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Sample records for h3n2 swine influenza

  1. Swine influenza virus vaccine serologic cross-reactivity to contemporary U.S. swine H3N2 and efficacy in pigs infected with an H3N2 similar to 2011-2012 H3N2v

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Background: Swine influenza A virus (IAV) reassortment with 2009 H1N1 pandemic (H1N1pdm09) virus has been documented and new genotypes and sub-clusters of H3N2 have since expanded in the U.S. swine population. An H3N2 variant (H3N2v) virus with the H1N1pdm09 matrix gene and the remaining genes of sw...

  2. Swine influenza virus vaccine serologic cross-reactivity to contemporary US swine H3N2 and efficacy in pigs infected with an H3N2 similar to 2011-2012 H3N2v.

    PubMed

    Kitikoon, Pravina; Gauger, Phillip C; Anderson, Tavis K; Culhane, Marie R; Swenson, Sabrina; Loving, Crystal L; Perez, Daniel R; Vincent, Amy L

    2013-12-01

    Swine influenza A virus (IAV) reassortment with 2009 H1N1 pandemic (H1N1pdm09) virus has been documented, and new genotypes and subclusters of H3N2 have since expanded in the US swine population. An H3N2 variant (H3N2v) virus with the H1N1pdm09 matrix gene and the remaining genes of swine triple reassortant H3N2 caused outbreaks at agricultural fairs in 2011-2012. To assess commercial swine IAV vaccines' efficacy against H3N2 viruses, including those similar to H3N2v, antisera to three vaccines were tested by hemagglutinin inhibition (HI) assay against contemporary H3N2. Vaccine 1, with high HI cross-reactivity, was further investigated for efficacy against H3N2 virus infection in pigs with or without maternally derived antibodies (MDA). In addition, efficacy of a vaccine derived from whole inactivated virus (WIV) was compared with live attenuated influenza virus (LAIV) against H3N2. Hemagglutinin inhibition cross-reactivity demonstrated that contemporary swine H3N2 viruses have drifted from viruses in current swine IAV vaccines. The vaccine with the highest level of HI cross-reactivity significantly protected pigs without MDA. However, the presence of MDA at vaccination blocked vaccine efficacy. The performance of WIV and LAIV was comparable in the absence of MDA. Swine IAV in the United States is complex and dynamic. Vaccination to minimize virus shedding can help limit transmission of virus among pigs and people. However, vaccines must be updated. A critical review of the use of WIV in sows is required in the context of the current IAV ecology and vaccine application in pigs with MDA. Published 2013. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  3. Antigenic and genetic evolution of swine influenza A (H3N2) viruses in Europe.

    PubMed

    de Jong, J C; Smith, D J; Lapedes, A S; Donatelli, I; Campitelli, L; Barigazzi, G; Van Reeth, K; Jones, T C; Rimmelzwaan, G F; Osterhaus, A D M E; Fouchier, R A M

    2007-04-01

    In the early 1970s, a human influenza A/Port Chalmers/1/73 (H3N2)-like virus colonized the European swine population. Analyses of swine influenza A (H3N2) viruses isolated in The Netherlands and Belgium revealed that in the early 1990s, antigenic drift had occurred, away from A/Port Chalmers/1/73, the strain commonly used in influenza vaccines for pigs. Here we show that Italian swine influenza A (H3N2) viruses displayed antigenic and genetic changes similar to those observed in Northern European viruses in the same period. We used antigenic cartography methods for quantitative analyses of the antigenic evolution of European swine H3N2 viruses and observed a clustered virus evolution as seen for human viruses. Although the antigenic drift of swine and human H3N2 viruses has followed distinct evolutionary paths, potential cluster-differentiating amino acid substitutions in the influenza virus surface protein hemagglutinin (HA) were in part the same. The antigenic evolution of swine viruses occurred at a rate approximately six times slower than the rate in human viruses, even though the rates of genetic evolution of the HA at the nucleotide and amino acid level were similar for human and swine H3N2 viruses. Continuous monitoring of antigenic changes is recommended to give a first indication as to whether vaccine strains may need updating. Our data suggest that humoral immunity in the population plays a smaller role in the evolutionary selection processes of swine H3N2 viruses than in human H3N2 viruses.

  4. Swine Influenza A(H3N2) Virus Infection in Immunocompromised Man, Italy, 2014

    PubMed Central

    Piralla, Antonio; Moreno, Ana; Orlandi, Maria Ester; Percivalle, Elena; Chiapponi, Chiara; Vezzoli, Fausto

    2015-01-01

    Because swine influenza virus infection is seldom diagnosed in humans, its frequency might be underestimated. We report a immunocompromised hematologic patient with swine influenza A(H3N2) virus in 2014 in Italy. Local pigs were the source of this human infection. PMID:26079745

  5. The avian-origin H3N2 canine influenza virus has limited replication in swine

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A genetically and antigenically distinct H3N2 canine influenza of avian-origin was detected in March of 2015 in Chicago, Illinois. A subsequent outbreak was reported with over 1,000 dogs in the Midwest affected. The potential for canine-to-swine transmission was unknown. Experimental infection in pi...

  6. Neutralizing DNA Aptamers against Swine Influenza H3N2 Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Wongphatcharachai, Manoosak; Wang, Ping; Enomoto, Shinichiro; Webby, Richard J.; Gramer, Marie R.; Amonsin, Alongkorn

    2013-01-01

    Triple reassortant influenza A viruses (IAVs) of swine, particularly the North American H3N2 subtype, circulate in swine herds and may reassort and result in the emergence of novel zoonotic strains. Current diagnostic tools rely on isolation of the viruses, followed by serotyping by hemagglutination or genome sequencing, both of which can be expensive and time-consuming. Thus, novel subtype-specific ligands and methods are needed for rapid testing and subtyping of IAVs in the field. To address this need, we selected DNA aptamers against the recombinant HA protein from swine IAV H3 cluster IV using systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX). Four candidate aptamers (HA68, HA7, HA2a, and HA2b) were identified and characterized. The dissociation constants (Kd) of aptamers HA68, HA7, HA2a, and HA2b against recombinant H3 protein were 7.1, 22.3, 16.0, and 3.7 nM, respectively. The binding site of HA68 to H3 was identified to be between nucleotide residues 8 and 40. All aptamers inhibited H3 hemagglutination. HA68 was highly specific to all four lineages within the North American H3N2 subtype. Further, the other three aptamers specifically identified live viruses belonging to the phylogenetic clusters I, II/III, and IV especially the virus that closely related to the recent H3N2 variant (H3N2v). Aptamer HA68 was also able to bind and detect H3N2v isolated from recent human cases. In conclusion, we provide subtype-specific aptamers against H3N2 IAVs of swine that can now be used in rapid detection and typing protocols for field applications. PMID:23077124

  7. Prior infection of pigs with a recent human H3N2 influenza virus confers minimal cross-protection against a European swine H3N2 virus.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yu; van der Meulen, Karen; Van Reeth, Kristien

    2013-11-01

    H3N2 influenza viruses circulating in humans and European pigs originate from the pandemic A/Hong Kong/68 virus. Because of slower antigenic drift in swine, the antigenic divergence between swine and human viruses has been increasing. It remains unknown to what extent this results in a reduced cross-protection between recent human and swine H3N2 influenza viruses. We examined whether prior infection of pigs with an old [A/Victoria/3/75 (A/Vic/75)] or a more recent [A/Wisconsin/67/05 (A/Wis/05)] human H3N2 virus protected against a European swine H3N2 virus [sw/Gent/172/08 (sw/Gent/08)]. Genetic and antigenic relationships between sw/Gent/08 and a selection of human H3N2 viruses were also assessed. After challenge with sw/Gent/08, all challenge controls had high virus titers in the entire respiratory tract at 3 days post-challenge and nasal virus excretion for 5-6 days. Prior infection with sw/Gent/08 or A/Vic/75 offered complete virological protection against challenge. Pigs previously inoculated with A/Wis/05 showed similar virus titers in the respiratory tract as challenge controls, but the mean duration of nasal shedding was 1·3 days shorter. Unlike sw/Gent/08- and A/Vic/75-inoculated pigs, A/Wis/05-inoculated pigs lacked cross-reactive neutralizing antibodies against sw/Gent/08 before challenge, but they showed a more rapid antibody response to sw/Gent/08 than challenge controls after challenge. Cross-protection and serological responses correlated with genetic and antigenic differences. Infection immunity to a recent human H3N2 virus confers minimal cross-protection against a European swine H3N2 virus. We discuss our findings with regard to the recent zoonotic infections of humans in the United States with a swine-origin H3N2 variant virus. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Identification of four genotypes of H3N2 swine influenza virus in pigs from southern China.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jidang; Fu, Xinliang; Chen, Ye; He, Shuyi; Zheng, Yun; Cao, Zhenpeng; Yu, Wenxin; Zhou, Han; Su, Shuo; Zhang, Guihong

    2014-10-01

    In 2011, four H3N2 swine influenza viruses (SIVs) were isolated from nasal swabs of four pigs (800 nasal swabs were collected from pigs showing influenza-like symptoms) in Guangdong province, China. Four different genotypes of H3N2 appeared among pigs in southern China, including wholly human-like H3N2 viruses, intermediate (1975) double-reassortant human H3N2 viruses (resulting from reassortment between an early human lineage and a recent human lineage), recent double-reassortant human H3N2 viruses, and avian-like H3N2 viruses. Because pigs can support the reassortment of human and avian influenza viruses, our surveillance should be enhanced as a part of an overall pandemic preparedness plan.

  9. Pathogenicity and Transmission in Pigs of the Novel A(H3N2)v Influenza Virus Isolated from Humans and Characterization of Swine H3N2 Viruses Isolated in 2010-2011

    PubMed Central

    Kitikoon, Pravina; Gauger, Phillip C.; Schlink, Sarah N.; Bayles, Darrell O.; Gramer, Marie R.; Darnell, Daniel; Webby, Richard J.; Lager, Kelly M.; Swenson, Sabrina L.; Klimov, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Swine influenza virus (SIV) H3N2 with triple reassorted internal genes (TRIG) has been enzootic in Unites States since 1998. Transmission of the 2009 pandemic H1N1 (pH1N1) virus to pigs in the United States was followed by reassortment with endemic SIV, resulting in reassorted viruses that include novel H3N2 genotypes (rH3N2p). Between July and December 2011, 12 cases of human infections with swine-lineage H3N2 viruses containing the pandemic matrix (pM) gene [A(H3N2)v] were detected. Whole-genome analysis of H3N2 viruses isolated from pigs from 2009 to 2011 sequenced in this study and other available H3N2 sequences showed six different rH3N2p genotypes present in the U.S. swine population since 2009. The presence of the pM gene was a common feature among all rH3N2p genotypes, but no specific genotype appeared to predominate in the swine population. We compared the pathogenic, transmission, genetic, and antigenic properties of a human A(H3N2)v isolate and two swine H3N2 isolates, H3N2-TRIG and rH3N2p. Our in vivo study detected no increased virulence in A(H3N2)v or rH3N2p viruses compared to endemic H3N2-TRIG virus. Antibodies to cluster IV H3N2-TRIG and rH3N2p viruses had reduced cross-reactivity to A(H3N2)v compared to other cluster IV H3N2-TRIG and rH3N2p viruses. Genetic analysis of the hemagglutinin gene indicated that although rH3N2p and A(H3N2)v are related to cluster IV of H3N2-TRIG, some recent rH3N2p isolates appeared to be forming a separate cluster along with the human isolates of A(H3N2)v. Continued monitoring of these H3N2 viruses is necessary to evaluate the evolution and potential loss of population immunity in swine and humans. PMID:22491461

  10. Pathogenicity and transmission in pigs of the novel A(H3N2)v influenza virus isolated from humans and characterization of swine H3N2 viruses isolated in 2010-2011.

    PubMed

    Kitikoon, Pravina; Vincent, Amy L; Gauger, Phillip C; Schlink, Sarah N; Bayles, Darrell O; Gramer, Marie R; Darnell, Daniel; Webby, Richard J; Lager, Kelly M; Swenson, Sabrina L; Klimov, Alexander

    2012-06-01

    Swine influenza virus (SIV) H3N2 with triple reassorted internal genes (TRIG) has been enzootic in Unites States since 1998. Transmission of the 2009 pandemic H1N1 (pH1N1) virus to pigs in the United States was followed by reassortment with endemic SIV, resulting in reassorted viruses that include novel H3N2 genotypes (rH3N2p). Between July and December 2011, 12 cases of human infections with swine-lineage H3N2 viruses containing the pandemic matrix (pM) gene [A(H3N2)v] were detected. Whole-genome analysis of H3N2 viruses isolated from pigs from 2009 to 2011 sequenced in this study and other available H3N2 sequences showed six different rH3N2p genotypes present in the U.S. swine population since 2009. The presence of the pM gene was a common feature among all rH3N2p genotypes, but no specific genotype appeared to predominate in the swine population. We compared the pathogenic, transmission, genetic, and antigenic properties of a human A(H3N2)v isolate and two swine H3N2 isolates, H3N2-TRIG and rH3N2p. Our in vivo study detected no increased virulence in A(H3N2)v or rH3N2p viruses compared to endemic H3N2-TRIG virus. Antibodies to cluster IV H3N2-TRIG and rH3N2p viruses had reduced cross-reactivity to A(H3N2)v compared to other cluster IV H3N2-TRIG and rH3N2p viruses. Genetic analysis of the hemagglutinin gene indicated that although rH3N2p and A(H3N2)v are related to cluster IV of H3N2-TRIG, some recent rH3N2p isolates appeared to be forming a separate cluster along with the human isolates of A(H3N2)v. Continued monitoring of these H3N2 viruses is necessary to evaluate the evolution and potential loss of population immunity in swine and humans.

  11. Swine-to-Human Transmission of Influenza A(H3N2) Virus at Agricultural Fairs, Ohio, USA, 2012

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Sarah W.; Page, Shannon L.; Nolting, Jacqueline M.; Killian, Mary L.; Sreevatsan, Srinand; Slemons, Richard D.

    2014-01-01

    Agricultural fairs provide an opportunity for bidirectional transmission of influenza A viruses. We sought to determine influenza A virus activity among swine at fairs in the United States. As part of an ongoing active influenza A virus surveillance project, nasal swab samples were collected from exhibition swine at 40 selected Ohio agricultural fairs during 2012. Influenza A(H3N2) virus was isolated from swine at 10 of the fairs. According to a concurrent public health investigation, 7 of the 10 fairs were epidemiologically linked to confirmed human infections with influenza A(H3N2) variant virus. Comparison of genome sequences of the subtype H3N2 isolates recovered from humans and swine from each fair revealed nucleotide identities of >99.7%, confirming zoonotic transmission between swine and humans. All influenza A(H3N2) viruses isolated in this study, regardless of host species or fair, were >99.5% identical, indicating that 1 virus strain was widely circulating among exhibition swine in Ohio during 2012. PMID:25148572

  12. Swine-to-human transmission of influenza A(H3N2) virus at agricultural fairs, Ohio, USA, 2012.

    PubMed

    Bowman, Andrew S; Nelson, Sarah W; Page, Shannon L; Nolting, Jacqueline M; Killian, Mary L; Sreevatsan, Srinand; Slemons, Richard D

    2014-09-01

    Agricultural fairs provide an opportunity for bidirectional transmission of influenza A viruses. We sought to determine influenza A virus activity among swine at fairs in the United States. As part of an ongoing active influenza A virus surveillance project, nasal swab samples were collected from exhibition swine at 40 selected Ohio agricultural fairs during 2012. Influenza A(H3N2) virus was isolated from swine at 10 of the fairs. According to a concurrent public health investigation, 7 of the 10 fairs were epidemiologically linked to confirmed human infections with influenza A(H3N2) variant virus. Comparison of genome sequences of the subtype H3N2 isolates recovered from humans and swine from each fair revealed nucleotide identities of >99.7%, confirming zoonotic transmission between swine and humans. All influenza A(H3N2) viruses isolated in this study, regardless of host species or fair, were >99.5% identical, indicating that 1 virus strain was widely circulating among exhibition swine in Ohio during 2012.

  13. Molecular characterization of H3N2 influenza A viruses isolated from Ontario swine in 2011 and 2012.

    PubMed

    Grgić, Helena; Costa, Marcio; Friendship, Robert M; Carman, Susy; Nagy, Éva; Wideman, Greg; Weese, Scott; Poljak, Zvonimir

    2014-11-22

    Data about molecular diversity of commonly circulating type A influenza viruses in Ontario swine are scarce. Yet, this information is essential for surveillance of animal and public health, vaccine updates, and for understanding virus evolution and its large-scale spread. The study population consisted of 21 swine herds with clinical problems due to respiratory disease. Nasal swabs from individual pigs were collected and tested by virus isolation in MDCK cells and by rtRT-PCR. All eight segments of 10 H3N2 viruses were sequenced using high-throughput sequencing and molecularly characterized. Within-herd prevalence ranged between 2 and 100%. Structurally, Ontario H3N2 viruses could be classified into three different groups. Group 1 was the most similar to the original trH3N2 virus from 2005. Group 2 was the most similar to the Ontario turkey H3N2 isolates with PB1 and NS genes originating from trH3N2 virus and M, PB2, PA and NP genes originating from the A(H1N1)pdm09 virus. All Group 3 internal genes were genetically related to A(H1N1)pdm09. Analysis of antigenic sites of HA1 showed that Group 1 had 8 aa changes within 4 antigenic sites, A(1), B(3), C(2) and E(2). The Group 2 viruses had 8 aa changes within 3 antigenic sites A(3), B(3) and C(2), while Group 3 viruses had 4 aa changes within 3 antigenic sites, B(1), D(1) and E(2), when compared to the cluster IV H3N2 virus [A/swine/Ontario/33853/2005/(H3N2)]. The characterization of the Ontario H3N2 viruses clearly indicates reassortment of gene segments between the North American swine trH3N2 from cluster IV and the A(H1N1)pdm09 virus.

  14. Phylogenetic analysis of a swine influenza A(H3N2) virus isolated in Korea in 2012.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Il; Lee, Ilseob; Park, Sehee; Lee, Sangmoo; Hwang, Min-Woong; Bae, Joon-Yong; Heo, Jun; Kim, Donghwan; Jang, Seok-Il; Kim, Kabsu; Park, Man-Seong

    2014-01-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) can infect avian and mammalian species, including humans. The genome nature of IAVs may contribute to viral adaptation in different animal hosts, resulting in gene reassortment and the reproduction of variants with optimal fitness. As seen again in the 2009 swine-origin influenza A H1N1 pandemic, pigs are known to be susceptible to swine, avian, and human IAVs and can serve as a 'mixing vessel' for the generation of novel IAV variants. To this end, the emergence of swine influenza viruses must be kept under close surveillance. Herein, we report the isolation and phylogenetic study of a swine IAV, A/swine/Korea/PL01/2012 (swPL01, H3N2 subtype). After screening nasopharyngeal samples from pigs in the Gyeongsangnam-do region of Korea from December 2011 to May 2012, we isolated the swPL01 virus and sequenced its all of 8 genome segments (polymerase basic 2, PB2; polymerase basic 1, PB1; polymerase acidic, PA; hemagglutinin, HA; nucleocapsid protein, NP; neuraminidase, NA; matrix protein, M; and nonstructural protein, NS). The phylogenetic study, analyzed with reference strains registered in the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) database, indicated that the swPL01 virus was similar to the North American triple-reassortant swine strains and that the HA gene of the swPL01 virus was categorized into swine H3 cluster IV. The swPL01 virus had the M gene of the triple-reassortant swine H3N2 viruses, whereas that of other contemporary strains in Korea was transferred from the 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus. These data suggest the possibility that various swine H3N2 viruses may co-circulate in Korea, which underlines the importance of a sustained surveillance system against swine IAVs.

  15. Phylogenetic Analysis of a Swine Influenza A(H3N2) Virus Isolated in Korea in 2012

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sehee; Lee, Sangmoo; Hwang, Min-Woong; Bae, Joon-Yong; Heo, Jun; Kim, Donghwan; Jang, Seok-Il; Kim, Kabsu; Park, Man-Seong

    2014-01-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) can infect avian and mammalian species, including humans. The genome nature of IAVs may contribute to viral adaptation in different animal hosts, resulting in gene reassortment and the reproduction of variants with optimal fitness. As seen again in the 2009 swine-origin influenza A H1N1 pandemic, pigs are known to be susceptible to swine, avian, and human IAVs and can serve as a ‘mixing vessel’ for the generation of novel IAV variants. To this end, the emergence of swine influenza viruses must be kept under close surveillance. Herein, we report the isolation and phylogenetic study of a swine IAV, A/swine/Korea/PL01/2012 (swPL01, H3N2 subtype). After screening nasopharyngeal samples from pigs in the Gyeongsangnam-do region of Korea from December 2011 to May 2012, we isolated the swPL01 virus and sequenced its all of 8 genome segments (polymerase basic 2, PB2; polymerase basic 1, PB1; polymerase acidic, PA; hemagglutinin, HA; nucleocapsid protein, NP; neuraminidase, NA; matrix protein, M; and nonstructural protein, NS). The phylogenetic study, analyzed with reference strains registered in the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) database, indicated that the swPL01 virus was similar to the North American triple-reassortant swine strains and that the HA gene of the swPL01 virus was categorized into swine H3 cluster IV. The swPL01 virus had the M gene of the triple-reassortant swine H3N2 viruses, whereas that of other contemporary strains in Korea was transferred from the 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus. These data suggest the possibility that various swine H3N2 viruses may co-circulate in Korea, which underlines the importance of a sustained surveillance system against swine IAVs. PMID:24523938

  16. Influenza A (H3N2) virus in swine at agricultural fairs and transmission to humans, Michigan and Ohio, USA, 2016

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    An 18 case outbreak of variant H3N2 influenza A occurred during 2016 after exposure to influenza-infected swine at seven agricultural fairs. Sixteen cases were infected with a reassortant between 2010-2011 human seasonal H3N2 strains and viruses endemic in North American swine, a viral lineage incre...

  17. Antigenically intact hemagglutinin in circulating avian and swine influenza viruses and potential for H3N2 pandemic.

    PubMed

    Tharakaraman, Kannan; Raman, Rahul; Stebbins, Nathan W; Viswanathan, Karthik; Sasisekharan, Viswanathan; Sasisekharan, Ram

    2013-01-01

    The 2009 swine-origin H1N1 influenza, though antigenically novel to the population at the time, was antigenically similar to the 1918 H1N1 pandemic influenza, and consequently was considered to be "archived" in the swine species before reemerging in humans. Given that the H3N2 is another subtype that currently circulates in the human population and is high on WHO pandemic preparedness list, we assessed the likelihood of reemergence of H3N2 from a non-human host. Using HA sequence features relevant to immune recognition, receptor binding and transmission we have identified several recent H3 strains in avian and swine that present hallmarks of a reemerging virus. IgG polyclonal raised in rabbit with recent seasonal vaccine H3 fail to recognize these swine H3 strains suggesting that existing vaccines may not be effective in protecting against these strains. Vaccine strategies can mitigate risks associated with a potential H3N2 pandemic in humans.

  18. Antigenically intact hemagglutinin in circulating avian and swine influenza viruses and potential for H3N2 pandemic

    PubMed Central

    Tharakaraman, Kannan; Raman, Rahul; Stebbins, Nathan W.; Viswanathan, Karthik; Sasisekharan, Viswanathan; Sasisekharan, Ram

    2013-01-01

    The 2009 swine-origin H1N1 influenza, though antigenically novel to the population at the time, was antigenically similar to the 1918 H1N1 pandemic influenza, and consequently was considered to be “archived” in the swine species before reemerging in humans. Given that the H3N2 is another subtype that currently circulates in the human population and is high on WHO pandemic preparedness list, we assessed the likelihood of reemergence of H3N2 from a non-human host. Using HA sequence features relevant to immune recognition, receptor binding and transmission we have identified several recent H3 strains in avian and swine that present hallmarks of a reemerging virus. IgG polyclonal raised in rabbit with recent seasonal vaccine H3 fail to recognize these swine H3 strains suggesting that existing vaccines may not be effective in protecting against these strains. Vaccine strategies can mitigate risks associated with a potential H3N2 pandemic in humans. PMID:23661027

  19. Emergence of a new swine H3N2 and pandemic (H1N1) 2009 influenza A virus reassortant in two Canadian animal populations, mink and swine.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, Donald; Allard, Véronique; Doyon, Jean-François; Bellehumeur, Christian; Spearman, J Grant; Harel, Josée; Gagnon, Carl A

    2011-12-01

    A swine H3N2 (swH3N2) and pandemic (H1N1) 2009 (pH1N1) influenza A virus reassortant (swH3N2/pH1N1) was detected in Canadian swine at the end of 2010. Simultaneously, a similar virus was also detected in Canadian mink based on partial viral genome sequencing. The origin of the new swH3N2/pH1N1 viral genes was related to the North American swH3N2 triple-reassortant cluster IV (for hemagglutinin [HA] and neuraminidase [NA] genes) and to pH1N1 for all the other genes (M, NP, NS, PB1, PB2, and PA). Data indicate that the swH3N2/pH1N1 virus can be found in several pigs that are housed at different locations.

  20. Evolution of Novel Reassortant A/H3N2 Influenza Viruses in North American Swine and Humans, 2009–2011

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Amy L.; Kitikoon, Pravina; Holmes, Edward C.; Gramer, Marie R.

    2012-01-01

    Novel H3N2 influenza viruses (H3N2v) containing seven genome segments from swine lineage triple-reassortant H3N2 viruses and a 2009 pandemic H1N1 (H1N1pdm09) matrix protein segment (pM) were isolated from 12 humans in the United States between August and December 2011. To understand the evolution of these novel H3N2 viruses in swine and humans, we undertook a phylogenetic analysis of 674 M sequences and 388 HA and NA sequences from influenza viruses isolated from North American swine during 2009–2011, as well as HA, NA, and M sequences from eight H3N2v viruses isolated from humans. We identified 34 swine influenza viruses (termed rH3N2p) with the same combination of H3, N2, and pM segments as the H3N2v viruses isolated from humans. Notably, these rH3N2p viruses were generated in swine via reassortment events between H3N2 viruses and the pM segment approximately 4 to 10 times since 2009. The pM segment has also reassorted with multiple distinct lineages of H1 virus, especially H1δ viruses. Importantly, the N2 segment of all H3N2v viruses isolated from humans is derived from a genetically distinct N2 lineage that has circulated in swine since being acquired by reassortment with seasonal human H3N2 viruses in 2001–2002, rather than from the N2 that is associated with the 1998 H3N2 swine lineage. The identification of this N2 variant may have implications for influenza vaccine design and the potential pandemic threat of H3N2v to human age groups with differing levels of prior exposure and immunity. PMID:22696653

  1. Effect of Priming With Seasonal Influenza A(H3N2) Virus on the Prevalence of Cross-Reactive Hemagglutination-Inhibition Antibodies to Swine-Origin A(H3N2) Variants.

    PubMed

    Liu, Feng; Veguilla, Vic; Gross, F Liaini; Gillis, Eric; Rowe, Thomas; Xu, Xiyan; Tumpey, Terrence M; Katz, Jacqueline M; Levine, Min Z; Lu, Xiuhua

    2017-09-15

    Recent outbreaks of swine-origin influenza A(H3N2) variant (H3N2v) viruses have raised public health concerns. Previous studies indicated that older children and young adults had the highest levels of hemagglutination-inhibition (HI) antibodies to 2010-2011 H3N2v viruses. However, newly emerging 2013 H3N2v have acquired antigenic mutations in the hemagglutinin at amino acid position 145 (N145K/R). We estimated the levels of serologic cross-reactivity among humans primed with seasonal influenza A(H3N2) (sH3N2), using postinfection ferret antisera. We also explored age-related HI antibody responses to 2012-2013 H3N2v viruses. Human and ferret antisera were tested in HI assays against 1 representative 2012 H3N2v (145N) and 2 2013 H3N2v (145K/R) viruses, together with 9 sH3N2 viruses circulating since 1968. Low levels of cross-reactivity between the H3N2v and sH3N2 viruses from the 1970s-1990s were observed using postinfection ferret antisera. The overall seroprevalence among the sH3N2-primed population against 2012-2013 H3N2v viruses was >50%, and age-related seroprevalence was observed. Seroprevalence was significantly higher to 2013 H3N2v than to 2012 H3N2v viruses among some children likely to have been primed with A/Sydney/5/97-like (145K) or A/Wuhan/359/95-like viruses (145K). A single substitution (N145K/R) was sufficient to affect seropositivity to H3N2v viruses in some individuals. Insight into age-related antibody responses to newly emerging H3N2v viruses is critical for risk assessment and pandemic preparedness.

  2. Pathogenicity and transmission in pigs of the novel A(H3N2)v influenza virus isolated from humans and characterization of swine H3N2 viruses isolated in 2010-2011

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Swine influenza virus (SIV) H3N2 with triple reassorted internal genes (TRIG) has been enzootic in U.S. since 1998. Transmission of the 2009 pandemic H1N1 (pH1N1) virus to pigs in the U.S. was followed by reassortment with endemic SIV, resulting in reassorted viruses that include novel H3N2 genotype...

  3. Unseasonal transmission of H3N2 influenza A virus during the swine-origin H1N1 pandemic.

    PubMed

    Ghedin, Elodie; Wentworth, David E; Halpin, Rebecca A; Lin, Xudong; Bera, Jayati; DePasse, Jay; Fitch, Adam; Griesemer, Sara; Hine, Erin; Katzel, Daniel A; Overton, Larry; Proudfoot, Kathleen; Sitz, Jeffrey; Szczypinski, Bridget; StGeorge, Kirsten; Spiro, David J; Holmes, Edward C

    2010-06-01

    The initial wave of swine-origin influenza A virus (pandemic H1N1/09) in the United States during the spring and summer of 2009 also resulted in an increased vigilance and sampling of seasonal influenza viruses (H1N1 and H3N2), even though they are normally characterized by very low incidence outside of the winter months. To explore the nature of virus evolution during this influenza "off-season," we conducted a phylogenetic analysis of H1N1 and H3N2 sequences sampled during April to June 2009 in New York State. Our analysis revealed that multiple lineages of both viruses were introduced and cocirculated during this time, as is typical of influenza virus during the winter. Strikingly, however, we also found strong evidence for the presence of a large transmission chain of H3N2 viruses centered on the south-east of New York State and which continued until at least 1 June 2009. These results suggest that the unseasonal transmission of influenza A viruses may be more widespread than is usually supposed.

  4. The growing diversity of H3N2 influenza A virus in swine and the impact on control in swine and at the human animal interface

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Introduction. H3N2 influenza A viruses (IAV) were recognized as endemic infections in the USA swine population following the 1997-98 incursion of the triple reassortant viruses with gene segments from human- (HA, NA, and PB1), swine- (NP, M, and NS) and avian- (PB2 and PA) adapted viruses (reviewed ...

  5. Influenza A(H3N2) Virus in Swine at Agricultural Fairs and Transmission to Humans, Michigan and Ohio, USA, 2016

    PubMed Central

    Walia, Rasna R.; Nolting, Jacqueline M.; Vincent, Amy L.; Killian, Mary Lea; Zentkovich, Michele M.; Lorbach, Joshua N.; Lauterbach, Sarah E.; Anderson, Tavis K.; Davis, C. Todd; Zanders, Natosha; Jones, Joyce; Jang, Yunho; Lynch, Brian; Rodriguez, Marisela R.; Blanton, Lenee; Lindstrom, Stephen E.; Wentworth, David E.; Schiltz, John; Averill, James J.; Forshey, Tony

    2017-01-01

    In 2016, a total of 18 human infections with influenza A(H3N2) virus occurred after exposure to influenza-infected swine at 7 agricultural fairs. Sixteen of these cases were the result of infection by a reassorted virus with increasing prevalence among US swine containing a hemagglutinin gene from 2010–11 human seasonal H3N2 strains. PMID:28820376

  6. Isolation of novel triple‐reassortant swine H3N2 influenza viruses possessing the hemagglutinin and neuraminidase genes of a seasonal influenza virus in Vietnam in 2010

    PubMed Central

    Ngo, Long Thanh; Hiromoto, Yasuaki; Pham, Vu Phong; Le, Ha Thi Hong; Nguyen, Ha Truc; Le, Vu Tri; Takemae, Nobuhiro; Saito, Takehiko

    2011-01-01

    Please cite this paper as: Ngo et al. (2012) Isolation of novel triple‐reassortant swine H3N2 influenza viruses possessing the hemagglutinin and neuraminidase genes of a seasonal influenza virus in Vietnam in 2010. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses 6(1), 6–10. Surveillance of swine influenza viruses (SIVs) in 31 pig farms in northern and southern parts of Vietnam was conducted. Six H3N2 influenza A viruses were isolated from a pig farm in southern Vietnam. They were novel genetic reassortants between a triple–reassortant SIV and a human seasonal H3N2 virus. Their hemagglutinin and neuraminidase genes were derived from a human virus circulating around 2004–2006 and the remaining genes from a triple‐reassortant SIV that originated in North America. This is the first report describing the isolation of a novel triple‐reassortant SIV in Vietnam. PMID:21668659

  7. Mutation from arginine to lysine at the position 189 of hemagglutinin contributes to the antigenic drift in H3N2 swine influenza viruses

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Jianqiang; Xu, Yifei; Harris, Jillian; Sun, Hailiang; Bowman, Andrew S.; Cunningham, Fred; Cardona, Carol; Yoon, Kyoungjin J.; Slemons, Richard D.; Wan, Xiu-Feng

    2014-01-01

    Two distinct antigenic clusters were previously identified among the H3N2 swine influenza A viruses (IAVs) and were designated H3N2SIV-alpha and H3N2SIV-beta (Feng et al., 2013, Journal of Virology 87(13), 7655-7667). A consistent mutation was observed at the position 189 of hemagglutinin (R189K) between H3N2SIV-alpha and H3N2SIV-beta fair isolates. To evaluate the contribution of R189K mutation to the antigenic drift from H3N2SIV-alpha to H3N2SIV-beta, four reassortant viruses with 189R or 189K were generated. The antigenic cartography demonstrated that the R189K mutation in the hemagglutinin of H3N2 IAV contributed to the antigenic drift, separating these viruses into H3N2SIV-alpha to H3N2SIV-beta. This R189K mutation was also found to contribute to the cross-reaction with several ferret sera raised against historical human IAVs with hemagglutinin carrying 189K. This study suggests that the R189K mutation plays a vital role in the antigenicity of swine and human H3N2 IAVs and identification of this antigenic determinant will help us rapidly identify antigenic variants in influenza surveillance. PMID:24074585

  8. Influenza A (H3N2) Variant Virus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Avian Swine Variant Other Influenza A (H3N2) Variant Virus Language: English (US) Español Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Influenza viruses that normally circulate in pigs are called “ ...

  9. Mitochondrial antiviral signaling adaptor mediated apoptosis in H3N2 swine influenza virus infection is inhibited by viral protein NS1 in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jinqiu; Miao, Jinfeng; Hou, Jibo; Lu, Chengping

    2015-05-15

    We investigated the in vitro role of mitochondrial antiviral signaling adaptor (MAVS) in apoptosis induced by H3N2 swine influenza virus infection and the influence of viral NS1 (nonstructural protein 1) protein on this process. H3N2 swine influenza virus (SIV, A/Swine/Shandong/3/2005) was co-cultured with human lung epithelial A549 cells. The relationship of MAVS expression to SIV replication and apoptosis, and the influence of viral proteins on MAVS functions were studied. The data indicate that in response to SIV infection, MAVS was significantly upregulated at both the transcriptional and protein levels in the early stages of infection. Its expression and localization to mitochondria are necessary for apoptosis of epithelial cells induced by H3N2 swine influenza virus. Viral protein NS1 can antagonize MAVS-mediated apoptosis. These findings indicate that MAVS have a role in regulating innate mitochondrial responses to viral infection.

  10. Detection of Novel Reassortant Influenza A (H3N2) and H1N1 2009 Pandemic Viruses in Swine in Hanoi, Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Baudon, E; Poon, L L; Dao, T D; Pham, N T; Cowling, B J; Peyre, M; Nguyen, K V; Peiris, M

    2015-09-01

    From May to September 2013, monthly samples were collected from swine in a Vietnamese slaughterhouse for influenza virus isolation and serological testing. A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses and a novel H3N2 originating from reassortment between A(H1N1)pdm09 and novel viruses of the North American triple reassortant lineage were isolated. Serological results showed low seroprevalence for the novel H3N2 virus and higher seroprevalence for A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses. In addition, serology suggested that other swine influenza viruses are also circulating in Vietnamese swine.

  11. Limited susceptibility and lack of systemic infection by an H3N2 swine influenza virus in intranasally inoculated chickens.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Colleen; Manin, Timofey B; Andriyasov, Artem V; Swayne, David E

    2008-09-01

    Chickens were intranasally inoculated with the swine influenza virus (SIV) A/swine/NC/307408/04 (H3N2) (NC/04 SIV) to determine the infectivity of a North American SIV for chickens, as well as the possibility of chicken meat serving as a transmission vehicle for SIV. White leghorn (WL) layer-type chickens were used for initial pathotyping and infectivity tests, and a more comprehensive intranasal pathogenesis study was done with white Plymouth rock (WPR) broiler-type chickens. None of the NC/04 SIV-inoculated WL or WPR chickens displayed clinical signs. Serologic tests showed that the virus was able to infect both intranasally inoculated WL and WPR chickens, but the antibody titers were low, suggesting inefficient replication. Some of the NC/04 SIV-inoculated WL chickens shed low levels of virus, mostly from the alimentary tract, but viral shedding was not detected in NC/04 SIV-inoculated WPR chickens. The comprehensive pathogenesis study demonstrated that the virus did not cause systemic infections in WPR chickens, and feeding breast and thigh meat from the NC/04 SIV-inoculated WPR to WL chickens did not transmit NC/04 SIV.

  12. Comparison of 2010-2011 H3N2 influenza A viruses isolated from swine and the A(H3N2)v isolated from humans in 2011

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In the end of 2011, 12 U.S. cases of humans infected with swine H3N2 virus containing the matrix gene from pandemic H1N1 2009 virus (H1N1pdm09) were detected and named A(H3N2)v. This study used a swine model to compare the pathogenic, transmission, genetic, and antigenic properties of a human A(H3N2...

  13. Swine-origin influenza A (H3N2) virus infection in two children--Indiana and Pennsylvania, July-August 2011.

    PubMed

    2011-09-09

    Influenza A viruses are endemic in many animal species, including humans, swine, and wild birds, and sporadic cases of transmission of influenza A viruses between humans and animals do occur, including human infections with avian-origin influenza A viruses (i.e., H5N1 and H7N7) and swine-origin influenza A viruses (i.e., H1N1, H1N2, and H3N2). Genetic analysis can distinguish animal origin influenza viruses from the seasonal human influenza viruses that circulate widely and cause annual epidemics. This report describes two cases of febrile respiratory illness caused by swine-origin influenza A (H3N2) viruses identified on August 19 and August 26, 2011, and the current investigations. No epidemiologic link between the two cases has been identified, and although investigations are ongoing, no additional confirmed human infections with this virus have been detected. These viruses are similar to eight other swine-origin influenza A (H3N2) viruses identified from previous human infections over the past 2 years, but are unique in that one of the eight gene segments (matrix [M] gene) is from the 2009 influenza A (H1N1) virus. The acquisition of the M gene in these two swine-origin influenza A (H3N2) viruses indicates that they are "reassortants" because they contain genes of the swine-origin influenza A (H3N2) virus circulating in North American pigs since 1998 and the 2009 influenza A (H1N1) virus that might have been transmitted to pigs from humans during the 2009 H1N1 pandemic. However, reassortments of the 2009 influenza A (H1N1) virus with other swine influenza A viruses have been reported previously in swine. Clinicians who suspect influenza virus infection in humans with recent exposure to swine should obtain a nasopharyngeal swab from the patient for timely diagnosis at a state public health laboratory and consider empiric neuraminidase inhibitor antiviral treatment to quickly limit potential human transmission.

  14. Vaccine efficacy of live-attenuated virus, whole inactivated virus and alphavirus vectored subunit vaccines against antigenically distinct H3N2 swine influenza A viruses

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Introduction Influenza A virus (IAV) is an important pathogen in swine, and the main intervention strategy is vaccination to induce neutralizing antibodies against the hemagglutinin (HA). Three major antigenic clusters, cyan, red, and green, were identified among H3N2 viruses circulating in pigs in ...

  15. Outbreak of Influenza A(H3N2) Variant Virus Infections Among Persons Attending Agricultural Fairs Housing Infected Swine - Michigan and Ohio, July-August 2016.

    PubMed

    Schicker, Rebekah S; Rossow, John; Eckel, Seth; Fisher, Nicolas; Bidol, Sally; Tatham, Lilith; Matthews-Greer, Janice; Sohner, Kevin; Bowman, Andrew S; Avrill, James; Forshey, Tony; Blanton, Lenee; Davis, C Todd; Schiltz, John; Skorupski, Susan; Berman, LaShondra; Jang, Yunho; Bresee, Joseph S; Lindstrom, Stephen; Trock, Susan C; Wentworth, David; Fry, Alicia M; de Fijter, Sietske; Signs, Kimberly; DiOrio, Mary; Olsen, Sonja J; Biggerstaff, Matthew

    2016-10-28

    On August 3, 2016, the Ohio Department of Health Laboratory reported to CDC that a respiratory specimen collected on July 28 from a male aged 13 years who attended an agricultural fair in Ohio during July 22-29, 2016, and subsequently developed a respiratory illness, tested positive by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (rRT-PCR) for influenza A(H3N2) variant* (H3N2v). The respiratory specimen was collected as part of routine influenza surveillance activities. The next day, CDC was notified of a child aged 9 years who was a swine exhibitor at an agricultural fair in Michigan who became ill on July 29, 2016, and tested positive for H3N2v virus at the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services Laboratory. Investigations by Michigan and Ohio health authorities identified 18 human infections linked to swine exhibits at agricultural fairs. To minimize transmission of influenza viruses from infected swine to visitors, agricultural fair organizers should consider prevention measures such as shortening the time swine are on the fairgrounds, isolating ill swine, maintaining a veterinarian on call, providing handwashing stations, and prohibiting food and beverages in animal barns. Persons at high risk for influenza-associated complications should be discouraged from entering swine barns.

  16. Pathogenicity and transmission of triple reassortant H3N2 swine influenza A viruses is attenuated following Turkey embryo propagation.

    PubMed

    Raghunath, Shobana; Pudupakam, Raghavendra Sumanth; Deventhiran, Jagadeeswaran; Tevatia, Rahul; Leroith, Tanya

    2017-03-01

    Genetic lineages of swine influenza A viruses (SIVs) have recently been established in Turkeys in the United States. To identify molecular determinants that are involved in virulence and transmission of SIVs to Turkeys, we sequentially passaged two triple reassortant H3N2 SIV isolates from Minnesota in ten day old specific-pathogen free (SPF) Turkey embryos and tested them in seven-day old Turkey poults. We found that SIV replication in Turkey embryos led to minimal mutations in and around the receptor binding and antigenic sites of the HA molecule, while other gene segments were unchanged. The predominant changes associated with Turkey embryo passage were A223V, V226A and T248I mutations in the receptor-binding and glycosylation sites of the HA molecule. Furthermore, Turkey embryo propagation altered receptor specificity in SIV strain 07-1145. Embryo passaged 07-1145 virus showed a decrease in α2, 6 sialic acid receptor binding compared to the wild type virus. Intranasal infection of wild type SIVs in one-week-old Turkey poults resulted in persistent diarrhea and all the infected birds seroconverted at ten days post infection. The 07-1145 wild type virus also transmitted to age matched in-contact birds introduced one-day post infection. Turkeys infected with embryo passaged viruses displayed no clinical signs and were not transmitted to in-contact poults. Our results suggest that Turkey embryo propagation attenuates recent TR SIVs for infectivity and transmission in one week old Turkeys. Our findings will have important implications in identifying molecular determinants that control the transmission and virulence of TR SIVs in Turkeys and other species. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. High genetic and antigenic similarity between a swine H3N2 influenza A virus and a prior human influenza vaccine virus: a possible immune pressure-driven cross-species transmission.

    PubMed

    Pan, Chungen; Wang, Guiping; Liao, Ming; Zhang, Gui-Hong; Jiang, Shibo

    2009-07-31

    In late April of 2009, a global outbreak of human influenza was reported. The causative agent is a highly unusual reassortant H1N1 influenza virus carrying genetic segments derived from swine, human and avian influenza viruses. In this study, we compared the HA, NA and other gene segments of a swine H3N2 influenza A virus, A/Swine/Guangdong/z5/2003, which was isolated from pigs in 2003 in Guangdong Province, China, to the predominant human and swine H3N2 viruses. We found that the similarity of gene segments of A/Swine/Guangdong/z5/2003 was closer to Moscow/99-like human H3N2 virus than Europe swine H3N2 viruses during 1999-2002. These results suggest that A/Swine/Guangdong/z5/2003 may be porcine in origin, possibly being driven by human immune pressure induced by either natural H3N2 virus infection or use of A/Moscow/10/99 (H3N2)-based human influenza vaccine. The results further confirm that swine may play a dual role as a "shelter" for hosting influenza virus from humans or birds and as a "mixing vessel" for generating reassortant influenza viruses, such as the one causing current influenza pandemic.

  18. Comparative pathology of pigs infected with Korean H1N1, H1N2, or H3N2 swine influenza A viruses.

    PubMed

    Lyoo, Kwang-Soo; Kim, Jeong-Ki; Jung, Kwonil; Kang, Bo-Kyu; Song, Daesub

    2014-09-24

    The predominant subtypes of swine influenza A virus (SIV) in Korea swine population are H1N1, H1N2, and H3N2. The viruses are genetically close to the classical U.S. H1N1 and triple-reassortant H1N2 and H3N2 viruses, respectively. Comparative pathogenesis caused by Korean H1N1, H1N2, and H3N2 SIV was evaluated in this study. The H3N2 infected pigs had severe scores of gross and histopathological lesions at post-inoculation days (PID) 2, and this then progressively decreased. Both the H1N1 and H1N2 infected pigs lacked gross lesions at PID 2, but they showed moderate to severe pneumonia on PID 4, 7 and 14. The pigs infected with H1N1 had significant scores of gross and histopathological lesions when compared with the other pigs infected with H1N2, H3N2, and mock at PID 14. Mean SIV antigen-positive scores were rarely detected for pigs infected with H1N2 and H3N2 from PID 7, whereas a significantly increased amount of viral antigens were found in the bronchioles and alveolar epithelium of the H1N1infected pigs at PID 14. We demonstrated that Korean SIV subtypes had different pulmonary pathologic patterns. The Korean H3N2 rapidly induced acute lung lesions such as broncho-interstitial pneumonia, while the Korean H1N1 showed longer course of infection as compared to other strains.

  19. Genotype patterns of contemporary reassorted H3N2 virus in U.S. swine

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    To understand the evolution of H3N2v influenza viruses that have infected 288 humans since July 2011, we performed the largest phylogenetic analysis at a whole genome scale of influenza viruses from North American swine to date (n = 200). At least ten distinct reassorted H3N2/pandemic H1N1 (rH3N2p)...

  20. Substitutions near the Hemagglutinin Receptor-Binding Site Determine the Antigenic Evolution of Influenza A H3N2 Viruses in U.S. Swine

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Nicola S.; Anderson, Tavis K.; Kitikoon, Pravina; Skepner, Eugene; Burke, David F.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Swine influenza A virus is an endemic and economically important pathogen in pigs, with the potential to infect other host species. The hemagglutinin (HA) protein is the primary target of protective immune responses and the major component in swine influenza A vaccines. However, as a result of antigenic drift, vaccine strains must be regularly updated to reflect currently circulating strains. Characterizing the cross-reactivity between strains in pigs and seasonal influenza virus strains in humans is also important in assessing the relative risk of interspecies transmission of viruses from one host population to the other. Hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay data for swine and human H3N2 viruses were used with antigenic cartography to quantify the antigenic differences among H3N2 viruses isolated from pigs in the United States from 1998 to 2013 and the relative cross-reactivity between these viruses and current human seasonal influenza A virus strains. Two primary antigenic clusters were found circulating in the pig population, but with enough diversity within and between the clusters to suggest updates in vaccine strains are needed. We identified single amino acid substitutions that are likely responsible for antigenic differences between the two primary antigenic clusters and between each antigenic cluster and outliers. The antigenic distance between current seasonal influenza virus H3 strains in humans and those endemic in swine suggests that population immunity may not prevent the introduction of human viruses into pigs, and possibly vice versa, reinforcing the need to monitor and prepare for potential incursions. IMPORTANCE Influenza A virus (IAV) is an important pathogen in pigs and humans. The hemagglutinin (HA) protein is the primary target of protective immune responses and the major target of vaccines. However, vaccine strains must be updated to reflect current strains. Characterizing the differences between seasonal IAV in humans and swine

  1. Population susceptibility to a variant swine-origin influenza virus A(H3N2) in Vietnam, 2011-2012.

    PubMed

    Hoa, L N M; Bryant, J E; Choisy, M; Nguyet, L A; Bao, N T; Trang, N H; Chuc, N T K; Toan, T K; Saito, T; Takemae, N; Horby, P; Wertheim, H; Fox, A

    2015-10-01

    A reassortant swine-origin A(H3N2) virus (A/swine/BinhDuong/03-9/2010) was detected through swine surveillance programmes in southern Vietnam in 2010. This virus contains haemagglutinin and neuraminidase genes from a human A(H3N2) virus circulating around 2004-2006, and the internal genes from triple-reassortant swine influenza A viruses (IAVs). To assess population susceptibility to this virus we measured haemagglutination inhibiting (HI) titres to A/swine/BinhDuong/03-9/2010 and to seasonal A/Perth/16/2009 for 947 sera collected from urban and rural Vietnamese people during 2011-2012. Seroprevalence (HI ⩾ 40) was high and similar for both viruses, with 62·6% [95% confidence interval (CI) 59·4-65·7] against A/Perth/16/2009 and 54·6% (95% CI 51·4-57·8%) against A/swine/BinhDuong/03-9/2010, and no significant differences between urban and rural participants. Children aged <5 years lacked antibodies to the swine origin H3 virus despite high seroprevalence for A/Perth/16/2009. These results reveal vulnerability to infection to this contemporary swine IAV in children aged <5 years; however, cross-reactive immunity in adults would likely limit epidemic emergence potential.

  2. Infectivity phenotypes of H3N2 influenza A viruses in primary swine respiratory epithelial cells are controlled by sialic acid binding

    PubMed Central

    Bateman, Allen C.; Busch, Marc G.; Karasin, Alexander I.; Olsen, Christopher W.

    2012-01-01

    Please cite this paper as: Bateman et al. (2012) Infectivity phenotypes of H3N2 influenza A viruses in primary swine respiratory epithelial cells are controlled by sialic acid binding. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses 6(6), 424–433. Background  In the late 1990s, triple reassortant H3N2 influenza A viruses emerged and spread widely in the US swine population. We have shown previously that an isolate representative of this virus‐lineage, A/Swine/Minnesota/593/99 (Sw/MN), exhibits phenotypic differences compared to a wholly human‐lineage H3N2 virus isolated during the same time period, A/Swine/Ontario/00130/97 (Sw/ONT). Specifically, Sw/MN was more infectious for pigs and infected a significantly higher proportion of cultured primary swine respiratory epithelial cells (SRECs). In addition, reverse genetics‐generated Sw/MN × Sw/ONT reassortant and point mutant viruses demonstrated that the infectivity phenotypes in SRECs were strongly dependent on three amino acids within the hemagglutinin (HA) gene. Objectives  To determine the mechanism by which Sw/MN attains higher infectivity than Sw/ONT in SRECs. Methods  A/Swine/Minnesota/593/99, Sw/ONT, and mutant (reverse genetics‐generated HA reassortant and point mutant) viruses were compared at various HA‐mediated stages of infection: initial sialic acid binding, virus entry, and the pH of virus–endosome fusion. Results/Conclusions  Sialic acid binding was the sole stage where virus differences directly paralleled infectivity phenotypes in SRECs, indicating that binding is the primary mechanism responsible for differences in the infectivity levels of Sw/MN and Sw/ONT. PMID:22353399

  3. Comparative analysis of receptor-binding specificity and pathogenicity in natural reassortant and non-reassortant H3N2 swine influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Cong, Yanlong; Sun, Yixue; Wang, Weili; Meng, Qingfeng; Ran, Wei; Zhu, Lisai; Yang, Guilian; Yang, Wentao; Yang, Lihua; Wang, Chunfeng; Ding, Zhuang

    2014-01-10

    Genetic reassortment between human and avian influenza viruses can create pandemic viruses. Influenza surveillance of pigs in Jilin Province, in China during 2007-2008 revealed that there were two distinguishable genotypes: a human-like H3N2 genotype and a double-reassortant genotype derived from the human H3N2 and avian H5 viruses. In this study, viral infection potential, replication kinetics, and pathogenicity were compared. The solid-phase binding assay demonstrated that both viruses prominently maintained a preference for the human-type receptor and the reassortant A/swine/Jilin/37/2008 (Sw/JL/37/08) showed relatively higher binding affinities than the non-reassortant A/swine/Jilin/19/2007 (Sw/JL/19/07). Replication kinetics showed that Sw/JL/37/08 had higher replicability in MDCK cells than Sw/JL/19/07. The mouse experiments clearly revealed that Sw/JL/37/08 had higher virulence than Sw/JL/19/07 as measured by more significant body weight loss, higher viral lung load, delayed viral clearance from lungs, and more severe pulmonary lesions. Sequence analysis indicated that the absence of glycosylation sites at residue 126 of HA and 93 of NA, as well as the characteristic NS1 C-terminal PL residues of ESEV may account for the increased replication and pathogenicity of Sw/JL/37/08. These results may imply that human may have infection risk by the reassortant swine influenza virus and emphasize the necessity for enhanced viral surveillance strategies, which monitor reassortment events in nature to reduce the public health threat posed by influenza viruses with the potential for human-to-human transmission currently circulating in pig populations. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Strain-dependent effects of PB1-F2 of triple-reassortant H3N2 influenza viruses in swine

    PubMed Central

    Pena, Lindomar; Loving, Crystal L.; Henningson, Jamie N.; Lager, Kelly M.; Li, Weizhong

    2012-01-01

    The PB1-F2 protein of the influenza A viruses (IAVs) can act as a virulence factor in mice. Its contribution to the virulence of IAV in swine, however, remains largely unexplored. In this study, we chose two genetically related H3N2 triple-reassortant IAVs to assess the impact of PB1-F2 in virus replication and virulence in pigs. Using reverse genetics, we disrupted the PB1-F2 ORF of A/swine/Wisconsin/14094/99 (H3N2) (Sw/99) and A/turkey/Ohio/313053/04 (H3N2) (Ty/04). Removing the PB1-F2 ORF led to increased expression of PB1-N40 in a strain-dependent manner. Ablation of the PB1-F2 ORF (or incorporation of the N66S mutation in the PB1-F2 ORF, Sw/99 N66S) affected the replication in porcine alveolar macrophages of only the Sw/99 KO (PB1-F2 knockout) and Sw/99 N66S variants. The Ty/04 KO strain showed decreased virus replication in swine respiratory explants, whereas no such effect was observed in Sw/99 KO, compared with the wild-type (WT) counterparts. In pigs, PB1-F2 did not affect virus shedding or viral load in the lungs for any of these strains. Upon necropsy, PB1-F2 had no effect on the lung pathology caused by Sw/99 variants. Interestingly, the Ty/04 KO-infected pigs showed significantly increased lung pathology at 3 days post-infection compared with pigs infected with the Ty/04 WT strain. In addition, the pulmonary levels of interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8 and gamma interferon were regulated differentially by the expression of PB1-F2. Taken together, these results indicate that PB1-F2 modulates virus replication, virulence and innate immune responses in pigs in a strain-dependent fashion. PMID:22815274

  5. Human T-cells directed to seasonal influenza A virus cross-react with 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1) and swine-origin triple-reassortant H3N2 influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Hillaire, Marine L B; Vogelzang-van Trierum, Stella E; Kreijtz, Joost H C M; de Mutsert, Gerrie; Fouchier, Ron A M; Osterhaus, Albert D M E; Rimmelzwaan, Guus F

    2013-03-01

    Virus-specific CD8(+) T-cells contribute to protective immunity against influenza A virus (IAV) infections. As the majority of these cells are directed to conserved viral proteins, they may afford protection against IAVs of various subtypes. The present study assessed the cross-reactivity of human CD8(+) T-lymphocytes, induced by infection with seasonal A (H1N1) or A (H3N2) influenza virus, with 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1) virus [A(H1N1)pdm09] and swine-origin triple-reassortant A (H3N2) [A(H3N2)v] viruses that are currently causing an increasing number of human cases in the USA. It was demonstrated that CD8(+) T-cells induced after seasonal IAV infections exerted lytic activity and produced gamma interferon upon in vitro restimulation with A(H1N1)pdm09 and A(H3N2)v influenza A viruses. Furthermore, CD8(+) T-cells directed to A(H1N1)pdm09 virus displayed a high degree of cross-reactivity with A(H3N2)v viruses. It was concluded that cross-reacting T-cells had the potential to afford protective immunity against A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses during the pandemic and offer some degree of protection against infection with A(H3N2)v viruses.

  6. Antigenic variation of H1N1, H1N2 and H3N2 swine influenza viruses in Japan and Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Takemae, Nobuhiro; Nguyen, Tung; Ngo, Long Thanh; Hiromoto, Yasuaki; Uchida, Yuko; Pham, Vu Phong; Kageyama, Tsutomu; Kasuo, Shizuko; Shimada, Shinichi; Yamashita, Yasutaka; Goto, Kaoru; Kubo, Hideyuki; Le, Vu Tri; Van Vo, Hung; Do, Hoa Thi; Nguyen, Dang Hoang; Hayashi, Tsuyoshi; Matsuu, Aya; Saito, Takehiko

    2013-04-01

    The antigenicity of the influenza A virus hemagglutinin is responsible for vaccine efficacy in protecting pigs against swine influenza virus (SIV) infection. However, the antigenicity of SIV strains currently circulating in Japan and Vietnam has not been well characterized. We examined the antigenicity of classical H1 SIVs, pandemic A(H1N1)2009 (A(H1N1)pdm09) viruses, and seasonal human-lineage SIVs isolated in Japan and Vietnam. A hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay was used to determine antigenic differences that differentiate the recent Japanese H1N2 and H3N2 SIVs from the H1N1 and H3N2 domestic vaccine strains. Minor antigenic variation between pig A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses was evident by HI assay using 13 mAbs raised against homologous virus. A Vietnamese H1N2 SIV, whose H1 gene originated from a human strain in the mid-2000s, reacted poorly with post-infection ferret serum against human vaccine strains from 2000-2010. These results provide useful information for selection of optimal strains for SIV vaccine production.

  7. Novel reassortant human-like H3N2 and H3N1 influenza A viruses detected in pigs are virulent and antigenically distinct from swine viruses endemic to the United States

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Since November of 2012, human-like swine H3 influenza A viruses have been detected by the USDA surveillance system. Here, we genetically and antigenically characterized two of the novel swine human-like H3N2 and H3N1 viruses detected in the same herd but two years apart. Their pathogenicity and tran...

  8. Vaccination with NS1-truncated H3N2 swine influenza virus primes T cells and confers cross-protection against an H1N1 heterosubtypic challenge in pigs

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The diversity of contemporary swine influenza virus (SIV) strains impedes effective immunization of swine herds. Mucosally delivered, attenuated virus vaccines are one approach with potential to provide broad cross-protection. Reverse genetics-derived H3N2 SIV virus with truncated NS1 (NS1delta126 T...

  9. Divergent immune responses and disease outcomes in piglets immunized with inactivated and attenuated H3N2 swine influenza vaccines in the presence of maternally-derived antibodies

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Vaccine-associated enhanced respiratory disease (VAERD) can occur in pigs given whole-inactivated virus (WIV) influenza vaccine upon infection with an antigenically divergent virus. VAERD was first characterized with H1 viruses, and later described in pigs vaccinated with H3N2 WIV and challenged wit...

  10. Genetic content of Influenza H3N2 vaccine seeds

    PubMed Central

    Bergeron, Corinne; Valette, Martine; Lina, Bruno; Ottmann, Michele

    2010-01-01

    Influenza vaccine seeds produced in chicken eggs are selected through HA and NA surface glycoproteins antigenicity, as well as through high replicative ability. Here we characterize the genetic content of recently used thirteen H3N2 influenza vaccine seeds. Interestingly, sequence analysis of the vaccine seeds shows reassortment events leading to PR8:H3N2 segment constellations, ranging from the 6:2 to 2:6 constellations. This study shows that the H3N2 PB1 is the most frequent internal segment incorporated in the tested vaccines seeds. PMID:20802842

  11. Genetic content of Influenza H3N2 vaccine seeds.

    PubMed

    Bergeron, Corinne; Valette, Martine; Lina, Bruno; Ottmann, Michele

    2010-09-05

    Influenza vaccine seeds produced in chicken eggs are selected through HA and NA surface glycoproteins antigenicity, as well as through high replicative ability. Here we characterize the genetic content of recently used thirteen H3N2 influenza vaccine seeds. Interestingly, sequence analysis of the vaccine seeds shows reassortment events leading to PR8:H3N2 segment constellations, ranging from the 6:2 to 2:6 constellations. This study shows that the H3N2 PB1 is the most frequent internal segment incorporated in the tested vaccines seeds.

  12. Recognition of influenza H3N2 variant virus by human neutralizing antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Bangaru, Sandhya; Nieusma, Travis; Kose, Nurgun; Thornburg, Natalie J.; Kaplan, Bryan S.; King, Hannah G.; Singh, Vidisha; Lampley, Rebecca M.; Cisneros, Alberto; Edwards, Kathryn M.; Edupuganti, Srilatha; Lai, Lilin; Richt, Juergen A.; Webby, Richard J.; Ward, Andrew B.; Crowe, James E.

    2016-01-01

    Since 2011, over 300 human cases of infection, especially in exposed children, with the influenza A H3N2 variant (H3N2v) virus that circulates in swine in the US have been reported. The structural and genetic basis for the lack of protection against H3N2v induced by vaccines containing seasonal H3N2 antigens is poorly understood. We isolated 17 human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that neutralized H3N2v virus from subjects experimentally immunized with an H3N2v candidate vaccine. Six mAbs exhibited very potent neutralizing activity (IC50 < 200 ng/ml) against the H3N2v virus but not against current human H3N2 circulating strains. Fine epitope mapping and structural characterization of antigen-antibody complexes revealed that H3N2v specificity was attributable to amino acid polymorphisms in the 150-loop and the 190-helix antigenic sites on the hemagglutinin protein. H3N2v-specific antibodies also neutralized human H3N2 influenza strains naturally circulating between 1995 and 2005. These results reveal a high level of antigenic relatedness between the swine H3N2v virus and previously circulating human strains, consistent with the fact that early human H3 seasonal strains entered the porcine population in the 1990s and reentered the human population, where they had not been circulating, as H3N2v about a decade later. The data also explain the increased susceptibility to H3N2v viruses in young children, who lack prior exposure to human seasonal strains from the 1990s. PMID:27482543

  13. Antigenic Characterization of H3N2 Influenza A Viruses from Ohio Agricultural Fairs

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Zhixin; Gomez, Janet; Bowman, Andrew S.; Ye, Jianqiang; Long, Li-Ping; Nelson, Sarah W.; Yang, Jialiang; Martin, Brigitte; Jia, Kun; Nolting, Jacqueline M.; Cunningham, Fred; Cardona, Carol; Zhang, Jianqiang; Yoon, Kyoung-Jin; Slemons, Richard D.

    2013-01-01

    The demonstrated link between the emergence of H3N2 variant (H3N2v) influenza A viruses (IAVs) and swine exposure at agricultural fairs has raised concerns about the human health risk posed by IAV-infected swine. Understanding the antigenic profiles of IAVs circulating in pigs at agricultural fairs is critical to developing effective prevention and control strategies. Here, 68 H3N2 IAV isolates recovered from pigs at Ohio fairs (2009 to 2011) were antigenically characterized. These isolates were compared with other H3 IAVs recovered from commercial swine, wild birds, and canines, along with human seasonal and variant H3N2 IAVs. Antigenic cartography demonstrated that H3N2 IAV isolates from Ohio fairs could be divided into two antigenic groups: (i) the 2009 fair isolates and (ii) the 2010 and 2011 fair isolates. These same two antigenic clusters have also been observed in commercial swine populations in recent years. Human H3N2v isolates from 2010 and 2011 are antigenically clustered with swine-origin IAVs from the same time period. The isolates recovered from pigs at fairs did not cross-react with ferret antisera produced against the human seasonal H3N2 IAVs circulating during the past decade, raising the question of the degree of immunity that the human population has to swine-origin H3N2 IAVs. Our results demonstrate that H3N2 IAVs infecting pigs at fairs and H3N2v isolates were antigenically similar to the IAVs circulating in commercial swine, demonstrating that exhibition swine can function as a bridge between commercial swine and the human population. PMID:23637412

  14. Reassortment between Swine H3N2 and 2009 Pandemic H1N1 in the United States Resulted in Influenza A Viruses with Diverse Genetic Constellations with Variable Virulence in Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Rajão, Daniela S.; Walia, Rasna R.; Campbell, Brian; Gauger, Phillip C.; Janas-Martindale, Alicia; Killian, Mary Lea

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Repeated spillovers of the H1N1 pandemic virus (H1N1pdm09) from humans to pigs resulted in substantial evolution of influenza A viruses infecting swine, contributing to the genetic and antigenic diversity of influenza A viruses (IAV) currently circulating in swine. The reassortment with endemic swine viruses and maintenance of some of the H1N1pdm09 internal genes resulted in the circulation of different genomic constellations in pigs. Here, we performed a whole-genome phylogenetic analysis of 368 IAV circulating in swine from 2009 to 2016 in the United States. We identified 44 different genotypes, with the most common genotype (32.33%) containing a clade IV-A HA gene, a 2002-lineage NA gene, an M-pdm09 gene, and remaining gene segments of triple reassortant internal gene (TRIG) origin. To understand how different genetic constellations may relate to viral fitness, we compared the pathogenesis and transmission in pigs of six representative genotypes. Although all six genotypes efficiently infected pigs, they resulted in different degrees of pathology and viral shedding. These results highlight the vast H3N2 genetic diversity circulating in U.S. swine after 2009. This diversity has important implications in the control of this disease by the swine industry, as well as a potential risk for public health if swine-adapted viruses with H1N1pdm09 genes have an increased risk to humans, as occurred in the 2011-2012 and 2016 human variant H3N2v cases associated with exhibition swine. IMPORTANCE People continue to spread the 2009 H1N1 pandemic (H1N1pdm09) IAV to pigs, allowing H1N1pdm09 to reassort with endemic swine IAV. In this study, we determined the 8 gene combinations of swine H3N2 IAV detected from 2009 to 2016. We identified 44 different genotypes of H3N2, the majority of which contained at least one H1N1pdm09 gene segment. We compared six representative genotypes of H3N2 in pigs. All six genotypes efficiently infected pigs, but they resulted in different

  15. Antigenic Detection of Human Strain of Influenza Virus A (H3N2) in Swine Populations at Three Locations in Nigeria and Ghana during the Dry Early Months of 2014.

    PubMed

    Adeola, O A; Olugasa, B O; Emikpe, B O

    2016-03-01

    Since the first detection of human H3N2 influenza virus in Taiwanese pigs in 1970, infection of pigs with wholly human viruses has been known to occur in other parts of the world. These viruses, referred to as human-like H3N2 viruses, have been known to cause clinical and subclinical infections of swine populations. Due to the paucity and complete unavailability of information on transmission of influenza viruses from other species, especially humans, to swine in Nigeria and Ghana, respectively, this study was designed to investigate the presence and prevalence of a human strain of influenza A (H3N2) in swine populations at three locations in two cities within these two West African countries in January and February, 2014. Using stratified random technique, nasal swab specimens were collected from seventy-five (75) pigs at two locations in Ibadan, Nigeria and from fifty (50) pigs in Kumasi, Ghana. These specimens were tested directly by a sensitive Quantitative Solid Phase Antigen-detection Sandwich ELISA using anti-A/Brisbane/10/2007 haemagglutinin monoclonal antibody. Influenza virus A/Brisbane/10/2007 (H3N2) was detected among pigs at the three study locations, with an aggregate prevalence of 4.0% for the two locations in Ibadan, Nigeria and also 4.0% for Kumasi, Ghana. Transmission of influenza viruses from other species to swine portends serious sinister prospects for genetic reassortment and evolvement of novel viruses. We therefore recommend that further studies should be carried out to investigate the presence of other circulating human and avian influenza viruses in swine populations in West Africa and also determine the extent of genetic reassortment of strains circulating among these pigs. This would provide an early warning system for detection of novel influenza viruses, which could have pandemic potentials.

  16. Emergence of H3N2pM-like and novel reassortant H3N1 swine viruses possessing segments derived from the A (H1N1)pdm09 influenza virus, Korea.

    PubMed

    Pascua, Philippe Noriel Q; Lim, Gyo-Jin; Kwon, Hyeok-il; Park, Su-Jin; Kim, Eun-Ha; Song, Min-Suk; Kim, Chul Joong; Choi, Young-Ki

    2013-11-01

    Human-to-swine transmission of the pandemic H1N1 2009 [A(H1N1)pdm09] virus in pig populations resulted in reassortment events with endemic swine influenza viruses worldwide. We investigated whether A(H1N1)pdm09-derived reassortant viruses are present in South Korea and sought to determine the pathogenic potential of the novel swine viruses. Pig lung tissues were collected from commercially slaughtered pigs. Isolated swine influenza viruses were genetically analyzed and characterized in vitro and in vivo. We identified reassortant H3N2 (H3N2pM-like) and H3N1 swine viruses containing A(H1N1)pdm09-like segments in Korean pigs that are genetically closely related to strains recently detected in pigs and humans in North America. Although the H3N2pM-like and novel H3N1 reassortants demonstrated efficient replication in mice and ferrets, all the H3N1 strains exhibited growth advantage over the representative H3N2pM-like virus in human airway cells. Interestingly, A/swine/Korea/CY02-07/2012(H3N1) and A/swine/Korea/CY03-13/2012(H3N1) reassortants were more readily transmitted to respiratory-droplet-contact ferrets compared with the H3N2pM-like (A/swine/Korea/CY02-10/2012) isolate. Furthermore, serologic evaluation showed poor antigenicity to contemporary reference human seasonal H3N2 vaccine strains. We report here for the first time the isolation of H3N2pM-like viruses outside North America and of novel reassortant swine H3N1 viruses with A(H1N1)pdm09-derived genes. Apart from further complicating the genetic diversity of influenza A viruses circulating in domestic pigs, our data also indicate that these strains could potentially pose threat to public health asserting the need for continuous virus monitoring in these ecologically important hosts. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Viral Reassortment and Transmission after Coinfection of Pigs with Classical H1N1 and Triple Reassortant H3N2 Swine Influenza Viruses

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Triple reassortant swine influenza viruses circulating in North American pigs contain the internal genes derived from swine (NP, M, NS), human (PB1) and avian (PA and PB2) influenza viruses forming a constellation of genes that is well conserved and called the triple reassortant internal gene (TRIG)...

  18. Substitutions near the hemagglutinin receptor-binding site determine the antigenic evolution of influenza A H3N2 viruses in U.S. swine

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Swine influenza A virus is an endemic and economically important pathogen in pigs with the zoonotic potential to infect other host species. The hemagglutinin (HA) protein is the primary target of protective immune responses and the major component in swine influenza A vaccines. However, as a result ...

  19. Novel Reassortant Human-Like H3N2 and H3N1 Influenza A Viruses Detected in Pigs Are Virulent and Antigenically Distinct from Swine Viruses Endemic to the United States

    PubMed Central

    Rajão, Daniela S.; Gauger, Phillip C.; Anderson, Tavis K.; Lewis, Nicola S.; Abente, Eugenio J.; Killian, Mary Lea; Sutton, Troy C.; Zhang, Jianqiang

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human-like swine H3 influenza A viruses (IAV) were detected by the USDA surveillance system. We characterized two novel swine human-like H3N2 and H3N1 viruses with hemagglutinin (HA) genes similar to those in human seasonal H3 strains and internal genes closely related to those of 2009 H1N1 pandemic viruses. The H3N2 neuraminidase (NA) was of the contemporary human N2 lineage, while the H3N1 NA was of the classical swine N1 lineage. Both viruses were antigenically distant from swine H3 viruses that circulate in the United States and from swine vaccine strains and also showed antigenic drift from human seasonal H3N2 viruses. Their pathogenicity and transmission in pigs were compared to those of a human H3N2 virus with a common HA ancestry. Both swine human-like H3 viruses efficiently infected pigs and were transmitted to indirect contacts, whereas the human H3N2 virus did so much less efficiently. To evaluate the role of genes from the swine isolates in their pathogenesis, reverse genetics-generated reassortants between the swine human-like H3N1 virus and the seasonal human H3N2 virus were tested in pigs. The contribution of the gene segments to virulence was complex, with the swine HA and internal genes showing effects in vivo. The experimental infections indicate that these novel H3 viruses are virulent and can sustain onward transmission in pigs, and the naturally occurring mutations in the HA were associated with antigenic divergence from H3 IAV from humans and swine. Consequently, these viruses could have a significant impact on the swine industry if they were to cause more widespread outbreaks, and the potential risk of these emerging swine IAV to humans should be considered. IMPORTANCE Pigs are important hosts in the evolution of influenza A viruses (IAV). Human-to-swine transmissions of IAV have resulted in the circulation of reassortant viruses containing human-origin genes in pigs, greatly contributing to the diversity of IAV in swine worldwide

  20. Novel Reassortant Human-Like H3N2 and H3N1 Influenza A Viruses Detected in Pigs Are Virulent and Antigenically Distinct from Swine Viruses Endemic to the United States.

    PubMed

    Rajão, Daniela S; Gauger, Phillip C; Anderson, Tavis K; Lewis, Nicola S; Abente, Eugenio J; Killian, Mary Lea; Perez, Daniel R; Sutton, Troy C; Zhang, Jianqiang; Vincent, Amy L

    2015-11-01

    Human-like swine H3 influenza A viruses (IAV) were detected by the USDA surveillance system. We characterized two novel swine human-like H3N2 and H3N1 viruses with hemagglutinin (HA) genes similar to those in human seasonal H3 strains and internal genes closely related to those of 2009 H1N1 pandemic viruses. The H3N2 neuraminidase (NA) was of the contemporary human N2 lineage, while the H3N1 NA was of the classical swine N1 lineage. Both viruses were antigenically distant from swine H3 viruses that circulate in the United States and from swine vaccine strains and also showed antigenic drift from human seasonal H3N2 viruses. Their pathogenicity and transmission in pigs were compared to those of a human H3N2 virus with a common HA ancestry. Both swine human-like H3 viruses efficiently infected pigs and were transmitted to indirect contacts, whereas the human H3N2 virus did so much less efficiently. To evaluate the role of genes from the swine isolates in their pathogenesis, reverse genetics-generated reassortants between the swine human-like H3N1 virus and the seasonal human H3N2 virus were tested in pigs. The contribution of the gene segments to virulence was complex, with the swine HA and internal genes showing effects in vivo. The experimental infections indicate that these novel H3 viruses are virulent and can sustain onward transmission in pigs, and the naturally occurring mutations in the HA were associated with antigenic divergence from H3 IAV from humans and swine. Consequently, these viruses could have a significant impact on the swine industry if they were to cause more widespread outbreaks, and the potential risk of these emerging swine IAV to humans should be considered. Pigs are important hosts in the evolution of influenza A viruses (IAV). Human-to-swine transmissions of IAV have resulted in the circulation of reassortant viruses containing human-origin genes in pigs, greatly contributing to the diversity of IAV in swine worldwide. New human-like H3N2

  1. Protection of guinea pigs by vaccination with a recombinant swinepox virus co-expressing HA1 genes of swine H1N1 and H3N2 influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jiarong; Yang, Deji; Huang, Dongyan; Xu, Jiaping; Liu, Shichao; Lin, Huixing; Zhu, Haodan; Liu, Bao; Lu, Chengping

    2013-03-01

    Swine influenza (SI) is an acute respiratory infectious disease of swine caused by swine influenza virus (SIV). SIV is not only an important respiratory pathogen in pigs but also a potent threat to human health. Here, we report the construction of a recombinant swinepox virus (rSPV/H3-2A-H1) co-expressing hemagglutinin (HA1) of SIV subtypes H1N1 and H3N2. Immune responses and protection efficacy of the rSPV/H3-2A-H1 were evaluated in guinea pigs. Inoculation of rSPV/H3-2A-H1 yielded neutralizing antibodies against SIV H1N1 and H3N2. The IFN-γ and IL-4 concentrations in the supernatant of lymphocytes stimulated with purified SIV HA1 antigen were significantly higher (P < 0.01) than those of the control groups. Complete protection of guinea pigs against SIV H1N1 or H3N2 challenge was observed. No SIV shedding was detected from guinea pigs vaccinated with rSPV/H3-2A-H1 after challenge. Most importantly, the guinea pigs immunized with rSPV/H3-2A-H1 did not show gross and micrographic lung lesions. However, the control guinea pigs experienced distinct gross and micrographic lung lesions at 7 days post-challenge. Our data suggest that the recombinant swinepox virus encoding HA1 of SIV H1N1 and H3N2 might serve as a promising candidate vaccine for protection against SIV H1N1 and H3N2 infections.

  2. Genotype patterns of contemporary reassorted H3N2 virus in US swine.

    PubMed

    Kitikoon, Pravina; Nelson, Martha I; Killian, Mary Lea; Anderson, Tavis K; Koster, Leo; Culhane, Marie R; Vincent, Amy L

    2013-06-01

    To understand the evolution of swine-origin H3N2v influenza viruses that have infected 320 humans in the USA since August 2011, we performed a phylogenetic analysis at a whole genome scale of North American swine influenza viruses (n = 200). All viral isolates evolved from the prototypical North American H3 cluster 4 (c4), with evidence for further diversification into subclusters. At least ten distinct reassorted H3N2/pandemic H1N1 (rH3N2p) genotypes were identified in swine. Genotype 1 (G1) was most frequently detected in swine and all human H3N2v viruses clustered within a single G1 clade. These data suggest that the genetic requirements for transmission to humans may be restricted to a specific subset of swine viruses. Mutations at putative antigenic sites as well as reduced serological cross-reactivity among the H3 subclusters suggest antigenic drift of these contemporary viruses.

  3. Vaccination-challenge studies with a Port Chalmers/73 (H3N2)-based swine influenza virus vaccine: Reflections on vaccine strain updates and on the vaccine potency test.

    PubMed

    De Vleeschauwer, Annebel; Qiu, Yu; Van Reeth, Kristien

    2015-05-11

    The human A/Port Chalmers/1/73 (H3N2) influenza virus strain, the supposed ancestor of European H3N2 swine influenza viruses (SIVs), was used in most commercial SIV vaccines in Europe until recently. If manufacturers want to update vaccine strains, they have to perform laborious intratracheal (IT) challenge experiments and demonstrate reduced virus titres in the lungs of vaccinated pigs. We aimed to examine (a) the ability of a Port Chalmers/73-based commercial vaccine to induce cross-protection against a contemporary European H3N2 SIV and serologic cross-reaction against H3N2 SIVs from Europe and North America and (b) the validity of intranasal (IN) challenge and virus titrations of nasal swabs as alternatives for IT challenge and titrations of lung tissue in vaccine potency tests. Pigs were vaccinated with Suvaxyn Flu(®) and challenged by the IT or IN route with sw/Gent/172/08. Post-vaccination sera were examined in haemagglutination-inhibition assays against vaccine and challenge strains and additional H3N2 SIVs from Europe and North America, including an H3N2 variant virus. Tissues of the respiratory tract and nasal swabs were collected 3 days post challenge (DPCh) and from 0-7 DPCh, respectively, and examined by virus titration. Two vaccinations consistently induced cross-reactive antibodies against European H3N2 SIVs from 1998-2012, but minimal or undetectable antibody titres against North American viruses. Challenge virus titres in the lungs, trachea and nasal mucosa of the vaccinated pigs were significantly reduced after both IT and IN challenge. Yet the reduction of virus titres and nasal shedding was greater after IT challenge. The Port Chalmers/73-based vaccine still offered protection against a European H3N2 SIV isolated 35 years later and with only 86.9% amino acid homology in its HA1, but it is unlikely to protect against H3N2 SIVs that are endemic in North America. We use our data to reflect on vaccine strain updates and on the vaccine potency test.

  4. Experimental infection of European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris) and house sparrows (Passer domesticus) with pandemic 2009 H1N1 and swine H1N1 and H3N2 triple reassortant influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Nemeth, Nicole M; Oesterle, Paul T; Poulson, Rebecca L; Jones, Cheryl A; Tompkins, S Mark; Brown, Justin D; Stallknecht, David E

    2013-04-01

    European Starlings (Sturnus vulgaris) and House Sparrows (Passer domesticus) are common peridomestic passerine birds that are often associated with domestic animal production facilities. This association provides a potential means for pathogen transmission between facilities. We inoculated European Starlings and House Sparrows with three non-avian influenza virus strains: two swine isolates (H1N1 and H3N2) and one human isolate representing the H1N1 pandemic strain that originated from swine. No viral shedding was observed in House Sparrows, and shedding was minimal and transient in two of 12 (17%) European Starlings. One of these two infected Starlings seroconverted 14 days after inoculation. These results suggest that these two passerine species are minimally susceptible to current influenza viruses in domestic pigs and therefore pose a negligible risk for transmission between or within swine production facilities.

  5. Human Infections with Novel Reassortant Influenza A(H3N2)v Viruses, United States, 2011

    PubMed Central

    Lindstrom, Stephen; Garten, Rebecca; Balish, Amanda; Shu, Bo; Emery, Shannon; Berman, LaShondra; Barnes, Nathelia; Sleeman, Katrina; Gubareva, Larisa; Villanueva, Julie

    2012-01-01

    During July–December 2011, a variant virus, influenza A(H3N2)v, caused 12 human cases of influenza. The virus contained genes originating from swine, avian, and human viruses, including the M gene from influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus. Influenza A(H3N2)v viruses were antigenically distinct from seasonal influenza viruses and similar to proposed vaccine virus A/Minnesota/11/2010. PMID:22516540

  6. Reassortment between Swine H3N2 and 2009 Pandemic H1N1 in the United States Resulted in Influenza A Viruses with Diverse Genetic Constellations with Variable Virulence in Pigs.

    PubMed

    Rajão, Daniela S; Walia, Rasna R; Campbell, Brian; Gauger, Phillip C; Janas-Martindale, Alicia; Killian, Mary Lea; Vincent, Amy L

    2017-02-15

    Repeated spillovers of the H1N1 pandemic virus (H1N1pdm09) from humans to pigs resulted in substantial evolution of influenza A viruses infecting swine, contributing to the genetic and antigenic diversity of influenza A viruses (IAV) currently circulating in swine. The reassortment with endemic swine viruses and maintenance of some of the H1N1pdm09 internal genes resulted in the circulation of different genomic constellations in pigs. Here, we performed a whole-genome phylogenetic analysis of 368 IAV circulating in swine from 2009 to 2016 in the United States. We identified 44 different genotypes, with the most common genotype (32.33%) containing a clade IV-A HA gene, a 2002-lineage NA gene, an M-pdm09 gene, and remaining gene segments of triple reassortant internal gene (TRIG) origin. To understand how different genetic constellations may relate to viral fitness, we compared the pathogenesis and transmission in pigs of six representative genotypes. Although all six genotypes efficiently infected pigs, they resulted in different degrees of pathology and viral shedding. These results highlight the vast H3N2 genetic diversity circulating in U.S. swine after 2009. This diversity has important implications in the control of this disease by the swine industry, as well as a potential risk for public health if swine-adapted viruses with H1N1pdm09 genes have an increased risk to humans, as occurred in the 2011-2012 and 2016 human variant H3N2v cases associated with exhibition swine.

  7. PB1-F2 Protein Does Not Impact the Virulence of Triple-Reassortant H3N2 Swine Influenza Virus in Pigs but Alters Pathogenicity and Transmission in Turkeys.

    PubMed

    Deventhiran, Jagadeeswaran; Kumar, Sandeep R P; Raghunath, Shobana; Leroith, Tanya; Elankumaran, Subbiah

    2015-10-14

    PB1-F2 protein, the 11th influenza A virus (IAV) protein, is considered to play an important role in primary influenza virus infection and postinfluenza secondary bacterial pneumonia in mice. The functional role of PB1-F2 has been reported to be a strain-specific and host-specific phenomenon. Its precise contribution to the pathogenicity and transmission of influenza virus in mammalian host, such as swine, and avian hosts, such as turkeys, remain largely unknown. In this study, we explored the role of PB1-F2 protein of triple-reassortant (TR) H3N2 swine influenza virus (SIV) in pigs and turkeys. Using the eight-plasmid reverse genetics system, we rescued wild-type SIV A/swine/Minnesota/1145/2007 (H3N2) (SIV 1145-WT), a PB1-F2 knockout mutant (SIV 1145-KO), and its N66S variant (SIV 1145-N66S). The ablation of PB1-F2 in SIV 1145 modulated early-stage apoptosis but did not affect the viral replication in swine alveolar macrophage cells. In pigs, PB1-F2 expression did not affect nasal shedding, lung viral load, immunophenotypes, and lung pathology. On the other hand, in turkeys, SIV 1145-KO infected poults, and its in-contacts developed clinical signs earlier than SIV 1145-WT groups and also displayed more extensive histopathological changes in intestine. Further, turkeys infected with SIV 1145-N66S displayed poor infectivity and transmissibility. The more extensive histopathologic changes in intestine and relative transmission advantage observed in turkeys infected with SIV 1145-KO need to be further explored. Taken together, these results emphasize the host-specific roles of PB1-F2 in the pathogenicity and transmission of IAV. Novel triple-reassortant H3N2 swine influenza virus emerged in 1998 and spread rapidly among the North American swine population. Subsequently, it showed an increased propensity to reassort, generating a range of reassortants. Unlike classical swine influenza virus, TR SIV produces a full-length PB1-F2 protein, which is considered an important

  8. Impact of prior seasonal H3N2 influenza vaccination or infection on protection and transmission of emerging variants of influenza A(H3N2)v virus in ferrets.

    PubMed

    Houser, Katherine V; Pearce, Melissa B; Katz, Jacqueline M; Tumpey, Terrence M

    2013-12-01

    Influenza H3N2 A viruses continue to circulate in swine and occasionally infect humans, resulting in outbreaks of variant influenza H3N2 [A(H3N2)v] virus. It has been previously demonstrated in ferrets that A(H3N2)v viruses transmit as efficiently as seasonal influenza viruses, raising concern over the pandemic potential of these viruses. However, A(H3N2)v viruses have not acquired the ability to transmit efficiently among humans, which may be due in part to existing cross-reactive immunity to A(H3N2)v viruses. Although current seasonal H3N2 and A(H3N2)v viruses are antigenically distinct from one another, historical H3N2 viruses have some antigenic similarity to A(H3N2)v viruses and previous exposure to these viruses may provide a measure of immune protection sufficient to dampen A(H3N2)v virus transmission. Here, we evaluated whether prior seasonal H3N2 influenza virus vaccination or infection affects virus replication and transmission of A(H3N2)v virus in the ferret animal model. We found that the seasonal trivalent inactivated influenza virus vaccine (TIV) or a monovalent vaccine prepared from an antigenically related 1992 seasonal influenza H3N2 (A/Beijing/32/1992) virus failed to substantially reduce A(H3N2)v (A/Indiana/08/2011) virus shedding and subsequent transmission to naive hosts. Conversely, ferrets primed by seasonal H3N2 virus infection displayed reduced A(H3N2)v virus shedding following challenge, which blunted transmission to naive ferrets. A higher level of specific IgG and IgA antibody titers detected among infected versus vaccinated ferrets was associated with the degree of protection offered by seasonal H3N2 virus infection. The data demonstrate in ferrets that the efficiency of A(H3N2)v transmission is disrupted by preexisting immunity induced by seasonal H3N2 virus infection.

  9. Impact of Prior Seasonal H3N2 Influenza Vaccination or Infection on Protection and Transmission of Emerging Variants of Influenza A(H3N2)v Virus in Ferrets

    PubMed Central

    Houser, Katherine V.; Pearce, Melissa B.; Katz, Jacqueline M.

    2013-01-01

    Influenza H3N2 A viruses continue to circulate in swine and occasionally infect humans, resulting in outbreaks of variant influenza H3N2 [A(H3N2)v] virus. It has been previously demonstrated in ferrets that A(H3N2)v viruses transmit as efficiently as seasonal influenza viruses, raising concern over the pandemic potential of these viruses. However, A(H3N2)v viruses have not acquired the ability to transmit efficiently among humans, which may be due in part to existing cross-reactive immunity to A(H3N2)v viruses. Although current seasonal H3N2 and A(H3N2)v viruses are antigenically distinct from one another, historical H3N2 viruses have some antigenic similarity to A(H3N2)v viruses and previous exposure to these viruses may provide a measure of immune protection sufficient to dampen A(H3N2)v virus transmission. Here, we evaluated whether prior seasonal H3N2 influenza virus vaccination or infection affects virus replication and transmission of A(H3N2)v virus in the ferret animal model. We found that the seasonal trivalent inactivated influenza virus vaccine (TIV) or a monovalent vaccine prepared from an antigenically related 1992 seasonal influenza H3N2 (A/Beijing/32/1992) virus failed to substantially reduce A(H3N2)v (A/Indiana/08/2011) virus shedding and subsequent transmission to naive hosts. Conversely, ferrets primed by seasonal H3N2 virus infection displayed reduced A(H3N2)v virus shedding following challenge, which blunted transmission to naive ferrets. A higher level of specific IgG and IgA antibody titers detected among infected versus vaccinated ferrets was associated with the degree of protection offered by seasonal H3N2 virus infection. The data demonstrate in ferrets that the efficiency of A(H3N2)v transmission is disrupted by preexisting immunity induced by seasonal H3N2 virus infection. PMID:24089569

  10. Analysis of the acute-phase protein response in pigs to clinical and subclinical infection with H3N2 swine influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Pomorska-Mól, Małgorzata; Kwit, Krzysztof; Pejsak, Zygmunt; Markowska-Daniel, Iwona

    2014-03-01

    Swine influenza (SI) is a contagious, important respiratory disease. Diagnosis of SI is based on the clinical signs, confirmed by the detection of viral RNA or specific antibodies. However, the infection is much more frequent than the disease. The aim of study was to investigate the kinetics of acute-phase protein (APP) response during subclinical and clinical influenza in pigs. The utility of APP measurements in identification of infected animals was also evaluated. Twenty-eight piglets were used. C-reactive protein (CRP), haptoglobin (Hp), serum amyloid A (SAA) and pig major acute-phase protein (Pig-MAP) concentrations in serum were measured using commercial ELISAs. No relevant clinical signs were observed in intranasally infected pigs. In contrast, coughing, nasal discharge, and fever were observed in pigs infected intratracheally. All infected pigs exhibited specific antibodies in the serum at 10 dpi, and viral shedding was confirmed. The concentrations of CRP, Hp and SAA were significantly increased after infection. The level of Pig-MAP remained constant during subclinical and clinical infection. The concentrations of CRP, Hp and SAA were higher in pigs with clinical disease. Although not specific, strategic APP measurements may reveal ongoing clinical and subclinical infection. A close relationship between the magnitude of serum APP response with the severity of disease, providing an objective tool for validation the severity of infection. The maximum concentration of SAA in serum was closely correlated with lung score and makes this APP potential indicator for disease progress or estimation of treatment strategy.

  11. Comparison of the efficacies of amantadine treatment of swine-origin influenza virus A H1N1 and seasonal influenza H1N1 and H3N2 in Japan (2008-2009).

    PubMed

    Miyachi, Kiyomitsu; Watanabe, Atushi; Iida, Hiromasa; Hattori, Haruki; Ukai, Hiroshi; Takano, Tsuruyo; Hankins, Raleigh W

    2011-08-01

    Amantadine is not thought to be effective for the treatment of swine-origin influenza virus (S-OIV) based on an analysis of genetic sequences of the M2 protein. However, the actual clinical efficacy of amantadine has not been well documented. Here, we were able to compare the efficacies of amantadine and neuraminidase inhibitors. Subjects consisted of 428 patients, including 144 with seasonal influenza (flu) identified between 2008 and 2009, and 284 with S-OIV identified between July 1 and November 30, 2009. Diagnosis of flu was established using a rapid diagnostic kit obtained commercially in Japan. Body temperature sheets were obtained from 95% of the S-OIV patients. Times required to recover normal body temperature were compared among subjects using different antiviral drugs. Genetic abnormalities in the M2 protein were also investigated in 66 randomly selected subjects from within the patient pool. Overall, the average hours required to recover normal body temperature in S-OIV patients treated with amantadine (160 cases), with oseltamivir (59 cases), or with zanamivir (65 cases) were 33.9 ± 20.7, 31.7 ± 16.0, or 36.3 ± 21.6, respectively. These differences were not statistically significant. The N31S abnormality was found in all 14 samples taken from the H3N2 patients and in all of the 23 samples taken from in S-OIV patients. However, this abnormality was not found in any of the 30 samples taken from seasonal H1N1 patients. Amantadine was found to be equally effective in treating S-OIV patients as neuraminidase inhibitors. The genetic abnormality resulting in S31N amino acid conversion identified in some of the H3N2 and S-OIV patients is thought to alter the function of M2 protein only mildly.

  12. Analysis of the acute-phase protein response in pigs to clinical and subclinical infection with H3N2 swine influenza virus

    PubMed Central

    Pomorska-Mól, Małgorzata; Krzysztof, Kwit; Pejsak, Zygmunt; Markowska-Daniel, Iwona

    2014-01-01

    Background Swine influenza (SI) is a contagious, important respiratory disease. Diagnosis of SI is based on the clinical signs, confirmed by the detection of viral RNA or specific antibodies. However, the infection is much more frequent than the disease. Objectives The aim of study was to investigate the kinetics of acute-phase protein (APP) response during subclinical and clinical influenza in pigs. The utility of APP measurements in identification of infected animals was also evaluated. Methods Twenty-eight piglets were used. C-reactive protein (CRP), haptoglobin (Hp), serum amyloid A (SAA) and pig major acute-phase protein (Pig-MAP) concentrations in serum were measured using commercial ELISAs. Results and Conclusions No relevant clinical signs were observed in intranasally infected pigs. In contrast, coughing, nasal discharge, and fever were observed in pigs infected intratracheally. All infected pigs exhibited specific antibodies in the serum at 10 dpi, and viral shedding was confirmed. The concentrations of CRP, Hp and SAA were significantly increased after infection. The level of Pig-MAP remained constant during subclinical and clinical infection. The concentrations of CRP, Hp and SAA were higher in pigs with clinical disease. Although not specific, strategic APP measurements may reveal ongoing clinical and subclinical infection. A close relationship between the magnitude of serum APP response with the severity of disease, providing an objective tool for validation the severity of infection. The maximum concentration of SAA in serum was closely correlated with lung score and makes this APP potential indicator for disease progress or estimation of treatment strategy. PMID:24734294

  13. The repeated introduction of the H3N2 virus from human to swine during 1979-1993 in China.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wenfei; Yang, Shuai; Dong, Libo; Yang, Lei; Tang, Jing; Zou, Xiaohui; Chen, Tao; Yang, Jing; Shu, Yuelong

    2015-07-01

    Limited data are available regarding the swine influenza viruses (SIVs) that circulated in Mainland China prior to the 1990s. Eleven H3N2 virus strains were isolated from swine populations from 1979 to 1992. To determine the origin and tendency of these SIVs, the phylogenetic and antigenic properties of these viruses were analyzed based on the whole genome sequenced and the HI titrations with post-infection ferret antisera against influenza A (H3N2) virus isolates of swine and human origin. The results revealed that these 11 SIVs originated from humans and were not maintained in swine populations, indicating the interspecies transmission from humans to pigs occurred frequently and independently throughout these periods. However, human H3N2 viruses might not have the ability to circulate in pig herds.

  14. Divergent immune responses and disease outcomes in piglets immunized with inactivated and attenuated H3N2 swine influenza vaccines in the presence of maternally-derived antibodies

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Vaccine-associated enhanced respiratory disease (VAERD) can occur in pigs immunized with whole-inactivated influenza virus (WIV) vaccine and subsequently infected with an antigenically divergent virus of the same HA subtype. Live-attenuated influenza virus (LAIV) vaccines administered intranasally h...

  15. A live-attenuated influenza vaccine for H3N2 canine influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Laura; Nogales, Aitor; Reilly, Emma C; Topham, David J; Murcia, Pablo R; Parrish, Colin R; Martinez Sobrido, Luis

    2017-04-01

    Canine influenza is a contagious respiratory disease in dogs caused by two subtypes (H3N2 and H3N8) of canine influenza virus (CIV). Currently, only inactivated influenza vaccines (IIVs) are available for the prevention of CIVs. Historically, live-attenuated influenza vaccines (LAIVs) have been shown to produce better immunogenicity and protection efficacy than IIVs. Here, we have engineered a CIV H3N2 LAIV by using the internal genes of a previously described CIV H3N8 LAIV as a master donor virus (MDV) and the surface HA and NA genes of a circulating CIV H3N2 strain. Our findings show that CIV H3N2 LAIV replicates efficiently at low temperature but its replication is impaired at higher temperatures. The CIV H3N2 LAIV was attenuated in vivo but induced better protection efficacy in mice against challenge with wild-type CIV H3N2 than a commercial CIV H3N2 IIV. This is the first description of a LAIV for the prevention of CIV H3N2 in dogs.

  16. Genetic and biological characterisation of an avian-like H1N2 swine influenza virus generated by reassortment of circulating avian-like H1N1 and H3N2 subtypes in Denmark

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The influenza A virus subtypes H1N1, H1N2 and H3N2 are the most prevalent subtypes in swine. In 2003, a reassorted H1N2 swine influenza virus (SIV) subtype appeared and became prevalent in Denmark. In the present study, the reassortant H1N2 subtype was characterised genetically and the infection dynamics compared to an “avian-like” H1N1 virus by an experimental infection study. Methods Sequence analyses were performed of the H1N2 virus. Two groups of pigs were inoculated with the reassortant H1N2 virus and an “avian-like” H1N1 virus, respectively, followed by inoculation with the opposite subtype four weeks later. Measurements of HI antibodies and acute phase proteins were performed. Nasal virus excretion and virus load in lungs were determined by real-time RT-PCR. Results The phylogenetic analysis revealed that the reassorted H1N2 virus contained a European “avian-like” H1-gene and a European “swine-like” N2-gene, thus being genetically distinct from most H1N2 viruses circulating in Europe, but similar to viruses reported in 2009/2010 in Sweden and Italy. Sequence analyses of the internal genes revealed that the reassortment probably arose between circulating Danish “avian-like” H1N1 and H3N2 SIVs. Infected pigs developed cross-reactive antibodies, and increased levels of acute phase proteins after inoculations. Pigs inoculated with H1N2 exhibited nasal virus excretion for seven days, peaking day 1 after inoculation two days earlier than H1N1 infected pigs and at a six times higher level. The difference, however, was not statistically significant. Pigs euthanized on day 4 after inoculation, had a high virus load in all lung lobes. After the second inoculation, the nasal virus excretion was minimal. There were no clinical sign except elevated body temperature under the experimental conditions. Conclusions The “avian-like” H1N2 subtype, which has been established in the Danish pig population at least since 2003, is a reassortant

  17. Comparison of inactivated H3 avian influenza vaccines to protect turkey hens against egg production losses following challenge with a recent H3N2 field isolate

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Recently, triple reassortant H3N2 subtype avian influenza (AI) viruses containing gene segments of avian, swine, and human origin appeared in both swine and turkey populations in the U.S. These H3N2 viruses appear to be responsible for significant turkey production losses, primarily in Minnesota an...

  18. Increased diversity of H3N2 influenza virus in pigs in the United States and implications for pigs and humans

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In 2011-2012 at least 320 human cases of H3N2 (H3N2v) viruses closely related to swine influenza A viruses (IAV) were detected in the United States. We performed phylogenetic analysis of 200 whole genome sequences of North American swine IAV to identify reassortment events and compare these novel ge...

  19. Influenza A(H3N2) Outbreak at Transit Center at Manas, Kyrgyzstan, 2014

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    pdm09, 65 influenza A(H3N2), one influenza A/not subtyped, and one influenza B); six specimens were positive for other respiratory viruses (one human...Article 3. DATES COVERED (From – To) December 2013-February 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Influenza A(H3N2) Outbreak at Transit Center at Manas...support in response to a moderate outbreak of influenza at the Transit Center at Manas (Kyrgyzstan). A total of 215 individuals presented with

  20. Environmental Conditions Affect Exhalation of H3N2 Seasonal and Variant Influenza Viruses and Respiratory Droplet Transmission in Ferrets

    PubMed Central

    Gustin, Kortney M.; Belser, Jessica A.; Veguilla, Vic; Zeng, Hui; Katz, Jacqueline M.; Tumpey, Terrence M.; Maines, Taronna R.

    2015-01-01

    The seasonality of influenza virus infections in temperate climates and the role of environmental conditions like temperature and humidity in the transmission of influenza virus through the air are not well understood. Using ferrets housed at four different environmental conditions, we evaluated the respiratory droplet transmission of two influenza viruses (a seasonal H3N2 virus and an H3N2 variant virus, the etiologic virus of a swine to human summertime infection) and concurrently characterized the aerosol shedding profiles of infected animals. Comparisons were made among the different temperature and humidity conditions and between the two viruses to determine if the H3N2 variant virus exhibited enhanced capabilities that may have contributed to the infections occurring in the summer. We report here that although increased levels of H3N2 variant virus were found in ferret nasal wash and exhaled aerosol samples compared to the seasonal H3N2 virus, enhanced respiratory droplet transmission was not observed under any of the environmental settings. However, overall environmental conditions were shown to modulate the frequency of influenza virus transmission through the air. Transmission occurred most frequently at 23°C/30%RH, while the levels of infectious virus in aerosols exhaled by infected ferrets agree with these results. Improving our understanding of how environmental conditions affect influenza virus infectivity and transmission may reveal ways to better protect the public against influenza virus infections. PMID:25969995

  1. Reassortment between swine H3N2 and 2009 pandemic H1N1 in the United States resulted in influenza A viruses with diverse genetic constellations with variable virulence in pigs

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Repeated spillovers of the H1N1 pandemic virus (H1N1pdm09) from humans to pigs resulted in substantial evolution of swine influenza viruses, contributing to the genetic and antigenic diversity of influenza A virus (IAV) currently circulating in swine. The reassortment with endemic swine viruses and ...

  2. Reassortment between swine H3N2 and 2009 pandemic H1N1 generated diverse genetic constellations in influenza A viruses currently circulating in pigs in the United States

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Introduction Influenza A virus (IAV) is a significant pathogen to the swine industry. Since its introduction in 2009, the H1N1 pandemic virus (H1N1pdm09) has been repeatedly transmitted from humans to swine, but onward transmission in U.S. swine was mostly restricted to its internal genes. Reassortm...

  3. Isolation of the pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus and its reassortant with an H3N2 swine influenza virus from healthy weaning pigs in Thailand in 2011.

    PubMed

    Hiromoto, Yasuaki; Parchariyanon, Sujira; Ketusing, Naree; Netrabukkana, Punnaporn; Hayashi, Tsuyoshi; Kobayashi, Tomoko; Takemae, Nobuhiro; Saito, Takehiko

    2012-10-01

    A total of 300 nasal swabs were collected from 5 pig farms in two provinces in the Eastern part of Thailand in February 2011 and were subjected to viral isolation of influenza A viruses. Two H3N2 and 6 H1N1 influenza A viruses were isolated from swabs collected from clinically healthy weaning pigs on farms in Chonburi and Chachoengsao provinces, respectively. The H3N2 isolates consisted of the hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) genes closely related to Thai SIVs and derived from a cluster of human seasonal H3N2 strains circulating around 1996-1997. The remaining gene segments of the isolates originated from the Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 (A (H1N1) pdm09) virus. Antigenicity of the H3N2 isolates was distinguishable from a human seasonal vaccine strain in the 1996-1998 seasons that represented antigenicity of the seasonal strains around 1996-1998. Nasal swabs from a Chachoengsao farm yielded A (H1N1) pdm09 viruses in chicken embryonated eggs and MDCK cells. A (H1N1) pdm09 viruses isolated in this study grew poorly in MDCK cells. Deduced amino acid sequences of the HA1 region of the HA protein of egg isolated viruses were identical to the sequences directly amplified from original swab samples. Our result demonstrated that the A (H1N1) pdm09 virus has been established in the Thai pig population and this has resulted in genetic reassortment with Thai SIV that previously circulated among pigs.

  4. Outbreak of Influenza A (H3N2) Variant Virus Infection among Attendees of an Agricultural Fair, Pennsylvania, USA, 2011

    PubMed Central

    Greenbaum, Adena; Moll, Maria E.; Lando, James; Moore, Erin L.; Ganatra, Rahul; Biggerstaff, Matthew; Lam, Eugene; Smith, Erica E.; Storms, Aaron D.; Miller, Jeffrey R.; Dato, Virginia; Nalluswami, Kumar; Nambiar, Atmaram; Silvestri, Sharon A.; Lute, James R.; Ostroff, Stephen; Hancock, Kathy; Branch, Alicia; Trock, Susan C.; Klimov, Alexander; Shu, Bo; Brammer, Lynnette; Epperson, Scott; Finelli, Lyn; Jhung, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    During August 2011, influenza A (H3N2) variant [A(H3N2)v] virus infection developed in a child who attended an agricultural fair in Pennsylvania, USA; the virus resulted from reassortment of a swine influenza virus with influenza A(H1N1)pdm09. We interviewed fair attendees and conducted a retrospective cohort study among members of an agricultural club who attended the fair. Probable and confirmed cases of A(H3N2)v virus infection were defined by serology and genomic sequencing results, respectively. We identified 82 suspected, 4 probable, and 3 confirmed case-patients who attended the fair. Among 127 cohort study members, the risk for suspected case status increased as swine exposure increased from none (4%; referent) to visiting swine exhibits (8%; relative risk 2.1; 95% CI 0.2–53.4) to touching swine (16%; relative risk 4.4; 95% CI 0.8–116.3). Fairs may be venues for zoonotic transmission of viruses with epidemic potential; thus, health officials should investigate respiratory illness outbreaks associated with agricultural events. PMID:23171635

  5. Outbreak of influenza A (H3N2) variant virus infection among attendees of an agricultural fair, Pennsylvania, USA, 2011.

    PubMed

    Wong, Karen K; Greenbaum, Adena; Moll, Maria E; Lando, James; Moore, Erin L; Ganatra, Rahul; Biggerstaff, Matthew; Lam, Eugene; Smith, Erica E; Storms, Aaron D; Miller, Jeffrey R; Dato, Virginia; Nalluswami, Kumar; Nambiar, Atmaram; Silvestri, Sharon A; Lute, James R; Ostroff, Stephen; Hancock, Kathy; Branch, Alicia; Trock, Susan C; Klimov, Alexander; Shu, Bo; Brammer, Lynnette; Epperson, Scott; Finelli, Lyn; Jhung, Michael A

    2012-12-01

    During August 2011, influenza A (H3N2) variant [A(H3N2)v] virus infection developed in a child who attended an agricultural fair in Pennsylvania, USA; the virus resulted from reassortment of a swine influenza virus with influenza A(H1N1)pdm09. We interviewed fair attendees and conducted a retrospective cohort study among members of an agricultural club who attended the fair. Probable and confirmed cases of A(H3N2)v virus infection were defined by serology and genomic sequencing results, respectively. We identified 82 suspected, 4 probable, and 3 confirmed case-patients who attended the fair. Among 127 cohort study members, the risk for suspected case status increased as swine exposure increased from none (4%; referent) to visiting swine exhibits (8%; relative risk 2.1; 95% CI 0.2-53.4) to touching swine (16%; relative risk 4.4; 95% CI 0.8-116.3). Fairs may be venues for zoonotic transmission of viruses with epidemic potential; thus, health officials should investigate respiratory illness outbreaks associated with agricultural events.

  6. Phylodynamics of influenza A(H3N2) in South America, 1999-2012.

    PubMed

    Born, Priscila Silva; Siqueira, Marilda Mendonça; Faria, Nuno Rodrigues; Resende, Paola Cristina; Motta, Fernando Couto; Bello, Gonzalo

    2016-09-01

    The limited influenza A(H3N2) genetic data available from the Southern Hemisphere (particularly from Africa and Latin America), constrains the accurate reconstruction of viral dissemination dynamics within those regions. Our objective was to describe the spatial dissemination dynamics of influenza A(H3N2) within South America. A total of 469 sequences of the HA1 portion of the hemagglutinin gene (HA) from influenza A(H3N2) viruses sampled in temperate and tropical South American countries between 1999 and 2012 were combined with available contemporary sequences from Australia, Hong Kong, United Kingdom and the United States. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that influenza A(H3N2) sequences from South America were highly intermixed with sequences from other geographical regions, although a clear geographic virus population structure was detected globally. We identified 14 clades mostly (≥80%) composed of influenza sequences from South American countries. Bayesian phylogeographic analyses of those clades support a significant role of both temperate and tropical regions in the introduction and dissemination of new influenza A(H3N2) strains within South America and identify an intensive bidirectional viral exchange between different geographical areas. These findings indicate that seasonal influenza A(H3N2) epidemics in South America are seeded by both the continuous importation of viral variants from other geographic regions and the short-term persistence of local lineages. This study also supports a complex metapopulation model of influenza A(H3N2) dissemination in South America, with no preferential direction in viral movement between temperate and tropical regions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Ineffectiveness of the 2014-2015 H3N2 influenza vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Mandelboim, Michal; Glatman-Freedman, Aharona; Drori, Yaron; Sherbany, Hilda; Pando, Rakefet; Sefty, Hanna; Zadka, Hila; Shohat, Tamar; Keller, Nathan; Mendelson, Ella

    2016-01-01

    The seasonal influenza vaccine is currently the most effective preventive modality against influenza infection. Nasopharyngeal samples of vaccinated and non-vaccinated patients presenting with Influenza-like-illness (ILI) were collected from over 20 outpatient clinics located in different geographic parts of Israel and were tested for the presence of influenza viruses (influenza A and influenza B). Here we show, that in the 2014-2015 season, the vaccine that included the A/Texas/50/2012 H3N2 virus was ineffective. Significant numbers of individuals vaccinated with the 2014-2015 vaccine, of all ages, were infected with influenza A (H3N2), manifesting similar symptoms as the non-vaccinated group. We further demonstrate that the Israeli circulating influenza A(H3N2) virus was different than that included in the 2014-2015 northern hemisphere vaccine, and that antibodies elicited by this vaccine were significantly less efficient in neutralizing influenza A(H3N2) infection. PMID:26716420

  8. Amino Acids in Hemagglutinin Antigenic Site B Determine Antigenic and Receptor Binding Differences between A(H3N2)v and Ancestral Seasonal H3N2 Influenza Viruses.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoquan; Ilyushina, Natalia A; Lugovtsev, Vladimir Y; Bovin, Nicolai V; Couzens, Laura K; Gao, Jin; Donnelly, Raymond P; Eichelberger, Maryna C; Wan, Hongquan

    2017-01-15

    Influenza A H3N2 variant [A(H3N2)v] viruses, which have caused human infections in the United States in recent years, originated from human seasonal H3N2 viruses that were introduced into North American swine in the mid-1990s, but they are antigenically distinct from both the ancestral and current circulating H3N2 strains. A reference A(H3N2)v virus, A/Minnesota/11/2010 (MN/10), and a seasonal H3N2 strain, A/Beijing/32/1992 (BJ/92), were chosen to determine the molecular basis for the antigenic difference between A(H3N2)v and the ancestral viruses. Viruses containing wild-type and mutant MN/10 or BJ/92 hemagglutinins (HAs) were constructed and probed for reactivity with ferret antisera against MN/10 and BJ/92 in hemagglutination inhibition assays. Among the amino acids that differ between the MN/10 and BJ/92 HAs, those in antigenic site A had little impact on the antigenic phenotype. Within antigenic site B, mutations at residues 156, 158, 189, and 193 of MN/10 HA to those in BJ/92 switched the MN/10 antigenic phenotype to that of BJ/92. Mutations at residues 156, 157, 158, 189, and 193 of BJ/92 HA to amino acids present in MN/10 were necessary for BJ/92 to become antigenically similar to MN/10. The HA amino acid substitutions responsible for switching the antigenic phenotype also impacted HA binding to sialyl receptors that are usually present in the human respiratory tract. Our study demonstrates that antigenic site B residues play a critical role in determining both the unique antigenic phenotype and receptor specificity of A(H3N2)v viruses, a finding that may facilitate future surveillance and risk assessment of novel influenza viruses.

  9. Amino Acids in Hemagglutinin Antigenic Site B Determine Antigenic and Receptor Binding Differences between A(H3N2)v and Ancestral Seasonal H3N2 Influenza Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoquan; Ilyushina, Natalia A.; Lugovtsev, Vladimir Y.; Bovin, Nicolai V.; Couzens, Laura K.; Gao, Jin

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Influenza A H3N2 variant [A(H3N2)v] viruses, which have caused human infections in the United States in recent years, originated from human seasonal H3N2 viruses that were introduced into North American swine in the mid-1990s, but they are antigenically distinct from both the ancestral and current circulating H3N2 strains. A reference A(H3N2)v virus, A/Minnesota/11/2010 (MN/10), and a seasonal H3N2 strain, A/Beijing/32/1992 (BJ/92), were chosen to determine the molecular basis for the antigenic difference between A(H3N2)v and the ancestral viruses. Viruses containing wild-type and mutant MN/10 or BJ/92 hemagglutinins (HAs) were constructed and probed for reactivity with ferret antisera against MN/10 and BJ/92 in hemagglutination inhibition assays. Among the amino acids that differ between the MN/10 and BJ/92 HAs, those in antigenic site A had little impact on the antigenic phenotype. Within antigenic site B, mutations at residues 156, 158, 189, and 193 of MN/10 HA to those in BJ/92 switched the MN/10 antigenic phenotype to that of BJ/92. Mutations at residues 156, 157, 158, 189, and 193 of BJ/92 HA to amino acids present in MN/10 were necessary for BJ/92 to become antigenically similar to MN/10. The HA amino acid substitutions responsible for switching the antigenic phenotype also impacted HA binding to sialyl receptors that are usually present in the human respiratory tract. Our study demonstrates that antigenic site B residues play a critical role in determining both the unique antigenic phenotype and receptor specificity of A(H3N2)v viruses, a finding that may facilitate future surveillance and risk assessment of novel influenza viruses. IMPORTANCE Influenza A H3N2 variant [A(H3N2)v] viruses have caused hundreds of human infections in multiple states in the United States since 2009. Most cases have been children who had contact with swine in agricultural fairs. These viruses originated from human seasonal H3N2 viruses that were introduced into the U

  10. Transmission of avian influenza virus (H3N2) to dogs.

    PubMed

    Song, Daesub; Kang, Bokyu; Lee, Chulseung; Jung, Kwonil; Ha, Gunwoo; Kang, Dongseok; Park, Seongjun; Park, Bongkyun; Oh, Jinsik

    2008-05-01

    In South Korea, where avian influenza virus subtypes H3N2, H5N1, H6N1, and H9N2 circulate or have been detected, 3 genetically similar canine influenza virus (H3N2) strains of avian origin (A/canine/Korea/01/2007, A/canine/Korea/02/2007, and A/canine/Korea/03/2007) were isolated from dogs exhibiting severe respiratory disease. To determine whether the novel canine influenza virus of avian origin was transmitted among dogs, we experimentally infected beagles with this influenza virus (H3N2) isolate. The beagles shed virus through nasal excretion, seroconverted, and became ill with severe necrotizing tracheobronchitis and bronchioalveolitis with accompanying clinical signs (e.g., high fever). Consistent with histologic observation of lung lesions, large amounts of avian influenza virus binding receptor (SAalpha 2,3-gal) were identified in canine tracheal, bronchial, and bronchiolar epithelial cells, which suggests potential for direct transmission of avian influenza virus (H3N2) from poultry to dogs. Our data provide evidence that dogs may play a role in interspecies transmission and spread of influenza virus.

  11. Efficacy in Pigs of Inactivated and Live Attenuated Influenza Virus Vaccines against Infection and Transmission of an Emerging H3N2 Similar to the 2011-2012 H3N2v

    PubMed Central

    Lager, Kelly M.; Vincent, Amy L.; Brockmeier, Susan L.; Gauger, Phillip C.; Anderson, Tavis K.; Kitikoon, Pravina; Perez, Daniel R.; Kehrli, Marcus E.

    2013-01-01

    Vaccines provide a primary means to limit disease but may not be effective at blocking infection and pathogen transmission. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of commercial inactivated swine influenza A virus (IAV) vaccines and experimental live attenuated influenza virus (LAIV) vaccines against infection with H3N2 virus and subsequent indirect transmission to naive pigs. The H3N2 virus evaluated was similar to the H3N2v detected in humans during 2011-2012, which was associated with swine contact at agricultural fairs. One commercial vaccine provided partial protection measured by reduced nasal shedding; however, indirect contacts became infected, indicating that the reduction in nasal shedding did not prevent aerosol transmission. One LAIV vaccine provided complete protection, and none of the indirect-contact pigs became infected. Clinical disease was not observed in any group, including nonvaccinated animals, a consistent observation in pigs infected with contemporary reassortant H3N2 swine viruses. Serum hemagglutination inhibition antibody titers against the challenge virus were not predictive of efficacy; titers following vaccination with a LAIV that provided sterilizing immunity were below the level considered protective, yet titers in a commercial vaccine group that was not protected were above that level. While vaccination with currently approved commercial inactivated products did not fully prevent transmission, certain vaccines may provide a benefit by limitating shedding, transmission, and zoonotic spillover of antigenically similar H3N2 viruses at agriculture fairs when administered appropriately and used in conjunction with additional control measures. PMID:23824815

  12. Zoonotic Risk, Pathogenesis, and Transmission of Avian-Origin H3N2 Canine Influenza Virus.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hailiang; Blackmon, Sherry; Yang, Guohua; Waters, Kaitlyn; Li, Tao; Tangwangvivat, Ratanaporn; Xu, Yifei; Shyu, Daniel; Wen, Feng; Cooley, Jim; Senter, Lucy; Lin, Xiaoxu; Jarman, Richard; Hanson, Larry; Webby, Richard; Wan, Xiu-Feng

    2017-08-16

    Two subtypes of influenza A virus (IAV), avian-origin canine influenza virus H3N2 (CIV-H3N2) and equine-origin CIV-H3N8, are enzootic in the canine population. Dogs have demonstrated seroconversion to diverse IAVs and naturally occurring reassortants of CIV-H3N2 and the 2009 H1N1 pandemic virus (pdmH1N1) have been isolated. We conducted a thorough phenotypic evaluation of CIV-H3N2 in order to assess its threat to human health. Using ferret-generated antisera we determined that CIV-H3N2 is antigenically distinct from contemporary human H3N2 IAVs, suggesting there may be minimal herd immunity in humans. We assessed the public health risk of CIV-H3N2×pdmH1N1 reassortants by characterizing in vitro genetic compatibility and in vivo pathogenicity and transmissibility. Using a luciferase minigenome assay, we quantified the polymerase activity of all possible 16 ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complexes (PB2, PB1, PA, NP) between CIV-H3N2 and pdmH1N1 identifying some combinations that were more active than either parental virus complex. Using reverse genetics, and fixing the CIV-H3N2 HA, we found that 51 of the 127 possible reassortant viruses were viable and able to be rescued. Nineteen of these reassortant viruses had high in vitro growth phenotypes and 13 of these replicated in mice lungs. A single reassortant with the NP and HA gene segments from CIV-H3N2 was selected for characterization in ferrets. The reassortant efficiently transmitted by contact but not airborne routes and was pathogenic in ferrets. Our results suggest that CIV-H3N2 reassortants may pose a moderate risk to public health and that the canine host should be monitored for emerging IAVs.Importance IAV pandemics are caused by the introduction of novel viruses that are capable of efficient and sustained human transmission into a human population with limited herd immunity. The dog, as a potential "mixing vessel" for avian and mammalian IAVs, represents a human health concern due to their susceptibility to

  13. Influenza A(H3N2) outbreak at Transit Center at Manas, Kyrgyzstan, 2014.

    PubMed

    Parms, Tiffany A; Zorich, Shauna C; Kramer, Karen P

    2015-01-01

    In February 2014, the U.S. Air Force School of Aerospace Medicine Epidemiology Consult Service provided support in response to a moderate outbreak of influenza at the Transit Center at Manas (Kyrgyzstan). A total of 215 individuals presented with influenza-like illness symptoms from 3 December 2013 through 28 February 2014. There were 85 specimens positive for influenza (18 influenza A(H1N1)pdm09, 65 influenza A(H3N2), one influenza A/not subtyped, and one influenza B); six specimens were positive for other respiratory viruses (one human metapneumovirus, two parainfluenza, and three rhinovirus/enterovirus) and eight specimens were negative. Twenty-two of the specimens that were positive for influenza were sequenced and were not remarkably different from the strains seen during routine surveillance for the 2013-2014 season or from specimens collected at other deployed sites.

  14. A novel canine influenza H3N2 virus isolated from cats in an animal shelter.

    PubMed

    Jeoung, Hye-Young; Lim, Seong-In; Shin, Bo-Hye; Lim, Ji-Ae; Song, Jae-Young; Song, Dae-Sub; Kang, Bo-Kyu; Moon, Hyoung-Joon; An, Dong-Jun

    2013-08-30

    The interspecies transmission of avian-origin H3N2 canine influenza virus (CIV) to dogs was first reported in 2007. The present study characterized a novel CIV H3N2 isolated from cats in an animal shelter. A comparative analysis of the deduced amino acid sequences of the A/Canine/Korea/CY009/2010(H3N2) (CY009) and A/Feline/Korea/FY028/2010 (H3N2) (FY028) strains isolated from dogs and cats, respectively, in the animal shelter identified point mutations in 18 amino acid positions within eight viral genes. Interestingly, CY009 and FY028 replicated well in specific pathogen-free embryonated chicken eggs and in mice, respectively. Mice infected with the FY028 strain exhibited significant over expression of IL-10, TNF-α, and IFN-γ (p<0.001) at 3 days postinfection. Thus, an emergency monitoring system should be developed to identify influenza mutations that occur during interspecies transmission in companion animals and for continuous public health surveillance. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Human infections with influenza A(H3N2) variant virus in the United States, 2011-2012

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    BACKGROUND. During August 2011-April 2012, 13 human infections with influenza A(H3N2) variant (H3N2v) virus were identified in the United States; 8 occurred in the prior 2 years. This virus differs from previous variant influenza viruses in that it contains the matrix (M) gene from the Influenza A(H...

  16. Pathogenicity and Transmissibility of Novel Reassortant H3N2 Influenza Viruses with 2009 Pandemic H1N1 Genes in Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jingjiao; Shen, Huigang; Liu, Qinfang; Bawa, Bhupinder; Qi, Wenbao; Duff, Michael; Lang, Yuekun; Lee, Jinhwa; Yu, Hai; Bai, Jianfa; Tong, Guangzhi; Hesse, Richard A.; Richt, Jürgen A.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT At least 10 different genotypes of novel reassortant H3N2 influenza viruses with 2009 pandemic H1N1 [A(H1N1)pdm09] gene(s) have been identified in U.S. pigs, including the H3N2 variant with a single A(H1N1)pdm09 M gene, which has infected more than 300 people. To date, only three genotypes of these viruses have been evaluated in animal models, and the pathogenicity and transmissibility of the other seven genotype viruses remain unknown. Here, we show that three H3N2 reassortant viruses that contain 3 (NP, M, and NS) or 5 (PA, PB2, NP, M, and NS) genes from A(H1N1)pdm09 were pathogenic in pigs, similar to the endemic H3N2 swine virus. However, the reassortant H3N2 virus with 3 A(H1N1)pdm09 genes and a recent human influenza virus N2 gene was transmitted most efficiently among pigs, whereas the reassortant H3N2 virus with 5 A(H1N1)pdm09 genes was transmitted less efficiently than the endemic H3N2 virus. Interestingly, the polymerase complex of reassortant H3N2 virus with 5 A(H1N1)pdm09 genes showed significantly higher polymerase activity than those of endemic and reassortant H3N2 viruses with 3 A(H1N1)pdm09 genes. Further studies showed that an avian-like glycine at position 228 at the hemagglutinin (HA) receptor binding site is responsible for inefficient transmission of the reassortant H3N2 virus with 5 A(H1N1)pdm09 genes. Taken together, our results provide insights into the pathogenicity and transmissibility of novel reassortant H3N2 viruses in pigs and suggest that a mammalian-like serine at position 228 in the HA is critical for the transmissibility of these reassortant H3N2 viruses. IMPORTANCE Swine influenza is a highly contagious zoonotic disease that threatens animal and public health. Introduction of 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus [A(H1N1)pdm09] into swine herds has resulted in novel reassortant influenza viruses in swine, including H3N2 and H1N2 variants that have caused human infections in the United States. We showed that reassortant H3N2 influenza

  17. Detection of H3N2 canine influenza virus using a Quartz Crystal Microbalance.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong Kwan; Lim, Seong-In; Cho, Yoon-Young; Choi, Sarah; Song, Jae-Young; An, Dong-Jun

    2014-11-01

    Label-free technology-based Quartz Crystal Microbalance (QCM) is an emerging tool in biological research. In this study, QCM was applied successfully for the rapid diagnosis of H3N2 canine influenza virus (CIV) infection. ProLinker™ B, a calixcrown derivative, enables antibodies to be attached to a gold-coated quartz surface and positioned in a regular pattern with the correct orientation. The ProLinker-coated quartz-based assay detected H3N2 CIV at lower concentrations (2(2) HA unit) than a commercial immunochromatography Ag kit (2(3) HA unit). Three independent experiments in which H3N2 CIV-positive reference samples were applied to an anti-CIV nucleoprotein (NP) monoclonal antibody immobilized on a quartz surface yielded standard deviations (SD) of ≤5%, indicating high reproducibility. In addition, the QCM assay with a cut-off value (-140 Hz) showed 97.1% (34/35) sensitivity and 94.7% (36/38) specificity in testing 73 field saliva samples, respectively. Thus, the QCM assay described herein will be a valuable tool for the rapid diagnosis of H3N2 CIV infection with high sensitivity and specificity, and should overcome several of the disadvantages and limitations inherent in the commercial immunochromatography Ag kit.

  18. Phylogeography of Influenza A(H3N2) Virus in Peru, 2010-2012.

    PubMed

    Pollett, Simon; Nelson, Martha I; Kasper, Matthew; Tinoco, Yeny; Simons, Mark; Romero, Candice; Silva, Marita; Lin, Xudong; Halpin, Rebecca A; Fedorova, Nadia; Stockwell, Timothy B; Wentworth, David; Holmes, Edward C; Bausch, Daniel G

    2015-08-01

    It remains unclear whether lineages of influenza A(H3N2) virus can persist in the tropics and seed temperate areas. We used viral gene sequence data sampled from Peru to test this source-sink model for a Latin American country. Viruses were obtained during 2010-2012 from influenza surveillance cohorts in Cusco, Tumbes, Puerto Maldonado, and Lima. Specimens positive for influenza A(H3N2) virus were randomly selected and underwent hemagglutinin sequencing and phylogeographic analyses. Analysis of 389 hemagglutinin sequences from Peru and 2,192 global sequences demonstrated interseasonal extinction of Peruvian lineages. Extensive mixing occurred with global clades, but some spatial structure was observed at all sites; this structure was weakest in Lima and Puerto Maldonado, indicating that these locations may experience greater viral traffic. The broad diversity and co-circulation of many simultaneous lineages of H3N2 virus in Peru suggests that this country should not be overlooked as a potential source for novel pandemic strains.

  19. Phylogeography of Influenza A(H3N2) Virus in Peru, 2010–2012

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Martha I.; Kasper, Matthew; Tinoco, Yeny; Simons, Mark; Romero, Candice; Silva, Marita; Lin, Xudong; Halpin, Rebecca A.; Fedorova, Nadia; Stockwell, Timothy B.; Wentworth, David; Holmes, Edward C.; Bausch, Daniel G.

    2015-01-01

    It remains unclear whether lineages of influenza A(H3N2) virus can persist in the tropics and seed temperate areas. We used viral gene sequence data sampled from Peru to test this source–sink model for a Latin American country. Viruses were obtained during 2010–2012 from influenza surveillance cohorts in Cusco, Tumbes, Puerto Maldonado, and Lima. Specimens positive for influenza A(H3N2) virus were randomly selected and underwent hemagglutinin sequencing and phylogeographic analyses. Analysis of 389 hemagglutinin sequences from Peru and 2,192 global sequences demonstrated interseasonal extinction of Peruvian lineages. Extensive mixing occurred with global clades, but some spatial structure was observed at all sites; this structure was weakest in Lima and Puerto Maldonado, indicating that these locations may experience greater viral traffic. The broad diversity and co-circulation of many simultaneous lineages of H3N2 virus in Peru suggests that this country should not be overlooked as a potential source for novel pandemic strains. PMID:26196599

  20. Explaining the geographical origins of seasonal influenza A (H3N2)

    PubMed Central

    Bedford, Trevor; Cobey, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Most antigenically novel and evolutionarily successful strains of seasonal influenza A (H3N2) originate in East, South and Southeast Asia. To understand this pattern, we simulated the ecological and evolutionary dynamics of influenza in a host metapopulation representing the temperate north, tropics and temperate south. Although seasonality and air traffic are frequently used to explain global migratory patterns of influenza, we find that other factors may have a comparable or greater impact. Notably, a region's basic reproductive number (R0) strongly affects the antigenic evolution of its viral population and the probability that its strains will spread and fix globally: a 17–28% higher R0 in one region can explain the observed patterns. Seasonality, in contrast, increases the probability that a tropical (less seasonal) population will export evolutionarily successful strains but alone does not predict that these strains will be antigenically advanced. The relative sizes of different host populations, their birth and death rates, and the region in which H3N2 first appears affect influenza's phylogeography in different but relatively minor ways. These results suggest general principles that dictate the spatial dynamics of antigenically evolving pathogens and offer predictions for how changes in human ecology might affect influenza evolution. PMID:27629034

  1. Selecting vaccine strains for H3N2 human influenza A virus.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yoshiyuki

    2015-06-01

    H3N2 human influenza A virus causes epidemics of influenza mainly in the winter season in temperate regions. Since the antigenicity of this virus evolves rapidly, several attempts have been made to predict the major amino acid sequence of hemagglutinin 1 (HA1) in the target season of vaccination. However, the usefulness of predicted sequence was unclear because its relationship to the antigenicity was unknown. Here the antigenic model for estimating the degree of antigenic difference (antigenic distance) between amino acid sequences of HA1 was integrated into the process of selecting vaccine strains for H3N2 human influenza A virus. When the effectiveness of a potential vaccine strain for a target season was evaluated retrospectively using the average antigenic distance between the strain and the epidemic viruses sampled in the target season, the most effective vaccine strain was identified mostly in the season one year before the target season (pre-target season). Effectiveness of actual vaccines appeared to be lower than that of the strains randomly chosen in the pre-target season on average. It was recommended to replace the vaccine strain for every target season with the strain having the smallest average antigenic distance to the others in the pre-target season. The procedure of selecting vaccine strains for future epidemic seasons described in the present study was implemented in the influenza virus forecasting system (INFLUCAST) (http://www.nsc.nagoya-cu.ac.jp/~yossuzuk/influcast.html).

  2. Predicting Fixation Tendencies of the H3N2 Influenza Virus by Free Energy Calculation

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Keyao; Deem, Michael W.

    2011-01-01

    Influenza virus evolves to escape from immune system antibodies that bind to it. We used free energy calculations with Einstein crystals as reference states to calculate the difference of antibody binding free energy (ΔΔG) induced by amino acid substitution at each position in epitope B of the H3N2 influenza hemagglutinin, the key target for antibody. A substitution with positive ΔΔG value decreases the antibody binding constant. On average an uncharged to charged amino acid substitution generates the highest ΔΔG values. Also on average, substitutions between small amino acids generate ΔΔG values near to zero. The 21 sites in epitope B have varying expected free energy differences for a random substitution. Historical amino acid substitutions in epitope B for the A/Aichi/2/1968 strain of influenza A show that most fixed and temporarily circulating substitutions generate positive ΔΔG values. We propose that the observed pattern of H3N2 virus evolution is affected by the free energy landscape, the mapping from the free energy landscape to virus fitness landscape, and random genetic drift of the virus. Monte Carlo simulations of virus evolution are presented to support this view. PMID:21691431

  3. Investigation of an Outbreak of Variant Influenza A(H3N2) Virus Infection Associated With an Agricultural Fair-Ohio, August 2012.

    PubMed

    Greenbaum, Adena; Quinn, Celia; Bailer, Jennifer; Su, Su; Havers, Fiona; Durand, Lizette O; Jiang, Victoria; Page, Shannon; Budd, Jeremy; Shaw, Michael; Biggerstaff, Matthew; de Fijter, Sietske; Smith, Kathleen; Reed, Carrie; Epperson, Scott; Brammer, Lynnette; Feltz, Dave; Sohner, Kevin; Ford, Jared; Jain, Seema; Gargiullo, Paul; Weiss, Edward; Burg, Pat; DiOrio, Mary; Fowler, Brian; Finelli, Lyn; Jhung, Michael A

    2015-11-15

    In 2012, one third of cases in a multistate outbreak of variant influenza A(H3N2) virus ([H3N2]v) infection occurred in Ohio. We conducted an investigation of (H3N2)v cases associated with agricultural Fair A in Ohio. We surveyed Fair A swine exhibitors and their household members. Confirmed cases had influenza-like illness (ILI) and a positive laboratory test for (H3N2)v, and probable cases had ILI. We calculated attack rates. We determined risk factors for infection, using multivariable log-binomial regression. We identified 20 confirmed and 94 probable cases associated with Fair A. Among 114 cases, the median age was 10 years, there were no hospitalizations or deaths, and 82% had swine exposure. In the exhibitor household cohort of 359 persons (83 households), we identified 6 confirmed cases (2%) and 40 probable cases (11%). An age of <10 years was a significant risk factor (P < .01) for illness. One instance of likely human-to-human transmission was identified. In this (H3N2)v outbreak, no evidence of sustained human-to-human (H3N2)v transmission was found. Our risk factor analysis contributed to the development of the recommendation that people at increased risk of influenza-associated complications, including children aged <5 years, avoid swine barns at fairs during the 2012 fair season. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America 2015. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  4. Global Migration Dynamics Underlie Evolution and Persistence of Human Influenza A (H3N2)

    PubMed Central

    Bedford, Trevor; Cobey, Sarah; Beerli, Peter; Pascual, Mercedes

    2010-01-01

    The global migration patterns of influenza viruses have profound implications for the evolutionary and epidemiological dynamics of the disease. We developed a novel approach to reconstruct the genetic history of human influenza A (H3N2) collected worldwide over 1998 to 2009 and used it to infer the global network of influenza transmission. Consistent with previous models, we find that China and Southeast Asia lie at the center of this global network. However, we also find that strains of influenza circulate outside of Asia for multiple seasons, persisting through dynamic migration between northern and southern regions. The USA acts as the primary hub of temperate transmission and, together with China and Southeast Asia, forms the trunk of influenza's evolutionary tree. These findings suggest that antiviral use outside of China and Southeast Asia may lead to the evolution of long-term local and potentially global antiviral resistance. Our results might also aid the design of surveillance efforts and of vaccines better tailored to different geographic regions. PMID:20523898

  5. Molecular epidemiology of influenza A/H3N2 viruses circulating in Mexico from 2003 to 2012.

    PubMed

    Escalera-Zamudio, Marina; Nelson, Martha I; Cobián Güemes, Ana Georgina; López-Martínez, Irma; Cruz-Ortiz, Natividad; Iguala-Vidales, Miguel; García, Elvia Rodríguez; Barrera-Badillo, Gisela; Díaz-Quiñonez, Jose Alberto; López, Susana; Arias, Carlos F; Isa, Pavel

    2014-01-01

    In this work, nineteen influenza A/H3N2 viruses isolated in Mexico between 2003 and 2012 were studied. Our findings show that different human A/H3N2 viral lineages co-circulate within a same season and can also persist locally in between different influenza seasons, increasing the chance for genetic reassortment events. A novel minor cluster was also identified, named here as Korea, that circulated worldwide during 2003. Frequently, phylogenetic characterization did not correlate with the determined antigenic identity, supporting the need for the use of molecular evolutionary tools additionally to antigenic data for the surveillance and characterization of viral diversity during each flu season. This work represents the first long-term molecular epidemiology study of influenza A/H3N2 viruses in Mexico based on the complete genomic sequences and contributes to the monitoring of evolutionary trends of A/H3N2 influenza viruses within North and Central America.

  6. Recent H3N2 Influenza Virus Clinical Isolates Rapidly Acquire Hemagglutinin or Neuraminidase Mutations When Propagated for Antigenic Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Chambers, Benjamin S.; Li, Yang; Hodinka, Richard L.

    2014-01-01

    Prior to serological testing, influenza viruses are typically propagated in eggs or cell culture. Recent human H3N2 strains bind to cells with low avidity. Here, we isolated nine primary H3N2 viral isolates from respiratory secretions of children. Upon propagation in vitro, five of these isolates acquired hemagglutinin or neuraminidase mutations that increased virus binding to cell surfaces. These mutations can potentially confound serological assays commonly used to identify antigenically novel influenza viruses. PMID:24991002

  7. Cellular and Humoral Cross-Immunity against Two H3N2v Influenza Strains in Presumably Unexposed Healthy and HIV-Infected Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Agrati, Chiara; Castilletti, Concetta; Cimini, Eleonora; Lapa, Daniele; Quartu, Serena; Caglioti, Claudia; Lanini, Simone; Cattoli, Giovanni; Martini, Federico; Ippolito, Giuseppe; Capobianchi, Maria R.

    2014-01-01

    Human cases of infection due to a novel swine-origin variant of influenza A virus subtype H3N2 (H3N2v) have recently been identified in the United States. Pre-existing humoral and cellular immunity has been recognized as one of the key factors in limiting the infection burden of an emerging influenza virus strain, contributing to restrict its circulation and to mitigate clinical presentation. Aim of this study was to assess humoral and cell-mediated cross immune responses to H3N2v in immuno-competent (healthy donors, n = 45) and immuno-compromised hosts (HIV-infected subjects, n = 46) never exposed to H3N2v influenza strain. Humoral response against i) H3N2v (A/H3N2/Ind/08/11), ii) animal vaccine H3N2 strain (A/H3N2/Min/11/10), and iii) pandemic H1N1 virus (A/H1N1/Cal/07/09) was analysed by hemagglutination inhibition assay; cell-mediated response against the same influenza strains was analysed by ELISpot assay. A large proportion of healthy and HIV subjects displayed cross-reacting humoral and cellular immune responses against two H3N2v strains, suggesting the presence of B- and T-cell clones able to recognize epitopes from emerging viral strains in both groups. Specifically, humoral response was lower in HIV subjects than in HD, and a specific age-related pattern of antibody response against different influenza strains was observed both in HD and in HIV. Cellular immune response was similar between HD and HIV groups and no relationship with age was reported. Finally, no correlation between humoral and cellular immune response was observed. Overall, a high prevalence of HD and HIV patients showing cross reactive immunity against two H3N2v strains was observed, with a slightly lower proportion in HIV persons. Other studies focused on HIV subjects at different stages of diseases are needed in order to define how cross immunity can be affected by advanced immunosuppression. PMID:25162670

  8. Molecular analyses of H3N2 canine influenza viruses isolated from Korea during 2013-2014.

    PubMed

    Lee, EunJung; Kim, Eun-Ju; Kim, Bo-Hye; Song, Jae-Young; Cho, In-Soo; Shin, Yeun-Kyung

    2016-04-01

    Canine influenza A virus (CIV) causes a respiratory disease among dog populations and is prevalent in North America and Asia. Recently, Asian H3N2 CIV infection has been of particular concern, with recent reports related to reassortants with pandemic 2009 strains, direct transmission from a human H3N2, a possibility of H3N2 CIV transmission to other mammals, and even the first outbreak of H3N2 CIVs in North America in April 2015. However, despite these global concerns, our understanding of how influenza A virus transmission impacts the overall populations of H3N2 CIVs remains incomplete. Hence, we investigated the evolutionary history of the most recent two Korean CIV isolates, A/canine/Korea/BD-1/2013 and A/canine/Korea/DG1/2014, along with 57 worldwide CIVs, using comprehensive molecular analyses based on genomic genotyping. This study presents that the new Korean CIV isolates are closely related to the predominantly circulating H3N2 CIVs with genotypes K, G, E, 3B, F, 2D, F, and 1E, carrying several mutations in antigenic and host determinant sites. Also, our findings show that the genome-wide genetic variations within the H3N2 CIVs are low; however, two antigenic protein (HA and NA) analysis demonstrates genetic diversification of the H3N2 CIVs, which evolves independently between Korea and China.

  9. Combining magnetic nanoparticle with biotinylated nanobodies for rapid and sensitive detection of influenza H3N2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Min; Hu, Yonghong; Li, Guirong; Ou, Weijun; Mao, Panyong; Xin, Shaojie; Wan, Yakun

    2014-09-01

    Our objective is to develop a rapid and sensitive assay based on magnetic beads to detect the concentration of influenza H3N2. The possibility of using variable domain heavy-chain antibodies (nanobody) as diagnostic tools for influenza H3N2 was investigated. A healthy camel was immunized with inactivated influenza H3N2. A nanobody library of 8 × 108 clones was constructed and phage displayed. After three successive biopanning steps, H3N2-specific nanobodies were successfully isolated, expressed in Escherichia coli, and purified. Sequence analysis of the nanobodies revealed that we possessed four classes of nanobodies against H3N2. Two nanobodies were further used to prepare our rapid diagnostic kit. Biotinylated nanobody was effectively immobilized onto the surface of streptavidin magnetic beads. The modified magnetic beads with nanobody capture specifically influenza H3N2 and can still be recognized by nanobodies conjugated to horseradish peroxidase (HRP) conjugates. Under optimized conditions, the present immunoassay exhibited a relatively high sensitive detection with a limit of 50 ng/mL. In conclusion, by combining magnetic beads with specific nanobodies, this assay provides a promising influenza detection assay to develop a potential rapid, sensitive, and low-cost diagnostic tool to screen for influenza infections.

  10. Swine Influenza (Swine Flu) in Pigs

    MedlinePlus

    ... of illness at all. How common is swine flu among pigs? H1N1 and H3N2 swine flu viruses are endemic among pig populations in the ... and winter) , but can occur year round. While H1N1 swine viruses have been ... least 1930, H3N2 influenza viruses did not begin circulating among pigs in ...

  11. Conserved Neutralizing Epitope at Globular Head of Hemagglutinin in H3N2 Influenza Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Iba, Yoshitaka; Fujii, Yoshifumi; Ohshima, Nobuko; Sumida, Tomomi; Kubota-Koketsu, Ritsuko; Ikeda, Mariko; Wakiyama, Motoaki; Shirouzu, Mikako; Okada, Jun; Okuno, Yoshinobu; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Neutralizing antibodies that target the hemagglutinin of influenza virus either inhibit binding of hemagglutinin to cellular receptors or prevent the low-pH-induced conformational change in hemagglutinin required for membrane fusion. In general, the former type of antibody binds to the globular head formed by HA1 and has narrow strain specificity, while the latter type binds to the stem mainly formed by HA2 and has broad strain specificity. In the present study, we analyzed the epitope and function of a broadly neutralizing human antibody against H3N2 viruses, F005-126. The crystal structure of F005-126 Fab in complex with hemagglutinin revealed that the antibody binds to the globular head, spans a cleft formed by two hemagglutinin monomers in a hemagglutinin trimer, and cross-links them. It recognizes two peptide portions (sites L and R) and a glycan linked to asparagine at residue 285 using three complementarity-determining regions and framework 3 in the heavy chain. Binding of the antibody to sites L (residues 171 to 173, 239, and 240) and R (residues 91, 92, 270 to 273, 284, and 285) is mediated mainly by van der Waals contacts with the main chains of the peptides in these sites and secondarily by hydrogen bonds with a few side chains of conserved sequences in HA1. Furthermore, the glycan recognized by F005-126 is conserved among H3N2 viruses. F005-126 has the ability to prevent low-pH-induced conformational changes in hemagglutinin. The newly identified conserved epitope, including the glycan, should be immunogenic in humans and may induce production of broadly neutralizing antibodies against H3 viruses. IMPORTANCE Antibodies play an important role in protection against influenza virus, and hemagglutinin is the major target for virus neutralizing antibodies. It has long been believed that all effective neutralizing antibodies bind to the surrounding regions of the sialic acid-binding pocket and inhibit the binding of hemagglutinin to the cellular

  12. Avian-origin H3N2 canine influenza virus circulating in farmed dogs in Guangdong, China.

    PubMed

    Su, Shuo; Li, Hua-Tao; Zhao, Fu-Rong; Chen, Ji-Dang; Xie, Jie-Xiong; Chen, Zhong-Ming; Huang, Zhen; Hu, Yi-Ming; Zhang, Min-Ze; Tan, Li-Kai; Zhang, Gui-Hong; Li, Shou-Jun

    2013-03-01

    Since 2006, more and more cases of the infectious H3N2 canine influenza virus (CIV) in pet dogs have been reported in southern China. However, little is known about the prevalence situation of H3N2 CIV infections in farmed dogs in China. This is the first systematic epidemiological surveillance of CIV in different dog populations in southern China. Two virus strains A/Canine/Guangdong/1/2011(H3N2) and A/canine/Guangdong/5/2011(H3N2) were isolated from canine nasal swabs collected at one dog farm in Guangzhou and the other farm in Shenzhen. Sequence and phylogenetic analysis of eight gene segments of these viruses revealed that they were most similar to the newly isolated canine H3N2 viruses in dogs and cats from Korea and China, which originated from avian strain. This indicates that H3N2 CIV may be a common pathogen for pet and farmed dog populations in southern China at present. Serological surveillance has shown that the infection rate of this avian-origin canine influenza in farmed dogs and in pet dogs were 12.22% and 5.3%, respectively; as determined by the ELISA. The data also suggested that transmission occurred, most probably by close contact, between H3N2 CIV infected dogs in different dog populations in recently years. As H3N2 outbreaks among dogs continue in the Guangdong province (located very close to Hong Kong), the areas where is densely populated and with frequent animal trade, there is a continued risk for pets H3N2 CIV infections and for mutations or genetic reassortment leading to new virus strains with increased transmissibility among dogs. Further in-depth study is required as the H3N2 CIV has been established in different dog populations and posed potential threat to public health. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Avian-origin H3N2 canine influenza virus circulating in farmed dogs in Guangdong, China.

    PubMed

    Su, Shuo; Chen, Ye; Zhao, Fu-Rong; Chen, Ji-Dang; Xie, Jie-Xiong; Chen, Zhong-Ming; Huang, Zhen; Hu, Yi-Ming; Zhang, Min-Ze; Tan, Li-Kai; Zhang, Gui-Hong; Li, Shou-Jun

    2013-10-01

    Since 2006, more and more cases of the infectious H3N2 canine influenza virus (CIV) in pet dogs have been reported in Southern China. However, little is known about the prevalence situation of H3N2 CIV infections in farmed dogs in China. This is the first systematic epidemiological surveillance of CIV in different dog populations in Southern China. Two virus strains A/Canine/Guangdong/1/2011(H3N2) and A/canine/Guangdong/5/2011(H3N2) were isolated from canine nasal swabs collected at one dog farm in Guangzhou and the other farm in Shenzhen. Sequence and phylogenetic analysis of eight gene segments of these viruses revealed that they were most similar to the newly isolated canine H3N2 viruses in dogs and cats from Korea and China, which originated from avian strain. This indicates that H3N2 CIV may be a common pathogen for pet and farmed dog populations in Southern China at present. Serological surveillance has shown that the infection rate of this avian-origin canine influenza in farmed dogs and in pet dogs were 12.22% and 5.3%, respectively; as determined by the ELISA. The data also suggested that transmission occurred, most probably by close contact, between H3N2 CIV infected dogs in different dog populations in recently years. As H3N2 outbreaks among dogs continue in the Guangdong Province (located very close to Hong Kong), the areas where is densely populated and with frequent animal trade, there is a continued risk for pet H3N2 CIV infections and for mutations or genetic reassortment leading to new virus strains with increased transmissibility among dogs. Further in-depth study is required as the H3N2 CIV has been established in different dog populations and posed potential threat to public health.

  14. Development of DIVA (differentiation of infected from vaccinated animals) vaccines utilizing heterologous NA and NS1 protein strategies for the control of triple reassortant H3N2 influenza in turkeys

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Since 2003, triple reassortant (TR) swine H3N2 influenza viruses containing gene segments from human, avian and swine origins have been detected in the U.S. turkey populations. The initial outbreak that occurred even involved birds that were vaccinated with the currently available H3 swine- and avia...

  15. Vaccination has minimal impact on the intrahost diversity of H3N2 influenza viruses

    PubMed Central

    Truscon, Rachel; Johnson, Emileigh; Monto, Arnold S.

    2017-01-01

    While influenza virus diversity and antigenic drift have been well characterized on a global scale, the factors that influence the virus’ rapid evolution within and between human hosts are less clear. Given the modest effectiveness of seasonal vaccination, vaccine-induced antibody responses could serve as a potent selective pressure for novel influenza variants at the individual or community level. We used next generation sequencing of patient-derived viruses from a randomized, placebo-controlled trial of vaccine efficacy to characterize the diversity of influenza A virus and to define the impact of vaccine-induced immunity on within-host populations. Importantly, this study design allowed us to isolate the impact of vaccination while still studying natural infection. We used pre-season hemagglutination inhibition and neuraminidase inhibition titers to quantify vaccine-induced immunity directly and to assess its impact on intrahost populations. We identified 166 cases of H3N2 influenza over 3 seasons and 5119 person-years. We obtained whole genome sequence data for 119 samples and used a stringent and empirically validated analysis pipeline to identify intrahost single nucleotide variants at ≥1% frequency. Phylogenetic analysis of consensus hemagglutinin and neuraminidase sequences showed no stratification by pre-season HAI and NAI titer, respectively. In our study population, we found that the vast majority of intrahost single nucleotide variants were rare and that very few were found in more than one individual. Most samples had fewer than 15 single nucleotide variants across the entire genome, and the level of diversity did not significantly vary with day of sampling, vaccination status, or pre-season antibody titer. Contrary to what has been suggested in experimental systems, our data indicate that seasonal influenza vaccination has little impact on intrahost diversity in natural infection and that vaccine-induced immunity may be only a minor contributor to

  16. Glycosylation changes in the globular head of H3N2 influenza hemagglutinin modulate receptor binding without affecting virus virulence

    PubMed Central

    Alymova, Irina V.; York, Ian A.; Air, Gillian M.; Cipollo, John F.; Gulati, Shelly; Baranovich, Tatiana; Kumar, Amrita; Zeng, Hui; Gansebom, Shane; McCullers, Jonathan A.

    2016-01-01

    Since the emergence of human H3N2 influenza A viruses in the pandemic of 1968, these viruses have become established as strains of moderate severity. A decline in virulence has been accompanied by glycan accumulation on the hemagglutinin globular head, and hemagglutinin receptor binding has changed from recognition of a broad spectrum of glycan receptors to a narrower spectrum. The relationship between increased glycosylation, binding changes, and reduction in H3N2 virulence is not clear. We evaluated the effect of hemagglutinin glycosylation on receptor binding and virulence of engineered H3N2 viruses. We demonstrate that low-binding virus is as virulent as higher binding counterparts, suggesting that H3N2 infection does not require either recognition of a wide variety of, or high avidity binding to, receptors. Among the few glycans recognized with low-binding virus, there were two structures that were bound by the vast majority of H3N2 viruses isolated between 1968 and 2012. We suggest that these two structures support physiologically relevant binding of H3N2 hemagglutinin and that this physiologically relevant binding has not changed since the 1968 pandemic. Therefore binding changes did not contribute to reduced severity of seasonal H3N2 viruses. This work will help direct the search for factors enhancing influenza virulence. PMID:27796371

  17. H3N2v and You

    MedlinePlus

    ... Viruses that normally circulate in pigs are “ swine influenza viruses .” When these viruses infect humans, they are termed “ variant ” viruses. In 2011, a specific H3N2 virus was detected with genes from avian, swine and human viruses and the 2009 H1N1 pandemic virus M gene. The virus was circulating ...

  18. Evolution of H3N2 Influenza Virus in a Guinea Pig Model

    PubMed Central

    Long, Jinxue; Bushnell, Ruth V.; Tobin, John K.; Pan, Keyao; Deem, Michael W.; Nara, Peter L.; Tobin, Gregory J.

    2011-01-01

    Studies of influenza virus evolution under controlled experimental conditions can provide a better understanding of the consequences of evolutionary processes with and without immunological pressure. Characterization of evolved strains assists in the development of predictive algorithms for both the selection of subtypes represented in the seasonal influenza vaccine and the design of novel immune refocused vaccines. To obtain data on the evolution of influenza in a controlled setting, naïve and immunized Guinea pigs were infected with influenza A/Wyoming/2003 (H3N2). Virus progeny from nasal wash samples were assessed for variation in the dominant and other epitopes by sequencing the hemagglutinin (HA) gene to quantify evolutionary changes. Viral RNA from the nasal washes from infection of naïve and immune animals contained 6% and 24.5% HA variant sequences, respectively. Analysis of mutations relative to antigenic epitopes indicated that adaptive immunity played a key role in virus evolution. HA mutations in immunized animals were associated with loss of glycosylation and changes in charge and hydrophobicity in and near residues within known epitopes. Four regions of HA-1 (75–85, 125–135, 165–170, 225–230) contained residues of highest variability. These sites are adjacent to or within known epitopes and appear to play an important role in antigenic variation. Recognition of the role of these sites during evolution will lead to a better understanding of the nature of evolution which help in the prediction of future strains for selection of seasonal vaccines and the design of novel vaccines intended to stimulated broadened cross-reactive protection to conserved sites outside of dominant epitopes. PMID:21799726

  19. H3N2v and other influenza epidemic risk based on age-specific estimates of sero-protection and contact network interactions.

    PubMed

    Skowronski, Danuta M; Moser, Flavia S; Janjua, Naveed Z; Davoudi, Bahman; English, Krista M; Purych, Dale; Petric, Martin; Pourbohloul, Babak

    2013-01-01

    Cases of a novel swine-origin influenza A(H3N2) variant (H3N2v) have recently been identified in the US, primarily among children. We estimated potential epidemic attack rates (ARs) based on age-specific estimates of sero-susceptibility and social interactions. A contact network model previously established for the Greater Vancouver Area (GVA), Canada was used to estimate average epidemic (infection) ARs for the emerging H3N2v and comparator viruses (H1N1pdm09 and an extinguished H3N2 seasonal strain) based on typical influenza characteristics, basic reproduction number (R(0)), and effective contacts taking into account age-specific sero-protection rates (SPRs). SPRs were assessed in sera collected from the GVA in 2009 or earlier (pre-H1N1pdm09) and fall 2010 (post-H1N1pdm09, seasonal A/Brisbane/10/2007(H3N2), and H3N2v) by hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay. SPR was assigned per convention based on proportion with HI antibody titre ≥40 (SPR40). Recognizing that the HI titre ≥40 was established as the 50%sero-protective threshold we also explored for ½SPR40, SPR80 and a blended gradient defined as: ¼SPR20, ½SPR40, ¾SPR80, SPR160. Base case analysis assumed R(0) = 1.40, but we also explored R(0) as high as 1.80. With R(0) = 1.40 and SPR40, simulated ARs were well aligned with field observations for H1N1pdm09 incidence (AR: 32%), sporadic detections without a third epidemic wave post-H1N1pdm09 (negligible AR<0.1%) as well as A/Brisbane/10/2007(H3N2) seasonal strain extinction and antigenic drift replacement (negligible AR<0.1%). Simulated AR for the novel swine-origin H3N2v was 6%, highest in children 6-11years (16%). However, with modification to SPR thresholds per above, H3N2v AR ≥20% became possible. At SPR40, H3N2v AR ≥10%, ≥15% or ≥30%, occur if R(0)≥1.48, ≥1.56 or ≥1.86, respectively. Based on conventional assumptions, the novel swine-origin H3N2v does not currently pose a substantial pandemic threat. If H3N2v epidemics do

  20. Surveillance of human influenza A(H3N2) virus from 1999 to 2009 in southern Italy.

    PubMed

    DE Donno, A; Idolo, A; Quattrocchi, M; Zizza, A; Gabutti, G; Romano, A; Grima, P; Donatelli, I; Guido, M

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the presence of influenza virus co-infections in humans and changes in the genetic variability of A(H3N2) virus strains in southern Italy from 1999 to 2009. A partial sequence of the haemagglutinin (HA) gene by human influenza H3N2 strains identified in oropharyngeal swabs from patients with influenza-like illness was analysed by DNA sequencing and a phylogenetic analysis was performed. During the seasons 1999-2000, 2002-2003, 2004-2005 and 2008-2009, the influenza viruses circulating belonged to subtype H3N2. However, A(H1N1) subtype virus and B type were respectively prevalent during the 2000-2001, 2006-2007, 2007-2008 and 2001-2002, 2003-2004, 2005-2006 seasons. The HA sequences appeared to be closely related to the sequence of the influenza A vaccine strain. Only the 2002-2003 season was characterized by co-circulation of two viral lineages: A/New York/55/01(H3N2)-like virus of the previous season and A/Fujian/411/02(H3N2)-like virus, a new H3 variant. In this study, over the decade analysed, no significant change was seen in the sequences of the HA gene of H3 viruses isolated.

  1. Influenza virus A(H3N2) strain isolated from cerebrospinal fluid from a patient presenting myelopathy post infectious.

    PubMed

    Paiva, T M; Theotonio, G; Paulino, R S; Benega, M A; Silva, D B B; Borborema, S E T; Ikeda, T I; Kisielius, J J; Ueda, M; Oliveira, M I; Santos, C L S

    2013-09-01

    Neurological involvement during influenza infection has been described during epidemics and is often consistent with serious sequelae or death. To investigate the etiologic agent involved in myelopathy post influenza-like syndrome. This investigation focuses on virus isolation from the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) collected from a 19-year-old male student presenting with clinical diagnosis of myelopathy post influenza-like syndrome. To achieve this goal, different cell cultures and molecular methodologies were carried out. Influenza virus A(H3N2) strain was isolated in MDCK cell culture; virus particles were observed under electron microscopy. Phylogenetics analyses showed that the Brazilian influenza A(H3N2) strains were closely related to the A/Perth/16/2009-like. This study demonstrates that influenza virus A(H3N2) strain was the cause of illness of the students. According to the Brazilian influenza virus sentinel surveillance data A/Perth/16/2009-LIKE (H3N2) strain has predominated during the 2010 influenza virus season in Brasília-DF. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. HA1-specific indirect ELISA for serological detection of canine influenza virus H3N2 infection in dogs.

    PubMed

    Shim, Doo Hee; Kim, Jeong-Ki; Hong, Minki; Na, Woonsung; Park, Yong-A; Park, Seong Jun; Song, Daesub; Lee, Jae Myun; Kim, Hye Kwon

    2015-04-01

    An indirect ELISA using recombinant HA1 protein of canine influenza virus (CIV) as a coating antigen was developed and characterized for its application to serosurveillance in dogs. The CIV H3N2-specific indirect ELISA was developed using recombinant HA1 protein (baculovirus-expression system) as a coating antigen. A total of 65 CIV H3N2-positive or negative canine sera were tested by the indirect ELISA for receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis and results compared to those generated by the hemagglutination inhibition (HI) test. Canine sera collected 10 days following intranasal inoculation with canine H3N2, seasonal H3N2 (A/Brisbane/10/2007) or pandemic H1N1 influenza virus (A/California/04/2009) were used for the cross-reaction test. An adjusted optical density (OD) of 0.17 was determined to be the optimal cut-off value for seropositivity. The indirect ELISA showed 95.7% sensitivity and 94.7% specificity when compared to the HI test. A cross-reaction test was also performed using canine sera reactive with CIV H3N2, seasonal H3N2 (human) and pandemic H1N1 (human) influenza viruses. Based on the data generated in this study, the canine H3N2-associated ELISA using baculovirus expressed HA1 antigen will be useful for herd-based serological survey of the canine H3N2 virus infection in dogs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Pathogenicity and transmission of the novel A (H3N2v) influenza virus isolated from humans in experimentally inoculated pigs

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Human cases with H3N2 (H3N2v) viruses closely related to swine H3N2 viruses were detected in 2011 and increased to >320 cases by the end of 2012. H3N2-TRIG was the H3N2 genotype endemically circulating in the U.S. swine population prior to the emergence of H1N1pdm09, and rH3N2p are novel H1N1pdm09/H...

  4. An outbreak of influenza A(H3N2) in Alappuzha district, Kerala, India, in 2011.

    PubMed

    Peter, Sam; Balakrishnan, Anukumar; Potdar, Varsha A; Chadha, Mandeep S; Jadhav, Santhosh M

    2015-04-15

    Influenza is an RNA virus that belongs to the Orthomyxoviridae family. It causes a highly contagious acute respiratory illness, has been recognized since ancient times, and is a major health threat throughout the world. An outbreak of influenza-like illness (ILI) was reported from Alappuzha district of Kerala State between late June and July 2011. This investigation was conducted to determine the clinical picture, causative agents, and epidemiological characteristics of the illness. The World Health Organization (WHO)'s case definition for ILI was followed throughout the investigation. Nasal or throat swabs were collected from 204 suspected patients. Real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR)-based diagnosis was performed to detect influenza A and B viruses and their subtypes. Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cell line was used for virus isolation. One-step RT-PCR was performed to amplify the HA1 gene of influenza A(H3N2). The amplicons for the HA1 gene of influenza A(H3N2) were sequenced, and phylogenetic analysis was done. Analysis of the data revealed that 96 (47.05%) of the 204 respiratory specimens collected were influenza A(H3N2) and only 6 (2.94%) were A(H1N1)pdm09. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the isolated A(H3N2) was closely related to the 2012-2013 northern hemisphere vaccine strain (A/Victoria/361/2011/H3N2). An influenza A(H3N2) outbreak was confirmed in Alappuzha district of Kerala state with a co-circulation of A(H1N1)pdm09. No substantial difference in the sequence was observed in the etiological agent, and the virus was found to be sensitive to oseltamivir.

  5. Cooperation between distinct viral variants promotes growth of H3N2 influenza in cell culture

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Katherine S; Hooper, Kathryn A; Ollodart, Anja R; Dingens, Adam S; Bloom, Jesse D

    2016-01-01

    RNA viruses rapidly diversify into quasispecies of related genotypes. This genetic diversity has long been known to facilitate adaptation, but recent studies have suggested that cooperation between variants might also increase population fitness. Here, we demonstrate strong cooperation between two H3N2 influenza variants that differ by a single mutation at residue 151 in neuraminidase, which normally mediates viral exit from host cells. Residue 151 is often annotated as an ambiguous amino acid in sequenced isolates, indicating mixed viral populations. We show that mixed populations grow better than either variant alone in cell culture. Pure populations of either variant generate the other through mutation and then stably maintain a mix of the two genotypes. We suggest that cooperation arises because mixed populations combine one variant’s proficiency at cell entry with the other’s proficiency at cell exit. Our work demonstrates a specific cooperative interaction between defined variants in a viral quasispecies. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13974.001 PMID:26978794

  6. Computational prediction of vaccine strains for human influenza A (H3N2) viruses.

    PubMed

    Steinbrück, L; Klingen, T R; McHardy, A C

    2014-10-01

    Human influenza A viruses are rapidly evolving pathogens that cause substantial morbidity and mortality in seasonal epidemics around the globe. To ensure continued protection, the strains used for the production of the seasonal influenza vaccine have to be regularly updated, which involves data collection and analysis by numerous experts worldwide. Computer-guided analysis is becoming increasingly important in this problem due to the vast amounts of generated data. We here describe a computational method for selecting a suitable strain for production of the human influenza A virus vaccine. It interprets available antigenic and genomic sequence data based on measures of antigenic novelty and rate of propagation of the viral strains throughout the population. For viral isolates sampled between 2002 and 2007, we used this method to predict the antigenic evolution of the H3N2 viruses in retrospective testing scenarios. When seasons were scored as true or false predictions, our method returned six true positives, three false negatives, eight true negatives, and one false positive, or 78% accuracy overall. In comparison to the recommendations by the WHO, we identified the correct antigenic variant once at the same time and twice one season ahead. Even though it cannot be ruled out that practical reasons such as lack of a sufficiently well-growing candidate strain may in some cases have prevented recommendation of the best-matching strain by the WHO, our computational decision procedure allows quantitative interpretation of the growing amounts of data and may help to match the vaccine better to predominating strains in seasonal influenza epidemics. Importance: Human influenza A viruses continuously change antigenically to circumvent the immune protection evoked by vaccination or previously circulating viral strains. To maintain vaccine protection and thereby reduce the mortality and morbidity caused by infections, regular updates of the vaccine strains are required. We

  7. Quantifying selection and diversity in viruses by entropy methods, with application to the haemagglutinin of H3N2 influenza

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Keyao; Deem, Michael W.

    2011-01-01

    Many viruses evolve rapidly. For example, haemagglutinin (HA) of the H3N2 influenza A virus evolves to escape antibody binding. This evolution of the H3N2 virus means that people who have previously been exposed to an influenza strain may be infected by a newly emerged virus. In this paper, we use Shannon entropy and relative entropy to measure the diversity and selection pressure by an antibody in each amino acid site of H3 HA between the 1992–1993 season and the 2009–2010 season. Shannon entropy and relative entropy are two independent state variables that we use to characterize H3N2 evolution. The entropy method estimates future H3N2 evolution and migration using currently available H3 HA sequences. First, we show that the rate of evolution increases with the virus diversity in the current season. The Shannon entropy of the sequence in the current season predicts relative entropy between sequences in the current season and those in the next season. Second, a global migration pattern of H3N2 is assembled by comparing the relative entropy flows of sequences sampled in China, Japan, the USA and Europe. We verify this entropy method by describing two aspects of historical H3N2 evolution. First, we identify 54 amino acid sites in HA that have evolved in the past to evade the immune system. Second, the entropy method shows that epitopes A and B on the top of HA evolve most vigorously to escape antibody binding. Our work provides a novel entropy-based method to predict and quantify future H3N2 evolution and to describe the evolutionary history of H3N2. PMID:21543352

  8. A serological survey of canine H3N2, pandemic H1N1/09 and human seasonal H3N2 influenza viruses in dogs in China.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yipeng; Shen, Ye; Zhang, Xuxiao; Wang, Qian; Liu, Linqing; Han, Xue; Jiang, Bo; Wang, Ran; Sun, Honglei; Pu, Juan; Lin, Degui; Xia, Zhaofei; Liu, Jinhua

    2014-01-10

    Influenza viruses have been isolated from dogs in China; however, the extent of influenza infection among dogs is not yet clear. Here, we examined the seroprevalence of avian-origin canine H3N2, pandemic H1N1/09 and human seasonal H3N2 influenza viruses in pet dogs in China during January 2012 to June 2013. The seropositivity rate of canine H3N2, H1N1/09 and human H3N2 were 3.5%, 1.5%, and 1.2%, respectively. Dogs aged 2-5 years were most commonly seropositive to canine H3N2 virus. It is worth noting that two serum samples were positive against both canine H3N2 and H1N1/09 viruses, suggesting the possibility of coinfection with both viruses. Our findings emphasize the necessity for continued surveillance of influenza viruses in dogs in China. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Serological survey of canine H3N2, pandemic H1N1/09, and human seasonal H3N2 influenza viruses in cats in northern China, 2010-2014.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuxiao; Shen, Ye; Du, Lijie; Wang, Ran; Jiang, Bo; Sun, Honglei; Pu, Juan; Lin, Degui; Wang, Ming; Liu, Jinhua; Sun, Yipeng

    2015-04-01

    The close contact between cats and humans poses a threat to public health because of the potential zoonotic transmission of influenza viruses to humans. Therefore, we examined the seroprevalence of pandemic H1N1/09, canine H3N2, and human H3N2 viruses in pet cats in northern China from 2010 to 2014. Of 1794 serum samples, the seropositivity rates for H1N1/09, canine H3N2, and human H3N2 were 5.7%, 0.7%, and 0.4%, respectively. The seropositivity rate for H1N1/09 in cats was highest in 2010 (8.3%), and then declined continuously thereafter. Cats older than 10 years were most commonly seropositive for the H1N1/09 virus. Our findings emphasize the need for continuous surveillance of influenza viruses in cats in China.

  10. Outbreaks of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 and seasonal influenza A (H3N2) on cruise ship.

    PubMed

    Ward, Kate A; Armstrong, Paul; McAnulty, Jeremy M; Iwasenko, Jenna M; Dwyer, Dominic E

    2010-11-01

    To determine the extent and pattern of influenza transmission and effectiveness of containment measures, we investigated dual outbreaks of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 and influenza A (H3N2) that had occurred on a cruise ship in May 2009. Of 1,970 passengers and 734 crew members, 82 (3.0%) were infected with pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus, 98 (3.6%) with influenza A (H3N2) virus, and 2 (0.1%) with both. Among 45 children who visited the ship's childcare center, infection rate for pandemic (H1N1) 2009 was higher than that for influenza A (H3N2) viruses. Disembarked passengers reported a high level of compliance with isolation and quarantine recommendations. We found 4 subsequent cases epidemiologically linked to passengers but no evidence of sustained transmission to the community or passengers on the next cruise. Among this population of generally healthy passengers, children seemed more susceptible to pandemic (H1N1) 2009 than to influenza (H3N2) viruses. Intensive disease control measures successfully contained these outbreaks.

  11. Outbreaks of Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 and Seasonal Influenza A (H3N2) on Cruise Ship

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Kate A.; Armstrong, Paul; Iwasenko, Jenna M.; Dwyer, Dominic E.

    2010-01-01

    To determine the extent and pattern of influenza transmission and effectiveness of containment measures, we investigated dual outbreaks of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 and influenza A (H3N2) that had occurred on a cruise ship in May 2009. Of 1,970 passengers and 734 crew members, 82 (3.0%) were infected with pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus, 98 (3.6%) with influenza A (H3N2) virus, and 2 (0.1%) with both. Among 45 children who visited the ship’s childcare center, infection rate for pandemic (H1N1) 2009 was higher than that for influenza A (H3N2) viruses. Disembarked passengers reported a high level of compliance with isolation and quarantine recommendations. We found 4 subsequent cases epidemiologically linked to passengers but no evidence of sustained transmission to the community or passengers on the next cruise. Among this population of generally healthy passengers, children seemed more susceptible to pandemic (H1N1) 2009 than to influenza (H3N2) viruses. Intensive disease control measures successfully contained these outbreaks. PMID:21029531

  12. Molecular Epidemiology of Influenza A/H3N2 Viruses Circulating in Mexico from 2003 to 2012

    PubMed Central

    Escalera-Zamudio, Marina; Nelson, Martha I.; Cobián Güemes, Ana Georgina; López-Martínez, Irma; Cruz-Ortiz, Natividad; Iguala-Vidales, Miguel; García, Elvia Rodríguez; Barrera-Badillo, Gisela; Díaz-Quiñonez, Jose Alberto; López, Susana; Arias, Carlos F.; Isa, Pavel

    2014-01-01

    In this work, nineteen influenza A/H3N2 viruses isolated in Mexico between 2003 and 2012 were studied. Our findings show that different human A/H3N2 viral lineages co-circulate within a same season and can also persist locally in between different influenza seasons, increasing the chance for genetic reassortment events. A novel minor cluster was also identified, named here as Korea, that circulated worldwide during 2003. Frequently, phylogenetic characterization did not correlate with the determined antigenic identity, supporting the need for the use of molecular evolutionary tools additionally to antigenic data for the surveillance and characterization of viral diversity during each flu season. This work represents the first long-term molecular epidemiology study of influenza A/H3N2 viruses in Mexico based on the complete genomic sequences and contributes to the monitoring of evolutionary trends of A/H3N2 influenza viruses within North and Central America. PMID:25075517

  13. Trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine effective against influenza A(H3N2) variant viruses in children during the 2014/15 season, Japan.

    PubMed

    Sugaya, Norio; Shinjoh, Masayoshi; Kawakami, Chiharu; Yamaguchi, Yoshio; Yoshida, Makoto; Baba, Hiroaki; Ishikawa, Mayumi; Kono, Mio; Sekiguchi, Shinichiro; Kimiya, Takahisa; Mitamura, Keiko; Fujino, Motoko; Komiyama, Osamu; Yoshida, Naoko; Tsunematsu, Kenichiro; Narabayashi, Atsushi; Nakata, Yuji; Sato, Akihiro; Taguchi, Nobuhiko; Fujita, Hisayo; Toki, Machiko; Myokai, Michiko; Ookawara, Ichiro; Takahashi, Takao

    2016-10-20

    The 2014/15 influenza season in Japan was characterised by predominant influenza A(H3N2) activity; 99% of influenza A viruses detected were A(H3N2). Subclade 3C.2a viruses were the major epidemic A(H3N2) viruses, and were genetically distinct from A/New York/39/2012(H3N2) of 2014/15 vaccine strain in Japan, which was classified as clade 3C.1. We assessed vaccine effectiveness (VE) of inactivated influenza vaccine (IIV) in children aged 6 months to 15 years by test-negative case-control design based on influenza rapid diagnostic test. Between November 2014 and March 2015, a total of 3,752 children were enrolled: 1,633 tested positive for influenza A and 42 for influenza B, and 2,077 tested negative. Adjusted VE was 38% (95% confidence intervals (CI): 28 to 46) against influenza virus infection overall, 37% (95% CI: 27 to 45) against influenza A, and 47% (95% CI: -2 to 73) against influenza B. However, IIV was not statistically significantly effective against influenza A in infants aged 6 to 11 months or adolescents aged 13 to 15 years. VE in preventing hospitalisation for influenza A infection was 55% (95% CI: 42 to 64). Trivalent IIV that included A/New York/39/2012(H3N2) was effective against drifted influenza A(H3N2) virus, although vaccine mismatch resulted in low VE.

  14. [Susceptibility of human influenza A (H3N2) viruses to neuraminidase inhibitors isolated during 2011-2012 in China].

    PubMed

    Huang, Weijuan; Tan, Minju; Zhao, Xiang; Cheng, Yanhui; Li, Xiyan; Guo, Junfeng; Wei, Hejiang; Xiao, Ning; Wang, Zhao; Wang, Dayan; Shu, Yuelong

    2015-06-01

    To analyze the susceptibility of influenza A (H3N2) viruses to neuraminidase inhibitors during 2011-2012 in Mainland China. All the tested viruses were obtained from the Chinese National Influenza Surveillance Network, which covers 31 provinces in mainland China, including 408 network laboratories and 554 sentinel hospitals. In total 1 903 viruses were selected with isolation date from January 1, 2011 to December 31, 2012 in Mainland China, among these viruses, 721 were confirmed to be influenza A (H3N2) virus by Chinese National Influenza Center and tested for the susceptibility to oseltamivir and zanamivir using chemiluminescence-based assay. The neuraminidase inhibitor sensitive reference virus A/Washington/01/2007 (119E) and oseltamivir resistant virus A/Texas/12/2007 (E119V) were used as control in this study. The t -test was used to compare the difference of NAI susceptibility of viruses isolated from different years. The half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC₅₀) of A/Washington/01/2007 for oseltamivir and zanamivir was (0.10 ± 0.02) and (0.30 ± 0.05) nmol/L, respectively. The IC₅₀ of A/Texas/12/2007 for oseltamivir and zanamivir was (4.27 ± 1.60) and (0.20 ± 0.03) nmol/L, respectively. Among the 721 influenza A (H3N2) viruses, 132 influenza A (H3N2) viruses were isolated in 2011 and 589 influenza A (H3N2) viruses were isolated in 2012. The IC50 for oseltamivir ranged from 0.04 to 0.62 nmol/L for viruses isolated in 2011 and ranged from 0.02 to 0.95 nmol/L for viruses in 2012, and the IC₅₀ of all the viruses tested was within 10-fold IC₅₀ (1.0 nmol/L) of the neuraminidase inhibitor sensitive reference virus A/Washington/01/2007. The IC50 of zanamivir ranged from 0.12 to 0.80 nmol/L for viruses in 2011 and ranged from 0.04 to 0.72 nmol/L for viruses in 2012, and was within 10-fold IC₅₀ (3.0 nmol/L) of the neuraminidase inhibitor sensitive reference virus A/Washington/01/2007. The influenza A(H3N2) viruses isolated during 2011-2012 in

  15. Natural co-infection of influenza A/H3N2 and A/H1N1pdm09 viruses resulting in a reassortant A/H3N2 virus.

    PubMed

    Rith, Sareth; Chin, Savuth; Sar, Borann; Y, Phalla; Horm, Srey Viseth; Ly, Sovann; Buchy, Philippe; Dussart, Philippe; Horwood, Paul F

    2015-12-01

    Despite annual co-circulation of different subtypes of seasonal influenza, co-infections between different viruses are rarely detected. These co-infections can result in the emergence of reassortant progeny. We document the detection of an influenza co-infection, between influenza A/H3N2 with A/H1N1pdm09 viruses, which occurred in a 3 year old male in Cambodia during April 2014. Both viruses were detected in the patient at relatively high viral loads (as determined by real-time RT-PCR CT values), which is unusual for influenza co-infections. As reassortment can occur between co-infected influenza A strains we isolated plaque purified clonal viral populations from the clinical material of the patient infected with A/H3N2 and A/H1N1pdm09. Complete genome sequences were completed for 7 clonal viruses to determine if any reassorted viruses were generated during the influenza virus co-infection. Although most of the viral sequences were consistent with wild-type A/H3N2 or A/H1N1pdm09, one reassortant A/H3N2 virus was isolated which contained an A/H1N1pdm09 NS1 gene fragment. The reassortant virus was viable and able to infect cells, as judged by successful passage in MDCK cells, achieving a TCID50 of 10(4)/ml at passage number two. There is no evidence that the reassortant virus was transmitted further. The co-infection occurred during a period when co-circulation of A/H3N2 and A/H1N1pdm09 was detected in Cambodia. It is unclear how often influenza co-infections occur, but laboratories should consider influenza co-infections during routine surveillance activities. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Enhanced Genetic Characterization of Influenza A(H3N2) Viruses and Vaccine Effectiveness by Genetic Group, 2014-2015.

    PubMed

    Flannery, Brendan; Zimmerman, Richard K; Gubareva, Larisa V; Garten, Rebecca J; Chung, Jessie R; Nowalk, Mary Patricia; Jackson, Michael L; Jackson, Lisa A; Monto, Arnold S; Ohmit, Suzanne E; Belongia, Edward A; McLean, Huong Q; Gaglani, Manjusha; Piedra, Pedro A; Mishin, Vasiliy P; Chesnokov, Anton P; Spencer, Sarah; Thaker, Swathi N; Barnes, John R; Foust, Angie; Sessions, Wendy; Xu, Xiyan; Katz, Jacqueline; Fry, Alicia M

    2016-10-01

    During the 2014-2015 US influenza season, expanded genetic characterization of circulating influenza A(H3N2) viruses was used to assess the impact of the genetic variability of influenza A(H3N2) viruses on influenza vaccine effectiveness (VE). A novel pyrosequencing assay was used to determine genetic group, based on hemagglutinin (HA) gene sequences, of influenza A(H3N2) viruses from patients enrolled at US Influenza Vaccine Effectiveness Network sites. VE was estimated using a test-negative design comparing vaccination among patients infected with influenza A(H3N2) viruses and uninfected patients. Among 9710 enrollees, 1868 (19%) tested positive for influenza A(H3N2) virus; genetic characterization of 1397 viruses showed that 1134 (81%) belonged to 1 HA genetic group (3C.2a) of antigenically drifted influenza A(H3N2) viruses. Effectiveness of 2014-2015 influenza vaccination varied by influenza A(H3N2) virus genetic group from 1% (95% confidence interval [CI], -14% to 14%) against illness caused by antigenically drifted influenza A(H3N2) virus group 3C.2a viruses versus 44% (95% CI, 16%-63%) against illness caused by vaccine-like influenza A(H3N2) virus group 3C.3b viruses. Effectiveness of 2014-2015 influenza vaccination varied by genetic group of influenza A(H3N2) virus. Changes in HA genes related to antigenic drift were associated with reduced VE. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America 2016. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  17. Patterns of Predicted T-Cell Epitopes Associated with Antigenic Drift in Influenza H3N2 Hemagglutinin

    PubMed Central

    Homan, E. Jane; Bremel, Robert D.

    2011-01-01

    Antigenic drift allowing escape from neutralizing antibodies is an important feature of transmission and survival of influenza viruses in host populations. Antigenic drift has been studied in particular detail for influenza A H3N2 and well defined antigenic clusters of this virus documented. We examine how host immunogenetics contributes to determination of the antibody spectrum, and hence the immune pressure bringing about antigenic drift. Using uTOPE™ bioinformatics analysis of predicted MHC binding, based on amino acid physical property principal components, we examined the binding affinity of all 9-mer and 15-mer peptides within the hemagglutinin 1 (HA1) of 447 H3N2 virus isolates to 35 MHC-I and 14 MHC-II alleles. We provide a comprehensive map of predicted MHC-I and MHC-II binding affinity for a broad array of HLA alleles for the H3N2 influenza HA1 protein. Each HLA allele exhibited a characteristic predicted binding pattern. Cluster analysis for each HLA allele shows that patterns based on predicted MHC binding mirror those described based on antibody binding. A single amino acid mutation or position displacement can result in a marked difference in MHC binding and hence potential T-helper function. We assessed the impact of individual amino acid changes in HA1 sequences between 10 virus isolates from 1968–2002, representative of antigenic clusters, to understand the changes in MHC binding over time. Gain and loss of predicted high affinity MHC-II binding sites with cluster transitions were documented. Predicted high affinity MHC-II binding sites were adjacent to antibody binding sites. We conclude that host MHC diversity may have a major determinant role in the antigenic drift of influenza A H3N2. PMID:22039539

  18. Development of DIVA (differentiation of infected from vaccinated animals) vaccines utilizing heterologous NA and NS1 protein strategies for the control of triple reassortant H3N2 influenza in turkeys.

    PubMed

    Wang, Leyi; Qin, Zhuoming; Pantin-Jackwood, Mary; Faulkner, Olivia; Suarez, David L; Garcia, Maricarmen; Lupiani, Blanca; Reddy, Sanjay M; Saif, Yehia M; Lee, Chang-Won

    2011-10-19

    Since 2003, triple reassortant (TR) swine H3N2 influenza viruses containing gene segments from human, avian, and swine origins have been detected in the U.S. turkey populations. The initial outbreak that occurred involved birds that were vaccinated with the currently available H3 swine- and avian-origin influenza vaccines. Antigenically, all turkey swine-lineage TR H3N2 isolates are closely related to each other but show little or no antigenic cross-reactivity with the avian origin or swine origin influenza vaccine strains that are currently being used in turkey operations. These results call for re-evaluation of currently available influenza vaccines being used in turkey flocks and development of more effective DIVA (differentiation of infected from vaccinated animals) vaccines. In this study, we selected one TR H3N2 strain, A/turkey/OH/313053/04 (H3N2) that showed broad cross reactivity with other recent TR turkey H3N2 isolates, and created NA- and NS-based DIVA vaccines using traditional reassortment as well as reverse genetics methods. Protective efficacy of those vaccines was determined in 2-week-old and 80-week-old breeder turkeys. The reassortant DIVA vaccines significantly reduced the presence of challenge virus in the oviduct of breeder turkeys as well as trachea and cloaca shedding of both young and old breeder turkeys, suggesting that proper vaccination could effectively prevent egg production drop and potential viral contamination of eggs in infected turkeys. Our results demonstrate that the heterologous NA and NS1 DIVA vaccines together with their corresponding serological tests could be useful for the control of TR H3N2 influenza in turkeys.

  19. Antigenic variation of the human influenza A (H3N2) virus during the 2014-2015 winter season.

    PubMed

    Hua, Sha; Li, XiYan; Liu, Mi; Cheng, YanHui; Peng, YouSong; Huang, WeiJuan; Tan, MinJu; Wei, HeJiang; Guo, JunFeng; Wang, DaYan; Wu, AiPing; Shu, YueLong; Jiang, TaiJiao

    2015-09-01

    The human influenza A (H3N2) virus dominated the 2014-2015 winter season in many countries and caused massive morbidity and mortality because of its antigenic variation. So far, very little is known about the antigenic patterns of the recent H3N2 virus. By systematically mapping the antigenic relationships of H3N2 strains isolated since 2010, we discovered that two groups with obvious antigenic divergence, named SW13 (A/Switzerland/9715293/2013-like strains) and HK14 (A/Hong Kong/5738/2014-like strains), co-circulated during the 2014-2015 winter season. HK14 group co-circulated with SW13 in Europe and the United States during this season, while there were few strains of HK14 in mainland China, where SW13 has dominated since 2012. Furthermore, we found that substitutions near the receptor-binding site on hemagglutinin played an important role in the antigenic variation of both the groups. These findings provide a comprehensive understanding of the recent antigenic evolution of H3N2 virus and will aid in the selection of vaccine strains.

  20. Kallikrein-Related Peptidase 5 Contributes to H3N2 Influenza Virus Infection in Human Lungs.

    PubMed

    Magnen, Mélia; Gueugnon, Fabien; Guillon, Antoine; Baranek, Thomas; Thibault, Virginie C; Petit-Courty, Agnès; de Veer, Simon J; Harris, Jonathan; Humbles, Alison A; Si-Tahar, Mustapha; Courty, Yves

    2017-08-15

    Hemagglutinin (HA) of influenza virus must be activated by proteolysis before the virus can become infectious. Previous studies indicated that HA cleavage is driven by membrane-bound or extracellular serine proteases in the respiratory tract. However, there is still uncertainty as to which proteases are critical for activating HAs of seasonal influenza A viruses (IAVs) in humans. This study focuses on human KLK1 and KLK5, 2 of the 15 serine proteases known as the kallikrein-related peptidases (KLKs). We find that their mRNA expression in primary human bronchial cells is stimulated by IAV infection. Both enzymes cleaved recombinant HA from several strains of the H1 and/or H3 virus subtype in vitro, but only KLK5 promoted the infectivity of A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (H1N1) and A/Scotland/20/74 (H3N2) virions in MDCK cells. We assessed the ability of treated viruses to initiate influenza in mice. The nasal instillation of only the KLK5-treated virus resulted in weight loss and lethal outcomes. The secretion of this protease in the human lower respiratory tract is enhanced during influenza. Moreover, we show that pretreatment of airway secretions with a KLK5-selective inhibitor significantly reduced the activation of influenza A/Scotland/20/74 virions, providing further evidence of its importance. Differently, increased KLK1 secretion appeared to be associated with the recruitment of inflammatory cells in human airways regardless of the origin of inflammation. Thus, our findings point to the involvement of KLK5 in the proteolytic activation and spread of seasonal influenza viruses in humans.IMPORTANCE Influenza A viruses (IAVs) cause acute infection of the respiratory tract that affects millions of people during seasonal outbreaks every year. Cleavage of the hemagglutinin precursor by host proteases is a critical step in the life cycle of these viruses. Consequently, host proteases that activate HA can be considered promising targets for the development of new antivirals

  1. Serological characterization of guinea pigs infected with H3N2 human influenza or immunized with hemagglutinin protein

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Recent and previous studies have shown that guinea pigs can be infected with, and transmit, human influenza viruses. Therefore guinea pig may be a useful animal model for better understanding influenza infection and assessing vaccine strategies. To more fully characterize the model, antibody responses following either infection/re-infection with human influenza A/Wyoming/03/2003 H3N2 or immunization with its homologous recombinant hemagglutinin (HA) protein were studied. Results Serological samples were collected and tested for anti-HA immunoglobulin by ELISA, antiviral antibodies by hemagglutination inhibition (HI), and recognition of linear epitopes by peptide scanning (PepScan). Animals inoculated with infectious virus demonstrated pronounced viral replication and subsequent serological conversion. Animals either immunized with the homologous HA antigen or infected, showed a relatively rapid rise in antibody titers to the HA glycoprotein in ELISA assays. Antiviral antibodies, measured by HI assay, were detectable after the second inoculation. PepScan data identified both previously recognized and newly defined linear epitopes. Conclusions Infection and/or recombinant HA immunization of guinea pigs with H3N2 Wyoming influenza virus resulted in a relatively rapid production of viral-specific antibody thus demonstrating the strong immunogenicity of the major viral structural proteins in this animal model for influenza infection. The sensitivity of the immune response supports the utility of the guinea pig as a useful animal model of influenza infection and immunization. PMID:20735849

  2. Interim estimates of 2016/17 vaccine effectiveness against influenza A(H3N2), Canada, January 2017

    PubMed Central

    Skowronski, Danuta M; Chambers, Catharine; Sabaiduc, Suzana; Dickinson, James A; Winter, Anne-Luise; De Serres, Gaston; Drews, Steven J; Jassem, Agatha; Gubbay, Jonathan B; Charest, Hugues; Balshaw, Robert; Bastien, Nathalie; Li, Yan; Krajden, Mel

    2017-01-01

    Using a test-negative design, the Canadian Sentinel Practitioner Surveillance Network (SPSN) assessed interim 2016/17 influenza vaccine effectiveness (VE) against dominant influenza A(H3N2) viruses considered antigenically matched to the clade 3C.2a vaccine strain. Sequence analysis revealed substantial heterogeneity in emerging 3C.2a1 variants by province and over time. Adjusted VE was 42% (95% confidence interval: 18–59%) overall, with variation by province. Interim virological and VE findings reported here warrant further investigation to inform potential vaccine reformulation. PMID:28205503

  3. Interim estimates of 2016/17 vaccine effectiveness against influenza A(H3N2), Canada, January 2017.

    PubMed

    Skowronski, Danuta M; Chambers, Catharine; Sabaiduc, Suzana; Dickinson, James A; Winter, Anne-Luise; De Serres, Gaston; Drews, Steven J; Jassem, Agatha; Gubbay, Jonathan B; Charest, Hugues; Balshaw, Robert; Bastien, Nathalie; Li, Yan; Krajden, Mel

    2017-02-09

    Using a test-negative design, the Canadian Sentinel Practitioner Surveillance Network (SPSN) assessed interim 2016/17 influenza vaccine effectiveness (VE) against dominant influenza A(H3N2) viruses considered antigenically matched to the clade 3C.2a vaccine strain. Sequence analysis revealed substantial heterogeneity in emerging 3C.2a1 variants by province and over time. Adjusted VE was 42% (95% confidence interval: 18-59%) overall, with variation by province. Interim virological and VE findings reported here warrant further investigation to inform potential vaccine reformulation. This article is copyright of The Authors, 2017.

  4. Fatal Cases of Influenza A(H3N2) in Children: Insights from Whole Genome Sequence Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Galiano, Monica; Johnson, Benjamin F.; Myers, Richard; Ellis, Joanna; Daniels, Rod; Zambon, Maria

    2012-01-01

    During the Northern Hemisphere winter of 2003–2004 the emergence of a novel influenza antigenic variant, A/Fujian/411/2002-like(H3N2), was associated with an unusually high number of fatalities in children. Seventeen fatal cases in the UK were laboratory confirmed for Fujian/411-like viruses. To look for phylogenetic patterns and genetic markers that might be associated with increased virulence, sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of the whole genomes of 63 viruses isolated from fatal cases and non fatal “control” cases was undertaken. The analysis revealed the circulation of two main genetic groups, I and II, both of which contained viruses from fatal cases. No associated amino acid substitutions could be linked with an exclusive or higher occurrence in fatal cases. The Fujian/411-like viruses in genetic groups I and II completely displaced other A(H3N2) viruses, but they disappeared after 2004. This study shows that two A(H3N2) virus genotypes circulated exclusively during the winter of 2003–2004 in the UK and caused an unusually high number of deaths in children. Host factors related to immune state and differences in genetic background between patients may also play important roles in determining the outcome of an influenza infection. PMID:22412998

  5. Surface glycoproteins of influenza A H3N2 virus modulate virus replication in the respiratory tract of ferrets.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xing; Zengel, James R; Xu, Qi; Jin, Hong

    2012-10-10

    The hemagglutinin (HA) genes of the influenza A H3N2 subtype viruses isolated from 1968 to 2010 have evolved substantially but their neuraminidase (NA) genes have been relatively less divergent. The H3N2 viruses isolated since 1995 were found to replicate in the lower respiratory tract of ferrets less efficiently than the earlier isolates. To evaluate whether the HA or/and NA or the internal protein gene segments of the H3N2 virus affected viral replication in the respiratory tract of ferrets, recombinant A/California/07/2004 (CA04) (H3N2) virus and its reassortants that contained the same CA04 internal protein gene segments and the HA and/or NA of A/Udorn/309/1972 (UD72) or A/Wuhan/359/1995 (WH95) H3N2 viruses were generated and evaluated for their replication in the respiratory tract of ferrets. All the reassortant viruses replicated efficiently in the upper respiratory tract of ferrets, but their replication in the lower respiratory tract of ferrets varied. In contrast to the UD72-HA reassortant virus that replicated efficiently in the lungs of ferrets, the virus with the WH95-HA or the CA04-HA either replicated modestly or did not replicate in the lungs of ferrets. The reassortants with the WH95-HA and UD72-NA or CA04-NA had the tendency to lose a N-linked glycosylation site at residue 246 in the HA, resulting in viral lung titer of 100-fold higher than the virus with the HA and NA from WH95. The UD72-NA had the highest neuraminidase activity and increased viral replication by up to 100-fold in tissue culture cells during early infection. Thus, our data indicate that both the HA and NA glycoproteins play important roles in viral replication of the H3N2 influenza virus in ferrets. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Vaccine-induced protection from egg production losses in commercial turkey breeder hens following experimental challenge with a triple-reassortant H3N2 avian influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Kapczynski, Darrell R; Gonder, Eric; Liljebjelke, Karen; Lippert, Ron; Petkov, Daniel; Tilley, Becky

    2009-03-01

    Infections of avian influenza virus (AIV) in turkey breeder hens can cause a decrease in both egg production and quality, resulting in significant production losses. In North Carolina in 2003, a triple-reassortant H3N2 AIV containing human, swine, and avian gene segments was isolated from turkey breeder hens (A/turkey/NC/16108/03). This viral subtype was subsequently isolated from both turkeys and swine in Ohio in 2004, and in Minnesota in 2005, and was responsible for significant losses in turkey production. The objective of this study was to determine if currently available commercial, inactivated avian influenza H3 subtype oil-emulsion vaccines would protect laying turkey hens from egg production losses following challenge with the 2003 H3N2 field virus isolate from North Carolina. Laying turkey hens were vaccinated in the field with two injections of either a commercial monovalent (A/duck/Minnesota/79/79 [H3N4]) or autogenous bivalent (A/turkey/North Carolina/05 (H3N2)-A/turkey/North Carolina/88 [H1N1]) vaccine, at 26 and 30 wk of age, and subsequently challenged under BSL 3-Ag conditions at 32 wk of age. Vaccine-induced efficacy was determined as protection from a 50% decrease in egg production and from a decrease in egg quality within 21 days postchallenge. Results indicate that, following a natural route of challenge (eye drop and intranasal), birds vaccinated with the 2005 North Carolina H3N2 subtype were significantly protected from the drop in egg production observed in both the H3N4 vaccinated and sham-vaccinated hens. The results demonstrate that groups receiving vaccines containing either H3 subtype had a decreased number of unsettable eggs, increased hemagglutination inhibition titers following challenge, and decreased virus isolations from cloacal swabs as compared to the sham-vaccinated group. Phylogenetic analysis of the nucleotide sequence of the HA1 gene segment from the three H3 viruses used in these studies indicated that the two North Carolina

  7. Trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine effective against influenza A(H3N2) variant viruses in children during the 2014/15 season, Japan

    PubMed Central

    Sugaya, Norio; Shinjoh, Masayoshi; Kawakami, Chiharu; Yamaguchi, Yoshio; Yoshida, Makoto; Baba, Hiroaki; Ishikawa, Mayumi; Kono, Mio; Sekiguchi, Shinichiro; Kimiya, Takahisa; Mitamura, Keiko; Fujino, Motoko; Komiyama, Osamu; Yoshida, Naoko; Tsunematsu, Kenichiro; Narabayashi, Atsushi; Nakata, Yuji; Sato, Akihiro; Taguchi, Nobuhiko; Fujita, Hisayo; Toki, Machiko; Myokai, Michiko; Ookawara, Ichiro; Takahashi, Takao

    2016-01-01

    The 2014/15 influenza season in Japan was characterised by predominant influenza A(H3N2) activity; 99% of influenza A viruses detected were A(H3N2). Subclade 3C.2a viruses were the major epidemic A(H3N2) viruses, and were genetically distinct from A/New York/39/2012(H3N2) of 2014/15 vaccine strain in Japan, which was classified as clade 3C.1. We assessed vaccine effectiveness (VE) of inactivated influenza vaccine (IIV) in children aged 6 months to 15 years by test-negative case–control design based on influenza rapid diagnostic test. Between November 2014 and March 2015, a total of 3,752 children were enrolled: 1,633 tested positive for influenza A and 42 for influenza B, and 2,077 tested negative. Adjusted VE was 38% (95% confidence intervals (CI): 28 to 46) against influenza virus infection overall, 37% (95% CI: 27 to 45) against influenza A, and 47% (95% CI: -2 to 73) against influenza B. However, IIV was not statistically significantly effective against influenza A in infants aged 6 to 11 months or adolescents aged 13 to 15 years. VE in preventing hospitalisation for influenza A infection was 55% (95% CI: 42 to 64). Trivalent IIV that included A/New York/39/2012(H3N2) was effective against drifted influenza A(H3N2) virus, although vaccine mismatch resulted in low VE. PMID:27784529

  8. Unifying viral genetics and human transportation data to predict the global transmission dynamics of human influenza H3N2.

    PubMed

    Lemey, Philippe; Rambaut, Andrew; Bedford, Trevor; Faria, Nuno; Bielejec, Filip; Baele, Guy; Russell, Colin A; Smith, Derek J; Pybus, Oliver G; Brockmann, Dirk; Suchard, Marc A

    2014-02-01

    Information on global human movement patterns is central to spatial epidemiological models used to predict the behavior of influenza and other infectious diseases. Yet it remains difficult to test which modes of dispersal drive pathogen spread at various geographic scales using standard epidemiological data alone. Evolutionary analyses of pathogen genome sequences increasingly provide insights into the spatial dynamics of influenza viruses, but to date they have largely neglected the wealth of information on human mobility, mainly because no statistical framework exists within which viral gene sequences and empirical data on host movement can be combined. Here, we address this problem by applying a phylogeographic approach to elucidate the global spread of human influenza subtype H3N2 and assess its ability to predict the spatial spread of human influenza A viruses worldwide. Using a framework that estimates the migration history of human influenza while simultaneously testing and quantifying a range of potential predictive variables of spatial spread, we show that the global dynamics of influenza H3N2 are driven by air passenger flows, whereas at more local scales spread is also determined by processes that correlate with geographic distance. Our analyses further confirm a central role for mainland China and Southeast Asia in maintaining a source population for global influenza diversity. By comparing model output with the known pandemic expansion of H1N1 during 2009, we demonstrate that predictions of influenza spatial spread are most accurate when data on human mobility and viral evolution are integrated. In conclusion, the global dynamics of influenza viruses are best explained by combining human mobility data with the spatial information inherent in sampled viral genomes. The integrated approach introduced here offers great potential for epidemiological surveillance through phylogeographic reconstructions and for improving predictive models of disease control.

  9. Frequency of influenza H3N2 intra-subtype reassortment: attributes and implications of reassortant spread.

    PubMed

    Maljkovic Berry, Irina; Melendrez, Melanie C; Li, Tao; Hawksworth, Anthony W; Brice, Gary T; Blair, Patrick J; Halsey, Eric S; Williams, Maya; Fernandez, Stefan; Yoon, In-Kyu; Edwards, Leslie D; Kuschner, Robert; Lin, Xiaoxu; Thomas, Stephen J; Jarman, Richard G

    2016-12-29

    Increasing evidence suggests that influenza reassortment not only contributes to the emergence of new human pandemics but also plays an important role in seasonal influenza epidemics, disease severity, evolution, and vaccine efficacy. We studied this process within 2091 H3N2 full genomes utilizing a combination of the latest reassortment detection tools and more conventional phylogenetic analyses. We found that the amount of H3N2 intra-subtype reassortment depended on the number of sampled genomes, occurred with a steady frequency of 3.35%, and was not affected by the geographical origins, evolutionary patterns, or previous reassortment history of the virus. We identified both single reassortant genomes and reassortant clades, each clade representing one reassortment event followed by successful spread of the reassorted variant in the human population. It was this spread that was mainly responsible for the observed high presence of H3N2 intra-subtype reassortant genomes. The successfully spread variants were generally sampled within one year of their formation, highlighting the risk of their rapid spread but also presenting an opportunity for their rapid detection. Simultaneous spread of several different reassortant lineages was observed, and despite their limited average lifetime, second and third generation reassortment was detected, as well as reassortment between viruses belonging to different vaccine-associated clades, likely displaying differing antigenic properties. Some of the spreading reassortants remained confined to certain geographical regions, while others, sharing common properties in amino acid positions of the HA, NA, and PB2 segments, were found throughout the world. Detailed surveillance of seasonal influenza reassortment patterns and variant properties may provide unique information needed for prediction of spread and construction of future influenza vaccines.

  10. Impact of repeated vaccination on vaccine effectiveness against influenza A(H3N2) and B during 8 seasons.

    PubMed

    McLean, Huong Q; Thompson, Mark G; Sundaram, Maria E; Meece, Jennifer K; McClure, David L; Friedrich, Thomas C; Belongia, Edward A

    2014-11-15

    Recent studies suggest that influenza vaccination in the previous season may influence the effectiveness of current-season vaccination, but this has not been assessed in a single population over multiple years. Patients presenting with acute respiratory illness were prospectively enrolled during the 2004-2005 through 2012-2013 influenza seasons. Respiratory swabs were tested for influenza and vaccination dates obtained from a validated registry. Vaccination status was determined for the current, previous, and prior 5 seasons. Vaccine effectiveness (VE) was calculated for participants aged ≥9 years using logistic regression models with an interaction term for vaccination history. There were 7315 enrollments during 8 seasons; 1056 (14%) and 650 (9%) were positive for influenza A(H3N2) and B, respectively. Vaccination during current only, previous only, or both seasons yielded similar protection against H3N2 (adjusted VE range, 31%-36%) and B (52%-66%). In the analysis using 5 years of historical vaccination data, current season VE against H3N2 was significantly higher among vaccinated individuals with no prior vaccination history (65%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 36%-80%) compared with vaccinated individuals with a frequent vaccination history (24%; 95% CI, 3%-41%; P = .01). VE against B was 75% (95% CI, 50%-87%) and 48% (95% CI, 29%-62%), respectively (P = .05). Similar findings were observed when analysis was restricted to adults 18-49 years. Current- and previous-season vaccination generated similar levels of protection, and vaccine-induced protection was greatest for individuals not vaccinated during the prior 5 years. Additional studies are needed to understand the long-term effects of annual vaccination. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

  11. Impact of Repeated Vaccination on Vaccine Effectiveness Against Influenza A(H3N2) and B During 8 Seasons

    PubMed Central

    McLean, Huong Q.; Thompson, Mark G.; Sundaram, Maria E.; Meece, Jennifer K.; McClure, David L.; Friedrich, Thomas C.; Belongia, Edward A.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Recent studies suggest that influenza vaccination in the previous season may influence the effectiveness of current-season vaccination, but this has not been assessed in a single population over multiple years. Methods. Patients presenting with acute respiratory illness were prospectively enrolled during the 2004–2005 through 2012–2013 influenza seasons. Respiratory swabs were tested for influenza and vaccination dates obtained from a validated registry. Vaccination status was determined for the current, previous, and prior 5 seasons. Vaccine effectiveness (VE) was calculated for participants aged ≥9 years using logistic regression models with an interaction term for vaccination history. Results. There were 7315 enrollments during 8 seasons; 1056 (14%) and 650 (9%) were positive for influenza A(H3N2) and B, respectively. Vaccination during current only, previous only, or both seasons yielded similar protection against H3N2 (adjusted VE range, 31%–36%) and B (52%–66%). In the analysis using 5 years of historical vaccination data, current season VE against H3N2 was significantly higher among vaccinated individuals with no prior vaccination history (65%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 36%–80%) compared with vaccinated individuals with a frequent vaccination history (24%; 95% CI, 3%–41%; P = .01). VE against B was 75% (95% CI, 50%–87%) and 48% (95% CI, 29%–62%), respectively (P = .05). Similar findings were observed when analysis was restricted to adults 18–49 years. Conclusions. Current- and previous-season vaccination generated similar levels of protection, and vaccine-induced protection was greatest for individuals not vaccinated during the prior 5 years. Additional studies are needed to understand the long-term effects of annual vaccination. PMID:25270645

  12. Waning protection of influenza vaccine against mild laboratory confirmed influenza A(H3N2) and B in Spain, season 2014-15.

    PubMed

    Gherasim, Alin; Pozo, Francisco; de Mateo, Salvador; Gamarra, Inma Aspiritxaga; García-Cenoz, Manuel; Vega, Tomas; Martínez, Eva; Giménez, Jaume; Castrillejo, Daniel; Larrauri, Amparo

    2016-04-29

    The 2014/15 influenza season in Spain was dominated by the circulation of drifted A(H3N2) and co-circulation of B viruses. We present the final estimates of influenza vaccine effectiveness (IVE) against confirmed influenza A(H3N2) and B its evolution along the season and with time since vaccination. We used data collected on influenza like illness patients (ILI), systematically swabbed for the presence of influenza viruses within the Spanish Influenza Sentinel Surveillance System (SISS) and a restricted observational study (cycEVA). We used a test negative case-control design to compare influenza confirmed cases with negative controls. We estimated the IVE through a logistic regression model adjusting for potential confounders. The evolution of IVE was studied in early and late stages of the epidemic, and in different time intervals between receiving influenza vaccination and the onset of symptoms. At the end of the season we have found low and moderate IVE point estimates against influenza A(H3N2) and B, respectively, in all ages and target groups for vaccination. An IVE decreased from an early value of 37% to a late of -76% against influenza A(H3N2), and similarly, 84% vs -4% against Influenza B. When the onset of symptoms occurred more than three months after vaccination, the decrease of IVE was slower and milder against influenza B than against influenza A(H3N2). No significant change in the percentage of circulating drifted influenza A(H3N2) strains belonging to the 3c.2a and 3c.3a clades could be identified through the season. In a season dominated by drifted A(H3N2) circulating virus, the vaccine offered little or no protection against A(H3N2) infection but had a moderate protective effect against influenza B. Efforts should be put in developing influenza vaccines that maintain their protective capabilities throughout the season and could stimulate a potentially broad immune response against diverse influenza strains. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All

  13. Investigation of an Influenza A (H3N2) outbreak in evacuation centres following the Great East Japan earthquake, 2011.

    PubMed

    Kamigaki, Taro; Seino, Jin; Tohma, Kentaro; Nukiwa-Soma, Nao; Otani, Kanako; Oshitani, Hitoshi

    2014-01-14

    The Great East Japan Earthquake of magnitude 9.0 that struck on 11 March 2011 resulted in more than 18000 deaths or cases of missing persons. The large-scale tsunami that followed the earthquake devastated many coastal areas of the Tohoku region, including Miyagi Prefecture, and many residents of the tsunami-affected areas were compelled to reside in evacuation centres (ECs). In Japan, seasonal influenza epidemics usually occur between December and March. At the time of the Great East Japan Earthquake on 11 March 2011, influenza A (H3N2) was still circulating and there was a heightened concern regarding severe outbreaks due to influenza A (H3N2). After local hospital staff and public health nurses detected influenza cases among the evacuees, an outbreak investigation was conducted in five ECs that had reported at least one influenza case from 23 March to 11 April 2011. Cases were confirmed by point-of-care tests and those residues were obtained and subjected to reverse transcription PCR and/or real time RT-PCR for sub-typing of influenza. There were 105 confirmed cases detected during the study period with a mean attack rate of 5.3% (range, 0.8%-11.1%). An epidemiological tree for two ECs demonstrated same-room and familial links that accounted for 88.5% of cases. The majority of cases occurred in those aged 15-64 years, who were likely to have engaged in search and rescue activities. No deaths were reported in this outbreak. Familial link accounted for on average 40.5% of influenza cases in two ECs and rooms where two or more cases were reported accounted for on average 85% in those ECs. A combination of preventative measures, including case cohorting, personal hygiene, wearing masks, and early detection and treatment, were implemented during the outbreak period. Influenza can cause outbreaks in a disaster setting when the disaster occurs during an epidemic influenza season. The transmission route is more likely to be associated with sharing room and space and

  14. Dynamic Convergent Evolution Drives the Passage Adaptation across 48 Years' History of H3N2 Influenza Evolution.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hui; Deng, Qiang; Ng, Sock Hoon; Lee, Raphael Tze Chuen; Maurer-Stroh, Sebastian; Zhai, Weiwei

    2016-12-01

    Influenza viruses are often propagated in a diverse set of culturing media and additional substitutions known as passage adaptation can cause extra evolution in the target strain, leading to ineffective vaccines. Using 25,482 H3N2 HA1 sequences curated from Global Initiative on Sharing All Influenza Data and National Center for Biotechnology Information databases, we found that passage adaptation is a very dynamic process that changes over time and evolves in a seesaw like pattern. After crossing the species boundary from bird to human in 1968, the influenza H3N2 virus evolves to be better adapted to the human environment and passaging them in embryonated eggs (i.e., an avian environment) leads to increasingly stronger positive selection. On the contrary, passage adaptation to the mammalian cell lines changes from positive selection to negative selection. Using two statistical tests, we identified 19 codon positions around the receptor binding domain strongly contributing to passage adaptation in the embryonated egg. These sites show strong convergent evolution and overlap extensively with positively selected sites identified in humans, suggesting that passage adaptation can confound many of the earlier studies on influenza evolution. Interestingly, passage adaptation in recent years seems to target a few codon positions in antigenic surface epitopes, which makes it difficult to produce antigenically unaltered vaccines using embryonic eggs. Our study outlines another interesting scenario whereby both convergent and adaptive evolution are working in synchrony driving viral adaptation. Future studies from sequence analysis to vaccine production need to take careful consideration of passage adaptation. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Global and quantitative proteomic analysis of dogs infected by avian-like H3N2 canine influenza virus

    PubMed Central

    Su, Shuo; Tian, Jin; Hong, Malin; Zhou, Pei; Lu, Gang; Zhu, Huachen; Zhang, Guihong; Lai, Alexander; Li, Shoujun

    2015-01-01

    Canine influenza virus A (H3N2) is a newly emerged etiological agent for respiratory infections in dogs. The mechanism of interspecies transmission from avian to canine species and the development of diseases in this new host remain to be explored. To investigate this, we conducted a differential proteomics study in 2-month-old beagles inoculated intranasally with 106 TCID50 of A/canine/Guangdong/01/2006 (H3N2) virus. Lung sections excised at 12 h post-inoculation (hpi), 4 days, and 7 days post-inoculation (dpi) were processed for global and quantitative analysis of differentially expressed proteins. A total of 17,796 proteins were identified at different time points. About 1.6% was differentially expressed between normal and infected samples. Of these, 23, 27, and 136 polypeptides were up-regulated, and 14, 18, and 123 polypeptides were down-regulated, at 12 hpi, 4 dpi, and 7 dpi, respectively. Vann diagram analysis indicated that 17 proteins were up-regulated and one was down-regulated at all three time points. Selected proteins were validated by real-time PCR and by Western blot. Our results show that apoptosis and cytoskeleton-associated proteins expression was suppressed, whereas interferon-induced proteins plus other innate immunity proteins were induced after the infection. Understanding of the interactions between virus and the host will provide insights into the basis of interspecies transmission, adaptation, and virus pathogenicity. PMID:25883591

  16. Detection of seasonal H3N2 influenza A virus by type-specific TaqMan minor groove binder probe assay.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ruixue; Schwartzman, Louis M; Memoli, Matthew J; Taubenberger, Jeffery K

    2011-06-01

    Despite the emergence of the pandemic H1N1 influenza A virus in 2009, seasonal H3N2 viruses continue to co-circulate in the population and may even predominate in the coming influenza season. We describe a specific minor groove binder TaqMan assay for H3N2 viruses with a detection limit of 16.5 standard DNA copies.

  17. Detection of seasonal H3N2 influenza A virus by type-specific TaqMan minor groove binder probe assay

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ruixue; Schwartzman, Louis M.; Memoli, Matthew J.; Taubenberger, Jeffery K.

    2011-01-01

    Despite the emergence of the pandemic H1N1 influenza A virus in 2009, seasonal H3N2 viruses continue to co-circulate in the population, and may even predominate in the coming influenza season. We describe a specific minor groove binder Taqman assay for H3N2 viruses with a detection limit of 16.5 standard DNA copies. PMID:21429691

  18. Neutralizing Antibody Responses to Antigenically Drifted Influenza A(H3N2) Viruses among Children and Adolescents following 2014-2015 Inactivated and Live Attenuated Influenza Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Judith M.; Gross, F. Liaini; Jefferson, Stacie; Cole, Kelly Stefano; Archibald, Crystal Ann; Nowalk, Mary Patricia; Susick, Michael; Moehling, Krissy; Spencer, Sarah; Chung, Jessie R.; Flannery, Brendan; Zimmerman, Richard K.

    2016-01-01

    Human influenza A(H3N2) viruses that predominated during the moderately severe 2014-2015 influenza season differed antigenically from the vaccine component, resulting in reduced vaccine effectiveness (VE). To examine antibody responses to 2014-2015 inactivated influenza vaccine (IIV) and live-attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) among children and adolescents, we collected sera before and after vaccination from 150 children aged 3 to 17 years enrolled at health care facilities. Hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assays were used to assess the antibody responses to vaccine strains. We evaluated cross-reactive antibody responses against two representative A(H3N2) viruses that had antigenically drifted from the A(H3N2) vaccine component using microneutralization (MN) assays. Postvaccination antibody titers to drifted A(H3N2) viruses were higher following receipt of IIV (MN geometric mean titers [GMTs], 63 to 68; 38 to 45% achieved seroconversion) versus LAIV (MN GMT, 22; only 3 to 5% achieved seroconversion). In 9- to 17-year-olds, the highest MN titers were observed among IIV-vaccinated individuals who had received LAIV in the previous season. Among all IIV recipients aged 3 to 17 years, the strongest predictor of antibody responses to the drifted viruses was the prevaccination titers to the vaccine strain. The results of our study suggest that in an antigenically drifted influenza season, vaccination still induced cross-reactive antibody responses to drifted circulating A(H3N2) viruses, although higher antibody titers may be required for protection. Antibody responses to drifted A(H3N2) viruses following vaccination were influenced by multiple factors, including vaccine type and preexisting immunity from prior exposure. PMID:27558294

  19. Isolation of influenza A(H3N2)v virus from pigs and characterization of its biological properties in pigs and mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seong-Hee; Kim, Hee-Jeong; Jin, Young-Hwa; Yeoul, Jeong-Ji; Lee, Kyoung-Ki; Oem, Jae-Ku; Lee, Myoung-Heon; Park, Choi-Kyu

    2013-11-01

    Recently, a novel reassortant virus, influenza A(H3N2)v [A(H3N2)v], was identified as the causative pathogen in 307 human cases of influenza in the United States. A(H3N2)v contains the matrix gene from the 2009 pandemic H1N1 (pH1N1) virus, while its other genes originate from H3N2 viruses with triple-reassorted internal genes. In this study, we isolated three A(H3N2)v viruses from commercial pigs in Korea that showed similarities with published human A(H3N2)v viruses in eight segment sequence alignments. After genetic characterization, the pathogenicity of one of these viruses was assessed in pigs and mice. Infection of pigs with this novel virus resulted in mild interstitial pneumonia with marked oronasal shedding of viral RNA for about 14 days. In mice, the virus replicated efficiently in the lungs; viral RNA was detected up to 9 days post-inoculation. However, the virus did not cause severe disease or death in mice, despite the administration of a high infectious dose (10(5.2) TCID50). This study demonstrates that A(H3N2)v causes a high morbidity rate with low virulence; however, global monitoring of A(H3N2)v outbreaks in mammals will be needed to determine whether this novel subtype will shift to a highly pathogenic virus.

  20. Multiple Influenza A (H3N2) Mutations Conferring Resistance to Neuraminidase Inhibitors in a Bone Marrow Transplant Recipient

    PubMed Central

    Eshaghi, Alireza; Shalhoub, Sarah; Rosenfeld, Paul; Li, Aimin; Higgins, Rachel R.; Stogios, Peter J.; Savchenko, Alexei; Bastien, Nathalie; Li, Yan; Rotstein, Coleman

    2014-01-01

    Immunocompromised patients are predisposed to infections caused by influenza virus. Influenza virus may produce considerable morbidity, including protracted illness and prolonged viral shedding in these patients, thus prompting higher doses and prolonged courses of antiviral therapy. This approach may promote the emergence of resistant strains. Characterization of neuraminidase (NA) inhibitor (NAI)-resistant strains of influenza A virus is essential for documenting causes of resistance. In this study, using quantitative real-time PCR along with conventional Sanger sequencing, we identified an NAI-resistant strain of influenza A (H3N2) virus in an immunocompromised patient. In-depth analysis by deep gene sequencing revealed that various known markers of antiviral resistance, including transient R292K and Q136K substitutions and a sustained E119K (N2 numbering) substitution in the NA protein emerged during prolonged antiviral therapy. In addition, a combination of a 4-amino-acid deletion at residues 245 to 248 (Δ245-248) accompanied by the E119V substitution occurred, causing resistance to or reduced inhibition by NAIs (oseltamivir, zanamivir, and peramivir). Resistant variants within a pool of viral quasispecies arose during combined antiviral treatment. More research is needed to understand the interplay of drug resistance mutations, viral fitness, and transmission. PMID:25246391

  1. Antigenic Drift of A/H3N2/Virus and Circulation of Influenza-Like Viruses During the 2014/2015 Influenza Season in Poland.

    PubMed

    Bednarska, K; Hallmann-Szelińska, E; Kondratiuk, K; Brydak, L B

    2016-01-01

    Morbidity rates of influenza could be greatly reduced due to vaccination. However, the virus is able to evolve through genetic mutations, which is why vaccines with updated composition are necessary every season. Their effectiveness depends on whether there is a good antigenic match between circulating viruses and vaccine strains. In Poland, the 2014/2015 influenza epidemic started in week 5 (January/February) of 2015 and continued until week 17 (April) of 2015. The influenza activity was moderate with the highest incidence of influence-like illness at week 10/2015 (March). During that season, antigenic drift of influenza virus A/H3N2/ occurred causing higher rates of A/H3N2/ infections. Among the 2416 tested specimens, 22.6 % of influenza cases were positive for A/H3N2/, while A/H1N1/pdm09 constituted 14.6 % cases. Influenza A viruses were detected in co-circulation with influenza B viruses; the latter amounted to 34.1 % of all influenza detections. Other detected causes of influenza-like illness consisted of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), being predominant, and, sporadically, human coronavirus, parainfluenza 1-3, rhinovirus, and adenovirus. Despite low vaccine effectiveness of solely one component, A/H3N2/, the vaccine could mitigate or shorten the length of influenza infection and reduce the number of severe outcomes and mortality. Thus, vaccination against influenza remains the most effective way to prevent illness and possibly fatal outcomes.

  2. Genomewide analysis of reassortment and evolution of human influenza A(H3N2) viruses circulating between 1968 and 2011.

    PubMed

    Westgeest, Kim B; Russell, Colin A; Lin, Xudong; Spronken, Monique I J; Bestebroer, Theo M; Bahl, Justin; van Beek, Ruud; Skepner, Eugene; Halpin, Rebecca A; de Jong, Jan C; Rimmelzwaan, Guus F; Osterhaus, Albert D M E; Smith, Derek J; Wentworth, David E; Fouchier, Ron A M; de Graaf, Miranda

    2014-03-01

    Influenza A(H3N2) viruses became widespread in humans during the 1968 H3N2 virus pandemic and have been a major cause of influenza epidemics ever since. These viruses evolve continuously by reassortment and genomic evolution. Antigenic drift is the cause for the need to update influenza vaccines frequently. Using two data sets that span the entire period of circulation of human influenza A(H3N2) viruses, it was shown that influenza A(H3N2) virus evolution can be mapped to 13 antigenic clusters. Here we analyzed the full genomes of 286 influenza A(H3N2) viruses from these two data sets to investigate the genomic evolution and reassortment patterns. Numerous reassortment events were found, scattered over the entire period of virus circulation, but most prominently in viruses circulating between 1991 and 1998. Some of these reassortment events persisted over time, and one of these coincided with an antigenic cluster transition. Furthermore, selection pressures and nucleotide and amino acid substitution rates of all proteins were studied, including those of the recently discovered PB1-N40, PA-X, PA-N155, and PA-N182 proteins. Rates of nucleotide and amino acid substitutions were most pronounced for the hemagglutinin, neuraminidase, and PB1-F2 proteins. Selection pressures were highest in hemagglutinin, neuraminidase, matrix 1, and nonstructural protein 1. This study of genotype in relation to antigenic phenotype throughout the period of circulation of human influenza A(H3N2) viruses leads to a better understanding of the evolution of these viruses. Each winter, influenza virus infects approximately 5 to 15% of the world's population, resulting in significant morbidity and mortality. Influenza A(H3N2) viruses evolve continuously by reassortment and genomic evolution. This leads to changes in antigenic recognition (antigenic drift) which make it necessary to update vaccines against influenza A(H3N2) viruses frequently. In this study, the relationship of genetic evolution

  3. Interim estimates of the effectiveness of the influenza vaccine against A(H3N2) influenza in adults in South Korea, 2016-2017 season.

    PubMed

    Noh, Ji Yun; Lim, Sooyeon; Song, Joon Young; Choi, Won Suk; Jeong, Hye Won; Heo, Jung Yeon; Lee, Jacob; Seo, Yu Bin; Lee, Jin-Soo; Wie, Seong Heon; Kim, Young Keun; Park, Kyung Hwa; Jung, Sook-In; Kim, Shin Woo; Lee, Sun Hee; Lee, Han Sol; Yoon, Young Hoon; Cheong, Hee Jin; Kim, Woo Joo

    2017-01-01

    In the 2016-2017 season, the A(H3N2) influenza epidemic presented an unusual early peak pattern compared with past seasons in South Korea. The interim vaccine effectiveness (VE) of influenza vaccination in preventing laboratory-confirmed influenza was estimated using test-negative design through the tertiary hospital-based influenza surveillance system in South Korea. From 1 September, 2016 to 7 January, 2017, adjusted VE of influenza vaccination in preventing laboratory-confirmed A(H3N2) was -52.1% (95% confidence interval [CI], -147.2 to 6.4); -70.0% (95% CI, -212.0 to 7.4) in 19-64 years and 4.3% (95% CI, -137.8 to 61.5) in the elderly. Circulating A(H3N2) viruses belonged to the three phylogenetic subclades of 3C.2a, differently to A/Hong Kong/4801/2014, the current vaccine strain. Amino acid substitutions in hemagglutinin of circulating viruses seem to contribute to low VE. In conclusion, interim VE analysis presented that the protection of laboratory-confirmed influenza by seasonal influenza vaccination did not show the statistical significance in South Korea in the 2016-2017 influenza season.

  4. Canine susceptibility to human influenza viruses (A/pdm 09H1N1, A/H3N2 and B).

    PubMed

    Song, Daesub; Kim, Hyekwon; Na, Woonsung; Hong, Minki; Park, Seong-Jun; Moon, Hyoungjoon; Kang, Bokyu; Lyoo, Kwang-Soo; Yeom, Minjoo; Jeong, Dae Gwin; An, Dong-Jun; Kim, Jeong-Ki

    2015-02-01

    We investigated the infectivity and transmissibility of the human seasonal H3N2, pandemic (pdm) H1N1 (2009) and B influenza viruses in dogs. Dogs inoculated with human seasonal H3N2 and pdm H1N1 influenza viruses exhibited nasal shedding and were seroconverted against the viruses; this did not occur in the influenza B virus-inoculated dogs. Transmission of human H3N2 virus between dogs was demonstrated by observing nasal shedding and seroconversion in naïve dogs after contact with inoculated dogs. The seroprevalence study offered evidence of human H3N2 infection occurring in dogs since 2008. Furthermore, serological evidence of pdm H1N1 influenza virus infection alone and in combination with canine H3N2 virus was found in the serum samples collected from field dogs during 2010 and 2011. Our results suggest that dogs may be hosts for human seasonal H3N2 and pdm H1N1 influenza viruses.

  5. A bivalent live-attenuated influenza vaccine for the control and prevention of H3N8 and H3N2 canine influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Laura; Nogales, Aitor; Murcia, Pablo R; Parrish, Colin R; Martínez-Sobrido, Luis

    2017-08-03

    Canine influenza viruses (CIVs) cause a contagious respiratory disease in dogs. CIV subtypes include H3N8, which originated from the transfer of H3N8 equine influenza virus (EIV) to dogs; and the H3N2, which is an avian-origin virus adapted to infect dogs. Only inactivated influenza vaccines (IIVs) are currently available against the different CIV subtypes. However, the efficacy of these CIV IIVs is not optimal and improved vaccines are necessary for the efficient prevention of disease caused by CIVs in dogs. Since live-attenuated influenza vaccines (LAIVs) induce better immunogenicity and protection efficacy than IIVs, we have combined our previously described H3N8 and H3N2 CIV LAIVs to create a bivalent vaccine against both CIV subtypes. Our findings show that, in a mouse model of infection, the bivalent CIV LAIV is safe and able to induce, upon a single intranasal immunization, better protection than that induced by a bivalent CIV IIV against subsequent challenge with H3N8 or H3N2 CIVs. These protection results also correlated with the ability of the bivalent CIV LAIV to induce better humoral immune responses. This is the first description of a bivalent LAIV for the control and prevention of H3N8 and H3N2 CIV infections in dogs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Efficacy of inactivated and live-attenuated influenza virus vaccines in pigs against infection and transmission of emerging H3N2 similar to the 2011-2012 H3N2v

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Vaccines provide a primary means to limit disease but may not be effective at blocking infection and pathogen transmission. The objective of the current study was to evaluate the efficacy of commercial inactivated swine influenza A virus (IAV) vaccines and experimental live-attenuated influenza viru...

  7. Genetic divergence of Influenza A(H3N2) amino acid substitutions mark the beginning of the 2016-2017 winter season in Israel.

    PubMed

    Glatman-Freedman, Aharona; Drori, Yaron; Beni, Sharon Alexandra; Friedman, Nehemya; Pando, Rakefet; Sefty, Hanna; Tal, Ilana; McCauley, John; Rahav, Galia; Keller, Nathan; Shohat, Tamy; Mendelson, Ella; Hindiyeh, Musa; Mandelboim, Michal

    2017-08-01

    Influenza vaccine composition is reevaluated each year due to the frequency and accumulation of genetic changes that influenza viruses undergo. The beginning of the 2016-2017 influenza surveillance period in Israel has been marked by the dominance of influenza A(H3N2). To evaluate the type, subtype, genetic evolution and amino acid substitutions of influenza A(H3N2) viruses detected among community patients with influenza-like illness (ILI) and hospitalized patients with respiratory illness in the first weeks of the 2016-2017 influenza season. Respiratory samples from community patients with influenza-like illness and from hospitalized patients underwent identification, subtyping and molecular characterization. Hemagglutinin sequences were compared to the vaccine strain, phylogenetic tree was created, and amino acid substitutions were determined. Influenza A(H3N2) predominated during the early stages of the 2016-2017 influenza season. Noticeably, approximately 20% of community patients and 36% of hospitalized patients, positive for influenza3), received the 2016-2017 influenza vaccine. The influenza A(H3N2) viruses demonstrated genetic divergence from the vaccine strain into three separate subgroups within the 3C.2a clade. One resembled the new 3C.2a1 subclade, one resembled the recently proposed 3C.2a2 subclade and the other was not previously described. Diversity was observed within each subgroup, in terms of additional amino acid substitutions. Characterization of the 2016-2017 A(H3N2) influenza viruses is imperative for determining the future influenza vaccine composition. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Mid-Season Estimates of Influenza Vaccine Effectiveness against Influenza A(H3N2) Hospitalization in the Elderly in Quebec, Canada, January 2015.

    PubMed

    Gilca, Rodica; Skowronski, Danuta M; Douville-Fradet, Monique; Amini, Rachid; Boulianne, Nicole; Rouleau, Isabelle; Martineau, Christine; Charest, Hugues; De Serres, Gaston

    2015-01-01

    The 2014/15 influenza season in Canada was characterized by an early epidemic due to vaccine-mismatched influenza A(H3N2) viruses, disproportionately affecting elderly individuals ≥65-years-old. We assessed vaccine effectiveness (VE) against A(H3N2) hospitalization among elderly individuals during the peak weeks of the 2014/15 epidemic in Quebec, Canada. Nasal specimens and clinical/epidemiological data were collected within 7 days of illness onset from elderly patients admitted with respiratory symptoms to one of four participating hospitals between November 30, 2014 and January 13, 2015. Cases tested RT-PCR positive for influenza A(H3N2) and controls tested negative for any influenza. VE was assessed by test-negative case-control design. There were 314 participants including 186 cases (62% vaccinated) and 128 controls (59% vaccinated) included in primary VE analysis. Median age was 81.5 years, two-thirds were admitted from the community and 91% had underlying comorbidity. Crude VE against A(H3N2) hospitalization was -17% (95%CI: -86% to 26%), decreasing to -23% (95%CI: -99 to 23%) with adjustment for age and comorbidity, and to -39% (95%CI: -142 to 20%) with additional adjustment for specimen collection interval, calendar time, type of residence and hospital. In sensitivity analyses, VE estimates were improved toward the null with restriction to participants admitted from the community (-2%; 95%CI: -105 to 49%) or with specimen collection ≤4 days since illness onset (- 8%; 95%CI: -104 to 43%) but further from the null with restriction to participants with comorbidity (-51%; 95%CI: -169 to 15%). The 2014/15 mismatched influenza vaccine provided elderly patients with no cross-protection against hospitalization with the A(H3N2) epidemic strain, reinforcing the need for adjunct protective measures among high-risk individuals and improved vaccine options.

  9. Mid-Season Estimates of Influenza Vaccine Effectiveness against Influenza A(H3N2) Hospitalization in the Elderly in Quebec, Canada, January 2015

    PubMed Central

    Gilca, Rodica; Skowronski, Danuta M.; Douville-Fradet, Monique; Amini, Rachid; Boulianne, Nicole; Rouleau, Isabelle; Martineau, Christine; Charest, Hugues; De Serres, Gaston

    2015-01-01

    Background The 2014/15 influenza season in Canada was characterized by an early epidemic due to vaccine-mismatched influenza A(H3N2) viruses, disproportionately affecting elderly individuals ≥65-years-old. We assessed vaccine effectiveness (VE) against A(H3N2) hospitalization among elderly individuals during the peak weeks of the 2014/15 epidemic in Quebec, Canada. Methods Nasal specimens and clinical/epidemiological data were collected within 7 days of illness onset from elderly patients admitted with respiratory symptoms to one of four participating hospitals between November 30, 2014 and January 13, 2015. Cases tested RT-PCR positive for influenza A(H3N2) and controls tested negative for any influenza. VE was assessed by test-negative case-control design. Results There were 314 participants including 186 cases (62% vaccinated) and 128 controls (59% vaccinated) included in primary VE analysis. Median age was 81.5 years, two-thirds were admitted from the community and 91% had underlying comorbidity. Crude VE against A(H3N2) hospitalization was -17% (95%CI: -86% to 26%), decreasing to -23% (95%CI: -99 to 23%) with adjustment for age and comorbidity, and to -39% (95%CI: -142 to 20%) with additional adjustment for specimen collection interval, calendar time, type of residence and hospital. In sensitivity analyses, VE estimates were improved toward the null with restriction to participants admitted from the community (-2%; 95%CI: -105 to 49%) or with specimen collection ≤4 days since illness onset (- 8%; 95%CI: -104 to 43%) but further from the null with restriction to participants with comorbidity (-51%; 95%CI: -169 to 15%). Conclusion The 2014/15 mismatched influenza vaccine provided elderly patients with no cross-protection against hospitalization with the A(H3N2) epidemic strain, reinforcing the need for adjunct protective measures among high-risk individuals and improved vaccine options. PMID:26200655

  10. Inference of Genotype–Phenotype Relationships in the Antigenic Evolution of Human Influenza A (H3N2) Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Steinbrück, Lars; McHardy, Alice Carolyn

    2012-01-01

    Distinguishing mutations that determine an organism's phenotype from (near-) neutral ‘hitchhikers’ is a fundamental challenge in genome research, and is relevant for numerous medical and biotechnological applications. For human influenza viruses, recognizing changes in the antigenic phenotype and a strains' capability to evade pre-existing host immunity is important for the production of efficient vaccines. We have developed a method for inferring ‘antigenic trees’ for the major viral surface protein hemagglutinin. In the antigenic tree, antigenic weights are assigned to all tree branches, which allows us to resolve the antigenic impact of the associated amino acid changes. Our technique predicted antigenic distances with comparable accuracy to antigenic cartography. Additionally, it identified both known and novel sites, and amino acid changes with antigenic impact in the evolution of influenza A (H3N2) viruses from 1968 to 2003. The technique can also be applied for inference of ‘phenotype trees’ and genotype–phenotype relationships from other types of pairwise phenotype distances. PMID:22532796

  11. Localization of epitopes recognized by monoclonal antibodies that neutralized the H3N2 influenza viruses in man

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Jun; Ohshima, Nobuko; Kubota-Koketsu, Ritsuko; Iba, Yoshitaka; Ota, Sayuri; Takase, Wakana; Yoshikawa, Tetsushi; Ishikawa, Toyokazu; Asano, Yoshizo; Okuno, Yoshinobu; Kurosawa, Yoshikazu

    2011-01-01

    Through extensive isolation of neutralizing mAbs against H3N2 influenza viruses representing the in vivo repertoire in a human donor, we examined the relationships between antigenic drift of influenza virus and protective antibodies generated in an infected individual. The majority of mAbs isolated from a donor born in 1960 were divided into three major groups with distinct strain specificity: 1968–1973, 1977–1993 and 1997–2003. In the present study, we developed a new method that allowed us to comprehensively determine the location of epitopes recognized by many mAbs. Original haemagglutinins (HAs) of several strains and chimaeric variants, in which one of the seven sites (A, B1, B2, C1, C2, D or E) was replaced by some other strain-derived sequence, were artificially expressed on the cell surface. The binding activity of mAbs to the HAs was examined by flow cytometry. By using this method, we determined the location of epitopes recognized by 98 different mAbs. Clones that neutralize the 1968–1973 strains bind to site B2/D, A or A/B1. While sites C, E and B were recognized by clones that neutralized the 1977–1993 strains, the majority of these clones bind to site C. Clones that neutralize the 1997–2003 strains bind to site B, A/B1, A/B2 or E/C2. PMID:21068214

  12. Genetic characterization of seasonal influenza A (H3N2) viruses in Ontario during 2010–2011 influenza season: high prevalence of mutations at antigenic sites

    PubMed Central

    Eshaghi, AliReza; Duvvuri, Venkata R; Li, Aimin; Patel, Samir N; Bastien, Nathalie; Li, Yan; Low, Donald E; Gubbay, Jonathan B

    2014-01-01

    Background The direct effect of antigenic site mutations in influenza viruses on antigenic drift and vaccine effectiveness is poorly understood. Objective To investigate the genetic and antigenic characteristics of human influenza A (H3N2) viruses circulating in Ontario during the early 2010–2011 winter season. Study design We sequenced the hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) genes from 41 A(H3N2) viruses detected in nasopharyngeal specimens. Strain typing was performed by hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay. Molecular and phylogenetic tree analyses were conducted. Results HA and NA genes showed high similarity to the 2010–2011 vaccine strain, A/Perth/16/2009 (H3N2)-like virus (97·7–98·5% and 98·7–99·5% amino acid (AA) identity, respectively). Compared to A/Perth/16/2009 strain, HA gene mutations were documented at 28 different AA positions across all five H3 antigenic sites, with a range of 5–11 mutations in individual viruses. Thirty-six (88%) viruses had 8 AA substitutions in common; none of these had reduced HI titer. Among Ontario isolates, 11 antigenic site AAs were positively selected with an increase in glycosylation sites. Conclusion The presence of antigenic site mutations with high frequency among 2010–2011 influenza H3N2 isolates confirms ongoing adaptive H3N2 evolution. These may represent early phylogenetic changes that could cause antigenic drift with further mutations. Clinical relevance of antigenic site mutations not causing drift in HI assays is unknown and requires further investigation. In addition, viral sequencing information will assist with vaccine strain planning and may facilitate early detection of vaccine escape. PMID:24313991

  13. Immune Response to Vaccination with a Live Influenza Virus (H3N2) Vaccine (“Ann” Strain)

    PubMed Central

    Prévost, J. M.; Peetermans, J.; Lamy, F.; Huygelen, C.

    1973-01-01

    A live attenuated influenza virus (“Ann” strain) derived from A/England/878/69 was given intranasally to a group of volunteers, most of whom had already circulating antibodies against H3N2 viruses at the time of inoculation. There was a fourfold or higher increase of circulating hemagglutination-inhibiting antibodies in those volunteers who had relatively low initial titers. The response was lower in those with initially higher serum titers. The pattern of the serum neutralizing antibody response was very similar. The geometric means of the antineuraminidase antibodies were 67 and 118 pre- and postvaccination, respectively. All subjects showed a rise in local neutralizing antibodies in their nasal secretions with geometric means of 4 and 17 pre- and postvaccination, respectively. The levels of local antineuraminidase antibodies also rose in most subjects. In addition to the response to the homologous virus type, the antibody formation to the recent A/England/42/72 was measured in the sera and nasal secretions of some subjects. There was a clearcut response in most of the sera and in all of the secretions examined. The stimulation of circulating lymphocytes was measured in 6 volunteers. All volunteers showed a temporary stimulation. The stimulation index ranged between 2.5 and 28.5. PMID:4729931

  14. H3N2 canine influenza virus causes severe morbidity in dogs with induction of genes related to inflammation and apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Dogs are companion animals that live in close proximity with humans. Canine H3N2 influenza virus has been isolated from pet dogs that showed severe respiratory signs and other clinical symptoms such as fever, reduced body weight, and interstitial pneumonia. The canine H3N2 influenza virus can be highly transmissible among dogs via aerosols. When we analyzed global gene expression in the lungs of infected dogs, the genes associated with the immune response and cell death were greatly elevated. Taken together, our results suggest that canine H3N2 influenza virus can be easily transmitted among dogs, and that severe pneumonia in the infected dogs may be partially due to the elevated expression of genes related to inflammation and apoptosis. PMID:24090140

  15. Safety and Immunogenicity of Cell Culture-Derived A/H3N2 Variant Influenza Vaccines: A Phase I Randomized, Observer-Blind, Dose-Ranging Study

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Casey; Hohenboken, Matthew; Poling, Terry; Jaehnig, Peter; Kanesa-thasan, Niranjan

    2015-01-01

    Background. A/H3N2 variant (H3N2v) influenza may sustain human-to-human transmission, and an available candidate vaccine would be important. Methods. In this phase I, randomized, observer-blind, dose-ranging study, 627 healthy subjects ≥3 years of age were randomized to receive 2 vaccinations with H3N2c cell-culture-derived vaccine doses containing 3.75 µg, 7.5 µg, or 15 µg hemagglutinin antigen of H3N2v with or without MF59 (registered trademark of Novartis AG) adjuvant (an oil-in-water emulsion). This paper reports Day 43 planned interim data. Results. Single MF59-adjuvanted H3N2c doses elicited immune responses in almost all subjects regardless of antigen and adjuvant dose; the Center for Biologics Evaluation Research and Review (CBER) licensure criteria were met for all groups. Subjects with prevaccination hemagglutination inhibition titers <10 and children 3–<9 years achieve CBER criteria only after receiving 2 doses of nonadjuvanted H3N2c vaccine. Highest antibody titers were observed in the 7.5 µg + 0.25 mL MF59 groups in all age cohorts. MF59-adjuvanted H3N2c vaccines showed the highest rates of solicited local and systemic events, predominately mild or moderate. Conclusions. A single dose of H3N2c vaccine may be immunogenic and supports further development of MF59-adjuvanted H3N2c vaccines, especially for pediatric populations. Clinical Trials Registration. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT01855945 (http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01855945). PMID:25538277

  16. Emergence of a novel subclade of influenza A(H3N2) virus in London, December 2016 to January 2017.

    PubMed

    Harvala, Heli; Frampton, Dan; Grant, Paul; Raffle, Jade; Ferns, Ruth Bridget; Kozlakidis, Zisis; Kellam, Paul; Pillay, Deenan; Hayward, Andrew; Nastouli, Eleni

    2017-02-23

    We report the molecular investigations of a large influenza A(H3N2) outbreak, in a season characterised by sharp increase in influenza admissions since December 2016. Analysis of haemagglutinin (HA) sequences demonstrated co-circulation of multiple clades (3C.3a, 3C.2a and 3C.2a1). Most variants fell into a novel subclade (proposed as 3C.2a2); they possessed four unique amino acid substitutions in the HA protein and loss of a potential glycosylation site. These changes potentially modify the H3N2 strain antigenicity. This article is copyright of The Authors, 2017.

  17. Emergence of a novel subclade of influenza A(H3N2) virus in London, December 2016 to January 2017

    PubMed Central

    Harvala, Heli; Frampton, Dan; Grant, Paul; Raffle, Jade; Ferns, Ruth Bridget; Kozlakidis, Zisis; Kellam, Paul; Pillay, Deenan; Hayward, Andrew; Nastouli, Eleni

    2017-01-01

    We report the molecular investigations of a large influenza A(H3N2) outbreak, in a season characterised by sharp increase in influenza admissions since December 2016. Analysis of haemagglutinin (HA) sequences demonstrated co-circulation of multiple clades (3C.3a, 3C.2a and 3C.2a1). Most variants fell into a novel subclade (proposed as 3C.2a2); they possessed four unique amino acid substitutions in the HA protein and loss of a potential glycosylation site. These changes potentially modify the H3N2 strain antigenicity. PMID:28251889

  18. Whole-Genome Analysis of Human Influenza A Virus Reveals Multiple Persistent Lineages and Reassortment among Recent H3N2 Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, Edward C; Ghedin, Elodie; Miller, Naomi; Taylor, Jill; Bao, Yiming; St George, Kirsten; Grenfell, Bryan T; Salzberg, Steven L; Fraser, Claire M; Taubenberger, Jeffery K

    2005-01-01

    Understanding the evolution of influenza A viruses in humans is important for surveillance and vaccine strain selection. We performed a phylogenetic analysis of 156 complete genomes of human H3N2 influenza A viruses collected between 1999 and 2004 from New York State, United States, and observed multiple co-circulating clades with different population frequencies. Strikingly, phylogenies inferred for individual gene segments revealed that multiple reassortment events had occurred among these clades, such that one clade of H3N2 viruses present at least since 2000 had provided the hemagglutinin gene for all those H3N2 viruses sampled after the 2002–2003 influenza season. This reassortment event was the likely progenitor of the antigenically variant influenza strains that caused the A/Fujian/411/2002-like epidemic of the 2003–2004 influenza season. However, despite sharing the same hemagglutinin, these phylogenetically distinct lineages of viruses continue to co-circulate in the same population. These data, derived from the first large-scale analysis of H3N2 viruses, convincingly demonstrate that multiple lineages can co-circulate, persist, and reassort in epidemiologically significant ways, and underscore the importance of genomic analyses for future influenza surveillance. PMID:16026181

  19. Phylogenetic relationships of the HA and NA genes between vaccine and seasonal influenza A(H3N2) strains in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sehee; Bae, Joon-Yong; Yoo, Kirim; Cheong, Hee Jin; Noh, Ji Yun; Hong, Kyung Wook; Lemey, Philippe; Vrancken, Bram; Kim, Juwon; Nam, Misun; Yun, Soo-Hyeon; Cho, Woo In; Song, Joon Young; Kim, Woo Joo; Park, Mee Sook; Song, Jin-Won; Kee, Sun-Ho; Song, Ki-Joon; Park, Man-Seong

    2017-01-01

    Seasonal influenza is caused by two influenza A subtype (H1N1 and H3N2) and two influenza B lineage (Victoria and Yamagata) viruses. Of these antigenically distinct viruses, the H3N2 virus was consistently detected in substantial proportions in Korea during the 2010/11-2013/14 seasons when compared to the other viruses and appeared responsible for the influenza-like illness rate peak during the first half of the 2011/12 season. To further scrutinize possible causes for this, we investigated the evolutionary and serological relationships between the vaccine and Korean H3N2 strains during the 2011/12 season for the main antigenic determinants of influenza viruses, the hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) genes. In the 2011/12 season, when the number of H3N2 cases peaked, the majority of the Korean strains did not belong to the HA clade of A/Perth/16/2009 vaccine, and no Korean strains were of this lineage in the NA segment. In a serological assay, post-vaccinated human sera exhibited much reduced hemagglutination inhibition antibody titers against the non-vaccine clade Korean H3N2 strains. Moreover, Korean strains harbored several amino acid differences in the HA antigenic sites and in the NA with respect to vaccine lineages during this season. Of these, the HA antigenic site C residues 45 and 261 and the NA residue 81 appeared to be the signatures of positive selection. In subsequent seasons, when H3N2 cases were lower, the HA and NA genes of vaccine and Korean strains were more phylogenetically related to each other. Combined, our results provide indirect support for using phylogenetic clustering patterns of the HA and possibly also the NA genes in the selection of vaccine viruses and the assessment of vaccine effectiveness. PMID:28257427

  20. Hemagglutinin Gene Clade 3C.2a Influenza A(H3N2) Viruses, Alachua County, Florida, USA, 2014–15

    PubMed Central

    Lednicky, John A.; Iovine, Nicole M.; Brew, Joe; Loeb, Julia C.; Sugimoto, Jonathan D.; Rand, Kenneth H.

    2016-01-01

    Influenza A(H3N2) strains isolated during 2014–15 in Alachua County, Florida, USA, belonged to hemagglutinin gene clade 3C.2a. High rates of influenza-like illness and confirmed influenza cases in children were associated with a decrease in estimated vaccine effectiveness. Illnesses were milder than in 2013–14; severe cases were concentrated in elderly patients with underlying diseases. PMID:26692074

  1. Complete genome sequence of an H3N2 avian influenza virus isolated from a live poultry market in eastern China.

    PubMed

    Teng, Qiaoyang; Hu, Tao; Li, Xuesong; Li, Guoxin; Li, Zejun

    2012-11-01

    Previous studies indicate that the H3 influenza virus has the ability to establish infection upon interspecies transmission and poses a threat to mammals. Therefore, it is important to enhance the surveillance of H3 avian influenza viruses (AIVs). In this study, A/duck/Shanghai/C84/2009(H3N2) (C84) was isolated from a live poultry market in Shanghai, China. Using PCR and sequencing analyses, we obtained the whole-genome sequence of this virus. The H3N2 virus proved to be a novel multiple-gene reassortant AIV whose genes were derived from H3N2, H4N6, H6N2, and H9N2. Knowledge regarding the complete genome sequence of the C84 virus will be useful for epidemiological surveillance.

  2. Assessing Antigenic Drift of Seasonal Influenza A(H3N2) and A(H1N1)pdm09 Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Tewawong, Nipaporn; Prachayangprecha, Slinporn; Vichiwattana, Preeyaporn; Korkong, Sumeth; Klinfueng, Sirapa; Vongpunsawad, Sompong; Thongmee, Thanunrat; Theamboonlers, Apiradee; Poovorawan, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Under selective pressure from the host immune system, antigenic epitopes of influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA) have continually evolved to escape antibody recognition, termed antigenic drift. We analyzed the genomes of influenza A(H3N2) and A(H1N1)pdm09 virus strains circulating in Thailand between 2010 and 2014 and assessed how well the yearly vaccine strains recommended for the southern hemisphere matched them. We amplified and sequenced the HA gene of 120 A(H3N2) and 81 A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza virus samples obtained from respiratory specimens and calculated the perfect-match vaccine efficacy using the pepitope model, which quantitated the antigenic drift in the dominant epitope of HA. Phylogenetic analysis of the A(H3N2) HA1 genes classified most strains into genetic clades 1, 3A, 3B, and 3C. The A(H3N2) strains from the 2013 and 2014 seasons showed very low to moderate vaccine efficacy and demonstrated antigenic drift from epitopes C and A to epitope B. Meanwhile, most A(H1N1)pdm09 strains from the 2012–2014 seasons belonged to genetic clades 6A, 6B, and 6C and displayed the dominant epitope mutations at epitopes B and E. Finally, the vaccine efficacy for A(H1N1)pdm09 (79.6–93.4%) was generally higher than that of A(H3N2). These findings further confirmed the accelerating antigenic drift of the circulating influenza A(H3N2) in recent years. PMID:26440103

  3. Assessment of Molecular, Antigenic, and Pathological Features of Canine Influenza A(H3N2) Viruses That Emerged in the United States.

    PubMed

    Pulit-Penaloza, Joanna A; Simpson, Natosha; Yang, Hua; Creager, Hannah M; Jones, Joyce; Carney, Paul; Belser, Jessica A; Yang, Genyan; Chang, Jessie; Zeng, Hui; Thor, Sharmi; Jang, Yunho; Killian, Mary Lea; Jenkins-Moore, Melinda; Janas-Martindale, Alicia; Dubovi, Edward; Wentworth, David E; Stevens, James; Tumpey, Terrence M; Davis, C Todd; Maines, Taronna R

    2017-09-15

    A single subtype of canine influenza virus (CIV), A(H3N8), was circulating in the United States until a new subtype, A(H3N2), was detected in Illinois in spring 2015. Since then, this CIV has caused thousands of infections in dogs in multiple states. In this study, genetic and antigenic properties of the new CIV were evaluated. In addition, structural and glycan array binding features of the recombinant hemagglutinin were determined. Replication kinetics in human airway cells and pathogenesis and transmissibility in animal models were also assessed. A(H3N2) CIVs maintained molecular and antigenic features related to low pathogenicity avian influenza A(H3N2) viruses and were distinct from A(H3N8) CIVs. The structural and glycan array binding profile confirmed these findings and revealed avian-like receptor-binding specificity. While replication kinetics in human airway epithelial cells was on par with that of seasonal influenza viruses, mild-to-moderate disease was observed in infected mice and ferrets, and the virus was inefficiently transmitted among cohoused ferrets. Further adaptation is needed for A(H3N2) CIVs to present a likely threat to humans. However, the potential for coinfection of dogs and possible reassortment of human and other animal influenza A viruses presents an ongoing risk to public health.

  4. The Proteolytic Activation of (H3N2) Influenza A Virus Hemagglutinin Is Facilitated by Different Type II Transmembrane Serine Proteases

    PubMed Central

    Kühn, Nora; Bergmann, Silke; Kösterke, Nadine; Lambertz, Ruth L. O.; Keppner, Anna; van den Brand, Judith M. A.; Weiß, Siegfried; Hummler, Edith; Hatesuer, Bastian

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cleavage of influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA) by host cell proteases is necessary for viral activation and infectivity. In humans and mice, members of the type II transmembrane protease family (TTSP), e.g., TMPRSS2, TMPRSS4, and TMPRSS11d (HAT), have been shown to cleave influenza virus HA for viral activation and infectivity in vitro. Recently, we reported that inactivation of a single HA-activating protease gene, Tmprss2, in knockout mice inhibits the spread of H1N1 influenza viruses. However, after infection of Tmprss2 knockout mice with an H3N2 influenza virus, only a slight increase in survival was observed, and mice still lost body weight. In this study, we investigated an additional trypsin-like protease, TMPRSS4. Both TMPRSS2 and TMPRSS4 are expressed in the same cell types of the mouse lung. Deletion of Tmprss4 alone in knockout mice does not protect them from body weight loss and death upon infection with H3N2 influenza virus. In contrast, Tmprss2−/− Tmprss4−/− double-knockout mice showed a remarkably reduced virus spread and lung pathology, in addition to reduced body weight loss and mortality. Thus, our results identified TMPRSS4 as a second host cell protease that, in addition to TMPRSS2, is able to activate the HA of H3N2 influenza virus in vivo. IMPORTANCE Influenza epidemics and recurring pandemics are responsible for significant global morbidity and mortality. Due to high variability of the virus genome, resistance to available antiviral drugs is frequently observed, and new targets for treatment of influenza are needed. Host cell factors essential for processing of the virus hemagglutinin represent very suitable drug targets because the virus is dependent on these host factors for replication. We reported previously that Tmprss2-deficient mice are protected against H1N1 virus infections, but only marginal protection against H3N2 virus infections was observed. Here we show that deletion of two host protease genes, Tmprss2 and

  5. A Case of Influenza A (H3N2) Complicated by Community-Acquired Pneumonia and Death in a Young Healthy Adult during the 2013–2014 Season

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Lauren F.; Anderson, Benjamin D.; Gray, Gregory C.

    2017-01-01

    With multiple available vaccines and antivirals, seasonal influenza A is typically a self-limited acutely debilitating illness in young healthy adults. Here, we illustrate unexpected morbidity and mortality in a relatively young and healthy patient seen at a large tertiary care academic medical center for seasonal influenza A (H3N2) complicated by community-acquired pneumonia, hypoxic respiratory failure, septic shock, and death. PMID:28229066

  6. Multiple amino acid substitutions involved in the virulence enhancement of an H3N2 avian influenza A virus isolated from wild waterfowl in mice.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhijun; Sun, Weiyang; Zhang, Xinghai; Cheng, Kaihui; Zhao, Chuqi; Gao, Yuwei; Xia, Xianzhu

    2017-08-01

    Frequent emergence of low pathogenic avian influenza H3N2 viruses in the wild birds has caused concern for human health. Here, we generated mouse-adapted strains of a wild waterfowl-origin low pathogenic avian influenza H3N2 virus to identify adaptive mutations that confer enhanced virulence in mammals. The mouse lethal doses (MLD50) of the adapted strains were reduced >562-fold compared to the parental virus. Mouse-adapted strains displayed enhanced replication in vitro and in vivo, and acquired the ability to replicate in extrapulmonary tissues. These observations suggest that enhanced growth characteristics and modified cell tropism may increase the virulence of H3N2 AIVs in mice. Genomic analysis revealed mutations in the PB2 (E192K and D701N), PB1 (F269S, I475V, and L598P), HA (V242E), NA (G170R), and M1 (M192V) proteins. Our results suggest that these amino acid substitutions collaboratively enhance the ability of H3N2 avian influenza A virus to replicate and cause severe disease in mammals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Phylogenetic analysis of human influenza A/H3N2 viruses isolated in 2015 in Germany indicates significant genetic divergence from vaccine strains.

    PubMed

    Mostafa, Ahmed; Abdelwhab, El-Sayed M; Slanina, Heiko; Hussein, Mohamed A; Kuznetsova, Irina; Schüttler, Christian G; Ziebuhr, John; Pleschka, Stephan

    2016-06-01

    Infections by H3N2-type influenza A viruses (IAV) resulted in significant numbers of hospitalization in several countries in 2014-2015, causing disease also in vaccinated individuals and, in some cases, fatal outcomes. In this study, sequence analysis of H3N2 viruses isolated in Germany from 1998 to 2015, including eleven H3N2 isolates collected early in 2015, was performed. Compared to the vaccine strain A/Texas/50/2012 (H3N2), the 2015 strains from Germany showed up to 4.5 % sequence diversity in their HA1 protein, indicating substantial genetic drift. The data further suggest that two distinct phylogroups, 3C.2 and 3C.3, with 1.6-2.3 % and 0.3-2.4 % HA1 nucleotide and amino acid sequence diversity, respectively, co-circulated in Germany in the 2014/2015 season. Distinct glycosylation patterns and amino acid substitutions in the hemagglutinin and neuraminidase proteins were identified, possibly contributing to the unusually high number of H3N2 infections in this season and providing important information for developing vaccines that are effective against both genotypes.

  8. Neuraminidase-mediated haemagglutination of recent human influenza A(H3N2) viruses is determined by arginine 150 flanking the neuraminidase catalytic site.

    PubMed

    Mögling, Ramona; Richard, Mathilde J; Vliet, Stefan van der; Beek, Ruud van; Schrauwen, Eefje J A; Spronken, Monique I; Rimmelzwaan, Guus F; Fouchier, Ron A M

    2017-06-01

    Over the last decade, an increasing proportion of circulating human influenza A(H3N2) viruses exhibited haemagglutination activity that was sensitive to neuraminidase inhibitors. This change in haemagglutination as compared to older circulating A(H3N2) viruses prompted an investigation of the underlying molecular basis. Recent human influenza A(H3N2) viruses were found to agglutinate turkey erythrocytes in a manner that could be blocked with either oseltamivir or neuraminidase-specific antisera, indicating that agglutination was driven by neuraminidase, with a low or negligible contribution of haemagglutinin. Using representative virus recombinants it was shown that the haemagglutinin of a recent A(H3N2) virus indeed had decreased activity to agglutinate turkey erythrocytes, while its neuraminidase displayed increased haemagglutinating activity. Viruses with chimeric and mutant neuraminidases were used to identify the amino acid substitution histidine to arginine at position 150 flanking the neuraminidase catalytic site as the determinant of this neuraminidase-mediated haemagglutination. An analysis of publicly available neuraminidase gene sequences showed that viruses with histidine at position 150 were rapidly replaced by viruses with arginine at this position between 2005 and 2008, in agreement with the phenotypic data. As a consequence of neuraminidase-mediated haemagglutination of recent A(H3N2) viruses and poor haemagglutination via haemagglutinin, haemagglutination inhibition assays with A(H3N2) antisera are no longer useful to characterize the antigenic properties of the haemagglutinin of these viruses for vaccine strain selection purposes. Continuous monitoring of the evolution of these viruses and potential consequences for vaccine strain selection remains important.

  9. Antiviral Susceptibility of Variant Influenza A(H3N2)v Viruses Isolated in the United States from 2011 to 2013

    PubMed Central

    Sleeman, K.; Mishin, V. P.; Guo, Z.; Garten, R. J.; Balish, A.; Fry, A. M.; Villanueva, J.; Stevens, J.

    2014-01-01

    Since 2011, outbreaks caused by influenza A(H3N2) variant [A(H3N2)v] viruses have become a public health concern in the United States. The A(H3N2)v viruses share the A(H1N1)pdm09 M gene containing the marker of M2 blocker resistance, S31N, but do not contain any known molecular markers associated with resistance to neuraminidase (NA) inhibitors (NAIs). Using a fluorescent NA inhibition (NI) assay, the susceptibilities of recovered A(H3N2)v viruses (n = 168) to FDA-approved (oseltamivir and zanamivir) and other (peramivir, laninamivir, and A-315675) NAIs were assessed. All A(H3N2)v viruses tested, with the exception of a single virus strain, A/Ohio/88/2012, isolated from an untreated patient, were susceptible to the NAIs tested. The A/Ohio/88/2012 virus contained two rare substitutions, S245N and S247P, in the NA and demonstrated reduced inhibition by oseltamivir (31-fold) and zanamivir (66-fold) in the NI assay. Using recombinant NA (recNA) proteins, S247P was shown to be responsible for the observed altered NAI susceptibility, in addition to an approximately 60% reduction in NA enzymatic activity. The S247P substitution has not been previously reported as a molecular marker of reduced susceptibility to the NAIs. Using cell culture assays, the investigational antiviral drugs nitazoxanide, favipiravir, and fludase were shown to inhibit the replication of A(H3N2)v viruses, including the virus with the S247P substitution in the NA. This report demonstrates the importance of continuous monitoring of susceptibility of zoonotic influenza viruses to available and investigational antiviral drugs. PMID:24449767

  10. Complete Genome Sequence of an Avian-Origin H3N2 Canine Influenza A Virus Isolated in Farmed Dogs in Southern China

    PubMed Central

    Su, Shuo; Cao, Nan; Chen, Jidang; Zhao, Furong; Li, Huatao; Zhao, Mingxi; Wang, Yanjing; Huang, Zhen; Yuan, Liguo; Wang, Heng; Zhang, Guihong

    2012-01-01

    We report here the complete genomic sequence of an avian-origin H3N2 canine influenza A virus containing multiple mutations in farmed dogs in southern China. Phylogenetic analyses of the sequences of all eight viral RNA segments demonstrated that these are wholly avian influenza viruses of the Asia lineage. To our knowledge, this is the first report of interspecies transmission of an avian H3N2 influenza virus to domestic farm dogs under natural conditions in Southern China. The amino acid information provided herein suggests that continued study is required to determine if this virus could be established in the farm dog population and pose potential threats to public health. PMID:22923798

  11. Chimeric virus-like particles containing influenza HA antigen and GPI-CCL28 induce long-lasting mucosal immunity against H3N2 viruses

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Teena; Berman, Zachary; Luo, Yuan; Wang, Chao; Wang, Shelly; Compans, Richard W.; Wang, Bao-Zhong

    2017-01-01

    Influenza virus is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality, with worldwide seasonal epidemics. The duration and quality of humoral immunity and generation of immunological memory to vaccines is critical for protective immunity. In the current study, we examined the long-lasting protective efficacy of chimeric VLPs (cVLPs) containing influenza HA and GPI-anchored CCL28 as antigen and mucosal adjuvant, respectively, when immunized intranasally in mice. We report that the cVLPs induced significantly higher and sustainable levels of virus-specific antibody responses, especially IgA levels and hemagglutination inhibition (HAI) titers, more than 8-month post-vaccination compared to influenza VLPs without CCL28 or influenza VLPs physically mixed with sCCL28 (soluble) in mice. After challenging the vaccinated animals at month 8 with H3N2 viruses, the cVLP group also demonstrated strong recall responses. On day 4 post-challenge, we measured increased antibody levels, ASCs and HAI titers with reduced viral load and inflammatory responses in the cVLP group. The animals vaccinated with the cVLP showed 20% cross-protection against drifted (Philippines) and 60% protection against homologous (Aichi) H3N2 viruses. Thus, the results suggest that the GPI-anchored CCL28 induces significantly higher mucosal antibody responses, involved in providing long-term cross-protection against H3N2 influenza virus when compared to other vaccination groups. PMID:28067290

  12. Age Distribution of Influenza Like Illness Cases during Post-Pandemic A(H3N2): Comparison with the Twelve Previous Seasons, in France

    PubMed Central

    Turbelin, Clément; Souty, Cécile; Pelat, Camille; Hanslik, Thomas; Sarazin, Marianne; Blanchon, Thierry; Falchi, Alessandra

    2013-01-01

    In France, the 2011–2012 influenza epidemic was characterized by the circulation of antigenically drifted influenza A(H3N2) viruses and by an increased disease severity and mortality among the elderly, with respect to the A(H1N1)pdm09 pandemic and post-pandemic outbreaks. Whether the epidemiology of influenza in France differed between the 2011–2012 epidemic and the previous outbreaks is unclear. Here, we analyse the age distribution of influenza like illness (ILI) cases attended in general practice during the 2011–2012 epidemic, and compare it with that of the twelve previous epidemic seasons. Influenza like illness data were obtained through a nationwide surveillance system based on sentinel general practitioners. Vaccine effectiveness was also estimated. The estimated number of ILI cases attended in general practice during the 2011–2012 was lower than that of the past twelve epidemics. The age distribution was characteristic of previous A(H3N2)-dominated outbreaks: school-age children were relatively spared compared to epidemics (co-)dominated by A(H1N1) and/or B viruses (including the 2009 pandemic and post-pandemic outbreaks), while the proportion of adults over 30 year-old was higher. The estimated vaccine effectiveness (54%, 95% CI (48, 60)) was in the lower range for A(H3N2) epidemics. In conclusion, the age distribution of ILI cases attended in general practice seems to be not different between the A(H3N2) pre-pandemic and post-pandemic epidemics. Future researches including a more important number of ILI epidemics and confirmed virological data of influenza and other respiratory pathogens are necessary to confirm these results. PMID:23755294

  13. Progressive antigenic drift and phylogeny of human influenza A(H3N2) virus over five consecutive seasons (2009-2013) in Hangzhou, China.

    PubMed

    Shao, Tie-Juan; Li, Jun; Yu, Xin-Fen; Kou, Yu; Zhou, Yin-Yan; Qian, Xin

    2014-12-01

    Vaccine efficacy (VE) can be affected by progressive antigenic drift or any new reassortment of influenza viruses. To effectively track the evolution of human influenza A(H3N2) virus circulating in Hangzhou, China, a total of 65 clinical specimens were selected randomly from outpatients infected by A(H3N2) viruses during the study period from November 2009 to December 2013. The results of reduced VE and antigenic drift of the correspondent epitopes (C-D-E to A-B) suggest that the current vaccine provides suboptimal protection against the A(H3N2) strains circulating recently. Phylogenetic analysis of the entire HA and NA sequences demonstrated that these two genes underwent independent evolutionary pathways during recent seasons. The H3-based phylogenetic tree showed that a special strain A/Hangzhou/A289/2012 fell in a cluster among viruses with reduced VE predominantly circulating in 2013. Our findings underscore a possible early warning for the circulation of A(H3N2) variants with antigenic drift during the previous seasons. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. Cocirculation of avian H9N2 and contemporary "human" H3N2 influenza A viruses in pigs in southeastern China: potential for genetic reassortment?

    PubMed

    Peiris, J S; Guan, Y; Markwell, D; Ghose, P; Webster, R G; Shortridge, K F

    2001-10-01

    Pigs are permissive to both human and avian influenza viruses and have been proposed to be an intermediate host for the genesis of pandemic influenza viruses through reassortment or adaptation of avian viruses. Prospective virological surveillance carried out between March 1998 and June 2000 in Hong Kong, Special Administrative Region, People's Republic of China, on pigs imported from southeastern China, provides the first evidence of interspecies transmission of avian H9N2 viruses to pigs and documents their cocirculation with contemporary human H3N2 (A/Sydney/5/97-like, Sydney97-like) viruses. All gene segments of the porcine H9N2 viruses were closely related to viruses similar to chicken/Beijing/1/94 (H9N2), duck/Hong Kong/Y280/97 (H9N2), and the descendants of the latter virus lineage. Phylogenetic analysis suggested that repeated interspecies transmission events had occurred from the avian host to pigs. The Sydney97-like (H3N2) viruses isolated from pigs were related closely to contemporary human H3N2 viruses in all gene segments and had not undergone genetic reassortment. Cocirculation of avian H9N2 and human H3N2 viruses in pigs provides an opportunity for genetic reassortment leading to the emergence of viruses with pandemic potential.

  15. Serological survey for emerging canine H3N8 and H3N2 influenza viruses in pet and village dogs in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Oluwayelu, D O; Bankole, O; Ajagbe, O; Adebiyi, A I; Abiola, J O; Otuh, P; Omobowale, O T

    2014-12-01

    In Nigeria, keeping of dogs as pets and guards is gaining popularity. To determine whether infection of dogs with novel canine influenza virus (CIV) of equine (H3N8) and avian (H3N2) origins had occurred in Nigeria, we screened pet and village dogs from Lagos, Ibadan, Odeda and Sagamu in southwestern Nigeria for antibodies to CIV H3N8 and H3N2. Sera from 96 pet dogs presented at veterinary clinics in Lagos and Ibadan, and 89 village dogs from hunting communities in Odeda and Sagamu were tested for antibodies to CIV H3N8 and H3N2 using the hemagglutination inhibition test. Anti-CIV H3N8 antibodies were detected in 51 (53.1%) and 24 (27.0%) pet and village dogs, respectively. Overall, 40.5% (75/185) of the sera were positive for CIV H3N8 antibodies while none contained anti-CIV H3N2 antibodies. The presence of CIV H3N8 antibodies in pet and village dogs in this study suggests that they had natural exposure to the virus since dogs are not currently vaccinated against canine influenza in Nigeria. It is possible that the pet dogs acquired infection through contact with imported dogs in veterinary clinics, breeding kennels and dog shows while the village dogs could have been exposed through consumption of offal of infected animals killed during hunting. Considering the potential public health risk of this disease arising from the close relationship between pet and hunting dogs and their owners in Nigeria, systematic epidemiological surveillance of the Nigerian dog population for CIV H3N8, H3N2 and other influenza A virus subtypes is advocated.

  16. SWINE INFLUENZA

    PubMed Central

    Shope, Richard E.

    1931-01-01

    1. It has been possible to demonstrate, in Berkefeld filtrates of infectious material from experimental cases of swine influenza, a virus which when administered intranasally to susceptible swine induced a mild, usually afebrile illness of short duration. The changes in the respiratory tract resembled those in swine influenza but were usually much less extensive. When the filtrable virus was mixed with pure cultures of H. influenzae suis and administered to swine a disease identical clinically and pathologically with swine influenza was induced. The data presented indicate that the filtrable virus of swine influenza and H. influenzae suis act in concert to produce swine influenza and that neither alone is capable of inducing the disease. 2. One attack of swine influenza usually renders an animal immune to reinfection. Blood serum from an animal made immune in this way neutralizes infectious material from swine influenza in vitro, as shown by the failure of the mixture to produce disease in a susceptible animal. 3. The virus can be stored in a dried state or in glycerol for several weeks at least. In one instance dried material apparently retained both the virus and H. influenzas suis in viable form for a period of 54 days. 4. Fatal cases of experimental swine influenza have been observed in which H. influenzae suis was the only organism that could be cultivated from the respiratory tract. 5. Attention has been called to some features of marked similarity between epizootic swine influenzae and epidemic influenzae in man. PMID:19869924

  17. Comparative Analyses of Pandemic H1N1 and Seasonal H1N1, H3N2, and Influenza B Infections Depict Distinct Clinical Pictures in Ferrets

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Stephen S. H.; Banner, David; Fang, Yuan; Ng, Derek C. K.; Kanagasabai, Thirumagal; Kelvin, David J.; Kelvin, Alyson A.

    2011-01-01

    Influenza A and B infections are a worldwide health concern to both humans and animals. High genetic evolution rates of the influenza virus allow the constant emergence of new strains and cause illness variation. Since human influenza infections are often complicated by secondary factors such as age and underlying medical conditions, strain or subtype specific clinical features are difficult to assess. Here we infected ferrets with 13 currently circulating influenza strains (including strains of pandemic 2009 H1N1 [H1N1pdm] and seasonal A/H1N1, A/H3N2, and B viruses). The clinical parameters were measured daily for 14 days in stable environmental conditions to compare clinical characteristics. We found that H1N1pdm strains had a more severe physiological impact than all season strains where pandemic A/California/07/2009 was the most clinically pathogenic pandemic strain. The most serious illness among seasonal A/H1N1 and A/H3N2 groups was caused by A/Solomon Islands/03/2006 and A/Perth/16/2009, respectively. Among the 13 studied strains, B/Hubei-Wujiagang/158/2009 presented the mildest clinical symptoms. We have also discovered that disease severity (by clinical illness and histopathology) correlated with influenza specific antibody response but not viral replication in the upper respiratory tract. H1N1pdm induced the highest and most rapid antibody response followed by seasonal A/H3N2, seasonal A/H1N1 and seasonal influenza B (with B/Hubei-Wujiagang/158/2009 inducing the weakest response). Our study is the first to compare the clinical features of multiple circulating influenza strains in ferrets. These findings will help to characterize the clinical pictures of specific influenza strains as well as give insights into the development and administration of appropriate influenza therapeutics. PMID:22110664

  18. Accelerating Influenza Research: Vaccines, Antivirals, Immunomodulators and Monoclonal Antibodies. The Manufacture of a New Wild-Type H3N2 Virus for the Human Viral Challenge Model

    PubMed Central

    Fullen, Daniel J.; Noulin, Nicolas; Catchpole, Andrew; Fathi, Hosnieh; Murray, Edward J.; Mann, Alex; Eze, Kingsley; Balaratnam, Ganesh; Borley, Daryl W.; Gilbert, Anthony; Lambkin-Williams, Rob

    2016-01-01

    Background Influenza and its associated diseases are a major cause of morbidity and mortality. The United States Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices recommends influenza vaccination for everyone over 6 months of age. The failure of the flu vaccine in 2014–2015 demonstrates the need for a model that allows the rapid development of novel antivirals, universal/intra-seasonal vaccines, immunomodulators, monoclonal antibodies and other novel treatments. To this end we manufactured a new H3N2 influenza virus in compliance with Good Manufacturing Practice for use in the Human Viral Challenge Model. Methods and Strain Selection We chose an H3N2 influenza subtype, rather than H1N1, given that this strain has the most substantial impact in terms of morbidity or mortality annually as described by the Centre for Disease Control. We first subjected the virus batch to rigorous adventitious agent testing, confirmed the virus to be wild-type by Sanger sequencing and determined the virus titres appropriate for human use via the established ferret model. We built on our previous experience with other H3N2 and H1N1 viruses to develop this unique model. Human Challenge and Conclusions We conducted an initial safety and characterisation study in healthy adult volunteers, utilising our unique clinical quarantine facility in London, UK. In this study we demonstrated this new influenza (H3N2) challenge virus to be both safe and pathogenic with an appropriate level of disease in volunteers. Furthermore, by inoculating volunteers with a range of different inoculum titres, we established the minimum infectious titre required to achieve reproducible disease whilst ensuring a sensitive model that can be translated to design of subsequent field based studies. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02525055 PMID:26761707

  19. Outbreak of H3N2 Influenza at a US Military Base in Djibouti during the H1N1 Pandemic of 2009

    PubMed Central

    Cosby, Michael T.; Pimentel, Guillermo; Nevin, Remington L.; Fouad Ahmed, Salwa; Klena, John D.; Amir, Ehab; Younan, Mary; Browning, Robert; Sebeny, Peter J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Influenza pandemics have significant operational impact on deployed military personnel working in areas throughout the world. The US Department of Defense global influenza-like illness (ILI) surveillance network serves an important role in establishing baseline trends and can be leveraged to respond to outbreaks of respiratory illness. Objective We identified and characterized an operationally unique outbreak of H3N2 influenza at Camp Lemonnier, Djibouti occurring simultaneously with the H1N1 pandemic of 2009 [A(H1N1)pdm09]. Methods Enhanced surveillance for ILI was conducted at Camp Lemonnier in response to local reports of a possible outbreak during the A(H1N1)pdm09 pandemic. Samples were collected from consenting patients presenting with ILI (utilizing a modified case definition) and who completed a case report form. Samples were cultured and analyzed using standard real-time reverse transcriptase PCR (rt-RT-PCR) methodology and sequenced genetic material was phylogenetically compared to other published strains. Results rt-RT-PCR and DNA sequencing revealed that 25 (78%) of the 32 clinical samples collected were seasonal H3N2 and only 2 (6%) were A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza. The highest incidence of H3N2 occurred during the month of May and 80% of these were active duty military personnel. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that sequenced H3N2 strains were genetically similar to 2009 strains from the United States of America, Australia, and South east Asia. Conclusions This outbreak highlights challenges in the investigation of influenza among deployed military populations and corroborates the public health importance of maintaining surveillance systems for ILI that can be enhanced locally when needed. PMID:24339995

  20. Outbreak of H3N2 influenza at a US military base in Djibouti during the H1N1 pandemic of 2009.

    PubMed

    Cosby, Michael T; Pimentel, Guillermo; Nevin, Remington L; Fouad Ahmed, Salwa; Klena, John D; Amir, Ehab; Younan, Mary; Browning, Robert; Sebeny, Peter J

    2013-01-01

    Influenza pandemics have significant operational impact on deployed military personnel working in areas throughout the world. The US Department of Defense global influenza-like illness (ILI) surveillance network serves an important role in establishing baseline trends and can be leveraged to respond to outbreaks of respiratory illness. We identified and characterized an operationally unique outbreak of H3N2 influenza at Camp Lemonnier, Djibouti occurring simultaneously with the H1N1 pandemic of 2009 [A(H1N1)pdm09]. Enhanced surveillance for ILI was conducted at Camp Lemonnier in response to local reports of a possible outbreak during the A(H1N1)pdm09 pandemic. Samples were collected from consenting patients presenting with ILI (utilizing a modified case definition) and who completed a case report form. Samples were cultured and analyzed using standard real-time reverse transcriptase PCR (rt-RT-PCR) methodology and sequenced genetic material was phylogenetically compared to other published strains. rt-RT-PCR and DNA sequencing revealed that 25 (78%) of the 32 clinical samples collected were seasonal H3N2 and only 2 (6%) were A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza. The highest incidence of H3N2 occurred during the month of May and 80% of these were active duty military personnel. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that sequenced H3N2 strains were genetically similar to 2009 strains from the United States of America, Australia, and South east Asia. This outbreak highlights challenges in the investigation of influenza among deployed military populations and corroborates the public health importance of maintaining surveillance systems for ILI that can be enhanced locally when needed.

  1. Determination of antigenicity-altering patches on the major surface protein of human influenza A/H3N2 viruses

    PubMed Central

    Kratsch, Christina; Klingen, Thorsten R.; Mümken, Linda; Steinbrück, Lars; McHardy, Alice C.

    2016-01-01

    Human influenza viruses are rapidly evolving RNA viruses that cause short-term respiratory infections with substantial morbidity and mortality in annual epidemics. Uncovering the general principles of viral coevolution with human hosts is important for pathogen surveillance and vaccine design. Protein regions are an appropriate model for the interactions between two macromolecules, but the currently used epitope definition for the major antigen of influenza viruses, namely hemagglutinin, is very broad. Here, we combined genetic, evolutionary, antigenic, and structural information to determine the most relevant regions of the hemagglutinin of human influenza A/H3N2 viruses for interaction with human immunoglobulins. We estimated the antigenic weights of amino acid changes at individual sites from hemagglutination inhibition data using antigenic tree inference followed by spatial clustering of antigenicity-altering protein sites on the protein structure. This approach determined six relevant areas (patches) for antigenic variation that had a key role in the past antigenic evolution of the viruses. Previous transitions between successive predominating antigenic types of H3N2 viruses always included amino acid changes in either the first or second antigenic patch. Interestingly, there was only partial overlap between the antigenic patches and the patches under strong positive selection. Therefore, besides alterations of antigenicity, other interactions with the host may shape the evolution of human influenza A/H3N2 viruses. PMID:27774294

  2. Determination of antigenicity-altering patches on the major surface protein of human influenza A/H3N2 viruses.

    PubMed

    Kratsch, Christina; Klingen, Thorsten R; Mümken, Linda; Steinbrück, Lars; McHardy, Alice C

    2016-01-01

    Human influenza viruses are rapidly evolving RNA viruses that cause short-term respiratory infections with substantial morbidity and mortality in annual epidemics. Uncovering the general principles of viral coevolution with human hosts is important for pathogen surveillance and vaccine design. Protein regions are an appropriate model for the interactions between two macromolecules, but the currently used epitope definition for the major antigen of influenza viruses, namely hemagglutinin, is very broad. Here, we combined genetic, evolutionary, antigenic, and structural information to determine the most relevant regions of the hemagglutinin of human influenza A/H3N2 viruses for interaction with human immunoglobulins. We estimated the antigenic weights of amino acid changes at individual sites from hemagglutination inhibition data using antigenic tree inference followed by spatial clustering of antigenicity-altering protein sites on the protein structure. This approach determined six relevant areas (patches) for antigenic variation that had a key role in the past antigenic evolution of the viruses. Previous transitions between successive predominating antigenic types of H3N2 viruses always included amino acid changes in either the first or second antigenic patch. Interestingly, there was only partial overlap between the antigenic patches and the patches under strong positive selection. Therefore, besides alterations of antigenicity, other interactions with the host may shape the evolution of human influenza A/H3N2 viruses.

  3. Genetic analysis of H3N2 avian influenza viruses isolated from live poultry markets and poultry slaughterhouses in Shanghai, China in 2013.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dequan; Liu, Jian; Ju, Houbin; Ge, Feifei; Wang, Jian; Li, Xin; Zhou, Jinping; Liu, Peihong

    2015-08-01

    Five H3N2 avian influenza viruses (AIVs) were isolated from live poultry markets (LPMs) and poultry slaughterhouses in Shanghai, China in 2013. All viruses were characterized by whole-genome sequencing with subsequent genetic comparison and phylogenetic analysis. The hemagglutinin cleavage site of all viruses indicated that the five strains were low-pathogenic AIVs. Phylogenetic analysis of all eight viral genes showed that the five H3N2 viruses clustered in the Eurasian lineage of influenza viruses. The eight genes showed evidence of reassortment events between these H3 subtype viruses and other subtype viruses, especially H5 and H7 subtypes, probably in pigeons, domestic ducks, and wild birds. These findings emphasized the importance of AIV surveillance in LPMs and poultry slaughterhouses for understanding the genesis and emergence of novel reassortants with pandemic potential.

  4. Clinical and serologic effects of Alice strain live attenuated influenza A (H3N2) virus vaccine in an adult population.

    PubMed

    Miller, L W; Togo, Y; Hornick, R B

    1975-12-30

    Alice strain live attenuated influenza A (H3N2) virus was evaluated in prison volunteers. By random double blind allocation, 94 volunteers received Alice strain vaccine (AS) intranasally and 97 received placebo. The vaccine was well tolerated, and there was no serious morbidity. The number, type, duration, and severity of symptoms was not significantly different between the vaccine and placebo groups. Seventy-five per cent of vaccines with initial HAI titers less than or equal to 1:8 had 4 fold or greater titer responses on day 30. Placebo recipients experienced no titer changes. The GMT among vaccinees increased from 23.5 prior to vaccination 59.7 30 days later. Surveillance activities failed to document influenza A (H3N2) infection in the volunteer population during a 6 month follow-up period. Additional studies on the protective effects of the vaccine are required before efficacy can be determined.

  5. Genetic evolution of recently emerged novel human-like swine H3 influenza A viruses (IAV) in United States swine

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Introduction Influenza A virus (IAV) is a major cause of respiratory disease in swine. IAV transmission from humans to swine is a major contributor to swine IAV diversity. In 2012, a novel H3N2 with an HA (hu-H3) and NA derived from human seasonal H3N2 was detected in United States (US) swine. The h...

  6. Cell-Mediated Immunity Against Antigenically Drifted Influenza A(H3N2) Viruses in Children During a Vaccine Mismatch Season.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Hyang; Mishina, Margarita; Chung, Jessie R; Cole, Kelly Stefano; Nowalk, Mary Patricia; Martin, Judith M; Spencer, Sarah; Flannery, Brendan; Zimmerman, Richard K; Sambhara, Suryaprakash

    2016-10-01

    Emergence of antigenically drifted influenza A(H3N2) viruses resulted in reduced vaccine effectiveness in all age groups during the 2014-2015 influenza season. In children, inactivated influenza vaccine (IIV) elicited neutralizing antibodies (Abs) against drifted strains at significantly lower levels than against the vaccine strain. Little is known about the cross-reactivity of cell-mediated immunity against drifted strains in children. Children aged 3-17 years (n = 48) received IIV during the 2014-2015 influenza season. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells, collected before (on day 0) and after (on days 7 and 21) vaccination were evaluated for induction of cross-reactive plasmablasts, memory B cells, and cytokine-secreting CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells against the vaccine and drifted A(H3N2) viruses by an enzyme-linked immunospot assay and flow cytometry. IIV increased frequencies of plasmablasts and memory B cells. The overall induction of the T-cell response was not significant. Both B-cell and T-cell responses showed significant cross-reactivity against A(H3N2) viruses. Age and preexisting immunity affected virus-specific plasmablast responses and fold-change of T-cell responses, respectively. The proportion of T-helper type 1-prone (ie, interferon γ- or tumor necrosis factor α-secreting) CD4(+) T cell responses also increased with age. In children aged 3-17 years, B- and T-cell responses following IIV receipt showed significant cross-reactivity against A(H3N2) viruses during a vaccine mismatch season. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America 2016. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  7. Effects of egg-adaptation on receptor-binding and antigenic properties of recent influenza A (H3N2) vaccine viruses

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Lauren; Wharton, Stephen A.; Martin, Stephen R.; Cross, Karen; Lin, Yipu; Liu, Yan; Feizi, Ten; Daniels, Rodney S.

    2016-01-01

    Influenza A virus (subtype H3N2) causes seasonal human influenza and is included as a component of influenza vaccines. The majority of vaccine viruses are isolated and propagated in eggs, which commonly results in amino acid substitutions in the haemagglutinin (HA) glycoprotein. These substitutions can affect virus receptor-binding and alter virus antigenicity, thereby, obfuscating the choice of egg-propagated viruses for development into candidate vaccine viruses. To evaluate the effects of egg-adaptive substitutions seen in H3N2 vaccine viruses on sialic acid receptor-binding, we carried out quantitative measurement of virus receptor-binding using surface biolayer interferometry with haemagglutination inhibition (HI) assays to correlate changes in receptor avidity with antigenic properties. Included in these studies was a panel of H3N2 viruses generated by reverse genetics containing substitutions seen in recent egg-propagated vaccine viruses and corresponding cell culture-propagated wild-type viruses. These assays provide a quantitative approach to investigating the importance of individual amino acid substitutions in influenza receptor-binding. Results show that viruses with egg-adaptive HA substitutions R156Q, S219Y, and I226N, have increased binding avidity to α2,3-linked receptor-analogues and decreased binding avidity to α2,6-linked receptor-analogues. No measurable binding was detected for the viruses with amino acid substitution combination 156Q+219Y and receptor-binding increased in viruses where egg-adaptation mutations were introduced into cell culture-propagated virus. Substitutions at positions 156 and 190 appeared to be primarily responsible for low reactivity in HI assays with post-infection ferret antisera raised against 2012–2013 season H3N2 viruses. Egg-adaptive substitutions at position 186 caused substantial differences in binding avidity with an insignificant effect on antigenicity. PMID:26974849

  8. Summary of Control Issues for Swine Influenza

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Multiple subtypes of endemic swine influenza virus (SIV) co-circulate in the U.S. and Canada (H3N2, H1N1, and H1N2 with a triple reassortant internal gene (TRIG) constellation derived from swine, avian and human influenza viruses). As a result of reassortment events and antigenic drift, four H1 SIV...

  9. Epidemiology and molecular characterization of co-circulating influenza A/H3N2 virus variants in children: Houston, Texas, 1997-8.

    PubMed Central

    O'Donnell, F. T.; Munoz, F. M.; Atmar, R. L.; Hwang, L. Y.; Demmler, G. J.; Glezen, W. P.

    2003-01-01

    Co-circulating variants of influenza A/H3N2 viruses in children were studied in Houston, Texas between October 1997 and March 1998 to assess the effects of a new variant strain on the severity of clinical illness. Influenza A virus was isolated from the nasal wash or nasal aspirate specimens collected from children at two tertiary care hospitals, and 271 isolates were available for variant-specific subtyping using RT-PCR and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis. We classified 124 (46%) influenza viruses as A/H3N2/Wuhan/359/95-like and 137 (50%) as A/H3N2/Sydney/05/97-like. Ten (4%) virus isolates could not be classified. Ill contacts in the household were reported more frequently in patients infected with A/Sydney-like viruses than in those infected with A/Wuhan-like viruses (85% vs. 71%, respectively, P=0.02). There were no differences in other demographic variables among children infected with these strains. This study found no increase in illness severity in children infected with a newly emerging strain. PMID:12825738

  10. 2011–12 Seasonal Influenza Vaccines Effectiveness against Confirmed A(H3N2) Influenza Hospitalisation: Pooled Analysis from a European Network of Hospitals. A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Rondy, Marc; Puig-Barbera, Joan; Launay, Odile; Duval, Xavier; Castilla, Jesús; Guevara, Marcela; Costanzo, Simona; de Gaetano Donati, Katleen; Moren, Alain

    2013-01-01

    Background Influenza vaccination strategies aim at protecting high-risk population from severe outcomes. Estimating the effectiveness of seasonal vaccines against influenza related hospitalisation is important to guide these strategies. Large sample size is needed to have precise estimate of influenza vaccine effectiveness (IVE) against severe outcomes. We assessed the feasibility of measuring seasonal IVE against hospitalisation with laboratory confirmed influenza through a network of 21 hospitals in the European Union. Methods We conducted a multicentre study in France (seven hospitals), Italy (one hospital), and Navarra (four hospitals) and Valencia (nine hospitals) regions in Spain. All ≥18 years hospitalised patients presenting an influenza-like illness within seven days were swabbed. Cases were patients RT-PCR positive for influenza A (H3N2); controls were patients negative for any influenza virus. Using logistic regression with study site as a fixed effect we calculated IVE adjusted for potential confounders. We restricted the analyses to those swabbed within four days. Results We included, 375 A(H3N2) cases and 770 controls. The overall adjusted IVE was 24.9% (95%CI–1.8;44.6). Among the target group for vaccination (N = 1058) the adjusted IVE was 28.8% (95%CI:2.8;47.9); it was respectively 36.8% (95%CI:−48.8; 73.1), 42.6% (95%CI:−16.5;71.7), 17.8%(95%CI:−40.8; 52.1) and 37.5% (95%CI:−22.8;68.2) in the age groups 18–64, 65–74, 75–84 and more than 84 years. Discussion Estimation of IVE based on the pooling of data obtained through a European network of hospitals was feasible. Our results suggest a low IVE against hospitalised confirmed influenza in 2011–12. The low IVE may be explained by a poor immune response in the high-risk population, imperfect match between vaccine and circulating strain or waning immunity due to a late season. Increased sample size within this network would allow more precise estimates and stratification of the

  11. Summer outbreak of respiratory disease in an Australian prison due to an influenza A/Fujian/411/2002(H3N2)-like virus.

    PubMed Central

    Young, L. C.; Dwyer, D. E.; Harris, M.; Guse, Z.; Noel, V.; Levy, M. H.

    2005-01-01

    An outbreak of influenza A occurred in a prison system in New South Wales, Australia in January 2003 during the southern hemisphere summer. This report documents only the third confirmed outbreak of influenza in a prison environment. The outbreak investigation included case ascertainment, state-wide surveillance, a case-control study and interventions to limit the outbreak such as infection control, quarantine, cohorting of cases, and the use of antiviral medication for prophylaxis. A total of 37 clinical cases were identified. Influenza A virus was detected in 11 of the 22 respiratory tract specimens collected. The virus was typed as an influenza A/Fujian/411/2002 (H3N2)-like virus. This strain subsequently became the predominant virus strain during the northern hemisphere winter and the following 2003 Australian southern hemisphere winter influenza season. PMID:15724717

  12. Highly conserved influenza A virus epitope sequences as candidates of H3N2 flu vaccine targets.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ko-Wen; Chien, Chih-Yi; Li, Shiao-Wen; King, Chwan-Chuen; Chang, Chuan-Hsiung

    2012-08-01

    This study focused on identifying the conserved epitopes in a single subtype A (H3N2)-as candidates for vaccine targets. We identified a total of 32 conserved epitopes in four viral proteins [22 HA, 4PB1, 3 NA, 3 NP]. Evaluation of conserved epitopes in coverage during 1968-2010 revealed that (1) 12 HA conserved epitopes were highly present in the circulating viruses; (2) the remaining 10 HA conserved epitopes appeared with lower percentage but a significantly increasing trend after 1989 [p<0.001]; and (3) the conserved epitopes in NA, NP and PB1 are also highly frequent in wild-type viruses. These conserved epitopes also covered an extremely high percentage of the 16 vaccine strains during the 42 year period. The identification of highly conserved epitopes using our approach can also be applied to develop broad-spectrum vaccines. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The avian-origin PB1 gene segment facilitated replication and transmissibility of the H3N2/1968 pandemic influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Wendel, Isabel; Rubbenstroth, Dennis; Doedt, Jennifer; Kochs, Georg; Wilhelm, Jochen; Staeheli, Peter; Klenk, Hans-Dieter; Matrosovich, Mikhail

    2015-04-01

    The H2N2/1957 and H3N2/1968 pandemic influenza viruses emerged via the exchange of genomic RNA segments between human and avian viruses. The avian hemagglutinin (HA) allowed the hybrid viruses to escape preexisting immunity in the human population. Both pandemic viruses further received the PB1 gene segment from the avian parent (Y. Kawaoka, S. Krauss, and R. G. Webster, J Virol 63:4603-4608, 1989), but the biological significance of this observation was not understood. To assess whether the avian-origin PB1 segment provided pandemic viruses with some selective advantage, either on its own or via cooperation with the homologous HA segment, we modeled by reverse genetics the reassortment event that led to the emergence of the H3N2/1968 pandemic virus. Using seasonal H2N2 virus A/California/1/66 (Cal) as a surrogate precursor human virus and pandemic virus A/Hong Kong/1/68 (H3N2) (HK) as a source of avian-derived PB1 and HA gene segments, we generated four reassortant recombinant viruses and compared pairs of viruses which differed solely by the origin of PB1. Replacement of the PB1 segment of Cal by PB1 of HK facilitated viral polymerase activity, replication efficiency in human cells, and contact transmission in guinea pigs. A combination of PB1 and HA segments of HK did not enhance replicative fitness of the reassortant virus compared with the single-gene PB1 reassortant. Our data suggest that the avian PB1 segment of the 1968 pandemic virus served to enhance viral growth and transmissibility, likely by enhancing activity of the viral polymerase complex. Despite the high impact of influenza pandemics on human health, some mechanisms underlying the emergence of pandemic influenza viruses still are poorly understood. Thus, it was unclear why both H2N2/1957 and H3N2/1968 reassortant pandemic viruses contained, in addition to the avian HA, the PB1 gene segment of the avian parent. Here, we addressed this long-standing question by modeling the emergence of the H3N2

  14. Impact of influenza in the post-pandemic phase: Clinical features in hospitalized patients with influenza A (H1N1) pdm09 and H3N2 viruses, during 2013 in Santa Fe, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Kusznierz, Gabriela; Carolina, Cudós; Manuel, Rudi Juan; Sergio, Lejona; Lucila, Ortellao; Julio, Befani; Mirta, Villani; Pedro, Morana; Graciana, Morera; Andrea, Uboldi; Elsa, Zerbini

    2016-12-22

    It is important to characterize the clinical and epidemiological pattern of the influenza A (H1N1) pdm09 virus and compare it with influenza A (H3N2) virus, as surveyed in just a few studies, in order to contribute to the implementation and strengthening of influenza control and prevention strategies. The aims in this study were to describe influenza clinical and epidemiological characteristics in hospitalized patients, caused by influenza A (H1N1)pdm09 and influenza A (H3N2) viruses during 2013, in Santa Fe, Argentina. A retrospective study was conducted over 2013 among hospitalized patients with laboratory-confirmed influenza diagnosis. In contrast to patients with influenza A (H3N2) (20.5%), a higher proportion of hospitalizations associated with influenza H1N1pdm were reported among adults aged 35-65 years (42.8%). Of all patients, 73.6% had an underlying medical condition. Hospitalized patients with H1N1pdm were subject to 2.6 (95%CI, 1.0-6.8) times higher risk of severity, than those hospitalized with influenza A (H3N2). This results demonstrate the impact in the post-pandemic era of H1N1pdm virus, with increased risk of severe disease, in relation to H3N2 virus, both viruses co-circulating during 2013.

  15. A Multiplex RT-PCR Assay for Detection and Differentiation of Avian-Origin Canine H3N2, Equine-Origin H3N8, Human-Origin H3N2, and H1N1/2009 Canine Influenza Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Honglei; Pu, Juan; Liu, Jinhua; Sun, Yipeng

    2017-01-01

    Virological and serological surveys have documented that H1N1/2009, avian-origin canine H3N2 (cH3N2), seasonal human-origin H3N2 (hH3N2), and equine-origin H3N8 influenza viruses are consistently circulating in dogs. In the present study, a multiplex reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (mRT-PCR) assay was developed for simultaneous detection and differentiation of these influenza viruses. Four primer sets were designed to target the hemagglutinin genes of H1N1/2009, cH3N2, hH3N2, and H3N8 canine influenza viruses (CIVs). This mRT-PCR assay demonstrated high specificity and sensitivity for the four CIV subtypes. Additionally, mRT-PCR results obtained from 420 clinical samples were consistent with those obtained by the conventional virus isolation method. Our mRT-PCR assay is reliable for clinical diagnosis and rapid identification of CIVs. PMID:28107507

  16. A Multiplex RT-PCR Assay for Detection and Differentiation of Avian-Origin Canine H3N2, Equine-Origin H3N8, Human-Origin H3N2, and H1N1/2009 Canine Influenza Viruses.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chenxi; Wang, Qian; Hu, Junyi; Sun, Honglei; Pu, Juan; Liu, Jinhua; Sun, Yipeng

    2017-01-01

    Virological and serological surveys have documented that H1N1/2009, avian-origin canine H3N2 (cH3N2), seasonal human-origin H3N2 (hH3N2), and equine-origin H3N8 influenza viruses are consistently circulating in dogs. In the present study, a multiplex reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (mRT-PCR) assay was developed for simultaneous detection and differentiation of these influenza viruses. Four primer sets were designed to target the hemagglutinin genes of H1N1/2009, cH3N2, hH3N2, and H3N8 canine influenza viruses (CIVs). This mRT-PCR assay demonstrated high specificity and sensitivity for the four CIV subtypes. Additionally, mRT-PCR results obtained from 420 clinical samples were consistent with those obtained by the conventional virus isolation method. Our mRT-PCR assay is reliable for clinical diagnosis and rapid identification of CIVs.

  17. The effects of a deleterious mutation load on patterns of influenza A/H3N2's antigenic evolution in humans.

    PubMed

    Koelle, Katia; Rasmussen, David A

    2015-09-15

    Recent phylogenetic analyses indicate that RNA virus populations carry a significant deleterious mutation load. This mutation load has the potential to shape patterns of adaptive evolution via genetic linkage to beneficial mutations. Here, we examine the effect of deleterious mutations on patterns of influenza A subtype H3N2's antigenic evolution in humans. By first analyzing simple models of influenza that incorporate a mutation load, we show that deleterious mutations, as expected, act to slow the virus's rate of antigenic evolution, while making it more punctuated in nature. These models further predict three distinct molecular pathways by which antigenic cluster transitions occur, and we find phylogenetic patterns consistent with each of these pathways in influenza virus sequences. Simulations of a more complex phylodynamic model further indicate that antigenic mutations act in concert with deleterious mutations to reproduce influenza's spindly hemagglutinin phylogeny, co-circulation of antigenic variants, and high annual attack rates.

  18. Adjuvanted inactivated influenza A(H3N2) vaccines induce stronger immunogenicity in mice and confer higher protection in ferrets than unadjuvanted inactivated vaccines.

    PubMed

    Ann, Julie; Samant, Mukesh; Rheaume, Chantal; Dumas, Carole; Beaulieu, Edith; Morasse, Audrey; Mallett, Corey; Hamelin, Marie-Eve; Papadopoulou, Barbara; Boivin, Guy

    2014-09-29

    Influenza viruses are major respiratory pathogens and the development of improved vaccines to prevent these infections is of high priority. Here, we evaluated split inactivated A(H3N2) vaccines (A/Uruguay/716/2007) combined or not with adjuvants (AS03, AS25 and Protollin) and administered by three different routes, intramuscular (i.m.), intranasal (i.n.) or intradermal (i.d.), both in BALB/c mice and in ferrets. Ferrets were challenged with the homologous strain A/Uruguay/716/2007 (H3N2) or the heterologous strain A/Perth/16/2009 (H3N2) 4 weeks after the second immunization with A/Uruguay/716/2007 vaccines. Temperature, weight loss and clinical signs were monitored on a daily basis and nasal washes were performed to evaluate viral titers in the upper respiratory tract. All adjuvanted vaccines induced stronger humoral immune responses than unadjuvanted ones in both mice and ferrets. In mice, the AS03- and AS25-adjuvanted i.m. vaccines generated a mixed Th1-Th2 response at 6 and 19 weeks after the last immunization as shown by the production of IgG1 and IgG2a antibodies as well as the production of IL-2, IL-4 and IFN-γ by CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. HAI and MN titers were also higher in those groups when compared to the i.n. Protollin-adjuvanted and unadjuvanted groups. The Protollin-adjuvanted i.n. vaccine induced a more Th1 oriented response with a significant production of IgA in bronchoalveolar lavages. In ferrets, the AS03- and AS25-adjuvanted i.m. vaccines also induced higher HAI and MN titers compared to the other groups. These vaccines also significantly decreased viral titers after challenge with both the homologous A/Uruguay/716/2007 (H3N2) and the heterologous A/Perth/16/2009 (H3N2) strains. In conclusion, adjuvanted influenza vaccines elicited stronger humoral response in mice and conferred greater protection in naive ferrets than unadjuvanted ones. Interestingly, the AS25 adjuvant system containing monophosphoryl-lipid-A appears particularly promising for

  19. Changes in genetically drifted H3N2 influenza A viruses and vaccine effectiveness in adults 65 years and older during the 2016/17 season in Denmark.

    PubMed

    Trebbien, Ramona; Fischer, Thea K; Krause, Tyra G; Nielsen, Lene; Nielsen, Xiaohui Chen; Weinreich, Lenette Sandborg; Lis-Tønder, Joanna; Skov, Marianne Nielsine; Christiansen, Claus Bohn; Emborg, Hanne-Dorthe

    2017-09-01

    In Denmark, influenza A virus of the subtype H3N2 has been dominating the 2016/17 season, as in most countries of the Northern Hemisphere. This study was conducted as part of the Danish seasonal influenza surveillance programme to genetically characterize circulating H3N2 viruses and determine the seasonal vaccine effectiveness (VE) overall in the Danish population and further on the virus cluster level. Influenza virus positive samples submitted for the national surveillance programme were genetically characterized by sequencing. VE estimates against influenza A and the circulating virus clusters were determined in patients above 65 years using the test-negative case-control design. The genetic characterization revealed several genetically drifted viruses, which could be divided into four main clusters by the defining amino acid substitutions: 3C.2a/N121K/S144K, 3C.2a/T131K/R142K, 3C.2a1, and 3C.2a1/N121K. Some of the drifted viruses appeared to be more prominent in vaccinated or non-vaccinated individuals, respectively. Overall the adjusted VE was 7.4% (95% confidence interval (CI): -6.0-19.2) among inpatients and 19.3% (95% CI: -5.7-38.4) among outpatients, respectively. VE for the four main virus clusters was; cluster 3C.2a1: 38.8% (95% CI: -29.8-71.1), cluster 3C.2a/N121K/S144K: 9.2% (95% CI: -63.0-49.4), cluster 3C.2a/T131K/R142K: 19.0% (95% CI: -85.3-64.6), and cluster 3C.2a1/N121K: -12.2% (95%CI: -129.7-45.2). Several genetically drifted H3N2 viruses have been circulating in Denmark in the 2016-17 influenza season. An overall low VE was estimated and VE for the four main virus cluster indicate different VEs between the circulating drifted H3N2 viruses. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Antiviral activity of chlorogenic acid against influenza A (H1N1/H3N2) virus and its inhibition of neuraminidase

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Yue; Cao, Zeyu; Cao, Liang; Ding, Gang; Wang, Zhenzhong; Xiao, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Lonicera japonica Thunb, rich in chlorogenic acid (CHA), is used for viral upper respiratory tract infection treatment caused by influenza virus, parainfluenza virus, and respiratory syncytial virus, ect in China. It was reported that CHA reduced serum hepatitis B virus level and death rate of influenza virus-infected mice. However, the underlying mechanisms of CHA against the influenza A virus have not been fully elucidated. Here, the antiviral effects and potential mechanisms of CHA against influenza A virus were investigated. CHA revealed inhibitory against A/PuertoRico/8/1934(H1N1) (EC50 = 44.87 μM), A/Beijing/32/92(H3N2) (EC50 = 62.33 μM), and oseltamivir-resistant strains. Time-course analysis showed CHA inhibited influenza virus during the late stage of infectious cycle. Indirect immunofluorescence assay indicated CHA down-regulated the NP protein expression. The inhibition of neuraminidase activity confirmed CHA blocked release of newly formed virus particles from infected cells. Intravenous injection of 100 mg/kg/d CHA possessed effective antiviral activity in mice, conferring 60% and 50% protection from death against H1N1 and H3N2, reducing virus titres and alleviating inflammation in the lungs effectively. These results demonstrate that CHA acts as a neuraminidase blocker to inhibit influenza A virus both in cellular and animal models. Thus, CHA has potential utility in the treatment of the influenza virus infection. PMID:28393840

  1. H3N2 Influenza Virus Infection Induces Broadly Reactive Hemagglutinin Stalk Antibodies in Humans and Mice

    PubMed Central

    Margine, Irina; Hai, Rong; Albrecht, Randy A.; Obermoser, Gerlinde; Harrod, A. Carson; Banchereau, Jacques; Palucka, Karolina; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Palese, Peter; Treanor, John J.

    2013-01-01

    Broadly neutralizing antibodies directed against the conserved stalk domain of the viral hemagglutinin have attracted increasing attention in recent years. However, only a limited number of stalk antibodies directed against group 2 influenza hemagglutinins have been isolated so far. Also, little is known about the general level of induction of these antibodies by influenza virus vaccination or infection. To characterize the anti-stalk humoral response in the mouse model as well as in humans, chimeric hemagglutinin constructs previously developed in our group were employed in serological assays. Whereas influenza virus infection induced high titers of stalk-reactive antibodies, immunization with inactivated influenza virus vaccines failed to do so in the mouse model. Analysis of serum samples collected from human individuals who were infected by influenza viruses also revealed the induction of stalk-reactive antibodies. Finally, we show that the hemagglutinin stalk-directed antibodies induced in mice and humans have broad reactivity and neutralizing activity in vitro and in vivo. The results of the study point toward the existence of highly conserved epitopes in the stalk domains of group 2 hemagglutinins, which can be targeted for the development of a universal influenza virus vaccine in humans. PMID:23408625

  2. Influenza Vaccine Effectiveness in Preventing Influenza A(H3N2)-Related Hospitalizations in Adults Targeted for Vaccination by Type of Vaccine: A Hospital-Based Test-Negative Study, 2011–2012 A(H3N2) Predominant Influenza Season, Valencia, Spain

    PubMed Central

    Puig-Barberà, Joan; García-de-Lomas, Juan; Díez-Domingo, Javier; Arnedo-Pena, Alberto; Ruiz-García, Montserrat; Limón-Ramírez, Ramón; Pérez-Vilar, Silvia; Micó-Esparza, José Luis; Tortajada-Girbés, Miguel; Carratalá-Munuera, Concha; Larrea-González, Rosa; Beltrán-Garrido, Juan Manuel; Otero-Reigada, Maria del Carmen; Mollar-Maseres, Joan; Correcher-Medina, Patricia; Schwarz-Chavarri, Germán; Gil-Guillén, Vicente

    2014-01-01

    Background Most evidence of the effectiveness of influenza vaccines comes from studies conducted in primary care, but less is known about their effectiveness in preventing serious complications. Here, we examined the influenza vaccine effectiveness (IVE) against hospitalization with PCR-confirmed influenza in the predominant A(H3N2) 2011–2012 influenza season. Methods A hospital-based, test-negative study was conducted in nine hospitals in Valencia, Spain. All emergency admissions with a predefined subset of symptoms were eligible. We enrolled consenting adults age 18 and over, targeted for influenza vaccination because of comorbidity, with symptoms of influenza-like-illness within seven days of admission. We estimated IVE as (1-adjusted vaccination odds ratio)*100 after accounting for major confounders, calendar time and recruitment hospital. Results The subjects included 544 positive for influenza A(H3N2) and 1,370 negative for influenza admissions. Age was an IVE modifying factor. Regardless of vaccine administration, IVE was 72% (38 to 88%) in subjects aged under 65 and 21% (−5% to 40%) in subjects aged 65 and over. By type of vaccine, the IVE of classical intramuscular split-influenza vaccine, used in subjects 18 to 64, was 68% (12% to 88%). The IVE for intradermal and virosomal influenza vaccines, used in subjects aged 65 and over, was 39% (11% to 58%) and 16% (−39% to 49%), respectively. Conclusions The split-influenza vaccine was effective in preventing influenza-associated hospitalizations in adults aged under 65. The intradermal vaccine was moderately effective in those aged 65 and over. PMID:25392931

  3. Characterization of Drug-Resistant Influenza Virus A(H1N1) and A(H3N2) Variants Selected In Vitro with Laninamivir

    PubMed Central

    Samson, Mélanie; Abed, Yacine; Desrochers, François-Marc; Hamilton, Stephanie; Luttick, Angela; Tucker, Simon P.; Pryor, Melinda J.

    2014-01-01

    Neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs) play a major role for managing influenza virus infections. The widespread oseltamivir resistance among 2007-2008 seasonal A(H1N1) viruses and community outbreaks of oseltamivir-resistant A(H1N1)pdm09 strains highlights the need for additional anti-influenza virus agents. Laninamivir is a novel long-lasting NAI that has demonstrated in vitro activity against influenza A and B viruses, and its prodrug (laninamivir octanoate) is in phase II clinical trials in the United States and other countries. Currently, little information is available on the mechanisms of resistance to laninamivir. In this study, we first performed neuraminidase (NA) inhibition assays to determine the activity of laninamivir against a set of influenza A viruses containing NA mutations conferring resistance to one or many other NAIs. We also generated drug-resistant A(H1N1) and A(H3N2) viruses under in vitro laninamivir pressure. Laninamivir demonstrated a profile of susceptibility that was similar to that of zanamivir. More specifically, it retained activity against oseltamivir-resistant H275Y and N295S A(H1N1) variants and the E119V A(H3N2) variant. In vitro, laninamivir pressure selected the E119A NA substitution in the A/Solomon Islands/3/2006 A(H1N1) background, whereas E119K and G147E NA changes along with a K133E hemagglutinin (HA) substitution were selected in the A/Quebec/144147/2009 A(H1N1)pdm09 strain. In the A/Brisbane/10/2007 A(H3N2) background, a large NA deletion accompanied by S138A/P194L HA substitutions was selected. This H3N2 variant had altered receptor-binding properties and was highly resistant to laninamivir in plaque reduction assays. Overall, we confirmed the similarity between zanamivir and laninamivir susceptibility profiles and demonstrated that both NA and HA changes can contribute to laninamivir resistance in vitro. PMID:24957832

  4. Optimization of an enzyme-linked lectin assay suitable for rapid antigenic characterization of the neuraminidase of human influenza A(H3N2) viruses.

    PubMed

    Westgeest, Kim B; Bestebroer, Theo M; Spronken, Monique I J; Gao, Jin; Couzens, Laura; Osterhaus, Albert D M E; Eichelberger, Maryna; Fouchier, Ron A M; de Graaf, Miranda

    2015-06-01

    Antibodies to neuraminidase (NA), the second most abundant surface protein of the influenza virus, contribute to protection against influenza virus infection. Although traditional and miniaturized thiobarbituric acid (TBA) neuraminidase inhibition (NI) assays have been successfully used to characterize the antigenic properties of NA, these methods are cumbersome and not easily amendable to rapid screening. An additional difficulty of the NI assay is the interference by hemagglutinin (HA)-specific antibodies. To prevent interference of HA-specific antibodies, most NI assays are performed with recombinant viruses containing a mismatched HA. However, generation of these viruses is time consuming and unsuitable for large-scale surveillance. The feasibility of using the recently developed enzyme-linked lectin assay (ELLA) to evaluate the antigenic relatedness of NA of wild type A(H3N2) viruses was assessed. Rather than using recombinant viruses, wild type A(H3N2) viruses were used as antigen with ferret sera elicited against recombinant viruses with a mismatched HA. In this study, details of the critical steps that are needed to modify and optimize the NI ELLA in a format that is reproducible, highly sensitive, and useful for influenza virus surveillance to monitor antigenic drift of NA are provided. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. PREDAC-H3: a user-friendly platform for antigenic surveillance of human influenza a(H3N2) virus based on hemagglutinin sequences.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yousong; Yang, Lei; Li, Honglei; Zou, Yuanqiang; Deng, Lizong; Wu, Aiping; Du, Xiangjun; Wang, Dayan; Shu, Yuelong; Jiang, Taijiao

    2016-08-15

    Timely surveillance of the antigenic dynamics of the influenza virus is critical for accurate selection of vaccine strains, which is important for effective prevention of viral spread and infection. Here, we provide a computational platform, called PREDAC-H3, for antigenic surveillance of human influenza A(H3N2) virus based on the sequence of surface protein hemagglutinin (HA). PREDAC-H3 not only determines the antigenic variants and antigenic cluster (grouped for similar antigenicity) to which the virus belongs, based on HA sequences, but also allows visualization of the spatial distribution and temporal dynamics of antigenic clusters of viruses isolated from around the world, thus assisting in antigenic surveillance of human influenza A(H3N2) virus. It is publicly available from: http://biocloud.hnu.edu.cn/influ411/html/index.php : yshu@cnic.org.cn or taijiao@moon.ibp.ac.cn. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Antiviral Action of Methylated β-Lactoglobulin on the Human Influenza Virus A Subtype H3N2.

    PubMed

    Sitohy, Mahmoud; Besse, Bernard; Billaudel, Sylviane; Haertlé, Thomas; Chobert, Jean-Marc

    2010-06-01

    Antiviral activity of methylated β-lactoglobulin (Met-BLG) against H3N2 infected into MDCK cell lines depended on concentration of Met-BLG, viral load, and duration of infection. IC50% of the hemagglutination activity for 1 and 0.2 MOI (multiplicity of infection) after 24 h of incubation at 37 °C in the presence of 5% CO2 were 20 ± 0.8 and 17 ± 0.7 μg mL(-1) Met-BLG, respectively. Longer incubation period (4 days) was associated with low IC50% of the hemagglutination activity (7.1 ± 0.3 μg mL(-1) Met-BLG) and low IC50% of immuno-fluorescence of viral nucleoproteins (9.7 ± 0.4 μg mL(-1) Met-BLG) when using 0.2 and 0.1 MOI, respectively. A concentration of 25 μg mL(-1) of Met-BLG reduced the amount of replicating virus by about 2 and 1.3 logs when the viral load was 0.01 and 0.1 MOI, respectively, while higher concentrations reduced it by about 5-6 logs. Antiviral action of Met-BLG was coupled with a cellular protective action, which reached 100% when using 0.01 and 0.1 MOI and 83% when using 1.0 MOI. The time of Met-BLG addition after the viral infection was determinant for its antiviral efficacy and for its protection of the infected MDCK cell lines. Anti-hemagglutination action and cell protective action decreased gradually and in parallel with the delay in the time of Met-BLG addition to disappear totally after 10 h delay.

  7. Single radial haemolysis compared to haemagglutinin inhibition and microneutralization as a correlate of protection against influenza A H3N2 in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Wang, Biao; Russell, Margaret L; Brewer, Angela; Newton, Jennifer; Singh, Pardeep; Ward, Brian J; Loeb, Mark

    2017-05-01

    Serum antibodies are often used as correlates of protection for influenza. Three commonly used serological assays for detecting influenza-specific serum antibodies are single radial haemolysis (SRH), haemagglutinin inhibition (HAI) and microneutralization (MN). However, here are limited data on SRH as well as HAI and MN as correlates of protection against influenza in children and adolescents. There are also limited data that compare SRH to HAI and MN. We sought primarily to understand how SRH titres correlate to protection against influenza infection in children and adolescents. We also compare SRH to HAI and MN. Of 732 healthy Hutterite children and adolescents aged between 3 and 15 years were enrolled from Saskatchewan and Alberta, Canada, in the 2008-2009 flu season. Blood samples were drawn from participants at baseline and between 3 and 5 weeks post-vaccination. Serum antibodies against seasonal H3N2 influenza were measured by SRH, HAI and MN assays. The estimates of protective efficacy fluctuated when the cut-off SRH values increased. The correlation between HAI and SRH titres was 0.53 (P<.01); between MN and SRH 0.82 (P<.01); and between HAI and MN 0.50 (P<.01). Sixteen per cent of participants had SRH titres below the detection limit, compared to 7% and 34% for the MN and HAI assays. SRH had the worst correlation with protection against seasonal H3N2 in children and adolescents compared to MN and HAI. SRH, HAI and MN titres were significantly correlated with each other. SRH was less sensitive than MN but more sensitive than HAI. © 2017 The Authors. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Influenza evolution and H3N2 vaccine effectiveness, with application to the 2014/2015 season

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xi; Deem, Michael W.

    2016-01-01

    Influenza A is a serious disease that causes significant morbidity and mortality, and vaccines against the seasonal influenza disease are of variable effectiveness. In this article, we discuss the use of the pepitope method to predict the dominant influenza strain and the expected vaccine effectiveness in the coming flu season. We illustrate how the effectiveness of the 2014/2015 A/Texas/50/2012 [clade 3C.1] vaccine against the A/California/02/2014 [clade 3C.3a] strain that emerged in the population can be estimated via pepitope. In addition, we show by a multidimensional scaling analysis of data collected through 2014, the emergence of a new A/New Mexico/11/2014-like cluster [clade 3C.2a] that is immunologically distinct from the A/California/02/2014-like strains. PMID:27313229

  9. Antiviral activity of a nanoemulsion of polyprenols from ginkgo leaves against influenza A H3N2 and hepatitis B virus in vitro.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cheng-Zhang; Li, Wen-Jun; Tao, Ran; Ye, Jian-Zhong; Zhang, Hong-Yu

    2015-03-19

    In order to improve the bioavailability levels of polyprenols (derived from ginkgo leaves (GBP)) in the human body, a GBP nanoemulsion was prepared, and its antiviral activity was evaluated against influenza A H3N2 and hepatitis B virus in vitro. A GBP nanoemulsion was prepared by inversed-phase emulsification (IPE). Next, we investigated the antiviral activity of the GBP nanoemulsion on influenza A H3N2 and hepatitis B virus in vitro by the MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenlytetrezolium bromide) method. ELISA and the fluorescent quantitative PCR method were used to measure the content of HBsAg, HBeAg and DNA virus in human samples. The GBP nanoemulsion exhibited uniformity at an average particle size 97 nm with a hydrophilic-lipophilic balance (HLB) of 9.5. GBP is non-toxic to normal cells, hepatitis B virus DNA, hepatitis B virus antigen and HepG2215. Furthermore, GBP could reach a 70% virucidal activity and a 74.9% protection rate (*** p < 0.001) on MDCK cells infected with H3N2 virus at a high concentration of 100 μg/mL. GBP had a good inhibition rate on HBsAg (52.11%, ** p < 0.01) at 50 μg/mL and Day 9 of incubation, and a 67.32% inhibition effect on HBeAg at a high concentration of 100 μg/mL and Day 9. GBP had good inhibition on HBV DNA with CT 18.6 and lower copies (** p < 0.01) at a middle concentration of 12.5 to 25 μg/mL. The GBP nanoemulsion was very stable and non-toxic and had very strong antiviral activity against influenza A H3N2 and hepatitis B virus in vitro. The inhibitory effects and reactive mechanisms were similar to the drug, 3TC; by lengthening the incubation time and increasing the drug concentration, GBP has promising potential as an antiviral drug.

  10. Reconstruction of the Evolutionary Dynamics of A(H3N2) Influenza Viruses Circulating in Italy from 2004 to 2012

    PubMed Central

    Ebranati, Erika; Gozalo-Margüello, Monica; Veo, Carla; Bubba, Laura; Amendola, Antonella; Ciccozzi, Massimo; Galli, Massimo; Zanetti, Alessandro Remo; Baldanti, Fausto; Zehender, Gianguglielmo

    2015-01-01

    Background Influenza A viruses are characterised by their rapid evolution, and the appearance of point mutations in the viral hemagglutinin (HA) domain causes seasonal epidemics. The A(H3N2) virus has higher mutation rate than the A(H1N1) virus. The aim of this study was to reconstruct the evolutionary dynamics of the A(H3N2) viruses circulating in Italy between 2004 and 2012 in the light of the forces driving viral evolution. Methods Phylodinamic analyses were made using a Bayesian method, and codon-specific positive selection acting on the HA coding sequence was evaluated. Results Global and local phylogenetic analyses showed that the Italian strains collected between 2004 and 2012 grouped into five significant Italian clades that included viral sequences circulating in different epidemic seasons. The time of the most recent common ancestor (tMRCA) of the tree root was between May and December 2003. The tMRCA estimates of the major clades suggest that the origin of a new viral strain precedes the effective circulation of the strain in the Italian population by 6–31 months, thus supporting a central role of global migration in seeding the epidemics in Italy. The study of selection pressure showed that four codons were under positive selection, three of which were located in antigenic sites. Analysis of population dynamics showed the alternation of periods of exponential growth followed by a decrease in the effective number of infections corresponding to epidemic and inter-epidemic seasons. Conclusions Our analyses suggest that a complex interaction between the immune status of the population, migrations, and a few selective sweeps drive the influenza A(H3N2) virus evolution. Our findings suggest the possibility of the year-round survival of local strains even in temperate zones, a hypothesis that warrants further investigation. PMID:26331945

  11. Viral fusion efficacy of specific H3N2 influenza virus reassortant combinations at single-particle level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Hung-Lun; Millet, Jean K.; Costello, Deirdre A.; Whittaker, Gary R.; Daniel, Susan

    2016-10-01

    Virus pseudotyping is a useful and safe technique for studying entry of emerging strains of influenza virus. However, few studies have compared different reassortant combinations in pseudoparticle systems, or compared entry kinetics of native viruses and their pseudotyped analogs. Here, vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV)-based pseudovirions displaying distinct influenza virus envelope proteins were tested for fusion activity. We produced VSV pseudotypes containing the prototypical X-31 (H3) HA, either alone or with strain-matched or mismatched N2 NAs. We performed single-particle fusion assays using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy to compare hemifusion kinetics among these pairings. Results illustrate that matching pseudoparticles behaved very similarly to native virus. Pseudoparticles harboring mismatched HA-NA pairings fuse at significantly slower rates than native virus, and NA-lacking pseudoparticles exhibiting the slowest fusion rates. Relative viral membrane HA density of matching pseudoparticles was higher than in mismatching or NA-lacking pseudoparticles. An equivalent trend of HA expression level on cell membranes of HA/NA co-transfected cells was observed and intracellular trafficking of HA was affected by NA co-expression. Overall, we show that specific influenza HA-NA combinations can profoundly affect the critical role played by HA during entry, which may factor into viral fitness and the emergence of new pandemic influenza viruses.

  12. Viral fusion efficacy of specific H3N2 influenza virus reassortant combinations at single-particle level

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Hung-Lun; Millet, Jean K.; Costello, Deirdre A.; Whittaker, Gary R.; Daniel, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Virus pseudotyping is a useful and safe technique for studying entry of emerging strains of influenza virus. However, few studies have compared different reassortant combinations in pseudoparticle systems, or compared entry kinetics of native viruses and their pseudotyped analogs. Here, vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV)-based pseudovirions displaying distinct influenza virus envelope proteins were tested for fusion activity. We produced VSV pseudotypes containing the prototypical X-31 (H3) HA, either alone or with strain-matched or mismatched N2 NAs. We performed single-particle fusion assays using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy to compare hemifusion kinetics among these pairings. Results illustrate that matching pseudoparticles behaved very similarly to native virus. Pseudoparticles harboring mismatched HA-NA pairings fuse at significantly slower rates than native virus, and NA-lacking pseudoparticles exhibiting the slowest fusion rates. Relative viral membrane HA density of matching pseudoparticles was higher than in mismatching or NA-lacking pseudoparticles. An equivalent trend of HA expression level on cell membranes of HA/NA co-transfected cells was observed and intracellular trafficking of HA was affected by NA co-expression. Overall, we show that specific influenza HA-NA combinations can profoundly affect the critical role played by HA during entry, which may factor into viral fitness and the emergence of new pandemic influenza viruses. PMID:27752100

  13. Alterations in Receptor Binding Properties of Recent Human Influenza H3N2 Viruses Are Associated with Reduced Natural Killer Cell Lysis of Infected Cells▿

    PubMed Central

    Owen, Rachel E.; Yamada, Eriko; Thompson, Catherine I.; Phillipson, Louisa J.; Thompson, Clare; Taylor, Elizabeth; Zambon, Maria; Osborn, Helen M. I.; Barclay, Wendy S.; Borrow, Persephone

    2007-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cell recognition of influenza virus-infected cells involves hemagglutinin (HA) binding to sialic acid (SA) on activating NK receptors. SA also acts as a receptor for the binding of influenza virus to its target host cells. The SA binding properties of H3N2 influenza viruses have been observed to change during circulation in humans: recent isolates are unable to agglutinate chicken red blood cells and show reduced affinity for synthetic glycopolymers representing SA-α-2,3-lactose (3′SL-PAA) and SA-α-2,6-N-acetyl lactosamine (6′SLN-PAA) carbohydrates. Here, NK lysis of cells infected with human H3N2 influenza viruses isolated between 1969 and 2003 was analyzed. Cells infected with recent isolates (1999 to 2003) were found to be lysed less effectively than cells infected with older isolates (1969 to 1996). This change occurred concurrently with the acquisition of two new potential glycosylation site motifs in HA. Deletion of the potential glycosylation site motif at 133 to 135 in HA1 from a recent isolate partially restored the agglutination phenotype to a recombinant virus, indicating that the HA-SA interaction is inhibited by the glycosylation modification. Deletion of either of the recently acquired potential glycosylation sites from HA led to increased NK lysis of cells infected with recombinant viruses carrying modified HA. These results indicate that alterations in HA glycosylation may affect NK cell recognition of influenza virus-infected cells in addition to virus binding to host cells. PMID:17670834

  14. Sequence amplification via cell passaging creates spurious signals of positive adaptation in influenza virus H3N2 hemagglutinin

    PubMed Central

    McWhite, Claire D.; Meyer, Austin G.; Wilke, Claus O.

    2016-01-01

    Clinical influenza A virus isolates are frequently not sequenced directly. Instead, a majority of these isolates (~70% in 2015) are first subjected to passaging for amplification, most commonly in non-human cell culture. Here, we find that this passaging leaves distinct signals of adaptation, which can confound evolutionary analyses of the viral sequences. We find distinct patterns of adaptation to Madin-Darby (MDCK) and monkey cell culture absent from unpassaged hemagglutinin sequences. These patterns also dominate pooled datasets not separated by passaging type, and they increase in proportion to the number of passages performed. By contrast, MDCK-SIAT1 passaged sequences seem mostly (but not entirely) free of passaging adaptations. Contrary to previous studies, we find that using only internal branches of influenza virus phylogenetic trees is insufficient to correct for passaging artifacts. These artifacts can only be safely avoided by excluding passaged sequences entirely from subsequent analysis. We conclude that future influenza virus evolutionary analyses should appropriately control for potentially confounding effects of passaging adaptations. PMID:27713835

  15. Rules of co-occurring mutations characterize the antigenic evolution of human influenza A/H3N2, A/H1N1 and B viruses.

    PubMed

    Chen, Haifen; Zhou, Xinrui; Zheng, Jie; Kwoh, Chee-Keong

    2016-12-05

    The human influenza viruses undergo rapid evolution (especially in hemagglutinin (HA), a glycoprotein on the surface of the virus), which enables the virus population to constantly evade the human immune system. Therefore, the vaccine has to be updated every year to stay effective. There is a need to characterize the evolution of influenza viruses for better selection of vaccine candidates and the prediction of pandemic strains. Studies have shown that the influenza hemagglutinin evolution is driven by the simultaneous mutations at antigenic sites. Here, we analyze simultaneous or co-occurring mutations in the HA protein of human influenza A/H3N2, A/H1N1 and B viruses to predict potential mutations, characterizing the antigenic evolution. We obtain the rules of mutation co-occurrence using association rule mining after extracting HA1 sequences and detect co-mutation sites under strong selective pressure. Then we predict the potential drifts with specific mutations of the viruses based on the rules and compare the results with the "observed" mutations in different years. The sites under frequent mutations are in antigenic regions (epitopes) or receptor binding sites. Our study demonstrates the co-occurring site mutations obtained by rule mining can capture the evolution of influenza viruses, and confirms that cooperative interactions among sites of HA1 protein drive the influenza antigenic evolution.

  16. Incidence of adamantane resistance among influenza A (H3N2) viruses isolated worldwide from 1994 to 2005: a cause for concern.

    PubMed

    Bright, Rick A; Medina, Marie-jo; Xu, Xiyan; Perez-Oronoz, Gilda; Wallis, Teresa R; Davis, Xiaohong M; Povinelli, Laura; Cox, Nancy J; Klimov, Alexander I

    2005-10-01

    Adamantanes have been used to treat influenza A virus infections for many years. Studies have shown a low incidence of resistance to these drugs among circulating influenza viruses; however, their use is rising worldwide and drug resistance has been reported among influenza A (H5N1) viruses isolated from poultry and human beings in Asia. We sought to assess adamantane resistance among influenza A viruses isolated during the past decade from countries participating in WHO's global influenza surveillance network. We analysed data for influenza field isolates that were obtained worldwide and submitted to the WHO Collaborating Center for Influenza at the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention between Oct 1, 1994, and Mar 31, 2005. We used pyrosequencing, confirmatory sequence analysis, and phenotypic testing to detect drug resistance among circulating influenza A H3N2 (n=6524), H1N1 (n=589), and H1N2 (n=83) viruses. More than 7000 influenza A field isolates were screened for specific aminoacid substitutions in the M2 gene known to confer drug resistance. During the decade of surveillance a significant increase in drug resistance was noted, from 0.4% in 1994-1995 to 12.3% in 2003-2004. This increase in the proportion of resistant viruses was weighted heavily by those obtained from Asia with 61% of resistant viruses isolated since 2003 being from people in Asia. Our data raise concerns about the appropriate use of adamantanes and draw attention to the importance of tracking the emergence and spread of drug-resistant influenza A viruses.

  17. MicroRNA-146a induction during influenza H3N2 virus infection targets and regulates TRAF6 levels in human nasal epithelial cells (hNECs).

    PubMed

    Deng, Yuqin; Yan, Yan; Tan, Kai Sen; Liu, Jing; Chow, Vincent T; Tao, Ze-Zhang; Wang, De-Yun

    2017-03-15

    We have previously shown that human nasal epithelial cells (hNECs) are highly permissive cells for respiratory viruses including influenza A virus (IAV) and respiratory syncytial virus. Recent studies have indicated that microRNAs (miRNAs) are involved in virus-host relationship, and this led us to investigate its essential roles in the in vitro hNECs model derived from multiple donors. By comparing the differential expression of miRNAs upon IAV infection among animal and cell line studies, candidates were selected with focus on the initial immune response. After infection of influenza H3N2 virus, hNECs showed constant increase virus titer at 24-72h post-infection (hpi); accompanied with a significantly elevated level of miR-146a-5p at 72 hpi. The exponential elevation of progeny virus titer correlated with a key influenza sensing Toll-like receptor (TLR)7 pathway. TLR7 downstream gene transcripts, myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88), interferon regulator factor 7 (IRF7), and interferon-β (IFN-β) were significantly upregulated at 48 and 72 hpi, while interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase 1 (IRAK1) and TNF receptor associated factor-6 (TRAF6) were unchanged. Interestingly, when miR-146a was overexpressed with miRNA mimics prior to H3N2 infection, further decreased transcripts of TRAF6, but not IRAK1, were detected. By using the in vitro hNEC model, we demonstrated that H3N2-induced miR-146a specifically targets and regulates TRAF6 expression; but not IRAK expression in the nasal epithelium. We also found that unlike the cell model studies that lead to our studies, when ran across a heterogeneous model of different individual, miRNA signals were highly varied and the expression of most miRNAs, including miR-146a-5p, was more subdued compared to homogenous cell line model, highlighting a need for a more thorough analysis of miRNA signals and targets in a model more mimicking a clinical influenza infection. Copyright © 2017. Published by

  18. NS1 Protein Mutation I64T Affects Interferon Responses and Virulence of Circulating H3N2 Human Influenza A Viruses.

    PubMed

    DeDiego, Marta L; Nogales, Aitor; Lambert-Emo, Kris; Martinez-Sobrido, Luis; Topham, David J

    2016-11-01

    Influenza NS1 protein is the main viral protein counteracting host innate immune responses, allowing the virus to efficiently replicate in interferon (IFN)-competent systems. In this study, we analyzed NS1 protein variability within influenza A (IAV) H3N2 viruses infecting humans during the 2012-2013 season. We also evaluated the impact of the mutations on the ability of NS1 proteins to inhibit host innate immune responses and general gene expression. Surprisingly, a previously unidentified mutation in the double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-binding domain (I64T) decreased NS1-mediated general inhibition of host protein synthesis by decreasing its interaction with cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor 30 (CPSF30), leading to increased innate immune responses after viral infection. Notably, a recombinant A/Puerto Rico/8/34 H1N1 virus encoding the H3N2 NS1-T64 protein was highly attenuated in mice, most likely because of its ability to induce higher antiviral IFN responses at early times after infection and because this virus is highly sensitive to the IFN-induced antiviral state. Interestingly, using peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) collected at the acute visit (2 to 3 days after infection), we show that the subject infected with the NS1-T64 attenuated virus has diminished responses to interferon and to interferon induction, suggesting why this subject could be infected with this highly IFN-sensitive virus. These data demonstrate the importance of influenza virus surveillance in identifying new mutations in the NS1 protein, affecting its ability to inhibit innate immune responses and, as a consequence, the pathogenicity of the virus.

  19. Reassortment between avian H5N1 and human H3N2 influenza viruses creates hybrid viruses with substantial virulence

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chengjun; Hatta, Masato; Nidom, Chairul A.; Muramoto, Yukiko; Watanabe, Shinji; Neumann, Gabriele; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro

    2010-01-01

    The spread of avian H5N1 influenza viruses around the globe has become a worldwide public health concern. To evaluate the pathogenic potential of reassortant viruses between currently cocirculating avian H5N1 and human H3N2 influenza viruses, we generated all the 254 combinations of reassortant viruses between A/chicken/South Kalimantan/UT6028/06 (SK06, H5N1) and A/Tokyo/Ut-Sk-1/07 (Tok07, H3N2) influenza viruses by reverse genetics. We found that the presence of Tok07 PB2 protein in the ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex allowed efficient viral RNA transcription in a minigenome assay and that RNP activity played an essential role in the viability and replicative ability of the reassortant viruses. When the pathogenicity of 75 reassortant H5 viruses was tested in mice, 22 were more pathogenic than the parental SK06 virus, and three were extremely virulent. Strikingly, all 22 of these viruses obtained their PB2 segment from Tok07 virus. Further analysis showed that Tok07 PB1 alone lacked the ability to enhance the pathogenicity of the reassortant viruses but could do so by cooperating with Tok07 PB2. Our data demonstrate that reassortment between an avian H5N1 virus with low pathogenicity in mice and a human virus could result in highly pathogenic viruses and that the human virus PB2 segment functions in the background of an avian H5N1 virus, enhancing its virulence. Our findings highlight the importance of surveillance programs to monitor the emergence of human H5 reassortant viruses, especially those containing a PB2 segment of human origin. PMID:20176961

  20. The neuraminidases of MDCK grown human influenza A(H3N2) viruses isolated since 1994 can demonstrate receptor binding.

    PubMed

    Mohr, Peter G; Deng, Yi-Mo; McKimm-Breschkin, Jennifer L

    2015-04-22

    The neuraminidases (NAs) of MDCK passaged human influenza A(H3N2) strains isolated since 2005 are reported to have dual functions of cleavage of sialic acid and receptor binding. NA agglutination of red blood cells (RBCs) can be inhibited by neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs), thus distinguishing it from haemagglutinin (HA) binding. We wanted to know if viruses prior to 2005 can demonstrate this property. Pairs of influenza A(H3N2) isolates ranging from 1993-2008 passaged in parallel only in eggs or in MDCK cells were tested for inhibition of haemagglutination by various NAIs. Only viruses isolated since 1994 and cultured in MDCK cells bound chicken RBCs solely through their NA. NAI inhibition of agglutination of turkey RBCs was seen for some, but not all of these same MDCK grown viruses. Efficacy of inhibition of enzyme activity and haemagglutination differed between NAIs. For many viruses lower concentrations of oseltamivir could inhibit agglutination compared to zanamivir, although they could both inhibit enzyme activity at comparable concentrations. An E119V mutation reduced sensitivity to oseltamivir and 4-aminoDANA for both the enzyme assay and inhibition of agglutination. Sequence analysis of the NAs and HAs of some paired viruses revealed mutations in the haemagglutinin of all egg passaged viruses. For many of the paired egg and MDCK cultured viruses we found no differences in their NA sequences by Sanger sequencing. However, deep sequencing of MDCK grown isolates revealed low levels of variant populations with mutations at either D151 or T148 in the NA, suggesting mutations at either site may be able to confer this property. The NA active site of MDCK cultured human influenza A(H3N2) viruses isolated since 1994 can express dual enzyme and receptor binding functions. Binding correlated with either D151 or T148 mutations. The catalytic and receptor binding sites do not appear to be structurally identical since relative concentrations of the NAIs to inhibit

  1. Evaluation of Influenza Virus A/H3N2 and B Vaccines on the Basis of Cross-Reactivity of Postvaccination Human Serum Antibodies against Influenza Viruses A/H3N2 and B Isolated in MDCK Cells and Embryonated Hen Eggs

    PubMed Central

    Kishida, Noriko; Fujisaki, Seiichiro; Yokoyama, Masaru; Sato, Hironori; Saito, Reiko; Ikematsu, Hideyuki; Xu, Hong; Takashita, Emi; Tashiro, Masato; Takao, Shinichi; Yano, Takuya; Suga, Tomoko; Kawakami, Chiharu; Yamamoto, Miwako; Kajiyama, Keiko; Saito, Hiroyuki; Shimada, Shin'ichi; Watanabe, Sumi; Aoki, Satomi; Taira, Katsuya; Kon, Miyako; Lin, Jih-Hui

    2012-01-01

    The vaccine strains against influenza virus A/H3N2 for the 2010-2011 season and influenza virus B for the 2009-2010 and 2010-2011 seasons in Japan are a high-growth reassortant A/Victoria/210/2009 (X-187) strain and an egg-adapted B/Brisbane/60/2008 (Victoria lineage) strain, respectively. Hemagglutination inhibition (HI) tests with postinfection ferret antisera indicated that the antisera raised against the X-187 and egg-adapted B/Brisbane/60/2008 vaccine production strains poorly inhibited recent epidemic isolates of MDCK-grown A/H3N2 and B/Victoria lineage viruses, respectively. The low reactivity of the ferret antisera may be attributable to changes in the hemagglutinin (HA) protein of production strains during egg adaptation. To evaluate the efficacy of A/H3N2 and B vaccines, the cross-reactivities of postvaccination human serum antibodies against A/H3N2 and B/Victoria lineage epidemic isolates were assessed by a comparison of the geometric mean titers (GMTs) of HI and neutralization (NT) tests. Serum antibodies elicited by the X-187 vaccine had low cross-reactivity to both MDCK- and egg-grown A/H3N2 isolates by HI test and narrow cross-reactivity by NT test in all age groups. On the other hand, the GMTs to B viruses detected by HI test were below the marginal level, so the cross-reactivity was assessed by NT test. The serum neutralizing antibodies elicited by the B/Brisbane/60/2008 vaccine reacted well with egg-grown B viruses but exhibited remarkably low reactivity to MDCK-grown B viruses. The results of these human serological studies suggest that the influenza A/H3N2 vaccine for the 2010-2011 season and B vaccine for the 2009-2010 and 2010-2011 seasons may possess insufficient efficacy and low efficacy, respectively. PMID:22492743

  2. The effects of a deleterious mutation load on patterns of influenza A/H3N2's antigenic evolution in humans

    PubMed Central

    Koelle, Katia; Rasmussen, David A

    2015-01-01

    Recent phylogenetic analyses indicate that RNA virus populations carry a significant deleterious mutation load. This mutation load has the potential to shape patterns of adaptive evolution via genetic linkage to beneficial mutations. Here, we examine the effect of deleterious mutations on patterns of influenza A subtype H3N2's antigenic evolution in humans. By first analyzing simple models of influenza that incorporate a mutation load, we show that deleterious mutations, as expected, act to slow the virus's rate of antigenic evolution, while making it more punctuated in nature. These models further predict three distinct molecular pathways by which antigenic cluster transitions occur, and we find phylogenetic patterns consistent with each of these pathways in influenza virus sequences. Simulations of a more complex phylodynamic model further indicate that antigenic mutations act in concert with deleterious mutations to reproduce influenza's spindly hemagglutinin phylogeny, co-circulation of antigenic variants, and high annual attack rates. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07361.001 PMID:26371556

  3. Paper-based enzyme-free immunoassay for rapid detection and subtyping of influenza A H1N1 and H3N2 viruses.

    PubMed

    Lei, Kin Fong; Huang, Chia-Hao; Kuo, Rei-Lin; Chang, Cheng-Kai; Chen, Kuan-Fu; Tsao, Kuo-Chien; Tsang, Ngan-Ming

    2015-07-09

    Development of rapid screening in the ambulatory environment is the most pressing needs for the control of spread of infectious disease. Despite there are many methods to detect the immunoassay results, quantitative measurement in rapid disease screening is still a great challenge for point-of-care applications. In this work, based on the internal structural protein, i.e., nucleoprotein (NP), and outer surface glycoproteins, i.e., H1 and H3, of the influenza viruses, specific and sensitive immunoassay on paper-based platform was evaluated and confirmed. Detection and subtyping of influenza A H1N1 and H3N2 viruses found in people were demonstrated by colorimetric paper-based sandwich immunoassay. Concentration-dependent response to influenza viruses was shown and the detection limits could achieve 2.7×10(3) pfu/assay for H1 detection and 2.7×10(4) pfu/assay for H3 detection, which are within the clinical relevant level. Moreover, detection of influenza virus from infected cell lysate and clinical samples was demonstrated to further confirm the reliability of the paper-based immunoassay. The use of paper for the development of diagnostic devices has the advantages of lightweight, ease-of-use, and low cost and paper-based immunoassay is appropriate to apply for rapid screening in point-of-care applications.

  4. Protective Effect of Korean Red Ginseng Extract on the Infections by H1N1 and H3N2 Influenza Viruses in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Dae-Goon; Kim, Min-Chul; Park, Min-Kyung; Song, Jae-Min; Quan, Fu-Shi; Park, Kyoung-Mi; Cho, Young-Keol

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Ginseng has been used in humans for thousands of years and is known to have multiple biological and immunomodulatory effects. In this study, we investigated whether Korean red ginseng extract would have preventive and antiviral effects on influenza virus infection. Oral administration to mice of red ginseng extract prior to infection significantly increased survival after infection with the 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus. Daily oral treatment of vaccinated mice with red ginseng extract provided enhanced cross-protection against antigenically distinct H1N1 and H3N2 influenza viruses. Naive mice that were infected with virus mixed with red ginseng extract showed significantly enhanced protection, lower levels of lung viral titers and interleukin-6, but higher levels of interferon-γ compared with control mice having virus infections without red ginseng extract, indicating an antiviral effect of ginseng. In addition, ginseng extract exhibited inhibitory effects on the growth of influenza virus in vitro. This study provides evidence that intake of ginseng extract will have beneficial effects on preventing lethal infection with newly emerging influenza viruses. PMID:22856395

  5. Protective effect of Korean red ginseng extract on the infections by H1N1 and H3N2 influenza viruses in mice.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Dae-Goon; Kim, Min-Chul; Park, Min-Kyung; Song, Jae-Min; Quan, Fu-Shi; Park, Kyoung-Mi; Cho, Young-Keol; Kang, Sang-Moo

    2012-10-01

    Ginseng has been used in humans for thousands of years and is known to have multiple biological and immunomodulatory effects. In this study, we investigated whether Korean red ginseng extract would have preventive and antiviral effects on influenza virus infection. Oral administration to mice of red ginseng extract prior to infection significantly increased survival after infection with the 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus. Daily oral treatment of vaccinated mice with red ginseng extract provided enhanced cross-protection against antigenically distinct H1N1 and H3N2 influenza viruses. Naive mice that were infected with virus mixed with red ginseng extract showed significantly enhanced protection, lower levels of lung viral titers and interleukin-6, but higher levels of interferon-γ compared with control mice having virus infections without red ginseng extract, indicating an antiviral effect of ginseng. In addition, ginseng extract exhibited inhibitory effects on the growth of influenza virus in vitro. This study provides evidence that intake of ginseng extract will have beneficial effects on preventing lethal infection with newly emerging influenza viruses.

  6. Seasonal H3N2 influenza A virus fails to enhance Staphylococcus aureus co-infection in a non-human primate respiratory tract infection model

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Scott D; Olsen, Randall J; LaCasse, Rachel A; Safronetz, David; Ashraf, Madiha; Porter, Adeline R; Braughton, Kevin R; Feldmann, Friederike; Clifton, Dawn R; Kash, John C; Bailey, John R; Gardner, Donald J; Otto, Michael; Brining, Douglas L; Kreiswirth, Barry N; Taubenberger, Jeffrey K; Parnell, Michael J; Feldmann, Heinz; Musser, James M; DeLeo, Frank R

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus community-acquired pneumonia is often associated with influenza or an influenza-like syndrome. Morbidity and mortality due to methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) or influenza and pneumonia, which includes bacterial co-infection, are among the top causes of death by infectious diseases in the United States. We developed a non-lethal influenza A virus (IAV) (H3N2)/S. aureus co-infection model in cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis) to test the hypothesis that seasonal IAV infection predisposes non-human primates to severe S. aureus pneumonia. Infection and disease progression were monitored by clinical assessment of animal health; analysis of blood chemistry, nasal swabs, and X-rays; and gross pathology and histopathology of lungs from infected animals. Seasonal IAV infection in healthy cynomolgus macaques caused mild pneumonia, but unexpectedly, did not predispose these animals to subsequent severe infection with the community-associated MRSA clone USA300. We conclude that in our co-infection model, seasonal IAV infection alone is not sufficient to promote severe S. aureus pneumonia in otherwise healthy non-human primates. The implication of these findings is that comorbidity factors in addition to IAV infection are required to predispose individuals to secondary S. aureus pneumonia. PMID:24104465

  7. Interim estimates of divergence date and vaccine strain match of human influenza A(H3N2) virus from systematic influenza surveillance (2010-2015) in Hangzhou, southeast of China.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; Zhou, Yin-yan; Kou, Yu; Yu, Xin-fen; Zheng, Zhi-bei; Yang, Xu-hui; Wang, Hao-qiu

    2015-11-01

    In the post-pandemic period 2010-2015, seasonal influenza A(H3N2) virus predominated in Hangzhou, southeast of China, with an increased activity and semi-annual seasons. This study utilized HA virus gene segment sequences to analyze the divergence date and vaccine strain match of human influenza A(H3N2) virus from systematic influenza surveillance in Hangzhou. Virological and serological analyses of 124 representative A(H3N2) viruses from prospective studies of systematic surveillance samples were conducted to quantify the genetic and antigenic characteristics and their vaccine strain match. Bayesian phylogenetic inference showed that two separate subgroups 3C.3 and 3C.2 probably diverged from group 3C in early 2012 and then evolved into groups 3C.3a and 3C.2a, respectively, in the 2014/15 influenza season. Furthermore, high amino acid substitution rates of the HA1 subunit were found in A(H3N2) group 3C.2a variants, indicating that increased antigenic drift of A(H3N2) group 3C.2a virus is associated with a vaccine mismatch to the 2015/16 vaccine reference strain Switzerland/9715293/2013 (group 3C.3a). A portion of the group 3C.2a isolates are not covered by the current A(H3N2) vaccine strain. These findings offer insights into the emergence of group 3C.2a variants with epidemic potential in the imminent influenza seasons. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  8. NS1 Protein Mutation I64T Affects Interferon Responses and Virulence of Circulating H3N2 Human Influenza A Viruses

    PubMed Central

    DeDiego, Marta L.; Nogales, Aitor; Lambert-Emo, Kris; Martinez-Sobrido, Luis

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Influenza NS1 protein is the main viral protein counteracting host innate immune responses, allowing the virus to efficiently replicate in interferon (IFN)-competent systems. In this study, we analyzed NS1 protein variability within influenza A (IAV) H3N2 viruses infecting humans during the 2012-2013 season. We also evaluated the impact of the mutations on the ability of NS1 proteins to inhibit host innate immune responses and general gene expression. Surprisingly, a previously unidentified mutation in the double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-binding domain (I64T) decreased NS1-mediated general inhibition of host protein synthesis by decreasing its interaction with cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor 30 (CPSF30), leading to increased innate immune responses after viral infection. Notably, a recombinant A/Puerto Rico/8/34 H1N1 virus encoding the H3N2 NS1-T64 protein was highly attenuated in mice, most likely because of its ability to induce higher antiviral IFN responses at early times after infection and because this virus is highly sensitive to the IFN-induced antiviral state. Interestingly, using peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) collected at the acute visit (2 to 3 days after infection), we show that the subject infected with the NS1-T64 attenuated virus has diminished responses to interferon and to interferon induction, suggesting why this subject could be infected with this highly IFN-sensitive virus. These data demonstrate the importance of influenza virus surveillance in identifying new mutations in the NS1 protein, affecting its ability to inhibit innate immune responses and, as a consequence, the pathogenicity of the virus. IMPORTANCE Influenza A and B viruses are one of the most common causes of respiratory infections in humans, causing 1 billion infections and between 300,000 and 500,000 deaths annually. Influenza virus surveillance to identify new mutations in the NS1 protein affecting innate immune responses and, as a consequence

  9. Genetic divergence of influenza A NS1 gene in pandemic 2009 H1N1 isolates with respect to H1N1 and H3N2 isolates from previous seasonal epidemics

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The Influenza A pandemic sustained by a new H1N1 variant (H1N1v) started in Mexico and the USA at the end of April 2009 spreading worldwide in a few weeks. In this study we investigate the variability of the NS1 gene of the pandemic H1N1v strain with respect to previous seasonal strains circulating in humans and the potential selection of virus variants through isolation in cell culture. Methods During the period April 27th 2009-Jan 15th 2010, 1633 potential 2009 H1N1v cases have been screened at our center using the CDC detection and typing realtime RT-PCR assays. Virus isolation on MDCK cells was systematically performed in 1/10 positive cases. A subset of 51 H1N1v strains isolated in the period May-September 2009 was selected for NS1 gene sequencing. In addition, 15 H1N1 and 47 H3N2 virus isolates from three previous seasonal epidemics (2006-2009) were analyzed in parallel. Results A low variability in the NS1 amino acid (aa) sequence among H1N1v isolates was shown (aa identity 99.5%). A slightly higher NS1 variability was observed among H1N1 and H3N2 strains from previous epidemics (aa identity 98.6% and 98.9%, respectively). The H1N1v strains were closely related (aa identity 92.1%) to swine reference strain (A/swine/Oklahoma/042169/2008). In contrast, substantial divergence (aa identity 83.4%) with respect to human reference strain A/Brevig Mission/1/1918 and previous epidemic strains H1N1 and H3N2 (aa identity 78.9% and 77.6%, respectively) was shown. Specific sequence signatures of uncertain significance in the new virus variant were a C-terminus deletion and a T215P substitution. Conclusions The H1N1v NS1 gene was more conserved than that of previous epidemic strains. In addition, a closer genetic identity of H1N1v with the swine than the human reference strains was shown. Hot-spots were shown in the H1N1v NS1 aa sequence whose biologic relevance remains to be investigated. PMID:20809948

  10. [ts-Mutations in the genomes of cold-adapted variants of influenza A/Hong Kong/1/68(H3N2) and A/Victoria/35/72(H3N2) viruses].

    PubMed

    Zhikhareva, I V; Medvedeva, T E; Aleksandrova, G I; Klimov, A I

    1993-05-01

    The phenotype and localization of ts mutations in genomes of the influenza A/Victoria/30-ir (A/Vic/30-ir) and A/Hong Kong/17-ir (A/HK/17-ir) cold-adapted (ca) viruses were studied. Using the recombination analysis in chick embryo fibroblasts (CEF) we determined that influenza A/HK/17-ir ca virus carries ts mutations in three "internal" genes, i.e., PB1, NP and M, and influenza A/Vic/30-ir ca virus carries ones in four genes, i.e., PA, NP, M and NS. We have revealed ts mutations for NA gene in none of these viruses. Prior to the analysis of ts mutations in HA gene of influenza A/HK/17-ir and A/Vic/30-ir ca viruses, three cloning steps were performed in chick embryos (CE) by the method of limiting dilutions at 34 degrees C followed by selection of some strains with the most prominent ts phenotype. The cloned strains with such phenotypes were shown to repeat stable results within the recombination analysis in CE, i.e., none from the cloned strains of A/HK/17-ir ca virus recombined in CE at 40 degrees C with the 46 ts mutant, while recombination of this mutant with the cloned A/Vic/30-ir ca strains led to formation of the ts progeny. Thereafter our data result in conclusion that ts mutations in the PA gene must lead to some insignificant contribution for the expression of general ts phenotype among the ca strains as far as this sign is clearly displayed by both viruses, although only one of them, i.e., A/HK/17-ir carries ts mutation in the HA gene.

  11. Human microRNAs profiling in response to influenza A viruses (subtypes pH1N1, H3N2, and H5N1).

    PubMed

    Makkoch, Jarika; Poomipak, Witthaya; Saengchoowong, Suthat; Khongnomnan, Kritsada; Praianantathavorn, Kesmanee; Jinato, Thananya; Poovorawan, Yong; Payungporn, Sunchai

    2016-02-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play an important role in regulation of gene silencing and are involved in many cellular processes including inhibition of infected viral replication. This study investigated cellular miRNA expression profiles operating in response to influenza virus in early stage of infection which might be useful for understanding and control of viral infection. A549 cells were infected with different subtypes of influenza virus (pH1N1, H3N2 and H5N1). After 24 h post-infection, miRNAs were extracted and then used for DNA library construction. All DNA libraries with different indexes were pooled together with equal concentration, followed by high-throughput sequencing based on MiSeq platform. The miRNAs were identified and counted from sequencing data by using MiSeq reporter software. The miRNAs expressions were classified into up and downregulated miRNAs compared to those found in non-infected cells. Mostly, each subtype of influenza A virus triggered the upregulated responses in miRNA expression profiles. Hsa-miR-101, hsa-miR-193b, hsa-miR-23b, and hsa-miR-30e* were upregulated when infected with all three subtypes of influenza A virus. Target prediction results showed that virus infection can trigger genes in cellular process, metabolic process, developmental process and biological regulation. This study provided some insights into the cellular miRNA profiling in response to various subtypes of influenza A viruses in circulation and which have caused outbreaks in human population. The regulated miRNAs might be involved in virus-host interaction or host defense mechanism, which should be investigated for effective antiviral therapeutic interventions.

  12. Application of a seven-target pyrosequencing assay to improve the detection of neuraminidase inhibitor-resistant Influenza A(H3N2) viruses.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Daisuke; Okomo-Adhiambo, Margaret; Mishin, Vasiliy P; Guo, Zhu; Xu, Xiyan; Villanueva, Julie; Fry, Alicia M; Stevens, James; Gubareva, Larisa V

    2015-04-01

    National U.S. influenza antiviral surveillance incorporates data generated by neuraminidase (NA) inhibition (NI) testing of isolates supplemented with NA sequence analysis and pyrosequencing analysis of clinical specimens. A lack of established correlates for clinically relevant resistance to NA inhibitors (NAIs) hinders interpretation of NI assay data. Nonetheless, A(H3N2) viruses are commonly monitored for moderately or highly reduced inhibition in the NI assay and/or for the presence of NA markers E119V, R292K, and N294S. In 2012 to 2013, three drug-resistant A(H3N2) viruses were detected by NI assay among isolates (n = 1,424); all showed highly reduced inhibition by oseltamivir and had E119V. In addition, one R292K variant was detected among clinical samples (n = 1,024) by a 3-target pyrosequencing assay. Overall, the frequency of NAI resistance was low (0.16% [4 of 2,448]). To screen for additional NA markers previously identified in viruses from NAI-treated patients, the pyrosequencing assay was modified to include Q136K, I222V, and deletions encompassing residues 245 to 248 (del245-248) and residues 247 to 250 (del247-250). The 7-target pyrosequencing assay detected NA variants carrying E119V, Q136, and del245-248 in an isolate from an oseltamivir-treated patient. Next, this assay was applied to clinical specimens collected from hospitalized patients and submitted for NI testing but failed cell culture propagation. Of the 27 clinical specimens tested, 4 (15%) contained NA changes: R292K (n = 2), E119V (n = 1), and del247-250 (n = 1). Recombinant NAs with del247-250 or del245-248 conferred highly reduced inhibition by oseltamivir, reduced inhibition by zanamivir, and normal inhibition by peramivir and laninamivir. Our results demonstrated the benefits of the 7-target pyrosequencing assay in conducting A(H3N2) antiviral surveillance and testing for clinical care. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  13. H3N2 Mismatch of 2014-15 Northern Hemisphere Influenza Vaccines and Head-to-head Comparison between Human and Ferret Antisera derived Antigenic Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Hang; Wan, Xiu-Feng; Ye, Zhiping; Plant, Ewan P.; Zhao, Yangqing; Xu, Yifei; Li, Xing; Finch, Courtney; Zhao, Nan; Kawano, Toshiaki; Zoueva, Olga; Chiang, Meng-Jung; Jing, Xianghong; Lin, Zhengshi; Zhang, Anding; Zhu, Yanhong

    2015-10-01

    The poor performance of 2014-15 Northern Hemisphere (NH) influenza vaccines was attributed to mismatched H3N2 component with circulating epidemic strains. Using human serum samples collected from 2009-10, 2010-11 and 2014-15 NH influenza vaccine trials, we assessed their cross-reactive hemagglutination inhibition (HAI) antibody responses against recent H3 epidemic isolates. All three populations (children, adults, and older adults) vaccinated with the 2014-15 NH egg- or cell-based vaccine, showed >50% reduction in HAI post-vaccination geometric mean titers against epidemic H3 isolates from those against egg-grown H3 vaccine strain A/Texas/50/2012 (TX/12e). The 2014-15 NH vaccines, regardless of production type, failed to further extend HAI cross-reactivity against H3 epidemic strains from previous seasonal vaccines. Head-to-head comparison between ferret and human antisera derived antigenic maps revealed different antigenic patterns among representative egg- and cell-grown H3 viruses characterized. Molecular modeling indicated that the mutations of epidemic H3 strains were mainly located in antibody-binding sites A and B as compared with TX/12e. To improve vaccine strain selection, human serologic testing on vaccination-induced cross-reactivity need be emphasized along with virus antigenic characterization by ferret model.

  14. Genetic evolution of the neuraminidase of influenza A (H3N2) viruses from 1968 to 2009 and its correspondence to haemagglutinin evolution

    PubMed Central

    Westgeest, Kim B.; de Graaf, Miranda; Fourment, Mathieu; Bestebroer, Theo M.; van Beek, Ruud; Spronken, Monique I. J.; de Jong, Jan C.; Rimmelzwaan, Guus F.; Russell, Colin A.; Osterhaus, Albert D. M. E.; Smith, Gavin J. D.; Smith, Derek J.

    2012-01-01

    Each year, influenza viruses cause epidemics by evading pre-existing humoral immunity through mutations in the major glycoproteins: the haemagglutinin (HA) and the neuraminidase (NA). In 2004, the antigenic evolution of HA of human influenza A (H3N2) viruses was mapped (Smith et al., Science 305, 371–376, 2004) from its introduction in humans in 1968 until 2003. The current study focused on the genetic evolution of NA and compared it with HA using the dataset of Smith and colleagues, updated to the epidemic of the 2009/2010 season. Phylogenetic trees and genetic maps were constructed to visualize the genetic evolution of NA and HA. The results revealed multiple reassortment events over the years. Overall rates of evolutionary change were lower for NA than for HA1 at the nucleotide level. Selection pressures were estimated, revealing an abundance of negatively selected sites and sparse positively selected sites. The differences found between the evolution of NA and HA1 warrant further analysis of the evolution of NA at the phenotypic level, as has been done previously for HA. PMID:22718569

  15. Prolonged intermittent virus shedding during an outbreak of canine influenza A H3N2 virus infection in dogs in three Chicago area shelters: 16 cases (March to May 2015).

    PubMed

    Newbury, Sandra; Godhardt-Cooper, Jennifer; Poulsen, Keith P; Cigel, Francine; Balanoff, Laura; Toohey-Kurth, Kathy

    2016-05-01

    OBJECTIVE To estimate an appropriate isolation period for dogs infected with canine influenza A H3N2 virus on the basis of the duration of virus shedding. DESIGN Retrospective case series. ANIMALS 16 dogs, from 3 Chicago area shelters, naturally infected with canine influenza A H3N2 virus. PROCEDURES Medical records of 16 affected dogs were reviewed. Nasal swab specimens from each dog had been tested periodically for a minimum of 15 days following an initial positive real-time reverse transcriptase PCR (rRT-PCR) assay result for influenza A virus shedding. Amplicons were purified, quantified, and sequenced by the Sanger DNA sequencing technique. Virus isolation and sequence results of canine influenza A H3N2 virus from nasal swab specimens were obtained in conjunction with signalment, description of clinical signs, type of treatment, and outcome. RESULTS Viruses from each dog were identified as canine influenza A H3N2 virus on the basis of DNA sequencing. The interval between first and last positive rRT-PCR assay results ranged from 13 to 24 days, whereas the time interval from first reported clinical signs to last positive assay results ranged from 15 to 26 days. Isolation of canine influenza A H3N2 virus was successful in the late shedding period from nasal swab specimens of 4 dogs at 15 and 20 days after the first positive rRT-PCR assay result and 18 to 20 days after the first clinical signs. Clinical signs resolved for all dogs that remained in the shelters during the testing period. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Dogs infected with H3N2 virus should be isolated for a period of ≥ 21 days following onset of illness. Even when resolution of clinical signs occurs sooner than 21 days, shedding of H3N2 virus may persist.

  16. Novel hemagglutinin nanoparticle influenza vaccine with Matrix-M™ adjuvant induces hemagglutination inhibition, neutralizing, and protective responses in ferrets against homologous and drifted A(H3N2) subtypes.

    PubMed

    Smith, Gale; Liu, Ye; Flyer, David; Massare, Michael J; Zhou, Bin; Patel, Nita; Ellingsworth, Larry; Lewis, Maggie; Cummings, James F; Glenn, Greg

    2017-09-25

    Influenza viruses frequently acquire mutations undergoing antigenic drift necessitating annual evaluation of vaccine strains. Highly conserved epitopes have been identified in the hemagglutinin (HA) head and stem regions, however, current influenza vaccines induce only limited responses to these conserved sites. Here, we describe a novel seasonal recombinant HA nanoparticle influenza vaccine (NIV) formulated with a saponin-based adjuvant, Matrix-M™. NIV induced hemagglutination inhibition (HAI) and microneutralizing (MN) antibodies against a broad range of influenza A(H3N2) subtypes. In a comparison of NIV against standard-dose and high-dose inactivated influenza vaccines (IIV and IIV-HD, respectively) in ferrets NIV elicited HAI and MN responses exceeding those induced by IIV-HD against homologous A(H3N2) by 7 fold, A(H1N1) by 26 fold, and B strain viruses by 2 fold. NIV also induced MN responses against all historic A/H3N2 strains tested, spanning more than a decade of viral evolution from the 2000-2017 influenza seasons whereas IIV and IIV-HD induced HAI and MN responses were largely directed against the homologous A(H3N2), A(H1N1), and B virus strains. NIV induced superior protection compared to IIV and IIV-HD in ferrets challenged with a homologous or 10-year drifted influenza A(H3N2) strain. HAI positive and HAI negative neutralizing monoclonal antibodies derived from mice immunized with NIV were active against homologous and drifted influenza A(H3N2) strains. Taken together these observations suggest that NIV can induce responses to one or more highly conserved HA head and stem epitopes and result in highly neutralizing antibodies against both homologous and drift strains. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Genome-Wide Analysis of Evolutionary Markers of Human Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and A(H3N2) Viruses May Guide Selection of Vaccine Strain Candidates

    PubMed Central

    Belanov, Sergei S.; Bychkov, Dmitrii; Benner, Christian; Ripatti, Samuli; Ojala, Teija; Kankainen, Matti; Kai Lee, Hong; Wei-Tze Tang, Julian; Kainov, Denis E.

    2015-01-01

    Here we analyzed whole-genome sequences of 3,969 influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and 4,774 A(H3N2) strains that circulated during 2009–2015 in the world. The analysis revealed changes at 481 and 533 amino acid sites in proteins of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and A(H3N2) strains, respectively. Many of these changes were introduced as a result of random drift. However, there were 61 and 68 changes that were present in relatively large number of A(H1N1)pdm09 and A(H3N2) strains, respectively, that circulated during relatively long time. We named these amino acid substitutions evolutionary markers, as they seemed to contain valuable information regarding the viral evolution. Interestingly, influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and A(H3N2) viruses acquired non-overlapping sets of evolutionary markers. We next analyzed these characteristic markers in vaccine strains recommended by the World Health Organization for the past five years. Our analysis revealed that vaccine strains carried only few evolutionary markers at antigenic sites of viral hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA). The absence of these markers at antigenic sites could affect the recognition of HA and NA by human antibodies generated in response to vaccinations. This could, in part, explain moderate efficacy of influenza vaccines during 2009–2014. Finally, we identified influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and A(H3N2) strains, which contain all the evolutionary markers of influenza A strains circulated in 2015, and which could be used as vaccine candidates for the 2015/2016 season. Thus, genome-wide analysis of evolutionary markers of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and A(H3N2) viruses may guide selection of vaccine strain candidates. PMID:26615216

  18. Rescue of a H3N2 Influenza Virus Containing a Deficient Neuraminidase Protein by a Hemagglutinin with a Low Receptor-Binding Affinity

    PubMed Central

    Richard, Mathilde; Erny, Alexandra; Caré, Bertrand; Traversier, Aurélien; Barthélémy, Mendy; Hay, Alan; Lin, Yi Pu; Ferraris, Olivier; Lina, Bruno

    2012-01-01

    Influenza viruses possess at their surface two glycoproteins, the hemagglutinin and the neuraminidase, of which the antagonistic functions have to be well balanced for the virus to grow efficiently. Ferraris et al. isolated in 2003–2004 viruses lacking both a NA gene and protein (H3NA- viruses) (Ferraris O., 2006, Vaccine, 24(44–46):6656-9). In this study we showed that the hemagglutinins of two of the H3NA- viruses have reduced affinity for SAα2.6Gal receptors, between 49 and 128 times lower than that of the A/Moscow/10/99 (H3N2) virus and no detectable affinity for SAα2.3Gal receptors. We also showed that the low hemagglutinin affinity of the H3NA- viruses compensates for the lack of NA activity and allows the restoration of the growth of an A/Moscow/10/99 virus deficient in neuraminidase. These observations increase our understanding of H3NA- viruses in relation to the balance between the functional activities of the neuraminidase and hemagglutinin. PMID:22563453

  19. Antigenic and genetic variation in the hemagglutinins of H1N1 and H3N2 human influenza a viruses in the Shanghai area from 2005 to 2008.

    PubMed

    Ren, Xiao-wei; Ju, Li-wen; Yang, Ji-xing; Lv, Xi-hong; Jiang, Lu-fang; Zhao, Nai-qing; Jiang, Qing-wu

    2011-07-01

    Continued rapid evolution of the influenza A virus is responsible for annual epidemics and occasional pandemics in the Shanghai area. In the present study, the representative strains of A/H1N1 and A/H3N2 influenza viruses isolated in the Shanghai area from 2005 to 2008 were antigenically and genetically characterized. The antigenic cartography method was carried out to visualize the hemagglutination-inhibition data. Antigenic differences were detected between circulating A/H1N1 strains isolated from 2005 to 2006 and the epidemic A/H1N1 strains isolated in 2008, which were found to be associated with the amino acid substitution K140E in HA1. The present vaccine strain A/Brisbane/59/2007 is considered to be capable of providing sufficient immunity against most of the circulating A/H1N1 viruses isolated in 2008 from the Shanghai population. The study showed that there were significant antigenic differences between the epidemic A/H3N2 strains isolated in 2007 and 2008, suggesting that antigenic drift had occurred in the A/H3N2 strains isolated in 2008. The P194L mutation was thought to be responsible for the antigenic evolution of influenza A/H3N2 viruses isolated from Shanghai in 2008. Evidence of antigenic drift suggests that the influenza A/H3N2 vaccine component needs to be updated.

  20. Compatibility among polymerase subunit proteins is a restricting factor in reassortment between equine H7N7 and human H3N2 influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Li, Chengjun; Hatta, Masato; Watanabe, Shinji; Neumann, Gabriele; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro

    2008-12-01

    Reassortment is an important driving force for influenza virus evolution, and a better understanding of the factors that affect this process could improve our ability to respond to future influenza pandemics and epidemics. To identify factors that restrict the generation of reassortant viruses, we cotransfected human embryonic kidney cells with plasmids for the synthesis of viral RNAs of both A/equine/Prague/1/56 (Prague; H7N7) and A/Yokohama/2017/03 (Yokohama; H3N2) viruses together with the supporting protein expression plasmids. Of the possible 256 genotypes, we identified 29 genotypes in 120 randomly plaque-picked reassortants examined. Analyses of these reassortants suggested that the formation of functional ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complexes was a restricting factor, a finding that correlated with the activities of RNP complexes composed of different combinations of the proteins from the two viruses, as measured in a minigenome assay. For at least one nonfunctional RNP complex (i.e., Prague PB2, Prague PB1, Yokohama PA, and Prague NP), the lack of activity was due to the inability of the three polymerase subunit proteins to form a heterotrimer. Adaptation of viruses possessing a gene encoding a chimera of the PA proteins of the two viruses and the remaining genes from Prague virus resulted in compensatory mutations in the PB2 and/or PA protein. These results indicate substantial incompatibility among the gene products of the two test viruses, a critical role for the RNP complex in the generation of reassortant viruses, and a functional interaction of PB2 and PA.

  1. Narcissus tazetta lectin shows strong inhibitory effects against respiratory syncytial virus, influenza A (H1N1, H3N2, H5N1) and B viruses.

    PubMed

    Ooi, Linda S M; Ho, Wing-Shan; Ngai, Karry L K; Tian, Li; Chan, Paul K S; Sun, Samuel S M; Ooi, Vincent E C

    2010-03-01

    A mannose-binding lectin (Narcissus tazetta lectin [NTL]) with potent antiviral activity was isolated and purified from the bulbs of the Chinese daffodil Narcissus tazetta var. chinensis, using ion exchange chromatography on diethylaminoethyl (DEAE)-cellulose, affinity chromatography on mannose-agarose and fast protein liquid chromatography (FPLC)-gel filtration on Superose 12. The purified lectin was shown to have an apparent molecular mass of 26 kDa by gel filtration and 13 kDa by SDS-PAGE, indicating that it is probably a dimer with two identical subunits. The cDNA-derived amino acid sequence of NTL as determined by molecular cloning also reveals that NTL protein contains a mature polypeptide consisting of 105 amino acids and a C-terminal peptide extension. Three-dimensional modelling study demonstrated that the NTL primary polypeptide contains three subdomains, each with a conserved mannose-binding site. It shows a high homology of about 60%-80% similarity with the existing monocot mannose-binding lectins. NTL could significantly inhibit plaque formation by the human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) with an IC50 of 2.30 microg/ml and exhibit strong antiviral properties against influenza A (H1N1, H3N2, H5N1) and influenza B viruses with IC50 values ranging from 0.20 microg/ml to 1.33 microg/ml in a dose-dependent manner. It is worth noting that the modes of antiviral action of NTL against RSV and influenza A virus are significantly different. NTL is effective in the inhibition of RSV during the whole viral infection cycle, but the antiviral activity of NTL is mainly expressed at the early stage of the viral cycle of influenza A (H1N1) virus. NTL with a high selective index (SI=CC50/IC50 > or = 141) resulting from its potent antiviral activity and low cytotoxicity demonstrates a potential for biotechnological development as an antiviral agent.

  2. The European I-MOVE Multicentre 2013-2014 Case-Control Study. Homogeneous moderate influenza vaccine effectiveness against A(H1N1)pdm09 and heterogenous results by country against A(H3N2).

    PubMed

    Valenciano, Marta; Kissling, Esther; Reuss, Annicka; Jiménez-Jorge, Silvia; Horváth, Judit K; Donnell, Joan M O; Pitigoi, Daniela; Machado, Ausenda; Pozo, Francisco

    2015-06-04

    In the first five I-MOVE (Influenza Monitoring Vaccine Effectiveness in Europe) influenza seasons vaccine effectiveness (VE) results were relatively homogenous among participating study sites. In 2013-2014, we undertook a multicentre case-control study based on sentinel practitioner surveillance networks in six European Union (EU) countries to measure 2013-2014 influenza VE against medically-attended influenza-like illness (ILI) laboratory-confirmed as influenza. Influenza A(H3N2) and A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses co-circulated during the season. Practitioners systematically selected ILI patients to swab within eight days of symptom onset. We compared cases (ILI positive to influenza A(H3N2) or A(H1N1)pdm09) to influenza negative patients. We calculated VE for the two influenza A subtypes and adjusted for potential confounders. We calculated heterogeneity between sites using the I(2) index and Cochrane's Q test. If the I(2) was <50%, we estimated pooled VE as (1 minus the OR)×100 using a one-stage model with study site as a fixed effect. If the I(2) was >49% we used a two-stage random effects model. We included in the A(H1N1)pdm09 analysis 531 cases and 1712 controls and in the A(H3N2) analysis 623 cases and 1920 controls. For A(H1N1)pdm09, the Q test (p=0.695) and the I(2) index (0%) suggested no heterogeneity of adjusted VE between study sites. Using a one-stage model, the overall pooled adjusted VE against influenza A(H1N1)pdm2009 was 47.5% (95% CI: 16.4-67.0). For A(H3N2), the I(2) was 51.5% (p=0.067). Using a two-stage model for the pooled analysis, the adjusted VE against A(H3N2) was 29.7 (95% CI: -34.4-63.2). The results suggest a moderate 2013-2014 influenza VE against A(H1N1)pdm09 and a low VE against A(H3N2). The A(H3N2) estimates were heterogeneous among study sites. Larger sample sizes by study site are needed to prevent statistical heterogeneity, decrease variability and allow for two-stage pooled VE for all subgroup analyses. Copyright © 2015 The Authors

  3. Bayesian phylogeography of influenza A/H3N2 for the 2014-15 season in the United States using three frameworks of ancestral state reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Suchard, Marc A.

    2017-01-01

    Ancestral state reconstructions in Bayesian phylogeography of virus pandemics have been improved by utilizing a Bayesian stochastic search variable selection (BSSVS) framework. Recently, this framework has been extended to model the transition rate matrix between discrete states as a generalized linear model (GLM) of genetic, geographic, demographic, and environmental predictors of interest to the virus and incorporating BSSVS to estimate the posterior inclusion probabilities of each predictor. Although the latter appears to enhance the biological validity of ancestral state reconstruction, there has yet to be a comparison of phylogenies created by the two methods. In this paper, we compare these two methods, while also using a primitive method without BSSVS, and highlight the differences in phylogenies created by each. We test six coalescent priors and six random sequence samples of H3N2 influenza during the 2014–15 flu season in the U.S. We show that the GLMs yield significantly greater root state posterior probabilities than the two alternative methods under five of the six priors, and significantly greater Kullback-Leibler divergence values than the two alternative methods under all priors. Furthermore, the GLMs strongly implicate temperature and precipitation as driving forces of this flu season and nearly unanimously identified a single root state, which exhibits the most tropical climate during a typical flu season in the U.S. The GLM, however, appears to be highly susceptible to sampling bias compared with the other methods, which casts doubt on whether its reconstructions should be favored over those created by alternate methods. We report that a BSSVS approach with a Poisson prior demonstrates less bias toward sample size under certain conditions than the GLMs or primitive models, and believe that the connection between reconstruction method and sampling bias warrants further investigation. PMID:28170397

  4. Analysis of cytokine production in a newly developed canine tracheal epithelial cell line infected with H3N2 canine influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Park, Woo-Jung; Park, Byung-Joo; Song, Young-Jo; Lee, Dong-Hun; Yuk, Seong-Su; Lee, Joong-Bok; Park, Seung-Yong; Song, Chang-Seon; Lee, Sang-Won; Choi, In-Soo

    2015-06-01

    The Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cell line is typically used to analyze pathological features after canine influenza virus (CIV) infection. However, MDCK cells are not the ideal cell type, because they are kidney epithelial cells. Therefore, we generated an immortalized canine tracheal epithelial cell line, KU-CBE, to more reliably study immune responses to CIV infection in the respiratory tract. KU-CBE cells expressed the influenza virus receptor, α-2,3-sialic acid (SA), but not α-2,6-SA. KU-CBE and MDCK cells infected with H3N2 CIV demonstrated comparable virus growth kinetics. Gene expression levels of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, and interferon (IFN)-β were estimated in both KU-CBE and MDCK cells infected with CIV by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Of these cytokines, IL-4, IL-10, TNF-α, and IFN-β mRNAs were detected in both cell lines. Gene expression of IL-4, IL-10, and TNF-α was not significantly different in the two cell lines. However, MDCK cells exhibited a significantly higher level of IFN-β mRNA than KU-CBE cells at 18 h post infection. Additionally, the protein concentrations of these four cytokines were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using cell culture supernatants obtained from the two CIV-infected cell lines. MDCK cells produced significantly higher amounts of IL-4 and IFN-β than KU-CBE cells. However, KU-CBE cells produced a significantly higher amount of TNF-α than MDCK cells. These data indicated that the newly developed canine tracheal epithelial cells exhibited different cytokine production patterns compared to MDCK cells when infected with CIV. Inflammation of the respiratory tract of dogs induced by CIV infection may be attributed to the elevated expression level of TNF-α in canine tracheal epithelial cells.

  5. Seroprevalence of three influenza A viruses (H1N1, H3N2, and H3N8) in pet dogs presented to a veterinary hospital in Ohio.

    PubMed

    Jang, Hyesun; Jackson, Yasmine K; Daniels, Joshua B; Ali, Ahmed; Kang, Kyung-Il; Elaish, Mohamed; Lee, Chang-Won

    2017-08-31

    The prevalence of canine H3N8 influenza and human H1N1 and H3N2 influenza in dogs in Ohio was estimated by conducting serologic tests on 1,082 canine serum samples. In addition, risk factors, such as health status and age were examined. The prevalences of human H1N1, H3N2, and canine H3N8 influenzas were 4.0%, 2.4%, and 2.3%, respectively. Two samples were seropositive for two subtypes (H1N1 and H3N2; H1N1 and canine influenza virus [CIV] H3N8). Compared to healthy dogs, dogs with respiratory signs were 5.795 times more likely to be seropositive against H1N1 virus (p = 0.042). The prevalence of human flu infection increased with dog age and varied by serum collection month. The commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay used in this study did not detect nucleoprotein-specific antibodies from many hemagglutination inhibition positive sera, which indicates a need for the development and validation of rapid tests for influenza screening in canine populations. In summary, we observed low exposure of dogs to CIV and human influenza viruses in Ohio but identified potential risk factors for consideration in future investigations. Our findings support the need for establishment of reliable diagnostic standards for serologic detection of influenza infection in canine species.

  6. Early 2016/17 vaccine effectiveness estimates against influenza A(H3N2): I-MOVE multicentre case control studies at primary care and hospital levels in Europe

    PubMed Central

    Kissling, Esther; Rondy, Marc

    2017-01-01

    We measured early 2016/17 season influenza vaccine effectiveness (IVE) against influenza A(H3N2) in Europe using multicentre case control studies at primary care and hospital levels. IVE at primary care level was 44.1%, 46.9% and 23.4% among 0–14, 15–64 and ≥ 65 year-olds, and 25.7% in the influenza vaccination target group. At hospital level, IVE was 2.5%, 7.9% and 2.4% among ≥ 65, 65–79 and ≥ 80 year-olds. As in previous seasons, we observed suboptimal IVE against influenza A(H3N2). PMID:28230524

  7. Early 2016/17 vaccine effectiveness estimates against influenza A(H3N2): I-MOVE multicentre case control studies at primary care and hospital levels in Europe.

    PubMed

    Kissling, Esther; Rondy, Marc

    2017-02-16

    We measured early 2016/17 season influenza vaccine effectiveness (IVE) against influenza A(H3N2) in Europe using multicentre case control studies at primary care and hospital levels. IVE at primary care level was 44.1%, 46.9% and 23.4% among 0-14, 15-64 and ≥ 65 year-olds, and 25.7% in the influenza vaccination target group. At hospital level, IVE was 2.5%, 7.9% and 2.4% among ≥ 65, 65-79 and ≥ 80 year-olds. As in previous seasons, we observed suboptimal IVE against influenza A(H3N2).

  8. Effect of previous and current vaccination against influenza A(H1N1)pdm09, A(H3N2), and B during the post-pandemic period 2010-2016 in Spain

    PubMed Central

    Castilla, Jesús; Pozo, Francisco

    2017-01-01

    Background Recent studies suggest that the protective effect of the current influenza vaccine could be influenced by vaccination in previous seasons. We estimated the combined effect of the previous and current influenza vaccines from the 2010–2011 season to the 2015–2016 season in Spain. Methods We performed a test-negative case-control study in patients ≥9 years old. We estimated the influenza vaccine effectiveness (IVE) against influenza A(H1N1)pdm09, A(H3N2), and B virus. Results We included 1206 influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 cases, 1358 A(H3N2) cases and 1079 B cases. IVE against A(H1N1)pdm09 virus in the pooled-season analysis was 53% (95% Confidence Interval (CI): 21% to 72%) for those vaccinated only in the current season and 50% (95%CI: 23% to 68%) for those vaccinated in the both current and previous seasons. Against the influenza A(H3N2) virus, IVE was 17% (95%CI: -43% to 52%) for those vaccinated only in the current season and 3% (95%CI: -33% to 28%) for those vaccinated in both seasons. Regarding influenza B, we obtained similar IVEs for those vaccinated only in the current and those vaccinated in both seasons: 57% (95%CI: 12% to 79%) and 56% (95%CI: 36% to 70%), respectively. Conclusion Our results suggested no interference between the previous and current influenza vaccines against A(H1N1)pdm09 and B viruses, but a possible negative interference against A(H3N2) virus. PMID:28614376

  9. Moderate influenza vaccine effectiveness against hospitalisation with A(H3N2) and A(H1N1) influenza in 2013–14: Results from the InNHOVE network

    PubMed Central

    Rondy, M.; Castilla, J.; Launay, O.; Costanzo, S.; Ezpeleta, C.; Galtier, F.; de Gaetano Donati, K.; Moren, A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT We conducted a multicentre test negative case control study to estimate the 2013–14 influenza vaccine effectiveness (IVE) against hospitalised laboratory confirmed influenza in 12 hospitals in France, Italy and Spain. We included all ≥18 years hospitalised patients targeted by local influenza vaccination campaign reporting an influenza-like illness within 7 days before admission. We defined as cases patients RT-PCR positive for influenza and as controls those negative for all influenza virus. We used a logistic regression to calculate IVE adjusted for country, month of onset, chronic diseases and age. We included 104 A(H1N1)pdm09, 157 A(H3N2) cases and 585 controls. The adjusted IVE was 42.8% (95%CI: 6.3;65;0) against A(H1N1)pdm09. It was respectively 61.4% (95%CI: −1.9;85.4), 39.4% (95%CI: −32.2;72.2) and 19.7% (95%CI:-148.1;74.0) among patients aged 18–64, 65–79 and ≥80 years. The adjusted IVE against A(H3N2) was 38.1% (95%CI: 8.3;58.2) overall. It was respectively 7.8% (95%CI: −145.3;65.4), 25.6% (95%CI: −36.0;59.2) and 55.2% (95%CI: 15.4;76.3) among patients aged 18–64, 65–79 and ≥80 years. These results suggest a moderate and age varying effectiveness of the 2013–14 influenza vaccine to prevent hospitalised laboratory-confirmed influenza. While vaccination remains the most effective prevention measure, developing more immunogenic influenza vaccines is needed to prevent severe outcomes among target groups. PMID:27065000

  10. Genome-Wide Analysis of Evolutionary Markers of Human Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and A(H3N2) Viruses May Guide Selection of Vaccine Strain Candidates.

    PubMed

    Belanov, Sergei S; Bychkov, Dmitrii; Benner, Christian; Ripatti, Samuli; Ojala, Teija; Kankainen, Matti; Kai Lee, Hong; Wei-Tze Tang, Julian; Kainov, Denis E

    2015-11-27

    Here we analyzed whole-genome sequences of 3,969 influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and 4,774 A(H3N2) strains that circulated during 2009-2015 in the world. The analysis revealed changes at 481 and 533 amino acid sites in proteins of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and A(H3N2) strains, respectively. Many of these changes were introduced as a result of random drift. However, there were 61 and 68 changes that were present in relatively large number of A(H1N1)pdm09 and A(H3N2) strains, respectively, that circulated during relatively long time. We named these amino acid substitutions evolutionary markers, as they seemed to contain valuable information regarding the viral evolution. Interestingly, influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and A(H3N2) viruses acquired non-overlapping sets of evolutionary markers. We next analyzed these characteristic markers in vaccine strains recommended by the World Health Organization for the past five years. Our analysis revealed that vaccine strains carried only few evolutionary markers at antigenic sites of viral hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA). The absence of these markers at antigenic sites could affect the recognition of HA and NA by human antibodies generated in response to vaccinations. This could, in part, explain moderate efficacy of influenza vaccines during 2009-2014. Finally, we identified influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and A(H3N2) strains, which contain all the evolutionary markers of influenza A strains circulated in 2015, and which could be used as vaccine candidates for the 2015/2016 season. Thus, genome-wide analysis of evolutionary markers of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and A(H3N2) viruses may guide selection of vaccine strain candidates. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  11. [Characterization of a nonspecific inhibitor found in human sera raised against the 2006/07 influenza vaccine strain A/Hiroshima/52/2005 (H3N2) virus].

    PubMed

    Maeda, Akiko; Morikawa, Saeko; Kase, Tetsuo; Irie, Sin; Hirota, Yoshio

    2012-07-01

    The serology of influenza viruses typically uses hemagglutination inhibition (HI) or the neutralization test (NT). However, the sera of many humans and animals contain nonspecific inhibitors of hemagglutinin that must be inactivated or removed from the serum before use in the HI assay. Any nonspecific inhibitor in human serum is typically inactivated by pre-treatment with receptor-destroying enzyme (RDE). However, during the 2006/07 influenza circulating season, we observed that influenza vaccine strain A/Hiroshima/52/ 2005 (H3N2) exhibited susceptibility to an RDE-resistant inhibitor in human serum. We report herein on a preliminary characterization of this inhibitor, including the development of a novel inhibitor-inactivating technique for pre-treatment of human serum to be used for HI with the A/Hiroshima/52/2005 (H3N2) virus.

  12. Enhanced Pneumonia With Pandemic 2009 A/H1N1 Swine Influenza Virus in Pigs

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Introduction. Swine influenza A viruses (SIV) in the major swine producing regions of North America consist of multiple subtypes of endemic H1N1, H1N2, and H3N2 derived from swine, avian and human influenza viruses with a triple reassortant internal gene (TRIG) constellation (1). Genetic drift and r...

  13. Higher titers of some H5N1 and recent human H1N1 and H3N2 influenza viruses in Mv1 Lu vs. MDCK cells.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Sara B; Wyatt, Diane E; Wahlgren, Brett T; O'Dowd, Maureen K; Morrissey, Jane M; Daniels, Deirdre E; Lednicky, John A

    2011-02-11

    The infectivity of influenza A viruses can differ among the various primary cells and continuous cell lines used for such measurements. Over many years, we observed that all things equal, the cytopathic effects caused by influenza A subtype H1N1, H3N2, and H5N1 viruses were often detected earlier in a mink lung epithelial cell line (Mv1 Lu) than in MDCK cells. We asked whether virus yields as measured by the 50% tissue culture infectious dose and plaque forming titer also differed in MDCK and Mv1 Lu cells infected by the same influenza virus subtypes. The 50% tissue culture infectious dose and plaque forming titer of many influenza A subtype H1N1, H3N2, and H5N1 viruses was higher in Mv1 Lu than in MDCK cells. The yields of influenza subtype H1N1, H3N2, and H5N1 viruses can be higher in Mv1 Lu cells than in MDCK cells.

  14. Detection of D151G/N mutations in the neuraminidase gene of influenza A (H3N2) viruses by real-time RT-PCR allelic discrimination assay.

    PubMed

    Zadeh, Vahid Rajabali; Jagadesh, Anitha; Krishnan, Anjana; Arunkumar, Govindakarnavar

    2017-07-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at D151 position of neuraminidase (NA) gene of influenza A (H3N2) virus has been associated with drug resistance and increased binding affinity. NA-D151G/N-substitutions of influenza A (H3N2) viruses are frequently induced and selected by culturing in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cell lines. It is important to consider and exclude D151G/N mutants after isolation of influenza virus in MDCK cell line; since, the substitutions can highly influence the results of experimental research. The study aims to develop an allelic discrimination real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for the screening of D151G/N mutants. Thirty-six influenza A (H3N2) virus isolates were included and screened for D151G/N mutants using allelic discrimination assay. Out of the 36 isolates, 11 isolates (30.5%) were detected as heterozygous for D and G/N substitutions. Twenty-one (58.3%) isolates were identified as homozygous wild type and four isolates (11.1%) were undetermined. Isolates with substitutions at D151 position were sequenced by Sanger sequencing method. The present study demonstrates a rapid and convenient method for primary screening of the mutation after culturing of the influenza virus in MDCK cell lines in order to avoid potential misinterpretations of results and improve the quality of experimental research. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Comparison of live, attenuated H1N1 and H3N2 cold-adapted and avian-human influenza A reassortant viruses and inactivated virus vaccine in adults.

    PubMed

    Sears, S D; Clements, M L; Betts, R F; Maassab, H F; Murphy, B R; Snyder, M H

    1988-12-01

    The infectivity, immunogenicity, and efficacy of live, attenuated influenza A/Texas/1/85 (H1N1) and A/Bethesda/1/85 (H3N2) avian-human (ah) and cold-adapted (ca) reassortant vaccines were compared in 252 seronegative adult volunteers. The immunogenicity and efficacy of the H1N1 reassortant vaccine were also compared with those of the trivalent inactivated virus vaccine. Each reassortant vaccine was satisfactorily attenuated. The 50% human infectious dose was 10(4.9) for ca H1N1, 10(5.4) for ah H1N1, 10(6.4) for ca H3N2, and 10(6.5) TCID50 for ah H3N2 reassortant virus. Within a subtype, the immunogenicities of ah and ca vaccines were comparable. Five to seven weeks after vaccination, volunteers were challenged with homologous wild-type influenza A virus. The magnitude of shedding of virus after challenge was greater than 100-fold less in H1N1 vaccinees and greater than 10-fold less in H3N2 vaccinees compared with unimmunized controls. The vaccines were equally efficacious, as indicated by an 86%-100% reduction in illness. Thus, the ah A/Mallard/New York/6750/78 and the ca A/Ann Arbor/6/60 reassortant viruses are comparable.

  16. Transmissibility of Variant Influenza From Swine to Humans: A Modeling Approach

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Karen K.; Gambhir, Manoj; Finelli, Lyn; Swerdlow, David L.; Ostroff, Stephen; Reed, Carrie

    2015-01-01

    Background Respiratory illness was reported among humans and swine at an agricultural fair in 2011; 3 human infections with an influenza A(H3N2) variant (H3N2v) virus were confirmed. Using epidemiologic investigation data, we sought to estimate H3N2v transmissibility from swine to humans. Methods We developed a model of H3N2v transmission among swine and humans and fit it to data from a cohort of 100 agricultural club members reporting swine contact to estimate transmissibility. A sensitivity analysis was performed varying H3N2v prevalence in the club cohort. Using the best-fit transmission probability, we simulated the number of swine-acquired infections among all fair attendees. Results We estimated the best-fit probability of swine-to-human H3N2v transmission per minute of swine contact. Applying this probability to 14 910 people with swine contact at the fair, we estimate that there were 80 (95% confidence interval [CI], 40–133) H3N2v infections among persons aged <20 years and 58 (95% CI, 29–96) H3N2v infections among person aged ≥20 years. Conclusions Using early data from investigation of a new virus with unclear transmission properties, we estimated the transmissibility of H3N2v from swine to humans and the burden of H3N2v among fair attendees. Although the risk of H3N2v virus infection is small for fair attendees with minimal swine contact, large populations attend agricultural events each year, and human cases will likely occur when infected swine are present. PMID:23794727

  17. Pandemic influenza 1918 H1N1 and 1968 H3N2 DNA vaccines induce cross‐reactive immunity in ferrets against infection with viruses drifted for decades

    PubMed Central

    Bragstad, Karoline; Martel, Cyril J.; Thomsen, Joakim S.; Jensen, Kim L.; Nielsen, Lars P.; Aasted, Bent; Fomsgaard, Anders

    2010-01-01

    Please cite this paper as: Bragstad et al. (2010) Pandemic influenza 1918 H1N1 and 1968 H3N2 DNA vaccines induce cross‐reactive immunity in ferrets against infection with viruses drifted for decades. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses 5(1), 13–23. Background  Alternative influenza vaccines and vaccine production forms are needed as the conventional protein vaccines do not induce broad cross‐reactivity against drifted strains. Furthermore, fast vaccine production is especially important in a pandemic situation, and broader vaccine reactivity would diminish the need for frequent change in the vaccine formulations. Objective  In this study, we compared the ability of pandemic influenza DNA vaccines to induce immunity against distantly related strains within a subtype with the immunity induced by conventional trivalent protein vaccines against homologous virus challenge. Methods  Ferrets were immunised by particle‐mediated epidermal delivery (gene gun) with DNA vaccines based on the haemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) and/or the matrix (M) and nucleoprotein genes of the 1918 H1N1 Spanish influenza pandemic virus or the 1968 H3N2 Hong Kong influenza pandemic virus. The animals were challenged with contemporary H1N1 or H3N2 viruses. Results  We demonstrated that DNA vaccines encoding proteins of the original 1918 H1N1 pandemic virus induced protective cross‐reactive immune responses in ferrets against infection with a 1947 H1N1 virus and a recent 1999 H1N1 virus. Similarly, a DNA vaccine, based on the HA and NA of the 1968 H3N2 pandemic virus, induced cross‐reactive immune responses against a recent 2005 H3N2 virus challenge. Conclusions  DNA vaccines based on pandemic or recent seasonal influenza genes induced cross‐reactive immunity against contemporary virus challenge as good as or superior to contemporary conventional trivalent protein vaccines. This suggests a unique ability of influenza DNA to induce cross‐protective immunity

  18. Higher vaccine effectiveness in seasons with predominant circulation of seasonal influenza A(H1N1) than in A(H3N2) seasons: test-negative case-control studies using surveillance data, Spain, 2003-2011.

    PubMed

    Savulescu, Camelia; Jiménez-Jorge, Silvia; Delgado-Sanz, Concha; de Mateo, Salvador; Pozo, Francisco; Casas, Inmaculada; Larrauri, Amparo

    2014-07-31

    We used data provided by the Spanish influenza surveillance system to measure seasonal influenza vaccine effectiveness (VE) against medically attended cases, laboratory confirmed with the predominately circulating influenza virus over eight seasons (2003-2011). Using the test-negative case-control design, we compared the vaccination status of swabbed influenza-like illnesses (ILI) patients who were laboratory confirmed with predominantly circulating influenza strain in the season (cases) to that of ILI patients testing negative for any influenza (controls). Data on age, sex, vaccination status and laboratory results were available for all seasons. We used logistic regression to calculate adjusted influenza VE for age, week of swabbing, Spanish region and season. We calculated the influenza VE by each season and pooling the seasons with the same predominant type/subtype. Overall influenza VE against infection with A(H3N2) subtype (four seasons) was 31 (95% confidence interval (CI):10; 48). For seasonal influenza A(H1N1) (two seasons), the effectiveness was 86% (95% CI: 65; 94). Against B infection (three seasons), influenza VE was 47% (95% CI: 27; 62). The Spanish influenza surveillance system allowed estimating influenza VE in the studied seasons for the predominant strain. Strengthening the influenza surveillance will result in more precise VE estimates for decision making. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Serological Evidence and Risk Factors for Swine Influenza Infections among Chinese Swine Workers in Guangdong Province.

    PubMed

    Ma, Mengmeng; Anderson, Benjamin D; Wang, Tao; Chen, Yingan; Zhang, Dingmei; Gray, Gregory C; Lu, Jiahai

    2015-01-01

    During July to September 2014, we performed a controlled, cross-sectional, seroepidemiologic study among 203 swine workers and 115 control subjects in Guangdong Province. Sera were tested using a hemagglutination inhibition assay against locally-isolated swine H3N2 and H1N1 viruses and commercially-obtained human influenza viral antigens. We found swine workers had a greater prevalence and odds of seropositivity against the swine H3N2 virus (17.3% vs. 7.0%; adjusted OR, 3.4; 95% CI, 1.1 -10.7). Younger age, self-report of a respiratory illness during the last 12 months, and seropositivity against seasonal H3N2 virus were identified as significant risk factors for seropositivity against swine H3N2 virus. As swine workers in China may be exposed to novel influenza viruses, it seems prudent for China to conduct special surveillance for such viruses among them. It also seems wise to offer such workers seasonal influenza vaccines with a goal to reduce cross-species influenza virus transmission.

  20. Serological Evidence and Risk Factors for Swine Influenza Infections among Chinese Swine Workers in Guangdong Province

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Mengmeng; Anderson, Benjamin D.; Wang, Tao; Chen, Yingan; Zhang, Dingmei; Gray, Gregory C.; Lu, Jiahai

    2015-01-01

    During July to September 2014, we performed a controlled, cross-sectional, seroepidemiologic study among 203 swine workers and 115 control subjects in Guangdong Province. Sera were tested using a hemagglutination inhibition assay against locally-isolated swine H3N2 and H1N1 viruses and commercially-obtained human influenza viral antigens. We found swine workers had a greater prevalence and odds of seropositivity against the swine H3N2 virus (17.3% vs. 7.0%; adjusted OR, 3.4; 95% CI, 1.1 -10.7). Younger age, self-report of a respiratory illness during the last 12 months, and seropositivity against seasonal H3N2 virus were identified as significant risk factors for seropositivity against swine H3N2 virus. As swine workers in China may be exposed to novel influenza viruses, it seems prudent for China to conduct special surveillance for such viruses among them. It also seems wise to offer such workers seasonal influenza vaccines with a goal to reduce cross-species influenza virus transmission. PMID:26016740

  1. Evaluation of Anti-A/Udorn/307/1972 Antibody Specificity to Influenza A/H3N2 Viruses Using an Evanescent-Field Coupled Waveguide-Mode Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Gopinath, Subash C. B.; Awazu, Koichi; Fujimaki, Makoto; Shimizu, Kazufumi

    2013-01-01

    Discrimination of closely related strains is a key issue, particularly for infectious diseases whose incidence fluctuates according to variations in the season and evolutionary changes. Among infectious diseases, influenza viral infections are a worldwide cause of pandemic disease and mortality. With the emergence of different influenza strains, it is vital to develop a method using antibodies that can differentiate between viral types and subtypes. Ideally, such a system would also be user friendly. In this study, a polyclonal antibody generated against A/Udorn/307/1972 (H3N2) was used as a probe to distinguish between influenza H3N2 viruses based on the interaction between the antibody and hemagglutinin, demonstrating its applicability for viral discrimination. Clear discrimination was demonstrated using an evanescent-field-coupled waveguide-mode sensor, which has appealing characteristics over other methods in the viewpoint of improving the sensitivity, measurement time, portability and usability. Further supporting evidence was obtained using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, hemagglutination-inhibition assays, and infectivity neutralization assays. The results obtained indicate that the polyclonal antibody used here is a potential probe for distinguishing influenza viruses and, with the aid of a handheld sensor it could be used for influenza surveillance. PMID:24339924

  2. [An overview on swine influenza viruses].

    PubMed

    Yang, Shuai; Zhu, Wen-Fei; Shu, Yue-Long

    2013-05-01

    Swine influenza viruses (SIVs) are respiratory pathogens of pigs. They cause both economic bur den in livestock-dependent industries and serious global public health concerns in humans. Because of their dual susceptibility to human and avian influenza viruses, pigs are recognized as intermediate hosts for genetic reassortment and interspecies transmission. Subtypes H1N1, H1N2, and H3N2 circulate in swine populations around the world, with varied origin and genetic characteristics among different continents and regions. In this review, the role of pigs in evolution of influenza A viruses, the genetic evolution of SIVs and interspecies transmission of SIVs are described. Considering the possibility that pigs might produce novel influenza viruses causing more outbreaks and pandemics, routine epidemiological surveillance of influenza viruses in pig populations is highly recommended.

  3. NS1 Protein Amino Acid Changes D189N and V194I Affect Interferon Responses, Thermosensitivity, and Virulence of Circulating H3N2 Human Influenza A Viruses.

    PubMed

    Nogales, Aitor; Martinez-Sobrido, Luis; Topham, David J; DeDiego, Marta L

    2017-03-01

    Influenza virus NS1 protein is a nonstructural, multifunctional protein that counteracts host innate immune responses, modulating virus pathogenesis. NS1 protein variability in subjects infected with H3N2 influenza A viruses (IAVs) during the 2010/2011 season was analyzed, and amino acid changes in residues 86, 189, and 194 were found. The consequences of these mutations for the NS1-mediated inhibition of IFN responses and the pathogenesis of the virus were evaluated, showing that NS1 mutations D189N and V194I impaired the ability of the NS1 protein to inhibit general gene expression, most probably because these mutations decreased the binding of NS1 to the cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor 30 (CPSF30). A recombinant A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (PR8) H1N1 virus encoding the H3N2 NS1-D189N protein was slightly attenuated, whereas the virus encoding the H3N2 NS1-V194I protein was further attenuated in mice. The higher attenuation of this virus could not be explained by differences in the ability of the two NS1 proteins to counteract host innate immune responses, indicating that another factor must be responsible. In fact, we showed that the virus encoding the H3N2 NS1-V194I protein demonstrated a temperature-sensitive (ts) phenotype, providing a most likely explanation for the stronger attenuation observed. As far as we know, this is the first description of a mutation in NS1 residue 194 conferring a ts phenotype. These studies are relevant in order to identify new residues important for NS1 functions and in human influenza virus surveillance to assess mutations affecting the pathogenicity of circulating viruses.IMPORTANCE Influenza viral infections represent a serious public health problem, with influenza virus causing a contagious respiratory disease that is most effectively prevented through vaccination. The multifunctional nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) is the main viral factor counteracting the host antiviral response. Therefore, influenza virus surveillance

  4. Newly emerging mutations in the matrix genes of the human influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and A(H3N2) viruses reduce the detection sensitivity of real-time reverse transcription-PCR.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ji-Rong; Kuo, Chuan-Yi; Huang, Hsiang-Yi; Wu, Fu-Ting; Huang, Yi-Lung; Cheng, Chieh-Yu; Su, Yu-Ting; Chang, Feng-Yee; Wu, Ho-Sheng; Liu, Ming-Tsan

    2014-01-01

    New variants of the influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and A(H3N2) viruses were detected in Taiwan between 2012 and 2013. Some of these variants were not detected in clinical specimens using a common real-time reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) assay that targeted the conserved regions of the viral matrix (M) genes. An analysis of the M gene sequences of the new variants revealed that several newly emerging mutations were located in the regions where the primers or probes of the real-time RT-PCR assay bind; these included three mutations (G225A, T228C, and G238A) in the A(H1N1)pdm09 virus, as well as one mutation (C163T) in the A(H3N2) virus. These accumulated mismatch mutations, together with the previously identified C154T mutation of the A(H1N1)pdm09 virus and the C153T and G189T mutations of the A(H3N2) virus, result in a reduced detection sensitivity for the real-time RT-PCR assay. To overcome the loss of assay sensitivity due to mismatch mutations, we established a real-time RT-PCR assay using degenerate nucleotide bases in both the primers and probe and successfully increased the sensitivity of the assay to detect circulating variants of the human influenza A viruses. Our observations highlight the importance of the simultaneous use of different gene-targeting real-time RT-PCR assays for the clinical diagnosis of influenza.

  5. Serial Vaccination and the Antigenic Distance Hypothesis: Effects on Influenza Vaccine Effectiveness During A(H3N2) Epidemics in Canada, 2010-2011 to 2014-2015.

    PubMed

    Skowronski, Danuta M; Chambers, Catharine; De Serres, Gaston; Sabaiduc, Suzana; Winter, Anne-Luise; Dickinson, James A; Gubbay, Jonathan B; Fonseca, Kevin; Drews, Steven J; Charest, Hugues; Martineau, Christine; Krajden, Mel; Petric, Martin; Bastien, Nathalie; Li, Yan; Smith, Derek J

    2017-04-01

    The antigenic distance hypothesis (ADH) predicts that negative interference from prior season's influenza vaccine (v1) on the current season's vaccine (v2) protection may occur when the antigenic distance is small between v1 and v2 (v1 ≈ v2) but large between v1 and the current epidemic (e) strain (v1 ≠ e). Vaccine effectiveness (VE) against medically attended, laboratory-confirmed influenza A(H3N2) illness was estimated by test-negative design during 3 A(H3N2) epidemics (2010-2011, 2012-2013, 2014-2015) in Canada. Vaccine effectiveness was derived with covariate adjustment across v2 and/or v1 categories relative to no vaccine receipt among outpatients aged ≥9 years. Prior vaccination effects were interpreted within the ADH framework. Prior vaccination effects varied significantly by season, consistent with the ADH. There was no interference by v1 in 2010-2011 when v1 ≠ v2 and v1 ≠ e, with comparable VE for v2 alone or v2 + v1: 34% (95% confidence interval [CI] = -51% to 71%) versus 34% (95% CI = -5% to 58%). Negative interference by v1 was suggested in 2012-2013 with nonsignificant reduction in VE when v1 ≈ v2 and v1 ≠ e: 49% (95% CI = -47% to 83%) versus 28% (95% CI = -12% to 54%). Negative effects of prior vaccination were pronounced and statistically significant in 2014-2015 when v1 ≡ v2 and v1 ≠ e: 65% (95% CI = 25% to 83%) versus -33% (95% CI = -78% to 1%). Effects of repeat influenza vaccination were consistent with the ADH and may have contributed to findings of low VE across recent A(H3N2) epidemics since 2010 in Canada.

  6. Evolution of the hemagglutinin expressed by human influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and A(H3N2) viruses circulating between 2008-2009 and 2013-2014 in Germany.

    PubMed

    Wedde, Marianne; Biere, Barbara; Wolff, Thorsten; Schweiger, Brunhilde

    2015-10-01

    This report describes the evolution of the influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and A(H3N2) viruses circulating in Germany between 2008-2009 and 2013-2014. The phylogenetic analysis of the hemagglutinin (HA) genes of both subtypes revealed similar evolution of the HA variants that were also seen worldwide with minor exceptions. The analysis showed seven distinct HA clades for A(H1N1)pdm09 and six HA clades for A(H3N2) viruses. Herald strains of both subtypes appeared sporadically since 2008-2009. Regarding A(H1N1)pdm09, herald strains of HA clade 3 and 4 were detected late in the 2009-2010 season. With respect to A(H3N2), we found herald strains of HA clade 3, 4 and 7 between 2009 and 2012. Those herald strains were predominantly seen for minor and not for major HA clades. Generally, amino acid substitutions were most frequently found in the globular domain, including substitutions near the antigenic sites or the receptor binding site. Differences between both influenza A subtypes were seen with respect to the position of the indicated substitutions in the HA. For A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses, we found more substitutions in the stem region than in the antigenic sites. In contrast, in A(H3N2) viruses most changes were identified in the major antigenic sites and five changes of potential glycosylation sites were identified in the head of the HA monomer. Interestingly, we found in seasons with less influenza activity a relatively high increase of substitutions in the head of the HA in both subtypes. This might be explained by the fact that mutations under negative selection are subsequently compensated by secondary mutations to restore important functions e.g. receptor binding properties. A better knowledge of basic evolution strategies of influenza viruses will contribute to the refinement of predictive mathematical models for identifying novel antigenic drift variants.

  7. The human H3N2 influenza viruses A/Victoria/3/75 and A/Hiroshima/52/2005 preferentially bind to α2-3-sialylated monosialogangliosides with fucosylated poly-N-acetyllactosaminyl chains.

    PubMed

    Meisen, Iris; Dzudzek, Tabea; Ehrhardt, Christina; Ludwig, Stephan; Mormann, Michael; Rosenbrück, Regina; Lümen, Regine; Kniep, Bernhard; Karch, Helge; Müthing, Johannes

    2012-08-01

    Among influenza A viruses, subtype H3N2 is the major cause of human influenza morbidity and is associated with seasonal epidemics causing annually half million deaths worldwide. Influenza A virus infection is initiated via hemagglutinin that binds to terminally sialylated glycoconjugates exposed on the surface of target cells. Gangliosides from human granulocytes were probed using thin-layer chromatography overlay assays for their binding potential to H3N2 virus strains A/Victoria/3/75 and A/Hiroshima/52/2005. Highly polar gangliosides with poly-N-acetyllactosaminyl chains showing low chromatographic mobility exhibited strong virus adhesion which was entirely abolished by sialidase treatment. Auxiliary overlay assays using anti-sialyl Lewis(x) (sLe(x)) monoclonal antibodies showed identical binding patterns compared with those performed with the viruses. A comprehensive structural analysis of fractionated gangliosides by electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry revealed sLe(x) gangliosides with terminal Neu5Acα2-3Galβ1-4(Fucα1-3)GlcNAc epitope and extended neolacto (nLc)-series core structures as the preferential virus binding gangliosides. More precisely, sLe(x) gangliosides with nLc8, nLc10 and nLc12Cer cores, carrying sphingosine (d18:1) and a fatty acid with variable chain length (mostly C24:0, C24:1 or C16:0) in the ceramide moiety and one or two additional internal fucose residues in the oligosaccharide portion, were identified as the preferred receptors recognized by H3N2 virus strains A/Victoria/3/75 and A/Hiroshima/52/2005. This study describes glycan-binding requirements of hemagglutinin beyond binding to glycans with a specific sialic acid linkage of as yet undefined neutrophil receptors acting as ligands for H3N2 viruses. In addition, our results pose new questions on the biological and clinical relevance of this unexpected specificity of a subtype of influenza A viruses.

  8. Effects of Repeated Annual Inactivated Influenza Vaccination among Healthcare Personnel on Serum Hemagglutinin Inhibition Antibody Response to A/Perth/16/2009 (H3N2)-like virus during 2010–11

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Mark G.; Naleway, Allison; Fry, Alicia M.; Ball, Sarah; Spencer, Sarah M.; Reynolds, Sue; Bozeman, Sam; Levine, Min; Katz, Jacqueline M.; Gaglani, Manjusha

    2016-01-01

    Background Recently, lower estimates of influenza vaccine effectiveness (VE) against A(H3N2) virus illness among those vaccinated during the previous season or multiple seasons have been reported; however, it is unclear whether these effects are due to differences in immunogenicity. Methods We performed hemagglutination inhibition antibody (HI) assays on serum collected at preseason, ∼30 days post-vaccination, and postseason from a prospective cohort of healthcare personnel (HCP). Eligible participants had medical and vaccination records for at least four years (since July, 2006), including 578 HCP who received 2010–11 trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine [IIV3, containing A/Perth/16/2009-like A(H3N2)] and 209 HCP who declined vaccination. Estimates of the percentage with high titers (≥40 and > 100) and geometric mean fold change ratios (GMRs) to A/Perth/16/2009-like virus by number of prior vaccinations were adjusted for age, sex, race, education, household size, hospital care responsibilities, and study site. Results Post-vaccination GMRs were inversely associated with the number of prior vaccinations, increasing from 2.3 among those with 4 prior vaccinations to 6.2 among HCP with zero prior vaccinations (F[4,567] = 9.97, p < .0005). Thirty-two percent of HCP with 1 prior vaccination achieved titers >100 compared to only 11% of HCP with 4 prior vaccinations (adjusted odds ratio = 6.8, 95% CI = 3.1 – 15.3). Conclusion Our findings point to an exposure-response association between repeated IIV3 vaccination and HI for A(H3N2) and are consistent with recent VE observations. Ultimately, better vaccines and vaccine strategies may be needed in order to optimize immunogenicity and VE for HCP and other repeated vaccinees. PMID:26813801

  9. Effects of Repeated Annual Inactivated Influenza Vaccination among Healthcare Personnel on Serum Hemagglutinin Inhibition Antibody Response to A/Perth/16/2009 (H3N2)-like virus during 2010-11.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Mark G; Naleway, Allison; Fry, Alicia M; Ball, Sarah; Spencer, Sarah M; Reynolds, Sue; Bozeman, Sam; Levine, Min; Katz, Jacqueline M; Gaglani, Manjusha

    2016-02-10

    Recently, lower estimates of influenza vaccine effectiveness (VE) against A(H3N2) virus illness among those vaccinated during the previous season or multiple seasons have been reported; however, it is unclear whether these effects are due to differences in immunogenicity. We performed hemagglutination inhibition antibody (HI) assays on serum collected at preseason, ∼ 30 days post-vaccination, and postseason from a prospective cohort of healthcare personnel (HCP). Eligible participants had medical and vaccination records for at least four years (since July, 2006), including 578 HCP who received 2010-11 trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine [IIV3, containing A/Perth/16/2009-like A(H3N2)] and 209 HCP who declined vaccination. Estimates of the percentage with high titers (≥ 40 and>100) and geometric mean fold change ratios (GMRs) to A/Perth/16/2009-like virus by number of prior vaccinations were adjusted for age, sex, race, education, household size, hospital care responsibilities, and study site. Post-vaccination GMRs were inversely associated with the number of prior vaccinations, increasing from 2.3 among those with 4 prior vaccinations to 6.2 among HCP with zero prior vaccinations (F[4,567]=9.97, p<.0005). Thirty-two percent of HCP with 1 prior vaccination achieved titers >100 compared to only 11% of HCP with 4 prior vaccinations (adjusted odds ratio=6.8, 95% CI=3.1 - 15.3). Our findings point to an exposure-response association between repeated IIV3 vaccination and HI for A(H3N2) and are consistent with recent VE observations. Ultimately, better vaccines and vaccine strategies may be needed in order to optimize immunogenicity and VE for HCP and other repeated vaccinees. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Influenza exposure in United States feral swine populations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hall, J.S.; Minnis, R.B.; Campbell, T.A.; Barras, S.; DeYoung, R.W.; Pabilonia, K.; Avery, M.L.; Sullivan, H.; Clark, L.; McLean, R.G.

    2008-01-01

    Swine play an important role in the disease ecology of influenza. Having cellular receptors in common with birds and humans, swine provide opportunities for mixed infections and potential for genetic reassortment between avian, human, and porcine influenza. Feral swine populations are rapidly expanding in both numbers and range and are increasingly coming into contact with waterfowl, humans, and agricultural operations. In this study, over 875 feral swine were sampled from six states across the United States for serologic evidence of exposure to influenza. In Oklahoma, Florida, and Missouri, USA, no seropositive feral swine were detected. Seropositive swine were detected in California, Mississippi, and Texas, USA. Antibody prevalences in these states were 1% in Mississippi, 5% in California, and 14.4% in Texas. All seropositive swine were exposed to H3N2 subtype, the predominant subtype currently circulating in domestic swine. The only exceptions were in San Saba County, Texas, where of the 15 seropositive samples, four were positive for H1N1 and seven for both H1N1 and H3N2. In Texas, there was large geographical and temporal variation in antibody prevalence and no obvious connection to domestic swine operations. No evidence of exposure to avian influenza in feral swine was uncovered. From these results it is apparent that influenza in feral swine poses a risk primarily to swine production operations. However, because feral swine share habitat with waterfowl, prey on and scavenge dead and dying birds, are highly mobile, and are increasingly coming into contact with humans, the potential for these animals to become infected with avian or human influenza in addition to swine influenza is a distinct possibility. ?? Wildlife Disease Association 2008.

  11. A Host Transcriptional Signature for Presymptomatic Detection of Infection in Humans Exposed to Influenza H1N1 or H3N2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-09

    intensity [6]. Although previous studies with dengue, melioidosis, tuberculosis , candidiasis, and sepsis have focused on diagnosis in patients as they...CM, McNab FW, Xu Z, Bloch SA, et al. (2010) An interferon-inducible neutrophil-driven blood transcriptional signature in human tuberculosis . Nature...BMC Bioinformatics 11: 552. 16. Julkunen I, Sareneva T, Pirhonen J, Ronni T, Melen K, et al. (2001) Molecular pathogenesis of influenza A virus

  12. Detection of influenza A H1N1 and H3N2 mutations conferring resistance to oseltamivir using rolling circle amplification.

    PubMed

    Steain, Megan C; Dwyer, Dominic E; Hurt, Aeron C; Kol, Chenda; Saksena, Nitin K; Cunningham, Anthony L; Wang, Bin

    2009-12-01

    In the event of an influenza pandemic, the use of oseltamivir (OTV) will undoubtedly increase and therefore it is more likely that OTV-resistant influenza strains will also arise. OTV-resistance genotyping using sequence-based testing on viruses isolated in cell culture is time consuming and less likely to detect the low-level presence of drug-resistant virus populations. We have developed a novel rolling circle amplification (RCA) method to achieve the sensitive detection of OTV-resistant viruses from clinical specimens. Using artificially created templates, RCA could detect the presence of OTV-resistant mutations (N2: 119V, 292K, N1: 274Y) even if the population carrying the mutations was <1% of the total. By applying RCA to clinical samples, we identified the emergence of the 274Y mutation in one OTV-treated patient, as well as in seven individuals who were treatment-naïve (confirming community transmission of 274Y-containing resistant influenza A H1N1). These results were further confirmed by neuraminidase region sequencing. In conclusion, RCA technology can provide rapid (<24 h), high-throughput diagnosis of OTV resistance mutations with a high specificity and sensitivity.

  13. Genetic structure of human A/H1N1 and A/H3N2 influenza virus on Corsica Island: phylogenetic analysis and vaccine strain match, 2006-2010.

    PubMed

    Falchi, Alessandra; Amoros, Jean Pierre; Arena, Christophe; Arrighi, Jean; Casabianca, François; Andreoletti, Laurent; Turbelin, Clément; Flahault, Antoine; Blanchon, Thierry; Hanslik, Thomas; Varesi, Laurent

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the genetic patterns of Hemagglutinin (HA) genes of influenza A strains circulating on Corsica Island during the 2006-2009 epidemic seasons and the 2009-2010 pandemic season. Nasopharyngeal samples from 371 patients with influenza-like illness (ILI) were collected by General Practitioners (GPs) of the Sentinelles Network through a randomised selection routine. Phylogenetic analysis of HA revealed that A/H3N2 strains circulating on Corsica were closely related to the WHO recommended vaccine strains in each analyzed season (2006-2007 to 2008-2009). Seasonal Corsican influenza A/H1N1 isolated during the 2007-2008 season had drifted towards the A/Brisbane/59/2007 lineage, the A/H1N1 vaccine strain for the 2008-2009 season. The A/H1N1 2009 (A/H1N1pdm) strains isolated on Corsica Island were characterized by the S220T mutation specific to clade 7 isolates. It should be noted that Corsican isolates formed a separate sub-clade of clade 7 as a consequence of the presence of the fixed substitution D222E. The percentages of the perfect match vaccine efficacy, estimated by using the p(epitope) model, against influenza viruses circulating on Corsica Island varied substantially across the four seasons analyzed, and tend to be highest for A/H1N1 compared with A/H3N2 vaccines, suggesting that cross-immunity seems to be stronger for the H1 HA gene. The molecular analysis of the HA gene of influenza viruses that circulated on Corsica Island between 2006-2010 showed for each season the presence of a dominant lineage characterized by at least one fixed mutation. The A/H3N2 and A/H1N1pdm isolates were characterized by multiples fixation at antigenic sites. The fixation of specific mutations at each outbreak could be explained by the combination of a neutral phenomenon and a founder effect, favoring the presence of a dominant lineage in a closed environment such as Corsica Island.

  14. Efficacy of Clarithromycin-Naproxen-Oseltamivir Combination in the Treatment of Patients Hospitalized for Influenza A(H3N2) Infection: An Open-label Randomized, Controlled, Phase IIb/III Trial.

    PubMed

    Hung, Ivan F N; To, Kelvin K W; Chan, Jasper F W; Cheng, Vincent C C; Liu, Kevin S H; Tam, Anthony; Chan, Tuen-Ching; Zhang, Anna Jinxia; Li, Patrick; Wong, Tin-Lun; Zhang, Ricky; Cheung, Michael K S; Leung, William; Lau, Johnson Y N; Fok, Manson; Chen, Honglin; Chan, Kwok-Hung; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2017-05-01

    Influenza causes excessive hospitalizations and deaths. The study assessed the efficacy and safety of a clarithromycin-naproxen-oseltamivir combination for treatment of serious influenza. From February to April 2015, we conducted a prospective open-label, randomized, controlled trial. Adult patients hospitalized for A(H3N2) influenza were randomly assigned to a 2-day combination of clarithromycin 500 mg, naproxen 200 mg, and oseltamivir 75 mg twice daily, followed by 3 days of oseltamivir or to oseltamivir 75 mg twice daily without placebo for 5 days as a control method (1:1). The primary end point was 30-day mortality. The secondary end points were 90-day mortality, serial nasopharyngeal aspirate (NPA) virus titer, percentage of neuraminidase-inhibitor-resistant A(H3N2) virus (NIRV) quasispecies, pneumonia severity index (PSI), and duration of hospital stay. Among the 217 patients with influenza A(H3N2) enrolled, 107 were randomly assigned to the combination treatment. The median age was 80 years, and 53.5% were men. Adverse events were uncommon. Ten patients died during the 30-day follow-up. The combination treatment was associated with lower 30-day mortality (P = .01), less frequent high dependency unit admission (P = .009), and shorter hospital stay (P < .0001). The virus titer and PSI (days 1-3; P < .01) and the NPA specimens with NIRV quasispecies ≥ 5% (days 1-2; P < .01) were significantly lower in the combination treatment group. Multivariate analysis showed that combination treatment was the only independent factor associated with lower 30-day mortality (OR, 0.06; 95% CI, 0.004-0.94; P = .04). Combination treatment reduced both 30- and 90-day mortality and length of hospital stay. Further study of the antiviral and immunomodulatory effects of this combination treatment of severe influenza is warranted. BioMed Central; No.: ISRCTN11273879 DOI 10.1186/ISRCTN11273879; URL: www.isrctn.com/ISRCTN11273879. Copyright © 2016 American College

  15. Influenza H3N2 infection of the collaborative cross founder strains reveals highly divergent host responses and identifies a unique phenotype in CAST/EiJ mice.

    PubMed

    Leist, Sarah R; Pilzner, Carolin; van den Brand, Judith M A; Dengler, Leonie; Geffers, Robert; Kuiken, Thijs; Balling, Rudi; Kollmus, Heike; Schughart, Klaus

    2016-02-27

    Influenza A virus is a zoonotic pathogen that poses a major threat to human and animal health. The severe course of influenza infection is not only influenced by viral virulence factors but also by individual differences in the host response. To determine the extent to which the genetic background can modulate severity of an infection, we studied the host responses to influenza infections in the eight genetically highly diverse Collaborative Cross (CC) founder mouse strains. We observed highly divergent host responses between the CC founder strains with respect to survival, body weight loss, hematological parameters in the blood, relative lung weight and viral load. Mouse strain was the main factor with highest effect size on body weight loss after infection, demonstrating that this phenotype was highly heritable. Sex represented another significant main effect, although it was less strong. Analysis of survival rates and mean time to death suggested three groups of susceptibility phenotypes: highly susceptible (A/J, CAST/EiJ, WSB/EiJ), intermediate susceptible (C57BL/6J, 129S1/SvImJ, NOD/ShiLtJ) and highly resistant strains (NZO/HlLtJ, PWK/PhJ). These three susceptibility groups were significantly different with respect to death/survival counts. Viral load was significantly different between susceptible and resistant strains but not between intermediate and highly susceptible strains. CAST/EiJ mice showed a unique phenotype. Despite high viral loads in their lungs, CAST/EiJ mice exhibited low counts of infiltrating granulocytes and showed increased numbers of macrophages in the lung. Histological studies of infected lungs and transcriptome analyses of peripheral blood cells and lungs confirmed an abnormal response in the leukocyte recruitment in CAST/EiJ mice. The eight CC founder strains exhibited a large diversity in their response to influenza infections. Therefore, the CC will represent an ideal mouse genetic reference population to study the influence of

  16. [Antibody response to trivalent anti-influenza vaccination (inactivated virus) A/Texas/1/77 H3N2), A/URSS/90/77 (H1N1), B/Hong Kong/8/73].

    PubMed

    Mancini, G; Andreoni, M; Arangio-Ruiz, G; Sarrecchia, C; Donatelli, I; Resta, S; Rozera, C; Sordillo, P; Rocchi, G

    1982-05-01

    Seventy-five young recruits received an intramuscular dose of anti-influenza virus vaccine containing 300 U.I. of A/Texas/1/77 (H3N2), A/URSS/90/77 (H1N1), B/Hong Kong/8/73 strains. Antibody responses were detected by HI and SRH tests: immunogenicity of the preparation was different for the individual vaccine strain in spite of the similar amount of antigenic content, and the immunity conferred by vaccine strains did not significantly extend to new influenza virus strains which prevailed in 1979/80 winter season with the exception for A/Brazil/11/78 (H1N1).

  17. Role of Preschool and Primary School Children in Epidemics of Influenza A in a Local Community in Japan during Two Consecutive Seasons with A(H3N2) as a Predominant Subtype.

    PubMed

    Mimura, Satoshi; Kamigaki, Taro; Takahashi, Yoshihiro; Umenai, Takamichi; Kudou, Mataka; Oshitani, Hitoshi

    2015-01-01

    Enhanced influenza surveillance was implemented to analyze transmission dynamics particularly driving force of influenza transmission in a community during 2011/12 and 2012/13 seasons in Odate City, Japan. In these two consecutive seasons, influenza A(H3N2) was the predominant influenza A subtype. Suspected influenza cases were tested by commercial rapid test kits. Demographic and epidemiological information of influenza positive cases were recorded using a standardized questionnaire, which included age or age group, date of visit, date of fever onset, and the result of rapid test kit. Epidemiological parameters including epidemic midpoint (EM) and growth rate (GR) were analyzed. In 2012/13 season, numbers of influenza A positive cases were significantly lower among preschool (212 cases) and primary school (224 cases) children than in 2011/12 season (461 and 538 cases, respectively). Simultaneously, total influenza A cases were also reduced from 2,092 in 2011/12 season to 1,846 in 2012/13 season. The EMs in preschool and primary school children were earlier than EMs for adult and all age group in both 2011/12 and 2012/13 seasons. The GR in 2012/13 season was significantly lower than that in 2011/12 season (0.11 and 0.18, respectively, p = 0.003). Multiple linear regression analysis by school districts revealed that GRs in both seasons were significantly correlated with the incidence of school age children. Our findings suggest that preschool and primary school children played an important role as a driving force of epidemics in the community in both 2011/12 and 2012/13 seasons. The reduction of total influenza A cases in 2012/13 season can be explained by decreased susceptible population in these age groups due to immunity acquired by infections in 2011/12 season. Further investigations are needed to investigate the effect of pre-existing immunity on influenza transmission in the community.

  18. Predominance of influenza A(H3N2) virus genetic subclade 3C.2a1 during an early 2016/17 influenza season in Europe - Contribution of surveillance data from World Health Organization (WHO) European Region to the WHO vaccine composition consultation for northern hemisphere 2017/18.

    PubMed

    Melidou, Angeliki; Broberg, Eeva

    2017-09-05

    During the European 2016/17 influenza season, A(H3N2) viruses have predominated and the majority clustered in genetic subclade 3C.2a1. Genetic analyses showed that circulating viruses have undergone considerable genetic diversification of the haemagglutinin gene from the current vaccine virus A/Hong Kong/4801/2014 (clade 3C.2a), but the antigenic data that is limited by the challenges with the antigenic characterisation of currently circulating A(H3N2) viruses, showed no clear evidence of antigenic change. The recommended A(H3N2) vaccine component for the northern hemisphere 2017/18 influenza season remained unchanged. However, early and mid-season vaccine effectiveness (VE) estimates were suggestive of reduced VE against A(H3N2) viruses. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Advantage of live attenuated cold-adapted influenza A virus over inactivated vaccine for A/Washington/80 (H3N2) wild-type virus infection.

    PubMed

    Clements, M L; Betts, R F; Murphy, B R

    1984-03-31

    The efficacy of live attenuated cold-adapted (ca) reassortant influenza virus vaccine against experimental challenge with homologous wild-type virus 5 to 8 weeks after vaccination was compared with that of licensed inactivated vaccine in 81 seronegative (haemagglutination-inhibition antibody titre less than or equal to 1:8) college students. At a dose of 10(7.5) 50% tissue culture infectious dose (TCID50) (70 HID50, human 50% infectious doses) the live virus vaccine, given intranasally, completely protected against illness caused by wild-type virus, whereas the inactivated vaccine, administered intramuscularly, provided 72% protection. Wild-type virus was recovered from only 13% of live virus vaccinees (10(7.5) TCID50 dose of ca virus) compared with 63% of inactivated virus vaccinees and the few infected live virus vaccinees shed 1000 times less wild-type virus than did infected inactivated virus vaccinees or unvaccinated controls. This striking reduction in virus shedding suggests that influenza transmission may be more efficiently interrupted with live than with inactivated virus vaccination.

  20. Comparative analysis of influenza A(H3N2) virus hemagglutinin specific IgG subclass and IgA responses in children and adults after influenza vaccination.

    PubMed

    Manenti, Alessandro; Tete, Sarah M; Mohn, Kristin G-I; Jul-Larsen, Åsne; Gianchecchi, Elena; Montomoli, Emanuele; Brokstad, Karl A; Cox, Rebecca J

    2017-01-03

    Two different influenza vaccines are generally used in many countries; trivalent live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV3) and trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (IIV3). Studies comparing the antibody response to IIV3 and LAIV3 commonly investigate the seroprotective response by hemagglutination-inhibition (HI) assay. However, there is limited data regarding comparative analysis of IgG subclass and IgA responses induced by LAIV3 and IIV3. Fifteen children <5years received 2 doses of LAIV3 while 14 children aged 10-17years received one dose. In addition, 15 adults were vaccinated with either intranasal LAIV3 or intramuscular IIV3. We analyzed the H3N2 humoral responses by HI assay and the hemagglutinin (HA) specific IgG1, IgG2, IgG3, IgG4 and IgA1 responses by ELISA. Furthermore, we investigated the avidity of induced IgG antibodies. Pre-existing seroprotective HI antibodies were present in adults (73%) previously vaccinated with IIV3. Vaccination resulted in a significant increase in HI titers in all groups, except LAIV3 vaccinated adults. Furthermore, a negative correlation between age and HI titers in LAIV3 vaccinated subjects was observed post-vaccination. LAIV3 in children and IIV3 in adults induced HA-specific IgG1, low IgG3 but no IgG2 or IgG4. Moreover, significant IgA1 responses were only induced in children. Interestingly, IIV3 and LAIV3 induced IgG antibodies with comparable and significantly augmented avidity post-vaccination in children and adults. Our results suggest that age and/or exposure history play a significant role in determining the antibody response. Clinical trial registry: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01003288 and NCT01866540.

  1. The characteristics and antigenic properties of recently emerged subclade 3C.3a and 3C.2a human influenza A(H3N2) viruses passaged in MDCK cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yipu; Wharton, Stephen A; Whittaker, Lynne; Dai, Mian; Ermetal, Burcu; Lo, Janice; Pontoriero, Andrea; Baumeister, Elsa; Daniels, Rodney S; McCauley, John W

    2017-05-01

    Two new subclades of influenza A(H3N2) viruses became prominent during the 2014-2015 Northern Hemisphere influenza season. The HA glycoproteins of these viruses showed sequence changes previously associated with alterations in receptor-binding properties. To address how these changes influence virus propagation, viruses were isolated and propagated in conventional MDCK cells and MDCK-SIAT1 cells, cells with enhanced expression of the human receptor for the virus, and analysed at each passage. Gene sequence analysis was undertaken as virus was passaged in conventional MDCK cells and MDCK-SIAT1 cells. Alterations in receptor recognition associated with passage of virus were examined by haemagglutination assays using red blood cells from guinea pigs, turkeys and humans. Microneutralisation assays were performed to determine how passage-acquired amino acid substitutions and polymorphisms affected virus antigenicity. Viruses were able to infect MDCK-SIAT1 cells more efficiently than conventional MDCK cells. Viruses of both the 3C.2a and 3C.3a subclades showed greater sequence change on passage in conventional MDCK cells than in MDCK-SIAT1 cells, with amino acid substitutions being seen in both HA and NA glycoproteins. However, virus passage in MDCK-SIAT1 cells at low inoculum dilutions showed reducing infectivity on continued passage. Current H3N2 viruses should be cultured in the MDCK-SIAT1 cell line to maintain faithful replication of the virus, and at an appropriate multiplicity of infection to retain infectivity. © 2017 The Authors. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Continual re-introduction of human pandemic H1N1 influenza A viruses into US swine, 2009-2014

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Human-to-swine transmission of pandemic H1N1 influenza viruses (pH1N1) increased the genetic diversity of influenza A viruses in swine (swIAVs) globally and is linked to the emergence of new pandemic threats, including H3N2v variants. Through phylogenetic analysis of contemporary swIAVs in the Unit...

  3. Experimental Evaluation of a Swine Influenza Virus Isolated from a County Fair Outbreak in the United States

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Since 1998, 3 predominant swine influenza virus (SIV) subtypes have circulated in US swine, H1N1, H1N2, and H3N2. Distinct antigenic and genetic clusters have been demonstrated within the H1 and H3 SIV subtypes (1, 2). In August 2007, pigs and people became clinically affected by an influenza-like i...

  4. Single-Dose Mucosal Immunization with a Candidate Universal Influenza Vaccine Provides Rapid Protection from Virulent H5N1, H3N2 and H1N1 Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Price, Graeme E.; Soboleski, Mark R.; Lo, Chia-Yun; Misplon, Julia A.; Quirion, Mary R.; Houser, Katherine V.; Pearce, Melissa B.; Pappas, Claudia; Tumpey, Terrence M.; Epstein, Suzanne L.

    2010-01-01

    Background The sudden emergence of novel influenza viruses is a global public health concern. Conventional influenza vaccines targeting the highly variable surface glycoproteins hemagglutinin and neuraminidase must antigenically match the emerging strain to be effective. In contrast, “universal” vaccines targeting conserved viral components could be used regardless of viral strain or subtype. Previous approaches to universal vaccination have required protracted multi-dose immunizations. Here we evaluate a single dose universal vaccine strategy using recombinant adenoviruses (rAd) expressing the conserved influenza virus antigens matrix 2 and nucleoprotein. Methodology/Principal Findings In BALB/c mice, administration of rAd via the intranasal route was superior to intramuscular immunization for induction of mucosal responses and for protection against highly virulent H1N1, H3N2, or H5N1 influenza virus challenge. Mucosally vaccinated mice not only survived, but had little morbidity and reduced lung virus titers. Protection was observed as early as 2 weeks post-immunization, and lasted at least 10 months, as did antibodies and lung T cells with activated phenotypes. Virus-specific IgA correlated with but was not essential for protection, as demonstrated in studies with IgA-deficient animals. Conclusion/Significance Mucosal administration of NP and M2-expressing rAd vectors provided rapid and lasting protection from influenza viruses in a subtype-independent manner. Such vaccines could be used in the interval between emergence of a new virus strain and availability of strain-matched vaccines against it. This strikingly effective single-dose vaccination thus represents a candidate off-the-shelf vaccine for emergency use during an influenza pandemic. PMID:20976273

  5. Full Genome Characterization of Human Influenza A/H3N2 Isolates from Asian Countries Reveals a Rare Amantadine Resistance-Conferring Mutation and Novel PB1-F2 Polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Zaraket, Hassan; Kondo, Hiroki; Hibino, Akinobu; Yagami, Ren; Odagiri, Takashi; Takemae, Nobuhiro; Tsunekuni, Ryota; Saito, Takehiko; Myint, Yi Yi; Kyaw, Yadanar; Oo, Khin Yi; Tin, Htay Htay; Lin, Nay; Anh, Nguyen Phuong; Hang, Nguyen Le Khanh; Mai, Le Quynh; Hassan, Mohd R; Shobugawa, Yugo; Tang, Julian; Dbaibo, Ghassan; Saito, Reiko

    2016-01-01

    Influenza A viruses evolve at a high rate requiring continuous monitoring to maintain the efficacy of vaccines and antiviral drugs. We performed next generation sequencing analysis of 100 influenza A/H3N2 isolates collected in four Asian countries (Japan, Lebanon, Myanmar, and Vietnam) during 2012-2015. Phylogenetic analysis revealed several reassortment events leading to the circulation of multiple clades within the same season. This was particularly evident during the 2013 and 2013/2014 seasons. Importantly, our data showed that certain lineages appeared to be fitter and were able to persist into the following season. The majority of A/H3N2 viruses continued to harbor the M2-S31N mutation conferring amantadine-resistance. In addition, an S31D mutation in the M2-protein, conferring a similar level of resistance as the S31N mutation, was detected in three isolates obtained in Japan during the 2014/2015 season. None of the isolates possessed the NA-H274Y mutation conferring oseltamivir-resistance, though a few isolates were found to contain mutations at the catalytic residue 151 (D151A/G/N or V) of the NA protein. These variations did not alter the susceptibility to neuraminidase inhibitors and were not detected in the original clinical specimens, suggesting that they had been acquired during their passage in MDCK cells. Novel polymorphisms were detected in the PB1-F2 open-reading frame resulting in truncations in the protein of 24-34 aminoacids in length. Thus, this study has demonstrated the utility of monitoring the full genome of influenza viruses to allow the detection of the potentially fittest lineages. This enhances our ability to predict the strain(s) most likely to persist into the following seasons and predict the potential degree of vaccine match or mismatch with the seasonal influenza season for that year. This will enable the public health and clinical teams to prepare for any related healthcare burden, depending on whether the vaccine match is

  6. History of Swine influenza viruses in Asia.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Huachen; Webby, Richard; Lam, Tommy T Y; Smith, David K; Peiris, Joseph S M; Guan, Yi

    2013-01-01

    The pig is one of the main hosts of influenza A viruses and plays important roles in shaping the current influenza ecology. The occurrence of the 2009 H1N1 pandemic influenza virus demonstrated that pigs could independently facilitate the genesis of a pandemic influenza strain. Genetic analyses revealed that this virus was derived by reassortment between at least two parent swine influenza viruses (SIV), from the northern American triple reassortant H1N2 (TR) and European avian-like H1N1 (EA) lineages. The movement of live pigs between different continents and subsequent virus establishment are preconditions for such a reassortment event to occur. Asia, especially China, has the largest human and pig populations in the world, and seems to be the only region frequently importing pigs from other continents. Virological surveillance revealed that not only classical swine H1N1 (CS), and human-origin H3N2 viruses circulated, but all of the EA, TR and their reassortant variants were introduced into and co-circulated in pigs in this region. Understanding the long-term evolution and history of SIV in Asia would provide insights into the emergence of influenza viruses with epidemic potential in swine and humans.

  7. Swine origin influenza (swine flu).

    PubMed

    Sebastian, Meghna R; Lodha, Rakesh; Kabra, S K

    2009-08-01

    Swine origin influenza was first recognized in the border area of Mexico and United States in April 2009 and during a short span of two months became the first pandemic. The currently circulating strain of swine origin influenza virus of the H1N1 strain has undergone triple reassortment and contains genes from the avian, swine and human viruses. It is transmitted by droplets or fomites. Incubation period is 2 to 7 days. Common clinical symptoms are indistinguishable by any viral respiratory illness, and include fever, cough, sore throat and myalgia. A feature seen more frequently with swine origin influenza is GI upset. Less than 10% of patients require hospitalization. Patients at risk of developing severe disease are - younger than five years, elderly, pregnant women, with chronic systemic illnesses, adolescents on aspirin. Of the severe manifestations of swine origin influenza, pneumonia and respiratory failure are the most common. Unusual symptoms reported are conjunctivitis, parotitis, hemophagocytic syndrome. Infants may present with fever and lethargy with no respiratory symptoms. Diagnosis is based on RT PCR, Viral culture or increasing neutralizing antibodies. Principle of treatment consist of isolation, universal precautions, good infection control practices, supportive care and use of antiviral drugs. Antiviral drugs effective against H1N1 virus include: oseltamivir and zamanavir. With good supportive care case fatality is less than 1%. Preventive measures include: social distancing, practicing respiratory etiquette, hand hygiene and use of chemoprohylaxis with antiviral drugs. Vaccine against H1N1 is not available at present, but will be available in near future.

  8. Swine Influenza/Variant Influenza Viruses

    MedlinePlus

    ... Variant Other Information on Swine Influenza/Variant Influenza Virus Language: English (US) Español Recommend on Facebook ... disease of pigs caused by type A influenza viruses that regularly cause outbreaks of influenza in pigs. ...

  9. Influenza A Viruses of Human Origin in Swine, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Martha I; Schaefer, Rejane; Gava, Danielle; Cantão, Maurício Egídio; Ciacci-Zanella, Janice Reis

    2015-08-01

    The evolutionary origins of the influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus that caused the first outbreak of the 2009 pandemic in Mexico remain unclear, highlighting the lack of swine surveillance in Latin American countries. Although Brazil has one of the largest swine populations in the world, influenza was not thought to be endemic in Brazil's swine until the major outbreaks of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 in 2009. Through phylogenetic analysis of whole-genome sequences of influenza viruses of the H1N1, H1N2, and H3N2 subtypes collected in swine in Brazil during 2009-2012, we identified multiple previously uncharacterized influenza viruses of human seasonal H1N2 and H3N2 virus origin that have circulated undetected in swine for more than a decade. Viral diversity has further increased in Brazil through reassortment between co-circulating viruses, including A(H1N1)pdm09. The circulation of multiple divergent hemagglutinin lineages challenges the design of effective cross-protective vaccines and highlights the need for additional surveillance.

  10. Influenza A Viruses of Human Origin in Swine, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Schaefer, Rejane; Gava, Danielle; Cantão, Maurício Egídio; Ciacci-Zanella, Janice Reis

    2015-01-01

    The evolutionary origins of the influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus that caused the first outbreak of the 2009 pandemic in Mexico remain unclear, highlighting the lack of swine surveillance in Latin American countries. Although Brazil has one of the largest swine populations in the world, influenza was not thought to be endemic in Brazil’s swine until the major outbreaks of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 in 2009. Through phylogenetic analysis of whole-genome sequences of influenza viruses of the H1N1, H1N2, and H3N2 subtypes collected in swine in Brazil during 2009–2012, we identified multiple previously uncharacterized influenza viruses of human seasonal H1N2 and H3N2 virus origin that have circulated undetected in swine for more than a decade. Viral diversity has further increased in Brazil through reassortment between co-circulating viruses, including A(H1N1)pdm09. The circulation of multiple divergent hemagglutinin lineages challenges the design of effective cross-protective vaccines and highlights the need for additional surveillance. PMID:26196759

  11. Quantitative analysis of influenza A (H3N2) E119V and R292K variants in clinical specimens by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Sato, Masatoki; Honzumi, Ken; Sato, Toshiko; Hashimoto, Koichi; Watanabe, Masahiro; Miyazaki, Kyohei; Kawasaki, Yukihiko; Hosoya, Mitsuaki

    2015-07-01

    Because influenza virus isolates after cell culture are required to determine their susceptibility to neuraminidase inhibitors, the differences in normal or low-susceptibility variant population frequencies between clinical samples and isolates have not been considered. To identify variations in low-susceptibility populations in clinical samples after initiation of oseltamivir and zanamivir therapy by quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). We measured the populations of the low-susceptibility influenza A H3N2 variants E119V and R292K by qRT-PCR using 305 nasal aspiration samples collected over time from 13, 16, and 11 patients treated with no neuraminidase inhibitors, oseltamivir, and zanamivir, respectively. The variant population in the isolates was also determined when the population of low-susceptibility variants in the clinical samples increased following treatment. Moreover, the susceptibility of all isolates was measured. The E119V variant was detected in only one patient during oseltamivir therapy, exhibiting decreased susceptibility to oseltamivir. Prior to treatment, R292K variants were detected in all clinical samples; however, they comprised only a small fraction of the total population. The proportion of the R292K variant in clinical samples increased for 6/27 (22.2%) patients treated with oseltamivir or zanamivir, whereas an increase in the proportion of the R292K variant in virus isolates was observed in only one patient. Discrepancies in the proportion of R292K variants between clinical samples and isolates should be suspected in clinical settings. qRT-PCR is useful for quantitative analysis of drug-resistant influenza virus and for immediate notification of the result. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. In Silico Identification of Highly Conserved Epitopes of Influenza A H1N1, H2N2, H3N2, and H5N1 with Diagnostic and Vaccination Potential

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-Medina, José Esteban; Sánchez-Vallejo, Carlos Javier; Méndez-Tenorio, Alfonso; Monroy-Muñoz, Irma Eloísa; Angeles-Martínez, Javier; Santos Coy-Arechavaleta, Andrea; Santacruz-Tinoco, Clara Esperanza; González-Ibarra, Joaquín; Anguiano-Hernández, Yu-Mei; González-Bonilla, César Raúl; Ramón-Gallegos, Eva; Díaz-Quiñonez, José Alberto

    2015-01-01

    The unpredictable, evolutionary nature of the influenza A virus (IAV) is the primary problem when generating a vaccine and when designing diagnostic strategies; thus, it is necessary to determine the constant regions in viral proteins. In this study, we completed an in silico analysis of the reported epitopes of the 4 IAV proteins that are antigenically most significant (HA, NA, NP, and M2) in the 3 strains with the greatest world circulation in the last century (H1N1, H2N2, and H3N2) and in one of the main aviary subtypes responsible for zoonosis (H5N1). For this purpose, the HMMER program was used to align 3,016 epitopes reported in the Immune Epitope Database and Analysis Resource (IEDB) and distributed in 34,294 stored sequences in the Pfam database. Eighteen epitopes were identified: 8 in HA, 5 in NA, 3 in NP, and 2 in M2. These epitopes have remained constant since they were first identified (~91 years) and are present in strains that have circulated on 5 continents. These sites could be targets for vaccination design strategies based on epitopes and/or as markers in the implementation of diagnostic techniques. PMID:26346523

  13. In Silico Identification of Highly Conserved Epitopes of Influenza A H1N1, H2N2, H3N2, and H5N1 with Diagnostic and Vaccination Potential.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Medina, José Esteban; Sánchez-Vallejo, Carlos Javier; Méndez-Tenorio, Alfonso; Monroy-Muñoz, Irma Eloísa; Angeles-Martínez, Javier; Santos Coy-Arechavaleta, Andrea; Santacruz-Tinoco, Clara Esperanza; González-Ibarra, Joaquín; Anguiano-Hernández, Yu-Mei; González-Bonilla, César Raúl; Ramón-Gallegos, Eva; Díaz-Quiñonez, José Alberto

    2015-01-01

    The unpredictable, evolutionary nature of the influenza A virus (IAV) is the primary problem when generating a vaccine and when designing diagnostic strategies; thus, it is necessary to determine the constant regions in viral proteins. In this study, we completed an in silico analysis of the reported epitopes of the 4 IAV proteins that are antigenically most significant (HA, NA, NP, and M2) in the 3 strains with the greatest world circulation in the last century (H1N1, H2N2, and H3N2) and in one of the main aviary subtypes responsible for zoonosis (H5N1). For this purpose, the HMMER program was used to align 3,016 epitopes reported in the Immune Epitope Database and Analysis Resource (IEDB) and distributed in 34,294 stored sequences in the Pfam database. Eighteen epitopes were identified: 8 in HA, 5 in NA, 3 in NP, and 2 in M2. These epitopes have remained constant since they were first identified (~91 years) and are present in strains that have circulated on 5 continents. These sites could be targets for vaccination design strategies based on epitopes and/or as markers in the implementation of diagnostic techniques.

  14. Usefulness of Ct value in acute respiratory infections caused by respiratory syncytial virus A and B and influenza virus A (H1N1)pdm09, A (H3N2) and B.

    PubMed

    Reina, Jordi; Morales, Carmen; Busquets, María; Norte, Cristina

    2017-06-07

    Acute respiratory infections of viral cause are very frequent entities. The difficulty in evaluating the detection of a virus in these entities could be solved by determining the viral load. A prospective study on the mean Ct value (cycle threshold value) detected against RSV-A, RSV-B and influenza A (H1N1)pdm09, A (H3N2) and B viruses in patients of different origin and age was performed. Detection was performed using a commercial molecular amplification (RT-PCR) technique. Different mean Ct values were detected for each virus. In RSV infections, no differences were observed between those caused by RSV-A or RSV-B in children. Depending on the patient's age, the only statistical significance was observed in those included in the 0-4 month groups for RSV-A and this group and the 5-12 months group for RSV-B (higher values). A lower viral load was detected in adult patients than in paediatric patients. In influenza infections, no statistical significance was observed in the mean values detected in patients from the Red Centinela («sentinel network», a Spanish network of doctors aimed at research and surveillance of diseases), those diagnosed in the adult emergency room or in hospital admissions. In the adult patients admitted to the ICU, only a slightly lower mean value was observed in those infected with influenza A (H1N1)pdm09, but without statistical significance. There were no patients admitted to the ICU with influenza B infection. The detection of viral load could be a good tool for the evaluation, monitoring and prognosis of acute viral respiratory infections. With the exception of those caused by RSV, no significant differences were observed in influenza infections except in younger paediatric patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  15. Detection of Antigenic Variants of Subtype H3 Swine Influenza A Viruses from Clinical Samples.

    PubMed

    Martin, Brigitte E; Bowman, Andrew S; Li, Lei; Nolting, Jacqueline M; Smith, David R; Hanson, Larry A; Wan, Xiu-Feng

    2017-04-01

    A large population of genetically and antigenically diverse influenza A viruses (IAVs) are circulating among the swine population, playing an important role in influenza ecology. Swine IAVs not only cause outbreaks among swine but also can be transmitted to humans, causing sporadic infections and even pandemic outbreaks. Antigenic characterizations of swine IAVs are key to understanding the natural history of these viruses in swine and to selecting strains for effective vaccines. However, influenza outbreaks generally spread rapidly among swine, and the conventional methods for antigenic characterization require virus propagation, a time-consuming process that can significantly reduce the effectiveness of vaccination programs. We developed and validated a rapid, sensitive, and robust method, the polyclonal serum-based proximity ligation assay (polyPLA), to identify antigenic variants of subtype H3N2 swine IAVs. This method utilizes oligonucleotide-conjugated polyclonal antibodies and quantifies antibody-antigen binding affinities by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR). Results showed the assay can rapidly detect H3N2 IAVs directly from nasal wash or nasal swab samples collected from laboratory-challenged animals or during influenza surveillance at county fairs. In addition, polyPLA can accurately separate the viruses at two contemporary swine IAV antigenic clusters (H3N2 swine IAV-α and H3N2 swine IAV-ß) with a sensitivity of 84.9% and a specificity of 100.0%. The polyPLA can be routinely used in surveillance programs to detect antigenic variants of influenza viruses and to select vaccine strains for use in controlling and preventing disease in swine. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  16. Comparison of Mutation Patterns in Full-Genome A/H3N2 Influenza Sequences Obtained Directly from Clinical Samples and the Same Samples after a Single MDCK Passage

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hong Kai; Tang, Julian Wei-Tze; Kong, Debra Han-Lin; Loh, Tze Ping; Chiang, Donald Kok-Leong; Lam, Tommy Tsan-Yuk; Koay, Evelyn Siew-Chuan

    2013-01-01

    Human influenza viruses can be isolated efficiently from clinical samples using Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells. However, this process is known to induce mutations in the virus as it adapts to this non-human cell-line. We performed a systematic study to record the pattern of MDCK-induced mutations observed across the whole influenza A/H3N2 genome. Seventy-seven clinical samples collected from 2009-2011 were included in the study. Two full influenza genomes were obtained for each sample: one from virus obtained directly from the clinical sample and one from the matching isolate cultured in MDCK cells. Comparison of the full-genome sequences obtained from each of these sources showed that 42% of the 77 isolates had acquired at least one MDCK-induced mutation. The presence or absence of these mutations was independent of viral load or sample origin (in-patients versus out-patients). Notably, all the five hemagglutinin missense mutations were observed at the hemaggutinin 1 domain only, particularly within or proximal to the receptor binding sites and antigenic site of the virus. Furthermore, 23% of the 77 isolates had undergone a MDCK-induced missense mutation, D151G/N, in the neuraminidase segment. This mutation has been found to be associated with reduced drug sensitivity towards the neuraminidase inhibitors and increased viral receptor binding efficiency to host cells. In contrast, none of the neuraminidase sequences obtained directly from the clinical samples contained the D151G/N mutation, suggesting that this mutation may be an indicator of MDCK culture-induced changes. These D151 mutations can confound the interpretation of the hemagglutination inhibition assay and neuraminidase inhibitor resistance results when these are based on MDCK isolates. Such isolates are currently in routine use in the WHO influenza vaccine and drug-resistance surveillance programs. Potential data interpretation miscalls can therefore be avoided by careful exclusion of such D151

  17. Evolutionary Dynamics of Influenza A Viruses in US Exhibition Swine.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Martha I; Wentworth, David E; Das, Suman R; Sreevatsan, Srinand; Killian, Mary L; Nolting, Jacqueline M; Slemons, Richard D; Bowman, Andrew S

    2016-01-15

    The role of exhibition swine in influenza A virus transmission was recently demonstrated by >300 infections with influenza A(H3N2) variant viruses among individuals who attended agricultural fairs. Through active influenza A virus surveillance in US exhibition swine and whole-genome sequencing of 380 isolates, we demonstrate that exhibition swine are actively involved in the evolution of influenza A viruses, including zoonotic strains. First, frequent introduction of influenza A viruses from commercial swine populations provides new genetic diversity in exhibition pigs each year locally. Second, genomic reassortment between viruses cocirculating in exhibition swine increases viral diversity. Third, viral migration between exhibition swine in neighboring states demonstrates that movements of exhibition pigs contributes to the spread of genetic diversity. The unexpected frequency of viral exchange between commercial and exhibition swine raises questions about the understudied interface between these populations. Overall, the complexity of viral evolution in exhibition swine indicates that novel viruses are likely to continually reemerge, presenting threats to humans.

  18. Evolutionary Dynamics of Influenza A Viruses in US Exhibition Swine

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Martha I.; Wentworth, David E.; Das, Suman R.; Sreevatsan, Srinand; Killian, Mary L.; Nolting, Jacqueline M.; Slemons, Richard D.; Bowman, Andrew S.

    2016-01-01

    The role of exhibition swine in influenza A virus transmission was recently demonstrated by >300 infections with influenza A(H3N2) variant viruses among individuals who attended agricultural fairs. Through active influenza A virus surveillance in US exhibition swine and whole-genome sequencing of 380 isolates, we demonstrate that exhibition swine are actively involved in the evolution of influenza A viruses, including zoonotic strains. First, frequent introduction of influenza A viruses from commercial swine populations provides new genetic diversity in exhibition pigs each year locally. Second, genomic reassortment between viruses cocirculating in exhibition swine increases viral diversity. Third, viral migration between exhibition swine in neighboring states demonstrates that movements of exhibition pigs contributes to the spread of genetic diversity. The unexpected frequency of viral exchange between commercial and exhibition swine raises questions about the understudied interface between these populations. Overall, the complexity of viral evolution in exhibition swine indicates that novel viruses are likely to continually reemerge, presenting threats to humans. PMID:26243317

  19. Influenza A Subtype H3 Viruses in Feral Swine, United States, 2011–2012

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Zhixin; Baroch, John A.; Long, Li-Ping; Xu, Yifei; Cunningham, Frederick L.; Pedersen, Kerri; Lutman, Mark W.; Schmit, Brandon S.; Bowman, Andrew S.; DeLiberto, Thomas J.

    2014-01-01

    To determine whether, and to what extent, influenza A subtype H3 viruses were present in feral swine in the United States, we conducted serologic and virologic surveillance during October 2011–September 2012. These animals were periodically exposed to and infected with A(H3N2) viruses, suggesting they may threaten human and animal health. PMID:24751326

  20. Swine influenza viruses: an Asian perspective.

    PubMed

    Choi, Young-Ki; Pascua, Phillippe Noriel Q; Song, Min-Suk

    2013-01-01

    Swine influenza viruses (SIVs) are respiratory viral pathogens of pigs that are capable of causing serious global public health concerns in human. Because of their dual susceptibility to mammalian and avian influenza A viruses, pigs are the leading intermediate hosts for genetic reassortment and interspecies transmission and serve as reservoirs of antigenically divergent human viruses from which zoonotic stains with pandemic potential may arise. Pandemic influenza viruses emerging after the 1918 Spanish flu have originated in asia. Although distinct lineages of North American and European SIVs of the H1N1, H3N2, and HiN2 subtypes have been widely studied, less is known about the porcine viruses that are circulating among pig populations throughout Asia. The current review understanding of Contemporary viruses, human infection with SIVs, and the potential threat of novel pandemic strains are described, Furthermore, to best use the limited resources that are available for comprehensive genetic assessment of influenza, consensus efforts among Asian nations to increase epidemiosurveillance of swine herds is also strongly promoted.

  1. Genetic correlation between current circulating H1N1 swine and human influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Lu, Lu; Yin, Yanbo; Sun, Zhongsheng; Gao, Lei; Gao, George F; Liu, Sidang; Sun, Lei; Liu, Wenjun

    2010-11-01

    H1N1 is the main subtype influenza A virus circulating in human and swine population, and has long been a threat to economy and public health. To explore the genetic correlation between current circulating H1N1 swine and human influenza viruses. Three new H1N1 swine influenza viruses (SIVs) were isolated and genomes sequencing were conducted followed by phylogenetic and molecular analysis of all swine and human H1N1 influenza viruses isolated in China in the past five years. Homology and phylogenetic analysis revealed that the three isolates possessed different characteristics: the genome of A/Swine/Shandong/1112/2008 was closely related to that of classical H1N1 SIV, while A/Swine/Shandong/1123/2008 was a reassortant with NS gene from the human-like H3N2 influenza virus and other genes from the classical H1N1 SIV, and A/Swine/Fujian/0325/2008 fell into a lineage of seasonal human H1N1 influenza viruses. Genetically, 2009 H1N1 influenza A viruses (2009 H1N1) in China were contiguous to the SIV lineages rather than the seasonal H1N1 human influenza virus's lineage. Furthermore, molecular analysis among human and swine influenza viruses provided more detail information for understanding their genetic correlation. These results suggested that in China in the past five years, the classical, avian-like and human-like H1N1 SIV existed in swine herds and the reassortment between H1N1 swine and H3N2 human influenza viruses was identified. In addition, the present data showed no evidence to support a strong correlation between the 2009 H1N1 and the swine influenza virus circulating in China. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Estimating reassortment rates in co-circulating Eurasian swine influenza viruses

    PubMed Central

    Baillie, G.; Coulter, E.; Bhatt, S.; Kellam, P.; McCauley, J. W.; Wood, J. L. N.; Brown, I. H.; Pybus, O. G.; Leigh Brown, A. J.

    2012-01-01

    Swine have often been considered as a mixing vessel for different influenza strains. In order to assess their role in more detail, we undertook a retrospective sequencing study to detect and characterize the reassortants present in European swine and to estimate the rate of reassortment between H1N1, H1N2 and H3N2 subtypes with Eurasian (avian-like) internal protein-coding segments. We analysed 69 newly obtained whole genome sequences of subtypes H1N1–H3N2 from swine influenza viruses sampled between 1982 and 2008, using Illumina and 454 platforms. Analyses of these genomes, together with previously published genomes, revealed a large monophyletic clade of Eurasian swine-lineage polymerase segments containing H1N1, H1N2 and H3N2 subtypes. We subsequently examined reassortments between the haemagglutinin and neuraminidase segments and estimated the reassortment rates between lineages using a recently developed evolutionary analysis method. High rates of reassortment between H1N2 and H1N1 Eurasian swine lineages were detected in European strains, with an average of one reassortment every 2–3 years. This rapid reassortment results from co-circulating lineages in swine, and in consequence we should expect further reassortments between currently circulating swine strains and the recent swine-origin H1N1v pandemic strain. PMID:22971819

  3. Vaccine effectiveness in preventing laboratory-confirmed influenza in primary care patients in a season of co-circulation of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09, B and drifted A(H3N2), I-MOVE Multicentre Case-Control Study, Europe 2014/15.

    PubMed

    Valenciano, Marta; Kissling, Esther; Reuss, Annicka; Rizzo, Caterina; Gherasim, Alin; Horváth, Judit Krisztina; Domegan, Lisa; Pitigoi, Daniela; Machado, Ausenda; Paradowska-Stankiewicz, Iwona Anna; Bella, Antonino; Larrauri, Amparo; Ferenczi, Annamária; Lazar, Mihaela; Pechirra, Pedro; Korczyńska, Monika Roberta; Pozo, Francisco; Moren, Alain

    2016-01-01

    Influenza A(H3N2), A(H1N1)pdm09 and B viruses co-circulated in Europe in 2014/15. We undertook a multicentre case-control study in eight European countries to measure 2014/15 influenza vaccine effectiveness (VE) against medically-attended influenza-like illness (ILI) laboratory-confirmed as influenza. General practitioners swabbed all or a systematic sample of ILI patients. We compared the odds of vaccination of ILI influenza positive patients to negative patients. We calculated adjusted VE by influenza type/subtype, and age group. Among 6,579 ILI patients included, 1,828 were A(H3N2), 539 A(H1N1)pdm09 and 1,038 B. VE against A(H3N2) was 14.4% (95% confidence interval (CI): -6.3 to 31.0) overall, 20.7% (95%CI: -22.3 to 48.5), 10.9% (95%CI -30.8 to 39.3) and 15.8% (95% CI: -20.2 to 41.0) among those aged 0-14, 15-59 and  ≥60  years, respectively. VE against A(H1N1)pdm09 was 54.2% (95%CI: 31.2 to 69.6) overall, 73.1% (95%CI: 39.6 to 88.1), 59.7% (95%CI: 10.9 to 81.8), and 22.4% (95%CI: -44.4 to 58.4) among those aged 0-14, 15-59 and  ≥60 years respectively. VE against B was 48.0% (95%CI: 28.9 to 61.9) overall, 62.1% (95%CI: 14.9 to 83.1), 41.4% (95%CI: 6.2 to 63.4) and 50.4% (95%CI: 14.6 to 71.2) among those aged 0-14, 15-59 and ≥60 years respectively. VE against A(H1N1)pdm09 and B was moderate. The low VE against A(H3N2) is consistent with the reported mismatch between circulating and vaccine strains.

  4. Genetics, evolution, and the zoonotic capacity of European Swine influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Zell, Roland; Scholtissek, Christoph; Ludwig, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    The European swine influenza virus lineage differs genetically from the classical swine influenza viruses and the triple reassortants found in North America and Asia. The avian-like swine H1N1 viruses emerged in 1979 after an avian-to-swine transmission and spread to all major European pig-producing countries. Reassortment of these viruses with seasonal H3N2 viruses led to human-like swine H3N2 viruses which appeared in 1984. Finally, human-like swine H1N2 viruses emerged in 1994. These are triple reassortants comprising genes of avian-like H1N1, seasonal H1N1, and seasonal H3N2 viruses. All three subtypes established persistent infection chains and became prevalent in the European pig population. They successively replaced the circulating classical swine H1N1 viruses of that time and gave rise to a number of reassortant viruses including the pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus. All three European lineages have the capacity to infect humans but zoonotic infections are benign.

  5. Comparative studies of wild-type and 'cold-mutant' (temperature sensitive) influenza viruses: geneology of the matrix (M) and non-structural (NS) proteins in recombinant cold-adapted H3N2 viruses.

    PubMed

    Kendal, A P; Cox, N J; Murphy, B R; Spring, S B; Maassab, H F

    1977-10-01

    The matrix (M) protein of the H2N2 virus A/Ann Arbor/6/60 may be distinguished from M protein of several H3N2 viruses and A/New Jersey/76 (HSWINI) by SDS acrylamide gel electrophoresis using a discontinuous buffer system. The smallest RNA (RNA 8) of the A/Ann Arbor/6/60 virus may be distinguished from RNA 8 of several H3N2 viruses by acrylamide gel electrophoresis in 3% or 3-6% gels in the absence of urea, if electrophoresis is done at 30 to 36 degrees C or 20 degrees C respectively. Ten clones of conditionally-lethal temperature-sensitive (ts) mutants were studied, which derived their cold-adaption and ts genes from mutant A/Ann Arbor/6/60, and their haemagglutinin from the H3N2 virus A/Scotland/840/74. Each clone was found to derive its M protein from A/Ann Arbor/6/60 mutant, and its RNA 8 from A/Scotland/840/74. The only assignment of genes 7 and 8 consistent with these findings for the recombinants is that in each parent virus (and in the recombinants) gene 7 codes for M protein, and gene 8 for NS protein. Furthermore, it may be concluded from the results that the biologically important ts lesions in the A/Ann Arbor/6/60 mutant parent are not present in the NS gene. In addition to the recombinants of A/Ann Arbor/6/60 and A/Scotland/840/74, five independent ts/cold-adapted recombinants of A/Ann Arbor/6/60 mutant with H3N2 and HSWINI wild-type viruses were examined, and all were found to contain the M protein of the A/Ann Arbor/6/60 mutant parent. This is suggestive that M protein may be at least partially responsible for the cold-adaptation and/or ts properties of the A/Ann Arbor/6/60 mutant and the recombinants.

  6. A novel monoclonal antibody effective against lethal challenge with swine-lineage and 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza viruses in mice

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The HA protein of the 2009 pandemic H1N1viruses (14 H1N1pdm) is antigenically closely related to the HA of classical North American swine H1N1 influenza viruses (cH1N1). Since 1998, through reassortment and incorporation of HA genes from human H3N2 and H1N1 influenza viruses, swine influenza strains...

  7. Introductions and evolution of human-origin seasonal influenza a viruses in multinational swine populations.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Martha I; Wentworth, David E; Culhane, Marie R; Vincent, Amy L; Viboud, Cecile; LaPointe, Matthew P; Lin, Xudong; Holmes, Edward C; Detmer, Susan E

    2014-09-01

    The capacity of influenza A viruses to cross species barriers presents a continual threat to human and animal health. Knowledge of the human-swine interface is particularly important for understanding how viruses with pandemic potential evolve in swine hosts. We sequenced the genomes of 141 influenza viruses collected from North American swine during 2002 to 2011 and identified a swine virus that possessed all eight genome segments of human seasonal A/H3N2 virus origin. A molecular clock analysis indicates that this virus--A/sw/Saskatchewan/02903/2009(H3N2)--has likely circulated undetected in swine for at least 7 years. For historical context, we performed a comprehensive phylogenetic analysis of an additional 1,404 whole-genome sequences from swine influenza A viruses collected globally during 1931 to 2013. Human-to-swine transmission occurred frequently over this time period, with 20 discrete introductions of human seasonal influenza A viruses showing sustained onward transmission in swine for at least 1 year since 1965. Notably, human-origin hemagglutinin (H1 and H3) and neuraminidase (particularly N2) segments were detected in swine at a much higher rate than the six internal gene segments, suggesting an association between the acquisition of swine-origin internal genes via reassortment and the adaptation of human influenza viruses to new swine hosts. Further understanding of the fitness constraints on the adaptation of human viruses to swine, and vice versa, at a genomic level is central to understanding the complex multihost ecology of influenza and the disease threats that swine and humans pose to each other. The swine origin of the 2009 A/H1N1 pandemic virus underscored the importance of understanding how influenza A virus evolves in these animals hosts. While the importance of reassortment in generating genetically diverse influenza viruses in swine is well documented, the role of human-to-swine transmission has not been as intensively studied. Through a

  8. Introductions and Evolution of Human-Origin Seasonal Influenza A Viruses in Multinational Swine Populations

    PubMed Central

    Wentworth, David E.; Culhane, Marie R.; Vincent, Amy L.; Viboud, Cecile; LaPointe, Matthew P.; Lin, Xudong; Holmes, Edward C.; Detmer, Susan E.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The capacity of influenza A viruses to cross species barriers presents a continual threat to human and animal health. Knowledge of the human-swine interface is particularly important for understanding how viruses with pandemic potential evolve in swine hosts. We sequenced the genomes of 141 influenza viruses collected from North American swine during 2002 to 2011 and identified a swine virus that possessed all eight genome segments of human seasonal A/H3N2 virus origin. A molecular clock analysis indicates that this virus—A/sw/Saskatchewan/02903/2009(H3N2)—has likely circulated undetected in swine for at least 7 years. For historical context, we performed a comprehensive phylogenetic analysis of an additional 1,404 whole-genome sequences from swine influenza A viruses collected globally during 1931 to 2013. Human-to-swine transmission occurred frequently over this time period, with 20 discrete introductions of human seasonal influenza A viruses showing sustained onward transmission in swine for at least 1 year since 1965. Notably, human-origin hemagglutinin (H1 and H3) and neuraminidase (particularly N2) segments were detected in swine at a much higher rate than the six internal gene segments, suggesting an association between the acquisition of swine-origin internal genes via reassortment and the adaptation of human influenza viruses to new swine hosts. Further understanding of the fitness constraints on the adaptation of human viruses to swine, and vice versa, at a genomic level is central to understanding the complex multihost ecology of influenza and the disease threats that swine and humans pose to each other. IMPORTANCE The swine origin of the 2009 A/H1N1 pandemic virus underscored the importance of understanding how influenza A virus evolves in these animals hosts. While the importance of reassortment in generating genetically diverse influenza viruses in swine is well documented, the role of human-to-swine transmission has not been as

  9. Influenza A virus infections in swine: pathogenesis and diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Janke, B H

    2014-03-01

    Influenza has been recognized as a respiratory disease in swine since its first appearance concurrent with the 1918 "Spanish flu" human pandemic. All influenza viruses of significance in swine are type A, subtype H1N1, H1N2, or H3N2 viruses. Influenza viruses infect epithelial cells lining the surface of the respiratory tract, inducing prominent necrotizing bronchitis and bronchiolitis and variable interstitial pneumonia. Cell death is due to direct virus infection and to insult directed by leukocytes and cytokines of the innate immune system. The most virulent viruses consistently express the following characteristics of infection: (1) higher or more prolonged virus replication, (2) excessive cytokine induction, and (3) replication in the lower respiratory tract. Nearly all the viral proteins contribute to virulence. Pigs are susceptible to infection with both human and avian viruses, which often results in gene reassortment between these viruses and endemic swine viruses. The receptors on the epithelial cells lining the respiratory tract are major determinants of infection by influenza viruses from other hosts. The polymerases, especially PB2, also influence cross-species infection. Methods of diagnosis and characterization of influenza viruses that infect swine have improved over the years, driven both by the availability of new technologies and by the necessity of keeping up with changes in the virus. Testing of oral fluids from pigs for virus and antibody is a recent development that allows efficient sampling of large numbers of animals.

  10. Guinea pig model for evaluating the potential public health risk of swine and avian influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yipeng; Bi, Yuhai; Pu, Juan; Hu, Yanxin; Wang, Jingjing; Gao, Huijie; Liu, Linqing; Xu, Qi; Tan, Yuanyuan; Liu, Mengda; Guo, Xin; Yang, Hanchun; Liu, Jinhua

    2010-11-23

    The influenza viruses circulating in animals sporadically transmit to humans and pose pandemic threats. Animal models to evaluate the potential public health risk potential of these viruses are needed. We investigated the guinea pig as a mammalian model for the study of the replication and transmission characteristics of selected swine H1N1, H1N2, H3N2 and avian H9N2 influenza viruses, compared to those of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 and seasonal human H1N1, H3N2 influenza viruses. The swine and avian influenza viruses investigated were restricted to the respiratory system of guinea pigs and shed at high titers in nasal tracts without prior adaptation, similar to human strains. None of the swine and avian influenza viruses showed transmissibility among guinea pigs; in contrast, pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus transmitted from infected guinea pigs to all animals and seasonal human influenza viruses could also horizontally transmit in guinea pigs. The analysis of the receptor distribution in the guinea pig respiratory tissues by lectin histochemistry indicated that both SAα2,3-Gal and SAα2,6-Gal receptors widely presented in the nasal tract and the trachea, while SAα2,3-Gal receptor was the main receptor in the lung. We propose that the guinea pig could serve as a useful mammalian model to evaluate the potential public health threat of swine and avian influenza viruses.

  11. Guinea Pig Model for Evaluating the Potential Public Health Risk of Swine and Avian Influenza Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Pu, Juan; Hu, Yanxin; Wang, Jingjing; Gao, Huijie; Liu, Linqing; Xu, Qi; Tan, Yuanyuan; Liu, Mengda; Guo, Xin; Yang, Hanchun; Liu, Jinhua

    2010-01-01

    Background The influenza viruses circulating in animals sporadically transmit to humans and pose pandemic threats. Animal models to evaluate the potential public health risk potential of these viruses are needed. Methodology/Principal Findings We investigated the guinea pig as a mammalian model for the study of the replication and transmission characteristics of selected swine H1N1, H1N2, H3N2 and avian H9N2 influenza viruses, compared to those of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 and seasonal human H1N1, H3N2 influenza viruses. The swine and avian influenza viruses investigated were restricted to the respiratory system of guinea pigs and shed at high titers in nasal tracts without prior adaptation, similar to human strains. None of the swine and avian influenza viruses showed transmissibility among guinea pigs; in contrast, pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus transmitted from infected guinea pigs to all animals and seasonal human influenza viruses could also horizontally transmit in guinea pigs. The analysis of the receptor distribution in the guinea pig respiratory tissues by lectin histochemistry indicated that both SAα2,3-Gal and SAα2,6-Gal receptors widely presented in the nasal tract and the trachea, while SAα2,3-Gal receptor was the main receptor in the lung. Conclusions/Significance We propose that the guinea pig could serve as a useful mammalian model to evaluate the potential public health threat of swine and avian influenza viruses. PMID:21124850

  12. Serological study of influenza viruses in veterinarians working with swine in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Saavedra-Montañez, Manuel; Castillo-Juárez, Héctor; Sánchez-Betancourt, Iván; Rivera-Benitez, José Francisco; Ramírez-Mendoza, Humberto

    2017-02-23

    Humans and swine are both affected by influenza viruses, and swine are considered a potential source of new influenza viruses. Transmission of influenza viruses across species is well documented. The aim of this study was to evaluate the seroprevalence of different influenza virus subtypes in veterinarians working for the Mexican swine industry, using a hemagglutination inhibition test. All sera tested were collected in July 2011. The data were analysed using a generalized linear model and a linear model to study the possible association of seroprevalence with the age of the veterinarian, vaccination status, and biosecurity level of the farm where they work. The observed seroprevalence was 12.3%, 76.5%, 46.9%, and 11.1% for the human subtypes of pandemic influenza virus (pH1N1), seasonal human influenza virus (hH1N1), the swine subtypes of classical swine influenza virus (swH1N1), and triple-reassortant swine influenza virus (swH3N2), respectively. Statistical analysis indicated that age was associated with hH1N1 seroprevalence (P < 0.05). Similarly, age and vaccination were associated with pH1N1 seroprevalence (P < 0.05). On the other hand, none of the studied factors were associated with swH1N1 and swH3N2 seroprevalence. All of the pH1N1-positive sera were from vaccinated veterinarians, whereas all of those not vaccinated tested negative for this subtype. Our findings suggest that, between the onset of the 2009 pandemic and July 2011, the Mexican veterinarians working in the swine industry did not have immunity to the pH1N1 virus; hence, they would have been at risk for infection with this virus if this subtype had been circulating in swine in Mexico prior to 2011.

  13. Evaluation of Screening Assays for the Detection of Influenza A Virus Serum Antibodies in Swine.

    PubMed

    Goodell, C K; Prickett, J; Kittawornrat, A; Johnson, J; Zhang, J; Wang, C; Zimmerman, J J

    2016-02-01

    Increased surveillance of influenza A virus (IAV) infections in human and swine populations is mandated by public health and animal health concerns. Antibody assays have proven useful in previous surveillance programmes because antibodies provide a record of prior exposure and the technology is inexpensive. The objective of this research was to compare the performance of influenza serum antibody assays using samples collected from pigs (vaccinated or unvaccinated) inoculated with either A/Swine/OH/511445/2007 γ H1N1 virus or A/Swine/Illinois/02907/2009 Cluster IV H3N2 virus and followed for 42 days. Weekly serum samples were tested for anti-IAV antibodies using homologous and heterologous haemagglutination-inhibition (HI) assays, commercial swine influenza H1N1 and H3N2 indirect ELISAs, and a commercial influenza nucleoprotein (NP)-blocking ELISA. The homologous HIs showed 100% diagnostic sensitivity, but largely failed to detect infection with the heterologous virus. With diagnostic sensitivities of 1.4% and 4.9%, respectively, the H1N1 and H3N2 indirect ELISAs were ineffective at detecting IAV antibodies in swine infected with the contemporary influenza viruses used in the study. At a cut-off of S/N ≤ 0.60, the sensitivity and specificity of the NP-blocking ELISA were estimated at 95.5% and 99.6%, respectively. Statistically significant factors which affected S/N results include vaccination status, inoculum (virus subtype), day post-inoculation and the interactions between those factors (P < 0.0001). Serum antibodies against NP provide an ideal universal diagnostic screening target and could provide a cost-effective approach for the detection and surveillance of IAV infections in swine populations.

  14. Introduction, Evolution, and Dissemination of Influenza A Viruses in Exhibition Swine in the United States during 2009 to 2013

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Martha I.; Stucker, Karla M.; Schobel, Seth A.; Dugan, Vivien G.; Nelson, Sarah W.; Sreevatsan, Srinand; Killian, Mary L.; Nolting, Jacqueline M.; Wentworth, David E.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The swine-human interface created at agricultural fairs, along with the generation of and maintenance of influenza A virus diversity in exhibition swine, presents an ongoing threat to public health. Nucleotide sequences of influenza A virus isolates collected from exhibition swine in Ohio (n = 262) and Indiana (n = 103) during 2009 to 2013 were used to investigate viral evolution and movement within this niche sector of the swine industry. Phylogenetic and Bayesian analyses were employed to identify introductions of influenza A virus to exhibition swine and study viral population dynamics. In 2013 alone, we identified 10 independent introductions of influenza A virus into Ohio and/or Indiana exhibition swine. Frequently, viruses from the same introduction were identified at multiple fairs within the region, providing evidence of rapid and widespread viral movement within the exhibition swine populations of the two states. While pigs moving from fair to fair to fair is possible in some locations, the concurrent detection of nearly identical strains at several fairs indicates that a common viral source was more likely. Importantly, we detected an association between the high number of human variant H3N2 (H3N2v) virus infections in 2012 and the widespread circulation of influenza A viruses of the same genotype in exhibition swine in Ohio fairs sampled that year. The extent of viral diversity observed in exhibition swine and the rapidity with which it disseminated across long distances indicate that novel strains of influenza A virus will continue to emerge and spread within exhibition swine populations, presenting an ongoing threat to humans. IMPORTANCE Understanding the underlying population dynamics of influenza A viruses in commercial and exhibition swine is central to assessing the risk for human infections with variant viruses, including H3N2v. We used viral genomic sequences from isolates collected from exhibition swine during 2009 to 2013 to understand

  15. Neuraminidase Receptor Binding Variants of Human Influenza A(H3N2) Viruses Resulting from Substitution of Aspartic Acid 151 in the Catalytic Site: a Role in Virus Attachment?▿

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yi Pu; Gregory, Victoria; Collins, Patrick; Kloess, Johannes; Wharton, Stephen; Cattle, Nicholas; Lackenby, Angie; Daniels, Rodney; Hay, Alan

    2010-01-01

    Changes in the receptor binding characteristics of human H3N2 viruses have been evident from changes in the agglutination of different red blood cells (RBCs) and the reduced growth capacity of recently isolated viruses, particularly in embryonated eggs. An additional peculiarity of viruses circulating in 2005 to 2009 has been the poor inhibition of hemagglutination by postinfection ferret antisera for many viruses isolated in MDCK cells, including homologous reference viruses. This was shown not to be due to an antigenic change in hemagglutinin (HA) but was shown to be the result of a mutation in aspartic acid 151 of neuraminidase (NA) to glycine, asparagine, or alanine, which caused an oseltamivir-sensitive agglutination of RBCs. The D151G substitution was shown to cause a change in the specificity of NA such that it acquired the capacity to bind receptors, which were refractory to enzymatic cleavage, without altering its ability to remove receptors for HA. Thus, the inhibition of NA-dependent agglutination by the inclusion of oseltamivir carboxylate in the assay was effective in restoring the anti-HA specificity of the hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay for monitoring antigenic changes in HA. Since the NA-dependent binding activity did not affect virus neutralization, and virus populations in clinical specimens possessed, at most, low levels of the “151 mutant,” the biological significance of this feature of NA in, for example, immune evasion is unclear. It is apparent, however, that an important role of aspartic acid 151 in the activity of NA may be to restrict the specificity of the NA interaction and its receptor-destroying activity to complement that of HA receptor binding. PMID:20410266

  16. Variant (Swine Origin) Influenza Viruses in Humans

    MedlinePlus

    ... Types Seasonal Avian Swine Variant Other Variant Influenza Viruses: Background and CDC Risk Assessment and Reporting Language: ... Background CDC Assessment Reporting Background On Variant Influenza Viruses Swine flu viruses do not normally infect humans. ...

  17. Replication of swine and human influenza viruses in juvenile and layer turkey hens.

    PubMed

    Ali, Ahmed; Yassine, Hadi; Awe, Olusegun O; Ibrahim, Mahmoud; Saif, Yehia M; Lee, Chang-Won

    2013-04-12

    Since the first reported isolation of swine influenza viruses (SIVs) in turkeys in the 1980s, transmission of SIVs to turkeys was frequently documented. Recently, the 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus, that was thought to be of swine origin, was detected in turkeys with a severe drop in egg production. In this study, we assessed the infectivity of different mammalian influenza viruses including swine, pandemic H1N1 and seasonal human influenza viruses in both juvenile and layer turkeys. In addition, we investigated the potential influenza virus dissemination in the semen of experimentally infected turkey toms. Results showed that all mammalian origin influenza viruses tested can infect turkeys. SIVs were detected in respiratory and digestive tracts of both juvenile and layer turkeys. Variations in replication efficiencies among SIVs were observed especially in the reproductive tract of layer turkeys. Compared to SIVs, limited replication of seasonal human H1N1 and no detectable replication of recent human-like swine H1N2, pandemic H1N1 and seasonal human H3N2 viruses was noticed. All birds seroconverted to all tested viruses regardless of their replication level. In turkey toms, we were able to detect swine H3N2 virus in semen and reproductive tract of infected toms by real-time RT-PCR although virus isolation was not successful. These data suggest that turkey hens could be affected by diverse influenza strains especially SIVs. Moreover, the differences in the replication efficiency we demonstrated among SIVs and between SIV and human influenza viruses in layer turkeys suggest a possible use of turkeys as an animal model to study host tropism and pathogenesis of influenza viruses. Our results also indicate a potential risk of venereal transmission of influenza viruses in turkeys.

  18. A possible outbreak of swine influenza, 1892.

    PubMed

    Morens, David M; Taubenberger, Jeffery K

    2014-02-01

    Influenza A viruses are globally enzootic in swine populations. Swine influenza has been recognised only since 1918, but an anecdotal report suggests that a swine-influenza epizootic might have occurred in England in 1892, at the same time as an explosive epidemic (or pandemic recurrence) of human influenza. This outbreak suggests that the ecobiological association between human and swine influenza could extend to before 1918. By contrast with the recent documentation of swine influenza, influenza in horses has been well documented for hundreds of years, and was often linked temporally and geographically to epidemics of human influenza. Both decreased contact between people and horses, and the concomitant increase in swine production over the past century, might have altered the character and dynamics of influenza host-switch events between people and domestic mammals. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. A possible outbreak of swine influenza, 1892

    PubMed Central

    Morens, David M; Taubenberger, Jeffery K

    2014-01-01

    Influenza A viruses are globally enzootic in swine populations. Swine influenza has been recognised only since 1918, but an anecdotal report suggests that a swine-influenza epizootic might have occurred in England in 1892, at the same time as an explosive epidemic (or pandemic recurrence) of human influenza. This outbreak suggests that the ecobiological association between human and swine influenza could extend to before 1918. By contrast with the recent documentation of swine influenza, influenza in horses has been well documented for hundreds of years, and was often linked temporally and geographically to epidemics of human influenza. Both decreased contact between people and horses, and the concomitant increase in swine production over the past century, might have altered the character and dynamics of influenza host-switch events between people and domestic mammals. PMID:24290840

  20. THE EFFECT OF HEMOPHILUS INFLUENZAE SUIS VACCINES ON SWINE INFLUENZA

    PubMed Central

    Shope, Richard E.

    1937-01-01

    Either living or heat-killed H. influenzae suis vaccines, given intramuscularly to swine, elicit an immune response capable of modifying the course of a later swine influenza infection. The protection afforded is only partial and is in no way comparable to the complete immunity afforded by swine influenza virus vaccines. PMID:19870654

  1. Poly I:C adjuvanted inactivated swine influenza vaccine induces heterologous protective immunity in pigs.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Milton; Wang, Zhao; Sreenivasan, Chithra C; Hause, Ben M; Gourapura J Renukaradhya; Li, Feng; Francis, David H; Kaushik, Radhey S; Khatri, Mahesh

    2015-01-15

    Swine influenza is widely prevalent in swine herds in North America and Europe causing enormous economic losses and a public health threat. Pigs can be infected by both avian and mammalian influenza viruses and are sources of generation of reassortant influenza viruses capable of causing pandemics in humans. Current commercial vaccines provide satisfactory immunity against homologous viruses; however, protection against heterologous viruses is not adequate. In this study, we evaluated the protective efficacy of an intranasal Poly I:C adjuvanted UV inactivated bivalent swine influenza vaccine consisting of Swine/OH/24366/07 H1N1 and Swine/CO/99 H3N2, referred as PAV, in maternal antibody positive pigs against an antigenic variant and a heterologous swine influenza virus challenge. Groups of three-week-old commercial-grade pigs were immunized intranasally with PAV or a commercial vaccine (CV) twice at 2 weeks intervals. Three weeks after the second immunization, pigs were challenged with the antigenic variant Swine/MN/08 H1N1 (MN08) and the heterologous Swine/NC/10 H1N2 (NC10) influenza virus. Antibodies in serum and respiratory tract, lung lesions, virus shedding in nasal secretions and virus load in lungs were assessed. Intranasal administration of PAV induced challenge viruses specific-hemagglutination inhibition- and IgG antibodies in the serum and IgA and IgG antibodies in the respiratory tract. Importantly, intranasal administration of PAV provided protection against the antigenic variant MN08 and the heterologous NC10 swine influenza viruses as evidenced by significant reductions in lung virus load, gross lung lesions and significantly reduced shedding of challenge viruses in nasal secretions. These results indicate that Poly I:C or its homologues may be effective as vaccine adjuvants capable of generating cross-protective immunity against antigenic variants/heterologous swine influenza viruses in pigs.

  2. Virological Surveillance of Influenza A Subtypes Isolated in 2014 from Clinical Outbreaks in Canadian Swine

    PubMed Central

    Grgić, Helena; Gallant, Jackie; Poljak, Zvonimir

    2017-01-01

    Influenza A viruses (IAVs) are respiratory pathogens associated with an acute respiratory disease that occurs year-round in swine production. It is currently one of the most important pathogens in swine populations, with the potential to infect other host species including humans. Ongoing research indicates that the three major subtypes of IAV—H1N1, H1N2, and H3N2—continue to expand in their genetic and antigenic diversity. In this study, we conducted a comprehensive genomic analysis of 16 IAVs isolated from different clinical outbreaks in Alberta, Manitoba, Ontario, and Saskatchewan in 2014. We also examined the genetic basis for probable antigenic differences among sequenced viruses. On the basis of phylogenetic analysis, all 13 Canadian H3N2 viruses belonged to cluster IV, eight H3N2 viruses were part of the IV-C cluster, and one virus belonged to the IV-B and one to the IV-D cluster. Based on standards used in this study, three H3N2 viruses could not be clearly classified into any currently established group within cluster IV (A to F). Three H1N2 viruses were part of the H1α cluster. PMID:28335552

  3. Investigation of exposure to swine influenza viruses in Ontario (Canada) finisher herds in 2004 and 2005.

    PubMed

    Poljak, Zvonimir; Friendship, Robert M; Carman, Susy; McNab, W Bruce; Dewey, Catherine E

    2008-01-01

    The epidemiology of influenza in the North American swine population has changed since the emergence of a triple-reassortant H3N2 influenza virus. Although seen previously in North America, the Ontario swine population had likely been free of viruses of the reassortant H3N2 lineage until 2005. The objective of this study was to investigate the frequency and distribution of exposure to H1N1 and H3N2 subtypes in the Ontario finisher pig population prior to and after the H3N2 outbreak that occurred in 2005. This included investigating prevalence and spatial distribution of positive herds, assessing proportion of random variation at different hierarchical levels, and evaluating selected demographic factors and management procedures as potential risk factors. In total, 919 and 978 sera collected in cross-sectional studies from 46 and 49 finisher herds in 2004 and 2005 were tested by a H1N1 subtype-specific and a H3N2 subtype-specific commercial ELISA. For the H1N1 subtype, the point prevalence of positive herds (>3 reactors) was 19.5% and 30.6% in 2004 and 2005, respectively. For the H3N2 subtype the point prevalence of positive herds (>3 reactors) was 6.5% and 40.8% in 2004 and 2005, respectively. Sera from 2004 that were positive on H3N2 ELISA did not cross-react with any of the H3N2 variants used as antigen on a sequential HI test. Only herds positive for H3N2 subtype in 2005 clustered in space (P<0.01). The H1N1 status in 2005 was associated with the H1N1 status in 2004, and with reported distance to the nearest herd. The H3N2 status in 2005 was associated with reported distance to the nearest herd and a type of replacement gilt source. For H3N2, distance seemed to be important even after controlling for type of gilt source. Most variability in seropositivity was between herds with little variability between pens. This study confirms that in 2005, the epidemic H3N2 subtype co-circulated with endemic H1N1 subtype in the Ontario finisher herds. We concluded that in

  4. Antiviral Responses by Swine Primary Bronchoepithelial Cells Are Limited Compared to Human Bronchoepithelial Cells Following Influenza Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Hauser, Mary J.; Dlugolenski, Daniel; Culhane, Marie R.; Wentworth, David E.; Tompkins, S. Mark; Tripp, Ralph A.

    2013-01-01

    Swine generate reassortant influenza viruses because they can be simultaneously infected with avian and human influenza; however, the features that restrict influenza reassortment in swine and human hosts are not fully understood. Type I and III interferons (IFNs) act as the first line of defense against influenza virus infection of respiratory epithelium. To determine if human and swine have different capacities to mount an antiviral response the expression of IFN and IFN-stimulated genes (ISG) in normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells and normal swine bronchial epithelial (NSBE) cells was evaluated following infection with human (H3N2), swine (H1N1), and avian (H5N3, H5N2, H5N1) influenza A viruses. Expression of IFNλ and ISGs were substantially higher in NHBE cells compared to NSBE cells following H5 avian influenza virus infection compared to human or swine influenza virus infection. This effect was associated with reduced H5 avian influenza virus replication in human cells at late times post infection. Further, RIG-I expression was lower in NSBE cells compared to NHBE cells suggesting reduced virus sensing. Together, these studies identify key differences in the antiviral response between human and swine respiratory epithelium alluding to differences that may govern influenza reassortment. PMID:23875024

  5. Swine Influenza Virus: Emerging Understandings

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Introduction: In March-April 2009, a novel pandemic H1N1 emerged in the human population in North America [1]. The gene constellation of the emerging virus was demonstrated to be a combination of genes from swine influenza A viruses (SIV) of North American and Eurasian lineages that had never before...

  6. Serologic evidence of human influenza virus infections in swine populations, Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Rith, Sareth; Netrabukkana, Punnaporn; Sorn, San; Mumford, Elizabeth; Mey, Channa; Holl, Davun; Goutard, Flavie; Y, Bunthin; Fenwick, Stan; Robertson, Ian; Roger, François; Buchy, Philippe

    2013-05-01

    This study was conducted from 2006 to 2010 and investigated the seroprevalence of influenza A viruses in Cambodian pigs, including human H1N1, H3N2, 2009 pandemic H1N1 (A(H1N1)pdm09), and highly pathogenic avian H5N1 influenza A viruses. A total of 1147 sera obtained from pigs in Cambodia were tested by haemagglutination inhibition (HI) assays for antibody to human influenza A viruses along with both HI and microneutralization (MN) tests to assess immunological responses to H5N1 virus. The results were compared by year, age, and province. Antibodies against a human influenza A virus were detected in 14·9% of samples. A(H1N1)pdm09 virus were dominant over the study period (23·1%), followed by those to human H1N1 (17·3%) and H3N2 subtypes (9·9%). No pigs were serologically positive for avian H5 influenza viruses. The seroprevalence of human H1N1 and H3N2 influenza viruses peaked in 2008, while that of A(H1N1)pdm09 reached a peak in 2010. No significant differences in seroprevalence to human influenza subtypes were observed in different age groups. Cambodian pigs were exposed to human strains of influenza A viruses either prior to or during this study. The implications of these high prevalence rates imply human-to-swine influenza virus transmission in Cambodia. Although pigs are mostly raised in small non-commercial farms, our preliminary results provide evidence of sustained human influenza virus circulation in pig populations in Cambodia. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  7. Reassortant swine influenza viruses isolated in Japan contain genes from pandemic A(H1N1) 2009.

    PubMed

    Kanehira, Katsushi; Takemae, Nobuhiro; Uchida, Yuko; Hikono, Hirokazu; Saito, Takehiko

    2014-06-01

    In 2013, three reassortant swine influenza viruses (SIVs)-two H1N2 and one H3N2-were isolated from symptomatic pigs in Japan; each contained genes from the pandemic A(H1N1) 2009 virus and endemic SIVs. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the two H1N2 viruses, A/swine/Gunma/1/2013 and A/swine/Ibaraki/1/2013, were reassortants that contain genes from the following three distinct lineages: (i) H1 and nucleoprotein (NP) genes derived from a classical swine H1 HA lineage uniquely circulating among Japanese SIVs; (ii) neuraminidase (NA) genes from human-like H1N2 swine viruses; and (iii) other genes from pandemic A(H1N1) 2009 viruses. The H3N2 virus, A/swine/Miyazaki/2/2013, comprised genes from two sources: (i) hemagglutinin (HA) and NA genes derived from human and human-like H3N2 swine viruses and (ii) other genes from pandemic A(H1N1) 2009 viruses. Phylogenetic analysis also indicated that each of the reassortants may have arisen independently in Japanese pigs. A/swine/Miyazaki/2/2013 were found to have strong antigenic reactivities with antisera generated for some seasonal human-lineage viruses isolated during or before 2003, whereas A/swine/Miyazaki/2/2013 reactivities with antisera against viruses isolated after 2004 were clearly weaker. In addition, antisera against some strains of seasonal human-lineage H1 viruses did not react with either A/swine/Gunma/1/2013 or A/swine/Ibaraki/1/2013. These findings indicate that emergence and spread of these reassortant SIVs is a potential public health risk.

  8. Airborne Influenza A Is Detected in the Personal Breathing Zone of Swine Veterinarians

    PubMed Central

    O’Brien, Kate M.; Nonnenmann, Matthew W.

    2016-01-01

    The 2009 H1N1 pandemic emphasized a need to evaluate zoonotic transmission of influenza A in swine production. Airborne influenza A virus has been detected in swine facilities during an outbreak. However, the personal exposure of veterinarians treating infected swine has not been characterized. Two personal bioaerosol samplers, the NIOSH bioaerosol sampler and the personal high-flow inhalable sampler head (PHISH), were placed in the breathing zone of veterinarians treating swine infected with either H1N1 or H3N2 influenza A. A greater number of viral particles were recovered from the NIOSH bioaerosol sampler (2094 RNA copies/m3) compared to the PHISH sampler (545 RNA copies/m3). In addition, the majority of viral particles were detected by the NIOSH bioaerosol sampler in the >4 μm size fraction. These results suggest that airborne influenza A virus is present in the breathing zone of veterinarians treating swine, and the aerosol route of zoonotic transmission of influenza virus should be further evaluated among agricultural workers. PMID:26867129

  9. Airborne Influenza A Is Detected in the Personal Breathing Zone of Swine Veterinarians.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Kate M; Nonnenmann, Matthew W

    2016-01-01

    The 2009 H1N1 pandemic emphasized a need to evaluate zoonotic transmission of influenza A in swine production. Airborne influenza A virus has been detected in swine facilities during an outbreak. However, the personal exposure of veterinarians treating infected swine has not been characterized. Two personal bioaerosol samplers, the NIOSH bioaerosol sampler and the personal high-flow inhalable sampler head (PHISH), were placed in the breathing zone of veterinarians treating swine infected with either H1N1 or H3N2 influenza A. A greater number of viral particles were recovered from the NIOSH bioaerosol sampler (2094 RNA copies/m3) compared to the PHISH sampler (545 RNA copies/m3). In addition, the majority of viral particles were detected by the NIOSH bioaerosol sampler in the >4 μm size fraction. These results suggest that airborne influenza A virus is present in the breathing zone of veterinarians treating swine, and the aerosol route of zoonotic transmission of influenza virus should be further evaluated among agricultural workers.

  10. Assessment of seasonality of influenza in swine using field submissions to a diagnostic laboratory in Ontario between 2007 and 2012.

    PubMed

    Poljak, Zvonimir; Carman, Susy; McEwen, Beverly

    2014-07-01

    Seasonality of any infectious disease is important for its control and monitoring. While influenza seasonality in people has been evaluated extensively, this question has not been studied well in swine populations. The goal of this study was to investigate seasonality of influenza in swine, using diagnostic submissions to a diagnostic laboratory. Two thousand seven hundred and eleven virological tests within 685 submissions and 5471 serological tests within 193 submissions in Ontario swine between 2007 and 2012 were included in the study and converted to total monthly number of virological and serological submissions, and the number of positive submissions. Data were analyzed by time-series decomposition, fixed-effect Poisson, random-effect Poisson regression with month as uncorrelated and correlated random effects. All approaches identified seasonality in virological submissions (P < 0.02) with peak in January and April, and a trough in July, but were not able to detect seasonality of influenza-positive virological submissions (P > 0.13). Seasonality of positive serological submissions was identified only if independence between months was assumed (P < 0.03). Almost 50% of serological submissions had evidence of exposure to H3N2 and H1N1. Thus, this study identified evidence of seasonality in influenza-like disease in swine herds, but not in circulation of influenza virus. Evidence of seasonality in exposure to influenza was dependent on assumptions of between-month correlation. High exposure to H3N2 and H1N1 subtypes warrants more detailed investigation of within-herd influenza virus circulation. The study provides initial insight into seasonality of influenza in swine and should be followed with herd-level studies. © 2014 The Authors. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Rapid detection and differentiation of swine-origin influenza A virus (H1N1/2009) from other seasonal influenza A viruses.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jiangqin; Wang, Xue; Ragupathy, Viswanath; Zhang, Panhe; Tang, Wei; Ye, Zhiping; Eichelberger, Maryna; Hewlett, Indira

    2012-11-09

    We previously developed a rapid and simple gold nanoparticle(NP)-based genomic microarray assay for identification of the avian H5N1 virus and its discrimination from other influenza A virus strains (H1N1, H3N2). In this study, we expanded the platform to detect the 2009 swine-origin influenza A virus (H1N1/2009). Multiple specific capture and intermediate oligonucleotides were designed for the matrix (M), hemagglutinin (HA), and neuraminidase (NA) genes of the H1N1/2009 virus. The H1N1/2009 microarrays were printed in the same format as those of the seasonal influenza H1N1 and H3N2 for the HA, NA, and M genes. Viral RNA was tested using capture-target-intermediate oligonucleotide hybridization and gold NP-mediated silver staining. The signal from the 4 capture-target-intermediates of the HA and NA genes was specific for H1N1/2009 virus and showed no cross hybridization with viral RNA from other influenza strains H1N1, H3N2, and H5N1. All of the 3 M gene captures showed strong affinity with H1N1/2009 viral RNA, with 2 out of the 3 M gene captures showing cross hybridization with the H1N1, H3N2, and H5N1 samples tested. The current assay was able to detect H1N1/2009 and distinguish it from other influenza A viruses. This new method may be useful for simultaneous detection and subtyping of influenza A viruses and can be rapidly modified to detect other emerging influenza strains in public health settings.

  12. WHO recommendations for the viruses used in the 2013-2014 Northern Hemisphere influenza vaccine: Epidemiology, antigenic and genetic characteristics of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09, A(H3N2) and B influenza viruses collected from October 2012 to January 2013.

    PubMed

    Barr, Ian G; Russell, Colin; Besselaar, Terry G; Cox, Nancy J; Daniels, Rod S; Donis, Ruben; Engelhardt, Othmar G; Grohmann, Gary; Itamura, Shigeyuki; Kelso, Anne; McCauley, John; Odagiri, Takato; Schultz-Cherry, Stacey; Shu, Yuelong; Smith, Derek; Tashiro, Masato; Wang, Dayan; Webby, Richard; Xu, Xiyan; Ye, Zhiping; Zhang, Wenqing

    2014-08-20

    In February the World Health Organisation (WHO) recommends influenza viruses to be included in influenza vaccines for the forthcoming winter in the Northern Hemisphere. These recommendations are based on data collected by National Influenza Centres (NICs) through the WHO Global Influenza Surveillance and Response System (GISRS) and a more detailed analysis of representative and potential antigenically variant influenza viruses from the WHO Collaborating Centres for Influenza (WHO CCs) and Essential Regulatory Laboratories (ERLs). This article provides a detailed summary of the antigenic and genetic properties of viruses and additional background data used by WHO experts during development of the recommendations of the 2013-2014 Northern Hemisphere influenza vaccine composition.

  13. Egg-adaptive mutations in H3N2v vaccine virus enhance egg-based production without loss of antigenicity or immunogenicity.

    PubMed

    Barman, Subrata; Franks, John; Turner, Jasmine C; Yoon, Sun-Woo; Webster, Robert G; Webby, Richard J

    2015-06-22

    The recently detected zoonotic H3N2 variant influenza A (H3N2v) viruses have caused 343 documented cases of human infection linked to contact with swine. An effective vaccine is needed for these viruses, which may acquire transmissibility among humans. However, viruses isolated from human cases do not replicate well in embryonated chicken eggs, posing an obstacle to egg-based vaccine production. To address this issue, we sought to identify egg-adaptive mutations in surface proteins that increase the yield of candidate vaccine viruses (CVVs) in eggs while preserving their immunizing effectiveness. After serial passage of a representative H3N2v isolate (A/Indiana/08/2011), we identified several egg-adaptive combinations of HA mutations and assessed the egg-based replication, antigenicity, and immunogenicity of A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (H1N1, PR8)-based 6+2 reverse genetics CVVs carrying these mutations. Here we demonstrate that the respective combined HA substitutions G1861V+N2461K, N1651K+G1861V, T1281N+N1651K+R762G, and T1281N+N1651K+I102M, all identified after egg passage, enhanced the replication of the CVVs in eggs without substantially affecting their antigenicity or immunogenicity. The mutations were stable, and the mutant viruses acquired no additional substitutions during six subsequent egg passages. We found two crucial mutations, G186V, which was previously defined, and N246K, which in combination improved virus yield in eggs without significantly impacting antigenicity or immunogenicity. This combination of egg-adaptive mutations appears to most effectively generate high egg-based yields of influenza A/Indiana/08/2011-like CVVs.

  14. Different evolutionary trends of swine H1N2 influenza viruses in Italy compared to European viruses.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Ana; Gabanelli, Elena; Sozzi, Enrica; Lelli, Davide; Chiapponi, Chiara; Ciccozzi, Massimo; Zehender, Gianguglielmo; Cordioli, Paolo

    2013-12-01

    European H1N2 swine influenza viruses (EU H1N2SIVs) arose from multiple reassortment events among human H1N1, human H3N2, and avian influenza viruses. We investigated the evolutionary dynamics of 53 Italian H1N2 strains by comparing them with EU H1N2 SIVs. Hemagglutinin (HA) phylogeny revealed Italian strains fell into four groups: Group A and B (41 strains) had a human H1 similar to EU H1N2SIVs, which probably originated in 1986. However Group B (38 strains) formed a subgroup that had a two-amino acid deletion at positions 146/147 in HA. Group C (11 strains) contained an avian H1 that probably originated in 1996, and Group D (1 strain) had an H1 characteristic of the 2009 pandemic strain. Neuraminidase (NA) phylogeny suggested a series of genomic reassortments had occurred. Group A had an N2 that originated from human H3N2 in the late 1970s. Group B had different human N2 that most likely arose from a reassortment with the more recent human H3N2 virus, which probably occurred in 2000. Group C had an avian-like H1 combined with an N2 gene from one of EU H1N2SIVs, EU H3N2SIVs or Human H3N2. Group D was part of the EU H3N2SIVs clade. Although selection pressure for HA and NA was low, several positively selected sites were identified in both proteins, some of which were antigenic, suggesting selection influenced the evolution of SIV. The data highlight different evolutionary trends between European viruses and currently circulating Italian B strains and show the establishment of reassortant strains involving human viruses in Italian pigs.

  15. Different evolutionary trends of swine H1N2 influenza viruses in Italy compared to European viruses

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    European H1N2 swine influenza viruses (EU H1N2SIVs) arose from multiple reassortment events among human H1N1, human H3N2, and avian influenza viruses. We investigated the evolutionary dynamics of 53 Italian H1N2 strains by comparing them with EU H1N2 SIVs. Hemagglutinin (HA) phylogeny revealed Italian strains fell into four groups: Group A and B (41 strains) had a human H1 similar to EU H1N2SIVs, which probably originated in 1986. However Group B (38 strains) formed a subgroup that had a two-amino acid deletion at positions 146/147 in HA. Group C (11 strains) contained an avian H1 that probably originated in 1996, and Group D (1 strain) had an H1 characteristic of the 2009 pandemic strain. Neuraminidase (NA) phylogeny suggested a series of genomic reassortments had occurred. Group A had an N2 that originated from human H3N2 in the late 1970s. Group B had different human N2 that most likely arose from a reassortment with the more recent human H3N2 virus, which probably occurred in 2000. Group C had an avian-like H1 combined with an N2 gene from one of EU H1N2SIVs, EU H3N2SIVs or Human H3N2. Group D was part of the EU H3N2SIVs clade. Although selection pressure for HA and NA was low, several positively selected sites were identified in both proteins, some of which were antigenic, suggesting selection influenced the evolution of SIV. The data highlight different evolutionary trends between European viruses and currently circulating Italian B strains and show the establishment of reassortant strains involving human viruses in Italian pigs. PMID:24289094

  16. Swine Influenza Viruses: a North American Perspective

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Influenza is a zoonotic viral disease that represents a health and economic threat to both humans and animals worldwide. Swine influenza was first recognized clinically in pigs in the Midwestern U.S. in 1918, coinciding with the human influenza pandemic known as the Spanish flu. Since that time swin...

  17. Reassortment patterns in Swine influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Khiabanian, Hossein; Trifonov, Vladimir; Rabadan, Raul

    2009-10-07

    Three human influenza pandemics occurred in the twentieth century, in 1918, 1957, and 1968. Influenza pandemic strains are the results of emerging viruses from non-human reservoirs to which humans have little or no immunity. At least two of these pandemic strains, in 1957 and in 1968, were the results of reassortments between human and avian viruses. Also, many cases of swine influenza viruses have reportedly infected humans, in particular, the recent H1N1 influenza virus of swine origin, isolated in Mexico and the United States. Pigs are documented to allow productive replication of human, avian, and swine influenza viruses. Thus it has been conjectured that pigs are the "mixing vessel" that create the avian-human reassortant strains, causing the human pandemics. Hence, studying the process and patterns of viral reassortment, especially in pigs, is a key to better understanding of human influenza pandemics. In the last few years, databases containing sequences of influenza A viruses, including swine viruses, collected since 1918 from diverse geographical locations, have been developed and made publicly available. In this paper, we study an ensemble of swine influenza viruses to analyze the reassortment phenomena through several statistical techniques. The reassortment patterns in swine viruses prove to be similar to the previous results found in human viruses, both in vitro and in vivo, that the surface glycoprotein coding segments reassort most often. Moreover, we find that one of the polymerase segments (PB1), reassorted in the strains responsible for the last two human pandemics, also reassorts frequently.

  18. Epidemiological, antigenic and genetic characteristics of seasonal influenza A(H1N1), A(H3N2) and B influenza viruses: basis for the WHO recommendation on the composition of influenza vaccines for use in the 2009-2010 northern hemisphere season.

    PubMed

    Barr, Ian G; McCauley, John; Cox, Nancy; Daniels, Rod; Engelhardt, Othmar G; Fukuda, Keiji; Grohmann, Gary; Hay, Alan; Kelso, Anne; Klimov, Alexander; Odagiri, Takato; Smith, Derek; Russell, Colin; Tashiro, Masato; Webby, Richard; Wood, John; Ye, Zhiping; Zhang, Wenqing

    2010-02-03

    Influenza vaccines form an important component of the global response against infections and subsequent illness caused in man by influenza viruses. Twice a year, in February and September, the World Health Organisation through its Global Influenza Surveillance Network (GISN), recommends appropriate influenza viruses to be included in the seasonal influenza vaccine for the upcoming Northern and Southern Hemisphere winters. This recommendation is based on the latest data generated from many sources and the availability of viruses that are suitable for vaccine manufacture. This article gives a summary of the data and background to the recommendations for the 2009-2010 Northern Hemisphere influenza vaccine formulation. (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. WHO recommendations for the viruses to be used in the 2012 Southern Hemisphere Influenza Vaccine: epidemiology, antigenic and genetic characteristics of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09, A(H3N2) and B influenza viruses collected from February to September 2011.

    PubMed

    Klimov, Alexander I; Garten, Rebecca; Russell, Colin; Barr, Ian G; Besselaar, Terry G; Daniels, Rod; Engelhardt, Othmar G; Grohmann, Gary; Itamura, Shigeyuki; Kelso, Anne; McCauley, John; Odagiri, Takato; Smith, Derek; Tashiro, Masato; Xu, Xiyan; Webby, Richard; Wang, Dayan; Ye, Zhiping; Yuelong, Shu; Zhang, Wenqing; Cox, Nancy

    2012-10-05

    In February and September each year the World Health Organisation (WHO) recommends influenza viruses to be included in influenza vaccines for the forthcoming winters in the Northern and Southern Hemispheres respectively. These recommendations are based on data collected by National Influenza Centres (NIC) through the Global Influenza Surveillance and Response System (GISRS) and a more detailed analysis of representative and potential antigenically variant influenza viruses from the WHO Collaborating Centres for Influenza (WHO CCs) and Essential Regulatory Laboratories (ERLs). This article provides a detailed summary of the antigenic and genetic properties of viruses and additional background data used by WHO experts during development of the recommendations for the 2012 Southern Hemisphere influenza vaccine composition. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Swine Worker Precautions During Suspected Outbreaks of Influenza in Swine.

    PubMed

    Paccha, Blanca; Neira-Ramirez, Victor; Gibbs, Shawn; Torremorell, Montserrat; Rabinowitz, Peter M

    2016-05-01

    To assess the behavior and precautions that swine workers take during suspected influenza outbreaks in swine, six commercial swine farms in the Midwest U.S. region were visited when influenza outbreaks were suspected in herds during the fall/winter of 2012-2013. Use of personal protective equipment (PPE) and type of task performed by swine workers were recorded based on farm representative reports. Between one to two workers were working on the day of each visit and spent approximately 25 minutes performing work-related tasks that placed them in close contact with the swine. The most common tasks reported were walking the aisles (27%), handling pigs (21%), and handling equipment (21%). The most common PPE were boots (100%), heavy rubber gloves (75%), and dedicated nondisposable clothing (74%). Use of N95 respirators was reported at three farms. Hand hygiene practices were common in most of the farms, but reportedly performed for only 20% to 25% of tasks.

  1. Exploration of risk factors contributing to the presence of influenza A virus in swine at agricultural fairs

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, Andrew S; Workman, Jeffrey D; Nolting, Jacqueline M; Nelson, Sarah W; Slemons, Richard D

    2014-01-01

    Influenza A virus infections occurring in exhibition swine populations at agricultural fairs during 2012 served as a source of H3N2 variant influenza A viruses transmitted to humans resulting in more than 300 documented cases. Prior to the outbreak, this investigation was initiated to identify fair-level risk factors contributing to influenza A virus infections in pigs at agricultural fairs. As part of an ongoing active surveillance program, nasal swabs and associated fair-level metadata were collected from pigs at 40 junior fair market swine shows held in Ohio during the 2012 fair season. Analyses of the data show that the adjusted odds of having influenza A virus-infected pigs at a fair were 1.27 (95% confidential interval (CI): 1.04–1.66) higher for every 20 pig increase in the size of the swine show. Additionally, four of the five fairs that hosted breeding swine shows in addition to their junior fair market swine shows had pigs test positive for influenza A virus. While the current study was limited to 40 fairs within one state, the findings provided insight for veterinary and public health officials developing mitigation strategies to decrease the intra- and inter-species transmission of influenza A virus at fairs. PMID:26038494

  2. Molecular Epidemiology and Evolution of Influenza Viruses Circulating within European Swine between 2009 and 2013

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Simon J.; Langat, Pinky; Reid, Scott M.; Lam, Tommy Tsan-Yuk; Cotten, Matthew; Kelly, Michael; Van Reeth, Kristien; Qiu, Yu; Simon, Gaëlle; Bonin, Emilie; Foni, Emanuela; Chiapponi, Chiara; Larsen, Lars; Hjulsager, Charlotte; Markowska-Daniel, Iwona; Urbaniak, Kinga; Dürrwald, Ralf; Schlegel, Michael; Huovilainen, Anita; Davidson, Irit; Dán, Ádám; Loeffen, Willie; Edwards, Stephanie; Bublot, Michel; Vila, Thais; Maldonado, Jaime; Valls, Laura; Brown, Ian H.; Pybus, Oliver G.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The emergence in humans of the A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza virus, a complex reassortant virus of swine origin, highlighted the importance of worldwide influenza virus surveillance in swine. To date, large-scale surveillance studies have been reported for southern China and North America, but such data have not yet been described for Europe. We report the first large-scale genomic characterization of 290 swine influenza viruses collected from 14 European countries between 2009 and 2013. A total of 23 distinct genotypes were identified, with the 7 most common comprising 82% of the incidence. Contrasting epidemiological dynamics were observed for two of these genotypes, H1huN2 and H3N2, with the former showing multiple long-lived geographically isolated lineages, while the latter had short-lived geographically diffuse lineages. At least 32 human-swine transmission events have resulted in A(H1N1)pdm09 becoming established at a mean frequency of 8% across European countries. Notably, swine in the United Kingdom have largely had a replacement of the endemic Eurasian avian virus-like (“avian-like”) genotypes with A(H1N1)pdm09-derived genotypes. The high number of reassortant genotypes observed in European swine, combined with the identification of a genotype similar to the A(H3N2)v genotype in North America, underlines the importance of continued swine surveillance in Europe for the purposes of maintaining public health. This report further reveals that the emergences and drivers of virus evolution in swine differ at the global level. IMPORTANCE The influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus contains a reassortant genome with segments derived from separate virus lineages that evolved in different regions of the world. In particular, its neuraminidase and matrix segments were derived from the Eurasian avian virus-like (“avian-like”) lineage that emerged in European swine in the 1970s. However, while large-scale genomic characterization of swine has been reported for southern

  3. Vaccination of pigs against swine influenza viruses by using an NS1-truncated modified live-virus vaccine.

    PubMed

    Richt, Jürgen A; Lekcharoensuk, Porntippa; Lager, Kelly M; Vincent, Amy L; Loiacono, Christina M; Janke, Bruce H; Wu, Wai-Hong; Yoon, Kyoung-Jin; Webby, Richard J; Solórzano, Alicia; García-Sastre, Adolfo

    2006-11-01

    Swine influenza viruses (SIV) naturally infect pigs and can be transmitted to humans. In the pig, genetic reassortment to create novel influenza subtypes by mixing avian, human, and swine influenza viruses is possible. An SIV vaccine inducing cross-protective immunity between different subtypes and strains circulating in pigs is highly desirable. Previously, we have shown that an H3N2 SIV (A/swine/Texas/4199-2/98 [TX98]) containing a deleted NS1 gene expressing a truncated NS1 protein of 126 amino acids, NS1black triangle126, was attenuated in swine. In this study, 4-week-old pigs were vaccinated with the TX98 NS1black triangle126 modified live virus (MLV). Ten days after boosting, pigs were challenged with wild-type homologous H3N2 or heterosubtypic H1N1 SIV and sacrificed 5 days later. The MLV was highly attenuated and completely protected against challenge with the homologous virus. Vaccinated pigs challenged with the heterosubtypic H1N1 virus demonstrated macroscopic lung lesions similar to those of the unvaccinated H1N1 control pigs. Remarkably, vaccinated pigs challenged with the H1N1 SIV had significantly lower microscopic lung lesions and less virus shedding from the respiratory tract than did unvaccinated, H1N1-challenged pigs. All vaccinated pigs developed significant levels of hemagglutination inhibition and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay titers in serum and mucosal immunoglobulin A antibodies against H3N2 SIV antigens. Vaccinated pigs were seronegative for NS1, indicating the potential use of the TX98 NS1black triangle126 MLV as a vaccine to differentiate infected from vaccinated animals.

  4. Vaccine escape in 2013-4 and the hydropathic evolution of glycoproteins of A/H3N2 viruses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, J. C.

    2016-08-01

    More virulent strains of influenza virus subtypes H1N1 appeared widely in 2007 and H3N2 in 2011, and especially 2013-4, when the effectiveness of the H3N2 vaccine decreased by more than a factor of two. The amino acid differences of neuraminidase from prior less virulent strains appear to be small (<1%) when tabulated through sequence alignments and counting site identities and similarities. Here we show how analyzing fractal hydropathic forces responsible for neuraminidase globular compaction and modularity quantifies the mutational origins of increased virulence. It also predicts vaccine escape and specifies optimized targets for the 2015 H3N2 vaccine. Unlike some earlier methods based on measuring hemagglutinin antigenic drift, which take several years, cover only a few candidate strains, and are ambiguous, the new methods are timely and can be completed, using NCBI and GISAID amino acid sequences only, in a few days.

  5. Pathogenicity of modified bat influenza virus with different M genes and its reassortment potential with swine influenza A virus.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jianmei; Lee, Jinhwa; Ma, Jingjiao; Lang, Yuekun; Nietfeld, Jerome; Li, Yuhao; Duff, Michael; Li, Yonghai; Yang, Yuju; Liu, Haixia; Zhou, Bin; Wentworth, David E; Richt, Juergen A; Li, Zejun; Ma, Wenjun

    2017-01-18

    In our previous studies the reassortant virus containing only the PR8 H1N1 matrix (M) gene in the background of the modified bat influenza Bat09:mH1mN1 virus could be generated. However, whether M genes from other origins can be rescued in the background of the Bat09:mH1mN1 virus and whether the resulting novel reassortant virus is virulent remain unknown. Herein, two reassortant viruses were generated in the background of the Bat09:mH1mN1 virus containing either a North American or a Eurasian swine influenza virus M gene. These two reassortant viruses and the reassortant virus with PR8 M as well as the control Bat09:mH1mN1 virus replicated efficiently in cultured cells, while the reassortant virus with PR8 M grew to a higher titer than the other three viruses in tested cells. Mouse studies showed that reassortant viruses with either North American or Eurasian swine influenza virus M genes did not enhance virulence, whereas the reassortant virus with PR8 M gene displayed higher pathogenicity when compared to the Bat09:mH1mN1 virus. This is most likely due to the fact that the PR8 H1N1 virus is a mouse-adapted virus. Furthermore, reassortment potential between the Bat09:mH1mN1 virus and an H3N2 swine influenza virus (A/swine/Texas/4199-2/1998) was investigated using co-infection of MDCK cells, but no reassortant viruses were detected. Taken together, our results indicate that the modified bat influenza virus is most likely incapable of reassortment with influenza A viruses with in vitro co-infection experiments, although reassortant viruses with different M genes can be generated by reverse genetics.

  6. Protection of human influenza vaccines against a reassortant swine influenza virus of pandemic H1N1 origin using a pig model.

    PubMed

    Arunorat, Jirapat; Charoenvisal, Nataya; Woonwong, Yonlayong; Kedkovid, Roongtham; Jittimanee, Supattra; Sitthicharoenchai, Panchan; Kesdangsakonwut, Sawang; Poolperm, Pariwat; Thanawongnuwech, Roongroje

    2017-02-28

    Since the pandemic H1N1 emergence in 2009 (pdmH1N1), many reassortant pdmH1N1 viruses emerged and found circulating in the pig population worldwide. Currently, commercial human subunit vaccines are used commonly to prevent the influenza symptom based on the WHO recommendation. In case of current reassortant swine influenza viruses transmitting from pigs to humans, the efficacy of current human influenza vaccines is of interest. In this study, influenza A negative pigs were vaccinated with selected commercial human subunit vaccines and challenged with rH3N2. All sera were tested with both HI and SN assays using four representative viruses from the surveillance data in 2012 (enH1N1, pdmH1N1, rH1N2 and rH3N2). The results showed no significant differences in clinical signs and macroscopic and microscopic findings among groups. However, all pig sera from vaccinated groups had protective HI titers to the enH1N1, pdmH1N1 and rH1N2 at 21DPV onward and had protective SN titers only to pdmH1N1and rH1N2 at 21DPV onward. SN test results appeared more specific than those of HI tests. All tested sera had no cross-reactivity against the rH3N2. Both studied human subunit vaccines failed to protect and to stop viral shedding with no evidence of serological reaction against rH3N2. SIV surveillance is essential for monitoring a novel SIV emergence potentially for zoonosis.

  7. Protective efficacy of a broadly cross-reactive swine influenza DNA vaccine encoding M2e, cytotoxic T lymphocyte epitope and consensus H3 hemagglutinin

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Pigs have been implicated as mixing reservoir for the generation of new pandemic influenza strains, control of swine influenza has both veterinary and public health significance. Unlike human influenza vaccines, strains used for commercially available swine influenza vaccines are not regularly replaced, making the vaccines provide limited protection against antigenically diverse viruses. It is therefore necessary to develop broadly protective swine influenza vaccines that are efficacious to both homologous and heterologous virus infections. In this study, two forms of DNA vaccines were constructed, one was made by fusing M2e to consensus H3HA (MHa), which represents the majority of the HA sequences of H3N2 swine influenza viruses. Another was made by fusing M2e and a conserved CTL epitope (NP147-155) to consensus H3HA (MNHa). Their protective efficacies against homologous and heterologous challenges were tested. Results BALB/c mice were immunized twice by particle-mediated epidermal delivery (gene gun) with the two DNA vaccines. It was shown that the two vaccines elicited substantial antibody responses, and MNHa induced more significant T cell-mediated immune response than MHa did. Then two H3N2 strains representative of different evolutional and antigenic clusters were used to challenge the vaccine-immunized mice (homosubtypic challenge). Results indicated that both of the DNA vaccines prevented homosubtypic virus infections completely. The vaccines’ heterologous protective efficacies were further tested by challenging with a H1N1 swine influenza virus and a reassortant 2009 pandemic strain. It was found that MNHa reduced the lung viral titers significantly in both challenge groups, histopathological observation showed obvious reduction of lung pathogenesis as compared to MHa and control groups. Conclusions The combined utility of the consensus HA and the conserved M2e and CTL epitope can confer complete and partial protection against homologous and

  8. Novel Human-like Influenza A Viruses Circulate in Swine in Mexico and Chile

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Martha; Culhane, Marie R.; Rovira, Albert; Torremorell, Montserrat; Guerrero, Pedro; Norambuena, Julio

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Further understanding of the genetic diversity and evolution of influenza A viruses circulating in swine (IAV-S) is important for the development of effective vaccines and our knowledge of pandemic threats. Until recently, very little was known of IAV-S diversity in Latin America, owing to a lack of surveillance. Methods: To address this gap, we sequenced and conducted a phylogenetic analysis of 69 hemagglutinin (HA) sequences from IAV-S isolates collected in swine in Mexico and Chile during 2010-2014, including the H1N1, H1N2, and H3N2 subtypes. Results: Our analysis identified multiple IAV-S lineages that appear to have been circulating undetected in swine for decades, including four novel IAV-S lineages of human seasonal virus origin that have not been previously identified in any swine populations globally. We also found evidence of repeated introductions of pandemic H1N1 viruses from humans into swine in Mexico and Chile since 2009, and incursions of H1 and H3 viruses from North American swine into Mexico. Discussion: Overall, our findings indicate that at least 12 genetically distinct HA lineages circulate in Latin American swine herds, only two of which have been found in North American swine herds. Human-to-swine transmission, spatial migration via swine movements, and genomic reassortment are the key evolutionary mechanisms that generate this viral diversity. Additional antigenic characterization and whole-genome sequencing is greatly needed to understand the diversity and independent evolution of IAV-S in Latin America.  PMID:26345598

  9. Serological Evidence of Pandemic H1N1 Influenza Virus Infections in Greek Swine.

    PubMed

    Kyriakis, C S; Papatsiros, V G; Athanasiou, L V; Valiakos, G; Brown, I H; Simon, G; Van Reeth, K; Tsiodras, S; Spyrou, V; Billinis, C

    2016-08-01

    The introduction of the 2009 pandemic H1N1 (pH1N1) influenza virus in pigs changed the epidemiology of influenza A viruses (IAVs) in swine in Europe and the rest of the world. Previously, three IAV subtypes were found in the European pig population: an avian-like H1N1 and two reassortant H1N2 and H3N2 viruses with human-origin haemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase proteins and internal genes of avian decent. These viruses pose antigenically distinct HAs, which allow the retrospective diagnosis of infection in serological investigations. However, cross-reactions between the HA of pH1N1 and the HAs of the other circulating H1 IAVs complicate serological diagnosis. The prevalence of IAVs in Greek swine has been poorly investigated. In this study, we examined and compared haemagglutination inhibition (HI) antibody titres against previously established IAVs and pH1N1 in 908 swine sera from 88 herds, collected before and after the 2009 pandemic. While we confirmed the historic presence of the three IAVs established in European swine, we also found that 4% of the pig sera examined after 2009 had HI antibodies only against the pH1N1 virus. Our results indicate that pH1N1 is circulating in Greek pigs and stress out the importance of a vigorous virological surveillance programme.

  10. Genetic characterization of Thai swine influenza viruses after the introduction of pandemic H1N1 2009.

    PubMed

    Charoenvisal, Nataya; Keawcharoen, Juthatip; Sreta, Donruethai; Chaiyawong, Supassama; Nonthabenjawan, Nutthawan; Tantawet, Siriporn; Jittimanee, Suphattra; Arunorat, Jirapat; Amonsin, Alongkorn; Thanawongnuwech, Roongroje

    2013-08-01

    Pandemic H1N1 2009 (pH1N1), influenza virus containing triple reassortant internal genes (TRIG) from avian, human, and swine influenza viruses emerged in 2009 as a highly infectious virus that was able to be transmitted from humans to pigs. During June 2010-May 2012, influenza virus surveillance was conducted in Thai pig population. Twenty-three samples (1.75%) were successfully isolated from total of 1,335 samples. Interestingly, pH1N1 (7 isolates, 30.34%), reassortant pH1N1 (rH1N1) (1 isolate, 4.35%), Thai endemic H1N1 (enH1N1) (3 isolates, 13.04%), reassortant H3N2 with pH1N1 internal genes (rH3N2) (9 isolates, 39.13%), and reassortant H1N2 with pH1N1 internal genes (rH1N2) (3 isolates, 13.04%) were found. It should be noted that rH1N1, rH1N2, and rH3N2 viruses contained the internal genes of pH1N1 virus having a TRIG cassette descendant from the North American swine lineage. Although all isolates in this study were obtained from mild clinically sick pigs, the viruses were still highly infective and possibly may play an important role in human-animal interfacing transmission. In addition, the TRIG cassette may have an influence on antigenic shift resulting in emergence of novel viruses, as seen in this study. Continuing surveillance of influenza A natural hosts, particularly in pigs is necessary.

  11. The global antigenic diversity of swine influenza A viruses.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Nicola S; Russell, Colin A; Langat, Pinky; Anderson, Tavis K; Berger, Kathryn; Bielejec, Filip; Burke, David F; Dudas, Gytis; Fonville, Judith M; Fouchier, Ron Am; Kellam, Paul; Koel, Bjorn F; Lemey, Philippe; Nguyen, Tung; Nuansrichy, Bundit; Peiris, Js Malik; Saito, Takehiko; Simon, Gaelle; Skepner, Eugene; Takemae, Nobuhiro; Webby, Richard J; Van Reeth, Kristien; Brookes, Sharon M; Larsen, Lars; Watson, Simon J; Brown, Ian H; Vincent, Amy L

    2016-04-15

    Swine influenza presents a substantial disease burden for pig populations worldwide and poses a potential pandemic threat to humans. There is considerable diversity in both H1 and H3 influenza viruses circulating in swine due to the frequent introductions of viruses from humans and birds coupled with geographic segregation of global swine populations. Much of this diversity is characterized genetically but the antigenic diversity of these viruses is poorly understood. Critically, the antigenic diversity shapes the risk profile of swine influenza viruses in terms of their epizootic and pandemic potential. Here, using the most comprehensive set of swine influenza virus antigenic data compiled to date, we quantify the antigenic diversity of swine influenza viruses on a multi-continental scale. The substantial antigenic diversity of recently circulating viruses in different parts of the world adds complexity to the risk profiles for the movement of swine and the potential for swine-derived infections in humans.

  12. Swine influenza: clinical, serological, pathological, and virological cross-sectional studies in nine farms in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Dibárbora, Marina; Cappuccio, Javier; Olivera, Valeria; Quiroga, Maria; Machuca, Mariana; Perfumo, Carlos; Pérez, Daniel; Pereda, Ariel

    2013-12-01

    Influenza A viruses (IAV) are important pathogens responsible for economic losses in the swine industry and represent a threat to public health. In Argentina, clinical, pathological, and virological findings suggest that IAV infection is widespread among pig farms. In addition, several subtypes of IAV, such as pH1N1, H3N2, δ1H1N1, and δ2H1N2, have been reported. To evaluate the infection patterns of influenza virus in nine pig farms in Argentina. Clinical, serological, pathological, and virological cross-sectional studies were conducted. Clinical and pathological results were characteristic of endemic influenza infection in eight of the nine farms studied. By rRT-PCR, six of the nine farms were positive to influenza. Five IAV were obtained. Genome analysis determined that four of the isolations were pH1N1 and that the remaining one was a reassortant human origin H3N2 virus containing pandemic internal genes. Serological results showed that all farms were positive to influenza A antibodies. Moreover, the hemagglutination inhibition test showed that infection with viruses containing HA's from different subtypes (pH1, δ1H1, δ2H1, and H3) is present among the farms studied and that coinfections with two or more subtypes were present in 80.5% of positive pigs. Because vaccines against IAV are not licensed in Argentina, these results reflect the situation of IAV infection in non-vaccinated herds. This study provides more information about the circulation and characteristics of IAV in a poorly surveyed region. This study provides more data that will be used to evaluate the tools necessary to control this disease. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. Genetic composition of contemporary swine influenza viruses in the West Central region of the United States of America

    PubMed Central

    Evseenko, Vasiliy A.; Boon, Adrianus C. M.; Brockwell‐Staats, Christy; Franks, John; Rubrum, Adam; Daniels, Curt S.; Gramer, Marie R.; Webby, Richard J.

    2011-01-01

    Please cite this paper as: Evseenko et al. (2011) Genetic composition of contemporary swine influenza viruses in the West Central region of the United States of America. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses DOI: 10.1111/j.1750‐2659.2010.00189.x. Background  Because of continuous circulation in different animal species and humans, influenza viruses have host‐specific phenotypic and genetic features. Reassortment of the genome segments can significantly change virus phenotype, potentially generating virus with pandemic potential. In 2009, a new pandemic influenza virus emerged. Objectives  In this study, we attempted to find precursor viruses or genes of pandemic H1N1 influenza 2009 among 25 swine influenza viruses, isolated in the West Central region of the United States of America (USA), between 2007 and 2009. The Phylogenetically Similar Triple‐Reassortant Internal Genes (PSTRIG) cassette of all the viruses studied here as well as the PSTRIG cassette of pandemic H1N1 viruses have close but equidistant phylogenetic relationships to the early triple‐reassortant swine H3N2 influenza A isolated in the USA in 1998. Methods  Samples (nasal swabs and lung tissue lavage) were taken from swine with or without clinical signs of respiratory disease via farmer‐funded syndromic surveillance. All studied viruses were isolated in Madin–Darby Canine Kidney cell cultures from the above‐mentioned samples according to standard protocols recommended for influenza virus isolation. Sequences were obtained using BigDye Terminator v3.1 Cycle Sequencing kit. Phylogenetic trees were built with MEGA 4.0 software using maximum composite likelihood algorithm and neighbor‐joining method for tree topology reconstruction. Results  Among the 25 viruses studied, we have not found any gene segments of Eurasian origin. Our results suggest that pandemic H1N1 viruses diverged and are not directly descended from swine viruses that have been circulating in USA since 1998

  14. Experimental infection with H1N1 European swine influenza virus protects pigs from an infection with the 2009 pandemic H1N1 human influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Busquets, Núria; Segalés, Jo