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Sample records for h3n2 swine influenza

  1. Swine influenza virus vaccine serologic cross-reactivity to contemporary U.S. swine H3N2 and efficacy in pigs infected with an H3N2 similar to 2011-2012 H3N2v

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Swine influenza A virus (IAV) reassortment with 2009 H1N1 pandemic (H1N1pdm09) virus has been documented and new genotypes and sub-clusters of H3N2 have since expanded in the U.S. swine population. An H3N2 variant (H3N2v) virus with the H1N1pdm09 matrix gene and the remaining genes of sw...

  2. The avian-origin H3N2 canine influenza virus has limited replication in swine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A genetically and antigenically distinct H3N2 canine influenza of avian-origin was detected in March of 2015 in Chicago, Illinois. A subsequent outbreak was reported with over 1,000 dogs in the Midwest affected. The potential for canine-to-swine transmission was unknown. Experimental infection in pi...

  3. Neutralizing DNA Aptamers against Swine Influenza H3N2 Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Wongphatcharachai, Manoosak; Wang, Ping; Enomoto, Shinichiro; Webby, Richard J.; Gramer, Marie R.; Amonsin, Alongkorn

    2013-01-01

    Triple reassortant influenza A viruses (IAVs) of swine, particularly the North American H3N2 subtype, circulate in swine herds and may reassort and result in the emergence of novel zoonotic strains. Current diagnostic tools rely on isolation of the viruses, followed by serotyping by hemagglutination or genome sequencing, both of which can be expensive and time-consuming. Thus, novel subtype-specific ligands and methods are needed for rapid testing and subtyping of IAVs in the field. To address this need, we selected DNA aptamers against the recombinant HA protein from swine IAV H3 cluster IV using systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX). Four candidate aptamers (HA68, HA7, HA2a, and HA2b) were identified and characterized. The dissociation constants (Kd) of aptamers HA68, HA7, HA2a, and HA2b against recombinant H3 protein were 7.1, 22.3, 16.0, and 3.7 nM, respectively. The binding site of HA68 to H3 was identified to be between nucleotide residues 8 and 40. All aptamers inhibited H3 hemagglutination. HA68 was highly specific to all four lineages within the North American H3N2 subtype. Further, the other three aptamers specifically identified live viruses belonging to the phylogenetic clusters I, II/III, and IV especially the virus that closely related to the recent H3N2 variant (H3N2v). Aptamer HA68 was also able to bind and detect H3N2v isolated from recent human cases. In conclusion, we provide subtype-specific aptamers against H3N2 IAVs of swine that can now be used in rapid detection and typing protocols for field applications. PMID:23077124

  4. Identification of four genotypes of H3N2 swine influenza virus in pigs from southern China.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jidang; Fu, Xinliang; Chen, Ye; He, Shuyi; Zheng, Yun; Cao, Zhenpeng; Yu, Wenxin; Zhou, Han; Su, Shuo; Zhang, Guihong

    2014-10-01

    In 2011, four H3N2 swine influenza viruses (SIVs) were isolated from nasal swabs of four pigs (800 nasal swabs were collected from pigs showing influenza-like symptoms) in Guangdong province, China. Four different genotypes of H3N2 appeared among pigs in southern China, including wholly human-like H3N2 viruses, intermediate (1975) double-reassortant human H3N2 viruses (resulting from reassortment between an early human lineage and a recent human lineage), recent double-reassortant human H3N2 viruses, and avian-like H3N2 viruses. Because pigs can support the reassortment of human and avian influenza viruses, our surveillance should be enhanced as a part of an overall pandemic preparedness plan.

  5. Pathogenicity and transmission in pigs of the novel A(H3N2)v influenza virus isolated from humans and characterization of swine H3N2 viruses isolated in 2010-2011.

    PubMed

    Kitikoon, Pravina; Vincent, Amy L; Gauger, Phillip C; Schlink, Sarah N; Bayles, Darrell O; Gramer, Marie R; Darnell, Daniel; Webby, Richard J; Lager, Kelly M; Swenson, Sabrina L; Klimov, Alexander

    2012-06-01

    Swine influenza virus (SIV) H3N2 with triple reassorted internal genes (TRIG) has been enzootic in Unites States since 1998. Transmission of the 2009 pandemic H1N1 (pH1N1) virus to pigs in the United States was followed by reassortment with endemic SIV, resulting in reassorted viruses that include novel H3N2 genotypes (rH3N2p). Between July and December 2011, 12 cases of human infections with swine-lineage H3N2 viruses containing the pandemic matrix (pM) gene [A(H3N2)v] were detected. Whole-genome analysis of H3N2 viruses isolated from pigs from 2009 to 2011 sequenced in this study and other available H3N2 sequences showed six different rH3N2p genotypes present in the U.S. swine population since 2009. The presence of the pM gene was a common feature among all rH3N2p genotypes, but no specific genotype appeared to predominate in the swine population. We compared the pathogenic, transmission, genetic, and antigenic properties of a human A(H3N2)v isolate and two swine H3N2 isolates, H3N2-TRIG and rH3N2p. Our in vivo study detected no increased virulence in A(H3N2)v or rH3N2p viruses compared to endemic H3N2-TRIG virus. Antibodies to cluster IV H3N2-TRIG and rH3N2p viruses had reduced cross-reactivity to A(H3N2)v compared to other cluster IV H3N2-TRIG and rH3N2p viruses. Genetic analysis of the hemagglutinin gene indicated that although rH3N2p and A(H3N2)v are related to cluster IV of H3N2-TRIG, some recent rH3N2p isolates appeared to be forming a separate cluster along with the human isolates of A(H3N2)v. Continued monitoring of these H3N2 viruses is necessary to evaluate the evolution and potential loss of population immunity in swine and humans.

  6. Swine-to-human transmission of influenza A(H3N2) virus at agricultural fairs, Ohio, USA, 2012.

    PubMed

    Bowman, Andrew S; Nelson, Sarah W; Page, Shannon L; Nolting, Jacqueline M; Killian, Mary L; Sreevatsan, Srinand; Slemons, Richard D

    2014-09-01

    Agricultural fairs provide an opportunity for bidirectional transmission of influenza A viruses. We sought to determine influenza A virus activity among swine at fairs in the United States. As part of an ongoing active influenza A virus surveillance project, nasal swab samples were collected from exhibition swine at 40 selected Ohio agricultural fairs during 2012. Influenza A(H3N2) virus was isolated from swine at 10 of the fairs. According to a concurrent public health investigation, 7 of the 10 fairs were epidemiologically linked to confirmed human infections with influenza A(H3N2) variant virus. Comparison of genome sequences of the subtype H3N2 isolates recovered from humans and swine from each fair revealed nucleotide identities of >99.7%, confirming zoonotic transmission between swine and humans. All influenza A(H3N2) viruses isolated in this study, regardless of host species or fair, were >99.5% identical, indicating that 1 virus strain was widely circulating among exhibition swine in Ohio during 2012.

  7. Phylogenetic analysis of a swine influenza A(H3N2) virus isolated in Korea in 2012.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Il; Lee, Ilseob; Park, Sehee; Lee, Sangmoo; Hwang, Min-Woong; Bae, Joon-Yong; Heo, Jun; Kim, Donghwan; Jang, Seok-Il; Kim, Kabsu; Park, Man-Seong

    2014-01-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) can infect avian and mammalian species, including humans. The genome nature of IAVs may contribute to viral adaptation in different animal hosts, resulting in gene reassortment and the reproduction of variants with optimal fitness. As seen again in the 2009 swine-origin influenza A H1N1 pandemic, pigs are known to be susceptible to swine, avian, and human IAVs and can serve as a 'mixing vessel' for the generation of novel IAV variants. To this end, the emergence of swine influenza viruses must be kept under close surveillance. Herein, we report the isolation and phylogenetic study of a swine IAV, A/swine/Korea/PL01/2012 (swPL01, H3N2 subtype). After screening nasopharyngeal samples from pigs in the Gyeongsangnam-do region of Korea from December 2011 to May 2012, we isolated the swPL01 virus and sequenced its all of 8 genome segments (polymerase basic 2, PB2; polymerase basic 1, PB1; polymerase acidic, PA; hemagglutinin, HA; nucleocapsid protein, NP; neuraminidase, NA; matrix protein, M; and nonstructural protein, NS). The phylogenetic study, analyzed with reference strains registered in the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) database, indicated that the swPL01 virus was similar to the North American triple-reassortant swine strains and that the HA gene of the swPL01 virus was categorized into swine H3 cluster IV. The swPL01 virus had the M gene of the triple-reassortant swine H3N2 viruses, whereas that of other contemporary strains in Korea was transferred from the 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus. These data suggest the possibility that various swine H3N2 viruses may co-circulate in Korea, which underlines the importance of a sustained surveillance system against swine IAVs.

  8. Antigenically intact hemagglutinin in circulating avian and swine influenza viruses and potential for H3N2 pandemic.

    PubMed

    Tharakaraman, Kannan; Raman, Rahul; Stebbins, Nathan W; Viswanathan, Karthik; Sasisekharan, Viswanathan; Sasisekharan, Ram

    2013-01-01

    The 2009 swine-origin H1N1 influenza, though antigenically novel to the population at the time, was antigenically similar to the 1918 H1N1 pandemic influenza, and consequently was considered to be "archived" in the swine species before reemerging in humans. Given that the H3N2 is another subtype that currently circulates in the human population and is high on WHO pandemic preparedness list, we assessed the likelihood of reemergence of H3N2 from a non-human host. Using HA sequence features relevant to immune recognition, receptor binding and transmission we have identified several recent H3 strains in avian and swine that present hallmarks of a reemerging virus. IgG polyclonal raised in rabbit with recent seasonal vaccine H3 fail to recognize these swine H3 strains suggesting that existing vaccines may not be effective in protecting against these strains. Vaccine strategies can mitigate risks associated with a potential H3N2 pandemic in humans.

  9. Emergence of a new swine H3N2 and pandemic (H1N1) 2009 influenza A virus reassortant in two Canadian animal populations, mink and swine.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, Donald; Allard, Véronique; Doyon, Jean-François; Bellehumeur, Christian; Spearman, J Grant; Harel, Josée; Gagnon, Carl A

    2011-12-01

    A swine H3N2 (swH3N2) and pandemic (H1N1) 2009 (pH1N1) influenza A virus reassortant (swH3N2/pH1N1) was detected in Canadian swine at the end of 2010. Simultaneously, a similar virus was also detected in Canadian mink based on partial viral genome sequencing. The origin of the new swH3N2/pH1N1 viral genes was related to the North American swH3N2 triple-reassortant cluster IV (for hemagglutinin [HA] and neuraminidase [NA] genes) and to pH1N1 for all the other genes (M, NP, NS, PB1, PB2, and PA). Data indicate that the swH3N2/pH1N1 virus can be found in several pigs that are housed at different locations.

  10. Pathogenicity and transmission in pigs of the novel A(H3N2)v influenza virus isolated from humans and characterization of swine H3N2 viruses isolated in 2010-2011

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Swine influenza virus (SIV) H3N2 with triple reassorted internal genes (TRIG) has been enzootic in U.S. since 1998. Transmission of the 2009 pandemic H1N1 (pH1N1) virus to pigs in the U.S. was followed by reassortment with endemic SIV, resulting in reassorted viruses that include novel H3N2 genotype...

  11. Unseasonal transmission of H3N2 influenza A virus during the swine-origin H1N1 pandemic.

    PubMed

    Ghedin, Elodie; Wentworth, David E; Halpin, Rebecca A; Lin, Xudong; Bera, Jayati; DePasse, Jay; Fitch, Adam; Griesemer, Sara; Hine, Erin; Katzel, Daniel A; Overton, Larry; Proudfoot, Kathleen; Sitz, Jeffrey; Szczypinski, Bridget; StGeorge, Kirsten; Spiro, David J; Holmes, Edward C

    2010-06-01

    The initial wave of swine-origin influenza A virus (pandemic H1N1/09) in the United States during the spring and summer of 2009 also resulted in an increased vigilance and sampling of seasonal influenza viruses (H1N1 and H3N2), even though they are normally characterized by very low incidence outside of the winter months. To explore the nature of virus evolution during this influenza "off-season," we conducted a phylogenetic analysis of H1N1 and H3N2 sequences sampled during April to June 2009 in New York State. Our analysis revealed that multiple lineages of both viruses were introduced and cocirculated during this time, as is typical of influenza virus during the winter. Strikingly, however, we also found strong evidence for the presence of a large transmission chain of H3N2 viruses centered on the south-east of New York State and which continued until at least 1 June 2009. These results suggest that the unseasonal transmission of influenza A viruses may be more widespread than is usually supposed.

  12. The growing diversity of H3N2 influenza A virus in swine and the impact on control in swine and at the human animal interface

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction. H3N2 influenza A viruses (IAV) were recognized as endemic infections in the USA swine population following the 1997-98 incursion of the triple reassortant viruses with gene segments from human- (HA, NA, and PB1), swine- (NP, M, and NS) and avian- (PB2 and PA) adapted viruses (reviewed ...

  13. Isolation of novel triple‐reassortant swine H3N2 influenza viruses possessing the hemagglutinin and neuraminidase genes of a seasonal influenza virus in Vietnam in 2010

    PubMed Central

    Ngo, Long Thanh; Hiromoto, Yasuaki; Pham, Vu Phong; Le, Ha Thi Hong; Nguyen, Ha Truc; Le, Vu Tri; Takemae, Nobuhiro; Saito, Takehiko

    2011-01-01

    Please cite this paper as: Ngo et al. (2012) Isolation of novel triple‐reassortant swine H3N2 influenza viruses possessing the hemagglutinin and neuraminidase genes of a seasonal influenza virus in Vietnam in 2010. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses 6(1), 6–10. Surveillance of swine influenza viruses (SIVs) in 31 pig farms in northern and southern parts of Vietnam was conducted. Six H3N2 influenza A viruses were isolated from a pig farm in southern Vietnam. They were novel genetic reassortants between a triple–reassortant SIV and a human seasonal H3N2 virus. Their hemagglutinin and neuraminidase genes were derived from a human virus circulating around 2004–2006 and the remaining genes from a triple‐reassortant SIV that originated in North America. This is the first report describing the isolation of a novel triple‐reassortant SIV in Vietnam. PMID:21668659

  14. Mitochondrial antiviral signaling adaptor mediated apoptosis in H3N2 swine influenza virus infection is inhibited by viral protein NS1 in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jinqiu; Miao, Jinfeng; Hou, Jibo; Lu, Chengping

    2015-05-15

    We investigated the in vitro role of mitochondrial antiviral signaling adaptor (MAVS) in apoptosis induced by H3N2 swine influenza virus infection and the influence of viral NS1 (nonstructural protein 1) protein on this process. H3N2 swine influenza virus (SIV, A/Swine/Shandong/3/2005) was co-cultured with human lung epithelial A549 cells. The relationship of MAVS expression to SIV replication and apoptosis, and the influence of viral proteins on MAVS functions were studied. The data indicate that in response to SIV infection, MAVS was significantly upregulated at both the transcriptional and protein levels in the early stages of infection. Its expression and localization to mitochondria are necessary for apoptosis of epithelial cells induced by H3N2 swine influenza virus. Viral protein NS1 can antagonize MAVS-mediated apoptosis. These findings indicate that MAVS have a role in regulating innate mitochondrial responses to viral infection.

  15. Detection of Novel Reassortant Influenza A (H3N2) and H1N1 2009 Pandemic Viruses in Swine in Hanoi, Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Baudon, E; Poon, L L; Dao, T D; Pham, N T; Cowling, B J; Peyre, M; Nguyen, K V; Peiris, M

    2015-09-01

    From May to September 2013, monthly samples were collected from swine in a Vietnamese slaughterhouse for influenza virus isolation and serological testing. A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses and a novel H3N2 originating from reassortment between A(H1N1)pdm09 and novel viruses of the North American triple reassortant lineage were isolated. Serological results showed low seroprevalence for the novel H3N2 virus and higher seroprevalence for A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses. In addition, serology suggested that other swine influenza viruses are also circulating in Vietnamese swine.

  16. Limited susceptibility and lack of systemic infection by an H3N2 swine influenza virus in intranasally inoculated chickens.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Colleen; Manin, Timofey B; Andriyasov, Artem V; Swayne, David E

    2008-09-01

    Chickens were intranasally inoculated with the swine influenza virus (SIV) A/swine/NC/307408/04 (H3N2) (NC/04 SIV) to determine the infectivity of a North American SIV for chickens, as well as the possibility of chicken meat serving as a transmission vehicle for SIV. White leghorn (WL) layer-type chickens were used for initial pathotyping and infectivity tests, and a more comprehensive intranasal pathogenesis study was done with white Plymouth rock (WPR) broiler-type chickens. None of the NC/04 SIV-inoculated WL or WPR chickens displayed clinical signs. Serologic tests showed that the virus was able to infect both intranasally inoculated WL and WPR chickens, but the antibody titers were low, suggesting inefficient replication. Some of the NC/04 SIV-inoculated WL chickens shed low levels of virus, mostly from the alimentary tract, but viral shedding was not detected in NC/04 SIV-inoculated WPR chickens. The comprehensive pathogenesis study demonstrated that the virus did not cause systemic infections in WPR chickens, and feeding breast and thigh meat from the NC/04 SIV-inoculated WPR to WL chickens did not transmit NC/04 SIV.

  17. Comparison of 2010-2011 H3N2 influenza A viruses isolated from swine and the A(H3N2)v isolated from humans in 2011

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the end of 2011, 12 U.S. cases of humans infected with swine H3N2 virus containing the matrix gene from pandemic H1N1 2009 virus (H1N1pdm09) were detected and named A(H3N2)v. This study used a swine model to compare the pathogenic, transmission, genetic, and antigenic properties of a human A(H3N2...

  18. Swine-origin influenza A (H3N2) virus infection in two children--Indiana and Pennsylvania, July-August 2011.

    PubMed

    2011-09-09

    Influenza A viruses are endemic in many animal species, including humans, swine, and wild birds, and sporadic cases of transmission of influenza A viruses between humans and animals do occur, including human infections with avian-origin influenza A viruses (i.e., H5N1 and H7N7) and swine-origin influenza A viruses (i.e., H1N1, H1N2, and H3N2). Genetic analysis can distinguish animal origin influenza viruses from the seasonal human influenza viruses that circulate widely and cause annual epidemics. This report describes two cases of febrile respiratory illness caused by swine-origin influenza A (H3N2) viruses identified on August 19 and August 26, 2011, and the current investigations. No epidemiologic link between the two cases has been identified, and although investigations are ongoing, no additional confirmed human infections with this virus have been detected. These viruses are similar to eight other swine-origin influenza A (H3N2) viruses identified from previous human infections over the past 2 years, but are unique in that one of the eight gene segments (matrix [M] gene) is from the 2009 influenza A (H1N1) virus. The acquisition of the M gene in these two swine-origin influenza A (H3N2) viruses indicates that they are "reassortants" because they contain genes of the swine-origin influenza A (H3N2) virus circulating in North American pigs since 1998 and the 2009 influenza A (H1N1) virus that might have been transmitted to pigs from humans during the 2009 H1N1 pandemic. However, reassortments of the 2009 influenza A (H1N1) virus with other swine influenza A viruses have been reported previously in swine. Clinicians who suspect influenza virus infection in humans with recent exposure to swine should obtain a nasopharyngeal swab from the patient for timely diagnosis at a state public health laboratory and consider empiric neuraminidase inhibitor antiviral treatment to quickly limit potential human transmission.

  19. Vaccine efficacy of live-attenuated virus, whole inactivated virus and alphavirus vectored subunit vaccines against antigenically distinct H3N2 swine influenza A viruses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction Influenza A virus (IAV) is an important pathogen in swine, and the main intervention strategy is vaccination to induce neutralizing antibodies against the hemagglutinin (HA). Three major antigenic clusters, cyan, red, and green, were identified among H3N2 viruses circulating in pigs in ...

  20. Outbreak of Influenza A(H3N2) Variant Virus Infections Among Persons Attending Agricultural Fairs Housing Infected Swine - Michigan and Ohio, July-August 2016.

    PubMed

    Schicker, Rebekah S; Rossow, John; Eckel, Seth; Fisher, Nicolas; Bidol, Sally; Tatham, Lilith; Matthews-Greer, Janice; Sohner, Kevin; Bowman, Andrew S; Avrill, James; Forshey, Tony; Blanton, Lenee; Davis, C Todd; Schiltz, John; Skorupski, Susan; Berman, LaShondra; Jang, Yunho; Bresee, Joseph S; Lindstrom, Stephen; Trock, Susan C; Wentworth, David; Fry, Alicia M; de Fijter, Sietske; Signs, Kimberly; DiOrio, Mary; Olsen, Sonja J; Biggerstaff, Matthew

    2016-10-28

    On August 3, 2016, the Ohio Department of Health Laboratory reported to CDC that a respiratory specimen collected on July 28 from a male aged 13 years who attended an agricultural fair in Ohio during July 22-29, 2016, and subsequently developed a respiratory illness, tested positive by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (rRT-PCR) for influenza A(H3N2) variant* (H3N2v). The respiratory specimen was collected as part of routine influenza surveillance activities. The next day, CDC was notified of a child aged 9 years who was a swine exhibitor at an agricultural fair in Michigan who became ill on July 29, 2016, and tested positive for H3N2v virus at the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services Laboratory. Investigations by Michigan and Ohio health authorities identified 18 human infections linked to swine exhibits at agricultural fairs. To minimize transmission of influenza viruses from infected swine to visitors, agricultural fair organizers should consider prevention measures such as shortening the time swine are on the fairgrounds, isolating ill swine, maintaining a veterinarian on call, providing handwashing stations, and prohibiting food and beverages in animal barns. Persons at high risk for influenza-associated complications should be discouraged from entering swine barns.

  1. High genetic and antigenic similarity between a swine H3N2 influenza A virus and a prior human influenza vaccine virus: a possible immune pressure-driven cross-species transmission.

    PubMed

    Pan, Chungen; Wang, Guiping; Liao, Ming; Zhang, Gui-Hong; Jiang, Shibo

    2009-07-31

    In late April of 2009, a global outbreak of human influenza was reported. The causative agent is a highly unusual reassortant H1N1 influenza virus carrying genetic segments derived from swine, human and avian influenza viruses. In this study, we compared the HA, NA and other gene segments of a swine H3N2 influenza A virus, A/Swine/Guangdong/z5/2003, which was isolated from pigs in 2003 in Guangdong Province, China, to the predominant human and swine H3N2 viruses. We found that the similarity of gene segments of A/Swine/Guangdong/z5/2003 was closer to Moscow/99-like human H3N2 virus than Europe swine H3N2 viruses during 1999-2002. These results suggest that A/Swine/Guangdong/z5/2003 may be porcine in origin, possibly being driven by human immune pressure induced by either natural H3N2 virus infection or use of A/Moscow/10/99 (H3N2)-based human influenza vaccine. The results further confirm that swine may play a dual role as a "shelter" for hosting influenza virus from humans or birds and as a "mixing vessel" for generating reassortant influenza viruses, such as the one causing current influenza pandemic.

  2. Genotype patterns of contemporary reassorted H3N2 virus in U.S. swine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To understand the evolution of H3N2v influenza viruses that have infected 288 humans since July 2011, we performed the largest phylogenetic analysis at a whole genome scale of influenza viruses from North American swine to date (n = 200). At least ten distinct reassorted H3N2/pandemic H1N1 (rH3N2p)...

  3. Population susceptibility to a variant swine-origin influenza virus A(H3N2) in Vietnam, 2011-2012.

    PubMed

    Hoa, L N M; Bryant, J E; Choisy, M; Nguyet, L A; Bao, N T; Trang, N H; Chuc, N T K; Toan, T K; Saito, T; Takemae, N; Horby, P; Wertheim, H; Fox, A

    2015-10-01

    A reassortant swine-origin A(H3N2) virus (A/swine/BinhDuong/03-9/2010) was detected through swine surveillance programmes in southern Vietnam in 2010. This virus contains haemagglutinin and neuraminidase genes from a human A(H3N2) virus circulating around 2004-2006, and the internal genes from triple-reassortant swine influenza A viruses (IAVs). To assess population susceptibility to this virus we measured haemagglutination inhibiting (HI) titres to A/swine/BinhDuong/03-9/2010 and to seasonal A/Perth/16/2009 for 947 sera collected from urban and rural Vietnamese people during 2011-2012. Seroprevalence (HI ⩾ 40) was high and similar for both viruses, with 62·6% [95% confidence interval (CI) 59·4-65·7] against A/Perth/16/2009 and 54·6% (95% CI 51·4-57·8%) against A/swine/BinhDuong/03-9/2010, and no significant differences between urban and rural participants. Children aged <5 years lacked antibodies to the swine origin H3 virus despite high seroprevalence for A/Perth/16/2009. These results reveal vulnerability to infection to this contemporary swine IAV in children aged <5 years; however, cross-reactive immunity in adults would likely limit epidemic emergence potential.

  4. Human T-cells directed to seasonal influenza A virus cross-react with 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1) and swine-origin triple-reassortant H3N2 influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Hillaire, Marine L B; Vogelzang-van Trierum, Stella E; Kreijtz, Joost H C M; de Mutsert, Gerrie; Fouchier, Ron A M; Osterhaus, Albert D M E; Rimmelzwaan, Guus F

    2013-03-01

    Virus-specific CD8(+) T-cells contribute to protective immunity against influenza A virus (IAV) infections. As the majority of these cells are directed to conserved viral proteins, they may afford protection against IAVs of various subtypes. The present study assessed the cross-reactivity of human CD8(+) T-lymphocytes, induced by infection with seasonal A (H1N1) or A (H3N2) influenza virus, with 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1) virus [A(H1N1)pdm09] and swine-origin triple-reassortant A (H3N2) [A(H3N2)v] viruses that are currently causing an increasing number of human cases in the USA. It was demonstrated that CD8(+) T-cells induced after seasonal IAV infections exerted lytic activity and produced gamma interferon upon in vitro restimulation with A(H1N1)pdm09 and A(H3N2)v influenza A viruses. Furthermore, CD8(+) T-cells directed to A(H1N1)pdm09 virus displayed a high degree of cross-reactivity with A(H3N2)v viruses. It was concluded that cross-reacting T-cells had the potential to afford protective immunity against A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses during the pandemic and offer some degree of protection against infection with A(H3N2)v viruses.

  5. Comparative analysis of receptor-binding specificity and pathogenicity in natural reassortant and non-reassortant H3N2 swine influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Cong, Yanlong; Sun, Yixue; Wang, Weili; Meng, Qingfeng; Ran, Wei; Zhu, Lisai; Yang, Guilian; Yang, Wentao; Yang, Lihua; Wang, Chunfeng; Ding, Zhuang

    2014-01-10

    Genetic reassortment between human and avian influenza viruses can create pandemic viruses. Influenza surveillance of pigs in Jilin Province, in China during 2007-2008 revealed that there were two distinguishable genotypes: a human-like H3N2 genotype and a double-reassortant genotype derived from the human H3N2 and avian H5 viruses. In this study, viral infection potential, replication kinetics, and pathogenicity were compared. The solid-phase binding assay demonstrated that both viruses prominently maintained a preference for the human-type receptor and the reassortant A/swine/Jilin/37/2008 (Sw/JL/37/08) showed relatively higher binding affinities than the non-reassortant A/swine/Jilin/19/2007 (Sw/JL/19/07). Replication kinetics showed that Sw/JL/37/08 had higher replicability in MDCK cells than Sw/JL/19/07. The mouse experiments clearly revealed that Sw/JL/37/08 had higher virulence than Sw/JL/19/07 as measured by more significant body weight loss, higher viral lung load, delayed viral clearance from lungs, and more severe pulmonary lesions. Sequence analysis indicated that the absence of glycosylation sites at residue 126 of HA and 93 of NA, as well as the characteristic NS1 C-terminal PL residues of ESEV may account for the increased replication and pathogenicity of Sw/JL/37/08. These results may imply that human may have infection risk by the reassortant swine influenza virus and emphasize the necessity for enhanced viral surveillance strategies, which monitor reassortment events in nature to reduce the public health threat posed by influenza viruses with the potential for human-to-human transmission currently circulating in pig populations.

  6. Antigenic variation of H1N1, H1N2 and H3N2 swine influenza viruses in Japan and Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Takemae, Nobuhiro; Nguyen, Tung; Ngo, Long Thanh; Hiromoto, Yasuaki; Uchida, Yuko; Pham, Vu Phong; Kageyama, Tsutomu; Kasuo, Shizuko; Shimada, Shinichi; Yamashita, Yasutaka; Goto, Kaoru; Kubo, Hideyuki; Le, Vu Tri; Van Vo, Hung; Do, Hoa Thi; Nguyen, Dang Hoang; Hayashi, Tsuyoshi; Matsuu, Aya; Saito, Takehiko

    2013-04-01

    The antigenicity of the influenza A virus hemagglutinin is responsible for vaccine efficacy in protecting pigs against swine influenza virus (SIV) infection. However, the antigenicity of SIV strains currently circulating in Japan and Vietnam has not been well characterized. We examined the antigenicity of classical H1 SIVs, pandemic A(H1N1)2009 (A(H1N1)pdm09) viruses, and seasonal human-lineage SIVs isolated in Japan and Vietnam. A hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay was used to determine antigenic differences that differentiate the recent Japanese H1N2 and H3N2 SIVs from the H1N1 and H3N2 domestic vaccine strains. Minor antigenic variation between pig A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses was evident by HI assay using 13 mAbs raised against homologous virus. A Vietnamese H1N2 SIV, whose H1 gene originated from a human strain in the mid-2000s, reacted poorly with post-infection ferret serum against human vaccine strains from 2000-2010. These results provide useful information for selection of optimal strains for SIV vaccine production.

  7. Novel reassortant human-like H3N2 and H3N1 influenza A viruses detected in pigs are virulent and antigenically distinct from swine viruses endemic to the United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Since November of 2012, human-like swine H3 influenza A viruses have been detected by the USDA surveillance system. Here, we genetically and antigenically characterized two of the novel swine human-like H3N2 and H3N1 viruses detected in the same herd but two years apart. Their pathogenicity and tran...

  8. Vaccination with NS1-truncated H3N2 swine influenza virus primes T cells and confers cross-protection against an H1N1 heterosubtypic challenge in pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The diversity of contemporary swine influenza virus (SIV) strains impedes effective immunization of swine herds. Mucosally delivered, attenuated virus vaccines are one approach with potential to provide broad cross-protection. Reverse genetics-derived H3N2 SIV virus with truncated NS1 (NS1delta126 T...

  9. Divergent immune responses and disease outcomes in piglets immunized with inactivated and attenuated H3N2 swine influenza vaccines in the presence of maternally-derived antibodies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vaccine-associated enhanced respiratory disease (VAERD) can occur in pigs given whole-inactivated virus (WIV) influenza vaccine upon infection with an antigenically divergent virus. VAERD was first characterized with H1 viruses, and later described in pigs vaccinated with H3N2 WIV and challenged wit...

  10. Recognition of influenza H3N2 variant virus by human neutralizing antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Bangaru, Sandhya; Nieusma, Travis; Kose, Nurgun; Thornburg, Natalie J.; Kaplan, Bryan S.; King, Hannah G.; Singh, Vidisha; Lampley, Rebecca M.; Cisneros, Alberto; Edwards, Kathryn M.; Edupuganti, Srilatha; Lai, Lilin; Richt, Juergen A.; Webby, Richard J.; Ward, Andrew B.; Crowe, James E.

    2016-01-01

    Since 2011, over 300 human cases of infection, especially in exposed children, with the influenza A H3N2 variant (H3N2v) virus that circulates in swine in the US have been reported. The structural and genetic basis for the lack of protection against H3N2v induced by vaccines containing seasonal H3N2 antigens is poorly understood. We isolated 17 human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that neutralized H3N2v virus from subjects experimentally immunized with an H3N2v candidate vaccine. Six mAbs exhibited very potent neutralizing activity (IC50 < 200 ng/ml) against the H3N2v virus but not against current human H3N2 circulating strains. Fine epitope mapping and structural characterization of antigen-antibody complexes revealed that H3N2v specificity was attributable to amino acid polymorphisms in the 150-loop and the 190-helix antigenic sites on the hemagglutinin protein. H3N2v-specific antibodies also neutralized human H3N2 influenza strains naturally circulating between 1995 and 2005. These results reveal a high level of antigenic relatedness between the swine H3N2v virus and previously circulating human strains, consistent with the fact that early human H3 seasonal strains entered the porcine population in the 1990s and reentered the human population, where they had not been circulating, as H3N2v about a decade later. The data also explain the increased susceptibility to H3N2v viruses in young children, who lack prior exposure to human seasonal strains from the 1990s. PMID:27482543

  11. Antigenic Detection of Human Strain of Influenza Virus A (H3N2) in Swine Populations at Three Locations in Nigeria and Ghana during the Dry Early Months of 2014.

    PubMed

    Adeola, O A; Olugasa, B O; Emikpe, B O

    2016-03-01

    Since the first detection of human H3N2 influenza virus in Taiwanese pigs in 1970, infection of pigs with wholly human viruses has been known to occur in other parts of the world. These viruses, referred to as human-like H3N2 viruses, have been known to cause clinical and subclinical infections of swine populations. Due to the paucity and complete unavailability of information on transmission of influenza viruses from other species, especially humans, to swine in Nigeria and Ghana, respectively, this study was designed to investigate the presence and prevalence of a human strain of influenza A (H3N2) in swine populations at three locations in two cities within these two West African countries in January and February, 2014. Using stratified random technique, nasal swab specimens were collected from seventy-five (75) pigs at two locations in Ibadan, Nigeria and from fifty (50) pigs in Kumasi, Ghana. These specimens were tested directly by a sensitive Quantitative Solid Phase Antigen-detection Sandwich ELISA using anti-A/Brisbane/10/2007 haemagglutinin monoclonal antibody. Influenza virus A/Brisbane/10/2007 (H3N2) was detected among pigs at the three study locations, with an aggregate prevalence of 4.0% for the two locations in Ibadan, Nigeria and also 4.0% for Kumasi, Ghana. Transmission of influenza viruses from other species to swine portends serious sinister prospects for genetic reassortment and evolvement of novel viruses. We therefore recommend that further studies should be carried out to investigate the presence of other circulating human and avian influenza viruses in swine populations in West Africa and also determine the extent of genetic reassortment of strains circulating among these pigs. This would provide an early warning system for detection of novel influenza viruses, which could have pandemic potentials.

  12. Substitutions near the hemagglutinin receptor-binding site determine the antigenic evolution of influenza A H3N2 viruses in U.S. swine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Swine influenza A virus is an endemic and economically important pathogen in pigs with the zoonotic potential to infect other host species. The hemagglutinin (HA) protein is the primary target of protective immune responses and the major component in swine influenza A vaccines. However, as a result ...

  13. Viral Reassortment and Transmission after Coinfection of Pigs with Classical H1N1 and Triple Reassortant H3N2 Swine Influenza Viruses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Triple reassortant swine influenza viruses circulating in North American pigs contain the internal genes derived from swine (NP, M, NS), human (PB1) and avian (PA and PB2) influenza viruses forming a constellation of genes that is well conserved and called the triple reassortant internal gene (TRIG)...

  14. Protection of guinea pigs by vaccination with a recombinant swinepox virus co-expressing HA1 genes of swine H1N1 and H3N2 influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jiarong; Yang, Deji; Huang, Dongyan; Xu, Jiaping; Liu, Shichao; Lin, Huixing; Zhu, Haodan; Liu, Bao; Lu, Chengping

    2013-03-01

    Swine influenza (SI) is an acute respiratory infectious disease of swine caused by swine influenza virus (SIV). SIV is not only an important respiratory pathogen in pigs but also a potent threat to human health. Here, we report the construction of a recombinant swinepox virus (rSPV/H3-2A-H1) co-expressing hemagglutinin (HA1) of SIV subtypes H1N1 and H3N2. Immune responses and protection efficacy of the rSPV/H3-2A-H1 were evaluated in guinea pigs. Inoculation of rSPV/H3-2A-H1 yielded neutralizing antibodies against SIV H1N1 and H3N2. The IFN-γ and IL-4 concentrations in the supernatant of lymphocytes stimulated with purified SIV HA1 antigen were significantly higher (P < 0.01) than those of the control groups. Complete protection of guinea pigs against SIV H1N1 or H3N2 challenge was observed. No SIV shedding was detected from guinea pigs vaccinated with rSPV/H3-2A-H1 after challenge. Most importantly, the guinea pigs immunized with rSPV/H3-2A-H1 did not show gross and micrographic lung lesions. However, the control guinea pigs experienced distinct gross and micrographic lung lesions at 7 days post-challenge. Our data suggest that the recombinant swinepox virus encoding HA1 of SIV H1N1 and H3N2 might serve as a promising candidate vaccine for protection against SIV H1N1 and H3N2 infections.

  15. Genotype patterns of contemporary reassorted H3N2 virus in US swine.

    PubMed

    Kitikoon, Pravina; Nelson, Martha I; Killian, Mary Lea; Anderson, Tavis K; Koster, Leo; Culhane, Marie R; Vincent, Amy L

    2013-06-01

    To understand the evolution of swine-origin H3N2v influenza viruses that have infected 320 humans in the USA since August 2011, we performed a phylogenetic analysis at a whole genome scale of North American swine influenza viruses (n = 200). All viral isolates evolved from the prototypical North American H3 cluster 4 (c4), with evidence for further diversification into subclusters. At least ten distinct reassorted H3N2/pandemic H1N1 (rH3N2p) genotypes were identified in swine. Genotype 1 (G1) was most frequently detected in swine and all human H3N2v viruses clustered within a single G1 clade. These data suggest that the genetic requirements for transmission to humans may be restricted to a specific subset of swine viruses. Mutations at putative antigenic sites as well as reduced serological cross-reactivity among the H3 subclusters suggest antigenic drift of these contemporary viruses.

  16. Vaccination-challenge studies with a Port Chalmers/73 (H3N2)-based swine influenza virus vaccine: Reflections on vaccine strain updates and on the vaccine potency test.

    PubMed

    De Vleeschauwer, Annebel; Qiu, Yu; Van Reeth, Kristien

    2015-05-11

    The human A/Port Chalmers/1/73 (H3N2) influenza virus strain, the supposed ancestor of European H3N2 swine influenza viruses (SIVs), was used in most commercial SIV vaccines in Europe until recently. If manufacturers want to update vaccine strains, they have to perform laborious intratracheal (IT) challenge experiments and demonstrate reduced virus titres in the lungs of vaccinated pigs. We aimed to examine (a) the ability of a Port Chalmers/73-based commercial vaccine to induce cross-protection against a contemporary European H3N2 SIV and serologic cross-reaction against H3N2 SIVs from Europe and North America and (b) the validity of intranasal (IN) challenge and virus titrations of nasal swabs as alternatives for IT challenge and titrations of lung tissue in vaccine potency tests. Pigs were vaccinated with Suvaxyn Flu(®) and challenged by the IT or IN route with sw/Gent/172/08. Post-vaccination sera were examined in haemagglutination-inhibition assays against vaccine and challenge strains and additional H3N2 SIVs from Europe and North America, including an H3N2 variant virus. Tissues of the respiratory tract and nasal swabs were collected 3 days post challenge (DPCh) and from 0-7 DPCh, respectively, and examined by virus titration. Two vaccinations consistently induced cross-reactive antibodies against European H3N2 SIVs from 1998-2012, but minimal or undetectable antibody titres against North American viruses. Challenge virus titres in the lungs, trachea and nasal mucosa of the vaccinated pigs were significantly reduced after both IT and IN challenge. Yet the reduction of virus titres and nasal shedding was greater after IT challenge. The Port Chalmers/73-based vaccine still offered protection against a European H3N2 SIV isolated 35 years later and with only 86.9% amino acid homology in its HA1, but it is unlikely to protect against H3N2 SIVs that are endemic in North America. We use our data to reflect on vaccine strain updates and on the vaccine potency test.

  17. Human Infections with Novel Reassortant Influenza A(H3N2)v Viruses, United States, 2011

    PubMed Central

    Lindstrom, Stephen; Garten, Rebecca; Balish, Amanda; Shu, Bo; Emery, Shannon; Berman, LaShondra; Barnes, Nathelia; Sleeman, Katrina; Gubareva, Larisa; Villanueva, Julie

    2012-01-01

    During July–December 2011, a variant virus, influenza A(H3N2)v, caused 12 human cases of influenza. The virus contained genes originating from swine, avian, and human viruses, including the M gene from influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus. Influenza A(H3N2)v viruses were antigenically distinct from seasonal influenza viruses and similar to proposed vaccine virus A/Minnesota/11/2010. PMID:22516540

  18. Experimental infection of European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris) and house sparrows (Passer domesticus) with pandemic 2009 H1N1 and swine H1N1 and H3N2 triple reassortant influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Nemeth, Nicole M; Oesterle, Paul T; Poulson, Rebecca L; Jones, Cheryl A; Tompkins, S Mark; Brown, Justin D; Stallknecht, David E

    2013-04-01

    European Starlings (Sturnus vulgaris) and House Sparrows (Passer domesticus) are common peridomestic passerine birds that are often associated with domestic animal production facilities. This association provides a potential means for pathogen transmission between facilities. We inoculated European Starlings and House Sparrows with three non-avian influenza virus strains: two swine isolates (H1N1 and H3N2) and one human isolate representing the H1N1 pandemic strain that originated from swine. No viral shedding was observed in House Sparrows, and shedding was minimal and transient in two of 12 (17%) European Starlings. One of these two infected Starlings seroconverted 14 days after inoculation. These results suggest that these two passerine species are minimally susceptible to current influenza viruses in domestic pigs and therefore pose a negligible risk for transmission between or within swine production facilities.

  19. Reassortment between Swine H3N2 and 2009 Pandemic H1N1 in the United States Resulted in Influenza A Viruses with Diverse Genetic Constellations with Variable Virulence in Pigs.

    PubMed

    Rajão, Daniela S; Walia, Rasna R; Campbell, Brian; Gauger, Phillip C; Janas-Martindale, Alicia; Killian, Mary Lea; Vincent, Amy L

    2017-02-15

    Repeated spillovers of the H1N1 pandemic virus (H1N1pdm09) from humans to pigs resulted in substantial evolution of influenza A viruses infecting swine, contributing to the genetic and antigenic diversity of influenza A viruses (IAV) currently circulating in swine. The reassortment with endemic swine viruses and maintenance of some of the H1N1pdm09 internal genes resulted in the circulation of different genomic constellations in pigs. Here, we performed a whole-genome phylogenetic analysis of 368 IAV circulating in swine from 2009 to 2016 in the United States. We identified 44 different genotypes, with the most common genotype (32.33%) containing a clade IV-A HA gene, a 2002-lineage NA gene, an M-pdm09 gene, and remaining gene segments of triple reassortant internal gene (TRIG) origin. To understand how different genetic constellations may relate to viral fitness, we compared the pathogenesis and transmission in pigs of six representative genotypes. Although all six genotypes efficiently infected pigs, they resulted in different degrees of pathology and viral shedding. These results highlight the vast H3N2 genetic diversity circulating in U.S. swine after 2009. This diversity has important implications in the control of this disease by the swine industry, as well as a potential risk for public health if swine-adapted viruses with H1N1pdm09 genes have an increased risk to humans, as occurred in the 2011-2012 and 2016 human variant H3N2v cases associated with exhibition swine.

  20. Comparison of the efficacies of amantadine treatment of swine-origin influenza virus A H1N1 and seasonal influenza H1N1 and H3N2 in Japan (2008-2009).

    PubMed

    Miyachi, Kiyomitsu; Watanabe, Atushi; Iida, Hiromasa; Hattori, Haruki; Ukai, Hiroshi; Takano, Tsuruyo; Hankins, Raleigh W

    2011-08-01

    Amantadine is not thought to be effective for the treatment of swine-origin influenza virus (S-OIV) based on an analysis of genetic sequences of the M2 protein. However, the actual clinical efficacy of amantadine has not been well documented. Here, we were able to compare the efficacies of amantadine and neuraminidase inhibitors. Subjects consisted of 428 patients, including 144 with seasonal influenza (flu) identified between 2008 and 2009, and 284 with S-OIV identified between July 1 and November 30, 2009. Diagnosis of flu was established using a rapid diagnostic kit obtained commercially in Japan. Body temperature sheets were obtained from 95% of the S-OIV patients. Times required to recover normal body temperature were compared among subjects using different antiviral drugs. Genetic abnormalities in the M2 protein were also investigated in 66 randomly selected subjects from within the patient pool. Overall, the average hours required to recover normal body temperature in S-OIV patients treated with amantadine (160 cases), with oseltamivir (59 cases), or with zanamivir (65 cases) were 33.9 ± 20.7, 31.7 ± 16.0, or 36.3 ± 21.6, respectively. These differences were not statistically significant. The N31S abnormality was found in all 14 samples taken from the H3N2 patients and in all of the 23 samples taken from in S-OIV patients. However, this abnormality was not found in any of the 30 samples taken from seasonal H1N1 patients. Amantadine was found to be equally effective in treating S-OIV patients as neuraminidase inhibitors. The genetic abnormality resulting in S31N amino acid conversion identified in some of the H3N2 and S-OIV patients is thought to alter the function of M2 protein only mildly.

  1. The repeated introduction of the H3N2 virus from human to swine during 1979-1993 in China.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wenfei; Yang, Shuai; Dong, Libo; Yang, Lei; Tang, Jing; Zou, Xiaohui; Chen, Tao; Yang, Jing; Shu, Yuelong

    2015-07-01

    Limited data are available regarding the swine influenza viruses (SIVs) that circulated in Mainland China prior to the 1990s. Eleven H3N2 virus strains were isolated from swine populations from 1979 to 1992. To determine the origin and tendency of these SIVs, the phylogenetic and antigenic properties of these viruses were analyzed based on the whole genome sequenced and the HI titrations with post-infection ferret antisera against influenza A (H3N2) virus isolates of swine and human origin. The results revealed that these 11 SIVs originated from humans and were not maintained in swine populations, indicating the interspecies transmission from humans to pigs occurred frequently and independently throughout these periods. However, human H3N2 viruses might not have the ability to circulate in pig herds.

  2. Divergent immune responses and disease outcomes in piglets immunized with inactivated and attenuated H3N2 swine influenza vaccines in the presence of maternally-derived antibodies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vaccine-associated enhanced respiratory disease (VAERD) can occur in pigs immunized with whole-inactivated influenza virus (WIV) vaccine and subsequently infected with an antigenically divergent virus of the same HA subtype. Live-attenuated influenza virus (LAIV) vaccines administered intranasally h...

  3. A live-attenuated influenza vaccine for H3N2 canine influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Laura; Nogales, Aitor; Reilly, Emma C; Topham, David J; Murcia, Pablo R; Parrish, Colin R; Martinez Sobrido, Luis

    2017-04-01

    Canine influenza is a contagious respiratory disease in dogs caused by two subtypes (H3N2 and H3N8) of canine influenza virus (CIV). Currently, only inactivated influenza vaccines (IIVs) are available for the prevention of CIVs. Historically, live-attenuated influenza vaccines (LAIVs) have been shown to produce better immunogenicity and protection efficacy than IIVs. Here, we have engineered a CIV H3N2 LAIV by using the internal genes of a previously described CIV H3N8 LAIV as a master donor virus (MDV) and the surface HA and NA genes of a circulating CIV H3N2 strain. Our findings show that CIV H3N2 LAIV replicates efficiently at low temperature but its replication is impaired at higher temperatures. The CIV H3N2 LAIV was attenuated in vivo but induced better protection efficacy in mice against challenge with wild-type CIV H3N2 than a commercial CIV H3N2 IIV. This is the first description of a LAIV for the prevention of CIV H3N2 in dogs.

  4. Increased diversity of H3N2 influenza virus in pigs in the United States and implications for pigs and humans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In 2011-2012 at least 320 human cases of H3N2 (H3N2v) viruses closely related to swine influenza A viruses (IAV) were detected in the United States. We performed phylogenetic analysis of 200 whole genome sequences of North American swine IAV to identify reassortment events and compare these novel ge...

  5. Comparison of inactivated H3 avian influenza vaccines to protect turkey hens against egg production losses following challenge with a recent H3N2 field isolate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recently, triple reassortant H3N2 subtype avian influenza (AI) viruses containing gene segments of avian, swine, and human origin appeared in both swine and turkey populations in the U.S. These H3N2 viruses appear to be responsible for significant turkey production losses, primarily in Minnesota an...

  6. Environmental Conditions Affect Exhalation of H3N2 Seasonal and Variant Influenza Viruses and Respiratory Droplet Transmission in Ferrets

    PubMed Central

    Gustin, Kortney M.; Belser, Jessica A.; Veguilla, Vic; Zeng, Hui; Katz, Jacqueline M.; Tumpey, Terrence M.; Maines, Taronna R.

    2015-01-01

    The seasonality of influenza virus infections in temperate climates and the role of environmental conditions like temperature and humidity in the transmission of influenza virus through the air are not well understood. Using ferrets housed at four different environmental conditions, we evaluated the respiratory droplet transmission of two influenza viruses (a seasonal H3N2 virus and an H3N2 variant virus, the etiologic virus of a swine to human summertime infection) and concurrently characterized the aerosol shedding profiles of infected animals. Comparisons were made among the different temperature and humidity conditions and between the two viruses to determine if the H3N2 variant virus exhibited enhanced capabilities that may have contributed to the infections occurring in the summer. We report here that although increased levels of H3N2 variant virus were found in ferret nasal wash and exhaled aerosol samples compared to the seasonal H3N2 virus, enhanced respiratory droplet transmission was not observed under any of the environmental settings. However, overall environmental conditions were shown to modulate the frequency of influenza virus transmission through the air. Transmission occurred most frequently at 23°C/30%RH, while the levels of infectious virus in aerosols exhaled by infected ferrets agree with these results. Improving our understanding of how environmental conditions affect influenza virus infectivity and transmission may reveal ways to better protect the public against influenza virus infections. PMID:25969995

  7. Reassortment between swine H3N2 and 2009 pandemic H1N1 generated diverse genetic constellations in influenza A viruses currently circulating in pigs in the United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction Influenza A virus (IAV) is a significant pathogen to the swine industry. Since its introduction in 2009, the H1N1 pandemic virus (H1N1pdm09) has been repeatedly transmitted from humans to swine, but onward transmission in U.S. swine was mostly restricted to its internal genes. Reassortm...

  8. Isolation of the pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus and its reassortant with an H3N2 swine influenza virus from healthy weaning pigs in Thailand in 2011.

    PubMed

    Hiromoto, Yasuaki; Parchariyanon, Sujira; Ketusing, Naree; Netrabukkana, Punnaporn; Hayashi, Tsuyoshi; Kobayashi, Tomoko; Takemae, Nobuhiro; Saito, Takehiko

    2012-10-01

    A total of 300 nasal swabs were collected from 5 pig farms in two provinces in the Eastern part of Thailand in February 2011 and were subjected to viral isolation of influenza A viruses. Two H3N2 and 6 H1N1 influenza A viruses were isolated from swabs collected from clinically healthy weaning pigs on farms in Chonburi and Chachoengsao provinces, respectively. The H3N2 isolates consisted of the hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) genes closely related to Thai SIVs and derived from a cluster of human seasonal H3N2 strains circulating around 1996-1997. The remaining gene segments of the isolates originated from the Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 (A (H1N1) pdm09) virus. Antigenicity of the H3N2 isolates was distinguishable from a human seasonal vaccine strain in the 1996-1998 seasons that represented antigenicity of the seasonal strains around 1996-1998. Nasal swabs from a Chachoengsao farm yielded A (H1N1) pdm09 viruses in chicken embryonated eggs and MDCK cells. A (H1N1) pdm09 viruses isolated in this study grew poorly in MDCK cells. Deduced amino acid sequences of the HA1 region of the HA protein of egg isolated viruses were identical to the sequences directly amplified from original swab samples. Our result demonstrated that the A (H1N1) pdm09 virus has been established in the Thai pig population and this has resulted in genetic reassortment with Thai SIV that previously circulated among pigs.

  9. Ineffectiveness of the 2014-2015 H3N2 influenza vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Mandelboim, Michal; Glatman-Freedman, Aharona; Drori, Yaron; Sherbany, Hilda; Pando, Rakefet; Sefty, Hanna; Zadka, Hila; Shohat, Tamar; Keller, Nathan; Mendelson, Ella

    2016-01-01

    The seasonal influenza vaccine is currently the most effective preventive modality against influenza infection. Nasopharyngeal samples of vaccinated and non-vaccinated patients presenting with Influenza-like-illness (ILI) were collected from over 20 outpatient clinics located in different geographic parts of Israel and were tested for the presence of influenza viruses (influenza A and influenza B). Here we show, that in the 2014-2015 season, the vaccine that included the A/Texas/50/2012 H3N2 virus was ineffective. Significant numbers of individuals vaccinated with the 2014-2015 vaccine, of all ages, were infected with influenza A (H3N2), manifesting similar symptoms as the non-vaccinated group. We further demonstrate that the Israeli circulating influenza A(H3N2) virus was different than that included in the 2014-2015 northern hemisphere vaccine, and that antibodies elicited by this vaccine were significantly less efficient in neutralizing influenza A(H3N2) infection. PMID:26716420

  10. Amino Acids in Hemagglutinin Antigenic Site B Determine Antigenic and Receptor Binding Differences between A(H3N2)v and Ancestral Seasonal H3N2 Influenza Viruses.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoquan; Ilyushina, Natalia A; Lugovtsev, Vladimir Y; Bovin, Nicolai V; Couzens, Laura K; Gao, Jin; Donnelly, Raymond P; Eichelberger, Maryna C; Wan, Hongquan

    2017-01-15

    Influenza A H3N2 variant [A(H3N2)v] viruses, which have caused human infections in the United States in recent years, originated from human seasonal H3N2 viruses that were introduced into North American swine in the mid-1990s, but they are antigenically distinct from both the ancestral and current circulating H3N2 strains. A reference A(H3N2)v virus, A/Minnesota/11/2010 (MN/10), and a seasonal H3N2 strain, A/Beijing/32/1992 (BJ/92), were chosen to determine the molecular basis for the antigenic difference between A(H3N2)v and the ancestral viruses. Viruses containing wild-type and mutant MN/10 or BJ/92 hemagglutinins (HAs) were constructed and probed for reactivity with ferret antisera against MN/10 and BJ/92 in hemagglutination inhibition assays. Among the amino acids that differ between the MN/10 and BJ/92 HAs, those in antigenic site A had little impact on the antigenic phenotype. Within antigenic site B, mutations at residues 156, 158, 189, and 193 of MN/10 HA to those in BJ/92 switched the MN/10 antigenic phenotype to that of BJ/92. Mutations at residues 156, 157, 158, 189, and 193 of BJ/92 HA to amino acids present in MN/10 were necessary for BJ/92 to become antigenically similar to MN/10. The HA amino acid substitutions responsible for switching the antigenic phenotype also impacted HA binding to sialyl receptors that are usually present in the human respiratory tract. Our study demonstrates that antigenic site B residues play a critical role in determining both the unique antigenic phenotype and receptor specificity of A(H3N2)v viruses, a finding that may facilitate future surveillance and risk assessment of novel influenza viruses.

  11. Transmission of avian influenza virus (H3N2) to dogs.

    PubMed

    Song, Daesub; Kang, Bokyu; Lee, Chulseung; Jung, Kwonil; Ha, Gunwoo; Kang, Dongseok; Park, Seongjun; Park, Bongkyun; Oh, Jinsik

    2008-05-01

    In South Korea, where avian influenza virus subtypes H3N2, H5N1, H6N1, and H9N2 circulate or have been detected, 3 genetically similar canine influenza virus (H3N2) strains of avian origin (A/canine/Korea/01/2007, A/canine/Korea/02/2007, and A/canine/Korea/03/2007) were isolated from dogs exhibiting severe respiratory disease. To determine whether the novel canine influenza virus of avian origin was transmitted among dogs, we experimentally infected beagles with this influenza virus (H3N2) isolate. The beagles shed virus through nasal excretion, seroconverted, and became ill with severe necrotizing tracheobronchitis and bronchioalveolitis with accompanying clinical signs (e.g., high fever). Consistent with histologic observation of lung lesions, large amounts of avian influenza virus binding receptor (SAalpha 2,3-gal) were identified in canine tracheal, bronchial, and bronchiolar epithelial cells, which suggests potential for direct transmission of avian influenza virus (H3N2) from poultry to dogs. Our data provide evidence that dogs may play a role in interspecies transmission and spread of influenza virus.

  12. Influenza A(H3N2) outbreak at Transit Center at Manas, Kyrgyzstan, 2014.

    PubMed

    Parms, Tiffany A; Zorich, Shauna C; Kramer, Karen P

    2015-01-01

    In February 2014, the U.S. Air Force School of Aerospace Medicine Epidemiology Consult Service provided support in response to a moderate outbreak of influenza at the Transit Center at Manas (Kyrgyzstan). A total of 215 individuals presented with influenza-like illness symptoms from 3 December 2013 through 28 February 2014. There were 85 specimens positive for influenza (18 influenza A(H1N1)pdm09, 65 influenza A(H3N2), one influenza A/not subtyped, and one influenza B); six specimens were positive for other respiratory viruses (one human metapneumovirus, two parainfluenza, and three rhinovirus/enterovirus) and eight specimens were negative. Twenty-two of the specimens that were positive for influenza were sequenced and were not remarkably different from the strains seen during routine surveillance for the 2013-2014 season or from specimens collected at other deployed sites.

  13. Human infections with influenza A(H3N2) variant virus in the United States, 2011-2012

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    BACKGROUND. During August 2011-April 2012, 13 human infections with influenza A(H3N2) variant (H3N2v) virus were identified in the United States; 8 occurred in the prior 2 years. This virus differs from previous variant influenza viruses in that it contains the matrix (M) gene from the Influenza A(H...

  14. Phylogeography of Influenza A(H3N2) Virus in Peru, 2010-2012.

    PubMed

    Pollett, Simon; Nelson, Martha I; Kasper, Matthew; Tinoco, Yeny; Simons, Mark; Romero, Candice; Silva, Marita; Lin, Xudong; Halpin, Rebecca A; Fedorova, Nadia; Stockwell, Timothy B; Wentworth, David; Holmes, Edward C; Bausch, Daniel G

    2015-08-01

    It remains unclear whether lineages of influenza A(H3N2) virus can persist in the tropics and seed temperate areas. We used viral gene sequence data sampled from Peru to test this source-sink model for a Latin American country. Viruses were obtained during 2010-2012 from influenza surveillance cohorts in Cusco, Tumbes, Puerto Maldonado, and Lima. Specimens positive for influenza A(H3N2) virus were randomly selected and underwent hemagglutinin sequencing and phylogeographic analyses. Analysis of 389 hemagglutinin sequences from Peru and 2,192 global sequences demonstrated interseasonal extinction of Peruvian lineages. Extensive mixing occurred with global clades, but some spatial structure was observed at all sites; this structure was weakest in Lima and Puerto Maldonado, indicating that these locations may experience greater viral traffic. The broad diversity and co-circulation of many simultaneous lineages of H3N2 virus in Peru suggests that this country should not be overlooked as a potential source for novel pandemic strains.

  15. Phylogeography of Influenza A(H3N2) Virus in Peru, 2010–2012

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Martha I.; Kasper, Matthew; Tinoco, Yeny; Simons, Mark; Romero, Candice; Silva, Marita; Lin, Xudong; Halpin, Rebecca A.; Fedorova, Nadia; Stockwell, Timothy B.; Wentworth, David; Holmes, Edward C.; Bausch, Daniel G.

    2015-01-01

    It remains unclear whether lineages of influenza A(H3N2) virus can persist in the tropics and seed temperate areas. We used viral gene sequence data sampled from Peru to test this source–sink model for a Latin American country. Viruses were obtained during 2010–2012 from influenza surveillance cohorts in Cusco, Tumbes, Puerto Maldonado, and Lima. Specimens positive for influenza A(H3N2) virus were randomly selected and underwent hemagglutinin sequencing and phylogeographic analyses. Analysis of 389 hemagglutinin sequences from Peru and 2,192 global sequences demonstrated interseasonal extinction of Peruvian lineages. Extensive mixing occurred with global clades, but some spatial structure was observed at all sites; this structure was weakest in Lima and Puerto Maldonado, indicating that these locations may experience greater viral traffic. The broad diversity and co-circulation of many simultaneous lineages of H3N2 virus in Peru suggests that this country should not be overlooked as a potential source for novel pandemic strains. PMID:26196599

  16. Detection of H3N2 canine influenza virus using a Quartz Crystal Microbalance.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong Kwan; Lim, Seong-In; Cho, Yoon-Young; Choi, Sarah; Song, Jae-Young; An, Dong-Jun

    2014-11-01

    Label-free technology-based Quartz Crystal Microbalance (QCM) is an emerging tool in biological research. In this study, QCM was applied successfully for the rapid diagnosis of H3N2 canine influenza virus (CIV) infection. ProLinker™ B, a calixcrown derivative, enables antibodies to be attached to a gold-coated quartz surface and positioned in a regular pattern with the correct orientation. The ProLinker-coated quartz-based assay detected H3N2 CIV at lower concentrations (2(2) HA unit) than a commercial immunochromatography Ag kit (2(3) HA unit). Three independent experiments in which H3N2 CIV-positive reference samples were applied to an anti-CIV nucleoprotein (NP) monoclonal antibody immobilized on a quartz surface yielded standard deviations (SD) of ≤5%, indicating high reproducibility. In addition, the QCM assay with a cut-off value (-140 Hz) showed 97.1% (34/35) sensitivity and 94.7% (36/38) specificity in testing 73 field saliva samples, respectively. Thus, the QCM assay described herein will be a valuable tool for the rapid diagnosis of H3N2 CIV infection with high sensitivity and specificity, and should overcome several of the disadvantages and limitations inherent in the commercial immunochromatography Ag kit.

  17. Explaining the geographical origins of seasonal influenza A (H3N2)

    PubMed Central

    Bedford, Trevor; Cobey, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Most antigenically novel and evolutionarily successful strains of seasonal influenza A (H3N2) originate in East, South and Southeast Asia. To understand this pattern, we simulated the ecological and evolutionary dynamics of influenza in a host metapopulation representing the temperate north, tropics and temperate south. Although seasonality and air traffic are frequently used to explain global migratory patterns of influenza, we find that other factors may have a comparable or greater impact. Notably, a region's basic reproductive number (R0) strongly affects the antigenic evolution of its viral population and the probability that its strains will spread and fix globally: a 17–28% higher R0 in one region can explain the observed patterns. Seasonality, in contrast, increases the probability that a tropical (less seasonal) population will export evolutionarily successful strains but alone does not predict that these strains will be antigenically advanced. The relative sizes of different host populations, their birth and death rates, and the region in which H3N2 first appears affect influenza's phylogeography in different but relatively minor ways. These results suggest general principles that dictate the spatial dynamics of antigenically evolving pathogens and offer predictions for how changes in human ecology might affect influenza evolution. PMID:27629034

  18. Selecting vaccine strains for H3N2 human influenza A virus.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yoshiyuki

    2015-06-01

    H3N2 human influenza A virus causes epidemics of influenza mainly in the winter season in temperate regions. Since the antigenicity of this virus evolves rapidly, several attempts have been made to predict the major amino acid sequence of hemagglutinin 1 (HA1) in the target season of vaccination. However, the usefulness of predicted sequence was unclear because its relationship to the antigenicity was unknown. Here the antigenic model for estimating the degree of antigenic difference (antigenic distance) between amino acid sequences of HA1 was integrated into the process of selecting vaccine strains for H3N2 human influenza A virus. When the effectiveness of a potential vaccine strain for a target season was evaluated retrospectively using the average antigenic distance between the strain and the epidemic viruses sampled in the target season, the most effective vaccine strain was identified mostly in the season one year before the target season (pre-target season). Effectiveness of actual vaccines appeared to be lower than that of the strains randomly chosen in the pre-target season on average. It was recommended to replace the vaccine strain for every target season with the strain having the smallest average antigenic distance to the others in the pre-target season. The procedure of selecting vaccine strains for future epidemic seasons described in the present study was implemented in the influenza virus forecasting system (INFLUCAST) (http://www.nsc.nagoya-cu.ac.jp/~yossuzuk/influcast.html).

  19. Predicting Fixation Tendencies of the H3N2 Influenza Virus by Free Energy Calculation

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Keyao; Deem, Michael W.

    2011-01-01

    Influenza virus evolves to escape from immune system antibodies that bind to it. We used free energy calculations with Einstein crystals as reference states to calculate the difference of antibody binding free energy (ΔΔG) induced by amino acid substitution at each position in epitope B of the H3N2 influenza hemagglutinin, the key target for antibody. A substitution with positive ΔΔG value decreases the antibody binding constant. On average an uncharged to charged amino acid substitution generates the highest ΔΔG values. Also on average, substitutions between small amino acids generate ΔΔG values near to zero. The 21 sites in epitope B have varying expected free energy differences for a random substitution. Historical amino acid substitutions in epitope B for the A/Aichi/2/1968 strain of influenza A show that most fixed and temporarily circulating substitutions generate positive ΔΔG values. We propose that the observed pattern of H3N2 virus evolution is affected by the free energy landscape, the mapping from the free energy landscape to virus fitness landscape, and random genetic drift of the virus. Monte Carlo simulations of virus evolution are presented to support this view. PMID:21691431

  20. Molecular epidemiology of influenza A/H3N2 viruses circulating in Mexico from 2003 to 2012.

    PubMed

    Escalera-Zamudio, Marina; Nelson, Martha I; Cobián Güemes, Ana Georgina; López-Martínez, Irma; Cruz-Ortiz, Natividad; Iguala-Vidales, Miguel; García, Elvia Rodríguez; Barrera-Badillo, Gisela; Díaz-Quiñonez, Jose Alberto; López, Susana; Arias, Carlos F; Isa, Pavel

    2014-01-01

    In this work, nineteen influenza A/H3N2 viruses isolated in Mexico between 2003 and 2012 were studied. Our findings show that different human A/H3N2 viral lineages co-circulate within a same season and can also persist locally in between different influenza seasons, increasing the chance for genetic reassortment events. A novel minor cluster was also identified, named here as Korea, that circulated worldwide during 2003. Frequently, phylogenetic characterization did not correlate with the determined antigenic identity, supporting the need for the use of molecular evolutionary tools additionally to antigenic data for the surveillance and characterization of viral diversity during each flu season. This work represents the first long-term molecular epidemiology study of influenza A/H3N2 viruses in Mexico based on the complete genomic sequences and contributes to the monitoring of evolutionary trends of A/H3N2 influenza viruses within North and Central America.

  1. Recent H3N2 Influenza Virus Clinical Isolates Rapidly Acquire Hemagglutinin or Neuraminidase Mutations When Propagated for Antigenic Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Chambers, Benjamin S.; Li, Yang; Hodinka, Richard L.

    2014-01-01

    Prior to serological testing, influenza viruses are typically propagated in eggs or cell culture. Recent human H3N2 strains bind to cells with low avidity. Here, we isolated nine primary H3N2 viral isolates from respiratory secretions of children. Upon propagation in vitro, five of these isolates acquired hemagglutinin or neuraminidase mutations that increased virus binding to cell surfaces. These mutations can potentially confound serological assays commonly used to identify antigenically novel influenza viruses. PMID:24991002

  2. Combining magnetic nanoparticle with biotinylated nanobodies for rapid and sensitive detection of influenza H3N2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Min; Hu, Yonghong; Li, Guirong; Ou, Weijun; Mao, Panyong; Xin, Shaojie; Wan, Yakun

    2014-09-01

    Our objective is to develop a rapid and sensitive assay based on magnetic beads to detect the concentration of influenza H3N2. The possibility of using variable domain heavy-chain antibodies (nanobody) as diagnostic tools for influenza H3N2 was investigated. A healthy camel was immunized with inactivated influenza H3N2. A nanobody library of 8 × 108 clones was constructed and phage displayed. After three successive biopanning steps, H3N2-specific nanobodies were successfully isolated, expressed in Escherichia coli, and purified. Sequence analysis of the nanobodies revealed that we possessed four classes of nanobodies against H3N2. Two nanobodies were further used to prepare our rapid diagnostic kit. Biotinylated nanobody was effectively immobilized onto the surface of streptavidin magnetic beads. The modified magnetic beads with nanobody capture specifically influenza H3N2 and can still be recognized by nanobodies conjugated to horseradish peroxidase (HRP) conjugates. Under optimized conditions, the present immunoassay exhibited a relatively high sensitive detection with a limit of 50 ng/mL. In conclusion, by combining magnetic beads with specific nanobodies, this assay provides a promising influenza detection assay to develop a potential rapid, sensitive, and low-cost diagnostic tool to screen for influenza infections.

  3. Molecular analyses of H3N2 canine influenza viruses isolated from Korea during 2013-2014.

    PubMed

    Lee, EunJung; Kim, Eun-Ju; Kim, Bo-Hye; Song, Jae-Young; Cho, In-Soo; Shin, Yeun-Kyung

    2016-04-01

    Canine influenza A virus (CIV) causes a respiratory disease among dog populations and is prevalent in North America and Asia. Recently, Asian H3N2 CIV infection has been of particular concern, with recent reports related to reassortants with pandemic 2009 strains, direct transmission from a human H3N2, a possibility of H3N2 CIV transmission to other mammals, and even the first outbreak of H3N2 CIVs in North America in April 2015. However, despite these global concerns, our understanding of how influenza A virus transmission impacts the overall populations of H3N2 CIVs remains incomplete. Hence, we investigated the evolutionary history of the most recent two Korean CIV isolates, A/canine/Korea/BD-1/2013 and A/canine/Korea/DG1/2014, along with 57 worldwide CIVs, using comprehensive molecular analyses based on genomic genotyping. This study presents that the new Korean CIV isolates are closely related to the predominantly circulating H3N2 CIVs with genotypes K, G, E, 3B, F, 2D, F, and 1E, carrying several mutations in antigenic and host determinant sites. Also, our findings show that the genome-wide genetic variations within the H3N2 CIVs are low; however, two antigenic protein (HA and NA) analysis demonstrates genetic diversification of the H3N2 CIVs, which evolves independently between Korea and China.

  4. Glycosylation changes in the globular head of H3N2 influenza hemagglutinin modulate receptor binding without affecting virus virulence

    PubMed Central

    Alymova, Irina V.; York, Ian A.; Air, Gillian M.; Cipollo, John F.; Gulati, Shelly; Baranovich, Tatiana; Kumar, Amrita; Zeng, Hui; Gansebom, Shane; McCullers, Jonathan A.

    2016-01-01

    Since the emergence of human H3N2 influenza A viruses in the pandemic of 1968, these viruses have become established as strains of moderate severity. A decline in virulence has been accompanied by glycan accumulation on the hemagglutinin globular head, and hemagglutinin receptor binding has changed from recognition of a broad spectrum of glycan receptors to a narrower spectrum. The relationship between increased glycosylation, binding changes, and reduction in H3N2 virulence is not clear. We evaluated the effect of hemagglutinin glycosylation on receptor binding and virulence of engineered H3N2 viruses. We demonstrate that low-binding virus is as virulent as higher binding counterparts, suggesting that H3N2 infection does not require either recognition of a wide variety of, or high avidity binding to, receptors. Among the few glycans recognized with low-binding virus, there were two structures that were bound by the vast majority of H3N2 viruses isolated between 1968 and 2012. We suggest that these two structures support physiologically relevant binding of H3N2 hemagglutinin and that this physiologically relevant binding has not changed since the 1968 pandemic. Therefore binding changes did not contribute to reduced severity of seasonal H3N2 viruses. This work will help direct the search for factors enhancing influenza virulence. PMID:27796371

  5. Vaccination has minimal impact on the intrahost diversity of H3N2 influenza viruses

    PubMed Central

    Truscon, Rachel; Johnson, Emileigh; Monto, Arnold S.

    2017-01-01

    While influenza virus diversity and antigenic drift have been well characterized on a global scale, the factors that influence the virus’ rapid evolution within and between human hosts are less clear. Given the modest effectiveness of seasonal vaccination, vaccine-induced antibody responses could serve as a potent selective pressure for novel influenza variants at the individual or community level. We used next generation sequencing of patient-derived viruses from a randomized, placebo-controlled trial of vaccine efficacy to characterize the diversity of influenza A virus and to define the impact of vaccine-induced immunity on within-host populations. Importantly, this study design allowed us to isolate the impact of vaccination while still studying natural infection. We used pre-season hemagglutination inhibition and neuraminidase inhibition titers to quantify vaccine-induced immunity directly and to assess its impact on intrahost populations. We identified 166 cases of H3N2 influenza over 3 seasons and 5119 person-years. We obtained whole genome sequence data for 119 samples and used a stringent and empirically validated analysis pipeline to identify intrahost single nucleotide variants at ≥1% frequency. Phylogenetic analysis of consensus hemagglutinin and neuraminidase sequences showed no stratification by pre-season HAI and NAI titer, respectively. In our study population, we found that the vast majority of intrahost single nucleotide variants were rare and that very few were found in more than one individual. Most samples had fewer than 15 single nucleotide variants across the entire genome, and the level of diversity did not significantly vary with day of sampling, vaccination status, or pre-season antibody titer. Contrary to what has been suggested in experimental systems, our data indicate that seasonal influenza vaccination has little impact on intrahost diversity in natural infection and that vaccine-induced immunity may be only a minor contributor to

  6. Evolution of H3N2 Influenza Virus in a Guinea Pig Model

    PubMed Central

    Long, Jinxue; Bushnell, Ruth V.; Tobin, John K.; Pan, Keyao; Deem, Michael W.; Nara, Peter L.; Tobin, Gregory J.

    2011-01-01

    Studies of influenza virus evolution under controlled experimental conditions can provide a better understanding of the consequences of evolutionary processes with and without immunological pressure. Characterization of evolved strains assists in the development of predictive algorithms for both the selection of subtypes represented in the seasonal influenza vaccine and the design of novel immune refocused vaccines. To obtain data on the evolution of influenza in a controlled setting, naïve and immunized Guinea pigs were infected with influenza A/Wyoming/2003 (H3N2). Virus progeny from nasal wash samples were assessed for variation in the dominant and other epitopes by sequencing the hemagglutinin (HA) gene to quantify evolutionary changes. Viral RNA from the nasal washes from infection of naïve and immune animals contained 6% and 24.5% HA variant sequences, respectively. Analysis of mutations relative to antigenic epitopes indicated that adaptive immunity played a key role in virus evolution. HA mutations in immunized animals were associated with loss of glycosylation and changes in charge and hydrophobicity in and near residues within known epitopes. Four regions of HA-1 (75–85, 125–135, 165–170, 225–230) contained residues of highest variability. These sites are adjacent to or within known epitopes and appear to play an important role in antigenic variation. Recognition of the role of these sites during evolution will lead to a better understanding of the nature of evolution which help in the prediction of future strains for selection of seasonal vaccines and the design of novel vaccines intended to stimulated broadened cross-reactive protection to conserved sites outside of dominant epitopes. PMID:21799726

  7. H3N2v and other influenza epidemic risk based on age-specific estimates of sero-protection and contact network interactions.

    PubMed

    Skowronski, Danuta M; Moser, Flavia S; Janjua, Naveed Z; Davoudi, Bahman; English, Krista M; Purych, Dale; Petric, Martin; Pourbohloul, Babak

    2013-01-01

    Cases of a novel swine-origin influenza A(H3N2) variant (H3N2v) have recently been identified in the US, primarily among children. We estimated potential epidemic attack rates (ARs) based on age-specific estimates of sero-susceptibility and social interactions. A contact network model previously established for the Greater Vancouver Area (GVA), Canada was used to estimate average epidemic (infection) ARs for the emerging H3N2v and comparator viruses (H1N1pdm09 and an extinguished H3N2 seasonal strain) based on typical influenza characteristics, basic reproduction number (R(0)), and effective contacts taking into account age-specific sero-protection rates (SPRs). SPRs were assessed in sera collected from the GVA in 2009 or earlier (pre-H1N1pdm09) and fall 2010 (post-H1N1pdm09, seasonal A/Brisbane/10/2007(H3N2), and H3N2v) by hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay. SPR was assigned per convention based on proportion with HI antibody titre ≥40 (SPR40). Recognizing that the HI titre ≥40 was established as the 50%sero-protective threshold we also explored for ½SPR40, SPR80 and a blended gradient defined as: ¼SPR20, ½SPR40, ¾SPR80, SPR160. Base case analysis assumed R(0) = 1.40, but we also explored R(0) as high as 1.80. With R(0) = 1.40 and SPR40, simulated ARs were well aligned with field observations for H1N1pdm09 incidence (AR: 32%), sporadic detections without a third epidemic wave post-H1N1pdm09 (negligible AR<0.1%) as well as A/Brisbane/10/2007(H3N2) seasonal strain extinction and antigenic drift replacement (negligible AR<0.1%). Simulated AR for the novel swine-origin H3N2v was 6%, highest in children 6-11years (16%). However, with modification to SPR thresholds per above, H3N2v AR ≥20% became possible. At SPR40, H3N2v AR ≥10%, ≥15% or ≥30%, occur if R(0)≥1.48, ≥1.56 or ≥1.86, respectively. Based on conventional assumptions, the novel swine-origin H3N2v does not currently pose a substantial pandemic threat. If H3N2v epidemics do

  8. Surveillance of human influenza A(H3N2) virus from 1999 to 2009 in southern Italy.

    PubMed

    DE Donno, A; Idolo, A; Quattrocchi, M; Zizza, A; Gabutti, G; Romano, A; Grima, P; Donatelli, I; Guido, M

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the presence of influenza virus co-infections in humans and changes in the genetic variability of A(H3N2) virus strains in southern Italy from 1999 to 2009. A partial sequence of the haemagglutinin (HA) gene by human influenza H3N2 strains identified in oropharyngeal swabs from patients with influenza-like illness was analysed by DNA sequencing and a phylogenetic analysis was performed. During the seasons 1999-2000, 2002-2003, 2004-2005 and 2008-2009, the influenza viruses circulating belonged to subtype H3N2. However, A(H1N1) subtype virus and B type were respectively prevalent during the 2000-2001, 2006-2007, 2007-2008 and 2001-2002, 2003-2004, 2005-2006 seasons. The HA sequences appeared to be closely related to the sequence of the influenza A vaccine strain. Only the 2002-2003 season was characterized by co-circulation of two viral lineages: A/New York/55/01(H3N2)-like virus of the previous season and A/Fujian/411/02(H3N2)-like virus, a new H3 variant. In this study, over the decade analysed, no significant change was seen in the sequences of the HA gene of H3 viruses isolated.

  9. Pathogenicity and transmission of the novel A (H3N2v) influenza virus isolated from humans in experimentally inoculated pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Human cases with H3N2 (H3N2v) viruses closely related to swine H3N2 viruses were detected in 2011 and increased to >320 cases by the end of 2012. H3N2-TRIG was the H3N2 genotype endemically circulating in the U.S. swine population prior to the emergence of H1N1pdm09, and rH3N2p are novel H1N1pdm09/H...

  10. Cooperation between distinct viral variants promotes growth of H3N2 influenza in cell culture

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Katherine S; Hooper, Kathryn A; Ollodart, Anja R; Dingens, Adam S; Bloom, Jesse D

    2016-01-01

    RNA viruses rapidly diversify into quasispecies of related genotypes. This genetic diversity has long been known to facilitate adaptation, but recent studies have suggested that cooperation between variants might also increase population fitness. Here, we demonstrate strong cooperation between two H3N2 influenza variants that differ by a single mutation at residue 151 in neuraminidase, which normally mediates viral exit from host cells. Residue 151 is often annotated as an ambiguous amino acid in sequenced isolates, indicating mixed viral populations. We show that mixed populations grow better than either variant alone in cell culture. Pure populations of either variant generate the other through mutation and then stably maintain a mix of the two genotypes. We suggest that cooperation arises because mixed populations combine one variant’s proficiency at cell entry with the other’s proficiency at cell exit. Our work demonstrates a specific cooperative interaction between defined variants in a viral quasispecies. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13974.001 PMID:26978794

  11. Computational prediction of vaccine strains for human influenza A (H3N2) viruses.

    PubMed

    Steinbrück, L; Klingen, T R; McHardy, A C

    2014-10-01

    Human influenza A viruses are rapidly evolving pathogens that cause substantial morbidity and mortality in seasonal epidemics around the globe. To ensure continued protection, the strains used for the production of the seasonal influenza vaccine have to be regularly updated, which involves data collection and analysis by numerous experts worldwide. Computer-guided analysis is becoming increasingly important in this problem due to the vast amounts of generated data. We here describe a computational method for selecting a suitable strain for production of the human influenza A virus vaccine. It interprets available antigenic and genomic sequence data based on measures of antigenic novelty and rate of propagation of the viral strains throughout the population. For viral isolates sampled between 2002 and 2007, we used this method to predict the antigenic evolution of the H3N2 viruses in retrospective testing scenarios. When seasons were scored as true or false predictions, our method returned six true positives, three false negatives, eight true negatives, and one false positive, or 78% accuracy overall. In comparison to the recommendations by the WHO, we identified the correct antigenic variant once at the same time and twice one season ahead. Even though it cannot be ruled out that practical reasons such as lack of a sufficiently well-growing candidate strain may in some cases have prevented recommendation of the best-matching strain by the WHO, our computational decision procedure allows quantitative interpretation of the growing amounts of data and may help to match the vaccine better to predominating strains in seasonal influenza epidemics. Importance: Human influenza A viruses continuously change antigenically to circumvent the immune protection evoked by vaccination or previously circulating viral strains. To maintain vaccine protection and thereby reduce the mortality and morbidity caused by infections, regular updates of the vaccine strains are required. We

  12. Quantifying selection and diversity in viruses by entropy methods, with application to the haemagglutinin of H3N2 influenza

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Keyao; Deem, Michael W.

    2011-01-01

    Many viruses evolve rapidly. For example, haemagglutinin (HA) of the H3N2 influenza A virus evolves to escape antibody binding. This evolution of the H3N2 virus means that people who have previously been exposed to an influenza strain may be infected by a newly emerged virus. In this paper, we use Shannon entropy and relative entropy to measure the diversity and selection pressure by an antibody in each amino acid site of H3 HA between the 1992–1993 season and the 2009–2010 season. Shannon entropy and relative entropy are two independent state variables that we use to characterize H3N2 evolution. The entropy method estimates future H3N2 evolution and migration using currently available H3 HA sequences. First, we show that the rate of evolution increases with the virus diversity in the current season. The Shannon entropy of the sequence in the current season predicts relative entropy between sequences in the current season and those in the next season. Second, a global migration pattern of H3N2 is assembled by comparing the relative entropy flows of sequences sampled in China, Japan, the USA and Europe. We verify this entropy method by describing two aspects of historical H3N2 evolution. First, we identify 54 amino acid sites in HA that have evolved in the past to evade the immune system. Second, the entropy method shows that epitopes A and B on the top of HA evolve most vigorously to escape antibody binding. Our work provides a novel entropy-based method to predict and quantify future H3N2 evolution and to describe the evolutionary history of H3N2. PMID:21543352

  13. Outbreaks of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 and seasonal influenza A (H3N2) on cruise ship.

    PubMed

    Ward, Kate A; Armstrong, Paul; McAnulty, Jeremy M; Iwasenko, Jenna M; Dwyer, Dominic E

    2010-11-01

    To determine the extent and pattern of influenza transmission and effectiveness of containment measures, we investigated dual outbreaks of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 and influenza A (H3N2) that had occurred on a cruise ship in May 2009. Of 1,970 passengers and 734 crew members, 82 (3.0%) were infected with pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus, 98 (3.6%) with influenza A (H3N2) virus, and 2 (0.1%) with both. Among 45 children who visited the ship's childcare center, infection rate for pandemic (H1N1) 2009 was higher than that for influenza A (H3N2) viruses. Disembarked passengers reported a high level of compliance with isolation and quarantine recommendations. We found 4 subsequent cases epidemiologically linked to passengers but no evidence of sustained transmission to the community or passengers on the next cruise. Among this population of generally healthy passengers, children seemed more susceptible to pandemic (H1N1) 2009 than to influenza (H3N2) viruses. Intensive disease control measures successfully contained these outbreaks.

  14. Molecular Epidemiology of Influenza A/H3N2 Viruses Circulating in Mexico from 2003 to 2012

    PubMed Central

    Escalera-Zamudio, Marina; Nelson, Martha I.; Cobián Güemes, Ana Georgina; López-Martínez, Irma; Cruz-Ortiz, Natividad; Iguala-Vidales, Miguel; García, Elvia Rodríguez; Barrera-Badillo, Gisela; Díaz-Quiñonez, Jose Alberto; López, Susana; Arias, Carlos F.; Isa, Pavel

    2014-01-01

    In this work, nineteen influenza A/H3N2 viruses isolated in Mexico between 2003 and 2012 were studied. Our findings show that different human A/H3N2 viral lineages co-circulate within a same season and can also persist locally in between different influenza seasons, increasing the chance for genetic reassortment events. A novel minor cluster was also identified, named here as Korea, that circulated worldwide during 2003. Frequently, phylogenetic characterization did not correlate with the determined antigenic identity, supporting the need for the use of molecular evolutionary tools additionally to antigenic data for the surveillance and characterization of viral diversity during each flu season. This work represents the first long-term molecular epidemiology study of influenza A/H3N2 viruses in Mexico based on the complete genomic sequences and contributes to the monitoring of evolutionary trends of A/H3N2 influenza viruses within North and Central America. PMID:25075517

  15. Trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine effective against influenza A(H3N2) variant viruses in children during the 2014/15 season, Japan.

    PubMed

    Sugaya, Norio; Shinjoh, Masayoshi; Kawakami, Chiharu; Yamaguchi, Yoshio; Yoshida, Makoto; Baba, Hiroaki; Ishikawa, Mayumi; Kono, Mio; Sekiguchi, Shinichiro; Kimiya, Takahisa; Mitamura, Keiko; Fujino, Motoko; Komiyama, Osamu; Yoshida, Naoko; Tsunematsu, Kenichiro; Narabayashi, Atsushi; Nakata, Yuji; Sato, Akihiro; Taguchi, Nobuhiko; Fujita, Hisayo; Toki, Machiko; Myokai, Michiko; Ookawara, Ichiro; Takahashi, Takao

    2016-10-20

    The 2014/15 influenza season in Japan was characterised by predominant influenza A(H3N2) activity; 99% of influenza A viruses detected were A(H3N2). Subclade 3C.2a viruses were the major epidemic A(H3N2) viruses, and were genetically distinct from A/New York/39/2012(H3N2) of 2014/15 vaccine strain in Japan, which was classified as clade 3C.1. We assessed vaccine effectiveness (VE) of inactivated influenza vaccine (IIV) in children aged 6 months to 15 years by test-negative case-control design based on influenza rapid diagnostic test. Between November 2014 and March 2015, a total of 3,752 children were enrolled: 1,633 tested positive for influenza A and 42 for influenza B, and 2,077 tested negative. Adjusted VE was 38% (95% confidence intervals (CI): 28 to 46) against influenza virus infection overall, 37% (95% CI: 27 to 45) against influenza A, and 47% (95% CI: -2 to 73) against influenza B. However, IIV was not statistically significantly effective against influenza A in infants aged 6 to 11 months or adolescents aged 13 to 15 years. VE in preventing hospitalisation for influenza A infection was 55% (95% CI: 42 to 64). Trivalent IIV that included A/New York/39/2012(H3N2) was effective against drifted influenza A(H3N2) virus, although vaccine mismatch resulted in low VE.

  16. Development of DIVA (differentiation of infected from vaccinated animals) vaccines utilizing heterologous NA and NS1 protein strategies for the control of triple reassortant H3N2 influenza in turkeys.

    PubMed

    Wang, Leyi; Qin, Zhuoming; Pantin-Jackwood, Mary; Faulkner, Olivia; Suarez, David L; Garcia, Maricarmen; Lupiani, Blanca; Reddy, Sanjay M; Saif, Yehia M; Lee, Chang-Won

    2011-10-19

    Since 2003, triple reassortant (TR) swine H3N2 influenza viruses containing gene segments from human, avian, and swine origins have been detected in the U.S. turkey populations. The initial outbreak that occurred involved birds that were vaccinated with the currently available H3 swine- and avian-origin influenza vaccines. Antigenically, all turkey swine-lineage TR H3N2 isolates are closely related to each other but show little or no antigenic cross-reactivity with the avian origin or swine origin influenza vaccine strains that are currently being used in turkey operations. These results call for re-evaluation of currently available influenza vaccines being used in turkey flocks and development of more effective DIVA (differentiation of infected from vaccinated animals) vaccines. In this study, we selected one TR H3N2 strain, A/turkey/OH/313053/04 (H3N2) that showed broad cross reactivity with other recent TR turkey H3N2 isolates, and created NA- and NS-based DIVA vaccines using traditional reassortment as well as reverse genetics methods. Protective efficacy of those vaccines was determined in 2-week-old and 80-week-old breeder turkeys. The reassortant DIVA vaccines significantly reduced the presence of challenge virus in the oviduct of breeder turkeys as well as trachea and cloaca shedding of both young and old breeder turkeys, suggesting that proper vaccination could effectively prevent egg production drop and potential viral contamination of eggs in infected turkeys. Our results demonstrate that the heterologous NA and NS1 DIVA vaccines together with their corresponding serological tests could be useful for the control of TR H3N2 influenza in turkeys.

  17. Antigenic variation of the human influenza A (H3N2) virus during the 2014-2015 winter season.

    PubMed

    Hua, Sha; Li, XiYan; Liu, Mi; Cheng, YanHui; Peng, YouSong; Huang, WeiJuan; Tan, MinJu; Wei, HeJiang; Guo, JunFeng; Wang, DaYan; Wu, AiPing; Shu, YueLong; Jiang, TaiJiao

    2015-09-01

    The human influenza A (H3N2) virus dominated the 2014-2015 winter season in many countries and caused massive morbidity and mortality because of its antigenic variation. So far, very little is known about the antigenic patterns of the recent H3N2 virus. By systematically mapping the antigenic relationships of H3N2 strains isolated since 2010, we discovered that two groups with obvious antigenic divergence, named SW13 (A/Switzerland/9715293/2013-like strains) and HK14 (A/Hong Kong/5738/2014-like strains), co-circulated during the 2014-2015 winter season. HK14 group co-circulated with SW13 in Europe and the United States during this season, while there were few strains of HK14 in mainland China, where SW13 has dominated since 2012. Furthermore, we found that substitutions near the receptor-binding site on hemagglutinin played an important role in the antigenic variation of both the groups. These findings provide a comprehensive understanding of the recent antigenic evolution of H3N2 virus and will aid in the selection of vaccine strains.

  18. Interim estimates of 2016/17 vaccine effectiveness against influenza A(H3N2), Canada, January 2017

    PubMed Central

    Skowronski, Danuta M; Chambers, Catharine; Sabaiduc, Suzana; Dickinson, James A; Winter, Anne-Luise; De Serres, Gaston; Drews, Steven J; Jassem, Agatha; Gubbay, Jonathan B; Charest, Hugues; Balshaw, Robert; Bastien, Nathalie; Li, Yan; Krajden, Mel

    2017-01-01

    Using a test-negative design, the Canadian Sentinel Practitioner Surveillance Network (SPSN) assessed interim 2016/17 influenza vaccine effectiveness (VE) against dominant influenza A(H3N2) viruses considered antigenically matched to the clade 3C.2a vaccine strain. Sequence analysis revealed substantial heterogeneity in emerging 3C.2a1 variants by province and over time. Adjusted VE was 42% (95% confidence interval: 18–59%) overall, with variation by province. Interim virological and VE findings reported here warrant further investigation to inform potential vaccine reformulation. PMID:28205503

  19. Fatal Cases of Influenza A(H3N2) in Children: Insights from Whole Genome Sequence Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Galiano, Monica; Johnson, Benjamin F.; Myers, Richard; Ellis, Joanna; Daniels, Rod; Zambon, Maria

    2012-01-01

    During the Northern Hemisphere winter of 2003–2004 the emergence of a novel influenza antigenic variant, A/Fujian/411/2002-like(H3N2), was associated with an unusually high number of fatalities in children. Seventeen fatal cases in the UK were laboratory confirmed for Fujian/411-like viruses. To look for phylogenetic patterns and genetic markers that might be associated with increased virulence, sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of the whole genomes of 63 viruses isolated from fatal cases and non fatal “control” cases was undertaken. The analysis revealed the circulation of two main genetic groups, I and II, both of which contained viruses from fatal cases. No associated amino acid substitutions could be linked with an exclusive or higher occurrence in fatal cases. The Fujian/411-like viruses in genetic groups I and II completely displaced other A(H3N2) viruses, but they disappeared after 2004. This study shows that two A(H3N2) virus genotypes circulated exclusively during the winter of 2003–2004 in the UK and caused an unusually high number of deaths in children. Host factors related to immune state and differences in genetic background between patients may also play important roles in determining the outcome of an influenza infection. PMID:22412998

  20. Trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine effective against influenza A(H3N2) variant viruses in children during the 2014/15 season, Japan

    PubMed Central

    Sugaya, Norio; Shinjoh, Masayoshi; Kawakami, Chiharu; Yamaguchi, Yoshio; Yoshida, Makoto; Baba, Hiroaki; Ishikawa, Mayumi; Kono, Mio; Sekiguchi, Shinichiro; Kimiya, Takahisa; Mitamura, Keiko; Fujino, Motoko; Komiyama, Osamu; Yoshida, Naoko; Tsunematsu, Kenichiro; Narabayashi, Atsushi; Nakata, Yuji; Sato, Akihiro; Taguchi, Nobuhiko; Fujita, Hisayo; Toki, Machiko; Myokai, Michiko; Ookawara, Ichiro; Takahashi, Takao

    2016-01-01

    The 2014/15 influenza season in Japan was characterised by predominant influenza A(H3N2) activity; 99% of influenza A viruses detected were A(H3N2). Subclade 3C.2a viruses were the major epidemic A(H3N2) viruses, and were genetically distinct from A/New York/39/2012(H3N2) of 2014/15 vaccine strain in Japan, which was classified as clade 3C.1. We assessed vaccine effectiveness (VE) of inactivated influenza vaccine (IIV) in children aged 6 months to 15 years by test-negative case–control design based on influenza rapid diagnostic test. Between November 2014 and March 2015, a total of 3,752 children were enrolled: 1,633 tested positive for influenza A and 42 for influenza B, and 2,077 tested negative. Adjusted VE was 38% (95% confidence intervals (CI): 28 to 46) against influenza virus infection overall, 37% (95% CI: 27 to 45) against influenza A, and 47% (95% CI: -2 to 73) against influenza B. However, IIV was not statistically significantly effective against influenza A in infants aged 6 to 11 months or adolescents aged 13 to 15 years. VE in preventing hospitalisation for influenza A infection was 55% (95% CI: 42 to 64). Trivalent IIV that included A/New York/39/2012(H3N2) was effective against drifted influenza A(H3N2) virus, although vaccine mismatch resulted in low VE. PMID:27784529

  1. Vaccine-induced protection from egg production losses in commercial turkey breeder hens following experimental challenge with a triple-reassortant H3N2 avian influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Kapczynski, Darrell R; Gonder, Eric; Liljebjelke, Karen; Lippert, Ron; Petkov, Daniel; Tilley, Becky

    2009-03-01

    Infections of avian influenza virus (AIV) in turkey breeder hens can cause a decrease in both egg production and quality, resulting in significant production losses. In North Carolina in 2003, a triple-reassortant H3N2 AIV containing human, swine, and avian gene segments was isolated from turkey breeder hens (A/turkey/NC/16108/03). This viral subtype was subsequently isolated from both turkeys and swine in Ohio in 2004, and in Minnesota in 2005, and was responsible for significant losses in turkey production. The objective of this study was to determine if currently available commercial, inactivated avian influenza H3 subtype oil-emulsion vaccines would protect laying turkey hens from egg production losses following challenge with the 2003 H3N2 field virus isolate from North Carolina. Laying turkey hens were vaccinated in the field with two injections of either a commercial monovalent (A/duck/Minnesota/79/79 [H3N4]) or autogenous bivalent (A/turkey/North Carolina/05 (H3N2)-A/turkey/North Carolina/88 [H1N1]) vaccine, at 26 and 30 wk of age, and subsequently challenged under BSL 3-Ag conditions at 32 wk of age. Vaccine-induced efficacy was determined as protection from a 50% decrease in egg production and from a decrease in egg quality within 21 days postchallenge. Results indicate that, following a natural route of challenge (eye drop and intranasal), birds vaccinated with the 2005 North Carolina H3N2 subtype were significantly protected from the drop in egg production observed in both the H3N4 vaccinated and sham-vaccinated hens. The results demonstrate that groups receiving vaccines containing either H3 subtype had a decreased number of unsettable eggs, increased hemagglutination inhibition titers following challenge, and decreased virus isolations from cloacal swabs as compared to the sham-vaccinated group. Phylogenetic analysis of the nucleotide sequence of the HA1 gene segment from the three H3 viruses used in these studies indicated that the two North Carolina

  2. Unifying viral genetics and human transportation data to predict the global transmission dynamics of human influenza H3N2.

    PubMed

    Lemey, Philippe; Rambaut, Andrew; Bedford, Trevor; Faria, Nuno; Bielejec, Filip; Baele, Guy; Russell, Colin A; Smith, Derek J; Pybus, Oliver G; Brockmann, Dirk; Suchard, Marc A

    2014-02-01

    Information on global human movement patterns is central to spatial epidemiological models used to predict the behavior of influenza and other infectious diseases. Yet it remains difficult to test which modes of dispersal drive pathogen spread at various geographic scales using standard epidemiological data alone. Evolutionary analyses of pathogen genome sequences increasingly provide insights into the spatial dynamics of influenza viruses, but to date they have largely neglected the wealth of information on human mobility, mainly because no statistical framework exists within which viral gene sequences and empirical data on host movement can be combined. Here, we address this problem by applying a phylogeographic approach to elucidate the global spread of human influenza subtype H3N2 and assess its ability to predict the spatial spread of human influenza A viruses worldwide. Using a framework that estimates the migration history of human influenza while simultaneously testing and quantifying a range of potential predictive variables of spatial spread, we show that the global dynamics of influenza H3N2 are driven by air passenger flows, whereas at more local scales spread is also determined by processes that correlate with geographic distance. Our analyses further confirm a central role for mainland China and Southeast Asia in maintaining a source population for global influenza diversity. By comparing model output with the known pandemic expansion of H1N1 during 2009, we demonstrate that predictions of influenza spatial spread are most accurate when data on human mobility and viral evolution are integrated. In conclusion, the global dynamics of influenza viruses are best explained by combining human mobility data with the spatial information inherent in sampled viral genomes. The integrated approach introduced here offers great potential for epidemiological surveillance through phylogeographic reconstructions and for improving predictive models of disease control.

  3. H3N2v and You

    MedlinePlus

    ... Influenza A (H3N2)v in Health Care Settings Interim Information for Clinicians about Human Infections with H3N2v Virus Interim Guidance for Enhanced Influenza Surveillance: Additional Specimen Collection ...

  4. Influenza A(H3N2) Outbreak at Transit Center at Manas, Kyrgyzstan, 2014

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    for influenza were sequenced and were not remarkably different from the strains seen during routine surveillance for the 2013–2014 season or from...enterovirus) and eight specimens were negative. Twenty-two of the specimens that were positive for infl uenza were sequenced and were not remarkably diff...this environment is not surprising. Although most sequenced cases of infl uenza followed molecular patterns found in other parts of the world, the

  5. Detection of seasonal H3N2 influenza A virus by type-specific TaqMan minor groove binder probe assay

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ruixue; Schwartzman, Louis M.; Memoli, Matthew J.; Taubenberger, Jeffery K.

    2011-01-01

    Despite the emergence of the pandemic H1N1 influenza A virus in 2009, seasonal H3N2 viruses continue to co-circulate in the population, and may even predominate in the coming influenza season. We describe a specific minor groove binder Taqman assay for H3N2 viruses with a detection limit of 16.5 standard DNA copies. PMID:21429691

  6. Detection of seasonal H3N2 influenza A virus by type-specific TaqMan minor groove binder probe assay.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ruixue; Schwartzman, Louis M; Memoli, Matthew J; Taubenberger, Jeffery K

    2011-06-01

    Despite the emergence of the pandemic H1N1 influenza A virus in 2009, seasonal H3N2 viruses continue to co-circulate in the population and may even predominate in the coming influenza season. We describe a specific minor groove binder TaqMan assay for H3N2 viruses with a detection limit of 16.5 standard DNA copies.

  7. Neutralizing Antibody Responses to Antigenically Drifted Influenza A(H3N2) Viruses among Children and Adolescents following 2014-2015 Inactivated and Live Attenuated Influenza Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Judith M.; Gross, F. Liaini; Jefferson, Stacie; Cole, Kelly Stefano; Archibald, Crystal Ann; Nowalk, Mary Patricia; Susick, Michael; Moehling, Krissy; Spencer, Sarah; Chung, Jessie R.; Flannery, Brendan; Zimmerman, Richard K.

    2016-01-01

    Human influenza A(H3N2) viruses that predominated during the moderately severe 2014-2015 influenza season differed antigenically from the vaccine component, resulting in reduced vaccine effectiveness (VE). To examine antibody responses to 2014-2015 inactivated influenza vaccine (IIV) and live-attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) among children and adolescents, we collected sera before and after vaccination from 150 children aged 3 to 17 years enrolled at health care facilities. Hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assays were used to assess the antibody responses to vaccine strains. We evaluated cross-reactive antibody responses against two representative A(H3N2) viruses that had antigenically drifted from the A(H3N2) vaccine component using microneutralization (MN) assays. Postvaccination antibody titers to drifted A(H3N2) viruses were higher following receipt of IIV (MN geometric mean titers [GMTs], 63 to 68; 38 to 45% achieved seroconversion) versus LAIV (MN GMT, 22; only 3 to 5% achieved seroconversion). In 9- to 17-year-olds, the highest MN titers were observed among IIV-vaccinated individuals who had received LAIV in the previous season. Among all IIV recipients aged 3 to 17 years, the strongest predictor of antibody responses to the drifted viruses was the prevaccination titers to the vaccine strain. The results of our study suggest that in an antigenically drifted influenza season, vaccination still induced cross-reactive antibody responses to drifted circulating A(H3N2) viruses, although higher antibody titers may be required for protection. Antibody responses to drifted A(H3N2) viruses following vaccination were influenced by multiple factors, including vaccine type and preexisting immunity from prior exposure. PMID:27558294

  8. Isolation of influenza A(H3N2)v virus from pigs and characterization of its biological properties in pigs and mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seong-Hee; Kim, Hee-Jeong; Jin, Young-Hwa; Yeoul, Jeong-Ji; Lee, Kyoung-Ki; Oem, Jae-Ku; Lee, Myoung-Heon; Park, Choi-Kyu

    2013-11-01

    Recently, a novel reassortant virus, influenza A(H3N2)v [A(H3N2)v], was identified as the causative pathogen in 307 human cases of influenza in the United States. A(H3N2)v contains the matrix gene from the 2009 pandemic H1N1 (pH1N1) virus, while its other genes originate from H3N2 viruses with triple-reassorted internal genes. In this study, we isolated three A(H3N2)v viruses from commercial pigs in Korea that showed similarities with published human A(H3N2)v viruses in eight segment sequence alignments. After genetic characterization, the pathogenicity of one of these viruses was assessed in pigs and mice. Infection of pigs with this novel virus resulted in mild interstitial pneumonia with marked oronasal shedding of viral RNA for about 14 days. In mice, the virus replicated efficiently in the lungs; viral RNA was detected up to 9 days post-inoculation. However, the virus did not cause severe disease or death in mice, despite the administration of a high infectious dose (10(5.2) TCID50). This study demonstrates that A(H3N2)v causes a high morbidity rate with low virulence; however, global monitoring of A(H3N2)v outbreaks in mammals will be needed to determine whether this novel subtype will shift to a highly pathogenic virus.

  9. Multiple Influenza A (H3N2) Mutations Conferring Resistance to Neuraminidase Inhibitors in a Bone Marrow Transplant Recipient

    PubMed Central

    Eshaghi, Alireza; Shalhoub, Sarah; Rosenfeld, Paul; Li, Aimin; Higgins, Rachel R.; Stogios, Peter J.; Savchenko, Alexei; Bastien, Nathalie; Li, Yan; Rotstein, Coleman

    2014-01-01

    Immunocompromised patients are predisposed to infections caused by influenza virus. Influenza virus may produce considerable morbidity, including protracted illness and prolonged viral shedding in these patients, thus prompting higher doses and prolonged courses of antiviral therapy. This approach may promote the emergence of resistant strains. Characterization of neuraminidase (NA) inhibitor (NAI)-resistant strains of influenza A virus is essential for documenting causes of resistance. In this study, using quantitative real-time PCR along with conventional Sanger sequencing, we identified an NAI-resistant strain of influenza A (H3N2) virus in an immunocompromised patient. In-depth analysis by deep gene sequencing revealed that various known markers of antiviral resistance, including transient R292K and Q136K substitutions and a sustained E119K (N2 numbering) substitution in the NA protein emerged during prolonged antiviral therapy. In addition, a combination of a 4-amino-acid deletion at residues 245 to 248 (Δ245-248) accompanied by the E119V substitution occurred, causing resistance to or reduced inhibition by NAIs (oseltamivir, zanamivir, and peramivir). Resistant variants within a pool of viral quasispecies arose during combined antiviral treatment. More research is needed to understand the interplay of drug resistance mutations, viral fitness, and transmission. PMID:25246391

  10. Canine susceptibility to human influenza viruses (A/pdm 09H1N1, A/H3N2 and B).

    PubMed

    Song, Daesub; Kim, Hyekwon; Na, Woonsung; Hong, Minki; Park, Seong-Jun; Moon, Hyoungjoon; Kang, Bokyu; Lyoo, Kwang-Soo; Yeom, Minjoo; Jeong, Dae Gwin; An, Dong-Jun; Kim, Jeong-Ki

    2015-02-01

    We investigated the infectivity and transmissibility of the human seasonal H3N2, pandemic (pdm) H1N1 (2009) and B influenza viruses in dogs. Dogs inoculated with human seasonal H3N2 and pdm H1N1 influenza viruses exhibited nasal shedding and were seroconverted against the viruses; this did not occur in the influenza B virus-inoculated dogs. Transmission of human H3N2 virus between dogs was demonstrated by observing nasal shedding and seroconversion in naïve dogs after contact with inoculated dogs. The seroprevalence study offered evidence of human H3N2 infection occurring in dogs since 2008. Furthermore, serological evidence of pdm H1N1 influenza virus infection alone and in combination with canine H3N2 virus was found in the serum samples collected from field dogs during 2010 and 2011. Our results suggest that dogs may be hosts for human seasonal H3N2 and pdm H1N1 influenza viruses.

  11. Efficacy of inactivated and live-attenuated influenza virus vaccines in pigs against infection and transmission of emerging H3N2 similar to the 2011-2012 H3N2v

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vaccines provide a primary means to limit disease but may not be effective at blocking infection and pathogen transmission. The objective of the current study was to evaluate the efficacy of commercial inactivated swine influenza A virus (IAV) vaccines and experimental live-attenuated influenza viru...

  12. Genetic characterization of seasonal influenza A (H3N2) viruses in Ontario during 2010–2011 influenza season: high prevalence of mutations at antigenic sites

    PubMed Central

    Eshaghi, AliReza; Duvvuri, Venkata R; Li, Aimin; Patel, Samir N; Bastien, Nathalie; Li, Yan; Low, Donald E; Gubbay, Jonathan B

    2014-01-01

    Background The direct effect of antigenic site mutations in influenza viruses on antigenic drift and vaccine effectiveness is poorly understood. Objective To investigate the genetic and antigenic characteristics of human influenza A (H3N2) viruses circulating in Ontario during the early 2010–2011 winter season. Study design We sequenced the hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) genes from 41 A(H3N2) viruses detected in nasopharyngeal specimens. Strain typing was performed by hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay. Molecular and phylogenetic tree analyses were conducted. Results HA and NA genes showed high similarity to the 2010–2011 vaccine strain, A/Perth/16/2009 (H3N2)-like virus (97·7–98·5% and 98·7–99·5% amino acid (AA) identity, respectively). Compared to A/Perth/16/2009 strain, HA gene mutations were documented at 28 different AA positions across all five H3 antigenic sites, with a range of 5–11 mutations in individual viruses. Thirty-six (88%) viruses had 8 AA substitutions in common; none of these had reduced HI titer. Among Ontario isolates, 11 antigenic site AAs were positively selected with an increase in glycosylation sites. Conclusion The presence of antigenic site mutations with high frequency among 2010–2011 influenza H3N2 isolates confirms ongoing adaptive H3N2 evolution. These may represent early phylogenetic changes that could cause antigenic drift with further mutations. Clinical relevance of antigenic site mutations not causing drift in HI assays is unknown and requires further investigation. In addition, viral sequencing information will assist with vaccine strain planning and may facilitate early detection of vaccine escape. PMID:24313991

  13. Immune Response to Vaccination with a Live Influenza Virus (H3N2) Vaccine (“Ann” Strain)

    PubMed Central

    Prévost, J. M.; Peetermans, J.; Lamy, F.; Huygelen, C.

    1973-01-01

    A live attenuated influenza virus (“Ann” strain) derived from A/England/878/69 was given intranasally to a group of volunteers, most of whom had already circulating antibodies against H3N2 viruses at the time of inoculation. There was a fourfold or higher increase of circulating hemagglutination-inhibiting antibodies in those volunteers who had relatively low initial titers. The response was lower in those with initially higher serum titers. The pattern of the serum neutralizing antibody response was very similar. The geometric means of the antineuraminidase antibodies were 67 and 118 pre- and postvaccination, respectively. All subjects showed a rise in local neutralizing antibodies in their nasal secretions with geometric means of 4 and 17 pre- and postvaccination, respectively. The levels of local antineuraminidase antibodies also rose in most subjects. In addition to the response to the homologous virus type, the antibody formation to the recent A/England/42/72 was measured in the sera and nasal secretions of some subjects. There was a clearcut response in most of the sera and in all of the secretions examined. The stimulation of circulating lymphocytes was measured in 6 volunteers. All volunteers showed a temporary stimulation. The stimulation index ranged between 2.5 and 28.5. PMID:4729931

  14. Emergence of a novel subclade of influenza A(H3N2) virus in London, December 2016 to January 2017.

    PubMed

    Harvala, Heli; Frampton, Dan; Grant, Paul; Raffle, Jade; Ferns, Ruth Bridget; Kozlakidis, Zisis; Kellam, Paul; Pillay, Deenan; Hayward, Andrew; Nastouli, Eleni

    2017-02-23

    We report the molecular investigations of a large influenza A(H3N2) outbreak, in a season characterised by sharp increase in influenza admissions since December 2016. Analysis of haemagglutinin (HA) sequences demonstrated co-circulation of multiple clades (3C.3a, 3C.2a and 3C.2a1). Most variants fell into a novel subclade (proposed as 3C.2a2); they possessed four unique amino acid substitutions in the HA protein and loss of a potential glycosylation site. These changes potentially modify the H3N2 strain antigenicity.

  15. Emergence of a novel subclade of influenza A(H3N2) virus in London, December 2016 to January 2017

    PubMed Central

    Harvala, Heli; Frampton, Dan; Grant, Paul; Raffle, Jade; Ferns, Ruth Bridget; Kozlakidis, Zisis; Kellam, Paul; Pillay, Deenan; Hayward, Andrew; Nastouli, Eleni

    2017-01-01

    We report the molecular investigations of a large influenza A(H3N2) outbreak, in a season characterised by sharp increase in influenza admissions since December 2016. Analysis of haemagglutinin (HA) sequences demonstrated co-circulation of multiple clades (3C.3a, 3C.2a and 3C.2a1). Most variants fell into a novel subclade (proposed as 3C.2a2); they possessed four unique amino acid substitutions in the HA protein and loss of a potential glycosylation site. These changes potentially modify the H3N2 strain antigenicity. PMID:28251889

  16. Hemagglutinin Gene Clade 3C.2a Influenza A(H3N2) Viruses, Alachua County, Florida, USA, 2014–15

    PubMed Central

    Lednicky, John A.; Iovine, Nicole M.; Brew, Joe; Loeb, Julia C.; Sugimoto, Jonathan D.; Rand, Kenneth H.

    2016-01-01

    Influenza A(H3N2) strains isolated during 2014–15 in Alachua County, Florida, USA, belonged to hemagglutinin gene clade 3C.2a. High rates of influenza-like illness and confirmed influenza cases in children were associated with a decrease in estimated vaccine effectiveness. Illnesses were milder than in 2013–14; severe cases were concentrated in elderly patients with underlying diseases. PMID:26692074

  17. Phylogenetic relationships of the HA and NA genes between vaccine and seasonal influenza A(H3N2) strains in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sehee; Bae, Joon-Yong; Yoo, Kirim; Cheong, Hee Jin; Noh, Ji Yun; Hong, Kyung Wook; Lemey, Philippe; Vrancken, Bram; Kim, Juwon; Nam, Misun; Yun, Soo-Hyeon; Cho, Woo In; Song, Joon Young; Kim, Woo Joo; Park, Mee Sook; Song, Jin-Won; Kee, Sun-Ho; Song, Ki-Joon; Park, Man-Seong

    2017-01-01

    Seasonal influenza is caused by two influenza A subtype (H1N1 and H3N2) and two influenza B lineage (Victoria and Yamagata) viruses. Of these antigenically distinct viruses, the H3N2 virus was consistently detected in substantial proportions in Korea during the 2010/11-2013/14 seasons when compared to the other viruses and appeared responsible for the influenza-like illness rate peak during the first half of the 2011/12 season. To further scrutinize possible causes for this, we investigated the evolutionary and serological relationships between the vaccine and Korean H3N2 strains during the 2011/12 season for the main antigenic determinants of influenza viruses, the hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) genes. In the 2011/12 season, when the number of H3N2 cases peaked, the majority of the Korean strains did not belong to the HA clade of A/Perth/16/2009 vaccine, and no Korean strains were of this lineage in the NA segment. In a serological assay, post-vaccinated human sera exhibited much reduced hemagglutination inhibition antibody titers against the non-vaccine clade Korean H3N2 strains. Moreover, Korean strains harbored several amino acid differences in the HA antigenic sites and in the NA with respect to vaccine lineages during this season. Of these, the HA antigenic site C residues 45 and 261 and the NA residue 81 appeared to be the signatures of positive selection. In subsequent seasons, when H3N2 cases were lower, the HA and NA genes of vaccine and Korean strains were more phylogenetically related to each other. Combined, our results provide indirect support for using phylogenetic clustering patterns of the HA and possibly also the NA genes in the selection of vaccine viruses and the assessment of vaccine effectiveness. PMID:28257427

  18. Assessing Antigenic Drift of Seasonal Influenza A(H3N2) and A(H1N1)pdm09 Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Tewawong, Nipaporn; Prachayangprecha, Slinporn; Vichiwattana, Preeyaporn; Korkong, Sumeth; Klinfueng, Sirapa; Vongpunsawad, Sompong; Thongmee, Thanunrat; Theamboonlers, Apiradee; Poovorawan, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Under selective pressure from the host immune system, antigenic epitopes of influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA) have continually evolved to escape antibody recognition, termed antigenic drift. We analyzed the genomes of influenza A(H3N2) and A(H1N1)pdm09 virus strains circulating in Thailand between 2010 and 2014 and assessed how well the yearly vaccine strains recommended for the southern hemisphere matched them. We amplified and sequenced the HA gene of 120 A(H3N2) and 81 A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza virus samples obtained from respiratory specimens and calculated the perfect-match vaccine efficacy using the pepitope model, which quantitated the antigenic drift in the dominant epitope of HA. Phylogenetic analysis of the A(H3N2) HA1 genes classified most strains into genetic clades 1, 3A, 3B, and 3C. The A(H3N2) strains from the 2013 and 2014 seasons showed very low to moderate vaccine efficacy and demonstrated antigenic drift from epitopes C and A to epitope B. Meanwhile, most A(H1N1)pdm09 strains from the 2012–2014 seasons belonged to genetic clades 6A, 6B, and 6C and displayed the dominant epitope mutations at epitopes B and E. Finally, the vaccine efficacy for A(H1N1)pdm09 (79.6–93.4%) was generally higher than that of A(H3N2). These findings further confirmed the accelerating antigenic drift of the circulating influenza A(H3N2) in recent years. PMID:26440103

  19. The Proteolytic Activation of (H3N2) Influenza A Virus Hemagglutinin Is Facilitated by Different Type II Transmembrane Serine Proteases

    PubMed Central

    Kühn, Nora; Bergmann, Silke; Kösterke, Nadine; Lambertz, Ruth L. O.; Keppner, Anna; van den Brand, Judith M. A.; Weiß, Siegfried; Hummler, Edith; Hatesuer, Bastian

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cleavage of influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA) by host cell proteases is necessary for viral activation and infectivity. In humans and mice, members of the type II transmembrane protease family (TTSP), e.g., TMPRSS2, TMPRSS4, and TMPRSS11d (HAT), have been shown to cleave influenza virus HA for viral activation and infectivity in vitro. Recently, we reported that inactivation of a single HA-activating protease gene, Tmprss2, in knockout mice inhibits the spread of H1N1 influenza viruses. However, after infection of Tmprss2 knockout mice with an H3N2 influenza virus, only a slight increase in survival was observed, and mice still lost body weight. In this study, we investigated an additional trypsin-like protease, TMPRSS4. Both TMPRSS2 and TMPRSS4 are expressed in the same cell types of the mouse lung. Deletion of Tmprss4 alone in knockout mice does not protect them from body weight loss and death upon infection with H3N2 influenza virus. In contrast, Tmprss2−/− Tmprss4−/− double-knockout mice showed a remarkably reduced virus spread and lung pathology, in addition to reduced body weight loss and mortality. Thus, our results identified TMPRSS4 as a second host cell protease that, in addition to TMPRSS2, is able to activate the HA of H3N2 influenza virus in vivo. IMPORTANCE Influenza epidemics and recurring pandemics are responsible for significant global morbidity and mortality. Due to high variability of the virus genome, resistance to available antiviral drugs is frequently observed, and new targets for treatment of influenza are needed. Host cell factors essential for processing of the virus hemagglutinin represent very suitable drug targets because the virus is dependent on these host factors for replication. We reported previously that Tmprss2-deficient mice are protected against H1N1 virus infections, but only marginal protection against H3N2 virus infections was observed. Here we show that deletion of two host protease genes, Tmprss2 and

  20. A Host Transcriptional Signature for Presymptomatic Detection of Infection in Humans Exposed to Influenza H1N1 or H3N2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-09

    Results Healthy Volunteers Demonstrate Variable Clinical Responses to Inoculation with Seasonal Influenza H1N1 and H3N2 For the H1N1 challenge we...individuals enrolled during the 2009– 10 Influenza season . At that time, we identified 36 individuals who presented to the Duke University Hospital...typical of very mild allergies [22] or even symptoms due to sequelae of chronic smoking [23]. Therefore, genomic analyses demonstrate the potential to

  1. A Case of Influenza A (H3N2) Complicated by Community-Acquired Pneumonia and Death in a Young Healthy Adult during the 2013–2014 Season

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Lauren F.; Anderson, Benjamin D.; Gray, Gregory C.

    2017-01-01

    With multiple available vaccines and antivirals, seasonal influenza A is typically a self-limited acutely debilitating illness in young healthy adults. Here, we illustrate unexpected morbidity and mortality in a relatively young and healthy patient seen at a large tertiary care academic medical center for seasonal influenza A (H3N2) complicated by community-acquired pneumonia, hypoxic respiratory failure, septic shock, and death. PMID:28229066

  2. SWINE INFLUENZA

    PubMed Central

    Shope, Richard E.

    1931-01-01

    1. It has been possible to demonstrate, in Berkefeld filtrates of infectious material from experimental cases of swine influenza, a virus which when administered intranasally to susceptible swine induced a mild, usually afebrile illness of short duration. The changes in the respiratory tract resembled those in swine influenza but were usually much less extensive. When the filtrable virus was mixed with pure cultures of H. influenzae suis and administered to swine a disease identical clinically and pathologically with swine influenza was induced. The data presented indicate that the filtrable virus of swine influenza and H. influenzae suis act in concert to produce swine influenza and that neither alone is capable of inducing the disease. 2. One attack of swine influenza usually renders an animal immune to reinfection. Blood serum from an animal made immune in this way neutralizes infectious material from swine influenza in vitro, as shown by the failure of the mixture to produce disease in a susceptible animal. 3. The virus can be stored in a dried state or in glycerol for several weeks at least. In one instance dried material apparently retained both the virus and H. influenzas suis in viable form for a period of 54 days. 4. Fatal cases of experimental swine influenza have been observed in which H. influenzae suis was the only organism that could be cultivated from the respiratory tract. 5. Attention has been called to some features of marked similarity between epizootic swine influenzae and epidemic influenzae in man. PMID:19869924

  3. Phylogenetic analysis of human influenza A/H3N2 viruses isolated in 2015 in Germany indicates significant genetic divergence from vaccine strains.

    PubMed

    Mostafa, Ahmed; Abdelwhab, El-Sayed M; Slanina, Heiko; Hussein, Mohamed A; Kuznetsova, Irina; Schüttler, Christian G; Ziebuhr, John; Pleschka, Stephan

    2016-06-01

    Infections by H3N2-type influenza A viruses (IAV) resulted in significant numbers of hospitalization in several countries in 2014-2015, causing disease also in vaccinated individuals and, in some cases, fatal outcomes. In this study, sequence analysis of H3N2 viruses isolated in Germany from 1998 to 2015, including eleven H3N2 isolates collected early in 2015, was performed. Compared to the vaccine strain A/Texas/50/2012 (H3N2), the 2015 strains from Germany showed up to 4.5 % sequence diversity in their HA1 protein, indicating substantial genetic drift. The data further suggest that two distinct phylogroups, 3C.2 and 3C.3, with 1.6-2.3 % and 0.3-2.4 % HA1 nucleotide and amino acid sequence diversity, respectively, co-circulated in Germany in the 2014/2015 season. Distinct glycosylation patterns and amino acid substitutions in the hemagglutinin and neuraminidase proteins were identified, possibly contributing to the unusually high number of H3N2 infections in this season and providing important information for developing vaccines that are effective against both genotypes.

  4. Antiviral Susceptibility of Variant Influenza A(H3N2)v Viruses Isolated in the United States from 2011 to 2013

    PubMed Central

    Sleeman, K.; Mishin, V. P.; Guo, Z.; Garten, R. J.; Balish, A.; Fry, A. M.; Villanueva, J.; Stevens, J.

    2014-01-01

    Since 2011, outbreaks caused by influenza A(H3N2) variant [A(H3N2)v] viruses have become a public health concern in the United States. The A(H3N2)v viruses share the A(H1N1)pdm09 M gene containing the marker of M2 blocker resistance, S31N, but do not contain any known molecular markers associated with resistance to neuraminidase (NA) inhibitors (NAIs). Using a fluorescent NA inhibition (NI) assay, the susceptibilities of recovered A(H3N2)v viruses (n = 168) to FDA-approved (oseltamivir and zanamivir) and other (peramivir, laninamivir, and A-315675) NAIs were assessed. All A(H3N2)v viruses tested, with the exception of a single virus strain, A/Ohio/88/2012, isolated from an untreated patient, were susceptible to the NAIs tested. The A/Ohio/88/2012 virus contained two rare substitutions, S245N and S247P, in the NA and demonstrated reduced inhibition by oseltamivir (31-fold) and zanamivir (66-fold) in the NI assay. Using recombinant NA (recNA) proteins, S247P was shown to be responsible for the observed altered NAI susceptibility, in addition to an approximately 60% reduction in NA enzymatic activity. The S247P substitution has not been previously reported as a molecular marker of reduced susceptibility to the NAIs. Using cell culture assays, the investigational antiviral drugs nitazoxanide, favipiravir, and fludase were shown to inhibit the replication of A(H3N2)v viruses, including the virus with the S247P substitution in the NA. This report demonstrates the importance of continuous monitoring of susceptibility of zoonotic influenza viruses to available and investigational antiviral drugs. PMID:24449767

  5. Complete Genome Sequence of an Avian-Origin H3N2 Canine Influenza A Virus Isolated in Farmed Dogs in Southern China

    PubMed Central

    Su, Shuo; Cao, Nan; Chen, Jidang; Zhao, Furong; Li, Huatao; Zhao, Mingxi; Wang, Yanjing; Huang, Zhen; Yuan, Liguo; Wang, Heng; Zhang, Guihong

    2012-01-01

    We report here the complete genomic sequence of an avian-origin H3N2 canine influenza A virus containing multiple mutations in farmed dogs in southern China. Phylogenetic analyses of the sequences of all eight viral RNA segments demonstrated that these are wholly avian influenza viruses of the Asia lineage. To our knowledge, this is the first report of interspecies transmission of an avian H3N2 influenza virus to domestic farm dogs under natural conditions in Southern China. The amino acid information provided herein suggests that continued study is required to determine if this virus could be established in the farm dog population and pose potential threats to public health. PMID:22923798

  6. Chimeric virus-like particles containing influenza HA antigen and GPI-CCL28 induce long-lasting mucosal immunity against H3N2 viruses

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Teena; Berman, Zachary; Luo, Yuan; Wang, Chao; Wang, Shelly; Compans, Richard W.; Wang, Bao-Zhong

    2017-01-01

    Influenza virus is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality, with worldwide seasonal epidemics. The duration and quality of humoral immunity and generation of immunological memory to vaccines is critical for protective immunity. In the current study, we examined the long-lasting protective efficacy of chimeric VLPs (cVLPs) containing influenza HA and GPI-anchored CCL28 as antigen and mucosal adjuvant, respectively, when immunized intranasally in mice. We report that the cVLPs induced significantly higher and sustainable levels of virus-specific antibody responses, especially IgA levels and hemagglutination inhibition (HAI) titers, more than 8-month post-vaccination compared to influenza VLPs without CCL28 or influenza VLPs physically mixed with sCCL28 (soluble) in mice. After challenging the vaccinated animals at month 8 with H3N2 viruses, the cVLP group also demonstrated strong recall responses. On day 4 post-challenge, we measured increased antibody levels, ASCs and HAI titers with reduced viral load and inflammatory responses in the cVLP group. The animals vaccinated with the cVLP showed 20% cross-protection against drifted (Philippines) and 60% protection against homologous (Aichi) H3N2 viruses. Thus, the results suggest that the GPI-anchored CCL28 induces significantly higher mucosal antibody responses, involved in providing long-term cross-protection against H3N2 influenza virus when compared to other vaccination groups. PMID:28067290

  7. Summary of Control Issues for Swine Influenza

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Multiple subtypes of endemic swine influenza virus (SIV) co-circulate in the U.S. and Canada (H3N2, H1N1, and H1N2 with a triple reassortant internal gene (TRIG) constellation derived from swine, avian and human influenza viruses). As a result of reassortment events and antigenic drift, four H1 SIV...

  8. Genetic evolution of recently emerged novel human-like swine H3 influenza A viruses (IAV) in United States swine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction Influenza A virus (IAV) is a major cause of respiratory disease in swine. IAV transmission from humans to swine is a major contributor to swine IAV diversity. In 2012, a novel H3N2 with an HA (hu-H3) and NA derived from human seasonal H3N2 was detected in United States (US) swine. The h...

  9. Cocirculation of avian H9N2 and contemporary "human" H3N2 influenza A viruses in pigs in southeastern China: potential for genetic reassortment?

    PubMed

    Peiris, J S; Guan, Y; Markwell, D; Ghose, P; Webster, R G; Shortridge, K F

    2001-10-01

    Pigs are permissive to both human and avian influenza viruses and have been proposed to be an intermediate host for the genesis of pandemic influenza viruses through reassortment or adaptation of avian viruses. Prospective virological surveillance carried out between March 1998 and June 2000 in Hong Kong, Special Administrative Region, People's Republic of China, on pigs imported from southeastern China, provides the first evidence of interspecies transmission of avian H9N2 viruses to pigs and documents their cocirculation with contemporary human H3N2 (A/Sydney/5/97-like, Sydney97-like) viruses. All gene segments of the porcine H9N2 viruses were closely related to viruses similar to chicken/Beijing/1/94 (H9N2), duck/Hong Kong/Y280/97 (H9N2), and the descendants of the latter virus lineage. Phylogenetic analysis suggested that repeated interspecies transmission events had occurred from the avian host to pigs. The Sydney97-like (H3N2) viruses isolated from pigs were related closely to contemporary human H3N2 viruses in all gene segments and had not undergone genetic reassortment. Cocirculation of avian H9N2 and human H3N2 viruses in pigs provides an opportunity for genetic reassortment leading to the emergence of viruses with pandemic potential.

  10. Progressive antigenic drift and phylogeny of human influenza A(H3N2) virus over five consecutive seasons (2009-2013) in Hangzhou, China.

    PubMed

    Shao, Tie-Juan; Li, Jun; Yu, Xin-Fen; Kou, Yu; Zhou, Yin-Yan; Qian, Xin

    2014-12-01

    Vaccine efficacy (VE) can be affected by progressive antigenic drift or any new reassortment of influenza viruses. To effectively track the evolution of human influenza A(H3N2) virus circulating in Hangzhou, China, a total of 65 clinical specimens were selected randomly from outpatients infected by A(H3N2) viruses during the study period from November 2009 to December 2013. The results of reduced VE and antigenic drift of the correspondent epitopes (C-D-E to A-B) suggest that the current vaccine provides suboptimal protection against the A(H3N2) strains circulating recently. Phylogenetic analysis of the entire HA and NA sequences demonstrated that these two genes underwent independent evolutionary pathways during recent seasons. The H3-based phylogenetic tree showed that a special strain A/Hangzhou/A289/2012 fell in a cluster among viruses with reduced VE predominantly circulating in 2013. Our findings underscore a possible early warning for the circulation of A(H3N2) variants with antigenic drift during the previous seasons.

  11. Accelerating Influenza Research: Vaccines, Antivirals, Immunomodulators and Monoclonal Antibodies. The Manufacture of a New Wild-Type H3N2 Virus for the Human Viral Challenge Model

    PubMed Central

    Fullen, Daniel J.; Noulin, Nicolas; Catchpole, Andrew; Fathi, Hosnieh; Murray, Edward J.; Mann, Alex; Eze, Kingsley; Balaratnam, Ganesh; Borley, Daryl W.; Gilbert, Anthony; Lambkin-Williams, Rob

    2016-01-01

    Background Influenza and its associated diseases are a major cause of morbidity and mortality. The United States Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices recommends influenza vaccination for everyone over 6 months of age. The failure of the flu vaccine in 2014–2015 demonstrates the need for a model that allows the rapid development of novel antivirals, universal/intra-seasonal vaccines, immunomodulators, monoclonal antibodies and other novel treatments. To this end we manufactured a new H3N2 influenza virus in compliance with Good Manufacturing Practice for use in the Human Viral Challenge Model. Methods and Strain Selection We chose an H3N2 influenza subtype, rather than H1N1, given that this strain has the most substantial impact in terms of morbidity or mortality annually as described by the Centre for Disease Control. We first subjected the virus batch to rigorous adventitious agent testing, confirmed the virus to be wild-type by Sanger sequencing and determined the virus titres appropriate for human use via the established ferret model. We built on our previous experience with other H3N2 and H1N1 viruses to develop this unique model. Human Challenge and Conclusions We conducted an initial safety and characterisation study in healthy adult volunteers, utilising our unique clinical quarantine facility in London, UK. In this study we demonstrated this new influenza (H3N2) challenge virus to be both safe and pathogenic with an appropriate level of disease in volunteers. Furthermore, by inoculating volunteers with a range of different inoculum titres, we established the minimum infectious titre required to achieve reproducible disease whilst ensuring a sensitive model that can be translated to design of subsequent field based studies. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02525055 PMID:26761707

  12. Outbreak of H3N2 Influenza at a US Military Base in Djibouti during the H1N1 Pandemic of 2009

    PubMed Central

    Cosby, Michael T.; Pimentel, Guillermo; Nevin, Remington L.; Fouad Ahmed, Salwa; Klena, John D.; Amir, Ehab; Younan, Mary; Browning, Robert; Sebeny, Peter J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Influenza pandemics have significant operational impact on deployed military personnel working in areas throughout the world. The US Department of Defense global influenza-like illness (ILI) surveillance network serves an important role in establishing baseline trends and can be leveraged to respond to outbreaks of respiratory illness. Objective We identified and characterized an operationally unique outbreak of H3N2 influenza at Camp Lemonnier, Djibouti occurring simultaneously with the H1N1 pandemic of 2009 [A(H1N1)pdm09]. Methods Enhanced surveillance for ILI was conducted at Camp Lemonnier in response to local reports of a possible outbreak during the A(H1N1)pdm09 pandemic. Samples were collected from consenting patients presenting with ILI (utilizing a modified case definition) and who completed a case report form. Samples were cultured and analyzed using standard real-time reverse transcriptase PCR (rt-RT-PCR) methodology and sequenced genetic material was phylogenetically compared to other published strains. Results rt-RT-PCR and DNA sequencing revealed that 25 (78%) of the 32 clinical samples collected were seasonal H3N2 and only 2 (6%) were A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza. The highest incidence of H3N2 occurred during the month of May and 80% of these were active duty military personnel. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that sequenced H3N2 strains were genetically similar to 2009 strains from the United States of America, Australia, and South east Asia. Conclusions This outbreak highlights challenges in the investigation of influenza among deployed military populations and corroborates the public health importance of maintaining surveillance systems for ILI that can be enhanced locally when needed. PMID:24339995

  13. Determination of antigenicity-altering patches on the major surface protein of human influenza A/H3N2 viruses.

    PubMed

    Kratsch, Christina; Klingen, Thorsten R; Mümken, Linda; Steinbrück, Lars; McHardy, Alice C

    2016-01-01

    Human influenza viruses are rapidly evolving RNA viruses that cause short-term respiratory infections with substantial morbidity and mortality in annual epidemics. Uncovering the general principles of viral coevolution with human hosts is important for pathogen surveillance and vaccine design. Protein regions are an appropriate model for the interactions between two macromolecules, but the currently used epitope definition for the major antigen of influenza viruses, namely hemagglutinin, is very broad. Here, we combined genetic, evolutionary, antigenic, and structural information to determine the most relevant regions of the hemagglutinin of human influenza A/H3N2 viruses for interaction with human immunoglobulins. We estimated the antigenic weights of amino acid changes at individual sites from hemagglutination inhibition data using antigenic tree inference followed by spatial clustering of antigenicity-altering protein sites on the protein structure. This approach determined six relevant areas (patches) for antigenic variation that had a key role in the past antigenic evolution of the viruses. Previous transitions between successive predominating antigenic types of H3N2 viruses always included amino acid changes in either the first or second antigenic patch. Interestingly, there was only partial overlap between the antigenic patches and the patches under strong positive selection. Therefore, besides alterations of antigenicity, other interactions with the host may shape the evolution of human influenza A/H3N2 viruses.

  14. Genetic analysis of H3N2 avian influenza viruses isolated from live poultry markets and poultry slaughterhouses in Shanghai, China in 2013.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dequan; Liu, Jian; Ju, Houbin; Ge, Feifei; Wang, Jian; Li, Xin; Zhou, Jinping; Liu, Peihong

    2015-08-01

    Five H3N2 avian influenza viruses (AIVs) were isolated from live poultry markets (LPMs) and poultry slaughterhouses in Shanghai, China in 2013. All viruses were characterized by whole-genome sequencing with subsequent genetic comparison and phylogenetic analysis. The hemagglutinin cleavage site of all viruses indicated that the five strains were low-pathogenic AIVs. Phylogenetic analysis of all eight viral genes showed that the five H3N2 viruses clustered in the Eurasian lineage of influenza viruses. The eight genes showed evidence of reassortment events between these H3 subtype viruses and other subtype viruses, especially H5 and H7 subtypes, probably in pigeons, domestic ducks, and wild birds. These findings emphasized the importance of AIV surveillance in LPMs and poultry slaughterhouses for understanding the genesis and emergence of novel reassortants with pandemic potential.

  15. Clinical and serologic effects of Alice strain live attenuated influenza A (H3N2) virus vaccine in an adult population.

    PubMed

    Miller, L W; Togo, Y; Hornick, R B

    1975-12-30

    Alice strain live attenuated influenza A (H3N2) virus was evaluated in prison volunteers. By random double blind allocation, 94 volunteers received Alice strain vaccine (AS) intranasally and 97 received placebo. The vaccine was well tolerated, and there was no serious morbidity. The number, type, duration, and severity of symptoms was not significantly different between the vaccine and placebo groups. Seventy-five per cent of vaccines with initial HAI titers less than or equal to 1:8 had 4 fold or greater titer responses on day 30. Placebo recipients experienced no titer changes. The GMT among vaccinees increased from 23.5 prior to vaccination 59.7 30 days later. Surveillance activities failed to document influenza A (H3N2) infection in the volunteer population during a 6 month follow-up period. Additional studies on the protective effects of the vaccine are required before efficacy can be determined.

  16. 2011–12 Seasonal Influenza Vaccines Effectiveness against Confirmed A(H3N2) Influenza Hospitalisation: Pooled Analysis from a European Network of Hospitals. A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Rondy, Marc; Puig-Barbera, Joan; Launay, Odile; Duval, Xavier; Castilla, Jesús; Guevara, Marcela; Costanzo, Simona; de Gaetano Donati, Katleen; Moren, Alain

    2013-01-01

    Background Influenza vaccination strategies aim at protecting high-risk population from severe outcomes. Estimating the effectiveness of seasonal vaccines against influenza related hospitalisation is important to guide these strategies. Large sample size is needed to have precise estimate of influenza vaccine effectiveness (IVE) against severe outcomes. We assessed the feasibility of measuring seasonal IVE against hospitalisation with laboratory confirmed influenza through a network of 21 hospitals in the European Union. Methods We conducted a multicentre study in France (seven hospitals), Italy (one hospital), and Navarra (four hospitals) and Valencia (nine hospitals) regions in Spain. All ≥18 years hospitalised patients presenting an influenza-like illness within seven days were swabbed. Cases were patients RT-PCR positive for influenza A (H3N2); controls were patients negative for any influenza virus. Using logistic regression with study site as a fixed effect we calculated IVE adjusted for potential confounders. We restricted the analyses to those swabbed within four days. Results We included, 375 A(H3N2) cases and 770 controls. The overall adjusted IVE was 24.9% (95%CI–1.8;44.6). Among the target group for vaccination (N = 1058) the adjusted IVE was 28.8% (95%CI:2.8;47.9); it was respectively 36.8% (95%CI:−48.8; 73.1), 42.6% (95%CI:−16.5;71.7), 17.8%(95%CI:−40.8; 52.1) and 37.5% (95%CI:−22.8;68.2) in the age groups 18–64, 65–74, 75–84 and more than 84 years. Discussion Estimation of IVE based on the pooling of data obtained through a European network of hospitals was feasible. Our results suggest a low IVE against hospitalised confirmed influenza in 2011–12. The low IVE may be explained by a poor immune response in the high-risk population, imperfect match between vaccine and circulating strain or waning immunity due to a late season. Increased sample size within this network would allow more precise estimates and stratification of the

  17. Summer outbreak of respiratory disease in an Australian prison due to an influenza A/Fujian/411/2002(H3N2)-like virus.

    PubMed Central

    Young, L. C.; Dwyer, D. E.; Harris, M.; Guse, Z.; Noel, V.; Levy, M. H.

    2005-01-01

    An outbreak of influenza A occurred in a prison system in New South Wales, Australia in January 2003 during the southern hemisphere summer. This report documents only the third confirmed outbreak of influenza in a prison environment. The outbreak investigation included case ascertainment, state-wide surveillance, a case-control study and interventions to limit the outbreak such as infection control, quarantine, cohorting of cases, and the use of antiviral medication for prophylaxis. A total of 37 clinical cases were identified. Influenza A virus was detected in 11 of the 22 respiratory tract specimens collected. The virus was typed as an influenza A/Fujian/411/2002 (H3N2)-like virus. This strain subsequently became the predominant virus strain during the northern hemisphere winter and the following 2003 Australian southern hemisphere winter influenza season. PMID:15724717

  18. Impact of influenza in the post-pandemic phase: Clinical features in hospitalized patients with influenza A (H1N1) pdm09 and H3N2 viruses, during 2013 in Santa Fe, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Kusznierz, Gabriela; Carolina, Cudós; Manuel, Rudi Juan; Sergio, Lejona; Lucila, Ortellao; Julio, Befani; Mirta, Villani; Pedro, Morana; Graciana, Morera; Andrea, Uboldi; Elsa, Zerbini

    2016-12-22

    It is important to characterize the clinical and epidemiological pattern of the influenza A (H1N1) pdm09 virus and compare it with influenza A (H3N2) virus, as surveyed in just a few studies, in order to contribute to the implementation and strengthening of influenza control and prevention strategies. The aims in this study were to describe influenza clinical and epidemiological characteristics in hospitalized patients, caused by influenza A (H1N1)pdm09 and influenza A (H3N2) viruses during 2013, in Santa Fe, Argentina. A retrospective study was conducted over 2013 among hospitalized patients with laboratory-confirmed influenza diagnosis. In contrast to patients with influenza A (H3N2) (20.5%), a higher proportion of hospitalizations associated with influenza H1N1pdm were reported among adults aged 35-65 years (42.8%). Of all patients, 73.6% had an underlying medical condition. Hospitalized patients with H1N1pdm were subject to 2.6 (95%CI, 1.0-6.8) times higher risk of severity, than those hospitalized with influenza A (H3N2). This results demonstrate the impact in the post-pandemic era of H1N1pdm virus, with increased risk of severe disease, in relation to H3N2 virus, both viruses co-circulating during 2013.

  19. A Multiplex RT-PCR Assay for Detection and Differentiation of Avian-Origin Canine H3N2, Equine-Origin H3N8, Human-Origin H3N2, and H1N1/2009 Canine Influenza Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Honglei; Pu, Juan; Liu, Jinhua; Sun, Yipeng

    2017-01-01

    Virological and serological surveys have documented that H1N1/2009, avian-origin canine H3N2 (cH3N2), seasonal human-origin H3N2 (hH3N2), and equine-origin H3N8 influenza viruses are consistently circulating in dogs. In the present study, a multiplex reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (mRT-PCR) assay was developed for simultaneous detection and differentiation of these influenza viruses. Four primer sets were designed to target the hemagglutinin genes of H1N1/2009, cH3N2, hH3N2, and H3N8 canine influenza viruses (CIVs). This mRT-PCR assay demonstrated high specificity and sensitivity for the four CIV subtypes. Additionally, mRT-PCR results obtained from 420 clinical samples were consistent with those obtained by the conventional virus isolation method. Our mRT-PCR assay is reliable for clinical diagnosis and rapid identification of CIVs. PMID:28107507

  20. A Multiplex RT-PCR Assay for Detection and Differentiation of Avian-Origin Canine H3N2, Equine-Origin H3N8, Human-Origin H3N2, and H1N1/2009 Canine Influenza Viruses.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chenxi; Wang, Qian; Hu, Junyi; Sun, Honglei; Pu, Juan; Liu, Jinhua; Sun, Yipeng

    2017-01-01

    Virological and serological surveys have documented that H1N1/2009, avian-origin canine H3N2 (cH3N2), seasonal human-origin H3N2 (hH3N2), and equine-origin H3N8 influenza viruses are consistently circulating in dogs. In the present study, a multiplex reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (mRT-PCR) assay was developed for simultaneous detection and differentiation of these influenza viruses. Four primer sets were designed to target the hemagglutinin genes of H1N1/2009, cH3N2, hH3N2, and H3N8 canine influenza viruses (CIVs). This mRT-PCR assay demonstrated high specificity and sensitivity for the four CIV subtypes. Additionally, mRT-PCR results obtained from 420 clinical samples were consistent with those obtained by the conventional virus isolation method. Our mRT-PCR assay is reliable for clinical diagnosis and rapid identification of CIVs.

  1. The effects of a deleterious mutation load on patterns of influenza A/H3N2's antigenic evolution in humans.

    PubMed

    Koelle, Katia; Rasmussen, David A

    2015-09-15

    Recent phylogenetic analyses indicate that RNA virus populations carry a significant deleterious mutation load. This mutation load has the potential to shape patterns of adaptive evolution via genetic linkage to beneficial mutations. Here, we examine the effect of deleterious mutations on patterns of influenza A subtype H3N2's antigenic evolution in humans. By first analyzing simple models of influenza that incorporate a mutation load, we show that deleterious mutations, as expected, act to slow the virus's rate of antigenic evolution, while making it more punctuated in nature. These models further predict three distinct molecular pathways by which antigenic cluster transitions occur, and we find phylogenetic patterns consistent with each of these pathways in influenza virus sequences. Simulations of a more complex phylodynamic model further indicate that antigenic mutations act in concert with deleterious mutations to reproduce influenza's spindly hemagglutinin phylogeny, co-circulation of antigenic variants, and high annual attack rates.

  2. Adjuvanted inactivated influenza A(H3N2) vaccines induce stronger immunogenicity in mice and confer higher protection in ferrets than unadjuvanted inactivated vaccines.

    PubMed

    Ann, Julie; Samant, Mukesh; Rheaume, Chantal; Dumas, Carole; Beaulieu, Edith; Morasse, Audrey; Mallett, Corey; Hamelin, Marie-Eve; Papadopoulou, Barbara; Boivin, Guy

    2014-09-29

    Influenza viruses are major respiratory pathogens and the development of improved vaccines to prevent these infections is of high priority. Here, we evaluated split inactivated A(H3N2) vaccines (A/Uruguay/716/2007) combined or not with adjuvants (AS03, AS25 and Protollin) and administered by three different routes, intramuscular (i.m.), intranasal (i.n.) or intradermal (i.d.), both in BALB/c mice and in ferrets. Ferrets were challenged with the homologous strain A/Uruguay/716/2007 (H3N2) or the heterologous strain A/Perth/16/2009 (H3N2) 4 weeks after the second immunization with A/Uruguay/716/2007 vaccines. Temperature, weight loss and clinical signs were monitored on a daily basis and nasal washes were performed to evaluate viral titers in the upper respiratory tract. All adjuvanted vaccines induced stronger humoral immune responses than unadjuvanted ones in both mice and ferrets. In mice, the AS03- and AS25-adjuvanted i.m. vaccines generated a mixed Th1-Th2 response at 6 and 19 weeks after the last immunization as shown by the production of IgG1 and IgG2a antibodies as well as the production of IL-2, IL-4 and IFN-γ by CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. HAI and MN titers were also higher in those groups when compared to the i.n. Protollin-adjuvanted and unadjuvanted groups. The Protollin-adjuvanted i.n. vaccine induced a more Th1 oriented response with a significant production of IgA in bronchoalveolar lavages. In ferrets, the AS03- and AS25-adjuvanted i.m. vaccines also induced higher HAI and MN titers compared to the other groups. These vaccines also significantly decreased viral titers after challenge with both the homologous A/Uruguay/716/2007 (H3N2) and the heterologous A/Perth/16/2009 (H3N2) strains. In conclusion, adjuvanted influenza vaccines elicited stronger humoral response in mice and conferred greater protection in naive ferrets than unadjuvanted ones. Interestingly, the AS25 adjuvant system containing monophosphoryl-lipid-A appears particularly promising for

  3. Antiviral activity of chlorogenic acid against influenza A (H1N1/H3N2) virus and its inhibition of neuraminidase

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Yue; Cao, Zeyu; Cao, Liang; Ding, Gang; Wang, Zhenzhong; Xiao, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Lonicera japonica Thunb, rich in chlorogenic acid (CHA), is used for viral upper respiratory tract infection treatment caused by influenza virus, parainfluenza virus, and respiratory syncytial virus, ect in China. It was reported that CHA reduced serum hepatitis B virus level and death rate of influenza virus-infected mice. However, the underlying mechanisms of CHA against the influenza A virus have not been fully elucidated. Here, the antiviral effects and potential mechanisms of CHA against influenza A virus were investigated. CHA revealed inhibitory against A/PuertoRico/8/1934(H1N1) (EC50 = 44.87 μM), A/Beijing/32/92(H3N2) (EC50 = 62.33 μM), and oseltamivir-resistant strains. Time-course analysis showed CHA inhibited influenza virus during the late stage of infectious cycle. Indirect immunofluorescence assay indicated CHA down-regulated the NP protein expression. The inhibition of neuraminidase activity confirmed CHA blocked release of newly formed virus particles from infected cells. Intravenous injection of 100 mg/kg/d CHA possessed effective antiviral activity in mice, conferring 60% and 50% protection from death against H1N1 and H3N2, reducing virus titres and alleviating inflammation in the lungs effectively. These results demonstrate that CHA acts as a neuraminidase blocker to inhibit influenza A virus both in cellular and animal models. Thus, CHA has potential utility in the treatment of the influenza virus infection. PMID:28393840

  4. Characterization of Drug-Resistant Influenza Virus A(H1N1) and A(H3N2) Variants Selected In Vitro with Laninamivir

    PubMed Central

    Samson, Mélanie; Abed, Yacine; Desrochers, François-Marc; Hamilton, Stephanie; Luttick, Angela; Tucker, Simon P.; Pryor, Melinda J.

    2014-01-01

    Neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs) play a major role for managing influenza virus infections. The widespread oseltamivir resistance among 2007-2008 seasonal A(H1N1) viruses and community outbreaks of oseltamivir-resistant A(H1N1)pdm09 strains highlights the need for additional anti-influenza virus agents. Laninamivir is a novel long-lasting NAI that has demonstrated in vitro activity against influenza A and B viruses, and its prodrug (laninamivir octanoate) is in phase II clinical trials in the United States and other countries. Currently, little information is available on the mechanisms of resistance to laninamivir. In this study, we first performed neuraminidase (NA) inhibition assays to determine the activity of laninamivir against a set of influenza A viruses containing NA mutations conferring resistance to one or many other NAIs. We also generated drug-resistant A(H1N1) and A(H3N2) viruses under in vitro laninamivir pressure. Laninamivir demonstrated a profile of susceptibility that was similar to that of zanamivir. More specifically, it retained activity against oseltamivir-resistant H275Y and N295S A(H1N1) variants and the E119V A(H3N2) variant. In vitro, laninamivir pressure selected the E119A NA substitution in the A/Solomon Islands/3/2006 A(H1N1) background, whereas E119K and G147E NA changes along with a K133E hemagglutinin (HA) substitution were selected in the A/Quebec/144147/2009 A(H1N1)pdm09 strain. In the A/Brisbane/10/2007 A(H3N2) background, a large NA deletion accompanied by S138A/P194L HA substitutions was selected. This H3N2 variant had altered receptor-binding properties and was highly resistant to laninamivir in plaque reduction assays. Overall, we confirmed the similarity between zanamivir and laninamivir susceptibility profiles and demonstrated that both NA and HA changes can contribute to laninamivir resistance in vitro. PMID:24957832

  5. Optimization of an enzyme-linked lectin assay suitable for rapid antigenic characterization of the neuraminidase of human influenza A(H3N2) viruses.

    PubMed

    Westgeest, Kim B; Bestebroer, Theo M; Spronken, Monique I J; Gao, Jin; Couzens, Laura; Osterhaus, Albert D M E; Eichelberger, Maryna; Fouchier, Ron A M; de Graaf, Miranda

    2015-06-01

    Antibodies to neuraminidase (NA), the second most abundant surface protein of the influenza virus, contribute to protection against influenza virus infection. Although traditional and miniaturized thiobarbituric acid (TBA) neuraminidase inhibition (NI) assays have been successfully used to characterize the antigenic properties of NA, these methods are cumbersome and not easily amendable to rapid screening. An additional difficulty of the NI assay is the interference by hemagglutinin (HA)-specific antibodies. To prevent interference of HA-specific antibodies, most NI assays are performed with recombinant viruses containing a mismatched HA. However, generation of these viruses is time consuming and unsuitable for large-scale surveillance. The feasibility of using the recently developed enzyme-linked lectin assay (ELLA) to evaluate the antigenic relatedness of NA of wild type A(H3N2) viruses was assessed. Rather than using recombinant viruses, wild type A(H3N2) viruses were used as antigen with ferret sera elicited against recombinant viruses with a mismatched HA. In this study, details of the critical steps that are needed to modify and optimize the NI ELLA in a format that is reproducible, highly sensitive, and useful for influenza virus surveillance to monitor antigenic drift of NA are provided.

  6. H3N2 Influenza Virus Infection Induces Broadly Reactive Hemagglutinin Stalk Antibodies in Humans and Mice

    PubMed Central

    Margine, Irina; Hai, Rong; Albrecht, Randy A.; Obermoser, Gerlinde; Harrod, A. Carson; Banchereau, Jacques; Palucka, Karolina; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Palese, Peter; Treanor, John J.

    2013-01-01

    Broadly neutralizing antibodies directed against the conserved stalk domain of the viral hemagglutinin have attracted increasing attention in recent years. However, only a limited number of stalk antibodies directed against group 2 influenza hemagglutinins have been isolated so far. Also, little is known about the general level of induction of these antibodies by influenza virus vaccination or infection. To characterize the anti-stalk humoral response in the mouse model as well as in humans, chimeric hemagglutinin constructs previously developed in our group were employed in serological assays. Whereas influenza virus infection induced high titers of stalk-reactive antibodies, immunization with inactivated influenza virus vaccines failed to do so in the mouse model. Analysis of serum samples collected from human individuals who were infected by influenza viruses also revealed the induction of stalk-reactive antibodies. Finally, we show that the hemagglutinin stalk-directed antibodies induced in mice and humans have broad reactivity and neutralizing activity in vitro and in vivo. The results of the study point toward the existence of highly conserved epitopes in the stalk domains of group 2 hemagglutinins, which can be targeted for the development of a universal influenza virus vaccine in humans. PMID:23408625

  7. Antiviral Action of Methylated β-Lactoglobulin on the Human Influenza Virus A Subtype H3N2.

    PubMed

    Sitohy, Mahmoud; Besse, Bernard; Billaudel, Sylviane; Haertlé, Thomas; Chobert, Jean-Marc

    2010-06-01

    Antiviral activity of methylated β-lactoglobulin (Met-BLG) against H3N2 infected into MDCK cell lines depended on concentration of Met-BLG, viral load, and duration of infection. IC50% of the hemagglutination activity for 1 and 0.2 MOI (multiplicity of infection) after 24 h of incubation at 37 °C in the presence of 5% CO2 were 20 ± 0.8 and 17 ± 0.7 μg mL(-1) Met-BLG, respectively. Longer incubation period (4 days) was associated with low IC50% of the hemagglutination activity (7.1 ± 0.3 μg mL(-1) Met-BLG) and low IC50% of immuno-fluorescence of viral nucleoproteins (9.7 ± 0.4 μg mL(-1) Met-BLG) when using 0.2 and 0.1 MOI, respectively. A concentration of 25 μg mL(-1) of Met-BLG reduced the amount of replicating virus by about 2 and 1.3 logs when the viral load was 0.01 and 0.1 MOI, respectively, while higher concentrations reduced it by about 5-6 logs. Antiviral action of Met-BLG was coupled with a cellular protective action, which reached 100% when using 0.01 and 0.1 MOI and 83% when using 1.0 MOI. The time of Met-BLG addition after the viral infection was determinant for its antiviral efficacy and for its protection of the infected MDCK cell lines. Anti-hemagglutination action and cell protective action decreased gradually and in parallel with the delay in the time of Met-BLG addition to disappear totally after 10 h delay.

  8. Influenza evolution and H3N2 vaccine effectiveness, with application to the 2014/2015 season

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xi; Deem, Michael W.

    2016-01-01

    Influenza A is a serious disease that causes significant morbidity and mortality, and vaccines against the seasonal influenza disease are of variable effectiveness. In this article, we discuss the use of the pepitope method to predict the dominant influenza strain and the expected vaccine effectiveness in the coming flu season. We illustrate how the effectiveness of the 2014/2015 A/Texas/50/2012 [clade 3C.1] vaccine against the A/California/02/2014 [clade 3C.3a] strain that emerged in the population can be estimated via pepitope. In addition, we show by a multidimensional scaling analysis of data collected through 2014, the emergence of a new A/New Mexico/11/2014-like cluster [clade 3C.2a] that is immunologically distinct from the A/California/02/2014-like strains. PMID:27313229

  9. Viral fusion efficacy of specific H3N2 influenza virus reassortant combinations at single-particle level

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Hung-Lun; Millet, Jean K.; Costello, Deirdre A.; Whittaker, Gary R.; Daniel, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Virus pseudotyping is a useful and safe technique for studying entry of emerging strains of influenza virus. However, few studies have compared different reassortant combinations in pseudoparticle systems, or compared entry kinetics of native viruses and their pseudotyped analogs. Here, vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV)-based pseudovirions displaying distinct influenza virus envelope proteins were tested for fusion activity. We produced VSV pseudotypes containing the prototypical X-31 (H3) HA, either alone or with strain-matched or mismatched N2 NAs. We performed single-particle fusion assays using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy to compare hemifusion kinetics among these pairings. Results illustrate that matching pseudoparticles behaved very similarly to native virus. Pseudoparticles harboring mismatched HA-NA pairings fuse at significantly slower rates than native virus, and NA-lacking pseudoparticles exhibiting the slowest fusion rates. Relative viral membrane HA density of matching pseudoparticles was higher than in mismatching or NA-lacking pseudoparticles. An equivalent trend of HA expression level on cell membranes of HA/NA co-transfected cells was observed and intracellular trafficking of HA was affected by NA co-expression. Overall, we show that specific influenza HA-NA combinations can profoundly affect the critical role played by HA during entry, which may factor into viral fitness and the emergence of new pandemic influenza viruses. PMID:27752100

  10. Viral fusion efficacy of specific H3N2 influenza virus reassortant combinations at single-particle level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Hung-Lun; Millet, Jean K.; Costello, Deirdre A.; Whittaker, Gary R.; Daniel, Susan

    2016-10-01

    Virus pseudotyping is a useful and safe technique for studying entry of emerging strains of influenza virus. However, few studies have compared different reassortant combinations in pseudoparticle systems, or compared entry kinetics of native viruses and their pseudotyped analogs. Here, vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV)-based pseudovirions displaying distinct influenza virus envelope proteins were tested for fusion activity. We produced VSV pseudotypes containing the prototypical X-31 (H3) HA, either alone or with strain-matched or mismatched N2 NAs. We performed single-particle fusion assays using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy to compare hemifusion kinetics among these pairings. Results illustrate that matching pseudoparticles behaved very similarly to native virus. Pseudoparticles harboring mismatched HA-NA pairings fuse at significantly slower rates than native virus, and NA-lacking pseudoparticles exhibiting the slowest fusion rates. Relative viral membrane HA density of matching pseudoparticles was higher than in mismatching or NA-lacking pseudoparticles. An equivalent trend of HA expression level on cell membranes of HA/NA co-transfected cells was observed and intracellular trafficking of HA was affected by NA co-expression. Overall, we show that specific influenza HA-NA combinations can profoundly affect the critical role played by HA during entry, which may factor into viral fitness and the emergence of new pandemic influenza viruses.

  11. Sequence amplification via cell passaging creates spurious signals of positive adaptation in influenza virus H3N2 hemagglutinin

    PubMed Central

    McWhite, Claire D.; Meyer, Austin G.; Wilke, Claus O.

    2016-01-01

    Clinical influenza A virus isolates are frequently not sequenced directly. Instead, a majority of these isolates (~70% in 2015) are first subjected to passaging for amplification, most commonly in non-human cell culture. Here, we find that this passaging leaves distinct signals of adaptation, which can confound evolutionary analyses of the viral sequences. We find distinct patterns of adaptation to Madin-Darby (MDCK) and monkey cell culture absent from unpassaged hemagglutinin sequences. These patterns also dominate pooled datasets not separated by passaging type, and they increase in proportion to the number of passages performed. By contrast, MDCK-SIAT1 passaged sequences seem mostly (but not entirely) free of passaging adaptations. Contrary to previous studies, we find that using only internal branches of influenza virus phylogenetic trees is insufficient to correct for passaging artifacts. These artifacts can only be safely avoided by excluding passaged sequences entirely from subsequent analysis. We conclude that future influenza virus evolutionary analyses should appropriately control for potentially confounding effects of passaging adaptations. PMID:27713835

  12. Evolution of oseltamivir resistance mutations in Influenza A(H1N1) and A(H3N2) viruses during selection in experimentally infected mice.

    PubMed

    Pizzorno, Andrés; Abed, Yacine; Plante, Pier-Luc; Carbonneau, Julie; Baz, Mariana; Hamelin, Marie-Ève; Corbeil, Jacques; Boivin, Guy

    2014-11-01

    The evolution of oseltamivir resistance mutations during selection through serial passages in animals is still poorly described. Herein, we assessed the evolution of neuraminidase (NA) and hemagglutinin (HA) genes of influenza A/WSN/33 (H1N1) and A/Victoria/3/75 (H3N2) viruses recovered from the lungs of experimentally infected BALB/c mice receiving suboptimal doses (0.05 and 1 mg/kg of body weight/day) of oseltamivir over two generations. The traditional phenotypic and genotypic methods as well as deep-sequencing analysis were used to characterize the potential selection of mutations and population dynamics of oseltamivir-resistant variants. No oseltamivir-resistant NA or HA changes were detected in the recovered A/WSN/33 viruses. However, we observed a positive selection of the I222T NA substitution in the recovered A/Victoria/3/75 viruses, with a frequency increasing over time and with an oseltamivir concentration from 4% in the initial pretherapy inoculum up to 28% after two lung passages. Although the presence of mixed I222T viral populations in mouse lungs only led to a minimal increase in oseltamivir 50% enzyme-inhibitory concentrations (IC50s) (by a mean of 5.7-fold) compared to that of the baseline virus, the expressed recombinant A/Victoria/3/75 I222T NA protein displayed a 16-fold increase in the oseltamivir IC50 level compared to that of the recombinant wild type (WT). In conclusion, the combination of serial in vivo passages under neuraminidase inhibitor (NAI) pressure and temporal deep-sequencing analysis enabled, for the first time, the identification and selection of the oseltamivir-resistant I222T NA mutation in an influenza H3N2 virus. Additional in vivo selection experiments with other antivirals and drug combinations might provide important information on the evolution of antiviral resistance in influenza viruses.

  13. NS1 Protein Mutation I64T Affects Interferon Responses and Virulence of Circulating H3N2 Human Influenza A Viruses.

    PubMed

    DeDiego, Marta L; Nogales, Aitor; Lambert-Emo, Kris; Martinez-Sobrido, Luis; Topham, David J

    2016-11-01

    Influenza NS1 protein is the main viral protein counteracting host innate immune responses, allowing the virus to efficiently replicate in interferon (IFN)-competent systems. In this study, we analyzed NS1 protein variability within influenza A (IAV) H3N2 viruses infecting humans during the 2012-2013 season. We also evaluated the impact of the mutations on the ability of NS1 proteins to inhibit host innate immune responses and general gene expression. Surprisingly, a previously unidentified mutation in the double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-binding domain (I64T) decreased NS1-mediated general inhibition of host protein synthesis by decreasing its interaction with cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor 30 (CPSF30), leading to increased innate immune responses after viral infection. Notably, a recombinant A/Puerto Rico/8/34 H1N1 virus encoding the H3N2 NS1-T64 protein was highly attenuated in mice, most likely because of its ability to induce higher antiviral IFN responses at early times after infection and because this virus is highly sensitive to the IFN-induced antiviral state. Interestingly, using peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) collected at the acute visit (2 to 3 days after infection), we show that the subject infected with the NS1-T64 attenuated virus has diminished responses to interferon and to interferon induction, suggesting why this subject could be infected with this highly IFN-sensitive virus. These data demonstrate the importance of influenza virus surveillance in identifying new mutations in the NS1 protein, affecting its ability to inhibit innate immune responses and, as a consequence, the pathogenicity of the virus.

  14. The effects of a deleterious mutation load on patterns of influenza A/H3N2's antigenic evolution in humans

    PubMed Central

    Koelle, Katia; Rasmussen, David A

    2015-01-01

    Recent phylogenetic analyses indicate that RNA virus populations carry a significant deleterious mutation load. This mutation load has the potential to shape patterns of adaptive evolution via genetic linkage to beneficial mutations. Here, we examine the effect of deleterious mutations on patterns of influenza A subtype H3N2's antigenic evolution in humans. By first analyzing simple models of influenza that incorporate a mutation load, we show that deleterious mutations, as expected, act to slow the virus's rate of antigenic evolution, while making it more punctuated in nature. These models further predict three distinct molecular pathways by which antigenic cluster transitions occur, and we find phylogenetic patterns consistent with each of these pathways in influenza virus sequences. Simulations of a more complex phylodynamic model further indicate that antigenic mutations act in concert with deleterious mutations to reproduce influenza's spindly hemagglutinin phylogeny, co-circulation of antigenic variants, and high annual attack rates. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07361.001 PMID:26371556

  15. Paper-based enzyme-free immunoassay for rapid detection and subtyping of influenza A H1N1 and H3N2 viruses.

    PubMed

    Lei, Kin Fong; Huang, Chia-Hao; Kuo, Rei-Lin; Chang, Cheng-Kai; Chen, Kuan-Fu; Tsao, Kuo-Chien; Tsang, Ngan-Ming

    2015-07-09

    Development of rapid screening in the ambulatory environment is the most pressing needs for the control of spread of infectious disease. Despite there are many methods to detect the immunoassay results, quantitative measurement in rapid disease screening is still a great challenge for point-of-care applications. In this work, based on the internal structural protein, i.e., nucleoprotein (NP), and outer surface glycoproteins, i.e., H1 and H3, of the influenza viruses, specific and sensitive immunoassay on paper-based platform was evaluated and confirmed. Detection and subtyping of influenza A H1N1 and H3N2 viruses found in people were demonstrated by colorimetric paper-based sandwich immunoassay. Concentration-dependent response to influenza viruses was shown and the detection limits could achieve 2.7×10(3) pfu/assay for H1 detection and 2.7×10(4) pfu/assay for H3 detection, which are within the clinical relevant level. Moreover, detection of influenza virus from infected cell lysate and clinical samples was demonstrated to further confirm the reliability of the paper-based immunoassay. The use of paper for the development of diagnostic devices has the advantages of lightweight, ease-of-use, and low cost and paper-based immunoassay is appropriate to apply for rapid screening in point-of-care applications.

  16. NS1 Protein Mutation I64T Affects Interferon Responses and Virulence of Circulating H3N2 Human Influenza A Viruses

    PubMed Central

    DeDiego, Marta L.; Nogales, Aitor; Lambert-Emo, Kris; Martinez-Sobrido, Luis

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Influenza NS1 protein is the main viral protein counteracting host innate immune responses, allowing the virus to efficiently replicate in interferon (IFN)-competent systems. In this study, we analyzed NS1 protein variability within influenza A (IAV) H3N2 viruses infecting humans during the 2012-2013 season. We also evaluated the impact of the mutations on the ability of NS1 proteins to inhibit host innate immune responses and general gene expression. Surprisingly, a previously unidentified mutation in the double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-binding domain (I64T) decreased NS1-mediated general inhibition of host protein synthesis by decreasing its interaction with cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor 30 (CPSF30), leading to increased innate immune responses after viral infection. Notably, a recombinant A/Puerto Rico/8/34 H1N1 virus encoding the H3N2 NS1-T64 protein was highly attenuated in mice, most likely because of its ability to induce higher antiviral IFN responses at early times after infection and because this virus is highly sensitive to the IFN-induced antiviral state. Interestingly, using peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) collected at the acute visit (2 to 3 days after infection), we show that the subject infected with the NS1-T64 attenuated virus has diminished responses to interferon and to interferon induction, suggesting why this subject could be infected with this highly IFN-sensitive virus. These data demonstrate the importance of influenza virus surveillance in identifying new mutations in the NS1 protein, affecting its ability to inhibit innate immune responses and, as a consequence, the pathogenicity of the virus. IMPORTANCE Influenza A and B viruses are one of the most common causes of respiratory infections in humans, causing 1 billion infections and between 300,000 and 500,000 deaths annually. Influenza virus surveillance to identify new mutations in the NS1 protein affecting innate immune responses and, as a consequence

  17. Genetic divergence of influenza A NS1 gene in pandemic 2009 H1N1 isolates with respect to H1N1 and H3N2 isolates from previous seasonal epidemics

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The Influenza A pandemic sustained by a new H1N1 variant (H1N1v) started in Mexico and the USA at the end of April 2009 spreading worldwide in a few weeks. In this study we investigate the variability of the NS1 gene of the pandemic H1N1v strain with respect to previous seasonal strains circulating in humans and the potential selection of virus variants through isolation in cell culture. Methods During the period April 27th 2009-Jan 15th 2010, 1633 potential 2009 H1N1v cases have been screened at our center using the CDC detection and typing realtime RT-PCR assays. Virus isolation on MDCK cells was systematically performed in 1/10 positive cases. A subset of 51 H1N1v strains isolated in the period May-September 2009 was selected for NS1 gene sequencing. In addition, 15 H1N1 and 47 H3N2 virus isolates from three previous seasonal epidemics (2006-2009) were analyzed in parallel. Results A low variability in the NS1 amino acid (aa) sequence among H1N1v isolates was shown (aa identity 99.5%). A slightly higher NS1 variability was observed among H1N1 and H3N2 strains from previous epidemics (aa identity 98.6% and 98.9%, respectively). The H1N1v strains were closely related (aa identity 92.1%) to swine reference strain (A/swine/Oklahoma/042169/2008). In contrast, substantial divergence (aa identity 83.4%) with respect to human reference strain A/Brevig Mission/1/1918 and previous epidemic strains H1N1 and H3N2 (aa identity 78.9% and 77.6%, respectively) was shown. Specific sequence signatures of uncertain significance in the new virus variant were a C-terminus deletion and a T215P substitution. Conclusions The H1N1v NS1 gene was more conserved than that of previous epidemic strains. In addition, a closer genetic identity of H1N1v with the swine than the human reference strains was shown. Hot-spots were shown in the H1N1v NS1 aa sequence whose biologic relevance remains to be investigated. PMID:20809948

  18. Human microRNAs profiling in response to influenza A viruses (subtypes pH1N1, H3N2, and H5N1).

    PubMed

    Makkoch, Jarika; Poomipak, Witthaya; Saengchoowong, Suthat; Khongnomnan, Kritsada; Praianantathavorn, Kesmanee; Jinato, Thananya; Poovorawan, Yong; Payungporn, Sunchai

    2016-02-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play an important role in regulation of gene silencing and are involved in many cellular processes including inhibition of infected viral replication. This study investigated cellular miRNA expression profiles operating in response to influenza virus in early stage of infection which might be useful for understanding and control of viral infection. A549 cells were infected with different subtypes of influenza virus (pH1N1, H3N2 and H5N1). After 24 h post-infection, miRNAs were extracted and then used for DNA library construction. All DNA libraries with different indexes were pooled together with equal concentration, followed by high-throughput sequencing based on MiSeq platform. The miRNAs were identified and counted from sequencing data by using MiSeq reporter software. The miRNAs expressions were classified into up and downregulated miRNAs compared to those found in non-infected cells. Mostly, each subtype of influenza A virus triggered the upregulated responses in miRNA expression profiles. Hsa-miR-101, hsa-miR-193b, hsa-miR-23b, and hsa-miR-30e* were upregulated when infected with all three subtypes of influenza A virus. Target prediction results showed that virus infection can trigger genes in cellular process, metabolic process, developmental process and biological regulation. This study provided some insights into the cellular miRNA profiling in response to various subtypes of influenza A viruses in circulation and which have caused outbreaks in human population. The regulated miRNAs might be involved in virus-host interaction or host defense mechanism, which should be investigated for effective antiviral therapeutic interventions.

  19. H3N2 Mismatch of 2014-15 Northern Hemisphere Influenza Vaccines and Head-to-head Comparison between Human and Ferret Antisera derived Antigenic Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Hang; Wan, Xiu-Feng; Ye, Zhiping; Plant, Ewan P.; Zhao, Yangqing; Xu, Yifei; Li, Xing; Finch, Courtney; Zhao, Nan; Kawano, Toshiaki; Zoueva, Olga; Chiang, Meng-Jung; Jing, Xianghong; Lin, Zhengshi; Zhang, Anding; Zhu, Yanhong

    2015-10-01

    The poor performance of 2014-15 Northern Hemisphere (NH) influenza vaccines was attributed to mismatched H3N2 component with circulating epidemic strains. Using human serum samples collected from 2009-10, 2010-11 and 2014-15 NH influenza vaccine trials, we assessed their cross-reactive hemagglutination inhibition (HAI) antibody responses against recent H3 epidemic isolates. All three populations (children, adults, and older adults) vaccinated with the 2014-15 NH egg- or cell-based vaccine, showed >50% reduction in HAI post-vaccination geometric mean titers against epidemic H3 isolates from those against egg-grown H3 vaccine strain A/Texas/50/2012 (TX/12e). The 2014-15 NH vaccines, regardless of production type, failed to further extend HAI cross-reactivity against H3 epidemic strains from previous seasonal vaccines. Head-to-head comparison between ferret and human antisera derived antigenic maps revealed different antigenic patterns among representative egg- and cell-grown H3 viruses characterized. Molecular modeling indicated that the mutations of epidemic H3 strains were mainly located in antibody-binding sites A and B as compared with TX/12e. To improve vaccine strain selection, human serologic testing on vaccination-induced cross-reactivity need be emphasized along with virus antigenic characterization by ferret model.

  20. Genome-Wide Analysis of Evolutionary Markers of Human Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and A(H3N2) Viruses May Guide Selection of Vaccine Strain Candidates.

    PubMed

    Belanov, Sergei S; Bychkov, Dmitrii; Benner, Christian; Ripatti, Samuli; Ojala, Teija; Kankainen, Matti; Kai Lee, Hong; Wei-Tze Tang, Julian; Kainov, Denis E

    2015-11-27

    Here we analyzed whole-genome sequences of 3,969 influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and 4,774 A(H3N2) strains that circulated during 2009-2015 in the world. The analysis revealed changes at 481 and 533 amino acid sites in proteins of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and A(H3N2) strains, respectively. Many of these changes were introduced as a result of random drift. However, there were 61 and 68 changes that were present in relatively large number of A(H1N1)pdm09 and A(H3N2) strains, respectively, that circulated during relatively long time. We named these amino acid substitutions evolutionary markers, as they seemed to contain valuable information regarding the viral evolution. Interestingly, influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and A(H3N2) viruses acquired non-overlapping sets of evolutionary markers. We next analyzed these characteristic markers in vaccine strains recommended by the World Health Organization for the past five years. Our analysis revealed that vaccine strains carried only few evolutionary markers at antigenic sites of viral hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA). The absence of these markers at antigenic sites could affect the recognition of HA and NA by human antibodies generated in response to vaccinations. This could, in part, explain moderate efficacy of influenza vaccines during 2009-2014. Finally, we identified influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and A(H3N2) strains, which contain all the evolutionary markers of influenza A strains circulated in 2015, and which could be used as vaccine candidates for the 2015/2016 season. Thus, genome-wide analysis of evolutionary markers of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and A(H3N2) viruses may guide selection of vaccine strain candidates.

  1. Genome-Wide Analysis of Evolutionary Markers of Human Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and A(H3N2) Viruses May Guide Selection of Vaccine Strain Candidates

    PubMed Central

    Belanov, Sergei S.; Bychkov, Dmitrii; Benner, Christian; Ripatti, Samuli; Ojala, Teija; Kankainen, Matti; Kai Lee, Hong; Wei-Tze Tang, Julian; Kainov, Denis E.

    2015-01-01

    Here we analyzed whole-genome sequences of 3,969 influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and 4,774 A(H3N2) strains that circulated during 2009–2015 in the world. The analysis revealed changes at 481 and 533 amino acid sites in proteins of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and A(H3N2) strains, respectively. Many of these changes were introduced as a result of random drift. However, there were 61 and 68 changes that were present in relatively large number of A(H1N1)pdm09 and A(H3N2) strains, respectively, that circulated during relatively long time. We named these amino acid substitutions evolutionary markers, as they seemed to contain valuable information regarding the viral evolution. Interestingly, influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and A(H3N2) viruses acquired non-overlapping sets of evolutionary markers. We next analyzed these characteristic markers in vaccine strains recommended by the World Health Organization for the past five years. Our analysis revealed that vaccine strains carried only few evolutionary markers at antigenic sites of viral hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA). The absence of these markers at antigenic sites could affect the recognition of HA and NA by human antibodies generated in response to vaccinations. This could, in part, explain moderate efficacy of influenza vaccines during 2009–2014. Finally, we identified influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and A(H3N2) strains, which contain all the evolutionary markers of influenza A strains circulated in 2015, and which could be used as vaccine candidates for the 2015/2016 season. Thus, genome-wide analysis of evolutionary markers of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and A(H3N2) viruses may guide selection of vaccine strain candidates. PMID:26615216

  2. Antigenic and genetic variation in the hemagglutinins of H1N1 and H3N2 human influenza a viruses in the Shanghai area from 2005 to 2008.

    PubMed

    Ren, Xiao-wei; Ju, Li-wen; Yang, Ji-xing; Lv, Xi-hong; Jiang, Lu-fang; Zhao, Nai-qing; Jiang, Qing-wu

    2011-07-01

    Continued rapid evolution of the influenza A virus is responsible for annual epidemics and occasional pandemics in the Shanghai area. In the present study, the representative strains of A/H1N1 and A/H3N2 influenza viruses isolated in the Shanghai area from 2005 to 2008 were antigenically and genetically characterized. The antigenic cartography method was carried out to visualize the hemagglutination-inhibition data. Antigenic differences were detected between circulating A/H1N1 strains isolated from 2005 to 2006 and the epidemic A/H1N1 strains isolated in 2008, which were found to be associated with the amino acid substitution K140E in HA1. The present vaccine strain A/Brisbane/59/2007 is considered to be capable of providing sufficient immunity against most of the circulating A/H1N1 viruses isolated in 2008 from the Shanghai population. The study showed that there were significant antigenic differences between the epidemic A/H3N2 strains isolated in 2007 and 2008, suggesting that antigenic drift had occurred in the A/H3N2 strains isolated in 2008. The P194L mutation was thought to be responsible for the antigenic evolution of influenza A/H3N2 viruses isolated from Shanghai in 2008. Evidence of antigenic drift suggests that the influenza A/H3N2 vaccine component needs to be updated.

  3. Compatibility among polymerase subunit proteins is a restricting factor in reassortment between equine H7N7 and human H3N2 influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Li, Chengjun; Hatta, Masato; Watanabe, Shinji; Neumann, Gabriele; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro

    2008-12-01

    Reassortment is an important driving force for influenza virus evolution, and a better understanding of the factors that affect this process could improve our ability to respond to future influenza pandemics and epidemics. To identify factors that restrict the generation of reassortant viruses, we cotransfected human embryonic kidney cells with plasmids for the synthesis of viral RNAs of both A/equine/Prague/1/56 (Prague; H7N7) and A/Yokohama/2017/03 (Yokohama; H3N2) viruses together with the supporting protein expression plasmids. Of the possible 256 genotypes, we identified 29 genotypes in 120 randomly plaque-picked reassortants examined. Analyses of these reassortants suggested that the formation of functional ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complexes was a restricting factor, a finding that correlated with the activities of RNP complexes composed of different combinations of the proteins from the two viruses, as measured in a minigenome assay. For at least one nonfunctional RNP complex (i.e., Prague PB2, Prague PB1, Yokohama PA, and Prague NP), the lack of activity was due to the inability of the three polymerase subunit proteins to form a heterotrimer. Adaptation of viruses possessing a gene encoding a chimera of the PA proteins of the two viruses and the remaining genes from Prague virus resulted in compensatory mutations in the PB2 and/or PA protein. These results indicate substantial incompatibility among the gene products of the two test viruses, a critical role for the RNP complex in the generation of reassortant viruses, and a functional interaction of PB2 and PA.

  4. Bayesian phylogeography of influenza A/H3N2 for the 2014-15 season in the United States using three frameworks of ancestral state reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Suchard, Marc A.

    2017-01-01

    Ancestral state reconstructions in Bayesian phylogeography of virus pandemics have been improved by utilizing a Bayesian stochastic search variable selection (BSSVS) framework. Recently, this framework has been extended to model the transition rate matrix between discrete states as a generalized linear model (GLM) of genetic, geographic, demographic, and environmental predictors of interest to the virus and incorporating BSSVS to estimate the posterior inclusion probabilities of each predictor. Although the latter appears to enhance the biological validity of ancestral state reconstruction, there has yet to be a comparison of phylogenies created by the two methods. In this paper, we compare these two methods, while also using a primitive method without BSSVS, and highlight the differences in phylogenies created by each. We test six coalescent priors and six random sequence samples of H3N2 influenza during the 2014–15 flu season in the U.S. We show that the GLMs yield significantly greater root state posterior probabilities than the two alternative methods under five of the six priors, and significantly greater Kullback-Leibler divergence values than the two alternative methods under all priors. Furthermore, the GLMs strongly implicate temperature and precipitation as driving forces of this flu season and nearly unanimously identified a single root state, which exhibits the most tropical climate during a typical flu season in the U.S. The GLM, however, appears to be highly susceptible to sampling bias compared with the other methods, which casts doubt on whether its reconstructions should be favored over those created by alternate methods. We report that a BSSVS approach with a Poisson prior demonstrates less bias toward sample size under certain conditions than the GLMs or primitive models, and believe that the connection between reconstruction method and sampling bias warrants further investigation. PMID:28170397

  5. Early 2016/17 vaccine effectiveness estimates against influenza A(H3N2): I-MOVE multicentre case control studies at primary care and hospital levels in Europe.

    PubMed

    Kissling, Esther; Rondy, Marc

    2017-02-16

    We measured early 2016/17 season influenza vaccine effectiveness (IVE) against influenza A(H3N2) in Europe using multicentre case control studies at primary care and hospital levels. IVE at primary care level was 44.1%, 46.9% and 23.4% among 0-14, 15-64 and ≥ 65 year-olds, and 25.7% in the influenza vaccination target group. At hospital level, IVE was 2.5%, 7.9% and 2.4% among ≥ 65, 65-79 and ≥ 80 year-olds. As in previous seasons, we observed suboptimal IVE against influenza A(H3N2).

  6. Early 2016/17 vaccine effectiveness estimates against influenza A(H3N2): I-MOVE multicentre case control studies at primary care and hospital levels in Europe

    PubMed Central

    Kissling, Esther; Rondy, Marc

    2017-01-01

    We measured early 2016/17 season influenza vaccine effectiveness (IVE) against influenza A(H3N2) in Europe using multicentre case control studies at primary care and hospital levels. IVE at primary care level was 44.1%, 46.9% and 23.4% among 0–14, 15–64 and ≥ 65 year-olds, and 25.7% in the influenza vaccination target group. At hospital level, IVE was 2.5%, 7.9% and 2.4% among ≥ 65, 65–79 and ≥ 80 year-olds. As in previous seasons, we observed suboptimal IVE against influenza A(H3N2). PMID:28230524

  7. Enhanced Pneumonia With Pandemic 2009 A/H1N1 Swine Influenza Virus in Pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction. Swine influenza A viruses (SIV) in the major swine producing regions of North America consist of multiple subtypes of endemic H1N1, H1N2, and H3N2 derived from swine, avian and human influenza viruses with a triple reassortant internal gene (TRIG) constellation (1). Genetic drift and r...

  8. Moderate influenza vaccine effectiveness against hospitalisation with A(H3N2) and A(H1N1) influenza in 2013–14: Results from the InNHOVE network

    PubMed Central

    Rondy, M.; Castilla, J.; Launay, O.; Costanzo, S.; Ezpeleta, C.; Galtier, F.; de Gaetano Donati, K.; Moren, A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT We conducted a multicentre test negative case control study to estimate the 2013–14 influenza vaccine effectiveness (IVE) against hospitalised laboratory confirmed influenza in 12 hospitals in France, Italy and Spain. We included all ≥18 years hospitalised patients targeted by local influenza vaccination campaign reporting an influenza-like illness within 7 days before admission. We defined as cases patients RT-PCR positive for influenza and as controls those negative for all influenza virus. We used a logistic regression to calculate IVE adjusted for country, month of onset, chronic diseases and age. We included 104 A(H1N1)pdm09, 157 A(H3N2) cases and 585 controls. The adjusted IVE was 42.8% (95%CI: 6.3;65;0) against A(H1N1)pdm09. It was respectively 61.4% (95%CI: −1.9;85.4), 39.4% (95%CI: −32.2;72.2) and 19.7% (95%CI:-148.1;74.0) among patients aged 18–64, 65–79 and ≥80 years. The adjusted IVE against A(H3N2) was 38.1% (95%CI: 8.3;58.2) overall. It was respectively 7.8% (95%CI: −145.3;65.4), 25.6% (95%CI: −36.0;59.2) and 55.2% (95%CI: 15.4;76.3) among patients aged 18–64, 65–79 and ≥80 years. These results suggest a moderate and age varying effectiveness of the 2013–14 influenza vaccine to prevent hospitalised laboratory-confirmed influenza. While vaccination remains the most effective prevention measure, developing more immunogenic influenza vaccines is needed to prevent severe outcomes among target groups. PMID:27065000

  9. Transmissibility of Variant Influenza From Swine to Humans: A Modeling Approach

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Karen K.; Gambhir, Manoj; Finelli, Lyn; Swerdlow, David L.; Ostroff, Stephen; Reed, Carrie

    2015-01-01

    Background Respiratory illness was reported among humans and swine at an agricultural fair in 2011; 3 human infections with an influenza A(H3N2) variant (H3N2v) virus were confirmed. Using epidemiologic investigation data, we sought to estimate H3N2v transmissibility from swine to humans. Methods We developed a model of H3N2v transmission among swine and humans and fit it to data from a cohort of 100 agricultural club members reporting swine contact to estimate transmissibility. A sensitivity analysis was performed varying H3N2v prevalence in the club cohort. Using the best-fit transmission probability, we simulated the number of swine-acquired infections among all fair attendees. Results We estimated the best-fit probability of swine-to-human H3N2v transmission per minute of swine contact. Applying this probability to 14 910 people with swine contact at the fair, we estimate that there were 80 (95% confidence interval [CI], 40–133) H3N2v infections among persons aged <20 years and 58 (95% CI, 29–96) H3N2v infections among person aged ≥20 years. Conclusions Using early data from investigation of a new virus with unclear transmission properties, we estimated the transmissibility of H3N2v from swine to humans and the burden of H3N2v among fair attendees. Although the risk of H3N2v virus infection is small for fair attendees with minimal swine contact, large populations attend agricultural events each year, and human cases will likely occur when infected swine are present. PMID:23794727

  10. [Characterization of a nonspecific inhibitor found in human sera raised against the 2006/07 influenza vaccine strain A/Hiroshima/52/2005 (H3N2) virus].

    PubMed

    Maeda, Akiko; Morikawa, Saeko; Kase, Tetsuo; Irie, Sin; Hirota, Yoshio

    2012-07-01

    The serology of influenza viruses typically uses hemagglutination inhibition (HI) or the neutralization test (NT). However, the sera of many humans and animals contain nonspecific inhibitors of hemagglutinin that must be inactivated or removed from the serum before use in the HI assay. Any nonspecific inhibitor in human serum is typically inactivated by pre-treatment with receptor-destroying enzyme (RDE). However, during the 2006/07 influenza circulating season, we observed that influenza vaccine strain A/Hiroshima/52/ 2005 (H3N2) exhibited susceptibility to an RDE-resistant inhibitor in human serum. We report herein on a preliminary characterization of this inhibitor, including the development of a novel inhibitor-inactivating technique for pre-treatment of human serum to be used for HI with the A/Hiroshima/52/2005 (H3N2) virus.

  11. Comparison of live, attenuated H1N1 and H3N2 cold-adapted and avian-human influenza A reassortant viruses and inactivated virus vaccine in adults.

    PubMed

    Sears, S D; Clements, M L; Betts, R F; Maassab, H F; Murphy, B R; Snyder, M H

    1988-12-01

    The infectivity, immunogenicity, and efficacy of live, attenuated influenza A/Texas/1/85 (H1N1) and A/Bethesda/1/85 (H3N2) avian-human (ah) and cold-adapted (ca) reassortant vaccines were compared in 252 seronegative adult volunteers. The immunogenicity and efficacy of the H1N1 reassortant vaccine were also compared with those of the trivalent inactivated virus vaccine. Each reassortant vaccine was satisfactorily attenuated. The 50% human infectious dose was 10(4.9) for ca H1N1, 10(5.4) for ah H1N1, 10(6.4) for ca H3N2, and 10(6.5) TCID50 for ah H3N2 reassortant virus. Within a subtype, the immunogenicities of ah and ca vaccines were comparable. Five to seven weeks after vaccination, volunteers were challenged with homologous wild-type influenza A virus. The magnitude of shedding of virus after challenge was greater than 100-fold less in H1N1 vaccinees and greater than 10-fold less in H3N2 vaccinees compared with unimmunized controls. The vaccines were equally efficacious, as indicated by an 86%-100% reduction in illness. Thus, the ah A/Mallard/New York/6750/78 and the ca A/Ann Arbor/6/60 reassortant viruses are comparable.

  12. Serological Evidence and Risk Factors for Swine Influenza Infections among Chinese Swine Workers in Guangdong Province

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Mengmeng; Anderson, Benjamin D.; Wang, Tao; Chen, Yingan; Zhang, Dingmei; Gray, Gregory C.; Lu, Jiahai

    2015-01-01

    During July to September 2014, we performed a controlled, cross-sectional, seroepidemiologic study among 203 swine workers and 115 control subjects in Guangdong Province. Sera were tested using a hemagglutination inhibition assay against locally-isolated swine H3N2 and H1N1 viruses and commercially-obtained human influenza viral antigens. We found swine workers had a greater prevalence and odds of seropositivity against the swine H3N2 virus (17.3% vs. 7.0%; adjusted OR, 3.4; 95% CI, 1.1 -10.7). Younger age, self-report of a respiratory illness during the last 12 months, and seropositivity against seasonal H3N2 virus were identified as significant risk factors for seropositivity against swine H3N2 virus. As swine workers in China may be exposed to novel influenza viruses, it seems prudent for China to conduct special surveillance for such viruses among them. It also seems wise to offer such workers seasonal influenza vaccines with a goal to reduce cross-species influenza virus transmission. PMID:26016740

  13. Serological Evidence and Risk Factors for Swine Influenza Infections among Chinese Swine Workers in Guangdong Province.

    PubMed

    Ma, Mengmeng; Anderson, Benjamin D; Wang, Tao; Chen, Yingan; Zhang, Dingmei; Gray, Gregory C; Lu, Jiahai

    2015-01-01

    During July to September 2014, we performed a controlled, cross-sectional, seroepidemiologic study among 203 swine workers and 115 control subjects in Guangdong Province. Sera were tested using a hemagglutination inhibition assay against locally-isolated swine H3N2 and H1N1 viruses and commercially-obtained human influenza viral antigens. We found swine workers had a greater prevalence and odds of seropositivity against the swine H3N2 virus (17.3% vs. 7.0%; adjusted OR, 3.4; 95% CI, 1.1 -10.7). Younger age, self-report of a respiratory illness during the last 12 months, and seropositivity against seasonal H3N2 virus were identified as significant risk factors for seropositivity against swine H3N2 virus. As swine workers in China may be exposed to novel influenza viruses, it seems prudent for China to conduct special surveillance for such viruses among them. It also seems wise to offer such workers seasonal influenza vaccines with a goal to reduce cross-species influenza virus transmission.

  14. [An overview on swine influenza viruses].

    PubMed

    Yang, Shuai; Zhu, Wen-Fei; Shu, Yue-Long

    2013-05-01

    Swine influenza viruses (SIVs) are respiratory pathogens of pigs. They cause both economic bur den in livestock-dependent industries and serious global public health concerns in humans. Because of their dual susceptibility to human and avian influenza viruses, pigs are recognized as intermediate hosts for genetic reassortment and interspecies transmission. Subtypes H1N1, H1N2, and H3N2 circulate in swine populations around the world, with varied origin and genetic characteristics among different continents and regions. In this review, the role of pigs in evolution of influenza A viruses, the genetic evolution of SIVs and interspecies transmission of SIVs are described. Considering the possibility that pigs might produce novel influenza viruses causing more outbreaks and pandemics, routine epidemiological surveillance of influenza viruses in pig populations is highly recommended.

  15. Evaluation of Anti-A/Udorn/307/1972 Antibody Specificity to Influenza A/H3N2 Viruses Using an Evanescent-Field Coupled Waveguide-Mode Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Gopinath, Subash C. B.; Awazu, Koichi; Fujimaki, Makoto; Shimizu, Kazufumi

    2013-01-01

    Discrimination of closely related strains is a key issue, particularly for infectious diseases whose incidence fluctuates according to variations in the season and evolutionary changes. Among infectious diseases, influenza viral infections are a worldwide cause of pandemic disease and mortality. With the emergence of different influenza strains, it is vital to develop a method using antibodies that can differentiate between viral types and subtypes. Ideally, such a system would also be user friendly. In this study, a polyclonal antibody generated against A/Udorn/307/1972 (H3N2) was used as a probe to distinguish between influenza H3N2 viruses based on the interaction between the antibody and hemagglutinin, demonstrating its applicability for viral discrimination. Clear discrimination was demonstrated using an evanescent-field-coupled waveguide-mode sensor, which has appealing characteristics over other methods in the viewpoint of improving the sensitivity, measurement time, portability and usability. Further supporting evidence was obtained using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, hemagglutination-inhibition assays, and infectivity neutralization assays. The results obtained indicate that the polyclonal antibody used here is a potential probe for distinguishing influenza viruses and, with the aid of a handheld sensor it could be used for influenza surveillance. PMID:24339924

  16. Oseltamivir-zanamivir combination therapy is not superior to zanamivir monotherapy in mice infected with influenza A(H3N2) and A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses.

    PubMed

    Pizzorno, Andrés; Abed, Yacine; Rhéaume, Chantal; Boivin, Guy

    2014-05-01

    The efficacy of oseltamivir-zanamivir combination therapy compared to that of monotherapy was evaluated in mice infected with influenza A(H3N2) or A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses. For A(H3N2) virus, zanamivir monotherapy and oseltamivir-zanamivir combination showed significant reduction of mean weight loss compared to oseltamivir. Zanamivir monotherapy also conferred decreased mortality, weight loss and lung viral titers (LVT) compared to oseltamivir for A(H1N1)pdm09 wild-type virus. Intermediate benefits were observed for the oseltamivir-zanamivir combination. For the oseltamivir-resistant A(H1N1)pdm09 H275Y virus, the efficacy of oseltamivir-zanamivir was comparable to that of zanamivir and significantly higher than that of oseltamivir in terms of survival, weight loss and LVT.

  17. Swine Influenza (Swine Flu) in Pigs

    MedlinePlus

    ... in the United States since 2005 Prevention Treatment Influenza Types Seasonal Avian Swine/Variant Pandemic Other Get ... Submit Button Past Newsletters Key Facts about Swine Influenza (Swine Flu) in Pigs Language: English Español ...

  18. NS1 Protein Amino Acid Changes D189N and V194I Affect Interferon Responses, Thermosensitivity, and Virulence of Circulating H3N2 Human Influenza A Viruses.

    PubMed

    Nogales, Aitor; Martinez-Sobrido, Luis; Topham, David J; DeDiego, Marta L

    2017-03-01

    Influenza virus NS1 protein is a nonstructural, multifunctional protein that counteracts host innate immune responses, modulating virus pathogenesis. NS1 protein variability in subjects infected with H3N2 influenza A viruses (IAVs) during the 2010/2011 season was analyzed, and amino acid changes in residues 86, 189, and 194 were found. The consequences of these mutations for the NS1-mediated inhibition of IFN responses and the pathogenesis of the virus were evaluated, showing that NS1 mutations D189N and V194I impaired the ability of the NS1 protein to inhibit general gene expression, most probably because these mutations decreased the binding of NS1 to the cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor 30 (CPSF30). A recombinant A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (PR8) H1N1 virus encoding the H3N2 NS1-D189N protein was slightly attenuated, whereas the virus encoding the H3N2 NS1-V194I protein was further attenuated in mice. The higher attenuation of this virus could not be explained by differences in the ability of the two NS1 proteins to counteract host innate immune responses, indicating that another factor must be responsible. In fact, we showed that the virus encoding the H3N2 NS1-V194I protein demonstrated a temperature-sensitive (ts) phenotype, providing a most likely explanation for the stronger attenuation observed. As far as we know, this is the first description of a mutation in NS1 residue 194 conferring a ts phenotype. These studies are relevant in order to identify new residues important for NS1 functions and in human influenza virus surveillance to assess mutations affecting the pathogenicity of circulating viruses.IMPORTANCE Influenza viral infections represent a serious public health problem, with influenza virus causing a contagious respiratory disease that is most effectively prevented through vaccination. The multifunctional nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) is the main viral factor counteracting the host antiviral response. Therefore, influenza virus surveillance

  19. Newly emerging mutations in the matrix genes of the human influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and A(H3N2) viruses reduce the detection sensitivity of real-time reverse transcription-PCR.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ji-Rong; Kuo, Chuan-Yi; Huang, Hsiang-Yi; Wu, Fu-Ting; Huang, Yi-Lung; Cheng, Chieh-Yu; Su, Yu-Ting; Chang, Feng-Yee; Wu, Ho-Sheng; Liu, Ming-Tsan

    2014-01-01

    New variants of the influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and A(H3N2) viruses were detected in Taiwan between 2012 and 2013. Some of these variants were not detected in clinical specimens using a common real-time reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) assay that targeted the conserved regions of the viral matrix (M) genes. An analysis of the M gene sequences of the new variants revealed that several newly emerging mutations were located in the regions where the primers or probes of the real-time RT-PCR assay bind; these included three mutations (G225A, T228C, and G238A) in the A(H1N1)pdm09 virus, as well as one mutation (C163T) in the A(H3N2) virus. These accumulated mismatch mutations, together with the previously identified C154T mutation of the A(H1N1)pdm09 virus and the C153T and G189T mutations of the A(H3N2) virus, result in a reduced detection sensitivity for the real-time RT-PCR assay. To overcome the loss of assay sensitivity due to mismatch mutations, we established a real-time RT-PCR assay using degenerate nucleotide bases in both the primers and probe and successfully increased the sensitivity of the assay to detect circulating variants of the human influenza A viruses. Our observations highlight the importance of the simultaneous use of different gene-targeting real-time RT-PCR assays for the clinical diagnosis of influenza.

  20. Evolution of the hemagglutinin expressed by human influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and A(H3N2) viruses circulating between 2008-2009 and 2013-2014 in Germany.

    PubMed

    Wedde, Marianne; Biere, Barbara; Wolff, Thorsten; Schweiger, Brunhilde

    2015-10-01

    This report describes the evolution of the influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and A(H3N2) viruses circulating in Germany between 2008-2009 and 2013-2014. The phylogenetic analysis of the hemagglutinin (HA) genes of both subtypes revealed similar evolution of the HA variants that were also seen worldwide with minor exceptions. The analysis showed seven distinct HA clades for A(H1N1)pdm09 and six HA clades for A(H3N2) viruses. Herald strains of both subtypes appeared sporadically since 2008-2009. Regarding A(H1N1)pdm09, herald strains of HA clade 3 and 4 were detected late in the 2009-2010 season. With respect to A(H3N2), we found herald strains of HA clade 3, 4 and 7 between 2009 and 2012. Those herald strains were predominantly seen for minor and not for major HA clades. Generally, amino acid substitutions were most frequently found in the globular domain, including substitutions near the antigenic sites or the receptor binding site. Differences between both influenza A subtypes were seen with respect to the position of the indicated substitutions in the HA. For A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses, we found more substitutions in the stem region than in the antigenic sites. In contrast, in A(H3N2) viruses most changes were identified in the major antigenic sites and five changes of potential glycosylation sites were identified in the head of the HA monomer. Interestingly, we found in seasons with less influenza activity a relatively high increase of substitutions in the head of the HA in both subtypes. This might be explained by the fact that mutations under negative selection are subsequently compensated by secondary mutations to restore important functions e.g. receptor binding properties. A better knowledge of basic evolution strategies of influenza viruses will contribute to the refinement of predictive mathematical models for identifying novel antigenic drift variants.

  1. The human H3N2 influenza viruses A/Victoria/3/75 and A/Hiroshima/52/2005 preferentially bind to α2-3-sialylated monosialogangliosides with fucosylated poly-N-acetyllactosaminyl chains.

    PubMed

    Meisen, Iris; Dzudzek, Tabea; Ehrhardt, Christina; Ludwig, Stephan; Mormann, Michael; Rosenbrück, Regina; Lümen, Regine; Kniep, Bernhard; Karch, Helge; Müthing, Johannes

    2012-08-01

    Among influenza A viruses, subtype H3N2 is the major cause of human influenza morbidity and is associated with seasonal epidemics causing annually half million deaths worldwide. Influenza A virus infection is initiated via hemagglutinin that binds to terminally sialylated glycoconjugates exposed on the surface of target cells. Gangliosides from human granulocytes were probed using thin-layer chromatography overlay assays for their binding potential to H3N2 virus strains A/Victoria/3/75 and A/Hiroshima/52/2005. Highly polar gangliosides with poly-N-acetyllactosaminyl chains showing low chromatographic mobility exhibited strong virus adhesion which was entirely abolished by sialidase treatment. Auxiliary overlay assays using anti-sialyl Lewis(x) (sLe(x)) monoclonal antibodies showed identical binding patterns compared with those performed with the viruses. A comprehensive structural analysis of fractionated gangliosides by electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry revealed sLe(x) gangliosides with terminal Neu5Acα2-3Galβ1-4(Fucα1-3)GlcNAc epitope and extended neolacto (nLc)-series core structures as the preferential virus binding gangliosides. More precisely, sLe(x) gangliosides with nLc8, nLc10 and nLc12Cer cores, carrying sphingosine (d18:1) and a fatty acid with variable chain length (mostly C24:0, C24:1 or C16:0) in the ceramide moiety and one or two additional internal fucose residues in the oligosaccharide portion, were identified as the preferred receptors recognized by H3N2 virus strains A/Victoria/3/75 and A/Hiroshima/52/2005. This study describes glycan-binding requirements of hemagglutinin beyond binding to glycans with a specific sialic acid linkage of as yet undefined neutrophil receptors acting as ligands for H3N2 viruses. In addition, our results pose new questions on the biological and clinical relevance of this unexpected specificity of a subtype of influenza A viruses.

  2. Influenza exposure in United States feral swine populations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hall, J.S.; Minnis, R.B.; Campbell, T.A.; Barras, S.; DeYoung, R.W.; Pabilonia, K.; Avery, M.L.; Sullivan, H.; Clark, L.; McLean, R.G.

    2008-01-01

    Swine play an important role in the disease ecology of influenza. Having cellular receptors in common with birds and humans, swine provide opportunities for mixed infections and potential for genetic reassortment between avian, human, and porcine influenza. Feral swine populations are rapidly expanding in both numbers and range and are increasingly coming into contact with waterfowl, humans, and agricultural operations. In this study, over 875 feral swine were sampled from six states across the United States for serologic evidence of exposure to influenza. In Oklahoma, Florida, and Missouri, USA, no seropositive feral swine were detected. Seropositive swine were detected in California, Mississippi, and Texas, USA. Antibody prevalences in these states were 1% in Mississippi, 5% in California, and 14.4% in Texas. All seropositive swine were exposed to H3N2 subtype, the predominant subtype currently circulating in domestic swine. The only exceptions were in San Saba County, Texas, where of the 15 seropositive samples, four were positive for H1N1 and seven for both H1N1 and H3N2. In Texas, there was large geographical and temporal variation in antibody prevalence and no obvious connection to domestic swine operations. No evidence of exposure to avian influenza in feral swine was uncovered. From these results it is apparent that influenza in feral swine poses a risk primarily to swine production operations. However, because feral swine share habitat with waterfowl, prey on and scavenge dead and dying birds, are highly mobile, and are increasingly coming into contact with humans, the potential for these animals to become infected with avian or human influenza in addition to swine influenza is a distinct possibility. ?? Wildlife Disease Association 2008.

  3. [Antibody response to trivalent anti-influenza vaccination (inactivated virus) A/Texas/1/77 H3N2), A/URSS/90/77 (H1N1), B/Hong Kong/8/73].

    PubMed

    Mancini, G; Andreoni, M; Arangio-Ruiz, G; Sarrecchia, C; Donatelli, I; Resta, S; Rozera, C; Sordillo, P; Rocchi, G

    1982-05-01

    Seventy-five young recruits received an intramuscular dose of anti-influenza virus vaccine containing 300 U.I. of A/Texas/1/77 (H3N2), A/URSS/90/77 (H1N1), B/Hong Kong/8/73 strains. Antibody responses were detected by HI and SRH tests: immunogenicity of the preparation was different for the individual vaccine strain in spite of the similar amount of antigenic content, and the immunity conferred by vaccine strains did not significantly extend to new influenza virus strains which prevailed in 1979/80 winter season with the exception for A/Brazil/11/78 (H1N1).

  4. Role of Preschool and Primary School Children in Epidemics of Influenza A in a Local Community in Japan during Two Consecutive Seasons with A(H3N2) as a Predominant Subtype.

    PubMed

    Mimura, Satoshi; Kamigaki, Taro; Takahashi, Yoshihiro; Umenai, Takamichi; Kudou, Mataka; Oshitani, Hitoshi

    2015-01-01

    Enhanced influenza surveillance was implemented to analyze transmission dynamics particularly driving force of influenza transmission in a community during 2011/12 and 2012/13 seasons in Odate City, Japan. In these two consecutive seasons, influenza A(H3N2) was the predominant influenza A subtype. Suspected influenza cases were tested by commercial rapid test kits. Demographic and epidemiological information of influenza positive cases were recorded using a standardized questionnaire, which included age or age group, date of visit, date of fever onset, and the result of rapid test kit. Epidemiological parameters including epidemic midpoint (EM) and growth rate (GR) were analyzed. In 2012/13 season, numbers of influenza A positive cases were significantly lower among preschool (212 cases) and primary school (224 cases) children than in 2011/12 season (461 and 538 cases, respectively). Simultaneously, total influenza A cases were also reduced from 2,092 in 2011/12 season to 1,846 in 2012/13 season. The EMs in preschool and primary school children were earlier than EMs for adult and all age group in both 2011/12 and 2012/13 seasons. The GR in 2012/13 season was significantly lower than that in 2011/12 season (0.11 and 0.18, respectively, p = 0.003). Multiple linear regression analysis by school districts revealed that GRs in both seasons were significantly correlated with the incidence of school age children. Our findings suggest that preschool and primary school children played an important role as a driving force of epidemics in the community in both 2011/12 and 2012/13 seasons. The reduction of total influenza A cases in 2012/13 season can be explained by decreased susceptible population in these age groups due to immunity acquired by infections in 2011/12 season. Further investigations are needed to investigate the effect of pre-existing immunity on influenza transmission in the community.

  5. Comparative analysis of influenza A(H3N2) virus hemagglutinin specific IgG subclass and IgA responses in children and adults after influenza vaccination.

    PubMed

    Manenti, Alessandro; Tete, Sarah M; Mohn, Kristin G-I; Jul-Larsen, Åsne; Gianchecchi, Elena; Montomoli, Emanuele; Brokstad, Karl A; Cox, Rebecca J

    2017-01-03

    Two different influenza vaccines are generally used in many countries; trivalent live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV3) and trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (IIV3). Studies comparing the antibody response to IIV3 and LAIV3 commonly investigate the seroprotective response by hemagglutination-inhibition (HI) assay. However, there is limited data regarding comparative analysis of IgG subclass and IgA responses induced by LAIV3 and IIV3. Fifteen children <5years received 2 doses of LAIV3 while 14 children aged 10-17years received one dose. In addition, 15 adults were vaccinated with either intranasal LAIV3 or intramuscular IIV3. We analyzed the H3N2 humoral responses by HI assay and the hemagglutinin (HA) specific IgG1, IgG2, IgG3, IgG4 and IgA1 responses by ELISA. Furthermore, we investigated the avidity of induced IgG antibodies. Pre-existing seroprotective HI antibodies were present in adults (73%) previously vaccinated with IIV3. Vaccination resulted in a significant increase in HI titers in all groups, except LAIV3 vaccinated adults. Furthermore, a negative correlation between age and HI titers in LAIV3 vaccinated subjects was observed post-vaccination. LAIV3 in children and IIV3 in adults induced HA-specific IgG1, low IgG3 but no IgG2 or IgG4. Moreover, significant IgA1 responses were only induced in children. Interestingly, IIV3 and LAIV3 induced IgG antibodies with comparable and significantly augmented avidity post-vaccination in children and adults. Our results suggest that age and/or exposure history play a significant role in determining the antibody response. Clinical trial registry: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01003288 and NCT01866540.

  6. Advantage of live attenuated cold-adapted influenza A virus over inactivated vaccine for A/Washington/80 (H3N2) wild-type virus infection.

    PubMed

    Clements, M L; Betts, R F; Murphy, B R

    1984-03-31

    The efficacy of live attenuated cold-adapted (ca) reassortant influenza virus vaccine against experimental challenge with homologous wild-type virus 5 to 8 weeks after vaccination was compared with that of licensed inactivated vaccine in 81 seronegative (haemagglutination-inhibition antibody titre less than or equal to 1:8) college students. At a dose of 10(7.5) 50% tissue culture infectious dose (TCID50) (70 HID50, human 50% infectious doses) the live virus vaccine, given intranasally, completely protected against illness caused by wild-type virus, whereas the inactivated vaccine, administered intramuscularly, provided 72% protection. Wild-type virus was recovered from only 13% of live virus vaccinees (10(7.5) TCID50 dose of ca virus) compared with 63% of inactivated virus vaccinees and the few infected live virus vaccinees shed 1000 times less wild-type virus than did infected inactivated virus vaccinees or unvaccinated controls. This striking reduction in virus shedding suggests that influenza transmission may be more efficiently interrupted with live than with inactivated virus vaccination.

  7. Continual re-introduction of human pandemic H1N1 influenza A viruses into US swine, 2009-2014

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Human-to-swine transmission of pandemic H1N1 influenza viruses (pH1N1) increased the genetic diversity of influenza A viruses in swine (swIAVs) globally and is linked to the emergence of new pandemic threats, including H3N2v variants. Through phylogenetic analysis of contemporary swIAVs in the Unit...

  8. Experimental Evaluation of a Swine Influenza Virus Isolated from a County Fair Outbreak in the United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Since 1998, 3 predominant swine influenza virus (SIV) subtypes have circulated in US swine, H1N1, H1N2, and H3N2. Distinct antigenic and genetic clusters have been demonstrated within the H1 and H3 SIV subtypes (1, 2). In August 2007, pigs and people became clinically affected by an influenza-like i...

  9. History of Swine influenza viruses in Asia.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Huachen; Webby, Richard; Lam, Tommy T Y; Smith, David K; Peiris, Joseph S M; Guan, Yi

    2013-01-01

    The pig is one of the main hosts of influenza A viruses and plays important roles in shaping the current influenza ecology. The occurrence of the 2009 H1N1 pandemic influenza virus demonstrated that pigs could independently facilitate the genesis of a pandemic influenza strain. Genetic analyses revealed that this virus was derived by reassortment between at least two parent swine influenza viruses (SIV), from the northern American triple reassortant H1N2 (TR) and European avian-like H1N1 (EA) lineages. The movement of live pigs between different continents and subsequent virus establishment are preconditions for such a reassortment event to occur. Asia, especially China, has the largest human and pig populations in the world, and seems to be the only region frequently importing pigs from other continents. Virological surveillance revealed that not only classical swine H1N1 (CS), and human-origin H3N2 viruses circulated, but all of the EA, TR and their reassortant variants were introduced into and co-circulated in pigs in this region. Understanding the long-term evolution and history of SIV in Asia would provide insights into the emergence of influenza viruses with epidemic potential in swine and humans.

  10. Swine Influenza/Variant Influenza Viruses

    MedlinePlus

    ... Past Newsletters Information on Swine Influenza/Variant Influenza Virus Language: English Español Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... disease of pigs caused by type A influenza viruses that regularly cause outbreaks of influenza in pigs. ...

  11. Full Genome Characterization of Human Influenza A/H3N2 Isolates from Asian Countries Reveals a Rare Amantadine Resistance-Conferring Mutation and Novel PB1-F2 Polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Zaraket, Hassan; Kondo, Hiroki; Hibino, Akinobu; Yagami, Ren; Odagiri, Takashi; Takemae, Nobuhiro; Tsunekuni, Ryota; Saito, Takehiko; Myint, Yi Yi; Kyaw, Yadanar; Oo, Khin Yi; Tin, Htay Htay; Lin, Nay; Anh, Nguyen Phuong; Hang, Nguyen Le Khanh; Mai, Le Quynh; Hassan, Mohd R; Shobugawa, Yugo; Tang, Julian; Dbaibo, Ghassan; Saito, Reiko

    2016-01-01

    Influenza A viruses evolve at a high rate requiring continuous monitoring to maintain the efficacy of vaccines and antiviral drugs. We performed next generation sequencing analysis of 100 influenza A/H3N2 isolates collected in four Asian countries (Japan, Lebanon, Myanmar, and Vietnam) during 2012-2015. Phylogenetic analysis revealed several reassortment events leading to the circulation of multiple clades within the same season. This was particularly evident during the 2013 and 2013/2014 seasons. Importantly, our data showed that certain lineages appeared to be fitter and were able to persist into the following season. The majority of A/H3N2 viruses continued to harbor the M2-S31N mutation conferring amantadine-resistance. In addition, an S31D mutation in the M2-protein, conferring a similar level of resistance as the S31N mutation, was detected in three isolates obtained in Japan during the 2014/2015 season. None of the isolates possessed the NA-H274Y mutation conferring oseltamivir-resistance, though a few isolates were found to contain mutations at the catalytic residue 151 (D151A/G/N or V) of the NA protein. These variations did not alter the susceptibility to neuraminidase inhibitors and were not detected in the original clinical specimens, suggesting that they had been acquired during their passage in MDCK cells. Novel polymorphisms were detected in the PB1-F2 open-reading frame resulting in truncations in the protein of 24-34 aminoacids in length. Thus, this study has demonstrated the utility of monitoring the full genome of influenza viruses to allow the detection of the potentially fittest lineages. This enhances our ability to predict the strain(s) most likely to persist into the following seasons and predict the potential degree of vaccine match or mismatch with the seasonal influenza season for that year. This will enable the public health and clinical teams to prepare for any related healthcare burden, depending on whether the vaccine match is

  12. Swine origin influenza (swine flu).

    PubMed

    Sebastian, Meghna R; Lodha, Rakesh; Kabra, S K

    2009-08-01

    Swine origin influenza was first recognized in the border area of Mexico and United States in April 2009 and during a short span of two months became the first pandemic. The currently circulating strain of swine origin influenza virus of the H1N1 strain has undergone triple reassortment and contains genes from the avian, swine and human viruses. It is transmitted by droplets or fomites. Incubation period is 2 to 7 days. Common clinical symptoms are indistinguishable by any viral respiratory illness, and include fever, cough, sore throat and myalgia. A feature seen more frequently with swine origin influenza is GI upset. Less than 10% of patients require hospitalization. Patients at risk of developing severe disease are - younger than five years, elderly, pregnant women, with chronic systemic illnesses, adolescents on aspirin. Of the severe manifestations of swine origin influenza, pneumonia and respiratory failure are the most common. Unusual symptoms reported are conjunctivitis, parotitis, hemophagocytic syndrome. Infants may present with fever and lethargy with no respiratory symptoms. Diagnosis is based on RT PCR, Viral culture or increasing neutralizing antibodies. Principle of treatment consist of isolation, universal precautions, good infection control practices, supportive care and use of antiviral drugs. Antiviral drugs effective against H1N1 virus include: oseltamivir and zamanavir. With good supportive care case fatality is less than 1%. Preventive measures include: social distancing, practicing respiratory etiquette, hand hygiene and use of chemoprohylaxis with antiviral drugs. Vaccine against H1N1 is not available at present, but will be available in near future.

  13. Influenza A Viruses of Human Origin in Swine, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Martha I; Schaefer, Rejane; Gava, Danielle; Cantão, Maurício Egídio; Ciacci-Zanella, Janice Reis

    2015-08-01

    The evolutionary origins of the influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus that caused the first outbreak of the 2009 pandemic in Mexico remain unclear, highlighting the lack of swine surveillance in Latin American countries. Although Brazil has one of the largest swine populations in the world, influenza was not thought to be endemic in Brazil's swine until the major outbreaks of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 in 2009. Through phylogenetic analysis of whole-genome sequences of influenza viruses of the H1N1, H1N2, and H3N2 subtypes collected in swine in Brazil during 2009-2012, we identified multiple previously uncharacterized influenza viruses of human seasonal H1N2 and H3N2 virus origin that have circulated undetected in swine for more than a decade. Viral diversity has further increased in Brazil through reassortment between co-circulating viruses, including A(H1N1)pdm09. The circulation of multiple divergent hemagglutinin lineages challenges the design of effective cross-protective vaccines and highlights the need for additional surveillance.

  14. In Silico Identification of Highly Conserved Epitopes of Influenza A H1N1, H2N2, H3N2, and H5N1 with Diagnostic and Vaccination Potential.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Medina, José Esteban; Sánchez-Vallejo, Carlos Javier; Méndez-Tenorio, Alfonso; Monroy-Muñoz, Irma Eloísa; Angeles-Martínez, Javier; Santos Coy-Arechavaleta, Andrea; Santacruz-Tinoco, Clara Esperanza; González-Ibarra, Joaquín; Anguiano-Hernández, Yu-Mei; González-Bonilla, César Raúl; Ramón-Gallegos, Eva; Díaz-Quiñonez, José Alberto

    2015-01-01

    The unpredictable, evolutionary nature of the influenza A virus (IAV) is the primary problem when generating a vaccine and when designing diagnostic strategies; thus, it is necessary to determine the constant regions in viral proteins. In this study, we completed an in silico analysis of the reported epitopes of the 4 IAV proteins that are antigenically most significant (HA, NA, NP, and M2) in the 3 strains with the greatest world circulation in the last century (H1N1, H2N2, and H3N2) and in one of the main aviary subtypes responsible for zoonosis (H5N1). For this purpose, the HMMER program was used to align 3,016 epitopes reported in the Immune Epitope Database and Analysis Resource (IEDB) and distributed in 34,294 stored sequences in the Pfam database. Eighteen epitopes were identified: 8 in HA, 5 in NA, 3 in NP, and 2 in M2. These epitopes have remained constant since they were first identified (~91 years) and are present in strains that have circulated on 5 continents. These sites could be targets for vaccination design strategies based on epitopes and/or as markers in the implementation of diagnostic techniques.

  15. In Silico Identification of Highly Conserved Epitopes of Influenza A H1N1, H2N2, H3N2, and H5N1 with Diagnostic and Vaccination Potential

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-Medina, José Esteban; Sánchez-Vallejo, Carlos Javier; Méndez-Tenorio, Alfonso; Monroy-Muñoz, Irma Eloísa; Angeles-Martínez, Javier; Santos Coy-Arechavaleta, Andrea; Santacruz-Tinoco, Clara Esperanza; González-Ibarra, Joaquín; Anguiano-Hernández, Yu-Mei; González-Bonilla, César Raúl; Ramón-Gallegos, Eva; Díaz-Quiñonez, José Alberto

    2015-01-01

    The unpredictable, evolutionary nature of the influenza A virus (IAV) is the primary problem when generating a vaccine and when designing diagnostic strategies; thus, it is necessary to determine the constant regions in viral proteins. In this study, we completed an in silico analysis of the reported epitopes of the 4 IAV proteins that are antigenically most significant (HA, NA, NP, and M2) in the 3 strains with the greatest world circulation in the last century (H1N1, H2N2, and H3N2) and in one of the main aviary subtypes responsible for zoonosis (H5N1). For this purpose, the HMMER program was used to align 3,016 epitopes reported in the Immune Epitope Database and Analysis Resource (IEDB) and distributed in 34,294 stored sequences in the Pfam database. Eighteen epitopes were identified: 8 in HA, 5 in NA, 3 in NP, and 2 in M2. These epitopes have remained constant since they were first identified (~91 years) and are present in strains that have circulated on 5 continents. These sites could be targets for vaccination design strategies based on epitopes and/or as markers in the implementation of diagnostic techniques. PMID:26346523

  16. Evolutionary Dynamics of Influenza A Viruses in US Exhibition Swine.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Martha I; Wentworth, David E; Das, Suman R; Sreevatsan, Srinand; Killian, Mary L; Nolting, Jacqueline M; Slemons, Richard D; Bowman, Andrew S

    2016-01-15

    The role of exhibition swine in influenza A virus transmission was recently demonstrated by >300 infections with influenza A(H3N2) variant viruses among individuals who attended agricultural fairs. Through active influenza A virus surveillance in US exhibition swine and whole-genome sequencing of 380 isolates, we demonstrate that exhibition swine are actively involved in the evolution of influenza A viruses, including zoonotic strains. First, frequent introduction of influenza A viruses from commercial swine populations provides new genetic diversity in exhibition pigs each year locally. Second, genomic reassortment between viruses cocirculating in exhibition swine increases viral diversity. Third, viral migration between exhibition swine in neighboring states demonstrates that movements of exhibition pigs contributes to the spread of genetic diversity. The unexpected frequency of viral exchange between commercial and exhibition swine raises questions about the understudied interface between these populations. Overall, the complexity of viral evolution in exhibition swine indicates that novel viruses are likely to continually reemerge, presenting threats to humans.

  17. Influenza A Subtype H3 Viruses in Feral Swine, United States, 2011–2012

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Zhixin; Baroch, John A.; Long, Li-Ping; Xu, Yifei; Cunningham, Frederick L.; Pedersen, Kerri; Lutman, Mark W.; Schmit, Brandon S.; Bowman, Andrew S.; DeLiberto, Thomas J.

    2014-01-01

    To determine whether, and to what extent, influenza A subtype H3 viruses were present in feral swine in the United States, we conducted serologic and virologic surveillance during October 2011–September 2012. These animals were periodically exposed to and infected with A(H3N2) viruses, suggesting they may threaten human and animal health. PMID:24751326

  18. Swine influenza viruses: an Asian perspective.

    PubMed

    Choi, Young-Ki; Pascua, Phillippe Noriel Q; Song, Min-Suk

    2013-01-01

    Swine influenza viruses (SIVs) are respiratory viral pathogens of pigs that are capable of causing serious global public health concerns in human. Because of their dual susceptibility to mammalian and avian influenza A viruses, pigs are the leading intermediate hosts for genetic reassortment and interspecies transmission and serve as reservoirs of antigenically divergent human viruses from which zoonotic stains with pandemic potential may arise. Pandemic influenza viruses emerging after the 1918 Spanish flu have originated in asia. Although distinct lineages of North American and European SIVs of the H1N1, H3N2, and HiN2 subtypes have been widely studied, less is known about the porcine viruses that are circulating among pig populations throughout Asia. The current review understanding of Contemporary viruses, human infection with SIVs, and the potential threat of novel pandemic strains are described, Furthermore, to best use the limited resources that are available for comprehensive genetic assessment of influenza, consensus efforts among Asian nations to increase epidemiosurveillance of swine herds is also strongly promoted.

  19. Genetics, evolution, and the zoonotic capacity of European Swine influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Zell, Roland; Scholtissek, Christoph; Ludwig, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    The European swine influenza virus lineage differs genetically from the classical swine influenza viruses and the triple reassortants found in North America and Asia. The avian-like swine H1N1 viruses emerged in 1979 after an avian-to-swine transmission and spread to all major European pig-producing countries. Reassortment of these viruses with seasonal H3N2 viruses led to human-like swine H3N2 viruses which appeared in 1984. Finally, human-like swine H1N2 viruses emerged in 1994. These are triple reassortants comprising genes of avian-like H1N1, seasonal H1N1, and seasonal H3N2 viruses. All three subtypes established persistent infection chains and became prevalent in the European pig population. They successively replaced the circulating classical swine H1N1 viruses of that time and gave rise to a number of reassortant viruses including the pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus. All three European lineages have the capacity to infect humans but zoonotic infections are benign.

  20. Vaccine effectiveness in preventing laboratory-confirmed influenza in primary care patients in a season of co-circulation of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09, B and drifted A(H3N2), I-MOVE Multicentre Case-Control Study, Europe 2014/15.

    PubMed

    Valenciano, Marta; Kissling, Esther; Reuss, Annicka; Rizzo, Caterina; Gherasim, Alin; Horváth, Judit Krisztina; Domegan, Lisa; Pitigoi, Daniela; Machado, Ausenda; Paradowska-Stankiewicz, Iwona Anna; Bella, Antonino; Larrauri, Amparo; Ferenczi, Annamária; Lazar, Mihaela; Pechirra, Pedro; Korczyńska, Monika Roberta; Pozo, Francisco; Moren, Alain

    2016-01-01

    Influenza A(H3N2), A(H1N1)pdm09 and B viruses co-circulated in Europe in 2014/15. We undertook a multicentre case-control study in eight European countries to measure 2014/15 influenza vaccine effectiveness (VE) against medically-attended influenza-like illness (ILI) laboratory-confirmed as influenza. General practitioners swabbed all or a systematic sample of ILI patients. We compared the odds of vaccination of ILI influenza positive patients to negative patients. We calculated adjusted VE by influenza type/subtype, and age group. Among 6,579 ILI patients included, 1,828 were A(H3N2), 539 A(H1N1)pdm09 and 1,038 B. VE against A(H3N2) was 14.4% (95% confidence interval (CI): -6.3 to 31.0) overall, 20.7% (95%CI: -22.3 to 48.5), 10.9% (95%CI -30.8 to 39.3) and 15.8% (95% CI: -20.2 to 41.0) among those aged 0-14, 15-59 and  ≥60  years, respectively. VE against A(H1N1)pdm09 was 54.2% (95%CI: 31.2 to 69.6) overall, 73.1% (95%CI: 39.6 to 88.1), 59.7% (95%CI: 10.9 to 81.8), and 22.4% (95%CI: -44.4 to 58.4) among those aged 0-14, 15-59 and  ≥60 years respectively. VE against B was 48.0% (95%CI: 28.9 to 61.9) overall, 62.1% (95%CI: 14.9 to 83.1), 41.4% (95%CI: 6.2 to 63.4) and 50.4% (95%CI: 14.6 to 71.2) among those aged 0-14, 15-59 and ≥60 years respectively. VE against A(H1N1)pdm09 and B was moderate. The low VE against A(H3N2) is consistent with the reported mismatch between circulating and vaccine strains.

  1. A novel monoclonal antibody effective against lethal challenge with swine-lineage and 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza viruses in mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The HA protein of the 2009 pandemic H1N1viruses (14 H1N1pdm) is antigenically closely related to the HA of classical North American swine H1N1 influenza viruses (cH1N1). Since 1998, through reassortment and incorporation of HA genes from human H3N2 and H1N1 influenza viruses, swine influenza strains...

  2. Influenza A virus infections in swine: pathogenesis and diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Janke, B H

    2014-03-01

    Influenza has been recognized as a respiratory disease in swine since its first appearance concurrent with the 1918 "Spanish flu" human pandemic. All influenza viruses of significance in swine are type A, subtype H1N1, H1N2, or H3N2 viruses. Influenza viruses infect epithelial cells lining the surface of the respiratory tract, inducing prominent necrotizing bronchitis and bronchiolitis and variable interstitial pneumonia. Cell death is due to direct virus infection and to insult directed by leukocytes and cytokines of the innate immune system. The most virulent viruses consistently express the following characteristics of infection: (1) higher or more prolonged virus replication, (2) excessive cytokine induction, and (3) replication in the lower respiratory tract. Nearly all the viral proteins contribute to virulence. Pigs are susceptible to infection with both human and avian viruses, which often results in gene reassortment between these viruses and endemic swine viruses. The receptors on the epithelial cells lining the respiratory tract are major determinants of infection by influenza viruses from other hosts. The polymerases, especially PB2, also influence cross-species infection. Methods of diagnosis and characterization of influenza viruses that infect swine have improved over the years, driven both by the availability of new technologies and by the necessity of keeping up with changes in the virus. Testing of oral fluids from pigs for virus and antibody is a recent development that allows efficient sampling of large numbers of animals.

  3. Serological study of influenza viruses in veterinarians working with swine in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Saavedra-Montañez, Manuel; Castillo-Juárez, Héctor; Sánchez-Betancourt, Iván; Rivera-Benitez, José Francisco; Ramírez-Mendoza, Humberto

    2017-02-23

    Humans and swine are both affected by influenza viruses, and swine are considered a potential source of new influenza viruses. Transmission of influenza viruses across species is well documented. The aim of this study was to evaluate the seroprevalence of different influenza virus subtypes in veterinarians working for the Mexican swine industry, using a hemagglutination inhibition test. All sera tested were collected in July 2011. The data were analysed using a generalized linear model and a linear model to study the possible association of seroprevalence with the age of the veterinarian, vaccination status, and biosecurity level of the farm where they work. The observed seroprevalence was 12.3%, 76.5%, 46.9%, and 11.1% for the human subtypes of pandemic influenza virus (pH1N1), seasonal human influenza virus (hH1N1), the swine subtypes of classical swine influenza virus (swH1N1), and triple-reassortant swine influenza virus (swH3N2), respectively. Statistical analysis indicated that age was associated with hH1N1 seroprevalence (P < 0.05). Similarly, age and vaccination were associated with pH1N1 seroprevalence (P < 0.05). On the other hand, none of the studied factors were associated with swH1N1 and swH3N2 seroprevalence. All of the pH1N1-positive sera were from vaccinated veterinarians, whereas all of those not vaccinated tested negative for this subtype. Our findings suggest that, between the onset of the 2009 pandemic and July 2011, the Mexican veterinarians working in the swine industry did not have immunity to the pH1N1 virus; hence, they would have been at risk for infection with this virus if this subtype had been circulating in swine in Mexico prior to 2011.

  4. Evaluation of Screening Assays for the Detection of Influenza A Virus Serum Antibodies in Swine.

    PubMed

    Goodell, C K; Prickett, J; Kittawornrat, A; Johnson, J; Zhang, J; Wang, C; Zimmerman, J J

    2016-02-01

    Increased surveillance of influenza A virus (IAV) infections in human and swine populations is mandated by public health and animal health concerns. Antibody assays have proven useful in previous surveillance programmes because antibodies provide a record of prior exposure and the technology is inexpensive. The objective of this research was to compare the performance of influenza serum antibody assays using samples collected from pigs (vaccinated or unvaccinated) inoculated with either A/Swine/OH/511445/2007 γ H1N1 virus or A/Swine/Illinois/02907/2009 Cluster IV H3N2 virus and followed for 42 days. Weekly serum samples were tested for anti-IAV antibodies using homologous and heterologous haemagglutination-inhibition (HI) assays, commercial swine influenza H1N1 and H3N2 indirect ELISAs, and a commercial influenza nucleoprotein (NP)-blocking ELISA. The homologous HIs showed 100% diagnostic sensitivity, but largely failed to detect infection with the heterologous virus. With diagnostic sensitivities of 1.4% and 4.9%, respectively, the H1N1 and H3N2 indirect ELISAs were ineffective at detecting IAV antibodies in swine infected with the contemporary influenza viruses used in the study. At a cut-off of S/N ≤ 0.60, the sensitivity and specificity of the NP-blocking ELISA were estimated at 95.5% and 99.6%, respectively. Statistically significant factors which affected S/N results include vaccination status, inoculum (virus subtype), day post-inoculation and the interactions between those factors (P < 0.0001). Serum antibodies against NP provide an ideal universal diagnostic screening target and could provide a cost-effective approach for the detection and surveillance of IAV infections in swine populations.

  5. Neuraminidase Receptor Binding Variants of Human Influenza A(H3N2) Viruses Resulting from Substitution of Aspartic Acid 151 in the Catalytic Site: a Role in Virus Attachment?▿

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yi Pu; Gregory, Victoria; Collins, Patrick; Kloess, Johannes; Wharton, Stephen; Cattle, Nicholas; Lackenby, Angie; Daniels, Rodney; Hay, Alan

    2010-01-01

    Changes in the receptor binding characteristics of human H3N2 viruses have been evident from changes in the agglutination of different red blood cells (RBCs) and the reduced growth capacity of recently isolated viruses, particularly in embryonated eggs. An additional peculiarity of viruses circulating in 2005 to 2009 has been the poor inhibition of hemagglutination by postinfection ferret antisera for many viruses isolated in MDCK cells, including homologous reference viruses. This was shown not to be due to an antigenic change in hemagglutinin (HA) but was shown to be the result of a mutation in aspartic acid 151 of neuraminidase (NA) to glycine, asparagine, or alanine, which caused an oseltamivir-sensitive agglutination of RBCs. The D151G substitution was shown to cause a change in the specificity of NA such that it acquired the capacity to bind receptors, which were refractory to enzymatic cleavage, without altering its ability to remove receptors for HA. Thus, the inhibition of NA-dependent agglutination by the inclusion of oseltamivir carboxylate in the assay was effective in restoring the anti-HA specificity of the hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay for monitoring antigenic changes in HA. Since the NA-dependent binding activity did not affect virus neutralization, and virus populations in clinical specimens possessed, at most, low levels of the “151 mutant,” the biological significance of this feature of NA in, for example, immune evasion is unclear. It is apparent, however, that an important role of aspartic acid 151 in the activity of NA may be to restrict the specificity of the NA interaction and its receptor-destroying activity to complement that of HA receptor binding. PMID:20410266

  6. Replication of swine and human influenza viruses in juvenile and layer turkey hens.

    PubMed

    Ali, Ahmed; Yassine, Hadi; Awe, Olusegun O; Ibrahim, Mahmoud; Saif, Yehia M; Lee, Chang-Won

    2013-04-12

    Since the first reported isolation of swine influenza viruses (SIVs) in turkeys in the 1980s, transmission of SIVs to turkeys was frequently documented. Recently, the 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus, that was thought to be of swine origin, was detected in turkeys with a severe drop in egg production. In this study, we assessed the infectivity of different mammalian influenza viruses including swine, pandemic H1N1 and seasonal human influenza viruses in both juvenile and layer turkeys. In addition, we investigated the potential influenza virus dissemination in the semen of experimentally infected turkey toms. Results showed that all mammalian origin influenza viruses tested can infect turkeys. SIVs were detected in respiratory and digestive tracts of both juvenile and layer turkeys. Variations in replication efficiencies among SIVs were observed especially in the reproductive tract of layer turkeys. Compared to SIVs, limited replication of seasonal human H1N1 and no detectable replication of recent human-like swine H1N2, pandemic H1N1 and seasonal human H3N2 viruses was noticed. All birds seroconverted to all tested viruses regardless of their replication level. In turkey toms, we were able to detect swine H3N2 virus in semen and reproductive tract of infected toms by real-time RT-PCR although virus isolation was not successful. These data suggest that turkey hens could be affected by diverse influenza strains especially SIVs. Moreover, the differences in the replication efficiency we demonstrated among SIVs and between SIV and human influenza viruses in layer turkeys suggest a possible use of turkeys as an animal model to study host tropism and pathogenesis of influenza viruses. Our results also indicate a potential risk of venereal transmission of influenza viruses in turkeys.

  7. THE EFFECT OF HEMOPHILUS INFLUENZAE SUIS VACCINES ON SWINE INFLUENZA

    PubMed Central

    Shope, Richard E.

    1937-01-01

    Either living or heat-killed H. influenzae suis vaccines, given intramuscularly to swine, elicit an immune response capable of modifying the course of a later swine influenza infection. The protection afforded is only partial and is in no way comparable to the complete immunity afforded by swine influenza virus vaccines. PMID:19870654

  8. A possible outbreak of swine influenza, 1892

    PubMed Central

    Morens, David M; Taubenberger, Jeffery K

    2014-01-01

    Influenza A viruses are globally enzootic in swine populations. Swine influenza has been recognised only since 1918, but an anecdotal report suggests that a swine-influenza epizootic might have occurred in England in 1892, at the same time as an explosive epidemic (or pandemic recurrence) of human influenza. This outbreak suggests that the ecobiological association between human and swine influenza could extend to before 1918. By contrast with the recent documentation of swine influenza, influenza in horses has been well documented for hundreds of years, and was often linked temporally and geographically to epidemics of human influenza. Both decreased contact between people and horses, and the concomitant increase in swine production over the past century, might have altered the character and dynamics of influenza host-switch events between people and domestic mammals. PMID:24290840

  9. A possible outbreak of swine influenza, 1892.

    PubMed

    Morens, David M; Taubenberger, Jeffery K

    2014-02-01

    Influenza A viruses are globally enzootic in swine populations. Swine influenza has been recognised only since 1918, but an anecdotal report suggests that a swine-influenza epizootic might have occurred in England in 1892, at the same time as an explosive epidemic (or pandemic recurrence) of human influenza. This outbreak suggests that the ecobiological association between human and swine influenza could extend to before 1918. By contrast with the recent documentation of swine influenza, influenza in horses has been well documented for hundreds of years, and was often linked temporally and geographically to epidemics of human influenza. Both decreased contact between people and horses, and the concomitant increase in swine production over the past century, might have altered the character and dynamics of influenza host-switch events between people and domestic mammals.

  10. Poly I:C adjuvanted inactivated swine influenza vaccine induces heterologous protective immunity in pigs.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Milton; Wang, Zhao; Sreenivasan, Chithra C; Hause, Ben M; Gourapura J Renukaradhya; Li, Feng; Francis, David H; Kaushik, Radhey S; Khatri, Mahesh

    2015-01-15

    Swine influenza is widely prevalent in swine herds in North America and Europe causing enormous economic losses and a public health threat. Pigs can be infected by both avian and mammalian influenza viruses and are sources of generation of reassortant influenza viruses capable of causing pandemics in humans. Current commercial vaccines provide satisfactory immunity against homologous viruses; however, protection against heterologous viruses is not adequate. In this study, we evaluated the protective efficacy of an intranasal Poly I:C adjuvanted UV inactivated bivalent swine influenza vaccine consisting of Swine/OH/24366/07 H1N1 and Swine/CO/99 H3N2, referred as PAV, in maternal antibody positive pigs against an antigenic variant and a heterologous swine influenza virus challenge. Groups of three-week-old commercial-grade pigs were immunized intranasally with PAV or a commercial vaccine (CV) twice at 2 weeks intervals. Three weeks after the second immunization, pigs were challenged with the antigenic variant Swine/MN/08 H1N1 (MN08) and the heterologous Swine/NC/10 H1N2 (NC10) influenza virus. Antibodies in serum and respiratory tract, lung lesions, virus shedding in nasal secretions and virus load in lungs were assessed. Intranasal administration of PAV induced challenge viruses specific-hemagglutination inhibition- and IgG antibodies in the serum and IgA and IgG antibodies in the respiratory tract. Importantly, intranasal administration of PAV provided protection against the antigenic variant MN08 and the heterologous NC10 swine influenza viruses as evidenced by significant reductions in lung virus load, gross lung lesions and significantly reduced shedding of challenge viruses in nasal secretions. These results indicate that Poly I:C or its homologues may be effective as vaccine adjuvants capable of generating cross-protective immunity against antigenic variants/heterologous swine influenza viruses in pigs.

  11. Virological Surveillance of Influenza A Subtypes Isolated in 2014 from Clinical Outbreaks in Canadian Swine

    PubMed Central

    Grgić, Helena; Gallant, Jackie; Poljak, Zvonimir

    2017-01-01

    Influenza A viruses (IAVs) are respiratory pathogens associated with an acute respiratory disease that occurs year-round in swine production. It is currently one of the most important pathogens in swine populations, with the potential to infect other host species including humans. Ongoing research indicates that the three major subtypes of IAV—H1N1, H1N2, and H3N2—continue to expand in their genetic and antigenic diversity. In this study, we conducted a comprehensive genomic analysis of 16 IAVs isolated from different clinical outbreaks in Alberta, Manitoba, Ontario, and Saskatchewan in 2014. We also examined the genetic basis for probable antigenic differences among sequenced viruses. On the basis of phylogenetic analysis, all 13 Canadian H3N2 viruses belonged to cluster IV, eight H3N2 viruses were part of the IV-C cluster, and one virus belonged to the IV-B and one to the IV-D cluster. Based on standards used in this study, three H3N2 viruses could not be clearly classified into any currently established group within cluster IV (A to F). Three H1N2 viruses were part of the H1α cluster. PMID:28335552

  12. Antiviral Responses by Swine Primary Bronchoepithelial Cells Are Limited Compared to Human Bronchoepithelial Cells Following Influenza Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Hauser, Mary J.; Dlugolenski, Daniel; Culhane, Marie R.; Wentworth, David E.; Tompkins, S. Mark; Tripp, Ralph A.

    2013-01-01

    Swine generate reassortant influenza viruses because they can be simultaneously infected with avian and human influenza; however, the features that restrict influenza reassortment in swine and human hosts are not fully understood. Type I and III interferons (IFNs) act as the first line of defense against influenza virus infection of respiratory epithelium. To determine if human and swine have different capacities to mount an antiviral response the expression of IFN and IFN-stimulated genes (ISG) in normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells and normal swine bronchial epithelial (NSBE) cells was evaluated following infection with human (H3N2), swine (H1N1), and avian (H5N3, H5N2, H5N1) influenza A viruses. Expression of IFNλ and ISGs were substantially higher in NHBE cells compared to NSBE cells following H5 avian influenza virus infection compared to human or swine influenza virus infection. This effect was associated with reduced H5 avian influenza virus replication in human cells at late times post infection. Further, RIG-I expression was lower in NSBE cells compared to NHBE cells suggesting reduced virus sensing. Together, these studies identify key differences in the antiviral response between human and swine respiratory epithelium alluding to differences that may govern influenza reassortment. PMID:23875024

  13. Swine Influenza Virus: Emerging Understandings

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction: In March-April 2009, a novel pandemic H1N1 emerged in the human population in North America [1]. The gene constellation of the emerging virus was demonstrated to be a combination of genes from swine influenza A viruses (SIV) of North American and Eurasian lineages that had never before...

  14. Variant (Swine Origin) Influenza Viruses in Humans

    MedlinePlus

    ... What's this? Submit Button Past Newsletters Variant Influenza Viruses: Background and CDC Risk Assessment and Reporting Language: ... Background CDC Assessment Reporting Background On Variant Influenza Viruses Swine flu viruses do not normally infect humans. ...

  15. Reassortant swine influenza viruses isolated in Japan contain genes from pandemic A(H1N1) 2009.

    PubMed

    Kanehira, Katsushi; Takemae, Nobuhiro; Uchida, Yuko; Hikono, Hirokazu; Saito, Takehiko

    2014-06-01

    In 2013, three reassortant swine influenza viruses (SIVs)-two H1N2 and one H3N2-were isolated from symptomatic pigs in Japan; each contained genes from the pandemic A(H1N1) 2009 virus and endemic SIVs. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the two H1N2 viruses, A/swine/Gunma/1/2013 and A/swine/Ibaraki/1/2013, were reassortants that contain genes from the following three distinct lineages: (i) H1 and nucleoprotein (NP) genes derived from a classical swine H1 HA lineage uniquely circulating among Japanese SIVs; (ii) neuraminidase (NA) genes from human-like H1N2 swine viruses; and (iii) other genes from pandemic A(H1N1) 2009 viruses. The H3N2 virus, A/swine/Miyazaki/2/2013, comprised genes from two sources: (i) hemagglutinin (HA) and NA genes derived from human and human-like H3N2 swine viruses and (ii) other genes from pandemic A(H1N1) 2009 viruses. Phylogenetic analysis also indicated that each of the reassortants may have arisen independently in Japanese pigs. A/swine/Miyazaki/2/2013 were found to have strong antigenic reactivities with antisera generated for some seasonal human-lineage viruses isolated during or before 2003, whereas A/swine/Miyazaki/2/2013 reactivities with antisera against viruses isolated after 2004 were clearly weaker. In addition, antisera against some strains of seasonal human-lineage H1 viruses did not react with either A/swine/Gunma/1/2013 or A/swine/Ibaraki/1/2013. These findings indicate that emergence and spread of these reassortant SIVs is a potential public health risk.

  16. Airborne Influenza A Is Detected in the Personal Breathing Zone of Swine Veterinarians

    PubMed Central

    O’Brien, Kate M.; Nonnenmann, Matthew W.

    2016-01-01

    The 2009 H1N1 pandemic emphasized a need to evaluate zoonotic transmission of influenza A in swine production. Airborne influenza A virus has been detected in swine facilities during an outbreak. However, the personal exposure of veterinarians treating infected swine has not been characterized. Two personal bioaerosol samplers, the NIOSH bioaerosol sampler and the personal high-flow inhalable sampler head (PHISH), were placed in the breathing zone of veterinarians treating swine infected with either H1N1 or H3N2 influenza A. A greater number of viral particles were recovered from the NIOSH bioaerosol sampler (2094 RNA copies/m3) compared to the PHISH sampler (545 RNA copies/m3). In addition, the majority of viral particles were detected by the NIOSH bioaerosol sampler in the >4 μm size fraction. These results suggest that airborne influenza A virus is present in the breathing zone of veterinarians treating swine, and the aerosol route of zoonotic transmission of influenza virus should be further evaluated among agricultural workers. PMID:26867129

  17. Rapid detection and differentiation of swine-origin influenza A virus (H1N1/2009) from other seasonal influenza A viruses.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jiangqin; Wang, Xue; Ragupathy, Viswanath; Zhang, Panhe; Tang, Wei; Ye, Zhiping; Eichelberger, Maryna; Hewlett, Indira

    2012-11-09

    We previously developed a rapid and simple gold nanoparticle(NP)-based genomic microarray assay for identification of the avian H5N1 virus and its discrimination from other influenza A virus strains (H1N1, H3N2). In this study, we expanded the platform to detect the 2009 swine-origin influenza A virus (H1N1/2009). Multiple specific capture and intermediate oligonucleotides were designed for the matrix (M), hemagglutinin (HA), and neuraminidase (NA) genes of the H1N1/2009 virus. The H1N1/2009 microarrays were printed in the same format as those of the seasonal influenza H1N1 and H3N2 for the HA, NA, and M genes. Viral RNA was tested using capture-target-intermediate oligonucleotide hybridization and gold NP-mediated silver staining. The signal from the 4 capture-target-intermediates of the HA and NA genes was specific for H1N1/2009 virus and showed no cross hybridization with viral RNA from other influenza strains H1N1, H3N2, and H5N1. All of the 3 M gene captures showed strong affinity with H1N1/2009 viral RNA, with 2 out of the 3 M gene captures showing cross hybridization with the H1N1, H3N2, and H5N1 samples tested. The current assay was able to detect H1N1/2009 and distinguish it from other influenza A viruses. This new method may be useful for simultaneous detection and subtyping of influenza A viruses and can be rapidly modified to detect other emerging influenza strains in public health settings.

  18. Swine Influenza Viruses: a North American Perspective

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Influenza is a zoonotic viral disease that represents a health and economic threat to both humans and animals worldwide. Swine influenza was first recognized clinically in pigs in the Midwestern U.S. in 1918, coinciding with the human influenza pandemic known as the Spanish flu. Since that time swin...

  19. Reassortment patterns in Swine influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Khiabanian, Hossein; Trifonov, Vladimir; Rabadan, Raul

    2009-10-07

    Three human influenza pandemics occurred in the twentieth century, in 1918, 1957, and 1968. Influenza pandemic strains are the results of emerging viruses from non-human reservoirs to which humans have little or no immunity. At least two of these pandemic strains, in 1957 and in 1968, were the results of reassortments between human and avian viruses. Also, many cases of swine influenza viruses have reportedly infected humans, in particular, the recent H1N1 influenza virus of swine origin, isolated in Mexico and the United States. Pigs are documented to allow productive replication of human, avian, and swine influenza viruses. Thus it has been conjectured that pigs are the "mixing vessel" that create the avian-human reassortant strains, causing the human pandemics. Hence, studying the process and patterns of viral reassortment, especially in pigs, is a key to better understanding of human influenza pandemics. In the last few years, databases containing sequences of influenza A viruses, including swine viruses, collected since 1918 from diverse geographical locations, have been developed and made publicly available. In this paper, we study an ensemble of swine influenza viruses to analyze the reassortment phenomena through several statistical techniques. The reassortment patterns in swine viruses prove to be similar to the previous results found in human viruses, both in vitro and in vivo, that the surface glycoprotein coding segments reassort most often. Moreover, we find that one of the polymerase segments (PB1), reassorted in the strains responsible for the last two human pandemics, also reassorts frequently.

  20. Egg-adaptive mutations in H3N2v vaccine virus enhance egg-based production without loss of antigenicity or immunogenicity.

    PubMed

    Barman, Subrata; Franks, John; Turner, Jasmine C; Yoon, Sun-Woo; Webster, Robert G; Webby, Richard J

    2015-06-22

    The recently detected zoonotic H3N2 variant influenza A (H3N2v) viruses have caused 343 documented cases of human infection linked to contact with swine. An effective vaccine is needed for these viruses, which may acquire transmissibility among humans. However, viruses isolated from human cases do not replicate well in embryonated chicken eggs, posing an obstacle to egg-based vaccine production. To address this issue, we sought to identify egg-adaptive mutations in surface proteins that increase the yield of candidate vaccine viruses (CVVs) in eggs while preserving their immunizing effectiveness. After serial passage of a representative H3N2v isolate (A/Indiana/08/2011), we identified several egg-adaptive combinations of HA mutations and assessed the egg-based replication, antigenicity, and immunogenicity of A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (H1N1, PR8)-based 6+2 reverse genetics CVVs carrying these mutations. Here we demonstrate that the respective combined HA substitutions G1861V+N2461K, N1651K+G1861V, T1281N+N1651K+R762G, and T1281N+N1651K+I102M, all identified after egg passage, enhanced the replication of the CVVs in eggs without substantially affecting their antigenicity or immunogenicity. The mutations were stable, and the mutant viruses acquired no additional substitutions during six subsequent egg passages. We found two crucial mutations, G186V, which was previously defined, and N246K, which in combination improved virus yield in eggs without significantly impacting antigenicity or immunogenicity. This combination of egg-adaptive mutations appears to most effectively generate high egg-based yields of influenza A/Indiana/08/2011-like CVVs.

  1. WHO recommendations for the viruses used in the 2013-2014 Northern Hemisphere influenza vaccine: Epidemiology, antigenic and genetic characteristics of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09, A(H3N2) and B influenza viruses collected from October 2012 to January 2013.

    PubMed

    Barr, Ian G; Russell, Colin; Besselaar, Terry G; Cox, Nancy J; Daniels, Rod S; Donis, Ruben; Engelhardt, Othmar G; Grohmann, Gary; Itamura, Shigeyuki; Kelso, Anne; McCauley, John; Odagiri, Takato; Schultz-Cherry, Stacey; Shu, Yuelong; Smith, Derek; Tashiro, Masato; Wang, Dayan; Webby, Richard; Xu, Xiyan; Ye, Zhiping; Zhang, Wenqing

    2014-08-20

    In February the World Health Organisation (WHO) recommends influenza viruses to be included in influenza vaccines for the forthcoming winter in the Northern Hemisphere. These recommendations are based on data collected by National Influenza Centres (NICs) through the WHO Global Influenza Surveillance and Response System (GISRS) and a more detailed analysis of representative and potential antigenically variant influenza viruses from the WHO Collaborating Centres for Influenza (WHO CCs) and Essential Regulatory Laboratories (ERLs). This article provides a detailed summary of the antigenic and genetic properties of viruses and additional background data used by WHO experts during development of the recommendations of the 2013-2014 Northern Hemisphere influenza vaccine composition.

  2. Swine Worker Precautions During Suspected Outbreaks of Influenza in Swine.

    PubMed

    Paccha, Blanca; Neira-Ramirez, Victor; Gibbs, Shawn; Torremorell, Montserrat; Rabinowitz, Peter M

    2016-05-01

    To assess the behavior and precautions that swine workers take during suspected influenza outbreaks in swine, six commercial swine farms in the Midwest U.S. region were visited when influenza outbreaks were suspected in herds during the fall/winter of 2012-2013. Use of personal protective equipment (PPE) and type of task performed by swine workers were recorded based on farm representative reports. Between one to two workers were working on the day of each visit and spent approximately 25 minutes performing work-related tasks that placed them in close contact with the swine. The most common tasks reported were walking the aisles (27%), handling pigs (21%), and handling equipment (21%). The most common PPE were boots (100%), heavy rubber gloves (75%), and dedicated nondisposable clothing (74%). Use of N95 respirators was reported at three farms. Hand hygiene practices were common in most of the farms, but reportedly performed for only 20% to 25% of tasks.

  3. Exploration of risk factors contributing to the presence of influenza A virus in swine at agricultural fairs

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, Andrew S; Workman, Jeffrey D; Nolting, Jacqueline M; Nelson, Sarah W; Slemons, Richard D

    2014-01-01

    Influenza A virus infections occurring in exhibition swine populations at agricultural fairs during 2012 served as a source of H3N2 variant influenza A viruses transmitted to humans resulting in more than 300 documented cases. Prior to the outbreak, this investigation was initiated to identify fair-level risk factors contributing to influenza A virus infections in pigs at agricultural fairs. As part of an ongoing active surveillance program, nasal swabs and associated fair-level metadata were collected from pigs at 40 junior fair market swine shows held in Ohio during the 2012 fair season. Analyses of the data show that the adjusted odds of having influenza A virus-infected pigs at a fair were 1.27 (95% confidential interval (CI): 1.04–1.66) higher for every 20 pig increase in the size of the swine show. Additionally, four of the five fairs that hosted breeding swine shows in addition to their junior fair market swine shows had pigs test positive for influenza A virus. While the current study was limited to 40 fairs within one state, the findings provided insight for veterinary and public health officials developing mitigation strategies to decrease the intra- and inter-species transmission of influenza A virus at fairs. PMID:26038494

  4. Molecular Epidemiology and Evolution of Influenza Viruses Circulating within European Swine between 2009 and 2013

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Simon J.; Langat, Pinky; Reid, Scott M.; Lam, Tommy Tsan-Yuk; Cotten, Matthew; Kelly, Michael; Van Reeth, Kristien; Qiu, Yu; Simon, Gaëlle; Bonin, Emilie; Foni, Emanuela; Chiapponi, Chiara; Larsen, Lars; Hjulsager, Charlotte; Markowska-Daniel, Iwona; Urbaniak, Kinga; Dürrwald, Ralf; Schlegel, Michael; Huovilainen, Anita; Davidson, Irit; Dán, Ádám; Loeffen, Willie; Edwards, Stephanie; Bublot, Michel; Vila, Thais; Maldonado, Jaime; Valls, Laura; Brown, Ian H.; Pybus, Oliver G.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The emergence in humans of the A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza virus, a complex reassortant virus of swine origin, highlighted the importance of worldwide influenza virus surveillance in swine. To date, large-scale surveillance studies have been reported for southern China and North America, but such data have not yet been described for Europe. We report the first large-scale genomic characterization of 290 swine influenza viruses collected from 14 European countries between 2009 and 2013. A total of 23 distinct genotypes were identified, with the 7 most common comprising 82% of the incidence. Contrasting epidemiological dynamics were observed for two of these genotypes, H1huN2 and H3N2, with the former showing multiple long-lived geographically isolated lineages, while the latter had short-lived geographically diffuse lineages. At least 32 human-swine transmission events have resulted in A(H1N1)pdm09 becoming established at a mean frequency of 8% across European countries. Notably, swine in the United Kingdom have largely had a replacement of the endemic Eurasian avian virus-like (“avian-like”) genotypes with A(H1N1)pdm09-derived genotypes. The high number of reassortant genotypes observed in European swine, combined with the identification of a genotype similar to the A(H3N2)v genotype in North America, underlines the importance of continued swine surveillance in Europe for the purposes of maintaining public health. This report further reveals that the emergences and drivers of virus evolution in swine differ at the global level. IMPORTANCE The influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus contains a reassortant genome with segments derived from separate virus lineages that evolved in different regions of the world. In particular, its neuraminidase and matrix segments were derived from the Eurasian avian virus-like (“avian-like”) lineage that emerged in European swine in the 1970s. However, while large-scale genomic characterization of swine has been reported for southern

  5. Pathogenicity of modified bat influenza virus with different M genes and its reassortment potential with swine influenza A virus.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jianmei; Lee, Jinhwa; Ma, Jingjiao; Lang, Yuekun; Nietfeld, Jerome; Li, Yuhao; Duff, Michael; Li, Yonghai; Yang, Yuju; Liu, Haixia; Zhou, Bin; Wentworth, David E; Richt, Juergen A; Li, Zejun; Ma, Wenjun

    2017-01-18

    In our previous studies the reassortant virus containing only the PR8 H1N1 matrix (M) gene in the background of the modified bat influenza Bat09:mH1mN1 virus could be generated. However, whether M genes from other origins can be rescued in the background of the Bat09:mH1mN1 virus and whether the resulting novel reassortant virus is virulent remain unknown. Herein, two reassortant viruses were generated in the background of the Bat09:mH1mN1 virus containing either a North American or a Eurasian swine influenza virus M gene. These two reassortant viruses and the reassortant virus with PR8 M as well as the control Bat09:mH1mN1 virus replicated efficiently in cultured cells, while the reassortant virus with PR8 M grew to a higher titer than the other three viruses in tested cells. Mouse studies showed that reassortant viruses with either North American or Eurasian swine influenza virus M genes did not enhance virulence, whereas the reassortant virus with PR8 M gene displayed higher pathogenicity when compared to the Bat09:mH1mN1 virus. This is most likely due to the fact that the PR8 H1N1 virus is a mouse-adapted virus. Furthermore, reassortment potential between the Bat09:mH1mN1 virus and an H3N2 swine influenza virus (A/swine/Texas/4199-2/1998) was investigated using co-infection of MDCK cells, but no reassortant viruses were detected. Taken together, our results indicate that the modified bat influenza virus is most likely incapable of reassortment with influenza A viruses with in vitro co-infection experiments, although reassortant viruses with different M genes can be generated by reverse genetics.

  6. Protection of human influenza vaccines against a reassortant swine influenza virus of pandemic H1N1 origin using a pig model.

    PubMed

    Arunorat, Jirapat; Charoenvisal, Nataya; Woonwong, Yonlayong; Kedkovid, Roongtham; Jittimanee, Supattra; Sitthicharoenchai, Panchan; Kesdangsakonwut, Sawang; Poolperm, Pariwat; Thanawongnuwech, Roongroje

    2017-02-28

    Since the pandemic H1N1 emergence in 2009 (pdmH1N1), many reassortant pdmH1N1 viruses emerged and found circulating in the pig population worldwide. Currently, commercial human subunit vaccines are used commonly to prevent the influenza symptom based on the WHO recommendation. In case of current reassortant swine influenza viruses transmitting from pigs to humans, the efficacy of current human influenza vaccines is of interest. In this study, influenza A negative pigs were vaccinated with selected commercial human subunit vaccines and challenged with rH3N2. All sera were tested with both HI and SN assays using four representative viruses from the surveillance data in 2012 (enH1N1, pdmH1N1, rH1N2 and rH3N2). The results showed no significant differences in clinical signs and macroscopic and microscopic findings among groups. However, all pig sera from vaccinated groups had protective HI titers to the enH1N1, pdmH1N1 and rH1N2 at 21DPV onward and had protective SN titers only to pdmH1N1and rH1N2 at 21DPV onward. SN test results appeared more specific than those of HI tests. All tested sera had no cross-reactivity against the rH3N2. Both studied human subunit vaccines failed to protect and to stop viral shedding with no evidence of serological reaction against rH3N2. SIV surveillance is essential for monitoring a novel SIV emergence potentially for zoonosis.

  7. Vaccine escape in 2013-4 and the hydropathic evolution of glycoproteins of A/H3N2 viruses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, J. C.

    2016-08-01

    More virulent strains of influenza virus subtypes H1N1 appeared widely in 2007 and H3N2 in 2011, and especially 2013-4, when the effectiveness of the H3N2 vaccine decreased by more than a factor of two. The amino acid differences of neuraminidase from prior less virulent strains appear to be small (<1%) when tabulated through sequence alignments and counting site identities and similarities. Here we show how analyzing fractal hydropathic forces responsible for neuraminidase globular compaction and modularity quantifies the mutational origins of increased virulence. It also predicts vaccine escape and specifies optimized targets for the 2015 H3N2 vaccine. Unlike some earlier methods based on measuring hemagglutinin antigenic drift, which take several years, cover only a few candidate strains, and are ambiguous, the new methods are timely and can be completed, using NCBI and GISAID amino acid sequences only, in a few days.

  8. Novel Human-like Influenza A Viruses Circulate in Swine in Mexico and Chile

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Martha; Culhane, Marie R.; Rovira, Albert; Torremorell, Montserrat; Guerrero, Pedro; Norambuena, Julio

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Further understanding of the genetic diversity and evolution of influenza A viruses circulating in swine (IAV-S) is important for the development of effective vaccines and our knowledge of pandemic threats. Until recently, very little was known of IAV-S diversity in Latin America, owing to a lack of surveillance. Methods: To address this gap, we sequenced and conducted a phylogenetic analysis of 69 hemagglutinin (HA) sequences from IAV-S isolates collected in swine in Mexico and Chile during 2010-2014, including the H1N1, H1N2, and H3N2 subtypes. Results: Our analysis identified multiple IAV-S lineages that appear to have been circulating undetected in swine for decades, including four novel IAV-S lineages of human seasonal virus origin that have not been previously identified in any swine populations globally. We also found evidence of repeated introductions of pandemic H1N1 viruses from humans into swine in Mexico and Chile since 2009, and incursions of H1 and H3 viruses from North American swine into Mexico. Discussion: Overall, our findings indicate that at least 12 genetically distinct HA lineages circulate in Latin American swine herds, only two of which have been found in North American swine herds. Human-to-swine transmission, spatial migration via swine movements, and genomic reassortment are the key evolutionary mechanisms that generate this viral diversity. Additional antigenic characterization and whole-genome sequencing is greatly needed to understand the diversity and independent evolution of IAV-S in Latin America.  PMID:26345598

  9. Serological Evidence of Pandemic H1N1 Influenza Virus Infections in Greek Swine.

    PubMed

    Kyriakis, C S; Papatsiros, V G; Athanasiou, L V; Valiakos, G; Brown, I H; Simon, G; Van Reeth, K; Tsiodras, S; Spyrou, V; Billinis, C

    2016-08-01

    The introduction of the 2009 pandemic H1N1 (pH1N1) influenza virus in pigs changed the epidemiology of influenza A viruses (IAVs) in swine in Europe and the rest of the world. Previously, three IAV subtypes were found in the European pig population: an avian-like H1N1 and two reassortant H1N2 and H3N2 viruses with human-origin haemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase proteins and internal genes of avian decent. These viruses pose antigenically distinct HAs, which allow the retrospective diagnosis of infection in serological investigations. However, cross-reactions between the HA of pH1N1 and the HAs of the other circulating H1 IAVs complicate serological diagnosis. The prevalence of IAVs in Greek swine has been poorly investigated. In this study, we examined and compared haemagglutination inhibition (HI) antibody titres against previously established IAVs and pH1N1 in 908 swine sera from 88 herds, collected before and after the 2009 pandemic. While we confirmed the historic presence of the three IAVs established in European swine, we also found that 4% of the pig sera examined after 2009 had HI antibodies only against the pH1N1 virus. Our results indicate that pH1N1 is circulating in Greek pigs and stress out the importance of a vigorous virological surveillance programme.

  10. Genetic characterization of Thai swine influenza viruses after the introduction of pandemic H1N1 2009.

    PubMed

    Charoenvisal, Nataya; Keawcharoen, Juthatip; Sreta, Donruethai; Chaiyawong, Supassama; Nonthabenjawan, Nutthawan; Tantawet, Siriporn; Jittimanee, Suphattra; Arunorat, Jirapat; Amonsin, Alongkorn; Thanawongnuwech, Roongroje

    2013-08-01

    Pandemic H1N1 2009 (pH1N1), influenza virus containing triple reassortant internal genes (TRIG) from avian, human, and swine influenza viruses emerged in 2009 as a highly infectious virus that was able to be transmitted from humans to pigs. During June 2010-May 2012, influenza virus surveillance was conducted in Thai pig population. Twenty-three samples (1.75%) were successfully isolated from total of 1,335 samples. Interestingly, pH1N1 (7 isolates, 30.34%), reassortant pH1N1 (rH1N1) (1 isolate, 4.35%), Thai endemic H1N1 (enH1N1) (3 isolates, 13.04%), reassortant H3N2 with pH1N1 internal genes (rH3N2) (9 isolates, 39.13%), and reassortant H1N2 with pH1N1 internal genes (rH1N2) (3 isolates, 13.04%) were found. It should be noted that rH1N1, rH1N2, and rH3N2 viruses contained the internal genes of pH1N1 virus having a TRIG cassette descendant from the North American swine lineage. Although all isolates in this study were obtained from mild clinically sick pigs, the viruses were still highly infective and possibly may play an important role in human-animal interfacing transmission. In addition, the TRIG cassette may have an influence on antigenic shift resulting in emergence of novel viruses, as seen in this study. Continuing surveillance of influenza A natural hosts, particularly in pigs is necessary.

  11. The global antigenic diversity of swine influenza A viruses.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Nicola S; Russell, Colin A; Langat, Pinky; Anderson, Tavis K; Berger, Kathryn; Bielejec, Filip; Burke, David F; Dudas, Gytis; Fonville, Judith M; Fouchier, Ron Am; Kellam, Paul; Koel, Bjorn F; Lemey, Philippe; Nguyen, Tung; Nuansrichy, Bundit; Peiris, Js Malik; Saito, Takehiko; Simon, Gaelle; Skepner, Eugene; Takemae, Nobuhiro; Webby, Richard J; Van Reeth, Kristien; Brookes, Sharon M; Larsen, Lars; Watson, Simon J; Brown, Ian H; Vincent, Amy L

    2016-04-15

    Swine influenza presents a substantial disease burden for pig populations worldwide and poses a potential pandemic threat to humans. There is considerable diversity in both H1 and H3 influenza viruses circulating in swine due to the frequent introductions of viruses from humans and birds coupled with geographic segregation of global swine populations. Much of this diversity is characterized genetically but the antigenic diversity of these viruses is poorly understood. Critically, the antigenic diversity shapes the risk profile of swine influenza viruses in terms of their epizootic and pandemic potential. Here, using the most comprehensive set of swine influenza virus antigenic data compiled to date, we quantify the antigenic diversity of swine influenza viruses on a multi-continental scale. The substantial antigenic diversity of recently circulating viruses in different parts of the world adds complexity to the risk profiles for the movement of swine and the potential for swine-derived infections in humans.

  12. Genetic composition of contemporary swine influenza viruses in the West Central region of the United States of America

    PubMed Central

    Evseenko, Vasiliy A.; Boon, Adrianus C. M.; Brockwell‐Staats, Christy; Franks, John; Rubrum, Adam; Daniels, Curt S.; Gramer, Marie R.; Webby, Richard J.

    2011-01-01

    Please cite this paper as: Evseenko et al. (2011) Genetic composition of contemporary swine influenza viruses in the West Central region of the United States of America. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses DOI: 10.1111/j.1750‐2659.2010.00189.x. Background  Because of continuous circulation in different animal species and humans, influenza viruses have host‐specific phenotypic and genetic features. Reassortment of the genome segments can significantly change virus phenotype, potentially generating virus with pandemic potential. In 2009, a new pandemic influenza virus emerged. Objectives  In this study, we attempted to find precursor viruses or genes of pandemic H1N1 influenza 2009 among 25 swine influenza viruses, isolated in the West Central region of the United States of America (USA), between 2007 and 2009. The Phylogenetically Similar Triple‐Reassortant Internal Genes (PSTRIG) cassette of all the viruses studied here as well as the PSTRIG cassette of pandemic H1N1 viruses have close but equidistant phylogenetic relationships to the early triple‐reassortant swine H3N2 influenza A isolated in the USA in 1998. Methods  Samples (nasal swabs and lung tissue lavage) were taken from swine with or without clinical signs of respiratory disease via farmer‐funded syndromic surveillance. All studied viruses were isolated in Madin–Darby Canine Kidney cell cultures from the above‐mentioned samples according to standard protocols recommended for influenza virus isolation. Sequences were obtained using BigDye Terminator v3.1 Cycle Sequencing kit. Phylogenetic trees were built with MEGA 4.0 software using maximum composite likelihood algorithm and neighbor‐joining method for tree topology reconstruction. Results  Among the 25 viruses studied, we have not found any gene segments of Eurasian origin. Our results suggest that pandemic H1N1 viruses diverged and are not directly descended from swine viruses that have been circulating in USA since 1998

  13. Experimental infection with H1N1 European swine influenza virus protects pigs from an infection with the 2009 pandemic H1N1 human influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Busquets, Núria; Segalés, Joaquim; Córdoba, Lorena; Mussá, Tufaria; Crisci, Elisa; Martín-Valls, Gerard E; Simon-Grifé, Meritxell; Pérez-Simó, Marta; Pérez-Maíllo, Monica; Núñez, Jose I; Abad, Francesc X; Fraile, Lorenzo; Pina, Sonia; Majó, Natalia; Bensaid, Albert; Domingo, Mariano; Montoya, María

    2010-01-01

    The recent pandemic caused by human influenza virus A(H1N1) 2009 contains ancestral gene segments from North American and Eurasian swine lineages as well as from avian and human influenza lineages. The emergence of this A(H1N1) 2009 poses a potential global threat for human health and the fact that it can infect other species, like pigs, favours a possible encounter with other influenza viruses circulating in swine herds. In Europe, H1N1, H1N2 and H3N2 subtypes of swine influenza virus currently have a high prevalence in commercial farms. To better assess the risk posed by the A(H1N1) 2009 in the actual situation of swine farms, we sought to analyze whether a previous infection with a circulating European avian-like swine A/Swine/Spain/53207/2004 (H1N1) influenza virus (hereafter referred to as SwH1N1) generated or not cross-protective immunity against a subsequent infection with the new human pandemic A/Catalonia/63/2009 (H1N1) influenza virus (hereafter referred to as pH1N1) 21 days apart. Pigs infected only with pH1N1 had mild to moderate pathological findings, consisting on broncho-interstitial pneumonia. However, pigs inoculated with SwH1N1 virus and subsequently infected with pH1N1 had very mild lung lesions, apparently attributed to the remaining lesions caused by SwH1N1 infection. These later pigs also exhibited boosted levels of specific antibodies. Finally, animals firstly infected with SwH1N1 virus and latter infected with pH1N1 exhibited undetectable viral RNA load in nasal swabs and lungs after challenge with pH1N1, indicating a cross-protective effect between both strains.

  14. European surveillance network for influenza in pigs: surveillance programs, diagnostic tools and Swine influenza virus subtypes identified in 14 European countries from 2010 to 2013.

    PubMed

    Simon, Gaëlle; Larsen, Lars E; Dürrwald, Ralf; Foni, Emanuela; Harder, Timm; Van Reeth, Kristien; Markowska-Daniel, Iwona; Reid, Scott M; Dan, Adam; Maldonado, Jaime; Huovilainen, Anita; Billinis, Charalambos; Davidson, Irit; Agüero, Montserrat; Vila, Thaïs; Hervé, Séverine; Breum, Solvej Østergaard; Chiapponi, Chiara; Urbaniak, Kinga; Kyriakis, Constantinos S; Brown, Ian H; Loeffen, Willie

    2014-01-01

    Swine influenza causes concern for global veterinary and public health officials. In continuing two previous networks that initiated the surveillance of swine influenza viruses (SIVs) circulating in European pigs between 2001 and 2008, a third European Surveillance Network for Influenza in Pigs (ESNIP3, 2010-2013) aimed to expand widely the knowledge of the epidemiology of European SIVs. ESNIP3 stimulated programs of harmonized SIV surveillance in European countries and supported the coordination of appropriate diagnostic tools and subtyping methods. Thus, an extensive virological monitoring, mainly conducted through passive surveillance programs, resulted in the examination of more than 9 000 herds in 17 countries. Influenza A viruses were detected in 31% of herds examined from which 1887 viruses were preliminary characterized. The dominating subtypes were the three European enzootic SIVs: avian-like swine H1N1 (53.6%), human-like reassortant swine H1N2 (13%) and human-like reassortant swine H3N2 (9.1%), as well as pandemic A/H1N1 2009 (H1N1pdm) virus (10.3%). Viruses from these four lineages co-circulated in several countries but with very different relative levels of incidence. For instance, the H3N2 subtype was not detected at all in some geographic areas whereas it was still prevalent in other parts of Europe. Interestingly, H3N2-free areas were those that exhibited highest frequencies of circulating H1N2 viruses. H1N1pdm viruses were isolated at an increasing incidence in some countries from 2010 to 2013, indicating that this subtype has become established in the European pig population. Finally, 13.9% of the viruses represented reassortants between these four lineages, especially between previous enzootic SIVs and H1N1pdm. These novel viruses were detected at the same time in several countries, with increasing prevalence. Some of them might become established in pig herds, causing implications for zoonotic infections.

  15. Evaluation of the zoonotic potential of a novel reassortant H1N2 swine influenza virus with gene constellation derived from multiple viral sources.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jee Hoon; Pascua, Philippe Noriel Q; Decano, Arun G; Kim, Se Mi; Park, Su-Jin; Kwon, Hyeok-Il; Kim, Eun-Ha; Kim, Young-Il; Kim, HyongKyu; Kim, Seok-Yong; Song, Min-Suk; Jang, Hyung-Kwan; Park, Bong Kyun; Choi, Young Ki

    2015-08-01

    In 2011-2012, contemporary North American-like H3N2 swine influenza viruses (SIVs) possessing the 2009 pandemic H1N1 matrix gene (H3N2pM-like virus) were detected in domestic pigs of South Korea where H1N2 SIV strains are endemic. More recently, we isolated novel reassortant H1N2 SIVs bearing the Eurasian avian-like swine H1-like hemagglutinin and Korean swine H1N2-like neuraminidase in the internal gene backbone of the H3N2pM-like virus. In the present study, we clearly provide evidence on the genetic origins of the novel H1N2 SIVs virus through genetic and phylogenetic analyses. In vitro studies demonstrated that, in comparison with a pre-existing 2012 Korean H1N2 SIV [A/swine/Korea/CY03-11/2012 (CY03-11/2012)], the 2013 novel reassortant H1N2 isolate [A/swine/Korea/CY0423/2013 (CY0423-12/2013)] replicated more efficiently in differentiated primary human bronchial epithelial cells. The CY0423-12/2013 virus induced higher viral titers than the CY03-11/2012 virus in the lungs and nasal turbinates of infected mice and nasal wash samples of ferrets. Moreover, the 2013 H1N2 reassortant, but not the intact 2012 H1N2 virus, was transmissible to naïve contact ferrets via respiratory-droplets. Noting that the viral precursors have the ability to infect humans, our findings highlight the potential threat of a novel reassortant H1N2 SIV to public health and underscore the need to further strengthen influenza surveillance strategies worldwide, including swine populations.

  16. One-Health Simulation Modelling: A Case Study of Influenza Spread between Human and Swine Populations using NAADSM.

    PubMed

    Dorjee, S; Revie, C W; Poljak, Z; McNab, W B; Sanchez, J

    2016-02-01

    The circulation of zoonotic influenza A viruses including pH1N1 2009 and H5N1 continue to present a constant threat to animal and human populations. Recently, an H3N2 variant spread from pigs to humans and between humans in limited numbers. Accordingly, this research investigated a range of scenarios of the transmission dynamics of pH1N1 2009 virus at the swine-human interface while accounting for different percentages of swine workers initially immune. Furthermore, the feasibility of using NAADSM (North American Animal Disease Spread Model) applied as a one-health simulation model was assessed. The study population included 488 swine herds and 29, 707 households of people within a county in Ontario, Canada. Households were categorized as follows: (i) rural households with swine workers, (ii) rural households without swine workers, and (iii) urban households without swine workers. Forty-eight scenarios were investigated, based on the combination of six scenarios around the transmissibility of the virus at the interface and four vaccination coverage levels of swine workers (0-60%), all under two settings of either swine or human origin of the virus. Outcomes were assessed in terms of stochastic 'die-out' fraction, size and time to peak epidemic day, overall size and duration of the outbreaks. The modelled outcomes indicated that minimizing influenza transmissibility at the interface and targeted vaccination of swine workers had significant beneficial effects. Our results indicate that NAADSM can be used as a framework to model the spread and control of contagious zoonotic diseases among animal and human populations, under certain simplifying assumptions. Further evaluation of the model is required. In addition to these specific findings, this study serves as a benchmark that can provide useful input to a future one-health influenza modelling studies. Some pertinent information gaps were also identified. Enhanced surveillance and the collection of high

  17. Serological and molecular prevalence of swine influenza virus on farms in northwestern Mexico.

    PubMed

    López-Robles, Guadalupe; Montalvo-Corral, Maricela; Burgara-Estrella, Alexel; Hernández, Jesús

    2014-08-06

    The aim of this study was to provide an overview of the epidemiological status of swine influenza viruses in pigs from northwestern Mexico in 2008-2009. A serological and molecular survey was conducted in 150 pigs from 15 commercial farms in Sonora, Mexico (northwestern region of Mexico). The serological data showed that 55% of the sera were positive for the H1N1 subtype, 59% for the H3N2 subtype, and 38% for both subtypes. Overall, 16.6% (25/150) of the samples were positive for type A influenza by qRT-PCR. The phylogenetic analysis of the H1 viruses circulating in northwestern Mexico were grouped into cluster α, from five other clusters previously described. The influenza virus H1 circulating in northwestern Mexico showed 97-100% identity at the nucleotide level among them, 89% identity with other North American strains, 88% with strains from central Mexico, and 85% with the pandemic A/H1N1p2009 virus. Meanwhile, a closer relationship with some influenza viruses from North America (97% nucleotide identity) was found for H3 subtype. In conclusion, our results demonstrated a high circulation of strains similar to those observed in the North American linage among commercial farms in northwestern Mexico, involving of a different lineage virus different to the influenza pandemic of 2009.

  18. Rapid Genotyping of Swine Influenza Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Mak, Polly W.Y.; Wong, Chloe K.S.; Li, Olive T.W.; Chan, Kwok Hung; Cheung, Chung Lam; Ma, Edward S.; Webby, Richard J.; Guan, Yi; Peiris, Joseph S. Malik

    2011-01-01

    The emergence of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus highlighted the need for enhanced surveillance of swine influenza viruses. We used real-time reverse–transcription PCR–based genotyping and found that this rapid and simple genotyping method may identify reassortants derived from viruses of Eurasian avian-like, triple reassortant-like, and pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus lineages. PMID:21470462

  19. Global migration of influenza A viruses in swine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The emergence of the 2009 A/H1N1 pandemic virus underscores the importance of understanding how influenza A viruses evolve in swine on a global scale. To reveal the frequency, patterns and drivers of the spread of swine influenza virus globally, we conducted the largest phylogenetic analysis of swin...

  20. Quantifying the global antigenic diversity of swine influenza A viruses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Swine influenza presents a substantial disease burden for pig populations worldwide and poses a potential pandemic threat to humans. There is considerable diversity in both H1 and H3 influenza viruses circulating in swine due to the frequent introductions of viruses from humans and birds coupled wit...

  1. Characterization of Viral Load, Viability and Persistence of Influenza A Virus in Air and on Surfaces of Swine Production Facilities

    PubMed Central

    Neira, Victor; Rabinowitz, Peter; Rendahl, Aaron; Paccha, Blanca; Gibbs, Shawn G.; Torremorell, Montserrat

    2016-01-01

    Indirect transmission of influenza A virus (IAV) in swine is poorly understood and information is lacking on levels of environmental exposure encountered by swine and people during outbreaks of IAV in swine barns. We characterized viral load, viability and persistence of IAV in air and on surfaces during outbreaks in swine barns. IAV was detected in pigs, air and surfaces from five confirmed outbreaks with 48% (47/98) of oral fluid, 38% (32/84) of pen railing and 43% (35/82) of indoor air samples testing positive by IAV RT-PCR. IAV was isolated from air and oral fluids yielding a mixture of subtypes (H1N1, H1N2 and H3N2). Detection of IAV RNA from air was sustained during the outbreaks with maximum levels estimated between 7 and 11 days from reported onset. Our results indicate that during outbreaks of IAV in swine, aerosols and surfaces in barns contain significant levels of IAV potentially representing an exposure hazard to both swine and people. PMID:26757362

  2. H1N1 influenza viruses varying widely in hemagglutinin stability transmit efficiently from swine to swine and to ferrets

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Guohua; Marinova-Petkova, Atanaska; Kaplan, Bryan S.; Webby, Richard J.

    2017-01-01

    A pandemic-capable influenza virus requires a hemagglutinin (HA) surface glycoprotein that is immunologically unseen by most people and is capable of supporting replication and transmission in humans. HA stabilization has been linked to 2009 pH1N1 pandemic potential in humans and H5N1 airborne transmissibility in the ferret model. Swine have served as an intermediate host for zoonotic influenza viruses, yet the evolutionary pressure exerted by this host on HA stability was unknown. For over 70 contemporary swine H1 and H3 isolates, we measured HA activation pH to range from pH 5.1 to 5.9 for H1 viruses and pH 5.3 to 5.8 for H3 viruses. Thus, contemporary swine isolates vary widely in HA stability, having values favored by both avian (pH >5.5) and human and ferret (pH ≤5.5) species. Using an early 2009 pandemic H1N1 (pH1N1) virus backbone, we generated three viruses differing by one HA residue that only altered HA stability: WT (pH 5.5), HA1-Y17H (pH 6.0), and HA2-R106K (pH 5.3). All three replicated in pigs and transmitted from pig-to-pig and pig-to-ferret. WT and R106 viruses maintained HA genotype and phenotype after transmission. Y17H (pH 6.0) acquired HA mutations that stabilized the HA protein to pH 5.8 after transmission to pigs and 5.5 after transmission to ferrets. Overall, we found swine support a broad range of HA activation pH for contact transmission and many recent swine H1N1 and H3N2 isolates have stabilized (human-like) HA proteins. This constitutes a heightened pandemic risk and underscores the importance of ongoing surveillance and control efforts for swine viruses. PMID:28282440

  3. Complete genome sequence of a novel influenza A H1N2 virus circulating in swine from Central Bajio region, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Betancourt, J I; Cervantes-Torres, J B; Saavedra-Montañez, M; Segura-Velázquez, R A

    2017-02-08

    The aim of this study was to perform the complete genome sequence of a swine influenza A H1N2 virus strain isolated from a pig in Guanajuato, México (A/swine/Mexico/GtoDMZC01/2014) and to report its seroprevalence in 86 counties at the Central Bajio zone. To understand the evolutionary dynamics of the isolate, we undertook a phylogenetic analysis of the eight gene segments. These data revealed that the isolated virus is a reassortant H1N2 subtype, as its genes are derived from human (HA, NP, PA) and swine (M, NA, PB1, PB2 and NS) influenza viruses. Pig serum samples were analysed by the hemagglutination inhibition test, using wild H1N2 and H3N2 strains (A/swine/México/Mex51/2010 [H3N2]) as antigen sources. Positive samples to the H1N2 subtype were processed using the field-isolated H1N1 subtype (A/swine/México/Ver37/2010 [H1N1]). Seroprevalence to the H1N2 subtype was 26.74% in the sampled counties, being Jalisco the state with highest seroprevalence to this subtype (35.30%). The results herein reported demonstrate that this new, previously unregistered influenza virus subtype in México that shows internal genes from other swine viral subtypes isolated in the past 5 years, along with human virus-originated genes, is widely distributed in this area of the country.

  4. Temporal insight into the natural generation of a new reassortant porcine influenza virus in a swine holding.

    PubMed

    Chiapponi, Chiara; Baioni, Laura; Luppi, Andrea; Moreno, Ana; Castellan, Alberto; Foni, Emanuela

    2014-11-07

    The influenza A virus (IAV) subtypes H1N1, H3N2 and H1N2 are the most prevalent subtypes in swine in Italy. Reassortant influenza A viruses subtypes in swine appeared in European pig population. In particular reassortant viruses carrying genome segment from the pandemic H1N1 (H1N1pdm) are reported in many European countries, including Italy. In a 1000 sows farrow-to feeder farm, in Northern Italy, we isolated 10 IAVs from recurrent episodes of respiratory disease in 45-70 days-old pigs from September 2012 to June 2013. The antigenic and genetic characterization of the swine IAV isolates showed the contemporary circulation of H1N1 avian-like and H1N1pdm strains in the first outbreak. The analysis of the viruses isolated subsequently showed the circulation of H1N1pdm IAV and then the establishment of a new previously undescribed H1N1 reassortant strain with a pandemic derived hemagglutinin gene and all the other seven segments of swine H1N1 avian-like lineage.

  5. A novel monoclonal antibody effective against lethal challenge with swine-lineage and 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza viruses in mice.

    PubMed

    Shao, Hongxia; Ye, Jianqiang; Vincent, Amy L; Edworthy, Nicole; Ferrero, Andrea; Qin, Aijian; Perez, Daniel R

    2011-09-01

    The HA protein of the 2009 pandemic H1N1 viruses (H1N1pdm) is antigenically closely related to the HA of classical North American swine H1N1 influenza viruses (cH1N1). Since 1998, through mutation and reassortment of HA genes from human H3N2 and H1N1 influenza viruses, swine influenza strains are undergoing substantial antigenic drift and shift. In this report we describe the development of a novel monoclonal antibody (S-OIV-3B2) that shows high hemagglutination inhibition (HI) and neutralization titers not only against H1N1pdm, but also against representatives of the α, β, and γ clusters of swine-lineage H1 influenza viruses. Mice that received a single intranasal dose of S-OIV-3B2 were protected against lethal challenge with either H1N1pdm or cH1N1 virus. These studies highlight the potential use of S-OIV-3B2 as effective intranasal prophylactic or therapeutic antiviral treatment for swine-lineage H1 influenza virus infections.

  6. Airborne Detection and Quantification of Swine Influenza A Virus in Air Samples Collected Inside, Outside and Downwind from Swine Barns

    PubMed Central

    Corzo, Cesar A.; Culhane, Marie; Dee, Scott; Morrison, Robert B.; Torremorell, Montserrat

    2013-01-01

    Airborne transmission of influenza A virus (IAV) in swine is speculated to be an important route of virus dissemination, but data are scarce. This study attempted to detect and quantify airborne IAV by virus isolation and RRT-PCR in air samples collected under field conditions. This was accomplished by collecting air samples from four acutely infected pig farms and locating air samplers inside the barns, at the external exhaust fans and downwind from the farms at distances up to 2.1 km. IAV was detected in air samples collected in 3 out of 4 farms included in the study. Isolation of IAV was possible from air samples collected inside the barn at two of the farms and in one farm from the exhausted air. Between 13% and 100% of samples collected inside the barns tested RRT-PCR positive with an average viral load of 3.20E+05 IAV RNA copies/m3 of air. Percentage of exhaust positive air samples also ranged between 13% and 100% with an average viral load of 1.79E+04 RNA copies/m3 of air. Influenza virus RNA was detected in air samples collected between 1.5 and 2.1 Km away from the farms with viral levels significantly lower at 4.65E+03 RNA copies/m3. H1N1, H1N2 and H3N2 subtypes were detected in the air samples and the hemagglutinin gene sequences identified in the swine samples matched those in aerosols providing evidence that the viruses detected in the aerosols originated from the pigs in the farms under study. Overall our results indicate that pigs can be a source of IAV infectious aerosols and that these aerosols can be exhausted from pig barns and be transported downwind. The results from this study provide evidence of the risk of aerosol transmission in pigs under field conditions. PMID:23951164

  7. The global antigenic diversity of swine influenza A viruses

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Nicola S; Russell, Colin A; Langat, Pinky; Anderson, Tavis K; Berger, Kathryn; Bielejec, Filip; Burke, David F; Dudas, Gytis; Fonville, Judith M; Fouchier, Ron AM; Kellam, Paul; Koel, Bjorn F; Lemey, Philippe; Nguyen, Tung; Nuansrichy, Bundit; Peiris, JS Malik; Saito, Takehiko; Simon, Gaelle; Skepner, Eugene; Takemae, Nobuhiro; Webby, Richard J; Van Reeth, Kristien; Brookes, Sharon M; Larsen, Lars; Watson, Simon J; Brown, Ian H; Vincent, Amy L

    2016-01-01

    Swine influenza presents a substantial disease burden for pig populations worldwide and poses a potential pandemic threat to humans. There is considerable diversity in both H1 and H3 influenza viruses circulating in swine due to the frequent introductions of viruses from humans and birds coupled with geographic segregation of global swine populations. Much of this diversity is characterized genetically but the antigenic diversity of these viruses is poorly understood. Critically, the antigenic diversity shapes the risk profile of swine influenza viruses in terms of their epizootic and pandemic potential. Here, using the most comprehensive set of swine influenza virus antigenic data compiled to date, we quantify the antigenic diversity of swine influenza viruses on a multi-continental scale. The substantial antigenic diversity of recently circulating viruses in different parts of the world adds complexity to the risk profiles for the movement of swine and the potential for swine-derived infections in humans. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12217.001 PMID:27113719

  8. THE INFECTION OF FERRETS WITH SWINE INFLUENZA VIRUS

    PubMed Central

    Shope, Richard E.

    1934-01-01

    The experiments described confirm the earlier observation of Smith, Andrewes, and Laidlaw that the swine influenza virus is pathogenic for ferrets when administered intranasally. A disease that is clinically more severe and pathologically more extensive than that described by the above workers is obtained if inoculation with the virus is performed under ether anesthesia. Animals infected in this way show at autopsy an edematous type of pneumonia of lobar distribution which may terminate fatally. The virus maintains its pathogenicity for ferrets when stored in 50 per cent glycerol at refrigerator temperature for as long as 75 days. After serial passage through 16 ferrets the virus is still capable of inducing swine influenza when mixed with H. influenzae suis and administered intranasally to swine. Ferret passage causes no apparent attenuation of the virus for swine. Serum from pigs recovered from swine influenza is capable of neutralizing the ferret-passaged virus for either swine or ferrets. Likewise serum from recovered ferrets neutralizes the swine influenza virus for either ferrets or swine. PMID:19870285

  9. Design and performance of the CDC real-time reverse transcriptase PCR swine flu panel for detection of 2009 A (H1N1) pandemic influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Shu, Bo; Wu, Kai-Hui; Emery, Shannon; Villanueva, Julie; Johnson, Roy; Guthrie, Erica; Berman, LaShondra; Warnes, Christine; Barnes, Nathelia; Klimov, Alexander; Lindstrom, Stephen

    2011-07-01

    Swine influenza viruses (SIV) have been shown to sporadically infect humans and are infrequently identified by the Influenza Division of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) after being received as unsubtypeable influenza A virus samples. Real-time reverse transcriptase PCR (rRT-PCR) procedures for detection and characterization of North American lineage (N. Am) SIV were developed and implemented at CDC for rapid identification of specimens from cases of suspected infections with SIV. These procedures were utilized in April 2009 for detection of human cases of 2009 A (H1N1) pandemic (pdm) influenza virus infection. Based on genetic sequence data derived from the first two viruses investigated, the previously developed rRT-PCR procedures were optimized to create the CDC rRT-PCR Swine Flu Panel for detection of the 2009 A (H1N1) pdm influenza virus. The analytical sensitivity of the CDC rRT-PCR Swine Flu Panel was shown to be 5 copies of RNA per reaction and 10(-1.3 - -0.7) 50% infectious doses (ID(50)) per reaction for cultured viruses. Cross-reactivity was not observed when testing human clinical specimens or cultured viruses that were positive for human seasonal A (H1N1, H3N2) and B influenza viruses. The CDC rRT-PCR Swine Flu Panel was distributed to public health laboratories in the United States and internationally from April 2009 until June 2010. The CDC rRT-PCR Swine Flu Panel served as an effective tool for timely and specific detection of 2009 A (H1N1) pdm influenza viruses and facilitated subsequent public health response implementation.

  10. Phylogeny of Spanish swine influenza viruses isolated from respiratory disease outbreaks and evolution of swine influenza virus within an endemically infected farm.

    PubMed

    Martín-Valls, Gerard E; Simon-Grifé, Meritxell; van Boheemen, Sander; de Graaf, Miranda; Bestebroer, Theo M; Busquets, Núria; Martín, Margarita; Casal, Jordi; Fouchier, Ron A M; Mateu, Enric

    2014-06-04

    In the present study, outbreaks of respiratory disease were investigated for the presence of swine influenza virus (SIV). In 14 cases the circulating SIV strains were isolated, fully sequenced and compared with other known SIVs. The viruses causing the outbreaks belonged to the H1N1 (including human pandemic H1N1), H3N2 and H1N2 subtypes. In 11/14 cases the phylogenetic analyses indicated the occurrence of probable reassortment events. In the second part of the study, the genetic evolution of H1N1 SIV was assessed in a longitudinal study in closed groups of pigs over six months. Sequencing of the 22 isolates indicated co-circulation of two different variants for the same virus, as well as the emergence of SIV reassortants at certain time-points. These results indicate that reassortment events in SIV are common, and point towards the need for a better understanding of the epidemiology of SIV, particularly in endemic farms.

  11. A virus-like particle vaccination strategy expands its tolerance to H3N2 antigenic drift by enhancing neutralizing antibodies against hemagglutinin stalk.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ji-Rong; Cheng, Chieh-Yu; Chen, Chih-Yuan; Lin, Chao-Hua; Kuo, Chuan-Yi; Huang, Hsiang-Yi; Wu, Fu-Ting; Yang, Yu-Chih; Wu, Chia-Ying; Liu, Ming-Tsan; Hsiao, Pei-Wen

    2017-04-01

    Seasonal influenza viruses impact public health annually due to their continual evolution. However, the current inactivated seasonal vaccines provide poor protection against antigenically drifted viruses and require periodical reformulation through hit-and-miss predictions about which strains will circulate during the next season. To reduce the impact caused by vaccine mismatch, we investigated the drift-tolerance of virus-like particles (VLP) as an improved vaccine candidate. The cross-protective humoral immunity elicited by the H3N2-VLP vaccine constructed for the 2011-2012 season was examined against viruses isolated from 2010 to 2015 in Taiwan evolving chronologically through clades 1, 4, 5, 3B and 3C, as well as viruses that were circulating globally in 2005, 2007 and 2009. Mouse immunization results demonstrated that H3N2-VLP vaccine elicited superior immunological breadth in comparison with the cognate conventional whole-inactivated virus (WIV) vaccine. Titers of neutralizing antibodies against heterologous strains representing each epidemic period in the VLP group were significantly higher than in the WIV group, indicating the antibody repertoire induced by the H3N2-VLPs was insensitive to viral antigenic drift over a span of at least 10 years. Noticeably, H3N2-VLP elicited higher levels of anti-stalk antibodies than H3N2-WIV, which offset the ineffectiveness caused by antigenic drift. This advantageous effect was attributed to the uncleaved precursor of their HA proteins. These results suggest a mechanism through which VLP-induced humoral immunity may better tolerate the evolutionary dynamics of influenza viruses and point to the possible use of a VLP vaccine as a method by which the requirement for annual updates of seasonal influenza vaccines may be diminished.

  12. Molecular and antigenic characterization of reassortant H3N2 viruses from turkeys with a unique constellation of pandemic H1N1 internal genes.

    PubMed

    Berhane, Yohannes; Kehler, Helen; Handel, Katherine; Hisanaga, Tamiko; Xu, Wanhong; Ojkic, Davor; Pasick, John

    2012-01-01

    Triple reassortant (TR) H3N2 influenza viruses cause varying degrees of loss in egg production in breeder turkeys. In this study we characterized TR H3N2 viruses isolated from three breeder turkey farms diagnosed with a drop in egg production. The eight gene segments of the virus isolated from the first case submission (FAV-003) were all of TR H3N2 lineage. However, viruses from the two subsequent case submissions (FAV-009 and FAV-010) were unique reassortants with PB2, PA, nucleoprotein (NP) and matrix (M) gene segments from 2009 pandemic H1N1 and the remaining gene segments from TR H3N2. Phylogenetic analysis of the HA and NA genes placed the 3 virus isolates in 2 separate clades within cluster IV of TR H3N2 viruses. Birds from the latter two affected farms had been vaccinated with a H3N4 oil emulsion vaccine prior to the outbreak. The HAl subunit of the H3N4 vaccine strain had only a predicted amino acid identity of 79% with the isolate from FAV-003 and 80% for the isolates from FAV-009 and FAV-0010. By comparison, the predicted amino acid sequence identity between a prototype TR H3N2 cluster IV virus A/Sw/ON/33853/2005 and the three turkey isolates from this study was 95% while the identity between FAV-003 and FAV-009/10 isolates was 91%. When the previously identified antigenic sites A, B, C, D and E of HA1 were examined, isolates from FAV-003 and FAV-009/10 had a total of 19 and 16 amino acid substitutions respectively when compared with the H3N4 vaccine strain. These changes corresponded with the failure of the sera collected from turkeys that received this vaccine to neutralize any of the above three isolates in vitro.

  13. Swine influenza virus infection dynamics in two pig farms; results of a longitudinal assessment

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    In order to assess the dynamics of influenza virus infection in pigs, serological and virological follow-ups were conducted in two whole batches of pigs from two different farms (F1 and F2), from 3 weeks of age until market age. Anti-swine influenza virus (SIV) antibodies (measured by ELISA and hemagglutination inhibition) and nasal virus shedding (measured by RRT-PCR and isolation in embryonated chicken eggs and MDCK cells) were carried out periodically. SIV isolates were subtyped and hemagglutinin and neuraminidase genes were partially sequenced and analyzed phylogenetically. In F1, four waves of viral circulation were detected, and globally, 62/121 pigs (51.2%) were positive by RRT-PCR at least once. All F1 isolates corresponded to H1N1 subtype although hemagglutination inhibition results also revealed the presence of antibodies against H3N2. The first viral wave took place in the presence of colostral-derived antibodies. Nine pigs were positive in two non-consecutive sampling weeks, with two of the animals being positive with the same isolate. Phylogenetic analyses showed that different H1N1 variants circulated in that farm. In F2, only one isolate, H1N2, was detected and all infections were concentrated in a very short period of time, as assumed for a classic influenza outbreak. These findings led us to propose that influenza virus infection in pigs might present different patterns, from an epidemic outbreak to an endemic form with different waves of infections with a lower incidence. PMID:22452923

  14. Serologic Evidence of Human and Swine Influenza in Mayan Persons

    PubMed Central

    Cadavieco-Burgos, Juan Manuel; Canul-Armas, Alejandro Bernardino

    2005-01-01

    Antibodies against influenza viruses were detected in 115 serum samples from indigenous Mayan persons from Kochol, Yucatán. Seropositivity rates were 26.9% to A/Bayern/7/95, 40.8% to A/Sydney/5/97, 1.7% to A/Swine/Wisconsin/238/97, and 79.1% to A/Swine/Minnesota/593/99. This report is the first in Mexico of the prevalence of antibodies to swine influenza virus in humans. PMID:15705345

  15. Influenza A virus pathogenesis and vaccination in swine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Swine influenza is an acute respiratory disease of pigs that is characterized by fever followed by lethargy, anorexia, and serous nasal discharge. The disease progresses rapidly and may be complicated when associated with other respiratory pathogens. Influenza A virus (IAV) is one of the most preval...

  16. Pathogenesis and transmission studies: non-swine influenza A viruses in the swine host

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Abstract Influenza A virus (IAV) causes disease in poultry, pigs, and people with wild waterfowl being the natural reservoir. IAV strains have been periodically transmitted between swine and humans in both directions and avian IAV have also sporadically infected swine. If an individual is infected w...

  17. Enhanced Pneumonia and Proinflammatory Cytokine Response in Pigs Challenged with Pandemic 2009 A/H1N1 Influenza Virus Following Vaccination with an Inactivated delta-Cluster H1N2 Virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Endemic strains of swine influenza A virus (IAV) in North America consist of the subtypes H1N1, H1N2, and H3N2. These circulating strains contain the triple reassortant internal gene (TRIG) cassette resulting from incorporation of genes from swine, avian, and human IAV’s. Genetic drift and reassortm...

  18. THE INFECTION OF MICE WITH SWINE INFLUENZA VIRUS

    PubMed Central

    Shope, Richard E.

    1935-01-01

    The experiments confirm the earlier observation of Andrewes, Laidlaw and Smith that the swine influenza virus is pathogenic for white mice when administered intranasally. Two field strains of the swine influenza virus were found to differ in their initial pathogenicity for mice. One strain was apparently fully pathogenic even in its 1st mouse passage while the other required 2 or 3 mouse passages to acquire full virulence for this species. Both strains, however, were initially infectious for mice, without the necessity of intervening ferret passages. There is no evidence that bacteria play any significant rôle in the mouse disease though essential in that of swine, and fatal pneumonias can be produced in mice by pure virus infections. Mice surviving the virus disease are immune to reinfection for at least a month. In mice the disease is not contagious though it is notably so in swine. The virus, while regularly producing fatal pneumonias when administered intranasally to mice, appears to be completely innocuous when given subcutaneously or intraperitoneally. Prolonged serial passage of the virus in mice does not influence its infectivity or virulence for swine or ferrets. It is a stable virus so far as its infectivity is concerned, and can be transferred at will from any one of its three known susceptible hosts to any other. In discussing these facts the stability of the swine influenza virus has been contrasted with the apparent instability of freshly isolated strains of the human influenza virus. Though the mouse is an un-natural host for the virus it is, nevertheless, useful for the study of those aspects of swine influenza which have to do with the virus only. PMID:19870434

  19. Inhibitory influence of Enterococcus faecium on the propagation of swine influenza A virus in vitro.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhenya; Chai, Weidong; Burwinkel, Michael; Twardziok, Sven; Wrede, Paul; Palissa, Christiane; Esch, Bettina; Schmidt, Michael F G

    2013-01-01

    The control of infectious diseases such as swine influenza viruses (SwIV) plays an important role in food production both from the animal health and from the public health point of view. Probiotic microorganisms and other health improving food supplements have been given increasing attention in recent years, but, no information on the effects of probiotics on swine influenza virus is available. Here we address this question by assessing the inhibitory potential of the probiotic Enterococcus faecium NCIMB 10415 (E. faecium) on the replication of two porcine strains of influenza virus (H1N1 and H3N2 strain) in a continuous porcine macrophage cell line (3D4/21) and in MDBK cells. Cell cultures were treated with E. faecium at the non-toxic concentration of 1×10(6) CFU/ml in growth medium for 60 to 90 min before, during and after SwIV infection. After further incubation of cultures in probiotic-free growth medium, cell viability and virus propagation were determined at 48 h or 96 h post infection. The results obtained reveal an almost complete recovery of viability of SwIV infected cells and an inhibition of virus multiplication by up to four log units in the E. faecium treated cells. In both 3D4/21- and MDBK-cells a 60 min treatment with E. faecium stimulated nitric oxide (NO) release which is in line with published evidence for an antiviral function of NO. Furthermore, E. faecium caused a modified cellular expression of selected mediators of defence in 3D4-cells: while the expression of TNF-α, TLR-3 and IL-6 were decreased in the SwIV-infected and probiotic treated cells, IL-10 was found to be increased. Since we obtained experimental evidence for the direct adsorptive trapping of SwIV through E. faecium, this probiotic microorganism inhibits influenza viruses by at least two mechanisms, direct physical interaction and strengthening of innate defence at the cellular level.

  20. Virulence and transmissibility of H1N2 influenza virus in ferrets imply the continuing threat of triple-reassortant swine viruses.

    PubMed

    Pascua, Philippe Noriel Q; Song, Min-Suk; Lee, Jun Han; Baek, Yun Hee; Kwon, Hyeok-il; Park, Su-Jin; Choi, Eun Hye; Lim, Gyo-Jin; Lee, Ok-Jun; Kim, Si-Wook; Kim, Chul-Joong; Sung, Moon Hee; Kim, Myung Hee; Yoon, Sun-Woo; Govorkova, Elena A; Webby, Richard J; Webster, Robert G; Choi, Young-Ki

    2012-09-25

    Efficient worldwide swine surveillance for influenza A viruses is urgently needed; the emergence of a novel reassortant pandemic H1N1 (pH1N1) virus in 2009 demonstrated that swine can be the direct source of pandemic influenza and that the pandemic potential of viruses prevalent in swine populations must be monitored. We used the ferret model to assess the pathogenicity and transmissibility of predominant Korean triple-reassortant swine (TRSw) H1N2 and H3N2 influenza viruses genetically related to North American strains. Although most of the TRSw viruses were moderately pathogenic, one [A/Swine/Korea/1204/2009; Sw/1204 (H1N2)] was virulent in ferrets, causing death within 10 d of inoculation, and was efficiently transmitted to naive contact ferrets via respiratory droplets. Although molecular analysis did not reveal known virulence markers, the Sw/1204 virus acquired mutations in hemagglutinin (HA) (Asp-225-Gly) and neuraminidase (NA) (Ser-315-Asn) proteins during the single ferret passage. The contact-Sw/1204 virus became more virulent in mice, replicated efficiently in vitro, extensively infected human lung tissues ex vivo, and maintained its ability to replicate and transmit in swine. Reverse-genetics studies further indicated that the HA(225G) and NA(315N) substitutions contributed substantially in altering virulence and transmissibility. These findings support the continuing threat of some field TRSw viruses to human and animal health, reviving concerns on the capacity of pigs to create future pandemic viruses. Apart from warranting continued and enhanced global surveillance, this study also provides evidence on the emerging roles of HA(225G) and NA(315N) as potential virulence markers in mammals.

  1. From where did the 2009 'swine-origin' influenza A virus (H1N1) emerge?

    PubMed

    Gibbs, Adrian J; Armstrong, John S; Downie, Jean C

    2009-11-24

    The swine-origin influenza A (H1N1) virus that appeared in 2009 and was first found in human beings in Mexico, is a reassortant with at least three parents. Six of the genes are closest in sequence to those of H1N2 'triple-reassortant' influenza viruses isolated from pigs in North America around 1999-2000. Its other two genes are from different Eurasian 'avian-like' viruses of pigs; the NA gene is closest to H1N1 viruses isolated in Europe in 1991-1993, and the MP gene is closest to H3N2 viruses isolated in Asia in 1999-2000. The sequences of these genes do not directly reveal the immediate source of the virus as the closest were from isolates collected more than a decade before the human pandemic started. The three parents of the virus may have been assembled in one place by natural means, such as by migrating birds, however the consistent link with pig viruses suggests that human activity was involved. We discuss a published suggestion that unsampled pig herds, the intercontinental live pig trade, together with porous quarantine barriers, generated the reassortant. We contrast that suggestion with the possibility that laboratory errors involving the sharing of virus isolates and cultured cells, or perhaps vaccine production, may have been involved. Gene sequences from isolates that bridge the time and phylogenetic gap between the new virus and its parents will distinguish between these possibilities, and we suggest where they should be sought. It is important that the source of the new virus be found if we wish to avoid future pandemics rather than just trying to minimize the consequences after they have emerged. Influenza virus is a very significant zoonotic pathogen. Public confidence in influenza research, and the agribusinesses that are based on influenza's many hosts, has been eroded by several recent events involving the virus. Measures that might restore confidence include establishing a unified international administrative framework coordinating

  2. Outbreak of influenza A (H3N2) in people and pigs at county fairs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    On July 11, 2012 a fair veterinarian was requested to examine an ill pig in the show barn. The following day additional pigs were reported as listless, anorexic, and febrile (up to 107F). The Board of Animal Health was notified of the situation on July 12th. Approximately 280 pigs were in attendance...

  3. Characterization of co-circulating swine influenza A viruses in North America and the identification of a novel H1 genetic clade with antigenic significance.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Tavis K; Campbell, Brian A; Nelson, Martha I; Lewis, Nicola S; Janas-Martindale, Alicia; Killian, Mary Lea; Vincent, Amy L

    2015-04-02

    Multiple genetically and antigenically distinct hemagglutinin genes of the H1 and H3 influenza A virus (IAV) subtypes co-circulate in North American swine. This diversity has evolved by repeated transmission of IAVs from humans to swine and subsequent antigenic drift in swine. To understand the evolutionary dynamics of these diverse HA lineages in North American swine, we undertook a phylogenetic analysis of 1576 H1 and 607 H3 HA gene segments, as well as 834 N1 and 1293 N2 NA gene segments, and 2126 M gene segments. These data revealed yearly co-circulation of H1N1, H1N2, and H3N2 viruses, with three HA clades representing the majority of the HA sequences: of the H1 viruses, 42% were classified as H1δ1 and 40.6% were classified as H1γ; and of the H3 viruses 53% were classified as cluster IV-A H3N2. We detected a genetically distinct minor clade consisting of 37 H1 viruses isolated between 2003 and 2013, which we classified as H1γ-2. We estimated that this clade circulated in swine since approximately 1995, but it was not detected in swine until 2003. Though this clade only represents 1.07% of swine H1 sequences reported over the past 10 years, hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assays demonstrated that representatives of this clade of viruses are antigenically distinct, and, when measured using antigenic cartography, were as many as 7 antigenic units from other H1γ viruses. Therefore vaccines against the contemporary H1γ viruses are not likely to cross-protect against γ-2 viruses. The long-term circulation of these γ-2 viruses suggests that minor populations of viruses may be underreported in the national dataset given the long branch lengths and gaps in detections. The identification of these γ-2 viruses demonstrates the need for robust surveillance to capture the full diversity IAVs in swine in the USA and the importance of antigenic drift in the diversification and emergence of new antigenic variants in swine, which complicates vaccine design.

  4. Cross-protection against European swine influenza viruses in the context of infection immunity against the 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus: studies in the pig model of influenza.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yu; De Hert, Karl; Van Reeth, Kristien

    2015-09-24

    Pigs are natural hosts for the same influenza virus subtypes as humans and are a valuable model for cross-protection studies with influenza. In this study, we have used the pig model to examine the extent of virological protection between a) the 2009 pandemic H1N1 (pH1N1) virus and three different European H1 swine influenza virus (SIV) lineages, and b) these H1 viruses and a European H3N2 SIV. Pigs were inoculated intranasally with representative strains of each virus lineage with 6- and 17-week intervals between H1 inoculations and between H1 and H3 inoculations, respectively. Virus titers in nasal swabs and/or tissues of the respiratory tract were determined after each inoculation. There was substantial though differing cross-protection between pH1N1 and other H1 viruses, which was directly correlated with the relatedness in the viral hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) proteins. Cross-protection against H3N2 was almost complete in pigs with immunity against H1N2, but was weak in H1N1/pH1N1-immune pigs. In conclusion, infection with a live, wild type influenza virus may offer substantial cross-lineage protection against viruses of the same HA and/or NA subtype. True heterosubtypic protection, in contrast, appears to be minimal in natural influenza virus hosts. We discuss our findings in the light of the zoonotic and pandemic risks of SIVs.

  5. Perspective: Swine-origin influenza: 1976 and 2009.

    PubMed

    Sencer, David J

    2011-01-01

    I am in a unique situation, having been involved in 2 major US public health events resulting from novel swine-origin influenza viruses. In 1976, I was Director of the Center for Disease Control (CDC, the name of the agency at the time) when a new influenza virus, characterized as an influenza A(H1N1) swine virus, was isolated from military recruits at Fort Dix, New Jersey. Subsequently, I led the CDC through the US response to this outbreak, which culminated in the decision to implement the swine flu vaccination program during which 45 million people were vaccinated over 10 weeks. The program was stopped after cases of Guillain-Barré Syndrome were identified following vaccination and when no spread of the virus occurred beyond Fort Dix. In 2009, as another new swine H1N1 virus was first identified and emergency response began, I was asked to be an advisor to the CDC Director in order that I might provide historical context to the novel H1N1 swine-origin outbreak and response. In this latter capacity, I have been able to observe and participate in discussions resulting in decision-making for the CDC's national response to this public health emergency as an unpaid consultant. This paper is a personal commentary on the similarities and dissimilarities of the 2 episodes.

  6. Swine influenza viruses isolated in 1983, 2002 and 2009 in Sweden exemplify different lineages.

    PubMed

    Kiss, István; Bálint, Adám; Metreveli, Giorgi; Emmoth, Eva; Widén, Frederik; Belák, Sándor; Wallgren, Per

    2010-12-14

    Swine influenza virus isolates originating from outbreaks in Sweden from 1983, 2002 and 2009 were subjected to nucleotide sequencing and phylogenetic analysis. The aim of the studies was to obtain an overview on their potential relatedness as well as to provide data for broader scale studies on swine influenza epidemiology. Nonetheless, analyzing archive isolates is justified by the efforts directed to the comprehension of the appearance of pandemic H1N1 influenza virus. Interestingly, this study illustrates the evolution of swine influenza viruses in Europe, because the earliest isolate belonged to 'classical' swine H1N1, the subsequent ones to Eurasian 'avian-like' swine H1N1 and reassortant 'avian-like' swine H1N2 lineages, respectively. The latter two showed close genetic relatedness regarding their PB2, HA, NP, and NS genes, suggesting common ancestry. The study substantiates the importance of molecular surveillance for swine influenza viruses.

  7. Diversity of influenza viruses in swine and the emergence of a novel human pandemic influenza A (H1N1).

    PubMed

    Brockwell-Staats, Christy; Webster, Robert G; Webby, Richard J

    2009-09-01

    The novel H1N1 influenza virus that emerged in humans in Mexico in early 2009 and transmitted efficiently in the human population with global spread has been declared a pandemic strain. Here we review influenza infections in swine since 1918 and the introduction of different avian and human influenza virus genes into swine influenza viruses of North America and Eurasia. These introductions often result in viruses of increased fitness for pigs that occasionally transmit to humans. The novel virus affecting humans is derived from a North American swine influenza virus that has acquired two gene segments [Neuraminidase (NA) and Matrix (M)] from the European swine lineages. This reassortant appears to have increased fitness in humans. The potential for increased virulence in humans and of further reassortment between the novel H1N1 influenza virus and oseltamivir resistant seasonal H1N1 or with highly pathogenic H5N1 influenza stresses the need for urgent pandemic planning.

  8. Global migration of influenza A viruses in swine

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Martha I.; Viboud, Cécile; Vincent, Amy L.; Culhane, Marie R.; Detmer, Susan E.; Wentworth, David E.; Rambaut, Andrew; Suchard, Marc A.; Holmes, Edward C.; Lemey, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    The complex and unresolved evolutionary origins of the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic exposed major gaps in our knowledge of the global spatial ecology and evolution of influenza A viruses in swine (swIAVs). Here we undertake an expansive phylogenetic analysis of swIAV sequence data and demonstrate that the global live swine trade strongly predicts the spatial dissemination of swIAVs, with Europe and North America acting as sources of viruses in Asian countries. In contrast, China has the world’s largest swine population but is not a major exporter of live swine, and is not an important source of swIAVs in neighboring Asian countries or globally. A meta-population simulation model incorporating trade data predicts that the global ecology of swIAVs is more complex than previously thought, and the US and China’s large swine populations are unlikely to be representative of swIAV diversity in their respective geographic regions, requiring independent surveillance efforts throughout Latin America and Asia. PMID:25813399

  9. Global migration of influenza A viruses in swine.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Martha I; Viboud, Cécile; Vincent, Amy L; Culhane, Marie R; Detmer, Susan E; Wentworth, David E; Rambaut, Andrew; Suchard, Marc A; Holmes, Edward C; Lemey, Philippe

    2015-03-27

    The complex and unresolved evolutionary origins of the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic exposed major gaps in our knowledge of the global spatial ecology and evolution of influenza A viruses in swine (swIAVs). Here we undertake an expansive phylogenetic analysis of swIAV sequence data and demonstrate that the global live swine trade strongly predicts the spatial dissemination of swIAVs, with Europe and North America acting as sources of viruses in Asian countries. In contrast, China has the world's largest swine population but is not a major exporter of live swine, and is not an important source of swIAVs in neighbouring Asian countries or globally. A meta-population simulation model incorporating trade data predicts that the global ecology of swIAVs is more complex than previously thought, and the United States and China's large swine populations are unlikely to be representative of swIAV diversity in their respective geographic regions, requiring independent surveillance efforts throughout Latin America and Asia.

  10. Reverse zoonosis of influenza to swine: new perspectives on the human-animal interface.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Martha I; Vincent, Amy L

    2015-03-01

    The origins of the 2009 influenza A (H1N1) pandemic in swine are unknown, highlighting gaps in our understanding of influenza A virus (IAV) ecology and evolution. We review how recently strengthened influenza virus surveillance in pigs has revealed that influenza virus transmission from humans to swine is far more frequent than swine-to-human zoonosis, and is central in seeding swine globally with new viral diversity. The scale of global human-to-swine transmission represents the largest 'reverse zoonosis' of a pathogen documented to date. Overcoming the bias towards perceiving swine as sources of human viruses, rather than recipients, is key to understanding how the bidirectional nature of the human-animal interface produces influenza threats to both hosts.

  11. Spatial dynamics of human-origin H1 influenza A virus in North American swine.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Martha I; Lemey, Philippe; Tan, Yi; Vincent, Amy; Lam, Tommy Tsan-Yuk; Detmer, Susan; Viboud, Cécile; Suchard, Marc A; Rambaut, Andrew; Holmes, Edward C; Gramer, Marie

    2011-06-01

    The emergence and rapid global spread of the swine-origin H1N1/09 pandemic influenza A virus in humans underscores the importance of swine populations as reservoirs for genetically diverse influenza viruses with the potential to infect humans. However, despite their significance for animal and human health, relatively little is known about the phylogeography of swine influenza viruses in the United States. This study utilizes an expansive data set of hemagglutinin (HA1) sequences (n = 1516) from swine influenza viruses collected in North America during the period 2003-2010. With these data we investigate the spatial dissemination of a novel influenza virus of the H1 subtype that was introduced into the North American swine population via two separate human-to-swine transmission events around 2003. Bayesian phylogeographic analysis reveals that the spatial dissemination of this influenza virus in the US swine population follows long-distance swine movements from the Southern US to the Midwest, a corn-rich commercial center that imports millions of swine annually. Hence, multiple genetically diverse influenza viruses are introduced and co-circulate in the Midwest, providing the opportunity for genomic reassortment. Overall, the Midwest serves primarily as an ecological sink for swine influenza in the US, with sources of virus genetic diversity instead located in the Southeast (mainly North Carolina) and South-central (mainly Oklahoma) regions. Understanding the importance of long-distance pig transportation in the evolution and spatial dissemination of the influenza virus in swine may inform future strategies for the surveillance and control of influenza, and perhaps other swine pathogens.

  12. Reverse zoonosis of influenza to swine: new perspectives on the human–animal interface

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The origins of the 2009 influenza A (H1N1) pandemic in swine are unknown, highlighting gaps in our understanding of influenza A virus (IAV) ecology and evolution. We review how recently strengthened influenza virus surveillance in pigs has revealed that influenza virus transmission from humans to sw...

  13. 76 FR 81467 - Availability of an Environmental Assessment for Field Testing Swine Influenza Vaccine, RNA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-28

    ... Swine Influenza Vaccine, RNA AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice... test, an unlicensed Swine Influenza Vaccine, RNA. The environmental assessment, which is based on a risk analysis prepared to assess the risks associated with the field testing of this vaccine,...

  14. National surveillance for swine influenza virus in the United States, 2009-present

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background and Objectives. In April 2009, a National surveillance plan for swine influenza virus in swine was implemented in the United States. Initial focus of the surveillance was to detect the presence and distribution of viruses (especially the 2009 H1N1 pandemic influenza, A(H1N1)pdm09) that ar...

  15. Genetic and antigenic characterization of H1 influenza viruses from United States swine from 2008

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Swine play an important role in the evolution of influenza A viruses. Prior to the introduction of the 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus from humans into pigs, four phylogenetic clusters of the hemagglutinin (HA) gene from H1 influenza viruses could be found in U.S. swine. Viruses from the classical H1N1 sw...

  16. The resurgence of swine-origin influenza A (H1N1).

    PubMed

    Mossad, Sherif Beniameen

    2009-06-01

    Unexpectedly, swine-origin influenza A (H1N1) virus (S-OIV, informally known as swine flu) appeared in North America at the very end of the 2008-2009 influenza season and began to spread internationally. As the world mobilizes for a potential pandemic, this article summarizes the developments in diagnosis, treatment, and prevention.

  17. Influenza viruses: transmission between species.

    PubMed

    Webster, R G; Hinshaw, V S; Bean, W J; Sriram, G

    1980-02-25

    The only direct evidence for transmission of influenza viruses between species comes from studies on swine influenza viruses. Antigenically and genetically identical Hsw1N1 influenza viruses were isolated from pigs and man on the same farm in Wisconsin, U.S.A. The isolation of H3N2 influenza viruses from a wide range of lower animals and birds suggests that influenza viruses of man can spread to the lower orders. Under some conditions the H3N2 viruses can persist for a number of years in some species. The isolation, from aquatic birds, of a large number of influenza A viruses that possess surface proteins antigenically similar to the viruses isolated from man, pigs and horses provides indirect evidence for inter-species transmission. There is now a considerable body of evidence which suggests that influenza viruses of lower animals and birds may play a role in the origin of some of the pandemic strains of influenza A viruses. There is no direct evidence that the influenza viruses in aquatic birds are transmitted to man, but they may serve as a genetic pool from which some genes may be introduced into humans by recombination. Preliminary evidence suggests that the molecular basis of host range and virulence may be related to the RNA segments coding for one of the polymerase proteins (P3) and for the nucleoprotein (NP).

  18. Molecular epidemiology study of swine influenza virus revealing a reassorted virus H1N1 in swine farms in Cuba.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Lester J; Perera, Carmen Laura; Coronado, Liani; Rios, Liliam; Vega, Armando; Frías, Maria T; Ganges, Llilianne; Núñez, José Ignacio; Díaz de Arce, Heidy

    2015-05-01

    In this report, we describe the emergence of reassorted H1N1 swine influenza virus, originated from a reassortment event between the H1N1 pandemic influenza virus (H1N1p/2009) and endemic swine influenza virus in Cuban swine population. In November 2010, a clinical respiratory outbreak was reported on a pig fattening farm in Cuba. Phylogenetic analysis showed that all the genes of one of the isolate obtained, with the exception of neuraminidase, belonged to the H1N1p/2009 cluster. This finding suggests that H1N1pdm has been established in swine and has become a reservoir of reassortment that may produce new viruses with both animal and public health risks.

  19. 76 FR 79203 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: Veterinary Biological Products for Swine Influenza Vaccines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-21

    ... Biological Products for Swine Influenza Vaccines AGENCY: National Institutes of Health, Public Health Service... methods of use as Veterinary Influenza Vaccines. Sustained outbreaks of highly pathogenic influenza in animals increase the risk of reassortment and adaption to humans. This technology describes DNA...

  20. Characterization of a novel oil-in-water emulsion adjuvant for swine influenza virus and Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae vaccines.

    PubMed

    Galliher-Beckley, A; Pappan, L K; Madera, Rachel; Burakova, Y; Waters, A; Nickles, M; Li, X; Nietfeld, J; Schlup, J R; Zhong, Q; McVey, S; Dritz, S S; Shi, J

    2015-06-09

    Vaccines consisting of subunit or inactivated bacteria/virus and potent adjuvants are widely used to control and prevent infectious diseases. Because inactivated and subunit antigens are often less antigenic than live microbes, a growing need exists for the development of new and improved vaccine adjuvants that can elicit rapid and long-lasting immunity. Here we describe the development and characterization of a novel oil-in-water emulsion, OW-14. OW-14 contains low-cost plant-based emulsifiers and was added to antigen at a ratio of 1:3 with simple hand mixing. OW-14 was stable for prolonged periods of time at temperatures ranging from 4 to 40°C and could be sterilized by autoclaving. Our results showed that OW-14 adjuvanted inactivated swine influenza viruses (SIV; H3N2 and H1N1) and Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae (M. hyo) vaccines could be safely administered to piglets in two doses, three weeks apart. Injection sites were monitored and no adverse reactions were observed. Vaccinated pigs developed high and prolonged antibody titers to both SIV and M. hyo. Interestingly, antibody titers were either comparable or greater than those produced by commercially available FluSure (SIV) or RespiSure (M. hyo) vaccines. We also found that OW-14 can induce high antibody responses in pigs that were vaccinated with a decreased antigen dose. This study provides direct evidence that we have developed an easy-to-use and low-cost emulsion that can act as a powerful adjuvant in two common types of swine vaccines.

  1. Efficacy of Inactivated Swine Influenza Virus Vaccines Against the 2009 A/H1N1 Influenza Virus in Pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The gene constellation of the 2009 pandemic A/H1N1 virus is a unique combination from swine influenza A viruses (SIV) of North American and Eurasian lineages, but prior to April 2009 had never before been identified in swine or other species. Although its hemagglutinin gene is related to North Ameri...

  2. Efficacy of Inactivated Swine Influenza Virus Vaccines Against 2009 H1N1 Influenza Virus in Pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction. The gene constellation of the 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus is a unique combination from swine influenza A viruses (SIV) of North American and Eurasian lineages, but prior to April 2009 had never before been identified in swine or other species (1). Although its hemagglutinin gene is relat...

  3. Cross-Species Infectivity of H3N8 Influenza Virus in an Experimental Infection in Swine

    PubMed Central

    Solórzano, Alicia; Foni, Emanuela; Córdoba, Lorena; Baratelli, Massimiliano; Razzuoli, Elisabetta; Bilato, Dania; Martín del Burgo, María Ángeles; Perlin, David S.; Martínez, Jorge; Martínez-Orellana, Pamela; Fraile, Lorenzo; Chiapponi, Chiara; Amadori, Massimo; del Real, Gustavo

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Avian influenza A viruses have gained increasing attention due to their ability to cross the species barrier and cause severe disease in humans and other mammal species as pigs. H3 and particularly H3N8 viruses, are highly adaptive since they are found in multiple avian and mammal hosts. H3N8 viruses have not been isolated yet from humans; however, a recent report showed that equine influenza A viruses (IAVs) can be isolated from pigs, although an established infection has not been observed thus far in this host. To gain insight into the possibility of H3N8 avian IAVs to cross the species barrier into pigs, in vitro experiments and an experimental infection in pigs with four H3N8 viruses from different origins (equine, canine, avian, and seal) were performed. As a positive control, an H3N2 swine influenza virus A was used. Although equine and canine viruses hardly replicated in the respiratory systems of pigs, avian and seal viruses replicated substantially and caused detectable lesions in inoculated pigs without previous adaptation. Interestingly, antibodies against hemagglutinin could not be detected after infection by hemagglutination inhibition (HAI) test with avian and seal viruses. This phenomenon was observed not only in pigs but also in mice immunized with the same virus strains. Our data indicated that H3N8 IAVs from wild aquatic birds have the potential to cross the species barrier and establish successful infections in pigs that might spread unnoticed using the HAI test as diagnostic tool. IMPORTANCE Although natural infection of humans with an avian H3N8 influenza A virus has not yet been reported, this influenza A virus subtype has already crossed the species barrier. Therefore, we have examined the potential of H3N8 from canine, equine, avian, and seal origin to productively infect pigs. Our results demonstrated that avian and seal viruses replicated substantially and caused detectable lesions in inoculated pigs without previous adaptation

  4. Cloned cDNA of A/swine/Iowa/15/1930 internal genes as a candidate backbone for reverse genetics vaccine against influenza A viruses.

    PubMed

    Lekcharoensuk, Porntippa; Wiriyarat, Witthawat; Petcharat, Nantawan; Lekcharoensuk, Chalermpol; Auewarakul, Prasert; Richt, Juergen A

    2012-02-14

    Reverse genetics viruses for influenza vaccine production usually utilize the internal genes of the egg-adapted A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (PR8) strain. This egg-adapted strain provides high production yield in embryonated eggs but does not necessarily give the best yield in mammalian cell culture. In order to generate a reverse genetics viral backbone that is well-adapted to high growth in mammalian cell culture, a swine influenza isolate A/swine/Iowa/15/30 (H1N1) (rg1930) that was shown to give high yield in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells was used as the internal gene donor for reverse genetics plasmids. In this report, the internal genes from rg1930 were used for construction of reverse genetics viruses carrying a cleavage site-modified hemagglutinin (HA) gene and neuraminidase (NA) gene from a highly pathogenic H5N1 virus. The resulting virus (rg1930H5N1) was low pathogenic in vivo. Inactivated rg1930H5N1 vaccine completely protected chickens from morbidity and mortality after challenge with highly pathogenic H5N1. Protective immunity was obtained when chickens were immunized with an inactivated vaccine consisting of at least 2(9) HA units of the rg1930H5N1 virus. In comparison to the PR8-based reverse genetics viruses carrying the same HA and NA genes from an H5N1 virus, rg1930 based viruses yielded higher viral titers in MDCK and Vero cells. In addition, the reverse genetics derived H3N2 and H5N2 viruses with the rg1930 backbone replicated in MDCK cells better than the cognate viruses with the rgPR8 backbone. It is concluded that this newly established reverse genetics backbone system could serve as a candidate for a master donor strain for development of inactivated influenza vaccines in cell-based systems.

  5. Current trends from the USDA influenza a virus in swine surveillance system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A U.S. national surveillance system for influenza A viruses (IAV) in swine was initiated in 2009 with increasing participation to the present day. The objectives are to monitor genetic evolution of IAV in swine, make isolates available for research, diagnostic reagents, and vaccine development throu...

  6. Connecting the dots between swine influenza A virus surveillance and vaccines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction Influenza A virus (IAV) infection was first recognized in the USA swine population following the 1918 Spanish flu pandemic in humans with the identification of an H1N1 virus that became known as the classical swine H1N1. In 1997-98, the incursion of the triple reassortant viruses with g...

  7. The genetic diversity of contemporary swine influenza A viruses in the United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction: Influenza A virus (IAV) is one of the most important respiratory pathogens of swine. It impacts mortality and causes significant financial losses through decreased production and the costs associated with vaccination and treatment. Further, due to the susceptibility of swine to transie...

  8. Early Induction of Cytokines in Pigs Coinfected with Swine Influenza Virus and Bordetella bronchiseptica

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Respiratory disease is one of the most important health issues for the swine industry, and coinfection with two or more pathogens is a common occurrence. Bordetella bronchiseptica and swine influenza virus (SIV) are important and common respiratory pathogens of pigs. A study examining the effect o...

  9. Early Induction of Cytokines in Pigs Coinfected with Swine Influenza Virus and Bordetella bronchiseptica

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Respiratory disease is one of the most important health issues for the swine industry, and coinfection with two or more pathogens is a common occurrence. Bordetella bronchiseptica and swine influenza virus (SIV) are important and common respiratory pathogens of pigs. The effect of coinfection of S...

  10. Pathogenesis Studies of the 2009 Pandemic Influenza Virus and Pseudorabies Virus From Wild Pigs In Swine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Over the last ten years in the United States the epidemiology and ecology of swine flu and pseudorabies has been dynamic. Swine flu is caused by influenza A virus and the disease was first recognized in pigs concurrent with the 1918 Spanish flu pandemic in humans. Pigs displayed clinical signs simil...

  11. Introductions and evolution of human-origin seasonal influenza A viruses in multinational swine populations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The capacity of influenza A viruses to cross species barriers presents a continual threat to human and animal health. Knowledge of the human-swine interface is particularly important for understanding how viruses with pandemic potential evolve in swine hosts. We sequenced the genomes of 141 influen...

  12. Influenza A Viruses of Swine (IAV-S) in Vietnam from 2010 to 2015: Multiple Introductions of A(H1N1)pdm09 Viruses into the Pig Population and Diversifying Genetic Constellations of Enzootic IAV-S.

    PubMed

    Takemae, Nobuhiro; Harada, Michiyo; Nguyen, Phuong Thanh; Nguyen, Tung; Nguyen, Tien Ngoc; To, Thanh Long; Nguyen, Tho Dang; Pham, Vu Phong; Le, Vu Tri; Do, Hoa Thi; Vo, Hung Van; Le, Quang Vinh Tin; Tran, Tan Minh; Nguyen, Thanh Duy; Thai, Phuong Duy; Nguyen, Dang Hoang; Le, Anh Quynh Thi; Nguyen, Diep Thi; Uchida, Yuko; Saito, Takehiko

    2017-01-01

    Active surveillance of influenza A viruses of swine (IAV-S) involving 262 farms and 10 slaughterhouses in seven provinces in northern and southern Vietnam from 2010 to 2015 yielded 388 isolates from 32 farms; these viruses were classified into H1N1, H1N2, and H3N2 subtypes. Whole-genome sequencing followed by phylogenetic analysis revealed that the isolates represented 15 genotypes, according to the genetic constellation of the eight segments. All of the H1N1 viruses were entirely A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses, whereas all of the H1N2 and H3N2 viruses were reassortants among 5 distinct ancestral viruses: H1 and H3 triple-reassortant (TR) IAV-S that originated from North American pre-2009 human seasonal H1, human seasonal H3N2, and A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses. Notably, 93% of the reassortant IAV-S retained M genes that were derived from A(H1N1)pdm09, suggesting some advantage in terms of their host adaptation. Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo analysis revealed that multiple introductions of A(H1N1)pdm09 and TR IAV-S into the Vietnamese pig population have driven the genetic diversity of currently circulating Vietnamese IAV-S. In addition, our results indicate that a reassortant IAV-S with human-like H3 and N2 genes and an A(H1N1)pdm09 origin M gene likely caused a human case in Ho Chi Minh City in 2010. Our current findings indicate that human-to-pig transmission as well as cocirculation of different IAV-S have contributed to diversifying the gene constellations of IAV-S in Vietnam.

  13. [Comparative study of the differential susceptibility of different cell lines to pandemic H1N1v influenza viruses and avian influenza, swine influenza, and human influenza viruses].

    PubMed

    Danilenko, D M; Smirnova, T D; Gudkova, T M; Eropkin, M Iu; Kiselev, O I

    2011-01-01

    The proliferation characteristics of influenza viruses of different origin were tested in various human and animal cell cultures. Pandemic H1N1v influenza and swine influenza viruses were shown to have a low infectious activity in virtually all the test lines. In spite of this, the replication of this group of viruses may be detected by de novo NP synthesis. These viruses are able to activate programmed cell death. Moreover, a low inoculative virus dose exerts a stimulating effect on cell proliferation in both suspension and monolayer cell lines.

  14. Influenza pandemics of the 20th century.

    PubMed

    Kilbourne, Edwin D

    2006-01-01

    Three worldwide (pandemic) outbreaks of influenza occurred in the 20th century: in 1918, 1957, and 1968. The latter 2 were in the era of modern virology and most thoroughly characterized. All 3 have been informally identified by their presumed sites of origin as Spanish, Asian, and Hong Kong influenza, respectively. They are now known to represent 3 different antigenic subtypes of influenza A virus: H1N1, H2N2, and H3N2, respectively. Not classified as true pandemics are 3 notable epidemics: a pseudopandemic in 1947 with low death rates, an epidemic in 1977 that was a pandemic in children, and an abortive epidemic of swine influenza in 1976 that was feared to have pandemic potential. Major influenza epidemics show no predictable periodicity or pattern, and all differ from one another. Evidence suggests that true pandemics with changes in hemagglutinin subtypes arise from genetic reassortment with animal influenza A viruses.

  15. Susceptibility of Swine to Low Pathogenic H5 and H7 Avian Influenza Viruses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction: The emergence of the 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza virus from swine origin viruses (1) reinforced the concern about transmission of animal influenza viruses to man. This follows the transmission of highly pathogenic H5N1 viruses from birds to people identified in the late 1990s and cont...

  16. Novel triple-reassortant H1N1 swine influenza viruses in pigs in Tianjin, Northern China.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ying-Feng; Wang, Xiu-Hui; Li, Xiu-Li; Zhang, Li; Li, Hai-Hua; Lu, Chao; Yang, Chun-Lei; Feng, Jing; Han, Wei; Ren, Wei-Ke; Tian, Xiang-Xue; Tong, Guang-Zhi; Wen, Feng; Li, Ze-Jun; Gong, Xiao-Qian; Liu, Xiao-Min; Ruan, Bao-Yang; Yan, Ming-Hua; Yu, Hai

    2016-02-01

    Pigs are susceptible to both human and avian influenza viruses and therefore have been proposed to be mixing vessels for the generation of pandemic influenza viruses through reassortment. In this study, for the first time, we report the isolation and genetic analyses of three novel triple-reassortant H1N1 swine influenza viruses from pigs in Tianjin, Northern China. Phylogenetic analysis showed that these novel viruses contained genes from the 2009 pandemic H1N1 (PB2, PB1, PA and NP), Eurasian swine (HA, NA and M) and triple-reassortant swine (NS) lineages. This indicated that the reassortment among the 2009 pandemic H1N1, Eurasian swine and triple-reassortant swine influenza viruses had taken place in pigs in Tianjin and resulted in the generation of new viruses. Furthermore, three human-like H1N1, two classical swine H1N1 and two Eurasian swine H1N1 viruses were also isolated during the swine influenza virus surveillance from 2009 to 2013, which indicated that multiple genetic lineages of swine H1N1 viruses were co-circulating in the swine population in Tianjin, China. The emergence of novel triple-reassortant H1N1 swine influenza viruses may be a potential threat to human health and emphasizes the importance of further continuous surveillance.

  17. Interspecies interactions and potential Influenza A virus risk in small swine farms in Peru

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The recent avian influenza epidemic in Asia and the H1N1 pandemic demonstrated that influenza A viruses pose a threat to global public health. The animal origins of the viruses confirmed the potential for interspecies transmission. Swine are hypothesized to be prime "mixing vessels" due to the dual receptivity of their trachea to human and avian strains. Additionally, avian and human influenza viruses have previously been isolated in swine. Therefore, understanding interspecies contact on smallholder swine farms and its potential role in the transmission of pathogens such as influenza virus is very important. Methods This qualitative study aimed to determine swine-associated interspecies contacts in two coastal areas of Peru. Direct observations were conducted at both small-scale confined and low-investment swine farms (n = 36) and in open areas where swine freely range during the day (n = 4). Interviews were also conducted with key stakeholders in swine farming. Results In both locations, the intermingling of swine and domestic birds was common. An unexpected contact with avian species was that swine were fed poultry mortality in 6/20 of the farms in Chancay. Human-swine contacts were common, with a higher frequency on the confined farms. Mixed farming of swine with chickens or ducks was observed in 36% of all farms. Human-avian interactions were less frequent overall. Use of adequate biosecurity and hygiene practices by farmers was suboptimal at both locations. Conclusions Close human-animal interaction, frequent interspecies contacts and suboptimal biosecurity and hygiene practices pose significant risks of interspecies influenza virus transmission. Farmers in small-scale swine production systems constitute a high-risk population and need to be recognized as key in preventing interspecies pathogen transfer. A two-pronged prevention approach, which offers educational activities for swine farmers about sound hygiene and biosecurity practices and

  18. The DoD Global, Laboratory-based, Influenza Surveillance Program: summary for the 2013-2014 influenza season.

    PubMed

    DeMarcus, Laurie S; Parms, Tiffany A; Thervil, Jeffrey W

    2016-03-01

    This report for the 2013-2014 influenza season summarizes the results of influenza surveillance carried out by the DoD Global, Laboratory-based, Influenza Surveillance Program, which is managed by the U.S. Air Force School of Aerospace Medicine Epidemiology Consult Service and Epidemiology Laboratory at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, OH. Sentinel sites submitted 3,903 specimens for clinical diagnostic testing and 1,163 (29.8%) were positive for influenza virus. The predominant influenza subtype was influenza A(H1N1)pdm09, identified in 79.2% of all influenza-positive specimens. The other most common subtypes were influenza A(H3N2) (10.5%) and influenza B (10.1%). In August 2014, a human case of influenza A(H3N2) variant was identified in a patient with a history of exposure to swine. Adjusted vaccine effectiveness (VE) was calculated among 1,016 military dependents and retirees in the U.S. and was found to be 44.8% for all vaccine types. Uncertainties and other limitations associated with estimating VE are discussed.

  19. Modified live virus vaccine induces a distinct immune response profile compared to inactivated influenza A virus vaccines in swine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetic and antigenic diversity within H1 influenza A virus (IAV) subtypes circulating in swine is increasing. The need for cross-protective influenza vaccines in swine is necessary as the virus becomes more diverse. This study compared the humoral and cell-mediated immune response of modified live ...

  20. Antigenic and sequence analysis of H3 influenza virus haemagglutinins from pigs in Italy.

    PubMed

    Castrucci, M R; Campitelli, L; Ruggieri, A; Barigazzi, G; Sidoli, L; Daniels, R; Oxford, J S; Donatelli, I

    1994-02-01

    To investigate the possible mechanism of maintenance of old human influenza A (H3N2) viruses in pigs, the haemagglutinins (HAs) of seven isolates from swine were studied by analysis of nucleotide and deduced primary amino acid sequences, as well as reactivity of the HA molecule to chicken antisera and monoclonal antibodies. The swine HAs were closely similar to the HA of the A/Victoria/3/75 human variant as regards antigenic and molecular characteristics. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that the swine HA genes were transmitted from an early human H3 virus to pigs, where they survived with limited mutations over a period of 5 years. The sequence data were also compared with swine H3 sequences to investigate genetic relationships between the H3 genes from swine viruses isolated in different geographical areas. An evolutionary tree, constructed from the nucleotide sequences of viruses isolated from pigs in China and in Italy, illustrated that, depending on the country of their isolation, the HA genes of swine influenza A (H3N2) viruses have different origins, e.g. human and avian, and evolved independently in different lineages. The study provides direct support for the hypothesis that pigs might serve as a 'mixing vessel' for the generation of pandemic strains of human influenza viruses.

  1. Live poultry market workers are susceptible to both avian and swine influenza viruses, Guangdong Province, China.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jidang; Ma, Jun; White, Sarah K; Cao, Zhenpeng; Zhen, Yun; He, Shuyi; Zhu, Wanjun; Ke, Changwen; Zhang, Yongbiao; Su, Shuo; Zhang, Guihong

    2015-12-31

    Guangdong Province is recognized for dense populations of humans, pigs, poultry and pets. In order to evaluate the threat of viral infection faced by those working with animals, a cross-sectional, sero-epidemiological study was conducted in Guangdong between December 2013 and January 2014. Individuals working with swine, at poultry farms, or live poultry markets (LPM), and veterinarians, and controls not exposed to animals were enrolled in this study and 11 (4 human, 3 swine, 3 avian, and 1 canine) influenza A viruses were used in hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assays (7 strains) and the cross-reactivity test (9 strains) in which 5 strains were used in both tests. Univariate analysis was performed to identify which variables were significantly associated with seropositivity. Odds ratios (OR) revealed that swine workers had a significantly higher risk of elevated antibodies against A/swine/Guangdong/L6/2009(H1N1), a classical swine virus, and A/swine/Guangdong/SS1/2012(H1N1), a Eurasian avian-like swine virus than non-exposed controls. Poultry farm workers were at a higher risk of infection with avian influenza H7N9 and H9N2. LPM workers were at a higher risk of infection with 3 subtypes of avian influenza, H5N1, H7N9, and H9N2. Interestingly, the OR also indicated that LPM workers were at risk of H1N1 swine influenza virus infection, perhaps due to the presence of pigs in the LPM. While partial confounding by cross-reactive antibodies against human viruses or vaccines cannot be ruled out, our data suggests that animal exposed people as are more likely to have antibodies against animal influenza viruses.

  2. Swine influenza virus co-infection with Bordetella bronchiseptica enhances bacterial colonization and host immune responses exacerbating pulmonary lesions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Swine influenza virus (SIV) is one of the most important disease causing agents for the U.S. swine industry, not only as a primary pathogen but as a predisposing agent to secondary bacterial infection. Bordetella bronchiseptica (Bb) is often isolated from swine and has been shown to contribute to th...

  3. Ring test evaluation of the detection of influenza A virus in swine oral fluids by real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction and virus isolation

    PubMed Central

    Goodell, Christa K.; Zhang, Jianqiang; Strait, Erin; Harmon, Karen; Patnayak, Devi; Otterson, Tracy; Culhane, Marie; Christopher-Hennings, Jane; Clement, Travis; Leslie-Steen, Pamela; Hesse, Richard; Anderson, Joe; Skarbek, Kevin; Vincent, Amy; Kitikoon, Pravina; Swenson, Sabrina; Jenkins-Moore, Melinda; McGill, Jodi; Rauh, Rolf; Nelson, William; O’Connell, Catherine; Shah, Rohan; Wang, Chong; Main, Rodger; Zimmerman, Jeffrey J.

    2016-01-01

    The probability of detecting influenza A virus (IAV) in oral fluid (OF) specimens was calculated for each of 13 assays based on real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (rRT-PCR) and 7 assays based on virus isolation (VI). The OF specimens were inoculated with H1N1 or H3N2 IAV and serially diluted 10-fold (10−1 to 10−8). Eight participating laboratories received 180 randomized OF samples (10 replicates × 8 dilutions × 2 IAV subtypes plus 20 IAV-negative samples) and performed the rRT-PCR and VI procedure(s) of their choice. Analysis of the results with a mixed-effect logistic-regression model identified dilution and assay as variables significant (P < 0.0001) for IAV detection in OF by rRT-PCR or VI. Virus subtype was not significant for IAV detection by either rRT-PCR (P = 0.457) or VI (P = 0.101). For rRT-PCR the cycle threshold (Ct) values increased consistently with dilution but varied widely. Therefore, it was not possible to predict VI success on the basis of Ct values. The success of VI was inversely related to the dilution of the sample; the assay was generally unsuccessful at lower virus concentrations. Successful swine health monitoring and disease surveillance require assays with consistent performance, but significant differences in reproducibility were observed among the assays evaluated. PMID:26733728

  4. Ring test evaluation of the detection of influenza A virus in swine oral fluids by real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction and virus isolation.

    PubMed

    Goodell, Christa K; Zhang, Jianqiang; Strait, Erin; Harmon, Karen; Patnayak, Devi; Otterson, Tracy; Culhane, Marie; Christopher-Hennings, Jane; Clement, Travis; Leslie-Steen, Pamela; Hesse, Richard; Anderson, Joe; Skarbek, Kevin; Vincent, Amy; Kitikoon, Pravina; Swenson, Sabrina; Jenkins-Moore, Melinda; McGill, Jodi; Rauh, Rolf; Nelson, William; O'Connell, Catherine; Shah, Rohan; Wang, Chong; Main, Rodger; Zimmerman, Jeffrey J

    2016-01-01

    The probability of detecting influenza A virus (IAV) in oral fluid (OF) specimens was calculated for each of 13 assays based on real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (rRT-PCR) and 7 assays based on virus isolation (VI). The OF specimens were inoculated with H1N1 or H3N2 IAV and serially diluted 10-fold (10(-1) to 10(-8)). Eight participating laboratories received 180 randomized OF samples (10 replicates × 8 dilutions × 2 IAV subtypes plus 20 IAV-negative samples) and performed the rRT-PCR and VI procedure(s) of their choice. Analysis of the results with a mixed-effect logistic-regression model identified dilution and assay as variables significant (P < 0.0001) for IAV detection in OF by rRT-PCR or VI. Virus subtype was not significant for IAV detection by either rRT-PCR (P = 0.457) or VI (P = 0.101). For rRT-PCR the cycle threshold (Ct) values increased consistently with dilution but varied widely. Therefore, it was not possible to predict VI success on the basis of Ct values. The success of VI was inversely related to the dilution of the sample; the assay was generally unsuccessful at lower virus concentrations. Successful swine health monitoring and disease surveillance require assays with consistent performance, but significant differences in reproducibility were observed among the assays evaluated.

  5. Quail as a potential mixing vessel for the generation of new reassortant influenza A viruses.

    PubMed

    Thontiravong, Aunyaratana; Kitikoon, Pravina; Wannaratana, Suwarak; Tantilertcharoen, Rachod; Tuanudom, Ranida; Pakpinyo, Somsak; Sasipreeyajan, Jiroj; Oraveerakul, Kanisak; Amonsin, Alongkorn

    2012-12-07

    Quail has been proposed as one of the intermediate hosts supporting the generation of newly reassortant influenza A viruses (IAVs) with the potential to infect humans. To evaluate the role of quail as an intermediate host of IAVs, co-infections of quail with swine-origin pandemic H1N1 2009 (pH1N1) and low pathogenic avian influenza (LPAI) duck H3N2 (dkH3N2) viruses (n=10) or endemic Thai swine H1N1 (swH1N1) and dkH3N2 viruses (n=10) were conducted. Three additional groups of five quail were each inoculated with pH1N1, swH1N1 and dkH3N2 as control groups to verify that each virus can infect quail. Our result showed that co-infected quail shed higher viral titers from the respiratory tract than single virus infected quail. This study confirmed that reassortant viruses could be readily generated in the respiratory tract of quail from both the pH1N1/dkH3N2 co-infected group (100% of quail generating reassortant viruses) and the swH1N1/dkH3N2 (33% of quail generating reassortant viruses) co-infected group without discernible clinical signs. The reassortment efficacy between the two combination of viruses was different in that the frequency of reassortant viruses was significantly higher in pH1N1/dkH3N2 co-infected quail (21.4%) compared to swH1N1/dkH3N2 co-infected quail (0.8%), indicating that gene combinations in pH1N1 have a higher potential to reassort with dkH3N2 compared to swH1N1. In summary, our result confirmed that quail could be an intermediate host of IAVs for generating new reassortant viruses. Our finding highlights the importance of monitoring IAVs especially pH1N1 in quail.

  6. Inferring patterns of influenza transmission in swine from multiple streams of surveillance data.

    PubMed

    Strelioff, Christopher C; Vijaykrishna, Dhanasekaran; Riley, Steven; Guan, Yi; Peiris, J S Malik; Lloyd-Smith, James O

    2013-07-07

    Swine populations are known to be an important source of new human strains of influenza A, including those responsible for global pandemics. Yet our knowledge of the epidemiology of influenza in swine is dismayingly poor, as highlighted by the emergence of the 2009 pandemic strain and the paucity of data describing its origins. Here, we analyse a unique dataset arising from surveillance of swine influenza at a Hong Kong abattoir from 1998 to 2010. We introduce a state-space model that estimates disease exposure histories by joint inference from multiple modes of surveillance, integrating both virological and serological data. We find that an observed decrease in virus isolation rates is not due to a reduction in the regional prevalence of influenza. Instead, a more likely explanation is increased infection of swine in production farms, creating greater immunity to disease early in life. Consistent with this, we find that the weekly risk of exposure on farms equals or exceeds the exposure risk during transport to slaughter. We discuss potential causes for these patterns, including competition between influenza strains and shifts in the Chinese pork industry, and suggest opportunities to improve knowledge and reduce prevalence of influenza in the region.

  7. Modifications in the polymerase genes of a swine-like triple-reassortant influenza virus to generate live attenuated vaccines against 2009 pandemic H1N1 viruses.

    PubMed

    Pena, Lindomar; Vincent, Amy L; Ye, Jianqiang; Ciacci-Zanella, Janice R; Angel, Matthew; Lorusso, Alessio; Gauger, Philip C; Janke, Bruce H; Loving, Crystal L; Perez, Daniel R

    2011-01-01

    On 11 June 2009, the World Health Organization (WHO) declared that the outbreaks caused by novel swine-origin influenza A (H1N1) virus had reached pandemic proportions. The pandemic H1N1 (H1N1pdm) virus is the predominant influenza virus strain in the human population. It has also crossed the species barriers and infected turkeys and swine in several countries. Thus, the development of a vaccine that is effective in multiple animal species is urgently needed. We have previously demonstrated that the introduction of temperature-sensitive mutations into the PB2 and PB1 genes of an avian H9N2 virus, combined with the insertion of a hemagglutinin (HA) tag in PB1, resulted in an attenuated (att) vaccine backbone for both chickens and mice. Because the new pandemic strain is a triple-reassortant (TR) virus, we chose to introduce the double attenuating modifications into a swine-like TR virus isolate, A/turkey/OH/313053/04 (H3N2) (ty/04), with the goal of producing live attenuated influenza vaccines (LAIV). This genetically modified backbone had impaired polymerase activity and restricted virus growth at elevated temperatures. In vivo characterization of two H1N1 vaccine candidates generated using the ty/04 att backbone demonstrated that this vaccine is highly attenuated in mice, as indicated by the absence of signs of disease, limited replication, and minimum histopathological alterations in the respiratory tract. A single immunization with the ty/04 att-based vaccines conferred complete protection against a lethal H1N1pdm virus infection in mice. More importantly, vaccination of pigs with a ty/04 att-H1N1 vaccine candidate resulted in sterilizing immunity upon an aggressive intratracheal challenge with the 2009 H1N1 pandemic virus. Our studies highlight the safety of the ty/04 att vaccine platform and its potential as a master donor strain for the generation of live attenuated vaccines for humans and livestock.

  8. Origins of the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic in swine in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Mena, Ignacio; Nelson, Martha I; Quezada-Monroy, Francisco; Dutta, Jayeeta; Cortes-Fernández, Refugio; Lara-Puente, J Horacio; Castro-Peralta, Felipa; Cunha, Luis F; Trovão, Nídia S; Lozano-Dubernard, Bernardo; Rambaut, Andrew; van Bakel, Harm; García-Sastre, Adolfo

    2016-01-01

    Asia is considered an important source of influenza A virus (IAV) pandemics, owing to large, diverse viral reservoirs in poultry and swine. However, the zoonotic origins of the 2009 A/H1N1 influenza pandemic virus (pdmH1N1) remain unclear, due to conflicting evidence from swine and humans. There is strong evidence that the first human outbreak of pdmH1N1 occurred in Mexico in early 2009. However, no related swine viruses have been detected in Mexico or any part of the Americas, and to date the most closely related ancestor viruses were identified in Asian swine. Here, we use 58 new whole-genome sequences from IAVs collected in Mexican swine to establish that the swine virus responsible for the 2009 pandemic evolved in central Mexico. This finding highlights how the 2009 pandemic arose from a region not considered a pandemic risk, owing to an expansion of IAV diversity in swine resulting from long-distance live swine trade. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16777.001 PMID:27350259

  9. Origins of the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic in swine in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Mena, Ignacio; Nelson, Martha I; Quezada-Monroy, Francisco; Dutta, Jayeeta; Cortes-Fernández, Refugio; Lara-Puente, J Horacio; Castro-Peralta, Felipa; Cunha, Luis F; Trovão, Nídia S; Lozano-Dubernard, Bernardo; Rambaut, Andrew; van Bakel, Harm; García-Sastre, Adolfo

    2016-06-28

    Asia is considered an important source of influenza A virus (IAV) pandemics, owing to large, diverse viral reservoirs in poultry and swine. However, the zoonotic origins of the 2009 A/H1N1 influenza pandemic virus (pdmH1N1) remain unclear, due to conflicting evidence from swine and humans. There is strong evidence that the first human outbreak of pdmH1N1 occurred in Mexico in early 2009. However, no related swine viruses have been detected in Mexico or any part of the Americas, and to date the most closely related ancestor viruses were identified in Asian swine. Here, we use 58 new whole-genome sequences from IAVs collected in Mexican swine to establish that the swine virus responsible for the 2009 pandemic evolved in central Mexico. This finding highlights how the 2009 pandemic arose from a region not considered a pandemic risk, owing to an expansion of IAV diversity in swine resulting from long-distance live swine trade.

  10. Antibodies against avian-like A (H1N1) swine influenza virus among swine farm residents in eastern China.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xiuchen; Yin, Xin; Rao, Baizhong; Xie, Chunfang; Zhang, Pengchao; Qi, Xian; Wei, Ping; Liu, Huili

    2014-04-01

    In 2007, the avian-like H1N1 virus (A/swine/Zhejiang/1/07) was first isolated in pigs in China. Recently, it was reported that a 3-year-old boy was infected with avian-like A (H1N1) swine influenza virus (SIV) in Jiangsu Province, China. To investigate the prevalence of avian-like A (H1N1) SIV infection among swine farm residents in eastern China, an active influenza surveillance program was conducted on swine farms in this region from May 21, 2010 through April 22, 2012. A total of 1,162 participants were enrolled, including 1,136 persons from 48 pig farms, as well as 26 pig farm veterinarians. A total of 10.7% and 7.8% swine farm residents were positive for antibodies against avian-like A (H1N1) SIV by HI and NT assay, respectively, using 40 as the cut-off antibody titer. Meanwhile, all the serum samples collected from a control of healthy city residents were negative against avian-like A (H1N1) SIV. As the difference in numbers of antibody positive samples between the swine farm residents and health city residents controls was statistically significant (P = 0.002), these data suggest that occupational exposure to pigs may increase swine farm residents' and veterinarians' risk of avian-like A (H1N1) SIV infection in eastern China. This study provides the first data on avian-like A (H1N1) SIV infections in humans in China; the potential for avian-like A (H1N1) SIV entering the human population should also be taken into consideration.

  11. Vaccines against influenza A viruses in poultry and swine: Status and future developments.

    PubMed

    Rahn, J; Hoffmann, D; Harder, T C; Beer, M

    2015-05-15

    Influenza A viruses are important pathogens with a very broad host spectrum including domestic poultry and swine. For preventing clinical disease and controlling the spread, vaccination is one of the most efficient tools. Classical influenza vaccines for domestic poultry and swine are conventional inactivated preparations. However, a very broad range of novel vaccine types ranging from (i) nucleic acid-based vaccines, (ii) replicon particles, (iii) subunits and virus-like particles, (iv) vectored vaccines, or (v) live-attenuated vaccines has been described, and some of them are now also used in the field. The different novel approaches for vaccines against avian and swine influenza virus infections are reviewed, and additional features like universal vaccines, novel application approaches and the "differentiating infected from vaccinated animals" (DIVA)-strategy are summarized.

  12. Rapid multiplex reverse transcription-PCR typing of influenza A and B virus, and subtyping of influenza A virus into H1, 2, 3, 5, 7, 9, N1 (human), N1 (animal), N2, and N7, including typing of novel swine origin influenza A (H1N1) virus, during the 2009 outbreak in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

    PubMed

    He, Jie; Bose, Michael E; Beck, Eric T; Fan, Jiang; Tiwari, Sagarika; Metallo, Jacob; Jurgens, Lisa A; Kehl, Sue C; Ledeboer, Nathan; Kumar, Swati; Weisburg, William; Henrickson, Kelly J

    2009-09-01

    A large outbreak of novel influenza A (H1N1) virus (swine origin influenza virus [S-OIV]) infection in Milwaukee, WI, occurred in late April 2009. We had recently developed a rapid multiplex reverse transcription-PCR enzyme hybridization assay (FluPlex) to determine the type (A or B) and subtype (H1, H2, H3, H5, H7, H9, N1 [human], N1 [animal], N2, or N7) of influenza viruses, and this assay was used to confirm the diagnoses for the first infected patients in the state. The analytical sensitivity was excellent at 1.5 to 116 copies/reaction, or 10(-3) to 10(-1) 50% tissue culture infective doses/ml. The testing of all existing hemagglutinin and neuraminidase subtypes of influenza A virus and influenza B virus (41 influenza virus strains) and 24 common respiratory pathogens showed only one low-level H3 cross-reaction with an H10N7 avian strain and only at 5.2 x 10(6) copies/reaction, not at lower concentrations. Comparisons of the FluPlex results with results from multiple validated in-house molecular assays, CDC-validated FDA-approved assays, and gene sequencing demonstrated 100% positive agreement for the typing of 179 influenza A viruses and 3 influenza B viruses, the subtyping of 110 H1N1 (S-OIV; N1 [animal]), 62 H1N1 (human), and 6 H3N2 (human) viruses, and the identification of 24 negative clinical samples and 100% negative agreement for all viruses tested except H1N1 (human) (97.7%). The small number of false-positive H1N1 (human) samples most likely represent increased sensitivity over that of other in-house assays, with four of four results confirmed by the CDC's influenza virus subtyping assay. The FluPlex is a rapid, inexpensive, sensitive, and specific method for the typing and subtyping of influenza viruses and demonstrated outstanding utility during the first 2 weeks of an S-OIV infection outbreak. Methods for rapid detection and broad subtyping of influenza viruses, including animal subtypes, are needed to address public concern over the emergence of

  13. 2012-2013 influenza update: hitting a rapidly moving target.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xian Wen; Mossad, Sherif Beniameen

    2012-11-01

    From the deadly 2009 influenza A H1N1 pandemic to the looming threat of bird flu H5N1, the recent outbreak of swine flu H3N2v at agriculture fairs, and the emergence of drug-resistant H1N1, we are constantly challenged by influenza viruses. Vaccination remains the main strategy for prevention. With the knowledge gained from past pandemics, an adequate vaccine supply, and an updated preventive strategy, we are in a better position to face the challenge.

  14. Presence of influenza viruses in backyard poultry and swine in El Yali wetland, Chile.

    PubMed

    Bravo-Vasquez, N; Di Pillo, F; Lazo, A; Jiménez-Bluhm, P; Schultz-Cherry, S; Hamilton-West, C

    2016-11-01

    In South America little is known regarding influenza virus circulating in backyard poultry and swine populations. Backyard productive systems (BPS) that breed swine and poultry are widely distributed throughout Chile with high density in the central zone, and several BPS are located within the "El Yali" (EY) ecosystem, which is one of the most important wetlands in South America. Here, 130 different wild bird species have been described, of them, at least 22 species migrate yearly from North America for nesting. For this reason, EY is considered as a high-risk zone for avian influenza virus. This study aims to identify if backyard poultry and swine bred in the EY ecosystem have been exposed to influenza A virus and if so, to identify influenza virus subtypes. A biosecurity and handling survey was applied and samples were collected from BPS in two seasons (spring 2013 and fall 2014) for influenza seroprevalence, and in one season (fall 2014) for virus presence. Seroprevalence at BPS level was 42% (95% CI:22-49) during spring 2013 and 60% (95% CI 43-72) in fall 2014. rRT-PCR for the influenza A matrix gene indicated a viral prevalence of 27% (95% CI:14-39) at BPS level in fall 2014. Eight farms (73% of rRT-PCR positive farms) were also positive to the Elisa test at the same time. One BPS was simultaneously positive (rRT-PCR) in multiple species (poultry, swine and geese) and a H1N2 virus was identified from swine, exemplifying the risk that these BPS may pose for generation of novel influenza viruses.

  15. An update on swine-origin influenza virus A/H1N1: a review.

    PubMed

    Schnitzler, Sebastian U; Schnitzler, Paul

    2009-12-01

    Influenza viruses cause annual epidemics and occasional pandemics that have claimed the lives of millions. The emergence of new strains will continue to pose challenges to public health and the scientific communities. The recent flu pandemic caused by a swine-origin influenza virus A/H1N1 (S-OIV) presents an opportunity to examine virulence factors, the spread of the infection and to prepare for major influenza outbreaks in the future. The virus contains a novel constellation of gene segments, the nearest known precursors being viruses found in swine and it probably arose through reassortment of two viruses of swine origin. Specific markers for virulence can be evaluated in the viral genome, PB1-F2 is a molecular marker of pathogenicity but is not present in the new S-OIV. While attention was focused on a threat of an avian influenza H5N1 pandemic emerging from Asia, a novel influenza virus of swine origin emerged in North America, and is now spreading worldwide. However, S-OIV demonstrates that even serotypes already encountered in past human pandemics may constitute new pandemic threats. There are concerns that this virus may mutate or reassort with existing influenza viruses giving rise to more transmissible or more pathogenic viruses. The 1918 Spanish flu pandemic virus was relatively mild in its first wave and acquired more virulence when it returned in the winter. Thus preparedness on a global scale against a potential more virulent strain is highly recommended. Most isolates of the new S-OIVs are susceptible to neuraminidase inhibitors, and currently a vaccine against the pandemic strain is being manufactured and will be available this fall. This review summarizes the current information on the new pandemic swine-origin influenza virus A/H1N1.

  16. Swine Influenza Virus (H1N2) Characterization and Transmission in Ferrets, Chile

    PubMed Central

    Bravo-Vasquez, Nicolás; Karlsson, Erik A.; Jimenez-Bluhm, Pedro; Meliopoulos, Victoria; Kaplan, Bryan; Marvin, Shauna; Cortez, Valerie; Freiden, Pamela; Beck, Melinda A.

    2017-01-01

    Phylogenetic analysis of the influenza hemagglutinin gene (HA) has suggested that commercial pigs in Chile harbor unique human seasonal H1-like influenza viruses, but further information, including characterization of these viruses, was unavailable. We isolated influenza virus (H1N2) from a swine in a backyard production farm in Central Chile and demonstrated that the HA gene was identical to that in a previous report. Its HA and neuraminidase genes were most similar to human H1 and N2 viruses from the early 1990s and internal segments were similar to influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus. The virus replicated efficiently in vitro and in vivo and transmitted in ferrets by respiratory droplet. Antigenically, it was distinct from other swine viruses. Hemagglutination inhibition analysis suggested that antibody titers to the swine Chilean H1N2 virus were decreased in persons born after 1990. Further studies are needed to characterize the potential risk to humans, as well as the ecology of influenza in swine in South America. PMID:28098524

  17. Human swine influenza A [H1N1]: practical advice for clinicians early in the pandemic.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Dominic A

    2009-09-01

    The influenza pandemic the world was waiting for may have arrived, but the early indications are that the first wave of human swine influenza A [H1N1], also referred to as H1N1 Mexico 09 or "swine flu", is highly transmissible but of no greater virulence than seasonal influenza to date. The new swine flu H1N1 virus is a mixture of avian, porcine and human influenza RNA. With twenty thousand confirmed cases worldwide and 117 deaths within 7 weeks of the first acknowledgement of a possible pandemic by Mexican and WHO experts, the mortality rate is less than 0.1% and the majority of deaths centred upon the origin of the epidemic in Mexico [83%]. Swine flu is thus far a relatively mild illness seen predominantly in those who are healthy and under 25 years of age, perhaps reflecting protection from previous human influenza exposure in older people. As the virus spreads internationally, border protection issues have surfaced and public health initiatives are being progressively rolled out to minimise the transmission. Vaccines are being developed which will be trialled in the coming months with a likely availability by August 2009, in time for the northern hemisphere autumn and winter. Vigilance without alarm appears to be the recommendation so far.

  18. The neuropsychiatric aspects of influenza/swine flu: A selective review.

    PubMed

    Manjunatha, Narayana; Math, Suresh Bada; Kulkarni, Girish Baburao; Chaturvedi, Santosh Kumar

    2011-07-01

    The world witnessed the influenza virus during the seasonal epidemics and pandemics. The current strain of H1N1 (swine flu) pandemic is believed to be the legacy of the influenza pandemic (1918-19). The influenza virus has been implicated in many neuropsychiatric disorders. In view of the recent pandemic, it would be interesting to review the neuropsychiatric aspects of influenza, specifically swine flu. Author used popular search engine 'PUBMED' to search for published articles with different MeSH terms using Boolean operator (AND). Among these, a selective review of the published literature was done. Acute manifestations of swine flu varied from behavioral changes, fear of misdiagnosis during outbreak, neurological features like seizures, encephalopathy, encephalitis, transverse myelitis, aseptic meningitis, multiple sclerosis, and Guillian-Barre Syndrome. Among the chronic manifestations, schizophrenia, Parkinson's disease, mood disorder, dementia, and mental retardation have been hypothesized. Further research is required to understand the etiological hypothesis of the chronic manifestations of influenza. The author urges neuroscientists around the world to make use of the current swine flu pandemic as an opportunity for further research.

  19. Characterization of triple reassortant H1N1 influenza A viruses from swine in Ohio.

    PubMed

    Yassine, H M; Khatri, M; Zhang, Y J; Lee, C W; Byrum, B A; O'Quin, J; Smith, K A; Saif, Y M

    2009-10-20

    An H1N1 influenza A virus, A/swine/Ohio/24366/07, was isolated from pigs in an Ohio county fair. Twenty-six people who came in contact with the infected pigs developed respiratory disease and two of these people were laboratory confirmed as H1N1 by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The A/swine/Ohio/24366/07 virus we isolated from swine was shown at the CDC to have 100% identical genome sequence to the human virus associated with the county fair. This prompted us to characterize three swine and two human origin H1N1 influenza A viruses isolated at different time points in the State of Ohio. The three swine viruses were shown to be triple reassortant viruses harboring genes of human (PB1), swine (HA, NA, NP, M, and NS), and avian (PB2 and PA) lineage viruses. Although viruses evaluated in this study were isolated during a short time interval (3 years), genetic drift was observed within the HA and NA genes, including changes at the receptor binding and antigenic sites of HA1 protein. Nevertheless, all viruses exhibited antigenic similarity as evaluated with hemagglutination inhibition and virus neutralizing tests. Internal genes were similar to other reassortant viruses of various subtypes currently circulating in the United States. Interestingly, two of the swine viruses including the 2007 isolate replicated well in human airway epithelial cells, however, another virus isolated in 2006 showed very little replication.

  20. Reassortment between swine influenza A viruses increased their adaptation to humans in pandemic H1N1/09.

    PubMed

    Furuse, Yuki; Suzuki, Akira; Oshitani, Hitoshi

    2010-05-01

    In April 2009, pandemic H1N1/09 influenza, which originated from swine influenza, appeared in North America, and it has since spread globally among humans. It is important to know how swine influenza A virus broke the host barrier to cause a pandemic. We analyzed 673 strains of human, avian, and swine influenza viruses and assessed the internal genes PB2, PB1, PA, NP, M, and NS. Here we found accumulation of mutations in segments that were retained as well as introduced due to genetic reassortment of viruses. The retained segments may have to mutate to accommodate new segments. The mutations caused by interaction among segments retained and introduced due to reassortment between swine influenza viruses may have increased the adaptation of the virus to humans, leading to pandemic H1N1/09. We indicate the sites that probably contributed to the acquisition of efficient human-to-human transmission.

  1. Novel swine-origin influenza A virus in humans: another pandemic knocking at the door.

    PubMed

    Michaelis, Martin; Doerr, Hans Wilhem; Cinatl, Jindrich

    2009-08-01

    Influenza A viruses represent a continuous pandemic threat. In April 2009, a novel influenza A virus, the so-called swine-origin influenza A (H1N1) virus (S-OIV), was identified in Mexico. Although S-OIV originates from triple-reassortant swine influenza A (H1) that has been circulating in North American pig herds since the end of the 1990s, S-OIV is readily transmitted between humans but is not epidemic in pigs. After its discovery, S-OIV rapidly spread throughout the world within few weeks. In this review, we sum up the current situation and put it into the context of the current state of knowledge of influenza and influenza pandemics. Some indications suggest that a pandemic may be mild but even "mild" pandemics can result in millions of deaths. However, no reasonable forecasts how this pandemic may develop can be made at this time. Despite stockpiling by many countries and WHO, antiviral drugs will be limited in case of pandemic and resistances may emerge. Effective vaccines are regarded to be crucial for the control of influenza pandemics. However, production capacities are restricted and development/production of a S-OIV vaccine will interfere with manufacturing of seasonal influenza vaccines. The authors are convinced that S-OIV should be taken seriously as pandemic threat and underestimation of the menace by S-OIV to be by far more dangerous than its overestimation.

  2. In Vivo Validation of Predicted and Conserved T Cell Epitopes in a Swine Influenza Model

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez, Andres H.; Loving, Crystal; Moise, Leonard; Terry, Frances E.; Brockmeier, Susan L.; Hughes, Holly R.; Martin, William D.; De Groot, Anne S.

    2016-01-01

    Swine influenza is a highly contagious respiratory viral infection in pigs that is responsible for significant financial losses to pig farmers annually. Current measures to protect herds from infection include: inactivated whole-virus vaccines, subunit vaccines, and alpha replicon-based vaccines. As is true for influenza vaccines for humans, these strategies do not provide broad protection against the diverse strains of influenza A virus (IAV) currently circulating in U.S. swine. Improved approaches to developing swine influenza vaccines are needed. Here, we used immunoinformatics tools to identify class I and II T cell epitopes highly conserved in seven representative strains of IAV in U.S. swine and predicted to bind to Swine Leukocyte Antigen (SLA) alleles prevalent in commercial swine. Epitope-specific interferon-gamma (IFNγ) recall responses to pooled peptides and whole virus were detected in pigs immunized with multi-epitope plasmid DNA vaccines encoding strings of class I and II putative epitopes. In a retrospective analysis of the IFNγ responses to individual peptides compared to predictions specific to the SLA alleles of cohort pigs, we evaluated the predictive performance of PigMatrix and demonstrated its ability to distinguish non-immunogenic from immunogenic peptides and to identify promiscuous class II epitopes. Overall, this study confirms the capacity of PigMatrix to predict immunogenic T cell epitopes and demonstrate its potential for use in the design of epitope-driven vaccines for swine. Additional studies that match the SLA haplotype of animals with the study epitopes will be required to evaluate the degree of immune protection conferred by epitope-driven DNA vaccines in pigs. PMID:27411061

  3. THE INCIDENCE OF NEUTRALIZING ANTIBODIES FOR SWINE INFLUENZA VIRUS IN THE SERA OF HUMAN BEINGS OF DIFFERENT AGES

    PubMed Central

    Shope, Richard E.

    1936-01-01

    Sera from a very high proportion of the human adults and new-born infants studied neutralized swine influenza virus; sera from children below the age of 12 years seldom exerted such an effect. The results of neutralization experiments with human sera and the virus of swine influenza have been compared with the outcome of similar tests with the virus of human influenza, and it seems evident that the presence of antibodies neutralizing swine influenza virus cannot be deemed the result of repeated exposures to the current human type of virus. From the known history of swine influenza and the similarity of its etiologic virus to that obtained from man it seems likely that the virus of swine influenza is the surviving prototype of the agent primarily responsible for the great human pandemic of 1918, as Laidlaw has already suggested. The presence in human sera of antibodies neutralizing swine influenza virus is believed to indicate a previous immunizing exposure to, or infection with, an influenza virus of the 1918 type. PMID:19870496

  4. Overview of swine influenza virus vaccine research and technology: What's on the horizon and what do we need to move forward?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction Swine influenza represents a problem for the health of pigs and the economic health of the swine industry due to real and perceived public health risks. This is largely driven by the diversity of influenza A viruses (IAV) in swine herds. Antigenic drift (mutations) and shifts (reassortm...

  5. Genetic and Antigenic Characterization of H1 Influenza Viruses from United States Swine Prior to the Emergence of the 2009 Pandemic H1N1

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Swine play a role for the evolution of influenza A viruses. Prior to the introduction of the 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus from humans into pigs, four phylogenetic clusters of the hemagglutinin (HA) gene from H1 influenza viruses could be found in U.S. swine. Viruses from the classical H1N1 swine lineage...

  6. Human-Like H1 (Delta-Cluster) Swine Influenza Virus (SIV) Can Efficiently Replicate, Transmit, Cause Lung Pathology and Induce Humoral Immune Responses in the Swine Host

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction. Genomic characterization of recently identified H1 influenza A viruses demonstrated the viruses were triple reassortants with an internal gene constellation similar to contemporary U.S. swine influenza virus (SIV) but hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) most similar to human seas...

  7. Classical swine H1N1 influenza viruses confer cross protection from swine-origin 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza virus infection in mice and ferrets.

    PubMed

    Min, Ji-Young; Chen, Grace L; Santos, Celia; Lamirande, Elaine W; Matsuoka, Yumiko; Subbarao, Kanta

    2010-12-05

    The hemagglutinin of the 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza virus is a derivative of and is antigenically related to classical swine but not to seasonal human H1N1 viruses. We compared the A/California/7/2009 (CA/7/09) virus recommended by the WHO as the reference virus for vaccine development, with two classical swine influenza viruses A/swine/Iowa/31 (sw/IA/31) and A/New Jersey/8/1976 (NJ/76) to establish the extent of immunologic cross-reactivity and cross-protection in animal models. Primary infection with 2009 pandemic or NJ/76 viruses elicited antibodies against the CA/7/09 virus and provided complete protection from challenge with this virus in ferrets; the response in mice was variable and conferred partial protection. Although ferrets infected with sw/IA/31 virus developed low titers of cross-neutralizing antibody, they were protected from pulmonary replication of the CA/7/09 virus. The data suggest that prior exposure to antigenically related H1N1 viruses of swine-origin provide some protective immunity against the 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus.

  8. Serological evidence of pig-to-human influenza virus transmission on Thai swine farms.

    PubMed

    Kitikoon, Pravina; Sreta, Donruethai; Tuanudom, Ranida; Amonsin, Alongkorn; Suradhat, Sanipa; Oraveerakul, Kanisak; Poovorawan, Yong; Thanawongnuwech, Roongroje

    2011-03-24

    We investigated influenza interspecies transmission in two commercial swine farms in Thailand. Sera from swine-exposed workers (n=78), age-matched non-swine-exposed healthy people (n=60) and swine populations in both farms (n=85) were studied. Hemagglutination-inhibition (HI) assay was performed on Thai swine H1 viruses (swH1N1 and swH1N2) isolated from both farms. Thai human H1N1 (huH1N1) and pandemic H1N1 2009 (pH1N1) were also used as test antigens. The hemagglutinin (HA) 1 genes of swH1N1 and swH1N2 viruses were sequenced and shown to be genetically distinct from the Thai huH1N1 and pH1N1 viruses. Evidence of pig-to-human influenza virus transmission was found in farm workers with increased odds of elevated antibody titers to both swH1N1 (OR 42.63, 95% CI, 14.65-124) and swH1N2 (OR 58, 95% CI, 13.12-256.3) viruses. No evidence of human-to-pig influenza virus transmission was detected in this study.

  9. Long-term evolution and transmission dynamics of swine influenza A virus.

    PubMed

    Vijaykrishna, Dhanasekaran; Smith, Gavin J D; Pybus, Oliver G; Zhu, Huachen; Bhatt, Samir; Poon, Leo L M; Riley, Steven; Bahl, Justin; Ma, Siu K; Cheung, Chung L; Perera, Ranawaka A P M; Chen, Honglin; Shortridge, Kennedy F; Webby, Richard J; Webster, Robert G; Guan, Yi; Peiris, J S Malik

    2011-05-26

    Swine influenza A viruses (SwIV) cause significant economic losses in animal husbandry as well as instances of human disease and occasionally give rise to human pandemics, including that caused by the H1N1/2009 virus. The lack of systematic and longitudinal influenza surveillance in pigs has hampered attempts to reconstruct the origins of this pandemic. Most existing swine data were derived from opportunistic samples collected from diseased pigs in disparate geographical regions, not from prospective studies in defined locations, hence the evolutionary and transmission dynamics of SwIV are poorly understood. Here we quantify the epidemiological, genetic and antigenic dynamics of SwIV in Hong Kong using a data set of more than 650 SwIV isolates and more than 800 swine sera from 12 years of systematic surveillance in this region, supplemented with data stretching back 34 years. Intercontinental virus movement has led to reassortment and lineage replacement, creating an antigenically and genetically diverse virus population whose dynamics are quantitatively different from those previously observed for human influenza viruses. Our findings indicate that increased antigenic drift is associated with reassortment events and offer insights into the emergence of influenza viruses with epidemic potential in swine and humans.

  10. Characterization of H1N1 swine influenza viruses circulating in Canadian pigs in 2009

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The 2009 pandemic H1N1 (pH1N1), of apparent swine origin, may have evolved in pigs unnoticed because of insufficient surveillance. Consequently, the need for surveillance of influenza viruses circulating in pigs has received added attention. In this study we characterized H1N1 viruses isolated from ...

  11. In vivo validation of predicted and conserved T cell epitopes in a swine influenza model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Swine influenza is a highly contagious respiratory viral infection in pigs that is responsible for significant financial losses to pig farmers annually. Current measures to protect herds from infection using inactivated whole-virus, subunit and alpha replicon-based vaccines do not provide broad prot...

  12. Swine flu (H1N1 influenza): awareness profile of visitors of swine flu screening booths in Belgaum city, Karnataka.

    PubMed

    Viveki, R G; Halappanavar, A B; Patil, M S; Joshi, A V; Gunagi, Praveena; Halki, Sunanda B

    2012-06-01

    The 2009 flu pandemic was a global outbreak of a new strain of H1N1 influenza virus often referred colloquially as "swine flu". The objectives of the study were: (1) To know the sociodemographic and awareness profile of visitors attending swine flu screening booths. (2) To reveal sources of information. The present cross-sectional study was undertaken among the visitors (18 years and above) attending swine flu screening booths organised within the Belgaum city during Ganesh festival from 28-08-2009 to 03-09-2009 by interviewing them using predesigned, pretested structured questionnaire on swine flu. The data was collected and analysed using SPSS software programme for windows (version 16). Chi-square test was applied. Out of 206 visitors, 132 (64.1%) were males and 107 (51.9%) were in the age group of 30-49 years; 183 (88.8%) had heard about swine flu. More than a third of the visitors (38.3%) disclosed that there was a vaccine to prevent swine flu. Majority responded that it could be transmitted by being in close proximity to pigs (49.0%) and by eating pork (51.5%). Newspaper/magazine (64.6%), television (61.7%), and public posters/pamphlets (44.2%) were common sources of information. The present study revealed that doctors/public health workers have played little role in creating awareness in the community. The improved communication between doctors and the community would help to spread correct information about the disease and the role that the community can play in controlling the spread of the disease.

  13. Review of influenza A virus in swine worldwide: a call for increased surveillance and research.

    PubMed

    Vincent, A; Awada, L; Brown, I; Chen, H; Claes, F; Dauphin, G; Donis, R; Culhane, M; Hamilton, K; Lewis, N; Mumford, E; Nguyen, T; Parchariyanon, S; Pasick, J; Pavade, G; Pereda, A; Peiris, M; Saito, T; Swenson, S; Van Reeth, K; Webby, R; Wong, F; Ciacci-Zanella, J

    2014-02-01

    Pigs and humans have shared influenza A viruses (IAV) since at least 1918, and many interspecies transmission events have been documented since that time. However, despite this interplay, relatively little is known regarding IAV circulating in swine around the world compared with the avian and human knowledge base. This gap in knowledge impedes our understanding of how viruses adapted to swine or man impacts the ecology and evolution of IAV as a whole and the true impact of swine IAV on human health. The pandemic H1N1 that emerged in 2009 underscored the need for greater surveillance and sharing of data on IAV in swine. In this paper, we review the current state of IAV in swine around the world, highlight the collaboration between international organizations and a network of laboratories engaged in human and animal IAV surveillance and research, and emphasize the need to increase information in high-priority regions. The need for global integration and rapid sharing of data and resources to fight IAV in swine and other animal species is apparent, but this effort requires grassroots support from governments, practicing veterinarians and the swine industry and, ultimately, requires significant increases in funding and infrastructure.

  14. Comparative virulence of wild-type H1N1pdm09 influenza A isolates in swine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In 2009, a novel swine-origin H1N1 (H1N1pdm09) influenza A virus (IAV) reached pandemic status and was soon after detected in pigs worldwide. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether differences in the HA protein can affect pathogenicity and antigenicity of H1N1pdm09 in swine. We compared...

  15. Challenge of Pigs with Natural Immunity to H1 and H3 Swine Influenza Virus with Pandemic 2009 H1N1 Influenza Virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction. The emergence of the pandemic 2009 human H1N1 influenza A virus raised many questions about the implications for this virus in swine (1). One such question is, does prior exposure to influenza virus confer any protection against the new virus? This report describes a study to evaluate ...

  16. 9 CFR 94.14 - Swine from regions where swine vesicular disease exists; importations prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... PATHOGENIC AVIAN INFLUENZA, AFRICAN SWINE FEVER, CLASSICAL SWINE FEVER, SWINE VESICULAR DISEASE, AND BOVINE SPONGIFORM ENCEPHALOPATHY: PROHIBITED AND RESTRICTED IMPORTATIONS § 94.14 Swine from regions where...

  17. Full-Genome Sequence of a Reassortant H1N1 Swine Influenza Virus Isolated from Pigs in Italy.

    PubMed

    Chiapponi, Chiara; Baioni, Laura; Luppi, Andrea; Moreno, Ana; Castellan, Alberto; Foni, Emanuela

    2013-10-03

    In this study, the full-genome sequence of a novel reassortant H1N1 swine influenza virus (SIV) is reported. The isolate has a hemagglutinin (HA) gene of the pandemic H1N1 influenza virus, but it carries the seven genome segments of the avian-origin H1N1 SIV currently circulating in European pig farms.

  18. Full-Genome Sequence of a Reassortant H1N1 Swine Influenza Virus Isolated from Pigs in Italy

    PubMed Central

    Chiapponi, Chiara; Baioni, Laura; Luppi, Andrea; Moreno, Ana; Castellan, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the full-genome sequence of a novel reassortant H1N1 swine influenza virus (SIV) is reported. The isolate has a hemagglutinin (HA) gene of the pandemic H1N1 influenza virus, but it carries the seven genome segments of the avian-origin H1N1 SIV currently circulating in European pig farms. PMID:24092781

  19. Population dynamics of co-circulating swine influenza A viruses in the United States from 2009-2012

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Understanding the ecology and evolution of influenza A viruses (IAV) in mammalian hosts is critical to reduce disease burden in production animals and lower zoonotic infection risk in humans. Recent advances in influenza surveillance in United States swine populations allow for timely epidemiologica...

  20. Receptor specificity of subtype H1 influenza A viruses isolated from swine and humans in the United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The evolution of receptor specificity of classical swine influenza viruses leading to the 2009 H1N1 pandemic virus was analyzed in glycan microarrays. Classical influenza viruses from the alpha, beta, and gamma antigenic clusters isolated between 1945 and 2009 revealed a binding profile very simila...

  1. Safety and efficacy of a novel live attenuated influenza vaccine against pandemic H1N1 in swine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    On June 11, 2009 the World Health Organization (WHO) declared that the outbreaks caused by novel swine-origin influenza A (H1N1) virus had reached pandemic proportions. The pandemic H1N1 (H1N1pdm) is the predominant influenza strain in the human population. It has also crossed the species barriers a...

  2. Simultaneous infection of pigs and people with triple-reassortant swine influenza virus H1N1 at a U.S. county fair.

    PubMed

    Killian, M L; Swenson, S L; Vincent, A L; Landgraf, J G; Shu, B; Lindstrom, S; Xu, X; Klimov, A; Zhang, Y; Bowman, A S

    2013-05-01

    Influenza-like illness was noted in people and pigs in attendance at an Ohio county fair in August 2007. The morbidity rate in swine approached 100% within 1-2 days of initial clinical signs being recognized, and approximately two dozen people developed influenza-like illness. Triple-reassortant swine H1N1 influenza viruses were identified in both pigs and people at the fair. The identified viruses (A/Sw/OH/511445/2007, A/Ohio/01/2007, and A/Ohio/02/2007) were similar to H1N1 swine influenza viruses currently found in the U.S. swine population. This case illustrates the possibility of transmission of swine influenza in settings where there is close human/swine interaction.

  3. Evidence of reassortment of pandemic H1N1 influenza virus in swine in Argentina: are we facing the expansion of potential epicenters of influenza emergence?

    PubMed Central

    Pereda, Ariel; Rimondi, Agustina; Cappuccio, Javier; Sanguinetti, Ramon; Angel, Matthew; Ye, Jianqiang; Sutton, Troy; Dibárbora, Marina; Olivera, Valeria; Craig, Maria I.; Quiroga, Maria; Machuca, Mariana; Ferrero, Andrea; Perfumo, Carlos; Perez, Daniel R.

    2011-01-01

    Please cite this paper as: Pereda et al. (2011) Evidence of reassortment of pandemic H1N1 influenza virus in swine in Argentina: are we facing the expansion of potential epicenters of influenza emergence? Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses 5(6), 409–412. In this report, we describe the occurrence of two novel swine influenza viruses (SIVs) in pigs in Argentina. These viruses are the result of two independent reassortment events between the H1N1 pandemic influenza virus (H1N1pdm) and human‐like SIVs, showing the constant evolution of influenza viruses at the human–swine interface and the potential health risk of H1N1pdm as it appears to be maintained in the swine population. It must be noted that because of the lack of information regarding the circulation of SIVs in South America, we cannot discard the possibility that ancestors of the H1N1pdm or other SIVs have been present in this part of the world. More importantly, these findings suggest an ever‐expanding geographic range of potential epicenters of influenza emergence with public health risks. PMID:21668680

  4. Tracking the Evolution of Polymerase Genes of Influenza A Viruses during Interspecies Transmission between Avian and Swine Hosts

    PubMed Central

    Karnbunchob, Nipawit; Omori, Ryosuke; Tessmer, Heidi L.; Ito, Kimihito

    2016-01-01

    Human influenza pandemics have historically been caused by reassortant influenza A viruses using genes from human and avian viruses. This genetic reassortment between human and avian viruses has been known to occur in swine during viral circulation, as swine are capable of circulating both avian and human viruses. Therefore, avian-to-swine transmission of viruses plays an important role in the emergence of new pandemic strains. The amino acids at several positions on PB2, PB1, and PA are known to determine the host range of influenza A viruses. In this paper, we track viral transmission between avian and swine to investigate the evolution on polymerase genes associated with their hosts. We traced viral transmissions between avian and swine hosts by using nucleotide sequences of avian viruses and swine viruses registered in the NCBI GenBank. Using BLAST and the reciprocal best hits technique, we found 32, 33, and 30 pairs of avian and swine nucleotide sequences that may be associated with avian-to-swine transmissions for PB2, PB1, and PA genes, respectively. Then, we examined the amino acid substitutions involved in these sporadic transmissions. On average, avian-to-swine transmission pairs had 5.47, 3.73, and 5.13 amino acid substitutions on PB2, PB1, and PA, respectively. However, amino acid substitutions were distributed over the positions, and few positions showed common substitutions in the multiple transmission events. Statistical tests on the number of repeated amino acid substitutions suggested that no specific positions on PB2 and PA may be required for avian viruses to infect swine. We also found that avian viruses that transmitted to swine tend to process I478V substitutions on PB2 before interspecies transmission events. Furthermore, most mutations occurred after the interspecies transmissions, possibly due to selective viral adaptation to swine. PMID:28082971

  5. The Inability to Screen Exhibition Swine for Influenza A Virus Using Body Temperature.

    PubMed

    Bowman, A S; Nolting, J M; Workman, J D; Cooper, M; Fisher, A E; Marsh, B; Forshey, T

    2016-02-01

    Agricultural fairs create an unconventional animal-human interface that has been associated with swine-to-human transmission of influenza A virus (IAV) in recent years. Early detection of IAV-infected pigs at agricultural fairs would allow veterinarians to better protect swine and human health during these swine exhibitions. This study assessed the use of swine body temperature measurement, recorded by infrared and rectal thermometers, as a practical method to detect IAV-infected swine at agricultural fairs. In our first objective, infrared thermometers were used to record the body surface temperature of 1,092 pigs at the time of IAV nasal swab collection at the end of the exhibition period of 55 agricultural fairs. IAV was recovered from 212 (19.4%) pigs, and the difference in mean infrared body temperature measurement of IAV-positive and IAV-negative pigs was 0.83°C. In a second objective, snout wipes were collected from 1,948 pigs immediately prior to the unloading of the animals at a single large swine exhibition. Concurrent to the snout wipe collection, owners took the rectal temperatures of his/her pigs. In this case, 47 (2.4%) pigs tested positive for IAV before they entered the swine barn. The mean rectal temperatures differed by only 0.19°C between IAV-positive and IAV-negative pigs. The low prevalence of IAV among the pigs upon entry to the fair in the second objective provides evidence that limiting intraspecies spread of IAV during the fairs will likely have significant impacts on the zoonotic transmission. However, in both objectives, the high degree of similarity in the body temperature measurements between the IAV-positive and IAV-negative pigs made it impossible to set a diagnostically meaningful cut point to differentiate IAV status of the individual animals. Unfortunately, body temperature measurement cannot be used to accurately screen exhibition swine for IAV.

  6. Reassortment events among swine influenza A viruses in China: implications for the origin of the 2009 influenza pandemic.

    PubMed

    Lam, Tommy Tsan-Yuk; Zhu, Huachen; Wang, Jia; Smith, David K; Holmes, Edward C; Webster, Robert G; Webby, Richard; Peiris, Joseph M; Guan, Yi

    2011-10-01

    That pigs may play a pivotal role in the emergence of pandemic influenza was indicated by the recent H1N1/2009 human pandemic, likely caused by a reassortant between viruses of the American triple-reassortant (TR) and Eurasian avian-like (EA) swine influenza lineages. As China has the largest human and pig populations in the world and is the only place where both TR and EA viruses have been reported to cocirculate, it is potentially the source of the H1N1/2009 pandemic virus. To examine this, the genome sequences of 405 swine influenza viruses from China were analyzed. Thirty-six TR and EA reassortant viruses were identified before and after the occurrence of the pandemic. Several of these TR-EA reassortant viruses had genotypes with most segments having the same lineage origin as the segments of the H1N1/2009 pandemic virus. However, these viruses were generated from independent reassortment events throughout our survey period and were not associated with the current pandemic. One TR-EA reassortant, which is least similar to the pandemic virus, has persisted since 2007, while all the other variants appear to be transient. Despite frequent reassortment events between TR and EA lineage viruses in China, evidence for the genesis of the 2009 pandemic virus in pigs in this region is still absent.

  7. Ring test evaluation of the detection of influenza A virus in swine oral fluids by real-time, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (rRT-PCR) and virus isolation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The probability of detecting influenza A virus (IAV) in oral fluid (OF) specimens was calculated for each of 13 real-time, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (rRT-PCR) and 7 virus isolation (VI) assays. To conduct the study, OF was inoculated with H1N1 or H3N2 IAV and serially 10-fold d...

  8. Identification and characterization of a highly virulent triple reassortant H1N1 swine influenza virus in the United States.

    PubMed

    Ma, Wenjun; Vincent, Amy L; Lager, Kelly M; Janke, Bruce H; Henry, Steven C; Rowland, Raymond R R; Hesse, Richard A; Richt, Jürgen A

    2010-02-01

    A highly virulent H1N1 influenza A virus, A/Swine/Kansas/77778/2007 (KS07), which caused approximately 10% mortality in finishing pigs, was isolated from herds in the Midwestern United States. Molecular and phylogenic analysis revealed this swine isolate was a triple reassortant virus, similar to an H1N1 virus that infected humans and pigs at an Ohio county fair in August 2007. A pig challenge model was developed to evaluate the pathogenicity and transmission capacity of the KS07 virus. The results confirmed that the KS07 virus is highly virulent in pigs and easily transmitted to sentinel animals. The KS07 virus failed to cross-react with a panel of H1-specific swine sera. Interestingly, the KS07 virus shed for a prolonged period up to 7 days in infected pigs, indicating that this virus can spread efficiently between animals. The highly virulent H1N1 swine influenza virus is further evidence of reassortment among avian, human and swine influenza viruses and justifies the need for continued surveillance of influenza viruses in swine.

  9. Origin of the 1918 Spanish influenza virus: a comparative genomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Vana, Geoff; Westover, Kristi M

    2008-06-01

    To test the avian-origin hypothesis of the 1918 Spanish influenza virus we surveyed influenza sequences from a broad taxonomic distribution and collected 65 full-length genomes representing avian, human and "classic" swine H1N1 lineages in addition to numerous other swine (H1N2, H3N1, and H3N2), human (H2N2, H3N2, and H5N1), and avian (H1N1, H4N6, H5N1, H6N1, H6N6, H6N8, H7N3, H8N4, H9N2, and H13N2) subtypes. Amino acids from all eight segments were concatenated, aligned, and used for phylogenetic analyses. In addition, the genes of the polymerase complex (PB1, PB2, and PA) were analyzed individually. All of our results showed the Brevig-Mission/1918 strain in a position basal to the rest of the clade containing human H1N1s and were consistent with a reassortment hypothesis for the origin of the 1918 virus. Our genome phylogeny further indicates a sister relationship with the "classic" swine H1N1 lineage. The individual PB1, PB2, and PA phylogenies were consistent with reassortment/recombination hypotheses for these genes. These results demonstrate the importance of using a complete-genome approach for addressing the avian-origin hypothesis and predicting the emergence of new pandemic influenza strains.

  10. Phylogenetic evolution of swine-origin human influenza virus: a pandemic H1N1 2009.

    PubMed

    Kowalczyk, A; Markowska-Daniel, I

    2010-01-01

    The knowledge of the genome constellation in pandemic influenza A virus H1N1 2009 from different countries and different hosts is valuable for monitoring and understanding of the evolution and migration of these strains. The complete genome sequences of selected worldwide distributed influenza A viruses are publicly available and there have been few longitudinal genome studies of human, avian and swine influenza A viruses. All possible to download SIV sequences of influenza A viruses available at GISAID Platform (Global Initiative on Sharing Avian Influenza Data) were analyzed firstly through the web servers of the Influenza Virus Resource in NCBI. Phylogenetic study of circulating human pandemic H1N1 virus indicated that the new variant possesses a distinctive evolutionary trait. There is no one way the pandemic H1N1 have acquired new genes from other distinguishable viruses circulating recently in local human, pig or domestic poultry populations from various geographic regions. The extensive genetic diversity among whole segments present in pandemic H1N1 genome suggests that multiple introduction of virus have taken place during the period 1999-2009. The initial interspecies transmission could have occurred in the long-range past and after it the reassortants steps lead to three lineages: classical SIV prevalent in the North America, avian-like SIV in Europe and avian-like related SIV in Asia. This analysis contributes to the evidence that pigs are not the only hosts playing the role of "mixing vessel", as it was suggested for many years.

  11. Emergence and characterisation of pandemic H1N1 influenza viruses in Hungarian swine herds.

    PubMed

    Bálint, Adám; Kiss, István; Bányai, Krisztián; Biksi, Imre; Szentpáli-Gavallér, Katalin; Magyar, Tibor; Jankovics, István; Rózsa, Mónika; Szalai, Bálint; Takács, Mária; Tóth, Adám György; Dán, Adám

    2013-03-01

    In 2010, two novel porcine H1N1 influenza viruses were isolated from pigs with influenza-like illness in Hungarian swine herds. Sequence and phylogenetic analysis of these strains revealed that they shared molecular features with the pandemic H1N1 influenza virus strains, which emerged globally during 2009. The PB2, HA and NA genes contained unique amino acid changes compared to the available new H1N1 influenza virus sequences of pig origin. Furthermore, the investigated strains could be separated with respect to parallel amino acid substitutions affecting the polymerase genes (PB2, PB1 and PA) and the nucleoprotein (NP) gene, supporting the proposed complementarities between these proteins, all required for the viral fitness. Molecular characterisation of two Hungarian human pandemic H1N1 isolates was also performed, so that we could compare contemporaneous strains of different host species origins. Shared molecular motifs in various genes of animal and human influenza strains suggested that the Hungarian porcine strains could have originated from humans through direct interspecies transmission. This study is among the few that support the natural human-to-pig transmission of the pandemic H1N1 influenza virus.

  12. Novel swine-origin influenza virus A (H1N1): the first pandemic of the 21st century.

    PubMed

    Chang, Luan-Yin; Shih, Shin-Ru; Shao, Pei-Lan; Huang, Daniel Tsung-Ning; Huang, Li-Min

    2009-07-01

    An influenza epidemic was detected in April 2009 at the border between the United States and Mexico. The virus was identified soon after to be a swine-origin influenza virus A (S-OIV A) (H1N1). This virus has an HA gene that is derived from the 1918 swine influenza virus and other genes from human, avian, and Eurasian swine influenza viruses. Clinically, it behaves similarly to seasonal influenza. The only differentiating characteristics are vomiting and diarrhea in a quarter of infected patients, which are rare in seasonal influenza. On June 11, 2009, the World Health Organization declared the first pandemic of the 21st century, caused by S-OIV A (H1N1). Vaccination is the only way to dampen this pandemic. Many questions await answers, including the clinical impact of the pandemic, optimal doses of vaccine, and the future destiny of the virus. A breakthrough in vaccinology against influenza is needed to address the recurring influenza pandemic.

  13. Characterization of co-circulating swine influenza A viruses in North America and the identification of a novel H1 genetic clade with antigenic significance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Multiple genetically and antigenically distinct hemagglutinin genes of the H1 and H3 influenza A virus (IAV) subtypes co-circulate in North American swine. This diversity has evolved by repeated transmission of IAVs from humans to swine and subsequent antigenic drift in swine. To understand the evol...

  14. Pathogenicity of swine influenza viruses possessing an avian or swine-origin PB2 polymerase gene evaluated in mouse and pig models

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Wenjun; Lager, Kelly M.; Li, Xi; Janke, Bruce H.; Mosier, Derek A; Painter, Laura E.; Ulery, Eva S.; Ma, Jingqun; Lekcharoensuk, Porntippa; Webby, Richard J.; Richt, Jürgen A.

    2010-01-01

    PB2 627K is a determinant of influenza host range and contributes to the pathogenicity of human-, avian-, and mouse-adapted influenza viruses in the mouse model. Here we used mouse and pig models to analyze the contribution of a swine-origin and avian-origin PB2 carrying either 627K or 627E in the background of the classical swine H1N1 (A/Swine/Iowa/15/30; 1930) virus. The results showed PB2 627K is crucial for virulence in the mouse model, independent of whether PB2 is derived from an avian or swine influenza virus (SIV). In the pig model, PB2 627E decreases pathogenicity of the classical 1930 SIV when it contains the swine-origin PB2, but not when it possesses the avian-origin PB2. Our study suggests the pathogenicity of SIVs with different PB2 genes and mutation of codon 627 in mice does not correlate with the pathogenicity of the same SIVs in the natural host, the pig. PMID:21074235

  15. Real-time reverse transcription-PCR assay for differentiating the Pandemic H1N1 2009 influenza virus from swine influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Hiromoto, Yasuaki; Uchida, Yuko; Takemae, Nobuhiro; Hayashi, Tsuyoshi; Tsuda, Tomoyuki; Saito, Takehiko

    2010-12-01

    Since the Pandemic H1N1 2009 (H1N1pdm) influenza virus emerged in human in 2009, H1N1pdm, classical swine H1, Eurasian avian-like H1, human-like H1 and human-like H3 swine influenza viruses have circulated in pig populations, and avian H9N2 viruses have been isolated in pigs as well. In this study, TaqMan single-step real-time reverse transcription-PCR (rtRT-PCR) assays targeting the hemagglutinin gene were developed to differentiate H1N1pdm from other genetic lineages of the H1 subtype and other subtypes of influenza viruses circulating in human and pig populations for veterinary use. H1N1pdm rtRT-PCR detected H1N1pdm RNA and did not cross-react with classical swine H1, Eurasian avian-like H1, human-like H1, human-like H3 swine and avian H9 influenza viruses RNA. Classical swine H1, Eurasian avian-like H1, human-like H1 and H3 and avian H9 rtRT-PCR were reacted exclusively with viral RNA of their respective lineages and subtypes. The results demonstrate that these assays are useful for the diagnosis of the H1N1pdm virus in both human- and animal-health-related fields.

  16. "Trivalent influenza vaccination of healthy adults 3 years after the onset of swine-origin H1N1 pandemic: restricted immunogenicity of the new A/H1N1v constituent?".

    PubMed

    Allwinn, R; Bickel, M; Lassmann, C; Wicker, S; Friedrichs, I

    2013-04-01

    Influenza vaccination is advised annually to reduce the burden of influenza disease. For sufficient vaccine campaigns also a continuous adoption of influenza vaccines are necessary, due to particularly high genetic variability of influenza A virus. Therefore, we evaluate the effectiveness of the trivalent influenza vaccine 2010/2011, against influenza A (H1N1, H3N2) and influenza B. Immune response was investigated in paired sera from 92 healthcare workers with the hemagglutination inhibition assay (HI). Protective antibody levels (HI titer ≥40) were found after vaccination for influenza A/California/07/2009(H1N1): 84.71 % [GMT: 115.34]; for influenza A/Perth/16/2009(H3N2): 94.94 % [GMT: 268.47] and for influenza B/Brisbane/60/2008: 96.20 % [GMT: 176.83]; matching with the currently circulating virus strains. However, the highest seroprevalence rate was found against influenza B; pre- and post-vaccination titers as well, which may be due to comparatively high virus preservation. Remarkable, lowest seropositivity was seen against H1N1. Despite the significant titer rise, sufficient H1N1 herd immunity was still not achieved. It can be assumed that a high influenza A herd immunity may be a requirement for a successful booster vaccination.

  17. Influenza A Virus in Backyard Pigs and Poultry in Rural Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Osbjer, K; Berg, M; Sokerya, S; Chheng, K; San, S; Davun, H; Magnusson, U; Olsen, B; Zohari, S

    2016-08-02

    Surveillance of influenza virus in humans and livestock is critical, given the worldwide public health threats and livestock production losses. Livestock farming involving close proximity between humans, pigs and poultry is often practised by smallholders in low-income countries and is considered an important driver of influenza virus evolution. This study determined the prevalence and genetic characteristics of influenza A virus (IAV) in backyard pigs and poultry in Cambodia. A total of 751 animals were tested by matrix gene-based rRT-PCR, and influenza virus was detected in 1.5% of sampled pigs, 1.4% of chickens and 1.0% of ducks, but not in pigeons. Full-length genome sequencing confirmed triple reassortant H3N2 in all IAV-positive pigs and various low pathogenic avian influenza subtypes in poultry. Phylogenetic analysis of the swine influenza viruses revealed that these had haemagglutinin and neuraminidase genes originating from human H3N2 viruses previously isolated in South-East Asia. Phylogenetic analysis also revealed that several of the avian influenza subtypes detected were closely related to internal viral genes from highly pathogenic H5N1 and H9N2 formerly sequenced in the region. High sequence homology was likewise found with influenza A viruses circulating in pigs, poultry and wild birds in China and Vietnam, suggesting transboundary introduction and cocirculation of the various influenza subtypes. In conclusion, highly pathogenic subtypes of influenza virus seem rare in backyard poultry, but virus reassortment, involving potentially zoonotic and pandemic subtypes, appears to occur frequently in smallholder pigs and poultry. Increased targeted surveillance and monitoring of influenza circulation on smallholdings would further improve understanding of the transmission dynamics and evolution of influenza viruses in humans, pigs and poultry in the Mekong subregion and could contribute to limit the influenza burden.

  18. A brief introduction to influenza A virus in swine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Influenza A viruses (IAV) of the Orthomyxoviridae virus family cause one of the most important respiratory diseases in pigs as well as humans. Repeated outbreaks and rapid spread of genetically and antigenically distinct IAVs represent a considerable challenge for animal production and public health...

  19. Swine influenza - need for global surveillance and improved vaccines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Surveillance for influenza A viruses (IAV) circulating in pigs and other non-human mammals has been chronically underfunded and virtually nonexistent in many areas of the world. In March-April 2009, a novel pandemic H1N1 emerged and demonstrated in a very public forum the paucity of data on influenz...

  20. Reflections on New York City's 1947 Smallpox Vaccination Program and Its 1976 Swine Influenza Immunization Program.

    PubMed

    Imperato, Pascal James

    2015-06-01

    In 1947, a smallpox outbreak occurred in New York City with a total of twelve cases and two deaths. In order to contain this outbreak, the New York City Department of Health launched a mass immunization campaign that over a period of some 60 days vaccinated 6.35 million people. This article examines in detail the epidemiology of this outbreak and the measures employed to contain it. In 1976, a swine influenza strain was isolated among a few recruits at a US Army training camp at Fort Dix, New Jersey. It was concluded at the time that this virus possibly represented a re-appearance of the 1918 influenza pandemic influenza strain. As a result, a mass national immunization program was launched by the federal government. From its inception, the program encountered a myriad of challenges ranging from doubts that it was even necessary to the development of Guillain-Barré paralysis among some vaccine recipients. This paper examines the planning for and implementation of the swine flu immunization program in New York City. It also compares it to the smallpox vaccination program of 1947. Despite equivalent financial and personnel resources, leadership and organizational skills, the 1976 program only immunized approximately a tenth of the number of New York City residents vaccinated in 1947. The reasons for these marked differences in outcomes are discussed in detail.

  1. Swine alveolar macrophage cell model allows optimal replication of influenza A viruses regardless of their origin.

    PubMed

    Kasloff, Samantha B; Weingartl, Hana M

    2016-03-01

    The importance of pigs in interspecies transmission of influenza A viruses has been repeatedly demonstrated over the last century. Eleven influenza A viruses from avian, human and swine hosts were evaluated for replication phenotypes at three physiologically relevant temperatures (41°C, 37°C, 33°C) in an immortalized swine pulmonary alveolar macrophage cell line (IPAM 3D4/31) to determine whether this system would allow for their efficient replication. All isolates replicated well in IPAMs at 37°C while clear distinctions were observed at 41°C and 33°C, correlating to species of origin of the PB2, reflected in distinct amino acid residue profiles rather than in one particular PB2 residue. A strong TNF-α response was induced by some mammalian but not avian IAVs, while other selected cytokines remained below detection levels. Porcine IPAMs represent a natural host cell model for influenza virus replication where the only condition requiring modification for optimal IAV replication, regardless of virus origin.

  2. Pathology of the swine-origin influenza A (H1N1) flu.

    PubMed

    Calore, E E; Uip, D E; Perez, N M

    2011-02-15

    Pathological studies would aid in finding the real causes of death and in outlining adequate strategies for treatment regarding patients with poor clinical outcome of influenza A H1N1 swine flu. We describe the autopsy findings of six cases of influenza A H1N1 swine flu. The lungs in these cases had an alveolitis with hyaline membranes. Immunohistochemistry for influenza was positive only in lungs (in pneumocytes, in macrophages, in some multinucleate cells in alveoli, and in blood vessel walls) of two cases. Disseminated petechial brain hemorrhage was observed in four of the cases and focally in one case. Focal myocarditis was observed in one case. Coagulation infarcts (ischemic) were observed in the pancreas of two cases and in the spleen of two cases. Our results indicate that there was marked replication of the virus in alveoli in the more recently infected cases, which could explain the extensive diffuse alveolar damage. In our cases, there were important vascular phenomena that resulted in hemorrhage and thrombosis, but without marked decrease of platelet count and coagulation cascade disruptions. This would be attributed to hemodynamic disruption. However, it is possible that the hemorrhagic petechial lesions in the brain are due to vascular lesions or to an increase of endothelial permeability.

  3. Optimal Use of Vaccines for Control of Influenza A Virus in Swine.

    PubMed

    Sandbulte, Matthew R; Spickler, Anna R; Zaabel, Pamela K; Roth, James A

    2015-01-30

    Influenza A virus in swine (IAV-S) is one of the most important infectious disease agents of swine in North America. In addition to the economic burden of IAV-S to the swine industry, the zoonotic potential of IAV-S sometimes leads to serious public health concerns. Adjuvanted, inactivated vaccines have been licensed in the United States for over 20 years, and there is also widespread usage of autogenous/custom IAV-S vaccines. Vaccination induces neutralizing antibodies and protection against infection with very similar strains. However, IAV-S strains are so diverse and prone to mutation that these vaccines often have disappointing efficacy in the field. This scientific review was developed to help veterinarians and others to identify the best available IAV-S vaccine for a particular infected herd. We describe key principles of IAV-S structure and replication, protective immunity, currently available vaccines, and vaccine technologies that show promise for the future. We discuss strategies to optimize the use of available IAV-S vaccines, based on information gathered from modern diagnostics and surveillance programs. Improvements in IAV-S immunization strategies, in both the short term and long term, will benefit swine health and productivity and potentially reduce risks to public health.

  4. Optimal Use of Vaccines for Control of Influenza A Virus in Swine

    PubMed Central

    Sandbulte, Matthew R.; Spickler, Anna R.; Zaabel, Pamela K.; Roth, James A.

    2015-01-01

    Influenza A virus in swine (IAV-S) is one of the most important infectious disease agents of swine in North America. In addition to the economic burden of IAV-S to the swine industry, the zoonotic potential of IAV-S sometimes leads to serious public health concerns. Adjuvanted, inactivated vaccines have been licensed in the United States for over 20 years, and there is also widespread usage of autogenous/custom IAV-S vaccines. Vaccination induces neutralizing antibodies and protection against infection with very similar strains. However, IAV-S strains are so diverse and prone to mutation that these vaccines often have disappointing efficacy in the field. This scientific review was developed to help veterinarians and others to identify the best available IAV-S vaccine for a particular infected herd. We describe key principles of IAV-S structure and replication, protective immunity, currently available vaccines, and vaccine technologies that show promise for the future. We discuss strategies to optimize the use of available IAV-S vaccines, based on information gathered from modern diagnostics and surveillance programs. Improvements in IAV-S immunization strategies, in both the short term and long term, will benefit swine health and productivity and potentially reduce risks to public health. PMID:26344946

  5. Analysis of the influenza virus gene pool of avian species from southern China.

    PubMed

    Lin, Y P; Shu, L L; Wright, S; Bean, W J; Sharp, G B; Shortridge, K F; Webster, R G

    1994-02-01

    Although Southern China has been considered the epicenter of human influenza pandemics, little is known about the genetic composition of influenza viruses in lower mammals or birds in that region. To provide information on the molecular epidemiology of these viruses, we used dot blot hybridization and phylogenetic methods to study the internal genes (PB1, PB2, PA, NP, M, and NS) of 106 avian influenza A viruses isolated from a total of 11,798 domestic ducks, chickens, and geese raised in Southern China including Hong Kong. All 636 genes examined were characteristic of avian influenza viruses; no human or swine influenza genes were detected. Thus, influenza virus reassortants do not appear to be maintained in the domesticated birds of Southeast Asia, eliminating opportunities for further gene reassortment. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the internal genes of these viruses belong to the Eurasian avian lineage, supporting geographical separation of the major avian lineages. The PB1 genes were most similar to A/Singapore/57 (H2N2) and Hong Kong (H3N2) viral genes, supporting an avian origin for the recent human H2N2 and H3N2 pandemic strains. The majority of internal genes from avian influenza viruses in Southern China belong to the Eurasian lineage and are similar to viruses that have recently been transmitted to humans, swine, and horses. This study provides evidence that the transmission of avian influenza viruses and their genes to other species is unidirectional and that the transmission of mammalian influenza virus strains to domestic poultry is probably not a factor in the generation of new pandemic strains.

  6. The origin of the PB1 segment of swine influenza A virus subtype H1N2 determines viral pathogenicity in mice.

    PubMed

    Metreveli, Giorgi; Gao, Qinshan; Mena, Ignacio; Schmolke, Mirco; Berg, Mikael; Albrecht, Randy A; García-Sastre, Adolfo

    2014-08-08

    Swine appear to be a key species in the generation of novel human influenza pandemics. Previous pandemic viruses are postulated to have evolved in swine by reassortment of avian, human, and swine influenza viruses. The human pandemic influenza viruses that emerged in 1957 and 1968 as well as swine viruses circulating since 1998 encode PB1 segments derived from avian influenza viruses. Here we investigate the possible role in viral replication and virulence of the PB1 gene segments present in two swine H1N2 influenza A viruses, A/swine/Sweden/1021/2009(H1N2) (sw 1021) and A/swine/Sweden/9706/2010(H1N2) (sw 9706), where the sw 1021 virus has shown to be more pathogenic in mice. By using reverse genetics, we swapped the PB1 genes of these two viruses. Similar to the sw 9706 virus, chimeric sw 1021 virus carrying the sw 9706 PB1 gene was not virulent in mice. In contrast, replacement of the PB1 gene of the sw 9706 virus by that from sw 1021 virus resulted in increased pathogenicity. Our study demonstrated that differences in virulence of swine influenza virus subtype H1N2 are attributed at least in part to the PB1 segment.

  7. Utilizing spatiotemporal analysis of influenza-like illness and rapid tests to focus swine-origin influenza virus intervention

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, J. Gaines; Ballou, Jessica; Yan, Chris; Fisher-Hoch, Susan P.; Reininger, Belinda; Gay, Jennifer; Salinas, Jennifer; Sanchez, Pablo; Salinas, Yvette; Calvillo, Fidel; Lopez, Leonel; deLima, Ionara P.; McCormick, Joseph B.

    2010-01-01

    In the spring of 2009, a novel strain of H1N1 swine-origin influenza A virus (S-OIV) emerged in Mexico and the United States, and soon after was declared a pandemic by the World Health Organization. This work examined the ability of real-time reports of influenza-like illness (ILI) symptoms and rapid influenza diagnostic tests (RIDTs) to approximate the spatiotemporal distribution of PCR-confirmed S-OIV cases for the purposes of focusing local intervention efforts. Cluster and age-adjusted relative risk patterns of ILI, RIDT and S-OIV were assessed at a fine spatial scale at different time and space extents within Cameron County, Texas on the U.S.-Mexico border. Space-time patterns of ILI and RIDT were found to effectively characterize the areas with highest geographical risk of S-OIV within the first two weeks of the outbreak. Based on these results, ILI and/or RIDT may prove to be acceptable indicators of the location of S-OIV hotspots. Given that S-OIV data is often difficult to obtain real-time during an outbreak, these findings may be of use to public health officials targeting prevention and response efforts during future flu outbreaks. PMID:20810301

  8. Emergence and pandemic potential of swine-origin H1N1 influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Gabriele; Noda, Takeshi; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro

    2009-06-18

    Influenza viruses cause annual epidemics and occasional pandemics that have claimed the lives of millions. The emergence of new strains will continue to pose challenges to public health and the scientific communities. A prime example is the recent emergence of swine-origin H1N1 viruses that have transmitted to and spread among humans, resulting in outbreaks internationally. Efforts to control these outbreaks and real-time monitoring of the evolution of this virus should provide us with invaluable information to direct infectious disease control programmes and to improve understanding of the factors that determine viral pathogenicity and/or transmissibility.

  9. Origins and evolutionary genomics of the 2009 swine-origin H1N1 influenza A epidemic.

    PubMed

    Smith, Gavin J D; Vijaykrishna, Dhanasekaran; Bahl, Justin; Lycett, Samantha J; Worobey, Michael; Pybus, Oliver G; Ma, Siu Kit; Cheung, Chung Lam; Raghwani, Jayna; Bhatt, Samir; Peiris, J S Malik; Guan, Yi; Rambaut, Andrew

    2009-06-25

    In March and early April 2009, a new swine-origin influenza A (H1N1) virus (S-OIV) emerged in Mexico and the United States. During the first few weeks of surveillance, the virus spread worldwide to 30 countries (as of May 11) by human-to-human transmission, causing the World Health Organization to raise its pandemic alert to level 5 of 6. This virus has the potential to develop into the first influenza pandemic of the twenty-first century. Here we use evolutionary analysis to estimate the timescale of the origins and the early development of the S-OIV epidemic. We show that it was derived from several viruses circulating in swine, and that the initial transmission to humans occurred several months before recognition of the outbreak. A phylogenetic estimate of the gaps in genetic surveillance indicates a long period of unsampled ancestry before the S-OIV outbreak, suggesting that the reassortment of swine lineages may have occurred years before emergence in humans, and that the multiple genetic ancestry of S-OIV is not indicative of an artificial origin. Furthermore, the unsampled history of the epidemic means that the nature and location of the genetically closest swine viruses reveal little about the immediate origin of the epidemic, despite the fact that we included a panel of closely related and previously unpublished swine influenza isolates. Our results highlight the need for systematic surveillance of influenza in swine, and provide evidence that the mixing of new genetic elements in swine can result in the emergence of viruses with pandemic potential in humans.

  10. Simultaneous detection of influenza viruses A, B, and swine origin influenza A using multiplex one-step real-time RT-PCR assay.

    PubMed

    Monavari, S H R; Mollaie, H R; Fazlalipour, M

    2014-01-01

    Every year, seasonal epidemics of influenza viruses are causing considerable morbidity and mortality worldwide. Also infrequent novel and rearranged strains of influenza viruses have caused quick, acute universal pandemics resulting in millions of mortalities. The usage of efficient and accurate detection is superior for infection control, effective treatment, and epidemiological supervision. Therefore, evaluation of useful real-time PCR molecular tests for the detection of pandemic viruses is important before the next wave of the pandemic. A novel quantitative real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) assay with specific primers was used successfully for detection and monitoring of the influenza A, B, and swine influenza. The newly designed primers target highly conserved regions in influenza viruses. Our qRT-PCR assay is highly specific for detecting influenza A, B, and swine influenza viruses. The cutoff CT value was determined <38 for domestic human diagnostic test, under conditions of FDA emergency, and the reaction efficiency of the InfA, swInfA, and InfB assays were thereby estimated to be 97.9 % (R2 = 0.998), 98.3 % (R2 = 0.986), and 99.5 % (R2 = 0.995), respectively. Interestingly, based on our finding, there is no cross reactivity of detecting other viruses.

  11. Complicated secondary pneumonia after swine-origin influenza A virus infection in an immunocompetent patient.

    PubMed

    Igusa, Ryotaro; Sakakibara, Tomohiro; Shibahara, Taizo; Sakamoto, Kazuhiro; Nishimura, Hidekazu; Ota, Kozo

    2012-01-01

    The pandemic of the swine-origin influenza A virus (S-OIV) in 2009 demonstrated severe viral pneumonia followed by acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Although ARDS would be caused by the influenza virus pneumonia itself, it has remained unclear whether other respiratory viral or bacterial infections coexist with S-OIV pneumonia. We report an immunocompetent patient with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Herpes simplex virus (HSV) pneumonia secondary to S-OIV infection. A 57-year-old man previously without major medical illness was admitted to our hospital with severe pneumonia accompanied by ARDS due to S-OIV. In his clinical course, anti-influenza treatment was not effective. Sputum culture revealed the presence of MRSA, and HSV was isolated in broncho-alveoler lavage (BAL) fluid. Administration of an antiviral agent (acyclovir), an antibacterial agent (linezolid), and a corticosteroid (methylprednisolone) successfully improved the pneumonia and ARDS. HSV pneumonia can scarcely be seen in healthy people. However recently it has been recognized as a ventilator-associated pneumonia. Although coexistence of Streptococcus pneumoniae and MRSA was reported in S-OIV pneumonia, secondary viral infection has not been reported. The present report is the first patient with HSV pneumonia secondary to S-OIV infection. We propose that a possibility of hidden HSV pneumonia should be taken into consideration in patients with prolonged severe pneumonia due to influenza infection.

  12. Modeling influenza epidemics and pandemics: insights into the future of swine flu (H1N1).

    PubMed

    Coburn, Brian J; Wagner, Bradley G; Blower, Sally

    2009-06-22

    Here we present a review of the literature of influenza modeling studies, and discuss how these models can provide insights into the future of the currently circulating novel strain of influenza A (H1N1), formerly known as swine flu. We discuss how the feasibility of controlling an epidemic critically depends on the value of the Basic Reproduction Number (R0). The R0 for novel influenza A (H1N1) has recently been estimated to be between 1.4 and 1.6. This value is below values of R0 estimated for the 1918-1919 pandemic strain (mean R0 approximately 2: range 1.4 to 2.8) and is comparable to R0 values estimated for seasonal strains of influenza (mean R0 1.3: range 0.9 to 2.1). By reviewing results from previous modeling studies we conclude it is theoretically possible that a pandemic of H1N1 could be contained. However it may not be feasible, even in resource-rich countries, to achieve the necessary levels of vaccination and treatment for control. As a recent modeling study has shown, a global cooperative strategy will be essential in order to control a pandemic. This strategy will require resource-rich countries to share their vaccines and antivirals with resource-constrained and resource-poor countries. We conclude our review by discussing the necessity of developing new biologically complex models. We suggest that these models should simultaneously track the transmission dynamics of multiple strains of influenza in bird, pig and human populations. Such models could be critical for identifying effective new interventions, and informing pandemic preparedness planning. Finally, we show that by modeling cross-species transmission it may be possible to predict the emergence of pandemic strains of influenza.

  13. Different evolutionary trajectories of European avian-like and classical swine H1N1 influenza A viruses.

    PubMed

    Dunham, Eleca J; Dugan, Vivien G; Kaser, Emilee K; Perkins, Sarah E; Brown, Ian H; Holmes, Edward C; Taubenberger, Jeffery K

    2009-06-01

    In 1979, a lineage of avian-like H1N1 influenza A viruses emerged in European swine populations independently from the classical swine H1N1 virus lineage that had circulated in pigs since the Spanish influenza pandemic of 1918. To determine whether these two distinct lineages of swine-adapted A/H1N1 viruses evolved from avian-like A/H1N1 ancestors in similar ways, as might be expected given their common host species and origin, we compared patterns of nucleotide and amino acid change in whole genome sequences of both groups. An analysis of nucleotide compositional bias across all eight genomic segments for the two swine lineages showed a clear lineage-specific bias, although a segment-specific effect was also apparent. As such, there appears to be only a relatively weak host-specific selection pressure. Strikingly, despite each lineage evolving in the same species of host for decades, amino acid analysis revealed little evidence of either parallel or convergent changes. These findings suggest that although adaptation due to evolutionary lineages can be distinguished, there are functional and structural constraints on all gene segments and that the evolutionary trajectory of each lineage of swine A/H1N1 virus has a strong historical contingency. Thus, in the context of emergence of an influenza A virus strain via a host switch event, it is difficult to predict what specific polygenic changes are needed for mammalian adaptation.

  14. Progressive emergence of an oseltamivir-resistant A(H3N2) virus over two courses of oseltamivir treatment in an immunocompromised paediatric patient.

    PubMed

    Hurt, Aeron C; Leang, Sook Kwan; Tiedemann, Karin; Butler, Jeff; Mechinaud, Francoise; Kelso, Anne; Downie, Peter; Barr, Ian G

    2013-11-01

    A minor viral population of oseltamivir-resistant A(H3N2) viruses (E119V neuraminidase mutation) was selected and maintained in a continually infected immunocompromised child following initial oseltamivir treatment. A subsequent course of oseltamivir given 7 weeks later rapidly selected for the E119V variant resulting in a near-pure population of the resistant virus. The study highlights the challenges of oseltamivir treatment of immunocompromised patients that are continually shedding virus and demonstrates the ability of the E119V oseltamivir-resistant virus to be maintained for prolonged periods even in the absence of drug-selective pressure.

  15. Serum virus neutralization assay for detection and quantitation of serum neutralizing antibodies to influenza A virus in swine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The serum virus neutralization (SVN) assay is a serological test to detect the presence and magnitude of functional systemic antibodies that prevent infectivity of a virus. The SVN assay is a highly sensitive and specific test that may be applied to influenza A viruses (IAV) in swine to measure the ...

  16. The molecular determinants of antibody recognition and antigenic drift in the H3 hemagglutinin of swine influenza A virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Influenza A virus (IAV) of the H3 subtype is an important pathogen that affects both humans and swine. The main intervention strategy for preventing infection is vaccination to induce neutralizing antibodies against the surface glycoprotein hemagglutinin (HA). However, due to antigenic drift, vaccin...

  17. α-Galactosylceramide protects swine against influenza infection when administered as a vaccine adjuvant

    PubMed Central

    Artiaga, Bianca L.; Yang, Guan; Hackmann, Timothy J.; Liu, Qinfang; Richt, Jürgen A.; Salek-Ardakani, Shahram; Castleman, William L.; Lednicky, John A.; Driver, John P.

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer T (NKT) -cells activated with the glycolipid ligand α-galactosylceramide (α-GalCer) stimulate a wide array of immune responses with many promising immunotherapeutic applications, including the enhancement of vaccines against infectious diseases and cancer. In the current study, we evaluated whether α-GalCer generates protective immunity against a swine influenza (SI) virus infection when applied as an intramuscular vaccine adjuvant. Immunization of newly weaned piglets with UV-killed pandemic H1N1 A/California/04/2009 (kCA04) SI virus and α-GalCer induced high titers of anti-hemagglutinin antibodies and generated virus-specific T cells that localized in intrapulmonary airways and in alveolar walls. Vaccination with α-GalCer resulted in a systemic increase in NKT-cell concentrations, including in the respiratory tract, which was associated with complete inhibition of viral replication in the upper and lower respiratory tract and much reduced viral shedding. These results indicate that NKT-cell agonists could be used to improve swine vaccine formulations in order to reduce the clinical signs of SI infection and limit the spread of influenza viruses amongst commercial pigs. PMID:27004737

  18. Comparative virulence of wild-type H1N1pdm09 influenza A isolates in swine.

    PubMed

    Henningson, Jamie N; Rajao, Daniela S; Kitikoon, Pravina; Lorusso, Alessio; Culhane, Marie R; Lewis, Nicola S; Anderson, Tavis K; Vincent, Amy L

    2015-03-23

    In 2009, a novel swine-origin H1N1 (H1N1pdm09) influenza A virus (IAV) reached pandemic status and was soon after detected in pigs worldwide. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether differences in the HA protein can affect pathogenicity and antigenicity of H1N1pdm09 in swine. We compared lung pathology, viral replication and shedding and the antigenic relationships of four wild-type H1N1pdm09 viruses in pigs: one human (CA/09) and three isolated in swine after the pandemic (IL/09, IL/10, and MN/10). The swine strains were selected based upon unique amino acid substitutions in the HA protein. All selected viruses resulted in mild disease and viral shedding through nasal and oral fluids, however, viral replication and the degree of pathology varied between the isolates. A/Swine/IL/5265/2010 (IL/10), with substitutions I120M, S146G, S186P, V252M, had lower viral titers in the lungs and nasal secretions and fewer lung lesions. The other two swine viruses caused respiratory pathology and replicated to titers similar to the human CA/09, although MN/10 (with mutations D45Y, K304E, A425S) had lower nasal shedding. Swine-adapted H1N1pdm09 have zoonotic potential, and have reassorted with other co-circulating swine viruses, influencing the evolution of IAV in swine globally. Further, our results suggest that amino acid changes in the HA gene have the potential to alter the virulence of H1N1pdm09 in swine. Importantly, the limited clinical signs in pigs could result in continued circulation of these viruses with other endemic swine IAVs providing opportunities for reassortment.

  19. Development of a rapid automated influenza A, influenza B, and respiratory syncytial virus A/B multiplex real-time RT-PCR assay and its use during the 2009 H1N1 swine-origin influenza virus epidemic in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

    PubMed

    Beck, Eric T; Jurgens, Lisa A; Kehl, Sue C; Bose, Michael E; Patitucci, Teresa; LaGue, Elizabeth; Darga, Patrick; Wilkinson, Kimberly; Witt, Lorraine M; Fan, Jiang; He, Jie; Kumar, Swati; Henrickson, Kelly J

    2010-01-01

    Rapid, semiautomated, and fully automated multiplex real-time RT-PCR assays were developed and validated for the detection of influenza (Flu) A, Flu B, and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) from nasopharyngeal specimens. The assays can detect human H1N1, H3N2, and swine-origin (S-OIV) H1N1 Flu A viruses and were effectively used to distinguish Flu A infections (of all subtypes) from Flu B and RSV infections during the current S-OIV outbreak in Milwaukee, WI. The analytical limits of detection were 10(-2) to 10(1) TCID(50)/ml depending on the platform and analyte and showed only one minor cross-reaction among 23 common respiratory pathogens (intermittent cross-reaction to adenovirus at >10(7) TCID(50)/ml). A total of 100 clinical samples were tested by tissue culture, both automated assays, and the US Food and Drug Administration-approved ProFlu+ assay. Both the semiautomated and fully automated assays exhibited greater overall (Flu A, Flu B, and RSV combined) clinical sensitivities (93 and 96%, respectively) and individual Flu A sensitivities (100%) than the Food and Drug Administration-approved test (89% overall sensitivity and 93% Flu A sensitivity). All assays were 99% specific. During the S-OIV outbreak in Milwaukee, WI, the fully automated assay was used to test 1232 samples in 2 weeks. Flu A was detected in 134 clinical samples (126 H1N1 S-OIV, 5 H1N1 [human], and 1 untyped) with 100% positive agreement compared with other "in-house" validated molecular assays, with only 2 false-positive results. Such accurate testing using automated high-throughput molecule systems should allow clinicians and public health officials to react quickly and effectively during viral outbreaks.

  20. Alternative live-attenuated influenza vaccines based on modifications in the polymerase genes protect against epidemic and pandemic flu.

    PubMed

    Solórzano, Alicia; Ye, Jianqiang; Pérez, Daniel R

    2010-05-01

    Human influenza is a seasonal disease associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Influenza vaccination is the most effective means for disease prevention. We have previously shown that mutations in the PB1 and PB2 genes of the live-attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) from the cold-adapted (ca) influenza virus A/Ann Arbor/6/60 (H2N2) could be transferred to avian influenza viruses and produce partially attenuated viruses. We also demonstrated that avian influenza viruses carrying the PB1 and PB2 mutations could be further attenuated by stably introducing a hemagglutinin (HA) epitope tag in the PB1 gene. In this work, we wanted to determine whether these modifications would also result in attenuation of a so-called triple reassortant (TR) swine influenza virus (SIV). Thus, the TR influenza A/swine/Wisconsin/14094/99 (H3N2) virus was generated by reverse genetics and subsequently mutated in the PB1 and PB2 genes. Here we show that a combination of mutations in this TR backbone results in an attenuated virus in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, we show the potential of our TR backbone as a vaccine that provides protection against the 2009 swine-origin pandemic influenza H1N1 virus (S-OIV) when carrying the surface of a classical swine strain. We propose that the availability of alternative backbones to the conventional ca A/Ann Arbor/6/60 LAIV strain could also be useful in epidemic and pandemic influenza and should be considered for influenza vaccine development. In addition, our data provide evidence that the use of these alternative backbones could potentially circumvent the effects of original antigenic sin (OAS) in certain circumstances.

  1. The Molecular Determinants of Antibody Recognition and Antigenic Drift in the H3 Hemagglutinin of Swine Influenza A Virus

    PubMed Central

    Abente, Eugenio J.; Santos, Jefferson; Lewis, Nicola S.; Gauger, Phillip C.; Stratton, Jered; Skepner, Eugene; Rajao, Daniela S.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Influenza A virus (IAV) of the H3 subtype is an important respiratory pathogen that affects both humans and swine. Vaccination to induce neutralizing antibodies against the surface glycoprotein hemagglutinin (HA) is the primary method used to control disease. However, due to antigenic drift, vaccine strains must be periodically updated. Six of the 7 positions previously identified in human seasonal H3 (positions 145, 155, 156, 158, 159, 189, and 193) were also indicated in swine H3 antigenic evolution. To experimentally test the effect on virus antigenicity of these 7 positions, substitutions were introduced into the HA of an isogenic swine lineage virus. We tested the antigenic effect of these introduced substitutions by using hemagglutination inhibition (HI) data with monovalent swine antisera and antigenic cartography to evaluate the antigenic phenotype of the mutant viruses. Combinations of substitutions within the antigenic motif caused significant changes in antigenicity. One virus mutant that varied at only two positions relative to the wild type had a >4-fold reduction in HI titers compared to homologous antisera. Potential changes in pathogenesis and transmission of the double mutant were evaluated in pigs. Although the double mutant had virus shedding titers and transmissibility comparable to those of the wild type, it caused a significantly lower percentage of lung lesions. Elucidating the antigenic effects of specific amino acid substitutions at these sites in swine H3 IAV has important implications for understanding IAV evolution within pigs as well as for improved vaccine development and control strategies in swine. IMPORTANCE A key component of influenza virus evolution is antigenic drift mediated by the accumulation of amino acid substitutions in the hemagglutinin (HA) protein, resulting in escape from prior immunity generated by natural infection or vaccination. Understanding which amino acid positions of the HA contribute to the ability

  2. Influenza A Virus Acquires Enhanced Pathogenicity and Transmissibility after Serial Passages in Swine

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Kai; Sun, Honglei; Sun, Zhenhong; Sun, Yipeng; Kong, Weili; Pu, Juan; Ma, Guangpeng; Yin, Yanbo; Yang, Hanchun; Guo, Xin; Chang, Kin-Chow

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Genetic and phylogenetic analyses suggest that the pandemic H1N1/2009 virus was derived from well-established swine influenza lineages; however, there is no convincing evidence that the pandemic virus was generated from a direct precursor in pigs. Furthermore, the evolutionary dynamics of influenza virus in pigs have not been well documented. Here, we subjected a recombinant virus (rH1N1) with the same constellation makeup as the pandemic H1N1/2009 virus to nine serial passages in pigs. The severity of infection sequentially increased with each passage. Deep sequencing of viral quasispecies from the ninth passage found five consensus amino acid mutations: PB1 A469T, PA 1129T, NA N329D, NS1 N205K, and NEP T48N. Mutations in the hemagglutinin (HA) protein, however, differed greatly between the upper and lower respiratory tracts. Three representative viral clones with the five consensus mutations were selected for functional evaluation. Relative to the parental virus, the three viral clones showed enhanced replication and polymerase activity in vitro and enhanced replication, pathogenicity, and transmissibility in pigs, guinea pigs, and ferrets in vivo. Specifically, two mutants of rH1N1 (PB1 A469T and a combination of NS1 N205K and NEP T48N) were identified as determinants of transmissibility in guinea pigs. Crucially, one mutant viral clone with the five consensus mutations, which also carried D187E, K211E, and S289N mutations in its HA, additionally was able to infect ferrets by airborne transmission as effectively as the pandemic virus. Our findings demonstrate that influenza virus can acquire viral characteristics that are similar to those of the pandemic virus after limited serial passages in pigs. IMPORTANCE We demonstrate here that an engineered reassortant swine influenza virus, with the same gene constellation pattern as the pandemic H1N1/2009 virus and subjected to only nine serial passages in pigs, acquired greatly enhanced virulence and

  3. Influenza A virus acquires enhanced pathogenicity and transmissibility after serial passages in swine.

    PubMed

    Wei, Kai; Sun, Honglei; Sun, Zhenhong; Sun, Yipeng; Kong, Weili; Pu, Juan; Ma, Guangpeng; Yin, Yanbo; Yang, Hanchun; Guo, Xin; Chang, Kin-Chow; Liu, Jinhua

    2014-10-01

    Genetic and phylogenetic analyses suggest that the pandemic H1N1/2009 virus was derived from well-established swine influenza lineages; however, there is no convincing evidence that the pandemic virus was generated from a direct precursor in pigs. Furthermore, the evolutionary dynamics of influenza virus in pigs have not been well documented. Here, we subjected a recombinant virus (rH1N1) with the same constellation makeup as the pandemic H1N1/2009 virus to nine serial passages in pigs. The severity of infection sequentially increased with each passage. Deep sequencing of viral quasispecies from the ninth passage found five consensus amino acid mutations: PB1 A469T, PA 1129T, NA N329D, NS1 N205K, and NEP T48N. Mutations in the hemagglutinin (HA) protein, however, differed greatly between the upper and lower respiratory tracts. Three representative viral clones with the five consensus mutations were selected for functional evaluation. Relative to the parental virus, the three viral clones showed enhanced replication and polymerase activity in vitro and enhanced replication, pathogenicity, and transmissibility in pigs, guinea pigs, and ferrets in vivo. Specifically, two mutants of rH1N1 (PB1 A469T and a combination of NS1 N205K and NEP T48N) were identified as determinants of transmissibility in guinea pigs. Crucially, one mutant viral clone with the five consensus mutations, which also carried D187E, K211E, and S289N mutations in its HA, additionally was able to infect ferrets by airborne transmission as effectively as the pandemic virus. Our findings demonstrate that influenza virus can acquire viral characteristics that are similar to those of the pandemic virus after limited serial passages in pigs. Importance: We demonstrate here that an engineered reassortant swine influenza virus, with the same gene constellation pattern as the pandemic H1N1/2009 virus and subjected to only nine serial passages in pigs, acquired greatly enhanced virulence and transmissibility

  4. Efficient isolation of Swine influenza viruses by age-targeted specimen collection.

    PubMed

    Ozawa, Makoto; Matsuu, Aya; Yonezawa, Kouki; Igarashi, Manabu; Okuya, Kosuke; Kawabata, Toshiko; Ito, Kimihito; Tsukiyama-Kohara, Kyoko; Taneno, Akira; Deguchi, Eisaburo

    2015-04-01

    The control of swine influenza virus (SIV) infection is paramount for increasing the productivity of pig farming and minimizing the threat of pandemic outbreaks. Thus, SIV surveillance should be conducted by region and on a regular basis. Here, we established a microneutralization assay specific for SIV seroprevalence surveillance by using reporter gene-expressing recombinant influenza viruses. Growth-based SIV seroprevalence revealed that most sows and piglets were positive for neutralizing antibodies against influenza viruses. In contrast, the 90-day-old growing pigs exhibited limited neutralizing activity in their sera, suggesting that this particular age of population is most susceptible to SIV infection and thus is an ideal age group for SIV isolation. From nasal swab specimens of healthy pigs in this age population, we were able to isolate SIVs at a higher incidence (5.3%) than those of previous reports. Nucleotide sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of the hemagglutinin (HA) genes revealed that the isolated SIVs have circulated and evolved in pigs but not have been recently introduced from humans, implying that a large number of SIV lineages may remain "undiscovered" in the global porcine populations. We propose that the 90-day-old growing pig-targeted nasal swab collection presented in this study facilitates global SIV surveillance and contributes to the detection and control of SIV infection.

  5. Update: influenza activity -- United States and worldwide, May 18-September 20, 2014.

    PubMed

    Blanton, Lenee; Brammer, Lynnette; Smith, Sophie; Mustaquim, Desiree; Steffens, Craig; Abd Elal, Anwar Isa; Gubareva, Larisa; Hall, Henrietta; Wallis, Teresa; Villanueva, Julie; Xu, Xiyan; Bresee, Joseph; Cox, Nancy; Finelli, Lyn

    2014-10-03

    During May 18-September 20, 2014, the United States experienced low levels of seasonal influenza activity overall. Influenza A (H1N1)pdm09 (pH1N1), influenza A (H3N2), and influenza B viruses were detected worldwide and were identified sporadically in the United States. In August, two influenza A (H3N2) variant viruses (H3N2v) were detected in Ohio. This report summarizes influenza activity in the United States and worldwide during May 18-September 20, 2014.

  6. Genetic and pathobiologic characterization of pandemic H1N1 2009 influenza viruses from a naturally infected swine herd.

    PubMed

    Weingartl, Hana M; Berhane, Yohannes; Hisanaga, Tamiko; Neufeld, James; Kehler, Helen; Emburry-Hyatt, Carissa; Hooper-McGreevy, Kathleen; Kasloff, Samantha; Dalman, Brett; Bystrom, Jan; Alexandersen, Soren; Li, Yan; Pasick, John

    2010-03-01

    Since its initial identification in Mexico and the United States, concerns have been raised that the novel H1N1 influenza virus might cause a pandemic of severity comparable to that of the 1918 pandemic. In late April 2009, viruses phylogenetically related to pandemic H1N1 influenza virus were isolated from an outbreak on a Canadian pig farm. This outbreak also had epidemiological links to a suspected human case. Experimental infections carried out in pigs using one of the swine isolates from this outbreak and the human isolate A/Mexico/InDRE4487/2009 showed differences in virus recovery from the lower respiratory tract. Virus was consistently isolated from the lungs of pigs infected with A/Mexico/InDRE4487/2009, while only one pig infected with A/swine/Alberta/OTH-33-8/2008 yielded live virus from the lung, despite comparable amounts of viral RNA and antigen in both groups of pigs. Clinical disease resembled other influenza virus infections in swine, albeit with somewhat prolonged virus antigen detection and delayed viral-RNA clearance from the lungs. There was also a noteworthy amount of genotypic variability among the viruses isolated from the pigs on the farm. This, along with the somewhat irregular pathobiological characteristics observed in experimentally infected animals, suggests that although the virus may be of swine origin, significant viral evolution may still be ongoing.

  7. Experimental Inoculation of Pigs with Pandemic H1N1 2009 Virus and HI Cross-Reactivity with Contemporary Swine Influenza Virus Antisera

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In March-April 2009, a novel A/H1N1 emerged in the human population in North America. The gene constellation of the virus was demonstrated to be a combination from swine influenza A viruses (SIV) of North American and Eurasian lineages that had never before been identified in swine or other species...

  8. Origin and evolutionary pathways of the H1 hemagglutinin gene of avian, swine and human influenza viruses: cocirculation of two distinct lineages of swine virus.

    PubMed

    Kanegae, Y; Sugita, S; Shortridge, K F; Yoshioka, Y; Nerome, K

    1994-01-01

    The nucleotide sequences of the HA1 domain of the H1 hemagglutinin genes of A/duck/Hong Kong/36/76, A/duck/Hong Kong/196/77, A/sw/North Ireland/38, A/sw/Cambridge/39 and A/Yamagata/120/86 viruses were determined, and their evolutionary relationships were compared with those of previously sequenced hemagglutinin (H1) genes from avian, swine and human influenza viruses. A pairwise comparison of the nucleotide sequences revealed that the genes can be segregated into three groups, the avian, swine and human virus groups. With the exception of two swine strains isolated in the 1930s, a high degree of nucleotide sequence homology exists within the group. Two phylogenetic trees constructed from the substitutions at the synonymous site and the third codon position showed that the H1 hemagglutinin genes can be divided into three host-specific lineages. Examination of 21 hemagglutinin genes from the human and swine viruses revealed that two distinct lineages are present in the swine population. The swine strains, sw/North Ireland/38 and sw/Cambridge/39, are clearly on the human lineage, suggesting that they originate from a human A/WSN/33-like variant. However, the classic swine strain, sw/Iowa/15/30, and the contemporary human viruses are not direct descendants of the 1918 human pandemic strain, but did diverge from a common ancestral virus around 1905. Furthermore, previous to this the above mammalian viruses diverged from the lineage containing the avian viruses at about 1880.

  9. Initial psychological responses to Influenza A, H1N1 ("Swine flu")

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The outbreak of the pandemic flu, Influenza A H1N1 (Swine Flu) in early 2009, provided a major challenge to health services around the world. Previous pandemics have led to stockpiling of goods, the victimisation of particular population groups, and the cancellation of travel and the boycotting of particular foods (e.g. pork). We examined initial behavioural and attitudinal responses towards Influenza A, H1N1 ("Swine flu") in the six days following the WHO pandemic alert level 5, and regional differences in these responses. Methods 328 respondents completed a cross-sectional Internet or paper-based questionnaire study in Malaysia (N = 180) or Europe (N = 148). Measures assessed changes in transport usage, purchase of preparatory goods for a pandemic, perceived risk groups, indicators of anxiety, assessed estimated mortality rates for seasonal flu, effectiveness of seasonal flu vaccination, and changes in pork consumption Results 26% of the respondents were 'very concerned' about being a flu victim (42% Malaysians, 5% Europeans, p < .001). 36% reported reduced public transport use (48% Malaysia, 22% Europe, p < .001), 39% flight cancellations (56% Malaysia, 17% Europe, p < .001). 8% had purchased preparatory materials (e.g. face masks: 8% Malaysia, 7% Europe), 41% Malaysia (15% Europe) intended to do so (p < .001). 63% of Europeans, 19% of Malaysians had discussed the pandemic with friends (p < .001). Groups seen as at 'high risk' of infection included the immune compromised (mentioned by 87% respondents), pig farmers (70%), elderly (57%), prostitutes/highly sexually active (53%), and the homeless (53%). In data collected only in Europe, 64% greatly underestimated the mortality rates of seasonal flu, 26% believed seasonal flu vaccination gave protection against swine flu. 7% had reduced/stopped eating pork. 3% had purchased anti-viral drugs for use at home, while 32% intended to do so if the pandemic worsened. Conclusion Initial responses to Influenza A

  10. Swine influenza H1N1 virus induces acute inflammatory immune responses in pig lungs: a potential animal model for human H1N1 influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Khatri, Mahesh; Dwivedi, Varun; Krakowka, Steven; Manickam, Cordelia; Ali, Ahmed; Wang, Leyi; Qin, Zhuoming; Renukaradhya, Gourapura J; Lee, Chang-Won

    2010-11-01

    Pigs are capable of generating reassortant influenza viruses of pandemic potential, as both the avian and mammalian influenza viruses can infect pig epithelial cells in the respiratory tract. The source of the current influenza pandemic is H1N1 influenza A virus, possibly of swine origin. This study was conducted to understand better the pathogenesis of H1N1 influenza virus and associated host mucosal immune responses during acute infection in humans. Therefore, we chose a H1N1 swine influenza virus, Sw/OH/24366/07 (SwIV), which has a history of transmission to humans. Clinically, inoculated pigs had nasal discharge and fever and shed virus through nasal secretions. Like pandemic H1N1, SwIV also replicated extensively in both the upper and lower respiratory tracts, and lung lesions were typical of H1N1 infection. We detected innate, proinflammatory, Th1, Th2, and Th3 cytokines, as well as SwIV-specific IgA antibody in lungs of the virus-inoculated pigs. Production of IFN-γ by lymphocytes of the tracheobronchial lymph nodes was also detected. Higher frequencies of cytotoxic T lymphocytes, γδ T cells, dendritic cells, activated T cells, and CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were detected in SwIV-infected pig lungs. Concomitantly, higher frequencies of the immunosuppressive T regulatory cells were also detected in the virus-infected pig lungs. The findings of this study have relevance to pathogenesis of the pandemic H1N1 influenza virus in humans; thus, pigs may serve as a useful animal model to design and test effective mucosal vaccines and therapeutics against influenza virus.

  11. Prevalence, genetics, and transmissibility in ferrets of Eurasian avian-like H1N1 swine influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huanliang; Chen, Yan; Qiao, Chuanling; He, Xijun; Zhou, Hong; Sun, Yu; Yin, Hang; Meng, Shasha; Liu, Liping; Zhang, Qianyi; Kong, Huihui; Gu, Chunyang; Li, Chengjun; Bu, Zhigao; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro; Chen, Hualan

    2016-01-12

    Pigs are important intermediate hosts for generating novel influenza viruses. The Eurasian avian-like H1N1 (EAH1N1) swine influenza viruses (SIVs) have circulated in pigs since 1979, and human cases associated with EAH1N1 SIVs have been reported in several countries. However, the biologic properties of EAH1N1 SIVs are largely unknown. Here, we performed extensive influenza surveillance in pigs in China and isolated 228 influenza viruses from 36,417 pigs. We found that 139 of the 228 strains from pigs in 10 provinces in China belong to the EAH1N1 lineage. These viruses formed five genotypes, with two distinct antigenic groups, represented by A/swine/Guangxi/18/2011 and A/swine/Guangdong/104/2013, both of which are antigenically and genetically distinct from the current human H1N1 viruses. Importantly, the EAH1N1 SIVs preferentially bound to human-type receptors, and 9 of the 10 tested viruses transmitted in ferrets by respiratory droplet. We found that 3.6% of children (≤10 y old), 0% of adults, and 13.4% of elderly adults (≥60 y old) had neutralization antibodies (titers ≥40 in children and ≥80 in adults) against the EAH1N1 A/swine/Guangxi/18/2011 virus, but none of them had such neutralization antibodies against the EAH1N1 A/swine/Guangdong/104/2013 virus. Our study shows the potential of EAH1N1 SIVs to transmit efficiently in humans and suggests that immediate action is needed to prevent the efficient transmission of EAH1N1 SIVs to humans.

  12. Dual Infection of Novel Influenza Viruses A/H1N1 and A/H3N2 in a Cluster of Cambodian Patients

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    Vomiting N N Y Y N Rhinorrhea N N N N Y Medication Amoxicillin and paracetamol Amoxicillin and paracetamol Amoxicillin and paracetamol Amoxicillin and... paracetamol N Epidemiology Recent travel Within country N N N N Animal exposure N N N N N Disposition Recovered Recovered Recovered Recovered

  13. Receptor characterization and susceptibility of cotton rats to avian and 2009 pandemic influenza virus strains.

    PubMed

    Blanco, Jorge C G; Pletneva, Lioubov M; Wan, Hongquan; Araya, Yonas; Angel, Matthew; Oue, Raymonde O; Sutton, Troy C; Perez, Daniel R

    2013-02-01

    Animal influenza viruses (AIVs) are a major threat to human health and the source of pandemic influenza. A reliable small-mammal model to study the pathogenesis of infection and for testing vaccines and therapeutics against multiple strains of influenza virus is highly desirable. We show that cotton rats (Sigmodon hispidus) are susceptible to avian and swine influenza viruses. Cotton rats express α2,3-linked sialic acid (SA) and α2,6-linked SA residues in the trachea and α2,6-linked SA residues in the lung parenchyma. Prototypic avian influenza viruses (H3N2, H9N2, and H5N1) and swine-origin 2009 pandemic H1N1 viruses replicated in the nose and in the respiratory tract of cotton rats without prior adaptation and produced strong lung pathology that was characterized by early lung neutrophilia, followed by subsequent pneumonia. Consistent with other natural and animal models of influenza, only the H5N1 virus was lethal for cotton rats. More importantly, we show that the different avian and pandemic H1N1 strains tested are strong activators of the type I interferon (IFN)-inducible MX-1 gene both locally and systemically. Our data indicate that the cotton rat is a suitable small-mammal model to study the infection of animal influenza viruses and for validation of vaccines and therapeutics against these viruses.

  14. Preparation and immunological effectiveness of a swine influenza DNA vaccine encapsulated in chitosan nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Kai; Shi, Xingming; Zhao, Yan; Wei, Haixia; Sun, Qingshen; Huang, Tingting; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Wang, Yunfeng

    2011-11-03

    Preparation conditions of a DNA vaccine against swine influenza encapsulated in chitosan nanoparticles were determined. The nanoparticles were prepared according to a complex coacervation method using chitosan as a biodegradable matrix forming polymer. Under the preparation conditions, chitosan nanoparticles containing the DNA vaccine were produced with good morphology, high encapsulation rate and high stability. Transfection test indicated that the vaccine could be expressed as an antigen in cells, and maintained good bioactivity. In addition, better immune responses of mice immunized with the chitosan nanoparticles containing the DNA vaccine were induced and prolonged release of the plasmid DNA was achieved compared to the DNA vaccine alone. These results laid a foundation for further development of DNA vaccines in nanoparticles before ultimate industrial application.

  15. Influenza A H1N1 2009 (Swine Flu) and Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Lim, Boon H; Mahmood, Tahir A

    2011-08-01

    The Influenza A H1N1 pandemic (A H1N1) occurred between June 2009 and August 2010. Although the pandemic is now over, the virus has emerged as the predominant strain in the current seasonal influenza phase in the northern hemisphere. The A H1N1 influenza is a novel strain of the influenza A virus and is widely known as swine flu. The virus contains a mixture of genetic material from human, pig and bird flu virus. It is a new variety of flu which people have not had much immunity to. Much has been learnt from the Pandemic of 2009/2010 but the messages about vaccination and treatment seem to be taken slowly by the clinical profession. Most people affected by the virus, including pregnant women, suffer a mild viral illness, and make a full recovery. The median duration of illness is around seven days. This influenza typically affects the younger age group i.e. from the ages of 5-65 years. Current experience shows that the age group experiencing increased morbidity and mortality rates are in those under 65 years of age. Pregnant women, because of their altered immunity and physiological adaptations, are at higher risk of developing pulmonary complications, especially in the second and third trimesters. In the United Kingdom, twelve maternal deaths were reported to be associated with the H1N1 virus during the pandemic and clear avoidable factors were identified (Modder, Review of Maternal Deaths in the UK related to A H1N1 2009 influenza (CMACE). www.cmace.org.uk, 2010). The pregnancy outcomes were also poor for women who were affected by the virus with a fivefold increase in the perinatal mortality rate and threefold increase in the preterm delivery rate (Yates et al. Health Technol Assess 14(34):109-182, 2010). There continues to be a low uptake of the flu vaccine and commencement of antiviral treatment for pregnant women.

  16. Update: Influenza Activity--United States and Worldwide, May 24-September 5, 2015.

    PubMed

    Blanton, Lenee; Kniss, Krista; Smith, Sophie; Mustaquim, Desiree; Steffens, Craig; Flannery, Brendan; Fry, Alicia M; Bresee, Joseph; Wallis, Teresa; Garten, Rebecca; Xu, Xiyan; Elal, Anwar Isa Abd; Gubareva, Larisa; Wentworth, David E; Burns, Erin; Katz, Jacqueline; Jernigan, Daniel; Brammer, Lynnette

    2015-09-18

    During May 24–September 5, 2015, the United States experienced typical low levels of seasonal influenza activity. Influenza A (H1N1)pdm09 (pH1N1), influenza A (H3N2), and influenza B viruses were detected worldwide and were identified sporadically in the United States. All of the influenza viruses collected from U.S. states and other countries during that time have been characterized antigenically and/or genetically as being similar to the influenza vaccine viruses recommended for inclusion in the 2015–16 Northern Hemisphere vaccine. During May 24–September 5, 2015, three influenza variant† virus infections were reported; one influenza A (H3N2) variant virus (H3N2v) from Minnesota in July, one influenza A (H1N1) variant (H1N1v) from Iowa in August, and one H3N2v from Michigan in August.

  17. Distribution of antibodies against influenza virus in pigs from farrow-to-finish farms in Minas Gerais state, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Alessandra S; Costa, Érica A; Rajão, Daniela S; Guedes, Roberto M C; Ciacci Zanella, Janice R; Lobato, Zélia I P

    2015-01-01

    Background Swine influenza virus (SIV) is the cause of an acute respiratory disease that affects swine worldwide. In Brazil, SIV has been identified in pigs since 1978. After the emergence of pandemic H1N1 in 2009 (H1N1pdm09), few studies reported the presence of influenza virus in Brazilian herds. Objectives The objective of this study was to evaluate the serological profile for influenza virus in farrow-to-finish pig farms in Minas Gerais state, Brazil. Methods Thirty farms with no SIV vaccination history were selected from the four larger pig production areas in Minas Gerais state (Zona da Mata, Triângulo Mineiro/Alto Paranaíba, South/Southwest and the Belo Horizonte metropolitan area). At each farm, blood samples were randomly collected from 20 animals in each production cycle category: breeding animals (sows and gilts), farrowing crate (2–3 weeks), nursery (4–7 weeks), grower pigs (8–14 weeks), and finishing pigs (15–16 weeks), with 100 samples per farm and a total of 3000 animals in this study. The samples were tested for hemagglutination inhibition activity against H1N1 pandemic strain (A/swine/Brazil/11/2009) and H3N2 SIV (A/swine/Iowa/8548-2/98) reference strain. Results The percentages of seropositive animals for H1N1pdm09 and H3N2 were 26·23% and 1·57%, respectively, and the percentages of seropositive herds for both viruses were 96·6% and 13·2%, respectively. Conclusions The serological profiles differed for both viruses and among the studied areas, suggesting a high variety of virus circulation around the state, as well as the presence of seronegative animals susceptible to influenza infection and, consequently, new respiratory disease outbreaks. PMID:25648743

  18. One-Step Real-Time RT-PCR for Pandemic Influenza A Virus (H1N1) 2009 Matrix Gene Detection in Swine Samples

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the spring of 2009, a novel H1N1 influenza A virus began to spread among humans worldwide. The genomic features of the new pandemic H1N1 were immediately identified: it contained gene segments with ancestors in North American and Eurasian swine influenza virus (SIV) lineages providing the virus a...

  19. Simultaneous infection of pigs and people with triple reassortant swine influenza virus H1N1 at a U.S. county fair

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Influenza-like illness was noted in people and pigs in attendance at an Ohio county fair in August 2007. The morbidity rate in swine approached 100 percent within one to two days of initial symptoms being recognized and approximately two dozen people developed influenza-like illness. Triple reassort...

  20. Utility of snout wipe samples for influenza A virus surveillance in exhibition swine populations

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Jody L; Nelson, Sarah W; Workman, Jeffrey D; Slemons, Richard D; Szablewski, Christine M; Nolting, Jacqueline M; Bowman, Andrew S

    2014-01-01

    Background Sporadic influenza A virus (IAV) outbreaks in humans and swine have resulted from commingling of large numbers of people and pigs at agricultural fairs in the United States. Current antemortem IAV surveillance strategies in swine require collecting nasal swabs, which entails restraining pigs with snares. Restraint is labor-intensive for samplers, stressful for pigs, and displeasing to onlookers because pigs often resist and vocalize. Objective To evaluate the utility of snout wipes in exhibition swine as a method to make IAV surveillance efforts less intrusive, less labor-intensive, and more widely accepted among pig owners and exhibition officials. Methods Three materials (rayon/polyester gauze, cotton gauze, and Swiffer® Sweeper dry cloths) were inoculated with IAV, and viral recoveries from these materials were quantified using qRT-PCR and TCID50 assays. In a field trial, paired cotton gauze snout wipes and gold standard polyester-tipped nasal swabs were collected from 553 pigs representing 29 agricultural fairs and the qualitative results of rRT-PCR and viral isolation were compared. Results and Conclusions Viral recoveries from potential snout wipe materials ranged from 0·26 to 1·59 log10 TCID50/ml less than that of the positive control in which no substrate was included; rayon/polyester gauze performed significantly worse than the other materials. In the field, snout wipes and nasal swabs had high levels of agreement for both rRT-PCR detection and virus isolation. Although further investigation and refinement of the sampling method is needed, results indicate that snout wipes will facilitate convenient and undisruptive IAV surveillance in pigs at agricultural fairs. PMID:25043408

  1. A simple Pichia pastoris fermentation and downstream processing strategy for making recombinant pandemic Swine Origin Influenza a virus Hemagglutinin protein.

    PubMed

    Athmaram, T N; Singh, Anil Kumar; Saraswat, Shweta; Srivastava, Saurabh; Misra, Princi; Kameswara Rao, M; Gopalan, N; Rao, P V L

    2013-02-01

    The present Influenza vaccine manufacturing process has posed a clear impediment to initiation of rapid mass vaccination against spreading pandemic influenza. New vaccine strategies are therefore needed that can accelerate the vaccine production. Pichia offers several advantages for rapid and economical bulk production of recombinant proteins and, hence, can be attractive alternative for producing an effective influenza HA based subunit vaccine. The recombinant Pichia harboring the transgene was subjected to fed-batch fermentation at 10 L scale. A simple fermentation and downstream processing strategy is developed for high-yield secretory expression of the recombinant Hemagglutinin protein of pandemic Swine Origin Influenza A virus using Pichia pastoris via fed-batch fermentation. Expression and purification were optimized and the expressed recombinant Hemagglutinin protein was verified by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, Western blot and MALDI-TOF analysis. In this paper, we describe a fed-batch fermentation protocol for the secreted production of Swine Influenza A Hemagglutinin protein in the P. pastoris GS115 strain. We have shown that there is a clear relationship between product yield and specific growth rate. The fed-batch fermentation and downstream processing methods optimized in the present study have immense practical application for high-level production of the recombinant H1N1 HA protein in a cost effective way using P. pastoris.

  2. Detection of swine-origin influenza A (H1N1) viruses using a paired surface plasma waves biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Li-Chen; Chang, Ying-Feng; Li, Ying-Chang; Hsieh, Jo-Ping; Lee, Cheng-Chung; Chou, Chien

    2010-08-01

    In order to enhance the sensitivity of conventional rapid test technique for the detection of swine-origin influenza A (H1N1) viruses (S-OIVs), we used a paired surface plasma waves biosensor (PSPWB) based on SPR in conjunction with an optical heterodyne technique. Experimentally, PSPWB showed a 125-fold improvement at least in the S-OIV detection as compared to conventional enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. Moreover, the detection limit of the PSPWB for the S-OIV detection was enhanced 250-fold in buffer at least in comparison with that of conventional rapid influenza diagnostic test.

  3. Human vs. animal outbreaks of the 2009 swine-origin H1N1 influenza A epidemic.

    PubMed

    Scotch, Matthew; Brownstein, John S; Vegso, Sally; Galusha, Deron; Rabinowitz, Peter

    2011-09-01

    The majority of emerging infectious diseases are zoonotic in origin, including recently emerging influenza viruses such as the 2009 swine-origin H1N1 influenza A epidemic. The epidemic that year affected both human and animal populations as it spread globally. In fact, before the end of 2009, 14 different countries reported H1N1 infected swine. In order to better understand the zoonotic nature of the epidemic and the relationship between human and animal disease surveillance data streams, we compared 2009 reports of H1N1 infection to define the temporal relationship between reported cases in animals and humans. Generally, human cases preceded animal cases at a country-level, supporting the potential of H1N1 infection to be a "reverse zoonosis", and the value of integrating human and animal disease report data.

  4. Identification of swine H1N2/pandemic H1N1 reassortant influenza virus in pigs, United States.

    PubMed

    Ali, Ahmed; Khatri, Mahesh; Wang, Leyi; Saif, Yehia M; Lee, Chang-Won

    2012-07-06

    In October and November 2010, novel H1N2 reassortant influenza viruses were identified from pigs showing mild respiratory signs that included cough and depression. Sequence and phylogenetic analysis showed that the novel H1N2 reassortants possesses HA and NA genes derived from recent H1N2 swine isolates similar to those isolated from Midwest. Compared to the majority of reported reassortants, both viruses preserved human-like host restrictive and putative antigenic sites in their HA and NA genes. The four internal genes, PB2, PB1, PA, and NS were similar to the contemporary swine triple reassortant viruses' internal genes (TRIG). Interestingly, NP and M genes of the novel reassortants were derived from the 2009 pandemic H1N1. The NP and M proteins of the two isolates demonstrated one (E16G) and four (G34A, D53E, I109T, and V313I) amino acid changes in the M2 and NP proteins, respectively. Similar amino acid changes were also noticed upon incorporation of the 2009 pandemic H1N1 NP in other reassortant viruses reported in the U.S. Thus the role of those amino acids in relation to host adaptation need to be further investigated. The reassortments of pandemic H1N1 with swine influenza viruses and the potential of interspecies transmission of these reassortants from swine to other species including human indicate the importance of systematic surveillance of swine population to determine the origin, the prevalence of similar reassortants in the U.S. and their impact on both swine production and public health.

  5. Update: influenza activity--United States and worldwide, May 19-September 28, 2013.

    PubMed

    2013-10-25

    During May 19-September 28, 2013,* the United States experienced low levels of seasonal influenza activity overall. Influenza A (H1N1) pdm09 (pH1N1), influenza A (H3N2), and influenza B viruses were detected worldwide and were identified sporadically in the United States. In June, influenza A (H3N2) variant(†) viruses (H3N2)v were first detected in Indiana, and between June 18 and September 28, a total of 20 cases of influenza A variant viruses ([H3N2]v and influenza A (H1N1) variant [H1N1]v) were reported from five states. This report summarizes influenza activity in the United States and worldwide from May 19 through September 28, 2013.

  6. Determination of Predominance of Influenza Virus Strains in the Americas.

    PubMed

    Azziz-Baumgartner, Eduardo; Garten, Rebecca J; Palekar, Rakhee; Cerpa, Mauricio; Mirza, Sara; Ropero, Alba Maria; Palomeque, Francisco S; Moen, Ann; Bresee, Joseph; Shaw, Michael; Widdowson, Marc-Alain

    2015-07-01

    During 2001-2014, predominant influenza A(H1N1) and A(H3N2) strains in South America predominated in all or most subsequent influenza seasons in Central and North America. Predominant A(H1N1) and A(H3N2) strains in North America predominated in most subsequent seasons in Central and South America. Sharing data between these subregions may improve influenza season preparedness.

  7. Evolution of influenza A virus nucleoprotein genes: implications for the origins of H1N1 human and classical swine viruses.

    PubMed

    Gorman, O T; Bean, W J; Kawaoka, Y; Donatelli, I; Guo, Y J; Webster, R G

    1991-07-01

    A phylogenetic analysis of 52 published and 37 new nucleoprotein (NP) gene sequences addressed the evolution and origin of human and swine influenza A viruses. H1N1 human and classical swine viruses (i.e., those related to Swine/Iowa/15/30) share a single common ancestor, which was estimated to have occurred in 1912 to 1913. From this common ancestor, human and classical swine virus NP genes have evolved at similar rates that are higher than in avian virus NP genes (3.31 to 3.41 versus 1.90 nucleotide changes per year). At the protein level, human virus NPs have evolved twice as fast as classical swine virus NPs (0.66 versus 0.34 amino acid change per year). Despite evidence of frequent interspecies transmission of human and classical swine viruses, our analysis indicates that these viruses have evolved independently since well before the first isolates in the early 1930s. Although our analysis cannot reveal the original host, the ancestor virus was avianlike, showing only five amino acid differences from the root of the avian virus NP lineage. The common pattern of relationship and origin for the NP and other genes of H1N1 human and classical swine viruses suggests that the common ancestor was an avian virus and not a reassortant derived from previous human or swine influenza A viruses. The new avianlike H1N1 swine viruses in Europe may provide a model for the evolution of newly introduced avian viruses into the swine host reservoir. The NPs of these viruses are evolving more rapidly than those of human or classical swine viruses (4.50 nucleotide changes and 0.74 amino acid change per year), and when these rates are applied to pre-1930s human and classical swine virus NPs, the predicted date of a common ancestor is 1918 rather than 1912 to 1913. Thus, our NP phylogeny is consistent with historical records and the proposal that a short time before 1918, a new H1N1 avianlike virus entered human or swine hosts (O. T. Gorman, R. O. Donis, Y. Kawaoka, and R. G. Webster

  8. Virulence and genetic compatibility of polymerase reassortant viruses derived from the pandemic (H1N1) 2009 influenza virus and circulating influenza A viruses.

    PubMed

    Song, Min-Suk; Pascua, Philippe Noriel Q; Lee, Jun Han; Baek, Yun Hee; Park, Kuk Jin; Kwon, Hyeok-il; Park, Su-Jin; Kim, Chul-Joong; Kim, Hyunggee; Webby, Richard J; Webster, Robert G; Choi, Young Ki

    2011-07-01

    Gene mutations and reassortment are key mechanisms by which influenza A virus acquires virulence factors. To evaluate the role of the viral polymerase replication machinery in producing virulent pandemic (H1N1) 2009 influenza viruses, we generated various polymerase point mutants (PB2, 627K/701N; PB1, expression of PB1-F2 protein; and PA, 97I) and reassortant viruses with various sources of influenza viruses by reverse genetics. Although the point mutations produced no significant change in pathogenicity, reassortment between the pandemic A/California/04/09 (CA04, H1N1) and current human and animal influenza viruses produced variants possessing a broad spectrum of pathogenicity in the mouse model. Although most polymerase reassortants had attenuated pathogenicity (including those containing seasonal human H3N2 and high-pathogenicity H5N1 virus segments) compared to that of the parental CA04 (H1N1) virus, some recombinants had significantly enhanced virulence. Unexpectedly, one of the five highly virulent reassortants contained a A/Swine/Korea/JNS06/04(H3N2)-like PB2 gene with no known virulence factors; the other four had mammalian-passaged avian-like genes encoding PB2 featuring 627K, PA featuring 97I, or both. Overall, the reassorted polymerase complexes were only moderately compatible for virus rescue, probably because of disrupted molecular interactions involving viral or host proteins. Although we observed close cooperation between PB2 and PB1 from similar virus origins, we found that PA appears to be crucial in maintaining viral gene functions in the context of the CA04 (H1N1) virus. These observations provide helpful insights into the pathogenic potential of reassortant influenza viruses composed of the pandemic (H1N1) 2009 influenza virus and prevailing human or animal influenza viruses that could emerge in the future.

  9. Influenza infection in humans and pigs in southeastern China.

    PubMed

    Zhou, N; He, S; Zhang, T; Zou, W; Shu, L; Sharp, G B; Webster, R G

    1996-01-01

    The three last pandemic strains of influenza A virus-Asian/57, Hong Kong/68 and Russian/77-are believed to have originated in China. The strains responsible for the 1957 and 1968 human pandemics were reassortants incorporating both human and avian influenza viruses, which may have arisen in pigs. We therefore undertook a population-based study in the Nanchang region of Central China to establish the prevalence, types and seasonal pattern of human influenza infection and to screen serum samples from animals and humans for evidence of interspecies transmission of influenza viruses. Two definite influenza seasons were demonstrated, one extending from November to March and the other July to September. The profile of antibodies to commonly circulating human influenza viruses was no different in Nanchang and neighboring rural communities than in Memphis, Tennessee, USA. In particular, Chinese women who raised pigs in their homes were no more likely to have been exposed to influenza virus than were subjects who seldom or never had contact with pigs. However, we did obtain evidence using isolated H7 protein in an enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assay for infection of pig farmers by an avian H7 influenza virus suggesting that influenza. A viruses may have been transmitted directly from ducks to humans. The results of the serological survey also indicated that pigs in or near Nanchang were infected by human H1N1 and H3N2 influenza viruses, but not with typical swine viruses. We found no serological evidence for H2 influenza viruses in humans after 1968.

  10. Characterization of Uncultivable Bat Influenza Virus Using a Replicative Synthetic Virus

    PubMed Central

    Bawa, Bhupinder; Wang, Wei; Shabman, Reed S.; Duff, Michael; Lee, Jinhwa; Lang, Yuekun; Cao, Nan; Nagy, Abdou; Lin, Xudong; Stockwell, Timothy B.; Richt, Juergen A.; Wentworth, David E.; Ma, Wenjun

    2014-01-01

    Bats harbor many viruses, which are periodically transmitted to humans resulting in outbreaks of disease (e.g., Ebola, SARS-CoV). Recently, influenza virus-like sequences were identified in bats; however, the viruses could not be cultured. This discovery aroused great interest in understanding the evolutionary history and pandemic potential of bat-influenza. Using synthetic genomics, we were unable to rescue the wild type bat virus, but could rescue a modified bat-influenza virus that had the HA and NA coding regions replaced with those of A/PR/8/1934 (H1N1). This modified bat-influenza virus replicated efficiently in vitro and in mice, resulting in severe disease. Additional studies using a bat-influenza virus that had the HA and NA of A/swine/Texas/4199-2/1998 (H3N2) showed that the PR8 HA and NA contributed to the pathogenicity in mice. Unlike other influenza viruses, engineering truncations hypothesized to reduce interferon antagonism into the NS1 protein didn't attenuate bat-influenza. In contrast, substitution of a putative virulence mutation from the bat-influenza PB2 significantly attenuated the virus in mice and introduction of a putative virulence mutation increased its pathogenicity. Mini-genome replication studies and virus reassortment experiments demonstrated that bat-influenza has very limited genetic and protein compatibility with Type A or Type B influenza viruses, yet it readily reassorts with another divergent bat-influenza virus, suggesting that the bat-influenza lineage may represent a new Genus/Species within the Orthomyxoviridae family. Collectively, our data indicate that the bat-influenza viruses recently identified are authentic viruses that pose little, if any, pandemic threat to humans; however, they provide new insights into the evolution and basic biology of influenza viruses. PMID:25275541

  11. Characterization of uncultivable bat influenza virus using a replicative synthetic virus.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Bin; Ma, Jingjiao; Liu, Qinfang; Bawa, Bhupinder; Wang, Wei; Shabman, Reed S; Duff, Michael; Lee, Jinhwa; Lang, Yuekun; Cao, Nan; Nagy, Abdou; Lin, Xudong; Stockwell, Timothy B; Richt, Juergen A; Wentworth, David E; Ma, Wenjun

    2014-10-01

    Bats harbor many viruses, which are periodically transmitted to humans resulting in outbreaks of disease (e.g., Ebola, SARS-CoV). Recently, influenza virus-like sequences were identified in bats; however, the viruses could not be cultured. This discovery aroused great interest in understanding the evolutionary history and pandemic potential of bat-influenza. Using synthetic genomics, we were unable to rescue the wild type bat virus, but could rescue a modified bat-influenza virus that had the HA and NA coding regions replaced with those of A/PR/8/1934 (H1N1). This modified bat-influenza virus replicated efficiently in vitro and in mice, resulting in severe disease. Additional studies using a bat-influenza virus that had the HA and NA of A/swine/Texas/4199-2/1998 (H3N2) showed that the PR8 HA and NA contributed to the pathogenicity in mice. Unlike other influenza viruses, engineering truncations hypothesized to reduce interferon antagonism into the NS1 protein didn't attenuate bat-influenza. In contrast, substitution of a putative virulence mutation from the bat-influenza PB2 significantly attenuated the virus in mice and introduction of a putative virulence mutation increased its pathogenicity. Mini-genome replication studies and virus reassortment experiments demonstrated that bat-influenza has very limited genetic and protein compatibility with Type A or Type B influenza viruses, yet it readily reassorts with another divergent bat-influenza virus, suggesting that the bat-influenza lineage may represent a new Genus/Species within the Orthomyxoviridae family. Collectively, our data indicate that the bat-influenza viruses recently identified are authentic viruses that pose little, if any, pandemic threat to humans; however, they provide new insights into the evolution and basic biology of influenza viruses.

  12. H1N1 influenza pandemics: comparing the events of 2009 in Mexico with those of 1976 and 1918-1919.

    PubMed

    Franco-Paredes, Carlos; Hernandez-Ramos, Isabel; Del Rio, Carlos; Alexander, Kelly T; Tapia-Conyer, Roberto; Santos-Preciado, Jose I

    2009-11-01

    Outbreaks of influenza A (H1N1) of avian- or swine-related origin have substantially impacted human populations. The most dramatic pandemic of influenza H1N1 occurred during 1918-1919 producing significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. In the 20th century, two other major pandemics took place but they were the H2N2 and H3N2 reassorted influenza strains. In 1976, a small outbreak of swine-related H1N1 in the U.S. led to a national scare but without any significant public health impact. More recently, in April 2009, in Mexico, and subsequently worldwide, an influenza (H1N1) triple reassortant strain produced >200,000 laboratory-confirmed cases and resulted in >2000 deaths. In August 2009, WHO declared this outbreak as the first influenza pandemic of the 21(st) century. It is critical to apply lessons learned during previous pandemics to mitigate the public health impact of the ongoing influenza pandemic in 2009. In particular, it is useful to compare the events in Mexico in 2009 to those during the Spanish influenza pandemic of 1918-1919.

  13. Reassortment Networks and the evolution of pandemic H1N1 swine-origin influenza.

    PubMed

    Bokhari, Shahid H; Pomeroy, Laura W; Janies, Daniel A

    2012-01-01

    Prior research developed Reassortment Networks to reconstruct the evolution of segmented viruses under both reassortment and mutation. We report their application to the swine-origin pandemic H1N1 virus (S-OIV). A database of all influenza A viruses, for which complete genome sequences were available in Genbank by October 2009, was created and dynamic programming was used to compute distances between all corresponding segments. A reassortment network was created to obtain the minimum cost evolutionary paths from all viruses to the exemplar S-OIV A/California/04/2009. This analysis took 35 hours on the Cray Extreme Multithreading (XMT) supercomputer, which has special hardware to permit efficient parallelization. Six specific H1N1/H1N2 bottleneck viruses were identified that almost always lie on minimum cost paths to S-OIV. We conjecture that these viruses are crucial to S-OIV evolution and worthy of careful study from a molecular biology viewpoint. In phylogenetics, ancestors are typically medians that have no functional constraints. In our method, ancestors are not inferred, but rather chosen from previously observed viruses along a path of mutation and reassortment leading to the target virus. This specificity and functional constraint render our results actionable for further experiments in vitro and in vivo.

  14. The 2009 Influenza A(H1N1) ’Swine Flu’ Outbreak: U.S. Responses to Global Human Cases

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-26

    treatable with two antiviral drugs, oseltamivir ( brand name Tamiflu®) and zanamivir ( brand name Relenza®), though there is no available vaccine. WHO...www.who.int/ csr /disease/swineflu/en/ index.html and CRS Report R40554, The 2009 H1N1 “Swine Flu” Outbreak: An Overview, by Sarah A. Lister and C...the virus 5 See WHO, Swine influenza - update 3, April 27, 2009, http://www.who.int/ csr /don

  15. Origins and evolutionary genomics of the novel swine-origin influenza A (H1N1) virus in humans--past and present perspectives.

    PubMed

    Mamun, M M A; Huda, A K M N

    2011-04-01

    Swine influenza viruses cause annual epidemics and occasional pandemics claiming the lives of millions from the early history up to the present days. This virus has drawn on a bag of evolutionary tricks to survive in one or another form in both humans and pigs with novel gene constellations through the periodic importation or exportation of viral genes. A prime example is emergence of pandemic novel swine-origin influenza A (H1N1) virus (S-OIV) in 2009 that have transmitted to and spread among humans, resulting in outbreaks internationally. The phylogenetic analysis of sequences of all genes of the S-OIV, showed that its genome contained six gene segments that were similar to ones previously found in triple-reassortant swine influenza viruses circulating in pigs in North America. The genes encoding neuraminidase and M protein were most closely related to those in influenza A viruses circulating in swine populations in Eurasia. This unique genetic combination of influenza virus gene segments leading to the emergence of novel S-OIV that had not been seen before in the world. Here, it has been used evolutionary analysis to estimate the timescale of the origins and the early development of the S-OIV epidemic. This paper shows that it was derived from several viruses circulating in swine and makes a briefly review over the origins and evolutionary genomics of current S-OIV in humans with historical perspectives with a view to exhibition of evolutionary relationship between past and present origins of swine influenza viruses.

  16. Pandemic Swine-Origin H1N1 Influenza A Virus Isolates Show Heterogeneous Virulence in Macaques ▿ ‡

    PubMed Central

    Safronetz, David; Rockx, Barry; Feldmann, Friederike; Belisle, Sarah E.; Palermo, Robert E.; Brining, Douglas; Gardner, Don; Proll, Sean C.; Marzi, Andrea; Tsuda, Yoshimi; LaCasse, Rachel A.; Kercher, Lisa; York, Anthony; Korth, Marcus J.; Long, Dan; Rosenke, Rebecca; Shupert, W. Lesley; Aranda, Celia Alpuche; Mattoon, John S.; Kobasa, Darwyn; Kobinger, Gary; Li, Yan; Taubenberger, Jeffery K.; Richt, Jürgen A.; Parnell, Michael; Ebihara, Hideki; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro; Katze, Michael G.; Feldmann, Heinz

    2011-01-01

    The first influenza pandemic of the new millennium was caused by a newly emerged swine-origin influenza virus (SOIV) (H1N1). This new virus is characterized by a previously unknown constellation of gene segments derived from North American and Eurasian swine lineages and the absence of common markers predictive of human adaptation. Overall, human infections appeared to be mild, but an alarming number of young individuals presented with symptoms atypical for seasonal influenza. The new SOIV also showed a sustained human-to-human transmissibility and higher reproduction ratio than common seasonal viruses, altogether indicating a higher pathogenic potential for this newly emerged virus. To study the virulence of the SOIV, we used a recently established cynomolgus macaque model and compared parameters of clinical disease, virology, host responses, and pathology/histopathology with a current seasonal H1N1 virus. We here show that infection of macaques with two genetically similar but clinically distinct SOIV isolates from the early stage of the pandemic (A/Mexico/4108/2009 and A/Mexico/InDRE4487/2009) resulted in upper and lower respiratory tract infections and clinical disease ranging from mild to severe pneumonia that was clearly advanced over the mild infection caused by A/Kawasaki/UTK-4/2009, a current seasonal strain. Unexpectedly, we observed heterogeneity among the two SOIV isolates in virus replication, host transcriptional and cytokine responses, and disease progression, demonstrating a higher pathogenic potential for A/Mexico/InDRE4487/2009. Differences in virulence may explain more severe disease, as was seen with certain individuals infected with the emerged pandemic influenza virus. Thus, the nonhuman primate model closely mimics influenza in humans. PMID:21084481

  17. Identification and analysis of the first 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza virus from U.S. feral swine.

    PubMed

    Clavijo, A; Nikooienejad, A; Esfahani, M S; Metz, R P; Schwartz, S; Atashpaz-Gargari, E; Deliberto, T J; Lutman, M W; Pedersen, K; Bazan, L R; Koster, L G; Jenkins-Moore, M; Swenson, S L; Zhang, M; Beckham, T; Johnson, C D; Bounpheng, M

    2013-08-01

    The first case of pandemic H1N1 influenza (pH1N1) virus in feral swine in the United States was identified in Texas through the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Wildlife Services' surveillance program. Two samples were identified as pandemic influenza by reverse transcriptase quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR). Full-genome Sanger sequencing of all eight influenza segments was performed. In addition, Illumina deep sequencing of the original diagnostic samples and their respective virus isolation cultures were performed to assess the feasibility of using an unbiased whole-genome linear target amplification method and multiple sample sequencing in a single Illumina GAIIx lane. Identical sequences were obtained using both techniques. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that all gene segments belonged to the pH1N1 (2009) lineage. In conclusion, we have identified the first pH1N1 isolate in feral swine in the United States and have demonstrated the use of an easy unbiased linear amplification method for deep sequencing of multiple samples.

  18. Characterization of an influenza A virus isolated from pigs during an outbreak of respiratory disease in swine and people during a county fair in the United States.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Amy L; Swenson, Sabrina L; Lager, Kelly M; Gauger, Phillip C; Loiacono, Christina; Zhang, Yan

    2009-05-28

    In August 2007, pigs and people became clinically affected by an influenza-like illness during attendance at an Ohio county fair. Influenza A virus was identified from pigs and people, and the virus isolates were characterized as swine H1N1 similar to swine viruses currently circulating in the U.S. pig population. The swine isolate, A/SW/OH/511445/2007 (OH07), was evaluated in an experimental challenge and transmission study reported here. Our results indicate that the OH07 virus was pathogenic in pigs, was transmissible among pigs, and failed to cross-react with many swine H1 anti-sera. Naturally exposed pigs shed virus as early as 3 days and as long as 7 days after contact with experimentally infected pigs. This suggests there was opportunity for exposure of people handling the pigs at the fair. The molecular analysis of the OH07 isolates demonstrated that the eight gene segments were similar to those of currently circulating triple reassortant swine influenza viruses. However, numerous nucleotide changes leading to amino acid changes were demonstrated in the HA gene and throughout the genome as compared to contemporary swine viruses in the same genetic cluster. It remains unknown if any of the amino acid changes were related to the ability of this virus to infect people. The characteristics of the OH07 virus in our pig experimental model as well as the documented human transmission warrant close monitoring of the spread of this virus in pig and human populations.

  19. Characterization of an influenza A virus in Mexican swine that is related to the A/H1N1/2009 pandemic clade.

    PubMed

    Escalera-Zamudio, Marina; Cobián-Güemes, Georgina; de los Dolores Soto-del Río, María; Isa, Pavel; Sánchez-Betancourt, Iván; Parissi-Crivelli, Aurora; Martínez-Cázares, María Teresa; Romero, Pedro; Velázquez-Salinas, Lauro; Huerta-Lozano, Belem; Nelson, Martha; Montero, Hilda; Vinuesa, Pablo; López, Susana; Arias, Carlos F

    2012-11-10

    In the spring of 2009, swine-origin influenza H1N1pdm09 viruses caused the first influenza pandemic of this century. We characterized the influenza viruses that circulated early during the outbreak in Mexico, including one newly sequenced swine H1N1pdm09 virus and three newly sequenced human H1N1pdm09 viruses that circulated in the outbreak of respiratory disease in La Gloria, Veracruz. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the swine isolate (A/swine/Mexico/4/2009) collected in April 2009 is positioned in a branch that is basal to the rest of the H1N1pdm09 clade in two (NP and PA) of the eight single-gene trees. In addition, the concatenated HA-NA and the complete whole-genome trees also showed a basal position for A/swine/Mexico/4/2009. Furthermore, this swine virus was found to share molecular traits with non-H1N1pdm09 H1N1 viral lineages. These results suggest that this isolate could potentially be the first one detected from a sister lineage closely related to the H1N1pdm09 viruses.

  20. Two years of surveillance of influenza a virus infection in a swine herd. Results of virological, serological and pathological studies.

    PubMed

    Cappuccio, Javier; Dibarbora, Marina; Lozada, Inés; Quiroga, Alejandra; Olivera, Valeria; Dángelo, Marta; Pérez, Estefanía; Barrales, Hernán; Perfumo, Carlos; Pereda, Ariel; Pérez, Daniel R

    2017-02-01

    Swine farms provide a dynamic environment for the evolution of influenza A viruses (IAVs). The present report shows the results of a surveillance effort of IAV infection in one commercial swine farm in Argentina. Two cross-sectional serological and virological studies (n=480) were carried out in 2011 and 2012. Virus shedding was detected in nasal samples from pigs from ages 7, 21 and 42-days old. More than 90% of sows and gilts but less than 40% of 21-days old piglets had antibodies against IAV. In addition, IAV was detected in 8/17 nasal swabs and 10/15 lung samples taken from necropsied pigs. A subset of these samples was further processed for virus isolation resulting in 6 viruses of the H1N2 subtype (δ2 cluster). Pathological studies revealed an association between suppurative bronchopneumonia and necrotizing bronchiolitis with IAV positive samples. Statistical analyses showed that the degree of lesions in bronchi, bronchiole, and alveoli was higher in lungs positive to IAV. The results of this study depict the relevance of continuing long-term active surveillance of IAV in swine populations to establish IAV evolution relevant to swine and humans.

  1. Molecular characterization of an H1N2 swine influenza virus isolated in Miyazaki, Japan, in 2006.

    PubMed

    Saito, Takehiko; Suzuki, Hirofumi; Maeda, Koji; Inai, Koji; Takemae, Nobuhiro; Uchida, Yuko; Tsunemitsu, Hiroshi

    2008-04-01

    Swine influenza virus (SIV) was isolated from a farm in Miyazaki Prefecture in Japan in July 2006. An isolate was genetically subtyped as H1N2 and was designated A/swine/Miyazaki/1/2006 (H1N2). The nucleotide sequences of all eight viral RNA segments were determined, and then phylogenetic analysis was performed using the neighbor-joining method. All segments were shown to be closely related to those of Japanese SIV H1N2 isolates, which have been circulating since the 1980s. The results indicate the persistence of the SIV H1N2 subtype in the Japanese pig population for more than two decades and emphasize the importance of continuous surveillance for SIV.

  2. Single-step multiplex reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction assay for detection and differentiation of the 2009 (H1N1) influenza A virus pandemic in Thai swine populations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A recently emerged H1N1 Influenza A virus (pandemic 1 H1N1: pH1N1) with a Swine influenza virus (SIV) genetic background spread globally from human-to-human causing the first influenza virus pandemic of the 21st century. In a short period reverse zoonotic cases in pigs followed by a wide spread of t...

  3. High level of genetic compatibility between swine-origin H1N1 and highly pathogenic avian H5N1 influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Octaviani, Cássio Pontes; Ozawa, Makoto; Yamada, Shinya; Goto, Hideo; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro

    2010-10-01

    Reassortment is an important mechanism for the evolution of influenza viruses. Here, we coinfected cultured cells with the pandemic swine-origin influenza virus (S-OIV) and a contemporary H5N1 virus and found that these two viruses have high genetic compatibility. Studies of human lung cell lines indicated that some reassortants had better growth kinetics than their parental viruses. We conclude that reassortment between these two viruses can occur and could create pandemic H5N1 viruses.

  4. Anti-influenza activity of marchantins, macrocyclic bisbibenzyls contained in liverworts.

    PubMed

    Iwai, Yuma; Murakami, Kouki; Gomi, Yasuyuki; Hashimoto, Toshihiro; Asakawa, Yoshinori; Okuno, Yoshinobu; Ishikawa, Toyokazu; Hatakeyama, Dai; Echigo, Noriko; Kuzuhara, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    The H1N1 influenza A virus of swine-origin caused pandemics throughout the world in 2009 and the highly pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza virus has also caused epidemics in Southeast Asia in recent years. The threat of influenza A thus remains a serious global health issue and novel drugs that target these viruses are highly desirable. Influenza A possesses an endonuclease within its RNA polymerase which comprises PA, PB1 and PB2 subunits. To identify potential new anti-influenza compounds in our current study, we screened 33 different types of phytochemicals using a PA endonuclease inhibition assay in vitro and an anti-influenza A virus assay. The marchantins are macrocyclic bisbibenzyls found in liverworts, and plagiochin A and perrottetin F are marchantin-related phytochemicals. We found from our screen that marchantin A, B, E, plagiochin A and perrottetin F inhibit influenza PA endonuclease activity in vitro. These compounds have a 3,4-dihydroxyphenethyl group in common, indicating the importance of this moiety for the inhibition of PA endonuclease. Docking simulations of marchantin E with PA endonuclease suggest a putative "fitting and chelating model" as the mechanism underlying PA endonuclease inhibition. The docking amino acids are well conserved between influenza A and B. In a cultured cell system, marchantin E was further found to inhibit the growth of both H3N2 and H1N1 influenza A viruses, and marchantin A, E and perrotein F showed inhibitory properties towards the growth of influenza B. These marchantins also decreased the viral infectivity titer, with marchantin E showing the strongest activity in this assay. We additionally identified a chemical group that is conserved among different anti-influenza chemicals including marchantins, green tea catechins and dihydroxy phenethylphenylphthalimides. Our present results indicate that marchantins are candidate anti-influenza drugs and demonstrate the utility of the PA endonuclease assay in the screening of

  5. Computer-aided assessment of pulmonary disease in novel swine-origin H1N1 influenza on CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Jianhua; Dwyer, Andrew J.; Summers, Ronald M.; Mollura, Daniel J.

    2011-03-01

    The 2009 pandemic is a global outbreak of novel H1N1 influenza. Radiologic images can be used to assess the presence and severity of pulmonary infection. We develop a computer-aided assessment system to analyze the CT images from Swine-Origin Influenza A virus (S-OIV) novel H1N1 cases. The technique is based on the analysis of lung texture patterns and classification using a support vector machine (SVM). Pixel-wise tissue classification is computed from the SVM value. The method was validated on four H1N1 cases and ten normal cases. We demonstrated that the technique can detect regions of pulmonary abnormality in novel H1N1 patients and differentiate these regions from visually normal lung (area under the ROC curve is 0.993). This technique can also be applied to differentiate regions infected by different pulmonary diseases.

  6. Recipients of vaccine against the 1976 "swine flu" have enhanced neutralization responses to the 2009 novel H1N1 influenza virus.

    PubMed

    McCullers, Jonathan A; Van De Velde, Lee-Ann; Allison, Kim J; Branum, Kristen C; Webby, Richard J; Flynn, Patricia M

    2010-06-01

    BACKGROUND. The world is facing a novel H1N1 influenza pandemic. A pandemic scare with a similar influenza virus in 1976 resulted in the vaccination of nearly 45 million persons. We hypothesized that prior receipt of the 1976 "swine flu" vaccine would enhance immune responses to the 2009 novel H1N1 influenza strain. METHODS. A prospective, volunteer sample of employees aged > or = 55 years at a children's cancer hospital in August 2009 was assessed for antibody responses to the 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza virus and the 2008-2009 seasonal H1N1 influenza virus. RESULTS. Antibody responses by hemagglutination-inhibition assay were high against both the seasonal influenza virus (89.7% had a titer considered seroprotective) and pandemic H1N1 influenza virus (88.8% had a seroprotective titer). These antibodies were effective at neutralizing the seasonal H1N1 influenza virus in 68.1% of participants (titer > or = 40), but only 18.1% had detectable neutralizing titers against the pandemic H1N1 influenza virus. Of 116 participants, 46 (39.7%) received the 1976 "swine flu" vaccine. Receipt of this vaccine significantly enhanced neutralization responses; 8 (17.4%) of 46 vaccine recipients had titers > or = 160, compared with only 3 (4.3%) of 70 who did not receive the vaccine (P = .018 by chi(2) test). CONCLUSIONS. In this cohort, persons aged > or = 55 years had evidence of robust immunity to the 2008-2009 seasonal H1N1 influenza virus. These antibodies were cross-reactive but nonneutralizing against the 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza strain. Receipt of a vaccine to a related virus significantly enhanced the neutralization capacity of these responses, suggesting homologous vaccination against the 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza virus would have a similar effect.

  7. Swine Influenza Virus and Association with the Porcine Respiratory Disease Complex in Pig Farms in Southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, C; Cibulski, S P; Andrade, C P; Teixeira, T F; Varela, A P M; Scheffer, C M; Franco, A C; de Almeida, L L; Roehe, P M

    2016-05-01

    Despite the putative endemic status of swine influenza A virus (swIAV) infections, data on the occurrence of swine influenza outbreaks are scarce in Brazil. The aim of this study was to detect and subtype swIAVs from six outbreaks of porcine respiratory disease complex (PRDC) in southern Brazil. Nasal swabs were collected from 66 piglets with signs of respiratory disease in six herds. Lung tissue samples were collected from six necropsied animals. Virus detection was performed by PCR screening and confirmed by virus isolation and hemagglutination (HA). Influenza A subtyping was performed by a real-time reverse transcriptase PCR (rRT-PCR) to detect the A(H1N1)pdm09; other swIAV subtypes were determined by multiplex RT-PCR. In lung tissues, the major bacterial and viral pathogens associated with PRDC (Pasteurella multocida, Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, Haemophilus parasuis and PCV2) were investigated. In some affected pigs, clinico-pathological evaluations were conducted. Influenza A was detected by screening PCR in 46 of 66 swab samples and from five of six lungs. Virus was recovered from pigs of all six herds. Subtype A(H1N1)pdm09 was detected in four of six herds and H1N2 in the other two herds. In lung tissues, further agents involved in PRDC were detected in all cases; Pasteurella multocida was identified in five of six samples and Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae in three of six. Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae (1/6), Haemophilus parasuis (1/6) and PCV2 (1/6) were also detected. These findings indicate that subtypes A(H1N1)pdm09 and H1N2 were present in pigs in southern Brazil and were associated with PRDC outbreaks.

  8. One-Health Simulation Modelling: Assessment of Control Strategies Against the Spread of Influenza between Swine and Human Populations Using NAADSM.

    PubMed

    Dorjee, S; Revie, C W; Poljak, Z; McNab, W B; McClure, J T; Sanchez, J

    2016-04-01

    Simulation models implemented using a range of parameters offer a useful approach to identifying effective disease intervention strategies. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of key control strategies to mitigate the simultaneous spread of influenza among and between swine and human populations. We used the pandemic H1N1 2009 virus as a case study. The study population included swine herds (488 herds) and households-of-people (29,707 households) within a county in Ontario, Canada. Households were categorized as: (i) rural households with swine workers, (ii) rural households without swine workers and (iii) urban households without swine workers. Seventy-two scenarios were investigated based on a combination of the parameters of speed of detection and control strategies, such as quarantine strategy, effectiveness of movement restriction and ring vaccination strategy, all assessed at three levels of transmissibility of the virus at the swine-human interface. Results showed that the speed of detection of the infected units combined with the quarantine strategy had the largest impact on the duration and size of outbreaks. A combination of fast to moderate speed of the detection (where infected units were detected within 5-10 days since first infection) and quarantine of the detected units alone contained the outbreak within the swine population in most of the simulated outbreaks. Ring vaccination had no added beneficial effect. In conclusion, our study suggests that the early detection (and therefore effective surveillance) and effective quarantine had the largest impact in the control of the influenza spread, consistent with earlier studies. To our knowledge, no study had previously assessed the impact of the combination of different intervention strategies involving the simultaneous spread of influenza between swine and human populations.

  9. Maternally-derived antibodies do not prevent transmission of swine influenza A virus between pigs.

    PubMed

    Cador, Charlie; Hervé, Séverine; Andraud, Mathieu; Gorin, Stéphane; Paboeuf, Frédéric; Barbier, Nicolas; Quéguiner, Stéphane; Deblanc, Céline; Simon, Gaëlle; Rose, Nicolas

    2016-08-17

    A transmission experiment involving 5-week-old specific-pathogen-free (SPF) piglets, with (MDA(+)) or without maternally-derived antibodies (MDA(-)), was carried out to evaluate the impact of passive immunity on the transmission of a swine influenza A virus (swIAV). In each group (MDA(+)/MDA(-)), 2 seeders were placed with 4 piglets in direct contact and 5 in indirect contact (3 replicates per group). Serological kinetics (ELISA) and individual viral shedding (RT-PCR) were monitored for 28 days after infection. MDA waning was estimated using a nonlinear mixed-effects model and survival analysis. Differential transmission rates were estimated depending on the piglets' initial serological status and contact structure (direct contact with pen-mates or indirect airborne contact). The time to MDA waning was 71.3 [52.8-92.1] days on average. The airborne transmission rate was 1.41 [0.64-2.63] per day. The compared shedding pattern between groups showed that MDA(+) piglets had mainly a reduced susceptibility to infection compared to MDA(-) piglets. The resulting reproduction number estimated in MDA(+) piglets (5.8 [1.4-18.9]), although 3 times lower than in MDA(-) piglets (14.8 [6.4-27.1]), was significantly higher than 1. Such an efficient and extended spread of swIAV at the population scale in the presence of MDAs could contribute to swIAV persistence on farms, given the fact that the period when transmission is expected to be impacted by the presence of MDAs can last up to 10 weeks.

  10. Introduction of a Novel Swine-Origin Influenza A (H1N1) Virus into Milwaukee, Wisconsin in 2009

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Swati; Chusid, Michael J.; Willoughby, Rodney E.; Havens, Peter L.; Kehl, Sue C.; Ledeboer, Nathan A.; Li, Shun-Hwa; Henrickson, Kelly J.

    2009-01-01

    On 17 April 2009, novel swine origin influenza A virus (S-OIV) cases appeared within the United States. Most influenza A diagnostic assays currently utilized in local clinical laboratories do not allow definitive subtype determination. Detailed subtype analysis of influenza A positive samples in our laboratory allowed early confirmation of a large outbreak of S-OIV in southeastern Wisconsin (SEW). The initial case of S-OIV in SEW was detected on 28 April 2009. All influenza A samples obtained during the 16 week period prior to 28 April 2009, and the first four weeks of the subsequent epidemic were sub typed. Four different multiplex assays were employed, utilizing real time PCR and end point PCR to fully subtype human and animal influenza viral components. Specific detection of S-OIV was developed within days. Data regarding patient demographics and other concurrently circulating viruses were analyzed. During the first four weeks of the epidemic, 679 of 3726 (18.2%) adults and children tested for influenza A were identified with S-OIV infection. Thirteen patients (0.34%) tested positive for seasonal human subtypes of influenza A during the first two weeks and none in the subsequent 2 weeks of the epidemic. Parainfluenza viruses were the most prevalent seasonal viral agents circulating during the epidemic (of those tested), with detection rates of 12% followed by influenza B and RSV at 1.9% and 0.9% respectively. S-OIV was confirmed on day 2 of instituting subtype testing and within 4 days of report of national cases of S-OIV. Novel surge capacity diagnostic infrastructure exists in many specialty and research laboratories around the world. The capacity for broader influenza A sub typing at the local laboratory level allows timely and accurate detection of novel strains as they emerge in the community, despite the presence of other circulating viruses producing identical illness. This is likely to become increasingly important given the need for appropriate subtype

  11. Identification and Characterization of a Highly Virulent Triple Reassortant H1N1 Swine Influenza Virus in the Midwest of the United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An H1N1 influenza A virus, A/Swine/Kansas/77778/2007 (KS07) was isolated from a herd in Kansas that was suffering severe respiratory disease and 10% mortality. A pig challenge model was developed to evaluate the pathogenicity and transmission capacity of the KS07 virus. The pathogenicity and trans...

  12. Genomic reassortants of pandemic A (H1N1) 2009 virus and endemic porcine H1 and H3 viruses in swine in Japan.

    PubMed

    Kirisawa, Rikio; Ogasawara, Yoshitaka; Yoshitake, Hayato; Koda, Asuka; Furuya, Tokujiro

    2014-11-01

    From 2010 to 2013 in Japan, we isolated 11 swine influenza viruses (SIVs) from pigs showing respiratory symptoms. Sequence and phylogenetic analyses showed that 6 H1N1 viruses originated from the pandemic (H1N1) 2009 (pdm 09) virus and the other 5 viruses were reassortants between SIVs and pdm 09 viruses, representing 4 genotypes. Two H1N2 viruses contained H1 and N2 genes originated from Japanese H1N2 SIV together with internal genes of pdm 09 viruses. Additionally, 1 H1N2 virus contained a further NP gene originating from Japanese H1N2 SIV. One H1N1 virus contained only the H1 gene originating from Japanese H1 SIV in a pdm 09 virus background. One H3N2 virus contained H3 and N2 genes originating from Japanese H3N2 SIV together with internal genes of pdm 09 virus. The results indicate that pdm 09 viruses are distributed widely in the Japanese swine population and that several reassortments with Japanese SIVs have occurred.

  13. [Colorimetric detection of human influenza A H1N1 virus by reverse transcription loop mediated isothermal amplification].

    PubMed

    Nie, Kai; Wang, Da-Yan; Qin, Meng; Gao, Rong-Bao; Wang, Miao; Zou, Shu-Mei; Han, Feng; Zhao, Xiang; Li, Xi-Yan; Shu, Yue-Long; Ma, Xue-Jun

    2010-03-01

    A simple, rapid and sensitive colorimetric Reverse Transcription Loop Mediated Isothermal Amplification (RT-LAMP) method was established to detect human influenza A H1N1 virus. The method employed a set of six specially designed primers that recognized eight distinct sequences of the HA gene for amplification of nucleic acid under isothermal conditions at 65 degrees C for one and half hour. The amplification process of RT-LAMP was monitored by the addition of HNB (Hydroxy naphthol blue) dye prior to amplification. A positive reaction was indicated by a color change from violet to sky blue and confirmed by agarose electrophoresis. The specificity of the RT-LAMP assay was validated by cross-reaction with different swine and human influenza virus including human seasonal influenza A /H1N1 A /H3N2, influenza B and swine A /H1N1. The sensitivity of this assay was evaluated by serial dilutions of RNA molecules from in vitro transcription of human influenza A H1N1 HA gene. The assay was further evaluated with 30 clinical specimens with suspected pandemic influenza A H1N1 virus infection in parallel with RT-PCR detection and 26 clinical specimens with seasonal influenza virus infection. Our results showed that the RT-LAMP was able to achieve a sensitivity of 60 RNA copies with high specificity, and detection rate was comparable to that of the RT-PCR with the clinical samples of pandemic influenza A H1N1 infection. The RT-LAMP reaction with HNB could also be measured at 650nm in a microplate reader for quantitative analysis. Thus, we concluded that this colorimetric RT-LAMP assay had potential for the rapid screening of the human influenza A H1N1 virus infection in National influenza monitoring network laboratories and sentinel hospitals of provincial and municipal region in China.

  14. Isolation of a novel swine influenza virus from Oklahoma in 2011 which is distantly related to human influenza C viruses.

    PubMed

    Hause, Ben M; Ducatez, Mariette; Collin, Emily A; Ran, Zhiguang; Liu, Runxia; Sheng, Zizhang; Armien, Anibal; Kaplan, Bryan; Chakravarty, Suvobrata; Hoppe, Adam D; Webby, Richard J; Simonson, Randy R; Li, Feng

    2013-02-01

    Of the Orthomyxoviridae family of viruses, only influenza A viruses are thought to exist as multiple subtypes and has non-human maintenance hosts. In April 2011, nasal swabs were collected for virus isolation from pigs exhibiting influenza-like illness. Subsequent electron microscopic, biochemical, and genetic studies identified an orthomyxovirus with seven RNA segments exhibiting approximately 50% overall amino acid identity to human influenza C virus. Based on its genetic organizational similarities to influenza C viruses this virus has been provisionally designated C/Oklahoma/1334/2011 (C/OK). Phylogenetic analysis of the predicted viral proteins found that the divergence between C/OK and human influenza C viruses was similar to that observed between influenza A and B viruses. No cross reactivity was observed between C/OK and human influenza C viruses using hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assays. Additionally, screening of pig and human serum samples found that 9.5% and 1.3%, respectively, of individuals had measurable HI antibody titers to C/OK virus. C/OK virus was able to infect both ferrets and pigs and transmit to naive animals by direct contact. Cell culture studies showed that C/OK virus displayed a broader cellular tropism than a human influenza C virus. The observed difference in cellular tropism was further supported by structural analysis showing that hemagglutinin esterase (HE) proteins between two viruses have conserved enzymatic but divergent receptor-binding sites. These results suggest that C/OK virus represents a new subtype of influenza C viruses that currently circulates in pigs that has not been recognized previously. The presence of multiple subtypes of co-circulating influenza C viruses raises the possibility of reassortment and antigenic shift as mechanisms of influenza C virus evolution.

  15. A Phylogeny-Based Global Nomenclature System and Automated Annotation Tool for H1 Hemagglutinin Genes from Swine Influenza A Viruses.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Tavis K; Macken, Catherine A; Lewis, Nicola S; Scheuermann, Richard H; Van Reeth, Kristien; Brown, Ian H; Swenson, Sabrina L; Simon, Gaëlle; Saito, Takehiko; Berhane, Yohannes; Ciacci-Zanella, Janice; Pereda, Ariel; Davis, C Todd; Donis, Ruben O; Webby, Richard J; Vincent, Amy L

    2016-01-01

    The H1 subtype of influenza A viruses (IAVs) has been circulating in swine since the 1918 human influenza pandemic. Over time, and aided by further introductions from nonswine hosts, swine H1 viruses have diversified into three genetic lineages. Due to limited global data, these H1 lineages were named based on colloquial context, leading to a proliferation of inconsistent regional naming conventions. In this study, we propose rigorous phylogenetic criteria to establish a globally consistent nomenclature of swine H1 virus hemagglutinin (HA) evolution. These criteria applied to a data set of 7,070 H1 HA sequences led to 28 distinct clades as the basis for the nomenclature. We developed and implemented a web-accessible annotation tool that can assign these biologically informative categories to new sequence data. The annotation tool assigned the combined data set of 7,070 H1 sequences to the correct clade more than 99% of the time. Our analyses indicated that 87% of the swine H1 viruses from 2010 to the present had HAs that belonged to 7 contemporary cocirculating clades. Our nomenclature and web-accessible classification tool provide an accurate method for researchers, diagnosticians, and health officials to assign clade designations to HA sequences. The tool can be updated readily to track evolving nomenclature as new clades emerge, ensuring continued relevance. A common global nomenclature facilitates comparisons of IAVs infecting humans and pigs, within and between regions, and can provide insight into the diversity of swine H1 influenza virus and its impact on vaccine strain selection, diagnostic reagents, and test performance, thereby simplifying communication of such data. IMPORTANCE A fundamental goal in the biological sciences is the definition of groups of organisms based on evolutionary history and the naming of those groups. For influenza A viruses (IAVs) in swine, understanding the hemagglutinin (HA) genetic lineage of a circulating strain aids in vaccine

  16. A Phylogeny-Based Global Nomenclature System and Automated Annotation Tool for H1 Hemagglutinin Genes from Swine Influenza A Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Macken, Catherine A.; Lewis, Nicola S.; Van Reeth, Kristien; Brown, Ian H.; Swenson, Sabrina L.; Simon, Gaëlle; Saito, Takehiko; Berhane, Yohannes; Ciacci-Zanella, Janice; Pereda, Ariel; Davis, C. Todd; Donis, Ruben O.; Webby, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The H1 subtype of influenza A viruses (IAVs) has been circulating in swine since the 1918 human influenza pandemic. Over time, and aided by further introductions from nonswine hosts, swine H1 viruses have diversified into three genetic lineages. Due to limited global data, these H1 lineages were named based on colloquial context, leading to a proliferation of inconsistent regional naming conventions. In this study, we propose rigorous phylogenetic criteria to establish a globally consistent nomenclature of swine H1 virus hemagglutinin (HA) evolution. These criteria applied to a data set of 7,070 H1 HA sequences led to 28 distinct clades as the basis for the nomenclature. We developed and implemented a web-accessible annotation tool that can assign these biologically informative categories to new sequence data. The annotation tool assigned the combined data set of 7,070 H1 sequences to the correct clade more than 99% of the time. Our analyses indicated that 87% of the swine H1 viruses from 2010 to the present had HAs that belonged to 7 contemporary cocirculating clades. Our nomenclature and web-accessible classification tool provide an accurate method for researchers, diagnosticians, and health officials to assign clade designations to HA sequences. The tool can be updated readily to track evolving nomenclature as new clades emerge, ensuring continued relevance. A common global nomenclature facilitates comparisons of IAVs infecting humans and pigs, within and between regions, and can provide insight into the diversity of swine H1 influenza virus and its impact on vaccine strain selection, diagnostic reagents, and test performance, thereby simplifying communication of such data. IMPORTANCE A fundamental goal in the biological sciences is the definition of groups of organisms based on evolutionary history and the naming of those groups. For influenza A viruses (IAVs) in swine, understanding the hemagglutinin (HA) genetic lineage of a circulating strain aids

  17. A new concept of the epidemic process of influenza A virus.

    PubMed Central

    Hope-Simpson, R. E.; Golubev, D. B.

    1987-01-01

    Influenza A virus was discovered in 1933, and since then four major variants have caused all the epidemics of human influenza A. Each had an era of solo world prevalence until 1977 as follows: H0N1 (old style) strains until 1946, H1N1 (old style) strains until 1957, H2N2 strains until 1968, then H3N2 strains, which were joined in 1977 by a renewed prevalence of H1N1 (old style) strains. Serological studies show that H2N2 strains probably had had a previous era of world prevalence during the last quarter of the nineteenth century, and had then been replaced by H3N2 strains from about 1900 to 1918. From about 1907 the H3N2 strains had been joined, as now, by H1N1 (old style) strains until both had been replaced in 1918 by a fifth major variant closely related to swine influenza virus A/Hswine1N1 (old style), which had then had an era of solo world prevalence in mankind until about 1929, when it had been replaced by the H0N1 strains that were first isolated in 1933. Eras of prevalence of a major variant have usually been initiated by a severe pandemic followed at intervals of a year or two by successive epidemics in each of which the nature of the virus is usually a little changed (antigenic drift), but not enough to permit frequent recurrent infections during the same era. Changes of major variant (antigenic shift) are large enough to permit reinfection. At both major and minor changes the strains of the previous variant tend to disappear and to be replaced within a single season, worldwide in the case of a major variant, or in the area of prevalence of a previous minor variant. Pandemics, epidemics and antigenic variations all occur seasonally, and influenza and its viruses virtually disappear from the population of any locality between epidemics, an interval of many consecutive months. A global view, however, shows influenza continually present in the world population, progressing each year south and then north, thus crossing the equator twice yearly around the

  18. Differential Induction of Type I and Type III Interferons by Swine and Human Origin H1N1 Influenza A Viruses in Porcine Airway Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Krishna, Venkatramana D; Roach, Erin; Zaidman, Nathan A; Panoskaltsis-Mortari, Angela; Rotschafer, Jessica H; O'Grady, Scott M; Cheeran, Maxim C-J

    2015-01-01

    Interferons (IFNs) have been shown to inhibit influenza A virus (IAV) replication and play an essential role in controlling viral infection. Here we studied the kinetics and magnitude of induction of type I and type III IFN transcripts by primary porcine airway epithelial cells (pAECs) in response to swine and human origin IAV. We observed that swine influenza viruses (SIV) replicate more efficiently than the human pandemic influenza A/California/2009 (pH1N1 CA/09) in pAECs. Interestingly, we also found significant difference in kinetics of IFN-β, IFN-λ1 and IFN-λ3 gene expression by these viruses. While there was delay of up to 12 hours post infection (h p.i.) in induction of IFN genes in pAECs infected with swine IAV A/Sw/Illinois/2008 (H1N1 IL/08), human pH1N1 CA/09 rapidly induced IFN-β, IFN-λ1 and IFN-λ3 gene expression as early as 4 h p.i. However, the magnitude of IFN-β and IFN-λ3 induction at 24 h p.i. was not significantly different between the viral strains tested. Additionally, we found that swine H1N1 IL/08 was less sensitive to dsRNA induced antiviral response compared to human pH1N1 CA/09. Our data suggest that the human and swine IAVs differ in their ability to induce and respond to type I and type III interferons in swine cells. Swine origin IAV may have adapted to the pig host by subverting innate antiviral responses to viral infection.

  19. Molecular cloning of the first human monoclonal antibodies neutralizing with high potency swine-origin influenza A pandemic virus (S-OIV).

    PubMed

    Burioni, Roberto; Canducci, Filippo; Mancini, Nicasio; Clementi, Nicola; Sassi, Monica; De Marco, Donata; Saita, Diego; Diotti, Roberta Antonia; Sautto, Giuseppe; Sampaolo, Michela; Clementi, Massimo

    2009-10-01

    The pandemic caused by the new H1N1 swine-origin influenza virus (S-OIV) strain is a worldwide health emergency and alternative therapeutic and prophylactic options are greatly needed. Two human monoclonal antibody Fab fragments (HMab) neutralizing the novel H1N1 influenza strain at very low concentrations were cloned from a patient who had a broad-range anti-H1N1 serum neutralizing activity. The two HMabs neutralized S-OIV with an IC50 of 2.8 and 4 microg/mL. The genes coding for the neutralizing HMabs could be used for generating full human monoclonal IgGs that can be safely administered with the potentially of representing a novel drug to be used in the prophylaxis and the treatment of this human infection. This is the first report of molecular cloning of human monoclonal antibodies against the new pandemic swine-origin influenza virus.

  20. The 2009 Influenza A(H1N1) "Swine Flu" Outbreak: An Overview

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-05

    Table 1. WHO Influenza Pandemic Phases (Current alert level is highlighted) Phase Description Phase 1 No animal influenza virus circulating among... animals has been reported to cause infection in humans. Phase 2 An animal influenza virus circulating in domesticated or wild animals is known to have...community-level outbreaks. Phase 4 Human-to-human transmission of an animal or human- animal influenza reassortant a virus able to sustain community

  1. Subtype identification of the novel A H1N1 and other human influenza A viruses using an oligonucleotide microarray.

    PubMed

    Kang, Xiaoping; Li, Yongqiang; Sun, Honghe; Wu, Weili; Liu, Hong; Lin, Fang; Qing, Chenfeng; Chang, Guohui; Zhu, Qingyu; Chen, Weijun; Yang, Yinhui

    2010-01-01

    A novel strain of influenza A (H1N1) virus was isolated in Mexico and the US in March and April 2009. This novel virus spread to many countries and regions in a few months, and WHO raised the level of pandemic alert from phase 5 to phase 6 on June 11, 2009. The accurate identification of H1N1 virus and other human seasonal influenza A viruses is very important for further treatment and control of their infections. In this study, we developed an oligonucleotide microarray to subtype human H1N1, H3N2 and H5N1 influenza viruses, which could distinguish the novel H1N1 from human seasonal H1N1 influenza viruses and swine H1N1 influenza viruses. The microarray utilizes a panel of primers for multiplex PCR amplification of the hemagglutinin (HA), neuraminidase (NA) and matrix (MP) genes of human influenza A viruses. The 59-mer oligonucleotides were designed to distinguish different subtypes of human influenza A viruses. With this microarray, we accurately identified and correctly subtyped the reference virus strains. Moreover, we confirmed 4 out of 39 clinical throat swab specimens from suspected cases of novel H1N1.

  2. New Influenza A/H1N1 (“Swine Flu”): information needs of airport passengers and staff

    PubMed Central

    Dickmann, P.; Rubin, G. J.; Gaber, W.; Wessely, S.; Wicker, S.; Serve, H.; Gottschalk, R.

    2010-01-01

    Please cite this paper as: Dickmann et al. (2010) New Influenza A/H1N1 (“Swine Flu”): information needs of airport passengers and staff. . Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses 5(1), 39–46. Background  Airports are the entrances of infectious diseases. Particularly at the beginning of an outbreak, information and communication play an important role to enable the early detection of signs or symptoms and to encourage passengers to adopt appropriate preventive behaviour to limit the spread of the disease. Objectives  To determine the adequacy of the information provided to airport passengers and staff in meeting their information needs in relation to their concerns. Methods  At the start of the influenza A/H1N1 epidemic (29–30 April 2009), qualitative semi‐structured interviews (N = 101) were conducted at Frankfurt International Airport with passengers who were either returning from or going to Mexico and with airport staff who had close contact with these passengers. Interviews focused on knowledge about swine flu, information needs and fear or concern about the outbreak. Results  The results showed that a desire for more information was associated with higher concern – the least concerned participants did not want any additional information, while the most concerned participants reported a range of information needs. Airport staff in contact with passengers travelling from the epicentre of the outbreak showed the highest levels of fear or concern, coupled with a desire to be adequately briefed by their employer. Conclusions  Our results suggest that information strategies should address not only the exposed or potentially exposed but also groups that feel at risk. Identifying what information these different passenger and staff groups wish to receive will be an important task in any future infectious disease outbreak. PMID:21138539

  3. Characterization of H1N1 swine influenza viruses circulating in Canadian pigs in 2009.

    PubMed

    Nfon, Charles K; Berhane, Yohannes; Hisanaga, Tamiko; Zhang, Shunzhen; Handel, Katherine; Kehler, Helen; Labrecque, Olivia; Lewis, Nicola S; Vincent, Amy L; Copps, John; Alexandersen, Soren; Pasick, John

    2011-09-01

    The 2009 pandemic H1N1 (pH1N1), of apparent swine origin, may have evolved in pigs unnoticed because of insufficient surveillance. Consequently, the need for surveillance of influenza viruses circulating in pigs has received added attention. In this study we characterized H1N1 viruses isolated from Canadian pigs in 2009. Isolates from May 2009 were comprised of hemagglutinin and neuraminidase (NA) genes of classical SIV origin in combination with the North American triple-reassortant internal gene (TRIG) cassette, here termed contemporary SIV (conSIV) H1N1. These conSIV H1N1 viruses were contiguous with the North American αH1 cluster, which was distinct from the pH1N1 isolates that were antigenically more related to the γH1 cluster. After the initial isolation of pH1N1 from an Alberta pig farm in early May 2009, pH1N1 was found several times in Canadian pigs. These pH1N1 isolates were genetically and antigenically homogeneous. In addition, H1N1 viruses bearing seasonal human H1 and N1 genes together with the TRIG cassette and an NA encoding an oseltamivir-resistance marker were isolated from pigs. The NS gene of one of these seasonal human-like SIV (shSIV) H1N1 isolates was homologous to pH1N1 NS, implicating reassortment between the two strains. Antigenic cross-reactivity was observed between pH1N1 and conSIV but not with shSIV H1N1. In summary, although there was cocirculation of pH1N1 with conSIV and shSIV H1N1 in Canadian pigs after May 2009, there was no evidence supporting the presence of pH1N1 in pigs prior to May 2009. The possibility for further reassortants being generated exists and should be closely monitored.

  4. Positive Selection in CD8+ T-Cell Epitopes of Influenza Virus Nucleoprotein Revealed by a Comparative Analysis of Human and Swine Viral Lineages

    PubMed Central

    Machkovech, Heather M.; Bedford, Trevor; Suchard, Marc A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Numerous experimental studies have demonstrated that CD8+ T cells contribute to immunity against influenza by limiting viral replication. It is therefore surprising that rigorous statistical tests have failed to find evidence of positive selection in the epitopes targeted by CD8+ T cells. Here we use a novel computational approach to test for selection in CD8+ T-cell epitopes. We define all epitopes in the nucleoprotein (NP) and matrix protein (M1) with experimentally identified human CD8+ T-cell responses and then compare the evolution of these epitopes in parallel lineages of human and swine influenza viruses that have been diverging since roughly 1918. We find a significant enrichment of substitutions that alter human CD8+ T-cell epitopes in NP of human versus swine influenza virus, consistent with the idea that these epitopes are under positive selection. Furthermore, we show that epitope-altering substitutions in human influenza virus NP are enriched on the trunk versus the branches of the phylogenetic tree, indicating that viruses that acquire these mutations have a selective advantage. However, even in human influenza virus NP, sites in T-cell epitopes evolve more slowly than do nonepitope sites, presumably because these epitopes are under stronger inherent functional constraint. Overall, our work demonstrates that there is clear selection from CD8+ T cells in human influenza virus NP and illustrates how comparative analyses of viral lineages from different hosts can identify positive selection that is otherwise obscured by strong functional constraint. IMPORTANCE There is a strong interest in correlates of anti-influenza immunity that are protective against diverse virus strains. CD8+ T cells provide such broad immunity, since they target conserved viral proteins. An important question is whether T-cell immunity is sufficiently strong to drive influenza virus evolution. Although many studies have shown that T cells limit viral replication in animal

  5. HA1-2-fljB Vaccine Induces Immune Responses against Pandemic Swine-Origin H1N1 Influenza Virus in Mice.

    PubMed

    Kang, Xilong; Yang, Yun; Jiao, Yang; Song, Hongqin; Song, Li; Xiong, Dan; Wu, Lili; Pan, Zhiming; Jiao, Xinan

    2016-01-01

    In 2009, a novel pandemic swine-origin influenza A (H1N1) virus caused a public emergency of international concern. Vaccination is the primary strategy for the control of influenza epidemics. However, the poor immunopotency of many vaccine antigens is a major barrier to the development of effective vaccines against influenza. Flagellin, a Toll-like receptor 5 (TLR5) ligand, has been used as an adjuvant to enhance the immunopotency of vaccines in preclinical studies. Here, we developed a recombinant candidate vaccine, HA1-2-fljB, in which the globular head of the hemagglutinin (HA) antigen (residues 62-284) from H1N1 virus was fused genetically to the N-terminus of Salmonella typhimurium fljB. The recombinant HA1-2-fljB protein was expressed efficiently in Escherichia coli, and the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of recombinant HA1-2-fljB were evaluated in a mouse model. Immunization with HA1-2-fljB elicited robust IgG antibodies and neutralizing antibodies and completely protected the mice against infection by swine-origin influenza A/swine/Jangsu/38/2010 (H1N1). These results suggest that HA antigen placed at the N-terminus of flagellin is also an excellent starting point for creating a fusion HA1-2-fljB protein as a candidate vaccine, and the recombinant HA1-2-fljB protein will contribute to the development of a more effective vaccine against swine-origin influenza virus infection.

  6. Influenza at the animal-human interface: a review of the literature for virological evidence of human infection with swine or avian influenza viruses other than A(H5N1).

    PubMed

    Freidl, G S; Meijer, A; de Bruin, E; de Nardi, M; Munoz, O; Capua, I; Breed, A C; Harris, K; Hill, A; Kosmider, R; Banks, J; von Dobschuetz, S; Stark, K; Wieland, B; Stevens, K; van der Werf, S; Enouf, V; van der Meulen, K; Van Reeth, K; Dauphin, G; Koopmans, M

    2014-05-08

    Factors that trigger human infection with animal influenza virus progressing into a pandemic are poorly understood. Within a project developing an evidence-based risk assessment framework for influenza viruses in animals, we conducted a review of the literature for evidence of human infection with animal influenza viruses by diagnostic methods used. The review covering Medline, Embase, SciSearch and CabAbstracts yielded 6,955 articles, of which we retained 89; for influenza A(H5N1) and A(H7N9), the official case counts of t he World Health Organization were used. An additional 30 studies were included by scanning the reference lists. Here, we present the findings for confirmed infections with virological evidence. We found reports of 1,419 naturally infected human cases, of which 648 were associated with avian influenza virus (AIV) A(H5N1), 375 with other AIV subtypes, and 396 with swine influenza virus (SIV). Human cases naturally infected with AIV spanned haemagglutinin subtypes H5, H6, H7, H9 and H10. SIV cases were associated with endemic SIV of H1 and H3 subtype descending from North American and Eurasian SIV lineages and various reassortants thereof. Direct exposure to birds or swine was the most likely source of infection for the cases with available information on exposure.

  7. Knowledge and Awareness Regarding Swine-Influenza A (H1N1) Virus Infection among Dental Professionals in India - A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Pannu, Prabh Roohan; Nanda, Tarun; Arora, Gagandeep; Kaur, Amanpreet

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Swine flu or Influenza A (H1N1) flu is the most recent of the pandemic disease that has affected the world’s population. We, as health care providers should feel responsible for reducing the transmission of influenza. Aim To conduct a systematic review of observational studies and to assess dental professionals’ knowledge and awareness regarding swine flu. Materials and Methods Relevant cross-sectional observational studies were included in the systematic review to assess the level of knowledge and awareness regarding swine flu among dental professionals. Three studies out of 28 were finally included in the present review after conducting both electronic and manual search of scientific databases like Pubmed, Medline, and EMBASE. No limitation in terms of publication date and language was considered. Potential biases were reported and appropriate data were extracted by the concerned investigators. Descriptive statistics, student t-test were used for analysis. Results Majority of the subjects (92.6%) had heard about swine flu, and 64.3% of them knew about the H1N1 virus in one of the study reports. More than 80% of subjects were aware regarding the availability of swine flu vaccine in one study reports as compared to another study in which only 31.5% had awareness. Majority of the subjects were of the opinion that frequent hand washing and use of sanitizer are one of the effective methods to prevent swine flu in all the three studies. Conclusion The results of the present review showed that some knowledge gaps existed among dental professionals regarding swine flu. Therefore, there is an urgent need for training and continuous education programs regarding infectious diseases. PMID:27790597

  8. Efficacy of a high-growth reassortant H1N1 influenza virus vaccine against the classical swine H1N1 subtype influenza virus in mice and pigs.

    PubMed

    Wen, Feng; Yu, Hai; Yang, Fu-Ru; Huang, Meng; Yang, Sheng; Zhou, Yan-Jun; Li, Ze-Jun; Tong, Guang-Zhi

    2014-11-01

    Swine influenza (SI) is an acute, highly contagious respiratory disease caused by swine influenza A viruses (SwIVs), and it poses a potential global threat to human health. Classical H1N1 (cH1N1) SwIVs are still circulating and remain the predominant subtype in the swine population in China. In this study, a high-growth reassortant virus (GD/PR8) harboring the hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) genes from a novel cH1N1 isolate in China, A/Swine/Guangdong/1/2011 (GD/11) and six internal genes from the high-growth A/Puerto Rico/8/34(PR8) virus was generated by plasmid-based reverse genetics and tested as a candidate seed virus for the preparation of an inactivated vaccine. The protective efficacy of this vaccine was evaluated in mice and pigs challenged with GD/11 virus. Prime and boost inoculation of GD/PR8 vaccine yielded high-titer serum hemagglutination inhibiting (HI) antibodies and IgG antibodies for GD/11 in both mice and pigs. Complete protection of mice and pigs against cH1N1 SIV challenge was observed, with significantly fewer lung lesions and reduced viral shedding in vaccine-inoculated animals compared with unvaccinated control animals. Our data demonstrated that the GD/PR8 may serve as the seed virus for a promising SwIVs vaccine to protect the swine population.

  9. Update: influenza activity--United States and worldwide, 1999-2000 season, and composition of the 2000-01 influenza vaccine.

    PubMed

    2000-05-05

    Influenza A (H3N2) viruses were the predominant viruses isolated in the United States and worldwide during 1999-2000. This was the third consecutive year that influenza A/Sydney/05/97-like (H3N2) viruses were the most prevalent viruses isolated in the United States. Influenza activity in the United States was similar to the previous two seasons, although mortality measurements attributed to pneumonia and influenza (P&I) were unusually high. Overall, the 1999-2000 influenza vaccine was well matched to circulating influenza viruses. The 2000-01 influenza season will be the first for which influenza vaccination is recommended for all persons aged > or =50 years. This report summarizes surveillance for influenza in the United States and worldwide during the 1999-2000 influenza season, describes the composition of the 2000-01 influenza vaccine, and highlights changes in the recommendations for prevention and control of influenza.

  10. Detection of novel influenza A(H1N1) virus by real-time RT-PCR.

    PubMed

    Whiley, David M; Bialasiewicz, Seweryn; Bletchly, Cheryl; Faux, Cassandra E; Harrower, Bruce; Gould, Allan R; Lambert, Stephen B; Nimmo, Graeme R; Nissen, Michael D; Sloots, Theo P

    2009-07-01

    Accurate and rapid diagnosis of novel influenza A(H1N1) infection is critical for minimising further spread through timely implementation of antiviral treatment and other public health based measures. In this study we developed two TaqMan-based reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) methods for the detection of novel influenza A(H1N1) virus targeting the haemagglutinin and neuraminidase genes. The assays were validated using 152 clinical respiratory samples, including 61 Influenza A positive samples, collected in Queenland, Australia during the years 2008 to 2009 and a further 12 seasonal H1N1 and H3N2 influenza A isolates collected from years 2000 to 2002. A wildtype swine H1N1 isolate was also tested. RNA from an influenza A(H1N1) virus isolate (Auckland, 2009) was used as a positive control. Overall, the results showed that the RT-PCR methods were suitable for sensitive and specific detection of novel influenza A(H1N1) RNA in human samples.

  11. Review of influenza A virus in swine worldwide: a call for increased surveillance and research

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Surveillance for influenza A viruses (IAV) circulating in pigs and other non-human mammals has been chronically underfunded and virtually nonexistent in many areas of the world. This deficit continues in spite of our knowledge that influenza is a disease shared between humans and pigs since at least...

  12. Susceptibility of swine to H5 and H7 low pathogenic avian influenza viruses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ability of pigs to become infected with low pathogenic avian influenza (LPAI) viruses from an avian reservoir, and then generate mammalian adaptable influenza A viruses (IAVs) is difficult to determine. Yet, it is an important link to understanding any relationship between LPAI virus ecology and...

  13. Spillback transmission of European H1N1 avian-like swine influenza viruses to turkeys: A strain-dependent possibility?

    PubMed

    Bonfante, Francesco; Fusaro, Alice; Tassoni, Luca; Patrono, Livia Victoria; Milani, Adelaide; Maniero, Silvia; Salviato, Annalisa; Terregino, Calogero

    2016-04-15

    In 1979, an avian influenza virus of the H1N1 subtype began to circulate in European swine herds, rapidly replacing classical swine H1N1 viruses. Spill-back transmissions to turkeys were recorded occasionally, but they might have been underreported due to the asymptomatic nature of the infection and the lack of specific surveillance. In our study, we evaluated the infectivity and transmissibility in turkeys of seven strains of H1N1 avian-like swine viruses isolated from 1979 to 2006, and compared them with their closest progenitor A/duck/Bavaria/1/77 (H1N1), to establish whether the adaptation to pigs has gradually decreased their fitness in turkeys. Our data indicate that the circulation of European H1N1 in pigs might have impaired the possibility of infecting turkeys. Nevertheless, the two swine-origin strains, which showed the ability to replicate and transmit in turkeys, possess typical swine-like genetic traits, not different from the rest of the tested isolates, suggesting replication of avian-like swine H1N1 viruses in turkeys as a strain-dependent polygenic feature.

  14. Pathogenesis and transmission of triple-reassortant swine H1N1 influenza viruses isolated before the 2009 H1N1 pandemic.

    PubMed

    Belser, Jessica A; Gustin, Kortney M; Maines, Taronna R; Blau, Dianna M; Zaki, Sherif R; Katz, Jacqueline M; Tumpey, Terrence M

    2011-02-01

    The 2009 H1N1 pandemic influenza virus represents the greatest incidence of human infection with an influenza virus of swine origin to date. Moreover, triple-reassortant swine (TRS) H1N1 viruses, which share similar host and lineage origins with 2009 H1N1 viruses, have been responsible for sporadic human cases since 2005. Similar to 2009 H1N1 viruses, TRS viruses are capable of causing severe disease in previously healthy individuals and frequently manifest with gastrointestinal symptoms; however, their ability to cause severe disease has not been extensively studied. Here, we evaluated the pathogenicity and transmissibility of two TRS viruses associated with disease in humans in the ferret model. TRS and 2009 H1N1 viruses exhibited comparable viral titers and histopathologies following virus infection and were similarly unable to transmit efficiently via respiratory droplets in the ferret model. Utilizing TRS and 2009 H1N1 viruses, we conducted extensive hematologic and blood serum analyses on infected ferrets to identify lymphohematopoietic parameters associated with mild to severe influenza virus infection. Following H1N1 or H5N1 influenza virus infection, ferrets were found to recapitulate several laboratory abnormalities previously documented with human disease, furthering the utility of the ferret model for the assessment of influenza virus pathogenicity.

  15. Swine influenza A (H1N1) virus (SIV) infection requiring extracorporeal life support in an immunocompetent adult patient with indirect exposure to pigs, Italy, October 2016.

    PubMed

    Rovida, Francesca; Piralla, Antonio; Marzani, Federico Capra; Moreno, Ana; Campanini, Giulia; Mojoli, Francesco; Pozzi, Marco; Girello, Alessia; Chiapponi, Chiara; Vezzoli, Fausto; Prati, Paola; Percivalle, Elena; Pavan, Anna; Gramegna, Maria; Iotti, Giorgio Antonio; Baldanti, Fausto

    2017-02-01

    We describe a case of severe swine influenza A(H1N1) virus infection in an immunocompetent middle-aged man in October 2016 in Italy who had only indirect exposure to pigs. The patient developed a severe acute distress respiratory syndrome which was successfully supported by extracorporeal membrane oxygenation and treated with antiviral therapy. The sole risk factor for influenza was a body mass index > 30 kg/m(2). After a month of hospitalisation, the patient was discharged in good health.

  16. Global Emerging Infection Surveillance and Response (GEIS)- Avian Influenza Pandemic Influenza (AI/PI) Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-10-01

    include nine influenza A?s (H3N2), twenty two influenza B?s, parainfluenza viruses, RSV, HSV1, adenoviruses, echoviruses, enteroviruses including...coxsackievirus subtype B and other uncharacterized enteroviruses . Seventy three (73) of these virus isolates have been shared with AFIOH. There is

  17. A New Adjuvant Combined with Inactivated Influenza Enhances Specific CD8 T Cell Response in Mice and Decreases Symptoms in Swine Upon Challenge.

    PubMed

    Bouguyon, Edwige; Goncalves, Elodie; Shevtsov, Alexander; Maisonnasse, Pauline; Remyga, Stepan; Goryushev, Oleg; Deville, Sebastien; Bertho, Nicolas; Ben Arous, Juliette

    2015-11-01

    Vaccination is the most effective way to control swine influenza virus (SIV) in the field. Classical vaccines are based on inactivated antigens formulated with an oil emulsion or a polymeric adjuvant. Standard adjuvants enhance the humoral response and orient the immune response toward a Th2 response. An important issue is that current vaccines do not protect against new strains. One approach to improve cross-protection is to enhance Th1 and cytotoxic responses. The development of adjuvants orienting the immune response of inactivated vaccines toward Th1/Cytotoxic responses would be highly beneficial. This study shows that the water in oil in water emulsion adjuvant Montanide™ ISA 201 VG allows the induction of anti-influenza CD8 T cell in mice and induces homologous protection against an H1N1 challenge in swine. Such adjuvants that induce both humoral and cell-mediated immunity could improve the protection conferred by SIV vaccines in the field.

  18. Immunization of pigs with an attenuated pseudorabies virus recombinant expressing the haemagglutinin of pandemic swine origin H1N1 influenza A virus.

    PubMed

    Klingbeil, Katharina; Lange, Elke; Teifke, Jens P; Mettenleiter, Thomas C; Fuchs, Walter

    2014-04-01

    Pigs can be severely harmed by influenza, and represent important reservoir hosts, in which new human pathogens such as the recent pandemic swine-origin H1N1 influenza A virus can arise by mutation and reassortment of genome segments. To obtain novel, safe influenza vaccines for pigs, and to investigate the antigen-specific immune response, we modified an established live-virus vaccine against Aujeszky's disease of swine, pseudorabies virus (PrV) strain Bartha (PrV-Ba), to serve as vector for the expression of haemagglutinin (HA) of swine-origin H1N1 virus. To facilitate transgene insertion, the genome of PrV-Ba was cloned as a bacterial artificial chromosome. HA expression occurred under control of the human or murine cytomegalovirus immediate early promoters (P-HCMV, P-MCMV), but could be substantially enhanced by synthetic introns and adaptation of the codon usage to that of PrV. However, despite abundant expression, the heterologous glycoprotein was not detectably incorporated into mature PrV particles. Replication of HA-expressing PrV in cell culture was only slightly affected compared to that of the parental virus strain. A single immunization of pigs with the PrV vector expressing the codon-optimized HA gene under control of P-MCMV induced high levels of HA-specific antibodies. The vaccinated animals were protected from clinical signs after challenge with a related swine-origin H1N1 influenza A virus, and challenge virus shedding was significantly reduced.

  19. rapidSTRIPE H1N1 test for detection of the pandemic swine origin influenza A (H1N1) virus.

    PubMed

    Patel, Pranav; Graser, Elmara; Robst, Stephan; Hillert, Roger; Meye, Axel; Hillebrand, Timo; Niedrig, Matthias

    2011-04-01

    The rapidSTRIPE H1N1 test, based on a nucleic acid lateral-flow assay, has been developed for diagnosis of a swine-origin influenza A (H1N1) virus. This test is simple and cost-effective and allows specific detection of the S-OIV A (H1N1) virus from swab sampling to final detection on a lateral-flow stripe within 2 to 3 h.

  20. Interspecies Interactions and Potential Influenza A Virus Risk in Small Swine Farms in Peru

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-15

    research in BMC journals or any BioMed Central journal, go to http://www.biomedcentral.com/info/authors/ BMC Infectious Diseases © 2012 McCune et al...veterinary technician “gatekeeper” to select participants. In Tumbes, the team benefited from on- going swine research work in the area and worked with the...footwear and the majority (60.0%) wore boots. By contrast, in Tumbes, 25.0 percent of farmers were barefoot while interacting with their swine. The

  1. Phylogenetically distinct equine influenza viruses show different tropism for the swine respiratory tract.

    PubMed

    Patrono, Livia V; Bonfante, Francesco; Zanardello, Claudia; Terregino, Calogero; Capua, Ilaria; Murcia, Pablo R

    2015-05-01

    Influenza A viruses circulate in a wide range of animals. H3N8 equine influenza virus (EIV) is an avian-origin virus that has established in dogs as canine influenza virus (CIV) and has also been isolated from camels and pigs. Previous work suggests that mutations acquired during EIV evolution might have played a role in CIV emergence. Given the potential role of pigs as a source of human infections, we determined the ability of H3N8 EIVs to replicate in pig cell lines and in respiratory explants. We show that phylogenetically distinct EIVs display different infection phenotypes along the pig respiratory tract, but not in cell lines. Our results suggest that EIV displays a dynamic host range along its evolutionary history, supporting the view that evolutionary processes play important roles in host range and tropism and also underscoring the utility of using explant cultures to study influenza pathogenesis.

  2. Crystal structure of swine major histocompatibility complex class I SLA-1 0401 and identification of 2009 pandemic swine-origin influenza A H1N1 virus cytotoxic T lymphocyte epitope peptides.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Nianzhi; Qi, Jianxun; Feng, Sijia; Gao, Feng; Liu, Jun; Pan, Xiaocheng; Chen, Rong; Li, Qirun; Chen, Zhaosan; Li, Xiaoying; Xia, Chun; Gao, George F

    2011-11-01

    The presentation of viral epitopes to cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) by swine leukocyte antigen class I (SLA I) is crucial for swine immunity. To illustrate the structural basis of swine CTL epitope presentation, the first SLA crystal structures, SLA-1 0401, complexed with peptides derived from either 2009 pandemic H1N1 (pH1N1) swine-origin influenza A virus (S-OIV(NW9); NSDTVGWSW) or Ebola virus (Ebola(AY9); ATAAATEAY) were determined in this study. The overall peptide-SLA-1 0401 structures resemble, as expected, the general conformations of other structure-solved peptide major histocompatibility complexes (pMHC). The major distinction of SLA-1 0401 is that Arg(156) has a "one-ballot veto" function in peptide binding, due to its flexible side chain. S-OIV(NW9) and Ebola(AY9) bind SLA-1 0401 with similar conformations but employ different water molecules to stabilize their binding. The side chain of P7 residues in both peptides is exposed, indicating that the epitopes are "featured" peptides presented by this SLA. Further analyses showed that SLA-1 0401 and human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I HLA-A 0101 can present the same peptides, but in different conformations, demonstrating cross-species epitope presentation. CTL epitope peptides derived from 2009 pandemic S-OIV were screened and evaluated by the in vitro refolding method. Three peptides were identified as potential cross-species influenza virus (IV) CTL epitopes. The binding motif of SLA-1 0401 was proposed, and thermostabilities of key peptide-SLA-1 0401 complexes were analyzed by circular dichroism spectra. Our results not only provide the structural basis of peptide presentation by SLA I but also identify some IV CTL epitope peptides. These results will benefit both vaccine development and swine organ-based xenotransplantation.

  3. Crystal Structure of Swine Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I SLA-1*0401 and Identification of 2009 Pandemic Swine-Origin Influenza A H1N1 Virus Cytotoxic T Lymphocyte Epitope Peptides ▿

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Nianzhi; Qi, Jianxun; Feng, Sijia; Gao, Feng; Liu, Jun; Pan, Xiaocheng; Chen, Rong; Li, Qirun; Chen, Zhaosan; Li, Xiaoying; Xia, Chun; Gao, George F.

    2011-01-01

    The presentation of viral epitopes to cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) by swine leukocyte antigen class I (SLA I) is crucial for swine immunity. To illustrate the structural basis of swine CTL epitope presentation, the first SLA crystal structures, SLA-1*0401, complexed with peptides derived from either 2009 pandemic H1N1 (pH1N1) swine-origin influenza A virus (S-OIVNW9; NSDTVGWSW) or Ebola virus (EbolaAY9; ATAAATEAY) were determined in this study. The overall peptide–SLA-1*0401 structures resemble, as expected, the general conformations of other structure-solved peptide major histocompatibility complexes (pMHC). The major distinction of SLA-1*0401 is that Arg156 has a “one-ballot veto” function in peptide binding, due to its flexible side chain. S-OIVNW9 and EbolaAY9 bind SLA-1*0401 with similar conformations but employ different water molecules to stabilize their binding. The side chain of P7 residues in both peptides is exposed, indicating that the epitopes are “featured” peptides presented by this SLA. Further analyses showed that SLA-1*0401 and human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I HLA-A*0101 can present the same peptides, but in different conformations, demonstrating cross-species epitope presentation. CTL epitope peptides derived from 2009 pandemic S-OIV were screened and evaluated by the in vitro refolding method. Three peptides were identified as potential cross-species influenza virus (IV) CTL epitopes. The binding motif of SLA-1*0401 was proposed, and thermostabilities of key peptide–SLA-1*0401 complexes were analyzed by circular dichroism spectra. Our results not only provide the structural basis of peptide presentation by SLA I but also identify some IV CTL epitope peptides. These results will benefit both vaccine development and swine organ-based xenotransplantation. PMID:21900158

  4. Influenza activity in China: 1998-1999.

    PubMed

    Yuanji, Guo

    2002-05-15

    During 1989-1999, influenza A H3N2 and H1N1 subtypes and B type viruses were still co-circulating in human population in China, while influenza A (H3N2) virus was predominant strain. The two antigenically and genetically distinguishable strains of influenza B virus were also still co-circulating in men in southern China. The antigenic analysis indicated that most of the H3N2 viruses were A/Panama/2007/99 (H3N2)-like strain, the most of the H1N1 viruses were antigenically similar to A/Beijing/262/95 (H1N1) virus. However, most of the influenza B viruses were B/Beijing/184/93-like strain, but few of them were antigenically similar to B/Shandong/7/97 virus. In the summer of 1998, the influenza outbreaks caused by H3N2 subtype of influenza A virus occurred widely in southern China. Afterwards, during 1998-1999 influenza season, a severe influenza epidemic caused by H3N2 virus emerged in northern China. The morbidity was reached as high as 10% in Beijing area. It was interesting that during influenza, surveillance from 1998 to 1999, five strains of avian influenza A (H9N2) virus were isolated from outpatients with influenza-like illness in July-August of 1998, and another one was repeatedly isolated from a child suffering from influenza-like disease in November of 1999 in Guangdong province. The genetic analysis revealed that the five strains isolated in 1998 were genetically closely related to H9N2 viruses being isolated from chickens (G9 lineage virus), whereas, A/Guangzhou/333/99 (H9N2) virus was a reassortant derived from reassortment between G9 and G1 lineage of avian influenza A (H9N2) viruses due to its genes encoding the HA, NA, NP and NS proteins, closely related to G9 lineage virus, the rest of the genes encoding the M and three polymerase (PB2, PB1 and PA) were closely related to G1 lineage strain of H9N2 virus. However, no avian influenza A (H5N1) virus has so far been isolated neither from in or outpatients with influenza-like disease in mainland China

  5. "Prepandemic" immunization for novel influenza viruses, "swine flu" vacc