimed at locating the electronic transitions of the neutral carbon chains, of astrophysical interest, in the gas-phase. The search was based on the measurements made previously on C 6H in neon matrices. The origin band ( Ω = 3/2) in the gas phase at 18996.4 cm -1 is 142 cm -1 to the blue of the matrix value.

  1. Thermophoretic separation of aerosol particles from a sampled gas stream

    DOEpatents

    Postma, Arlin K.

    1986-01-01

    A method for separating gaseous samples from a contained atmosphere that includes aerosol particles uses the step of repelling particles from a gas permeable surface or membrane by heating the surface to a temperature greater than that of the surrounding atmosphere. The resulting thermophoretic forces maintain the gas permeable surface clear of aerosol particles. The disclosed apparatus utilizes a downwardly facing heated plate of gas permeable material to combine thermophoretic repulsion and gravity forces to prevent particles of any size from contacting the separating plate surfaces.

  2. GC/MS Gas Separator Operates At Lower Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinha, Mahadeva P.; Gutnikov, George

    1991-01-01

    Experiments show palladium/silver tube used to separate hydrogen carrier gas from gases being analyzed in gas-chromatography/mass-spectrometry (GC/MS) system functions satisfactorily at temperatures as low as 70 to 100 degrees C. Less power consumed, and catalytic hydrogenation of compounds being analyzed diminished. Because separation efficiency high even at lower temperatures, gas load on vacuum pump of mass spectrometer kept low, permitting use of smaller pump. These features facilitate development of relatively small, lightweight, portable GC/MS system for such uses as measuring concentrations of pollutants in field.

  3. Ceria-based Catalysts for the Production of H2 Through the Water-gas-shift Reaction: Time-Resolved XRD and XAFS Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Wang,X.; Rodriguez, J.; Hanson, J.; Gamarra, D.; Marinez-Arias, A.; Fernandez-Garcia, M.

    2008-01-01

    Hydrogen is a potential alternate energy source for satisfying many of our energy needs. In this work, we studied H2 production from the water-gas-shift (WGS) reaction over Ce1-x Cu x O2 catalysts, prepared with a novel microemulsion method, using two synchrotron-based techniques: time-resolved X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS). The results are compared with those reported for conventional CuO x /CeO2 and AuO x /CeO2 catalysts obtained through impregnation of ceria. For the fresh Ce1-x Cu x O2 catalysts, the results of XAFS measurements at the Cu K-edge indicate that Cu is in an oxidation state higher than in CuO. Nevertheless, under WGS reaction conditions the Ce1-x Cu x O2 catalysts undergo reduction and the active phase contains very small particles of metallic Cu and CeO2-x . Time-resolved XRD and XAFS results also indicate that Cud+ and Aud+ species present in fresh CuO x /CeO2 and AuO x /CeO2 catalysts do not survive above 200 C under the WGS conditions. In all these systems, the ceria lattice displayed a significant increase after exposure to CO and a decrease in H2O, indicating that CO reduced ceria while H2O oxidized it. Our data suggest that H2O dissociation occurred on the Ovacancy sites or the Cu-Ovacancy and Au-Ovacancy interfaces. The rate of H2 generation by a Ce0.95Cu0.05O2 catalyst was comparable to that of a 5 wt% CuO x /CeO2 catalyst and much bigger than those of pure ceria or CuO.

  4. Gas-Phase Synthesis of Boronylallene (H2CCCH(BO)) under Single Collision Conditions: A Crossed Molecular Beams and Computational Study.

    PubMed

    Maity, Surajit; Parker, Dorian S N; Kaiser, Ralf I; Ganoe, Brad; Fau, Stefan; Perera, Ajith; Bartlett, Rodney J

    2014-05-15

    The gas phase reaction between the boron monoxide radical ((11)BO; X(2)Σ(+)) and allene (H2CCCH2; X(1)A1) was investigated experimentally under single collision conditions using the crossed molecular beam technique and theoretically exploiting ab initio electronic structure and statistical (RRKM) calculations. The reaction was found to follow indirect (complex forming) scattering dynamics and proceeded via the formation of a van der Waals complex ((11)BOC3H4). This complex isomerized via addition of the boron monoxide radical ((11)BO; X(2)Σ(+)) with the radical center located at the boron atom to the terminal carbon atom of the allene molecule forming a H2CCCH2(11)BO intermediate on the doublet surface. The chemically activated H2CCCH2(11)BO intermediate underwent unimolecular decomposition via atomic hydrogen elimination from the terminal carbon atom holding the boronyl group through a tight exit transition state to synthesize the boronylallene product (H2CCCH(11)BO) in a slightly exoergic reaction (55 ± 11 kJ mol(-1)). Statistical (RRKM) calculations suggest that minor reaction channels lead to the products 3-propynyloxoborane (CH2((11)BO)CCH) and 1-propynyloxoborane (CH3CC(11)BO) with fractions of 1.5% and 0.2%, respectively. The title reaction was also compared with the cyano (CN; X(2)Σ(+))-allene and boronyl-methylacetylene reactions to probe similarities, but also differences of these isoelectronic systems. Our investigation presents a novel gas phase synthesis and characterization of a hitherto elusive organyloxoborane (RBO) monomer-boronylallene-which is inherently tricky to isolate in the condensed phase except in matrix studies; our work further demonstrates that the crossed molecular beams approach presents a useful tool in investigating the chemistry and synthesis of highly reactive organyloxoboranes. PMID:24806514

  5. Fast gas chromatographic separation of biodiesel.

    SciTech Connect

    Pauls, R. E.

    2011-05-01

    A high-speed gas chromatographic method has been developed to determine the FAME distribution of B100 biodiesel. The capillary column used in this work has dimensions of 20 m x 0.100 mm and is coated with a polyethylene glycol film. Analysis times are typically on the order of 4-5 min depending upon the composition of the B100. The application of this method to a variety of vegetable and animal derived B100 is demonstrated. Quantitative results obtained with this method were in close agreement with those obtained by a more conventional approach on a 100 m column. The method, coupled with solid-phase extraction, was also found suitable to determine the B100 content of biodiesel-diesel blends.

  6. BIODESULF(TM), A Novel Biological Technology for the Removal of H2S From Sour Natural Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, K.C.; Stashick, J.J.; Johnson, P.E.; Kaushik, N.K.

    1997-10-01

    The state-of-the-art technologies for the removal of sulfur compounds from Sour Natural Gas (SNG) are not cost-effective when scaled down to approximately 2-5 MMSCFD. At the same time, the SNG Production is increasing at 3-6 TCF/Yr and -78 TCF potential reserves are also sour. Assuming only 3% treatment of this potential SNG market is for small volume processing, the potential U.S. Market is worth $0.14 to $0.28 billion. Therefore, the Gas Processing Industry is seeking novel, cost-effective, environmentally compatible and operator friendly technologies applicable to the small volume producers in the range of less than 1 MMSCFD to - 5 MMSCFD. A novel biological process, BIODESTJLFTM (patent pending), developed at ARCTECH removes H{sub 2}S and other sulfur contaminants that make the Natural Gas Sour. The removal is accomplished by utilizing an adapted mixed microbial culture (consortium). A variety of anaerobic microbial consortia from ARCTECH`s Microbial Culture Collection were grown and tested for removal of H{sub 2}S. One of these consortia, termed SS-11 was found to be particularly effective. Utilizing the SS-11 consortium, a process has been developed on a laboratory-scale to remove sulfur species from Sour Natural Gas at well head production pressures and temperatures. The process has been independently evaluated and found to be promising in effectively removing H{sub 2}S and other sulfur species cost effectively.

  7. Laboratory Investigations of a Low-Swirl Injector with H2 and CH4 at Gas Turbine Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, R. K.; Littlejohn, D.; Strakey, P.A.; Sidwell, T.

    2008-03-05

    Laboratory experiments were conducted at gas turbine and atmospheric conditions (0.101 < P{sub 0} < 0.810 MPa, 298 < T{sub 0} < 580K, 18 < U{sub 0} < 60 m/s) to characterize the overall behaviors and emissions of the turbulent premixed flames produced by a low-swirl injector (LSI) for gas turbines. The objective was to investigate the effects of hydrogen on the combustion processes for the adaptation to gas turbines in an IGCC power plant. The experiments at high pressures and temperatures showed that the LSI can operate with 100% H{sub 2} at up to {phi} = 0.5 and has a slightly higher flashback tolerance than an idealized high-swirl design. With increasing H{sub 2} fuel concentration, the lifted LSI flame begins to shift closer to the exit and eventually attaches to the nozzle rim and assumes a different shape at 100% H{sub 2}. The STP experiments show the same phenomena. The analysis of velocity data from PIV shows that the stabilization mechanism of the LSI remains unchanged up to 60% H{sub 2}. The change in the flame position with increasing H{sub 2} concentration is attributed to the increase in the turbulent flame speed. The NO{sub x} emissions show a log linear dependency on the adiabatic flame temperature and the concentrations are similar to those obtained previously in a LSI prototype developed for natural gas. These results show that the LSI exhibits the same overall behaviors at STP and at gas turbine conditions. Such insight will be useful for scaling the LSI to operate at IGCC conditions.

  8. Nanostructured PdO Thin Film from Langmuir-Blodgett Precursor for Room-Temperature H2 Gas Sensing.

    PubMed

    Choudhury, Sipra; Betty, C A; Bhattacharyya, Kaustava; Saxena, Vibha; Bhattacharya, Debarati

    2016-07-01

    Nanoparticulate thin films of PdO were prepared using the Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) technique by thermal decomposition of a multilayer film of octadecylamine (ODA)-chloropalladate complex. The stable complex formation of ODA with chloropalladate ions (present in subphase) at the air-water interface was confirmed by the surface pressure-area isotherm and Brewster angle microscopy. The formation of nanocrystalline PdO thin film after thermal decomposition of as-deposited LB film was confirmed by X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. Nanocrystalline PdO thin films were further characterized by using UV-vis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic (XPS) measurements. The XPS study revealed the presence of prominent Pd(2+) with a small quantity (18%) of reduced PdO (Pd(0)) in nanocrystalline PdO thin film. From the absorption spectroscopic measurement, the band gap energy of PdO was estimated to be 2 eV, which was very close to that obtained from specular reflectance measurements. Surface morphology studies of these films using atomic force microscopy and field-emission scanning electron microscopy indicated formation of nanoparticles of size 20-30 nm. These PdO film when employed as a chemiresistive sensor showed H2 sensitivity in the range of 30-4000 ppm at room temperature. In addition, PdO films showed photosensitivity with increase in current upon shining of visible light.

  9. Nanostructured PdO Thin Film from Langmuir-Blodgett Precursor for Room-Temperature H2 Gas Sensing.

    PubMed

    Choudhury, Sipra; Betty, C A; Bhattacharyya, Kaustava; Saxena, Vibha; Bhattacharya, Debarati

    2016-07-01

    Nanoparticulate thin films of PdO were prepared using the Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) technique by thermal decomposition of a multilayer film of octadecylamine (ODA)-chloropalladate complex. The stable complex formation of ODA with chloropalladate ions (present in subphase) at the air-water interface was confirmed by the surface pressure-area isotherm and Brewster angle microscopy. The formation of nanocrystalline PdO thin film after thermal decomposition of as-deposited LB film was confirmed by X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. Nanocrystalline PdO thin films were further characterized by using UV-vis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic (XPS) measurements. The XPS study revealed the presence of prominent Pd(2+) with a small quantity (18%) of reduced PdO (Pd(0)) in nanocrystalline PdO thin film. From the absorption spectroscopic measurement, the band gap energy of PdO was estimated to be 2 eV, which was very close to that obtained from specular reflectance measurements. Surface morphology studies of these films using atomic force microscopy and field-emission scanning electron microscopy indicated formation of nanoparticles of size 20-30 nm. These PdO film when employed as a chemiresistive sensor showed H2 sensitivity in the range of 30-4000 ppm at room temperature. In addition, PdO films showed photosensitivity with increase in current upon shining of visible light. PMID:27299704

  10. Intracavity CO laser photoacoustic trace gas detection: cyclic CH 4 , H 2 O and CO 2 emission by cockroaches and scarab beetles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bijnen, F. G. C.; Harren, F. J. M.; Hackstein, J. H. P.; Reuss, J.

    1996-09-01

    A liquid-nitrogen-cooled CO laser and an intracavity resonant photoacoustic cell are employed to monitor trace gases. The setup was designed to monitor trace gas emissions of biological samples on line. The arrangement offers the possibility to measure gases at the 10 9 by volume (ppbv) level (e.g., CH 4 , H 2 O) and to detect rapid changes in trace gas emission. A detection limit of 1 ppbv for CH 4 in N 2 equivalent to a minimal detectable absorption of 3 10 9 cm 1 can be achieved. Because of the kinetic cooling effect we lowered the detection limit for CH 4 in air is decreased to 10 ppbv. We used the instrument in a first application to measure the CH 4 and H 2 O emission of individual cockroaches and scarab beetles. These emissions could be correlated with CO 2 emissions that were recorded simultaneously with an infrared gas analyzer. Characteristic breathing patterns of the insects could be observed; unexpectedly methane was also found to be released.

  11. The properties of clusters in the gas phase. IV - Complexes of H2O and HNOx clustering on NOx/-/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, N.; Castleman, A. W., Jr.; Keesee, R. G.

    1980-01-01

    Thermodynamic quantities for the gas-phase clustering equilibria of NO2(-) and NO3(-) were determined with high-pressure mass spectrometry. A comparison of values of the free energy of hydration derived from the data shows good agreement with formerly reported values at 296 K. New data for larger NO2(-) and NO3(-) hydrates as well as NO2(-)(HNO2)n were obtained in this study. To aid in understanding the bonding and stability of the hydrates of nitrite and nitrate ions, CNDO/2 calculations were performed, and the results are discussed. A correlation between the aqueous-phase total hydration enthalpy of a single ion and its gas-phase hydration enthalpy was obtained. Atmospheric implications of the data are also briefly discussed.

  12. Flame made ceria supported noble metal catalysts for efficient H2 production via the water gas shift reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavusoglu, G.; Lichtenberg, H.; Gaur, A.; Goldbach, A.; Grunwaldt, J.-D.

    2016-05-01

    Rh/ceria catalysts were synthesized by flame spray pyrolysis for high temperature water gas shift (WGS) reactions. These catalysts show a high specific surface area due to a high degree of nanocrystallinity. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) unraveled the formation of small Rh particles under WGS reaction conditions. The catalytic activity was examined at atmospheric pressure by measuring CO conversion as a function of temperature. Some methane formation was observed above 310°C.

  13. Laboratory Carburization of Direct-Reduced Iron in CH4-H2-N2 Gas Mixtures, and Comparison with Industrial Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yining; Pistorius, P. Chris

    2016-06-01

    Iron ore pellets, reduced with hydrogen, were isothermally carburized in CH4-H2-N2 at 823 K, 923 K, and 1023 K (550 °C, 650 °C, and 750 °C). Temperature strongly affected the total carbon concentration after carburization; significant unbound carbon deposited at the highest temperature. For the range of sizes tested (10 to 12 mm), pellet size did not affect carburization. The variability between pellets was much smaller than for industrial pellets; inhomogeneous gas distribution likely affects carburization under large-scale industrial conditions.

  14. H2 blockers

    MedlinePlus

    Peptic ulcer disease - H2 blockers; PUD - H2 blockers; Gastroesophageal reflux - H2 blockers ... used to: Relieve symptoms of acid reflux, or gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). This is a condition where food ...

  15. [Gas chromatography with a Pulsed discharge helium ionization detector for measurement of molecular hydrogen(H2) in the atmosphere].

    PubMed

    Luan, Tian; Fang, Shuang-xi; Zhou, Ling-xi; Wang, Hong-yang; Zhang, Gen

    2015-01-01

    A high precision GC system with a pulsed discharge helium ionization detector was set up based on the commercial Agilent 7890A gas chromatography. The gas is identified by retention time and the concentration is calculated through the peak height. Detection limit of the system is about 1 x 10(-9) (mole fraction, the same as below). The standard deviation of 140 continuous injections with a standard cylinder( concentration is roughly 600 x 10(-9)) is better than 0.3 x 10(-9). Between 409.30 x 10(-9) and 867.74 x 10(-9) molecular hydrogen mole fractions and peak height have good linear response. By using two standards to quantify the air sample, the precision meets the background molecular hydrogen compatibility goal within the World Meteorological Organization/Global Atmosphere Watch (WMO/GAW) program. Atmospheric molecular hydrogen concentration at Guangzhou urban area was preliminarily measured by this method from January to November 2013. The results show that the atmospheric molecular hydrogen mole fraction varies from 450 x 10(-9) to 700 x 10(-9) during the observation period, with the lowest value at 14:00 (Beijing time, the same as below) and the peak value at 20:00. The seasonal variation of atmospheric hydrogen at Guangzhou area was similar with that of the same latitude stations in northern hemisphere.

  16. Advanced Sorbents as a Versatile Platform for Gas Separation

    SciTech Connect

    Neil Stephenson

    2003-09-30

    The program objective was to develop materials and processes for industrial gas separations to reduce energy use and enable waste reduction. The approach chosen combined novel oxygen selective adsorbents and pressure swing adsorption (PSA) processes. Preliminary materials development and process simulation results indicated that oxygen selective adsorbents could provide a versatile platform for industrial gas separations. If fully successful, this new technology offered the potential for reducing the cost of producing nitrogen/oxygen co-products, high purity nitrogen, argon, and possibly oxygen. The potential energy savings for the gas separations are appreciable, but the end users are the main beneficiaries. Lowering the cost of industrial gases expands their use in applications that can employ them for reducing energy consumption and emissions.

  17. Optimization of an enclosed gas analyzer sampling system for measuring eddy covariance fluxes of H2O and CO2

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Metzger, Stefan; Burba, George; Burns, Sean P.; Blanken, Peter D.; Li, Jiahong; Luo, Hongyan; Zulueta, Rommel C.

    2016-03-31

    Several initiatives are currently emerging to observe the exchange of energy and matter between the earth's surface and atmosphere standardized over larger space and time domains. For example, the National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) and the Integrated Carbon Observing System (ICOS) are set to provide the ability of unbiased ecological inference across ecoclimatic zones and decades by deploying highly scalable and robust instruments and data processing. In the construction of these observatories, enclosed infrared gas analyzers are widely employed for eddy covariance applications. While these sensors represent a substantial improvement compared to their open- and closed-path predecessors, remaining high-frequency attenuation variesmore » with site properties and gas sampling systems, and requires correction. Here, we show that components of the gas sampling system can substantially contribute to such high-frequency attenuation, but their effects can be significantly reduced by careful system design. From laboratory tests we determine the frequency at which signal attenuation reaches 50 % for individual parts of the gas sampling system. For different models of rain caps and particulate filters, this frequency falls into ranges of 2.5–16.5 Hz for CO2, 2.4–14.3 Hz for H2O, and 8.3–21.8 Hz for CO2, 1.4–19.9 Hz for H2O, respectively. A short and thin stainless steel intake tube was found to not limit frequency response, with 50 % attenuation occurring at frequencies well above 10 Hz for both H2O and CO2. From field tests we found that heating the intake tube and particulate filter continuously with 4 W was effective, and reduced the occurrence of problematic relative humidity levels (RH > 60 %) by 50 % in the infrared gas analyzer cell. No further improvement of H2O frequency response was found for heating in excess of 4 W. These laboratory and field tests were reconciled using resistor–capacitor theory, and NEON's final gas sampling system was

  18. Co-gasification of different rank coals with biomass and petroleum coke in a high-pressure reactor for H(2)-rich gas production.

    PubMed

    Fermoso, J; Arias, B; Gil, M V; Plaza, M G; Pevida, C; Pis, J J; Rubiera, F

    2010-05-01

    Four coals of different rank were gasified, using a steam/oxygen mixture as gasifying agent, at atmospheric and elevated pressure in a fixed bed reactor fitted with a solids feeding system in continuous mode. Independently of coal rank, an increase in gasification pressure led to a decrease in H(2) + CO production and carbon conversion. Gasification of the different rank coals revealed that the higher the carbon content and reactivity, the greater the hydrogen production. Co-gasification experiments of binary (coal-biomass) and ternary blends (coal-petcoke-biomass) were conducted at high pressure to study possible synergetic effects. Interactions between the blend components were found to modify the gas production. An improvement in hydrogen production and cold gas efficiency was achieved when the coal was gasified with biomass.

  19. Sulfur-doped graphene via thermal exfoliation of graphite oxide in H2S, SO2, or CS2 gas.

    PubMed

    Poh, Hwee Ling; Šimek, Petr; Sofer, Zdeněk; Pumera, Martin

    2013-06-25

    Doping of graphene with heteroatoms is an effective way to tailor its properties. Here we describe a simple and scalable method of doping graphene lattice with sulfur atoms during the thermal exfoliation process of graphite oxides. The graphite oxides were first prepared by Staudenmaier, Hofmann, and Hummers methods followed by treatments in hydrogen sulfide, sulfur dioxide, or carbon disulfide. The doped materials were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, high-resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, combustible elemental analysis, and Raman spectroscopy. The ζ-potential and conductivity of sulfur-doped graphenes were also investigated in this paper. It was found that the level of doping is more dramatically influenced by the type of graphite oxide used rather than the type of sulfur-containing gas used during exfoliation. Resulting sulfur-doped graphenes act as metal-free electrocatalysts for an oxygen reduction reaction.

  20. Separation of anthracene from crude anthracene using gas antisolvent recrystallization

    SciTech Connect

    Yuchung Liou; Chiehming Chang )

    1992-08-01

    Pure anthracene is mostly used for conversion to anthraquinone, an intermediate for the synthesis of very powerful vat dyestuffs. A coal tar distillate, crude anthracene, which contains 30% anthracene, 25% phenanthrene, 15% carbazole, and other impurities, was used as the model mixture. In this study, 90% by weight purity anthracene was obtained using gas antisolvent (GAS) recrystallization. The GAS process induces the separation of solids by introducing an antisolvent, carbon dioxide (or the supercritical fluid), into acetone which was used as the liquid solvent. The dissolution of the compressed gas into the solute-laden solution selectively lowers the solubilities of solid solutes and salts them out. The results showed that high purity anthracene was obtained at a high feed concentration and high pressure conditions. The separation factor of anthracene versus phenanthrene is close to 30.07.

  1. Sulfur isotope fractionation during oxidation of sulfur dioxide: gas-phase oxidation by OH radicals and aqueous oxidation by H2O2, O3 and iron catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, E.; Sinha, B.; Hoppe, P.; Crowley, J. N.; Ono, S.; Foley, S.

    2011-08-01

    The oxidation of SO2 to sulfate is a key reaction in determining the role of sulfate in the environment through its effect on aerosol size distribution and composition. Sulfur isotope analysis has been used to investigate sources and chemistry of sulfur dioxide and sulfate in the atmosphere, however interpretation of measured sulfur isotope ratios is challenging due to a lack of reliable information on the isotopic fractionation involved in major transformation pathways. This paper presents measurements of the fractionation factors for the major atmospheric oxidation reactions for SO2: Gas-phase oxidation by OH radicals, and aqueous oxidation by H2O2, O3 and a radical chain reaction initiated by iron. The measured fractionation factor for 34S/32S during the gas-phase reaction is αOH = (1.0089±0.0007) - ((4±5)×10-5) T(°C). The measured fractionation factor for 34S/32S during aqueous oxidation by H2O2 or O3 is αaq=(1.0167±0.0019) - ((8.7±3.5) ×10-5) T(°C). The observed fractionation during oxidation by H2O2 and O3 appeared to be controlled primarily by protonation and acid-base equilbria of S(IV) in solution, and there was no significant difference between the fractionation produced by the two oxidants within the experimental error. The isotopic fractionation factor from a radical chain reaction in solution catalysed by iron is αFe = (0.989±0.0043) at 19 °C for 34S/32S. Fractionation was mass-dependent with regards to 33S for all the reactions investigated. The radical chain reaction mechanism was the only measured reaction that had a faster rate for the light isotopes, and will be particularly useful to determine the importance of the transition-metal catalysed oxidation pathway.

  2. Recombination of H+3 ions with electrons in He/H2 ambient gas at temperatures from 240 K to 340 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glosík, J.; Dohnal, P.; Rubovič, P.; Kálosi, Á.; Plašil, R.; Roučka, Š.; Johnsen, R.

    2015-12-01

    We have studied the recombination of \\text{H}3+ ions with electrons in a stationary afterglow experiment either in pure hydrogen or in mixtures of helium, hydrogen, and argon. The decay of the ion density during the afterglow was monitored using near-infrared cavity ring-down absorption spectroscopy. The gas temperatures ranged from 240 K to 340 K. We find that three-body recombination, where molecular hydrogen acts as a third body, increases the recombination rate significantly. However, {{\\text{H}}2} assisted three-body recombination saturates at hydrogen densities above ≈ {{10}16}~\\text{c}{{\\text{m}}-3} and the recombination rate then becomes nearly independent of the neutral gas density. The saturation can lead to the erroneous conclusion that the recombination is purely binary and this appears to be the cause of some inconsistencies between previously reported recombination rate coefficients. At temperatures 240-340 K the obtained three-body recombination rate coefficient is independent on temperature ({{K}\\text{H2}}=≤ft(9.4~+/- ~1.3\\right)× {{10}-23}~\\text{c}{{\\text{m}}6}~{{\\text{s}}-1} ) and it is larger by five orders of magnitude than those expected from the classical theory for atomic ions of Bates and Khare ({{K}\\text{BK}}≤ft(300~\\text{K}\\right)≈ {{10}-27}~\\text{c}{{\\text{m}}6}~{{\\text{s}}-1} ). The observed dependences on {{\\text{H}}2} density suggest that a substantial fraction of neutral \\text{H}3\\# complexes formed in capture of electrons by \\text{H}3+ ions do not rapidly predissociate but can be stabilized by interactions with third bodies. Saturation occurs if the capture step is rate limiting rather than stabilization.

  3. Utilization of CO2 and biomass char derived from pyrolysis of Dunaliella salina: the effects of steam and catalyst on CO and H2 gas production.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chao; Jia, Lishan; Su, Shuai; Tian, Zhongbiao; Song, Qianqian; Fang, Weiping; Chen, Changping; Liu, Guangfa

    2012-04-01

    Biomass char, by-product of Dunaliella salina pyrolysis at a final pyrolysis temperature of 500°C, was used as feedstock material in this study. The reactions of biomass char with CO(2) were performed in a fixed-bed reactor to evaluate the effect of temperature and steam on the CO(2) conversion, CO yield and gas composition. The CO(2) conversion and CO yield without steam and catalyst reached about 61.84% and 0.99mol/(mol CO(2)) at 800°C, respectively. Steam and high temperature led to high CO(2) conversion. A new approach for improving H(2) was carried out by using biomass char and Au/Al(2)O(3) catalyst, which combined steam gasification of biomass char and water gas shift reaction, and the H(2) concentration was 1.8 times higher than without catalyst. The process not only mitigated CO(2) emission and made use of residual biomass char, but also created renewable source. PMID:22336747

  4. Binderless Composite Electrode Monolith from Carbon Nanotube and Biomass Carbon Activated by H2 SO4 and CO2 Gas for Supercapacitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deraman, M.; Ishak, M. M.; Farma, R.; Awitdrus, Taer, E.; Talib, I. A.; Omar, R.

    2011-12-01

    Binderless composite electrodes in the monolithic form prepared from carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and self-adhesive carbon grains (SACG) from fibers of oil palm empty fruit bunch were studied as an electrode in a supercapacitor. The green monoliths (GMs) were prepared from three different types of precursors, SACG, SACG treated with 0.4 Molar H2 SO4 and mixture of SACG and 5% CNTs (by weight) treated with 0.4 Molar H2 SO4 , respectively. These GMs were carbonized at 600 ° C in N2 gas environment and activated by CO2 gas at 800 ° C for 1 hour to produce activated carbon monoliths (ACMs). The properties of the ACMs (density, porosity, microstructure, structure and electrical conductivity) were found affected by CNTs addition and acid treatment. The acid treatment did not improve the electrochemical behavior of the ACMs used as electrodes (specific capacitance, specific energy and specific power of the supercapacitor) in the supercapacitor cells but CNTs addition improves the equivalent series resistance of the cell.

  5. Utilization of CO2 and biomass char derived from pyrolysis of Dunaliella salina: the effects of steam and catalyst on CO and H2 gas production.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chao; Jia, Lishan; Su, Shuai; Tian, Zhongbiao; Song, Qianqian; Fang, Weiping; Chen, Changping; Liu, Guangfa

    2012-04-01

    Biomass char, by-product of Dunaliella salina pyrolysis at a final pyrolysis temperature of 500°C, was used as feedstock material in this study. The reactions of biomass char with CO(2) were performed in a fixed-bed reactor to evaluate the effect of temperature and steam on the CO(2) conversion, CO yield and gas composition. The CO(2) conversion and CO yield without steam and catalyst reached about 61.84% and 0.99mol/(mol CO(2)) at 800°C, respectively. Steam and high temperature led to high CO(2) conversion. A new approach for improving H(2) was carried out by using biomass char and Au/Al(2)O(3) catalyst, which combined steam gasification of biomass char and water gas shift reaction, and the H(2) concentration was 1.8 times higher than without catalyst. The process not only mitigated CO(2) emission and made use of residual biomass char, but also created renewable source.

  6. Recoil separator ERNA: gas target and beam suppression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gialanella, L.; Schürmann, D.; Strieder, F.; Di Leva, A.; De Cesare, N.; D'Onofrio, A.; Imbriani, G.; Klug, J.; Lubritto, C.; Ordine, A.; Roca, V.; Röcken, H.; Rolfs, C.; Rogalla, D.; Romano, M.; Schümann, F.; Terrasi, F.; Trautvetter, H. P.

    2004-04-01

    For improved cross-section measurements of the reaction 12C(α,γ) 16O in inverted kinematics, a recoil separator ERNA is developed at the 4 MV Dynamitron tandem accelerator in Bochum to detect directly the 16O recoils with high efficiency. The 16O recoils are produced by the 12C projectiles in a windowless 4He gas target. We report on the pressure profile of the gas target, the beam suppression by the separator, and the first observation of the 16O recoils at selected energies.

  7. Porous liquids: A promising class of media for gas separation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jinshui; Chai, Song -Hai; Qiao, Zhen -An; Mahurin, Shannon M.; Chen, Jihua; Fang, Youxing; Wan, Shun; Nelson, Kimberly; Zhang, Pengfei; Dai, Sheng

    2014-11-17

    In porous liquids with empty cavities we successfully has been successfully fabricated by surface engineering of hollow structures with suitable corona and canopy species. By taking advantage of the liquid-like polymeric matrices as a separation medium and the empty cavities as gas transport pathway, this unique porous liquid can function as a promising candidate for gas separation. A facile synthetic strategy can be further extended to other types of nanostructure-based porous liquid fabrication, opening up new opportunities for preparation of porous liquids with attractive properties for specific tasks.

  8. Ceramic membranes for gas separation at high temperatures. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.J.

    1994-03-01

    Superior heat, wear, erosion, and corrosion resistance of ceramic materials have motivated the studies of processing-structure-performance interrelationships of ceramic membranes for high temperature gas separations. A literature review on pore transport mechanisms, physical structure of membranes, and module configuration of industrial membrane processes has been made to obtain a better understanding of membrane performance in gas separations. The research experience in decomposing polymer resins for ablative composites has stimulated a research interest in developing a dynamic model for membrane processes, incorporating a temperature effects on material and fluid properties. Brief summaries of the reviewed literature, permeability experiments, and process modeling are presented in this report.

  9. Oil/gas collector/separator for underwater oil leaks

    SciTech Connect

    Henning, C.D.

    1993-05-25

    An oil/gas collector/separator for underwater oil leaks is described comprising: a cylindrical tank; a hollow float member for supporting said tank in a substantially upright position; a skirt assembly secured to said hollow float member and extending in a direction away from said float member opposite said tank; means for removing oil from said tank; and means for removing gas from said tank.

  10. Sulfolane-Cross-Polybenzimidazole Membrane For Gas Separation

    DOEpatents

    Young, Jennifer S.; Long, Gregory S.; Espinoza, Brent F.

    2006-02-14

    A cross-linked, supported polybenzimidazole membrane for gas separation is prepared by reacting polybenzimidazole (PBI) with the sulfone-containing crosslinking agent 3,4-dichloro-tetrahydro-thiophene-1,1-dioxide. The cross-linked reaction product exhibits enhanced gas permeability to hydrogen, carbon dioxide, nitrogen, and methane as compared to the unmodified analog, without significant loss of selectivity, at temperatures from about 20 degrees Celsius to about 400 degrees Celsius.

  11. Separation of Dimethyl Ether from Syn-Gas Components by Poly(dimethylsiloxane) and Poly(4-methyl-1-pentene) Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher J. Orme; Frederick F. Stewart

    2011-05-01

    Permeability and selectivity in gas transport through poly(4-methyl-1-pentene) (TPX) and poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) using variable temperature mixed gas experiments is reported. Selected gases include H2, CO, CH4, CO2, and dimethyl ether (DME). The DME data is the first to be reported through these membranes. In this paper, the chosen polymers reflect both rubbery and crystalline materials. Rubbery polymers tend to be weakly size sieving, which, in this work, has resulted in larger permeabilities, lower separation factors, and lower activation energies of permeation (Ep). Conversely, the crystalline TPX membranes showed much greater sensitivity to penetrant size; although the gas condensability also played a role in transport.

  12. Separation of Carbon Dioxide from Flue Gas Using Ion Pumping

    SciTech Connect

    Aines, R; Bourcier, W L; Johnson, M R

    2006-04-21

    We are developing a new way of separating carbon dioxide from flue gas based on ionic pumping of carbonate ions dissolved in water. Instead of relying on large temperature or pressure changes to remove carbon dioxide from solvent used to absorb it from flue gas, the ion pump increases the concentration of dissolved carbonate ion in solution. This increases the overlying vapor pressure of carbon dioxide gas, which can be removed from the downstream side of the ion pump as a nearly pure gas. This novel approach to increasing the concentration of the extracted gas permits new approaches to treating flue gas. The slightly basic water used as the extraction medium is impervious to trace acid gases that destroy existing solvents, and no pre-separation is necessary. The simple, robust nature of the process lends itself to small separation plants. Although the energy cost of the ion pump is significant, we anticipate that it will be compete favorably with the current 35% energy penalty of chemical stripping systems in use at power plants. There is the distinct possibility that this simple method could be significantly more efficient than existing processes.

  13. Process for separating carbon dioxide from flue gas using sweep-based membrane separation and absorption steps

    DOEpatents

    Wijmans, Johannes G.; Baker, Richard W.; Merkel, Timothy C.

    2012-08-21

    A gas separation process for treating flue gases from combustion processes, and combustion processes including such gas separation. The invention involves routing a first portion of the flue gas stream to be treated to an absorption-based carbon dioxide capture step, while simultaneously flowing a second portion of the flue gas across the feed side of a membrane, flowing a sweep gas stream, usually air, across the permeate side, then passing the permeate/sweep gas to the combustor.

  14. Fluid geochemistry and soil gas fluxes (CO2-CH4-H2S) at a promissory Hot Dry Rock Geothermal System: The Acoculco caldera, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peiffer, L.; Bernard-Romero, R.; Mazot, A.; Taran, Y. A.; Guevara, M.; Santoyo, E.

    2014-09-01

    The Acoculco caldera has been recognized by the Mexican Federal Electricity Company (CFE) as a Hot Dry Rock Geothermal System (HDR) and could be a potential candidate for developing an Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS). Apart from hydrothermally altered rocks, geothermal manifestations within the Acoculco caldera are scarce. Close to ambient temperature bubbling springs and soil degassing are reported inside the caldera while a few springs discharge warm water on the periphery of the caldera. In this study, we infer the origin of fluids and we characterize for the first time the soil degassing dynamic. Chemical and isotopic (δ18O-δD) analyses of spring waters indicate a meteoric origin and the dissolution of CO2 and H2S gases, while gas chemical and isotopic compositions (N2/He, 3He/4He, 13C, 15N) reveal a magmatic contribution with both MORB- and arc-type signatures which could be explained by an extension regime created by local and regional fault systems. Gas geothermometry results are in agreement with temperature measured during well drilling (260 °C-300 °C). Absence of well-developed water reservoir at depth impedes re-equilibration of gases upon surface. A multi-gas flux survey including CO2, CH4 and H2S measurements was performed within the caldera. Using the graphical statistical analysis (GSA) approach, CO2 flux measurements were classified in two populations. Population A, representing 95% of measured fluxes is characterized by low values (mean: 18 g m- 2 day- 1) while the remaining 5% fluxes belonging to Population B are much higher (mean: 5543 g m- 2 day- 1). This low degassing rate probably reflects the low permeability of the system, a consequence of the intense hydrothermal alteration observed in the upper 800 m of volcanic rocks. An attempt to interpret the origin and transport mechanism of these fluxes is proposed by means of flux ratios as well as by numerical modeling. Measurements with CO2/CH4 and CO2/H2S flux ratios similar to mass ratios

  15. Phase Separation in a Polarized Fermi Gas at Zero Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Pilati, S.; Giorgini, S.

    2008-01-25

    We investigate the phase diagram of asymmetric two-component Fermi gases at zero temperature as a function of polarization and interaction strength. The equations of state of the uniform superfluid and normal phase are determined using quantum Monte Carlo simulations. We find three different mixed states, where the superfluid and the normal phase coexist in equilibrium, corresponding to phase separation between (a) the polarized superfluid and the fully polarized normal gas, (b) the polarized superfluid and the partially polarized normal gas, and (c) the unpolarized superfluid and the partially polarized normal gas.

  16. Oxygen-for-Sulfur Switching in the Gas Phase: Reactions of Al and Si Oxyanions with H2S

    SciTech Connect

    Groenewold, Gary Steven; Hodges, Brittany DM; Scott, Jill Rennee; Gianotto, Anita Kay; Appelhans, Anthony David; Kessinger, Glen Frank; Wright, J. B.

    2001-03-01

    Gas-phase Si and Al oxyanions were formed by particle bombardment, isolated by mass, and then reacted with H{sub 2}S in an ion trap secondary ion mass spectrometer (IT-SIMS). The reactions proceeded by different reaction pathways depending on whether the oxyanions were even- or odd-electron species. The radical anion SiO{sub 2}{sm_bullet}{sup -} reacted with H{sub 2}S by abstracting a {sm_bullet}SH radical to form the even-electron SiO{sub 2}SH{sup -}. Once formed, the even electron SiO{sub 2}SH{sup -} reacted with a second H{sub 2}S molecule by O-for-S exchange to form SiOS{sub 2}H{sup -}. The radical anion SiO{sub 3}{sm_bullet}{sup -} abstracted an {sm_bullet}H radical from H{sub 2}S to form even-electron SiO{sub 3}H{sup -}, which then underwent two consecutive O-for-S exchange reactions with H{sub 2}S to form SiO{sub 2}SH{sup -} and SiOS{sub 2}H{sup -}. For the reactions of the even-electron anion AlO{sub 2}{sup -}, the products of two consecutive O-for-S exchange reactions with H{sub 2}S were AlOS{sup -} and AlS{sub 2}{sup -}. The radical abstraction reactions and the O-for-S exchange reactions of SiO3H{sup -}, AlO{sub 2}{sup -}, and AlOS{sup -} were efficient in the 30-50% range. The efficiency of the O-for-S exchange reaction of SiO{sub 2}SH{sup -} (producing SiOS{sub 2}H{sup -}) was substantially less efficient at 8%.

  17. First detection of gas-phase ammonia in a planet-forming disk. NH3, N2H+, and H2O in the disk around TW Hydrae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salinas, Vachail N.; Hogerheijde, Michiel R.; Bergin, Edwin A.; Cleeves, L. Ilsedore; Brinch, Christian; Blake, Geoffrey A.; Lis, Dariusz C.; Melnick, Gary J.; Panić, Olja; Pearson, John C.; Kristensen, Lars; Yıldız, Umut A.; van Dishoeck, Ewine F.

    2016-06-01

    Context. Nitrogen chemistry in protoplanetary disks and the freeze-out on dust particles is key for understanding the formation of nitrogen-bearing species in early solar system analogs. In dense cores, 10% to 20% of the nitrogen reservoir is locked up in ices such as NH3, NH4+ and OCN-. So far, ammonia has not been detected beyond the snowline in protoplanetary disks. Aims: We aim to find gas-phase ammonia in a protoplanetary disk and characterize its abundance with respect to water vapor. Methods: Using HIFI on the Herschel Space Observatory, we detected for the first time the ground-state rotational emission of ortho-NH3 in a protoplanetary disk around TW Hya. We used detailed models of the disk's physical structure and the chemistry of ammonia and water to infer the amounts of gas-phase molecules of these species. We explored two radial distributions (extended across the disk and confined to <60 au like the millimeter-sized grains) and two vertical distributions (near the midplane and at intermediate heights above the midplane, where water is expected to photodesorb off icy grains) to describe the (unknown) location of the molecules. These distributions capture the effects of radial drift and vertical settling of ice-covered grains. Results: The NH310-00 line is detected simultaneously with H2O 110-101 at an antenna temperature of 15.3 mK in the Herschel beam; the same spectrum also contains the N2H+ 6-5 line with a strength of 18.1 mK. We use physical-chemical models to reproduce the fluxes and assume that water and ammonia are cospatial. We infer ammonia gas-phase masses of 0.7-11.0 × 1021 g, depending on the adopted spatial distribution, in line with previous literature estimates. For water, we infer gas-phase masses of 0.2-16.0 × 1022 g, improving upon earlier literature estimates This corresponds to NH3/H2O abundance ratios of 7%-84%, assuming that water and ammonia are co-located. The inferred N2H+ gas mass of 4.9 × 1021 g agrees well with earlier

  18. Comparison of temporal variation in emission intensity of OH(A) in after-glow period of Ar/H2O and He/H2O gas-mixture plasmas in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirafuji, Tatsuru

    2014-10-01

    Previously, we have reported quite long duration (approx. 500 ns) of optical emission intensity of OH(A) in an after glow period of Ar plasma in water. Numerical simulation has revealed that this phenomenon can be explained in terms of production of OH(A) through the reaction of H3O+ and low temperature electrons. We can perform similar plasma processing using He plasma in water with almost the same process performance in the case of decomposition of methylene blue molecules in aqueous solution. Thus, we have expected that the long duration of OH(A) optical emission can be observed also in He plasma in water. However, such long duration of OH(A) optical emission has not been observed in the case of He plasma in water. To understand this difference, we have performed numerical simulation of Ar/H2O and He/H2O plasmas, and discuss differences in major reaction pathways to produce OH(A) in Ar/H2O and He/H2O plasmas. This work has been partly supported by the Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research on Priority Area ``Frontier science of interactions between plasmas and nano-interfaces'' from MEXT, Japan, and a Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (C) from JSPS.

  19. MELCOR-H2

    SciTech Connect

    2009-11-10

    Before this LDRD research, no single tool could simulate a very high temperature reactor (VHTR) that is coupled to a secondary system and the sulfur iodine (SI) thermochemistry. Furthermore, the SI chemistry could only be modeled in steady state, typically via flow sheets. Additionally, the MELCOR nuclear reactor analysis code was suitable only for the modeling of light water reactors, not gas-cooled reactors. We extended MELCOR in order to address the above deficiencies. In particular, we developed three VHTR input models, added generalized, modular secondary system components, developed reactor point kinetics, included transient thermochemistry for the most important cycles [SI and the Westinghouse hybrid sulfur], and developed an interactive graphical user interface for full plant visualization. The new tool is called MELCOR-H2, and it allows users to maximize hydrogen and electrical production, as well as enhance overall plant safety. We conducted validation and verification studies on the key models, and showed that the MELCOR-H2 results typically compared to within less than 5% from experimental data, code-to-code comparisons, and/or analytical solutions.

  20. MELCOR-H2

    2009-11-10

    Before this LDRD research, no single tool could simulate a very high temperature reactor (VHTR) that is coupled to a secondary system and the sulfur iodine (SI) thermochemistry. Furthermore, the SI chemistry could only be modeled in steady state, typically via flow sheets. Additionally, the MELCOR nuclear reactor analysis code was suitable only for the modeling of light water reactors, not gas-cooled reactors. We extended MELCOR in order to address the above deficiencies. In particular,more » we developed three VHTR input models, added generalized, modular secondary system components, developed reactor point kinetics, included transient thermochemistry for the most important cycles [SI and the Westinghouse hybrid sulfur], and developed an interactive graphical user interface for full plant visualization. The new tool is called MELCOR-H2, and it allows users to maximize hydrogen and electrical production, as well as enhance overall plant safety. We conducted validation and verification studies on the key models, and showed that the MELCOR-H2 results typically compared to within less than 5% from experimental data, code-to-code comparisons, and/or analytical solutions.« less

  1. Measurement of H2S in Crude Oil and Crude Oil Headspace Using Multidimensional Gas Chromatography, Deans Switching and Sulfur-selective Detection.

    PubMed

    Heshka, Nicole E; Hager, Darcy B

    2015-01-01

    A method for the analysis of dissolved hydrogen sulfide in crude oil samples is demonstrated using gas chromatography. In order to effectively eliminate interferences, a two dimensional column configuration is used, with a Deans switch employed to transfer hydrogen sulfide from the first to the second column (heart-cutting). Liquid crude samples are first separated on a dimethylpolysiloxane column, and light gases are heart-cut and further separated on a bonded porous layer open tubular (PLOT) column that is able to separate hydrogen sulfide from other light sulfur species. Hydrogen sulfide is then detected with a sulfur chemiluminescence detector, adding an additional layer of selectivity. Following separation and detection of hydrogen sulfide, the system is backflushed to remove the high-boiling hydrocarbons present in the crude samples and to preserve chromatographic integrity. Dissolved hydrogen sulfide has been quantified in liquid samples from 1.1 to 500 ppm, demonstrating wide applicability to a range of samples. The method has also been successfully applied for the analysis of gas samples from crude oil headspace and process gas bags, with measurement from 0.7 to 9,700 ppm hydrogen sulfide. PMID:26709594

  2. Infrared studies of molecular shocks in the supernova remnant HB 21: II. Thermal admixture of shocked H2 gas in the south

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinn, Jong-Ho; Koo, Bon-Chul; Burton, Michael; Lee, Ho-Gyu; Moon, Dae-Sik

    2010-02-01

    We present near- and mid-infrared observations on the shock-cloud interaction region in the southern part of the supernova remnant HB 21, performed with the InfraRed Camera (IRC) aboard AKARI satellite and the Wide InfraRed Camera (WIRC) at the Palomar 5 m telescope. The IRC 4 μm (N4), 7 μm (S7), and 11 μm (S11) band images and the WIRC Hυ=1→0S(1) 2.12 μm image show similar diffuse features, around a shocked CO cloud. We analyzed the emission through comparison with the H2 line emission of several shock models. The IRC colors are well explained by the thermal admixture model of H2 gas - whose infinitesimal H2 column density has a power-law relation with the temperature T, dN˜T-dT - with n(H)˜3.9×104cm-3,b˜4.2, and N(H;T>100K)˜2.8×1021cm-2. We interpreted these parameters with several different pictures of the shock-cloud interactions - multiple planar C-shocks, bow shocks, and shocked clumps - and discussed their weaknesses and strengths. The observed Hυ=1→0S(1) intensity is four times greater than the prediction from the power-law admixture model, the same tendency as found in the northern part of HB 21 (Paper I). We also explored the limitation of the thermal admixture model with respect to the derived model parameters.

  3. The corrosion inhibition and gas evolution studies of some surfactants and citric acid on lead alloy in 12.5 M H2SO4 solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tizpar, A.; Ghasemi, Z.

    2006-10-01

    The inhibition action of the citric acid and three surfactants: sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), t-octyl phenoxy polyethoxyethanol (Triton X-100), sodium dodecyl benzene sulphonate (SDBS) on the corrosion behavior and gas evolution of Pb Sb As Se was investigated in 12.5 M H2SO4 solution with linear sweep polarization, cyclic voltammetry and weight loss measurements methods. The results drawn from different techniques are comparable. It was found that these surfactants and citric acid act as good inhibitors for the corrosion of lead alloy in H2SO4 solution. SDS inhibited most effectively the lead alloy corrosion among the three surfactants and citric acid. The inhibition efficiency for the inhibitors decreases in the order: SDS > SDBS > Triton X-100 > citric acid > blank. The inhibition efficiency increases with rising of the inhibitor concentration. In this work, the effect of the inhibitors on hydrogen and oxygen evolution was studied. In addition, it was found that the adsorption of used inhibitors on lead alloy surface follows Langmuir isotherm.

  4. Measurements of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) using PTR-MS: calibration, humidity dependence, inter-comparison and results from field studies in an oil and gas production region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, R.; Warneke, C.; Graus, M.; Field, R.; Geiger, F.; Veres, P. R.; Soltis, J.; Li, S.-M.; Murphy, S. M.; Sweeney, C.; Pétron, G.; Roberts, J. M.; de Gouw, J.

    2014-10-01

    Natural gas production is associated with emissions of several trace gases, some of them classified as air toxics. While volatile organic compounds (VOCs) have received much attention, hydrogen sulfide (H2S) can also be of concern due to the known health impacts of exposure to this hazardous air pollutant. Here, we present quantitative, fast time-response measurements of H2S using proton-transfer-reaction mass-spectrometry (PTR-MS) instruments. An ultra-light-weight PTR-MS (ULW-PTR-MS) in a mobile laboratory was operated for measurements of VOCs and H2S in a gas and oil field during the Uintah Basin Winter Ozone Study (UBWOS) 2012 campaign. Measurements of VOCs and H2S by a PTR-MS were also made at the Horse Pool ground site in the Uintah Basin during UBWOS 2013. The H2S measurement by PTR-MS is strongly humidity dependent because the proton affinity of H2S is only slightly higher than that of water. The H2S sensitivity of PTR-MS ranged between 0.6-1.4 ncps ppbv-1 during UBWOS 2013. We compare the humidity dependence determined in the laboratory with in-field calibrations and determine the H2S mixing ratios for the mobile and ground measurements. The PTR-MS measurements at Horse Pool are evaluated by comparison with simultaneous H2S measurements using a PTR time-of-flight MS (PTR-ToF-MS) and a Picarro cavity ring down spectroscopy (CRDS) instrument for H2S / CH4. On average 0.6 ± 0.3 ppbv H2S was present at Horse Pool during UBWOS 2013. The correlation between H2S and methane enhancements suggests that the source of H2S is associated with oil and gas extraction in the basin. Significant H2S mixing ratios of up to 9 ppmv downwind of storage tanks were observed during the mobile measurements. This study suggests that H2S emissions associated with oil and gas production can lead to short-term high levels close to point sources, and elevated background levels away from those sources. In addition, our work has demonstrated that PTR-MS can make reliable measurements of

  5. Measurements of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) using PTR-MS: calibration, humidity dependence, inter-comparison and results from field studies in an oil and gas production region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, R.; Warneke, C.; Graus, M.; Field, R.; Geiger, F.; Veres, P. R.; Soltis, J.; Li, S.-M.; Murphy, S. M.; Sweeney, C.; Pétron, G.; Roberts, J. M.; de Gouw, J.

    2014-06-01

    Natural gas production is associated with emissions of several trace gases, some of them classified as air toxics. While volatile organic compounds (VOCs) have received much attention, hydrogen sulfide (H2S) can also be of concern due to the known health impacts of exposure to this hazardous air pollutant. Here, we present quantitative, fast time-response measurements of H2S using Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass-Spectrometry (PTR-MS) instruments. An Ultra-Light-Weight PTR-MS (ULW-PTR-MS) in a mobile laboratory was operated for measurements of VOCs and H2S in a gas and oil field during the Uintah Basin Winter Ozone Study (UBWOS) 2012 campaign. Measurements of VOCs and H2S by a PTR-MS were also made at the Horse Pool ground site in the Uintah Basin during UBWOS 2013. The H2S measurement by PTR-MS is strongly humidity dependent because the proton affinity of H2S is only slightly higher than that of water. The H2S sensitivity of PTR-MS ranged between 0.6-1.4 ncps ppbv-1 (normalized counts per second/parts per billion by volume) during UBWOS 2013. We compare the humidity dependence determined in the laboratory with in-field calibrations and determine the H2S mixing ratios for the mobile and ground measurements. The PTR-MS measurements at Horse Pool are evaluated by comparison with simultaneous H2S measurements using a PTR Time-of-Flight MS (PTR-ToF-MS) and a Picarro cavity ring down spectroscopy (CRDS) instrument for H2S/CH4. On average 0.6 ± 0.3 ppbv H2S was present at Horse Pool during UBWOS 2013. The correlation between H2S and methane enhancements suggests that the source of H2S is associated with oil and gas extraction in the basin. Significant H2S mixing ratios of up to 9 ppmv downwind of storage tanks were observed during the mobile measurements. This study suggests that H2S emissions associated with oil and gas production can lead to short-term high levels close to point sources, and elevated background levels away from those sources. In addition, our work has

  6. Gas cell based on optical contacting for fundamental spectroscopy studies with initial reference absorption spectrum of H2O vapor at 1723 K and 0.0235 bar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melin, Scott T.; Sanders, Scott T.

    2016-09-01

    A gas cell, using optically contacted sapphire windows to form a hot vapor seal, has been created for high temperature fundamental spectroscopy studies. It is designed to operate at temperatures from 280-2273 K and pressures from vacuum to 1.3 bar. Using the cell in conjunction with an external cavity diode laser spectrometer, a reference H2O vapor absorption spectrum at P=0.0235±0.0036 bar and T=1723±6 K was measured with 0.0001 cm-1 resolution over the 7326-7598 cm-1 range. Comparison of the measured spectrum to simulations reveals errors in both the HITEMP and BT2 databases. This work establishes heated static cell capabilities at temperatures well above the typical limit of approximately 1300 K set by quartz material properties. This paper addresses the design of the cell as well as the cell's limitations.

  7. Energy-filtered environmental transmission electron microscopy for the assessment of solid-gas reactions at elevated temperature: NiO/YSZ-H2 as a case study.

    PubMed

    Jeangros, Q; Hansen, T W; Wagner, J B; Dunin-Borkowski, R E; Hébert, C; Van Herle, J; Hessler-Wyser, A

    2016-10-01

    A novel approach, which is based on the analysis of sequences of images recorded using energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy and can be used to assess the reaction of a solid with a gas at elevated temperature, is illustrated for the reduction of a NiO/ceramic solid oxide fuel cell anode in 1.3mbar of H2. Three-window elemental maps and jump-ratio images of the O K edge and total inelastic mean free path images are recorded as a function of temperature and used to provide local and quantitative information about the reaction kinetics and the volume changes that result from the reaction. Under certain assumptions, the speed of progression of the reaction front in all three dimensions is obtained, thereby providing a three-dimensional understanding of the reaction.

  8. Permeance of H2 through porous graphene from molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hongjun; Dai, Sheng; Jiang, De-en

    2013-12-01

    A recent experiment (Koenig et al., 2012 [15]) demonstrated the capability of porous graphene as one-atom-thin membrane to separate gases by molecular sieving. A quantitative connection between the measured leak rate and the simulated gas permeance has yet to be established. Using H2 as a model gas, here we determine its permeance through porous graphene from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Trajectories are used to directly obtain H2 flux, pressure drop across the graphene membrane, and subsequently, H2 permeance. The permeance is determined to be on the order of 105 GPU (gas permeance unit) for pressure driving forces ranging from 2 to 163 atm. By relating to the experimental leak rate, we then use the permeation data to estimate the pore density in the experimentally created porous graphene.

  9. Computational investigation of thermal gas separation for CO2 capture.

    SciTech Connect

    Gallis, Michail A.; Bryan, Charles R.; Brady, Patrick Vane; Torczynski, John Robert; Brooks, Carlton, F.

    2009-09-01

    This report summarizes the work completed under the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project 09-1351, 'Computational Investigation of Thermal Gas Separation for CO{sub 2} Capture'. Thermal gas separation for a binary mixture of carbon dioxide and nitrogen is investigated using the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method of molecular gas dynamics. Molecular models for nitrogen and carbon dioxide are developed, implemented, compared to theoretical results, and compared to several experimental thermophysical properties. The molecular models include three translational modes, two fully excited rotational modes, and vibrational modes, whose degree of excitation depends on the temperature. Nitrogen has one vibrational mode, and carbon dioxide has four vibrational modes (two of which are degenerate). These models are used to perform a parameter study for mixtures of carbon dioxide and nitrogen confined between parallel walls over realistic ranges of gas temperatures and nominal concentrations of carbon dioxide. The degree of thermal separation predicted by DSMC is slightly higher than experimental values and is sensitive to the details of the molecular models.

  10. Gas adsorption and gas mixture separations using mixed-ligand MOF material

    DOEpatents

    Hupp, Joseph T.; Mulfort, Karen L.; Snurr, Randall Q.; Bae, Youn-Sang

    2011-01-04

    A method of separating a mixture of carbon dioxiode and hydrocarbon gas using a mixed-ligand, metal-organic framework (MOF) material having metal ions coordinated to carboxylate ligands and pyridyl ligands.

  11. Sulfur isotope fractionation during oxidation of sulfur dioxide: gas-phase oxidation by OH radicals and aqueous oxidation by H2O2, O3 and iron catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, E.; Sinha, B.; Hoppe, P.; Crowley, J. N.; Ono, S.; Foley, S.

    2012-01-01

    The oxidation of SO2 to sulfate is a key reaction in determining the role of sulfate in the environment through its effect on aerosol size distribution and composition. Sulfur isotope analysis has been used to investigate sources and chemical processes of sulfur dioxide and sulfate in the atmosphere, however interpretation of measured sulfur isotope ratios is challenging due to a lack of reliable information on the isotopic fractionation involved in major transformation pathways. This paper presents laboratory measurements of the fractionation factors for the major atmospheric oxidation reactions for SO2: Gas-phase oxidation by OH radicals, and aqueous oxidation by H2O2, O3 and a radical chain reaction initiated by iron. The measured fractionation factor for 34S/32S during the gas-phase reaction is αOH = (1.0089±0.0007)-((4±5)×10-5) T(°C). The measured fractionation factor for 34S/32S during aqueous oxidation by H2O2 or O3 is αaq = (1.0167±0.0019)-((8.7±3.5) ×10-5)T(°C). The observed fractionation during oxidation by H2O2 and O3 appeared to be controlled primarily by protonation and acid-base equilibria of S(IV) in solution, which is the reason that there is no significant difference between the fractionation produced by the two oxidants within the experimental error. The isotopic fractionation factor from a radical chain reaction in solution catalysed by iron is αFe = (0.9894±0.0043) at 19 °C for 34S/32S. Fractionation was mass-dependent with regards to 33S/32S for all the reactions investigated. The radical chain reaction mechanism was the only measured reaction that had a faster rate for the light isotopes. The results presented in this study will be particularly useful to determine the importance of the transition metal-catalysed oxidation pathway compared to other oxidation pathways, but other main oxidation pathways can not be distinguished based on stable sulfur isotope measurements alone.

  12. Dynamic Absorption Model for Off-Gas Separation

    SciTech Connect

    Veronica J. Rutledge

    2011-07-01

    Modeling and simulations will aid in the future design of U.S. advanced reprocessing plants for the recovery and recycle of actinides in used nuclear fuel. The specific fuel cycle separation process discussed in this report is the off-gas treatment system. The off-gas separation consists of a series of scrubbers and adsorption beds to capture constituents of interest. Dynamic models are being developed to simulate each unit operation involved so each unit operation can be used as a stand-alone model and in series with multiple others. Currently, a rate based, dynamic absorption model is being developed in gPROMS software. Inputs include liquid and gas stream constituents, column properties, liquid and gas phase reactions, number of stages, and inlet conditions. It simulates multiple component absorption with countercurrent flow and accounts for absorption by mass transfer and chemical reaction. The assumption of each stage being a discrete well-mixed entity was made. Therefore, the model is solved stagewise. The simulation outputs component concentrations in both phases as a function of time from which the rate of absorption is determined. Temperature of both phases is output as a function of time also. The model will be used able to be used as a standalone model in addition to in series with other off-gas separation unit operations. The current model is being generated based on NOx absorption; however, a future goal is to develop a CO2 specific model. The model will have the capability to be modified for additional absorption systems. The off-gas models, both adsorption and absorption, will be made available via the server or web for evaluation by customers.

  13. Thermophoretic separation of aerosol particles from a sampled gas stream

    DOEpatents

    Postma, A.K.

    1984-09-07

    This disclosure relates to separation of aerosol particles from gas samples withdrawn from within a contained atmosphere, such as containment vessels for nuclear reactors or other process equipment where remote gaseous sampling is required. It is specifically directed to separation of dense aerosols including particles of any size and at high mass loadings and high corrosivity. The United States Government has rights in this invention pursuant to Contract DE-AC06-76FF02170 between the US Department of Energy and Westinghouse Electric Corporation.

  14. Synthesis and gas separation studies of substituted polyaniline membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Su, T.M.; Kwon, A.H.; Lew, B.M.; Kaner, R.B.

    1996-10-01

    Polyaniline is a conjugated polymer that can be reversibly doped and undoped using common acids and bases. In the doped state, polyaniline is thermally and environmentally stable and electrically conducting. Polyaniline has shown promise as a gas separation membrane, however, it is limited by poor thermal processability and solvent solubility. The solvent solubility is increased for ethyl and methoxy substituted polyaniline. The smooth free-standing membranes cast from these substituted polymers exhibit an increase in gas permeability compared to the base form of polyaniline, but a decrease in selectivity.

  15. ANALYTICAL METHOD FOR MEASURING TOTAL PROTIUM AND TOTAL DEUTERIUM IN A GAS MIXTURE CONTAINING H2, D2,AND HD VIA GAS CHAROMATOGRAPHY

    SciTech Connect

    Sessions, H

    2007-08-07

    The most common analytical method of identifying and quantifying non-radioactive isotopic species of hydrogen is mass spectrometry. A low mass, high resolution mass spectrometer with adequate sensitivity and stability to identify and quantify hydrogen isotopes in the low ppm range is an expensive, complex instrument. A new analytical technique has been developed that measures both total protium (H) and total deuterium (D) in a gas mixture containing H{sub 2}, D{sub 2}, and HD using an inexpensive micro gas chromatograph (GC) with two molecular sieve columns. One column uses D{sub 2} as the carrier gas and the other uses H{sub 2} as the carrier gas. Laboratory tests have shown that when used in this configuration the GC can measure both total protium and total deuterium each with a detection and quantification limit of less than 20 ppm.

  16. Polyimides and their derivatives for gas separation applications

    SciTech Connect

    J. R. Klaehn; C.J. Orme; T.J. Luther; E.S. Peterson; Jagoda M. Urban-Klaehn

    2007-07-01

    High performance polymers are of interest for high temperature gas separations, especially for the sequestration of carbon dioxide. A new family of high performance imide polymers (VTEC, RBI Inc.) has been identified as a material class containing the potential building blocks needed for a successful membrane capture material. The VTEC polyimides possess the desired thermal properties (up to 500 °C) and are robust and flexible even after multiple thermal cycles (up to 400 °C). A critical variable when working with the glassy polymers is their moisture content. It has been found that water entrapped within the polymer matrix (either as hydration molecules attached to salts in the polymer, left over solvent, or physisorbed) can also cause the polymer to change dramatically. Additionally presence of molecular water in the polymer’s void volume has been validated through Positron Annihilation Lifetime (PAL) spectroscopy. In this presentation, polymer characterization and gas-separation testing results will be discussed.

  17. Gas separation device based on electrical swing adsorption

    DOEpatents

    Judkins, Roddie R.; Burchell, Timothy D.

    1999-10-26

    A method and apparatus for separating one constituent, especially carbon dioxide, from a fluid mixture, such as natural gas. The fluid mixture flows through an adsorbent member having an affinity for molecules of the one constituent, the molecules being adsorbed on the adsorbent member. A voltage is applied to the adsorbent member, the voltage imparting a current flow which causes the molecules of the one constituent to be desorbed from the adsorbent member.

  18. Carbon-fiber composite molecular sieves for gas separation

    SciTech Connect

    Jagtoyen, M.; Derbyshire, F.; Kimber, G.; Fei, Y.Q.

    1995-08-01

    The progress of research in the development of novel, rigid, monolithic adsorbent carbon fiber composites is described. Carbon fiber composites are produced at ORNL and activated at the CAER using steam or CO{sub 2} under different conditions, with the aims of producing a uniform degree of activation through the material, and of closely controlling pore structure and adsorptive properties The principal focus of the work to date has been to produce materials with narrow porosity for use in gas separations.

  19. The use of gas separation membranes for pollution control

    SciTech Connect

    Logsdon, B.W.; Stull, D.; Pellegrino, J.

    1993-04-01

    Rocky Flats is considering the use of a fluidized bed oxidation unit (FBU) for the destruction of mixed waste. Public concerns about the health effects of such destruction have been intense. In order to allay such concerns and minimize the possible health impacts of the proposed mixed waste destruction, RFP has been investigating novel methods of air pollution control. Among the most promising of these techniques is the use of gas separation membranes, which is described in this report.

  20. Effect of gas properties on the dynamics of the electrical slope asymmetry effect in capacitive plasmas: comparison of Ar, H2 and CF4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruneau, B.; Lafleur, T.; Gans, T.; O'Connell, D.; Greb, A.; Korolov, I.; Derzsi, A.; Donkó, Z.; Brandt, S.; Schüngel, E.; Schulze, J.; Diomede, P.; Economou, D. J.; Longo, S.; Johnson, E.; Booth, J.-P.

    2016-02-01

    Tailored voltage excitation waveforms provide an efficient control of the ion energy (through the electrical asymmetry effect) in capacitive plasmas by varying the ‘amplitude’ asymmetry of the waveform. In this work, the effect of a ‘slope’ asymmetry of the waveform is investigated by using sawtooth-like waveforms, through which the sheath dynamic can be manipulated. A remarkably different discharge dynamic is found for Ar, H2, and CF4 gases, which is explained by the different dominant electron heating mechanisms and plasma chemistries. In comparison to Argon we find that the electrical asymmetry can even be reversed by using an electronegative gas such as CF4. Phase resolved optical emission spectroscopy measurements, probing the spatiotemporal distribution of the excitation rate show excellent agreement with the results of particle-in-cell simulations, confirming the high degree of correlation between the excitation rates with the dominant heating mechanisms in the various gases. It is shown that, depending on the gas used, sawtooth-like voltage waveforms may cause a strong asymmetry.

  1. Investigation of Cross-Linked and Additive Containing Polymer Materials for Membranes with Improved Performance in Pervaporation and Gas Separation

    PubMed Central

    Hunger, Katharina; Schmeling, Nadine; Jeazet, Harold B. Tanh; Janiak, Christoph; Staudt, Claudia; Kleinermanns, Karl

    2012-01-01

    Pervaporation and gas separation performances of polymer membranes can be improved by crosslinking or addition of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). Crosslinked copolyimide membranes show higher plasticization resistance and no significant loss in selectivity compared to non-crosslinked membranes when exposed to mixtures of CO2/CH4 or toluene/cyclohexane. Covalently crosslinked membranes reveal better separation performances than ionically crosslinked systems. Covalent interlacing with 3-hydroxypropyldimethylmaleimide as photocrosslinker can be investigated in situ in solution as well as in films, using transient UV/Vis and FTIR spectroscopy. The photocrosslinking yield can be determined from the FTIR-spectra. It is restricted by the stiffness of the copolyimide backbone, which inhibits the photoreaction due to spatial separation of the crosslinker side chains. Mixed-matrix membranes (MMMs) with MOFs as additives (fillers) have increased permeabilities and often also selectivities compared to the pure polymer. Incorporation of MOFs into polysulfone and Matrimid® polymers for MMMs gives defect-free membranes with performances similar to the best polymer membranes for gas mixtures, such as O2/N2 H2/CH4, CO2/CH4, H2/CO2, CH4/N2 and CO2/N2 (preferentially permeating gas is named first). The MOF porosity, its particle size and content in the MMM are factors to influence the permeability and the separation performance of the membranes. PMID:24958427

  2. Use of exhaust gas as sweep flow to enhance air separation membrane performance

    DOEpatents

    Dutart, Charles H.; Choi, Cathy Y.

    2003-01-01

    An intake air separation system for an internal combustion engine is provided with purge gas or sweep flow on the permeate side of separation membranes in the air separation device. Exhaust gas from the engine is used as a purge gas flow, to increase oxygen flux in the separation device without increasing the nitrogen flux.

  3. iCONVERT: an integrated device for the UV-assisted determination of H2S via mid-infrared gas sensors.

    PubMed

    Petruci, João Flavio da Silveira; Cardoso, Arnaldo Alves; Wilk, Andreas; Kokoric, Vjekoslav; Mizaikoff, Boris

    2015-10-01

    In this technical note, we describe an integrated device platform for performing in-flow gaseous conversion reactions based on ultraviolet (UV) irradiation. The system combines, using the same footprint, an integrated UV-conversion device (iCONVERT), a preconcentrator unit (iPRECON), and a new generation of mid-infrared (MIR) gas cell simultaneously serving as a photon conduit, i.e., so-called substrate-integrated hollow waveguide (iHWG) optically coupled to a compact Fourier transform-infrared (FT-IR) spectrometer. The iCONVERT is assembled from two blocks of aluminum (dimensions, 75 mm × 50 mm × 40 mm; L × W × D) containing 4 miniaturized UV-lamps (47mm × 6 mm × 47 mm each). For the present study, the iPRECON-iCONVERT-iHWG sensing platform has specifically been tailored to the determination of H2S in gaseous samples. Thereby, the quantitative UV-assisted conversion of the rather weak IR-absorber H2S into the more pronouncedly responding SO2 is used for hydrogen sulfide detection. A linear calibration model was established in the range of 7.5 to 100 ppmv achieving a limit of detection at 1.5 ppmv using 10 min of sample preconcentration (onto Molecular Sieve 5A) at a flow rate of 200 mL min(-1). When compared to a conventional UV-conversion system, the iCONVERT revealed similar performance. Considering the potential for system miniaturization using, e.g., dedicated quantum cascade lasers (QCL) in lieu of the FT-IR spectrometer, the developed sensing platform may be further evolved into a hand-held device.

  4. Effect of precursor and preparation method on manganese based activated carbon sorbents for removing H2S from hot coal gas.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiancheng; Qiu, Biao; Han, Lina; Feng, Gang; Hu, Yongfeng; Chang, Liping; Bao, Weiren

    2012-04-30

    Activated carbon (AC) supported manganese oxide sorbents were prepared by the supercritical water impregnation (SCWI) using two different precursor of Mn(NO(3))(2) (SCW(N)) and Mn(Ac)(2)·4H(2)O (SCW(A)). Their capacities of removing H(2)S from coal gas were evaluated and compared to the sorbents prepared by the pore volume impregnation (PVI) method. The structure and composition of different sorbents were characterized by XRD, SEM, TEM, XPS and XANES techniques. It is found that the precursor of active component plays the crucial role and SCW(N) sorbents show much better sulfidation performance than the SCW(A) sorbents. This is because the Mn(3)O(4) active phase of the SCW(N) sorbents are well dispersed on the AC support, while the Mn(2)SiO(4)-like species in the SCW(A) sorbent can be formed and seriously aggregated. The SCW(N) sorbents with 2.80% and 5.60% manganese are favorable for the sulfidation reaction, since the Mn species are better dispersed on the SCW(N) sorbents than those on the PV(N) sorbents and results in the better sulfidation performance of the SCW(N) sorbents. As the Mn content increases to 11.20%, the metal oxide particles on AC supports aggregate seriously, which leads to poorer sulfidation performance of the SCW(N)11.20% sorbents than that of the PV(N)11.20% sorbents. PMID:22341981

  5. Global OZone Chemistry And Related trace gas Data records for the Stratosphere (GOZCARDS): methodology and sample results with a focus on HCl, H2O, and O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Froidevaux, L.; Anderson, J.; Wang, H.-J.; Fuller, R. A.; Schwartz, M. J.; Santee, M. L.; Livesey, N. J.; Pumphrey, H. C.; Bernath, P. F.; Russell, J. M., III; McCormick, M. P.

    2015-09-01

    We describe the publicly available data from the Global OZone Chemistry And Related trace gas Data records for the Stratosphere (GOZCARDS) project and provide some results, with a focus on hydrogen chloride (HCl), water vapor (H2O), and ozone (O3). This data set is a global long-term stratospheric Earth system data record, consisting of monthly zonal mean time series starting as early as 1979. The data records are based on high-quality measurements from several NASA satellite instruments and the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE-FTS) on SCISAT. We examine consistency aspects between the various data sets. To merge ozone records, the time series are debiased relative to SAGE II (Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiments) values by calculating average offsets versus SAGE II during measurement overlap periods, whereas for other species the merging derives from an averaging procedure during overlap periods. The GOZCARDS files contain mixing ratios on a common pressure-latitude grid, as well as standard errors and other diagnostics; we also present estimates of systematic uncertainties in the merged products. Monthly mean temperatures for GOZCARDS were also produced, based directly on data from the Modern-Era Retrospective analysis for Research and Applications. The GOZCARDS HCl merged product comes from the Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE), ACE-FTS and lower-stratospheric Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) data. After a rapid rise in upper-stratospheric HCl in the early 1990s, the rate of decrease in this region for 1997-2010 was between 0.4 and 0.7 % yr-1. On 6-8-year timescales, the rate of decrease peaked in 2004-2005 at about 1 % yr-1, and it has since levelled off, at ~ 0.5 % yr-1. With a delay of 6-7 years, these changes roughly follow total surface chlorine, whose behavior versus time arises from inhomogeneous changes in the source gases. Since the late 1990s, HCl decreases in the lower stratosphere have occurred with

  6. Influence of the source gas ratio on the hydrogen and deuterium content of a-C:H and a-C:D films: Plasma-enhanced CVD with CH4/H2, CH4/D2, CD4/H2 and CD4/D2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozeki, K.; Sekiba, D.; Suzuki, T.; Kanda, K.; Niibe, M.; Hirakuri, K. K.; Masuzawa, T.

    2013-01-01

    Amorphous hydrogenated carbon (a-C:H) and amorphous deuterated carbon (a-C:D) films were prepared using plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) from CD4, H2, CD4 and D2 source gases. Fourteen different samples were prepared by changing the source gas ratios of CH4/H2, CH4/D2, CD4/H2, and CD4/D2. The concentrations of hydrogen (H) and deuterium (D) relative to carbon (C) in the films were determined by elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA) and Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS). The sp2/(sp2 + sp3) ratios of the films were analyzed by near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) measurements. Hardness and mass density of the films were measured using a nanoindenter and X-ray reflectivity (XRR), respectively. For all combinations of source gas, the H and D concentrations varied by only 4.0 at.%. For the CH4/D2 source gas, the D concentration in the film increased from 0 at.% with the D2/(CH4 + D2) source gas combination to 11.2 at.% for the 80% D2/(CH4 + D2) source gas combination. The increase in D concentration exceeded the increase in total H and D concentration (3.4 at.%). For CH4/D2 source gas, the H concentration decreased as the D concentration increased. For the CD4/H2 source gas, we observed the opposite tendency. Additionally, an isotope effect between the a-C:H films and the a-C:D films was observed, with preferential incorporation of H over D. From the NEXAFS measurements, the sp2/(sp2 + sp3) ratios in all of the samples were between 38.8% and 40.8%. A correlation between the sp2/(sp2 + sp3) ratio and the H2 or D2 gas source ratio was not observed. The hardness and density of the films decreased when the H2 or D2 source gas ratio increased. Even though the H concentration in the a-C:H films was higher than the D concentration in the a-C:D films, the a-C:D films had lower hardness and mass density values. These findings suggest that information concerning the voids, nanostructures, sp2/sp3 ratios and H concentrations of

  7. Separation of CO2 from flue gas using electrochemical cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pennline, H.W; Granite, E.J.; Luebke, D.R; Kitchin, J.R; Landon, J.; Weiland, L.M.

    2010-06-01

    ABSTRACT Past research with high temperature molten carbonate electrochemical cells has shown that carbon dioxide can be separated from flue gas streams produced by pulverized coal combustion for power generation, However, the presence of trace contaminants, i.e" sulfur dioxide and nitric oxides, will impact the electrolyte within the cell. If a lower temperature cell could be devised that would utilize the benefits of commercially-available, upstream desulfurization and denitrification in the power plant, then this CO2 separation technique can approach more viability in the carbon sequestration area, Recent work has led to the assembly and successful operation of a low temperature electrochemical cell. In the proof-of-concept testing with this cell, an anion exchange membrane was sandwiched between gas-diffusion electrodes consisting of nickel-based anode electrocatalysts on carbon paper. When a potential was applied across the cell and a mixture of oxygen and carbon dioxide was flowed over the wetted electrolyte on the cathode side, a stream of CO2 to O2 was produced on the anode side, suggesting that carbonate/ bicarbonate ions are the CO2 carrier in the membrane. Since a mixture of CO 2 and 02 is produced, the possibility exists to use this stream in oxy-firing of additional fuel. From this research, a novel concept for efficiently producing a carbon dioxide rich effiuent from combustion of a fossil fuel was proposed. Carbon dioxide and oxygen are captured from the flue gas of a fossilfuel combustor by one or more electrochemical cells or cell stacks. The separated stream is then transferred to an oxy-fired combustor which uses the gas stream for ancillary combustion, ultimately resulting in an effluent rich in carbon dioxide, A portion of the resulting flow produced by the oxy-fired combustor may be continuously recycled back into the oxy-fired combustor for temperature control and an optimal carbon dioxide rich effluent.

  8. Separation of CO2 from flue gas using electrochemical cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pennline HW, Granite EJ, Luebke DR,

    2010-06-01

    Past research with high temperature molten carbonate electrochemical cells has shown that carbon dioxide can be separated from flue gas streams produced by pulverized coal combustion for power generation. However, the presence of trace contaminants, i.e., sulfur dioxide and nitric oxides, will impact the electrolyte within the cell. If a lower temperature cell could be devised that would utilize the benefits of commercially-available, upstream desulfurization and denitrification in the power plant, then this CO2 separation technique can approach more viability in the carbon sequestration area. Recent work has led to the assembly and successful operation of a low temperature electrochemical cell. In the proof-of-concept testing with this cell, an anion exchange membrane was sandwiched between gas-diffusion electrodes consisting of nickel-based anode electrocatalysts on carbon paper. When a potential was applied across the cell and a mixture of oxygen and carbon dioxide was flowed over the wetted electrolyte on the cathode side, a stream of CO2 to O2 was produced on the anode side, suggesting that carbonate/ bicarbonate ions are the CO2 carrier in the membrane. Since a mixture of CO2 and O2 is produced, the possibility exists to use this stream in oxy-firing of additional fuel. From this research, a novel concept for efficiently producing a carbon dioxide rich effluent from combustion of a fossil fuel was proposed. Carbon dioxide and oxygen are captured from the flue gas of a fossilfuel combustor by one or more electrochemical cells or cell stacks. The separated stream is then transferred to an oxy-fired combustor which uses the gas stream for ancillary combustion, ultimately resulting in an effluent rich in carbon dioxide. A portion of the resulting flow produced by the oxy-fired combustor may be continuously recycled back into the oxy-fired combustor for temperature control and an optimal carbon dioxide rich effluent

  9. Separation of flue-gas scrubber sludge into marketable products

    SciTech Connect

    Kawatra, S.K.; Eisele, T.C.

    1997-08-31

    A tremendous amount of wet flue-gas desulfurization scrubber sludge (estimated 20 million metric tons per year in the US) is currently being landfilled at a huge cost to utility companies. Scrubber sludge is the solid precipitate produced during desulfurization of flue-gas from burning high sulfur coal. The amount of this sludge is expected to increase in the near future due to ever increasing governmental regulation concerning the amount of sulfur emissions. Scrubber sludge is a fine, grey colored powder that contains calcium sulfite hemihydrate (CaSO{sub 3} {center_dot} 1/2H{sub 2}), calcium sulfate dihydrate (CaSO{sub 4} {center_dot} 2H{sub 2}O), limestone (CaCO{sub 3}), silicates, and iron oxides. This material can continue to be landfilled at a steadily increasing cost, or an alternative for utilizing this material can be developed. This study explores the characteristics of a naturally oxidized wet flue-gas desulfurization scrubber sludge and uses these characteristics to develop alternatives for recycling this material. In order for scrubber sludge to be used as a feed material for various markets, it was necessary to process it to meet the specifications of these markets. A physical separation process was therefore needed to separate the components of this sludge into useful products at a low cost. There are several physical separation techniques available to separate fine particulates. These techniques can be divided into four major groups: magnetic separation, electrostatic separation, physico-chemical separation, and density-based separation. The properties of this material indicated that two methods of separation were feasible: water-only cycloning (density-based separation), and froth flotation (physico-chemical separation). These processes could be used either separately, or in combination. The goal of this study was to reduce the limestone impurity in this scrubber sludge from 5.6% by weight to below 2.0% by weight. The resulting clean calcium

  10. Bendable Zeolite Membranes: Synthesis and Improved Gas Separation Performance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bo; Ho, W S Winston; Figueroa, Jose D; Dutta, Prabir K

    2015-06-23

    Separation and sequestration of CO2 emitted from fossil energy fueled electric generating units and industrial facilities will help in reducing anthropogenic CO2, thereby mitigating its adverse climate change effects. Membrane-based gas separation has the potential to meet the technical challenges of CO2 separation if high selectivity and permeance with low costs for large-scale manufacture are realized. Inorganic zeolite membranes in principle can have selectivity and permeance considerably higher than polymers. This paper presents a strategy for zeolite growth within the pores of a polymer support, with crystallization time of an hour. With a thin coating of 200-300 nm polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) on the zeolite-polymer composite, transport data for CO2/N2 separation indicate separation factors of 35-45, with CO2 permeance between 1600 and 2200 GPU (1 GPU = 3.35 × 10(-10) mol/(m(2) s Pa)) using dry synthetic mixtures of CO2 and N2 at 25 °C. The synthesis process results in membranes that are highly reproducible toward transport measurements and exhibit long-term stability (3 days). Most importantly, these membranes because of the zeolite growth within the polymer support, as contrasted to conventional zeolite growth on top of a support, are mechanically flexible.

  11. Pressure swing permeation: Novel process for gas separation by membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, X.; Pan, C.Y.; Ivory, J.

    2000-04-01

    A novel process for gas separation, called pressure swing permeation, was investigated to elevate the relatively low permeate pressure by pressurization with high-pressure feed gas, thereby reducing or eliminating additional permeate compression costs where a pressurized permeate is required. This process uses two or more membrane modules and operates in a cyclic fashion, with each module repeatedly undergoing the sequential steps of feed admission and permeation, residual removal, permeate reception, permeate pressurization, and product withdrawal. The unsteady-state permeation associated with pressure swing permeation was studied parametrically, and a bench-scale unit compromising two hollow-fiber membrane modules in parallel was tested for H{sub 2}/N{sub 2} separation to demonstrate the effectiveness of the process. The permeate product at a pressure as high as the feed pressure can be produced without using a compressor. This is impossible with traditional steady-state processes where a pressure differential across the membrane must be maintained. The pressure swing permeation is analogous to pressure swing adsorption and has the potential to be synergistically integrated with the pressure swing adsorption process for enhanced separation of gases.

  12. Polymer blend membranes for CO2 separation from natural gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhtar, H.; Mannan, H. A.; Minh, D.; Nasir, R.; Moshshim, D. F.; Murugesan, T.

    2016-06-01

    Polymeric membranes are dominantly used in industrial gas separation membrane processes. Enhancement in membranes permeability and/or selectivity is a key challenge faced by membrane researchers. The current work represents the effect of poyetherimide blending on separation performance of polysulfone membranes. Polysulfone/poyetherimide (PSF/PEI) blend flat sheet dense membranes were synthesized and tested for permeation analysis of CO2 and CH4 gases at 6, 8 and 10 bar pressure and 25oC temperature. Morphology and thermal properties of membranes were characterized by field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) and thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA) respectively. Blend membranes were dense and homogeneous as deduced from FESEM analysis. Thermal stability of synthesized blend membranes was maintained by blending with PEI as characterized by TGA results. Decrease in permeability of both gases was observed by the addition of PEI due to rigidity of PEI chains. Additionally, selectivity of synthesized blend membranes was enhanced by blending PEI and blend membranes show improved selectivity over pure PSF membrane. This new material has the capability to be used as gas separation membrane material.

  13. Morphology, structure, and properties of Cu-poor and Cu-rich Cu(In,Ga)Se2 films partially selenized using H2Se gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Anjun; Huang, Yongliang; Liu, Xiaohui; Xian, Wang; Meng, Fanying; Liu, Zhengxin

    2016-11-01

    Cu-poor and Cu-rich metallic precursors were prepared by cosputtering from In and Cu–Ga alloy targets and then partially selenized using H2Se gas. The properties of Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) films are comparatively studied and the phase transition process is analyzed. The cosputtered metallic precursor has a rough morphology mostly covered by large In-rich nodules. After selenization, a large number of crumblike InSe grains were formed from the nodules on the surface of the Cu-rich film, whereas the Cu-poor film shows a dense surface. The selenized films comprise CIGS, Cu9(In,Ga)4 intermetallic, and the InSe phases. The proportion of the Cu9(In,Ga)4 phase in the Cu-rich film is more than that in the Cu-poor film. After annealing, the residual Cu9(In,Ga)4 of the Cu-poor film is eliminated. A negligible effect of Cu/(In+Ga) on the grain size can be observed. The CIGS solar cell with an efficiency of 15.1% was prepared by this method.

  14. Selectivity trend of gas separation through nanoporous graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Hongjun; Chen, Zhongfang; Dai, Sheng; Jiang, De-en

    2014-01-29

    We demonstrate that porous graphene can efficiently separate gases according to their molecular sizes using molecular dynamic (MD) simulations,. The flux sequence from the classical MD simulation is H2>CO2>>N2>Ar>CH4, which generally follows the trend in the kinetic diameters. Moreover, this trend is also confirmed from the fluxes based on the computed free energy barriers for gas permeation using the umbrella sampling method and kinetic theory of gases. Both brute-force MD simulations and free-energy calcualtions lead to the flux trend consistent with experiments. Case studies of two compositions of CO2/N2 mixtures further demonstrate the separation capability of nanoporous graphene.

  15. Synthesis, pervaporation and gas separation studies of polyaniline blends

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, S.C.; Conklin, J.A.; Su, T.M.

    1995-12-01

    Membranes have been successfully produced from blends of polyaniline/polyacrylic acid and polyaniline/polyimide. The uniqueness of these membranes is the incorporation of {open_quotes}polymer dopants{close_quotes} in polyaniline. Conductivity measurements show that polyacrylic acid dopes the polyaniline. Pervaporation of water and water/acetic acid mixtures were performed using polyaniline and its polyacrylic acid blend. An improved flux over the polyaniline base form is observed. Polyaniline/polyimide blends were synthesized for gas permeability studies. These blends combine improved thermal stability relative to polyaniline with greater gas selectivity relative to polyimide. The blend shows an increase in permeability for all gases studied over both, polyaniline base and polyimide, while maintaining comparable separation factors.

  16. Adsorption and Gas Separation of Molecules by Carbon Nanohorns.

    PubMed

    Gatica, Silvina M; Nekhai, Anton; Scrivener, Adam

    2016-05-19

    In this paper, we report the results of Monte Carlo simulations of the adsorption of neon, argon, methane and carbon dioxide in carbon nanohorns. We model the nanohorns as an array of carbon cones and obtained adsorption isotherms and isosteric heats. The main sites of adsorption are inside the cones and in the interstices between three cones. We also calculated the selectivity of carbon dioxide/methane, finding that nanohorns are a suitable substrate for gas separation. Our simulations are compared to available experimental data.

  17. Gas separation by composite solvent-swollen membranes

    DOEpatents

    Matson, S.L.; Lee, E.K.L.; Friesen, D.T.; Kelly, D.J.

    1989-04-25

    There is disclosed a composite immobilized liquid membrane of a solvent-swollen polymer and a microporous organic or inorganic support, the solvent being at least one highly polar solvent containing at least one nitrogen, oxygen, phosphorus or sulfur atom, and having a boiling point of at least 100 C and a specified solubility parameter. The solvent or solvent mixture is homogeneously distributed through the solvent-swollen polymer from 20% to 95% by weight. The membrane is suitable for acid gas scrubbing and oxygen/nitrogen separation. 3 figs.

  18. Gas separation by composite solvent-swollen membranes

    DOEpatents

    Matson, Stephen L.; Lee, Eric K. L.; Friesen, Dwayne T.; Kelly, Donald J.

    1989-01-01

    There is disclosed a composite immobulized liquid membrane of a solvent-swollen polymer and a microporous organic or inorganic support, the solvent being at least one highly polar solvent containing at least one nitrogen, oxygen, phosphorous or sulfur atom, and having a boiling point of at least 100.degree. C. and a specified solubility parameter. The solvent or solvent mixture is homogeneously distributed through the solvent-swollen polymer from 20% to 95% by weight. The membrane is suitable for acid gas scrubbing and oxygen/nitrogen separation.

  19. Adsorption and Gas Separation of Molecules by Carbon Nanohorns.

    PubMed

    Gatica, Silvina M; Nekhai, Anton; Scrivener, Adam

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we report the results of Monte Carlo simulations of the adsorption of neon, argon, methane and carbon dioxide in carbon nanohorns. We model the nanohorns as an array of carbon cones and obtained adsorption isotherms and isosteric heats. The main sites of adsorption are inside the cones and in the interstices between three cones. We also calculated the selectivity of carbon dioxide/methane, finding that nanohorns are a suitable substrate for gas separation. Our simulations are compared to available experimental data. PMID:27213313

  20. Counter pumping debris excluder and separator. [gas turbine shaft seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ludwig, L. P. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A dirt separator and excluder for removing entrained debris from gas turbine shaft seals is described. A helical groove pattern is constructed on the rotating shaft with the pumping pattern such that it tends to pump seal pressurizing gas toward the gas turbine seal. A second helical groove pattern is provided on the stationary housing or counter rotating member coaxial with the shaft, and this pattern is designed to provide pumping in the direction opposite from that of the groove pattern on the shaft. Gas with entrained debris entering this grooved area will be subjected to high centrifugal forces due to the swirl motion induced by the groove pattern and the rotation of the shaft. This debris is centrifuged outwardly into the outer groove pattern on the housing or counter rotating member. Because the outer groove pattern has a pumping direction opposite from that of the seal, dirt is pumped away from the seal and can be collected in a suitable debris trap remote from the seal location.

  1. Carbon Dioxide Separation from Flue Gas by Phase Enhanced Absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Liang Hu

    2006-06-30

    A new process, phase enhanced absorption, was invented. The method is carried out in an absorber, where a liquid carrier (aqueous solution), an organic mixture (or organic compound), and a gas mixture containing a gas to be absorbed are introduced from an inlet. Since the organic mixture is immiscible or at least partially immiscible with the liquid carrier, the organic mixture forms a layer or small parcels between the liquid carrier and the gas mixture. The organic mixture in the absorber improves mass transfer efficiency of the system and increases the absorption rate of the gas. The organic mixture serves as a transportation media. The gas is finally accumulated in the liquid carrier as in a conventional gas-liquid absorption system. The presence of the organic layer does not hinder the regeneration of the liquid carrier or recovery of the gas because the organic layer is removed by a settler after the absorption process is completed. In another aspect, the system exhibited increased gas-liquid separation efficiency, thereby reducing the costs of operation and maintenance. Our study focused on the search of the organic layer or transportation layer to enhance the absorption rate of carbon dioxide. The following systems were studied, (1) CO{sub 2}-water system and CO{sub 2}-water-organic layer system; (2) CO{sub 2}-Potassium Carbonate aqueous solution system and CO{sub 2}-Potassium Carbonate aqueous solution-organic layer system. CO{sub 2}-water and CO{sub 2}-Potassium Carbonate systems are the traditional gas-liquid absorption processes. The CO{sub 2}-water-organic layer and CO{sub 2}-Potassium Carbonate-organic layer systems are the novel absorption processes, phase enhanced absorption. As we mentioned early, organic layer (transportation layer phase) is used for the increase of absorption rate. Our study showed that the absorption rate can be increased by adding the organic layer. However, the enhanced factor is highly depended on the liquid mass transfer

  2. Carbon Dioxide Separation from Flue Gas by Phase Enhanced Absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Tim Fout

    2007-06-30

    A new process, phase enhanced absorption, was invented. The method is carried out in an absorber, where a liquid carrier (aqueous solution), an organic mixture (or organic compound), and a gas mixture containing a gas to be absorbed are introduced from an inlet. Since the organic mixture is immiscible or at least partially immiscible with the liquid carrier, the organic mixture forms a layer or small parcels between the liquid carrier and the gas mixture. The organic mixture in the absorber improves mass transfer efficiency of the system and increases the absorption rate of the gas. The organic mixture serves as a transportation media. The gas is finally accumulated in the liquid carrier as in a conventional gas-liquid absorption system. The presence of the organic layer does not hinder the regeneration of the liquid carrier or recovery of the gas because the organic layer is removed by a settler after the absorption process is completed. In another aspect, the system exhibited increased gas-liquid separation efficiency, thereby reducing the costs of operation and maintenance. Our study focused on the search of the organic layer or transportation layer to enhance the absorption rate of carbon dioxide. The following systems were studied, (1) CO{sub 2}-water system and CO{sub 2}-water-organic layer system; (2) CO{sub 2}-Potassium Carbonate aqueous solution system and CO{sub 2}-Potassium Carbonate aqueous solution-organic layer system. CO{sub 2}-water and CO{sub 2}-Potassium Carbonate systems are the traditional gas-liquid absorption processes. The CO{sub 2}-water-organic layer and CO{sub 2}-Potassium Carbonate-organic layer systems are the novel absorption processes, phase enhanced absorption. As we mentioned early, organic layer is used for the increase of absorption rate, and plays the role of transportation of CO{sub 2}. Our study showed that the absorption rate can be increased by adding the organic layer. However, the enhanced factor is highly depended on the

  3. WATER-GAS SHIFT WITH INTEGRATED HYDROGEN SEPARATION

    SciTech Connect

    Maria Flytzani-Stephanopoulos; Jerry Meldon; Xiaomei Qi

    2001-12-01

    Optimization of the water-gas shift (WGS) reaction system for hydrogen production for fuel cells is of particular interest to the energy industry. To this end, it is desirable to couple the WGS reaction to hydrogen separation using a semi-permeable membrane, with both processes carried out at high temperature to improve reaction kinetics. Reduced equilibrium conversion of the WGS reaction at high temperatures is overcome by product H{sub 2} removal via the membrane. This project involves fundamental research and development of novel cerium oxide-based catalysts for the water-gas-shift reaction and the integration of these catalysts with Pd-alloy H{sub 2}-separation membranes supplying high purity hydrogen for fuel cell use. Conditions matching the requirements of coal gasifier-exit gas streams will be examined in the project. In the first year of the project, we prepared a series of nanostructured Cu- and Fe-containing ceria catalysts by a special gelation/precipitation technique followed by air calcination at 650 C. Each sample was characterized by ICP for elemental composition analysis, BET-N2 desorption for surface area measurement, and by temperature-programmed reduction in H{sub 2} to evaluate catalyst reducibility. Screening WGS tests with catalyst powders were conducted in a flow microreactor at temperatures in the range of 200-550 C. On the basis of both activity and stability of catalysts in simulated coal gas, and in CO{sub 2}-rich gases, a Cu-CeO{sub 2} catalyst formulation was selected for further study in this project. Details from the catalyst development and testing work are given in this report. Also in this report, we present H{sub 2} permeation data collected with unsupported flat membranes of pure Pd and Pd-alloys over a wide temperature window.

  4. Correlations of Polyimides and Blended Polyimides for High Temperature Gas Separations

    SciTech Connect

    John R. Klaehn; Christopher J. Orme; Thomas A. Luther; Eric S. Peterson; Jagoda M. Urban-Klaehn

    2002-03-01

    High performance polymers are of interest for high temperature gas separations, especially for the sequestration of carbon dioxide. A new family of high performance imide polymers has been identified as a successful membrane capture material. VTEC polyimides possess desired thermal properties (up to 500 °C) along with being robust and flexible even after multiple thermal cycles (up to 400 °C). Polyimides (PI) are excellent materials for high selectivity for smaller kinetic diameter gases such as H2 and CO2; however, they have low fluxes. We blended small amounts of different polymers with VTEC polyimide, which changes the fluxes. Another critical problem when working with glassy polymers is their moisture content. It has been found that water entrapped within the polymer matrix (left over from the solvent, or physisorbed) can also cause the polymer to change dramatically. Additionally presence of molecular water in the polymer’s void volume has been validated through Positron Annihilation Lifetime (PAL) spectroscopy. In this presentation, polymer characterization and gas-separation testing results will be discussed.

  5. Selectivity trend of gas separation through nanoporous graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Hongjun; Chen, Zhongfang; Dai, Sheng; Jiang, De-en

    2015-04-15

    By means of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, we demonstrate that porous graphene can efficiently separate gases according to their molecular sizes. The flux sequence from the classical MD simulation is H{sub 2}>CO{sub 2}≫N{sub 2}>Ar>CH{sub 4}, which generally follows the trend in the kinetic diameters. This trend is also confirmed from the fluxes based on the computed free energy barriers for gas permeation using the umbrella sampling method and kinetic theory of gases. Both brute-force MD simulations and free-energy calcualtions lead to the flux trend consistent with experiments. Case studies of two compositions of CO{sub 2}/N{sub 2} mixtures further demonstrate the separation capability of nanoporous graphene. - Graphical abstract: Classical molecular dynamics simulations show the flux trend of H{sub 2}>CO{sub 2}≫N{sub 2}>Ar>CH{sub 4} for their permeation through a porous graphene, in excellent agreement with a recent experiment. - Highlights: • Classical MD simulations show the flux trend of H{sub 2}>CO{sub 2}≫N{sub 2}>Ar>CH{sub 4} for their permeation through a porous graphene. • Free energy calculations yield permeation barriers for those gases. • Selectivities for several gas pairs are estimated from the free-energy barriers and the kinetic theory of gases. • The selectivity trend is in excellent agreement with a recent experiment.

  6. The Yale Gas-Filled Split Pole Magnetic Separator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cata-Danil, G.; Beausang, C. W.; Casten, R. F.; Chen, A.; Chubrich, N.; Cooper, J. R.; Krücken, R.; Liu, B.; Novak, J. R.; Visser, D.; Zamfir, N. V.

    1998-10-01

    Design and construction of a gas-filled recoil separator is underway at the Wright Nuclear Structure Laboratory at Yale University. By filling the magnetic field region of the existing Enge Split-Pole magnet with N2 or He2 gases in the 1 to 15 mbar pressure range a gradual focussing of discrete charge states has been measured. The incident ions were ^16O and ^35,37Cl with 49 MeV and 95 MeV energies, respectively. The process is understood as a result of coalescing of trajectories of different charge states around a trajectory defined by the mean charge state (q¯) of the ion in gas. Because q¯ depends on the atomic number Z and is roughly proportional with the ion velocity, the average magnetic rigidity (B¯ρ=Av/q¯) is almost independent of the velocity distribution of the incident ions. The ion trajectories will be therefore be mainly determined by the mass number A and the atomic number Z of the ion. Monte Carlo simulations with the code RAYTRACE closely reproduce the experimental behavior. We plan to use the Yale Mass Separator (YaMS) for nuclear structure studies in conjunction with high efficency gamma detectors (clover detectors) for enhancing weak reaction channels and fission background reduction. Work supported by the US-DOE under contract numbers DE-FG02-91ER-40609 and DE-FG02-88ER-40417.

  7. Separation of light gas mixtures using SAPO-34 membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Poshusta, J.C.; Tuan, V.A.; Pape, E.A.; Noble, R.D.; Falconer, J.L.

    2000-04-01

    Continuous SAPO-34 membranes were prepared on porous alumina tubular supports, and shown to be useful for light gas separations at low and high temperatures. Single-gas permeances of CO{sub 2}, N{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} decreased with increasing kinetic diameter. For the best membrane at 300 K, the He and H{sub 2} permeances were less than that of CO{sub 2}, because He, H{sub 2}, and CO{sub 2} were small compared to the SAPO-34 pore, and differences in the heat of adsorption determined the permeance order. The smaller component permeated the fastest in CO{sub 2}/CH{sub 4}, CO{sub 2}/N{sub 2}, N{sub 2}/CH{sub 4}, H{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} and H{sub 2}/N{sub 2} mixtures between 300 and 470 K. For H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} mixtures, which were separated by competitive adsorption at room temperature, the larger component permeated faster below 400 K. The CO{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} selectivity at room temperature was 36 and decreased with temperature. The H{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} mixture selectivity was 8 and constant with temperature up to 480 K. Calcination, slow temperature cycles, and exposure to water vapor had no permanent effect on membrane performance, but temperature changes of approximately 30 K/min decreased the membrane's effectiveness.

  8. Sulfur Tolerant Pd/Cu and Pd/Au Alloy Membranes for H2 Separation with High Pressure CO2 for Sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    Yi Hua Ma; Natalie Pomerantz; Chao-Huang Chen

    2008-09-30

    The effect of H{sub 2}S poisoning on Pd, Pd/Cu, and Pd/Au alloy composite membranes prepared by the electroless deposition method on porous Inconel supports was investigated to provide a fundamental understanding of the durability and preparation of sulfur tolerant membranes. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) studies showed that the exposure of pure Pd to 50 ppm H{sub 2}S/H{sub 2} mixtures caused bulk sulfide formation at lower temperatures and surface sulfide formation at higher temperatures. Lower temperatures, longer exposure times, and higher H{sub 2}S concentrations resulted in a higher degree of sulfidation. In a Pd membrane, the bulk sulfide formation caused a drastic irrecoverable H{sub 2} permeance decline and an irreparable loss in selectivity. Pd/Cu and Pd/Au alloy membranes exhibited permeance declines due to surface sulfide formation upon exposure to 50 ppm H{sub 2}S/H{sub 2} gas mixtures. However in contrast to the pure Pd membrane, the permeances of the Pd/Cu and Pd/Au alloy membranes were mostly recovered in pure H{sub 2} and the selectivity of the Pd alloy layers remained essentially intact throughout the characterization in H{sub 2}, He and H{sub 2}S/H{sub 2} mixtures which lasted several thousand hours. The amount of irreversible sulfur poisoning decreased with increasing temperature due to the exothermicity of H{sub 2}S adsorption. Longer exposure times increased the amount of irreversible poisoning of the Pd/Cu membrane but not the Pd/Au membrane. Pd/Au coupon studies of the galvanic displacement method showed that higher Au{sup 3+} concentrations, lower pH values, higher bath temperatures and stirring the bath at a rate of 200 rpm yielded faster displacement rates, more uniform depositions, and a higher Au content within the layers. While 400 C was found to be sufficient to form a Pd/Au alloy on the surface, high temperature X-ray diffraction (HTXRD) studies showed that even after annealing between 500-600 C, the Pd/Cu alloys could have

  9. The use of silica nanoparticles for gas chromatographic separation.

    PubMed

    Na, Na; Cui, Xianglan; De Beer, Thomas; Liu, Tingting; Tang, Tingting; Sajid, Muhammad; Ouyang, Jin

    2011-07-15

    A new IL-dispersed silica nanoparticles (IL-SNs) capillary column, combining properties of silica nanoparticles and ionic liquid (IL), was used for gas chromatographic separation. By dispersing silica nanoparticles in a conventional IL of 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate ([BuMIm][BF6]), a layer of homogeneous interconnected particulate silica networks (thickness: 0.4-0.6 μm) was formed on the inner surface of a capillary column. This coating integrates advantages of silica nanoparticles (high surface area, high dispersed behaviour) and IL (extended liquid-state temperature range, chemical stability), hence increasing interactions between stationary phase and analytes. It was demonstrated that mixtures of a wide range of organic compounds including alcohols, esters, alkanes, aromatic compounds, as well as isomers and non-polar compounds can be well separated using an IL-SNs capillary column. Comparing to traditional support coated open tubular columns, the IL-SNs capillary column displays retention behaviors of separating both polar and non-polar compounds. The much thinner coating film of IL-SNs capillary column, compared to the coating film of SNs capillary column, decreases the resistance to mass transfer, resulting a good column efficiency of 3030 theoretical plates per meter for n-butanol (which is about 5 times higher than for the SNs capillary column). Furthermore, the IL-SNs capillary column decreases the IL retention selectivity dominated by IL structures, and has a higher coating value than neat IL stationary phase. Moreover, the preparation is simple as no modification of ILs or adoption of additional reagents is needed in pretreatments. This manuscript is the first report on the use of silica nanoparticles for gas chromatography, which would expand the applicability of silica nanoparticles in analytical chemistry.

  10. Separation efficiency of a vacuum gas lift for microalgae harvesting.

    PubMed

    Barrut, Bertrand; Blancheton, Jean-Paul; Muller-Feuga, Arnaud; René, François; Narváez, César; Champagne, Jean-Yves; Grasmick, Alain

    2013-01-01

    Low-energy and low-cost separation of microalgae from water is important to the economics of microalgae harvesting and processing. Flotation under vacuum using a vacuum gas lift for microalgae harvesting was investigated for different airflow rates, bubble sizes, salinities and harvest volumes. Harvesting efficiency (HE) and concentration factor (CF) of the vacuum gas lift increased by around 50% when the airflow rate was reduced from 20 to 10 L min(-1). Reduced bubble size multiplied HE and CF 10 times when specific microbubble diffusers were used or when the salinity of the water was increased from 0‰ to 40‰. The reduction in harvest volume from 100 to 1L increased the CF from 10 to 130. An optimized vacuum gas lift could allow partial microalgae harvesting using less than 0.2 kWh kg(-1) DW, thus reducing energy costs 10-100 times compared to complete harvesting processes, albeit at the expense of a less concentrated biomass harvest.

  11. Biogeochemistry of dihydrogen (H2).

    PubMed

    Hoehler, Tori M

    2005-01-01

    of water-rock interaction could have supported an early chemosynthetic biosphere. Such processes offer the continued potential for a deep, rock-hosted biosphere on Earth or other bodies in the solar system. The continued evolution of metabolic and community-level versatility among microbes led to an expanded ability to completely exploit the energy available in complex organic matter. Under the anoxic conditions that prevailed on the early Earth, this was accomplished through the linked and sequential action of several metabolic classes of organisms. By transporting electrons between cells, H2 provides a means of linking the activities of these organisms into a highly functional and interactive network. At the same time, H2 concentrations exert a powerful thermodynamic control on many aspects of metabolism and biogeochemical function in these systems. Anaerobic communities based on the consumption of organic matter continue to play an important role in global biogeochemistry even into the present day. As the principal arbiters of chemistry in most aquatic sediments and animal digestive systems, these microbes affect the redox and trace-gas chemistry of our oceans and atmosphere, and constitute the ultimate biological filter on material passing into the rock record. It is in such communities that the significance of H2 in mediating biogeochemical function is most strongly expressed. The advent of phototrophic metabolism added another layer of complexity to microbial communities, and to the role of H2 therein. Anoxygenic and oxygenic phototrophs retained and expanded on the utilization of H2 in metabolic processes. Both groups produce and consume H2 through a variety of mechanisms. In the natural world, phototrophic organisms are often closely juxtaposed with a variety of other metabolic types, through the formation of biofilms and microbial mats. In the few examples studied, phototrophs contribute an often swamping term to the H2 economy of these communities, with

  12. Extraction of Mg(OH)2 from Mg silicate minerals with NaOH assisted with H2O: implications for CO2 capture from exhaust flue gas.

    PubMed

    Madeddu, Silvia; Priestnall, Michael; Godoy, Erik; Kumar, R Vasant; Raymahasay, Sugat; Evans, Michael; Wang, Ruofan; Manenye, Seabelo; Kinoshita, Hajime

    2015-01-01

    The utilisation of Mg(OH)2 to capture exhaust CO2 has been hindered by the limited availability of brucite, the Mg(OH)2 mineral in natural deposits. Our previous study demonstrated that Mg(OH)2 can be obtained from dunite, an ultramafic rock composed of Mg silicate minerals, in highly concentrated NaOH aqueous systems. However, the large quantity of NaOH consumed was considered an obstacle for the implementation of the technology. In the present study, Mg(OH)2 was extracted from dunite reacted in solid systems with NaOH assisted with H2O. The consumption of NaOH was reduced by 97% with respect to the NaOH aqueous systems, maintaining a comparable yield of Mg(OH)2 extraction, i.e. 64.8-66%. The capture of CO2 from a CO2-N2 gas mixture was tested at ambient conditions using a Mg(OH)2 aqueous slurry. Mg(OH)2 almost fully dissolved and reacted with dissolved CO2 by forming Mg(HCO3)2 which remained in equilibrium storing the CO2 in the aqueous solution. The CO2 balance of the process was assessed from the emissions derived from the power consumption for NaOH production and Mg(OH)2 extraction together with the CO2 captured by Mg(OH)2 derived from dunite. The process resulted as carbon neutral when dunite is reacted at 250 °C for durations of 1 and 3 hours and CO2 is captured as Mg(HCO3)2. PMID:26391815

  13. Separation of Mercury from Flue Gas Desulfurization Scrubber Produced Gypsum

    SciTech Connect

    Hensman, Carl, E., P.h.D; Baker, Trevor

    2008-06-16

    Frontier Geosciences (Frontier; FGS) proposed for DOE Grant No. DE-FG02-07ER84669 that mercury control could be achieved in a wet scrubber by the addition of an amendment to the wet-FGD scrubber. To demonstrate this, a bench-scale scrubber and synthetic flue-gas supply was designed to simulate the limestone fed, wet-desulfurization units utilized by coal-fired power plants. Frontier maintains that the mercury released from these utilities can be controlled and reduced by modifying the existing equipment at installations where wet flue-gas desulfurization (FGD) systems are employed. A key element of the proposal was FGS-PWN, a liquid-based mercury chelating agent, which can be employed as the amendment for removal of all mercury species which enter the wet-FGD scrubber. However, the equipment design presented in the proposal was inadequate to demonstrate these functions and no significant progress was made to substantiate these claims. As a result, funding for a Phase II continuation of this work will not be pursued. The key to implementing the technology as described in the proposal and report appears to be a high liquid-to-gas ratio (L/G) between the flue-gas and the scrubber liquor, a requirement not currently implemented in existing wet-FGD designs. It may be that this constraint can be reduced through parametric studies, but that was not apparent in this work. Unfortunately, the bench-scale system constructed for this project did not function as intended and the funds and time requested were exhausted before the separation studies could occur.

  14. Advanced separation technology for flue gas cleanup. Topical report

    SciTech Connect

    Bhown, A.S.; Alvarado, D.; Pakala, N.; Ventura, S.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this work is to develop a novel system for regenerable SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} scrubbing of flue gas that focuses on (1) a novel method for regenerating spent SO{sub 2} scrubbing liquor and (2) novel chemistry for reversible absorption of NO{sub x}. In addition, high efficiency hollow fiber contactors (HFC) are proposed as the devices for scrubbing the SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} from the flue gas. The system will be designed to remove more than 95% of the SO{sub 2} and more than 75% of the NO{sub x} from flue gases typical of pulverized coal-fired power plants at a cost that is at least 20% less than combined wet limestone scrubbing of SO{sub x} and selective catalytic reduction of NO{sub x}. The process will generate only marketable by-products. Our approach is to reduce the capital cost by using high-efficiency hollow fiber devices for absorbing and desorbing the SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x}. We will also introduce new process chemistry to minimize traditionally well-known problems with SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} absorption and desorption. Our novel chemistry for scrubbing NO{sub x} will consist of water-soluble phthalocyanine compounds invented by SRI as well as polymeric forms of Fe{sup ++} complexes similar to traditional NO{sub x} scrubbing media. The final novelty of our approach is the arrangement of the absorbers in cassette (stackable) form so that the NO{sub x} absorber can be on top of the SO{sub x} absorber. This arrangement is possible only because of the high efficiency of the hollow fiber scrubbing devices, as indicated by our preliminary laboratory data. This arrangement makes it possible for the SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} scrubbing chambers to be separate without incurring the large ducting and gas pressure drop costs necessary if a second conventional absorber vessel were used. Because we have separate scrubbers, we will have separate liquor loops and simplify the chemical complexity of simultaneous SO{sub 2}/NO{sub x} scrubbing.

  15. WATER-GAS SHIFT WITH INTEGRATED HYDROGEN SEPARATION PROCESS

    SciTech Connect

    Maria Flytzani-Stephanopoulos; Xiaomei Qi; Scott Kronewitter

    2004-02-01

    This project involved fundamental research and development of novel cerium oxide-based catalysts for the water-gas-shift reaction and the integration of these catalysts with Pd-alloy H{sub 2} -separation membranes supplying high purity hydrogen for fuel cell use. Conditions matching the requirements of coal gasifier-exit gas streams were examined in the project. Cu-cerium oxide was identified as the most promising high-temperature water-gas shift catalyst for integration with H{sub 2}-selective membranes. Formulations containing iron oxide were found to deactivate in the presence of CO{sub 2}. Cu-containing ceria catalysts, on the other hand, showed high stability in CO{sub 2}-rich gases. This type gas will be present over much of the catalyst, as the membrane removes the hydrogen produced from the shift reaction. The high-temperature shift catalyst composition was optimized by proper selection of dopant type and amount in ceria. The formulation 10at%Cu-Ce(30at%La)O{sub x} showed the best performance, and was selected for further kinetic studies. WGS reaction rates were measured in a simulated coal-gas mixture. The apparent activation energy, measured over aged catalysts, was equal to 70.2 kJ/mol. Reaction orders in CO, H{sub 2}O, CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2} were found to be 0.8, 0.2, -0.3, and -0.3, respectively. This shows that H{sub 2}O has very little effect on the reaction rate, and that both CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2} weakly inhibit the reaction. Good stability of catalyst performance was found in 40-hr long tests. A flat (38 cm{sup 2}) Pd-Cu alloy membrane reactor was used with the catalyst washcoated on oxidized aluminum screens close coupled with the membrane. To achieve higher loadings, catalyst granules were layered on the membrane itself to test the combined HTS activity/ H{sub 2} -separation efficiency of the composite. Simulated coal gas mixtures were used and the effect of membrane on the conversion of CO over the catalyst was evidenced at high space

  16. Gas Sensing of SnO2 Nanocrystals Revisited: Developing Ultra-Sensitive Sensors for Detecting the H2S Leakage of Biogas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Lin; Chen, Yuejiao; Ma, Jianmin

    2014-08-01

    As a typical mode of energy from waste, biogas technology is of great interest to researchers. To detect the trace H2S released from biogas, we herein demonstrate a high-performance sensor based on highly H2S-sensitive SnO2 nanocrystals, which have been selectively prepared by solvothermal methods using benzimidazole as a mineralization agent. The sensitivity of as-obtained SnO2 sensor towards 5 ppm H2S can reach up to 357. Such a technique based on SnO2 nanocrystals opens up a promising avenue for future practical applications in real-time monitoring a trace of H2S from the leakage of biogas.

  17. Gas Sensing of SnO2 Nanocrystals Revisited: Developing Ultra-Sensitive Sensors for Detecting the H2S Leakage of Biogas

    PubMed Central

    Mei, Lin; Chen, Yuejiao; Ma, Jianmin

    2014-01-01

    As a typical mode of energy from waste, biogas technology is of great interest to researchers. To detect the trace H2S released from biogas, we herein demonstrate a high-performance sensor based on highly H2S-sensitive SnO2 nanocrystals, which have been selectively prepared by solvothermal methods using benzimidazole as a mineralization agent. The sensitivity of as-obtained SnO2 sensor towards 5 ppm H2S can reach up to 357. Such a technique based on SnO2 nanocrystals opens up a promising avenue for future practical applications in real-time monitoring a trace of H2S from the leakage of biogas. PMID:25112163

  18. Separation of Flue-Gas Scrubber Sludge into Marketable Products

    SciTech Connect

    1998-02-28

    The reduction of sulfur oxides from high sulfur coal burning utility companies has resulted in the production of huge quantities of wet flue-gas desulfurization scrubber sludge. A typical 400 MW power station burning a coal containing 3.5% sulfur by weight and using a limestone absorbent would produce approximately 177,000 tons (dry weight) of scrubber sludge per year. This brownish colored, finely divided material contains calcium sulfite (CaSO{sub 3} {center_dot} 1/2 H{sub 2}O), calcium sulfate (CaSO{sub 4} {center_dot} 2H{sub 2}O), unreacted limestone (CaCO{sub 3}), and various other impurities such as fly-ash and iron oxide particles. The physical separation of the components of scrubber sludge would result in the re-use of this material. The primary use would be conversion to a highly pure synthetic gypsum. This technical report concentrates on the effect of baffle configuration on the separation of calcium sulfite/sulfate from limestone. The position of the baffles as they related to the feed inlet, and the quantity of the baffles were examined. A clean calcium sulfite/sulfate (less than 2.0% limestone by weight) was achieved with the combination of water-only cyclone and horizontally baffled column.

  19. Stakeholder acceptance analysis: In-well vapor stripping, in-situ bioremediation, gas membrane separation system (membrane separation)

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, T.

    1995-12-01

    This document provides stakeholder evaluations on innovative technologies to be used in the remediation of volatile organic compounds from soils and ground water. The technologies evaluated are; in-well vapor stripping, in-situ bioremediation, and gas membrane separation.

  20. Mixed-conducting dense ceramics for gas separation applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Balachandran, U.; Dorris, S. E.; Dusek, J. T.; Guan, J.; Liu, M.; Ma, B.; Maiya, P. S.; Picciolo, J. J.

    1999-06-22

    Mixed-conducting (electronic and ionic conducting) dense ceramics are used in many applications, including fuel cells, gas separation membranes, batteries, sensors, and electrocatalysis. This paper describes mixed-conducting ceramic membranes that are being developed to selectively remove oxygen and hydrogen from gas streams in a nongalvanic mode of operation (i.e., with no electrodes or external power supply). Ceramic membranes made of Sr-Fe-Co oxide (SFC), which exhibits high combined electronic and oxygen ionic conductivities, can be used for high-purity oxygen separation and/or partial oxidation of methane to synthesis gas (syngas, a mixture of CO and H{sub 2}). The electronic and ionic conductivities of SFC were found to be comparable in magnitude. Steady-state oxygen permeability of SFC has been measured as a function of oxygen-partial-pressure gradient and temperature. For an {approx}3-mm-thick membrane, the oxygen permeability was {approx}2.5 scc{center_dot}cm{sup {minus}2}{center_dot}min{sup {minus}1} at 900 C. Oxygen permeation increases as membrane thickness decreases. Tubular SFC membranes have been fabricated and operated at 900 C for {approx}1000 h in converting methane into syngas. The oxygen permeated through the membrane reacted with methane in the presence of a catalyst and produced syngas. We also studied the transport properties of yttria-doped BaCeO{sub 3{minus}{delta}} (BCY) by impedance spectroscopy and open-cell voltage (OCV) measurement. Total conductivity of the BCY sample increased from {approx}5 x 10{sup {minus}3} {Omega}{sup {minus}1}{center_dot}cm{sup {minus}1} to {approx}2 x 10{sup {minus}2} {Omega}{sup {minus}1}{center_dot}cm{sup {minus}1}, whereas the protonic transference number decreased from 0.87 to 0.63 and the oxygen transference number increased from 0.03 to 0.15 as temperature increased from 600 to 800 C. Unlike SFC, in which the ionic and electronic conductivities are nearly equivalent BCY exhibits protonic conductivity that

  1. Predicting possible effects of H2S impurity on CO2 transportation and geological storage.

    PubMed

    Ji, Xiaoyan; Zhu, Chen

    2013-01-01

    For CO(2) geological storage, permitting impurities, such as H(2)S, in CO(2) streams can lead to a great potential for capital and energy savings for CO(2) capture and separation, but it also increases costs and risk management for transportation and storage. To evaluate the cost-benefits, using a recently developed model (Ji, X.; Zhu, C. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 2012, 91, 40-59), this study predicts phase equilibria and thermodynamic properties of the system H(2)S-CO(2)-H(2)O-NaCl under transportation and storage conditions and discusses potential effects of H(2)S on transportation and storage. The prediction shows that inclusion of H(2)S in CO(2) streams may lead to two-phase flow. For H(2)S-CO(2) mixtures, at a given temperature, the bubble and dew pressures decrease with increasing H(2)S content, while the mass density increases at low pressures and decreases at high pressures. For the CO(2)-H(2)S-H(2)O system, the total gas solubility increases while the mass density of the aqueous solution with dissolved gas decreases. For the CO(2)-H(2)S-H(2)O-NaCl system, at a given temperature, pressure and NaCl concentration, the solubility of the gas mixture in aqueous phase increases with increasing H(2)S content and then decreases, while the mass density of aqueous solution decreases and may be lower than the mass density of the solution without gas dissolution.

  2. Analysis of gas centrifuge cascade for separation of multicomponent isotopes and optimal feed position

    SciTech Connect

    Chuntong Ying; Hongjiang Wu; Mingsheng Zhou; Yuguang Nie; Guangjun Liu

    1997-10-01

    Analysis of the concentration distribution in a gas centrifuge cascade for separation of multicomponent isotope mixtures is different from that in a cascade for separation of two-component mixtures. This paper presents the governing equations for a multicomponent isotope separation cascade. Numerically predicted separation factors for the gas centrifuge cascade agree well with the experimental data. A theoretical optimal feed position is derived for a short square cascade for a two-component mixture in a close-separation case. The optimal feed position for a gas centrifuge cascade for separation of multicomponent mixture is discussed.

  3. Engineering design and theoretical analysis of nanoporous carbon membranes for gas separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acharya, Madhav

    1999-11-01

    Gases are used in a direct or indirect manner in virtually every major industry, such as steel manufacturing, oil production, foodstuffs and electronics. Membranes are being investigated as an alternative to established methods of gas separation such as pressure swing adsorption and cryogenic distillation. Membranes can be used in continuous operation and work very well at ambient conditions, thus representing a tremendous energy and economic saving over the other technologies. In addition, the integration of reaction and separation into a single unit known as a membrane reactor has the potential to revolutionize the chemical industry by making selective reactions a reality. Nanoporous carbons are highly disordered materials obtained from organic polymers or natural sources. They have the ability to separate gas molecules by several different mechanisms, and hence there is a growing effort to form them into membranes. In this study, nanoporous carbon membranes were prepared on macroporous stainless steel supports of both tubular and disk geometries. The precursor used was poly(furfuryl alcohol) and different synthesis protocols were employed. A spray coating method also was developed which allowed reproducible synthesis of membranes with very few defects. High gas selectivities were obtained such as O2/N2 = 6, H2/C2H 4 = 70 and CO2/N2 = 20. Membranes also were characterized using SEM and AFM, which revealed thin layers of carbon that were quite uniform and homogeneous. The simulation of nanoporous carbon structures also was carried out using a simple algorithmic approach. 5,6 and 7-membered rings were introduced into the structure, thus resulting in considerable curvature. The density of the structures were calculated and found to compare favorably with experimental findings. Finally, a theoretical analysis of size selective transport was performed using transition state theory concepts. A definite correlation of gas permeance with molecular size was obtained after

  4. Engineering the performance of mixed matrix membranes for gas separations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Shu

    Mixed matrix membranes that comprise domains of organic and inorganic components are investigated in this research. Such materials effectively circumvent the polymeric 'upper bound trade-off curve' and show properties highly attractive for industrial gas separations. Nevertheless, lack of intrinsic compatibility between the organic polymers and inorganic fillers poses the biggest challenge to successful fabrication of mixed matrix membranes. Consequently, control of the nanoscale interface between the sieve and polymer has been the key technical challenge to the implementation of composite membrane materials. The overarching goal of this research was to devise and explore approaches to enhance the performance of mixed matrix membranes by properly tailoring the sieve/polymer interface. In an effort to pursue the aforementioned objective, three approaches were developed and inspected: (i) use of silane coupling agents, (ii) hydrophobizing of sieve surface through alcohol etherification reactions, and (iii) a two-step modification sequence involving the use of a Grignard reagent. A comparison was drawn to evaluate these methodologies and the most effective strategy (Grignard treatment) was selected and further investigated. Successful formulation and characterization of mixed matrix membranes constituting zeolite 4A modified via the Grignard treatment are described in detail. Membranes with impressive improvements in gas separation efficiency and mechanical properties were demonstrated. The basis for the improvements in polymer/sieve compatibility enabled by this specific process were proposed and investigated. A key aspect of the present study was illuminating the detailed chemical mechanisms involved in the Grignard modification. Systematic characterization and carefully designed experiments revealed that the formation of distinctive surface structures is essentially a heterogeneous nucleation process, where Mg(OH)2 crystals grow from the nuclei previously extracted

  5. Biogeochemistry of dihydrogen (H2).

    PubMed

    Hoehler, Tori M

    2005-01-01

    of water-rock interaction could have supported an early chemosynthetic biosphere. Such processes offer the continued potential for a deep, rock-hosted biosphere on Earth or other bodies in the solar system. The continued evolution of metabolic and community-level versatility among microbes led to an expanded ability to completely exploit the energy available in complex organic matter. Under the anoxic conditions that prevailed on the early Earth, this was accomplished through the linked and sequential action of several metabolic classes of organisms. By transporting electrons between cells, H2 provides a means of linking the activities of these organisms into a highly functional and interactive network. At the same time, H2 concentrations exert a powerful thermodynamic control on many aspects of metabolism and biogeochemical function in these systems. Anaerobic communities based on the consumption of organic matter continue to play an important role in global biogeochemistry even into the present day. As the principal arbiters of chemistry in most aquatic sediments and animal digestive systems, these microbes affect the redox and trace-gas chemistry of our oceans and atmosphere, and constitute the ultimate biological filter on material passing into the rock record. It is in such communities that the significance of H2 in mediating biogeochemical function is most strongly expressed. The advent of phototrophic metabolism added another layer of complexity to microbial communities, and to the role of H2 therein. Anoxygenic and oxygenic phototrophs retained and expanded on the utilization of H2 in metabolic processes. Both groups produce and consume H2 through a variety of mechanisms. In the natural world, phototrophic organisms are often closely juxtaposed with a variety of other metabolic types, through the formation of biofilms and microbial mats. In the few examples studied, phototrophs contribute an often swamping term to the H2 economy of these communities, with

  6. Coupled cluster calculations of mean excitation energies of the noble gas atoms He, Ne and Ar and of the H2 molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauer, Stephan P. A.; Haq, Inam Ul; Sabin, John R.; Oddershede, Jens; Christiansen, Ove; Coriani, Sonia

    2014-03-01

    Using an asymmetric Lanczos chain algorithm for the calculation of the coupled cluster linear response functions at the coupled cluster singles and doubles (CCSD) and coupled cluster singles and approximate iterative doubles (CC2) levels of approximation, we have calculated the mean excitation energies of the noble gases He, Ne and Ar, and of the hydrogen molecule (H2). Convergence with respect to the one-electron basis set was investigated in detail for families of correlation-consistent basis sets including both augmentation and core-valence functions. We find that the electron correlation effects at the CCSD level change the mean excitation energies obtained at the uncorrelated Hartree-Fock level by about 1%. For the two-electron systems He and H2, our CCSD results (for a Lanczos chain length equal to the full excitation space), I0 = 42.28 eV (helium) and I0 = 19.62 eV (H2), correspond to full configuration interaction results and are therefore the exact, non-relativistic theoretical values for the mean excitation energy of these two systems within the Bethe theory for the chosen basis set and, in the case of H2, at the experimental equilibrium geometry.

  7. Automation of experiments at Dubna Gas-Filled Recoil Separator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsyganov, Yu. S.

    2016-01-01

    Approaches to solving the problems of automation of basic processes in long-term experiments in heavy ion beams of the Dubna Gas-Filled Recoil Separator (DGFRS) facility are considered. Approaches in the field of spectrometry, both of rare α decays of superheavy nuclei and those for constructing monitoring systems to provide accident-free experiment running with highly radioactive targets and recording basic parameters of experiment, are described. The specific features of Double Side Silicon Strip Detectors (DSSSDs) are considered, special attention is paid to the role of boundary effects of neighboring p-n transitions in the "active correlations" method. An example of an off-beam experiment attempting to observe Zeno effect is briefly considered. Basic examples for nuclear reactions of complete fusion at 48Ca ion beams of U-400 cyclotron (LNR, JINR) are given. A scenario of development of the "active correlations" method for the case of very high intensity beams of heavy ions at promising accelerators of LNR, JINR, is presented.

  8. Falling microbead counter-flow process for separating gas mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Hornbostel, Marc D.; Krishnan, Gopala N.; Sanjurjo, Angel

    2015-07-07

    A method and reactor for removing a component from a gas stream is provided. In one embodiment, the method includes providing the gas stream containing the component that is to be removed and adsorbing the component out of the gas stream as the gas stream rises via microbeads of a sorbent falling down an adsorber section of a reactor.

  9. Falling microbead counter-flow process for separating gas mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Hornbostel, Marc D.; Krishnan, Gopala N.; Sanjurjo, Angel

    2015-10-27

    A method and reactor for removing a component from a gas stream is provided. In one embodiment, the method includes providing the gas stream containing the component that is to be removed and adsorbing the component out of the gas stream as the gas stream rises via microbeads of a sorbent falling down an adsorber section of a reactor.

  10. Tunable composite membranes for gas separations. Quarterly technical progress report, November 1, 1995--January 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Ferraris, J.P.; Balkus, K.J. Jr.; Musselman, I.H.

    1996-01-01

    Research continued on composite membranes for gas separations. This report describes work in the following: instrument development; polymer synthesis; membrane fabrication; and permeability measurements.

  11. Gas separations using ceramic membranes. Final report, September 1988--February 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, C.L.; Wu, J.C.S.; Gallaher, G.R.; Smith, G.W.; Flowers, D.L.; Gerdes, T.E.; Liu, P.K.T.

    1993-02-01

    This study covers a comprehensive evaluation of existing ceramic membranes for high temperature gas separations. Methodology has been established for microporous characterization stability and gas separation efficiency. A mathematical model was developed to predict gas separations with existing membranes. Silica and zeolitic modifications of existing membranes were pursued to enhance its separation efficiency. Some of which demonstrate unique separations properties. Use of the dense-silica membranes for hydrogen enrichment was identified as a promising candidate for future development. In addition, the decomposition of trace ammonia contaminant via a catalytic membrane reactor appears feasible. A further economic analysis is required to assess its commercial viability.

  12. Computational study of porous materials for gas separations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Li-Chiang

    Nanoporous materials such as zeolites, zeolitic imidazolate frameworks (ZIFs), and metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are used as sorbents or membranes for gas separations such as carbon dioxide capture, methane capture, paraffin/olefin separations, etc. The total number of nanoporous materials is large; by changing the chemical composition and/or the structural topologies we can envision an infinite number of possible materials. In practice one can synthesize and fully characterize only a small subset of these materials. Hence, computational study can play an important role by utilizing various techniques in molecular simulations as well as quantum chemical calculations to accelerate the search for optimal materials for various energy-related separations. Accordingly, several large-scale computational screenings of over one hundred thousand materials have been performed to find the best materials for carbon capture, methane capture, and ethane/ethene separation. These large-scale screenings identified a number of promising materials for different applications. Moreover, the analysis of these screening studies yielded insights into those molecular characteristics of a material that contribute to an optimal performance for a given application. These insights provided useful guidelines for future structural design and synthesis. For instance, one of the screening studies indicated that some zeolite structures can potentially reduce the energy penalty imposed on a coal-fired power plant by as much as 35% compared to the near-term MEA technology for carbon capture application. These optimal structures have topologies with a maximized density of pockets and they capture and release CO2 molecules with an optimal energy. These screening studies also pointed to some systems, for which conventional force fields were unable to make sufficiently reliable predictions of the adsorption isotherms of different gasses, e.g., CO2 in MOFs with open-metal sites. For these systems, we

  13. CO 2 and H 2O gas exchange of a triticale field: II. Micrometeorological flux studies and comparison with upscaling from porometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ammann, C.; Meixner, F. X.; Busch, J.; Lösch, R.

    1996-05-01

    During June and July 1995 a field experiment was conducted at a 9 ha field of cereal crop (triticale) located in Bellheim, Germany. Our investigation focused on the exchange processes of H 2O and CO 2 and micrometeorological quantities within and above the triticale canopy. Data were collected by porometer measurements at leaf scale, and canopy scale flux measurements using eddy correlation techniques. Due to the senescent state of triticale, the CO 2 exchange was generally small. The micrometeorological flux data are compared to estimates which were upscaled from porometer measurements. The results of one particular day are selected for presentation. The good agreement for both the CO 2 and H 2O fluxes, indicates that a relatively simple and direct upscaling procedure from single leaf porometry data may correctly describe the net exchange of an entire canopy.

  14. Infrared spectroscopic and modeling studies of H2/CH4 microwave plasma gas phase from low to high pressure and power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rond, C.; Hamann, S.; Wartel, M.; Lombardi, G.; Gicquel, A.; Röpcke, J.

    2014-09-01

    InfraRed Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy technique has been implemented in a H2/CH4 Micro-Wave (MW frequency f = 2.45 GHz) plasma reactor dedicated to diamond deposition under high pressure and high power conditions. Parametric studies such as a function of MW power, pressure, and admixtures of methane have been carried out on a wide range of experimental conditions: the pressure up to 270 mbar and the MW power up to 4 kW. These conditions allow high purity Chemical Vapor Deposition diamond deposition at high growth rates. Line integrated absorption measurements have been performed in order to monitor hydrocarbon species, i.e., CH3, CH4, C2H2, C2H4, and C2H6. The densities of the stable detected species were found to vary in the range of 1012-1017 molecules cm-3, while the methyl radical CH3 (precursor of diamond growth under these conditions) measured into the plasma bulk was found up to 1014 molecules cm-3. The experimental densities have been compared to those provided by 1D-radial thermochemical model for low power and low pressure conditions (up to 100 mbar/2 kW). These densities have been axially integrated. Experimental measurements under high pressure and power conditions confirm a strong increase of the degree of dissociation of the precursor, CH4, associated to an increase of the C2H2 density, the most abundant reaction product in the plasma.

  15. Catalytic oxidation of H2 by N2O in the gas phase: O-atom transport with atomic metal cations.

    PubMed

    Blagojevic, Voislav; Bozović, Andrea; Orlova, Galina; Bohme, Diethard K

    2008-10-16

    Twenty-five atomic cations, M (+), that lie within the thermodynamic window for O-atom transport catalysis of the oxidation of hydrogen by nitrous oxide, have been checked for catalytic activity at room temperature with kinetic measurements using an inductively-coupled plasma/selected-ion flow tube (ICP/SIFT) tandem mass spectrometer. Only 4 of these 25 atomic cations were seen to be catalytic: Fe (+), Os (+), Ir (+), and Pt (+). Two of these, Ir (+) and Pt (+), are efficient catalysts, while Fe (+) and Os (+) are not. Eighteen atomic cations (Cr (+), Mn (+), Co (+), Ni (+), Cu (+), Ge (+), Se (+), Mo (+), Ru (+), Rh (+), Sn (+), Te (+), Re (+), Pb (+), Bi (+), Eu (+), Tm (+), and Yb (+)) react too slowly at room temperature either in their oxidation with N 2O to form MO (+) or in the reduction of MO (+) by H 2. Many of these reactions are known to be spin forbidden and a few actually may lie outside the thermodynamic window. Three alkaline-earth metal monoxide cations, CaO (+), SrO (+), and BaO (+), were observed to favor MOH (+) formation in their reactions with H 2. A potential-energy landscape is computed for the oxidation of H 2 with N 2O catalyzed by Fe (+)( (6)D) that vividly illustrates the operation of an ionic catalyst and qualitatively accounts for the relative inefficiency of this catalyst. PMID:18808088

  16. Alkaline biofiltration of H2S odors.

    PubMed

    González-Sánchez, Armando; Revah, Sergio; Deshusses, Marc A

    2008-10-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a very common odor nuisance which is best controlled by chemical or biological scrubbing. Under alkaline pH, the amount of H2S that can be solubilized in a scrubbing liquid increases significantly, and therefore, gas-liquid mass transfer limitations can be reduced. To date, biological scrubbing of H2S has been limited to neutral or acidic pH, despite the potential benefit of reduced mass transfer limitations at alkaline pH. In the present paper, an alkaliphilic sulfoxidizing bacterial consortium was deployed in a laboratory-scale biotrickling filter treating H2S at pH 10. The gas contact time ranged from 1 to 6 s, and H2S inlet concentrations, from 2.5 to 18 ppm(v). The results showed that under most conditions, H2S removal exceeded 98% and the degradation end-product was sulfate. At the highest H2S concentrations and shortest gas contacttimes, when the loading exceeded 30 g m(-3) h(-1), the H2S removal efficiency decreased significantly due to biological reaction limitation, and incompletely oxidized sulfides were measured in the trickling liquid. An analysis of the process demonstrated that operating the biotrickling filter at high pH results in an enhancement of the mass transfer by a factor of 1700-11 000. Overall, alkaline biotrickling filtration was shown to be very effective at low concentration of H2S and very short gas contact time. This is the first demonstration of a biotrickling filter for air pollution control operated at high pH.

  17. Hydrophobic liquid/gas separator for heat pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marcus, B. D.

    1972-01-01

    Perforated nonwetting plug of material such as polytetrafluoroethylene is mounted in gas reservoir feed tube, preferably at end which extends into heat pipe condenser section, to prevent liquid from entering gas reservoir of passively controlled heat pipe.

  18. Carbon-fiber composite molecular sieves for gas separation

    SciTech Connect

    Jagtoyen, M.; Derbyshire, F.

    1996-08-01

    This report describes continuing work on the activation and characterization of formed carbon fiber composites. The composites are produced at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and activated at the Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER) using steam, CO{sub 2}, or O{sub 2} at different conditions of temperature and time, and with different furnace configurations. The general aims of the project are to produce uniformly activated samples with controlled pore structures for specialist applications such as gas separation and water treatment. In previous work the authors reported that composites produced from isotropic pitch fibers weighing up to 25g can be uniformly activated through the appropriate choice of reaction conditions and furnace configurations. They have now succeeded in uniformly activating composites of dimensions up to 12 x 7 x 6 cm, or up to about 166 gram - a scale-up factor of about six. Part of the work has involved the installation of a new furnace that can accommodate larger composites. Efforts were made to achieve uniform activation in both steam and CO{sub 2}. The authors have also succeeded in producing materials with very uniform and narrow pore size distributions by using a novel method involving low temperature oxygen chemisorption in combination with heat treatment in N{sub 2} at high temperatures. Work has also started on the activation of PAN based carbon fibers and fiber composites with the aim of producing composites with wide pore structures for use as catalyst supports. So far activation of the PAN fiber composites supplied by ORNL has been difficult which is attributed to the low reactivity of the PAN fibers. As a result, studies are now being made of the activation of the PAN fibers to investigate the optimum carbonization and activation conditions for PAN based fibers.

  19. Computational study of the CF4 /CHF3 / H2 /Cl2 /O2 /HBr gas phase plasma chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinck, Stefan; Bogaerts, Annemie

    2016-05-01

    A modelling study is performed of high-density low-pressure inductively coupled CF4/CHF3/H2/Cl2/O2/HBr plasmas under different gas mixing ratios. A reaction set describing the complete plasma chemistry is presented and discussed. The gas fraction of each component in this mixture is varied to investigate the sensitivity of the plasma properties, like electron density, plasma potential and species densities, towards the gas mixing ratios. This research is of great interest for microelectronics applications because these gases are often combined in two (or more)-component mixtures, and mixing gases or changing the fraction of a gas can sometimes yield unwanted reaction products or unexpected changes in the overall plasma properties due to the increased chemical complexity of the system. Increasing the CF4 fraction produces more F atoms for chemical etching as expected, but also more prominently lowers the density of Cl atoms, resulting in an actual drop in the etch rate under certain conditions. Furthermore, CF4 decreases the free electron density when mixed with Cl2. However, depending on the other gas components, CF4 gas can also sometimes enhance free electron density. This is the case when HBr is added to the mixture. The addition of H2 to the gas mixture will lower the sputtering process, not only due to the lower overall positive ion density at higher H2 fractions, but also because more H+, \\text{H}2+ and \\text{H}3+ are present and they have very low sputter yields. In contrast, a larger Cl2 fraction results in more chemical etching but also in less physical sputtering due to a smaller abundance of positive ions. Increasing the O2 fraction in the plasma will always lower the etch rate due to more oxidation of the wafer surface and due to a lower plasma density. However, it is also observed that the density of F atoms can actually increase with rising O2 gas fraction. This is relevant to note because the exact balance between fluorination and oxidation is

  20. Catalyst functionalized buffer sorbent pebbles for rapid separation of carbon dioxide from gas mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Aines, Roger D

    2015-03-31

    A method for separating CO.sub.2 from gas mixtures uses a slurried media impregnated with buffer compounds and coating the solid media with a catalyst or enzyme that promotes the transformation of CO.sub.2 to carbonic acid. Buffer sorbent pebbles with a catalyst or enzyme coating are provided for rapid separation of CO.sub.2 from gas mixtures.

  1. Catalyst functionalized buffer sorbent pebbles for rapid separation of carbon dioxide from gas mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Aines, Roger D.

    2013-03-12

    A method for separating CO.sub.2 from gas mixtures uses a slurried media impregnated with buffer compounds and coating the solid media with a catalyst or enzyme that promotes the transformation of CO.sub.2 to carbonic acid. Buffer sorbent pebbles with a catalyst or enzyme coating are provided for rapid separation of CO.sub.2 from gas mixtures.

  2. Large-Flow-Area Flow-Selective Liquid/Gas Separator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasquez, Arturo; Bradley, Karla F.

    2010-01-01

    This liquid/gas separator provides the basis for a first stage of a fuel cell product water/oxygen gas phase separator. It can separate liquid and gas in bulk in multiple gravity environments. The system separates fuel cell product water entrained with circulating oxygen gas from the outlet of a fuel cell stack before allowing the gas to return to the fuel cell stack inlet. Additional makeup oxygen gas is added either before or after the separator to account for the gas consumed in the fuel cell power plant. A large volume is provided upstream of porous material in the separator to allow for the collection of water that does not exit the separator with the outgoing oxygen gas. The water then can be removed as it continues to collect, so that the accumulation of water does not impede the separating action of the device. The system is designed with a series of tubes of the porous material configured into a shell-and-tube heat exchanger configuration. The two-phase fluid stream to be separated enters the shell-side portion of the device. Gas flows to the center passages of the tubes through the porous material and is then routed to a common volume at the end of the tubes by simple pressure difference from a pumping device. Gas flows through the porous material of the tubes with greater ease as a function of the ratio of the dynamic viscosity of the water and gas. By careful selection of the dimensions of the tubes (wall thickness, porosity, diameter, length of the tubes, number of the tubes, and tube-to-tube spacing in the shell volume) a suitable design can be made to match the magnitude of water and gas flow, developed pressures from the oxygen reactant pumping device, and required residual water inventory for the shellside volume.

  3. Central 300 PC of the Galaxy Probed by the Infrared Spectra of H_3^+ and Co: I. Predominance of Warm and Diffuse Gas and High H_2 Ionization Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oka, Takeshi; Geballe, Thomas R.; Goto, Miwa; Usuda, Tomonori; Indriolo, Nick

    2016-06-01

    A low-resolution 2.0-2.5 μm survey of ˜500 very red point-like objects in the Central Molecular Zone (CMZ) of our Galaxy, initiated in 2008, has revealed many new bright objects with featureless spectra that are suitable for high resolution absorption spectroscopy of H_3^+ and CO. We now have altogether 48 objects mostly close to the Galactic plane located from 142 pc to the west of Sgr A* to 120 pc east allowing us to probe dense and diffuse gas by H_3^+ and dense gas by CO. Our observations demonstrate that the warm (˜250 K) and diffuse (≤100 cm-3) gas with a large column length (≥30 pc) initially observed toward the brightest star in the CMZ, GCS3-2 of the Quintuplet Cluster, exists throughout the CMZ with the surface filling factor of ˜ 100% dominating the region. The column densities of CO in the CMZ are found to be much less than those in the three foreground spiral arms except in the directions of Sgr B and Sgr E complexes and indicate that the volume filling factor of dense clouds of 10% previously estimated is a gross overestimate for the front half of the CMZ. Nevertheless the predominance of the newly found diffuse molecular gas makes the term "Central Molecular Zone" even more appropriate. The ultra-hot X-rays emitting plasma which some thought to dominate the region must be non existent except near the stars and SNRs. Recently the H_2 fraction f(H_2) in diffuse gas of the CMZ has been reported to be ˜0.6. If we use this value, the cosmic ray H_2 ionization rate ζ of a few times 10-15 s-1 reported earlier^b on the assumption of f(H_2)=1 needs to be increased by a factor of ˜3 since the value is approximately inversely proportional to f(H_2)^2. Geballe, T. R., Oka, T., Lambridges, E., Yeh, S. C. C., Schlegelmilch, B., Goto, M., Westrick, C. W., WI07 at the 70th ISMS, Urbana, IL, USA,2015 Oka, T., Geballe, T. R., Goto, M., Usuda, T., McCall, B. J. 2005, ApJ, 632, 882 Le Petit, F., Ruaud, M., Bron, E., Godard, B., Roueff, E., Languignon, D., Le

  4. Line strength and collisional broadening coefficients of H2O at 2.7 μm for natural gas quality assurance applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anyangwe Nwaboh, Javis; Werhahn, Olav; Ebert, Volker

    2014-09-01

    We employed tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy to measure the line strength, the methane (CH4), ethane (C2H6) and the propane (C3H8) broadening coefficients for the 523-422 H2O transition at 3619.61 cm-1. Water amount fractions generated by a stable and accurate humidity transfer standard, traceable to the SI units via the German national humidity standard, were used to calibrate the spectroscopic line strength measurements. We focus on the traceability of the measured line data to the SI and on uncertainty assessments following the guidelines of the Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement. We determined the line strength to be (8.42 ± 0.07)×10-20 cm-1/(cm-2 molecule) corresponding to a relative uncertainty of ±0.8%. To the best of our knowledge, we report the first methane, ethane and propane broadening coefficients of (8.037 ± 0.056)×10-5 cm-1/hPa, (9.077 ± 0.064)×10-5 cm-1/hPa and (10.469 ± 0.073)×10-5 cm-1/hPa for the 523-422 H2O transition at 3619.61 cm-1, respectively. The relative combined uncertainties of the stated CH4, C2H6 and C3H8 broadening coefficients are in the ±0.7% range.

  5. AC plasma torch with a H2O/CO2/CH4 mix as the working gas for methane reforming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutberg, Ph G.; Nakonechny, Gh V.; Pavlov, A. V.; Popov, S. D.; Serba, E. O.; Surov, A. V.

    2015-06-01

    This paper presents results of investigations implemented during construction of the three-phase ac plasma torch working on a mixture of steam with carbon dioxide and methane (H2O/CO2/CH4) with power upto 120 kW. Such thermal plasma generators are needed in industrial technologies for methane reforming with the aim of producing the syngas comprising of the hydrogen and carbon mono-oxide (H2/CO). It was shown that during plasma torch work there are two character parts of the high-voltage arc. In these parts, the arc column has a different diameter and temperature about (8.5  -  8.3) · 103 K and (10.5  -  10.0) · 103 K, respectively. The plasma torch output characteristics have been obtained for working regimes with various flow rates of the methane (0.0-0.8 g s-1) in the plasma-forming mix and constant flow rates of the carbon dioxide and water steam (each of 3.0 g s-1). For the mentioned mix of gases, the unit generates plasma with the mass-average temperature ~(3.2-3.3) · 103K and the thermal efficiency ~94-96%. This provides effective reforming of methane.

  6. Hollow-fiber-based adsorbers for gas separation by pressure-swing adsorption

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, X.; Pan, C.Y.; McMinis, C.W.; Ivory, J.; Ghosh, D.

    1998-07-01

    Hollow-fiber-based adsorbers for gas separation by pressure-swing adsorption (PSA) was studied experimentally. The high efficiency of hollow-fiber-based adsorbers for gas separation was illustrated by hydrogen separation using fine-powder-activated carbon and molecular sieve as adsorbents. The adsorption equilibrium and dynamics of the hollow-fiber adsorbers were determined. The pressure drop of the gas flowing through the adsorbers was also examined. The adsorbers were tested for hydrogen separation from nitrogen, carbon dioxide, and a multicomponent gas mixture simulating ammonia synthesis purge gas. The PSA systems using the hollow-fiber adsorbers were very effective for hydrogen purification. The high separation efficiency is derived from the fast mass-transfer rate and low pressure drop, two key features of hollow-fiber-based adsorbers.

  7. The sulfur depletion problem: upper limits on the H2S2, HS·2, and S2 gas-phase abundances toward the low-mass warm core IRAS 16293-2422

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín-Doménech, R.; Jiménez-Serra, I.; Muñoz Caro, G. M.; Müller, H. S. P.; Occhiogrosso, A.; Testi, L.; Woods, P. M.; Viti, S.

    2016-01-01

    Context. A fraction of the missing sulfur in dense clouds and circumstellar regions could be in the form of three species not yet detected in the interstellar medium: H2S2, HS.2, and S2 according to experimental simulations performed under astrophysically relevant conditions. These S-S bonded molecules can be formed by the energetic processing of H2S-bearing ice mantles on dust grains, and subsequently desorb to the gas phase. Aims: The detection of these species could partially solve the sulfur depletion problem, and would help to improve our knowledge of the poorly known chemistry of sulfur in the interstellar medium. To this purpose we calculated the frequencies and expected intensities of the rotational transitions not previously reported, and performed dedicated ground-based observations toward the low-mass warm core IRAS 16293-2422, a region with one of the highest measured gas-phase H2S abundances. Methods: Observations in the submillimeter regime were obtained with the APEX 12 m telescope during 15 h of observation. A total of ~16 GHz were covered in a range of about 100 GHz, targeting a wide selection of the predicted rotational transitions of the three molecules. Results: The 1σ noise rms values were extracted in the spectral regions where the targeted species should have been detected. These values were a factor of 2-7 lower than those reached by previous observations toward the same source, and allowed us to estimate a 1σ upper limit to their molecular abundances of ≤8.1 × 10-9, ≤ 1.1 × 10-8, and ≤ 2.9 × 10-7 relative to H2, for H2S 2 , HS.2, and S2, respectively. Conclusions: The upper limit abundances of the three molecules containing the S2 unit are up to two orders of magnitude lower than the H2S abundance in the source, and one order of magnitude lower than the expected abundances from the experimental simulations using ice analogs. Subsequent gas-phase chemistry after desorption could lower the abundances of the three species to

  8. Phase separation in a polarized Fermi gas with spin-orbit coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Yi, W.; Guo, G.-C.

    2011-09-15

    We study the phase separation of a spin-polarized Fermi gas with spin-orbit coupling near a wide Feshbach resonance. As a result of the competition between spin-orbit coupling and population imbalance, the phase diagram for a uniform gas develops a rich structure of phase separation involving topologically nontrivial gapless superfluid states. We then demonstrate the phase separation induced by an external trapping potential and discuss the optimal parameter region for the experimental observation of the gapless superfluid phases.

  9. Dynamic graphene filters for selective gas-water-oil separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bong, Jihye; Lim, Taekyung; Seo, Keumyoung; Kwon, Cho-Ah; Park, Ju Hyun; Kwak, Sang Kyu; Ju, Sanghyun

    2015-09-01

    Selective filtration of gas, water, and liquid or gaseous oil is essential to prevent possible environmental pollution and machine/facility malfunction in oil-based industries. Novel materials and structures able to selectively and efficiently filter liquid and vapor in various types of solutions are therefore in continuous demand. Here, we investigate selective gas-water-oil filtration using three-dimensional graphene structures. The proposed approach is based on the adjustable wettability of three-dimensional graphene foams. Three such structures are developed in this study; the first allows gas, oil, and water to pass, the second blocks water only, and the third is exclusively permeable to gas. In addition, the ability of three-dimensional graphene structures with a self-assembled monolayer to selectively filter oil is demonstrated. This methodology has numerous potential practical applications as gas, water, and/or oil filtration is an essential component of many industries.

  10. CARBON DIOXIDE SEPARATION BY PHASE ENHANCED GAS-LIQUID ABSORPTION

    SciTech Connect

    Liang Hu

    2004-09-30

    A new process called phase enhanced gas-liquid absorption has been developed in its early stage. It was found that adding another phase into the absorption system of gas/aqueous phase could enhance the absorption rate. A system with three phases was studied. In the system, gas phase was carbon dioxide. Two liquid phases were used. One was organic phase. Another was aqueous phase. By addition of organic phase into the absorption system of CO{sub 2}-aqueous phase, the absorption rate of CO{sub 2} was increased significantly. CO{sub 2} finally accumulated into aqueous phase. The experimental results proved that (1) Absorption rate of carbon dioxide was enhanced by adding organic phase into gas aqueous phase system; (2) Organic phase played the role of transportation of gas solute (CO{sub 2}). Carbon dioxide finally accumulated into aqueous phase.

  11. CARBON DIOXIDE SEPARATION BY PHASE ENHANCED GAS-LIQUID ABSORPTION

    SciTech Connect

    Liang Hu; Adeyinka A. Adeyiga

    2004-05-01

    A new process called phase enhanced gas-liquid absorption has been developed in its early stage. It was found that adding another phase into the absorption system of gas/aqueous phase could enhance the absorption rate. A system with three phases was studied. In the system, gas phase was carbon dioxide. Two liquid phases were used. One was organic phase. Another was aqueous phase. By addition of organic phase into the absorption system of CO{sub 2}-aqueous phase, the absorption rate of CO{sub 2} was increased significantly. CO{sub 2} finally accumulated into aqueous phase. The experimental results proved that (1) Absorption rate of carbon dioxide was enhanced by adding organic phase into gas aqueous phase system; (2) Organic phase played the role of transportation of gas solute (CO{sub 2}). Carbon dioxide finally accumulated into aqueous phase.

  12. Dynamic graphene filters for selective gas-water-oil separation.

    PubMed

    Bong, Jihye; Lim, Taekyung; Seo, Keumyoung; Kwon, Cho-Ah; Park, Ju Hyun; Kwak, Sang Kyu; Ju, Sanghyun

    2015-09-23

    Selective filtration of gas, water, and liquid or gaseous oil is essential to prevent possible environmental pollution and machine/facility malfunction in oil-based industries. Novel materials and structures able to selectively and efficiently filter liquid and vapor in various types of solutions are therefore in continuous demand. Here, we investigate selective gas-water-oil filtration using three-dimensional graphene structures. The proposed approach is based on the adjustable wettability of three-dimensional graphene foams. Three such structures are developed in this study; the first allows gas, oil, and water to pass, the second blocks water only, and the third is exclusively permeable to gas. In addition, the ability of three-dimensional graphene structures with a self-assembled monolayer to selectively filter oil is demonstrated. This methodology has numerous potential practical applications as gas, water, and/or oil filtration is an essential component of many industries.

  13. Dynamic graphene filters for selective gas-water-oil separation

    PubMed Central

    Bong, Jihye; Lim, Taekyung; Seo, Keumyoung; Kwon, Cho-Ah; Park, Ju Hyun; Kwak, Sang Kyu; Ju, Sanghyun

    2015-01-01

    Selective filtration of gas, water, and liquid or gaseous oil is essential to prevent possible environmental pollution and machine/facility malfunction in oil-based industries. Novel materials and structures able to selectively and efficiently filter liquid and vapor in various types of solutions are therefore in continuous demand. Here, we investigate selective gas-water-oil filtration using three-dimensional graphene structures. The proposed approach is based on the adjustable wettability of three-dimensional graphene foams. Three such structures are developed in this study; the first allows gas, oil, and water to pass, the second blocks water only, and the third is exclusively permeable to gas. In addition, the ability of three-dimensional graphene structures with a self-assembled monolayer to selectively filter oil is demonstrated. This methodology has numerous potential practical applications as gas, water, and/or oil filtration is an essential component of many industries. PMID:26394930

  14. Electrochemical performance of lithium-sulfur batteries based on a sulfur cathode obtained by H2S gas treatment of a lithium salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dressel, Carina B.; Jha, Himendra; Eberle, Anna-Marietta; Gasteiger, Hubert A.; Fässler, Thomas F.

    2016-03-01

    A new technique to produce Li2S/C composites and Li2S cathodes as well as their application in high-capacity Li-S batteries is demonstrated. The simple but effective method converts an easy-to-handle lithium salt-containing composite or electrode to Li2S using H2S. The main advantage is that the conversion to Li2S can be performed towards the final stage of the electrode preparation process, which significantly reduces the need of controlled atmosphere otherwise required for Li2S handling. LiOH is used to demonstrate the technique, and such fabricated Li2S electrode is successfully used in a Li-S battery (half-cell) where it shows discharge capacities of up to 770 mAh g-1(Li2S) and retained >410 mAh g-1(Li2S) after 100 cycles at C/5.

  15. Helium tube separates nitrogen gas from liquid nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. B.

    1964-01-01

    To prevent a boiloff problem, liquid nitrogen flowing from a storage tank to a container, is separated into liquid and gaseous components. This is accomplished by centrifugal and venting action, using a section of perforated helical aluminum tubing.

  16. Gas chromatographic separation of hydrogen isotopes using metal hydrides

    SciTech Connect

    Aldridge, F.T.

    1984-05-09

    A study was made of the properties of metal hydrides which may be suitable for use in chromatographic separation of hydrogen isotopes. Sixty-five alloys were measured, with the best having a hydrogen-deuterium separation factor of 1.35 at 60/sup 0/C. Chromatographic columns using these alloys produced deuterium enrichments of up to 3.6 in a single pass, using natural abundance hydrogen as starting material. 25 references, 16 figures, 4 tables.

  17. Blends of a Polymer of Intrinsic Microporosity and Partially Sulfonated Polyphenylenesulfone for Gas Separation.

    PubMed

    Yong, Wai Fen; Lee, Zhi Kang; Chung, Tai-Shung; Weber, Martin; Staudt, Claudia; Maletzko, Christian

    2016-08-01

    Polyphenylenesulfone (PPSU) and sulfonated polyphenylenesulfone (sPPSU) are widely used for liquid separations in the medical and food industries. However, their potential applications for gas separation have not been studied extensively owing to their low intrinsic gas permeability. We report here for the first time that blending with sPPSU can significantly improve the gas separation performance of highly permeable polymers of intrinsic microporosity (PIMs), specifically PIM-1, because of the strong molecular interactions of the sulfonic acid groups of sPPSU with CO2 and O2 . In addition, a novel co-solvent system has been discovered to overcome the immiscibility of these polymers. The presence of a higher degree of sulfonation in sPPSU results in better gas separation performance of the blend membranes close to or above the Robeson upper bound lines for O2 /N2 , CO2 /N2 and CO2 /CH4 separations. Interestingly, the blend membranes have comparable gas selectivity to sPPSU even though their sPPSU content is only 5-20 wt %. Moreover, they also display improved anti-plasticization properties up to 30 atm (3 MPa) using a binary CO2 /CH4 feed gas. The newly developed PIM-1/sPPSU membranes are potential candidates for air separation, natural gas separation, and CO2 capture.

  18. Blends of a Polymer of Intrinsic Microporosity and Partially Sulfonated Polyphenylenesulfone for Gas Separation.

    PubMed

    Yong, Wai Fen; Lee, Zhi Kang; Chung, Tai-Shung; Weber, Martin; Staudt, Claudia; Maletzko, Christian

    2016-08-01

    Polyphenylenesulfone (PPSU) and sulfonated polyphenylenesulfone (sPPSU) are widely used for liquid separations in the medical and food industries. However, their potential applications for gas separation have not been studied extensively owing to their low intrinsic gas permeability. We report here for the first time that blending with sPPSU can significantly improve the gas separation performance of highly permeable polymers of intrinsic microporosity (PIMs), specifically PIM-1, because of the strong molecular interactions of the sulfonic acid groups of sPPSU with CO2 and O2 . In addition, a novel co-solvent system has been discovered to overcome the immiscibility of these polymers. The presence of a higher degree of sulfonation in sPPSU results in better gas separation performance of the blend membranes close to or above the Robeson upper bound lines for O2 /N2 , CO2 /N2 and CO2 /CH4 separations. Interestingly, the blend membranes have comparable gas selectivity to sPPSU even though their sPPSU content is only 5-20 wt %. Moreover, they also display improved anti-plasticization properties up to 30 atm (3 MPa) using a binary CO2 /CH4 feed gas. The newly developed PIM-1/sPPSU membranes are potential candidates for air separation, natural gas separation, and CO2 capture. PMID:27332951

  19. Cooler and particulate separator for an off-gas stack

    DOEpatents

    Wright, G.T.

    1991-04-08

    This report describes an off-gas stack for a melter, furnace or reaction vessel comprising an air conduit leading to two sets of holes, one set injecting air into the off-gas stack near the melter plenum and the second set injecting air downstream of the first set. The first set injects air at a compound angle, having both downward and tangential components, to create a reverse vortex flow, counter to the direction of flow of gas through the stack and also along the periphery of the stack interior surface. Air from the first set of holes prevents recirculation zones from forming and the attendant accumulation of particulate deposits on the wall of the stack and will also return to the plenum any particulate swept up in the gas entering the stack. The second set of holes injects air in the same direction as the gas in the stack to compensate for the pressure drop and to prevent the concentration of condensate in the stack. A set of sprayers, receiving water from a second conduit, is located downstream of the second set of holes and sprays water into the gas to further cool it.

  20. Cooler and particulate separator for an off-gas stack

    DOEpatents

    Wright, George T.

    1992-01-01

    An off-gas stack for a melter comprising an air conduit leading to two sets of holes, one set injecting air into the off-gas stack near the melter plenum and the second set injecting air downstream of the first set. The first set injects air at a compound angle, having both downward and tangential components, to create a reverse vortex flow, counter to the direction of flow of gas through the stack and also along the periphery of the stack interior surface. Air from the first set of holes pervents recirculation zones from forming and the attendant accumulation of particulate deposits on the wall of the stack and will also return to the plenum any particulate swept up in the gas entering the stack. The second set of holes injects air in the same direction as the gas in the stack to compensate for the pressure drop and to prevent the concentration of condensate in the stack. A set of sprayers, receiving water from a second conduit, is located downstream of the second set of holes and sprays water into the gas to further cool it.

  1. Effectiveness and reaction networks of H2O2 vapor with NH3 gas for decontamination of the toxic warfare nerve agent, VX on a solid surface.

    PubMed

    Gon Ryu, Sam; Wan Lee, Hae

    2015-01-01

    The nerve agent, O-ethyl S-[2-(diisopropylamino)ethyl] methylphosphonothioate (VX) must be promptly eliminated following its release into the environment because it is extremely toxic, can cause death within a few minutes after exposure, acts through direct skin contact as well as inhalation, and persists in the environment for several weeks after release. A mixture of hydrogen peroxide vapor and ammonia gas was examined as a decontaminant for the removal of VX on solid surfaces at ambient temperature, and the reaction products were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry (NMR). All the VX on glass wool filter disks was found to be eliminated after 2 h of exposure to the decontaminant mixtures, and the primary decomposition product was determined to be non-toxic ethyl methylphosphonic acid (EMPA); no toxic S-[2-(diisopropylamino)ethyl] methylphosphonothioic acid (EA-2192), which is usually produced in traditional basic hydrolysis systems, was found to be formed. However, other by-products, such as toxic O-ethyl S-vinyl methylphosphonothioate and (2-diisopropylaminoethyl) vinyl disulfide, were detected up to 150 min of exposure to the decontaminant mixture; these by-products disappeared after 3 h. The two detected vinyl byproducts were identified first in this study with the decontamination system of liquid VX on solid surfaces using a mixture of hydrogen peroxide vapor and ammonia gas. The detailed decontamination reaction networks of VX on solid surfaces produced by the mixture of hydrogen peroxide vapor and ammonia gas were suggested based on the reaction products. These findings suggest that the mixture of hydrogen peroxide vapor and ammonia gas investigated in this study is an efficient decontaminant mixture for the removal of VX on solid surfaces at ambient temperature despite the formation of a toxic by-product in the reaction process. PMID:26327407

  2. Crossed molecular beam study of gas phase reactions relevant to the chemistry of planetary atmospheres: The case of C 2+C 2H 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonori, Francesca; Petrucci, Raffaele; Hickson, Kevin M.; Segoloni, Enrico; Balucani, Nadia; Le Picard, Sébastien D.; Foggi, Paolo; Casavecchia, Piergiorgio

    2008-11-01

    The reaction between dicarbon (C 2) and acetylene was recently suggested as a possible competitive reaction in the atmospheres of Titan, Saturn and Uranus by rate constant measurements at very low temperatures [see Canosa, A., Páramo, A., Le Picard, S.D., Sims, I.R., 2007. An experimental study of the reaction kinetics of C 2(X 1Σ g+) with hydrocarbons (CH 4, C 2H 2, C 2H 4, C 2H 6 and C 3H 8) over the temperature range 24-300 K: implications for the atmospheres of Titan and the Giant Planets. Icarus 187, 558-568]. We have investigated the reaction of the two low lying electron states of C 2 and acetylene by the crossed molecular beam (CMB) technique with mass spectrometric detection. C 4H, already identified as a primary product in previous CMB experiments, is confirmed as such, even though the mechanism of formation is inferred to be partly different with respect to the previous study. An experimental setup has been devised to characterize the internal population of C 2 and refine the interpretation of the scattering results. The implications for the modelling of the atmospheres of Giant Planets and Titan, as well as cometary comae and the interstellar medium, are discussed.

  3. One Step Biomass Gas Reforming-Shift Separation Membrane Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, Michael J.; Souleimanova, Razima

    2012-12-28

    GTI developed a plan where efforts were concentrated in 4 major areas: membrane material development, membrane module development, membrane process development, and membrane gasifier scale-up. GTI assembled a team of researchers to work in each area. Task 1.1 Ceramic Membrane Synthesis and Testing was conducted by Arizona State University (ASU), Task 1.2 Metallic Membrane Synthesis and Testing was conducted by the U.S. National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), Task 1.3 was conducted by SCHOTT, and GTI was to test all membranes that showed potential. The initial focus of the project was concentrated on membrane material development. Metallic and glass-based membranes were identified as hydrogen selective membranes under the conditions of the biomass gasification, temperatures above 700C and pressures up to 30 atmospheres. Membranes were synthesized by arc-rolling for metallic type membranes and incorporating Pd into a glass matrix for glass membranes. Testing for hydrogen permeability properties were completed and the effects of hydrogen sulfide and carbon monoxide were investigated for perspective membranes. The initial candidate membrane of Pd80Cu20 chosen in 2008 was selected for preliminary reactor design and cost estimates. Although the H2A analysis results indicated a $1.96 cost per gge H2 based on a 5A (micron) thick PdCu membrane, there was not long-term operation at the required flux to satisfy the go/no go decision. Since the future PSA case yielded a $2.00/gge H2, DOE decided that there was insufficient savings compared with the already proven PSA technology to further pursue the membrane reactor design. All ceramic membranes synthesized by ASU during the project showed low hydrogen flux as compared with metallic membranes. The best ceramic membrane showed hydrogen permeation flux of 0.03 SCFH/ft2 at the required process conditions while the metallic membrane, Pd80Cu20 showed a flux of 47.2 SCFH/ft2 (3 orders of magnitude difference). Results from

  4. Systems and methods for using a boehmite bond-coat with polyimide membranes for gas separation

    DOEpatents

    Polishchuk, Kimberly Ann

    2013-03-05

    The subject matter disclosed herein relates to gas separation membranes and, more specifically, to polyimide gas separation membranes. In an embodiment, a gas separation membrane includes a porous substrate, a substantially continuous polyimide membrane layer, and one or more layers of boehmite nanoparticles disposed between the porous substrate and the polyimide membrane layer to form a bond-coat layer. The bond-coat layer is configured to improve the adhesion of the polyimide membrane layer to the porous substrate, and the polyimide membrane layer has a thickness approximately 100 nm or less.

  5. H-bonding of an NH3 gas molecule to H2O/Pt(111) — A barrier-free path

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henkelman, Graeme; Feibelman, Peter J.

    2016-02-01

    Does an OH-flipping barrier hinder H-bond formation between a gas phase molecule and a water monolayer whose free OH ligands point toward a substrate? According to density functional theory calculations for water on Pt(111) the answer is yes, when the molecule is CO or N2, but no when it is NH3. The difference is the relatively strong attraction of the NH3 lone pair to free OH ligands.

  6. Electrochemical separation and concentration of hydrogen sulfide from gas mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Winnick, Jack; Sather, Norman F.; Huang, Hann S.

    1984-10-30

    A method of removing sulfur oxides of H.sub.2 S from high temperature gas mixtures (150.degree.-1000.degree. C.) is the subject of the present invention. An electrochemical cell is employed. The cell is provided with inert electrodes and an electrolyte which will provide anions compatible with the sulfur containing anions formed at the anode. The electrolyte is also selected to provide inert stable cations at the temperatures encountered. The gas mixture is passed by the cathode where the sulfur gases are converted to SO.sub.4 -- or, in the case of H.sub.2 S, to S--. The anions migrate to the anode where they are converted to a stable gaseous form at much greater concentration levels (>10X). Current flow may be effected by utilizing an external source of electrical energy or by passing a reducing gas such as hydrogen past the anode.

  7. ELECTROCHEMICAL SEPARATION AND CONCENTRATION OF HYDROGEN SULFIDE FROM GAS MIXTURES

    DOEpatents

    Winnick, Jack; Sather, Norman F.; Huang, Hann S.

    1984-10-30

    A method of removing sulfur oxides of H.sub.2 S from high temperature gas mixtures (150.degree.-1000.degree. C.) is the subject of the present invention. An electrochemical cell is employed. The cell is provided with inert electrodes and an electrolyte which will provide anions compatible with the sulfur containing anions formed at the anode. The electrolyte is also selected to provide inert stable cations at the temperatures encountered. The gas mixture is passed by the cathode where the sulfur gases are converted to SO.sub.4 -- or, in the case of H.sub.2 S, to S--. The anions migrate to the anode where they are converted to a stable gaseous form at much greater concentration levels (>10X). Current flow may be effected by utilizing an external source of electrical energy or by passing a reducing gas such as hydrogen past the anode.

  8. Interstellar clouds containing optically thin H2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jura, M.

    1975-01-01

    The theory of Black and Delgarno that the relative populations of the excited rotational levels of H2 can be understood in terms of cascading following absorption in the Lyman and Werner bands is employed to infer the gas densities and radiation fields within diffuse interstellar clouds containing H2 that is optically thin in those bands. The procedure is described for computing the populations of the different rotation levels, the relative distribution among the different rotation levels of newly formed H2 is determined on the basis of five simplified models, and the rate of H2 formation is estimated. The results are applied to delta Ori, two components of iota Ori, the second components of rho Leo and zeta Ori, tau Sco, gamma Vel, and zeta Pup. The inferred parameters are summarized for each cloud.

  9. Cellulose triacetate doped with ionic liquids for membrane gas separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Benjamin Fatt Soon

    The doping of cellulose triacetate (CTA) with imidazolium based ionic liquids (ILs) is investigated in order to reduce the polymer crystallinity and enhance the affinity with CO2, thus increasing CO2 permeability and CO2/light gas selectivity. CTA membranes doped with [emim] BF4 or [emim] DCA were prepared, and the effect of the ILs loading on properties, such as crystallinity, density, degradation temperature, glass transition temperature, and gas transport properties, has been determined. In general, doping with IL reduces the crystallinity in CTA, increasing gas solubility, diffusivity and permeability. The ILs doping also increases CO 2/CH4 solubility selectivity and CO2/N2 permeability selectivity, due to the affinity of these ILs with CO2, instead of light gases such as CH4 and N2. This study provides a mechanistic understanding of interaction of ILs and CTA, and demonstrates an effective route in manipulating the morphology and gas transport properties of semi crystalline polymers by doping with ILs.

  10. Selective detection of toxic cyanogen gas in the presence of O2, and H2O molecules using a AlN nanocluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solimannejad, Mohammad; Kamalinahad, Saeedeh; Shakerzadeh, Ehsan

    2016-08-01

    The interaction of cyanogen molecule with Al12N12 nanocage has been studied using density functional theory (DFT) at CAM-B3LYP/6-31+G(d) level. Geometric, electronic structure and natural bond orbitals (NBO) analysis display that adsorption of cyanogen onto exterior surface of Al12N12 is physisorption with adsorption energy (Eads) equal to -55.36 kJ/mol. UV-vis study shows a high intensity peak in 388.9 nm due to interaction of gas with nanocage. It is expected that Al12N12 will be used in designing novel materials for potential applications to detect toxic cyanogen molecule.

  11. Tunable composite membranes for gas separations. Quarterly technical progress report, May--July 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Ferraris, J.P.; Balkus, K.J. Jr.; Musselman, I.H.

    1996-08-05

    Significant progress has been made in the synthesis and characterization of conducting polymer composite membranes for gas separations. Zeolite/polyalkylthiophene composite membranes have been prepared and characterized for zeolite NaY.

  12. Gas Separation Using Organic-Vapor-Resistent Membranes In Conjunctin With Organic-Vapor-Selective Membranes

    DOEpatents

    Baker, Richard W.; Pinnau, Ingo; He, Zhenjie; Da Costa, Andre R.; Daniels, Ramin; Amo, Karl D.; Wijmans, Johannes G.

    2003-06-03

    A process for treating a gas mixture containing at least an organic compound gas or vapor and a second gas, such as natural gas, refinery off-gas or air. The process uses two sequential membrane separation steps, one using membrane selective for the organic compound over the second gas, the other selective for the second gas over the organic vapor. The second-gas-selective membranes use a selective layer made from a polymer having repeating units of a fluorinated polymer, and demonstrate good resistance to plasticization by the organic components in the gas mixture under treatment, and good recovery after exposure to liquid aromatic hydrocarbons. The membrane steps can be combined in either order.

  13. Estimated CO2, SO2 and H2S emission to the atmosphere from the 2011 El Hierro submarine eruption (Canary Islands) on the basis of helicopter gas surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrancos, J.; Padilla, G.; Padrón, E.; Hernández, P. A.; Calvo, D.; Marquez, A.; Pérez, N. M.; Melian, G.; Dionis, S.; Rodríguez, F.; Nolasco, D.; Hernández, I.

    2012-04-01

    An accurate estimation of SO2 emission rates is an important issue to elucidate the activity of volcanoes, moreover the monitoring of its temporal evolution might help to predict a possible eruption and thus, save the loss of human's lives in cities nearby volcanoes. In the lasts years new instruments have been developed and improved, in order to be more portable, cheaper and lighter. The miniDOAS consist of a small spectrometer with a lens for collecting scattered UV light, and are controlled/powered via USB with a laptop. Recently, new technical developments have allowed monitoring the emission of other gas species such as CO2, H2S, etc from volcanic plumes by means of portable multisensor system. With both devices we were able to evaluate the SO2 emission rates and the molar ratios of major volcanic gas components, respectively. Multiplying the observed SO2 emission rate times the observed (gas)i/SO2 mass ratios (CO2/SO2 and H2S/SO2) allowed us to estimate other volatiles emission rates. Between November 11, 2011, and January 16, 2012, and as a consequence of the submarine volcanic eruption started on October 10, 2011, south off shore El Hierro, Canary Islands, a regularly monitoring of the volcanic plume from the submarine volcano has been performed with remote sensors, always depending of helicopter availability. The instruments are mounted aboard on a helicopter belonged to the Helicopter Unit of Spanish Civil Guard. The SO2 flux measured during this period showed a maximum SO2 emission of 109 ± 19 t/d on November 6, just two days before the occurrence of a intense bubbling at the sea surface on November 8, producing a water, gas and ash column of about 15 meters over the sea surface. That day, CO2 and H2S emission also reached the maximum measured, with 5400 t/d and 3.6 t/d, respectively. Since then, SO2, CO2 and H2S emission rates have declined to values close to detection limit (~ 2 t/d for SO2). These results report the first SO2 emission rates measured

  14. Liquid-gas phase separation in confined vibrated dry granular matter.

    PubMed

    Roeller, Klaus; Clewett, James P D; Bowley, R M; Herminghaus, Stephan; Swift, Michael R

    2011-07-22

    A new phase transition is observed experimentally in a dry granular gas subject to vertical vibration between two horizontal plates. Molecular dynamics simulations of this system allow us to investigate the observed phase separation in detail. We find a high-density, low temperature liquid, coexisting with a low-density, high temperature gas moving coherently. The importance of the coherent motion for phase separation is investigated using frequency modulation.

  15. Noble-gas-rich separates from ordinary chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moniot, R. K.

    1980-02-01

    Acid-resistant residues were prepared by HCl-HF demineralization of three H-type ordinary chondrites: Brownfield 1937 (H3), Dimmitt (H3, 4), and Estacado (H6). These residues were found to contain a large proportion of the planetary-type trapped Ar, Kr, and Xe in the meteorites. The similarity of these acid residues to those from carbonaceous chondrites and LL-type ordinary chondrites suggests that the same phase carries the trapped noble gases in all these diverse meteorite types. Because the H group represents a large fraction of all meteorites, this result indicates that the gas-rich carrier phase is as universal as the trapped noble-gas component itself. When treated with an oxidizing etchant, the acid residues lost almost all their complement of noble gases.

  16. COS Observations of Molecular H2 at z = 0.248

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruse, Ethan; Tumlinson, J.; Thom, C.; Sembach, K.

    2011-01-01

    We present HST/COS observations of a QSO sightline through the halo of two merging galaxies at z = 0.25 at impact parameter 90 kpc. This sightline presents the first example of strong H2 absorption features in our large COS survey of galaxy halo gas at low redshift (COS-Halos, Tumlinson et al.). COS spectra reveal a sub-DLA at z = 0.2478 which splits into two components separated by 70 km/s. One component appears to contain more high-ionization states and less neutral H I while the other favors neutral atoms and contains a strong H2 signature (J = 0-3) along with the majority of the H I. Aside from H2 we detect O I, N I and N II, Si II and Si III, and C II. We find a total H2 column density of N(H2) = 16.89 and an H2 fraction of f_{H2} = 0.0034. Fitting the unblended H2 lines from 0-0 to 15-0 to a curve of growth we find a best fit with b = 11.8 km s-1. Due to the full saturation of all Lyman lines, we are unable to separate the H I column density into the two components and therefore cannot get a direct metallicity for either cloud. However through Cloudy modelling we are able to estimate a H I column density and ionization correction in each component and therefore obtain an approximate metallicity through O I absorption. This system shows similar features to a portion of the Magellanic Stream studied by Sembach et al. 2006. Both sightlines have comparable H I and H2 columns, H2 excitation temperatures, and similar metallicities, suggesting this sightline could be a distant counterpart to the Magellanic Stream, perhaps stripped from an unseen companion galaxy to the two merger partners.

  17. Noble-gas-rich separates from the Allende meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ott, U.; Mack, R.; Chang, S.

    1981-01-01

    Predominantly carbonaceous HF/HCl-resistant residues from the Allende meteorite are studied. Samples are characterized by SEM/EDXA, X-ray diffraction, INAA, C, S, H, N, and noble gas analyses. Isotopic data for carbon show variations no greater than 5%, while isotopic data from noble gases confirm previously established systematics. Noble gas abundances correlate with those of C and N, and concomitant partial loss of C and normal trapped gas occur during treatments with oxidizing acids. HF/HCl demineralization of bulk meteorite results in similar fractional losses of C and trapped noble gases, which leads to the conclusion that various macromolecular carbonaceous substances serve as the main host phase for normal trapped noble gases and anomalous gases in acid-resistant residues, and as the carrier of the major part of trapped noble gases lost during HF/HCl demineralization. Limits on the possible abundances of dense mineralic host phases in the residues are obtained, and considerations of the nucleogenetic origin for CCF-XE indicate that carbonaceous host phases and various forms of organic matter in carbonaceous meteorites may have a presolar origin.

  18. Doping and defect structure of mixed-conducting ceramics for gas separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, Chendong

    A worldwide energy crisis and increasing environmental concerns are strong incentives for using hydrogen as a sustainable and clean energy source. "Hydrogen economy" has been around since 1970s, but it started to look practicable only in recent years. The trend in the future is to switch from using hydrogen as the basic raw material in the chemical industry to the energy carrier in the transportation and distributed energy industries. To meet the expected rising demand, hydrogen has to be generated in a more cost-effective manner. As one of the most important operation units in the hydrogen production, a high performance hydrogen separation membrane system is essential to the coming hydrogen economy. The project of hydrogen separation membrane based on Mixed ionic and electronic conductor (MIEC) composite was initiated by DoE years ago, and the MIEC membrane has been developed in Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for several years. The goal at ANL is to develop a dense, ceramic-based MIEC membrane that is highly selective, chemical stable in practical environments at operative temperatures up to ≈900°C, and can separate hydrogen from mixed gases at commercially significant fluxes under industrially relevant operating conditions, without the need for electrodes or electrical circuitry. The effort at ANL initially focused on BCY20 (BaCe0.8Y 0.2O3). BCY20 forms the matrix of ANL-1a and -2a ceramic-metal composite membranes (40-50 vol.% of a metal is dispersed in a ceramic matrix) and its bulk transport properties, including ionic transfer number, ionic and electronic conductivity, and chemical and mechanical stability have been systematically studied. However, exposure to CO2 and H2O-containing atmospheres, as would be present in a practical environment, will degrade the material as it reacts to form insulating barium carbonate (BaCO3 ) and cerium oxide (CeO2). This decomposition greatly limits its applicability in hydrogen separation, despite the promising

  19. Ecosystem CO2/H2O fluxes are explained by hydraulically limited gas exchange during tree mortality from spruce bark beetles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, John M.; Massman, William J.; Ewers, Brent E.; Huckaby, Laurie S.; Negrón, José F.

    2014-06-01

    Disturbances are increasing globally due to anthropogenic changes in land use and climate. This study determines whether a disturbance that affects the physiology of individual trees can be used to predict the response of the ecosystem by weighing two competing hypothesis at annual time scales: (a) changes in ecosystem fluxes are proportional to observable patterns of mortality or (b) to explain ecosystem fluxes the physiology of dying trees must also be incorporated. We evaluate these hypotheses by analyzing 6 years of eddy covariance flux data collected throughout the progression of a spruce beetle (Dendroctonus rufipennis) epidemic in a Wyoming Engelmann spruce (Picea engelmannii)-subalpine fir (Abies lasiocarpa) forest and testing for changes in canopy conductance (gc), evapotranspiration (ET), and net ecosystem exchange (NEE) of CO2. We predict from these hypotheses that (a) gc, ET, and NEE all diminish (decrease in absolute magnitude) as trees die or (b) that (1) gc and ET decline as trees are attacked (hydraulic failure from beetle-associated blue-stain fungi) and (2) NEE diminishes both as trees are attacked (restricted gas exchange) and when they die. Ecosystem fluxes declined as the outbreak progressed and the epidemic was best described as two phases: (I) hydraulic failure caused restricted gc, ET (28 ± 4% decline, Bayesian posterior mean ± standard deviation), and gas exchange (NEE diminished 13 ± 6%) and (II) trees died (NEE diminished 51 ± 3% with minimal further change in ET to 36 ± 4%). These results support hypothesis b and suggest that model predictions of ecosystem fluxes following massive disturbances must be modified to account for changes in tree physiological controls and not simply observed mortality.

  20. Performance of Na 2O promoted alumina as CO 2 chemisorbent in sorption-enhanced reaction process for simultaneous production of fuel-cell grade H 2 and compressed CO 2 from synthesis gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ki Bong; Beaver, Michael G.; Caram, Hugo S.; Sircar, Shivaji

    The performance of a novel thermal swing sorption-enhanced reaction (TSSER) concept for simultaneous production of fuel-cell grade hydrogen and compressed carbon dioxide as a by-product from a synthesis gas feed is simulated using Na 2O promoted alumina as a CO 2 chemisorbent in the process. The process simultaneously carries out the water gas shift (WGS) reaction and removal of CO 2 from the reaction zone by chemisorption in a single unit. Periodic regeneration of the chemisorbent is achieved by using the principles of thermal swing adsorption employing super-heated steam purge. Recently measured equilibrium and kinetic data for chemisorption and desorption of CO 2 on the promoted alumina using conventional column dynamic tests as well as new experimental data demonstrating the concept of sorption-enhanced WGS reaction using the material are reviewed. The simulated performance of the TSSER process employing this material as a chemisorbent is compared with the process performance using K 2CO 3 promoted hydrotalcite as the chemisorbent. The promoted alumina exhibited (i) ∼15% lower H 2 productivity at a slightly reduced CO to H 2 conversion, and (ii) comparable compressed CO 2 productivity at a higher CO 2 recovery, albeit at a relatively lower product pressure. However, the steam duty for regeneration of the chemisorbent was reduced by ∼50% for the promoted alumina.

  1. Separation of gas from liquid in a two-phase flow system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayes, L. G.; Elliott, D. G.

    1973-01-01

    Separation system causes jets which leave two-phase nozzles to impinge on each other, so that liquid from jets tends to coalesce in center of combined jet streams while gas phase is forced to outer periphery. Thus, because liquid coalescence is achieved without resort to separation with solid surfaces, cycle efficiency is improved.

  2. Comment on "Pairing and phase separation in a polarized Fermi gas".

    PubMed

    Zwierlein, Martin W; Ketterle, Wolfgang

    2006-10-01

    Partridge et al. (Reports, 27 January 2006, p. 503) reported pairing and phase separation in a polarized Fermi gas. We argue that it is not possible to distinguish the superfluid from the normal regimes in the presented data, or to discern which clouds were phase-separated. Some of the reported conclusions are inconsistent with recent experiments.

  3. Potential Flue Gas Impurities in Carbon Dioxide Streams Separated from Coal-fired Power Plants

    EPA Science Inventory

    For geological sequestration of CO2 separated from pulverized coal combustion flue gas, it is necessary to adequately evaluate the potential impacts of flue gas impurities on groundwater aquifers in the case of the CO2 leakage from its storage sites. This s...

  4. Separation of gases through gas enrichment membrane composites

    DOEpatents

    Swedo, R.J.; Kurek, P.R.

    1988-07-19

    Thin film composite membranes having as a permselective layer a film of a homopolymer of certain vinyl alkyl ethers are useful in the separation of various gases. Such homopolymers have a molecular weight of greater than 30,000 and the alkyl group of the vinyl alkyl monomer has from 4 to 20 carbon atoms with branching within the alkyl moiety at least at the carbon atom bonded to the ether oxygen or at the next adjacent carbon atom. These membranes show excellent hydrolytic stability, especially in the presence of acidic or basic gaseous components.

  5. Separation of gases through gas enrichment membrane composites

    DOEpatents

    Swedo, Raymond J.; Kurek, Paul R.

    1988-01-01

    Thin film composite membranes having as a permselective layer a film of a homopolymer of certain vinyl alkyl ethers are useful in the separation of various gases. Such homopolymers have a molecular weight of greater than 30,000 and the alkyl group of the vinyl alkyl monomer has from 4 to 20 carbon atoms with branching within the alkyl moiety at least at the carbon atom bonded to the ether oxygen or at the next adjacent carbon atom. These membranes show excellent hydrolytic stability, especially in the presence of acidic or basic gaseous components.

  6. Process for the separation of components from gas mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Merriman, J.R.; Pashley, J.H.; Stephenson, M.J.; Dunthorn, D.I.

    1973-10-01

    A process for the removal, from gaseous mixtures of a desired component selected from oxygen, iodine, methyl iodide, and lower oxides of carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur is described. The gaseous mixture is contacted with a liquid fluorocarbon in an absorption zone maintained at superatmospheric pressure to preferentially absorb the desired component in the fluorocarbon. Unabsorbed constituents of the gaseous mixture are withdrawn from the absorption zone. Liquid fluorocarbon enriched in the desired component is withdrawn separately from the zone, following which the desired component is recovered from the fluorocarbon absorbent. (Official Gazette)

  7. Functionalized carbon nanotubes mixed matrix membranes of polymers of intrinsic microporosity for gas separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Muntazim Munir; Filiz, Volkan; Bengtson, Gisela; Shishatskiy, Sergey; Rahman, Mushfequr; Abetz, Volker

    2012-09-01

    The present work reports on the gas transport behavior of mixed matrix membranes (MMM) which were prepared from multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and dispersed within polymers of intrinsic microporosity (PIM-1) matrix. The MWCNTs were chemically functionalized with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) for a better dispersion in the polymer matrix. MMM-incorporating functionalized MWCNTs (f-MWCNTs) were fabricated by dip-coating method using microporous polyacrylonitrile membrane as a support and were characterized for gas separation performance. Gas permeation measurements show that MMM incorporated with pristine or functionalized MWCNTs exhibited improved gas separation performance compared to pure PIM-1. The f-MWCNTs MMM show better performance in terms of permeance and selectivity in comparison to pristine MWCNTs. The gas permeances of the derived MMM are increased to approximately 50% without sacrificing the selectivity at 2 wt.% of f-MWCNTs' loading. The PEG groups on the MWCNTs have strong interaction with CO2 which increases the solubility of polar gas and limit the solubility of nonpolar gas, which is advantageous for CO2/N2 selectivity. The addition of f-MWCNTs inside the polymer matrix also improved the long-term gas transport stability of MMM in comparison with PIM-1. The high permeance, selectivity, and long term stability of the fabricated MMM suggest that the reported approach can be utilized in practical gas separation technology.

  8. Preparation and characterization of composite membrane for high temperature gas separation

    SciTech Connect

    Ilias, S.; King, F.G.; Su, N.

    1994-10-01

    The objective of this project is to develop thin film palladium membranes for separation of hydrogen in high temperature applications. The authors plan to use electroless plating to deposit thin palladium films on microporous ceramic and silver substrates and then characterize the membrane in terms of permeability and selectivity for gas separation. To accomplish the research objective, the project requires three tasks: Development of a process for composite membrane fabrication; Characterization of composite membrane; and Development of theoretical model for hydrogen gas separation. The experimental procedures are described.

  9. Membrane loop process for separating carbon dioxide for use in gaseous form from flue gas

    SciTech Connect

    Wijmans, Johannes G; Baker, Richard W; Merkel, Timothy C

    2014-10-07

    The invention is a process involving membrane-based gas separation for separating and recovering carbon dioxide emissions from combustion processes in partially concentrated form, and then transporting the carbon dioxide and using or storing it in a confined manner without concentrating it to high purity. The process of the invention involves building up the concentration of carbon dioxide in a gas flow loop between the combustion step and a membrane separation step. A portion of the carbon dioxide-enriched gas can then be withdrawn from this loop and transported, without the need to liquefy the gas or otherwise create a high-purity stream, to a destination where it is used or confined, preferably in an environmentally benign manner.

  10. UV and IR Spectroscopy of Cold H2O(+)-Benzo-Crown Ether Complexes.

    PubMed

    Inokuchi, Yoshiya; Ebata, Takayuki; Rizzo, Thomas R

    2015-11-12

    The H2O(+) radical ion, produced in an electrospray ion source via charge transfer from Eu(3+), is encapsulated in benzo-15-crown-5 (B15C5) or benzo-18-crown-6 (B18C6). We measure UV photodissociation (UVPD) spectra of the (H2O·B15C5)(+) and (H2O·B18C6)(+) complexes in a cold, 22-pole ion trap. These complexes show sharp vibronic bands in the 35 700-37 600 cm(-1) region, similar to the case of neutral B15C5 or B18C6. These results indicate that the positive charge in the complexes is localized on H2O, giving the forms H2O(+)·B15C5 and H2O(+)·B18C6, in spite of the fact that the ionization energy of B15C5 and B18C6 is lower than that of H2O. The formation of the H2O(+) complexes and the suppression of the H3O(+) production through the reaction of H2O(+) and H2O can be attributed to the encapsulation of hydrated Eu(3+) clusters by B15C5 and B18C6. On the contrary, the main fragment ions subsequent to the UV excitation of these complexes are B15C5(+) and B18C6(+) radical ions; the charge transfer occurs from H2O(+) to B15C5 and B18C6 after the UV excitation. The position of the band origin for the H2O(+)·B18C6 complex (36323 cm(-1)) is almost the same as that for Rb(+)·B18C6 (36315 cm(-1)); the strength of the intermolecular interaction of H2O(+) with B18C6 is similar to that of Rb(+). The spectral features of the H2O(+)·B15C5 complex also resemble those of the Rb(+)·B15C5 ion. We measure IR-UV spectra of these complexes in the CH and OH stretching region. Four conformers are found for the H2O(+)·B15C5 complex, but there is one dominant form for the H2O(+)·B18C6 ion. This study demonstrates the production of radical ions by charge transfer from multivalent metal ions, their encapsulation by host molecules, and separate detection of their conformers by cold UV spectroscopy in the gas phase.

  11. Electronic states and potential energy surfaces of H2Te, H2Po, and their positive ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumathi, K.; Balasubramanian, K.

    1990-06-01

    Geometries, bond energies, ionization potentials, dipole moments, other one-electron properties, and potential energy surfaces of six valence electronic states of H2Te and H2Po species are obtained using the relativistic complete active space multiconfiguration self-consistent field (CASSCF) followed by full second-order configuration interaction (SOCI) and relativistic configuration interaction (RCI) calculations including spin-orbit coupling. In addition, Rydberg states of H2Te and H2Se are studied to interpret the experimental spectra. The potential energy surfaces of two electronic states of H2Te+ and H2Po+ are obtained. The ground states of both H2Te and H2Po are found to be of X 1A1(A1) symmetry with bent (C2v) equilibrium geometries of H2Te:re =1.668 Å, θe=91.2°; and H2Po:re =1.835 Å and θe=90.9°. The ground states of H2Te+ and H2Po+ are X 2B1 with H2Te+:re =1.676 Å, θe=90.7° and H2Po+:re =1.828 Å and θe=88°. The De (HTe-H) and De (HPo-H) including spin-orbit effects are calculated as 63.2 and 39.4 kcal/mol, respectively. The X 2B1(E)-A 2A1(E) energy separations of H2Te+ and H2Po+ ions are calculated as 66.6 and 76 kcal/mol, respectively. The adiabatic IPs of H2Te and H2Po are calculated as 8.47 and 7.79 eV, respectively. In addition CASSCF/SOCI/RCI calculations are also carried out on the X 2Π3/2 and 2Π1/2 states of TeH and PoH diatomics. The X 2Π3/2-2Π1/2 energy separations of TeH and PoH are computed as 3710 and 9920 cm-1, respectively. Spin-orbit effects are thus found to be very significant for PoH and H2Po. All excited states of H2Te and H2Po are above 3.7 and 3.1 eV, respectively. Properties and energy separations of H2Te and H2Po are compared with the lighter group (VI) H2Ch species.

  12. Constraining the ortho-to-para ratio of H2 with anomalous H_2CO absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troscompt, N.; Faure, A.; Maret, S.; Ceccarelli, C.; Hily-Blant, P.; Wiesenfeld, L.

    2009-11-01

    Context: The ortho-to-para ratio (OPR) of molecular hydrogen is a fundamental parameter in understanding the physics and chemistry of molecular clouds. In dark and cold regions, however, H2 is not directly observable and the OPR of H2 in these sources has so far remained elusive. Aims: We show that the 6 cm absorption line of ortho-formaldehyde (H2CO) can be employed to constrain both the density and the OPR of H2 in dark clouds. Methods: Green Bank Telescope (GBT) observations of ortho-H2CO toward the molecular cloud Barnard 68 (B68) are reported. Non-LTE radiative transfer calculations combined with the well-constrained structure of B68 are then employed to derive the physical conditions in the absorption region. Results: We provide the first firm confirmation of the Townes & Cheung mechanism: propensity rules for the collisions of H2CO with H2 molecules are responsible for the sub-2.7 K cooling of the 6 cm doublet. Non-LTE calculations show that in the absorption region of B68, the kinetic temperature is ˜ 10 K, the ortho-H2CO column density amounts to ˜ 2.2× 1013 cm-2, the H2 density is in the range 1.4{-}2.4× 10 4 cm-3, and the OPR of H2 is close to zero. Our observations thus provide fresh evidence that H2 is mostly in its para form in the cold gas, as expected from theoretical considerations. Our results also suggest that formaldehyde absorption originates in the edge of B68, at visual extinctions A_V⪉ 0.5 mag. This work has been inspired by our colleague and friend Pierre Valiron, who passed away in August 2008. This paper is dedicated to his memory.

  13. Improved high efficiency third stage separator cyclones for separation of fines from fluid catalytic cracking flue gas

    SciTech Connect

    Chitnis, G.K.; Schatz, K.W.; Bussey, B.K.

    1996-12-31

    Stairmand type small diameter (0.254 m) multicyclones were cold flow tested for fluid catalytic cracking third stage separator application. The gas discharge from the cyclone dust outlet into the common collection hopper was found to far exceed the hopper bleed rate (underflow). The excess gas reentrained dust from the hopper back into cyclones, which lowered collection efficiencies. Vortex {open_quotes}stabilization{close_quotes} using apex cones was unsuccessful whereas a Mobil proprietary cyclone modification was successful in minimizing excess gas discharge and dust reentrainment at the cyclone-hopper boundary. In tests at 700 {degrees}C, the modified cyclones captured all particles above 4 {mu}m. Mobil-Kellogg incorporated the modified cyclones in a new third stage separator design which is targeted for achieving lowest opacity and <50 mg/Nm{sup 3} emissions at the stack. The first such unit will be commercialized in Mobil`s newest catalytic cracker (M.W. Kellogg design) under construction in Altona, Australia in late 1996. 5 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Fluid Phase Separation (FPS) experiment for flight on a space shuttle Get Away Special (GAS) canister

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, Bruce; Wingo, Dennis; Bower, Mark; Amborski, Robert; Blount, Laura; Daniel, Alan; Hagood, Bob; Handley, James; Hediger, Donald; Jimmerson, Lisa

    1990-01-01

    The separation of fluid phases in microgravity environments is of importance to environmental control and life support systems (ECLSS) and materials processing in space. A successful fluid phase separation experiment will demonstrate a proof of concept for the separation technique and add to the knowledge base of material behavior. The phase separation experiment will contain a premixed fluid which will be exposed to a microgravity environment. After the phase separation of the compound has occurred, small samples of each of the species will be taken for analysis on the Earth. By correlating the time of separation and the temperature history of the fluid, it will be possible to characterize the process. The experiment has been integrated into space available on a manifested Get Away Special (GAS) experiment, CONCAP 2, part of the Consortium for Materials Complex Autonomous Payload (CAP) Program, scheduled for STS-42. The design and the production of a fluid phase separation experiment for rapid implementation at low cost is presented.

  15. Process and apparatus for separation of components of a gas stream

    DOEpatents

    Bryan, Charles R.; Torczynski, John R.; Brady, Patrick V.; Gallis, Michail; Brooks, Carlton F.

    2014-06-17

    A process and apparatus for separating a gas mixture comprising providing a slot in a gas separation channel (conceptualized as a laterally elongated Clusius-Dickel column), having a length through which a net cross-flow of the gas mixture may be established; applying a higher temperature to one side of the channel and a lower temperature on an opposite side of the channel thereby causing thermal-diffusion and buoyant-convection flow to occur in the slot; and establishing a net cross-flow of a gas mixture comprising at least one higher density gas component and at least one lower density gas component along the length of the slot, wherein the cross-flow causes, in combination with the convection flow, a spiraling flow in the slot; and wherein the spiral flow causes an increasing amount of separation of the higher density gas from the lower density gas along the length of the channel. The process may use one or more slots and/or channels.

  16. Process and apparatus for separation of components of a gas stream

    DOEpatents

    Bryan, Charles R; Torczynski, John R; Brady, Patrick V; Gallis, Michail; Brooks, Carlton F

    2013-09-17

    A process and apparatus for separating a gas mixture comprising providing a slot in a gas separation channel (conceptualized as a laterally elongated Clusius-Dickel column), having a length through which a net cross-flow of the gas mixture may be established; applying a higher temperature to one side of the channel and a lower temperature on an opposite side of the channel thereby causing thermal-diffusion and buoyant-convection flow to occur in the slot; and establishing a net cross-flow of a gas mixture comprising at least one higher density gas component and at least one lower density gas component along the length of the slot, wherein the cross-flow causes, in combination with the convection flow, a spiraling flow in the slot; and wherein the spiral flow causes an increasing amount of separation of the higher density gas from the lower density gas along the length of the channel. The process may use one or more slots and/or channels.

  17. Process and apparatus for separation of components of a gas stream

    DOEpatents

    Bryan, Charles R; Torczynski, John R; Brady, Patrick V; Gallis, Michail; Brooks, Carlton F

    2013-11-19

    A process and apparatus for separating a gas mixture comprising providing a slot in a gas separation channel (conceptualized as a laterally elongated Clusius-Dickel column), having a length through which a net cross-flow of the gas mixture may be established; applying a higher temperature to one side of the channel and a lower temperature on an opposite side of the channel thereby causing thermal-diffusion and buoyant-convection flow to occur in the slot; and establishing a net cross-flow of a gas mixture comprising at least one higher density gas component and at least one lower density gas component along the length of the slot, wherein the cross-flow causes, in combination with the convection flow, a spiraling flow in the slot; and wherein the spiral flow causes an increasing amount of separation of the higher density gas from the lower density gas along the length of the channel. The process may use one or more slots and/or channels.

  18. Application of time-division-multiplexed lasers for measurements of gas temperature and CH4 and H2O concentrations at 30 kHz in a high-pressure combustor.

    PubMed

    Caswell, Andrew W; Kraetschmer, Thilo; Rein, Keith; Sanders, Scott T; Roy, Sukesh; Shouse, Dale T; Gord, James R

    2010-09-10

    Two time-division-multiplexed (TDM) sources based on fiber Bragg gratings were applied to monitor gas temperature, H(2)O mole fraction, and CH(4) mole fraction using line-of-sight absorption spectroscopy in a practical high-pressure gas turbine combustor test article. Collectively, the two sources cycle through 14 wavelengths in the 1329-1667 nm range every 33 μs. Although it is based on absorption spectroscopy, this sensing technology is fundamentally different from typical diode-laser-based absorption sensors and has many advantages. Specifically, the TDM lasers allow efficient, flexible acquisition of discrete-wavelength information over a wide spectral range at very high speeds (typically 30 kHz) and thereby provide a multiplicity of precise data at high speeds. For the present gas turbine application, the TDM source wavelengths were chosen using simulated temperature-difference spectra. This approach is used to select TDM wavelengths that are near the optimum values for precise temperature and species-concentration measurements. The application of TDM lasers for other measurements in high-pressure, turbulent reacting flows and for two-dimensional tomographic reconstruction of the temperature and species-concentration fields is also forecast.

  19. Modification of gas separation membrane materials by antiplasticization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Trevino, Francisco Alberto

    The effects of adding low molecular weight diluents or additives on gas permeation properties of polysulfone, PSF, and substituted, high free volume polysulfones and polyarylates were analyzed. Such diluents to glassy polymers lead to the phenomenon called antiplasticization, i.e. they increase modulus and retard certain segmental motions. Additives based on naphthalene, bisphenol A and fluorene structures were incorporated into PSF. The incorporation of low concentrations of such additives increases the selectivity and reduces permeability of PSF. The largest increases in selectivity are observed for the additives that cause the largest reductions in the glass transition temperature and fractional free volume; typically, these additives have low glass transition temperature and are planar molecules containing polar or small asymmetric protuberances. The productivity-selectivity balance response of the modified PSF membranes reveals that the naphthalene-based additives containing asymmetric groups of atoms leads to membranes with higher selectivity and with only small losses in permeability relative to the unmodified PSF membranes. The permselectivity properties of tetramethylhexafluoro polysulfone, TMHFPSF, and tetramethylhexafluoro bisphenol A t-butyl isophthalate, TMHFBPA-tBIA, modified with a low molecular weight glassy additive Kenflex A, KXA, were compared to the permselectivity properties shown by the base, unsubstituted polysulfone, PSF, and bisphenol A t-butyl isophthalate, BPA-tBIA. The addition of modest amounts of KXA (ca 20 wt%) into TMHFPSF or TMHFBPA-tBIA, leads to materials whose permeability/selectivity combination is better than that of the PSF or BPA-tBIA materials. The polymer TMHFPSF responds more beneficially to the incorporation of KXA than TMHFBPA-tBIA. A mathematical model to describe the effect of incorporating diluents on the specific volume of polymers is presented. Comparisons of the predicted to the experimental specific volume reveals

  20. Gas separation process using membranes with permeate sweep to remove CO.sub.2 from gaseous fuel combustion exhaust

    DOEpatents

    Wijmans Johannes G.; Merkel, Timothy C.; Baker, Richard W.

    2012-05-15

    A gas separation process for treating exhaust gases from the combustion of gaseous fuels, and gaseous fuel combustion processes including such gas separation. The invention involves routing a first portion of the exhaust stream to a carbon dioxide capture step, while simultaneously flowing a second portion of the exhaust gas stream across the feed side of a membrane, flowing a sweep gas stream, usually air, across the permeate side, then passing the permeate/sweep gas back to the combustor.

  1. Modeling the influence of bubble pressure on grain boundary separation and fission gas release

    SciTech Connect

    Pritam Chakraborty; Michael R. Tonks; Giovanni Pastore

    2014-09-01

    Grain boundary (GB) separation as a mechanism for fission gas release (FGR), complementary to gas bubble interlinkage, has been experimentally observed in irradiated light water reactor fuel. However there has been limited effort to develop physics-based models incorporating this mechanism for the analysis of FGR. In this work, a computational study is carried out to investigate GB separation in UO2 fuel under the effect of gas bubble pressure and hydrostatic stress. A non-dimensional stress intensity factor formula is obtained through 2D axisymmetric analyses considering lenticular bubbles and Mode-I crack growth. The obtained functional form can be used in higher length-scale models to estimate the contribution of GB separation to FGR.

  2. Feasibility of the preparation of silica monoliths for gas chromatography: fast separation of light hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Azzouz, Imadeddine; Essoussi, Anouar; Fleury, Joachim; Haudebourg, Raphael; Thiebaut, Didier; Vial, Jerome

    2015-02-27

    The preparation conditions of silica monoliths for gas chromatography were investigated. Silica-based monolithic capillary columns based on sol-gel process were tested in the course of high-speed gas chromatographic separations of light hydrocarbons mixture (C1-C4). The impact of modifying the amount of porogen and/or catalyst on the monolith properties were studied. At the best precursor/catalyst/porogen ratio evaluated, a column efficiency of about 6500 theoretical plates per meter was reached with a very good resolution (4.3) for very light compounds (C1-C2). The test mixture was baseline separated on a 70cm column. To our knowledge for the first time a silica-based monolithic capillary column was able to separate light hydrocarbons from methane to n-butane at room temperature with a back pressure in the range of gas chromatography facilities (under 4.1bar).

  3. Device for two-dimensional gas-phase separation and characterization of ion mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Tang, Keqi; Shvartsburg, Alexandre A.; Smith, Richard D.

    2006-12-12

    The present invention relates to a device for separation and characterization of gas-phase ions. The device incorporates an ion source, a field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) analyzer, an ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) drift tube, and an ion detector. In one aspect of the invention, FAIMS operating voltages are electrically floated on top of the IMS drift voltage. In the other aspect, the FAIMS/IMS interface is implemented employing an electrodynamic ion funnel, including in particular an hourglass ion funnel. The present invention improves the efficiency (peak capacity) and sensitivity of gas-phase separations; the online FAIMS/IMS coupling creates a fundamentally novel two-dimensional gas-phase separation technology with high peak capacity, specificity, and exceptional throughput.

  4. Feasibility of the preparation of silica monoliths for gas chromatography: fast separation of light hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Azzouz, Imadeddine; Essoussi, Anouar; Fleury, Joachim; Haudebourg, Raphael; Thiebaut, Didier; Vial, Jerome

    2015-02-27

    The preparation conditions of silica monoliths for gas chromatography were investigated. Silica-based monolithic capillary columns based on sol-gel process were tested in the course of high-speed gas chromatographic separations of light hydrocarbons mixture (C1-C4). The impact of modifying the amount of porogen and/or catalyst on the monolith properties were studied. At the best precursor/catalyst/porogen ratio evaluated, a column efficiency of about 6500 theoretical plates per meter was reached with a very good resolution (4.3) for very light compounds (C1-C2). The test mixture was baseline separated on a 70cm column. To our knowledge for the first time a silica-based monolithic capillary column was able to separate light hydrocarbons from methane to n-butane at room temperature with a back pressure in the range of gas chromatography facilities (under 4.1bar). PMID:25622518

  5. Determination of gas temperature and C2 absolute density in Ar/H2/CH4 microwave discharges used for nanocrystalline diamond deposition from the C2 Mulliken system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombardi, G.; Bénédic, F.; Mohasseb, F.; Hassouni, K.; Gicquel, A.

    2004-08-01

    The spectroscopic characterization of Ar/H2/CH4 discharges suitable for the synthesis of nanocrystalline diamond using the microwave plasma assisted chemical vapour deposition process is reported. The experiments are realized in a moderate-pressure bell jar reactor, where discharges are ignited using a microwave cavity coupling system. The concentration of CH4 is maintained at 1% and the coupled set of hydrogen concentration/microwave power (MWP) ranges from 2%/500 W to 7%/800 W at a pressure of 200 mbar. Emission spectroscopy and broadband absorption spectroscopy studies are carried out on the \\C_{2}(D\\,^{1\\!}\\Sigma_u^{+}\\mbox{--}X\\,^{1\\!}\\Sigma_g^{+}) Mulliken system and the C2(d 3Pgrg-a 3Pgru) Swan system in order to determine the gas temperature and the C2 absolute density within the plasma. For this purpose, and since the Swan system is quite well-known, much importance is devoted to the achievement of a detailed simulation of the Mulliken system, which allows the determination of both the rotational temperature and the density of the \\smash{X\\,^{1\\!}\\Sigma_g^{+}} ground state, as well as the rotational temperature of the \\smash{D\\,^{1\\!}\\Sigma_u^{+}} state, from experimental data. All the experimental values are compared to those predicted by a thermochemical model developed to describe Ar/H2/CH4 microwave discharges under quasi-homogeneous plasma assumption. This comparison shows a reasonable agreement between the values measured from the C2 Mulliken system, those measured from the C2 Swan system and that calculated from plasma modelling, especially at low hydrogen concentration/MWP. These consistent results show that the use of the Mulliken system leads to fairly good estimates of the gas temperature and of the C2 absolute density. The relatively high gas temperatures found for the conditions investigated, typically between 3000 K and 4000 K, are attributed to the low thermal conductivity of argon that may limit thermal losses to the

  6. Enhancement of atmospheric H2SO4 / H2O nucleation: organic oxidation products versus amines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berndt, T.; Sipilä, M.; Stratmann, F.; Petäjä, T.; Vanhanen, J.; Mikkilä, J.; Patokoski, J.; Taipale, R.; Mauldin, R. L., III; Kulmala, M.

    2014-01-01

    Atmospheric H2SO4 / H2O nucleation influencing effects have been studied in the flow tube IfT-LFT (Institute for Tropospheric Research - Laminar Flow Tube) at 293 ± 0.5 K and a pressure of 1 bar using synthetic air as the carrier gas. The presence of a possible background amine concentration in the order of 107-108 molecule cm-3 throughout the experiments has to be taken into account. In a first set of investigations, ozonolysis of olefins (tetramethylethylene, 1-methyl-cyclohexene, α-pinene and limonene) for close to atmospheric concentrations, served as the source of OH radicals and possibly other oxidants initiating H2SO4 formation starting from SO2. The oxidant generation is inevitably associated with the formation of organic oxidation products arising from the parent olefins. These products (first generation mainly) showed no clear effect on the number of nucleated particles within a wide range of experimental conditions for H2SO4 concentrations higher than ~107 molecule cm-3. Also the early growth process of the nucleated particles was not significantly influenced by the organic oxidation products in line with the expected growth by organic products using literature data. An additional, H2SO4-independent process of particle (nano-CN) formation was observed in the case of α-pinene and limonene ozonolysis for H2SO4 concentrations smaller than ~107 molecule cm-3. Furthermore, the findings confirm the appearance of an additional oxidant for SO2 beside OH radicals, very likely stabilized Criegee Intermediates (sCI). A second set of experiments has been performed in the presence of added amines in the concentrations range of a few 107-1010 molecule cm-3 applying photolytic OH radical generation for H2SO4 production without addition of other organics. All amines showed significant nucleation enhancement with increasing efficiency in the order pyridine < aniline < dimethylamine < trimethylamine. This result supports the idea of H2SO4 cluster stabilization by

  7. Phase Separation and Pair Condensation in a Spin-Imbalanced 2D Fermi Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, Debayan; Brown, Peter T.; Schauß, Peter; Kondov, Stanimir S.; Bakr, Waseem S.

    2016-08-01

    We study a two-component quasi-two-dimensional Fermi gas with imbalanced spin populations. We probe the gas at different interaction strengths and polarizations by measuring the density of each spin component in the trap and the pair momentum distribution after time of flight. For a wide range of experimental parameters, we observe in-trap phase separation characterized by the appearance of a spin-balanced core surrounded by a polarized gas. Our momentum space measurements indicate pair condensation in the imbalanced gas even for large polarizations where phase separation vanishes, pointing to the presence of a polarized pair condensate. Our observation of zero momentum pair condensates in 2D spin-imbalanced gases opens the way to explorations of more exotic superfluid phases that occupy a large part of the phase diagram in lower dimensions.

  8. Phase Separation and Pair Condensation in a Spin-Imbalanced 2D Fermi Gas.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Debayan; Brown, Peter T; Schauß, Peter; Kondov, Stanimir S; Bakr, Waseem S

    2016-08-26

    We study a two-component quasi-two-dimensional Fermi gas with imbalanced spin populations. We probe the gas at different interaction strengths and polarizations by measuring the density of each spin component in the trap and the pair momentum distribution after time of flight. For a wide range of experimental parameters, we observe in-trap phase separation characterized by the appearance of a spin-balanced core surrounded by a polarized gas. Our momentum space measurements indicate pair condensation in the imbalanced gas even for large polarizations where phase separation vanishes, pointing to the presence of a polarized pair condensate. Our observation of zero momentum pair condensates in 2D spin-imbalanced gases opens the way to explorations of more exotic superfluid phases that occupy a large part of the phase diagram in lower dimensions. PMID:27610853

  9. Phase Separation and Pair Condensation in a Spin-Imbalanced 2D Fermi Gas.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Debayan; Brown, Peter T; Schauß, Peter; Kondov, Stanimir S; Bakr, Waseem S

    2016-08-26

    We study a two-component quasi-two-dimensional Fermi gas with imbalanced spin populations. We probe the gas at different interaction strengths and polarizations by measuring the density of each spin component in the trap and the pair momentum distribution after time of flight. For a wide range of experimental parameters, we observe in-trap phase separation characterized by the appearance of a spin-balanced core surrounded by a polarized gas. Our momentum space measurements indicate pair condensation in the imbalanced gas even for large polarizations where phase separation vanishes, pointing to the presence of a polarized pair condensate. Our observation of zero momentum pair condensates in 2D spin-imbalanced gases opens the way to explorations of more exotic superfluid phases that occupy a large part of the phase diagram in lower dimensions.

  10. Cryogenic system with GM cryocooler for krypton, xenon separation from hydrogen-helium purge gas

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, X. X.; Zhang, D. X.; Qian, Y.; Liu, W.; Zhang, M. M.; Xu, D.

    2014-01-29

    In the thorium molten salt reactor (TMSR), fission products such as krypton, xenon and tritium will be produced continuously in the process of nuclear fission reaction. A cryogenic system with a two stage GM cryocooler was designed to separate Kr, Xe, and H{sub 2} from helium purge gas. The temperatures of two stage heat exchanger condensation tanks were maintained at about 38 K and 4.5 K, respectively. The main fluid parameters of heat transfer were confirmed, and the structural heat exchanger equipment and cold box were designed. Designed concentrations after cryogenic separation of Kr, Xe and H{sub 2} in helium recycle gas are less than 1 ppb.

  11. Effect of evaporation time on cellulose acetate membrane for gas separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jami'an, W. N. R.; Hasbullah, H.; Mohamed, F.; Yusof, N.; Ibrahim, N.; Ali, R. R.

    2016-06-01

    Throughout this decades, membrane technology has been the desirable option among the others gas separation technologies. However, few issues have been raised regarding the membrane gas separation application including the trade-off between its permeability and selectivity and also its effects towards environment. Therefore, for this research, a biopolymer membrane for gas separation application will be developed with reasonably high on both permeability and selectivity. The main objective of this research is to study the effect of solvent evaporation time on the flat sheet asymmetric membrane morphology and gas separation performance. The membranes were produced by a simple dry/wet phase inversion technique using a pneumatically controlled casting system. The dope solution for the membrane casting was prepared by dissolving the cellulose acetate (CA) polymer in N-Methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP) and the solvent evaporation time was varied. Permeability and selectivity of the membrane was performed by using pure gases of carbon dioxide, CO2 and methane, CH4. The increase in solvent evaporation time had improved the membrane morphologies as the porosity of the membrane surface decrease and formation of a more mature skin layer. The gas permeation tests determined that increasing in solvent evaporation time had increased the selectivity of CO2/CH4 but reduce the permeability of both gases

  12. Analysis of CO2 Separation from Flue Gas, Pipeline Transportation, and Sequestration in Coal

    SciTech Connect

    Eric P. Robertson

    2007-09-01

    This report was written to satisfy a milestone of the Enhanced Coal Bed Methane Recovery and CO2 Sequestration task of the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration project. The report begins to assess the costs associated with separating the CO2 from flue gas and then injecting it into an unminable coal seam. The technical challenges and costs associated with CO2 separation from flue gas and transportation of the separated CO2 from the point source to an appropriate sequestration target was analyzed. The report includes the selection of a specific coal-fired power plant for the application of CO2 separation technology. An appropriate CO2 separation technology was identified from existing commercial technologies. The report also includes a process design for the chosen technology tailored to the selected power plant that used to obtain accurate costs of separating the CO2 from the flue gas. In addition, an analysis of the costs for compression and transportation of the CO2 from the point-source to an appropriate coal bed sequestration site was included in the report.

  13. Gravity wave propagation in a diffusively separated gas: Effects on the total gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walterscheid, R. L.; Hickey, M. P.

    2012-05-01

    We present a full-wave model that simulates acoustic-gravity wave propagation in a binary-gas mixture of atomic oxygen and molecular nitrogen, including molecular viscosity and thermal conductivity appropriately partitioned between the two gases. Compositional effects include the collisional transfer of heat and momentum by mutual diffusion between the two gases. An important result of compositional effects is that the velocity and temperature summed over species can be significantly different from the results of one-gas models with the same height dependent mean molecular weight (M(z)). We compare the results of our binary-gas model to two one-gas full-wave models: one where M is fixed and fluctuations of M (M‧) are zero and the other where M is conserved following parcel displacement (whence M‧ is nonzero). The former is the usual approach and is equivalent to assuming that mutual diffusion acts instantaneously to restore composition to its ambient value. In all cases we considered, the single gas model results obtained assuming that M is conserved following parcels gave significantly better agreement with the binary-gas model. This implies that compositional effects may be included in one-gas models by simply adding a conservation equation for M and for the specific gas at constant pressure, which depends on M.

  14. Membrane gas separation. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the research and development of gas separation and purification techniques involving the use of plastic and metal membranes. Citations review isotope separation, osmotic techniques, reverse osmosis, and preparation of membranes for specific separation processes. The permeability of polymer membranes is discussed in terms of physical properties as well as molecular structure. The selectivity of polymeric films for a variety of gases is also included. (Contains a minimum of 205 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  15. Membrane gas separation. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the research and development of gas separation and purification techniques involving the use of plastic and metal membranes. Citations review isotope separation, osmotic techniques, reverse osmosis, and preparation of membranes for specific separation processes. The permeability of polymer membranes is discussed in terms of physical properties as well as molecular structure. The selectivity of polymeric films for a variety of gases is also included. (Contains a minimum of 198 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  16. Membrane gas separation. (Latest citations from the NTIS data base). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-08-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the research and development of gas separation and purification techniques involving the use of plastic and metal membranes. Among the topics included are isotope separation, osmotic techniques, reverse osmosis, and preparation of membranes for specific separation processes. The permeability of polymer membranes is discussed in terms of physical properties as well as molecular structure. The selectivity of polymeric films for a variety of gases is also included. (Contains a minimum of 168 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  17. Efficient gas-separation process to upgrade dilute methane stream for use as fuel

    DOEpatents

    Wijmans, Johannes G.; Merkel, Timothy C.; Lin, Haiqing; Thompson, Scott; Daniels, Ramin

    2012-03-06

    A membrane-based gas separation process for treating gas streams that contain methane in low concentrations. The invention involves flowing the stream to be treated across the feed side of a membrane and flowing a sweep gas stream, usually air, across the permeate side. Carbon dioxide permeates the membrane preferentially and is picked up in the sweep air stream on the permeate side; oxygen permeates in the other direction and is picked up in the methane-containing stream. The resulting residue stream is enriched in methane as well as oxygen and has an EMC value enabling it to be either flared or combusted by mixing with ordinary air.

  18. Porous anionic indium-organic framework with enhanced gas and vapor adsorption and separation ability.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yuanbiao; Lin, Zujin; Fu, Hongru; Wang, Fei; Shen, Min; Wang, Xusheng; Cao, Rong

    2014-09-01

    A three-dimensional microporous anionic metal-organic framework (MOF) (Et4N)3[In3(TATB)4] (FJI-C1, H3TATB=4,4',4''-s-triazine-2,4,6-triyltribenzoic acid) with large unit cell volume has been synthesized. Assisted by the organic cation group Et4N in the pores of the compound, FJI-C1 not only shows high adsorption uptakes of C2 and C3 hydrocarbons, but also exhibits highly selective separation of propane, acetylene, ethane, and ethylene from methane at room temperature. Furthermore, it also exhibits high separation selectivity for propane over C2 hydrocarbons and acetylene can be readily separated from their C2 hydrocarbons mixtures at low pressure due to the high selectivity for C2H2 in comparison to C2H4 and C2H6. In addition, FJI-C1 with hydrophilic internal pores surfaces shows highly efficient adsorption separation of polar molecules from nonpolar molecules. Notably, it exhibits high separation selectivity for benzene over cyclohexane due to the π-π interactions between benzene molecules and s-triazine rings of the porous MOF.

  19. Zero liquid carryover whole-body shower vortex liquid/gas separator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The development and evaluation of a liquid/gas vortex type separator design eliminating liquid and semi-liquid (suds) carryover into air recirculating system were described. Consideration was given to a number of soaps other than the "Miranol JEM" which was the low sudsing soap used in previous test runs of the space shower. Analysis of test parameters and prototype testing resulted in a revised separator configuration and a better understanding of the suds generating mechanism in the wastewater collection system. The final design of the new separator provides for a wider choice of soaps without leading to the problem of "carryover". Furthermore, no changes in separator-to-shower interfaces were required. The new separator was retrofitted on the "space shower" and satisfactorily demonstrated in one-g testing.

  20. The tropospheric gas composition of Jupiter's north equatorial belt (NH3, PH3, CH3D, GeH4, H2O) and the Jovian D/H isotropic ratio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunde, V.; Hanel, R.; Maguire, W.; Gautier, D.; Baluteau, J. P.; Marten, A.; Chedin, A.; Husson, N.; Scott, N.

    1982-01-01

    The gas composition of the troposphere of Jupiter in the clearest regions of the North Equatorial Belt (NEB) was derived from the Voyager 1 IRIS data. The infrared spectrum for this homogeneous cloud free region was modeled to infer altitude profiles for NH3, PH3, GeH4 and H2O. The Profiles for NH3 and PH3 were found to be depleted in the upper troposphere but otherwise in agreement with their solar values at the 1 bar level. The mole fraction for CH3D was determined to be 3.5(+1.0 or -1.3) x 10 to the minus 7th power. The GeH4 mole fraction of 7+ or -2 x 10 to the minus 10th power at the 2 to 3 bar level is a factor of 10 lower than the solar value. The H2O mole fraction is approximately 1 x 0.00001 at the 2.5 bar level and is increasing to approximately 3 x 0.00001 at 4 bars where it is a factor of 30 lower than solar. Using IRIS infrared values for the mole fractions of CH3D and CH4 a value of D/H = 3.6(+1.0 or -1.4)x 0.00001 is derived. Assuming this Jovian D/H ratio is representative of the protosolar nebula, and correcting for chemical galactic evolution, yields a value of 5.5 - 9.0 x 0.00001 for the primordial D/H ratio and an upper limit of 1.8 to 2.4 x 10 to the minus 31st power cu cm for the present day baryon density.

  1. ENANTIOMER SEPARATION OF POLYCHLORINATED BIPHENYL ATROPISOMERS AND POLYCHLORINATED BIPHENYL RETENTION BEHAVIOR ON MODIFIED CYCLODEXTRIN CAPILLARY GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY COLUMNS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Seven commercially-available chiral capillary gas chromatography columns containing modified cyclodextrins were evaluated for their ability to separate enantiomers of the 19 stable chiral polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) atropisomers, and for their ability to separate these enantio...

  2. The Separation and Identification of Straight Chain Hydrocarbons: An Experiment Using Gas-Liquid Chromatography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benson, G. A.

    1982-01-01

    An experiment using gas-liquid chromatography is discussed, introducing the student to concept of dead volume and its measurement, idea and use of an internal reference compound, and to linear relationship existing between measurements of a separation on two different stationary phases. (Author/SK)

  3. Ultraselective Gas Separation by Nanoporous Metal-Organic Frameworks Embedded in Gas-Barrier Nanocellulose Films.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Makoto; Kitaoka, Takuya

    2016-03-01

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are synthesized at carboxy groups on crystalline TEMPO-oxidized cellulose nanofibers (TOCNs). MOF-TOCN films coated on a paper filter have a hierarchical structure from the nano- to macroscale, and demonstrate a high CO2 /CH4 selectivity, over 120 for CO2 at a high gas flux, by the combination of the nanoporous MOFs and the gas-barrier TOCNs, which have strong affinity with each other. PMID:26669724

  4. Potential energy surface and rovibrational energy levels of the H2-CS van der Waals complex.

    PubMed

    Denis-Alpizar, Otoniel; Stoecklin, Thierry; Halvick, Philippe; Dubernet, Marie-Lise; Marinakis, Sarantos

    2012-12-21

    Owing to its large dipole, astrophysicists use carbon monosulfide (CS) as a tracer of molecular gas in the interstellar medium, often in regions where H(2) is the most abundant collider. Predictions of the rovibrational energy levels of the weakly bound complex CS-H(2) (not yet observed) and also of rate coefficients for rotational transitions of CS in collision with H(2) should help to interpret the observed spectra. This paper deals with the first goal, i.e., the calculation of the rovibrational energy levels. A new four-dimensional intermolecular potential energy surface for the H(2)-CS complex is presented. Ab initio potential energy calculations were carried out at the coupled-cluster level with single and double excitations and a perturbative treatment of triple excitations, using a quadruple-zeta basis set and midbond functions. The potential energy surface was obtained by an analytic fit of the ab initio data. The equilibrium structure of the H(2)-CS complex is found to be linear with the carbon pointing toward H(2) at the intermolecular separation of 8.6 a(o). The corresponding well depth is -173 cm(-1). The potential was used to calculate the rovibrational energy levels of the para-H(2)-CS and ortho-H(2)-CS complexes. The present work provides the first theoretical predictions of these levels. The calculated dissociation energies are found to be 35.9 cm(-1) and 49.9 cm(-1), respectively, for the para and ortho complexes. The second virial coefficient for the H(2)-CS pair has also been calculated for a large range of temperature. These results could be used to assign future experimental spectra and to check the accuracy of the potential energy surface.

  5. Effect of Inlet and Outlet Flow Conditions on Natural Gas Parameters in Supersonic Separation Process

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yan; Wen, Chuang; Wang, Shuli; Feng, Yuqing

    2014-01-01

    A supersonic separator has been introduced to remove water vapour from natural gas. The mechanisms of the upstream and downstream influences are not well understood for various flow conditions from the wellhead and the back pipelines. We used a computational model to investigate the effect of the inlet and outlet flow conditions on the supersonic separation process. We found that the shock wave was sensitive to the inlet or back pressure compared to the inlet temperature. The shock position shifted forward with a higher inlet or back pressure. It indicated that an increasing inlet pressure declined the pressure recovery capacity. Furthermore, the shock wave moved out of the diffuser when the ratio of the back pressure to the inlet one was greater than 0.75, in which the state of the low pressure and temperature was destroyed, resulting in the re-evaporation of the condensed liquids. Natural gas would be the subsonic flows in the whole supersonic separator, if the mass flow rate was less than the design value, and it could not reach the low pressure and temperature for the condensation and separation of the water vapor. These results suggested a guidance mechanism for natural gas supersonic separation in various flow conditions. PMID:25338207

  6. Ultem®/ZIF-8 mixed matrix membranes for gas separation: Transport and physical properties

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Eiras, Daniel; Labreche, Ying; Pessan, Luiz Antonio

    2016-02-19

    Mixed matrix membranes are promising options for improving gas separation processes. Zeolitic imidazolate frameworks (ZIFs) have a porous structure similar to conventional zeolites, being capable in principle of separating gases based on their differences in kinetic diameter while offering the advantage of having a partial organic character. This partial organic nature improves the compatibility between the sieve and the polymer, and a combination of the mentioned characteristics makes these hybrid materials interesting for the preparation of mixed matrix gas separation membranes. In this context the present work reports the preparation of Ultem®/ZIF-8 mixed matrix membranes and their permeabilities to puremore » CO2, N2 and CH4 gases. A significant increase in permeability with increase in CO2/N2 selectivity was observed for the mixed matrix systems as compared to the properties of the neat Ultem®. Sorption results allowed to speculate that the ZIF-8 framework is not completely stable dimensionally, what influences the separation process by allowing gases with higher kinetic diameter than its nominal aperture to be sorbed and to diffuse through the crystal. Lastly, sorption and diffusion selectivities indicate that the higher separation performance of the mixed matrix membranes is governed by the diffusion process associated with the influence of gas molecule´s geometry.« less

  7. Effect of inlet and outlet flow conditions on natural gas parameters in supersonic separation process.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yan; Wen, Chuang; Wang, Shuli; Feng, Yuqing

    2014-01-01

    A supersonic separator has been introduced to remove water vapour from natural gas. The mechanisms of the upstream and downstream influences are not well understood for various flow conditions from the wellhead and the back pipelines. We used a computational model to investigate the effect of the inlet and outlet flow conditions on the supersonic separation process. We found that the shock wave was sensitive to the inlet or back pressure compared to the inlet temperature. The shock position shifted forward with a higher inlet or back pressure. It indicated that an increasing inlet pressure declined the pressure recovery capacity. Furthermore, the shock wave moved out of the diffuser when the ratio of the back pressure to the inlet one was greater than 0.75, in which the state of the low pressure and temperature was destroyed, resulting in the re-evaporation of the condensed liquids. Natural gas would be the subsonic flows in the whole supersonic separator, if the mass flow rate was less than the design value, and it could not reach the low pressure and temperature for the condensation and separation of the water vapor. These results suggested a guidance mechanism for natural gas supersonic separation in various flow conditions.

  8. Spontaneous separation of large-spin Fermi gas in the harmonic trap: a density functional study.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zongli; Gu, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    The component separation of the trapped large-spin Fermi gas is studied within density functional theory. The ground state and ferromagnetic transition in the gas, with and without the spin mixing collision, are calculated. In the absence of spin mixing, two patterns of separation are observed as the interaction between atoms increases, whereas only one of them corresponds to a ferromagnetic transition. The phase diagram suggests that the pattern which the system chooses depends on the interaction strength in the collision channels. With the presence of spin mixing, the distribution of phase region changes because of the interplay between different collision channels. Specifically, the spin exchange benefits the FM transition, while it suppresses the component separation of CS-II pattern. PMID:27549012

  9. Spontaneous separation of large-spin Fermi gas in the harmonic trap: a density functional study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zongli; Gu, Qiang

    2016-08-01

    The component separation of the trapped large-spin Fermi gas is studied within density functional theory. The ground state and ferromagnetic transition in the gas, with and without the spin mixing collision, are calculated. In the absence of spin mixing, two patterns of separation are observed as the interaction between atoms increases, whereas only one of them corresponds to a ferromagnetic transition. The phase diagram suggests that the pattern which the system chooses depends on the interaction strength in the collision channels. With the presence of spin mixing, the distribution of phase region changes because of the interplay between different collision channels. Specifically, the spin exchange benefits the FM transition, while it suppresses the component separation of CS-II pattern.

  10. Spontaneous separation of large-spin Fermi gas in the harmonic trap: a density functional study

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zongli; Gu, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    The component separation of the trapped large-spin Fermi gas is studied within density functional theory. The ground state and ferromagnetic transition in the gas, with and without the spin mixing collision, are calculated. In the absence of spin mixing, two patterns of separation are observed as the interaction between atoms increases, whereas only one of them corresponds to a ferromagnetic transition. The phase diagram suggests that the pattern which the system chooses depends on the interaction strength in the collision channels. With the presence of spin mixing, the distribution of phase region changes because of the interplay between different collision channels. Specifically, the spin exchange benefits the FM transition, while it suppresses the component separation of CS-II pattern. PMID:27549012

  11. Onboard Inert Gas Generation System/Onboard Oxygen Gas Generation System (OBIGGS/OBOGS) Study. Part 2; Gas Separation Technology--State of the Art

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, Thomas L.; Eklund, Thor I.; Haack, Gregory A.

    2001-01-01

    This purpose of this contract study task was to investigate the State of the Art in Gas Separation Technologies utilized for separating air into both nitrogen and oxygen gases for potential applications on commercial aircraft. The intended applications included: nitrogen gas for fuel tank inerting, cargo compartment fire protection, and emergency oxygen for passenger and crew use in the event of loss of cabin pressure. The approach was to investigate three principle methods of gas separation: Hollow Fiber Membrane (HFM), Ceramic Membrane (CM), and liquefaction: Total Atmospheric Liquefaction of Oxygen and Nitrogen (TALON). Additional data on the performance of molecular sieve pressure swing adsorption (PSA) systems was also collected and discussed. Performance comparisons of these technologies are contained in the body of the report.

  12. A biofilter integrated with gas membrane separation unit for the treatment of fluctuating styrene loads.

    PubMed

    Li, Lin; Lian, Jing; Han, Yunping; Liu, Junxin

    2012-05-01

    Biofiltration for volatile organic compound control in waste gas streams is best operated at steady contaminant loadings. To provide long-term stable operation of a biofilter under adverse contaminant feeding conditions, an integrated bioreactor system with a gas separation membrane module installed after a biofilter was proposed for styrene treatment. Styrene was treated effectively, with average styrene effluent concentrations maintained at less than 50 mg m(-3) and a total removal efficiency of over 96% achieved when the biofiltration column faced fluctuating loads. The maximum elimination capacity of the integrated bioreactor system was 93.8 g m(-3)h(-1), which was higher than that obtained with the biofiltration column alone. The combination of these two processes (microbial and chemical) led to more efficient elimination of styrene and buffering of the fluctuating loads. The factors on gas membrane separation, microbial characteristics in the integrated bioreactor and membrane fouling were also investigated in this study.

  13. Carbon dioxide capture-related gas adsorption and separation in metal-organic frameworks

    SciTech Connect

    Li, JR; Ma, YG; McCarthy, MC; Sculley, J; Yu, JM; Jeong, HK; Balbuena, PB; Zhou, HC

    2011-08-01

    Reducing anthropogenic CO2 emission and lowering the concentration of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere has quickly become one of the most urgent environmental issues of our age. Carbon capture and storage (CCS) is one option for reducing these harmful CO2 emissions. While a variety of technologies and methods have been developed, the separation of CO2 from gas streams is still a critical issue. Apart from establishing new techniques, the exploration of capture materials with high separation performance and low capital cost are of paramount importance. Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), a new class of crystalline porous materials constructed by metal-containing nodes bonded to organic bridging ligands hold great potential as adsorbents or membrane materials in gas separation. In this paper, we review the research progress (from experimental results to molecular simulations) in MOFs for CO2 adsorption, storage, and separations (adsorptive separation and membrane-based separation) that are directly related to CO2 capture. (C) 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. H2S mediated thermal and photochemical methane activation

    PubMed Central

    Baltrusaitis, Jonas; de Graaf, Coen; Broer, Ria; Patterson, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Sustainable, low temperature methods of natural gas activation are critical in addressing current and foreseeable energy and hydrocarbon feedstock needs. Large portions of natural gas resources are still too expensive to process due to their high content of hydrogen sulfide gas (H2S) in mixture with methane, CH4, altogether deemed as sub-quality or “sour” gas. We propose a unique method for activating this “sour” gas to form a mixture of sulfur-containing hydrocarbon intermediates, CH3SH and CH3SCH3, and an energy carrier, such as H2. For this purpose, we computationally investigated H2S mediated methane activation to form a reactive CH3SH species via direct photolysis of sub-quality natural gas. Photoexcitation of hydrogen sulfide in the CH4+H2S complex results in a barrier-less relaxation via a conical intersection to form a ground state CH3SH+H2 complex. The resulting CH3SH can further be heterogeneously coupled over acidic catalysts to form higher hydrocarbons while the H2 can be used as a fuel. This process is very different from a conventional thermal or radical-based processes and can be driven photolytically at low temperatures, with enhanced controllability over the process conditions currently used in industrial oxidative natural gas activation. Finally, the proposed process is CO2 neutral, as opposed to the currently industrially used methane steam reforming (SMR). PMID:24150813

  15. Decarb/Desal: Separation of Carbon Dioxide from Flue Gas with Simultaneous Fresh Water Production

    SciTech Connect

    Aines, R; Bourcier, W

    2009-10-21

    If fossil fuels continue to be a major part of the world's energy supply, effective means must be developed to deal with the carbon emissions. Geologic sequestration of supercritical CO{sub 2} is expected to play a major role in mitigating this problem. Separating carbon dioxide from other gases is the most costly aspect of schemes for geologic sequestration. That cost is driven by the complexity and energy intensity of current chemical-stripping methods for separating carbon dioxide. Our experience in water treatment technology indicated that an entirely new approach could be developed, taking advantage of water's propensity to separate gases that ionize in water (like CO{sub 2}) from those that do not (like N{sub 2}). Even though water-based systems might not have the extreme selectivity of chemicals like substituted amines used in industrial systems today, they have the potential to tolerate NO{sub x}, SO{sub x}, and particulates while also producing clean drinking water as a valuable byproduct. Lower capital cost, broader range of applicability, environmental friendliness, and revenue from a second product stream give this approach the potential to significantly expand the worldwide application of carbon separation for geologic sequestration. Here we report results for separation of CO{sub 2} from flue gas by two methods that simultaneously separate carbon dioxide and fresh water: ionic pumping of carbonate ions dissolved in water, and thermal distillation. The ion pumping method dramatically increases dissolved carbonate ion in solution and hence the overlying vapor pressure of CO{sub 2} gas, allowing its removal as a pure gas. We have used two common water treatment methods to drive the ion pumping approach, reverse osmosis and electrodialysis to produce pure CO{sub 2}. This novel approach to increasing the concentration of the extracted gas permits new approaches to treating flue gas, because the slightly basic water used as the extraction medium is

  16. Matrix-isolation and computational study of H2CCCl and H2CCBr radicals.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Cheng; Duarte, Luís; Khriachtchev, Leonid

    2016-08-21

    We report on two new radicals, H2CCCl and H2CCBr, prepared in low-temperature noble-gas matrices and characterized using infrared spectroscopy. These radicals are made by UV photolysis of HCCCl and HCCBr and subsequent thermal annealing to mobilize hydrogen atoms in the matrices and promote their reaction with the residual precursor molecules. Three characteristic infrared bands are observed for each radical. The assignments are supported by quantum chemical calculations at the B3LYP and CCSD(T) levels of theory with the def2-TZVPPD basis set. PMID:27544110

  17. Matrix-isolation and computational study of H2CCCl and H2CCBr radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Cheng; Duarte, Luís; Khriachtchev, Leonid

    2016-08-01

    We report on two new radicals, H2CCCl and H2CCBr, prepared in low-temperature noble-gas matrices and characterized using infrared spectroscopy. These radicals are made by UV photolysis of HCCCl and HCCBr and subsequent thermal annealing to mobilize hydrogen atoms in the matrices and promote their reaction with the residual precursor molecules. Three characteristic infrared bands are observed for each radical. The assignments are supported by quantum chemical calculations at the B3LYP and CCSD(T) levels of theory with the def2-TZVPPD basis set.

  18. Variable-temperature cryogenic trap for the separation of gas mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Des Marais, D. J.

    1978-01-01

    The paper describes a continuous variable-temperature U-shaped cold trap which can both purify vacuum-line combustion products for subsequent stable isotopic analysis and isolate the methane and ethane constituents of natural gases. The canister containing the trap is submerged in liquid nitrogen, and, as the gas cools, the gas mixture components condense sequentially according to their relative vapor pressures. After the about 12 min required for the bottom of the trap to reach the liquid-nitrogen temperature, passage of electric current through the resistance wire wrapped around the tubing covering the U-trap permits distillation of successive gas components at optimal temperatures. Data on the separation achieved for two mixtures, the first being typical vacuum-line combustion products of geochemical samples such as rocks and the second being natural gas, are presented, and the thermal behavior and power consumption are reported.

  19. Diffusible gas transmitter signaling in the copepod crustacean Calanus finmarchicus: identification of the biosynthetic enzymes of nitric oxide (NO), carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) using a de novo assembled transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    Christie, Andrew E.; Fontanilla, Tiana M.; Roncalli, Vittoria; Cieslak, Matthew C.; Lenz, Petra H.

    2014-01-01

    Neurochemical signaling is a major component of physiological/behavioral control throughout the animal kingdom. Gas transmitters are perhaps the most ancient class of molecules used by nervous systems for chemical communication. Three gases are generally recognized as being produced by neurons: nitric oxide (NO), carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S). As part of an ongoing effort to identify and characterize the neurochemical signaling systems of the copepod Calanus finmarchicus, the biomass dominant zooplankton in much of the North Atlantic Ocean, we have mined a de novo assembled transcriptome for sequences encoding the neuronal biosynthetic enzymes of these gases, i.e. nitric oxide synthase (NOS), heme oxygenase (HO) and cystathionine β-synthase (CBS), respectively. Using Drosophila proteins as queries, two NOS-, one HO-, and one CBS-encoding transcripts were identified. Reverse BLAST and structural analyses of the deduced proteins suggest that each is a true member of its respective enzyme family. RNA-Seq data collected from embryos, early nauplii, late nauplii, early copepodites, late copepodites and adults revealed the expression of each transcript to be stage specific: one NOS restricted primarily to the embryo and the other was absent in the embryo but expressed in all other stages, no CBS expression in the embryo, but present in all other stages, and HO expressed across all developmental stages. Given the importance of gas transmitters in the regulatory control of a number of physiological processes, these data open opportunities for investigating the roles these proteins play under different life-stage and environmental conditions in this ecologically important species. PMID:24747481

  20. Gas-phase simulated moving bed: Propane/propylene separation on 13X zeolite.

    PubMed

    Martins, Vanessa F D; Ribeiro, Ana M; Plaza, Marta G; Santos, João C; Loureiro, José M; Ferreira, Alexandre F P; Rodrigues, Alírio E

    2015-12-01

    In the last years several studies were carried out in order to separate gas mixtures by SMB technology; however, this technology has never been implemented on an industrial scale. In the present work, a gas phase SMB bench unit was built and tested for the separation of propane and propylene mixtures, using 13X zeolite extrudates as adsorbent and isobutane as desorbent. Three experiments were performed to separate propane/propylene by gas phase SMB in the bench scale unit with a 4-2-2 configuration, i.e., open loop circuit by suppressing section IV (desorbent regeneration followed by a recycle). Consequently, all the experiments were conducted using an external supply of pure isobutane as desorbent. Parameters such as switching time, extract and raffinate stream flow rates were changed to improve the efficiency of the process. Experimental results have shown that it is feasible to separate propylene from propane by gas phase SMB at a bench scale and that this process is a potential candidate to replace the conventional technologies for the propane/propylene separation. The performance parameters obtained are very promising for future development of this technology, since propylene was obtained in the extract stream with a purity of 99.93%, a recovery of 99.51%, and a productivity of [Formula: see text] . Propane was obtained in the raffinate stream with a purity of 98.10%, a recovery of 99.73% and a productivity of [Formula: see text] . The success of the above mentioned bench scale tests is a big step for the future implementation of this technology in a larger scale.

  1. Selectivity and self-diffusion of CO2 and H2 in a mixture on a graphite surface.

    PubMed

    Trinh, Thuat T; Vlugt, Thijs J H; Hägg, May-Britt; Bedeaux, Dick; Kjelstrup, Signe

    2013-01-01

    We performed classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to understand the mechanism of adsorption from a gas mixture of CO2 and H2 (mole fraction of CO2 = 0.30) and diffusion along a graphite surface, with the aim to help enrich industrial off-gases in CO2, separating out H2. The temperature of the system in the simulation covered typical industrial conditions for off-gas treatment (250-550 K). The interaction energy of single molecules CO2 or H2 on graphite surface was calculated with classical force fields (FFs) and with Density Functional Theory (DFT). The results were in good agreement. The binding energy of CO2 on graphite surface is three times larger than that of H2. At lower temperatures, the selectivity of CO2 over H2 is five times larger than at higher temperatures. The position of the dividing surface was used to explain how the adsorption varies with pore size. In the temperature range studied, the self-diffusion coefficient of CO2 is always smaller than of H2. The temperature variation of the selectivities and the self-diffusion coefficient imply that the carbon molecular sieve membrane can be used for gas enrichment of CO2.

  2. Selectivity and self-diffusion of CO2 and H2 in a mixture on a graphite surface

    PubMed Central

    Trinh, Thuat T.; Vlugt, Thijs J. H.; Hägg, May-Britt; Bedeaux, Dick; Kjelstrup, Signe

    2013-01-01

    We performed classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to understand the mechanism of adsorption from a gas mixture of CO2 and H2 (mole fraction of CO2 = 0.30) and diffusion along a graphite surface, with the aim to help enrich industrial off-gases in CO2, separating out H2. The temperature of the system in the simulation covered typical industrial conditions for off-gas treatment (250–550 K). The interaction energy of single molecules CO2 or H2 on graphite surface was calculated with classical force fields (FFs) and with Density Functional Theory (DFT). The results were in good agreement. The binding energy of CO2 on graphite surface is three times larger than that of H2. At lower temperatures, the selectivity of CO2 over H2 is five times larger than at higher temperatures. The position of the dividing surface was used to explain how the adsorption varies with pore size. In the temperature range studied, the self-diffusion coefficient of CO2 is always smaller than of H2. The temperature variation of the selectivities and the self-diffusion coefficient imply that the carbon molecular sieve membrane can be used for gas enrichment of CO2. PMID:24790965

  3. High Temperature Polybenzimidazole Hollow Fiber Membranes for Hydrogen Separation and Carbon Dioxide Capture from Synthesis Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Rajinder P.; Dahe, Ganpat J.; Dudeck, Kevin W.; Welch, Cynthia F.; Berchtold, Kathryn A.

    2014-12-31

    Sustainable reliance on hydrocarbon feedstocks for energy generation requires CO₂ separation technology development for energy efficient carbon capture from industrial mixed gas streams. High temperature H₂ selective glassy polymer membranes are an attractive option for energy efficient H₂/CO₂ separations in advanced power production schemes with integrated carbon capture. They enable high overall process efficiencies by providing energy efficient CO₂ separations at process relevant operating conditions and correspondingly, minimized parasitic energy losses. Polybenzimidazole (PBI)-based materials have demonstrated commercially attractive H₂/CO₂ separation characteristics and exceptional tolerance to hydrocarbon fuel derived synthesis (syngas) gas operating conditions and chemical environments. To realize a commercially attractive carbon capture technology based on these PBI materials, development of high performance, robust PBI hollow fiber membranes (HFMs) is required. In this work, we discuss outcomes of our recent efforts to demonstrate and optimize the fabrication and performance of PBI HFMs for use in pre-combustion carbon capture schemes. These efforts have resulted in PBI HFMs with commercially attractive fabrication protocols, defect minimized structures, and commercially attractive permselectivity characteristics at IGCC syngas process relevant conditions. The H₂/CO₂ separation performance of these PBI HFMs presented in this document regarding realistic process conditions is greater than that of any other polymeric system reported to-date.

  4. High Temperature Polybenzimidazole Hollow Fiber Membranes for Hydrogen Separation and Carbon Dioxide Capture from Synthesis Gas

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Singh, Rajinder P.; Dahe, Ganpat J.; Dudeck, Kevin W.; Welch, Cynthia F.; Berchtold, Kathryn A.

    2014-12-31

    Sustainable reliance on hydrocarbon feedstocks for energy generation requires CO₂ separation technology development for energy efficient carbon capture from industrial mixed gas streams. High temperature H₂ selective glassy polymer membranes are an attractive option for energy efficient H₂/CO₂ separations in advanced power production schemes with integrated carbon capture. They enable high overall process efficiencies by providing energy efficient CO₂ separations at process relevant operating conditions and correspondingly, minimized parasitic energy losses. Polybenzimidazole (PBI)-based materials have demonstrated commercially attractive H₂/CO₂ separation characteristics and exceptional tolerance to hydrocarbon fuel derived synthesis (syngas) gas operating conditions and chemical environments. To realize a commerciallymore » attractive carbon capture technology based on these PBI materials, development of high performance, robust PBI hollow fiber membranes (HFMs) is required. In this work, we discuss outcomes of our recent efforts to demonstrate and optimize the fabrication and performance of PBI HFMs for use in pre-combustion carbon capture schemes. These efforts have resulted in PBI HFMs with commercially attractive fabrication protocols, defect minimized structures, and commercially attractive permselectivity characteristics at IGCC syngas process relevant conditions. The H₂/CO₂ separation performance of these PBI HFMs presented in this document regarding realistic process conditions is greater than that of any other polymeric system reported to-date.« less

  5. Field Demonstration of a Membrane Process to Separate Nitrogen from Natural Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Kaaeid Lokhandwala

    2006-09-30

    The original proposal described the construction and operation of a 1 MMscfd treatment system to be operated at a Butcher Energy gas field in Ohio. The gas produced at this field contained 17% nitrogen. During pre-commissioning of the project, a series of well tests showed that the amount of gas in the field was significantly smaller than expected and that the nitrogen content of the wells was very high (25 to 30%). After evaluating the revised cost of the project, Butcher Energy decided that the plant would not be economical and withdrew from the project. Since that time, Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) has signed a marketing and sales partnership with ABB Lummus Global, a large multinational corporation. MTR is working with the company's Randall Gas Technology group, a supplier of equipment and processing technology to the natural gas industry. Randall's engineering group found a new site for the project at a North Texas Exploration (NTE) gas processing plant, and we continue, but have as yet been unsuccessful in our attempts, to negotiate with Atmos Energy for a final test of the original project demonstration unit. In the meantime, MTR has located an alternative testing opportunity and signed a contract with Towne Exploration for a demonstration plant in Rio Vista, CA, to be run through May 2007. Several commercial sales have resulted from the partnership with ABB, and total sales of nitrogen/natural gas membrane separation units are now approaching $2.6 million.

  6. Field Demonstration of a Membrane Process to Separate Nitrogen from Natural Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Kaaeid Lokhandwala

    2006-03-20

    The original proposal described the construction and operation of a 1 MMscfd treatment system to be operated at a Butcher Energy gas field in Ohio. The gas produced at this field contained 17% nitrogen. During pre-commissioning of the project, a series of well tests showed that the amount of gas in the field was significantly smaller than expected and that the nitrogen content of the wells was very high (25 to 30%). After evaluating the revised cost of the project, Butcher Energy decided that the plant would not be economical and withdrew from the project. Since that time, Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) has signed a marketing and sales partnership with ABB Lummus Global, a large multinational corporation. MTR will be working with the company's Randall Gas Technology group, a supplier of equipment and processing technology to the natural gas industry. Randall's engineering group found a new site for the project at a North Texas Exploration (NTE) gas processing plant, and we are now negotiating with Atmos Energy for a final test of the project demonstration unit. Several commercial sales have also resulted from the partnership with ABB, and sales of nitrogen/natural gas membrane separation units now total $2.3 million.

  7. Gas chromatography of volatile fatty acids. Method involving separation from biological material by vacuum distillation.

    PubMed

    Tyler, J E; Dibdin, G H

    1975-02-19

    A method is described for the quantitation of C2-C5 volatile fatty acids present in biological tissues. It involved recovery of the acids from their biological matrix by vacuum micro-distillation at room temperature, followed by gas phase separation of aqueous solutions on orthophosphoric acid-modified Phasepak Q columns. The subsequent gas chromatographic procedure resolved iso from normal isomers and showed a linear response for each volatile acid over the range 10-400 ng. There was no evidence of ghosting, isomer peak broadening, or peak tailing. Relative molar response values were shown to be linear with carbon number for all the volatile fatty acids studied.

  8. Synthesis and analysis of novel polymers with high permselectivity and permeability in gas separation applications

    SciTech Connect

    Koros, W.J.; Paul, D.R.

    1991-12-31

    Significant progress was made toward developing advanced materials for gas separation membrane applications and rationalizing molecular structure and efficacy: Synthesized and tested polyarylates based on terephthalic or isophthalic acid or a tertiary butyl derivative of the isophthalic acid with different diols to illustrate the effects of: opening'' the matrix by incorporation of bulky packing inhibiting groups such as the tertiary butyl moiety inhibition of backbone motion via meta connected backbone connections and tightening'' of the matrix by incorporation of polar halogens. Completed high temperature characterization of sorption and transport properties for novel materials. Continued studies of the phenyl-substituted polymers aimed at producing super stable high temperature useful polymers for gas separations. Synthesized a polyarylate based on the spirobiindane diol and bibenzoyl acid chloride to incorporate long flat packable bibenzoyl units between packing disruptive spirobiindane units in an attempt to control the segmental level morphology to produce highly selective bottleneck'' regions between highly open regions.

  9. Task 6.5 -- Gas separation and hot-gas cleanup. Semi-annual report, January 1--June 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Swanson, M.L.; Bieber, J.A.; Ness, R.O. Jr.; Hurley, J.P.

    1995-12-31

    The objective of this task is to develop and test superior gas separation membranes. Several methods will be tested to prepare new membrane materials, including physical vapor deposition via electron beam evaporation. Other ceramic filter materials used in hot-gas particulate filters will be obtained from selected suppliers for use as substrates to develop a thin-film membrane selective to hydrogen permeation. This thin-film membrane will be modified via an EERC proprietary process. The base filter materials will already have been characterized for hydrothermal and chemical stability and pore size. The selectivity of these membrane materials for separating undesired gases will be determined. Selectivity will be measured by mixing bottled gases in a manifold, feeding the gases to the membrane, and sampling the inlet, permeate, and raffinate streams for gas composition and volumetric flow rate. Specific questions to be answered include the following: What are the effects of ceramic membrane properties (i.e., surface area, pore size, and coating thickness) on permeability and selectivity of the desired gases? What are the effects of operating conditions (i.e., temperature, pressure, and flow rate) on permeability and selectivity?

  10. The role of endogenous H2S in cardiovascular physiology.

    PubMed

    Skovgaard, Nini; Gouliaev, Anja; Aalling, Mathilde; Simonsen, Ulf

    2011-09-01

    Recent research has shown that the endogenous gas hydrogen sulphide (H2S) is a signalling molecule of considerable biological potential and has been suggested to be involved in a vast number of physiological processes. In the vascular system, H2S is synthesized from cysteine by cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE) in smooth muscle cells (SMC) and 3- mercaptopyruvate sulfuresterase (3MST) and CSE in the endothelial cells. In pulmonary and systemic arteries, H2S induces relaxation and/or contraction dependent on the concentration of H2S, type of vessel and species. H2S relaxes SMC through a direct effect on KATP-channels or Kv-channels causing hyperpolarization and closure of voltage-dependent Ca2+-channels followed by a reduction in intracellular calcium. H2S also relaxes SMC through the release of endothelium- derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF) and nitric oxide (NO) from the endothelium. H2S contracts SMC through a reduction in nitric oxide (NO) availability by reacting with NO forming a nitrosothiol compound and through an inhibitory effect on endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) as well as a reduction in SMC cyclic AMP concentration. Evidence supports a role for H2S in oxygen sensing. Furthermore, reduced endogenous H2S production may also play a role in ischemic heart diseases and hypertension, and treatment with H2S donors and cysteine analogues may be beneficial in treatment of cardiovascular disease.

  11. H2 distribution during the formation of multiphase molecular clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdivia, Valeska; Hennebelle, Patrick; Gérin, Maryvonne; Lesaffre, Pierre

    2016-03-01

    Context. H2 is the simplest and the most abundant molecule in the interstellar medium (ISM), and its formation precedes the formation of other molecules. Aims: Understanding the dynamical influence of the environment and the interplay between the thermal processes related to the formation and destruction of H2 and the structure of the cloud is mandatory to understand correctly the observations of H2. Methods: We performed high-resolution magnetohydrodynamical colliding-flow simulations with the adaptive mesh refinement code RAMSES in which the physics of H2 has been included. We compared the simulation results with various observations of the H2 molecule, including the column densities of excited rotational levels. Results: As a result of a combination of thermal pressure, ram pressure, and gravity, the clouds produced at the converging point of HI streams are highly inhomogeneous. H2 molecules quickly form in relatively dense clumps and spread into the diffuse interclump gas. This in particular leads to the existence of significant abundances of H2 in the diffuse and warm gas that lies in between clumps. Simulations and observations show similar trends, especially for the HI-to-H2 transition (H2 fraction vs. total hydrogen column density). Moreover, the abundances of excited rotational levels, calculated at equilibrium in the simulations, turn out to be very similar to the observed abundances inferred from FUSE results. This is a direct consequence of the presence of the H2 enriched diffuse and warm gas. Conclusions: Our simulations, which self-consistently form molecular clouds out of the diffuse atomic gas, show that H2 rapidly forms in the dense clumps and, due to the complex structure of molecular clouds, quickly spreads at lower densities. Consequently, a significant fraction of warm H2 exists in the low-density gas. This warm H2 leads to column densities of excited rotational levels close to the observed ones and probably reveals the complex intermix between

  12. Enhancement of atmospheric H2SO4/H2O nucleation: organic oxidation products versus amines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berndt, T.; Sipilä, M.; Stratmann, F.; Petäjä, T.; Vanhanen, J.; Mikkilä, J.; Patokoski, J.; Taipale, R.; Mauldin, R. Lee, III; Kulmala, M.

    2013-06-01

    Atmospheric H2SO4/H2O nucleation influencing effects have been studied in the flow tube IfT-LFT (Institute for Tropospheric Research - Laminar Flow Tube) at 293 ± 0.5 K and a pressure of 1 bar using synthetic air as the carrier gas. The presence of a~possible background amine concentration in the order of 107-108 molecule cm-3 throughout the experiments has to be taken into account. In a first set of investigations, ozonolysis of olefins (tetramethylethylene, 1-methyl-cyclohexene, α-pinene and limonene) for close to atmospheric concentrations, served as the source of OH radicals and possibly other oxidants initiating H2SO4 formation starting from SO2. The oxidant generation is inevitably associated with the formation of a series of organic oxidation products arising from the parent olefins. These products (first generation mainly) showed no clear effect on the number of nucleated particles within a wide range of experimental conditions for H2SO4 concentrations higher than ~107 molecule cm-3. A comparison of the results of two different particle counters (50% cut-off size: about 1.5 nm or 2.5-3 nm) suggested that the early growth process of the nucleated particles was not significantly influenced by the organic oxidation products. An additional, H2SO4-independent process of particle (nano-CN) formation was observed in the case of α-pinene and limonene ozonolysis for H2SO4 concentrations smaller than ~10 7 molecule cm-3. Furthermore, the findings confirm the existence of an additional oxidant for SO2 beside OH radicals, very likely stabilized Criegee Intermediate (sCI). In the case of the ozonolysis of tetramethylethylene, the H2SO4 measurements in the absence and presence of an OH radical scavenger were well described by modelling using recently obtained kinetic data for the sCI reactivity in this system. A second set of experiments has been performed in the presence of added amines (trimethylamine, dimethylamine, aniline and pyridine) in the concentration range

  13. Fluorescent excitation of interstellar H2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, John H.; Van Dishoeck, Ewine F.

    1987-01-01

    The infrared emission spectrum of H2 excited by ultraviolet absorption, followed by fluorescence, was investigated using comprehensive models of interstellar clouds for computing the spectrum and to assess the effects on the intensity to various cloud properties, such as density, size, temperature, and the intensity of the UV radiation field. It is shown that the absolute H2 IR line intensities depend primarily on the density of the cloud and the strength of the incident UV radiation, and to a much lesser exent on the temperature of the gas, the total thickness of the cloud, and the optical properties of the grains. A variety of recent observational results are discussed with reference to theoretical models. It is shown that the rich H2 emission spectrum of the reflection nebula NGC 2023 can be reproduced by a model with density of about 10,000/cu cm, temperature of about 80 K, and UV flux approximately 300 times that of the Galactic background starlight.

  14. Computational Investigation of the Oxidative Deboronation of Boroglycine, H2N-CH2-B(OH)2, Using H2O and H2O2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larkin, Joseph D.; Markham, George D.; Milkevitch, Matt; Brooks, Bernard R.; Bock, Charles W.

    2009-09-01

    We report results from a computational investigation of the oxidative deboronation of boroglycine, H2N-CH2-B(OH)2, using H2O and H2O2 as the reactive oxygen species (ROS) to yield aminomethanol, H2N-CH2-OH; these results complement our study on the protodeboronation of boroglycine to produce methylamine, H2N-CH3 (Larkin et al. J. Phys. Chem. A 2007, 111, 6489-6500). Second-order Møller-Plesset (MP2) perturbation theory with Dunning-Woon correlation-consistent (cc) basis sets were used for the calculations with comparisons made to results from density functional theory (DFT) at the PBE1PBE/6-311++G(d,p)(cc-pVDZ) levels. The effects of a bulk aqueous environment were also incorporated into the calculations employing PCM and CPCM methodology. Using H2O as the ROS, the reaction H2O + H2N-CH2-B(OH)2 → H2N-CH2-OH + H-B(OH)2 was calculated to be endothermic; the value of ΔH2980 was +12.0 kcal/mol at the MP2(FC)/cc-pVTZ computational level in vacuo and +13.7 kcal/mol in PCM aqueous media; the corresponding value for the activation barrier, ΔH‡, was +94.3 kcal/mol relative to the separated reactants in vacuo and +89.9 kcal/mol in PCM aqueous media. In contrast, the reaction H2O2 + H2N-CH2-B(OH)2 → H2N-CH2-OH + B(OH)3 was calculated to be highly exothermic with an ΔH2980 value of -100.9 kcal/mol at the MP2(FC)/cc-pVTZ computational level in vacuo and -99.6 kcal/mol in CPCM aqueous media; the highest-energy transition state for the multistep process associated with this reaction involved the rearrangement of H2N-CH2-B(OH)(OOH) to H2N-CH2-O-B(OH)2 with a ΔH‡ value of +23.2 kcal/mol in vacuo relative to the separated reactants. These computational results for boroglycine are in accord with the experimental observations for the deboronation of the FDA approved anticancer drug bortezomib (Velcade, PS-341), where it was found to be the principle deactivation pathway (Labutti et al. Chem. Res. Toxicol. 2006, 19, 539-546).

  15. Integrated Cryogenic System for CO2 Separation and Lng Production from Landfill Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, H. M.; Chung, M. J.; Park, S. B.

    2010-04-01

    An integrated cryogenic system to separate carbon dioxide (CO2) and produce LNG from landfill gas is investigated and designed. The main objective of this design is to eliminate the requirement of a standard CO2 removal process in the liquefaction system such distillation or (temperature or pressure) swing adsorption, and to directly separate carbon dioxide as frost at the liquefying channel of methane. Two identical sets of heat exchangers are installed in parallel and switched alternatively with a time period so that one is in separation-liquefaction mode while the other is in CO2 clean-up mode. A thermal regeneration scheme is presented for the purpose of saving energy and avoiding the stoppage of LNG production followed by the flow switching. The switching period is determined from results of a combined heat and mass transfer analysis on the CO2 freeze-out process.

  16. The separation process of methane-butane fraction from natural gas before transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galtseva, O. V.; Bordunov, S. V.

    2015-04-01

    A series of experiments of adsorption of vapor-air mixtures of some individual hydrocarbons on fibrous sorbents out of polyethylene and polypropylene is made. The calculated changes of concentrations of hydrocarbons in the vapor-air mixture base on experimental data. It is shown that concentration of hydrocarbons decreases after column by 1.4 times and that sorption capacity of fibers reaches 1 g of hydrocarbons on 1 g of a fibrous sorbent. This result was assumed as a basis of calculation of model of the separator for separation of hydrocarbons C1-4 from water and fractions C5-n, the degree of separation of the first stage gas of the Verkhne - Tarskoe's field was 98%.

  17. Design and Development of Gas-Liquid Cylindrical Cyclone Compact Separators for Three-Phase Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Mohan, Ram S.; Shoham, Ovadia

    1999-10-28

    The objective of this five-year project (October, 1997--September, 2002) is to expand the current research activities of Tulsa University Separation Technology Projects (TUSTP) to multiphase oil/water/gas separation. This project will be executed in two phases. Phase I (1997--2000) will focus on the investigations of the complex multiphase hydrodynamic flow behavior in a three-phase Gas-Liquid Cylindrical Cyclone (GLCC) Separator. The activities of this phase will include the development of a mechanistic model, a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulator, and detailed experimentation on the three-phase GLCC. The experimental and CFD simulation results will be suitably integrated with the mechanistic model. In Phase II (2000--2002), the developed GLCC separator will be tested under high pressure and real crudes conditions. This is crucial for validating the GLCC design for field application and facilitating easy and rapid technology deployment. Design criteria for industrial applications will be developed based on these results and will be incorporated into the mechanistic model by TUSTP.

  18. Metal-organic framework nanosheets in polymer composite materials for gas separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodenas, Tania; Luz, Ignacio; Prieto, Gonzalo; Seoane, Beatriz; Miro, Hozanna; Corma, Avelino; Kapteijn, Freek; Llabrés I Xamena, Francesc X.; Gascon, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Composites incorporating two-dimensional nanostructures within polymeric matrices have potential as functional components for several technologies, including gas separation. Prospectively, employing metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) as versatile nanofillers would notably broaden the scope of functionalities. However, synthesizing MOFs in the form of freestanding nanosheets has proved challenging. We present a bottom-up synthesis strategy for dispersible copper 1,4-benzenedicarboxylate MOF lamellae of micrometre lateral dimensions and nanometre thickness. Incorporating MOF nanosheets into polymer matrices endows the resultant composites with outstanding CO2 separation performance from CO2/CH4 gas mixtures, together with an unusual and highly desired increase in the separation selectivity with pressure. As revealed by tomographic focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy, the unique separation behaviour stems from a superior occupation of the membrane cross-section by the MOF nanosheets as compared with isotropic crystals, which improves the efficiency of molecular discrimination and eliminates unselective permeation pathways. This approach opens the door to ultrathin MOF-polymer composites for various applications.

  19. Design and Development of Gas-Liquid Cylindrical Cyclone Compact Separators for Three-Phase Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Mohan, R.S.; Shoham, O.

    2001-01-10

    The objective of this five-year project (October 1997--September 2002) was to expand the current research activities of Tulsa University Separation Technology Projects (TUSTP) to multiphase oil/water/gas separation. This project was executed in two phases. Phase I (1997--2000) focused on the investigations of the complex multiphase hydrodynamic flow behavior in a three-phase Gas-Liquid Cylindrical Cyclone (GLCC) Separator. The activities of this phase included the development of a mechanistic model, a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulator, and detailed experimentation on the three-phase GLCC. The experimental and CFD simulation results will be suitably integrated with the mechanistic model. In Phase II (2000--2002), the developed GLCC separator will be tested under high pressure and real crude conditions. This is crucial for validating the GLCC design for field application and facilitating easy and rapid technology deployment. Design criteria for industrial applications will be developed based on these results and will be incorporated into the mechanistic model by TUSTP.

  20. Metal-organic framework nanosheets in polymer composite materials for gas separation

    PubMed Central

    Seoane, Beatriz; Miro, Hozanna; Corma, Avelino; Kapteijn, Freek; Llabrés i Xamena, Francesc X.; Gascon, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    Composites incorporating two-dimensional nanostructures within polymeric matrices hold potential as functional components for several technologies, including gas separation. Prospectively, employing metal-organic-frameworks (MOFs) as versatile nanofillers would notably broaden the scope of functionalities. However, synthesizing MOFs in the form of free standing nanosheets has proven challenging. We present a bottom-up synthesis strategy for dispersible copper 1,4-benzenedicarboxylate MOF lamellae of micrometer lateral dimensions and nanometer thickness. Incorporating MOF nanosheets into polymer matrices endows the resultant composites with outstanding CO2 separation performance from CO2/CH4 gas mixtures, together with an unusual and highly desired increment in the separation selectivity with pressure. As revealed by tomographic focused-ion-beam scanning-electron-microscopy, the unique separation behaviour stems from a superior occupation of the membrane cross-section by the MOF nanosheets as compared to isotropic crystals, which improves the efficiency of molecular discrimination and eliminates unselective permeation pathways. This approach opens the door to ultrathin MOF-polymer composites for various applications. PMID:25362353

  1. Separation and Detection of Toxic Gases with a Silicon Micromachined Gas Chromatography System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolesar, Edward S.; Reston, Rocky R.

    1995-01-01

    A miniature gas chromatography (GC) system was designed and fabricated using silicon micromachining and integrated circuit (IC) processing techniques. The silicon micromachined gas chromatography system (SMGCS) is composed of a miniature sample injector that incorporates a 10 microliter sample loop; a 0.9 meter long, rectangular shaped (300 micrometer width and 10 micrometer height) capillary column coated with a 0.2 micrometer thick copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) stationary phase; and a dual detector scheme based upon a CuPc-coated chemiresistor and a commercially available 125 micrometer diameter thermal conductivity detector (TCD) bead. Silicon micromachining was employed to fabricate the interface between the sample injector and the GC column, the column itself, and the dual detector cavity. A novel IC thin-film processing technique was developed to sublime the CuPc stationary phase coating on the column walls that were micromachined in the host silicon wafer substrate and Pyrex (r) cover plate, which were then electrostatically bonded together. The SMGCS can separate binary gas mixtures composed of parts-per-million (ppm) concentrations of ammonia (NH3) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) when isothermally operated (55-80 degrees C). With a helium carrier gas and nitrogen diluent, a 10 microliter sample volume containing ammonia and nitrogen dioxide injected at 40 psi ((2.8 x 10(exp 5)Pa)) can be separated in less than 30 minutes.

  2. Microwave Spectra and Structures of H_2S-CuCl and H_2O-CuCl.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, N. R.; Wheatley, D. E.; Stephens, S. L.; Roberts, F. J.; Mikhailov, V. A.; Legon, A. C.

    2010-06-01

    A Balle-Flygare FT-MW spectrometer coupled to a laser ablation source has been used to measure the pure rotational spectra of H2S-CuCl and H2O-CuCl. Both molecules are generated via laser ablation (532 nm) of a metal rod in the presence of CCl4, argon, a low partial pressure of H2S or H2O and are stabilized by supersonic expansion. Rotational constants and centrifugal distortion constants have been measured for eight isotopologues of H2S-CuCl with substitutions available at the copper, chlorine and hydrogen atoms. Transitions in the spectra of nine isotopologues of H2O-CuCl have been measured with isotopic substitutions achieved for every atom. The spectra of both H2S-CuCl and H2O-CuCl are consistent with a linear arrangement of sulphur or oxygen, metal and chlorine atoms. The structure of H2S-CuCl is pyramidal with CS symmetry. The structure of H2O-CuCl is either C2v planar at equilibrium or CS pyramidal but with a low potential-energy barrier to planarity such that the v=0 and 1 states associated with the motion that inverts the configuration at the O atom are well separated. Nuclear quadrupole coupling constants have been measured for the chlorine and copper atoms in each molecule. Nuclear spin-rotation constants have been determined for the copper atom.

  3. Gravity Wave Propagation in Diffusively Separated Gases: Mutual Diffusion and Collisional Effects on the Total Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickey, M. P.; Walterscheid, R. L.

    2012-12-01

    Gravity wave models for the diffusively separated thermosphere are typically one gas models that account for variations in composition by assuming the atmosphere is a single gas with mean molecular M that is variable in the vertical coordinate, but fixed in time (there is no wave induced fluctuation in M). This is the limiting case where mutual diffusion between individual gases acts to instantaneously annul advective changes. The other limiting case is where mutual diffusion is slow compared to advective changes and M is conserved following parcel displacements (wave-induced fluctuations in M are nonzero). We evaluate the realism of these limits using a binary gas model of acoustic-gravity wave propagation in a mixture of atomic oxygen and molecular nitrogen, with molecular viscosity and thermal conductivity appropriately partitioned between the two gases. Compositional effects include the collisional transfer of heat and momentum by mutual diffusion between the two gases. An important compositional effect is that the velocity and temperature summed over species can be significantly different from the results of one-gas models with the same height dependent mean molecular weight. In all cases considered, the one gas model results obtained assuming that M is conserved following parcels gave significantly better agreement with the binary gas model than the usual approach of assuming that the local variations of M are zero. This implies that compositional effects may be included in one-gas models by simply adding a conservation equation for M (and for the specific gas at constant pressure, which depends on M).

  4. Field Demonstration of a Membrane Process to Separate Nitrogen from Natural Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Kaaeid Lokhandwala

    2007-03-31

    The original proposal described the construction and operation of a 1 MMscfd treatment system to be operated at a Butcher Energy gas field in Ohio. The gas produced at this field contained 17% nitrogen. During pre-commissioning of the project, a series of well tests showed that the amount of gas in the field was significantly smaller than expected and that the nitrogen content of the wells was very high (25 to 30%). After evaluating the revised cost of the project, Butcher Energy decided that the plant would not be economical and withdrew from the project. Since that time, Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) has signed a marketing and sales partnership with ABB Lummus Global, a large multinational corporation. MTR is working with the company's Randall Gas Technology group, a supplier of equipment and processing technology to the natural gas industry. Randall's engineering group found a new site for the project at a North Texas Exploration (NTE) gas processing plant, which met with limited success. However, a small test system was installed at a Twin Bottoms Energy well in Kentucky. This unit operated successfully for six months, and demonstrated the technology's reliability on a small scale. MTR then located an alternative test site with much larger gas flow rates and signed a contract with Towne Exploration in the third quarter of 2006, for a demonstration plant in Rio Vista, California, to be run through May 2007. The demonstration for Towne has already resulted in the sale of two commercial skids to the company; both units will be delivered by the end of 2007. Total sales of nitrogen/natural gas membrane separation units from the partnership with ABB are now approaching $4.0 million.

  5. An aminopyrimidine-functionalized cage-based metal-organic framework exhibiting highly selective adsorption of C2H2 and CO2 over CH4.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Jingjing; Dou, Li; Liu, Huimin; Chen, Fengli; Bai, Dongjie; Feng, Yunlong; Xiong, Shunshun; Chen, De-Li; He, Yabing

    2016-09-14

    There has been considerable interest in adsorptive separation of C2H2/CH4 and CO2/CH4 gas mixtures due to its industrial significance and scientific challenge. In this work, we have designed and synthesized a bent diisophthalate ligand functionalized with aminopyrimidine groups, and constructed via a solvothermal reaction, a porous copper-based framework. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies show that the framework is a three-dimensional network containing three different types of polyhedral nanocages, which are stacked together to form two distinct types of one-dimensional channels along the crystallographic c axis. The compound after activation shows exceptionally high C2H2 and CO2 uptakes of 211 and 120 cm(3) (STP) g(-1) at 295 K and 1 atm, as well as impressive adsorption selectivities towards C2H2 and CO2 over CH4. High C2H2 and CO2 uptake capacities as well as significant adsorption selectivities of C2H2 and CO2 over CH4 imply potential applications in the adsorptive separation and purification of C2H2/CH4 and CO2/CH4 gas mixtures, which have been verified by column breakthrough experiments. Several important binding sites for C2H2 and CO2 in ZJNU-54 were revealed by quantum chemical calculations, demonstrating that the organic linkers in ZJNU-54 form unique structures that facilitate the adsorption of C2H2, while the amine groups and the Lewis basic pyrimidine-ring nitrogen sites in the organic linker improve the adsorption energies for CO2, finally leading to the increase of adsorption capacities for these two gas molecules. This work provides an efficient strategy for incorporating specific functional groups into cage-based MOFs for generating new adsorbents for highly selective gas storage and separation. PMID:27483189

  6. A quantum chemistry study for ionic liquids applied to gas capture and separation.

    PubMed

    Damas, Giane B; Dias, Amina B A; Costa, Luciano T

    2014-07-31

    In recent years, the global climate change is in evidence and it is almost a consensus that it is caused by the greenhouse gases emissions. An alternative to reduce these emissions is carbon capture and storage (CCS), which employs solvents based on amine compounds. In this scene, ionic liquids (IL) have been investigated to a greater extent for this application. In this work, we make an evaluation of interactions between gases (CO2, SO2, and H2S) and anion/cation from IL, as well as cation-anion interactions. For this, quantum calculations under vacuum were performed at the B3LYP/6-311+G** level of theory and using the M06-2X functional, where dispersion effects are considered. Among the well-studied systems based on imidazolium cations and fluorinated anions, we also studied the tetraalkylammonium, tetraalkylphosphonium, ether-functionalized imidazolium based systems, and tetrahexylammonium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide, [THA][Tf2N], as a potential prototype. The ion pairs evaluated include [Tf2N](-)-based IL, with alkyl chain varying from [C1mim](+) to [C8mim](+) and [C1mim](+)-based IL. We found that the anion becomes more available to interact with gas with the weakening of the cation-anion interaction. [THA][Tf2N] has a binding energy of -274.89 kJ/mol at the B3LYP/6-311+G** level of theory, which is considered energetically interesting to gas capture applications.

  7. The effect of H2O gas on volatilities of planet-forming major elements. I - Experimental determination of thermodynamic properties of Ca-, Al-, and Si-hydroxide gas molecules and its application to the solar nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hashimoto, Akihiko

    1992-01-01

    The vapor pressures of Ca(OH)2(g), Al(OH)3(g), and Si(OH)4(g) molecules in equilibrium with solid calcium-, aluminum, and silicon-oxides, respectively, were determined, and were used to derive the heats of formation and entropies of these species, which are expected to be abundant under the currently postulated physical conditions in the primordial solar nebula. These data, in conjunction with thermodynamic data from literature, were used to calculate the relative abundances of M, MO(x), and M(OH)n gas species and relative volatilities of Fe, Mg, Si, Ca, and Al for ranges of temperature, total pressure, and H/O abundance ratio corresponding to the plausible ranges of physical conditions in the solar nebula. The results are used to explain how Ca and Al could have evaporated from Ca,Al-rich inclusions in carbonaceous chondrites, while Si, Mg, and Fe condensed onto them during the preaccretion alteration of CAIs.

  8. Diffusive separation of noble gases and noble gas abundance patterns in sedimentary rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Torgersen, T.; Kennedy, B.M.; van Soest, M.C.

    2004-06-14

    The mechanisms responsible for noble gas concentrations, abundance patterns, and strong retentivity in sedimentary lithologies remain poorly explained. Diffusion-controlled fractionation of noble gases is modeled and examined as an explanation for the absolute and relative abundances of noble gases observed in sediments. Since the physical properties of the noble gases are strong functions of atomic mass, the individual diffusion coefficients, adsorption coefficients and atomic radii combine to impede heavy noble gas (Xe) diffusion relative to light noble gas (Ne) diffusion. Filling of lithic grains/half-spaces by diffusive processes thus produces Ne enrichments in the early and middle stages of the filling process with F(Ne) values similar to that observed in volcanic glasses. Emptying lithic grains/half-spaces produces a Xe-enriched residual in the late (but not final) stages of the process producing F(Xe) values similar to that observed in shales. 'Exotic but unexceptional' shales that exhibit both F(Ne) and F(Xe) enrichments can be produced by incomplete emptying followed by incomplete filling. This mechanism is consistent with literature reported noble gas abundance patterns but may still require a separate mechanism for strong retention. A system of labyrinths-with-constrictions and/or C-, Si-nanotubes when combined with simple adsorption can result in stronger diffusive separation and non-steady-state enrichments that persist for longer times. Enhanced adsorption to multiple C atoms inside C-nanotubes as well as dangling functional groups closing the ends of nanotubes can provide potential mechanisms for 'strong retention'. We need new methods of examining noble gases in rocks to determine the role and function of angstrom-scale structures in both the diffusive enrichment process and the 'strong retention' process for noble gas abundances in terrestrial rocks.

  9. Rapid separation of beryllium and lanthanide derivatives by capillary gas chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, Scott D.; Lucke, Richard B.; Douglas, Matt

    2012-09-04

    Previous studies describe derivatization of metal ions followed by analysis using gas chromatography, usually on packed columns. In many of these studies, stable and volatile derivatives were formed using fluorinated β-diketonate reagents. This paper extends previous work by investigating separations of the derivatives on small-diameter capillary gas chromatography columns and exploring on-fiber, solid-phase microextraction derivatization techniques for beryllium. The β-diketonate used for these studies was 1,1,1,2,2,6,6,7,7,7-decafluoro-3,5-heptanedione. Derivatization of lanthanides also required addition of a neutral donor, dibutyl sulfoxide, in addition to 1,1,1,2,2,6,6,7,7,7-decafluoro-3,5-heptanedione. Unoptimized separations on a 100-μm i.d. capillary column proved capable of rapid separations (within 15 min) of lanthanide derivatives that are adjacent to one another in the periodic table. Full-scan mass spectra were obtained from derivatives containing 5 ng of each lanthanide. Studies also developed a simple on-fiber solid-phase microextraction derivatization of beryllium. Beryllium could be analyzed in the presence of other alkali earth elements (Ba(II) and Sr(II)) without interference. Finally, extension of the general approach was demonstrated for several additional elements (i.e. Cu(II), Cr(III), and Ga(III)).

  10. Separation of cis- and trans-Asarone from Acorus tatarinowii by Preparative Gas Chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, H. L.; Yang, F. Q.; Zhang, X. M.; Xia, Z. N.

    2012-01-01

    A preparative gas chromatography (pGC) method was developed for the separation of isomers (cis- and trans-asarone) from essential oil of Acorus tatarinowii. The oil was primarily fractionated by silica gel chromatography using different ratios of petroleum ether and ethyl acetate as gradient elution solvents. And then the fraction that contains mixture of the isomers was further separated by pGC. The compounds were separated on a stainless steel column packed with 10% OV-101 (3 m × 6 mm, i.d.), and then the effluent was split into two gas flows. One percent of the effluent passed to the flame ionization detector (FID) for detection and the remaining 99% was directed to the fraction collector. Two isomers were collected after 90 single injections (5 uL) with the yield of 178 mg and 82 mg, respectively. Furthermore, the structures of the obtained compounds were identified as cis- and trans-asarone by 1H- and 13C-NMR spectra, respectively. PMID:22448339

  11. Minimum separation distances for natural gas pipeline and boilers in the 300 area, Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Daling, P.M.; Graham, T.M.

    1997-08-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is proposing actions to reduce energy expenditures and improve energy system reliability at the 300 Area of the Hanford Site. These actions include replacing the centralized heating system with heating units for individual buildings or groups of buildings, constructing a new natural gas distribution system to provide a fuel source for many of these units, and constructing a central control building to operate and maintain the system. The individual heating units will include steam boilers that are to be housed in individual annex buildings located at some distance away from nearby 300 Area nuclear facilities. This analysis develops the basis for siting the package boilers and natural gas distribution systems to be used to supply steam to 300 Area nuclear facilities. The effects of four potential fire and explosion scenarios involving the boiler and natural gas pipeline were quantified to determine minimum separation distances that would reduce the risks to nearby nuclear facilities. The resulting minimum separation distances are shown in Table ES.1.

  12. Development of Brazing Technology for Use in High Temperature Gas Separation Equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Weil, K. Scott; Hardy, John S.; Kim, Jin Yong Y.

    2003-04-07

    The development of high-temperature electrochemical devices such as oxygen and hydrogen separators, fuel gas reformers, solid oxide fuel cells, and chemical sensors is part of a rapidly expanding segment of the solid state technology market. These devices employ an ionic conducting ceramic as the active membrane that establishes the electrochemical potential of the device, either under voltage (i.e. to carry out gas separation) or under chemical gradient (to develop an electrical potential and thereby generate electrical power). Because the device operates under an ionic gradient that develops across the electrolyte, hermiticity across this layer is paramount. That is, not only must this thin ceramic membrane be dense with no interconnected porosity, but it must be connected to the rest of the device, typically constructed from a heat resistant alloy, with a high-temperature, gas-tight seal. A significant engineering challenge in fabricating these devices is how to effectively join the thin electrochemically active membrane to the metallic body of the device such that the resulting seal is hermetic, rugged, and stable during continuous high temperature operation.

  13. High-temperature separation with polymer-coated fiber in packed capillary gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Saito, Yoshihiro; Ogawa, Mitsuhiro; Imaizumi, Motohiro; Ban, Kazuhiro; Abe, Akira; Takeichi, Tsutomu; Wada, Hiroo; Jinno, Kiyokatsu

    2005-06-01

    High-temperature gas chromatographic separation of several synthetic polymer mixtures with Dexsil-coated fiber-packed columns was studied. A bundle of heat-resistant filaments, Zylon, was longitudinally packed into a short metal capillary, followed by the conventional coating process with Dexsil 300 material. Prior to the packing process the metal capillary was deactivated by the formation of a silica layer. The typical size of the resulting column was 0.3-mm i.d., 0.5-mm o.d., 1-m length, and packed with about 170 filaments of the Dexsil-coated Zylon. The column temperature could be elevated up to 450 degrees C owing to the good thermal stability of the fiber, Dexsil coating, and metal capillary; furthermore, this allowed the separation of low-volatile compounds to be studied.

  14. High-temperature separation with polymer-coated fiber in packed capillary gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Saito, Yoshihiro; Ogawa, Mitsuhiro; Imaizumi, Motohiro; Ban, Kazuhiro; Abe, Akira; Takeichi, Tsutomu; Wada, Hiroo; Jinno, Kiyokatsu

    2005-06-01

    High-temperature gas chromatographic separation of several synthetic polymer mixtures with Dexsil-coated fiber-packed columns was studied. A bundle of heat-resistant filaments, Zylon, was longitudinally packed into a short metal capillary, followed by the conventional coating process with Dexsil 300 material. Prior to the packing process the metal capillary was deactivated by the formation of a silica layer. The typical size of the resulting column was 0.3-mm i.d., 0.5-mm o.d., 1-m length, and packed with about 170 filaments of the Dexsil-coated Zylon. The column temperature could be elevated up to 450 degrees C owing to the good thermal stability of the fiber, Dexsil coating, and metal capillary; furthermore, this allowed the separation of low-volatile compounds to be studied. PMID:15933854

  15. A Mechanistic Study of Chemically Modified Inorganic Membranes for Gas and Liquid Separations

    SciTech Connect

    Way, J Douglas

    2011-01-21

    This final report will summarize the progress made during the period August 1, 1993 - October 31, 2010 with support from DOE grant number DE-FG03-93ER14363. The objectives of the research have been to investigate the transport mechanisms in micro- and mesoporous, metal oxide membranes and to examine the relationship between the microstructure of the membrane, the membrane surface chemistry, and the separation performance of the membrane. Examples of the membrane materials under investigation are the microporous silica hollow fiber membrane manufactured by PPG Industries, chemically modified mesoporous oxide membranes, and polymer membranes containing microporous oxides (mixed matrix membranes). Analytical techniques such as NMR, FTIR and Raman spectroscopy, thermal analysis, and gas adsorption were used to investigate membrane microstructure and to probe the chemical interactions occurring at the gas-membrane interface.

  16. The H2O2-H2O Hypothesis: Extremophiles Adapted to Conditions on Mars?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houtkooper, Joop M.; Schulze-Makuch, Dirk

    2007-08-01

    evolved into employing H2O2 as an antifreeze, which would also have the function as a water collector. If we would find life on Mars based on an intracellular H2O2-H2O mixture, this would not necessarily imply an independent origin of terrestrial and martian life. For that, a detailed study of the biochemistry and genetics is needed. The transfer of terrestrial organisms to Mars or vice versa is a possibility given favorable conditions for the origin and persistance of life on both planets early in solar system history (Schulze-Makuch and Houtkooper, 2007). The transfer of terrestrial organisms by early spacecrafts to Mars that either landed or crashed is a possibility, but it is not plausible that these organisms evolved in a few years. We suggest that we already have evidence of their existence from the Viking landers in two widely distant locations. The H2O2-H2O hypothesis does explain the Viking observations remarkably well, especially (1) the lack of organics detected by GC-MS, (2) the lack of detected oxidant(s) to support a chemical explanation, (3) evolution of O2 upon wetting (GEx experiment), (4) limited organic synthesis reactions (PR experiment), and (5) the gas release observations made (LR experiment)(Houtkooper and Schulze-Makuch, 2007). From the amounts of evolved CO2, O2 and N2 in the GEx experiment it can be concluded that the organisms have an excess oxidative content. This is a problem since in any destructive test, even by laser desorption-mass spectrometry (LDMS), the organisms may decompose completely into H2O, CO2, O2, and N2. The same will occur if the organisms are exposed to excess water, as they will perish due to hyperhydration. The consequence for future biology experiments is that the most fruitful approach may be the detection of metabolism under close to local environmental conditions, especially avoiding the addition of too much water. Of the Viking experiments, the PR experiment which aimed at carbon assimilation was the closest to

  17. Microalgae: a green source of renewable H(2).

    PubMed

    Ghirardi, M L; Zhang, L; Lee, J W; Flynn, T; Seibert, M; Greenbaum, E; Melis, A

    2000-12-01

    This article summarizes recent advances in the field of algal hydrogen production. Two fundamental approaches are being developed. One involves the temporal separation of the usually incompatible reactions of O(2) and H(2) production in green algae, and the second involves the use of classical genetics to increase the O(2) tolerance of the reversible hydrogenase enzyme. The economic and environmental impact of a renewable source of H(2) are also discussed. PMID:11102662

  18. Relative importance of H2 and H2S as energy sources for primary production in geothermal springs.

    PubMed

    D'Imperio, Seth; Lehr, Corinne R; Oduro, Harry; Druschel, Greg; Kühl, Michael; McDermott, Timothy R

    2008-09-01

    Geothermal waters contain numerous potential electron donors capable of supporting chemolithotrophy-based primary production. Thermodynamic predictions of energy yields for specific electron donor and acceptor pairs in such systems are available, although direct assessments of these predictions are rare. This study assessed the relative importance of dissolved H(2) and H(2)S as energy sources for the support of chemolithotrophic metabolism in an acidic geothermal spring in Yellowstone National Park. H(2)S and H(2) concentration gradients were observed in the outflow channel, and vertical H(2)S and O(2) gradients were evident within the microbial mat. H(2)S levels and microbial consumption rates were approximately three orders of magnitude greater than those of H(2). Hydrogenobaculum-like organisms dominated the bacterial component of the microbial community, and isolates representing three distinct 16S rRNA gene phylotypes (phylotype = 100% identity) were isolated and characterized. Within a phylotype, O(2) requirements varied, as did energy source utilization: some isolates could grow only with H(2)S, some only with H(2), while others could utilize either as an energy source. These metabolic phenotypes were consistent with in situ geochemical conditions measured using aqueous chemical analysis and in-field measurements made by using gas chromatography and microelectrodes. Pure-culture experiments with an isolate that could utilize H(2)S and H(2) and that represented the dominant phylotype (70% of the PCR clones) showed that H(2)S and H(2) were used simultaneously, without evidence of induction or catabolite repression, and at relative rate differences comparable to those measured in ex situ field assays. Under in situ-relevant concentrations, growth of this isolate with H(2)S was better than that with H(2). The major conclusions drawn from this study are that phylogeny may not necessarily be reliable for predicting physiology and that H(2)S can dominate over H(2

  19. Relative Importance of H2 and H2S as Energy Sources for Primary Production in Geothermal Springs▿ †

    PubMed Central

    D'Imperio, Seth; Lehr, Corinne R.; Oduro, Harry; Druschel, Greg; Kühl, Michael; McDermott, Timothy R.

    2008-01-01

    Geothermal waters contain numerous potential electron donors capable of supporting chemolithotrophy-based primary production. Thermodynamic predictions of energy yields for specific electron donor and acceptor pairs in such systems are available, although direct assessments of these predictions are rare. This study assessed the relative importance of dissolved H2 and H2S as energy sources for the support of chemolithotrophic metabolism in an acidic geothermal spring in Yellowstone National Park. H2S and H2 concentration gradients were observed in the outflow channel, and vertical H2S and O2 gradients were evident within the microbial mat. H2S levels and microbial consumption rates were approximately three orders of magnitude greater than those of H2. Hydrogenobaculum-like organisms dominated the bacterial component of the microbial community, and isolates representing three distinct 16S rRNA gene phylotypes (phylotype = 100% identity) were isolated and characterized. Within a phylotype, O2 requirements varied, as did energy source utilization: some isolates could grow only with H2S, some only with H2, while others could utilize either as an energy source. These metabolic phenotypes were consistent with in situ geochemical conditions measured using aqueous chemical analysis and in-field measurements made by using gas chromatography and microelectrodes. Pure-culture experiments with an isolate that could utilize H2S and H2 and that represented the dominant phylotype (70% of the PCR clones) showed that H2S and H2 were used simultaneously, without evidence of induction or catabolite repression, and at relative rate differences comparable to those measured in ex situ field assays. Under in situ-relevant concentrations, growth of this isolate with H2S was better than that with H2. The major conclusions drawn from this study are that phylogeny may not necessarily be reliable for predicting physiology and that H2S can dominate over H2 as an energy source in terms of

  20. Batch separation of shredded bulky waste by gas-solid fluidized bed at laboratory scale.

    PubMed

    Sekito, Tomoo; Tanaka, Nobutoshi; Matsuto, Toshihiko

    2006-01-01

    A gas-solid fluidized bed separator using various bed materials was used to separate shredded municipal bulky waste (SBW). Using 290 microm glass beads as the bed material, the apparent density of the fluidized bed was 1.5 g/cm(3) and the SBW could be separated into combustibles such as wood, paper and plastics and incombustibles such as metals and glass. The overall efficiency (Newton's efficiency) of the separation was calculated to be 0.93. In order to obtain high efficiency, the superficial velocity must be adjusted so that the fluidized bed is agitated moderately and at the same time there is no weak fluidized region. Using a mixture of particles of nylon shot and 68 microm glass beads, the apparent density of the fluidized mixture bed could be varied between 0.63 and 0.99 g/cm(3) by changing the mixing ratio of the two materials. In the case of a mixing ratio of 20% for glass beads, an apparent density of 0.65 g/cm(3) was produced, in which wood and paper components were recovered while plastics remained in the bed to give a final overall efficiency of 0.88.

  1. Graphitic carbon nitride as high-resolution stationary phase for gas chromatographic separations.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yunzhong; Qi, Meiling; Fu, Ruonong

    2016-07-01

    This work presents the first example of utilization of graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) as stationary phase for capillary gas chromatographic (GC) separations. The statically coated g-C3N4 column showed the column efficiencies of 3760 plates/m and weak polarity. Its resolving capability and retention behaviours were investigated by using the Grob test mixture, and mixtures of diverse types of analytes, and structural and positional isomers. The results showed superior separation performance of the g-C3N4 stationary phase for some critical analytes and preferential retention for aromatic analytes. Specifically, it exhibited high-resolution capability for aromatic and aliphatic isomers such as methylnaphthalenes and dimethylnaphthalenes, phenanthrene and anthracene and alkane isomers. In addition, g-C3N4 column showed excellent thermal stability up to 280°C and good repeatability with relative standard deviation (RSD) values less than 0.09% for intra-day, below 0.23% for inter-day and in the range of 1.9-8.4% for between-column, respectively. The advantageous separation performance shows the potential of g-C3N4 and related materials as stationary phase in GC and other separation technologies.

  2. Separation of vapour and gas mixtures using a thin zeolite MFI membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Vroon, Z.A.E.P.; Gilde, M.J.; Kiezer, K.

    1994-12-31

    Zeolite MFI composite membranes were prepared by in situ crystallisation. A very thin (L < 5 {mu}m) polycrystalline MFI layer was grown on a flat {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} support (pore radii 80 nm). XRD and SEM showed that the layer was built of small MFI particles ({+-}200 nm). The single gas flux of methane, n-butane and iso-butane are respectively 9.7, 2.7 and 0.032 10{sup -3} mol.m{sup -2}.s{sup -1} at 25{degrees}C and 100 kPa. The separation of n-butane/methane is reversible. At 25{degrees}C it is possible to separate n-butane from methane. At 200{degrees}C it is possible to separate methane from n-butane. The separation factor for 50 n-butane/50 iso-butane is 26 at 50{degrees}C. Experiments with large molecules showed that the zeolite MFI membrane contains no pores larger than inherent to the zeolite.

  3. Membrane process for separating H{sub 2}S from natural gas

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, R.W.

    1995-07-01

    Objective was to develop a membrane process for separating hydrogen sulfide and other impurities (CO{sub 2}, water vapor) from low-quality natural gas. A membrane material was identified with very high H{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} selectivity in the range of 40--60; membrane production was scaled up to commercial size rolls; high-pressure membrane and module development and optimization were completed; and a membrane permeation flux of 4{times}10{sub {minus}6} cm{sup 3}/s{center_dot}cm{sup 2}cmHg, twice as high state-of-the-art cellulose acetate membranes, was achieved.

  4. Are CO Observations of Interstellar Clouds Tracing the H2?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Federrath, Christoph; Glover, S. C. O.; Klessen, R. S.; Mac Low, M.

    2010-01-01

    Interstellar clouds are commonly observed through the emission of rotational transitions from carbon monoxide (CO). However, the abundance ratio of CO to molecular hydrogen (H2), which is the most abundant molecule in molecular clouds is only about 10-4. This raises the important question of whether the observed CO emission is actually tracing the bulk of the gas in these clouds, and whether it can be used to derive quantities like the total mass of the cloud, the gas density distribution function, the fractal dimension, and the velocity dispersion--size relation. To evaluate the usability and accuracy of CO as a tracer for H2 gas, we generate synthetic observations of hydrodynamical models that include a detailed chemical network to follow the formation and photo-dissociation of H2 and CO. These three-dimensional models of turbulent interstellar cloud formation self-consistently follow the coupled thermal, dynamical and chemical evolution of 32 species, with a particular focus on H2 and CO (Glover et al. 2009). We find that CO primarily traces the dense gas in the clouds, however, with a significant scatter due to turbulent mixing and self-shielding of H2 and CO. The H2 probability distribution function (PDF) is well-described by a log-normal distribution. In contrast, the CO column density PDF has a strongly non-Gaussian low-density wing, not at all consistent with a log-normal distribution. Centroid velocity statistics show that CO is more intermittent than H2, leading to an overestimate of the velocity scaling exponent in the velocity dispersion--size relation. With our systematic comparison of H2 and CO data from the numerical models, we hope to provide a statistical formula to correct for the bias of CO observations. CF acknowledges financial support from a Kade Fellowship of the American Museum of Natural History.

  5. Metal Oxide/Zeolite Combination Absorbs H2S

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voecks, Gerald E.; Sharma, Pramod K.

    1989-01-01

    Mixed copper and molybdenum oxides supported in pores of zeolite found to remove H2S from mixture of gases rich in hydrogen and steam, at temperatures from 256 to 538 degree C. Absorber of H2S needed to clean up gas streams from fuel processors that incorporate high-temperature steam reformers or hydrodesulfurizing units. Zeolites chosen as supporting materials because of their high porosity, rigidity, alumina content, and variety of both composition and form.

  6. The interstellar chemistry of H2C3O isomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loison, Jean-Christophe; Agúndez, Marcelino; Marcelino, Núria; Wakelam, Valentine; Hickson, Kevin M.; Cernicharo, José; Gerin, Maryvonne; Roueff, Evelyne; Guélin, Michel

    2016-03-01

    We present the detection of two H2C3O isomers, propynal and cyclopropenone, toward various starless cores and molecular clouds, together with upper limits for the third isomer propadienone. We review the processes controlling the abundances of H2C3O isomers in interstellar media showing that the reactions involved are gas-phase ones. We show that the abundances of these species are controlled by kinetic rather than thermodynamic effects.

  7. The interstellar chemistry of H2C3O isomers

    PubMed Central

    Loison, Jean-Christophe; Agúndez, Marcelino; Marcelino, Núria; Wakelam, Valentine; Hickson, Kevin M.; Cernicharo, José; Gerin, Maryvonne; Roueff, Evelyne; Guélin, Michel

    2016-01-01

    We present the detection of two H2C3O isomers, propynal and cyclopropenone, toward various starless cores and molecular clouds, together with upper limits for the third isomer propadienone. We review the processes controlling the abundances of H2C3O isomers in interstellar media showing that the reactions involved are gas-phase ones. We show that the abundances of these species are controlled by kinetic rather than thermodynamic effects. PMID:27013768

  8. Separation of particulate from flue gas of fossil fuel combustion and gasification

    DOEpatents

    Yang, W.C.; Newby, R.A.; Lippert, T.E.

    1997-08-05

    The gas from combustion or gasification of fossil fuel contains fly ash and other particulates. The fly ash is separated from the gas in a plurality of standleg moving granular-bed filter modules. Each module includes a dipleg through which the bed media flows into the standleg. The bed media forms a first filter bed having an upper mass having a first frusto-conical surface in a frusto-conical member at the entrance to the standleg and a lower mass having a second frusto-conical surface of substantially greater area than the first surface after it passes through the standleg. A second filter media bed may be formed above the first filter media bed. The gas is fed tangentially into the module above the first surface. The fly ash is captured on the first frusto-conical surface and within the bed mass. The processed gas flows out through the second frusto-conical surface and then through the second filter bed, if present. The bed media is cleaned of the captured fly ash and recirculated to the moving granular bed filter. Alternatively, the bed media may be composed of the ash from the combustion which is pelletized to form agglomerates. The ash flows through the bed only once; it is not recycled. 11 figs.

  9. Separation of particulate from flue gas of fossil fuel combustion and gasification

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Wen-Ching; Newby, Richard A.; Lippert, Thomas E.

    1997-01-01

    The gas from combustion or gasification of fossil fuel contains flyash and other particulate. The flyash is separated from the gas in a plurality of standleg moving granular-bed filter modules. Each module includes a dipleg through which the bed media flows into the standleg. The bed media forms a first filter bed having an upper mass having a first frusto-conical surface in a frusto-conical member at the entrance to the standleg and a lower mass having a second frusto-conical surface of substantially greater area than the first surface after it passes through the standleg. A second filter media bed may be formed above the first filter media bed. The gas is fed tangentially into the module above the first surface. The flyash is captured on the first frusto-conical surface and within the bed mass. The processed gas flows out through the second frusto-conical surface and then through the second filter bed, if present. The bed media is cleaned of the captured flyash and recirculated to the moving granular bed filter. Alternatively, the bed media may be composed of the ash from the combustion which is pelletized to form agglomerates. The ash flows through the bed only once; it is not recycled.

  10. Development of silver impregnated alumina for iodine separation from off-gas streams

    SciTech Connect

    Funabashi, Kiyomi; Fukasawa, Tetsuo; Kikuchi, Makoto

    1995-02-01

    An inorganic iodine adsorbent, silver impregnated alumina (AgA), has been developed to separate iodine effectively from off-gas streams of nuclear facilities and to decrease the volume of waste (spent adsorbent). Iodine removal efficiency was improved at relatively high humidity by using alumina carrier with two different pore diameters. Waste volume reduction was achieved by impregnating relatively large amounts of silver into the alumina pores. The developed adsorbent was tested first with simulated off-gas streams under various experimental conditions and finally with actual off-gas streams of the Karlsruhe reprocessing plant. The decontamination factor (DF) was about 100 with the AgA bed depth of 2cm at 70% relative humidity, which was a DF one order higher than that when AgA with one pore size was used. Iodine adsorption capacity was checked by passing excess iodine into the AgA bed. Values were about 0.12 and 0.35 g-I/cm`-AgA bed for 10 and 24wt% silver impregnated AgA, respectively. The results obtained in this study demonstrated the applicability of the developed AgA to the off-gas treatment system of nuclear facilities.

  11. DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT OF GAS-LIQUID CYLINDRICAL CYCLONE COMPACT SEPARATORS FOR THREE-PHASE FLOW

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Ram S. Mohan; Dr. Ovadia Shoham

    2003-06-25

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has awarded a five-year (1997-2002) grant (Mohan and Shoham, DE-FG26-97BC15024, 1997) to The University of Tulsa, to develop compact multiphase separation components for 3-phase flow. The research activities of this project have been conducted through cost sharing by the member companies of the Tulsa University Separation Technology Projects (TUSTP) research consortium and the Oklahoma Center for the Advancement of Science and Technology (OCAST). As part of this project, several individual compact separation components have been developed for onshore and offshore applications. These include gas-liquid cylindrical cyclones (GLCC{copyright}), liquid-liquid cylindrical cyclones (LLCC{copyright}), and the gas-liquid-liquid cylindrical cyclones (GLLCC{copyright}). A detailed study has also been completed for the liquid-liquid hydrocyclones (LLHC). Appropriate control strategies have been developed for proper operation of the GLCC{copyright} and LLCC{copyright}. Testing of GLCC{copyright} at high pressure and real crude conditions for field applications is also completed. Limited studies have been conducted on flow conditioning devices to be used upstream of the compact separators for performance improvement. This report presents a brief overview of the activities and tasks accomplished during the 5-year project period, October 1, 1997-March 31, 2003 (including the no-cost extended period of 6 months). An executive summary is presented initially followed by the tasks of the 5-year budget periods. Then, detailed description of the experimental and modeling investigations are presented. Subsequently, the technical and scientific results of the activities of this project period are presented with some discussions. The findings of this investigation are summarized in the ''Conclusions'' section, followed by relevant references. The publications resulting from this study in the form of MS Theses, Ph.D. Dissertation, Journal Papers and

  12. Analytic H i-to-H2 Photodissociation Transition Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bialy, Shmuel; Sternberg, Amiel

    2016-05-01

    We present a simple analytic procedure for generating atomic (H i) to molecular ({{{H}}}2) density profiles for optically thick hydrogen gas clouds illuminated by far-ultraviolet radiation fields. Our procedure is based on the analytic theory for the structure of one-dimensional H i/{{{H}}}2 photon-dominated regions, presented by Sternberg et al. Depth-dependent atomic and molecular density fractions may be computed for arbitrary gas density, far-ultraviolet field intensity, and the metallicity-dependent H2 formation rate coefficient, and dust absorption cross section in the Lyman–Werner photodissociation band. We use our procedure to generate a set of {{H}} {{I}}{-}{to}{-}{{{H}}}2 transition profiles for a wide range of conditions, from the weak- to strong-field limits, and from super-solar down to low metallicities. We show that if presented as functions of dust optical depth, the {{H}} {{I}} and {{{H}}}2 density profiles depend primarily on the Sternberg “α G parameter” (dimensionless) that determines the dust optical depth associated with the total photodissociated {{H}} {{I}} column. We derive a universal analytic formula for the {{H}} {{I}}{-}{to}{-}{{{H}}}2 transition points as a function of just α G. Our formula will be useful for interpreting emission-line observations of H i/{{{H}}}2 interfaces, for estimating star formation thresholds, and for sub-grid components in hydrodynamics simulations.

  13. Analytic H i-to-H2 Photodissociation Transition Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bialy, Shmuel; Sternberg, Amiel

    2016-05-01

    We present a simple analytic procedure for generating atomic (H i) to molecular ({{{H}}}2) density profiles for optically thick hydrogen gas clouds illuminated by far-ultraviolet radiation fields. Our procedure is based on the analytic theory for the structure of one-dimensional H i/{{{H}}}2 photon-dominated regions, presented by Sternberg et al. Depth-dependent atomic and molecular density fractions may be computed for arbitrary gas density, far-ultraviolet field intensity, and the metallicity-dependent H2 formation rate coefficient, and dust absorption cross section in the Lyman-Werner photodissociation band. We use our procedure to generate a set of {{H}} {{I}}{-}{to}{-}{{{H}}}2 transition profiles for a wide range of conditions, from the weak- to strong-field limits, and from super-solar down to low metallicities. We show that if presented as functions of dust optical depth, the {{H}} {{I}} and {{{H}}}2 density profiles depend primarily on the Sternberg “α G parameter” (dimensionless) that determines the dust optical depth associated with the total photodissociated {{H}} {{I}} column. We derive a universal analytic formula for the {{H}} {{I}}{-}{to}{-}{{{H}}}2 transition points as a function of just α G. Our formula will be useful for interpreting emission-line observations of H i/{{{H}}}2 interfaces, for estimating star formation thresholds, and for sub-grid components in hydrodynamics simulations.

  14. The Anharmonic Force Field of BeH2 Revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Jan M. L.; Lee, Timothy J.

    2003-01-01

    The anharmonic force field of BeH2 has been calculated near the basis set and n-particle space limits. The computed antisymmetric stretch frequencies of BeH2 and BeD2 are in excellent agreement with recent high-resolution gas-phase measurements. The agreement between theory and experiment for the other spectroscopic constants is also excellent, except for omega(sub 3) and X(sub 33) for BeH2 and G(sub 22) for BeD2. It is concluded that further experimental work is needed in order to resolve these discrepancies.

  15. Legumes, N2 fixation and the H2 cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Layzell, D. B.

    2004-12-01

    Legume plants such as soybean or pea can form symbiotic, N2 fixing associations with bacteria that exist in root nodules. For every N2 fixed, 1 to 3 H2 are produced as a by-product of the nitrogenase reaction. Therefore, a typical N2 fixing legume crop produces about 200,000 L H2 gas (at STP) per hectare per crop season. This paper will summarize our current understanding of the processes leading to H2 production in legumes, the magnitude of H2 production associated with global cropping systems, and the implications for its production and oxidation on both the legumes and the soils in which they grow. Specific points may include: ˜ In symbioses lacking uptake hydrogenase (HUP) activity (thought to be the majority of crop legumes), the H2 diffuses into the soil where it is oxidized by soil microbes that grow up around the legume nodules. The kinetic properties of these microbes are very different (higher Km and Vmax) from that of microbes in soils exposed to normal air (ca. 0.5 ppm H2); ˜ Laboratory studies indicate that 60% of the reducing power from H2 is coupled to O2 uptake, whereas 40% is coupled to autotrophic CO2 fixation. The latter process should increase soil carbon stocks by about 25 kg C/ha/yr; ˜ At the site of the nitrogenase enzyme, H2 production is autocatalytic such that the higher the H2 concentration, the more H2 is produced and the less N2 fixed. The variable O2 diffusion barrier in legumes can act to restrict H2 diffusion from the nodule, thereby increasing the relative magnitude of H2 production versus N2 fixation; ˜ Studies to understand why legume symbioses make such an energy investment in H2 production have led to the discovery that H2 treated soils have improved fertility, supporting the growth and yield of legume and non-legume crops. This observation may account for the benefits of legumes when used in rotation with cereal crops, a phenomenon that has been used by farmers for over 2000 years, but which has remained unexplained. An

  16. High performance liquid chromatographic separations of gas oil samples and their hydrotreated products using commercial normal phases.

    PubMed

    Oro, Nicole E; Lucy, Charles A

    2011-10-28

    Three commercially available high performance liquid chromatography columns are used in normal phase or quasi-normal phase mode for the separation of gas oil samples. The columns are tested with 20 analytical standards to determine their suitability for separations of petroleum samples and their ability to separate the nitrogen group-types (pyrrole and pyridine) found in petroleum. The columns studied are polymeric hypercrosslinked polystyrene (HGN), a biphenyl phase, and a Chromegabond "DNAP" column from ES Industries. The HGN column separates gas oils based on both ring structure and heteroatom, while the biphenyl phase has low retention of most compounds studied in quasi-normal phase mode. The "DNAP" column is selective for nitrogen-containing compounds, separating them from PAHs as well as oxygen and sulphur compounds. Retention data of standards on all three columns is shown, along with chromatograms of gas oil samples on the HGN and "DNAP" columns.

  17. Mathematical Modeling of Non-Stationary Hydraulic Process Occurring in the Gas Centrifuge Cascade During the Separation of Multicomponent Isotope Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlov, A. A.; Ushakov, A. A.; Sovach, V. P.

    2016-08-01

    This article presents results of development of the mathematical model of nonstationary separation processes occurring in gas centrifuge cascades for separation of multicomponent isotope mixtures. This model was used for the calculation parameters of gas centrifuge cascade for separation of germanium isotopes. Comparison of obtained values with results of other authors revealed that developed mathematical model is adequate to describe nonstationary separation processes in gas centrifuge cascades for separation of multicomponent isotope mixtures.

  18. Single Step Bi-reforming and Oxidative Bi-reforming of Methane (Natural Gas) with Steam and Carbon Dioxide to Metgas (CO-2H2) for Methanol Synthesis: Self-Sufficient Effective and Exclusive Oxygenation of Methane to Methanol with Oxygen.

    PubMed

    Olah, George A; Goeppert, Alain; Czaun, Miklos; Mathew, Thomas; May, Robert B; Prakash, G K Surya

    2015-07-15

    Catalysts based on suitable metal oxide supports, such as NiO/MgO and CoO/MgO, were shown to be active for single step bi-reforming, the combined steam and dry reforming of methane or natural gas with H2O and CO2 exclusively to metgas (CO-2H2) for efficient methanol synthesis. Reactions were carried out in a tubular flow reactor under pressures up to 42 bar at 830-910 °C. Using a CH4 to steam to CO2 ratio of ∼3:2:1 in the gas feed, the H2/CO ratio of 2:1 was achieved, which is desired for subsequent methanol synthesis. The needed 2/1 steam/CO2 feed ratio together with the reaction heat for the endothermic bi-reforming can be conveniently obtained by the complete combustion of a quarter part of the overall used methane (natural gas) with oxygen of the air (oxidative bi-reforming). Complete combustion of a part of methane followed by bi-reforming leads to the production of metgas (H2/CO in 2:1 mol ratio) for self-sufficient exclusive methanol synthesis. The long sought after but elusive efficient and selective oxygenation of methane to methanol is thus achieved in an effective and economic way without any oxidation byproduct formation according to CH4 + 1/2O2 → CH3OH.

  19. Single Step Bi-reforming and Oxidative Bi-reforming of Methane (Natural Gas) with Steam and Carbon Dioxide to Metgas (CO-2H2) for Methanol Synthesis: Self-Sufficient Effective and Exclusive Oxygenation of Methane to Methanol with Oxygen.

    PubMed

    Olah, George A; Goeppert, Alain; Czaun, Miklos; Mathew, Thomas; May, Robert B; Prakash, G K Surya

    2015-07-15

    Catalysts based on suitable metal oxide supports, such as NiO/MgO and CoO/MgO, were shown to be active for single step bi-reforming, the combined steam and dry reforming of methane or natural gas with H2O and CO2 exclusively to metgas (CO-2H2) for efficient methanol synthesis. Reactions were carried out in a tubular flow reactor under pressures up to 42 bar at 830-910 °C. Using a CH4 to steam to CO2 ratio of ∼3:2:1 in the gas feed, the H2/CO ratio of 2:1 was achieved, which is desired for subsequent methanol synthesis. The needed 2/1 steam/CO2 feed ratio together with the reaction heat for the endothermic bi-reforming can be conveniently obtained by the complete combustion of a quarter part of the overall used methane (natural gas) with oxygen of the air (oxidative bi-reforming). Complete combustion of a part of methane followed by bi-reforming leads to the production of metgas (H2/CO in 2:1 mol ratio) for self-sufficient exclusive methanol synthesis. The long sought after but elusive efficient and selective oxygenation of methane to methanol is thus achieved in an effective and economic way without any oxidation byproduct formation according to CH4 + 1/2O2 → CH3OH. PMID:26086090

  20. Metal-substituted zeolitic imidazolate framework ZIF-108: gas-sorption and membrane-separation properties.

    PubMed

    Ban, Yujie; Li, Yanshuo; Peng, Yuan; Jin, Hua; Jiao, Wenmei; Liu, Xinlei; Yang, Weishen

    2014-09-01

    A series of dual-metal zeolitic imidazolate framework (ZIF) crystals with SOD and RHO topologies was synthesised by metal substitution from ZIF-108 (Zn(2-nitroimidazolate)2 , SOD topology) as the parent material. This was based on the concept that metal substitution of ZIF-108 requires a much lower activation energy than homogenous nucleation owing to the metastability of ZIF-108. In-depth investigations of the formation processes of the daughter ZIFs indicated that the transformation of ZIF-108 is a dissolution/heterogeneous nucleation process. Typical isostructural Co(2+) substitution mainly occurs at the outer surface of ZIF-108 and results in a core-shell structure. On the contrary, the Cu(2+) -substituted ZIF has a RHO topology with a homogeneous distribution of Cu(2+) ions in the structure. Substitution with Ni(2+) resulted in a remarkable enhancement in adsorption selectivity toward CO(2) over N(2) by a factor of up to 227. With Co(2+) -substituted nanoparticles as inorganic filler, a mixed matrix membrane based on polysulfone displayed greatly improved performance in the separation of H(2)/CH(4), CO(2)/N(2) and CO(2)/CH(4). PMID:25056685

  1. Density functional theory of gas-liquid phase separation in dilute binary mixtures.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Ryuichi; Onuki, Akira

    2016-06-22

    We examine statics and dynamics of phase-separated states of dilute binary mixtures using density functional theory. In our systems, the difference of the solvation chemical potential between liquid and gas [Formula: see text] (the Gibbs energy of transfer) is considerably larger than the thermal energy [Formula: see text] for each solute particle and the attractive interaction among the solute particles is weaker than that among the solvent particles. In these conditions, the saturated vapor pressure increases by [Formula: see text], where [Formula: see text] is the solute density added in liquid. For [Formula: see text], phase separation is induced at low solute densities in liquid and the new phase remains in gaseous states, even when the liquid pressure is outside the coexistence curve of the solvent. This explains the widely observed formation of stable nanobubbles in ambient water with a dissolved gas. We calculate the density and stress profiles across planar and spherical interfaces, where the surface tension decreases with increasing interfacial solute adsorption. We realize stable solute-rich bubbles with radius about 30 nm, which minimize the free energy functional. We then study dynamics around such a bubble after a decompression of the surrounding liquid, where the bubble undergoes a damped oscillation. In addition, we present some exact and approximate expressions for the surface tension and the interfacial stress tensor.

  2. Measurement of vibrational, gas, and rotational temperatures of H2 (X1 Σg+) in radio frequency inductive discharge plasma by multiplex coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering spectroscopy technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakhatov, V. A.; De Pascale, O.; Capitelli, M.; Hassouni, K.; Lombardi, G.; Gicquel, A.

    2005-02-01

    Translational, rotational, and vibrational temperatures of H2 in radio frequency inductive discharge plasmas at pressures and power release ranges, respectively, of 0.5-8 torr and 0.5-2W/cm3 have been measured by using multiplex coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) spectroscopy. Computational codes have been developed to determine the rotational and vibrational temperatures and to analyze H2 CARS spectrum for nonequilibrium conditions. The results show a decrease of the vibrational temperature from 4250 to 2800 K by increasing the pressure from 0.5 to 8 torr and a corresponding increase of the rotational temperature from 525 to 750 K.

  3. Experiments on gas-ash separation processes in volcanic umbrella plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holasek, Rick E.; Woods, Andrew W.; Self, Stephen

    1996-03-01

    We present a series of analogue laboratory experiments which simulate the separation of ash and gas and the formation of secondary intrusions from finite volcanic umbrella plumes. We examined the lateral spreading of mixtures of freshwater and particles released into a laboratory tank containing a uniformly stratified aqueous solution. For times smaller than the sedimentation time of particles through the intrusion, the current remains coherent and intrudes laterally. As some of the particles settle into the underlying ambient fluid, a layer of particle-depleted fluid develops below the upper surface of the current and the density of the residual fluid is reduced. Over longer times, the intrusion ceases to be coherent, with small fingers of relatively buoyant, particle-depleted fluid rising from the upper part of the intrusion into the overlying fluid. Meanwhile, the lateral motion of the injected solution induces a return flow in the ambient fluid which sweeps some of the particles sedimenting from the lower surface of the intrusion inwards. As a result, relatively dense particle-laden fluid collects below the intrusion and then sinks into the underlying fluid. Eventually this fluid reaches a new neutral buoyancy height, where it intrudes to form a second laterally spreading current below the original intrusion. The process then repeats to form further weaker intrusions below. These results of the separation of the ash and volcanic gas in an umbrella plume are consistent with field observations at Sakurajima volcano where positively charged plumes, thought to consist of volcanic gas, have been observed above negatively charged plumes of ash. This work also suggests that volcanic aerosols may form up to a kilometer above the original injection height of the ash. In a strong wind shear, this could result in very different trajectories of the ash and gas and so be important for evaluating the impact of ash plumes on both aviation safety and volcanic aerosol formation

  4. Carbon nanocomposite sorbent and methods of using the same for separation of one or more materials from a gas stream

    DOEpatents

    Olson, Edwin S; Pavlish, John H

    2015-04-21

    The present invention relates to carbon nanocomposite sorbents. The present invention provides carbon nanocomposite sorbents, methods for making the same, and methods for separation of a pollutant from a gas that includes that pollutant. Various embodiments provide a method for reducing the mercury content of a mercury-containing gas.

  5. Membrane gas separation. January 1970-May 1981 (citations from the NTIS data base). Report for Jan 70-May 81

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-05-01

    This retrospective bibliography discusses the current literature on gas separation and purification using polymeric and metallic membranes. Included are topics such as isotope separation, osmotic techniques, reverse osmosis, and preparation of membranes for specific separation processes. The permeability of polymer membranes is discussed in terms of physical properties, of the membrane as well as its molecular structure. The selectivity of polymeric films for a variety of gases is also considered. (Contains 78 citations fully indexed and including a title list.)

  6. Membrane gas separation. January 1976-May 1981 (citations from the Energy Data Base). Report for Jan 76-May 81

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-05-01

    This retrospective bibliography discusses the current literature on gas separation and purification using polymeric and metallic membranes. Included are topics such as isotope separation, osmotic techniques, reverse osmosis and preparation of membranes for specific separation processes. The permeability of polymer membranes is discussed in terms of physical properties of the membrane as well as its molecular structure. The selectivity of polymeric films for a variety of gases is also considered. (Contains 65 citations fully indexed and including a title list.)

  7. Membrane gas separation. January 1970-May 1981 (citations from the Engineering Index Data Base). Report for Jan 70-May 81

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-05-01

    This retrospective bibliography discusses the current literature on gas separation and purification using polymeric and metallic membranes. Included are topics such as isotope separation, osmotic techniques, reverse osmosis and preparation of membranes for specific separation processes. The permeability of polymer membranes is discussed in terms of physical properties of the membrane as well as its molecular structure. The selectivity of polymeric films for a variety of gases is also considered. (Contains 51 citations fully indexed and including a title list.)

  8. Separation of gas mixtures by supported complexes. Final report, 1 October 1982-30 September 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, D.A.; Hallen, R.T.; Lilga, M.A.

    1985-01-01

    This final report covers research performed to identify and demonstrate advantageous procedures for the chemical separation of gases, such as CO, CO/sub 2/, and H/sub 2/, from medium-Btu gas mixtures by use of supported complexes. Three complexes were chosen for rapid gas uptake and selectivity at 25/sup 0/C from among a group of 22 coordination complexes synthesized during this program. The three complexes showed considerable selectivity toward individual gases. For instance, Pd/sub 2/(dpm)/sub 2/Cl/sub 2/ or bis-..mu..-(bisdiphenylphosphinomethane)-dichlorodipalladium (Pd-Pd), rapidly bound carbon monoxide from solution. This complex could be regenerated, with the carbon monoxide reversibly removed, by warming to 40/sup 0/C. The presence of other gases, such as carbon dioxide, oxygen, nitrogen, hydrogen, ethylene, or acetylene, had no effect upon the rapid uptake of carbon monoxide or its removal. Such selectivity was also noted with Ru(CO)/sub 2/(PPh/sub 3/)/sub 3/, biscarbonyltris(triphenylphosphine)ruthenium. Although this complex bound hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and oxygen in solution, the hydrogen was taken up twice as fast as carbon monoxide and seven times faster than oxygen. These gases could be removed from the complex with mild heat or decreased pressure. Crystalline Rh(OH)(CO)(PPh/sub 3/)/sub 2/, hydroxocarbonylbis(triphenylphosphine)rhodium, rapidly bound carbon dioxide; the complex was regenerated at 50/sup 0/C under reduced pressure. The rapid uptake of carbon dioxide by this complex was not changed in the presence of oxygen. In general the three selected crystalline or solvent dissolved complexes performed well in the absence of polymeric support. The stability and favorable kinetics of the three complexes suggest that they could be utilized in a solution system for gas separation (Conceptual Analyses and Preliminary Economics). Further, these complexes appear to be superb candidates as transport agents for facilitated-transport, membrane systems

  9. Improved micromachined column design and fluidic interconnects for programmed high-temperature gas chromatography separations.

    PubMed

    Gaddes, David; Westland, Jessica; Dorman, Frank L; Tadigadapa, Srinivas

    2014-07-01

    This work focuses on the development and experimental evaluation of micromachined chromatographic columns for use in a commercial gas chromatography (GC) system. A vespel/graphite ferrule based compression sealing technique is presented using which leak-proof fluidic interconnection between the inlet tubing and the microchannel was achieved. This sealing technique enabled separation at temperatures up to 350°C on a μGC column. This paper reports the first high-temperature separations in microfabricated chromatographic columns at these temperatures. A 2m microfabricated column using a double Archimedean spiral design with a square cross-section of 100μm×100μm has been developed using silicon microfabrication techniques. The microfabricated column was benchmarked against a 2m 100μm diameter commercial column and the performance between the two columns was evaluated in tests performed under identical conditions. High temperature separations of simulated distillation (ASTM2887) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (EPA8310) were performed using the μGC column in temperature programmed mode. The demonstrated μGC column along with the high temperature fixture offers one more solution toward potentially realizing a portable μGC device for the detection of semi-volatile environmental pollutants and explosives without the thermal limitations reported to date with μGC columns using epoxy based interconnect technology. PMID:24866564

  10. Evaluation of two commercial capillary columns for the enantioselective gas chromatographic separation of organophosphorus pesticides.

    PubMed

    Fidalgo-Used, Natalia; Blanco-González, Elisa; Sanz-Medel, Alfredo

    2006-12-15

    The separation of the enantiomers of 13 organophosphorus pesticides (OPPs) has been investigated by gas chromatography (GC) with flame ionisation detection (FID) using two different commercially available chiral columns, Chirasil-Val (l-valine-tert-butylamide) and CP-Chirasil-Dex CB (heptakis (2,3,6-tri-O-metil)-beta-cyclodextrin). Using the Chirasil-Val column no chiral resolution was obtained for the OPPs investigated under any tested experimental condition. The use of the CP-Chirasil-Dex CB stationary phase enabled good individual enantiomeric separation of two OPPs, ruelene and trichlorfon and partial separation of naled, chloretoxyphos, isophenphos and metamidophos. Also, the obtained chromatographic results showed that Chirasil-Dex could resolve enantiomers through the combination of different mechanism (e.g. formation of inclusion complexes and/or interactions outside the cyclodextrin cavity). Under optimised conditions, precision, linearity range and detection limits were evaluated for the enantiomers of ruelene and trichlorfon using CP-Chirasil-Dex CB column and electron capture detection (ECD). By using the GC-ECD method the enantiomers of these OPPs could be satisfactorily detected at very low concentration levels. The detection limits observed were 1.5ngmL(-1) and 11.5ngmL(-1) for the enantiomers of trichlorfon and ruelene, respectively. PMID:18970881

  11. Heat Transfer Characteristics of Liquid-Driven Swirl Boiling Liquid/Gas Separator under Reduced Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oinuma, Ryoji; Nguyen, Ngoc; Dickes, Neil; Kurwitz, Richard C.; Best, Frederick R.

    2009-03-01

    Under reduced gravity conditions, conventional gravity-assisted steam generators do not function properly and shear-driven or swirl type of devices must be used. Once-through boilers with special inserts such as twisted-tapes or swirl devices and rotating boilers have been previously studied. The once-through boiler requires a liquid-vapor phase separator due to the inability to vaporize all liquid completely to avoid burn-out. These devices also encounter instabilities due to the sudden formation or collapse of vapor. The rotating boiler requires a large power input to operate and has less reliability due to moving parts and dynamic seals at high temperature. A liquid-driven vortex boiling separator is categorized as a shear-driven boiler, but creates centripetal-driven buoyancy forces to form a gas-liquid vortex by injecting liquid tangentially along the inner wall of the cylinder rather than rotating the body itself. The vortex boiling separator eliminates the disadvantages of devices mentioned above, having a low pressure drop, no moving parts and generating dry vapor at its outlet. Texas A&M University carried out a reduced gravity flight experiment on the NASA C-9 aircraft to investigate the heat transfer characteristics and performance based on similar devices developed at Texas A&M.

  12. Improved micromachined column design and fluidic interconnects for programmed high-temperature gas chromatography separations.

    PubMed

    Gaddes, David; Westland, Jessica; Dorman, Frank L; Tadigadapa, Srinivas

    2014-07-01

    This work focuses on the development and experimental evaluation of micromachined chromatographic columns for use in a commercial gas chromatography (GC) system. A vespel/graphite ferrule based compression sealing technique is presented using which leak-proof fluidic interconnection between the inlet tubing and the microchannel was achieved. This sealing technique enabled separation at temperatures up to 350°C on a μGC column. This paper reports the first high-temperature separations in microfabricated chromatographic columns at these temperatures. A 2m microfabricated column using a double Archimedean spiral design with a square cross-section of 100μm×100μm has been developed using silicon microfabrication techniques. The microfabricated column was benchmarked against a 2m 100μm diameter commercial column and the performance between the two columns was evaluated in tests performed under identical conditions. High temperature separations of simulated distillation (ASTM2887) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (EPA8310) were performed using the μGC column in temperature programmed mode. The demonstrated μGC column along with the high temperature fixture offers one more solution toward potentially realizing a portable μGC device for the detection of semi-volatile environmental pollutants and explosives without the thermal limitations reported to date with μGC columns using epoxy based interconnect technology.

  13. Computational investigation of noble gas adsorption and separation by nanoporous materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Allendorf, Mark D.; Sanders, Joseph C.; Greathouse, Jeffery A.

    2008-10-01

    Molecular simulations are used to assess the ability of metal-organic framework (MOF) materials to store and separate noble gases. Specifically, grand canonical Monte Carlo simulation techniques are used to predict noble gas adsorption isotherms at room temperature. Experimental trends of noble gas inflation curves of a Zn-based material (IRMOF-1) are matched by the simulation results. The simulations also predict that IRMOF-1 selectively adsorbs Xe atoms in Xe/Kr and Xe/Ar mixtures at total feed gas pressures of 1 bar (14.7 psia) and 10 bar (147 psia). Finally, simulations of a copper-based MOF (Cu-BTC) predict this material's ability to selectively adsorb Xe and Kr atoms when present in trace amounts in atmospheric air samples. These preliminary results suggest that Cu-BTC may be an ideal candidate for the pre-concentration of noble gases from air samples. Additional simulations and experiments are needed to determine the saturation limit of Cu-BTC for xenon, and whether any krypton atoms would remain in the Cu-BTC pores upon saturation.

  14. Air separation membranes : an alternative to EGR in large bore natural gas engines.

    SciTech Connect

    Biruduganti, M.; Gupta, S.; Bihari, B.; McConnell, S.; Sekar, R.; Energy Systems

    2010-08-01

    Air separation membranes (ASMs) could potentially replace exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) technology in engines due to the proven benefits in NOx reduction but without the drawbacks of EGR. Previous investigations of nitrogen-enriched air (NEA) combustion using nitrogen bottles showed up to 70% NOx reduction with modest 2% nitrogen enrichment. The investigation in this paper was performed with an ASM capable of delivering at least 3.5% NEA to a single-cylinder spark-ignited natural gas engine. Low temperature combustion is one of the pathways to meet the mandatory ultra low NOx emissions levels set by regulatory agencies. In this study, a comparative assessment is made between natural gas combustion in standard air and 2% NEA. Enrichment beyond this level degraded engine performance in terms of power density, brake thermal efficiency (BTE), and unburned hydrocarbon emissions for a given equivalence ratio. The ignition timing was optimized to yield maximum brake torque for standard air and NEA. Subsequently, conventional spark ignition was replaced by laser ignition (LI) to extend lean ignition limit. Both ignition systems were studied under a wide operating range from {Psi} :1.0 to the lean misfire limit. It was observed that with 2% NEA, for a similar fuel quantity, the equivalence ratio {Psi} increases by 0.1 relative to standard air conditions. Analysis showed that lean burn operation along with NEA and alternative ignition source, such as LI, could pave the pathway for realizing lower NO{sub x} emissions with a slight penalty in BTE.

  15. The tropospheric cycle of H2: a critical review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehhalt, D. H.; Rohrer, F.

    2009-07-01

    The literature on the distribution, budget and isotope content of molecular hydrogen (H2) in the troposphere is critically reviewed. The global distribution of H2 is reasonably well established and is relatively uniform. The surface measurements exhibit a weak latitudinal gradient with 3% higher concentrations in the Southern Hemisphere and seasonal variations that maximize in arctic latitudes and the interior of continents with peak-to-peak amplitudes up to 10%. There is no evidence for a continuous long-term trend, but older data suggest a reversal of the interhemispheric gradient in the late 1970s, and an increase in the deuterium content of H2 in the Northern Hemisphere from 80‰ standard mean ocean water (SMOW) in the 1970s to 130‰ today. The current budget analyses can be divided in two classes: bottom up, in which the source and sink terms are estimated separately based on emission factors and turnovers of precursors and on global integration of regional loss rates, respectively. That category includes the analyses by 3-D models and furnishes tropospheric turnovers around 75 Tg H2 yr-1. The other approach, referred to as top down, relies on inverse modelling or analysis of the deuterium budget of tropospheric H2. These provide a global turnover of about 105 Tg H2 yr-1. The difference is due to a much larger sink strength by soil uptake and a much larger H2 production from the photochemical oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOC) in the case of the top down approaches. The balance of evidence seems to favour the lower estimates-mainly due to the constraint placed by the global CO budget on the H2 production from VOC. An update of the major source and sink terms yields: fossil fuel use 11 +/- 4 Tg H2 yr-1 biomass burning (including bio-fuel) 15 +/- 6 Tg H2 yr-1 nitrogen fixation (ocean) 6 +/- 3 Tg H2 yr-1 nitrogen fixation (land) 3 +/- 2 Tg H2 yr-1 photochemical production from CH4 23 +/- 8 Tg H2 yr-1 and photochemical production from other VOC 18

  16. Equations of state for H2, H2O, and H2-H2O fluid mixtures at temperatures above 0.01° C and at high pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rimbach, Helmut; Chatterjee, Niranjan D.

    1987-11-01

    Modified Redlich-Kwong (MRK) equations of state have been derived for the pure fluid species H2 and H2O by expressing the parameter a as a function of T and P, and b as as a function of P only. These equations are valid above 0° and 0.01° C, respectively. For H2O, the prediction of volumes is successful not only in the supercritical, but also in the subcritical range. As a result of this, the saturation curve of H2O can be calculated with a maximum deviation of ±1.4 bar in the range 100 350° C. Between 350° C and the critical point (374.15° C), the uncertainty increases somewhat; this is due to a fundamental inadequacy of the Redlich-Kwong equation itself. These equations of state permit extrapolations to pressures of 100 kbar for H2 and at least 200 kbar for H2O and are, therefore, eminently suited for geochemical applications. Formulation of the MRK of the binary H2-H2O mixtures was achieved by assuming the quadratic mixing rule for the parameters a mix and b+mix. To derive the cross coefficients, aH2-H2Oand b H 2-H 2O, adjustable corrective factors ɛ and τ had to be introduced. The T- and P-dependences of ɛ and τ are based on P-V-T-X H 2 data (Seward and Franck 1981) to 440° C and 2500 bar. The resulting equation of state very satisfactorily reproduces the volumes observed experimentally at various sets of T, P, and X H 2. At a total pressure of 2 kbar, positive deviation from ideal mixing behaviour is still perceptible at as high a temperature as 1000° C. At some temperature around 380° C, phase separation sets in, an aqueous solution with dissolved H2 coexisting in equilibrium with an H2-rich fluid with dissolved H2O. The computed P-T-X H 2 surface of this two-phase region agrees well with that observed in Seward and Franck's (1981) experiments. An independent proof of the validity of this equation of state is the accuracy with which H {m/ex}can be predicted. Calorimetric measurements of H {m/ex}(Smith et al. 1983, Wormald and Colling 1985

  17. Molecular hydrogen (H2) emissions from gasoline and diesel vehicles.

    PubMed

    Bond, S W; Alvarez, R; Vollmer, M K; Steinbacher, M; Weilenmann, M; Reimann, S

    2010-08-01

    This study assesses individual-vehicle molecular hydrogen (H2) emissions in exhaust gas from current gasoline and diesel vehicles measured on a chassis dynamometer. Absolute H2 emissions were found to be highest for motorcycles and scooters (141+/-38.6 mg km(-1)), approximately 5 times higher than for gasoline-powered automobiles (26.5+/-12.1 mg km(-1)). All diesel-powered vehicles emitted marginal amounts of H2 ( approximately 0.1 mg km(-1)). For automobiles, the highest emission factors were observed for sub-cycles subject to a cold-start (mean of 53.1+/-17.0 mg km(-1)). High speeds also caused elevated H2 emission factors for sub-cycles reaching at least 150 km h(-1) (mean of 40.4+/-7.1 mg km(-1)). We show that H2/CO ratios (mol mol(-1)) from gasoline-powered vehicles are variable (sub-cycle means of 0.44-5.69) and are typically higher (mean for automobiles 1.02, for 2-wheelers 0.59) than previous atmospheric ratios characteristic of traffic-influenced measurements. The lowest mean individual sub-cycle ratios, which correspond to high absolute emissions of both H2 and CO, were observed during cold starts (for automobiles 0.48, for 2-wheelers 0.44) and at high vehicle speeds (for automobiles 0.73, for 2-wheelers 0.45). This finding illustrates the importance of these conditions to observed H2/CO ratios in ambient air. Overall, 2-wheelers displayed lower H2/CO ratios (0.48-0.69) than those from gasoline-powered automobiles (0.75-3.18). This observation, along with the lower H2/CO ratios observed through studies without catalytic converters, suggests that less developed (e.g. 2-wheelers) and older vehicle technologies are largely responsible for the atmospheric H2/CO ratios reported in past literature. PMID:20553937

  18. Vacuum ultraviolet photolysis of hydrogenated amorphous carbons . I. Interstellar H2 and CH4 formation rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alata, I.; Cruz-Diaz, G. A.; Muñoz Caro, G. M.; Dartois, E.

    2014-09-01

    Context. The interstellar hydrogenated amorphous carbons (HAC or a-C:H) observed in the diffuse medium are expected to disappear in a few million years, according to the destruction time scale from laboratory measurements. The existence of a-C:H results from the equilibrium between photodesorption, radiolysis, hydrogenation and resilience of the carbonaceous network. During this processing, many species are therefore injected into the gas phase, in particular H2, but also small organic molecules, radicals or fragments. Aims: We perform experiments on interstellar a-C:H analogs to quantify the release of these species in the interstellar medium. Methods: The vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photolysis of interstellar hydrogenated amorphous carbon analogs was performed at low (10 K) to ambient temperature, coupled to mass-spectrometry detection and temperature-programed desorption. Using deuterium isotopic substitution, the species produced were unambiguously separated from background contributions. Results: The VUV photolysis of hydrogenated amorphous carbons leads to the efficient production of H2 molecules, but also to small hydrocarbons. Conclusions: These species are formed predominantly in the bulk of the a-C:H analog carbonaceous network, in addition to the surface formation. Compared with species made by the recombination of H atoms and physisorbed on surfaces, they diffuse out at higher temperatures. In addition to the efficient production rate, it provides a significant formation route in environments where the short residence time scale for H atoms inhibits H2 formation on the surface, such as PDRs. The photolytic bulk production of H2 with carbonaceous hydrogenated amorphous carbon dust grains can provide a very large portion of the contribution to the H2 molecule formation. These dust grains also release small hydrocarbons (such as CH4) into the diffuse interstellar medium, which contribute to the formation of small carbonaceous radicals after being dissociated

  19. Evaluation of injection methods for fast, high peak capacity separations with low thermal mass gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Fitz, Brian D; Mannion, Brandyn C; To, Khang; Hoac, Trinh; Synovec, Robert E

    2015-05-01

    Low thermal mass gas chromatography (LTM-GC) was evaluated for rapid, high peak capacity separations with three injection methods: liquid, headspace solid phase micro-extraction (HS-SPME), and direct vapor. An Agilent LTM equipped with a short microbore capillary column was operated at a column heating rate of 250 °C/min to produce a 60s separation. Two sets of experiments were conducted in parallel to characterize the instrumental platform. First, the three injection methods were performed in conjunction with in-house built high-speed cryo-focusing injection (HSCFI) to cryogenically trap and re-inject the analytes onto the LTM-GC column in a narrower band. Next, the three injection methods were performed natively with LTM-GC. Using HSCFI, the peak capacity of a separation of 50 nl of a 73 component liquid test mixture was 270, which was 23% higher than without HSCFI. Similar peak capacity gains were obtained when using the HSCFI with HS-SPME (25%), and even greater with vapor injection (56%). For the 100 μl vapor sample injected without HSCFI, the preconcentration factor, defined as the ratio of the maximum concentration of the detected analyte peak relative to the analyte concentration injected with the syringe, was determined to be 11 for the earliest eluting peak (most volatile analyte). In contrast, the preconcentration factor for the earliest eluting peak using HSCFI was 103. Therefore, LTM-GC is demonstrated to natively provide in situ analyte trapping, although not to as great an extent as with HSCFI. We also report the use of LTM-GC applied with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOFMS) detection for rapid, high peak capacity separations from SPME sampled banana peel headspace.

  20. Characterization of low-temperature cofired ceramic tiles as platforms for gas chromatographic separations.

    PubMed

    Darko, Ernest; Thurbide, Kevin B; Gerhardt, Geoff C; Michienzi, Joseph

    2013-06-01

    A gas chromatography (GC) column is fabricated within a low-temperature cofired ceramic (LTCC) tile, and its analytical properties are characterized. By using a dual-spiral design, a 100 μm wide square channel up to 15 m in length is produced within an 11 cm × 5.5 cm LTCC tile. The channel is dynamically coated with an OV-101 stationary phase that is cross-linked with dicumyl peroxide. While the uncoated LTCC tiles were able to separate a mixture of n-alkanes, the peak shapes were broad (base width of ~2 min) and tailing. In contrast to this, the coated LTCC tiles produced sharp (base width of ~8-10 s), symmetrical, well-resolved peaks for the same analytes. By using a 7.5 m long channel, about 15,000 plates were obtained for a dodecane test analyte. Further, the coated LTCC tiles were found to produce plate heights that were about 3-fold smaller than those obtained from a conventional capillary GC column of similar length, dimension, and coating operated under the same conditions. As a result, test analyte separations were slightly improved in the LTCC tiles, and their overall performance fared well. In terms of temperature programming, it was found that a series of n-alkanes separated on the LTCC tile provided a cumulative peak capacity of around 54 peaks when using C₈ to C₁₃ as analyte markers. Results indicate that LTCC tiles provide a viable and useful alternative platform for performing good quality GC separations.