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Sample records for hadron electron collider

  1. Future Electron-Hadron Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Litvinenko, V.

    2010-05-23

    Outstanding research potential of electron-hadron colliders (EHC) was clearly demonstrated by first - and the only - electron-proton collider HERA (DESY, Germany). Physics data from HERA revealed new previously unknown facets of Quantum Chromo-Dynamics (QCD). EHC is an ultimate microscope probing QCD in its natural environment, i.e. inside the hadrons. In contrast with hadrons, electrons are elementary particles with known initial state. Hence, scattering electrons from hadrons provides a clearest pass to their secrets. It turns EHC into an ultimate machine for high precision QCD studies and opens access to rich physics with a great discovery potential: solving proton spin puzzle, observing gluon saturation or physics beyond standard model. Access to this physics requires high-energy high-luminosity EHCs and a wide reach in the center-of-mass (CM) energies. This paper gives a brief overview of four proposed electron-hadron colliders: ENC at GSI (Darmstadt, Germany), ELIC/MEIC at TJNAF (Newport News, VA, USA), eRHIC at BNL (Upton, NY, USA) and LHeC at CERN (Geneva, Switzerland). Future electron-hadron colliders promise to deliver very rich physics not only in the quantity but also in the precision. They are aiming at very high luminosity two-to-four orders of magnitude beyond the luminosity demonstrated by the very successful HERA. While ENC and LHeC are on opposite side of the energy spectrum, eRHIC and ELIC are competing for becoming an electron-ion collider (EIC) in the U.S. Administrations of BNL and Jlab, in concert with US DoE office of Nuclear Physics, work on the strategy for down-selecting between eRHIC and ELIC. The ENC, EIC and LHeC QCD physics programs to a large degree are complimentary to each other and to the LHC physics. In last decade, an Electron Ion Collider (EIC) collaboration held about 25 collaboration meetings to develop physics program for EIC with CM energy {approx}100 GeV. One of these meetings was held at GSI, where ENC topic was in the

  2. A large hadron electron collider at CERN

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Abelleira Fernandez, J. L.

    2015-04-06

    This document provides a brief overview of the recently published report on the design of the Large Hadron Electron Collider (LHeC), which comprises its physics programme, accelerator physics, technology and main detector concepts. The LHeC exploits and develops challenging, though principally existing, accelerator and detector technologies. This summary is complemented by brief illustrations of some of the highlights of the physics programme, which relies on a vastly extended kinematic range, luminosity and unprecedented precision in deep inelastic scattering. Illustrations are provided regarding high precision QCD, new physics (Higgs, SUSY) and eletron-ion physics. The LHeC is designed to run synchronously withmore » the LHC in the twenties and to achieve an integrated luminosity of O(100)fb–1. It will become the cleanest high resolution microscope of mankind and will substantially extend as well as complement the investigation of the physics of the TeV energy scale, which has been enabled by the LHC.« less

  3. A large hadron electron collider at CERN

    SciTech Connect

    Abelleira Fernandez, J. L.

    2015-04-06

    This document provides a brief overview of the recently published report on the design of the Large Hadron Electron Collider (LHeC), which comprises its physics programme, accelerator physics, technology and main detector concepts. The LHeC exploits and develops challenging, though principally existing, accelerator and detector technologies. This summary is complemented by brief illustrations of some of the highlights of the physics programme, which relies on a vastly extended kinematic range, luminosity and unprecedented precision in deep inelastic scattering. Illustrations are provided regarding high precision QCD, new physics (Higgs, SUSY) and eletron-ion physics. The LHeC is designed to run synchronously with the LHC in the twenties and to achieve an integrated luminosity of O(100)fb–1. It will become the cleanest high resolution microscope of mankind and will substantially extend as well as complement the investigation of the physics of the TeV energy scale, which has been enabled by the LHC.

  4. Electron Lenses for the Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Stancari, Giulio; Valishev, Alexander; Bruce, Roderik; Redaelli, Stefano; Rossi, Adriana; Salvachua, Belen

    2014-07-01

    Electron lenses are pulsed, magnetically confined electron beams whose current-density profile is shaped to obtain the desired effect on the circulating beam. Electron lenses were used in the Fermilab Tevatron collider for bunch-by-bunch compensation of long-range beam-beam tune shifts, for removal of uncaptured particles in the abort gap, for preliminary experiments on head-on beam-beam compensation, and for the demonstration of halo scraping with hollow electron beams. Electron lenses for beam-beam compensation are being commissioned in RHIC at BNL. Within the US LHC Accelerator Research Program and the European HiLumi LHC Design Study, hollow electron beam collimation was studied as an option to complement the collimation system for the LHC upgrades. This project is moving towards a technical design in 2014, with the goal to build the devices in 2015-2017, after resuming LHC operations and re-assessing needs and requirements at 6.5 TeV. Because of their electric charge and the absence of materials close to the proton beam, electron lenses may also provide an alternative to wires for long-range beam-beam compensation in LHC luminosity upgrade scenarios with small crossing angles.

  5. Invisible Higgs decay at the Large Hadron-Electron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yi-Lei; Zhang, Chen; Zhu, Shou-hua

    2016-07-01

    The possibility that the 125 GeV Higgs boson may decay into invisible non-standard-model (non-SM) particles is theoretically and phenomenologically intriguing. In this paper, we investigate the sensitivity of the Large Hadron Electron Collider (LHeC) to an invisibly decaying Higgs, in its proposed high-luminosity running mode. We focus on the neutral current Higgs production channel which offers more kinematical handles than its charged current counterpart. The signal contains one electron, one jet, and large missing energy. With a cut-based parton-level analysis, we estimate that if the h Z Z coupling is at its standard model (SM) value, then assuming an integrated luminosity of 1 ab-1 , the LHeC with the proposed 60 GeV electron beam (with -0.9 polarization) and 7 TeV proton beam is capable of probing Br (h →TE)=6 % at 2 σ level. Good lepton veto performance (especially hadronic τ veto) in the forward region is crucial to the suppression of the dominant W j e background. We also explicitly point out the important role that may be played by the LHeC in probing a wide class of exotic Higgs decay processes and emphasize the general function of lepton-hadron colliders in the precision study of new resonances after their discovery in hadron-hadron collisions.

  6. Hadron hadron collider group

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, R.; Peoples, J.; Ankenbrandt, C.

    1982-01-01

    The objective of this group was to make a rough assessment of the characteristics of a hadron-hadron collider which could make it possible to study the 1 TeV mass scale. Since there is very little theoretical guidance for the type of experimental measurements which could illuminate this mass scale, we chose to extend the types of experiments which have been done at the ISR, and which are in progress at the SPS collider to these higher energies.

  7. High luminosity electron-hadron collider eRHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Ptitsyn, V.; Aschenauer, E.; Bai, M.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Belomestnykh, S.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Blaskiewicz, M..; Calaga, R.; Chang, X.; Fedotov, A.; Gassner, D.; Hammons, L.; Hahn, H.; Hammons, L.; He, P.; Hao, Y.; Jackson, W.; Jain, A.; Johnson, E.C.; Kayran, D.; Kewisch, J.; Litvinenko, V.N.; Luo, Y.; Mahler, G.; McIntyre, G.; Meng, W.; Minty, M.; Parker, B.; Pikin, A.; Rao, T.; Roser, T.; Skaritka, J.; Sheehy, B.; Skaritka, J.; Tepikian, S.; Than, Y.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J.; Wang, G.; Webb, S.; Wu, Q.; Xu, W.; Pozdeyev, E.; Tsentalovich, E.

    2011-03-28

    We present the design of a future high-energy high-luminosity electron-hadron collider at RHIC called eRHIC. We plan on adding 20 (potentially 30) GeV energy recovery linacs to accelerate and to collide polarized and unpolarized electrons with hadrons in RHIC. The center-of-mass energy of eRHIC will range from 30 to 200 GeV. The luminosity exceeding 10{sup 34} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} can be achieved in eRHIC using the low-beta interaction region with a 10 mrad crab crossing. We report on the progress of important eRHIC R&D such as the high-current polarized electron source, the coherent electron cooling, ERL test facility and the compact magnets for recirculation passes. A natural staging scenario of step-by-step increases of the electron beam energy by building-up of eRHIC's SRF linacs is presented.

  8. Hadron-hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Month, M.; Weng, W.T.

    1983-06-21

    The objective is to investigate whether existing technology might be extrapolated to provide the conceptual framework for a major hadron-hadron collider facility for high energy physics experimentation for the remainder of this century. One contribution to this large effort is to formalize the methods and mathematical tools necessary. In this report, the main purpose is to introduce the student to basic design procedures. From these follow the fundamental characteristics of the facility: its performance capability, its size, and the nature and operating requirements on the accelerator components, and with this knowledge, we can determine the technology and resources needed to build the new facility.

  9. First electron-cloud studies at the Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domínguez, O.; Li, K.; Arduini, G.; Métral, E.; Rumolo, G.; Zimmermann, F.; Cuna, H. Maury

    2013-01-01

    During the beam commissioning of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) [LHC Design Report No. CERN-2004-003-V-1, 2004 [http://cds.cern.ch/record/782076?ln=en]; O. Brüning, H. Burkhardt, and S. Myers, Prog. Part. Nucl. Phys. 67, 705 (2012)10.1016/j.ppnp.2012.03.001PPNPDB0146-6410] with 150, 75, 50, and 25-ns bunch spacing, important electron-cloud effects, like pressure rise, cryogenic heat load, beam instabilities, or emittance growth, were observed. Methods have been developed to infer different key beam-pipe surface parameters by benchmarking simulations and pressure rise as well as heat-load observations. These methods allow us to monitor the scrubbing process, i.e., the reduction of the secondary emission yield as a function of time, in order to decide on the most appropriate strategies for machine operation. To better understand the influence of electron clouds on the beam dynamics, simulations have been carried out to examine both the coherent and the incoherent effects on the beam. In this paper we present the methodology and first results for the scrubbing monitoring process at the LHC. We also review simulated instability thresholds and tune footprints for beams of different emittance, interacting with an electron cloud in field-free or dipole regions.

  10. The Large Hadron Collider.

    PubMed

    Evans, Lyndon

    2012-02-28

    The construction of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has been a massive endeavour spanning almost 30 years from conception to commissioning. Building the machine with the highest possible energy (7 TeV) in the existing large electron-positron (LEP) collider tunnel of 27 km circumference and with a tunnel diameter of only 3.8 m has required considerable innovation. The first was the development of a two-in-one magnet, where the two rings are integrated into a single magnetic structure. This compact two-in-one structure was essential for the LHC owing to the limited space available in the existing LEP collider tunnel and the cost. The second was a bold move to the use of superfluid helium cooling on a massive scale, which was imposed by the need to achieve a high (8.3 T) magnetic field using an affordable Nb-Ti superconductor.

  11. The Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, Stephen

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) was first suggested (in a documented way) in 1983 [1] as a possible future hadron collider to be installed in the 27 km "LEP" tunnel. More than thirty years later the collider has been operated successfully with beam for three years with spectacular performance and has discovered the long-sought-after Higgs boson. The LHC is the world's largest and most energetic particle collider. It took many years to plan and build this large complex machine which promises exciting, new physics results for many years to come...

  12. Probing gluon number fluctuation effects in future electron-hadron colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaral, J. T.; Gonçalves, V. P.; Kugeratski, M. S.

    2014-10-01

    The description of the QCD dynamics in the kinematical range which will be probed in the future electron-hadron colliders is still an open question. Although phenomenological studies indicate that the gluon number fluctuations, which are related to discreteness in the QCD evolution, are negligible at HERA, the magnitude of these effects for the next generation of colliders still should be estimated. In this paper we investigate inclusive and diffractive ep observables considering a model for the physical scattering amplitude which describes the HERA data. Moreover, we estimate, for the first time, the contribution of the fluctuation effects for the nuclear structure functions. Our results indicate that the study of these observables in the future colliders can be useful to constrain the presence of gluon number fluctuations.

  13. Conceptual design of hollow electron lenses for beam halo control in the Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Stancari, Giulio; Previtali, Valentina; Valishev, Alexander; Bruce, Roderik; Redaelli, Stefano; Rossi, Adriana; Salvachua Ferrando, Belen

    2014-06-26

    Collimation with hollow electron beams is a technique for halo control in high-power hadron beams. It is based on an electron beam (possibly pulsed or modulated in intensity) guided by strong axial magnetic fields which overlaps with the circulating beam in a short section of the ring. The concept was tested experimentally at the Fermilab Tevatron collider using a hollow electron gun installed in one of the Tevatron electron lenses. We are proposing a conceptual design for applying this technique to the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. A prototype hollow electron gun for the LHC was built and tested. The expected performance of the hollow electron beam collimator was based on Tevatron experiments and on numerical tracking simulations. Halo removal rates and enhancements of halo diffusivity were estimated as a function of beam and lattice parameters. Proton beam core lifetimes and emittance growth rates were checked to ensure that undesired effects were suppressed. Hardware specifications were based on the Tevatron devices and on preliminary engineering integration studies in the LHC machine. Required resources and a possible timeline were also outlined, together with a brief discussion of alternative halo-removal schemes and of other possible uses of electron lenses to improve the performance of the LHC.

  14. The large hadron collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brüning, O.; Burkhardt, H.; Myers, S.

    2012-07-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is the world’s largest and most energetic particle collider. It took many years to plan and build this large complex machine which promises exciting, new physics results for many years to come. We describe and review the machine design and parameters, with emphasis on subjects like luminosity and beam conditions which are relevant for the large community of physicists involved in the experiments at the LHC. First collisions in the LHC were achieved at the end of 2009 and followed by a period of a rapid performance increase. We discuss what has been learned so far and what can be expected for the future.

  15. Results from hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Pondrom, L.G. )

    1990-12-14

    The present status of hadron collider physics is reviewed. The total cross section for {bar p} + p has been measured at 1.8 TeV: {sigma}{sub tot} = 72.1 {plus minus} 3.3 mb. New data confirm the UA2 observation of W/Z {yields} {bar q}q. Precision measurements of M{sub W} by UA2 and CDF give an average value M{sub W} = 80.13 {plus minus} 0.30 GeV/c{sup 2}. When combined with measurements of M{sub Z} from LEP and SLC this number gives sin{sup 2}{theta}{sub W} = 0.227 {plus minus} 0.006, or m{sub top} = 130{sub {minus}60}{sup +40} GeV/c{sup 2} from the EWK radiative correction term {Delta}r. Evidence for hadron colliders as practical sources of b quarks has been strengthened, while searches for t quarks have pushed the mass above M{sub W}: m{sub top} > 89 GeV/c{sup 2} 95% cl (CDF Preliminary). Searches beyond the standard model based on the missing E{sub T} signature have not yet produced any positive results. Future prospects for the discovery of the top quark in the range m{sub top} < 200 GeV/c{sup 2} look promising. 80 refs., 35 figs., 7 tabs.

  16. Left-right symmetry and lepton number violation at the Large Hadron electron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindner, Manfred; Queiroz, Farinaldo S.; Rodejohann, Werner; Yaguna, Carlos E.

    2016-06-01

    We show that the proposed Large Hadron electron Collider (LHeC) will provide an opportunity to search for left-right symmetry and establish lepton number violation, complementing current and planned searches based on LHC data and neutrinoless double beta decay. We consider several plausible configurations for the LHeC — including different electron energies and polarizations, as well as distinct values for the charge misidentification rate. Within left-right symmetric theories we determine the values of right-handed neutrino and gauge boson masses that could be tested at the LHeC after one, five and ten years of operation. Our results indicate that this collider might probe, via the Δ L = 2 signal e - p → e + jjj, Majorana neutrino masses up to 1 TeV and W R masses up to ˜ 6 .5 TeV. Interestingly, part of this parameter space is beyond the expected reach of the LHC and of future neutrinoless double beta decay experiments.

  17. Hadron collider physics at UCR

    SciTech Connect

    Kernan, A.; Shen, B.C.

    1997-07-01

    This paper describes the research work in high energy physics by the group at the University of California, Riverside. Work has been divided between hadron collider physics and e{sup +}-e{sup {minus}} collider physics, and theoretical work. The hadron effort has been heavily involved in the startup activities of the D-Zero detector, commissioning and ongoing redesign. The lepton collider work has included work on TPC/2{gamma} at PEP and the OPAL detector at LEP, as well as efforts on hadron machines.

  18. Physics at hadron colliders: Experimental view

    SciTech Connect

    Siegrist, J.L.

    1987-08-01

    The physics of the hadron-hadron collider experiment is considered from an experimental point of view. The problems encountered in determination of how well the standard model describes collider results are discussed. 53 refs., 58 figs.

  19. CERN's Large Hadron Collider project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fearnley, Tom A.

    1997-03-01

    The paper gives a brief overview of CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC) project. After an outline of the physics motivation, we describe the LHC machine, interaction rates, experimental challenges, and some important physics channels to be studied. Finally we discuss the four experiments planned at the LHC: ATLAS, CMS, ALICE and LHC-B.

  20. B physics at hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, J.N.; /Fermilab

    2005-09-01

    This paper discusses the physics opportunity and challenges for doing high precision B physics experiments at hadron colliders. It describes how these challenges have been addressed by the two currently operating experiments, CDF and D0, and how they are addressed by three experiments, ATLAS, CMS, and LHCb, at the LHC.

  1. Beam collimation at hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolai V. Mokhov

    2003-08-12

    Operational and accidental beam losses in hadron colliders can have a serious impact on machine and detector performance, resulting in effects ranging from minor to catastrophic. Principles and realization are described for a reliable beam collimation system required to sustain favorable background conditions in the collider detectors, provide quench stability of superconducting magnets, minimize irradiation of accelerator equipment, maintain operational reliability over the life of the machine, and reduce the impact of radiation on personnel and the environment. Based on detailed Monte-Carlo simulations, such a system has been designed and incorporated in the Tevatron collider. Its performance, comparison to measurements and possible ways to further improve the collimation efficiency are described in detail. Specifics of the collimation systems designed for the SSC, LHC, VLHC, and HERA colliders are discussed.

  2. Recent results from hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Frisch, H.J. )

    1990-12-10

    This is a summary of some of the many recent results from the CERN and Fermilab colliders, presented for an audience of nuclear, medium-energy, and elementary particle physicists. The topics are jets and QCD at very high energies, precision measurements of electroweak parameters, the remarkably heavy top quark, and new results on the detection of the large flux of B mesons produced at these machines. A summary and some comments on the bright prospects for the future of hadron colliders conclude the talk. 39 refs., 44 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. State of hadron collider physics

    SciTech Connect

    Grannis, P.D. |

    1993-12-01

    The 9th Topical Workshop on Proton-Antiproton Collider Physics in Tsukuba Japan demonstrated clearly the enormous breadth of physics accessible in hadron cowders. Although no significant chinks were reported in the armor of the Standard Model, new results presented in this meeting have expanded our knowledge of the electroweak and strong interactions and have extended the searches for non-standard phenomena significantly. Much of the new data reported came from the CDF and D0 experiments at the Fermilab cowder. Superb operation of the Tevatron during the 1992-1993 Run and significant advances on the detector fronts -- in particular, the emergence of the new D0 detector as a productive physics instrument in its first outing and the addition of the CDF silicon vertex detector -- enabled much of this advance. It is noteworthy however that physics from the CERN collider experiments UA1 and UA4 continued to make a large impact at this meeting. In addition, very interesting summary talks were given on new results from HERA, cosmic ray experiments, on super-hadron collider physics, and on e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} experiments at LEP and TRISTAN. These summaries are reported in elsewhere in this volume.

  4. LHC: The Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Lincoln, Don

    2015-03-04

    The Large Hadron Collider (or LHC) is the world’s most powerful particle accelerator. In 2012, scientists used data taken by it to discover the Higgs boson, before pausing operations for upgrades and improvements. In the spring of 2015, the LHC will return to operations with 163% the energy it had before and with three times as many collisions per second. It’s essentially a new and improved version of itself. In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln explains both some of the absolutely amazing scientific and engineering properties of this modern scientific wonder.

  5. LHC: The Large Hadron Collider

    ScienceCinema

    Lincoln, Don

    2016-07-12

    The Large Hadron Collider (or LHC) is the world’s most powerful particle accelerator. In 2012, scientists used data taken by it to discover the Higgs boson, before pausing operations for upgrades and improvements. In the spring of 2015, the LHC will return to operations with 163% the energy it had before and with three times as many collisions per second. It’s essentially a new and improved version of itself. In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln explains both some of the absolutely amazing scientific and engineering properties of this modern scientific wonder.

  6. Polarized window for left-right symmetry and a right-handed neutrino at the Large Hadron-Electron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Subhadeep; Rai, Santosh Kumar

    2016-01-01

    The breaking of parity, a fundamental symmetry between left and right, is best understood in the framework of left-right symmetric extension of the standard model. We show that the production of a heavy right-handed neutrino at the proposed Large Hadron-Electron Collider (LHeC) could give us the most simple and direct hint of the scale of this breaking in left-right symmetric theories. This production mode gives a lepton number violating signal with Δ L =2 which is very clean and has practically no standard model background. We highlight that the right-handed nature of WR exchange which defines the left-right symmetric theories can be confirmed by using a polarized electron beam and also enhance the production rates with relatively lower beam energy.

  7. Bilepton production at hadron colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dion, B.; Grégoire, T.; London, D.; Marleau, L.; Nadeau, H.

    1999-04-01

    We examine, as model-independently as possible, the production of bileptons at hadron colliders. When a particular model is necessary or useful, we choose the 3-3-1 model. We consider a variety of processes: qq¯-->Y++Y--, ud¯-->Y++Y-, ūd-->Y+Y--, qq¯-->Y++e-e-, qq¯-->φ++φ--, ud¯-->φ++φ-, and ūd-->φ+φ--, where Y and φ are vector and scalar bileptons, respectively. Given the present low-energy constraints, we find that, at the Fermilab Tevatron, vector bileptons are unobservable, while light scalar bileptons (Mφ<~300 GeV) are just barely observable. At the CERN LHC, the reach is extended considerably: vector bileptons of mass MY<~1 TeV are observable, as are scalar bileptons of mass Mφ<~850 GeV.

  8. XXth Hadron Collider Physics Symposium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    In 2009, the Hadron Collider Physics Symposium took place in Evian (France), on the shore of the Geneva Lake, from 16-20 November. It was jointly organised by CERN and the French HEP community (CNRS-IN2P3 and CEA-IRFU). This year's symposium come at an important time for both the Tevatron and LHC communities. It stimulated the completion of analyses for a significant Tevatron data sample, and it allowed an in-depth review of the readiness of the LHC and its detectors just before first collisions. The programme includes sessions on top-quark and electro-weak physics, QCD, B physics, new phenomena, electro-weak symmetry breaking, heavy ions, and the status and commissioning of the LHC machine and its experiments. Conference website : http://hcp2009.in2p3.fr/

  9. Very large hadron collider (VLHC)

    SciTech Connect

    1998-09-01

    A VLHC informal study group started to come together at Fermilab in the fall of 1995 and at the 1996 Snowmass Study the parameters of this machine took form. The VLHC as now conceived would be a 100 TeV hadron collider. It would use the Fermilab Main Injector (now nearing completion) to inject protons at 150 GeV into a new 3 TeV Booster and then into a superconducting pp collider ring producing 100 TeV c.m. interactions. A luminosity of {approximately}10{sup 34} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} is planned. Our plans were presented to the Subpanel on the Planning for the Future of US High- Energy Physics (the successor to the Drell committee) and in February 1998 their report stated ``The Subpanel recommends an expanded program of R&D on cost reduction strategies, enabling technologies, and accelerator physics issues for a VLHC. These efforts should be coordinated across laboratory and university groups with the aim of identifying design concepts for an economically and technically viable facility`` The coordination has been started with the inclusion of physicists from Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), and Cornell University. Clearly, this collaboration must expanded internationally as well as nationally. The phrase ``economically and technically viable facility`` presents the real challenge.

  10. Black holes at the Large Hadron Collider.

    PubMed

    Dimopoulos, S; Landsberg, G

    2001-10-15

    If the scale of quantum gravity is near TeV, the CERN Large Hadron Collider will be producing one black hole (BH) about every second. The decays of the BHs into the final states with prompt, hard photons, electrons, or muons provide a clean signature with low background. The correlation between the BH mass and its temperature, deduced from the energy spectrum of the decay products, can test Hawking's evaporation law and determine the number of large new dimensions and the scale of quantum gravity.

  11. Flavourful production at hadron colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giudice, Gian Francesco; Gripaios, Ben; Sundrum, Raman

    2011-08-01

    We ask what new states may lie at or below the TeV scale, with sizable flavour-dependent couplings to light quarks, putting them within reach of hadron colliders via resonant production, or in association with Standard Model states. In particular, we focus on the compatibility of such states with stringent flavour-changing neutral current and electric-dipole moment constraints. We argue that the broadest and most theoretically plausible flavour structure of the new couplings is that they are hierarchical, as are Standard Model Yukawa couplings, although the hierarchical pattern may well be different. We point out that, without the need for any more elaborate or restrictive structure, new scalars with "diquark" couplings to standard quarks are particularly immune to existing constraints, and that such scalars may arise within a variety of theoretical paradigms. In particular, there can be substantial couplings to a pair of light quarks or to one light and one heavy quark. For example, the latter possibility may provide a flavour-safe interpretation of the asymmetry in top quark production observed at the Tevatron. We thereby motivate searches for diquark scalars at the Tevatron and LHC, and argue that their discovery represents one of our best chances for new insight into the Flavour Puzzle of the Standard Model.

  12. Top quark studies at hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Sinervo, P.K.; CDF Collaboration

    1996-08-01

    The techniques used to study top quarks at hadron colliders are presented. The analyses that discovered the top quark are described, with emphasis on the techniques used to tag {ital b} quark jets in candidate events. The most recent measurements of top quark properties by the CDF and D{null} collaborations are reviewed, including the top quark cross section, mass, branching fractions and production properties. Future top quark studies at hadron colliders are discussed, and predictions for event yields and uncertainties in the measurements of top quark properties are presented.

  13. Top quark studies at hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Sinervo, P.K.

    1997-01-01

    The techniques used to study top quarks at hadron colliders are presented. The analyses that discovered the top quark are described, with emphasis on the techniques used to tag b quark jets in candidate events. The most recent measurements of top quark properties by the CDF and DO Collaborations are reviewed, including the top quark cross section, mass, branching fractions, and production properties. Future top quark studies at hadron colliders are discussed, and predictions for event yields and uncertainties in the measurements of top quark properties are presented.

  14. Black Holes and the Large Hadron Collider

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roy, Arunava

    2011-01-01

    The European Center for Nuclear Research or CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has caught our attention partly due to the film "Angels and Demons." In the movie, an antimatter bomb attack on the Vatican is foiled by the protagonist. Perhaps just as controversial is the formation of mini black holes (BHs). Recently, the American Physical Society…

  15. The Large Hadron Collider: Redefining High Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Demers, Sarah

    2007-06-19

    Particle physicists have a description of the forces of nature known as the Standard Model that has successfully withstood decades of testing at laboratories around the world. Though the Standard Model is powerful, it is not complete. Important details like the masses of particles are not explained well, and realities as fundamental as gravity, dark matter, and dark energy are left out altogether. I will discuss gaps in the model and why there is hope that some puzzles will be solved by probing high energies with the Large Hadron Collider. Beginning next year, this machine will accelerate protons to record energies, hurling them around a 27 kilometer ring before colliding them 40 million times per second. Detectors the size of five-story buildings will record the debris of these collisions. The new energy frontier made accessible by the Large Hadron Collider will allow thousands of physicists to explore nature's fundamental forces and particles from a fantastic vantage point.

  16. The future of the Large Hadron Collider and CERN.

    PubMed

    Heuer, Rolf-Dieter

    2012-02-28

    This paper presents the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and its current scientific programme and outlines options for high-energy colliders at the energy frontier for the years to come. The immediate plans include the exploitation of the LHC at its design luminosity and energy, as well as upgrades to the LHC and its injectors. This may be followed by a linear electron-positron collider, based on the technology being developed by the Compact Linear Collider and the International Linear Collider collaborations, or by a high-energy electron-proton machine. This contribution describes the past, present and future directions, all of which have a unique value to add to experimental particle physics, and concludes by outlining key messages for the way forward.

  17. Hadron colliders (SSC/LHC)

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, A.W.; Palmer, R.B. |; Evans, L.; Gareyte, J.; Siemann, R.H.

    1992-12-31

    The nominal SSC and LHC designs should operate conservatively at luminosities up to 10{sup 33} cm{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1}. This luminosity is dictated by the event rates that can be handled by the detectors. However, this limit is event dependent (e.g. it does not take much of a detector to detect the event pp {yields} elephant; all one needs is extremely high luminosity). As such, it is useful to explore the possibility of going beyond the 10{sup 33} cm{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1} level. Such exploration will also improve the accelerator physics understanding of pp collider designs. If the detector limitations are removed, the first accelerator limits occur when the luminosity is at the level of 10{sup 34} cm{sup {minus}2}s{sup {minus}1}. These accelerator limits will first be reviewed. The authors will then continue on to explore even higher luminosity as the ultimate limit of pp colliders. Accelerator technologies needed to achieve this ultimate luminosity as well as the R and D needed to reach it are discussed.

  18. Collins Asymmetry at Hadron Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Feng

    2008-01-17

    We study the Collins effect in the azimuthal asymmetricdistribution of hadrons inside a high energy jet in the single transversepolarized proton proton scattering. From the detailed analysis ofone-gluon and two-gluon exchange diagrams contributions, the Collinsfunction is found the same as that in the semi-inclusive deep inelasticscattering and e+e- annihilations. The eikonal propagators in thesediagrams do not contribute to the phase needed for the Collins-typesingle spin asymmetry, and the universality is derived as a result of theWard identity. We argue that this conclusion depends on the momentum flowof the exchanged gluon and the kinematic constraints in the fragmentationprocess, and is generic and model-independent.

  19. Really large hadron collider working group summary

    SciTech Connect

    Dugan, G.; Limon, P.; Syphers, M.

    1996-12-01

    A summary is presented of preliminary studies of three 100 TeV center-of-mass hadron colliders made with magnets of different field strengths, 1.8T, 9.5T and 12.6T. Descriptions of the machines, and some of the major and most challenging subsystems, are presented, along with parameter lists and the major issues for future study.

  20. Large Hadron Collider commissioning and first operation.

    PubMed

    Myers, S

    2012-02-28

    A history of the commissioning and the very successful early operation of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is described. The accident that interrupted the first commissioning, its repair and the enhanced protection system put in place are fully described. The LHC beam commissioning and operational performance are reviewed for the period from 2010 to mid-2011. Preliminary plans for operation and future upgrades for the LHC are given for the short and medium term.

  1. The Tevatron Hadron Collider: A short history

    SciTech Connect

    Tollestrup, A.V.

    1994-11-01

    The subject of this presentation was intended to cover the history of hadron colliders. However this broad topic is probably better left to historians. I will cover a much smaller portion of this subject and specialize my subject to the history of the Tevatron. As we will see, the Tevatron project is tightly entwined with the progress in collider technology. It occupies a unique place among accelerators in that it was the first to make use of superconducting magnets and indeed the basic design now forms a template for all machines using this technology. It was spawned in an incredibly productive era when new ideas were being generated almost monthly and it has matured into our highest energy collider complete with two large detectors that provide the major facility in the US for probing high Pt physics for the coming decade.

  2. String resonances at hadron colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anchordoqui, Luis A.; Antoniadis, Ignatios; Dai, De-Chang; Feng, Wan-Zhe; Goldberg, Haim; Huang, Xing; Lüst, Dieter; Stojkovic, Dejan; Taylor, Tomasz R.

    2014-09-01

    We consider extensions of the standard model based on open strings ending on D-branes, with gauge bosons due to strings attached to stacks of D-branes and chiral matter due to strings stretching between intersecting D-branes. Assuming that the fundamental string mass scale Ms is in the TeV range and that the theory is weakly coupled, we discuss possible signals of string physics at the upcoming HL-LHC run (integrated luminosity =3000 fb-1) with a center-of-mass energy of √s =14 TeV and at potential future pp colliders, HE-LHC and VLHC, operating at √s =33 and 100 TeV, respectively (with the same integrated luminosity). In such D-brane constructions, the dominant contributions to full-fledged string amplitudes for all the common QCD parton subprocesses leading to dijets and γ +jet are completely independent of the details of compactification and can be evaluated in a parameter-free manner. We make use of these amplitudes evaluated near the first (n=1) and second (n=2) resonant poles to determine the discovery potential for Regge excitations of the quark, the gluon, and the color singlet living on the QCD stack. We show that for string scales as large as 7.1 TeV (6.1 TeV) lowest massive Regge excitations are open to discovery at the ≥5σ in dijet (γ +jet) HL-LHC data. We also show that for n=1 the dijet discovery potential at HE-LHC and VLHC exceedingly improves: up to 15 TeV and 41 TeV, respectively. To compute the signal-to-noise ratio for n=2 resonances, we first carry out a complete calculation of all relevant decay widths of the second massive level string states (including decays into massless particles and a massive n=1 and a massless particle), where we rely on factorization and conformal field theory techniques. Helicity wave functions of arbitrary higher spin massive bosons are also constructed. We demonstrate that for string scales Ms≲10.5 TeV (Ms≲28 TeV) detection of n =2 Regge recurrences at HE-LHC (VLHC) would become the smoking gun for D

  3. Heaviest bound baryons production at the Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Su-Zhi; Li, You-Wei; Rashidin, Reyima

    2012-12-01

    We calculate the hadronic production of three heaviest bound baryons Ωbbb, Ωbbc*, and Ωbbc at hadron colliders at tree level. We present the integrated cross section and differential cross section distributions in this paper.

  4. Comment on "Polarized window for left-right symmetry and a right-handed neutrino at the Large Hadron-Electron Collider"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Queiroz, Farinaldo S.

    2016-06-01

    Reference [1 S. Mondal and S. K. Rai, Phys. Rev. D 93, 011702 (2016).] recently argued that the projected Large Hadron Electron Collider (LHeC) presents a unique opportunity to discover a left-right symmetry since the LHeC has availability for polarized electrons. In particular, the authors apply some basic pT cuts on the jets and claim that the on-shell production of right-handed neutrinos at the LHeC, which violates lepton number in two units, has practically no standard model background and, therefore, that the right-handed nature of WR interactions that are intrinsic to left-right symmetric models can be confirmed by using colliding beams consisting of an 80% polarized electron and a 7 TeV proton. In this Comment, we show that their findings, as presented, have vastly underestimated the SM background which prevents a Left-Right symmetry signal from being seen at the LHeC.

  5. Black Holes and the Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Arunava

    2011-12-01

    The European Center for Nuclear Research or CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has caught our attention partly due to the film ``Angels and Demons.'' In the movie, an antimatter bomb attack on the Vatican is foiled by the protagonist. Perhaps just as controversial is the formation of mini black holes (BHs). Recently, the American Physical Society1 website featured an article on BH formation at the LHC.2 This article examines some aspects of mini BHs and explores the possibility of their detection at the LHC.

  6. Mass reach scaling for future hadron colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzo, Thomas G.

    2015-04-01

    The primary goal of any future hadron collider is to discover new physics (NP) associated with a high mass scale, , beyond the range of the LHC. In order to maintain the same relative mass reach for rate-limited NP, , as increases, Richter recently reminded us that the required integrated luminosity obtainable at future hadron colliders (FHC) must grow rapidly, , in the limit of naive scaling. This would imply, e.g., a 50-fold increase in the required integrated luminosity when going from the 14 TeV LHC to a FHC with TeV, an increase that would prove quite challenging on many different fronts. In this paper we point out, due to the scaling violations associated with the evolution of the parton density functions (PDFs) and the running of the strong coupling, , that the actual luminosity necessary in order to maintain any fixed value of the relative mass reach is somewhat greater than this scaling result indicates. However, the actual values of the required luminosity scaling are found to be dependent upon the detailed nature of the NP being considered. Here we elucidate this point explicitly by employing several specific benchmark examples of possible NP scenarios and briefly discuss the (relatively weak) search impact in each case if these luminosity goals are not met.

  7. Development of Large Area Gas Electron Multiplier Detector and Its Application to a Digital Hadron Calorimeter for Future Collider Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Jaehoon; White, Andrew

    2014-09-25

    The UTA High Energy Physics Group conducted generic detector development based on large area, very thin and high sensitivity gas detector using gas electron multiplier (GEM) technology. This is in preparation for a use as a sensitive medium for sampling calorimeters in future collider experiments at the Energy Frontier as well as part of the tracking detector in Intensity Frontier experiments. We also have been monitoring the long term behavior of one of the prototype detectors (30cmx30cm) read out by the SLAC-developed 13-bit KPiX analog chip over three years and have made presentations of results at various APS meetings. While the important next step was the development of large area (1m x 1m) GEM planes, we also have looked into opportunities of applying this technology to precision tracking detectors to significantly improve the performance of the Range Stack detector for CP violation experiments and to provide an amplification layer for the liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber in the LBNE experiment. We have jointly developed 33cmx100cm large GEM foils with the CERN gas detector development group to construct 33cm x100cm unit chambers. Three of these unit chambers will be put together to form a 1m x 1m detector plane. Following characterization of one 33cmx100cm unit chamber prototype, a total of five 1m x 1m planes will be constructed and inserted into an existing 1m3 RPC DHCAL stack to test the performance of the new GEM DHCAL in particle beams. The large area GEM detector we planned to develop in this proposal not only gives an important option to DHCAL for future collider experiments but also the potential to expand its use to Intensity Frontier and Cosmic Frontier experiments as high efficiency, high amplification anode planes for liquid Argon time projection chambers. Finally, thanks to its sensitivity to X-rays and other neutral radiations and its light-weight characteristics, the large area GEM has a great potential for the use in medical imaging and

  8. QCD and jets at hadron colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapeta, Sebastian

    2016-07-01

    We review various aspects of jet physics in the context of hadron colliders. We start by discussing the definitions and properties of jets and recent development in this area. We then consider the question of factorization for processes with jets, in particular for cases in which jets are produced in special configurations, like for example in the region of forward rapidities. We review numerous perturbative methods for calculating predictions for jet processes, including the fixed-order calculations as well as various matching and merging techniques. We also discuss the questions related to non-perturbative effects and the role they play in precision jet studies. We describe the status of calculations for processes with jet vetoes and we also elaborate on production of jets in forward direction. Throughout the article, we present selected comparisons between state-of-the-art theoretical predictions and the data from the LHC.

  9. Illuminating new electroweak states at hadron colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, Ahmed; Izaguirre, Eder; Shuve, Brian

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel powerful strategy to perform searches for new electroweak states. Uncolored electroweak states appear in generic extensions of the Standard Model (SM) and yet are challenging to discover at hadron colliders. This problem is particularly acute when the lightest state in the electroweak multiplet is neutral and all multiplet components are approximately degenerate. In this scenario, production of the charged fields of the multiplet is followed by decay into nearly invisible states; if this decay occurs promptly, the only way to infer the presence of the reaction is through its missing energy signature. Our proposal relies on emission of photon radiation from the new charged states as a means of discriminating the signal from SM backgrounds. We demonstrate its broad applicability by studying two examples: a pure Higgsino doublet and an electroweak quintuplet field.

  10. Big Science and the Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giudice, Gian Francesco

    2012-03-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the particle accelerator operating at CERN, is probably the most complex and ambitious scientific project ever accomplished by humanity. The sheer size of the enterprise, in terms of financial and human resources, naturally raises the question whether society should support such costly basic-research programs. I address this question by first reviewing the process that led to the emergence of Big Science and the role of large projects in the development of science and technology. I then compare the methodologies of Small and Big Science, emphasizing their mutual linkage. Finally, after examining the cost of Big Science projects, I highlight several general aspects of their beneficial implications for society.

  11. Genesis of the Large Hadron Collider.

    PubMed

    Smith, Chris Llewellyn

    2015-01-13

    This paper describes the scientific, technical and political genesis of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). It begins with an outline of the early history of the LHC, from first thoughts and accelerator and detector developments that underwrote the project, through the first studies of the LHC and its scientific potential and the genesis of the experimental programme, to the presentation of the proposal to build the LHC to the CERN Council in December 1993. The events that led to the proposal to build the LHC in two stages, which was approved in December 1994, are then described. Next, the role of non-Member State contributions and of the agreement that CERN could take loans, which allowed single stage construction to be approved in December 1996, despite a cut in the Members' contributions, are explained. The paper concludes by identifying points of potential relevance for the approval of possible future large particle physics projects.

  12. Light-gravitino production at hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, J.; Nanopoulos, D.V.; Rangarajan, R.; Lopez, J.L.; Nanopoulos, D.V.; Zichichi, A.

    1998-01-01

    We consider the production of gravitinos ({tilde G}) in association with gluinos ({tilde g}) or squarks ({tilde q}) at hadron colliders, including the three main subprocesses: q{bar q}{r_arrow}{tilde g}{tilde G}, and qg{r_arrow}{tilde q}{tilde G}, and gg{r_arrow}{tilde g}{tilde G}. These channels become enhanced to the point of being observable for sufficiently light gravitino masses (m{sub {tilde G}}{lt}10{sup {minus}4}eV), as motivated by some supersymmetric explanations of the Collider Detector at Fermilab ee{gamma}{gamma}+E{sub T,miss} event. The characteristic signal of such events would be monojets, as opposed to dijets obtained in the more traditional supersymmetric process p{bar p}{r_arrow}{tilde g}{tilde g}. Searches for such events at the Fermilab Tevatron can impose lower limits on the gravitino mass. In the appendixes, we provide a complete set of Feynman rules for the gravitino interactions used in our calculation. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  13. Prospects for heavy flavor physics at hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, J.N.

    1997-09-01

    The role of hadron colliders in the observation and study of CP violation in B decays is discussed. We show that hadron collider experiments can play a significant role in the early studies of these phenomena and will play an increasingly dominant role as the effort turns towards difficult to measure decays, especially those of the B{sub s} meson, and sensitive searches for rare decays and subtle deviations from Standard Model predictions. We conclude with a discussion of the relative merits of hadron collider detectors with `forward` vs `central` rapidity coverage.

  14. Heavy flavor production and top quark search at hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, H.A.

    1991-01-01

    We review heavy flavor production at hadron colliders, with an eye towards the physics of the top quark. Motivation for existence of top, and current status of top search are reviewed. The physics of event simulation at hadron colliders is reviewed. We discuss characteristics of top quark events at p{bar p} colliders that may aid in distinguishing the top quark signal from Standard Model backgrounds, and illustrate various cuts which may be useful for top discovery. Top physics at hadron supercolliders is commented upon, as well as top quark mass measurement techniques. 22 refs., 5 figs.

  15. Suppressing Electron Cloud in Future Linear Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Pivi, M; Kirby, R.E.; Raubenheimer, T.O.; Le Pimpec, F.; /PSI, Villigen

    2005-05-27

    Any accelerator circulating positively charged beams can suffer from a build-up of an electron cloud (EC) in the beam pipe. The cloud develops through ionization of residual gases, synchrotron radiation and secondary electron emission and, when severe, can cause instability, emittance blow-up or loss of the circulating beam. The electron cloud is potentially a luminosity limiting effect for both the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and the International Linear Collider (ILC). For the ILC positron damping ring, the development of the electron cloud must be suppressed. This paper discusses the state-of-the-art of the ongoing SLAC and international R&D program to study potential remedies.

  16. Higgs boson production at hadron colliders: Signal and background processes

    SciTech Connect

    David Rainwater; Michael Spira; Dieter Zeppenfeld

    2004-01-12

    We review the theoretical status of signal and background calculations for Higgs boson production at hadron colliders. Particular emphasis is given to missing NLO results, which will play a crucial role for the Tevatron and the LHC.

  17. The ATLAS Experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ATLAS Collaboration; Aad, G.; Abat, E.; Abdallah, J.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Abdesselam, A.; Abdinov, O.; Abi, B. A.; Abolins, M.; Abramowicz, H.; Acerbi, E.; Acharya, B. S.; Achenbach, R.; Ackers, M.; Adams, D. L.; Adamyan, F.; Addy, T. N.; Aderholz, M.; Adorisio, C.; Adragna, P.; Aharrouche, M.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahles, F.; Ahmad, A.; Ahmed, H.; Aielli, G.; Åkesson, P. F.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimov, A. V.; Alam, S. M.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Aleppo, M.; Alessandria, F.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alimonti, G.; Aliyev, M.; Allport, P. P.; Allwood-Spiers, S. E.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, J.; Alves, R.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amako, K.; Amaral, P.; Amaral, S. P.; Ambrosini, G.; Ambrosio, G.; Amelung, C.; Ammosov, V. V.; Amorim, A.; Amram, N.; Anastopoulos, C.; Anderson, B.; Anderson, K. J.; Anderssen, E. C.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Andricek, L.; Andrieux, M.-L.; Anduaga, X. S.; Anghinolfi, F.; Antonaki, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonelli, S.; Apsimon, R.; Arabidze, G.; Aracena, I.; Arai, Y.; Arce, A. T. H.; Archambault, J. P.; Arguin, J.-F.; Arik, E.; Arik, M.; Arms, K. E.; Armstrong, S. R.; Arnaud, M.; Arnault, C.; Artamonov, A.; Asai, S.; Ask, S.; Åsman, B.; Asner, D.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astbury, A.; Athar, B.; Atkinson, T.; Aubert, B.; Auerbach, B.; Auge, E.; Augsten, K.; Aulchenko, V. M.; Austin, N.; Avolio, G.; Avramidou, R.; Axen, A.; Ay, C.; Azuelos, G.; Baccaglioni, G.; Bacci, C.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Bachy, G.; Badescu, E.; Bagnaia, P.; Bailey, D. C.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Ballester, F.; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F.; Banas, E.; Banfi, D.; Bangert, A.; Bansal, V.; Baranov, S. P.; Baranov, S.; Barashkou, A.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbier, G.; Barclay, P.; Bardin, D. Y.; Bargassa, P.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Baron, S.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, M.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Barrillon, P.; Barriuso Poy, A.; Barros, N.; Bartheld, V.; Bartko, H.; Bartoldus, R.; Basiladze, S.; Bastos, J.; Batchelor, L. E.; Bates, R. L.; Batley, J. R.; Batraneanu, S.; Battistin, M.; Battistoni, G.; Batusov, V.; Bauer, F.; Bauss, B.; Baynham, D. E.; Bazalova, M.; Bazan, A.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beaugiraud, B.; Beccherle, R. B.; Beck, G. A.; Beck, H. P.; Becks, K. H.; Bedajanek, I.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednár, P.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C.; Behar Harpaz, S.; Belanger, G. A. N.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Belhorma, B.; Bell, P. J.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellachia, F.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellina, F.; Bellomo, G.; Bellomo, M.; Beltramello, O.; Belymam, A.; Ben Ami, S.; Ben Moshe, M.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Benchouk, C.; Bendel, M.; Benedict, B. H.; Benekos, N.; Benes, J.; Benhammou, Y.; Benincasa, G. P.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Benslama, K.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Berglund, S.; Bergsma, F.; Beringer, J.; Bernabéu, J.; Bernardet, K.; Berriaud, C.; Berry, T.; Bertelsen, H.; Bertin, A.; Bertinelli, F.; Bertolucci, S.; Besson, N.; Beteille, A.; Bethke, S.; Bialas, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Bieri, M.; Biglietti, M.; Bilokon, H.; Binder, M.; Binet, S.; Bingefors, N.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biscarat, C.; Bischof, R.; Bischofberger, M.; Bitadze, A.; Bizzell, J. P.; Black, K. M.; Blair, R. E.; Blaising, J. J.; Blanch, O.; Blanchot, G.; Blocker, C.; Blocki, J.; Blondel, A.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Boaretto, C.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bocci, A.; Bocian, D.; Bock, R.; Boehm, M.; Boek, J.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogouch, A.; Bohm, C.; Bohm, J.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Bondarenko, V. G.; Bonino, R.; Bonis, J.; Bonivento, W.; Bonneau, P.; Boonekamp, M.; Boorman, G.; Boosten, M.; Booth, C. N.; Booth, P. S. L.; Booth, P.; Booth, J. R. A.; Borer, K.; Borisov, A.; Borjanovic, I.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosi, F.; Bosman, M.; Bosteels, M.; Botchev, B.; Boterenbrood, H.; Botterill, D.; Boudreau, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boulahouache, C.; Bourdarios, C.; Boutemeur, M.; Bouzakis, K.; Boyd, G. R.; Boyd, J.; Boyer, B. H.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozhko, N. I.; Braccini, S.; Braem, A.; Branchini, P.; Brandenburg, G. W.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Braun, H. M.; Bravo, S.; Brawn, I. P.; Brelier, B.; Bremer, J.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Breton, D.; Brett, N. D.; Breugnon, P.; Bright-Thomas, P. G.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Brodbeck, T. J.; Brodet, E.; Broggi, F.; Broklova, Z.; Bromberg, C.; Brooijmans, G.; Brouwer, G.; Broz, J.; Brubaker, E.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Buanes, T.; Buchanan, N. J.; Buchholz, P.; Budagov, I. A.; Büscher, V.; Bugge, L.; Buira-Clark, D.; Buis, E. J.; Bujor, F.; Buran, T.; Burckhart, H.; Burckhart-Chromek, D.; Burdin, S.; Burns, R.; Busato, E.; Buskop, J. J. F.; Buszello, K. P.; Butin, F.; Butler, J. M.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J.; Butterworth, J. M.; Byatt, T.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Cabruja Casas, E.; Caccia, M.; Caforio, D.; Cakir, O.; Calafiura, P.; Calderini, G.; Calderón Terol, D.; Callahan, J.; Caloba, L. P.; Caloi, R.; Calvet, D.; Camard, A.; Camarena, F.; Camarri, P.; Cambiaghi, M.; Cameron, D.; Cammin, J.; Campabadal Segura, F.; Campana, S.; Canale, V.; Cantero, J.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Caprio, M.; Caracinha, D.; Caramarcu, C.; Carcagno, Y.; Cardarelli, R.; Cardeira, C.; Cardiel Sas, L.; Cardini, A.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, B.; Caron, S.; Carpentieri, C.; Carr, F. S.; Carter, A. A.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Cascella, M.; Caso, C.; Castelo, J.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N.; Castrovillari, F.; Cataldi, G.; Cataneo, F.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Caughron, S.; Cauz, D.; Cavallari, A.; Cavalleri, P.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerna, C.; Cernoch, C.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerutti, F.; Cervetto, M.; Cetin, S. A.; Cevenini, F.; Chalifour, M.; Chamizo llatas, M.; Chan, A.; Chapman, J. W.; Charlton, D. G.; Charron, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chen, H.; Chen, L.; Chen, T.; Chen, X.; Cheng, S.; Cheng, T. L.; Cheplakov, A.; Chepurnov, V. F.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Chesneanu, D.; Cheu, E.; Chevalier, L.; Chevalley, J. L.; Chevallier, F.; Chiarella, V.; Chiefari, G.; Chikovani, L.; Chilingarov, A.; Chiodini, G.; Chouridou, S.; Chren, D.; Christiansen, T.; Christidi, I. A.; Christov, A.; Chu, M. L.; Chudoba, J.; Chuguev, A. G.; Ciapetti, G.; Cicalini, E.; Ciftci, A. K.; Cindro, V.; Ciobotaru, M. D.; Ciocio, A.; Cirilli, M.; Citterio, M.; Ciubancan, M.; Civera, J. V.; Clark, A.; Cleland, W.; Clemens, J. C.; Clement, B. C.; Clément, C.; Clements, D.; Clifft, R. W.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Coco, R.; Coe, P.; Coelli, S.; Cogneras, E.; Cojocaru, C. D.; Colas, J.; Colijn, A. P.; Collard, C.; Collins-Tooth, C.; Collot, J.; Coluccia, R.; Comune, G.; Conde Muiño, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Consonni, M.; Constantinescu, S.; Conta, C.; Conventi, F. A.; Cook, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper-Smith, N. J.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Correard, S.; Corso-Radu, A.; Coss, J.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Costin, T.; Coura Torres, R.; Courneyea, L.; Couyoumtzelis, C.; Cowan, G.; Cox, B. E.; Cox, J.; Cragg, D. A.; Cranmer, K.; Cranshaw, J.; Cristinziani, M.; Crosetti, G.; Cuenca Almenar, C.; Cuneo, S.; Cunha, A.; Curatolo, M.; Curtis, C. J.; Cwetanski, P.; Czyczula, Z.; D'Auria, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; Da Rocha Gesualdi Mello, A.; Da Silva, P. V. 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F.; Volpi, M.; Volpini, G.; von Boehn-Buchholz, R.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobiev, A. P.; Vorozhtsov, A. S.; Vorozhtsov, S. B.; Vos, M.; Voss, K. C.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vovenko, A. S.; Vranjes, N.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Anh, T. Vu; Vuaridel, B.; Vudragovic, M.; Vuillemin, V.; Vuillermet, R.; Wänanen, A.; Wahlen, H.; Walbersloh, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wall, R.; Wallny, R. S.; Walsh, S.; Wang, C.; Wang, J. C.; Wappler, F.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Warner, G. P.; Warren, M.; Warsinsky, M.; Wastie, R.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watts, G.; Waugh, A. T.; Waugh, B. M.; Weaverdyck, C.; Webel, M.; Weber, G.; Weber, J.; Weber, M.; Weber, P.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weilhammer, P. M.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Wellenstein, H.; Wellisch, H. P.; Wells, P. S.; Wemans, A.; Wen, M.; Wenaus, T.; Wendler, S.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werneke, P.; Werner, P.; Werthenbach, U.; Wheeler-Ellis, S. J.; Whitaker, S. P.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, S.; Whittington, D.; Wicek, F.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiesmann, M.; Wiesmann, M.; Wijnen, T.; Wildauer, A.; Wilhelm, I.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, H. H.; Willis, W.; Willocq, S.; Wilmut, I.; Wilson, J. A.; Wilson, A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winton, L.; Witzeling, W.; Wlodek, T.; Woehrling, E.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wright, C.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wuestenfeld, J.; Wunstorf, R.; Xella-Hansen, S.; Xiang, A.; Xie, S.; Xie, Y.; Xu, G.; Xu, N.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamaoka, H.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, J. C.; Yang, S.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Z.; Yao, W.-M.; Yao, Y.; Yarradoddi, K.; Yasu, Y.; Ye, J.; Yilmaz, M.; Yoosoofmiya, R.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, H.; Yoshida, R.; Young, C.; Youssef, S. P.; Yu, D.; Yu, J.; Yu, M.; Yu, X.; Yuan, J.; Yurkewicz, A.; Zaets, V. G.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zajac, J.; Zajacova, Z.; Zalite, A. Yu; Zalite, Yo K.; Zanello, L.; Zarzhitsky, P.; Zaytsev, A.; Zdrazil, M.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeller, M.; Zema, P. F.; Zendler, C.; Zenin, A. V.; Zenis, T.; Zenonos, Z.; Zenz, S.; Zerwas, D.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zheng, W.; Zhang, X.; Zhao, L.; Zhao, T.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Z.; Zhelezko, A.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zheng, S.; Zhichao, L.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, N.; Zhou, S.; Zhou, Y.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H. Z.; Zhuang, X. A.; Zhuravlov, V.; Zilka, B.; Zimin, N. I.; Zimmermann, S.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zitoun, R.; Zivkovic, L.; Zmouchko, V. V.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; Zoeller, M. M.; Zolnierowski, Y.; Zsenei, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zychacek, V.

    2008-08-01

    The ATLAS detector as installed in its experimental cavern at point 1 at CERN is described in this paper. A brief overview of the expected performance of the detector when the Large Hadron Collider begins operation is also presented.

  18. A feedback microprocessor for hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Herrup, D.A.; Chapman, L.; Franck, A.; Groves, T.; Lublinsky, B. )

    1995-02-01

    A feedback microprocessor has been built for the Tevatron. It has been constructed to be applicable to hadron colliders in general. Its inputs are realtime accelerator measurements, data describing the state of the Tevatron, and ramp tables. The microprocessor software includes a finite-state machine. Each state corresponds to a specific Tevatron operation and has a state-specific Tevatron model. Transitions between states are initiated by the global Tevatron clock. Each state includes a cyclic routine, which is called periodically and where all calculations are performed. The output corrections are inserted onto a fast Tevatron-wide link from which the power supplies will read the real time corrections. We also store all of the input data and output corrections in a set of buffers that can easily be retrieved for diagnostic analysis. In this paper we describe this device and its use to control the Tevatron tunes as well as other possible applications. [copyright] 1995 [ital American] [ital Institute] [ital of] [ital Physics

  19. Computing and data handling requirements for SSC (Superconducting Super Collider) and LHC (Large Hadron Collider) experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Lankford, A.J.

    1990-05-01

    A number of issues for computing and data handling in the online in environment at future high-luminosity, high-energy colliders, such as the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) and Large Hadron Collider (LHC), are outlined. Requirements for trigger processing, data acquisition, and online processing are discussed. Some aspects of possible solutions are sketched. 6 refs., 3 figs.

  20. Hadron collider potential for excited bosons search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chizhov, M. V.; Boyko, I. R.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Budagov, J. A.

    2014-05-01

    The e + e - and μ+μ- dilepton final states are the most clear channels for a new heavy neutral resonance search. Their advantage is that usually in the region of expected heavy-mass resonance peak the main irreducible background, from the Standard Model Drell-Yan process, contributes two orders of magnitude smaller than the signal. In this paper we consider the future prospects for search for the excited neutral Z*-bosons. The bosons can be observed as a Breit-Wigner resonance peak in the dilepton invariant mass distributions in the same way as the well-known extra gauge Z' bosons. However, the Z* bosons have unique signatures in transverse momentum, angular and pseudorapidity distributions of the final leptons, which allow to distinguish them from the other heavy neutral resonances. At present only the ATLAS Collaboration has looked for such new excitations at the Large Hadron Collider and has published its results for 7 TeV collision energy. After successful comparison of our evaluation with these official results we present our estimations for the discovery potential and the exclusion limits on the Z*-boson search in pp collisions at higher centre-of-mass energies and different luminosities. In particular, LHC Run 2 can discover Z*-boson with its mass up to 5.3 TeV, while the High Luminosity LHC can extend that reach to 6.2 TeV. The High Energy LHC (with collision energy of 33 TeV) will be able to probe two times heavier resonance masses at the same integrated luminosities.

  1. Production of Electroweak Bosons at Hadron Colliders: Theoretical Aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangano, Michelangelo L.

    2016-10-01

    Since the W± and Z0 discovery, hadron colliders have provided a fertile ground, in which continuously improving measurements and theoretical predictions allow to precisely determine the gauge boson properties, and to probe the dynamics of electroweak and strong interactions. This article will review, from a theoretical perspective, the role played by the study, at hadron colliders, of electroweak boson production properties, from the better understanding of the proton structure, to the discovery and studies of the top quark and of the Higgs, to the searches for new phenomena beyond the Standard Model.

  2. Jet Reconstruction and Spectroscopy at Hadron Colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellettini, Giorgio

    2011-11-01

    Dear colleagues and friends, Major new particle discoveries were made in the past by exploring the mass spectrum of lepton pairs. These searches still have great potential. However, new particle searches are now being extended to masses larger than the W, Z mass. More and more decay channels open up and the branching ratios into lepton pairs are reduced. Also, physics may dictate that states with heavy bosons and quarks become dominant. Examples are the decay of top quarks, and the expected final states of the standard model Higgs boson. Supersymmetry in any of its wide spectrum of models predicts intrigued final states where jets are major observables. To reconstruct masses and to study the dynamics of these states one must exploit the energy-momentum four-vectors of jets. Past experiments at the CERN SPS collider, at HERA, at LEP and now at the Tevatron collider and at LHC, have studied how best to reconstruct hadron jets. However, originally the role of jets in searching for new physics was primarily to sense new parton contact interactions by means of increased large pt tails in inclusive jet spectra, or studying jet events with large missing Et, or measuring branching ratios into jets of different flavour. These studies did not require as accurate a measure of jet four-momenta as needed in new particle searches in multi-jets final states. Figure 1 Figure 1. W, Z associated production in CDF events with large Et, miss and 2 jets. Consider for example (figure 1) the mass spectrum of dijets in events with large missing Et recently measured by CDF [1]. Trigger and analysis cuts were chosen so as to favour production of heavy boson pairs, with decay of one Z boson into neutrinos tagging the event and another W or Z boson decaying into jets. Associated production of boson pairs is observed, but the dijet mass resolution does not allow the separation of W from Z. A broad agreement of the overall observed rate with expectation is found, but a comparative study of the

  3. TOP AND HIGGS PHYSICS AT THE HADRON COLLIDERS

    SciTech Connect

    Jabeen, Shabnam

    2013-10-20

    This review summarizes the recent results for top quark and Higgs boson measurements from experiments at Tevatron, a proton–antiproton collider at a center-of-mass energy of √ s =1 . 96 TeV, and the Large Hadron Collider, a proton–proton collider at a center- of-mass energy of √ s = 7 TeV. These results include the discovery of a Higgs-like boson and measurement of its various properties, and measurements in the top quark sector, e.g. top quark mass, spin, charge asymmetry and production of single top quark.

  4. Large Hadron collider tests of the little Higgs model.

    PubMed

    Burdman, Gustavo; Perelstein, Maxim; Pierce, Aaron

    2003-06-20

    The little Higgs model provides an alternative to traditional candidates for new physics at the TeV scale. The new heavy gauge bosons predicted by this model should be observable at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). We discuss how the LHC experiments could test the little Higgs model by studying the production and decay of these particles. PMID:12857187

  5. High-brightness injectors for hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Wangler, T.P.

    1990-01-01

    The counterrotating beams in collider rings consist of trains of beam bunches with N{sub B} particles per bunch, spaced a distance S{sub B} apart. When the bunches collide, the interaction rate is determined by the luminosity, which is defined as the interaction rate per unit cross section. For head-on collisions between cylindrical Gaussian beams moving at speed {beta}c, the luminosity is given by L = N{sub B}{sup 2}{beta}c/4{pi}{sigma}{sup 2}S{sub B}, where {sigma} is the rms beam size projected onto a transverse plane (the two transverse planes are assumed identical) at the interaction point. This beam size depends on the rms emittance of the beam and the focusing strength, which is a measure of the 2-D phase-space area in each transverse plane, and is defined in terms of the second moments of the beam distribution. Our convention is to use the rms normalized emittance, without factors of 4 or 6 that are sometimes used. The quantity {tilde {beta}} is the Courant-Synder betatron amplitude function at the interaction point, a characteristic of the focusing lattice and {gamma} is the relativistic Lorentz factor. Achieving high luminosity at a given energy, and at practical values of {tilde {beta}} and S{sub B}, requires a large value for the ratio N{sub B}{sup 2}/{var epsilon}{sub n}, which implies high intensity and small emittance. Thus, specification of the luminosity sets the requirements for beam intensity and emittance, and establishes the requirements on the performance of the injector to the collider ring. In general, for fixed N{sub B}, the luminosity can be increased if {var epsilon}{sub n} can be reduced. The minimum emittance of the collider is limited by the performance of the injector; consequently the design of the injector is of great importance for the ultimate performance of the collider.

  6. SEARCHING FOR HIGGS BOSONS AND NEW PHYSICS AT HADRON COLLIDERS

    SciTech Connect

    Chung Kao

    2007-09-05

    The objectives of research activities in particle theory are predicting the production cross section and decay branching fractions of Higgs bosons and new particles at hadron colliders, developing techniques and computer software to discover these particles and to measure their properties, and searching for new phenomena and new interactions at the Fermilab Tevatron and the CERN Large Hadron Collider. The results of our project could lead to the discovery of Higgs bosons, new particles, and signatures for new physics, or we will be able to set meaningful limits on important parameters in particle physics. We investigated the the prospects for the discovery at the CERN Large Hadron Collider of Higgs bosons and supersymmetric particles. Promising results are found for the CP-odd pseudoscalar ($A^0$) and the heavier CP-even scalar ($H^0$) Higgs bosons with masses up to 800 GeV. Furthermore, we study properties of the lightest neutralino ($\\chi^0$) and calculate its cosmological relic density in a supersymmetric $U(1)'$ model as well as the muon anomalous magnetic moment $a_\\mu = (g_\\mu - 2)/2$ in a supersymmetric $U(1)'$ model. We found that there are regions of the parameter space that can explain the experimental deviation of $a_\\mu$ from the Standard Model calculation and yield an acceptable cold dark matter relic density without conflict with collider experimental constraints. % Recently, we presented a complete next-to-leading order (NLO) calculation for the total cross section of inclusive Higgs pair production via bottom-quark fusion ($b\\bar{b} \\to hh$) at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in the Standard Model and the minimal supersymmetric model. We plan to predict the Higgs pair production rate and to study the trilinear coupling among the Higgs bosons. % In addition, we have made significant contributions in B physics, single top production, charged Higgs search at the Fermilab as well as in grid computing for both D0 and ATLAS.

  7. Polarized Electrons for Linear Colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clendenin, J. E.; Brachmann, A.; Garwin, E. L.; Kirby, R. E.; Luh, D.-A.; Maruyama, T.; Prescott, C. Y.; Sheppard, J. C.; Turner, J.; Prepost, R.

    2005-08-01

    Future electron-positron linear colliders require a highly polarized electron beam with a pulse structure that depends primarily on whether the acceleration utilizes warm or superconducting RF structures. The International Linear Collider (ILC) will use cold structures for the main linac. It is shown that a DC-biased polarized photoelectron source such as successfully used for the SLC can meet the charge requirements for the ILC micropulse with a polarization approaching 90%.

  8. Polarized Electrons for Linear Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Clendenin, J.

    2004-11-19

    Future electron-positron linear colliders require a highly polarized electron beam with a pulse structure that depends primarily on whether the acceleration utilizes warm or superconducting rf structures. The International Linear Collider (ILC) will use cold structures for the main linac. It is shown that a dc-biased polarized photoelectron source such as successfully used for the SLC can meet the charge requirements for the ILC micropulse with a polarization approaching 90%.

  9. Parton-Hadron-String Dynamics at relativistic collider energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bratkovskaya, E. L.; Cassing, W.; Konchakovski, V. P.; Linnyk, O.

    2011-04-01

    The novel Parton-Hadron-String Dynamics (PHSD) transport approach is applied to nucleus-nucleus collisions at RHIC energies with respect to differential hadronic spectra in comparison to available data. The PHSD approach is based on a dynamical quasiparticle model for partons (DQPM) matched to reproduce recent lattice-QCD results from the Wuppertal-Budapest group in thermodynamic equilibrium. The transition from partonic to hadronic degrees of freedom is described by covariant transition rates for the fusion of quark-antiquark pairs or three quarks (antiquarks), respectively, obeying flavor current-conservation, color neutrality as well as energy-momentum conservation. Our dynamical studies for heavy-ion collisions at relativistic collider energies are compared to earlier results from the Hadron-String Dynamics (HSD) approach - incorporating no explicit dynamical partonic phase - as well as to experimental data from the STAR, PHENIX, BRAHMS and PHOBOS Collaborations for Au + Au collisions at the top RHIC energy of √{s}=200 GeV. We find a reasonable reproduction of hadron rapidity distributions and transverse mass spectra and also a fair description of the elliptic flow of charged hadrons as a function of the centrality of the reaction and the transverse momentum p. Furthermore, an approximate quark-number scaling of the elliptic flow v of hadrons is observed in the PHSD results, too.

  10. Searches for scalar and vector leptoquarks at future hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Rizzo, T.G.

    1996-09-01

    The search reaches for both scalar(S) and vector(V) leptoquarks at future hadron colliders are summarized. In particular the authors evaluate the production cross sections of both leptoquark types at TeV33 and LHC as well as the proposed 60 and 200 TeV colliders through both quark-antiquark annihilation and gluon-gluon fusion: q{anti q},gg {r_arrow} SS,VV. Experiments at these machines should easily discover such particles if their masses are not in excess of the few TeV range.

  11. Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF): Data from B Hadrons Research

    DOE Data Explorer

    The Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) is a Tevatron experiment at Fermilab. The Tevatron, a powerful particle accelerator, accelerates protons and antiprotons close to the speed of light, and then makes them collide head-on inside the CDF detector. The CDF detector is used to study the products of such collisions. The CDF Physics Group is organized into six working groups, each with a specific focus. The Bottom group studies the production and decay of B hadrons. Their public web page makes data and numerous figures available from both CDF Runs I and II.

  12. The Structure of Jets at Hadron Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Larkoski, Andrew James

    2012-08-01

    Particle physics seeks to understand the interactions and properties of the fundamental particles. To gain understanding, there is an interplay between theory and experiment. Models are proposed to explain how particles behave and interact. These models make precise predictions that can be tested. Experiments are built and executed to measure the properties of these particles, providing necessary tests for the theories that attempt to explain the realm of fundamental particles. However, there is also another level of interaction between theory and experiment; the development of new experiments demands the study of how particles will behave with respect to the measured observables toward the goal of understanding the details and idiosyncrasies of the measurements very well. Only once these are well-modeled and understood can one be con dent that the data that are measured is trustworthy. The modeling and interpretation of the physics of a proton collider, such as the LHC, is the main topic of this thesis.

  13. Tracking study of hadron collider boosters

    SciTech Connect

    Machida, S.; Bourianoff, G.; Huang, Y.; Mahale, N.

    1992-07-01

    A simulation code SIMPSONS (previously called 6D-TEASE T) of single- and multi-particle tracking has been developed for proton synchrotrons. The 6D phase space coordinates are calculated each time step including acceleration with an arbitrary ramping curve by integration of the rf phase. Space-charge effects are modelled by means of the Particle In Cell (PIC) method. We observed the transverse emittance growth around the injection energy of the Low Energy Booster (LEB) of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) with and without second harmonic rf cavities which reduce peak line density. We also employed the code to see the possible transverse emittance deterioration around the transition energy in the Medium Energy Booster (MEB) and to estimate the emittance dilution due to an injection error of the MEB.

  14. Higgs Boson Searches at Hadron Colliders (1/4)

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    In these Academic Training lectures, the phenomenology of Higgs bosons and search strategies at hadron colliders are discussed. After a brief introduction on Higgs bosons in the Standard Model and a discussion of present direct and indirect constraints on its mass the status of the theoretical cross section calculations for Higgs boson production at hadron colliders is reviewed. In the following lectures important experimental issues relevant for Higgs boson searches (trigger, measurements of leptons, jets and missing transverse energy) are presented. This is followed by a detailed discussion of the discovery potential for the Standard Model Higgs boson for both the Tevatron and the LHC experiments. In addition, various scenarios beyond the Standard Model, primarily the MSSM, are considered. Finally, the potential and strategies to measured Higgs boson parameters and the investigation of alternative symmetry breaking scenarios are addressed.

  15. The technical challenges of the Large Hadron Collider.

    PubMed

    Collier, Paul

    2015-01-13

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is a 27km circumference hadron collider, built at CERN to explore the energy frontier of particle physics. Approved in 1994, it was commissioned and began operation for data taking in 2009. The design and construction of the LHC presented many design, engineering and logistical challenges which involved pushing a number of technologies well beyond their level at the time. Since the start-up of the machine, there has been a very successful 3-year run with an impressive amount of data delivered to the LHC experiments. With an increasingly large stored energy in the beam, the operation of the machine itself presented many challenges and some of these will be discussed. Finally, the planning for the next 20 years has been outlined with progressive upgrades of the machine, first to nominal energy, then to progressively higher collision rates. At each stage the technical challenges are illustrated with a few examples. PMID:26949802

  16. Higgs Boson Searches at Hadron Colliders (1/4)

    SciTech Connect

    2010-06-21

    In these Academic Training lectures, the phenomenology of Higgs bosons and search strategies at hadron colliders are discussed. After a brief introduction on Higgs bosons in the Standard Model and a discussion of present direct and indirect constraints on its mass the status of the theoretical cross section calculations for Higgs boson production at hadron colliders is reviewed. In the following lectures important experimental issues relevant for Higgs boson searches (trigger, measurements of leptons, jets and missing transverse energy) are presented. This is followed by a detailed discussion of the discovery potential for the Standard Model Higgs boson for both the Tevatron and the LHC experiments. In addition, various scenarios beyond the Standard Model, primarily the MSSM, are considered. Finally, the potential and strategies to measured Higgs boson parameters and the investigation of alternative symmetry breaking scenarios are addressed.

  17. The technical challenges of the Large Hadron Collider.

    PubMed

    Collier, Paul

    2015-01-13

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is a 27km circumference hadron collider, built at CERN to explore the energy frontier of particle physics. Approved in 1994, it was commissioned and began operation for data taking in 2009. The design and construction of the LHC presented many design, engineering and logistical challenges which involved pushing a number of technologies well beyond their level at the time. Since the start-up of the machine, there has been a very successful 3-year run with an impressive amount of data delivered to the LHC experiments. With an increasingly large stored energy in the beam, the operation of the machine itself presented many challenges and some of these will be discussed. Finally, the planning for the next 20 years has been outlined with progressive upgrades of the machine, first to nominal energy, then to progressively higher collision rates. At each stage the technical challenges are illustrated with a few examples.

  18. Learning to See at the Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Quigg, Chris

    2010-01-01

    The staged commissioning of the Large Hadron Collider presents an opportunity to map gross features of particle production over a significant energy range. I suggest a visual tool - event displays in (pseudo)rapidity-transverse-momentum space - as a scenic route that may help sharpen intuition, identify interesting classes of events for further investigation, and test expectations about the underlying event that accompanies large-transverse-momentum phenomena.

  19. Lattice optimization for a really large hadron collider (RLHC)

    SciTech Connect

    Peggs, S.; Dell, F.; Harrison, M.; Syphers, M.; Tepikian, S.

    1996-07-01

    Long arc cells would lead to major cost savings in a high field high T{sub c} hadron collider, operating in the regime of significant synchrotron radiation. Two such lattices, with half cell lengths of 110 and 260 m, are compared. Both allow flexible tuning, and have large dynamic apertures when dominated by chromatic sextupoles. Lattices with longer cells are much more sensitive to systematic magnet errors, which are expected to dominate.

  20. Disambiguating seesaw models using invariant mass variables at hadron colliders

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Dev, P. S. Bhupal; Kim, Doojin; Mohapatra, Rabindra N.

    2016-01-19

    Here, we propose ways to distinguish between different mechanisms behind the collider signals of TeV-scale seesaw models for neutrino masses using kinematic endpoints of invariant mass variables. We particularly focus on two classes of such models widely discussed in literature: (i) Standard Model extended by the addition of singlet neutrinos and (ii) Left-Right Symmetric Models. Relevant scenarios involving the same "smoking-gun" collider signature of dilepton plus dijet with no missing transverse energy differ from one another by their event topology, resulting in distinctive relationships among the kinematic endpoints to be used for discerning them at hadron colliders. Furthermore, these kinematic endpoints are readily translated to the mass parameters of the on-shell particles through simple analytic expressions which can be used for measuring the masses of the new particles. We also conducted a Monte Carlo simulation with detector effects in order to test the viability of the proposed strategy in a realistic environment. Finally, we discuss the future prospects of testing these scenarios at themore » $$\\sqrt{s}$$ = 14 and 100TeV hadron colliders.« less

  1. Disambiguating seesaw models using invariant mass variables at hadron colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dev, P. S. Bhupal; Kim, Doojin; Mohapatra, Rabindra N.

    2016-01-01

    We propose ways to distinguish between different mechanisms behind the collider signals of TeV-scale seesaw models for neutrino masses using kinematic endpoints of invariant mass variables. We particularly focus on two classes of such models widely discussed in literature: (i) Standard Model extended by the addition of singlet neutrinos and (ii) Left-Right Symmetric Models. Relevant scenarios involving the same "smoking-gun" collider signature of dilepton plus dijet with no missing transverse energy differ from one another by their event topology, resulting in distinctive relationships among the kinematic endpoints to be used for discerning them at hadron colliders. These kinematic endpoints are readily translated to the mass parameters of the on-shell particles through simple analytic expressions which can be used for measuring the masses of the new particles. A Monte Carlo simulation with detector effects is conducted to test the viability of the proposed strategy in a realistic environment. Finally, we discuss the future prospects of testing these scenarios at the √{s}=14 and 100 TeV hadron colliders.

  2. Hunting electroweakinos at future hadron colliders and direct detection experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Cortona, Giovanni Grilli

    2015-05-01

    We analyse the mass reach for electroweakinos at future hadron colliders and their interplay with direct detection experiments. Motivated by the LHC data, we focus on split supersymmetry models with different electroweakino spectra. We find for example that a 100 TeV collider may explore Winos up to ˜ 7 TeV in low scale gauge mediation models or thermal Wino dark matter around 3 TeV in models of anomaly mediation with long-lived Winos. We show moreover how collider searches and direct detection experiments have the potential to cover large part of the parameter space even in scenarios where the lightest neutralino does not contribute to the whole dark matter relic density.

  3. An Electron-Ion Collider at CEBAF

    SciTech Connect

    Kees de Jager; Lia Merminga; Ya. Derbenev

    2002-10-01

    Electron-ion colliders with a center of mass energy between 15 and 100 GeV, a luminosity of at least 10{sup 33}cm{sup -1}s{sup -1}, and a polarization of both beams at or above 80% have been proposed for future studies of hadronic structure. The scheme proposed here would accelerate the electron beam using the CEBAF recirculating linac with energy recovery. If all accelerating structures presently installed in the CEBAF tunnel are replaced by ones with a {approx}20 MV/m gradient, then a single recirculation results in an electron beam energy of about 5 GeV. After colliding with protons/light ions circulating in a figure-of-eight storage ring (for flexibility of spin manipulation) at an energy of up to 100 GeV, the electrons are re-injected into the CEBAF accelerator for deceleration and energy recovery. In this report several lay-out options and their respective feasibilities will be presented and discussed, together with parameters which would provide a luminosity of up to 1 x 10{sup 35} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. The feasibility of combining such a collider at a center-of-mass energy [sq rt] s of up to 43 GeV with a fixed target facility of 25 GeV is also explored.

  4. Precision Studies of Hadronic and Electro-Weak Interactions for Collider Physics. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Yost, Scott A

    2014-04-02

    This project was directed toward developing precision computational tools for proton collisions at the Large Hadron Collider, focusing primarily on electroweak boson production and electroweak radiative corrections. The programs developed under this project carried the name HERWIRI, for High Energy Radiation With Infra-Red Improvements, and are the first steps in an ongoing program to develop a set of hadronic event generators based on combined QCD and QED exponentiation. HERWIRI1 applied these improvements to the hadronic shower, while HERWIRI2 will apply the electroweak corrections from the program KKMC developed for electron-positron scattering to a hadronic event generator, including exponentiated initial and final state radiation together with first-order electroweak corrections to the hard process. Some progress was also made on developing differential reduction techniques for hypergeometric functions, for application to the computation of Feynman diagrams.

  5. Physics and Analysis at a Hadron Collider - An Introduction (1/3)

    SciTech Connect

    2010-01-20

    This is the first lecture of three which together discuss the physics of hadron colliders with an emphasis on experimental techniques used for data analysis. This first lecture provides a brief introduction to hadron collider physics and collider detector experiments as well as offers some analysis guidelines. The lectures are aimed at graduate students.

  6. Physics and Analysis at a Hadron Collider - An Introduction (1/3)

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    This is the first lecture of three which together discuss the physics of hadron colliders with an emphasis on experimental techniques used for data analysis. This first lecture provides a brief introduction to hadron collider physics and collider detector experiments as well as offers some analysis guidelines. The lectures are aimed at graduate students.

  7. A 233 km tunnel for lepton and hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Summers, D. J.; Cremaldi, L. M.; Datta, A.; Duraisamy, M.; Luo, T.; Lyons, G. T.

    2012-12-21

    A decade ago, a cost analysis was conducted to bore a 233 km circumference Very Large Hadron Collider (VLHC) tunnel passing through Fermilab. Here we outline implementations of e{sup +}e{sup -}, pp-bar , and {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} collider rings in this tunnel using recent technological innovations. The 240 and 500 GeV e{sup +}e{sup -} colliders employ Crab Waist Crossings, ultra low emittance damped bunches, short vertical IP focal lengths, superconducting RF, and low coercivity, grain oriented silicon steel/concrete dipoles. Some details are also provided for a high luminosity 240 GeV e{sup +}e{sup -} collider and 1.75 TeV muon accelerator in a Fermilab site filler tunnel. The 40 TeV pp-bar collider uses the high intensity Fermilab p-bar source, exploits high cross sections for pp-bar production of high mass states, and uses 2 Tesla ultra low carbon steel/YBCO superconducting magnets run with liquid neon. The 35 TeV muon ring ramps the 2 Tesla superconducting magnets at 9 Hz every 0.4 seconds, uses 250 GV of superconducting RF to accelerate muons from 1.75 to 17.5 TeV in 63 orbits with 71% survival, and mitigates neutrino radiation with phase shifting, roller coaster motion in a FODO lattice.

  8. QCD corrections to stoponium production at hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Younkin, James E.; Martin, Stephen P.

    2010-03-01

    If the lighter top squark has no kinematically allowed two-body decays that conserve flavor, then it will live long enough to form hadronic bound states. The observation of the diphoton decays of stoponium could then provide a uniquely precise measurement of the top squark mass. In this paper, we calculate the cross section for the production of stoponium in a hadron collider at next-to-leading order (NLO) in QCD. We present numerical results for the cross section for production of stoponium at the LHC and study the dependence on beam energy, stoponium mass, and the renormalization and factorization scale. The cross-section is substantially increased by the NLO corrections, counteracting a corresponding decrease found earlier in the NLO diphoton branching ratio.

  9. Possible Signals of Wino LSP at the Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Ibe, M.; Moroi, Takeo; Yanagida, T.T.; /Tokyo U. /Tokyo U., RESCEU

    2006-11-27

    We consider a class of anomaly-mediated supersymmetry breaking models where gauginos acquire masses mostly from anomaly mediation while masses of other superparticles are from Kaehler interactions, which are as large as gravitino mass {approx} {Omicron}(10-100) TeV. In this class of models, the neutral Wino becomes the lightest superparticle in a wide parameter region. The mass splitting between charged and neutral Winos are very small and experimental discovery of such Winos is highly non-trivial. We discuss how we should look for Wino-induced signals at Large Hadron Collider.

  10. NLO QCD corrections to ZZ jet production at hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Binoth, T.; Gleisberg, T.; Karg, S.; Kauer, N.; Sanguinetti, G.; /Annecy, LAPTH

    2010-05-26

    A fully differential calculation of the next-to-leading order QCD corrections to the production of Z-boson pairs in association with a hard jet at the Tevatron and LHC is presented. This process is an important background for Higgs particle and new physics searches at hadron colliders. We find sizable corrections for cross sections and differential distributions, particularly at the LHC. Residual scale uncertainties are typically at the 10% level and can be further reduced by applying a veto against the emission of a second hard jet. Our results confirm that NLO corrections do not simply rescale LO predictions.

  11. INTERACTION REGION LOCAL CORRECTION FOR THE LARGE HADRON COLLIDER.

    SciTech Connect

    WEI,J.; FISCHER,W.; PTITSIN,V.; OSTOJIC,R.; STRAIT,J.

    1999-03-29

    The performance of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at collision energy is limited by the field quality of the interaction region (IB) quadrupoles and dipoles. In this paper we study the impact of the expected field errors of these magnets on the dynamic aperture (DA). Since the betatron phase advance is well defined for magnets that are located in regions of large beta functions, local corrections can be very effective and robust. We compare possible compensation schemes and propose a corrector layout to meet the required DA performance.

  12. vh@nnlo-Higgs Strahlung at hadron colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brein, Oliver; Harlander, Robert V.; Zirke, Tom J. E.

    2013-03-01

    A numerical program for the evaluation of the inclusive cross section for associated Higgs production with a massive weak gauge boson at hadron colliders is described, σ(pp/pp¯→HV), V∈{W,Z}. The calculation is performed in the framework of the Standard Model and includes next-to-next-to-leading order QCD as well as next-to-leading order electro-weak effects. Catalogue identifier: AEOF_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEOF_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 32835 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 206496 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran 77, C++. Computer: Personal computer. Operating system: Unix/Linux, Mac OS. RAM: A few 100 MB Classification: 11.1. External routines: LHAPDF (http://lhapdf.hepforge.org/), CUBA (http://www.feynarts.de/cuba/) Nature of problem: Calculation of the inclusive total cross section for associated Higgs- and W- or Z- boson production at hadron colliders through next-to-next-to-leading order QCD. Solution method: Numerical Monte Carlo integration. Running time: A few seconds for a single set of parameters.

  13. Higgs boson production with heavy quarks at hadron colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Christopher B.

    2005-11-01

    One of the remaining puzzles in particle physics is the origin of electroweak symmetry breaking. In the Standard Model (SM), a single doublet of complex scalar fields is responsible for breaking the SU(2) L x U(1)Y gauge symmetry thus giving mass to the electroweak gauge bosons via the Higgs mechanism and to the fermions via Yukawa couplings. The remnant of the process is a vet to he discovered scalar particle, the Higgs boson (h). However, current and future experiments at hadron colliders hold great promise. Of particular interest at hadron colliders is the production of a Higgs boson in association with a pair of heavy quarks, pp¯(pp) → QQ¯h, where Q can be either a top or a bottom quark. Indeed, the production of a Higgs boson with a pair of top quarks provides a very distinctive signal in hadronic collisions where background processes are formidable, and it will be instrumental in the discovery of a Higgs boson below about 130 GeV at the LHC. On the other hand, the production of a Higgs boson with bottom quarks can be strongly enhanced in models of new physics beyond the SM, e.g. supersymmetric models. If this is the case, bb¯h production will play a crucial role at the Tevatron where it could provide the first signal of new physics. Given the prominent role that Higgs production with heavy quarks can play at hadron colliders, it becomes imperative to have precise theoretical predictions for total and differential cross sections. In this dissertation, we outline and present detailed results for the next-to-leading order (NLO) calculation of the Quantum Chromodynamic (QCD) corrections to QQ¯h production at both the Tevatron and the LHC. This calculation involves several difficult issues due to the three massive particles in the final state, a situation which is at the frontier of radiative correction calculations in quantum field theory. We detail the novel techniques developed to deal with these challenges. The calculation of pp¯(pp) → bb¯h at NLO in

  14. Challenges for MSSM Higgs searches at hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Carena, Marcela S.; Menon, A.; Wagner, C.E.M.; /Argonne /Chicago U., EFI /KICP, Chicago /Chicago U.

    2007-04-01

    In this article we analyze the impact of B-physics and Higgs physics at LEP on standard and non-standard Higgs bosons searches at the Tevatron and the LHC, within the framework of minimal flavor violating supersymmetric models. The B-physics constraints we consider come from the experimental measurements of the rare B-decays b {yields} s{gamma} and B{sub u} {yields} {tau}{nu} and the experimental limit on the B{sub s} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} branching ratio. We show that these constraints are severe for large values of the trilinear soft breaking parameter A{sub t}, rendering the non-standard Higgs searches at hadron colliders less promising. On the contrary these bounds are relaxed for small values of A{sub t} and large values of the Higgsino mass parameter {mu}, enhancing the prospects for the direct detection of non-standard Higgs bosons at both colliders. We also consider the available ATLAS and CMS projected sensitivities in the standard model Higgs search channels, and we discuss the LHC's ability in probing the whole MSSM parameter space. In addition we also consider the expected Tevatron collider sensitivities in the standard model Higgs h {yields} b{bar b} channel to show that it may be able to find 3 {sigma} evidence in the B-physics allowed regions for small or moderate values of the stop mixing parameter.

  15. Summary of the very large hadron collider physics and detector workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, G.; Berger, M.; Brandt, A.; Eno, S.

    1997-10-01

    One of the options for an accelerator beyond the LHC is a hadron collider with higher energy. Work is going on to explore accelerator technologies that would make such a machine feasible. This workshop concentrated on the physics and detector issues associated with a hadron collider with an energy in the center of mass of the order of 100 to 200 TeV.

  16. Direct measurement of the top quark charge at hadron colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baur, U.; Buice, M.; Orr, Lynne H.

    2001-11-01

    We consider photon radiation in t¯t events at the upgraded Fermilab Tevatron and the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) as a tool to measure the electric charge of the top quark. We analyze the contributions of t¯tγ production and radiative top quark decays to pp(-)-->γl+/-νb¯bjj, assuming that both b quarks are tagged. With 20 fb-1 at the Tevatron, the possibility that the ``top quark'' discovered in run I is actually an exotic charge -4/3 quark can be ruled out at the ~95% confidence level. At the CERN LHC, it will be possible to determine the charge of the top quark with an accuracy of about 10%.

  17. Modification of Fox-Wolfram moments for hadron colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiller, L. A.

    2016-03-01

    Collisions of composite particles impose an arbitrary boost in the longitudinal direction on a given event. This implies that the centre-of-mass frame at hadron colliders is undetermined for processes with missing energy in the final state. This motivates the modification of the Fox-Wolfram moments such that the moments for a given event are identical when viewed in the lab or centre-of-mass frame of the beam. The resulting moments are invariant under rotations in the plane transverse to the beam and boosts parallel to the beam. These moments are then used to demonstrate improved signal separation in the channel where the Higgs decays to two b-quarks while being produced in association with a vector boson.

  18. Flavour physics and the Large Hadron Collider beauty experiment.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Valerie

    2012-02-28

    An exciting new era in flavour physics has just begun with the start of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The LHCb (where b stands for beauty) experiment, designed specifically to search for new phenomena in quantum loop processes and to provide a deeper understanding of matter-antimatter asymmetries at the most fundamental level, is producing many new and exciting results. It gives me great pleasure to describe a selected few of the results here-in particular, the search for rare B(0)(s)-->μ+ μ- decays and the measurement of the B(0)(s) charge-conjugation parity-violating phase, both of which offer high potential for the discovery of new physics at and beyond the LHC energy frontier in the very near future.

  19. Calculations of bottom quark production at hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Kuebel, D.

    1991-06-29

    This thesis studies Monte Carlo simulations of QCD heavy flavor production processes (p{bar p} {yields} Q({anti Q})X) at hadron colliders. ISAJET bottom quark cross-sections are compared to the O({alpha} {sub s}{sup 3}) perturbative calculation of Nason, Dawson, and Ellis. These Monte Carlo cross-sections are computed from data samples which use different parton distribution functions and physics parameters. Distributions are presented in the heavy quark`s transverse momentum and rapidity. Correlations in rapidity and azimuthal angle are computed for the heavy flavor pair. Theory issues which arise are the behavior of the cross-section at low and high values of transverse momentum and the treatment of double counting problems in the flavor excitation samples. An important result is that ISAJET overestimates bottom quark production cross-sections and K factors. These findings are relevant for estimates of rates and backgrounds of heavy floor events.

  20. Calculations of bottom quark production at hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Kuebel, D.

    1991-06-29

    This thesis studies Monte Carlo simulations of QCD heavy flavor production processes (p{bar p} {yields} Q({anti Q})X) at hadron colliders. ISAJET bottom quark cross-sections are compared to the O({alpha} {sub s}{sup 3}) perturbative calculation of Nason, Dawson, and Ellis. These Monte Carlo cross-sections are computed from data samples which use different parton distribution functions and physics parameters. Distributions are presented in the heavy quark's transverse momentum and rapidity. Correlations in rapidity and azimuthal angle are computed for the heavy flavor pair. Theory issues which arise are the behavior of the cross-section at low and high values of transverse momentum and the treatment of double counting problems in the flavor excitation samples. An important result is that ISAJET overestimates bottom quark production cross-sections and K factors. These findings are relevant for estimates of rates and backgrounds of heavy floor events.

  1. General-Purpose Detectors for the Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Froidevaux, Daniel; Sphicas, Paris

    2006-11-01

    This review describes the two general-purpose experiments, ATLAS and CMS, that have been designed to study proton-proton collisions at 14 TeV, the highest center-of-mass energy ever achieved, at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN in Geneva, Switzerland. These experiments have undergone a long research and development and construction period since 1989 and are now in the middle of a strenuous and exciting integration, installation, and commissioning period. After a brief introduction to the physics context and prospects as perceived today, this review presents an overview of both projects in terms of their global design characteristics. The main features and challenges related to the tracking systems, to the calorimetry, and to the muon spectrometers are described. The various aspects of the trigger and data acquisition systems and of the computing and software are also discussed broadly. Finally, we conclude with the lessons learned during the design and construction years.

  2. Precise Predictions for Z + 4 Jets at Hadron Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Ita, H.; Bern, Z.; Dixon, L.J.; Cordero, F.Febres; Kosower, D.A.; Maitre, D.

    2011-12-09

    We present the cross section for production of a Z boson in association with four jets at the Large Hadron Collider, at next-to-leading order in the QCD coupling. When the Z decays to neutrinos, this process is a key irreducible background to many searches for new physics. Its computation has been made feasible through the development of the on-shell approach to perturbative quantum field theory. We present the total cross section for pp collisions at {radical}s = 7 TeV, after folding in the decay of the Z boson, or virtual photon, to a charged-lepton pair. We also provide distributions of the transverse momenta of the four jets, and we compare cross sections and distributions to the corresponding ones for the production of a W boson with accompanying jets.

  3. 120-mm supercondcting quadrupole for interaction regions of hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Zlobin, A.V.; Kashikhin, V.V.; Mokhov, N.V.; Novitski, I.; /Fermilab

    2010-05-01

    Magnetic and mechanical designs of a Nb{sub 3}Sn quadrupole magnet with 120-mm aperture suitable for interaction regions of hadron colliders are presented. The magnet is based on a two-layer shell-type coil and a cold iron yoke. Special spacers made of a low-Z material are implemented in the coil mid-planes to reduce the level of radiation heat deposition and radiation dose in the coil. The quadrupole mechanical structure is based on aluminum collars supported by an iron yoke and a stainless steel skin. Magnet parameters including maximum field gradient and field harmonics, Nb3Sn coil pre-stress and protection at the operating temperatures of 4.5 and 1.9 K are reported. The level and distribution of radiation heat deposition in the coil and other magnet components are discussed.

  4. Double vector meson production in photon-hadron interactions at hadronic colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonçalves, V. P.; Moreira, B. D.; Navarra, F. S.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper we analyze the double vector meson production in photon-hadron (γ h) interactions at pp / pA / AA collisions and present predictions for the ρ ρ , J/Ψ J/Ψ , and ρ J/Ψ production considering the double scattering mechanism. We estimate the total cross sections and rapidity distributions at LHC energies and compare our results with the predictions for the double vector meson production in γ γ interactions at hadronic colliders. We present predictions for the different rapidity ranges probed by the ALICE, ATLAS, CMS, and LHCb Collaborations. Our results demonstrate that the ρ ρ and J/Ψ J/Ψ production in PbPb collisions is dominated by the double-scattering mechanism, while the two-photon mechanism dominates in pp collisions. Moreover, our results indicate that the analysis of the ρ J/Ψ production at LHC can be useful to constrain the double-scattering mechanism.

  5. ELECTRON COOLING AND ELECTRON-ION COLLIDERS AT BNL.

    SciTech Connect

    BEN-ZVI,I.

    2007-10-03

    Superconducting Energy Recovery Linacs (ERL) have significant potential uses in various fields, including High Energy Physics and Nuclear Physics. Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is pursuing some of the potential applications in this area and the technology issues that are associated with these applications. The work addressed in this paper is carried out at BNL towards applications in electron cooling of high-energy hadron beams and electron-nucleon colliders. The common issues for these applications are the generation of high currents of polarized or high-brightness unpolarized electrons, high-charge per bunch and high-current. One must address the associated issue of High-Order Modes generation and damping. Superconducting ERLs have great advantages for these applications as will be outlined in the text.

  6. Luminosity limitations for Electron-Ion Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Valeri Lebedev

    2000-09-01

    The major limitations on reaching the maximum luminosity for an electron ion collider are discussed in application to the ring-ring and linac-ring colliders. It is shown that with intensive electron cooling the luminosity of 10{sup 33} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} is feasible for both schemes for the center-of-mass collider energy above approximately 15 GeV. Each scheme has its own pros and cons. The ring-ring collider is better supported by the current accelerator technology while the linac-ring collider suggests unique features for spin manipulations of the electron beam. The article addresses a general approach to a choice of collider scheme and parameters leaving details for other conference publications dedicated to particular aspects of the ring-ring and linac-ring colliders.

  7. A new micro-strip tracker for the new generation of experiments at hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Dinardo, Mauro E.

    2005-12-01

    This thesis concerns the development and characterization of a prototype Silicon micro-strip detector that can be used in the forward (high rapidity) region of a hadron collider. These detectors must operate in a high radiation environment without any important degradation of their performance. The innovative feature of these detectors is the readout electronics, which, being completely data-driven, allows for the direct use of the detector information at the lowest level of the trigger. All the particle hits on the detector can be readout in real-time without any external trigger and any particular limitation due to dead-time. In this way, all the detector information is available to elaborate a very selective trigger decision based on a fast reconstruction of tracks and vertex topology. These detectors, together with the new approach to the trigger, have been developed in the context of the BTeV R&D program; our aim was to define the features and the design parameters of an optimal experiment for heavy flavour physics at hadron colliders. Application of these detectors goes well beyond the BTeV project and, in particular, involves the future upgrades of experiments at hadron colliders, such as Atlas, CMS and LHCb. These experiments, indeed, are already considering for their future high-intensity runs a new trigger strategy a la BTeV. Their aim is to select directly at trigger level events containing Bhadrons, which, on several cases, come from the decay of Higgs bosons, Zo's or W±'s; the track information can also help on improving the performance of the electron and muon selection at the trigger level. For this reason, they are going to develop new detectors with practically the same characteristics as those of BTeV. To this extent, the work accomplished in this thesis could serve as guide-line for those upgrades.

  8. Accelerator physics in ERL based polarized electron ion collider

    SciTech Connect

    Hao, Yue

    2015-05-03

    This talk will present the current accelerator physics challenges and solutions in designing ERL-based polarized electron-hadron colliders, and illustrate them with examples from eRHIC and LHeC designs. These challenges include multi-pass ERL design, highly HOM-damped SRF linacs, cost effective FFAG arcs, suppression of kink instability due to beam-beam effect, and control of ion accumulation and fast ion instabilities.

  9. Design study for a staged Very Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Peter J. Limon et al.

    2001-06-26

    Advancing accelerator designs and technology to achieve the highest energies has enabled remarkable discoveries in particle physics. This report presents the results of a design study for a new collider at Fermilab that will create exceptional opportunities for particle physics--a two-stage very large hadron collider. In its first stage, the machine provides a facility for energy-frontier particle physics research, at an affordable cost and on a reasonable time scale. In a second-stage upgrade in the same tunnel, the VLHC offers the possibility of reaching 100 times the collision energy of the Tevatron. The existing Fermilab accelerator complex serves as the injector, and the collision halls are on the Fermilab site. The Stage-1 VLHC reaches a collision energy of 40 TeV and a luminosity comparable to that of the LHC, using robust superferric magnets of elegant simplicity housed in a large-circumference tunnel. The Stage-2 VLHC, constructed after the scientific potential of the first stage has been fully realized, reaches a collision energy of at least 175 TeV with the installation of high-field magnets in the same tunnel. It makes optimal use of the infrastructure developed for the Stage-1 machine, using the Stage-1 accelerator itself as the injector. The goals of this study, commissioned by the Fermilab Director in November 2000, are: to create reasonable designs for the Stage-1 and Stage-2 VLHC in the same tunnel; to discover the technical challenges and potential impediments to building such a facility at Fermilab; to determine the approximate costs of the major elements of the Stage-1 VLHC; and to identify areas requiring significant R and D to establish the basis for the design.

  10. Low-cost hadron colliders at Fermilab: A discussion paper

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, G.W.; Malamud, E.

    1996-06-21

    New more economic approaches are required to continue the dramatic exponential rise in collider energies as represented by the well known Livingston plot. The old idea of low cost, low field iron dominated magnets in a small diameter pipe may become feasible in the next decade with dramatic recent advances in technology: (1) advanced tunneling technologies for small diameter, non human accessible tunnels, (2) accurate remote guidance systems for tunnel survey and boring machine steering, (3) high T{sub c} superconductors operating at liquid N{sub 2} or liquid H{sub 2} temperatures, (4) industrial applications of remote manipulation and robotics, (5) digitally multiplexed electronics to minimize cables, (6) achievement of high luminosities in p-p and p-{anti P} colliders. The goal of this paper is to stimulate continuing discussions on approaches to this new collider and to identify critical areas needing calculations, construction of models, proof of principle experiments, and full scale prototypes in order to determine feasibility and arrive at cost estimates.

  11. Supersymmetric dark matter in the harsh light of the Large Hadron Collider

    PubMed Central

    Peskin, Michael E.

    2015-01-01

    I review the status of the model of dark matter as the neutralino of supersymmetry in the light of constraints on supersymmetry given by the 7- to 8-TeV data from the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). PMID:25331902

  12. One-Loop Helicity Amplitudes for tt Production at Hadron Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Badger, Simon; Sattler, Ralf; Yundin, Valery

    2011-04-01

    We present compact analytic expressions for all one-loop helicity amplitudes contributing to tt production at hadron colliders. Using recently developed generalized unitarity methods and a traditional Feynman based approach we produce a fast and flexible implementation.

  13. Development of superconducting links for the Large Hadron Collider machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballarino, Amalia

    2014-04-01

    In the framework of the upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) machine, new superconducting lines are being developed for the feeding of the LHC magnets. The proposed electrical layout envisages the location of the power converters in surface buildings, and the transfer of the current from the surface to the LHC tunnel, where the magnets are located, via superconducting links containing tens of cables feeding different circuits and transferring altogether more than 150 kA. Depending on the location, the links will have a length ranging from 300 m to 500 m, and they will span a vertical distance of about 80 m. An overview of the R&D program that has been launched by CERN is presented, with special attention to the development of novel types of cables made from MgB2 and high temperature superconductors (Bi-2223 and REBCO) and to the results of the tests performed on prototype links. Plans for future activities are presented, together with a timeline for potential future integration in the LHC machine.

  14. The Hunt for New Physics at the Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, Pran; Nelson, Brent; Davoudiasl, Hooman; Dutta, Bhaskar; Feldman, Daniel; Liu, Zuowei; Han, Tao; Langacker, Paul; Mohapatra, Rabi; Valle, Jose; Pilaftsis, Apostolos; Zerwas, Dirk; AbdusSalam, Shehu; Adam-Bourdarios, Claire; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Allanach, Benjamin; Altunkaynak, B.; Anchordoqui, Luis A.; Baer, Howard; Bajc, Borut; Buchmueller, O.; Carena, M.; Cavanaugh, R.; Chang, S.; Choi, Kiwoon; Csáki, C.; Dawson, S.; de Campos, F.; De Roeck, A.; Dührssen, M.; Éboli, O. J. P.; Ellis, J. R.; Flächer, H.; Goldberg, H.; Grimus, W.; Haisch, U.; Heinemeyer, S.; Hirsch, M.; Holmes, M.; Ibrahim, Tarek; Isidori, G.; Kane, Gordon; Kong, K.; Lafaye, Remi; Landsberg, G.; Lavoura, L.; Lee, Jae Sik; Lee, Seung J.; Lisanti, M.; Lüst, Dieter; Magro, M. B.; Mahbubani, R.; Malinsky, M.; Maltoni, Fabio; Morisi, S.; Mühlleitner, M. M.; Mukhopadhyaya, B.; Neubert, M.; Olive, K. A.; Perez, Gilad; Pérez, Pavel Fileviez; Plehn, T.; Pontón, E.; Porod, Werner; Quevedo, F.; Rauch, M.; Restrepo, D.; Rizzo, T. G.; Romão, J. C.; Ronga, F. J.; Santiago, J.; Schechter, J.; Senjanović, G.; Shao, J.; Spira, M.; Stieberger, S.; Sullivan, Zack; Tait, Tim M. P.; Tata, Xerxes; Taylor, T. R.; Toharia, M.; Wacker, J.; Wagner, C. E. M.; Wang, Lian-Tao; Weiglein, G.; Zeppenfeld, D.; Zurek, K.

    2010-03-01

    The Large Hadron Collider presents an unprecedented opportunity to probe the realm of new physics in the TeV region and shed light on some of the core unresolved issues of particle physics. These include the nature of electroweak symmetry breaking, the origin of mass, the possible constituent of cold dark matter, new sources of CP violation needed to explain the baryon excess in the universe, the possible existence of extra gauge groups and extra matter, and importantly the path Nature chooses to resolve the hierarchy problem - is it supersymmetry or extra dimensions. Many models of new physics beyond the standard model contain a hidden sector which can be probed at the LHC. Additionally, the LHC will be a top factory and accurate measurements of the properties of the top and its rare decays will provide a window to new physics. Further, the LHC could shed light on the origin of neutralino masses if the new physics associated with their generation lies in the TeV region. Finally, the LHC is also a laboratory to test the hypothesis of TeV scale strings and D brane models. An overview of these possibilities is presented in the spirit that it will serve as a companion to the Technical Design Reports (TDRs) by the particle detector groups ATLAS and CMS to facilitate the test of the new theoretical ideas at the LHC. Which of these ideas stands the test of the LHC data will govern the course of particle physics in the subsequent decades.

  15. Discovering Higgs Boson Decays to Lepton Jets at Hadron Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Falkowski, Adam; Ruderman, Joshua T.; Volansky, Tomer; Zupan, Jure

    2010-12-10

    The Higgs boson may decay predominantly into a hidden sector, producing lepton jets instead of the standard Higgs signatures. We propose a search strategy for such a signal at hadron colliders. A promising channel is the associated production of the Higgs boson with a Z or W. The dominant background is Z or W plus QCD jets. The lepton jets can be discriminated from QCD jets by cutting on the electromagnetic fraction and charge ratio. The former is the fraction of jet energy deposited in the electromagnetic calorimeter and the latter is the ratio of energy carried by charged particles to the electromagnetic energy. We use a Monte Carlo description of detector response to estimate QCD rejection efficiencies of O(10{sup -3}) per jet. The expected 5{sigma} (3{sigma}) discovery reach in Higgs boson mass is {approx}115 GeV (150 GeV) at the Tevatron with 10 fb{sup -1} of data and {approx}110 GeV (130 GeV) at the 7 TeV LHC with 1 fb{sup -1}.

  16. Resolving gluon fusion loops at current and future hadron colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azatov, Aleksandr; Grojean, Christophe; Paul, Ayan; Salvioni, Ennio

    2016-09-01

    Inclusive Higgs measurements at the LHC have limited resolution on the gluon fusion loops, being unable to distinguish the long-distance contributions mediated by the top quark from possible short-distance new physics effects. Using an Effective Field Theory (EFT) approach we compare several proposed methods to lift this degeneracy, including toverline{t}h and boosted, off-shell and double Higgs production, and perform detailed projections to the High-Luminosity LHC and a future hadron collider. In addition, we revisit off-shell Higgs production. Firstly, we point out its sensitivity to modifications of the top- Z couplings, and by means of a general analysis we show that the reach is comparable to that of tree-level processes such as toverline{t}Z production. Implications for composite Higgs models are also discussed. Secondly, we assess the regime of validity of the EFT, performing an explicit comparison for a simple extension of the Standard Model containing one vector-like quark.

  17. Resummation of the transverse-energy distribution in Higgs boson production at the Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grazzini, Massimiliano; Papaefstathiou, Andreas; Smillie, Jennifer M.; Webber, Bryan R.

    2014-09-01

    We compute the resummed hadronic transverse-energy ( E T ) distribution due to initial-state QCD radiation in the production of a Standard Model Higgs boson of mass 126 GeV by gluon fusion at the Large Hadron Collider, with matching to next-to-leading order calculations at large E T . Effects of hadronization, underlying event and limited detector acceptance are estimated using aMC@NLO with the Herwig++ and Pythia8 event generators.

  18. Investigating Electroweak Physics at the Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tien, Pin-Ju

    The basic principle of naturalness has driven the majority of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) program, but so far all searches for new physics beyond the Standard Model (SM) have come up empty. On the other hand, a few existing measurements of SM processes contain interesting anomalies, for instance in the measurement of the WW cross section. The deviation of WW cross section was seen both at ATLAS and CMS and both at 7 and 8 TeV. The discrepancy also became larger at 8 TeV. Combined results with LHC 7 TeV and 8 TeV implies around a three sigma deviation from the SM NLO calculation. This allows for the possibility of new physics with mass scales very close to the Electroweak Scale. We show that the addition of physics beyond the SM at electroweak scale can improve the agreement with the data. In particular supersymmetric models involving charginos, stops and sleptons all provide better fits with the data. In the case of models of sleptons that agree better with the WW data, they can also explain dark matter and the (g-2) anomaly. Furthermore, we show that there are several different classes of stop driven scenarios that not only evade all direct searches, but improve the agreement with the data in the SM measurement of the WW cross section. We also demonstrate that even if these anomalies are not due to new physics, the WW channel can also be used to derive new exclusion limits which are more powerful than existing results using the same ATLAS and CMS datasets. By examining the differential WW cross section we show that the gap between LHC and LEP exclusions can be start to be closed. In particular, we lay out a program under which the diffcult to search for regions of new physics models with large SM backgrounds can be investigated.

  19. Accelerator physics and technology challenges of very high energy hadron colliders

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Shiltsev, Vladimir D.

    2015-08-20

    High energy hadron colliders have been in the forefront of particle physics for more than three decades. At present, international particle physics community considers several options for a 100 TeV proton–proton collider as a possible post-LHC energy frontier facility. The method of colliding beams has not fully exhausted its potential but has slowed down considerably in its progress. This article briefly reviews the accelerator physics and technology challenges of the future very high energy colliders and outlines the areas of required research and development towards their technical and financial feasibility.

  20. Science and Technology of the TESLA Electron-Positron Linear Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Albrecht

    2002-07-01

    Recent analyses of the long term future of particles physics in Asia, Europe, and the U.S.A. have led to the consensus that the next major facility to be built to unravel the secrets of the micro-cosmos is an electron-positron linear collider in the energy range of 500 to 1000 GeV. This collider should be constructed in an as timely fashion as possible to overlap with the Large Hadron Collider, under construction at CERN. Here, the scientific potential and the technological aspects of the TESLA projects, a superconducting collider with an integrated X-ray laser laboratory, are summarised.

  1. Precise Predictions for W+4-Jet Production at the Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, C. F.; Bern, Z.; Ita, H.; Dixon, L. J.; Cordero, F. Febres; Forde, D.; Gleisberg, T.; Kosower, D. A.; Maitre, D.

    2011-03-04

    We present the next-to-leading order (NLO) QCD results for W+4-jet production at hadron colliders. This is the first hadron-collider process with five final-state objects to be computed at NLO. It represents an important background to many searches for new physics at the energy frontier. Total cross sections, as well as distributions in the jet transverse momenta, are provided for the initial LHC energy of {radical}(s)=7 TeV. We use a leading-color approximation, known to be accurate to 3% for W production with fewer jets. The calculation uses the BlackHat library along with the SHERPA package.

  2. Production of tidal-charged black holes at the Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Gingrich, Douglas M.

    2010-03-01

    Tidal-charged black hole solutions localized on a three-brane in the five-dimensional gravity scenario of Randall and Sundrum have been known for some time. The solutions have been used to study the decay, and growth, of black holes with initial mass of about 10 TeV. These studies are interesting in that certain black holes, if produced at the Large Hadron Collider, could live long enough to leave the detectors. I examine the production of tidal-charged black holes at the Large Hadron Collider and show that it is very unlikely that they will be produced during the lifetime of the accelerator.

  3. Diffractive Higgs boson production at the Fermilab Tevatron and the CERN Large Hadron Collider.

    PubMed

    Enberg, R; Ingelman, G; Kissavos, A; Tîmneanu, N

    2002-08-19

    Improved possibilities to find the Higgs boson in diffractive events, having less hadronic activity, depend on whether the cross section is large enough. Based on the soft color interaction models that successfully describe diffractive hard scattering at DESY HERA and the Fermilab Tevatron, we find that only a few diffractive Higgs events may be produced at the Tevatron, but we predict a substantial rate at the CERN Large Hadron Collider.

  4. Probing the Higgs sector of the minimal Left-Right symmetric model at future hadron colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dev, P. S. Bhupal; Mohapatra, Rabindra N.; Zhang, Yongchao

    2016-05-01

    If neutrino masses arise from a TeV-scale minimal Left-Right seesaw model, the ensuing extended Higgs sector with neutral, singly and doubly-charged scalars has a plethora of implications for new Higgs boson searches beyond the Standard Model at future hadron colliders, such as the √{s} = 14 TeV High-Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) and the proposed √{s} = 100 TeV collider (FCC-hh or SPPC). In this article, we provide a glimpse of this new physics in the Higgs sector. Our discussion focuses on the minimal non-supersymmetric version of the Left-Right model with high-scale parity breaking but TeV-scale SU(2) R -breaking, a property desirable to suppress the type-II seesaw contribution to neutrino masses. We analyze the masses and couplings of the physical Higgs bosons in this model, and discuss their dominant production and decay modes at hadron colliders. We identify the best discovery channels for each of the non-SM Higgs bosons and estimate the expected SM backgrounds in these channels to derive the sensitivity reaches for the new Higgs sector at future hadron colliders under discussion. Following a rather conservative approach, we estimate that the heavy Higgs sector can be effectively probed up to 15 TeV at the √{s} = 100 TeV machine. We also discuss how the LR Higgs sector can be distinguished from other extended Higgs sectors.

  5. Observation of exclusive electron-positron production in hadron-hadron collisions.

    PubMed

    Abulencia, A; Adelman, J; Affolder, T; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Ambrose, D; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Anikeev, K; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Aoki, M; Apollinari, G; Arguin, J-F; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Azzurri, P; Bacchetta, N; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Belforte, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Belloni, A; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Berry, T; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bolla, G; Bolshov, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Budroni, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carillo, S; Carlsmith, D; Caron, B; Carosi, R; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, I; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Choudalakis, G; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciljak, M; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Coca, M; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cooper, B; Copic, K; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Crescioli, F; Almenar, C Cuenca; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cully, J C; Cyr, D; Daronco, S; D'Auria, S; Davies, T; D'Onofrio, M; Dagenhart, D; de Barbaro, P; Cecco, S De; Deisher, A; Lentdecker, G De; Dell'orso, M; Paoli, F Delli; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; Pedis, D De; Derwent, P F; Giovanni, G P Di; Dionisi, C; Ruzza, B Di; Dittmann, J R; Dituro, P; Dörr, C; Donati, S; Donega, M; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Efron, J; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, I; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Foland, A; Forrester, S; Foster, G W; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garcia, J E; Garberson, F; Garfinkel, A F; Gay, C; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Giagu, S; Giannetti, P; Gibson, A; Gibson, K; Gimmell, J L; Ginsburg, C; Giokaris, N; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Goldstein, J; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Griffiths, M; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Grundler, U; da Costa, J Guimaraes; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Hamilton, A; Han, B-Y; Han, J Y; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartz, M; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Heijboer, A; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Henderson, C; Herndon, M; Heuser, J; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Holloway, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Huston, J; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ishizawa, Y; Ivanov, A; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeans, D; Jensen, H; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Jung, J E; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kemp, Y; Kephart, R; Kerzel, U; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Klute, M; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kovalev, A; Kraan, A C; Kraus, J; Kravchenko, I; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kubo, T; Kuhlmann, S E; Kuhr, T; Kusakabe, Y; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lai, S; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lecompte, T; Lee, J; Lee, J; Lee, Y J; Lee, S W; Lefèvre, R; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Levy, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C; Lin, C S; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Loverre, P; Lu, R-S; Lucchesi, D; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Lytken, E; Mack, P; Macqueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Maki, T; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Manca, G; Margaroli, F; Marginean, R; Marino, C; Marino, C P; Martin, A; Martin, M; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Maruyama, T; Mastrandrea, P; Masubuchi, T; Matsunaga, H; Mattson, M E; Mazini, R; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Menzemer, S; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Messina, A; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miles, J; Miller, R; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyamoto, A; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Mohr, B; Moore, R; Morello, M; Fernandez, P Movilla; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Nachtman, J; Nagano, A; Naganoma, J; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Necula, V; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nigmanov, T; Nodulman, L; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Oldeman, R; Orava, R; Osterberg, K; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Paramonov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Piedra, J; Pinera, L; Pinfold, J; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Portell, X; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Ranjan, N; Rappoccio, S; Reisert, B; Rekovic, V; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Saarikko, H; Sabik, S; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Salamanna, G; Saltó, O; Saltzberg, D; Sánchez, C; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Savard, P; Savoy-Navarro, A; Scheidle, T; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scott, A L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sfyrla, A; Shapiro, M D; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Sherman, D; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Sjolin, J; Slaughter, A J; Slaunwhite, J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soderberg, M; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spalding, J; Spinella, F; Spreitzer, T; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; Staveris-Polykalas, A; Denis, R St; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Sun, H; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Takikawa, K; Tanaka, M; Tanaka, R; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Tiwari, V; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Tourneur, S; Trischuk, W; Tsuchiya, R; Tsuno, S; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Unverhau, T; Uozumi, S; Usynin, D; Vallecorsa, S; van Remortel, N; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Veramendi, G; Veszpremi, V; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vine, T; Vollrath, I; Volobouev, I; Volpi, G; Würthwein, F; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, J; Wagner, W; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waschke, S; Waters, D; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, G; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wynne, S M; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yamashita, T; Yang, C; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zaw, I; Zhang, X; Zhou, J; Zucchelli, S

    2007-03-16

    We present the first observation of exclusive e(+)e(-) production in hadron-hadron collisions, using pp[over] collision data at (square root) s = 1.96 TeV taken by the run II Collider Detector at Fermilab, and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 532 pb(-1). We require the absence of any particle signatures in the detector except for an electron and a positron candidate, each with transverse energy E(T) > 5 GeV and pseudorapidity |eta| < 2. With these criteria, 16 events are observed compared to a background expectation of 1.9+/-0.3 events. These events are consistent in cross section and properties with the QED process pp[over] --> p + e(+)e(-) + p[over] through two-photon exchange. The measured cross section is 1.6(-0.3)(+0.5)(stat) +/- 0.3(syst) pb. This agrees with the theoretical prediction of 1.71+/-0.01 pb.

  6. NCG gluon fusion for the Higgs production at large hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Chadou, I.; Mebarki, N.; Bekli, M. R.

    2012-06-27

    A pure NCG gluon fusion contribution to the Higgs production at large hadron colliders is discussed. It is shown that the NCG results become relevant at very high energies. This can be a good signal for the space-time non commutativity events.

  7. Summary of the Very Large Hadron Collider Physics and Detector subgroup

    SciTech Connect

    Denisov, D.; Keller, S.

    1996-12-31

    We summarize the activity of the Very Large Hadron Collider Physics and Detector subgroup during Snowmass 96. Members of the group: M. Albrow, R. Diebold, S. Feher, L. Jones, R. Harris, D. Hedin, W. Kilgore, J. Lykken, F. Olness, T. Rizzo, V. Sirotenko, and J. Womersley. 9 refs.

  8. Physics and Analysis at a Hadron Collider - Searching for New Physics (2/3)

    SciTech Connect

    2010-01-20

    This is the second lecture of three which together discuss the physics of hadron colliders with an emphasis on experimental techniques used for data analysis. This second lecture discusses techniques important for analyses searching for new physics using the CDF B_s --> mu+ mu- search as a specific example. The lectures are aimed at graduate students.

  9. Taking Energy to the Physics Classroom from the Large Hadron Collider at CERN

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cid, Xabier; Cid, Ramon

    2009-01-01

    In 2008, the greatest experiment in history began. When in full operation, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN will generate the greatest amount of information that has ever been produced in an experiment before. It will also reveal some of the most fundamental secrets of nature. Despite the enormous amount of information available on this…

  10. Physics and Analysis at a Hadron Collider - Searching for New Physics (2/3)

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    This is the second lecture of three which together discuss the physics of hadron colliders with an emphasis on experimental techniques used for data analysis. This second lecture discusses techniques important for analyses searching for new physics using the CDF B_s --> mu+ mu- search as a specific example. The lectures are aimed at graduate students.

  11. Signatures for Right-Handed Neutrinos at the Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Huitu, Katri; Rai, Santosh Kumar; Khalil, Shaaban; Okada, Hiroshi

    2008-10-31

    We explore possible signatures for right-handed neutrinos in a TeV scale B-L extension of the standard model at the Large Hadron Collider. The studied four lepton signal has a tiny standard model background. We find the signal experimentally accessible at the LHC for the considered parameter regions.

  12. Constraints on new physics from baryogenesis and Large Hadron Collider data.

    PubMed

    Damgaard, Poul H; O'Connell, Donal; Petersen, Troels C; Tranberg, Anders

    2013-11-27

    We demonstrate the power of constraining theories of new physics by insisting that they lead to electroweak baryogenesis, while agreeing with current data from the Large Hadron Collider. The general approach is illustrated with a singlet scalar extension of the standard model. Stringent bounds can already be obtained, which reduce the viable parameter space to a small island.

  13. Advanced Concepts for Electron-Ion Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Yaroslav Derbenev

    2002-08-01

    A superconducting energy recovery linac (ERL) of 5 to 10 GeV was proposed earlier as an alternative to electron storage rings to deliver polarized electron beam for electron-ion collider (EIC). To enhance the utilization efficiency of electron beam from a polarized source, it is proposed to complement the ERL by circulator ring (CR) wherein the injected electrons undergo up to 100 revolutions colliding with the ion beam. In this way, electron injector and linac operate in pulsed current (beam energy recovery) regime of a relatively low average current, while the polarization is still easily delivered and preserved. To make it also easier delivering and manipulating the proton and light ion polarization, twisted (figure 8) synchrotrons are proposed for heavy particle booster and collider ring. Same type of beam orbit can be used then for electron circulator. Electron cooling (EC) of the ion beam is considered an inevitable component of high luminosity EIC (1033/s. cm2 or above). It is recognized that EC also gives a possibility to obtain very short ion bunches, that allows much stronger final focusing. At the same time, short bunches make feasible the crab crossing (and traveling focus for ion beam) at collision points, hence, allow maximizing the collision rate. As a result, one can anticipate the luminosity increase by one or two orders of magnitude.

  14. Production of doubly heavy-flavored hadrons at e+e- colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Xu-Chang; Chang, Chao-Hsi; Pan, Zan

    2016-02-01

    Production of the doubly heavy-flavored hadrons (Bc meson, doubly heavy baryons Ξc c , Ξb c , Ξb b , their excited states, and antiparticles of them as well) at e+e- colliders is investigated under two different approaches: LO (leading-order QCD complete calculation) and LL (leading-logarithm fragmentation calculation). The results for the production obtained by the LO and LL approaches, including the angle distributions of the produced hadrons with unpolarized and polarized incoming beams, the behaviors on the energy fraction of the produced doubly heavy-flavored hadron, and comparisons of results between the two approaches, are presented in tables and figures. Thus, characteristics of the production and uncertainties of the approaches are shown precisely, and it is concluded that only if the colliders run at the energies around the Z pole (which may be called the Z factories) and the luminosity of the colliders is as high as possible is the study of the doubly heavy-flavored hadrons completely accessible.

  15. Drag of heavy quarks in quark gluon plasma at energies available at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC)

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Santosh K.; Alam, Jan-e; Mohanty, Payal

    2010-07-15

    The drag and diffusion coefficients of charm and bottom quarks propagating through quark gluon plasma (QGP) have been evaluated for conditions relevant to nuclear collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The dead cone and Landau-Pomeronchuk-Migdal (LPM) effects on radiative energy loss of heavy quarks have been considered. Both radiative and collisional processes of energy loss are included in the effective drag and diffusion coefficients. With these effective transport coefficients, we solve the Fokker-Plank (FP) equation for the heavy quarks executing Brownian motion in the QGP. The solution of the FP equation has been used to evaluate the nuclear suppression factor, R{sub AA}, for the nonphotonic single-electron spectra resulting from the semileptonic decays of hadrons containing charm and bottom quarks. The effects of mass on R{sub AA} have also been highlighted.

  16. An energy recovery electron linac-on-ring collider

    SciTech Connect

    Merminga, L.; Krafft, G.A.; Lebedev, V.A.; Ben-Zvi, I.

    2000-09-14

    We present the design of high-luminosity electron-proton/ion colliders in which the electrons are produced by an Energy Recovering Linac (ERL). Electron-proton/ion colliders with center of mass energies between 14 GeV and 100 GeV (protons) or 63 GeV/A (ions) and luminosities at the 10{sup 33}(per nucleon) level have been proposed recently as a means for studying hadronic structure. The linac-on-ring option presents significant advantages with respect to: (1) spin manipulations (2) reduction of the synchrotron radiation load in the detectors (3) a wide range of continuous energy variability. Rf power and beam dump considerations require that the electron linac recover the beam energy. Based on extrapolations from actual measurements and calculations, energy recovery is expected to be feasible at currents of a few hundred mA and multi-GeV energies. Luminosity projections for the linac-ring scenario based on fundamental limitations are presented. The feasibility of an energy recovery electron linac-on-proton ring collider is investigated and four conceptual point designs are shown corresponding to electron to proton energies of: 3 GeV on 15 GeV, 5 GeV on 50 GeV and 10 GeV on 250 GeV, and for gold ions with 100 GeV/A. The last two designs assume that the protons or ions are stored in the existing RHIC accelerator. Accelerator physics issues relevant to proton rings and energy recovery linacs are discussed and a list of required R and D for the realization of such a design is presented.

  17. ORAL ISSUE OF THE JOURNAL "USPEKHI FIZICHESKIKH NAUK": Physics at the Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dremin, Igor M.

    2009-06-01

    The goals of the physics to be studied at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) are very impressive. Four major experimental installations are ready to compete in obtaining and analyzing the data from high-energy hadron collisions. The main hope is to answer the most intricate questions ever asked concerning the most fundamental problems of matter and its fundamental forces and space structure. The design of the LHC and its four detectors is briefly described. We then review the main facts revealed previously by experimentalists at other accelerators. The most pertinent topics and the stage-by-stage plans for LHC investigations are discussed. Further prospects for high-energy physics are outlined.

  18. The frontier of high energy physics and the large hadron collider

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, Kalanand

    2013-09-09

    High Energy Physics explores the most fundamental questions about the nature of the universe, e.g., basic building blocks of matter and energy, existence of the smallest sub-atomic particles, dark matter, dark energy etc. The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is the most powerful accelerator on earth located near Geneva, Switzerland. It recreates the conditions just after the Big Bang by colliding two proton beams head-on at very high energy every 25-50 nanosecond. With the recent discovery of Higgs boson, the LHC is firmly marching on to explore the TeV energy scale.

  19. Particle Physics after the Higgs-Boson Discovery: Opportunities for the Large Hadron Collider

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Quigg, Chris

    2015-08-24

    The first run of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN brought the discovery of the Higgs boson, an apparently elementary scalar particle with a mass of 125 GeV, the avatar of the mechanism that hides the electroweak symmetry. Then, a new round of experimentation is beginning, with the energy of the proton–proton colliding beams raised to 6.5 TeV per beam, from 4 TeV at the end of the first run. I summarize what we have learned about the Higgs boson, and calls attention to some issues that will be among our central concerns in the near future.

  20. Higgs bosons, electroweak symmetry breaking, and the physics of the Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Quigg, Chris; /Fermilab /CERN

    2007-02-01

    The Large Hadron Collider, a 7 {circle_plus} 7 TeV proton-proton collider under construction at CERN (the European Laboratory for Particle Physics in Geneva), will take experiments squarely into a new energy domain where mysteries of the electroweak interaction will be unveiled. What marks the 1-TeV scale as an important target? Why is understanding how the electroweak symmetry is hidden important to our conception of the world around us? What expectations do we have for the agent that hides the electroweak symmetry? Why do particle physicists anticipate a great harvest of discoveries within reach of the LHC?

  1. TRADING STUDIES OF A VERY LARGE HADRON COLLIDER

    SciTech Connect

    RUGGIERO,A.G.

    1996-11-04

    The authors have shown that the design of the ELOISATRON can be approached in five separate steps. In this report they deal with the two major issues of the collider: the size and the strength of the superconducting magnets. The reference design of the SSC calls for a collider circumference of 86 km. It represents the largest size that until recently was judged feasible. The reference design of the LHC requires a bending field of 9 Tesla, that industries are presently determined to demonstrate. Clearly the large size of the project presents problem with magnet tolerances, and collider operation and management. The high field of the superconducting magnets needs to be demonstrated, and the high-field option in excess of 9 Tesla requires extensive research and development. It is obvious from the start that, if the ELOISATRON has to allow large beam energies, the circumference has also to be larger than that of the SSC, probably of few hundred kilometers. On the other end, Tevatron, RHIC and SSC type of superconducting magnets have been built and demonstrated on a large scale and proven to be cost effective and reliable. Their field, nevertheless, hardly can exceed a value of 7.5 Tesla, without major modifications that need to be studied. The LHC type of magnets may be capable of 9 Tesla, but they are being investigated presently by the European industries. It is desired that if one wants to keep the size of the ring under reasonable limits, a somewhat higher bending field is required for the ELOISATRON, especially if one wants also to take advantage of the synchrotron radiation effects. A field value of 13 Tesla, twice the value of the SSC superconducting magnets, has recently been proposed, but it clearly needs a robust program of research and development. This magnet will not probably be of the RHIC/SSC type and not even of the LHC type. It will have to be designed and conceived anew. In the following they examine two possible approaches. In the first approach

  2. Electroweak and flavor dynamics at hadron colliders - I

    SciTech Connect

    Elchtent, E.; Lane, K.

    1998-02-01

    This is the first of two reports cataloging the principal signatures of electroweak and flavor dynamics at {anti p}p and pp colliders. Here, we discuss some of the signatures of dynamical electroweak and flavor symmetry breaking. The framework for dynamical symmetry breaking we assume is technicolor, with a walking coupling {alpha}{sub TC}, and extended technicolor. The reactions discussed occur mainly at subprocess energies {radical}{cflx s}{approx_lt} 1 TeV. They include production of color-singlet and octet technirhos and their decay into pairs of technipions, longitudinal weak bosons, or jets. Technipions, in turn, decay predominantly into heavy fermions. This report will appear in the Proceedings of the 1996 DPF/DPB Summer Study on New Directions for High Energy Physics (Snowmass 96).

  3. Electron Cloud Effect in the Linear Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Pivi, M

    2004-09-13

    Beam induced multipacting, driven by the electric field of successive positively charged bunches, may arise from a resonant motion of electrons, generated by secondary emission, bouncing back and forth between opposite walls of the vacuum chamber. The electron-cloud effect (ECE) has been observed or is expected at many storage rings [1]. In the beam pipe of the Damping Ring (DR) of a linear collider, an electron cloud is produced initially by ionization of the residual gas and photoelectrons from the synchrotron radiation. The cloud is then sustained by secondary electron emission. This electron cloud can reach equilibrium after the passage of only a few bunches. The electron-cloud effect may be responsible for collective effects as fast coupled-bunch and single-bunch instability, emittance blow-up or incoherent tune shift when the bunch current exceeds a certain threshold, accompanied by a large number of electrons in the vacuum chamber. The ECE was identified as one of the most important R&D topics in the International Linear Collider Report [2]. Systematic studies on the possible electron-cloud effect have been initiated at SLAC for the GLC/NLC and TESLA linear colliders, with particular attention to the effect in the positron main damping ring (MDR) and the positron Low Emittance Transport which includes the bunch compressor system (BCS), the main linac, and the beam delivery system (BDS). We present recent computer simulation results for the main features of the electron cloud generation in both machine designs. Thus, single and coupled-bunch instability thresholds are estimated for the GLC/NLC design.

  4. Azimuthally sensitive femtoscopy in hydrodynamics with statistical hadronization from the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider to the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Kisiel, Adam; Broniowski, Wojciech; Florkowski, Wojciech; Chojnacki, Mikolaj

    2009-01-15

    Azimuthally sensitive femtoscopy for heavy-ion collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is explored within the approach consisting of the hydrodynamics of perfect fluid followed by statistical hadronization. It is found that for the RHIC initial conditions, employing the Gaussian shape of the initial energy density, the very same framework that reproduces the standard soft observables [including the transverse-momentum spectra, the elliptic flow, and the azimuthally averaged Hanbury-Brown-Twiss (HBT) radii] leads to a proper description of the azimuthally sensitive femtoscopic observables; we find that the azimuthal variation of the side and out HBT radii as well as out-side cross term are very well reproduced for all centralities. Concerning the dependence of the femtoscopic parameters on k{sub T} we find that it is very well reproduced. The model is then extrapolated to the LHC energy. We predict the overall moderate growth of the HBT radii and the decrease of their azimuthal oscillations. Such effects are naturally caused by longer evolution times. In addition, we discuss in detail the space-time patterns of particle emission. We show that they are quite complex and argue that the overall shape seen by the femtoscopic methods cannot be easily disentangled on the basis of simple-minded arguments.

  5. Thermal Photon Radiation in High Multiplicity p+Pb Collisions at the Large Hadron Collider.

    PubMed

    Shen, Chun; Paquet, Jean-François; Denicol, Gabriel S; Jeon, Sangyong; Gale, Charles

    2016-02-19

    The collective behavior of hadronic particles has been observed in high multiplicity proton-lead collisions at the Large Hadron Collider, as well as in deuteron-gold collisions at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider. In this work we present the first calculation, in the hydrodynamic framework, of thermal photon radiation from such small collision systems. Owing to their compact size, these systems can reach temperatures comparable to those in central nucleus-nucleus collisions. The thermal photons can thus shine over the prompt background, and increase the low p_{T} direct photon spectrum by a factor of 2-3 in 0%-1% p+Pb collisions at 5.02 TeV. This thermal photon enhancement can therefore serve as a signature of the existence of a hot quark-gluon plasma during the evolution of these small collision systems, as well as validate hydrodynamic behavior in small systems.

  6. Thermal Photon Radiation in High Multiplicity p+Pb Collisions at the Large Hadron Collider

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Shen, Chun; Paquet, Jean-François; Denicol, Gabriel S.; Jeon, Sangyong; Gale, Charles

    2016-02-18

    We observed the collective behavior of hadronic particles in high multiplicity proton-lead collisions at the Large Hadron Collider, as well as in deuteron-gold collisions at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider. In our work we present the first calculation, in the hydrodynamic framework, of thermal photon radiation from such small collision systems. Owing to their compact size, these systems can reach temperatures comparable to those in central nucleus-nucleus collisions. Moreover, the thermal photons can thus shine over the prompt background, and increase the low pT direct photon spectrum by a factor of 2–3 in 0%–1% p+Pb collisions at 5.02 TeV. This thermalmore » photon enhancement can therefore serve as a signature of the existence of a hot quark-gluon plasma during the evolution of these small collision systems, as well as validate hydrodynamic behavior in small systems.« less

  7. Thermal Photon Radiation in High Multiplicity p+Pb Collisions at the Large Hadron Collider.

    PubMed

    Shen, Chun; Paquet, Jean-François; Denicol, Gabriel S; Jeon, Sangyong; Gale, Charles

    2016-02-19

    The collective behavior of hadronic particles has been observed in high multiplicity proton-lead collisions at the Large Hadron Collider, as well as in deuteron-gold collisions at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider. In this work we present the first calculation, in the hydrodynamic framework, of thermal photon radiation from such small collision systems. Owing to their compact size, these systems can reach temperatures comparable to those in central nucleus-nucleus collisions. The thermal photons can thus shine over the prompt background, and increase the low p_{T} direct photon spectrum by a factor of 2-3 in 0%-1% p+Pb collisions at 5.02 TeV. This thermal photon enhancement can therefore serve as a signature of the existence of a hot quark-gluon plasma during the evolution of these small collision systems, as well as validate hydrodynamic behavior in small systems. PMID:26943529

  8. Is hadronic flow produced in p-Pb collisions at the Large Hadron Collider?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, You; Zhu, Xiangrong; Li, Pengfei; Song, Huichao

    2016-05-01

    Using the Ultra-relativistic Quantum Molecular Dynamics (UrQMD) model, we investigate the azimuthal correlations in p-Pb collisions at √sNN = 5.02 TeV. It is shown that the simulated hadronic p-Pb system can not generate the collective flow signatures, but mainly behaves as a non-flow dominant system. However, the characteristic υ2(pT) mass-ordering of pions, kaons and protons is observed in UrQMD simulations, which is the consequence of hadronic interactions and not necessarily associated with strong fluid-like expansions.

  9. Determining the structure of Higgs couplings at the CERN LargeHadron Collider.

    PubMed

    Plehn, Tilman; Rainwater, David; Zeppenfeld, Dieter

    2002-02-01

    Higgs boson production via weak boson fusion at the CERN Large Hadron Collider has the capability to determine the dominant CP nature of a Higgs boson, via the tensor structure of its coupling to weak bosons. This information is contained in the azimuthal angle distribution of the two outgoing forward tagging jets. The technique is independent of both the Higgs boson mass and the observed decay channel.

  10. Next-to-Leading-Order QCD Corrections to tt+jet Production at Hadron Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Dittmaier, S.; Uwer, P.; Weinzierl, S.

    2007-06-29

    We report on the calculation of the next-to-leading-order QCD corrections to the production of top-quark-top-antiquark pairs in association with a hard jet at the Fermilab Tevatron and the CERN Large Hadron Collider. We present results for the tt+jet cross section and the forward-backward charge asymmetry. The corrections stabilize the leading-order prediction for the cross section. The charge asymmetry receives large corrections.

  11. Next-to-Leading-Order QCD Corrections to WW+Jet Production at Hadron Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Dittmaier, S.; Kallweit, S.; Uwer, P.

    2008-02-15

    We report on the calculation of the next-to-leading-order QCD corrections to the production of W-boson pairs in association with a hard jet at the Fermilab Tevatron and CERN Large Hadron Collider, which is an important source of background for Higgs boson and new-physics searches. The corrections stabilize the leading-order prediction for the cross section considerably, in particular, if a veto against the emission of a second hard jet is applied.

  12. Nucleon Decay and Neutrino Experiments, Experiments at High Energy Hadron Colliders, and String Theor

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Chang Kee; Douglas, Michaek; Hobbs, John; McGrew, Clark; Rijssenbeek, Michael

    2013-07-29

    This is the final report of the DOE grant DEFG0292ER40697 that supported the research activities of the Stony Brook High Energy Physics Group from November 15, 1991 to April 30, 2013. During the grant period, the grant supported the research of three Stony Brook particle physics research groups: The Nucleon Decay and Neutrino group, the Hadron Collider Group, and the Theory Group.

  13. Physics and Analysis at a Hadron Collider - Making Measurements (3/3)

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    This is the third lecture of three which together discuss the physics of hadron colliders with an emphasis on experimental techniques used for data analysis. This third lecture discusses techniques important for analyses making a measurement (e.g. determining a cross section or a particle property such as its mass or lifetime) using some CDF top-quark analyses as specific examples. The lectures are aimed at graduate students.

  14. MSSM Higgs Discovery Potential at Tevatron with new Benchmark Scenarios for Hadron Colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drollinger, Volker; Gold, Michael; Jarrell, Jason; Rekovic, Vladimir; Smirnov, Dmitri

    2003-04-01

    Four benchmark scenarios for MSSM Higgs boson searches at hadron colliders have recently been suggested. We discuss two aspects of the Higgs discovery potential in these scenarios. In the first part of this study, cross sections times branching ratios are computed for the most important search channel pbarp arrow W^± h^0 arrow l^± ν b barb. The second part is dedicated to the Higgs mass behavior in the parameter space and two independent Higgs mass calculations are compared.

  15. Construction of block-coil high-field model dipoles for future hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Blackburn, Raymond; Elliott, Tim; Henchel, William; McInturff, Al; McIntyre, Peter; Sattarov, Akhdior

    2002-08-04

    A family of high-field dipoles is being developed at Texas A&M University, as part of the program to improve the cost-effectiveness of superconducting magnet technology for future hadron colliders. The TAMU technology employs stress management, flux-plate control of persistent-current multipoles, conductor optimization using mixed-strand cable, and metal-filled bladders to provide pre-load and surface compliance. Construction details and status of the latest model dipole will be presented.

  16. Probing neutral gauge boson self-interactions in ZZ production at hadron colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baur, U.; Rainwater, D.

    2000-12-01

    A detailed analysis of ZZ production at the upgraded Fermilab Tevatron and the CERN Large Hadron Collider is presented for general ZZZ and ZZγ couplings. Deviations from the standard model gauge theory structure for each of these can be parametrized in terms of two form factors which are severely restricted by unitarity at high energy. Achievable limits on these couplings are shown to be a dramatic improvement over the limits currently obtained by e+e- experiments.

  17. Lattices for a high-field 30 TeV hadron collider

    SciTech Connect

    Peggs, S.; Dell, F.; Harrison, M.; Syphers, M.; Tepikian, S.

    1996-12-01

    Long arc cells would lead to major cost savings in a high field high T{sub c} hadron collider, operating in the regime of significant synchrotron radiation. Two such lattices, with half cell lengths of 110 and 260 m, are compared. Both allow flexible tuning, and have large dynamic apertures when dominated by chromatic sextupoles. Lattices with longer cells are much more sensitive to systematic magnet errors, which are expected to dominate.

  18. [Calorimeter based detectors for high energy hadron colliders]. [Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-08-04

    This document provides a progress report on research that has been conducted under DOE Grant DEFG0292ER40697 for the past year, and describes proposed work for the second year of this 8 year grant starting November 15, 1992. Personnel supported by the contract include 4 faculty, 1 research faculty, 4 postdocs, and 9 graduate students. The work under this grant has in the past been directed in two complementary directions -- DO at Fermilab, and the second SSC detector GEM. A major effort has been towards the construction and commissioning of the new Fermilab Collider detector DO, including design, construction, testing, the commissioning of the central tracking and the central calorimeters. The first DO run is now underway, with data taking and analysis of the first events. Trigger algorithms, data acquisition, calibration of tracking and calorimetry, data scanning and analysis, and planning for future upgrades of the DO detector with the advent of the FNAL Main Injector are all involved. The other effort supported by this grant has been towards the design of GEM, a large and general-purpose SSC detector with special emphasis on accurate muon measurement over a large solid angle. This effort will culminate this year in the presentation to the SSC laboratory of the GEM Technical Design Report. Contributions are being made to the detector design, coordination, and physics simulation studies with special emphasis on muon final states. Collaboration with the RD5 group at CERN to study muon punch through and to test cathode strip chamber prototypes was begun.

  19. Toward particle-level filtering of individual collision events at the Large Hadron Collider and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colecchia, Federico

    2014-03-01

    Low-energy strong interactions are a major source of background at hadron colliders, and methods of subtracting the associated energy flow are well established in the field. Traditional approaches treat the contamination as diffuse, and estimate background energy levels either by averaging over large data sets or by restricting to given kinematic regions inside individual collision events. On the other hand, more recent techniques take into account the discrete nature of background, most notably by exploiting the presence of substructure inside hard jets, i.e. inside collections of particles originating from scattered hard quarks and gluons. However, none of the existing methods subtract background at the level of individual particles inside events. We illustrate the use of an algorithm that will allow particle-by-particle background discrimination at the Large Hadron Collider, and we envisage this as the basis for a novel event filtering procedure upstream of the official reconstruction chains. Our hope is that this new technique will improve physics analysis when used in combination with state-of-the-art algorithms in high-luminosity hadron collider environments.

  20. Hadrons from coalescence plus fragmentation in A A collisions at energies available at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider to the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minissale, Vincenzo; Scardina, Francesco; Greco, Vincenzo

    2015-11-01

    In a coalescence plus independent fragmentation approach we calculate the pT spectra of the main hadrons: π ,K ,p ,p ¯,Λ ,ϕ in a wide range of transverse momentum from low pT up to about 10 GeV. The approach in its main features was developed several years ago at Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) energy. Augmenting the model with the inclusion of some more main resonance decays, we show that the approach correctly predicts the evolution of the pT spectra from RHIC to LHC (Large Hadron Collider) energy and in particular the baryon-to-meson ratios p /π ,p ¯/π ,Λ /K that reach a value of the order of unit at pT˜3 GeV . This is achieved without any change of the coalescence parameters. The more recent availability of experimental data up to pT˜10 GeV for Λ spectrum as well as for p /π and Λ /K shows some lack of yield in a limited pT range around 6 GeV. This indicates that the baryons pT spectra from Albino-Kniehl-Kramer fragmentation functions are too flat at pT≲8 GeV . We also show that in a coalescence plus fragmentation approach one predicts a nearly pT independent p /ϕ ratio up to pT˜4 GeV followed by a significant decrease at higher pT. Such a behavior is driven by a similar radial flow effect at pT<2 GeV and the dominance of fragmentation for ϕ at larger pT.

  1. Aspects of perturbative QCD at a 100 TeV future hadron collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bothmann, Enrico; Ferrarese, Piero; Krauss, Frank; Kuttimalai, Silvan; Schumann, Steffen; Thompson, Jennifer

    2016-08-01

    In this paper we consider particle production at a future circular hadron collider with 100 TeV center-of-mass energy within the Standard Model, and in particular their QCD aspects. Accurate predictions for these processes pose severe theoretical challenges related to large hierarchies of scales and possible large multiplicities of final-state particles. We investigate scaling patterns in multijet-production rates allowing to extrapolate predictions to very high final-state multiplicities. Furthermore, we consider large-area QCD jets and study the expectation for the mean number of subjets to be reconstructed from their constituents and confront these with analytical resummed predictions and with the expectation for boosted hadronic decays of top quarks and W bosons. We also discuss the validity of Higgs effective field theory in making predictions for Higgs-boson production in association with jets. Finally, we consider the case of new physics searches at such a 100 TeV hadron-collider machine and discuss the expectations for corresponding Standard-Model background processes.

  2. Quark-Hadron Duality in Electron Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Wally Melnitchouk; Rolf Ent; Cynthia Keppel

    2004-08-01

    The duality between partonic and hadronic descriptions of physical phenomena is one of the most remarkable features of strong interaction physics. A classic example of this is in electron-nucleon scattering, in which low-energy cross sections, when averaged over appropriate energy intervals, are found to exhibit the scaling behavior expected from perturbative QCD. We present a comprehensive review of data on structure functions in the resonance region, from which the global and local aspects of duality are quantified, including its flavor, spin and nuclear medium dependence. To interpret the experimental findings, we discuss various theoretical approaches which have been developed to understand the microscopic origins of quark-hadron duality in QCD. Examples from other reactions are used to place duality in a broader context, and future experimental and theoretical challenges are identified.

  3. Muon colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, R.B. |; Sessler, A.; Skrinsky, A.

    1996-01-01

    Muon Colliders have unique technical and physics advantages and disadvantages when compared with both hadron and electron machines. They should thus be regarded as complementary. Parameters are given of 4 TeV and 0.5 TeV high luminosity {micro}{sup +}{micro}{sup {minus}}colliders, and of a 0.5 TeV lower luminosity demonstration machine. We discuss the various systems in such muon colliders, starting from the proton accelerator needed to generate the muons and proceeding through muon cooling, acceleration and storage in a collider ring. Problems of detector background are also discussed.

  4. Time evolution of the luminosity of colliding heavy-ion beams in BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and CERN Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruce, R.; Jowett, J. M.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Fischer, W.

    2010-09-01

    We have studied the time evolution of the heavy-ion luminosity and bunch intensities in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at BNL, and in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. First, we present measurements from a large number of RHIC stores (from run-7), colliding 100GeV/nucleon Au79+197 beams without stochastic cooling. These are compared with two different calculation methods. The first is a simulation based on multiparticle tracking taking into account collisions, intrabeam scattering, radiation damping, and synchrotron and betatron motion. In the second, faster, method, a system of ordinary differential equations with terms describing the corresponding effects on emittances and bunch populations is solved numerically. Results of the tracking method agree very well with the RHIC data. With the faster method, significant discrepancies are found since the losses of particles diffusing out of the rf bucket due to intrabeam scattering are not modeled accurately enough. Finally, we use both methods to make predictions of the time evolution of the future Pb82+208 beams in the LHC at injection and collision energy. For this machine, the two methods agree well.

  5. Time evolution of the luminosity of colliding heavy-ion beams in BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and CERN Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce, R.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Jowett, J.M.; Fischer, W.

    2010-09-07

    We have studied the time evolution of the heavy ion luminosity and bunch intensities in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), at BNL, and in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), at CERN. First, we present measurements from a large number of RHIC stores (from Run 7), colliding 100 GeV/nucleon {sup 197}Au{sup 79}+ beams without stochastic cooling. These are compared with two different calculation methods. The first is a simulation based on multi-particle tracking taking into account collisions, intrabeam scattering, radiation damping, and synchrotron and betatron motion. In the second, faster, method, a system of ordinary differential equations with terms describing the corresponding effects on emittances and bunch populations is solved numerically. Results of the tracking method agree very well with the RHIC data. With the faster method, significant discrepancies are found since the losses of particles diffusing out of the RF bucket due to intrabeam scattering are not modeled accurately enough. Finally, we use both methods to make predictions of the time evolution of the future {sup 208}Pb+{sup 82+} beams in the LHC at injection and collision energy. For this machine, the two methods agree well.

  6. Probing charged Higgs boson couplings at a future circular hadron collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ćakır, I. T.; Kuday, S.; Saygın, H.; Şenol, A.; ćakır, O.

    2016-07-01

    Many of the new physics models predict a light Higgs boson similar to the Higgs boson of the Standard Model (SM) and also extra scalar bosons. Beyond the search channels for a SM Higgs boson, the future collider experiments will explore additional channels that are specific to extended Higgs sectors. We study the charged Higgs boson production within the framework of two Higgs doublet models (THDM) in the proton-proton collisions at a future circular hadron collider (FCC-hh). With an integrated luminosity of Lint=500 fb-1 at very high energy frontier (√{s }=100 TeV ), we obtain a significant coverage of the parameter space and distinguish the charged Higgs-top-bottom interaction within the THDM or other new physics models with charged Higgs boson mass up to 1.5 TeV.

  7. Test of Relativistic Gravity for Propulsion at the Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felber, Franklin

    2010-01-01

    A design is presented of a laboratory experiment that could test the suitability of relativistic gravity for propulsion of spacecraft to relativistic speeds. An exact time-dependent solution of Einstein's gravitational field equation confirms that even the weak field of a mass moving at relativistic speeds could serve as a driver to accelerate a much lighter payload from rest to a good fraction of the speed of light. The time-dependent field of ultrarelativistic particles in a collider ring is calculated. An experiment is proposed as the first test of the predictions of general relativity in the ultrarelativistic limit by measuring the repulsive gravitational field of bunches of protons in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The estimated `antigravity beam' signal strength at a resonant detector of each proton bunch is 3 nm/s2 for 2 ns during each revolution of the LHC. This experiment can be performed off-line, without interfering with the normal operations of the LHC.

  8. Signatures of the anomalous Zγ and ZZ production at lepton and hadron colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gounaris, G. J.; Layssac, J.; Renard, F. M.

    2000-04-01

    The possible form of new physics (NP) interactions affecting the ZZZ, ZZγ, and Zγγ vertices is critically examined. Their signatures and the possibilities to study them, through ZZ and Zγ production, at the CERN e-e+ colliders LEP and LC and at the hadronic colliders, the Fermilab Tevatron and CERN LHC, are investigated. Experimental limits obtained or expected on each coupling are collected. A simple theoretical model based on virtual effects due to some heavy fermions is used for acquiring some guidance on the plausible forms of these NP vertices. In such a case specific relations among the various neutral couplings are predicted, which can be experimentally tested and possibly used to constrain the form of the responsible NP structure.

  9. Overview of the Large Hadron Collider and of the ATLAS and CMS experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nisati, Aleandro; Sharma, Vivek

    2016-10-01

    The Large Hadron Collider is the most powerful particle accelerator ever built. It has allowed the discovery of a Higgs boson with mass near 125 GeV in 2012 by the ATLAS and CMS experiments. This chapter provides first an overview of the main characteristics of this collider, as well as a short description of the two general purpose experiments, ATLAS and CMS, which discovered in 2012 a Higgs boson with mass close to 125 GeV. This is followed by a summary of the main aspects of particle identification and reconstruction by these two detectors, together with a short presentation of the main analysis tools used to extract the LHC results of the Higgs boson(s) searches and measurements.

  10. Transverse-momentum resummation for top-quark pairs at hadron colliders.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hua Xing; Li, Chong Sheng; Li, Hai Tao; Shao, Ding Yu; Yang, Li Lin

    2013-02-22

    We develop a framework for a systematic resummation of the transverse momentum distribution of top-quark pairs produced at hadron colliders based on effective field theory. Compared to Drell-Yan and Higgs production, a novel soft function matrix is required to account for the soft gluon emissions from the final states. We calculate this soft function at the next-to-leading order, and perform the resummation at the next-to-next-to-leading logarithmic accuracy. We compare our results with parton shower programs and with the experimental data at the Tevatron and the LHC. We also discuss the implications for the top quark charge asymmetry.

  11. W production at large transverse momentum at the CERN Large Hadron Collider.

    PubMed

    Gonsalves, Richard J; Kidonakis, Nikolaos; Sabio Vera, Agustín

    2005-11-25

    We study the production of W bosons at large transverse momentum in pp collisions at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. We calculate the complete next-to-leading order (NLO) corrections to the differential cross section. We find that the NLO corrections provide a large increase to the cross section but, surprisingly, do not reduce the scale dependence relative to leading order (LO). We also calculate next-to-next-to-leading-order (NNLO) soft-gluon corrections and find that, although they are small, they significantly reduce the scale dependence thus providing a more stable result.

  12. Lower limit on dark matter production at the CERN Large Hadron Collider.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jonathan L; Su, Shufang; Takayama, Fumihiro

    2006-04-21

    We evaluate the prospects for finding evidence of dark matter production at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. We consider weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) and superWIMPs and characterize their properties through model-independent parametrizations. The observed relic density then implies lower bounds on dark matter production rates as functions of a few parameters. For WIMPs, the resulting signal is indistinguishable from background. For superWIMPs, however, this analysis implies significant production of metastable charged particles. For natural parameters, these rates may far exceed Drell-Yan cross sections and yield spectacular signals.

  13. Boosting Higgs CP properties via VH production at the Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godbole, Rohini; Miller, David J.; Mohan, Kirtimaan; White, Chris D.

    2014-03-01

    We consider ZH and WH production at the Large Hadron Collider, where the Higgs decays to a bbbar pair. We use jet substructure techniques to reconstruct the Higgs boson and construct angular observables involving leptonic decay products of the vector bosons. These efficiently discriminate between the tensor structure of the HVV vertex expected in the Standard Model and that arising from possible new physics, as quantified by higher dimensional operators. This can then be used to examine the CP nature of the Higgs as well as CP mixing effects in the HZZ and HWW vertices separately.

  14. Technical challenges of the Large Hadron Collider experiments (ATLAS and CMS).

    PubMed

    Ball, Austin

    2015-01-13

    This review article introduces the design of the general purpose experiments ATLAS and CMS, which independently discovered the Higgs boson, showing how generic features are motivated by the characteristics needed to explore the physics landscape made accessible by the Large Hadron Collider accelerator, whose high collision rate creates an extremely challenging operating environment for instrumentation. Examples of the very different component designs chosen by the two experiment collaborations are highlighted, as an introduction to briefly describing techniques used in the construction of some of these elements and, subsequently, in the assembly of both detection systems in their respective underground caverns. PMID:26949803

  15. Compressed supersymmetry after 1 fb⁻¹ at the Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    LeCompte, Thomas J.; Martin, Stephen P.

    2012-02-22

    We study the reach of the Large Hadron Collider with 1 fb⁻¹ of data at √s=7 TeV for several classes of supersymmetric models with compressed mass spectra, using jets and missing transverse energy cuts like those employed by ATLAS for summer 2011 data. In the limit of extreme compression, the best limits come from signal regions that do not require more than 2 or 3 jets and that remove backgrounds by requiring more missing energy rather than a higher effective mass.

  16. Observable T{sub 7} Lepton Flavor Symmetry at the Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Cao Qinghong; Khalil, Shaaban; Ma, Ernest; Okada, Hiroshi

    2011-04-01

    More often than not, models of flavor symmetry rely on the use of nonrenormalizable operators (in the guise of flavons) to accomplish the phenomenologically successful tribimaximal mixing of neutrinos. We show instead how a simple renormalizable two-parameter neutrino mass model of tribimaximal mixing can be constructed with the non-Abelian discrete symmetry T{sub 7} and the gauging of B-L. This is also achieved without the addition of auxiliary symmetries and particles present in almost all other proposals. Most importantly, it is verifiable at the Large Hadron Collider.

  17. Technical challenges of the Large Hadron Collider experiments (ATLAS and CMS).

    PubMed

    Ball, Austin

    2015-01-13

    This review article introduces the design of the general purpose experiments ATLAS and CMS, which independently discovered the Higgs boson, showing how generic features are motivated by the characteristics needed to explore the physics landscape made accessible by the Large Hadron Collider accelerator, whose high collision rate creates an extremely challenging operating environment for instrumentation. Examples of the very different component designs chosen by the two experiment collaborations are highlighted, as an introduction to briefly describing techniques used in the construction of some of these elements and, subsequently, in the assembly of both detection systems in their respective underground caverns.

  18. Testing the handedness of a heavy {ital W}{prime} at future hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Cvetic, M.; Langacker, P.; Liu, J.

    1994-03-01

    We show that the associated production {ital pp}{r_arrow}{ital W}{prime}{ital W} and the rare dec at future hadron colliders. For {ital M}{sub {ital W}{prime}}{similar_to}(1--3) TeV they would allow a clean determination on whether the {ital W}{prime} couples to {ital V}{minus}{ital A} or {ital V}+{ital A} currents. As an illustration a model in which the {ital W}{prime}{sup {plus_minus}} couples only to {ital V}{minus}{ital A} currents is contrasted with the left-right-symmetric models which involve {ital V}+{ital A} currents.

  19. Kinematical Correlations for Higgs Boson Plus High P_{T} Jet Production at Hadron Colliders.

    PubMed

    Sun, Peng; Yuan, C-P; Yuan, Feng

    2015-05-22

    We investigate the effect of QCD resummation to kinematical correlations in the Higgs boson plus high transverse momentum (P(T)) jet events produced at hadron colliders. We show that at the complete one-loop order, the Collins-Soper-Sterman resummation formalism can be applied to derive the Sudakov form factor. We compare the singular behavior of resummation calculation to fixed order prediction in the case that a Higgs boson and high P(T) jet are produced nearly back to back in their transverse momenta, and find perfect agreement. The phenomenological importance of the resummation effect at the LHC is also demonstrated. PMID:26047222

  20. Observable T7 lepton flavor symmetry at the Large Hadron Collider.

    PubMed

    Cao, Qing-Hong; Khalil, Shaaban; Ma, Ernest; Okada, Hiroshi

    2011-04-01

    More often than not, models of flavor symmetry rely on the use of nonrenormalizable operators (in the guise of flavons) to accomplish the phenomenologically successful tribimaximal mixing of neutrinos. We show instead how a simple renormalizable two-parameter neutrino mass model of tribimaximal mixing can be constructed with the non-Abelian discrete symmetry T(7) and the gauging of B-L. This is also achieved without the addition of auxiliary symmetries and particles present in almost all other proposals. Most importantly, it is verifiable at the Large Hadron Collider.

  1. Beam dynamics aspects of crab cavities in the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Y.; Calaga, R.; Assmann, R.; Barranco, J.; Tomas, R.; Weiler, T.; Zimmermann, F.; Morita, A.

    2009-10-14

    Modern colliders bring into collision a large number of bunches to achieve a high luminosity. The long-range beam-beam effects arising from parasitic encounters at such colliders are mitigated by introducing a crossing angle. Under these conditions, crab cavities (CC) can be used to restore effective head-on collisions and thereby to increase the geometric luminosity. Such crab cavities have been proposed for both linear and circular colliders. The crab cavities are rf cavities operated in a transverse dipole mode, which imparts on the beam particles a transverse kick that varies with the longitudinal position along the bunch. The use of crab cavities in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) may not only raise the luminosity, but it could also complicate the beam dynamics, e.g., crab cavities might not only cancel synchrobetatron resonances excited by the crossing angle but they could also excite new ones, they could reduce the dynamic aperture for off-momentum particles, they could influence the aperture and orbit, also degrade the collimation cleaning efficiency, and so on. In this paper, we explore the principal feasibility of LHC crab cavities from a beam dynamics point of view. The implications of the crab cavities for the LHC optics, analytical and numerical luminosity studies, dynamic aperture, aperture and beta beating, emittance growth, beam-beam tune shift, long-range collisions, and synchrobetatron resonances, crab dispersion, and collimation efficiency will be discussed.

  2. Secondary particle in background levels and effects on detectors at future hadron colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, T.

    1993-06-01

    The next generation of hadron colliders, the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), will operate at high center-of-mass energies and luminosities. Namely, for the SSC (LHC) the square root of s = 40 TeV (the square root of s = 16 TeV) and L = 10(exp 33) cm(exp -2)s(exp -1) (L = 3 x 10(exp 34) cm(exp -2)s(exp -1)). These conditions will result in the production of large backgrounds as well as radiation environments. Ascertaining the backgrounds, in terms of the production of secondary charged and neutral particles, and the radiation environments are important considerations for the detectors proposed for these colliders. An initial investigation of the radiation levels in the SSC detectors was undertaken by D. Groom and colleagues, in the context of the 'task force on radiation levels in the SSC interaction regions.' The method consisted essentially of an analytic approach, using standard descriptions of average events in conjunction with simulations of secondary processes. Following Groom's work, extensive Monte Carlo simulations were performed to address the issues of backgrounds and radiation environments for the GEM and SD C3 experiments proposed at the SSC and for the ATLAS and CMS experiments planned for the LHC. The purpose of the present article is to give a brief summary of some aspects of the methods, assumptions, and calculations performed to date (principally for the SSC detectors) and to stress the relevance of such calculations to the detectors proposed for the study of B-physics in particular.

  3. Prospects for the study of gluonic states at Beijing Electron- Positron Collider (BEPC)

    SciTech Connect

    Chanowitz, M.S.

    1989-01-11

    Progress in the study of gluonic states depends crucially on accumulating data samples of order 10/sup 8/ J//psi/ decays, in order to perform complete partial wave analyses of radiative and hadronic J//psi/ decays. This requirement is well matched to the capabilities of the Beijing Electron-Positron Collider, which has approached the necessary luminosity in its first two months of operation. 28 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  4. Cooling of electronics in collider experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Richard P. Stanek et al.

    2003-11-07

    Proper cooling of detector electronics is critical to the successful operation of high-energy physics experiments. Collider experiments offer unique challenges based on their physical layouts and hermetic design. Cooling systems can be categorized by the type of detector with which they are associated, their primary mode of heat transfer, the choice of active cooling fluid, their heat removal capacity and the minimum temperature required. One of the more critical detector subsystems to require cooling is the silicon vertex detector, either pixel or strip sensors. A general design philosophy is presented along with a review of the important steps to include in the design process. Factors affecting the detector and cooling system design are categorized. A brief review of some existing and proposed cooling systems for silicon detectors is presented to help set the scale for the range of system designs. Fermilab operates two collider experiments, CDF & D0, both of which have silicon systems embedded in their detectors. A review of the existing silicon cooling system designs and operating experience is presented along with a list of lessons learned.

  5. An Energy Recovery Electron Linac On Ring Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolitsa Merminga; Geoffrey Krafft; Valeri Lebedev; Ilan Ben-Zvi

    2001-09-01

    Electron-proton/ion colliders with center of mass energies between 14 GeV and 100 GeV (protons) or 63 GeV/A (ions) and luminosities at the 10{sup 33} (per nucleon) level have been proposed recently as a means for studying hadronic structure. Electron beam polarization appears to be crucial for many of the experiments. Two accelerator design scenarios have been examined in detail: colliding rings and recirculating linac-on-ring. Although the linac-on-ring scenario is not as well developed as the ring-ring scenario, comparable luminosities appear feasible. The linac-on-ring option presents significant advantages with respect to: (1) spin manipulations; (2) reduction of the synchrotron radiation load in the detectors; (3) a wide range of continuous energy variability. Rf power and beam dump considerations require that the electron linac recover the beam energy. This technology has been demonstrated at Jefferson Lab's IR FEL with cw current up to 5 mA and beam energy up to 50 MeV. Based on extrapolations from actual measurements and calculations, energy recovery is expected to be feasible at higher currents (a few hundred mA) and higher energies (a few GeV) as well. The report begins with a brief overview of Jefferson Lab's experience with energy recovery and summarize its benefits. Luminosity projections for the linac-ring scenario based on fundamental limitations are presented next. The feasibility of an energy recovery electron linac-on-proton ring collider is investigated and four conceptual point designs are shown corresponding to electron to proton energies of: 3 GeV on 15 GeV, 5 GeV on 50 GeV and 10 GeV on 250 GeV, and for gold ions with 100 GeV/A. The last two designs assume that the protons or ions are stored in the existing RHIC accelerator. Accelerator physics issues relevant to proton rings and energy recovery linacs are discussed next and a list of required R and D for the realization of such a design is presented.

  6. Polarized Electron - Polarized Deuteron Deep-Inelastic Scattering in Electron-Ion Collider with Tagging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sargsian, Misak; Cosyn, Wim; Weiss, Christian

    2015-10-01

    For the past several years there have been an intensive research and development for the possible electron-ion collider that will be able to probe deep inelastic processes at unprecedentedly high energies in eA channel. One of the important advantages of the collider kinematics in DIS processes is the possibility for an unambiguous separation of hadrons emerging from DIS and hadrons fragmenting from the target nucleus. This creates a unique possibility for tagging the interacting nucleon with the recoil slow fragments in the DIS process. The situation is most clean for the deuteron target in which case the recoil particle is a nucleon. In addition, the possibility of having polarized deuteron beams will create unprecedented opportunities in probing polarization degrees of freedom for parton distributions in the interacting bound nucleon. In this work we develop a theoretical framework for the polarized electron-polarized deuteron deep inelastic scattering in which the recoil nucleon is detected in the target fragmentation region. Two main contributions for which theoretical models are developed are the plane-wave impulse approximation, in which no reinteractions are taking place between the final state products of DIS and the recoil nucleon.

  7. A particle consistent with the Higgs boson observed with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider.

    PubMed

    2012-12-21

    Nearly 50 years ago, theoretical physicists proposed that a field permeates the universe and gives energy to the vacuum. This field was required to explain why some, but not all, fundamental particles have mass. Numerous precision measurements during recent decades have provided indirect support for the existence of this field, but one crucial prediction of this theory has remained unconfirmed despite 30 years of experimental searches: the existence of a massive particle, the standard model Higgs boson. The ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN has now observed the production of a new particle with a mass of 126 giga-electron volts and decay signatures consistent with those expected for the Higgs particle. This result is strong support for the standard model of particle physics, including the presence of this vacuum field. The existence and properties of the newly discovered particle may also have consequences beyond the standard model itself.

  8. Cryogenic testing of by-pass diode stacks for the superconducting magnets of the large hadron collider at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    della Corte, A.; Gharib, A.; Hagedorn, D.; Turtù, S.; Basile, G. L.; Catitti, A.; Chiarelli, S.; Di Ferdinando, E.; Taddia, G.; Talli, M.; Verdini, L.; Viola, R.

    2002-05-01

    A dedicated facility prepared by ENEA (Italian Agency for Energy and Environment) for the cryogenic testing of by-pass diodes for the protection of the CERN Large Hadron Collider main magnets will be described. This experimental activity is in the frame of a contract awarded to OCEM, an Italian firm active in the field of electronic devices and power supplies, in collaboration with ENEA, for the manufacture and testing of all the diode stacks. In particular, CERN requests the measurement of the reverse and forward voltage diode characteristics at 300 K and 77 K, and endurance test cycles at liquid helium temperature. The experimental set-up at ENEA and data acquisition system developed for the scope will be described and the test results reported.

  9. Beam Dynamics Considerations in Electron Ion Colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krafft, Geoffrey

    2015-04-01

    The nuclear physics community is converging on the idea that the next large project after FRIB should be an electron-ion collider. Both Brookhaven National Lab and Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility have developed accelerator designs, both of which need novel solutions to accelerator physics problems. In this talk we discuss some of the problems that must be solved and their solutions. Examples in novel beam optics systems, beam cooling, and beam polarization control will be presented. Authored by Jefferson Science Associates, LLC under U.S. DOE Contract No. DE-AC05-06OR23177. The U.S. Government retains a non-exclusive, paid-up, irrevocable, world-wide license to publish or reproduce this manuscript for U.S. Government purposes.

  10. Signals of supersymmetry with inaccessible first two families at the Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Desai, Nishita; Mukhopadhyaya, Biswarup

    2009-09-01

    We investigate the signals of supersymmetry in a scenario where only the third family squarks and sleptons can be produced at the Large Hadron Collider, in addition to the gluino, charginos, and neutralinos. The final states in such cases are marked by a multiplicity of top or bottom quarks. We study, in particular, the case when the top squark, bottom squark, and gluino masses are near the TeV scale due to which, the final state t's and b's are very energetic. We point out the difficulty in b tagging and identifying energetic tops and suggest several event selection criteria which allow the signals to remain significantly above the standard model background. We show that such scenarios with gluino mass up to 2 TeV can be successfully probed at the Large Hadron Collider. Information on tan{beta} can also be obtained by looking at associated Higgs production in the cascades of accompanying neutralinos. We also show that a combined analysis of event rates in the different channels and the effective mass distribution allows one to differentiate this scenario from the one where all three sfermion families are accessible.

  11. Fully automated precision predictions for heavy neutrino production mechanisms at hadron colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degrande, Céline; Mattelaer, Olivier; Ruiz, Richard; Turner, Jessica

    2016-09-01

    Motivated by TeV-scale neutrino mass models, we propose a systematic treatment of heavy neutrino (N ) production at hadron colliders. Our simple and efficient modeling of the vector boson fusion (VBF) W±γ →N ℓ± and N ℓ±+nj signal definitions resolve collinear and soft divergences that have plagued past studies, and is applicable to other color-singlet processes, e.g., associated Higgs (W±h), sparticle (ℓ˜±νℓ˜), and charged Higgs (h±±h∓) production. We present, for the first time, a comparison of all leading N production modes, including both gluon fusion (GF) g g →Z*/h*→N νℓ (-) and VBF. We obtain fully differential results up to next-to-leading order (NLO) in QCD accuracy using a Monte Carlo tool chain linking feynrules, nloct, and madgraph5_amc@nlo. Associated model files are publicly available. At the 14 TeV LHC, the leading order GF rate is small and comparable to the NLO N ℓ±+1 j rate; at a future 100 TeV Very Large Hadron Collider, GF dominates for mN=300 - 1500 GeV , beyond which VBF takes the lead.

  12. Heavy-Quark Associated Production with One Hard Photon at Hadron Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Hartanto, Heribertus Bayu

    2013-01-01

    We present the calculation of heavy-quark associated production with a hard photon at hadron colliders, namely $pp(p\\bar p) → Q\\bar Q +X$γ (for $Q=t,b$), at Next-to-Leading Order (NLO) in Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). We study the impact of NLO QCD corrections on the total cross section and several differential distributions at both the Tevatron and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). For $t\\bar t$γ production we observe a sizeable reduction of the renormalization and factorization scale dependence when the NLO QCD corrections are included, while for $b\\bar b$γ production a considerable scale dependence still persists at NLO in QCD. This is consistent with what emerges in similar processes involving $b$ quarks and vector bosons and we explain its origin in detail. For $b\\bar b$γ production we study both the case in which at least one $b$ jet and the case in which at least two $b$ jets are observed. We perform the $b\\bar b$γ calculation using the Four Flavor Number Scheme (4FNS) and compare the case where at least one $b$ jet is observed with the corresponding results from the Five Flavor Number Scheme (5FNS) calculation. Finally we compare our results for $p\\bar p →+b+X$γ with the Tevatron data.

  13. Fully automated precision predictions for heavy neutrino production mechanisms at hadron colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degrande, Céline; Mattelaer, Olivier; Ruiz, Richard; Turner, Jessica

    2016-09-01

    Motivated by TeV-scale neutrino mass models, we propose a systematic treatment of heavy neutrino (N ) production at hadron colliders. Our simple and efficient modeling of the vector boson fusion (VBF) W±γ →N ℓ± and N ℓ±+nj signal definitions resolve collinear and soft divergences that have plagued past studies, and is applicable to other color-singlet processes, e.g., associated Higgs (W±h), sparticle (ℓ˜±νℓ˜),and charged Higgs (h±±h∓) production. We present, for the first time, a comparison of all leading N production modes, including both gluon fusion (GF) g g →Z*/h*→N ν ℓ (-) and VBF. We obtain fully differential results up to next-to-leading order (NLO) in QCD accuracy using a Monte Carlo tool chain linking feynrules, nloct, and madgraph5_amc@nlo. Associated model files are publicly available. At the 14 TeV LHC, the leading order GF rate is small and comparable to the NLO N ℓ±+1 j rate; at a future 100 TeV Very Large Hadron Collider, GF dominates for mN=300 - 1500 GeV , beyond which VBF takes the lead.

  14. Dual topological unitarization of hard and soft hadronic cross sections: A new approach to multiparticle production at hadron colliders in the TeV energy range

    SciTech Connect

    Ranft, J.; Hahn, K. . SSC Central Design Group); Aurenche, P.; Maire, P. . Lab. de Physique des Particules Elementaires); Bopp, F. . Fachbereich Physik); Capella, A.; Tran Thanh Van, J. . Lab. de Physique Theorique et Particules Elementaires); Kwi

    1987-12-01

    The dual topological unitarization of hard and soft hadronic collisions is formulated as a Monte-Carlo event generator for events containing both the soft (low p{perpendicular}) and hard (jets, minijets) component of hadron production. The parameters of the model are determined from fits to the energy dependence of the total and inelastic hadron cross-sections and from the predictions of the QCD-parton model for the perturbative hard constituent scattering cross sections. The properties of the model are studied. Good agreement of the model predictions is found with data at present accelerator and collider energies. The predictions of the model for TeV colliders are presented. Interesting changes of the produced multiparticle system are formed when selecting classes of events with and without hard jets or minijets. 35 refs., 22 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Analysis of the Laser Calibration System for the CMS HCAL at CERN's Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebolo, Luis

    2005-11-01

    The European Organization for Nuclear Physics' (CERN) Large Hadron Collider uses the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) detector to measure collision products from proton-proton interactions. CMS uses a hadron calorimeter (HCAL) to measure the energy and position of quarks and gluons by reconstructing their hadronic decay products. An essential component of the detector is the calibration system, which was evaluated in terms of its misalignment, linearity, and resolution. In order to analyze the data, the authors created scripts in ROOT 5.02/00 and C++. The authors also used Mathematica 5.1 to perform complex mathematics and AutoCAD 2006 to produce optical ray traces. The misalignment of the optical components was found to be satisfactory; the Hybrid Photodiodes (HPDs) were confirmed to be linear; the constant, noise and stochastic contributions to its resolution were analyzed; and the quantum efficiency of most HPDs was determined to be approximately 40%. With a better understanding of the laser calibration system, one can further understand and improve the HCAL.

  16. New avenues to heavy right-handed neutrinos with pair production at hadronic colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Zhaofeng; Ko, P.; Li, Jinmian

    2016-04-01

    In many models incorporating the type-I seesaw mechanism, the right-handed neutrino (N ) couples to heavy vector/scalar bosons and thereby has resonant pair production. It has barely received attention thus far; however, it may provide the best avenue to probe TeV scale N without requiring anomalously large mixing between N and the active neutrino νL . In this paper we explore the discovery prospects of (mainly heavy) N pair production at the 14 TeV LHC and future 100 TeV p p collider, based on the three signatures: (1) trilepton from N (→ℓWℓ)N (→ℓWh) with Wℓ/h being the leptonically/hadronically decaying W ; (2) boosted di-Higgs boson plus ET from N (→νLh )N (→νLh ) ; (3) a single boosted Higgs boson with leptons and ET from N (→ℓWℓ)N (→νLh ) . At the 100 TeV collider, we also consider the situation when the Higgs boson is overboosted, thus losing its jet substructure. Interpreting our tentative results in the benchmark model, the local B -L model, we find that the (multi-) TeV scale N can be probed at the (100) 14 TeV colliders.

  17. First evidence for WW and WZ diboson production with semi-leptonic decays at a Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Haley, Joseph Glenn Biddle

    2009-06-01

    Presented is a measurement of the simultaneous production of a W± boson in association with a second weak boson (W± or Z0) in p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV. Events are consider with one electron or one muon, missing transverse energy, and at least two hadronic jets. The data were collected by the D0 detector in Run IIa of the Tevatron accelerator and correspond to 1.07 fb-1 of integrated luminosity for each of the two channels (WW/WZ → evq$\\bar{q}$ and WW/WZ → μvq$\\bar{q}$). The cross section for WW + WZ production is measured to be 20.2 ± 2.5(stat) ± 3.6(sys) ± 1.2(lum) pb with a Gaussian significance of 4.4 standard deviations above the background-only scenario. This measurement is consistent with the Standard Model prediction and represents the first direct evidence for WW and WZ production with semi-leptonic decays at a hadron collider.

  18. Uniform description of bulk observables in the hydrokinetic model of A+A collisions at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpenko, Iu. A.; Sinyukov, Yu. M.; Werner, K.

    2013-02-01

    A simultaneous description of hadronic yields; pion, kaon, and proton spectra; elliptic flows; and femtoscopy scales in the hydrokinetic model of A+A collisions is presented at different centralities for the top BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) 2.76-TeV energies. The initial conditions are based on the Monte Carlo Glauber simulations. When going from RHIC to LHC energy in the model, the only parameters changed are the normalization of the initial entropy defined by the number of all charged particles in most central collisions, contribution to entropy from binary collisions, and barionic chemical potential. The hydrokinetic model is used in its hybrid version, which provides the correct match (at the isochronic hypersurface) of the decaying hadron matter evolution with hadronic ultrarelativistic quantum molecular dynamics cascade. The results are compared with the standard hybrid models where hydrodynamics and hadronic cascade are matching just at the non-space-like hypersurface of chemical freeze-out or on the isochronic hypersurface. The modification of the particle-number ratios at LHC caused, in particular, by the particle annihilations at the afterburn stage is also analyzed.

  19. High luminosity muon collider design

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, R.; Gallardo, J.

    1996-10-01

    Muon Colliders have unique technical and physics advantages and disadvantages when compared with both hadron and electron machines. They should be regarded as complementary. Parameters are given of 4 TeV high luminosity {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup {minus}} collider, and of a 0.5 TeV lower luminosity demonstration machine. We discuss the various systems in such muon colliders.

  20. ELIC: A High Luminosity And Efficient Spin Manipulation Electron-Light Ion Collider Based At CEBAF

    SciTech Connect

    Lia Merminga; Yaroslav Derbenev

    2004-02-01

    Electron-light ion colliders with center of mass energy between 20 and 100 GeV, luminosity between 10{sup 33} and 10{sup 35} cm{sup -2} sec{sup -1}, and polarization of both beams at or above 80% have been proposed for the study of hadronic structure. The Electron-Light Ion Collider (ELIC) facility would require the upgrade of CEBAF to 5-7 GeV energy recovering linac and the realization of an ion storage ring complex, accelerating and storing light ions of up to 150 GeV. In this report several innovative features of electron and ion beam designs and their advantages in delivering the luminosity and spin are described. These features include: electron circulator ring to reduce electron polarized source and energy recovering linac requirements, twisted spin booster and collider ring; interaction points with low beta-star and crab-crossing using the short, cooled ion bunches. Accelerator physics and technology issues for both protons/ions and electrons are presented. The feasibility of an integrated fixed target program at 25 GeV and collider program with center of mass energy between 20 and 65 GeV is explored.

  1. VHEeP: a very high energy electron-proton collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caldwell, A.; Wing, M.

    2016-08-01

    Based on current CERN infrastructure, an electron-proton collider is proposed at a centre-of-mass energy of about 9 TeV. A 7 TeV LHC bunch is used as the proton driver to create a plasma wakefield which then accelerates electrons to 3 TeV, these then colliding with the other 7 TeV LHC proton beam. Although of very high energy, the collider has a modest projected integrated luminosity of 10-100 pb^{-1}. For such a collider, with a centre-of-mass energy 30 times greater than HERA, parton momentum fractions, x, down to about 10^{-8} are accessible for photon virtualities, Q^2, of 1 GeV^2. The energy dependence of hadronic cross sections at high energies, such as the total photon-proton cross section, which has synergy with cosmic-ray physics, can be measured and QCD and the structure of matter better understood in a region where the effects are completely unknown. Searches at high Q^2 for physics beyond the Standard Model will be possible, in particular the significantly increased sensitivity to the production of leptoquarks. These and other physics highlights of a very high energy electron-proton collider are outlined.

  2. Design Concept and Parameters of a 15 T $Nb_{3}Sn$ Dipole Demonstrator for a 100 TEV Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Zlobin, A. V.; Andreev, N.; Barzi, E.; Kashikhin, V. V.; Novitski, I.

    2015-06-01

    FNAL has started the development of a 15 T $Nb_{3}Sn$ dipole demonstrator for a 100 TeV scale hadron collider. This paper describes the design concept and parameters of the 15 T $Nb_{3}Sn$ dipole demonstrator. The dipole magnetic, mechanical and quench protection concept and parameters are presented and discussed.

  3. Higgs self-coupling measurements at a 100 TeV hadron collider

    SciTech Connect

    Barr, Alan J.; Dolan, Matthew J.; Englert, Christoph; Ferreira de Lima, Enoque Danilo; Spannowsky, Michael

    2015-02-03

    An important physics goal of a possible next-generation high-energy hadron collider will be precision characterisation of the Higgs sector and electroweak symmetry breaking. A crucial part of understanding the nature of electroweak symmetry breaking is measuring the Higgs self-interactions. We study dihiggs production in proton-proton collisions at 100 TeV centre of mass energy in order to estimate the sensitivity such a machine would have to variations in the trilinear Higgs coupling around the Standard Model expectation. We focus on the bb¯γγ final state, including possible enhancements in sensitivity by exploiting dihiggs recoils against a hard jet. In conclusion, we find that it should be possible to measure the trilinear self-coupling with 40% accuracy given 3/ab and 12% with 30/ab of data.

  4. Summary and highlights of the 14th Topical Conference on Hadron Collider Physics (HCP2002)

    SciTech Connect

    John Womersley

    2002-11-13

    First of all, I would like to thank the scientific committee, the conference organizers, the University of Karlsruhe and the Institute for Experimental Nuclear Physics, all of the speakers, and the conference secretariat, for making this an extremely well-organized and uniformly high-quality meeting. I would also like to thank all of the speakers who provided me with material for my talk before and during the conference. There is obviously no point in these proceedings in attempting to repeat all of the material from the individual contributions; by definition, these are all available earlier in this volume. In the written version, therefore, I will try to give a high level overview of the current state of hadron collider physics and to highlight the connections between the many presentations at this conference.

  5. Landscape of supersymmetric particle mass hierarchies and their signature space at the CERN Large Hadron Collider.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Daniel; Liu, Zuowei; Nath, Pran

    2007-12-21

    The minimal supersymmetric standard model with soft breaking has a large landscape of supersymmetric particle mass hierarchies. This number is reduced significantly in well-motivated scenarios such as minimal supergravity and alternatives. We carry out an analysis of the landscape for the first four lightest particles and identify at least 16 mass patterns, and provide benchmarks for each. We study the signature space for the patterns at the CERN Large Hadron Collider by analyzing the lepton+ (jet> or =2) + missing P{T} signals with 0, 1, 2, and 3 leptons. Correlations in missing P{T} are also analyzed. It is found that even with 10 fb{-1} of data a significant discrimination among patterns emerges.

  6. Black holes in many dimensions at the CERN Large Hadron Collider: testing critical string theory.

    PubMed

    Hewett, JoAnne L; Lillie, Ben; Rizzo, Thomas G

    2005-12-31

    We consider black hole production at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in a generic scenario with many extra dimensions where the standard model fields are confined to a brane. With approximately 20 dimensions the hierarchy problem is shown to be naturally solved without the need for large compactification radii. We find that in such a scenario the properties of black holes can be used to determine the number of extra dimensions, . In particular, we demonstrate that measurements of the decay distributions of such black holes at the LHC can determine if is significantly larger than 6 or 7 with high confidence and thus can probe one of the critical properties of string theory compactifications.

  7. Closing in on supersymmetric electroweak baryogenesis with dark matter searches and the Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Kozaczuk, Jonathan; Profumo, Stefano E-mail: profumo@scipp.ucsc.edu

    2011-11-01

    We study the impact of recent direct and indirect searches for particle dark matter on supersymmetric models with resonant neutralino- or chargino-driven electroweak baryogenesis (EWB) and heavy sfermions. We outline regions of successful EWB on the planes defined by gaugino and higgsino mass parameters, and calculate the portions of those planes excluded by dark matter search results, and the regions soon to be probed by current and future experiments. We conclude that dark matter searches robustly exclude a wino-like lightest supersymmetric particle in successful EWB regions. Bino-like dark matter is still a possibility, although one that will be probed with a modest improvement in the sensitivity of current direct and indirect detection experiments. We also calculate the total production cross section of chargino and neutralino pairs at the Large Hadron Collider, with a center of mass energy of 7 and 14 TeV.

  8. Cryogenic safety aspect of the low -$\\beta$ magnest systems at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC)

    SciTech Connect

    Darve, C.; /Fermilab

    2010-07-01

    The low-{beta} magnet systems are located in the LHC insertion regions around the four interaction points. They are the key elements in the beams focusing/defocusing process and will allow proton collisions at a luminosity of up to 10{sup 34}cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. Large radiation dose deposited at the proximity of the beam collisions dictate stringent requirements for the design and operation of the systems. The hardware commissioning phase of the LHC was completed in the winter of 2010 and permitted to validate this system safe operation. This paper presents the analysis used to qualify and quantify the safe operation of the low-{beta} magnet systems in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) for the first years of operation.

  9. The Large Hadron Collider project: organizational and financial matters (of physics at the terascale).

    PubMed

    Engelen, Jos

    2012-02-28

    In this paper, I present a view of organizational and financial matters relevant for the successful construction and operation of the experimental set-ups at the Large Hadron Collider of CERN, the European Laboratory for Particle Physics in Geneva. Construction of these experiments was particularly challenging: new detector technologies had to be developed; experimental set-ups that are larger and more complex than ever before had to be constructed; and larger collaborations than ever before had to be organized. Fundamental to the success were: the 'reference' provided by CERN, peer review, signed memoranda of understanding, well-organized resources review boards as an interface to the national funding agencies and collegial, but solidly organized, experimental collaborations. PMID:22253248

  10. The data acquisition and reduction challenge at the Large Hadron Collider.

    PubMed

    Cittolin, Sergio

    2012-02-28

    The Large Hadron Collider detectors are technological marvels-which resemble, in functionality, three-dimensional digital cameras with 100 Mpixels-capable of observing proton-proton (pp) collisions at the crossing rate of 40 MHz. Data handling limitations at the recording end imply the selection of only one pp event out of each 10(5). The readout and processing of this huge amount of information, along with the selection of the best approximately 200 events every second, is carried out by a trigger and data acquisition system, supplemented by a sophisticated control and monitor system. This paper presents an overview of the challenges that the development of these systems has presented over the past 15 years. It concludes with a short historical perspective, some lessons learnt and a few thoughts on the future.

  11. Search for a light fermiophobic Higgs boson produced via gluon fusion at hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Arhrib, Abdesslam; Benbrik, Rachid; Guedes, R. B.; Santos, R.

    2008-10-01

    In this study, we propose new Higgs production mechanisms with multiphoton final states in the fermiophobic limit of the two Higgs doublet model. The processes are: gg{yields}hh, gg{yields}Hh followed by H{yields}hh and gg{yields}Ah followed by A{yields}hZ. In the fermiophobic limit, gg{yields}hh and gg{yields}Ah{yields}hhZ would give rise to 4{gamma} signature while gg{yields}Hh{yields}hhh can give a 6{gamma} final state. We show that both the Fermilab Tevatron and CERN's Large Hadron Collider can probe a substantial slice of the parameter space in this fermiophobic scenario of the two Higgs doublet model. If observed the above processes can give some information on the triple Higgs couplings involved.

  12. EXERGY ANALYSIS OF THE CRYOGENIC HELIUM DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM FOR THE LARGE HADRON COLLIDER (LHC)

    SciTech Connect

    Claudet, S.; Lebrun, Ph.; Tavian, L.; Wagner, U.

    2010-04-09

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN features the world's largest helium cryogenic system, spreading over the 26.7 km circumference of the superconducting accelerator. With a total equivalent capacity of 145 kW at 4.5 K including 18 kW at 1.8 K, the LHC refrigerators produce an unprecedented exergetic load, which must be distributed efficiently to the magnets in the tunnel over the 3.3 km length of each of the eight independent sectors of the machine. We recall the main features of the LHC cryogenic helium distribution system at different temperature levels and present its exergy analysis, thus enabling to qualify second-principle efficiency and identify main remaining sources of irreversibility.

  13. The Large Hadron Collider project: organizational and financial matters (of physics at the terascale).

    PubMed

    Engelen, Jos

    2012-02-28

    In this paper, I present a view of organizational and financial matters relevant for the successful construction and operation of the experimental set-ups at the Large Hadron Collider of CERN, the European Laboratory for Particle Physics in Geneva. Construction of these experiments was particularly challenging: new detector technologies had to be developed; experimental set-ups that are larger and more complex than ever before had to be constructed; and larger collaborations than ever before had to be organized. Fundamental to the success were: the 'reference' provided by CERN, peer review, signed memoranda of understanding, well-organized resources review boards as an interface to the national funding agencies and collegial, but solidly organized, experimental collaborations.

  14. Observing light-by-light scattering at the Large Hadron Collider.

    PubMed

    d'Enterria, David; da Silveira, Gustavo G

    2013-08-23

    Elastic light-by-light scattering (γγ→γγ) is open to study at the Large Hadron Collider thanks to the large quasireal photon fluxes available in electromagnetic interactions of protons (p) and lead (Pb) ions. The γγ→γγ cross sections for diphoton masses m(γγ)>5 GeV amount to 12 fb, 26 pb, and 35 nb in p-p, p-Pb, and Pb-Pb collisions at nucleon-nucleon center-of-mass energies √(s(NN))=14, 8.8, and 5.5 TeV, respectively. Such a measurement has no substantial background in Pb-Pb collisions where one expects about 20 signal events per run, after typical detector acceptance and reconstruction efficiency selections.

  15. Signatures of non-universal gaugino and scalar masses at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC)

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharya, Subhaditya

    2008-11-23

    We perform a multichannel analysis in context of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) for supersymmetric (SUSY) theories with high-scale non-universal gaugino masses arising from different non-singlet representations of SU(5) and SO(10) gauge groups in a SUSY-GUT scenario and non-universal scalar masses in form of squark-slepton non-universality, third family scalar non-universality and that arising due to SO(10) D-terms. We present the numerical predictions over a wide region of parameter space using event generator Pythia. Certain broad features emerge from the study which may be useful to identify these non-universal schemes and distinguish them from the minimal supergravity (mSUGRA) framework.

  16. Search for a light fermiophobic Higgs boson produced via gluon fusion at hadron colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arhrib, Abdesslam; Benbrik, Rachid; Guedes, R. B.; Santos, R.

    2008-10-01

    In this study, we propose new Higgs production mechanisms with multiphoton final states in the fermiophobic limit of the two Higgs doublet model. The processes are: gg→hh, gg→Hh followed by H→hh and gg→Ah followed by A→hZ. In the fermiophobic limit, gg→hh and gg→Ah→hhZ would give rise to 4γ signature while gg→Hh→hhh can give a 6γ final state. We show that both the Fermilab Tevatron and CERN’s Large Hadron Collider can probe a substantial slice of the parameter space in this fermiophobic scenario of the two Higgs doublet model. If observed the above processes can give some information on the triple Higgs couplings involved.

  17. Non-Standard ZZ Production with Leptonic Decays at the Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hao

    2012-04-01

    The prospects of anomalous ZZγ and ZZZ triple gauge boson couplings are investigated at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) through an excess of events in ZZ diboson production. Two such channels are selected and the tree level results including leptonic final states are discussed: ZZ → l1-l1+l2-l2+ and ZZ → l-l+νν¯(l, l1,2 = e, μ). The results in the full finite width method are compared with the narrow width approximation (NWA) method in detail. Besides the Z boson transverse momentum distributions, the azimuthal angle between the Z boson decay to fermions, ΔΦ, and their separations in the pseudo-rapidity-azimuthal angle plane, ΔR, as well as the sensitivity on anomalous couplings are displayed at the 14 TeV LHC.

  18. First beta-beating measurement and optics analysis for the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Tomas, R.; Calaga, R.; Aiba, M.; Fartoukh, S.; Franchi, A.; Giovannozzi, M.; Kain, V.; Lamont, M.; Vanbavinckhove, G.; Wenninger, J.; Zimmermann, F.; Morita, A.

    2009-08-13

    Proton beams were successfully steered through the entire ring of the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) on September the 10th of 2008. A reasonable lifetime was achieved for the counterclockwise beam, namely beam 2, after the radiofrequency capture of the particle bunch was established. This provided the unique opportunity of acquiring turn-by-turn betatron oscillations for a maximum of 90 turns right at injection. Transverse coupling was not corrected and chromaticity was estimated to be large. Despite this largely constrained scenario, reliable optics measurements have been accomplished. These measurements together with the application of new algorithms for the reconstruction of optics errors have led to the identification of a dominant error source.

  19. Higgs self-coupling measurements at a 100 TeV hadron collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barr, Alan J.; Dolan, Matthew J.; Englert, Christoph; de Lima, Danilo Enoque Ferreira; Spannowsky, Michael

    2015-02-01

    An important physics goal of a possible next-generation high-energy hadron collider will be precision characterisation of the Higgs sector and electroweak symmetry breaking. A crucial part of understanding the nature of electroweak symmetry breaking is measuring the Higgs self-interactions. We study dihiggs production in proton-proton collisions at 100 TeV centre of mass energy in order to estimate the sensitivity such a machine would have to variations in the trilinear Higgs coupling around the Standard Model expectation. We focus on the final state, including possible enhancements in sensitivity by exploiting dihiggs recoils against a hard jet. We find that it should be possible to measure the trilinear self-coupling with 40% accuracy given 3/ab and 12% with 30/ab of data.

  20. Precise Predictions for W 4 Jet Production at the Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, C.F.; Bern, Z.; Dixon, Lance J.; Cordero, F.Febres; Forde, D.; Gleisberg, T.; Ita, H.; Kosower, D.A.; Maitre, D.; /Durham U.

    2010-09-14

    We present the first next-to-leading order QCD results for W + 4-jet production at hadron colliders. Total cross sections, as well as distributions in the jet transverse momenta and in the total transverse energy HT, are provided for the initial LHC energy of {radical}s = 7 TeV. We use a leading-color approximation, known to be accurate to 3% for W production with fewer jets. The virtual matrix elements and the most complicated real-emission matrix elements are handled by the BlackHat library, based on on-shell methods. The remaining parts of the calculation, including the integration over phase space, are performed by the SHERPA package.

  1. QCD corrections to associated production of tt{gamma} at hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Duan Pengfei; Ma Wengan; Zhang Renyou; Han Liang; Guo Lei; Wang Shaoming

    2009-07-01

    We report on the next-to-leading order (NLO) QCD computation of top-quark pair production in association with a photon at the Fermilab Tevatron RUN II and CERN Large Hadron Collider. We describe the impact of the complete NLO QCD radiative corrections to this process, and provide the predictions of the leading order (LO) and NLO integrated cross sections, distributions of the transverse momenta of the top quark and photon for the LHC and Tevatron, and the LO and NLO forward-backward top-quark charge asymmetries for the Tevatron. We investigate the dependence of the LO and NLO cross sections on the renormalization/factorization scale, and find the scale dependence of the LO cross section is obviously improved by the NLO QCD corrections. The K-factor of the NLO QCD correction is 0.977(1.524) for the Tevatron (LHC)

  2. Viewpoint: the End of the World at the Large Hadron Collider?

    SciTech Connect

    Peskin, Michael E.; /SLAC

    2011-11-21

    New arguments based on astrophysical phenomena constrain the possibility that dangerous black holes will be produced at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. On 8 August, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN injected its first beams, beginning an experimental program that will produce proton-proton collisions at an energy of 14 TeV. Particle physicists are waiting expectantly. The reason is that the Standard Model of strong, weak, and electromagnetic interactions, despite its many successes, is clearly incomplete. Theory says that the holes in the model should be filled by new physics in the energy region that will be studied by the LHC. Some candidate theories are simple quick fixes, but the most interesting ones involve new concepts of spacetime waiting to be discovered. Look up the LHC on Wikipedia, however, and you will find considerable space devoted to safety concerns. At the LHC, we will probe energies beyond those explored at any previous accelerator, and we hope to create particles that have never been observed. Couldn't we, then, create particles that would actually be dangerous, for example, ones that would eat normal matter and eventually turn the earth into a blob of unpleasantness? It is morbid fun to speculate about such things, and candidates for such dangerous particles have been suggested. These suggestions have been analyzed in an article in Reviews of Modern Physics by Jaffe, Busza, Wilczek, and Sandweiss and excluded on the basis of constraints from observation and from the known laws of physics. These conclusions have been upheld by subsequent studies conducted at CERN.

  3. A Novel method for modeling the recoil in W boson events at hadron collider

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; Abbott, Braden Keim; Abolins, Maris A.; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; Adams, Mark Raymond; Adams, Todd; Aguilo, Ernest; Ahsan, Mahsana; Alexeev, Guennadi D.; Alkhazov, Georgiy D.; Alton, Andrew K.; /Michigan U. /Augustana Coll., Sioux Falls /Northeastern U.

    2009-07-01

    We present a new method for modeling the hadronic recoil in W {yields} {ell}{nu} events produced at hadron colliders. The recoil is chosen from a library of recoils in Z {yields} {ell}{ell} data events and overlaid on a simulated W {yields} {ell}{nu} event. Implementation of this method requires that the data recoil library describe the properties of the measured recoil as a function of the true, rather than the measured, transverse momentum of the boson. We address this issue using a multidimensional Bayesian unfolding technique. We estimate the statistical and systematic uncertainties from this method for the W boson mass and width measurements assuming 1 fb{sup -1} of data from the Fermilab Tevatron. The uncertainties are found to be small and comparable to those of a more traditional parameterized recoil model. For the high precision measurements that will be possible with data from Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron and from the CERN LHC, the method presented in this paper may be advantageous, since it does not require an understanding of the measured recoil from first principles.

  4. Heavy-ion physics with the ALICE experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider.

    PubMed

    Schukraft, J

    2012-02-28

    After close to 20 years of preparation, the dedicated heavy-ion experiment A Large Ion Collider Experiment (ALICE) took first data at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) accelerator with proton collisions at the end of 2009 and with lead nuclei at the end of 2010. After a short introduction into the physics of ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions, this article recalls the main design choices made for the detector and summarizes the initial operation and performance of ALICE. Physics results from this first year of operation concentrate on characterizing the global properties of typical, average collisions, both in proton-proton (pp) and nucleus-nucleus reactions, in the new energy regime of the LHC. The pp results differ, to a varying degree, from most quantum chromodynamics-inspired phenomenological models and provide the input needed to fine tune their parameters. First results from Pb-Pb are broadly consistent with expectations based on lower energy data, indicating that high-density matter created at the LHC, while much hotter and larger, still behaves like a very strongly interacting, almost perfect liquid.

  5. Long term dynamics of the high luminosity Large Hadron Collider with crab cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barranco García, J.; De Maria, R.; Grudiev, A.; Tomás García, R.; Appleby, R. B.; Brett, D. R.

    2016-10-01

    The High Luminosity upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) aims to achieve an integrated luminosity of 200 - 300 fb-1 per year, including the contribution from the upgrade of the injector chain. For the HL-LHC the larger crossing angle together with a smaller beta function at the collision point would result in more than 70% luminosity loss due to the incomplete geometric overlap of colliding bunches. To recover head-on collisions at the high-luminosity particle-physics detectors ATLAS and CMS and benefit from the very low β* provided by the Achromatic Telescopic Squeezing (ATS) optics, a local crab cavity scheme provides transverse kicks to the proton bunches. The tight space constraints at the location of these cavities leads to designs which are axially non-symmetric, giving rise to high order multipoles components of the main deflecting mode and, since these kicks are harmonic in time, we expand them in a series of multipoles in a similar fashion as is done for static field magnets. In this work we calculate, for the first time, the higher order multipoles and their impact on beam dynamics for three different crab cavity prototypes. Different approaches to calculate the multipoles are presented. Furthermore, we perform the first calculation of their impact on the long term stability of the machine using the concept of dynamic aperture.

  6. The Electron-Ion Collider - overview and few-body opportunities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadel-Turonski, Pawel

    2016-03-01

    The Electron-Ion Collider (EIC), which received a high recommendation in the long-range plan, is envisioned as the next-generation US facility for exploring the strong interaction (QCD). The program will include mapping the spin- and spatial structure of the quark and gluon sea in the nucleon, understanding the emergence of hadronic matter from color charge, and probing the gluon fields in nuclei. The EIC will provide beams of polarized electrons and light-ion beams, as well as unpolarized heavy ions, and advanced detectors capable of precisely measuring nuclear fragments - creating new opportunities for exciting few-body physics.

  7. Hadron physics at the new CW electron accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Burkert, V.D.

    1990-01-01

    Major trends of the physics program related to the study of hadron structure and hadron spectroscopy at the new high current, high duty cycle electron machines are discussed. It is concluded that planned experiments at these machines may have important impact on our understanding of the strong interaction by studying the internal structure and spectroscopy of the nucleon and lower mass hyperon states.

  8. Laser cooling of electron beams for linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Telnov, V.

    1996-10-01

    A novel method of electron beam cooling is considered which can be used for linear colliders. The electron beam is cooled during collision with focused powerful laser pulse. With reasonable laser parameters (laser flash energy about 10 J) one can decrease transverse beam emittances by a factor about 10 per one stage. The ultimate transverse emittances are much below that given by other methods. Depolarization of a beam during the cooling is about 5--15% for one stage. This method is especially useful for photon colliders and open new possibilities for e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} colliders and x-ray FEL based on high energy linacs.

  9. Probing Sea Quarks and Gluons: The Electron-Ion Collider Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horn, Tanja

    2014-03-01

    The 21st century holds great promise for reaching a new era for unlocking the mysteries of the structure of the atomic nucleus and the nucleons inside it governed by the theory of strong interactions (QCD). In particular, much remains to be learned about the dynamical basis of the structure of hadrons and nuclei in terms of the fundamental quarks and gluons. One of the main goals of existing and nearly completed facilities is to map out the spin flavor structure of the nucleons in the valence region. A future Electron-Ion Collider (EIC) would be the world's first polarized electron-proton collider, and the world's first e-A collider, and would seek the QCD foundation of nucleons and nuclei in terms of the sea quarks and gluons, matching to these valence quark studies. The EIC will provide a versatile range of kinematics and beam polarization, as well as beam species, to allow for mapping the spin and spatial structure of the quark sea and gluons, to discover the collective effects of gluons in atomic nuclei, and to understand the emergence of hadronic matter from color charge.

  10. Update on the MEIC electron collider ring design

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Fangei; Derbenev, Yaroslav S.; Harwood, Leigh; Hutton, Andrew; Morozov, Vasiliy; Pilat, Fulvia; Zhang, Yuhong; Cai, Y.; Nosochkov, Y. M.; Sullivan, Michael; Wang, M.-H; Wienands, Uli

    2015-09-01

    The electron collider ring of the Medium-energy Electron-Ion Collider (MEIC) at Jefferson Lab is designed to accumulate and store a high-current polarized electron beam for collisions with an ion beam. We consider a design of the electron collider ring based on reusing PEP-II components, such as magnets, power supplies, vacuum system, etc. This has the potential to significantly reduce the cost and engineering effort needed to bring the project to fruition. This paper reports on an electron ring optics design considering the balance of PEP-II hardware parameters (such as dipole sagitta, magnet field strengths and acceptable synchrotron radiation power) and electron beam quality in terms of equilibrium emittances.

  11. Update on the MEIC electron collider ring design

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, F.; Derbenev, Ya. S.; Harwood, L.; Hutton, A.; Morozov, V. S.; Pilat, F.; Zhang, Y.; Cai, Y.; Nosochkov, Y. M.; Sullivan, M.; Wang, M-H; Wienands, U.

    2015-07-14

    The electron collider ring of the Medium-energy Electron-Ion Collider (MEIC) at Jefferson Lab is designed to accumulate and store a high-current polarized electron beam for collisions with an ion beam. We consider a design of the electron collider ring based on reusing PEPII components, such as magnets, power supplies, vacuum system, etc. This has the potential to significantly reduce the cost and engineering effort needed to bring the project to fruition. This paper reports on an electron ring optics design considering the balance of PEP-II hardware parameters (such as dipole sagitta, magnet field strengths and acceptable synchrotron radiation power) and electron beam quality in terms of equilibrium emittances.

  12. Next-to-Leading-Order QCD Corrections to W{sup +}W{sup -}bb Production at Hadron Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Denner, A.; Dittmaier, S.; Kallweit, S.; Pozzorini, S.

    2011-02-04

    Top-antitop quark pairs belong to the most abundantly produced and precisely measurable heavy-particle signatures at hadron colliders and allow for crucial tests of the standard model and new physics searches. Here we report on the calculation of the next-to-leading order (NLO) QCD corrections to hadronic W{sup +}W{sup -}bb production, which provides a complete NLO description of the production of top-antitop pairs and their subsequent decay into W bosons and bottom quarks, including interferences, off-shell effects, and nonresonant backgrounds. Numerical predictions for the Tevatron and the LHC are presented.

  13. Experimental demonstration of colliding beam lifetime improvement by electron lenses

    SciTech Connect

    Shiltsev, Vladimir; Alexahin, Yuri; Kamerdzhiev, Vsevolod; Kuznetsov, Gennady; Zhang, Xiao-Long; Bishofberger, Kip; /Los Alamos

    2007-10-01

    We report successful application of space-charge forces of a low-energy electron beam for improvement of particle lifetime determined by beam-beam interaction in high-energy collider. In our experiments, an electron lens, a novel instrument developed for the beam-beam compensation, was set on a 980-GeV proton bunch in the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider. The proton bunch losses due to its interaction with antiproton beam were reduced by a factor of 2 when the electron lens was operating. We describe the principle of electron lens operation and present experimental results.

  14. Searches for Lorentz Violation in Top-Quark Production and Decay at Hadron Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Whittington, Denver Wade

    2012-07-01

    We present a first-of-its-kind confirmation that the most massive known elementary particle obeys the special theory of relativity. Lorentz symmetry is a fundamental aspect of special relativity which posits that the laws of physics are invariant regardless of the orientation and velocity of the reference frame in which they are measured. Because this symmetry is a fundamental tenet of physics, it is important to test its validity in all processes. We quantify violation of this symmetry using the Standard-Model Extension framework, which predicts the effects that Lorentz violation would have on elementary particles and their interactions. The top quark is the most massive known elementary particle and has remained inaccessible to tests of Lorentz invariance until now. This model predicts a dependence of the production cross section for top and antitop quark pairs on sidereal time as the orientation of the experiment in which these events are produced changes with the rotation of the Earth. Using data collected with the DØ detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider, we search for violation of Lorentz invariance in events involving the production of a $t\\bar{t}$ pair. Within the experimental precision, we find no evidence for such a violation and set upper limits on parameters describing its possible strength within the Standard-Model Extension. We also investigate the prospects for extending this analysis using the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider which, because of the higher rate of $t\\bar{t}$ events at that experiment, has the potential to improve the limits presented here.

  15. High energy proton-proton elastic scattering at the Large Hadron Collider and nucleon structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luddy, Richard Joseph

    To gain insight into the structure of the nucleon, we pursue the development of the phenomenological model of Islam et al. (IIFS model) for high energy elastic pp and p¯p scattering. We determine the energy dependence of the parameters of the IIFS model using the available elastic differential cross section data from SPS Collider and Tevatron and the known asymptotic behavior of sigmatot (s) and rho(s) from dispersion relation calculations and more recent analyses of Cudell et al. (COMPETE Collaboration). Next, we incorporate a high energy elastic valence quark-quark scattering amplitude into the model based on BFKL pomeron to describe small impact parameter (large | t|) pp collisions. Finally, we predict the pp elastic differential cross section at the unprecedented c.m. energy of s = 14.0 TeV at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). This prediction assumes crucial significance---because of an approved experiment at LHC: TOTal and Elastic Measurement (TOTEM). The TOTEM group plans to measure pp elastic dsigma/dt at 14.0 TeV all the way from momentum transfer |t| = 0 to |t| ≃ 10 GeV 2. Their measurement will stringently test not only the diffraction and o-exchange descriptions of the original IIFS model, but also the additional valence quark-quark scattering contribution that we find to be dominant for large |t|. Successful quantitative verification of the predicted dsigma/dt will mean that our picture of the nucleon with an outer cloud of qq¯ condensed ground state, an inner core of topological baryonic charge, and a still smaller core of massless valence quarks provides a realistic description of nucleon structure.

  16. Simulations and measurements of beam loss patterns at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruce, R.; Assmann, R. W.; Boccone, V.; Bracco, C.; Brugger, M.; Cauchi, M.; Cerutti, F.; Deboy, D.; Ferrari, A.; Lari, L.; Marsili, A.; Mereghetti, A.; Mirarchi, D.; Quaranta, E.; Redaelli, S.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Rossi, A.; Salvachua, B.; Skordis, E.; Tambasco, C.; Valentino, G.; Weiler, T.; Vlachoudis, V.; Wollmann, D.

    2014-08-01

    The CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is designed to collide proton beams of unprecedented energy, in order to extend the frontiers of high-energy particle physics. During the first very successful running period in 2010-2013, the LHC was routinely storing protons at 3.5-4 TeV with a total beam energy of up to 146 MJ, and even higher stored energies are foreseen in the future. This puts extraordinary demands on the control of beam losses. An uncontrolled loss of even a tiny fraction of the beam could cause a superconducting magnet to undergo a transition into a normal-conducting state, or in the worst case cause material damage. Hence a multistage collimation system has been installed in order to safely intercept high-amplitude beam protons before they are lost elsewhere. To guarantee adequate protection from the collimators, a detailed theoretical understanding is needed. This article presents results of numerical simulations of the distribution of beam losses around the LHC that have leaked out of the collimation system. The studies include tracking of protons through the fields of more than 5000 magnets in the 27 km LHC ring over hundreds of revolutions, and Monte Carlo simulations of particle-matter interactions both in collimators and machine elements being hit by escaping particles. The simulation results agree typically within a factor 2 with measurements of beam loss distributions from the previous LHC run. Considering the complex simulation, which must account for a very large number of unknown imperfections, and in view of the total losses around the ring spanning over 7 orders of magnitude, we consider this an excellent agreement. Our results give confidence in the simulation tools, which are used also for the design of future accelerators.

  17. MEKS: A program for computation of inclusive jet cross sections at hadron colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Jun; Liang, Zhihua; Soper, Davison E.; Lai, Hung-Liang; Nadolsky, Pavel M.; Yuan, C.-P.

    2013-06-01

    EKS is a numerical program that predicts differential cross sections for production of single-inclusive hadronic jets and jet pairs at next-to-leading order (NLO) accuracy in a perturbative QCD calculation. We describe MEKS 1.0, an upgraded EKS program with increased numerical precision, suitable for comparisons to the latest experimental data from the Large Hadron Collider and Tevatron. The program integrates the regularized patron-level matrix elements over the kinematical phase space for production of two and three partons using the VEGAS algorithm. It stores the generated weighted events in finely binned two-dimensional histograms for fast offline analysis. A user interface allows one to customize computation of inclusive jet observables. Results of a benchmark comparison of the MEKS program and the commonly used FastNLO program are also documented. Program SummaryProgram title: MEKS 1.0 Catalogue identifier: AEOX_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEOX_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland. Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 9234 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 51997 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran (main program), C (CUBA library and analysis program). Computer: All. Operating system: Any UNIX-like system. RAM: ˜300 MB Classification: 11.1. External routines: LHAPDF (https://lhapdf.hepforge.org/) Nature of problem: Computation of differential cross sections for inclusive production of single hadronic jets and jet pairs at next-to-leading order accuracy in perturbative quantum chromodynamics. Solution method: Upon subtraction of infrared singularities, the hard-scattering matrix elements are integrated over available phase space using an optimized VEGAS algorithm. Weighted events are generated and filled

  18. Nuclear physics with a medium-energy Electron-Ion Collider

    SciTech Connect

    A. Accardi, V. Guzey, A. Prokudin, C. Weiss

    2012-06-01

    A polarized ep/eA collider (Electron-Ion Collider, or EIC) with variable center-of-mass energy {radical}s {approx} 20-70 GeV and a luminosity {approx}10{sup 34} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} would be uniquely suited to address several outstanding questions of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) and the microscopic structure of hadrons and nuclei: (i) the three-dimensional structure of the nucleon in QCD (sea quark and gluon spatial distributions, orbital motion, polarization, correlations); (ii) the fundamental color fields in nuclei (nuclear parton densities, shadowing, coherence effects, color transparency); (iii) the conversion of color charge to hadrons (fragmentation, parton propagation through matter, in-medium jets). We briefly review the conceptual aspects of these questions and the measurements that would address them, emphasizing the qualitatively new information that could be obtained with the collider. Such a medium-energy EIC could be realized at Jefferson Lab after the 12 GeV Upgrade (MEIC), or at Brookhaven National Lab as the low-energy stage of eRHIC.

  19. CONCLUSIONS OF THE WORKSHOP [Hadron Colliders at the highest energy and luminosity

    SciTech Connect

    RUGGIERO,A.G.

    1996-11-04

    During this Workshop, it was concluded that a Proton-Proton Collider with an energy of 100 TeV per beam and a luminosity of about 10{sup 35} cm{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1} is feasible. The most important technical requirement for the realization of such a project is a large bending field. For instance, a field of 13 Tesla would be desirable. This is twice the field of the SSC superconducting magnets, which very likely may be achieved in a non-too-far future by extrapolation of the present technology. The design of this Collider would follow very closely the methods used for the design of the SSC and of the LHC, with the major noticeable difference that, because of the larger bending field and the larger beam energy, the performance is determined by the effects of the Synchrotron Radiation in the similar manner they affect the performance of an electron-positron collider. This fact has considerable beneficial consequences since it allows the attainment of large luminosity by reducing the beam dimensions at collision and by requiring, to some degree, less number of particles per beam. On the other end. the losses to synchrotron radiation are to be absorbed by the cryogenic system, and the vacuum system should be capable to cope with them. A more significant rf system may also be required.

  20. Production of b-quark jets at the large Hadron Collider in the parton-reggeization approach

    SciTech Connect

    Saleev, V. A. Shipilova, A. V.

    2013-11-15

    The inclusive hadroproduction of b-quark jets and bb-bar-quark dijets at the Large Hadron Collider is considered by using the hypothesis of gluon Reggeization in t-channel exchanges at high energies. Experimental data obtained by the ATLAS Collaboration are described well within all of the presented kinematical regions for single b-quark jets and bb-bar-quark dijets without resort to any free parameters.

  1. Journey in the search for the Higgs boson: the ATLAS and CMS experiments at the Large Hadron Collider.

    PubMed

    Della Negra, M; Jenni, P; Virdee, T S

    2012-12-21

    The search for the standard model Higgs boson at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) started more than two decades ago. Much innovation was required and diverse challenges had to be overcome during the conception and construction of the LHC and its experiments. The ATLAS and CMS Collaboration experiments at the LHC have discovered a heavy boson that could complete the standard model of particle physics. PMID:23258886

  2. Journey in the search for the Higgs boson: the ATLAS and CMS experiments at the Large Hadron Collider.

    PubMed

    Della Negra, M; Jenni, P; Virdee, T S

    2012-12-21

    The search for the standard model Higgs boson at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) started more than two decades ago. Much innovation was required and diverse challenges had to be overcome during the conception and construction of the LHC and its experiments. The ATLAS and CMS Collaboration experiments at the LHC have discovered a heavy boson that could complete the standard model of particle physics.

  3. Thermomechanical response of Large Hadron Collider collimators to proton and ion beam impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cauchi, Marija; Assmann, R. W.; Bertarelli, A.; Carra, F.; Cerutti, F.; Lari, L.; Redaelli, S.; Mollicone, P.; Sammut, N.

    2015-04-01

    The CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is designed to accelerate and bring into collision high-energy protons as well as heavy ions. Accidents involving direct beam impacts on collimators can happen in both cases. The LHC collimation system is designed to handle the demanding requirements of high-intensity proton beams. Although proton beams have 100 times higher beam power than the nominal LHC lead ion beams, specific problems might arise in case of ion losses due to different particle-collimator interaction mechanisms when compared to protons. This paper investigates and compares direct ion and proton beam impacts on collimators, in particular tertiary collimators (TCTs), made of the tungsten heavy alloy INERMET® 180. Recent measurements of the mechanical behavior of this alloy under static and dynamic loading conditions at different temperatures have been done and used for realistic estimates of the collimator response to beam impact. Using these new measurements, a numerical finite element method (FEM) approach is presented in this paper. Sequential fast-transient thermostructural analyses are performed in the elastic-plastic domain in order to evaluate and compare the thermomechanical response of TCTs in case of critical beam load cases involving proton and heavy ion beam impacts.

  4. The upgraded Pixel Detector of the ATLAS Experiment for Run 2 at the Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Backhaus, M.

    2016-09-01

    During Run 1 of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the ATLAS Pixel Detector has shown excellent performance. The ATLAS collaboration took advantage of the first long shutdown of the LHC during 2013 and 2014 and extracted the ATLAS Pixel Detector from the experiment, brought it to surface and maintained the services. This included the installation of new service quarter panels, the repair of cables, and the installation of the new Diamond Beam Monitor (DBM). Additionally, a completely new innermost pixel detector layer, the Insertable B-Layer (IBL), was constructed and installed in May 2014 between a new smaller beam pipe and the existing Pixel Detector. With a radius of 3.3 cm the IBL is located extremely close to the interaction point. Therefore, a new readout chip and two new sensor technologies (planar and 3D) are used in the IBL. In order to achieve best possible physics performance the material budget was improved with respect to the existing Pixel Detector. This is realized using lightweight staves for mechanical support and a CO2 based cooling system. This paper describes the improvements achieved during the maintenance of the existing Pixel Detector as well as the performance of the IBL during the construction and commissioning phase. Additionally, first results obtained during the LHC Run 2 demonstrating the distinguished tracking performance of the new Four Layer ATLAS Pixel Detector are presented.

  5. Study of the Standard Model W angular coefficients and associated helicity cross sections at hadron colliders.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strologas, John

    2002-04-01

    We present the Standard Model prediction for the W angular coefficients and the corresponding helicity cross sections at hadron colliders. There are eight angular coefficients, four of which are present in high transverse momentum events associated with the production of a jet, while the last three ones are related to gluon loops and they are T-odd and P-odd, thus a probable source of CP violation in W production and decay. All angular coefficients are ratios of the W helicity cross sections and the unpolarized total W cross section. If the W is produced with zero transverse momentum, its spin is parallel to the beam-axis and only one coefficient survives, giving us the familiar formula (dσ/(dp_T^Wd\\cosθ)=(1±\\cosθ)^2, where θ is the azimuthal angle of the final state charged lepton in the W^mp rest frame), if only valence quarks contribute to the W production. In the case of W production with non-trivial transverse momentum, the differential W cross section is more involved and also a function of the polar angle of the charged lepton. We discuss a method of experimentally extracting the W angular coefficients and helicity cross sections using W+jet events at next-to-leading order in QCD (gluon loops), without dividing the data with any Monte Carlo isotropic gauge boson decays, as it was proposed in the past.

  6. The CERN Large Hadron Collider as a tool to study high-energy density matter.

    PubMed

    Tahir, N A; Kain, V; Schmidt, R; Shutov, A; Lomonosov, I V; Gryaznov, V; Piriz, A R; Temporal, M; Hoffmann, D H H; Fortov, V E

    2005-04-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN will generate two extremely powerful 7 TeV proton beams. Each beam will consist of 2808 bunches with an intensity per bunch of 1.15x10(11) protons so that the total number of protons in one beam will be about 3x10(14) and the total energy will be 362 MJ. Each bunch will have a duration of 0.5 ns and two successive bunches will be separated by 25 ns, while the power distribution in the radial direction will be Gaussian with a standard deviation, sigma=0.2 mm. The total duration of the beam will be about 89 mus. Using a 2D hydrodynamic code, we have carried out numerical simulations of the thermodynamic and hydrodynamic response of a solid copper target that is irradiated with one of the LHC beams. These calculations show that only the first few hundred proton bunches will deposit a high specific energy of 400 kJ/g that will induce exotic states of high energy density in matter.

  7. Mathematical formulation to predict the harmonics of the superconducting Large Hadron Collider magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sammut, Nicholas; Bottura, Luca; Micallef, Joseph

    2006-01-01

    CERN is currently assembling the LHC (Large Hadron Collider) that will accelerate and bring in collision 7 TeV protons for high energy physics. Such a superconducting magnet-based accelerator can be controlled only when the field errors of production and installation of all magnetic elements are known to the required accuracy. The ideal way to compensate the field errors obviously is to have direct diagnostics on the beam. For the LHC, however, a system solely based on beam feedback may be too demanding. The present baseline for the LHC control system hence requires an accurate forecast of the magnetic field and the multipole field errors to reduce the burden on the beam-based feedback. The field model is the core of this magnetic prediction system, that we call the field description for the LHC (FIDEL). The model will provide the forecast of the magnetic field at a given time, magnet operating current, magnet ramp rate, magnet temperature, and magnet powering history. The model is based on the identification and physical decomposition of the effects that contribute to the total field in the magnet aperture of the LHC dipoles. Each effect is quantified using data obtained from series measurements, and modeled theoretically or empirically depending on the complexity of the physical phenomena involved. This paper presents the developments of the new finely tuned magnetic field model and, using the data accumulated through series tests to date, evaluates its accuracy and predictive capabilities over a sector of the machine.

  8. Finite-width effects in unstable-particle production at hadron colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falgari, P.; Papanastasiou, A. S.; Signer, A.

    2013-05-01

    We present a general formalism for the calculation of finite-width contributions to the differential production cross sections of unstable particles at hadron colliders. In this formalism, which employs an effective-theory description of unstable-particle production and decay, the matrix element computation is organized as a gauge-invariant expansion in powers of Γ X /m X , with Γ X and m X the width and mass of the unstable particle. This framework allows for a systematic inclusion of off-shell and non-factorizable effects whilst at the same time keeping the computational effort minimal compared to a full calculation in the complex-mass scheme. As a proof-of-concept example, we give results for an NLO calculation of top-antitop production in the qoverline{q} partonic channel. As already found in a similar calculation of single-top production, the finite-width effects are small for the total cross section, as expected from the naïve counting Γ t /m t 1%. However, they can be sizeable, in excess of 10%, close to edges of certain kinematical distributions. The dependence of the results on the mass renormalization scheme, and its implication for a precise extraction of the top-quark mass, is also discussed.

  9. Measurement of nonlinear observables in the Large Hadron Collider using kicked beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maclean, E. H.; Tomás, R.; Schmidt, F.; Persson, T. H. B.

    2014-08-01

    The nonlinear dynamics of a circular accelerator such as the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) may significantly impact its performance. As the LHC progresses to more challenging regimes of operation it is to be expected that the nonlinear single particle dynamics in the transverse planes will play an increasing role in limiting the reach of the accelerator. As such it is vital that the nonlinear sources are well understood. The nonlinear fields of a circular accelerator may be probed through measurement of the amplitude detuning: the variation of tune with single particle emittance. This quantity may be assessed experimentally by exciting the beam to large amplitudes with kicks, and obtaining the tunes and actions from turn-by-turn data at Beam Position Monitors. The large amplitude excitations inherent to such a measurement also facilitate measurement of the dynamic aperture from an analysis of beam losses following the kicks. In 2012 these measurements were performed on the LHC Beam 2 at injection energy (450 GeV) with the nominal magnetic configuration. Nonlinear coupling was also observed. A second set of measurements were performed following the application of corrections for b4 and b5 errors. Analysis of the experimental results, and a comparison to simulation are presented herein.

  10. Next-to-Leading Order Predictions for W + 3-Jet Distributions at Hadron Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, C.F.; Bern, Z.; Dixon, L.J.; Febres Cordero, F.; Forde, D.; Gleisberg, T.; Ita, H.; Kosower, D.A.; Maitre, D.; /Durham U.

    2009-12-09

    We present next-to-leading order QCD predictions for a variety of distributions in W + 3-jet production at both the Tevatron and the Large Hadron Collider. We include all subprocesses and incorporate the decay of the W boson into leptons. Our results are in excellent agreement with existing Tevatron data and provide the first quantitatively precise next-to-leading order predictions for the LHC. We include all terms in an expansion in the number of colors, confirming that the specific leading-color approximation used in our previous study is accurate to within three percent. The dependence of the cross section on renormalization and factorization scales is reduced significantly with respect to a leading-order calculation. We study different dynamical scale choices, and find that the total transverse energy is significantly better than choices used in previous phenomenological studies. We compute the one-loop matrix elements using on-shell methods, as numerically implemented in the BlackHat code. The remaining parts of the calculation, including generation of the real-emission contributions and integration over phase space, are handled by the SHERPA package.

  11. Performance Analysis of the Ironless Inductive Position Sensor in the Large Hadron Collider Collimators Environment

    PubMed Central

    Danisi, Alessandro; Masi, Alessandro; Losito, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    The Ironless Inductive Position Sensor (I2PS) has been introduced as a valid alternative to Linear Variable Differential Transformers (LVDTs) when external magnetic fields are present. Potential applications of this linear position sensor can be found in critical systems such as nuclear plants, tokamaks, satellites and particle accelerators. This paper analyzes the performance of the I2PS in the harsh environment of the collimators of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), where position uncertainties of less than 20 µm are demanded in the presence of nuclear radiation and external magnetic fields. The I2PS has been targeted for installation for LHC Run 2, in order to solve the magnetic interference problem which standard LVDTs are experiencing. The paper describes in detail the chain of systems which belong to the new I2PS measurement task, their impact on the sensor performance and their possible further optimization. The I2PS performance is analyzed evaluating the position uncertainty (on 30 s), the magnetic immunity and the long-term stability (on 7 days). These three indicators are assessed from data acquired during the LHC operation in 2015 and compared with those of LVDTs. PMID:26569259

  12. Higgs boson pair production in new physics models at hadron, lepton, and photon colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Asakawa, Eri; Harada, Daisuke; Okada, Yasuhiro; Kanemura, Shinya; Tsumura, Koji

    2010-12-01

    We study Higgs boson pair production processes at future hadron and lepton colliders including the photon collision option in several new physics models; i.e., the two-Higgs-doublet model, the scalar leptoquark model, the sequential fourth generation fermion model and the vectorlike quark model. Cross sections for these processes can deviate significantly from the standard model predictions due to the one-loop correction to the triple Higgs boson coupling constant. For the one-loop induced processes such as gg{yields}hh and {gamma}{gamma}{yields}hh, where h is the (lightest) Higgs boson and g and {gamma} respectively represent a gluon and a photon, the cross sections can also be affected by new physics particles via additional one-loop diagrams. In the two-Higgs-doublet model and scalar leptoquark models, cross sections of e{sup +}e{sup -}{yields}hhZ and {gamma}{gamma}{yields}hh can be enhanced due to the nondecoupling effect in the one-loop corrections to the triple Higgs boson coupling constant. In the sequential fourth generation fermion model, the cross section for gg{yields}hh becomes very large because of the loop effect of the fermions. In the vectorlike quark model, effects are small because the theory has decoupling property. Measurements of the Higgs boson pair production processes can be useful to explore new physics through the determination of the Higgs potential.

  13. Dijet Signals for Low Mass Strings at the Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Anchordoqui, Luis A.; Nawata, Satoshi; Goldberg, Haim; Taylor, Tomasz R.; Luest, Dieter; Stieberger, Stephan

    2008-12-12

    Assuming that the fundamental string mass scale is in the TeV range and the theory is weakly coupled, we discuss possible signals of string physics at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). In D-brane constructions, the dominant contributions to full-fledged string amplitudes for all the common QCD parton subprocesses leading to dijets are completely independent of the details of compactification, and can be evaluated in a parameter-free manner. We make use of these amplitudes evaluated near the first resonant pole to determine the discovery potential of LHC for the first Regge excitations of the quark and gluon. Remarkably, the reach of LHC after a few years of running can be as high as 6.8 TeV. Even after the first 100 pb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity, string scales as high as 4.0 TeV can be discovered. Data on pp{yields}direct{gamma}+ jet can provide corroboration for string physics at scales as high as 5 TeV.

  14. Jet Signals for Low Mass Strings at the Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Anchordoqui, Luis A.; Nawata, Satoshi; Goldberg, Haim; Taylor, Tomasz R.

    2008-05-02

    The mass scale M{sub s} of superstring theory is an arbitrary parameter that can be as low as few TeVs if the Universe contains large extra dimensions. We propose a search for the effects of Regge excitations of fundamental strings at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC), in the process pp{yields}{gamma}+jet. The underlying parton process is dominantly the single photon production in gluon fusion, gg{yields}{gamma}g, with open string states propagating in intermediate channels. If the photon mixes with the gauge boson of the baryon number, which is a common feature of D-brane quivers, the amplitude appears already at the string disk level. It is completely determined by the mixing parameter--and it is otherwise model (compactification) independent. Even for relatively small mixing, 100 fb{sup -1} of LHC data could probe deviations from standard model physics, at a 5{sigma} significance, for M{sub s} as large as 3.3 TeV.

  15. Physics requirements for the design of the ATLAS and CMS experiments at the Large Hadron Collider.

    PubMed

    Virdee, T S

    2012-02-28

    The ATLAS and CMS experiments at the CERN Large Hadron Collider are discovery experiments. Thus, the aim was to make them sensitive to the widest possible range of new physics. New physics is likely to reveal itself in addressing questions such as: how do particles acquire mass; what is the particle responsible for dark matter; what is the path towards unification; do we live in a world with more space-time dimensions than the familiar four? The detection of the Higgs boson, conjectured to give mass to particles, was chosen as a benchmark to test the performance of the proposed experiment designs. Higgs production is one of the most demanding hypothesized processes in terms of required detector resolution and background discrimination. ATLAS and CMS feature full coverage, 4π-detectors to measure precisely the energies, directions and identity of all the particles produced in proton-proton collisions. Realizing this goal has required the collaborative efforts of enormous teams of people from around the world. PMID:22253241

  16. Jet signals for low mass strings at the large hadron collider.

    PubMed

    Anchordoqui, Luis A; Goldberg, Haim; Nawata, Satoshi; Taylor, Tomasz R

    2008-05-01

    The mass scale M{s} of superstring theory is an arbitrary parameter that can be as low as few TeVs if the Universe contains large extra dimensions. We propose a search for the effects of Regge excitations of fundamental strings at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC), in the process pp-->gamma+jet. The underlying parton process is dominantly the single photon production in gluon fusion, gg-->gammag, with open string states propagating in intermediate channels. If the photon mixes with the gauge boson of the baryon number, which is a common feature of D-brane quivers, the amplitude appears already at the string disk level. It is completely determined by the mixing parameter-and it is otherwise model (compactification) independent. Even for relatively small mixing, 100 fb{-1} of LHC data could probe deviations from standard model physics, at a 5sigma significance, for M{s} as large as 3.3 TeV.

  17. Dijet signals for low mass strings at the Large Hadron Collider.

    PubMed

    Anchordoqui, Luis A; Goldberg, Haim; Lüst, Dieter; Nawata, Satoshi; Stieberger, Stephan; Taylor, Tomasz R

    2008-12-12

    Assuming that the fundamental string mass scale is in the TeV range and the theory is weakly coupled, we discuss possible signals of string physics at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). In D-brane constructions, the dominant contributions to full-fledged string amplitudes for all the common QCD parton subprocesses leading to dijets are completely independent of the details of compactification, and can be evaluated in a parameter-free manner. We make use of these amplitudes evaluated near the first resonant pole to determine the discovery potential of LHC for the first Regge excitations of the quark and gluon. Remarkably, the reach of LHC after a few years of running can be as high as 6.8 TeV. Even after the first 100 pb(-1) of integrated luminosity, string scales as high as 4.0 TeV can be discovered. Data on pp-->directgamma + jet can provide corroboration for string physics at scales as high as 5 TeV.

  18. Search for Microscopic Black Hole Signatures at the Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Tsang, Ka Vang

    2011-05-01

    A search for microscopic black hole production and decay in proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV has been conducted using Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) detector at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. A total integrated luminosity of 35 pb-1 data sample, taken by CMS Collaboration in year 2010, has been analyzed. A novel background estimation for multi-jet events beyond TeV scale has been developed. A good agreement with standard model backgrounds, dominated by multi-jet production, is observed for various final-state multiplicities. Using semi-classical approximation, upper limits on minimum black hole mass at 95% confidence level are set in the range of 3.5 - 4.5 TeV for values of the Planck scale up to 3 TeV. Model-independent limits are provided to further constrain microscopic black hole models with additional regions of parameter space, as well as new physics models with multiple energetic final states. These are the first limits on microscopic black hole production at a particle accelerator.

  19. Performance Analysis of the Ironless Inductive Position Sensor in the Large Hadron Collider Collimators Environment.

    PubMed

    Danisi, Alessandro; Masi, Alessandro; Losito, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    The Ironless Inductive Position Sensor (I2PS) has been introduced as a valid alternative to Linear Variable Differential Transformers (LVDTs) when external magnetic fields are present. Potential applications of this linear position sensor can be found in critical systems such as nuclear plants, tokamaks, satellites and particle accelerators. This paper analyzes the performance of the I2PS in the harsh environment of the collimators of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), where position uncertainties of less than 20 µm are demanded in the presence of nuclear radiation and external magnetic fields. The I2PS has been targeted for installation for LHC Run 2, in order to solve the magnetic interference problem which standard LVDTs are experiencing. The paper describes in detail the chain of systems which belong to the new I2PS measurement task, their impact on the sensor performance and their possible further optimization. The I2PS performance is analyzed evaluating the position uncertainty (on 30 s), the magnetic immunity and the long-term stability (on 7 days). These three indicators are assessed from data acquired during the LHC operation in 2015 and compared with those of LVDTs.

  20. Dijet signals for low mass strings at the Large Hadron Collider.

    PubMed

    Anchordoqui, Luis A; Goldberg, Haim; Lüst, Dieter; Nawata, Satoshi; Stieberger, Stephan; Taylor, Tomasz R

    2008-12-12

    Assuming that the fundamental string mass scale is in the TeV range and the theory is weakly coupled, we discuss possible signals of string physics at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). In D-brane constructions, the dominant contributions to full-fledged string amplitudes for all the common QCD parton subprocesses leading to dijets are completely independent of the details of compactification, and can be evaluated in a parameter-free manner. We make use of these amplitudes evaluated near the first resonant pole to determine the discovery potential of LHC for the first Regge excitations of the quark and gluon. Remarkably, the reach of LHC after a few years of running can be as high as 6.8 TeV. Even after the first 100 pb(-1) of integrated luminosity, string scales as high as 4.0 TeV can be discovered. Data on pp-->directgamma + jet can provide corroboration for string physics at scales as high as 5 TeV. PMID:19113614

  1. Instrumentation status of the low-b magnet systems at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC)

    SciTech Connect

    Darve, C.; Balle, C.; Casas-Cubillos, J.; Perin, A.; Vauthier, N.; /CERN

    2011-05-01

    The low-{beta} magnet systems are located in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) insertion regions around the four interaction points. They are the key elements in the beams focusing/defocusing process allowing proton collisions at luminosity up to 10{sup 34}cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. Those systems are a contribution of the US-LHC Accelerator project. The systems are mainly composed of the quadrupole magnets (triplets), the separation dipoles and their respective electrical feed-boxes (DFBX). The low-{beta} magnet systems operate in an environment of extreme radiation, high gradient magnetic field and high heat load to the cryogenic system due to the beam dynamic effect. Due to the severe environment, the robustness of the diagnostics is primordial for the operation of the triplets. The hardware commissioning phase of the LHC was completed in February 2010. In the sake of a safer and more user-friendly operation, several consolidations and instrumentation modifications were implemented during this commissioning phase. This paper presents the instrumentation used to optimize the engineering process and operation of the final focusing/defocusing quadrupole magnets for the first years of operation.

  2. Phenomenology of Rotating Extra-Dimensional Black Holes at Hadron Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Frost, James A.

    2010-02-10

    Results are presented from CHARYBDIS2, a new Monte Carlo simulation of black hole production and decay at hadron colliders. The main new features of CHARYBDIS2 are a full treatment of the spin-down phase of the decay process using the angular and energy distributions of the associated Hawking radiation, improved modelling of the loss of angular momentum and energy in the production process as well as a wider range of options for the Planck-scale termination of the decay. The new features allow the study of the effects of black hole rotation and the feasibility of its observation. We present results, with emphasis on the consequences and experimental signatures of black hole rotation at the LHC. The effects of rotation are found to be large, with substantial changes to particle energies and distributions. Rotation persists throughout evaporation, invalidating the approximation of a rapid spin-down followed by isotropic emission in a non-rotating Schwarzschild phase. A selection of results are presented from the original article, arXiv:0904:0979.

  3. Performance Analysis of the Ironless Inductive Position Sensor in the Large Hadron Collider Collimators Environment.

    PubMed

    Danisi, Alessandro; Masi, Alessandro; Losito, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    The Ironless Inductive Position Sensor (I2PS) has been introduced as a valid alternative to Linear Variable Differential Transformers (LVDTs) when external magnetic fields are present. Potential applications of this linear position sensor can be found in critical systems such as nuclear plants, tokamaks, satellites and particle accelerators. This paper analyzes the performance of the I2PS in the harsh environment of the collimators of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), where position uncertainties of less than 20 µm are demanded in the presence of nuclear radiation and external magnetic fields. The I2PS has been targeted for installation for LHC Run 2, in order to solve the magnetic interference problem which standard LVDTs are experiencing. The paper describes in detail the chain of systems which belong to the new I2PS measurement task, their impact on the sensor performance and their possible further optimization. The I2PS performance is analyzed evaluating the position uncertainty (on 30 s), the magnetic immunity and the long-term stability (on 7 days). These three indicators are assessed from data acquired during the LHC operation in 2015 and compared with those of LVDTs. PMID:26569259

  4. Report of Snowmass 2001 working group E2: Electron - positron colliders from the phi to the Z

    SciTech Connect

    Zhen-guo Zhao et al.

    2002-12-23

    We report on the status and plans of experiments now running or proposed for electron-positron colliders at energies between the {phi} and the Z. The e{sup +}e{sup -}B and charm factories we considered were PEP-II/BABAR, KEKB/Belle, superKEK, SuperBABAR, and CESR-c/CLEO-c. We reviewed the programs at the {phi} factory at Frascati and the proposed PEP-N facility at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. We studied the prospects for B physics with a dedicated linear collider Z factory, associated with the TESLA high energy linear collider. In all cases, we compared the physics reach of these facilities with that of alternative experiments at hadron colliders or fixed target facilities.

  5. Alternative positron-target design for electron-positron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Donahue, R.J. ); Nelson, W.R. )

    1991-04-01

    Current electron-positron linear colliders are limited in luminosity by the number of positrons which can be generated from targets presently used. This paper examines the possibility of using an alternate wire-target geometry for the production of positrons via an electron-induced electromagnetic cascade shower. 39 refs., 38 figs., 5 tabs.

  6. Science Requirements and Conceptual Design for a Polarized Medium Energy Electron-Ion Collider at Jlab

    SciTech Connect

    Abeyratne, S; Ahmed, S; Barber, D; Bisognano, J; Bogacz, A; Castilla, A; Chevtsov, P; Corneliussen, S; Deconinck, W; Degtiarenko, P; Delayen, J; Derbenev, Ya; DeSilva, S; Douglas, D; Dudnikov, V; Ent, R; Erdelyi, B; Evtushenko, P; Fujii, Yu; Filatov, Yury; Gaskell, D; Geng, R; Guzey, V; Horn, T; Hutton, A; Hyde, C; Johnson, R; Kim, Y; Klein, F; Kondratenko, A; Kondratenko, M; Krafft, G; Li, R; Lin, F; Manikonda, S; Marhauser, F; McKeown, R; Morozov, V; Dadel-Turonski, P; Nissen, E; Ostroumov, P; Pivi, M; Pilat, F; Poelker, M; Prokudin, A; Rimmer, R; Satogata, T; Sayed, H; Spata, M; Sullivan, M; Tennant, C; Terzic, B; Tiefenback, M; Wang, M; Wang, S; Weiss, C; Yunn, B; Zhang, Y

    2012-08-01

    Researchers have envisioned an electron-ion collider with ion species up to heavy ions, high polarization of electrons and light ions, and a well-matched center-of-mass energy range as an ideal gluon microscope to explore new frontiers of nuclear science. In its most recent Long Range Plan, the Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) of the US Department of Energy and the National Science Foundation endorsed such a collider in the form of a 'half-recommendation.' As a response to this science need, Jefferson Lab and its user community have been engaged in feasibility studies of a medium energy polarized electron-ion collider (MEIC), cost-effectively utilizing Jefferson Lab's already existing Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF). In close collaboration, this community of nuclear physicists and accelerator scientists has rigorously explored the science case and design concept for this envisioned grand instrument of science. An electron-ion collider embodies the vision of reaching the next frontier in Quantum Chromodynamics - understanding the behavior of hadrons as complex bound states of quarks and gluons. Whereas the 12 GeV Upgrade of CEBAF will map the valence-quark components of the nucleon and nuclear wave functions in detail, an electron-ion collider will determine the largely unknown role sea quarks play and for the first time study the glue that binds all atomic nuclei. The MEIC will allow nuclear scientists to map the spin and spatial structure of quarks and gluons in nucleons, to discover the collective effects of gluons in nuclei, and to understand the emergence of hadrons from quarks and gluons. The proposed electron-ion collider at Jefferson Lab will collide a highly polarized electron beam originating from the CEBAF recirculating superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) linear accelerator (linac) with highly polarized light-ion beams or unpolarized light- to heavy-ion beams from a new ion accelerator and storage complex. Since the very

  7. Magnetic-field-induced squeezing effect at energies available at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Long-Gang; Endrődi, Gergely; Petersen, Hannah

    2016-04-01

    In off-central heavy-ion collisions, quark-gluon plasma (QGP) is exposed to the strongest magnetic fields ever created in the universe. Because of the paramagnetic nature of the QGP at high temperatures, the spatially inhomogeneous magnetic field configuration exerts an anisotropic force density that competes with the pressure gradients resulting from purely geometric effects. In this paper, we simulate (3+1)-dimensional ideal hydrodynamics with external magnetic fields to estimate the effect of this force density on the anisotropic expansion of the QGP in collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). While negligible for quickly decaying magnetic fields, we find that long-lived fields generate a substantial force density that suppresses the momentum anisotropy of the plasma by up to 20 % at the LHC energy and also leaves its imprint on the elliptic flow v2 of charged pions.

  8. Chiral electric field in relativistic heavy-ion collisions at energies available at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Yang; Yang, Chun-Bin; Cai, Xu; Feng, Sheng-Qin

    2016-08-01

    It has been proposed that electric fields may lead to chiral separation in quark-gluon plasma (QGP). This is called the chiral electric separation effect. The strong electromagnetic field and the QCD vacuum can both be completely produced in off-central nuclear-nuclear collision. We use the Woods-Saxon nucleon distribution to calculate the electric field distributions of off-central collisions. The chiral electric field spatial distribution at Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) and Large Hadron Collider (LHC) energy regions are systematically studied in this paper. The dependence of the electric field produced by the thermal quark in the central position with different impact parameters on the proper time with different collision energies in the RHIC and LHC energy regions are studied in this paper. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11375069, 11435054, 11075061, 11221504) and Key Laboratory Foundation of Quark and Lepton Physics (Hua-Zhong Normal University)(QLPL2014P01)

  9. Beam losses from ultra-peripheral nuclear collisions between Pb ions in the Large Hadron Collider and their alleviation

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce, R.; Bocian, D.; Gilardoni, S.; Jowett, J.M.; /CERN

    2009-08-01

    Electromagnetic interactions between colliding heavy ions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN will give rise to localized beam losses that may quench superconducting magnets, apart from contributing significantly to the luminosity decay. To quantify their impact on the operation of the collider, we have used a three-step simulation approach, which consists of optical tracking, a Monte-Carlo shower simulation and a thermal network model of the heat flow inside a magnet. We present simulation results for the case of {sup 208}Pb{sup 82+} ion operation in the LHC, with focus on the alice interaction region, and show that the expected heat load during nominal {sup 208}Pb{sup 82+} operation is 40% above the quench level. This limits the maximum achievable luminosity. Furthermore, we discuss methods of monitoring the losses and possible ways to alleviate their effect.

  10. An e^+e^- Top Factory in a 50+50 TeV Hadron Collider Tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norem, J.; Jagger, J.; Noonan, J.; Sharma, S.; Keil, E.; Foster, G. W.; Malamud, E.; Chojnacki, E.; Winn, D.

    1997-05-01

    We have begun to look at the parameters of an e^+e^- collider in the tunnel of a 50 + 50 TeV superferric hadron collider. This machine would be an extrapolation of LEP technology. Assuming a diameter of 170 km, a maximum radiated power of 100 MW, this collider should have a maximum energy of 500 - 600 GeV (c.m.) and should be able to produce a luminosity L = 0.9 \\cdot 10^33 cm-2sec-1 at a center of mass energy of 360 GeV, (somewhat less at higher or lower energies) which would make it useful for producing top quarks or light Higgs bosons. Design problems include the very low field magnets, synchrotron radiation power, beam stability, and vacuum systems. Preliminary magnet, vacuum chamber and cooling designs will be presented along with possible construction techniques, and some costing algorithms.

  11. Design considerations for the semi-digital hadronic calorimeter (SDHCAL) for future leptonic colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pingault, A.

    2016-07-01

    The first technological SDHCAL prototype having been successfully tested, a new phase of R&D, to validate completely the SDHCAL option for the International Linear Detector (ILD) project of the International Linear Collider (ILC), has started with the conception and the realisation of a new prototype. The new one is intended to host few but large active layers of the future SDHCAL. The new active layers, made of Glass Resistive Plate Chambers (GRPC) with sizes larger than 2 m2 will be equipped with a new version of the electronic readout, fulfilling the requirements of the future ILD detector. The new GRPC are conceived to improve the homogeneity with a new gas distribution scheme. Finally the mechanical structure will be achieved using the electron beam welding technique. The progress realised will be presented and future steps will be discussed.

  12. QCD corrections to pair production of Type III Seesaw leptons at hadron colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, Richard

    2015-12-01

    If kinematically accessible, hadron collider experiments provide an ideal laboratory for the direct production of heavy lepton partners in Seesaw models. In the context of the Type III Seesaw Mechanism, the O({α}_s) rate and shape corrections are presented for the pair production of hypothetical, heavy SU(2) L triplet leptons in pp collisions at √{s} = 13, 14 and 100TeV. The next-to-leading order (NLO) K-factors span, approximately, K NLO = 1 .1 - 1 .4 for both charged current and neutral current processes over a triplet mass range m T = 100 GeV - 2 TeV. Total production cross sections exhibit a - 6 % + 5 % scale dependence at 14 TeV and ±1% at 100 TeV. The NLO differential K-factors for heavy lepton kinematics are largely flat, suggesting that na¨ıve scaling by the total K NLO is reasonably justified. The resummed transverse momentum distribution of the dilepton system is presented at leading logarithmic (LL) accuracy. The effects of resummation are large in TeV-scale dilepton systems. Discovery potential to heavy lepton pairs at 14 and 100 TeV is briefly explored: at the High-Luminosity LHC, we estimate a 4 .8 - 6 .3 σ discovery potential maximally for m T = 1 .5 - 1 .6 TeV after 3000 fb-1. With 300 (3000) fb-1, there is 2σ sensitivity up to m T = 1 .3 - 1 .4 TeV (1 .7 - 1 .8 TeV) in the individual channels. At 100 TeV and with 10 fb-1, a 5 σ discovery can be achieved for m T = 1 .4 - 1 .6 TeV. Due to the factorization properties of Drell-Yan-type systems, the fixed order and resummed calculations reduce to convolutions over tree-level quantities.

  13. Measured and simulated heavy-ion beam loss patterns at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermes, P. D.; Bruce, R.; Jowett, J. M.; Redaelli, S.; Salvachua Ferrando, B.; Valentino, G.; Wollmann, D.

    2016-05-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN pushes forward to new regimes in terms of beam energy and intensity. In view of the combination of very energetic and intense beams together with sensitive machine components, in particular the superconducting magnets, the LHC is equipped with a collimation system to provide protection and intercept uncontrolled beam losses. Beam losses could cause a superconducting magnet to quench, or in the worst case, damage the hardware. The collimation system, which is optimized to provide a good protection with proton beams, has shown a cleaning efficiency with heavy-ion beams which is worse by up to two orders of magnitude. The reason for this reduced cleaning efficiency is the fragmentation of heavy-ion beams into isotopes with a different mass to charge ratios because of the interaction with the collimator material. In order to ensure sufficient collimation performance in future ion runs, a detailed theoretical understanding of ion collimation is needed. The simulation of heavy-ion collimation must include processes in which 82+208Pb ions fragment into dozens of new isotopes. The ions and their fragments must be tracked inside the magnetic lattice of the LHC to determine their loss positions. This paper gives an overview of physical processes important for the description of heavy-ion loss patterns. Loss maps simulated by means of the two tools ICOSIM [1,2] and the newly developed STIER (SixTrack with Ion-Equivalent Rigidities) are compared with experimental data measured during LHC operation. The comparison shows that the tool STIER is in better agreement.

  14. Study on the compensated lead hadron calorimeter characteristics by means of hadron and electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekseev, G. A.; Apokin, V. D.; Buyanov, O. V.

    The results on measuring the basic characteristics of a compensated lead calorimeter (NEPTUN experiment) in a hadron and electron beam are presented. A prototype consisting of 30 modulus was used in the measurements. The energy resolution follows the dependence approximately = 57%/sq. root of E, the detector uniformity is (+-)5%, the measured e/h ratio is close to unity.

  15. Towards future circular colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedikt, Michael; Zimmermann, Frank

    2016-09-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) presently provides proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass (c.m.) energy of 13 TeV. The LHC design was started more than 30 years ago, and its physics program will extend through the second half of the 2030's. The global Future Circular Collider (FCC) study is now preparing for a post-LHC project. The FCC study focuses on the design of a 100-TeV hadron collider (FCC-hh) in a new ˜100 km tunnel. It also includes the design of a high-luminosity electron-positron collider (FCCee) as a potential intermediate step, and a lepton-hadron collider option (FCC-he). The scope of the FCC study comprises accelerators, technology, infrastructure, detectors, physics, concepts for worldwide data services, international governance models, and implementation scenarios. Among the FCC core technologies figure 16-T dipole magnets, based on Nb3 S n superconductor, for the FCC-hh hadron collider, and a highly-efficient superconducting radiofrequency system for the FCC-ee lepton collider. Following the FCC concept, the Institute of High Energy Physics (IHEP) in Beijing has initiated a parallel design study for an e + e - Higgs factory in China (CEPC), which is to be succeeded by a high-energy hadron collider (SPPC). At present a tunnel circumference of 54 km and a hadron collider c.m. energy of about 70 TeV are being considered. After a brief look at the LHC, this article reports the motivation and the present status of the FCC study, some of the primary design challenges and R&D subjects, as well as the emerging global collaboration.

  16. ACCELERATOR PHYSICS ISSUES FOR FUTURE ELECTRON ION COLLIDERS.

    SciTech Connect

    PEGGS,S.; BEN-ZVI,I.; KEWISCH,J.; MURPHY,J.

    2001-06-18

    Interest continues to grow in the physics of collisions between electrons and heavy ions, and between polarized electrons and polarized protons [1,2,3]. Table 1 compares the parameters of some machines under discussion. DESY has begun to explore the possibility of upgrading the existing HERA-p ring to store heavy ions, in order to collide them with electrons (or positrons) in the HERA-e ring, or from TESLA [4]. An upgrade to store polarized protons in the HERA-p ring is also under discussion [1]. BNL is considering adding polarized electrons to the RHIC repertoire, which already includes heavy and light ions, and polarized protons. The authors of this paper have made a first pass analysis of this ''eRHIC'' possibility [5]. MIT-BATES is also considering electron ion collider designs [6].

  17. Lattice design for the ERL electron ion collider in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Trbojevic, D.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Tsoupas, N.; Chang, X.; Kayran, D.; Ptitsyn, V.; Litvinenko, V.; Hao, Y.; Parker, B.; Pozdeyev, E.

    2010-05-23

    We present electron ion collider lattice design for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (eRHIC) where the electrons have multi-passes through recirculating linacs (ERL) and arcs placed in the existing RHIC tunnel. The present RHIC interaction regions (IR's), where the electron ion collisions will occur, are modified to allow for the large luminosity. Staging of eRHIC will bring the electron energy from 4 up to 20 (30) GeV as the superconducting cavities are built and installed sequentially. The synchrotron radiation from electrons at the IR is reduced as they arrive straight to the collision while ions and protons come with 10 mrad crossing angle using the crab cavities.

  18. Understanding the nuclear initial state with an electron ion collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toll, Tobias

    2013-09-01

    In these proceedings I describe how a future electron-ion collider will allow us to directly measure the initial spatial distribution of gluons in heavy ions, as well as its variance ("lumpiness") in exclusive diffraction. I show the feasibility of such a measurement by means of simulated data from the novel event generator Sartre.

  19. An Electron-Ion Collider at Jefferson lab

    SciTech Connect

    A.W. Thomas

    2009-10-01

    Long term plans for the investigation of the quark and gluon structure of matter have for some time focussed on the possibility of an electron-ion collider, with the nuclear physics communities associated with JLab and BNL being particularly active. We briefly outline the current thinking on this subject at Jefferson lab.

  20. Simulation of tail distributions in electron-positron circular colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Irwin, J.

    1992-02-01

    In addition to the Gaussian shaped core region, particle bunches in electron-positron circular colliders have a rarefied halo region of importance in determining beam lifetimes and backgrounds in particle detectors. A method is described which allows simulation of halo particle distributions.

  1. Forward-backward asymmetries of lepton pairs in events with a large-transverse-momentum jet at hadron colliders.

    PubMed

    del Aguila, F; Ametller, Ll; Talavera, P

    2002-10-14

    We discuss forward-backward charge asymmetries for lepton-pair production in association with a large-transverse-momentum jet at hadron colliders. The lepton charge asymmetry relative to the jet direction A(j)(FB) gives a new determination of the effective weak mixing angle sin((2)theta(lept)(eff)(M(2)(Z)) with a statistical precision after cuts of approximately 10(-3) (8x10(-3)) at LHC (Tevatron). This is to be compared with the current uncertainty at LEP and SLD from the asymmetries alone, 2x10(-4). The identification of b jets also allows for the measurement of the bottom-quark-Z asymmetry A(b)(FB) at hadron colliders, the resulting statistical precision for sin((2)theta(lept)(eff)(M(2)(Z)) being approximately 9x10(-4) (2x10(-2) at Tevatron), also lower than the reported precision at e(+)e(-) colliders, 3x10(-4).

  2. Technicolor corrections to bb{yields}W{sup {+-}{pi}}{sub t}{sup {+-}}at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Jinshu; Pan, Qunna; Song, Taiping; Lu, Gongru

    2010-07-01

    In this paper we calculate the technicolor correction to the production of a charged top pion in association with a W boson via bb annihilation at the CERN Large Hadron Collider in the context of the topcolor assisted technicolor model. We find that the cross section of pp{yields}bb{yields}W{sup {+-}{pi}}{sub t}{sup {+-}}at the tree level can reach a few hundred femtobarns for reasonable ranges of the parameters, roughly corresponding to the result of the process pp{yields}bb{yields}W{sup {+-}H{+-}}in the minimal supersymmetric standard model; the relative corrections arising from the one-loop diagrams are about a few percent to two dozen percent, and they will increase the cross section at the tree level. As a comparison, we also discuss the size of the hadron cross section via the other subprocess gg{yields}W{sup {+-}{pi}}{sub t}{sup {+-}.}

  3. Probing small parton densities in ultraperipheral A A and pA collisions at the CERN large Hadron Collider.

    PubMed

    Strikman, Mark; Vogt, Ramona; White, Sebastian

    2006-03-01

    We calculate photoproduction rates for several hard processes in ultraperipheral proton-lead and lead-lead collisions at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) with square root of sNN = 8.8 and 5.5 TeV, respectively, which could be triggered in the large LHC detectors. We use ATLAS as an example. The lead ion is treated as a source of (coherently produced) photons with energies and intensities greater than those of equivalent ep collisions at the DESY collider HERA. We find very large rates for both inclusive and diffractive production that will extend the HERA x range by nearly an order of magnitude for similar virtualities. We demonstrate that it is possible to reach the kinematic regime where nonlinear effects are larger than at HERA.

  4. The high field superferric magnet Design and test of a new dipole magnet for future hadron colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colvin, John C.; Hinterberger, Henry; Russell Huson, F.; Mackay, William W.; Mann, Thomas L.; McIntyre, Peter M.; Phillips, Gerald C.; Pissanetzky, Sergio; Rocha, Richard; Schmidt, William M.; Shotzman, Garry; Wenzel, William A.; Fen Xie, Wan; Zeigler, John C.

    1988-07-01

    The Texas Accelerator Center has successfully tested a 6 T superferric dipole magnet of a design appropriate for future hadron colliders. The magnet surpassed the design field (90% of the short sample limit) on its first quench without training. The measured field quality is in excellent agreement with design calculations and meets collider requirements. The magnetic field design was developed at Rice University and is the subject of a Master's thesis. The features of the design include simple construction, efficient use of superconductor, and adequate containment of magnetic forces. A straightforward extension of the design to an 8 T dipole is under development. The high-field superferric magnet constitutes a significant improvement in magnet performance and cost for future accelerators.

  5. Accessing the Distribution of Linearly Polarized Gluons in Unpolarized Hadrons

    SciTech Connect

    Boer, Daniel; Brodsky, Stanley J.; Mulders, Piet J.; Pisano, Cristian; /Cagliari U. /INFN, Cagliari

    2011-08-19

    Gluons inside unpolarized hadrons can be linearly polarized provided they have a nonzero transverse momentum. The simplest and theoretically safest way to probe this distribution of linearly polarized gluons is through cos2{phi} asymmetries in heavy quark pair or dijet production in electron-hadron collisions. Future Electron-Ion Collider (EIC) or Large Hadron electron Collider (LHeC) experiments are ideally suited for this purpose. Here we estimate the maximum asymmetries for EIC kinematics.

  6. Four-Jet Production at the Large Hadron Collider at Next-to-Leading Order in QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bern, Z.; Diana, G.; Dixon, L. J.; Cordero, F. Febres; Höche, S.; Kosower, D. A.; Ita, H.; Maître, D.; Ozeren, K.

    2012-07-01

    We present the cross sections for production of up to four jets at the Large Hadron Collider, at next-to-leading order in the QCD coupling. We use the BlackHat library in conjunction with SHERPA and a recently developed algorithm for assembling primitive amplitudes into color-dressed amplitudes. We adopt the cuts used by ATLAS in their study of multijet events in pp collisions at s=7TeV. We include estimates of nonperturbative corrections and compare to ATLAS data. We store intermediate results in a framework that allows the inexpensive computation of additional results for different choices of scale or parton distributions.

  7. Searches for and identification of effects of extra spatial dimensions in dilepton and diphoton production at the Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Pankov, A. A. Serenkova, I. A. Tsytrinov, A. V. Bednyakov, V. A.

    2015-06-15

    Prospects of discovering and identifying effects of extra spatial dimensions in dilepton and diphoton production at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) are studied. Such effects may be revealed by the characteristic behavior of the invariant-mass distributions of dileptons and diphotons, and their identification can be performed on the basis of an analysis of their angular distributions. The discovery and identification reaches are estimated for the scale parameter M{sub S} of the Kaluza-Klein gravitational towers, which can be determined in experiments devoted to measuring the dilepton and diphoton channels at the LHC.

  8. Four-jet production at the Large Hadron Collider at next-to-leading order in QCD.

    PubMed

    Bern, Z; Diana, G; Dixon, L J; Febres Cordero, F; Höche, S; Kosower, D A; Ita, H; Maître, D; Ozeren, K

    2012-07-27

    We present the cross sections for production of up to four jets at the Large Hadron Collider, at next-to-leading order in the QCD coupling. We use the BLACKHAT library in conjunction with SHERPA and a recently developed algorithm for assembling primitive amplitudes into color-dressed amplitudes. We adopt the cuts used by ATLAS in their study of multijet events in pp collisions at √s=7 TeV. We include estimates of nonperturbative corrections and compare to ATLAS data. We store intermediate results in a framework that allows the inexpensive computation of additional results for different choices of scale or parton distributions.

  9. Large Hadron Collider at CERN: Beams generating high-energy-density matter.

    PubMed

    Tahir, N A; Schmidt, R; Shutov, A; Lomonosov, I V; Piriz, A R; Hoffmann, D H H; Deutsch, C; Fortov, V E

    2009-04-01

    This paper presents numerical simulations that have been carried out to study the thermodynamic and hydrodynamic responses of a solid copper cylindrical target that is facially irradiated along the axis by one of the two Large Hadron Collider (LHC) 7 TeV/ c proton beams. The energy deposition by protons in solid copper has been calculated using an established particle interaction and Monte Carlo code, FLUKA, which is capable of simulating all components of the particle cascades in matter, up to multi-TeV energies. These data have been used as input to a sophisticated two-dimensional hydrodynamic computer code BIG2 that has been employed to study this problem. The prime purpose of these investigations was to assess the damage caused to the equipment if the entire LHC beam is lost at a single place. The FLUKA calculations show that the energy of protons will be deposited in solid copper within about 1 m assuming constant material parameters. Nevertheless, our hydrodynamic simulations have shown that the energy deposition region will extend to a length of about 35 m over the beam duration. This is due to the fact that first few tens of bunches deposit sufficient energy that leads to high pressure that generates an outgoing radial shock wave. Shock propagation leads to continuous reduction in the density at the target center that allows the protons delivered in subsequent bunches to penetrate deeper and deeper into the target. This phenomenon has also been seen in case of heavy-ion heated targets [N. A. Tahir, A. Kozyreva, P. Spiller, D. H. H. Hoffmann, and A. Shutov, Phys. Rev. E 63, 036407 (2001)]. This effect needs to be considered in the design of a sacrificial beam stopper. These simulations have also shown that the target is severely damaged and is converted into a huge sample of high-energy density (HED) matter. In fact, the inner part of the target is transformed into a strongly coupled plasma with fairly uniform physical conditions. This work, therefore, has

  10. Ion colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, W.

    2011-12-01

    Ion colliders are research tools for high-energy nuclear physics, and are used to test the theory of Quantum Chromo Dynamics (QCD). The collisions of fully stripped high-energy ions create matter of a temperature and density that existed only microseconds after the Big Bang. Ion colliders can reach higher densities and temperatures than fixed target experiments although at a much lower luminosity. The first ion collider was the CERN Intersecting Storage Ring (ISR), which collided light ions [77Asb1, 81Bou1]. The BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is in operation since 2000 and has collided a number of species at numerous energies. The CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) started the heavy ion program in 2010. Table 1 shows all previous and the currently planned running modes for ISR, RHIC, and LHC. All three machines also collide protons, which are spin-polarized in RHIC. Ion colliders differ from proton or antiproton colliders in a number of ways: the preparation of the ions in the source and the pre-injector chain is limited by other effects than for protons; frequent changes in the collision energy and particle species, including asymmetric species, are typical; and the interaction of ions with each other and accelerator components is different from protons, which has implications for collision products, collimation, the beam dump, and intercepting instrumentation devices such a profile monitors. In the preparation for the collider use the charge state Z of the ions is successively increased to minimize the effects of space charge, intrabeam scattering (IBS), charge change effects (electron capture and stripping), and ion-impact desorption after beam loss. Low charge states reduce space charge, intrabeam scattering, and electron capture effects. High charge states reduce electron stripping, and make bending and acceleration more effective. Electron stripping at higher energies is generally more efficient. Table 2 shows the charge states and energies in the

  11. Full one-loop electroweak and NLO QCD corrections to the associated production of chargino and neutralino at hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Hao; Han Liang; Zhang Renyou; Jiang Yi; Guo Lei; Ma Wengan

    2006-03-01

    We study the process of the association production of chargino and neutralino including the next-to-leading order (NLO) QCD and the complete one-loop electroweak corrections in the framework of the minimal supersymmetric standard model at the Fermilab Tevatron and the CERN Large Hadron Collider. In both the NLO QCD and one-loop electroweak calculations we apply the algorithm of the phase-space slicing method. We find that the NLO QCD corrections generally increase the Born cross sections, while the electroweak relative corrections decrease the Born cross section in most of the chosen parameter space. The NLO QCD and electroweak relative corrections typically have the values of about 32% and -8% at the Tevatron, and about 42% and -6% at the Large Hadron Collider, respectively. The results show that both the NLO QCD and the complete one-loop electroweak corrections to the processes pp/pp{yields}{chi}-tilde{sub 1}{sup {+-}}{chi}-tilde{sub 2}{sup 0}+X are generally significant and should be taken into consideration in precision experimental analysis.

  12. High-energy high-luminosity electron-ion collider eRHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Litvinenko, V.N.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Hammons, L.; Hao, Y.; Webb, S.; et al

    2011-08-09

    In this paper, we describe a future electron-ion collider (EIC), based on the existing Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) hadron facility, with two intersecting superconducting rings, each 3.8 km in circumference. The replacement cost of the RHIC facility is about two billion US dollars, and the eRHIC will fully take advantage and utilize this investment. We plan adding a polarized 5-30 GeV electron beam to collide with variety of species in the existing RHIC accelerator complex, from polarized protons with a top energy of 325 GeV, to heavy fully-striped ions with energies up to 130 GeV/u. Brookhaven's innovative design, is based on one of the RHIC's hadron rings and a multi-pass energy-recovery linac (ERL). Using the ERL as the electron accelerator assures high luminosity in the 10{sup 33}-10{sup 34} cm{sup -2} sec{sup -1} range, and for the natural staging of eRHIC, with the ERL located inside the RHIC tunnel. The eRHIC will provide electron-hadron collisions in up to three interaction regions. We detail the eRHIC's performance in Section 2. Since first paper on eRHIC paper in 2000, its design underwent several iterations. Initially, the main eRHIC option (the so-called ring-ring, RR, design) was based on an electron ring, with the linac-ring (LR) option as a backup. In 2004, we published the detailed 'eRHIC 0th Order Design Report' including a cost-estimate for the RR design. After detailed studies, we found that an LR eRHIC has about a 10-fold higher luminosity than the RR. Since 2007, the LR, with its natural staging strategy and full transparency for polarized electrons, became the main choice for eRHIC. In 2009, we completed technical studies of the design and dynamics for MeRHIC with 3-pass 4 GeV ERL. We learned much from this evaluation, completed a bottom-up cost estimate for this $350M machine, but then shelved the design. In the same year, we turned again to considering the cost-effective, all-in-tunnel six-pass ERL for our design of the high

  13. Probing the Quark Sea and Gluons: the Electron-Ion Collider Projects

    SciTech Connect

    Rolf Ent

    2012-04-01

    EIC is the generic name for the nuclear science-driven Electron-Ion Collider presently considered in the US. Such an EIC would be the world’s first polarized electron-proton collider, and the world’s first e-A collider. Very little remains known about the dynamical basis of the structure of hadrons and nuclei in terms of the fundamental quarks and gluons of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). A large community effort to sharpen a compelling nuclear science case for an EIC occurred during a ten-week program taking place at the Institute for Nuclear Theory (INT) in Seattle from September 13 to November 19, 2010. The critical capabilities of a stage-I EIC are a range in center-of-mass energies from 20 to 70 GeV and variable, full polarization of electrons and light ions (the latter both longitudinal and transverse), ion species up to A=200 or so, multiple interaction regions, and a high luminosity of about 10{sup 34} electron-nucleons per cm{sup 2} and per second. The physics program of such a stage-I EIC encompass inclusive measurements (ep/A{yields}e'+X), which require detection of the scattered lepon and/or the full scattered hadronic debris with high precision, semi-inclusive processes (ep/A{yields}e'+h+X), which require detection in coincidence with the scattered lepton of at least one (current or target region) hadron; and exclusive processes (ep/A{yields}e'+N'/A'+{gamma}/m), which require detection of all particles in the reaction. The main science themes of an EIC are to i) map the spin and spatial structure of quarks and gluons in nucleons, ii) discover the collective effects of gluons in atomic nuclei, and (iii) understand the emergence of hadronic matter from color charge. In addition, there are opportunities at an EIC for fundamental symmetry and nucleon structure measurements using the electroweak probe. To truly make headway to image the sea quarks and gluons in nucleons and nuclei, the EIC needs high luminosity over a range of energies as more exclusive

  14. Direct probes of linearly polarized gluons inside unpolarized hadrons.

    PubMed

    Boer, Daniël; Brodsky, Stanley J; Mulders, Piet J; Pisano, Cristian

    2011-04-01

    We show that linearly polarized gluons inside unpolarized hadrons can be directly probed in jet or heavy quark pair production in electron-hadron collisions. We discuss the simplest cos2ϕ asymmetries and estimate their maximal value, concluding that measurements of the unknown linearly polarized gluon distribution in the proton should be feasible in future Electron-Ion Collider or Large Hadron electron Collider experiments. Analogous asymmetries in hadron-hadron collisions suffer from factorization breaking contributions and would allow us to quantify the importance of initial- and final-state interactions.

  15. Hadron Production in Quark, Antiquark, and Gluon Jets from Electron-Positron Interactions at the Z0 Pole

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Hyejoo

    2002-01-30

    We present production measurements of the charged hadrons {pi}{sup {+-}}, K{sup {+-}} and p/{bar p} in e{sup +}e{sup -} interactions at the Z{sup 0} pole. The excellent particle identification capability of the SLC Large Detector (SLD) at the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) are used. In addition to studies over a wide momentum range in hadronic Z{sup 0} events of all five flavors, we have made the most precise measurements in light (uds), c and b flavor events separately. Unambiguous flavor dependencies have been observed, and the results have been compared with the predictions of several QCD fragmentation models. We have also exploited the unique feature of electron beam polarization in our experiment to compare hadron production separately in quark and antiquark jets. Direct evidence that higher momentum hadrons are more likely to contain the primary quark and antiquark is seen, with precision sufficient to provide new model tests. Finally, we have studied hard gluon jets in detail. We have confirmed that gluon jets have a higher multiplicity of softer particles than light quark jets, and found this enhancement to be the same for {pi}{sup {+-}}, K{sup {+-}} and p/{bar p} at the few percent level at all momenta. Any overall difference in the hadron fractions is limited to 0.018 at the 95% confidence level, indicating that there are no differences at the hadronization stage in jet formation between gluons and quarks.

  16. Discovery and measurement of excited b hadrons at the Collider Detector at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Pursley, Jennifer Marie

    2007-08-01

    This thesis presents evidence for the B**0 and Σ$(*)±\\atop{b}$ hadrons in proton-antiproton collisions at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV, using data collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab. In the search for B**0 → B± π, two B± decays modes are reconstructed: B± → J/ΨK±, where J/Ψ → μ+μ-, and B± → $\\bar{D}$0π±, where $\\bar{D}$0 → K± π±. Both modes are reconstructed using 370 ± 20 pb-1 of data. Combining the B± meson with a charged pion to reconstruct B**0 led to the observation and measurement of the masses of the two narrow B**0 states, B$1\\atop{0}$ and B$*0\\atop{2}$, of m(B$1\\atop{0}$) = 5734 ± 3(stat.) ± 2(syst.) MeV/c2; m(B$*0\\atop{2}$) = 5738 ± 5(stat.) ± 1(syst.) MeV/c{sup 2}. In the search for Σ$(*)±\\atop{b}$ → Λ$0\\atop{b}$π±, the Λ$0\\atop{b}$ is reconstructed in the decay mode Λ$0\\atop{b}$ → Λ$+\\atop{c}$π-, where Λ$+\\atop{c}$→ pK- π+, using 1070 ± 60 pb-1 of data. Upon combining the Λ$0\\atop{b}$ candidate with a charged pion, all four of the Σ$(*)±\\atop{b}$ states are observed and their masses measured to be: m(Σ$+\\atop{b}$) = 5807.8$+2.0\\atop{-2.2}$(stat.) ± 1.7(syst.) MeV/c2; m(Σ$+\\atop{b}$) = 5815.2 ± 1.0(stat.) ± 1.7(syst.) MeV/c2; m(Σ$*+\\atop{b}$) = 5829.0$+1.6\\atop{-1.8}$(stat.)$+1.7\\atop{-1.8}$(syst.) MeV/c 2; M(Σ$*-±\\atop{b}$) - 5836.4 ± 2.0(stat.)$+1.8\\atop{-1.7}$(syst.) MeV/c2. This is the first observation of Σ$(*)±\\atop{b}$ baryons.

  17. Are the collective phenomena a universal feature of the hadronic matter created in p-p, p-A and A-A colliding systems?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, Eleazar Cuautle

    2016-06-01

    Collective phenomena in ion-ion collisions are well-known, but the research in small systems, like proton-proton and proton-lead, is starting both from the experimental and theoretical side. In this paper, we present a short review of the most important observables related to flow, as well as phenomenological results to explain the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and Large Hadron Collider results. Different variables and their relations to collectivity in small systems are discussed.

  18. Single electron yields from semileptonic charm and bottom hadron decays in Au+Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Adare, A.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Akimoto, R.; Alexander, J.; Alfred, M.; Aoki, K.; Apadula, N.; Aramaki, Y.; et al

    2016-03-07

    We measured open heavy flavor production in minimum bias Au + Au collisions at √s(NN) = 200 GeV via the yields of electrons from semileptonic decays of charm and bottom hadrons, using the PHENIX Collaboration at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. In the past, heavy flavor electron measurements indicated substantial modification in the momentum distribution of the parent heavy quarks owing to the quark-gluon plasma created in these collisions. For the first time, using the PHENIX silicon vertex detector to measure precision displaced tracking, the relative contributions from charm and bottom hadrons to these electrons as a function of transversemore » momentum are measured in Au + Au collisions. Here, we compare the fraction of electrons from bottom hadrons to previously published results extracted from electron-hadron correlations in p + p collisions at √s(NN) = 200 GeV and find the fractions to be similar within the large uncertainties on both measurements for p(T) > 4 GeV/c. We use the bottom electron fractions in Au + Au and p + p along with the previously measured heavy flavor electron R(AA) to calculate the R(AA) for electrons from charm and bottom hadron decays separately. Finally, we find that electrons from bottom hadron decays are less suppressed than those from charm for the region 3 < p(T) < 4 GeV/c.« less

  19. Single electron yields from semileptonic charm and bottom hadron decays in Au +Au collisions at √{sN N}=200 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adare, A.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Akimoto, R.; Alexander, J.; Alfred, M.; Aoki, K.; Apadula, N.; Aramaki, Y.; Asano, H.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Atomssa, E. T.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Bai, M.; Bandara, N. S.; Bannier, B.; Barish, K. N.; Bassalleck, B.; Bathe, S.; Baublis, V.; Baumgart, S.; Bazilevsky, A.; Beaumier, M.; Beckman, S.; Belmont, R.; Berdnikov, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Black, D.; Blau, D. S.; Bok, J. S.; Boyle, K.; Brooks, M. L.; Bryslawskyj, J.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Butsyk, S.; Campbell, S.; Chen, C.-H.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choi, J. B.; Choi, S.; Choudhury, R. K.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chvala, O.; Cianciolo, V.; Citron, Z.; Cole, B. A.; Connors, M.; Cronin, N.; Crossette, N.; Csanád, M.; Csörgő, T.; Dairaku, S.; Danley, T. W.; Datta, A.; Daugherity, M. S.; David, G.; Deblasio, K.; Dehmelt, K.; Denisov, A.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Dietzsch, O.; Ding, L.; Dion, A.; Diss, P. B.; Do, J. H.; Donadelli, M.; D'Orazio, L.; Drapier, O.; Drees, A.; Drees, K. A.; Durham, J. M.; Durum, A.; Edwards, S.; Efremenko, Y. V.; Engelmore, T.; Enokizono, A.; Esumi, S.; Eyser, K. O.; Fadem, B.; Feege, N.; Fields, D. E.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Fleuret, F.; Fokin, S. L.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Fukao, Y.; Fusayasu, T.; Gainey, K.; Gal, C.; Gallus, P.; Garg, P.; Garishvili, A.; Garishvili, I.; Ge, H.; Giordano, F.; Glenn, A.; Gong, X.; Gonin, M.; Goto, Y.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Gu, Y.; Gunji, T.; Hachiya, T.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hahn, K. I.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamilton, H. F.; Han, S. Y.; Hanks, J.; Hasegawa, S.; Haseler, T. O. S.; Hashimoto, K.; Hayano, R.; Hayashi, S.; He, X.; Hemmick, T. K.; Hester, T.; Hill, J. C.; Hollis, R. S.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Horaguchi, T.; Hoshino, T.; Hotvedt, N.; Huang, J.; Huang, S.; Ichihara, T.; Iinuma, H.; Ikeda, Y.; Imai, K.; Imazu, Y.; Imrek, J.; Inaba, M.; Iordanova, A.; Isenhower, D.; Isinhue, A.; Ivanishchev, D.; Jacak, B. V.; Javani, M.; Jezghani, M.; Jia, J.; Jiang, X.; Johnson, B. M.; Joo, K. S.; Jouan, D.; Jumper, D. S.; Kamin, J.; Kanda, S.; Kang, B. H.; Kang, J. H.; Kang, J. S.; Kapustinsky, J.; Karatsu, K.; Kawall, D.; Kazantsev, A. V.; Kempel, T.; Key, J. A.; Khachatryan, V.; Khandai, P. K.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kijima, K. M.; Kim, B. I.; Kim, C.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, E.-J.; Kim, G. W.; Kim, M.; Kim, Y.-J.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimelman, B.; Kinney, E.; Kistenev, E.; Kitamura, R.; Klatsky, J.; Kleinjan, D.; Kline, P.; Koblesky, T.; Komkov, B.; Koster, J.; Kotchetkov, D.; Kotov, D.; Krizek, F.; Kurita, K.; Kurosawa, M.; Kwon, Y.; Kyle, G. S.; Lacey, R.; Lai, Y. S.; Lajoie, J. G.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, D. M.; Lee, J.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, S.; Lee, S. H.; Lee, S. R.; Leitch, M. J.; Leite, M. A. L.; Leitgab, M.; Lewis, B.; Li, X.; Lim, S. H.; Linden Levy, L. A.; Liu, M. X.; Lynch, D.; Maguire, C. F.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Makek, M.; Manion, A.; Manko, V. I.; Mannel, E.; Maruyama, T.; McCumber, M.; McGaughey, P. L.; McGlinchey, D.; McKinney, C.; Meles, A.; Mendoza, M.; Meredith, B.; Miake, Y.; Mibe, T.; Midori, J.; Mignerey, A. C.; Milov, A.; Mishra, D. K.; Mitchell, J. T.; Miyasaka, S.; Mizuno, S.; Mohanty, A. K.; Mohapatra, S.; Montuenga, P.; Moon, H. J.; Moon, T.; Morrison, D. P.; Moskowitz, M.; Moukhanova, T. V.; Murakami, T.; Murata, J.; Mwai, A.; Nagae, T.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagashima, K.; Nagle, J. L.; Nagy, M. I.; Nakagawa, I.; Nakagomi, H.; Nakamiya, Y.; Nakamura, K. R.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, K.; Nattrass, C.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Nihashi, M.; Niida, T.; Nishimura, S.; Nouicer, R.; Novák, T.; Novitzky, N.; Nukariya, A.; Nyanin, A. S.; Obayashi, H.; O'Brien, E.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Okada, K.; Orjuela Koop, J. D.; Osborn, J. D.; Oskarsson, A.; Ozawa, K.; Pak, R.; Pantuev, V.; Papavassiliou, V.; Park, I. H.; Park, J. S.; Park, S.; Park, S. K.; Pate, S. F.; Patel, L.; Patel, M.; Pei, H.; Peng, J.-C.; Perepelitsa, D. V.; Perera, G. D. N.; Peressounko, D. Yu.; Perry, J.; Petti, R.; Pinkenburg, C.; Pinson, R.; Pisani, R. P.; Purschke, M. L.; Qu, H.; Rak, J.; Ramson, B. J.; Ravinovich, I.; Read, K. F.; Reynolds, D.; Riabov, V.; Riabov, Y.; Richardson, E.; Rinn, T.; Riveli, N.; Roach, D.; Roche, G.; Rolnick, S. D.; Rosati, M.; Rowan, Z.; Rubin, J. G.; Ryu, M. S.; Sahlmueller, B.; Saito, N.; Sakaguchi, T.; Sako, H.; Samsonov, V.; Sarsour, M.; Sato, S.; Sawada, S.; Schaefer, B.; Schmoll, B. K.; Sedgwick, K.; Seidl, R.; Sen, A.; Seto, R.; Sett, P.; Sexton, A.; Sharma, D.; Shein, I.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shigaki, K.; Shimomura, M.; Shoji, K.; Shukla, P.; Sickles, A.; Silva, C. L.; Silvermyr, D.; Sim, K. S.; Singh, B. K.; Singh, C. P.; Singh, V.; Skolnik, M.; Slunečka, M.; Snowball, M.; Solano, S.; Soltz, R. A.; Sondheim, W. E.; Sorensen, S. P.; Sourikova, I. V.; Stankus, P. W.; Steinberg, P.; Stenlund, E.; Stepanov, M.; Ster, A.; Stoll, S. P.; Sugitate, T.; Sukhanov, A.; Sumita, T.; Sun, J.; Sziklai, J.; Takagui, E. M.; Takahara, A.; Taketani, A.; Tanaka, Y.; Taneja, S.; Tanida, K.; Tannenbaum, M. J.; Tarafdar, S.; Taranenko, A.; Tennant, E.; Tieulent, R.; Timilsina, A.; Todoroki, T.; Tomášek, M.; Torii, H.; Towell, C. L.; Towell, R.; Towell, R. S.; Tserruya, I.; Tsuchimoto, Y.; Vale, C.; van Hecke, H. W.; Vargyas, M.; Vazquez-Zambrano, E.; Veicht, A.; Velkovska, J.; Vértesi, R.; Virius, M.; Voas, B.; Vrba, V.; Vznuzdaev, E.; Wang, X. R.; Watanabe, D.; Watanabe, K.; Watanabe, Y.; Watanabe, Y. S.; Wei, F.; Whitaker, S.; White, A. S.; White, S. N.; Winter, D.; Wolin, S.; Woody, C. L.; Wysocki, M.; Xia, B.; Xue, L.; Yalcin, S.; Yamaguchi, Y. L.; Yanovich, A.; Ying, J.; Yokkaichi, S.; Yoo, J. H.; Yoon, I.; You, Z.; Younus, I.; Yu, H.; Yushmanov, I. E.; Zajc, W. A.; Zelenski, A.; Zhou, S.; Zou, L.; Phenix Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The PHENIX Collaboration at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider has measured open heavy flavor production in minimum bias Au +Au collisions at √{sN N}=200 GeV via the yields of electrons from semileptonic decays of charm and bottom hadrons. Previous heavy flavor electron measurements indicated substantial modification in the momentum distribution of the parent heavy quarks owing to the quark-gluon plasma created in these collisions. For the first time, using the PHENIX silicon vertex detector to measure precision displaced tracking, the relative contributions from charm and bottom hadrons to these electrons as a function of transverse momentum are measured in Au +Au collisions. We compare the fraction of electrons from bottom hadrons to previously published results extracted from electron-hadron correlations in p +p collisions at √{sN N}=200 GeV and find the fractions to be similar within the large uncertainties on both measurements for pT>4 GeV/c . We use the bottom electron fractions in Au +Au and p +p along with the previously measured heavy flavor electron RA A to calculate the RA A for electrons from charm and bottom hadron decays separately. We find that electrons from bottom hadron decays are less suppressed than those from charm for the region 3

  20. Future proton and electron colliders: Dreams for the 1990's

    SciTech Connect

    Richter, B.

    1988-10-01

    In this paper I have reviewed the possibilities for new colliders that might be available in the 1990's. One or more new proton should be available in the late-90s based on plans of Europe, the US and the USSR. The two very high energy machines, LHC and SSC, are quite expensive, and their construction will be more decided by the politicians' view on the availability of resources than by the physicists' view of the need for new machines. Certainly something will be built, but the question is when. New electron colliders beyond LEP II could be available in the late 1990's as well. Most of the people who have looked at this problem believe that at a minimum three years of RandD are required before a proposal can be made, two years will be required to convince the authorities to go ahead, and five years will be required to build such a machine. Thus the earliest time a new electron collider at high energy could be available is around 1988. A strong international RandD program will be required to meet that schedule. In the field of B factories, PSI's proposal is the first serious step beyond the capabilities of CESR. There are other promising techniques but these need more RandD. The least RandD would be required for the asymmetric storage ring systems, while the most would be required for high luminosity linear colliders. For the next decade, high energy physics will be doing its work at the high energy frontier with Tevatron I and II, UNK, SLC, LEP I and II, and HERA. The opportunities for science presented by experiments at these facilities are very great, and it is to be hoped that the pressure for funding to construct the next generation facilities will not badly affect the operating budgets of the ones we now have or which will soon be turning on. 9 refs., 12 figs., 6 tabs.

  1. Predicting the sin ϕS transverse single-spin asymmetry of pion production at an electron ion collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoyu; Lu, Zhun

    2016-04-01

    We study the transverse single-spin asymmetry with a sin ϕS modulation in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering. In particular, we consider the case in which the transverse momentum of the final state hadron is integrated out. Thus, the asymmetry is merely contributed by the coupling of the transversity distribution function h1(x ) and the twist-3 collinear fragmentation function H ˜(z ). Using the available parametrization of h1(x ) from SIDIS data and the recent extracted result for H ˜(z ), we predict the sin ϕS asymmetry for charged and neutral pion production at an electron ion collider. We find that the asymmetry is sizable and could be measured. We also study the impact of the leading-order QCD evolution effect and find that it affects the sin ϕS asymmetry at an electron ion collider considerably.

  2. Measurement of the hadronic cross section in electron-positron annihilation

    SciTech Connect

    Clearwater, S.

    1983-11-01

    This thesis describes the most precise measurement to date of the ratio R, the hadronic cross section in lowest order electron-positron annihilation to the cross section for muon pair production in lowest order electron-positron annihilation. This experiment is of interest because R is a fundamental parameter that tests in a model independent way the basic assumptions of strong interaction theories. According to the assumptions of one of these theories the value of R is determined simply from the electric charges, spin, and color assignments of the produced quark-pairs. The experiment was carried out with the MAgnetic Calorimeter using collisions of 14.5 GeV electrons and positrons at the 2200m circumference PEP storage ring at SLAC. The MAC detector is one of the best-suited collider detectors for measuring R due to its nearly complete coverage of the full angular range. The data for this experiment were accumulated between February 1982 and April 1983 corresponding to a total event sample of about 40,000 hadronic events. About 5% of the data were taken with 14 GeV beams and the rest of the data were taken with 14.5 GeV beams. A description of particle interactions and experimental considerations is given.

  3. Electron density and plasma dynamics of a colliding plasma experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiechula, J.; Schönlein, A.; Iberler, M.; Hock, C.; Manegold, T.; Bohlender, B.; Jacoby, J.

    2016-07-01

    We present experimental results of two head-on colliding plasma sheaths accelerated by pulsed-power-driven coaxial plasma accelerators. The measurements have been performed in a small vacuum chamber with a neutral-gas prefill of ArH2 at gas pressures between 17 Pa and 400 Pa and load voltages between 4 kV and 9 kV. As the plasma sheaths collide, the electron density is significantly increased. The electron density reaches maximum values of ≈8 ṡ 1015 cm-3 for a single accelerated plasma and a maximum value of ≈2.6 ṡ 1016 cm-3 for the plasma collision. Overall a raise of the plasma density by a factor of 1.3 to 3.8 has been achieved. A scaling behavior has been derived from the values of the electron density which shows a disproportionately high increase of the electron density of the collisional case for higher applied voltages in comparison to a single accelerated plasma. Sequences of the plasma collision have been taken, using a fast framing camera to study the plasma dynamics. These sequences indicate a maximum collision velocity of 34 km/s.

  4. High Energy Colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, R. B.; Gallardo, J. C.

    INTRODUCTION PHYSICS CONSIDERATIONS GENERAL REQUIRED LUMINOSITY FOR LEPTON COLLIDERS THE EFFECTIVE PHYSICS ENERGIES OF HADRON COLLIDERS HADRON-HADRON MACHINES LUMINOSITY SIZE AND COST CIRCULAR e^{+}e^- MACHINES LUMINOSITY SIZE AND COST e^{+}e^- LINEAR COLLIDERS LUMINOSITY CONVENTIONAL RF SUPERCONDUCTING RF AT HIGHER ENERGIES γ - γ COLLIDERS μ ^{+} μ^- COLLIDERS ADVANTAGES AND DISADVANTAGES DESIGN STUDIES STATUS AND REQUIRED R AND D COMPARISION OF MACHINES CONCLUSIONS DISCUSSION

  5. Les Houches guidebook to Monte Carlo generators for hadron collider physics

    SciTech Connect

    Dobbs, Matt A.; Frixione, Stefano; Laenen, Eric; Tollefson, Kirsten

    2004-03-01

    Recently the collider physics community has seen significant advances in the formalisms and implementations of event generators. This review is a primer of the methods commonly used for the simulation of high energy physics events at particle colliders. We provide brief descriptions, references, and links to the specific computer codes which implement the methods. The aim is to provide an overview of the available tools, allowing the reader to ascertain which tool is best for a particular application, but also making clear the limitations of each tool.

  6. Les Houches Guidebook to Monte Carlo generators for hadron collider physics

    SciTech Connect

    Dobbs, M.A

    2004-08-24

    Recently the collider physics community has seen significant advances in the formalisms and implementations of event generators. This review is a primer of the methods commonly used for the simulation of high energy physics events at particle colliders. We provide brief descriptions, references, and links to the specific computer codes which implement the methods. The aim is to provide an overview of the available tools, allowing the reader to ascertain which tool is best for a particular application, but also making clear the limitations of each tool.

  7. W+n-jet predictions at the Large Hadron Collider at next-to-leading order matched with a parton shower.

    PubMed

    Höche, Stefan; Krauss, Frank; Schönherr, Marek; Siegert, Frank

    2013-02-01

    For the first time, differential cross sections for the production of W bosons in conjunction with up to three jets, computed at next-to leading order in QCD and including parton shower corrections, are presented and compared to recent experimental data from the Large Hadron Collider.

  8. Centrality dependence of high energy jets in p +Pb collisions at energies available at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bzdak, Adam; Skokov, Vladimir; Bathe, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    The recently measured centrality dependence of high energy jets in proton-lead collisions at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is investigated. We hypothesize that events with jets of very high energy (a few hundred GeV) are characterized by a suppressed number of soft particles, thus shifting these events into more peripheral bins. This naturally results in the suppression (enhancement) of the nuclear modification factor, Rp A, in central (peripheral) collisions. Our calculations suggest that a moderate suppression of the order of 20 % , for 103 GeV jets, can quantitatively reproduce the experimental data. We further extract the suppression factor as a function of jet energy and test our conjecture using available Rp A data for various centralities.

  9. CERN-RD39 collaboration activities aimed at cryogenic silicon detector application in high-luminosity Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zheng; Eremin, Vladimir; Verbitskaya, Elena; Dehning, Bernd; Sapinski, Mariusz; Bartosik, Marcin R.; Alexopoulos, Andreas; Kurfürst, Christoph; Härkönen, Jaakko

    2016-07-01

    Beam Loss Monitors (BLM) made of silicon are new devices for monitoring of radiation environment in the vicinity of superconductive magnets of the Large Hadron Collider. The challenge of BLMs is extreme radiation hardness, up to 1016 protons/cm2 while placed in superfluid helium (temperature of 1.9 K). CERN BE-BI-BL group, together with CERN-RD39 collaboration, has developed prototypes of BLMs and investigated their device physics. An overview of this development-results of the in situ radiation tests of planar silicon detectors at 1.9 K, performed in 2012 and 2014-is presented. Our main finding is that silicon detectors survive under irradiation to 1×1016 p/cm2 at 1.9 K. In order to improve charge collection, current injection into the detector sensitive region (Current Injection Detector (CID)) was tested. The results indicate that the detector signal increases while operated in CID mode.

  10. Optimising charged Higgs boson searches at the Large Hadron Collider across b b bar W± final states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moretti, Stefano; Santos, Rui; Sharma, Pankaj

    2016-09-01

    In the light of the most recent data from Higgs boson searches and analyses, we re-assess the scope of the Large Hadron Collider in accessing heavy charged Higgs boson signals in b b bar W± final states, wherein the contributing channels can be H+ → t b bar , hW±, HW± and AW±. We consider a 2-Higgs Doublet Model Type-II and we assume as production mode bg → tH- +c.c., the dominant one over the range MH± ≥ 480 GeV, as dictated by b → sγ constraints. Prospects of detection are found to be significant for various Run 2 energy and luminosity options.

  11. Crab Crossing Schemes and Studies for Electron Ion Collider

    SciTech Connect

    S. Ahmed, Y. Derbenev, V. Morozov, A. Castilla, G.A. Krafft, B. Yunn, Y. Zhang, J.R. Delayen

    2011-09-01

    This report shows our progress in crab crossing consideration for future electron-ion collider envisioned at JLab. In this design phase, we are evaluating two crabbing schemes viz., the deflecting and dispersive. The mathematical formulations and lattice design for these schemes are discussed in this paper. Numerical simulations involving particle tracking through a realistic deflecting RF cavity and optics illustrate the desired crab tilt of 25 mrad for 1.35 MV. Evolution of beam propagation are shown which provides the physical insight of the crabbing phenomenon.

  12. Charm production in Pb + Pb collisions at energies available at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Taesoo; Berrehrah, Hamza; Cabrera, Daniel; Cassing, Wolfgang; Bratkovskaya, Elena

    2016-03-01

    We study charm production in Pb +Pb collisions at √{sN N}=2.76 TeV in the parton-hadron-string-dynamics (PHSD) transport approach and the charm dynamics in the partonic and hadronic medium. The charm quarks are produced through initial binary nucleon-nucleon collisions by using the pythia event generator, taking into account the (anti-)shadowing incorporated in the eps09 package. The produced charm quarks interact with off-shell massive partons in the quark-gluon plasma and are hadronized into D mesons through coalescence or fragmentation close to the critical energy density, and then interact with hadrons in the final hadronic stage with scattering cross sections calculated in an effective Lagrangian approach with heavy-quark spin symmetry. The PHSD results show a reasonable RAA and elliptic flow of D mesons in comparison to the experimental data for Pb +Pb collisions at √{sN N}=2.76 TeV from the ALICE Collaboration. We also study the effect of temperature-dependent off-shell charm quarks in relativistic heavy-ion collisions. We find that the scattering cross sections are only moderately affected by off-shell charm degrees of freedom. However, the position of the peak of RAA for D mesons depends on the strength of the scalar partonic forces which also have an impact on the D meson elliptic flow. The comparison with experimental data on the RAA suggests that the repulsive force is weaker for off-shell charm quarks as compared to that for light quarks. Furthermore, the effects from radiative charm energy loss appear to be low compared to the collisional energy loss up to transverse momenta of ˜15 GeV/c .

  13. NLO QED contributions to top-pair production at hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Hollik, W.; Kollar, M.

    2008-01-01

    Electroweak one-loop calculations for production of top-quark pairs at colliders are completed by providing the missing QED type contributions from real and virtual photons, where also effects from interference between QED and QCD contributions have to be taken into account. Moreover, photon-induced tt production is included as another partonic channel.

  14. INTERACTION REGION DESIGN FOR THE ELECTRON-ION COLLIDER ERHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    MONTAG, C.; PARKER, B.; TEPIKIAN, S.; ET AL.

    2005-05-16

    To facilitate the study of collisions between 10 GeV polarized electrons and 100 GeV/u heavy ions or 250 GeV polarized protons at luminosities in the 10{sup 33} cm{sup -2} sec{sup -1} range (e-p case), adding a 10 GeV electron storage ring to the existing RHIC complex has been proposed. The interaction region of this electron-ion collider eRHIC has to provide the required low-beta focusing, while simultaneously accommodating the synchrotron radiation fan generated by beam separation close to the interaction point, which is particularly challenging. The latest design status of the eRHIC interaction region will be presented.

  15. Light-by-light scattering in ultraperipheral Pb-Pb collisions at energies available at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kłusek-Gawenda, Mariola; Lebiedowicz, Piotr; Szczurek, Antoni

    2016-04-01

    We calculate cross sections for diphoton production in (semi)exclusive PbPb collisions, relevant for the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The calculation is based on the equivalent photon approximation in the impact parameter space. The cross sections for the elementary γ γ →γ γ subprocess are calculated including two different mechanisms. We take into account box diagrams with leptons and quarks in the loops. In addition, we consider a vector-meson dominance (VDM-Regge) contribution with virtual intermediate hadronic (vector-like) excitations of the photons. We get measurable cross sections in PbPb collisions. This opens a possibility to study the γ γ →γ γ (quasi)elastic scattering at the LHC. We present many interesting differential distributions which could be measured by the ALICE, CMS, or ATLAS Collaborations at the LHC. We study whether a separation or identification of different components (boxes, VDM-Regge) is possible. We find that the cross section for elastic γ γ scattering could be measured in the heavy-ion collisions for subprocess energies smaller than Wγ γ≈15 -20 GeV.

  16. Evidence for x -dependent proton color fluctuations in p A collisions at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvioli, M.; Cole, B. A.; Frankfurt, L.; Perepelitsa, D. V.; Strikman, M.

    2016-01-01

    The centrality dependence of forward jet production in p A collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has been found to grossly violate the Glauber model prediction in a way that depends on the x in the proton. We argue that this modification pattern provides the first experimental evidence for x -dependent proton color fluctuation effects. On average, parton configurations in the projectile proton containing a parton with large x interact with a nuclear target with a significantly smaller than average cross section and have smaller than average size. We implement the effects of fluctuations of the interaction strength and, using the ATLAS analysis of how hadron production at backward rapidities depends on the number of wounded nucleons, make quantitative predictions for the centrality dependence of the jet production rate as a function of the x -dependent interaction strength σ (x ) . We find that σ (x ) ˜0.6 <σ > gives a good description of the data at x =0.6 . These findings support an explanation of the European Muon Collaboration effect as arising from the suppression of small-size nucleon configurations in the nucleus.

  17. Study of cosmic ray events with high muon multiplicity using the ALICE detector at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The ALICE Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    ALICE is one of four large experiments at the CERN Large Hadron Collider near Geneva, specially designed to study particle production in ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions. Located 52 meters underground with 28 meters of overburden rock, it has also been used to detect muons produced by cosmic ray interactions in the upper atmosphere. In this paper, we present the multiplicity distribution of these atmospheric muons and its comparison with Monte Carlo simulations. This analysis exploits the large size and excellent tracking capability of the ALICE Time Projection Chamber. A special emphasis is given to the study of high multiplicity events containing more than 100 reconstructed muons and corresponding to a muon areal density ρμ > 5.9 m-2. Similar events have been studied in previous underground experiments such as ALEPH and DELPHI at LEP. While these experiments were able to reproduce the measured muon multiplicity distribution with Monte Carlo simulations at low and intermediate multiplicities, their simulations failed to describe the frequency of the highest multiplicity events. In this work we show that the high multiplicity events observed in ALICE stem from primary cosmic rays with energies above 1016 eV and that the frequency of these events can be successfully described by assuming a heavy mass composition of primary cosmic rays in this energy range. The development of the resulting air showers was simulated using the latest version of QGSJET to model hadronic interactions. This observation places significant constraints on alternative, more exotic, production mechanisms for these events.

  18. The Quest for the Higgs Boson and the Planck Black Hole Production at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haramein, Nassim; Rauscher, E. A.

    2003-10-01

    When the CERN 7 TeV Large Hadron Collider (LHC) comes on line in the next few years, hypothesis is that significant experimental discoveries may verify the Higgs boson and the production of short lived Planck size mini Schwarzchild black holes, both of which are fundamental to a unified particle and cosmological standard and supersymmetry model. The Higgs mechanism relates to particle mass in the standard model and the mini black holes may relate to the cosmological mini mass problem as well as yield clues as to the structure of the vacuum. These points are of particular interest to our research [1,2], and the discovery and identification of mini black holes (mbh) is basic to our scaling law model [1]. Hawking radiation from the production of mini black holes from accelerated Hadrons are expected to be observed from x- and γ-ray lepton production from subcomponents of quarks or partons. Our model [1,2] and Hawking's picture [3] may demonstrate that mbh hold basic clues about the very nature of the fabric of spacetime itself. We examine the Kerr-Newman black hole production cross section in detail at the energies of the LHC. (1) N. Haramein, Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. AB006, 1154 (2001), (2) E.A. Rauscher, lett. Nuovo Cimento 3, 661 (1972), (3) S.W. Hawking, Phys. Rev. D53, 3099 (1996).

  19. Drell-Yan process as an avenue to test a noncommutative standard model at the Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    J, Selvaganapathy; Das, Prasanta Kumar; Konar, Partha

    2016-06-01

    We study the Drell-Yan process at the Large Hadron Collider in the presence of the noncommutative extension of the standard model. Using the Seiberg-Witten map, we calculate the production cross section to first order in the noncommutative parameter Θμ ν . Although this idea has been evolving for a long time, only a limited amount of phenomenological analysis has been completed, and this was mostly in the context of the linear collider. An outstanding feature from this nonminimal noncommutative standard model not only modifies the couplings over the SM production channel but also allows additional nonstandard vertices which can play a significant role. Hence, in the Drell-Yan process, as studied in the present analysis, one also needs to account for the gluon fusion process at the tree level. Some of the characteristic signatures, such as oscillatory azimuthal distributions, are an outcome of the momentum-dependent effective couplings. We explore the noncommutative scale ΛNC≥0.4 TeV , considering different machine energy ranging from 7 to 13 TeV.

  20. Eventwise mean-pt fluctuations versus minimum-bias jets (minijets) at energies available at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trainor, Thomas A.

    2015-08-01

    Fluctuation measurements of eventwise mean transverse momentum for p -p and Pb-Pb collisions at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) have been reported recently. In that study it was concluded that the strength of "nonstatistical" fluctuations decreases with increasing particle multiplicity nch (or A -A centrality) and is nearly independent of collision energy over a large interval. Among several potential mechanisms for those trends the onset of thermalization and collectivity are mentioned. The LHC analysis employed one fluctuation measure selected from several possibilities. An alternative fluctuation measure reveals a strong increase of pt fluctuations with nc h (or A -A centrality) and collision energy, consistent with previous measurements at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The pt fluctuation data for LHC p -p collisions can be described accurately by a two-component (soft +hard ) model (TCM) in which the hard component represents dijet production. The data for Pb-Pb collisions are described accurately by a TCM reference for more-peripheral collisions (suggesting transparent collisions), but the data deviate quantitatively from the reference for more-central collisions, suggesting a modification of jet formation. Overall fluctuation data trends suggest that minimum-bias jets (minijets) dominate pt fluctuations at both the LHC and the RHIC.

  1. Jet Substructure as a New Higgs-Search Channel at the Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Butterworth, Jonathan M.; Davison, Adam R.; Rubin, Mathieu; Salam, Gavin P.

    2008-06-20

    It is widely considered that, for Higgs boson searches at the CERN Large Hadron Colider, WH and ZH production where the Higgs boson decays to bb are poor search channels due to large backgrounds. We show that at high transverse momenta, employing state-of-the-art jet reconstruction and decomposition techniques, these processes can be recovered as promising search channels for the standard model Higgs boson around 120 GeV in mass00.

  2. TMDs and GPDs at a future Electron-Ion Collider

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ent, Rolf

    2016-06-21

    With two options studied at Brookhaven National Lab and Jefferson Laboratory the U.S., an Electron-Ion Collider (EIC) of energy √s=20-100 GeV was under design. Furthermore, the recent 2015 US Nuclear Science Long-Range Planning effort included a future EIC as a recommendation for future construction. The EIC will be unique in colliding polarised electrons off polarised protons and light nuclei, providing the spin degrees of freedom essential to pursue its physics program driven by spin structure, multi-dimensional tomographic images of protons and nuclei, and discovery of the role of collective effects of gluons in nuclei. The foreseen luminosity of the EIC,more » coupled with its energy variability and reach, will allow unprecedented three-dimensional imaging of the gluon and sea quark distributions, via both TMDs and GPDs, and to explore correlations amongst them. Its hermetic detection capability of correlated fragments promises to similar allow for precise tomographic images of the quark-gluon landscape in nuclei, transcending from light few-body nuclei to the heaviest nuclei, and could uncover how the TMD and GPD landscape changes when gluons display an anticipated collective behavior at the higher energies.« less

  3. TMDs and GPDs at a future Electron-Ion Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ent, Rolf

    2016-06-01

    In the U.S., an Electron-Ion Collider (EIC) of energy √{s}=20-100 GeV is under design, with two options studied at Brookhaven National Lab and Jefferson Laboratory. The recent 2015 US Nuclear Science Long-Range Planning effort included a future EIC as a recommendation for future construction. The EIC will be unique in colliding polarised electrons off polarised protons and light nuclei, providing the spin degrees of freedom essential to pursue its physics program driven by spin structure, multi-dimensional tomographic images of protons and nuclei, and discovery of the role of collective effects of gluons in nuclei. The foreseen luminosity of the EIC, coupled with its energy variability and reach, will allow unprecedented three-dimensional imaging of the gluon and sea quark distributions, via both TMDs and GPDs, and to explore correlations amongst them. Its hermetic detection capability of correlated fragments promises to similarly allow for precise tomographic images of the quark-gluon landscape in nuclei, transcending from light few-body nuclei to the heaviest nuclei, and could uncover how the TMD and GPD landscape changes when gluons display an anticipated collective behavior at the higher energies.

  4. Prospects for electroweakino discovery at a 100 TeV hadron collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gori, Stefania; Jung, Sunghoon; Wang, Lian-Tao; Wells, James D.

    2014-12-01

    We investigate the prospects of discovering split Supersymmetry at a future 100 TeV proton-proton collider through the direct production of electroweakino next-to-lightest- supersymmetric-particles (NLSPs). We focus on signatures with multi-lepton and missing energy: 3ℓ, opposite-sign dileptons and same-sign dileptons. We perform a comprehensive study of different electroweakino spectra. A 100 TeV collider with 3000 /fb data is expected to exclude Higgsino thermal dark matter candidates with m LSP ~ 1 TeV if Wino NLSPs are lighter than about 3.2 TeV. The 3ℓ search usually offers the highest mass reach, which varies in the range of (2-4) TeV depending on scenarios. In particular, scenarios with light Higgsinos have generically simplified parameter dependences. We also demonstrate that, at a 100 TeV collider, lepton collimation becomes a crucial issue for NLSPs heavier than about 2.5 TeV. We finally compare our results with the discovery prospects of gluino pair productions and deduce which SUSY breaking model can be discovered first by electroweakino searches.

  5. Modeling Crabbing Dynamics in an Electron-Ion Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Castilla, Alejandro; Morozov, Vasiliy S.; Satogata, Todd J.; Delayen, Jean R.

    2015-09-01

    A local crabbing scheme requires π/2 (mod π) horizontal betatron phase advances from an interaction point (IP) to the crab cavities on each side of it. However, realistic phase advances generated by sets of quadrupoles, or Final Focusing Blocks (FFB), between the crab cavities located in the expanded beam regions and the IP differ slightly from π/2. To understand the effect of crabbing on the beam dynamics in this case, a simple model of the optics of the Medium Energy Electron-Ion Collider (MEIC) including local crabbing was developed using linear matrices and then studied numerically over multiple turns (1000 passes) of both electron and proton bunches. The same model was applied to both local and global crabbing schemes to determine the linear-order dynamical effects of the synchro-betatron coupling induced by crabbing.

  6. Bruno Touschek: From Betatrons to Electron-Positron Colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardini, Carlo; Pancheri, Giulia; Pellegrini, Claudio

    Bruno Touschek's life as a physicist spanned the period from World War II to the 1970s. He was a key figure in the developments of electron-positron colliders and storage rings, and made important contributions to theoretical high energy physics. Storage rings, initially developed for high energy physics, are being widely used in many countries as synchrotron radiation sources and are a tool for research in physics, chemistry, biology, environmental sciences and cultural heritage studies. We describe Touschek's life in Austria, where he was born, in Germany, where he participated in the construction of a betatron during WWII, and in Italy, where he proposed and led to completion the first electron-positron storage ring in 1960, in Frascati. We highlight how his central European culture influenced his lifestyle and work, and his main contributions to physics, such as the discovery of the Touschek effect and beam instabilities in the larger storage ring ADONE.

  7. Bruno Touschek: From Betatrons to Electron-Positron Colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardini, Carlo; Pancheri, Giulia; Pellegrini, Claudio

    Bruno Touschek’s life as a physicist spanned the period from World War II to the 1970s. He was a key figure in the developments of electron-positron colliders and storage rings, and made important contributions to theoretical high energy physics. Storage rings, initially developed for high energy physics, are being widely used in many countries as synchrotron radiation sources and are a tool for research in physics, chemistry, biology, environmental sciences and cultural heritage studies. We describe Touschek’s life in Austria, where he was born, in Germany, where he participated in the construction of a betatron during WWII, and in Italy, where he proposed and led to completion the first electron-positron storage ring in 1960, in Frascati. We highlight how his central European culture influenced his lifestyle and work, and his main contributions to physics, such as the discovery of the Touschek effect and beam instabilities in the larger storage ring ADONE.

  8. The Polarized Electron Source for the International Collider (ILC) Project

    SciTech Connect

    Brachmann, A.; Clendenin, J. E.; Garwin, E. L.; Ioakeimidi, K.; Kirby, R. E.; Maruyama, T.; Prescott, C. Y.; Sheppard, J.; Turner, J.; Zhou, F.

    2007-06-13

    The ILC project will be the next large high energy physics tool that will use polarized electrons (and positrons). For this machine spin physics will play an important role. The polarized electron source design is based on electron injectors built for the Stanford Linear Collider (polarized) and Tesla Test Facility (un-polarized). The ILC polarized electron source will provide a 5GeV spin polarized electron beam for injection into the ILC damping ring. Although most ILC machine parameters have been achieved by the SLC or TTF source, features of both must be integrated into one design. The bunch train structure presents unique challenges to the source laser drive system. A suitable laser system has not yet been demonstrated and is part of the ongoing R and D program for ILC at SLAC. Furthermore, ILC injector R and D incorporates photocathode development, increasing available polarization, and improving operational properties in gun vacuum systems. Another important area of research and development is advancing the design of DC and RF electron gun technology for polarized sources. This presentation presents the current status of the design and outlines aspects of the relevant R and D program carried out within the ILC community.

  9. The Polarized Electron Source for the International Collider (ILC) Project

    SciTech Connect

    Brachmann, A.; Clendenin, J.E.; Garwin, E.L.; Ioakeimidi, K.; Kirby, R.e.; Maruyama, T.; Prescott, C.Y.; Sheppard, J.; Turner, J.; Zhou, F.; /SLAC

    2006-12-01

    ILC project will be the next large high energy physics tool that will use polarized electrons (and positrons). For this machine spin physics will play an important role. The polarized electron source design is based on electron injectors built for the Stanford Linear Collider (polarized) and Tesla Test Facility (un-polarized). The ILC polarized electron source will provide a 5GeV spin polarized electron beam for injection into the ILC damping ring. Although most ILC machine parameters have been achieved by the SLC or TTF source, features of both must be integrated into one design. The bunch train structure presents unique challenges to the source laser drive system. A suitable laser system has not yet been demonstrated and is part of the ongoing R&D program for ILC at SLAC. Furthermore, ILC injector R&D incorporates photocathode development, increasing available polarization, and improving operational properties in gun vacuum systems. Another important area of research and development is advancing the design of DC and RF electron gun technology for polarized sources. This presentation presents the current status of the design and outlines aspects of the relevant R&D program carried out within the ILC community.

  10. Associated Higgs-W-Boson Production at Hadron Colliders: A Fully Exclusive QCD Calculation at NNLO

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrera, Giancarlo; Grazzini, Massimiliano; Tramontano, Francesco

    2011-10-07

    We consider QCD radiative corrections to standard model Higgs-boson production in association with a W boson in hadron collisions. We present a fully exclusive calculation up to next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) in QCD perturbation theory. To perform this NNLO computation, we use a recently proposed version of the subtraction formalism. Our calculation includes finite-width effects, the leptonic decay of the W boson with its spin correlations, and the decay of the Higgs boson into a bb pair. We present selected numerical results at the Tevatron and the LHC.

  11. Indications of conical emission of charged hadrons at the BNL relativistic heavy ion collider.

    SciTech Connect

    Abelev, B. I.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Krueger, K.; Spinka, H. M.; Underwood, D. G.; High Energy Physics; Univ. of Illinois; Panjab Univ.; Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre; Kent State Univ.; Particle Physic Lab.; STAR Collaboration

    2009-01-01

    Three-particle azimuthal correlation measurements with a high transverse momentum trigger particle are reported for pp, d+Au, and Au+Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV by the STAR experiment. Dijet structures are observed in pp, d+Au and peripheral Au+Au collisions. An additional structure is observed in central Au+Au data, signaling conical emission of correlated charged hadrons. The conical emission angle is found to be {theta} = 1.37 {+-} 0.02(stat){sub -0.07}{sup +0.06} (syst), independent of p.

  12. Indications of conical emission of charged hadrons at the BNL relativistic heavy ion collider.

    PubMed

    Abelev, B I; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Anderson, B D; Arkhipkin, D; Averichev, G S; Bai, Y; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Baumgart, S; Beavis, D R; Bellwied, R; Benedosso, F; Betts, R R; Bhardwaj, S; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bichsel, H; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Biritz, B; Bland, L C; Bombara, M; Bonner, B E; Botje, M; Bouchet, J; Braidot, E; Brandin, A V; Bruna, E; Bueltmann, S; Burton, T P; Bystersky, M; Cai, X Z; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Callner, J; Catu, O; Cebra, D; Cendejas, R; Cervantes, M C; Chajecki, Z; Chaloupka, P; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, J H; Chen, J Y; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Choi, K E; Christie, W; Chung, S U; Clarke, R F; Codrington, M J M; Coffin, J P; Cormier, T M; Cosentino, M R; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Das, D; Dash, S; Daugherity, M; De Silva, C; de Moura, M M; Dedovich, T G; Dephillips, M; Derevschikov, A A; de Souza, R Derradi; Didenko, L; Djawotho, P; Dogra, S M; Dong, X; Drachenberg, J L; Draper, J E; Du, F; Dunlop, J C; Dutta Mazumdar, M R; Edwards, W R; Efimov, L G; Elhalhuli, E; Elnimr, M; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Estienne, M; Eun, L; Fachini, P; Fatemi, R; Fedorisin, J; Feng, A; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fine, V; Fisyak, Y; Gagliardi, C A; Gaillard, L; Gangadharan, D R; Ganti, M S; Garcia-Solis, E; Ghazikhanian, V; Ghosh, P; Gorbunov, Y N; Gordon, A; Grebenyuk, O; Grosnick, D; Grube, B; Guertin, S M; Guimaraes, K S F F; Gupta, A; Gupta, N; Guryn, W; Haag, B; Hallman, T J; Hamed, A; Harris, J W; He, W; Heinz, M; Heppelmann, S; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffman, A M; Hoffmann, G W; Hofman, D J; Hollis, R S; Huang, H Z; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Iordanova, A; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Jakl, P; Jin, F; Jones, P G; Joseph, J; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kajimoto, K; Kang, K; Kapitan, J; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Kettler, D; Khodyrev, V Yu; Kiryluk, J; Kisiel, A; Klein, S R; Knospe, A G; Kocoloski, A; Koetke, D D; Kopytine, M; Kotchenda, L; Kouchpil, V; Kravtsov, P; Kravtsov, V I; Krueger, K; Krus, M; Kuhn, C; Kumar, L; Kurnadi, P; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Lapointe, S; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, C-H; Levine, M J; Li, C; Li, Y; Lin, G; Lin, X; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, H; Liu, J; Liu, L; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Longacre, R S; Love, W A; Lu, Y; Ludlam, T; Lynn, D; Ma, G L; Ma, Y G; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Mall, O I; Mangotra, L K; Manweiler, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; McShane, T S; Meschanin, A; Millane, J; Miller, M L; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mischke, A; Mitchell, J; Mohanty, B; Molnar, L; Morozov, D A; Munhoz, M G; Nandi, B K; Nattrass, C; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Nepali, C; Netrakanti, P K; Ng, M J; Nogach, L V; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Okada, H; Okorokov, V; Olson, D; Pachr, M; Page, B S; Pal, S K; Pandit, Y; Panebratsev, Y; Pawlak, T; Peitzmann, T; Perevoztchikov, V; Perkins, C; Peryt, W; Phatak, S C; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Poljak, N; Poskanzer, A M; Potukuchi, B V K S; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Pruthi, N K; Putschke, J; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ray, R L; Reed, R; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Rose, A; Roy, C; Ruan, L; Russcher, M J; Rykov, V; Sahoo, R; Sakrejda, I; Sakuma, T; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Sarsour, M; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Seger, J; Selyuzhenkov, I; Seyboth, P; Shabetai, A; Shahaliev, E; Shao, M; Sharma, M; Shi, S S; Shi, X-H; Sichtermann, E P; Simon, F; Singaraju, R N; Skoby, M J; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sorensen, P; Sowinski, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stadnik, A; Stanislaus, T D S; Staszak, D; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Suaide, A A P; Suarez, M C; Subba, N L; Sumbera, M; Sun, X M; Sun, Y; Sun, Z; Surrow, B; Symons, T J M; Szanto de Toledo, A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tang, Z; Tarnowsky, T; Thein, D; Thomas, J H; Tian, J; Timmins, A R; Timoshenko, S; Tlusty, D; Tokarev, M; Trainor, T A; Tram, V N; Trattner, A L; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tsai, O D; Ulery, J; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; van Leeuwen, M; Vander Molen, A M; Vanfossen, J A; Varma, R; Vasconcelos, G M S; Vasilevski, I M; Vasiliev, A N; Videbaek, F; Vigdor, S E; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Voloshin, S A; Wada, M; Waggoner, W T; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, J S; Wang, Q; Wang, X; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Webb, J C; Westfall, G D; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wu, Y; Xu, N; Xu, Q H; Xu, Y; Xu, Z; Yepes, P; Yoo, I-K; Yue, Q; Zawisza, M; Zbroszczyk, H; Zhan, W; Zhang, H; Zhang, S; Zhang, W M; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, Y; Zhong, C; Zhou, J; Zoulkarneev, R; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zuo, J X

    2009-02-01

    Three-particle azimuthal correlation measurements with a high transverse momentum trigger particle are reported for pp, d+Au, and Au+Au collisions at sqrt[s_{NN}]=200 GeV by the STAR experiment. Dijet structures are observed in pp, d+Au and peripheral Au+Au collisions. An additional structure is observed in central Au+Au data, signaling conical emission of correlated charged hadrons. The conical emission angle is found to be theta=1.37+/-0.02(stat)-0.07+0.06(syst), independent of p_{ perpendicular}. PMID:19257508

  13. A new boson with a mass of 125 GeV observed with the CMS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider.

    PubMed

    2012-12-21

    The Higgs boson was postulated nearly five decades ago within the framework of the standard model of particle physics and has been the subject of numerous searches at accelerators around the world. Its discovery would verify the existence of a complex scalar field thought to give mass to three of the carriers of the electroweak force-the W(+), W(-), and Z(0) bosons-as well as to the fundamental quarks and leptons. The CMS Collaboration has observed, with a statistical significance of five standard deviations, a new particle produced in proton-proton collisions at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. The evidence is strongest in the diphoton and four-lepton (electrons and/or muons) final states, which provide the best mass resolution in the CMS detector. The probability of the observed signal being due to a random fluctuation of the background is about 1 in 3 × 10(6). The new particle is a boson with spin not equal to 1 and has a mass of about 125 [corrected] giga-electron volts. Although its measured properties are, within the uncertainties of the present data, consistent with those expected of the Higgs boson, more data are needed to elucidate the precise nature of the new particle.

  14. A new boson with a mass of 125 GeV observed with the CMS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider.

    PubMed

    2012-12-21

    The Higgs boson was postulated nearly five decades ago within the framework of the standard model of particle physics and has been the subject of numerous searches at accelerators around the world. Its discovery would verify the existence of a complex scalar field thought to give mass to three of the carriers of the electroweak force-the W(+), W(-), and Z(0) bosons-as well as to the fundamental quarks and leptons. The CMS Collaboration has observed, with a statistical significance of five standard deviations, a new particle produced in proton-proton collisions at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. The evidence is strongest in the diphoton and four-lepton (electrons and/or muons) final states, which provide the best mass resolution in the CMS detector. The probability of the observed signal being due to a random fluctuation of the background is about 1 in 3 × 10(6). The new particle is a boson with spin not equal to 1 and has a mass of about 125 [corrected] giga-electron volts. Although its measured properties are, within the uncertainties of the present data, consistent with those expected of the Higgs boson, more data are needed to elucidate the precise nature of the new particle. PMID:23258887

  15. Measurement of Hadronic Event Shapes and Jet Substructure in Proton-Proton Collisions at 7.0 TeV Center-of-Mass Energy with the ATLAS Detector at the Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, David Wilkins

    2012-03-20

    This thesis presents the first measurement of 6 hadronic event shapes in proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of {radical}s = 7 TeV using the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. Results are presented at the particle-level, permitting comparisons to multiple Monte Carlo event generator tools. Numerous tools and techniques that enable detailed analysis of the hadronic final state at high luminosity are described. The approaches presented utilize the dual strengths of the ATLAS calorimeter and tracking systems to provide high resolution and robust measurements of the hadronic jets that constitute both a background and a signal throughout ATLAS physics analyses. The study of the hadronic final state is then extended to jet substructure, where the energy flow and topology within individual jets is studied at the detector level and techniques for estimating systematic uncertainties for such measurements are commissioned in the first data. These first substructure measurements in ATLAS include the jet mass and sub-jet multiplicity as well as those concerned with multi-body hadronic decays and color flow within jets. Finally, the first boosted hadronic object observed at the LHC - the decay of the top quark to a single jet - is presented.

  16. Design studies for the next generation electron ion colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayed, Hisham Kamal; Bogacz, S. A.; Krafft, G.

    2014-04-01

    The next generation Electron Ion Collider (EIC) at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLAB) utilizes a figure-8 shaped ion and electron rings. EIC has the ability to preserve the ion polarization during acceleration, where the electron ring matches in footprint with a figure-8 ion ring. The electron ring is designed to deliver a highly polarized high luminous electron beam at interaction point (IP). The main challenges of the electron ring design are the chromaticity compensation and maintaining high beam polarization of 70% at all energies 3-11 GeV without introducing transverse orbital coupling before the IP. The very demanding detector design limits the minimum distance between the final focus quadrupole and the interaction point to 3.5 m which results in a large β function inside the final focus quadrupoles leading to increased beam chromaticity. In this paper, we present a novel chromaticity compensation scheme that mitigates IP chromaticity by a compact chromaticity compensation section with multipole magnet components. In addition, a set of spin rotators are utilized to manipulate the polarization vector of the electron beam in order to preserve the beam polarization. The spin rotator solenoids introduce undesired coupling between the horizontal and vertical betatron motion of the beam. We introduce a compact and modular orbit decoupling insert that can fit in the limited space of the straight section in the figure-8 ring. We show a numerical study of the figure-8 ring design with the compact straight section, which includes the interaction region, chromaticity compensation section, and the spin rotators, the figure-8 design performance is evaluated with particle tracking.

  17. Design studies for the next generation electron ion colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Sayed, Hisham Kamal; Bogacz, Slawomir A.; Krafft, Geoffrey A.

    2014-04-01

    The next generation Electron Ion Collider (EIC) at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLAB) utilizes a figure-8 shaped ion and electron rings. EIC has the ability to preserve the ion polarization during acceleration, where the electron ring matches in footprint with a figure-8 ion ring. The electron ring is designed to deliver a highly polarized high luminous electron beam at interaction point (IP). The main challenges of the electron ring design are the chromaticity compensation and maintaining high beam polarization of 70% at all energies 3–11 GeV without introducing transverse orbital coupling before the IP. The very demanding detector design limits the minimum distance between the final focus quadrupole and the interaction point to 3.5 m which results in a large β function inside the final focus quadrupoles leading to increased beam chromaticity. In this paper, we present a novel chromaticity compensation scheme that mitigates IP chromaticity by a compact chromaticity compensation section with multipole magnet components. In addition, a set of spin rotators are utilized to manipulate the polarization vector of the electron beam in order to preserve the beam polarization. The spin rotator solenoids introduce undesired coupling between the horizontal and vertical betatron motion of the beam. We introduce a compact and modular orbit decoupling insert that can fit in the limited space of the straight section in the figure-8 ring. We show a numerical study of the figure-8 ring design with the compact straight section, which includes the interaction region, chromaticity compensation section, and the spin rotators, the figure-8 design performance is evaluated with particle tracking.

  18. First observation of vector boson pairs in a hadronic final state at the tevatron collider.

    PubMed

    Aaltonen, T; Adelman, J; Akimoto, T; Alvarez González, B; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Apresyan, A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Barria, P; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Beauchemin, P-H; Bedeschi, F; Beecher, D; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bolla, G; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Bridgeman, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burke, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Calancha, C; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carls, B; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Choudalakis, G; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Chwalek, T; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Cox, C A; Cox, D J; Crescioli, F; Almenar, C Cuenca; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cully, J C; Dagenhart, D; Datta, M; Davies, T; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lorenzo, G; Dell'Orso, M; Deluca, C; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; Derwent, P F; Di Canto, A; di Giovanni, G P; Dionisi, C; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Efron, J; Elagin, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Ferrazza, C; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Frank, M J; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garberson, F; Garcia, J E; Garfinkel, A F; Garosi, P; Genser, K; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Gessler, A; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Gimmell, J L; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Group, R C; Grundler, U; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Han, B-Y; Han, J Y; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartz, M; Hatakeyama, K; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heijboer, A; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Henderson, C; Herndon, M; Heuser, J; Hewamanage, S; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Hussein, M; Huston, J; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jha, M K; Jindariani, S; Johnson, W; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Jung, J E; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Kar, D; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kephart, R; Ketchum, W; Keung, J; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, H W; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krop, D; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kubo, T; Kuhr, T; Kulkarni, N P; Kurata, M; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; LeCompte, T; Lee, E; Lee, H S; Lee, S W; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C-S; Linacre, J; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, C; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Lovas, L; Lucchesi, D; Luci, C; Lueck, J; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; MacQueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Maki, T; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, C; Marino, C P; Martin, A; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Martínez-Ballarín, R; Maruyama, T; Mastrandrea, P; Masubuchi, T; Mathis, M; Mattson, M E; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miller, R; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyake, H; Moggi, N; Mondragon, M N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Morlock, J; Fernandez, P Movilla; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Nagano, A; Naganoma, J; Nakamura, K; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Necula, V; Nett, J; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Neubauer, S; Nielsen, J; Nodulman, L; Norman, M; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Osterberg, K; Griso, S Pagan; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Papaikonomou, A; Paramonov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Peiffer, T; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pinera, L; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Pueschel, E; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Ramakrishnan, V; Ranjan, N; Redondo, I; Renton, P; Renz, M; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rodriguez, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Roy, P; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Rutherford, B; Saarikko, H; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Saltó, O; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, A; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M A; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sforza, F; Sfyrla, A; Shalhout, S Z; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shiraishi, S; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Slaughter, A J; Slaunwhite, J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spreitzer, T; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Strycker, G L; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, R; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thompson, G A; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Ttito-Guzmán, P; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Tourneur, S; Trovato, M; Tsai, S-Y; Tu, Y; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Vallecorsa, S; van Remortel, N; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Vidal, M; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vine, T; Vogel, M; Volobouev, I; Volpi, G; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, W; Wagner-Kuhr, J; Wakisaka, T; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Weinberger, M; Weinelt, J; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Wilbur, S; Williams, G; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wright, T; Wu, X; Würthwein, F; Xie, S; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yi, K; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zhang, X; Zheng, Y; Zucchelli, S

    2009-08-28

    We present the first observation in hadronic collisions of the electroweak production of vector boson pairs (VV, V = W, Z) where one boson decays to a dijet final state. The data correspond to 3.5 fb(-1) of integrated luminosity of pp[over ] collisions at sqrt[s] = 1.96 TeV collected by the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. We observe 1516 + or - 239(stat) + or - 144(syst) diboson candidate events and measure a cross section sigma(pp[over ]-->VV + X) of 18.0 + or - 2.8(stat) + or - 2.4(syst) + or -1.1(lumi) pb, in agreement with the expectations of the standard model.

  19. First Observation of Vector Boson Pairs in a Hadronic Final State at the Tevatron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, Jahred A.; Akimoto, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, Dante E.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, Alberto; Antos, Jaroslav; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; /Purdue U. /Waseda U.

    2009-05-01

    We present the first observation in hadronic collisions of the electroweak production of vector boson pairs (VV, V = W,Z) where one boson decays to a dijet final state. The data correspond to 3.5 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity of p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV collected by the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. We observe 1516 {+-} 239(stat) {+-} 144(syst) diboson candidate events and measure a cross section {sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} VV + X) of 18.0 {+-} 2.8(stat) {+-} 2.4(syst) {+-} 1.1(lumi) pb, in agreement with the expectations of the standard model.

  20. Top++: A program for the calculation of the top-pair cross-section at hadron colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czakon, Michał; Mitov, Alexander

    2014-11-01

    We present the program Top++ for the numerical evaluation of the total inclusive cross-section for producing top quark pairs at hadron colliders. The program calculates the cross-section in (a) fixed order approach with exact next-to-next-to leading order (NNLO) accuracy and (b) by including soft-gluon resummation for the hadronic cross-section in Mellin space with full next-to-next-to-leading logarithmic (NNLL) accuracy. The program offers the user significant flexibility through the large number (29) of available options. Top++ is written in C++. It has a very simple to use interface that is intuitive and directly reflects the physics. The running of the program requires no programming experience from the user. Catalogue identifier: AETR_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AETR_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen’s University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU General Public License No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 15 896 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 695 919 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C++. Computer: any running a unix operating system. Program was developed and tested with GNU Compiler Collection, C++ compiler. Operating system: Linux; Mac OS X; can be adapted for other unix systems. RAM: typically less than 200 MB. Classification: 11.1. External routines: GNU Scientific Library (GSL); the Les Houches Accord pdf Interface (LHAPDF). Nature of problem: computation of the total cross-section in perturbative QCD. Solution method: numerical integration of the product of hard partonic cross-section (with or without soft gluon resummation) with two parton distribution functions. Additional comments: sub per-mill accuracy achievable in realistic time (program does not employ Monte Carlo methods). Running time: depending on the options. The program is optimized for speed.

  1. Study of cosmic ray events with high muon multiplicity using the ALICE detector at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Collaboration: ALICE Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    ALICE is one of four large experiments at the CERN Large Hadron Collider near Geneva, specially designed to study particle production in ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions. Located 52 meters underground with 28 meters of overburden rock, it has also been used to detect muons produced by cosmic ray interactions in the upper atmosphere. In this paper, we present the multiplicity distribution of these atmospheric muons and its comparison with Monte Carlo simulations. This analysis exploits the large size and excellent tracking capability of the ALICE Time Projection Chamber. A special emphasis is given to the study of high multiplicity events containing more than 100 reconstructed muons and corresponding to a muon areal density ρ{sub μ} > 5.9 m{sup −2}. Similar events have been studied in previous underground experiments such as ALEPH and DELPHI at LEP. While these experiments were able to reproduce the measured muon multiplicity distribution with Monte Carlo simulations at low and intermediate multiplicities, their simulations failed to describe the frequency of the highest multiplicity events. In this work we show that the high multiplicity events observed in ALICE stem from primary cosmic rays with energies above 10{sup 16} eV and that the frequency of these events can be successfully described by assuming a heavy mass composition of primary cosmic rays in this energy range. The development of the resulting air showers was simulated using the latest version of QGSJET to model hadronic interactions. This observation places significant constraints on alternative, more exotic, production mechanisms for these events.

  2. Hadronization of partons

    SciTech Connect

    Albino, S.

    2010-07-15

    The description of inclusive production of single unpolarized light hadrons using fragmentation functions in the framework of the factorization theorem is reviewed. The factorization of observables into perturbatively calculable quantities and these universal fragmentation functions are summarized and some improvements beyond the standard fixed order approach are discussed. The extraction of fragmentation functions for light charged ({pi}{sup {+-}}, K{sup {+-}}, and p/p) and neutral (K{sub S}{sup 0} and {Lambda}/{Lambda}) hadrons using these theoretical tools is discussed through global fits to experimental data from reactions at various colliders, in particular from accurate e{sup +}e{sup -} reactions at the Large Electron-Position Collider (LEP), and the subsequent successful predictions of other experimental data, such as data gathered at Hadron Electron Ring Accelerator (HERA), the Tevatron, and the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), from these fitted fragmentation functions as allowed by factorization universality. These global fits also impose competitive constraints on {alpha}{sub s}(M{sub Z}). Emphasis is placed on the need for accurate data from pp(p) and ep reactions in which the hadron species is identified in order to constrain the separate fragmentation functions of the gluon and each quark flavor for each hadron species.

  3. Free Electron Laser for Gamma-Gamma Collider at a Low-Energy Option of International Linear Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Saldin, Evgeny; Schneidmiller, Evgeny; Yurkov, Mikhail; Seryi, Andrei; /SLAC

    2009-10-30

    Different scenarios of a start-up with International Linear Collider (ILC) are under discussion at the moment in the framework of the Global Design Effort (GDE). One of them assumes construction of the ILC in stages from some minimum CM energy up to final target of 500 GeV CM energy. Gamma-gamma collider with CM energy of 180GeV is considered as a candidate for the first stage of the facility. In this report we present conceptual design of a free electron laser as a source of primary photons for the first stage of ILC.

  4. Spin identification of graviton resonances in the process pp {sup {yields}}e{sup +}e{sup -} + X at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC)

    SciTech Connect

    Serenkova, I. A. Pankov, A.A. Tsytrinov, A.V.; Bednyakov, V. A.

    2010-07-15

    Prospects for discovering heavy graviton resonances in decays to an electron-positron pair and for identifying the nature of these resonances in the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) are investigated. Gravitons in the Randall-Sundrum model, which features extra spatial dimensions, are considered by way of example. A comparative analysis of effects of new different-spin heavy resonances, scalar [supersymmetric neutrino (sneutrino)], vector (new gauge Z' boson), and tensor (graviton) ones, is performed in order to identify the graviton spin. An identification of gravitons is performed by using the integrated center-edge asymmetry. For LHC, the graviton discovery (identification) reach is found to be 2.1 TeV (1.2 TeV) and 3.9 TeV (2.9 TeV) at a confidence level of 5{delta} (95%) for the graviton coupling constants of k/bar M {sub Pl} = 0.01 and 0.1, respectively. This analysis is the most general, since, for the first time, it takes into account the possible existence of scalar resonances, which affects substantially quantitative estimates of the identification reach.

  5. Charm and bottom production in inclusive double Pomeron exchange in heavy-ion collisions at energies available at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Gay Ducati, M. B.; Machado, M. M.; Machado, M. V. T.

    2011-01-15

    The inclusive double Pomeron exchange cross section for heavy-quark pair production is calculated for nucleus-nucleus collisions at the Large Hadron Collider. The present estimate is based on hard diffractive factorization, corrected by absorptive corrections and nuclear effects. The theoretical uncertainties for nuclear collisions are investigated and a comparison to other approaches is presented. The production channels giving a similar final state configuration are discussed as well.

  6. Kaluza-Klein gluon + jets associated production at the Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyer, A. M.; Mahmoudi, F.; Manglani, N.; Sridhar, K.

    2016-08-01

    The Kaluza-Klein excitations of gluons offer the exciting possibility of probing bulk Randall-Sundrum (RS) models. In these bulk models either a custodial symmetry or a deformation of the metric away from AdS is invoked in order to deal with electroweak precision tests. Addressing both these models, we suggest a new channel in which to study the production of KK-gluons (gKK): one where it is produced in association with one or more hard jets. The cross-section for the gKK + jets channel is significant because of several contributing sub-processes. In particular, the 1-jet and the 2-jet associated processes are important because at these orders in QCD the qg and the gg initial states respectively come into play. We have performed a hadron-level simulation of the signal and present strategies to effectively extract the signal from what could potentially be a huge background. We present results for the kinematic reach of the LHC Run-II for different gKK masses in bulk-RS models.

  7. Integrated analysis of particle interactions at hadron colliders Report of research activities in 2010-2015

    SciTech Connect

    Nadolsky, Pavel M.

    2015-08-31

    The report summarizes research activities of the project ”Integrated analysis of particle interactions” at Southern Methodist University, funded by 2010 DOE Early Career Research Award DE-SC0003870. The goal of the project is to provide state-of-the-art predictions in quantum chromodynamics in order to achieve objectives of the LHC program for studies of electroweak symmetry breaking and new physics searches. We published 19 journal papers focusing on in-depth studies of proton structure and integration of advanced calculations from different areas of particle phenomenology: multi-loop calculations, accurate long-distance hadronic functions, and precise numerical programs. Methods for factorization of QCD cross sections were advanced in order to develop new generations of CTEQ parton distribution functions (PDFs), CT10 and CT14. These distributions provide the core theoretical input for multi-loop perturbative calculations by LHC experimental collaborations. A novel ”PDF meta-analysis” technique was invented to streamline applications of PDFs in numerous LHC simulations and to combine PDFs from various groups using multivariate stochastic sampling of PDF parameters. The meta-analysis will help to bring the LHC perturbative calculations to the new level of accuracy, while reducing computational efforts. The work on parton distributions was complemented by development of advanced perturbative techniques to predict observables dependent on several momentum scales, including production of massive quarks and transverse momentum resummation at the next-to-next-to-leading order in QCD.

  8. Double vector meson production in γ γ interactions at hadronic colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonçalves, V. P.; Moreira, B. D.; Navarra, F. S.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper we revisit the double vector meson production in γ γ interactions at heavy ion collisions and present, by the first time, predictions for the ρ ρ and J/Ψ J/Ψ production in proton-nucleus and proton-proton collisions. In order to obtain realistic predictions for rapidity distributions and total cross sections for the double vector production in ultra peripheral hadronic collisions we take into account the description of γ γ → VV cross section at low energies as well as its behavior at large energies, associated to the gluonic interaction between the color dipoles. Our results demonstrate that the double ρ production is dominated by the low energy behavior of the γ γ → VV cross section. In contrast, for the double J/Ψ production, the contribution associated to the description of the QCD dynamics at high energies contributes significantly, mainly in pp collisions. Predictions for the RHIC, LHC, FCC, and CEPC-SPPC energies are shown.

  9. Sources of machine-induced background in the ATLAS and CMS detectors at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce, R.; et al.,

    2013-11-21

    One source of experimental background in the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is particles entering the detectors from the machine. These particles are created in cascades, caused by upstream interactions of beam protons with residual gas molecules or collimators. We estimate the losses on the collimators with SixTrack and simulate the showers with FLUKA and MARS to obtain the flux and distribution of particles entering the ATLAS and CMS detectors. We consider some machine configurations used in the first LHC run, with focus on 3.5 TeV operation as in 2011. Results from FLUKA and MARS are compared and a very good agreement is found. An analysis of logged LHC data provides, for different processes, absolute beam loss rates, which are used together with further simulations of vacuum conditions to normalize the results to rates of particles entering the detectors. We assess the relative importance of background from elastic and inelastic beam-gas interactions, and the leakage out of the LHC collimation system, and show that beam-gas interactions are the dominating source of machine-induced background for the studied machine scenarios. Our results serve as a starting point for the experiments to perform further simulations in order to estimate the resulting signals in the detectors.

  10. Mathematical formulation to predict the harmonics of the superconducting Large Hadron Collider magnets. II. Dynamic field changes and scaling laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sammut, Nicholas J.; Bottura, Luca; Bauer, Pierre; Velev, George; Pieloni, Tatiana; Micallef, Joseph

    2007-08-01

    A superconducting particle accelerator like the LHC (Large Hadron Collider) at CERN, can only be controlled well if the effects of the magnetic field multipoles on the beam are compensated. The demands on a control system solely based on beam feedback may be too high for the requirements to be reached at the specified bandwidth and accuracy. Therefore, we designed a suitable field description for the LHC (FIDEL) as part of the machine control baseline to act as a feed-forward magnetic field prediction system. FIDEL consists of a physical and empirical parametric field model based on magnetic measurements at warm and in cryogenic conditions. The performance of FIDEL is particularly critical at injection when the field decays, and in the initial part of the acceleration when the field snaps back. These dynamic components are both current and time dependent and are not reproducible from cycle to cycle since they also depend on the magnet powering history. In this paper a qualitative and quantitative description of the dynamic field behavior substantiated by a set of scaling laws is presented.

  11. W- and Z-boson production with a massive bottom-quark pair at the Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Cordero, F. Febres; Reina, L.; Wackeroth, D.

    2009-08-01

    We present total and differential cross sections for Wbb and Zbb production at the CERN Large Hadron Collider with a center-of-mass energy of {radical}(s)=14 TeV, including next-to-leading order (NLO) QCD corrections and full bottom-quark mass effects. We also provide numerical results obtained with a center-of-mass energy of {radical}(s)=10 TeV. We study the scale uncertainty of the total cross sections due to the residual renormalization- and factorization-scale dependence of the truncated perturbative series. While in the case of Zbb production the scale uncertainty of the total cross section is reduced by NLO QCD corrections, the Wbb production process at NLO in QCD still suffers from large scale uncertainties, in particular, in the inclusive case. We also perform a detailed comparison with a calculation that considers massless bottom quarks, as implemented in the Monte Carlo program MCFM. The effects of a nonzero bottom-quark mass (m{sub b}) cannot be neglected in phase-space regions where the relevant kinematic observable, such as the transverse-momentum of the bottom quarks or the invariant-mass of the bottom-quark pair, are of the order of m{sub b}. The effects on the total production cross sections are usually smaller than the residual scale uncertainty at NLO in QCD.

  12. Thermomechanical assessment of the effects of a jaw-beam angle during beam impact on Large Hadron Collider collimators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cauchi, Marija; Assmann, R. W.; Bertarelli, A.; Carra, F.; Lari, L.; Rossi, A.; Mollicone, P.; Sammut, N.

    2015-02-01

    The correct functioning of a collimation system is crucial to safely and successfully operate high-energy particle accelerators, such as the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). However, the requirements to handle high-intensity beams can be demanding, and accident scenarios must be well studied in order to assess if the collimator design is robust against possible error scenarios. One of the catastrophic, though not very probable, accident scenarios identified within the LHC is an asynchronous beam dump. In this case, one (or more) of the 15 precharged kicker circuits fires out of time with the abort gap, spraying beam pulses onto LHC machine elements before the machine protection system can fire the remaining kicker circuits and bring the beam to the dump. If a proton bunch directly hits a collimator during such an event, severe beam-induced damage such as magnet quenches and other equipment damage might result, with consequent downtime for the machine. This study investigates a number of newly defined jaw error cases, which include angular misalignment errors of the collimator jaw. A numerical finite element method approach is presented in order to precisely evaluate the thermomechanical response of tertiary collimators to beam impact. We identify the most critical and interesting cases, and show that a tilt of the jaw can actually mitigate the effect of an asynchronous dump on the collimators. Relevant collimator damage limits are taken into account, with the aim to identify optimal operational conditions for the LHC.

  13. (Calorimeter based detectors for high energy hadron colliders). [State Univ. of New York

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-08-04

    This document provides a progress report on research that has been conducted under DOE Grant DEFG0292ER40697 for the past year, and describes proposed work for the second year of this 8 year grant starting November 15, 1992. Personnel supported by the contract include 4 faculty, 1 research faculty, 4 postdocs, and 9 graduate students. The work under this grant has in the past been directed in two complementary directions -- DO at Fermilab, and the second SSC detector GEM. A major effort has been towards the construction and commissioning of the new Fermilab Collider detector DO, including design, construction, testing, the commissioning of the central tracking and the central calorimeters. The first DO run is now underway, with data taking and analysis of the first events. Trigger algorithms, data acquisition, calibration of tracking and calorimetry, data scanning and analysis, and planning for future upgrades of the DO detector with the advent of the FNAL Main Injector are all involved. The other effort supported by this grant has been towards the design of GEM, a large and general-purpose SSC detector with special emphasis on accurate muon measurement over a large solid angle. This effort will culminate this year in the presentation to the SSC laboratory of the GEM Technical Design Report. Contributions are being made to the detector design, coordination, and physics simulation studies with special emphasis on muon final states. Collaboration with the RD5 group at CERN to study muon punch through and to test cathode strip chamber prototypes was begun.

  14. Reliability of Beam Loss Monitors System for the Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Guaglio, G.; Dehning, B.; Santoni, C.

    2004-11-10

    The employment of superconducting magnets in high energy colliders opens challenging failure scenarios and brings new criticalities for the whole system protection. For the LHC beam loss protection system, the failure rate and the availability requirements have been evaluated using the Safety Integrity Level (SIL) approach. A downtime cost evaluation is used as input for the SIL approach. The most critical systems, which contribute to the final SIL value, are the dump system, the interlock system, the beam loss monitors system and the energy monitor system. The Beam Loss Monitors System (BLMS) is critical for short and intense particle losses, while at medium and higher loss time it is assisted by other systems, such as the quench protection system and the cryogenic system. For BLMS, hardware and software have been evaluated in detail. The reliability input figures have been collected using historical data from the SPS, using temperature and radiation damage experimental data as well as using standard databases. All the data have been processed by reliability software (Isograph). The analysis ranges from the components data to the system configuration.

  15. Z{prime} phenomenology: Constraints from low-energy measurements, and detailed study at TeV-scale lepton and hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Austern, M.H.

    1994-05-01

    In this dissertation, I discuss the phenomenology of new massive neutral gauge bosons, or Z{prime} bosons, concentrating on experimental tests by which the properties of a Z{prime} boson could be determined. In Chapter I, I briefly review the Standard Model of elementary particle physics, and discuss the motivation for extending it. I review some of the extensions to the Standard Model that predict the existence of Z{prime} bosons, and present a general, model-independent parameterization of the Z{prime}s properties, as well as a simpler parameterization that applies to the most important class of models. In Chapter II, I discuss present-day limits on the existence of Z{prime} bosons, both from direct searches, and from indirect higher-order tests. In Chapter III, I discuss the production and discovery of a Z{prime} at a future hadron collider, such as the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Discovery of a Z{prime} at the LHC may be possible if its mass is less than 5 TeV. I also discuss the experimental tests of its properties that could be performed at such a collider, emphasizing the measurement of leptonic asymmetries. Finally, the Chapter IV, I discuss the experimental tests that could be performed at an e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} collider with {radical}s = M{sub Z{prime}}. I include several higher-order effects, such as initial-state radiation and beamstrahlung, whose inclusion is necesary for a realistic description of the experimental environment at a very high energy e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} collider. The combination of leptonic and hadronic experiments permits the measurement of all of the parameters.

  16. Weibel instability in colliding electron-positron-ion plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Luis

    2008-04-01

    The new regimes accessed in ultra intense laser plasma interactions and recent developments in relativistic astrophysics are giving rise to an increased interest in the Weibel instability. In fact, whenever colliding streams of plasmas (arbitrary mixtures of electrons-positrons-ions) are present, a fraction of the kinetic energy of the plasma flows can be converted to a sub-equipartition magnetic field. In this talk, and using a combination of particle-in-cell simulations and relativistic kinetic theory, I will first describe the recent theoretical advances in our understanding of the Weibel instability and the connection with the electromagnetic beam plasma instability. Emphasis will be given to the coupling with longitudinal modes, leading to the formation of tilted filaments, and to the effects of the collisions and the merging of the Weibel instability with the resistive filamentation instability. In light of these results, the relevance of Weibel instability to ultra intense laser matter interactions (e.g. fast ignition) and to astrophysical scenarios (e.g. in gamma ray bursters and for cluster magnetic fields) will be discussed. Finally, the role of the Weibel instability in the formation of relativistic shocks and in particle acceleration in these structures will also be addressed.

  17. New Photocathode materials for electron-ion-colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Lukaszew, Rosa A.

    2015-02-25

    Our aim has been to explore new photocathode materials and schemes to develop strategies and technologies for next generation nuclear physics accelerator capabilities, particularly for Electron Ion Colliders (EIC). Thus, we investigated thin film deposition and ensuing properties for several adequate magnetic materials applicable to spin-polarized photocathodes. We also implemented a full experimental setup for light incidence at an acute angle onto the photocathode surface in order to excite surface Plasmon resonance hence increasing light absorption by a metallic surface. We successfully tested the setup with a thermionic cathode as well as Plasmonic silver-MgO samples and obtained very encouraging results. Our first results are very encouraging since the photocurrent measured on this preliminary plasmonic Ag-MgO sample under low power (~ 1mW) cw red light from a HeNe laser was 256 pA, thus two orders magnitude larger than that reported by others following also plasmonic approaches. We extended our studies to shorter wavelengths and we also started preliminary work on chemically ordered MnAl thin films –a component of the tertiary Ag-Mn-Al (silmanal) alloy in order to develop spin-polarized photocathodes capable of sustaining surface Plasmon resonance. It is worthwhile mentioning that a graduate student has been directly involved during this project ensuring the training of next generation of scientists in this area of research.

  18. Experimental Opportunities for Few Body Physics at an Electron Ion Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyde, Charles

    2016-03-01

    A high energy electron-ion collider (EIC) is proposed as the next major facility in the United States for studying the QCD structure of matter. I will discuss the following key few-body physics topics enabled by an EIC: 1. Spatial imaging of quarks and gluons in the nucleon via deep virtual exclusive reactions (DVES). Momentum imaging of quarks and gluons via Semi-Inclusive Deep Inelastic Scattering (SIDIS) in both the current and projectile fragmentation regimes. These experiments will span the kinematic range from large xBj where the nucleon can be fruitfully described as a few-body quark system, to low xBj, where the structure is dominated by the quark-gluon sea; 2. Spectator nucleon tagging of Deep Inelastic Scattering (DIS) in light nuclei and DVES with identification of the nuclear final state are probes of both neutron structure and the quark-gluon structure of nuclear binding; 3. Evaporation and projectile fragmentation in DIS on nuclei as a probe of the dynamic generation of mass of a fast quark or gluon as it propagates through the nuclear medium and evolves into a final state hadron. I will also discuss proposed detectors to implement this program. U.S. Dept of Energy.

  19. ELECTRON POLARIZATION IN THE MEDIUM-ENERGY ELECTRON-ION COLLIDER AT JLAB

    SciTech Connect

    Fanglei Lin, Yaroslav Derbenev, Vasiliy Morozov, Yuhong Zhang, Desmond Barber

    2012-07-01

    A key feature of the Medium-energy Electron-Ion Collider (MEIC) at Jefferson Lab is high polarization (over 80%) of the electron beam at all collision points for the particle physics program. The equilibrium electron polarization is arranged to be vertical in the arcs of the figure-8 collider ring of the MEIC and anti-parallel to the arc dipole magnetic fields, in order to take advantage of the preservation of polarization by the Sokolov-Ternov (S-T) effect. Longitudinal polarization is achieved at collision points by utilizing energy-independent universal spin rotators each of which consists of a set of solenoids and dipoles placed at the end of an arc. The equilibrium beam polarization and its lifetime depend on competition between the S-T effect and radiative depolarization. The latter must be suppressed by spin matching. This paper reports on investigations of polarization in the MEIC electron collider ring and a preliminary estimate of beam polarization from calculations using the code SLICK.

  20. Impact of high energy high intensity proton beams on targets: Case studies for Super Proton Synchrotron and Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahir, N. A.; Sancho, J. Blanco; Shutov, A.; Schmidt, R.; Piriz, A. R.

    2012-05-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is designed to collide two proton beams with unprecedented particle energy of 7 TeV. Each beam comprises 2808 bunches and the separation between two neighboring bunches is 25 ns. The energy stored in each beam is 362 MJ, sufficient to melt 500 kg copper. Safety of operation is very important when working with such powerful beams. An accidental release of even a very small fraction of the beam energy can result in severe damage to the equipment. The machine protection system is essential to handle all types of possible accidental hazards; however, it is important to know about possible consequences of failures. One of the critical failure scenarios is when the entire beam is lost at a single point. In this paper we present detailed numerical simulations of the full impact of one LHC beam on a cylindrical solid carbon target. First, the energy deposition by the protons is calculated with the FLUKA code and this energy deposition is used in the BIG2 code to study the corresponding thermodynamic and the hydrodynamic response of the target that leads to a reduction in the density. The modified density distribution is used in FLUKA to calculate new energy loss distribution and the two codes are thus run iteratively. A suitable iteration step is considered to be the time interval during which the target density along the axis decreases by 15%-20%. Our simulations suggest that the full LHC proton beam penetrates up to 25 m in solid carbon whereas the range of the shower from a single proton in solid carbon is just about 3 m (hydrodynamic tunneling effect). It is planned to perform experiments at the experimental facility HiRadMat (High Radiation Materials) at CERN using the proton beam from the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS), to compare experimental results with the theoretical predictions. Therefore simulations of the response of a solid copper cylindrical target hit by the SPS beam were performed. The particle energy in the SPS beam is 440

  1. 3D imaging of sea quarks and gluons at an electron-ion collider

    SciTech Connect

    Vadim Guzey

    2011-11-01

    We outline key objectives and capabilities of an Electron-Ion Collider (EIC) — a high-energy and high-luminosity electron-proton/nucleus collider with polarized electron and proton beams. One of goals of a future EIC is to map the 3D (in configuration and momentum spaces) structure of sea quarks and gluons in the nucleon and nuclei. We briefly present and discuss key observables and measurements pertaining to the program of 3D imaging at an EIC.

  2. Interaction region design for the electron-nucleon collider ENC at FAIR

    SciTech Connect

    Montag, C.; Jankowiak, A.; Lehrach, A.

    2010-05-23

    To facilitate studies of collisions between polarized electron and protons at {radical}s = 14 GeV; constructing an electron-nucleon collider at the FAIR facility has been proposed. This machine would collide the stored 15 GeV polarized proton beam in the HESR with a polarized 3.3 GeV electron beam circulating in an additional storage ring. We describe the interaction region design of this facility, which utilizes the PANDA detector.

  3. A study on dual readout crystal calorimeter for hadron and jet energy measurement at a future lepton collider

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, G.P.; /Fermilab

    2010-01-01

    Studies of requirements and specifications of crystals are necessary to develop a new generation of crystals for dual readout crystal hadron or total absorption calorimeter. This is a short and basic study of the characteristics and hadron energy measurement of PbWO4 and BGO crystals for scintillation and Cerenkov Dual Readout hadron calorimeter.

  4. Mass and Spin Measurement Techniques (for the Large Hadron Collider):. Lectures Given at TASI 2011, Boulder, Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lester, Christopher G.

    2013-12-01

    For TASI 2011, I was asked to give a series of lectures on "Mass and Spin Measurement Techniques" with relevance to the Large Hadron Collider. This document provides a written record of those lectures - or more precisely of what I said while giving the lectures - warts and all. It is provided as my contribution to the proceedings primarily for the benefit of those who heard the lectures first hand and may wish to refer back to them. What it is not is a scientific paper or a teaching resource. Though lecture slides may be prepared in advance, what is actually said in a lecture is usually extemporaneous, may be partial, can be influenced by audience reaction, and may not even make sense without a visual record of the concomitant gesticulations of the lecturer. More worryingly, some of the statements made may be down-right false, if the lecturer's tongue is in a twist. Accordingly, these proceedings are provided without warranty of any kind - not least in respect of accuracy or impartiality. The lectures were intended to engage the audience and get them thinking about a number of topics that they had not seen before. They were not expected to be the sort of sombre or well-balanced overview of the field that one might hope to achive in a review. These proceedings are provided to jog the memory of those who saw the lectures first hand, and for little other purpose. Footnotes, where they appear, indicate text/thoughts I have added during the editing process that were not voiced during the lectures themselves. Copies of the lecture slides are inserted at approximately the locations they would have become visible in the lectures.

  5. Mono-jet, -photon and - Z signals of a supersymmetric ( B - L) model at the Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdallah, W.; Fiaschi, J.; Khalil, S.; Moretti, S.

    2016-02-01

    Search for invisible final states produced at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) by new physics scenarios are normally carried out resorting to a variety of probes emerging from the initial state, in the form of single-jet, -photon and - Z boson signatures. These are particularly effective for models of Supersymmetry (SUSY) in presence of R-parity conservation, owing to the presence in their spectra of a stable neutralino as a Dark Matter (DM) candidate. We assume here as theoretical framework the Supersymmetric version of the ( B - L) extension of the Standard Model (BLSSM), wherein a mediator for invisible decays can be the Z ' boson present in this scenario. The peculiarity of the signal is thus that the final state objects carry a very large (transverse) missing energy, since the Z ' is naturally massive and constrained by direct searches and Electro-Weak Precision Tests (EWPTs) to be at least in the TeV scale region. Under these circumstances the efficiency in accessing the invisible final state and rejecting the Standard Model (SM) background is very high. This somehow compensates the rather meagre production rates. Another special feature of this invisible BLSSM signal is its composition, which is often dominated by sneutrino decays (alongside the more traditional neutrino and neutralino modes). Sensitivity of the CERN machine to these two features can therefore help disentangling the BLSSM from more popular SUSY models. We assess in this analysis the scope of the LHC in establishing the aforementioned invisible signals through a sophisticated signal-to-background simulation carried out in presence of parton shower, hadronisation as well as detector effects. We find that significant sensitivity exists already after 300 fb-1 during Run 2. We find that mono-jet events can be readily accessible at the LHC, so as to enable one to claim a prompt discovery, while mono-photon and - Z signals can be used as diagnostic tools of the underlying scenario.

  6. eRHIC, the BNL design for a future Electron-Ion Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roser, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    With the addition of a 20 GeV polarized electron accelerator to the existing Brookhaven Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), the world's only high energy heavy ion and polarized proton collider, a future eRHIC facility will be able to produce polarized electron-nucleon collisions at center-of-mass energies of up to 145 GeV and cover the whole science case as outlined in the Electron-Ion Collider White Paper and endorsed by the 2015 Nuclear Physics Long Range Plan with high luminosity. The presentation will describe the eRHIC design concepts and recent efforts to reduce the technical risks of the project.

  7. Detectors for Linear Colliders: Calorimetry at a Future Electron-Positron Collider (3/4)

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Calorimetry will play a central role in determining the physics reach at a future e+e- collider. The requirements for calorimetry place the emphasis on achieving an excellent jet energy resolution. The currently favoured option for calorimetry at a future e+e- collider is the concept of high granularity particle flow calorimetry. Here granularity and a high pattern recognition capability is more important than the single particle calorimetric response. In this lecture I will describe the recent progress in understanding the reach of high granularity particle flow calorimetry and the related R&D; efforts which concentrate on test beam demonstrations of the technological options for highly granular calorimeters. I will also discuss alternatives to particle flow, for example the technique of dual readout calorimetry.

  8. Detectors for Linear Colliders: Calorimetry at a Future Electron-Positron Collider (3/4)

    SciTech Connect

    2010-02-17

    Calorimetry will play a central role in determining the physics reach at a future e+e- collider. The requirements for calorimetry place the emphasis on achieving an excellent jet energy resolution. The currently favoured option for calorimetry at a future e+e- collider is the concept of high granularity particle flow calorimetry. Here granularity and a high pattern recognition capability is more important than the single particle calorimetric response. In this lecture I will describe the recent progress in understanding the reach of high granularity particle flow calorimetry and the related R&D; efforts which concentrate on test beam demonstrations of the technological options for highly granular calorimeters. I will also discuss alternatives to particle flow, for example the technique of dual readout calorimetry.

  9. Design of Electron and Ion Crabbing Cavities for an Electron-Ion Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Alejandro Castilla Loeza, Geoffrey Krafft, Jean Delayen

    2012-07-01

    Beyond the 12 GeV upgrade at the Jefferson Lab a Medium Energy Electron-Ion Collider (MEIC) has been considered. In order to achieve the desired high luminosities at the Interaction Points (IP), the use of crabbing cavities is under study. In this work, we will present to-date designs of superconducting cavities, considered for crabbing both ion and electron bunches. A discussion of properties such as peak surface fields and higher-order mode separation will be presented. Keywords: super conducting, deflecting cavity, crab cavity.

  10. Design of High Luminosity Ring-Ring Electron- Light Ion Collider at CEBAF

    SciTech Connect

    Slawomir Bogacz; Antje Bruell; Jean Delayen; Yaroslav Derbenev; Rolf Ent; Joseph Grames; Andrew Hutton; Geoffrey Krafft; Rui Li; Nikolitsa Merminga; Benard Poelker; Bogdan Wojtsekhowski; Byung Yunn; Yuhong Zhang; C Montag

    2007-06-25

    Experimental studies of fundamental structure of nucleons require an electron-ion collider of a center-of-mass energy up to 90 GeV at luminosity up to 1035 cm-2s-1 with both beams polarized. A CEBAF-based collider of 9 GeV electrons/positrons and 225 GeV ions is envisioned to meet this science need and as a next step for CEBAF after the planned 12 GeV energy upgrade of the fixed target program. A ring-ring scheme of this collider developed recently takes advantage of the existing polarized electron CW beam from the CEBAF and a green-field design of an ion complex with electron cooling. We present a conceptual design and report design studies of this high-luminosity collider.

  11. Production of high intensity electron bunches for the SLAC Linear Collider

    SciTech Connect

    James, M.B.

    1987-08-01

    This thesis describes the design and performance of a high intensity electron injecfor for the SLAC Linear Collider. Motivation for the collider and the specifications for the injector are discussed. An analytic theory of the bunching and capture of electrons by rf fields is discussed in the limit of low space charge and small signal. The design and performance of SLAC's main injector are described to illustrate a successful application of this theory. The bunching and capture of electrons by rf fields are then discussed in the limit of high space charge and large signal, and a description of the design of the collider injector follows. In the limit of high space charge forces and large rf signals, the beam dynamics are considerably more complex and numerical simulations are required to predict particle motion. A computer code which models the longitudinal dynamics of electrons in the presence of space charge and rf fields is described. The results of the simulations, the resulting collider injector design and the various components which make up the collider injector are described. These include the gun, subharmonic bunchers, traveling-wave buncher and velocity-of-light accelerator section. Finally, the performance of the injector is described including the beam intensity, bunch length, transverse emittance and energy spectrum. While the final operating conditions differ somewaht from the design, the performance of the collider injector is in good agreement with the numerical simulations and meets all of the collider specifications. 28 refs.

  12. Probing short-range nucleon-nucleon interactions with an electron-ion collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Gerald A.; Sievert, Matthew D.; Venugopalan, Raju

    2016-04-01

    We derive the cross section for exclusive vector meson production in high-energy deeply inelastic scattering off a deuteron target that disintegrates into a proton and a neutron carrying large relative momentum in the final state. This cross section can be expressed in terms of a novel gluon transition generalized parton distribution (T-GPD); the hard scale in the final state makes the T-GPD sensitive to the short-distance nucleon-nucleon interaction. We perform a toy model computation of this process in a perturbative framework and discuss the time scales that allow the separation of initial- and final-state dynamics in the T-GPD. We outline the more general computation based on the factorization suggested by the toy computation: In particular, we discuss the relative role of "pointlike" and "geometric" Fock configurations that control the parton dynamics of short-range nucleon-nucleon scattering. With the aid of exclusive J /ψ production data at the Hadron-Electron Ring Accelerator at DESY, as well as elastic nucleon-nucleon cross sections, we estimate rates for exclusive deuteron photodisintegration at a future Electron-Ion Collider (EIC). Our results, obtained using conservative estimates of EIC integrated luminosities, suggest that center-of-mass energies sNN˜12 GeV2 of the neutron-proton subsystem can be accessed. We argue that the high energies of the EIC can address outstanding dynamical questions regarding the short-range quark-gluon structure of nuclear forces by providing clean gluon probes of such "knockout" exclusive reactions in light and heavy nuclei.

  13. Alternate approaches to future electron-positron linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Loew, G.A.

    1998-07-01

    The purpose of this article is two-fold: to review the current international status of various design approaches to the next generation of e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} linear colliders, and on the occasion of his 80th birthday, to celebrate Richard B. Neal`s many contributions to the field of linear accelerators. As it turns out, combining these two tasks is a rather natural enterprise because of Neal`s long professional involvement and insight into many of the problems and options which the international e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} linear collider community is currently studying to achieve a practical design for a future machine.

  14. Top Quark Pair Production in Association with a Jet with Next-to-Leading-Order QCD Off-Shell Effects at the Large Hadron Collider.

    PubMed

    Bevilacqua, G; Hartanto, H B; Kraus, M; Worek, M

    2016-02-01

    We present a complete description of top quark pair production in association with a jet in the dilepton channel. Our calculation is accurate to next-to-leading order (NLO) in QCD and includes all nonresonant diagrams, interferences, and off-shell effects of the top quark. Moreover, nonresonant and off-shell effects due to the finite W gauge boson width are taken into account. This calculation constitutes the first fully realistic NLO computation for top quark pair production with a final state jet in hadronic collisions. Numerical results for differential distributions as well as total cross sections are presented for the Large Hadron Collider at 8 TeV. With our inclusive cuts, NLO predictions reduce the unphysical scale dependence by more than a factor of 3 and lower the total rate by about 13% compared to leading-order QCD predictions. In addition, the size of the top quark off-shell effects is estimated to be below 2%.

  15. Strong and Electroweak Corrections to the Production of a Higgs Boson+2 Jets via Weak Interactions at the Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Ciccolini, M.; Denner, A.; Dittmaier, S.

    2007-10-19

    Radiative corrections of strong and electroweak interactions are presented at next-to-leading order for the production of a Higgs boson plus two hard jets via weak interactions at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. The calculation includes all weak-boson fusion and quark-antiquark annihilation diagrams as well as the corresponding interferences. The electroweak corrections, which are discussed here for the first time, reduce the cross sections by 5% and thus are of the same order of magnitude as the QCD corrections.

  16. Shadowing effects on J /ψ and Υ production at energies available at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, R.

    2015-09-01

    Background: Proton-nucleus collisions have been used as a intermediate baseline for the determination of cold-medium effects. They lie between proton-proton collisions in vacuum and nucleus-nucleus collisions which are expected to be dominated by hot-matter effects. Modifications of the quark densities in nuclei relative to those of the proton are well established, although those of the gluons in the nucleus are not well understood. The effect of these modifications on quarkonium production are studied in proton-lead collisions at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at a center-of-mass energy of 5.02 TeV. Purpose: The possibility of whether the LHC proton-lead data can be described by nuclear modifications of the parton densities, referred to as shadowing, alone is examined. The results are compared to the nuclear modification factor and to the forward-backward ratio, as a function of both transverse momentum, pT, and rapidity, y . Methods: The color evaporation model of quarkonium production is employed at next-to-leading order (NLO) in the total cross section and leading order in the transverse momentum dependence. The EPS09 NLO modifications are used as a standard of comparison. The effect of the proton parton density and the choice of shadowing parametrization on the pT and rapidity dependence of the result is studied. The consistency of the shadowing calculations at LO and NLO are checked. The size of the mass and scale uncertainties relative to the uncertainty on the shadowing parametrization is also investigated. Finally, whether the expected cold-matter effect in nucleus-nucleus collisions can be modeled as the product of proton-nucleus results at forward and backward rapidity is studied. Results: The rapidity and pT dependence of the nuclear modification factor is found to be generally consistent with the NLO calculations in the color evaporation model. The forward-backward ratio is more difficult to describe with shadowing alone. The LO and NLO

  17. Depolarization due to beam-beam interaction in electron-positron linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Yokoya, Kaoru; Chen, Pisin

    1988-09-01

    We investigate two major mechanisms which induce depolarization of electron beams during beam-beam interaction in linear colliders. These are the classical spin precession under the collective field of the oncoming beam, and the spin-flip effect from beamstrahlung. Analytic formulas are derived for estimating these depolarization effects. As examples, we estimate the depolarization in the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) and a possible future TeV linear collider (TLC). The effects are found to be negligibly small for SLC and not very large for TLC. 7 refs., 1 fig.

  18. Theories of statistical equilibrium in electron-positron colliding-beam storage rings

    SciTech Connect

    Schonfeld, J.F.

    1985-01-01

    In this lecture I introduce you to some recent theoretical work that represents a significant and long overdue departure from the mainstream of ideas on the physics of colliding- beam storage rings. The goal of the work in question is to understand analytically - without recourse to computer simulation - the role that dissipation and noise play in the observed colliding-beam behavior of electron-positron storage rings.

  19. Single and double production of the Higgs boson at hadron and lepton colliders in minimal composite Higgs models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanemura, Shinya; Kaneta, Kunio; Machida, Naoki; Odori, Shinya; Shindou, Tetsuo

    2016-07-01

    In the composite Higgs models, originally proposed by Georgi and Kaplan, the Higgs boson is a pseudo Nambu-Goldstone boson (pNGB) of spontaneous breaking of a global symmetry. In the minimal version of such models, global SO(5) symmetry is spontaneously broken to SO(4), and the pNGBs form an isospin doublet field, which corresponds to the Higgs doublet in the Standard Model (SM). Predicted coupling constants of the Higgs boson can in general deviate from the SM predictions, depending on the compositeness parameter. The deviation pattern is determined also by the detail of the matter sector. We comprehensively study how the model can be tested via measuring single and double production processes of the Higgs boson at the LHC and future electron-positron colliders. The possibility to distinguish the matter sector among the minimal composite Higgs models is also discussed. In addition, we point out differences in the cross section of double Higgs boson production from the prediction in other new physics models.

  20. World lays groundwork for future linear collider

    SciTech Connect

    Feder, Toni

    2010-07-15

    With the Large Hadron Collider at CERN finally working, the particle-physics community can now afford to divide its attention between achieving LHC results and preparing for the next machine on its wish list, an electron-positron linear collider. The preparations involve developing and deciding on the technology for such a machine, the mode of its governance, and how to balance regional and global particle- and accelerator-physics programs.

  1. Electron/muon specific two Higgs doublet model at e+e- colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansen, Aria R.; Sher, Marc

    2015-03-01

    Recently, Kajiyama, Okada and Yagyu proposed an electron/muon specific two Higgs doublet model. In this model, an S3 symmetry suppresses flavor-changing neutral currents instead of a Z2 symmetry. In the "Type I" version of the model, the heavy Higgs bosons have a greatly enhanced coupling to electrons and muons. Kajiyama, Okada and Yagyu studied the phenomenology of the heavy Higgs bosons at the LHC. In this paper, the phenomenology at electron-positron colliders is studied. For the heavy Higgs mass range between 150 and 210 GeV, bounds from Large Electron Positron (LEP-200) Collider are stronger than those from the LHC. The model allows for the interesting possibility that muon pair production at the International Linear Collider can be mediated by s-channel Higgs exchange. This requires an energy scan. The scanning rate and necessary resolution are discussed.

  2. Probing triple-Higgs productions via 4b2γ decay channel at a 100 TeV hadron collider

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chen, Chien-Yi; Yan, Qi-Shu; Zhao, Xiaoran; Zhao, Zhijie; Zhong, Yi-Ming

    2016-01-11

    We report that the quartic self-coupling of the Standard Model Higgs boson can only be measured by observing the triple-Higgs production process, but it is challenging for the LHC Run 2 or International Linear Collider (ILC) at a few TeV because of its extremely small production rate. In this paper, we present a detailed Monte Carlo simulation study of the triple-Higgs production through gluon fusion at a 100 TeV hadron collider and explore the feasibility of observing this production mode. We focus on the decay channel HHH →more » $$b\\bar{b}$$$$b\\bar{b}$$γγ, investigating detector effects and optimizing the kinematic cuts to discriminate the signal from the backgrounds. Our study shows that, in order to observe the Standard Model triple-Higgs signal, the integrated luminosity of a 100 TeV hadron collider should be greater than 1.8×104 ab₋1. We also explore the dependence of the cross section upon the trilinear (λ3) and quartic (λ4) self-couplings of the Higgs. Ultimately, we find that, through a search in the triple-Higgs production, the parameters λ3 and λ4 can be restricted to the ranges [₋1,5] and [₋20,30], respectively. We also examine how new physics can change the production rate of triple-Higgs events. For example, in the singlet extension of the Standard Model, we find that the triple-Higgs production rate can be increased by a factor of O(10).« less

  3. Measurement of very forward neutron energy spectra for 7 TeV proton-proton collisions at the Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adriani, O.; Berti, E.; Bonechi, L.; Bongi, M.; Castellini, G.; D'Alessandro, R.; Del Prete, M.; Haguenauer, M.; Itow, Y.; Kasahara, K.; Kawade, K.; Makino, Y.; Masuda, K.; Matsubayashi, E.; Menjo, H.; Mitsuka, G.; Muraki, Y.; Okuno, Y.; Papini, P.; Perrot, A.-L.; Ricciarini, S.; Sako, T.; Sakurai, N.; Sugiura, Y.; Suzuki, T.; Tamura, T.; Tiberio, A.; Torii, S.; Tricomi, A.; Turner, W. C.; Zhou, Q. D.

    2015-11-01

    The Large Hadron Collider forward (LHCf) experiment is designed to use the LHC to verify the hadronic-interaction models used in cosmic-ray physics. Forward baryon production is one of the crucial points to understand the development of cosmic-ray showers. We report the neutron-energy spectra for LHC √{ s} = 7 TeV proton-proton collisions with the pseudo-rapidity η ranging from 8.81 to 8.99, from 8.99 to 9.22, and from 10.76 to infinity. The measured energy spectra obtained from the two independent calorimeters of Arm1 and Arm2 show the same characteristic feature before unfolding the detector responses. We unfolded the measured spectra by using the multidimensional unfolding method based on Bayesian theory, and the unfolded spectra were compared with current hadronic-interaction models. The QGSJET II-03 model predicts a high neutron production rate at the highest pseudo-rapidity range similar to our results, and the DPMJET 3.04 model describes our results well at the lower pseudo-rapidity ranges. However, no model perfectly explains the experimental results over the entire pseudo-rapidity range. The experimental data indicate a more abundant neutron production rate relative to the photon production than any model predictions studied here.

  4. Leading-order hadronic contributions to the electron and tau anomalous magnetic moments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burger, Florian; Jansen, Karl; Petschlies, Marcus; Pientka, Grit

    2016-08-01

    The leading hadronic contributions to the anomalous magnetic moments of the electron and the τ -lepton are determined by a four-flavour lattice QCD computation with twisted mass fermions. The results presented are based on the quark-connected contribution to the hadronic vacuum polarisation function. The continuum limit is taken and systematic uncertainties are quantified. Full agreement with results obtained by phenomenological analyses is found.

  5. RF System Requirements for a Medium-Energy Electron-Ion Collider (MEIC) at JLab

    SciTech Connect

    Rimmer, Robert A; Hannon, Fay E; Guo, Jiquan; Huang, Shichun; Huang, Yulu; Wang, Haipeng; Wang, S

    2015-09-01

    JLab is studying options for a medium energy electron-ion collider that could fit on the JLab site and use CEBAF as a full-energy electron injector. A new ion source, linac and booster would be required, together with collider storage rings for the ions and electrons. In order to achieve the maximum luminosity these will be high-current storage rings with many bunches. We present the high-level RF system requirements for the storage rings, ion booster ring and high-energy ion beam cooling system, and describe the technology options under consideration to meet them. We also present options for staging that might reduce the initial capital cost while providing a smooth upgrade path to a higher final energy. The technologies under consideration may also be useful for other proposed storage ring colliders or ultimate light sources.

  6. Measurement of the Inclusive $Z \\to ee$ Production Cross Section in Proton-Proton Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7TeV and $Z \\to ee$ Decays as Standard Candles for Luminosity at the Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Werner, Jeremy

    2011-01-01

    This thesis comprises a precision measurement of the inclusive \\Zee production cross section in proton-proton collisions provided by the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at a center-of-mass energy of $\\sqrt{s}=7$~TeV and the absolute luminosity based on \\Zee decays. The data was collected by the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) detector near Geneva, Switzerland during the year of 2010 and corresponds to an integrated luminosity of $\\int\\mathcal{L}dt = 35.9\\pm 1.4$~pb$^{-1}$. Electronic decays of $Z$ bosons allow one of the first electroweak measurements at the LHC, making the cross section measurement a benchmark of physics performance after the first year of CMS detector and LHC machine operations. It is the first systematic uncertainty limited \\Zee cross section measurement performed at $\\sqrt{s}=7$~TeV. The measured cross section pertaining to the invariant mass window $M_{ee}\\in (60,120)$~GeV is reported as: $\\sigma(pp\\to Z+X) \\times \\mathcal{B}( Z\\to ee ) = 997 \\pm 11 \\mathrm{(sta t)} \\pm 19 \\mathrm{(syst)} \\pm 40 \\mathrm{(lumi)} \\textrm{ pb}$, which agrees with the theoretical prediction calculated to NNLO in QCD. Leveraging \\Zee decays as ``standard candles'' for measuring the absolute luminosity at the LHC is examined; they are produced copiously, are well understood, and have clean detector signatures. Thus the consistency of the inclusive \\Zee production cross section measurement with the theoretical prediction motivates inverting the measurement to instead use the \\Zee signal yield to measure the luminosity. The result, which agrees with the primary relative CMS luminosity measurement calibrated using Van der Meer separation scans, is not only the most precise absolute luminosity measurement performed to date at a hadron collider, but also the first one based on a physics signal at the LHC.

  7. Thermalization, evolution, and observables at energies available at the CERN Large Hadron Collider in an integrated hydrokinetic model of A +A collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naboka, V. Yu.; Karpenko, Iu. A.; Sinyukov, Yu. M.

    2016-02-01

    A further development of the evolutionary picture of A +A collisions, which we call the integrated hydrokinetic model (iHKM), is proposed. The model comprises a generator of the initial state GLISSANDO, prethermal dynamics of A +A collisions leading to thermalization, subsequent relativistic viscous hydrodynamic expansion of quark-gluon and hadron medium (vHLLE), its particlization, and finally the hadronic cascade ultrarelativistic QMD. We calculate midrapidity charged-particle multiplicities, pion, kaon, and antiproton spectra, charged-particle elliptic flows, and pion interferometry radii for Pb + Pb collisions at the energies available at the CERN Large Hadron Collider, √{s }=2.76 TeV, at different centralities. We find that the best description of the experimental data is reached when the initial states are attributed to the very small initial time 0.1 fm/c , the prethermal stage (thermalization process) lasts at least until 1 fm/c , and the shear viscosity at the hydrodynamic stage of the matter evolution has its minimal value, η /s =1/4 π . At the same time it is observed that the various momentum anisotropies of the initial states, different initial and relaxation times, as well as even a treatment of the prethermal stage within just viscous or ideal hydrodynamic approach, lead sometimes to worse but nevertheless similar results if the normalization of maximal initial energy density in most central events is adjusted to reproduce the final hadron multiplicity in each scenario. This can explain a good enough data description in numerous variants of hybrid models without a prethermal stage when the initial energy densities are defined up to a common factor.

  8. Confronting fragmentation function universality with single hadron inclusive production at HERA and e{sup +}e{sup -} colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Albino, S.; Kniehl, B. A.; Kramer, G.; Sandoval, C.

    2007-02-01

    Predictions for light charged hadron production data in the current fragmentation region of deeply inelastic scattering from the H1 and ZEUS experiments are calculated using perturbative quantum chromodynamics at next-to-leading order, and using fragmentation functions obtained by fitting to similar data from e{sup +}e{sup -} reactions. General good agreement is found when the magnitude Q{sup 2} of the hard photon's virtuality is sufficiently large. The discrepancy at low Q and small scaled momentum x{sub p} is reduced by incorporating mass effects of the detected hadron. By performing quark tagging, the contributions to the overall fragmentation from the various quark flavours in the ep reactions are studied and compared to the contributions in e{sup +}e{sup -} reactions. The yields of the various hadron species are also calculated.

  9. Entropy production in chemically nonequilibrium quark-gluon plasma created in central Pb +Pb collisions at energies available at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vovchenko, V.; Gorenstein, M. I.; Satarov, L. M.; Mishustin, I. N.; Csernai, L. P.; Kisel, I.; Stöcker, H.

    2016-01-01

    We study the possibility that partonic matter produced at an early stage of ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions is out of chemical equilibrium. It is assumed that initially this matter is mostly composed of gluons, but quarks and antiquarks are produced at later times. The dynamical evolution of partonic system is described by the Bjorken-like ideal hydrodynamics with a time-dependent quark fugacity. The results of this model are compared with those obtained by assuming the complete chemical equilibrium of partons already at the initial stage. It is shown that in a chemically nonequilibrium scenario the entropy gradually increases, and about 25% of the total final entropy is generated during the hydrodynamic evolution of deconfined matter. We argue that the (anti)quark suppression included in this approach may be responsible for reduced (anti)baryon-to-meson ratios observed in heavy-ion collisions at energies available at the CERN Large Hadron Collider.

  10. Using single top rapidity to measure V{sub td}, V{sub ts}, V{sub tb} at hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Onofre, A.

    2011-04-01

    Single top production processes are usually regarded as the ones in which V{sub tb} can be directly measured at hadron colliders. We show that the analysis of the single top rapidity distribution in t-channel and tW production can also set direct limits on V{sub td}. At LHC with 10 fb{sup -1} at 14 TeV, the combined limits on V{sub td} may be reduced by almost a factor of 2 when the top rapidity distribution is used. This also implies that the limits on V{sub tb} can also be reduced by 15%, since both parameters, as well as V{sub ts}, must be simultaneously obtained from a global fit to data. At Tevatron, the exploitation of this distribution would require very high statistics.

  11. Results of a higgs boson searches in the ATLAS and CMS experiments at the large hadron collider at energies 7 and 8 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artamonov, A. A.; Epshteyn, V. S.; Gavrilov, V. B.; Gavrilyuk, A. A.; Gorbounov, P. A.; Jokin, A. S.; Lychkovskaya, N. V.; Popov, V. P.; Safronov, G. B.; Shamanov, V. V.; Shatalov, P. B.; Spiridonov, A. A.; Tsukerman, I. I.

    2016-05-01

    Recent achievements of the ATLAS and CMS experiments at the Large Hadron Collider searching for a Higgs boson are summarized. A new particle with the mass of 125 GeV and properties expected for the Standard Model Higgs boson was discovered three years ago in these experiments in proton-proton collisions when analyzing part of the data taken at the centre-of-mass energies 7 TeV and 8 TeV in 2011 and 2012 year exposures. Today all the data are processed and fully analyzed. Experimental results of studies of individual Higgs boson decay channels as well as their combination to extract such properties as mass, signal strength, coupling constants, spin and parity are reviewed. All experimental results are found to be compatible with the Standard Model predictions.

  12. On theoretical uncertainty of color dipole phenomenology in the J/\\psi and ϒ photoproduction in pA and AA collisions at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sampaio dos Santos, G.; Machado, M. V. T.

    2015-10-01

    We investigate the theoretical uncertainty of the predictions for the photoproduction of J/\\psi and ϒ states in proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) within the color dipole formalism. Predictions for the rapidity distributions are presented and the dependence on the meson wavefunction, heavy quark mass as well as the models for the dipole cross section are analyzed. We compare the theoretical results directly with recent data from the ALICE Collaboration on J/\\psi production in pPb collisions at a centre-of-mass energy per nucleon pair of 5.02 TeV and in PbPb collisions at a centre-of-mass energy per nucleon pair of 2.76 TeV. Predictions are also performed for ϒ state in PbPb and pPb collisions at LHC energies, including the coherent and incoherent contributions.

  13. Next-to-leading order QCD predictions for A{sup 0}{gamma} associated production at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Dai Liang; Shao Dingyu; Gao Jun; Zhang Hao; Li Chongsheng

    2011-03-01

    We calculate the complete next-to-leading order (NLO) QCD corrections (including SUSY QCD corrections) to the inclusive total cross sections of the associated production processes pp{yields}A{sup 0}{gamma}+X in the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM) at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Our results show that the enhancement of the total cross sections from the NLO QCD corrections can reach 25%{approx}15% for 200 GeV

  14. Next-to-leading order QCD corrections to the single top quark production via model-independent tqg flavor-changing neutral-current couplings at hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Gao Jun; Li Chongsheng; Zhang Jiajun; Zhu Huaxing

    2009-12-01

    We present the calculations of the complete next-to-leading order (NLO) QCD effects on the single top productions induced by model-independent tqg flavor-changing neutral-current couplings at hadron colliders. Our results show that, for the tcg coupling, the NLO QCD corrections can enhance the total cross sections by about 60% and 30%, and for the tug coupling by about 50% and 20% at the Tevatron and LHC, respectively, which means that the NLO corrections can increase the experimental sensitivity to the flavor-changing neutral-current couplings by about 10%-30%. Moreover, the NLO corrections reduce the dependence of the total cross sections on the renormalization or factorization scale significantly, which lead to increased confidence on the theoretical predictions. Besides, we also evaluate the NLO corrections to several important kinematic distributions, and find that for most of them the NLO corrections are almost the same and do not change the shape of the distributions.

  15. Next-to-leading order QCD effects in associated charged Higgs and W boson production in the MSSM at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Gao Jun; Li Chongsheng; Li Zhao

    2008-01-01

    We present the calculations of the next-to-leading order (NLO) QCD corrections to the inclusive total cross sections for the associated production of the W{sup {+-}}H{sup {+-}} through bb annihilation in the minimal supersymmetric standard model at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. The NLO QCD corrections can either enhance or reduce the total cross sections, but they generally efficiently reduce the dependence of the total cross sections on the renormalization/factorization scale. The magnitude of the NLO QCD corrections is about 10% in most of the parameter space and can reach 15% in some parameter regions. We also show the Monte Carlo simulation results for the 2j+{tau}{sub jet}+pe{sub T} signature from the W{sup {+-}} and the H{sup {+-}} decays including the NLO QCD effects, and find an observable signal at a 5{sigma} level in some parameter region of the minimal supergravity model.

  16. First measurement and correction of nonlinear errors in the experimental insertions of the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maclean, E. H.; Tomás, R.; Giovannozzi, M.; Persson, T. H. B.

    2015-12-01

    Nonlinear magnetic errors in low-β insertions can contribute significantly to detuning with amplitude, linear and nonlinear chromaticity, and lead to degradation of dynamic aperture and beam lifetime. As such, the correction of nonlinear errors in the experimental insertions of colliders can be of critical significance for successful operation. This is expected to be of particular relevance to the LHC's second run and its high luminosity upgrade, as well as to future colliders such as the Future Circular Collider. Current correction strategies envisioned for these colliders assume it will be possible to calculate optimized local corrections through the insertions, using a magnetic model of the errors. This paper shows however, that reliance purely upon magnetic measurements of the nonlinear errors of insertion elements is insufficient to guarantee a good correction quality in the relevant low-β* regime. It is possible to perform beam-based examination of nonlinear magnetic errors via the feed-down to readily observed beam properties upon application of closed orbit bumps, and methods based upon feed-down to tune have been utilized at RHIC, SIS18, and SPS. This paper demonstrates the extension of such methodology to include direct observation of feed-down to linear coupling in the LHC. It is further shown that such beam-based studies can be used to complement magnetic measurements performed during LHC construction, in order to validate and refine the magnetic model of the collider. Results from first attempts of the measurement and correction of nonlinear errors in the LHC experimental insertions are presented. Several discrepancies of beam-based studies with respect to the LHC magnetic model are reported.

  17. Top Quark Pair Production in Association with a Jet with Next-to-Leading-Order QCD Off-Shell Effects at the Large Hadron Collider.

    PubMed

    Bevilacqua, G; Hartanto, H B; Kraus, M; Worek, M

    2016-02-01

    We present a complete description of top quark pair production in association with a jet in the dilepton channel. Our calculation is accurate to next-to-leading order (NLO) in QCD and includes all nonresonant diagrams, interferences, and off-shell effects of the top quark. Moreover, nonresonant and off-shell effects due to the finite W gauge boson width are taken into account. This calculation constitutes the first fully realistic NLO computation for top quark pair production with a final state jet in hadronic collisions. Numerical results for differential distributions as well as total cross sections are presented for the Large Hadron Collider at 8 TeV. With our inclusive cuts, NLO predictions reduce the unphysical scale dependence by more than a factor of 3 and lower the total rate by about 13% compared to leading-order QCD predictions. In addition, the size of the top quark off-shell effects is estimated to be below 2%. PMID:26894704

  18. Proton enhancement at large pT at the CERN large hadron collider without structure in associated-particle distribution.

    PubMed

    Hwa, Rudolph C; Yang, C B

    2006-07-28

    The production of pions and protons in the pT range between 10 and 20 GeV/c for Pb+Pb collisions at CERN LHC is studied in the recombination model. It is shown that the dominant mechanism for hadronization is the recombination of shower partons from neighboring jets when the jet density is high. Protons are more copiously produced than pions in that pT range because the coalescing partons can have lower momentum fractions, but no thermal partons are involved. The proton-to-pion ratio can be as high as 20. When such high pT hadrons are used as trigger particles, there will not be any associated particles that are not in the background.

  19. Supersymmetric QCD one-loop effects in (un)polarized top-pair production at hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Berge, Stefan; Hollik, Wolfgang; Mosle, Wolf M.; Wackeroth, Doreen

    2007-08-01

    We study the effects of O({alpha}{sub s}) supersymmetric QCD (SQCD) corrections on the total production rate and kinematic distributions of polarized and unpolarized top-pair production in pp and pp collisions. At the Fermilab Tevatron pp collider, top-quark pairs are mainly produced via quark-antiquark annihilation, qq{yields}tt, while at the CERN LHC pp collider gluon-gluon scattering, gg{yields}tt, dominates. We compute the complete set of O({alpha}{sub s}) SQCD corrections to both production channels and study their dependence on the parameters of the minimal supersymmetric standard model. In particular, we discuss the prospects for observing strong, loop-induced SUSY effects in top-pair production at the Tevatron run II and the LHC.

  20. LEIC - A Polarized Low Energy Electron-ion Collider at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Derbenev, Yaroslav S.; Hutton, Andrew M.; Krafft, Geoffrey A.; Li, Rui; Lin, Fanglei; Morozov, Vasiliy; Nissen, Edward W.; Yunn, Byung C.; Zhang, He; Sullivan, Michael K.; Zhang, Yuhong

    2013-06-01

    A polarized electron-ion collider is envisioned as the future nuclear science program at JLab beyond the 12 GeV CEBAF. Presently, a medium energy collider (MEIC) is set as an immediate goal with options for a future energy upgrade. A comprehensive design report for MEIC has been released recently. The MEIC facility could also accommodate electron and proton/ion collisions in a low CM energy range, covering proton energies from 10 to 25 GeV and ion energies with a similar magnetic rigidity, for additional science reach. In this paper, we present a conceptual design of this low energy collider, LEIC, showing its luminosity can reach above 10{sup 33} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. The design specifies that the large booster of the MEIC is converted to a low energy ion collider ring with an interaction region and an electron cooler integrated into it. The design provides options for either sharing the detector with the MEIC or a dedicated low energy detector in a third collision point, with advantages of either a minimum cost or extra detection parallel to the MEIC operation, respectively. The LEIC could be positioned as the first and low cost phase of a multi-stage approach to realize the full MEIC.

  1. Klystron switching power supplies for the Internation Linear Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Fraioli, Andrea; /Cassino U. /INFN, Pisa

    2009-12-01

    The International Linear Collider is a majestic High Energy Physics particle accelerator that will give physicists a new cosmic doorway to explore energy regimes beyond the reach of today's accelerators. ILC will complement the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), a proton-proton collider at the European Center for Nuclear Research (CERN) in Geneva, Switzerland, by producing electron-positron collisions at center of mass energy of about 500 GeV. In particular, the subject of this dissertation is the R&D for a solid state Marx Modulator and relative switching power supply for the International Linear Collider Main LINAC Radio Frequency stations.

  2. Preservation and control of the proton and deuteron polarizations in the proposed electron-ion collider at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Kondratenko, Anatoliy; Derbenev, Yaroslav S.; Filatov, Yury; Lin, Fanglei; Morozov, Vasiliy; Kondratenko, M. A.; Zhang, Yuhong

    2014-01-01

    We propose a scheme of preserving the proton and deuteron beam polarizations during acceleration and storage in the proposed electron-ion collider at Jefferson Lab. This scheme allows one to provide both the longitudinal and transverse polarization orientations of the proton and deuteron beams at the interaction points of the figure-8 ion collider ring. We discuss questions of matching the polarization direction at all stages of the beam transport including the pre-booster, large booster and ion collider ring.

  3. QCD Processes and Hadron Production in High Energy ELECTRON(+) - Annihilation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burrows, Philip Nicholas

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. A study is presented of general features of the reaction e^+e^- to hadrons. The data are interpreted in terms of current models of the underlying QCD and hadronisation processes. These models are outlined in detail and their predictions are compared with most of the available experimental data collected between 12.0 and 46.8 GeV mean centre of mass energies. The model arbitrary parameters were optimised to give a generally good description of the global properties of the large hadronic event sample accumulated by the TASSO detector at 35 GeV: The Lund O(alpha_sp {s}{2}) model describes properties in the event plane very well, but is deficient in the properties transverse to this plane. The Webber LLA model gives a good description of the transverse observables, but overestimates those quantities in the plane. The Lund LLA + O( alpha_{s}) model provides a good representation of the transverse properties but underestimates some quantities in the plane, though the discrepancy is much smaller than for the LLA model. The evolution of the observables as a function of c.m. energy between 12.0 and 41.5 GeV is generally well described, the Lund LLA + O(alpha_ {s}) model representing the data best. It is concluded that this model is successful in reproducing accurately most features of the data because it includes QCD calculations of both hard and multiple soft gluon emission processes. The model predictions are extended up to W = 200 GeV, where the two parton cascade models give similar predictions of the event properties which differ significantly from those of the O(alpha_sp{s} {2}) model. Top quark production is simulated at W = 200 GeV for a top mass of 60 GeV/c^2 and the distributions of thrust, aplanarity, p_ {Tin}, p_{Tout} and rapidity are found to be most sensitive to its presence. The data at 35 GeV are also analysed in terms of explicit multijet final states and compared with the QCD

  4. THE ELECTRON ION COLLIDER. A HIGH LUMINOSITY PROBE OF THE PARTONIC SUBSTRUCTURE OF NUCLEONS AND NUCLEI.

    SciTech Connect

    EDITED BY M.S. DAVIS

    2002-02-01

    By the end of this decade, the advancement of current and planned research into the fundamental structure of matter will require a new facility, the Electron Ion Collider (EIC). The EIC will collide high-energy beams of polarized electrons from polarized protons and neutrons, and unpolarized beams of electrons off atomic nuclei with unprecedented intensity. Research at the EIC will lead to a detailed understanding of the structure of the proton, neutron, and atomic nuclei as described by Quantum Chromo-Dynamics (QCD), the accepted theory of the strong interaction. The EIC will establish quantitative answers to important questions by delivering dramatically increased precision over existing and planned experiments and by providing completely new experimental capabilities. Indeed, the EIC will probe QCD in a manner not possible previously. This document presents the scientific case for the design, construction and operation of the EIC. While realization of the EIC requires a significant advance in the development of efficient means of producing powerful beams of energetic electrons, an important consideration for choosing the site of the EIC is the planned upgrade to the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The upgrade planned for RHIC will fully meet the requirements for the ion beam for the EIC, providing a distinct advantage in terms of cost, schedule and the final operation.

  5. Environmental assessment for the proposed B-Factory (Asymmetric Electron Positron Collider)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-11-01

    This document presents the potential environmental consequences associated with the construction and operation of an Asymmetric Electron Positron Collider, also known as a B-Factory. DOE proposes to modify either the existing Positron-Electron Project at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) or the Cornell Electron Storage Ring (CESR) at Cornell University. PEP and CESR provide the most technically promising and practical options for a B-Factory. A B-Factory can be constructed by modifying the existing facilities and with minor or no conventional construction. Details involved with the upgrade along with two alternatives to the proposed action are described.

  6. Electron-Ion Collider at CEBAF: New Insights and Conceptual Progress

    SciTech Connect

    Yaroslav Derbenev; Andrei Afanasev; Kevin Beard; Lawrence Cardman; Swapan Chattopadhyay; Pavel Degtiarenko; Jean Delayen; Rolf Ent; Andrew Hutton; Geoffrey Krafft; Rui Li; Nikolitsa Merminga; Benard Poelker; Byung Yunn; Petr Ostroumov

    2004-07-01

    We report on progress in the conceptual development of the proposed high luminosity (up to 1035 cm-2s-1) and efficient spin manipulation (using ''figure 8'' boosters and collider rings) Electron-Ion Collider at the CEBAF. This facility would use a polarized 5-7 GeV electron beam from a superconducting energy recovering linac with a kicker-operated circulator ring, and a 30-150 GeV ion beam in a storage ring (for polarized p, d, 3He, Li and unpolarized totally stripped nuclei up to Ar). Ultra-high luminosity is envisioned to be achieved with very short crab-crossing bunches at 1.5 GHz repetition rate. Our recent studies were concentrated on understanding beam-beam interaction, ion beam instabilities, luminosity lifetime due to intrabeam scatterings, ERL-ring synchronization, and ion spin control. We also proposed a preliminary conceptual design of the interaction region.

  7. Z0-tagged jet event asymmetry in heavy-ion collisions at the CERN large hadron collider.

    PubMed

    Neufeld, R B; Vitev, I

    2012-06-15

    Tagged jet measurements provide a promising experimental channel to quantify the similarities and differences in the mechanisms of jet production in proton-proton and nucleus-nucleus collisions. We present the first calculation of the transverse momentum asymmetry of Z0/γ*-tagged jet events in sqrt[s]=2.76  TeV reactions at the LHC. Our results combine the O(G(F)α(s)2) perturbative cross sections with the radiative and collisional processes that modify parton showers in the presence of dense strongly interacting matter. We find that a strong asymmetry is generated in central lead-lead reactions that has little sensitivity to the fluctuations of the underlying soft hadronic background. We present theoretical model predictions for its shape and magnitude.

  8. Comparison of electric dipole moments and the Large Hadron Collider for probing CP violation in triple boson vertices

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Sunghoon; Wells, James D.

    2009-07-01

    CP violation from physics beyond the standard model may reside in triple boson vertices of the electroweak theory. We review the effective theory description and discuss how CP-violating contributions to these vertices might be discerned by electric dipole moments (EDM) or diboson production at the LHC. Despite triple boson CP-violating interactions entering EDMs only at the two-loop level, we find that EDM experiments are generally more powerful than the diboson processes. To give an example to these general considerations we perform the comparison between EDMs and collider observables within supersymmetric theories that have heavy sfermions, such that substantive EDMs at the one-loop level are disallowed. EDMs generally remain more powerful probes, and next-generation EDM experiments may surpass even the most optimistic assumptions for LHC sensitivities.

  9. Particle multiplicities in lead-lead collisions at the CERN large hadron collider from nonlinear evolution with running coupling corrections.

    PubMed

    Albacete, Javier L

    2007-12-31

    We present predictions for the pseudorapidity density of charged particles produced in central Pb-Pb collisions at the LHC. Particle production in such collisions is calculated in the framework of k(t) factorization. The nuclear unintegrated gluon distributions at LHC energies are determined from numerical solutions of the Balitsky-Kovchegov equation including recently calculated running coupling corrections. The initial conditions for the evolution are fixed by fitting Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider data at collision energies square root[sNN]=130 and 200 GeV per nucleon. We obtain dNch(Pb-Pb)/deta(square root[sNN]=5.5 TeV)/eta=0 approximately 1290-1480.

  10. Overview of a high luminosity {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup {minus}} collider

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, R.B.; Gallardo, J.C.

    1997-03-01

    Muon Colliders have unique technical and physics advantages and disadvantages when compared with both hadron and electron machines. They should be regarded as complementary. Parameters are given of a 4 TeV high luminosity {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup {minus}} collider, and of a 0.5 TeV lower luminosity demonstration machine. The authors discuss the various systems in such muon colliders.

  11. Total Hadron Cross Section, New Particles, and Muon Electron Events in e{sup +}e{sup -} Annihilation at SPEAR

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Richter, B.

    1976-01-01

    The review of total hadron electroproduction cross sections, the new states, and the muon--electron events includes large amount of information on hadron structure, nine states with width ranging from 10's of keV to many MeV, the principal decay modes and quantum numbers of some of the states, and limits on charm particle production. 13 references. (JFP)

  12. Stochastic heating and acceleration of electrons in colliding laser fields in plasma.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Z-M; Mima, K; Sentoku, Y; Jovanović, M S; Taguchi, T; Zhang, J; Meyer-Ter-Vehn, J

    2002-02-01

    We propose a mechanism that leads to efficient acceleration of electrons in plasma by two counterpropagating laser pulses. It is triggered by stochastic motion of electrons when the laser fields exceed some threshold amplitudes, as found in single-electron dynamics. It is further confirmed in particle-in-cell simulations. In vacuum or tenuous plasma, electron acceleration in the case with two colliding laser pulses can be much more efficient than with one laser pulse only. In plasma at moderate densities, such as a few percent of the critical density, the amplitude of the Raman-backscattered wave is high enough to serve as the second counterpropagating pulse to trigger the electron stochastic motion. As a result, even with one intense laser pulse only, electrons can be heated up to a temperature much higher than the corresponding laser ponderomotive potential.

  13. Linear Colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Akira; Yokoya, Kaoru

    2015-02-01

    An overview of linear collider programs is given. The history and technical challenges are described and the pioneering electron-positron linear collider, the SLC, is first introduced. For future energy frontier linear collider projects, the International Linear Collider (ILC) and the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) are introduced and their technical features are discussed. The ILC is based on superconducting RF technology and the CLIC is based on two-beam acceleration technology. The ILC collaboration completed the Technical Design Report in 2013, and has come to the stage of "Design to Reality." The CLIC collaboration published the Conceptual Design Report in 2012, and the key technology demonstration is in progress. The prospects for further advanced acceleration technology are briefly discussed for possible long-term future linear colliders.

  14. Linear Colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Akira; Yokoya, Kaoru

    An overview of linear collider programs is given. The history and technical challenges are described and the pioneering electron-positron linear collider, the SLC, is first introduced. For future energy frontier linear collider projects, the International Linear Collider (ILC) and the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) are introduced and their technical features are discussed. The ILC is based on superconducting RF technology and the CLIC is based on two-beam acceleration technology. The ILC collaboration completed the Technical Design Report in 2013, and has come to the stage of "Design to Reality." The CLIC collaboration published the Conceptual Design Report in 2012, and the key technology demonstration is in progress. The prospects for further advanced acceleration technology are briefly discussed for possible long-term future linear colliders.

  15. Progress on the design of the polarized Medium-energy Electron Ion Collider at JLAB

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, F.; Bogacz, A.; Brindza, P.; Camsonne, A.; Daly, E.; Derbenev, Ya. S.; Douglas, D.; Ent, R.; Gaskell, D.; Geng, R.; Grames, J.; Guo, J.; Harwood, L.; Hutton, A.; Jordan, K.; Kimber, A.; Krafft, G.; Li, R.; Michalski, T.; Morozov, V. S.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; /Jefferson Lab /Argonne /DESY /Moscow , Inst. Phys. Tech., Dolgoprydny /Dubna, JINR /Northern Illinois U. /Old Doominion U. /Novosibirsk, GOO Zaryad /SLAC /Texas A-M

    2015-07-14

    The Medium-energy Electron Ion Collider (MEIC) at JLab is designed to provide high luminosity and high polarization needed to reach new frontiers in the exploration of nuclear structure. The luminosity, exceeding 1033 cm-2s-1 in a broad range of the center-of-mass (CM) energy and maximum luminosity above 1034 cm-2s-1, is achieved by high-rate collisions of short small-emittance low-charge bunches made possible by high-energy electron cooling of the ion beam and synchrotron radiation damping of the electron beam. The polarization of light ion species (p, d, 3He) can be easily preserved and manipulated due to the unique figure-8 shape of the collider rings. A fully consistent set of parameters have been developed considering the balance of machine performance, required technical development and cost. This paper reports recent progress on the MEIC accelerator design including electron and ion complexes, integrated interaction region design, figure-8-ring-based electron and ion polarization schemes, RF/SRF systems and ERL-based high-energy electron cooling. Luminosity performance is also presented for the MEIC baseline design.

  16. Concepts for ELIC - A High Luminosity CEBAF Based Electron-Light Ion Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Ya. Derbenev, A. Bogacz, G. Krafft, R. Li, L. Merminga, B. Yunn, Y. Zhang

    2006-09-01

    A CEBAF accelerator based electron-light ion collider (ELIC) of rest mass energy from 20 to 65 GeV and luminosity from 10^33 to 10^35 cm6-2s^-1 with both beams polarized is envisioned as a future upgrade to CEBAF. A two step upgrade scenario is under study: CEBAF accelerator-ring-ring scheme (CRR) as the first step, and a multi-turn ERL-ring as the second step, to attain a better electron emittance and maximum luminosity. In this paper we report results of our studies of the CRR version of ELIC.

  17. Electromagnetic probes of a pure-glue initial state in nucleus-nucleus collisions at energies available at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vovchenko, V.; Karpenko, Iu. A.; Gorenstein, M. I.; Satarov, L. M.; Mishustin, I. N.; Kämpfer, B.; Stoecker, H.

    2016-08-01

    Partonic matter produced in the early stage of ultrarelativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions is assumed to be composed mainly of gluons, and quarks and antiquarks are produced at later times. To study the implications of such a scenario, the dynamical evolution of a chemically nonequilibrated system is described by ideal (2+1)-dimensional hydrodynamics with a time dependent (anti)quark fugacity. The equation of state interpolates linearly between the lattice data for the pure gluonic matter and the lattice data for the chemically equilibrated quark-gluon plasma. The spectra and elliptic flows of thermal dileptons and photons are calculated for central Pb+Pb collisions at the CERN Large Hadron Collider energy of √{sN N}=2.76 TeV. We test the sensitivity of the results to the choice of equilibration time, including also the case where the complete chemical equilibrium of partons is reached already at the initial stage. It is shown that a suppression of quarks at early times leads to a significant reduction of the yield of the thermal dileptons, but only to a rather modest suppression of the pT distribution of direct photons. It is demonstrated that an enhancement of photon and dilepton elliptic flows might serve as a promising signature of the pure-glue initial state.

  18. Hadronic resonance production in d+au collisions at {radical}{ovr s}{sub NN} =200 GeV measured at the BNL relativistic heavy ion collider.

    SciTech Connect

    Abelev, B. I.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Krueger, K.; Spinka, H. M.; Underwood, D. G.; STAR Collaboration; High Energy Physics; Univ. of Illinois; Panjab Univ.; Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre; Kent State Univ.; Particle Physic Lab.

    2008-01-01

    We present the first measurements of the {rho}(770){sup 0},K*(892), {Delta}(1232){sup ++}, {sigma}(1385), and {Lambda}(1520) resonances in d+Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV, reconstructed via their hadronic decay channels using the STAR detector (the solenoidal tracker at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider). The masses and widths of these resonances are studied as a function of transverse momentum p{sub T}. We observe that the resonance spectra follow a generalized scaling law with the transverse mass m{sub T}. The of resonances in minimum bias collisions are compared with the of {pi},K and {bar p}. The {rho}{sup 0}/{pi}{sup -}, K{sup +}/K{sup -}, {Delta}{sup ++}/p, {Sigma}(1385)/{Lambda}, and {Lambda}(1520)/{Lambda} ratios in d+Au collisions are compared with the measurements in minimum bias p+p interactions, where we observe that both measurements are comparable. The nuclear modification factors (R{sub dAu}) of the {rho}{sup 0},K{sup +}, and {Sigma}{sup +} scale with the number of binary collisions (N{sub bin}) for p{sub T} > 1.2 GeV/c.

  19. Beam-loss induced pressure rise of Large Hadron Collider collimator materials irradiated with 158 GeV/u In49+ ions at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahner, E.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Hansen, J.; Page, E.; Vincke, H.

    2004-10-01

    During heavy ion operation, large pressure rises, up to a few orders of magnitude, were observed at CERN, GSI, and BNL. The dynamic pressure rises were triggered by lost beam ions that impacted onto the vacuum chamber walls and desorbed about 104 to 107 molecules per ion. The deterioration of the dynamic vacuum conditions can enhance charge-exchange beam losses and can lead to beam instabilities or even to beam abortion triggered by vacuum interlocks. Consequently, a dedicated measurement of heavy-ion induced molecular desorption in the GeV/u energy range is important for Large Hadron Collider (LHC) ion operation. In 2003, a desorption experiment was installed at the Super Proton Synchrotron to measure the beam-loss induced pressure rise of potential LHC collimator materials. Samples of bare graphite, sputter coated (Cu, TiZrV) graphite, and 316LN (low carbon with nitrogen) stainless steel were irradiated under grazing angle with 158 GeV/u indium ions. After a description of the new experimental setup, the results of the pressure rise measurements are presented, and the derived desorption yields are compared with data from other experiments.

  20. Next-to-leading order QCD predictions for t{gamma} associated production via model-independent flavor-changing neutral-current couplings at hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Yue; Li Bohua; Li Chongsheng; Gao Jun; Zhu Huaxing

    2011-05-01

    We present the complete next-to-leading order (NLO) QCD predictions for the t{gamma} associated production induced by model-independent tq{gamma} and tqg flavor-changing neutral-current (FCNC) couplings at hadron colliders, respectively. We also consider the mixing effects between the tq{gamma} and tqg FCNC couplings for this process. Our results show that, for the tq{gamma} couplings, the NLO QCD corrections can enhance the total cross sections by about 50% and 40% at the Tevatron and LHC, respectively. Including the contributions from the tq{gamma}, tqg FCNC couplings and their mixing effects, the NLO QCD corrections can enhance the total cross sections by about 50% for the tu{gamma} and tug FCNC couplings, and by about 80% for the tc{gamma} and tcg FCNC couplings at the LHC, respectively. Moreover, the NLO corrections reduce the dependence of the total cross section on the renormalization and factorization scale significantly. We also evaluate the NLO corrections for several important kinematic distributions.

  1. Physics at Future Circular Colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotwal, Ashutosh

    2016-03-01

    The Large Hadron Collider has been a grand success with the discovery of the Higgs boson, with bright prospects for additional discoveries since the recent increase in collider energy and the anticipated large datasets. Big open questions such as the nature of dark matter, the origin of the matter-antimatter asymmetry in the Universe, and the theoretical puzzle of the finely-tuned parameters in the Higgs sector, demand new physics principles that extend the established Standard Model paradigm. Future circular colliders in a substantially larger tunnel can house both a high luminosity electron-positron collider for precision measurements of Higgs and electroweak parameters, as well as a very high energy proton-proton collider which can directly manifest particles associated with these new physics principles. We discuss the physics goals of these future circular colliders, and the prospects for elucidating fundamental new laws of nature that will significantly extend our understanding of the Universe. Detailed studies of the discovery potential in specific benchmark models will be presented, with implications for detector design.

  2. Proton-Λ correlation functions at energies available at the CERN Large Hadron Collider taking into account residual correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapoval, V. M.; Sinyukov, Yu. M.; Naboka, V. Yu.

    2015-10-01

    The theoretical analysis of the p ¯-Λ ⊕p -Λ ¯ correlation function in 10% most central Au+Au collisions at Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) energy √{sNN}=200 GeV shows that the contribution of residual correlations is a necessary factor for obtaining a satisfactory description of the experimental data. Neglecting the residual correlation effect leads to an unrealistically low source radius, about 2 times smaller than the corresponding value for p -Λ ⊕p ¯-Λ ¯ case, when one fits the experimental correlation function within Lednický-Lyuboshitz analytical model. Recently an approach that accounts effectively for residual correlations for the baryon-antibaryon correlation function was proposed, and a good RHIC data description was reached with the source radius extracted from the hydrokinetic model (HKM). The p ¯-Λ scattering length, as well as the parameters characterizing the residual correlation effect—annihilation dip amplitude and its inverse width—were extracted from the corresponding fit. In this paper we use these extracted values and simulated in HKM source functions for Pb+Pb collisions at the LHC energy √{sNN}=2.76 TeV to predict the corresponding p Λ and p Λ ¯ correlation functions.

  3. Revealing Fundamental Interactions: the Role of Polarized Positrons and Electrons at the Linear Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Moortgat-Pick, G.; Abe, T.; Alexander, G.; Ananthanarayan, B.; Babich, A.A.; Bharadwaj, V.; Barber, D.; Bartl, A.; Brachmann, A.; Chen, S.; Clarke, J.; Clendenin, J.E.; Dainton, J.; Desch, K.; Diehl, M.; Dobos, B.; Dorland, T.; Eberl, H.; Ellis, John R.; Flottman, K.; Frass, H.; /CERN /Durham U., IPPP /Colorado U. /Tel-Aviv U. /Bangalore, Indian Inst. Sci. /Gomel State Tech. U. /SLAC /DESY /Vienna U. /Daresbury /Liverpool U. /Freiburg U. /Vienna, OAW /Wurzburg U. /Fermilab /Uppsala U. /Waseda U., RISE /Warsaw U. /Bonn U. /Aachen, Tech. Hochsch. /Cornell U., Phys. Dept.

    2005-07-06

    The proposed International Linear Collider (ILC) is well-suited for discovering physics beyond the Standard Model and for precisely unraveling the structure of the underlying physics. The physics return can be maximized by the use of polarized beams. This report shows the paramount role of polarized beams and summarizes the benefits obtained from polarizing the positron beam, as well as the electron beam. The physics case for this option is illustrated explicitly by analyzing reference reactions in different physics scenarios. The results show that positron polarization, combined with the clean experimental environment provided by the linear collider, allows to improve strongly the potential of searches for new particles and the identification of their dynamics, which opens the road to resolve shortcomings of the Standard Model. The report also presents an overview of possible designs for polarizing both beams at the ILC, as well as for measuring their polarization.

  4. The Role of polarized positrons and electrons in revealing fundamental interactions at the linear collider

    SciTech Connect

    Moortgat-Pick, G.; Abe, T.; Alexander, G.; Ananthanarayan, B.; Babich, A.A.; Bharadwaj, V.; Barber, D.; Bartl, A.; Brachmann, A.; Chen, S.; Clarke, J.; Clendenin, J.E.; Dainton, J.; Desch, K.; Diehl, M.; Dobos, B.; Dorland, T.; Eberl, H.; Ellis, John R.; Flottman, K.; Frass, H.; /CERN /Durham U., IPPP /Colorado U. /Tel-Aviv U. /Bangalore, Indian Inst. Sci. /Gomel State Tech. U. /SLAC /DESY /Vienna U. /Daresbury /Liverpool U. /Freiburg U. /Vienna, OAW /Wurzburg U. /Fermilab /Uppsala U. /Waseda U., RISE /Warsaw U. /Bonn U. /Aachen, Tech. Hochsch. /Cornell U., Phys. Dept.

    2005-07-01

    The proposed International Linear Collider (ILC) is well-suited for discovering physics beyond the Standard Model and for precisely unraveling the structure of the underlying physics. The physics return can be maximized by the use of polarized beams. This report shows the paramount role of polarized beams and summarizes the benefits obtained from polarizing the positron beam, as well as the electron beam. The physics case for this option is illustrated explicitly by analyzing reference reactions in different physics scenarios. The results show that positron polarization, combined with the clean experimental environment provided by the linear collider, allows to improve strongly the potential of searches for new particles and the identification of their dynamics, which opens the road to resolve shortcomings of the Standard Model. The report also presents an overview of possible designs for polarizing both beams at the ILC, as well as for measuring their polarization.

  5. Neutron dosimetry at a high-energy electron-positron collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedogni, Roberto

    Electron-positron colliders with energy of hundreds of MeV per beam have been employed for studies in the domain of nuclear and sub-nuclear physics. The typical structure of such a collider includes an LINAC, able to produce both types of particles, an accumulator ring and a main ring, whose diameter ranges from several tens to hundred meters and allows circulating particle currents of several amperes per beam. As a consequence of the interaction of the primary particles with targets, shutters, structures and barriers, a complex radiation environment is produced. This paper addresses the neutron dosimetry issues associated with the operation of such accelerators, referring in particular to the DAΦ NE complex, operative since 1997 at INFN-Frascati National Laboratory (Italy). Special attention is given to the active and passive techniques used for the spectrometric and dosimetric characterization of the workplace neutron fields, for radiation protection dosimetry purposes.

  6. Hadron colliders as the {open_quotes}neutralino factory{close_quotes}: Search for a slow decay of the lightest neutralino at the CERN LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Maki, K.; Orito, S.

    1998-01-01

    The prospects are examined for the detection of a slow decay of the lightest neutralino (or any other long-lived particles) at the CERN LHC and at the Very Large Hadron Collider (VLHC). We first point out that such hadron colliders will become the {open_quotes}neutralino factory{close_quotes} producing 10{sup 6}{endash}10{sup 9}neutralinos/yr, if gluinos and/or squarks actually exist below O(1) TeV. The lightest neutralino ({tilde {chi}}{sub 1}{sup 0}), usually assumed to be stable, will be unstable if lighter superparticles such as the gravitino ({tilde G}) or axino ({tilde a}) exist, or R-parity is not conserved. The decay signal would, however, be missed in usual collider experiments, particularly when the decay mostly occurs outside the detector. In order to search for such a slow decay of {tilde {chi}}{sub 1}{sup 0}, we propose a dedicated experiment where the collision products are dumped by a thick shield, which is followed by a long decay tunnel. The decay product of {tilde {chi}}{sub 1}{sup 0} can be detected by a detector located at the end of the tunnel. The slow arrival time and the large off angle (to the direction of the interaction point) of the decay product will provide a clear signature of slowly decaying {tilde {chi}}{sub 1}{sup 0}{close_quote}s. One can explore the decay length (c{tau}) in a wide range, i.e., 0.2 m to 1{times}10{sup 5}km for m{sub {tilde {chi}}{sub 1}{sup 0}}=25GeV and 1 m to 2 km for m{sub {tilde {chi}}{sub 1}{sup 0}}=200GeV at the LHC. This corresponds to the range of the SUSY breaking scale {radical} (F) =2{times}10{sup 5} to 2{times}10{sup 7}GeV in case of the {tilde {chi}}{sub 1}{sup 0}{r_arrow}{gamma}{tilde G} decay predicted in gauge-mediated SUSY breaking models. At VLHC, one can extend the explorable range of m{sub {tilde {chi}}{sub 1}{sup 0}} up to {approximately}1000GeV, and that of {radical} (F) up to {approximately}1{times}10{sup 8}GeV. In the case of the {tilde {chi}}{sub 1}{sup 0}{r_arrow}{gamma}{tilde a} decay

  7. Fragmentation production of charmed hadrons in electron-positron annihilation

    SciTech Connect

    Novoselov, A. A.

    2010-10-15

    Processes involving the production of D* mesons and {Lambda}{sub c} baryons in electron-positron annihilation at the energies of 10.58 and 91.18 GeV are considered. At the energy of 10.58 GeV, the production of pairs of B mesons that is followed by their decay to charmed particles is analyzed along with direct charm production. The violation of scaling in the respective fragmentation functions is taken into account in the next-to-leading-logarithmic approximation of perturbative QCD. The required nonperturbative fragmentation functions are extracted numerically from experimental data obtained at B factories and are approximated by simple analytic expressions. It is shown that the difference in the nonperturbative fragmentation functions for transitions to mesons and baryons can readily be explained on the basis of the quark-counting rules.

  8. Injection of electrons by colliding laser pulses in a laser wakefield accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansson, M.; Aurand, B.; Ekerfelt, H.; Persson, A.; Lundh, O.

    2016-09-01

    To improve the stability and reproducibility of laser wakefield accelerators and to allow for future applications, controlling the injection of electrons is of great importance. This allows us to control the amount of charge in the beams of accelerated electrons and final energy of the electrons. Results are presented from a recent experiment on controlled injection using the scheme of colliding pulses and performed using the Lund multi-terawatt laser. Each laser pulse is split into two parts close to the interaction point. The main pulse is focused on a 2 mm diameter gas jet to drive a nonlinear plasma wave below threshold for self-trapping. The second pulse, containing only a fraction of the total laser energy, is focused to collide with the main pulse in the gas jet under an angle of 150°. Beams of accelerated electrons with low divergence and small energy spread are produced using this set-up. Control over the amount of accelerated charge is achieved by rotating the plane of polarization of the second pulse in relation to the main pulse. Furthermore, the peak energy of the electrons in the beams is controlled by moving the collision point along the optical axis of the main pulse, and thereby changing the acceleration length in the plasma.

  9. Radiative return capabilities of a high-energy, high-luminositye+e-collider

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Karliner, Marek; Low, Matthew; Rosner, Jonathan L.; Wang, Lian-Tao

    2015-08-14

    An electron-positron collider operating at a center-of-mass energy ECM can collect events at all lower energies through initial-state radiation (ISR or radiative return). We explore the capabilities for radiative return studies by a proposed high-luminosity collider at ECM = 250 or 90 GeV, to fill in gaps left by lower-energy colliders such as PEP, PETRA, TRISTAN, and LEP. These capabilities are compared with those of the lower-energy e+e- colliders as well as hadron colliders such as the Tevatron and the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Some examples of accessible questions in dark photon searches and heavy flavor spectroscopy are given.

  10. Radiative return capabilities of a high-energy, high-luminosity e+e- collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karliner, Marek; Low, Matthew; Rosner, Jonathan L.; Wang, Lian-Tao

    2015-08-01

    An electron-positron collider operating at a center-of-mass energy ECM can collect events at all lower energies through initial-state radiation (ISR or radiative return). We explore the capabilities for radiative return studies by a proposed high-luminosity collider at ECM=250 or 90 GeV, to fill in gaps left by lower-energy colliders such as PEP, PETRA, TRISTAN, and LEP. These capabilities are compared with those of the lower-energy e+e- colliders as well as hadron colliders such as the Tevatron and the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Some examples of accessible questions in dark photon searches and heavy flavor spectroscopy are given.

  11. Online beam energy measurement of Beijing electron positron collider II linear accelerator.

    PubMed

    Wang, S; Iqbal, M; Liu, R; Chi, Y

    2016-02-01

    This paper describes online beam energy measurement of Beijing Electron Positron Collider upgraded version II linear accelerator (linac) adequately. It presents the calculation formula, gives the error analysis in detail, discusses the realization in practice, and makes some verification. The method mentioned here measures the beam energy by acquiring the horizontal beam position with three beam position monitors (BPMs), which eliminates the effect of orbit fluctuation, and is much better than the one using the single BPM. The error analysis indicates that this online measurement has further potential usage such as a part of beam energy feedback system. The reliability of this method is also discussed and demonstrated in this paper.

  12. Online beam energy measurement of Beijing electron positron collider II linear accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, S.; Iqbal, M.; Liu, R.; Chi, Y.

    2016-02-01

    This paper describes online beam energy measurement of Beijing Electron Positron Collider upgraded version II linear accelerator (linac) adequately. It presents the calculation formula, gives the error analysis in detail, discusses the realization in practice, and makes some verification. The method mentioned here measures the beam energy by acquiring the horizontal beam position with three beam position monitors (BPMs), which eliminates the effect of orbit fluctuation, and is much better than the one using the single BPM. The error analysis indicates that this online measurement has further potential usage such as a part of beam energy feedback system. The reliability of this method is also discussed and demonstrated in this paper.

  13. ACHROMATIC LOW-BETA INTERACTION REGION DESIGN FOR AN ELECTRON-ION COLLIDER

    SciTech Connect

    Vasiliy Morozov, Yaroslav Derbenev

    2011-09-01

    An achromatic Interaction Region (IR) design concept is presented with an emphasis on its application at an electron-ion collider. A specially-designed symmetric Chromaticity Compensation Block (CCB) induces an angle spread in the passing beam such that it cancels the chromatic kick of the final focusing quadrupoles. Two such CCB's placed symmetrically around an interaction point (IP) allow simultaneous compensation of the 1st-order chromaticities and chromatic beam smear at the IP without inducing significant 2nd-order aberrations. Special attention is paid to the difference in the electron and ion IR design requirements. We discuss geometric matching of the electron and ion IR footprints. We investigate limitations on the momentum acceptance in this IR design.

  14. Status of the Future Circular Collider Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedikt, Michael

    2016-03-01

    Following the 2013 update of the European Strategy for Particle Physics, the international Future Circular Collider (FCC) Study has been launched by CERN as host institute, to design an energy frontier hadron collider (FCC-hh) in a new 80-100 km tunnel with a centre-of-mass energy of about 100 TeV, an order of magnitude beyond the LHC's, as a long-term goal. The FCC study also includes the design of a 90-350 GeV high-luminosity lepton collider (FCC-ee) installed in the same tunnel, serving as Higgs, top and Z factory, as a potential intermediate step, as well as an electron-proton collider option (FCC-he). The physics cases for such machines will be assessed and concepts for experiments will be developed in time for the next update of the European Strategy for Particle Physics by the end of 2018. The presentation will summarize the status of machine designs and parameters and discuss the essential technical components to be developed in the frame of the FCC study. Key elements are superconducting accelerator-dipole magnets with a field of 16 T for the hadron collider and high-power, high-efficiency RF systems for the lepton collider. In addition the unprecedented beam power presents special challenges for the hadron collider for all aspects of beam handling and machine protection. First conclusions of geological investigations and implementation studies will be presented. The status of the FCC collaboration and the further planning for the study will be outlined.

  15. Theoretical study of the effect of the size of a high-energy proton beam of the Large Hadron Collider on the formation and propagation of shock waves in copper irradiated by 450-GeV proton beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryazanov, A. I.; Stepakov, A. V.; Vasilyev, Ya. S.; Ferrari, A.

    2014-02-01

    The interaction of 450-GeV protons with copper, which is the material of the collimators of the Large Hadron Collider, has been theoretically studied. A theoretical model for the formation and propagation of shock waves has been proposed on the basis of the analysis of the energy released by a proton beam in the electronic subsystem of the material owing to the deceleration of secondary particles appearing in nuclear reactions induced by this beam on the electronic subsystem of the material. The subsequent transfer of the energy from the excited electronic subsystem to the crystal lattice through the electron-phonon interaction has been described within the thermal spike model [I.M. Lifshitz, M.I. Kaganov, and L.V. Tanatarov, Sov. Phys. JETP 4, 173 (1957); I.M. Lifshitz, M.I. Kaganov, and L.V. Tanatarov, At. Energ. 6, 391 (1959); K. Yasui, Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res., Sect. B 90, 409 (1994)]. The model of the formation of shock waves involves energy exchange processes between excited electronic and ionic subsystems of the irradiated material and is based on the hydrodynamic approximation proposed by Zel'dovich [Ya.B. Zel'dovich and Yu.P. Raizer, Physics of Shock Waves and High-Temperature Hydrodynamic Phenomena (Nauka, Moscow, 1966; Dover, New York, 2002)]. This model makes it possible to obtain the space-time distributions of the main physical characteristics (temperatures of the ionic and electronic subsystems, density, pressure, etc.) in materials irradiated by high-energy proton beams and to analyze the formation and propagation of shock waves in them. The nonlinear differential equations describing the conservation laws of mass, energy, and momentum of electrons and ions in the Euler variables in the case of the propagation of shock waves has been solved with the Godunov scheme [S. K. Godunov, A.V. Zabrodin, M.Ya. Ivanov, A.N. Kraiko, and G.P. Prokopov, Numerical Solution of Multidimensional Problems in Gas Dynamics (Nauka, Moscow, 1976) [in Russian

  16. Reco level Smin and subsystem Smin: improved global inclusive variables for measuring the new physics mass scale in MET events at hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Konar, Partha; Kong, Kyoungchul; Matchev, Konstantin T.; Park, Myeonghun; /Florida U.

    2011-08-11

    The variable {radical}s{sub min} was originally proposed in [1] as a model-independent, global and fully inclusive measure of the new physics mass scale in missing energy events at hadron colliders. In the original incarnation of {radical}s{sub min}, however, the connection to the new physics mass scale was blurred by the effects of the underlying event, most notably initial state radiation and multiple parton interactions. In this paper we advertize two improved variants of the {radical}s{sub min} variable, which overcome this problem. First we show that by evaluating the {radical}s{sub min} variable at the RECO level, in terms of the reconstructed objects in the event, the effects from the underlying event are significantly diminished and the nice correlation between the peak in the {radical}s{sub min}{sup (reco)} distribution and the new physics mass scale is restored. Secondly, the underlying event problem can be avoided altogether when the {radical}s{sub min} concept is applied to a subsystem of the event which does not involve any QCD jets. We supply an analytic formula for the resulting subsystem {radical}s{sub min}{sup (sub)} variable and show that its peak exhibits the usual correlation with the mass scale of the particles produced in the subsystem. Finally, we contrast {radical}s{sub min} to other popular inclusive variables such as H{sub T}, M{sub Tgen} and M{sub TTgen}. We illustrate our discussion with several examples from supersymmetry, and with dilepton events from top quark pair production.

  17. Optimization of a closed-loop gas system for the operation of Resistive Plate Chambers at the Large Hadron Collider experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capeans, M.; Glushkov, I.; Guida, R.; Hahn, F.; Haider, S.

    2012-01-01

    Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs), thanks to their fast time resolution (˜1 ns), suitable space resolution (˜1 cm) and low production cost (˜50 €/m2), are widely employed for the muon trigger systems at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Their large detector volume (they cover a surface of about 4000 m2 equivalent to 16 m3 of gas volume both in ATLAS and CMS) and the use of a relatively expensive Freon-based gas mixture make a closed-loop gas circulation unavoidable. It has been observed that the return gas of RPCs operated in conditions similar to the difficult experimental background foreseen at LHC contains a large amount of impurities potentially dangerous for long-term operation. Several gas-cleaning agents are currently in use in order to avoid accumulation of impurities in the closed-loop circuits. We present the results of a systematic study characterizing each of these cleaning agents. During the test, several RPCs were operated at the CERN Gamma Irradiation Facility (GIF) in a high radiation environment in order to observe the production of typical impurities: mainly fluoride ions, molecules of the Freon group and hydrocarbons. The polluted return gas was sent to several cartridges, each containing a different cleaning agent. The effectiveness of each material was studied using gas chromatography and mass-spectrometry techniques. Results of this test have revealed an optimized configuration of filters that is now under long-term validation.Gas optimization studies are complemented with a finite element simulation of gas flow distribution in the RPCs, aiming at its eventual optimization in terms of distribution and flow rate.

  18. Physics at the Large Hadron Collider. Higgs boson (Scientific session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 26 February 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-09-01

    A scientific session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS) "Physics at the Large Hadron Collider. Higgs boson" was held in the conference hall of the Lebedev Physical Institute, RAS, on 26 February 2014. The agenda of the session, announced on the website http://www.gpad.ac.ru of the Physical Sciences Division, RAS, listed the following reports: (1) Boos E E (Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow) "Standard Model and predictions for the Higgs boson"; (2) Zaytsev A M (National Research Center Kurchatov Institute, Moscow) "ATLAS experiment. The Higgs boson and the Standard Model"; (3) Lanyov A V (Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Moscow region) "CMS collaboration results: Higgs boson and search for new physics"; (4) Kazakov D I (Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Moscow region) "The Higgs boson has been found: what is next?" Papers written on the basis of oral reports 1, 3, and 4 are published below. An extensive review of the topic in item 2 will be published in an upcoming issue of Physics-Uspekhi. • Standard Model and predictions for the Higgs boson, E E Boos Physics-Uspekhi, 2014, Volume 57, Number 9, Pages 912-923 • CMS collaboration results: Higgs boson and search for new physics, A V Lanyov Physics-Uspekhi, 2014, Volume 57, Number 9, Pages 923-930 • The Higgs boson is found: what is next?, D I Kazakov Physics-Uspekhi, 2014, Volume 57, Number 9, Pages 930-942

  19. Testing of multigap Resistive Plate Chambers for Electron Ion Collider Detector Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Hannah; Phenix Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    Despite decades of research on the subject, some details of the spin structure of the nucleon continues to be unknown. To improve our knowledge of the nucleon spin structure, the construction of a new collider is needed. This is one of the primary goals of the proposed Electron Ion Collider (EIC). Planned EIC spectrometers will require good particle identification. This can be provided by time of flight (TOF) detectors with excellent timing resolutions of 10 ps. A potential TOF detector that could meet this requirement is a glass multigap resistive plate chamber (mRPC). These mRPCs can provide excellent timing resolution at a low cost. The current glass mRPC prototypes have a total of twenty 0.1 mm thick gas gaps. In order to test the feasibility of this design, a cosmic test stand was assembled. This stand used the coincidence of scintillators as a trigger, and contains fast electronics. The construction, the method of testing, and the test results of the mRPCs will be presented.

  20. Diffractive ρ production at small x in future electron-ion colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonçalves, V. P.; Navarra, F. S.; Spiering, D.

    2016-09-01

    The future electron-ion (eA) collider is expected to probe the high energy regime of the quantum chromodynamics (QCD), with the exclusive vector meson production cross section being one of the most promising observables. In this paper we complement previous studies of exclusive processes presenting a comprehensive analysis of diffractive ρ production at small x. We compute the coherent and incoherent cross sections taking into account non-linear QCD dynamical effects and considering different models for the dipole-proton scattering amplitude and vector meson wave function. The dependence of these cross sections on the energy, photon virtuality, nuclear mass number and squared momentum transfer is analysed in detail. Moreover, we compare the non-linear predictions with those obtained in the linear regime. Finally, we also estimate the exclusive photon, J/{{\\Psi }} and ϕ production and compare with the results obtained for ρ production. Our results demonstrate that the analysis of diffractive ρ production in future electron-ion colliders will be important in understanding the non-linear QCD dynamics.

  1. Conceptual Design of the Cryogenic System for the High-luminosity Upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodzinski, K.; Claudet, S.; Ferlin, G.; Tavian, L.; Wagner, U.; Van Weelderen, R.

    The discovery of a Higgs boson at CERN in 2012 is the start of a major program of work to measure this particle's properties with the highest possible precision for testing the validity of the Standard Model and to search for further new physics at the energy frontier. The LHC is in a unique position to pursue this program. Europe's top priority is the exploitation of the full potential of the LHC, including the high-luminosity upgrade of the machine and detectors with an objective to collect ten times more data than in the initial design, by around 2030. To reach this objective, the LHC cryogenic system must be upgraded to withstand higher beam current and higher luminosity at top energy while keeping the same operation availability by improving the collimation system and the protection of electronics sensitive to radiation. This paper will present the conceptual design of the cryogenic system upgrade with recent updates in performance requirements, the corresponding layout and architecture of the system as well as the main technical challenges which have to be met in the coming years.

  2. Measurements of beam halo diffusion and population density in the Tevatron and in the Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Stancari, Giulio

    2015-03-01

    Halo dynamics influences global accelerator performance: beam lifetimes, emittance growth, dynamic aperture, and collimation efficiency. Halo monitoring and control are also critical for the operation of high-power machines. For instance, in the high-luminosity upgrade of the LHC, the energy stored in the beam tails may reach several megajoules. Fast losses can result in superconducting magnet quenches, magnet damage, or even collimator deformation. The need arises to measure the beam halo and to remove it at controllable rates. In the Tevatron and in the LHC, halo population densities and diffusivities were measured with collimator scans by observing the time evolution of losses following small inward or outward collimator steps, under different experimental conditions: with single beams and in collision, and, in the case of the Tevatron, with a hollow electron lens acting on a subset of bunches. After the LHC resumes operations, it is planned to compare measured diffusivities with the known strength of transverse damper excitations. New proposals for nondestructive halo population density measurements are also briefly discussed.

  3. Single event effects and their mitigation for the Collider Detector at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Tesarek, Richard J.; D'Auria, Saverio; Dong, Peter; Hocker, Andy; Kordas, Kostas; McGimpsey, Susan; Nicolas, Ludovic; Wallny, Rainer; Schmitt, Wayne; Worm, Steven; /Fermilab /Toronto U. /Glasgow U. /Rutherford /UCLA

    2005-11-01

    We present an overview of radiation induced failures and operational experiences from the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF). In our summary, we examine single event effects (SEE) in electronics located in and around the detector. We present results of experiments to identify the sources and composition of the radiation and steps to reduce the rate of SEEs in our electronics. Our studies have led to a better, more complete understanding of the radiation environment in a modern hadron collider experiment.

  4. Beam-induced Electron Loading Effects in High Pressure Cavities for a Muon Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, M.; Tollestrup, A.; Jansson, A.; Yonehara, K.; Insepov, Z.; /Argonne

    2010-05-01

    Ionization cooling is a critical building block for the realization of a muon collider. To suppress breakdown in the presence of the external magnetic field, an idea of using an RF cavity filled with high pressure hydrogen gas is being considered for the cooling channel design. One possible problem expected in the high pressure RF cavity is, however, the dissipation of significant RF power through the beam-induced electrons accumulated inside the cavity. To characterize this detrimental loading effect, we develop a simplified model that relates the electron density evolution and the observed pickup voltage signal in the cavity, with consideration of several key molecular processes such as the formation of the polyatomic molecules, recombination and attachment. This model is expected to be compared with the actual beam test of the cavity in the MuCool Test Area (MTA) of Fermilab.

  5. Colliding pulse injection experiments in non-collinear geometryfor controlled laser plasma wakefield acceleration of electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Toth, Carl B.; Esarey, Eric H.; Geddes, Cameron G.R.; Leemans,Wim P.; Nakamura, Kei; Panasenko, Dmitriy; Schroeder, Carl B.; Bruhwiler,D.; Cary, J.R.

    2007-06-25

    An optical injection scheme for a laser-plasma basedaccelerator which employs a non-collinear counter-propagating laser beamto push background electrons in the focusing and acceleration phase viaponderomotive beat with the trailing part of the wakefield driver pulseis discussed. Preliminary experiments were performed using a drive beamof a_0 = 2.6 and colliding beam of a_1 = 0.8 both focused on the middleof a 200 mu m slit jet backed with 20 bar, which provided ~; 260 mu mlong gas plume. The enhancement in the total charge by the collidingpulse was observed with sharp dependence on the delay time of thecolliding beam. Enhancement of the neutron yield was also measured, whichsuggests a generation of electrons above 10 MeV.

  6. Tests of an RF Dipole Crabbing Cavity for an Electron-Ion Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Castilla Loeza, Alejandro; Delayen, Jean R.

    2013-12-01

    On the scheme of developing a medium energy electron-ion collider (MEIC) at Jefferson Lab, we have designed a compact superconducting rf dipole cavity at 750 MHz to crab both electron and ion bunches and increase luminosities at the interaction points (IP) of the machine. Following the design optimization and characterization of the electromagnetic properties such as peak surface fields and shunt impedance, along with field nonuniformities, multipole components content, higher order modes (HOM) and multipacting, a prototype cavity was built by Niowave Inc. The 750 MHz prototype crab cavity has been tested at 4 K and is ready for re-testing at 4 K and 2 K at Jefferson Lab. In this paper we present the detailed results of the rf tests performed on the 750 MHz crab cavity prototype.

  7. Enhancement of hadron-electron discrimination in calorimeters by detection of the neutron component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adriani, O.; Bonechi, L.; Bongi, M.; Bottai, S.; Calamai, M.; Castellini, G.; D'Alessandro, R.; Grandi, M.; Papini, P.; Ricciarini, S.; Sguazzoni, G.; Sona, P.; Sorichetti, G.

    2011-02-01

    In many physics experiments where calorimeters are employed, the requirement of an accurate energy measurement is accompanied by the requirement of very high hadron-electron discrimination power. Normally the latter requirement is achieved by designing a high-granularity detector with sufficient depth so that the showers can fully develop. This method has many drawbacks ranging from the high number of electronic channels to the high mass of the detector itself. Some of these drawbacks may in fact severely limit the deployment of such a detector in many experiments, most notably in space-based ones. Another method, proposed by our group and currently under investigation, relies on the use of scintillation detectors which are sensitive to the neutron component of the hadron showers. Here a review of the current status will be presented starting with the simulations performed both with GEANT4 and FLUKA. A small prototype detector has been built and has been tested in a high-energy pion/electron beam behind a "shallow" calorimeter. Results are encouraging and indicate that it is possible to enhance the discrimination power of an existing calorimeter by the addition of a small-mass neutron detector, thus paving the way for better performing astroparticle experiments.

  8. Simulation Studies of Beam-Beam Effects of a Ring-Ring Electron-Ion Collider Based on CEBAF

    SciTech Connect

    Yuhong Zhang,Ji Qiang

    2009-05-01

    The collective beam-beam effect can potentially cause a rapid growth of beam sizes and reduce the luminosity of a collider to an unacceptably low level. The ELIC, a proposed ultra high luminosity electron-ion collider based on CEBAF, employs high repetition rate crab crossing colliding beams with very small bunch transverse sizes and very short bunch lengths, and collides them at up to 4 interaction points with strong final focusing. All of these features can make the beam-beam effect challenging. In this paper, we present simulation studies of the beam-beam effect in ELIC using a self-consistent strong-strong beam-beam simulation code developed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. This simulation study is used for validating the ELIC design and for searching for an optimal parameter set.

  9. Motion and energy dissipation of secondary electrons, positrons and hadrons correlated with terrestrial gamma-ray flashes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koehn, Christoph; Ebert, Ute

    2015-04-01

    Thunderstorms can emit high-energy particles, photons with energies of up to at least 40 MeV, leptons (electrons, positrons) and hadrons (neutrons and protons) with energies of tens of MeV. Some of these events have been correlated with negative lightning leaders propagating upwards in the cloud. For particular lightning events we show that photons, leptons and hadrons can reach ground altitude as well as satellite altitude, and we present the number as well as the spatial and energy distribution of photons, leptons and hadrons. We have reviewed the latest literature on cross sections for collisions of photons, leptons and hadrons with air molecules and have implemented them in our Monte Carlo code. We initialize a photon beam with the characteristic energy distribution of a TGF at thunderstorm altitude and we use the Monte Carlo model to trace these photons; we include the production of secondary electrons through photoionization, Compton scattering and pair production, the production of positrons through pair production as well as the production of neutrons and protons through photonuclear processes. Subsequently we calculate the motion and energy dissipation of these leptons and hadrons with the feedback of electrons and positrons producing new photons through Bremsstrahlung and through positron annihilation at shell electrons. Additionally we provide analytic estimates for the energy losses of photons, leptons and hadrons in the energy range between 0.03 eV and 100 MeV based on the relevant cross sections. We provide the spectral analysis of how many photons, leptons and hadrons will reach ground or satellite altitude and what their energies are, depending on the initial photon energy. This is of particular interest because of campaigns measuring fluxes of all these species at 0 and 500 km altitude without knowing the actual energies of initial electrons converting into photons within a thundercloud.

  10. Electron-Ion Collider: The next QCD frontier. Understanding the glue that binds us all

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Accardi, A.; Albacete, J. L.; Anselmino, M.; Armesto, N.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Bacchetta, A.; Boer, D.; Brooks, W. K.; Burton, T.; Chang, N.-B.; Deng, W.-T.; Deshpande, A.; Diehl, M.; Dumitru, A.; Dupré, R.; Ent, R.; Fazio, S.; Gao, H.; Guzey, V.; Hakobyan, H.; Hao, Y.; Hasch, D.; Holt, R.; Horn, T.; Huang, M.; Hutton, A.; Hyde, C.; Jalilian-Marian, J.; Klein, S.; Kopeliovich, B.; Kovchegov, Y.; Kumar, K.; Kumerički, K.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Lappi, T.; Lee, J.-H.; Lee, Y.; Levin, E. M.; Lin, F.-L.; Litvinenko, V.; Ludlam, T. W.; Marquet, C.; Meziani, Z.-E.; McKeown, R.; Metz, A.; Milner, R.; Morozov, V. S.; Mueller, A. H.; Müller, B.; Müller, D.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Paukkunen, H.; Prokudin, A.; Ptitsyn, V.; Qian, X.; Qiu, J.-W.; Ramsey-Musolf, M.; Roser, T.; Sabatié, F.; Sassot, R.; Schnell, G.; Schweitzer, P.; Sichtermann, E.; Stratmann, M.; Strikman, M.; Sullivan, M.; Taneja, S.; Toll, T.; Trbojevic, D.; Ullrich, T.; Venugopalan, R.; Vigdor, S.; Vogelsang, W.; Weiss, C.; Xiao, B.-W.; Yuan, F.; Zhang, Y.-H.; Zheng, L.

    2016-09-01

    This White Paper presents the science case of an Electron-Ion Collider (EIC), focused on the structure and interactions of gluon-dominated matter, with the intent to articulate it to the broader nuclear science community. It was commissioned by the managements of Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) with the objective of presenting a summary of scientific opportunities and goals of the EIC as a follow-up to the 2007 NSAC Long Range plan. This document is a culmination of a community-wide effort in nuclear science following a series of workshops on EIC physics over the past decades and, in particular, the focused ten-week program on "Gluons and quark sea at high energies" at the Institute for Nuclear Theory in Fall 2010. It contains a brief description of a few golden physics measurements along with accelerator and detector concepts required to achieve them. It has been benefited profoundly from inputs by the users' communities of BNL and JLab. This White Paper offers the promise to propel the QCD science program in the US, established with the CEBAF accelerator at JLab and the RHIC collider at BNL, to the next QCD frontier.

  11. Electron-ion collider: The next QCD frontier: Understanding the glue that binds us all

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Accardi, A.; Albacete, J. L.; Anselmino, M.; Armesto, N.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Bacchetta, A.; Boer, D.; Brooks, W. K.; Burton, T.; Chang, N. -B.; et al

    2016-09-08

    This White Paper presents the science case of an Electron-Ion Collider (EIC), focused on the structure and interactions of gluon-dominated matter, with the intent to articulate it to the broader nuclear science community. It was commissioned by the managements of Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) with the objective of presenting a summary of scientific opportunities and goals of the EIC as a follow-up to the 2007 NSAC Long Range plan. This document is a culmination of a community-wide effort in nuclear science following a series of workshops on EIC physics over the past decadesmore » and, in particular, the focused ten-week program on “Gluons and quark sea at high energies” at the Institute for Nuclear Theory in Fall 2010. It contains a brief description of a few golden physics measurements along with accelerator and detector concepts required to achieve them. It has been benefited profoundly from inputs by the users’ communities of BNL and JLab. Furthermore, this White Paper offers the promise to propel the QCD science program in the US, established with the CEBAF accelerator at JLab and the RHIC collider at BNL, to the next QCD frontier.« less

  12. QCD and Hadron Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; Deshpande, Abhay L.; Gao, Haiyan; McKeown, Robert D.; Meyer, Curtis A.; Meziani, Zein-Eddine; Milner, Richard G.; Qiu, Jianwei; Richards, David G.; Roberts, Craig D.

    2015-02-26

    This White Paper presents the recommendations and scientific conclusions from the Town Meeting on QCD and Hadronic Physics that took place in the period 13-15 September 2014 at Temple University as part of the NSAC 2014 Long Range Planning process. The meeting was held in coordination with the Town Meeting on Phases of QCD and included a full day of joint plenary sessions of the two meetings. The goals of the meeting were to report and highlight progress in hadron physics in the seven years since the 2007 Long Range Plan (LRP07), and present a vision for the future by identifying the key questions and plausible paths to solutions which should define the next decade. The introductory summary details the recommendations and their supporting rationales, as determined at the Town Meeting on QCD and Hadron Physics, and the endorsements that were voted upon. The larger document is organized as follows. Section 2 highlights major progress since the 2007 LRP. It is followed, in Section 3, by a brief overview of the physics program planned for the immediate future. Finally, Section 4 provides an overview of the physics motivations and goals associated with the next QCD frontier: the Electron-Ion-Collider.

  13. Leading-order hadronic contribution to the electron and muon g - 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jegerlehner, Fred

    2016-04-01

    I present a new data driven update of the hadronic vacuum polarization effects for the muon and the electron g - 2. For the leading order contributions I find aμhad(1) = (688.57 ± 4.28) [688.91 ± 3.52] × 10-10 based on e+e- data [incl. τ data], aμhad(2) = (- 9.92 ± 0.10) × 10-10 (NLO) and aμhad(3) = (1.23 ± 0.01) × 10-10 (NNLO) for the muon, and aehad(1) = (185.11 ± 1.24) × 10-14 (LO), aehad(2) = (-22.15 ± 0.16) × 10-14 (NLO) and aehad(3) = (-2.80 ± 0.02) × 10-14 (NNLO) for the electron. A problem with vacuum polarization undressing of cross-sections (time-like region) is addressed. I also add a comment on properly including axial mesons in the hadronic light-by-light scattering contribution. My estimate here reads aμ[a1, f'1, f1] ˜ (7.51 ± 2.71) × 10-11. With these updates aμexp - aμthe = (31.0 ± 8.2) × 10-10 a 3.8σ deviation, while aeexp - aethe = (-1.14 ± 08.2) × 10-12 shows no significat deviation.

  14. Charged-particle (pseudo-)rapidity distributions in p+p/p+p and Pb+Pb/Au+Au collisions from UrQMD calculations at energies available at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron to the Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Mitrovski, Michael; Petersen, Hannah; Schuster, Tim; Graef, Gunnar; Bleicher, Marcus

    2009-04-15

    We present results for final state charged-particle (pseudo-)rapidity distributions in p+p/p+p and Pb+Pb/Au+Au at ultra high energies (17.3 GeV{<=}{radical}(s{sub NN}){<=}14 TeV) from the Ultra-relativistic Quantum Molecular Dynamics (UrQMD-v2.3) model. In addition, excitation functions of produced charged-particle multiplicities (N{sub ch}) and pseudorapidity spectra are investigated up to CERN Large Hadron Collider energies. Good agreement is observed between UrQMD and measured pseudorapidity distributions of charged particles up to the highest Tevatron and SppS energies.

  15. Luminosity measurements at hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Papadimitriou, Vaia; /Fermilab

    2008-04-01

    In this paper we discuss luminosity measurements at Tevatron and HERA as well as plans for luminosity measurements at LHC. We discuss luminosity measurements using the luminosity detectors of the experiments as well as measurements by the machine. We address uncertainties of the measurements, challenges and lessons learned.

  16. Triphoton production at hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, John M.; Williams, Ciaran

    2014-06-01

    We present next-to-leading order predictions for the production of triphoton final states at the LHC and the Tevatron. Our results include the effect of photon fragmentation for the first time and we are able to quantify the impact of different isolation prescriptions. We find that calculations accounting for fragmentation effects at leading order, and those employing a smooth cone isolation where no fragmentation contribution is required, are in reasonable agreement with one another. However, larger differences in the predicted rates arise when higher order corrections to the fragmentation functions are included. In addition we present full analytic results for the $\\gamma\\gamma\\gamma$ and $\\gamma\\gamma+$jet one-loop amplitudes. These amplitudes, which are particularly compact, may be useful to future higher-order calculations. Our results are available in the Monte Carlo code MCFM.

  17. hc production at hadron colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jian-Xiong; Zhang, Hong-Fei

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, we present the study of the hadroproduction rate of hc at next-to-leading order in {{α }s} under the nonrelativisitic QCD (NRQCD) factorization framework, using color-octet long-distance matrix elements obtained from a global fit of experimental measurements on {{χ }c} yield and the ratio dσ ({{χ }c2})/dσ ({{χ }c1}) from the CDF, LHCb, CMS, and ATLAS Collaborations. This paper considers the problem of NRQCD scale dependence for the first time, and finds that, for some experimental conditions, the choice of this scale can significantly affect the final results, which indicates that, for these conditions, theoretical evaluation up to next-to-leading order cannot provide sufficiently precise predictions. We also present a brief analysis on the NRQCD scale dependence problem, and provide a criterion to determine in which case next-to-leading order prediction would be ruined by the scale dependence.

  18. Hadron Colliders Working Group Report

    SciTech Connect

    S. Peggs and M.J. Syphers

    2001-11-08

    The ''point design'' studied this year shows that a staged VLHC (40, {approx} 200 TeV) is feasible, with no insurmountable challenges. Further work can provide a more optimized design, by studying various alternative field strengths (e.g., superferric magnets for Stage 1) for improvements to vacuum, wall impedance, and other major performance parameters. It may be that a ''single-stage'' scenario for accessing higher energies sooner is the correct approach. A next-step design study should be considered to look at the two cases near to and complementary to the 2001 VLHC Design Study. The effectiveness of photon stops and their engineering design need to be addressed in the near future to truly determine if these devices can lead this effort to even higher luminosities and energies. The superbunch approach should continue to be studied, as well as IR designs, new instrumentation and diagnostics, and beam dynamics issues. Finally, a well organized VLHC-motivated beam studies effort should become part of the national program.

  19. Exploring the Standard Model with the High Luminosity, Polarized Electron-Ion Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Milner, Richard G.

    2009-08-04

    The Standard Model is only a few decades old and has been successfully confirmed by experiment, particularly at the high energy frontier. This will continue with renewed vigor at the LHC. However, many important elements of the Standard Model remain poorly understood. In particular, the exploration of the strong interaction theory Quantum Chromodynamics is in its infancy. How does the spin-1/2 of the proton arise from the fundamental quark and gluon constituents? Can we understand the new QCD world of virtual quarks and gluons in the nucleon? Using precision measurements can we test the limits of the Standard Model and look for new physics? To address these and other important questions, physicists have developed a concept for a new type of accelerator, namely a high luminosity, polarized electron-ion collider. Here the scientific motivation is summarized and the accelerator concepts are outlined.

  20. Tau reconstruction methods at an electron-positron collider in the search for new physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jinmian; Williams, Anthony G.

    2016-04-01

    By exploiting the relatively long lifetime of the tau lepton, we propose several novel methods for searching for new physics at an electron-positron collider. We consider processes that involve final states consisting of a tau lepton pair plus two missing particles. The mass and spin of the new physics particles can be measured in 3-prong tau decays. The tau polarization, which reflects the coupling to new physics, can be measured from the τ →π ν decay channel using the impact parameter distribution of the charged pion. We also discuss the corresponding backgrounds for these measurements, the next-to-leading order (NLO) effects, and the implications of finite detector resolution.

  1. Design study of primary ion provider for relativistic heavy ion collider electron beam ion source.

    PubMed

    Kondo, K; Kanesue, T; Tamura, J; Okamura, M

    2010-02-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory has developed the new preinjector system, electron beam ion source (EBIS) for relativistic heavy ion collider (RHIC) and National Aeronautics and Space Administration Space Radiation Laboratory. Design of primary ion provider is an essential problem since it is required to supply beams with different ion species to multiple users simultaneously. The laser ion source with a defocused laser can provide a low charge state and low emittance ion beam, and is a candidate for the primary ion source for RHIC-EBIS. We show a suitable design with appropriate drift length and solenoid, which helps to keep sufficient total charge number with longer pulse length. The whole design of primary ion source, as well as optics arrangement, solid targets configuration and heating about target, is presented.

  2. An Accumulator/Pre-Booster for the Medium-Energy Electron Ion Collider at Jlab

    SciTech Connect

    Erdelyi, B.; Manikonda, S. L.; Ostroumov, P. N.; Abeyratne, S.; Derbenev, Y. S.; Krafft, G. A.; Zhang, Y.

    2011-04-01

    Future nuclear physics facilities such as the proposed electron ion collider (MEIC) will need to achieve record high luminosities in order to maximize discovery potential. Among the necessary ingredients is the ability to generate, accumulate , accelerate, and store high current ion beams from protons to lead ions. One of the main components of this ion accelerator complex for MEIC chain is the accumulator that also doubles as a pre-booster, which takes 200 MeV protons from a superconducting linear accelerator, accumulates on the order of 1A beam, and boosts its energy to 3GeV, before extraction to the next accelerator in the chain, the large booster. This paper describes its design concepts, and summarizes some preliminary results, including linear optics, space charge dynamics, and spin polarization resonance analysis.

  3. Investigation into electron cloud effects in the International Linear Collider positron damping ring

    SciTech Connect

    Crittenden, J.A.; Conway, J.; Dugan, G.F.; Palmer, M.A.; Rubin, D.L.; Shanks, J.; Sonnad, K.G.; Boon, L.; Harkay, K.; Ishibashi, T.; Furman, M.A.; Guiducci, S.; Pivi, M.T.F.; Wang, L.; Crittenden, J.A.; Conway, J.; Dugan, G.F.; Palmer, M.A.; Rubin, D.L.; Shanks, J.; Sonnad, K.G.; Boon, L.; Harkay, K.; Ishibashi, T.; Furman, M.A.; Guiducci, S.; Pivi, M.T.F.; Wang, L.

    2014-02-28

    We report modeling results for electron cloud buildup and instability in the International Linear Collider positron damping ring. Updated optics, wiggler magnets, and vacuum chamber designs have recently been developed for the 5 GeV, 3.2-km racetrack layout. An analysis of the synchrotron radiation profile around the ring has been performed, including the effects of diffuse and specular photon scattering on the interior surfaces of the vacuum chamber. The results provide input to the cloud buildup simulations for the various magnetic field regions of the ring. The modeled cloud densities thus obtained are used in the instability threshold calculations. We conclude that the mitigation techniques employed in this model will suffice to allow operation of the damping ring at the design operational specifications

  4. Muon Muon Collider: Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Gallardo, J.C.; Palmer, R.B.; Tollestrup, A.V.; Sessler, A.M.; Skrinsky, A.N.; Ankenbrandt, C.; Geer, S.; Griffin, J.; Johnstone, C.; Lebrun, P.; McInturff, A.; Mills, Frederick E.; Mokhov, N.; Moretti, A.; Neuffer, D.; Ng, K.Y.; Noble, R.; Novitski, I.; Popovic, M.; Qian, C.; Van Ginneken, A. /Fermilab /Brookhaven /Wisconsin U., Madison /Tel Aviv U. /Indiana U. /UCLA /LBL, Berkeley /SLAC /Argonne /Sobolev IM, Novosibirsk /UC, Davis /Munich, Tech. U. /Virginia U. /KEK, Tsukuba /DESY /Novosibirsk, IYF /Jefferson Lab /Mississippi U. /SUNY, Stony Brook /MIT /Columbia U. /Fairfield U. /UC, Berkeley

    2012-04-05

    A feasibility study is presented of a 2 + 2 TeV muon collider with a luminosity of L = 10{sup 35} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. The resulting design is not optimized for performance, and certainly not for cost; however, it does suffice - we believe - to allow us to make a credible case, that a muon collider is a serious possibility for particle physics and, therefore, worthy of R and D support so that the reality of, and interest in, a muon collider can be better assayed. The goal of this support would be to completely assess the physics potential and to evaluate the cost and development of the necessary technology. The muon collider complex consists of components which first produce copious pions, then capture the pions and the resulting muons from their decay; this is followed by an ionization cooling channel to reduce the longitudinal and transverse emittance of the muon beam. The next stage is to accelerate the muons and, finally, inject them into a collider ring wich has a small beta function at the colliding point. This is the first attempt at a point design and it will require further study and optimization. Experimental work will be needed to verify the validity of diverse crucial elements in the design. Muons because of their large mass compared to an electron, do not produce significant synchrotron radiation. As a result there is negligible beamstrahlung and high energy collisions are not limited by this phenomena. In addition, muons can be accelerated in circular devices which will be considerably smaller than two full-energy linacs as required in an e{sup +} - e{sup -} collider. A hadron collider would require a CM energy 5 to 10 times higher than 4 TeV to have an equivalent energy reach. Since the accelerator size is limited by the strength of bending magnets, the hadron collider for the same physics reach would have to be much larger than the muon collider. In addition, muon collisions should be cleaner than hadron collisions. There are many detailed particle

  5. Operational head-on beam-beam compensation with electron lenses in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Fischer, W.; Gu, X.; Altinbas, Z.; Costanzo, M.; Hock, J.; Liu, C.; Luo, Y.; Marusic, A.; Michnoff, R.; Miller, T. A.; et al

    2015-12-23

    Head-on beam-beam compensation has been implemented in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) in order to increase the luminosity delivered to the experiments. We discuss the principle of combining a lattice for resonance driving term compensation and an electron lens for tune spread compensation. We describe the electron lens technology and its operational use. As of this date the implemented compensation scheme approximately doubled the peak and average luminosities.

  6. Recent Progress on Design Studies of High-Luminosity Ring-Ring Electron-Ion Collider at CEBAF

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y; Bruell, A; Chevtsov, P; Derbenev, Y S; Ent, R; Krafft, G A; Li, R; Merminga, L; Yunn, B C

    2009-05-01

    The conceptual design of a ring-ring electron-ion collider based on CEBAF has been continuously optimized to cover a wide center-of-mass energy region and to achieve high luminosity and polarization to support next generation nuclear science programs. Here, we summarize the recent design improvements and R&D progress on interaction region optics with chromatic aberration compensation, matching and tracking of electron polarization in the Figure-8 ring, beam-beam simulations and ion beam cooling studies.

  7. Operational Head-on Beam-Beam Compensation with Electron Lenses in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider.

    PubMed

    Fischer, W; Gu, X; Altinbas, Z; Costanzo, M; Hock, J; Liu, C; Luo, Y; Marusic, A; Michnoff, R; Miller, T A; Pikin, A I; Schoefer, V; Thieberger, P; White, S M

    2015-12-31

    Head-on beam-beam compensation has been implemented in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider in order to increase the luminosity delivered to the experiments. We discuss the principle of combining a lattice for resonance driving term compensation and an electron lens for tune spread compensation. We describe the electron lens technology and its operational use. To date, the implemented compensation scheme approximately doubled the peak and average luminosities.

  8. The Design of a Large Booster Ring for the Medium Energy Electron-Ion Collider at Jlab

    SciTech Connect

    Edward Nissen, Todd Satogata, Yuhong Zhang

    2012-07-01

    In this paper, we present the current design of the large booster ring for the Medium energy Electron-Ion Collider at Jefferson Lab. The booster ring takes 3 GeV protons or ions of equivalent rigidity from a pre-booster ring, and accelerates them to 20 GeV for protons or equivalent energy for light to heavy ions before sending them to the ion collider ring. The present design calls for a figure-8 shape of the ring for superior preservation of ion polarization. The ring is made of warm magnets and shares a tunnel with the two collider rings. Acceleration is achieved by warm RF systems. The linear optics has been designed with the transition energy above the highest beam energy in the ring so crossing of transition energy will be avoided. Preliminary beam dynamics studies including chromaticity compensation are presented in this paper.

  9. The Emergence of Hadrons from QCD Color

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, Will

    2013-10-01

    The propagation of colored quarks through strongly interacting systems, and their subsequent evolution into color-singlet hadrons, are phenomena that showcase unique facets of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). Medium-stimulated gluon bremsstrahlung, a fundamental QCD process, induces broadening of the transverse momentum of the parton, and creates partonic energy loss manifesting itself in experimental observables that are accessible in high energy interactions in hot and cold systems. The formation of hadrons, which is the dynamical enforcement of the QCD confinement principle, is very poorly understood on the basis of fundamental theory, although detailed models such as the Lund string model or cluster hadronization models can generally be tuned to capture the main features of hadronic final states. With the advent of the technical capability to study hadronic final states with good particle identification and at high luminosity, a new opportunity has appeared. Study of the characteristics of parton propagation and hadron formation as they unfold within atomic nuclei are now being used to understand the coherence and spatial features of these processes and to refine new experimental tools that will be used in future experiments. Fixed-target data on nuclei with lepton and hadron beams, and collider experiments involving nuclei, all make essential contact with these topics and they elucidate different aspects of these same themes. In this talk, a survey of the most relevant recent data and its potential interpretation will be followed by descriptions of feasible experiments at an electron-ion collider, in the context of existing measurements as well as the experiments performed following the upgrade of Jefferson Lab to 12 GeV.

  10. Charged Higgs-boson production in association with an electron and a neutrino at electron-positron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Brein, Oliver; Figy, Terrance

    2008-03-01

    We present results of a calculation of the cross section for the production of a charged Higgs boson in association with an electron and a neutrino at electron-positron colliders (e{sup +}e{sup -}{yields}H{sup +}e{sup -}{nu}{sub e}, H{sup -}e{sup +}{nu}{sub e}). We study predictions for the cross section in the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM) and the two Higgs doublet model (THDM), highlighting possible differences. The process is effectively loop-induced in both models. Hence, the cross section is expected to be strongly model-dependent. Most notably, due to the presence of superpartners, the MSSM amplitude contains Feynman graphs of pentagon-type, which are not present in the THDM. This is the first complete one-loop calculation of the cross section for this process in the THDM and the MSSM. For both models, so far, only approximate results with limited ranges of validity were available. Our main aim here is to clarify several open questions in the existing literature on this process. Specifically, we will discuss the validity of the heavy fermion loop approximation in both models, and of the fermion/sfermion loop approximation in the MSSM.

  11. Unveiling the proton spin decomposition at a future electron-ion collider

    SciTech Connect

    Aschenauer, Elke C.; Sassot, Rodolfo; Stratmann, Marco

    2015-11-24

    We present a detailed assessment of how well a future electron-ion collider could constrain helicity parton distributions in the nucleon and, therefore, unveil the role of the intrinsic spin of quarks and gluons in the proton’s spin budget. Any remaining deficit in this decomposition will provide the best indirect constraint on the contribution due to the total orbital angular momenta of quarks and gluons. Specifically, all our studies are performed in the context of global QCD analyses based on realistic pseudodata and in the light of the most recent data obtained from polarized proton-proton collisions at BNL-RHIC that have provided evidence for a significant gluon polarization in the accessible, albeit limited range of momentum fractions. We also present projections on what can be achieved on the gluon’s helicity distribution by the end of BNL-RHIC operations. As a result, all estimates of current and projected uncertainties are performed with the robust Lagrange multiplier technique.

  12. Unveiling the proton spin decomposition at a future electron-ion collider

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Aschenauer, Elke C.; Sassot, Rodolfo; Stratmann, Marco

    2015-11-24

    We present a detailed assessment of how well a future electron-ion collider could constrain helicity parton distributions in the nucleon and, therefore, unveil the role of the intrinsic spin of quarks and gluons in the proton’s spin budget. Any remaining deficit in this decomposition will provide the best indirect constraint on the contribution due to the total orbital angular momenta of quarks and gluons. Specifically, all our studies are performed in the context of global QCD analyses based on realistic pseudodata and in the light of the most recent data obtained from polarized proton-proton collisions at BNL-RHIC that have providedmore » evidence for a significant gluon polarization in the accessible, albeit limited range of momentum fractions. We also present projections on what can be achieved on the gluon’s helicity distribution by the end of BNL-RHIC operations. As a result, all estimates of current and projected uncertainties are performed with the robust Lagrange multiplier technique.« less

  13. TeV-scale stringy signatures at the electron-positron collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burikham, Piyabut

    2006-03-01

    We investigate the TeV-scale stringy signals of the four-fermion scattering at the electron-positron collider with the center-of-mass energy 500 1000 GeV. The nature of the stringy couplings leads to distinguishable asymmetries comparing to the other new physics models. Specifically, the stringy states in the four-fermion scattering at the leading-order corrections are of spin-1 and 2 with the chiral couplings inherited from the gauge bosons identified as the zeroth-mode string states. The angular left-right, forward-backward, center-edge asymmetries, and the corresponding polarized-beam asymmetries are investigated. The low-energy stringy corrections are compared to the ones induced by the Kaluza-Klein (KK) gravitons. The angular left-right asymmetry of the scattering with the final states of u and d-type quarks, namely c and b, shows significant deviations from the standard model values. The center-edge and forward-backward asymmetries for all final-states fermions also show significant deviations from the corresponding standard model values. The differences between the signatures induced by the stringy corrections and the KK gravitons are appreciable in both angular left-right and forward-backward asymmetries.

  14. High-performance DIRC detector for the future Electron Ion Collider experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalicy, G.; Allison, L.; Cao, T.; Dzhygadlo, R.; Horn, T.; Hyde, C.; Ilieva, Y.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Park, K.; Peters, K.; Schwarz, C.; Schwiening, J.; Stevens, J.; Xi, W.; Zorn, C.

    2016-07-01

    A radially-compact subsystem providing particle identification (e/π, π/K, K/p) over a wide momentum range is an essential requirement for the central detector of an Electron-Ion Collider (EIC). With a radial size of only a few cm, a detector based on Detection of Internally Reflected Cherenkov light (DIRC) principle is a very attractive solution. The R&D undertaken by the EIC PID consortium achieved the goal of showing feasibility of a high-performance DIRC that would extend the momentum coverage well beyond state-of-the-art allowing 3σ separation of π/K up to 6 GeV/c, e/K up to 1.8 GeV/c and p/K up to 10 GeV/c. A key component to reach such a performance is a special 3-layer spherical compound lens. This article describes the status of the design and R&D for the DIRC at EIC detector, with a focus on the detailed Monte Carlo simulation results for the high-performance DIRC.

  15. Deeply virtual Compton scattering at small x in future electron-ion colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonçalves, V. P.; Pires, D. S.

    2015-05-01

    The study of exclusive processes in the future electron-ion (e A ) colliders will be an important tool to investigate the QCD dynamics at high energies as they are in general driven by the gluon content of the target which is strongly subject to parton saturation effects. In this paper we compute the coherent and incoherent cross sections for the deeply virtual Compton scattering (DVCS) process relying on the color dipole approach and considering different models for the dipole-proton scattering amplitude. The dependencies of the cross sections with the energy, photon virtuality, nuclear mass number, and squared momentum transfer are analyzed in detail. We demonstrate that the ratio between the incoherent and coherent cross sections decreases at smaller values of Q2 and increases at smaller values of A . We show that the coherent cross section dominates at small t and exhibits the typical diffractive pattern, with the number of dips in the range |t | ≤0.3 GeV2 increasing with the mass atomic number. Our results indicate that the position of the dips are independent of the model used to treat the dipole-proton interaction as well as of the center-of-mass energy.

  16. Testing sterile neutrino extensions of the Standard Model at the Circular Electron Positron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antusch, Stefan; Fischer, Oliver

    2015-08-01

    Extending the Standard Model with sterile (“right-handed”) neutrinos is one of the best motivated ways to account for the observed neutrino masses. We discuss the expected sensitivity of the Circular Electron Positron Collider (CEPC) for testing such extensions. An interesting scenario is given by symmetry protected seesaw models, which theoretically allow for sterile neutrino masses around the electroweak scale with up to order one mixings with the active (SM) neutrinos. When the masses of the sterile neutrinos are well above the electroweak scale, they affect precision data via effective non-unitarity of the leptonic mixing matrix in a model independent way. The expected improvement of the electroweak precision observables from the CEPC may allow to test mixings between active and sterile neutrinos down to ˜ 5 × 10-3 (using currently discussed CEPC performance parameters). For sterile neutrinos with masses around the electroweak scale, direct searches are possible. Such tests are given by the search for sterile neutrino decays at the Z pole, by deviations from the SM cross section for four leptons at and beyond the W threshold, and by Higgs boson production and decays. The expected sensitivities at the CEPC could reach down to mixings as small as ˜ 5 × 10-5.

  17. High energy colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, R.B.; Gallardo, J.C.

    1997-02-01

    The authors consider the high energy physics advantages, disadvantages and luminosity requirements of hadron (pp, p{anti p}), lepton (e{sup +}e{sup {minus}}, {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup {minus}}) and photon-photon colliders. Technical problems in obtaining increased energy in each type of machine are presented. The machines relative size are also discussed.

  18. High luminosity {mu}{sup +} {mu}{sup {minus}} collider: Report of a feasibility study

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, R.B.; Gallardo, J.C.; Tollestrup, A.; Sessler, A.

    1996-12-01

    Parameters are given of 4 TeV and 0.5 TeV (c-of-m) high luminosity {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} colliders, and of a 0.5 TeV lower luminosity demonstration machine. We discuss the various systems in such muon colliders, starting from the proton accelerator needed to generate the muons and proceeding through muon cooling, acceleration and storage in a collider ring. Detector background, polarization, and nonstandard operating conditions are analyzed. Muon Colliders have unique technical and physics advantages and disadvantages when compared with both hadron and electron machines. They should thus be regarded as complementary. We briefly mention the luminosity requirements of hadrons and lepton machines and their high-energy-physics advantages and disadvantages in reference to their effective center of mass energy. Finally, we present an R & D plan to determine whether such machines are practical.

  19. International linear collider reference design report

    SciTech Connect

    Aarons, G.

    2007-06-22

    The International Linear Collider will give physicists a new cosmic doorway to explore energy regimes beyond the reach of today's accelerators. A proposed electron-positron collider, the ILC will complement the Large Hadron Collider, a proton-proton collider at the European Center for Nuclear Research (CERN) in Geneva, Switzerland, together unlocking some of the deepest mysteries in the universe. With LHC discoveries pointing the way, the ILC -- a true precision machine -- will provide the missing pieces of the puzzle. Consisting of two linear accelerators that face each other, the ILC will hurl some 10 billion electrons and their anti-particles, positrons, toward each other at nearly the speed of light. Superconducting accelerator cavities operating at temperatures near absolute zero give the particles more and more energy until they smash in a blazing crossfire at the centre of the machine. Stretching approximately 35 kilometres in length, the beams collide 14,000 times every second at extremely high energies -- 500 billion-electron-volts (GeV). Each spectacular collision creates an array of new particles that could answer some of the most fundamental questions of all time. The current baseline design allows for an upgrade to a 50-kilometre, 1 trillion-electron-volt (TeV) machine during the second stage of the project. This reference design provides the first detailed technical snapshot of the proposed future electron-positron collider, defining in detail the technical parameters and components that make up each section of the 31-kilometer long accelerator. The report will guide the development of the worldwide R&D program, motivate international industrial studies and serve as the basis for the final engineering design needed to make an official project proposal later this decade.

  20. Two- and three-pion quantum statistics correlations in Pb-Pb collisions at √sNN =2.76 TeV at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abelev, B.; Adam, J.; Adamová, D.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Rinella, G. Aglieri; Agnello, M.; Agocs, A. G.; Agostinelli, A.; Agrawal, N.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahmad, N.; Masoodi, A. Ahmad; Ahmed, I.; Ahn, S. U.; Ahn, S. A.; Aimo, I.; Aiola, S.; Ajaz, M.; Akindinov, A.; Aleksandrov, D.; Alessandro, B.; Alexandre, D.; Alici, A.; Alkin, A.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Altini, V.; Altinpinar, S.; Altsybeev, I.; Prado, C. Alves Garcia; Andrei, C.; Andronic, A.; Anguelov, V.; Anielski, J.; Antičić, T.; Antinori, F.; Antonioli, P.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelshäuser, H.; Arbor, N.; Arcelli, S.; Armesto, N.; Arnaldi, R.; Aronsson, T.; Arsene, I. C.; Arslandok, M.; Augustinus, A.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmi, M. D.; Bach, M.; Badalà, A.; Baek, Y. W.; Bagnasco, S.; Bailhache, R.; Bairathi, V.; Bala, R.; Baldisseri, A.; Pedrosa, F. Baltasar Dos Santos; Bán, J.; Baral, R. C.; Barbera, R.; Barile, F.; Barnaföldi, G. G.; Barnby, L. S.; Barret, V.; Bartke, J.; Basile, M.; Bastid, N.; Basu, S.; Bathen, B.; Batigne, G.; Batyunya, B.; Batzing, P. C.; Baumann, C.; Bearden, I. G.; Beck, H.; Bedda, C.; Behera, N. K.; Belikov, I.; Bellini, F.; Bellwied, R.; Belmont-Moreno, E.; Bencedi, G.; Beole, S.; Berceanu, I.; Bercuci, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Berenyi, D.; Berger, M. E.; Bergognon, A. A. E.; Bertens, R. A.; Berzano, D.; Betev, L.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattacharjee, B.; Bhom, J.; Bianchi, L.; Bianchi, N.; Bianchin, C.; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, J.; Bilandzic, A.; Bjelogrlic, S.; Blanco, F.; Blau, D.; Blume, C.; Bock, F.; Boehmer, F. V.; Bogdanov, A.; Bøggild, H.; Bogolyubsky, M.; Boldizsár, L.; Bombara, M.; Book, J.; Borel, H.; Borissov, A.; Bornschein, J.; Bossú, F.; Botje, M.; Botta, E.; Böttger, S.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Bregant, M.; Breitner, T.; Broker, T. A.; Browning, T. A.; Broz, M.; Bruna, E.; Bruno, G. E.; Budnikov, D.; Buesching, H.; Bufalino, S.; Buncic, P.; Busch, O.; Buthelezi, Z.; Caffarri, D.; Cai, X.; Caines, H.; Caliva, A.; Villar, E. Calvo; Camerini, P.; Roman, V. Canoa; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Carminati, F.; Díaz, A. Casanova; Castellanos, J. Castillo; Casula, E. A. R.; Catanescu, V.; Cavicchioli, C.; Sanchez, C. Ceballos; Cepila, J.; Cerello, P.; Chang, B.; Chapeland, S.; Charvet, J. L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Cherney, M.; Cheshkov, C.; Cheynis, B.; Barroso, V. Chibante; Chinellato, D. D.; Chochula, P.; Chojnacki, M.; Choudhury, S.; Christakoglou, P.; Christensen, C. H.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, S. U.; Cicalo, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Cleymans, J.; Colamaria, F.; Colella, D.; Collu, A.; Colocci, M.; Balbastre, G. Conesa; Conesa Del Valle, Z.; Connors, M. E.; Contin, G.; Contreras, J. G.; Cormier, T. M.; Morales, Y. Corrales; Cortese, P.; Maldonado, I. Cortés; Cosentino, M. R.; Costa, F.; Crochet, P.; Albino, R. Cruz; Cuautle, E.; Cunqueiro, L.; Dainese, A.; Dang, R.; Danu, A.; Das, D.; Das, I.; Das, K.; Das, S.; Dash, A.; Dash, S.; de, S.; Delagrange, H.; Deloff, A.; Dénes, E.; D'Erasmo, G.; de Barros, G. O. V.; de Caro, A.; de Cataldo, G.; de Cuveland, J.; de Falco, A.; de Gruttola, D.; De Marco, N.; de Pasquale, S.; de Rooij, R.; Corchero, M. A. Diaz; Dietel, T.; Divià, R.; Bari, D. Di; Liberto, S. Di; Mauro, A. Di; Nezza, P. Di; Djuvsland, Ø.; Dobrin, A.; Dobrowolski, T.; Gimenez, D. Domenicis; Dönigus, B.; Dordic, O.; Dorheim, S.; Dubey, A. K.; Dubla, A.; Ducroux, L.; Dupieux, P.; Majumdar, A. K. Dutta; Elia, D.; Engel, H.; Erazmus, B.; Erdal, H. A.; Eschweiler, D.; Espagnon, B.; Estienne, M.; Esumi, S.; Evans, D.; Evdokimov, S.; Eyyubova, G.; Fabris, D.; Faivre, J.; Falchieri, D.; Fantoni, A.; Fasel, M.; Fehlker, D.; Feldkamp, L.; Felea, D.; Feliciello, A.; Feofilov, G.; Ferencei, J.; Téllez, A. Fernández; Ferreiro, E. G.; Ferretti, A.; Festanti, A.; Figiel, J.; Figueredo, M. A. S.; Filchagin, S.; Finogeev, D.; Fionda, F. M.; Fiore, E. M.; Floratos, E.; Floris, M.; Foertsch, S.; Foka, P.; Fokin, S.; Fragiacomo, E.; Francescon, A.; Frankenfeld, U.; Fuchs, U.; Furget, C.; Girard, M. Fusco; Gaardhøje, J. J.; Gagliardi, M.; Gallio, M.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganoti, P.; Garabatos, C.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Gargiulo, C.; Garishvili, I.; Gerhard, J.; Germain, M.; Gheata, A.; Gheata, M.; Ghidini, B.; Ghosh, P.; Ghosh, S. K.; Gianotti, P.; Giubellino, P.; Gladysz-Dziadus, E.; Glässel, P.; Gomez, R.; González-Zamora, P.; Gorbunov, S.; Görlich, L.; Gotovac, S.; Graczykowski, L. K.; Grajcarek, R.; Grelli, A.; Grigoras, A.; Grigoras, C.; Grigoriev, V.; Grigoryan, A.; Grigoryan, S.; Grinyov, B.; Grion, N.; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J. F.; Grossiord, J.-Y.; Grosso, R.; Guber, F.; Guernane, R.; Guerzoni, B.; Guilbaud, M.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gulkanyan, H.; Gunji, T.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, R.; Khan, K. H.; Haake, R.; Haaland, Ø.; Hadjidakis, C.; Haiduc, M.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamar, G.; Hanratty, L. D.; Hansen, A.; Harris, J. W.; Hartmann, H.; Harton, A.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hayashi, S.; Hayrapetyan, A.; Heckel, S. T.; Heide, M.; Helstrup, H.; Herghelegiu, A.; Corral, G. Herrera; Hess, B. A.; Hetland, K. F.; Hicks, B.; Hippolyte, B.; Hladky, J.; Hristov, P.; Huang, M.; Humanic, T. J.; Hutter, D.; Hwang, D. S.; Ianigro, J.-C.; Ilkaev, R.; Ilkiv, I.; Inaba, M.; Incani, E.; Innocenti, G. M.; Ionita, C.; Ippolitov, M.; Irfan, M.; Ivanov, M.; Ivanov, V.; Ivanytskyi, O.; Jachołkowski, A.; Jahnke, C.; Jang, H. J.; Janik, M. A.; Jayarathna, P. H. S. Y.; Jena, S.; Bustamante, R. T. Jimenez; Jones, P. G.; Jung, H.; Jusko, A.; Kalcher, S.; Kalinak, P.; Kalweit, A.; Kamin, J.; Kang, J. H.; Kaplin, V.; Kar, S.; Uysal, A. Karasu; Karavichev, O.; Karavicheva, T.; Karpechev, E.; Kebschull, U.; Keidel, R.; Ketzer, B.; Khan, M. Mohisin.; Khan, P.; Khan, S. A.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kharlov, Y.; Kileng, B.; Kim, B.; Kim, D. W.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, J. S.; Kim, M.; Kim, M.; Kim, S.; Kim, T.; Kirsch, S.; Kisel, I.; Kiselev, S.; Kisiel, A.; Kiss, G.; Klay, J. L.; Klein, J.; Klein-Bösing, C.; Kluge, A.; Knichel, M. L.; Knospe, A. G.; Kobdaj, C.; Köhler, M. K.; Kollegger, T.; Kolojvari, A.; Kondratiev, V.; Kondratyeva, N.; Konevskikh, A.; Kovalenko, V.; Kowalski, M.; Kox, S.; Meethaleveedu, G. Koyithatta; Kral, J.; Králik, I.; Kramer, F.; Kravčáková, A.; Krelina, M.; Kretz, M.; Krivda, M.; Krizek, F.; Krus, M.; Kryshen, E.; Krzewicki, M.; Kučera, V.; Kucheriaev, Y.; Kugathasan, T.; Kuhn, C.; Kuijer, P. G.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, J.; Kurashvili, P.; Kurepin, A.; Kurepin, A. B.; Kuryakin, A.; Kushpil, S.; Kushpil, V.; Kweon, M. J.; Kwon, Y.; de Guevara, P. Ladron; Fernandes, C. Lagana; Lakomov, I.; Langoy, R.; Lara, C.; Lardeux, A.; Lattuca, A.; Pointe, S. L. La; Rocca, P. La; Lea, R.; Lee, G. R.; Legrand, I.; Lehnert, J.; Lemmon, R. C.; Lenhardt, M.; Lenti, V.; Leogrande, E.; Leoncino, M.; Monzón, I. León; Lévai, P.; Li, S.; Lien, J.; Lietava, R.; Lindal, S.; Lindenstruth, V.; Lippmann, C.; Lisa, M. A.; Ljunggren, H. M.; Lodato, D. F.; Loenne, P. I.; Loggins, V. R.; Loginov, V.; Lohner, D.; Loizides, C.; Lopez, X.; Torres, E. López; Lu, X.-G.; Luettig, P.; Lunardon, M.; Luo, J.; Luparello, G.; Luzzi, C.; Gago, A. M.; Jacobs, P. M.; Ma, R.; Maevskaya, A.; Mager, M.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Maire, A.; Malaev, M.; Cervantes, I. Maldonado; Malinina, L.; Mal'Kevich, D.; Malzacher, P.; Mamonov, A.; Manceau, L.; Manko, V.; Manso, F.; Manzari, V.; Marchisone, M.; Mareš, J.; Margagliotti, G. V.; Margotti, A.; Marín, A.; Markert, C.; Marquard, M.; Martashvili, I.; Martin, N. A.; Martinengo, P.; Martínez, M. I.; García, G. Martínez; Blanco, J. Martin; Martynov, Y.; Mas, A.; Masciocchi, S.; Masera, M.; Masoni, A.; Massacrier, L.; Mastroserio, A.; Matyja, A.; Mayer, C.; Mazer, J.; Mazumder, R.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Meddi, F.; Menchaca-Rocha, A.; Pérez, J. Mercado; Meres, M.; Miake, Y.; Mikhaylov, K.; Milano, L.; Milosevic, J.; Mischke, A.; Mishra, A. N.; Miśkowiec, D.; Mitu, C. M.; Mlynarz, J.; Mohanty, B.; Molnar, L.; Zetina, L. Montaño; Montes, E.; Morando, M.; de Godoy, D. A. Moreira; Moretto, S.; Morreale, A.; Morsch, A.; Muccifora, V.; Mudnic, E.; Muhuri, S.; Mukherjee, M.; Müller, H.; Munhoz, M. G.; Murray, S.; Musa, L.; Musinsky, J.; Nandi, B. K.; Nania, R.; Nappi, E.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, T. K.; Nazarenko, S.; Nedosekin, A.; Nicassio, M.; Niculescu, M.; Nielsen, B. S.; Nikolaev, S.; Nikulin, S.; Nikulin, V.; Nilsen, B. S.; Noferini, F.; Nomokonov, P.; Nooren, G.; Nyanin, A.; Nyatha, A.; Nystrand, J.; Oeschler, H.; Oh, S.; Oh, S. K.; Okatan, A.; Olah, L.; Oleniacz, J.; da Silva, A. C. Oliveira; Onderwaater, J.; Oppedisano, C.; Velasquez, A. Ortiz; Oskarsson, A.; Otwinowski, J.; Oyama, K.; Pachmayer, Y.; Pachr, M.; Pagano, P.; Paić, G.; Painke, F.; Pajares, C.; Pal, S. K.; Palmeri, A.; Pant, D.; Papikyan, V.; Pappalardo, G. S.; Park, W. J.; Passfeld, A.; Patalakha, D. I.; Paticchio, V.; Paul, B.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; da Costa, H. Pereira; Filho, E. Pereira De Oliveira; Peresunko, D.; Lara, C. E. Pérez; Peryt, W.; Pesci, A.; Pestov, Y.; Petráček, V.; Petran, M.; Petris, M.; Petrovici, M.; Petta, C.; Piano, S.; Pikna, M.; Pillot, P.; Pinazza, O.; Pinsky, L.; Piyarathna, D. B.; Planinic, M.; Płoskoń, M.; Pluta, J.; Pochybova, S.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Poghosyan, M. G.; Pohjoisaho, E. H. O.; Polichtchouk, B.; Poljak, N.; Pop, A.; Porteboeuf-Houssais, S.; Porter, J.; Pospisil, V.; Potukuchi, B.; Prasad, S. K.; Preghenella, R.; Prino, F.; Pruneau, C. A.; Pshenichnov, I.; Puddu, G.; Pujahari, P.; Punin, V.; Putschke, J.; Qvigstad, H.; Rachevski, A.; Raha, S.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ramello, L.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Räsänen, S. S.; Rascanu, B. T.; Rathee, D.; Rauf, A. W.; Razazi, V.; Read, K. F.; Real, J. S.; Redlich, K.; Reed, R. J.; Rehman, A.; Reichelt, P.; Reicher, M.; Reidt, F.; Renfordt, R.; Reolon, A. R.; Reshetin, A.; Rettig, F.; Revol, J.-P.; Reygers, K.; Riabov, V.; Ricci, R. A.; Richert, T.; Richter, M.; Riedler, P.; Riegler, W.; Riggi, F.; Rivetti, A.; Rocco, E.; Cahuantzi, M. Rodríguez; Manso, A. Rodriguez; Røed, K.; Rogochaya, E.; Rohni, S.; Rohr, D.; Röhrich, D.; Romita, R.; Ronchetti, F.; Ronflette, L.; Rosnet, P.; Rossegger, S.; Rossi, A.; Roy, A.; Roy, C.; Roy, P.; Montero, A. J. Rubio; Rui, R.; Russo, R.; Ryabinkin, E.; Ryabov, Y.; Rybicki, A.; Sadovsky, S.; Šafařík, K.; Sahlmuller, B.; Sahoo, R.; Sahu, P. K.; Saini, J.; Salgado, C. A.; Salzwedel, J.; Sambyal, S.; Samsonov, V.; Castro, X. Sanchez; Rodríguez, F. J. Sánchez; Šándor, L.; Sandoval, A.; Sano, M.; Santagati, G.; Sarkar, D.; Scapparone, E.; Scarlassara, F.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schiaua, C.; Schicker, R.; Schmidt, C.; Schmidt, H. R.; Schuchmann, S.; Schukraft, J.; Schulc, M.; Schuster, T.; Schutz, Y.; Schwarz, K.; Schweda, K.; Scioli, G.; Scomparin, E.; Scott, P. A.; Scott, R.; Segato, G.; Seger, J. E.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seo, J.; Serradilla, E.; Sevcenco, A.; Shabetai, A.; Shabratova, G.; Shahoyan, R.; Shangaraev, A.; Sharma, N.; Sharma, S.; Shigaki, K.; Shtejer, K.; Sibiriak, Y.; Siddhanta, S.; Siemiarczuk, T.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Simatovic, G.; Singaraju, R.; Singh, R.; Singha, S.; Singhal, V.; Sinha, B. C.; Sinha, T.; Sitar, B.; Sitta, M.; Skaali, T. B.; Skjerdal, K.; Smakal, R.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R. J. M.; Søgaard, C.; Soltz, R.; Song, J.; Song, M.; Soramel, F.; Sorensen, S.; Spacek, M.; Sputowska, I.; Spyropoulou-Stassinaki, M.; Srivastava, B. K.; Stachel, J.; Stan, I.; Stefanek, G.; Steinpreis, M.; Stenlund, E.; Steyn, G.; Stiller, J. H.; Stocco, D.; Stolpovskiy, M.; Strmen, P.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Vasquez, M. A. Subieta; Sugitate, T.; Suire, C.; Suleymanov, M.; Sultanov, R.; Šumbera, M.; Susa, T.; Symons, T. J. M.; de Toledo, A. Szanto; Szarka, I.; Szczepankiewicz, A.; Szymanski, M.; Takahashi, J.; Tangaro, M. A.; Takaki, J. D. Tapia; Peloni, A. Tarantola; Martinez, A. Tarazona; Tauro, A.; Muñoz, G. Tejeda; Telesca, A.; Terrevoli, C.; Minasyan, A. Ter; Thäder, J.; Thomas, D.; Tieulent, R.; Timmins, A. R.; Toia, A.; Torii, H.; Trubnikov, V.; Trzaska, W. H.; Tsuji, T.; Tumkin, A.; Turrisi, R.; Tveter, T. S.; Ulery, J.; Ullaland, K.; Ulrich, J.; Uras, A.; Usai, G. L.; Vajzer, M.; Vala, M.; Palomo, L. Valencia; Vallero, S.; Vyvre, P. Vande; Vannucci, L.; van Hoorne, J. W.; van Leeuwen, M.; Vargas, A.; Varma, R.; Vasileiou, M.; Vasiliev, A.; Vechernin, V.; Veldhoen, M.; Venaruzzo, M.; Vercellin, E.; Limón, S. Vergara; Vernet, R.; Verweij, M.; Vickovic, L.; Viesti, G.; Viinikainen, J.; Vilakazi, Z.; Baillie, O. Villalobos; Vinogradov, A.; Vinogradov, L.; Vinogradov, Y.; Virgili, T.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vodopyanov, A.; Völkl, M. A.; Voloshin, K.; Voloshin, S. A.; Volpe, G.; von Haller, B.; Vorobyev, I.; Vranic, D.; Vrláková, J.; Vulpescu, B.; Vyushin, A.; Wagner, B.; Wagner, J.; Wagner, V.; Wang, M.; Wang, Y.; Watanabe, D.; Weber, M.; Wessels, J. P.; Westerhoff, U.; Wiechula, J.; Wikne, J.; Wilde, M.; Wilk, G.; Wilkinson, J.; Williams, M. C. S.; Windelband, B.; Winn, M.; Xiang, C.; Yaldo, C. G.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yang, H.; Yang, P.; Yang, S.; Yano, S.; Yasnopolskiy, S.; Yi, J.; Yin, Z.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yushmanov, I.; Zaccolo, V.; Zach, C.; Zaman, A.; Zampolli, C.; Zaporozhets, S.; Zarochentsev, A.; Závada, P.; Zaviyalov, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zgura, I. S.; Zhalov, M.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhou, D.; Zhou, F.; Zhou, Y.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, X.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, A.; Zimmermann, M. B.; Zinovjev, G.; Zoccarato, Y.; Zynovyev, M.; Zyzak, M.; Alice Collaboration

    2014-02-01

    Correlations induced by quantum statistics are sensitive to the spatiotemporal extent as well as dynamics of particle-emitting sources in heavy-ion collisions. In addition, such correlations can be used to search for the presence of a coherent component of pion production. Two- and three-pion correlations of same and mixed charge are measured at low relative momentum to estimate the coherent fraction of charged pions in Pb-Pb collisions at √sNN =2.76 TeV at the CERN Large Hadron Collider with ALICE. The genuine three-pion quantum statistics correlation is found to be suppressed relative to the two-pion correlation based on the assumption of fully chaotic pion emission. The suppression is observed to decrease with triplet momentum. The observed suppression at low triplet momentum may correspond to a coherent fraction in charged-pion emission of 23%±8%.

  1. Non-Diagonal Flavour Observables in B and Collider Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Hurth, Tobias

    2003-11-11

    Until now the focus within the direct search for supersymmetry has mainly been on flavour diagonal observables. Recently lepton flavour violating signals at future electron positron colliders have been studied. There is now an opportunity to analyze the relations between collider observables and low-energy observables in the hadronic sector. In a first work in this direction, we study flavour violation in the squark decays of the second and third generations taking into account results from B physics, in particular from the rare decay b {yields} s gamma. Correlations between various squark decay modes can be used to get more precise information on various flavour violating parameters.

  2. Prospects for and tests of hadron calorimetry with silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Brau, James E.; Gabriel, Tony A.; Rancoita, P. G.

    1989-03-01

    Hadron calorimetry with silicon may provide crucial capabilities in experiments at the high luminosity, high energy colliders of the future, particularly due to silicon's fast intrinsic speed and absolute calibration. The important underlying processes of our understanding of hadron calorimeters are reviewed to set the framework for the presentation of recent calculations of the expected performance of silicon detector based hadron calorimeters. Such devices employing uranium are expected to achieve the compensation condition (that is, the ratio of the most probable electron signal to hadron signal (e/h) is approx.1.0) based on the understanding that has been derived from the uranium-liquid argon and uranium-plastic scintillator systems. In fact, even lead-silicon calorimeters are found to achieve the attractive value for the e/h ratio of 1.16 at 10 GeV. An experimental test of these predictions is underway at CERN by the SICAPO Collaboration. 64 refs., 19 figs.

  3. Measurement of electrons from beauty hadron decays in pp collisions at √{ s} = 7 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abelev, B.; Adam, J.; Adamová, D.; Adare, A. M.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Agocs, A. G.; Agostinelli, A.; Aguilar Salazar, S.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahmad, N.; Ahmad Masoodi, A.; Ahn, S. A.; Ahn, S. U.; Akindinov, A.; Aleksandrov, D.; Alessandro, B.; Alfaro Molina, R.; Alici, A.; Alkin, A.; Almaráz Aviña, E.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Altini, V.; Altinpinar, S.; Altsybeev, I.; Andrei, C.; Andronic, A.; Anguelov, V.; Anielski, J.; Anson, C.; Antičić, T.; Antinori, F.; Antonioli, P.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelshäuser, H.; Arbor, N.; Arcelli, S.; Arend, A.; Armesto, N.; Arnaldi, R.; Aronsson, T.; Arsene, I. C.; Arslandok, M.; Asryan, A.; Augustinus, A.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Äystö, J.; Azmi, M. D.; Bach, M.; Badalà, A.; Baek, Y. W.; Bailhache, R.; Bala, R.; Baldini Ferroli, R.; Baldisseri, A.; Baldit, A.; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F.; Bán, J.; Baral, R. C.; Barbera, R.; Barile, F.; Barnaföldi, G. G.; Barnby, L. S.; Barret, V.; Bartke, J.; Basile, M.; Bastid, N.; Basu, S.; Bathen, B.; Batigne, G.; Batyunya, B.; Baumann, C.; Bearden, I. G.; Beck, H.; Behera, N. K.; Belikov, I.; Bellini, F.; Bellwied, R.; Belmont-Moreno, E.; Bencedi, G.; Beole, S.; Berceanu, I.; Bercuci, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Berenyi, D.; Bergognon, A. A. E.; Berzano, D.; Betev, L.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhom, J.; Bianchi, L.; Bianchi, N.; Bianchin, C.; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, J.; Bilandzic, A.; Bjelogrlic, S.; Blanco, F.; Blanco, F.; Blau, D.; Blume, C.; Boccioli, M.; Bock, N.; Böttger, S.; Bogdanov, A.; Bøggild, H.; Bogolyubsky, M.; Boldizsár, L.; Bombara, M.; Book, J.; Borel, H.; Borissov, A.; Bose, S.; Bossú, F.; Botje, M.; Botta, E.; Boyer, B.; Braidot, E.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Bregant, M.; Breitner, T.; Browning, T. A.; Broz, M.; Brun, R.; Bruna, E.; Bruno, G. E.; Budnikov, D.; Buesching, H.; Bufalino, S.; Busch, O.; Buthelezi, Z.; Caballero Orduna, D.; Caffarri, D.; Cai, X.; Caines, H.; Calvo Villar, E.; Camerini, P.; Canoa Roman, V.; Cara Romeo, G.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Carlin Filho, N.; Carminati, F.; Casanova Díaz, A.; Castillo Castellanos, J.; Castillo Hernandez, J. F.; Casula, E. A. R.; Catanescu, V.; Cavicchioli, C.; Ceballos Sanchez, C.; Cepila, J.; Cerello, P.; Chang, B.; Chapeland, S.; Charvet, J. L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chawla, I.; Cherney, M.; Cheshkov, C.; Cheynis, B.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Chinellato, D. D.; Chochula, P.; Chojnacki, M.; Choudhury, S.; Christakoglou, P.; Christensen, C. H.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, S. U.; Cicalo, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Cleymans, J.; Coccetti, F.; Colamaria, F.; Colella, D.; Conesa Balbastre, G.; Conesa Del Valle, Z.; Constantin, P.; Contin, G.; Contreras, J. G.; Cormier, T. M.; Corrales Morales, Y.; Cortese, P.; Cortés Maldonado, I.; Cosentino, M. R.; Costa, F.; Cotallo, M. E.; Crescio, E.; Crochet, P.; Cruz Alaniz, E.; Cuautle, E.; Cunqueiro, L.; Dainese, A.; Dalsgaard, H. H.; Danu, A.; Das, D.; Das, I.; Das, K.; Dash, A.; Dash, S.; de, S.; de Barros, G. O. V.; de Caro, A.; de Cataldo, G.; de Cuveland, J.; de Falco, A.; de Gruttola, D.; Delagrange, H.; Deloff, A.; Demanov, V.; De Marco, N.; Dénes, E.; de Pasquale, S.; Deppman, A.; D Erasmo, G.; de Rooij, R.; Diaz Corchero, M. A.; di Bari, D.; Dietel, T.; di Giglio, C.; di Liberto, S.; di Mauro, A.; di Nezza, P.; Divià, R.; Djuvsland, Ø.; Dobrin, A.; Dobrowolski, T.; Domínguez, I.; Dönigus, B.; Dordic, O.; Driga, O.; Dubey, A. K.; Dubla, A.; Ducroux, L.; Dupieux, P.; Dutta Majumdar, M. R.; Dutta Majumdar, A. K.; Elia, D.; Emschermann, D.; Engel, H.; Erazmus, B.; Erdal, H. A.; Espagnon, B.; Estienne, M.; Esumi, S.; Evans, D.; Eyyubova, G.; Fabris, D.; Faivre, J.; Falchieri, D.; Fantoni, A.; Fasel, M.; Fearick, R.; Fedunov, A.; Fehlker, D.; Feldkamp, L.; Felea, D.; Fenton-Olsen, B.; Feofilov, G.; Fernández Téllez, A.; Ferretti, A.; Ferretti, R.; Festanti, A.; Figiel, J.; Figueredo, M. A. S.; Filchagin, S.; Finogeev, D.; Fionda, F. M.; Fiore, E. M.; Floris, M.; Foertsch, S.; Foka, P.; Fokin, S.; Fragiacomo, E.; Francescon, A.; Frankenfeld, U.; Fuchs, U.; Furget, C.; Fusco Girard, M.; Gaardhøje, J. J.; Gagliardi, M.; Gago, A.; Gallio, M.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganoti, P.; Garabatos, C.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Garishvili, I.; Gerhard, J.; Germain, M.; Geuna, C.; Gheata, A.; Gheata, M.; Ghidini, B.; Ghosh, P.; Gianotti, P.; Girard, M. R.; Giubellino, P.; Gladysz-Dziadus, E.; Glässel, P.; Gomez, R.; Ferreiro, E. G.; González-Trueba, L. H.; González-Zamora, P.; Gorbunov, S.; Goswami, A.; Gotovac, S.; Grabski, V.; Graczykowski, L. K.; Grajcarek, R.; Grelli, A.; Grigoras, C.; Grigoras, A.; Grigoriev, V.; Grigoryan, A.; Grigoryan, S.; Grinyov, B.; Grion, N.; Gros, P.; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J. F.; Grossiord, J.-Y.; Grosso, R.; Guber, F.; Guernane, R.; Guerra Gutierrez, C.; Guerzoni, B.; Guilbaud, M.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gunji, T.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, R.; Gutbrod, H.; Haaland, Ø.; Hadjidakis, C.; Haiduc, M.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamar, G.; Han, B. H.; Hanratty, L. D.; Hansen, A.; Harmanová-Tóthová, Z.; Harris, J. W.; Hartig, M.; Hasegan, D.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hayrapetyan, A.; Heckel, S. T.; Heide, M.; Helstrup, H.; Herghelegiu, A.; Herrera Corral, G.; Herrmann, N.; Hess, B. A.; Hetland, K. F.; Hicks, B.; Hille, P. T.; Hippolyte, B.; Horaguchi, T.; Hori, Y.; Hristov, P.; Hřivnáčová, I.; Huang, M.; Humanic, T. J.; Hwang, D. S.; Ichou, R.; Ilkaev, R.; Ilkiv, I.; Inaba, M.; Incani, E.; Innocenti, P. G.; Innocenti, G. M.; Ippolitov, M.; Irfan, M.; Ivan, C.; Ivanov, V.; Ivanov, A.; Ivanov, M.; Ivanytskyi, O.; Jacobs, P. M.; Jang, H. J.; Janik, M. A.; Janik, R.; Jayarathna, P. H. S. Y.; Jena, S.; Jha, D. M.; Jimenez Bustamante, R. T.; Jirden, L.; Jones, P. G.; Jung, H.; Jusko, A.; Kaidalov, A. B.; Kakoyan, V.; Kalcher, S.; Kaliňák, P.; Kalliokoski, T.; Kalweit, A.; Kang, J. H.; Kaplin, V.; Karasu Uysal, A.; Karavichev, O.; Karavicheva, T.; Karpechev, E.; Kazantsev, A.; Kebschull, U.; Keidel, R.; Khan, M. M.; Khan, S. A.; Khan, P.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kharlov, Y.; Kileng, B.; Kim, M.; Kim, D. W.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, J. S.; Kim, M.; Kim, S.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, B.; Kim, T.; Kirsch, S.; Kisel, I.; Kiselev, S.; Kisiel, A.; Klay, J. L.; Klein, J.; Klein-Bösing, C.; Kliemant, M.; Kluge, A.; Knichel, M. L.; Knospe, A. G.; Koch, K.; Köhler, M. K.; Kollegger, T.; Kolojvari, A.; Kondratiev, V.; Kondratyeva, N.; Konevskikh, A.; Korneev, A.; Kour, R.; Kowalski, M.; Kox, S.; Koyithatta Meethaleveedu, G.; Kral, J.; Králik, I.; Kramer, F.; Kraus, I.; Krawutschke, T.; Krelina, M.; Kretz, M.; Krivda, M.; Krizek, F.; Krus, M.; Kryshen, E.; Krzewicki, M.; Kucheriaev, Y.; Kugathasan, T.; Kuhn, C.; Kuijer, P. G.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, J.; Kurashvili, P.; Kurepin, A.; Kurepin, A. B.; Kuryakin, A.; Kushpil, S.; Kushpil, V.; Kvaerno, H.; Kweon, M. J.; Kwon, Y.; Ladrón de Guevara, P.; Lakomov, I.; Langoy, R.; La Pointe, S. L.; Lara, C.; Lardeux, A.; La Rocca, P.; Lea, R.; Le Bornec, Y.; Lechman, M.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, S. C.; Lee, G. R.; Lefèvre, F.; Lehnert, J.; Lenhardt, M.; Lenti, V.; León, H.; Leoncino, M.; León Monzón, I.; León Vargas, H.; Lévai, P.; Lien, J.; Lietava, R.; Lindal, S.; Lindenstruth, V.; Lippmann, C.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, L.; Loggins, V. R.; Loginov, V.; Lohn, S.; Lohner, D.; Loizides, C.; Loo, K. K.; Lopez, X.; López Torres, E.; Løvhøiden, G.; Lu, X.-G.; Luettig, P.; Lunardon, M.; Luo, J.; Luparello, G.; Luquin, L.; Luzzi, C.; Ma, R.; Ma, K.; Madagodahettige-Don, D. M.; Maevskaya, A.; Mager, M.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Maire, A.; Malaev, M.; Maldonado Cervantes, I.; Malinina, L.; Mal'Kevich, D.; Malzacher, P.; Mamonov, A.; Mangotra, L.; Manko, V.; Manso, F.; Manzari, V.; Mao, Y.; Marchisone, M.; Mareš, J.; Margagliotti, G. V.; Margotti, A.; Marín, A.; Marin Tobon, C. A.; Markert, C.; Martashvili, I.; Martinengo, P.; Martínez, M. I.; Martínez Davalos, A.; Martínez García, G.; Martynov, Y.; Mas, A.; Masciocchi, S.; Masera, M.; Masoni, A.; Massacrier, L.; Mastroserio, A.; Matthews, Z. L.; Matyja, A.; Mayer, C.; Mazer, J.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Meddi, F.; Menchaca-Rocha, A.; Mercado Pérez, J.; Meres, M.; Miake, Y.; Milano, L.; Milosevic, J.; Mischke, A.; Mishra, A. N.; Miśkowiec, D.; Mitu, C.; Mlynarz, J.; Mohanty, B.; Molnar, L.; Montaño Zetina, L.; Monteno, M.; Montes, E.; Moon, T.; Morando, M.; Moreira de Godoy, D. A.; Moretto, S.; Morsch, A.; Muccifora, V.; Mudnic, E.; Muhuri, S.; Mukherjee, M.; Müller, H.; Munhoz, M. G.; Musa, L.; Musso, A.; Nandi, B. K.; Nania, R.; Nappi, E.; Nattrass, C.; Naumov, N. P.; Navin, S.; Nayak, T. K.; Nazarenko, S.; Nazarov, G.; Nedosekin, A.; Nicassio, M.; Niculescu, M.; Nielsen, B. S.; Niida, T.; Nikolaev, S.; Nikolic, V.; Nikulin, S.; Nikulin, V.; Nilsen, B. S.; Nilsson, M. S.; Noferini, F.; Nomokonov, P.; Nooren, G.; Novitzky, N.; Nyanin, A.; Nyatha, A.; Nygaard, C.; Nystrand, J.; Ochirov, A.; Oeschler, H.; Oh, S.; Oh, S. K.; Oleniacz, J.; Oppedisano, C.; Ortiz Velasquez, A.; Ortona, G.; Oskarsson, A.; Ostrowski, P.; Otwinowski, J.; Oyama, K.; Ozawa, K.; Pachmayer, Y.; Pachr, M.; Padilla, F.; Pagano, P.; Paić, G.; Painke, F.; Pajares, C.; Pal, S. K.; Palaha, A.; Palmeri, A.; Papikyan, V.; Pappalardo, G. S.; Park, W. J.; Passfeld, A.; Pastirčák, B.; Patalakha, D. I.; Paticchio, V.; Pavlinov, A.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Pereira da Costa, H.; Pereira de Oliveira Filho, E.; Peresunko, D.; Pérez Lara, C. E.; Perez Lezama, E.; Perini, D.; Perrino, D.; Peryt, W.; Pesci, A.; Peskov, V.; Pestov, Y.; Petráček, V.; Petran, M.; Petris, M.; Petrov, P.; Petrovici, M.; Petta, C.; Piano, S.; Piccotti, A.; Pikna, M.; Pillot, P.; Pinazza, O.; Pinsky, L.; Pitz, N.; Piyarathna, D. B.; Planinic, M.; Płoskoń, M.; Pluta, J.; Pocheptsov, T.; Pochybova, S.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Poghosyan, M. G.; Polák, K.; Polichtchouk, B.; Pop, A.; Porteboeuf-Houssais, S.; Pospíšil, V.; Potukuchi, B.; Prasad, S. K.; Preghenella, R.; Prino, F.; Pruneau, C. A.; Pshenichnov, I.; Puchagin, S.; Puddu, G.; Pulvirenti, A.; Punin, V.; Putiš, M.; Putschke, J.; Quercigh, E.; Qvigstad, H.; Rachevski, A.; Rademakers, A.; Räihä, T. S.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ramello, L.; Ramírez Reyes, A.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Räsänen, S. S.; Rascanu, B. T.; Rathee, D.; Read, K. F.; Real, J. S.; Redlich, K.; Reichelt, P.; Reicher, M.; Renfordt, R.; Reolon, A. R.; Reshetin, A.; Rettig, F.; Revol, J.-P.; Reygers, K.; Riccati, L.; Ricci, R. A.; Richert, T.; Richter, M.; Riedler, P.; Riegler, W.; Riggi, F.; Rodrigues Fernandes Rabacal, B.; Rodríguez Cahuantzi, M.; Rodriguez Manso, A.; Røed, K.; Rohr, D.; Röhrich, D.; Romita, R.; Ronchetti, F.; Rosnet, P.; Rossegger, S.; Rossi, A.; Roy, C.; Roy, P.; Rubio Montero, A. J.; Rui, R.; Russo, R.; Ryabinkin, E.; Rybicki, A.; Sadovsky, S.; Šafařík, K.; Sahoo, R.; Sahu, P. K.; Saini, J.; Sakaguchi, H.; Sakai, S.; Sakata, D.; Salgado, C. A.; Salzwedel, J.; Sambyal, S.; Samsonov, V.; Sanchez Castro, X.; Šándor, L.; Sandoval, A.; Sano, S.; Sano, M.; Santo, R.; Santoro, R.; Sarkamo, J.; Scapparone, E.; Scarlassara, F.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schiaua, C.; Schicker, R.; Schmidt, C.; Schmidt, H. R.; Schreiner, S.; Schuchmann, S.; Schukraft, J.; Schutz, Y.; Schwarz, K.; Schweda, K.; Scioli, G.; Scomparin, E.; Scott, R.; Segato, G.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Senyukov, S.; Seo, J.; Serci, S.; Serradilla, E.; Sevcenco, A.; Shabetai, A.; Shabratova, G.; Shahoyan, R.; Sharma, S.; Sharma, N.; Rohni, S.; Shigaki, K.; Shimomura, M.; Shtejer, K.; Sibiriak, Y.; Siciliano, M.; Sicking, E.; Siddhanta, S.; Siemiarczuk, T.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Simatovic, G.; Simonetti, G.; Singaraju, R.; Singh, R.; Singha, S.; Singhal, V.; Sinha, B. C.; Sinha, T.; Sitar, B.; Sitta, M.; Skaali, T. B.; Skjerdal, K.; Smakal, R.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R. J. M.; Søgaard, C.; Soltz, R.; Son, H.; Song, J.; Song, M.; Soos, C.; Soramel, F.; Sputowska, I.; Spyropoulou-Stassinaki, M.; Srivastava, B. K.; Stachel, J.; Stan, I.; Stan, I.; Stefanek, G.; Steinpreis, M.; Stenlund, E.; Steyn, G.; Stiller, J. H.; Stocco, D.; Stolpovskiy, M.; Strabykin, K.; Strmen, P.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Subieta Vásquez, M. A.; Sugitate, T.; Suire, C.; Sukhorukov, M.; Sultanov, R.; Šumbera, M.; Susa, T.; Symons, T. J. M.; Szanto de Toledo, A.; Szarka, I.; Szczepankiewicz, A.; Szostak, A.; Szymański, M.; Takahashi, J.; Tapia Takaki, J. D.; Tauro, A.; Tejeda Muñoz, G.; Telesca, A.; Terrevoli, C.; Thäder, J.; Thomas, D.; Tieulent, R.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Toia, A.; Torii, H.; Toscano, L.; Trubnikov, V.; Truesdale, D.; Trzaska, W. H.; Tsuji, T.; Tumkin, A.; Turrisi, R.; Tveter, T. S.; Ulery, J.; Ullaland, K.; Ulrich, J.; Uras, A.; Urbán, J.; Urciuoli, G. M.; Usai, G. L.; Vajzer, M.; Vala, M.; Valencia Palomo, L.; Vallero, S.; Vande Vyvre, P.; van Leeuwen, M.; Vannucci, L.; Vargas, A.; Varma, R.; Vasileiou, M.; Vasiliev, A.; Vechernin, V.; Veldhoen, M.; Venaruzzo, M.; Vercellin, E.; Vergara, S.; Vernet, R.; Verweij, M.; Vickovic, L.; Viesti, G.; Vikhlyantsev, O.; Vilakazi, Z.; Villalobos Baillie, O.; Vinogradov, Y.; Vinogradov, L.; Vinogradov, A.; Virgili, T.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vodopyanov, A.; Voloshin, K.; Voloshin, S.; Volpe, G.; von Haller, B.; Vranic, D.; Øvrebekk, G.; Vrláková, J.; Vulpescu, B.; Vyushin, A.; Wagner, V.; Wagner, B.; Wan, R.; Wang, D.; Wang, M.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Watanabe, K.; Weber, M.; Wessels, J. P.; Westerhoff, U.; Wiechula, J.; Wikne, J.; Wilde, M.; Wilk, A.; Wilk, G.; Williams, M. C. S.; Windelband, B.; Xaplanteris Karampatsos, L.; Yaldo, C. G.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yang, S.; Yang, H.; Yasnopolskiy, S.; Yi, J.; Yin, Z.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yoon, J.; Yu, W.; Yuan, X.; Yushmanov, I.; Zaccolo, V.; Zach, C.; Zampolli, C.; Zaporozhets, S.; Zarochentsev, A.; Závada, P.; Zaviyalov, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zelnicek, P.; Zgura, I. S.; Zhalov, M.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, H.; Zhou, F.; Zhou, Y.; Zhou, D.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, X.; Zhu, J.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, A.; Zinovjev, G.; Zoccarato, Y.; Zynovyev, M.; Zyzak, M.; Alice Collaboration

    2013-04-01

    The production cross section of electrons from semileptonic decays of beauty hadrons was measured at mid-rapidity (| y | < 0.8) in the transverse momentum range 1 Electrons from beauty hadron decays were selected based on the displacement of the decay vertex from the collision vertex. A perturbative QCD calculation agrees with the measurement within uncertainties. The data were extrapolated to the full phase space to determine the total cross section for the production of beauty quark-antiquark pairs.

  4. Single electrons from semi-leptonic charm and bottom hadron decays in Au+Au collisions at PHENIX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hachiya, Takashi

    2016-08-01

    Heavy quarks are clean probes to explore the nature of strongly coupled quark gluon plasma created in high energy heavy ion collisions. The strong suppression of single electrons from semi-leptonic decays of heavy flavor hadrons was observed. To further understand the heavy quark suppressions, PHENIX installed the silicon vertex detector (VTX) which allows us to measure the bottom and charm productions separately from measurement of displaced tracks. For the first time, we observed the electrons from bottom hadron decays are less suppressed than those from charms for 3 < pT < 4 GeV/c and are similarly strongly suppressed for higher pT in minimum bias Au+Au collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV. We present the results of separated bottom and charm productions using the 2011 dataset with the VTX.

  5. From Hadronic Parity Violation to Parity-Violating Electron Scattering and Tests of the Standard Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Oers, Willem T. H.

    Searches for parity violation in hadronic systems started soon after the evidence for parity violation in β-decay of 60Co was presented by Madame Chien-Shiung Wu and in π and μ decay by Leon Lederman in 1957. The early searches for parity violation in hadronic systems did not reach the sensitivity required and only after technological advances in later years was parity violation unambiguously established. Within the meson-exchange description of the strong interaction, theory and experiment meet in a set of seven weak meson-nucleon coupling constants. Even today, after almost five decades, the determination of the seven weak meson-nucleon couplings is incomplete. Parity violation in nuclear systems is rather complex due to the intricacies of QCD. More straight forward in terms of interpretation are measurements of the proton-proton parity-violating analyzing power (normalized differences in scattering yields for positive and negative helicity incident beams), for which there exist three precision experiments (at 13.6, at 45, and 221 MeV). To-date, there are better possibilities for theoretical interpretation using effective field theory approaches. The situation with regard to the measurement of the parity-violating analyzing power or asymmetry in polarized electron scattering is quite different. Although the original measurements were intended to determine the electro-weak mixing angle, with the current knowledge of the electro-weak interaction and the great precision with which electro-weak radiative corrections can be calculated, the emphasis has been to study the structure of the nucleon, and in particular the strangeness content of the nucleon. A whole series of experiments (the SAMPLE experiment at MIT-Bates, the G0 experiment and HAPPEX experiments at Jefferson Laboratory (JLab), and the PVA4 experiment at MAMI) have indicated that the strange quark contributions to the charge and magnetization distributions of the nucleon are tiny. These measurements if

  6. Gamma-gamma colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.J.; Sessler, A.

    1996-06-01

    Gamma-gamma colliders make intense beams of gamma rays and have them collide so as to make elementary particles. The authors show, in this article, that constructing a gamma-gamma collider as an add-on to an electron-positron linear collider is possible with present technology and that it does not require much additional cost. Furthermore, they show that the resulting capability is very interesting from a particle physics point of view. An overview of a linear collider, with a second interaction region devoted to {gamma}{gamma} collisions is shown.

  7. Single spin asymmetries of inclusive hadrons produced in electron scattering from a transversely polarized 3 He target

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Allada, K.; Zhao, Y. X.; Aniol, K.; Annand, J. R. M.; Averett, T.; Benmokhtar, F.; Bertozzi, W.; Bradshaw, P. C.; Bosted, P.; Camsonne, A.; et al

    2014-04-07

    We report the first measurement of target single-spin asymmetries (AN) in the inclusive hadron production reaction, e + 3He↑→h+X, using a transversely polarized 3 He target. This experiment was conducted at Jefferson Lab in Hall A using a 5.9-GeV electron beam. Three types of hadrons (π±, K± and proton) were detected in the transverse hadron momentum range 0.54 < pT < 0.74 GeV/c. The range of xF for pions was -0.29 < xF< -0.23 and for kaons -0.25 < xF<-0.18. The observed asymmetry strongly depends on the type of hadron. A positive asymmetry is observed for π+ and K+. Amore » negative asymmetry is observed for π–. The magnitudes of the asymmetries follow |Aπ –|<|Aπ +|<|AK +|. The K– and proton asymmetries are consistent with zero within the experimental uncertainties. The π+ and π– asymmetries measured for the 3He target and extracted for neutrons are opposite in sign with a small increase observed as a function of pT.« less

  8. Status and future directions for advanced accelerator research - conventional and non-conventional collider concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Siemann, R.H.

    1997-01-01

    The relationship between advanced accelerator research and future directions for particle physics is discussed. Comments are made about accelerator research trends in hadron colliders, muon colliders, and e{sup +}3{sup {minus}} linear colliders.

  9. Experimental study of magnetically confined hollow electron beams in the Tevatron as collimators for intense high-energy hadron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Stancari, G.; Annala, G.; Shiltsev, V.; Still, D.; Valishev, A.; Vorobiev, L.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    Magnetically confined hollow electron beams for controlled halo removal in high-energy colliders such as the Tevatron or the LHC may extend traditional collimation systems beyond the intensity limits imposed by tolerable losses. They may also improve collimation performance by suppressing loss spikes due to beam jitter and by increasing capture efficiency. A hollow electron gun was designed and tested at Fermilab for this purpose. It was installed in one of the Tevatron electron lenses in the summer of 2010. We present the results of the first experimental tests of the hollow-beam collimation concept on 980-GeV antiproton bunches in the Tevatron.

  10. Virtual hadronic and leptonic contributions to Bhabha scattering.

    PubMed

    Actis, Stefano; Czakon, Michał; Gluza, Janusz; Riemann, Tord

    2008-04-01

    Using dispersion relations, we derive the complete virtual QED contributions to Bhabha scattering due to vacuum polarization effects. We apply our result to hadronic corrections and to heavy lepton and top quark loop insertions. We give the first complete estimate of their net numerical effects for both small and large angle scattering at typical beam energies of meson factories, the CERN Large Electron-Positron Collider, and the International Linear Collider. With a typical amount of 1-3 per mil they are of relevance for precision experiments. PMID:18517933

  11. A New Chicane Experiment in PEP-II to Test Mitigations of the Electron Cloud Effect for Linear Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Pivi, M. T.; Pivi, M.T.F.; Ng, J.S.T.; Arnett, D.; Cooper, F.; Kharakh, D.; King, F.K.; Kirby, R.E.; Kuekan, B.; Lipari, J.J.; Munro, M.; Olszewski, J.; Raubenheimer, T.O.; Seeman, J.; Spencer, C.M.; Wang, L.; Wittmer, W.; Celata, C.M.; Furman, M.A.; Smith, B.

    2008-06-11

    Beam instability caused by the electron cloud has been observed in positron and proton storage rings, and it is expected to be a limiting factor in the performance of future colliders [1-3]. The effect is expected to be particularly severe in magnetic field regions. To test possible mitigation methods in magnetic fields, we have installed a new 4-dipole chicane experiment in the PEP-II Low Energy Ring (LER) at SLAC with both bare and TiN-coated aluminum chambers. In particular, we have observed a large variation of the electron flux at the chamber wall as a function of the chicane dipole field. We infer this is a new high order resonance effect where the energy gained by the electrons in the positron beam depends on the phase of the electron cyclotron motion with respect to the bunch crossing, leading to a modulation of the secondary electron production. Presumably the cloud density is modulated as well and this resonance effect could be used to reduce its magnitude in future colliders. We present the experimental results obtained during January 2008 until the April final shut-down of the PEP-II machine.

  12. A New Chicane Experiment In PEP-II to Test Mitigations of the Electron Cloud Effect for Linear Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Pivi, M.T.F.; Ng, J.S.T.; Arnett, D.; Cooper, F.; Kharakh, D.; King, F.K.; Kirby, R.E.; Kuekan, B.; Lipari, J.J.; Munro, M.; Olszewski, J.; Raubenheimer, T.O.; Seeman, J.; Smith, B.; Spencer, C.M.; Wang, L.; Wittmer, W.; Celata, C.M.; Furman, M.A.; /SLAC /LBL, Berkeley

    2008-07-03

    Beam instability caused by the electron cloud has been observed in positron and proton storage rings, and it is expected to be a limiting factor in the performance of future colliders [1-3]. The effect is expected to be particularly severe in magnetic field regions. To test possible mitigation methods in magnetic fields, we have installed a new 4-dipole chicane experiment in the PEP-II Low Energy Ring (LER) at SLAC with both bare and TiN-coated aluminum chambers. In particular, we have observed a large variation of the electron flux at the chamber wall as a function of the chicane dipole field. We infer this is a new high order resonance effect where the energy gained by the electrons in the positron beam depends on the phase of the electron cyclotron motion with respect to the bunch crossing, leading to a modulation of the secondary electron production. Presumably the cloud density is modulated as well and this resonance effect could be used to reduce its magnitude in future colliders. We present the experimental results obtained during January 2008 until the April final shut-down of the PEP-II machine.

  13. Tau physics at p{bar p} colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Konigsberg, J.

    1993-01-01

    Tau detection techniques in hadron colliders are discussed together with the measurements and searches performed so far. We also underline the importance tau physics has in present and future collider experiments.

  14. P{bar P} collider physics

    SciTech Connect

    Demarteau, M.

    1992-04-01

    A brief introduction to {bar p}p collider physics is given. Selected results from the collider experiments at the CERN S{bar p}pS and the Tevatron collider are described. The emphasis is on experimental aspects of {bar p}p collisions. Minimum bias physics and the production of jets, Intermediate Vector Bosons and heavy flavors is reviewed. The outlook for physics at hadron colliders for the near future is briefly discussed.

  15. MULTI-WAVELENGTH EMISSION FROM THE FERMI BUBBLE. II. SECONDARY ELECTRONS AND THE HADRONIC MODEL OF THE BUBBLE

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, K.-S.; Chernyshov, D. O.; Dogiel, V. A.; Ko, C.-M.

    2015-01-20

    We analyze the origin of the gamma-ray flux from the Fermi Bubbles (FBs) in the framework of the hadronic model in which gamma-rays are produced by collisions of relativistic protons with the protons of the background plasma in the Galactic halo. It is assumed in this model that the observed radio emission from the FBs is due to synchrotron radiation of secondary electrons produced by pp collisions. However, if these electrons lose their energy through synchrotron and inverse-Compton emission, the spectrum of secondary electrons will be too soft, and an additional arbitrary component of the primary electrons will be necessary in order to reproduce the radio data. Thus, a mixture of the hadronic and leptonic models is required for the observed radio flux. It was shown that if the spectrum of primary electrons is ∝E{sub e}{sup −2}, the permitted range of the magnetic field strength is within the 2-7 μG region. The fraction of gamma-rays produced by pp collisions can reach about 80% of the total gamma-ray flux from the FBs. If the magnetic field is <2 μG or >7 μG the model is unable to reproduce the data. Alternatively, the electrons in the FBs may lose their energy through adiabatic energy losses if there is a strong plasma outflow in the GC. Then, the pure hadronic model is able to reproduce characteristics of the radio and gamma-ray flux from the FBs. However, in this case the required magnetic field strength in the FBs and the power of CR sources are much higher than those following from observations.

  16. Status report of a high luminosity muon collider and future research and development plans

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, R.B.; Tollestrup, A.; Sessler, A.

    1996-11-01

    Muon Colliders have unique technical and physics advantages and disadvantages when compared with both hadron and electron machines. They should thus be regarded as complementary. Parameters are given of 4 TeV and 0.5 TeV (c-of-m) high luminosity {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} colliders, and of a 0.5 TeV lower luminosity demonstration machine. We discuss the various systems in such muon colliders, starting from the proton accelerator needed to generate the muons and proceeding through muon cooling, acceleration and storage in a collider ring. Detector background, polarization, and nonstandard operating conditions are analyzed. Finally, we present an R & D plan to determine whether such machines are practical, and, if they are, lead to the construction of a 0.5 TeV demonstration by 2010, and to a 4 TeV collider by the year 2020.

  17. Recent electron-cloud simulation results for the main damping rings of the NLC and TESLA linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Pivi, M.; Raubenheimer, T.O.; Furman, M.A.

    2003-05-01

    In the beam pipe of the Main Damping Ring (MDR) of the Next Linear Collider (NLC), ionization of residual gases and secondary emission give rise to an electron-cloud which stabilizes to equilibrium after few bunch trains. In this paper, we present recent computer simulation results for the main features of the electron cloud at the NLC and preliminary simulation results for the TESLA main damping rings, obtained with the code POSINST that has been developed at LBNL, and lately in collaboration with SLAC, over the past 7 years. Possible remedies to mitigate the effect are also discussed. We have recently included the possibility to simulate different magnetic field configurations in our code including solenoid, quadrupole, sextupole and wiggler.

  18. Considerations on the design of front-end electronics for silicon calorimetry for the SSC (Superconducting Super Collider)

    SciTech Connect

    Wintenberg, A.L.; Bauer, M.L.; Britton, C.L. Jr.; Kennedy, E.J.; Todd, R.A. ); Berridge, S.C.; Bugg, W.M. )

    1990-01-01

    Some considerations are described for the design of a silicon-based sampling calorimetry detector for the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC). The use of silicon as the detection medium allows fast, accurate, and fine-grained energy measurements -- but for optimal performance, the front-end electronics must be matched to the detector characteristics and have the speed required by the high SSC interaction rates. The relation between the signal-to-noise ratio of the calorimeter electronics and the charge collection time, the preamplifier power dissipation, detector capacitance and leakage, charge gain, and signal shaping and sampling was studied. The electrostatic transformer connection was analyzed and found to be unusable for a tightly arranged calorimeter because of stray capacitance effects. The method of deconvolutional sampling was developed as a means for pileup correction following synchronous sampling and analog storage. 3 refs., 6 figs.

  19. Triangular flow of thermal photons from an event-by-event hydrodynamic model for 2.76 A TeV Pb + Pb collisions at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Rupa; Srivastava, Dinesh K.; Renk, Thorsten

    2016-07-01

    We calculate the triangular flow parameter v3 of thermal photons from an event-by-event ideal hydrodynamic model for 0-40% central collisions of Pb nuclei at √{sN N}=2.76 TeV at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. v3 determined with respect to the participant plane (PP) is found to be nonzero and positive, and its pT dependence is qualitatively similar to the elliptic flow parameter v2(PP) of thermal photons in the range 1 ≤pT≤6 GeV/c . In the range pT≤ 3 GeV/c , v3(PP) is found to be about 50-75% of v2(PP) and for pT> 3 GeV/c the two anisotropy parameters become comparable. The value of v3 is driven by local density fluctuations both directly via the creation of triangular geometry and indirectly via additional flow. As expected, the triangular flow parameter calculated with respect to the reaction plane v3(RP) is found to be close to zero. We show that v3(PP) strongly depends on the spatial size of fluctuations, especially in the higher pT(≥3 GeV /c ) region where a larger value of σ results in a smaller v3(PP ) . In addition, v3(PP ) is found to increase with the assumed formation time of the thermalized system.

  20. Impact of parton distribution function and {alpha}{sub s} uncertainties on Higgs boson production in gluon fusion at hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Demartin, Federico; Mariani, Elisa; Forte, Stefano; Vicini, Alessandro; Rojo, Juan

    2010-07-01

    We present a systematic study of uncertainties due to parton distributions (PDFs) and the strong coupling on the gluon-fusion production cross section of the standard model Higgs at the Tevatron and LHC colliders. We compare procedures and results when three recent sets of PDFs are used, CTEQ6.6, MSTW08, and NNPDF1.2, and we discuss specifically the way PDF and strong coupling uncertainties are combined. We find that results obtained from different PDF sets are in reasonable agreement if a common value of the strong coupling is adopted. We show that the addition in quadrature of PDF and {alpha}{sub s} uncertainties provides an adequate approximation to the full result with exact error propagation. We discuss a simple recipe to determine a conservative PDF+{alpha}{sub s} uncertainty from available global parton sets, and we use it to estimate this uncertainty on the given process to be about 10% at the Tevatron and 5% at the LHC for a light Higgs.