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Sample records for h9n2 avian influenza

  1. Genesis of avian influenza H9N2 in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Shanmuganatham, Karthik; Feeroz, Mohammed M; Jones-Engel, Lisa; Walker, David; Alam, SMRabiul; Hasan, MKamrul; McKenzie, Pamela; Krauss, Scott; Webby, Richard J; Webster, Robert G

    2014-12-01

    Avian influenza subtype H9N2 is endemic in many bird species in Asia and the Middle East and has contributed to the genesis of H5N1, H7N9 and H10N8, which are potential pandemic threats. H9N2 viruses that have spread to Bangladesh have acquired multiple gene segments from highly pathogenic (HP) H7N3 viruses that are presumably in Pakistan and currently cocirculate with HP H5N1. However, the source and geographic origin of these H9N2 viruses are not clear. We characterized the complete genetic sequences of 37 Bangladeshi H9N2 viruses isolated in 2011-2013 and investigated their inter- and intrasubtypic genetic diversities by tracing their genesis in relationship to other H9N2 viruses isolated from neighboring countries. H9N2 viruses in Bangladesh are homogenous with several mammalian host-specific markers and are a new H9N2 sublineage wherein the hemagglutinin (HA) gene is derived from an Iranian H9N2 lineage (Mideast_B Iran), the neuraminidase (NA) and polymerase basic 2 (PB2) genes are from Dubai H9N2 (Mideast_C Dubai), and the non-structural protein (NS), nucleoprotein (NP), matrix protein (MP), polymerase acidic (PA) and polymerase basic 1 (PB1) genes are from HP H7N3 originating from Pakistan. Different H9N2 genotypes that were replaced in 2006 and 2009 by other reassortants have been detected in Bangladesh. Phylogenetic and molecular analyses suggest that the current genotype descended from the prototypical H9N2 lineage (G1), which circulated in poultry in China during the late 1990s and came to Bangladesh via the poultry trade within the Middle East, and that this genotype subsequently reassorted with H7N3 and H9N2 lineages from Pakistan and spread throughout India. Thus, continual surveillance of Bangladeshi HP H5N1, H7N3 and H9N2 is warranted to identify further evolution and adaptation to humans.

  2. Genesis of avian influenza H9N2 in Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Shanmuganatham, Karthik; Feeroz, Mohammed M; Jones-Engel, Lisa; Walker, David; Alam, SMRabiul; Hasan, MKamrul; McKenzie, Pamela; Krauss, Scott; Webby, Richard J; Webster, Robert G

    2014-01-01

    Avian influenza subtype H9N2 is endemic in many bird species in Asia and the Middle East and has contributed to the genesis of H5N1, H7N9 and H10N8, which are potential pandemic threats. H9N2 viruses that have spread to Bangladesh have acquired multiple gene segments from highly pathogenic (HP) H7N3 viruses that are presumably in Pakistan and currently cocirculate with HP H5N1. However, the source and geographic origin of these H9N2 viruses are not clear. We characterized the complete genetic sequences of 37 Bangladeshi H9N2 viruses isolated in 2011–2013 and investigated their inter- and intrasubtypic genetic diversities by tracing their genesis in relationship to other H9N2 viruses isolated from neighboring countries. H9N2 viruses in Bangladesh are homogenous with several mammalian host-specific markers and are a new H9N2 sublineage wherein the hemagglutinin (HA) gene is derived from an Iranian H9N2 lineage (Mideast_B Iran), the neuraminidase (NA) and polymerase basic 2 (PB2) genes are from Dubai H9N2 (Mideast_C Dubai), and the non-structural protein (NS), nucleoprotein (NP), matrix protein (MP), polymerase acidic (PA) and polymerase basic 1 (PB1) genes are from HP H7N3 originating from Pakistan. Different H9N2 genotypes that were replaced in 2006 and 2009 by other reassortants have been detected in Bangladesh. Phylogenetic and molecular analyses suggest that the current genotype descended from the prototypical H9N2 lineage (G1), which circulated in poultry in China during the late 1990s and came to Bangladesh via the poultry trade within the Middle East, and that this genotype subsequently reassorted with H7N3 and H9N2 lineages from Pakistan and spread throughout India. Thus, continual surveillance of Bangladeshi HP H5N1, H7N3 and H9N2 is warranted to identify further evolution and adaptation to humans. PMID:26038507

  3. Transmission of avian H9N2 influenza viruses in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Wu, Rui; Sui, Zhiwei; Liu, Zewen; Liang, Wangwang; Yang, Keli; Xiong, Zhongliang; Xu, Diping

    2010-05-19

    Avian H9N2 influenza viruses have circulated widely in domestic poultry around the world, resulting in occasional transmission of virus from infected poultry to humans. However, it is unknown whether H9N2 influenza virus has acquired the ability to be transmitted from human to human. Here, we report that mouse-adapted H9N2 influenza viruses can replicate efficiently and are lethal for several strains of mice. To evaluate the transmissibility of mouse-adapted H9N2 influenza viruses, we carried out transmission studies in mice using both contact and respiratory droplet routes. Our results indicate that mouse-adapted H9N2 influenza viruses can replicate efficiently and be transmitted between mice. This suggests that once H9N2 influenza viruses adapt to new host, they should present potential public health risks, therefore, urgent attention should be paid to H9N2 influenza viruses.

  4. Seroprevalence of avian influenza H9N2 among poultry workers in Shandong Province, China.

    PubMed

    Huang, R; Wang, A-R; Liu, Z-H; Liang, W; Li, X-X; Tang, Y-J; Miao, Z-M; Chai, T-J

    2013-10-01

    H9N2 avian influenza virus has been circulating widely in birds, with occasional infection among humans. Poultry workers are considered to be at high risk of infection with avian influenza due to their frequent exposure to chickens, but the frequency of H9N2 avian influenza virus infections among them is still indistinct. This study was carried out in order to identify the seroprevalence of H9N2 avian influenza virus among poultry workers in Shandong, China. During the period from December 2011 to February 2012, a total of 482 subjects took part in this study, including 382 poultry workers and 100 healthy residents without occupational poultry exposure. Serum samples were collected and tested for the presence of antibodies against H9N2 avian influenza virus by hemagglutination inhibition (HI) and microneutralization (MN) assays. Nine subjects (9/382 = 2.3%) were positive for antibodies against H9N2 avian influenza virus among poultry workers by either HI or MN assays using ≥40 cut-off, while none of the 100 healthy residents were seropositive. In conclusion, our study identified H9N2 avian influenza infections among poultry workers in Shandong, China, and continuous surveillance of H9N2 avian influenza virus infection in humans should be carried out to evaluate the threat to public health.

  5. H9N2 low pathogenic avian influenza in Pakistan (2012-2015)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Significant economic losses from deaths and decreased egg production have resulted from H9N2 low pathogenic avian influenza virus (LPAIV) infections in poultry across North Africa, the Middle East and Asia. The H9N2 LPAIVs have been endemic in Pakistani poultry since 1996, but no new viruses have be...

  6. Poultry vaccination directed evolution of H9N2 low pathogenicity avian influenza viruses in Korea

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Significant economic losses in the poultry industries have resulted from H9N2 low pathogenic avian influenza virus infections across North Africa, the Middle East and Asia. The present study investigated the evolutionary dynamics of H9N2 viruses circulating in Korea from 1996 to 2012. Our analysis o...

  7. Domestic cats and dogs are susceptible to H9N2 avian influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kun; Zhang, Zhaowei; Yu, Zhijun; Li, Lin; Cheng, Kaihui; Wang, Tiecheng; Huang, Geng; Yang, Songtao; Zhao, Yongkun; Feng, Na; Fu, Jun; Qin, Chuan; Gao, Yuwei; Xia, Xianzhu

    2013-07-01

    Replication and transmission of avian influenza virus (AIV) in domestic dogs and cats may pose a risk to humans. The susceptibility of cats and dogs to H9N2 influenza virus was evaluated by intranasally or orally inoculating animals with an H9N2 influenza virus. Cats had recoverable virus in respiratory tissues and the olfactory bulb three days post-inoculation and shed H9N2 virus into nasal washes and pharyngeal swabs from day 2 through day 10 post-inoculation. Virus was recovered from respiratory tissues of dogs three days post-inoculation, but was not detected in nasal washes or pharyngeal swabs. While no virus shedding or replication was detected in cats or dogs following consumption of H9N2-infected chicks, one of two cats and one of two dogs seroconverted. Two of three naïve contact cats seroconverted following co-housing with cats that were intranasally inoculated with H9N2 virus, whereas none of the three naïve contact dogs seroconverted. Our results demonstrate that H9N2 AIV can infect domestic cats and dogs via the upper respiratory tract and indicate that cats are more susceptible than dogs to H9N2 AIV. These findings suggest that domestic dogs and cats may serve as host species contributing to the adaptation of H9N2 viruses in mammals.

  8. Current situation of H9N2 subtype avian influenza in China.

    PubMed

    Gu, Min; Xu, Lijun; Wang, Xiaoquan; Liu, Xiufan

    2017-09-15

    In China, H9N2 subtype avian influenza outbreak is firstly reported in Guangdong province in 1992. Subsequently, the disease spreads into vast majority regions nationwide and has currently become endemic there. Over vicennial genetic evolution, the viral pathogenicity and transmissibility have showed an increasing trend as year goes by, posing serious threat to poultry industry. In addition, H9N2 has demonstrated significance to public health as it could not only directly infect mankind, but also donate partial or even whole cassette of internal genes to generate novel human-lethal reassortants like H5N1, H7N9, H10N8 and H5N6 viruses. In this review, we mainly focused on the epidemiological dynamics, biological characteristics, molecular phylogeny and vaccine strategy of H9N2 subtype avian influenza virus in China to present an overview of the situation of H9N2 in China.

  9. A novel activation mechanism of avian influenza virus H9N2 by furin.

    PubMed

    Tse, Longping V; Hamilton, Alice M; Friling, Tamar; Whittaker, Gary R

    2014-02-01

    Avian influenza virus H9N2 is prevalent in waterfowl and has become endemic in poultry in Asia and the Middle East. H9N2 influenza viruses have served as a reservoir of internal genes for other avian influenza viruses that infect humans, and several cases of human infection by H9N2 influenza viruses have indicated its pandemic potential. Fortunately, an extensive surveillance program enables close monitoring of H9N2 influenza viruses worldwide and has generated a large repository of virus sequences and phylogenetic information. Despite the large quantity of sequences in different databases, very little is known about specific virus isolates and their pathogenesis. Here, we characterize a low-pathogenicity avian influenza virus, A/chicken/Israel/810/2001 (H9N2) (Israel810), which is representative of influenza virus strains that have caused severe morbidity and mortality in poultry farms. We show that under certain circumstances the Israel810 hemagglutinin (HA) can be activated by furin, a hallmark of highly pathogenic avian influenza virus. We demonstrate that Israel810 HA can be cleaved in cells with high levels of furin expression and that a mutation that eliminates a glycosylation site in HA(1) allows the Israel810 HA to gain universal cleavage in cell culture. Pseudoparticles generated from Israel810 HA, or the glycosylation mutant, transduce cells efficiently. In contrast, introduction of a polybasic cleavage site into Israel810 HA leads to pseudoviruses that are compromised for transduction. Our data indicate a mechanism for an H9N2 evolutionary pathway that may allow it to gain virulence in a distinct manner from H5 and H7 influenza viruses.

  10. Genetic variation of the hemagglutinin of avian influenza virus H9N2.

    PubMed

    Song, Xiao-feng; Han, Ping; Chen, Yi-Ping Phoebe

    2011-05-01

    Avian influenza virus H9N2 has become the dominant subtype of influenza which is endemic in poultry. The hemagglutinin, one of eight protein-coding genes, plays an important role during the early stage of infection. The adaptive evolution and the positively selected sites of the HA (the glycoprotein molecule) of H9N2 subtype viruses were investigated. Investigating 68 hemagglutinin H9N2 avian influenza virus isolates in China and phylogenetic analysis, it was necessary that these isolates were distributed geographically from 1994, and were all derived from the Eurasian lineage. H9N2 avian influenza virus isolates from domestic poultry in China were distinct phylogenetically from those isolated in Hong Kong, including viruses which had infected humans. Seven amino acid substitutions (2T, 3T, 14T, 165D, 197A, 233Q, 380R) were identified in the HA possibly due to positive selection pressure. Apart from the 380R site, the other positively selected sites detected were all located near the receptor-binding site of the HA1 strain. Based on epidemiological and phylogenetics analysis, the H9N2 epidemic in China was divided into three groups: the 1994-1997 group, the 1998-1999 group, and the 2000-2007 group. By investigating these three groups using the maximum likelihood estimation method, there were more positive selective sites in the 1994-1997 and 1998-1999 epidemic group than the 2000-2007 groups. This indicates that those detected selected sites are changed during different epidemic periods and the evolution of H9N2 is currently slow. The antigenic determinant or other key functional amino acid sites should be of concern because their adjacent sites have been under positive selection pressure. The results provide further evidence that the pathogenic changes in the H9N2 subtype are due mainly to re-assortment with other highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses.

  11. Protective efficacy of an inactivated vaccine against H9N2 avian influenza virus in ducks.

    PubMed

    Teng, Qiaoyang; Shen, Weixia; Liu, Qinfang; Rong, Guangyu; Chen, Lin; Li, Xuesong; Chen, Hongjun; Yang, Jianmei; Li, Zejun

    2015-09-17

    Wild ducks play an important role in the evolution of avian influenza viruses (AIVs). Domestic ducks in China are known to carry and spread H9N2 AIVs that are thought to have contributed internal genes for the recent outbreak of zoonotic H7N9 virus. In order to protect animal and public health, an effective vaccine is urgently needed to block and prevent the spread of H9N2 virus in ducks. We developed an inactivated H9N2 vaccine (with adjuvant Montanide ISA 70VG) based on an endemic H9N2 AIV and evaluated this vaccine in ducks. The results showed that the inactivated H9N2 vaccine was able to induce a strong and fast humoral immune response in vaccinated ducks. The hemagglutination inhibition titer in the sera increased fast, and reached its peak of 12.3 log2 at 5 weeks post-vaccination in immunized birds and remained at a high level for at least 37 weeks post-vaccination. Moreover, viral shedding was completely blocked in vaccinated ducks after challenge with a homologous H9N2 AIV at both 3 and 37 weeks post-vaccination. The results of this study indicate that the inactivated H9N2 vaccine induces high and prolonged immune response in vaccinated ducks and are efficacious in protecting ducks from H9N2 infection.

  12. Efficacy of Live-Attenuated H9N2 Influenza Vaccine Candidates Containing NS1 Truncations against H9N2 Avian Influenza Viruses.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sujuan; Zhu, Yinbiao; Yang, Da; Yang, Yang; Shi, Shaohua; Qin, Tao; Peng, Daxin; Liu, Xiufan

    2017-01-01

    H9N2 avian influenza virus is a zoonotic agent with a broad host range that can contribute genetic information to H5 or H7N9 subtype viruses, which are significant threats to both humans and birds. Thus, there is a great need for a vaccine to control H9N2 avian influenza. Three mutant viruses of an H9N2 virus A/chicken/Taixing/10/2010 (rTX-NS1-73, rTX-NS1-100, and rTX-NS1-128) were constructed with different NS1 gene truncations and confirmed by western blot analysis. The genetic stability, pathogenicity, transmissibility, and host immune responses toward these mutants were evaluated. The mutant virus rTX-NS1-128 exhibited the most attenuated phenotype and lost transmissibility. The expression levels of interleukin 12 in the nasal and tracheal tissues from chickens immunized with rTX-NS1-128 were significantly upregulated on day 3 post-immunization and the IgA and IgG antibody levels were significantly increased on days 7, 14, and 21 post-immunization when compared to chickens that received an inactivated vaccine. rTX-NS1-128 also protected chickens from challenge by homologous and heterologous H9N2 avian influenza viruses. The results indicate that rTX-NS1-128 can be used as a potential live-attenuated vaccine against H9N2 avian influenza.

  13. Antigenic and Molecular Characterization of Avian Influenza A(H9N2) Viruses, Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Shanmuganatham, Karthik; Feeroz, Mohammed M.; Jones-Engel, Lisa; Smith, Gavin J.D.; Fourment, Mathieu; Walker, David; McClenaghan, Laura; Alam, S.M. Rabiul; Hasan, M. Kamrul; Seiler, Patrick; Franks, John; Danner, Angie; Barman, Subrata; McKenzie, Pamela; Krauss, Scott; Webby, Richard J.

    2013-01-01

    Human infection with avian influenza A(H9N2) virus was identified in Bangladesh in 2011. Surveillance for influenza viruses in apparently healthy poultry in live-bird markets in Bangladesh during 2008–2011 showed that subtype H9N2 viruses are isolated year-round, whereas highly pathogenic subtype H5N1 viruses are co-isolated with subtype H9N2 primarily during the winter months. Phylogenetic analysis of the subtype H9N2 viruses showed that they are reassortants possessing 3 gene segments related to subtype H7N3; the remaining gene segments were from the subtype H9N2 G1 clade. We detected no reassortment with subtype H5N1 viruses. Serologic analyses of subtype H9N2 viruses from chickens revealed antigenic conservation, whereas analyses of viruses from quail showed antigenic drift. Molecular analysis showed that multiple mammalian-specific mutations have become fixed in the subtype H9N2 viruses, including changes in the hemagglutinin, matrix, and polymerase proteins. Our results indicate that these viruses could mutate to be transmissible from birds to mammals, including humans. PMID:23968540

  14. Two DNA aptamers against avian influenza H9N2 virus prevent viral infection in cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuewei; Yu, Ziqiang; Jiang, Fei; Fu, Ping; Shen, Junjun; Wu, Wenxue; Li, Jinxiang

    2015-01-01

    New antiviral therapy for pandemic influenza mediated by the H9N2 avian influenza virus (AIV) is increasingly in demand not only for the poultry industry but also for public health. Aptamers are confirmed to be promising candidates for treatment and prevention of influenza viral infections. Thus, we studied two DNA aptamers, A9 and B4, selected by capillary electrophoresis-based systemic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (CE-SELEX) procedure using H9N2 AIV purified haemagglutinin (HA) as target. Both aptamers had whole-virus binding affinity. Also, an enzyme-linked aptamer assay (ELAA) confirmed binding affinity and specificity against other AIV subtypes. Finally, we studied aptamer-inhibitory effects on H9N2 AIV infection in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells and quantified viral load in supernatant and in cell with quantitative PCR (qPCR). Our data provide a foundation for future development of innovative anti-influenza drugs.

  15. Avian Influenza H9N2 Seroprevalence among Poultry Workers in Pune, India, 2010

    PubMed Central

    Pawar, Shailesh D.; Tandale, Babasaheb V.; Raut, Chandrashekhar G.; Parkhi, Saurabh S.; Barde, Tanaji D.; Gurav, Yogesh K.; Kode, Sadhana S.; Mishra, Akhilesh C.

    2012-01-01

    Avian influenza (AI) H9N2 has been reported from poultry in India. A seroepidemiological study was undertaken among poultry workers to understand the prevalence of antibodies against AI H9N2 in Pune, Maharashtra, India. A total of 338 poultry workers were sampled. Serum samples were tested for presence of antibodies against AI H9N2 virus by hemagglutination inhibition (HI) and microneutralization (MN) assays. A total of 249 baseline sera from general population from Pune were tested for antibodies against AI H9N2 and were negative by HI assay using ≥40 cut-off antibody titre. Overall 21 subjects (21/338 = 6.2%) were positive for antibodies against AI H9N2 by either HI or MN assays using ≥40 cut-off antibody titre. A total of 4.7% and 3.8% poultry workers were positive for antibodies against AI H9N2 by HI and MN assay respectively using 40 as cut-off antibody titre. This is the first report of seroprevalence of antibodies against AI H9N2 among poultry workers in India. PMID:22623954

  16. Biological Characteristics of H9N2 Avian Influenza Viruses from Healthy Chickens in Shanghai, China

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Qingfeng; Wang, Qianli; Ju, Liwen; Xiong, Haiyan; Chen, Yue; Jiang, Lufang; Jiang, Qingwu

    2016-01-01

    Background H9N2 avian influenza viruses that circulate in domestic poultry in eastern China pose challenges to human health. However, few studies have compared the biological characteristics of H9N2 viruses isolated from healthy chickens in Shanghai. Material/Methods Three H9N2 viruses – CK/SH/Y1/07, CK/SH/Y1/02, and CK/SH/23/13 – isolated from healthy chickens in Shanghai between 2002 and 2013, were selected and their biological characteristics were determined. Results All 3 H9N2 viruses showed a preference for both the avian- and human-like receptors, and they replicated well in MDCK and A549 cells. All H9N2 viruses were non-pathogenic to mini-pigs and were detected in the trachea and lung tissues. The CK/SH/Y1/07 and CK/SH/Y1/02 viruses were transmitted to mini-pigs through direct-contact or respiratory droplet exposure, but CK/SH/23/13 virus was not. Conclusions These results suggest that H9N2 viruses isolated from healthy chickens in Shanghai efficiently replicate and transmit among pigs and other mammals. PMID:27941707

  17. Biological Characteristics of H9N2 Avian Influenza Viruses from Healthy Chickens in Shanghai, China.

    PubMed

    Shi, Qingfeng; Wang, Qianli; Ju, Liwen; Xiong, Haiyan; Chen, Yue; Jiang, Lufang; Jiang, Qingwu

    2016-12-10

    BACKGROUND H9N2 avian influenza viruses that circulate in domestic poultry in eastern China pose challenges to human health. However, few studies have compared the biological characteristics of H9N2 viruses isolated from healthy chickens in Shanghai. MATERIAL AND METHODS Three H9N2 viruses - CK/SH/Y1/07, CK/SH/Y1/02, and CK/SH/23/13 - isolated from healthy chickens in Shanghai between 2002 and 2013, were selected and their biological characteristics were determined. RESULTS All 3 H9N2 viruses showed a preference for both the avian- and human-like receptors, and they replicated well in MDCK and A549 cells. All H9N2 viruses were non-pathogenic to mini-pigs and were detected in the trachea and lung tissues. The CK/SH/Y1/07 and CK/SH/Y1/02 viruses were transmitted to mini-pigs through direct-contact or respiratory droplet exposure, but CK/SH/23/13 virus was not. CONCLUSIONS These results suggest that H9N2 viruses isolated from healthy chickens in Shanghai efficiently replicate and transmit among pigs and other mammals.

  18. H9N2 low pathogenic avian influenza in Pakistan (2012–2015)

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dong-Hun; Swayne, David E.; Sharma, Poonam; Rehmani, Shafqat Fatima; Wajid, Abdul; Suarez, David L.; Afonso, Claudio L.

    2016-01-01

    Significant economic losses from deaths and decreased egg production have resulted from H9N2 low pathogenic avian influenza virus (LPAIV) infections in poultry across North Africa, the Middle East and Asia. The H9N2 LPAIVs have been endemic in Pakistani poultry since 1996, but no new viruses have been reported since 2010. Because novel genotypes of Pakistani H9N2 contain mammalian host-specific markers, recent surveillance is essential to better understand any continuing public health risk. Here the authors report on four new H9N2 LPAIVs, three from 2015 and one from 2012. All of the viruses tested in this study belonged to Middle East B genetic group of G1 lineage and had PAKSSR/G motif at the haemagglutinin cleavage site. The mammalian host-specific markers at position 226 in the haemagglutinin receptor-binding site and internal genes suggest that Pakistan H9N2 viruses are still potentially infectious for mammals. Continued active surveillance in poultry and mammals is needed to monitor the spread and understand the potential for zoonotic infection by these H9N2 LPAIVs. PMID:27403327

  19. Differential replication properties among H9N2 avian influenza viruses of Eurasian origin.

    PubMed

    Parvin, Rokshana; Shehata, Awad A; Heenemann, Kristin; Gac, Malgorzata; Rueckner, Antje; Halami, Mohammad Y; Vahlenkamp, Thomas W

    2015-07-06

    Avian influenza H9N2 viruses have become panzootic in Eurasia causing respiratory manifestations, great economic losses and occasionally being transmitted to humans. To evaluate the replication properties and compare the different virus quantification methods, four Eurasian H9N2 viruses from different geographical origins were propagated in embryonated chicken egg (ECE) and Madin-Darby canine kidney epithelial cell systems. The ECE-grown and cell culture-grown viruses were monitored for replication kinetics based on tissue culture infectious dose (TCID50), Hemagglutination (HA) test and quantitative real time RT-PCR (qRT-PCR). The cellular morphology was analyzed using immunofluorescence (IF) and cellular ELISA was used to screen the sensitivity of the viruses to amantadine. The Eurasian wild type-H9N2 virus produced lower titers compared to the three G1-H9N2 viruses at respective time points. Detectable titers were observed earliest at 16 h post inoculation (hpi), significant morphological changes on cells were first observed at 32 hpi. Few nucleotide and amino acid substitutions were noticed in the HA, NA and NS gene sequences but none of them are related to the known conserved region that can alter pathogenesis or virulence following a single passage in cell culture. All studied H9N2 viruses were sensitive to amantadine. The G1-H9N2 viruses have higher replication capabilities compared to the European wild bird-H9N2 probably due to their specific genetic constitutions which is prerequisite for a successful vaccine candidate. Both the ECE and MDCK cell system allowed efficient replication but the ECE system is considered as the better cultivation system for H9N2 viruses in order to get maximum amounts of virus within a short time period.

  20. Vertical Transmission of H9N2 Avian Influenza Virus in Goose.

    PubMed

    Yu, Guanliu; Wang, Aihua; Tang, Yi; Diao, Youxiang

    2017-01-01

    During a study on high mortality cases of goose embryo in Shandong Province, China (2014-2015), we isolated an H9N2 avian influenza virus (AIV) strain (A/goose/Shandong/DP01/2014, DP01), which was supposedly the causative agent for goose embryo death. Sequence analysis revealed that DP01 shared 99.9% homology in the HA gene with a classic immune suppression strain SD06. To study the potential vertical transmission ability of the DP01 strain in breeder goose, a total of 105 Taizhou breeder geese, which were 360 days old, were equally divided into five groups (A, B, C, D, and E) for experimental infection. H9N2 AIV (DP01) was used for inoculating through intravenous (group A), intranasal instillation (group B), and throat inoculation (group C) routes, respectively. The geese in group D were inoculated with phosphate buffer solution (PBS) and those in group E were the non-treated group. At 24 h post inoculation, H9N2 viral RNA could be detected at vitelline membrane, embryos, and allantoic fluid of goose embryos from H9N2 inoculated groups. Furthermore, the HA gene of H9N2 virus from vitelline membrane, embryo, allantoic fluid, and gosling shared almost 100% homology with an H9N2 virus isolated from the ovary of breeder goose, which laid these eggs, indicating that H9N2 AIV can be vertically transmitted in goose. The present research study provides evidence that vertical transmission of H9N2 AIV from breeding goose to goslings is possible.

  1. Infectivity and Transmissibility of Avian H9N2 Influenza Viruses in Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jia; Wu, Maocai; Hong, Wenshan; Fan, Xiaohui; Chen, Rirong; Zheng, Zuoyi; Zeng, Yu; Huang, Ren; Zhang, Yu; Lam, Tommy Tsan-Yuk; Smith, David K.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The H9N2 influenza viruses that are enzootic in terrestrial poultry in China pose a persistent pandemic threat to humans. To investigate whether the continuous circulation and adaptation of these viruses in terrestrial poultry increased their infectivity to pigs, we conducted a serological survey in pig herds with H9N2 viruses selected from the aquatic avian gene pool (Y439 lineage) and the enzootic terrestrial poultry viruses (G1 and Y280 lineages). We also compared the infectivity and transmissibility of these viruses in pigs. It was found that more than 15% of the pigs sampled from 2010 to 2012 in southern China were seropositive to either G1 or Y280 lineage viruses, but none of the sera were positive to the H9 viruses from the Y439 lineage. Viruses of the G1 and Y280 lineages were able to infect experimental pigs, with detectable nasal shedding of the viruses and seroconversion, whereas viruses of the Y439 lineage did not cause a productive infection in pigs. Thus, adaptation and prevalence in terrestrial poultry could lead to interspecies transmission of H9N2 viruses from birds to pigs. Although H9N2 viruses do not appear to be continuously transmissible among pigs, repeated introductions of H9 viruses to pigs naturally increase the risk of generating mammalian-adapted or reassorted variants that are potentially infectious to humans. This study highlights the importance of monitoring the activity of H9N2 viruses in terrestrial poultry and pigs. IMPORTANCE H9N2 subtype of influenza viruses has repeatedly been introduced into mammalian hosts, including humans and pigs, so awareness of their activity and evolution is important for influenza pandemic preparedness. However, since H9N2 viruses usually cause mild or even asymptomatic infections in mammalian hosts, they may be overlooked in influenza surveillance. Here, we found that the H9N2 viruses established in terrestrial poultry had higher infectivity in pigs than those from aquatic birds, which

  2. Evidence for Avian H9N2 Influenza Virus Infections among Rural Villagers in Cambodia

    PubMed Central

    Blair, Patrick J.; Putnam, Shannon D.; Krueger, Whitney S.; Chum, Channimol; Wierzba, Thomas F.; Heil, Gary L.; Yasuda, Chadwick Y.; Williams, Maya; Kasper, Matthew R.; Friary, John A.; Capuano, Ana W.; Saphonn, Vonthanak; Peiris, Malik; Shao, Hongxia; Perez, Daniel R.; Gray, Gregory C.

    2013-01-01

    Background Southeast Asia remains a critical region for the emergence of novel and/or zoonotic influenza, underscoring the importance of extensive sampling in rural areas where early transmission is most likely to occur. Methods In 2008, 800 adult participants from eight sites were enrolled in a prospective population-based study of avian influenza (AI) virus transmission where highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 virus had been reported in humans and poultry from 2006 to 2008. From their enrollment sera and questionnaires, we report risk factor findings for serologic evidence of previous infection with 18 AI virus strains. Results Serologic assays revealed no evidence of previous infection with 13 different low-pathogenic AI viruses or with HPAI avian-like A/Cambodia/R0404050/2007(H5N1). However, 21 participants had elevated antibodies against avian-like A/Hong Kong/1073/1999(H9N2), validated with a monoclonal antibody blocking ELISA assay specific for avian H9. Conclusions Although cross-reaction from antibodies against human influenza viruses cannot be completely excluded, the study data suggest that a number of participants were previously infected with the avian-like A/Hong Kong/1073/1999(H9N2) virus, likely due to as yet unidentified environmental exposures. Prospective data from this cohort will help us better understand the serology of zoonotic influenza infection in a rural cohort in SE Asia. PMID:23537819

  3. Evidence for avian H9N2 influenza virus infections among rural villagers in Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Blair, Patrick J; Putnam, Shannon D; Krueger, Whitney S; Chum, Channimol; Wierzba, Thomas F; Heil, Gary L; Yasuda, Chadwick Y; Williams, Maya; Kasper, Matthew R; Friary, John A; Capuano, Ana W; Saphonn, Vonthanak; Peiris, Malik; Shao, Hongxia; Perez, Daniel R; Gray, Gregory C

    2013-04-01

    Southeast Asia remains a critical region for the emergence of novel and/or zoonotic influenza, underscoring the importance of extensive sampling in rural areas where early transmission is most likely to occur. In 2008, 800 adult participants from eight sites were enrolled in a prospective population-based study of avian influenza (AI) virus transmission where highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 virus had been reported in humans and poultry from 2006 to 2008. From their enrollment sera and questionnaires, we report risk factor findings for serologic evidence of previous infection with 18 AI virus strains. Serologic assays revealed no evidence of previous infection with 13 different low-pathogenic AI viruses or with HPAI avian-like A/Cambodia/R0404050/2007(H5N1). However, 21 participants had elevated antibodies against avian-like A/Hong Kong/1073/1999(H9N2), validated with a monoclonal antibody blocking ELISA assay specific for avian H9. Although cross-reaction from antibodies against human influenza viruses cannot be completely excluded, the study data suggest that a number of participants were previously infected with the avian-like A/Hong Kong/1073/1999(H9N2) virus, likely due to as yet unidentified environmental exposures. Prospective data from this cohort will help us better understand the serology of zoonotic influenza infection in a rural cohort in SE Asia. Copyright © 2013 King Saud Bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences. All rights reserved.

  4. Poultry vaccination directed evolution of H9N2 low pathogenicity avian influenza viruses in Korea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong-Hun; Fusaro, Alice; Song, Chang-Seon; Suarez, David L; Swayne, David E

    2016-01-15

    Significant economic losses in the poultry industries have resulted from H9N2 low pathogenic avian influenza virus infections across North Africa, the Middle East and Asia. The present study investigated the evolutionary dynamics of H9N2 viruses circulating in Korea from 1996 to 2012. Our analysis of viral population dynamics revealed an increase in genetic diversity between the years 2003 and 2007, corresponding to the spread and diversification of H9N2 viruses into multiple genetic groups (named A and B), followed by a sudden decrease in 2007, which was associated with implementation of vaccination using a Clade A virus. Implementation of the H9N2 vaccination program in Korea has dramatically reduced the diversity of H9N2 virus, and only one sub-lineage of clade B has survived, expanded, and currently circulates in Korea. In addition, the antigenic drift of this new genetic group away from the current vaccine strain suggests the need to update the vaccine seed strain. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Serological evidence for avian H9N2 influenza virus infections among Romanian agriculture workers.

    PubMed

    Coman, Alexandru; Maftei, Daniel N; Krueger, Whitney S; Heil, Gary L; Friary, John A; Chereches, Razvan M; Sirlincan, Emanuela; Bria, Paul; Dragnea, Claudiu; Kasler, Iosif; Gray, Gregory C

    2013-12-01

    In recent years, wild birds have introduced multiple highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 virus infections in Romanian poultry. In 2005 HPAI infections were widespread among domestic poultry and anecdotal reports suggested domestic pigs may also have been exposed. We sought to examine evidence for zoonotic influenza infections among Romanian agriculture workers. Between 2009 and 2010, 363 adult participants were enrolled in a cross-sectional, seroepidemiological study. Confined animal feeding operation (CAFO) swine workers in Tulcea and small, traditional backyard farmers in Cluj-Napoca were enrolled, as well as a non-animal exposed control group from Cluj-Napoca. Enrollment sera were examined for serological evidence of previous infection with 9 avian and 3 human influenza virus strains. Serologic assays showed no evidence of previous infection with 7 low pathogenic avian influenza viruses or with HPAI H5N1. However, 33 participants (9.1%) had elevated microneutralization antibody titers against avian-like A/Hong Kong/1073/1999(H9N2), 5 with titers ≥ 1:80 whom all reported exposure to poultry. Moderate poultry exposure was significantly associated with elevated titers after controlling for the subjects' age (adjusted OR = 3.6; 95% CI, 1.1-12.1). There was no evidence that previous infection with human H3N2 or H2N2 viruses were confounding the H9N2 seroreactivity. These data suggest that H9N2 virus may have circulated in Romanian poultry and occasionally infected man.

  6. Replication Capacity of Avian Influenza A(H9N2) Virus in Pet Birds and Mammals, Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Lenny, Brian J.; Shanmuganatham, Karthik; Sonnberg, Stephanie; Feeroz, Mohammed M.; Alam, S.M. Rabiul; Hasan, M. Kamrul; Jones-Engel, Lisa; McKenzie, Pamela; Krauss, Scott; Webster, Robert G.

    2015-01-01

    Avian influenza A(H9N2) is an agricultural and public health threat. We characterized an H9N2 virus from a pet market in Bangladesh and demonstrated replication in samples from pet birds, swine tissues, human airway and ocular cells, and ferrets. Results implicated pet birds in the potential dissemination and zoonotic transmission of this virus. PMID:26583371

  7. Replication Capacity of Avian Influenza A(H9N2) Virus in Pet Birds and Mammals, Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Lenny, Brian J; Shanmuganatham, Karthik; Sonnberg, Stephanie; Feeroz, Mohammed M; Alam, S M Rabiul; Hasan, M Kamrul; Jones-Engel, Lisa; McKenzie, Pamela; Krauss, Scott; Webster, Robert G; Jones, Jeremy C

    2015-12-01

    Avian influenza A(H9N2) is an agricultural and public health threat. We characterized an H9N2 virus from a pet market in Bangladesh and demonstrated replication in samples from pet birds, swine tissues, human airway and ocular cells, and ferrets. Results implicated pet birds in the potential dissemination and zoonotic transmission of this virus.

  8. Isolation and pathotyping of H9N2 avian influenza viruses in Indian poultry.

    PubMed

    Nagarajan, S; Rajukumar, K; Tosh, C; Ramaswamy, V; Purohit, K; Saxena, G; Behera, P; Pattnaik, B; Pradhan, H K; Dubey, S C

    2009-01-01

    A total of 1246 faecal and tissue samples collected/received from 119 farms located in various states of India were processed for isolation of avian influenza viruses (AIV) during 2003-2004 as part of a program to monitor AIV infection in Indian poultry population. Avian influenza virus was isolated for the first time in India from poultry farms with history of drop in egg production, respiratory illness and increased mortality in Haryana state. A total of 29 H9N2 AIV isolates were obtained from the states of Punjab, Haryana, Uttar Pradesh, Gujarat, and Orissa and Union Territory Delhi. Subtyping was done by HI, RT-PCR and neuraminidase inhibition assay. Pathotyping of six representative isolates by intravenous pathogenicity index (0.0/3.0) in 6-8 weeks old chicken, trypsin dependency in cell culture and HA cleavage site analysis (335RSSR*GLF341) confirmed that these isolates are low pathogenic. Nucleotide sequence analysis of the HA gene showed that the Indian isolates are very closely related (95.0-99.6%) and shared a homology of 92-96% with H9N2 isolates from Germany and Asian regions other than that of mainland China. Deduced amino acid sequences showed the presence of L226 (234 in H9 numbering) which indicates a preference to binding of alpha (2-6) sialic acid receptors. Two of the six isolates had 7 glycosylation sites in the HA1 cleaved protein and the remaining four had 5 sites. Phylogenetic analysis showed that they share a common ancestor Qa/HK/G1/97 isolate which had contributed internal genes of H5N1 virus circulating in Vietnam. Further characterization of Indian H9N2 isolates is required to understand their nature and evolution.

  9. The avian influenza H9N2 at avian-human interface: A possible risk for the future pandemics

    PubMed Central

    RahimiRad, Shaghayegh; Alizadeh, Ali; Alizadeh, Effat; Hosseini, Seyyed Masoud

    2016-01-01

    The avian influenza subtype H9N2 is considered a low pathogenic virus which is endemic in domestic poultry of a majority of Asian countries. Many reports of seropositivity in occupationally poultry-exposed workers and a number of confirmed human infections with an H9N2 subtype of avian influenza have been documented up to now. Recently, the human infections with both H7N9 and H10N8 viruses highlighted that H9N2 has a great potential for taking a part in the emergence of new human-infecting viruses. This review aimed at discussing the great potential of H9N2 virus which is circulating at avian-human interface, for cross-species transmission, contribution in the production of new reassortants and emergence of new pandemic subtypes. An intensified surveillance is needed for controlling the future risks which would be created by H9N2 circulation at avian-human interfaces. PMID:28083072

  10. Generation and protective efficacy of a cold-adapted attenuated avian H9N2 influenza vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Yandi; Qi, Lu; Gao, Huijie; Sun, Honglei; Pu, Juan; Sun, Yipeng; Liu, Jinhua

    2016-01-01

    To prevent H9N2 avian influenza virus infection in chickens, a long-term vaccination program using inactivated vaccines has been implemented in China. However, the protective efficacy of inactivated vaccines against antigenic drift variants is limited, and H9N2 influenza virus continues to circulate in vaccinated chicken flocks in China. Therefore, developing a cross-reactive vaccine to control the impact of H9N2 influenza in the poultry industry remains a high priority. In the present study, we developed a live cold-adapted H9N2 influenza vaccine candidate (SD/01/10-ca) by serial passages in embryonated eggs at successively lower temperatures. A total of 13 amino acid mutations occurred during the cold-adaptation of this H9N2 virus. The candidate was safe in chickens and induced robust hemagglutination-inhibition antibody responses and influenza virus–specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cell immune responses in chickens immunized intranasally. Importantly, the candidate could confer protection of chickens from homologous and heterogenous H9N2 viruses. These results demonstrated that the cold-adapted attenuated H9N2 virus would be selected as a vaccine to control the infection of prevalent H9N2 influenza viruses in chickens. PMID:27457755

  11. The comparison of pathology in ferrets infected by H9N2 avian influenza viruses with different genomic features.

    PubMed

    Gao, Rongbao; Bai, Tian; Li, Xiaodan; Xiong, Ying; Huang, Yiwei; Pan, Ming; Zhang, Ye; Bo, Hong; Zou, Shumei; Shu, Yuelong

    2016-01-15

    H9N2 avian influenza virus circulates widely in poultry and has been responsible for sporadic human infections in several regions. Few studies have been conducted on the pathogenicity of H9N2 AIV isolates that have different genomic features. We compared the pathology induced by a novel reassortant H9N2 virus and two currently circulating H9N2 viruses that have different genomic features in ferrets. The results showed that the three viruses can induce infections with various amounts of viral shedding in ferrets. The novel H9N2 induced respiratory infection, but no pathological lesions were observed in lung tissues. The other two viruses induced mild to intermediate pathological lesions in lung tissues, although the clinical signs presented mildly in ferrets. The pathological lesions presented a diversity consistent with viral replication in ferrets.

  12. Astragalus polysaccharide enhances immunity and inhibits H9N2 avian influenza virus in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the humoral immunization of Astragalus polysaccharide (APS) against H9N2 avian influenza virus (H9N2 AIV) infection in chickens. The effects of APS treatment on H9N2 infection was evaluated by an MTT [3(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 3-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide] assay and analysis of MHC and cytokine mRNA expression. The effect on lymphocyte and serum antibody titers in vivo was also investigated. IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, LITAF, IL-12 and antibody titers to H9N2 AIV were enhanced in the first week after APS treatment. The results indicated that APS treatment reduces H9N2 AIV replication and promotes early humoral immune responses in young chickens. PMID:23786718

  13. Passaging impact of H9N2 avian influenza virus in hamsters on its pathogenicity and genetic variability.

    PubMed

    Shaib, Houssam A; Cochet, Nelly; Ribeiro, Thierry; Abdel Nour, Afif M; Nemer, Georges; Azhar, Esam; Iyer, Archana; Kumosani, Taha; Harakeh, Steve; Barbour, Elie K

    2014-05-14

    Avian influenza viruses of the H9N2 subtype have been reported to cause human infections. This study demonstrates the impact of nasal viral passaging of avian H9N2 in hamsters on its cross species-pathogenic adaptability and variability of amino acid sequences of the hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) stalk. Three intranasal passagings of avian H9N2 in hamsters P1, P2, and P3 were accomplished. Morbidity signs and lesions were observed three days post viral inoculation. The HA test was used for presumptive detection of H9N2 virus in the trachea and lungs of the hamsters challenged with the differently passaged viruses. Different primers were used for PCR amplification of the HA1 and NA stalk regions of the differently passaged H9N2 viruses, followed by sequence alignment. The morbidity signs indicated low pathogenicity of the differently passaged H9N2 viruses in hamsters. The frequency of gross and microscopic lesions in the tracheas and lungs were insignificantly different among hamsters challenged with the differently passaged H9N2 viruses (p > 0.05). There was 100% similarity in the amino acid sequence of the HA gene of most passaged viruses. The amino acid sequence of the neuraminidase in the third passaged H9N2 virus recovered from lungs showed a R46P mutation that might have a role in the pathogenic adaptability of P3 viruses in hamsters' lungs. The apparent adaptation of avian H9N2 virus to mammalian cells is in agreement with the World Health Organization's alertness for a possible public health threat by this adaptable virus.

  14. Genetic characterization of H9N2 avian influenza virus in plateau pikas in the Qinghai Lake region of China.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yan; Gu, Jin-Yan; Yuan, Zhuang-Chuan; Chen, Xin-Yu; Li, Zeng-Kui; Lei, Jing; Hu, Bo-Li; Yan, Li-Ping; Xing, Gang; Liao, Min; Zhou, Ji-Yong

    2017-04-01

    Qinghai Lake is a major migratory-bird breeding site that has experienced several highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (AIV) epizootics. Plateau pikas (Ochotona curzoniae) have previously been implicated in the ecology of avian influenza virus in this region. We first isolated an H9N2 AIV (A/Pika/Menyuan/01/2008) from plateau pikas between November 2008 and October 2009. Sequence analysis showed that the A/Pika/Menyuan/01/2008 AIV was closely related to the H9N2 AIV strain (A/Turkey/Wisconsin/ 1/1966). Our findings suggested that plateau pikas may contribute to AIV epidemiology in the Qinghai Lake region.

  15. First outbreaks and phylogenetic analyses of avian influenza H9N2 viruses isolated from poultry flocks in Morocco.

    PubMed

    El Houadfi, Mohammed; Fellahi, Siham; Nassik, Saadia; Guérin, Jean-Luc; Ducatez, Mariette F

    2016-08-15

    H9N2 avian influenza viruses continue to spread in poultry and wild birds worldwide. Morocco just faced its first H9N2 influenza virus outbreaks early 2016 affecting different types of poultry production. After its introduction, the virus spread very rapidly throughout the country. Samples were collected from 11 chicken flocks with high morbidity and mortality rates. Four viruses were successfully isolated from broiler chickens and one from broiler breeders and fully sequenced. Phylogenetic and molecular markers analyses showed the Moroccan viruses belonged to the G1 lineage and likely originated from the Middle East. As known for H9N2 viruses, the Moroccanisolates possess several genetic markers that enhance virulence in poultry and transmission to humans. The present study demonstrated that under field conditions H9N2 could have a devastating effect on egg production and mortalities and highlighted a lack of surveillance data on the pathogen in the region.

  16. Mesenchymal stromal cell treatment prevents H9N2 avian influenza virus-induced acute lung injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Xu, Jun; Shi, Weiqing; Chen, Cheng; Shao, Yan; Zhu, Limei; Lu, Wei; Han, XiaoDong

    2016-10-28

    The avian influenza virus (AIV) can cross species barriers and expand its host range from birds to mammals, even humans. Avian influenza is characterized by pronounced activation of the proinflammatory cytokine cascade, which perpetuates the inflammatory response, leading to persistent systemic inflammatory response syndrome and pulmonary infection in animals and humans. There are currently no specific treatment strategies for avian influenza. We hypothesized that mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) would have beneficial effects in the treatment of H9N2 AIV-induced acute lung injury in mice. Six- to 8-week-old C57BL/6 mice were infected intranasally with 1 × 10(4) MID50 of A/HONG KONG/2108/2003 [H9N2 (HK)] H9N2 virus to induce acute lung injury. After 30 min, syngeneic MSCs were delivered through the caudal vein. Three days after infection, we measured the survival rate, lung weight, arterial blood gas, and cytokines in both bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and serum, and assessed pathological changes to the lungs. MSC administration significantly palliated H9N2 AIV-induced pulmonary inflammation by reducing chemokines and proinflammatory cytokines levels, as well as reducing inflammatory cell recruit into the lungs. Thus, H9N2 AIV-induced lung injury was markedly alleviated in mice treated with MSCs. Lung histopathology and arterial blood gas analysis were improved in mice with H9N2 AIV-induced lung injury following MSC treatment. MSC treatment significantly reduces H9N2 AIV-induced acute lung injury in mice and is associated with reduced pulmonary inflammation. These results indicate a potential role for MSC therapy in the treatment of clinical avian influenza.

  17. Genetic and antigenic evolution of H9N2 avian influenza viruses circulating in Egypt between 2011 and 2013

    PubMed Central

    Kandeil, Ahmed; El-Shesheny, Rabeh; Maatouq, Asmaa M.; Moatasim, Yassmin; Shehata, Mahmoud M.; Bagato, Ola; Rubrum, Adam; Shanmuganatham, Karthik; Webby, Richard J.; Ali, Mohamed Ahmed; Kayali, Ghazi

    2014-01-01

    Avian influenza virus subtype H9N2 has been circulating in the Middle East since the 1990s. For uncertain reasons, H9N2 was not detected in Egyptian farms until the end of 2010. Circulation of H9N2 viruses in Egyptian poultry in the presence of the enzootic highly pathogenic H5N1 subtype adds a huge risk factor to the Egyptian poultry industry. In this study, 22 H9N2 viruses collected from 2011 to 2013 in Egypt were isolated and sequenced. The genomic signatures and protein sequences of these isolates were analyzed. Multiple mammalian-host-associated mutations were detected that favor transmission from avian to mammalian hosts. Other mutations related to virulence were also identified. Phylogenetic data showed that Egyptian H9N2 viruses were closely related to viruses isolated from neighboring Middle Eastern countries, and their HA gene resembled those of viruses of the G1-like lineage. No reassortment was detected with H5N1 subtypes. Serological analysis of H9N2 virus revealed antigenic conservation among Egyptian isolates. Accordingly, continuous surveillance that results in genetic and antigenic characterization of H9N2 in Egypt is warranted. PMID:24990416

  18. The replication of Bangladeshi H9N2 avian influenza viruses carrying genes from H7N3 in mammals.

    PubMed

    Shanmuganatham, Karthik K; Jones, Jeremy C; Marathe, Bindumadhav M; Feeroz, Mohammed M; Jones-Engel, Lisa; Walker, David; Turner, Jasmine; Rabiul Alam, S M; Kamrul Hasan, M; Akhtar, Sharmin; Seiler, Patrick; McKenzie, Pamela; Krauss, Scott; Webby, Richard J; Webster, Robert G

    2016-04-20

    H9N2 avian influenza viruses are continuously monitored by the World Health Organization because they are endemic; they continually reassort with H5N1, H7N9 and H10N8 viruses; and they periodically cause human infections. We characterized H9N2 influenza viruses carrying internal genes from highly pathogenic H7N3 viruses, which were isolated from chickens or quail from live-bird markets in Bangladesh between 2010 and 2013. All of the H9N2 viruses used in this study carried mammalian host-specific mutations. We studied their replication kinetics in normal human bronchoepithelial cells and swine tracheal and lung explants, which exhibit many features of the mammalian airway epithelium and serve as a mammalian host model. All H9N2 viruses replicated to moderate-to-high titers in the normal human bronchoepithelial cells and swine lung explants, but replication was limited in the swine tracheal explants. In Balb/c mice, the H9N2 viruses were nonlethal, replicated to moderately high titers and the infection was confined to the lungs. In the ferret model of human influenza infection and transmission, H9N2 viruses possessing the Q226L substitution in hemagglutinin replicated well without clinical signs and spread via direct contact but not by aerosol. None of the H9N2 viruses tested were resistant to the neuraminidase inhibitors. Our study shows that the Bangladeshi H9N2 viruses have the potential to infect humans and highlights the importance of monitoring and characterizing this influenza subtype to better understand the potential risk these viruses pose to humans.

  19. The replication of Bangladeshi H9N2 avian influenza viruses carrying genes from H7N3 in mammals

    PubMed Central

    Shanmuganatham, Karthik K; Jones, Jeremy C; Marathe, Bindumadhav M; Feeroz, Mohammed M; Jones-Engel, Lisa; Walker, David; Turner, Jasmine; Rabiul Alam, S M; Kamrul Hasan, M; Akhtar, Sharmin; Seiler, Patrick; McKenzie, Pamela; Krauss, Scott; Webby, Richard J; Webster, Robert G

    2016-01-01

    H9N2 avian influenza viruses are continuously monitored by the World Health Organization because they are endemic; they continually reassort with H5N1, H7N9 and H10N8 viruses; and they periodically cause human infections. We characterized H9N2 influenza viruses carrying internal genes from highly pathogenic H7N3 viruses, which were isolated from chickens or quail from live-bird markets in Bangladesh between 2010 and 2013. All of the H9N2 viruses used in this study carried mammalian host-specific mutations. We studied their replication kinetics in normal human bronchoepithelial cells and swine tracheal and lung explants, which exhibit many features of the mammalian airway epithelium and serve as a mammalian host model. All H9N2 viruses replicated to moderate-to-high titers in the normal human bronchoepithelial cells and swine lung explants, but replication was limited in the swine tracheal explants. In Balb/c mice, the H9N2 viruses were nonlethal, replicated to moderately high titers and the infection was confined to the lungs. In the ferret model of human influenza infection and transmission, H9N2 viruses possessing the Q226L substitution in hemagglutinin replicated well without clinical signs and spread via direct contact but not by aerosol. None of the H9N2 viruses tested were resistant to the neuraminidase inhibitors. Our study shows that the Bangladeshi H9N2 viruses have the potential to infect humans and highlights the importance of monitoring and characterizing this influenza subtype to better understand the potential risk these viruses pose to humans. PMID:27094903

  20. Effect of serial pig passages on the adaptation of an avian H9N2 influenza virus to swine.

    PubMed

    Mancera Gracia, Jose Carlos; Van den Hoecke, Silvie; Saelens, Xavier; Van Reeth, Kristien

    2017-01-01

    H9N2 avian influenza viruses are endemic in poultry in Asia and the Middle East. These viruses sporadically cause dead-end infections in pigs and humans raising concerns about their potential to adapt to mammals or reassort with human or swine influenza viruses. We performed ten serial passages with an avian H9N2 virus (A/quail/Hong Kong/G1/1997) in influenza naïve pigs to assess the potential of this virus to adapt to swine. Virus replication in the entire respiratory tract and nasal virus excretion were examined after each passage and we deep sequenced viral genomic RNA of the parental and passage four H9N2 virus isolated from the nasal mucosa and lung. The parental H9N2 virus caused a productive infection in pigs with a predominant tropism for the nasal mucosa, whereas only 50% lung samples were virus-positive. In contrast, inoculation of pigs with passage four virus resulted in viral replication in the entire respiratory tract. Subsequent passages were associated with reduced virus replication in the lungs and infectious virus was no longer detectable in the upper and lower respiratory tract of inoculated pigs at passage ten. The broader tissue tropism after four passages was associated with an amino acid residue substitution at position 225, within the receptor-binding site of the hemagglutinin. We also compared the parental H9N2, passage four H9N2 and the 2009 pandemic H1N1 (pH1N1) virus in a direct contact transmission experiment. Whereas only one out of six contact pigs showed nasal virus excretion of the wild-type H9N2 for more than four days, all six contact animals shed the passage four H9N2 virus. Nevertheless, the amount of excreted virus was significantly lower when compared to that of the pH1N1, which readily transmitted and replicated in all six contact animals. Our data demonstrate that serial passaging of H9N2 virus in pigs enhances its replication and transmissibility. However, full adaptation of an avian H9N2 virus to pigs likely requires an

  1. Serological evidence of H9N2 avian influenza virus exposure among poultry workers from Fars province of Iran.

    PubMed

    Heidari, A; Mancin, M; Nili, H; Pourghanbari, G H; Lankarani, K B; Leardini, S; Cattoli, G; Monne, I; Piccirillo, A

    2016-01-27

    Since the 1990s, influenza A viruses of the H9N2 subtype have been causing infections in the poultry population around the globe. This influenza subtype is widely circulating in poultry and human cases of AI H9N2 have been sporadically reported in countries where this virus is endemic in domestic birds. The wide circulation of H9N2 viruses throughout Europe and Asia along with their ability to cause direct infection in mammals and humans, raises public health concerns. H9N2 AI was reported for the first time in Iran in 1998 and at present it is endemic in poultry. This study was carried out to evaluate the exposure to H9N2 AI viruses among poultry workers from the Fars province. 100 poultry workers and 100 healthy individuals with no professional exposure to poultry took part in this study. Serum samples were tested for antibodies against two distinct H9N2 avian influenza viruses, which showed different phylogenetic clustering and important molecular differences, such as at the amino acid (aa) position 226 (Q/L) (H3 numbering), using haemagglutination inhibition (HI) and microneutralization (MN) assays. Results showed that 17 % of the poultry workers were positive for the A/chicken/Iran/10VIR/854-5/2008 virus in MN test and 12 % in HI test using the titer ≥40 as positive cut-off value. Only 2 % of the poultry workers were positive for the A/chicken/Iran/12VIR/9630/1998 virus. Seroprevalence of non exposed individuals for both H9N2 strains was below 3 % by both tests. Statistical analyses models showed that exposure to poultry significantly increases the risk of infection with H9N2 virus. The results have demonstrated that exposure to avian H9N2 viruses had occurred among poultry workers in the Fars province of Iran. Continuous surveillance programmes should be implemented to monitor the presence of avian influenza infections in humans and to evaluate their potential threat to poultry workers and public health.

  2. Characterization of Avian H9N2 Influenza Viruses from United Arab Emirates 2000 to 2003

    PubMed Central

    Aamir, U. B.; Wernery, Ulrich; Ilyushina, N.; Webster, R. G.

    2009-01-01

    Our aim was to establish the phylogenetic relation of H9N2 avian viruses in the Middle East to other Asian H9N2 lineages by characterization of 7 viruses isolated from United Arab Emirates (2000-2003). All these viruses had an additional basic amino acid at the hemagglutinin-connecting peptide; 6 contained a mutation associated with increased affinity toward human-like sialic acid substrates. The viruses' surface glycoproteins and most internal genes were >90% similar to those of A/Quail/Hong Kong/G1/97 (H9N2) lineage. The hemadsorbing site of neuraminidase had up to 4 amino acid substitutions, as do human pandemic viruses. M2 sequence analysis revealed amino acid changes at 2 positions, with increasing resistance to amantadine in cell culture. They replicated efficiently in inoculated chickens and were successfully transmitted to contacts. They continue to maintain H5N1-like genes and may augment the spread of H5N1 viruses through regional co-circulation and inapparent infection. These viruses may present as potential pandemic candidates themselves. PMID:17157891

  3. Characterization of avian H9N2 influenza viruses from United Arab Emirates 2000 to 2003.

    PubMed

    Aamir, U B; Wernery, Ulrich; Ilyushina, N; Webster, R G

    2007-04-25

    Our aim was to establish the phylogenetic relation of H9N2 avian viruses in the Middle East to other Asian H9N2 lineages by characterization of 7 viruses isolated from United Arab Emirates (2000-2003). All these viruses had an additional basic amino acid at the hemagglutinin-connecting peptide; 6 contained a mutation associated with increased affinity toward human-like sialic acid substrates. The viruses' surface glycoproteins and most internal genes were >90% similar to those of A/Quail/Hong Kong/G1/97 (H9N2) lineage. The hemadsorbing site of neuraminidase had up to 4 amino acid substitutions, as do human pandemic viruses. M2 sequence analysis revealed amino acid changes at 2 positions, with increasing resistance to amantadine in cell culture. They replicated efficiently in inoculated chickens and were successfully transmitted to contacts. They continue to maintain H5N1-like genes and may augment the spread of H5N1 viruses through regional co-circulation and inapparent infection. These viruses may present as potential pandemic candidates themselves.

  4. Detection and Genetic Characteristics of H9N2 Avian Influenza Viruses from Live Poultry Markets in Hunan Province, China

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Shixiong; Cai, Liang; Sun, Qianlai; Li, Wenchao; Deng, Zhihong; Xiang, Xingyu; Zhang, Hengjiao; Li, Fangcai; Gao, Lidong

    2015-01-01

    H9N2 avian influenza viruses (AIVs) are highly prevalent and of low pathogenicity in domestic poultry. These viruses show a high genetic compatibility with other subtypes of AIVs and have been involved in the genesis of H5N1, H7N9 and H10N8 viruses causing severe infection in humans. The first case of human infection with H9N2 viruses in Hunan province of China have been confirmed in November 2013 and identified that H9N2 viruses from live poultry markets (LPMs) near the patient’s house could be the source of infection. However, the prevalence, distribution and genetic characteristics of H9N2 viruses in LPMs all over the province are not clear. We collected and tested 3943 environmental samples from 380 LPMs covering all 122 counties/districts of Hunan province from February to April, 2014. A total of 618 (15.7%) samples were H9 subtype positive and 200 (52.6%) markets in 98 (80.3%) counties/districts were contaminated with H9 subtype AIVs. We sequenced the entire coding sequences of the genomes of eleven H9N2 isolates from environmental samples. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the gene sequences of the H9N2 AIVs exhibited high homology (94.3%-100%). All eleven viruses were in a same branch in the phylogenetic trees and belonged to a same genotype. No gene reassortment had been found. Molecular analysis demonstrated that all the viruses had typical molecular characteristics of contemporary avian H9N2 influenza viruses. Continued surveillance of AIVs in LPMs is warranted for identification of further viral evolution and novel reassortants with pandemic potential. PMID:26554921

  5. Modification of the Hemagglutinin Cleavage Site Allows Indirect Activation of Avian Influenza Virus H9N2 by Bacterial Staphylokinase

    PubMed Central

    Tse, Longping V.; Whittaker, Gary R.

    2015-01-01

    Influenza H9N2 is considered to be a low pathogenicity avian influenza (LPAI) virus that commonly infects avian species and can also infect humans. In 1996, the influenza virus, A/chicken/Korea/MS96-CE6/1996/H9N2 (MS96) was isolated from an outbreak in multiple farms in South Korea that resulted in upwards of 30% mortality in infected chickens, with the virus infecting a number of extrapulmonary tissues, indicating internal spread. However, in experimental infections, complete recovery of specific pathogen free (SPF) chickens occurred. Such a discrepancy indicated an alternative pathway for MS96 virus to gain virulence in farmed chickens. A key determinant of influenza pathogenesis is the susceptibility of the viral hemagglutinin (HA) to proteolytic cleavage/activation. Here, we identified that an amino acid substitution, Ser to Tyr found at the P2 position of the MS96 HA cleavage site optimizes cleavage by the protease plasmin (Pm). Importantly, we identified that certain Staphylococcus sp. are able to cleave and activate MS96 HA by activating plasminogen (Plg) to plasmin by use of a virulence factor, staphylokinase. Overall, these studies provide an in-vitro mechanism for bacterially mediated enhancement of influenza activation, and allow insight into the microbiological mechanisms underlying the avian influenza H9N2 outbreak in Korea in1996. PMID:25841078

  6. Prevailing PA Mutation K356R in Avian Influenza H9N2 Virus Increases Mammalian Replication and Pathogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Guanlong; Zhang, Xuxiao; Gao, Weihua; Wang, Chenxi; Wang, Jinliang; Sun, Honglei; Sun, Yipeng; Guo, Lu; Zhang, Rui; Chang, Kin-Chow; Liu, Jinhua

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Adaptation of the viral polymerase complex comprising PB1, PB2, and PA is necessary for efficient influenza A virus replication in new host species. We found that PA mutation K356R (PA-K356R) has become predominant since 2014 in avian H9N2 viruses in China as with seasonal human H1N1 viruses. The same mutation is also found in most human isolates of emergent avian H7N9 and H10N8 viruses whose six internal gene segments are derived from the H9N2 virus. We further demonstrated the mammalian adaptive functionality of the PA-K356R mutation. Avian H9N2 virus with the PA-K356R mutation in human A549 cells showed increased nuclear accumulation of PA and increased viral polymerase activity that resulted in elevated levels of viral transcription and virus output. The same mutant virus in mice also enhanced virus replication and caused lethal infection. In addition, combined mutation of PA-K356R and PB2-E627K, a well-known mammalian adaptive marker, in the H9N2 virus showed further cooperative increases in virus production and severity of infection in vitro and in vivo. In summary, PA-K356R behaves as a novel mammalian tropism mutation, which, along with other mutations such as PB2-E627K, might render avian H9N2 viruses adapted for human infection. IMPORTANCE Mutations of the polymerase complex (PB1, PB2, and PA) of influenza A virus are necessary for viral adaptation to new hosts. This study reports a novel and predominant mammalian adaptive mutation, PA-K356R, in avian H9N2 viruses and human isolates of emergent H7N9 and H10N8 viruses. We found that PA-356R in H9N2 viruses causes significant increases in virus replication and severity of infection in human cells and mice and that PA-K356R cooperates with the PB2-E627K mutation, a well-characterized human adaptive marker, to exacerbate mammalian infection in vitro and in vivo. Therefore, the PA-K356R mutation is a significant adaptation in H9N2 viruses and related H7N9 and H10N8 reassortants toward human

  7. Lowly pathogenic avian influenza (H9N2) infection in Plateau pika (Ochotona curzoniae), Qinghai Lake, China.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhijun; Cheng, Kaihui; Sun, Weiyang; Xin, Yue; Cai, Jinshan; Ma, Ruilin; Zhao, Quanbang; Li, Lin; Huang, Jing; Sang, Xiaoyu; Li, Xue; Zhang, Kun; Wang, Tiecheng; Qin, Chuan; Qian, Jun; Gao, Yuwei; Xia, Xianzhu

    2014-09-17

    Avian influenza viruses (AIVs) are globally important contagions. Several domestic mammals can be infected with AIVs and may play important roles in the adaptation and transmission of these viruses in mammals, although the roles of wild mammals in the natural ecology of AIVs are not yet clear. Here, we performed a serological survey of apparently healthy Plateau pikas at Qinghai Lake in China to assess the prevalence of exposure to AIVs. Ninety-two of 293 (31%) of wild Plateau pikas possessed serum antibodies against a lowly pathogenic avian influenza (LPAI) H9N2 virus. Experimental inoculation of Plateau pikas with a LPAI H9N2 virus resulted in productive viral replication in respiratory tissues without prior adaptation. Our findings suggest that Plateau pikas represent a natural mammalian host to H9N2 AIVs and may play a role in the ongoing circulation of H9N2 viruses at Qinghai Lake in China. Surveillance for AIV infection in Plateau pika populations and other mammals that have close contact with the Plateau pikas should be considered. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Genetics, Receptor Binding Property, and Transmissibility in Mammals of Naturally Isolated H9N2 Avian Influenza Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Guohua; Zhang, Qianyi; Wang, Jinliang; He, Xijun; Wang, Kaicheng; Chen, Jiming; Li, Yuanyuan; Fan, Jun; Kong, Huiui; Gu, Chunyang; Guan, Yuantao; Suzuki, Yasuo; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro; Liu, Liling; Jiang, Yongping; Tian, Guobin; Li, Yanbing; Bu, Zhigao; Chen, Hualan

    2014-01-01

    H9N2 subtype influenza viruses have been detected in different species of wild birds and domestic poultry in many countries for several decades. Because these viruses are of low pathogenicity in poultry, their eradication is not a priority for animal disease control in many countries, which has allowed them to continue to evolve and spread. Here, we characterized the genetic variation, receptor-binding specificity, replication capability, and transmission in mammals of a series of H9N2 influenza viruses that were detected in live poultry markets in southern China between 2009 and 2013. Thirty-five viruses represented 17 genotypes on the basis of genomic diversity, and one specific “internal-gene-combination” predominated among the H9N2 viruses. This gene combination was also present in the H7N9 and H10N8 viruses that have infected humans in China. All of the 35 viruses preferentially bound to the human-like receptor, although two also retained the ability to bind to the avian-like receptor. Six of nine viruses tested were transmissible in ferrets by respiratory droplet; two were highly transmissible. Some H9N2 viruses readily acquired the 627K or 701N mutation in their PB2 gene upon infection of ferrets, further enhancing their virulence and transmission in mammals. Our study indicates that the widespread dissemination of H9N2 viruses poses a threat to human health not only because of the potential of these viruses to cause an influenza pandemic, but also because they can function as “vehicles” to deliver different subtypes of influenza viruses from avian species to humans. PMID:25411973

  9. Host immune and apoptotic responses to avian influenza virus H9N2 in human tracheobronchial epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Xing, Zheng; Harper, Richart; Anunciacion, Jerome; Yang, Zengqi; Gao, Wei; Qu, Bingqian; Guan, Yi; Cardona, Carol J

    2011-01-01

    The avian influenza virus H9N2 subtype has circulated in wild birds, is prevalent in domestic poultry, and has successfully crossed the species boundary to infect humans. Phylogenetic analyses showed that viruses of this subtype appear to have contributed to the generation of highly pathogenic H5N1 viruses. Little is known about the host responses to H9N2 viruses in human airway respiratory epithelium, the primary portal for viral infection. Using an apically differentiated primary human tracheobronchial epithelial (TBE) culture, we examined host immune responses to infection by an avian H9N2 virus, in comparison with a human H9N2 isolate. We found that IFN-β was the prominent antiviral component, whereas interferon gamma-induced protein 10 kDa (IP-10), chemokine (C-C motif) ligand (CCL)-5 and TNF-α may be critical in proinflammatory responses to H9N2 viruses. In contrast, proinflammatory IL-1β, IL-8, and even IL-6 may only play a minor role in pathogenicity. Apparently Toll-like receptor (TLR)-3, TLR-7, and melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5 (MDA-5) contributed to the innate immunity against the H9N2 viruses, and MDA-5 was important in the induction of IFN-β. We showed that the avian H9N2 virus induced apoptosis through the mitochondria/cytochrome c-mediated intrinsic pathway, in addition to the caspase 8-mediated extrinsic pathway, as evidenced by the cytosolic presence of active caspase 9 and cytochrome c, independent of truncated BH3 interacting domain death agonist (Bid) activation. Further, we demonstrated that FLICE-like inhibitory protein (FLIP), an apoptotic dual regulator, and the p53-dependent Bcl-2 family members, Bax and Bcl-x(s), appeared to be involved in the regulation of extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic pathways, respectively. The findings in this study will further our understanding of host defense mechanisms and the pathogenesis of H9N2 influenza viruses in human respiratory epithelium.

  10. Avian influenza H9N2 subtype in Poland--characterization of the isolates and evidence of concomitant infections.

    PubMed

    Smietanka, Krzysztof; Minta, Zenon; Swiętoń, Edyta; Olszewska, Monika; Jóźwiak, Michał; Domańska-Blicharz, Katarzyna; Wyrostek, Krzysztof; Tomczyk, Grzegorz; Pikuła, Anna

    2014-01-01

    In April/May 2013, four outbreaks of avian influenza virus (AIV) infections caused by H9N2 subtype were diagnosed in Poland in fattening turkey flocks exhibiting a drop in feed and water intake, depression, respiratory signs and mortality. The subsequent serological survey carried out on samples collected between June 2012 and September 2013 from 92 poultry flocks detected positive sera in two additional meat turkey flocks located in the same province. The analysis of amino acids in the haemagglutinin and neuraminidase glycoproteins revealed that the detected H9N2 viruses possessed molecular profiles suggestive of low pathogenicity, avian-like SAα2,3 receptor specificity and adaptation to domestic poultry. Phylogenetic studies showed that these H9N2 AIVs grouped within the Eurasian clade of wild bird-origin AIVs and had no relationship with H9N2 AIV circulating in poultry in the Middle East and Far East Asia over the past decade. Experimentally infected SPF chickens with the index-case H9N2 virus remained healthy throughout the experiment. On the other hand, ten 3-week-old commercial turkeys infected via the oculonasal route showed respiratory signs and mortality (2/10 birds). Additional diagnostic tests demonstrated the consistent presence of DNA/RNA of Ornithobacterium rhinotracheale, Bordetella avium and, less frequently, of astro-, rota-, reo-, parvo- and adenoviruses in turkeys both from field outbreaks and laboratory experiment. Although no microbiological culture was performed, we speculate that these secondary pathogens could play a role in the pathogenicity of the current H9N2 infections.

  11. Molecular Mechanism of the Airborne Transmissibility of H9N2 Avian Influenza A Viruses in Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Lei; Wang, Xiaoquan; Li, Qunhui; Liu, Dong; Chen, Hongzhi; Zhao, Mingjun; Gu, Xiaobing; He, Liang; Liu, Xiaowen; Gu, Min; Peng, Daxin

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT H9N2 avian influenza virus has been prevalent in poultry in many parts of the world since the 1990s and occasionally crosses the host barrier, transmitting to mammals, including humans. In recent years, these viruses have contributed genes to H5N1 and H7N9 influenza viruses, threatening public health. To explore the molecular mechanism for the airborne transmission of H9N2 virus, we compared two genetically close strains isolated from chickens in 2001, A/chicken/Shanghai/7/2001(SH7) and A/chicken/Shanghai/14/2001 (SH14). SH7 is airborne transmissible between chickens, whereas SH14 is not. We used reverse genetics and gene swapping to derive recombinant SH7 (rSH7), rSH14, and a panel of reassortant viruses. Among the reassortant viruses, we identified segments HA and PA as governing the airborne transmission among chickens. In addition, the NP and NS genes also contributed to a lesser extent. Furthermore, the mutational analyses showed the transmissibility phenotype predominantly mapped to the HA and PA genes, with HA-K363 and PA-L672 being important for airborne transmissibility among chickens. In addition, the viral infectivity and acid stability are related to the airborne transmissibility. Importantly, airborne transmission studies of 18 arbitrarily chosen H9N2 viruses from our collections confirmed the importance of both 363K in HA and 672L in PA in determining their levels of transmissibility. Our finding elucidates the genetic contributions to H9N2 transmissibility in chickens and highlights the importance of their prevalence in poultry. IMPORTANCE Our study investigates the airborne transmissibility of H9N2 viruses in chickens and the subsequent epidemic. H9N2 virus is the donor for several prevalent reassortant influenza viruses, such as H7N9/2013 and the H5N1 viruses. Poultry as the reservoir hosts of influenza virus is closely associated with human society. Airborne transmission is an efficient pathway for influenza virus transmission among

  12. Effects of Lactobacillus acidophilus and inulin on faecal viral shedding and immunization against H9 N2 Avian influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Poorbaghi, S L; Dadras, H; Gheisari, H R; Mosleh, N; Firouzi, S; Roohallazadeh, H

    2014-03-01

    The aims of this investigation were to compare the effects of Lactobacillus acidophilus addition as simple or microencapsulated (ME) probiotic and inulin as prebiotic to the broiler diet on the faecal viral shedding and immunization against avian influenza virus (AIV) with or without H9 N2 vaccination. Simple or ME forms of Lact. acidophilus, inulin and combination of them as synbiotic were analysed for their ability to enhance immunity against H9 N2 AIV and to decrease faecal viral shedding in Cobb-500 broiler chicks. Our results indicated that probiotic as ME form can decrease haemagglutination inhibition (HI) titre significantly on days 34 in vaccinated trial (P < 0·05). Also, the effects of ME form of probiotic are more remarkable on reduction of viral faecal shedding detected by RT-PCR. The study shows the significant role of microencapsulation on probiotic effects against H9 N2 AIV. The application of probiotics especially in the ME form could have the potential for stimulating the immune system, preventing influenza infection and consequently reduce faecal viral shedding of H9 N2 AIV. © 2013 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  13. Low pathogenic avian influenza (H9N2) in chicken: Evaluation of an ancestral H9-MVA vaccine.

    PubMed

    Ducatez, Mariette F; Becker, Jens; Freudenstein, Astrid; Delverdier, Maxence; Delpont, Mattias; Sutter, Gerd; Guérin, Jean-Luc; Volz, Asisa

    2016-06-30

    Modified Vaccinia Ankara (MVA) has proven its efficacy as a recombinant vector vaccine for numerous pathogens including influenza virus. The present study aimed at evaluating a recombinant MVA candidate vaccine against low pathogenic avian influenza virus subtype H9N2 in the chicken model. As the high genetic and antigenic diversity of H9N2 viruses increases vaccine design complexity, one strategy to widen the range of vaccine coverage is to use an ancestor sequence. We therefore generated a recombinant MVA encoding for the gene sequence of an ancestral hemagglutinin H9 protein (a computationally derived amino acid sequence of the node of the H9N2 G1 lineage strains was obtained using the ANCESCON program). We analyzed the genetics and the growth properties of the MVA vector virus confirming suitability for use under biosafety level 1 and tested its efficacy when applied either as an intra-muscular (IM) or an oral vaccine in specific pathogen free chickens challenged with A/chicken/Tunisia/12/2010(H9N2). Two control groups were studied in parallel (unvaccinated and inoculated birds; unvaccinated and non-inoculated birds). IM vaccinated birds seroconverted as early as four days post vaccination and neutralizing antibodies were detected against A/chicken/Tunisia/12/2010(H9N2) in all the birds before challenge. The role of local mucosal immunity is unclear here as no antibodies were detected in eye drop or aerosol vaccinated birds. Clinical signs were not detected in any of the infected birds even in absence of vaccination. Virus replication was observed in both vaccinated and unvaccinated chickens, suggesting the MVA-ancestral H9 vaccine may not stop virus spread in the field. However vaccinated birds showed less histological damage, fewer influenza-positive cells and shorter virus shedding than their unvaccinated counterparts. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Identification and characterisation of a novel anti-viral peptide against avian influenza virus H9N2

    PubMed Central

    Rajik, Mohamed; Jahanshiri, Fatemeh; Omar, Abdul Rahman; Ideris, Aini; Hassan, Sharifah Syed; Yusoff, Khatijah

    2009-01-01

    Background Avian influenza viruses (AIV) cause high morbidity and mortality among the poultry worldwide. Their highly mutative nature often results in the emergence of drug resistant strains, which have the potential of causing a pandemic. The virus has two immunologically important glycoproteins, hemagglutinin (HA), neuraminidase (NA), and one ion channel protein M2 which are the most important targets for drug discovery, on its surface. In order to identify a peptide-based virus inhibitor against any of these surface proteins, a disulfide constrained heptapeptide phage display library was biopanned against purified AIV sub-type H9N2 virus particles. Results After four rounds of panning, four different fusion phages were identified. Among the four, the phage displaying the peptide NDFRSKT possessed good anti-viral properties in vitro and in ovo. Further, this peptide inhibited the hemagglutination activity of the viruses but showed very little and no effect on neuraminidase and hemolytic activities respectively. The phage-antibody competition assay proved that the peptide competed with anti-influenza H9N2 antibodies for the binding sites. Based on yeast two-hybrid assay, we observed that the peptide inhibited the viral replication by interacting with the HA protein and this observation was further confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation. Conclusion Our findings show that we have successfully identified a novel antiviral peptide against avian influenza virus H9N2 which act by binding with the hemagglutination protein of the virus. The broad spectrum activity of the peptide molecule against various subtypes of the avian and human influenza viruses and its comparative efficiency against currently available anti-influenza drugs are yet to be explored. PMID:19497129

  15. Human infection with an avian influenza A (H9N2) virus in the middle region of China.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yiwei; Li, Xiaodan; Zhang, Hong; Chen, Bozhong; Jiang, Yonglin; Yang, Lei; Zhu, Wenfei; Hu, Shixiong; Zhou, Siyu; Tang, Yunli; Xiang, Xingyu; Li, Fangcai; Li, Wenchao; Gao, Lidong

    2015-10-01

    During the epidemic period of the novel H7N9 viruses, an influenza A (H9N2) virus was isolated from a 7-year-old boy with influenza-like illness in Yongzhou city of Hunan province in November 2013. To identify the possible source of infection, environmental specimens collected from local live poultry markets epidemiologically linked to the human case in Yongzhou city were tested for influenza type A and its subtypes H5, H7, and H9 using real-time RT-PCR methods as well as virus isolation, and four other H9N2 viruses were isolated. The real-time RT-PCR results showed that the environment was highly contaminated with avian influenza H9 subtype viruses (18.0%). Sequencing analyses revealed that the virus isolated from the patient, which was highly similar (98.5-99.8%) to one of isolates from environment in complete genome sequences, was of avian origin. Based on phylogenetic and antigenic analyses, it belonged to genotype S and Y280 lineage. In addition, the virus exhibited high homology (95.7-99.5%) of all six internal gene lineages with the novel H7N9 and H10N8 viruses which caused epidemic and endemic in China. Meanwhile, it carried several mammalian adapted molecular residues including Q226L in HA protein, L13P in PB1 protein, K356R, S409N in PA protein, V15I in M1 protein, I28V, L55F in M2 protein, and E227K in NS protein. These findings reinforce the significance of continuous surveillance of H9N2 influenza viruses.

  16. Attenuation of a human H9N2 influenza virus in mammalian host by reassortment with an avian influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Saito, T; Lim, W; Tashiro, M

    2004-07-01

    In order to develop a surrogate virus strain for production of an inactivated influenza vaccine against a human H9N2 virus, A/Hong Kong/1073/99 (HK1073: H9N2) was co-infected in embryonated chicken eggs with an apathogenic avian influenza virus, A/Duck/Czechoslovakia/56 (Dk/Cz: H4N6), for gene segment reassortment. Multiple-gene reassortants obtained were examined for replication in mammalian hosts in vitro and in vivo by infecting MDCK cells and by intranasal administration to hamsters, respectively. A 2-6 gene reassortant with both surface glycoproteins of HK1073 origin and the rest of Dk/Cz origin, HK/CZ-13, was shown to replicate poorly in the mammalian hosts both in vivo and in vitro comparing with HK1073, although this reassortant replicated as efficiently as each parental strain in embryonated eggs. No sequence difference was observed in the HA1 region between HK1073 and HK/CZ-13, indicating that the reassortant would be equivalent in its immunogenicity to the parental HK1073 strain when it is used as an inactivated vaccine. A virus strain with attenuation in mammalian hosts is preferable for production of an H9 vaccine, since it should reduce the risk of manufacturing-related infections of employees during the vaccine production. HK/CZ-13 can therefore be a surrogate strain for production of an inactivated vaccine as well as diagnostic antigens in case of a possible future pandemic caused by an HK1073-like H9 influenza virus.

  17. Infectivity and transmissibility of H9N2 avian influenza virus in chickens and wild terrestrial birds

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Genetic changes in avian influenza viruses influence their infectivity, virulence and transmission. Recently we identified a novel genotype of H9N2 viruses in widespread circulation in poultry in Pakistan that contained polymerases (PB2, PB1 and PA) and non-structural (NS) gene segments identical to highly pathogenic H7N3 viruses. Here, we investigated the potential of these viruses to cause disease and assessed the transmission capability of the virus within and between poultry and wild terrestrial avian species. Groups of broilers, layers, jungle fowl, quail, sparrows or crows were infected with a representative strain (A/chicken/UDL-01/08) of this H9N2 virus and then mixed with naïve birds of the same breed or species, or different species to examine transmission. With the exception of crows, all directly inoculated and contact birds showed clinical signs, varying in severity with quail showing the most pronounced clinical signs. Virus shedding was detected in all infected birds, with quail showing the greatest levels of virus secretion, but only very low levels of virus were found in directly infected crow samples. Efficient virus intra-species transmission was observed within each group with the exception of crows in which no evidence of transmission was seen. Interspecies transmission was examined between chickens and sparrows and vice versa and efficient transmission was seen in either direction. These results highlight the ease of spread of this group of H9N2 viruses between domesticated poultry and sparrows and show that sparrows need to be considered as a high risk species for transmitting H9N2 viruses between premises. PMID:24134616

  18. Predicting Avian Influenza Co-Infection with H5N1 and H9N2 in Northern Egypt.

    PubMed

    Young, Sean G; Carrel, Margaret; Malanson, George P; Ali, Mohamed A; Kayali, Ghazi

    2016-09-06

    Human outbreaks with avian influenza have been, so far, constrained by poor viral adaptation to non-avian hosts. This could be overcome via co-infection, whereby two strains share genetic material, allowing new hybrid strains to emerge. Identifying areas where co-infection is most likely can help target spaces for increased surveillance. Ecological niche modeling using remotely-sensed data can be used for this purpose. H5N1 and H9N2 influenza subtypes are endemic in Egyptian poultry. From 2006 to 2015, over 20,000 poultry and wild birds were tested at farms and live bird markets. Using ecological niche modeling we identified environmental, behavioral, and population characteristics of H5N1 and H9N2 niches within Egypt. Niches differed markedly by subtype. The subtype niches were combined to model co-infection potential with known occurrences used for validation. The distance to live bird markets was a strong predictor of co-infection. Using only single-subtype influenza outbreaks and publicly available ecological data, we identified areas of co-infection potential with high accuracy (area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC) 0.991).

  19. Predicting Avian Influenza Co-Infection with H5N1 and H9N2 in Northern Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Young, Sean G.; Carrel, Margaret; Malanson, George P.; Ali, Mohamed A.; Kayali, Ghazi

    2016-01-01

    Human outbreaks with avian influenza have been, so far, constrained by poor viral adaptation to non-avian hosts. This could be overcome via co-infection, whereby two strains share genetic material, allowing new hybrid strains to emerge. Identifying areas where co-infection is most likely can help target spaces for increased surveillance. Ecological niche modeling using remotely-sensed data can be used for this purpose. H5N1 and H9N2 influenza subtypes are endemic in Egyptian poultry. From 2006 to 2015, over 20,000 poultry and wild birds were tested at farms and live bird markets. Using ecological niche modeling we identified environmental, behavioral, and population characteristics of H5N1 and H9N2 niches within Egypt. Niches differed markedly by subtype. The subtype niches were combined to model co-infection potential with known occurrences used for validation. The distance to live bird markets was a strong predictor of co-infection. Using only single-subtype influenza outbreaks and publicly available ecological data, we identified areas of co-infection potential with high accuracy (area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC) 0.991). PMID:27608035

  20. Genetic characterization and protective immunity of cold-adapted attenuated avian H9N2 influenza vaccine.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joo Sub; Kim, Hyun Soo; Seo, Sang Heui

    2008-12-02

    H9N2 influenza viruses are endemic in many Asian countries including China and Korea, and cause a considerable economic loss to chicken industry by reduction in egg production and about 30% mortality. Here we developed live cold-adapted attenuated H9N2 influenza vaccine by adaptation of viruses in hen's eggs at 25 degrees C. Genetic analysis shows that the cold-adapted H9N2 (A/Chicken/Korea/S1/03) viruses contain a total of 44 amino acid substitutions, of which 7 amino acids are identical to the loci identified in the cold-adapted H2N2 (A/Ann Arbor/6/60) vaccine strain compared to genes in wild-type H9N2 (A/Chicken/Korea/S1/03) influenza viruses. When cold-adapted H9N2 (A/Chicken/Korea/S1/03) influenza viruses were inoculated in layers viruses were detectable in the tracheas, not in the lungs, no reduction of egg production and mortality was observed in contrast to the infection of wild-type H9N2 influenza viruses, and CD8+ T lymphocytes expressing IFN-gamma were induced. When layers vaccinated with cold-adapted attenuated H9N2 (A/Chicken/Korea/S1/03) influenza viruses were challenged with wild-type H9N2 (A/Chicken/Korea/521/04) influenza viruses, they were protected from the loss of egg production and mortality. Our results suggest that cold-adapted attenuated H9N2 vaccine can be used for controlling the infection of H9N2 influenza viruses in chickens.

  1. [Genetic analysis of the nonstructural gene (NS1) of H9N2 avian influenza viruses isolated in China].

    PubMed

    Li, Jian-Li; Chen, En-Lin; Li, He-Ping; Hao, Chun-Li; Bi, Ding-Ren; Wang, Ze-Lin

    2008-05-01

    The nonstructural genes (NS1) of nine H9N2 subtype avian influenza viruses isolated from diseased chickens on different farms during 1998-2005 were amplified by RT-PCR and completely sequenced. The nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences of NS1 genes of these isolates were compared. The results showed that NS1 genes of all H9N2 isolates contained 654 bp and encoded 217 amino acids. The homologies of the nucleotide and deduced amino sequences of the isolates were 95.4%-99.8% and 93.6%-100%, respectively. Comparison of the amino acid sequences of NS1 proteins of these isolates with other H9N2 viruses demonstrated that NS1 proteins of the nine strains had a deletion of 13 amino acid residues at the carboxyl terminus, which may be the molecule mark of the isolates in mainland China. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the NS1 genes of these isolates fell into the same lineage and belonged to allele A. Eight out of nine isolates belonged to the CK/SH/F/98-like lineage while only Ck/HN/A3/98 strain belonged to the Ck/HK/Y280/97-like linease. All the isolates were derived from Ck/BJ/1/94 strain which was the first isolate is mainland China in 1994. The results indicated that H9N2 subtype AIV appeared differentiation following the passage of time and the viruses belonging to Ck/SH/F/98-like acquired an epidemic spread advantage in chicken population in mainland China.

  2. Avian influenza H9N2 seroprevalence among pig population and pig farm staff in Shandong, China.

    PubMed

    Li, Song; Zhou, Yufa; Zhao, Yuxin; Li, Wenbo; Song, Wengang; Miao, Zengmin

    2015-03-01

    Shandong province of China has a large number of pig farms with the semi-enclosed houses, allowing crowds of wild birds to seek food in the pig houses. As the carriers of avian influenza virus (AIV), these wild birds can easily pass the viruses to the pigs and even the occupational swine-exposed workers. However, thus far, serological investigation concerning H9N2 AIV in pig population and pig farm staff in Shandong is sparse. To better understand the prevalence of H9N2 AIV in pig population and pig farm staff in Shandong, the serum samples of pigs and occupational pig-exposed workers were collected and tested for the antibodies for H9N2 AIV by both hemagglutination inhibition (HI) and micro-neutralization (MN) assays. When using the antibody titers ≥40 as cut-off value, 106 (HI: 106/2176, 4.87%) and 84 (MN: 84/2176, 3.86%) serum samples of pigs were tested positive, respectively; 6 (HI: 6/287, 2.09%) and 4 (MN: 4/287, 1.39%) serum samples of the pig farm staff were positive, respectively; however, serum samples from the control humans were tested negative in both HI and MN assays. These findings revealed that there were H9N2 AIV infections in pig population and pig farm staff in Shandong, China. Therefore, it is of utmost importance to conduct the long-term surveillance of AIV in pig population and the pig farm staff.

  3. Evaluation of Immune Response Against Inactivated Avian Influenza (H9N2) Vaccine, by Using Chitosan Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Khalili, Iraj; Ghadimipour, Rahim; Sadigh Eteghad, Saeed; Fathi Najafi, Mohsen; Ebrahimi, Mohammad Majid; Godsian, Naser; Sefidi Heris, Yousef; Khalili, Mohammad Taghi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Influenza A is a virus that affects a wide range of animals and also human beings. Avian influenza virus (AIV) subtype H9N2 has the potential to create influenza pandemic and vaccination is a common solution for this problem. The vaccine, used for rapid intervention, should be safe to use and highly effective, after a single administration. Chitosan nanoparticles (CNP) have already been recommended as a new adjuvant for inactivated AIV H9N2 vaccine immunization. Objectives: This study aimed at the evaluation and better understanding of optimum concentration of CNP preparations and also, assessment of loading capacity of AIV into CNP, as an adjuvant in specific pathogen-free (SPF) chickens. Materials and Methods: For measurement of vaccine-antibody response, different types of CNP were injected intramuscularly, in a single dose, to 21-day-old specific pathogen-free chickens. Chickens were monitored for the efficacy of the nanoparticles and, also, their immune response, during a follow up of 7 weeks, by using hemagglutination-inhibition (HI) test. The CNP were prepared according to modified ionic gelation method and inactivated antigen was loaded in four hemagglutinin units (HAU) concentrations. Loading capacity of nanoparticles was determined by hemagglutination (HA) method. Inactivated A/H9N2 AIV was mixed with chitosan of low molecular weight. Results: The CNP did not cause any mortality or side effects, when chickens were administered the prepared vaccine. The results strongly showed that this novel vaccine significantly enhances the immunogenicity of inactivated AIV, comparing with ISA70 (SEPPIC, Puteaux, France) adjuvant that is used routinely in the Razi Serum and Vaccine Research and Production Institute, Karaj, Iran, to reduce ISA70’s side effects. Conclusions: The AIV loaded into CNP vaccines induce appropriate antibody titers, after a single immunization, while requiring a low dose of antigen. The CNP also represent an interesting new

  4. Mycoplasma synoviae vaccine modifies virus shedding and immune responses of avian influenza (H9N2) infection in commercial layers.

    PubMed

    Umar, Sajid; Tanweer, Muhammad; Iqbal, Mudassar; Shahzad, Asad; Hassan, Farooq; Usman, Muhammad; Sarwar, Fozia; Qadir, Hajra; Asif, Sajjad; Un-Nisa, Qamar; Younus, Muhammad; Ali, Asif; Akbar, Mehboob; Towakal, Farhan; Shah, Muhammad Ali

    2017-09-01

    Mycoplasma synoviae (MS) is an important pathogen of domestic poultry and is prevalent in commercial layers. Avian influenza (AI; H9N2) infections are emerging respiratory problems causing huge economic losses to the poultry industry, especially in the presence of other co-infecting pathogens. The possible role of MS vaccination and response to AI (H9N2) virus in commercial layers was evaluated during this study. Experimental commercial layers were divided into different groups which were identified as follows: non-vaccinated non-challenged (NVNC), non-vaccinated challenged (NVC), vaccinated non-challenged (VNC), and vaccinated challenged (VC). The titer of AI antibodies was measured pre- and post-challenge to confirm experimental infection. Infected layers showed clinical signs of differing severity, with the most prominent disease signs and mortality (25%) appearing in layers of the VC group. Moreover, the layers in VC group showed a significant decrease in weight and enhanced gross lesions. All infected layers showed positive results for virus shedding; however, the pattern of virus shedding was different, with layers of VC group showing more pronounced virus excretion than the layers in the NVC group. In addition, layers of VC group showed significantly reduced antibody responses and interferon gene expression when compared with the layers of NVC group. The present study revealed that MS vaccine could facilitate replication of avian influenza viruses and thus avian influenza virus infections can be worse after MS vaccination, especially in AIV-endemic areas. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Poultry Science Association 2017.

  5. Endemic Variation of H9N2 Avian Influenza Virus in China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu-Fu; Lai, Han-Zhang; Li, Lin; Liu, Yu-Peng; Zhang, Wen-Yan; Gao, Ren; Huang, Wen-Ke; Luo, Qin-Fang; Gao, Yan; Luo, Qiong; Xie, Xiao-Yu; Xu, Jia-Hua; Chen, Rui-Ai

    2016-12-01

    Forty-two H9N2 subtype AIV strains were isolated from vaccinated commercial chickens in China from 2012 to 2015. Their HA genes had nucleotide sequence homology from 86.7% to 99.7%, and similarity to the classic vaccine strain was 88.6%-92.6%. A comparison was carried out with published HA genes (410 H9 strains) and whole genomes (306 strains) isolated in China during 2012-2015. Interestingly, 99.1% (448/452) of Chinese H9N2 AIV belonged to lineage h9.4.2, and 98.5% (445/452) of the viruses belonged to h9.4.2.5. Meanwhile, 99.6% (443/445) of lineage 9.4.2.5 viruses had PSRSSR↓GLF instead of PARSSR↓GLF motifs in the HA cleavage sites; 98.2% (444/452) of HA genes showed human receptor binding associated mutation Q226L. A total of 96.8% (337/348) of the viruses had three amino-acid deletions at 63-65 in the NA stalk, associated with enhanced virulence in chickens and mice; 97.1% (338/348) of M2 proteins had the S31N mutation associated with adamantane resistance in humans. Two H9 viruses isolated in this study were highly homologous to the human-origin H9N2 virus reported in 2013. The isolates were divided into four different genotypes (U, S, V, and W). Genotype S was the major one, accounting for 94.8% (330/348). Genotypes V and W were new reassortment genotypes, with genotype W recombined with the PB2 gene originating from the new wild waterfowl-like lineage. According to the cross-HI antibody titer data, HA gene evolution, and isolation history, the isolates were divided into A, B, and C antigenic groups successively. All the antigenic group viruses were found to circulate throughout China. This study emphasizes the importance of updated vaccine and strengthened veterinary biosecurity on poultry farms and trade markets.

  6. Transmissibility of novel H7N9 and H9N2 avian influenza viruses between chickens and ferrets.

    PubMed

    Ku, Keun Bon; Park, Eun Hye; Yum, Jung; Kim, Heui Man; Kang, Young Myong; Kim, Jeong Cheol; Kim, Ji An; Kim, Hyun Soo; Seo, Sang Heui

    2014-02-01

    Previous studies have shown that the H7N9 avian influenza virus cannot be transmitted efficiently between ferrets via respiratory droplets. Here, we studied the infectivity of the H7N9 avian influenza virus in chickens and its transmissibility from infected to naïve chickens and ferrets. The H7N9 virus (A/Anhui/1/2013) replicated poorly in chickens and could not be transmitted efficiently from infected chickens to naïve chickens and ferrets. H7N9 virus was shed from chicken tracheae for only 2 days after infection and from chicken cloacae for only 1 day after infection, while the H9N2 avian influenza virus, which is endemic in chickens in many Asian countries, was shed from tracheae and cloacae for 8 days after infection. Taken together, our results suggest that chickens may be a poor agent of transmission for the H7N9 virus to other chickens and to mammals, including humans.

  7. Effects of dietary supplementation of mannan-oligosaccharide on virus shedding in avian influenza (H9N2) challenged broilers

    PubMed Central

    Akhtar, T.; Ara, G.; Ali, N.; ud Din Mufti, F.; Imran Khan, M.

    2016-01-01

    Avian influenza (AI) is a highly contagious disease causing significant economic losses worldwide. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of mannan-oligosaccharide (MOS) on tracheal and cloacal virus shedding in AI challenged broilers and contamination of environment with H9N2. A total of 300 1-day-old-broiler chicks were randomly divided into 3 groups (A, B and C) and supplemented 0.2, 0.5 and 0.0% MOS, respectively in NRC recommended diet for 36 days. On day 21 the groups were further split into two sub groups A+ve, A-ve, B+ve, B-ve, C+ve and C-ve with 5 replicates each. The positive groups were shifted to remote sheds and were challenged intranasally with 0.1 ml of reference virus (AIV; Pk-UDL/01/08 H9N2) with EID50 = 10-6.66. Treatment reduces (P<0.05) cloacal virus shedding from day 24 to 26 and 28 to 32. Tracheal virus shedding was lower (P<0.05) on days 25-26 and 28-30 in treatment groups. Day 27 showed highest (P>0.05) virus shedding in all groups. However the reduction of viral shedding is faster in treatment groups and showed no virus shedding on day 32. Maternal antibody titer against AI showed a declining pattern but MOS influenced (P<0.05) the titer in treated groups. Hence the use of MOS may constitute a novel and effective plausible alternative that reduces the spread of disease by decreasing virus shedding and contamination of environment from AIV (H9N2) infection in poultry. PMID:28224012

  8. Genome Sequence of an H9N2 Avian Influenza Virus Strain with Hemagglutinin-Neuraminidase Combination, Isolated from a Quail in Guangxi, Southern China.

    PubMed

    Xie, Liji; Xie, Zhixun; Li, Dan; Luo, Sisi; Zhang, Minxiu; Huang, Li; Xie, Zhiqin; Huang, Jiaoling; Zhang, Yanfang; Zeng, Tingting; Deng, Xianwen

    2017-09-21

    We isolated a strain of H9N2 avian influenza virus from a quail in southern China in May 2015 and named it A/quail/Guangxi/198Q39/2015. All eight gene segments of the strain were sequenced. Sequence analysis indicated that the amino acid motif of the hemagglutinin cleavage site of this H9N2 virus was RSSR↓GLF, which is a typical characteristic of the low pathogenic avian influenza virus. This study will help in better understanding the epidemiology and molecular characteristics of avian influenza virus in wild birds. Copyright © 2017 Xie et al.

  9. Reassortant Avian Influenza A(H9N2) viruses in chickens in retail poultry shops, Pakistan, 2009-2010.

    PubMed

    Chaudhry, Mamoona; Angot, Angélique; Rashid, Hamad B; Cattoli, Giovanni; Hussain, Manzoor; Trovò, Giulia; Drago, Alessandra; Valastro, Viviana; Thrusfield, Michael; Welburn, Sue; Eisler, Mark C; Capua, Ilaria

    2015-04-01

    Phylogenetic analysis of influenza viruses collected during December 2009-February 2010 from chickens in live poultry retail shops in Lahore, Pakistan, showed influenza A(H9N2) lineage polymerase and nonstructural genes generate through inter- and intrasubtypic reassortments. Many amino acid signatures observed were characteristic of human isolates; hence, their circulation could enhance inter- or intrasubtypic reassortment.

  10. The infection of turkeys and chickens by reassortants derived from pandemic H1N1 2009 and avian H9N2 influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Sun, Honglei; Kong, Weili; Liu, Litao; Qu, Yi; Li, Chong; Shen, Ye; Zhou, Yu; Wang, Yu; Wu, Sizhe; Pu, Juan; Liu, Jinhua; Sun, Yipeng

    2015-06-01

    Outbreaks of pandemic H1N1 2009 (pH1N1) in turkeys have been reported in several countries. Co-infection of pH1N1 and avian H9N2 influenza viruses in turkeys provide the opportunity for their reassortment, and novel reassortant viruses might further be transmitted to other avian species. However, virulence and transmission of those reassortant viruses in poultry remain unclear. In the present study, we generated 16 single-gene reassortant influenza viruses including eight reassortants on the pH1N1 background by individual replacement with a corresponding gene segment from H9N2 and eight reassortants on the H9N2 background replaced individually with corresponding gene from pH1N1, and characterized reassortants viruses in turkeys and chickens. We found that the pH1N1 virus dramatically increased its infectivity and transmissibility in turkeys and chickens after introducing any gene (except for PB2) from H9N2 virus, and H9N2 virus acquired single gene (except for HA) of pH1N1 almost did not influence its replication and transmission in turkeys and chickens. Additionally, 13 reassortant viruses transmitted from turkeys to chickens. Our results indicate that turkeys and chickens are susceptible to pH1N1-H9N2 reassortant viruses, and mixing breeding of different avian species would facilitate the transmission of these reassortant viruses.

  11. PB2-Q591K Mutation Determines the Pathogenicity of Avian H9N2 Influenza Viruses for Mammalian Species

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Congrong; Lee, Horace Hok Yeung; Yang, Zi Feng; Mok, Chris Ka Pun; Zhang, Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Background Influenza A subtype H9N2 is widespread and prevalent in poultry. It has repeatedly transmitted zoonotically to cause mild influenza-like illness in humans and is regarded as a potential pandemic candidate. In additon, the six internal genes of H7N9 and H10N8 viruses which caused infection in human in China as well as some of the highly pathogenic H5N1 strains are origined from H9N2. Previous studies have shown that the mammalian adaptation PB2-Q591K contributes to the pathogenicity of H5N1 and H7N9 viruses. However, the role of the PB2-Q591K mutation in H9N2 subtype is still not well understood. Methods To define and compare the individual role of PB2-Q591K substitution in the PB2 gene segment of H9N2 in relation to polymerase activity, replication competence and the pathogenicity using in vitro and in vivo models. Results The PB2-Q591K mutation in H9N2 virus enhanced the polymerase activity and virus replication in human NHBE cells when compared to the wild type strain. Mice infected with the PB2 mutant showed significant weight loss, higher virus replication and immune responses in the lungs. Conclusions Our evidences suggest that the PB2-Q591K, in addition to the -E627K mutation in H9N2 enhanced the pathogenicity in mammalian host. PMID:27684944

  12. Cocirculation of avian H9N2 and contemporary "human" H3N2 influenza A viruses in pigs in southeastern China: potential for genetic reassortment?

    PubMed

    Peiris, J S; Guan, Y; Markwell, D; Ghose, P; Webster, R G; Shortridge, K F

    2001-10-01

    Pigs are permissive to both human and avian influenza viruses and have been proposed to be an intermediate host for the genesis of pandemic influenza viruses through reassortment or adaptation of avian viruses. Prospective virological surveillance carried out between March 1998 and June 2000 in Hong Kong, Special Administrative Region, People's Republic of China, on pigs imported from southeastern China, provides the first evidence of interspecies transmission of avian H9N2 viruses to pigs and documents their cocirculation with contemporary human H3N2 (A/Sydney/5/97-like, Sydney97-like) viruses. All gene segments of the porcine H9N2 viruses were closely related to viruses similar to chicken/Beijing/1/94 (H9N2), duck/Hong Kong/Y280/97 (H9N2), and the descendants of the latter virus lineage. Phylogenetic analysis suggested that repeated interspecies transmission events had occurred from the avian host to pigs. The Sydney97-like (H3N2) viruses isolated from pigs were related closely to contemporary human H3N2 viruses in all gene segments and had not undergone genetic reassortment. Cocirculation of avian H9N2 and human H3N2 viruses in pigs provides an opportunity for genetic reassortment leading to the emergence of viruses with pandemic potential.

  13. Antiviral activity of the oseltamivir and Melissa officinalis L. essential oil against avian influenza A virus (H9N2).

    PubMed

    Pourghanbari, Gholamhosein; Nili, Hasan; Moattari, Afagh; Mohammadi, Ali; Iraji, Aida

    2016-06-01

    Lemon balm derivatives are going to acquire a novelty as natural and potent remedy for treatment of viral infections since the influenza viruses are developing resistance to the current antivirals widely. Oseltamivir, Melissa officinalis essential oil (MOEO) and their synergistic efficacy against avian influenza virus (AIV) subtype H9N2 were evaluated in vitro in MDCK cells at different time exposure by using TCID50, HA, Real Time PCR and HI assay. The results showed that MOEO could inhibit replication of AVI through the different virus replication phase (P ≤ 0.05). Also the highest antiviral activity of MOEO was seen when AIV incubated with MOEO before cell infection. The TCID50/ml was reduced 1.3-2.1, 2.3-2.8, 3.7-4.5 log 10 than control group (5.6 log 10), HAU/50 µl was decreased 85-94, 71.4-94, 71.4-94 % and viral genome copy number/µl was brought down 68-95, 90-100, 89.6-99.9 % at pre-infection, post-infection and simultaneous stage, respectively. Hemagglutination inhibition result showed the MOEO was not able to inhibit agglutination of the chicken red blood cell (cRBC). Replication of the AVI was suppressed by the different concentration of oseltamivir completely or near 100 %. Also oseltamivir showed a synergistic activity with MOEO especially when oseltamivir concentration reduced under 0.005 mg/ml. The chemical composition was examined by GC-MS analysis and Its main constituents were identified as monoterpenaldehydes citral a, citral b. In conclusion, the findings of the study showed that lemon balm essential oil could inhibit influenza virus replication through different replication cycle steps especially throughout the direct interaction with the virus particles.

  14. Reassortant Avian Influenza A(H5N1) Viruses with H9N2-PB1 Gene in Poultry, Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Yamage, Mat; Dauphin, Gwenaëlle; Claes, Filip; Ahmed, Garba; Giasuddin, Mohammed; Salviato, Annalisa; Ormelli, Silvia; Bonfante, Francesco; Schivo, Alessia; Cattoli, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Bangladesh has reported a high number of outbreaks of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) (H5N1) in poultry. We identified a natural reassortant HPAI (H5N1) virus containing a H9N2-PB1 gene in poultry in Bangladesh. Our findings highlight the risks for prolonged co-circulation of avian influenza viruses and the need to monitor their evolution. PMID:24047513

  15. Up-Regulation of Pro-Inflammatory Cytokines and Chemokine Production in Avian Influenza H9N2 Virus-Infected Human Lung Epithelial Cell Line (A549).

    PubMed

    Farzin, Hamidreza; Toroghi, Reza; Haghparast, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Influenza H9N2 virus mostly infects avian species but poses a potential health risk to humans. Little is known about the mammalian host immune responses to H9N2 virus. To obtain insight into the innate immune responses of human lung epithelial cells to the avian H9N2 virus, the expressions of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokine in the human airway epithelial cells infected with avian H9N2 virus were examined by real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). H9N2 virus was able to cultivate in the human lung epithelial cell line (A549) and stimulate production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6) and chemokine (IL-8). Expressions of cytokine genes were up-regulated to a significantly higher level for IL-1β (p < 0.01), IL-6 (p < 0.01 after 12 hours and p < 0.05 after 24 hours) and IL-8 (p < 0.01 after 12 hours and p < 0.001 after 24 hours) in virus-cultured A549 cells as compared with non-virus-cultured cells. The amount of IL-6 and IL-1β proteins secreted into the culture medium was also increased after virus culture infection of A549 cell line compared to non-virus-cultured A549 cells and were significant in both IL-1β (p < 0.05 in 18 hours and p < 0.001 in 24-48 hours harvested supernatant) and IL-6 (p < 0.001). Silencing the p65 component of NF-κB in A549 cells suppressed the stimulatory effects of influenza virus on secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokine. The findings in this study will broaden our understanding of host innate immune mechanisms and the pathogenesis of H9N2 influenza viruses in human respiratory epithelium.

  16. Reassortant H5N1 avian influenza viruses containing PA or NP gene from an H9N2 virus significantly increase the pathogenicity in mice.

    PubMed

    Hao, Xiaoli; Hu, Jiao; Wang, Jiongjiong; Xu, Jing; Cheng, Hao; Xu, Yunpeng; Li, Qunhui; He, Dongchang; Liu, Xiaowen; Wang, Xiaoquan; Gu, Min; Hu, Shunlin; Xu, Xiulong; Liu, Huimou; Chen, Sujuan; Peng, Daxin; Liu, Xiufan

    2016-08-30

    Reassortment between different influenza viruses is a crucial way to generate novel influenza viruses with unpredictable virulence and transmissibility, which may threaten the public health. As currently in China, avian influenza viruses (AIVs) of H9N2 and H5N1 subtypes are endemic in poultry in many areas, while they are prone to reassort with each other naturally. In order to evaluate the risk of the reassortment to public health, A/Goose/Jiangsu/k0403/2010 [GS/10(H5N1)] virus was used as a backbone to generate a series of reassortants, each contained a single internal gene derived from the predominant S genotype of the A/Chicken/Jiangsu/WJ57/2012 [WJ/57(H9N2)]. We next assessed the biological characteristics of these assortments, including pathogenicity, replication efficiency and polymerase activity. We found that the parental WJ/57(H9N2) and GS/10(H5N1) viruses displayed high genetic compatibility. Notably, the H5N1 reassortants containing the PA or NP gene from WJ/57(H9N2) virus significantly increased virulence and replication ability in mice, as well as markedly enhanced polymerase activity. Our results indicate that the endemicity of H9N2 and H5N1 in domestic poultry greatly increases the possibility of generating new viruses by reassortment that may pose a great threat to poultry industry and public health. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Protection against avian influenza H9N2 virus challenge by immunization with hemagglutinin- or neuraminidase-expressing DNA in BALB/c mice

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu Meizhen; Fang Fang; Chen Yan; Wang Hualin; Chen Quanjiao; Chang Haiyan; Wang Fuyan; Wang Hanzhong; Zhang Ran; Chen Ze . E-mail: chenze2005@263.net

    2006-05-19

    Avian influenza viruses of H9N2 subtype are widely spread in avian species. The viruses have recently been transmitted to mammalian species, including humans, accelerating the efforts to devise protective strategies against them. In this study, an avian influenza H9N2 virus strain (A/Chicken/Jiangsu/7/2002), isolated in Jiangsu Province, China, was used to infect BALB/c mice for adaptation. After five lung-to-lung passages, the virus was stably proliferated in a large quantity in the murine lung and caused the deaths of mice. In addition, we explored the protection induced by H9N2 virus hemagglutinin (HA)- and neuraminidase (NA)-expressing DNAs in BALB/c mice. Female BALB/c mice aged 6-8 weeks were immunized once or twice at a 3-week interval with HA-DNA and NA-DNA by electroporation, respectively, each at a dose of 3, 10 or 30 {mu}g. The mice were challenged with a lethal dose (40x LD{sub 5}) of influenza H9N2 virus four weeks after immunization once or one week after immunization twice. The protections of DNA vaccines were evaluated by the serum antibody titers, residual lung virus titers, and survival rates of the mice. The result showed that immunization once with not less than 10 {mu}g or twice with 3 {mu}g HA-DNA or NA-DNA provided effective protection against homologous avian influenza H9N2 virus.

  18. Expression profile and histological distribution of IFITM1 and IFITM3 during H9N2 avian influenza virus infection in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Yu, Meng; Qi, Wenbao; Huang, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Kaizhao; Ye, Jinhui; Liu, Rongchang; Wang, Heng; Ma, Yongjiang; Liao, Ming; Ning, Zhangyong

    2015-08-01

    The H9N2 avian influenza virus is a pandemic threat which has repeatedly caused infection in humans and shows enhanced replication and transmission in mice. Previous reports showed that host factors, the interferon-inducible transmembrane (IFITM) protein, can block the replication of pathogens and affect their pathogenesis. BALB/c mice are routine laboratory animals used in influenza virus research, but the effects of H9N2 influenza virus on tissue distribution and expression pattern of IFITM in these mice are unknown. Here, we investigated the expression patterns and tissue distribution of IFITM1 and IFITM3 in BALB/c mice by infection with H9N2 AIV strains with only a PB2 residue 627 difference. The results showed that the expression patterns of ITITM1 and IFITM3 differ in various tissues of BALB/c mice at different time points after infection. IFITM1 and IFITM3 showed cell- and tissue-specific distribution in the lung, heart, liver, spleen, kidney and brain. Notably, the epithelial and neuronal cells all expressed the proteins of IFITM1 and IFITM3. Our results provide the first look at differences in IFITM1 and IFITM3 expression patterns in BALB/c mice infected by H9N2 influenza viruses. This will enhance research on the interaction between AIV and host and further will elucidate the pathogenesis of influenza virus infection based on the interferon-inducible transmembrane (IFITM) protein.

  19. Serological and virological surveillance of avian influenza A virus H9N2 subtype in humans and poultry in Shanghai, China, between 2008 and 2010.

    PubMed

    Wang, Q; Ju, L; Liu, P; Zhou, J; Lv, X; Li, L; Shen, H; Su, H; Jiang, L; Jiang, Q

    2015-03-01

    We report the serological evidence of low-pathogenic avian influenza (LPAI) H9N2 infection in an occupational poultry-exposed population and a general population. A serological survey of an occupational poultry-exposed population and a general population was conducted using a haemagglutinin-inhibiting (HI) assay in Shanghai, China, from January 2008 to December 2010. Evidence of higher anti-H9 antibodies was found in serum samples collected from poultry workers. During this period, 239 H9N2 avian influenza viruses (AIVs) were isolated from 9297 tracheal and cloacal paired specimens collected from the poultry in live poultry markets. In addition, a total of 733 influenza viruses were isolated from 1569 nasal and throat swabs collected from patients with influenza-like symptoms in a sentinel hospital, which include H3N2, H1N1, pandemic H1N1 and B, but no H9N2 virus was detected. These findings highlight the need for long-term surveillance of avian influenza viruses in occupational poultry-exposed workers. © 2014 The Authors. Zoonoses and Public Health Published by Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  20. Serological and Virological Surveillance of Avian Influenza A Virus H9N2 Subtype in Humans and Poultry in Shanghai, China, Between 2008 and 2010

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Q; Ju, L; Liu, P; Zhou, J; Lv, X; Li, L; Shen, H; Su, H; Jiang, L; Jiang, Q

    2015-01-01

    We report the serological evidence of low-pathogenic avian influenza (LPAI) H9N2 infection in an occupational poultry-exposed population and a general population. A serological survey of an occupational poultry-exposed population and a general population was conducted using a haemagglutinin-inhibiting (HI) assay in Shanghai, China, from January 2008 to December 2010. Evidence of higher anti-H9 antibodies was found in serum samples collected from poultry workers. During this period, 239 H9N2 avian influenza viruses (AIVs) were isolated from 9297 tracheal and cloacal paired specimens collected from the poultry in live poultry markets. In addition, a total of 733 influenza viruses were isolated from 1569 nasal and throat swabs collected from patients with influenza-like symptoms in a sentinel hospital, which include H3N2, H1N1, pandemic H1N1 and B, but no H9N2 virus was detected. These findings highlight the need for long-term surveillance of avian influenza viruses in occupational poultry-exposed workers. PMID:24803167

  1. Heterologous Humoral Response against H5N1, H7N3, and H9N2 Avian Influenza Viruses after Seasonal Vaccination in a European Elderly Population.

    PubMed

    Sanz, Ivan; Rojo, Silvia; Tamames, Sonia; Eiros, José María; Ortiz de Lejarazu, Raúl

    2017-07-17

    Avian influenza viruses are currently one of the main threats to human health in the world. Although there are some screening reports of antibodies against these viruses in humans from Western countries, most of these types of studies are conducted in poultry and market workers of Asian populations. The presence of antibodies against avian influenza viruses was evaluated in an elderly European population. An experimental study was conducted, including pre- and post-vaccine serum samples obtained from 174 elderly people vaccinated with seasonal influenza vaccines of 2006-2007, 2008-2009, 2009-2010, and 2010-2011 Northern Hemisphere vaccine campaigns. The presence of antibodies against A/H5N1, A/H7N3, and A/H9N2 avian influenza viruses were tested by using haemaglutination inhibition assays. Globally, heterotypic antibodies were found before vaccination in 2.9% of individuals against A/H5N1, 1.2% against A/H7N3, and 25.9% against A/H9N2. These pre-vaccination antibodies were present at titers ≥1/40 in 1.1% of individuals against A/H5N1, in 1.1% against H7N3, and in 0.6% against the A/H9N2 subtype. One 76 year-old male showed pre-vaccine antibodies (Abs) against those three avian influenza viruses, and another three individuals presented Abs against two different viruses. Seasonal influenza vaccination induced a significant number of heterotypic seroconversions against A/H5N1 (14.4%) and A/H9N2 (10.9%) viruses, but only one seroconversion was observed against the A/H7N3 subtype. After vaccination, four individuals showed Abs titers ≥1/40 against those three avian viruses, and 55 individuals against both A/H5N1 and A/H9N2. Seasonal vaccination is able to induce some weak heterotypic responses to viruses of avian origin in elderly individuals with no previous exposure to them. However, this response did not accomplish the European Medicament Agency criteria for influenza vaccine efficacy. The results of this study show that seasonal vaccines induce a broad response

  2. A Case-Control Study to Identify Risk Factors Associated with Avian Influenza Subtype H9N2 on Commercial Poultry Farms in Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhry, Mamoona; Rashid, Hamad B.; Thrusfield, Michael; Welburn, Sue; Bronsvoort, Barend MdeC.

    2015-01-01

    A 1:1 matched case-control study was conducted to identify risk factors for avian influenza subtype H9N2 infection on commercial poultry farms in 16 districts of Punjab, and 1 administrative unit of Pakistan. One hundred and thirty-three laboratory confirmed positive case farms were matched on the date of sample submission with 133 negative control farms. The association between a series of farm-level characteristics and the presence or absence of H9N2 was assessed by univariable analysis. Characteristics associated with H9N2 risk that passed the initial screening were included in a multivariable conditional logistic regression model. Manual and automated approaches were used, which produced similar models. Key risk factors from all approaches included selling of eggs/birds directly to live bird retail stalls, being near case/infected farms, a previous history of infectious bursal disease (IBD) on the farm and having cover on the water storage tanks. The findings of current study are in line with results of many other studies conducted in various countries to identify similar risk factors for AI subtype H9N2 infection. Enhancing protective measures and controlling risks identified in this study could reduce spread of AI subtype H9N2 and other AI viruses between poultry farms in Pakistan. PMID:25774768

  3. A case-control study to identify risk factors associated with avian influenza subtype H9N2 on commercial poultry farms in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Chaudhry, Mamoona; Rashid, Hamad B; Thrusfield, Michael; Welburn, Sue; Bronsvoort, Barend MdeC

    2015-01-01

    A 1:1 matched case-control study was conducted to identify risk factors for avian influenza subtype H9N2 infection on commercial poultry farms in 16 districts of Punjab, and 1 administrative unit of Pakistan. One hundred and thirty-three laboratory confirmed positive case farms were matched on the date of sample submission with 133 negative control farms. The association between a series of farm-level characteristics and the presence or absence of H9N2 was assessed by univariable analysis. Characteristics associated with H9N2 risk that passed the initial screening were included in a multivariable conditional logistic regression model. Manual and automated approaches were used, which produced similar models. Key risk factors from all approaches included selling of eggs/birds directly to live bird retail stalls, being near case/infected farms, a previous history of infectious bursal disease (IBD) on the farm and having cover on the water storage tanks. The findings of current study are in line with results of many other studies conducted in various countries to identify similar risk factors for AI subtype H9N2 infection. Enhancing protective measures and controlling risks identified in this study could reduce spread of AI subtype H9N2 and other AI viruses between poultry farms in Pakistan.

  4. [Genetic characterization of the entire genome of an H9N2 avian influenza virus A/Chicken/Shanghai/F/98].

    PubMed

    Lu, Jianhong; Liu, Xiufan; Shao, Weixing; Zhang, Pinghu; Wei, Dongping

    2003-08-01

    Eight full-length genes of an H9N2 subtype avian influenza virus A/Chicken/Shanghai/F/ 98(H9N2), were amplified by RT-PCR and rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) and sequenced. The results of phylogenetic analysis showed that A/Chicken/Shanghai/F/98 was entirely different from Quail/Hong Kong/G1/97 which was directly related to human infection with avian influenza virus in Hong Kong, whereas its HA, NA, M and NS genes belonged to A/Chicken/Beijing/ 1/94-like sublineage with the nucleotide homology of 96.7%, 96.4%, 97.5% and 98.0% respectively. The homology of NA gene between A/Chicken/Shanghai/F/98 and A/Duck/Hong Kong/Y280/ 97 was 97.4% and they both lost 9 nucleotides between nt 205 to 206. However, the PB2, PB1, PA, NP genes did not show any close relationship with those of the three known sublineages and the later three didn't share immediate ancestors with available isolates whose sequences had been reported. Therefore, A/Chicken/Shanghai/F/98 is a product of natural reassortment between H9N2 avian influenza viruses from different sublineages.

  5. Evolutionary trajectories and diagnostic challenges of potentially zoonotic avian influenza viruses H5N1 and H9N2 co-circulating in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Naguib, Mahmoud M; Arafa, Abdel-Satar A; El-Kady, Magdy F; Selim, Abdullah A; Gunalan, Vithiagaran; Maurer-Stroh, Sebastian; Goller, Katja V; Hassan, Mohamed K; Beer, Martin; Abdelwhab, E M; Harder, Timm C

    2015-08-01

    In Egypt, since 2006, descendants of the highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HP AIV) H5N1 of clade 2.2 continue to cause sharp losses in poultry production and seriously threaten public health. Potentially zoonotic H9N2 viruses established an endemic status in poultry in Egypt as well and co-circulate with HP AIV H5N1 rising concerns of reassortments between H9N2 and H5N1 viruses along with an increase of mixed infections of poultry. Nucleotide sequences of whole genomes of 15 different isolates (H5N1: 7; H9N2: 8), and of the hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) encoding segments of nine further clinical samples (H5N1: 2; H9N2: 7) from 2013 and 2014 were generated and analysed. The HA of H5N1 viruses clustered with clade 2.2.1 while the H9 HA formed three distinguishable subgroups within cluster B viruses. BEAST analysis revealed that H9N2 viruses are likely present in Egypt since 2009. Several previously undescribed substituting mutations putatively associated with host tropism and virulence modulation were detected in different proteins of the analysed H9N2 and H5N1 viruses. Reassortment between HP AIV H5N1 and H9N2 is anticipated in Egypt, and timely detection of such events is of public health concern. As a rapid tool for detection of such reassortants discriminative SYBR-Green reverse transcription real-time PCR assays (SG-RT-qPCR), targeting the internal genes of the Egyptian H5N1 and H9N2 viruses were developed for the rapid screening of viral RNAs from both virus isolates and clinical samples. However, in accordance to Sanger sequencing, no reassortants were found by SG-RT-qPCR. Nevertheless, the complex epidemiology of avian influenza in poultry in Egypt will require sustained close observation. Further development and continuing adaptation of rapid and cost-effective screening assays such as the SG-RT-qPCR protocol developed here are at the basis of efforts for improvement the currently critical situation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All

  6. Insight into live bird markets of Bangladesh: an overview of the dynamics of transmission of H5N1 and H9N2 avian influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Turner, Jasmine C M; Feeroz, Mohammed M; Hasan, M Kamrul; Akhtar, Sharmin; Walker, David; Seiler, Patrick; Barman, Subrata; Franks, John; Jones-Engel, Lisa; McKenzie, Pamela; Krauss, Scott; Webby, Richard J; Kayali, Ghazi; Webster, Robert G

    2017-03-08

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 and low pathogenic avian influenza (LPAI) H9N2 viruses have been recognized as threats to public health in Bangladesh since 2007. Although live bird markets (LBMs) have been implicated in the transmission, dissemination, and circulation of these viruses, an in-depth analysis of the dynamics of avian transmission of H5N1 and H9N2 viruses at the human-animal interface has been lacking. Here we present and evaluate epidemiological findings from active surveillance conducted among poultry in various production sectors in Bangladesh from 2008 to 2016. Overall, the prevalence of avian influenza viruses (AIVs) in collected samples was 24%. Our data show that AIVs are more prevalent in domestic birds within LBMs (30.4%) than in farms (9.6%). Quail, chickens and ducks showed a high prevalence of AIVs (>20%). The vast majority of AIVs detected (99.7%) have come from apparently healthy birds and poultry drinking water served as a reservoir of AIVs with a prevalence of 32.5% in collected samples. HPAI H5N1 was more frequently detected in ducks while H9N2 was more common in chickens and quail. LBMs, particularly wholesale markets, have become a potential reservoir for various types of AIVs, including HPAI H5N1 and LPAI H9N2. The persistence of AIVs in LBMs is of great concern to public health, and this study highlights the importance of regularly reviewing and implementing infection control procedures as a means of reducing the exposure of the general public to AIVs.Emerging Microbes & Infections (2017) 6, e12; doi:10.1038/emi.2016.142; published online 8 March 2017.

  7. Insight into live bird markets of Bangladesh: an overview of the dynamics of transmission of H5N1 and H9N2 avian influenza viruses

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Jasmine C M; Feeroz, Mohammed M; Hasan, M Kamrul; Akhtar, Sharmin; Walker, David; Seiler, Patrick; Barman, Subrata; Franks, John; Jones-Engel, Lisa; McKenzie, Pamela; Krauss, Scott; Webby, Richard J; Kayali, Ghazi; Webster, Robert G

    2017-01-01

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 and low pathogenic avian influenza (LPAI) H9N2 viruses have been recognized as threats to public health in Bangladesh since 2007. Although live bird markets (LBMs) have been implicated in the transmission, dissemination, and circulation of these viruses, an in-depth analysis of the dynamics of avian transmission of H5N1 and H9N2 viruses at the human–animal interface has been lacking. Here we present and evaluate epidemiological findings from active surveillance conducted among poultry in various production sectors in Bangladesh from 2008 to 2016. Overall, the prevalence of avian influenza viruses (AIVs) in collected samples was 24%. Our data show that AIVs are more prevalent in domestic birds within LBMs (30.4%) than in farms (9.6%). Quail, chickens and ducks showed a high prevalence of AIVs (>20%). The vast majority of AIVs detected (99.7%) have come from apparently healthy birds and poultry drinking water served as a reservoir of AIVs with a prevalence of 32.5% in collected samples. HPAI H5N1 was more frequently detected in ducks while H9N2 was more common in chickens and quail. LBMs, particularly wholesale markets, have become a potential reservoir for various types of AIVs, including HPAI H5N1 and LPAI H9N2. The persistence of AIVs in LBMs is of great concern to public health, and this study highlights the importance of regularly reviewing and implementing infection control procedures as a means of reducing the exposure of the general public to AIVs. PMID:28270655

  8. The mRNA and Proteins Expression Levels Analysis of TC-1 Cells Immune Response to H9N2 Avian Influenza Virus

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jiyuan; Li, Ning; Meng, Dan; Hao, Mengchan; Wei, Liangmeng; Chai, Tongjie

    2016-01-01

    Since 1994, the H9N2 avian influenza virus (AIV) has spread widely in mainland China, causing great economic losses to the poultry industry there. Subsequently, it was found that the H9N2 AIV had the ability to infect mammals, which gave rise to great panic. In order to investigate the immune response of a host infected with H9N2 AIV, TC-1 cells were set as a model in this research. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay methods were used to study the expression changes of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), inflammatory cytokines, and chemokines in AIV-infected TC-1 cells. Our research found that TC-1 cells had similar susceptibility to both CK/SD/w3 (A/Chicken/Shandong/W3/2012) and CK/SD/w4 (A/Chicken/Shandong/W4/2012) H9N2 isolates, while the CK/SD/w3 isolate had a stronger capability of replication in the TC-1 cells. At the same time, the expression of PRRs (melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5, MDA-5), cytokines [interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6], and chemokines [regulated on activation, normal T cell expressed and secreted (RANTES) and interferon-γ-induced protein-10 kDa (IP-10)] were significantly up-regulated. These results indicated that MDA-5, IL-1β, IL-6, RANTES, and IP-10 might play important roles in the host immune response to H9N2 AIV infection. This study provided useful information for further understanding the interaction between H9N2 virus infection and host immunity, and had certain guiding significance for the prevention and treatment of this disease. PMID:27446066

  9. PB2-588 V promotes the mammalian adaptation of H10N8, H7N9 and H9N2 avian influenza viruses

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Chencheng; Ma, Wenjun; Sun, Na; Huang, Lihong; Li, Yaling; Zeng, Zhaoyong; Wen, Yijun; Zhang, Zaoyue; Li, Huanan; Li, Qian; Yu, Yuandi; Zheng, Yi; Liu, Shukai; Hu, Pingsheng; Zhang, Xu; Ning, Zhangyong; Qi, Wenbao; Liao, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Human infections with avian influenza H7N9 or H10N8 viruses have been reported in China, raising concerns that they might cause human epidemics and pandemics. However, how these viruses adapt to mammalian hosts is unclear. Here we show that besides the commonly recognized viral polymerase subunit PB2 residue 627 K, other residues including 87E, 292 V, 340 K, 588 V, 648 V, and 676 M in PB2 also play critical roles in mammalian adaptation of the H10N8 virus. The avian-origin H10N8, H7N9, and H9N2 viruses harboring PB2-588 V exhibited higher polymerase activity, more efficient replication in mammalian and avian cells, and higher virulence in mice when compared to viruses with PB2-588 A. Analyses of available PB2 sequences showed that the proportion of avian H9N2 or human H7N9 influenza isolates bearing PB2-588 V has increased significantly since 2013. Taken together, our results suggest that the substitution PB2-A588V may be a new strategy for an avian influenza virus to adapt mammalian hosts. PMID:26782141

  10. PB2-588 V promotes the mammalian adaptation of H10N8, H7N9 and H9N2 avian influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Chencheng; Ma, Wenjun; Sun, Na; Huang, Lihong; Li, Yaling; Zeng, Zhaoyong; Wen, Yijun; Zhang, Zaoyue; Li, Huanan; Li, Qian; Yu, Yuandi; Zheng, Yi; Liu, Shukai; Hu, Pingsheng; Zhang, Xu; Ning, Zhangyong; Qi, Wenbao; Liao, Ming

    2016-01-19

    Human infections with avian influenza H7N9 or H10N8 viruses have been reported in China, raising concerns that they might cause human epidemics and pandemics. However, how these viruses adapt to mammalian hosts is unclear. Here we show that besides the commonly recognized viral polymerase subunit PB2 residue 627 K, other residues including 87E, 292 V, 340 K, 588 V, 648 V, and 676 M in PB2 also play critical roles in mammalian adaptation of the H10N8 virus. The avian-origin H10N8, H7N9, and H9N2 viruses harboring PB2-588 V exhibited higher polymerase activity, more efficient replication in mammalian and avian cells, and higher virulence in mice when compared to viruses with PB2-588 A. Analyses of available PB2 sequences showed that the proportion of avian H9N2 or human H7N9 influenza isolates bearing PB2-588 V has increased significantly since 2013. Taken together, our results suggest that the substitution PB2-A588V may be a new strategy for an avian influenza virus to adapt mammalian hosts.

  11. Development of a real-time TaqMan RT-PCR assay for the detection of H9N2 avian influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Ben Shabat, M; Meir, R; Haddas, R; Lapin, E; Shkoda, I; Raibstein, I; Perk, S; Davidson, I

    2010-09-01

    Avian influenza viruses (AIVs) of the H9N2 subtype are a major economic problem in the poultry industry in Israel. Most field isolates from the last decade differ significantly from H9N2 isolates from Europe and the USA, rendering published detection methods inadequate. This study aimed to develop a real-time TaqMan((R)) RT-PCR assay, based on a conserved region in the HA9 gene. The assay was validated with viruses representing different genetic subtypes and other common avian pathogens, and was found specific to H9N2. The real-time RT-PCR assay was compared to RT-PCR, which is in routine diagnostic use. Real-time RT-PCR was found to be more sensitive than RT-PCR by 1.5-2.5 orders of magnitude when testing tracheal swabs directly and by 2-3 orders of magnitude allantoic fluid after AIV propagation in embryonated eggs. Sensitivity was quantified by using 10-fold dilutions of the H9-gene amplification fragment, and real-time RT-PCR was found to be 10(4)-fold more sensitive than RT-PCR. Clinical samples, which included tracheal and cloacal swabs, as well as allantoic fluid, were tested by both methods. By real-time RT-PCR 20% more positive H9N2 samples were detected than by RT-PCR. The real-time RT-PCR assay was found suitable for detection and epidemiological survey not only of Israeli H9N2 viruses, but also for isolates from other parts of the world.

  12. Mutations during the Adaptation of H9N2 Avian Influenza Virus to the Respiratory Epithelium of Pigs Enhance Sialic Acid Binding Activity and Virulence in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yang, W.; Punyadarsaniya, D.; Lambertz, R. L. O.; Lee, D. C. C.; Liang, C. H.; Höper, D.; Leist, S. R.; Hernández-Cáceres, A.; Stech, J.; Beer, M.; Wu, C. Y.; Wong, C. H.; Schughart, K.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The natural reservoir for influenza viruses is waterfowl, and from there they succeeded in crossing the barrier to different mammalian species. We analyzed the adaptation of avian influenza viruses to a mammalian host by passaging an H9N2 strain three times in differentiated swine airway epithelial cells. Using precision-cut slices from the porcine lung to passage the parental virus, isolates from each of the three passages (P1 to P3) were characterized by assessing growth curves and ciliostatic effects. The only difference noted was an increased growth kinetics of the P3 virus. Sequence analysis revealed four mutations: one each in the PB2 and NS1 proteins and two in the HA protein. The HA mutations, A190V and T212I, were characterized by generating recombinant viruses containing either one or both amino acid exchanges. Whereas the parental virus recognized α2,3-linked sialic acids preferentially, the HA190 mutant bound to a broad spectrum of glycans with α2,6/8/9-linked sialic acids. The HA212 mutant alone differed only slightly from the parental virus; however, the combination of both mutations (HA190+HA212) increased the binding affinity to those glycans recognized by the HA190 mutant. Remarkably, only the HA double mutant showed a significantly increased pathogenicity in mice. In contrast, none of those mutations affected the ciliary activity of the epithelial cells which is characteristic for virulent swine influenza viruses. Taken together, our results indicate that shifts in the HA receptor affinity are just an early adaptation step of avian H9N2 strains; further mutational changes may be required to become virulent for pigs. IMPORTANCE Swine play an important role in the interspecies transmission of influenza viruses. Avian influenza A viruses (IAV) of the H9N2 subtype have successfully infected hosts from different species but have not established a stable lineage. We have analyzed the adaptation of IAV-H9N2 virus to target cells of a new host

  13. The impact of H9N2 avian influenza virus vaccine antigenic variation on virus infectious dose in chickens

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The H9 subtype of avian influenza virus is wide-spread in the areas of Asia and Middle East. Selection of effective vaccines that provide effective protection mainly depends on the antigenic match of the hemagglutinin protein (HA), between the vaccine and the field strain. To determine how the ant...

  14. A comprehensive retrospective study of the seroprevalence of H9N2 avian influenza viruses in occupationally exposed populations in China.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Tian, Bai; Jianfang, Zhou; Yongkun, Chen; Xiaodan, Li; Wenfei, Zhu; Yan, Li; Jing, Tang; Junfeng, Guo; Tao, Chen; Rongbao, Gao; Dayan, Wang; Shu, Yuelong

    2017-01-01

    The H9N2 avian influenza virus circulates worldwide, predominantly in poultry. Its increasing infectivity and adaptation in poultry and mammals have enhanced the possibility of human infection. However, H9N2 human cases are difficult to detect due to their mild clinical symptoms. Serological study is valuable for risk assessment. A total of 15,700 serum samples were collected from occupationally exposed populations in 22 provinces of China and tested using hemagglutination inhibition (HI) and microneutralization (MN) assays. The sera positive rate of A/Guangzhou/333/99 (G9) was significantly higher than that of A/quail/Hong Kong/G1/97 (G1) (p<0.0001). The seroprevalences of H9N2 were significantly higher in live poultry market workers, large-scale poultry farmers and backyard farmers than in poultry slaughtering factory workers and wild bird habitant workers. The seroprevalences of A/Guangzhou/333/99 (G9) (3.42%) and A/quail/Hong Kong/G1/97 (G1) (1.37%) in Southern China were significantly higher than those in Northern China (p<0.001). The seroprevalence was highest in the elderly, followed by adults and then youths. Our results indicate that subclinical human infection with H9N2 avian influenza virus is widely distributed in China. Longer poultry exposure might contribute to the higher seroprevalence in the elderly group. The higher seroprevalence observed in Southern China than in Northern China might be caused by a higher poultry density.

  15. Evaluation of Leuconostoc mesenteroides YML003 as a probiotic against low-pathogenic avian influenza (H9N2) virus in chickens.

    PubMed

    Seo, B J; Rather, I A; Kumar, V J R; Choi, U H; Moon, M R; Lim, J H; Park, Y H

    2012-07-01

      The aims of the study were to isolate anti-H9N2 bacteria from Korean Kimchi isolates and to evaluate its performance in cell line, egg and in specific pathogen-free (SPF) chickens.   Using Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cell line, 220 bacterial isolates were screened and the isolate YML003 was selected having pronounced antiviral activity against H9N2 virus. This isolate was identified as Leuconostoc mesenteroides by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Anti-H9N2 activity of the strain was also evaluated by hemagglutination assay. Leuconostoc mesenteroides YML003 was assessed for its survival in gastric juice and 5% bile acid and the antibiotic susceptibility. Both live and heat-killed cells were selected for in vivo chicken feeding experiment. Body weight, immune index, serobiochemical parameters and splenic IFN-γ production were assessed during selected intervals. Viral population in the trachea and cloacae were calculated by quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase PCR (qRT-PCR).   Leuconostoc mesenteroides YML003 exhibited anti-H9N2 activity both in in vitro cell line as well as in vivo SPF chickens.   This is a primary report on the anti-H9N2 activity by a Leuconostoc strain. Amid the increasing reports of avian influenza virus occurrence resulting in severe losses to the poultry industry, prophylactic administration of such probiotic strains are highly significant. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Applied Microbiology © 2012 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  16. Apoptosis induction and release of inflammatory cytokines in the oviduct of egg-laying hens experimentally infected with H9N2 avian influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingyu; Tang, Chao; Wang, Qiuzhen; Li, Ruiqiao; Chen, Zhanli; Han, Xueying; Wang, Jing; Xu, Xingang

    2015-06-12

    The H9N2 subtype avian influenza virus (AIV) can cause serious damage to the reproductive tract of egg-laying hens, leading to severe egg-drop and poor egg shell quality. However, previous studies in relation to the oviductal-dysfunction resulted from this agent have not clearly been elucidated. In this study, apoptosis and pathologic changes in the oviducts of egg-laying hens caused by H9N2 AIV were evaluated. To understand the immune response in the pathogenic processes, 30-week old specific pathogen free (SPF) egg-laying hens inoculated with H9N2 subtype of AIV through combined intra-ocular and intra-nasal routes. H9N2 AIV infection resulted in oviductal lesions, triggered apoptosis and expression of immune related genes accompanied with infiltration of CD3(+)CD4(+) and CD3(+)CD8α(+) cells. Significant tissue damage and apoptosis were observed in the five oviductal parts (infundibulum, magnum, isthmus, uterus and vagina) at 5 days post-inoculation (dpi). Furthermore, immune-related genes, including chicken TLR3 (7, 21), MDA5, IL-2, IFN-β, CXCLi1, CXCLi2, XCL1, XCR1 and CCR5 showed variation in the egg-laying hens infected with H9N2 AIV. Notably, mRNA expression of IFN-α was suppressed during the infection. These results show distinct expression patterns of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines amongst segments of the oviduct. Differential gene expression of inflammatory cytokines and lymphocytes aggregation occurring in oviducts may initiate the infected tissue in response to virus replication which may eventually lead to excessive cellular apoptosis and tissue damage.

  17. Genetic and molecular characterization of H9N2 and H5 avian influenza viruses from live poultry markets in Zhejiang Province, eastern China

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Haibo; Peng, Xiuming; Peng, Xiaorong; Cheng, Linfang; Lu, Xiangyun; Jin, Changzhong; Xie, Tiansheng; Yao, Hangping; Wu, Nanping

    2015-01-01

    Live poultry markets (LPMs) are a key source of reassorted avian influenza viruses (AIVs) because of the density of terrestrial and aquatic poultry and the frequency of AIV infection. H9N2 viruses are prevalent in terrestrial poultry throughout Asia and have been isolated from poultry outbreaks worldwide. They infect both avian and mammalian species and may be significant donors of genetic material to emerging human pathogens. LPMs in Zhejiang Province were surveyed from 2013–2014 for AIVs. Three hundred seventy-four (374) AIV strains were isolated from 3,328 samples. Whole–genome sequencing and phylogenetic analyses were performed. We identified a novel H9N2 virus genotype that had undergone reassortment with gene segments from Qa/HK/G1/97–like, Ck/BJ/1/94–like, and Dk/HK/Y439/97–like viruses. Phylogenetic analyses suggested the H9N2 viruses had undergone reassortments with other AIV subtypes. The results also suggested that two different clades (2.3.2 and 2.3.4.6) of H5 viruses were co–circulating in Zhejiang Province. Given that reassorted H5 AIVs were detected in geese and ducks, it is possible that apparently healthy birds contribute to emerging H5 AIVs. Continued surveillance is required in poultry in eastern China. PMID:26627108

  18. Genetic and molecular characterization of H9N2 and H5 avian influenza viruses from live poultry markets in Zhejiang Province, eastern China.

    PubMed

    Wu, Haibo; Peng, Xiuming; Peng, Xiaorong; Cheng, Linfang; Lu, Xiangyun; Jin, Changzhong; Xie, Tiansheng; Yao, Hangping; Wu, Nanping

    2015-12-02

    Live poultry markets (LPMs) are a key source of reassorted avian influenza viruses (AIVs) because of the density of terrestrial and aquatic poultry and the frequency of AIV infection. H9N2 viruses are prevalent in terrestrial poultry throughout Asia and have been isolated from poultry outbreaks worldwide. They infect both avian and mammalian species and may be significant donors of genetic material to emerging human pathogens. LPMs in Zhejiang Province were surveyed from 2013-2014 for AIVs. Three hundred seventy-four (374) AIV strains were isolated from 3,328 samples. Whole-genome sequencing and phylogenetic analyses were performed. We identified a novel H9N2 virus genotype that had undergone reassortment with gene segments from Qa/HK/G1/97-like, Ck/BJ/1/94-like, and Dk/HK/Y439/97-like viruses. Phylogenetic analyses suggested the H9N2 viruses had undergone reassortments with other AIV subtypes. The results also suggested that two different clades (2.3.2 and 2.3.4.6) of H5 viruses were co-circulating in Zhejiang Province. Given that reassorted H5 AIVs were detected in geese and ducks, it is possible that apparently healthy birds contribute to emerging H5 AIVs. Continued surveillance is required in poultry in eastern China.

  19. Complete genome sequence of a natural reassortant H9N2 avian influenza virus found in bean goose (Anser fabalis): direct evidence for virus exchange between Korea and China via wild birds.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong-Hun; Park, Jae-Keun; Yuk, Seong-Su; Erdene-Ochir, Tseren-Ochir; Kwon, Jung-Hoon; Lee, Joong-Bok; Park, Seung-Yong; Choi, In-Soo; Lee, Sang-Won; Song, Chang-Seon

    2014-08-01

    In 2011, we isolated a natural recombinant H9N2 avian influenza virus from fecal droppings of bean goose (Anser fabalis) in Korea. Phylogenetic analyses showed that the A/bean goose/Korea/220/2011(H9N2) isolate is a reassortant of Eurasian and North American lineages of avian influenza virus. In addition, the complete genome sequence, including all 8 gene segments, was associated with Chinese H9N2 viruses isolated from wild birds in the Hunan East Dongting Lake National Nature Reserve. These data provide direct evidence for the exchange of avian influenza viruses between Korea and China via wild birds.

  20. Characterization of Low Pathogenic Avian Influenza Virus Subtype H9N2 Isolated from Free-Living Mynah Birds (Acridotheres tristis) in the Sultanate of Oman.

    PubMed

    Body, Mohammad H; Alrarawahi, Abdulmajeed H; Alhubsy, Saif S; Saravanan, Nirmala; Rajmony, Sunil; Mansoor, Muhammad Khalid

    2015-06-01

    A low pathogenic avian influenza virus was identified from free-living birds (mynah, Acridotheres tristis) of the starling family. Virus was isolated by inoculation of homogenized suspension from lung, tracheal, spleen, and cloacal swabs into the allantoic cavity of embryonated chicken eggs. Subtype of the isolate was characterized as H9N2 by hemagglutination inhibition test using monospecific chicken antisera to a wide range of influenza reference strain. Pathogenicity of the isolate was determined by intravenous pathogenicity index. The virus was reisolated from experimentally infected chicken. Additionally, the isolate was subjected to reverse transcriptase PCR using partial hemagglutinin (HA) gene-specific primers and yielded an amplicon of 487 bp. HA gene sequence analysis revealed 99% sequence homology among mynah and chicken isolates from Oman. On phylogenetic analysis, isolates from mynah (A/mynnah/Oman/AIVS6/2005) and chicken (A/chicken/Oman/AIVS3/2006; A/chicken/Oman/AIVS7/2006) clustered together tightly, indicating these free-flying birds may be a source of introduction of H9N2 subtype in poultry bird in Oman. Moreover, the HA gene of H9N2 isolates from Oman resembled those of viruses of the G1-like lineage and were very similar to those from United Arab Emirates.

  1. Construction of a recombinant duck enteritis virus vaccine expressing hemagglutinin of H9N2 avian influenza virus and evaluation of its efficacy in ducks.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ying; Yang, Chenghuai; Li, Junping; Li, Ling; Cao, Minghui; Li, Qihong; Li, Huijiao

    2017-01-01

    H9 subtype avian influenza viruses (AIVs) remain a significant burden in the poultry industry and are considered to be one of the most likely causes of any new influenza pandemic in humans. As ducks play an important role in the maintenance of H9 viruses in nature, successful control of the spread of H9 AIVs in ducks will have significant beneficial effects on public health. Duck enteritis virus (DEV) may be a promising candidate viral vector for aquatic poultry vaccination. In this study, we constructed a recombinant DEV, rDEV-∆UL2-HA, inserting the hemagglutinin (HA) gene from duck-origin H9N2 AIV into the UL2 gene by homologous recombination. One-step growth analyses showed that the HA gene insertion had no effect on viral replication and suggested that the UL2 gene was nonessential for virus growth in vitro. In vivo tests further showed that the insertion of the HA gene in place of the UL2 gene did not affect the immunogenicity of the virus. Moreover, a single dose of 10(3) TCID50 of rDEV-∆UL2-HA induced solid protection against lethal DEV challenge and completely prevented H9N2 AIV viral shedding. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a DEV-vectored vaccine providing robust protection against both DEV and H9N2 AIV virus infections in ducks.

  2. High genetic compatibility and increased pathogenicity of reassortants derived from avian H9N2 and pandemic H1N1/2009 influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yipeng; Qin, Kun; Wang, Jingjing; Pu, Juan; Tang, Qingdong; Hu, Yanxin; Bi, Yuhai; Zhao, Xueli; Yang, Hanchun; Shu, Yuelong; Liu, Jinhua

    2011-03-08

    H9N2 influenza viruses have been circulating worldwide in multiple avian species and repeatedly infecting mammals, including pigs and humans, posing a significant threat to public health. The coexistence of H9N2 and pandemic influenza H1N1/2009 viruses in pigs and humans provides an opportunity for these viruses to reassort. To evaluate the potential public risk of the reassortant viruses derived from these viruses, we used reverse genetics to generate 127 H9 reassortants derived from an avian H9N2 and a pandemic H1N1 virus, and evaluated their compatibility, replication ability, and virulence in mice. These hybrid viruses showed high genetic compatibility and more than half replicated to a high titer in vitro. In vivo studies of 73 of 127 reassortants revealed that all viruses were able to infect mice without prior adaptation and 8 reassortants exhibited higher pathogenicity than both parental viruses. All reassortants with higher virulence than parental viruses contained the PA gene from the 2009 pandemic virus, revealing the important role of the PA gene from the H1N1/2009 virus in generating a reassortant virus with high public health risk. Analyses of the polymerase activity of the 16 ribonucleoprotein combinations in vitro suggested that the PA of H1N1/2009 origin also enhanced polymerase activity. Our results indicate that some avian H9-pandemic reassortants could emerge with a potentially higher threat for humans and also highlight the importance of monitoring the H9-pandemic reassortant viruses that may arise, especially those that possess the PA gene of H1N1/2009 origin.

  3. Synergy or interference of a H9N2 avian influenza virus with a velogenic Newcastle disease virus in chickens is dose dependent.

    PubMed

    Bonfante, Francesco; Cattoli, Giovanni; Leardini, Sofia; Salomoni, Angela; Mazzetto, Eva; Davidson, Irit; Haddas, Ruth; Terregino, Calogero

    2017-10-01

    Field observations indicate that the impact of velogenic Newcastle disease virus (vNDV) is more severe in countries with concomitant circulation of low pathogenicity avian influenza virus, as is the case in the Middle East, in particular in Israel, where H9N2 and NDV are endemic. In our study, we evaluated how the exposure of chickens to an H9N2 challenge either favours or interferes with a subsequent vNDV infection and its transmission to sentinels. For this purpose, single vNDV and sequential H9/NDV challenges were performed with increasing doses of vNDV (10(1)-10(6) EID50). The H9N2 challenge made birds more susceptible to the vNDV, lowering the minimum dose required to cause an infection, exacerbating the clinical outcome, while delaying the onset of the disease and time of death. Interestingly, the presence and degree of these seemingly contrasting effects were dose-dependent and not mutually exclusive.

  4. Amino acid substitutions in the neuraminidase protein of an H9N2 avian influenza virus affect its airborne transmission in chickens.

    PubMed

    Lv, Jing; Wei, Liangmeng; Yang, Yan; Wang, Bingxiao; Liang, Wei; Gao, Yuwei; Xia, Xianzhu; Gao, Lili; Cai, Yumei; Hou, Peiqiang; Yang, Huili; Wang, Airong; Huang, Rong; Gao, Jing; Chai, Tongjie

    2015-04-18

    Cases of H9N2 avian influenza virus (AIV) in poultry are increasing throughout many Eurasian countries, and co-infections with other pathogens have resulted in high morbidity and mortality in poultry. Few studies have investigated the genetic factors of virus airborne transmission which determine the scope of this epidemic. In this study, we used specific-pathogen-free chickens housed in isolators to investigate the airborne transmissibility of five recombinant H9N2 AIV rescued by reverse genetic technology. The results show that airborne transmission of A/Chicken/Shandong/01/2008 (SD01) virus was related to the neuraminidase (NA) gene, and four amino acid mutations (D368E, S370L, E313K and G381D) within the head region of the SD01 NA, reduced virus replication in the respiratory tract of chickens, reduced virus NA activity, and resulted in a loss of airborne transmission ability in chickens. Similarly, reverse mutations of these four amino acids in the NA protein of r01/NASS virus, conferred an airborne transmission ability to the recombinant virus. We conclude that these four NA residues may be significant genetic markers for evaluating potential disease outbreak of H9N2 AIV, and propose that immediate attention should be paid to the airborne transmission of this virus.

  5. Development of a dual-protective live attenuated vaccine against H5N1 and H9N2 avian influenza viruses by modifying the NS1 gene.

    PubMed

    Choi, Eun-hye; Song, Min-Suk; Park, Su-Jin; Pascua, Philippe Noriel Q; Baek, Yun Hee; Kwon, Hyeok-il; Kim, Eun-Ha; Kim, Semi; Jang, Hyung-Kwan; Poo, Haryoung; Kim, Chul-Joong; Choi, Young Ki

    2015-07-01

    An increasing number of outbreaks of avian influenza H5N1 and H9N2 viruses in poultry have caused serious economic losses and raised concerns for human health due to the risk of zoonotic transmission. However, licensed H5N1 and H9N2 vaccines for animals and humans have not been developed. Thus, to develop a dual H5N1 and H9N2 live-attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV), the HA and NA genes from a virulent mouse-adapted avian H5N2 (A/WB/Korea/ma81/06) virus and a recently isolated chicken H9N2 (A/CK/Korea/116/06) virus, respectively, were introduced into the A/Puerto Rico/8/34 backbone expressing truncated NS1 proteins (NS1-73, NS1-86, NS1-101, NS1-122) but still possessing a full-length NS gene. Two H5N2/NS1-LAIV viruses (H5N2/NS1-86 and H5N2/NS1-101) were highly attenuated compared with the full-length and remaining H5N2/NS-LAIV viruses in a mouse model. Furthermore, viruses containing NS1 modifications were found to induce more IFN-β activation than viruses with full-length NS1 proteins and were correspondingly attenuated in mice. Intranasal vaccination with a single dose (10(4.0) PFU/ml) of these viruses completely protected mice from a lethal challenge with the homologous A/WB/Korea/ma81/06 (H5N2), heterologous highly pathogenic A/EM/Korea/W149/06 (H5N1), and heterosubtypic highly virulent mouse-adapted H9N2 viruses. This study clearly demonstrates that the modified H5N2/NS1-LAIV viruses attenuated through the introduction of mutations in the NS1 coding region display characteristics that are desirable for live attenuated vaccines and hold potential as vaccine candidates for mammalian hosts.

  6. Molecular immunophenotyping of lungs and spleens in naive and vaccinated chickens early after pulmonary avian influenza A (H9N2) virus infection.

    PubMed

    Degen, Winfried G J; Smith, Jacqueline; Simmelink, Bartjan; Glass, Elizabeth J; Burt, Dave W; Schijns, Virgil E J C

    2006-08-28

    In a respiratory-infection-model with the avian influenza A H9N2 virus we studied lung and splenic immune reactions in chickens using a recently developed 5K chicken immuno-microarray. Groups of chickens were either mock-immunized (referred to as non-immune), vaccinated with inactivated viral antigen only (immune) or with viral antigen in a water-in-oil (W/O) immunopotentiator (immune potentiated). Three weeks after vaccination all animals were given a respiratory infection. Immune potentiated birds developed inhibitory antiviral antibodies, showed minimal lung histopathology and no detectable viral sequences, while non-immune animals showed microscopic immunopathology and detectable virus. Immune birds, receiving antigen in saline only, showed minimal microscopic histopathology, and intermediate levels of virus detection. These classical features in the different groups were mirrored by overlapping or specific mRNA gene expression profiles in lungs and spleen using microarray analysis. To our knowledge this is the first study demonstrating pneumonia-associated lung pathology of the low pathogenic avian influenza H9N2 virus. Our data provide insights into the molecular interaction of this virus with its natural host when naive or primed by vaccination.

  7. Genetic analysis of H9N2 avian influenza viruses circulated in broiler flocks: a case study in Iraq in 2014-2015.

    PubMed

    Kraidi, Qayssar Ali; Madadgar, Omid; Ghalyanchi Langeroudi, Arash; Karimi, Vahid

    2017-04-01

    H9N2 avian influenza viruses (AIVs) have been recorded in Eurasian for several years. Since 2004-2005, the disease has become endemic in Iraq, causing serious economic losses in the poultry industry. The hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA), two out of eight protein-coding genes, play an important role during the early stage of infection and hinder virus assembling. Little is known about the genetic information of the H9N2 viruses currently circulating in Iraq; thus, gene sequences of six AIVS of the H9N2 subtype have been detected and analyzed in the period of 2014-2015 from different outbreaks of broiler flocks in five provinces situated in the middle and southern parts of Iraq. Genetic comparison of the partial sequences of HA gene indicated that all Iraqi viruses are related to each other and could be divided into two subgroups. Viruses of the first and the second subgroups demonstrated a high similar identity with Pakistani and Iranian viruses, respectively. The nucleotide sequences of the NA protein of the all studied Iraqi viruses were very similar (95.2-100% identity), and shared high nucleotide sequence identity with Iranian, Pakistani, and Lebanese strains. All six recent viruses possessed histidine, alanine, and leucine at positions 183, 190, and 226, respectively, which are the key residues in receptor-binding sites. The Iraqi viruses were closely related to viruses of G1-like lineage isolated from poultry flocks of Iran and Pakistan, suggesting that possible epidemiological links could be derived from a common origin. Further investigations are required and should include the viral isolation and full-length molecular characterization of H9N2 AIVs in this area.

  8. Identification of potential virulence determinants associated H9N2 avian influenza virus PB2 E627K mutation by comparative proteomics.

    PubMed

    Qi, Wenbao; Tian, Jin; Su, Shuo; Huang, Lihong; Li, Huanan; Liao, Ming

    2015-05-01

    Some highly pathogenic H5N1, H7N9, and H10N8 isolated from China carried six internal genes from H9N2 avian influenza viruses (AIV) and the key amino acids at 627 in PB2 of these viruses had mutated to K. To investigate the mechanism of increased pathogenicity for H9N2 AIV PB2 627K, we analyzed the difference in mouse lung proteins expression response to PB2 K627E. By iTRAQ method, we found that the mutated K627E contributed to a set of differentially expressed lung proteins, including five upregulated proteins and nine downregulated proteins at 12 h postinfection; ten upregulated proteins and 25 downregulated proteins at 72 h postinfection. These proteins were chiefly involved within the cytoskeleton and motor proteins, antiviral proteins, regulation of glucocorticoids signal-associated proteins, pro- and anti-inflammatory proteins. Alteration of moesin, FKBP4, Hsp70, ezrin, and pulmonary surfactant protein A (sp-A) may play important roles in increasing virulence and decreasing lungs antiviral response. Further, three upregulated proteins (moesin, ezrin, and sp-A) caused by PB2 K627E were also confirmed in A549 cells. Moreover, overexpression of sp-A in A549 inhibited virus replication and downregulation promoted virus replication. In this study, sp-A as a potential virulence determinant associated H9N2 AIV PB2 E627K mutation was identified using comparative proteomics. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Genetic and antigenic evolution of H9N2 subtype avian influenza virus in domestic chickens in southwestern China, 2013–2016

    PubMed Central

    He, Xiao; Liu, Yue-Yue; Yao, Ke-Chang; Cao, San-Jie; Han, Xin-Feng; Huang, Yong

    2017-01-01

    H9N2 avian influenza virus (AIV) has caused significant losses in chicken flocks throughout china in recent years. There is a limited understanding of the genetic and antigenic characteristics of the H9N2 virus isolated in chickens in southwestern China. In this study a total of 12 field strains were isolated from tissue samples from diseased chickens between 2013 and 2016. Phylogenetic analysis of the Hemagglutinin (HA) and Neuraminidase (NA) nucleotide sequences from the 12 field isolates and other reference strains showed that most of the isolates in the past four years could be clustered into a major branch (HA-branch A and NA-branch I) in the Clade h9.4.2 lineages. These sequences are accompanied by nine and seven new amino acids mutations in the HA and NA proteins, respectively, when compared with those previous to 2013. In addition, four new isolates were grouped into a minor branch (HA-branch B) in the Clade h9.4.2 lineages and two potential N-glycosylation sites were observed due to amino acid mutations in the HA protein. Three antigenic groups (1–3), which had low antigenic relatedness with two commonly used vaccines in China, were identified among the 12 isolates by antigenMap analysis. Immunoprotection testing showed that those two vaccines could efficiently prevent the shedding of branch A viruses but not branch B viruses. In conclusion, these results indicate the genotype of branch B may become epidemic in the next few years and that a new vaccine should be developed for the prevention of H9N2 AIV. PMID:28158271

  10. Effect of route of inoculation on replication of avian influenza virus (H9N2) and interferon gene expression in guinea fowl (Numida meleagridis).

    PubMed

    Umar, S; Munir, M T; Kaboudi, K; Rehman, A; Asif, S; Usman, M; Ali, A; Shahzad, M; Subhan, S; Shah, M A A

    2016-08-01

    The study was designed to investigate the replication of a re-assortant H9N2 avian influenza virus (AIV) and induction of the interferon (IFNγ) response after aerosol or intranasal inoculation with the virus in guinea fowl. To determine virus shedding pattern, oropharyngeal and cloacal swabs and tissue specimens of trachea, lungs, spleen and caecal tonsils were collected post-inoculation (pi). Infected guinea fowl showed mild clinical signs, while negative control guinea fowl remained healthy and active throughout the experiment irrespective of the inoculation route. However, the clinical signs were more prominent in guinea fowl infected through the aerosol route. Virus was detected in all oropharyngeal and cloacal swabs up to 7 d pi in guinea fowl from both inoculation groups. However, virus was detected more frequently and in higher titres in oropharyngeal swabs and specimens of trachea and lungs from the group exposed to aerosols than in the group given intranasal drops. In accordance with viral replication findings, expression of IFNγ was up-regulated on 1, 2 and 4 d pi to a significantly higher level in lung tissue specimens from the group exposed to virus aerosol than from controls treated with PBS intranasally. On the other hand, IFNγ was up-regulated above that of controls in lung tissue specimens from the group treated with intranasal drops of virus only on 4 d pi. These findings indicate that virus administered in aerosols was more efficient in infecting the lower respiratory tract and in inducing activity of the IFNγ gene than virus administered as intranasal drops. The results of this study suggest that virus aerosols cause more intense respiratory infection and increase the shedding of the H9N2 AIV in guinea fowl, highlighting the potential role of guinea fowl as a mixing bowl for transmission and maintenance of H9N2 AIV between poultry premises.

  11. High genetic diversity and frequent genetic reassortment of avian influenza A(H9N2) viruses along the East Asian-Australian migratory flyway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haiming; Zhang, Zhenjie; Chen, Zhanqiang; Zhang, Yanru; Lv, Qiang; An, Xiaoping; Tong, Yigang; Carr, Michael J; Sun, Shuhong; Shi, Weifeng

    2016-04-01

    To understand the molecular epidemiology and evolution of avian influenza viruses (AIV) along the East Asian-Australian migration flyway, we collected faecal samples (n=2859) between November 2014 and March 2015 from poultry, environmental sources and wild birds in Dongying, Shandong province and Yancheng, Jiangsu province in eastern China. The presence of AIV RNA was evaluated by real-time PCR and the positivity rate ranged from 0 to 29.3%. In both Dongying and Yancheng, samples collected from live poultry markets had the highest positivity rate for AIV RNA. AIV whole genomes were generated and phylogenetically analysed. Our results demonstrate that most of the viruses belonged to the H9N2 subtype, and could be classified into nine novel genotypes based on the phylogenetic analysis of the eight gene segments of the AIV genomes. This revealed a high genetic diversity of H9N2 in this region and suggested that they might have undergone frequent genetic reassortment. In addition, the internal genes (PB2, etc.) of two viruses from wild birds and several viruses from poultry belonged to the same gene constellation, suggesting a potential inter-host transmission of AIV between wild birds and poultry in live markets along routes of migratory flyways. Our results highlight the high genetic diversity of AIV along the East Asian-Australian migration flyway and the need for more extensive AIV surveillance in eastern China. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Heterologous post-infection immunity against Egyptian avian influenza virus (AIV) H9N2 modulates the course of subsequent infection by highly pathogenic AIV H5N1, but vaccination immunity does not.

    PubMed

    Naguib, Mahmoud M; Grund, Christian; Arafa, Abdel-Satar; Abdelwhab, E M; Beer, Martin; Harder, Timm C

    2017-06-01

    In Egypt, zoonotic A/goose/Guangdong/1/96 (gs/GD-like) highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIV) H5N1 of clade 2.2.1.2 is entrenched in poultry populations and has co-circulated with low-pathogenic avian influenza virus H9N2 of the G1 lineage since 2010. Here, the impact of H9N2 infection or vaccination on the course of consecutive infection with a lethal Egyptian HPAIV H5N1 is studied. Three-week-old chickens were infected with H9N2 or vaccinated with inactivated H9N2 or H5N1 antigens and challenged three weeks later by an HPAIV H5N1. Interestingly, pre-infection of chickens with H9N2 decreased the oral excretion of H5N1 to levels that were comparable to those of H5N1-immunized chickens, but vaccination with inactivated H9N2 did not. H9N2 pre-infection modulated but did not conceal clinical disease by HPAIV H5N1. By contrast, homologous H5 vaccination abolished clinical syndromic surveillance, although vaccinated clinical healthy birds were capable of spreading the virus.

  13. Replication of an H9N2 Avian Influenza Virus and Cytokine Gene Expression in Chickens Exposed by Aerosol or Intranasal Routes.

    PubMed

    Guan, Jiewen; Fu, Qigao; Sharif, Shayan

    2015-06-01

    This study related the replication of an H9N2 avian influenza virus in chickens to the induction of host acute immune response after aerosol or intranasal inoculation with the virus. On 1, 2, 4, and 7 days postinoculation (dpi), oropharyngeal swabs and tissue specimens of trachea, lungs, spleen, and cecal tonsils were collected for quantification of viral RNA. Expression of cytokine genes in lungs, spleen, and cecal tonsils was quantified by reverse transcriptase-PCR. Virus was detected in all oropharyngeal swabs up to 4 dpi in chickens from both inoculation groups. However, virus was detected more frequently (P<0.05) and in higher titers (1-4 log difference) in specimens of trachea and lungs from the group exposed to aerosols than from the group given intranasal drops. In accord with viral replication findings, expressions of cytokine genes interleukin (IL)-1β (on 2 and 7 dpi), IL-6 (on 2 dpi), and interferon (IFN)-γ (on 2 and 4 dpi) were up-regulated to a significantly higher level (P<0.05) in lung tissue specimens from the group exposed to virus aerosol than from controls that were given saline intranasally. Only IFN-γ on 1 dpi was up-regulated (P<0.05) above that of controls in lung tissue specimens from the group given intranasal drops of virus. In comparison, replication of the virus and induction of IL-1β and IL-6 genes were limited in spleen and cecal tonsil tissue specimens from both groups of chickens inoculated with the virus. These findings indicate that virus administered in aerosols was more efficient than virus administered as intranasal drops, in infecting the lower respiratory tract and in inducing the activity of the cytokine genes. The intense respiratory infection caused by virus aerosols might increase the shedding and transmission of the H9N2 virus in chickens.

  14. Molecular quantitation of H9N2 avian influenza virus in various organs of broiler chickens using TaqMan real time PCR.

    PubMed

    Mosleh, Najmeh; Dadras, Habibollah; Mohammadi, Ali

    2009-01-16

    During the past decade, H9N2 low pathogenic avian influenza virus (LPAI) has caused considerable economic loss due to decreased production, increased mortality and the cost of vaccination in Iranian poultry industry. Because of widespread occurrence of this disease and the virus potential to mutate to highly-pathogenic (HP) form and transmission to humans, it is, therefore, imperative to understand the pathogenesis and properties of these viruses. In this study, a two step TaqMan real time PCR assay was performed for the quantitation of A/chicken/Iran/772/1998(H(9)N(2)) virus in various organs of broiler chickens at different days post inoculation (DPI). Forty 5-week-old commercial broiler chickens were inoculated with the virus. Five chickens were randomly selected on days 1, 3, 6 and 9 PI. Their trachea, lungs, spleen, kidneys, pancreas, blood and faeces were collected for virus detection. A PCR test was performed and the positive samples were used for quantitative real time PCR assay. The result of RT-PCR assay showed the presence of the virus in trachea (40%, 33%), lungs (20%, 66.6%) and spleen (20%, 50%) of infected chickens on days 3 and 6 PI, respectively. The virus was also detected in the kidneys of inoculated chickens on 3 (40%), 6 (60%) and 9 (100%) DPI. In faecal samples the virus was only detected on day 6 PI (83.3%). The molecular quantitation of AIV showed that the AIV titre in the trachea, lungs and spleen of chickens at 3 DPI is lower than the AIV titre at 6 DPI in these organs. The highest titre was observed in the faeces. The AIV titre in all organs of the birds which died at 6 DPI was higher than those of the same organs in the other experimental birds.

  15. Muscovy duck retinoic acid-induced gene I (MdRIG-I) functions in innate immunity against H9N2 avian influenza viruses (AIV) infections.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yuqiang; Huang, Qingqing; Ji, Wenhui; Du, Bin; Fu, Qiang; An, Huiting; Li, Jing; Wang, Hengan; Yan, Yaxian; Ding, Chan; Sun, Jianhe

    2015-02-15

    Retinoic acid inducible gene I (RIG-I) is a cytosolic pattern recognition receptor that senses pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). Muscovy duck (Cairina moschata) is a large duck different from other species of ducks, and is more susceptible to some microbial pathogens. In this study, the Muscovy duck RIG-I gene (MdRIG-I) was identified. Quantitative RT-PCR showed that MdRIG-I mRNA was widely expressed in different tissues, especially in those with mucosa. RIG-I null DF-1 cells transfected with DNA constructs encoding MdRIG-I or CARDs domain can activate IRF-3 and NF-κB to up-regulated activity of IFN-β promoter. The components of the signaling pathway downstream of RIG-I in mammalian cells including IRF-3, NF-κB, IFN-β and the IFN-stimulated genes Mx-1, PKR and MDA5 were significantly up-regulated in CARDs-overexpressing-DF-1 cells. Implicating RIG-I in the antiviral response to an infection in vivo, we found that RIG-I expression in brain, spleen, lung and bursa were up-regulated in ducks challenged with H9N2 avian influenza virus (AIV), whose six internal genes were closely related to the H7N9 and H10N8 AIV. In vitro, DF-1 cells transfected with MdRIG-I plasmid can respond significantly to H9N2 AIV, evident through enhancement of IFN-β promoter activity and decreased virus titer. Altogether, these results indicated that MdRIG-I is a novel member of RLR gene family, engaging in the early stage of antiviral innate immunity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Cross reactive antibody and cytotoxic T lymphocytes from avian influenza H9N2 infected chickens against homologous and heterologous avian influenza isolates

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Immunity against avian influenza (AI) is largely based on the induction of neutralizing antibodies produced against the hemagglutinin, although cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL’s) have been reported as critical for clearance of virus from infected cells. Antibody production against a particular virus ...

  17. Oral administration of live attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium expressing chicken interferon-α alleviates clinical signs caused by respiratory infection with avian influenza virus H9N2.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Md Masudur; Uyangaa, Erdenebileg; Han, Young Woo; Kim, Seong Bum; Kim, Jin Hyoung; Choi, Jin Young; Yoo, Dong Jin; Hong, Jin Tae; Han, Sang-Bae; Kim, Bumseok; Kim, Koanhoi; Eo, Seong Kug

    2011-12-29

    Low pathogenic avian influenza (LPAI) H9N2 has attracted considerable attention due to severe commercial losses in the poultry industry. Furthermore, avian influenza virus (AIV) H9N2-infected chickens can be a reservoir for viral transmission to mammals including pigs and humans, complicating control of viral mutants. Chicken interferon-alpha (chIFN-α) may be useful as an exogenous antiviral agent to control AIV H9N2 infection. However, a superior vehicle for administration of chIFN-α is needed because of challenges of protein stability, production cost, and labor associated with mass administration. Presently, oral administration of single dose of attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium expressing chIFN-α alleviated clinical signs and histopathological changes caused by respiratory infection with AIV H9N2 and reduced the excretion of virus in cloacal swab samples. Similarly, chickens administered S. enterica serovar Typhimurium expressing chIFN-α showed inhibited replication of AIV H9N2 in several different tissues including trachea, lung, cecal tonsil, and brain. Furthermore, immune responses specific for challenged AIV H9N2 were enhanced in chickens administered S. enterica serovar Typhimurium expressing chIFN-α, as determined by hemagglutination inhibition assay of sera, proliferation and IFN-γ and interleukin-4 expression by AIV H9N2 antigen-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells and splenocytes. Therefore, oral administration of S. enterica serovar Typhimurium expressing chIFN-α can successfully control clinical signs caused by respiratory infection with AIV H9N2, which provides valuable insight into the use of attenuated Salmonella vaccine as an oral delivery system of chIFN-α to prevent the replication of AIV H9N2 in respiratory tract. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Isolation and characterization of an H9N2 influenza virus isolated in Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Kemin; Ferreri, Lucas; Rimondi, Agustina; Olivera, Valeria; Romano, Marcelo; Ferreyra, Hebe; Rago, Virgina; Uhart, Marcela; Chen, Hongjun; Sutton, Troy; Pereda, Ariel; Perez, Daniel R.

    2016-01-01

    As part of our ongoing efforts on animal influenza surveillance in Argentina, an H9N2 virus was isolated from a wild aquatic bird (Netta peposaca), A/rosy-billed pochard/Argentina/CIP051-559/2007 (H9N2) – herein referred to as 559/H9N2. Due to the important role that H9N2 viruses play in the ecology of influenza in nature, the 559/H9N2 isolate was characterized molecularly and biologically. Phylogenetic analysis of the HA gene revealed that the 559/H9N2 virus maintained an independent evolutionary pathway and shared a sister-group relationship with North American viruses, suggesting a common ancestor. The rest of the genome segments clustered with viruses from South America. Experimental inoculation of the 559/H9N2 in chickens and quail revealed efficient replication and transmission only in quail. Our results add to the notion of the unique evolutionary trend of avian influenza viruses in South America. Our study increases our understanding of H9N2 viruses in nature and emphasizes the importance of expanding animal influenza surveillance efforts to better define the ecology of influenza viruses at a global scale. PMID:22709552

  19. Systemic immune responses to an inactivated, whole H9N2 avian influenza virus vaccine using class B CpG oligonucleotides in chickens.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shirene M; Alkie, Tamiru N; Hodgins, Douglas C; Nagy, Éva; Shojadoost, Bahram; Sharif, Shayan

    2015-07-31

    Commercial vaccines against avian influenza viruses (AIV) in chickens consist mainly of inactivated AIV, requiring parenteral administration and co-delivery of an adjuvant. Limitations in T helper 1 or T helper 2 biased responses generated by these vaccines emphasize the need for alternative, more efficacious adjuvants. The Toll-like receptor (TLR) 21 ligand, CpG oligodeoxynucleotides (ODN), has been established as immunomodulatory in chickens. Therefore, the objective of this study was to investigate the adjuvant potential of high (20μg) and low (2μg) doses of CpG ODN 2007 (CpG 2007) and CpG ODN 1826 (CpG 1826) when administered to chickens with a formalin-inactivated H9N2 AIV. Antibody responses in sera were evaluated in 90 specific pathogen free (SPF) chickens after intramuscular administration of vaccine formulations at 7 and 21 days post-hatch. Antibody responses were assessed based on haemagglutination inhibition (HI) and virus neutralization (VN) assays; virus-specific IgM and IgY antibody responses were evaluated by ELISA. The results suggest that the vaccine formulation containing low dose CpG 2007 was significantly more effective at generating neutralizing (both HI and VN) responses than formulations with high or low doses of CpG 1826 or high dose CpG 2007. Neutralizing responses elicited by low dose CpG 2007 significantly exceeded those generated by a squalene-based adjuvanted vaccine formulation during peak responses. A significantly higher IgM response was elicited by the formulation containing low dose CpG 2007 compared to high and low doses of 1826. Although the low dose of CpG 2007 elicited a higher IgY response than CpG 1826, the difference was not statistically significant. In conclusion, 2μg of CpG 2007 is potentially promising as a vaccine adjuvant when delivered intramuscularly with inactivated H9N2 virus to chickens. Future studies may be directed at determining the mucosal antibody responses to the same vaccine formulations.

  20. Experimental Infection of Chickens with Intercontinental Reassortant H9N2 Influenza Viruses from Wild Birds.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong-Hun; Kwon, Jung-Hoon; Park, Jae-Keun; Yuk, Seong-Su; Tseren-Ochir, Erdene-Ochir; Noh, Jin-Yong; Lee, Joong-Bok; Park, Seung-Yong; Choi, In-Soo; Song, Chang-Seon

    2016-06-01

    The H9N2 subtype of low pathogenic avian influenza (LPAI) virus is the most prevalent LPAI in domestic poultry. We previously reported the natural reassortant H9N2 viruses between North American and Eurasian lineages isolated from wild birds in Korea. These viruses were identified in China and Alaska, providing evidence of intercontinental dispersal. In this study, we evaluated the infectivity, transmissibility, and pathogenic potential of these H9N2 viruses and Eurasian H9N2 virus identified from wild birds using specific-pathogen-free chickens. Three-week-old chickens were infected intranasally. All of these reassortant H9N2 viruses could not be replicated and transmitted in chickens. On the other hand, three out of eight chickens inoculated with the Eurasian H9N2 virus shed detectable levels of virus and showed seroconversion but did not show contact transmission of the virus. Although all reassortant H9N2 viruses could not be replicated and transmitted in chickens, and although there are no reports on reassortant H9N2 virus infection in poultry farms until now, monitoring of reassortant H9N2 viruses should be continued to prepare for the advent and evolution of these viruses.

  1. Molecular epidemiology of H9N2 influenza viruses in Northern Europe.

    PubMed

    Lindh, Erika; Ek-Kommonen, Christine; Väänänen, Veli-Matti; Vaheri, Antti; Vapalahti, Olli; Huovilainen, Anita

    2014-08-27

    Low pathogenic avian influenza viruses are maintained in wild bird populations throughout the world. Avian influenza viruses are characterized by their efficient ability to reassort and adapt, which enables them to cross the species barrier and enhances their zoonotic potential. Influenza viruses of the H9N2 subtype appear endemic among poultry in Eurasia. They usually exist as low-pathogenic strains and circulate between wild bird populations, poultry and birds sold at live bird markets. Direct transmission of H9N2 viruses, with receptor specificities similar to human influenza strains, to pigs and humans has been reported on several occasions. H9N2 virus was first encountered in Finland in 2009, during routine screening of hunted wild waterfowl. The next year, H9N2 influenza viruses were isolated from wild birds on four occasions, including once from a farmed mallard. We have investigated the relationship between the reared and wild bird isolates by sequencing the hemagglutinin and the neuraminidase genes of the Finnish H9N2 viruses. Nucleotide sequence comparison and phylogenetic analyses indicate that H9N2 was transmitted from wild birds to reared birds in 2010, and that highly identical strains have been circulating in Europe during the last few years.

  2. The effect of the hexanic extracts of fig (Ficus carica) and olive (Olea europaea) fruit and nanoparticles of selenium on the immunogenicity of the inactivated avian influenza virus subtype H9N2.

    PubMed

    Asl Najjari, Amir Hossein; Rajabi, Zolfaghar; Vasfi Marandi, Mehdi; Dehghan, Gholamreza

    2015-01-01

    Influenza is a contagious viral disease that is seen in avian, human and other mammals, so its control is important. Vaccination against influenza virus subtype H9N2 is one of the ways in controlling program, for this reason several vaccines has been produced. Recently, application of inactivated oil-emulsion vaccines in poultry for controlling low pathogenic avian influenza is increasing. At present, oils that are used as adjuvant in commercial vaccines are mineral oils, which not only lack immunizing effect, but also produce some detriments. The aim of this study is the evaluation the immunogenicity of vegetable oils, which are more metabolizable and safer than mineral oils. In this study the efficacy of hexanic extracts of fig (Ficus carica) and olive (Olea europaea) fruit and also nano-selenium on the immunogenicity of the inactivated avian influenza virus subtype H9N2 was evaluated in broiler chickens. The results indicated that the prepared emulsions could elicit a little degree of immunity, but they could not inhibit the anamnestic response and infection. With regard to the results, it seems that the intact mixture of fig and olive fruit hexanic extracts could not be administered as an immunoadjuvant in the vaccine, and about nano-selenium. In spite of positive effect on the immunogenicity of avian influenza virus subtype H9N2, it still needs more work.

  3. Enhancement of Th1-biased protective immunity against avian influenza H9N2 virus via oral co-administration of attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium expressing chicken interferon-α and interleukin-18 along with an inactivated vaccine

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Control of currently circulating re-assorted low-pathogenicity avian influenza (LPAI) H9N2 is a major concern for both animal and human health. Thus, an improved LPAI H9N2 vaccination strategy is needed to induce complete immunity in chickens against LPAI H9N2 virus strains. Cytokines play a crucial role in mounting both the type and extent of an immune response generated following infection with a pathogen or after vaccination. To improve the efficacy of inactivated LPAI H9N2 vaccine, attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium was used for oral co-administration of chicken interferon-α (chIFN-α) and chicken interleukin-18 (chIL-18) as natural immunomodulators. Results Oral co-administration of S. enterica serovar Typhimurium expressing chIFN-α and chIL-18, prior to vaccination with inactivated AI H9N2 vaccine, modulated the immune response of chickens against the vaccine antigen through enhanced humoral and Th1-biased cell-mediated immunity, compared to chickens that received single administration of S. enterica serovar Typhimurium expressing either chIFN-α or chIL-18. To further test the protective efficacy of this improved vaccination regimen, immunized chickens were intra-tracheally challenged with a high dose of LPAI H9N2 virus. Combined administration of S. enterica serovar Typhimurium expressing chIFN-α and chIL-18 showed markedly enhanced protection compared to single administration of the construct, as determined by mortality, clinical severity, and feed and water intake. This enhancement of protective immunity was further confirmed by reduced rectal shedding and replication of AIV H9N2 in different tissues of challenged chickens. Conclusions Our results indicate the value of combined administration of chIFN-α and chIL-18 using a Salmonella vaccine strain to generate an effective immunization strategy in chickens against LPAI H9N2. PMID:22776696

  4. Generation of a reassortant avian influenza virus H5N2 vaccine strain capable of protecting chickens against infection with Egyptian H5N1 and H9N2 viruses.

    PubMed

    Kandeil, Ahmed; Moatasim, Yassmin; Gomaa, Mokhtar R; Shehata, Mahmoud M; El-Shesheny, Rabeh; Barakat, Ahmed; Webby, Richard J; Ali, Mohamed A; Kayali, Ghazi

    2016-01-04

    Avian influenza H5N1 viruses have been enzootic in Egyptian poultry since 2006. Avian influenza H9N2 viruses which have been circulating in Egyptian poultry since 2011 showed high replication rates in embryonated chicken eggs and mammalian cells. To investigate which gene segment was responsible for increasing replication, we constructed reassortant influenza viruses using the low pathogenic H1N1 PR8 virus as backbone and included individual genes from A/chicken/Egypt/S4456B/2011(H9N2) virus. Then, we invested this finding to improve a PR8-derived H5N1 influenza vaccine strain by incorporation of the NA segment of H9N2 virus instead of the NA of H5N1. The growth properties of this virus and several other forms of reassortant H5 viruses were compared. Finally, we tested the efficacy of this reassortant vaccine strain in chickens. We observed an increase in replication for a reassortant virus expressing the neuraminidase gene (N2) of H9N2 virus relative to that of either parental viruses or reassortant PR8 viruses expressing other genes. Then, we generated an H5N2 vaccine strain based on the H5 from an Egyptian H5N1 virus and the N2 from an Egyptian H9N2 virus on a PR8 backbone. This strain had better replication rates than an H5N2 reassortant strain on an H9N2 backbone and an H5N1 reassortant on a PR8 backbone. This virus was then used to develop a killed, oil-emulsion vaccine and tested for efficacy against H5N1 and H9N2 viruses in chickens. Results showed that this vaccine was immunogenic and reduced mortality and shedding. Our findings suggest that an inactivated PR8-derived H5N2 influenza vaccine is efficacious in poultry against H5N1 and H9N2 viruses and the vaccine seed replicates at a high rate thus improving vaccine production. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Generation of a reassortant avian influenza virus H5N2 vaccine strain capable of protecting chickens against infection with Egyptian H5N1 and H9N2 viruses

    PubMed Central

    Kandeil, Ahmed; Moatasim, Yassmin; Gomaa, Mokhtar R.; Shehata, Mahmoud M.; El-Shesheny, Rabeh; Barakat, Ahmed; Webby, Richard J.; Ali, Mohamed A.; Kayali, Ghazi

    2015-01-01

    Background Avian influenza H5N1 viruses have been enzootic in Egyptian poultry since 2006. Avian influenza H9N2 viruses which have been circulating in Egyptian poultry since 2011, showed high replication rates in embryonated chicken eggs and mammalian cells. Methods To investigate which gene segment was responsible for increasing replication, we constructed reassortant influenza viruses using the low pathogenic H1N1 PR8 virus as backbone and included individual genes from A/chicken/Egypt/S4456B/2011(H9N2) virus. Then, we invested this finding to improve a PR8-derived H5N1 influenza vaccine strain by incorporation of the NA segment of H9N2 virus instead of the NA of H5N1. The growth properties of this virus and several other forms of reassortant H5 viruses were compared. Finally, we tested the efficacy of this reassortant vaccine strain in chickens. Results We observed an increase in replication for a reassortant virus expressing the neuraminidase gene (N2) of H9N2 virus relative to that of either parental viruses or reassortant PR8 viruses expressing other genes. Then, we generated an H5N2 vaccine strain based on the H5 from an Egyptian H5N1 virus and the N2 from an Egyptian H9N2 virus on a PR8 backbone. This strain had better replication rates than an H5N2 reassortant strain on an H9N2 backbone and an H5N1 reassortant on a PR8 backbone. This virus was then used to develop a killed, oil-emulsion vaccine and tested for efficacy against H5N1 and H9N2 viruses in chickens. Results showed that this vaccine was immunogenic and reduced mortality and shedding. Discussion Our findings suggest that an inactivated PR8-derived H5N2 influenza vaccine is efficacious in poultry against H5N1 and H9N2 viruses and the vaccine seed replicates at a high rate thus improving vaccine production. PMID:26620838

  6. Isolation and mutation trend analysis of influenza A virus subtype H9N2 in Egypt

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Avian influenza virus H9N2 is a panzootic pathogen that affects poultry causing mild to moderate respiratory distress but has been associated with high morbidity and considerable mortality. Interspecies transmission of H9N2 from avian species to mammalian hosts does occur. The virus possesses human virus-like receptor specificity and it can infect humans producing flu-like illness. Methods Recently, mild influenza like symptoms were detected in H5N1 vaccinated flocks. Influenza A subtype H9N2 was isolated from the infected flock. The virus evolution was investigated by sequencing the viral genes to screen the possible virus recombination. The viral amino acid sequences from the isolated H9N2 strains were compared to other related sequences from the flu data base that were used to assess the robustness of the mutation trend. Changes in the species-associated amino acid residues or those that enabled virulence to mammals were allocated. Results Phylogenetic analyses of haemagglutinin and neuraminidase genes showed that the recently isolated Egyptian strain belonged to the H9N2 sub-lineage that prevails in Israel. The six internal segments of the isolated virus were found to be derived from the same sub-lineage with no new evidence of reassortment. The results demonstrated conserved genetic and biological constitution of H9N2 viruses in the Middle East. The recently isolated H9N2 virus from chicken in Egypt possessed amino acids that could enable the virus to replicate in mammals and caused severe disease in domestic chickens. Conclusion The study highlights the importance of continuous monitoring of the mutations evolved in avian influenza viruses and its impact on virulence to avian species in addition to its importance in the emergence of new strains with the capacity to be a pandemic candidate. PMID:22925485

  7. Isolation of H5N6, H7N9 and H9N2 avian influenza A viruses from air sampled at live poultry markets in China, 2014 and 2015

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jie; Wu, Jie; Zeng, Xianqiao; Huang, Guofeng; Zou, Lirong; Song, Yingchao; Gopinath, Divya; Zhang, Xin; Kang, Min; Lin, Jinyan; Cowling, Benjamin J; Lindsley, William G.; Ke, Changwen; Peiris, Joseph Sriyal Malik; Yen, Hui-Ling

    2016-01-01

    Zoonotic infections by avian influenza viruses occur at the human–poultry interface, but the modes of transmission have not been fully investigated. We assessed the potential for airborne and fomite transmission at live poultry markets in Guangzhou city and in Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (SAR), China, during 2014 and 2015. Viral genome and infectious avian influenza A viruses of H5N6, H7N9, and H9N2 subtypes were detected predominantly from particles larger or equal to 1 μm in diameter in the air sampled with cyclone-based bioaerosol samplers at the live poultry markets in Guangzhou. Influenza A(H9N2) viruses were ubiquitously isolated every month during the study period from air and environmental swabs, and different lineages of H9N2 virus were isolated from markets where chickens and minor land-based poultry were sold. The use of de-feathering devices increased the quantity of virus-laden airborne particles while market closure reduced the amount of such particles. The results highlight the possibility of airborne transmission of avian influenza viruses among poultry or from poultry to humans within such settings. This may explain epidemiological observations in which some patients with H7N9 infection reported being in markets but no direct contact with live poultry or poultry stalls. PMID:27608369

  8. Isolation of H5N6, H7N9 and H9N2 avian influenza A viruses from air sampled at live poultry markets in China, 2014 and 2015.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jie; Wu, Jie; Zeng, Xianqiao; Huang, Guofeng; Zou, Lirong; Song, Yingchao; Gopinath, Divya; Zhang, Xin; Kang, Min; Lin, Jinyan; Cowling, Benjamin J; Lindsley, William G; Ke, Changwen; Peiris, Joseph Sriyal Malik; Yen, Hui-Ling

    2016-09-01

    Zoonotic infections by avian influenza viruses occur at the human-poultry interface, but the modes of transmission have not been fully investigated. We assessed the potential for airborne and fomite transmission at live poultry markets in Guangzhou city and in Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (SAR), China, during 2014 and 2015. Viral genome and infectious avian influenza A viruses of H5N6, H7N9, and H9N2 subtypes were detected predominantly from particles larger or equal to 1 μm in diameter in the air sampled with cyclone-based bioaerosol samplers at the live poultry markets in Guangzhou. Influenza A(H9N2) viruses were ubiquitously isolated every month during the study period from air and environmental swabs, and different lineages of H9N2 virus were isolated from markets where chickens and minor land-based poultry were sold. The use of de-feathering devices increased the quantity of virus-laden airborne particles while market closure reduced the amount of such particles. The results highlight the possibility of airborne transmission of avian influenza viruses among poultry or from poultry to humans within such settings. This may explain epidemiological observations in which some patients with H7N9 infection reported being in markets but no direct contact with live poultry or poultry stalls. This article is copyright of The Authors, 2016.

  9. Evaluation of the Protective Efficacy of Poly I:C as an Adjuvant for H9N2 Subtype Avian Influenza Inactivated Vaccine and Its Mechanism of Action in Ducks.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Aiguo; Lai, Hanzhang; Xu, Jiahua; Huang, Wenke; Liu, Yufu; Zhao, Dawei; Chen, Ruiai

    2017-01-01

    Current commercial H9 avian influenza vaccines cannot provide satisfactory protective immunity against antigenic variant influenza viruses in ducks. Poly I:C, when used as an adjuvant, improves humoral and cellular immunity in many animals but has not been tested in ducks. In this study, we investigated the protective efficacy of Poly I:C as an adjuvant for an inactivated H9N2 Avian influenza vaccine in ducks. We found that an H9N2 vaccine administered with poly I:C (H9-PIC vaccine) induced a significantly more rapid response with higher anti-influenza antibody titers than those of the vaccine alone (H9 vaccine). Moreover, virus shedding was reduced in ducks immunized with the H9-PIC vaccine after challenge with an H9 subtype antigenic variant viruses. IFN-α, IFN-γ, IL-6 and MHC-II mRNA levels were all elevated in ducks receiving the H9-PIC vaccine. In addition, lower expression level of MHC-I may be a reason for inefficient protective ability against heterologous influenza viruses in H9-PIC vaccination of ducks. In conclusion, poly I:C adjuvant enhanced both humoral and cellular immune responses in ducks induced by immunization of inactivated H9N2 vaccine.

  10. Evaluation of the Protective Efficacy of Poly I:C as an Adjuvant for H9N2 Subtype Avian Influenza Inactivated Vaccine and Its Mechanism of Action in Ducks

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Aiguo; Lai, Hanzhang; Xu, Jiahua; Huang, Wenke; Liu, Yufu; Zhao, Dawei; Chen, Ruiai

    2017-01-01

    Current commercial H9 avian influenza vaccines cannot provide satisfactory protective immunity against antigenic variant influenza viruses in ducks. Poly I:C, when used as an adjuvant, improves humoral and cellular immunity in many animals but has not been tested in ducks. In this study, we investigated the protective efficacy of Poly I:C as an adjuvant for an inactivated H9N2 Avian influenza vaccine in ducks. We found that an H9N2 vaccine administered with poly I:C (H9-PIC vaccine) induced a significantly more rapid response with higher anti-influenza antibody titers than those of the vaccine alone (H9 vaccine). Moreover, virus shedding was reduced in ducks immunized with the H9-PIC vaccine after challenge with an H9 subtype antigenic variant viruses. IFN-α, IFN-γ, IL-6 and MHC-II mRNA levels were all elevated in ducks receiving the H9-PIC vaccine. In addition, lower expression level of MHC-I may be a reason for inefficient protective ability against heterologous influenza viruses in H9-PIC vaccination of ducks. In conclusion, poly I:C adjuvant enhanced both humoral and cellular immune responses in ducks induced by immunization of inactivated H9N2 vaccine. PMID:28135294

  11. Continuing evolution of H9N2 influenza viruses in Southeastern China.

    PubMed

    Choi, Y K; Ozaki, H; Webby, R J; Webster, R G; Peiris, J S; Poon, L; Butt, C; Leung, Y H C; Guan, Y

    2004-08-01

    H9N2 influenza viruses are panzootic in domestic poultry in Eurasia and since 1999 have caused transient infections in humans and pigs. To investigate the zoonotic potential of H9N2 viruses, we studied the evolution of the viruses in live-poultry markets in Hong Kong in 2003. H9N2 was the most prevalent influenza virus subtype in the live-poultry markets between 2001 and 2003. Antigenic and phylogenetic analysis of hemagglutinin (HA) showed that all of the 19 isolates found except one belonged to the lineage represented by A/Duck/Hong Kong/Y280/97 (H9N2). The exception was A/Guinea fowl/NT184/03 (H9N2), whose HA is most closely related to that of the human isolate A/Guangzhou/333/99 (H9N2), a virus belonging to the A/Chicken/Beijing/1/94-like (H9N2) lineage. At least six different genotypes were recognized. The majority of the viruses had nonstructural (and HA) genes derived from the A/Duck/Hong Kong/Y280/97-like virus lineage but had other genes of mixed avian virus origin, including genes similar to those of H5N1 viruses isolated in 2001. Viruses of all six genotypes of H9N2 found were able to replicate in chickens and mice without adaptation. The infected chickens showed no signs of disease, but representatives of two viral genotypes were lethal to mice. Three genotypes of virus replicated in the respiratory tracts of swine, which shed virus for at least 5 days. These results show an increasing genetic and biologic diversity of H9N2 viruses in Hong Kong and support their potential role as pandemic influenza agents.

  12. Phylogenetic Analysis and Pathogenicity Assessment of Two Strains of Avian Influenza Virus Subtype H9N2 Isolated from Migratory Birds: High Homology of Internal Genes with Human H10N8 Virus.

    PubMed

    Ye, Ge; Liang, Chai Hong; Hua, Deng Guo; Song, Lei Yong; Xiang, Yang Guo; Guang, Chen; Lan, Chen Hua; Ping, Hua Yu

    2016-01-01

    Two human-infecting avian influenza viruses (AIVs), H7N9 and H10N8, have emerged in China, which further indicate that the H9N2 subtype of AIVs, as an internal gene donor, may have an important role in the generation of new viruses with cross-species transmissibility and pathogenicity. H9N2 viruses that contain such internal genes widely exist in poultry but are rarely reported in migratory birds. In this study, two strains of the H9N2 virus were isolated from fecal samples of migratory birds in 2014: one strain from Caizi Lake in Anhui Province and one from Chen Lake in Hubei Province of China. Nucleotide sequence analysis revealed high homology of all six internal genes of these two strains with the internal genes of the human H10N8 virus in Jiangxi Province, as well as with the human H7N9 virus. Phylogenetic analysis indicated a possible origin of these two strains from poultry in South China. Both of the two viruses tested could replicated in respiratory organs of infective mice without adaption, by both strains of the H9N2 AIVs from wild birds, suggesting their potential capacity for directly infecting mammals. Our findings indicate the existence of H9N2 viruses that contain internal genes highly homologous with human H10N8 or H7N9 viruses. Wild birds can contribute to the spread of the H9N2 virus that contains the "harmful" internal gene complex, leading to gene rearrangement with other influenza viruses and to the generation of new pathogenic viruses. Therefore, strengthening AIV surveillance in wild birds can promote an understanding of the presence and prevalence of viruses and provide scientific evidence for the prevention and control of AIVs and human-infecting AIVs.

  13. Phylogenetic Analysis and Pathogenicity Assessment of Two Strains of Avian Influenza Virus Subtype H9N2 Isolated from Migratory Birds: High Homology of Internal Genes with Human H10N8 Virus

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Ge; Liang, Chai Hong; Hua, Deng Guo; Song, Lei Yong; Xiang, Yang Guo; Guang, Chen; Lan, Chen Hua; Ping, Hua Yu

    2016-01-01

    Two human-infecting avian influenza viruses (AIVs), H7N9 and H10N8, have emerged in China, which further indicate that the H9N2 subtype of AIVs, as an internal gene donor, may have an important role in the generation of new viruses with cross-species transmissibility and pathogenicity. H9N2 viruses that contain such internal genes widely exist in poultry but are rarely reported in migratory birds. In this study, two strains of the H9N2 virus were isolated from fecal samples of migratory birds in 2014: one strain from Caizi Lake in Anhui Province and one from Chen Lake in Hubei Province of China. Nucleotide sequence analysis revealed high homology of all six internal genes of these two strains with the internal genes of the human H10N8 virus in Jiangxi Province, as well as with the human H7N9 virus. Phylogenetic analysis indicated a possible origin of these two strains from poultry in South China. Both of the two viruses tested could replicated in respiratory organs of infective mice without adaption, by both strains of the H9N2 AIVs from wild birds, suggesting their potential capacity for directly infecting mammals. Our findings indicate the existence of H9N2 viruses that contain internal genes highly homologous with human H10N8 or H7N9 viruses. Wild birds can contribute to the spread of the H9N2 virus that contains the “harmful” internal gene complex, leading to gene rearrangement with other influenza viruses and to the generation of new pathogenic viruses. Therefore, strengthening AIV surveillance in wild birds can promote an understanding of the presence and prevalence of viruses and provide scientific evidence for the prevention and control of AIVs and human-infecting AIVs. PMID:26973600

  14. Experimental co-infection of infectious bronchitis and low pathogenic avian influenza H9N2 viruses in commercial broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Kareem E; Ali, Ahmed; Shany, Salama A S; El-Kady, Magdy F

    2017-06-30

    In this study, commercial broilers were experimentally infected with single (classical IBV, variant IBV or AIV-H9N2) or mixed AIV-H9N2 with classical, variant or vaccine strains of IBV. Birds were monitored for clinical and pathological outcomes and virus shedding for 10days post infection (DPI). Clinical signs were limited to the respiratory tract in all challenged groups and varied from mild to moderate mouth breathing to severe respiratory signs with snorting sound and extended head. Mortalities were only recorded in mixed AIV-H9N2/variant IBV challenge group. AIV-H9N2 challenge caused tracheal petechial hemorrhage that progressed to tracheal congestion and caseation. In mixed AIV-H9N2/IBV vaccine challenge, severe tracheitis with bronchial cast formation was observed. In mixed AIV-H9N2/variant IBV challenge severe congestion of the tracheal mucosa and excessive exudates with a tendency to form tubular casts were observed. Kidney ureate deposition was only observed in variant IBV challenge group. Histopathologically, tracheal congestion, severe degeneration, and deciliation were noticed in all groups of mixed infection. Interestingly, hemorrhage and atrophy were observed in thymus gland of birds challenged with single AIV-H9N2 or mixed AIV-H9N2/IBV. There was no difference in the tracheal shedding level of variant IBV between single and mixed infected groups while classical IBV shedding increased in mixed infection group. Interestingly, the AIV-H9N2 showed constantly high shedding titers till 7DPI with variant or vaccine IBV co-infection. In conclusion, co-infection of IBV and AIV-H9N2 induced severe clinical outcome and high mortality. Also, IBV co-infection increased the shedding of AIV-H9N2 in experimentally infected birds. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Improved hatchability and efficient protection after in ovo vaccination with live-attenuated H7N2 and H9N2 avian influenza viruses

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Mass in ovo vaccination with live attenuated viruses is widely used in the poultry industry to protect against various infectious diseases. The worldwide outbreaks of low pathogenic and highly pathogenic avian influenza highlight the pressing need for the development of similar mass vaccination strategies against avian influenza viruses. We have previously shown that a genetically modified live attenuated avian influenza virus (LAIV) was amenable for in ovo vaccination and provided optimal protection against H5 HPAI viruses. However, in ovo vaccination against other subtypes resulted in poor hatchability and, therefore, seemed impractical. In this study, we modified the H7 and H9 hemagglutinin (HA) proteins by substituting the amino acids at the cleavage site for those found in the H6 HA subtype. We found that with this modification, a single dose in ovo vaccination of 18-day old eggs provided complete protection against homologous challenge with low pathogenic virus in ≥70% of chickens at 2 or 6 weeks post-hatching. Further, inoculation of 19-day old egg embryos with 106 EID50 of LAIVs improved hatchability to ≥90% (equivalent to unvaccinated controls) with similar levels of protection. Our findings indicate that the strategy of modifying the HA cleavage site combined with the LAIV backbone could be used for in ovo vaccination against avian influenza. Importantly, with protection conferred as early as 2 weeks post-hatching, with this strategy birds would be protected prior to or at the time of delivery to a farm or commercial operation. PMID:21255403

  16. Improved hatchability and efficient protection after in ovo vaccination with live-attenuated H7N2 and H9N2 avian influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yibin; Song, Haichen; Ye, Jianqiang; Shao, Hongxia; Padmanabhan, Rangarajan; Sutton, Troy C; Perez, Daniel R

    2011-01-21

    Mass in ovo vaccination with live attenuated viruses is widely used in the poultry industry to protect against various infectious diseases. The worldwide outbreaks of low pathogenic and highly pathogenic avian influenza highlight the pressing need for the development of similar mass vaccination strategies against avian influenza viruses. We have previously shown that a genetically modified live attenuated avian influenza virus (LAIV) was amenable for in ovo vaccination and provided optimal protection against H5 HPAI viruses. However, in ovo vaccination against other subtypes resulted in poor hatchability and, therefore, seemed impractical. In this study, we modified the H7 and H9 hemagglutinin (HA) proteins by substituting the amino acids at the cleavage site for those found in the H6 HA subtype. We found that with this modification, a single dose in ovo vaccination of 18-day old eggs provided complete protection against homologous challenge with low pathogenic virus in ≥ 70% of chickens at 2 or 6 weeks post-hatching. Further, inoculation of 19-day old egg embryos with 10⁶ EID₅₀ of LAIVs improved hatchability to ≥ 90% (equivalent to unvaccinated controls) with similar levels of protection. Our findings indicate that the strategy of modifying the HA cleavage site combined with the LAIV backbone could be used for in ovo vaccination against avian influenza. Importantly, with protection conferred as early as 2 weeks post-hatching, with this strategy birds would be protected prior to or at the time of delivery to a farm or commercial operation.

  17. Genotypic evolution and antigenicity of H9N2 influenza viruses in Shanghai, China.

    PubMed

    Ge, Feifei; Li, Xin; Ju, Houbin; Yang, Dequan; Liu, Jian; Qi, Xinyong; Wang, Jian; Yang, Xianchao; Qiu, Yafeng; Liu, Peihong; Zhou, Jinping

    2016-06-01

    H9N2 influenza viruses have been circulating in China since 1994, but a systematic investigation of H9N2 in Shanghai has not previously been undertaken. Here, using 14 viruses we isolated from poultry and pigs in Shanghai during 2002 and 2006-2014, together with the commercial vaccine A/chicken/Shanghai/F/1998 (Ck/SH/F/98), we analyzed the evolution of H9N2 influenza viruses in Shanghai and showed that all 14 isolates originated from Ck/SH/F/98 antigenically. We evaluated the immune protection efficiency of the vaccine. Our findings demonstrate that H9N2 viruses in Shanghai have undergone extensive reassortment. Various genotypes emerged in 2002, 2006 and 2007, while during 2009-2014 only one genotype was found. Four antigenic groups, A-D, could be identified among the 14 isolates and a variety of antigenically distinct H9N2-virus-derived avian influenza viruses (AIVs) circulated simultaneously in Shanghai during this period. Challenge experiments using vaccinated chickens indicated that the vaccine prevented shedding of antigenic group A and B viruses, but not those of the more recent groups C and D. Genetic analysis showed that compared to the vaccine strain, representative viruses of antigenic groups C and D possess greater numbers of amino acid substitutions in the hemagglutinin (HA) protein than viruses in antigenic groups A and B. Many of these substitutions are located in antigenic sites. Our results indicate that the persistence of H9N2 AIV in China might be due to incomplete vaccine protection and that the avian influenza vaccine should be regularly evaluated and updated to maintain optimal protection.

  18. Complete Genome Sequence of Influenza Virus H9N2 Associated with a Fatal Outbreak among Chickens in Dubai.

    PubMed

    Lau, Siu-Ying; Joseph, Sunitha; Chan, Kwok-Hung; Chen, Honglin; Patteril, Nissy Annie Gerogy; Elizabeth, Shyna K; Muhammed, Rubeena; Baskar, Vijay; Lau, Susanna K P; Kinne, Joerg; Wernery, Ulrich; Woo, Patrick C Y

    2016-08-18

    We report the complete genome sequence of influenza virus H9N2 associated with a fatal outbreak among chickens in Dubai. All segments are clustered with avian H9N2 viruses circulating in the Middle East but distinct from those in southeast Asia. It is not a reassortant virus or transmitted from other regions.

  19. Assessment of the safety and efficacy of low pathogenic avian influenza (H9N2) virus in inactivated oil emulsion vaccine in laying hens

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jeong-Hwa; Mo, Jong Seo; Kim, Jong-Nyeo; Mo, In-pil

    2016-01-01

    In Korea, several outbreaks of low pathogenic AI (H9N2) viral infections leading to decreased egg production and increased mortality have been reported on commercial farms since 1996, resulting in severe economic losses. To control the H9N2 LPAI endemic, the Korea Veterinary Authority has permitted the use of the inactivated H9N2 LPAI vaccine since 2007. In this study, we developed a killed vaccine using a low pathogenic H9N2 AI virus (A/chicken/Korea/ADL0401) and conducted safety and efficacy tests in commercial layer farms while focusing on analysis of factors that cause losses to farms, including egg production rate, egg abnormality, and feed efficiency. The egg production rate of the control group declined dramatically 5 days after the challenge. There were no changes in feed consumption of all three groups before the challenge, but rates of the control declined afterward. Clinical signs in the vaccinated groups were similar, and a slight decline in feed consumption was observed after challenge; however, this returned to normal more rapidly than the control group and commercial layers. Overall, the results of this study indicate that the safety and efficacy of the vaccine are adequate to provide protection against the AI field infection (H9N2) epidemic in Korea. PMID:27051337

  20. Characterization of recombinant H9N2 influenza viruses isolated from wild ducks in China.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Guangjian; Wang, Renjie; Xuan, Fujun; Daszak, Peter; Anthony, Simon J; Zhang, Shuyi; Zhang, Libiao; He, Guimei

    2013-10-25

    Wild birds are considered to be the natural reservoirs for avian influenza A viruses (AIV). During active influenza surveillance in Poyang Lake of southeast China, we isolated and characterized 11 H9N2 viruses from two species of wild ducks. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the 11 isolates were almost identical with 99.3-100% nucleotide homology in their entire genome, and they all closely related in whole eight genes (95.6-99.4% homology) to human H9N2 isolates (HK/33982/2009) and clustered in the same sublineage. The isolates belonged to triple reassortant H9N2 genotype viruses containing Ck/Bei-like NA genes, Y439-like PA genes and six other G1-like genes. We also found that the subtype of virus replicated efficiently in the lungs and tracheas of BALB/c mice and caused mortality in 20-40% of infected groups after 3-6 days, which indicates that the subtype of virus is capable of establishing lethal mammalian infections. However, whether or not the virus has features transmittable from wild ducks to humans is not known. This study showed H9N2 subtype avian influenza virus for the first time in wild birds, and suggests that wild birds may carry the virus along migratory routes, highlighting the need for continued surveillance of wild birds.

  1. A global phylogenetic analysis in order to determine the host species and geography dependent features present in the evolution of avian H9N2 influenza hemagglutinin

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, Munir

    2014-01-01

    A complete phylogenetic analysis of all of the H9N2 hemagglutinin sequences that were collected between 1966 and 2012 was carried out in order to build a picture of the geographical and host specific evolution of the hemagglutinin protein. To improve the quality and applicability of the output data the sequences were divided into subsets based upon location and host species. The phylogenetic analysis of hemagglutinin reveals that the protein has distinct lineages between China and the Middle East, and that wild birds in both regions retain a distinct form of the H9 molecule, from the same lineage as the ancestral hemagglutinin. The results add further evidence to the hypothesis that the current predominant H9N2 hemagglutinin lineage might have originated in Southern China. The study also shows that there are sampling problems that affect the reliability of this and any similar analysis. This raises questions about the surveillance of H9N2 and the need for wider sampling of the virus in the environment. The results of this analysis are also consistent with a model where hemagglutinin has predominantly evolved by neutral drift punctuated by occasional selection events. These selective events have produced the current pattern of distinct lineages in the Middle East, Korea and China. This interpretation is in agreement with existing studies that have shown that there is widespread intra-country sequence evolution. PMID:25374791

  2. H9N2 influenza viruses isolated from poultry in Korean live bird markets continuously evolve and cause the severe clinical signs in layers.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin A; Cho, Sung Hwan; Kim, Hyun Soo; Seo, Sang Heui

    2006-12-20

    H9N2 influenza viruses are endemic in many Asian countries. We demonstrated that H9N2 influenza viruses isolated from poultry in Korean live bird markets are genetically changing and could cause the clinical signs in layers. Genetic analysis showed that Korean avian H9N2 influenza viruses are distinct from H9N2 influenza viruses circulating in poultry in China and Hong Kong. When we infected layers with H9N2 isolates, layers showed about 30% mortality and the reduction of egg productions. Considering that H9N2 influenza virus is one of potential pandemic candidates, the continuous surveillance is needed to monitor avian H9N2 influenza viruses for the poultry industry and humans.

  3. H9N2 avian influenza virus-derived natural reassortant H5N2 virus in swan containing the hemagglutinin segment from Eurasian H5 avian influenza virus with an in-frame deletion of four basic residues in the polybasic hemagglutinin cleavage site.

    PubMed

    Wang, Youling; Yuan, Xiaoyuan; Qi, Lihong; Zhang, Yuxia; Xu, Huaiying; Yang, Jinxing; Ai, Wu; Qi, Wenbao; Liao, Ming; Wang, Dan; Song, Minxun; Li, Feng

    2016-06-01

    We isolated a novel H5N2 avian influenza virus from swans in China. The virus was derived from a widespread H9N2 avian influenza virus but acquired the hemagglutinin gene from Eurasian H5 subtype with a naturally occurring in-frame deletion of four basic residues in the polybasic hemagglutinin cleavage site. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Evolution of H9N2 influenza viruses from domestic poultry in Mainland China.

    PubMed

    Li, Chengjun; Yu, Kangzhen; Tian, Guobin; Yu, Dandan; Liu, Liling; Jing, Bo; Ping, Jihui; Chen, Hualan

    2005-09-15

    H9N2 viruses have circulated in domestic poultry in Mainland China since 1994, and an inactivated vaccine has been used in chickens to control the disease since 1998. The present study analyzed 27 H9N2 avian influenza viruses that were isolated from chickens and ducks from 1996 to 2002. Infection studies indicated that most of the viruses replicate efficiently but none of them is lethal for SPF chickens. However, these viruses exhibit different phenotypes of replication in a mouse model. Five viruses, including 4 early isolates and one 2000 isolate, are not able to replicate in mice; 14 viruses replicate to moderate titers in mouse lungs and cause less than 5% weight loss, while other 8 viruses could replicate to high titers in the lungs and 7 of them induce 10-20% weight loss of the mice on day 5 after inoculation. Most of the viruses isolated after 1996 are antigenically different from the vaccine strain that is currently used in China. Three viruses isolated in central China in 1998 are resistant to adamantanes. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that all of the viruses originated from CK/BJ/1/94-like virus and formed multiple genotypes through complicated reassortment with QA/HK/G1/97-, CK/HK/G9/97-, CK/SH/F/98-, and TY/WI/66-like viruses. This study is a description of the previously uncharacterized H9N2 avian influenza viruses recently circulating in chickens and ducks in Mainland China. Our findings suggest that urgent attention should be paid to the control of H9N2 influenza viruses in animals and to the human's influenza pandemic preparedness.

  5. Assessing evidence for avian-to-human transmission of influenza A/H9N2 virus in rural farming communities in northern Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Hoa, Le Nguyen Minh; Tuan, Nguyen Anh; My, Pham Ha; Huong, Tran Thi Kieu; Chi, Nguyen Thi Yen; Hau Thu, Trang Thi; Carrique-Mas, Juan; Duong, Mai Thuy; Tho, Nguyen Dang; Hoang, Nguyen Dang; Thanh, To Long; Diep, Nguyen Thi; Duong, Nguyen van; Toan, Tran Khanh; Tung, Trinh Son; Mai, Le Quynh; Iqbal, Munir; Wertheim, Heiman; van Doorn, H Rogier; Bryant, Juliet E; The Vizions Consortium

    2017-08-01

    Rural farming communities in northern Vietnam do not routinely practice vaccination for influenza A viruses (IAV) for either humans or poultry, which enables us to study transmission intensity via seroepidemiology. Using samples from a longitudinal cohort of farming households, we determined the number of symptomatic and asymptomatic human infections for seasonal IAV and avian A/H9 over 2 years. As expected, we detected virologically confirmed acute cases of seasonal IAV in humans, as well as large numbers of subclinical seroconversions to A/H1pdm [55/265 (21 %)], A/H3 [95/265 (36 %)] and A/H9 [24/265 (9 %)]. Five of the A/H9 human seroconverters likely represented true infections rather than heterosubtypic immunity, because the individuals seroconverted solely to A/H9. Among co-located poultry, we found significantly higher seroprevalance for A/H5 compared to A/H9 in both chickens and ducks [for northern study sites overall, 337/1105 (30.5 %) seropositive for A/H5 and 123/1105 (11.1 %) seropositive for A/H9].

  6. Assessing the fitness of distinct clades of influenza A (H9N2) viruses

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Influenza A (H9N2) viruses are a genetically diverse population that infects wild and domestic avian species and mammals and contributed the internal gene segments to the A/H5N1 and A/H7N9 viruses associated with lethal human infections. Here we comprehensively assess the potential risk to mammals of a diverse panel of A/H9N2 viruses, representing the major H9N2 clades, using a combination of in vitro assays (e.g., antiviral susceptibility and virus growth in primary differentiated human airway cells) and in vivo assays (e.g., replication, transmission and/or pathogenicity of viruses in ducks, pigs, mice and ferrets). We observed that viruses isolated from humans, A/Hong Kong/1073/1999 and A/Hong Kong/33982/2009, had the highest risk potential. However, the A/swine/Hong Kong/9A-1/1998 and A/chicken/Hong Kong/G9/1997 viruses also displayed several features suggesting a fitness profile adapted to human infection and transmission. The North American avian H9N2 clade virus had the lowest risk profile, and the other viruses tested displayed various levels of fitness across individual assays. In many cases, the known genotypic polymorphisms alone were not sufficient to accurately predict the virus' phenotype. Therefore, we conclude that comprehensive risk analyses based on surveillance of circulating influenza virus strains are necessary to assess the potential for human infection by emerging influenza A viruses. PMID:26038443

  7. Mutations during the adaptation of H9N2 avian influenza virus to the respiratory epithelium of pigs enhance the sialic acid binding activity and the virulence in mice.

    PubMed

    Yang, W; Punyadarsaniya, D; Lambertz, R L O; Lee, D C C; Liang, C H; Höper, D; Leist, S R; Hernández-Cáceres, A; Stech, J; Beer, M; Wu, C Y; Wong, C H; Schughart, K; Meng, F; Herrler, G

    2017-02-01

    The natural reservoir for influenza viruses is waterfowl from where they succeeded to cross the barrier to different mammalian species. We analyzed the adaptation of avian influenza viruses to a mammalian host by passaging an H9N2 strain three times in differentiated swine airway epithelial cells. Using precision-cut slices from the porcine lung to passage the parental virus, isolates from each of the three passages (P1-P3) were characterized by assessing growth curves and ciliostatic effects. The only difference noted was an increased growth kinetics of the P3 virus. Sequence analysis revealed four mutations: one each in the PB2 and NS1, and two in the HA protein. The HA mutations, A190V and T212I, were characterized by generating recombinant viruses containing either one or both amino acid exchanges. Whereas the parental virus recognized α2,3-linked sialic acids preferentially, the HA190 mutant bound to a broad spectrum of glycans with α2,6/8/9-linked sialic acids. The HA212 mutant alone differed only slightly from the parental virus; however, the combination of both mutations (HA190+HA212) increased the binding affinity to those glycans recognized by the HA190 mutant. Remarkably, only the HA double mutant showed a significantly increased pathogenicity in mice. By contrast, none of those mutations affected the ciliary activity of the epithelial cells which is characteristic for virulent swine influenza viruses. Taken together, our results indicate that shifts in the HA receptor affinity are just an early adaptation step of avian H9N2 strains; further mutational changes may be required to become virulent for pigs.

  8. Characterization of Recombinant H9N2 Influenza Viruses Isolated from Wild Ducks in China

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Guangjian; Wang, Renjie; Xuan, Fujun; Daszak, Peter; Anthony, Simon J.; Zhang, Shuyi; Zhang, Libiao; He, Guimei

    2013-01-01

    Wild birds are considered to be the natural reservoirs for avian influenza A viruses (AIV). During active influenza surveillance in Poyang Lake of southeast China, we isolated and characterized eleven H9N2 viruses from two species of wild ducks. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the eleven isolates were almost identical with 99.3% to 100% nucleotide homology in their entire genome, and they all closely related in whole eight genes (95.6-99.4% homology) to human H9N2 isolates (HK/33982/2009) and clustered in the same sublineage. The isolates belonged to triple reassortant H9N2 genotype viruses containing Ck/Bei-like NA genes, Y439-like PA genes and six other G1-like genes. We also found that the subtype of virus replicated efficiently in the lungs and tracheas of BALB/c mice and caused mortality in 20-40% of infected groups after 3-6 days, which indicates that the subtype of virus is capable of establishing lethal mammalian infections. However, whether or not the virus has features transmittable from wild ducks to humans is not known. This study showed that the subtype of virus was detected for the first time in wild birds, and also suggested that wild birds may carry the virus for a long time and spread it over long distances along migratory routes, so more attention should be paid to the continued surveillance of wild birds. PMID:23830774

  9. H9N2 Avian Influenza Virus Protein PB1 Enhances the Immune Responses of Bone Marrow-Derived Dendritic Cells by Down-Regulating miR375

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jian; Xia, Jing; Tu, Chong Z.; Zhang, Ke Y.; Zeng, Yan; Yang, Qian

    2017-01-01

    Polymerase basic protein 1 (PB1), the catalytic core of the influenza A virus RNA polymerase complex, is essential for viral transcription and replication. Dendritic cells (DCs) possess important antigen presenting ability and a crucial role in recognizing and clearing virus. MicroRNA (miRNA) influence the development of DCs and their ability to present antigens as well as the ability of avian influenza virus (AIV) to infect host cells and replicate. Here, we studied the molecular mechanism underlying the miRNA-mediated regulation of immune function in mouse DCs. We first screened for and verified the induction of miRNAs in DCs after PB1 transfection. Results showed that the viral protein PB1 down-regulated the expression of miR375, miR146, miR339, and miR679 in DCs, consistent with the results of H9N2 virus treatment; however, the expression of miR222 and miR499, also reduced in the presence of PB1, was in contrast to the results of H9N2 virus treatment. Our results suggest that PB1 enhanced the ability of DCs to present antigens, activate lymphocytes, and secrete cytokines, while miR375 over-expression repressed activation of DC maturation. Nevertheless, PB1 could not promote DC maturation once miR375 was inhibited. Finally, we revealed that PB1 inhibited the P-Jnk/Jnk signaling pathway, but activated the p-Erk/Erk signaling pathway. While inhibition of miR375 -activated the p-Erk/Erk and p-p38/p38 signaling pathway, but repressed the P-Jnk/Jnk signaling pathway. Taken together, results of our studies shed new light on the roles and mechanisms of PB1 and miR375 in regulating DC function and suggest new strategies for combating AIV. PMID:28382020

  10. Pre-immune state induced by chicken interferon gamma inhibits the replication of H1N1 human and H9N2 avian influenza viruses in chicken embryo fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Yuk, Seong-Su; Lee, Dong-Hun; Park, Jae-Keun; Tseren-Ochir, Erdene-Ochir; Kwon, Jung-Hoon; Noh, Jin-Yong; Lee, Joong-Bok; Park, Seung-Yong; Choi, In-Soo; Song, Chang-Seon

    2016-04-27

    Interferon gamma (IFN-γ), an immunoregulatory cytokine, is known to control many microbial infections. In a previous study, chicken interferon gamma (chIFN-γ) was found to be up-regulated following avian influenza virus (AIV) infection in specific pathogen-free chickens. We aimed to investigate whether the pre-immune state induced by chIFN-γ could generate an antiviral response against influenza virus. We generated a chIFN-γ-expressing plasmid and transfected it into chicken embryo fibroblasts (CEFs) and then infected the cells with human origin H1N1 or avian origin H9N2 influenza viruses. Viral titers of culture medium were evaluated in MDCK cell and the viral RNA and IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) were then quantified by real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase. To further evaluate the role of the antiviral effect of chIFN-γ by using a backward approach, synthetic small interfering RNAs (siRNA) targeting chIFN-γ were used to suppress chIFN-γ. The chIFN-γ-stimulated CEFs inhibited the replication of viral RNA (vRNA) and showed a mild decrease in the infectious virus load released in the culture medium. Compared to the mock-transfected control, the messenger RNA (mRNA) levels of type I IFNs and IFN-stimulated genes were up-regulated in the cells expressing chIFN-γ. After treatment with the siRNA, we detected a higher expression of viral genes than that observed in the mock-transfected control. Our results suggest that apart from the important role played by chIFN-γ in the antiviral state generated against influenza virus infection, the pre-immune state induced by chIFN-γ can be helpful in mitigating the propagation of influenza virus.

  11. Characterization of a human H9N2 influenza virus isolated in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Saito, T; Lim, W; Suzuki, T; Suzuki, Y; Kida, H; Nishimura, S I; Tashiro, M

    2001-10-12

    Two H9N2 viruses were isolated, for the first time, from humans in Hong Kong in 1999. Isolation of influenza viruses with a novel subtype of the hemagglutinin (HA) drew attention of health care authorities worldwide from the view of pandemic preparedness. Sequence analysis of the HA genes reveals that HA of A/Hong Kong/1073/99 (H9N2) is most closely related to that of A/quail/HK/G1/97 (H9N2) that contains the internal genes similar to those of Hong Kong/97 (H5N1) viruses. Phylogenetic and antigenic analyses demonstrated the diversity among H9 HA. A/Hong Kong/1073/99 was shown to cause a respiratory infection in Syrian hamsters, suggesting that the virus can replicate efficiently in mammalian hosts. We developed a whole virion test vaccine with a formalin-inactivated egg-grown HK1073. Intraperitoneal administration of the vaccine twice to hamsters conferred a complete protection against challenge infection by the MDCK cell-grown homologous virus. Receptor specificity of HK1073 appeared different from that of other avian influenza viruses of H9 subtype which recognize preferentially alpha-2,3 linked sialic acid. Hemagglutination of HK1073 with guinea pig erythrocytes was inhibited by both alpha-2,3 and alpha-2,6 linked sialic acid containing polymers. These data suggested that HK1073 had acquired a broader host range, including humans. Together with data so far available, the present study suggested that isolation of the H9 influenza viruses from humans requires precaution against the emergence of a novel human influenza.

  12. Intraspecies and interspecies transmission of mink H9N2 influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Yong-Feng, Zhao; Fei-Fei, Diao; Jia-Yu, Yu; Feng-Xia, Zhang; Chang-Qing, Jiang; Jian-Li, Wang; Shou-Yu, Guo; Kai, Cui; Chuan-Yi, Liu; Xue-Hua, Wei; Jiang, Shi-Jin; Zhi-Jing, Xie

    2017-08-07

    H9N2 influenza A virus (IAV) causes low pathogenic respiratory disease and infects a wide range of hosts. In this study, six IAVs were isolated from mink and identified as H9N2 IAV. Sequence analysis revealed that the six isolates continued to evolve, and their PB2 genes shared high nucleotide sequence identity with H7N9 IAV. The six isolates contained an amino acid motif PSRSSR↓GL at the hemagglutinin cleavage site, which is a characteristic of low pathogenic influenza viruses. A serosurvey demonstrated that H9N2 IAV had spread widely in mink and was prevalent in foxes and raccoon dogs. Transmission experiments showed that close contact between H9N2-infected mink and naive mink, foxes and raccoon dogs resulted in spread of the virus to the contact animals. Furthermore, H9N2 challenge experiments in foxes and raccoon dogs showed that H9N2 IAV could infect these hosts. Virological and epidemiological surveillance of H9N2 IAV should be strengthened for the fur animal industry.

  13. Modulation of the innate immune-related genes expression in H9N2 avian influenza virus-infected chicken macrophage-like cells (HD11) in response to Escherichia coli LPS stimulation.

    PubMed

    Qi, Xuefeng; Liu, Caihong; Li, Ruiqiao; Zhang, Huizhu; Xu, Xingang; Wang, Jingyu

    2017-04-01

    Macrophages play important roles in mediating virus-induced innate immune responses and are thought to be involved in the pathogenesis of bacterial superinfections. The innate immune response initiated by both low pathogenicity AIV and bacterial superinfection in their avian host is not fully understood. We therefore determine the transcripts of innate immune-related genes following avian H9N2 AIV virus infection and E. coli LPS co-stimulation of avian macrophage-like cell line HD11 cells. More pronounced expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-6 and IL-1β) as well as the inflammatory chemokines (CXCLi1 and CXCLi2) was observed in virus infected plus LPS treated HD11 cells compared to H9N2 virus solely infected control. For two superinfection groups, the levels of genes examined in a prior H9N2 virus infection before secondary LPS treatment group were significantly higher as compared with simultaneous virus infection plus LPS stimulation group. Interestingly, similar high levels of IL-6 gene were observed between LPS sole stimulation group and two superinfection groups. Moreover, IL-10 and TGF-β3 mRNA levels in both superinfection groups were moderately upregulated compared to sole LPS stimulation group or virus alone infection group. Although TLR4 and MDA5 levels in virus alone infection group were significantly lower compared to that in both superinfection groups, TLR4 upregulation respond more rapid to virus sole infection compared to LPS plus virus superinfection. Collectively, innate immune-related genes respond more pronounced in LPS stimulation plus H9N2 virus infection HD11 cells compared to sole virus infection or LPS alone stimulation control cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Comparative Epidemiology of Human Fatal Infections with Novel, High (H5N6 and H5N1) and Low (H7N9 and H9N2) Pathogenicity Avian Influenza A Viruses.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zu-Qun; Zhang, Yi; Zhao, Na; Yu, Zhao; Pan, Hao; Chan, Ta-Chien; Zhang, Zhi-Ruo; Liu, She-Lan

    2017-03-04

    This study aimed to assess the mortality risks for human infection with high (HPAI) and low (LPAI) pathogenicity avian influenza viruses. The HPAI case fatality rate (CFR) was far higher than the LPAI CFR [66.0% (293/444) vs. 68.75% (11/16) vs. 40.4% (265/656) vs. 0.0% (0/18) in the cases with H5N1, H5N6, H7N9, and H9N2 viruses, respectively; p < 0.001]. Similarly, the CFR of the index cases was greater than the secondary cases with H5N1 [100% (43/43) vs. 43.3% (42/97), p < 0.001]. Old age [22.5 vs. 17 years for H5N1, p = 0.018; 61 vs. 49 years for H7H9, p < 0.001], concurrent diseases [18.8% (15/80) vs. 8.33% (9/108) for H5N1, p = 0.046; 58.6% (156/266) vs. 34.8% (135/388) for H7H9, p < 0.001], delayed confirmation [13 vs. 6 days for H5N1, p < 0.001; 10 vs. 8 days for H7N9, p = 0.011] in the fatalities and survivors, were risk factors for deaths. With regard to the H5N1 clusters, exposure to poultry [67.4% (29/43) vs. 45.2% (19/42), p = 0.039] was the higher risk for the primary than the secondary deaths. In conclusion, old age, comorbidities, delayed confirmation, along with poultry exposure are the major risks contributing to fatal outcomes in human HPAI and LPAI infections.

  15. Comparative Epidemiology of Human Fatal Infections with Novel, High (H5N6 and H5N1) and Low (H7N9 and H9N2) Pathogenicity Avian Influenza A Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zu-Qun; Zhang, Yi; Zhao, Na; Yu, Zhao; Pan, Hao; Chan, Ta-Chien; Zhang, Zhi-Ruo; Liu, She-Lan

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the mortality risks for human infection with high (HPAI) and low (LPAI) pathogenicity avian influenza viruses. The HPAI case fatality rate (CFR) was far higher than the LPAI CFR [66.0% (293/444) vs. 68.75% (11/16) vs. 40.4% (265/656) vs. 0.0% (0/18) in the cases with H5N1, H5N6, H7N9, and H9N2 viruses, respectively; p < 0.001]. Similarly, the CFR of the index cases was greater than the secondary cases with H5N1 [100% (43/43) vs. 43.3% (42/97), p < 0.001]. Old age [22.5 vs. 17 years for H5N1, p = 0.018; 61 vs. 49 years for H7H9, p < 0.001], concurrent diseases [18.8% (15/80) vs. 8.33% (9/108) for H5N1, p = 0.046; 58.6% (156/266) vs. 34.8% (135/388) for H7H9, p < 0.001], delayed confirmation [13 vs. 6 days for H5N1, p < 0.001; 10 vs. 8 days for H7N9, p = 0.011] in the fatalities and survivors, were risk factors for deaths. With regard to the H5N1 clusters, exposure to poultry [67.4% (29/43) vs. 45.2% (19/42), p = 0.039] was the higher risk for the primary than the secondary deaths. In conclusion, old age, comorbidities, delayed confirmation, along with poultry exposure are the major risks contributing to fatal outcomes in human HPAI and LPAI infections. PMID:28273867

  16. Multiple introductions of a reassortant H5N1 avian influenza virus of clade 2.3.2.1c with PB2 gene of H9N2 subtype into Indian poultry.

    PubMed

    Tosh, Chakradhar; Nagarajan, Shanmugasundaram; Kumar, Manoj; Murugkar, Harshad V; Venkatesh, Govindarajulu; Shukla, Shweta; Mishra, Amit; Mishra, Pranav; Agarwal, Sonam; Singh, Bharati; Dubey, Prashant; Tripathi, Sushil; Kulkarni, Diwakar D

    2016-09-01

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 viruses are a threat to poultry in Asia, Europe, Africa and North America. Here, we report isolation and characterization of H5N1 viruses isolated from ducks and turkeys in Kerala, Chandigarh and Uttar Pradesh, India between November 2014 and March 2015. Genetic and phylogenetic analyses of haemagglutinin gene identified that the virus belonged to a new clade 2.3.2.1c which has not been detected earlier in Indian poultry. The virus possessed molecular signature for high pathogenicity to chickens, which was corroborated by intravenous pathogenicity index of 2.96. The virus was a reassortant which derives its PB2 gene from H9N2 virus isolated in China during 2007-2013. However, the neuraminidase and internal genes are of H5N1 subtype. Phylogenetic and network analysis revealed that after detection in China in 2013/2014, the virus moved to Europe, West Africa and other Asian countries including India. The analyses further indicated multiple introductions of H5N1 virus in Indian poultry and internal spread in Kerala. One of the outbreaks in ducks in Kerala is linked to the H5N1 virus isolated from wild birds in Dubai suggesting movement of virus probably through migration of wild birds. However, the outbreaks in ducks in Chandigarh and Uttar Pradesh were from an unknown source in Asia which also contributed gene pools to the outbreaks in Europe and West Africa. The widespread incidence of the novel H5N1 HPAI is similar to the spread of clade 2.2 ("Qinghai-like") virus in 2005, and should be monitored to avoid threat to animal and public health.

  17. Different outcomes of infection of chickens and ducks with a duck-origin H9N2 influenza A virus.

    PubMed

    Wang, J; Li, C C; Diao, Y X; Sun, X Y; Hao, D M; Liu, X; Ge, P P

    2014-01-01

    As the major aquatic and terrestrial hosts for avian influenza viruses (AIVs), ducks and chickens play a critical role in the evolution and spread of the H9N2 virus. However, the outcomes of infection of ducks and chickens with the H9N2 virus are not sufficiently documented. In this study, we compared the outcomes of infection of chickens and Peking ducks with a duck-origin H9N2 virus. The results showed that this virus caused more pronounced clinical signs and histological lesions in chickens. As for the virus shedding, chickens shed more virus in the trachea and less virus in the cloaca in levels of interferon (IFN) γ were found in the trachea of ducks compared with chickens, while comparison with ducks. As for cytokines, namely IFNs and interleukins (IL), higher higher levels of IFN-β, IFN-γ, IL-1β, and IL-6 were observed in the ileum of chickens compared with ducks. Eventually, serum hemagglutination-inhibition (HI) antibody titers were higher in chickens than in ducks. Taken together, ducks and chickens use different strategies in response to the H9N2 virus infection in tissues representing main replication sites of low-pathogenic AIVs. Given the different outcomes of the H9N2 virus infection in ducks and chickens, different measures should be taken in vaccination and treatment.

  18. Two Genetically Similar H9N2 Influenza A Viruses Show Different Pathogenicity in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qingtao; Liu, Yuzhuo; Yang, Jing; Huang, Xinmei; Han, Kaikai; Zhao, Dongmin; Bi, Keran; Li, Yin

    2016-01-01

    H9N2 Avian influenza virus has repeatedly infected humans and other mammals, which highlights the need to determine the pathogenicity and the corresponding mechanism of this virus for mammals. In this study, we found two H9N2 viruses with similar genetic background but with different pathogenicity in mice. The A/duck/Nanjing/06/2003 (NJ06) virus was highly pathogenic for mice, with a 50% mouse lethal dose (MLD50) of 102.83 50% egg infectious dose (EID50), whereas the A/duck/Nanjing/01/1999 (NJ01) virus was low pathogenic for mice, with a MLD50 of >106.81 EID50. Further studies showed that the NJ06 virus grew faster and reached significantly higher titers than NJ01 in vivo and in vitro. Moreover, the NJ06 virus induced more severe lung lesions, and higher levels of inflammatory cellular infiltration and cytokine response in lungs than NJ01 did. However, only 12 different amino acid residues (HA-K157E, NA-A9T, NA-R435K, PB2-T149P, PB2-K627E, PB1-R187K, PA-L548M, PA-M550L, NP-G127E, NP-P277H, NP-D340N, NS1-D171N) were found between the two viruses, and all these residues except for NA-R435K were located in the known functional regions involved in interaction of viral proteins or between the virus and host factors. Summary, our results suggest that multiple amino acid differences may be responsible for the higher pathogenicity of the NJ06 virus for mice, resulting in lethal infection, enhanced viral replication, severe lung lesions, and excessive inflammatory cellular infiltration and cytokine response in lungs. These observations will be helpful for better understanding the pathogenic potential and the corresponding molecular basis of H9N2 viruses that might pose threats to human health in the future. PMID:27867373

  19. Carnosine markedly ameliorates H9N2 swine influenza virus-induced acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Xu, Tong; Wang, Cunlian; Zhang, Ruihua; Xu, Mingju; Liu, Baojian; Wei, Dong; Wang, Guohua; Tian, Shufei

    2015-10-01

    Oxidative stress injury is an important pathogenesis of influenza virus in critically ill patients. The present study investigated the efficacy of carnosine, an antioxidant and free radical scavenger, on a model of acute lung injury (ALI) induced by H9N2 swine influenza virus. Female specific-pathogen-free BALB/c mice were randomized into four groups and treated as follows: (1) H9N2 group, (2) mock control group, (3) H9N2+carnosine group and (4) carnosine control group. The H9N2 group mice were inoculated intranasally with A/Swine/Hebei/012/2008/ (H9N2) virus (100 μl) in allantoic fluid (AF), whilst mock-infected animals were intranasally inoculated with non-infectious AF. Carnosine [10 mg (kg body mass)- 1] was administered orally (100 μl) for 7 days consecutively. The survival rate, lung water content, TNF-α and IL-1β levels, lung histopathology, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, and Toll-like receptor (TLR)-4 levels were determined at 2, 4, 6, 8 and 14 days after inoculation. Carnosine treatment effectively decreased the mortality (43 versus 75 %, P < 0.05), significantly ameliorated pathological lesions in lungs and decreased the lung wet/dry mass ratio (P < 0.05). It also inhibited MPO activity, suppressed TNF-α and IL-1β release, decreased the H9N2 viral titre, and markedly inhibited levels of TLR-4 mRNA and protein in the lungs of infected mice (P < 0.05), which supported the use of carnosine for managing severe influenza cases.

  20. Carnosine markedly ameliorates H9N2 swine influenza virus-induced acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Cunlian; Zhang, Ruihua; Xu, Mingju; Liu, Baojian; Wei, Dong; Wang, Guohua; Tian, Shufei

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress injury is an important pathogenesis of influenza virus in critically ill patients. The present study investigated the efficacy of carnosine, an antioxidant and free radical scavenger, on a model of acute lung injury (ALI) induced by H9N2 swine influenza virus. Female specific-pathogen-free BALB/c mice were randomized into four groups and treated as follows: (1) H9N2 group, (2) mock control group, (3) H9N2+carnosine group and (4) carnosine control group. The H9N2 group mice were inoculated intranasally with A/Swine/Hebei/012/2008/ (H9N2) virus (100 μl) in allantoic fluid (AF), whilst mock-infected animals were intranasally inoculated with non-infectious AF. Carnosine [10 mg (kg body mass)− 1] was administered orally (100 μl) for 7 days consecutively. The survival rate, lung water content, TNF-α and IL-1β levels, lung histopathology, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, and Toll-like receptor (TLR)-4 levels were determined at 2, 4, 6, 8 and 14 days after inoculation. Carnosine treatment effectively decreased the mortality (43 versus 75 %, P < 0.05), significantly ameliorated pathological lesions in lungs and decreased the lung wet/dry mass ratio (P < 0.05). It also inhibited MPO activity, suppressed TNF-α and IL-1β release, decreased the H9N2 viral titre, and markedly inhibited levels of TLR-4 mRNA and protein in the lungs of infected mice (P < 0.05), which supported the use of carnosine for managing severe influenza cases. PMID:26233716

  1. Experimental co-infection of SPF chickens with low pathogenicity avian influenza virus (LPAIV) subtypes H9N2, H5N2 and H7N9, and infectious bronchitis virus (IBV)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Avian influenza virus (AIV) and infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) are two of the most important respiratory viruses affecting poultry worldwide, but little is known about the effect of co-infection of these two viruses in poultry. Low pathogenicity (LP) AIV can produce from mild to moderate upper r...

  2. Characterization of H5N2 influenza viruses isolated in South Korea and their influence on the emergence of a novel H9N2 influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hye-Ryoung; Park, Choi-Ku; Oem, Jae-Ku; Bae, You-Chan; Choi, Jun-Gu; Lee, O-Soo; Lee, Youn-Jeong

    2010-08-01

    We characterized low pathogenic avian influenza (LPAI) H5N2 and H9N2 viruses isolated in South Korea from 2008 to 2009. Genetic analysis of the H5N2 viruses isolated from wild birds and domestic ducks demonstrated that they were related to the recently isolated southern Chinese LPAI H5 viruses and various influenza viruses circulating in Eurasia. Three H9N2 viruses obtained at live bird markets and duck farms were reassortant viruses generated from the H5N2 viruses of domestic ducks and the H9N2 virus endemic in Korean chickens. The H5N2 viruses did not replicate well in experimentally infected chickens and mice, but novel H9N2 viruses, without pre-adaptation, were recovered at high titres in chickens. Our results show that reassortment between H5N2 and H9N2 viruses must have occurred in domestic ducks and may have contributed to the diversity expansion of the gene pool, which has potential to alter the pathogenicity and host range of the influenza virus.

  3. Molecular characterization of mammalian-adapted Korean-type avian H9N2 virus and evaluation of its virulence in mice.

    PubMed

    Park, Kuk Jin; Song, Min-Suk; Kim, Eun-Ha; Kwon, Hyeok-Il; Baek, Yun Hee; Choi, Eun-Hye; Park, Su-Jin; Kim, Se Mi; Kim, Young-Il; Choi, Won-Suk; Yoo, Dae-Won; Kim, Chul-Joong; Choi, Young Ki

    2015-08-01

    Avian influenza A virus (AIV) is commonly isolated from domestic poultry and wild migratory birds, and the H9N2 subtype is the most prevalent and the major cause of severe disease in poultry in Korea. In addition to the veterinary concerns regarding the H9N2 subtype, it is also considered to be the next potential human pandemic strain due to its rapid evolution and interspecies transmission. In this study, we utilize serial lung-to-lung passage of a low pathogenic avian influenza virus (LPAI) H9N2 (A/Ck/Korea/163/04, WT163) (Y439-lineage) in mice to increase pathogenicity and investigate the potential virulence marker. Mouse-adapted H9N2 virus obtained high virulence (100% mortality) in mice after 98 serial passages. Sequence results show that the mouse adaptation (ma163) possesses several mutations within seven gene segments (PB2, PA, HA, NP, NA, M, and NS) relative to the wild-type strain. The HA gene showed the most mutations (at least 11) with one resulting in the loss of an N-glycosylation site (at amino acid 166). Moreover, reverse genetic studies established that an E627K substitution in PB2 and the loss of the N-glycosylation site in the HA protein (aa166) are critical virulence markers in the mouse-adapted H9N2 virus. Thus, these results add to the increasing body of mutational analysis data defining the function of the viral polymerase and HA genes and their roles in mammalian host adaptation. To our knowledge, this is first report of the generation of a mammalian-adapted Korea H9N2 virus (Y493-lineages). Therefore, this study offers valuable insights into the molecular evolution of the LPAI Korean H9N2 in a new host and adds to the current knowledge of the molecular markers associated with increased virulence.

  4. Influenza H7N9 and H9N2 Viruses: Coexistence in Poultry Linked to Human H7N9 Infection and Genome Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xinfen; Jin, Tao; Cui, Yujun; Pu, Xiaoying; Li, Jun; Xu, Jin; Liu, Guang; Jia, Huijue; Liu, Dan; Song, Shili; Yu, Yang; Xie, Li; Huang, Renjie; Ding, Hua; Kou, Yu; Zhou, Yinyan; Wang, Yayu; Xu, Xun; Yin, Ye; Wang, Jian; Guo, Chenyi; Yang, Xianwei; Hu, Liangping; Wu, Xiaopeng; Wang, Hailong; Liu, Jun; Zhao, Guoqiu; Zhou, Jiyong; Gao, George F.; Yang, Ruifu; Wang, Jun

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Avian influenza virus A of the novel H7N9 reassortant subtype was recently found to cause severe human respiratory infections in China. Live poultry markets were suspected locations of the human H7N9 infection sources, based on the cases' exposure histories and sequence similarities between viral isolates. To explore the role of live poultry markets in the origin of the novel H7N9 virus, we systematically examined poultry and environmental specimens from local markets and farms in Hangzhou, using real-time reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) as well as high-throughput next-generation sequencing (NGS). RT-PCR identified specimens positive for the H7 and N9 genomic segments in all of the 12 poultry markets epidemiologically linked to 10 human H7N9 cases. Chickens, ducks, and environmental specimens from the markets contained heavily mixed subtypes, including H7, N9, H9, and N2 and sometimes H5 and N1. The idea of the coexistence of H7N9 and H9N2 subtypes in chickens was further supported by metagenomic sequencing. In contrast, human H7N9 infection cases (n = 31) were all negative for H9N2 virus according to real-time RT-PCR. The six internal segments were indistinguishable for the H7N9 and H9N2 viruses. The H9, N2, and internal-segment sequences were very close to the sequence of the H9N2 virus circulating in chickens in China recently. Our results provide direct evidence that H9N2 strains coexisted with the novel human-pathogenic H7N9 influenza virus in epidemiologically linked live poultry markets. Avian influenza A virus of the H9N2 subtype likely made a recent contribution to the evolution of the H7N9 virus and continues to do so. IMPORTANCE Our results suggest that avian influenza A virus of the H9N2 subtype likely made a recent contribution to the evolution of the H7N9 virus, a novel reassortant avian influenza virus A subtype, and continues to do so. The finding helps shed light on how the H7N9 virus emerged, spread, and transmitted to humans. It is of

  5. The genesis and evolution of H9N2 influenza viruses in poultry from southern China, 2000 to 2005.

    PubMed

    Xu, K M; Smith, G J D; Bahl, J; Duan, L; Tai, H; Vijaykrishna, D; Wang, J; Zhang, J X; Li, K S; Fan, X H; Webster, R G; Chen, H; Peiris, J S M; Guan, Y

    2007-10-01

    H9N2 influenza viruses have become established in terrestrial poultry in different Asian countries over the last 2 decades. Our previous study demonstrated that quail harbor increasingly diverse novel H9N2 reassortants, including both Chicken/Beijing/1/94 (Ck/Bei-like) and Quail/Hong Kong/G1/97 (G1-like) viruses. However, since 1999, the genesis and evolution of H9N2 viruses in different types of poultry have not been investigated systematically. In the present study, H9N2 viruses isolated from chickens, ducks, and other minor poultry species were characterized genetically and antigenically. Our findings demonstrate that Ck/Bei-like H9N2 viruses have been introduced into many different types of poultry in southern China, including quail, partridges, chukar, pheasant, guinea fowl, and domestic ducks, while G1-like viruses were commonly detected in quail, less frequently detected in other minor poultry species, and not detected in chickens and ducks. Genetic analysis revealed 35 genotypes of H9N2 viruses, including 14 novel genotypes that have not been recognized before. Our results also suggested that two-way interspecies transmission exists between different types of poultry. Our study demonstrates that the long-term cocirculation of multiple virus lineages (e.g., H5N1 and H9N2 viruses) in different types of poultry has facilitated the frequent reassortment events that are mostly responsible for the current great genetic diversity in H9N2 and H5N1 influenza viruses in this region. This situation favors the emergence of influenza viruses with pandemic potential.

  6. The Genesis and Evolution of H9N2 Influenza Viruses in Poultry from Southern China, 2000 to 2005▿

    PubMed Central

    Xu, K. M.; Smith, G. J. D.; Bahl, J.; Duan, L.; Tai, H.; Vijaykrishna, D.; Wang, J.; Zhang, J. X.; Li, K. S.; Fan, X. H.; Webster, R. G.; Chen, H.; Peiris, J. S. M.; Guan, Y.

    2007-01-01

    H9N2 influenza viruses have become established in terrestrial poultry in different Asian countries over the last 2 decades. Our previous study demonstrated that quail harbor increasingly diverse novel H9N2 reassortants, including both Chicken/Beijing/1/94 (Ck/Bei-like) and Quail/Hong Kong/G1/97 (G1-like) viruses. However, since 1999, the genesis and evolution of H9N2 viruses in different types of poultry have not been investigated systematically. In the present study, H9N2 viruses isolated from chickens, ducks, and other minor poultry species were characterized genetically and antigenically. Our findings demonstrate that Ck/Bei-like H9N2 viruses have been introduced into many different types of poultry in southern China, including quail, partridges, chukar, pheasant, guinea fowl, and domestic ducks, while G1-like viruses were commonly detected in quail, less frequently detected in other minor poultry species, and not detected in chickens and ducks. Genetic analysis revealed 35 genotypes of H9N2 viruses, including 14 novel genotypes that have not been recognized before. Our results also suggested that two-way interspecies transmission exists between different types of poultry. Our study demonstrates that the long-term cocirculation of multiple virus lineages (e.g., H5N1 and H9N2 viruses) in different types of poultry has facilitated the frequent reassortment events that are mostly responsible for the current great genetic diversity in H9N2 and H5N1 influenza viruses in this region. This situation favors the emergence of influenza viruses with pandemic potential. PMID:17652402

  7. Sequence and phylogenetic analysis of surface protein genes of emerging H9N2 influenza viruses isolated from poultry in two geographical regions of China.

    PubMed

    Xue, Yu; Wang, Jing-Lan; Yan, Zhuan-Qiang; Li, Guang-Wei; Chen, Shun-Yan; Zhang, Xiang-Bin; Qin, Jian-Ping; Li, Hai-Yan; Chang, Shuang; Chen, Feng; Bee, Ying-Zuo; Xie, Qing-Mei

    2014-06-01

    Subtype H9N2 avian influenza viruses (AIVs) circulating in China have aroused increasing concerns for their impact on poultry and risk to public health. The present study was an attempt to elucidate the phylogenetic relationship of H9N2 AIVs in two geographically distinct regions of China where vaccination is routinely practiced. A total of 18 emerging H9N2 isolates were identified and genetically characterized. Phylogenetic analysis of hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) genes confirmed that the isolates belonged to the Y280 lineage. Based on the HA genes, the isolates were subdivided into two subgroups. The viruses from Zhejiang Province were clustered together in Group I, while the isolates from Guangdong Province were clustered together in Group II. Antigenic characterization showed that the tested viruses were antigenically different when compared to the current used vaccine strain. It was notable that 14 out of total 18 isolates had an amino acid exchange (Q→L) at position 216 (226 by H3 Numbering) in the receptor-binding site, which indicated that the virus had potential affinity of binding to human like receptor. These results suggest that the emerging viruses have potential risk to public health than previously thought. Therefore, continuous surveillance studies of H9N2 influenza virus are very important to the prognosis and control of future influenza pandemics.

  8. Differences in transmissibility and pathogenicity of reassortants between H9N2 and 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza A viruses from humans and swine.

    PubMed

    He, Liang; Wu, Qiwen; Jiang, Kaijun; Duan, Zhiqiang; Liu, Jingjing; Xu, Haixu; Cui, Zhu; Gu, Min; Wang, Xiaoquan; Liu, Xiaowen; Liu, Xiufan

    2014-07-01

    Both H9N2 subtype avian influenza and 2009 pandemic H1N1 viruses (pH1N1) can infect humans and pigs, which provides the opportunity for virus reassortment, leading to the genesis of new strains with potential pandemic risk. In this study, we generated six reassortant H9 viruses in the background of three pH1N1 strains from different hosts (A/California/04/2009 [CA04], A/Swine/Jiangsu/48/2010 [JS48] and A/Swine/Jiangsu/285/2010 [JS285]) by replacing either the HA (H9N1-pH1N1) or both the HA and NA genes (H9N2-pH1N1) from an h9.4.2.5-lineage H9N2 subtype influenza virus, A/Swine/Taizhou/5/08 (TZ5). The reassortant H9 viruses replicated to higher titers in vitro and in vivo and gained both efficient transmissibility in guinea pigs and increased pathogenicity in mice compared with the parental H9N2 virus. In addition, differences in transmissibility and pathogenicity were observed among these reassortant H9 viruses. The H9N2-pH1N1viruses were transmitted more efficiently than the corresponding H9N1-pH1N1 viruses but showed significantly decreased pathogenicity. One of the reassortant H9 viruses that were generated, H9N-JS48, showed the highest virulence in mice and acquired respiratory droplet transmissibility between guinea pigs. These results indicate that coinfection of swine with H9N2 and pH1N1viruses may pose a threat for humans if reassortment occurs, emphasizing the importance of surveillance of these viruses in their natural hosts.

  9. Immune responses of chickens inoculated with a recombinant fowlpox vaccine coexpressing HA of H9N2 avain influenza virus and chicken IL-18.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong-Ying; Shang, Yan-Hong; Yao, Hui-Xia; Cui, Bao-An; Zhang, Hong-Ying; Wang, Zi-Xin; Wang, Ya-Dan; Chao, An-Jun; Duan, Ting-Yun

    2011-07-01

    Control of the circulation of H9N2 avian influenza virus (AIV) is a major concern for both animal and public health, and H9N2 AIV poses a major threat to the chicken industry worldwide. Here, we developed a recombinant fowlpox virus (rFPV-HA) expressing the haemagglutinin (HA) gene of the A/CH/JY/1/05 (H9N2) influenza virus and a recombinant fowlpox virus (rFPV-HA/IL18) expressing the HA gene and chicken interleukin-18 (IL-18) gene. Recombinant plasmid pSY-HA/IL18 was constructed by cloning chicken IL-18 expression cassette into recombinant plasmid pSY-HA containing the HA gene. Two rFPVs were generated by transfecting two recombinant plasmids into the chicken embryo fibroblast cells pre-infected with S-FPV-017, and assessed for their immunological efficacy on one-day-old White Leghorn specific-pathogen-free chickens challenged with the A/CH/JY/1/05 (H9N2) strain. There was a significant difference in HI antibody levels (P<0.05) elicited by either rFPV-HA or rFPV-HA/IL18. The level of splenocyte proliferation response in the rFPV-HA/IL18-vaccinated group was significantly higher (P<0.05) than that in the rFPV-HA group. After challenge with 10(6.5)ELD(50) H9N2 AIV 43days after immunization, rFPVs vaccinated groups could prevent virus shedding and replication in multiple organs in response to H9N2 AIV infection, and rFPV-HA/IL18 vaccinated group had better inhibition of viruses than rFPV-HA vaccinated group. Our results show that the protective efficacy of the rFPV-HA vaccine could be enhanced significantly by simultaneous expression of IL-18.

  10. Safety and antigenicity of whole virus and subunit influenza A/Hong Kong/1073/99 (H9N2) vaccine in healthy adults: phase I randomised trial.

    PubMed

    Stephenson, Iain; Nicholson, Karl G; Glück, Reinhardt; Mischler, Robert; Newman, Robert W; Palache, Abraham M; Verlander, Neville Q; Warburton, Fiona; Wood, John M; Zambon, Maria C

    2003-12-13

    In 1999, avian influenza A/Hong Kong/1073/99 (H9N2) virus emerged as a pandemic threat to human beings. We aimed to assess safety, tolerability, and antigenicity of whole virus and subunit H9N2 vaccines in healthy volunteers. In a phase I randomised trial we randomly assigned 60 participants to whole virus or subunit H9N2 vaccine. Two doses of 7.5 microg, 15 microg, or 30 microg haemagglutinin influenza A H9N2 vaccine, were given 3 weeks apart. We measured antibody responses by haemagglutination-inhibition and microneutralisation. The primary outcome was geometric mean antibody titre 21 days after vaccination. Analysis was per protocol. Both vaccines were safe and well tolerated. The antibody titres after vaccination did not differ significantly between subunit and whole virus vaccine. 24 of 60 prevaccination serum samples had unexpected reactivity to H9N2, but only in participants older than 32 years, in whom one dose of either vaccine evoked antibody responses associated with protection. In participants aged 32 years or younger, antibody responses to one dose of whole virus or subunit vaccine were poor, fulfilling none of the criteria used for yearly relicensing of interpandemic vaccines. Whole virus vaccine produced a significantly higher probability of seroconversion compared with subunit virus for this age-group. In immunologically naive patients whole-virus vaccine produced better responses than subunit vaccine. Two doses of subunit or whole virus vaccine would leave a large proportion of the naive population (< or =32 years) unprotected against A/Hong Kong/1073/99 (H9N2). Primed patients should be protected with a single dose of either vaccine.

  11. Dispersal of H9N2 influenza A viruses between East Asia and North America by wild birds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ramey, Andy M.; Reeves, Andrew B.; Sonsthagen, Sarah A.; Teslaa, Joshua L.; Nashold, Sean W.; Donnelly, Tyrone F.; Casler, Bruce; Hall, Jeffrey S.

    2015-01-01

    Samples were collected from wild birds in western Alaska to assess dispersal of influenza A viruses between East Asia and North America. Two isolates shared nearly identical nucleotide identity at eight genomic segments with H9N2 viruses isolated from China and South Korea providing evidence for intercontinental dispersal by migratory birds.

  12. Immune Escape Variants of H9N2 Influenza Viruses Containing Deletions at the Hemagglutinin Receptor Binding Site Retain Fitness In Vivo and Display Enhanced Zoonotic Characteristics.

    PubMed

    Peacock, Thomas P; Benton, Donald J; James, Joe; Sadeyen, Jean-Remy; Chang, Pengxiang; Sealy, Joshua E; Bryant, Juliet E; Martin, Stephen R; Shelton, Holly; Barclay, Wendy S; Iqbal, Munir

    2017-07-15

    H9N2 avian influenza viruses are enzootic in poultry across Asia and North Africa, where they pose a threat to human health as both zoonotic agents and potential pandemic candidates. Poultry vaccination against H9N2 viruses has been employed in many regions; however, vaccine effectiveness is frequently compromised due to antigenic drift arising from amino acid substitutions in the major influenza virus antigen hemagglutinin (HA). Using selection with HA-specific monoclonal antibodies, we previously identified H9N2 antibody escape mutants that contained deletions of amino acids in the 220 loop of the HA receptor binding sites (RBSs). Here we analyzed the impact of these deletions on virus zoonotic infection characteristics and fitness. We demonstrated that mutant viruses with RBS deletions are able to escape polyclonal antiserum binding and are able to infect and be transmitted between chickens. We showed that the deletion mutants have increased binding to human-like receptors and greater replication in primary human airway cells; however, the mutant HAs also displayed reduced pH and thermal stability. In summary, we infer that variant influenza viruses with deletions in the 220 loop could arise in the field due to immune selection pressure; however, due to reduced HA stability, we conclude that these viruses are unlikely to be transmitted from human to human by the airborne route, a prerequisite for pandemic emergence. Our findings underscore the complex interplay between antigenic drift and viral fitness for avian influenza viruses as well as the challenges of predicting which viral variants may pose the greatest threats for zoonotic and pandemic emergence.IMPORTANCE Avian influenza viruses, such as H9N2, cause disease in poultry as well as occasionally infecting humans and are therefore considered viruses with pandemic potential. Many countries have introduced vaccination of poultry to try to control the disease burden; however, influenza viruses are able to

  13. Immune Escape Variants of H9N2 Influenza Viruses Containing Deletions at the Hemagglutinin Receptor Binding Site Retain Fitness In Vivo and Display Enhanced Zoonotic Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Peacock, Thomas P.; Benton, Donald J.; James, Joe; Sadeyen, Jean-Remy; Chang, Pengxiang; Sealy, Joshua E.; Bryant, Juliet E.; Martin, Stephen R.; Barclay, Wendy S.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT H9N2 avian influenza viruses are enzootic in poultry across Asia and North Africa, where they pose a threat to human health as both zoonotic agents and potential pandemic candidates. Poultry vaccination against H9N2 viruses has been employed in many regions; however, vaccine effectiveness is frequently compromised due to antigenic drift arising from amino acid substitutions in the major influenza virus antigen hemagglutinin (HA). Using selection with HA-specific monoclonal antibodies, we previously identified H9N2 antibody escape mutants that contained deletions of amino acids in the 220 loop of the HA receptor binding sites (RBSs). Here we analyzed the impact of these deletions on virus zoonotic infection characteristics and fitness. We demonstrated that mutant viruses with RBS deletions are able to escape polyclonal antiserum binding and are able to infect and be transmitted between chickens. We showed that the deletion mutants have increased binding to human-like receptors and greater replication in primary human airway cells; however, the mutant HAs also displayed reduced pH and thermal stability. In summary, we infer that variant influenza viruses with deletions in the 220 loop could arise in the field due to immune selection pressure; however, due to reduced HA stability, we conclude that these viruses are unlikely to be transmitted from human to human by the airborne route, a prerequisite for pandemic emergence. Our findings underscore the complex interplay between antigenic drift and viral fitness for avian influenza viruses as well as the challenges of predicting which viral variants may pose the greatest threats for zoonotic and pandemic emergence. IMPORTANCE Avian influenza viruses, such as H9N2, cause disease in poultry as well as occasionally infecting humans and are therefore considered viruses with pandemic potential. Many countries have introduced vaccination of poultry to try to control the disease burden; however, influenza viruses are

  14. Isolation and phylogenetic analysis of hemagglutinin gene of H9N2 influenza viruses from chickens in South China from 2012 to 2013.

    PubMed

    Shen, Han-Qin; Yan, Zhuan-Qiang; Zeng, Fan-Gui; Liao, Chang-Tao; Zhou, Qing-Feng; Qin, Jian-Ping; Xie, Qing-Mei; Bi, Ying-Zuo; Chen, Feng

    2015-01-01

    As part of our ongoing influenza surveillance program in South China, 19 field strains of H9N2 subtype avian influenza viruses (AIVs) were isolated from dead or diseased chicken flocks in Guangdong province, South China, between 2012 and 2013. Hemagglutinin (HA) genes of these strains were sequenced and analyzed and phylogenic analysis showed that 12 of the 19 isolates belonged to the lineage h9.4.2.5, while the other seven belonged to h9.4.2.6. Specifically, we found that all of the viruses isolated in 2013 belonged to lineage h9.4.2.5. The lineage h9.4.2.5 viruses contained a PSRSSR↓GLF motif at HA cleavage site, while the lineage h9.4.2.6 viruses contained a PARSSR↓GLF at the same position. Most of the isolates in lineage h9.4.2.5 lost one potential glycosylation site at residues 200-202, and had an additional one at residues 295-297 in HA1. Notably, 19 isolates had an amino acid exchange (Q226L) in the receptor binding site, which indicated that the viruses had potential affinity of binding to human like receptor. The present study shows the importance of continuing surveillance of new H9N2 strains to better prepare for the next epidemic or pandemic outbreak of H9N2 AIV infections in chicken flocks.

  15. A novel method for detection of H9N2 influenza viruses by an aptamer-real time-PCR.

    PubMed

    Hmila, Issam; Wongphatcharachai, Manoosak; Laamiri, Nacira; Aouini, Rim; Marnissi, Boutheina; Arbi, Marwa; Sreevatsan, Srinand; Ghram, Abdeljelil

    2017-01-31

    H9N2 Influenza subtype has emerged in Tunisia causing epidemics in poultry and resulting in major economic losses. New mutations in their hemagglutinin and neuraminidase proteins were acquired, suggesting their potential to directly infect humans. Effective surveillance tools should be implemented to help prevent potential spillover of the virus across species. We have developed a highly sensitive real time immuno-polymerase chain reaction (RT-I-PCR) method for detecting H9N2 virus. The assay applies aptamers as ligands to capture and detect the virus. First, a panel of specific ssDNA aptamers was selected via a one step high stringency protocol. Next, the panel of selected aptamers was characterized for their affinities and their specificity to H9N2 virus. The aptamer showing the highest binding affinity to the virus was used as ligand to develop a highly sensitive sandwich Aptamer I-PCR. A 3-log increase in analytical sensitivity was achieved as compared to a routinely used ELISA antigen test, highlighting the potential of this approach to detect very low levels of virus particles. The test was validated using clinical samples and constitutes a rapid and a label-free platform, opening a new venue for the development of aptamer -based viability sensing for a variety of microorganisms of economic importance in Tunisia and surrounding regions.

  16. The Continuing Evolution of H5N1 and H9N2 Influenza Viruses in Bangladesh Between 2013 and 2014.

    PubMed

    Marinova-Petkova, Atanaska; Shanmuganatham, Karthik; Feeroz, Mohammed M; Jones-Engel, Lisa; Hasan, M Kamrul; Akhtar, Sharmin; Turner, Jasmine; Walker, David; Seiler, Patrick; Franks, John; McKenzie, Pamela; Krauss, Scott; Webby, Richard J; Webster, Robert G

    2016-05-01

    In 2011, avian influenza surveillance at the Bangladesh live bird markets (LBMs) showed complete replacement of the highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 virus of clade 2.2.2 (Qinghai-like H5N1 lineage) by the HPAI H5N1 clade 2.3.2.1. This clade, which continues to circulate in Bangladesh and neighboring countries, is an intra-and interclade reassortant; its HA, polymerase basic 1 (PB1), polymerase (PA), and nonstructural (NS) genes come from subclade 2.3.2.1a; the polymerase basic 2 (PB2) comes from subclade 2.3.2.1c; and the NA, nucleocapsid protein (NP), and matrix (M) gene from clade 2.3.4.2. The H9N2 influenza viruses cocirculating in the Bangladesh LBMs are also reassortants, possessing five genes (NS, M, NP, PA, and PB1) from an HPAI H7N3 virus previously isolated in Pakistan. Despite frequent coinfection of chickens and ducks, reassortment between these H5N1 and H9N2 viruses has been rare. However, all such reassortants detected in 2011 through 2013 have carried seven genes from the local HPAI H5N1 lineage and the PB1 gene from the Bangladeshi H9N2 clade G1 Mideast, itself derived from HPAI H7N3 virus. Although the live birds we sampled in Bangladesh showed no clinical signs of morbidity, the emergence of this reassortant HPAI H5N1 lineage further complicates endemic circulation of H5N1 viruses in Bangladesh, posing a threat to both poultry and humans.

  17. Proteomic Analysis of Differential Expression of Cellular Proteins in Response to Avian H9N2 Virus Infection of A549 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Guanliu; Liang, Wei; Liu, Jiyuan; Meng, Dan; Wei, Liangmeng; Chai, Tongjie; Cai, Yumei

    2016-01-01

    In this study, differentially expressed proteins in A549 cells (human lung adenocarcinoma epithelial cell line) infected with H9N2 avian influenza virus (AIV) were investigated by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE). Sixteen different spots between the groups (ratio > 2, p < 0.05) were identified with mass spectrometry identification. Proteins located in the downstream of the NF-κB and IFN transcription factor pathways were identified, e.g., ISG15. Actin and keratin were also identified, suggesting that the cytoskeleton may plays an important role in the AIV infection of mammalian cells. These findings could provide insights into the interaction between host and influenza viruses and might provide valuable information for clarifying the pathogenesis of viral infections as well. PMID:28018302

  18. M Gene Reassortment in H9N2 Influenza Virus Promotes Early Infection and Replication: Contribution to Rising Virus Prevalence in Chickens in China.

    PubMed

    Pu, Juan; Sun, Honglei; Qu, Yi; Wang, Chenxi; Gao, Weihua; Zhu, Junda; Sun, Yipeng; Bi, Yuhai; Huang, Yinhua; Chang, Kin-Chow; Cui, Jie; Liu, Jinhua

    2017-04-15

    Segment reassortment and base mutagenesis of influenza A viruses are the primary routes to the rapid evolution of high-fitness virus genotypes. We recently described a predominant G57 genotype of avian H9N2 viruses that caused countrywide outbreaks in chickens in China during 2010 to 2013, which led to the zoonotic emergence of H7N9 viruses. One of the key features of the G57 genotype is the replacement of the earlier A/chicken/Beijing/1/1994 (BJ/94)-like M gene with the A/quail/Hong Kong/G1/1997 (G1)-like M gene of quail origin. We report here the functional significance of the G1-like M gene in H9N2 viruses in conferring increased infection severity and infectivity in primary chicken embryonic fibroblasts and chickens. H9N2 virus housing the G1-like M gene, in place of the BJ/94-like M gene, showed an early surge in viral mRNA and viral RNA (vRNA) transcription that was associated with enhanced viral protein production and with an early elevated release of progeny virus comprising largely spherical rather than filamentous virions. Importantly, H9N2 virus with the G1-like M gene conferred extrapulmonary virus spread in chickens. Five highly represented signature amino acid residues (37A, 95K, 224N, and 242N in the M1 protein and 21G in the M2 protein) encoded by the prevalent G1-like M gene were demonstrated to be prime contributors to enhanced infectivity. Therefore, the genetic evolution of the M gene in H9N2 virus increases reproductive virus fitness, indicating its contribution to the rising virus prevalence in chickens in China.IMPORTANCE We recently described the circulation of a dominant genotype (genotype G57) of H9N2 viruses in countrywide outbreaks in chickens in China, which was responsible, through reassortment, for the emergence of H7N9 viruses that cause severe human infections. A key feature of the genotype G57 H9N2 virus is the presence of the quail-origin G1-like M gene, which had replaced the earlier BJ/94-like M gene. We found that H9N2 virus

  19. Novel Genotypes of H9N2 Influenza A Viruses Isolated from Poultry in Pakistan Containing NS Genes Similar to Highly Pathogenic H7N3 and H5N1 Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, Munir; Yaqub, Tahir; Reddy, Kolli; McCauley, John W.

    2009-01-01

    The impact of avian influenza caused by H9N2 viruses in Pakistan is now significantly more severe than in previous years. Since all gene segments contribute towards the virulence of avian influenza virus, it was imperative to investigate the molecular features and genetic relationships of H9N2 viruses prevalent in this region. Analysis of the gene sequences of all eight RNA segments from 12 viruses isolated between 2005 and 2008 was undertaken. The hemagglutinin (HA) sequences of all isolates were closely related to H9N2 viruses isolated from Iran between 2004 and 2007 and contained leucine instead of glutamine at position 226 in the receptor binding pocket, a recognised marker for the recognition of sialic acids linked α2–6 to galactose. The neuraminidase (NA) of two isolates contained a unique five residue deletion in the stalk (from residues 80 to 84), a possible indication of greater adaptation of these viruses to the chicken host. The HA, NA, nucleoprotein (NP), and matrix (M) genes showed close identity with H9N2 viruses isolated during 1999 in Pakistan and clustered in the A/Quail/Hong Kong/G1/97 virus lineage. In contrast, the polymerase genes clustered with H9N2 viruses from India, Iran and Dubai. The NS gene segment showed greater genetic diversity and shared a high level of similarity with NS genes from either H5 or H7 subtypes rather than with established H9N2 Eurasian lineages. These results indicate that during recent years the H9N2 viruses have undergone extensive genetic reassortment which has led to the generation of H9N2 viruses of novel genotypes in the Indian sub-continent. The novel genotypes of H9N2 viruses may play a role in the increased problems observed by H9N2 to poultry and reinforce the continued need to monitor H9N2 infections for their zoonotic potential. PMID:19517011

  20. Amino Acid 316 of Hemagglutinin and the Neuraminidase Stalk Length Influence Virulence of H9N2 Influenza Virus in Chickens and Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yipeng; Tan, Yuanyuan; Wei, Kai; Sun, Honglei; Shi, Yi; Pu, Juan; Yang, Hanchun; Gao, George F.; Yin, Yanbo; Feng, Wenhai; Perez, Daniel R.

    2013-01-01

    H9N2 influenza viruses with an A316S substitution in hemagglutinin (HA) and a shorter neuraminidase (NA) stalk have become predominant in China. The A316S was shown to increase HA cleavage efficiency when combined with short stalk NA, and the short stalk NA improved NA enzyme activity and release of virus from erythrocytes. Single mutations or combinations of these mutations strengthened the virulence of H9N2 virus in chickens and mice. PMID:23269805

  1. Live bird markets of Bangladesh: H9N2 viruses and the near absence of highly pathogenic H5N1 influenza.

    PubMed

    Negovetich, Nicholas J; Feeroz, Mohammed M; Jones-Engel, Lisa; Walker, David; Alam, S M Rabiul; Hasan, Kamrul; Seiler, Patrick; Ferguson, Angie; Friedman, Kim; Barman, Subrata; Franks, John; Turner, Jasmine; Krauss, Scott; Webby, Richard J; Webster, Robert G

    2011-04-26

    Avian influenza surveillance in Bangladesh has been passive, relying on poultry farmers to report suspected outbreaks of highly pathogenic H5N1 influenza. Here, the results of an active surveillance effort focusing on the live-bird markets are presented. Prevalence of influenza infection in the birds of the live bird markets is 23.0%, which is similar to that in poultry markets in other countries. Nearly all of the isolates (94%) were of the non-pathogenic H9N2 subtype, but viruses of the H1N2, H1N3, H3N6, H4N2, H5N1, and H10N7 subtypes were also observed. The highly pathogenic H5N1-subtype virus was observed at extremely low prevalence in the surveillance samples (0.08%), and we suggest that the current risk of infection for humans in the retail poultry markets in Bangladesh is negligible. However, the high prevalence of the H9 subtype and its potential for interaction with the highly pathogenic H5N1-subtype, i.e., reassortment and attenuation of host morbidity, highlight the importance of active surveillance of the poultry markets.

  2. Live Bird Markets of Bangladesh: H9N2 Viruses and the Near Absence of Highly Pathogenic H5N1 Influenza

    PubMed Central

    Negovetich, Nicholas J.; Feeroz, Mohammed M.; Jones-Engel, Lisa; Walker, David; Alam, S. M. Rabiul; Hasan, Kamrul; Seiler, Patrick; Ferguson, Angie; Friedman, Kim; Barman, Subrata; Franks, John; Turner, Jasmine; Krauss, Scott; Webby, Richard J.; Webster, Robert G.

    2011-01-01

    Avian influenza surveillance in Bangladesh has been passive, relying on poultry farmers to report suspected outbreaks of highly pathogenic H5N1 influenza. Here, the results of an active surveillance effort focusing on the live-bird markets are presented. Prevalence of influenza infection in the birds of the live bird markets is 23.0%, which is similar to that in poultry markets in other countries. Nearly all of the isolates (94%) were of the non-pathogenic H9N2 subtype, but viruses of the H1N2, H1N3, H3N6, H4N2, H5N1, and H10N7 subtypes were also observed. The highly pathogenic H5N1-subtype virus was observed at extremely low prevalence in the surveillance samples (0.08%), and we suggest that the current risk of infection for humans in the retail poultry markets in Bangladesh is negligible. However, the high prevalence of the H9 subtype and its potential for interaction with the highly pathogenic H5N1-subtype, i.e., reassortment and attenuation of host morbidity, highlight the importance of active surveillance of the poultry markets. PMID:21541296

  3. H9N2 influenza viruses possessing H5N1-like internal genomes continue to circulate in poultry in southeastern China.

    PubMed

    Guan, Y; Shortridge, K F; Krauss, S; Chin, P S; Dyrting, K C; Ellis, T M; Webster, R G; Peiris, M

    2000-10-01

    The transmission of H9N2 influenza viruses to humans and the realization that the A/Hong Kong/156/97-like (H5N1) (abbreviated HK/156/97) genome complex may be present in H9N2 viruses in southeastern China necessitated a study of the distribution and characterization of H9N2 viruses in poultry in the Hong Kong SAR in 1999. Serological studies indicated that H9N2 influenza viruses had infected a high proportion of chickens and other land-based birds (pigeon, pheasant, quail, guinea fowl, and chukka) from southeastern China. Two lineages of H9N2 influenza viruses present in the live-poultry markets were represented by A/Quail/Hong Kong/G1/97 (Qa/HK/G1/97)-like and A/Duck/Hong Kong/Y280/97 (Dk/HK/Y280/97)-like viruses. Up to 16% of cages of quail in the poultry markets contained Qa/HK/G1/97-like viruses, while about 5% of cages of other land-based birds were infected with Dk/HK/Y280/97-like viruses. No reassortant between the two H9N2 virus lineages was detected despite their cocirculation in the poultry markets. Reassortant viruses represented by A/Chicken/Hong Kong/G9/97 (H9N2) were the major H9N2 influenza viruses circulating in the Hong Kong markets in 1997 but have not been detected since the chicken slaughter in 1997. The Qa/HK/G1/97-like viruses were frequently isolated from quail, while Dk/HK/Y280/97-like viruses were predominately associated with chickens. The Qa/HK/G1/97-like viruses were evolving relatively rapidly, especially in their PB2, HA, NP, and NA genes, suggesting that they are in the process of adapting to a new host. Experimental studies showed that both H9N2 lineages were primarily spread by the aerosol route and that neither quail nor chickens showed evidence of disease. The high prevalence of quail infected with Qa/HK/G1/97-like virus that contains six gene segments genetically highly related to HK/156/97 (H5N1) virus emphasizes the need for surveillance of mammals including humans.

  4. H9N2 Influenza Viruses Possessing H5N1-Like Internal Genomes Continue To Circulate in Poultry in Southeastern China

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Y.; Shortridge, K. F.; Krauss, S.; Chin, P. S.; Dyrting, K. C.; Ellis, T. M.; Webster, R. G.; Peiris, M.

    2000-01-01

    The transmission of H9N2 influenza viruses to humans and the realization that the A/Hong Kong/156/97-like (H5N1) (abbreviated HK/156/97) genome complex may be present in H9N2 viruses in southeastern China necessitated a study of the distribution and characterization of H9N2 viruses in poultry in the Hong Kong SAR in 1999. Serological studies indicated that H9N2 influenza viruses had infected a high proportion of chickens and other land-based birds (pigeon, pheasant, quail, guinea fowl, and chukka) from southeastern China. Two lineages of H9N2 influenza viruses present in the live-poultry markets were represented by A/Quail/Hong Kong/G1/97 (Qa/HK/G1/97)-like and A/Duck/Hong Kong/Y280/97 (Dk/HK/Y280/97)-like viruses. Up to 16% of cages of quail in the poultry markets contained Qa/HK/G1/97-like viruses, while about 5% of cages of other land-based birds were infected with Dk/HK/Y280/97-like viruses. No reassortant between the two H9N2 virus lineages was detected despite their cocirculation in the poultry markets. Reassortant viruses represented by A/Chicken/Hong Kong/G9/97 (H9N2) were the major H9N2 influenza viruses circulating in the Hong Kong markets in 1997 but have not been detected since the chicken slaughter in 1997. The Qa/HK/G1/97-like viruses were frequently isolated from quail, while Dk/HK/Y280/97-like viruses were predominately associated with chickens. The Qa/HK/G1/97-like viruses were evolving relatively rapidly, especially in their PB2, HA, NP, and NA genes, suggesting that they are in the process of adapting to a new host. Experimental studies showed that both H9N2 lineages were primarily spread by the aerosol route and that neither quail nor chickens showed evidence of disease. The high prevalence of quail infected with Qa/HK/G1/97-like virus that contains six gene segments genetically highly related to HK/156/97 (H5N1) virus emphasizes the need for surveillance of mammals including humans. PMID:11000205

  5. LABEL: Fast and Accurate Lineage Assignment with Assessment of H5N1 and H9N2 Influenza A Hemagglutinins

    PubMed Central

    Shepard, Samuel S.; Davis, C. Todd; Bahl, Justin; Rivailler, Pierre; York, Ian A.; Donis, Ruben O.

    2014-01-01

    The evolutionary classification of influenza genes into lineages is a first step in understanding their molecular epidemiology and can inform the subsequent implementation of control measures. We introduce a novel approach called Lineage Assignment By Extended Learning (LABEL) to rapidly determine cladistic information for any number of genes without the need for time-consuming sequence alignment, phylogenetic tree construction, or manual annotation. Instead, LABEL relies on hidden Markov model profiles and support vector machine training to hierarchically classify gene sequences by their similarity to pre-defined lineages. We assessed LABEL by analyzing the annotated hemagglutinin genes of highly pathogenic (H5N1) and low pathogenicity (H9N2) avian influenza A viruses. Using the WHO/FAO/OIE H5N1 evolution working group nomenclature, the LABEL pipeline quickly and accurately identified the H5 lineages of uncharacterized sequences. Moreover, we developed an updated clade nomenclature for the H9 hemagglutinin gene and show a similarly fast and reliable phylogenetic assessment with LABEL. While this study was focused on hemagglutinin sequences, LABEL could be applied to the analysis of any gene and shows great potential to guide molecular epidemiology activities, accelerate database annotation, and provide a data sorting tool for other large-scale bioinformatic studies. PMID:24466291

  6. Testing the Effect of Internal Genes Derived from a Wild-Bird-Origin H9N2 Influenza A Virus on the Pathogenicity of an A/H7N9 Virus.

    PubMed

    Su, Wen; Wang, Chengmin; Luo, Jing; Zhao, Yuliang; Wu, Yan; Chen, Lin; Zhao, Na; Li, Meng; Xing, Chao; Liu, Huimin; Zhang, Hong; Chang, Yung-fu; Li, Tianxian; Ding, Hua; Wan, Xiufeng; He, Hongxuan

    2015-09-22

    Since 2013, avian influenza A(H7N9) viruses have diversified into multiple lineages by dynamically reassorting with other viruses, especially H9N2, in Chinese poultry. Despite concerns about the pandemic threat posed by H7N9 viruses, little is known about the biological properties of H7N9 viruses that may recruit internal genes from genetically distinct H9N2 viruses circulating among wild birds. Here, we generated 63 H7N9 reassortants derived from an avian H7N9 and a wild-bird-origin H9N2 virus. Compared with the wild-type parent, 25/63 reassortants had increased pathogenicity in mice. A reassortant containing PB1 of the H9N2 virus was highly lethal to mice and chickens but was not transmissible to guinea pigs by airborne routes; however, three substitutions associated with adaptation to mammals conferred airborne transmission to the virus. The emergence of the H7N9-pandemic reassortant virus highlights that continuous monitoring of H7N9 viruses is needed, especially at the domestic poultry/wild bird interface.

  7. Evolution and Molecular Epidemiology of H9N2 Influenza A Viruses from Quail in Southern China, 2000 to 2005▿

    PubMed Central

    Xu, K. M.; Li, K. S.; Smith, G. J. D.; Li, J. W.; Tai, H.; Zhang, J. X.; Webster, R. G.; Peiris, J. S. M.; Chen, H.; Guan, Y.

    2007-01-01

    H9N2 influenza viruses have become established and maintain long-term endemicity in terrestrial poultry in Asian countries. Occasionally these viruses transmit to other mammals, including humans. Increasing epidemiological and laboratory findings suggest that quail may be an important host, as they are susceptible to different subtypes of influenza viruses. To better understand the role of quail in influenza virus ecology and evolution, H9N2 viruses isolated from quail during 2000 to 2005 were antigenically and genetically characterized. Our results showed that H9N2 viruses are prevalent year-round in southern China and replicate mainly asymptomatically in the respiratory tract of quail. Genetic analysis revealed that both the G1-like and Ck/Bei-like H9N2 lineages were cocirculating in quail since 2000. Phylogenetic analyses demonstrated that most of the isolates tested were double- or multiple-reassortant variants, with four G1-like and 16 Ck/Bei-like genotypes recognized. A novel genotype of G1-like virus became predominant in quail since 2003, while multiple Ck/Bei-like genotypes were introduced into quail, wherein they incorporated G1-like gene segments, but none of them became established in this host. Those Ck/Bei-like reassortants generated in quail have then been introduced into other poultry. These complex interactions form a two-way transmission system between quail and other types of poultry. The present study provides evidence that H9N2 and H5N1 subtype viruses have also exchanged gene segments to generate currently circulating reassortants of both subtypes that have pandemic potential. Continuing influenza virus surveillance in poultry is critical to understanding the genesis and emergence of potentially pandemic strains in this region. PMID:17192315

  8. Evolution of the H9N2 influenza genotype that facilitated the genesis of the novel H7N9 virus.

    PubMed

    Pu, Juan; Wang, Shuoguo; Yin, Yanbo; Zhang, Guozhong; Carter, Robert A; Wang, Jinliang; Xu, Guanlong; Sun, Honglei; Wang, Min; Wen, Chu; Wei, Yandi; Wang, Dongdong; Zhu, Baoli; Lemmon, Gordon; Jiao, Yuannian; Duan, Susu; Wang, Qian; Du, Qian; Sun, Meng; Bao, Jinnan; Sun, Yipeng; Zhao, Jixun; Zhang, Hui; Wu, Gang; Liu, Jinhua; Webster, Robert G

    2015-01-13

    The emergence of human infection with a novel H7N9 influenza virus in China raises a pandemic concern. Chicken H9N2 viruses provided all six of the novel reassortant's internal genes. However, it is not fully understood how the prevalence and evolution of these H9N2 chicken viruses facilitated the genesis of the novel H7N9 viruses. Here we show that over more than 10 y of cocirculation of multiple H9N2 genotypes, a genotype (G57) emerged that had changed antigenicity and improved adaptability in chickens. It became predominant in vaccinated farm chickens in China, caused widespread outbreaks in 2010-2013 before the H7N9 viruses emerged in humans, and finally provided all of their internal genes to the novel H7N9 viruses. The prevalence and variation of H9N2 influenza virus in farmed poultry could provide an important early warning of the emergence of novel reassortants with pandemic potential.

  9. Evolution of the H9N2 influenza genotype that facilitated the genesis of the novel H7N9 virus

    PubMed Central

    Pu, Juan; Wang, Shuoguo; Yin, Yanbo; Zhang, Guozhong; Carter, Robert A.; Wang, Jinliang; Xu, Guanlong; Sun, Honglei; Wang, Min; Wen, Chu; Wei, Yandi; Wang, Dongdong; Zhu, Baoli; Lemmon, Gordon; Jiao, Yuannian; Duan, Susu; Wang, Qian; Du, Qian; Sun, Meng; Bao, Jinnan; Sun, Yipeng; Zhao, Jixun; Zhang, Hui; Wu, Gang; Liu, Jinhua; Webster, Robert G.

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of human infection with a novel H7N9 influenza virus in China raises a pandemic concern. Chicken H9N2 viruses provided all six of the novel reassortant’s internal genes. However, it is not fully understood how the prevalence and evolution of these H9N2 chicken viruses facilitated the genesis of the novel H7N9 viruses. Here we show that over more than 10 y of cocirculation of multiple H9N2 genotypes, a genotype (G57) emerged that had changed antigenicity and improved adaptability in chickens. It became predominant in vaccinated farm chickens in China, caused widespread outbreaks in 2010–2013 before the H7N9 viruses emerged in humans, and finally provided all of their internal genes to the novel H7N9 viruses. The prevalence and variation of H9N2 influenza virus in farmed poultry could provide an important early warning of the emergence of novel reassortants with pandemic potential. PMID:25548189

  10. A point mutation in the polymerase protein PB2 allows a reassortant H9N2 influenza isolate of wild-bird origin to replicate in human cells.

    PubMed

    Hussein, Islam T M; Ma, Eric J; Hill, Nichola J; Meixell, Brandt W; Lindberg, Mark; Albrecht, Randy A; Bahl, Justin; Runstadler, Jonathan A

    2016-07-01

    H9N2 influenza A viruses are on the list of potentially pandemic subtypes. Therefore, it is important to understand how genomic reassortment and genetic polymorphisms affect phenotypes of H9N2 viruses circulating in the wild bird reservoir. A comparative genetic analysis of North American H9N2 isolates of wild bird origin identified a naturally occurring reassortant virus containing gene segments derived from both North American and Eurasian lineage ancestors. The PB2 segment of this virus encodes 10 amino acid changes that distinguish it from other H9 strains circulating in North America. G590S, one of the 10 amino acid substitutions observed, was present in ~12% of H9 viruses worldwide. This mutation combined with R591 has been reported as a marker of pathogenicity for human pandemic 2009 H1N1 viruses. Screening by polymerase reporter assay of all the natural polymorphisms at these two positions identified G590/K591 and S590/K591 as the most active, with the highest polymerase activity recorded for the SK polymorphism. Rescued viruses containing these two polymorphic combinations replicated more efficiently in MDCK cells and they were the only ones tested that were capable of establishing productive infection in NHBE cells. A global analysis of all PB2 sequences identified the K591 signature in six viral HA/NA subtypes isolated from several hosts in seven geographic locations. Interestingly, introducing the K591 mutation into the PB2 of a human-adapted H3N2 virus did not affect its polymerase activity. Our findings demonstrate that a single point mutation in the PB2 of a low pathogenic H9N2 isolate could have a significant effect on viral phenotype and increase its propensity to infect mammals. However, this effect is not universal, warranting caution in interpreting point mutations without considering protein sequence context.

  11. A point mutation in the polymerase protein PB2 allows a reassortant H9N2 influenza isolate of wild-bird origin to replicate in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Hussein, Islam T. M.; Ma, Eric J.; Hill, Nichola J.; Meixell, Brandt W.; Lindberg, Mark; Albrecht, Randy A.; Bahl, Justin; Runstadler, Jonathan A.

    2016-01-01

    H9N2 influenza A viruses are on the list of potentially pandemic subtypes. Therefore, it is important to understand how genomic reassortment and genetic polymorphisms affect phenotypes of H9N2 viruses circulating in the wild bird reservoir. A comparative genetic analysis of North American H9N2 isolates of wild bird origin identified a naturally occurring reassortant virus containing gene segments derived from both North American and Eurasian lineage ancestors. The PB2 segment of this virus encodes 10 amino acid changes that distinguish it from other H9 strains circulating in North America. G590S, one of the 10 amino acid substitutions observed, was present in ∼12% of H9 viruses worldwide. This mutation combined with R591 has been reported as a marker of pathogenicity for human pandemic 2009 H1N1 viruses. Screening by polymerase reporter assay of all the natural polymorphisms at these two positions identified G590/K591 and S590/K591 as the most active, with the highest polymerase activity recorded for the SK polymorphism. Rescued viruses containing these two polymorphic combinations replicated more efficiently in MDCK cells and they were the only ones tested that were capable of establishing productive infection in NHBE cells. A global analysis of all PB2 sequences identified the K591 signature in six viral HA/NA subtypes isolated from several hosts in seven geographic locations. Interestingly, introducing the K591 mutation into the PB2 of a human-adapted H3N2 virus did not affect its polymerase activity. Our findings demonstrate that a single point mutation in the PB2 of a low pathogenic H9N2 isolate could have a significant effect on viral phenotype and increase its propensity to infect mammals. However, this effect is not universal, warranting caution in interpreting point mutations without considering protein sequence context. PMID:27101787

  12. A point mutation in the polymerase protein PB2 allows a reassortant H9N2 influenza isolate of wild-bird origin to replicate in human cells.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hussein, Islam T.M.; Ma, Eric J.; Meixell, Brandt; Hill, Nichola J.; Lindberg, Mark S.; Albrecht , Randy A.; Bahl, Justin; Runstadler, Jonathan A.

    2016-01-01

    H9N2 influenza A viruses are on the list of potentially pandemic subtypes. Therefore, it is important to understand how genomic reassortment and genetic polymorphisms affect phenotypes of H9N2 viruses circulating in the wild bird reservoir. A comparative genetic analysis of North American H9N2 isolates of wild bird origin identified a naturally occurring reassortant virus containing gene segments derived from both North American and Eurasian lineage ancestors. The PB2 segment of this virus encodes 10 amino acid changes that distinguish it from other H9 strains circulating in North America. G590S, one of the 10 amino acid substitutions observed, was present in ~ 12% of H9 viruses worldwide. This mutation combined with R591 has been reported as a marker of pathogenicity for human pandemic 2009 H1N1 viruses. Screening by polymerase reporter assay of all the natural polymorphisms at these two positions identified G590/K591 and S590/K591 as the most active, with the highest polymerase activity recorded for the SK polymorphism. Rescued viruses containing these two polymorphic combinations replicated more efficiently in MDCK cells and they were the only ones tested that were capable of establishing productive infection in NHBE cells. A global analysis of all PB2 sequences identified the K591 signature in six viral HA/NA subtypes isolated from several hosts in seven geographic locations. Interestingly, introducing the K591 mutation into the PB2 of a human-adapted H3N2 virus did not affect its polymerase activity. Our findings demonstrate that a single point mutation in the PB2 of a low pathogenic H9N2 isolate could have a significant effect on viral phenotype and increase its propensity to infect mammals. However, this effect is not universal, warranting caution in interpreting point mutations without considering protein sequence context.

  13. Variability of tropism and replicative capacity of two naturally occurring influenza A H9N2 viruses in cell cultures from different tissues.

    PubMed

    Tombari, Wafa; ElBehi, Imen; Amouna, Faten; Ghram, Abdeljelil

    2016-01-01

    Studies carried out on cell permissivity are of great interest to understand virus replication and pathogenicity. We described the results of a comparative analysis of replication efficiency of two naturally occurring influenza A H9N2 variants isolated from poultry and wild birds, differing by only two substitutions Q226L and T384N, in the receptor-binding site of haemagglutinin and the 380 loop region of NA proteins, respectively. Considering the overall growth of both viruses, lung cultures ensured the most efficient growth of TUN12L226N384 strain with titres up to 10(9) TCID50/ml whereas small intestine culture was highly susceptible to the TUN51Q226T384 virus reaching a titre of 10(6) TCID50/ml. The lowest replication was shown in liver cells. The addition of trypsin was essential for the replication of either virus in primary fibroblasts, but it had a marginal positive effect on virus replication in the four other culture types with maximum titres of 10(8) TCID50/ml. This means that in chicken, the proteolytic activation of the H9N2 viruses with the cleavage motif RSSR may be mediated by other endoproteases than trypsin. Further investigations should concentrate on the production of the appropriate set of viruses by a reverse genetics approach and the examination of cellular protease expression in chicken tissues. This would lead to a more complete understanding of the tropism of low-pathogenic Influenza A viruses.

  14. NA Proteins of Influenza A Viruses H1N1/2009, H5N1, and H9N2 Show Differential Effects on Infection Initiation, Virus Release, and Cell-Cell Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Quanjiao; Huang, Shengping; Chen, Jianjun; Zhang, Shaoqiong; Chen, Ze

    2013-01-01

    Two surface glycoproteins of influenza virus, haemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA), play opposite roles in terms of their interaction with host sialic acid receptors. HA attaches to sialic acid on host cell surface receptors to initiate virus infection while NA removes these sialic acids to facilitate release of progeny virions. This functional opposition requires a balance. To explore what might happen when NA of an influenza virus was replaced by one from another isolate or subtype, in this study, we generated three recombinant influenza A viruses in the background of A/PR/8/34 (PR8) (H1N1) and with NA genes obtained respectively from the 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus, a highly pathogenic avian H5N1 virus, and a lowly pathogenic avian H9N2 virus. These recombinant viruses, rPR8-H1N1NA, rPR8-H5N1NA, and rPR8-H9N2NA, were shown to have similar growth kinetics in cells and pathogenicity in mice. However, much more rPR8-H5N1NA and PR8-wt virions were released from chicken erythrocytes than virions of rPR8-H1N1NA and rPR8-H9N2NA after 1 h. In addition, in MDCK cells, rPR8-H5N1NA and rPR8-H9N2NA infected a higher percentage of cells, and induced cell-cell fusion faster and more extensively than PR8-wt and rPR8-H1N1NA did in the early phase of infection. In conclusion, NA replacement in this study did not affect virus replication kinetics but had different effects on infection initiation, virus release and fusion of infected cells. These phenomena might be partially due to NA proteins’ different specificity to α2-3/2-6-sialylated carbohydrate chains, but the exact mechanism remains to be explored. PMID:23349854

  15. NA proteins of influenza A viruses H1N1/2009, H5N1, and H9N2 show differential effects on infection initiation, virus release, and cell-cell fusion.

    PubMed

    Chen, Quanjiao; Huang, Shengping; Chen, Jianjun; Zhang, Shaoqiong; Chen, Ze

    2013-01-01

    Two surface glycoproteins of influenza virus, haemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA), play opposite roles in terms of their interaction with host sialic acid receptors. HA attaches to sialic acid on host cell surface receptors to initiate virus infection while NA removes these sialic acids to facilitate release of progeny virions. This functional opposition requires a balance. To explore what might happen when NA of an influenza virus was replaced by one from another isolate or subtype, in this study, we generated three recombinant influenza A viruses in the background of A/PR/8/34 (PR8) (H1N1) and with NA genes obtained respectively from the 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus, a highly pathogenic avian H5N1 virus, and a lowly pathogenic avian H9N2 virus. These recombinant viruses, rPR8-H1N1NA, rPR8-H5N1NA, and rPR8-H9N2NA, were shown to have similar growth kinetics in cells and pathogenicity in mice. However, much more rPR8-H5N1NA and PR8-wt virions were released from chicken erythrocytes than virions of rPR8-H1N1NA and rPR8-H9N2NA after 1 h. In addition, in MDCK cells, rPR8-H5N1NA and rPR8-H9N2NA infected a higher percentage of cells, and induced cell-cell fusion faster and more extensively than PR8-wt and rPR8-H1N1NA did in the early phase of infection. In conclusion, NA replacement in this study did not affect virus replication kinetics but had different effects on infection initiation, virus release and fusion of infected cells. These phenomena might be partially due to NA proteins' different specificity to α2-3/2-6-sialylated carbohydrate chains, but the exact mechanism remains to be explored.

  16. Modulation of the Severity of Highly Pathogenic H5N1 Influenza in Chickens Previously Inoculated with Israeli H9N2 Influenza Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Khalenkov, Alexey; Perk, Shimon; Panshin, Alexander; Golender, Natalia; Webster, Robert. G.

    2009-01-01

    The continued evolution of H9N2 and H5N1 viruses and their spread and re-emergence across Eurasia raise concern that prior H9N2 virus infection may limit the detection of subsequent H5N1 infection in gallinaceous poultry by attenuating the severity of disease. We show that H9N2 viruses isolated from Israeli turkeys during 2000–2004 were antigenically and genetically distinguishable. These three H9N2 viruses caused no overt signs of disease in chickens. The 2004 isolate replicated and spread most efficiently, and chickens previously inoculated with this H9N2 virus showed 90%–100% survival after inoculation 1 to 35 days later with lethal H5N1 virus. Chickens that survived did not show signs of disease but did shed lethal H5N1 virus from the cloaca. The modulation of survivability was time-dependent; the effect was maximal five days after H9N2 inoculation. These findings suggest that co-circulation of H9N2 viruses can contribute to the spread of lethal H5N1 viruses. PMID:18992907

  17. A Novel Genotype H9N2 Influenza Virus Possessing Human H5N1 Internal Genomes Has Been Circulating in Poultry in Eastern China since 1998 ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Pinghu; Tang, Yinghua; Liu, Xiaowen; Liu, Wenbo; Zhang, Xiaorong; Liu, Hongqi; Peng, Daxin; Gao, Song; Wu, Yantao; Zhang, Luyong; Lu, Shan; Liu, Xiufan

    2009-01-01

    Many novel reassortant influenza viruses of the H9N2 genotype have emerged in aquatic birds in southern China since their initial isolation in this region in 1994. However, the genesis and evolution of H9N2 viruses in poultry in eastern China have not been investigated systematically. In the current study, H9N2 influenza viruses isolated from poultry in eastern China during the past 10 years were characterized genetically and antigenically. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that these H9N2 viruses have undergone extensive reassortment to generate multiple novel genotypes, including four genotypes (J, F, K, and L) that have never been recognized before. The major H9N2 influenza viruses represented by A/Chicken/Beijing/1/1994 (Ck/BJ/1/94)-like viruses circulating in poultry in eastern China before 1998 have been gradually replaced by A/Chicken/Shanghai/F/1998 (Ck/SH/F/98)-like viruses, which have a genotype different from that of viruses isolated in southern China. The similarity of the internal genes of these H9N2 viruses to those of the H5N1 influenza viruses isolated from 2001 onwards suggests that the Ck/SH/F/98-like virus may have been the donor of internal genes of human and poultry H5N1 influenza viruses circulating in Eurasia. Experimental studies showed that some of these H9N2 viruses could be efficiently transmitted by the respiratory tract in chicken flocks. Our study provides new insight into the genesis and evolution of H9N2 influenza viruses and supports the notion that some of these viruses may have been the donors of internal genes found in H5N1 viruses. PMID:19553328

  18. Phase I/II randomized double-blind study of the safety and immunogenicity of a nonadjuvanted vero cell culture-derived whole-virus H9N2 influenza vaccine in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Aichinger, Gerald; Grohmann-Izay, Barbara; van der Velden, Maikel V W; Fritsch, Sandor; Koska, Manuela; Portsmouth, Daniel; Hart, Mary Kate; El-Amin, Wael; Kistner, Otfried; Barrett, P Noel

    2015-01-01

    Studies on candidate pandemic vaccines against avian influenza viruses have focused on H5N1, but viruses of other subtypes, such as A/H9N2, are also considered to have pandemic potential. We investigated the safety and immunogenicity of two immunizations with one of five different antigen doses (ranging from 3.75 to 45 μg of hemagglutinin antigen) of a nonadjuvanted whole-virus G9 lineage H9N2 influenza virus vaccine in healthy adults aged 18 to 49 years. The antibody responses were measured by hemagglutination inhibition (HI), microneutralization (MN), and single radial hemolysis (SRH) assays. To investigate a hypothesis that previous exposure to H2N2 viruses in subjects born in or before 1968 might prime for more robust antibody responses to H9N2 vaccination than that in subjects born after 1968, a post hoc age-stratified analysis of antibody responses was done. Both vaccinations in all dose groups were safe and well tolerated. No vaccine-related serious adverse events were reported, and the majority of the adverse reactions were rated as mild. The rates of injection site reactions were lower in the 3.75-μg- and 7.5-μg-dose groups than those in the higher-dose groups; the rates of systemic reactions were similar across all dose groups. The seroprotection rates among the different dose groups 21 days after the second immunization ranged from 52.8% to 88.9% as measured by HI assay, from 88.7% to 98.1% or 82.7% to 96.2% as measured by MN assay (MN titer cutoffs, 1:40 and 1:80, respectively), and from 94.2% to 100% as measured by SRH assay. Higher antibody responses were not induced in subjects born in or before 1968. These data indicate that a nonadjuvanted whole-virus H9N2 vaccine is well tolerated and immunogenic in healthy adults. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT01320696.). Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  19. Phase I/II Randomized Double-Blind Study of the Safety and Immunogenicity of a Nonadjuvanted Vero Cell Culture-Derived Whole-Virus H9N2 Influenza Vaccine in Healthy Adults

    PubMed Central

    Grohmann-Izay, Barbara; van der Velden, Maikel V. W.; Fritsch, Sandor; Koska, Manuela; Portsmouth, Daniel; Hart, Mary Kate; El-Amin, Wael; Kistner, Otfried; Barrett, P. Noel

    2014-01-01

    Studies on candidate pandemic vaccines against avian influenza viruses have focused on H5N1, but viruses of other subtypes, such as A/H9N2, are also considered to have pandemic potential. We investigated the safety and immunogenicity of two immunizations with one of five different antigen doses (ranging from 3.75 to 45 μg of hemagglutinin antigen) of a nonadjuvanted whole-virus G9 lineage H9N2 influenza virus vaccine in healthy adults aged 18 to 49 years. The antibody responses were measured by hemagglutination inhibition (HI), microneutralization (MN), and single radial hemolysis (SRH) assays. To investigate a hypothesis that previous exposure to H2N2 viruses in subjects born in or before 1968 might prime for more robust antibody responses to H9N2 vaccination than that in subjects born after 1968, a post hoc age-stratified analysis of antibody responses was done. Both vaccinations in all dose groups were safe and well tolerated. No vaccine-related serious adverse events were reported, and the majority of the adverse reactions were rated as mild. The rates of injection site reactions were lower in the 3.75-μg- and 7.5-μg-dose groups than those in the higher-dose groups; the rates of systemic reactions were similar across all dose groups. The seroprotection rates among the different dose groups 21 days after the second immunization ranged from 52.8% to 88.9% as measured by HI assay, from 88.7% to 98.1% or 82.7% to 96.2% as measured by MN assay (MN titer cutoffs, 1:40 and 1:80, respectively), and from 94.2% to 100% as measured by SRH assay. Higher antibody responses were not induced in subjects born in or before 1968. These data indicate that a nonadjuvanted whole-virus H9N2 vaccine is well tolerated and immunogenic in healthy adults. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT01320696.) PMID:25355797

  20. Avian And Other Zoonotic Influenza

    MedlinePlus

    ... as avian influenza virus subtypes A(H5N1), A(H7N9), and A(H9N2) and swine influenza virus subtypes ... of human cases of A(H5N1) and A(H7N9) infection have been associated with direct or indirect ...

  1. In vivo inhibition of NAS preparation on H9N2 subtype AIV.

    PubMed

    Shang, Ruo-feng; Liang, Jian-ping; Na, Zhong-yuan; Yang, Hong-jun; Lu, Yu; Hua, Lan-ying; Guo, Wen-zhu; Cui, Ying; Wang, Ling

    2010-04-01

    NAS preparation, a kind of Chinese herbal medicine found by the Yunnan Eco-agricultural Research Institute, has potential antiviral activity. In this paper, the inhibiting effect of NAS preparation on H9N2 subtype Avian influenza virus (AIV) was investigated in vivo. Chickens infected with H9N2 virus were treated with NAS preparation for 4 days. The virus was then detected by hemoagglutination (HA) test and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The results showed that no H9N2 virus could be detected at the 7th day when the chickens were treated with 0.2 g/kg/d or 0.1 g/kg/d of NAS preparation. However the virus could be detected in other chickens without NAS preparation treatment. This result suggested that NAS preparation may be a potential drug candidate to control infection of H9N2 subtype AIV in chickens.

  2. Avian influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chang-Won; Saif, Yehia M

    2009-07-01

    Avian influenza viruses do not typically replicate efficiently in humans, indicating direct transmission of avian influenza virus to humans is unlikely. However, since 1997, several cases of human infections with different subtypes (H5N1, H7N7, and H9N2) of avian influenza viruses have been identified and raised the pandemic potential of avian influenza virus in humans. Although circumstantial evidence of human to human transmission exists, the novel avian-origin influenza viruses isolated from humans lack the ability to transmit efficiently from person-to-person. However, the on-going human infection with avian-origin H5N1 viruses increases the likelihood of the generation of human-adapted avian influenza virus with pandemic potential. Thus, a better understanding of the biological and genetic basis of host restriction of influenza viruses is a critical factor in determining whether the introduction of a novel influenza virus into the human population will result in a pandemic. In this article, we review current knowledge of type A influenza virus in which all avian influenza viruses are categorized.

  3. Kaempferol ameliorates H9N2 swine influenza virus-induced acute lung injury by inactivation of TLR4/MyD88-mediated NF-κB and MAPK signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ruihua; Ai, Xia; Duan, Yongjie; Xue, Man; He, Wenxiao; Wang, Cunlian; Xu, Tong; Xu, Mingju; Liu, Baojian; Li, Chunhong; Wang, Zhijun; Zhang, Ruihong; Wang, Guohua; Tian, Shufei; Liu, Huifeng

    2017-03-02

    Kaempferol, a very common type of dietary flavonoids, has been found to exert antioxidative and anti-inflammatory properties. The purpose of our investigation was designed to reveal the effect of kaempferol on H9N2 influenza virus-induced inflammation in vivo and in vitro. In vivo, BALB/C mice were infected intranasally with H9N2 influenza virus with or without kaempferol treatment to induce acute lung injury (ALI) model. In vitro, MH-S cells were infected with H9N2 influenza virus with or without kaempferol treatment. In vivo, kaempferol treatment attenuated pulmonary edema, the W/D mass ratio, pulmonary capillary permeability, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, and the numbers of inflammatory cells. Kaempferol reduced ROS and Malondialdehyde (MDA) production, and increased the superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity. Kaempferol also reduced overproduction of TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6. In addition, kaempferol decreased the H9N2 viral titre. In vitro, ROS, MDA, TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 was also reduced by kaempferol. Moreover, our data showed that kaempferol significantly inhibited the upregulation of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88), phosphorylation level of IκBα and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) p65, NF-κB p65 DNA binding activity, and phosphorylation level of MAPKs, both in vivo and in vitro. These results suggest that kaempferol exhibits a protective effect on H9N2 virus-induced inflammation via suppression of TLR4/MyD88-mediated NF-κB and MAPKs pathways, and kaempferol may be considered as an effective drug for the potential treatment of influenza virus-induced ALI.

  4. Partial heterologous protection by low pathogenic H9N2 virus against natural H9N2-PB1 gene reassortant highly pathogenic H5N1 virus in chickens.

    PubMed

    Dash, Sandeep Kumar; Kumar, Manoj; Kataria, Jag Mohan; Nagarajan, Shanmugasundaram; Tosh, Chakradhar; Murugkar, Harshad V; Kulkarni, Diwakar D

    2016-06-01

    Low pathogenic avian influenza H9N2 and highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 viruses continue to co-circulate in chickens. Prior infection with low pathogenic avian influenza can modulate the outcome of H5N1 infection. In India, low pathogenic H9N2 and highly pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza viruses are co-circulating in poultry. Herein, by using chickens with prior infection of A/chicken/India/04TI05/2012 (H9N2) virus we explored the outcome of infection with H5N1 virus A/turkey/India/10CA03/2012 natural PB1 gene reassortant from H9N2. Four groups (E1-E4) of SPF chickens (n = 6) prior inoculated with 10(6) EID50 of H9N2 virus were challenged with 10(6) EID50 of H5N1 natural reassortant (PB1-H9N2) virus at days 1 (group E1); 3 (group E2); 7 (group E3) and 14 (group E4) post H9N2 inoculation. The survival percentage in groups E1-E4 was 0, 100, 66.6 and 50%, respectively. Virus shedding periods for groups E1-E4 were 3, 4, 7 and 9 days, respectively post H5N1 challenge. Birds of group E1 and E2 were shedding both H9N2 and H5N1 viruses and mean viral RNA copy number was higher in oropharyngeal swabs than cloacal swabs. In group, E3 and E4 birds excreted only H5N1 virus and mean viral RNA copy number was higher in most cloacal swabs than oral swabs. These results indicate that prior infection with H9N2 virus could protect from lethal challenge of reassortant H5N1 virus as early as with three days prior H9N2 inoculation and protection decreased in groups E3 and E4 as time elapsed. However, prior infection with H9N2 did not prevent infection with H5N1 virus and birds continue to excrete virus in oropharyngeal and cloacal swabs. Amino acid substitution K368E was found in HA gene of excreted H5N1 virus of group E3. Hence, concurrent infection can also cause emergence of viruses with mutations leading to virus evolution. The results of this study are important for the surveillance and epidemiological data analysis where both H9N2 and H5N1 viruses are co-circulating.

  5. Characterization of H9N2 influenza viruses isolated from vaccinated flocks in an integrated broiler chicken operation in eastern China during a 5 year period (1998-2002).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pinghu; Tang, Yinghua; Liu, Xiaowen; Peng, Daxin; Liu, Wenbo; Liu, Hongqi; Lu, Shan; Liu, Xiufan

    2008-12-01

    In the current study, we characterized H9N2 influenza viruses isolated from vaccinated flocks in an integrated broiler chicken operation during a 5 year period (1998-2002). Phylogenetic analysis of the 8 genes of 11 representative viruses showed that they all shared high similarity to that of the first isolate, A/Chicken/Shanghai/F/1998 (Ck/SH/F/98), and clustered to the same lineages. Furthermore, all 11 viruses had a 9 nt deletion between positions 206 and 214 of the neuraminidase gene. These genetic characteristics strongly suggest that these viruses are descendants of the first isolate. In addition, our study also showed that the H9N2 viruses circulating in the operation during this 5 year period were evolving, as shown by antigenic variations between viruses manifested by reactivity with polyclonal antisera and monoclonal antibodies, by haemagglutination with erythrocytes from different animals, by amino acid differences in haemagglutinin and neuraminidase proteins, and by variation in their ability to replicate in the respiratory and intestinal tract and to be transmitted by aerosol. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the internal genes from some H5N1 viruses of duck origin clustered together with those from H9N2 virus and that the RNP genes of these H5N1 viruses isolated after 2001 are more closely related to the genes of the Ck/SH/F/98-like H9N2 viruses, indicating more recent reassortment events between these two subtypes of viruses. Continuous surveillance of influenza virus in poultry and waterfowl is critical for monitoring the genesis and emergence of potentially pandemic strains in this region.

  6. Immune-Related Gene Expression Patterns in GPV- or H9N2-Infected Goose Spleens

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shun; Wang, Anqi; Sun, Lipei; Liu, Fei; Wang, Mingshu; Jia, Renyong; Zhu, Dekang; Liu, Mafeng; Yang, Qiao; Wu, Ying; Sun, Kunfeng; Chen, Xiaoyue; Cheng, Anchun

    2016-01-01

    Goose parvovirus (GPV) and avian influenza virus subtype H9N2 are single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) and single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) viruses, respectively, both of which can spread in goslings and cause a significant economic loss. To explore the comprehensive transcriptome of GPV- or H9N2-infected goose spleens and to understand the immune responses induced by a DNA virus (GPV) or a RNA virus (H9N2), RNA-seq was performed on the spleens of goslings at the fifth day post infection. In the present study, 2604 and 2409 differentially expressed unigenes were identified in the GPV- and H9N2-infected groups, respectively. Through KEGG pathway enrichment analyses, the up-regulated transcripts in the two virus-infected groups were mainly involved in immune-related pathways. In addition, the two virus-infected groups displayed similar expression patterns in the immune response pathways, including pattern-recognition receptor signaling pathways, the antigen processing and presentation pathway, the NF-κB signaling pathway and the JAK-STAT signaling pathway, as well as cytokines. Furthermore, most of the immune-related genes, particularly TLR7, TRAF3, Mx, TRIM25, CD4, and CD8α, increased in response to GPV and H9N2 infection. However, the depression of NF-κB signaling may be a mechanism by which the viruses evade the host immune system or a strategy to achieve immune homeostasis. PMID:27916934

  7. Avian influenza

    MedlinePlus

    Bird flu; H5N1; H5N2; H5N8; H7N9; Avian influenza A (HPAI) H5 ... The first avian influenza in humans was reported in Hong Kong in 1997. It was called avian influenza (H5N1). The outbreak was linked ...

  8. Variability in H9N2 haemagglutinin receptor-binding preference and the pH of fusion.

    PubMed

    Peacock, Thomas P; Benton, Donald J; Sadeyen, Jean-Remy; Chang, Pengxiang; Sealy, Joshua E; Bryant, Juliet E; Martin, Stephen R; Shelton, Holly; McCauley, John W; Barclay, Wendy S; Iqbal, Munir

    2017-03-22

    H9N2 avian influenza viruses are primarily a disease of poultry; however, they occasionally infect humans and are considered a potential pandemic threat. Little work has been performed to assess the intrinsic biochemical properties related to zoonotic potential of H9N2 viruses. The objective of this study, therefore, was to investigate H9N2 haemagglutinins (HAs) using two well-known correlates for human adaption: receptor-binding avidity and pH of fusion. Receptor binding was characterized using bio-layer interferometry to measure virus binding to human and avian-like receptor analogues and the pH of fusion was assayed by syncytium formation in virus-infected cells at different pHs. We characterized contemporary H9N2 viruses of the zoonotic G1 lineage, as well as representative viruses of the zoonotic BJ94 lineage. We found that most contemporary H9N2 viruses show a preference for sulphated avian-like receptor analogues. However, the 'Eastern' G1 H9N2 viruses displayed a consistent preference in binding to a human-like receptor analogue. We demonstrate that the presence of leucine at position 226 of the HA receptor-binding site correlated poorly with the ability to bind a human-like sialic acid receptor. H9N2 HAs also display variability in their pH of fusion, ranging between pH 5.4 and 5.85 which is similar to that of the first wave of human H1N1pdm09 viruses but lower than the pH of fusion seen in zoonotic H5N1 and H7N9 viruses. Our results suggest possible molecular mechanisms that may underlie the relatively high prevalence of human zoonotic infection by particular H9N2 virus lineages.

  9. Comparative assessment of humoral immune responses of aluminum hydroxide and oil-emulsion adjuvants in Influenza (H9N2) and Newcastle inactive vaccines to chickens.

    PubMed

    Jafari, Mahdie; Moghaddam Pour, Masoud; Taghizadeh, Morteza; Masoudi, Shahin; Bayat, Zahra

    2017-02-01

    Context Adjuvants are compounds used in the preparation of inactive vaccines to enhance the immune response. Aluminum hydroxide (alum) is one of the first compounds approved by the Food and Drug Administration, which is used as adjuvants in vaccine products for humans. Montanide ISA 70 is an oil-emulsion adjuvant and is used in poultry inactive vaccines. Objective In this study, the effects of alum adjuvant on the efficiency and induction of immune response in inactive vaccines of Influenza and Newcastle are compared with those of ISA 70. Materials and methods Six groups of 7-d-old specific-pathogen-free chickens were inoculated with 0.3 ml of the prepared vaccines via the subcutaneous route in the neck. Immune response in each group after 7, 14, 21, 31, 41, and 45 d was evaluated using the technique of hemagglutination inhibition. Results The results were compared using SPSS software. Results showed that vaccines containing adjuvant ISA 70 depicted a higher increase in the immune response and adjuvant of 20% alum is similar to adjuvant of ISA 70 in boosting the immune system. There was no statistically significant difference between 10% and 20% alum, but these adjuvants are visibly different from ISA 70. Conclusion In conclusion, alum can be used as an easily accessible, harmless, and effective adjuvant; however, to increase the immune period using the inactive vaccines for poultry, more research would be necessary.

  10. Genotype diversity of H9N2 viruses isolated from wild birds and chickens in Hunan Province, China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ba; Liu, Zhihua; Chen, Quanjiao; Gao, Zhimin; Fang, Fang; Chang, Haiyan; Chen, Jianjun; Xu, Bing; Chen, Ze

    2014-01-01

    Three H9N2 avian influenza viruses were isolated from the Dongting Lake wetland, among which one was from fresh egret feces, the other two were from chicken cloacal swabs in poultry markets. Phylogenetic analyses suggested that eight genes of the egret-derived H9N2 virus might come from Korean-like or American-like lineages. The two poultry-derived H9N2 viruses were reassortants between the CK/BJ/94-like and G1-like viruses. Except the PB1 genes (90.6%), the nucleotide sequence of other internal genes of the two viruses exhibited high homology (>95%). In addition, they also exhibited high homology (96-98.3%) with some genes of the H7N9 virus that caused an epidemic in China in 2013. Nucleotide sequence of the poultry-derived and egret-derived H9N2 viruses shared low homology. Infection studies showed that the egret-derived H9N2 virus was non-pathogenic to both mice and chickens, and the virus was unable to infect chickens even through 8 passages continuously in the lung. On the other hand, the chickens infected by poultry-derived viruses showed obvious clinical symptoms and even died; the infected mice showed no noticeable clinical symptoms and weight loss, but viruses could be detected in their lungs. In conclusion, for the egret-derived H9N2 virus, it would take a long adaptation process to achieve cross-species transmission in poultry and mammals. H9N2 viruses isolated at different times from the same host species in the same geographical region presented different evolutionary status, and virus isolated from different hosts in the same geographical region exhibited genetic diversity. Therefore, it is important to continue the H9N2 virus surveillance for understanding their evolutionary trends so as to provide guidance for disease control and prevention.

  11. H9N2 influenza A virus isolated from a Greater White-fronted wild goose (Anser albifrons) in Alaska has a mutation in the PB2 gene, which is associated with pathogenicity in human pandemic 2009 H1N1

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reeves, Andrew; Ip, Hon S.

    2016-01-01

    We report here the genomic sequence of an H9N2 influenza A virus [A/greater white-fronted goose/Alaska/81081/2008 (H9N2)]. This virus shares ≥99.8% identity with a previously reported virus. Both strains contain a G590S mutation in the polymerase basic 2 (PB2) gene, which is a pathogenicity marker in the pandemic 2009 H1N1 virus when combined with R591.

  12. H9N2 Influenza A Virus Isolated from a Greater White-Fronted Wild Goose (Anser albifrons) in Alaska Has a Mutation in the PB2 Gene, Which Is Associated with Pathogenicity in Human Pandemic 2009 H1N1

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We report here the genomic sequence of an H9N2 influenza A virus [A/greater white-fronted goose/Alaska/81081/2008 (H9N2)]. This virus shares ≥99.8% identity with a previously reported virus. Both strains contain a G590S mutation in the polymerase basic 2 (PB2) gene, which is a pathogenicity marker in the pandemic 2009 H1N1 virus when combined with R591. PMID:27587808

  13. Avian influenza in Poland.

    PubMed

    Smietanka, Krzysztof; Minta, Zenon

    2014-01-01

    Poland has experienced four episodes of avian influenza (AI) outbreaks over the past two decades. The first epidemic was caused by a low pathogenicity (LPAIV) H7N7 subtype and occurred in fattening and breeder turkeys in 1995. Two waves of H5N1 high pathogenicity avian influenza (HPAI) took place in 2006 and 2007. In spring 2006, 64 cases of the H5N1 virus were detected, mostly in mute swans. In December 2007, ten outbreaks of H5N1 HPAI were detected in commercial poultry (n = 9) and wild birds kept in captivity (n = 1). The outbreaks in 2006 and 2007 were caused by genetically similar but clearly distinguishable viruses of the 2.2 clade. In 2013, an H9N2 avian influenza virus was detected in 4 fattening turkey holdings. The virus was low pathogenic and a phylogenetic study has shown a close relatedness to the Eurasian lineage of AIV of the wild bird origin. Neither preventive nor prophylactic vaccinations have ever been used in poultry or other birds. Emergency vaccinations using autogenous vaccine were introduced only to control the H7N7 LPAI outbreaks in 1995. The baseline surveillance for AI in live migratory birds and poultry provides a valuable insight into the ecology of AIV at the wild and domestic bird interface. Passive surveillance is in place of early detection of HPAIV infection in dead or moribund birds.

  14. Preparation of mucosal nanoparticles and polymer-based inactivated vaccine for Newcastle disease and H9N2 AI viruses

    PubMed Central

    Naggar, Heba M. El; Madkour, Mohamed Sayed; Hussein, Hussein Ali

    2017-01-01

    Aim: To develop a mucosal inactivated vaccines for Newcastle disease (ND) and H9N2 viruses to protect against these viruses at sites of infections through mucosal immunity. Materials and Methods: In this study, we prepared two new formulations for mucosal bivalent inactivated vaccine formulations for Newcastle and Avian Influenza (H9N2) based on the use of nanoparticles and polymer adjuvants. The prepared vaccines were delivered via intranasal and spray routes of administration in specific pathogen-free chickens. Cell-mediated and humoral immune response was measured as well as challenge trial was carried out. In addition, ISA71 water in oil was also evaluated. Results: Our results showed that the use of spray route as vaccination delivery method of polymer and nanoparticles Montanide™ adjuvants revealed that it enhanced the cell mediated immune response as indicated by phagocytic activity, gamma interferon and interleukin 6 responses and induced protection against challenge with Newcastle and Avian Influenza (H9N2) viruses. Conclusion: The results of this study demonstrate the potentiality of polymer compared to nanoparticles adjuvantes when used via spray route. Mass application of such vaccines will add value to improve the vaccination strategies against ND virus and Avian influenza viruses. PMID:28344402

  15. Avian Influenza.

    PubMed

    Zeitlin, Gary Adam; Maslow, Melanie Jane

    2005-05-01

    The current epidemic of H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza in Southeast Asia raises serious concerns that genetic reassortment will result in the next influenza pandemic. There have been 164 confirmed cases of human infection with avian influenza since 1996. In 2004, there were 45 cases of human H5N1 in Vietnam and Thailand, with a mortality rate more than 70%. In addition to the potential public health hazard, the current zoonotic epidemic has caused severe economic losses. Efforts must be concentrated on early detection of bird outbreaks with aggressive culling, quarantining, and disinfection. To prepare for and prevent an increase in human cases, it is essential to improve detection methods and stockpile effective antivirals. Novel therapeutic modalities, including short-interfering RNAs and new vaccine strategies that use plasmid-based genetic systems, offer promise should a pandemic occur.

  16. Avian influenza.

    PubMed

    Zeitlin, Gary A; Maslow, Melanie J

    2006-03-01

    The current epidemic of H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza in Southeast Asia raises serious concerns that genetic reassortment will result in the next influenza pandemic. There have been 164 confirmed cases of human infection with avian influenza since 1996. In 2004 alone, there were 45 cases of human H5N1 in Vietnam and Thailand, with a mortality rate over 70%. In addition to the potential public health hazard, the current zoonotic epidemic has caused severe economic losses. Efforts must be concentrated on early detection of bird outbreaks with aggressive culling, quarantines, and disinfection. To prepare for and prevent increased human cases, it is essential to improve detection methods and stockpile effective antivirals. Novel therapeutic modalities, including short, interfering RNAs and new vaccine strategies that use plasmid-based genetic systems offer promise, should a pandemic occur.

  17. Avian influenza and human health.

    PubMed

    Capua, Ilaria; Alexander, Dennis J

    2002-07-01

    Natural infections with influenza A viruses have been reported in a variety of animal species including humans, pigs, horses, sea mammals, mustelids and birds. Occasionally devastating pandemics occur in humans. Although viruses of relatively few HA and NA subtype combinations have been isolated from mammalian species, all 15 HA subtypes and all 9 NA subtypes, in most combinations, have been isolated from birds. In the 20th century the sudden emergence of antigenically different strains transmissible in humans, termed antigenic shift, has occurred on four occasions, 1918 (H1N1), 1957 (H2N2), 1968 (H3N2) and 1977 (H1N1), each time resulting in a pandemic. Genetic analysis of the isolates demonstrated that 'new' strains most certainly emerged after reassortment of genes of viruses of avian and human origin in a permissive host. The leading theory is that the pig represents the 'mixing vessel' where this genetic reassortment may occur. In 1996, an H7N7 influenza virus of avian origin was isolated from a woman with a self-limiting conjunctivitis. During 1997 in Hong Kong, an H5N1 avian influenza virus was recognised as the cause of death of 6 of 18 infected patients. Genetic analysis revealed these human isolates of H5N1 subtype to be indistinguishable from a highly pathogenic avian influenza virus that was endemic in the local poultry population. More recently, in March 1999, two independent isolations of influenza virus subtype H9N2 were made from girls aged one to four who recovered from flu-like illnesses in Hong Kong. Subsequently, five isolations of H9N2 virus from humans on mainland China in August 1998 were reported. H9N2 viruses were known to be widespread in poultry in China and other Asian countries. In all these cases there was no evidence of human to human spread except with the H5N1 infections where there was evidence of very limited spread. This is in keeping with the finding that all these viruses possessed all eight genes of avian origin. It may well

  18. [Is avian influenza a risk for humans?].

    PubMed

    Allwinn, R; Doerr, H W

    2005-04-15

    Avian influenza is an infectious disease of birds, caused by type A strains of the influenza virus. The disease, which was first identified in Italy more than 100 years ago, occurs worldwide. Avian influenza viruses are mainly distributed by migratory birds. Different mammals like swine, horse and finally humans are susceptible for avian influenza viruses. The high possibility of genomic changes like gene shift and drift is caused by the segmented RNA genome. During the avian flu outbreak in East Asia at the end of 2003 the virus also killed several humans in Vietnam and Thailand. That avian influenza could also infect humans has been known since 1997. The H5N1 flu outbreak seemed successfully controlled, but currently new cases in poultry and humans in Vietnam, Thailand, China and Indonesia are recognized. Also another avian influenza A strain type H9N2 was prevalent in chickens of local markets in Hong Kong. Because of the natural virus reservoir like wild and/ or domesticated ducks and others, actually there is little chance of eradicating avian influenza. Furthermore the virus could mutate and jump to humans with the threat of a global influenza pandemic.

  19. LPAIV H9N2 Drives the Differential Expression of Goose Interferons and Proinflammatory Cytokines in Both In Vitro and In Vivo Studies.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hao; Chen, Shun; Yan, Bing; Chen, Hongjun; Wang, Mingshu; Jia, Renyong; Zhu, Dekang; Liu, Mafeng; Liu, Fei; Yang, Qiao; Wu, Ying; Sun, Kunfeng; Chen, Xiaoyue; Jing, Bo; Cheng, Anchun

    2016-01-01

    Geese, as aquatic birds, are an important natural reservoir of avian influenza virus (AIV). To characterize the innate antiviral immune response against AIV H9N2 strain infection in geese as well as the probable relationship between the expression of immune-related genes and the distribution of viral antigens, we investigated the levels of immune-related gene transcription both in AIV H9N2 strain-infected geese and in vitro. The patterns of viral location and the tissue distribution of CD4- and CD8α-positive cells were concurrently detected by immunohistochemical staining, which revealed respiratory and digestive organs as the primary sites of antigen-positive signals. Average AIV H9N2 viral loads were detected in the feces, Harderian gland (HG), and trachea, where higher copy numbers were detected compared with the rectum. Our results suggested the strong induction of proinflammatory cytokine expression compared with interferons (IFNs). Notably, in most tissues from the AIV H9N2 strain-infected birds, IFNα and IFNγ gene transcripts were differentially expressed. However, inverse changes in IFNα and IFNγ expression after AIV H9N2 strain infection were observed in vitro. Taken together, the results suggest that AIV H9N2 is widely distributed in multiple tissues, efficiently induces inflammatory cytokines in the HG and spleen of goslings and inversely influences type I and II IFN expression both in vivo and in vitro. The findings of this study further our understanding of host defense mechanisms and the pathogenesis of the H9N2 influenza virus in geese.

  20. LPAIV H9N2 Drives the Differential Expression of Goose Interferons and Proinflammatory Cytokines in Both In Vitro and In Vivo Studies

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hao; Chen, Shun; Yan, Bing; Chen, Hongjun; Wang, Mingshu; Jia, Renyong; Zhu, Dekang; Liu, Mafeng; Liu, Fei; Yang, Qiao; Wu, Ying; Sun, Kunfeng; Chen, Xiaoyue; Jing, Bo; Cheng, Anchun

    2016-01-01

    Geese, as aquatic birds, are an important natural reservoir of avian influenza virus (AIV). To characterize the innate antiviral immune response against AIV H9N2 strain infection in geese as well as the probable relationship between the expression of immune-related genes and the distribution of viral antigens, we investigated the levels of immune-related gene transcription both in AIV H9N2 strain-infected geese and in vitro. The patterns of viral location and the tissue distribution of CD4- and CD8α-positive cells were concurrently detected by immunohistochemical staining, which revealed respiratory and digestive organs as the primary sites of antigen-positive signals. Average AIV H9N2 viral loads were detected in the feces, Harderian gland (HG), and trachea, where higher copy numbers were detected compared with the rectum. Our results suggested the strong induction of proinflammatory cytokine expression compared with interferons (IFNs). Notably, in most tissues from the AIV H9N2 strain-infected birds, IFNα and IFNγ gene transcripts were differentially expressed. However, inverse changes in IFNα and IFNγ expression after AIV H9N2 strain infection were observed in vitro. Taken together, the results suggest that AIV H9N2 is widely distributed in multiple tissues, efficiently induces inflammatory cytokines in the HG and spleen of goslings and inversely influences type I and II IFN expression both in vivo and in vitro. The findings of this study further our understanding of host defense mechanisms and the pathogenesis of the H9N2 influenza virus in geese. PMID:26925041

  1. Avian Influenza in Birds

    MedlinePlus

    ... during outbreaks of highly pathogenic avian influenza the economic impact and trade restrictions from a highly pathogenic avian influenza outbreak the possibility that avian influenza A viruses could be transmitted to humans When H5 or H7 avian influenza outbreaks occur ...

  2. Occurrence and Reassortment of Avian Influenza A (H7N9) Viruses Derived from Coinfected Birds in China

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wei; Fan, Hang; Raghwani, Jayna; Lam, Tommy Tsan-Yuk; Li, Jing; Pybus, Oliver G.; Yao, Hong-Wu; Wo, Ying; Liu, Kun; An, Xiao-Ping; Pei, Guang-Qian; Li, Hao; Wang, Hong-Yu; Zhao, Jian-Jun; Jiang, Tao; Ma, Mai-Juan; Xia, Xian; Dong, Yan-De; Zhao, Tong-Yan; Jiang, Jia-Fu; Yang, Yin-Hui; Guan, Yi

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Over the course of two waves of infection, H7N9 avian influenza A virus has caused 436 human infections and claimed 170 lives in China as of July 2014. To investigate the prevalence and genetic diversity of H7N9, we surveyed avian influenza viruses in poultry in Jiangsu province within the outbreak epicenter. We found frequent occurrence of H7N9/H9N2 coinfection in chickens. Molecular clock phylogenetic analysis confirms coinfection by H7N9/H9N2 viruses and also reveals that the identity of the H7N9 outbreak lineage is confounded by ongoing reassortment between outbreak viruses and diverse H9N2 viruses in domestic birds. Experimental inoculation of a coinfected sample in cell culture yielded two reassortant H7N9 strains with polymerase segments from the original H9N2 strain. Ongoing reassortment between the H7N9 outbreak lineage and diverse H9N2 viruses may generate new strains with the potential to infect humans, highlighting the need for continued viral surveillance in poultry and humans. IMPORTANCE We found frequent occurrence of H7N9/H9N2 coinfection in chickens. The H7N9 outbreak lineage is confounded by ongoing reassortment between H7N9 and H9N2 viruses. The importance of H9N2 viruses as the source of novel avian influenza virus infections in humans requires continuous attention. PMID:25210174

  3. Adaptation of H9N2 AIV in guinea pigs enables efficient transmission by direct contact and inefficient transmission by respiratory droplets.

    PubMed

    Sang, Xiaoyu; Wang, Airong; Ding, Jie; Kong, Huihui; Gao, Xiaolong; Li, Lin; Chai, Tongjie; Li, Yuanguo; Zhang, Kun; Wang, Chengyu; Wan, Zhonghai; Huang, Geng; Wang, Tiecheng; Feng, Na; Zheng, Xuexing; Wang, Hualei; Zhao, Yongkun; Yang, Songtao; Qian, Jun; Hu, Guixue; Gao, Yuwei; Xia, Xianzhu

    2015-11-10

    H9N2 avian influenza viruses circulate worldwide in poultry and have sporadically infected humans, raising concern whether H9N2 viruses have pandemic potential. Here, we use a guinea pig model to examine whether serial passage results in adaptive viral changes that confer a transmissible phenotype to a wild-type H9N2 virus. After nine serial passages of an H9N2 virus through guinea pigs, productive transmission by direct contact occurred in 2/3 guinea pig pairs. The efficiency of transmission by direct contact increased following the fifteenth passage and occurred in 3/3 guinea pig pairs. In contrast, airborne transmission of the passaged virus was less efficient and occurred in 1/6 guinea pig pairs and 0/6 ferret pairs after the fifteenth passage. Three amino acid substitutions, HA1-Q227P, HA2-D46E, and NP-E434K, were sufficient for contact transmission in guinea pigs (2/3 pairs). The two HA amino acid substitutions enhanced receptor binding to α2,3-linked sialic acid receptors. Additionally, the HA2-D46E substitution increased virus thermostability whereas the NP-E434K mutation enhanced viral RNA polymerase activity in vitro. Our findings suggest that adaptive changes that enhance viral receptor binding, thermostability, and replicative capacity in mammalian cells can collectively enhance the transmissibility of H9N2 AIVs by direct contact in the guinea pig model.

  4. Inhibition of H9N2 Virus Invasion into Dendritic Cells by the S-Layer Protein from L. acidophilus ATCC 4356.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xue; Huang, Lulu; Zhu, Liqi; Mou, Chunxiao; Hou, Qihang; Yu, Qinghua

    2016-01-01

    Probiotics are essential for the prevention of virus invasion and the maintenance of the immune balance. However, the mechanism of competition between probiotics and virus are unknown. The objectives of this study were to isolate the surface layer (S-layer) protein from L. acidophilus ATCC 4356 as a new antiviral material, to evaluate the stimulatory effects of the S-layer protein on mouse dendritic cells (DCs) and to verify its ability to inhibit the invasion of H9N2 avian influenza virus (AIV) in DCs. We found that the S-layer protein induced DCs activation and up-regulated the IL-10 secretion. The invasion and replication of the H9N2 virus in mouse DCs was successfully demonstrated. However, the invasion of H9N2 virus into DCs could be inhibited by treatment with the S-layer protein prior to infection, which was verified by the reduced hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) mRNA expression, and nucleoprotein (NP) protein expression in the DCs. Furthermore, treatment with the S-layer protein increases the Mx1, Isg15, and Ddx58 mRNA expressions, and remits the inflammatory process to inhibit H9N2 AIV infection. In conclusion, the S-layer protein stimulates the activation of mouse DCs, inhibits H9N2 virus invasion of DCs, and stimulates the IFN-I signaling pathway. Thus, the S-layer protein from Lactobacillus is a promising biological antiviral material for AIV prevention.

  5. Adaptation of H9N2 AIV in guinea pigs enables efficient transmission by direct contact and inefficient transmission by respiratory droplets

    PubMed Central

    Sang, Xiaoyu; Wang, Airong; Ding, Jie; Kong, Huihui; Gao, Xiaolong; Li, Lin; Chai, Tongjie; Li, Yuanguo; Zhang, Kun; Wang, Chengyu; Wan, Zhonghai; Huang, Geng; Wang, Tiecheng; Feng, Na; Zheng, Xuexing; Wang, Hualei; Zhao, Yongkun; Yang, Songtao; Qian, Jun; Hu, Guixue; Gao, Yuwei; Xia, Xianzhu

    2015-01-01

    H9N2 avian influenza viruses circulate worldwide in poultry and have sporadically infected humans, raising concern whether H9N2 viruses have pandemic potential. Here, we use a guinea pig model to examine whether serial passage results in adaptive viral changes that confer a transmissible phenotype to a wild-type H9N2 virus. After nine serial passages of an H9N2 virus through guinea pigs, productive transmission by direct contact occurred in 2/3 guinea pig pairs. The efficiency of transmission by direct contact increased following the fifteenth passage and occurred in 3/3 guinea pig pairs. In contrast, airborne transmission of the passaged virus was less efficient and occurred in 1/6 guinea pig pairs and 0/6 ferret pairs after the fifteenth passage. Three amino acid substitutions, HA1-Q227P, HA2-D46E, and NP-E434K, were sufficient for contact transmission in guinea pigs (2/3 pairs). The two HA amino acid substitutions enhanced receptor binding to α2,3-linked sialic acid receptors. Additionally, the HA2-D46E substitution increased virus thermostability whereas the NP-E434K mutation enhanced viral RNA polymerase activity in vitro. Our findings suggest that adaptive changes that enhance viral receptor binding, thermostability, and replicative capacity in mammalian cells can collectively enhance the transmissibility of H9N2 AIVs by direct contact in the guinea pig model. PMID:26552719

  6. Inhibition of H9N2 Virus Invasion into Dendritic Cells by the S-Layer Protein from L. acidophilus ATCC 4356

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xue; Huang, Lulu; Zhu, Liqi; Mou, Chunxiao; Hou, Qihang; Yu, Qinghua

    2016-01-01

    Probiotics are essential for the prevention of virus invasion and the maintenance of the immune balance. However, the mechanism of competition between probiotics and virus are unknown. The objectives of this study were to isolate the surface layer (S-layer) protein from L. acidophilus ATCC 4356 as a new antiviral material, to evaluate the stimulatory effects of the S-layer protein on mouse dendritic cells (DCs) and to verify its ability to inhibit the invasion of H9N2 avian influenza virus (AIV) in DCs. We found that the S-layer protein induced DCs activation and up-regulated the IL-10 secretion. The invasion and replication of the H9N2 virus in mouse DCs was successfully demonstrated. However, the invasion of H9N2 virus into DCs could be inhibited by treatment with the S-layer protein prior to infection, which was verified by the reduced hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) mRNA expression, and nucleoprotein (NP) protein expression in the DCs. Furthermore, treatment with the S-layer protein increases the Mx1, Isg15, and Ddx58 mRNA expressions, and remits the inflammatory process to inhibit H9N2 AIV infection. In conclusion, the S-layer protein stimulates the activation of mouse DCs, inhibits H9N2 virus invasion of DCs, and stimulates the IFN-I signaling pathway. Thus, the S-layer protein from Lactobacillus is a promising biological antiviral material for AIV prevention. PMID:27826541

  7. Avian influenza virus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Avian influenza virus (AIV) is type A influenza, which is adapted to an avian host. Although avian influenza has been isolated from numerous avian species, the primary natural hosts for the virus are dabbling ducks, shorebirds, and gulls. The virus can be found world-wide in these species and in o...

  8. [Molecular mechanism affecting route of transmission for H9N2 subtype AIV].

    PubMed

    Shi, Huo-ying; Liu, Xiu-fan

    2006-02-01

    The available evidence suggests that H9 subtype avian influenza virus (AIV) did not circulate in Chicken flocks in China until the early 1990s. However, the pandemic of H9 subtype AI, which started in summer of 1998, spread very rapidly to more than 20 provinces within several months. Obviously, the virus responsible for the 1998 pandemic was quite different from the virus isolated in early 1990s. In order to investigate the molecular mechanism affecting the route of transmission for H9N2 AIVs, strains of A/Chicken/Guangdong/SS/94 (H9N2) (SS) and A/Chicken/ Shanghai/F/98 (H9N2) (F) were compared in their route of transmission. SS strain representing the earlier strain was isolated in chickens in Guangdong province in 1994, whereas F strain was isolated in Shanghai during 1998 pandemic. The findings suggested that F strain could transmitted in chickens by direct contact and by aerosol route. Whereas SS strain only by direct contact, and neither of two viruses by fecal contact. The cDNAs derived from the HA and NA genes of SS strain were cloned into vector pHW2000 to construct two transcription/expression plasmids respectively, and the cDNAs derived from 8 genes of F strain was done in the same way. Three recombinants were generated by reverse genetics: RF7/SSHA with the HA gene from SS strain and the remaining seven genes from F strain, RF7/SSNA with the NA gene from SS strain and the remaining seven genes from F strain, and RF7/SSHA/SSNA with the HA and NA genes of SS strain and the remaining six genes from F strain. In order to identify three recombinants, a total of seven genes from them were amplified by using PCR with universal primer pairs of H9N2 influenza virus and sequenced. In addition, three recombinants were characterized by HA and HI tests and sequence analysis. The results indicated that three recombinants were successfully rescued by reverse genetics. To determine the genes associated with the ability to transmit by aerosol route in chickens, a set of

  9. Pandemic Threat Posed by Avian Influenza A Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Horimoto, Taisuke; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro

    2001-01-01

    Influenza pandemics, defined as global outbreaks of the disease due to viruses with new antigenic subtypes, have exacted high death tolls from human populations. The last two pandemics were caused by hybrid viruses, or reassortants, that harbored a combination of avian and human viral genes. Avian influenza viruses are therefore key contributors to the emergence of human influenza pandemics. In 1997, an H5N1 influenza virus was directly transmitted from birds in live poultry markets in Hong Kong to humans. Eighteen people were infected in this outbreak, six of whom died. This avian virus exhibited high virulence in both avian and mammalian species, causing systemic infection in both chickens and mice. Subsequently, another avian virus with the H9N2 subtype was directly transmitted from birds to humans in Hong Kong. Interestingly, the genes encoding the internal proteins of the H9N2 virus are genetically highly related to those of the H5N1 virus, suggesting a unique property of these gene products. The identification of avian viruses in humans underscores the potential of these and similar strains to produce devastating influenza outbreaks in major population centers. Although highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses had been identified before the 1997 outbreak in Hong Kong, their devastating effects had been confined to poultry. With the Hong Kong outbreak, it became clear that the virulence potential of these viruses extended to humans. PMID:11148006

  10. Pandemic threat posed by avian influenza A viruses.

    PubMed

    Horimoto, T; Kawaoka, Y

    2001-01-01

    Influenza pandemics, defined as global outbreaks of the disease due to viruses with new antigenic subtypes, have exacted high death tolls from human populations. The last two pandemics were caused by hybrid viruses, or reassortants, that harbored a combination of avian and human viral genes. Avian influenza viruses are therefore key contributors to the emergence of human influenza pandemics. In 1997, an H5N1 influenza virus was directly transmitted from birds in live poultry markets in Hong Kong to humans. Eighteen people were infected in this outbreak, six of whom died. This avian virus exhibited high virulence in both avian and mammalian species, causing systemic infection in both chickens and mice. Subsequently, another avian virus with the H9N2 subtype was directly transmitted from birds to humans in Hong Kong. Interestingly, the genes encoding the internal proteins of the H9N2 virus are genetically highly related to those of the H5N1 virus, suggesting a unique property of these gene products. The identification of avian viruses in humans underscores the potential of these and similar strains to produce devastating influenza outbreaks in major population centers. Although highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses had been identified before the 1997 outbreak in Hong Kong, their devastating effects had been confined to poultry. With the Hong Kong outbreak, it became clear that the virulence potential of these viruses extended to humans.

  11. Avian Influenza (Bird Flu)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Address What's this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Influenza Types Seasonal Avian Swine/Variant Pandemic Other Information on Avian Influenza Language: English (US) Español Recommend on Facebook ...

  12. Avian influenza A H5N1 virus.

    PubMed

    Loeffelholz, Michael J

    2010-03-01

    Although influenza A viruses of avian origin have long been responsible for influenza pandemics, including the "Spanish flu" pandemic of 1918, human infections caused by avian subtypes of influenza A virus, most notably H5N1, have emerged since the 1990s (H5N1 in 1997; H9N2 in 1999; and H7N7 in 2003). The wide geographic distribution of influenza A H5N1 in avian species, and the number and severity of human infections are unprecedented. Together with the ongoing genetic evolution of this virus, these features make influenza A H5N1 a likely candidate for a future influenza pandemic. This article discusses the epidemiology, pathogenesis, and diagnosis of human infections caused by influenza A H5N1 virus.

  13. Pigeon RIG-I Function in Innate Immunity against H9N2 IAV and IBDV

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wenping; Shao, Qiang; Zang, Yunlong; Guo, Qiang; Zhang, Yongchao; Li, Zandong

    2015-01-01

    Retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I), a cytosolic pattern recognition receptor (PRR), can sense various RNA viruses, including the avian influenza virus (AIV) and infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV), and trigger the innate immune response. Previous studies have shown that mammalian RIG-I (human and mice) and waterfowl RIG-I (ducks and geese) are essential for type I interferon (IFN) synthesis during AIV infection. Like ducks, pigeons are also susceptible to infection but are ineffective propagators and disseminators of AIVs, i.e., “dead end” hosts for AIVs and even highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI). Consequently, we sought to identify pigeon RIG-I and investigate its roles in the detection of A/Chicken/Shandong/ZB/2007 (H9N2) (ZB07), Gansu/Tianshui (IBDV TS) and Beijing/CJ/1980 (IBDV CJ-801) strains in chicken DF-1 fibroblasts or human 293T cells. Pigeon mRNA encoding the putative pigeon RIG-I analogs was identified. The exogenous expression of enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP)-tagged pigeon RIG-I and caspase activation and recruitment domains (CARDs), strongly induced antiviral gene (IFN-β, Mx, and PKR) mRNA synthesis, decreased viral gene (M gene and VP2) mRNA expression, and reduced the viral titers of ZB07 and IBDV TS/CJ-801 virus strains in chicken DF-1 cells, but not in 293T cells. We also compared the antiviral abilities of RIG-I proteins from waterfowl (duck and goose) and pigeon. Our data indicated that waterfowl RIG-I are more effective in the induction of antiviral genes and the repression of ZB07 and IBDV TS/CJ-801 strain replication than pigeon RIG-I. Furthermore, chicken melanoma differentiation associated gene 5(MDA5)/ mitochondrial antiviral signaling (MAVS) silencing combined with RIG-I transfection suggested that pigeon RIG-I can restore the antiviral response in MDA5-silenced DF-1 cells but not in MAVS-silenced DF-1 cells. In conclusion, these results demonstrated that pigeon RIG-I and CARDs have a strong antiviral

  14. Pigeon RIG-I Function in Innate Immunity against H9N2 IAV and IBDV.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wenping; Shao, Qiang; Zang, Yunlong; Guo, Qiang; Zhang, Yongchao; Li, Zandong

    2015-07-22

    Retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I), a cytosolic pattern recognition receptor (PRR), can sense various RNA viruses, including the avian influenza virus (AIV) and infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV), and trigger the innate immune response. Previous studies have shown that mammalian RIG-I (human and mice) and waterfowl RIG-I (ducks and geese) are essential for type I interferon (IFN) synthesis during AIV infection. Like ducks, pigeons are also susceptible to infection but are ineffective propagators and disseminators of AIVs, i.e., "dead end" hosts for AIVs and even highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI). Consequently, we sought to identify pigeon RIG-I and investigate its roles in the detection of A/Chicken/Shandong/ZB/2007 (H9N2) (ZB07), Gansu/Tianshui (IBDV TS) and Beijing/CJ/1980 (IBDV CJ-801) strains in chicken DF-1 fibroblasts or human 293T cells. Pigeon mRNA encoding the putative pigeon RIG-I analogs was identified. The exogenous expression of enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP)-tagged pigeon RIG-I and caspase activation and recruitment domains (CARDs), strongly induced antiviral gene (IFN-β, Mx, and PKR) mRNA synthesis, decreased viral gene (M gene and VP2) mRNA expression, and reduced the viral titers of ZB07 and IBDV TS/CJ-801 virus strains in chicken DF-1 cells, but not in 293T cells. We also compared the antiviral abilities of RIG-I proteins from waterfowl (duck and goose) and pigeon. Our data indicated that waterfowl RIG-I are more effective in the induction of antiviral genes and the repression of ZB07 and IBDV TS/CJ-801 strain replication than pigeon RIG-I. Furthermore, chicken melanoma differentiation associated gene 5(MDA5)/ mitochondrial antiviral signaling (MAVS) silencing combined with RIG-I transfection suggested that pigeon RIG-I can restore the antiviral response in MDA5-silenced DF-1 cells but not in MAVS-silenced DF-1 cells. In conclusion, these results demonstrated that pigeon RIG-I and CARDs have a strong antiviral ability

  15. Enhanced immune response of BMDCs pulsed with H9N2 AIV and CpG.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jian; Yin, Yin Y; Qin, Tao; Zhu, Li Q; Yu, Qing H; Yang, Qian

    2014-11-28

    Dendritic cells (DCs), professional antigen presenting cells, have demonstrated effective in controlling the initial of innate immune, while CpG could improve the performance of immune system. To explore the mechanism of CpG enhancing the immune response, we compared different stimulated mouse DCs with systemic approach microarrays. Analysis revealed 1840 differentially expressed genes in H9N2 stimulated group, more than 1728 altered genes in inactive H9N2 group. Investigation also proved that CpG/inactive H9N2 co-stimulation changed 2140 genes, more than that in H9N2 group, strongly demonstrated that CpG improved the performance of inactive H9N2 vaccination. Pathways analysis founded that DCs response rapid to shift in their maturation state, which involved Toll-like receptor (TLR) pathway significantly. Microarrays results were also verified by qRT-PCR with 14 elected representative genes. Further analysis proved that co-stimulatory molecules (CD40, CD80, CD86 and MHC-II), regulatory protein (IRF-7 and TRAF-6) and pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1, IL-6 and IL-12) were all changed and involved in DCs maturation. At last we demonstrated TLR signalling pathway in chicken bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (chBM-DCs) stimulated with CpG. The distinct transcriptional profiles of DCs pulsed with various stimuli expanded our understanding of how DCs respond and recognize influenza. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Avian influenza viruses and human health.

    PubMed

    Alexander, D J

    2006-01-01

    Influenza A viruses cause natural infections of humans, some other mammals and birds. Few of the 16 haemagglutinin and nine neuraminidase subtype combinations have been isolated from mammals, but all subtypes have been isolated from birds. In the 20th century, there were four pandemics of influenza as a result of the emergence of antigenically different strains in humans: 1918 (H1N1), 1957 (H2N2), 1968 (H3N2) and 1977 (H1N1). Influenza A viruses contain eight distinct RNA genes and reassortment of these can occur in mixed infections with different viruses. The 1957 and 1968 pandemic viruses differed from the preceding viruses in humans by the substitution of genes that came from avian viruses, suggesting they arose by genetic reassortment of viruses of human and avian origin. Up to 1995, there had been only three reports of avian influenza viruses infecting humans, in 1959, 1977 and 1981 (all H7N7), but, since 1996, there have been regular reports of natural infections of humans with avian influenza viruses: in England in 1996 (H7N7), Hong Kong 1997 (H5N1), 1999 (H9N2), and 2003 (H5N1), in The Netherlands 2003 (H7N7), Canada 2004 (H7N3), Vietnam 2004 (H5N1) and Thailand 2004 (H5N1). The H5N1 virus is alarming because 51 (64 %) of the 80 people confirmed as infected since 1997 have died.

  17. Avian influenza virus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Avian influenza virus (AIV) is type A influenza that is adapted to avian host species. Although the virus can be isolated from numerous avian species, the natural host reservoir species are dabbling ducks, shorebirds and gulls. Domestic poultry species (poultry being defined as birds that are rais...

  18. Avian Influenza A Virus Infections in Humans

    MedlinePlus

    ... Avian Swine/Variant Pandemic Other Avian Influenza A Virus Infections in Humans Language: English (US) Español ... with Avian Influenza A Viruses Avian Influenza A Virus Infections in Humans Although avian influenza A viruses ...

  19. Active Surveillance for Avian Influenza Virus, Egypt, 2010–2012

    PubMed Central

    Kandeil, Ahmed; El-Shesheny, Rabeh; Kayed, Ahmed S.; Gomaa, Mokhtar M.; Maatouq, Asmaa M.; Shehata, Mahmoud M.; Moatasim, Yassmin; Bagato, Ola; Cai, Zhipeng; Rubrum, Adam; Kutkat, Mohamed A.; McKenzie, Pamela P.; Webster, Robert G.; Webby, Richard J.; Ali, Mohamed A.

    2014-01-01

    Continuous circulation of influenza A(H5N1) virus among poultry in Egypt has created an epicenter in which the viruses evolve into newer subclades and continue to cause disease in humans. To detect influenza viruses in Egypt, since 2009 we have actively surveyed various regions and poultry production sectors. From August 2010 through January 2013, >11,000 swab samples were collected; 10% were positive by matrix gene reverse transcription PCR. During this period, subtype H9N2 viruses emerged, cocirculated with subtype H5N1 viruses, and frequently co-infected the same avian host. Genetic and antigenic analyses of viruses revealed that influenza A(H5N1) clade 2.2.1 viruses are dominant and that all subtype H9N2 viruses are G1-like. Cocirculation of different subtypes poses concern for potential reassortment. Avian influenza continues to threaten public and animal health in Egypt, and continuous surveillance for avian influenza virus is needed. PMID:24655395

  20. Active surveillance for avian influenza virus, Egypt, 2010-2012.

    PubMed

    Kayali, Ghazi; Kandeil, Ahmed; El-Shesheny, Rabeh; Kayed, Ahmed S; Gomaa, Mokhtar M; Maatouq, Asmaa M; Shehata, Mahmoud M; Moatasim, Yassmin; Bagato, Ola; Cai, Zhipeng; Rubrum, Adam; Kutkat, Mohamed A; McKenzie, Pamela P; Webster, Robert G; Webby, Richard J; Ali, Mohamed A

    2014-04-01

    Continuous circulation of influenza A(H5N1) virus among poultry in Egypt has created an epicenter in which the viruses evolve into newer subclades and continue to cause disease in humans. To detect influenza viruses in Egypt, since 2009 we have actively surveyed various regions and poultry production sectors. From August 2010 through January 2013, >11,000 swab samples were collected; 10% were positive by matrix gene reverse transcription PCR. During this period, subtype H9N2 viruses emerged, cocirculated with subtype H5N1 viruses, and frequently co-infected the same avian host. Genetic and antigenic analyses of viruses revealed that influenza A(H5N1) clade 2.2.1 viruses are dominant and that all subtype H9N2 viruses are G1-like. Cocirculation of different subtypes poses concern for potential reassortment. Avian influenza continues to threaten public and animal health in Egypt, and continuous surveillance for avian influenza virus is needed.

  1. Avian influenza viruses in Korean live poultry markets and their pathogenic potential.

    PubMed

    Choi, Young Ki; Seo, Sang Heui; Kim, Jin A; Webby, Richard J; Webster, Robert G

    2005-02-20

    We surveyed live-poultry markets in Korea in 2003 and isolated 9 H9N2, 6 H3N2, and 1 H6N1 influenza viruses. Antigenic and phylogenetic analyses showed that all 9 H9N2 isolates were of A/Chicken/Korea/25232-96006/96-like lineage (which caused disease in chickens in Korea in 1996) but were different from H9N2 viruses of southeastern China. They had at least 4 genotypes and replicated in chickens but not in mice. The H3N2 and H6N1 viruses were new to Korea and were probably reassortants of avian influenza viruses from southeastern China and recent Korean H9N2 viruses. All 8 segments of the H3N2 viruses formed a single phylogenetic cluster with 99.1 to 100% homology. The H3N2 viruses replicated in chickens and mice without preadaptation, but the H6N1 virus did not. Our results show an increasingly diverse pool of avian influenza viruses in Korea that are potential pandemic influenza agents.

  2. GoTLR7 but not GoTLR21 mediated antiviral immune responses against low pathogenic H9N2 AIV and Newcastle disease virus infection.

    PubMed

    Yan, Bing; Zhang, Jinyue; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Mingshu; Jia, Renyong; Zhu, Dekang; Liu, Mafeng; Yang, Qiao; Wu, Ying; Sun, Kunfeng; Chen, Xiaoyue; Cheng, Anchun; Chen, Shun

    2017-01-01

    Aquatic birds are considered the biological and genetic reservoirs of avian influenza virus and play a critical role in the transmission and dissemination of Newcastle Disease Virus (NDV). Both TLR7 and TLR21 are important for the host antiviral immune response. In an in vivo study, goTLR7, not goTLR21, was significantly up-regulated in the lungs of geese at 3 to 7 d after challenge with H9N2. And goOASL expression was induced in the bursa of fabricius, harderian glands and lungs. An increase in goRIG-I was detected in the lung and small intestine, whereas goPKR was increased in the lung but decreased in the thymus. In the in vitro study, goTLR7 and goRIG-I but not goTLR21 were highly induced by H9N2. Moreover, goOASL and goPKR were significantly induced in H9N2-treated PBMCs, whereas goMx was suppressed. The over-expression of goTLR7, not goTLR21, controlled NDV replication in DF-1 cells, resulting in a decrease in viral copies and the viral titres. Furthermore, we explored the cellular localization of goTLR7 and goTLR21 in heterologous (DF-1 and BHK21) and homologous cells (GEF) through ectopic expression of goTLRs. The antiviral functions of goTLR7 and goTLR21 during H9N2 and NDV infection and their cellular locations were reported here for the first time. These results will contribute to better understand the TLR-dependent antiviral immune responses of waterfowl. Copyright © 2016 European Federation of Immunological Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Avian influenza virus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Avian influenza (AI) is caused by type A influenza virus, a member of the Orthomyxoviridae family. AI viruses are serologically categorized into 16 hemagglutinin (H1-H16) and 9 neuraminidase (N1-N9) subtypes. All subtypes have been identified in birds. Infections by AI viruses have been reported in ...

  4. Avian Influenza/Pandemic Influenza Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-01

    Defense Global Emerging Infections Surveillance and Response System (DoD-GEIS) research related to avian influenza and pandemic influenza preparedness and...surveillance and efforts in support of research related to avian influenza /pandemic influenza. The results of these efforts will be coordinated with the

  5. Phylogenetic analysis of hemagglutinin and neuraminidase genes of H9N2 viruses isolated from migratory ducks.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jin-Hua; Okazaki, Katsunori; Shi, Wei-Min; Kida, Hiroshi

    2003-12-01

    Genetic analysis indicated that the pandemic influenza strains derived from wild aquatic birds harbor viruses of 15 hemagglutinin (HA) and 9 neuraminidase (NA) antigenic subtypes. Surveillance studies have shown that H9N2 subtype viruses are worldwide in domestic poultry and could infect mammalian species, including humans. Here, we genetically analyzed the HA and NA genes of five H9N2 viruses isolated from the migratory ducks in Hokkaido, Japan, the flyway of migration from Siberia during 1997-2000. The results showed that HA and NA genes of these viruses belong to the same lineages, respectively. Compared with those of A/quail/Hong Kong/G1/97-like and A/duck/Hong Kong/Y280/97-like viruses, HA and NA of the migratory duck isolates had a close relationship with those of H9N2 viruses isolated from the chicken in Korea, indicating that the Korea H9N2 viruses might be derived from the migratory ducks. The NA genes of the five isolates were located in the same cluster as those of N2 viruses, which had caused a human pandemic in 1968, indicating that the NA genes of the previous pandemic strains are still circulating in waterfowl reservoirs. The present results further emphasize the importance of carrying out molecular epidemiological surveillance of H9N2 viruses in wild ducks to obtain more information for the future human influenza pandemics preparedness.

  6. Active surveillance of avian influenza viruses in Egyptian poultry, 2015.

    PubMed

    Kayed, A S; Kandeil, A; El Shesheny, R; Ali, M A; Kayali, G

    2016-10-02

    Surveillance for avian influenza viruses in Egyptian poultry has been conducted since 2009. Up to 2011, all the detected viruses were H5N1, and the overall prevalence was 5%. In 2011, H9N2 viruses were observed to be co-circulating and co-infecting the same hosts as H5N1 viruses. Since then, the detection rate has increased to around 10%. In the 2014-2015 winter season, H5N1 was circulating heavily in poultry flocks and caused an unprecedented number of human infections. In contrast, surveillance in the last quarter of 2015 indicated a near absence of H5N1 in Egyptian poultry. Surveillance for avian influenza viruses must continue in Egypt to monitor further developments in H5N1 circulation in poultry.

  7. Avian influenza control strategies

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Control strategies for avian influenza in poultry vary depending on whether the goal is prevention, management, or eradication. Components used in control programs include: 1) education which includes communication, public awareness, and behavioral change, 2) changes to production and marketing sys...

  8. Avian influenza (fowl plague)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Avian influenza (AI) viruses infect domestic poultry and wild birds. In domestic poultry, AI viruses are typically of low pathogenicity (LP) causing subclinical infections, respiratory disease or drops in egg production. However, a few AI viruses cause severe systemic disease with high mortality; ...

  9. Serological evidence of avian influenza virus and canine influenza virus infections among stray cats in live poultry markets, China.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Han; He, Shu-yi; Sun, Lingshuang; He, Huamei; Ji, Fangxiao; Sun, Yao; Jia, Kun; Ning, Zhangyong; Wang, Heng; Yuan, Liguo; Zhou, Pei; Zhang, Guihong; Li, Shoujun

    2015-02-25

    From January 2010 to January 2012, we collected sera samples from 700 stray cats living in close proximity to poultry farms or poultry markets in 4 provinces in China. A number of cats had evidence of avian and canine influenza virus infection: avian H9N2 [24 by HI ≥1:20 and 16 by microneutralization (MN) assay ≥1:80]; avian H5N1 (9 by HI ≥1:20 and 3 by MN assay ≥1:80) and canine H3N2 (32 by HI ≥1:20 and 18 by MN ≥1:80). Bivariate analyses revealed that cats sampled near live poultry markets and cats with influenza-like-illness were at increased risk of having elevated antibody titers by HI against avian H9N2, avian H5N1, or canine H3N2 viruses. Hence, cats may play a very important role in the ecology of novel influenza viruses and periodic epidemiological surveillance for novel influenza infections among stray cats could serve as an early warning system for human threats. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Avian Influenza A(H5N1) Virus in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Kayali, Ghazi; Kandeil, Ahmed; El-Shesheny, Rabeh; Kayed, Ahmed S; Maatouq, Asmaa M; Cai, Zhipeng; McKenzie, Pamela P; Webby, Richard J; El Refaey, Samir; Kandeel, Amr; Ali, Mohamed A

    2016-03-01

    In Egypt, avian influenza A subtype H5N1 and H9N2 viruses are enzootic in poultry. The control plan devised by veterinary authorities in Egypt to prevent infections in poultry focused mainly on vaccination and ultimately failed. Recently, widespread H5N1 infections in poultry and a substantial increase in the number of human cases of H5N1 infection were observed. We summarize surveillance data from 2009 through 2014 and show that avian influenza viruses are established in poultry in Egypt and are continuously evolving genetically and antigenically. We also discuss the epidemiology of human infection with avian influenza in Egypt and describe how the true burden of disease is underestimated. We discuss the failures of relying on vaccinating poultry as the sole intervention tool. We conclude by highlighting the key components that need to be included in a new strategy to control avian influenza infections in poultry and humans in Egypt.

  11. Avian Influenza A(H5N1) Virus in Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Kandeil, Ahmed; El-Shesheny, Rabeh; Kayed, Ahmed S.; Maatouq, Asmaa M.; Cai, Zhipeng; McKenzie, Pamela P.; Webby, Richard J.; El Refaey, Samir; Kandeel, Amr; Ali, Mohamed A.

    2016-01-01

    In Egypt, avian influenza A subtype H5N1 and H9N2 viruses are enzootic in poultry. The control plan devised by veterinary authorities in Egypt to prevent infections in poultry focused mainly on vaccination and ultimately failed. Recently, widespread H5N1 infections in poultry and a substantial increase in the number of human cases of H5N1 infection were observed. We summarize surveillance data from 2009 through 2014 and show that avian influenza viruses are established in poultry in Egypt and are continuously evolving genetically and antigenically. We also discuss the epidemiology of human infection with avian influenza in Egypt and describe how the true burden of disease is underestimated. We discuss the failures of relying on vaccinating poultry as the sole intervention tool. We conclude by highlighting the key components that need to be included in a new strategy to control avian influenza infections in poultry and humans in Egypt. PMID:26886164

  12. The continued pandemic threat posed by avian influenza viruses in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Hatta, Masato; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro

    2002-07-01

    In 1997, a highly pathogenic avian H5N1 influenza virus was transmitted directly from live commercial poultry to humans in Hong Kong. Of the 18 people infected, six died. The molecular basis for the high virulence of this virus in mice was found to involve an amino acid change in the PB2 protein. To eliminate the source of the pathogenic virus, all birds in the Hong Kong markets were slaughtered. In 1999, another avian influenza virus of H9N2 subtype was transmitted to two children in Hong Kong. In 2000-2002, H5N1 avian viruses reappeared in the poultry markets of Hong Kong, although they have not infected humans. Continued circulation of H5N1 and other avian viruses in Hong Kong raises the possibility of future human influenza outbreaks. Moreover, the acquisition of properties of human viruses by the avian viruses currently circulating in southeast China might result in a pandemic.

  13. Sialic acid content in human saliva and anti-influenza activity against human and avian influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Limsuwat, Nattavatchara; Suptawiwat, Ornpreya; Boonarkart, Chompunuch; Puthavathana, Pilaipan; Wiriyarat, Witthawat; Auewarakul, Prasert

    2016-03-01

    It was shown previously that human saliva has higher antiviral activity against human influenza viruses than against H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses, and that the major anti-influenza activity was associated with sialic-acid-containing molecules. To further characterize the differential susceptibility to saliva among influenza viruses, seasonal influenza A and B virus, pandemic H1N1 virus, and 15 subtypes of avian influenza virus were tested for their susceptibility to human and chicken saliva. Human saliva showed higher hemagglutination inhibition (HI) and neutralization (NT) titers against seasonal influenza A virus and the pandemic H1N1 viruses than against influenza B virus and most avian influenza viruses, except for H9N2 and H12N9 avian influenza viruses, which showed high HI and NT titers. To understand the nature of sialic-acid-containing anti-influenza factors in human saliva, α2,3- and α2,6-linked sialic acid was measured in human saliva samples using a lectin binding and dot blot assay. α2,6-linked sialic acid was found to be more abundant than α2,3-linked sialic acid, and a seasonal H1N1 influenza virus bound more efficiently to human saliva than an H5N1 virus in a dot blot analysis. These data indicated that human saliva contains the sialic acid type corresponding to the binding preference of seasonal influenza viruses.

  14. Virus-like particles comprising H5, H7 and H9 hemagglutinins elicit protective immunity to heterologous avian influenza viruses in chickens

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Avian influenza (AI) viruses circulating in wild birds pose a serious threat to public health. Human and veterinary vaccines against AI subtypes are needed. Here we prepared triple-subtype VLPs that co-localized H5, H7 and H9 antigens derived from H5N1, H7N3 and H9N2 viruses. VLPs also contained inf...

  15. Rapid production of a H₉ N₂ influenza vaccine from MDCK cells for protecting chicken against influenza virus infection.

    PubMed

    Ren, Zhenghua; Lu, Zhongzheng; Wang, Lei; Huo, Zeren; Cui, Jianhua; Zheng, Tingting; Dai, Qing; Chen, Cuiling; Qin, Mengying; Chen, Meihua; Yang, Rirong

    2015-04-01

    H9N2 subtype avian influenza viruses are widespread in domestic poultry, and vaccination remains the most effective way to protect the chicken population from avian influenza pandemics. Currently, egg-based H9N2 influenza vaccine production has several disadvantages and mammalian MDCK cells are being investigated as candidates for influenza vaccine production. However, little research has been conducted on low pathogenic avian influenza viruses (LPAIV) such as H9N2 replicating in mammalian cells using microcarrier beads in a bioreactor. In this study, we present a systematic analysis of a safe H9N2 influenza vaccine derived from MDCK cells for protecting chickens against influenza virus infection. In 2008, we isolated two novel H9N2 influenza viruses from chickens raised in southern China, and these H9N2 viruses were adapted to MDCK cells. The H9N2 virus was produced in MDCK cells in a scalable bioreactor, purified, inactivated, and investigated for use as a vaccine. The MDCK-derived H9N2 vaccine was able to induce high titers of neutralizing antibodies in chickens of different ages. Histopathological examination, direct immunofluorescence, HI assay, CD4(+)/CD8(+) ratio test, and cytokine evaluation indicated that the MDCK-derived H9N2 vaccine evoked a rapid and effective immune response to protect chickens from influenza infection. High titers of H9N2-specific antibodies were maintained in chickens for 5 months, and the MDCK-derived H9N2 vaccine had no effects on chicken growth. The use of MDCK cells in bioreactors for LPAIV vaccine production is an attractive option to prevent outbreaks of LPAIV in poultry.

  16. Prospective Study of Avian Influenza Virus Infections among Rural Thai Villagers

    PubMed Central

    Krueger, Whitney S.; Khuntirat, Benjawan; Yoon, In-Kyu; Blair, Patrick J.; Chittagarnpitch, Malinee; Putnam, Shannon D.; Supawat, Krongkaew; Gibbons, Robert V.; Bhuddari, Darunee; Pattamadilok, Sirima; Sawanpanyalert, Pathom; Heil, Gary L.; Gray, Gregory C.

    2013-01-01

    Background In 2008, 800 rural Thai adults living within Kamphaeng Phet Province were enrolled in a prospective cohort study of zoonotic influenza transmission. Serological analyses of enrollment sera suggested this cohort had experienced subclinical avian influenza virus (AIV) infections with H9N2 and H5N1 viruses. Methods After enrollment, participants were contacted weekly for 24mos for acute influenza-like illnesses (ILI). Cohort members confirmed to have influenza A infections were enrolled with their household contacts in a family transmission study involving paired sera and respiratory swab collections. Cohort members also provided sera at 12 and 24 months after enrollment. Serologic and real-time RT-PCR assays were performed against avian, swine, and human influenza viruses. Results Over the 2 yrs of follow-up, 81 ILI investigations in the cohort were conducted; 31 (38%) were identified as influenza A infections by qRT-PCR. Eighty-three household contacts were enrolled; 12 (14%) reported ILIs, and 11 (92%) of those were identified as influenza infections. A number of subjects were found to have slightly elevated antibodies against avian-like A/Hong Kong/1073/1999(H9N2) virus: 21 subjects (2.7%) at 12-months and 40 subjects (5.1%) at 24-months. Among these, two largely asymptomatic acute infections with H9N2 virus were detected by >4-fold increases in annual serologic titers (final titers 1∶80). While controlling for age and influenza vaccine receipt, moderate poultry exposure was significantly associated with elevated H9N2 titers (adjusted OR = 2.3; 95% CI, 1.04–5.2) at the 24-month encounter. One subject had an elevated titer (1∶20) against H5N1 during follow-up. Conclusions From 2008–10, evidence for AIV infections was sparse among this rural population. Subclinical H9N2 AIV infections likely occurred, but serological results were confounded by antibody cross-reactions. There is a critical need for improved serological diagnostics to more

  17. Profiles of cytokine and chemokine gene expression in human pulmonary epithelial cells induced by human and avian influenza viruses

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Influenza pandemic remains a serious threat to human health. In this study, the repertoire of host cellular cytokine and chemokine responses to infections with highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1, low pathogenicity avian influenza H9N2 and seasonal human influenza H1N1 were compared using an in vitro system based on human pulmonary epithelial cells. The results showed that H5N1 was more potent than H9N2 and H1N1 in inducing CXCL-10/IP-10, TNF-alpha and CCL-5/RANTES. The cytokine/chemokine profiles for H9N2, in general, resembled those of H1N1. Of interest, only H1N1, but none of the avian subtypes examined could induce a persistent elevation of the immune-regulatory cytokine - TGF-β2. The differential expression of cytokines/chemokines following infection with different influenza viruses could be a key determinant for clinical outcome. The potential of using these cytokines/chemokines as prognostic markers or targets of therapy is worth exploring. PMID:21108843

  18. Avian influenza surveillance and diagnosis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Rapid detection and accurate identification of low (LPAI) and high pathogenicity avian influenza (HPAI) is critical to controlling infections and disease in poultry. Test selection and algorithms for the detection and diagnosis of avian influenza virus (AIV) in poultry may vary somewhat among differ...

  19. Characterization of Avian Influenza and Newcastle Disease Viruses from Poultry in Libya.

    PubMed

    Kammon, Abdulwahab; Heidari, Alireza; Dayhum, Abdunaser; Eldaghayes, Ibrahim; Sharif, Monier; Monne, Isabela; Cattoli, Giovanni; Asheg, Abdulatif; Farhat, Milad; Kraim, Elforjani

    2015-09-01

    On March 2013, the Libyan poultry industry faced severe outbreaks due to mixed infections of APMV-1 (Newcastle disease) and low pathogenic avian influenza (AI) of the H9N2 subtype which were causing high mortality and great economic losses. APMV-1 and H9N2 were isolated and characterized. Genetic sequencing of the APMV-1/chicken/Libya/13VIR/ 7225-1/2013 isolate revealed the presence of a velogenic APMV-1 belonging to lineage 5 (GRRRQKR*F Lin.5) or genotype VII in class II, according to the nomenclature in use. Three AI viruses of the H9N2 subtype, namely A/avian/Libya/13VIR7225-2/2013, A/avian/Libya/13VIR7225-3/2013, and A/avian/Libya/13VIR7225-5/2013, were isolated and found to belong to the G1 lineage. Analysis of amino acid sequences showed that the analyzed H9N2 viruses contained the amino acid Leu at position 226 (H3 numbering) at the receptor binding site of the HA, responsible for human virus-like receptor specificity. On March 2014, an outbreak of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) virus of the H5N1 subtype was diagnosed in a backyard poultry farm in an eastern region of Libya. The H5N1 isolate (A/chicken/Libya/14VIR2749-16/2014) was detected by real time RT-PCR (rRT-PCR). Genetic characterization of the HA gene revealed that the identified subtype was highly pathogenic, belonged to the 2.2.1 lineage, and clustered with recent Egyptian viruses. This study revealed the presence of a velogenic APMV-1 genotype and of two influenza subtypes, namely HPAI H5N1 and H9N2, which are of major interest for public and animal health. Considering these findings, more investigations must be undertaken to establish and implement adequate influenza surveillance programs; this would allow better study of the epidemiology of APMV-1 genotype VII in Libya and evaluation of the current vaccination strategies.

  20. Genome Wide Host Gene Expression Analysis in Chicken Lungs Infected with Avian Influenza Viruses.

    PubMed

    Ranaware, Pradip B; Mishra, Anamika; Vijayakumar, Periyasamy; Gandhale, Pradeep N; Kumar, Himanshu; Kulkarni, Diwakar D; Raut, Ashwin Ashok

    2016-01-01

    The molecular pathogenesis of avian influenza infection varies greatly with individual bird species and virus strain. The molecular pathogenesis of the highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIV) or the low pathogenic avian influenza virus (LPAIV) infection in avian species remains poorly understood. Thus, global immune response of chickens infected with HPAI H5N1 (A/duck/India/02CA10/2011) and LPAI H9N2 (A/duck/India/249800/2010) viruses was studied using microarray to identify crucial host genetic components responsive to these infection. HPAI H5N1 virus induced excessive expression of type I IFNs (IFNA and IFNG), cytokines (IL1B, IL18, IL22, IL13, and IL12B), chemokines (CCL4, CCL19, CCL10, and CX3CL1) and IFN stimulated genes (OASL, MX1, RSAD2, IFITM5, IFIT5, GBP 1, and EIF2AK) in lung tissues. This dysregulation of host innate immune genes may be the critical determinant of the severity and the outcome of the influenza infection in chickens. In contrast, the expression levels of most of these genes was not induced in the lungs of LPAI H9N2 virus infected chickens. This study indicated the relationship between host immune genes and their roles in pathogenesis of HPAIV infection in chickens.

  1. Genome Wide Host Gene Expression Analysis in Chicken Lungs Infected with Avian Influenza Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Gandhale, Pradeep N.; Kumar, Himanshu; Kulkarni, Diwakar D.

    2016-01-01

    The molecular pathogenesis of avian influenza infection varies greatly with individual bird species and virus strain. The molecular pathogenesis of the highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIV) or the low pathogenic avian influenza virus (LPAIV) infection in avian species remains poorly understood. Thus, global immune response of chickens infected with HPAI H5N1 (A/duck/India/02CA10/2011) and LPAI H9N2 (A/duck/India/249800/2010) viruses was studied using microarray to identify crucial host genetic components responsive to these infection. HPAI H5N1 virus induced excessive expression of type I IFNs (IFNA and IFNG), cytokines (IL1B, IL18, IL22, IL13, and IL12B), chemokines (CCL4, CCL19, CCL10, and CX3CL1) and IFN stimulated genes (OASL, MX1, RSAD2, IFITM5, IFIT5, GBP 1, and EIF2AK) in lung tissues. This dysregulation of host innate immune genes may be the critical determinant of the severity and the outcome of the influenza infection in chickens. In contrast, the expression levels of most of these genes was not induced in the lungs of LPAI H9N2 virus infected chickens. This study indicated the relationship between host immune genes and their roles in pathogenesis of HPAIV infection in chickens. PMID:27071061

  2. Molecular identification and comparative transcriptional analysis of myxovirus resistance GTPase (Mx) gene in goose (Anser cygnoide) after H9N2 AIV infection.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Miao; Chen, Shun; Wang, Mingshu; Jia, Renyong; Zhu, Dekang; Liu, Mafeng; Sun, Kunfeng; Yang, Qiao; Wu, Ying; Chen, Xiaoyue; Cheng, Anchun

    2016-08-01

    Interferon (IFN)-induced myxovirus resistance (Mx) GTPases belong to the family of dynamin-like GTPases and control a diverse range of viruses. In this study, the identified goose Mx (goMx) mRNA is 2009bp long, shares partially conserved exons with other homologues, and shares highly conserved domains in its primary structure. The amino acid position 629 (629aa) of the goMx protein was identified as serine (Ser), in contrast to the Ser located at 631aa in chicken Mx, which is considered to be responsible for the lack of chicken Mx antiviral activity. In addition, the goMx 142aa residue in the dynamin family signature differs from that of other functional Mx proteins. Transcriptional analysis revealed that goMx was mainly expressed in the digestive, respiratory and immune systems in an age-specific manner. GoMx transcript levels in goose peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were found to be significantly up-regulated by various agonists and avian viruses. Furthermore, a time course study of the effects of H9N2 avian influenza virus (AIV) on goMx expression in infected goslings suggested that H9N2 AIV affected goMx expression. However, significant changes in goMx expression were observed in the trachea, lung and small intestine of infected birds. Altogether, these results indicate that goMx protein may have acquired its broad antiviral activity by changing only a few amino acids at select sites, even as it shares a conserved architectures with species. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Avian influenza in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Villarreal, C

    2009-04-01

    The outbreak of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N2 in Mexico in 1994 led to a clear increase in biosecurity measures and improvement of intensive poultry production systems. The control and eradication measures implemented were based on active surveillance, disease detection, depopulation of infected farms and prevention of possible contacts (identified by epidemiological investigations), improvement of biosecurity measures, and restriction of the movement of live birds, poultry products, by-products and infected material. In addition, Mexico introduced a massive vaccination programme, which resulted in the eradication of HPAI in a relatively short time in two affected areas that had a high density of commercial poultry.

  4. Full-genome analysis of avian influenza A(H5N1) virus from a human, North America, 2013.

    PubMed

    Pabbaraju, Kanti; Tellier, Raymond; Wong, Sallene; Li, Yan; Bastien, Nathalie; Tang, Julian W; Drews, Steven J; Jang, Yunho; Davis, C Todd; Fonseca, Kevin; Tipples, Graham A

    2014-05-01

    Full-genome analysis was conducted on the first isolate of a highly pathogenic avian influenza A(H5N1) virus from a human in North America. The virus has a hemagglutinin gene of clade 2.3.2.1c and is a reassortant with an H9N2 subtype lineage polymerase basic 2 gene. No mutations conferring resistance to adamantanes or neuraminidase inhibitors were found.

  5. Transmission of avian influenza virus (H3N2) to dogs.

    PubMed

    Song, Daesub; Kang, Bokyu; Lee, Chulseung; Jung, Kwonil; Ha, Gunwoo; Kang, Dongseok; Park, Seongjun; Park, Bongkyun; Oh, Jinsik

    2008-05-01

    In South Korea, where avian influenza virus subtypes H3N2, H5N1, H6N1, and H9N2 circulate or have been detected, 3 genetically similar canine influenza virus (H3N2) strains of avian origin (A/canine/Korea/01/2007, A/canine/Korea/02/2007, and A/canine/Korea/03/2007) were isolated from dogs exhibiting severe respiratory disease. To determine whether the novel canine influenza virus of avian origin was transmitted among dogs, we experimentally infected beagles with this influenza virus (H3N2) isolate. The beagles shed virus through nasal excretion, seroconverted, and became ill with severe necrotizing tracheobronchitis and bronchioalveolitis with accompanying clinical signs (e.g., high fever). Consistent with histologic observation of lung lesions, large amounts of avian influenza virus binding receptor (SAalpha 2,3-gal) were identified in canine tracheal, bronchial, and bronchiolar epithelial cells, which suggests potential for direct transmission of avian influenza virus (H3N2) from poultry to dogs. Our data provide evidence that dogs may play a role in interspecies transmission and spread of influenza virus.

  6. Avian-human influenza epidemic model.

    PubMed

    Iwami, Shingo; Takeuchi, Yasuhiro; Liu, Xianning

    2007-05-01

    A mathematical model is proposed to interpret the spread of avian influenza from the bird world to the human world. Our mathematical model warns that two types of the outbreak of avian influenza may occur if the humans do not prevent the spread of avian influenza. Moreover, it suggests that we cannot feel relieved although the total infected humans are kept at low level. In order to prevent spread of avian influenza in the human world, we must take the measures not only for the birds infected with avian influenza to exterminate but also for the humans infected with mutant avian influenza to quarantine when mutant avian influenza has already occurred. In particular, the latter measure is shown to be important to stop the second pandemic of avian influenza.

  7. Genetic analysis of novel avian A(H7N9) influenza viruses isolated from patients in China, February to April 2013.

    PubMed

    Kageyama, T; Fujisaki, S; Takashita, E; Xu, H; Yamada, S; Uchida, Y; Neumann, G; Saito, T; Kawaoka, Y; Tashiro, M

    2013-04-11

    Novel influenza viruses of the H7N9 subtype have infected 33 and killed nine people in China as of 10 April 2013. Their haemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase genes probably originated from Eurasian avian influenza viruses; the remaining genes are closely related to avian H9N2 influenza viruses. Several characteristic amino acid changes in HA and the PB2 RNA polymerase subunit probably facilitate binding to human-type receptors and efficient replication in mammals, respectively, highlighting the pandemic potential of the novel viruses.

  8. Avian influenza infections in birds--a moving target.

    PubMed

    Capua, Ilaria; Alexander, Dennis J

    2007-01-01

    Avian influenza (AI) is a complex infection of birds, of which the ecology and epidemiology have undergone substantial changes over the last decade. Avian influenza viruses infecting poultry can be divided into two groups. The very virulent viruses cause highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI), with flock mortality as high as 100%. These viruses have been restricted to subtypes H5 and H7, although not all H5 and H7 viruses cause HPAI. All other viruses cause a milder, primarily respiratory, disease (low pathogenic avian influenza, LPAI), unless exacerbated by other infections or environmental conditions. Until recently, HPAI viruses were rarely isolated from wild birds, but for LPAI viruses extremely high isolation rates have been recorded in surveillance studies, particularly in feral waterfowl. In recent years, there have been costly outbreaks of HPAI in poultry in Italy, the Netherlands and Canada and in each of these countries millions of birds were slaughtered to bring the outbreaks under control. However, these outbreaks tend to have been overshadowed by the H5N1 HPAI virus, initially isolated in China, that has now spread in poultry and/or wild birds throughout Asia and into Europe and Africa, resulting in the death or culling of hundreds of millions of poultry and posing a significant zoonosis threat. Since the 1990s, AI infections due to two subtypes, LPAI H9N2 and HPAI H5N1,have been widespread in poultry across large areas of the world, resulting in a modified eco-epidemiology and a zoonotic potential. An extraordinary effort is required to manage these epidemics from both the human and animal health perspectives.

  9. Avian influenza virus in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shelan; Sha, Jianping; Yu, Zhao; Hu, Yan; Chan, Ta-Chien; Wang, Xiaoxiao; Pan, Hao; Cheng, Wei; Mao, Shenghua; Zhang, Run Ju; Chen, Enfu

    2016-07-01

    The unprecedented epizootic of avian influenza viruses, such as H5N1, H5N6, H7N1 and H10N8, has continued to cause disease in humans in recent years. In 2013, another novel influenza A (H7N9) virus emerged in China, and 30% of those patients died. Pregnant women are particularly susceptible to avian influenza and are more likely to develop severe complications and to die, especially when infection occurs in the middle and late trimesters. Viremia is believed to occur infrequently, and thus vertical transmission induced by avian influenza appears to be rare. However, avian influenza increases the risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes, including spontaneous abortion, preterm birth and fatal distress. This review summarises 39 cases of pregnant women and their fetuses from different countries dating back to 1997, including 11, 15 and 13 infections with H7N9, H5N1 and the 2009 pandemic influenza (H1N1), respectively. We analysed the epidemic features, following the geographical, population and pregnancy trimester distributions; underlying diseases; exposure history; medical timelines; human-to-human transmission; pathogenicity and vertical transmission; antivirus treatments; maternal severity and mortality and pregnancy outcome. The common experiences reported in different countries and areas suggest that early identification and treatment are imperative. In the future, vigilant virologic and epidemiologic surveillance systems should be developed to monitor avian influenza viruses during pregnancy. Furthermore, extensive study on the immune mechanisms should be conducted, as this will guide safe, rational immunomodulatory treatment among this high-risk population. Most importantly, we should develop a universal avian influenza virus vaccine to prevent outbreaks of the different subtypes. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. 77 FR 34783 - Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-12

    ... Avian Influenza AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, USDA. ACTION: Interim rule... importation of bird and poultry products from regions where any subtype of highly pathogenic avian influenza... avian influenza (HPAI). On January 24, 2011, we published in the Federal Register (76 FR 4046-4056...

  11. 76 FR 24793 - Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-03

    ... Inspection Service 9 CFR Parts 93, 94, and 95 RIN 0579-AC36 Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza AGENCY: Animal... products from regions where any subtype of highly pathogenic avian influenza is considered to exist. The... vaccinated for certain types of avian influenza, or that have moved through regions where any subtype of...

  12. Current situation on highly pathogenic avian influenza

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Avian influenza is one of the most important diseases affecting the poultry industry worldwide. Avian influenza viruses can cause a range of clinical disease in poultry. Viruses that cause severe disease and mortality are referred to as highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses. The Asian ...

  13. Guinea pig model for evaluating the potential public health risk of swine and avian influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yipeng; Bi, Yuhai; Pu, Juan; Hu, Yanxin; Wang, Jingjing; Gao, Huijie; Liu, Linqing; Xu, Qi; Tan, Yuanyuan; Liu, Mengda; Guo, Xin; Yang, Hanchun; Liu, Jinhua

    2010-11-23

    The influenza viruses circulating in animals sporadically transmit to humans and pose pandemic threats. Animal models to evaluate the potential public health risk potential of these viruses are needed. We investigated the guinea pig as a mammalian model for the study of the replication and transmission characteristics of selected swine H1N1, H1N2, H3N2 and avian H9N2 influenza viruses, compared to those of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 and seasonal human H1N1, H3N2 influenza viruses. The swine and avian influenza viruses investigated were restricted to the respiratory system of guinea pigs and shed at high titers in nasal tracts without prior adaptation, similar to human strains. None of the swine and avian influenza viruses showed transmissibility among guinea pigs; in contrast, pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus transmitted from infected guinea pigs to all animals and seasonal human influenza viruses could also horizontally transmit in guinea pigs. The analysis of the receptor distribution in the guinea pig respiratory tissues by lectin histochemistry indicated that both SAα2,3-Gal and SAα2,6-Gal receptors widely presented in the nasal tract and the trachea, while SAα2,3-Gal receptor was the main receptor in the lung. We propose that the guinea pig could serve as a useful mammalian model to evaluate the potential public health threat of swine and avian influenza viruses.

  14. Guinea Pig Model for Evaluating the Potential Public Health Risk of Swine and Avian Influenza Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Pu, Juan; Hu, Yanxin; Wang, Jingjing; Gao, Huijie; Liu, Linqing; Xu, Qi; Tan, Yuanyuan; Liu, Mengda; Guo, Xin; Yang, Hanchun; Liu, Jinhua

    2010-01-01

    Background The influenza viruses circulating in animals sporadically transmit to humans and pose pandemic threats. Animal models to evaluate the potential public health risk potential of these viruses are needed. Methodology/Principal Findings We investigated the guinea pig as a mammalian model for the study of the replication and transmission characteristics of selected swine H1N1, H1N2, H3N2 and avian H9N2 influenza viruses, compared to those of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 and seasonal human H1N1, H3N2 influenza viruses. The swine and avian influenza viruses investigated were restricted to the respiratory system of guinea pigs and shed at high titers in nasal tracts without prior adaptation, similar to human strains. None of the swine and avian influenza viruses showed transmissibility among guinea pigs; in contrast, pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus transmitted from infected guinea pigs to all animals and seasonal human influenza viruses could also horizontally transmit in guinea pigs. The analysis of the receptor distribution in the guinea pig respiratory tissues by lectin histochemistry indicated that both SAα2,3-Gal and SAα2,6-Gal receptors widely presented in the nasal tract and the trachea, while SAα2,3-Gal receptor was the main receptor in the lung. Conclusions/Significance We propose that the guinea pig could serve as a useful mammalian model to evaluate the potential public health threat of swine and avian influenza viruses. PMID:21124850

  15. Single PA mutation as a high yield determinant of avian influenza vaccines.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ilseob; Il Kim, Jin; Park, Sehee; Bae, Joon-Yong; Yoo, Kirim; Yun, Soo-Hyeon; Lee, Joo-Yeon; Kim, Kisoon; Kang, Chun; Park, Man-Seong

    2017-01-13

    Human infection with an avian influenza virus persists. To prepare for a potential outbreak of avian influenza, we constructed a candidate vaccine virus (CVV) containing hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) genes of a H5N1 virus and evaluated its antigenic stability after serial passaging in embryonated chicken eggs. The passaged CVV harbored the four amino acid mutations (R136K in PB2; E31K in PA; A172T in HA; and R80Q in M2) without changing its antigenicity, compared with the parental CVV. Notably, the passaged CVV exhibited much greater replication property both in eggs and in Madin-Darby canine kidney and Vero cells. Of the four mutations, the PA E31K showed the greatest effect on the replication property of reverse genetically-rescued viruses. In a further luciferase reporter, mini-replicon assay, the PA mutation appeared to affect the replication property by increasing viral polymerase activity. When applied to different avian influenza CVVs (H7N9 and H9N2 subtypes), the PA E31K mutation resulted in the increases of viral replication in the Vero cell again. Taken all together, our results suggest the PA E31K mutation as a single, substantial growth determinant of avian influenza CVVs and for the establishment of a high-yield avian influenza vaccine backbone.

  16. Single PA mutation as a high yield determinant of avian influenza vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ilseob; Il Kim, Jin; Park, Sehee; Bae, Joon-Yong; Yoo, Kirim; Yun, Soo-Hyeon; Lee, Joo-Yeon; Kim, Kisoon; Kang, Chun; Park, Man-Seong

    2017-01-01

    Human infection with an avian influenza virus persists. To prepare for a potential outbreak of avian influenza, we constructed a candidate vaccine virus (CVV) containing hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) genes of a H5N1 virus and evaluated its antigenic stability after serial passaging in embryonated chicken eggs. The passaged CVV harbored the four amino acid mutations (R136K in PB2; E31K in PA; A172T in HA; and R80Q in M2) without changing its antigenicity, compared with the parental CVV. Notably, the passaged CVV exhibited much greater replication property both in eggs and in Madin-Darby canine kidney and Vero cells. Of the four mutations, the PA E31K showed the greatest effect on the replication property of reverse genetically-rescued viruses. In a further luciferase reporter, mini-replicon assay, the PA mutation appeared to affect the replication property by increasing viral polymerase activity. When applied to different avian influenza CVVs (H7N9 and H9N2 subtypes), the PA E31K mutation resulted in the increases of viral replication in the Vero cell again. Taken all together, our results suggest the PA E31K mutation as a single, substantial growth determinant of avian influenza CVVs and for the establishment of a high-yield avian influenza vaccine backbone. PMID:28084423

  17. Live poultry market workers are susceptible to both avian and swine influenza viruses, Guangdong Province, China.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jidang; Ma, Jun; White, Sarah K; Cao, Zhenpeng; Zhen, Yun; He, Shuyi; Zhu, Wanjun; Ke, Changwen; Zhang, Yongbiao; Su, Shuo; Zhang, Guihong

    2015-12-31

    Guangdong Province is recognized for dense populations of humans, pigs, poultry and pets. In order to evaluate the threat of viral infection faced by those working with animals, a cross-sectional, sero-epidemiological study was conducted in Guangdong between December 2013 and January 2014. Individuals working with swine, at poultry farms, or live poultry markets (LPM), and veterinarians, and controls not exposed to animals were enrolled in this study and 11 (4 human, 3 swine, 3 avian, and 1 canine) influenza A viruses were used in hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assays (7 strains) and the cross-reactivity test (9 strains) in which 5 strains were used in both tests. Univariate analysis was performed to identify which variables were significantly associated with seropositivity. Odds ratios (OR) revealed that swine workers had a significantly higher risk of elevated antibodies against A/swine/Guangdong/L6/2009(H1N1), a classical swine virus, and A/swine/Guangdong/SS1/2012(H1N1), a Eurasian avian-like swine virus than non-exposed controls. Poultry farm workers were at a higher risk of infection with avian influenza H7N9 and H9N2. LPM workers were at a higher risk of infection with 3 subtypes of avian influenza, H5N1, H7N9, and H9N2. Interestingly, the OR also indicated that LPM workers were at risk of H1N1 swine influenza virus infection, perhaps due to the presence of pigs in the LPM. While partial confounding by cross-reactive antibodies against human viruses or vaccines cannot be ruled out, our data suggests that animal exposed people as are more likely to have antibodies against animal influenza viruses.

  18. Poultry Drinking Water Used for Avian Influenza Surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Y.H. Connie; Zhang, Li-Juan; Chow, Chun-Kin; Tsang, Chun-Lok; Ng, Chi-Fung; Wong, Chun-Kuen; Guan, Yi

    2007-01-01

    Samples of drinking water from poultry cages, which can be collected conveniently and noninvasively, provide higher rates of influenza (H9N2) virus isolation than do samples of fecal droppings. Studies to confirm the usefulness of poultry drinking water for detecting influenza (H5N1) should be conducted in disease-endemic areas. PMID:18252115

  19. Poultry drinking water used for avian influenza surveillance.

    PubMed

    Leung, Y H Connie; Zhang, Li-Juan; Chow, Chun-Kin; Tsang, Chun-Lok; Ng, Chi-Fung; Wong, Chun-Kuen; Guan, Yi; Peiris, J S Malik

    2007-09-01

    Samples of drinking water from poultry cages, which can be collected conveniently and noninvasively, provide higher rates of influenza (H9N2) virus isolation than do samples of fecal droppings. Studies to confirm the usefulness of poultry drinking water for detecting influenza (H5N1) should be conducted in disease-endemic areas.

  20. The history of avian influenza.

    PubMed

    Lupiani, Blanca; Reddy, Sanjay M

    2009-07-01

    The first description of avian influenza (AI) dates back to 1878 in northern Italy, when Perroncito [Perroncito E. Epizoozia tifoide nei gallinacei. Annali Accad Agri Torino 1878;21:87-126] described a contagious disease of poultry associated with high mortality. The disease, termed "fowl plague", was initially confused with the acute septicemic form of fowl cholera. However, in 1880, soon after its first description, Rivolta and Delprato [as reported by Stubs EL. Fowl pest, In: Biester HE, Devries L, editors. Diseases of poultry. 1st ed. Ames, IO: Iowa State College Press; 1943. p. 493-502] showed it to be different from fowl cholera, based on clinical and pathological properties, and called it Typhus exudatious gallinarum. In 1901, Centanni and Savunzzi [Centanni E, Savonuzzi E, La peste aviaria I & II, Communicazione fatta all'accademia delle scienze mediche e naturali de Ferrara, 1901] determined that fowl plague was caused by a filterable virus; however, it was not until 1955 that the classical fowl plague virus was shown to be a type A influenza virus based on the presence of type A influenza virus type-specific ribonucleoprotein [Schäfer W. Vergleichender sero-immunologische Untersuchungen über die Viren der Influenza und klassischen Geflügelpest. Z Naturf 1955;10b:81-91]. The term fowl plague was substituted by the more appropriate term highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) at the First International Symposium on Avian Influenza [Proceedings of the First International Symposium on Avian Influenza. Beltsville, MD. 1981, Avian Dis 47 (Special Issue) 2003.] and will be used throughout this review when referring to any previously described fowl plague virus.

  1. The characterization of low pathogenic avian influenza viruses isolated from wild birds in northern Vietnam from 2006 to 2009.

    PubMed

    Takakuwa, Hiroki; Yamashiro, Tetsu; Le, Mai Q; Phuong, Lien S; Ozaki, Hiroichi; Tsunekuni, Ryota; Usui, Tatsufumi; Ito, Hiroshi; Yamaguchi, Tsuyoshi; Ito, Toshihiro; Murase, Toshiyuki; Ono, Etsuro; Otsuki, Koichi

    2013-12-01

    Due to concerns that wild birds could possibly spread H5N1 viruses, surveillance was conducted to monitor the types of avian influenza viruses circulating among the wild birds migrating to or inhabiting in northern Vietnam from 2006 to 2009. An H5N2 virus isolated from a Eurasian woodcock had a close phylogenetic relationship to H5 viruses recently isolated in South Korea and Japan, suggesting that H5N2 has been shared between Vietnam, South Korea, and Japan. An H9N2 virus isolated from a Chinese Hwamei was closely related to two H9N2 viruses that were isolated from humans in Hong Kong in 2009, suggesting that an H9N2 strain relevant to the human isolates had been transmitted to and maintained among the wild bird population in Vietnam and South China. The results support the idea that wild bird species play a significant role in the spread and maintenance of avian influenza and that this also occurs in Vietnam.

  2. Receptor characterization and susceptibility of cotton rats to avian and 2009 pandemic influenza virus strains.

    PubMed

    Blanco, Jorge C G; Pletneva, Lioubov M; Wan, Hongquan; Araya, Yonas; Angel, Matthew; Oue, Raymonde O; Sutton, Troy C; Perez, Daniel R

    2013-02-01

    Animal influenza viruses (AIVs) are a major threat to human health and the source of pandemic influenza. A reliable small-mammal model to study the pathogenesis of infection and for testing vaccines and therapeutics against multiple strains of influenza virus is highly desirable. We show that cotton rats (Sigmodon hispidus) are susceptible to avian and swine influenza viruses. Cotton rats express α2,3-linked sialic acid (SA) and α2,6-linked SA residues in the trachea and α2,6-linked SA residues in the lung parenchyma. Prototypic avian influenza viruses (H3N2, H9N2, and H5N1) and swine-origin 2009 pandemic H1N1 viruses replicated in the nose and in the respiratory tract of cotton rats without prior adaptation and produced strong lung pathology that was characterized by early lung neutrophilia, followed by subsequent pneumonia. Consistent with other natural and animal models of influenza, only the H5N1 virus was lethal for cotton rats. More importantly, we show that the different avian and pandemic H1N1 strains tested are strong activators of the type I interferon (IFN)-inducible MX-1 gene both locally and systemically. Our data indicate that the cotton rat is a suitable small-mammal model to study the infection of animal influenza viruses and for validation of vaccines and therapeutics against these viruses.

  3. Construction of recombinant Marek's disease virus (MDV) lacking the meq oncogene and co-expressing AIV-H9N2 HA and NA genes under control of exogenous promoters.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhenjie; Chen, Wenqing; Ma, Chengtai; Zhao, Peng; Duan, Luntao; Zhang, Fushou; Sun, Aijun; Li, Yanpeng; Su, Hongqin; Li, Sifei; Cui, He; Cui, Zhizhong

    2014-07-10

    To develop a recombinant Marek's disease virus (rMDV1) co-expressing the hemagglutinin gene (HA) and neuramidinase gene (NA) from a low pathogenic avian influenza virus (LPAIV) H9N2 strain and lacking the meq oncogene that shares homology with the Jun/Fos family of transcriptional factors, a wild strain of MDV GX0101 was used as parental virus, the HA and NA genes co-expression cassette under control of the CMV and SV40 early promoters was inserted at two meq sites of GX0101 to form a new meq knock-out mutant MDV (MZC12HA/NA) through homologous recombination. MZC12HA/NA was reconstituted by transfection of recombinant BAC-MDV DNA into the secondary chicken embryo fibroblast (CEF) cells. Highly purified MZC12HA/NA was obtained after four rounds of plaque purification and proliferation. In vitro growth properties of recombinant virus were also inspected and concluded that the MZC12HA/NA had the same growth kinetics in CEF cultures as its parental wild type virus GX0101. Southern blot indicated that co-expression cassette was successfully inserted at two copies sites of meq gene, so two meq genes were knocked-out completely. RT-qPCR showed transcription and expression levels of the HA and NA genes were both significantly higher than that of GX0101 own pp38 gene. Indirect fluorescence antibody (IFA) test, and Western blot analyses indicated that HA and NA genes were co-expressed simultaneously under control of the different promoters but meq genes were not. These results herald a new and effective recombinant meq-deleted MDV-based AIV-H9N2 vaccine may be useful in protecting chickens from very virulent MDV and H9N2 challenges. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Human H7N9 avian influenza virus infection: a review and pandemic risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Yiu Lai, Kang; Wing Yiu Ng, George; Fai Wong, Kit; Fan Ngai Hung, Ivan; Kam Fai Hong, Jeffrey; Fan Cheng, Fanny; Kwok Cheung Chan, John

    2013-08-01

    China is undergoing a recent outbreak of a novel H7N9 avian influenza virus (nH7N9) infection that has thus far involved 132 human patients, including 37 deaths. The nH7N9 virus is a reassortant virus originating from the H7N3, H7N9 and H9N2 avian influenza viruses. nH7N9 isolated from humans contains features related to adaptation to humans, including a Q226L mutation in the hemagglutinin cleavage site and E627K and D701N mutations in the PB2 protein. Live poultry markets provide an environment for the emergence, spread and maintenance of nH7N9 as well as for the selection of mutants that facilitate nH7N9 binding to and replication in the human upper respiratory tract. Innate immune suppression conferred by the internal genes of H9N2 may contribute to the virulence of nH7N9. The quail may serve as the intermediate host during the adaptation of avian influenza viruses from domestic waterfowl to gallinaceous poultry, such as chickens and related terrestrial-based species, due to the selection of viral mutants with a short neuraminidase stalk. Infections in chickens, common quails, red-legged partridges and turkeys may select for mutants with human receptor specificity. Infection in Ratitae species may lead to the selection of PB2-E627K and PB2-D701N mutants and the conversion of nH7N9 to a highly pathogenic avian influenza virus.

  5. Human H7N9 avian influenza virus infection: a review and pandemic risk assessment

    PubMed Central

    Yiu Lai, Kang; Wing Yiu Ng, George; Fai Wong, Kit; Fan Ngai Hung, Ivan; Kam Fai Hong, Jeffrey; Fan Cheng, Fanny; Kwok Cheung Chan, John

    2013-01-01

    China is undergoing a recent outbreak of a novel H7N9 avian influenza virus (nH7N9) infection that has thus far involved 132 human patients, including 37 deaths. The nH7N9 virus is a reassortant virus originating from the H7N3, H7N9 and H9N2 avian influenza viruses. nH7N9 isolated from humans contains features related to adaptation to humans, including a Q226L mutation in the hemagglutinin cleavage site and E627K and D701N mutations in the PB2 protein. Live poultry markets provide an environment for the emergence, spread and maintenance of nH7N9 as well as for the selection of mutants that facilitate nH7N9 binding to and replication in the human upper respiratory tract. Innate immune suppression conferred by the internal genes of H9N2 may contribute to the virulence of nH7N9. The quail may serve as the intermediate host during the adaptation of avian influenza viruses from domestic waterfowl to gallinaceous poultry, such as chickens and related terrestrial-based species, due to the selection of viral mutants with a short neuraminidase stalk. Infections in chickens, common quails, red-legged partridges and turkeys may select for mutants with human receptor specificity. Infection in Ratitae species may lead to the selection of PB2-E627K and PB2-D701N mutants and the conversion of nH7N9 to a highly pathogenic avian influenza virus. PMID:26038484

  6. Influenza vaccines for avian species

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Beginning in Southeast Asia, in 2003, a multi-national epizootic outbreak of H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) was identified in commercial poultry and wild bird species. This lineage, originally identified in Southern China in 1996 and then Hong Kong in 1997, caused severe morbidity an...

  7. Control strategies against avian influenza

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Since 1959, 40 epizootics of high pathogenicity avian influenza (HPAI) have occurred (Figure 1). Thirty-five of these epizootic HPAI viruses were geographically-limited (mostly to single countries), involved farm-to-farm spread and were eradicated from poultry by stamping-out programs; i.e. the HPAI...

  8. Avian influenza virus RNA extraction

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The efficient extraction and purification of viral RNA is critical for down-stream molecular applications whether it is the sensitive and specific detection of virus in clinical samples, virus gene cloning and expression, or quantification of avian influenza (AI) virus by molecular methods from expe...

  9. OFFLU Network on Avian Influenza

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    OFFLU is the name of the network of avian influenza expertise inaugurated jointly in 2005 by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations and the World Organisation for Animal Health. Achievements and constraints to date and plans for the future are described. PMID:16965718

  10. Exploring sialic acid receptors-related infection behavior of avian influenza virus in human bronchial epithelial cells by single-particle tracking.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhi-Gang; Liu, Shu-Lin; Zhang, Zhi-Ling; Tian, Zhi-Quan; Tang, Hong-Wu; Pang, Dai-Wen

    2014-07-09

    Human respiratory tract epithelial cells are the portals of human infection with influenza viruses. However, the infection pathway of individual avian influenza viruses in human respiratory cells remains poorly reported so far. The single-particle tracking technique (SPT) is a powerful tool for studying the transport mechanism of biomolecules in live cells. In this work, we use quantum dots to label avian influenza H9N2 virus and elaborate on the infection mechanism of the virus in human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells using a three-dimensional SPT technique. We have found that the H9N2 virus can infect HBE cells directly and the virus infection follows an actin filament- and microtubule-dependent process with a three-stage pattern. The transport behaviors show a high degree of consistency between the sialic acid receptors and the influenza virus. Real-time SPT provides dynamic evidence of the sialic acid receptors-related infection behavior of the avian influenza virus in live cells. The study of the influence of sialic acid receptors on virus infection may contribute to a better understanding of the cross-species transmission of the avian influenza virus. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Avian influenza surveillance reveals presence of low pathogenic avian influenza viruses in poultry during 2009-2011 in the West Bengal State, India.

    PubMed

    Pawar, Shailesh D; Kale, Sandeep D; Rawankar, Amol S; Koratkar, Santosh S; Raut, Chandrashekhar G; Pande, Satish A; Mullick, Jayati; Mishra, Akhilesh C

    2012-08-07

    More than 70 outbreaks of the highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 have been reported in poultry in the western and north-eastern parts of India. Therefore, in view of the recent HPAI H5N1 outbreaks in poultry, active AI surveillance encompassing wild, resident, migratory birds and poultry was undertaken during 2009-2011 in the State of West Bengal. A total of 5722 samples were collected from West Bengal; 3522 samples (2906 fecal droppings + 616 other environmental samples) were from migratory birds and 2200 samples [1604 tracheal, cloacal swabs, environmental samples, tissue samples + 596 blood (serum)] were from domestic ducks and poultry. All tracheal, cloacal and environmental samples were processed for virus isolation. Virus isolates were detected using hemagglutination assay and identified using hemagglutination inhibition (HI) and reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assays. Sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of partial region of the hemagglutinin and neuraminidase genes was done. Intravenous pathogenicity index assays were performed in chickens to assess pathogenicity of AI virus isolates. Serum samples were tested for detection of antibodies against AI viruses using HI assay. A total of 57 AI H9N2, 15 AI H4N6 and 15 Newcastle Disease (NDV) viruses were isolated from chickens, from both backyard and wet poultry markets; AI H4N6 viruses were isolated from backyard chickens and domestic ducks. Characterization of AI H9N2 and H4N6 viruses revealed that they were of low pathogenicity. Domestic ducks were positive for antibodies against H5 and H7 viruses while chickens were positive for presence of antibodies against AI H9N2 and NDV. In the current scenario of HPAI H5N1 outbreaks in West Bengal, this report shows presence of low pathogenic AI H9N2 and H4N6 viruses in chickens and domestic ducks during the period 2009-2011. This is the first report of isolation of H4N6 from India. Antibodies against AI H5 and H7 in ducks

  12. Avian influenza surveillance reveals presence of low pathogenic avian influenza viruses in poultry during 2009-2011 in the West Bengal State, India

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction More than 70 outbreaks of the highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 have been reported in poultry in the western and north-eastern parts of India. Therefore, in view of the recent HPAI H5N1 outbreaks in poultry, active AI surveillance encompassing wild, resident, migratory birds and poultry was undertaken during 2009–2011 in the State of West Bengal. Methods A total of 5722 samples were collected from West Bengal; 3522 samples (2906 fecal droppings + 616 other environmental samples) were from migratory birds and 2200 samples [1604 tracheal, cloacal swabs, environmental samples, tissue samples + 596 blood (serum)] were from domestic ducks and poultry. All tracheal, cloacal and environmental samples were processed for virus isolation. Virus isolates were detected using hemagglutination assay and identified using hemagglutination inhibition (HI) and reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assays. Sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of partial region of the hemagglutinin and neuraminidase genes was done. Intravenous pathogenicity index assays were performed in chickens to assess pathogenicity of AI virus isolates. Serum samples were tested for detection of antibodies against AI viruses using HI assay. Results A total of 57 AI H9N2, 15 AI H4N6 and 15 Newcastle Disease (NDV) viruses were isolated from chickens, from both backyard and wet poultry markets; AI H4N6 viruses were isolated from backyard chickens and domestic ducks. Characterization of AI H9N2 and H4N6 viruses revealed that they were of low pathogenicity. Domestic ducks were positive for antibodies against H5 and H7 viruses while chickens were positive for presence of antibodies against AI H9N2 and NDV. Conclusions In the current scenario of HPAI H5N1 outbreaks in West Bengal, this report shows presence of low pathogenic AI H9N2 and H4N6 viruses in chickens and domestic ducks during the period 2009–2011. This is the first report of isolation of H4N6 from India

  13. Infection of Differentiated Porcine Airway Epithelial Cells by Influenza Virus: Differential Susceptibility to Infection by Porcine and Avian Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Punyadarsaniya, Darsaniya; Liang, Chi-Hui; Winter, Christine; Petersen, Henning; Rautenschlein, Silke; Hennig-Pauka, Isabel; Schwegmann-Wessels, Christel; Wu, Chung-Yi; Wong, Chi-Huey; Herrler, Georg

    2011-01-01

    Background Swine are important hosts for influenza A viruses playing a crucial role in the epidemiology and interspecies transmission of these viruses. Respiratory epithelial cells are the primary target cells for influenza viruses. Methodology/Principal Findings To analyze the infection of porcine airway epithelial cells by influenza viruses, we established precision-cut lung slices as a culture system for differentiated respiratory epithelial cells. Both ciliated and mucus-producing cells were found to be susceptible to infection by swine influenza A virus (H3N2 subtype) with high titers of infectious virus released into the supernatant already one day after infection. By comparison, growth of two avian influenza viruses (subtypes H9N2 and H7N7) was delayed by about 24 h. The two avian viruses differed both in the spectrum of susceptible cells and in the efficiency of replication. As the H9N2 virus grew to titers that were only tenfold lower than that of a porcine H3N2 virus this avian virus is an interesting candidate for interspecies transmission. Lectin staining indicated the presence of both α-2,3- and α-2,6-linked sialic acids on airway epithelial cells. However, their distribution did not correlate with pattern of virus infection indicating that staining by plant lectins is not a reliable indicator for the presence of cellular receptors for influenza viruses. Conclusions/Significance Differentiated respiratory epithelial cells significantly differ in their susceptibility to infection by avian influenza viruses. We expect that the newly described precision-cut lung slices from the swine lung are an interesting culture system to analyze the infection of differentiated respiratory epithelial cells by different pathogens (viral, bacterial and parasitic ones) of swine. PMID:22174804

  14. Infection of differentiated porcine airway epithelial cells by influenza virus: differential susceptibility to infection by porcine and avian viruses.

    PubMed

    Punyadarsaniya, Darsaniya; Liang, Chi-Hui; Winter, Christine; Petersen, Henning; Rautenschlein, Silke; Hennig-Pauka, Isabel; Schwegmann-Wessels, Christel; Wu, Chung-Yi; Wong, Chi-Huey; Herrler, Georg

    2011-01-01

    Swine are important hosts for influenza A viruses playing a crucial role in the epidemiology and interspecies transmission of these viruses. Respiratory epithelial cells are the primary target cells for influenza viruses. To analyze the infection of porcine airway epithelial cells by influenza viruses, we established precision-cut lung slices as a culture system for differentiated respiratory epithelial cells. Both ciliated and mucus-producing cells were found to be susceptible to infection by swine influenza A virus (H3N2 subtype) with high titers of infectious virus released into the supernatant already one day after infection. By comparison, growth of two avian influenza viruses (subtypes H9N2 and H7N7) was delayed by about 24 h. The two avian viruses differed both in the spectrum of susceptible cells and in the efficiency of replication. As the H9N2 virus grew to titers that were only tenfold lower than that of a porcine H3N2 virus this avian virus is an interesting candidate for interspecies transmission. Lectin staining indicated the presence of both α-2,3- and α-2,6-linked sialic acids on airway epithelial cells. However, their distribution did not correlate with pattern of virus infection indicating that staining by plant lectins is not a reliable indicator for the presence of cellular receptors for influenza viruses. Differentiated respiratory epithelial cells significantly differ in their susceptibility to infection by avian influenza viruses. We expect that the newly described precision-cut lung slices from the swine lung are an interesting culture system to analyze the infection of differentiated respiratory epithelial cells by different pathogens (viral, bacterial and parasitic ones) of swine.

  15. Avian flu to human influenza.

    PubMed

    Lewis, David B

    2006-01-01

    Influenza A viral infection causes substantial annual morbidity and mortality worldwide, particularly for infants, the elderly, and the immunocompromised. The virus mainly replicates in the respiratory tract and is spread by respiratory secretions. A growing concern is the recent identification of H5N1 strains of avian influenza A in Asia that were previously thought to infect only wild birds and poultry, but have now infected humans, cats, pigs, and other mammals, often with fatal results, in an ongoing outbreak. A human pandemic with H5N1 virus could potentially be catastrophic because most human populations have negligible antibody-mediated immunity to the H5 surface protein and this viral subtype is highly virulent. Whether an H5N1 influenza pandemic will occur is likely to hinge on whether the viral strains involved in the current outbreak acquire additional mutations that facilitate efficient human-to-human transfer of infection. Although there is no historical precedent for an H5N1 avian strain causing widespread human-to-human transmission, some type of influenza A pandemic is very likely in the near future. The possibility of an H5N1 influenza pandemic has highlighted the many current limitations of treatment with antiviral agents and of vaccine production and immunogenicity. Future vaccine strategies that may include more robust induction of T-cell responses, such as cytotoxic T lymphocytes, may provide better protection than is offered by current vaccines, which rely solely or mainly on antibody neutralization of infection.

  16. Newly Emergent Highly Pathogenic H5N9 Subtype Avian Influenza A Virus

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yang; Wang, Xingbo; Jin, Tao; Wang, Hailong; Si, Weiying; Yang, Hui; Wu, Jiusheng; Yan, Yan; Liu, Guang; Sang, Xiaoyu; Wu, Xiaopeng; Gao, Yuwei; Xia, Xianzhu; Yu, Xinfen; Pan, Jingcao; Gao, George F.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The novel H7N9 avian influenza virus (AIV) was demonstrated to cause severe human respiratory infections in China. Here, we examined poultry specimens from live bird markets linked to human H7N9 infection in Hangzhou, China. Metagenomic sequencing revealed mixed subtypes (H5, H7, H9, N1, N2, and N9). Subsequently, AIV subtypes H5N9, H7N9, and H9N2 were isolated. Evolutionary analysis showed that the hemagglutinin gene of the novel H5N9 virus originated from A/Muscovy duck/Vietnam/LBM227/2012 (H5N1), which belongs to clade 2.3.2.1. The neuraminidase gene of the novel H5N9 virus originated from human-infective A/Hangzhou/1/2013 (H7N9). The six internal genes were similar to those of other H5N1, H7N9, and H9N2 virus strains. The virus harbored the PQRERRRKR/GL motif characteristic of highly pathogenic AIVs at the HA cleavage site. Receptor-binding experiments demonstrated that the virus binds α-2,3 sialic acid but not α-2,6 sialic acid. Identically, pathogenicity experiments also showed that the virus caused low mortality rates in mice. This newly isolated H5N9 virus is a highly pathogenic reassortant virus originating from H5N1, H7N9, and H9N2 subtypes. Live bird markets represent a potential transmission risk to public health and the poultry industry. IMPORTANCE This investigation confirms that the novel H5N9 subtype avian influenza A virus is a reassortant strain originating from H5N1, H7N9, and H9N2 subtypes and is totally different from the H5N9 viruses reported before. The novel H5N9 virus acquired a highly pathogenic H5 gene and an N9 gene from human-infecting subtype H7N9 but caused low mortality rates in mice. Whether this novel H5N9 virus will cause human infections from its avian host and become a pandemic subtype is not known yet. It is therefore imperative to assess the risk of emergence of this novel reassortant virus with potential transmissibility to public health. PMID:26085150

  17. Avian influenza: an agricultural perspective.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Andrea

    2006-11-01

    Recent outbreaks of infection with highly pathogenic H5N1 strains of avian influenza virus in poultry in Asia, Africa, Europe, and the Middle East have raised concern over the potential emergence of a pandemic strain that can easily infect humans and cause serious morbidity and mortality. To prevent and control a national outbreak, the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) conducts measures based on the ecology of avian influenza viruses. To prevent an outbreak in the United States, the USDA conducts surveillance of bird populations, restrictions on bird importation, educational outreach, and regulation of agricultural practices, in collaboration with local, state, and federal organizations. To manage an outbreak, the USDA has in place a well-established emergency management system for optimizing efforts. The USDA also collaborates with international organizations for disease prevention and control in other countries.

  18. Climate change and avian influenza

    PubMed Central

    Slingenbergh, J.; Xiao, X.

    2009-01-01

    Summary This paper discusses impacts of climate change on the ecology of avian influenza viruses (AI viruses), which presumably co-evolved with migratory water birds, with virus also persisting outside the host in subarctic water bodies. Climate change would almost certainly alter bird migration, influence the AI virus transmission cycle and directly affect virus survival outside the host. The joint, net effects of these changes are rather unpredictable, but it is likely that AI virus circulation in water bird populations will continue with endless adaptation and evolution. In domestic poultry, too little is known about the direct effect of environmental factors on highly pathogenic avian influenza transmission and persistence to allow inference about the possible effect of climate change. However, possible indirect links through changes in the distribution of duck-crop farming are discussed. PMID:18819672

  19. Genetically Diverse Low Pathogenicity Avian Influenza A Virus Subtypes Co-Circulate among Poultry in Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Gerloff, Nancy A.; Khan, Salah Uddin; Zanders, Natosha; Balish, Amanda; Haider, Najmul; Islam, Ausraful; Chowdhury, Sukanta; Rahman, Mahmudur Ziaur; Haque, Ainul; Hosseini, Parviez; Gurley, Emily S.; Luby, Stephen P.; Wentworth, David E.; Donis, Ruben O.; Sturm-Ramirez, Katharine; Davis, C. Todd

    2016-01-01

    Influenza virus surveillance, poultry outbreak investigations and genomic sequencing were assessed to understand the ecology and evolution of low pathogenicity avian influenza (LPAI) A viruses in Bangladesh from 2007 to 2013. We analyzed 506 avian specimens collected from poultry in live bird markets and backyard flocks to identify influenza A viruses. Virus isolation-positive specimens (n = 50) were subtyped and their coding-complete genomes were sequenced. The most frequently identified subtypes among LPAI isolates were H9N2, H11N3, H4N6, and H1N1. Less frequently detected subtypes included H1N3, H2N4, H3N2, H3N6, H3N8, H4N2, H5N2, H6N1, H6N7, and H7N9. Gene sequences were compared to publicly available sequences using phylogenetic inference approaches. Among the 14 subtypes identified, the majority of viral gene segments were most closely related to poultry or wild bird viruses commonly found in Southeast Asia, Europe, and/or northern Africa. LPAI subtypes were distributed over several geographic locations in Bangladesh, and surface and internal protein gene segments clustered phylogenetically with a diverse number of viral subtypes suggesting extensive reassortment among these LPAI viruses. H9N2 subtype viruses differed from other LPAI subtypes because genes from these viruses consistently clustered together, indicating this subtype is enzootic in Bangladesh. The H9N2 strains identified in Bangladesh were phylogenetically and antigenically related to previous human-derived H9N2 viruses detected in Bangladesh representing a potential source for human infection. In contrast, the circulating LPAI H5N2 and H7N9 viruses were both phylogenetically and antigenically unrelated to H5 viruses identified previously in humans in Bangladesh and H7N9 strains isolated from humans in China. In Bangladesh, domestic poultry sold in live bird markets carried a wide range of LPAI virus subtypes and a high diversity of genotypes. These findings, combined with the seven year

  20. Genetically Diverse Low Pathogenicity Avian Influenza A Virus Subtypes Co-Circulate among Poultry in Bangladesh

    SciTech Connect

    Gerloff, Nancy A.; Khan, Salah Uddin; Zanders, Natosha; Balish, Amanda; Haider, Najmul; Islam, Ausraful; Chowdhury, Sukanta; Rahman, Mahmudur Ziaur; Haque, Ainul; Hosseini, Parviez; Gurley, Emily S.; Luby, Stephen P.; Wentworth, David E.; Donis, Ruben O.; Sturm-Ramirez, Katharine; Davis, C. Todd; Waldenstrom, Jonas

    2016-03-24

    Influenza virus surveillance, poultry outbreak investigations and genomic sequencing were assessed to understand the ecology and evolution of low pathogenicity avian influenza (LPAI) A viruses in Bangladesh from 2007 to 2013. We analyzed 506 avian specimens collected from poultry in live bird markets and backyard flocks to identify influenza A viruses. Virus isolation-positive specimens (n = 50) were subtyped and their coding-complete genomes were sequenced. The most frequently identified subtypes among LPAI isolates were H9N2, H11N3, H4N6, and H1N1. Less frequently detected subtypes included H1N3, H2N4, H3N2, H3N6, H3N8, H4N2, H5N2, H6N1, H6N7, and H7N9. Gene sequences were compared to publicly available sequences using phylogenetic inference approaches. Among the 14 subtypes identified, the majority of viral gene segments were most closely related to poultry or wild bird viruses commonly found in Southeast Asia, Europe, and/or northern Africa. LPAI subtypes were distributed over several geographic locations in Bangladesh, and surface and internal protein gene segments clustered phylogenetically with a diverse number of viral subtypes suggesting extensive reassortment among these LPAI viruses. H9N2 subtype viruses differed from other LPAI subtypes because genes from these viruses consistently clustered together, indicating this subtype is enzootic in Bangladesh. The H9N2 strains identified in Bangladesh were phylogenetically and antigenically related to previous human-derived H9N2 viruses detected in Bangladesh representing a potential source for human infection. In contrast, the circulating LPAI H5N2 and H7N9 viruses were both phylogenetically and antigenically unrelated to H5 viruses identified previously in humans in Bangladesh and H7N9 strains isolated from humans in China. In Bangladesh, domestic poultry sold in live bird markets carried a wide range of LPAI virus subtypes and a high diversity of genotypes. Here these findings, combined with the seven year

  1. Genetically Diverse Low Pathogenicity Avian Influenza A Virus Subtypes Co-Circulate among Poultry in Bangladesh

    DOE PAGES

    Gerloff, Nancy A.; Khan, Salah Uddin; Zanders, Natosha; ...

    2016-03-24

    Influenza virus surveillance, poultry outbreak investigations and genomic sequencing were assessed to understand the ecology and evolution of low pathogenicity avian influenza (LPAI) A viruses in Bangladesh from 2007 to 2013. We analyzed 506 avian specimens collected from poultry in live bird markets and backyard flocks to identify influenza A viruses. Virus isolation-positive specimens (n = 50) were subtyped and their coding-complete genomes were sequenced. The most frequently identified subtypes among LPAI isolates were H9N2, H11N3, H4N6, and H1N1. Less frequently detected subtypes included H1N3, H2N4, H3N2, H3N6, H3N8, H4N2, H5N2, H6N1, H6N7, and H7N9. Gene sequences were compared tomore » publicly available sequences using phylogenetic inference approaches. Among the 14 subtypes identified, the majority of viral gene segments were most closely related to poultry or wild bird viruses commonly found in Southeast Asia, Europe, and/or northern Africa. LPAI subtypes were distributed over several geographic locations in Bangladesh, and surface and internal protein gene segments clustered phylogenetically with a diverse number of viral subtypes suggesting extensive reassortment among these LPAI viruses. H9N2 subtype viruses differed from other LPAI subtypes because genes from these viruses consistently clustered together, indicating this subtype is enzootic in Bangladesh. The H9N2 strains identified in Bangladesh were phylogenetically and antigenically related to previous human-derived H9N2 viruses detected in Bangladesh representing a potential source for human infection. In contrast, the circulating LPAI H5N2 and H7N9 viruses were both phylogenetically and antigenically unrelated to H5 viruses identified previously in humans in Bangladesh and H7N9 strains isolated from humans in China. In Bangladesh, domestic poultry sold in live bird markets carried a wide range of LPAI virus subtypes and a high diversity of genotypes. Here these findings, combined with the seven

  2. Genetically Diverse Low Pathogenicity Avian Influenza A Virus Subtypes Co-Circulate among Poultry in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Gerloff, Nancy A; Khan, Salah Uddin; Zanders, Natosha; Balish, Amanda; Haider, Najmul; Islam, Ausraful; Chowdhury, Sukanta; Rahman, Mahmudur Ziaur; Haque, Ainul; Hosseini, Parviez; Gurley, Emily S; Luby, Stephen P; Wentworth, David E; Donis, Ruben O; Sturm-Ramirez, Katharine; Davis, C Todd

    2016-01-01

    Influenza virus surveillance, poultry outbreak investigations and genomic sequencing were assessed to understand the ecology and evolution of low pathogenicity avian influenza (LPAI) A viruses in Bangladesh from 2007 to 2013. We analyzed 506 avian specimens collected from poultry in live bird markets and backyard flocks to identify influenza A viruses. Virus isolation-positive specimens (n = 50) were subtyped and their coding-complete genomes were sequenced. The most frequently identified subtypes among LPAI isolates were H9N2, H11N3, H4N6, and H1N1. Less frequently detected subtypes included H1N3, H2N4, H3N2, H3N6, H3N8, H4N2, H5N2, H6N1, H6N7, and H7N9. Gene sequences were compared to publicly available sequences using phylogenetic inference approaches. Among the 14 subtypes identified, the majority of viral gene segments were most closely related to poultry or wild bird viruses commonly found in Southeast Asia, Europe, and/or northern Africa. LPAI subtypes were distributed over several geographic locations in Bangladesh, and surface and internal protein gene segments clustered phylogenetically with a diverse number of viral subtypes suggesting extensive reassortment among these LPAI viruses. H9N2 subtype viruses differed from other LPAI subtypes because genes from these viruses consistently clustered together, indicating this subtype is enzootic in Bangladesh. The H9N2 strains identified in Bangladesh were phylogenetically and antigenically related to previous human-derived H9N2 viruses detected in Bangladesh representing a potential source for human infection. In contrast, the circulating LPAI H5N2 and H7N9 viruses were both phylogenetically and antigenically unrelated to H5 viruses identified previously in humans in Bangladesh and H7N9 strains isolated from humans in China. In Bangladesh, domestic poultry sold in live bird markets carried a wide range of LPAI virus subtypes and a high diversity of genotypes. These findings, combined with the seven year

  3. Reassortment and modification of hemagglutinin cleavage motif of avian/WSN influenza viruses generated by reverse genetics that correlate with attenuation.

    PubMed

    Lu, J-H; Long, J-X; Jia, L-J; Liu, Y-L; Shao, W-X; Zhang, Y-M; Liu, X-F

    2006-01-01

    Avian influenza associated with H9N2 and H5N1 subtypes of avian influenza viruses (AIVs) has raised great concerns in China. To study this problem, reverse genetics has been employed. Three reassortants, rgH9N2, rgH5N1 and rgH5N2, were prepared and compared. Their hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) genes originated from Chinese AIV isolates of H9N2 or H5N1 subtype, while the rest of their genes were derived from A/WSN/33(H1N1) virus (WSN). In the H5 HA reassortants, the multibasic cleavage site was converted to a monobasic one. The results demonstrated that the reassortants did not produce CPE on MDCK cells in the absence of trypsin, showed egg-adaptation phenotype and stability of HA and NA during consecutive egg passages, and were not lethal to chickens and mice. However, the rgH5N1 reassortant exhibited a residual virulence in terms of lethality to chick embryos and pathogenesis in chickens. It can be concluded that (i) the genetic modification of H5 HA attenuated the H5 reassortants, (ii) the presence of internal WSN proteins contributed to the attenuated properties of the reassortants independently on H5 HA, and (iii) also the overall genome composition contributed to virulence differences. This report provides further contribution of reverse genetics to the knowledge of virulence of influenza viruses.

  4. Nonlinear dynamics of avian influenza epidemic models.

    PubMed

    Liu, Sanhong; Ruan, Shigui; Zhang, Xinan

    2017-01-01

    Avian influenza is a zoonotic disease caused by the transmission of the avian influenza A virus, such as H5N1 and H7N9, from birds to humans. The avian influenza A H5N1 virus has caused more than 500 human infections worldwide with nearly a 60% death rate since it was first reported in Hong Kong in 1997. The four outbreaks of the avian influenza A H7N9 in China from March 2013 to June 2016 have resulted in 580 human cases including 202 deaths with a death rate of nearly 35%. In this paper, we construct two avian influenza bird-to-human transmission models with different growth laws of the avian population, one with logistic growth and the other with Allee effect, and analyze their dynamical behavior. We obtain a threshold value for the prevalence of avian influenza and investigate the local or global asymptotical stability of each equilibrium of these systems by using linear analysis technique or combining Liapunov function method and LaSalle's invariance principle, respectively. Moreover, we give necessary and sufficient conditions for the occurrence of periodic solutions in the avian influenza system with Allee effect of the avian population. Numerical simulations are also presented to illustrate the theoretical results. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. A brief introduction to avian influenza virus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Avian influenza virus (AIV) causes a disease of high economic importance for poultry production worldwide. The earliest recorded cases of probable high pathogenicity AIV in poultry were reported in Italy in the 1870’s and avian influenza been recognized in domestic poultry through the modern era of ...

  6. The global nature of avian influenza

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Avian influenza virus is a global virus which knows no geographic boundaries, has no political agenda, and can infect poultry irrespective of their agricultural or anthropocentric production systems. Avian influenza viruses or evidence of their infection have been detected in poultry and wild birds...

  7. Influenza vaccines for avian species.

    PubMed

    Kapczynski, Darrell R; Swayne, David E

    2009-01-01

    Beginning in Southeast Asia in 2003, a multinational epizootic outbreak of H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) was identified in commercial poultry and wild bird species. This lineage, originally identified in Southern China in 1996 and then Hong Kong in 1997, caused severe morbidity and mortality in many bird species, was responsible for considerable economic losses via trade restrictions, and crossed species barriers (including its recovery from human cases). To date, these H5N1 HPAI viruses have been isolated in European, Middle Eastern, and African countries, and are considered endemic in many areas where regulatory control and different production sectors face substantial hurdles in controlling the spread of this disease. While control of avian influenza (AI) virus infections in wild bird populations may not be feasible at this point, control and eradiation of AI from commercial, semicommercial, zoo, pet, and village/backyard birds will be critical to preventing events that could lead to the emergence of epizootic influenza virus. Efficacious vaccines can help reduce disease, viral shedding, and transmission to susceptible cohorts. However, only when vaccines are used in a comprehensive program including biosecurity, education, culling, diagnostics and surveillance can control and eradication be considered achievable goals. In humans, protection against influenza is provided by vaccines that are chosen based on molecular, epidemiologic, and antigenic data. In poultry and other birds, AI vaccines are produced against a specific hemagglutinin subtype of AI, and use is decided by government and state agricultural authorities based on risk and economic considerations, including the potential for trade restrictions. In the current H5N1 HPAI epizootic, vaccines have been used in a variety of avian species as a part of an overall control program to aid in disease management and control.

  8. CpG oligodeoxynucleotide-specific goose TLR21 initiates an anti-viral immune response against NGVEV but not AIV strain H9N2 infection.

    PubMed

    Qi, Yulin; Yan, Bing; Chen, Shun; Chen, Hongjun; Wang, Mingshu; Jia, Renyong; Zhu, Dekang; Liu, Mafeng; Liu, Fei; Yang, Qiao; Sun, Kunfeng; Wu, Ying; Chen, Xiaoyue; Jing, Bo; Cheng, Anchun

    2016-03-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) recognize components of pathogens and mediate the host innate immune response. TLR21 is a TLR that specifically recognizes exogenous double-stranded DNA and rapidly signals to downstream innate immune factors. This study reports the cDNA of goose TLR21 and identifies its immune characteristics. The goose TLR21 is 3161 base pairs and encodes a 975 amino acid protein. As predicted, the goose transmembrane protein TLR21 has a signal peptide, leucine-rich repeat regions, a transmembrane domain, and a Toll/interleukin-1 receptor domain. Multiple sequence alignments and phylogenetic analyses showed that goose TLR21 has homology to chicken TLR21. The tissue distribution of TLR21 suggested that it has high transcript levels in immune-associated tissues, especially in the bursa of Fabricius, the Hadrian gland, and the thymus. After challenge with agonist ODN2006 and new type gosling viral enteritis virus (NGVEV), significant induction of TLR21 production, pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β and IL-6, and interferons were observed in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Both synthetic DNA (ODN2006) and viral DNA (NGVEV) can be recognized by goose TLR21, which leads to a rapid up-regulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines and anti-viral molecules. In vivo, avian influenza A virus H9N2 and NGVEV were used to infect goslings, which was followed by a significant up-regulation of TLR21 mRNA transcripts in multiple tissues of NGVEV-infected geese. In general, goose TLR21 plays an important role in binding invading pathogenic DNA viruses, which subsequently triggers an innate immune response; furthermore, it acts as a functional homologue of mammalian TLR9, as TLR21 recognizes a mammalian TLR9 agonist. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  9. Preexisting Salmonella-specific immunity interferes with the subsequent development of immune responses against the Salmonella strains delivering H9N2 hemagglutinin.

    PubMed

    Hajam, Irshad Ahmed; Lee, John Hwa

    2017-06-01

    Recombinant Salmonella strains expressing foreign heterologous antigens have been extensively studied as promising live vaccine delivery vehicles. In this study, we constructed attenuated smooth (S-HA) and rough (R-HA) Salmonella strains expressing hemagglutinin (HA) of H9N2, a low pathogenic avian influenza A virus. We then investigated the HA-specific immune responses following oral immunization with either S-HA or R-HA strain in chicken model. We further examined the effects of the preexisting anti-Salmonella immunity on the subsequent elicitation of the HA and the Salmonella ompA specific immune responses. Our results showed that primary immunization with either the S-HA or the R-HA strain elicited comparable HA-specific immune responses and the responses were significantly (p<0.05) higher compared to the Salmonella vector control. When chickens were pre-immunized with the smooth Salmonella carrier alone and then vaccinated with either S-HA or R-HA strain 3, 6 and 9 weeks later, respectively, significant reductions were seen for HA-specific immune responses at week 6, a point which corresponded to the peak of the primary Salmonella-specific antibody responses. No reductions were seen at week 3 and 9, albeit, the HA-specific immune responses were boosted at week 9, a point which corresponded to the lowest primary Salmonella-specific antibody responses. The ompA recall responses remain refractory at week 3 and 6 following deliberate immunization with the carrier strain, but were significantly (p<0.05) increased at week 9 post-primary immunization. We conclude that preexisting anti-Salmonella immunity inhibits antigen-specific immune responses and this effect could be avoided by carefully selecting the time point when carrier-specific immune responses are relatively low. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Replication and transmission of mammalian-adapted H9 subtype influenza virus in pigs and quail

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Influenza A is a major pathogen of birds, swine, and humans. Strains can jump from one species to another in a process that often requires genetic mutation and genome reassortment and results in outbreaks and, potentially, pandemics. H9N2 avian influenza is one of the most predominant influenza subt...

  11. Lactobacillus plantarum vaccine vector expressing hemagglutinin provides protection against H9N2 challenge infection.

    PubMed

    Shi, Shao-Hua; Yang, Wen-Tao; Yang, Gui-Lian; Zhang, Xu-Ke; Liu, Yu-Ying; Zhang, Li-Jiao; Ye, Li-Ping; Hu, Jing-Tao; Xing, Xin; Qi, Chong; Li, Yu; Wang, Chun-Feng

    2016-01-04

    Hemagglutinin (HA) has been demonstrated as an effective candidate vaccine antigen against AIVs. Dendritic cell-targeting peptide (DCpep) can enhance the robustness of immune responses. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether DCpep could enhance the immune response against H9N2 AIV when utilizing Lactobacillus plantarum NC8 (NC8) to present HA-DCpep in mouse and chicken models. To accomplish this, a mucosal vaccine of a recombinant NC8 strain expressing HA and DCpep that was constructed in a previous study was employed. Orally administered NC8-pSIP409-HA-DCpep elicited high serum titers of hemagglutination-inhibition (HI) antibodies in mice and also induced robust T cell immune responses in both mouse and chicken models. Orally administered NC8-pSIP409-HA-DCpep elicited high serum titers of hemagglutination-inhibition (HI) antibodies in mice and also induced robust T cell immune responses in both mouse and chicken models. These results revealed that recombinant L. plantarum NC8-pSIP409-HA-DCpep is an effective vaccine candidate against H9N2 AIVs.

  12. Intranasal vaccination with H5, H7 and H9 hemagglutinins co-localized in a virus-like particle protects ferrets from multiple avian influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Tretyakova, Irina; Pearce, Melissa B; Florese, Ruth; Tumpey, Terrence M; Pushko, Peter

    2013-07-20

    Avian influenza H5, H7 and H9 viruses top the World Health Organization's (WHO) list of subtypes with the greatest pandemic potential. Here we describe a recombinant virus-like particle (VLP) that co-localizes hemagglutinin (HA) proteins derived from H5N1, H7N2, and H9N2 viruses as an experimental vaccine against these viruses. A baculovirus vector was configured to co-express the H5, H7, and H9 genes from A/Viet Nam/1203/2004 (H5N1), A/New York/107/2003 (H7N2) and A/Hong Kong/33982/2009 (H9N2) viruses, respectively, as well as neuraminidase (NA) and matrix (M1) genes from A/Puerto Rico/8/1934 (H1N1) virus. Co-expression of these genes in Sf9 cells resulted in production of triple-subtype VLPs containing HA molecules derived from the three influenza viruses. The triple-subtype VLPs exhibited hemagglutination and neuraminidase activities and morphologically resembled influenza virions. Intranasal vaccination of ferrets with the VLPs resulted in induction of serum antibody responses and efficient protection against experimental challenges with H5N1, H7N2, and H9N2 viruses.

  13. Genetic evolution of H9 subtype influenza viruses from live poultry markets in Shanghai, China.

    PubMed

    Ge, Fei-Fei; Zhou, Jin-Ping; Liu, Jian; Wang, Jian; Zhang, Wei-Yi; Sheng, Li-Ping; Xu, Feng; Ju, Hou-Bing; Sun, Quan-Yun; Liu, Pei-Hong

    2009-10-01

    H9N2 influenza viruses have become established and maintain long-term endemicity in poultry. The complete genomes of seven avian H9N2 influenza viruses were characterized. These seven influenza virus isolates were obtained from live poultry markets in Shanghai, China, in 2002 and from 2006 to 2008. Genetic analysis revealed that all seven isolates had an RSSR motif at the cleavage site of hemagglutinin (HA), indicating low pathogenicity in chickens. Phylogenetic analyses indicated that the seven avian H9N2 viruses belonged to the lineage represented by Duck/Hong Kong/Y280/97 (H9N2), a virus belonging to the Chicken/Beijing/1/94-like (H9N2) lineage, and that they are all quadruple reassortants consisting of genes from different lineages. The six internal genes of the isolates possessed H5N1-like sequences, indicating that they were reassortants of H9 and H5 viruses. All of the viruses had nonstructural (as well as HA and neuraminidase) genes derived from the Duck/Hong Kong/Y280/97-like virus lineage but also had other genes of mixed avian virus origin, including genes similar to those of H5N1 viruses (Gs/GD-like). The infected chickens showed no signs of disease. These results show the genetic and biological diversity of H9N2 viruses in Shanghai and support their potential role as pandemic influenza agents.

  14. Poultry farms as a source of avian influenza A (H7N9) virus reassortment and human infection

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Donglin; Zou, Shumei; Bai, Tian; Li, Jing; Zhao, Xiang; Yang, Lei; Liu, Hongmin; Li, Xiaodan; Yang, Xianda; Xin, Li; Xu, Shuang; Zou, Xiaohui; Li, Xiyan; Wang, Ao; Guo, Junfeng; Sun, Bingxin; Huang, Weijuan; Zhang, Ye; Li, Xiang; Gao, Rongbao; Shen, Bo; Chen, Tao; Dong, Jie; Wei, Hejiang; Wang, Shiwen; Li, Qun; Li, Dexin; Wu, Guizhen; Feng, Zijian; Gao, George F.; Wang, Yu; Wang, Dayan; Fan, Ming; Shu, Yuelong

    2015-01-01

    Live poultry markets are a source of human infection with avian influenza A (H7N9) virus. On February 21, 2014, a poultry farmer infected with H7N9 virus was identified in Jilin, China, and H7N9 and H9N2 viruses were isolated from the patient's farm. Reassortment between these subtype viruses generated five genotypes, one of which caused the human infection. The date of H7N9 virus introduction to the farm is estimated to be between August 21, 2013 (95% confidence interval [CI] June 6, 2013-October 6, 2013) and September 25, 2013 (95% CI May 28, 2013-January 4, 2014), suggesting that the most likely source of virus introduction was the first batch of poultry purchased in August 2013. The reassortment event that led to the human virus may have occurred between January 2, 2014 (95% CI November 8, 2013-February 12, 2014) and February 12, 2014 (95% CI January 19, 2014-February 18, 2014). Our findings demonstrate that poultry farms could be a source of reassortment between H7N9 virus and H9N2 virus as well as human infection, which emphasizes the importance to public health of active avian influenza surveillance at poultry farms. PMID:25591105

  15. Poultry farms as a source of avian influenza A (H7N9) virus reassortment and human infection.

    PubMed

    Wu, Donglin; Zou, Shumei; Bai, Tian; Li, Jing; Zhao, Xiang; Yang, Lei; Liu, Hongmin; Li, Xiaodan; Yang, Xianda; Xin, Li; Xu, Shuang; Zou, Xiaohui; Li, Xiyan; Wang, Ao; Guo, Junfeng; Sun, Bingxin; Huang, Weijuan; Zhang, Ye; Li, Xiang; Gao, Rongbao; Shen, Bo; Chen, Tao; Dong, Jie; Wei, Hejiang; Wang, Shiwen; Li, Qun; Li, Dexin; Wu, Guizhen; Feng, Zijian; Gao, George F; Wang, Yu; Wang, Dayan; Fan, Ming; Shu, Yuelong

    2015-01-15

    Live poultry markets are a source of human infection with avian influenza A (H7N9) virus. On February 21, 2014, a poultry farmer infected with H7N9 virus was identified in Jilin, China, and H7N9 and H9N2 viruses were isolated from the patient's farm. Reassortment between these subtype viruses generated five genotypes, one of which caused the human infection. The date of H7N9 virus introduction to the farm is estimated to be between August 21, 2013 (95% confidence interval [CI] June 6, 2013-October 6, 2013) and September 25, 2013 (95% CI May 28, 2013-January 4, 2014), suggesting that the most likely source of virus introduction was the first batch of poultry purchased in August 2013. The reassortment event that led to the human virus may have occurred between January 2, 2014 (95% CI November 8, 2013-February 12, 2014) and February 12, 2014 (95% CI January 19, 2014-February 18, 2014). Our findings demonstrate that poultry farms could be a source of reassortment between H7N9 virus and H9N2 virus as well as human infection, which emphasizes the importance to public health of active avian influenza surveillance at poultry farms.

  16. Antigenic cartography of H9N2 virus and its impact on the vaccine efficacy in chickens

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The H9 subtype of avian influenza virus (AIV) is wide-spread in Asia and the Middle East. The efficacy of vaccines is enhanced by the antigenic match of the hemagglutinin protein (HA) between the vaccine and the field strain. To determine how antigenic variations affect the vaccine efficacy, speci...

  17. Prospective study of avian influenza H9 infection in commercial poultry farms of Punjab Province and Islamabad Capital Territory, Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Chaudhry, Mamoona; Ahmad, Maqbool; Rashid, Hamad Bin; Sultan, Bakhat; Chaudhry, Haroon Rashid; Riaz, Aayesha; Shaheen, Muhammad Shabir

    2017-01-01

    A prospective study was conducted from November 2013 to February 2014 to estimate the spatial clustering; cumulative incidence and risk factors associated with avian influenza (AI) subtype H9 infection on commercial poultry farms of Pakistan. A total of 400 farms were enrolled and followed during the study period. Among these, 109 farms submitted samples suspected for AI to the laboratory, and only 47 farms were confirmed positive by hemagglutinin inhibition (HI) test. Data was collected from these 109 farms about their demography, management, and biosecurity practices. The cumulative incidence of H9N2 was 11.75 % (95 % confidence interval (CI) 8.76-15.23). The highest number of cases (40.42 %) was reported in January. One most likely cluster (p = 0.009, radius = 4.61 km) occurred in the Kasur district. Multivariable logistic regression analyses showed that the presence of wild birds on the farms (odds ratio (OR) = 16.18; 95 % CI 3.94-66.45) was independently associated with H9N2 infection. Cleaning of cages before delivery on farm (OR = 0.16; 95 % CI = 0.06-0.47), presence of a footbath at the entrance of farm (OR = 0.24; 95 % CI 0.08-0.79), and changing of gloves (OR = 0.33; 95 % CI 0.11-0.99) were protective factors against H9N2 infection. Reducing the exposure to risk factors and adapting biosecurity measures may reduce the risk of AI H9N2 infection on commercial poultry farms in Pakistan.

  18. Antigenic Cartography of H9 Avian Influenza Virus and Its Application to Vaccine Selection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yue; Davidson, Irit; Fouchier, Ron; Spackman, Erica

    2016-05-01

    Vaccination is frequently used as a control method for the H9 subtype of low pathogenicity avian influenza virus (AIV), which is widespread in Asia and the Middle East. One of the most important factors for selecting an effective vaccine strain is the antigenic match between the hemagglutinin protein of the vaccine and the strain circulating in the field. To demonstrate the antigenic relationships among H9 AIVs, with a focus on Israeli H9 isolates, antigenic cartography was used to develop a map of H9 AIVs. Based on their antigenic diversity, three isolates from Israel were selected for vaccination-challenge studies: 1) the current vaccine virus, A/chicken/Israel/215/2007 H9N2 (Ck/215); 2) A/chicken/Israel/1163/2011 H9N2 (Ck/1163); and 3) A/ostrich/Israel/1436/2003 (Os/1436). A 50% infective dose (ID50) model was used to determine the effect of the vaccines on susceptibility to infection by using a standardized dose of vaccine. Sera collected immediately prior to challenge showed that Ck/215 was the most immunogenic, followed by Ck/1163 and Os/1436. A significant difference in ID50 was only observed with Ck/215 homologous challenge, where the ID50 was increased by 2 log 10 per bird. The ID50 for Ck/1163 was the same, regardless of vaccine, including sham vaccination. The ID50 for Os/1436 was above the maximum possible dose and therefore could not be established.

  19. Avian influenza: an emerging pandemic threat.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xian Wen; Mossad, Sherif B

    2005-12-01

    While we are facing the threat of an emerging pandemic from the current avian flu outbreak in Asia, we have learned important traits of the virus responsible for the 1918 Spanish influenza pandemic that made it so deadly. By using stockpiled antiviral drugs effectively and developing an effective vaccine, we can be in a better position than ever to mitigate the global impact of an avian influenza pandemic.

  20. Low pathogenicity avian influenza viruses infect chicken layers by different routes of inoculation.

    PubMed

    Pantin-Jackwood, Mary J; Smith, Diane M; Wasilenko, Jamie L; Spackman, Erica

    2012-06-01

    In order to develop better control measures against avian influenza, it is necessary to understand how the virus transmits in poultry. In a previous study in which the infectivity and transmissibility of the pandemic H1N1 influenza virus was examined in different poultry species, we found that no or minimal infection occurred in chicken and turkeys intranasally (IN) inoculated with the virus. However, we demonstrated that the virus can infect laying turkey hens by the intracloacal (IC) and intraoviduct (IO) routes, possibly explaining the drops in egg production observed in turkey breeder farms affected by the virus. Such novel routes of exposure have not been previously examined in chickens and could also explain outbreaks of low pathogenicity avian influenza (LPAI) that cause a decrease in egg production in chicken layers and breeders. In the present study, 46-wk-old specific-pathogen-free chicken layers were infected by the IN, IC, or IO routes with one of two LPAI viruses: a poultry origin virus, A/chicken/CA/1255/02 (H6N2), and a live bird market isolate, A/chicken/NJ/12220/97 (H9N2). Only hens IN inoculated with the H6N2 virus presented mild clinical signs consisting of depression and anorexia. However, a decrease in number of eggs laid was observed in all virus-inoculated groups when compared to control hens. Evidence of infection was found in all chickens inoculated with the H6N2 virus by any of the three routes and the virus transmitted to contact hens. On the other hand, only one or two hens from each of the groups inoculated with the H9N2 virus shed detectable levels of virus, or seroconverted and did not transmit the virus to contacts, regardless of the route of inoculation. In conclusion, LPAI viruses can also infect chickens through other routes besides the IN route, which is considered the natural route of exposure. However, as seen with the H9N2 virus, the infectivity of the virus did not increase when given by these alternate routes.

  1. Novel human H7N9 influenza virus in China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chengmin; Luo, Jing; Wang, Jing; Su, Wen; Gao, Shanshan; Zhang, Min; Xie, Li; Ding, Hua; Liu, Shelan; Liu, Xiaodong; Chen, Yu; Jia, Yaxiong; He, Hongxuan

    2014-06-01

    Outbreaks of H7N9 avian influenza in humans in 5 provinces and 2 municipalities of China have reawakened concern that avian influenza viruses may again cross species barriers to infect the human population and thereby initiate a new influenza pandemic. Evolutionary analysis shows that human H7N9 influenza viruses originated from the H9N2, H7N3 and H11N9 avian viruses, and that it is as a novel reassortment influenza virus. This article reviews current knowledge on 11 subtypes of influenza A virus from human which can cause human infections.

  2. Epidemiology, Evolution, and Recent Outbreaks of Avian Influenza Virus in China

    PubMed Central

    Su, Shuo; Wong, Gary; Gray, Gregory C.; Gao, George F.

    2015-01-01

    Novel reassortants of H7N9, H10N8, and H5N6 avian influenza viruses (AIVs) are currently circulating in China's poultry flocks, occasionally infecting humans and other mammals. Combined with the sometimes enzootic H5N1 and H9N2 strains, this cauldron of genetically diverse AIVs pose significant risks to public health. Here, we review the epidemiology, evolution, and recent outbreaks of AIVs in China, discuss reasons behind the recent increase in the emergence of novel AIVs, and identify warning signs which may point to the emergence of a potentially virulent and highly transmissible AIV to humans. This review will be useful to authorities who consider options for the detection and control of AIV transmission in animals and humans, with the goal of preventing future epidemics and pandemics. PMID:26063419

  3. Avian influenza virus RNA extraction.

    PubMed

    Spackman, Erica; Lee, Scott A

    2014-01-01

    The efficient extraction and purification of viral RNA is critical for down-stream molecular applications whether it is the sensitive and specific detection of virus in clinical samples, virus gene cloning and expression, or quantification of avian influenza (AI) virus by molecular methods from experimentally infected birds. Samples can generally be divided into two types; enriched (e.g. virus stocks) and clinical. Clinical type samples, which may be tissues or swab material, are the most difficult to process due to the complex sample composition and possibly low virus titers. In this chapter two well established procedures for the isolation of AI virus RNA from common clinical specimen types and enriched virus stocks for further molecular applications will be presented.

  4. Replication and Adaptive Mutations of Low Pathogenic Avian Influenza Viruses in Tracheal Organ Cultures of Different Avian Species

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Henning; Matrosovich, Mikhail; Pleschka, Stephan; Rautenschlein, Silke

    2012-01-01

    Transmission of avian influenza viruses (AIV) between different avian species may require genome mutations that allow efficient virus replication in a new species and could increase virulence. To study the role of domestic poultry in the evolution of AIV we compared replication of low pathogenic (LP) AIV of subtypes H9N2, H7N7 and H6N8 in tracheal organ cultures (TOC) and primary embryo fibroblast cultures of chicken, turkey, Pekin duck and homing pigeon. Virus strain-dependent and avian species-related differences between LPAIV were observed in growth kinetics and induction of ciliostasis in TOC. In particular, our data demonstrate high susceptibility to LPAIV of turkey TOC contrasted with low susceptibility of homing pigeon TOC. Serial virus passages in the cells of heterologous host species resulted in adaptive mutations in the AIV genome, especially in the receptor-binding site and protease cleavage site of the hemagglutinin. Our data highlight differences in susceptibility of different birds to AIV viruses and emphasizes potential role of poultry in the emergence of new virus variants. PMID:22912693

  5. Seroepidemiological evidence of avian H4, H5, and H9 influenza A virus transmission to pigs in southeastern China.

    PubMed

    Ninomiya, Ai; Takada, Ayato; Okazaki, Katsunori; Shortridge, Kennedy F; Kida, Hiroshi

    2002-08-25

    Pig serum samples collected in southeastern China were examined for antibodies to influenza A viruses. Since the hemagglutination inhibition (HI) test does not accurately detect antibodies to the hemagglutinins (HAs) of "avian" influenza viruses, we utilized the neutralization (NT) test to detect subtype-specific antibodies to the HA of avian viruses in pig sera. Neutralizing antibodies to H1, H3, H4, and H5 influenza viruses were detected in the serum samples collected in 1977-1982 and 1998, suggesting that pigs in China have been sporadically infected with avian H4 and H5 viruses in addition to swine and human H1 and H3 viruses. Antibodies to H9 virus, on the other hand, were found only in the sera collected in 1998, not in those collected in 1977-1982, correlating with the recent spread in poultry and subsequent isolation of H9N2 viruses from pigs and humans in 1998. The present results indicate that avian influenza viruses have been transmitted to pig populations in southeastern China.

  6. Is a highly pathogenic avian influenza virus H5N1 fragment recombined in PB1 the key for the epidemic of the novel AIV H7N9 in China, 2013?

    PubMed

    Chen, Liang; Sun, Liqian; Li, Rui; Chen, Yue; Zhang, Zhijie; Xiong, Chenglong; Zhao, Genming; Jiang, Qingwu

    2016-02-01

    A novel avian influenza A H7N9 virus that infects humans was identified in China in 2013. This study is the first to comprehensively investigate the characteristics of genomic recombination, rather than reassortment, which has been the subject of investigation in previously reported studies. Novel avian influenza virus (AIV) H7N9 genome sequences were obtained from the NCBI Influenza Virus Sequence Database and the Global Initiative on Sharing Avian Influenza Database (GISAID) and a representative isolate was subjected to homogeneity analysis. A phylogenetic tree was constructed. Eight segments of the isolate were analyzed to identify segments with recombination events, the corresponding recombination fragments, and breakpoints. The evolutionary history of the recombined fragments was tracked by constructing phylogenetic trees of the recombination fragments. Among the eight segments of the novel AIV H7N9 analyzed, only the PB1 segment showed a marked recombination phenomenon, with 11 recombination events; these included five actual recombination events and six possible misalignment artifact recombination events. The most notable was the recombination of a 291-nucleotide (nt) fragment at the 490-780 nt site that was affiliated to a highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIV) H5N1 (A/tree sparrow/Thailand/VSMU-16-RBR/2005). The phylogenetic tree of the 291-nt recombination fragment on the PB1 segment showed that the novel AIV H7N9 had a close genetic relationship to H9N2 and H5N1. The novel AIV H7N9 might have reassorted its PB1 segment from H9N2 circulating in China, and this H9N2 PB1 might have been recombined into a highly pathogenic fragment from HPAIV H5N1, which could be the reason for the high fatality rate among patients with AIV H7N9 influenza. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  7. Prevention and Treatment of Avian Influenza A Viruses in People

    MedlinePlus

    ... Address What's this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Influenza Types Seasonal Avian Swine/Variant Pandemic Other Prevention and Treatment of Avian Influenza A Viruses in People Language: English (US) Españ ...

  8. Vaccine Efficacy of Inactivated, Chimeric Hemagglutinin H9/H5N2 Avian Influenza Virus and Its Suitability for the Marker Vaccine Strategy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Se Mi; Kim, Young-Il; Park, Su-Jin; Kim, Eun-Ha; Kwon, Hyeok-Il; Si, Young-Jae; Lee, In-Won; Song, Min-Suk; Choi, Young Ki

    2017-03-15

    In order to produce a dually effective vaccine against H9 and H5 avian influenza viruses that aligns with the DIVA (differentiating infected from vaccinated animals) strategy, we generated a chimeric H9/H5N2 recombinant vaccine that expressed the whole HA1 region of A/CK/Korea/04163/04 (H9N2) and the HA2 region of recent highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) A/MD/Korea/W452/14 (H5N8) viruses. The chimeric H9/H5N2 virus showed in vitro and in vivo growth properties and virulence that were similar to those of the low-pathogenic avian influenza (LPAI) H9 virus. An inactivated vaccine based on this chimeric virus induced serum neutralizing (SN) antibodies against both H9 and H5 viruses but induced cross-reactive hemagglutination inhibition (HI) antibody only against H9 viruses. Thus, this suggests its compatibility for use in the DIVA strategy against H5 strains. Furthermore, the chimeric H9/H5N2 recombinant vaccine protected immunized chickens against lethal challenge by HPAI H5N8 viruses and significantly attenuated virus shedding after infection by both H9N2 and HPAI H5N8 viruses. In mice, serological analyses confirmed that HA1- and HA2 stalk-specific antibody responses were induced by vaccination and that the DIVA principle could be employed through the use of an HI assay against H5 viruses. Furthermore, each HA1- and HA2 stalk-specific antibody response was sufficient to inhibit viral replication and protect the chimeric virus-immunized mice from lethal challenge with both mouse-adapted H9N2 and wild-type HPAI H5N1 viruses, although differences in vaccine efficacy against a homologous H9 virus (HA1 head domain immune-mediated protection) and a heterosubtypic H5 virus (HA2 stalk domain immune-mediated protection) were observed. Taken together, these results demonstrate that the novel chimeric H9/H5N2 recombinant virus is a low-pathogenic virus, and this chimeric vaccine is suitable for a DIVA vaccine with broad-spectrum neutralizing antibody against H5 avian

  9. Avian influenza surveillance of wild birds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Slota, Paul

    2007-01-01

    The President's National Strategy for Pandemic Influenza directs federal agencies to expand the surveillance of United States domestic livestock and wildlife to ensure early warning of hightly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) in the U.S. The immediate concern is a potential introduction of HPAI H5N1 virus into the U.S. The presidential directive resulted in the U.S. Interagency Strategic Plan for Early Detection of H5N1 Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza in Wild Migratory Birds (referred to as the Wild Bird Surveillance Plan or the Plan).

  10. Virus-like particles displaying H5, H7, H9 hemagglutinins and N1 neuraminidase elicit protective immunity to heterologous avian influenza viruses in chickens.

    PubMed

    Pushko, Peter; Tretyakova, Irina; Hidajat, Rachmat; Zsak, Aniko; Chrzastek, Klaudia; Tumpey, Terrence M; Kapczynski, Darrell R

    2017-01-15

    Avian influenza (AI) viruses circulating in wild birds pose a serious threat to public health. Human and veterinary vaccines against AI subtypes are needed. Here we prepared triple-subtype VLPs that co-localized H5, H7 and H9 antigens derived from H5N1, H7N3 and H9N2 viruses. VLPs also contained influenza N1 neuraminidase and retroviral gag protein. The H5/H7/H9/N1/gag VLPs were prepared using baculovirus expression. Biochemical, functional and antigenic characteristics were determined including hemagglutination and neuraminidase enzyme activities. VLPs were further evaluated in a chicken AI challenge model for safety, immunogenicity and protective efficacy against heterologous AI viruses including H5N2, H7N3 and H9N2 subtypes. All vaccinated birds survived challenges with H5N2 and H7N3 highly pathogenic AI (HPAI) viruses, while all controls died. Immune response was also detectable after challenge with low pathogenicity AI (LPAI) H9N2 virus suggesting that H5/H7/H9/N1/gag VLPs represent a promising approach for the development of broadly protective AI vaccine. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. North American Plan for Avian and Pandemic Influenza

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-08-01

    Canada, Mexico and the United States face a growing threat posed by the spread of avian influenza and the potential emergence of a human influenza...pandemic. The highly pathogenic (HPAI) H5N1 avian influenza virus, which re-emerged in Asia in late 2003, has already spread to Europe, the Middle East...to work together to combat an outbreak of avian influenza or an influenza pandemic in North America. The Plan complements national emergency

  12. DIVA vaccination strategies for avian influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Suarez, David L

    2012-12-01

    Vaccination for both low pathogenicity avian influenza and highly pathogenic avian influenza is commonly used by countries that have become endemic for avian influenza virus, but stamping-out policies are still common for countries with recently introduced disease. Stamping-out policies of euthanatizing infected and at-risk flocks has been an effective control tool, but it comes at a high social and economic cost. Efforts to identify alternative ways to respond to outbreaks without widespread stamping out has become a goal for organizations like the World Organisation for Animal Health. A major issue with vaccination for avian influenza is trade considerations because countries that vaccinate are often considered to be endemic for the disease and they typically lose their export markets. Primarily as a tool to promote trade, the concept of DIVA (differentiate infected from vaccinated animals) has been considered for avian influenza, but the goal for trade is to differentiate vaccinated and not-infected from vaccinated and infected animals because trading partners are unwilling to accept infected birds. Several different strategies have been investigated for a DIVA strategy, but each has advantages and disadvantages. A review of current knowledge on the research and implementation of the DIVA strategy will be discussed with possible ways to implement this strategy in the field. The increased desire for a workable DIVA strategy may lead to one of these ideas moving from the experimental to the practical.

  13. Genomic and phylogenetic characterization of novel, recombinant H5N2 avian influenza virus strains isolated from vaccinated chickens with clinical symptoms in China.

    PubMed

    Xu, Huaiying; Meng, Fang; Huang, Dihai; Sheng, Xiaodan; Wang, Youling; Zhang, Wei; Chang, Weishan; Wang, Leyi; Qin, Zhuoming

    2015-02-25

    Infection of poultry with diverse lineages of H5N2 avian influenza viruses has been documented for over three decades in different parts of the world, with limited outbreaks caused by this highly pathogenic avian influenza virus. In the present study, three avian H5N2 influenza viruses, A/chicken/Shijiazhuang/1209/2013, A/chicken/Chiping/0321/2014, and A/chicken/Laiwu/0313/2014, were isolated from chickens with clinical symptoms of avian influenza. Complete genomic and phylogenetic analyses demonstrated that all three isolates are novel recombinant viruses with hemagglutinin (HA) and matrix (M) genes derived from H5N1, and remaining genes derived from H9N2-like viruses. The HA cleavage motif in all three strains (PQIEGRRRKR/GL) is characteristic of a highly pathogenic avian influenza virus strain. These results indicate the occurrence of H5N2 recombination and highlight the importance of continued surveillance of the H5N2 subtype virus and reformulation of vaccine strains.

  14. Composting for Avian Influenza Virus Elimination

    PubMed Central

    Emmoth, Eva; Albihn, Ann; Vinnerås, Björn; Ottoson, Jakob

    2012-01-01

    Effective sanitization is important in viral epizootic outbreaks to avoid further spread of the pathogen. This study examined thermal inactivation as a sanitizing treatment for manure inoculated with highly pathogenic avian influenza virus H7N1 and bacteriophages MS2 and ϕ6. Rapid inactivation of highly pathogenic avian influenza virus H7N1 was achieved at both mesophilic (35°C) and thermophilic (45 and 55°C) temperatures. Similar inactivation rates were observed for bacteriophage ϕ6, while bacteriophage MS2 proved too thermoresistant to be considered a valuable indicator organism for avian influenza virus during thermal treatments. Guidelines for treatment of litter in the event of emergency composting can be formulated based on the inactivation rates obtained in the study. PMID:22389376

  15. Generation of an attenuated H5N1 avian influenza virus vaccine with all eight genes from avian viruses.

    PubMed

    Shi, Huoying; Liu, Xiu Fan; Zhang, Xiaorong; Chen, Sujuan; Sun, Lei; Lu, Jianhong

    2007-10-16

    In the face of disease outbreaks in poultry and the potential pandemic threat to humans caused by the highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses (HPAIVs) of H5N1 subtype, improvement in biosecurity and the use of inactivated vaccines are two main options for the control of this disease. Vaccine candidates of influenza A viruses of H5N1 subtype have been generated in several laboratories by plasmid-based reverse genetics with hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) genes from the epidemic strains of avian viruses in a background of internal genes from the vaccine donor strain of human strains, A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (PR8). These reassortant viruses containing genes from both avian and human viruses might impose biosafety concerns, also may be do if C4/F AIV would be a live attenuated vaccine or cold-adaptive strain vaccine. In order to generate better and safer vaccine candidate viruses, we genetically constructed attenuated reassortant H5N1 influenza A virus, designated as C4/F AIV, by plasmid-based reverse genetics with all eight genes from the avian strains. The C4/F AIV virus contained HA and NA genes from an epidemic strain A/Chicken/Huadong/04 (H5N1) (C4/H5N1) in a background of internal genes derived from a low pathogenic strain of A/Chicken/F/98(H9N2). The reassortant virus was attenuated by removal of the multibasic amino acid motif in the HA gene by mutation and deletion (from PQRERRRKKR (downward arrow) G to PQIETR (downward arrow) G). The intravenous pathogenicity index (IVPI) of C4/F AIV virus was 0, whereas that of the donor virus C4/H5N1 was 3.0. The virus HA titer of C4/H5N1 in the allantoic fluid from infected embryonated eggs was as high as 1:2048. The inactivated vaccine prepared from the reassortant virus C4/F AIV-induced high HI titer in vaccinated chickens and gave 100% protection when challenged with highly pathogenic avian influenza virus of H5N1 subtype.

  16. Serological evidence for exposure to avian influenza viruses within poultry workers in southern China.

    PubMed

    de Bruin, E; Zhang, X; Ke, C; Sikkema, R; Koopmans, M

    2017-02-20

    The risk of infection with avian influenza viruses for poultry workers is relatively unknown in China, and study results are often biased by the notification of only the severe human cases. Protein microarray was used to detect binding antibodies to 13 different haemagglutinin (HA1-part) antigens of avian influenza A(H5N1), A(H7N7), A(H7N9) and A(H9N2) viruses, in serum samples from poultry workers and healthy blood donors collected in the course of 3 years in Guangdong Province, China. Significantly higher antibody titre levels were detected in poultry workers when compared to blood donors for the most recent H5 and H9 strains tested. These differences were most pronounced in younger age groups for antigens from older strains, but were observed in all age groups for the recent H5 and H9 antigens. For the H7 strains tested, only poultry workers from two retail live poultry markets had significantly higher antibody titres compared to blood donors.

  17. Sustained live poultry market surveillance contributes to early warnings for human infection with avian influenza viruses

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Shisong; Bai, Tian; Yang, Lei; Wang, Xin; Peng, Bo; Liu, Hui; Geng, Yijie; Zhang, Renli; Ma, Hanwu; Zhu, Wenfei; Wang, Dayan; Cheng, Jinquan; Shu, Yuelong

    2016-01-01

    Sporadic human infections with the highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) A (H5N6) virus have been reported in different provinces in China since April 2014. From June 2015 to January 2016, routine live poultry market (LPM) surveillance was conducted in Shenzhen, Guangdong Province. H5N6 viruses were not detected until November 2015. The H5N6 virus-positive rate increased markedly beginning in December 2015, and viruses were detected in LPMs in all districts of the city. Coincidently, two human cases with histories of poultry exposure developed symptoms and were diagnosed as H5N6-positive in Shenzhen during late December 2015 and early January 2016. Similar viruses were identified in environmental samples collected in the LPMs and the patients. In contrast to previously reported H5N6 viruses, viruses with six internal genes derived from the H9N2 or H7N9 viruses were detected in the present study. The increased H5N6 virus-positive rate in the LPMs and the subsequent human infections demonstrated that sustained LPM surveillance for avian influenza viruses provides an early warning for human infections. Interventions, such as LPM closures, should be immediately implemented to reduce the risk of human infection with the H5N6 virus when the virus is widely detected during LPM surveillance. PMID:27485495

  18. Sustained live poultry market surveillance contributes to early warnings for human infection with avian influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Fang, Shisong; Bai, Tian; Yang, Lei; Wang, Xin; Peng, Bo; Liu, Hui; Geng, Yijie; Zhang, Renli; Ma, Hanwu; Zhu, Wenfei; Wang, Dayan; Cheng, Jinquan; Shu, Yuelong

    2016-08-03

    Sporadic human infections with the highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) A (H5N6) virus have been reported in different provinces in China since April 2014. From June 2015 to January 2016, routine live poultry market (LPM) surveillance was conducted in Shenzhen, Guangdong Province. H5N6 viruses were not detected until November 2015. The H5N6 virus-positive rate increased markedly beginning in December 2015, and viruses were detected in LPMs in all districts of the city. Coincidently, two human cases with histories of poultry exposure developed symptoms and were diagnosed as H5N6-positive in Shenzhen during late December 2015 and early January 2016. Similar viruses were identified in environmental samples collected in the LPMs and the patients. In contrast to previously reported H5N6 viruses, viruses with six internal genes derived from the H9N2 or H7N9 viruses were detected in the present study. The increased H5N6 virus-positive rate in the LPMs and the subsequent human infections demonstrated that sustained LPM surveillance for avian influenza viruses provides an early warning for human infections. Interventions, such as LPM closures, should be immediately implemented to reduce the risk of human infection with the H5N6 virus when the virus is widely detected during LPM surveillance.

  19. Control of Avian Influenza in Poultry

    PubMed Central

    Marangon, Stefano

    2006-01-01

    Avian influenza, listed by the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE), has become a disease of great importance for animal and human health. Several aspects of the disease lack scientific information, which has hampered the management of some recent crises. Millions of animals have died, and concern is growing over the loss of human lives and management of the pandemic potential. On the basis of data generated in recent outbreaks and in light of new OIE regulations and maintenance of animal welfare, we review the available control methods for avian influenza infections in poultry, from stamping out to prevention through emergency and prophylactic vaccination. PMID:17073078

  20. Genetic tuning of the novel avian influenza A(H7N9) virus during interspecies transmission, China, 2013.

    PubMed

    Wang, D; Yang, L; Gao, R; Zhang, X; Tan, Y; Wu, A; Zhu, W; Zhou, J; Zou, S; Li, Xiyan; Sun, Y; Zhang, Y; Liu, Y; Liu, T; Xiong, Y; Xu, J; Chen, L; Weng, Y; Qi, X; Guo, J; Li, Xiaodan; Dong, J; Huang, W; Zhang, Y; Dong, L; Zhao, X; Liu, L; Lu, J; Lan, Y; Wei, H; Xin, L; Chen, Y; Xu, C; Chen, T; Zhu, Y; Jiang, T; Feng, Z; Yang, W; Wang, Y; Zhu, H; Guan, Y; Gao, G F; Li, D; Han, J; Wang, S; Wu, G; Shu, Y

    2014-06-26

    A novel avian influenza A(H7N9) virus causing human infection emerged in February 2013 in China. To elucidate the mechanism of interspecies transmission, we compared the signature amino acids of avian influenza A(H7N9) viruses from human and non-human hosts and analysed the reassortants of 146 influenza A(H7N9) viruses with full genome sequences. We propose a genetic tuning procedure with continuous amino acid substitutions and reassorting that mediates host adaptation and interspecies transmission. When the early influenza A(H7N9) virus, containing ancestor haemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) genes similar to A/Shanghai/05 virus, circulated in waterfowl and transmitted to terrestrial poultry, it acquired an NA stalk deletion at amino acid positions 69 to 73. Then, receptor binding preference was tuned to increase the affinity to human-like receptors through HA G186V and Q226L mutations in terrestrial poultry. Additional mammalian adaptations such as PB2 E627K were selected in humans. The continual reassortation between H7N9 and H9N2 viruses resulted in multiple genotypes for further host adaptation. When we analysed a potential association of mutations and reassortants with clinical outcome, only the PB2 E627K mutation slightly increased the case fatality rate. Genetic tuning may create opportunities for further adaptation of influenza A(H7N9) and its potential to cause a pandemic.

  1. Avian influenza in shorebirds: experimental infection of ruddy turnstones (Arenaria interpres) with avian influenza virus

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Jeffrey S.; Krauss, Scott; Franson, J. Christian; TeSlaa, Joshua L.; Nashold, Sean W.; Stallknecht, David E.; Webby, Richard J.; Webster, Robert G.

    2012-01-01

    Please cite this paper as: Hall et al. (2012) Avian influenza in shorebirds: experimental infection of ruddy turnstones (Arenaria interpres) with avian influenza virus. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses DOI: 10.1111/j.1750‐2659.2012.00358.x. Background  Low pathogenic avian influenza viruses (LPAIV) have been reported in shorebirds, especially at Delaware Bay, USA, during spring migration. However, data on patterns of virus excretion, minimal infectious doses, and clinical outcome are lacking. The ruddy turnstone (Arenaria interpres) is the shorebird species with the highest prevalence of influenza virus at Delaware Bay. Objectives  The primary objective of this study was to experimentally assess the patterns of influenza virus excretion, minimal infectious doses, and clinical outcome in ruddy turnstones. Methods  We experimentally challenged ruddy turnstones using a common LPAIV shorebird isolate, an LPAIV waterfowl isolate, or a highly pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza virus. Cloacal and oral swabs and sera were analyzed from each bird. Results  Most ruddy turnstones had pre‐existing antibodies to avian influenza virus, and many were infected at the time of capture. The infectious doses for each challenge virus were similar (103·6–104·16 EID50), regardless of exposure history. All infected birds excreted similar amounts of virus and showed no clinical signs of disease or mortality. Influenza A‐specific antibodies remained detectable for at least 2 months after inoculation. Conclusions  These results provide a reference for interpretation of surveillance data, modeling, and predicting the risks of avian influenza transmission and movement in these important hosts. PMID:22498031

  2. Viral vectors for avian influenza vaccines

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Prior to 2003, vaccines against avian influenza (AI) had limited, individual country or regional use in poultry. In late 2003, H5N1 high pathogenicity (HP) AI spread from China to multiple Southeast Asian countries, and to Europe during 2005 and Africa during 2006, challenging governments and all p...

  3. 76 FR 4046 - Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-24

    ... Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service 9 CFR Parts 93, 94, and 95 RIN 0579-AC36 Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, USDA. ACTION: Interim rule and...-4356. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Background The Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service...

  4. Avian influenza--a new challenge.

    PubMed

    Laranjeira, C A

    2006-01-01

    To present a wide-ranging review of the literature on avian influenza A (H5N1). The recent epidemics caused by the avian influenza A virus in Asia, have demonstrated the capacity of this agent to cause serious illness in humans. Most articles were obtained from the Medline database using the keywords "Influenza A virus", "avian flu", "epidemiology", "disease vectors" and "H5N1 infection" for the period between 1996 and 2006. We selected 25 original articles addressing the recent outbreaks of infection with the H5N1 subtype of avian influenza A in domesticated birds in Asia, which have resulted in significant economic losses and repercussions for public health, as well as some cases of human infection presenting high lethality. In most cases, infection has been associated with direct exposure to infected birds or contact with surfaces infected with bird excrement. However, cases of human-to-human transmission have been confirmed. Controlling outbreaks in domestic fowl and limiting contact between humans and infected birds must be the priorities in the management of this disease at the public health level. In addition, techniques and knowledge regarding the disease should be widely disseminated (Ref: 28).

  5. Avian influenza virus and Newcastle disease virus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Avian influenza virus (AIV) and Newcastle disease virus (NDV) severely impact poultry egg production. Decreased egg yield and hatchability, as well as misshapen eggs, are often observed during infection with AIV and NDV, even with low-virulence strains or in vaccinated flocks. Data suggest that in...

  6. Avian influenza vaccines and vaccination for poultry

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Vaccines against avian influenza (AI) have had more limited use in poultry than vaccines against other poultry diseases such as Newcastle disease (ND) and infectious bronchitis, and have been used more commonly in the developing world. Over the past 40 years, AI vaccines have been primarily based o...

  7. The global nature of avian influenza

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Avian influenza (AI) virus (AIV) is a global virus which knows no geographic boundaries, has no political agenda, and can infect poultry irrespective of their occupying ecosystem, agricultural production system, or other anthropocentric niches. AIVs or evidence of their infection have been detected...

  8. Pathobiology of avian influenza in domestic ducks

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Domestic ducks are an important source of food and income in many parts of the world. The susceptibility of domestic ducks to avian influenza (AI) viruses varies depending on many factors, including the species and the age of the ducks, the virus strain, and management practices. Although wild wat...

  9. Different cation-protonation patterns in mol­ecular salts of unsymmetrical dimethyhydrazine: C2H9N2·Br and C2H9N2·H2PO3

    PubMed Central

    Katinaitė, Judita; Harrison, William T. A.

    2016-01-01

    We describe the syntheses and crystal structures of two mol­ecular salts containing the 1,1-di­methyl­hydrazinium cation, namely 1,1-di­methyl­hydrazin-1-ium bromide, C2H9N2 +·Br−, (I), and 2,2-di­methyl­hydrazin-1-ium di­hydrogen phosphite, C2H9N2 +·H2PO3 −, (II). In (I), the cation is protonated at the methyl­ated N atom and N—H⋯Br hydrogen bonds generate [010] chains in the crystal. In (II), the cation is protonated at the terminal N atom and cation-to-anion N—H⋯O and anion-to-anion O—H⋯O hydrogen bonds generate (001) sheets. PMID:27536415

  10. Genetic analysis of an H5N2 highly pathogenic avian influenza virus isolated from a chicken in a live bird market in Northern Vietnam in 2012.

    PubMed

    Nishi, Tatsuya; Okamatsu, Masatoshi; Sakurai, Kenji; Chu, Huy Duc; Thanh, Long Pham; van Nguyen, Long; van Hoang, Nam; Thi, Diep Nguyen; Sakoda, Yoshihiro; Kida, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    In August 2012, A/chicken/Vietnam/OIE-2215/2012 (H5N2) was isolated from a chicken in a live bird market (LBM) in Northern Vietnam. Intravenous pathogenicity test revealed that this virus is highly pathogenic in chickens. The PA, HA, NP and M, PB2 and NA, and PB1 and NS genes of the isolate were phylogenetically closely related to those of A/duck/Vietnam/OIE-2202/2012 (H5N1) of clade 2.3.2.1, A/chicken/Vietnam/OIE-1611/2012 (H9N2) and A/chicken/Vietnam/OIE-2468/2012 (H9N2), respectively. All of these viruses were isolated from birds in LBMs in the same province. These results indicate that A/chicken/Vietnam/OIE-2215/2012 (H5N2) is a genetic reassortant and that surveillance of avian influenza in LBMs and stamping out policy are essential for the eradication of highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses from Asia.

  11. Highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 virus induces cytokine dysregulation with suppressed maturation of chicken monocyte-derived dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Kalaiyarasu, Semmannan; Kumar, Manoj; Senthil Kumar, Dhanapal; Bhatia, Sandeep; Dash, Sandeep Kumar; Bhat, Sushant; Khetan, Rohit K; Nagarajan, Shanmugasundaram

    2016-10-01

    One of the major causes of death in highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIV) infection in chickens is acute induction of pro-inflammatory cytokines (cytokine storm), which leads to severe pathology and acute mortality. DCs and respiratory tract macrophages are the major antigen presenting cells that are exposed to mucosal pathogens. We hypothesized that chicken DCs are a major target for induction of cytokine dysregulation by H5N1 HPAIV. It was found that infection of chicken peripheral blood monocyte-derived dendritic cells (chMoDCs) with H5N1 HPAIV produces high titers of progeny virus with more rounding and cytotoxicity than with H9N2 LPAIV. Expression of maturation markers (CD40, CD80 and CD83) was weaker in both H5N1 and H9N2 groups than in a LPS control group. INF-α, -β and -γ were significantly upregulated in the H5N1 group. Pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-18) were highly upregulated in early mid (IL-1), and late (IL-6) phases of H5N1 virus infection. IL-8 (CXCLi2) mRNA expression was significantly stronger in the H5N1 group from 6 hr of infection. TLR3, 7, 15 and 21 were upregulated 24 hr after infection by H5N1 virus compared with H9N2 virus, with maximum expression of TLR 3 mRNA. Similarly, greater H5N1 virus-induced apoptotic cell death and cytotoxicity, as measured by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling and lactate dehydrogenase assays, respectively, were found. Thus, both H5N1 and H9N2 viruses evade the host immune system by inducing impairment of chMoDCs maturation and enhancing cytokine dysregulation in H5N1 HPAIV-infected cells.

  12. Avian influenza in shorebirds: experimental infection of ruddy turnstones (Arenaria interpres) with avian influenza virus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hall, Jeffrey S.; Krauss, Scott; Franson, J. Christian; TeSlaa, Joshua L.; Nashold, Sean W.; Stallknecht, David E.; Webby, Richard J.; Webster, Robert G.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Low pathogenic avian influenza viruses (LPAIV) have been reported in shorebirds, especially at Delaware Bay, USA, during spring migration. However, data on patterns of virus excretion, minimal infectious doses, and clinical outcome are lacking. The ruddy turnstone (Arenaria interpres) is the shorebird species with the highest prevalence of influenza virus at Delaware Bay. Objectives: The primary objective of this study was to experimentally assess the patterns of influenza virus excretion, minimal infectious doses, and clinical outcome in ruddy turnstones. Methods: We experimentally challenged ruddy turnstones using a common LPAIV shorebird isolate, an LPAIV waterfowl isolate, or a highly pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza virus. Cloacal and oral swabs and sera were analyzed from each bird. Results: Most ruddy turnstones had pre-existing antibodies to avian influenza virus, and many were infected at the time of capture. The infectious doses for each challenge virus were similar (103·6–104·16 EID50), regardless of exposure history. All infected birds excreted similar amounts of virus and showed no clinical signs of disease or mortality. Influenza A-specific antibodies remained detectable for at least 2 months after inoculation. Conclusions: These results provide a reference for interpretation of surveillance data, modeling, and predicting the risks of avian influenza transmission and movement in these important hosts.

  13. Detection of Avian H7N9 Influenza A Viruses in the Yangtze Delta Region of China During Early H7N9 Outbreaks.

    PubMed

    Li, Yin; Huang, Xin-Mei; Zhao, Dong-Min; Liu, Yu-Zhuo; He, Kong-Wang; Liu, Yao-Xing; Chen, Chang-Hai; Long, Li-Ping; Xu, Yifei; Xie, Xing-Xing; Han, Kai-Kai; Liu, Xiao-Yan; Yang, Jing; Zhang, You-Fa; Fan, Feng; Webby, Richard; Wan, Xiu-Feng

    2016-05-01

    Since the first H7N9 human case in Shanghai, February 19, 2013, the emerging avian-origin H7N9 influenza A virus has become an epizootic virus in China, posing a potential pandemic threat to public health. From April 2 to April 28, 2013, some 422 oral-pharyngeal and cloacal swabs were collected from birds and environmental surfaces at five live poultry markets (LPMs) and 13 backyard poultry farms (BPFs) across three cities, Wuxi, Suzhou, and Nanjing, in the Yangtze Delta region. In total 22 isolates were recovered, and six were subtyped as H7N9, nine as H9N2, four as H7N9/H9N2, and three unsubtyped influenza A viruses. Genomic sequences showed that the HA and NA genes of the H7N9 viruses were similar to those of the H7N9 human isolates, as well as other avian-origin H7N9 isolates in the region, but the PB1, PA, NP, and MP genes of the sequenced viruses were more diverse. Among the four H7N9/H9N2 mixed infections, three were from LPM, whereas the other one was from the ducks at one BPF, which were H7N9 negative in serologic analyses. A survey of the bird trading records of the LPMs and BPFs indicates that trading was a likely route for virus transmission across these regions. Our results suggested that better biosecurity and more effective vaccination should be implemented in backyard farms, in addition to biosecurity management in LPMs.

  14. Detection of avian H7N9 influenza A viruses at the Yangtze Delta Region of China during early H7N9 outbreaks

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yin; Huang, Xin-mei; Zhao, Dong-min; Liu, Yu-zhuo; He, Kong-wang; Liu, Yao-xing; Chen, Chang-hai; Long, Li-Ping; Xu, Yifei; Xie, Xing-xing; Han, Kai-kai; Liu, Xiao-yan; Yang, Jing; Zhang, You-Fa; Fan, Feng; Webby, Richard; Wan, Xiu-Feng

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Since the first H7N9 human case in Shanghai, February 19, 2013, the emerging avian-origin H7N9 influenza A virus has become an epizootic virus in China, posing a potential pandemic threat to public health. From April 2 to April 28, 2013, 422 oral-pharyngeal and cloacal swabs were collected from birds and environmental surfaces at five live poultry markets (LPMs) and 13 backyard poultry farms (BPFs) across three cities, Wuxi, Suzhou, and Nanjing, in the Yangtze Delta Region. A total of 22 isolates were recovered, and 6 were subtyped as H7N9, 9 as H9N2, 4 as H7N9/H9N2, and 3 un-subtyped influenza A viruses. Genomic sequences showed that the HA and NA genes of the H7N9 viruses were similar to those of the H7N9 human isolates as well as other avian origin H7N9 isolates in the region but the PB1, PA, NP, and MP genes of the sequenced viruses were, however, more diverse. Among the four H7N9/H9N2 mixed infections, three were from LPM whereas the other one from the ducks at one BPF, which were H7N9 negative in serological analyses. A survey of the bird trading records of the LPMs and BPFs indicates that trading was a likely route for virus transmission across these regions. Our results suggested that a better biosecurity and more effective vaccination should be implemented in backyard farms besides biosecurity management in LPMs. PMID:27309047

  15. Sparse serological evidence of H5N1 avian influenza virus infections in domestic cats, northeastern China.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lingshuang; Zhou, Pei; He, Shuyi; Luo, Yongfeng; Jia, Kun; Fu, Cheng; Sun, Yao; He, Huamei; Tu, Liqing; Ning, Zhangyong; Yuan, Ziguo; Wang, Heng; Li, Shoujun; Yuan, Liguo

    2015-05-01

    Today the cross-species transmission of avian influenza viruses (AIV) are a great concern. A number of AIV strains are now enzootic among poultry, with H9N2 and highly pathogenic H5N1 AIV strains prevalent in China. H5N1 strains have been recognized to infect zoo and domestic feline species. In this serological study we sought to examine evidence that H5N1 strains have infected domestic cats in northeastern China. In 2013, we conducted a cross-sectional serological study of 916 healthy cats in Heilongjian, Jilin, and Liaonin Provinces. Sera were screened with a hemagglutinin inhibition (HI) assay and seropositive specimens (HI ≥ 1:20) were further evaluated with a microneutralization (MN) assay against a clade 2.3.2 H5N1 AIV, a H9N2 AIV, A (H1N1)pdm09, and a canine H3N2 virus. While ∼2% of cats had elevated HI assays against H5N1, no elevations were confirmed (MN ≥ 1:80). These data serve as baseline for future surveillance for AIV infections among domestic cats. Conducting such surveillance seems important for geographical areas recognized as endemic for AIVs. This is especially true for countries such as China where domestic cats and poultry are often in close contact.

  16. [Expression of hemagglutinin of avian influenza virus (AIV) and its application in diagnosis of AIV H9 subtype].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rui-Hua; Jin, Mei-Lin; Wang, Gui-Hua; Yu, Zheng-Jun; Zhao, Si-Ting; Li, Hong-Chao; Tan, Ya-Di; Chen, Huan-Chun

    2005-03-01

    In order to differently diagnose avian influenza virus (AIV) subtypes, the HA gene of AIV H9 subtype was cloned, expressed and utilized in an enzyme-linked immunoad sorbent assay (ELISA). HA gene (1683bp) of H9N2 AIV was amplified by RT-PCR from a strain of field isolated H9N2 AIV, and its identity was confirmed by sequencing. The HA gene was subcloned into prokaryotic expression vector pGEX-KG with its secretion signal sequence removed. The expressed HA-GST fusion protein in E. coli BL21 was characterized by SDS-PAGE and western blotting analysis as a 90kD protein with immunogenicity. The fusion protein was present primarily in inclusion bodies and was purified via denaturation and renenaturation. The HA-GST fusion protein was used to establish an indirect ELISA for the detection of antibodies to H9 subtypes of AIV. The assay has 91.57% specificity to H9 AIV, 92.31% sensitivity and excellent reduplication. It could be used to differently detect antibodies to H9 AIV.

  17. Avian influenza virus infections in humans.

    PubMed

    Wong, Samson S Y; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2006-01-01

    Seroepidemiologic and virologic studies since 1889 suggested that human influenza pandemics were caused by H1, H2, and H3 subtypes of influenza A viruses. If not for the 1997 avian A/H5N1 outbreak in Hong Kong of China, subtype H2 is the likely candidate for the next pandemic. However, unlike previous poultry outbreaks of highly pathogenic avian influenza due to H5 that were controlled by depopulation with or without vaccination, the presently circulating A/H5N1 genotype Z virus has since been spreading from Southern China to other parts of the world. Migratory birds and, less likely, bird trafficking are believed to be globalizing the avian influenza A/H5N1 epidemic in poultry. More than 200 human cases of avian influenza virus infection due to A/H5, A/H7, and A/H9 subtypes mainly as a result of poultry-to-human transmission have been reported with a > 50% case fatality rate for A/H5N1 infections. A mutant or reassortant virus capable of efficient human-to-human transmission could trigger another influenza pandemic. The recent isolation of this virus in extrapulmonary sites of human diseases suggests that the high fatality of this infection may be more than just the result of a cytokine storm triggered by the pulmonary disease. The emergence of resistance to adamantanes (amantadine and rimantadine) and recently oseltamivir while H5N1 vaccines are still at the developmental stage of phase I clinical trial are causes for grave concern. Moreover, the to-be pandemic strain may have little cross immunogenicity to the presently tested vaccine strain. The relative importance and usefulness of airborne, droplet, or contact precautions in infection control are still uncertain. Laboratory-acquired avian influenza H7N7 has been reported, and the laboratory strains of human influenza H2N2 could also be the cause of another pandemic. The control of this impending disaster requires more research in addition to national and international preparedness at various levels. The

  18. Overview of avian influenza DIVA test strategies.

    PubMed

    Suarez, David L

    2005-12-01

    The use of vaccination in poultry to control avian influenza has been increasing in recent years. Vaccination has been primarily with killed whole virus-adjuvanted vaccines. Proper vaccination can reduce or prevent clinical signs, reduce virus shedding in infected birds, and increase the resistance to infection. Historically, one limitation of the killed vaccines is that vaccinated birds cannot be differentiated serologically from naturally infected birds using the commonly available diagnostic tests. Therefore, surveillance for avian influenza becomes much more difficult and often results in trade restrictions because of the inability to differentiate infected from vaccinated animals (DIVA). Several different DIVA strategies have been proposed for avian influenza to overcome this limitation. The most common is the use of unvaccinated sentinels. A second approach is the use of subunit vaccines targeted to the hemagglutinin protein that allows serologic surveillance to the internal proteins. A third strategy is to vaccinate with a homologous hemagglutinin to the circulating field strain, but a heterologous neuraminidase subtype. Serologic surveillance can then be performed for the homologous NA subtype as evidence of natural infection. The fourth strategy is to measure the serologic response to the nonstructural protein 1 (NS1). The NS1 protein is produced in large quantities in infected cells, but it is not packaged in the virion. Since killed vaccines for influenza are primarily made with whole virions, a differential antibody response can be seen between naturally infected and vaccinated animals. However, poultry vaccines are not highly purified, and they contain small amounts of the NS1 protein. Although vaccinated chickens will produce low levels of antibody to the NS1 protein, virus infected chickens will produce higher levels of NS1 antibody, and the two groups can be differentiated. All four DIVA strategies have advantages and disadvantages, and further

  19. Molecular evolution of H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses in Bangladesh between 2007 and 2012.

    PubMed

    Haque, M E; Giasuddin, M; Chowdhury, E H; Islam, M R

    2014-01-01

    In Bangladesh, highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) virus subtype H5N1 was first detected in February 2007. Since then the virus has become entrenched in poultry farms of Bangladesh. There have so far been seven human cases of H5N1 HPAI infection in Bangladesh with one death. The objective of the present study was to investigate the molecular evolution of H5N1 HPAI viruses during 2007 to 2012. Partial or complete nucleotide sequences of all eight gene segments of two chicken isolates, five gene segments of a duck isolate and the haemagglutinin gene segment of 18 isolates from Bangladesh were established in the present study and subjected to molecular analysis. In addition, full-length sequences of different gene segments of other Bangladeshi H5N1 isolates available in GenBank were included in the analysis. The analysis revealed that the first introduction of clade 2.2 virus in Bangladesh in 2007 was followed by the introduction of clade 2.3.2.1 and 2.3.4 viruses in 2011. However, only clade 2.3.2.1 viruses could be isolated in 2012, indicating progressive replacement of clade 2.2 and 2.3.4 viruses. There has been an event of segment re-assortment between H5N1 and H9N2 viruses in Bangladesh, where H5N1 virus acquired the PB1 gene from a H9N2 virus. Point mutations have accumulated in Bangladeshi isolates over the last 5 years with potential modification of receptor binding site and antigenic sites. Extensive and continuous molecular epidemiological studies are necessary to monitor the evolution of circulating avian influenza viruses in Bangladesh.

  20. Avian influenza virus and free-ranging wild birds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dierauf, Leslie A.; Karesh, W.B.; Ip, Hon S.; Gilardi, K.V.; Fischer, John R.

    2006-01-01

    Recent media and news reports and other information implicate wild birds in the spread of highly pathogenic avian influenza in Asia and Eastern Europe. Although there is little information concerning highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses in wild birds, scientists have amassed a large amount of data on low-pathogenicity avian influenza viruses during decades of research with wild birds. This knowledge can provide sound guidance to veterinarians, public health professionals, the general public, government agencies, and other entities with concerns about avian influenza.

  1. Animal influenza epidemiology

    PubMed Central

    Ducatez, M.F.; Webster, R.G.; Webby, R.J.

    2009-01-01

    Influenza A viruses exist within their natural host, aquatic birds, in a number of antigenic subtypes. Only a few of these subtypes have successfully crossed into other avian and mammalian hosts. This brief review will focus on just three examples of viruses that have successfully passed between species; avian H5N1 and H9N2 viruses and H3N2 viruses which have transmitted from aquatic birds to humans and then to swine. Although there are a number of other subtypes that have also transmitted successfully between species, these three selected examples have spread and evolved in different ways, exemplifying the complexity of influenza A virus epidemiology. PMID:19230163

  2. Origin of the European avian-like swine influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Krumbholz, Andi; Lange, Jeannette; Sauerbrei, Andreas; Groth, Marco; Platzer, Matthias; Kanrai, Pumaree; Pleschka, Stephan; Scholtissek, Christoph; Büttner, Mathias; Dürrwald, Ralf; Zell, Roland

    2014-11-01

    The avian-like swine influenza viruses emerged in 1979 in Belgium and Germany. Thereafter, they spread through many European swine-producing countries, replaced the circulating classical swine H1N1 influenza viruses, and became endemic. Serological and subsequent molecular data indicated an avian source, but details remained obscure due to a lack of relevant avian influenza virus sequence data. Here, the origin of the European avian-like swine influenza viruses was analysed using a collection of 16 European swine H1N1 influenza viruses sampled in 1979-1981 in Germany, the Netherlands, Belgium, Italy and France, as well as several contemporaneous avian influenza viruses of various serotypes. The phylogenetic trees suggested a triple reassortant with a unique genotype constellation. Time-resolved maximum clade credibility trees indicated times to the most recent common ancestors of 34-46 years (before 2008) depending on the RNA segment and the method of tree inference. © 2014 The Authors.

  3. Multiple introductions of highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 viruses into Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Marinova-Petkova, Atanaska; Feeroz, Mohammed M; Rabiul Alam, SM; Kamrul Hasan, M; Akhtar, Sharmin; Jones-Engel, Lisa; Walker, David; McClenaghan, Laura; Rubrum, Adam; Franks, John; Seiler, Patrick; Jeevan, Trushar; McKenzie, Pamela; Krauss, Scott; Webby, Richard J; Webster, Robert G

    2014-01-01

    Highly pathogenic H5N1 and low pathogenic H9N2 influenza viruses are endemic to poultry markets in Bangladesh and have cocirculated since 2008. H9N2 influenza viruses circulated constantly in the poultry markets, whereas highly pathogenic H5N1 viruses occurred sporadically, with peaks of activity in cooler months. Thirty highly pathogenic H5N1 influenza viruses isolated from poultry were characterized by antigenic, molecular, and phylogenetic analyses. Highly pathogenic H5N1 influenza viruses from clades 2.2.2 and 2.3.2.1 were isolated from live bird markets only. Phylogenetic analysis of the 30 H5N1 isolates revealed multiple introductions of H5N1 influenza viruses in Bangladesh. There was no reassortment between the local H9N2 influenza viruses and H5N1 genotype, despite their prolonged cocirculation. However, we detected two reassortant H5N1 viruses, carrying the M gene from the Chinese H9N2 lineage, which briefly circulated in the Bangladesh poultry markets and then disappeared. On the other hand, interclade reassortment occurred within H5N1 lineages and played a role in the genesis of the currently dominant H5N1 viruses in Bangladesh. Few ‘human-like' mutations in H5N1 may account for the limited number of human cases. Antigenically, clade 2.3.2.1 H5N1 viruses in Bangladesh have evolved since their introduction and are currently mainly homogenous, and show evidence of recent antigenic drift. Although reassortants containing H9N2 genes were detected in live poultry markets in Bangladesh, these reassortants failed to supplant the dominant H5N1 lineage. PMID:26038508

  4. Interaction of Influenza A Viruses with Oviduct Explants of Different Avian Species.

    PubMed

    Sid, Hicham; Hartmann, Sandra; Winter, Christine; Rautenschlein, Silke

    2017-01-01

    Infection of poultry with low pathogenic avian influenza viruses (LPAIV) is often associated with mild respiratory symptoms but may also lead to loss in egg production in laying birds. In vivo susceptibility of the reproductive tract for LPAIV infection was reported for turkeys and chickens, but virus-interaction with epithelial cells of the oviduct and possible stimulation of the local antiviral immune responses have not been characterized. In this study, we wanted to investigate the suitability of magnum organ cultures (MOC) as an in vitro model to study virus-host interactions. We compared the susceptibility of duck (Du), chicken (Ch), and turkey (Tu) MOC for three different influenza A viruses (IAV). Overall, the course of infection and the antiviral immune response varied between strains as well as host cell origin, but MOC gave reproducible results for all investigated parameters within each species. While pandemic (p) H1N1 and H9N2 efficiently replicated in MOC-Ch and MOC-Tu, MOC-Du were significantly less susceptible to infection as indicated by a reduced replication level for both viruses (p < 0.05). Overall, virus replication levels did not correlate with interferonα (IFNα) mRNA-expression levels in neither species. H9N2-infection led to a significant upregulation of interferonλ (IFNλ) mRNA expression in MOC of all species compared to the non-infected controls (p < 0.05), while a correlation with replication levels was only seen for MOC-Tu. pH1N1-infection induced only significant upregulation of IFNλ mRNA expression in MOC-Tu at 48 hours post infection (p < 0.05), but the expression pattern did not correlate with replication levels. Our results show that MOC are a suitable model to study IAV-interaction with the mucosal surface of the avian reproductive tract. The data suggest that the reproductive tract may play a role in the pathobiology of IAV in poultry.

  5. Replication and transmission of mammalian-adapted H9 subtype influenza virus in pigs and quail.

    PubMed

    Obadan, Adebimpe O; Kimble, Brian J; Rajao, Daniela; Lager, Kelly; Santos, Jefferson J S; Vincent, Amy; Perez, Daniel R

    2015-09-01

    Influenza A virus is a major pathogen of birds, swine and humans. Strains can jump between species in a process often requiring mutations and reassortment, resulting in outbreaks and, potentially, pandemics. H9N2 avian influenza is predominant in poultry across Asia and occasionally infects humans and swine. Pandemic H1N1 (H1N1pdm) is endemic in humans and swine and has a history of reassortment in pigs. Previous studies have shown the compatibility of H9N2 and H1N1pdm for reassortment in ferrets, a model for human infection and transmission. Here, the effects of ferret adaptation of H9 surface gene segments on the infectivity and transmission in at-risk natural hosts, specifically swine and quail, were analysed. Reassortant H9N1 and H9N2 viruses, carrying seven or six gene segments from H1N1pdm, showed infectivity and transmissibility in swine, unlike the wholly avian H9N2 virus with ferret-adapted surface genes. In quail, only the reassortant H9N2 with the six internal gene segments from the H1N1pdm strain was able to infect and transmit, although less efficiently than the wholly avian H9N2 virus with ferret-adapted surface genes. These results highlight that ferret-adapted mutations on the haemagglutinin of H9 subtype virus do not restrict the ability of the virus to infect swine and quail, and that the ability to transmit in these species depends on the context of the whole virus. As such, this study emphasizes the threat that H9N2 reassortant viruses pose to humans and agricultural species and the importance of the genetic constellation of the virus to its ability to replicate and transmit in natural hosts of influenza.

  6. Replication and transmission of mammalian-adapted H9 subtype influenza virus in pigs and quail

    PubMed Central

    Obadan, Adebimpe O.; Kimble, Brian J.; Rajao, Daniela; Lager, Kelly; Santos, Jefferson J. S.; Vincent, Amy

    2015-01-01

    Influenza A virus is a major pathogen of birds, swine and humans. Strains can jump between species in a process often requiring mutations and reassortment, resulting in outbreaks and, potentially, pandemics. H9N2 avian influenza is predominant in poultry across Asia and occasionally infects humans and swine. Pandemic H1N1 (H1N1pdm) is endemic in humans and swine and has a history of reassortment in pigs. Previous studies have shown the compatibility of H9N2 and H1N1pdm for reassortment in ferrets, a model for human infection and transmission. Here, the effects of ferret adaptation of H9 surface gene segments on the infectivity and transmission in at-risk natural hosts, specifically swine and quail, were analysed. Reassortant H9N1 and H9N2 viruses, carrying seven or six gene segments from H1N1pdm, showed infectivity and transmissibility in swine, unlike the wholly avian H9N2 virus with ferret-adapted surface genes. In quail, only the reassortant H9N2 with the six internal gene segments from the H1N1pdm strain was able to infect and transmit, although less efficiently than the wholly avian H9N2 virus with ferret-adapted surface genes. These results highlight that ferret-adapted mutations on the haemagglutinin of H9 subtype virus do not restrict the ability of the virus to infect swine and quail, and that the ability to transmit in these species depends on the context of the whole virus. As such, this study emphasizes the threat that H9N2 reassortant viruses pose to humans and agricultural species and the importance of the genetic constellation of the virus to its ability to replicate and transmit in natural hosts of influenza. PMID:25986634

  7. Genesis and Dissemination of Highly Pathogenic H5N6 Avian Influenza Viruses.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lei; Zhu, Wenfei; Li, Xiaodan; Bo, Hong; Zhang, Ye; Zou, Shumei; Gao, Rongbao; Dong, Jie; Zhao, Xiang; Chen, Wenbing; Dong, Libo; Zou, Xiaohui; Xing, Yongcai; Wang, Dayan; Shu, Yuelong

    2017-03-01

    Clade 2.3.4.4 highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses (H5Nx) have spread from Asia to other parts of the world. Since 2014, human infections with clade 2.3.4.4 highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N6 viruses have been continuously reported in China. To investigate the genesis of the virus, we analyzed 123 H5 or N6 environmental viruses sampled from live-poultry markets or farms from 2012 to 2015 in Mainland China. Our results indicated that clade 2.3.4.4 H5N2/N6/N8 viruses shared the same hemagglutinin gene as originated in early 2009. From 2012 to 2015, the genesis of highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N6 viruses occurred via two independent pathways. Three major reassortant H5N6 viruses (reassortants A, B, and C) were generated. Internal genes of reassortant A and B viruses and reassortant C viruses derived from clade 2.3.2.1c H5N1 and H9N2 viruses, respectively. Many mammalian adaption mutations and antigenic variations were detected among the three reassortant viruses. Considering their wide circulation and dynamic reassortment in poultry, we highly recommend close monitoring of the viruses in poultry and humans. IMPORTANCE Since 2014, clade 2.3.4.4 highly pathogenic avian influenza (H5Nx) viruses have caused many outbreaks in both wild and domestic birds globally. Severe human cases with novel H5N6 viruses in this group were also reported in China in 2014 and 2015. To investigate the genesis of the genetic diversity of these H5N6 viruses, we sequenced 123 H5 or N6 environmental viruses sampled from 2012 to 2015 in China. Sequence analysis indicated that three major reassortants of these H5N6 viruses had been generated by two independent evolutionary pathways. The H5N6 reassortant viruses had been detected in most provinces of southern China and neighboring countries. Considering the mammalian adaption mutations and antigenic variation detected, the spread of these viruses should be monitored carefully due to their pandemic potential.

  8. Complete genome sequence of an H3N2 avian influenza virus isolated from a live poultry market in eastern China.

    PubMed

    Teng, Qiaoyang; Hu, Tao; Li, Xuesong; Li, Guoxin; Li, Zejun

    2012-11-01

    Previous studies indicate that the H3 influenza virus has the ability to establish infection upon interspecies transmission and poses a threat to mammals. Therefore, it is important to enhance the surveillance of H3 avian influenza viruses (AIVs). In this study, A/duck/Shanghai/C84/2009(H3N2) (C84) was isolated from a live poultry market in Shanghai, China. Using PCR and sequencing analyses, we obtained the whole-genome sequence of this virus. The H3N2 virus proved to be a novel multiple-gene reassortant AIV whose genes were derived from H3N2, H4N6, H6N2, and H9N2. Knowledge regarding the complete genome sequence of the C84 virus will be useful for epidemiological surveillance.

  9. Practical aspects of vaccination of poultry against avian influenza virus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Although little has changed in vaccine technology for avian influenza virus (AIV) in the past 20 years, the approach to vaccination of poultry (chickens, turkeys and ducks) for avian influenza has evolved as highly pathogenic (HP) AIV has become endemic in several regions of the world. Vaccination f...

  10. Migratory bird avian influenza sampling; Yukon Kuskokwim Delta, Alaska, 2015

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ramey, Andy M.

    2016-01-01

    Data set containing avian influenza sampling information for spring and summer waterbirds on the Yukon Kuskokwim Delta, 2015. Data contains sample ID, species common name, age and sex, collection data and location, and laboratory specific data used to identify presence and absence of avian influenza viruses.

  11. Avian influenza in Indonesia: Observations of disease detection in poultry

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza, subtype H5N1, also known as highly pathogenic notifiable avian influenza (HPNAI), has spread throughout Indonesia since 2003. As of June 2007 there have been a total of 100 documented human cases in Indonesia, 80 of which have been fatal. Although efforts have be...

  12. Avian Influenza Viruses in Water Birds, Africa1

    PubMed Central

    Dodman, Tim; Caron, Alexandre; Balança, Gilles; Desvaux, Stephanie; Goutard, Flavie; Cattoli, Giovanni; Lamarque, François; Hagemeijer, Ward; Monicat, François

    2007-01-01

    We report the first large-scale surveillance of avian influenza viruses in water birds conducted in Africa. This study shows evidence of avian influenza viruses in wild birds, both Eurasian and Afro-tropical species, in several major wetlands of Africa. PMID:17553284

  13. Experimental vaccinations for avian influenza virus including DIVA approaches

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Avian influenza (AI) is a viral disease of poultry that remains an economic threat to commercial poultry throughout the world by negatively impacting animal health and trade. Strategies to control avian influenza (AI) virus are developed to prevent, manage or eradicate the virus from the country, re...

  14. Epidemiological Surveillance of Low Pathogenic Avian Influenza Virus (LPAIV) from Poultry in Guangxi Province, Southern China

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Yi; Xie, Zhi-xun; Liu, Jia-bo; Pang, Yao-shan; Deng, Xian-wen; Xie, Zhi-qin; Xie, Li-ji; Fan, Qing; Luo, Si-si

    2013-01-01

    Low pathogenic avian influenza virus (LPAIV) usually causes mild disease or asymptomatic infection in poultry. However, some LPAIV strains can be transmitted to humans and cause severe infection. Genetic rearrangement and recombination of even low pathogenic influenza may generate a novel virus with increased virulence, posing a substantial risk to public health. Southern China is regarded as the world “influenza epicenter”, due to a rash of outbreaks of influenza in recent years. In this study, we conducted an epidemiological survey of LPAIV at different live bird markets (LBMs) in Guangxi province, Southern China. From January 2009 to December 2011, we collected 3,121 cotton swab samples of larynx, trachea and cloaca from the poultry at LBMs in Guangxi. Virus isolation, hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay, and RT-PCR were used to detect and subtype LPAIV in the collected samples. Of the 3,121 samples, 336 samples (10.8%) were LPAIV positive, including 54 (1.7%) in chicken and 282 (9.1%) in duck. The identified LPAIV were H3N1, H3N2, H6N1, H6N2, H6N5, H6N6, H6N8, and H9N2, which are combinations of seven HA subtypes (H1, H3, H4, H6, H9, H10 and H11) and five NA subtypes (N1, N2, N5, N6 and N8). The H3 and H9 subtypes are predominant in the identified LPAIVs. Among the 336 cases, 29 types of mixed infection of different HA subtypes were identified in 87 of the cases (25.9%). The mixed infections may provide opportunities for genetic recombination. Our results suggest that the LPAIV epidemiology in poultry in the Guangxi province in southern China is complicated and highlights the need for further epidemiological and genetic studies of LPAIV in this area. PMID:24204754

  15. A National Study of US Bird Banders for Evidence of Avian Influenza Virus Infections

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Gregory C.; Ferguson, Dwight D.; Lowther, Peter E.; Heil, Gary L.; Friary, John A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Previously we have found that Midwestern US wildlife biologists, poultry farmers, veterinarians, and duck hunters have had evidence of avian influenza virus infections (AIVs). Objectives We sought to evaluate a national sample of US bird banders for previous evidence of AIV infection. Study Design Controlled, cross-sectional serological survey Results In 2009 and 2010 we enrolled 157 registered bird banders from 40 US states and compared their enrollment data and serological results with 78 adult age-group matched controls from Iowa. On average, the bird banders had 15 years of wild bird exposure, banded 20 days per year, worked chiefly in 1 of the 4 North American flyways, and banded 300 individual birds of 5 different species per season. While handling birds, only 15% of banders reported wearing gloves. Three bird banders and 1 control had evidence of previous infection (1 AIV each) with A/BWTE/Ohio/07/495762-6(H7N3), A/Ty/MN/38391-6/95(H9N2) or A/CK/NJ/7290-2/95(H11N3) by microneutralization assay. There was no evidence of previous infection with a representative sample H4, H5, H6, H8, or H10 AIVs. Participants were followed for influenza-like-illness for a median of 7 months and 4 (3 bird banders) submitted self-collected eye, nasal, and throat influenza-like-illness swab specimens, 1 of which collected in November of 2009, yielded a pandemic H1N1 influenza A virus. Conclusion Despite reports of conjunctivitis and upper respiratory symptoms while bird banding, we found sparse evidence that US bird banders had infections with AIVs. PMID:21530384

  16. Avian influenza in birds and mammals.

    PubMed

    Cardona, Carol J; Xing, Zheng; Sandrock, Christian E; Davis, Cristina E

    2009-07-01

    The disease syndromes caused by avian influenza viruses are highly variable depending on the host species infected, its susceptibility and response to infection and the virulence of the infecting viral strain. Although avian influenza viruses have a broad host range in general, it is rare for an individual strain or subtype to infect more than one species. The H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIV) lineages of viruses that descended from A/goose/Guandong/96 (H5N1 HPAIV) are unusual in the diversity of species they have infected worldwide. Although the species affected by H5N1 HPAI in the field and those that have been experimentally studied are diverse, their associated disease syndromes are remarkably similar across species. In some species, multi-organ failure and death are rapid and no signs of the disease are observed. Most prominently in this category are chickens and other avian species of the order Galliformes. In other species, neurologic signs develop resulting in the death of the host. This is what has been reported in domestic cats (Carnivora), geese (Anseriformes), ratites (Struthioniformes), pigeons inoculated with high doses (Columbiformes) and ducks infected with H5N1 HPAIV isolated since 2002 (Anseriformes). In some other species, the disease is more prolonged and although multi-organ failure and death are the eventual outcomes, the signs of disease are more extensive. Predominantly, these species include humans (Primates) and the laboratory models of human disease, the ferret (Carnivora), mouse (Rodentia) and cynamologous macaques (Primates). Finally, some species are more resistant to infection with H5N1 HPAIV and show few or no signs of disease. These species include pigeons in some studies (Columbiformes), ducks inoculated with pre-2002 isolates (Anseriformes), and pigs (Artiodactyla).

  17. On avian influenza epidemic models with time delay.

    PubMed

    Liu, Sanhong; Ruan, Shigui; Zhang, Xinan

    2015-12-01

    After the outbreak of the first avian influenza A virus (H5N1) in Hong Kong in 1997, another avian influenza A virus (H7N9) crossed the species barrier in mainland China in 2013 and 2014 and caused more than 400 human cases with a death rate of nearly 40%. In this paper, we take account of the incubation periods of avian influenza A virus and construct a bird-to-human transmission model with different time delays in the avian and human populations combining the survival probability of the infective avian and human populations at the latent time. By analyzing the dynamical behavior of the model, we obtain a threshold value for the prevalence of avian influenza and investigate local and global asymptotical stability of equilibria of the system.

  18. Avian influenza: a pandemic waiting in the wings?

    PubMed

    Hampson, Alan W

    2006-01-01

    Recent widespread outbreaks of avian influenza and, associated with these a growing number of human infections with a high mortality rate, have raised concerns that this might be the prelude to a severe pandemic of human influenza. As a background to these concerns the present article reviews influenza as a human disease, its origins and the involvement of other species, properties of the influenza viruses and the current status of influenza prevention and control.

  19. Diversity and evolution of avian influenza viruses in live poultry markets, free-range poultry and wild wetland birds in China.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liang-Jun; Lin, Xian-Dan; Guo, Wen-Ping; Tian, Jun-Hua; Wang, Wen; Ying, Xu-Hua; Wang, Miao-Ruo; Yu, Bin; Yang, Zhan-Qiu; Shi, Mang; Holmes, Edward C; Zhang, Yong-Zhen

    2016-04-01

    The wide circulation of novel avian influenza viruses (AIVs) highlights the risk of pandemic influenza emergence in China. To investigate the prevalence and genetic diversity of AIVs in different ecological contexts, we surveyed AIVs in live poultry markets (LPMs), free-range poultry and the wetland habitats of wild birds in Zhejiang and Hubei provinces. Notably, LPMs contained the highest frequency of AIV infection, and the greatest number of subtypes (n = 9) and subtype co-infections (n = 14), as well as frequent reassortment, suggesting that they play an active role in fuelling AIV transmission. AIV-positive samples were also identified in wild birds in both provinces and free-range poultry in one sampling site close to a wetland region in Hubei. H9N2, H7N9 and H5N1 were the most commonly sampled subtypes in the LPMs from Zhejiang, whilst H5N6 and H9N2 were the dominant subtypes in the LPMs from Hubei. Phylogenetic analyses of the whole-genome sequences of 43 AIVs revealed that three reassortant H5 subtypes were circulating in LMPs in both geographical regions. Notably, the viruses sampled from the wetland regions and free-range poultry contained complex reassortants, for which the origins of some segments were unclear. Overall, our study highlights the extent of AIV genetic diversity in two highly populated parts of central and south-eastern China, particularly in LPMs, and emphasizes the need for continual surveillance.

  20. New USDA licensed avian influenza vaccine (rHVT-AI) for protection against H5 avian influenza and usage discussion

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Recently, a new avian influenza vaccine was licensed by USDA for use in the United States for protection of commercial poultry. The vaccine is a recombinant herpes virus of turkeys expressing the hemagglutinin gene of an H5 subtype avian influenza virus belonging to the 2.2 clade of the H5N1 highly ...

  1. USGS highly pathogenic avian influenza research strategy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harris, M. Camille; Miles, A. Keith; Pearce, John M.; Prosser, Diann J.; Sleeman, Jonathan M.; Whalen, Mary E.

    2015-09-09

    Avian influenza viruses are naturally occurring in wild birds such as ducks, geese, swans, and gulls. These viruses generally do not cause illness in wild birds, however, when spread to poultry they can be highly pathogenic and cause illness and death in backyard and commercial farms. Outbreaks may cause devastating agricultural economic losses and some viral strains have the potential to infect people directly. Furthermore, the combination of avian influenza viruses with mammalian viruses can result in strains with the ability to transmit from person to person, possibly leading to viruses with pandemic potential. All known pandemic influenza viruses have had some genetic material of avian origin. Since 1996, a strain of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) virus, H5N1, has caused infection in wild birds, losses to poultry farms in Eurasia and North Africa, and led to the deaths of several hundred people. Spread of the H5N1 virus and other influenza strains from China was likely facilitated by migratory birds. In December 2014, HPAI was detected in poultry in Canada and migratory birds in the United States. Since then, HPAI viruses have spread to large parts of the United States and will likely continue to spread through migratory bird flyways and other mechanisms throughout North America. In the United States, HPAI viruses have severely affected the poultry industry with millions of domestic birds dead or culled. These strains of HPAI are not known to cause disease in humans; however, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) advise caution when in close contact with infected birds. Experts agree that HPAI strains currently circulating in wild birds of North America will likely persist for the next few years. This unprecedented situation presents risks to the poultry industry, natural resource management, and potentially human health. Scientific knowledge and decision support tools are urgently needed to understand factors affecting the persistence

  2. Influenza activity in China: 1998-1999.

    PubMed

    Yuanji, Guo

    2002-05-15

    During 1989-1999, influenza A H3N2 and H1N1 subtypes and B type viruses were still co-circulating in human population in China, while influenza A (H3N2) virus was predominant strain. The two antigenically and genetically distinguishable strains of influenza B virus were also still co-circulating in men in southern China. The antigenic analysis indicated that most of the H3N2 viruses were A/Panama/2007/99 (H3N2)-like strain, the most of the H1N1 viruses were antigenically similar to A/Beijing/262/95 (H1N1) virus. However, most of the influenza B viruses were B/Beijing/184/93-like strain, but few of them were antigenically similar to B/Shandong/7/97 virus. In the summer of 1998, the influenza outbreaks caused by H3N2 subtype of influenza A virus occurred widely in southern China. Afterwards, during 1998-1999 influenza season, a severe influenza epidemic caused by H3N2 virus emerged in northern China. The morbidity was reached as high as 10% in Beijing area. It was interesting that during influenza, surveillance from 1998 to 1999, five strains of avian influenza A (H9N2) virus were isolated from outpatients with influenza-like illness in July-August of 1998, and another one was repeatedly isolated from a child suffering from influenza-like disease in November of 1999 in Guangdong province. The genetic analysis revealed that the five strains isolated in 1998 were genetically closely related to H9N2 viruses being isolated from chickens (G9 lineage virus), whereas, A/Guangzhou/333/99 (H9N2) virus was a reassortant derived from reassortment between G9 and G1 lineage of avian influenza A (H9N2) viruses due to its genes encoding the HA, NA, NP and NS proteins, closely related to G9 lineage virus, the rest of the genes encoding the M and three polymerase (PB2, PB1 and PA) were closely related to G1 lineage strain of H9N2 virus. However, no avian influenza A (H5N1) virus has so far been isolated neither from in or outpatients with influenza-like disease in mainland China

  3. Avian influenza: genetic evolution under vaccination pressure

    PubMed Central

    Escorcia, Magdalena; Vázquez, Lourdes; Méndez, Sara T; Rodríguez-Ropón, Andrea; Lucio, Eduardo; Nava, Gerardo M

    2008-01-01

    Antigenic drift of avian influenza viruses (AIVs) has been observed in chickens after extended vaccination program, similar to those observed with human influenza viruses. To evaluate the evolutionary properties of endemic AIV under high vaccination pressure (around 2 billion doses used in the last 12 years), we performed a pilot phylogenic analysis of the hemagglutinin (HA) gene of AIVs isolated from 1994 to 2006. This study demonstrates that Mexican low pathogenicity (LP) H5N2-AIVs are constantly undergoing genetic drifts. Recent AIV isolates (2002–2006) show significant molecular drifts when compared with the H5N2 vaccine-strain or other field isolates (1994–2000). This study also demonstrates that molecular drifts in the HA gene lineages follow a yearly trend, suggesting gradually cumulative sequence mutations. These findings might explain the increasing incidence of LP H5N2 AIV isolated from commercial avian farms. These findings support recent concerns about the challenge of AIV antigenic drift and influenza epidemics. PMID:18218105

  4. Ecology of avian influenza virus in birds.

    PubMed

    Causey, Douglas; Edwards, Scott V

    2008-02-15

    Avian influenza A virus (an orthomyxovirus) is a zoonotic pathogen with a natural reservoir entirely in birds. The influenza virus genome is an 8-segment single-stranded RNA with high potential for in situ recombination. Two segments code for the hemagglutinin (H) and neuraminidase (N) antigens used for host-cell entry. At present, 16 H and 9 N subtypes are known, for a total of 144 possible different influenza subtypes, each with potentially different host susceptibility. With >10,000 species of birds found in nearly every terrestrial and aquatic habitat, there are few places on earth where birds cannot be found. The avian immune system differs from that of humans in several important features, including asynchronous B and T lymphocyte systems and a polymorphic multigene immune complex, but little is known about the immunogenetics of pathogenic response. Postbreeding dispersal and migration and a naturally high degree of environmental vagility mean that wild birds have the potential to be vectors that transmit highly pathogenic variants great distances from the original sources of infection.

  5. Avian influenza: genetic evolution under vaccination pressure.

    PubMed

    Escorcia, Magdalena; Vázquez, Lourdes; Méndez, Sara T; Rodríguez-Ropón, Andrea; Lucio, Eduardo; Nava, Gerardo M

    2008-01-24

    Antigenic drift of avian influenza viruses (AIVs) has been observed in chickens after extended vaccination program, similar to those observed with human influenza viruses. To evaluate the evolutionary properties of endemic AIV under high vaccination pressure (around 2 billion doses used in the last 12 years), we performed a pilot phylogenic analysis of the hemagglutinin (HA) gene of AIVs isolated from 1994 to 2006. This study demonstrates that Mexican low pathogenicity (LP) H5N2-AIVs are constantly undergoing genetic drifts. Recent AIV isolates (2002-2006) show significant molecular drifts when compared with the H5N2 vaccine-strain or other field isolates (1994-2000). This study also demonstrates that molecular drifts in the HA gene lineages follow a yearly trend, suggesting gradually cumulative sequence mutations. These findings might explain the increasing incidence of LP H5N2 AIV isolated from commercial avian farms. These findings support recent concerns about the challenge of AIV antigenic drift and influenza epidemics.

  6. Summary of avian influenza activity in Europe, Asia, Africa, and Australasia, 2002-2006.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Dennis J

    2007-03-01

    Between December 2003 and January 2004 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 infections of poultry were declared in China, Japan, South Korea, Laos, Thailand, Cambodia, Vietnam, and Indonesia. In 2004 an outbreak was reported in Malaysia. In 2005 H5N1 outbreaks were recorded in poultry in Russia, Kazakhstan, Mongolia, Romania, Turkey, and Ukraine, and virus was isolated from swans in Croatia. In 2004 HPAI H5N1 virus was isolated from smuggled eagles detected at the Brussels Airport and in 2005 imported caged birds held in quarantine in England. In 2006 HPAI was reported in poultry in Iraq, India, Azerbaijan, Pakistan, Myanmar, Afghanistan, and Israel in Asia; Albania, France, and Sweden in Europe; and Nigeria, Cameroon, and Niger in Africa; as well as in wild birds in some 24 countries across Asia and Europe. In 2003, over 25,000,000 birds were slaughtered because of 241 outbreaks of HPAI caused by virus of H7N7 subtype in the Netherlands. The virus spread into Belgium (eight outbreaks) and Germany (one outbreak). HPAI H5N2 virus was responsible for outbreaks in ostriches in South Africa during 2005. HPAI H7N3 virus was isolated in Pakistan in 2004. Low-pathogenicity avian influenza (LPAI) H5 or H7 viruses were isolated from poultry in Italy (H7N3 2002-2003; H5N2 2005), The Netherlands (H7N3 2002), France (H5N2 2003), Denmark (H5N7 2003), Taiwan (H5N2 2004), and Japan (H5N2 2005). Many isolations of LPAI viruses of other subtypes were reported from domestic and wild birds. Infections with H9N2 subtype viruses have been widespread across Asia during 2002-06.

  7. Cellular response to influenza virus infection: a potential role for autophagy in CXCL10 and interferon-alpha induction.

    PubMed

    Law, Anna Hing-Yee; Lee, Davy Chun-Wai; Yuen, Kwok-Yung; Peiris, Malik; Lau, Allan Sik-Yin

    2010-07-01

    Historically, influenza pandemics have arisen from avian influenza viruses. Avian influenza viruses H5N1 and H9N2 are potential pandemic candidates. Infection of humans with the highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 virus is associated with a mortality in excess of 60%, which has been attributed to dysregulation of the cytokine system. Human macrophages and epithelial cells infected with some genotypes of H5N1 and H9N2 viruses express markedly elevated cytokine and chemokine levels when compared with seasonal influenza A subtype H1N1 virus. The mechanisms underlying this cytokine and chemokine hyperinduction are not fully elucidated. In the present study, we demonstrate that autophagy, a tightly regulated homeostatic process for self-digestion of unwanted cellular subcomponents, plays a role in cytokine induction. Autophagy is induced to a greater extent by H9N2/G1, in association with cytokine hyperinduction, compared with H1N1 and the novel pandemic swine-origin influenza A/H1N1 viruses. Using 3-methyladenine to inhibit autophagy and small interfering RNA to silence the autophagy gene, Atg5, we further show that autophagic responses play a role in influenza virus-induced CXCL10 and interferon-alpha expression in primary human blood macrophages. Our results provide new insights into the pathogenic mechanisms of avian influenza viruses.

  8. Different incubation temperatures affect viral polymerase activity and yields of low-pathogenic avian influenza viruses in embryonated chicken eggs.

    PubMed

    Lang, Victoria; Marjuki, Henju; Krauss, Scott L; Webby, Richard J; Webster, Robert G

    2011-06-01

    Various incubation conditions (35°C-38°C, 2-7 days) have been used in surveillance studies of the prevalence of avian influenza viruses in wild birds. Here, we studied viral polymerase activity and virus growth kinetics of low-pathogenic avian influenza viruses (LPAIVs) isolated from field samples [A/duck/Hong Kong/365/1978 (H4N6) and A/duck/Nanchang/2-0480/2000 (H9N2)] during incubation at different temperatures (35°C, 37°C, and 39°C) in the allantoic cavity of 10-day-old embryonated chicken eggs (ECE). The higher incubation temperatures (37°C and 39°C) resulted in a significantly higher rate of virus growth, which is most likely a result of increased viral polymerase activity (20%-60%), than was observed at 35°C, and as much as a 100% greater virus yield (as measured by hemagglutination assay) was observed two days after inoculation. Our findings revealed that the optimal activity of the viral polymerase complex, resulting in the highest yield of LPAIV field isolates, could be obtained by incubation for two days in ECE at 37°C and 39°C.

  9. Origin and diversity of novel avian influenza A H7N9 viruses causing human infection: phylogenetic, structural, and coalescent analyses.

    PubMed

    Liu, Di; Shi, Weifeng; Shi, Yi; Wang, Dayan; Xiao, Haixia; Li, Wei; Bi, Yuhai; Wu, Ying; Li, Xianbin; Yan, Jinghua; Liu, Wenjun; Zhao, Guoping; Yang, Weizhong; Wang, Yu; Ma, Juncai; Shu, Yuelong; Lei, Fumin; Gao, George F

    2013-06-01

    On March 30, 2013, a novel avian influenza A H7N9 virus that infects human beings was identified. This virus had been detected in six provinces and municipal cities in China as of April 18, 2013. We correlated genomic sequences from avian influenza viruses with ecological information and did phylogenetic and coalescent analyses to extrapolate the potential origins of the virus and possible routes of reassortment events. We downloaded H7N9 virus genome sequences from the Global Initiative on Sharing Avian Influenza Data (GISAID) database and public sequences used from the Influenza Virus Resource. We constructed phylogenetic trees and did 1000 bootstrap replicates for each tree. Two rounds of phylogenetic analyses were done. We used at least 100 closely related sequences for each gene to infer the overall topology, removed suspicious sequences from the trees, and focused on the closest clades to the novel H7N9 viruses. We compared our tree topologies with those from a bayesian evolutionary analysis by sampling trees (BEAST) analysis. We used the bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo method to jointly estimate phylogenies, divergence times, and other evolutionary parameters for all eight gene fragments. We used sequence alignment and homology-modelling methods to study specific mutations regarding phenotypes, specifically addressing the human receptor binding properties. The novel avian influenza A H7N9 virus originated from multiple reassortment events. The HA gene might have originated from avian influenza viruses of duck origin, and the NA gene might have transferred from migratory birds infected with avian influenza viruses along the east Asian flyway. The six internal genes of this virus probably originated from two different groups of H9N2 avian influenza viruses, which were isolated from chickens. Detailed analyses also showed that ducks and chickens probably acted as the intermediate hosts leading to the emergence of this virulent H7N9 virus. Genotypic and

  10. Avian influenza: virology, diagnosis and surveillance.

    PubMed

    El Zowalaty, Mohamed E; Bustin, Stephen A; Husseiny, Mohamed I; Ashour, Hossam M

    2013-09-01

    Avian influenza virus (AIV) is the causative agent of a zoonotic disease that affects populations worldwide with often devastating economic and health consequences. Most AIV subtypes cause little or no disease in waterfowl, but outbreaks in poultry can be associated with high mortality. Although transmission of AIV to humans occurs rarely and is strain dependent, the virus has the ability to mutate or reassort into a form that triggers a life-threatening infection. The constant emergence of new influenza strains makes it particularly challenging to predict the behavior, spread, virulence or potential for human-to-human transmission. Because it is difficult to anticipate which viral strain or what location will initiate the next pandemic, it is difficult to prepare for that event. However, rigorous implementation of biosecurity, vaccination and education programs can minimize the threat of AIV. Global surveillance programs help record and identify newly evolving and potentially pandemic strains harbored by the reservoir host.

  11. Mineralized State of the Avian Influenza Virus in the Environment.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hangyu; Wang, Guangchuan; Wang, Xiaoyu; Song, Zhiyong; Tang, Ruikang

    2017-10-09

    Although the circulation of avian influenza viruses in humans is limited, they can be transmitted from Aves (birds) to humans, representing a great challenge. Herein, we suggest that influenza viruses from Aves might exist in a mineralized state owing to the high calcium concentrations in the avian intestine. Using two typical influenza viruses as examples, we demonstrate that these viruses can self-mineralize in simulated avian intestinal fluid, resulting in egg-like virus-mineral structured composites. The mineralized viruses are more robust, with enhanced infectivity and thermostability. More importantly, the mineral exterior of mineralized viruses can alter their cell internalization, expanding the possible tropisms. The discovery of a mineralized state of influenza viruses highlights the integration of nanomaterials and viruses in the environment, which provides a new understanding of avian influenza infection and its control. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Complete Coding Sequences of One H9 and Three H7 Low-Pathogenic Influenza Viruses Circulating in Wild Birds in Belgium, 2009 to 2012

    PubMed Central

    Rosseel, Toon; Marché, Sylvie; Steensels, Mieke; Vangeluwe, Didier; Linden, Annick; van den Berg, Thierry; Lambrecht, Bénédicte

    2016-01-01

    The complete coding sequences of four avian influenza A viruses (two H7N7, one H7N1, and one H9N2) circulating in wild waterfowl in Belgium from 2009 to 2012 were determined using Illumina sequencing. All viral genome segments represent viruses circulating in the Eurasian wild bird population. PMID:27284153

  13. Precision-cut intestinal slices as a culture system to analyze the infection of differentiated intestinal epithelial cells by avian influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Punyadarsaniya, Darsaniya; Winter, Christine; Mork, Ann-Kathrin; Amiri, Mahdi; Naim, Hassan Y; Rautenschlein, Silke; Herrler, Georg

    2015-02-01

    Many viruses infect and replicate in their host via the intestinal tract, e.g. many picornaviruses, several coronaviruses and avian influenza viruses of waterfowl. To analyze infection of enterocytes is a challenging task as culture systems for differentiated intestinal epithelial cells are not readily available and often have a life span that is too short for infection studies. Precision-cut intestinal slices (PCIS) from chicken embryos were prepared and shown that the epithelial cells lining the lumen of the intestine are viable for up to 4 days. Using lectin staining, it was demonstrated that α2,3-linked sialic acids, the preferred receptor determinants of avian influenza viruses, are present on the apical side of the epithelial cells. Furthermore, the epithelial cells (at the tips) of the villi were shown to be susceptible to infection by an avian influenza virus of the H9N2 subtype. This culture system will be useful to analyze virus infection of intestinal epithelial cells and it should be applicable also to the intestine of other species.

  14. Little Evidence of Avian or Equine Influenza Virus Infection among a Cohort of Mongolian Adults with Animal Exposures, 2010–2011

    PubMed Central

    Khurelbaatar, Nyamdavaa; Krueger, Whitney S.; Heil, Gary L.; Darmaa, Badarchiin; Ulziimaa, Daramragchaa; Tserennorov, Damdindorj; Baterdene, Ariungerel; Anderson, Benjamin D.; Gray, Gregory C.

    2014-01-01

    Avian (AIV) and equine influenza virus (EIV) have been repeatedly shown to circulate among Mongolia’s migrating birds or domestic horses. In 2009, 439 Mongolian adults, many with occupational exposure to animals, were enrolled in a prospective cohort study of zoonotic influenza transmission. Sera were drawn upon enrollment and again at 12 and 24 months. Participants were contacted monthly for 24 months and queried regarding episodes of acute influenza-like illnesses (ILI). Cohort members confirmed to have acute influenza A infections, permitted respiratory swab collections which were studied with rRT-PCR for influenza A. Serologic assays were performed against equine, avian, and human influenza viruses. Over the 2 yrs of follow-up, 100 ILI investigations in the cohort were conducted. Thirty-six ILI cases (36%) were identified as influenza A infections by rRT-PCR; none yielded evidence for AIV or EIV. Serological examination of 12 mo and 24 mo annual sera revealed 37 participants had detectable antibody titers (≥1∶10) against studied viruses during the course of study follow-up: 21 against A/Equine/Mongolia/01/2008(H3N8); 4 against an avian A/Teal/Hong Kong/w3129(H6N1), 11 against an avian-like A/Hong Kong/1073/1999(H9N2), and 1 against an avian A/Migrating duck/Hong Kong/MPD268/2007(H10N4) virus. However, all such titers were <1∶80 and none were statistically associated with avian or horse exposures. A number of subjects had evidence of seroconversion to zoonotic viruses, but the 4-fold titer changes were again not associated with avian or horse exposures. As elevated antibodies against seasonal influenza viruses were high during the study period, it seems likely that cross-reacting antibodies against seasonal human influenza viruses were a cause of the low-level seroreactivity against AIV or EIV. Despite the presence of AIV and EIV circulating among wild birds and horses in Mongolia, there was little evidence of AIV or EIV infection in this prospective

  15. Little evidence of avian or equine influenza virus infection among a cohort of Mongolian adults with animal exposures, 2010-2011.

    PubMed

    Khurelbaatar, Nyamdavaa; Krueger, Whitney S; Heil, Gary L; Darmaa, Badarchiin; Ulziimaa, Daramragchaa; Tserennorov, Damdindorj; Baterdene, Ariungerel; Anderson, Benjamin D; Gray, Gregory C

    2014-01-01

    Avian (AIV) and equine influenza virus (EIV) have been repeatedly shown to circulate among Mongolia's migrating birds or domestic horses. In 2009, 439 Mongolian adults, many with occupational exposure to animals, were enrolled in a prospective cohort study of zoonotic influenza transmission. Sera were drawn upon enrollment and again at 12 and 24 months. Participants were contacted monthly for 24 months and queried regarding episodes of acute influenza-like illnesses (ILI). Cohort members confirmed to have acute influenza A infections, permitted respiratory swab collections which were studied with rRT-PCR for influenza A. Serologic assays were performed against equine, avian, and human influenza viruses. Over the 2 yrs of follow-up, 100 ILI investigations in the cohort were conducted. Thirty-six ILI cases (36%) were identified as influenza A infections by rRT-PCR; none yielded evidence for AIV or EIV. Serological examination of 12 mo and 24 mo annual sera revealed 37 participants had detectable antibody titers (≥1∶10) against studied viruses during the course of study follow-up: 21 against A/Equine/Mongolia/01/2008(H3N8); 4 against an avian A/Teal/Hong Kong/w3129(H6N1), 11 against an avian-like A/Hong Kong/1073/1999(H9N2), and 1 against an avian A/Migrating duck/Hong Kong/MPD268/2007(H10N4) virus. However, all such titers were <1∶80 and none were statistically associated with avian or horse exposures. A number of subjects had evidence of seroconversion to zoonotic viruses, but the 4-fold titer changes were again not associated with avian or horse exposures. As elevated antibodies against seasonal influenza viruses were high during the study period, it seems likely that cross-reacting antibodies against seasonal human influenza viruses were a cause of the low-level seroreactivity against AIV or EIV. Despite the presence of AIV and EIV circulating among wild birds and horses in Mongolia, there was little evidence of AIV or EIV infection in this prospective study

  16. Low-pathogenic avian influenza viruses in wild house mice.

    PubMed

    Shriner, Susan A; VanDalen, Kaci K; Mooers, Nicole L; Ellis, Jeremy W; Sullivan, Heather J; Root, J Jeffrey; Pelzel, Angela M; Franklin, Alan B

    2012-01-01

    Avian influenza viruses are known to productively infect a number of mammal species, several of which are commonly found on or near poultry and gamebird farms. While control of rodent species is often used to limit avian influenza virus transmission within and among outbreak sites, few studies have investigated the potential role of these species in outbreak dynamics. We trapped and sampled synanthropic mammals on a gamebird farm in Idaho, USA that had recently experienced a low pathogenic avian influenza outbreak. Six of six house mice (Mus musculus) caught on the outbreak farm were presumptively positive for antibodies to type A influenza. Consequently, we experimentally infected groups of naïve wild-caught house mice with five different low pathogenic avian influenza viruses that included three viruses derived from wild birds and two viruses derived from chickens. Virus replication was efficient in house mice inoculated with viruses derived from wild birds and more moderate for chicken-derived viruses. Mean titers (EID(50) equivalents/mL) across all lung samples from seven days of sampling (three mice/day) ranged from 10(3.89) (H3N6) to 10(5.06) (H4N6) for the wild bird viruses and 10(2.08) (H6N2) to 10(2.85) (H4N8) for the chicken-derived viruses. Interestingly, multiple regression models indicated differential replication between sexes, with significantly (p<0.05) higher concentrations of avian influenza RNA found in females compared with males. Avian influenza viruses replicated efficiently in wild-caught house mice without adaptation, indicating mice may be a risk pathway for movement of avian influenza viruses on poultry and gamebird farms. Differential virus replication between males and females warrants further investigation to determine the generality of this result in avian influenza disease dynamics.

  17. Low-Pathogenic Avian Influenza Viruses in Wild House Mice

    PubMed Central

    Shriner, Susan A.; VanDalen, Kaci K.; Mooers, Nicole L.; Ellis, Jeremy W.; Sullivan, Heather J.; Root, J. Jeffrey; Pelzel, Angela M.; Franklin, Alan B.

    2012-01-01

    Background Avian influenza viruses are known to productively infect a number of mammal species, several of which are commonly found on or near poultry and gamebird farms. While control of rodent species is often used to limit avian influenza virus transmission within and among outbreak sites, few studies have investigated the potential role of these species in outbreak dynamics. Methodology/Principal Findings We trapped and sampled synanthropic mammals on a gamebird farm in Idaho, USA that had recently experienced a low pathogenic avian influenza outbreak. Six of six house mice (Mus musculus) caught on the outbreak farm were presumptively positive for antibodies to type A influenza. Consequently, we experimentally infected groups of naïve wild-caught house mice with five different low pathogenic avian influenza viruses that included three viruses derived from wild birds and two viruses derived from chickens. Virus replication was efficient in house mice inoculated with viruses derived from wild birds and more moderate for chicken-derived viruses. Mean titers (EID50 equivalents/mL) across all lung samples from seven days of sampling (three mice/day) ranged from 103.89 (H3N6) to 105.06 (H4N6) for the wild bird viruses and 102.08 (H6N2) to 102.85 (H4N8) for the chicken-derived viruses. Interestingly, multiple regression models indicated differential replication between sexes, with significantly (p<0.05) higher concentrations of avian influenza RNA found in females compared with males. Conclusions/Significance Avian influenza viruses replicated efficiently in wild-caught house mice without adaptation, indicating mice may be a risk pathway for movement of avian influenza viruses on poultry and gamebird farms. Differential virus replication between males and females warrants further investigation to determine the generality of this result in avian influenza disease dynamics. PMID:22720076

  18. (Highly pathogenic) avian influenza as a zoonotic agent.

    PubMed

    Kalthoff, Donata; Globig, Anja; Beer, Martin

    2010-01-27

    Zoonotic agents challenging the world every year afresh are influenza A viruses. In the past, human pandemics caused by influenza A viruses had been occurring periodically. Wild aquatic birds are carriers of the full variety of