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Sample records for hadrons band-spinor representations

  1. Hadron interactions

    SciTech Connect

    K. Orginos

    2011-12-01

    In this talk I am reviewing recent calculations of properties of multi-hadron systems in lattice QCD. In particular, I am reviewing results of elastic scattering phase shifts in meson-meson, meson-baryon and baryon-baryon systems, as well as discussing results indicating possible existence of bound states in two baryon systems. Finally, calculations of properties of systems with more than two hadrons are presented.

  2. Hadron physics

    SciTech Connect

    Bunce, G.

    1984-05-30

    Is all hadronic physics ultimately describable by QCD. Certainly, many disparate phenomena can be understood within the QCD framework. Also certainly, there are important questions which are open, both theoretically (little guidance, as yet) and experimentally, regarding confinement. Are there dibaryons, baryonium, glueballs. In addition, there are experimental results which at present do not have an explanation. This talk, after a short section on QCD successes and difficulties, will emphasize two experimental topics which have recent results - glueball spectroscopy and exclusive reactions at large momentum transfer. Both are experimentally accessible in the AGS/LAMPF II/AGS II/TRIUMF II/SIN II energy domain.

  3. Light-cone quantization and hadron structure

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, S.J.

    1996-04-01

    Quantum chromodynamics provides a fundamental description of hadronic and nuclear structure and dynamics in terms of elementary quark and gluon degrees of freedom. In practice, the direct application of QCD to reactions involving the structure of hadrons is extremely complex because of the interplay of nonperturbative effects such as color confinement and multi-quark coherence. In this talk, the author will discuss light-cone quantization and the light-cone Fock expansion as a tractable and consistent representation of relativistic many-body systems and bound states in quantum field theory. The Fock state representation in QCD includes all quantum fluctuations of the hadron wavefunction, including fax off-shell configurations such as intrinsic strangeness and charm and, in the case of nuclei, hidden color. The Fock state components of the hadron with small transverse size, which dominate hard exclusive reactions, have small color dipole moments and thus diminished hadronic interactions. Thus QCD predicts minimal absorptive corrections, i.e., color transparency for quasi-elastic exclusive reactions in nuclear targets at large momentum transfer. In other applications, such as the calculation of the axial, magnetic, and quadrupole moments of light nuclei, the QCD relativistic Fock state description provides new insights which go well beyond the usual assumptions of traditional hadronic and nuclear physics.

  4. QCD in hadron-hadron collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Albrow, M.

    1997-03-01

    Quantum Chromodynamics provides a good description of many aspects of high energy hadron-hadron collisions, and this will be described, along with some aspects that are not yet understood in QCD. Topics include high E{sub T} jet production, direct photon, W, Z and heavy flavor production, rapidity gaps and hard diffraction.

  5. High energy hadron-hadron collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, T.T.

    1990-11-01

    Results of a study on high energy collision with the geometrical model are summarized in three parts: (i) the elastic hadron-hadron collision, (ii) the inelastic hadron-hadron collision, and (iii) the e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} annihilation. For elastic collisions, a simple expression for the proton matter distribution is proposed which fits well the elastic {bar p}p scattering from ISR to S{bar p}pS energies within the geometrical model. The proton form factor is of the dipole form with an energy-dependent range parameter. The {bar p}p elastic differential cross section at Tevatron energies obtained by extrapolation is in good agreement with experiments. For multiparticle emission processes a unified physical picture for hadron-hadron and e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} collisions was proposed. A number of predictions were made, including the one that KNO-scaling does not obtain for e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} two-jet events. An extension of the considerations within the geometrical model led to a theory of the momentum distributions of the outgoing particles which are found in good agreement with current experimental data. Extrapolations of results to higher energies have been made. The cluster size of hadrons produced in e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} annihilation is found to increase slowly with energy.

  6. Theory of hadronic nonperturbative models

    SciTech Connect

    Coester, F.; Polyzou, W.N.

    1995-08-01

    As more data probing hadron structure become available hadron models based on nonperturbative relativistic dynamics will be increasingly important for their interpretation. Relativistic Hamiltonian dynamics of few-body systems (constituent-quark models) and many-body systems (parton models) provides a precisely defined approach and a useful phenomenology. However such models lack a quantitative foundation in quantum field theory. The specification of a quantum field theory by a Euclidean action provides a basis for the construction of nonperturbative models designed to maintain essential features of the field theory. For finite systems it is possible to satisfy axioms which guarantee the existence of a Hilbert space with a unitary representation of the Poincare group and the spectral condition which ensures that the spectrum of the four-momentum operator is in the forward light cone. The separate axiom which guarantees locality of the field operators can be weakened for the construction for few-body models. In this context we are investigating algebraic and analytic properties of model Schwinger functions. This approach promises insight into the relations between hadronic models based on relativistic Hamiltonian dynamics on one hand and Bethe-Salpeter Green`s-function equations on the other.

  7. Hadron Physics at FAIR

    SciTech Connect

    Wiedner, Ulrich

    2011-10-24

    The new FAIR facility in Darmstadt has a broad program in the field of hadron and nuclear physics utilizing ion beams with unprecedented intensity and accuracy. The hadron physics program centers around the the high-energy storage ring HESR for antiprotons and the PANDA experiment that is integrated in it. The physics program includes among others topics like hadron spectroscopy in the charmonium mass region and below, hyperon physics, electromagnetic processes and charm in nuclei.

  8. Holographic Model of Hadronization

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Nick; Tedder, Andrew

    2008-04-25

    We study hadronization of the final state in a particle-antiparticle annihilation using a holographic gravity dual description of QCD. At the point of hadronization we match the events to a simple (Gaussian) energy distribution in the five dimensional theory. The final state multiplicities are then modeled by calculating the overlap between the Gaussian and a set of functions in the fifth dimension which represent each hadron. We compare our results to those measured in e{sup +}e{sup -} collisions. Hadron production numbers over a range of 4 orders of magnitude are reproduced well.

  9. Holographic model of hadronization.

    PubMed

    Evans, Nick; Tedder, Andrew

    2008-04-25

    We study hadronization of the final state in a particle-antiparticle annihilation using a holographic gravity dual description of QCD. At the point of hadronization we match the events to a simple (Gaussian) energy distribution in the five dimensional theory. The final state multiplicities are then modeled by calculating the overlap between the Gaussian and a set of functions in the fifth dimension which represent each hadron. We compare our results to those measured in e(+)e(-) collisions. Hadron production numbers over a range of 4 orders of magnitude are reproduced well.

  10. QCD, hadrons and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nardulli, G.

    2005-04-01

    I give a summary of Section E of the sixth edition of the Conference Quark confinement and the hadron spectrum. Papers were presented on different subjects, from spectroscopy, including pentaquarks and hadron structure, to new physics effects (non commutative field theories, supersymmetry and extra dimensions) and the problem of color confinement, both in ordinary Yang-Mills models and in supersymmetric Yang-Mills.

  11. Renormdynamics and Hadronization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makhaldiani, Nugzar

    2016-01-01

    Independently radiating valence quarks and corresponding negative binomial distribution presents phenomenologically preferable mechanism of hadronization in multiparticle production processes. Main properties of the renormdynamics, corresponding motion equations and their solutions are considered.

  12. Radiobiology of Hadrons

    SciTech Connect

    Streit-Bianchi, Marilena

    2008-08-11

    Radiobiological studies of hadrons beams are essential for optimizing tumour treatments. Whit hadrons when clinical facilities are running radiobiological studies are also done to ensure beam optimization and quality control as well as for the understanding of tumour and normal tissue reactions and late effects. Beam characteristic determinations nowadays are carried out according to well established radiobiological standard parameters and using well established biological reference systems. Some of the most recent studies on the topic are reported here.

  13. Radiobiology of Hadrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streit-Bianchi, Marilena

    2008-08-01

    Radiobiological studies of hadrons beams are essential for optimizing tumour treatments. Whit hadrons when clinical facilities are running radiobiological studies are also done to ensure beam optimization and quality control as well as for the understanding of tumour and normal tissue reactions and late effects. Beam characteristic determinations nowadays are carried out according to well established radiobiological standard parameters and using well established biological reference systems. Some of the most recent studies on the topic are reported here.

  14. Holography inspired stringy hadrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonnenschein, Jacob

    2017-01-01

    Holography inspired stringy hadrons (HISH) is a set of models that describe hadrons: mesons, baryons and glueballs as strings in flat four dimensional space-time. The models are based on a "map" from stringy hadrons of holographic confining backgrounds. In this note we review the "derivation" of the models. We start with a brief reminder of the passage from the AdS5 ×S5 string theory to certain flavored confining holographic models. We then describe the string configurations in holographic backgrounds that correspond to a Wilson line, a meson, a baryon and a glueball. The key ingredients of the four dimensional picture of hadrons are the "string endpoint mass" and the "baryonic string vertex". We determine the classical trajectories of the HISH. We review the current understanding of the quantization of the hadronic strings. We end with a summary of the comparison of the outcome of the HISH models with the PDG data about mesons and baryons. We extract the values of the tension, masses and intercepts from best fits, write down certain predictions for higher excited hadrons and present attempts to identify glueballs.

  15. Hadronization of partons

    SciTech Connect

    Albino, S.

    2010-07-15

    The description of inclusive production of single unpolarized light hadrons using fragmentation functions in the framework of the factorization theorem is reviewed. The factorization of observables into perturbatively calculable quantities and these universal fragmentation functions are summarized and some improvements beyond the standard fixed order approach are discussed. The extraction of fragmentation functions for light charged ({pi}{sup {+-}}, K{sup {+-}}, and p/p) and neutral (K{sub S}{sup 0} and {Lambda}/{Lambda}) hadrons using these theoretical tools is discussed through global fits to experimental data from reactions at various colliders, in particular from accurate e{sup +}e{sup -} reactions at the Large Electron-Position Collider (LEP), and the subsequent successful predictions of other experimental data, such as data gathered at Hadron Electron Ring Accelerator (HERA), the Tevatron, and the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), from these fitted fragmentation functions as allowed by factorization universality. These global fits also impose competitive constraints on {alpha}{sub s}(M{sub Z}). Emphasis is placed on the need for accurate data from pp(p) and ep reactions in which the hadron species is identified in order to constrain the separate fragmentation functions of the gluon and each quark flavor for each hadron species.

  16. Hadron Resonances from QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudek, Jozef J.

    2016-03-01

    I describe how hadron-hadron scattering amplitudes are related to the eigenstates of QCD in a finite cubic volume. The discrete spectrum of such eigenstates can be determined from correlation functions computed using lattice QCD, and the corresponding scattering amplitudes extracted. I review results from the Hadron Spectrum Collaboration who have used these finite volume methods to study ππ elastic scattering, including the ρ resonance, as well as coupled-channel πK, ηK scattering. The very recent extension to the case where an external current acts is also presented, considering the reaction πγ* → ππ, from which the unstable ρ → πγ transition form factor is extracted. Ongoing calculations are advertised and the outlook for finite volume approaches is presented.

  17. High intensity hadron accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Teng, L.C.

    1989-05-01

    This rapporteur report consists mainly of two parts. Part I is an abridged review of the status of all High Intensity Hadron Accelerator projects in the world in semi-tabulated form for quick reference and comparison. Part II is a brief discussion of the salient features of the different technologies involved. The discussion is based mainly on my personal experiences and opinions, tempered, I hope, by the discussions I participated in in the various parallel sessions of the workshop. In addition, appended at the end is my evaluation and expression of the merits of high intensity hadron accelerators as research facilities for nuclear and particle physics.

  18. Hadron Physics with Antiprotons

    SciTech Connect

    Wiedner, Ulrich

    2005-10-26

    The new FAIR facility which comes into operation at GSI in the upcoming years has a dedicated program of utilizing antiprotons for hadron physics. In particular, the planned PANDA experiment belongs to the group of core experiments at the new FAIR facility in Darmstadt/Germany. PANDA will be a universal detector to study the strong interaction by utilizing the annihilation process of antiprotons with protons and nuclear matter. The current paper gives an introduction into the hadron physics with antiprotons and part of the planned physics program with PANDA.

  19. Hadron Therapy for Cancer Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Lennox, Arlene

    2003-09-10

    The biological and physical rationale for hadron therapy is well understood by the research community, but hadron therapy is not well established in mainstream medicine. This talk will describe the biological advantage of neutron therapy and the dose distribution advantage of proton therapy, followed by a discussion of the challenges to be met before hadron therapy can play a significant role in treating cancer. A proposal for a new research-oriented hadron clinic will be presented.

  20. Weibull model of multiplicity distribution in hadron-hadron collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dash, Sadhana; Nandi, Basanta K.; Sett, Priyanka

    2016-06-01

    We introduce the use of the Weibull distribution as a simple parametrization of charged particle multiplicities in hadron-hadron collisions at all available energies, ranging from ISR energies to the most recent LHC energies. In statistics, the Weibull distribution has wide applicability in natural processes that involve fragmentation processes. This provides a natural connection to the available state-of-the-art models for multiparticle production in hadron-hadron collisions, which involve QCD parton fragmentation and hadronization. The Weibull distribution describes the multiplicity data at the most recent LHC energies better than the single negative binomial distribution.

  1. Hadron collider physics

    SciTech Connect

    Pondrom, L.

    1991-10-03

    An introduction to the techniques of analysis of hadron collider events is presented in the context of the quark-parton model. Production and decay of W and Z intermediate vector bosons are used as examples. The structure of the Electroweak theory is outlined. Three simple FORTRAN programs are introduced, to illustrate Monte Carlo calculation techniques. 25 refs.

  2. Why Representations?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schultz, James E.; Waters, Michael S.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses representations in the context of solving a system of linear equations. Views representations (concrete, tables, graphs, algebraic, matrices) from perspectives of understanding, technology, generalization, exact versus approximate solution, and learning style. (KHR)

  3. Phase variation of hadronic amplitudes

    SciTech Connect

    Dedonder, J.-P.; Gibbs, W. R.; Nuseirat, Mutazz

    2008-04-15

    The phase variation with angle of hadronic amplitudes is studied with a view to understanding the underlying physical quantities that control it and how well it can be determined in free space. We find that unitarity forces a moderately accurate determination of the phase in standard amplitude analyses but that the nucleon-nucleon analyses done to date do not give the phase variation needed to achieve a good representation of the data in multiple scattering calculations. Models are examined that suggest its behavior near forward angles is related to the radii of the real and absorptive parts of the interaction. The dependence of this phase on model parameters is such that if these radii are modified in the nuclear medium (in combination with the change due to the shift in energy of the effective amplitude in the medium) then the larger magnitudes of the phase needed to fit the data might be attainable but only for negative values of the phase variation parameter.

  4. QCD and Hadron Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; Deshpande, Abhay L.; Gao, Haiyan; McKeown, Robert D.; Meyer, Curtis A.; Meziani, Zein-Eddine; Milner, Richard G.; Qiu, Jianwei; Richards, David G.; Roberts, Craig D.

    2015-02-26

    This White Paper presents the recommendations and scientific conclusions from the Town Meeting on QCD and Hadronic Physics that took place in the period 13-15 September 2014 at Temple University as part of the NSAC 2014 Long Range Planning process. The meeting was held in coordination with the Town Meeting on Phases of QCD and included a full day of joint plenary sessions of the two meetings. The goals of the meeting were to report and highlight progress in hadron physics in the seven years since the 2007 Long Range Plan (LRP07), and present a vision for the future by identifying the key questions and plausible paths to solutions which should define the next decade. The introductory summary details the recommendations and their supporting rationales, as determined at the Town Meeting on QCD and Hadron Physics, and the endorsements that were voted upon. The larger document is organized as follows. Section 2 highlights major progress since the 2007 LRP. It is followed, in Section 3, by a brief overview of the physics program planned for the immediate future. Finally, Section 4 provides an overview of the physics motivations and goals associated with the next QCD frontier: the Electron-Ion-Collider.

  5. Hadronization processes in neutrino interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Katori, Teppei; Mandalia, Shivesh

    2015-10-15

    Next generation neutrino oscillation experiments utilize details of hadronic final states to improve the precision of neutrino interaction measurements. The hadronic system was often neglected or poorly modelled in the past, but they have significant effects on high precision neutrino oscillation and cross-section measurements. Among the physics of hadronic systems in neutrino interactions, the hadronization model controls multiplicities and kinematics of final state hadrons from the primary interaction vertex. For relatively high invariant mass events, many neutrino experiments rely on the PYTHIA program. Here, we show a possible improvement of this process in neutrino event generators, by utilizing expertise from the HERMES experiment. Finally, we estimate the impact on the systematics of hadronization models for neutrino mass hierarchy analysis using atmospheric neutrinos such as the PINGU experiment.

  6. Physics of very high energy hadron-hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Hinchliffe, I.

    1986-09-01

    A review is given of the physics accessible at a very high energy hadron-hadron collider. Emphasis is placed on the reliability of the predicted rates, and upon the energy and luminosity required to explore new physics options. 38 refs., 19 figs.

  7. Gamma-hadron families and scaling violation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaisser, T. K.; Stanev, T.; Wrotniak, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    For three different interaction models we have simulated gamma-hadron families, including the detector (Pamir emulsion chamber) response. Rates of gamma families, hadrons, and hadron-gamma ratios were compared with experiments.

  8. Quarkonia production with leptons and hadrons

    SciTech Connect

    V. Papadimitriou

    2004-06-09

    We discuss current issues and present the latest measurements on quarkonia production from experiments monitoring hadron-hadron and lepton-hadron collisions. These measurements include cross section and polarization results for charmonium and bottomonium states.

  9. Hadronic laws from QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahill, R. T.

    1992-06-01

    A review is given of progress in deriving the effective action for hadronic physics, S[π, ϱ, ω,.., overlineN, N,..] , from the fundamental defining action of QCD, S[ overlineq, q, A μa] . This is a problem in quantum field theory and the most success so far has been achieved using functional integral calculus (FIC) techniques. This formulates the problem as an exercise in changing the variables of integration in the functional integrals, from those of the quark and gluon fields to those of the (bare) meson and baryon fields. The appropriate variables are determined by the dynamics of QCD, and the final hadronic variables (essentially the 'normal modes' of QCD) are local fields describing the 'centre-of-mass' motion of extended bound states of quarks. The quarks are extensively dressed by the gluons, and the detailed aspects of the hidden chiral symmetry emerge naturally from the formalism. Particular attention is given to covariant integral equations which determine bare nucleon structure (i.e. in the quenched approximation). These equations, which arise from the closed double-helix diagrams of the FIC analysis, describe the baryons in terms of quark-diquark structure, in the form of Faddeev equations. This hadronisation of QCD also generates the dressing of these baryons by the pions, and the non-local πNN coupling.

  10. Energy dependence of hadronic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabriel, T. A.; Groom, D. E.; Job, P. K.; Mokhov, N. V.; Stevenson, G. R.

    1994-01-01

    Two features of high-energy hadronic cascades have long been known to shielding specialists: a) in a high-energy hadronic cascade in a given material (incident E ≳ 10 GeV), the relative abundance and spectrum of each hadronic species responsible for most of the energy deposition is independent of the energy or species of the incident hadron, and b) because π0 production bleeds off more and more energy into the electromagnetic sector as the energy of the incident hadron increases, the absolute level of this low-energy hadronic activity ( E ≲ 1 GeV) rises less rapidly than the incident energy, and in fact rises very nearly as a power of the incident energy. Both features are of great importance in hadron calorimetry, where it is the "universal spectrum" which makes possible the definition of an intrinsic {e}/{h}, and the increasing fraction of the energy going into π0's which leads to the energy dependence of {e}/{π}. We present evidence for the "universal spectrum," and use an induction argument and simulation results to demonstrate that the low-energy activity ss Em, with 0.80 ≲ m ≲ 0.85. The hadronic activity produced by incident pions is 15-20% less than that initiated by protons.

  11. Quarkonium production in hadronic collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Gavai, R.; Schuler, G.A.; Sridhar, K.

    1995-07-01

    We summarize the theoretical description of charmonium and bottonium production in hadronic collisions and compare it to the available data from hadron-nucleon interactions. With the parameters of the theory established by these data, we obtain predictions for quarkonium production at RHIC and LHC energies.

  12. Review of hadrons in medium

    SciTech Connect

    Krein, Gastão

    2016-01-22

    I review the present status in the theoretical and phenomenological understanding of hadron properties in strongly interacting matter. The topics covered are the EMC effect, nucleon structure functions in cold nuclear matter, spectral properties of light vector mesons in hot and cold nuclear matter, and in-medium properties of heavy flavored hadrons.

  13. Hadron production experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Boris A.

    2013-02-01

    The HARP and NA61/SHINE hadroproduction experiments as well as their implications for neutrino physics are discussed. HARP measurements have already been used for predictions of neutrino beams in K2K and MiniBooNE/SciBooNE experiments and are also being used to improve the atmospheric neutrino flux predictions and to help in the optimization of neutrino factory and super-beam designs. First measurements released recently by the NA61/SHINE experiment are of significant importance for a precise prediction of the J-PARC neutrino beam used for the T2K experiment. Both HARP and NA61/SHINE experiments provide also a large amount of input for validation and tuning of hadron production models in Monte-Carlo generators.

  14. Hadron collider physics at UCR

    SciTech Connect

    Kernan, A.; Shen, B.C.

    1997-07-01

    This paper describes the research work in high energy physics by the group at the University of California, Riverside. Work has been divided between hadron collider physics and e{sup +}-e{sup {minus}} collider physics, and theoretical work. The hadron effort has been heavily involved in the startup activities of the D-Zero detector, commissioning and ongoing redesign. The lepton collider work has included work on TPC/2{gamma} at PEP and the OPAL detector at LEP, as well as efforts on hadron machines.

  15. Physics at future hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    U. Baur et al.

    2002-12-23

    We discuss the physics opportunities and detector challenges at future hadron colliders. As guidelines for energies and luminosities we use the proposed luminosity and/or energy upgrade of the LHC (SLHC), and the Fermilab design of a Very Large Hadron Collider (VLHC). We illustrate the physics capabilities of future hadron colliders for a variety of new physics scenarios (supersymmetry, strong electroweak symmetry breaking, new gauge bosons, compositeness and extra dimensions). We also investigate the prospects of doing precision Higgs physics studies at such a machine, and list selected Standard Model physics rates.

  16. Forward physics of hadronic colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, I. P.

    2013-12-01

    These lectures were given at the Baikal Summer School on Physics of Elementary Particles and Astrophysics in July 2012. They can be viewed as a concise introduction to hadronic diffraction, to the physics of the Pomeron and related topics.

  17. Two types of hadrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaffe, R. L.

    2008-05-01

    Resonances and enhancements in meson-meson scattering can be divided into two classes distinguished by their behavior as the number of colors (Nc) in QCD becomes large: The first are ordinary mesons that become stable as Nc → ∞. This class includes textbook qbar q mesons as well as glueballs and hybrids. The second class, extraordinary mesons, are enhancements that disappear as Nc → ∞; they subside into the hadronic continuum. This class includes indistinct and controversial objects that have been classified as qbarqbar qq mesons or meson-meson molecules. Peláez's study of the Nc dependence of unitarized chiral dynamics illustrates both classes: the p-wave ππ and Kπ resonances, the ρ (770) and K∗ (892), behave as ordinary mesons; the s-wave ππ and Kπ enhancements, the σ (600) and κ (800), behave like extraordinary mesons. Ordinary mesons resemble Feshbach resonances while extraordinary mesons look more like effects due to potentials in meson-meson scattering channels. I build and explore toy models along these lines. Finally I discuss some related dynamical issues affecting the interpretation of extraordinary mesons.

  18. Late effects from hadron therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Blakely, Eleanor A.; Chang, Polly Y.

    2004-06-01

    Successful cancer patient survival and local tumor control from hadron radiotherapy warrant a discussion of potential secondary late effects from the radiation. The study of late-appearing clinical effects from particle beams of protons, carbon, or heavier ions is a relatively new field with few data. However, new clinical information is available from pioneer hadron radiotherapy programs in the USA, Japan, Germany and Switzerland. This paper will review available data on late tissue effects from particle radiation exposures, and discuss its importance to the future of hadron therapy. Potential late radiation effects are associated with irradiated normal tissue volumes at risk that in many cases can be reduced with hadron therapy. However, normal tissues present within hadron treatment volumes can demonstrate enhanced responses compared to conventional modes of therapy. Late endpoints of concern include induction of secondary cancers, cataract, fibrosis, neurodegeneration, vascular damage, and immunological, endocrine and hereditary effects. Low-dose tissue effects at tumor margins need further study, and there is need for more acute molecular studies underlying late effects of hadron therapy.

  19. Representing Representation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuntz, Aaron M.

    2010-01-01

    What can be known and how to render what we know are perpetual quandaries met by qualitative research, complicated further by the understanding that the everyday discourses influencing our representations are often tacit, unspoken or heard so often that they seem to warrant little reflection. In this article, I offer analytic memos as a means for…

  20. Hadron particle theory

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso, J.R.

    1995-05-01

    Radiation therapy with ``hadrons`` (protons, neutrons, pions, ions) has accrued a 55-year track record, with by now over 30,000 patients having received treatments with one of these particles. Very good, and in some cases spectacular results are leading to growth in the field in specific well-defined directions. The most noted contributor to success has been the ability to better define and control the radiation field produced with these particles, to increase the dose delivered to the treatment volume while achieving a high degree of sparing of normal tissue. An additional benefit is the highly-ionizing, character of certain beams, leading to creater cell-killing potential for tumor lines that have historically been very resistant to radiation treatments. Until recently these treatments have been delivered in laboratories and research centers whose primary, or original mission was physics research. With maturity in the field has come both the desire to provide beam facilities more accessible to the clinical setting, of a hospital, as well as achieving, highly-efficient, reliable and economical accelerator and beam-delivery systems that can make maximum advantage of the physical characteristics of these particle beams. Considerable work in technology development is now leading, to the implementation of many of these ideas, and a new generation of clinically-oriented facilities is beginning to appear. We will discuss both the physical, clinical and technological considerations that are driving these designs, as well as highlighting, specific examples of new facilities that are either now treating, patients or that will be doing so in the near future.

  1. QCD thermodynamics and missing hadron states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petreczky, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Equation of State and fluctuations of conserved charges in hot strongly interacting matter are being calculated with increasing accuracy in lattice QCD, and continuum results at physical quark masses become available. At sufficiently low temperature the thermodynamic quantities can be understood in terms of hadron resonance gas model that includes known hadrons and hadronic resonances from Particle Data Book. However, for some quantities it is necessary to include undiscovered hadronic resonances (missing states) that are, however, predicted by quark model and lattice QCD study of hadron spectrum. Thus, QCD thermodynamics can provide indications for the existence of yet undiscovered hadron states.

  2. The segmentation of hadron calorimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, He Sheng

    1987-05-01

    Optimization of the segmentation of large hadron calorimeters is important in order to obtain good resolution for jet physics at minimum construction cost for the next generation of high energy experiments. The principles of the segmentation of hadron calorimeters are discussed. As an example, the Monte Carlo optimization of the segmentation of the L3 hadron calorimeter barrel at CERN is described. Comparisons of results for the reconstructed jet shapes show that the optimum number ADC channels is about 20K for the readout of 450K wires of the proportional chambers. The matching between the sandwiched φ towers and Z towers is the dominant factor for angular resolution. Based on these Monte Carlo simulations, an optimized tower structure is obtained.

  3. History of hadron therapy accelerators.

    PubMed

    Degiovanni, Alberto; Amaldi, Ugo

    2015-06-01

    In the last 60 years, hadron therapy has made great advances passing from a stage of pure research to a well-established treatment modality for solid tumours. In this paper the history of hadron therapy accelerators is reviewed, starting from the first cyclotrons used in the thirties for neutron therapy and passing to more modern and flexible machines used nowadays. The technical developments have been accompanied by clinical studies that allowed the selection of the tumours which are more sensitive to this type of radiotherapy. This paper aims at giving a review of the origin and the present status of hadron therapy accelerators, describing the technological basis and the continuous development of this application to medicine of instruments developed for fundamental science. At the end the present challenges are reviewed.

  4. Quenched hadron spectrum of QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Seyong.

    1992-12-01

    We calculate hadron spectrum of quantum chromodynamics without dynamical fermions on a 32[sup 3] [times] 64 lattice volume at [beta] = 6.5. Using two different wall sources of staggered fermion whose mass is 0.01, 0.005 and 0.0025 under the background gauge configurations, we extract local light hadron masses and the [triangle] masses and compare these hadron masses with those from experiments. The numerical simulation is executed on the Intel Touchstone Delta computer. We employ multihit metropolis algorithm with over-relaxation method steps to update gauge field configuration and gauge field configuration are collected at every 1000 sweeps. After the gauge field configuration is fixed to Coulomb gauge, the conjugate gradient method is used for Dirac matrix inversion.

  5. Quenched hadron spectrum of QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Seyong

    1992-12-01

    We calculate hadron spectrum of quantum chromodynamics without dynamical fermions on a 32{sup 3} {times} 64 lattice volume at {beta} = 6.5. Using two different wall sources of staggered fermion whose mass is 0.01, 0.005 and 0.0025 under the background gauge configurations, we extract local light hadron masses and the {triangle} masses and compare these hadron masses with those from experiments. The numerical simulation is executed on the Intel Touchstone Delta computer. We employ multihit metropolis algorithm with over-relaxation method steps to update gauge field configuration and gauge field configuration are collected at every 1000 sweeps. After the gauge field configuration is fixed to Coulomb gauge, the conjugate gradient method is used for Dirac matrix inversion.

  6. Hadron Contribution to Vacuum Polarisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davier, M.; Hoecker, A.; Malaescu, B.; Zhang, Z.

    2016-10-01

    Precision tests of the Standard Theory require theoretical predictions taking into account higher-order quantum corrections. Among these vacuum polarisation plays a predominant role. Vacuum polarisation originates from creation and annihilation of virtual particle-antiparticle states. Leptonic vacuum polarisation can be computed from quantum electrodynamics. Hadronic vacuum polarisation cannot because of the non-perturbative nature of QCD at low energy. The problem is remedied by establishing dispersion relations involving experimental data on the cross section for e+ e- annihilation into hadrons. This chapter sets the theoretical and experimental scene and reviews the progress achieved in the last decades thanks to more precise and complete data sets. Among the various applications of hadronic vacuum polarisation calculations, two are emphasised: the contribution to the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon, and the running of the fine structure constant α to the Z mass scale. They are fundamental ingredients to high precision tests of the Standard Theory.

  7. Hadron scattering, resonances, and QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Briceno, Raul

    2016-12-01

    The non-perturbative nature of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) has historically left a gap in our understanding of the connection between the fundamental theory of the strong interactions and the rich structure of experimentally observed phenomena. For the simplest properties of stable hadrons, this is now circumvented with the use of lattice QCD (LQCD). In this talk I discuss a path towards a rigorous determination of few-hadron observables from LQCD. I illustrate the power of the methodology by presenting recently determined scattering amplitudes in the light-meson sector and their resonance content.

  8. Properties of b-flavored hadrons

    SciTech Connect

    Jaros, J.A.

    1983-10-01

    Experimental progress in the study of b-flavored hadrons is reviewed. The observation of the B meson, properties of hadronic B decays, semi-leptonic B decays, and the B lifetime are discussed. 30 references.

  9. Quark-Hadron Duality in Electron Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    W. Melnitchouk

    2000-09-01

    Quark-hadron duality addresses some of the most fundamental issues in strong interaction physics, in particular the nature of the transition from the perturbative to non-perturbative regions of QCD. I summarize recent developments in quark-hadron duality in lepton-hadron scattering, and outline how duality can be studied at future high-luminosity facilities such as Jefferson Lab at 12 GeV, or an electron-hadron collider such as EPIC.

  10. Sudden Hadronization in Relativistic Nuclear Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Rafelski, Johann; Letessier, Jean

    2000-11-27

    We formulate and study a mechanical instability criterion for sudden hadronization of dense matter fireballs formed in 158A GeV Pb-Pb collisions. Considering properties of quark-gluon matter and hadron gas we obtain the phase boundary between these two phases and demonstrate that the required deep quark-gluon-plasma supercooling prior to sudden hadronization has occurred.

  11. Future hadron physics at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Appel, Jeffrey A.; /Fermilab

    2005-09-01

    Today, hadron physics research occurs at Fermilab as parts of broader experimental programs. This is very likely to be the case in the future. Thus, much of this presentation focuses on our vision of that future--a future aimed at making Fermilab the host laboratory for the International Linear Collider (ILC). Given the uncertainties associated with the ILC--the level of needed R&D, the ILC costs, and the timing--Fermilab is also preparing for other program choices. I will describe these latter efforts, efforts focused on a Proton Driver to increase the numbers of protons available for experiments. As examples of the hadron physics which will be coming from Fermilab, I summarize three experiments: MIPP/E907 which is running currently, and MINERvA and Drell-Yan/E906 which are scheduled for future running periods. Hadron physics coming from the Tevatron Collider program will be summarized by Arthur Maciel in another talk at Hadron05.

  12. The very large hadron collider

    SciTech Connect

    1998-09-01

    This paper reviews the purposes to be served by a very large hadron collider and the organization and coordination of efforts to bring it about. There is some discussion of magnet requirements and R&D and the suitability of the Fermilab site.

  13. Key Issues in Hadronic Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Simon Capstick; et. Al.

    2000-12-01

    A group of fifty physicists met in Duck, NC, Nov. 6-9 to discuss the current status and future goals of hadronic physics. The main purpose of the meeting was to define the field by identifying its key issues, challenges, and opportunities. The conclusions, incorporating considerable input from the community at large, are presented in this white paper.

  14. Hadronic Interactions from Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Konstantinos Orginos

    2006-03-19

    In this talk I discuss a few recent results on lattice calculations of scattering lengths in hadronic processes. In particular, I present the scattering length of the pion-pion scattering in the I=2 channel and the nucleon-nucleon {sup 1}S{sub 0} channel and {sup 3}S{sub 1}-{sup 3}D{sub 1} coupled channels.

  15. Exciting Developments in Hadron Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Seth, Kamal K.

    2006-02-11

    There has been a renaissance in hadron spectroscopy during the last couple of years. Long lost states have been tracked down. Unexpected states are showing up all over, and numerous measurements with unprecedented precision are being reported. A review is presented.

  16. B physics at hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, J.N.; /Fermilab

    2005-09-01

    This paper discusses the physics opportunity and challenges for doing high precision B physics experiments at hadron colliders. It describes how these challenges have been addressed by the two currently operating experiments, CDF and D0, and how they are addressed by three experiments, ATLAS, CMS, and LHCb, at the LHC.

  17. Anomalous correlation between hadron and electromagnetic particles in hadron and gamma-ray families

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tamada, M.

    1985-01-01

    Correlations between hadrons and electromagnetic particles were studied in the hadron-gamma families observed in the Chacaltaya emulsion chamber experiment. It is found that there exist a number of hadrons which associate electromagnetic showers in extraordinarily close vicinity. The probability to have such a large number of hadrons associating electromagnetic showers, expected from background calculation, is found to be negligibly small and it means there exists anomalous correlation between hadrons and electromagnetic particles in the characteristic spread of atmospheric electromagnetic cascade.

  18. Thermalization of hadrons via Hagedorn states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beitel, M.; Gallmeister, K.; Greiner, C.

    2014-10-01

    Hagedorn states are characterized by being very massive hadron-like resonances and by not being limited to quantum numbers of known hadrons. To generate such a zoo of different Hagedorn states, a covariantly formulated bootstrap equation is solved by ensuring energy conservation and conservation of baryon number B, strangeness S, and electric charge Q. The numerical solution of this equation provides Hagedorn spectra, which also enable us to obtain the decay width for Hagedorn states needed in cascading decay simulations. A single Hagedorn state cascades by various two-body decay channels subsequently into final stable hadrons. All final hadronic observables such as masses, spectral functions, and decay branching ratios for hadronic feed-down are taken from a hadronic transport model. Strikingly, the final energy spectra of resulting hadrons are exponential, showing a thermal-like distribution with the characteristic Hagedorn temperature.

  19. Future Electron-Hadron Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Litvinenko, V.

    2010-05-23

    Outstanding research potential of electron-hadron colliders (EHC) was clearly demonstrated by first - and the only - electron-proton collider HERA (DESY, Germany). Physics data from HERA revealed new previously unknown facets of Quantum Chromo-Dynamics (QCD). EHC is an ultimate microscope probing QCD in its natural environment, i.e. inside the hadrons. In contrast with hadrons, electrons are elementary particles with known initial state. Hence, scattering electrons from hadrons provides a clearest pass to their secrets. It turns EHC into an ultimate machine for high precision QCD studies and opens access to rich physics with a great discovery potential: solving proton spin puzzle, observing gluon saturation or physics beyond standard model. Access to this physics requires high-energy high-luminosity EHCs and a wide reach in the center-of-mass (CM) energies. This paper gives a brief overview of four proposed electron-hadron colliders: ENC at GSI (Darmstadt, Germany), ELIC/MEIC at TJNAF (Newport News, VA, USA), eRHIC at BNL (Upton, NY, USA) and LHeC at CERN (Geneva, Switzerland). Future electron-hadron colliders promise to deliver very rich physics not only in the quantity but also in the precision. They are aiming at very high luminosity two-to-four orders of magnitude beyond the luminosity demonstrated by the very successful HERA. While ENC and LHeC are on opposite side of the energy spectrum, eRHIC and ELIC are competing for becoming an electron-ion collider (EIC) in the U.S. Administrations of BNL and Jlab, in concert with US DoE office of Nuclear Physics, work on the strategy for down-selecting between eRHIC and ELIC. The ENC, EIC and LHeC QCD physics programs to a large degree are complimentary to each other and to the LHC physics. In last decade, an Electron Ion Collider (EIC) collaboration held about 25 collaboration meetings to develop physics program for EIC with CM energy {approx}100 GeV. One of these meetings was held at GSI, where ENC topic was in the

  20. Modeling QCD for Hadron Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Tandy, P. C.

    2011-10-24

    We review the approach to modeling soft hadron physics observables based on the Dyson-Schwinger equations of QCD. The focus is on light quark mesons and in particular the pseudoscalar and vector ground states, their decays and electromagnetic couplings. We detail the wide variety of observables that can be correlated by a ladder-rainbow kernel with one infrared parameter fixed to the chiral quark condensate. A recently proposed novel perspective in which the quark condensate is contained within hadrons and not the vacuum is mentioned. The valence quark parton distributions, in the pion and kaon, as measured in the Drell Yan process, are investigated with the same ladder-rainbow truncation of the Dyson-Schwinger and Bethe-Salpeter equations.

  1. Exotic Hadrons from B Factories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fulsom, Bryan

    2017-01-01

    The first generation of B-Factories, BaBar and Belle, operated over the previous decade and produced many world-leading measurements related to flavor physics. One of the most important discoveries was that of an apparent four-quark particle, named X(3872). It was the first of a growing X, Y, Z alphabet of exotic hadrons, now numbering more than a dozen, found by the e + e - collider experiments. These multi-quark states represent an unusual departure from the standard description that hadronic matter consists of only two or three quarks. These discoveries have led to the emergence of a new category of physics within heavy meson spectroscopy. This talk will review some of these key experimental results, and highlight the potential of the next generation B-Factory, Belle II, as it begins operation in the coming year.

  2. The PHENIX Hadron Blind Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Durham, J. M.

    2009-03-10

    Dielectron measurements by the PHENIX Experiment at RHIC are limited by the combinatorial background from electrons and positrons which are not produced in the same pair. The Hadron Blind Detector will allow a substantial reduction of this background by correctly identifying dielectrons from photon conversions and pion Dalitz decays which dominate the signal in the low mass region of the spectrum. Triple GEM stacks, with a CsI photocathode deposited on the uppermost GEM, detect Cherenkov light produced by electrons in a CF{sub 4} radiator. The transparency of CF{sub 4}, high quantum efficiency of CsI in the UV, and absence of a window between the gas radiator and the GEMs allow a large photoelectron yield, while minimizing the hadron signal. Results from the HBD in RHIC's Run-7 and preparations for upcoming runs are discussed.

  3. Lifetime measurements for bottom hadrons

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, G.

    1984-09-01

    The review of lifetime measurements of bottom hadrons begins with a first measurement by JADE, followed by similar measurements by MAC and MKII groups. New MAC data are reviewed based on a total of 75,000 multihadron events taken at a c.m. energy of 29 GeV. According to Monte Carlo calculations, 18% of the lepton candidates stem from charm decay and roughly 30% were misidentified hadrons. DELCO studied electrons obtained from 42,000 multihadron events at 29 GeV. The electrons were identified by means of Cerenkov counters. JADE analayzed 22,000 multihadron events at 35 GeV. Data were analyzed using two methods - one using a sample of b-enriched events, and the other using weighted distributions. The TASSO results were obtained with two different configurations of the detector - one of which used a drift chamber and the other a vertex detector. (LEW)

  4. Hadron therapy information sharing prototype

    PubMed Central

    Roman, Faustin Laurentiu; Abler, Daniel; Kanellopoulos, Vassiliki; Amoros, Gabriel; Davies, Jim; Dosanjh, Manjit; Jena, Raj; Kirkby, Norman; Peach, Ken; Salt, Jose

    2013-01-01

    The European PARTNER project developed a prototypical system for sharing hadron therapy data. This system allows doctors and patients to record and report treatment-related events during and after hadron therapy. It presents doctors and statisticians with an integrated view of adverse events across institutions, using open-source components for data federation, semantics, and analysis. There is a particular emphasis upon semantic consistency, achieved through intelligent, annotated form designs. The system as presented is ready for use in a clinical setting, and amenable to further customization. The essential contribution of the work reported here lies in the novel data integration and reporting methods, as well as the approach to software sustainability achieved through the use of community-supported open-source components. PMID:23824127

  5. Hadronic Resonances from Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    John Bulava; Robert Edwards; George Fleming; K. Jimmy Juge; Adam C. Lichtl; Nilmani Mathur; Colin Morningstar; David Richards; Stephen J. Wallace

    2007-06-16

    The determination of the pattern of hadronic resonances as predicted by Quantum Chromodynamics requires the use of non-perturbative techniques. Lattice QCD has emerged as the dominant tool for such calculations, and has produced many QCD predictions which can be directly compared to experiment. The concepts underlying lattice QCD are outlined, methods for calculating excited states are discussed, and results from an exploratory Nucleon and Delta baryon spectrum study are presented.

  6. Hadronic Resonances from Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Lichtl, Adam C.; Bulava, John; Morningstar, Colin; Edwards, Robert; Mathur, Nilmani; Richards, David; Fleming, George; Juge, K. Jimmy; Wallace, Stephen J.

    2007-10-26

    The determination of the pattern of hadronic resonances as predicted by Quantum Chromodynamics requires the use of non-perturbative techniques. Lattice QCD has emerged as the dominant tool for such calculations, and has produced many QCD predictions which can be directly compared to experiment. The concepts underlying lattice QCD are outlined, methods for calculating excited states are discussed, and results from an exploratory Nucleon and Delta baryon spectrum study are presented.

  7. Hadron physics from lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bietenholz, Wolfgang

    2016-07-01

    We sketch the basic ideas of the lattice regularization in Quantum Field Theory, the corresponding Monte Carlo simulations, and applications to Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). This approach enables the numerical measurement of observables at the non-perturbative level. We comment on selected results, with a focus on hadron masses and the link to Chiral Perturbation Theory. At last, we address two outstanding issues: topological freezing and the sign problem.

  8. Compensation effects in hadron calorimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Gabriel, T.A.; Bishop, B.L.; Brau, J.; Di Ciaccio, A.; Goodman, M.; Wilson, R.

    1984-01-01

    The pros and cons of utilizing a fissionable material such as /sup 238/U to compensate for the nuclear binding energy losses in a hadron calorimeter are discussed. Fissionable material can return some lost energy to the particle cascade in terms of low-energy neutrons and gamma rays, but electromagnetic sampling inefficiencies (often called transition effects) and the detection medium which tries to convert this energy to a useable signal are just as important. 12 references.

  9. Hard processes in hadronic interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Satz, H. |; Wang, X.N.

    1995-07-01

    Quantum chromodynamics is today accepted as the fundamental theory of strong interactions, even though most hadronic collisions lead to final states for which quantitative QCD predictions are still lacking. It therefore seems worthwhile to take stock of where we stand today and to what extent the presently available data on hard processes in hadronic collisions can be accounted for in terms of QCD. This is one reason for this work. The second reason - and in fact its original trigger - is the search for the quark-gluon plasma in high energy nuclear collisions. The hard processes to be considered here are the production of prompt photons, Drell-Yan dileptons, open charm, quarkonium states, and hard jets. For each of these, we discuss the present theoretical understanding, compare the resulting predictions to available data, and then show what behaviour it leads to at RHIC and LHC energies. All of these processes have the structure mentioned above: they contain a hard partonic interaction, calculable perturbatively, but also the non-perturbative parton distribution within a hadron. These parton distributions, however, can be studied theoretically in terms of counting rule arguments, and they can be checked independently by measurements of the parton structure functions in deep inelastic lepton-hadron scattering. The present volume is the work of Hard Probe Collaboration, a group of theorists who are interested in the problem and were willing to dedicate a considerable amount of their time and work on it. The necessary preparation, planning and coordination of the project were carried out in two workshops of two weeks` duration each, in February 1994 at CERn in Geneva andin July 1994 at LBL in Berkeley.

  10. Hadron Properties with FLIC Fermions

    SciTech Connect

    James Zanotti; Wolodymyr Melnitchouk; Anthony Williams; J Zhang

    2003-07-01

    The Fat-Link Irrelevant Clover (FLIC) fermion action provides a new form of nonperturbative O(a)-improvement in lattice fermion actions offering near continuum results at finite lattice spacing. It provides computationally inexpensive access to the light quark mass regime of QCD where chiral nonanalytic behavior associated with Goldstone bosons is revealed. The motivation and formulation of FLIC fermions, its excellent scaling properties and its low-lying hadron mass phenomenology are presented.

  11. Three Lectures on Hadron Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Craig D.

    2016-04-01

    These lectures explain that comparisons between experiment and theory can expose the impact of running couplings and masses on hadron observables and thereby aid materially in charting the momentum dependence of the interaction that underlies strong-interaction dynamics. The series begins with a primer on continuum QCD, which introduces some of the basic ideas necessary in order to understand the use of Schwinger functions as a nonperturbative tool in hadron physics. It continues with a discussion of confinement and dynamical symmetry breaking (DCSB) in the Standard Model, and the impact of these phenomena on our understanding of condensates, the parton structure of hadrons, and the pion electromagnetic form factor. The final lecture treats the problem of grand unification; namely, the contemporary use of Schwinger functions as a symmetry-preserving tool for the unified explanation and prediction of the properties of both mesons and baryons. It reveals that DCSB drives the formation of diquark clusters in baryons and sketches a picture of baryons as bound-states with Borromean character. Planned experiments are capable of validating the perspectives outlined in these lectures.

  12. Applications of instantons to hadronic processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zetocha, Valeriu Ioan

    Instantons constitute an important part of QCD as they provide a way to reach beyond the perturbative region. In the introductory chapters we present the ideas that constitute the backbone of instanton computation on a simple standard integral. We then turn our attention to QCD instantons and briefly show the steps to compute the effective lagrangian. The effective lagrangian is then used as a main tool for studying instanton contributions to hadronic decays of the scalar glueball, the pseudoscalar charmonium state etac, and the scalar charmonium state chic. Hadronic decays of the eta c are of particular interest. The three main decay channels are KK¯pi, etapipi and eta'pipi, each with an unusually large branching ratio of ˜5%. We show that the total decay rate into three pseudoscalar mesons can be reproduced using an instanton size distribution consistent with phenomenology and lattice results. Instantons correctly reproduce the ratio B(etapipi)/ B(eta'pipi) but over-predict the ratio B(KK¯pi)/B(etapipi). In the next part we study the contribution of instantons to OZI violation in the axial-vector channel. We consider, in particular, the f1-a 1 meson splitting, the flavor singlet and triplet axial coupling of a constituent quark, and the axial coupling constant of the nucleon. Instantons provide a short distance contribution to OZI violating correlation functions which is repulsive in the f1 meson channel and adds to the flavor singlet three-point function of a constituent quark. We compute long distance contributions using numerical simulations of the instanton liquid. We find that the iso-vector axial coupling constant of a constituent quark is (g A3)Q = 0.9 and that of a nucleon is g A3 = 1.28, in good agreement with experiment. The flavor singlet coupling of quark is close to one, while that of a nucleon is suppressed gA0 = 0.8. This number is still significantly larger than the experimental value gA0 = (0.28--0.41). In the last part we present an algorithm

  13. Validation of Hadronic Models in GEANT4

    SciTech Connect

    Koi, Tatsumi; Wright, Dennis H.; Folger, Gunter; Ivanchenko, Vladimir; Kossov, Mikhail; Starkov, Nikolai; Heikkinen, Aatos; Truscott, Peter; Lei, Fan; Wellisch, Hans-Peter

    2007-09-26

    Geant4 is a software toolkit for the simulation of the passage of particles through matter. It has abundant hadronic models from thermal neutron interactions to ultra relativistic hadrons. An overview of validations in Geant4 hadronic physics is presented based on thin target measurements. In most cases, good agreement is available between Monte Carlo prediction and experimental data; however, several problems have been detected which require some improvement in the models.

  14. Hadron Physics with PANDA at FAIR

    SciTech Connect

    Wiedner, Ulrich

    2011-10-21

    The recently established FAIR facility in Darmstadt has a broad program in the field of hadron and nuclear physics utilizing ion beams with unprecedented intensity and accuracy. The PANDA experiment, which is integrated in the HESR storage ring for antiprotons is at the center of the hadron physics program. It includes among others topics like hadron spectroscopy in the charmonium mass region and below, hyperon physics and electromagnetic processes.

  15. The Emergence of Hadrons from QCD Color

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, William; Color Dynamics in Cold Matter (CDCM) Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    The formation of hadrons from energetic quarks, the dynamical enforcement of QCD confinement, is not well understood at a fundamental level. In Deep Inelastic Scattering, modifications of the distributions of identified hadrons emerging from nuclei of different sizes reveal a rich variety of spatial and temporal characteristics of the hadronization process, including its dependence on spin, flavor, energy, and hadron mass and structure. The EIC will feature a wide range of kinematics, allowing a complete investigation of medium-induced gluon bremsstrahlung by the propagating quarks, leading to partonic energy loss. This fundamental process, which is also at the heart of jet quenching in heavy ion collisions, can be studied for light and heavy quarks at the EIC through observables quantifying hadron ``attenuation'' for a variety of hadron species. Transverse momentum broadening of hadrons, which is sensitive to the nuclear gluonic field, will also be accessible, and can be used to test our understanding from pQCD of how this quantity evolves with pathlength, as well as its connection to partonic energy loss. The evolution of the forming hadrons in the medium will shed new light on the dynamical origins of the forces between hadrons, and thus ultimately on the nuclear force. Supported by the Comision Nacional de Investigacion Cientifica y Tecnologica (CONICYT) of Chile.

  16. Hadronization measurements in cold nuclear matter

    SciTech Connect

    Dupre, Raphael

    2015-05-01

    Hadronization is the non-perturbative process of QCD by which partons become hadrons. It has been studied at high energies through various processes, we focus here on the experiments of lepto-production of hadrons in cold nuclear matter. By studying the dependence of observables to the atomic number of the target, these experimentscan give information on the dynamic of the hadronization at the femtometer scale. In particular, we will present preliminary results from JLab Hall B (CLAS collaboration), which give unprecedented statistical precision. Then, we will present results of a phenomenological study showing how HERMES data can be described with pure energyloss models.

  17. Heavy flavor production from photons and hadrons

    SciTech Connect

    Heusch, C.A.

    1982-01-01

    The present state of the production and observation of hadrons containing heavy quarks or antiquarks as valence constituents, in reactions initiated by real and (space-like) virtual photon or by hadron beams is discussed. Heavy flavor production in e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation, which is well covered in a number of recent review papers is not discussed, and similarly, neutrino production is omitted due to the different (flavor-changing) mechanisms that are involved in those reactions. Heavy flavors from spacelike photons, heavy flavors from real photons, and heavy flavors from hadron-hadron collisions are discussed. (WHK)

  18. Quark forces from hadronic spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pirjol, Dan; Schat, Carlos

    2009-04-17

    We consider the implications of the most general two-body quark-quark interaction Hamiltonian for the spin-flavor structure of the negative parity L = 1 excited baryons. Assuming the most general two-body quark interaction Hamiltonian, we derive two correlations among the masses and mixing angles of these states, which constrain the mixing angles, and can be used to test for the presence of three-body quark interactions. We find that the pure gluon-exchange model is disfavored by data, independently of any assumptions about hadronic wave functions.

  19. Multidimensional intermittency in hadronic collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Jicai; Hwa, Rudolph C.

    1992-12-01

    The study of intermittency in high-energy hadronic collisions by the Monte Carlo code ecco is extended to three-dimensional phase space. Strong intermittency is found in agreement with the data. Fluctuation in the impact parameter is responsible for the intermittency in lnpT, and the transverse-momentum conservation leads to negative intermittency slopes in the azimuthal angle φ. The Ochs-Wosiek plots are linear in all dimensions having universal slopes. An exponent ν=1.448 emerges to characterize multiparticle production in pp collisions. The properties of G moments are also examined, and the fractal dimensions determined.

  20. Multidimensional intermittency in hadronic collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, J.; Hwa, R. C.

    1992-06-01

    The study of intermittency in high-energy hadronic collisions by the Monte Carlo code ECCO is extended to 3-dimensional phase space. Strong intermittency is found in agreement with the data. Fluctuation in the impact parameter is responsible for the intermittency in 1np(sub T), and the transverse-momentum conservation leads to negative intermittency slopes in the azimuthal angle (phi). The Ochs-Wosiek plots are linear in all dimensions having universal slopes. An exponent nu = 1.448 emerges to characterize multiparticle production in pp collisions. The properties of G moments are also examined, and the fractal dimensions determined.

  1. LHC: The Large Hadron Collider

    ScienceCinema

    Lincoln, Don

    2016-07-12

    The Large Hadron Collider (or LHC) is the world’s most powerful particle accelerator. In 2012, scientists used data taken by it to discover the Higgs boson, before pausing operations for upgrades and improvements. In the spring of 2015, the LHC will return to operations with 163% the energy it had before and with three times as many collisions per second. It’s essentially a new and improved version of itself. In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln explains both some of the absolutely amazing scientific and engineering properties of this modern scientific wonder.

  2. The theory of hadronic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbs, W.R.

    1995-03-16

    This report briefly discusses progress on the following topics: isospin breaking in the pion-nucleon system; subthreshold amplitudes in the {pi}N system; neutron-proton charge-exchange; transparency in pion production; energy dependence of pion DCX; direct capture of pions into deeply bound atomic states; knock out of secondary components in the nucleus; radii of neutron distributions in nuclei; the hadronic double scattering operator; pion scattering and charge exchange from polarized nuclei; pion absorption in nuclei; modification of nucleon structure in nuclei; and antiproton annihilation in nuclei.

  3. Recent results from hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Frisch, H.J. )

    1990-12-10

    This is a summary of some of the many recent results from the CERN and Fermilab colliders, presented for an audience of nuclear, medium-energy, and elementary particle physicists. The topics are jets and QCD at very high energies, precision measurements of electroweak parameters, the remarkably heavy top quark, and new results on the detection of the large flux of B mesons produced at these machines. A summary and some comments on the bright prospects for the future of hadron colliders conclude the talk. 39 refs., 44 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. LHC: The Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Lincoln, Don

    2015-03-04

    The Large Hadron Collider (or LHC) is the world’s most powerful particle accelerator. In 2012, scientists used data taken by it to discover the Higgs boson, before pausing operations for upgrades and improvements. In the spring of 2015, the LHC will return to operations with 163% the energy it had before and with three times as many collisions per second. It’s essentially a new and improved version of itself. In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln explains both some of the absolutely amazing scientific and engineering properties of this modern scientific wonder.

  5. State of hadron collider physics

    SciTech Connect

    Grannis, P.D. |

    1993-12-01

    The 9th Topical Workshop on Proton-Antiproton Collider Physics in Tsukuba Japan demonstrated clearly the enormous breadth of physics accessible in hadron cowders. Although no significant chinks were reported in the armor of the Standard Model, new results presented in this meeting have expanded our knowledge of the electroweak and strong interactions and have extended the searches for non-standard phenomena significantly. Much of the new data reported came from the CDF and D0 experiments at the Fermilab cowder. Superb operation of the Tevatron during the 1992-1993 Run and significant advances on the detector fronts -- in particular, the emergence of the new D0 detector as a productive physics instrument in its first outing and the addition of the CDF silicon vertex detector -- enabled much of this advance. It is noteworthy however that physics from the CERN collider experiments UA1 and UA4 continued to make a large impact at this meeting. In addition, very interesting summary talks were given on new results from HERA, cosmic ray experiments, on super-hadron collider physics, and on e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} experiments at LEP and TRISTAN. These summaries are reported in elsewhere in this volume.

  6. Novel Perspectives for Hadron Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; /SLAC

    2012-03-09

    I discuss several novel and unexpected aspects of quantum chromodynamics. These include: (a) the nonperturbative origin of intrinsic strange, charm and bottom quarks in the nucleon at large x; the breakdown of pQCD factorization theorems due to the lensing effects of initial- and final-state interactions; (b) important corrections to pQCD scaling for inclusive reactions due to processes in which hadrons are created at high transverse momentum directly in the hard processes and their relation to the baryon anomaly in high-centrality heavy-ion collisions; and (c) the nonuniversality of quark distributions in nuclei. I also discuss some novel theoretical perspectives in QCD: (a) light-front holography - a relativistic color-confining first approximation to QCD based on the AdS/CFT correspondence principle; (b) the principle of maximum conformality - a method which determines the renormalization scale at finite order in perturbation theory yielding scheme independent results; (c) the replacement of quark and gluon vacuum condensates by 'in-hadron condensates' and how this helps to resolve the conflict between QCD vacuum and the cosmological constant.

  7. Status and Prospects for Hadron Production Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeter, Raphaeel

    2010-03-30

    The latest results from the HARP, MIPP and NA61 Hadron Production Experiments are reviewed and their implications for neutrinos physics experiments are discussed. We emphasize three neutrino sources: accelerator-based neutrino beams, advanced neutrino sources and atmospheric neutrinos. Finally, prospects from additional forthcoming hadron production measurements are presented.

  8. A Survey of Hadron Therapy Accelerator Technologies.

    SciTech Connect

    PEGGS,S.; SATOGATA, T.; FLANZ, J.

    2007-06-25

    Hadron therapy has entered a new age [1]. The number of facilities grows steadily, and 'consumer' interest is high. Some groups are working on new accelerator technology, while others optimize existing designs by reducing capital and operating costs, and improving performance. This paper surveys the current requirements and directions in accelerator technology for hadron therapy.

  9. Di-hadron production at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Anefalos Pereira, Sergio; et. al.,

    2014-10-01

    Semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering (SIDIS) has been used extensively in recent years as an important testing ground for QCD. Studies so far have concentrated on better determination of parton distribution functions, distinguishing between the quark and antiquark contributions, and understanding the fragmentation of quarks into hadrons. Hadron pair (di-hadron) SIDIS provides information on the nucleon structure and hadronization dynamics that complement single hadron SIDIS. Di-hadrons allow the study of low- and high-twist distribution functions and Dihadron Fragmentation Functions (DiFF). Together with the twist-2 PDFs ( f1, g1, h1), the Higher Twist (HT) e and hL functions are very interesting because they offer insights into the physics of the largely unexplored quark-gluon correlations, which provide access into the dynamics inside hadrons. The CLAS spectrometer, installed in Hall-B at Jefferson Lab, has collected data using the CEBAF 6 GeV longitudinally polarized electron beam on longitudinally polarized solid NH3 targets. Preliminary results on di-hadron beam-, target- and double-spin asymmetries will be presented.

  10. TOPOLOGICAL THEORY OF HADRONS II: BARYONS

    SciTech Connect

    Stapp, Henry P.

    1981-10-01

    The first paper of this series described a method for incorporating spin into the meson sector of the topological theory of hadrons. This second paper extends the theory to all hadrons. It also incorporates into the covariant S-matrix topological framework the group-theoretic properties of the constituent quark model.

  11. Variation of transverse momentum in hadronic collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saint Amand, J.; Uritam, R. A.

    1975-01-01

    The paper presents a detailed parameterization of the transverse momentum in hadronic collisions on multiplicity and on beam momentum. Hadronic collisions are considered at energies below the ultra-high energy domain, on the basis of an uncertainty relation and a naive eikonal model with an impact-parameter-dependent multiplicity.

  12. Geometric representation of fundamental particles' inertial mass

    SciTech Connect

    Schachter, L.; Spencer, James

    2015-07-22

    A geometric representation of the (N = 279) masses of quarks, leptons, hadrons and gauge bosons was introduced by employing a Riemann Sphere facilitating the interpretation of the N masses in terms of a single particle, the Masson, which might be in one of the N eigen-states. Geometrically, its mass is the radius of the Riemann Sphere. Dynamically, its derived mass is near the mass of the nucleon regardless of whether it is determined from all N particles of only the hadrons, the mesons or the baryons separately. Ignoring all the other properties of these particles, it is shown that the eigen-values, the polar representation θν of the masses on the Sphere, satisfy the symmetry θν + θN+1-ν = π within less than 1% relative error. In addition, these pair correlations include the pairs θγ + θtop ≃ π and θgluon + θH ≃ π as well as pairing the weak gauge bosons with the three neutrinos.

  13. Nuclear Physics and Hadron Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Braunn, B.

    2011-12-13

    Hadron therapy uses light charged particles beams (mainly proton and {sup 12}C ions) to irradiate tumors. These beams present a ballistic advantage with a maximum energy deposition at the end of the path. A large dose can be delivered inside a deep tumor while the surrounding healthy tissues are preserved. There is an obvious advantage in using these beams but the beam control has to be achieved and all the physical processes leading to the energy deposition have to be fully under control. This treatment protocol requires accurate control devices and a good knowledge of the physical processes occurring all along the path of the projectile in human tissues. In this report, we will present one example of a beam monitor for the proton therapy. We will also present the experimental program which has been initiated to obtain fundamental data on the nuclear fragmentation process.

  14. Collins Asymmetry at Hadron Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Feng

    2008-01-17

    We study the Collins effect in the azimuthal asymmetricdistribution of hadrons inside a high energy jet in the single transversepolarized proton proton scattering. From the detailed analysis ofone-gluon and two-gluon exchange diagrams contributions, the Collinsfunction is found the same as that in the semi-inclusive deep inelasticscattering and e+e- annihilations. The eikonal propagators in thesediagrams do not contribute to the phase needed for the Collins-typesingle spin asymmetry, and the universality is derived as a result of theWard identity. We argue that this conclusion depends on the momentum flowof the exchanged gluon and the kinematic constraints in the fragmentationprocess, and is generic and model-independent.

  15. Hadron therapy: history, status, prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klenov, G. I.; Khoroshkov, V. S.

    2016-08-01

    A brief historical review is given of external radiation therapy (RT), one of the main cancer treatment methods along with surgery and chemotherapy. Cellular mechanisms of radiation damage are described. Special attention is paid to hadron (proton and ion) therapy, its history, results, problems, challenges, current trends, and prospects. Undeniably great contributions to proton therapy have been made by Russian researchers, notably at the experimental centers that have operated since the mid-20th century at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, the A I Alikhanov Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics (ITEP), and the B P Konstantinov Petersburg Institute of Nuclear Physics. A quarter of the global clinical experience was accumulated by 1990 at the world's largest ITEP-hosted multicabin proton therapy center.

  16. Di-hadron production at Jefferson Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anefalos Pereira, Sergio; CLAS Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    Semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering (SIDIS) has been used extensively in recent years as an important testing ground for QCD. Studies so far have concentrated on better determination of parton distribution functions, distinguishing between the quark and antiquark contributions, and understanding the fragmentation of quarks into hadrons. Pair of hadrons (di-hadron) SIDIS provides information on the nucleon structure and hadronization dynamics that complements single-hadron SIDIS. The study of di-hadrons allow us to study higher twist distribution functions and Dihadron Fragmentation Functions (DiFF). Together with the twist-2 PDFs (f 1, g 1, h 1), the Higher Twist (HT) e and hL functions are very interesting because they offer insights into the physics of the largely unexplored quark-gluon correlations which provide direct and unique insights into the dynamics inside hadrons. The CLAS spectrometer, installed in Hall-B at Jefferson Lab, has collected data using the CEBAF 6 GeV longitudinally polarized electron beam on longitudinally polarized solid NH3 targets. Preliminary results on beam-, target- and double-spin asymmetries will be presented.

  17. Hadron cascades produced by electromagnetic cascades

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, W.R.; Jenkins, T.M.; Ranft, J.

    1986-12-01

    A method for calculating high energy hadron cascades induced by multi-GeV electron and photon beams is described. Using the EGS4 computer program, high energy photons in the EM shower are allowed to interact hadronically according to the vector meson dominance (VMD) model, facilitated by a Monte Carlo version of the dual multistring fragmentation model which is used in the hadron cascade code FLUKA. The results of this calculation compare very favorably with experimental data on hadron production in photon-proton collisions and on the hadron production by electron beams on targets (i.e., yields in secondary particle beam lines). Electron beam induced hadron star density contours are also presented and are compared with those produced by proton beams. This FLUKA-EGS4 coupling technique could find use in the design of secondary beams, in the determination high energy hadron source terms for shielding purposes, and in the estimation of induced radioactivity in targets, collimators and beam dumps.

  18. Quark Hadron Duality - Recent Jefferson Lab Results

    SciTech Connect

    Niculescu, Maria Ioana

    2016-08-01

    The duality between the partonic and hadronic descriptions of electron--nucleon scattering is a remarkable feature of nuclear interactions. When averaged over appropriate energy intervals the cross section at low energy which is dominated by nucleon resonances resembles the smooth behavior expected from perturbative QCD. Recent Jefferson Lab results indicate that quark-hadron duality is present in a variety of observables, not just the proton F2 structure function. An overview of recent results, especially local quark-hadron duality on the neutron, are presented here.

  19. Constraints on hadronically decaying dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Garny, Mathias; Ibarra, Alejandro; Tran, David E-mail: alejandro.ibarra@ph.tum.de

    2012-08-01

    We present general constraints on dark matter stability in hadronic decay channels derived from measurements of cosmic-ray antiprotons. We analyze various hadronic decay modes in a model-independent manner by examining the lowest-order decays allowed by gauge and Lorentz invariance for scalar and fermionic dark matter particles and present the corresponding lower bounds on the partial decay lifetimes in those channels. We also investigate the complementarity between hadronic and gamma-ray constraints derived from searches for monochromatic lines in the sky, which can be produced at the quantum level if the dark matter decays into quark-antiquark pairs at leading order.

  20. Non-perturbative QCD and hadron physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cobos-Martínez, J. J.

    2016-10-01

    A brief exposition of contemporary non-perturbative methods based on the Schwinger-Dyson (SDE) and Bethe-Salpeter equations (BSE) of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) and their application to hadron physics is given. These equations provide a non-perturbative continuum formulation of QCD and are a powerful and promising tool for the study of hadron physics. Results on some properties of hadrons based on this approach, with particular attention to the pion distribution amplitude, elastic, and transition electromagnetic form factors, and their comparison to experimental data are presented.

  1. Hadron scattering and resonances in QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Dudek, Jozef J.

    2016-05-01

    I describe how hadron-hadron scattering amplitudes are related to the eigenstates of QCD in a finite cubic volume. The discrete spectrum of such eigenstates can be determined from correlation functions computed using lattice QCD, and the corresponding scattering amplitudes extracted. I review results from the Hadron Spectrum Collaboration who have used these finite volume methods to study pi pi elastic scattering, including the rho resonance, as well as coupled-channel pi K, eta K scattering. Ongoing calculations are advertised and the outlook for finite volume approaches is presented.

  2. Hadron scattering and resonances in QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudek, Jozef J.

    2016-05-01

    I describe how hadron-hadron scattering amplitudes are related to the eigenstates of QCD in a finite cubic volume. The discrete spectrum of such eigenstates can be determined from correlation functions computed using lattice QCD, and the corresponding scattering amplitudes extracted. I review results from the Hadron Spectrum Collaboration who have used these finite volume methods to study ππ elastic scattering, including the ρ resonance, as well as coupled-channel π >K, ηK scattering. Ongoing calculations are advertised and the outlook for finite volume approaches is presented.

  3. Understanding Representation in Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bodker, Susanne

    1998-01-01

    Discusses the design of computer applications, focusing on understanding design representations--what makes design representations work, and how, in different contexts. Examines the place of various types of representation (e.g., formal notations, models, prototypes, scenarios, and mock-ups) in design and the role of formalisms and representations…

  4. SHARE: Statistical hadronization with resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torrieri, G.; Steinke, S.; Broniowski, W.; Florkowski, W.; Letessier, J.; Rafelski, J.

    2005-05-01

    interaction feed-down corrections, the observed hadron abundances are obtained. SHARE incorporates diverse physical approaches, with a flexibility of choice of the details of the statistical hadronization model, including the selection of a chemical (non-)equilibrium condition. SHARE also offers evaluation of the extensive properties of the source of particles, such as energy, entropy, baryon number, strangeness, as well as the determination of the best intensive input parameters fitting a set of experimental yields. This allows exploration of a proposed physical hypothesis about hadron production mechanisms and the determination of the properties of their source. Method of solving the problem: Distributions at freeze-out of both the stable particles and the hadronic resonances are set according to a statistical prescription, technically calculated via a series of Bessel functions, using CERN library programs. We also have the option of including finite particle widths of the resonances. While this is computationally expensive, it is necessary to fully implement the essence of the strong interaction dynamics within the statistical hadronization picture. In fact, including finite width has a considerable effect when modeling directly detectable short-lived resonances ( Λ(1520),K, etc.), and is noticeable in fits to experimentally measured yields of stable particles. After production, all hadronic resonances decay. Resonance decays are accomplished by addition of the parent abundances to the daughter, normalized by the branching ratio. Weak interaction decays receive a special treatment, where we introduce daughter particle acceptance factors for both strongly interacting decay products. An interface for fitting to experimental particle ratios of the statistical model parameters with the help of MINUIT[1] is provided. The χ function is defined in the standard way. For an investigated quantity f and experimental error Δ f, χ=((N=N-N. (note that systematic and statistical

  5. Hadron spectroscopy and B physics at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, S.U.; Weygand, D.P.; Willutzki, H.J.

    1991-11-01

    A description is given of the physics opportunities at RHIC regarding quark-gluon spectroscopy. The basic idea is to isolate with appropriate triggers the sub-processes pomeron + pomeron {yields} hadrons and {gamma}{sup *} + {gamma}{sup *} {yields} hadrons with the net effective mass of hadrons in the range of 1.0 to 10.0 GeV, in order to study the hadronic states composed of quarks and gluons. The double-pomeron interactions are expected to produce glueballs and hybrids preferentially, while the two-offshell-photon initial states should couple predominantly to quarkonia and multiquark states. Of particular interest is the possibility of carrying out a CP-violation study in the self-tagging B decays, B{sub d}{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup {minus}} and {bar B}{sub d}{sup 0} {yields} K{sup {minus}}{pi}{sup +}. 20 refs., 4 figs.

  6. Hadrons and Quark-Gluon Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Letessier, Jean; Rafelski, Johann

    2002-06-01

    Before matter as we know it emerged, the universe was filled with the primordial state of hadronic matter called quark gluon plasma. This hot soup of quarks and gluon is effectively an inescapable consequence of our current knowledge about the fundamental hadronic interactions, quantum chromodynamics. This book covers the ongoing search to verify this prediction experimentally and discusses the physical properties of this novel form of matter.

  7. Hadron formation from interaction among quarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Z. G.; Yang, C. B.

    2015-06-01

    This paper deals with the hadronization process of quark system. A phenomenological potential is introduced to describe the interaction between a quark pair. The potential depends on the color charge of those quarks and their relative distances. Those quarks move according to classical equations of motion. Due to the color interaction, coloring quarks are separated to form color neutral clusters which are supposed to be the hadrons.

  8. Hadron thermodynamics in relativistic nuclear collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ammiraju, P.

    1985-01-01

    Various phenomenological models based on statistical thermodynamical considerations were used to fit the experimental data at high P sub T to a two temperature distribution. Whether this implies that the two temperatures belong to two different reaction mechanisms, or consequences of Lorentz-contraction factor, or related in a fundamental way to the intrinsic thermodynamics of Space-Time can only be revealed by further theoretical and experimental investigations of high P sub T phenomena in extremely energetic hadron-hadron collisions.

  9. Very large hadron collider (VLHC)

    SciTech Connect

    1998-09-01

    A VLHC informal study group started to come together at Fermilab in the fall of 1995 and at the 1996 Snowmass Study the parameters of this machine took form. The VLHC as now conceived would be a 100 TeV hadron collider. It would use the Fermilab Main Injector (now nearing completion) to inject protons at 150 GeV into a new 3 TeV Booster and then into a superconducting pp collider ring producing 100 TeV c.m. interactions. A luminosity of {approximately}10{sup 34} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} is planned. Our plans were presented to the Subpanel on the Planning for the Future of US High- Energy Physics (the successor to the Drell committee) and in February 1998 their report stated ``The Subpanel recommends an expanded program of R&D on cost reduction strategies, enabling technologies, and accelerator physics issues for a VLHC. These efforts should be coordinated across laboratory and university groups with the aim of identifying design concepts for an economically and technically viable facility`` The coordination has been started with the inclusion of physicists from Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), and Cornell University. Clearly, this collaboration must expanded internationally as well as nationally. The phrase ``economically and technically viable facility`` presents the real challenge.

  10. A correlated-cluster model and the ridge phenomenon in hadron-hadron collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchis-Lozano, Miguel-Angel; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, Edward

    2017-03-01

    A study of the near-side ridge phenomenon in hadron-hadron collisions based on a cluster picture of multiparticle production is presented. The near-side ridge effect is shown to have a natural explanation in this context provided that clusters are produced in a correlated manner in the collision transverse plane.

  11. Hadronic interactions in the MINOS detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Kordosky, Michael Alan

    2004-08-01

    MINOS, the Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search, will study neutrino flavor transformations using a Near detector at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory and a Far detector located in the Soudan Underground Laboratory in northern Minnesota. The MINOS collaboration also constructed the CalDet (calibration detector), a smaller version of the Near and Far detectors, to determine the topological and signal response to hadrons, electrons and muons. The detector was exposed to test-beams in the CERN Proton Synchrotron East Hall during 2001-2003, where it collected events at momentum settings between 200 MeV/c and 10 GeV/c. In this dissertation we present results of the CalDet experiment, focusing on the topological and signal response to hadrons. We briefly describe the MINOS experiment and its iron-scintillator tracking-sampling calorimters as a motivation for the CalDet experiment. We discuss the operation of the CalDet in the beamlines as well as the trigger and particle identification systems used to isolate the hadron sample. The method used to calibrate the MINOS detector is described and validated with test-beam data. The test-beams were simulated to model the muon flux, energy loss upstream of the detector and the kaon background. We describe the procedure used to discriminate between pions and muons on the basis of the event topology. The hadron samples were used to benchmark the existing GEANT3 based hadronic shower codes and determine the detector response and resolution for pions and protons. We conclude with comments on the response to single hadrons and to neutrino induced hadronic showers.

  12. XML-BASED REPRESENTATION

    SciTech Connect

    R. KELSEY

    2001-02-01

    For focused applications with limited user and use application communities, XML can be the right choice for representation. It is easy to use, maintain, and extend and enjoys wide support in commercial and research sectors. When the knowledge and information to be represented is object-based and use of that knowledge and information is a high priority, then XML-based representation should be considered. This paper discusses some of the issues involved in using XML-based representation and presents an example application that successfully uses an XML-based representation.

  13. Theoretical studies of hadrons and nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    COTANCH, STEPHEN R

    2007-03-20

    This report details final research results obtained during the 9 year period from June 1, 1997 through July 15, 2006. The research project, entitled Theoretical Studies of Hadrons and Nuclei , was supported by grant DE-FG02-97ER41048 between North Carolina State University [NCSU] and the U. S. Department of Energy [DOE]. In compliance with grant requirements the Principal Investigator [PI], Professor Stephen R. Cotanch, conducted a theoretical research program investigating hadrons and nuclei and devoted to this program 50% of his time during the academic year and 100% of his time in the summer. Highlights of new, significant research results are briefly summarized in the following three sections corresponding to the respective sub-programs of this project (hadron structure, probing hadrons and hadron systems electromagnetically, and many-body studies). Recent progress is also discussed in a recent renewal/supplemental grant proposal submitted to DOE. Finally, full detailed descriptions of completed work can be found in the publications listed at the end of this report.

  14. Universal effective hadron dynamics from superconformal algebra

    DOE PAGES

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; de Teramond, Guy F.; Dosch, Hans Gunter; ...

    2016-05-25

    An effective supersymmetric QCD light-front Hamiltonian for hadrons composed of light quarks, which includes a spin–spin interaction between the hadronic constituents, is constructed by embedding superconformal quantum mechanics into AdS space. A specific breaking of conformal symmetry inside the graded algebra determines a unique effective quark-confining potential for light hadrons, as well as remarkable connections between the meson and baryon spectra. The results are consistent with the empirical features of the light-quark hadron spectra, including a universal mass scale for the slopes of the meson and baryon Regge trajectories and a zero-mass pion in the limit of massless quarks. Ourmore » analysis is consistently applied to the excitation spectra of the π , ρ , K , K* and Φ meson families as well as to the N , Δ, Λ, Σ, Σ* , Ξ and Ξ* in the baryon sector. Here, we also predict the existence of tetraquarks which are degenerate in mass with baryons with the same angular momentum. The mass of light hadrons is expressed in a universal and frame-independent decomposition in the semiclassical approximation described here.« less

  15. Universal effective hadron dynamics from superconformal algebra

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; de Teramond, Guy F.; Dosch, Hans Gunter; Lorce, Cedric

    2016-05-25

    An effective supersymmetric QCD light-front Hamiltonian for hadrons composed of light quarks, which includes a spin–spin interaction between the hadronic constituents, is constructed by embedding superconformal quantum mechanics into AdS space. A specific breaking of conformal symmetry inside the graded algebra determines a unique effective quark-confining potential for light hadrons, as well as remarkable connections between the meson and baryon spectra. The results are consistent with the empirical features of the light-quark hadron spectra, including a universal mass scale for the slopes of the meson and baryon Regge trajectories and a zero-mass pion in the limit of massless quarks. Our analysis is consistently applied to the excitation spectra of the π , ρ , K , K* and Φ meson families as well as to the N , Δ, Λ, Σ, Σ* , Ξ and Ξ* in the baryon sector. Here, we also predict the existence of tetraquarks which are degenerate in mass with baryons with the same angular momentum. The mass of light hadrons is expressed in a universal and frame-independent decomposition in the semiclassical approximation described here.

  16. Universal effective hadron dynamics from superconformal algebra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; de Téramond, Guy F.; Dosch, Hans Günter; Lorcé, Cédric

    2016-08-01

    An effective supersymmetric QCD light-front Hamiltonian for hadrons composed of light quarks, which includes a spin-spin interaction between the hadronic constituents, is constructed by embedding superconformal quantum mechanics into AdS space. A specific breaking of conformal symmetry inside the graded algebra determines a unique effective quark-confining potential for light hadrons, as well as remarkable connections between the meson and baryon spectra. The results are consistent with the empirical features of the light-quark hadron spectra, including a universal mass scale for the slopes of the meson and baryon Regge trajectories and a zero-mass pion in the limit of massless quarks. Our analysis is consistently applied to the excitation spectra of the π, ρ, K, K* and ϕ meson families as well as to the N, Δ, Λ, Σ, Σ*, Ξ and Ξ* in the baryon sector. We also predict the existence of tetraquarks which are degenerate in mass with baryons with the same angular momentum. The mass of light hadrons is expressed in a universal and frame-independent decomposition in the semiclassical approximation described here.

  17. Technical design of hadron therapy facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso, J.R.

    1993-08-01

    Radiation therapy with hadron beams now has a 40-year track record at many accelerator laboratories around the world, essentially all of these originally physics-research oriented. The great promise shown for treating cancer has led the medical community to seek dedicated accelerator facilities in a hospital setting, where more rapid progress can be made in clinical research. This paper will discuss accelerator and beam characteristics relevant to hadron therapy, particularly as applied to hospital-based facilities. A survey of currently-operating and planned hadron therapy facilities will be given, with particular emphasis on Loma Linda (the first dedicated proton facility in a hospital) and HIMAC (the first dedicated heavy-ion medical facility).

  18. Technical Design of Hadron Therapy Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso, J.R.

    1993-08-01

    Radiation therapy with hadron beams now has a 40-year track record at many accelerator laboratories around the world, essentially all of these originally physics-research oriented. The great promise shown for treating cancer has led the medical community to seek dedicated accelerator facilities in a hospital setting, where more rapid progress can be made in clinical research. This paper will discuss accelerator and beam characteristics relevant to hadron therapy, particularly as applied to hospital-based facilities. A survey of currently-operating and planned hadron therapy facilities will be given, with particular emphasis on Lorna Linda (the first dedicated proton facility in a hospital) and HIMAC (the first dedicated heavy-ion medical facility).

  19. A New Slant on Hadron Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Anthony Thomas; Wolodymyr Melnitchouk; Will Detmold; Stewart Wright; Derek Leinweber

    2001-09-01

    Rather than regarding the restriction of current lattice QCD simulations to quark masses that are 5--10 times larger than those observed, we note that this presents a wonderful opportunity to deepen our understanding of QCD. Just as it has been possible to learn a great deal about QCD by treating N{sub c} as a variable, so the study of hadron properties as a function of quark mass is leading us to a much deeper appreciation of hadron structure. As examples we cite recent progress in using the chiral properties of QCD to connect hadron masses, magnetic moments, charge radii and structure functions calculated at large quark masses within lattice QCD with the values observed physically.

  20. Hadronization of QCD and effective interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, M.R.

    1994-07-01

    An introductory treatment of hadronization through functional integral calculus and bifocal Bose fields is given. Emphasis is placed on the utility of this approach for providing a connection between QCD and effective hadronic field theories. The hadronic interactions obtained by this method are nonlocal due to the QCD substructure, yet, in the presence of an electromagnetic field, maintain the electromagnetic gauge invariance manifest at the quark level. A local chiral model which is structurally consistent with chiral perturbation theory is obtained through a derivative expansion of the nonlocalities with determined, finite coefficients. Tree-level calculations of the pion form factor and {pi} {minus} {pi} scattering, which illustrate the dual constituent-quark-chiral-model nature of this approach, are presented.

  1. Dynamic versus Static Hadronic Structure Functions

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; /SLAC

    2009-01-09

    'Static' structure functions are the probabilistic distributions computed from the square of the light-front wavefunctions of the target hadron. In contrast, the 'dynamic' structure functions measured in deep inelastic lepton-hadron scattering include the effects of rescattering associated with the Wilson line. Initial- and final-state rescattering, neglected in the parton model, can have a profound effect in QCD hard-scattering reactions, producing single-spin asymmetries, diffractive deep inelastic scattering, diffractive hard hadronic reactions, the breakdown of the Lam-Tung relation in Drell-Yan reactions, nuclear shadowing, and non-universal nuclear antishadowing|novel leading-twist physics not incorporated in the light-front wavefunctions of the target computed in isolation. I also review how 'direct' higher-twist processes--where a proton is produced in the hard subprocess itself--can explain the anomalous proton-to-pion ratio seen in high centrality heavy ion collisions.

  2. Freeze-out, Hadronization and Statistical Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castorina, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    The comparison of the statistical hadronization model with experimental data and lattice QCD results is not always straightforward. Indeed, the interpretation of the ϕ meson production, of the proton to pion multiplicity ratio at LHC and the agreement of the freeze-out curve with the lattice critical line in the T — µB plane, require further analyses. Moreover the dynamics of the hadronization has to be compatible with: 1) the statitical behavior also observed in elementary high energy collisions; 2) a universal hadronization temperature for all high energy collisions; 3) the freeze-out criteria. In these lecture notes the SHM is recalled and some explanations of the puzzling aspects of its comparison with data are discussed.

  3. Hadronic form factors in kaon photoproduction

    SciTech Connect

    Syukurilla, L. Mart, T.

    2014-09-25

    We have revisited the effect of hadronic form factors in kaon photoproduction process by utilizing an isobaric model developed for kaon photoproduction off the proton. The model is able to reproduce the available experimental data nicely as well as to reveal the origin of the second peak in the total cross section, which was the main source of confusion for decades. Different from our previous study, in the present work we explore the possibility of using different hadronic form factors in each of the KΛN vertices. The use of different hadronic form factors, e.g. dipole, Gaussian, and generalized dipole, has been found to produce a more flexible isobar model, which can provide a significant improvement in the model.

  4. Deconfining Phase Transition to a Quark-Gluon Plasma in Different SU(3) Color Representations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezouar, K.; Ait El Djoudi, A.; Ghenam, L.

    2016-10-01

    For a statistical description of the quark gluon plasma (QGP) considering its internal symmetry, we calculate its partition function using the group theoretical projection method. We project out the partition function of a QGP consisting of gluons, massless up and down quarks, and massive strange quarks onto the singlet representation of the SU(3) color group, as well as onto the color octet and the color 27-plet representations. A comparison of these color representations is done, by studying their effects on the behavior of some thermodynamical quantities characterizing the mixed hadronic gas-QGP system undergoing a thermal deconfining phase transition on one side, and on the free energy during the formation of a QGP droplet from the hot hadronic gas on another side.

  5. Density-Dependent Relations among Properties of Hadronic Matter and Applications to Hadron-Quark Stars

    SciTech Connect

    Uechi, Hiroshi; Uechi, Schun T.

    2011-05-06

    Density-dependent relations among the saturation properties of symmetric nuclear matter and hyperonic matter, and properties of hadron-(strange) quark stars are shown by applying the conserving nonlinear {sigma}-{omega}-{rho} hadronic mean-field theory. Nonlinear interactions are renormalized self-consistently as effective coupling constants, effective masses, and sources of equations of motion by maintaining thermodynamic consistency to the mean-field approximation. Effective masses and coupling constants at the saturation point of symmetric nuclear matter simultaneously determine the binding energy and saturation properties of hyperonic matter. The coupling constants expected from the hadronic mean-field model and SU(6) quark model for the vector coupling constants are compared by calculating masses of hadron-quark neutron stars. The nonlinear {sigma}-{omega}-{rho} mean-field approximation with vacuum fluctuation corrections and strange quark matter defined by the MIT-bag model were employed to examine properties of hadron-(strange) quark stars. We found that hadron-(strange) quark stars become more stable at high densities compared to pure hadronic and strange quark stars.

  6. Inscriptions Becoming Representations in Representational Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Medina, Richard; Suthers, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    We analyze the interaction of 3 students working on mathematics problems over several days in a virtual math team. Our analysis traces out how successful collaboration in a later session is contingent upon the work of prior sessions and shows how the development of representational practices is an important aspect of these participants' problem…

  7. Monte Carlo implementation of polarized hadronization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matevosyan, Hrayr H.; Kotzinian, Aram; Thomas, Anthony W.

    2017-01-01

    We study the polarized quark hadronization in a Monte Carlo (MC) framework based on the recent extension of the quark-jet framework, where a self-consistent treatment of the quark polarization transfer in a sequential hadronization picture has been presented. Here, we first adopt this approach for MC simulations of the hadronization process with a finite number of produced hadrons, expressing the relevant probabilities in terms of the eight leading twist quark-to-quark transverse-momentum-dependent (TMD) splitting functions (SFs) for elementary q →q'+h transition. We present explicit expressions for the unpolarized and Collins fragmentation functions (FFs) of unpolarized hadrons emitted at rank 2. Further, we demonstrate that all the current spectator-type model calculations of the leading twist quark-to-quark TMD SFs violate the positivity constraints, and we propose a quark model based ansatz for these input functions that circumvents the problem. We validate our MC framework by explicitly proving the absence of unphysical azimuthal modulations of the computed polarized FFs, and by precisely reproducing the earlier derived explicit results for rank-2 pions. Finally, we present the full results for pion unpolarized and Collins FFs, as well as the corresponding analyzing powers from high statistics MC simulations with a large number of produced hadrons for two different model input elementary SFs. The results for both sets of input functions exhibit the same general features of an opposite signed Collins function for favored and unfavored channels at large z and, at the same time, demonstrate the flexibility of the quark-jet framework by producing significantly different dependences of the results at mid to low z for the two model inputs.

  8. Embedded Data Representations.

    PubMed

    Willett, Wesley; Jansen, Yvonne; Dragicevic, Pierre

    2017-01-01

    We introduce embedded data representations, the use of visual and physical representations of data that are deeply integrated with the physical spaces, objects, and entities to which the data refers. Technologies like lightweight wireless displays, mixed reality hardware, and autonomous vehicles are making it increasingly easier to display data in-context. While researchers and artists have already begun to create embedded data representations, the benefits, trade-offs, and even the language necessary to describe and compare these approaches remain unexplored. In this paper, we formalize the notion of physical data referents - the real-world entities and spaces to which data corresponds - and examine the relationship between referents and the visual and physical representations of their data. We differentiate situated representations, which display data in proximity to data referents, and embedded representations, which display data so that it spatially coincides with data referents. Drawing on examples from visualization, ubiquitous computing, and art, we explore the role of spatial indirection, scale, and interaction for embedded representations. We also examine the tradeoffs between non-situated, situated, and embedded data displays, including both visualizations and physicalizations. Based on our observations, we identify a variety of design challenges for embedded data representation, and suggest opportunities for future research and applications.

  9. Top quark studies at hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Sinervo, P.K.

    1997-01-01

    The techniques used to study top quarks at hadron colliders are presented. The analyses that discovered the top quark are described, with emphasis on the techniques used to tag b quark jets in candidate events. The most recent measurements of top quark properties by the CDF and DO Collaborations are reviewed, including the top quark cross section, mass, branching fractions, and production properties. Future top quark studies at hadron colliders are discussed, and predictions for event yields and uncertainties in the measurements of top quark properties are presented.

  10. Hadron Spectroscopy in Double Pomeron Exchange Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Albrow, Michael

    2016-11-15

    Central exclusive production in hadron-hadron collisions at high energies, for example p + p -> p + X + p, where the "+" represents a large rapidity gap, is a valuable process for spectroscopy of mesonic states X. At collider energies the gaps can be large enough to be dominated by pomeron exchange, and then the quantum numbers of the state X are restricted. Isoscalar JPC = 0++ and 2++ mesons are selected, and our understanding of these spectra is incomplete. In particular, soft pomeron exchanges favor gluon-dominated states such as glueballs, which are expected in QCD but not yet well established. I will review some published data.

  11. High energy hadrons in extensive air showers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tonwar, S. C.

    1985-01-01

    Experimental data on the high energy hadronic component in extensive air showers of energies approx. 10 to the 14 to 10 to the 16 eV when compared with expectations from Monte Carlo simulations have shown the observed showers to be deficient in high energy hadrons relative to simulated showers. An attempt is made to understand these anomalous features with more accurate comparison of observations with expectations, taking into account the details of the experimental system. Results obtained from this analysis and their implications for the high energy physics of particle interactions at energy approx. 10 to the 15 eV are presented.

  12. The QCD vacuum, hadrons and superdense matter

    SciTech Connect

    Shuryak, E.

    1986-01-01

    This is probably the only textbook available that gathers QCD, many-body theory and phase transitions in one volume. The presentation is pedagogical and readable. Contents: The QCD Vacuum: Introduction; QCD on the Lattice Topological Effects in Gauges Theories. Correlation Functions and Microscopic Excitations: Introduction; Operator Product Expansion; The Sum Rules beyond OPE; Nonpower Contributions to Correlators and Instantons; Hadronic Spectroscopy on the Lattice. Dense Matter: Hadronic Matter; Asymptotically Dense Quark-Gluon Plasma; Instantons in Matter; Lattice Calculations at Finite Temperature; Phase Transitions; Macroscopic Excitations and Experiments: General Properties of High Energy Collisions; ''Barometers'', ''Thermometers'', Interferometric ''Microscope''; Experimental Perspectives.

  13. Hadron polarizability data analysis: GoAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stegen, H.; Collicott, C.; Hornidge, D.; Martel, P.; Ott, P.

    2015-12-01

    The A2 Collaboration at the Institute for Nuclear Physics in Mainz, Germany, is working towards determining the polarizabilities of hadrons from nonperturbative quantum chromodynamics through Compton scattering experiments at low energies. The asymmetry observables are directly related to the scalar and spin polarizabilities of the hadrons. Online analysis software, which will give real-time feedback on asymmetries, efficiencies, energies, and angle distributions, has been developed. The new software is a big improvement over the existing online code and will greatly develop the quality of the acquired data.

  14. Hadron polarizability data analysis: GoAT

    SciTech Connect

    Stegen, H. Hornidge, D.; Collicott, C.; Martel, P.; Ott, P.

    2015-12-31

    The A2 Collaboration at the Institute for Nuclear Physics in Mainz, Germany, is working towards determining the polarizabilities of hadrons from nonperturbative quantum chromodynamics through Compton scattering experiments at low energies. The asymmetry observables are directly related to the scalar and spin polarizabilities of the hadrons. Online analysis software, which will give real-time feedback on asymmetries, efficiencies, energies, and angle distributions, has been developed. The new software is a big improvement over the existing online code and will greatly develop the quality of the acquired data.

  15. Issues and opportunities in exotic hadrons

    SciTech Connect

    Briceno, Raul A.; Cohen, Thomas D.; Coito, S.; Dudek, Jozef J.; Eichten, E.; Fischer, C. S.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Jackura, A.; Kornicer, M.; Krein, G.; Lebed, Richard F.; Machado, F. A.; Mitchell, R. E.; Morningstar, C. J.; Peardon, M.; R. Pennington, M.; Peters, K.; M. Richard, J.; P. Shen, C.; Shepherd, M. R.; Skwarnicki, T.; S. Swanson, E.; Szczepaniak, A. P.; Yuan, C. Z.

    2016-04-01

    The last few years have been witness to a proliferation of new results concerning heavy exotic hadrons. Experimentally, many new signals have been discovered that could be pointing towards the existence of tetraquarks, pentaquarks, and other exotic configurations of quarks and gluons. Theoretically, advances in lattice field theory techniques place us at the cusp of understanding complex coupled-channel phenomena, modelling grows more sophisticated, and effective field theories are being applied to an ever greater range of situations. Consequently, it is thus an opportune time to evaluate the status of the field. In the following, a series of high priority experimental and theoretical issues concerning heavy exotic hadrons is presented.

  16. Medium Modification of Hadronic Interactions from Low Energy Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, E.

    Medium-modification of hadronic interactions is defined as the differences between hadron-hadron interaction in the nuclear medium and the corresponding interaction in free space. Deeply penetrating hadrons provide such information and we discuss here pionic atoms and scattering by nuclei of 21.5 MeV pions. Brief mention is made also of the interaction of 500-700 MeV/c K+ with nuclei.

  17. Clustering of Hadronic Showers with a Structural Algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Charles, M.J.; /SLAC

    2005-12-13

    The internal structure of hadronic showers can be resolved in a high-granularity calorimeter. This structure is described in terms of simple components and an algorithm for reconstruction of hadronic clusters using these components is presented. Results from applying this algorithm to simulated hadronic Z-pole events in the SiD concept are discussed.

  18. Longitudinally-invariant k⊥-clustering algorithms for hadron-hadron collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catani, S.; Dokshitzer, Yu. L.; Seymour, M. H.; Webber, B. R.

    1993-09-01

    We propose a version of the QCD-motivated " k⊥" jet-clustering algorithm for hadron-hadron collisions which is invariant under boosts along the beam directions. This leads to improved factorization properties and closer correspondence to experimental practice at hadron colliders. We examine alternative definitions of the resolution variables and cluster recombination scheme, and show that the algorithm can be implemented efficiently on a computer to provide a full clustering history of each event. Using simulated data at √ S = 1.8 TeV, we study the effects of calorimeter segmentation, hadronization and the soft underlying event, and compare the results with those obtained using a conventional cone-type algorithm.

  19. Hadron shower decomposition in the highly granular CALICE analogue hadron calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eigen, G.; Price, T.; Watson, N. K.; Marshall, J. S.; Thomson, M. A.; Ward, D. R.; Benchekroun, D.; Hoummada, A.; Khoulaki, Y.; Apostolakis, J.; Dotti, A.; Folger, G.; Ivantchenko, V.; Ribon, A.; Uzhinskiy, V.; Hostachy, J.-Y.; Morin, L.; Brianne, E.; Ebrahimi, A.; Gadow, K.; Göttlicher, P.; Günter, C.; Hartbrich, O.; Hermberg, B.; Irles, A.; Krivan, F.; Krüger, K.; Kvasnicka, J.; Lu, S.; Lutz, B.; Morgunov, V.; Neubüser, C.; Provenza, A.; Reinecke, M.; Sefkow, F.; Schuwalow, S.; Tran, H. L.; Garutti, E.; Laurien, S.; Matysek, M.; Ramilli, M.; Schröder, S.; Briggl, K.; Eckert, P.; Munwes, Y.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-Ch.; Shen, W.; Stamen, R.; Bilki, B.; Norbeck, E.; Northacker, D.; Onel, Y.; van Doren, B.; Wilson, G. W.; Kawagoe, K.; Hirai, H.; Sudo, Y.; Suehara, T.; Sumida, H.; Takada, S.; Tomita, T.; Yoshioka, T.; Wing, M.; Bonnevaux, A.; Combaret, C.; Caponetto, L.; Grenier, G.; Han, R.; Ianigro, J. C.; Kieffer, R.; Laktineh, I.; Lumb, N.; Mathez, H.; Mirabito, L.; Steen, A.; Berenguer Antequera, J.; Calvo Alamillo, E.; Fouz, M.-C.; Marin, J.; Puerta-Pelayo, J.; Verdugo, A.; Bobchenko, B.; Markin, O.; Novikov, E.; Rusinov, V.; Tarkovsky, E.; Kirikova, N.; Kozlov, V.; Smirnov, P.; Soloviev, Y.; Besson, D.; Buzhan, P.; Chadeeva, M.; Danilov, M.; Drutskoy, A.; Ilyin, A.; Mironov, D.; Mizuk, R.; Popova, E.; Gabriel, M.; Goecke, P.; Kiesling, C.; van der Kolk, N.; Simon, F.; Szalay, M.; Bilokin, S.; Bonis, J.; Cornebise, P.; Pöschl, R.; Richard, F.; Thiebault, A.; Zerwas, D.; Anduze, M.; Balagura, V.; Becheva, E.; Boudry, V.; Brient, J.-C.; Cizel, J.-B.; Clerc, C.; Cornat, R.; Frotin, M.; Gastaldi, F.; Magniette, F.; Mora de Freitas, P.; Musat, G.; Pavy, S.; Rubio-Roy, M.; Ruan, M.; Videau, H.; Callier, S.; Dulucq, F.; Martin-Chassard, G.; Raux, L.; Seguin-Moreau, N.; de la Taille, Ch.; Cvach, J.; Gallus, P.; Havranek, M.; Janata, M.; Lednicky, D.; Marcisovsky, M.; Polak, I.; Popule, J.; Tomasek, L.; Tomasek, M.; Sicho, P.; Smolik, J.; Vrba, V.; Zalesak, J.; Kotera, K.; Ono, H.; Takeshita, T.; Ieki, S.; Kamiya, Y.; Ootani, W.; Shibata, N.; Jeans, D.; Komamiya, S.; Nakanishi, H.

    2016-06-01

    The spatial development of hadronic showers in the CALICE scintillator-steel analogue hadron calorimeter is studied using test beam data collected at CERN and FNAL for single positive pions and protons with initial momenta in the range of 10-80 GeV/c. Both longitudinal and radial development of hadron showers are parametrised with two-component functions. The parametrisation is fit to test beam data and simulations using the QGSP_BERT and FTFP_BERT physics lists from GEANT4 version 9.6. The parameters extracted from data and simulated samples are compared for the two types of hadrons. The response to pions and the ratio of the non-electromagnetic to the electromagnetic calorimeter response, h/e, are estimated using the extrapolation and decomposition of the longitudinal profiles.

  20. Black Holes and the Large Hadron Collider

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roy, Arunava

    2011-01-01

    The European Center for Nuclear Research or CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has caught our attention partly due to the film "Angels and Demons." In the movie, an antimatter bomb attack on the Vatican is foiled by the protagonist. Perhaps just as controversial is the formation of mini black holes (BHs). Recently, the American Physical Society…

  1. Lattice studies of hadrons with heavy flavors

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher Aubin

    2009-07-01

    I will discuss recent developments in lattice studies of hadrons composed of heavy quarks. I will mostly cover topics which are at a state of direct comparison with experiment, but will also discuss new ideas and promising techniques to aid future studies of lattice heavy quark physics.

  2. Hard hadronic collisions: extrapolation of standard effects

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, A.; Aurenche, P.; Baier, R.; Berger, E.; Douiri, A.; Fontannaz, M.; Humpert, B.; Ingelman, G.; Kinnunen, R.; Pietarinen, E.

    1984-01-01

    We study hard hadronic collisions for the proton-proton (pp) and the proton-antiproton (p anti p) option in the CERN LEP tunnel. Based on our current knowledge of hard collisions at the present CERN p anti p Collider, and with the help of quantum chromodynamics (QCD), we extrapolate to the next generation of hadron colliders with a centre-of-mass energy E/sub cm/ = 10 to 20 TeV. We estimate various signatures, trigger rates, event topologies, and associated distributions for a variety of old and new physical processes, involving prompt photons, leptons, jets, W/sup + -/ and Z bosons in the final state. We also calculate the maximum fermion and boson masses accessible at the LEP Hadron Collider. The standard QCD and electroweak processes studied here, being the main body of standard hard collisions, quantify the challenge of extracting new physics with hadron colliders. We hope that our estimates will provide a useful profile of the final states, and that our experimental physics colleagues will find this of use in the design of their detectors. 84 references.

  3. BEAM INSTRUMENTATION FOR HIGH POWER HADRON BEAMS

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksandrov, Alexander V

    2013-01-01

    This presentation will describe developments in the beam diagnostics which support the understanding and operation of high power hadron accelerators. These include the measurement of large dynamic range transverse and longitudinal beam profiles, beam loss detection, and non-interceptive diagnostics.

  4. Scaling violation in hadron-nucleus interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verbetski, Y. G.; Garsevanishvili, L. P.; Kotlyarevski, D. M.; Ladaria, N. K.; Tatalashvili, N. G.; Tsomaya, P. V.; Sherer, N. I.; Shabelski, Y. M.; Stemanetyan, G. Z.

    1985-01-01

    The scaling violation within the pionization region in the energy range of 0.2 to 2.0 TeV is shown on the basis of the analysis of angular characteristics in the interactions of the cosmic radiation hadrons with the nuclei of various substances (CH2, Al, Cu, Pb).

  5. Recent measurements of the B hadron lifetime

    SciTech Connect

    Ong, R.A.

    1987-12-01

    Recent measurements of the B hadron lifetime from PEP and PETRA experiments are presented. These measurements firmly establish that the B lifetime is long (approx.1 psec), implying that the mixing between the third generation of quarks and the lighter quarks is much weaker that the mixing between the first two generations.

  6. Future hadron physics facilities at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Appel, Jeffrey A.; /Fermilab

    2004-12-01

    Fermilab's hadron physics research continues in all its accelerator-based programs. These efforts will be identified, and the optimization of the Fermilab schedules for physics will be described. In addition to the immediate plans, the Fermilab Long Range Plan will be cited, and the status and potential role of a new proton source, the Proton Driver, is described.

  7. Hadron physics at the COMPASS experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krinner, Fabian

    2015-05-01

    Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD), the theory of strong interactions, in principle describes the interaction of quark and gluon fields. However, due to the self-coupling of the gluons, quarks and gluons are confined into hadrons and cannot exist as free particles. The quantitative understanding of this confinement phenomenon, which is responsible for about 98% of the mass of the visible universe, is one of the major open questions in particle physics. The measurement of the excitation spectrum of hadrons and of their properties gives valuable input to theory and phenomenology. In the Constituent Quark Model (CQM) two types of hadrons exist: mesons, made out of a quark and an antiquark, and baryons, which consist of three quarks. But more advanced QCD-inspired models and Lattice QCD calculations predict the existence of hadrons with exotic properties interpreted as excited glue (hybrids) or even pure gluonic bound states (glueballs). The Compass experiment at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron has acquired large data sets, which allow to study light-quark meson and baryon spectra in unprecedented detail. The presented overview of the first results from this data set focuses in particular on the light meson sector and presents a detailed analysis of three-pion final states. A new JPC = 1++ state, the a1(1420), is observed with a mass and width in the ranges m = 1412 - 1422MeV/c2 and Γ = 130 - 150MeV/c2.

  8. Pion double charge exchange and hadron dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, M.B.

    1991-01-01

    This paper will review theoretical results to show how pion double charge exchange is contributing to our understanding of hadron dynamics in nuclei. The exploitation of the nucleus as a filter is shown to be essential in facilitating the comparison between theory and experiment. 23 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Mean transverse momenta correlations in hadron-hadron collisions in MC toy model with repulsing strings

    SciTech Connect

    Altsybeev, Igor

    2016-01-22

    In the present work, Monte-Carlo toy model with repulsing quark-gluon strings in hadron-hadron collisions is described. String repulsion creates transverse boosts for the string decay products, giving modifications of observables. As an example, long-range correlations between mean transverse momenta of particles in two observation windows are studied in MC toy simulation of the heavy-ion collisions.

  10. Highlights from Compass in hadron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krinner, Fabian

    2015-06-01

    Since Quantum Choromdynamics allows for gluon self-coupling, quarks and gluons cannot be observed as free particles, but only their bound states, the hadrons. This so-called confinement phenomenon is responsible for 98% of the mass in the visible universe. Measurement of the hadron excitation spectra therefore gives valuable input for theory and phenomenology to quantitatively understand this phenomenon. One simple model to describe hadrons is the Constituent Quark Model (CQM), which knows two types of hadrons: mesons consisting of a quark and an antiquark and baryons, which are made of three quarks. More advanced models, which are inspired by QCD as well as calculations within Lattice QCD, predict the existence of other types of hadrons, which may be, e.g., described solely by gluonic excitations (glueballs) or mixed quark and gluon excitations (hybrids). In order to search for such states, the Compass experiment at the Super Proton Synchrotron at CERN has collected large data sets, which allow to study the light-quark meson and baryon spectra with unmatched precision. The overview shown here focuses on the light meson sector, presenting a detailed Partial-Wave Analysis of the processes: π- p → π-π+π- p and π- p → π-π0π0 p. A new state, the a1(1420) with JPC = 1++, is observed. Its Breit-Wigner parameters are found to be in the ranges: m = 1412 - 1422MeV/c2 and Γ = 130 - 150MeV/c2. In the same analysis, a signal in a wave with JPC = 1- + is observed. A resonant origin of this signal would not be explicable within the CQM. In addition to this possibility of an exotic state, possible non-resonant origin of this signal is discussed.

  11. Function, anticipation, representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bickhard, Mark. H.

    2001-06-01

    Function emerges in certain kinds of far-from-equilibrium systems. One important kind of function is that of interactive anticipation, an adaptedness to temporal complexity. Interactive anticipation is the locus of the emergence of normative representational content, and, thus, of representation in general: interactive anticipation is the naturalistic core of the evolution of cognition. Higher forms of such anticipation are involved in the subsequent macro-evolutionary sequence of learning, emotions, and reflexive consciousness.

  12. Contacts de langues et representations (Language Contacts and Representations).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthey, Marinette, Ed.

    1997-01-01

    Essays on language contact and the image of language, entirely in French, include: "Representations 'du' contexte et representations 'en' contexte? Eleves et enseignants face a l'apprentissage de la langue" ("Representations 'of' Context or Representations 'in' Context? Students and Teachers Facing Language Learning" (Laurent…

  13. Bose-Einstein correlation within the framework of hadronic mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Burande, Chandrakant S.

    2015-03-10

    The Bose-Einstein correlation is the phenomenon in which protons and antiprotons collide at extremely high energies; coalesce one into the other resulting into the fireball of finite dimension. They annihilate each other and produces large number of mesons that remain correlated at distances very large compared to the size of the fireball. It was believed that Einstein’s special relativity and relativistic quantum mechanics are the valid frameworks to represent this phenomenon. Although, these frameworks are incomplete and require arbitrary parameters (chaoticity) to fit the experimental data which are prohibited by the basic axioms of relativistic quantum mechanics, such as that for the vacuum expectation values. Moreover, correlated mesons can not be treated as a finite set of isolated point-like particles because it is non-local event due to overlapping of wavepackets. Therefore, the Bose-Einstein correlation is incompatible with the axiom of expectation values of quantum mechanics. In contrary, relativistic hadronic mechanics constructed by Santilli allows an exact representation of the experimental data of the Bose-Einstein correlation and restore the validity of the Lorentz and Poincare symmetries under nonlocal and non-Hamiltonian internal effects. Further, F. Cardone and R. Mignani observed that the Bose-Einstein two-point correlation function derived by Santilli is perfectly matched with experimental data at high energy.

  14. Theory of hadronic production of heavy quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, C.

    1981-07-01

    Conventional theoretical predictions for hadronic production of heavy quarks (Q anti Q) are reviewed and confronted with data. Perturbative hard scattering predictions agree qualitatively well with hidden Q anti Q production (e.g., psi, chi, T) whereas for open Q anti Q-production (e.g., pp ..-->.. ..lambda../sub c//sup +/X) additional mechanisms or inputs are needed to explain the forwardly produced ..lambda../sub c//sup +/ at ISR. It is suggested that the presence of c anti c-pairs on the 1 to 2% level in the hadron Fock state decomposition (intrinsic charm) gives a natural description of the ISR data. The theoretical foundations of the intrinsic charm hypotheses together with its consequences for lepton-induced reactions is discussed in some detail.

  15. Trends in accelerator technology for hadron therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostromin, S. A.; Syresin, E. M.

    2013-12-01

    Hadron therapy with protons and carbon ions is one of the most effective branches in radiation oncology. It has advantages over therapy using gamma radiation and electron beams. Fifty thousand patients a year need such treatment in Russia. A review of the main modern trends in the development of accelerators for therapy and treatment techniques concerned with respiratory gated irradiation and scanning with the intensity modulated pencil beams is given. The main stages of formation, time structure, and the main parameters of the beams used in proton therapy, as well as the requirements for medicine accelerators, are considered. The main results of testing with the beam of the C235-V3 cyclotron for the first Russian specialized hospital proton therapy center in Dimitrovgrad are presented. The use of superconducting accelerators and gantry systems for hadron therapy is considered.

  16. Exclusive hadronic decays of B mesons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hölscher, Andreas

    1991-06-01

    The recent experimental results on exclusive hadronic decays of B mesons obtained by the ARGUS collaboration are presented in the talk. The results include exclusive hadronic decays involving a b → c transition, namely B decays with a D, D ∗ plus several pions and B decays to J/ψ or ψ' mesons plus Kaons have been studied. The measurements of branching ratios for two-body B decays involving a J/ψ or ψ' meson are of wide interest in the light of proposals for the study of CP violation in future experiments. The branching ratios are compared with the predictions of the model of Bauer, Stech and Wirbel and with a model of A.V. Dobrovolskaya. Using the cleanest decay channels, the masses and mass difference of the charged and neutral B meson are obtained. This mass difference is then compared with the mass splitting in other isospinmultipletts and with theoretical models.

  17. Quark-Hadron Duality in Electron Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Wally Melnitchouk; Rolf Ent; Cynthia Keppel

    2004-08-01

    The duality between partonic and hadronic descriptions of physical phenomena is one of the most remarkable features of strong interaction physics. A classic example of this is in electron-nucleon scattering, in which low-energy cross sections, when averaged over appropriate energy intervals, are found to exhibit the scaling behavior expected from perturbative QCD. We present a comprehensive review of data on structure functions in the resonance region, from which the global and local aspects of duality are quantified, including its flavor, spin and nuclear medium dependence. To interpret the experimental findings, we discuss various theoretical approaches which have been developed to understand the microscopic origins of quark-hadron duality in QCD. Examples from other reactions are used to place duality in a broader context, and future experimental and theoretical challenges are identified.

  18. Sources of compensation in hadronic calorimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Goodman, M.S.; Gabriel, T.A.; Di Ciaccio, A.; Wilson, R.

    1988-12-01

    Monte Carlo simulations are presented using the CALOR code system to study the design of a large hybrid hadron calorimeter system employing a warm liquid active medium (tetramethylsilane, Si(CH/sub 3/)/sub 4/) and uranium plates in addition to a conventional Fe/plastic system. In the system described here, the uranium provides partial compensation by suppressing the electromagnetic cascade produced by incident electrons due to sampling inefficiencies. The results of the simulations also indicate that significant compensation is achieved (given small enough saturation) due to low energy recoil protons produced in collisions with low energy (1--20 MeV) cascade and fission neutrons in the active medium. Both compensation mechanisms are important to help balance the response of a calorimeter to incident electrons and hadrons, that is, to achieve a ratio of pulse heights (e/h approx. 1) which will lead to the best energy resolution. 17 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Production of heavy quarkonia in hadronic experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Likhoded, A. K.; Luchinsky, A. V.; Poslavsky, S. V.

    2015-12-01

    The phenomenology of the production of P-wave χ c,b mesons and S-wave η c,b mesons in highenergy hadron-hadron collisions was studied on the basis of nonrelativistic quantum chromodynamics (NRQCD). Available experimental data on χ c -meson production were analyzed, and nonperturbative NRQCDmatrix elements were determined from a fit to these data. It is shown that the observed transversemomentum ( pT) spectrum of χ c mesons is basically formed by color-singlet contributions. At the same time, the ratio σ( χ c2)/ σ( χ c1) depends greatly on color-octet contributions; this ratio therefore becomes a highly sensitive tool for separating different NRQCD contributions. Predictions for χ b -meson production are obtained on the basis of NRQCD scaling rules. For the case of η c -meson production, it is shown that the observed cross sections agree with the color-singlet model featuring phenomenological parameters.

  20. Superconformal Algebraic Approach to Hadron Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Téramond, Guy F.; Brodsky, Stanley J.; Deur, Alexandre; Dosch, Hans Günter; Sufian, Raza Sabbir

    2017-03-01

    Fundamental aspects of nonperturbative QCD dynamics which are not obvious from its classical Lagrangian, such as the emergence of a mass scale and confinement, the existence of a zero mass bound state, the appearance of universal Regge trajectories and the breaking of chiral symmetry are incorporated from the onset in an effective theory based on superconformal quantum mechanics and its embedding in a higher dimensional gravitational theory. In addition, superconformal quantum mechanics gives remarkable connections between the light meson and nucleon spectra. This new approach to hadron physics is also suitable to describe nonperturbative QCD observables based on structure functions, such as GPDs, which are not amenable to a first-principle computation. The formalism is also successful in the description of form factors, the nonperturbative behavior of the strong coupling and diffractive processes. We also discuss in this article how the framework can be extended rather successfully to the heavy-light hadron sector.

  1. Issues and opportunities in exotic hadrons

    DOE PAGES

    Briceno, Raul A.; Cohen, Thomas D.; Coito, S.; ...

    2016-04-01

    The last few years have been witness to a proliferation of new results concerning heavy exotic hadrons. Experimentally, many new signals have been discovered that could be pointing towards the existence of tetraquarks, pentaquarks, and other exotic configurations of quarks and gluons. Theoretically, advances in lattice field theory techniques place us at the cusp of understanding complex coupled-channel phenomena, modelling grows more sophisticated, and effective field theories are being applied to an ever greater range of situations. Consequently, it is thus an opportune time to evaluate the status of the field. In the following, a series of high priority experimentalmore » and theoretical issues concerning heavy exotic hadrons is presented.« less

  2. Hadron Production in Quark and Antiquark Jets

    SciTech Connect

    Muller, David

    1999-09-27

    We present a number of jet fragmentation measurements e{sup +}e{sup -} --> hadrons. The ALEPH collaboration measures inclusive rho{sup 0}(770), f{sub 0}(980) and f{sub 2}(1270) production rates, improving the world averages. The SLD collaboration measures pi{sup {+-}}, K{sup {+-}} and p/anti-p production in light-, c- and b-flavor Z{sup 0} decays, as well as leading hadrons in light-quark jets, precisely. The DELPHI collaboration measures the average charged multiplicity in light- and b-flavor events at 183 and 189 GeV, verifying a precise prediction of QCD and excluding flavor-independent fragmentation.

  3. Unraveling hadron structure with generalized parton distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Andrei Belitsky; Anatoly Radyushkin

    2004-10-01

    The recently introduced generalized parton distributions have emerged as a universal tool to describe hadrons in terms of quark and gluonic degrees of freedom. They combine the features of form factors, parton densities and distribution amplitudes - the functions used for a long time in studies of hadronic structure. Generalized parton distributions are analogous to the phase-space Wigner quasi-probability function of non-relativistic quantum mechanics which encodes full information on a quantum-mechanical system. We give an extensive review of main achievements in the development of this formalism. We discuss physical interpretation and basic properties of generalized parton distributions, their modeling and QCD evolution in the leading and next-to-leading orders. We describe how these functions enter a wide class of exclusive reactions, such as electro- and photo-production of photons, lepton pairs, or mesons.

  4. Many body theory in hadronic physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llanes-Estrada, Felipe Jose

    2000-11-01

    This dissertation presents the development of several many body techniques of widespread use in Atomic, Nuclear and Solid State to Hadronic, the low energy Particle Physics that studies strong interactions. For the high energy, asymptotically free, quarks and gluons described by Quantum Chromodynamics, a canonical (BCS) transformation is performed to generate effective low energy degrees of freedom. Then a model Hamiltonian is approximately diagonalized in Fock space using the TDA and RPA formulations. The relativistic wave equations resulting in each sector are numerically solved, yielding mass eigenvalues for the hadronic spectrum. The TDA provides a reasonable approximation for the glueball and meson spectra, with the exception of the light pseudoscalar mesons, where only the RPA correctly incorporates chiral symmetry and the Goldstone boson nature of the pion. Particular attention is devoted to charmed and hybrid mesons, especially exotic states, given the existing data from BNL and prospects of detection at both TJNAF (Hall D) and CERN (Compass).

  5. Hadronic density of states from string theory.

    PubMed

    Pando Zayas, Leopoldo A; Vaman, Diana

    2003-09-12

    We present an exact calculation of the finite temperature partition function for the hadronic states corresponding to a Penrose-Güven limit of the Maldacena-Nùñez embedding of the N=1 super Yang-Mills (SYM) into string theory. It is established that the theory exhibits a Hagedorn density of states. We propose a semiclassical string approximation to the finite temperature partition function for confining gauge theories admitting a supergravity dual, by performing an expansion around classical solutions characterized by temporal windings. This semiclassical approximation reveals a hadronic energy density of states of a Hagedorn type, with the coefficient determined by the gauge theory string tension as expected for confining theories. We argue that our proposal captures primarily information about states of pure N=1 SYM theory, given that this semiclassical approximation does not entail a projection onto states of large U(1) charge.

  6. The Large Hadron Collider: Redefining High Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Demers, Sarah

    2007-06-19

    Particle physicists have a description of the forces of nature known as the Standard Model that has successfully withstood decades of testing at laboratories around the world. Though the Standard Model is powerful, it is not complete. Important details like the masses of particles are not explained well, and realities as fundamental as gravity, dark matter, and dark energy are left out altogether. I will discuss gaps in the model and why there is hope that some puzzles will be solved by probing high energies with the Large Hadron Collider. Beginning next year, this machine will accelerate protons to record energies, hurling them around a 27 kilometer ring before colliding them 40 million times per second. Detectors the size of five-story buildings will record the debris of these collisions. The new energy frontier made accessible by the Large Hadron Collider will allow thousands of physicists to explore nature's fundamental forces and particles from a fantastic vantage point.

  7. Grassmannian sparse representations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azary, Sherif; Savakis, Andreas

    2015-05-01

    We present Grassmannian sparse representations (GSR), a sparse representation Grassmann learning framework for efficient classification. Sparse representation classification offers a powerful approach for recognition in a variety of contexts. However, a major drawback of sparse representation methods is their computational performance and memory utilization for high-dimensional data. A Grassmann manifold is a space that promotes smooth surfaces where points represent subspaces and the relationship between points is defined by the mapping of an orthogonal matrix. Grassmann manifolds are well suited for computer vision problems because they promote high between-class discrimination and within-class clustering, while offering computational advantages by mapping each subspace onto a single point. The GSR framework combines Grassmannian kernels and sparse representations, including regularized least squares and least angle regression, to improve high accuracy recognition while overcoming the drawbacks of performance and dependencies on high dimensional data distributions. The effectiveness of GSR is demonstrated on computationally intensive multiview action sequences, three-dimensional action sequences, and face recognition datasets.

  8. Really large hadron collider working group summary

    SciTech Connect

    Dugan, G.; Limon, P.; Syphers, M.

    1996-12-01

    A summary is presented of preliminary studies of three 100 TeV center-of-mass hadron colliders made with magnets of different field strengths, 1.8T, 9.5T and 12.6T. Descriptions of the machines, and some of the major and most challenging subsystems, are presented, along with parameter lists and the major issues for future study.

  9. Hadronic wavefunctions in light-cone quantization

    SciTech Connect

    Hyer, T.

    1994-05-01

    The analysis of light-cone wavefunctions seems the most promising theoretical approach to a detailed understanding of the structure of relativistic bound states, particularly hadrons. However, there are numerous complications in this approach. Most importantly, the light-cone approach sacrifices manifest rotational invariance in exchange for the elimination of negative-energy states. The requirement of rotational invariance of the full theory places important constraints on proposed light-cone wavefunctions, whether they are modelled or extracted from some numerical procedure. A formulation of the consequences of the hidden rotational symmetry has been sought for some time; it is presented in Chapter 2. In lattice gauge theory or heavy-quark effective theory, much of the focus is on the extraction of numerical values of operators which are related to the hadronic wavefunction. These operators are to some extent interdependent, with relations induced by fundamental constraints on the underlying wavefunction. The consequences of the requirement of unitarity are explored in Chapter 3, and are found to have startling phenomenological relevance. To test model light-cone wavefunctions, experimental predictions must be made. The reliability of perturbative QCD as a tool for making such predictions has been questioned. In Chapter 4, the author presents a computation of the rates for nucleon-antinucleon annihilation, improving the reliability of the perturbative computation by taking into account the Sudakov suppression of exclusive processes at large transverse impact parameter. In Chapter 5, he develops the analysis of semiexclusive production. This work focuses on processes in which a single isolated meson is produced perturbatively and recoils against a wide hadronizing system. At energies above about 10 GeV, semiexclusive processes are shown to be the most sensitive experimental probes of hadronic structure.

  10. Hadron Physics in BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Lafferty, G.D.; /Manchester U.

    2005-08-29

    Some recent results in hadron physics from the BaBar experiment are discussed. In particular, the observation of two new charmed states, the D*{sub sJ}{sup +}(2317) and the D*{sub sJ}{sup +}(2457), is described, and results are presented on the first measurement of the rare decay mode of the B meson, B{sup 0} {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}.

  11. High energy hadron collisions in QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, E. M.; Ryskin, M. G.

    1990-05-01

    In this review we present the microscopic approach to large cross section physics at high energy, based on the leading logarithmic approximation of perturbative QCD and the reggeon diagram technique. We insist that at high energy the main source of secondary hadrons is the production and fragmentation of the gluon minijets with transverse momentum qt ≈ q0, which rapidly growswith energy, namely q2t≈ q20≈Λ 2 exp(2.5√ln s). Such a large value of the transverse momentum allows us to adopt perturbative QCD for high hadron collisions. The completely avoid the unknown confinement problem, a new scale overlineQ0 ( overlineQ0≈1 GeV, α s( overlineQ20)<1) is introduced in our calculations and only momenta qt> overlineQ0 for gluons are taken into account in any integration. All our results only slightly depend on the value of overlineQ0. It is shown that perturbative QCD is able to describe the main properties of the hedron interactions at high energy, namely, the inclusive spectra of secondary hadrons as functions of y and qt, including small qt⪅300MeV, in a wide energy range √ s=50-900 GeV, the multiplicity distribution, the mean transverse momentum versus multiplicity and so on. We use only three phenomenological parameters in such a description of the experimental data; these values are in agreement with theoretical estimates. Our approach predicts a rapid increase of the mean transverse momentum for secondary hadrons, qt≈ q0, where q0=2.5 GeV at √ S=0.5 TeV, and q0⋍7 GeV at √ S=40 TeV, the total multiplicity N≈ q20, the total cross section σ t≈ln 2s and a comparatively slow increase of the diffraction dissociation cross section σ D≈ln s.

  12. Search for hadronic b-->u decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albrecht, H.; Gläser, R.; Harder, G.; Krüger, A.; Nilsson, A. W.; Nippe, A.; Oest, T.; Reidenbach, M.; Schäfer, M.; Schmidt-Parzefall, W.; Schröder, H.; Schulz, H. D.; Sefkow, F.; Wurth, R.; Appuhn, R. D.; Drescher, A.; Hast, C.; Herrera, G.; Kolanoski, H.; Lange, A.; Lindner, A.; Mankel, R.; Scheck, H.; Schweda, G.; Spaan, B.; Walther, A.; Wegener, D.; Paulini, M.; Reim, K.; Volland, U.; Wegener, H.; Funk, W.; Stiewe, J.; Werner, S.; Ball, S.; Gabriel, J. C.; Geyer, C.; Hölscher, A.; Hofmann, W.; Holzer, B.; Khan, S.; Spengler, J.; Charlesworth, C. E. K.; Edwards, K. W.; Frisken, W. R.; Kapitza, H.; Krieger, P.; Kutschke, R.; Macfarlene, D. B.; McLean, K. W.; Orr, R. S.; Parsons, J. A.; Patel, P. M.; Prentice, J. D.; Seidel, S. C.; Swain, J. D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tzamariudaki, K.; Yoon, T.-S.; Ruf, T.; Schael, S.; Schubert, K. R.; Strahl, K.; Waldi, R.; Weseler, S.; Boštjančič, B.; Kernel, G.; Križan, P.; Križnič, E.; Cronström, H. I.; Jönsson, L.; Babaev, A.; Danilo, M.; Fominykh, B.; Golutvin, A.; Gorelov, I.; Lubimov, V.; Rostovtsev, A.; Semenov, A.; Semenov, S.; Shevchenko, V.; Soloshenko, V.; Tchistilin, V.; Tichomirov, I.; Zaitsev, Yu.; Childers, R.; Darden, C. W.; Argus Collaboration

    1990-05-01

    Using the ARGUS detector at the e +e - storage ring DORIS II at DESY, we searched for b→u transitions in exclusive hadronic B meson decays. A systematic analysis of B decays into pions has been performed for decay modes with 2-7 pions in the final state. In none of the decays a positive signal was observed. The upper limits obtained on various branching ratios are consistent with the current model predictions.

  13. Perspectives of hadron therapy in Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Contreras, J. G.

    2008-08-11

    The need for a hadron therapy center in Mexico is presented. The question if such a facility is affordable in Mexico is discussed, addressing the economical factor as well as the expertise and know how available in both the private and the public sector. To conclude, a possible path, and the first steps on it, to move forward towards a medical facility in Mexico devoted to proton therapy are sketched.

  14. Hadron physics as Seiberg dual of QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Kitano, Ryuichiro

    2012-07-27

    We try to identify the light hadron world as the magnetic picture of QCD. We take both phenomenological and theoretical approaches to this hypothesis, and find that the interpretation seems to show interesting consistencies. In particular, one can identify the {rho} and {omega} mesons as the magnetic gauge bosons, and the Higgs mechanism for them provides a dual picture of the color confinement{sup 1}.

  15. Natural h{yields}4g in supersymmetric models and R-hadrons at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Luty, Markus A.; Phalen, Daniel J.; Pierce, Aaron

    2011-04-01

    We construct a simple and natural supersymmetric model where the dominant Higgs decay is h{yields}aa followed by a{yields}gg. In this case m{sub h}representations. In this case a{yields}{gamma}{gamma} has a {approx}1% branching ratio, so h{yields}gg{gamma}{gamma} may be observable. The colored particles that mediate the a{yields}gg decay must be below the TeV scale, and can therefore be produced at the LHC. If these particles are stable on collider time scales, they will appear as R-hadrons, a signal visible in early LHC running. A smoking-gun signal that the stable colored particles are mediators of h{yields}4j is R-hadron production in association with an a. We show that this signal with a{yields}{gamma}{gamma} is observable at the LHC with as little as 10 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity. Observation of R-hadrons plus missing energy would show that the superpartner of the R-hadron is R-parity odd, and therefore not an ordinary quark or gluon.

  16. The hadronic final state at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, Paul R.; Wing, Matthew

    2014-07-01

    The hadronic final state in electron-proton collisions at HERA has provided a rich testing ground for development of the theory of the strong force, QCD. In this review, over 200 publications from the H1 and ZEUS Collaborations are summarized. Short distance physics, the measurement of processes at high-energy scales, has provided rigorous tests of perturbative QCD and constrained the structure of the proton as well as allowing precise determinations of the strong coupling constant to be made. Nonperturbative or low-energy processes have also been investigated and results on hadronization interpreted together with those from other experiments. Searches for exotic QCD objects, such as pentaquarks, glueballs, and instantons, have been performed. The subject of diffraction has been reinvigorated through its precise measurement, such that it can now be described by perturbative QCD. After discussion of HERA, the H1 and ZEUS detectors, and the techniques used to reconstruct differing hadronic final states, the above subject areas are elaborated on. The major achievements are then condensed further in a final section summarizing what has been learned.

  17. Emergent phenomena and partonic structure in hadrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Craig D.; Mezrag, Cédric

    2017-03-01

    Modern facilities are poised to tackle fundamental questions within the Standard Model, aiming to reveal the nature of confinement, its relationship to dynamical chiral symmetry breaking (DCSB) - the origin of visible mass - and the connection between these two, key emergent phenomena. There is strong evidence to suggest that they are intimately connected with the appearance of momentum-dependent masses for gluons and quarks in QCD, which are large in the infrared: mg 500MeV and Mq 350MeV. DCSB, expressed in the dynamical generation of a dressed-quark mass, has an enormous variety of verifiable consequences, including an enigmatic result that the properties of the (almost) massless pion are the cleanest expression of the mechanism which is responsible for almost all the visible mass in the Universe. This contribution explains that these emergent phenomena are expressed with particular force in the partonic structure of hadrons, e.g. in valence-quark parton distribution amplitudes and functions, and, consequently, in numerous hadronic observables, so that we are now in a position to exhibit the consequences of confinement and DCSB in a wide range of hadron observables, opening the way to empirical verification of their expression in the Standard Model.

  18. Spacecraft Attitude Representations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markley, F. Landis

    1999-01-01

    The direction cosine matrix or attitude matrix is the most fundamental representation of the attitude, but it is very inefficient: It has six redundant parameters, it is difficult to enforce the six (orthogonality) constraints. the four-component quaternion representation is very convenient: it has only one redundant parameter, it is easy to enforce the normalization constraint, the attitude matrix is a homogeneous quadratic function of q, quaternion kinematics are bilinear in q and m. Euler angles are extensively used: they often have a physical interpretation, they provide a natural description of some spacecraft motions (COBE, MAP), but kinematics and attitude matrix involve trigonometric functions, "gimbal lock" for certain values of the angles. Other minimum (three-parameter) representations: Gibbs vector is infinite for 180 deg rotations, but useful for analysis, Modified Rodrigues Parameters are nonsingular, no trig functions, Rotation vector phi is nonsingular, but requires trig functions.

  19. Learning network representations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moyano, Luis G.

    2017-02-01

    In this review I present several representation learning methods, and discuss the latest advancements with emphasis in applications to network science. Representation learning is a set of techniques that has the goal of efficiently mapping data structures into convenient latent spaces. Either for dimensionality reduction or for gaining semantic content, this type of feature embeddings has demonstrated to be useful, for example, for node classification or link prediction tasks, among many other relevant applications to networks. I provide a description of the state-of-the-art of network representation learning as well as a detailed account of the connections with other fields of study such as continuous word embeddings and deep learning architectures. Finally, I provide a broad view of several applications of these techniques to networks in various domains.

  20. Umbra's system representation.

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, Michael James

    2005-07-01

    This document describes the Umbra System representation. Umbra System representation, initially developed in the spring of 2003, is implemented in Incr/Tcl using concepts borrowed from Carnegie Mellon University's Architecture Description Language (ADL) called Acme. In the spring of 2004 through January 2005, System was converted to Umbra 4, extended slightly, and adopted as the underlying software system for a variety of Umbra applications that support Complex Systems Engineering (CSE) and Complex Adaptive Systems Engineering (CASE). System is now a standard part Of Umbra 4. While Umbra 4 also includes an XML parser for System, the XML parser and Schema are not described in this document.

  1. Analysis of hadron yield data within hadron resonance gas model with multi-component eigenvolume corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vovchenko, Volodymyr; Stoecker, Horst

    2017-01-01

    We analyze the sensitivity of thermal fits to heavy-ion hadron yield data of ALICE and NA49 collaborations to the systematic uncertainties in the hadron resonance gas (HRG) model related to the modeling of the eigenvolume interactions. We find a surprisingly large sensitivity in extraction of chemical freeze-out parameters to the assumptions regarding eigenvolumes of different hadrons. We additionally study the effect of including yields of light nuclei into the thermal fits to LHC data and find even larger sensitivity to the modeling of their eigenvolumes. The inclusion of light nuclei yields, thus, may lead to further destabilization of thermal fits. Our results show that modeling of eigenvolume interactions plays a crucial role in thermodynamics of HRG and that conclusions based on a non-interacting HRG are inconclusive.

  2. Hadron Production in Heavy Ion Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Ritter, Hans Georg; Xu, Nu

    2009-05-19

    Heavy ion collisions are an ideal tool to explore the QCD phase diagram. The goal is to study the equation of state (EOS) and to search for possible in-medium modifications of hadrons. By varying the collision energy a variety of regimes with their specific physics interest can be studied. At energies of a few GeV per nucleon, the regime where experiments were performed first at the Berkeley Bevalac and later at the Schwer-Ionen-Synchrotron (SIS) at GSI in Darmstadt, we study the equation of state of dense nuclear matter and try to identify in-medium modifications of hadrons. Towards higher energies, the regime of the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), the Super-Proton Synchrotron (SPS) at CERN, and the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at BNL, we expect to produce a new state of matter, the Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP). The physics goal is to identify the QGP and to study its properties. By varying the energy, different forms of matter are produced. At low energies we study dense nuclear matter, similar to the type of matter neutron stars are made of. As the energy is increased the main constituents of the matter will change. Baryon excitations will become more prevalent (resonance matter). Eventually we produce deconfined partonic matter that is thought to be in the core of neutron stars and that existed in the early universe. At low energies a great variety of collective effects is observed and a rather good understanding of the particle production has been achieved, especially that of the most abundantly produced pions and kaons. Many observations can be interpreted as time-ordered emission of various particle species. It is possible to determine, albeit model dependent, the equation of state of nuclear matter. We also have seen indications, that the kaon mass, especially the mass of the K{sup +}, might be modified by the medium created in heavy ion collisions. At AGS energies and above, emphasis shifts towards

  3. Knowledge Representation in PARKA

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-02-01

    the color of Poodle could be restricted to being just black or white, while the color of Irish-Setter could be set to red. Note that this would allow a...sub- field of knowledge representation with considerable subtlety and a history of interesting, difficult problems (see, e.g. [10]). Winston et. al

  4. Reading Students' Representations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diezmann, Carmel M.; McCosker, Natalie T.

    2011-01-01

    Representations play a key role in mathematical thinking: They offer "a medium" to express mathematical knowledge or organize mathematical information and to discern mathematical relationships (e.g., relative household expenditures on a pie chart) using text, symbols, or graphics. They also furnish "tools" for mathematical processes (e.g., use of…

  5. The Problem of Representation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tervo, Juuso

    2012-01-01

    In "Postphysical Vision: Art Education's Challenge in an Age of Globalized Aesthetics (AMondofesto)" (2008) and "Beyond Aesthetics: Returning Force and Truth to Art and Its Education" (2009), jan jagodzinski argued for politics that go "beyond" representation--a project that radically questions visual culture…

  6. A hadron calorimeter with scintillators parallel to the beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramov, V.; Goncharov, P.; Gorin, A.; Gurzhiev, A.; Dyshkant, A.; Evdokimov, V.; Kolosov, V.; Korablev, A.; Korneev, Yu.; Kostritskii, A.; Krinitsyn, A.; Kryshkin, V.; Podstavkov, V.; Polyakov, V.; Shtannikov, A.; Tereschenko, S.; Turchanovich, L.; Zaichenko, A.

    1997-02-01

    A hadron calorimeter in which scintillators are arranged nearly parallel to the incident particle direction and light is collected by optical fibres with WLS, has been built. The iron absorber plates are of the tapered shape to fit a barrel structure of the collider geometry. The performance of the calorimeter studied with hadron beam is presented as a function of tilt angle without and with electromagnetic calorimeter in front of the hadron one.

  7. Accessing the Distribution of Linearly Polarized Gluons in Unpolarized Hadrons

    SciTech Connect

    Boer, Daniel; Brodsky, Stanley J.; Mulders, Piet J.; Pisano, Cristian; /Cagliari U. /INFN, Cagliari

    2011-08-19

    Gluons inside unpolarized hadrons can be linearly polarized provided they have a nonzero transverse momentum. The simplest and theoretically safest way to probe this distribution of linearly polarized gluons is through cos2{phi} asymmetries in heavy quark pair or dijet production in electron-hadron collisions. Future Electron-Ion Collider (EIC) or Large Hadron electron Collider (LHeC) experiments are ideally suited for this purpose. Here we estimate the maximum asymmetries for EIC kinematics.

  8. Quark-hadron phase transition in massive gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atazadeh, K.

    2016-11-01

    We study the quark-hadron phase transition in the framework of massive gravity. We show that the modification of the FRW cosmological equations leads to the quark-hadron phase transition in the early massive Universe. Using numerical analysis, we consider that a phase transition based on the chiral symmetry breaking after the electroweak transition, occurred at approximately 10 μs after the Big Bang to convert a plasma of free quarks and gluons into hadrons.

  9. Microbunched electron cooling for high-energy hadron beams.

    PubMed

    Ratner, D

    2013-08-23

    Electron and stochastic cooling are proven methods for cooling low-energy hadron beams, but at present there is no way of cooling hadrons as they near the TeV scale. In the 1980s, Derbenev suggested that electron instabilities, such as free-electron lasers, could create collective space charge fields strong enough to correct the hadron energies. This Letter presents a variation on Derbenev's electron cooling scheme using the microbunching instability as the amplifier. The large bandwidth of the instability allows for faster cooling of high-density beams. A simple analytical model illustrates the cooling mechanism, and simulations show cooling rates for realistic parameters of the Large Hadron Collider.

  10. Energy-range relations for hadrons in nuclear matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strugalski, Z.

    1985-01-01

    Range-energy relations for hadrons in nuclear matter exist similarly to the range-energy relations for charged particles in materials. When hadrons of GeV kinetic energies collide with atomic nuclei massive enough, events occur in which incident hadron is stopped completely inside the target nucleus without causing particle production - without pion production in particular. The stoppings are always accompanied by intensive emission of nucleons with kinetic energy from about 20 up to about 400 MeV. It was shown experimentally that the mean number of the emitted nucleons is a measure of the mean path in nuclear matter in nucleons on which the incident hadrons are stopped.

  11. K(s)0 Hadronization Following DIS at CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    K. Hicks, A. Daniel

    2009-10-01

    The hadronization of K{sup 0} particles was measured in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering (SIDIS) kinematics for several nuclear targets using the CLAS detector. Multiplicity ratios and Δp{sup 2}{sub T} values were extracted from the data. These results may be compared with similar values for π{sup +} hadronization from CLAS (at the same kinematics) and K{sup +} hadronization from HERMES (at higher energy transfer). The physics goal of these measurements is to understand the space-time evolution as the struck quark becomes a full-blown hadron as it propagates through nuclear matter.

  12. The Brief Life of a Hadron: QCD unquenched

    SciTech Connect

    Pennington, Michael R.

    2015-03-01

    Once upon a time, the picture of hadrons was of mesons made of a quark and an antiquark, and baryons of three quarks. Though hadrons heavier than the ground states inevitably decay by the strong interaction, the successes of the quark model might suggest their decays are a mere perturbation. However, Eef van Beveren, whose career we celebrate here, recognised that decays are an integral part of the life of a hadron. The channels into which they decay are often essential to their very existence. These hold the secrets of strong coupling QCD and teach us the way quarks really build hadrons.

  13. Hadronic and nuclear interactions in QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    Despite the evidence that QCD - or something close to it - gives a correct description of the structure of hadrons and their interactions, it seems paradoxical that the theory has thus far had very little impact in nuclear physics. One reason for this is that the application of QCD to distances larger than 1 fm involves coherent, non-perturbative dynamics which is beyond present calculational techniques. For example, in QCD the nuclear force can evidently be ascribed to quark interchange and gluon exchange processes. These, however, are as complicated to analyze from a fundamental point of view as is the analogous covalent bond in molecular physics. Since a detailed description of quark-quark interactions and the structure of hadronic wavefunctions is not yet well-understood in QCD, it is evident that a quantitative first-principle description of the nuclear force will require a great deal of theoretical effort. Another reason for the limited impact of QCD in nuclear physics has been the conventional assumption that nuclear interactions can for the most part be analyzed in terms of an effective meson-nucleon field theory or potential model in isolation from the details of short distance quark and gluon structure of hadrons. These lectures, argue that this view is untenable: in fact, there is no correspondence principle which yields traditional nuclear physics as a rigorous large-distance or non-relativistic limit of QCD dynamics. On the other hand, the distinctions between standard nuclear physics dynamics and QCD at nuclear dimensions are extremely interesting and illuminating for both particle and nuclear physics.

  14. Hadron bubble evolution into the quark sea

    SciTech Connect

    Freese, K. ); Adams, F.C. )

    1990-04-15

    A solution is presented for the evolution of hadron bubbles which nucleate in the quark sea if there is a first-order quark-hadron phase transition at a temperature {ital T}{sub {ital c}} on the order of 100 MeV. We make three assumptions: (1) the dominant mechanism for transport of latent heat is radiative, e.g., neutrinos; (2) the distance between nucleation sites is greater than the neutrino mean free path; and (3) the effects of hydrodynamic flow can be neglected. Bubbles nucleate with a characteristic radius 1 fm/{Delta}, where {Delta} is a dimensionless parameter for the undercooling (we take {Delta}{ge}10{sup {minus}4}, so that the expansion of the Universe can be neglected). We argue that bubbles grow stably and remain spherical until the radius becomes as large as the neutrino mean free path, {ital l}{congruent}10 cm. The growth then becomes diffusion limited and the bubbles become unstable to formation of dendrites, or fingerlike structures, because latent heat can diffuse away more easily from long fingers than from spheres. We study the nonlinear evolution of structure with a geometrical model'' and argue that the hadron bubbles ultimately look like stringy seaweed. The percolation of seaweed-shaped bubbles can leave behind regions of quark phase that are quite small. In fact, one might expect the typical scale to be {ital L}{sub {ital Q}}={ital l}{congruent}10 cm. Protons can easily diffuse out of such small regions (and neutrons back in). Thus, these instabilities can lead to important modifications of inhomogeneous nucleosynthesis, which requires {ital L}{sub {ital Q}}{approx gt}1 m.

  15. Identifying Representational Competence with Multi-Representational Displays

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stieff, Mike; Hegarty, Mary; Deslongchamps, Ghislain

    2011-01-01

    Increasingly, multi-representational educational technologies are being deployed in science classrooms to support science learning and the development of representational competence. Several studies have indicated that students experience significant challenges working with these multi-representational displays and prefer to use only one…

  16. High-energy hadron-hadron (dipole-dipole) scattering from lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giordano, Matteo; Meggiolaro, Enrico

    2008-10-01

    In this paper the problem of high-energy hadron-hadron (dipole-dipole) scattering is approached (for the first time) from the point of view of lattice QCD, by means of Monte Carlo numerical simulations. In the first part, we give a brief review of how high-energy scattering amplitudes can be reconstructed, using a functional-integral approach, in terms of certain correlation functions of two Wilson loops, and we also briefly recall some relevant analyticity and crossing-symmetry properties of these loop-loop correlation functions, when going from Euclidean to Minkowskian theory. In the second part, we shall see how these (Euclidean) loop-loop correlation functions can be evaluated in lattice QCD, and we shall compare our numerical results with some nonperturbative analytical estimates that appeared in the literature, discussing, in particular, the question of the analytic continuation from Euclidean to Minkowskian theory and its relation to the still unsolved problem of the asymptotic s dependence of the hadron-hadron total cross sections.

  17. Neutron stars: A cosmic hadron physics laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pines, David

    1989-01-01

    A progress report is given on neutron stars as a cosmic hadron physics laboratory. Particular attention is paid to the crustal neutron superfluid, and to the information concerning its properties which may be deduced from observations of pulsar glitches and postglitch behavior. Current observational evidence concerning the softness or stiffness of the high density neutron matter equation of state is reviewed briefly, and the (revolutionary) implications of a confirmation of the existence of a 0.5 ms pulsar at the core of (Supernova) SN1987A are discussed.

  18. The Large Hadron Collider and Grid computing.

    PubMed

    Geddes, Neil

    2012-02-28

    We present a brief history of the beginnings, development and achievements of the worldwide Large Hadron Collider Computing Grid (wLCG). The wLCG is a huge international endeavour, which is itself embedded within, and directly influences, a much broader computing and information technology landscape. It is often impossible to identify true cause and effect, and they may appear very different from the different perspectives (e.g. information technology industry or academic researcher). This account is no different. It represents a personal view of the developments over the last two decades and is therefore inevitably biased towards those things in which the author has been personally involved.

  19. Slepton Pair Production at Hadron Colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuks, B.

    2007-04-01

    In R-parity conserving supersymmetric models, sleptons are produced in pairs at hadron colliders. We show that measurements of the longitudinal single-spin asymmetry at possible polarization upgrades of existing colliders allow for a direct extraction of the slepton mixing angle. A calculation of the transverse-momentum spectrum shows the importance of resummed contributions at next-to-leading logarithmic accuracy in the small and intermediate transverse-momentum regions and little dependence on unphysical scales and non-perturbative contributions.

  20. Black Holes and the Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Arunava

    2011-12-01

    The European Center for Nuclear Research or CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has caught our attention partly due to the film ``Angels and Demons.'' In the movie, an antimatter bomb attack on the Vatican is foiled by the protagonist. Perhaps just as controversial is the formation of mini black holes (BHs). Recently, the American Physical Society1 website featured an article on BH formation at the LHC.2 This article examines some aspects of mini BHs and explores the possibility of their detection at the LHC.

  1. Oscillating Hadron and Jet Multiplicity Moments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochs, W.

    2004-01-01

    Recently, the moments of multiplicity distributions in e+e- annihilation and the ratios Hq (cumulant over factorial moments Kq/Fq) have been determined both for the hadronic final state and for jets at variable resolution. These ratios show an oscillatory behaviour as function of q with strong dependence of the amplitude and length of oscillation on the jet resolution parameter ycut. The recent explanation of this phenomenon based on perturbative QCD calculations is discussed.

  2. Quarks and gluons in hadrons and nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Close, F.E. Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN )

    1989-01-01

    These lectures discuss the particle-nuclear interface -- a general introduction to the ideas and application of colored quarks in nuclear physics, color, the Pauli principle, and spin flavor correlations -- this lecture shows how the magnetic moments of hadrons relate to the underlying color degree of freedom, and the proton's spin -- a quark model perspective. This lecture reviews recent excitement which has led some to claim that in deep inelastic polarized lepton scattering very little of the spin of a polarized proton is due to its quarks. 38 refs.

  3. Hadron rapidity spectra within a hybrid model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khvorostukhin, A. S.; Toneev, V. D.

    2017-01-01

    A 2-stage hybrid model is proposed that joins the fast initial state of interaction, described by the hadron string dynamics (HSD) model, to subsequent evolution of the expanding system at the second stage, treated within ideal hydrodynamics. The developed hybrid model is assigned to describe heavy-ion collisions in the energy range of the NICA collider under construction in Dubna. Generally, the model is in reasonable agreement with the available data on proton rapidity spectra. However, reproducing proton rapidity spectra, our hybrid model cannot describe the rapidity distributions of pions. The model should be improved by taking into consideration viscosity effects at the hydrodynamical stage of system evolution.

  4. Photodetectors for the CMS hadron calorimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elias, J. E.; CMS Hadron Calorimeter Readout Group

    1997-02-01

    Hadronic energy measurements in the central and end cap regions of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) detector will be made using sampling calorimeter techniques with plastic scintillator tiles as the sensitive layers. Plastic fibers doped with wavelength shifting fluors embedded in each tile are used to extract the scintillation light. Clear plastic wave guide fibers carry the shifted light to photodetectors located on the outer surface of the calorimeter structure. Environmental constraints and physics performance requirements for these photodetectors are presented. Candidate photodetector technologies are discussed, and the hybrid photomultiplier tube technology is identified as most promising.

  5. Partial restoration of chiral symmetry inside hadrons

    SciTech Connect

    Iritani, Takumi; Cossu, Guido; Hashimoto, Shoji

    2016-01-22

    We investigate the spatial distribution of the chiral condensate around static color sources for both quark-antiquark and three-quark systems. In the QCD vacuum a tube-like structure of chromo fields appears between color sources, which leads to a linearly confining potential. We show that the magnitude of the condensate is reduced inside the flux-tube, which suggests that chiral symmetry is partially restored inside the hadrons. By using a static baryon source in a periodic box as a model of the nuclear matter, we estimate the restoration of chiral symmetry with finite baryon number density.

  6. Uniformity requirements in CMS hadron calorimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Green, D.

    1996-02-01

    Practical considerations of calorimeter systems require a specification of the allowed manufacturing tolerances. The tightness of these requirements directly makes an impact on the assembly costs of the calorimeter. For that reason, a precise and well defined set of criteria is mandatory. In addition, the intrinsic limitations of hadron calorimetry define the level of accuracy needed in the manufacture of such devices. Therefore, considerations of the limitations on energy measurement accuracy due to Physics should define the needed level of effort to produce a uniform calorimetric device.

  7. Signatures for Majorana neutrinos at hadron colliders.

    PubMed

    Han, Tao; Zhang, Bin

    2006-10-27

    The Majorana nature of neutrinos may only be experimentally verified via lepton-number violating processes involving charged leptons. We explore the Delta L = 2 like-sign dilepton production at hadron colliders to search for signals of Majorana neutrinos. We find significant sensitivity for resonant production of a Majorana neutrino in the mass range of 10-80 GeV at the current run of the Tevatron with 2 fb(-1) integrated luminosity and in the range of 10-400 GeV at the CERN LHC with 100 fb(-1).

  8. Charmless b-hadrons decays at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Morello, Michael Joseph; /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa

    2008-10-01

    We present CDF results on the branching fractions and time-integrated direct CP asymmetries for Bd, Bs and Lb decay modes into pairs of charmless charged hadrons (pions, kaons and protons). The data-set for these measurements amounts to 1fb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collisions at a center of mass energy 1.96TeV. We report on the first observation of the Bs->Kpi, Lb-ppi and Lb->pK decay modes and on the measurement of their branching fractions and direct CP asymmetries.

  9. Hadronic and Semileptonic B Decays at Babar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rama, M.

    2003-02-01

    We present a review of a selection of hadronic and semileptonic B decays reconstructed with the BaBar detector on a data sample of 22.7 million Bbar B pairs. Measurements of the exclusive branching ratios of B0 → D*+D*- and B -> D{( * )} ˜ D{( * )} K and the ratio of branching fractions of B± → J/ψh± and B- → D0 h- (h = π, K) decays are presented. Measurements of the inclusive semileptonic branching fractions of charged and neutral B mesons are described and a measurement of |Vcb| is presented.

  10. QCD SPIN PHYSICS IN HADRONIC INTERACTIONS.

    SciTech Connect

    VOGELSANG,W.

    2007-06-19

    We discuss spin phenomena in high-energy hadronic scattering, with a particular emphasis on the spin physics program now underway at the first polarized proton-proton collider, RHIC. Experiments at RHIC unravel the spin structure of the nucleon in new ways. Prime goals are to determine the contribution of gluon spins to the proton spin, to elucidate the flavor structure of quark and antiquark polarizations in the nucleon, and to help clarify the origin of transverse-spin phenomena in QCD. These lectures describe some aspects of this program and of the associated physics.

  11. Di-Hadron Angular Correlation Dependence on Leading Hadron Identity in Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kauder, Kolja

    A unique state of matter is created in ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP). It displays the properties of a near-perfect liquid of quarks and gluons (partons) interacting collectively via the strong force. Properties of this medium can be explored using high-energy probes created in the form of back-to-back pairs (jets) in hard scatterings. A distinct feature of the QGP is jet quenching, which describes the large energy loss of such probes observed in measurements of hadron distributions in head-on heavy ion collisions. A more differential measurement of jet quenching is achieved using di-hadron correlations, where relative angular distributions are studied with respect to a leading (high energy) "trigger" hadron. Two striking features found in di-hadron correlations are the emergence of a long-range plateau on the near-side (at small relative azimuth), the so-called "ridge", and a broadening and deformation of the away-side, back to back with the trigger. Using 200 GeV central gold-gold and minimum bias deuteron-gold collision data collected by the STAR detector at RHIC, a systematic study of the dependence of di-hadron correlation structures on the identity of the trigger particle is carried out in this work by statistically separating pion from non-pion (i.e. proton and kaon) triggers, offering new insights into the hadronization mechanisms in the QGP. The jet-like yield at small relative angles is found enhanced for leading pions in Au+Au data with respect to the d+Au reference, while leading non-pions (protons and kaons) do not elicit such an enhancement. These findings are discussed within the context of quark recombination. At large angles, the correlated yield is significantly higher for leading non-pions than pions. Parameters extracted from two-dimensional model fits are used to test consistency with the constituent quark scaling assumptions

  12. Standard model of knowledge representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Wensheng

    2016-09-01

    Knowledge representation is the core of artificial intelligence research. Knowledge representation methods include predicate logic, semantic network, computer programming language, database, mathematical model, graphics language, natural language, etc. To establish the intrinsic link between various knowledge representation methods, a unified knowledge representation model is necessary. According to ontology, system theory, and control theory, a standard model of knowledge representation that reflects the change of the objective world is proposed. The model is composed of input, processing, and output. This knowledge representation method is not a contradiction to the traditional knowledge representation method. It can express knowledge in terms of multivariate and multidimensional. It can also express process knowledge, and at the same time, it has a strong ability to solve problems. In addition, the standard model of knowledge representation provides a way to solve problems of non-precision and inconsistent knowledge.

  13. Charged kaon and proton production in B-hadron decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tegenfeldt, Fredrik Per

    The production of charged kaons and protons in B-hadron decays has been measured in e+e- annihilations at centre-of-mass energies corresponding to the Z0 mass. In total 1.6 million hadronic Z0 decays were analysed, corresponding to about 690000 B-hadron decays. They were collected using the DELPHI detector at the LEP collider at CERN during 1994 and 1995. Events containing B-hadron decays were identified using special characteristics of the B-hadron decay topology. In particular, the long lifetime of the B-hadron leads to decay vertices significantly displaced relative the interaction point. These so called secondary vertices were reconstructed using a powerful micro vertex detector. In order to discriminate B-hadron decay products from fragmentation tracks, a method was used where the impact parameter measured by the vertex detector was employed as a discriminating variable. The tracks were thus divided into two classes, one compatible with the interaction point and the other compatible with a secondary vertex. An unfolding method was used to extract the true B-hadron decay tracks from the two classes. Charged kaons and protons were identified using the Ring Imaging CHerenkov (RICH) detector and corrected for misidentification using an efficiency matrix. The analysis resulted in charged kaon and proton spectra from B-hadron decays, including previously unmeasured momentum regions. Integrating the spectra yielded the following multiplicities n(B- hadron-->K+/- X)=0.683+/-0.021(stat) +/-0.017(syst) n(B- hadron-->p/p X)=0.127+/-0.013(stat) +/-0.019(syst) where the proton multiplicity does not include Λ baryon decay products.

  14. Representation in incremental learning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Work focused on two areas in machine learning: representation for inductive learning and how to apply concept learning techniques to learning state preferences, which can represent search control knowledge for problem solving. Specifically, in the first area the issues of the effect of representation on learning, on how learning formalisms are biased, and how concept learning can benefit from the use of a hybrid formalism are addressed. In the second area, the issues of developing an agent to learn search control knowledge from the relative values of states, of the source of that qualitative information, and of the ability to use both quantitative and qualitative information in order to develop an effective problem-solving policy are examined.

  15. Multiple Sparse Representations Classification

    PubMed Central

    Plenge, Esben; Klein, Stefan S.; Niessen, Wiro J.; Meijering, Erik

    2015-01-01

    Sparse representations classification (SRC) is a powerful technique for pixelwise classification of images and it is increasingly being used for a wide variety of image analysis tasks. The method uses sparse representation and learned redundant dictionaries to classify image pixels. In this empirical study we propose to further leverage the redundancy of the learned dictionaries to achieve a more accurate classifier. In conventional SRC, each image pixel is associated with a small patch surrounding it. Using these patches, a dictionary is trained for each class in a supervised fashion. Commonly, redundant/overcomplete dictionaries are trained and image patches are sparsely represented by a linear combination of only a few of the dictionary elements. Given a set of trained dictionaries, a new patch is sparse coded using each of them, and subsequently assigned to the class whose dictionary yields the minimum residual energy. We propose a generalization of this scheme. The method, which we call multiple sparse representations classification (mSRC), is based on the observation that an overcomplete, class specific dictionary is capable of generating multiple accurate and independent estimates of a patch belonging to the class. So instead of finding a single sparse representation of a patch for each dictionary, we find multiple, and the corresponding residual energies provides an enhanced statistic which is used to improve classification. We demonstrate the efficacy of mSRC for three example applications: pixelwise classification of texture images, lumen segmentation in carotid artery magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and bifurcation point detection in carotid artery MRI. We compare our method with conventional SRC, K-nearest neighbor, and support vector machine classifiers. The results show that mSRC outperforms SRC and the other reference methods. In addition, we present an extensive evaluation of the effect of the main mSRC parameters: patch size, dictionary size, and

  16. Future directions in particle and nuclear physics at multi-GeV hadron beam facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Geesaman, D.F.

    1993-11-01

    This report contains papers on the following topics in particle and nuclear physics: hadron dynamics; lepton physics; spin physics; hadron and nuclear spectroscopy; hadronic weak interactions; and Eta physics. These papers have been indexed separately elsewhere.

  17. [Time perceptions and representations].

    PubMed

    Tordjman, S

    2015-09-01

    Representations of time and time measurements depend on subjective constructs that vary according to changes in our concepts, beliefs, societal needs and technical advances. Similarly, the past, the future and the present are subjective representations that depend on each individual's psychic time and biological time. Therefore, there is no single, one-size-fits-all time for everyone, but rather a different, subjective time for each individual. We need to acknowledge the existence of different inter-individual times but also intra-individual times, to which different functions and different rhythms are attached, depending on the system of reference. However, the construction of these time perceptions and representations is influenced by objective factors (physiological, physical and cognitive) related to neuroscience which will be presented and discussed in this article. Thus, studying representation and perception of time lies at the crossroads between neuroscience, human sciences and philosophy. Furthermore, it is possible to identify several constants among the many and various representations of time and their corresponding measures, regardless of the system of time reference. These include the notion of movements repeated in a stable rhythmic pattern involving the recurrence of the same interval of time, which enables us to define units of time of equal and invariable duration. This rhythmicity is also found at a physiological level and contributes through circadian rhythms, in particular the melatonin rhythm, to the existence of a biological time. Alterations of temporality in mental disorders will be also discussed in this article illustrated by certain developmental disorders such as autism spectrum disorders. In particular, the hypothesis will be developed that children with autism would need to create discontinuity out of continuity through stereotyped behaviors and/or interests. This discontinuity repeated at regular intervals could have been

  18. Translation between representation languages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanbaalen, Jeffrey

    1994-01-01

    A capability for translating between representation languages is critical for effective knowledge base reuse. A translation technology for knowledge representation languages based on the use of an interlingua for communicating knowledge is described. The interlingua-based translation process consists of three major steps: translation from the source language into a subset of the interlingua, translation between subsets of the interlingua, and translation from a subset of the interlingua into the target language. The first translation step into the interlingua can typically be specified in the form of a grammar that describes how each top-level form in the source language translates into the interlingua. In cases where the source language does not have a declarative semantics, such a grammar is also a specification of a declarative semantics for the language. A methodology for building translators that is currently under development is described. A 'translator shell' based on this methodology is also under development. The shell has been used to build translators for multiple representation languages and those translators have successfully translated nontrivial knowledge bases.

  19. Elementary and brief introduction of hadronic chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tangde, Vijay M.

    2013-10-01

    The discipline, today known as Quantum Chemistry for atomic and subatomic level interactions has no doubt made a significant historical contributions to the society. Despite of its significant achievements, quantum chemistry is also known for its widespread denial of insufficiencies it inherits. An Italian-American Scientist Professor Ruggero Maria Santilli during his more than five decades of dedicated and sustained research has denounced the fact that quantum chemistry is mostly based on mere nomenclatures without any quantitative scientific contents. Professor R M Santilli first formulated the iso-, geno- and hyper-mathematics [1-4] that helped in understanding numerous diversified problems and removing inadequacies in most of the established and celebrated theories of 20th century physics and chemistry. This involves the isotopic, genotopic, etc. lifting of Lie algebra that generated Lie admissible mathematics to properly describe irreversible processes. The studies on Hadronic Mechanics in general and chemistry in particular based on Santilli's mathematics[3-5] for the first time has removed the very fundamental limitations of quantum chemistry [2, 6-8]. In the present discussion, we have briefly reviewed the conceptual foundations of Hadronic Chemistry that imparts the completeness to the Quantum Chemistry via an addition of effects at distances of the order of 1 fm (only) which are assumed to be Non-linear, Non-local, Non-potential, Non-hamiltonian and thus Non-unitary and its application in development of a new chemical species called Magnecules.

  20. Hadron production measurements for neutrino physics

    SciTech Connect

    Panman, Jaap

    2008-02-21

    One of the limiting factors for the precision of neutrino oscillation experiments is the uncertainty in the composition and spectrum of the neutrino flux. Recently, dedicated hadron production experiments have been taking data and are being planned to supply measurements which can significantly reduce these uncertainties. The HARP experiment has presented results on the measurements of the double-differential production cross-section of charged pions in proton interactions with beryllium, carbon, aluminium, copper, tin, tantalum and lead targets. These results are relevant for a detailed understanding of neutrino flux in accelerator neutrino experiments K2K (p-Al data) and MiniBooNE/SciBooNE (p-Be data), for a better prediction of atmospheric neutrino fluxes (p-C, {pi}{sup +}-C and {pi}{sup -}-C data) as well as for a systematic improvement of hadron production models. The E910 experiment at BNL has recently published their p-Be data. NA49 has measured pion production spectra in p-C interactions and a new experiment, NA61, is starting to take data using essentially the same detector. NA61 plans to measure production spectra for the T2K experiment and for the calculation of extended air showers. MIPP has taken data with a copy of the NuMI target and is progressing in the analysis of these data. An upgrade of the readout of this experiment can greatly increase its potential.

  1. Mass reach scaling for future hadron colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzo, Thomas G.

    2015-04-01

    The primary goal of any future hadron collider is to discover new physics (NP) associated with a high mass scale, , beyond the range of the LHC. In order to maintain the same relative mass reach for rate-limited NP, , as increases, Richter recently reminded us that the required integrated luminosity obtainable at future hadron colliders (FHC) must grow rapidly, , in the limit of naive scaling. This would imply, e.g., a 50-fold increase in the required integrated luminosity when going from the 14 TeV LHC to a FHC with TeV, an increase that would prove quite challenging on many different fronts. In this paper we point out, due to the scaling violations associated with the evolution of the parton density functions (PDFs) and the running of the strong coupling, , that the actual luminosity necessary in order to maintain any fixed value of the relative mass reach is somewhat greater than this scaling result indicates. However, the actual values of the required luminosity scaling are found to be dependent upon the detailed nature of the NP being considered. Here we elucidate this point explicitly by employing several specific benchmark examples of possible NP scenarios and briefly discuss the (relatively weak) search impact in each case if these luminosity goals are not met.

  2. Strong interaction physics from hadronic atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batty, C. J.; Friedman, E.; Gal, A.

    1997-08-01

    Hadronic atoms provide a unique laboratory for studying strong interactions and nuclear medium effects at zero kinetic energy. Previous results from analyses of strong-interaction data consisting of level shifts, widths and yields in π-, K -, p¯ and ∑ - atoms are reviewed. Recent results from fits to comprehensive sets of data in terms of density-dependent optical potentials that respect the low-density limit, where the interaction tends to the free hadron nucleon value, are discussed. The importance of using realistic nuclear density distributions is highlighted. The introduction of density dependence in most cases significantly improves the fit to the data and leads to some novel results. For K - atoms, a substantial attraction of order 200 MeV in nuclear matter is suggested, with interesting repercussions for K¯ condensation and the evolution of strangeness in high-density stars. For p¯ atoms it is found that a reasonable p-wave strength can be accommodated in the fitted optical potential, in agreement with the energy dependence observed for some low-energy p¯N reactions. For ∑ - atoms, the fitted potential becomes repulsive inside the nucleus, implying that Σ hyperons generally do not bind in nuclei in agreement with recent measurements. This repulsion significantly affects calculated masses of neutron stars.

  3. Hadronic Lorentz violation in chiral perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamand, Rasha; Altschul, Brett; Schindler, Matthias R.

    2017-03-01

    Any possible Lorentz violation in the hadron sector must be tied to Lorentz violation at the underlying quark level. The relationships between the theories at these two levels are studied using chiral perturbation theory. Starting from a two-flavor quark theory that includes dimension-4 Lorentz-violation operators, the effective Lagrangians are derived for both pions and nucleons, with novel terms appearing in both sectors. Since the Lorentz-violation coefficients for nucleons and pions are all related to a single set of underlying quark coefficients, one can compare the sensitivity of different types of experiments. Our analysis shows that atomic physics experiments currently provide constraints on the quark parameters that are stronger by about 10 orders of magnitude than astrophysical experiments with relativistic pions. Alternatively, it is possible to place approximate bounds on pion Lorentz violation using only proton and neutron observations. Under the assumption that the Lorentz-violating operators considered here are the only ones contributing to the relevant observables and taking the currently unknown hadronic low-energy constants to be of natural size, the resulting estimated bounds on four pion parameters are at the 10-23 level, representing improvements of 10 orders of magnitude.

  4. Diffractive hadron production at ultrahigh energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anisovich, V. V.; Matveev, M. A.; Nikonov, V. A.

    2015-03-01

    Diffractive production is considered in the ultrahigh energy region where pomeron exchange amplitudes are transformed into black disk ones due to rescattering corrections. The corresponding corrections in hadron reactions h1 + h3 → h1 + h2 + h3 with small momenta transferred (q2{1-> 1} ˜ m2/ln;2s, q2{3-> 3} ˜ m2/ln;2s) are calculated in terms of the K-matrix technique modified for ultrahigh energies. Small values of the momenta transferred are crucial for introducing equations for amplitudes. The three-body equation for hadron diffractive production reaction h1 + h3 → h1 + h2 + h3 is written and solved precisely in the eikonal approach. In the black disk regime final state scattering processes do not change the shapes of amplitudes principally but dump amplitudes by a factor 1/4; initial state rescatterings result in additional factor 1/2. In the resonant disk regime initial and final state scatterings damp strongly the production amplitude that corresponds to σinel/σtot → 0 at √ {s}->∞ in this mode.

  5. Search For Hadronic Axions Emitted From The Sun

    SciTech Connect

    Ljubicic, A.; Kekez, D.; Krecak, Z.

    2007-10-26

    We made a search for hadronic axions, which could be emitted from the Sun in the axiobremsstrahlung process and absorbed in the HPGe detector by axioelectric effect. An upper limit on hadronic axion mass of 100 eV is obtained at the 95% confidence level.

  6. Using analytic continuation for the hadronic vacuum polarization computation

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Xu; Hashimoto, Shoji; Hotzel, Grit; Jansen, Karl; Petschlies, Marcus; B, Renner Dru

    2014-11-01

    We present two examples of applications of the analytic continuation method for computing the hadronic vacuum polarization function in space- and time-like momentum regions. These examples are the Adler function and the leading order hadronic contribution to the muon anomalous magnetic moment. We comment on the feasibility of the analytic continuation method and provide an outlook for possible further applications.

  7. Muon g-2 and Hadronic Vacuum Polarization: Recent Developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eidelman, Simon

    2016-04-01

    We discuss various experiments on e+e- annihilation into hadrons relevant to the problem of the muon anomalous magnetic moment. They include a status of the ISR measurements of the e+e- → π+π- as well as studies of numerous hadronic final states in experiments with the CMD-3 and SND detectors at the VEPP-2000 e+e- collider.

  8. Hadron physics at the new CW electron accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Burkert, V.D.

    1990-01-01

    Major trends of the physics program related to the study of hadron structure and hadron spectroscopy at the new high current, high duty cycle electron machines are discussed. It is concluded that planned experiments at these machines may have important impact on our understanding of the strong interaction by studying the internal structure and spectroscopy of the nucleon and lower mass hyperon states.

  9. Exclusive processes and the fundamental structure of hadrons

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.

    2015-01-20

    I review the historical development of QCD predictions for exclusive hadronic processes, beginning with constituent counting rules and the quark interchange mechanism, phenomena which gave early validation for the quark structure of hadrons. The subsequent development of pQCD factorization theorems for hard exclusive amplitudes and the development of evolution equations for the hadron distribution amplitudes provided a rigorous framework for calculating hadronic form factors and hard scattering exclusive scattering processes at high momentum transfer. I also give a brief introduction to the field of "light-front holography" and the insights it brings to quark confinement, the behavior of the QCD coupling in the nonperturbative domain, as well as hadron spectroscopy and the dynamics of exclusive processes.

  10. Exclusive processes and the fundamental structure of hadrons

    DOE PAGES

    Brodsky, Stanley J.

    2015-01-20

    I review the historical development of QCD predictions for exclusive hadronic processes, beginning with constituent counting rules and the quark interchange mechanism, phenomena which gave early validation for the quark structure of hadrons. The subsequent development of pQCD factorization theorems for hard exclusive amplitudes and the development of evolution equations for the hadron distribution amplitudes provided a rigorous framework for calculating hadronic form factors and hard scattering exclusive scattering processes at high momentum transfer. I also give a brief introduction to the field of "light-front holography" and the insights it brings to quark confinement, the behavior of the QCD couplingmore » in the nonperturbative domain, as well as hadron spectroscopy and the dynamics of exclusive processes.« less

  11. Di-hadron fragmentation and mapping of the nucleon structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisano, Silvia; Radici, Marco

    2016-06-01

    The fragmentation of a colored parton directly into a pair of colorless hadrons is a non-perturbative mechanism that offers important insights into the nucleon structure. Di-hadron fragmentation functions can be extracted from semi-inclusive electron-positron annihilation data. They also appear in observables describing the semi-inclusive production of two hadrons in deep-inelastic scattering of leptons off nucleons or in hadron-hadron collisions. When a target nucleon is transversely polarized, a specific chiral-odd di-hadron fragmentation function can be used as the analyzer of the net density of transversely polarized quarks in a transversely polarized nucleon, the so-called transversity distribution. The latter can be extracted through suitable single-spin asymmetries in the framework of collinear factorization, thus in a much simpler framework with respect to the traditional one in single-hadron fragmentation. At subleading twist, the same chiral-odd di-hadron fragmentation function provides the cleanest access to the poorly known twist-3 parton distribution e( x) , which is intimately related to the mechanism of dynamical chiral symmetry breaking in QCD. When sensitive to details of transverse-momentum dynamics of partons, the di-hadron fragmentation functions for a longitudinally polarized quark can be connected to the longitudinal jet handedness to explore possible effects due to CP -violation of the QCD vacuum. In this review, we outline the formalism of di-hadron fragmentation functions, we discuss different observables where they appear and we present measurements and future worldwide plans.

  12. A gist of comprehensive review of hadronic chemistry and its applications

    SciTech Connect

    Tangde, Vijay M.

    2015-03-10

    20{sup th} century theories of Quantum Mechanics and Quantum Chemistry are exactly valid only when considered to represent the atomic structures. While considering the more general aspects of atomic combinations these theories fail to explain all the related experimental data from first unadulterated axiomatic principles. According to Quantum Chemistry two valence electrons should repel each other and as such there is no mathematical representation of a strong attractive forces between such valence electrons. In view of these and other insufficiencies of Quantum Chemistry, an Italian-American Scientist Professor Ruggero Maria Santilli during his more than five decades of dedicated and sustained research has denounced the fact that quantum chemistry is mostly based on mere nomenclatures. Professor R M Santilli first formulated the iso-, geno- and hyper- mathematics [1, 2, 3, 4] that helped in understanding numerous diversified problems and removing inadequacies in most of the established and celebrated theories of 20th century physics and chemistry. This involves the isotopic, genotopic, etc. lifting of Lie algebra that generated Lie admissible mathematics to properly describe irreversible processes. The studies on Hadronic Mechanics in general and chemistry in particular based on Santilli’s mathematics[3, 4, 5] for the first time has removed the very fundamental limitations of quantum chemistry [2, 6, 7, 8]. In the present discussion, a comprehensive review of Hadronic Chemistry is presented that imparts the completeness to the Quantum Chemistry via an addition of effects at distances of the order of 1 fm (only) which are assumed to be Non-linear, Non-local, Non-potential, Non-hamiltonian and thus Non-unitary, stepwise successes of Hadronic Chemistry and its application in development of a new chemical species called Magnecules.

  13. Computer aided surface representation

    SciTech Connect

    Barnhill, R.E.

    1990-02-19

    The central research problem of this project is the effective representation, computation, and display of surfaces interpolating to information in three or more dimensions. If the given information is located on another surface, then the problem is to construct a surface defined on a surface''. Sometimes properties of an already defined surface are desired, which is geometry processing''. Visualization of multivariate surfaces is possible by means of contouring higher dimensional surfaces. These problems and more are discussed below. The broad sweep from constructive mathematics through computational algorithms to computer graphics illustrations is utilized in this research. The breadth and depth of this research activity makes this research project unique.

  14. Observation of exclusive electron-positron production in hadron-hadron collisions.

    PubMed

    Abulencia, A; Adelman, J; Affolder, T; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Ambrose, D; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Anikeev, K; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Aoki, M; Apollinari, G; Arguin, J-F; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Azzurri, P; Bacchetta, N; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Belforte, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Belloni, A; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Berry, T; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bolla, G; Bolshov, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Budroni, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carillo, S; Carlsmith, D; Caron, B; Carosi, R; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, I; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Choudalakis, G; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciljak, M; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Coca, M; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cooper, B; Copic, K; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Crescioli, F; Almenar, C Cuenca; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cully, J C; Cyr, D; Daronco, S; D'Auria, S; Davies, T; D'Onofrio, M; Dagenhart, D; de Barbaro, P; Cecco, S De; Deisher, A; Lentdecker, G De; Dell'orso, M; Paoli, F Delli; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; Pedis, D De; Derwent, P F; Giovanni, G P Di; Dionisi, C; Ruzza, B Di; Dittmann, J R; Dituro, P; Dörr, C; Donati, S; Donega, M; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Efron, J; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, I; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Foland, A; Forrester, S; Foster, G W; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garcia, J E; Garberson, F; Garfinkel, A F; Gay, C; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Giagu, S; Giannetti, P; Gibson, A; Gibson, K; Gimmell, J L; Ginsburg, C; Giokaris, N; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Goldstein, J; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Griffiths, M; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Grundler, U; da Costa, J Guimaraes; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Hamilton, A; Han, B-Y; Han, J Y; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartz, M; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Heijboer, A; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Henderson, C; Herndon, M; Heuser, J; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Holloway, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Huston, J; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ishizawa, Y; Ivanov, A; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeans, D; Jensen, H; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Jung, J E; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kemp, Y; Kephart, R; Kerzel, U; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Klute, M; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kovalev, A; Kraan, A C; Kraus, J; Kravchenko, I; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kubo, T; Kuhlmann, S E; Kuhr, T; Kusakabe, Y; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lai, S; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lecompte, T; Lee, J; Lee, J; Lee, Y J; Lee, S W; Lefèvre, R; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Levy, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C; Lin, C S; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Loverre, P; Lu, R-S; Lucchesi, D; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Lytken, E; Mack, P; Macqueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Maki, T; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Manca, G; Margaroli, F; Marginean, R; Marino, C; Marino, C P; Martin, A; Martin, M; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Maruyama, T; Mastrandrea, P; Masubuchi, T; Matsunaga, H; Mattson, M E; Mazini, R; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Menzemer, S; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Messina, A; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miles, J; Miller, R; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyamoto, A; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Mohr, B; Moore, R; Morello, M; Fernandez, P Movilla; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Nachtman, J; Nagano, A; Naganoma, J; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Necula, V; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nigmanov, T; Nodulman, L; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Oldeman, R; Orava, R; Osterberg, K; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Paramonov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Piedra, J; Pinera, L; Pinfold, J; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Portell, X; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Ranjan, N; Rappoccio, S; Reisert, B; Rekovic, V; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Saarikko, H; Sabik, S; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Salamanna, G; Saltó, O; Saltzberg, D; Sánchez, C; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Savard, P; Savoy-Navarro, A; Scheidle, T; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scott, A L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sfyrla, A; Shapiro, M D; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Sherman, D; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Sjolin, J; Slaughter, A J; Slaunwhite, J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soderberg, M; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spalding, J; Spinella, F; Spreitzer, T; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; Staveris-Polykalas, A; Denis, R St; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Sun, H; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Takikawa, K; Tanaka, M; Tanaka, R; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Tiwari, V; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Tourneur, S; Trischuk, W; Tsuchiya, R; Tsuno, S; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Unverhau, T; Uozumi, S; Usynin, D; Vallecorsa, S; van Remortel, N; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Veramendi, G; Veszpremi, V; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vine, T; Vollrath, I; Volobouev, I; Volpi, G; Würthwein, F; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, J; Wagner, W; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waschke, S; Waters, D; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, G; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wynne, S M; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yamashita, T; Yang, C; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zaw, I; Zhang, X; Zhou, J; Zucchelli, S

    2007-03-16

    We present the first observation of exclusive e(+)e(-) production in hadron-hadron collisions, using pp[over] collision data at (square root) s = 1.96 TeV taken by the run II Collider Detector at Fermilab, and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 532 pb(-1). We require the absence of any particle signatures in the detector except for an electron and a positron candidate, each with transverse energy E(T) > 5 GeV and pseudorapidity |eta| < 2. With these criteria, 16 events are observed compared to a background expectation of 1.9+/-0.3 events. These events are consistent in cross section and properties with the QED process pp[over] --> p + e(+)e(-) + p[over] through two-photon exchange. The measured cross section is 1.6(-0.3)(+0.5)(stat) +/- 0.3(syst) pb. This agrees with the theoretical prediction of 1.71+/-0.01 pb.

  15. Single particle momentum and angular distributions in hadron-hadron collisions at ultrahigh energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, T. T.; Chen, N. Y.

    1985-01-01

    The forward-backward charged multiplicity distribution (P n sub F, n sub B) of events in the 540 GeV antiproton-proton collider has been extensively studied by the UA5 Collaboration. It was pointed out that the distribution with respect to n = n sub F + n sub B satisfies approximate KNO scaling and that with respect to Z = n sub F - n sub B is binomial. The geometrical model of hadron-hadron collision interprets the large multiplicity fluctuation as due to the widely different nature of collisions at different impact parameters b. For a single impact parameter b, the collision in the geometrical model should exhibit stochastic behavior. This separation of the stochastic and nonstochastic (KNO) aspects of multiparticle production processes gives conceptually a lucid and attractive picture of such collisions, leading to the concept of partition temperature T sub p and the single particle momentum spectrum to be discussed in detail.

  16. Hadron-Hadron Interactions in the Constituent Quark Model: Results and Extensions

    SciTech Connect

    Eric S. Swanson

    2001-01-01

    Hadronic interactions are discussed within the context of the constituent quark model. The ''Quark Born Diagram'' methodology is outlined, extensive applications to meson-meson and meson-baryon interactions are discussed, and general features of these interactions are highlighted. The second half of this document deals with shortcomings of the quark model approach and methods to overcome them. These include relativistic kinematics, unitarity, nonlocal potentials, coupled channel effects, and the chiral nature of the pion.

  17. Big Science and the Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giudice, Gian Francesco

    2012-03-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the particle accelerator operating at CERN, is probably the most complex and ambitious scientific project ever accomplished by humanity. The sheer size of the enterprise, in terms of financial and human resources, naturally raises the question whether society should support such costly basic-research programs. I address this question by first reviewing the process that led to the emergence of Big Science and the role of large projects in the development of science and technology. I then compare the methodologies of Small and Big Science, emphasizing their mutual linkage. Finally, after examining the cost of Big Science projects, I highlight several general aspects of their beneficial implications for society.

  18. Fixed-target hadron production experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Boris A.

    2015-08-01

    Results from fixed-target hadroproduction experiments (HARP, MIPP, NA49 and NA61/SHINE) as well as their implications for cosmic ray and neutrino physics are reviewed. HARP measurements have been used for predictions of neutrino beams in K2K and MiniBooNE/SciBooNE experiments and are also being used to improve predictions of the muon yields in EAS and of the atmospheric neutrino fluxes as well as to help in the optimization of neutrino factory and super-beam designs. Recent measurements released by the NA61/SHINE experiment are of significant importance for a precise prediction of the J-PARC neutrino beam used for the T2K experiment and for interpretation of EAS data. These hadroproduction experiments provide also a large amount of input for validation and tuning of hadron production models in Monte-Carlo generators.

  19. Strange and heavy mesons in hadronic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabrera, Daniel; Abreu, Luciano M.; Bratkovskaya, Elena; Ilner, Andrej; Llanes-Estrada, Felipe J.; Ramos, Angels; Tolos, Laura; Torres-Rincon, Juan M.

    2014-04-01

    We present selected results on the properties of strange and heavy-flavoured mesons in a hot and dense nuclear medium, with emphasis in selfconsistent coupled-channel approaches based on the chiral Lagrangian. In the strangeness sector, we discuss how the enhanced reactivity of light strange vectors at FAIR conditions can be tied to in-medium effects on their predominant decay modes (e.g. bar K* → bar Kπ) and to the excitation of strange baryons in vector-meson nucleon interactions. In the heavy-flavour sector, we focus on recent determinations of the transport coefficients of charmed and bottomed mesons in a hadron gas at vanishing baryonic chemical potential. We comment on the role of microscopic transport simulations to establish a connection between theoretical models and experimental observables from heavy-ion collisions (HICs).

  20. Unraveling duality violations in hadronic tau decays

    SciTech Connect

    Cata, Oscar; Cata, Oscar; Golterman, Maarten; Peris, Santiago

    2008-03-03

    There are some indications from recent determinations of the strong coupling constant alpha_s and the gluon condensate that the Operator Product Expansion may not be accurate enough to describe non-perturbative effects in hadronic tau decays. This breakdown of the Operator Product Expansion is usually referred to as being due to"Duality Violations." With the help of a physically motivated model, we investigate these duality violations. Based on this model, we argue how they may introduce a non-negligible systematic error in the current analysis, which employs finite-energy sum rules with pinched weights. In particular, this systematic effect might affect the precision determination of alpha_s from tau decays. With a view to a possible future application to real data, we present an alternative method for determining the OPE coefficients that might help estimating, and possibly even reducing, this systematic error.

  1. Quarks and gluons in hadrons and nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Close, F.E. Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN )

    1989-12-01

    These lectures discuss the particle-nuclear interface -- a general introduction to the ideas and application of colored quarks in nuclear physics, color, the Pauli principle, and spin flavor correlations -- this lecture shows how the magnetic moments of hadrons relate to the underlying color degree of freedom, and the proton's spin -- a quark model perspective. This lecture reviews recent excitement which has led some to claim that in deep inelastic polarized lepton scattering very little of the spin of a polarized proton is due to its quarks. This lecture discusses the distribution functions of quarks and gluons in nucleons and nuclei, and how knowledge of these is necessary before some quark-gluon plasma searches can be analyzed. 56 refs., 2 figs.

  2. The NA49 large acceptance hadron detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afanasiev, S.; Alber, T.; Appelshäuser, H.; Bächler, J.; Barna, D.; Barnby, L. S.; Bartke, J.; Barton, R. A.; Betev, L.; Bialkowska, H.; Bieser, F.; Billmeier, A.; Blyth, C. O.; Bock, R.; Bormann, C.; Bracinik, J.; Brady, F. P.; Brockmann, R.; Brun, R.; Buncic, P.; Caines, H. L.; Cebra, D.; Cooper, G. E.; Cramer, J. G.; Csato, P.; Cyprian, M.; Dunn, J.; Eckardt, V.; Eckhardt, F.; Empl, T.; Eschke, J.; Ferguson, M. I.; Fessler, H.; Fischer, H. G.; Flierl, D.; Fodor, Z.; Frankenfeld, U.; Foka, P.; Freund, P.; Friese, V.; Ftacnik, J.; Fuchs, M.; Gabler, F.; Gal, J.; Ganz, R.; Gaździcki, M.; Gładysz, E.; Grebieszkow, J.; Günther, J.; Harris, J. W.; Hegyi, S.; Henkel, T.; Hill, L. A.; Hlinka, V.; Huang, I.; Hümmler, H.; Igo, G.; Irmscher, D.; Ivanov, M.; Janik, R.; Jacobs, P.; Jones, P. G.; Kadija, K.; Kolesnikov, V. I.; Kowalski, M.; Lasiuk, B.; Lévai, P.; Liebicher, K.; Lynen, U.; Malakhov, A. I.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Marks, C.; Mayes, B.; Melkumov, G. L.; Mock, A.; Molnár, J.; Nelson, J. M.; Oldenburg, M.; Odyniec, G.; Palla, G.; Panagiotou, A. D.; Pestov, Y.; Petridis, A.; Pikna, M.; Pimpl, W.; Pinsky, L.; Piper, A.; Porter, R. J.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Poziombka, S.; Prindle, D. J.; Pühlhofer, F.; Rauch, W.; Reid, J. G.; Renfordt, R.; Retyk, W.; Ritter, H. G.; Röhrich, D.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rudolph, H.; Rybicki, A.; Sammer, T.; Sandoval, A.; Sann, H.; Schäfer, E.; Schmidt, R.; Schmischke, D.; Schmitz, N.; Schönfelder, S.; Semenov, A. Yu.; Seyboth, J.; Seyboth, P.; Seyerlein, J.; Sikler, F.; Sitar, B.; Skrzypczak, E.; Squier, G. T. A.; Stelzer, H.; Stock, R.; Strmen, P.; Ströbele, H.; Struck, C.; Susa, T.; Szarka, I.; Szentpetery, I.; Szymański, P.; Sziklai, J.; Toy, M.; Trainor, T. A.; Trentalange, S.; Ullrich, T.; Vassiliou, M.; Veres, G.; Vesztergombi, G.; Vranic, D.; Wang, F. Q.; Weerasundara, D. D.; Wenig, S.; Whitten, C.; Wieman, H.; Wienold, T.; Wood, L.; Yates, T. A.; Zimanyi, J.; Zhu, X.-Z.; Zybert, R.

    1999-07-01

    The NA49 detector is a wide acceptance spectrometer for the study of hadron production in p+p, p+A, and A+A collisions at the CERN SPS. The main components are 4 large-volume TPCs for tracking and particle identification via d E/d x. TOF scintillator arrays complement particle identification. Calorimeters for transverse energy determination and triggering, a detector for centrality selection in p+A collisions, and beam definition detectors complete the set-up. A description of all detector components is given with emphasis on new technical realizations. Performance and operational experience are discussed in particular with respect to the high track density environment of central Pb+Pb collisions.

  3. Illuminating new electroweak states at hadron colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, Ahmed; Izaguirre, Eder; Shuve, Brian

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel powerful strategy to perform searches for new electroweak states. Uncolored electroweak states appear in generic extensions of the Standard Model (SM) and yet are challenging to discover at hadron colliders. This problem is particularly acute when the lightest state in the electroweak multiplet is neutral and all multiplet components are approximately degenerate. In this scenario, production of the charged fields of the multiplet is followed by decay into nearly invisible states; if this decay occurs promptly, the only way to infer the presence of the reaction is through its missing energy signature. Our proposal relies on emission of photon radiation from the new charged states as a means of discriminating the signal from SM backgrounds. We demonstrate its broad applicability by studying two examples: a pure Higgsino doublet and an electroweak quintuplet field.

  4. The Tevatron Hadron Collider: A short history

    SciTech Connect

    Tollestrup, A.V.

    1994-11-01

    The subject of this presentation was intended to cover the history of hadron colliders. However this broad topic is probably better left to historians. I will cover a much smaller portion of this subject and specialize my subject to the history of the Tevatron. As we will see, the Tevatron project is tightly entwined with the progress in collider technology. It occupies a unique place among accelerators in that it was the first to make use of superconducting magnets and indeed the basic design now forms a template for all machines using this technology. It was spawned in an incredibly productive era when new ideas were being generated almost monthly and it has matured into our highest energy collider complete with two large detectors that provide the major facility in the US for probing high Pt physics for the coming decade.

  5. Report of the Snowmass hadronization group

    SciTech Connect

    Derrick, M.; Gottschalk, T.

    1984-01-01

    Most of the data on jets and the relationship to the parent partons has come from e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation which provides a particularly simple laboratory. A number of Monte Carlo (MC) models have been developed that are quite successful in describing the overall character e/sup +/e/sup -/ events. Although such comparisons provide an essential foundation, hadronic interactions are much more complicated and the detailed modeling of these processes is at a more primitive level of development. In this report, we review in detail the state-of-the-art of this modeling, including some comparisons with data. We highlight the experiments that are needed in order to guide the future developments of the models and give a detailed discussion of the relevant theoretical issues. Finally, we consider what can be measured at the SSC itself and make some suggestions for further work in this area. 128 references, 50 figures.

  6. Illuminating new electroweak states at hadron colliders

    DOE PAGES

    Ismail, Ahmed; Izaguirre, Eder; Shuve, Brian

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel powerful strategy to perform searches for new electroweak states. Uncolored electroweak states appear in generic extensions of the Standard Model (SM) and yet are challenging to discover at hadron colliders. This problem is particularly acute when the lightest state in the electroweak multiplet is neutral and all multiplet components are approximately degenerate. In this scenario, production of the charged fields of the multiplet is followed by decay into nearly invisible states; if this decay occurs promptly, the only way to infer the presence of the reaction is through its missing energy signature. Ourmore » proposal relies on emission of photon radiation from the new charged states as a means of discriminating the signal from SM backgrounds. Lastly, we demonstrate its broad applicability by studying two examples: a pure Higgsino doublet and an electroweak quintuplet field.« less

  7. Illuminating new electroweak states at hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Ismail, Ahmed; Izaguirre, Eder; Shuve, Brian

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel powerful strategy to perform searches for new electroweak states. Uncolored electroweak states appear in generic extensions of the Standard Model (SM) and yet are challenging to discover at hadron colliders. This problem is particularly acute when the lightest state in the electroweak multiplet is neutral and all multiplet components are approximately degenerate. In this scenario, production of the charged fields of the multiplet is followed by decay into nearly invisible states; if this decay occurs promptly, the only way to infer the presence of the reaction is through its missing energy signature. Our proposal relies on emission of photon radiation from the new charged states as a means of discriminating the signal from SM backgrounds. Lastly, we demonstrate its broad applicability by studying two examples: a pure Higgsino doublet and an electroweak quintuplet field.

  8. Hadron scattering lengths in lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Fukugita, M. |; Kuramashi, Y.; Okawa, M.; Mino, H.; Ukawa, A.

    1995-09-01

    For {ital N}-{ital N} scattering a phenomenological study with one-boson exchange potentials indicate that the deuteron becomes unbound if the quark mass is increased beyond 30--40% of the physical value. Simulations with the Wilson action on a 20{sup 4} lattice with heavy quarks with {ital m}{sub {pi}}/{ital m}{sub {rho}}{approx}0.74--0.95 show that the nucleon-nucleon force is attractive for both spin triplet and singlet channels, and that the scatteirng lengths are substantially larger compared to those for the {pi}-{pi} and {pi}-{ital N} cases even for such heavy quarks. The problem of statistical errors, which has to be overcome toward a more realistic calculation of hadron scattering lengths, is discussed.

  9. Calorimeter Simulation with Hadrons in CMS

    SciTech Connect

    Piperov, Stefan; /Sofiya, Inst. Nucl. Res. /Fermilab

    2008-11-01

    CMS is using Geant4 to simulate the detector setup for the forthcoming data from the LHC. Validation of physics processes inside Geant4 is a major concern in view of getting a proper description of jets and missing energy for signal and background events. This is done by carrying out an extensive studies with test beam using the prototypes or real detector modules of the CMS calorimeter. These data are matched with Geant4 predictions using the same framework that is used for the entire CMS detector. Tuning of the Geant4 models is carried out and steps to be used in reproducing detector signals are defined in view of measurements of energy response, energy resolution, transverse and longitudinal shower profiles for a variety of hadron beams over a broad energy spectrum between 2 to 300 GeV/c. The tuned Monte Carlo predictions match many of these measurements within systematic uncertainties.

  10. Legendre Expansions for Two-Hadron Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strakovsky, Igor; Azimov, Yakov; Briscoe, William

    2017-01-01

    Modern experimental facilities and detectors provide tremendous volumes of detailed data. For two-hadron reactions, they are usually presented as a set of multiple panels, e . g . , angular distributions at many particular energies. Such presentations lose visuality, and their physical content may be extracted only through some model-dependent treatment. Instead, we suggest to use expansion into the Legendre series with a relatively small number of essential coefficients. This approach was applied in several experimental investigations and demonstrated its higher visualization. This talk presents some general properties of the Legendre coefficients which allow one to extract physical information even without any model-dependent assumptions. The U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics, Award Numbers DE-SC0014133 and DE-SC0016582 and the Russian Science Foundation, Award No.14-22-00281.

  11. Fast Dynamical Evolution of Hadron Resonance Gas via Hagedorn States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beitel, M.; Gallmeister, K.; Greiner, C.

    2017-01-01

    Hagedorn states (HS) are a tool to model the hadronization process which occurs in the phase transition region between the quark gluon plasma (QGP) and the hadron resonance gas (HRG). These states are believed to appear near the Hagedorn temperature TH which in our understanding equals the critical temperature Tc . A covariantly formulated bootstrap equation is solved to generate the zoo of these particles characterized baryon number B, strangeness S and electric charge Q. These hadron-like resonances are characterized by being very massive and by not being limited to quantum numbers of known hadrons. All hadronic properties like masses, spectral functions etc. are taken from the hadronic transport model Ultra Relativistic Quantum Molecular Dynamics (UrQMD). Decay chains of single Hagedorn states provide a well description of experimentally observed multiplicity ratios of strange and multi-strange particles as the Ξ0- and the Ω‑-baryon. In addition, the final energy spectra of resulting hadrons show a thermal-like distribution with the characteristic Hagedorn temperature TH . Box calculations including these Hagedorn states are performed. Indeed, the time scales leading to equilibration of the system are drastically reduced down to 2. . . 5 fm/c.

  12. Equilibration of hadrons in HICs via Hagedorn States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beitel, M.; Gallmeister, K.; Greiner, C.

    2016-08-01

    Hagedorn states (HS) are a tool to model the hadronization process which occurs in the phase transition region between the quark gluon plasma (QGP) and the hadron resonance gas (HRG). These states are believed to appear near the Hagedorn temperature TH which in our understanding equals the critical temperature Tc. A covariantly formulated bootstrap equation is solved to generate the zoo of these particles characterized baryon number B, strangeness S and electric charge Q. These hadron-like resonances are characterized by being very massive and by not being limited to quantum numbers of known hadrons. All hadronic properties like masses, spectral functions etc. are taken from the hadronic transport model Ultra Relativistic Quantum Molecular Dynamics (UrQMD). Decay chains of single Hagedorn states provide a well description of experimentally observed multiplicity ratios of strange and multi-strange particles. In addition, the final energy spectra of resulting hadrons show a thermal-like distribution with the characteristic Hagedorn temperature TH. Box calculations including these Hagedorn states are performed. Indeed, the time scales leading to equilibration of the system are drastically reduced down to 2... 5fm/c.

  13. Equilibration of hadrons in HICs via Hagedorn States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beitel, M.; Gallmeister, K.; Greiner, C.

    2016-01-01

    Hagedorn states (HS) are a tool to model the hadronization process which occurs in the phase transition region between the quark gluon plasma (QGP) and the hadron resonance gas (HRG). These states are believed to appear near the Hagedorn temperature TH which in our understanding equals the critical temperature Tc. A covariantly formulated bootstrap equation is solved to generate the zoo of these particles characterized baryon number B, strangeness S and electric charge Q. These hadron-like resonances are characterized by being very massive and by not being limited to quantum numbers of known hadrons. All hadronic properties like masses, spectral functions etc. are taken from the hadronic transport model Ultra Relativistic Quantum Molecular Dynamics (UrQMD). Decay chains of single Hagedorn states provide a well description of experimentally observed multiplicity ratios of strange and multi-strange particles. In addition, the final energy spectra of resulting hadrons show a thermal-like distribution with the characteristic Hagedorn temperature TH. Box calculations including these Hagedorn states are performed. Indeed, the time scales leading to equilibration of the system are drastically reduced down to 2…5fm/c.

  14. Quark-hadron phase transition and strangeness conservation constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saeed-Uddin

    1999-01-01

    The implications of the strangeness conservation in a hadronic resonance gas (HRG) on the expected phase transition to the quark gluon plasma (QGP) are investigated. It is assumed that under favourable conditions a first order hadron-quark matter phase transition may occur in the hot hadronic matter such as those produced in the ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions at CERN and BNL. It is however shown that the criteria of strict strangeness conservation in the HRG may not permit the occurrence of a strict first order equilibrium quark-hadron phase transition unlike a previous study. This emerges as a consequence of the application of a realistic equation of state (EOS) for the HRG and QGP phases, which account for the finite-size effect arising from the short range hard-core hadronic repulsion in the HRG phase and the perturbative QCD interactions in the QGP phase. For a first order hadron-quark matter phase transition to occur one will therefore require large fluctuations in the critical thermal parameters, which might arise due to superheating, supercooling or other nonequlibrium effects. We also discuss a scenario proposed earlier, leading to a possible strangeness separation process during hadronization.

  15. On a microscopic representation of space-time

    SciTech Connect

    Dahm, R.

    2012-10-15

    We start from a noncompact Lie algebra isomorphic to the Dirac algebra and relate this Lie algebra in a brief review to low-energy hadron physics described by the compact group SU(4). This step permits an overall physical identification of the operator actions. Then we discuss the geometrical origin of this noncompact Lie algebra and 'reduce' the geometry in order to introduce in each of these steps coordinate definitions which can be related to an algebraic representation in terms of the spontaneous symmetry breakdown along the Lie algebra chain su*(4) {yields} usp(4) {yields} su(2) Multiplication-Sign u(1). Standard techniques of Lie algebra decomposition(s) as well as the (physical) operator identification give rise to interesting physical aspects and lead to a rank-1 Riemannian space which provides an analytic representation and leads to a 5-dimensional hyperbolic space H{sub 5} with SO(5, 1) isometries. The action of the (compact) symplectic group decomposes this (globally) hyperbolic space into H{sub 2} Circled-Plus H{sub 3} with SO(2, 1) and SO(3, 1) isometries, respectively, which we relate to electromagnetic (dynamically broken SU(2) isospin) and Lorentz transformations. Last not least, we attribute this symmetry pattern to the algebraic representation of a projective geometry over the division algebra H and subsequent coordinate restrictions.

  16. PREFACE: 5th DAE-BRNS Workshop on Hadron Physics (Hadron 2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jyoti Roy, Bidyut; Chatterjee, A.; Kailas, S.

    2012-07-01

    The 5th DAE-BRNS Workshop on Hadron Physics was held at the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), Mumbai from 31 October to 4 November 2011. This workshop series, supported by the Board of Research in Nuclear Sciences, Department of Atomic Energy (BRNS, DAE), Govt. of India, began ten years ago with the first one being held at BARC, Mumbai in October 2002. The second one was held at Puri in 2005, organized jointly by Institute of Physics, Bhubneswar and Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, Kolkata. The 3rd and 4th ones took place, respectively, at Shantineketan in 2006, organized by Visva Bharati University, and at Aligarh in 2008, organized by Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh. The aim of the present workshop was to bring together the experts and young researchers in the field of hadron physics (both experiment and theory) and to have in-depth discussions on the current research activities in this field. The format of the workshop was: a series of review lectures by various experts from India and abroad, the presentation of advanced research results by researchers in the field, and a review of major experimental programs being planned and pursued in major laboratories in the field of hadron physics, with the aim of providing a platform for the young participants for interaction with their peers. The upcoming international FAIR facility at GSI is a unique future facility for studies of hadron physics in the charm sector and hyper nuclear physics. The Indian hadron physics community is involved in this mega science project and is working with the PANDA collaboration on the development of detectors, simulation and software tools for the hadron physics programme with antiprotons at FAIR. A one-day discussion session was held at this workshop to discuss India-PANDA activities, the current collaboration status and the work plan. This volume presents the workshop proceedings consisting of lectures and seminars which were delivered during the workshop. We are thankful to

  17. Excited-state hadron masses from lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morningstar, C.; Bulava, J.; Foley, J.; Jhang, Y. C.; J, K. J.; Lenkner, D.; Wong, C. H.

    2012-09-01

    Progress in computing the spectrum of excited baryons and mesons in lattice QCD is described. Large sets of spatially-extended hadron operators are used. The need for multi-hadron operators in addition to single-hadron operators is emphasized, necessitating the use of a new stochastic method of treating the low-lying modes of quark propagation which exploits Laplacian Heaviside quark-field smearing. A new glueball operator is tested and computing the mixing of this glueball operator with a quark-antiquark operator and multiple two-pion operators is shown to be feasible.

  18. Prospects for heavy flavor physics at hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, J.N.

    1997-09-01

    The role of hadron colliders in the observation and study of CP violation in B decays is discussed. We show that hadron collider experiments can play a significant role in the early studies of these phenomena and will play an increasingly dominant role as the effort turns towards difficult to measure decays, especially those of the B{sub s} meson, and sensitive searches for rare decays and subtle deviations from Standard Model predictions. We conclude with a discussion of the relative merits of hadron collider detectors with `forward` vs `central` rapidity coverage.

  19. Searching for the rules that govern hadron construction

    SciTech Connect

    Shepherd, Matthew R.; Dudek, Jozef J.; Mitchell, Ryan E.

    2016-06-22

    Just as quantum electrodynamics describes how electrons are bound in atoms by the electromagnetic force, mediated by the exchange of photons, quantum chromodynamics (QCD) describes how quarks are bound inside hadrons by the strong force, mediated by the exchange of gluons. QCD seems to allow hadrons constructed from increasingly many quarks to exist, just as atoms with increasing numbers of electrons exist, yet such complex constructions seemed, until recently, not to be present in nature. In this paper, we describe advances in the spectroscopy of mesons that are refining our understanding of the rules for predicting hadron structure from QCD.

  20. Computing the hadronic vacuum polarization function by analytic continuation

    DOE PAGES

    Feng, Xu; Hashimoto, Shoji; Hotzel, Grit; ...

    2013-08-29

    We propose a method to compute the hadronic vacuum polarization function on the lattice at continuous values of photon momenta bridging between the spacelike and timelike regions. We provide two independent demonstrations to show that this method leads to the desired hadronic vacuum polarization function in Minkowski spacetime. We present with the example of the leading-order QCD correction to the muon anomalous magnetic moment that this approach can provide a valuable alternative method for calculations of physical quantities where the hadronic vacuum polarization function enters.

  1. Nuclear modification of charged hadron production at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De, Somnath; Srivastava, Dinesh K.

    2013-07-01

    We analyze recent results for the suppressed production of charged hadrons for Pb+Pb collisions at the center-of-mass energy of 2.76 TeV/nucleon-pair. We closely follow the treatment recently used by us in which partons lose energy due to the radiation of gluons following multiple scatterings while traversing the quark-gluon plasma, before fragmenting into hadrons at the center-of-mass energy of 200 GeV/nucleon-pair. We obtain an empirical value for the momentum transport coefficient (\\widehat{q}) and provide predictions for azimuthal anisotropy of hadron momenta for non-central collisions. Communicated by Steffen Bass

  2. Intentionality, Representation, and Anticipation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Preester, Helena

    2002-09-01

    Both Brentano and Merleau-Ponty have developed an account of intentionality, which nevertheless differ profoundly in the following respect. According to Brentano, intentionality mainly is a matter of mental presentations. This marks the beginning of phenomenology's difficult relation with the nature of the intentional reference. Merleau-Ponty, on the other hand, has situated intentionality on the level of the body, a turn which has important implications for the nature of intentionality. Intentionality no longer is primarily based on having (re)presentations, but is rooted in the dynamics of the living body. To contrast those approaches enables us to make clear in what way intentionality is studied nowadays. On the one hand, intentionality is conceived of as a matter of formal-syntactical causality in cognitive science, and in particular in classical-computational theory. On the other hand, a interactivist approach offers a more Merleau-Ponty-like point of view, in which autonomy, embodiment and interaction are stressed.

  3. Computer aided surface representation

    SciTech Connect

    Barnhill, R.E.

    1991-04-02

    Modern computing resources permit the generation of large amounts of numerical data. These large data sets, if left in numerical form, can be overwhelming. Such large data sets are usually discrete points from some underlying physical phenomenon. Because we need to evaluate the phenomenon at places where we don't have data, a continuous representation (a surface'') is required. A simple example is a weather map obtained from a discrete set of weather stations. (For more examples including multi-dimensional ones, see the article by Dr. Rosemary Chang in the enclosed IRIS Universe). In order to create a scientific structure encompassing the data, we construct an interpolating mathematical surface which can evaluate at arbitrary locations. We can also display and analyze the results via interactive computer graphics. In our research we construct a very wide variety of surfaces for applied geometry problems that have sound theoretical foundations. However, our surfaces have the distinguishing feature that they are constructed to solve short or long term practical problems. This DOE-funded project has developed the premiere research team in the subject of constructing surfaces (3D and higher dimensional) that provide smooth representations of real scientific and engineering information, including state of the art computer graphics visualizations. However, our main contribution is in the development of fundamental constructive mathematical methods and visualization techniques which can be incorporated into a wide variety of applications. This project combines constructive mathematics, algorithms, and computer graphics, all applied to real problems. The project is a unique resource, considered by our peers to be a de facto national center for this type of research.

  4. Relativistic Few-Body Hadronic Physics Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Polyzou, Wayne

    2016-06-20

    The goal of this research proposal was to use ``few-body'' methods to understand the structure and reactions of systems of interacting hadrons (neutrons, protons, mesons, quarks) over a broad range of energy scales. Realistic mathematical models of few-hadron systems have the advantage that they are sufficiently simple that they can be solved with mathematically controlled errors. These systems are also simple enough that it is possible to perform complete accurate experimental measurements on these systems. Comparison between theory and experiment puts strong constraints on the structure of the models. Even though these systems are ``simple'', both the experiments and computations push the limits of technology. The important property of ``few-body'' systems is that the ``cluster property'' implies that the interactions that appear in few-body systems are identical to the interactions that appear in complicated many-body systems. Of particular interest are models that correctly describe physics at distance scales that are sensitive to the internal structure of the individual nucleons. The Heisenberg uncertainty principle implies that in order to be sensitive to physics on distance scales that are a fraction of the proton or neutron radius, a relativistic treatment of quantum mechanics is necessary. The research supported by this grant involved 30 years of effort devoted to studying all aspects of interacting two and three-body systems. Realistic interactions were used to compute bound states of two- and three-nucleon, and two- and three-quark systems. Scattering observables for these systems were computed for a broad range of energies - from zero energy scattering to few GeV scattering, where experimental evidence of sub-nucleon degrees of freedom is beginning to appear. Benchmark calculations were produced, which when compared with calculations of other groups provided an essential check on these complicated calculations. In addition to computing bound state

  5. Clothed particle representation in quantum field theory: Mass renormalization

    SciTech Connect

    Korda, V.Yu.; Shebeko, A.V.

    2004-10-15

    We consider the neutral pion and nucleon fields interacting via the pseudoscalar (PS) Yukawa-type coupling. The method of unitary clothing transformations is used to handle the so-called clothed particle representation, where the total field Hamiltonian and the three boost operators in the instant form of relativistic dynamics take on the same sparse structure in the Hilbert space of hadronic states. In this approach the mass counterterms are cancelled (at least, partly) by commutators of the generators of clothing transformations and the field interaction operator. This allows the pion and nucleon mass shifts to be expressed through the corresponding three-dimensional integrals whose integrands depend on certain covariant combinations of the relevant three-momenta. The property provides the momentum independence of mass renormalization. The present results prove to be equivalent to the results obtained by Feynman techniques.

  6. The ATLAS Experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ATLAS Collaboration; Aad, G.; Abat, E.; Abdallah, J.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Abdesselam, A.; Abdinov, O.; Abi, B. A.; Abolins, M.; Abramowicz, H.; Acerbi, E.; Acharya, B. S.; Achenbach, R.; Ackers, M.; Adams, D. L.; Adamyan, F.; Addy, T. N.; Aderholz, M.; Adorisio, C.; Adragna, P.; Aharrouche, M.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahles, F.; Ahmad, A.; Ahmed, H.; Aielli, G.; Åkesson, P. F.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimov, A. V.; Alam, S. M.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Aleppo, M.; Alessandria, F.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alimonti, G.; Aliyev, M.; Allport, P. P.; Allwood-Spiers, S. E.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, J.; Alves, R.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amako, K.; Amaral, P.; Amaral, S. P.; Ambrosini, G.; Ambrosio, G.; Amelung, C.; Ammosov, V. V.; Amorim, A.; Amram, N.; Anastopoulos, C.; Anderson, B.; Anderson, K. J.; Anderssen, E. C.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Andricek, L.; Andrieux, M.-L.; Anduaga, X. S.; Anghinolfi, F.; Antonaki, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonelli, S.; Apsimon, R.; Arabidze, G.; Aracena, I.; Arai, Y.; Arce, A. T. H.; Archambault, J. P.; Arguin, J.-F.; Arik, E.; Arik, M.; Arms, K. E.; Armstrong, S. R.; Arnaud, M.; Arnault, C.; Artamonov, A.; Asai, S.; Ask, S.; Åsman, B.; Asner, D.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astbury, A.; Athar, B.; Atkinson, T.; Aubert, B.; Auerbach, B.; Auge, E.; Augsten, K.; Aulchenko, V. M.; Austin, N.; Avolio, G.; Avramidou, R.; Axen, A.; Ay, C.; Azuelos, G.; Baccaglioni, G.; Bacci, C.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Bachy, G.; Badescu, E.; Bagnaia, P.; Bailey, D. C.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Ballester, F.; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F.; Banas, E.; Banfi, D.; Bangert, A.; Bansal, V.; Baranov, S. P.; Baranov, S.; Barashkou, A.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbier, G.; Barclay, P.; Bardin, D. Y.; Bargassa, P.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Baron, S.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, M.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Barrillon, P.; Barriuso Poy, A.; Barros, N.; Bartheld, V.; Bartko, H.; Bartoldus, R.; Basiladze, S.; Bastos, J.; Batchelor, L. E.; Bates, R. L.; Batley, J. R.; Batraneanu, S.; Battistin, M.; Battistoni, G.; Batusov, V.; Bauer, F.; Bauss, B.; Baynham, D. E.; Bazalova, M.; Bazan, A.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beaugiraud, B.; Beccherle, R. B.; Beck, G. A.; Beck, H. P.; Becks, K. H.; Bedajanek, I.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednár, P.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C.; Behar Harpaz, S.; Belanger, G. A. N.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Belhorma, B.; Bell, P. J.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellachia, F.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellina, F.; Bellomo, G.; Bellomo, M.; Beltramello, O.; Belymam, A.; Ben Ami, S.; Ben Moshe, M.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Benchouk, C.; Bendel, M.; Benedict, B. H.; Benekos, N.; Benes, J.; Benhammou, Y.; Benincasa, G. P.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Benslama, K.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Berglund, S.; Bergsma, F.; Beringer, J.; Bernabéu, J.; Bernardet, K.; Berriaud, C.; Berry, T.; Bertelsen, H.; Bertin, A.; Bertinelli, F.; Bertolucci, S.; Besson, N.; Beteille, A.; Bethke, S.; Bialas, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Bieri, M.; Biglietti, M.; Bilokon, H.; Binder, M.; Binet, S.; Bingefors, N.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biscarat, C.; Bischof, R.; Bischofberger, M.; Bitadze, A.; Bizzell, J. P.; Black, K. M.; Blair, R. E.; Blaising, J. J.; Blanch, O.; Blanchot, G.; Blocker, C.; Blocki, J.; Blondel, A.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Boaretto, C.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bocci, A.; Bocian, D.; Bock, R.; Boehm, M.; Boek, J.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogouch, A.; Bohm, C.; Bohm, J.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Bondarenko, V. G.; Bonino, R.; Bonis, J.; Bonivento, W.; Bonneau, P.; Boonekamp, M.; Boorman, G.; Boosten, M.; Booth, C. N.; Booth, P. S. L.; Booth, P.; Booth, J. R. A.; Borer, K.; Borisov, A.; Borjanovic, I.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosi, F.; Bosman, M.; Bosteels, M.; Botchev, B.; Boterenbrood, H.; Botterill, D.; Boudreau, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boulahouache, C.; Bourdarios, C.; Boutemeur, M.; Bouzakis, K.; Boyd, G. R.; Boyd, J.; Boyer, B. H.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozhko, N. I.; Braccini, S.; Braem, A.; Branchini, P.; Brandenburg, G. W.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Braun, H. M.; Bravo, S.; Brawn, I. P.; Brelier, B.; Bremer, J.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Breton, D.; Brett, N. D.; Breugnon, P.; Bright-Thomas, P. G.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Brodbeck, T. J.; Brodet, E.; Broggi, F.; Broklova, Z.; Bromberg, C.; Brooijmans, G.; Brouwer, G.; Broz, J.; Brubaker, E.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Buanes, T.; Buchanan, N. J.; Buchholz, P.; Budagov, I. A.; Büscher, V.; Bugge, L.; Buira-Clark, D.; Buis, E. J.; Bujor, F.; Buran, T.; Burckhart, H.; Burckhart-Chromek, D.; Burdin, S.; Burns, R.; Busato, E.; Buskop, J. J. F.; Buszello, K. P.; Butin, F.; Butler, J. M.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J.; Butterworth, J. M.; Byatt, T.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Cabruja Casas, E.; Caccia, M.; Caforio, D.; Cakir, O.; Calafiura, P.; Calderini, G.; Calderón Terol, D.; Callahan, J.; Caloba, L. P.; Caloi, R.; Calvet, D.; Camard, A.; Camarena, F.; Camarri, P.; Cambiaghi, M.; Cameron, D.; Cammin, J.; Campabadal Segura, F.; Campana, S.; Canale, V.; Cantero, J.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Caprio, M.; Caracinha, D.; Caramarcu, C.; Carcagno, Y.; Cardarelli, R.; Cardeira, C.; Cardiel Sas, L.; Cardini, A.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, B.; Caron, S.; Carpentieri, C.; Carr, F. S.; Carter, A. A.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Cascella, M.; Caso, C.; Castelo, J.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N.; Castrovillari, F.; Cataldi, G.; Cataneo, F.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Caughron, S.; Cauz, D.; Cavallari, A.; Cavalleri, P.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerna, C.; Cernoch, C.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerutti, F.; Cervetto, M.; Cetin, S. A.; Cevenini, F.; Chalifour, M.; Chamizo llatas, M.; Chan, A.; Chapman, J. W.; Charlton, D. G.; Charron, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chen, H.; Chen, L.; Chen, T.; Chen, X.; Cheng, S.; Cheng, T. L.; Cheplakov, A.; Chepurnov, V. F.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Chesneanu, D.; Cheu, E.; Chevalier, L.; Chevalley, J. L.; Chevallier, F.; Chiarella, V.; Chiefari, G.; Chikovani, L.; Chilingarov, A.; Chiodini, G.; Chouridou, S.; Chren, D.; Christiansen, T.; Christidi, I. A.; Christov, A.; Chu, M. L.; Chudoba, J.; Chuguev, A. G.; Ciapetti, G.; Cicalini, E.; Ciftci, A. K.; Cindro, V.; Ciobotaru, M. 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A.; Van der Bij, H.; van der Graaf, H.; van der Kraaij, E.; Van Eijk, B.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; van Kesteren, Z.; van Vulpen, I.; Van Berg, R.; Vandelli, W.; Vandoni, G.; Vaniachine, A.; Vannucci, F.; Varanda, M.; Varela Rodriguez, F.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vassilakopoulos, V. I.; Vassilieva, L.; Vataga, E.; Vaz, L.; Vazeille, F.; Vedrine, P.; Vegni, G.; Veillet, J. J.; Vellidis, C.; Veloso, F.; Veness, R.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, S.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vertogardov, L.; Vetterli, M. C.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Vigeolas, E.; Villa, M.; Villani, E. G.; Villate, J.; Villella, I.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincent, P.; Vincke, H.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Virchaux, M.; Viret, S.; Virzi, J.; Vitale, A.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives, R.; Vives Vaques, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vogt, H.; Vokac, P.; Vollmer, C. F.; Volpi, M.; Volpini, G.; von Boehn-Buchholz, R.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobiev, A. P.; Vorozhtsov, A. S.; Vorozhtsov, S. B.; Vos, M.; Voss, K. C.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vovenko, A. S.; Vranjes, N.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Anh, T. Vu; Vuaridel, B.; Vudragovic, M.; Vuillemin, V.; Vuillermet, R.; Wänanen, A.; Wahlen, H.; Walbersloh, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wall, R.; Wallny, R. S.; Walsh, S.; Wang, C.; Wang, J. C.; Wappler, F.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Warner, G. P.; Warren, M.; Warsinsky, M.; Wastie, R.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watts, G.; Waugh, A. T.; Waugh, B. M.; Weaverdyck, C.; Webel, M.; Weber, G.; Weber, J.; Weber, M.; Weber, P.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weilhammer, P. M.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Wellenstein, H.; Wellisch, H. P.; Wells, P. S.; Wemans, A.; Wen, M.; Wenaus, T.; Wendler, S.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werneke, P.; Werner, P.; Werthenbach, U.; Wheeler-Ellis, S. J.; Whitaker, S. P.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, S.; Whittington, D.; Wicek, F.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiesmann, M.; Wiesmann, M.; Wijnen, T.; Wildauer, A.; Wilhelm, I.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, H. H.; Willis, W.; Willocq, S.; Wilmut, I.; Wilson, J. A.; Wilson, A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winton, L.; Witzeling, W.; Wlodek, T.; Woehrling, E.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wright, C.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wuestenfeld, J.; Wunstorf, R.; Xella-Hansen, S.; Xiang, A.; Xie, S.; Xie, Y.; Xu, G.; Xu, N.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamaoka, H.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, J. C.; Yang, S.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Z.; Yao, W.-M.; Yao, Y.; Yarradoddi, K.; Yasu, Y.; Ye, J.; Yilmaz, M.; Yoosoofmiya, R.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, H.; Yoshida, R.; Young, C.; Youssef, S. P.; Yu, D.; Yu, J.; Yu, M.; Yu, X.; Yuan, J.; Yurkewicz, A.; Zaets, V. G.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zajac, J.; Zajacova, Z.; Zalite, A. Yu; Zalite, Yo K.; Zanello, L.; Zarzhitsky, P.; Zaytsev, A.; Zdrazil, M.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeller, M.; Zema, P. F.; Zendler, C.; Zenin, A. V.; Zenis, T.; Zenonos, Z.; Zenz, S.; Zerwas, D.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zheng, W.; Zhang, X.; Zhao, L.; Zhao, T.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Z.; Zhelezko, A.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zheng, S.; Zhichao, L.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, N.; Zhou, S.; Zhou, Y.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H. Z.; Zhuang, X. A.; Zhuravlov, V.; Zilka, B.; Zimin, N. I.; Zimmermann, S.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zitoun, R.; Zivkovic, L.; Zmouchko, V. V.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; Zoeller, M. M.; Zolnierowski, Y.; Zsenei, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zychacek, V.

    2008-08-01

    The ATLAS detector as installed in its experimental cavern at point 1 at CERN is described in this paper. A brief overview of the expected performance of the detector when the Large Hadron Collider begins operation is also presented.

  7. Calibration of a digital hadron calorimeter with muons

    SciTech Connect

    Bilki, Burak; Butler, John; Cundiff, Tim; Drake, Gary; Haberichter, William; Hazen, Eric; Hoff, Jim; Holm, Scott; Kreps, Andrew; May, Ed; Mavromanolakis, Georgios; /Fermilab /Iowa U. /Argonne /Boston U. /Argonne, PHY

    2008-02-01

    The calibration procedure of a finely granulated digital hadron calorimeter with Resistive Plate Chambers as the active elements is described. Results obtained with a stack of nine layers exposed to muons from the Fermilab test beam are presented.

  8. Containment and resolution of hadronic showers at the FCC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carli, T.; Helsens, C.; Henriques Correia, A.; Solans Sánchez, C.

    2016-09-01

    The particles produced at a potential Future Circular Collider with √s = 100 TeV are of unprecented energies. In this document we present the hadronic shower containment and resolution parametrizations based on Geant4 simulations for the Hadronic calorimetry needed for conceptual detector design at this energy. The Geant4 toolkit along with FTFP_BERT physics list are used in this study. Comparisons are made with test-beam data from the ATLAS Tile hadronic calorimeter. These simulations motivate a 12 λ calorimeter in order to contain at 98% level TeV single hadron showers and multi-TeV jets and keep a pion energy resolution constant term of approximately 3%.

  9. Higgs boson production at hadron colliders: Signal and background processes

    SciTech Connect

    David Rainwater; Michael Spira; Dieter Zeppenfeld

    2004-01-12

    We review the theoretical status of signal and background calculations for Higgs boson production at hadron colliders. Particular emphasis is given to missing NLO results, which will play a crucial role for the Tevatron and the LHC.

  10. Charmless Hadronic B Decays at BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, James P.; /Liverpool U.

    2007-12-04

    We report recent measurements for the branching fractions of charmless hadronic B decays obtained from data collected by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy collider at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center.

  11. The COMPASS setup for physics with hadron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbon, P.; Adolph, C.; Akhunzyanov, R.; Alexandrov, Yu.; Alexeev, M. G.; Alexeev, G. D.; Amoroso, A.; Andrieux, V.; Anosov, V.; Austregesilo, A.; Badełek, B.; Balestra, F.; Barth, J.; Baum, G.; Beck, R.; Bedfer, Y.; Berlin, A.; Bernhard, J.; Bicker, K.; Bielert, E. R.; Bieling, J.; Birsa, R.; Bisplinghoff, J.; Bodlak, M.; Boer, M.; Bordalo, P.; Bradamante, F.; Braun, C.; Bressan, A.; Büchele, M.; Burtin, E.; Capozza, L.; Ciliberti, P.; Chiosso, M.; Chung, S. U.; Cicuttin, A.; Colantoni, M.; Cotte, D.; Crespo, M. L.; Curiel, Q.; Dafni, T.; Dalla Torre, S.; Dasgupta, S. S.; Dasgupta, S.; Denisov, O. Yu.; Desforge, D.; Dinkelbach, A. M.; Donskov, S. V.; Doshita, N.; Duic, V.; Dünnweber, W.; Durand, D.; Dziewiecki, M.; Efremov, A.; Elia, C.; Eversheim, P. D.; Eyrich, W.; Faessler, M.; Ferrero, A.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Fischer, H.; Franco, C.; du Fresne von Hohenesche, N.; Friedrich, J. M.; Frolov, V.; Gatignon, L.; Gautheron, F.; Gavrichtchouk, O. P.; Gerassimov, S.; Geyer, R.; Giganon, A.; Gnesi, I.; Gobbo, B.; Goertz, S.; Gorzellik, M.; Grabmüller, S.; Grasso, A.; Gregori, M.; Grube, B.; Grussenmeyer, T.; Guskov, A.; Haas, F.; von Harrach, D.; Hahne, D.; Hashimoto, R.; Heinsius, F. H.; Herrmann, F.; Hinterberger, F.; Höppner, Ch.; Horikawa, N.; d`Hose, N.; Huber, S.; Ishimoto, S.; Ivanov, A.; Ivanshin, Yu.; Iwata, T.; Jahn, R.; Jary, V.; Jasinski, P.; Jörg, P.; Joosten, R.; Kabuß, E.; Ketzer, B.; Khaustov, G. V.; Khokhlov, Yu. A.; Kisselev, Yu.; Klein, F.; Klimaszewski, K.; Koivuniemi, J. H.; Kolosov, V. N.; Kondo, K.; Königsmann, K.; Konorov, I.; Konstantinov, V. F.; Kotzinian, A. M.; Kouznetsov, O.; Krämer, M.; Kroumchtein, Z. V.; Kuchinski, N.; Kuhn, R.; Kunne, F.; Kurek, K.; Kurjata, R. P.; Lednev, A. A.; Lehmann, A.; Levillain, M.; Levorato, S.; Lichtenstadt, J.; Maggiora, A.; Magnon, A.; Makke, N.; Mallot, G. K.; Marchand, C.; Marroncle, J.; Martin, A.; Marzec, J.; Matousek, J.; Matsuda, H.; Matsuda, T.; Menon, G.; Meshcheryakov, G.; Meyer, W.; Michigami, T.; Mikhailov, Yu. V.; Miyachi, Y.; Moinester, M. A.; Nagaytsev, A.; Nagel, T.; Nerling, F.; Neubert, S.; Neyret, D.; Nikolaenko, V. I.; Novy, J.; Nowak, W.-D.; Nunes, A. S.; Olshevsky, A. G.; Orlov, I.; Ostrick, M.; Panknin, R.; Panzieri, D.; Parsamyan, B.; Paul, S.; Pesaro, G.; Pesaro, V.; Peshekhonov, D. V.; Pires, C.; Platchkov, S.; Pochodzalla, J.; Polyakov, V. A.; Pretz, J.; Quaresma, M.; Quintans, C.; Ramos, S.; Regali, C.; Reicherz, G.; Reymond, J.-M.; Rocco, E.; Rossiyskaya, N. S.; Rousse, J.-Y.; Ryabchikov, D. I.; Rychter, A.; Samartsev, A.; Samoylenko, V. D.; Sandacz, A.; Sarkar, S.; Savin, I. A.; Sbrizzai, G.; Schiavon, P.; Schill, C.; Schlüter, T.; Schmidt, K.; Schmieden, H.; Schönning, K.; Schopferer, S.; Schott, M.; Shevchenko, O. Yu.; Silva, L.; Sinha, L.; Sirtl, S.; Slunecka, M.; Sosio, S.; Sozzi, F.; Srnka, A.; Steiger, L.; Stolarski, M.; Sulc, M.; Sulej, R.; Suzuki, H.; Szabelski, A.; Szameitat, T.; Sznajder, P.; Takekawa, S.; Terça, G.; Wolbeek, J. ter; Tessaro, S.; Tessarotto, F.; Thibaud, F.; Tskhay, V.; Uhl, S.; Uman, I.; Virius, M.; Wang, L.; Weisrock, T.; Weitzel, Q.; Wilfert, M.; Windmolders, R.; Wollny, H.; Zaremba, K.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zemlyanichkina, E.; Ziembicki, M.; Zink, A.

    2015-04-01

    The main characteristics of the COMPASS experimental setup for physics with hadron beams are described. This setup was designed to perform exclusive measurements of processes with several charged and/or neutral particles in the final state. Making use of a large part of the apparatus that was previously built for spin structure studies with a muon beam, it also features a new target system as well as new or upgraded detectors. The hadron setup is able to operate at the high incident hadron flux available at CERN. It is characterised by large angular and momentum coverages, large and nearly flat acceptances, and good two and three-particle mass resolutions. In 2008 and 2009 it was successfully used with positive and negative hadron beams and with liquid hydrogen and solid nuclear targets. This paper describes the new and upgraded detectors and auxiliary equipment, outlines the reconstruction procedures used, and summarises the general performance of the setup.

  12. Physics Program at COSY-Juelich with Polarized Hadronic Probes

    SciTech Connect

    Kacharava, Andro

    2009-08-04

    Hadron physics aims at a fundamental understanding of all particles and their interactions that are subject to the strong force. Experiments using hadronic probes could contribute to shed light on open questions on the structure of hadrons and their interaction as well as the symmetries of nature. The COoler SYnchrotron COSY at the Forschungszentrum Juelich accelerates protons and deuterons with momenta up to 3.7 GeV/c. The availability of both an electron cooler as well as a stochastic beam cooling system allows for precision measurements, using polarized proton and deuteron beams in combination with polarized Hydrogen or Deuterium targets.This contribution summarizes the ongoing physics program at the COSY facility using ANKE, WASA and TOF detector systems with polarized hadronic probes, highlighting recent results and outlining the new developments.

  13. Correlations in back-to-back hadron production in SIDIS

    SciTech Connect

    Avakian, Harut; Pisano, Silvia

    2016-08-01

    The Deep Inelastic Scattering (DIS) proved to be a great tool in testing of the theory of strong in- teractions. Semi-Inclusive DIS (SIDIS), with detection of an additional hadron allowed first stud- ies of 3D structure of the nucleon, moving the main focus from testing the QCD to understanding of strong interactions and quark gluon dynamics to address a number of puzzles accumulated in recent years. Detection of two hadrons in SIDIS, which is even more complicated, provides ac- cess to details of quark gluon interactions inaccessible in single-hadron SIDIS, providing a new avenue to study the complex nucleon structure. Large acceptance of the CLAS detector at Jef- ferson Lab, allowing detection of two hadrons, produced back-to-back (b2b) in the current and target fragmentation regions, provides a unique possibility to study the nucleon structure in target fragmentation region, and correlations of target and current fragmentation regions

  14. SUMMARY OF THE 2006 HADRONIC SHOWER SIMULATION WORKSHOP

    SciTech Connect

    WATERS, LAURIE S.

    2007-01-19

    The 2006 Hadronic Shower Simulation Workshop, held September 6-8, 2006 at Fermi National Laboratory brought together an international assembly of experts in the field of hadronic shower development. The overall goal was to present the current understanding of the physics of hadronic showers, and to study examples of how this is measured in particle-physics calorimetry. The modeling of such events is critical, and the major Monte Carlo codes, FLUKA, GEANT, MARS, MCNPX, and PHTS were represented at the workshop. A wide range of physics, much of which is used by the simulation codes was also discussed, ranging from the hadronic CEM, LAQGSM, and DTUJET models, down to low energy neutronics capabilities. Special purpose codes and methodologies used for specific applications such as muon and neutrino physics were also shown. The results of a code benchmarking exercises were presented and extensively discussed. This paper summarizes the key topics presented in the workshop.

  15. Hadron distributions at higher rapidity using the BRAHMS forward spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Moskowitz, B.

    1995-07-15

    Different conditions, and therefore different physics, are expected to exist over the range of rapidities at RHIC. The BRAHMS Forward Spectrometer will measure identified hadron distributions up to y=4, giving it a unique place in the RHIC experimental program.

  16. Summary of the parallel session on hadron dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Corcoran, M.D.; Carroll, A.S.

    1994-12-31

    The hadron dynamics sessions focussed on A-dependent effects in hard interactions and heavy quark production, as well as color transparency effects. Other topics covered included exclusive processes and spin effects.

  17. E.M. and Hadronic Shower Simulation with FLUKA

    SciTech Connect

    Battistoni, G.; Fasso, A.; Ferrari, A.; Ranft, J.; Rubbia, A.; Sala, P.R.; /INFN, Milan /SLAC /CERN /Siegen U. /Zurich, ETH

    2005-10-03

    A description of the main features of e.m. and hadronic shower simulation models used in the FLUKA code is summarized and some recent applications are discussed. The general status of the FLUKA project is also reported.

  18. INTRA-BEAM SCATTERING SCALING FOR VERY LARGE HADRON COLLIDERS.

    SciTech Connect

    WEI,J.; PARZEN,G.

    2001-06-18

    For Very Large Hadron Colliders (VLHC), flat hadron beams [2] with their vertical emittance much smaller than their horizontal emittance are proposed to maximize the design luminosity. Emittance growth caused by intra-beam scattering (IBS) is a concern on the realization of such flat-beam conditions. Based on existing IBS formalism on beams of Gaussian distribution, we analytically derive [6] the IBS growth rate and determine the IBS limit on the aspect ratio for a flat beam.

  19. Role of heavy quarks in light hadron fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epele, Manuel; García Canal, Carlos; Sassot, R.

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the role of heavy quarks in the production of light flavored hadrons and in the determination of the corresponding nonperturbative hadronization probabilities. We define a general mass variable flavor number scheme for fragmentation functions that accounts for heavy quark mass effects, and perform a global QCD analysis to an up-to-date data set including very precise Belle and BABAR results. We show that the mass dependent picture provides a much more accurate and consistent description of the data.

  20. Test beam performance of the CDF plug upgrade hadron calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    de Barbaro, P.; CDF Plug Upgrade Group

    1998-01-13

    We report on the performance of the CDF End Plug Hadron Calorimeter in a test beam. The sampling calorimeter is constructed using 2 inch iron absorber plates and scintillator planes with wavelength shifting fibers for readout. The linearity and energy resolution of the calorimeter response to pions, and the transverse uniformity of the response to muons and pions are presented. The parameter e/h, representing the ratio of the electromagnetic to hadronic response, is extracted from the data.

  1. Hadron spectroscopy in lattice QCD with dynamical quark loops

    SciTech Connect

    Fukugita, M.; Oyanagi, Y.; Ukawa, A.

    1986-08-25

    Hadron mass calculations are carried out in lattice QCD on a 9/sup 3/ x 18 lattice for flavor-nonsinglet mesons and baryons. Dynamical quark loops are fully incorporated with the Langevin technique. The contribution of dynamical quark loops significantly modifies the hadron masses in lattice units, but its dominant part can be absorbed into a shift of the coupling constant for the quark mass range we explored.

  2. Onset of quark-hadron duality in pion electroproduction.

    PubMed

    Navasardyan, T; Adams, G S; Ahmidouch, A; Angelescu, T; Arrington, J; Asaturyan, R; Baker, O K; Benmouna, N; Bertoncini, C; Blok, H P; Boeglin, W U; Bosted, P E; Breuer, H; Christy, M E; Connell, S H; Cui, Y; Dalton, M M; Danagoulian, S; Day, D; Dodario, T; Dunne, J A; Dutta, D; El Khayari, N; Ent, R; Fenker, H C; Frolov, V V; Gan, L; Gaskell, D; Hafidi, K; Hinton, W; Holt, R J; Horn, T; Huber, G M; Hungerford, E; Jiang, X; Jones, M; Joo, K; Kalantarians, N; Kelly, J J; Keppel, C E; Kubarovski, V; Li, Y; Liang, Y; Malace, S; Markowitz, P; McGrath, E; McKee, P; Meekins, D G; Mkrtchyan, H; Moziak, B; Niculescu, G; Niculescu, I; Opper, A K; Ostapenko, T; Reimer, P; Reinhold, J; Roche, J; Rock, S E; Schulte, E; Segbefia, E; Smith, C; Smith, G R; Stoler, P; Tadevosyan, V; Tang, L; Ungaro, M; Uzzle, A; Vidakovic, S; Villano, A; Vulcan, W F; Wang, M; Warren, G; Wesselmann, F; Wojtsekhowski, B; Wood, S A; Xu, C; Yuan, L; Zheng, X; Zhu, H

    2007-01-12

    A large data set of charged-pion (pi+/-) electroproduction from both hydrogen and deuterium targets has been obtained spanning the low-energy residual-mass region. These data conclusively show the onset of the quark-hadron duality phenomenon, as predicted for high-energy hadron electroproduction. We construct several ratios from these data to exhibit the relation of this phenomenon to the high-energy factorization ansatz of electron-quark scattering and subsequent quark-->pion production mechanisms.

  3. The Onset of Quark-Hadron Duality in Pion Electroproduction

    SciTech Connect

    Tigran Navasardyan; Gary Adams; Abdellah Ahmidouch; Tatiana Angelescu; John Arrington; Razmik Asaturyan; O. Baker; Nawal Benmouna; Crystal Bertoncini; Henk Blok; Werner Boeglin; Peter Bosted; Herbert Breuer; Michael Christy; Simon Connell; Yonggang Cui; Mark Dalton; Samuel Danagoulian; Donal Day; T. Dodario; James Dunne; Dipangkar Dutta; Najib Elkhayari; Rolf Ent; Howard Fenker; Valera Frolov; Liping Gan; David Gaskell; Kawtar Hafidi; Wendy Hinton; Roy Holt; Tanja Horn; Garth Huber; Ed Hungerford; Xiaodong Jiang; Mark Jones; Kyungseon Joo; Narbe Kalantarians; James Kelly; Cynthia Keppel; Edward Kinney; V. Kubarovski; Ya Li; Yongguang Liang; Simona Malace; Pete Markowitz; Erin McGrath; Daniella Mckee; David Meekins; Hamlet Mkrtchyan; Brian Moziak; Gabriel Niculescu; Maria-Ioana Niculescu; Allena Opper; Tanya Ostapenko; Paul Reimer; Joerg Reinhold; Julie Roche; Stephen Rock; Elaine Schulte; Edwin Segbefia; C. Smith; G.R. Smith; Paul Stoler; Vardan Tadevosyan; Liguang Tang; Maurizio Ungaro; Alicia Uzzle; Sandra Vidakovic; Anthony Villano; William Vulcan; Miao Wang; Glen Warren; Frank Wesselmann; Bogdan Wojtsekhowski; Stephen Wood; Chuncheng Xu; Lulin Yuan; Xiaochao Zheng; Hong Guo Zhu

    2006-08-29

    A large data set of charged-pion electroproduction from both hydrogen and deuterium targets has been obtained spanning the low-energy residual-mass region. These data conclusively show the onset of the quark-hadron duality phenomenon, as predicted for high-energy hadron electroproduction. We construct several ratios from these data to exhibit the relation of this phenomenon to the high-energy factorization ansatz of electron-quark scattering and subsequent quark-to- pion production mechanisms.

  4. The state of the art in hadron beam cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Prost, L.R.; Derwent, P.; /Fermilab

    2008-09-01

    Cooling of hadron beams (including heavy-ions) is a powerful technique by which accelerator facilities around the world achieve the necessary beam brightness for their physics research. In this paper, we will give an overview of the latest developments in hadron beam cooling, for which high energy electron cooling at Fermilab's Recycler ring and bunched beam stochastic cooling at Brookhaven National Laboratory's RHIC facility represent two recent major accomplishments. Novel ideas in the field will also be introduced.

  5. Revealing Children's Implicit Spelling Representations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Critten, Sarah; Pine, Karen J.; Messer, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Conceptualizing the underlying representations and cognitive mechanisms of children's spelling development is a key challenge for literacy researchers. Using the Representational Redescription model (Karmiloff-Smith), Critten, Pine and Steffler (2007) demonstrated that the acquisition of phonological and morphological knowledge may be underpinned…

  6. Scientific Representation and Science Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matta, Corrado

    2014-01-01

    In this article I examine three examples of philosophical theories of scientific representation with the aim of assessing which of these is a good candidate for a philosophical theory of scientific representation in science learning. The three candidate theories are Giere's intentional approach, Suárez's inferential approach and Lynch and…

  7. Learning with Interactive Graphical Representations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saljo, Roger, Ed.

    1999-01-01

    The seven articles of this theme issue deal with the use of computer-based interactive graphical representations. Studying their use will bring answers to users of static graphics in traditional paper-based media and those who plan instruction using graphical representations that allow semantically direct manipulation. (SLD)

  8. Representation of Fuzzy Symmetric Relations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-03-19

    Std Z39-18 REPRESENTATION OF FUZZY SYMMETRIC RELATIONS L. Valverde Dept. de Matematiques i Estadistica Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya Avda...REPRESENTATION OF FUZZY SYMMETRIC RELATIONS L. "Valverde* Dept. de Matematiques i Estadistica Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya Avda. Diagonal, 649

  9. The Representational Value of Hats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Jane M.; Fitzallen, Noleine E.; Wilson, Karen G.; Creed, Julie F.

    2008-01-01

    The literature that is available on the topic of representations in mathematics is vast. One commonly discussed item is graphical representations. From the history of mathematics to modern uses of technology, a variety of graphical forms are available for middle school students to use to represent mathematical ideas. The ideas range from algebraic…

  10. Symbolic representation of probabilistic worlds.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Jacob

    2012-04-01

    Symbolic representation of environmental variables is a ubiquitous and often debated component of cognitive science. Yet notwithstanding centuries of philosophical discussion, the efficacy, scope, and validity of such representation has rarely been given direct consideration from a mathematical point of view. This paper introduces a quantitative measure of the effectiveness of symbolic representation, and develops formal constraints under which such representation is in fact warranted. The effectiveness of symbolic representation hinges on the probabilistic structure of the environment that is to be represented. For arbitrary probability distributions (i.e., environments), symbolic representation is generally not warranted. But in modal environments, defined here as those that consist of mixtures of component distributions that are narrow ("spiky") relative to their spreads, symbolic representation can be shown to represent the environment with a relatively negligible loss of information. Modal environments support propositional forms, logical relations, and other familiar features of symbolic representation. Hence the assumption that our environment is, in fact, modal is a key tacit assumption underlying the use of symbols in cognitive science.

  11. Symbolic Representation of Probabilistic Worlds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldman, Jacob

    2012-01-01

    Symbolic representation of environmental variables is a ubiquitous and often debated component of cognitive science. Yet notwithstanding centuries of philosophical discussion, the efficacy, scope, and validity of such representation has rarely been given direct consideration from a mathematical point of view. This paper introduces a quantitative…

  12. Constraining high energy interaction mechanisms by studying forward hadron production at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostapchenko, S.; Bleicher, M.; Pierog, T.; Werner, K.

    2016-12-01

    We demonstrate that underlying assumptions concerning the structure of constituent parton Fock states in hadrons make a strong impact on the predictions of hadronic interaction models for forward hadron spectra and for long-range correlations between central and forward hadron production. Our analysis shows that combined studies of proton-proton collisions at the Large Hadron Collider by central and forward-looking detectors have a rich potential for discriminating between the main model approaches.

  13. A large hadron electron collider at CERN

    SciTech Connect

    Abelleira Fernandez, J. L.

    2015-04-06

    This document provides a brief overview of the recently published report on the design of the Large Hadron Electron Collider (LHeC), which comprises its physics programme, accelerator physics, technology and main detector concepts. The LHeC exploits and develops challenging, though principally existing, accelerator and detector technologies. This summary is complemented by brief illustrations of some of the highlights of the physics programme, which relies on a vastly extended kinematic range, luminosity and unprecedented precision in deep inelastic scattering. Illustrations are provided regarding high precision QCD, new physics (Higgs, SUSY) and eletron-ion physics. The LHeC is designed to run synchronously with the LHC in the twenties and to achieve an integrated luminosity of O(100)fb–1. It will become the cleanest high resolution microscope of mankind and will substantially extend as well as complement the investigation of the physics of the TeV energy scale, which has been enabled by the LHC.

  14. Hadron collider limits on anomalous WWγ couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barger, Kevin R.; Reno, M. H.

    1995-01-01

    A next-to-leading log calculation of the reactions pp and pp¯-->W+/-γX is presented including a triboson gauge coupling from non-standard-model contributions. The additional term arises by considering the standard model as a low energy effective theory. Two approaches are made for comparison. The first approach considers the triboson WWγ coupling as being uniquely fixed by tree level unitarity at high energies to its standard model form and, consequently, suppresses the non-standard-model contributions with form factors. The second approach is to ignore such considerations and calculate the contributions to non-standard-model triboson gauge couplings without such suppressions, using the first term in the momentum expansion of an effective chiral Lagrangian. It is found that at Fermilab Tevatron energies the two approaches do not differ much in quantitative results, while at large Hadron Collider (LHC) energies the two approaches give significantly different predictions for production rates. At the Tevatron and LHC, however, the sensitivity limits on the anomalous coupling of WWγ are too weak to usefully constrain parameters in the chiral Lagrangian.

  15. Simulating graviton production at hadron colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Aquino, Priscila; Hagiwara, Kaoru; Li, Qiang; Maltoni, Fabio

    2011-06-01

    Spin-2 particles and in particular gravitons are predicted in many new physics scenarios at the TeV scale. Depending on the details of models such new states might show up as a continuum, massless particles, or TeV scale resonances. Correspondingly, very different discovery signatures should be exploited, from the search of excesses in events with multi jets and large missing transverse energy, to resonances in weak boson or jet pair productions. We present a very general and flexible implementation in M ad-G raph/M adE vent of spin-2 particles interacting with the standard model particles via the energy momentum tensor, which encompasses all of the most popular TeV scale models featuring gravitons. By merging matrix elements with parton shower, we can generate inclusive samples of graviton + jets at the hadron colliders in several scenarios (ADD, zero-mass graviton and RS). We compare and validate our results against the corresponding next-to-leading order QCD calculations.

  16. Measurements of hadron form factors at BESIII

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, Cristina Morales

    2016-05-01

    BEPCII is a symmetric e+e--collider located in Beijing running at center-of-mass energies between 2.0 and 4.6 GeV. This energy range allows the BESIII-experiment to measure hadron form factors both from direct e+e--annihilation and from initial state radiation processes. In this paper, results on e+e- → p p ¯ based on data collected by BESIII in 2011 and 2012 are presented. We also present preliminary results on e+e- → Λ Λ ¯ based on the same data samples at 4 center-of-mass energies. BESIII results obtained from e+e- → π+π- using the initial state radiation technique at the center-of-mass energy of 3.773 GeV are also summarized. Finally, expectations on the measurement of baryon electromagnetic form factors from the BESIII high luminosity energy scan in 2015 and from initial state radiation processes at different center-of-mass energies are also explained.

  17. Di-hadron SIDIS measurements at CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Pisano, Silvia

    2014-06-01

    Semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering (SIDIS) is an essential tool to probe nucleon internal structure. Through single hadron SIDIS processes, indeed, it is possible to access the TMDs, containing information on both the longitudinal and transverse motion of the partons. In recent years, moreover, an increasing attention has been devoted to dihadron SIDIS. It constitutes the golden channel to access the higher-twist collinear Parton Distribution Functions e(x) and h{sub L}(x), so far only marginally known, whose extraction will complete the collinear description of the nucleon at the twist-3 level. The CLAS detector in the Hall-B at JLab, thanks to its large acceptance, is particularly suited for such measurements. Analyses aiming at the extraction of dihadron SIDIS Beam and Target-Spin Asymmetries are presently in progress. In these proceedings, preliminary results for the Beam-Spin Asymmetry are reported, together with a summary of the dihadron SIDIS experimental program at JLab.

  18. Production of heavy quarkonia in hadronic experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Likhoded, A. K. Luchinsky, A. V. Poslavsky, S. V.

    2015-12-15

    The phenomenology of the production of P-wave χ{sub c,b} mesons and S-wave η{sub c,b} mesons in highenergy hadron–hadron collisions was studied on the basis of nonrelativistic quantum chromodynamics (NRQCD). Available experimental data on χ{sub c}-meson production were analyzed, and nonperturbative NRQCDmatrix elements were determined from a fit to these data. It is shown that the observed transversemomentum (pT) spectrum of χ{sub c} mesons is basically formed by color-singlet contributions. At the same time, the ratio σ(χ{sub c2})/σ(χ{sub c1}) depends greatly on color-octet contributions; this ratio therefore becomes a highly sensitive tool for separating different NRQCD contributions. Predictions for χ{sub b}-meson production are obtained on the basis of NRQCD scaling rules. For the case of η{sub c}-meson production, it is shown that the observed cross sections agree with the color-singlet model featuring phenomenological parameters.

  19. Synchrotron radiation issues in future hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    P. Bauer, C. Darve and I. Terechkine

    2002-11-21

    Hadron machines mostly use high field superconducting magnets operating at low temperatures. Therefore the issue of extracting a SR power heat load becomes more critical and costly. Conceptual solutions to the problem exist in the form of beam screens and photon stops. Cooled beam screens are more expensive in production and operation than photon stops, but they are, unlike photon stops, routinely used in existing machines. Photon stops are the most economical solution because the heat load is extracted at room temperature. They presently consider it most prudent to work with a combined beam screen and photon stop approach, in which the photon stop absorbs most of the SR power, and the beam screen serves only the vacuum purpose. Provided that the recently launched photon stop R and D [10] supports it, we would like to explore solutions with photon stops only. This would allow to reduce the magnet apertures to a certain extent with respect to those required to accommodate high SR power compliant beam screens and reduce cost. The possibility of magnet designs, which have larger vertical apertures where large cooling capillaries can be housed at no additional cost, would allow to soften this statement somewhat and should therefore be pursued as well.

  20. The Hadron Blind Ring Imaging Cherenkov Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blatnik, Marie; Zajac, Stephanie; Hemmick, Tom

    2013-10-01

    Heavy Ion Collisions in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven Lab have hinted at the existence of a new form of matter at high gluon density, the Color Glass Condensate. High energy electron scattering off of nuclei, focusing on the low-x components of the nuclear wave function, will definitively measure this state of matter. However, when a nucleus contributes a low x parton, the reaction products are highly focused in the electron-going direction and have large momentum in the lab system. High-momentum particle identification is particularly challenging. A particle is identifiable by its mass, but tracking algorithms only yield a particle's momentum based on its track's curvature. The particle's velocity is needed to identify the particle. A ring-imaging Cerenkov detector is being developed for the forward angle particle identification from the technological advancements of PHENIX's Hadron-Blind Detector (HBD), which uses Gas Electron Multipliers (GEMs) and pixelated pad planes to detect Cerenkov photons. The new HBD will focus the Cerenkov photons into a ring to determine the parent particle's velocity. Results from the pad plane simulations, construction tests, and test beam run will be presented.

  1. Advances in hadronic structure from Lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constantinou, Martha

    2017-01-01

    Understanding nucleon structure is considered a milestone of hadronic physics and new facilities are planned devoted to its study. A future Electron-Ion-Collider proposed by the scientific community will greatly deepen our knowledge on the fundamental constituents of the visible world. To achieve this goal, a synergy between the experimental and theoretical sectors is imperative, and Lattice QCD is in a unique position to provide input from first principle calculations. In this talk we will discuss recent progress in nucleon structure from Lattice QCD, focusing on the evaluation of matrix elements using state-of-the-art simulations with pion masses at their physical value. The axial form factors, electromagnetic radii, the quark momentum fraction and the spin content of the nucleon will be discussed. We will also highlight quantities that may guide New Physics searches, such as the scalar and tensor charges. Finally, we will give updates on a new direct approach to compute quark parton distributions functions on the lattice.

  2. Parity violation in the hadronic weak interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balascuta, Septimiu

    This thesis deals with the first measurements done with a cold neutron beam at the Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The experimental technique consisted of capturing polarized cold neutrons by nuclei to measure parity-violation in the angular distribution of the gamma rays following neutron capture. The measurements presented here for the nuclei Chlorine (35Cl) and Aluminum (27Al) are part of a program with the ultimate goal of measuring the asymmetry in the angular distribution of gamma rays emitted in the capture of neutrons on protons, with a precision better than 10-8, in order to extract the weak hadronic coupling constant due to pion exchange interaction with isospin change equal with one (hpi 1). Based on theoretical calculations asymmetry in the angular distribution of the gamma rays from neutron capture on protons has an estimated size of 5·10 -8. This implies that the Al parity violation asymmetry and its uncertainty have to be known with a precision smaller than 4·10 -8. The proton target is liquid Hydrogen (H2) contained in an Aluminum vessel. Results are presented for parity violation and parity-conserving asymmetries in Chlorine and Aluminum. The systematic and statistical uncertainties in the calculation of the parity-violating and parity-conserving asymmetries are discussed.

  3. A large hadron electron collider at CERN

    DOE PAGES

    Abelleira Fernandez, J. L.

    2015-04-06

    This document provides a brief overview of the recently published report on the design of the Large Hadron Electron Collider (LHeC), which comprises its physics programme, accelerator physics, technology and main detector concepts. The LHeC exploits and develops challenging, though principally existing, accelerator and detector technologies. This summary is complemented by brief illustrations of some of the highlights of the physics programme, which relies on a vastly extended kinematic range, luminosity and unprecedented precision in deep inelastic scattering. Illustrations are provided regarding high precision QCD, new physics (Higgs, SUSY) and eletron-ion physics. The LHeC is designed to run synchronously withmore » the LHC in the twenties and to achieve an integrated luminosity of O(100)fb–1. It will become the cleanest high resolution microscope of mankind and will substantially extend as well as complement the investigation of the physics of the TeV energy scale, which has been enabled by the LHC.« less

  4. Non-perturbative inputs for gluon distributions in the hadrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermolaev, B. I.; Troyan, S. I.

    2017-03-01

    Description of hadronic reactions at high energies is conventionally done in the framework of QCD factorization. All factorization convolutions comprise non-perturbative inputs mimicking non-perturbative contributions and perturbative evolution of those inputs. We construct inputs for the gluon-hadron scattering amplitudes in the forward kinematics and, using the optical theorem, convert them into inputs for gluon distributions in the hadrons, embracing the cases of polarized and unpolarized hadrons. In the first place, we formulate mathematical criteria which any model for the inputs should obey and then suggest a model satisfying those criteria. This model is based on a simple reasoning: after emitting an active parton off the hadron, the remaining set of spectators becomes unstable and therefore it can be described through factors of the resonance type, so we call it the resonance model. We use it to obtain non-perturbative inputs for gluon distributions in unpolarized and polarized hadrons for all available types of QCD factorization: basic, K_T-and collinear factorizations.

  5. The Common Elements of Atomic and Hadronic Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.

    2015-02-26

    Atomic physics and hadronic physics are both governed by the Yang Mills gauge theory Lagrangian; in fact, Abelian quantum electrodynamics can be regarded as the zero-color limit of quantum chromodynamics. I review a number of areas where the techniques of atomic physics can provide important insight into hadronic eigenstates in QCD. For example, the Dirac-Coulomb equation, which predicts the spectroscopy and structure of hydrogenic atoms, has an analog in hadron physics in the form of frame-independent light-front relativistic equations of motion consistent with light-front holography which give a remarkable first approximation to the spectroscopy, dynamics, and structure of light hadrons. The production of antihydrogen in flight can provide important insight into the dynamics of hadron production in QCD at the amplitude level. The renormalization scale for the running coupling is unambiguously set in QED; an analogous procedure sets the renormalization scales in QCD, leading to scheme-independent scale-fixed predictions. Conversely, many techniques which have been developed for hadron physics, such as scaling laws, evolution equations, the quark-interchange process and light-front quantization have important applicants for atomic physics and photon science, especially in the relativistic domain.

  6. Hadron production measurements to constrain accelerator neutrino beams

    SciTech Connect

    Korzenev, Alexander

    2015-07-15

    A precise prediction of expected neutrino fluxes is required for a long-baseline accelerator neutrino experiment. The flux is used to measure neutrino cross sections at the near detector, while at the far detector it provides an estimate of the expected signal for the study of neutrino oscillations. In the talk several approaches to constrain the ν flux are presented. The first is the traditional one when an interaction chain for the neutrino parent hadrons is stored to be weighted later with real measurements. In this approach differential hadron cross sections are used which, in turn, are measured in ancillary hadron production experiments. The approach is certainly model dependent because it requires an extrapolation to different incident nucleon momenta assuming x{sub F} scaling as well as extrapolation between materials having different atomic numbers. In the second approach one uses a hadron production yields off a real target exploited in the neutrino beamline. Yields of neutrino parent hadrons are parametrized at the surface of the target, thus one avoids to trace the particle interaction history inside the target. As in the case of the first approach, a dedicated ancillary experiment is mandatory. Recent results from the hadron production experiments – NA61/SHINE at CERN (measurements for T2K) and MIPP at Fermilab (measurements for NuMI) – are reviewed.

  7. Hadron production measurements to constrain accelerator neutrino beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korzenev, Alexander

    2015-07-01

    A precise prediction of expected neutrino fluxes is required for a long-baseline accelerator neutrino experiment. The flux is used to measure neutrino cross sections at the near detector, while at the far detector it provides an estimate of the expected signal for the study of neutrino oscillations. In the talk several approaches to constrain the ν flux are presented. The first is the traditional one when an interaction chain for the neutrino parent hadrons is stored to be weighted later with real measurements. In this approach differential hadron cross sections are used which, in turn, are measured in ancillary hadron production experiments. The approach is certainly model dependent because it requires an extrapolation to different incident nucleon momenta assuming xF scaling as well as extrapolation between materials having different atomic numbers. In the second approach one uses a hadron production yields off a real target exploited in the neutrino beamline. Yields of neutrino parent hadrons are parametrized at the surface of the target, thus one avoids to trace the particle interaction history inside the target. As in the case of the first approach, a dedicated ancillary experiment is mandatory. Recent results from the hadron production experiments - NA61/SHINE at CERN (measurements for T2K) and MIPP at Fermilab (measurements for NuMI) - are reviewed.

  8. A generalized wavelet extrema representation

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Jian; Lades, M.

    1995-10-01

    The wavelet extrema representation originated by Stephane Mallat is a unique framework for low-level and intermediate-level (feature) processing. In this paper, we present a new form of wavelet extrema representation generalizing Mallat`s original work. The generalized wavelet extrema representation is a feature-based multiscale representation. For a particular choice of wavelet, our scheme can be interpreted as representing a signal or image by its edges, and peaks and valleys at multiple scales. Such a representation is shown to be stable -- the original signal or image can be reconstructed with very good quality. It is further shown that a signal or image can be modeled as piecewise monotonic, with all turning points between monotonic segments given by the wavelet extrema. A new projection operator is introduced to enforce piecewise inonotonicity of a signal in its reconstruction. This leads to an enhancement to previously developed algorithms in preventing artifacts in reconstructed signal.

  9. Revealing children's implicit spelling representations.

    PubMed

    Critten, Sarah; Pine, Karen J; Messer, David J

    2013-06-01

    Conceptualizing the underlying representations and cognitive mechanisms of children's spelling development is a key challenge for literacy researchers. Using the Representational Redescription model (Karmiloff-Smith), Critten, Pine and Steffler (2007) demonstrated that the acquisition of phonological and morphological knowledge may be underpinned by increasingly explicit levels of spelling representation. However, their proposal that implicit representations may underlie early 'visually based' spelling remains unresolved. Children (N = 101, aged 4-6 years) were given a recognition task (Critten et al., 2007) and a novel production task, both involving verbal justifications of why spellings are correct/incorrect, strategy use and word pattern similarity. Results for both tasks supported an implicit level of spelling characterized by the ability to correctly recognize/produce words but the inability to explain operational strategies or generalize knowledge. Explicit levels and multiple representations were also in evidence across the two tasks. Implications for cognitive mechanisms underlying spelling development are discussed.

  10. Averages of $b$-hadron, $c$-hadron, and $\\tau$-lepton properties as of summer 2016

    SciTech Connect

    Amhis, Y.; et al.

    2016-12-21

    This article reports world averages of measurements of $b$-hadron, $c$-hadron, and $\\tau$-lepton properties obtained by the Heavy Flavor Averaging Group (HFAG) using results available through summer 2016. For the averaging, common input parameters used in the various analyses are adjusted (rescaled) to common values, and known correlations are taken into account. The averages include branching fractions, lifetimes, neutral meson mixing parameters, \\CP~violation parameters, parameters of semileptonic decays and CKM matrix elements.

  11. Averages of $b$-hadron, $c$-hadron, and $\\tau$-lepton properties as of summer 2014

    SciTech Connect

    Amhis, Y.; et al.

    2014-12-23

    This article reports world averages of measurements of $b$-hadron, $c$-hadron, and $\\tau$-lepton properties obtained by the Heavy Flavor Averaging Group (HFAG) using results available through summer 2014. For the averaging, common input parameters used in the various analyses are adjusted (rescaled) to common values, and known correlations are taken into account. The averages include branching fractions, lifetimes, neutral meson mixing parameters, $CP$ violation parameters, parameters of semileptonic decays and CKM matrix elements.

  12. Multiple Representations of Buoyancy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliviera, Jessica; Weglarz, Meredith; Vesenka, James

    2009-10-01

    For many students the concept of buoyancy falls under a category that can be loosely described as ``knowing it when they see it.'' Unfortunately some of the misconceptions this generates are that ``objects float because they are light'' and ``objects float because they are full of air'' [1]. Those these can some times be true, these descriptions are vague at best, and frequently can be wrong. Part of these misconceptions may stem from incomplete immersion of the object in the fluid and the vector nature of forces. We describe a demonstration/lab activity to help students make sense about relationship between the tension on and weight of an object immersed in water. The activity is in rich in multiple representations, graphical, diagrammatical as well as mathematical. A simple four question multiple choice pre/post test survey has been developed to evaluate the effectiveness of the lab activity.[4pt] [1] Bruce Harlan ``Diving Science'', www.stmatthewsschool.com/deep/pdfs/Diving%20Science.pdf

  13. Observation of Exclusive Electron-Positron Production in Hadron-Hadron Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Abulencia, A.; Adelman, J.; Affolder, T.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M.G.; Ambrose, D.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Anikeev, K.; Annovi, A.

    2006-11-01

    We present the first observation of exclusive e{sup +}e{sup -} production in hadron-hadron collisions, using p{bar p} collision data at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV taken by the Run II Collider Detector at Fermilab, and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 532 pb{sup -1}. We require the absence of any particle signatures in the detector except for an electron and a positron candidate, each with transverse energy E{sub T} > 5 GeV and pseudorapidity |{eta}| < 2. With these criteria, 16 events are observed compared to a background expectation of 1.9 {+-} 0.3 events. These events are consistent in cross section and properties with the QED process p{bar p} {yields} p + e{sup +}e{sup -} + {bar p} through two-photon exchange. The measured cross section is 1.6{sub -0.3}{sup +0.5}(stat) {+-} 0.3(syst) pb. This agrees with the theoretical prediction of 1.71 {+-} 0.01 pb.

  14. Issues and Opportunities in Exotic Hadrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briceño, R. A.; Cohen, T. D.; Coito, S.; Dudek, J. J.; Eichten, E.; Fischer, C. S.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Jackura, A.; Kornicer, M.; Krein, G.; Lebed, R. F.; Machado, F. A.; Mitchell, R. E.; Morningstar, C. J.; Peardon, M.; Pennington, M. R.; Peters, K.; Richard, J. M.; Shen, C. P.; Shepherd, M. R.; Skwarnicki, T.; Swanson, E. S.; Szczepaniak, A. P.; Yuan, C. Z.

    2016-04-01

    The last few years have been witness to a proliferation of new results concerning heavy exotic hadrons. Experimentally, many new signals have been discovered that could be pointing towards the existence of tetraquarks, pentaquarks, and other exotic configurations of quarks and gluons. Theoretically, advances in lattice field theory techniques place us at the cusp of understanding complex coupled-channel phenomena, modelling grows more sophisticated, and effective field theories are being applied to an ever greater range of situations. It is thus an opportune time to evaluate the status of the field. In the following, a series of high priority experimental and theoretical issues concerning heavy exotic hadrons is presented. Supported by U.S. Department of Energy (Cohen); the Institute of Modern Physics and Chinese Academy of Sciences under contract Y104160YQ0 and agreement No. 2015-BH-02 (Coito); the U.S. Department of Energy, for grant DE-AC05-06OR23177, under which Jefferson Science Associates, LLC, manages and operates Jefferson Laboratory and DE-SC0006765, Early Career award (Dudek); Fermilab, operated by the Fermi Research Alliance under contract number DEAC02-07CH11359 with the U.S. Department of Energy (Eichten); BMBF, under contract No. 06GI7121, and the DAAD under contract No. 56889822 and by the Helmholtz International Center for FAIR within the LOEWE program of the State of Hesse (Fischer); the German Research Foundation DFG under contract number Collaborative Research Centre CRC-1044 (Gradl); the Conselho Nacional de Desenvolvimento Científico e Tecnológico - CNPq, Grant No. 305894/2009-9 and Fundação de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de São Paulo - FAPESP, Grant No. 2013/01907-0 (Krein); U.S. National Science Foundation, under grants PHY-1068286 and PHY-1403891 (Lebed); the Brazilian National Council for Scientific and Technological Development under grant CNPq/CAPES-208188/2014-2 (Machado); U.S. Department of Energy under grant DE-FG02-05ER41374

  15. Bounds on hadronic axions from stellar evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raffelt, Georg G.; Dearborn, David S. P.

    1987-10-01

    We consider in detail the effect of the emission of ``hadronic'' invisible axions (which do not couple to electrons) from the interior of stars on stellar evolution. To this end we calculate plasma emission rates for axions due to the Primakoff process for the full range of conditions encountered in a giant star. Much attention is paid to plasma, degeneracy, and screening effects. We reconsider the solar bound by evolving a 1.0 Msolar star to solar age and lowering the presolar helium abundance so as to obtain the correct present-day luminosity of the Sun. The previous bound on the axion-photon coupling of G9<~2.5 (corresponding to ma<~17 eV R where R is a model-dependent factor of order unity) is confirmed, where G9 is the coupling constant G in units of 10-9 GeV-1. We then follow the evolution of a 1.3Msolar star from zero age to the top of the giant branch. Helium ignites for all values of G consistent with the solar bound; however, the core mass, surface temperature, and luminosity at the helium flash exceed the standard values. The luminosity at the helium flash is larger than about twice the standard value unless G9<~0.3 (corresponding to ma<~2 eV R), in conflict with observational data, which are statistically weak, however. We find our most stringent limits from the helium-burning lifetime. In the absence of axion cooling we calculate a lifetime of 1.2×108 yr which corresponds well with the value 1.5×108 yr derived from the number of red giants in the ``clump'' of the open cluster M67 and with the value 1.3×108 yr derived from the number of such stars in the old galactic disk population. We obtain a conservative limit of G9<0.3 which, at saturation, results in a helium-burning lifetime an order of magnitude low. We believe that G9<~0.1 (ma<~0.7 eV R) is a reasonably safe limit which, if saturated, leads to a calculated helium-burning lifetime a factor of 2 below the observed value. Our results exclude the recently suggested possibility of detecting

  16. Perspective on the Origin of Hadron Masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Craig D.

    2017-01-01

    The energy-momentum tensor in chiral QCD, T_{μ ν }, exhibits an anomaly, viz. \\varTheta _0 := T_{μ μ } ne 0. Measured in the proton, this anomaly yields m_p^2, where m_p is the proton's mass; but, at the same time, when computed in the pion, the answer is m_π ^2=0. Any attempt to understand the origin and nature of mass, and identify observable expressions thereof, must explain and unify these two apparently contradictory results, which are fundamental to the nature of our Universe. Given the importance of Poincaré-invariance in modern physics, the utility of a frame-dependent approach to this problem seems limited. That is especially true of any approach tied to a rest-frame decomposition of T_{μ ν } because a massless particle does not possess a rest-frame. On the other hand, the dynamical chiral symmetry breaking paradigm, connected with a Poincaré-covariant treatment of the continuum bound-state problem, provides a straightforward, simultaneous explanation of both these identities, and also a diverse array of predictions, testable at existing and proposed facilities. From this perspective, < π | \\varTheta _0 |π rangle =0 owing to exact, symmetry-driven cancellations which occur between one-body dressing effects and two-body-irreducible binding interactions in any well-defined computation of the forward scattering amplitude that defines this expectation value in the pseudoscalar meson. The cancellation is incomplete in any other hadronic bound state, with a remainder whose scale is set by the size of one-body dressing effects.

  17. Attitude Representations for Kalman Filtering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markley, F. Landis; Bauer, Frank H. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The four-component quaternion has the lowest dimensionality possible for a globally nonsingular attitude representation, it represents the attitude matrix as a homogeneous quadratic function, and its dynamic propagation equation is bilinear in the quaternion and the angular velocity. The quaternion is required to obey a unit norm constraint, though, so Kalman filters often employ a quaternion for the global attitude estimate and a three-component representation for small errors about the estimate. We consider these mixed attitude representations for both a first-order Extended Kalman filter and a second-order filter, as well for quaternion-norm-preserving attitude propagation.

  18. Representations of mechanical assembly sequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Homem De Mello, Luiz S.; Sanderson, Arthur C.

    1991-01-01

    Five types of representations for assembly sequences are reviewed: the directed graph of feasible assembly sequences, the AND/OR graph of feasible assembly sequences, the set of establishment conditions, and two types of sets of precedence relationships. (precedence relationships between the establishment of one connection between parts and the establishment of another connection, and precedence relationships between the establishment of one connection and states of the assembly process). The mappings of one representation into the others are established. The correctness and completeness of these representations are established. The results presented are needed in the proof of correctness and completeness of algorithms for the generation of mechanical assembly sequences.

  19. Computer aided surface representation

    SciTech Connect

    Barnhill, R.E.

    1989-02-09

    The central research problem of this project is the effective representation and display of surfaces, interpolating to given information, in three or more dimensions. In a typical problem, we wish to create a surface from some discrete information. If this information is itself on another surface, the problem is to determine a surface defined on a surface,'' which is discussed below. Often, properties of an already constructed surface are desired: such geometry processing'' is described below. The Summary of Proposed Research from our original proposal describes the aims of this research project. This Summary and the Table of Contents from the original proposal are enclosed as an Appendix to this Progress Report. The broad sweep from constructive mathematics through algorithms and computer graphics displays is utilized in the research. The wide range of activity, directed in both theory and applications, makes this project unique. Last month in the first Ardent Titan delivered in the State of Arizona came to our group, funded by the DOE and Arizona State University. Although the Titan is a commercial product, its newness requires our close collaboration with Ardent to maximize results. During the past year, four faculty members and several graduate research assistants have worked on this DOE project. The gaining of new professionals is an important aspect of this project. A listing of the students and their topics is given in the Appendix. The most significant publication during the past year is the book, Curves and Surfaces for Computer Aided Geometric Design, by Dr. Gerald Farin. This 300 page volume helps fill a considerable gap in the subject and includes many new results on Bernstein-Bezier curves and surfaces.

  20. Computer representation of molecular surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Max, N.L.

    1981-07-06

    This review article surveys recent work on computer representation of molecular surfaces. Several different algorithms are discussed for producing vector or raster drawings of space-filling models formed as the union of spheres. Other smoother surfaces are also considered.

  1. Vietnamese Document Representation and Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Giang-Son; Gao, Xiaoying; Andreae, Peter

    Vietnamese is very different from English and little research has been done on Vietnamese document classification, or indeed, on any kind of Vietnamese language processing, and only a few small corpora are available for research. We created a large Vietnamese text corpus with about 18000 documents, and manually classified them based on different criteria such as topics and styles, giving several classification tasks of different difficulty levels. This paper introduces a new syllable-based document representation at the morphological level of the language for efficient classification. We tested the representation on our corpus with different classification tasks using six classification algorithms and two feature selection techniques. Our experiments show that the new representation is effective for Vietnamese categorization, and suggest that best performance can be achieved using syllable-pair document representation, an SVM with a polynomial kernel as the learning algorithm, and using Information gain and an external dictionary for feature selection.

  2. Graphical Representation of Complex Functions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Renka, Robert J.

    1988-01-01

    Describes methods and software for graphing representation of a complex function of a complex variable. Includes an application of a graphical interpretation of the complex zeros of the cubic and their properties. (PK)

  3. Light-Front Holography and Hadronization at the Amplitude Level

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; de Teramond, Guy; Shrock, Robert

    2008-07-25

    The correspondence between theories in anti-de Sitter space and conformal field theories in physical space-time leads to an analytic, semiclassical model for strongly-coupled QCD which has scale invariance at short distances and color confinement at large distances. Light-front holography is a remarkable feature of AdS/CFT: it allows hadronic amplitudes in the AdS fifth dimension to be mapped to frame-independent light-front wavefunctions of hadrons in physical space-time, thus providing a relativistic description of hadrons at the amplitude level. Some novel features of QCD are discussed, including the consequences of confinement for quark and gluon condensates and the behavior of the QCD coupling in the infrared. We suggest that the spatial support of QCD condensates is restricted to the interior of hadrons, since they arise due to the interactions of confined quarks and gluons. Chiral symmetry is thus broken in a limited domain of size 1=m{sub {pi}} in analogy to the limited physical extent of superconductor phases. A new method for computing the hadronization of quark and gluon jets at the amplitude level, an event amplitude generator, is outlined.

  4. Light-Front Holography and Hadronization at the Amplitude Level

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; Teramond, Guy F. de; Shrock, Robert

    2008-10-13

    The correspondence between theories in anti-de Sitter space and conformal field theories in physical space-time leads to an analytic, semiclassical model for strongly-coupled QCD which has scale invariance at short distances and color confinement at large distances. Light-front holography is a remarkable feature of AdS/CFT: it allows hadronic amplitudes in the AdS fifth dimension to be mapped to frame-independent light-front wavefunctions of hadrons in physical space-time, thus providing a relativistic description of hadrons at the amplitude level. Some novel features of QCD are discussed, including the consequences of confinement for quark and gluon condensates and the behavior of the QCD coupling in the infrared. We suggest that the spatial support of QCD condensates is restricted to the interior of hadrons, since they arise due to the interactions of confined quarks and gluons. Chiral symmetry is thus broken in a limited domain of size 1/m{sub {pi}}, in analogy to the limited physical extent of superconductor phases. A new method for computing the hadronization of quark and gluon jets at the amplitude level, an event amplitude generator, is outlined.

  5. Multiplicity dependence of transverse momentum in hadronic collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saint Amand, J.; Uritam, R. A.

    1976-01-01

    The process of secondary-particle emission in hadron-hadron collisions is analytically studied using a simple model of hadron structure. The model neglects the 'size' of the hadron constituents, considering a hadron as a continuous distribution of matter according to a step function of radius R. A version of the eikonal approximation is applied to derive the relative probability for interaction and emission of secondaries when the impact parameter b is smaller than 2R. On the basis of these assumptions, and using the uncertainty relation, an empirical parameterization is obtained for the dependence of the transverse momentum of charged secondaries on their multiplicity in the case of high-energy proton-proton collisions. Comparison with experimental data at 28 GeV/c yields agreement to within about 3%. The analysis shows that at a fixed beam momentum, the transverse momentum decreases with increasing multiplicity, and that for a given multiplicity, the transverse momentum exhibits a slow increase with beam momentum.

  6. Progress in knowledge representation research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lum, Henry

    1985-01-01

    Brief descriptions are given of research being carried out in the field of knowledge representation. Dynamic simulation and modelling of planning systems with real-time sensor inputs; development of domain-independent knowledge representation tools which can be used in the development of application-specific expert and planning systems; and development of a space-borne very high speed integrated circuit processor are among the projects discussed.

  7. Light-front holography and superconformal quantum mechanics: A new approach to hadron structure and color confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; Deur, Alexandre; de Téramond, Guy F.; Dosch, Hans Günter

    2015-11-01

    A primary question in hadron physics is how the mass scale for hadrons consisting of light quarks, such as the proton, emerges from the QCD Lagrangian even in the limit of zero quark mass. If one requires the effective action which underlies the QCD Lagrangian to remain conformally invariant and extends the formalism of de Alfaro, Fubini and Furlan to light-front Hamiltonian theory, then a unique, color-confining potential with a mass parameter κ emerges. The actual value of the parameter κ is not set by the model - only ratios of hadron masses and other hadronic mass scales are predicted. The result is a nonperturbative, relativistic light-front quantum mechanical wave equation, the Light-Front Schrödinger Equation which incorporates color confinement and other essential spectroscopic and dynamical features of hadron physics, including a massless pion for zero quark mass and linear Regge trajectories with the identical slope in the radial quantum number n and orbital angular momentum L. The same light-front equations for mesons with spin J also can be derived from the holographic mapping to QCD (3+1) at fixed light-front time from the soft-wall model modification of AdS5 space with a specific dilaton profile. Light-front holography thus provides a precise relation between the bound-state amplitudes in the fifth dimension of AdS space and the boost-invariant light-front wavefunctions describing the internal structure of hadrons in physical space-time. One can also extend the analysis to baryons using superconformal algebra - 2 × 2 supersymmetric representations of the conformal group. The resulting fermionic LF bound-state equations predict striking similarities between the meson and baryon spectra. In fact, the holographic QCD light-front Hamiltonians for the states on the meson and baryon trajectories are identical if one shifts the internal angular momenta of the meson (LM) and baryon (LB) by one unit: LM = LB + 1. We also show how the mass scale κ

  8. Lattice QCD Calculation of Hadronic Light-by-Light Scattering.

    PubMed

    Green, Jeremy; Gryniuk, Oleksii; von Hippel, Georg; Meyer, Harvey B; Pascalutsa, Vladimir

    2015-11-27

    We perform a lattice QCD calculation of the hadronic light-by-light scattering amplitude in a broad kinematical range. At forward kinematics, the results are compared to a phenomenological analysis based on dispersive sum rules for light-by-light scattering. The size of the pion pole contribution is investigated for momenta of typical hadronic size. The presented numerical methods can be used to compute the hadronic light-by-light contribution to the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon. Our calculations are carried out in two-flavor QCD with the pion mass in the range of 270-450 MeV and contain so far only the diagrams with fully connected quark lines.

  9. Hadronic light-by-light scattering in muonium hyperfine splitting

    SciTech Connect

    Karshenboim, S. G.; Shelyuto, V. A.; Vainshtein, A. I.

    2008-09-15

    We consider an impact of hadronic light-by-light scattering on the muonium hyperfine structure. A shift of the hyperfine interval {delta}{nu}(Mu){sub HLBL} is calculated with the light-by-light scattering approximated by the exchange of pseudoscalar and pseudovector mesons. Constraints from the operator product expansion in QCD are used to fix parameters of the model similar to the one used earlier for the hadronic light-by-light scattering in calculations of the muon anomalous magnetic moment. The pseudovector exchange is dominant in the resulting shift, {delta}{nu}(Mu){sub HLBL}=-0.0065(10) Hz. Although the effect is tiny it is useful in understanding the level of hadronic uncertainties.

  10. NEUTRON-ENHANCED CALORIMETRY FOR HADRONS (NECH): FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Andrew Stroud, Lee Sawyer

    2012-08-31

    We present the results of a project to apply scintillator technology recently developed at Louisiana Tech University to hadronic calorimetry. In particular, we developed a prototype calorimeter module incorporating scintillator embedded with metal oxide nanoparticles as the active layers. These metal oxide nanoparticles of gadolinium oxide, have high cross-sections for interactions with slow neutrons. As a part fo this research project, we have developed a novel method for producing plastic scintillators with metal oxide nanoparticles evenly distributed through the plastic without aggregation.We will test the performance of the calorimeter module in test beam and with a neutron source, in order to measure the response to the neutron component of hadronic showers. We will supplement our detector prototyping activities with detailed studies of the effect of neutron component on the resolution of hadronic energy measurements, particular in the next generation of particle flow calorimeters.

  11. The gluon condensation at high energy hadron collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Wei; Lan, Jiangshan

    2017-03-01

    We report that the saturation/CGC model of gluon distribution is unstable under action of the chaotic solution in a nonlinear QCD evolution equation, and it evolves to the distribution with a sharp peak at the critical momentum. We find that this gluon condensation is caused by a new kind of shadowing-antishadowing effects, and it leads to a series of unexpected effects in high energy hadron collisions including astrophysical events. For example, the extremely intense fluctuations in the transverse-momentum and rapidity distributions of the gluon jets present the gluon-jet bursts; a sudden increase of the proton-proton cross sections may fill the GZK suppression; the blocking QCD evolution will restrict the maximum available energy of the hadron-hadron colliders.

  12. CMS Hadron Endcap Calorimeter Upgrade Studies for Super-LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilki, Burak; CMS HCAL Collaboration

    2011-04-01

    When the Large Hadron Collider approaches Super-LHC conditions above a luminosity of 1034cm-2s-1, the scintillator tiles of the CMS Hadron Endcap calorimeters will lose their efficiencies. As a radiation hard solution, the scintillator tiles are planned to be replaced by quartz plates. In order to improve the efficiency of the photodetection, various methods were investigated including radiation hard wavelength shifters, p-terphenyl or 4% gallium doped zinc oxide. We constructed a 20 layer calorimeter prototype with pTp coated plates of size 20 cm × 20 cm, and tested the hadronic and the electromagnetic capabilities at the CERN H2 beam-line. The beam tests revealed a substantial light collection increase with pTp or ZnO:Ga deposited quartz plates. Here we report on the current R&D for a viable endcap calorimeter solution for CMS with beam tests and radiation damage studies.

  13. Updated measurements of hadronic B decays at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Morello, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    The CDF experiment at the Tevatron p{bar p} collider established that extensive and detailed exploration of the b-quark dynamics is possible in hadron collisions, with results competitive and supplementary to those from e{sup +}e{sup -} colliders. This provides a rich, and highly rewarding program that has currently reached full maturity. In the following I report some recent results on hadronic decays: the evidence for the charmless annihilation decay mode B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, and the first reconstruction in hadron collisions of the suppressed decays B{sup -} {yields} D({yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup 0})K{sup -} and B{sup -} {yields} D({yields} K{sup +} {pi}{sup -}){pi}{sup -}.

  14. Masses of constituent quarks confined in open bottom hadrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borka Jovanović, V.; Borka, D.; Jovanović, P.; Milošević, J.; Ignjatović, S. R.

    2014-12-01

    We apply color-spin and flavor-spin quark-quark interactions to the meson and baryon constituent quarks, and calculate constituent quark masses, as well as the coupling constants of these interactions. The main goal of this paper was to determine constituent quark masses from light and open bottom hadron masses, using the fitting method we have developed and clustering of hadron groups. We use color-spin Fermi-Breit (FB) and flavor-spin Glozman-Riska (GR) hyperfine interaction (HFI) to determine constituent quark masses (especially b quark mass). Another aim was to discern between the FB and GR HFI because our previous findings had indicated that both interactions were satisfactory. Our improved fitting procedure of constituent quark masses showed that on average color-spin (FB) HFI yields better fits. The method also shows the way how the constituent quark masses and the strength of the interaction constants appear in different hadron environments.

  15. Hadronic resonance production measured by the ALICE experiment at LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Malaev, Mikhail

    2016-01-22

    Hadronic resonances are among the most interesting probes of the hot and dense matter created in Pb-Pb collisions. Due to their short lifetime, they are sensitive to the anticipated chiral symmetry restoration as well as to suppression and regeneration due to hadronic interactions in the final state. At intermediate and high transverse momenta the hadron resonances, which cover the range of masses between the light pions and heavier protons, contribute to the systematic study of the baryon anomaly and parton energy loss in the dense medium. Measurements in pp collisions are used as a reference for collision of heavier systems and contribute to precision tests of pQCD and of the currently available parameterizations of fragmentation functions. Studies in p-Pb collisions are important for the interpretation of heavy ion results as they allow the decoupling of the initial nuclear effects from hot matter final state effects.

  16. The Hadronic Spectrum of a Holographic Dual of QCD

    SciTech Connect

    de T'eramond, G.

    2005-01-04

    We compute the spectrum of light hadrons in a holographic dual of QCD defined on AdS{sub 5} x S{sup 5} which has conformal behavior at short distances and confinement at large interquark separation. Specific hadrons are identified by the correspondence of string modes with the dimension of the interpolating operator of the hadron's valence Fock state. Higher orbital excitations are matched quanta to quanta with fluctuations about the AdS background. Since only one parameter, the QCD scale {Lambda}{sub QCD}, is used, the agreement with the pattern of physical states is remarkable. In particular, the ratio of Delta to nucleon trajectories is determined by the ratio of zeroes of Bessel functions.

  17. Hadronic Spectrum of a Holographic Dual of QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Teramond, Guy F. de; Brodsky, Stanley J.

    2005-05-27

    We compute the spectrum of light hadrons in a holographic dual of QCD defined on AdS{sub 5}xS{sup 5} which has conformal behavior at short distances and confinement at large interquark separation. Specific hadrons are identified by the correspondence of string modes with the dimension of the interpolating operator of the hadron's valence Fock state. Higher orbital excitations are matched quanta to quanta with fluctuations about the AdS background. Since only one parameter, the QCD scale {lambda}{sub QCD}, is used, the agreement with the pattern of physical states is remarkable. In particular, the ratio of delta to nucleon trajectories is determined by the ratio of zeros of Bessel functions.

  18. Hadron Spectroscopy, exotics and BC + physics at LHCb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Biplab

    2016-11-01

    The LHCb experiment is designed to study properties and decays of heavy flavored hadrons produced from pp collisions at the LHC. During Run 1, it has recorded the world's largest data sample of beauty and charm hadrons, enabling precision spectroscopy studies of such particles. Several important results obtained by LHCb, such as the discovery of the first pentaquark states and the first unambiguous determination of the Zc (4430) - as an exotic state, have dramatically increased the interest in spectroscopy of heavy hadrons. An overview of the latest LHCb results on the subject, including the discovery of four strange exotic states decaying as X → J/ψϕ, is presented. LHCb has also made significant contributions to the field of BC + physics, the lowest bound state of the heavy flavor ̅b and c quarks. A synopsis of the latest results is given.

  19. Hot Neutron Stars with Hadron-Quark Crossover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuda, Kota; Hatsuda, Tetsuo; Takatsuka, Tatsuyuki

    2016-12-01

    The effects of the hadron-quark crossover on the bulk properties of cold and hot neutron stars (NSs) are studied. We suggested a new phenomenological equation of state (EOS), which interpolates the two phases at around 3 times the nuclear matter density (ρ0), and found that the cold NSs with the gravitational mass larger than 2M⊙ can be sustained. This is in sharp contrast to the case of the first-order hadron-quark transition where the quark matter inevitably leads to soft EOS. The interpolated EOS is also generalized to the supernova matter at finite temperature to describe the hot NSs at birth. The hadron-quark crossover is found to decrease the central temperature of the hot NSs under isentropic condition due to the color degrees of freedom.

  20. Finite-size effect in lattice QCD hadron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Fukugita, M.; Mino, H.; Okawa, M.; Ukawa, A. Faculty of Engineering, Yamanashi University, Kofu 400 National Laboratory for High Energy Physics , Ibaraki 305 Institute of Physics, University of Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305 )

    1992-02-10

    A hadron spectrum calculation with two light dynamical quark flavors was carried out with the Kogut-Susskind quark action at {beta}=5.7 on lattices of spatial size 8{sup 3}, 12{sup 3}, and 20{sup 3} for {ital m}{sub {ital q}}=0.01 and 0.02 in lattice units, with emphasis given to a systematic study of the finite-lattice-size effect. It is found that hadron masses on a 16{sup 3} spatial lattice at this {beta} still suffer from a significant finite-lattice effect at least for {ital m}{sub {ital q}}=0.01, showing the importance of a quantitative control over the finite-size effect in comparing simulation results with the experimental hadron masses even for a fairly large lattice. A comparison is also made to the analytic prediction for the finite-size effect from chiral perturbation theory.

  1. PREFACE: 3rd International Conference on Hadron Physics (TROIA'11)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erkol, Güray; Küçükarslan, Ayşe; Özpineci, Altuğ

    2012-03-01

    The 3rd International Conference on Hadron Physics, TROIA'11 was held at Canakkale, Turkey on 22-25 August 2011. Ozyegin University, Middle East Technical University, Canakkale Onsekiz Mart University and HadronPhysics2 Consortium sponsored the conference. Its aim was to bring together the experts and young scientists working on experimental and theoretical hadron physics. About 60 participants from 12 countries attended the conference. The topics covered included: Chiral Perturbation Theory QCD Sum Rules Effective Field Theory Exotic Hadrons Hadron Properties from Lattice QCD Experimental Results and Future Perspectives Hadronic Distribution Amplitudes The conference presentations were organized such that the morning sessions contained invited talks and the afternoon sessions were devoted to contributed talks and poster presentations. The speakers of the invited talks were: D Melikhov, M Nielsen, M Oka, E Oset, S Scherer, T T Takahashi and R Wanke. The conference venue was a resort hotel near Canakkale. As a social program, a guided full-day excursion to the excavation site of the ancient town of Troia and Assos was organized. We believe that this conference provided a medium for young scientists and experts in the field to effectively communicate and share ideas. We would like to express our sincere thanks to all participants for their contributions and stimulating discussions. We are also grateful to the Scientific Secretary, Kadir Utku Can, and all other members of the Organizing Committee for their patience and efforts. 13 February 2012 The Editors Güray Erkol Ayşe Küçükarslan Altuğ Özpineci Conference photograph

  2. Hyperon puzzle, hadron-quark crossover and massive neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuda, Kota; Hatsuda, Tetsuo; Takatsuka, Tatsuyuki

    2016-03-01

    Bulk properties of cold and hot neutron stars are studied on the basis of the hadron-quark crossover picture where a smooth transition from the hadronic phase to the quark phase takes place at finite baryon density. By using a phenomenological equation of state (EOS) "CRover", which interpolates the two phases at around 3 times the nuclear matter density (ρ0, it is found that the cold NSs with the gravitational mass larger than 2M_{odot} can be sustained. This is in sharp contrast to the case of the first-order hadron-quark transition. The radii of the cold NSs with the CRover EOS are in the narrow range (12.5 ± 0.5) km which is insensitive to the NS masses. Due to the stiffening of the EOS induced by the hadron-quark crossover, the central density of the NSs is at most 4 ρ0 and the hyperon-mixing barely occurs inside the NS core. This constitutes a solution of the long-standing hyperon puzzle. The effect of color superconductivity (CSC) on the NS structures is also examined with the hadron-quark crossover. For the typical strength of the diquark attraction, a slight softening of the EOS due to two-flavor CSC (2SC) takes place and the maximum mass is reduced by about 0.2M_{odot}. The CRover EOS is generalized to the supernova matter at finite temperature to describe the hot NSs at birth. The hadron-quark crossover is found to decrease the central temperature of the hot NSs under isentropic condition. The gravitational energy release and the spin-up rate during the contraction from the hot NS to the cold NS are also estimated.

  3. PREFACE: 4th International Hadron Physics Conference (TROIA'14)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dağ, Hüseyin; Erkol, Güray; Küçükarslan, Ayşe; Özpineci, Altuğ

    2014-11-01

    The 4th International Conference on Hadron Physics, TROIA'14, was held at Canakkale, Turkey on 1-5 July 2014. Ozyegin University, Middle East Technical University, Canakkale Onsekiz Mart University, Turkish Atomic Energy Authority and HadronPhysics2 Consortium sponsored the conference. It aimed at bringing together the experts and the young scientists working on experimental and theoretical hadron physics. About 50 participants from 10 countries attended the conference. The topics covered included: . Chiral Perturbation Theory . QCD Sum Rules . Effective Field Theory . Exotic Hadrons . Hadron Properties from Lattice QCD . Experimental Results and Future Perspectives . Hadronic Distribution Amplitudes The conference presentations were organized such that the morning sessions contained invited talks and afternoon sessions were devoted to contributed talks. The speakers of the invited talks were: C. Alexandrou, A. Gal, L. Tolos, J.R. Pelaez and M. Schindler. We had also guest speakers D. A. Demir and T. Senger. The conference venue was a resort hotel around Canakkale. As a social program, a guided full-day excursion to the excavation site of the ancient Troia town and Assos was organized. We believe that this conference provided a medium for young scientists and experts in the field to effectively communicate and share ideas. We would like to express our sincere thanks to supporting agencies and to all participants for their contributions and stimulating discussions. We are also grateful to the Scientific Secretary, Bora Işıldak, and all other members of the Organizing Committee for their patience and efforts. 30.10.2014 The Editors

  4. Puzzles in quarkonium hadronic transitions with two pion emission

    SciTech Connect

    Fernández, F.; Segovia, J.; Entem, D. R.; Ortega, P. G.

    2016-01-22

    The anomalously large rates of some hadronic transitions from quarkonium are studied using QCD multipole expansion (QCDME) in the framework of a constituent quark model which has been successful in describing hadronic phenomenology. The hybrid intermediate states needed in the QCDME method are calculated in a natural extension of our constituent quark model based on the Quark Confining String (QCS) scheme. Some of the anomalies are explained due to the presence of an hybrid state with a mass near the mass of the decaying resonance whereas other are justified by the presence of molecular components in the wave function. Some unexpected results are pointed out.

  5. Hadronic nuclear energy: An approach towards green energy

    SciTech Connect

    Das Sarma, Indrani B.

    2015-03-10

    Nuclear energy is undoubtedly the largest energy source capable of meeting the total energy requirements to a large extent in long terms. However the conventional nuclear energy involves production of high level of radioactive wastes which possesses threat, both to the environment and mankind. The modern day demand of clean, cheap and abundant energy gets fulfilled by the novel fuels that have been developed through hadronic mechanics/chemistry. In the present paper, a short review of Hadronic nuclear energy by intermediate controlled nuclear synthesis and particle type like stimulated neutron decay and double beta decay has been presented.

  6. Exotic hadron production in a quark combination model

    SciTech Connect

    Han Wei; Shao Fenglan; Li Shiyuan; Shang Yonghui; Yao Tao

    2009-09-15

    The philosophy on production of exotic hadrons (multiquark states) in the framework of the quark combination model is investigated, taking f{sub 0}(980) as an example. The production rate and p{sub T} spectra of f{sub 0}(980) considered as (ss) or (sqsq), respectively, are calculated and compared in Au+Au collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN})=200 GeV. The unitarity of various combination models, when open for exotic hadron production, is addressed.

  7. Status of Theory and Experiment in Hadronic Parity Violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snow, W. M.; Ahmed, M. W.; Bowman, J. D.; Crawford, C.; Fomin, N.; Gao, H.; Gericke, M. T.; Gudkov, V.; Holstein, B. R.; Howell, C. R.; Huffman, P.; van Oers, W. T. H.; Penttilä, S.; Wu, Y. K.

    2016-02-01

    Hadronic parity violation uses quark-quark weak interactions to probe nonperturbative strong interaction dynamics through two nonperturbative QCD scales: ΛQCD and the fine-tuned MeV scales of NN bound states in low energy nuclear physics. The current and projected availability of high-intensity neutron and photon sources coupled with ongoing experiments and continuing developments in theoretical methods provide the opportunity to greatly expand our understanding of hadronic parity violation in few-nucleon systems. The current status of these efforts and future plans are discussed.

  8. Phase 1 upgrade of the CMS forward hadronic calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noonan, D.

    2017-02-01

    The CMS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN is upgrading the photo-detection and readout system of the forward hadronic calorimeter. The phase 1 upgrade of the CMS forward calorimeter requires the replacement of the current photomultiplier tubes, as well as the installation of a new front-end readout system. The new photomultiplier tubes contain a thinner window as well as multi-anode readout. The front-end electronics will use the QIE10 ASIC which combines signal digitization with timing information. The major components of the upgrade as well as the current status are described in this paper.

  9. Hadron Formation in DIS in a nuclear environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muccifora, Valeria

    2002-10-01

    The influence of the nuclear medium on the production of charged hadrons in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering has been studied by the HERMES experiment at DESY using 27.5 GeV positrons. A substantial reduction of the multiplicity of charged hadrons and identified charged pions from nuclei relative to that from deuterium has been measured as function of the relevant kinematic variables. The preliminary results on krypton show a larger reduction of the multiplicity ratio RMh with respect to the one previously measured on nitrogen and suggest a possible modification of the quark fragmentation process in the nuclear environment.

  10. Two-photon physics as a probe of hadron dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, S.J.

    1981-05-01

    Two-photon collisions provide an ideal laboratory for testing many features of quantum chromodynamics, especially the interplay between the vector-meson-dominated and point-like hadronic interactions of the photon. A number of QCD applications are discussed, including: jet and single-particle production at large transverse momentum; the photon structure function and its relationship to the ..gamma.. ..-->.. q anti q wave function; and the possible role of gluonium states in the ..gamma gamma.. ..-->.. rho/sup 0/rho/sup 0/ channel. Evidence that even low momentum transfer photon-hadron interactions are sensitive to the point-like ..gamma.. ..-->.. q anti q coupling is discussed.

  11. Progress in Hadronic Physics Modelling in Geant4

    SciTech Connect

    Apostolakis, John; Folger, Gunter; Grichine, Vladimir; Heikkinen, Aatos; Howard, Alexander; Ivanchenko, Vladimir; Kaitaniemi, Pekka; Koi, Tatsumi; Kosov, Mikhail; Quesada, Jose Manuel; Ribon, Alberto; Uzhinsky, Vladimir; Wright, Dennis; /SLAC

    2011-11-28

    Geant4 offers a set of models to simulate hadronic showers in calorimeters. Recent improvements to several models relevant to the modelling of hadronic showers are discussed. These include improved cross sections, a revision of the FTF model, the addition of quasi-elastic scattering to the QGS model, and enhancements in the nuclear precompound and de-excitation models. The validation of physics models against thin target experiments has been extended especially in the energy region 10 GeV and below. Examples of new validation results are shown.

  12. Development of Hadron Therapy for Cancer Treatment in Europe

    SciTech Connect

    Dosanjh, Manjit

    2008-08-11

    The European Network for LIGht ion Hadron Therapy aims at a coordinated effort towards ion beam research in Europe. ENLIGHT network is formed by the European Hadron Therapy Community which consists of more than 150 researchers and specialists, belonging to more than fifty European Universities and research Institutes from sixteen European countries. ENLIGHT has demonstrated the advantages of regular and organised exchanges of data, information, best practices as well as information on treatment procedures, protocols and strategies. A major success of ENLIGHT has been the creation of a multidisciplinary platform, uniting traditionally separate communities so that clinicians, physicists, biologists and engineers with experience and interest in particle therapy work together.

  13. Production of Electroweak Bosons at Hadron Colliders: Theoretical Aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangano, Michelangelo L.

    2016-10-01

    Since the W± and Z0 discovery, hadron colliders have provided a fertile ground, in which continuously improving measurements and theoretical predictions allow to precisely determine the gauge boson properties, and to probe the dynamics of electroweak and strong interactions. This article will review, from a theoretical perspective, the role played by the study, at hadron colliders, of electroweak boson production properties, from the better understanding of the proton structure, to the discovery and studies of the top quark and of the Higgs, to the searches for new phenomena beyond the Standard Model.

  14. Spectroscopy and Decay of $B$ Hadrons at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Paulini, Manfred

    2007-02-01

    The authors review recent results on heavy quark physics focusing on Run II measurements of B hadron spectroscopy and decay at the Tevatron. A wealth of new B physics measurements from CDF and D0 has been available. These include the spectroscopy of excited B states (B**, B**{sub s}) and the observation of the {Sigma}{sub b} baryon. The discussion of the decays of B hadrons and measurements of branching fractions focuses on charmless two-body decays of B {yields} h{sup +}h{sup -}. They report several new B{sub s}{sup 0} and {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} decay channels.

  15. Energy Deposition and Radiological Studies for the LBNF Hadron Absorber

    SciTech Connect

    Rakhno, I. L.; Mokhov, N. V.; Tropin, I. S.; Eidelman, Y. I.

    2015-06-25

    Results of detailed Monte Carlo energy deposition and radiological studies performed for the LBNF hadron absorber with the MARS15 code are described. The model of the entire facility, that includes a pion-production target, focusing horns, target chase, decay channel, hadron absorber system – all with corresponding radiation shielding – was developed using the recently implemented ROOT-based geometry option in the MARS15 code. Both normal operation and accidental conditions were studied. Results of detailed thermal calculations with the ANSYS code helped to select the most viable design options.

  16. Causality constraints on hadron production in high energy collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castorina, Paolo; Satz, Helmut

    2014-04-01

    For hadron production in high energy collisions, causality requirements lead to the counterpart of the cosmological horizon problem: the production occurs in a number of causally disconnected regions of finite space-time size. As a result, globally conserved quantum numbers (charge, strangeness, baryon number) must be conserved locally in spatially restricted correlation clusters. This provides a theoretical basis for the observed suppression of strangeness production in elementary interactions (pp, e+e-). In contrast, the space-time superposition of many collisions in heavy ion interactions largely removes these causality constraints, resulting in an ideal hadronic resonance gas in full equilibrium.

  17. Spectral functions and in-medium properties of hadrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripolt, R.-A.; von Smekal, L.; Wambach, J.

    The in-medium modifications of hadron properties such as masses and decay widths have been a major focus of the scientific work of Gerry Brown and the insights gained by him and his collaborators made them major drivers of this field for several decades. Their prediction of experimental signals in di-lepton pair production in relativistic heavy-ion collisions was instrumental in initiating large experimental campaigns which continue till today. In this chapter, we review recent results which elucidate the relation of hadronic spectral properties at finite temperature and density to the restoration of spontaneously broken chiral symmetry.

  18. Data Representations for Geographic Information Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaffer, Clifford A.

    1992-01-01

    Surveys the field and literature of geographic information systems (GIS) and spatial data representation as it relates to GIS. Highlights include GIS terms, data types, and operations; vector representations and raster, or grid, representations; spatial indexing; elevation data representations; large spatial databases; and problem areas and future…

  19. Culture as shared cognitive representations.

    PubMed Central

    Romney, A K; Boyd, J P; Moore, C C; Batchelder, W H; Brazill, T J

    1996-01-01

    Culture consists of shared cognitive representations in the minds of individuals. This paper investigates the extent to which English speakers share the "same" semantic structure of English kinship terms. The semantic structure is defined as the arrangement of the terms relative to each other as represented in a metric space in which items judged more similar are placed closer to each other than items judged as less similar. The cognitive representation of the semantic structure, residing in the mind of an individual, is measured by judged similarity tasks involving comparisons among terms. Using six independent measurements, from each of 122 individuals, correspondence analysis represents the data in a common multidimensional spatial representation. Judged by a variety of statistical procedures, the individuals in our sample share virtually identical cognitive representations of the semantic structure of kinship terms. This model of culture accounts for 70-90% of the total variability in these data. We argue that our findings on kinship should generalize to all semantic domains--e.g., animals, emotions, etc. The investigation of semantic domains is important because they may reside in localized functional units in the brain, because they relate to a variety of cognitive processes, and because they have the potential to provide methods for diagnosing individual breakdowns in the structure of cognitive representations typical of such ailments as Alzheimer disease. PMID:11607678

  20. Final state interactions in hadronic B decays

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, H.-Y.; Chua, C.-K.; Soni, Amarjit

    2005-01-01

    There exist many experimental indications that final-state interactions (FSIs) may play a prominent role not only in charmful B decays but also in charmless B ones. We examine the final-state rescattering effects on the hadronic B decay rates and their impact on direct CP violation. The color-suppressed neutral modes such as B{sup 0}{yields}D{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0},{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0},{rho}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0},K{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0} can be substantially enhanced by long-distance rescattering effects. The direct CP-violating partial rate asymmetries in charmless B decays to {pi}{pi}/{pi}K and {rho}{pi} are significantly affected by final-state rescattering, and their signs are generally different from that predicted by the short-distance (SD) approach. For example, direct CP asymmetry in B{sup 0}{yields}{rho}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0} is increased to around 60% due to final-state rescattering effects whereas the short-distance picture gives about 1%. Evidence of direct CP violation in the decay B{sup 0}{yields}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +} is now established, while the combined BABAR and Belle measurements of B{sup 0}{yields}{rho}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {+-}} imply a 3.6{sigma} direct CP asymmetry in the {rho}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} mode. Our predictions for CP violation agree with experiment in both magnitude and sign, whereas the QCD factorization predictions (especially for {rho}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}) seem to have some difficulty with the data. Direct CP violation in the decay B{sup -}{yields}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} is very small ((less-or-similar sign)1%) in the standard model even after the inclusion of FSIs. Its measurement will provide a nice way to search for new physics as in the standard model QCD penguins cannot contribute (except by isospin violation). Current data on {pi}K modes seem to violate the isospin sum-rule relation, suggesting the presence of electroweak penguin contributions. We have also investigated whether a large transverse polarization in B{yields}{phi}K* can arise from the

  1. Averages of B-Hadron, C-Hadron, and tau-lepton properties as of early 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Amhis, Y.; et al.

    2012-07-01

    This article reports world averages of measurements of b-hadron, c-hadron, and tau-lepton properties obtained by the Heavy Flavor Averaging Group (HFAG) using results available through the end of 2011. In some cases results available in the early part of 2012 are included. For the averaging, common input parameters used in the various analyses are adjusted (rescaled) to common values, and known correlations are taken into account. The averages include branching fractions, lifetimes, neutral meson mixing parameters, CP violation parameters, parameters of semileptonic decays and CKM matrix elements.

  2. Diffractive J/{Psi} photoproduction at large momentum transfer in coherent hadron-hadron interactions at CERN LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Sauter, W. K.; Goncalves, V. P.

    2010-11-12

    The vector meson production in coherent hadron-hadron interactions at LHC energies is addressed assuming that the color singlet t-channel exchange carries large momentum transfer. We consider the non-forward solution of the BFKL equation at high energy and large momentum transfer and estimate the rapidity distribution and total cross section for the process h{sub 1}h{sub 2{yields}}h{sub 1}J/{Psi}X, where h{sub i} can be a proton or a nucleus. We predict large rates, which implies that the experimental identification could be feasible at the LHC.

  3. Assessing value representation in animals.

    PubMed

    San-Galli, Aurore; Bouret, Sebastien

    2015-01-01

    Among all factors modulating our motivation to perform a given action, the ability to represent its outcome is clearly the most determining. Representation of outcomes, rewards in particular, and how they guide behavior, have sparked much research. Both practically and theoretically, understanding the relationship between the representation of outcome value and the organization of goal directed behavior implies that these two processes can be assessed independently. Most of animal studies essentially used instrumental actions as a proxy for the expected goal-value. The purpose of this article is to consider alternative measures of expected outcome value in animals, which are critical to understand the behavioral and neurobiological mechanisms relating the representation of the expected outcome to the organization of the behavior oriented towards its obtention. This would be critical in the field of decision making or social interactions, where the value of multiple items must often be compared and/or shared among individuals to determine the course of actions.

  4. Representational issues in machine learning

    SciTech Connect

    Liepins, G.E.; Hilliard, M.R.

    1986-10-25

    Classifier systems are numeric machine learning systems. They are machine counterparts to the natural genetic process and learn by reproduction, crossover, and mutation. Much publicity has been attended to their ability to demonstrate significant learning from a random start and without human intervention. Less well publicized is the considerable care that must be given to the choices of parameter settings and representation. Without the proper ''nurturing environment'' genetic algorithms are apt to learn very little. This infusion of human intelligence is often discounted, but the choice of appropriate representation forms the core of much of the current genetic algorithm research. This paper will address some of the representational issues from the perspective of two current experiments, one with scheduling and the other with a simulated robot. 10 refs., 7 figs.

  5. Nonequilibrium photons as a signature of quark-hadron phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Da-Shin; Ng, Kin-Wang

    1999-03-01

    We study the nonequilibrium photon production in the quark-hadron phase transition, using the Friedberg-Lee type solitons as a working model for quark-hadron physics. We propose that to search for nonequilibrium photons in the direct photon measurements of heavy-ion collisions may be a characteristic test of the transition from the quark-gluon to hadronic phases.

  6. Measurement of the Masses and Lifetimes of B Hadrons at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Catastini, Pierluigi; /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa

    2006-05-01

    The latest results for the B Hadron sector at the Tevatron Collider are summarized. The properties of B hadrons can be precisely measured at the Tevatron. In particularly they will focus on the masses and lifetimes. The new Tevatron results for the CP violation in B Hadrons are also discussed.

  7. Cross-modal influences on representational momentum and representational gravity.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, Timothy L; Courtney, Jon R

    2010-01-01

    Effects of cross-modal information on representational momentum and on representational gravity (ie on displacement of remembered location in the direction of target motion or in the direction of gravitational attraction, respectively) were examined. In experiment 1, ascending or descending visual motion (in the picture plane) was paired with ascending or descending auditory motion (in frequency space); motion was congruent (both ascending, both descending) or incongruent (one ascending, one descending). Memory for visual location or auditory pitch was probed. Congruence resulted in larger forward displacement for auditory pitch, but did not influence forward displacement for visual location. In experiment 2, horizontal visual motion was paired with ascending, descending, or no auditory motion. Memory for visual location was displaced downward with descending or no auditory motion, and downward displacement was larger for visual motion paired with descending auditory motion than for visual motion paired with ascending auditory motion. Effects of cross-modal information on displacement suggest representational momentum and representational gravity reflect high-level processing.

  8. The Statistics of Visual Representation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jobson, Daniel J.; Rahman, Zia-Ur; Woodell, Glenn A.

    2002-01-01

    The experience of retinex image processing has prompted us to reconsider fundamental aspects of imaging and image processing. Foremost is the idea that a good visual representation requires a non-linear transformation of the recorded (approximately linear) image data. Further, this transformation appears to converge on a specific distribution. Here we investigate the connection between numerical and visual phenomena. Specifically the questions explored are: (1) Is there a well-defined consistent statistical character associated with good visual representations? (2) Does there exist an ideal visual image? And (3) what are its statistical properties?

  9. Medieval theories of mental representation.

    PubMed

    Kemp, S

    1998-11-01

    Throughout most of the Middle ages, it was generally held that stored mental representations of perceived objects or events preserved the forms or species of such objects. This belief was consistent with a metaphor used by Plato. It was also consistent with the medieval belief that a number of cognitive processes took place in the ventricles of the brain and with the phenomenology of afterimages and imagination itself. In the 14th century, William of Ockham challenged this belief by claiming that mental representations are not stored but instead constructed in the basis of past learned experiences.

  10. J/psi and UPSILON radiative and hadronic decays

    SciTech Connect

    Bloom, E.D.

    1987-07-01

    The search for gluonium at the J/psi and UPSILON is discussed, as well as the search for exotics at the UPSILON. Reactions discussed include radiative and hadronic decays of the J/psi and the search for radiative decays of the UPSILON. Future perspectives are also briefly considered. 45 refs., 27 figs. (LEW)

  11. Hadronic decays of the eta/sub c/

    SciTech Connect

    Koenigsmann, K.

    1980-08-01

    Results on hadronic decays of the eta/sub c/ candidate state are presented. A mass value of M = (2978 +- 9) MeV is obtained. The branching fraction for the decay into eta ..pi../sup +/..pi../sup -/ is presented and an upper limit for the decay into ..pi../sup 0/K/sup +/K/sup -/ is given. 6 figures.

  12. Extraction of hadron interactions above inelastic threshold in lattice QCD.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Sinya; Ishii, Noriyoshi; Doi, Takumi; Hatsuda, Tetsuo; Ikeda, Yoichi; Inoue, Takashi; Murano, Keiko; Nemura, Hidekatsu; Sasaki, Kenji

    2011-01-01

    We propose a new method to extract hadron interactions above inelastic threshold from the Nambu-Bethe-Salpeter amplitude in lattice QCD. We consider the scattering such as A + B → C + D, where A, B, C, D are names of different 1-particle states. An extension to cases where particle productions occur during scatterings is also discussed.

  13. Influence of pions on the hadron-quark phase transition

    SciTech Connect

    Lourenco, O.; Dutra, M.; Frederico, T.; Malheiro, M.; Delfino, A.

    2013-05-06

    In this work we present the features of the hadron-quark phase transition diagrams in which the pions are included in the system. To construct such diagrams we use two different models in the description of the hadronic and quark sectors. At the quark level, we consider two distinct parametrizations of the Polyakov-Nambu-Jona-Lasinio (PNJL) models. In the hadronic side, we use a well known relativistic mean-field (RMF) nonlinear Walecka model. We show that the effect of the pions on the hadron-quark phase diagrams is to move the critical end point (CEP) of the transitions lines. Such an effect also depends on the value of the critical temperature (T{sub 0}) in the pure gauge sector used to parametrize the PNJL models. Here we treat the phase transitions using two values for T{sub 0}, namely, T{sub 0}= 270 MeV and T{sub 0}= 190 MeV. The last value is used to reproduce lattice QCD data for the transition temperature at zero chemical potential.

  14. Inclusive hadron production at 10 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldi, R.

    1989-12-01

    Recent results of the ARGUS collaboration on inclusive momentum and angular distributions of charged hadrons produced in direct Υ(1S) decays and nonresonant e+e- annihilation at 10 GeV are presented, which allow investigation of quark and gluon fragmentation. The data demonstrate some of the shortcomings of present fragmentation models.

  15. The large-scale organization of the hadron decay network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xinping; Liu, Feng

    2008-01-01

    The standard model of particle physics predicts a complex structure of decay modes for hadrons, which opens up an avenue for observing the internal forces governing the decay dynamics. In this paper, we present the decay modes of hadrons as a network in which the nodes are particles and directed links are pointing from the mother particles to daughter particles. Using the database of decay modes collected from the Particle Data Group, we try to unveil the topological structure and possible intrinsic nature of hadron decays in the light of recent investigations of complex networks. We study distributions of the numbers of daughter and mother particles, and explore scaling laws that may govern the underlying decay structure of the system. We find that it is a small-world network with symmetrical structure. We also study the influence of constraints arising from conservation laws on the network structure, and our analysis suggests that the constraints of conservations of momentum energy, charge, lepton number and baryon number play important roles in the topology of the decay network. Finally, we classify the hadrons into communities according to their quark component, and uncover the relationship between the particle roles and connection patterns in the communities.

  16. Hadron formation in a nuclear environment at HERMES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muccifora, V.; HERM. E. S. Collaboration

    The influence of the nuclear medium on the production of charged hadrons in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering has been studied by the HERMES experiment at DESY using 27.5 GeV positrons. A substantial reduction of the multiplicity of charged hadrons and identified charged pions from nuclei relative to that from deuterium has been measured as a function of the relevant kinematic variables. The preliminary results on krypton show a larger reduction of the multiplicity ratio R hM with respect to the one previously measured on nitrogen. Both the krypton and nitrogen data show that the multiplicity ratio is the same for positive and negative pions, while a significant difference is observed between R hM for positive and negative hadrons. This result can be interpreted in terms of a difference between the formation time of protons and pions. Alternatively, it has been suggested that the observed differences between positive and negative hadrons can be attributed to a different modification of the quark and antiquark fragmentation functions in nuclei.

  17. Average formation length of hadrons in a string model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoryan, L.

    2010-04-01

    The space-time scales of the hadronization process in the framework of the string model are investigated. It is shown that the average formation lengths of pseudoscalar mesons, produced in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering of leptons on different targets, depend on their electrical charges. In particular, the average formation lengths of positively charged hadrons are larger than those of negatively charged ones. This statement is fulfilled for all scaling functions used, for z (the fraction of the virtual photon energy transferred to the detected hadron) larger than 0.15, for all nuclear targets, and for any value of the Björken scaling variable xBj. In all cases, the main mechanism is direct production of pseudoscalar mesons. Including in consideration an additional mechanism of production resulting in decay of resonances leads to a decrease in average formation lengths. It is shown that the average formation lengths of positively (negatively) charged mesons are slowly increasing (decreasing) functions of xBj. The results obtained can be important, in particular, for understanding of the hadronization process in the nuclear environment.

  18. Hadronic Showers in a Highly Granular Imaging Calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, A.; The Calice Collaboration

    The CALICE collaboration develops highly granular calorimeter prototypes to evaluate technologies for experiments at a future lepton collider. The analogue hadronic calorimeter prototype consists of steel absorber plates interleaved with 38 active plastic scintillator layers which are sub-divided into small tiles. In total 7608 tiles are read out individually via embedded Silicon Photomultipliers. The prototype is one of the first large scale applications of these novel and very promising miniature photodetectors. Since 2006, the calorimeter has been operated in combined test beam setups at DESY, CERN and FNAL. The high-resolution 3D image data with analogue energy information are used to study properties and composition of hadronic showers at a new level of detail. This helps to constrain hadronic shower models through comparisons with model calculations. The spatial shower development and the substructure of the showers, compared to a variety of different Geant 4 shower models including decompositions into individual shower components are presented. Aspects of the energy reconstruction of hadronic showers, such as Particle Flow, are discussed.

  19. High-energy hadron physics at J-PARC

    SciTech Connect

    Kumano, S.

    2008-10-13

    The J-PARC facility is near completion and experiments will start in 2009 on nuclear and particle physics projects. In this article, the J-PARC facility is introduced, and possible projects are discussed in high-energy hadron physics by using the primary proton beam of 30-50 GeV. There are proposed experiments on charm-production and Drell-Yan processes as well as single spin asymmetries for investigating quark and gluon structure of the nucleon and nuclei. Parton-energy loss could be studied in the Drell-Yan processes. There is also a proposal on hadron-mass modifications in a nuclear medium by using the proton beam. In addition, possible topics include transition from hadron to quark degrees of freedom by elastic pp scattering, color transparency by (p,2p), short-range correlation in nuclear force by (p,2pN), tensor structure functions for spin-one hadrons, fragmentation functions, and generalized partem distributions in the ERBL region although proposals are not written on these projects. If proton-beam polarization is attained, it is possible to investigate details of nucleon spin structure. In the last part of this article, our own studies are explained on partem distribution functions in connection with the J-PARC projects.

  20. A study of the double hadron neutrino production on nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Agababyan, N. M.; Ammosov, V. V.; Grigoryan, N.; Gulkanyan, H.; Ivanilov, A. A.; Karamyan, Zh.; Korotkov, V. A.

    2011-02-15

    The nuclear medium influence on the dihadron neutrino charged current production is investigated using the data obtained with SKAT bubble chamber. An indication is obtained that the nuclear attenuation of the dihadron production is more expressed for kinematically closest hadron pairs. The experimental data are compared with predictions of the string model.

  1. Analysis Tools for Next-Generation Hadron Spectroscopy Experiments

    DOE PAGES

    Battaglieri, Marco; Briscoe, William; Celentano, Andrea; ...

    2015-01-01

    The series of workshops on New Partial-Wave Analysis Tools for Next-Generation Hadron Spectroscopy Experiments was initiated with the ATHOS 2012 meeting, which took place in Camogli, Italy, June 20-22, 2012. It was followed by ATHOS 2013 in Kloster Seeon near Munich, Germany, May 21-24, 2013. The third, ATHOS3, meeting is planned for April 13-17, 2015 at The George Washington University Virginia Science and Technology Campus, USA. The workshops focus on the development of amplitude analysis tools for meson and baryon spectroscopy, and complement other programs in hadron spectroscopy organized in the recent past including the INT-JLab Workshop on Hadron Spectroscopymore » in Seattle in 2009, the International Workshop on Amplitude Analysis in Hadron Spectroscopy at the ECT*-Trento in 2011, the School on Amplitude Analysis in Modern Physics in Bad Honnef in 2011, the Jefferson Lab Advanced Study Institute Summer School in 2012, and the School on Concepts of Modern Amplitude Analysis Techniques in Flecken-Zechlin near Berlin in September 2013. The aim of this document is to summarize the discussions that took place at the ATHOS 2012 and ATHOS 2013 meetings. We do not attempt a comprehensive review of the field of amplitude analysis, but offer a collection of thoughts that we hope may lay the ground for such a document.« less

  2. Analysis Tools for Next-Generation Hadron Spectroscopy Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Battaglieri, Marco; Briscoe, William; Celentano, Andrea; Chung, Suh-Urk; D'Angelo, Annalisa; De Vita, Rafaella; Döring, Michael; Dudek, Jozef; Eidelman, S.; Fegan, Stuart; Ferretti, J.; Filippi, A.; Fox, G.; Galata, G.; García-Tecocoatzi, H.; Glazier, Derek; Grube, B.; Hanhart, C.; Hoferichter, M.; Hughes, S. M.; Ireland, David G.; Ketzer, B.; Klein, Franz J.; Kubis, B.; Liu, B.; Masjuan, P.; Mathieu, Vincent; McKinnon, Brian; Mitchel, R.; Nerling, F.; Paul, S.; Peláez, J. R.; Rademacker, J.; Rizzo, Alessandro; Salgado, Carlos; Santopinto, E.; Sarantsev, Andrey V.; Sato, Toru; Schlüter, T.; da Silva, M. L.L.; Stankovic, I.; Strakovsky, Igor; Szczepaniak, Adam; Vassallo, A.; Walford, Natalie K.; Watts, Daniel P.

    2015-01-01

    The series of workshops on New Partial-Wave Analysis Tools for Next-Generation Hadron Spectroscopy Experiments was initiated with the ATHOS 2012 meeting, which took place in Camogli, Italy, June 20-22, 2012. It was followed by ATHOS 2013 in Kloster Seeon near Munich, Germany, May 21-24, 2013. The third, ATHOS3, meeting is planned for April 13-17, 2015 at The George Washington University Virginia Science and Technology Campus, USA. The workshops focus on the development of amplitude analysis tools for meson and baryon spectroscopy, and complement other programs in hadron spectroscopy organized in the recent past including the INT-JLab Workshop on Hadron Spectroscopy in Seattle in 2009, the International Workshop on Amplitude Analysis in Hadron Spectroscopy at the ECT*-Trento in 2011, the School on Amplitude Analysis in Modern Physics in Bad Honnef in 2011, the Jefferson Lab Advanced Study Institute Summer School in 2012, and the School on Concepts of Modern Amplitude Analysis Techniques in Flecken-Zechlin near Berlin in September 2013. The aim of this document is to summarize the discussions that took place at the ATHOS 2012 and ATHOS 2013 meetings. We do not attempt a comprehensive review of the field of amplitude analysis, but offer a collection of thoughts that we hope may lay the ground for such a document.

  3. Investigating the QCD phase diagram with hadron multiplicities at NICA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becattini, F.; Stock, R.

    2016-08-01

    We discuss the potential of the experimental programme at NICA to investigate the QCD phase diagram and particularly the position of the critical line at large baryon-chemical potential with accurate measurements of particle multiplicities. We briefly review the present status and we outline the tasks to be accomplished both theoretically and the experimentally to make hadronic abundances a sensitive probe.

  4. Group theoretic approaches to nuclear and hadronic collective motion

    SciTech Connect

    Biedenharn, L.C.

    1982-01-01

    Three approaches to nuclear and hadronic collective motion are reviewed, compared and contrasted: the standard symmetry approach as typified by the Interacting Boson Model, the kinematic symmetry group approach of Gell-Mann and Tomonaga, and the recent direct construction by Buck. 50 references.

  5. Measurement of masses and lifetimes of B hadrons

    SciTech Connect

    Filthaut, F.; /Nijmegen U.

    2007-05-01

    We present recent measurements by the CDF and D{O} Collaborations at the Tevatron Collider on the masses and lifetimes of B hadrons. The results are compared to predictions based on Heavy Quark Effective Theory, lattice gauge theory, and quark models.

  6. Proceedings of the workshop on B physics at hadron accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    McBride, P.; Mishra, C.S.

    1993-12-31

    This report contains papers on the following topics: Measurement of Angle {alpha}; Measurement of Angle {beta}; Measurement of Angle {gamma}; Other B Physics; Theory of Heavy Flavors; Charged Particle Tracking and Vertexing; e and {gamma} Detection; Muon Detection; Hadron ID; Electronics, DAQ, and Computing; and Machine Detector Interface. Selected papers have been indexed separately for inclusion the in Energy Science and Technology Database.

  7. Hadron Diffractive Production at Ultrahigh Energies and Shadow Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anisovich, V. V.; Matveev, M. A.; Nikonov, V. A.

    Shadow effects at collisions of hadrons with light nuclei at high energies were subject of scientific interest of V.N. Gribov, first, we mean his study of the hadron-deuteron scattering, see Sov. Phys. JETP 29, 483 (1969) [Zh. Eksp. Teor. Fiz. 56, 892 (1969)] and discovery of the reinforcement of shadowing due to inelastic diffractive rescatterings. It turns out that the similar effect exists on hadron level though at ultrahigh energies... Diffractive production is considered in the ultrahigh energy region where pomeron exchange amplitudes are transformed into black disk ones due to rescattering corrections. The corresponding corrections in hadron reactions h1 + h3 → h1 + h2 + h3 with small momenta transferred (q^2_{1 to 1} m^2/ ln^2 s, q^2_{3 to 3} m^2/ ln^2 s) are calculated in terms of the K-matrix technique modified for ultrahigh energies. Small values of the momenta transferred are crucial for introducing equations for amplitudes. The three-body equation for hadron diffractive production reaction h1 + h3 → h1 + h2 + h3 is written and solved precisely in the eikonal approach. In the black disk regime final state scattering processes do not change the shapes of amplitudes principally but dump amplitudes by a factor 1/4 initial state rescatterings result in additional factor 1/2. In the resonant disk regime initial and final state scatterings damp strongly the production amplitude that corresponds to σ_{inel}/σ_{tot} to 0 at √{s}to ∞ in this mode.

  8. Hadron diffractive production at ultrahigh energies and shadow effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anisovich, V. V.; Matveev, M. A.; Nikonov, V. A.

    2016-10-01

    Shadow effects at collisions of hadrons with light nuclei at high energies were subject of scientific interest of V.N. Gribov, first, we mean his study of the hadron-deuteron scattering, see Sov. Phys. JETP 29, 483 (1969) [Zh. Eksp. Teor. Fiz. 56, 892 (1969)] and discovery of the reinforcement of shadowing due to inelastic diffractive rescatterings. It turns out that the similar effect exists on hadron level though at ultrahigh energies. Diffractive production is considered in the ultrahigh energy region where pomeron exchange amplitudes are transformed into black disk ones due to rescattering corrections. The corresponding corrections in hadron reactions h1 + h3 → h1 + h2 + h3 with small momenta transferred (q1→12 ˜ m2/ln2s, q3→32 ˜ m2/ln2s) are calculated in terms of the K-matrix technique modified for ultrahigh energies. Small values of the momenta transferred are crucial for introducing equations for amplitudes. The three-body equation for hadron diffractive production reaction h1 + h3 → h1 + h2 + h3 is written and solved precisely in the eikonal approach. In the black disk regime final state scattering processes do not change the shapes of amplitudes principally but dump amplitudes by a factor ˜ 1 4; initial state rescatterings result in additional factor ˜ 1 2. In the resonant disk regime initial and final state scatterings damp strongly the production amplitude that corresponds to σinel/σtot → 0 at s →∞ in this mode.

  9. Rotation-independent representations for haptic movements.

    PubMed

    Shioiri, Satoshi; Yamazaki, Takanori; Matsumiya, Kazumichi; Kuriki, Ichiro

    2013-01-01

    The existence of a common mechanism for visual and haptic representations has been reported in object perception. In contrast, representations of movements might be more specific to modalities. Referring to the vertical axis is natural for visual representations whereas a fixed reference axis might be inappropriate for haptic movements and thus also inappropriate for its representations in the brain. The present study found that visual and haptic movement representations are processed independently. A psychophysical experiment examining mental rotation revealed the well-known effect of rotation angle for visual representations whereas no such effect was found for haptic representations. We also found no interference between processes for visual and haptic movements in an experiment where different stimuli were presented simultaneously through visual and haptic modalities. These results strongly suggest that (1) there are separate representations of visual and haptic movements, and (2) the haptic process has a rotation-independent representation.

  10. Lie antialgebras: cohomology and representations

    SciTech Connect

    Ovsienko, V.

    2008-11-18

    We describe the main algebraic and geometric properties of the class of algebras introduced in [1]. We discuss their origins in symplectic geometry and associative algebra, and the notions of cohomology and representations. We formulate classification theorems and give a number of examples.

  11. Representational Momentum in Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piotrowski, Andrea S.; Jakobson, Lorna S.

    2011-01-01

    Humans have a tendency to perceive motion even in static images that simply "imply" movement. This tendency is so strong that our memory for actions depicted in static images is distorted in the direction of implied motion--a phenomenon known as representational momentum (RM). In the present study, we created an RM display depicting a pattern of…

  12. Correct Representation of Conformational Equilibria.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fulop, F.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    In representing conformational equilibria of compounds having only one chiral center, erroneous formulas showing different antipodes on the two sides of the equilibrium are rare. In contrast, with compounds having two or more chiral centers especially with saturated heterocycles, this erroneous representation occurs frequently in the chemical…

  13. Mental Representations of Social Status

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiao, Joan Y.; Bordeaux, Andrew R.; Ambady, Nalni

    2004-01-01

    How do people think about social status? We investigated the nature of social status and number representations using a semantic distance latency test. In Study 1, 21 college students compared words connoting different social status as well as numbers, which served as a control task. Participants were faster at comparing occupations and numbers…

  14. Representational learning for sonar ATR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaacs, Jason C.

    2014-06-01

    Learned representations have been shown to give hopeful results for solving a multitude of novel learning tasks, even though these tasks may be unknown when the model is being trained. A few notable examples include the techniques of topic models, deep belief networks, deep Boltzmann machines, and local discriminative Gaussians, all inspired by human learning. This self-learning of new concepts via rich generative models has emerged as a promising area of research in machine learning. Although there has been recent progress, existing computational models are still far from being able to represent, identify and learn the wide variety of possible patterns and struc- ture in real-world data. An important issue for further consideration is the use of unsupervised representations for novel underwater target recognition applications. This work will discuss and demonstrate the use of latent Dirichlet allocation and autoencoders for learning unsupervised representations of objects in sonar imagery. The objective is to make these representations more abstract and invariant to noise in the training distribution and improve performance.

  15. Asymptotic and Fredholm representations of discrete groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manuilov, V. M.; Mishchenko, A. S.

    1998-10-01

    A C^*-algebra servicing the theory of asymptotic representations and its embedding into the Calkin algebra that induces an isomorphism of K_1-groups is constructed. As a consequence, it is shown that all vector bundles over the classifying space B\\pi that can be obtained by means of asymptotic representations of a discrete group \\pi can also be obtained by means of representations of the group \\pi \\times {\\mathbb Z} into the Calkin algebra. A generalization of the concept of Fredholm representation is also suggested, and it is shown that an asymptotic representation can be regarded as an asymptotic Fredholm representation.

  16. Additional strange hadrons from QCD thermodynamics and strangeness freezeout in heavy ion collisions.

    PubMed

    Bazavov, A; Ding, H-T; Hegde, P; Kaczmarek, O; Karsch, F; Laermann, E; Maezawa, Y; Mukherjee, Swagato; Ohno, H; Petreczky, P; Schmidt, C; Sharma, S; Soeldner, W; Wagner, M

    2014-08-15

    We compare lattice QCD results for appropriate combinations of net strangeness fluctuations and their correlations with net baryon number fluctuations with predictions from two hadron resonance gas (HRG) models having different strange hadron content. The conventionally used HRG model based on experimentally established strange hadrons fails to describe the lattice QCD results in the hadronic phase close to the QCD crossover. Supplementing the conventional HRG with additional, experimentally uncharted strange hadrons predicted by quark model calculations and observed in lattice QCD spectrum calculations leads to good descriptions of strange hadron thermodynamics below the QCD crossover. We show that the thermodynamic presence of these additional states gets imprinted in the yields of the ground-state strange hadrons leading to a systematic 5-8 MeV decrease of the chemical freeze-out temperatures of ground-state strange baryons.

  17. First Look at PYTHIA8 Hadronization Program for Neutrino Interaction Generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katori, Teppei; Lasorak, Pierre; Mandalia, Shivesh; Terri, Ryan

    Current and future neutrino oscillation experiments utilize information of hadronic final states to improve sensitivities on oscillation parameters measurements. Among the physics of hadronic systems in neutrino interactions, the hadronization model controls multiplicities and kinematics of final state hadrons from the primary interaction vertex. For relatively high invariant mass events, neutrino interaction generators rely on the PYTHIA6 hadronization program. Here, we show a possible improvement of this process in neutrino event generators, by utilizing expertise from the HERMES experiment. Next, we discuss the possibility to implement the PYTHIA8 program in neutrino interaction generators, including GENIE and NEUT. Finally, we show preliminary comparisons of PYTHIA8 predictions with neutrino hadron multiplicity data from bubble chamber experiments within the GENIE hadronization validation tool.

  18. Reconstruction of semileptonically decaying beauty hadrons produced in high energy pp collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciezarek, G.; Lupato, A.; Rotondo, M.; Vesterinen, M.

    2017-02-01

    It is well known that in b-hadron decays with a single unreconstructible final state particle, the decay kinematics can be solved up to a quadratic ambiguity, without any knowledge of the b-hadron momentum. We present a method to infer the momenta of b-hadrons produced in hadron collider experiments using information from their reconstructed flight vectors. Our method is strictly agnostic to the decay itself, which implies that it can be validated with control samples of topologically similar decays to fully reconstructible final states. A multivariate regression algorithm based on the flight information provides a b-hadron momentum estimate with a resolution of around 60% which is sufficient to select the correct solution to the quadratic equation in around 70% of cases. This will improve the ability of hadron collider experiments to make differential decay rate measurements with semileptonic b-hadron decays.

  19. Representations of mad cow disease.

    PubMed

    Washer, Peter

    2006-01-01

    This paper examines the reporting of the story of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) and its human derivative variant Creutzfeld-Jacob Disease (vCJD) in the British newspapers. Three 'snapshots' of newspaper coverage are sampled and analysed between the period 1986 and 1996 focusing on how representations of the disease evolved over the 10-year period. Social representations theory is used to elucidate how this new disease threat was conceptualised in the newspaper reporting and how it was explained to the UK public. This paper examines who or what was said to be at risk from the new disease, and whether some individuals or groups held to blame for the diseases' putative origins, the appearance of vCJD in human beings, and its spread.

  20. Time representations in social science

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, Yvan

    2012-01-01

    Time has long been a major topic of study in social science, as in other sciences or in philosophy. Social scientists have tended to focus on collective representations of time, and on the ways in which these representations shape our everyday experiences. This contribution addresses work from such disciplines as anthropology, sociology and history. It focuses on several of the main theories that have preoccupied specialists in social science, such as the alleged “acceleration” of life and overgrowth of the present in contemporary Western societies, or the distinction between so-called linear and circular conceptions of time. The presentation of these theories is accompanied by some of the critiques they have provoked, in order to enable the reader to form her or his own opinion of them. PMID:23393420

  1. Mental representations of social status.

    PubMed

    Chiao, Joan Y; Bordeaux, Andrew R; Ambady, Nalini

    2004-09-01

    How do people think about social status? We investigated the nature of social status and number representations using a semantic distance latency test. In Study 1, 21 college students compared words connoting different social status as well as numbers, which served as a control task. Participants were faster at comparing occupations and numbers that were semantically farther apart relative to those more closely related. In Study 2, we examined the semantic distance effect for a social status category, for which participants have as much knowledge of, as with numbers. We asked 15 US Navy Midshipmen to compare the social status associated with different ranks in the Navy as well as compare number magnitudes. Participants were fastest when comparing ranks far in status relative to ranks close in status. These findings reveal that humans have mental representations of social status that share properties with that of number.

  2. Berry phase in Heisenberg representation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andreev, V. A.; Klimov, Andrei B.; Lerner, Peter B.

    1994-01-01

    We define the Berry phase for the Heisenberg operators. This definition is motivated by the calculation of the phase shifts by different techniques. These techniques are: the solution of the Heisenberg equations of motion, the solution of the Schrodinger equation in coherent-state representation, and the direct computation of the evolution operator. Our definition of the Berry phase in the Heisenberg representation is consistent with the underlying supersymmetry of the model in the following sense. The structural blocks of the Hamiltonians of supersymmetrical quantum mechanics ('superpairs') are connected by transformations which conserve the similarity in structure of the energy levels of superpairs. These transformations include transformation of phase of the creation-annihilation operators, which are generated by adiabatic cyclic evolution of the parameters of the system.

  3. Knowledge representation in fuzzy logic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zadeh, Lotfi A.

    1989-01-01

    The author presents a summary of the basic concepts and techniques underlying the application of fuzzy logic to knowledge representation. He then describes a number of examples relating to its use as a computational system for dealing with uncertainty and imprecision in the context of knowledge, meaning, and inference. It is noted that one of the basic aims of fuzzy logic is to provide a computational framework for knowledge representation and inference in an environment of uncertainty and imprecision. In such environments, fuzzy logic is effective when the solutions need not be precise and/or it is acceptable for a conclusion to have a dispositional rather than categorical validity. The importance of fuzzy logic derives from the fact that there are many real-world applications which fit these conditions, especially in the realm of knowledge-based systems for decision-making and control.

  4. Time representations in social science.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Yvan

    2012-12-01

    Time has long been a major topic of study in social science, as in other sciences or in philosophy. Social scientists have tended to focus on collective representations of time, and on the ways in which these representations shape our everyday experiences. This contribution addresses work from such disciplines as anthropology, sociology and history. It focuses on several of the main theories that have preoccupied specialists in social science, such as the alleged "acceleration" of life and overgrowth of the present in contemporary Western societies, or the distinction between so-called linear and circular conceptions of time. The presentation of these theories is accompanied by some of the critiques they have provoked, in order to enable the reader to form her or his own opinion of them.

  5. The upgrade of the CMS hadron calorimeter with silicon photomultipliers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strobbe, N.

    2017-01-01

    The upgrade of the hadron calorimeter of the CMS experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider is currently underway. The endcap sections will be upgraded in the winter of 2016–2017 and the barrel sections during the second LHC long shutdown in 2019. The existing photosensors will be replaced with about 16 000 new silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs), resulting in the first large installation of SiPMs in a radiation environment. All associated front-end electronics will also be upgraded. This paper discusses the motivation for the upgrade and provides a description of the new system, including the SiPMs with associated control electronics and the front-end readout cards.

  6. Weak decays of heavy hadrons into dynamically generated resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Oset, Eulogio; Liang, Wei -Hong; Bayar, Melahat; Xie, Ju -Jun; Dai, Lian Rong; Albaladejo, Miguel; Nielsen, Marina; Sekihara, Takayasu; Navarra, Fernando; Roca, Luis; Mai, Maxim; Nieves, Juan; Dias, Jorgivan Morais; Feijoo, Alberto; Magas, Volodymyr K.; Ramos, Angels; Miyahara, Kenta; Hyodo, Tetsuo; Jido, Daisuke; Doring, Michael; Molina, Raquel; Chen, Hua -Xing; Wang, En; Geng, Lisheng; Ikeno, Natsumi; Fernandez-Soler, Pedro; Sun, Zhi Feng

    2016-01-28

    In this study, we present a review of recent works on weak decay of heavy mesons and baryons with two mesons, or a meson and a baryon, interacting strongly in the final state. The aim is to learn about the interaction of hadrons and how some particular resonances are produced in the reactions. It is shown that these reactions have peculiar features and act as filters for some quantum numbers which allow to identify easily some resonances and learn about their nature. The combination of basic elements of the weak interaction with the framework of the chiral unitary approach allow for an interpretation of results of many reactions and add a novel information to different aspects of the hadron interaction and the properties of dynamically generated resonances.

  7. Observation of new charmless decays of bottom hadrons.

    PubMed

    Aaltonen, T; Adelman, J; Akimoto, T; Alvarez González, B; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Apresyan, A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Azzurri, P; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Beauchemin, P-H; Bedeschi, F; Beecher, D; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bolla, G; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Bridgeman, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burke, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Calancha, C; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carls, B; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Choudalakis, G; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Chwalek, T; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Cox, C A; Cox, D J; Crescioli, F; Cuenca Almenar, C; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cully, J C; Dagenhart, D; Datta, M; Davies, T; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lorenzo, G; Dell'Orso, M; Deluca, C; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; Derwent, P F; di Giovanni, G P; Dionisi, C; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Efron, J; Elagin, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Ferrazza, C; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Frank, M J; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garberson, F; Garcia, J E; Garfinkel, A F; Genser, K; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Gessler, A; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Gimmell, J L; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Grundler, U; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Han, B-Y; Han, J Y; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartz, M; Hatakeyama, K; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heijboer, A; Heinrich, J; Henderson, C; Herndon, M; Heuser, J; Hewamanage, S; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Hussein, M; Huston, J; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jha, M K; Jindariani, S; Johnson, W; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Jung, J E; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Kar, D; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kephart, R; Keung, J; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, H W; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krop, D; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kubo, T; Kuhr, T; Kulkarni, N P; Kurata, M; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; LeCompte, T; Lee, E; Lee, H S; Lee, S W; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C-S; Linacre, J; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, C; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Lovas, L; Lucchesi, D; Luci, C; Lueck, J; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Macqueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Maki, T; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, C; Marino, C P; Martin, A; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Martínez-Ballarín, R; Maruyama, T; Mastrandrea, P; Masubuchi, T; Mathis, M; Mattson, M E; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miller, R; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyake, H; Moggi, N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Morlock, J; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Nagano, A; Naganoma, J; Nakamura, K; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Necula, V; Nett, J; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Neubauer, S; Nielsen, J; Nodulman, L; Norman, M; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Osterberg, K; Griso, S Pagan; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Papaikonomou, A; Paramonov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Peiffer, T; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pinera, L; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Pueschel, E; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Ramakrishnan, V; Ranjan, N; Redondo, I; Renton, P; Renz, M; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rodriguez, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Roy, P; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Saarikko, H; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Saltó, O; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, A; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M A; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sforza, F; Sfyrla, A; Shalhout, S Z; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shiraishi, S; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Slaughter, A J; Slaunwhite, J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spalding, J; Spreitzer, T; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Strycker, G L; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, R; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Tesarek, R; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thompson, G A; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Ttito-Guzmán, P; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Tourneur, S; Trovato, M; Tsai, S-Y; Tu, Y; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Vallecorsa, S; van Remortel, N; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Vidal, M; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vine, T; Vogel, M; Volobouev, I; Volpi, G; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, W; Wagner-Kuhr, J; Wakisaka, T; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Weinberger, M; Weinelt, J; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Wilbur, S; Williams, G; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wright, T; Wu, X; Würthwein, F; Xie, S; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zhang, X; Zheng, Y; Zucchelli, S

    2009-07-17

    We search for new charmless decays of neutral b hadrons to pairs of charged hadrons, using 1 fb(-1) of data collected by the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. We report the first observation of the Bs0-->K-pi+ decay and measure B(Bs0-->K-pi+)=(5.0+/-0.7(stat)+/-0.8(syst))x10(-6). We also report the first observation of charmless b-baryon decays, and measure B(Lambdab0-->ppi-)=(3.5+/-0.6(stat)+/-0.9(syst))x10(-6) and B(Lambdab0-->pK-)=(5.6+/-0.8(stat)+/-1.5(syst))x10(-6). No evidence is found for other modes, and we set the limit B(Bs0-->pi+pi;-)<1.2x10(-6) at 90% C.L.

  8. Multi-strangeness production in hadron induced reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaitanos, T.; Moustakidis, Ch.; Lalazissis, G. A.; Lenske, H.

    2016-10-01

    We discuss in detail the formation and propagation of multi-strangeness particles in reactions induced by hadron beams relevant for the forthcoming experiments at FAIR. We focus the discussion on the production of the decuplet-particle Ω and study for the first time the production and propagation mechanism of this heavy hyperon inside hadronic environments. The transport calculations show the possibility of Ω-production in the forthcoming P ‾ANDA-experiment, which can be achieved with measurable probabilities using high-energy secondary Ξ-beams. We predict cross sections for Ω-production. The theoretical results are important in understanding the hyperon-nucleon and, in particular, the hyperon-hyperon interactions also in the high-strangeness sector. We emphasize the importance of our studies for the research plans at FAIR.

  9. PSEUDOSPIN SYMMETRY IN NUCLEI, SPIN SYMMETRY IN HADRONS

    SciTech Connect

    P. PAGE; T. GOLDMAN; J. GINOCCHIO

    2000-08-01

    Ginocchio argued that chiral symmetry breaking in QCD is responsible for the relativistic pseudospin symmetry in the Dirac equation, explaining the observed approximate pseudospin symmetry in sizable nuclei. On a much smaller scale, it is known that spin-orbit splittings in hadrons are small. Specifically, new experimental data from CLEO indicate small splittings in D-mesons. For heavy-light mesons we identify a cousin of pseudospin symmetry that suppresses these splittings in the Dirac equation, known as spin symmetry. We suggest an experimental test of the implications of spin symmetry for wave functions in electron-positron annihilation. We investigate how QCD can give rise to two different dynamical symmetries on nuclear and hadronic scales.

  10. Highly granular hadron calorimeter: software compensation and shower decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadeeva, M.; CALICE Collaboration

    2016-02-01

    The highly granular analogue hadron calorimeter was developed and constructed by the CALICE collaboration. The active layers of the calorimeter are assembled from scintillator tiles with individual readout by silicon photomultipliers and are interleaved with absorber plates. The response and resolution of the calorimeter equipped with steel absorber was intensively tested in single particle beams. The application of software compensation techniques developed for the scintillator-steel prototype allows for reduction of the stochastic term of the single particle resolution from 58%/ √E/GeV to 45%/ √E/GeV. The detailed study and decomposition of the longitudinal and radial profiles of hadron-induced showers in the energy range from 10 to 80 GeV are presented and compared to GEANT4 simulations.

  11. Search for charmed hadrons in the OPERA experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastore, A.

    2015-05-01

    The OPERA experiment was designed to study muon neutrino to tau neutrino oscillations in appearance mode, using the CERN to Gran Sasso (CNGS) high energy neutrino beam 730 km far from the source. From 2008 to 2012, CNGS neutrinos interactions were recorded in the OPERA detector, which includes target units made of lead plates alternated with emulsion films and electronic tracker planes. The on-going analysis is aimed at the detection of short-lived particle decays occurring over distances of the order of 1 mm from the neutrino interaction point. It has allowed identifying charmed hadrons together with the tau lepton decay candidates that have established vμ → vτ oscillations with a significance of 4.2 σ. The procedure applied in OPERA to detect short-lived particle decays and its application to the search for charmed hadrons will be discussed here in detail.

  12. Higgs Boson Searches at Hadron Colliders (1/4)

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    In these Academic Training lectures, the phenomenology of Higgs bosons and search strategies at hadron colliders are discussed. After a brief introduction on Higgs bosons in the Standard Model and a discussion of present direct and indirect constraints on its mass the status of the theoretical cross section calculations for Higgs boson production at hadron colliders is reviewed. In the following lectures important experimental issues relevant for Higgs boson searches (trigger, measurements of leptons, jets and missing transverse energy) are presented. This is followed by a detailed discussion of the discovery potential for the Standard Model Higgs boson for both the Tevatron and the LHC experiments. In addition, various scenarios beyond the Standard Model, primarily the MSSM, are considered. Finally, the potential and strategies to measured Higgs boson parameters and the investigation of alternative symmetry breaking scenarios are addressed.

  13. Deep-inelastic muon scattering from nuclei with hadron detection

    SciTech Connect

    Geesaman, D.; Jackson, H.; Kaufman, S.

    1995-08-01

    Deep-inelastic lepton scattering from nuclei provides a direct look at the quark structure of nuclear matter. These reactions revealed the first convincing evidence that the structure of nucleons is modified in the nuclear medium and had profound implications on the understanding of nuclear dynamics. FNAL experiment E665, using the 490-GeV muon beams at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, provides new information on the nuclear effects on nucleon properties by studying deep-inelastic muon scattering with coincident hadron detection. The high beam energy makes the experiment particularly suited to the study of the region of x < 0.1 (where x is the fraction of the momentum of the nucleon carried by the struck quark in the infinite momentum frame), and total center-of-mass hadronic energy > 25 GeV, where hard QCD processes are expected to become evident and there are little data from other deep-inelastic measurements.

  14. Hadron supercolliders: The 1-TeV scale and beyond

    SciTech Connect

    Quigg, C.

    1990-08-10

    Greater understanding of the connection between the weak and electromagnetic interactions is central to progress in elementary-particle physics. A definitive exploration of the mechanism for electroweak symmetry breaking will require collisions between fundamental constituents at energies on the order of 1 TeV. This goal drives the design of high-energy, high-luminosity hadron colliders that will be commissioned during the next decade, but by no means completely defines their scientific potential. These three lectures are devoted to a review of the standard-model issues that motivated an experimental assault on the 1-TeV scale, an introduction to the machines and the experimental environment they will present, and a survey of possibilities for measurement and discovery with a multi-TeV hadron collider. 72 refs., 29 figs.

  15. Penguins with charm and quark-hadron duality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beneke, M.; Buchalla, G.; Neubert, M.; Sachrajda, C. T.

    2009-06-01

    The integrated branching fraction of the process B→ X s l + l - is dominated by resonance background from narrow charmonium states, such as B→ X s ψ→ X s l + l -, which exceeds the non-resonant charm-loop contribution by two orders of magnitude. The origin of this fact is discussed in view of the general expectation of quark-hadron duality. The situation in B→ X s l + l - is contrasted with charm-penguin amplitudes in two-body hadronic B decays of the type B→ π π, for which it is demonstrated that resonance effects and the potentially non-perturbative cbar{c} threshold region do not invalidate the standard picture of QCD factorization. This holds irrespective of whether the charm quark is treated as a light or a heavy quark.

  16. Models of quark-hadron matter and compact stars

    SciTech Connect

    Schramm, S.; Steinheimer, J.; Dexheimer, V.; Negreiros, R.

    2016-01-22

    Phenomenological approaches to Quantum Chromodynamics covering the whole region of low and high temperatures and/or densities must address the problem that the effective degrees of freedom change from hadrons to quarks and gluons. We approach this task with a unified description of hadronic and quark matter allowing for cross-over as well as first or second-order phase transitions. As a further benefit of such an approach, a quantitatively satisfactory description of nuclear ground state matter as well as nuclear and hypernuclear properties can be achieved. We apply this model to neutron stars and consider potential constraints on star properties arising from lattice gauge results in relation with the observation of 2 solar mass stars.

  17. Weak decays of heavy hadrons into dynamically generated resonances

    DOE PAGES

    Oset, Eulogio; Liang, Wei -Hong; Bayar, Melahat; ...

    2016-01-28

    In this study, we present a review of recent works on weak decay of heavy mesons and baryons with two mesons, or a meson and a baryon, interacting strongly in the final state. The aim is to learn about the interaction of hadrons and how some particular resonances are produced in the reactions. It is shown that these reactions have peculiar features and act as filters for some quantum numbers which allow to identify easily some resonances and learn about their nature. The combination of basic elements of the weak interaction with the framework of the chiral unitary approach allowmore » for an interpretation of results of many reactions and add a novel information to different aspects of the hadron interaction and the properties of dynamically generated resonances.« less

  18. Systematic Uncertainties in High-Energy Hadronic Interaction Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zha, M.; Knapp, J.; Ostapchenko, S.

    2003-07-01

    Hadronic interaction models for cosmic ray energies are uncertain since our knowledge of hadronic interactions is extrap olated from accelerator experiments at much lower energies. At present most high-energy models are based on Grib ov-Regge theory of multi-Pomeron exchange, which provides a theoretical framework to evaluate cross-sections and particle production. While experimental data constrain some of the model parameters, others are not well determined and are therefore a source of systematic uncertainties. In this paper we evaluate the variation of results obtained with the QGSJET model, when modifying parameters relating to three ma jor sources of uncertainty: the form of the parton structure function, the role of diffractive interactions, and the string hadronisation. Results on inelastic cross sections, on secondary particle production and on the air shower development are discussed.

  19. Effects of Induced Surface Tension in Nuclear and Hadron Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagun, V. V.; Bugaev, K. A.; Ivanytskyi, A. I.; Oliinychenko, D. R.; Mishustin, I. N.

    2017-03-01

    Short range particle repulsion is rather important property of the hadronic and nuclear matter equations of state. We present a novel equation of state which is based on the virial expansion for the multicomponent mixtures with hard-core repulsion. In addition to the hard-core repulsion taken into account by the proper volumes of particles, this equation of state explicitly contains the surface tension which is induced by another part of the hard-core repulsion between particles. At high densities the induced surface tension vanishes and the excluded volume treatment of hard-core repulsion is switched to its proper volume treatment. Possible applications of this equation of state to a description of hadronic multiplicities measured in A+A collisions, to an investigation of the nuclear matter phase diagram properties and to the neutron star interior modeling are discussed.

  20. Tests of quark-hadron duality in τ-decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominguez, C. A.; Hernandez, L. A.; Schilcher, K.; Spiesberger, H.

    2016-09-01

    An exhaustive number of QCD finite energy sum rules for τ-decay together with the latest updated ALEPH data is used to test the assumption of global duality. Typical checks are the absence of the dimension d = 2 condensate, the equality of the gluon condensate extracted from vector or axial vector spectral functions, the Weinberg sum rules, the chiral condensates of dimensions d = 6 and d = 8, as well as the extraction of some low-energy parameters of chiral perturbation theory. Suitable pinched linear integration kernels are introduced in the sum rules in order to suppress potential quark-hadron duality violations and experimental errors. We find no compelling indications of duality violations in hadronic τ-decay in the kinematic region above s ≃ 2.2 GeV2 for these kernels.

  1. Hadron resonances with a quark core embedded in the continuum

    SciTech Connect

    Shimizu, Kiyotaka; Takeuchi, Sachiko; Takizawa, Makoto

    2011-05-06

    We investigate the excited baryons and mesons which cannot be described in terms of a simple constituent quark model, such as {Lambda}(1405) and X(3872) as a resonance in a coupled channel hadron-hadron (baryon-meson or meson-meson) scattering with a 'bound state embedded in the continuum' (BSEC). For this purpose, we solve the Lippmann-Schwinger equation including a BSEC in the momentum space. This BSEC is introduced by hand, as a state not originated from a simple baryon-meson or meson-meson system. We assume it comes from the three-quark state or quark-anti quark state and show such a picture can describe the {Lambda}(1405) and X(3872) resonances.

  2. Physics in J-PARC Hadron-Hall Extension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noumi, Hiroyuki

    The Hadron Experimental Facility (HEF) of the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) provides the world highest intensity hadron beams, such as kaons, pions, and so on, for various experimental researches in particle and nuclear physics. Currently, HEF operates two charged and one neutral secondary beam lines, K1.8, K1.1, and KL, sharing secondary beams produced at a primary target, T1. In addition, a high-momentum beam line is being constructed, which is branched from the primary beam line to deliver a fraction of the primary proton beam. We have a plan to extend HEF and construct a several new beam lines, which would enhance physics opportunities at HEF. A floor plan of extended HEF and physics scopes are presented.

  3. Instanton contributions to the low-lying hadron mass spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Samuel D.; Kamleh, Waseem; Leinweber, Derek B.

    2015-11-01

    The role of instanton-like objects in the QCD vacuum on the mass spectrum of low-lying light hadrons is explored in lattice QCD. Using overimproved stout-link smearing, tuned to preserve instanton-like objects in the QCD vacuum, the evolution of the mass spectrum under smearing is examined. The calculation is performed using a 203×40 dynamical fat-link-irrelevant-clover (FLIC) fermion action ensemble with lattice spacing 0.126 fm. Through the consideration of a range of pion masses, the effect of the vacuum instanton content is compared at a common pion mass. While the qualitative features of ground-state hadrons are preserved on instanton-dominated configurations, the excitation spectrum experiences significant changes. The underlying physics revealed shows little similarity to the direct-instanton-interaction predictions of the instanton liquid model.

  4. SAR Image Complex Pixel Representations

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin W.

    2015-03-01

    Complex pixel values for Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images of uniform distributed clutter can be represented as either real/imaginary (also known as I/Q) values, or as Magnitude/Phase values. Generally, these component values are integers with limited number of bits. For clutter energy well below full-scale, Magnitude/Phase offers lower quantization noise than I/Q representation. Further improvement can be had with companding of the Magnitude value.

  5. Temporal Representation in Semantic Graphs

    SciTech Connect

    Levandoski, J J; Abdulla, G M

    2007-08-07

    A wide range of knowledge discovery and analysis applications, ranging from business to biological, make use of semantic graphs when modeling relationships and concepts. Most of the semantic graphs used in these applications are assumed to be static pieces of information, meaning temporal evolution of concepts and relationships are not taken into account. Guided by the need for more advanced semantic graph queries involving temporal concepts, this paper surveys the existing work involving temporal representations in semantic graphs.

  6. Spatial Representations of Taxi Drivers.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-09-28

    some people have suggested that adults, when they learn a new environment, proceed through these same Piagetian Stages in their representations...East Green Street Naval Postgraduate School Pasadena, CA 91101 Monterey, CA 93940 1 Special Asst. for Education and I Dr. Robert Wisher Training (OP-O1E...Research Laborat Pensacola, FL 32508 1 Dr. Gary Poock Operations Research Department Code 55PK Naval Postgraduate School Monterey, CA 93940 1 Roger W

  7. Cooperativity and 3-D Representation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-02-28

    image, to simplified mechanisms for understandingshadows and shading and to renewed interest in " isophot " models of shading. Visual searchstudies have...reversals of contrast. One such representation is the isophots of the images, the lines of equal luminance. They capture the flow field of the brightness...shading as an oriented field of isophots (or at least short oriented segments) is still at an exploratory stage. We will digitize live scenes in our

  8. Computing Visible-Surface Representations,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-03-01

    Terzopoulos N00014-75-C-0643 9. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME AMC ADDRESS 10. PROGRAM ELEMENT. PROJECT, TASK Artificial Inteligence Laboratory AREA A...Massachusetts Institute of lechnolog,. Support lbr the laboratory’s Artificial Intelligence research is provided in part by the Advanced Rtccarcl Proj...dynamically maintaining visible surface representations. Whether the intention is to model human vision or to design competent artificial vision systems

  9. 48 CFR 1480.803 - Representation process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... enterprise to an IA CO in the IEE representation at 1452.280-4 in response to a specific solicitation under the Buy Indian Act. (c) The CO may ask the appropriate Regional Solicitor to review the enterprise's representation. (d) The IEE representation does not relieve the CO of the obligation for determining...

  10. Imitation and the Dialectic of Representation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zelazo, Philip David; Lourenco, Stella Felix

    2003-01-01

    Describes a theory of the understanding and use of representations, drawing heavily on Paul Ricoeur's and James Mark Baldwin's theories. Presents this theory as construing representation as intrinsically mimetic, characterizing the development of representational understanding as internalization, and emphasizing the importance of self-reflection…

  11. Methods and Strategies: The Science Representation Continuum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Joanne K.

    2008-01-01

    Research indicates that people more easily understand abstractions when they are preceded by concrete representations (Lawson 2002). This article describes how educators can use science representations to help students form lasting understandings of abstract concepts. A spectrum illustrating some commonly used representation types and their level…

  12. 75 FR 32273 - Representation Election Procedure

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-08

    ... 29 CFR Parts 1202 and 1206 RIN 3140-ZA00 Representation Election Procedure AGENCY: National Mediation... delaying the effective date of its rule regarding representation election procedures from June 10, 2010 to... Representation Election Procedure Rule have been made. The NMB will notify participants if there are any...

  13. Promoting Decimal Number Sense and Representational Fluency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suh, Jennifer M.; Johnston, Chris; Jamieson, Spencer; Mills, Michelle

    2008-01-01

    The abstract nature of mathematics requires the communication of mathematical ideas through multiple representations, such as words, symbols, pictures, objects, or actions. Building representational fluency involves using mathematical representations flexibly and being able to interpret and translate among these different models and mathematical…

  14. Neural Representations of Physics Concepts.

    PubMed

    Mason, Robert A; Just, Marcel Adam

    2016-06-01

    We used functional MRI (fMRI) to assess neural representations of physics concepts (momentum, energy, etc.) in juniors, seniors, and graduate students majoring in physics or engineering. Our goal was to identify the underlying neural dimensions of these representations. Using factor analysis to reduce the number of dimensions of activation, we obtained four physics-related factors that were mapped to sets of voxels. The four factors were interpretable as causal motion visualization, periodicity, algebraic form, and energy flow. The individual concepts were identifiable from their fMRI signatures with a mean rank accuracy of .75 using a machine-learning (multivoxel) classifier. Furthermore, there was commonality in participants' neural representation of physics; a classifier trained on data from all but one participant identified the concepts in the left-out participant (mean accuracy = .71 across all nine participant samples). The findings indicate that abstract scientific concepts acquired in an educational setting evoke activation patterns that are identifiable and common, indicating that science education builds abstract knowledge using inherent, repurposed brain systems.

  15. Topographic NMF for data representation.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yanhui; Zhu, Zhenfeng; Zhao, Yao; Wei, Yunchao; Wei, Shikui; Li, Xuelong

    2014-10-01

    Nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF) is a useful technique to explore a parts-based representation by decomposing the original data matrix into a few parts-based basis vectors and encodings with nonnegative constraints. It has been widely used in image processing and pattern recognition tasks due to its psychological and physiological interpretation of natural data whose representation may be parts-based in human brain. However, the nonnegative constraint for matrix factorization is generally not sufficient to produce representations that are robust to local transformations. To overcome this problem, in this paper, we proposed a topographic NMF (TNMF), which imposes a topographic constraint on the encoding factor as a regularizer during matrix factorization. In essence, the topographic constraint is a two-layered network, which contains the square nonlinearity in the first layer and the square-root nonlinearity in the second layer. By pooling together the structure-correlated features belonging to the same hidden topic, the TNMF will force the encodings to be organized in a topographical map. Thus, the feature invariance can be promoted. Some experiments carried out on three standard datasets validate the effectiveness of our method in comparison to the state-of-the-art approaches.

  16. Symbol Systems and Pictorial Representations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diederich, Joachim; Wright, Susan

    All problem-solvers are subject to the same ultimate constraints -- limitations on space, time, and materials (Minsky, 1985). He introduces two principles: (1) Economics: Every intelligence must develop symbol-systems for representing objects, causes and goals, and (2) Sparseness: Every evolving intelligence will eventually encounter certain very special ideas -- e.g., about arithmetic, causal reasoning, and economics -- because these particular ideas are very much simpler than other ideas with similar uses. An extra-terrestrial intelligence (ETI) would have developed symbol systems to express these ideas and would have the capacity of multi-modal processing. Vakoch (1998) states that ...``ETI may rely significantly on other sensory modalities (than vision). Particularly useful representations would be ones that may be intelligible through more than one sensory modality. For instance, the information used to create a three-dimensional representation of an object might be intelligible to ETI heavily reliant on either visual or tactile sensory processes.'' The cross-modal representations Vakoch (1998) describes and the symbol systems Minsky (1985) proposes are called ``metaphors'' when combined. Metaphors allow for highly efficient communication. Metaphors are compact, condensed ways of expressing an idea: words, sounds, gestures or images are used in novel ways to refer to something they do not literally denote. Due to the importance of Minsky's ``economics'' principle, it is therefore possible that a message heavily relies on metaphors.

  17. Representations of metabolic knowledge: Pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Karp, P.D.; Paley, S.M.

    1994-12-31

    The automatic generation of drawings of metabolic pathways is a challenging problem that depends intimately on exactly what information has been recorded for each pathway, and on how that information is encoded. The chief contributions of the paper are a minimized representation for biochemical pathways called the predecessor list, and inference procedures for converting the predecessor list into a pathway-graph representation that can serve as input to a pathway-drawing algorithm. The predecessor list has several advantages over the pathway graph, including its compactness and its lack of redundancy. The conversion between the two representations can be formulated as both a constraint-satisfaction problem and a logical inference problem, whose goal is to assign directions to reactions, and to determine which are the main chemical compounds in the reaction. We describe a set of production rules that solves this inference problem. We also present heuristics for inferring whether the exterior compounds that are substrates of reactions at the periphery of a pathway are side or main compounds. These techniques were evaluated on 18 metabolic pathways from the EcoCyc knowledge base.

  18. A QCD Sum Rules Approach to Mixing of Hadrons

    SciTech Connect

    Aliev, T. M.; Ozpineci, A.; Zamiralov, V. S.

    2010-12-28

    A method for the calculation of the hadronic mixing angles using QCD sum rules is proposed. This method is then applied to predict the mixing angle between the heavy cascade hyperons {Xi}{sub Q} and {Xi}{sub Q}{sup '} where Q = c or Q = b. It is obtained the {theta}{sub b} = 6.4 deg. {+-}1.8 deg. and {theta}{sub c} = 5.5 deg. {+-}1.8 deg.

  19. Opening address (for the International Conference on Hadron Spectroscopy)

    SciTech Connect

    Lindenbaum, S.J.

    1985-01-01

    Some historical perspective and comments are presented on some aspects of the present state of the field of hadron interactions and its potential future. Included in the discussion are the results of pion-nucleon cross sections measurements of the 1950's, the ''double pole'' of the A2 (which later was found to be wrong), and the local gauge invariant SU(3)/sub color/ and QCD. 9 refs., 9 figs. (LEW)

  20. Hadron spectroscopy on a 32 3 × 48 lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akemi, K.; de Forcrand, Ph.; Fujisaki, M.; Hashimoto, T.; Hege, H. C.; Hioki, S.; Makino, J.; Miyamura, O.; Nakamura, A.; Okuda, M.; Stamatescu, I. O.; Tago, Y.; Takaishi, T.; QCD TARO (QCD on Thousand cell A Ray processorOmnipurpose) Collaboration

    We report the first results of a hadron spectrum measurement by the QCD_TARO Collaboration with the massively parallel computer AP1000. The main memory of AP1000 is currently 8Gbytes (final goal : 16 Gbytes), which allows us to treat rather large lattices. We measure the quenched Wilson spectrum on a 32 3 × 48 lattice at β = 6.3. We obtain a good agreement with an empirical curve on the Edinburgh plot.

  1. A stochastic method for computing hadronic matrix elements

    DOE PAGES

    Alexandrou, Constantia; Constantinou, Martha; Dinter, Simon; ...

    2014-01-24

    In this study, we present a stochastic method for the calculation of baryon 3-point functions which is an alternative to the typically used sequential method offering more versatility. We analyze the scaling of the error of the stochastically evaluated 3-point function with the lattice volume and find a favorable signal to noise ratio suggesting that the stochastic method can be extended to large volumes providing an efficient approach to compute hadronic matrix elements and form factors.

  2. Study of hadronic decays of the Z0 boson

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aarnio, P.; Abreu, P.; Adam, W.; Adami, F.; Adrianos, P.; Adye, T.; Alekseev, G. D.; Allaby, J. V.; Allen, P.; Allport, P.; Almehed, S.; Alvsvaag, S. J.; Amaldi, U.; Anassontzis, E.; Antilogus, P.; Apel, W. D.; Asman, B.; Astesan, F.; Astor Ferreres, C.; Augustin, J. E.; Augustinus, A.; Baillon, P.; Barao, F.; Barbiellini, G.; Bardin, D. Yu.; Barlag, S.; Barlow, J.; Baroncelli, A.; Barranco-Luque, M.; Barreira, G.; Barring, O.; Bartl, W.; Bates, M. J.; Baubillier, M.; Becks, K. H.; Beeston, C. J.; Bell, W.; Belokopytov, I.; Beltran, P.; Benedic, D.; Benlloch, J. M.; Berggren, M.; Bertrand, D.; Biagi, S.; Bianchi, F.; Bibby, J. H.; Bilenky, M.; Billoir, P.; Bingefors, N.; Bjarne, J.; Bloch, D.; Bogolubov, P. N.; Bollini, D.; Bolognese, T.; Bonapart, M.; Booth, P. S. L.; Boratav, M.; Borgeaud, P.; Borisov, G.; Borner, H.; Bosio, C.; Botner, O.; Bouquet, B.; Bozzo, M.; Braibant, S.; Branchini, P.; Brand, C.; Brand, K. D.; Bricman, C.; Brown, R. C. A.; Brummer, N.; Brunet, J. M.; Bugge, L.; Buran, T.; Burmeister, H.; Buttar, C.; Buytaert, J. A. M. A.; Cabras, G.; Caccia, M.; Cairanti, S.; Calvi, M.; Camacho Rozas, A. J.; Campagne, J. E.; Campion, A.; Camporesi, T.; Canale, V.; Carroll, L.; Caso, C.; Castelli, E.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Cattai, A.; Cavallo, F. R.; Cerrito, L.; Chadwick, G.; Charpentier, P.; Checchia, P.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chevalier, L.; Chiccoli, C.; Chliapnikov, P. V.; Chorowicz, V.; Cirio, R.; Clara, M. P.; Contreras, J. L.; Contri, R.; Couchot, F.; Crawley, H. B.; Crennell, D.; Cresti, M.; Crosetti, G.; Crosland, N.; Crozon, M.; Cuevas Maestro, J.; Curwen, L. S.; Dahl-Jensen, E.; D'Almagne, B.; Dam, M.; Damgaard, G.; Darbo, G.; Daubie, E.; Davenport, M.; de Angelis, A.; de Beer, M.; de Clercq, C.; de Groot, N.; de La Vaissiere, C.; Delikaris, D.; Delpierre, P.; di Ciaccio, L.; Diddens, A. N.; Dijkstra, H.; Dimitriou, N.; Djama, F.; Dolbeau, J.; Doroba, K.; Downs, R.; Dracos, M.; Drees, J.; Dris, M.; Du, S.; Dulinski, W.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Edwards, D. N.; Eek, L. O.; Eerola, P. A. M.; Ekelof, T.; Ekspong, G.; Ellila, M.; Engel, J. P.; Falaleev, V.; Fenyuk, A.; Fernandez Alonso, M.; Ferrer, A.; Ferroni, S.; Fillipas, T. A.; Firestone, A.; Fischer, H. G.; Flinn, M.; Foeth, H.; Fokitis, E.; Folegati, P.; Fontanelli, F.; Forsbach, H.; Fraissard, D.; Franek, B.; Fransson, K. E.; Frenkiel, P.; Fries, D. C.; Frodesen, A. G.; Fruhwirth, R.; Fulda-Quenzer, F.; Fuster, J.; Gago, J. M.; Gaillard, M.; Galeazzi, G.; Gamba, D.; Gaspar, C.; Gasparini, U.; Gavillet, P.; Gawne, S.; Gazis, E. N.; Genat, J. F.; Gerber, J. P.; Glitza, K. W.; Gokieli, R.; Golovatyuk, V. M.; Gomes, P.; Gomez Y Cadenas, J. J.; Goobar, A.; Gopal, G.; Gorbics, M.; Goret, B.; Gorski, M.; Goujon, G.; Gracco, V.; Grant, A.; Grard, F.; Graziani, E.; Grillet, J. P.; Gros, M. H.; Gros, M.; Grosdidier, G.; Grossetete, B.; Grung, B.; Guglielmi, L.; Gumenyuk, S.; Guy, J.; Hahn, F.; Hahn, M.; Haider, S.; Haissinski, J.; Hajduk, Z.; Hakansson, A.; Hallgren, A.; Hamacher, K.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Harris, F.; Heck, B.; Herbst, I.; Hernandez, J. J.; Herquet, P.; Herr, H.; Higon, E.; Hilke, H. J.; Hofmann, H.; Hofmokl, T.; Holmgren, S. O.; Hooper, J. E.; Horisberger, R.; Houlden, M.; Hrisoho, A.; Hrubec, J.; Huitu, K.; Hulth, P. O.; Hultqvist, K.; Husson, D.; Hyams, B. D.; Imbault, D.; Innocente, M.; Ioannou, P.; Iversen, P. S.; Jackson, J. N.; Jalocha, P.; Jarlskog, G.; Jarry, P.; Jean-Marie, B.; Joensuu, J.; Johansson, E. K.; Johansson, H.; Johansson, S.; Jonker, M.; Juillot, P.; Kadyrov, R. B.; Kalkanis, G.; Kalmus, G.; Kantardjian, G.; Katsanevas, S.; Katsoufis, E. C.; Keranen, R.; Kesteman, J.; Khomenko, B.; Khovanski, N. N.; King, B.; Kisielewski, B.; Klein, H.; Klempt, W.; Klovning, A.; Koene, B.; Kokkinias, P.; Kontaxis, I.; Kopf, M.; Koratzinos, M.; Korcyl, K.; Korzen, B.; Kostarakis, P.; Kourkoumelis, C.; Kreuzberger, T.; Krolikowski, J.; Krstic, J.; Kruener-Marquis, U.; Kucewicz, W.; Kuhn, G.; Kurvinen, K.; Laakso, M. I.; Lambropoulos, C.; Lanceri, L.; Langerveld, D.; Lapchine, V.; Lapin, V.; Laugier, J. P.; Lauhakangas, R.; Laurikainen, P.; Lavigne, B.; Le Grand, J. C.; Lebbolo, H.; Leder, G.; Lemonne, J.; Lenzen, G.; Lepeltier, V.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lidbury, J. A.; Lieb, E.; Lillestol, E.; Lillethun, E.; Lippi, I.; Llosa, R.; Loerstad, B.; Lokajicek, M.; Loken, J. G.; Lopez Aguera, M. A.; Lorenz, P.; Loukas, D.; Lucock, R.; Lund-Jensen, B.; Lutz, P.; Lyons, L.; Maehlum, G.; Maeland, O.; Maillard, J.; Maltezos, A.; Maltezos, S.; Mandl, F.; Marco, J.; Marin, J. C.; Markou, A.; Mas, J.; Mathis, L.; Matteuzzi, C.; Matthiae, G.; Mattsson, L.; Mazzucato, M.; Mc Cubbin, M.; Mc Kay, R.; Menichetti, E.; Meroni, C.; Meyer, W. T.; Michalowski, J.; Mitaroff, W. A.; Mitselmakher, G. V.; Mjoernmark, U.; Moa, T.; Moeller, R.; Moenig, K.; Monge, M. R.; Morettini, P.; Mueller, H.; Muller, H.; Mur, M.; Muryn, B.; Myatt, G.; Navarria, F. L.; Negri, P.; Nielsen, B. S.; Nigro, M.; Nikolaenko, V.; Nonni, M.; Noppe, J. M.; Nordberg, M.; Nounos, S.; Obraztsov, V.; Odegaard, T.; Orava, R.; Ouraou, A.; Pagot, J.; Pain, R.; Pakonski, K.; Palka, H.; Palma Lopes, S.; Papadopoulou, T.; Pape, L.; Pasini, P.; Passeneau, M.; Passeri, A.; Pattison, J. B.; Pegoraro, M.; Perevozchikov, V.; Perez, J.; Pernicka, M.; Perrotta, A.; Petrucci, G.; Pettersen, T.; Pimenta, M.; Pingot, O.; Pinori, C.; Pinsent, A.; Poiret, C.; Pol, M. E.; Polok, G.; Poropat, P.; Privitera, P.; Pullia, A.; Pyyhtia, J.; Queru, P.; Quinton, S.; Rademakers, A. A.; Radojicic, D.; Ragazzi, S.; Ragazzon, R.; Range, W. H.; Raoul, J. C.; Ratoff, P.; Read, A. L.; Redaelli, N. G.; Regler, M.; Reid, D.; Reis, M. V.; Renton, P.; Resvanis, L. K.; Richard, F.; Rinaudo, G.; Romaya, A. M.; Romero, A.; Roncagliolo, I.; Ronchese, P.; Rongved, R.; Rosenberg, E.; Rossel, F.; Rosso, E.; Roudeau, P.; Rovelli, T.; Ruhlmann, V.; Ruiz, A.; Rybicki, K.; Saarikko, H.; Sacco, D.; Sacquin, Y.; Sadovsky, A.; Salgado, C. W.; Salt, J.; Samarin, A.; Sanchez, E.; Sanchis, E.; Sannino, M.; Schaeffer, M.; Schneider, H.; Scuri, F.; Sebastia, A.; Sedykh, Y. V.; Segar, A. M.; Sekulin, R.; Sessa, M.; Sette, G.; Seufert, R.; Shellard, R. C.; Siegrist, P.; Simonetti, S.; Simonetto, F.; Sissakian, A. N.; Skaali, T. B.; Skeens, J.; Skjevling, G.; Smadja, G.; Smith, G. R.; Sosnowski, R.; Spang, K.; Spassov, T.; Spentzouris, P.; Spiriti, E.; Squarcia, S.; Staeck, H.; Stanescu, C.; Stavropoulos, G.; Stichelbaut, F.; Stocchi, A.; Strauss, J.; Strub, R.; Sundell, E.; Szczekowski, M.; Szeptycka, M.; Szymanski, P.; Tavernier, S.; Tcherniaev, E.; Theodosiou, G.; Tilquin, A.; Timmermans, J.; Timofeev, V. G.; Tkachev, L. G.; Toet, D. Z.; Topp-Jorgensen, S.; Topphol, A. K.; Tortora, L.; Treille, D.; Trevisan, U.; Tristram, G.; Troncon, C.; Truong, T. K.; Tsyganov, E. N.; Turala, M.; Turchetta, R.; Turluer, M. L.; Tuuva, T.; Tyapkin, I.; Tyndel, M.; Udo, F.; Ueberschaer, S.; Ullaland, O.; Uvarov, V. A.; Valenti, G.; van Apeldoorn, G. W.; van Dam, P.; van Doninck, W. K.; van Eijk, B.; van Eijndhoven, N.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanuxem, J. P.; Varela, J.; Vaz, P.; Vegni, G.; Veitch, M. E.; Vela, E.; Velasco, J.; Ventura, L.; Venus, W.; Vertogradov, L.; Vilanova, D.; Viseu Melo, L.; Vlasov, E. V.; Vodopianov, A. S.; Vollmer, M.; Voulgaris, G.; Voutilainen, M.; Vrba, V.; Wahlen, H.; Walck, C.; Waldner, F.; Wayne, M.; Weilhammer, P.; Werner, J.; Wetherell, A. M.; Wickens, J. H.; Williams, W. S. C.; Winter, M.; Wormser, G.; Woschnagg, K.; Yamdagni, N.; Yelton, J. M.; Zaitsev, A.; Zalewska, A.; Zalewski, P.; Zevgolatakos, E.; Zhang, G.; Zimin, N. I.; Zito, M.; Zitoun, R.; Zukanovich Funchal, R.; Zumerle, G.

    1990-04-01

    Hadronic decays of Z0 bosons are studied in the Delphi detector. Global event variables and singel particles inclusive distributions are compared with QCD-based predictions. The mean charged multiplicity is found to be 20.6+/-1.0 (stat+syst). The mean values of the sphericity, aplanarity, thrust, minor value, pinT and poutT are compared with values found at lower energy e+e- colliders.

  3. Discriminating Supersymmetry and Black Holes at the Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Arunava; Cavaglia, Marco

    2008-04-01

    We assess the distinguishability between supersymmetry and black hole events at the Large Hadron Collider. Black hole events are simulated with the CATFISH black hole generator. Supersymmetry simulations use a combination of PYTHIA and ISAJET. Our study, based on event shape variables, visible and missing momenta, and analysis of dilepton events, shows that supersymmetry and black hole events at the LHC can be easily discriminated.

  4. Strangeness-conserving hadronic parity violation at low energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, C.-P.

    2007-05-01

    The parity-violating nucleaon interacton is the key to understanding the strangeness-conserving hadronic weak interaction at low energies. In this brief talk, I review the past accomplishement in and current status of this subject, and outline a new joint effort between experiment and theory that that tries to address the potential problems in the past by focusing on parity violation in few-nucleon systems and using the language of effective field theory.

  5. High energy gamma-rays and hadrons at Mount Fuji

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amenomori, M.; Nanjo, H.; Konishi, E.; Hotta, N.; Mizutani, K.; Kasahara, K.; Kobayashi, T.; Mikumo, E.; Sato, K.; Yuda, T.

    1985-01-01

    The energy spectra of high energy gamma-rays and hadrons were obtained by the emulsion chamber with 40 c.u. thickness at Mt. Fuji (3750 m). These results are compared with the Monte Carlo calculation based on the same model which is used in a family analysis. Our data are compatible with the model of heavy-enriched primary and scaling in the fragmentation region.

  6. The response of a bonner sphere spectrometer to charged hadrons.

    PubMed

    Agosteo, S; Dimovasili, E; Fassò, A; Silari, M

    2004-01-01

    Bonner sphere spectrometers (BSSs) are employed in neutron spectrometry and dosimetry since many years. Recent developments have seen the addition to a conventional BSS of one or more detectors (moderator plus thermal neutron counter) specifically designed to improve the overall response of the spectrometer to neutrons above 10 MeV. These additional detectors employ a shell of material with a high mass number (such as lead) within the polyethylene moderator, in order to slow down high-energy neutrons via (n,xn) reactions. A BSS can be used to measure neutron spectra both outside accelerator shielding and from an unshielded target. Measurements were recently performed at CERN of the neutron yield and spectral fluence at various angles from unshielded, semi-thick copper, silver and lead targets, bombarded by a mixed proton/pion beam with 40 GeV per c momentum. These experiments have provided evidence that under certain circumstances, the use of lead-enriched moderators may present a problem: these detectors were found to have a significant response to the charged hadron component accompanying the neutrons emitted from the target. Conventional polyethylene moderators show a similar behaviour but less pronounced. These secondary hadrons interact with the moderator and generate neutrons, which are in turn detected by the counter. To investigate this effect and determine a correction factor to be applied to the unfolding procedure, a series of Monte Carlo simulations were performed with the FLUKA code. These simulations aimed at determining the response of the BSS to charged hadrons under the specific experimental situation. Following these results, a complete response matrix of the extended BSS to charged pions and protons was calculated with FLUKA. An experimental verification was carried out with a 120 GeV per c hadron beam at the CERF facility at CERN.

  7. Learning to See at the Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Quigg, Chris

    2010-01-01

    The staged commissioning of the Large Hadron Collider presents an opportunity to map gross features of particle production over a significant energy range. I suggest a visual tool - event displays in (pseudo)rapidity-transverse-momentum space - as a scenic route that may help sharpen intuition, identify interesting classes of events for further investigation, and test expectations about the underlying event that accompanies large-transverse-momentum phenomena.

  8. Analysis of transverse momentum correlations in hadronic Z decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ALEPH Collaboration; Barate, R.; Buskulic, D.; Decamp, D.; Ghez, P.; Goy, C.; Lees, J.-P.; Lucotte, A.; Merle, E.; Minard, M.-N.; Nief, J.-Y.; Perrodo, P.; Pietrzyk, B.; Alemany, R.; Casado, M. P.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J. M.; Delfino, M.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, Ll.; Graugès, E.; Juste, A.; Martinez, M.; Merino, G.; Miquel, R.; Mir, Ll. M.; Pacheco, A.; Park, I. C.; Pascual, A.; Riu, I.; Sanchez, F.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Gelao, G.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Tricomi, A.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Abbaneo, D.; Becker, U.; Boix, G.; Cattaneo, M.; Cerutti, F.; Ciulli, V.; Dissertori, G.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Frank, M.; Halley, A. W.; Hansen, J. B.; Harvey, J.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Lehraus, I.; Leroy, O.; Mato, P.; Minten, A.; Moneta, L.; Moutoussi, A.; Ranjard, F.; Rolandi, L.; Rousseau, D.; Schlatter, D.; Schmitt, M.; Schneider, O.; Tejessy, W.; Teubert, F.; Tomalin, I. R.; Tournefier, E.; Wachsmuth, H.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Badaud, F.; Chazelle, G.; Deschamps, O.; Falvard, A.; Ferdi, C.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Nilsson, B. S.; Rensch, B.; Wäänänen, A.; Daskalakis, G.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Siotis, I.; Vayaki, A.; Blondel, A.; Bonneaud, G.; Brient, J.-C.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Swynghedauw, M.; Valassi, A.; Verderi, M.; Videau, H.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Zachariadou, K.; Corden, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Jaffe, D. E.; Antonelli, A.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Chiarella, V.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Curtis, L.; Lynch, J. G.; Negus, P.; O'Shea, V.; Raine, C.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomson, E.; Buchmüller, O.; Dhamotharan, S.; Geweniger, C.; Hanke, P.; Hansper, G.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Putzer, A.; Sommer, J.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Dornan, P. J.; Girone, M.; Goodsir, S.; Martin, E. B.; Marinelli, N.; Nash, J.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Spagnolo, P.; Williams, M. D.; Ghete, V. M.; Girtler, P.; Kneringer, E.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Betteridge, A. P.; Bowdery, C. K.; Buck, P. G.; Colrain, P.; Crawford, G.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jones, R. W. L.; Robertson, N. A.; Williams, M. I.; Giehl, I.; Hoffmann, C.; Jakobs, K.; Kleinknecht, K.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Rohne, E.; Sander, H.-G.; van Gemmeren, P.; Zeitnitz, C.; Aubert, J. J.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Carr, J.; Coyle, P.; Etienne, F.; Motsch, F.; Payre, P.; Talby, M.; Thulasidas, M.; Aleppo, M.; Antonelli, M.; Ragusa, F.; Berlich, R.; Büscher, V.; Dietl, H.; Ganis, G.; Hüttmann, K.; Lütjens, G.; Mannert, C.; Männer, W.; Moser, H.-G.; Schael, S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; Stenzel, H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wolf, G.; Azzurri, P.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Chen, S.; Cordier, A.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Jacholkowska, A.; Kim, D. W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrançois, J.; Lutz, A.-M.; Schune, M.-H.; Veillet, J.-J.; Videau, I.; Zerwas, D.; Bagliesi, G.; Bettarini, S.; Boccali, T.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; dell'Orso, R.; Ferrante, I.; Foà, L.; Giassi, A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lusiani, A.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Rizzo, G.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciabà, A.; Sguazzoni, G.; Tenchini, R.; Vannini, C.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Blair, G. A.; Chambers, J. T.; Cowan, G.; Green, M. G.; Medcalf, T.; Strong, J. A.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Botterill, D. R.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Norton, P. R.; Thompson, J. C.; Wright, A. E.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Emery, S.; Kozanecki, W.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M.-C.; Locci, E.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schwindling, J.; Trabelsi, A.; Vallage, B.; Black, S. N.; Dann, J. H.; Johnson, R. P.; Kim, H. Y.; Konstantinidis, N.; Litke, A. M.; McNeil, M. A.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C. N.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Kelly, M. S.; Lehto, M.; Thompson, L. F.; Affholderbach, K.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Grupen, C.; Prange, G.; Saraiva, P.; Smolik, L.; Stephan, F.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Rothberg, J.; Wasserbaech, S.; Armstrong, S. R.; Charles, E.; Elmer, P.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; Gao, Y.; González, S.; Greening, T. C.; Hayes, O. J.; Hu, H.; Jin, S.; McNamara, P. A., III; Nachtman, J. M.; Nielsen, J.; Orejudos, W.; Pan, Y. B.; Saadi, Y.; Scott, I. J.; Walsh, J.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Zobernig, G.

    1999-02-01

    In a recent paper, evidence was presented for a significant, positive correlation between the total transverse momenta of particles on opposite hemispheres of hadronic events. A new, model independent analysis of the data has been made. Two components can be distinguished in the correlation, and quantitative estimates of each are given. The results form a significant test of Monte Carlo models and some of the physics behind them.

  9. Dyson-Schwinger equations and their application to hadronic physics

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, C.D.; Williams, A.G.

    1995-08-01

    At the invitation of the editor of {open_quotes}Progress in Particle and Nuclear Physics{close_quotes} a review article which describes the present status of the application of Dyson-Schwinger equations to nonperturbative studies of quantum electrodynamics in three and four dimensions, quantum chromodynamics and hadronic physics was written. This article was written with the aim of making this increasingly useful and efficacious nonperturbative approach accessible to a larger group of physicists and to encourage its broader application.

  10. Solution Radioactivated by Hadron Radiation Can Increase Sister Chromatid Exchanges

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Junko; Yurkon, Charles R.; Fujii, Yoshihiro; Fujisawa, Hiroshi; Kato, Sayaka; Brents, Colleen A.; Uesaka, Mitsuru; Fujimori, Akira; Kitamura, Hisashi; Kato, Takamitsu A.

    2015-01-01

    When energetic particles irradiate matter, it becomes activated by nuclear reactions. Radioactivation induced cellular effects are not clearly understood, but it could be a part of bystander effects. This investigation is aimed at understanding the biological effects from radioactivation in solution induced by hadron radiation. Water or phosphate buffered saline was activated by being exposed to hadron radiation including protons, carbon- and iron-ions. 1 mL of radioactivated solution was transferred to flasks with Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells cultured in 5 mL of complete media. The induction of sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) was used to observe any increase in DNA damage responses. The energy spectrum and the half-lives of the radioactivation were analyzed by NaI scintillation detector in order to identify generated radionuclides. In the radioactivated solution, 511 keV gamma-rays were observed, and their half-lives were approximately 2 min, 10 min, and 20 min. They respectively correspond to the beta+ decay of 15O, 13N, and 11C. The SCE frequencies in CHO cells increased depending on the amount of radioactivation in the solution. These were suppressed with a 2-hour delayed solution transfer or pretreatment with dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). Our results suggest that the SCE induction by radioactivated solution was mediated by free radicals produced by the annihilated gamma-rays. Since the SCE induction and DMSO modulation are also reported in radiation-induced bystander effects, our results imply that radioactivation of the solution may have some contribution to the bystander effects from hadron radiation. Further investigations are required to assess if radioactivation effects would attribute an additional level of cancer risk of the hadron radiation therapy itself. PMID:26657140

  11. Transverse momentum distribution of hadrons within a jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Zhongbo

    2017-01-01

    We consider the transverse momentum distribution of hadrons within a fully reconstructed jet. Within the framework of Soft Collinear Effective Theory (SCET), we demonstrate how such a distribution for inclusive jet production in proton-proton collisions can be expressed in a transverse momentum dependent (TMD) factorization formalism. We show the phenomenological application of such a formalism, for both unpolarized and polarized collisions (e.g., Collins azimuthal asymmetry), which has been measured at both RHIC and/or LHC.

  12. Dependence of nuclear binding on hadronic mass variation

    SciTech Connect

    Flambaum, V. V.; Wiringa, R. B.

    2007-11-15

    We examine how the binding of light (A{<=}8) nuclei depends on possible variations of hadronic masses, including meson, nucleon, and nucleon-resonance masses. Small variations in hadronic masses may have occurred over time; the present results can help evaluate the consequences for big bang nucleosynthesis. Larger variations may be relevant to current attempts to extrapolate properties of nucleon-nucleon interactions from lattice QCD calculations. Results are presented as derivatives of the energy with respect to the different masses so they can be combined with different predictions of the hadronic mass-dependence on the underlying current-quark mass m{sub q}. As an example, we employ a particular set of relations obtained from a study of hadron masses and sigma terms based on Dyson-Schwinger equations and a Poincare-covariant Faddeev equation for confined quarks and diquarks. We find that nuclear binding decreases moderately rapidly as the quark mass increases, with the deuteron becoming unbound when the pion mass is increased by {approx}60% (corresponding to an increase in X{sub q}=m{sub q}/{lambda}{sub QCD} of 2.5). In the other direction, the dineutron becomes bound if the pion mass is decreased by {approx}15% (corresponding to a reduction of X{sub q} by {approx}30%). If we interpret the disagreement between big bang nucleosynthesis calculations and measurements to be the result of variation in X{sub q}, we obtain an estimate {delta}X{sub q}/X{sub q}=K{center_dot}(0.013{+-}0.002) where K{approx}1 (the expected accuracy in K is about a factor of 2). The result is dominated by {sup 7}Li data.

  13. Conformal symmetry algebra of the quark potential and degeneracies in the hadron spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirchbach, M.

    2012-10-01

    The essence of the potential algebra concept [Y. Alhassid, F. Gürsey, F. Yachello. Phys. Rev. Lett. 50 (1983)] is that quantum mechanical free motions of scalar particles on curved surfaces of given isometry algebras can be mapped on 1D Schrödinger equations with particular potentials. As long as the Laplace-Beltrami operator on a curved surface is proportional to one of the Casimir invariants of the isometry algebra, free motion on the surface is described by means of the eigenvalue problem of that very Casimir operator. In effect, the excitation modes considered are classified according to the irreducible representations of the algebra of interest and are characterized by typical degeneracies. In consequence, also the spectra of the equivalent Schrödinger operators are classified according to the same irreducible representations and carry the same typical degeneracies. A subtle point concerns the representation of the algebra elements which may or may not be unitarily equivalent to the standard one generating classical groups like SO(n), SO(p,q), etc. To be specific, any similarity transformations of an algebra that underlies, say, an orthogonal group, always conserve the commutators among the elements, but a non-unitarily transformed algebra must not generate same group. One can then consider the parameters of the non-unitary similarity transformation as group symmetry breaking scales and seek to identify them with physical observables. We here use the potential algebra concept as a guidance in the search for an interaction describing conformal degeneracies. For this purpose we subject the so(4) ⊂ so(2,4) isometry algebra of the S3 ball to a particular non-unitary similarity transformation and obtain a deformed isometry copy to S3 such that free motion on the copy is equivalent to a cotangent perturbed motion on S3, and to the 1D Schrödinger operator with the trigonometric Rosen-Morse potential as well. The latter presents itself especially well suited for

  14. Representation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-01

    absolutely nothing, for others familiarity or even a sense of kinship while others feel pangs of contemptuousness. The psychologist Carl Jung ...noticed this about people.1 Of the Christian cross, Jung noted that it carried a much different significance (p.81) if found after one’s name in a book...signifying their death as opposed to its placement on a building. Jung researched early Christianity and discovered that the crossbeam of its Latin

  15. Hadronic γ-ray images of Sedov supernova remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beshley, V.; Petruk, O.

    2012-01-01

    A number of modern experiments in high-energy astrophysics produce images of supernova remnants (SNRs) in the TeV and GeV γ-rays. Either relativistic electrons (due to the inverse-Compton scattering) or protons (due to the pion decays) may be responsible for this emission. In particular, the broad-band spectra of SNRs may be explained in both leptonic and hadronic scenarios. Another kind of observational data, namely, images of SNRs, is an important part of experimental information. We present a method to model γ-ray images of Sedov SNRs in uniform media and magnetic field due to hadronic emission. These γ-rays are assumed to appear as a consequence of meson decays produced in inelastic collisions of accelerated protons with thermal protons downstream of the shock - a model would be relevant for SNRs without firm confirmations of the shock-cloud interaction, as e.g. SN 1006. Distribution of surface brightness of the shell-like SNR is synthesized numerically for a number of configurations. An approximate analytical formula for azimuthal and radial variation of hadronic γ-ray brightness close to the shock is derived. The properties of images as well as the main factors determining the surface brightness distribution are determined. Some conclusions that would be relevant to SN 1006 are discussed.

  16. Momentum space dipole amplitude for DIS and inclusive hadron production

    SciTech Connect

    Basso, E. A.; Gay Ducati, M. B.; De Oliveira, E. G.

    2013-03-25

    We show how the AGBS model, originally developed for deep inelastic scattering applied to HERA data on the proton structure function, can also describe the RHIC data on single inclusive hadron yield for d+Au and p+p collisions through a new simultaneous fit. The single inclusive hadron production is modeled through the color glass condensate, which uses the quark(and gluon) condensate amplitudes in momentum space. The AGBS model is also a momentum space model based on the asymptotic solutions of the BK equation, although a different definition of the Fourier transform is used. This description entirely in transverse momentum of both processes arises for the first time. The small difference between the simultaneous fit and the one for HERA data alone suggests that the AGBS model describes very well both kind of processes and thus emerges as a good tool to investigate the inclusive hadron production data. We use this model for predictions at LHC energies, which agree quite well with available experimental data.

  17. Average and individual B hadron lifetimes at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, O.; CDF Collaboration

    1993-09-01

    Bottom hadron lifetime measurements have been performed using B {yields} J/{psi} {yields} {mu}+{mu}{sup {minus}}X dacays recorded with the collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) during the first half of the 1992--1993 Tevatron collider run. These decays have been reconstructed in a silicon vertex detector. Using 5344 {plus_minus} 73 inclusive J/{psi} events, the average lifetime of all bottom hadrons produced in 1.8 TeV p{bar p} collisions and decaying into a J/{psi} events, the average lifetime of all bottom hadrons produced in 1.8 TeV p{bar p} collisions and decaying into a J/{psi} is found to be 1.46 {plus_minus} 0.06(stat) {plus_minus}0.06(sys)ps. The charged and neutral B meson lifetimes have been measured separately using 75 {plus_minus}10 (charged) and 61{plus_minus}9 (neutral) fully reconstructed decays; preliminary results are {tau}{sup {plus_minus}} = 1.63 {plus_minus} 0.21(stat) {plus_minus} 0.16(sys) {plus_minus} 0. 10(sys) ps, yielding a lifetime ratio of {tau}{sup {plus_minus}}/{tau}{sup 0} = 1.06{plus_minus} 0.20(stat){plus_minus}0.12(sys).

  18. Time Dependent Hadronic Modeling of Flat Spectrum Radio Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diltz, C.; Böttcher, M.; Fossati, G.

    2015-04-01

    We introduce a new time-dependent lepto-hadronic model for blazar emission that takes into account the radiation emitted by secondary particles, such as pions and muons, from photo hadronic interactions. Starting from a baseline parameter set guided by a fit to the spectral energy distribution of the blazar 3C 279, we perform a parameter study to investigate the effects of perturbations of the input parameters to mimic different flaring events to study the resulting light curves in the optical, X-ray, high-energy (HE: E\\gt 100 MeV), and very-high-energy (E\\gt 100 GeV) γ-rays as well as the neutrino emission associated with charged-pion and muon decay. We find that flaring events from an increase in the efficiency of Fermi II acceleration will produce a positive correlation between all bandpasses and a marked plateau in the HE γ-ray lightcurve. We also predict a distinctive dip in the HE lightcurve for perturbations caused by a change in the proton injection spectral index. These plateaus/dips could be a tell tale signature of hadronic models for perturbations that lead to more efficient acceleration of high-energy protons in parameter regimes where pion and muon synchrotron emission is non-negligible.

  19. Measurement of the average lifetime of hadrons containing bottom quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Klem, D.E.

    1986-06-01

    This thesis reports a measurement of the average lifetime of hadrons containing bottom quarks. It is based on data taken with the DELCO detector at the PEP e/sup +/e/sup -/ storage ring at a center of mass energy of 29 GeV. The decays of hadrons containing bottom quarks are tagged in hadronic events by the presence of electrons with a large component of momentum transverse to the event axis. Such electrons are identified in the DELCO detector by an atmospheric pressure Cherenkov counter assisted by a lead/scintillator electromagnetic shower counter. The lifetime measured is 1.17 psec, consistent with previous measurements. This measurement, in conjunction with a limit on the non-charm branching ratio in b-decay obtained by other experiments, can be used to constrain the magnitude of the V/sub cb/ element of the Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix to the range 0.042 (+0.005 or -0.004 (stat.), +0.004 or -0.002 (sys.)), where the errors reflect the uncertainty on tau/sub b/ only and not the uncertainties in the calculations which relate the b-lifetime and the element of the Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix.

  20. Exclusive hadronic cross sections measured via ISR from BABAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafner, Andreas; Babar Collaboration

    2010-10-01

    Measuring the inclusive hadronic cross section in ee annihilation is of major interest for the determination of the Standard Model prediction of the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon a. The QED and weak contribution to a can be calculated with very high precission. At low energies, however, perturbation theory cannot be used to calculate the hadronic contribution aμhad. It therefore has to be derived via a dispersion relation from the sum of measured cross sections of exclusive hadronic reactions. Decreasing the experimental uncertainties on these channels is of utmost importance for an improved Standard Model prediction of a. Between 1999 and 2008 a data set of approximately 500 fb -1was recorded with the BABAR detector at the B-Factory PEP-II at SLAC (Stanford, USA), an electron-positron storage ring with fixed Center of Mass energy of 10.58 GeV. Using the technique of Initial State Radiation the energy range from threshold up to 4.5 GeV can be accessed. The measurement of the important process ee→ππ and other channels will be presented.

  1. Hadronic and electromagnetic fragmentation of ultrarelativistic heavy ions at LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, H. H.; Fassò, A.; Ferrari, A.; Jowett, J. M.; Sala, P. R.; Smirnov, G. I.

    2014-02-01

    Reliable predictions of yields of nuclear fragments produced in electromagnetic dissociation and hadronic fragmentation of ion beams are of great practical importance in analyzing beam losses and interactions with the beam environment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN as well as for estimating radiation effects of galactic cosmic rays on the spacecraft crew and electronic equipment. The model for predicting the fragmentation of relativistic heavy ions is briefly described, and then applied to problems of relevance for LHC. The results are based on the fluka code, which includes electromagnetic dissociation physics and dpmjet-iii as hadronic event generator. We consider the interaction of fully stripped lead ions with nuclei in the energy range from about one hundred MeV to ultrarelativistic energies. The yields of fragments close in the mass and charge to initial ions are calculated. The approach under discussion provides a good overall description of Pb fragmentation data at 30 and 158A GeV as well as recent LHC data for √sNN =2.76 TeV Pb-Pb interactions. Good agreement with the calculations in the framework of different models is found. This justifies application of the developed simulation technique both at the LHC injection energy of 177A GeV and at its collision energies of 1.38, 1.58, and 2.75A TeV, and gives confidence in the results obtained.

  2. Exploring Jet-Hadron correlations at the LHC with ALICE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazer, Joel

    2016-08-01

    In relativistic heavy ion collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the conditions are met to produce the hot and dense, strongly interacting medium known as the Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP). The QGP, a state of matter created shortly after the Big Bang, is a phase where the deconfinement of quarks and gluons is hypothesized. Jets, the collimated sprays of hadrons from fragmenting partons, are a key probe of the medium. The experimental methods used for jet measurements at ALICE to remove, reduce, and correct for the underlying background event will be presented. In pp collisions, jet production is well understood within the framework of perturbative QCD and acts as a rigorous baseline measurement for jet quenching measurements. By comparing to heavy ion collision systems, we can study the suppression of the number of jets seen and study the modification of the pT or angular distributions of jet fragments. Azimuthal angular correlations of charged hadrons with respect to the axis of a full (charged + neutral) reconstructed (trigger) jet in Pb-Pb and pp collisions at √sNN = 2.76 TeV in ALICE will be presented here. Newly developed combinatoric background subtraction methods and their improvement compared to prior techniques will be discussed.

  3. The Future of Hadrons: The Nexus of Subatomic Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Quigg, Chris

    2011-09-01

    The author offers brief observations on matters discussed at the XIV International Conference on Hadron Spectroscopy and explore prospects for hadron physics. Quantum chromodynamics (QCD) has been validated as a new law of nature. It is internally consistent up to very high energies, and so could be a complete theory of the strong interactions. Whether QCD is the final answer for the strong interactions is a subject for continuing experimental tests, which are being extended in experimentation at the Large Hadron Collider. Beyond the comparison of perturbative calculations with experiment, it remains critically important to test the confinement hypothesis by searching for free quarks, or for signatures of unconfined color. Sensitive negative searches for quarks continue to be interesting, and the definitive observation of free quarks would be revolutionary. Breakdowns of factorization would compromise the utility of perturbative QCD. Other discoveries that would require small or large revisions to QCD include the observation of new kinds of colored matter beyond quarks and gluons, the discovery that quarks are composite, or evidence that SU(3){sub c} gauge symmetry is the vestige of a larger, spontaneously broken, color symmetry. While probing our underlying theory for weakness or new openings, we have plenty to do to apply QCD to myriad experimental settings, to learn its implications for matter under unusual conditions, and to become more adept at calculating its consequences. New experimental tools provide the means for progress on a very broad front.

  4. Application of the hidden local symmetry in hadron physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, Masayasu

    About two decades ago, Gerry Brown pushed me to study hadron physics using hadronic models based on the hidden local symmetry (HLS). Since then, I have been involving many works related to the HLS. In this contribution to Gerry’s memorial, I will summarize my recent analyses associated with the HLS. After a very brief summary of the HLS, I will show a way to determine parameters of the HLS model from holographic QCD models. This model provides a soliton solution which is identified with the nucleon. I will briefly introduce a model in which the solitons are put onto a crystal lattice for simulating nuclear matter. The results suggest existence of the chiral invariant mass of nucleon. I also briefly review my recent analyses on the nuclear matter by using a hadronic model including nucleon field together with the π, σ, ρ and ω mesons based on the parity doublet structure of nucleon combined with the HLS, in which the chiral invariant mass of the nucleon is naturally embedded. The result implies that studying effective masses of nucleons will give a clue for the chiral invariant mass. Finally, I will show our recent analysis on the medium modification of charmed meson masses using a chiral model based on the chiral doubling structure of charmed mesons. The result shows that the masses of the chiral partners of charmed mesons become closer in high density reflecting the particle chiral symmetry restoration in medium.

  5. Resistive Plate Chamber digitization in a hadronic shower environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Z.; Li, Y.; Wang, Y.; Yue, Q.; Yang, Z.; Boumediene, D.; Carloganu, C.; Français, V.; Cho, G.; Kim, D.-W.; Lee, S. C.; Park, W.; Vallecorsa, S.; Apostolakis, J.; Folger, G.; Grefe, C.; Ivantchenko, V.; Ribon, A.; Uzhinskiy, V.; Cauwenbergh, S.; Tytgat, M.; Pingault, A.; Zaganidis, N.; Brianne, E.; Ebrahimi, A.; Gadow, K.; Göttlicher, P.; Günter, C.; Hartbrich, O.; Hermberg, B.; Irles, A.; Krivan, F.; Krüger, K.; Kvasnicka, J.; Lu, S.; Lutz, B.; Morgunov, V.; Neubüser, C.; Provenza, A.; Reinecke, M.; Sefkow, F.; Schuwalow, S.; Tran, H. L.; Garutti, E.; Laurien, S.; Matysek, M.; Ramilli, M.; Schroeder, S.; Bilki, B.; Norbeck, E.; Northacker, D.; Onel, Y.; Chang, S.; Khan, A.; Kim, D. H.; Kong, D. J.; Oh, Y. D.; Kawagoe, K.; Hirai, H.; Sudo, Y.; Suehara, T.; Sumida, H.; Yoshioka, T.; Cortina Gil, E.; Mannai, S.; Buridon, V.; Combaret, C.; Caponetto, L.; Eté, R.; Garillot, G.; Grenier, G.; Han, R.; Ianigro, J. C.; Kieffer, R.; Laktineh, I.; Lumb, N.; Mathez, H.; Mirabito, L.; Petrukhin, A.; Steen, A.; Berenguer Antequera, J.; Calvo Alamillo, E.; Fouz, M.-C.; Marin, J.; Puerta-Pelayo, J.; Verdugo, A.; Chadeeva, M.; Danilov, M.; Corriveau, F.; Gabriel, M.; Goecke, P.; Kiesling, C.; van der Kolk, N.; Simon, F.; Szalay, M.; Bilokin, S.; Bonis, J.; Cornebise, P.; Richard, F.; Pöschl, R.; Rouëné, J.; Thiebault, A.; Zerwas, D.; Anduze, M.; Balagura, V.; Belkadhi, K.; Boudry, V.; Brient, J.-C.; Cornat, R.; Frotin, M.; Gastaldi, F.; Haddad, Y.; Magniette, F.; Ruan, M.; Rubio-Roy, M.; Shpak, K.; Videau, H.; Yu, D.; Callier, S.; Conforti di Lorenzo, S.; Dulucq, F.; Martin-Chassard, G.; de la Taille, Ch.; Raux, L.; Seguin-Moreau, N.; Kotera, K.; Ono, H.; Takeshita, T.

    2016-06-01

    The CALICE Semi-Digital Hadronic Calorimeter technological prototype is a sampling calorimeter using Glass Resistive Plate Chamber detectors with a three-threshold readout as the active medium. This technology is one of the two options proposed for the hadronic calorimeter of the International Large Detector for the International Linear Collider. The prototype was exposed to beams of muons, electrons and pions of different energies at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron. To be able to study the performance of such a calorimeter in future experiments it is important to ensure reliable simulation of its response. This paper presents the SDHCAL prototype simulation performed with GEANT4 and the digitization procedure achieved with an algorithm called SimDigital. A detailed description of this algorithm is given and the methods to determinate its parameters using muon tracks and electromagnetic showers are explained. The comparison with hadronic shower data shows a good agreement up to 50 GeV. Discrepancies are observed at higher energies. The reasons for these differences are investigated.

  6. Antiparticle to particle production ratios in hadron-hadron and d-Au collisions in the DPMJET-III Monte Carlo model

    SciTech Connect

    Bopp, F. W.; Ranft, J.; Engel, R.; Roesler, S.

    2008-01-15

    To understand baryon stopping we analyze new Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and Fermilab data within the framework of the multichain Monte Carlo DPMJET-III. The present consideration is restricted to hadron-hadron and d-Au collisions, where the present version of the model can be trusted.

  7. Negotiated Representational Mediators: How Young Children Decide What to Include in Their Science Representations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danish, Joshua A.; Enyedy, Noel

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we synthesize two bodies of work related to students' representational activities: the notions of meta-representational competence and representation as a form of practice. We report on video analyses of kindergarten and first-grade students as they create representations of pollination in a science classroom, as well as summarize…

  8. Military Representation: The Theoretical and Practical Implications of Population Representation in the American Armed Forces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-10-01

    REPRESENTATION AND SOCIAL EQUITY: PAST AND PRESENT EXPERIENCES.. ............... 103 Equity in the Military Melting Pot Black Representation in the...Vietnam The Vietnam-Era Draft in Retrospect Military Representation and Social Equity under the AVF Measures of Social Equity Implications CHAPTER V...MILITARY REPRESENTATION AND SOCIAL EQUITY: THE POLICY MAZE ........ ..................... ... 183 Benefits vs. Burdens of Military Service

  9. Search for New Physics in All-Hadronic Events With the Compact Muon Solenoid Experiment at the Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jandir, Pawandeep Singh

    In this dissertation, a search for New Physics is presented in proton-proton collisions at √s = 13 TeV. This collision data was collected by the Compact Muon Solenoid detector at the CERN Large Hadron Collider located in Geneva, Switzerland in 2015 and corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 2.3 fb-1. The search analyzes events with zero leptons and large hadronic activity. The data is divided into search regions of jet multiplicity, bottom quark tagged jet multiplicity, missing transverse momentum, and scalar sum of jet transverse momenta. The observed event count in the search regions are found to be in agreement within the standard model expectation. Thus, the results are interpreted in the context of simplified supersymmetric models of gluino pair production leading to a significant improvement in the exclusion limits on the possible mass of the gluino and neutralino.

  10. Rapidity gaps and jets as a new-physics signature in very-high-energy hadron-hadron collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjorken, J. D.

    1993-01-01

    In hadron-hadron collisions, production of Higgs bosons and other color-singlet systems can occur via fusion of electroweak bosons, occasionally leaving a ``rapidity gap'' in the underlying-event structure. This observation, due to Dokshitzer, Khoze, and Troyan, is studied to see whether it serves as a signature for detection of the Higgs bosons, etc. We find it is a very strong signature at subprocess c.m. energies in excess of a few TeV. The most serious problem with this strategy is the estimation of the fraction of events containing the rapidity gap; most of the time the gap is filled by soft interactions of spectator degrees of freedom. We also study this question and estimate this ``survival probability of the rapidity gap'' to be of order 5%, with an uncertainty of a factor 3. Ways of testing this estimate and further discussion of the underlying hard-diffraction physics are presented.

  11. Alternative Approach to Nuclear Data Representation

    SciTech Connect

    Pruet, J; Brown, D; Beck, B; McNabb, D P

    2005-07-27

    This paper considers an approach for representing nuclear data that is qualitatively different from the approach currently adopted by the nuclear science community. Specifically, they examine a representation in which complicated data is described through collections of distinct and self contained simple data structures. This structure-based representation is compared with the ENDF and ENDL formats, which can be roughly characterized as dictionary-based representations. A pilot data representation for replacing the format currently used at LLNL is presented. Examples are given as is a discussion of promises and shortcomings associated with moving from traditional dictionary-based formats to a structure-rich or class-like representation.

  12. Thermodynamics of Hot Hadronic Gases at Finite Baryon Densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albright, Michael Glenn

    In this thesis we investigate equilibrium and nonequilibrium thermodynamic properties of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) matter at finite baryon densities. We begin by constructing crossover models for the thermodynamic equation of state. These use switching functions to smoothly interpolate between a hadronic gas model at low energy densities to a perturbative QCD equation of state at high energy densities. We carefully design the switching function to avoid introducing first-, second-, or higher-order phase transitions which lattice QCD indicates are not present at small baryon chemical potentials. We employ three kinds of hadronic models in the crossover constructions, two of which include repulsive interactions via an excluded volume approximation while one model does not. We find that the three crossover models are in excellent agreement with accurate lattice QCD calculations of the equation of state over a wide range of temperatures and baryon chemical potentials. Hence, the crossover models should be very useful for parameterizing the equation of state at finite baryon densities, which is needed to build next-generation hydrodynamic simulations of heavy-ion collisions. We next calculate the speed of sound and baryon number fluctuations predicted by the crossover models. We find that crossover models with hadronic repulsion are most successful at reproducing the lattice results, while the model without repulsion is less successful, and hadron (only) models show poor agreement. We then compare the crossover models to net-proton fluctuation measurements from the STAR Collaboration at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The comparisons suggest baryon number fluctuations freeze-out well below the chemical freeze-out temperature. We also search for signs of critical fluctuations in the STAR data, but we find no evidence for them at this time. Finally, we derive kinetic theory formulas for the shear and bulk viscosity and thermal conductivity of hot hadronic

  13. Representation learning: a review and new perspectives.

    PubMed

    Bengio, Yoshua; Courville, Aaron; Vincent, Pascal

    2013-08-01

    The success of machine learning algorithms generally depends on data representation, and we hypothesize that this is because different representations can entangle and hide more or less the different explanatory factors of variation behind the data. Although specific domain knowledge can be used to help design representations, learning with generic priors can also be used, and the quest for AI is motivating the design of more powerful representation-learning algorithms implementing such priors. This paper reviews recent work in the area of unsupervised feature learning and deep learning, covering advances in probabilistic models, autoencoders, manifold learning, and deep networks. This motivates longer term unanswered questions about the appropriate objectives for learning good representations, for computing representations (i.e., inference), and the geometrical connections between representation learning, density estimation, and manifold learning.

  14. Representation and re-presentation in litigation science.

    PubMed

    Jasanoff, Sheila

    2008-01-01

    Federal appellate courts have devised several criteria to help judges distinguish between reliable and unreliable scientific evidence. The best known are the U.S. Supreme Court's criteria offered in 1993 in Daubert v. Merrell Dow Pharmaceuticals, Inc. This article focuses on another criterion, offered by the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals, that instructs judges to assign lower credibility to "litigation science" than to science generated before litigation. In this article I argue that the criterion-based approach to judicial screening of scientific evidence is deeply flawed. That approach buys into the faulty premise that there are external criteria, lying outside the legal process, by which judges can distinguish between good and bad science. It erroneously assumes that judges can ascertain the appropriate criteria and objectively apply them to challenged evidence before litigation unfolds, and before methodological disputes are sorted out during that process. Judicial screening does not take into account the dynamics of litigation itself, including gaming by the parties and framing by judges, as constitutive factors in the production and representation of knowledge. What is admitted through judicial screening, in other words, is not precisely what a jury would see anyway. Courts are sites of repeated re-representations of scientific knowledge. In sum, the screening approach fails to take account of the wealth of existing scholarship on the production and validation of scientific facts. An unreflective application of that approach thus puts courts at risk of relying upon a "junk science" of the nature of scientific knowledge.

  15. Time reversal odd fragmentation functions in semi-inclusive deep inelastic lepton-hadron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Mulders, P.J.; Levelt, J.

    1994-04-01

    In semi-inclusive scattering of polarized leptons from unpolarized hadrons, one can measure a time reversal odd structure function. It shows up as a sin({phi}) asymmetry of the produced hadrons. This asymmetry can be expressed as the product of a twist-three {open_quotes}hadron {r_arrow} quark{close_quotes} profile function and a time reversal odd twist-two {open_quotes}quark {r_arrow} hadron{close_quotes} fragmentation function. This fragmentation function can only be measured for nonzero transverse momenta of the produced hadron. Its appearance is a consequence of final state interactions between the produced hadron and the rest of the final state.

  16. Violation of mass ordering for multi-strange hadrons at RHIC and LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, Shiori; Murase, Koichi; Hirano, Tetsufumi; Huovinen, Pasi; Nara, Yasushi

    2016-12-01

    We study effects of the hadronic rescattering on final observables especially for multi-strange hadrons such as ϕ, Ξ and Ω in high-energy heavy-ion collisions within an integrated dynamical approach. In this approach, (3+1)-dimensional ideal hydrodynamics is combined with a microscopic transport model, JAM. We simulate the collisions with or without hadronic rescatterings and compare observables between these two options so that we quantify the effects of the hadronic rescattering. We find that the mean transverse momentum and the elliptic flow parameter of multi-strange hadrons are less affected by hadronic rescattering and, as a result, the mass ordering of the pT-differential elliptic flow parameter v2 (pT) is violated: At the RHIC and the LHC energies the v2 (pT) for ϕ-mesons is larger than that for protons in the low-pT regions.

  17. Unitary Representations of Gauge Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huerfano, Ruth Stella

    I generalize to the case of gauge groups over non-trivial principal bundles representations that I. M. Gelfand, M. I. Graev and A. M. Versik constructed for current groups. The gauge group of the principal G-bundle P over M, (G a Lie group with an euclidean structure, M a compact, connected and oriented manifold), as the smooth sections of the associated group bundle is presented and studied in chapter I. Chapter II describes the symmetric algebra associated to a Hilbert space, its Hilbert structure, a convenient exponential and a total set that later play a key role in the construction of the representation. Chapter III is concerned with the calculus needed to make the space of Lie algebra valued 1-forms a Gaussian L^2-space. This is accomplished by studying general projective systems of finitely measurable spaces and the corresponding systems of sigma -additive measures, all of these leading to the description of a promeasure, a concept modeled after Bourbaki and classical measure theory. In the case of a locally convex vector space E, the corresponding Fourier transform, family of characters and the existence of a promeasure for every quadratic form on E^' are established, so the Gaussian L^2-space associated to a real Hilbert space is constructed. Chapter III finishes by exhibiting the explicit Hilbert space isomorphism between the Gaussian L ^2-space associated to a real Hilbert space and the complexification of its symmetric algebra. In chapter IV taking as a Hilbert space H the L^2-space of the Lie algebra valued 1-forms on P, the gauge group acts on the motion group of H defining in an straight forward fashion the representation desired.

  18. The conceptual representation of number.

    PubMed

    Patson, Nikole D; George, Gerret; Warren, Tessa

    2014-01-01

    The experiments reported here investigated the format of plural conceptual representations using a picture-matching paradigm. In Experiment 1, participants read sentences that ended with a singular noun phrase (NP), a two-quantified plural NP, or a plural definite description [The parents handed the child the (two) crayon/s] and then saw a picture of one or multiple referents for the NP. Judgement times to confirm that there was overlap between the pictured object(s) and a noun in the sentence showed an interaction between the NP's number and NP-picture match. For singular NPs and two-quantified NPs, participants were reliably faster to respond "yes" to a picture that had the exact number of objects specified by the NP, but for plural definite descriptions, the effect of the number of pictured items was not reliable. Experiment 2 extended this finding to conceptual plurals. Participants read sentences biased toward either a collective (Together the men carried a box-box is interpreted as singular) or distributed (Each of the men carried a box-box is likely interpreted as plural) reading. Experiment 2 showed the same interaction between NP conceptual plurality and NP-picture match as that in Experiment 1. These results suggest that: (a) our default conceptual representations for plural definite descriptions are no more similar to images of small sets of multiple items than to images of singular items; and (b) the difference between singular and plural conceptual representations is unlikely to be simply the presence or absence of a plural feature. The results are consistent with theories in which plurality is unmarked, such that some plural NPs can refer to singular referents [e.g., Sauerland, U., Anderssen, J., & Yatsushiro, J. (2005). The plural is semantically unmarked. In S. Kepser & M. Reis (Eds.), Linguistic evidence (pp. 413-434). Berlin: de Gruyter].

  19. Argumentation-Based Collaborative Inquiry in Science Through Representational Work: Impact on Primary Students' Representational Fluency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichols, Kim; Gillies, Robyn; Hedberg, John

    2016-06-01

    This study explored the impact of argumentation-promoting collaborative inquiry and representational work in science on primary students' representational fluency. Two hundred sixty-six year 6 students received instruction on natural disasters with a focus on collaborative inquiry. Students in the Comparison condition received only this instruction. Students in the Explanation condition were also instructed with a focus on explanations using representations. Students in the Argumentation condition received similar instruction to the Comparison and Explanation conditions but were also instructed with a focus on argumentation using representations. Conceptual understanding and representational competencies (interpreting, explaining and constructing representations) were measured prior to and immediately following the instruction. A small group collaborative representational task was video recorded at the end of the instruction and coded for modes of knowledge-building discourse; knowledge-sharing and knowledge-construction. Higher measures of conceptual understanding, representational competencies and knowledge-construction discourse were taken together as representational fluency. Students in all conditions showed significant improvement in conceptual understanding, interpreting representations and explaining representations. Students in the Comparison and Argumentation conditions also showed significantly improved scores in constructing representations. When compared to the other conditions, the Explanation group had the highest scores in conceptual understanding and also interpreting and explaining representations. While the Argumentation group had the highest scores for constructing representations, their scores for conceptual understanding as well as interpreting and explaining representations were also high. There was no difference between the groups in knowledge-sharing discourse; however, the Argumentation group displayed the highest incidence of knowledge

  20. Visual representation of scientific information.

    PubMed

    Wong, Bang

    2011-02-15

    Great technological advances have enabled researchers to generate an enormous amount of data. Data analysis is replacing data generation as the rate-limiting step in scientific research. With this wealth of information, we have an opportunity to understand the molecular causes of human diseases. However, the unprecedented scale, resolution, and variety of data pose new analytical challenges. Visual representation of data offers insights that can lead to new understanding, whether the purpose is analysis or communication. This presentation shows how art, design, and traditional illustration can enable scientific discovery. Examples will be drawn from the Broad Institute's Data Visualization Initiative, aimed at establishing processes for creating informative visualization models.

  1. QED in the worldline representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubert, Christian

    2007-06-01

    Simultaneously with inventing the modern relativistic formalism of quantum electrodynamics, Feynman presented also a first-quantized representation of QED in terms of worldline path integrals. Although this alternative formulation has been studied over the years by many authors, only during the last fifteen years it has acquired some popularity as a computational tool. I will shortly review here three very different techniques which have been developed during the last few years for the evaluation of worldline path integrals, namely (i) the "string-inspired formalism", based on the use of worldline Green functions, (ii) the numerical "worldline Monte Carlo formalism", and (iii) the semiclassical "worldline instanton" approach.

  2. Particles, Cutoffs and Inequivalent Representations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egg, Matthias; Lam, Vincent; Oldofredi, Andrea

    2017-03-01

    We critically review the recent debate between Doreen Fraser and David Wallace on the interpretation of quantum field theory, with the aim of identifying where the core of the disagreement lies. We show that, despite appearances, their conflict does not concern the existence of particles or the occurrence of unitarily inequivalent representations. Instead, the dispute ultimately turns on the very definition of what a quantum field theory is. We further illustrate the fundamental differences between the two approaches by comparing them both to the Bohmian program in quantum field theory.

  3. Efficient Type Representation in TAL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Juan

    2009-01-01

    Certifying compilers generate proofs for low-level code that guarantee safety properties of the code. Type information is an essential part of safety proofs. But the size of type information remains a concern for certifying compilers in practice. This paper demonstrates type representation techniques in a large-scale compiler that achieves both concise type information and efficient type checking. In our 200,000-line certifying compiler, the size of type information is about 36% of the size of pure code and data for our benchmarks, the best result to the best of our knowledge. The type checking time is about 2% of the compilation time.

  4. Cognitive representation of negative numbers.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Martin H

    2003-05-01

    To understand negative numbers, must we refer to positive number representations (the phylogenetic hypothesis), or do we acquire a negative mental number line (the ontogenetic hypothesis)? In the experiment reported here, participants made lateralized button responses to indicate the larger of two digits from the range -9 to 9. Digit pairs were displayed spatially congruent or incongruent with either a phylogenetic or an ontogenetic mental number line. The pattern of decision latencies suggests that negative numbers become associated with left space, thus supporting the ontogenetic view.

  5. Material Activation Benchmark Experiments at the NuMI Hadron Absorber Hall in Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumura, H.; Matsuda, N.; Kasugai, Y.; Toyoda, A.; Yashima, H.; Sekimoto, S.; Iwase, H.; Oishi, K.; Sakamoto, Y.; Nakashima, H.; Leveling, A.; Boehnlein, D.; Lauten, G.; Mokhov, N.; Vaziri, K.

    2014-06-15

    In our previous study, double and mirror symmetric activation peaks found for Al and Au arranged spatially on the back of the Hadron absorber of the NuMI beamline in Fermilab were considerably higher than those expected purely from muon-induced reactions. From material activation bench-mark experiments, we conclude that this activation is due to hadrons with energy greater than 3 GeV that had passed downstream through small gaps in the hadron absorber.

  6. Theoretical studies in hadronic and nuclear physics. Progress report, July 1, 1994--June 1, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, M.K.; Griffin, J.J.

    1995-06-01

    This progress report contains 36 items of research work done by ten members of the University of Maryland Nuclear Theory Group with 21 outside collaborators from various institutions in the US, Canada, Korea and Europe. The report is in four sections, each representing major and basic areas of interest in nuclear theory. The sections are as follows: (1) hadrons in nuclei and nuclear matter; (2) hadron physics; (3) relativistic dynamics in quark, hadron and nuclear physics; (4) heavy ion dynamics and related processes.

  7. Excited-State Hadrons Using the Stochastic LapH Method

    SciTech Connect

    Morningstar, Colin; Bell, Alexander; Lenkner, D.; Wong, C. H.; Bulava, John; Foley, J.; Juge, Keisuke J.

    2011-05-24

    Progress in computing the spectrum of excited baryons and mesons in lattice QCD is described. Large sets of spatially-extended hadron operators are used. A new method of stochastically estimating the low-lying effects of quark propagation is utilized which allows reliable determinations of temporal correlations of both single-hadron and multi-hadron operators. The method is tested on the {eta},{sigma},{omega} mesons.

  8. Novel method for detecting the hadronic component of extensive air showers

    SciTech Connect

    Gromushkin, D. M.; Volchenko, V. I.; Petrukhin, A. A.; Stenkin, Yu. V.; Stepanov, V. I.; Shchegolev, O. B.; Yashin, I. I.

    2015-05-15

    A novel method for studying the hadronic component of extensive air showers (EAS) is proposed. The method is based on recording thermal neutrons accompanying EAS with en-detectors that are sensitive to two EAS components: an electromagnetic (e) component and a hadron component in the form of neutrons (n). In contrast to hadron calorimeters used in some arrays, the proposed method makes it possible to record the hadronic component over the whole area of the array. The efficiency of a prototype array that consists of 32 en-detectors was tested for a long time, and some parameters of the neutron EAS component were determined.

  9. On volume-source representations based on the representation theorem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichihara, Mie; Kusakabe, Tetsuya; Kame, Nobuki; Kumagai, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    We discuss different ways to characterize a moment tensor associated with an actual volume change of ΔV C , which has been represented in terms of either the stress glut or the corresponding stress-free volume change ΔV T . Eshelby's virtual operation provides a conceptual model relating ΔV C to ΔV T and the stress glut, where non-elastic processes such as phase transitions allow ΔV T to be introduced and subsequent elastic deformation of - ΔV T is assumed to produce the stress glut. While it is true that ΔV T correctly represents the moment tensor of an actual volume source with volume change ΔV C , an explanation as to why such an operation relating ΔV C to ΔV T exists has not previously been given. This study presents a comprehensive explanation of the relationship between ΔV C and ΔV T based on the representation theorem. The displacement field is represented using Green's function, which consists of two integrals over the source surface: one for displacement and the other for traction. Both integrals are necessary for representing volumetric sources, whereas the representation of seismic faults includes only the first term, as the second integral over the two adjacent fault surfaces, across which the traction balances, always vanishes. Therefore, in a seismological framework, the contribution from the second term should be included as an additional surface displacement. We show that the seismic moment tensor of a volume source is directly obtained from the actual state of the displacement and stress at the source without considering any virtual non-elastic operations. A purely mathematical procedure based on the representation theorem enables us to specify the additional imaginary displacement necessary for representing a volume source only by the displacement term, which links ΔV C to ΔV T . It also specifies the additional imaginary stress necessary for representing a moment tensor solely by the traction term, which gives the "stress glut." The

  10. Conceptual Representations of Perceptual Knowledge

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Edward E.; Myers, Nicholas; Sethi, Umrao; Pantazatos, Spiro; Yanagihara, Ted; Hirsch, Joy

    2012-01-01

    Many neuroimaging studies of semantic memory have argued that knowledge of an object’s perceptual properties are represented in a modality-specific manner. These studies often base their argument on finding activation in the left-hemisphere fusiform gyrus - a region assumed to be involved in perceptual processing - when the participant is verifying verbal statements about objects and properties. In this paper we report an extension of one of these influential papers—Kan, Barsalou, Solomon, Minor, and Thompson-Schill (2003)—and present evidence for an amodal component in the representation and processing of perceptual knowledge. Participants were required to verify object-property statements (e.g., “cat- whiskers?”; “bear-wings?”) while they were being scanned by fMRI. We replicated Kan et al’s activation in the left fusiform gyrus, but also found activation in regions of left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) and middle-temporal gyrus, areas known to reflect amodal processes or representations. Further, only activations in the left IFG, an amodal area, were correlated with measures of behavioral performance. PMID:22994286

  11. The mental representation of bilingualism.

    PubMed

    Riehl, Claudia Maria

    2010-09-01

    This article addresses the question of how different languages are represented in our memory and how bilingual speakers access these languages in language production. The first section discusses diverse approaches to language storage. It introduces a model that considers connections between different levels of language representation, i.e., conceptual and lexical features, morpho-syntactic information, and phonological patterns. The second section is concerned with access to different languages: the focus here is on language production and models of interactive activation. The next section focuses on control mechanisms that are capable of inhibiting one language while the other is spoken. These theoretical assumptions are illustrated by authentic speech production data that provide insights into the cognitive workings of bilingual speakers. Finally, differences in mental representation due to age of acquisition or language proficiency are discussed and explained by dissimilarities in memory types and neural processes of knowledge activation. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  12. Bottomonium states in hot asymmetric strange hadronic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Amruta; Pathak, Divakar

    2014-08-01

    We calculate the in-medium masses of the bottomonium states [Υ(1S),Υ(2S),Υ(3S), and Υ (4S)] in isospin asymmetric strange hadronic matter at finite temperatures. The medium modifications of the masses arise due to the interaction of these heavy quarkonium states with the gluon condensates of QCD. The gluon condensates in the hot hadronic matter are computed from the medium modification of a scalar dilaton field within a chiral SU(3) model, introduced in the hadronic model to incorporate the broken scale invariance of QCD. There is seen to be a drop in the masses of the bottomonium states and mass shifts are observed to be quite considerable at high densities for the excited states. The effects of density, isospin asymmetry, strangeness, as well as temperature of the medium on the masses of the Υ states are investigated. The effects of the isospin asymmetry as well as strangeness fraction of the medium are seen to be appreciable at high densities and small temperatures. The density effects are the most dominant medium effects which should have observable consequences in the compressed baryonic matter (CBM) in the heavy ion collision experiments in the future facility at FAIR, GSI. The study of the Υ states will, however, require access to energies higher than the energy regime planned at CBM experiment. The density effects on the bottomonium masses should also show up in the dilepton spectra at the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) energies, especially for the excited states for which the mass drop is observed to quite appreciable.

  13. Representation and Re-Presentation in Litigation Science

    PubMed Central

    Jasanoff, Sheila

    2008-01-01

    Federal appellate courts have devised several criteria to help judges distinguish between reliable and unreliable scientific evidence. The best known are the U.S. Supreme Court’s criteria offered in 1993 in Daubert v. Merrell Dow Pharmaceuticals, Inc. This article focuses on another criterion, offered by the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals, that instructs judges to assign lower credibility to “litigation science” than to science generated before litigation. In this article I argue that the criterion-based approach to judicial screening of scientific evidence is deeply flawed. That approach buys into the faulty premise that there are external criteria, lying outside the legal process, by which judges can distinguish between good and bad science. It erroneously assumes that judges can ascertain the appropriate criteria and objectively apply them to challenged evidence before litigation unfolds, and before methodological disputes are sorted out during that process. Judicial screening does not take into account the dynamics of litigation itself, including gaming by the parties and framing by judges, as constitutive factors in the production and representation of knowledge. What is admitted through judicial screening, in other words, is not precisely what a jury would see anyway. Courts are sites of repeated re-representations of scientific knowledge. In sum, the screening approach fails to take account of the wealth of existing scholarship on the production and validation of scientific facts. An unreflective application of that approach thus puts courts at risk of relying upon a “junk science” of the nature of scientific knowledge. PMID:18197311

  14. The quark-hadron phase transition and primordial nucleosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogan, Craig J.

    After presenting the current view of the processes taking place during the cosmological transition from 'quark soup' to normal hadron matter, attention is given to what happens to cosmological nucleosynthesis in the presence of small-scale baryon inhomogeneities. The QCD phase transition is among the plausible sources of this inhomogeneity. It is concluded that the formation of primordial 'quark nuggets' and other cold exotica requires very low entropy regions at the outset, and that even the more modest nonlinearities perturbing nucleosynthesis probably require some ingredient in addition to a quiescent, mildly supercooled transition.

  15. Hadronic parity violation in few-body systems

    SciTech Connect

    L. Girlanda, R. Schiavilla, M. Viviani, A. Kievsky, L.E. Marcucci

    2009-06-01

    Recent interest, both from experimental and theoretical point of view, on hadronic parity violation is reviewed, with particular emphasis on an effective theory description. After discussing the minimal form of the parity-violating NN contact e ective Lagrangian, we concentrate on the calculation of the neutron spin rotation in vec n - d scattering at zero energy. We find that this observable is sensitive to the long-range component of the parity-violating NN pontential due to the pion exchange, and that it is expected to be one order of magnitude larger than in vec n - p scattering.

  16. Higgs boson production with heavy quarks at hadron colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Christopher B.

    2005-11-01

    One of the remaining puzzles in particle physics is the origin of electroweak symmetry breaking. In the Standard Model (SM), a single doublet of complex scalar fields is responsible for breaking the SU(2) L x U(1)Y gauge symmetry thus giving mass to the electroweak gauge bosons via the Higgs mechanism and to the fermions via Yukawa couplings. The remnant of the process is a vet to he discovered scalar particle, the Higgs boson (h). However, current and future experiments at hadron colliders hold great promise. Of particular interest at hadron colliders is the production of a Higgs boson in association with a pair of heavy quarks, pp¯(pp) → QQ¯h, where Q can be either a top or a bottom quark. Indeed, the production of a Higgs boson with a pair of top quarks provides a very distinctive signal in hadronic collisions where background processes are formidable, and it will be instrumental in the discovery of a Higgs boson below about 130 GeV at the LHC. On the other hand, the production of a Higgs boson with bottom quarks can be strongly enhanced in models of new physics beyond the SM, e.g. supersymmetric models. If this is the case, bb¯h production will play a crucial role at the Tevatron where it could provide the first signal of new physics. Given the prominent role that Higgs production with heavy quarks can play at hadron colliders, it becomes imperative to have precise theoretical predictions for total and differential cross sections. In this dissertation, we outline and present detailed results for the next-to-leading order (NLO) calculation of the Quantum Chromodynamic (QCD) corrections to QQ¯h production at both the Tevatron and the LHC. This calculation involves several difficult issues due to the three massive particles in the final state, a situation which is at the frontier of radiative correction calculations in quantum field theory. We detail the novel techniques developed to deal with these challenges. The calculation of pp¯(pp) → bb¯h at NLO in

  17. A stochastic approach to the hadron spectrum. III

    SciTech Connect

    Aron, J.C.

    1986-12-01

    The connection with the quarks of the stochastic model proposed in the two preceding papers is studied; the slopes of the baryon trajectories are calculated with reference to the quarks. Suggestions are made for the interpretation of the model (quadratic or linear addition of the contributions to the mass, dependence of the decay on the quantum numbers of the hadrons involved, etc.) and concerning its link with the quarkonium model, which describes the mesons with charm or beauty. The controversial question of the ''subquantum level'' is examined.

  18. Single and multiple intrabeam scattering in hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Lebedev, V.; /Fermilab

    2005-01-01

    Single and multiple intra-beam scattering are usually considered separately. Such separation works well for electron-positron colliders but usually yields only coarse description in the case of hadron colliders. Boltzmann type integro-differential equation is used to describe evolution of longitudinal distribution due to IBS. The finite size of the longitudinal potential well, its non-linearity and x-y coupling are taken into account. The model predictions for longitudinal and transverse distributions are compared to the experimental measurements.

  19. D meson hadronic decays at CLEO-c

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Fan; /Fermilab

    2011-01-01

    The recent CLEO-c results on hadronic decays of D and D{sub s} mesons are presented. First the absolute branching fractions for D and D{sub s} mesons using a double tag technique are discussed, then are the Cabibbo suppressed decays and doubly Cabibbo suppressed decays. Finally, I present the inclusive and rare decay modes and other measurements from CLEO-c. These decays illuminate a wide range of physics. A brief theoretical introduction is given before the corresponding discussion on measurement.

  20. Reconstruction and identification of $\\tau$ lepton decays to hadrons and $\

    SciTech Connect

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2016-01-29

    This paper describes the algorithms used by the CMS experiment to reconstruct and identify τ→ hadrons + vt decays during Run 1 of the LHC. The performance of the algorithms is studied in proton-proton collisions recorded at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb-1. The algorithms achieve an identification efficiency of 50–60%, with misidentification rates for quark and gluon jets, electrons, and muons between per mille and per cent levels.