Science.gov

Sample records for haemophilus ducreyi treponema

  1. Simultaneous PCR detection of Haemophilus ducreyi, Treponema pallidum, and herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2 from genital ulcers.

    PubMed

    Orle, K A; Gates, C A; Martin, D H; Body, B A; Weiss, J B

    1996-01-01

    A multiplex PCR (M-PCR) assay with colorimetric detection was devised for the simultaneous amplification of DNA targets from Haemophilus ducreyi, Treponema pallidum, and herpes simplex virus (HSV) types 1 and 2. By using target-specific oligonucleotides in a microwell format, 298 genital ulcer swab specimens collected in New Orleans during three intervals from 1992 through 1994 were evaluated. The results of the M-PCR assay were compared with the results of dark-field microscopy and H. ducreyi culture on two different culture media. HSV culture results were available for 99 specimens collected during the third interval. Confirmatory PCR assays targeting different gene sequences for each of the three organisms were used to validate the M-PCR results. Specimens were resolved as positive for the determination of sensitivity if the reference diagnostic test was positive or if the results of both the M-PCR and the confirmatory PCR were positive. The resolved sensitivities of M-PCR for HSV, H. ducreyi, and T. pallidum were 100, 98.4, and 91%, respectively. The resolved sensitivities of HSV culture, H. ducreyi culture, and dark-field microscopy were 71.8, 74.2, and 81%, respectively. These results indicate that the M-PCR assay is more sensitive than standard diagnostic tests for the detection of HSV, H. ducreyi, and T. pallidum from genital ulcers.

  2. Chancroid and Haemophilus ducreyi.

    PubMed Central

    Morse, S A

    1989-01-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi is the causative agent of chancroid, one of the genital ulcerative diseases. H. ducreyi is the major cause of genital ulcer disease in Africa and Southeast Asia and is of increasing concern in the United States. Definitive diagnosis of chancroid requires the isolation and identification of H. ducreyi, but isolation of this organism is difficult and the available medium is not optimal for all strains. Fluorescent antibody and serologic tests are of limited value. In general, our knowledge of this organism is rather limited, and indeed, recent studies have questioned the placement of H. ducreyi in the genus Haemophilus. H. ducreyi has relatively few biochemical activities, and epidemiologic studies are limited because there are limited phenotypic markers available for strain typing. Specific virulence factors of H. ducreyi have yet to be identified. Antimicrobial resistance in H. ducreyi is of special concern, as this organism has acquired both gram-negative and gram-positive resistance determinants. In addition, some of these determinants can be mobilized and transferred to other Haemophilus species or to Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Images PMID:2650859

  3. Epidemiology of Haemophilus ducreyi Infections

    PubMed Central

    González-Beiras, Camila; Marks, Michael; Chen, Cheng Y.; Roberts, Sally

    2016-01-01

    The global epidemiology of Haemophilus ducreyi infections is poorly documented because of difficulties in confirming microbiological diagnoses. We evaluated published data on the proportion of genital and nongenital skin ulcers caused by H. ducreyi before and after introduction of syndromic management for genital ulcer disease (GUD). Before 2000, the proportion of GUD caused by H. ducreyi ranged from 0.0% to 69.0% (35 studies in 25 countries). After 2000, the proportion ranged from 0.0% to 15.0% (14 studies in 13 countries). In contrast, H. ducreyi has been recently identified as a causative agent of skin ulcers in children in the tropical regions; proportions ranged from 9.0% to 60.0% (6 studies in 4 countries). We conclude that, although there has been a sustained reduction in the proportion of GUD caused by H. ducreyi, this bacterium is increasingly recognized as a major cause of nongenital cutaneous ulcers. PMID:26694983

  4. DNA probes for the identification of Haemophilus ducreyi.

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, L M; Shayegani, M; Waring, A L; Bopp, L H

    1989-01-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi ATCC 33922, a virulent, well-characterized strain, was used to construct a genomic library in a bacteriophage expression vector. Three DNA fragments were selected for use as probes on the basis of their ability to encode H. ducreyi-specific proteins, as demonstrated by reactivity with rabbit polyclonal antiserum. With DNA-DNA hybridization, the three probes, labeled with 32P, reacted strongly with 16 strains of H. ducreyi obtained from a variety of sources. Thirty-seven other bacterial isolates, representing 33 different species and including organisms likely to be encountered in the urogenital tract, were also tested with the three probes. Twenty-eight of these isolates, including the genital pathogen Neisseria gonorrhoeae, showed no hybridization with the probes. In addition, herpes simplex virus-infected tissue culture cells and Treponema pallidum-infected rabbit testicular fluid were also completely nonreactive. Nine isolates, six belonging to other Haemophilus species and three belonging to Pasteurella species, reacted weakly with the probes when approximately 3.0 x 10(7) to 6.0 x 10(7) CFU was tested. When 10(5) to 10(6) CFU of these organisms was tested, the weak reactions could no longer be seen. Yet this number of H. ducreyi still reacted strongly. In fact, the three probes consistently detected 10(4) CFU of H. ducreyi in pure and mixed cultures and even produced a weak signal when only 10(3) CFU was present. It is clear from our results that use of these probes will greatly facilitate the laboratory diagnosis of this genital pathogen. Images PMID:2788660

  5. Haemophilus ducreyi infections--time for reappraisal.

    PubMed Central

    McEntegart, M. G.; Hafiz, S.; Kinghorn, G. R.

    1982-01-01

    As the literature on Haemophilus ducreyi and clinical chancroid is reviewed, it becomes obvious that many significant findings have been forgotten over the years. As a result, from the time of Ducrey's original description of the organism in 1890 until about 1977, both clinical and laboratory experts in the United Kingdom believed that H. ducreyi infections were rare, generally acquired abroad, and almost impossible to confirm in the routine laboratory! In consequence it was a common view that it was not worth looking for H. ducreyi until all other possible causes of genital ulceration had been excluded. Moreover, the search for such an infection stopped as soon as any other cause for the patient's lesions had been found. A decision to ignore this 'rule' in Sheffield led to our looking for H. ducreyi in specimens from an unselected series of patients with genital ulceration including a number with herpes genitalis infections. The surprise finding of H. ducreyi in circumstances suggesting that it was a secondary invader made us re-examine the whole question of H. ducreyi infections and chancroid and wonder if the same organism can act as a primary pathogen and as a secondary invader. An account of the media and methods we used and of the characteristics of the organism is presented. In an attempt to find out more about the characteristic coherent colonies of H. ducreyi we studied them with the scanning electron microscope. It is clear that the whole subject of H. ducreyi infections has been neglected in the United Kingdom, but we believe that interest has now been aroused and progress will surely follow. Some areas for further investigation are suggested. Images Plate 1 PMID:7153512

  6. Haemophilus ducreyi associated with skin ulcers among children, Solomon Islands.

    PubMed

    Marks, Michael; Chi, Kai-Hua; Vahi, Ventis; Pillay, Allan; Sokana, Oliver; Pavluck, Alex; Mabey, David C; Chen, Cheng Y; Solomon, Anthony W

    2014-10-01

    During a survey of yaws prevalence in the Solomon Islands, we collected samples from skin ulcers of 41 children. Using PCR, we identified Haemophilus ducreyi infection in 13 (32%) children. PCR-positive and PCR-negative ulcers were phenotypically indistinguishable. Emergence of H. ducreyi as a cause of nongenital ulcers may affect the World Health Organization's yaws eradication program. PMID:25271477

  7. Haemophilus ducreyi Associated with Skin Ulcers among Children, Solomon Islands

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Kai-Hua; Vahi, Ventis; Pillay, Allan; Sokana, Oliver; Pavluck, Alex; Mabey, David C.; Chen, Cheng Y.; Solomon, Anthony W.

    2014-01-01

    During a survey of yaws prevalence in the Solomon Islands, we collected samples from skin ulcers of 41 children. Using PCR, we identified Haemophilus ducreyi infection in 13 (32%) children. PCR-positive and PCR-negative ulcers were phenotypically indistinguishable. Emergence of H. ducreyi as a cause of nongenital ulcers may affect the World Health Organization’s yaws eradication program. PMID:25271477

  8. Characterization of a multiple antibiotic resistance plasmid from Haemophilus ducreyi.

    PubMed Central

    Willson, P J; Albritton, W L; Slaney, L; Setlow, J K

    1989-01-01

    Plasmid pLS88 from a clinical isolate of Haemophilus ducreyi encoded resistance determinants for sulfonamides and streptomycin related to those of RSF1010 and for kanamycin related to Tn903 but lacked the inverted repeats of the transposon. Its host range included Haemophilus influenzae, Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, and Escherichia coli; and it was compatible with pDM2 and RSF1010. Images PMID:2684012

  9. Immunohistochemical investigations of genital ulcers caused by Haemophilus ducreyi.

    PubMed

    Abeck, D; Freinkel, A L; Korting, H C; Szeimis, R M; Ballard, R C

    1997-09-01

    To gain information on the specific composition of the inflammatory infiltrate of genital ulcers caused by Haemophilus ducreyi, biopsies of 6 genital ulcers which were diagnosed as chancroid on clinical and microbiological grounds were subjected to immunohistochemical investigations after conventional haematoxylineosin staining. A variety of antibodies reactive against B- and T-cells, plasma cells and granulocytes were used with each tissue sections. The lymphocytic infiltrate of chancroid ulcers consisted of both B- and T-lymphocytes and showed a cluster-like formation. B-lymphocytes were preferentially localized perivascularly in the middle layer, T-lymphocytes mainly in the deep layer of the inflamed oedematous tissue. Results stress the importance of both B- and T-cell mediated immune responses in Haemophilus ducreyi infection.

  10. Fine tangled pili expressed by Haemophilus ducreyi are a novel class of pili.

    PubMed Central

    Brentjens, R J; Ketterer, M; Apicella, M A; Spinola, S M

    1996-01-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi synthesizes fine, tangled pili composed predominantly of a protein whose apparent molecular weight is 24,000 (24K). A hybridoma, 2D8, produced a monoclonal antibody (MAb) that bound to a 24K protein in H. ducreyi strains isolated from diverse geographic locations. A lambda gt11 H. ducreyi library was screened with MAb 2D8. A 3.5-kb chromosomal insert from one reactive plaque was amplified and ligated into the pCRII vector. The recombinant plasmid, designated pHD24, expressed a 24K protein in Escherichia coli INV alpha F that bound MAb 2D8. The coding sequence of the 24K gene was localized by exonuclease III digestion. The insert contained a 570-bp open reading frame, designated ftpA (fine, tangled pili). Translation of ftpA predicted a polypeptide with a molecular weight of 21.1K. The predicted N-terminal amino acid sequence of the polypeptide encoded by ftpA was identical to the N-terminal amino acid sequence of purified pilin and lacked a cleavable signal sequence. Primer extension analysis of ftpA confirmed the lack of a leader peptide. The predicted amino acid sequence lacked homology to known pilin sequences but shared homology with the sequences of E. coli Dps and Treponema pallidum antigen TpF1 or 4D, proteins which associate to form ordered rings. An isogenic pilin mutant, H. ducreyi 35000ftpA::mTn3(Cm), was constructed by shuttle mutagenesis and did not contain pili when examined by electron microscopy. We conclude that H. ducreyi synthesizes fine, tangled pili that are composed of a unique major subunit, which may be exported by a signal sequence independent mechanism. PMID:8550517

  11. Haemophilus ducreyi Cutaneous Ulcer Strains Are Nearly Identical to Class I Genital Ulcer Strains

    PubMed Central

    Gangaiah, Dharanesh; Webb, Kristen M.; Humphreys, Tricia L.; Fortney, Kate R.; Toh, Evelyn; Tai, Albert; Katz, Samantha S.; Pillay, Allan; Chen, Cheng-Yen; Roberts, Sally A.; Munson, Robert S.; Spinola, Stanley M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Although cutaneous ulcers (CU) in the tropics is frequently attributed to Treponema pallidum subspecies pertenue, the causative agent of yaws, Haemophilus ducreyi has emerged as a major cause of CU in yaws-endemic regions of the South Pacific islands and Africa. H. ducreyi is generally susceptible to macrolides, but CU strains persist after mass drug administration of azithromycin for yaws or trachoma. H. ducreyi also causes genital ulcers (GU) and was thought to be exclusively transmitted by microabrasions that occur during sex. In human volunteers, the GU strain 35000HP does not infect intact skin; wounds are required to initiate infection. These data led to several questions: Are CU strains a new variant of H. ducreyi or did they evolve from GU strains? Do CU strains contain additional genes that could allow them to infect intact skin? Are CU strains susceptible to azithromycin? Methodology/Principal Findings To address these questions, we performed whole-genome sequencing and antibiotic susceptibility testing of 5 CU strains obtained from Samoa and Vanuatu and 9 archived class I and class II GU strains. Except for single nucleotide polymorphisms, the CU strains were genetically almost identical to the class I strain 35000HP and had no additional genetic content. Phylogenetic analysis showed that class I and class II strains formed two separate clusters and CU strains evolved from class I strains. Class I strains diverged from class II strains ~1.95 million years ago (mya) and CU strains diverged from the class I strain 35000HP ~0.18 mya. CU and GU strains evolved under similar selection pressures. Like 35000HP, the CU strains were highly susceptible to antibiotics, including azithromycin. Conclusions/Significance These data suggest that CU strains are derivatives of class I strains that were not recognized until recently. These findings require confirmation by analysis of CU strains from other regions. PMID:26147869

  12. Use of pyocin to select a Haemophilus ducreyi variant defective in lipooligosaccharide biosynthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Campagnari, A A; Karalus, R; Apicella, M; Melaugh, W; Lesse, A J; Gibson, B W

    1994-01-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi, a cause of genital ulcer disease in developing countries, appears to facilitate the heterosexual transmission of the human immunodeficiency virus in Africa. Despite an increase in studies of this gram-negative human pathogen, little is known about the pathogenesis of chancroid. Our studies have shown that the lipooligosaccharides (LOS) of H. ducreyi may play an important role in ulcer formation. Monoclonal antibody and mass spectrometric analyses identified a terminal trisaccharide present on H. ducreyi LOS that is immunochemically similar to human paragloboside. This epitope is present on the LOS of Neisseria gonorrhoeae, and it may be the site of attachment for pyocin lysis. We have used pyocin, produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, to select LOS variants with sequential saccharide deletions from N. gonorrhoeae. On the basis of the similarities between N. gonorrhoeae and H. ducreyi LOS, we employed the same technique to determine if H. ducreyi strains were susceptible to pyocin lysis. In this study, we report the generation of a pyocin N-resistant H. ducreyi strain which synthesizes a truncated version of the parental LOS. Further studies have shown that this H. ducreyi variant has lost the terminal LOS epitope defined by monoclonal antibody 3F11. This report demonstrates that H. ducreyi is sensitive to pyocins and that this technique can be used to generate H. ducreyi LOS variants. Such variants could be used in comparative studies to relate LOS structure to biologic function in the pathogenesis of chancroid. Images PMID:8188362

  13. Complete Genome Sequences of 11 Haemophilus ducreyi Isolates from Children with Cutaneous Lesions in Vanuatu and Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Samantha S.; Abrams, A. Jeanine; Ballard, Ronald C.; Simpson, Shirley V.; Taleo, Fasihah; Lahra, Monica M.; Batra, Dhwani; Rowe, Lori; Trees, David L.; Asiedu, Kingsley; Chen, Cheng-Yen

    2016-01-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi causes chancroid and has recently been shown to be a significant cause of cutaneous lesions in tropical or subtropical regions where yaws is endemic. Here, we report the draft genome assemblies for 11 cutaneous strains of Haemophilus ducreyi, isolated from children in Vanuatu and Ghana. PMID:27389258

  14. Characterization of a WaaF (RfaF) Homolog Expressed by Haemophilus ducreyi

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Beth A.; Lumbley, Sheryl R.; Hansen, Eric J.

    1999-01-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi lipooligosaccharide (LOS) is capable of inducing an inflammatory response in skin (A. A. Campagnari, L. M. Wild, G. Griffiths, R. J. Karalus, M. A. Wirth, and S. M. Spinola, Infect. Immun. 59:2601–2608, 1991) and likely contributes to the virulence of this sexually transmitted pathogen (B. A. Bauer, M. K. Stevens, and E. J. Hansen, Infect. Immun. 68:4290–4298, 1998). An open reading frame in H. ducreyi 35000 was found to encode a predicted protein that was 59% identical to the protein product of the rfaF (waaF) gene of Salmonella typhimurium. The H. ducreyi waaF gene was able to complement an S. typhimurium rfaF (waaF) mutant, a result which confirmed the identity of this gene. In contrast to the rfaF (waaF) gene of enteric bacteria, the H. ducreyi waaF gene was not located adjacent to other genes involved in lipopolysaccharide expression. Inactivation of the H. ducreyi waaF gene by insertion mutagenesis resulted in expression of a LOS that migrated much faster than wild-type LOS in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The LOS of this mutant also did not bind a monoclonal antibody directed against a cell surface-exposed epitope of wild-type H. ducreyi LOS. Testing of the wild-type H. ducreyi strain and its isogenic waaF mutant in the temperature-dependent rabbit model for dermal lesion production by H. ducreyi revealed that this waaF mutant was less virulent than the wild-type parent strain. Complementation of the H. ducreyi waaF mutant with the wild-type H. ducreyi waaF gene resulted in expression of both wild-type LOS and wild-type virulence by this mutant. PMID:9916106

  15. Trimeric autotransporter DsrA is a major mediator of fibrinogen binding in Haemophilus ducreyi.

    PubMed

    Fusco, William G; Elkins, Christopher; Leduc, Isabelle

    2013-12-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi is the etiologic agent of the sexually transmitted genital ulcer disease chancroid. In both natural and experimental chancroid, H. ducreyi colocalizes with fibrin at the base of the ulcer. Fibrin is obtained by cleavage of the serum glycoprotein fibrinogen (Fg) by thrombin to initiate formation of the blood clot. Fg binding proteins are critical virulence factors in medically important Gram-positive bacteria. H. ducreyi has previously been shown to bind Fg in an agglutination assay, and the H. ducreyi Fg binding protein FgbA was identified in ligand blotting with denatured proteins. To better characterize the interaction of H. ducreyi with Fg, we examined Fg binding to intact, viable H. ducreyi bacteria and identified a novel Fg binding protein. H. ducreyi bound unlabeled Fg in a dose-dependent manner, as measured by two different methods. In ligand blotting with total denatured cellular proteins, digoxigenin (DIG)-Fg bound only two H. ducreyi proteins, the trimeric autotransporter DsrA and the lectin DltA; however, only the isogenic dsrA mutant had significantly less cell-associated Fg than parental strains in Fg binding assays with intact bacteria. Furthermore, expression of DsrA, but not DltA or an empty vector, rendered the non-Fg-binding H. influenzae strain Rd capable of binding Fg. A 13-amino-acid sequence in the C-terminal section of the passenger domain of DsrA appears to be involved in Fg binding by H. ducreyi. Taken together, these data suggest that the trimeric autotransporter DsrA is a major determinant of Fg binding at the surface of H. ducreyi. PMID:24042118

  16. Haemophilus ducreyi Inhibits Phagocytosis by U-937 Cells, a Human Macrophage-Like Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Gwendolyn E.; Dutro, Susan M.; Totten, Patricia A.

    2001-01-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi is a gram-negative obligate human pathogen that causes the genital ulcer disease chancroid. Chancroid lesions are deep necrotic ulcers with an immune cell infiltrate that includes macrophages. Despite the presence of these phagocytic cells, chancroid ulcers can persist for months and live H. ducreyi can be isolated from these lesions. To analyze the interaction of H. ducreyi with macrophages, we investigated the ability of H. ducreyi strain 35000 to adhere to, invade, and survive within U-937 cells, a human macrophage-like cell line. We found that although H. ducreyi strain 35000 adhered efficiently to U-937 cells, few bacteria were internalized, suggesting that H. ducreyi avoids phagocytosis by human macrophages. The few bacteria that were phagocytosed in these experiments were rapidly killed. We also found that H. ducreyi inhibits the phagocytosis of a secondary target (opsonized sheep red blood cells). Antiphagocytic activity was found in logarithmic, stationary-phase, and plate-grown cultures and was associated with whole, live bacteria but not with heat-killed cultures, sonicates, or culture supernatants. Phagocytosis was significantly inhibited after a 15-min exposure to H. ducreyi, and a multiplicity of infection of approximately 1 CFU per macrophage was sufficient to cause a significant reduction in phagocytosis by U-937 cells. Finally, all of nine H. ducreyi strains tested were antiphagocytic, suggesting that this is a common virulence mechanism for this organism. This finding suggests a mechanism by which H. ducreyi avoids killing and clearance by macrophages in chancroid lesions and inguinal lymph nodes. PMID:11447144

  17. On the evolution of the sexually transmitted bacteria Haemophilus ducreyi and Klebsiella granulomatis.

    PubMed

    Lagergård, Teresa; Bölin, Ingrid; Lindholm, Leif

    2011-08-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi and Klebsiella (Calymmatobacterium) granulomatis are sexually transmitted bacteria that cause characteristic, persisting ulceration on external genitals called chancroid and granuloma inguinale, respectively. Those ulcers are endemic in developing countries or exist, as does granuloma inguinale, only in some geographic "hot spots."H. ducreyi is placed in the genus Haemophilus (family Pasteurellacae); however, this phylogenetic position is not obvious. The multiple ways in which the bacterium may be adapted to its econiche through specialized nutrient acquisitions; defenses against the immune system; and virulence factors that increase attachment, fitness, and persistence within genital tissue are discussed below. The analysis of K. granulomatis phylogeny demonstrated a high degree of identity with other Klebsiella species, and the name K. granulomatis comb. nov. was proposed. Because of the difficulty in growing this bacterium on artificial media, its characteristics have not been sufficiently defined. More studies are needed to understand bacterial genetics related to the pathogenesis and evolution of K. granulomatis.

  18. Production of monoclonal antibodies specific for Haemophilus ducreyi: a screening method to discriminate specific and cross-reacting antibodies.

    PubMed

    Odumeru, J A; Alfa, M J; Martin, C F; Ronald, A R; Jay, F T

    1989-06-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi is the etiological agent of chancroid. The organism shares extensive immunological cross-reactivity with other Haemophilus species. This presents substantial difficulties for the production of specific monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). A competition ELISA was devised for hybridoma screening which allowed the detection of H. ducreyi-specific antibody-producing hybridoma cultures during the initial screening process. With this screening method, seven MAbs specific for H. ducreyi were obtained in a single cell fusion exercise. The specificities of the 7 MAbs were demonstrated by direct ELISA and dot immunobinding assays against several strains each of H. influenzae, H. parainfluenzae and Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Five of the MAbs reacted against all ten strains of H. ducreyi. These MAbs may permit the development of rapid and efficient immunodiagnostics for chancroid. The principle of the competition ELISA for hybridoma screening should be widely applicable to the development of specific MAbs to other organisms in which immunological cross-reactivity is an impediment to hybridoma screening by conventional methods. PMID:2787274

  19. Pathogenic microbial flora of genital ulcers in Sheffield with particular reference to herpes simplex virus and Haemophilus ducreyi.

    PubMed

    Kinghorn, G R; Hafiz, S; McEntegart, M G

    1982-12-01

    The pathogenic microbial flora of genital ulcers in 161 (80 men and 81 women) unselected patients was studied prospectively. In only one case was Treponema pallidum responsible whereas herpes simplex virus was considered to be the cause of 130 (80.8%) genital ulcers. H ducreyi was isolated from 46 (28.6%) patients, most commonly as a secondary pathogen in herpetic lesions. Two or more pathogens were isolated from the ulcers in 67 (41.6%) patients, and in 21 (13%) patients no pathogens were isolated. Our results indicate an urgent need for antiviral treatment to reduce the local reservoir of genital herpes, challenge traditional concepts about the prevalence of H ducreyi in Britain, and call for a reappraisal of its role in the causation of genital ulcers.

  20. Haemophilus ducreyi Seeks Alternative Carbon Sources and Adapts to Nutrient Stress and Anaerobiosis during Experimental Infection of Human Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Gangaiah, Dharanesh; Zhang, Xinjun; Baker, Beth; Fortney, Kate R.; Gao, Hongyu; Holley, Concerta L.; Munson, Robert S.; Liu, Yunlong

    2016-01-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi causes the sexually transmitted disease chancroid in adults and cutaneous ulcers in children. In humans, H. ducreyi resides in an abscess and must adapt to a variety of stresses. Previous studies (D. Gangaiah, M. Labandeira-Rey, X. Zhang, K. R. Fortney, S. Ellinger, B. Zwickl, B. Baker, Y. Liu, D. M. Janowicz, B. P. Katz, C. A. Brautigam, R. S. Munson, Jr., E. J. Hansen, and S. M. Spinola, mBio 5:e01081-13, 2014, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/mBio.01081-13) suggested that H. ducreyi encounters growth conditions in human lesions resembling those found in stationary phase. However, how H. ducreyi transcriptionally responds to stress during human infection is unknown. Here, we determined the H. ducreyi transcriptome in biopsy specimens of human lesions and compared it to the transcriptomes of bacteria grown to mid-log, transition, and stationary phases. Multidimensional scaling showed that the in vivo transcriptome is distinct from those of in vitro growth. Compared to the inoculum (mid-log-phase bacteria), H. ducreyi harvested from pustules differentially expressed ∼93 genes, of which 62 were upregulated. The upregulated genes encode homologs of proteins involved in nutrient transport, alternative carbon pathways (l-ascorbate utilization and metabolism), growth arrest response, heat shock response, DNA recombination, and anaerobiosis. H. ducreyi upregulated few genes (hgbA, flp-tad, and lspB-lspA2) encoding virulence determinants required for human infection. Most genes regulated by CpxRA, RpoE, Hfq, (p)ppGpp, and DksA, which control the expression of virulence determinants and adaptation to a variety of stresses, were not differentially expressed in vivo, suggesting that these systems are cycling on and off during infection. Taken together, these data suggest that the in vivo transcriptome is distinct from those of in vitro growth and that adaptation to nutrient stress and anaerobiosis is crucial for H. ducreyi survival in humans. PMID:26930707

  1. Haemophilus ducreyi Seeks Alternative Carbon Sources and Adapts to Nutrient Stress and Anaerobiosis during Experimental Infection of Human Volunteers.

    PubMed

    Gangaiah, Dharanesh; Zhang, Xinjun; Baker, Beth; Fortney, Kate R; Gao, Hongyu; Holley, Concerta L; Munson, Robert S; Liu, Yunlong; Spinola, Stanley M

    2016-05-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi causes the sexually transmitted disease chancroid in adults and cutaneous ulcers in children. In humans, H. ducreyi resides in an abscess and must adapt to a variety of stresses. Previous studies (D. Gangaiah, M. Labandeira-Rey, X. Zhang, K. R. Fortney, S. Ellinger, B. Zwickl, B. Baker, Y. Liu, D. M. Janowicz, B. P. Katz, C. A. Brautigam, R. S. Munson, Jr., E. J. Hansen, and S. M. Spinola, mBio 5:e01081-13, 2014, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/mBio.01081-13) suggested that H. ducreyi encounters growth conditions in human lesions resembling those found in stationary phase. However, how H. ducreyi transcriptionally responds to stress during human infection is unknown. Here, we determined the H. ducreyi transcriptome in biopsy specimens of human lesions and compared it to the transcriptomes of bacteria grown to mid-log, transition, and stationary phases. Multidimensional scaling showed that the in vivo transcriptome is distinct from those of in vitro growth. Compared to the inoculum (mid-log-phase bacteria), H. ducreyi harvested from pustules differentially expressed ∼93 genes, of which 62 were upregulated. The upregulated genes encode homologs of proteins involved in nutrient transport, alternative carbon pathways (l-ascorbate utilization and metabolism), growth arrest response, heat shock response, DNA recombination, and anaerobiosis. H. ducreyi upregulated few genes (hgbA, flp-tad, and lspB-lspA2) encoding virulence determinants required for human infection. Most genes regulated by CpxRA, RpoE, Hfq, (p)ppGpp, and DksA, which control the expression of virulence determinants and adaptation to a variety of stresses, were not differentially expressed in vivo, suggesting that these systems are cycling on and off during infection. Taken together, these data suggest that the in vivo transcriptome is distinct from those of in vitro growth and that adaptation to nutrient stress and anaerobiosis is crucial for H. ducreyi survival in humans. PMID:26930707

  2. Detoxified Haemophilus ducreyi cytolethal distending toxin and induction of toxin specific antibodies in the genital tract.

    PubMed

    Lundqvist, Annika; Fernandez-Rodrigues, Julia; Ahlman, Karin; Lagergård, Teresa

    2010-08-16

    Haemophilus ducreyi causes genital ulceration (chancroid), a sexually transmitted infection and still an important factor which contributes to the spread of HIV in developing countries. The bacterium produces a cytolethal distending toxin (HdCDT) causing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis/necrosis of human cells and contributes to the aggravation of ulcers. The aim of the study was to induce toxin-neutralizing antibodies in the genital tract of mice. Repeated subcutaneous (sc) immunisations with 5-10microg active HdCDT induced low levels of serum anti-HdCDT IgG without neutralizing capacity. High levels of specific IgG1 antibodies in serum and genital tract were generated after sc immunisations with 10microg formaldehyde detoxified HdCDT toxoid alone and the addition of aluminium salts or RIBI (based on the lipid A moiety) as adjuvant further increased the level of serum antibodies. A high correlation was found between elevated levels of anti-HdCDT IgG in sera, the level of neutralizing activity and the antibody level in genital tract (r=0.8). Thus, induction of high antibody levels specific to HdCDT in the genital tissue can be achieved by parenteral immunisation with the toxoid. The HdCDT toxoid can be considered as a candidate component in vaccine against chancroid. PMID:20609397

  3. DksA and (p)ppGpp have unique and overlapping contributions to Haemophilus ducreyi pathogenesis in humans.

    PubMed

    Holley, Concerta L; Zhang, Xinjun; Fortney, Kate R; Ellinger, Sheila; Johnson, Paula; Baker, Beth; Liu, Yunlong; Janowicz, Diane M; Katz, Barry P; Munson, Robert S; Spinola, Stanley M

    2015-08-01

    The (p)ppGpp-mediated stringent response is important for bacterial survival in nutrient limiting conditions. For maximal effect, (p)ppGpp interacts with the cofactor DksA, which stabilizes (p)ppGpp's interaction with RNA polymerase. We previously demonstrated that (p)ppGpp was required for the virulence of Haemophilus ducreyi in humans. Here, we constructed an H. ducreyi dksA mutant and showed it was also partially attenuated for pustule formation in human volunteers. To understand the roles of (p)ppGpp and DksA in gene regulation in H. ducreyi, we defined genes potentially altered by (p)ppGpp and DksA deficiency using transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq). In bacteria collected at stationary phase, lack of (p)ppGpp and DksA altered expression of 28% and 17% of H. ducreyi open reading frames, respectively, including genes involved in transcription, translation, and metabolism. There was significant overlap in genes differentially expressed in the (p)ppGpp mutant relative to the dksA mutant. Loss of (p)ppGpp or DksA resulted in the dysregulation of several known virulence determinants. Deletion of dksA downregulated lspB and rendered the organism less resistant to phagocytosis and increased its sensitivity to oxidative stress. Both mutants had reduced ability to attach to human foreskin fibroblasts; the defect correlated with reduced expression of the Flp adhesin proteins in the (p)ppGpp mutant but not in the dksA mutant, suggesting that DksA regulates the expression of an unknown cofactor(s) required for Flp-mediated adherence. We conclude that both (p)ppGpp and DksA serve as major regulators of H. ducreyi gene expression in stationary phase and have both overlapping and unique contributions to pathogenesis.

  4. Haemophilus ducreyi Lipooligosaccharide Mutant Defective in Expression of β-1,4-Glucosyltransferase Is Virulent in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Young, Royden S.; Filiatrault, Melanie J.; Fortney, Kate R.; Hood, Antoinette F.; Katz, Barry P.; Munson, Robert S.; Campagnari, Anthony A.; Spinola, Stanley M.

    2001-01-01

    The lipooligosaccharide (LOS) of Haemophilus ducreyi contains a major glycoform that is immunochemically identical to paragloboside, a glycosphingolipid precursor of major human blood group antigens. We recently identified the gene responsible for the glucosyltransferase activity and constructed an isogenic mutant (35000glu-) deficient in this activity. 35000glu- makes an LOS that consists only of the heptose trisaccharide core and 2-keto-deoxyoctulosonic acid (KDO). For this study, the mutant was reconstructed in the 35000HP (human passaged [HP]) background. Five human subjects were inoculated with 35000HP and 35000HPglu- in a dose-response trial. The pustule formation rates were 40% (95% confidence interval [CI], 13.7 to 72.6%) at 10 sites for 35000HP and 46.7% (95% CI, 24.8 to 69.9%) at 15 sites for 35000HPglu-. The histopathology and recovery rates of H. ducreyi from surface cultures and biopsies obtained from mutant and parent sites were similar. These results indicate that the expression of glycoforms with sugar moieties extending beyond the heptose trisaccharide core is not required for pustule formation by H. ducreyi in humans. PMID:11349097

  5. A (p)ppGpp-null mutant of Haemophilus ducreyi is partially attenuated in humans due to multiple conflicting phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Holley, Concerta; Gangaiah, Dharanesh; Li, Wei; Fortney, Kate R; Janowicz, Diane M; Ellinger, Sheila; Zwickl, Beth; Katz, Barry P; Spinola, Stanley M

    2014-08-01

    (p)ppGpp responds to nutrient limitation through a global change in gene regulation patterns to increase survival. The stringent response has been implicated in the virulence of several pathogenic bacterial species. Haemophilus ducreyi, the causative agent of chancroid, has homologs of both relA and spoT, which primarily synthesize and hydrolyze (p)ppGpp in Escherichia coli. We constructed relA and relA spoT deletion mutants to assess the contribution of (p)ppGpp to H. ducreyi pathogenesis. Both the relA single mutant and the relA spoT double mutant failed to synthesize (p)ppGpp, suggesting that relA is the primary synthetase of (p)ppGpp in H. ducreyi. Compared to the parent strain, the double mutant was partially attenuated for pustule formation in human volunteers. The double mutant had several phenotypes that favored attenuation, including increased sensitivity to oxidative stress. The increased sensitivity to oxidative stress could be complemented in trans. However, the double mutant also exhibited phenotypes that favored virulence. When grown to the mid-log phase, the double mutant was significantly more resistant than its parent to being taken up by human macrophages and exhibited increased transcription of lspB, which is involved in resistance to phagocytosis. Additionally, compared to the parent, the double mutant also exhibited prolonged survival in the stationary phase. In E. coli, overexpression of DksA compensates for the loss of (p)ppGpp; the H. ducreyi double mutant expressed higher transcript levels of dksA than the parent strain. These data suggest that the partial attenuation of the double mutant is likely the net result of multiple conflicting phenotypes.

  6. Expression of Haemophilus ducreyi Collagen Binding Outer Membrane Protein NcaA Is Required for Virulence in Swine and Human Challenge Models of Chancroid

    PubMed Central

    Fulcher, Robert A.; Cole, Leah E.; Janowicz, Diane M.; Toffer, Kristen L.; Fortney, Kate R.; Katz, Barry P.; Orndorff, Paul E.; Spinola, Stanley M.; Kawula, Thomas H.

    2006-01-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi, the etiologic agent of the sexually transmitted genital ulcer disease chancroid, has been shown to associate with dermal collagen fibers within infected skin lesions. Here we describe NcaA, a previously uncharacterized outer membrane protein that is important for H. ducreyi collagen binding and host colonization. An H. ducreyi strain lacking the ncaA gene was impaired in adherence to type I collagen but not fibronectin (plasma or cellular form) or heparin. The mutation had no effect on serum resistance or binding to HaCaT keratinocytes or human foreskin fibroblasts in vitro. Escherichia coli expressing H. ducreyi NcaA bound to type I collagen, demonstrating that NcaA is sufficient to confer collagen attachment. The importance of NcaA in H. ducreyi pathogenesis was assessed using both swine and human experimental models of chancroid. In the swine model, 20% of lesions from sites inoculated with the ncaA mutant were culture positive for H. ducreyi 7 days after inoculation, compared to 73% of wild-type-inoculated sites. The average number of CFU recovered from mutant-inoculated lesions was also significantly reduced compared to that recovered from wild-type-inoculated sites at both 2 and 7 days after inoculation. In the human challenge model, 8 of 30 sites inoculated with wild-type H. ducreyi progressed to the pustular stage, compared to 0 of 30 sites inoculated with the ncaA mutant. Together these results demonstrate that the collagen binding protein NcaA is required for H. ducreyi infection. PMID:16622201

  7. Deletion of mtrC in Haemophilus ducreyi Increases Sensitivity to Human Antimicrobial Peptides and Activates the CpxRA Regulon ▿

    PubMed Central

    Rinker, Sherri D.; Trombley, Michael P.; Gu, Xiaoping; Fortney, Kate R.; Bauer, Margaret E.

    2011-01-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi resists killing by antimicrobial peptides encountered during human infection, including cathelicidin LL-37, α-defensins, and β-defensins. In this study, we examined the role of the proton motive force-dependent multiple transferable resistance (MTR) transporter in antimicrobial peptide resistance in H. ducreyi. We found a proton motive force-dependent effect on H. ducreyi's resistance to LL-37 and β-defensin HBD-3, but not α-defensin HNP-2. Deletion of the membrane fusion protein MtrC rendered H. ducreyi more sensitive to LL-37 and human β-defensins but had relatively little effect on α-defensin resistance. The mtrC mutant 35000HPmtrC exhibited phenotypic changes in outer membrane protein profiles, colony morphology, and serum sensitivity, which were restored to wild type by trans-complementation with mtrC. Similar phenotypes were reported in a cpxA mutant; activation of the two-component CpxRA regulator was confirmed by showing transcriptional effects on CpxRA-regulated genes in 35000HPmtrC. A cpxR mutant had wild-type levels of antimicrobial peptide resistance; a cpxA mutation had little effect on defensin resistance but led to increased sensitivity to LL-37. 35000HPmtrC was more sensitive than the cpxA mutant to LL-37, indicating that MTR contributed to LL-37 resistance independent of the CpxRA regulon. The CpxRA regulon did not affect proton motive force-dependent antimicrobial peptide resistance; however, 35000HPmtrC had lost proton motive force-dependent peptide resistance, suggesting that the MTR transporter promotes proton motive force-dependent resistance to LL-37 and human β-defensins. This is the first report of a β-defensin resistance mechanism in H. ducreyi and shows that LL-37 resistance in H. ducreyi is multifactorial. PMID:21444663

  8. Haemophilus ducreyi RpoE and CpxRA Appear To Play Distinct yet Complementary Roles in Regulation of Envelope-Related Functions

    PubMed Central

    Gangaiah, Dharanesh; Zhang, Xinjun; Baker, Beth; Fortney, Kate R.; Liu, Yunlong; Munson, Robert S.

    2014-01-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi causes the sexually transmitted disease chancroid and a chronic limb ulceration syndrome in children. In humans, H. ducreyi is found in an abscess and overcomes a hostile environment to establish infection. To sense and respond to membrane stress, bacteria utilize two-component systems (TCSs) and extracytoplasmic function (ECF) sigma factors. We previously showed that activation of CpxRA, the only intact TCS in H. ducreyi, does not regulate homologues of envelope protein folding factors but does downregulate genes encoding envelope-localized proteins, including many virulence determinants. H. ducreyi also harbors a homologue of RpoE, which is the only ECF sigma factor in the organism. To potentially understand how H. ducreyi responds to membrane stress, here we defined RpoE-dependent genes using transcriptome sequencing (RNA-Seq). We identified 180 RpoE-dependent genes, of which 98% were upregulated; a major set of these genes encodes homologues of envelope maintenance and repair factors. We also identified and validated a putative RpoE promoter consensus sequence, which was enriched in the majority of RpoE-dependent targets. Comparison of RpoE-dependent genes to those controlled by CpxR showed that each transcription factor regulated a distinct set of genes. Given that RpoE activated a large number of genes encoding envelope maintenance and repair factors and that CpxRA represses genes encoding envelope-localized proteins, these data suggest that RpoE and CpxRA appear to play distinct yet complementary roles in regulating envelope homeostasis in H. ducreyi. PMID:25201944

  9. Construction and Characterization of Haemophilus ducreyi Lipooligosaccharide (LOS) Mutants Defective in Expression of Heptosyltransferase III and β1,4-Glucosyltransferase: Identification of LOS Glycoforms Containing Lactosamine Repeats

    PubMed Central

    Filiatrault, Melanie J.; Gibson, Bradford W.; Schilling, Birgit; Sun, Shuhua; Munson, Robert S.; Campagnari, Anthony A.

    2000-01-01

    To begin to understand the role of the lipooligosaccharide (LOS) molecule in chancroid infections, we constructed mutants defective in expression of glycosyltransferase genes. Pyocin lysis and immunoscreening was used to identify a LOS mutant of Haemophilus ducreyi 35000. This mutant, HD35000R, produced a LOS molecule that lacked the monoclonal antibody 3F11 epitope and migrated with an increased mobility on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Structural studies indicated that the principal LOS glycoform contains lipid A, Kdo, and two of the three core heptose residues. HD35000R was transformed with a plasmid library of H. ducreyi 35000 DNA, and a clone producing the wild-type LOS was identified. Sequence analysis of the plasmid insert revealed one open reading frame (ORF) that encodes a protein with homology to the WaaQ (heptosyltransferase III) of Escherichia coli. A second ORF had homology to the LgtF (glucosyltransferase) of Neisseria meningitidis. Individual isogenic mutants lacking expression of the putative H. ducreyi heptosyltransferase III, the putative glucosyltransferase, and both glycosyltransferases were constructed and characterized. Each mutant was complemented with the representative wild-type genes in trans to restore expression of parental LOS and confirm the function of each enzyme. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry and SDS-PAGE analysis identified several unique LOS glycoforms containing di-, tri-, and poly-N-acetyllactosamine repeats added to the terminal region of the main LOS branch synthesized by the heptosyltransferase III mutant. These novel H. ducreyi mutants provide important tools for studying the regulation of LOS assembly and biosynthesis. PMID:10816485

  10. The Haemophilus ducreyi LspA1 Protein Inhibits Phagocytosis By Using a New Mechanism Involving Activation of C-Terminal Src Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Dodd, Dana A.; Worth, Randall G.; Rosen, Michael K.; Grinstein, Sergio; van Oers, Nicolai S. C.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Haemophilus ducreyi causes chancroid, a sexually transmitted infection. A primary means by which this pathogen causes disease involves eluding phagocytosis; however, the molecular basis for this escape mechanism has been poorly understood. Here, we report that the LspA virulence factors of H. ducreyi inhibit phagocytosis by stimulating the catalytic activity of C-terminal Src kinase (Csk), which itself inhibits Src family protein tyrosine kinases (SFKs) that promote phagocytosis. Inhibitory activity could be localized to a 37-kDa domain (designated YL2) of the 456-kDa LspA1 protein. The YL2 domain impaired ingestion of IgG-opsonized targets and decreased levels of active SFKs when expressed in mammalian cells. YL2 contains tyrosine residues in two EPIYG motifs that are phosphorylated in mammalian cells. These tyrosine residues were essential for YL2-based inhibition of phagocytosis. Csk was identified as the predominant mammalian protein interacting with YL2, and a dominant-negative Csk rescued phagocytosis in the presence of YL2. Purified Csk phosphorylated the tyrosines in the YL2 EPIYG motifs. Phosphorylated YL2 increased Csk catalytic activity, resulting in positive feedback, such that YL2 can be phosphorylated by the same kinase that it activates. Finally, we found that the Helicobacter pylori CagA protein also inhibited phagocytosis in a Csk-dependent manner, raising the possibility that this may be a general mechanism among diverse bacteria. Harnessing Csk to subvert the Fcγ receptor (FcγR)-mediated phagocytic pathway represents a new bacterial mechanism for circumventing a crucial component of the innate immune response and may potentially affect other SFK-involved cellular pathways. PMID:24902122

  11. Immunization with the Haemophilus ducreyi trimeric autotransporter adhesin DsrA with alum, CpG or imiquimod generates a persistent humoral immune response that recognizes the bacterial surface.

    PubMed

    Samo, Melissa; Choudhary, Neelima R; Riebe, Kristina J; Shterev, Ivo; Staats, Herman F; Sempowski, Gregory D; Leduc, Isabelle

    2016-02-24

    The Ducreyi serum resistance A (DsrA) protein of Haemophilus ducreyi belongs to a large family of multifunctional outer membrane proteins termed trimeric autotransporter adhesins responsible for resistance to the bactericidal activity of human complement (serum resistance), agglutination and adhesion. The ability of DsrA to confer serum resistance and bind extracellular matrix proteins lies in its N-terminal passenger domain. We have previously reported that immunization with a recombinant form of the passenger domain of DsrA, rNT-DsrA, in complete/incomplete Freund's adjuvant, protects against a homologous challenge in swine. We present herein the results of an immunogenicity study in mice aimed at investigating the persistence, type of immune response, and the effect of immunization route and adjuvants on surrogates of protection. Our results indicate that a 20 μg dose of rNT-DsrA administered with alum elicited antisera with comparable bacterial surface reactivity to that obtained with complete/incomplete Freund's adjuvant. At that dose, high titers and bacterial surface reactivity persisted for 211 days after the first immunization. Administration of rNT-DsrA with CpG or imiquimod as adjuvants elicited a humoral response with similar quantity and quality of antibodies (Abs) as seen with Freund's adjuvant. Furthermore, intramuscular administration of rNT-DsrA elicited high-titer Abs with significantly higher reactivity to the bacterial surface than those obtained with subcutaneous immunization. All rNT-DsrA/adjuvant combinations tested, save CpG, elicited a Th2-type response. Taken together, these findings show that a 20 μg dose of rNT-DsrA administered with the adjuvants alum, CpG or imiquimod elicits high-quality Abs with reactivity to the bacterial surface that could protect against an H. ducreyi infection. PMID:26812077

  12. Enzyme immunoassays (EIAs) for the detection of anti-Haemophilus ducreyi serum IgA, IgG, and IgM antibodies.

    PubMed

    Roggen, E L; Hoofd, G; Van Dyck, E; Piot, P

    1994-01-01

    In Belgium, the Department of Infection and Immunity of the Institute of Tropical Medicine in Antwerp modified an experimental enzyme immunoassay (EIA) for the detection of serum IgG to Hemophilus ducreyi to develop EIAs for detection of anti-H. ducreyi IgA and IgM antibodies. They tested the modified EIA on sera from people in Nairobi, Kenya; Kigali, Rwanda; Banjul, The Gambia; and Bangkok, Thailand, who had a sexually transmitted disease. The EIA was able to identify correctly those who did not have anti-H ducreyi IgA, IgG, and IgM antibodies in 97%, 92%, and 99% of cases, respectively. Among people with a genital ulceration for more than 8 days, it was able to identify correctly those who had IgA, IgG, and IgM antibodies in 88%, 93%, and 78% of cases, respectively. 95% of all culture-proven chancroid patients tested seropositive for at least 1 antibody type. The sensitivity of IgG and IgA EIAs was significantly enhanced in patients with culture-proven chancroid who were older than 24 years old (p .01). HIV seropositive people from Kigali who had culture-proven chancroid had higher anti-H. ducreyi IgG seropositivity rates (but not IgA and IgM seropositivity rates), than did HIV seronegative chancroid people from Kigali (p .05). The increased IgG seropositivity rate was not related to higher antibody titers, however, suggesting that HIV infection modifies the response to H. ducreyi. These results show that the 3 EIAs hold promise as a means to study the kinetics of antibodies and the epidemiology of chancroid.

  13. Bilateral treponema periostitis.

    PubMed

    Bhatti, Anisuddin; Bhatti, Maqsood Ahmed; Mehboob, Ghulam

    2003-12-01

    Symmetrical exuberant periostitis is a rare disease caused by variety of infectious and non-infectious causes. Treponematosis is one of the rare causes of this condition. We report a patient who presented with left arm swelling, secondary to onion peel periostitis of the humerus, which was caused by Treponema species. PMID:15569562

  14. Bilateral treponema periostitis.

    PubMed

    Bhatti, Anisuddin; Bhatti, Maqsood Ahmed; Mehboob, Ghulam

    2003-12-01

    Symmetrical exuberant periostitis is a rare disease caused by variety of infectious and non-infectious causes. Treponematosis is one of the rare causes of this condition. We report a patient who presented with left arm swelling, secondary to onion peel periostitis of the humerus, which was caused by Treponema species.

  15. Haemophilus influenzae: comparison of respiratory tract isolates with genitourinary tract isolates.

    PubMed Central

    Albritton, W L; Brunton, J L; Meier, M; Bowman, M N; Slaney, L A

    1982-01-01

    Haemophilus influenzae isolates recovered from the genitourinary (GU) tract were shown to have a significantly different biotype distribution compared with respiratory tract isolates. Biotype IV strains were recovered more commonly from the GU tract, and most strains were non-serotypable. Antibiotic-susceptible strains isolated from the GU tract more frequently harbored plasmids of less than 10 megadaltons than did antibiotic-susceptible respiratory tract strains. One 2.8-megadalton plasmid resident in a GU tract isolate and one 1.8-megadalton plasmid resident in a respiratory tract isolate were shown to be related to the small ampicillin resistance plasmids previously described in H. influenzae, Haemophilus parainfluenzae, Haemophilus ducreyi, and Neisseria gonorrhoeae. This supports the suggestion that these ampicillin resistance plasmids originated by transposition or recombination of the ampicillin transposon (TnA) with cryptic endogenous Haemophilus plasmids. Images PMID:6984048

  16. 21 CFR 866.3820 - Treponema pallidum non-treponemal test reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... reaction of treponema microorganisms with body tissues. The identification aids in the diagnosis of syphilis caused by microorganisms belonging to the genus Treponema and provides epidemiological information... Treponema pallidum non-treponemal test reagents. (a) Identification. Treponema pallidum nontreponemal...

  17. 21 CFR 866.3820 - Treponema pallidum non-treponemal test reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... reaction of treponema microorganisms with body tissues. The identification aids in the diagnosis of syphilis caused by microorganisms belonging to the genus Treponema and provides epidemiological information... Treponema pallidum non-treponemal test reagents. (a) Identification. Treponema pallidum nontreponemal...

  18. 21 CFR 866.3820 - Treponema pallidum non-treponemal test reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... reaction of treponema microorganisms with body tissues. The identification aids in the diagnosis of syphilis caused by microorganisms belonging to the genus Treponema and provides epidemiological information... Treponema pallidum non-treponemal test reagents. (a) Identification. Treponema pallidum nontreponemal...

  19. 21 CFR 866.3820 - Treponema pallidum non-treponemal test reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... reaction of treponema microorganisms with body tissues. The identification aids in the diagnosis of syphilis caused by microorganisms belonging to the genus Treponema and provides epidemiological information... Treponema pallidum non-treponemal test reagents. (a) Identification. Treponema pallidum nontreponemal...

  20. 21 CFR 866.3820 - Treponema pallidum non-treponemal test reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... reaction of treponema microorganisms with body tissues. The identification aids in the diagnosis of syphilis caused by microorganisms belonging to the genus Treponema and provides epidemiological information... Treponema pallidum non-treponemal test reagents. (a) Identification. Treponema pallidum nontreponemal...

  1. Expression of Treponema pallidum Antigens in Escherichia coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walfield, Alan M.; Hanff, Philip A.; Lovett, Michael A.

    1982-04-01

    Treponema pallidum DNA was cloned in a bacteriophage. Clones were screened for expression of Treponema pallidum antigens by an in situ radio-immunoassay on nitrocellulose, with the use of subsequent reactions with syphilitic serum and radioiodinated Staphylococcus aureus protein A. One clone, which gave a strong signal, codes for at least seven antigens that react specifically with human antibodies to Treponema pallidum.

  2. Haemophilus influenza organism (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... prior to the widespread use of the H. influenza vaccine). The large red-colored objects are cells in the spinal fluid. A vaccine to prevent infection by Haemophilus influenza (type B) is available as one of the ...

  3. Treponema pallidum azithromycin resistance in Dublin, Ireland.

    PubMed

    Muldoon, Eavan G; Walsh, Anne; Crowley, Brendan; Mulcahy, Fiona

    2012-10-01

    This study aimed to reassess rates of syphilis azithromycin resistance in Dublin. Of the 104 samples, 36 (34.6%) were positive for Treponema pallidum DNA by polymerase chain reaction. Thirty samples were analyzed for A2058G mutation, 29 samples sequenced. Of the 29 samples, 27 (93.1%) had the mutation. Azithromycin cannot be recommended for the treatment of syphilis in Dublin.

  4. Visualization of an extracellular mucoid layer of Treponema denticola ATCC 35405 and surface sugar lectin analysis of some Treponema species.

    PubMed

    Scott, D; Klitorinos, A; Chan, E C; Siboo, R

    1997-04-01

    Slime layers and capsules are common amongst medically relevant bacteria. We herein report that Treponema denticola, which has been associated with periodontitis, synthesizes or acquires an extracellular polysaccharide layer that we have observed through electron microscopy using the polysaccharide-specific dye Alcian blue and phosphotungstate. We have also visualized this extracellular layer by dark-field microscopy of Alcian blue-stained spirochete cells. A representative strain of each of the oral spirochete species T. denticola, Treponema vincentii and Treponema socranskii were differentiated by concanavalin A, phaseolus, lotus A and arachis lectins in a microtiter plate immunoassay for the detection of surface sugars.

  5. Treponema diversity in root canals with endodontic failure

    PubMed Central

    Nóbrega, Leticia M. M.; Delboni, Maraisa G.; Martinho, Frederico C.; Zaia, Alexandre A; Ferraz, Caio C. R.; Gomes, Brenda P. F. A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This study sought to investigate the prevalence of eight oral Treponemas (Treponema denticola, T. amylovorum, T. maltophilum, T. medium, T. pectinovorum, T. socranskii, T. vicentii and T. lecithinolyticum) in teeth with endodontic treatment failure and periapical lesion. Methods: Samples were taken from 40 root canals presenting endodontic failure and periapical lesion. DNA extraction was performed and Nested-PCR technique was used for the detection of Treponema species using specific primers. Results: Treponemas was detected in 56.5% of the samples analyzed (22/39). Individual root canals yielded a maximum of 6 target Treponema species. T. denticola (30.8%) and T. maltophilum (30.8%) were the most frequently detected species followed by T. medium (20.5%), T. socranskii (20.5%), T. pectinovorum (17.9%) and T. vicentii (17.9%). Positive association was verified between T. denticola and T. maltophilum such as T. medium (P<.05). T. lecithinolyticum was positively associated with intraradicular post (P<.05). Conclusion: The present study revealed that a wide variety of Treponema species plays a role in persistent/secondary infection turning the root canal microbiota even more complex than previously described by endodontic literature. PMID:23408792

  6. Complete genome sequence of Treponema succinifaciens type strain (6091T)

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Cliff; Gronow, Sabine; Teshima, Hazuki; Lapidus, Alla L.; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Hammon, Nancy; Deshpande, Shweta; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Zeytun, Ahmet; Tapia, Roxanne; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Pagani, Ioanna; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Mikhailova, Natalia; Huntemann, Marcel; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie; Rohde, Manfred; Goker, Markus; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Detter, J. Chris

    2011-01-01

    Treponema succinifaciens Cwyk and Canale-Parola 1981 is of interest because this strictly anaerobic, apathogenic member of the genus Treponema oxidizes carbohydrates and couples the Embden-Meyerhof pathway via activity of a pyruvate-formate lyase to the production of acetyl-coenzyme A and formate. This feature separates this species from most other anaerob- ic spirochetes. The genome of T. succinifaciens 6091T is only the second completed and pub- lished type strain genome from the genus Treponema in the family Spirochaetaceae. The 2,897,425 bp long genome with one plasmid harbors 2,723 protein-coding and 63 RNA genes and is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  7. Characterization of Genetic and Phenotypic Diversity of Invasive Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae

    PubMed Central

    Erwin, Alice L.; Nelson, Kevin L.; Mhlanga-Mutangadura, Tendai; Bonthuis, Paul J.; Geelhood, Jennifer L.; Morlin, Gregory; Unrath, William C. T.; Campos, Jose; Crook, Derrick W.; Farley, Monica M.; Henderson, Frederick W.; Jacobs, Richard F.; Mühlemann, Kathrin; Satola, Sarah W.; van Alphen, Loek; Golomb, Miriam; Smith, Arnold L.

    2005-01-01

    The ability of unencapsulated (nontypeable) Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) to cause systemic disease in healthy children has been recognized only in the past decade. To determine the extent of similarity among invasive nontypeable isolates, we compared strain R2866 with 16 additional NTHi isolates from blood and spinal fluid, 17 nasopharyngeal or throat isolates from healthy children, and 19 isolates from middle ear aspirates. The strains were evaluated for the presence of several genetic loci that affect bacterial surface structures and for biochemical reactions that are known to differ among H. influenzae strains. Eight strains, including four blood isolates, shared several properties with R2866: they were biotype V (indole and ornithine decarboxylase positive, urease negative), contained sequence from the adhesin gene hia, and lacked a genetic island flanked by the infA and ksgA genes. Multilocus sequence typing showed that most biotype V isolates belonged to the same phylogenetic cluster as strain R2866. When present, the infA-ksgA island contains lipopolysaccharide biosynthetic genes, either lic2B and lic2C or homologs of the losA and losB genes described for Haemophilus ducreyi. The island was found in most nasopharyngeal and otitis isolates but was absent from 40% of invasive isolates. Overall, the 33 hmw-negative isolates were much more likely than hmw-containing isolates to have tryptophanase, ornithine decarboxylase, or lysine decarboxylase activity or to contain the hif genes. We conclude (i) that invasive isolates are genetically and phenotypically diverse and (ii) that certain genetic loci of NTHi are frequently found in association among NTHi strains. PMID:16113304

  8. Haemophilus influenzae and the lung (Haemophilus and the lung)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Haemophilus influenzae is present as a commensal organism in the nasopharynx of most healthy adults from where it can spread to cause both systemic and respiratory tract infection. This bacterium is divided into typeable forms (such as type b) or nontypeable forms based on the presence or absence of a tough polysaccharide capsule. Respiratory disease is predominantly caused by the nontypeable forms (NTHi). Haemophilus influenzae has evolved a number of strategies to evade the host defense including the ability to invade into local tissue. Pathogenic properties of this bacterium as well as defects in host defense may result in the spread of this bacterium from the upper airway to the bronchi of the lung. This can result in airway inflammation and colonization particularly in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Treatment of respiratory tract infection with Haemophilus influenzae is often only partially successful with ongoing infection and inflammation. Improvement in patient outcome will be dependent on a better understanding of the pathogenesis and host immune response to this bacterium. PMID:23369277

  9. In vitro cultivation of Treponema pallidum: a review

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, Thomas

    1981-01-01

    In vitro cultivation of Treponema pallidum would facilitate many different aspects of syphilis research. This review summarizes developments in this field that have been published since 1975. Findings are discussed in terms of treponemes and the oxygen question, treponemal metabolism involving proteins, nucleic acids, and fatty acids, and treponemal interaction with tissue culture cells. Suggested future approaches and potential problem areas pertinent to successful cultivation are discussed. PMID:6172213

  10. 21 CFR 866.3830 - Treponema pallidum tre-ponemal test reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... from infecting treponemal organisms in serum. The identification aids in the diagnosis of syphilis caused by bacteria belonging to the genus Treponema and provides epidemiological information on...

  11. 21 CFR 866.3830 - Treponema pallidum tre-ponemal test reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... from infecting treponemal organisms in serum. The identification aids in the diagnosis of syphilis caused by bacteria belonging to the genus Treponema and provides epidemiological information on...

  12. 21 CFR 866.3830 - Treponema pallidum tre-ponemal test reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... from infecting treponemal organisms in serum. The identification aids in the diagnosis of syphilis caused by bacteria belonging to the genus Treponema and provides epidemiological information on...

  13. The host-interacting proteins Tp0750 and Pallilysin; conservation among treponemes and restriction of proteolytic capacity to Treponema pallidum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The spirochete Treponema pallidum is the causative agent of syphilis, a chronic, sexually transmitted bacterial infection characterized by multiple symptomatic and asymptomatic stages. Treponema pallidum is significantly more invasive than other treponemal species, being able to cross both the blood...

  14. Use of CB hamsters in the study of Treponema pertenue.

    PubMed

    Schell, R F; Le Frock, J L; Babu, J P; Chan, J K

    1979-10-01

    The CB/Ss LAK strain of inbred hamster was used as a model for studies of infection with Treponema pertenue and of acquired resistance to it. When infected, this strain developed cutaneous lesions which lasted for six to seven months, even in the presence of peak titres of antitreponemal antibody. The rate of appearance and resolution of these lesions varied with the size of the inoculum. The infected hamsters' inguinal lymph nodes increased significantly in weight and teemed with treponemes for several weeks. Animals infected for eight or 10 weeks obtained quick resolution of their lesions by treatment with penicillin and were thereafter resistant to reinfection. PMID:509189

  15. Treponema pallidum Invades Intercellular Junctions of Endothelial Cell Monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, D. Denee; Navab, Mahamad; Haake, David A.; Fogelman, Alan M.; Miller, James N.; Lovett, Michael A.

    1988-05-01

    The pathogenesis of syphilis reflects invasive properties of Treponema pallidum, but the actual mode of tissue invasion is unknown. We have found two in vitro parallels of treponemal invasiveness. We tested whether motile T. pallidum could invade host cells by determining the fate of radiolabeled motile organisms added to a HeLa cell monolayer; 26% of treponemes associated with the monolayer in a trypsin-resistant niche, presumably between the monolayer and the surface to which it adhered, but did not attain intracellularity. Attachment of T. pallidum to cultured human and rabbit aortic and human umbilical vein endothelial cells was 2-fold greater than to HeLa cells. We added T. pallidum to aortic endothelial cells grown on membrane filters under conditions in which tight intercellular junctions had formed. T. pallidum was able to pass through the endothelial cell monolayers without altering tight junctions, as measured by electrical resistance. In contrast, heat-killed T. pallidum and the nonpathogen Treponema phagedenis biotype Reiter failed to penetrate the monolayer. Transmission electron micrographs of sections of the monolayer showed T. pallidum in intercellular junctions. Our in vitro observations suggest that these highly motile spirochetes may leave the circulation by invading the junctions between endothelial cells.

  16. Identification of Gardnerella (Haemophilus) vaginalis.

    PubMed

    Piot, P; Van Dyck, E; Totten, P A; Holmes, K K

    1982-01-01

    Different tests for the identification of Gardnerella (Haemophilus) vaginalis and for its differentiation from catalase-negative unclassified coryneforms from the vagina were evaluated on over 200 bacterial strains, with special emphasis on optimal test conditions. A presumptive identification of G. vaginalis in the clinical laboratory can be made on the basis of colonial morphology, clear beta-hemolysis with diffuse edges on human blood bilayer-Tween agar, a negative catalase test, and typical cell morphology in the Gram stain. This procedure will correctly identify 90 to 98% of suspect colonies of G. vaginalis with human blood bilayer-Tween agar as primary isolation medium. Useful additional reactions for the confirmation of G. vaginalis include positive hippurate and starch hydrolysis, positive alpha-glucosidase but negative beta-glucosidase tests, the production of acid from glucose and maltose but not from mannitol, and susceptibility to disks containing metronidazole, nitrofurantoin, sulfonamides, and bile. PMID:6821205

  17. Isolation and characterization of a newly identified Haemophilus species from cats: "Haemophilus felis".

    PubMed Central

    Inzana, T J; Johnson, J L; Shell, L; Møller, K; Kilian, M

    1992-01-01

    A gram-negative coccobacillus was isolated from the lower respiratory tract of a cat with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The isolate required CO2 and V factor for growth and was initially identified as Haemophilus paraphrophilus on the basis of its nutritional requirements, colony morphology, and some biochemical tests. Because of the host specificity of Haemophilus species and discrepancies in catalase, oxidase, and hemolytic activities, additional testing was done. Extensive biochemical testing, G+C content, and DNA reassociation studies indicated that the organism was distinct from other Haemophilus species. Therefore, the organism was identified as a previously unrecognized Haemophilus species and was tentatively named "Haemophilus felis." Bacteria identical to the original isolate were isolated from the nasopharynxes of 6 of 28 apparently normal cats, indicating that H. felis or H. felis-like organisms may be common members of the feline upper respiratory tract flora. PMID:1500518

  18. Relationship of Treponema denticola periplasmic flagella to irregular cell morphology.

    PubMed Central

    Ruby, J D; Li, H; Kuramitsu, H; Norris, S J; Goldstein, S F; Buttle, K F; Charon, N W

    1997-01-01

    Treponema denticola is an anaerobic, motile, oral spirochete associated with periodontal disease. We found that the periplasmic flagella (PFs), which are located between the outer membrane sheath and cell cylinder, influence its morphology in a unique manner. In addition, the protein composition of the PFs was found to be quite complex and similar to those of other spirochetes. Dark-field microscopy revealed that most wild-type cells had an irregular twisted morphology, with both planar and helical regions, and a minority of cells had a regular right-handed helical shape. High-voltage electron microscopy indicated that the PFs, especially in those regions of the cell which were planar, wrapped around the cell body axis in a right-handed sense. In those regions of the cell which were helical or irregular, the PFs tended to lie along the cell axis. The PFs caused the cell to form the irregular shape, as two nonmotile, PF-deficient mutants (JR1 and HL51) were no longer irregular but were right-handed helices. JR1 was isolated as a spontaneously occurring nonmotile mutant, and HL51 was isolated as a site-directed mutant in the flagellar hook gene flgE. Consistent with these results is the finding that wild-type cells with their outer membrane sheath removed were also right-handed helices similar in shape to JR1 and HL51. Purified PFs were analyzed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, and several protein species were identified. Western blot analysis using antisera to Treponema pallidum PF proteins along with N-terminal amino acid sequence analysis indicated T. denticola PFs are composed of one class A sheath protein of 38 kDa (FlaA) and three class B proteins of 35 kDa (FlaB1 and FlaB2) and one of 34 kDa (FlaB3). The N-terminal amino acid sequences of the FlaA and FlaB proteins of T. denticola were most similar to those of T. pallidum and Treponema phagedenis. Because these proteins were present in markedly reduced amounts or were absent in HL51, PF synthesis is

  19. Virulence Factors of the Oral Spirochete Treponema denticola

    PubMed Central

    Dashper, S.G.; Seers, C.A.; Tan, K.H.; Reynolds, E.C.

    2011-01-01

    There is compelling evidence that treponemes are involved in the etiology of several chronic diseases, including chronic periodontitis as well as other forms of periodontal disease. There are interesting parallels with other chronic diseases caused by treponemes that may indicate similar virulence characteristics. Chronic periodontitis is a polymicrobial disease, and recent animal studies indicate that co-infection of Treponema denticola with other periodontal pathogens can enhance alveolar bone resorption. The bacterium has a suite of molecular determinants that could enable it to cause tissue damage and subvert the host immune response. In addition to this, it has several non-classic virulence determinants that enable it to interact with other pathogenic bacteria and the host in ways that are likely to promote disease progression. Recent advances, especially in molecular-based methodologies, have greatly improved our knowledge of this bacterium and its role in disease. PMID:20940357

  20. Antimicrobial Resistance in Haemophilus influenzae

    PubMed Central

    Tristram, Stephen; Jacobs, Michael R.; Appelbaum, Peter C.

    2007-01-01

    Haemophilus influenzae is a major community-acquired pathogen causing significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. Meningitis and bacteremia due to type b strains occur in areas where the protein-conjugated type b vaccine is not in use, whereas nontypeable strains are major causes of otitis media, sinusitis, acute exacerbations of chronic bronchitis, and pneumonia. Antibiotic resistance in this organism is more diverse and widespread than is commonly appreciated. Intrinsic efflux resistance mechanisms limit the activity of the macrolides, azalides, and ketolides. β-Lactamase production is highly prevalent worldwide and is associated with resistance to ampicillin and amoxicillin. Strains with alterations in penicillin binding proteins, particularly PBP3 (β-lactamase negative ampicillin resistant and β-lactamase positive amoxicillin-clavulanate resistant), are increasing in prevalence, particularly in Japan, with increasing resistance to ampicillin, amoxicillin, amoxicillin-clavulanate, and many cephalosporins, limiting the efficacy of expanded-spectrum cephalosporins against meningitis and of many oral cephalosporins against other diseases. Most strains remain susceptible to the carbapenems, which are not affected by penicillin binding protein changes, and the quinolones. The activity of many oral agents is limited by pharmacokinetics achieved with administration by this route, and the susceptibility of isolates based on pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameters is reviewed. PMID:17428889

  1. Culture and PCR detection of Haemophilus influenzae and Haemophilus haemolyticus in Australian Indigenous children with bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Hare, K M; Binks, M J; Grimwood, K; Chang, A B; Leach, A J; Smith-Vaughan, H

    2012-07-01

    A PCR for protein D (hpd#3) was used to differentiate nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHI) from Haemophilus haemolyticus. While 90% of nasopharyngeal specimens and 100% of lower-airway specimens from 84 Indigenous Australian children with bronchiectasis had phenotypic NTHI isolates confirmed as H. influenzae, only 39% of oropharyngeal specimens with phenotypic NTHI had H. influenzae. The nasopharynx is therefore the preferred site for NTHI colonization studies, and NTHI is confirmed as an important lower-airway pathogen.

  2. [Resistance of Haemophilus sp. to antibiotics].

    PubMed

    Janicka, G; Gospodarek, E; Mikucka, A; Białek, M; Wojak, I; Krawiecka, D

    1998-02-01

    The present study was undertaken to determine the in vitro drug resistance of Haemophilus influenzae (68 isolates) and H. parainfluenzae (17 isolates). The tests susceptibility to Ampicillin, Amoxicilin/Clavulanic Acid, Cefaclor, Cefuroxime, Cotrimoxazole, Aztreonam, Ceftriaxone, Tetracycline, Ciprofloxacin, Rifampicin and Chloramphenicol were performed with a standard disk-diffusion method. The NCCLS methodology and susceptibility interpretative criteria were applied as described by the disk manufacturer. Beta-lactamase production was detected with nitrocefin impregnated disk (Cefinase, BBL Microbiology System). Resistance in nosocomially acquired Haemophilus isolates to several antibiotics was observed. Of the Haemophilus isolates 28.2% were Ampicillin in resistant, all were susceptible to the combination of Amoxicillin/Clavulanic acid. The Ampicillin-resistant strains were beta-lactamase producers. We observed the high resistance (70.1%) to Tetracycline and (28.2%) to SXT (Cotrimoxazole). All isolates of Haemophilus were susceptible to Ciprofloxacin. The low resistance percentages to Rifampin (1.2%), Aztreonam (3.5%) and Chloramphenicol (3.5%) was observed.

  3. Porphyromonas gingivalis and Treponema denticola Synergistic Polymicrobial Biofilm Development

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Ying; Dashper, Stuart G.; Chen, Yu-Yen; Crawford, Simon; Slakeski, Nada; Reynolds, Eric C.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic periodontitis has a polymicrobial biofilm aetiology and interactions between key bacterial species are strongly implicated as contributing to disease progression. Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola and Tannerella forsythia have all been implicated as playing roles in disease progression. P. gingivalis cell-surface-located protease/adhesins, the gingipains, have been suggested to be involved in its interactions with several other bacterial species. The aims of this study were to determine polymicrobial biofilm formation by P. gingivalis, T. denticola and T. forsythia, as well as the role of P. gingivalis gingipains in biofilm formation by using a gingipain null triple mutant. To determine homotypic and polymicrobial biofilm formation a flow cell system was employed and the biofilms imaged and quantified by fluorescent in situ hybridization using DNA species-specific probes and confocal scanning laser microscopy imaging. Of the three species, only P. gingivalis and T. denticola formed mature, homotypic biofilms, and a strong synergy was observed between P. gingivalis and T. denticola in polymicrobial biofilm formation. This synergy was demonstrated by significant increases in biovolume, average biofilm thickness and maximum biofilm thickness of both species. In addition there was a morphological change of T. denticola in polymicrobial biofilms when compared with homotypic biofilms, suggesting reduced motility in homotypic biofilms. P. gingivalis gingipains were shown to play an essential role in synergistic polymicrobial biofilm formation with T. denticola. PMID:23990979

  4. Treponema denticola improves adhesive capacities of Porphyromonas gingivalis.

    PubMed

    Meuric, V; Martin, B; Guyodo, H; Rouillon, A; Tamanai-Shacoori, Z; Barloy-Hubler, F; Bonnaure-Mallet, M

    2013-02-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis, an important etiological agent of periodontal disease, is frequently found associated with Treponema denticola, an anaerobic spirochete, in pathogenic biofilms. However, interactions between these two bacteria are not well understood at the molecular level. In this study, we seek to link the influence of T. denticola on the expression of P. gingivalis proteases with its capacities to adhere and to form biofilms. The P. gingivalis genes encoding Arg-gingipain A (RgpA), Lys-gingipain (Kgp), and hemagglutinin A (HagA) were more strongly expressed after incubation with T. denticola compared with P. gingivalis alone. The amounts of the three resulting proteins, all of which contain hemagglutinin adhesion domains, were increased in culture supernatants. Moreover, incubation of P. gingivalis with T. denticola promoted static and dynamic biofilm formation, primarily via a time-dependent enhancement of P. gingivalis adhesion capacities on bacterial partners such as Streptococcus gordonii. Adhesion of P. gingivalis to human cells was also increased. These results showed that interactions of P. gingivalis with other bacterial species, such as T. denticola, induce increased adhesive capacities on various substrata by hemagglutinin adhesion domain-containing proteins. PMID:23194417

  5. Etiology of genital ulcers and prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus coinfection in 10 US cities. The Genital Ulcer Disease Surveillance Group.

    PubMed

    Mertz, K J; Trees, D; Levine, W C; Lewis, J S; Litchfield, B; Pettus, K S; Morse, S A; St Louis, M E; Weiss, J B; Schwebke, J; Dickes, J; Kee, R; Reynolds, J; Hutcheson, D; Green, D; Dyer, I; Richwald, G A; Novotny, J; Weisfuse, I; Goldberg, M; O'Donnell, J A; Knaup, R

    1998-12-01

    To determine the etiology of genital ulcers and to assess the prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in ulcer patients in 10 US cities, ulcer and serum specimens were collected from approximately 50 ulcer patients at a sexually transmitted disease clinic in each city. Ulcer specimens were tested using a multiplex polymerase chain reaction assay to detect Haemophilus ducreyi, Treponema pallidum, and herpes simplex virus (HSV); sera were tested for antibody to HIV. H. ducreyi was detected in ulcer specimens from patients in Memphis (20% of specimens) and Chicago (12%). T. pallidum was detected in ulcer specimens from every city except Los Angeles (median, 9% of specimens; range, 0%-46%). HSV was detected in >/=50% of specimens from all cities except Memphis (42%). HIV seroprevalence in ulcer patients was 6% (range by city, 0%-18%). These data suggest that chancroid is prevalent in some US cities and that persons with genital ulcers should be a focus of HIV prevention activities.

  6. Comparative Behavior of Virulent Strains of Treponema pallidum and Treponema pertenue in Gradient Cultures of Various Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fieldsteel, A. Howard; Stout, James G.; Becker, Frances A.

    1979-01-01

    Two strains of virulent Treponema pallidum and two of virulent T. pertenue were investigated for their ability to attach to and survive in gradient cultures of five different mammalian cells under aerobic conditions. The strains of T. pallidum studied were the high-rabbit-passage Nichols and the low-rabbit-passage KKJ. The former was known to readily attach to cottontail rabbit epithelial cells (Sf1Ep) and to survive in the virulent state for up to 21 days. We therefore compared attachment of the other virulent treponemes with that of T. pallidum (Nichols). The KKJ strain of T. pallidum behaved in a fashion similar to T. pallidum (Nichols) in all of the cultures. Both strains exhibited preferential attachment to cells of Sf1Ep and those derived from the ear of a nude athymic (nu/nu) mouse. In these cultures, we observed a consistent three- to fivefold increase in attached treponemes up to 12 days after initial inoculation. The strains of T. pertenue were the human-derived Gauthier and cynocephalus-derived FB. These two strains of T. pertenue also attached to cells of all five types of cultures, but in smaller numbers than were seen with T. pallidum and equally to all of the cultures. Neither preferential attachment to Sf1Ep and nude mouse ear cells nor increased attachment with time was seen. PMID:378851

  7. Kanamycin Resistance Cassette for Genetic Manipulation of Treponema denticola.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuebin; Ruby, John; Wu, Hui

    2015-07-01

    Treponema denticola has been recognized as an important oral pathogen of the "red complex" bacterial consortium that is associated with the pathogenesis of endodontal and periodontal diseases. However, little is known about the virulence of T. denticola due to its recalcitrant genetic system. The difficulty in genetically manipulating oral spirochetes is partially due to the lack of antibiotic resistance cassettes that are useful for gene complementation following allelic replacement mutagenesis. In this study, a kanamycin resistance cassette was identified and developed for the genetic manipulation of T. denticola ATCC 35405. Compared to the widely used ermF-ermAM cassette, the kanamycin cassette used in the transformation experiments gave rise to additional antibiotic-resistant T. denticola colonies. The kanamycin cassette is effective for allelic replacement mutagenesis as demonstrated by inactivation of two open reading frames of T. denticola, TDE1430 and TDE0911. In addition, the cassette is also functional in trans-chromosomal complementation. This was determined by functional rescue of a periplasmic flagellum (PF)-deficient mutant that had the flgE gene coding for PF hook protein inactivated. The integration of the full-length flgE gene into the genome of the flgE mutant rescued all of the defects associated with the flgE mutant that included the lack of PF filament and spirochetal motility. Taken together, we demonstrate that the kanamycin resistance gene is a suitable cassette for the genetic manipulation of T. denticola that will facilitate the characterization of virulence factors attributed to this important oral pathogen.

  8. Proteases of Treponema denticola outer sheath and extracellular vesicles.

    PubMed Central

    Rosen, G; Naor, R; Rahamim, E; Yishai, R; Sela, M N

    1995-01-01

    Electron microscopical observations of the oral periodontopathogen Treponema denticola show the presence of extracellular vesicles bound to the bacterial surface or free in the surrounding medium. Extracellular vesicles from T. denticola ATCC 35404, 50 to 100 nm in diameter, were isolated and further characterized. Protein and proteolytic patterns of the vesicles were found to be very similar to those of isolated T. denticola outer sheaths. They were enriched with the major outer sheath polypeptides (molecular sizes, 113 to 234 kDa) and with outer sheath proteases of 91, 153, 173, and 228 kDa. These findings indicate that treponemal outer sheath vesicles contain the necessary adhesins and proteolytic arsenal for adherence to and damage of eucaryotic cells and mammalian matrix proteins. The major outer sheath- and vesicle-associated protease of T. denticola ATCC 35404 was purified and characterized. The purified enzyme had a molecular size of 91 kDa, and it dissociated into three polypeptides of 72, 38, and 35 kDa upon heating in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate with or without a reducing agent. The activity of the enzyme could be inhibited by diisopropylfluorophosphate, phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride, and phenylboronic acid. The value of the second-order rate constant of the protease inactivation by phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride was 0.48 x 10(4) M(-1) min-1. Inhibition of the enzyme by phenylboronic acid was rapid (< 1 min) and pH dependent. These data strongly suggest that this major surface proteolytic activity belongs to a family of serine proteases. PMID:7558307

  9. Purulent pericarditis caused by Haemophilus parainfluenzae.

    PubMed

    Latyshev, Yevgeniy; Mathew, Aswin; Jacobson, Jeffrey M; Sturm, Eron

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial pericarditis is a rare disease in the era of antibiotics. Purulent pericarditis is most often caused by Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, or Haemophilus influenzae. The number of H. parainfluenzae infections has been increasing; in rare cases, it has caused endocarditis. We report a case of purulent pericarditis caused by H. parainfluenzae in a 62-year-old woman who reported a recent upper respiratory tract infection. The patient presented with signs and symptoms of pericardial tamponade. Urgent pericardiocentesis restored her hemodynamic stability. However, within 24 hours, fluid reaccumulation led to recurrent pericardial tamponade and necessitated the creation of a pericardial window. Cultures of the first pericardial fluid grew H. parainfluenzae. Levofloxacin therapy was started, and the patient recovered. Haemophilus parainfluenzae should be considered in a patient who has signs and symptoms of purulent pericarditis. Prompt diagnosis, treatment, and antibiotic therapy are necessary for the patient's survival. To our knowledge, this is the first report of purulent pericarditis caused by H. parainfluenzae.

  10. Haemophilus influenzae sepsis resulting from pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Marinella, M A

    1997-01-01

    Haemophilus influenzae is a pleomorphic gram-negative bacterium that causes a myriad of infections in both adults and children. The organism frequently causes respiratory infections in patients with obstructive lung disease but may on occasion cause invasive infections including pneumonia with bacteremia. We report the case of a patient with underlying lung disease and metastatic malignancy in whom sepsis related to pneumonia caused by H. influenzae developed.

  11. Cellular fatty acid composition of Haemophilus equigenitalis.

    PubMed Central

    Sugimoto, C; Miyagawa, E; Mitani, K; Nakazawa, M; Isayama, Y

    1982-01-01

    The cellular fatty acid composition of eight Haemophilus equigenitalis strains was determined by gas-liquid chromatography. All strains showed a grossly similar pattern characterized by large amounts of 18:1 and 16:0. The amounts of 16:1, 18:2, 18:0, 3-OH 14:0, 3-OH 16:0, and 3-OH 18:1 were relatively small. PMID:7096556

  12. Invasive Disease Caused by Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae

    PubMed Central

    de Jonge, Marien I.

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of severe Haemophilus influenza infections, such as sepsis and meningitis, has declined substantially since the introduction of the H. influenzae serotype b vaccine. However, the H. influenzae type b vaccine fails to protect against nontypeable H. influenzae strains, which have become increasingly frequent causes of invasive disease, especially among children and the elderly. We summarize recent literature supporting the emergence of invasive nontypeable H. influenzae and describe mechanisms that may explain its increasing prevalence over the past 2 decades. PMID:26407156

  13. Molecular tools for differentiation of non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae from Haemophilus haemolyticus

    PubMed Central

    Pickering, Janessa; Richmond, Peter C.; Kirkham, Lea-Ann S.

    2014-01-01

    Non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) and Haemophilus haemolyticus are closely related bacteria that reside in the upper respiratory tract. NTHi is associated with respiratory tract infections that frequently result in antibiotic prescription whilst H. haemolyticus is rarely associated with disease. NTHi and H. haemolyticus can be indistinguishable by traditional culture methods and molecular differentiation has proven difficult. This current review chronologically summarizes the molecular approaches that have been developed for differentiation of NTHi from H. haemolyticus, highlighting the advantages and disadvantages of each target and/or technique. We also provide suggestions for the development of new tools that would be suitable for clinical and research laboratories. PMID:25520712

  14. Use of Treponema pallidum PCR in Testing of Ulcers for Diagnosis of Primary Syphilis1

    PubMed Central

    Sednaoui, Patrice; Lautenschlager, Stephan; Ferry, Tristan; Toutous-Trellu, Laurence; Cavassini, Matthias; Yassir, Fatima; Martinez de Tejada, Begoña; Emonet, Stéphane; Combescure, Christophe; Schrenzel, Jacques; Perneger, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Treponema pallidum PCR (Tp-PCR) has been noted as a valid method for diagnosing syphilis. We compared Tp-PCR to a combination of darkfield microscopy (DFM), the reference method, and serologic testing in a cohort of 273 patients from France and Switzerland and found the diagnostic accuracy of Tp-PCR was higher than that for DFM. PMID:25531672

  15. Use of Treponema pallidum PCR in testing of ulcers for diagnosis of primary syphilis.

    PubMed

    Gayet-Ageron, Angèle; Sednaoui, Patrice; Lautenschlager, Stephan; Ferry, Tristan; Toutous-Trellu, Laurence; Cavassini, Matthias; Yassir, Fatima; Martinez de Tejada, Begoña; Emonet, Stéphane; Combescure, Christophe; Schrenzel, Jacques; Perneger, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Treponema pallidum PCR (Tp-PCR) has been noted as a valid method for diagnosing syphilis. We compared Tp-PCR to a combination of darkfield microscopy (DFM), the reference method, and serologic testing in a cohort of 273 patients from France and Switzerland and found the diagnostic accuracy of Tp-PCR was higher than that for DFM. PMID:25531672

  16. 21 CFR 866.3830 - Treponema pallidum tre-ponemal test reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Treponema pallidum tre-ponemal test reagents. 866.3830 Section 866.3830 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  17. 21 CFR 866.3830 - Treponema pallidum tre-ponemal test reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Treponema pallidum tre-ponemal test reagents. 866.3830 Section 866.3830 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  18. Percoll-purified Treponema pallidum, an improved fluorescent treponemal antibody-absorbed antigen.

    PubMed

    Hanff, P A; Fernandez, C; Folds, J D

    1986-05-01

    Percoll-purified Treponema pallidum was evaluated as a fluorescent treponemal antibody-absorbed antigen. Borderline and false-positive reactions were essentially eliminated, resulting in sensitivity and specificity of 100 and 95.5%, respectively. The lack of background debris improved the ease and speed of reading the test.

  19. Identifying Haemophilus haemolyticus and Haemophilus influenzae by SYBR Green real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Latham, Roger; Zhang, Bowen; Tristram, Stephen

    2015-05-01

    SYBR Green real time PCR assays for protein D (hpd), fuculose kinase (fucK) and [Cu, Zn]-superoxide dismutase (sodC) were designed for use in an algorithm for the identification of Haemophilus influenzae and H. haemolyticus. When tested on 127 H. influenzae and 60 H. haemolyticus all isolates were identified correctly. PMID:25753676

  20. Evaluation of new biomarker genes for differentiating Haemophilus influenzae from Haemophilus haemolyticus.

    PubMed

    Theodore, M Jordan; Anderson, Raydel D; Wang, Xin; Katz, Lee S; Vuong, Jeni T; Bell, Melissa E; Juni, Billie A; Lowther, Sara A; Lynfield, Ruth; MacNeil, Jessica R; Mayer, Leonard W

    2012-04-01

    PCR detecting the protein D (hpd) and fuculose kinase (fucK) genes showed high sensitivity and specificity for identifying Haemophilus influenzae and differentiating it from H. haemolyticus. Phylogenetic analysis using the 16S rRNA gene demonstrated two distinct groups for H. influenzae and H. haemolyticus. PMID:22301020

  1. Haemophilus parainfluenzae urethritis among homosexual men.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Meng-Shiuan; Wu, Mei-Yu; Lin, Tsui-Hsien; Liao, Chun-Hsing

    2015-08-01

    Haemophilus parainfluenzae is a common inhabitant of the human upper respiratory tract of the normal oral microflora. We report three men who had been having unprotected sex with men (MSM) and subsequently acquired H. parainfluenzae urethritis, which was confirmed by 16S rRNA gene sequencing analysis. Two men were treated with ceftriaxone and doxycycline, and the third man was treated with clarithromycin. All three patients responded to treatment. This case series highlights the potential role of H. parainfluenzae as a sexually transmitted genitourinary pathogen.

  2. Serine Biosynthesis and Regulation in Haemophilus influenzae

    PubMed Central

    Pizer, Lewis I.; Ponce-De-Leon, Manuel; Michalka, Jack

    1969-01-01

    Nutritional mutants of Haemophilus influenzae requiring l-serine for growth were shown to be deficient in their capacity to synthesize serine-phosphate from 3-phosphoglycerate. On the basis of the correlation between this block and the requirement for an exogenous supply of the amino acid, it was concluded that the “phosphorylated” pathway is the only pathway used by H. influenzae for serine biosynthesis. Serine inhibits serine-phosphate production, thereby regulating its own synthesis in a manner analagous to the Enterobacteriaceae. A mutant strain that required either serine or tryptophan for growth was normal in serine-phosphate synthesis and regulation. It was concluded that this strain probably has a tryptophan synthetase with an increased Michaelis constant for serine. PMID:5305003

  3. Invasive Haemophilus influenzae disease in adults.

    PubMed Central

    Sarangi, J.; Cartwright, K.; Stuart, J.; Brookes, S.; Morris, R.; Slack, M.

    2000-01-01

    We reviewed retrospectively all invasive Haemophilus influenzae (Hi) infections in adults ascertained from reference laboratory records and notifications from five NHS regions over the 5 years from 1 October 1990, a period encompassing the introduction of routine Hib childhood immunization (October 1992). A total of 446 cases were identified, a rate of 0.73 infections per 10(5) adults per annum. Though numbers of Hib infections in adults fell after the introduction of Hib vaccines for children (P = 0.035), and there was no increase in infections caused by other capsulated Hi serotypes, total numbers of invasive Hi infections increased due to a large rise in infections caused by non-capsulated Hi (ncHi) strains (P = 0.0067). There was an unexpectedly low rate of infections in those aged 75 years or more (P < 0.0001). The commonest clinical presentations were pneumonia with bacteraemia (227/350, 65%) and bacteraemia alone (62/350, 18%) and the highest rates of disease were in the 65-74 years age group (P < 0.0001). Clinical presentation was not influenced by the capsulation status of the invading Hi strain. 103/350 cases (29%) died within 1 month, and 207/350 (59%) within 6 months of their Hi infection. Case fatality rates were high in all age groups. Pre-existing diseases were noted in 220/350 cases and were associated with a higher case fatality rate (82% vs. 21%, P < 0.0001). After the introduction of Hib immunization in children, invasive Hib infections in unimmunized adults also declined, but the overall rate of invasive Hi disease in adults increased, with most infections now caused by non-capsulated strains. Physicians and microbiologists should be aware of the changing epidemiology, the high associated mortality and high risk of underlying disease. Invasive haemophilus infections in adults should be investigated and treated aggressively. PMID:10982068

  4. Haemophilus influenzae Type b (Hib) vaccine - what you need to know

    MedlinePlus

    ... taken in its entirety from the CDC Hib (Haemophilus Influenzae Type b) Vaccine Information Statement (VIS): www.cdc. ... statements/hib.pdf . CDC review information for Hib (Haemophilus Influenzae Type b) VIS: Page last reviewed: April 2, ...

  5. Pharyngeal Colonization Dynamics of Haemophilus influenzae and Haemophilus haemolyticus in Healthy Adult Carriers▿

    PubMed Central

    Mukundan, Deepa; Ecevit, Zafer; Patel, Mayuri; Marrs, Carl F.; Gilsdorf, Janet R.

    2007-01-01

    Haemophilus influenzae is an important cause of respiratory infections, including acute otitis media, sinusitis, and chronic bronchitis, which are preceded by asymptomatic H. influenzae colonization of the human pharynx. The aim of this study was to describe the dynamics of pharyngeal colonization by H. influenzae and an intimately related species, Haemophilus haemolyticus, in healthy adults. Throat specimens from four healthy adult carriers were screened for Haemophilus species; 860 isolates were identified as H. influenzae or H. haemolyticus based on the porphyrin test and on dependence on hemin and NAD for growth. Based on tests for hemolysis, for the presence of the 7F3 epitope of the P6 protein, and for the presence of iga in 412 of the isolates, 346 (84%) were H. influenzae, 47 (11%) were H. haemolyticus, 18 (4%) were nonhemolytic H. haemolyticus, and 1 was a variant strain. Carriers A and B were predominantly colonized with nontypeable H. influenzae, carrier C predominantly with b− H. influenzae mutants, and carrier D with H. haemolyticus. A total of 358 H. influenzae and H. haemolyticus isolates were genotyped by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) following SmaI or EagI digestion of their DNA, and the carriers displayed the following: carrier A had 11 unique PFGE genotypes, carrier B had 15, carrier C had 7, and carrier D had 10. Thus, adult H. influenzae and H. haemolyticus carriers are colonized with multiple unique genotypes, the colonizing strains exhibit genetic diversity, and we observed day-to-day and week-to-week variability of the genotypes. These results appear to reflect both evolutionary processes that occur among H. influenzae isolates during asymptomatic pharyngeal carriage and sample-to-sample collection bias from a large, variable population of colonizing bacteria. PMID:17687018

  6. Treponema-specific tests for serodiagnosis of syphilis: comparative evaluation of seven assays.

    PubMed

    Binnicker, M J; Jespersen, D J; Rollins, L O

    2011-04-01

    The diagnosis of syphilis is challenging and often relies on serologic tests to detect treponemal or nontreponemal antibodies. Recently, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Association of Public Health Laboratories proposed an update to the syphilis serology testing algorithm, in which serum samples are first tested using a treponema-specific test and positive samples are analyzed with a nontreponemal assay. The goal of this study was to compare the performance of seven treponemal assays (BioPlex 2200 syphilis IgG [Bio-Rad, Hercules, CA], fluorescent treponemal antibody [FTA] assay [Zeus Scientific, Raritan, NJ], Treponema pallidum particle agglutination [TP-PA; Fujirebio Diagnostics, Malvern, PA], Trep-Sure enzyme immunoassay [EIA; Phoenix Biotech, Oakville, Ontario, Canada], Trep-Chek EIA [Phoenix Biotech], Trep-ID EIA [Phoenix Biotech], and Treponema ViraBlot IgG [Viramed Biotech AG, Planegg, Germany]) using serum samples (n = 303) submitted to our reference laboratory. In addition to testing with these 7 assays, all samples were tested by a rapid plasma reagin (RPR) assay and a treponemal IgM Western blot assay (Viramed ViraBlot). Compared to the FTA assay as the gold standard, the evaluated treponemal tests demonstrated comparable levels of performance, with percent agreement ranging from 95.4% (95% confidence interval, 92.3 to 97.3) for the Trep-Sure EIA to 98.4% (96.1 to 99.4) for the Trep-ID EIA. Compared to a "consensus of the test panel" (defined as at least 4 of 7 treponemal tests being in agreement), the percent agreement ranged from 95.7% (92.7 to 97.5) for Trep-Sure to 99.3% (97.5 to 99.9) for Trep-ID. These data may assist clinical laboratories that are considering implementing a treponemal test for screening or confirmatory purposes.

  7. MALDI-TOF MS Distinctly Differentiates Nontypable Haemophilus influenzae from Haemophilus haemolyticus

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Huifang; Zhang, Yongchan; Gao, Yuan; Xu, Li; Lv, Jing; Wang, Yingtong; Zhang, Jianzhong; Shao, Zhujun

    2013-01-01

    Nontypable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) and Haemophilus haemolyticus exhibit different pathogenicities, but to date, there remains no definitive and reliable strategy for differentiating these strains. In this study, we evaluated matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) as a potential method for differentiating NTHi and H. haemolyticus. The phylogenetic analysis of concatenated 16S rRNA and recombinase A (recA) gene sequences, outer membrane protein P6 gene sequencing and single-gene PCR were used as reference methods. The original reference database (ORD, provided with the Biotyper software) and new reference database (NRD, extended with Chinese strains) were compared for the evaluation of MALDI-TOF MS. Through a search of the ORD, 76.9% of the NTHi (40/52) and none of the H. haemolyticus (0/20) strains were identified at the species level. However, all NTHi and H. haemolyticus strains used for identification were accurately recognized at the species level when searching the NRD. From the dendrogram clustering of the main spectra projections, the Chinese and foreign H. influenzae reference strains were categorized into two distinct groups, and H. influenzae and H. haemolyticus were also separated into two categories. Compared to the existing methods, MALDI-TOF MS has the advantage of integrating high throughput, accuracy and speed. In conclusion, MALDI-TOF MS is an excellent method for differentiating NTHi and H. haemolyticus. This method can be recommended for use in appropriately equipped laboratories. PMID:23457514

  8. Cellular fatty acid composition of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans and Haemophilus aphrophilus.

    PubMed

    Braunthal, S D; Holt, S C; Tanner, A C; Socransky, S S

    1980-06-01

    Strains of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans isolated from deep pockets of patients with juvenile periodontitis were analyzed for their content of cellular fatty acids. Oral Haemophilus strains, morphologically and biochemically similar to Haemophilus aphrophilus, were also examined for their content of cellular fatty acids. The extractable lipids of the actinobacilli represented approximately 10% of the cell dry weight, with the bound lipids representing 2 to 5%. The major fatty acids consisted of myristic (C14:0) and palmitic (C16:0) acids and a C16:1 acid, possibly palmitoleic acid, accounting for 21, 35, and 31% of the total extractable fatty acids, respectively. Haemophilus strains had a similar cellular fatty acid content. PMID:7430333

  9. Cellular fatty acid composition of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans and Haemophilus aphrophilus.

    PubMed Central

    Braunthal, S D; Holt, S C; Tanner, A C; Socransky, S S

    1980-01-01

    Strains of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans isolated from deep pockets of patients with juvenile periodontitis were analyzed for their content of cellular fatty acids. Oral Haemophilus strains, morphologically and biochemically similar to Haemophilus aphrophilus, were also examined for their content of cellular fatty acids. The extractable lipids of the actinobacilli represented approximately 10% of the cell dry weight, with the bound lipids representing 2 to 5%. The major fatty acids consisted of myristic (C14:0) and palmitic (C16:0) acids and a C16:1 acid, possibly palmitoleic acid, accounting for 21, 35, and 31% of the total extractable fatty acids, respectively. Haemophilus strains had a similar cellular fatty acid content. PMID:7430333

  10. Morphological variations of Haemophilus parasuis strains.

    PubMed Central

    Morozumi, T; Nicolet, J

    1986-01-01

    Haemophilus parasuis strains isolated from the noses of apparently healthy animals and from animals with pathological conditions were examined for the presence of a capsule, for their ability to agglutinate in acriflavine or after boiling, and for their peptide profile after polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE). The capsule was identified by precipitation against hexadecyl trimethylammonium bromide (Cetavlon), by demonstration of iridescence, and by means of a capsule-staining method. We found a group of capsulated strains showing a rather coccobacillary morphology compared with the morphology with polymorphism, varying from rod-like to filamentous, in strains without detectable capsules. The strains of the latter group were agglutinated by acriflavine or by boiling. Soluble antigens of capsulated strains reacting with Cetavlon were thermostable and resisted proteolytic enzymes, thus suggesting the presence of an acidic polysaccharide. A few of the capsulated strains did not precipitate with Cetavlon, which indicated that their chemical composition was different. Acriflavine-positive strains belonging to a definite PAGE pattern (type II) seemed to be associated with pathological conditions more frequently than were capsulated strains which were mostly isolated from nasal cavities of apparently healthy pigs. We put forward the hypothesis that the agglutinability in acriflavine, together with the PAGE profile type II, may be associated with particular structures responsible for virulence. Images PMID:3700597

  11. Outer membrane protein profiles of Haemophilus pleuropneumoniae.

    PubMed Central

    Rapp, V J; Munson, R S; Ross, R F

    1986-01-01

    Outer membrane protein profiles of Haemophilus pleuropneumoniae were examined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Cells were disrupted by sonication, and outer membrane-enriched fractions were prepared by differential centrifugation and selective solubilization of the inner membrane with sodium N-lauroyl sarcosinate. Colony type, growth medium, time of harvest, and in vitro or in vivo passage had no appreciable effect on the protein profiles of the strains examined. Seven patterns were distinguished among the reference strains of the nine capsular serotypes. These patterns were based on the mobility of the major outer membrane proteins migrating in the 39,000- to 44,000-molecular-weight region of the gel, a 16K to 16.5K protein, and a heat-modifiable 29K protein. Strains of serotypes 1 and 9 had identical outer membrane protein profiles, as did strains of serotypes 2 and 6. The reference strains of the remaining five serotypes each had a distinct pattern. The outer membrane protein profiles of 95 field isolates belonging to serotypes 1, 5, 7, and 9 from swine in the midwestern United States were determined and compared with the reference patterns. The results indicate that the population of H. pleuropneumoniae is clonal, with three predominant clones distinguished by both serotype and outer membrane protein profile responsible for the majority of H. pleuropneumoniae disease occurring in swine in the United States. Images PMID:3699889

  12. Acute Haemophilus parainfluenzae endocarditis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Numerous pathogens can cause infective endocarditis, including Haemophilus parainfluenzae. H. parainfluenzae is part of the H. aphrophilus, Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, Cardiobacterium hominis, Eikenella corrodens, and Kingella kingae group that may cause about 3% of the total endocarditis cases, and is characterized by a subacute course and large vegetations. Case presentation Acute H. parainfluenzae endocarditis developed in a 54-year-old woman, with no underlying predisposing factors. The patient presented with fever of 3 days duration and a severe headache. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain revealed multiple cerebral emboli with hemorrhagic foci. Upon suspicion of endocarditis, cardiac transesophageal ultrasonography was performed and revealed massive vegetations. The patient underwent emergency mitral valve replacement, and was further treated with ceftriaxone. Blood cultures grew H. parainfluenzae only after valve replacement, and a 6-week course of ceftriaxone was prescribed. Conclusion We underline the typical presentation of large vegetations in H. parainfluenzae endocarditis, which are associated with embolic phenomena and resulting severity. Although the majority of the few cases reported in the literature are subacute in progress, our case further underlines the possibility that H. parainfluenzae endocarditis may develop rapidly. Thus, awareness of the imaging characteristics of the pathogen may enhance early appropriate diagnosis and therapeutic response. PMID:19830211

  13. Characterization of Haemophilus influenzae type b fimbriae.

    PubMed Central

    Stull, T L; Mendelman, P M; Haas, J E; Schoenborn, M A; Mack, K D; Smith, A L

    1984-01-01

    We confirmed that the fimbriae of Haemophilus influenzae type b conferred hemagglutinating activity (HA) towards human erythrocytes, and erythrocytes of certain other species. Most (17/25) cerebrospinal fluid isolates lacked detectable HA on direct testing, but selective enrichment for fimbriation (f+) indicated that 22 of 25 strains could produce these surface structures. HA was unchanged from pH 4.5 to 9.5 and was not inhibited by mannose or certain other simple sugars. The HA titer of a suspension of three f+ strains was slightly decreased at 50 degrees C; HA was lost by heating at 60 degrees C for 3 min. Growth on a variety of solid and liquid media and under differing degrees of oxygenation did not change the HA titer of a suspension of three f+ strains. Fimbriation was not lost on repeated subculture. Wild-type fimbriated strains, and those derived by transformation, did not contain detectable plasmid DNA. Transformation of a strain lacking fimbriae to f+ was associated with the appearance of an outer membrane protein of 24 kilodaltons. This protein was purified from one strain to homogeneity on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis by selective detergent solubilization and ammonium sulfate fractionation. Colonization capacity was equivalent with an isogenic untypable strain lacking or possessing fimbriae. Fimbriae of type b H. influenzae possess characteristics similar to those structures on other gram-negative bacteria; their role in cell physiology or pathogenesis of invasive disease is unknown. Images PMID:6150012

  14. Evaluation of the HISCL Anti-Treponema pallidum Assay as a Screening Test for Syphilis.

    PubMed

    An, Jingna; Chen, Qixia; Liu, Qianqian; Rao, Chenli; Li, Dongdong; Wang, Tingting; Tao, Chuanmin; Wang, Lanlan

    2015-07-01

    The resurgence of syphilis in recent years has become a serious threat to public health worldwide, and the serological detection of specific antibodies against Treponema pallidum remains the most reliable method for laboratory diagnosis of syphilis. This study examined the performance of the recently launched HISCL anti-Treponema pallidum (anti-TP) assay as a screening test for syphilis in a high-volume laboratory. The HISCL anti-TP assay was tested in 300 preselected syphilis-positive samples, 704 fresh syphilis-negative samples, 48 preselected potentially interfering samples, and 30 "borderline" samples and was compared head to head with the commercially available Lumipulse G TP-N. In this study, the HISCL anti-TP assay was in perfect agreement with the applied testing algorithms with an overall agreement of 100%, comparable to that of Lumipulse G TP-N (99.63%). The sensitivity and specificity of the HISCL anti-TP assay were 100% (95% confidence interval [CI], 98.42% to 100%) and 100% (95% CI, 99.37% to 100%), respectively. Considering the excellent ease of use and automation, high throughput, and its favorable sensitivity and specificity, the HISCL anti-TP assay may represent a new choice for syphilis screening in high-volume laboratories.

  15. Genome sequence of the thermophilic fresh-water bacterium Spirochaeta caldaria type strain (H1T), reclassification of Spirochaeta caldaria, Spirochaeta stenostrepta, and Spirochaeta zuelzerae in the genus Treponema as Treponema caldaria comb. nov., Treponema stenostrepta comb. nov., and Treponema zuelzerae comb. nov., and emendation of the genus Tr

    SciTech Connect

    Abt, Birte; Goker, Markus; Scheuner, Carmen; Han, Cliff; Lu, Megan; Misra, Monica; Lapidus, Alla L.; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Hammon, Nancy; Deshpande, Shweta; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Tapia, Roxanne; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Pagani, Ioanna; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Mikhailova, Natalia; Huntemann, Marcel; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Jeffries, Cynthia; Rohde, Manfred; Spring, Stefan; Gronow, Sabine; Detter, J. Chris; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Woyke, Tanja; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2013-01-01

    Spirochaeta caldaria Pohlschroeder et al. 1995 is an obligately anaerobic, spiral-shaped bac- terium that is motile via periplasmic flagella. The type strain, H1T, was isolated in 1990 from cyanobacterial mat samples collected at a freshwater hot spring in Oregon, USA, and is of in- terest because it enhances the degradation of cellulose when grown in co-culture with Clos- tridium thermocellum. Here we provide a taxonomic re-evaluation for S. caldaria based on phylogenetic analyses of 16S rRNA sequences and whole genomes, and propose the reclassi- fication of S. caldaria and two other Spirochaeta species as members of the emended genus Treponema. Whereas genera such as Borrelia and Sphaerochaeta possess well-distinguished genomic features related to their divergent lifestyles, the physiological and functional ge- nomic characteristics of Spirochaeta and Treponema appear to be intermixed and are of little taxonomic value. The 3,239,340 bp long genome of strain H1T with its 2,869 protein-coding and 59 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  16. Evaluation of the HISCL Anti-Treponema pallidum Assay as a Screening Test for Syphilis

    PubMed Central

    An, Jingna; Chen, Qixia; Liu, Qianqian; Rao, Chenli; Li, Dongdong; Wang, Tingting

    2015-01-01

    The resurgence of syphilis in recent years has become a serious threat to public health worldwide, and the serological detection of specific antibodies against Treponema pallidum remains the most reliable method for laboratory diagnosis of syphilis. This study examined the performance of the recently launched HISCL anti-Treponema pallidum (anti-TP) assay as a screening test for syphilis in a high-volume laboratory. The HISCL anti-TP assay was tested in 300 preselected syphilis-positive samples, 704 fresh syphilis-negative samples, 48 preselected potentially interfering samples, and 30 “borderline” samples and was compared head to head with the commercially available Lumipulse G TP-N. In this study, the HISCL anti-TP assay was in perfect agreement with the applied testing algorithms with an overall agreement of 100%, comparable to that of Lumipulse G TP-N (99.63%). The sensitivity and specificity of the HISCL anti-TP assay were 100% (95% confidence interval [CI], 98.42% to 100%) and 100% (95% CI, 99.37% to 100%), respectively. Considering the excellent ease of use and automation, high throughput, and its favorable sensitivity and specificity, the HISCL anti-TP assay may represent a new choice for syphilis screening in high-volume laboratories. PMID:25972403

  17. Haemophilus somnus (Histophilus somni) in bighorn sheep

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Respiratory disease and poor lamb recruitment have been identified as limiting factors for bighorn-sheep populations. Haemophilus somnus (recently reclassified as Histophilus somni) is associated with respiratory disease in American bison, domestic sheep, and cattle. It is also harbored in their reproductive tracts and has been associated with reproductive failure in domestic sheep and cattle. Therefore, reproductive tract and lung samples from bighorn sheep were evaluated for the presence of this organism. Organisms identified as H. somnus were isolated from 6 of 62 vaginal but none of 12 preputial swab samples. Antigen specific to H. somnus was detected by immunohistochemical study in 4 of 12 formalin-fixed lung tissue samples of bighorn sheep that died with evidence of pneumonia. Notably, H. somnus was found in alveolar debris in areas of inflammation. The 6 vaginal isolates and 2 H. somnus isolates previously cultured from pneumonic lungs of bighorn sheep were compared with 3 representative isolates from domestic sheep and 2 from cattle. The profiles of major outer membrane proteins and antigens for all of the isolates were predominantly similar, although differences that may be associated with the host–parasite relationship and virulence were detected. The DNA restriction fragment length profiles of the bighorn-sheep isolates had similarities not shared with the other isolates, suggesting distinct phylogenetic lines. All of the isolates had similar antimicrobial profiles, but the isolates from the bighorn sheep produced less pigment than those from the domestic livestock, and growth of the former was not enhanced by CO2. Wildlife biologists and diagnosticians should be aware of the potential of these organisms to cause disease in bighorn sheep and of growth characteristics that may hinder laboratory detection. PMID:16548330

  18. Complete Genome Sequence of Treponema paraluiscuniculi, Strain Cuniculi A: The Loss of Infectivity to Humans Is Associated with Genome Decay

    PubMed Central

    Šmajs, David; Zobaníková, Marie; Strouhal, Michal; Čejková, Darina; Dugan-Rocha, Shannon; Pospíšilová, Petra; Norris, Steven J.; Albert, Tom; Qin, Xiang; Hallsworth-Pepin, Kym; Buhay, Christian; Muzny, Donna M.; Chen, Lei; Gibbs, Richard A.; Weinstock, George M.

    2011-01-01

    Treponema paraluiscuniculi is the causative agent of rabbit venereal spirochetosis. It is not infectious to humans, although its genome structure is very closely related to other pathogenic Treponema species including Treponema pallidum subspecies pallidum, the etiological agent of syphilis. In this study, the genome sequence of Treponema paraluiscuniculi, strain Cuniculi A, was determined by a combination of several high-throughput sequencing strategies. Whereas the overall size (1,133,390 bp), arrangement, and gene content of the Cuniculi A genome closely resembled those of the T. pallidum genome, the T. paraluiscuniculi genome contained a markedly higher number of pseudogenes and gene fragments (51). In addition to pseudogenes, 33 divergent genes were also found in the T. paraluiscuniculi genome. A set of 32 (out of 84) affected genes encoded proteins of known or predicted function in the Nichols genome. These proteins included virulence factors, gene regulators and components of DNA repair and recombination. The majority (52 or 61.9%) of the Cuniculi A pseudogenes and divergent genes were of unknown function. Our results indicate that T. paraluiscuniculi has evolved from a T. pallidum-like ancestor and adapted to a specialized host-associated niche (rabbits) during loss of infectivity to humans. The genes that are inactivated or altered in T. paraluiscuniculi are candidates for virulence factors important in the infectivity and pathogenesis of T. pallidum subspecies. PMID:21655244

  19. TEM-1-encoding small plasmids impose dissimilar fitness costs on Haemophilus influenzae and Haemophilus parainfluenzae.

    PubMed

    Søndergaard, Annette; Lund, Marianne; Nørskov-Lauritsen, Niels

    2015-12-01

    Only two beta-lactamases, TEM-1 and ROB-1, have been observed in Haemophilus influenzae, while four different TEM but no ROB enzymes have been found in Haemophilus parainfluenzae. In order to investigate the mechanisms behind the dissemination of small beta-lactamase-encoding plasmids in H. influenzae and H. parainfluenzae, we assessed the fitness cost of three TEM-1- (pPN223, pA1209, pA1606), one TEM-15- (pSF3) and one ROB-1-bearing (pB1000) plasmid when expressed in either bacterial species. All plasmids were stable in H. influenzae and H. parainfluenzae except pB1000, which showed on average (sample mean) 76% curing in H. parainfluenzae after 5  days of subculture. Competition assays between isogenic strains with and without plasmid showed no competitive disadvantage of pPN223 and pA1606 in H. influenzae, or of pA1209 in H. parainfluenzae. In contrast, pSF3 and pB1000 were associated with significant competitive disadvantages in both species. Some of the competitive disadvantages may be related to differences in plasmid copy number and mRNA expression of the beta-lactamase genes, as revealed by quantitative PCR analysis. In conclusion, plasmids encoding TEM beta-lactamases isolated from H. influenzae and H. parainfluenzae can be stably transferred between species. The fast curing of pB1000 in H. parainfluenzae observed in this study correlates to the fact that ROB-1 has never been reported for this species. TEM-1-encoding plasmids are associated with the lowest level of fitness cost, but different TEM-1 plasmids confer different levels of fitness cost on the two hosts.

  20. Isolation and characterization of outer membrane vesicles from Haemophilus parasuis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Haemophilus parasuis is a small, pleomorphic Gram-negative bacterium that colonizes the upper respiratory tract of swine. Numerous strains of this organism are capable of causing systemic disease, resulting in high morbidity and mortality in the host. H. parasuis isolates display a wide range of vir...

  1. 21 CFR 866.3300 - Haemophilus spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Haemophilus spp. serological reagents. 866.3300 Section 866.3300 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3300...

  2. 21 CFR 866.3300 - Haemophilus spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Haemophilus spp. serological reagents. 866.3300 Section 866.3300 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3300...

  3. 21 CFR 866.3300 - Haemophilus spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Haemophilus spp. serological reagents. 866.3300 Section 866.3300 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3300...

  4. 21 CFR 866.3300 - Haemophilus spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Haemophilus spp. serological reagents. 866.3300 Section 866.3300 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3300...

  5. 21 CFR 866.3300 - Haemophilus spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Haemophilus spp. serological reagents. 866.3300 Section 866.3300 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3300...

  6. Haemophilus parainfluenzae endocarditis with systemic embolisation following maxillary sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Barreto Cortes, Margarida; Teixeira, Vitor; Fernandes, Samuel Raimundo; Rego, Fernanda

    2016-01-01

    The authors present a case of a man with Haemophilus parainfluenzae endocarditis complicated with embolisation to the central nervous system. The patient had no evidence of endocarditis by transoesophageal and transthoracic echocardiograms at baseline, but shortly after developed large mitral valve vegetations with valve rupture. The case highlights how rapidly structural valve damage can ensue despite good clinical and laboratorial antibiotic response. PMID:27599807

  7. Investigating the porcine immune reponse to Haemophilus parasuis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Haemophilus parasuis is the causative agent of Glässers disease in swine, which is characterized by systemic invasion of the bacteria to serosal surfaces, resulting in inflammation and induction of pleuritis, peritonitis, and arthritis. In addition, certain strains of H. parasuis cause pneumonia wh...

  8. Evidence that TP_0144 of Treponema pallidum Is a Thiamine-Binding Protein

    PubMed Central

    Bian, Jiang; Tu, Youbin; Wang, Song-Mei; Wang, Xuan-Yi

    2015-01-01

    Thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP), the biologically active form of thiamine (also known as vitamin B1), is an essential cofactor for several important enzymes involved in carbohydrate metabolism, and therefore, it is required for all living organisms. We recently found that a thiamine-binding protein (TDE_0143) is essential for the survival of Treponema denticola, an important bacterial pathogen that is associated with human periodontitis. In this report, we provide experimental evidence showing that TP_0144, a homolog of TDE_0143 from the syphilis spirochete Treponema pallidum, is a thiamine-binding protein that has biochemical features and functions that are similar to those of TDE_0143. First, structural modeling analysis reveal that both TDE_0143 and TP_0144 contain a conserved TPP-binding site and share similar structures to the thiamine-binding protein of Escherichia coli. Second, biochemical analysis shows that these two proteins bind to TPP with similar dissociation constant (Kd) values (TDE_0143, Kd of 36.50 nM; TP_0144, Kd of 32.62 nM). Finally, heterologous expression of TP_0144 in a ΔTDE_0143 strain, a previously constructed TDE_0143 mutant of T. denticola, fully restores its growth and TPP uptake when exogenous thiamine is limited. Collectively, these results indicate that TP_0144 is a thiamine-binding protein that is indispensable for T. pallidum to acquire exogenous thiamine, a key nutrient for bacterial survival. In addition, the studies shown in this report further underscore the feasibility of using T. denticola as a platform to study the biology and pathogenicity of T. pallidum and probably other uncultivable treponemal species as well. PMID:25605310

  9. Evidence that TP_0144 of Treponema pallidum is a thiamine-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Bian, Jiang; Tu, Youbin; Wang, Song-Mei; Wang, Xuan-Yi; Li, Chunhao

    2015-04-01

    Thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP), the biologically active form of thiamine (also known as vitamin B1), is an essential cofactor for several important enzymes involved in carbohydrate metabolism, and therefore, it is required for all living organisms. We recently found that a thiamine-binding protein (TDE_0143) is essential for the survival of Treponema denticola, an important bacterial pathogen that is associated with human periodontitis. In this report, we provide experimental evidence showing that TP_0144, a homolog of TDE_0143 from the syphilis spirochete Treponema pallidum, is a thiamine-binding protein that has biochemical features and functions that are similar to those of TDE_0143. First, structural modeling analysis reveal that both TDE_0143 and TP_0144 contain a conserved TPP-binding site and share similar structures to the thiamine-binding protein of Escherichia coli. Second, biochemical analysis shows that these two proteins bind to TPP with similar dissociation constant (Kd) values (TDE_0143, Kd of 36.50 nM; TP_0144, Kd of 32.62 nM). Finally, heterologous expression of TP_0144 in a ΔTDE_0143 strain, a previously constructed TDE_0143 mutant of T. denticola, fully restores its growth and TPP uptake when exogenous thiamine is limited. Collectively, these results indicate that TP_0144 is a thiamine-binding protein that is indispensable for T. pallidum to acquire exogenous thiamine, a key nutrient for bacterial survival. In addition, the studies shown in this report further underscore the feasibility of using T. denticola as a platform to study the biology and pathogenicity of T. pallidum and probably other uncultivable treponemal species as well.

  10. Bipartite Topology of Treponema pallidum Repeat Proteins C/D and I

    PubMed Central

    Anand, Arvind; LeDoyt, Morgan; Karanian, Carson; Luthra, Amit; Koszelak-Rosenblum, Mary; Malkowski, Michael G.; Puthenveetil, Robbins; Vinogradova, Olga; Radolf, Justin D.

    2015-01-01

    We previously identified Treponema pallidum repeat proteins TprC/D, TprF, and TprI as candidate outer membrane proteins (OMPs) and subsequently demonstrated that TprC is not only a rare OMP but also forms trimers and has porin activity. We also reported that TprC contains N- and C-terminal domains (TprCN and TprCC) orthologous to regions in the major outer sheath protein (MOSPN and MOSPC) of Treponema denticola and that TprCC is solely responsible for β-barrel formation, trimerization, and porin function by the full-length protein. Herein, we show that TprI also possesses bipartite architecture, trimeric structure, and porin function and that the MOSPC-like domains of native TprC and TprI are surface-exposed in T. pallidum, whereas their MOSPN-like domains are tethered within the periplasm. TprF, which does not contain a MOSPC-like domain, lacks amphiphilicity and porin activity, adopts an extended inflexible structure, and, in T. pallidum, is tightly bound to the protoplasmic cylinder. By thermal denaturation, the MOSPN and MOSPC-like domains of TprC and TprI are highly thermostable, endowing the full-length proteins with impressive conformational stability. When expressed in Escherichia coli with PelB signal sequences, TprC and TprI localize to the outer membrane, adopting bipartite topologies, whereas TprF is periplasmic. We propose that the MOSPN-like domains enhance the structural integrity of the cell envelope by anchoring the β-barrels within the periplasm. In addition to being bona fide T. pallidum rare outer membrane proteins, TprC/D and TprI represent a new class of dual function, bipartite bacterial OMP. PMID:25805501

  11. [Evaluation of gelatin particle agglutination method for detection of Treponema pallidum antibody].

    PubMed

    Deguchi, M; Hosotsubo, H; Yamashita, N; Ohmine, T; Asari, S

    1994-10-01

    Treponema pallidum hemagglutination (HA) is one of the most frequently used methods for the detection of Treponema pallidum (T. pallidum) antibodies. Recently, an innovative agglutination method using artificial carriers was newly developed, and is now available as a routine method. In order to compare the newly developed particle agglutination (PA) method (FUJIREBIO INC.) with the conventional HA method, T. pallidum antibody titers of numerous sera were measured by respective methods. In the stability study, reconstituted reagent was stable for at least three weeks. Sample inactivation (56 degrees C/30 min) demonstrated no effect on the test results. Among 800 sera, 132 (16.6%) positives (+), 633 (79.1%) negatives (-) and (4.3%) indeterminates (+) were obtained by HA method. Meanwhile, 144 (18.0%) positives (+), 627 (78.4%) negatives (-) and 29 (3.6%) indeterminates (+) were obtained by PA method. The correlation between PA and HA method was 97.8%, and the antibody titers obtained by PA method showed good correlation with HA method. Those samples which showed discrepancy between PA and HA method in the above study were further examined with fluorescent treponemal antibody-absorption (FTA-ABS) method. The results obtained from FTA-ABS method were almost consistent with those obtained from PA method. For respective syphilis patients in stage I and II, antibody titer was monitored by HA, PA and RPR method. The results indicated that changes in antibody titer obtained from PA method was approximately the same as the titer changes obtained from RPR method. Namely, PA method detected the presence of IgM earlier than HA method.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Molecular basis of antimicrobial resistance in non-typable Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, L; Leranoz, S; Puig, M; Lorén, J G; Nikaido, H; Viñas, M

    1997-09-01

    Strains of the facultative anaerobe Haemophilus influenzae, both type b and non typable strains, are frequently multiresistant. The measurement of the antibiotic permeability of Haemophilus influenzae outer membrane (OM) shows that antibiotics can cross through the OM easily. Thus, enzymatic activity or efflux pumps could be responsible for multiresistance. An efflux system closely related to AcrAB of Escherichia coli is present in Haemophilus influenzae. However, their role in multiresistance seems irrelevant. Classical mechanisms such as plasmid exchange seems to be playing a major role in the multidrug resistance in Haemophilus influenzae.

  13. High-level association of bovine digital dermatitis Treponema spp. with contagious ovine digital dermatitis lesions and presence of Fusobacterium necrophorum and Dichelobacter nodosus.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, L E; Clegg, S R; Angell, J W; Newbrook, K; Blowey, R W; Carter, S D; Bell, J; Duncan, J S; Grove-White, D H; Murray, R D; Evans, N J

    2015-05-01

    Contagious ovine digital dermatitis (CODD) is an important foot disease in sheep, with significant animal welfare and economic implications. It is thought that CODD emerged from bovine digital dermatitis (BDD) via treponemal bacteria. With wildlife species such as elk now suffering a CODD-like disease, it is imperative to clarify these disease etiologies. A large investigation into treponemal association with CODD is warranted. CODD lesions (n = 58) and healthy sheep foot tissues (n = 56) were analyzed by PCR for the three BDD-associated Treponema phylogroups and two other lameness-associated bacteria, Dichelobacter nodosus and Fusobacterium necrophorum. Spirochete culture was also attempted on CODD lesions. "Treponema medium/Treponema vincentii-like," "Treponema phagedenis-like," and Treponema pedis spirochetes were identified in 39/58 (67%), 49/58 (85%), and 41/58 (71%) of CODD lesions, respectively. One or more BDD-associated Treponema phylogroups were detected in 100% of CODD lesions. Healthy foot tissues did not amplify BDD-associated Treponema phylogroup DNA. D. nodosus and F. necrophorum were present in 34/58 (59%) and 41/58 (71%) of CODD lesions and 22/56 (39%) and 5/56 (9%) of healthy foot tissues, respectively. Thirty-two spirochetes were isolated from CODD lesions, with representatives clustering with, and indistinguishable from, each of the three BDD-associated Treponema phylogroups based on 16S rRNA gene comparisons. This study for the first time demonstrates a high-level association for BDD treponeme phylogroups in CODD and their absence from healthy tissues, supporting the hypothesis that BDD treponemes play a primary causative role in CODD and confirming that the specific PCR assays are an effective differential diagnostic tool for CODD.

  14. High-Level Association of Bovine Digital Dermatitis Treponema spp. with Contagious Ovine Digital Dermatitis Lesions and Presence of Fusobacterium necrophorum and Dichelobacter nodosus

    PubMed Central

    Clegg, S. R.; Angell, J. W.; Newbrook, K.; Blowey, R. W.; Carter, S. D.; Bell, J.; Duncan, J. S.; Grove-White, D. H.; Murray, R. D.; Evans, N. J.

    2015-01-01

    Contagious ovine digital dermatitis (CODD) is an important foot disease in sheep, with significant animal welfare and economic implications. It is thought that CODD emerged from bovine digital dermatitis (BDD) via treponemal bacteria. With wildlife species such as elk now suffering a CODD-like disease, it is imperative to clarify these disease etiologies. A large investigation into treponemal association with CODD is warranted. CODD lesions (n = 58) and healthy sheep foot tissues (n = 56) were analyzed by PCR for the three BDD-associated Treponema phylogroups and two other lameness-associated bacteria, Dichelobacter nodosus and Fusobacterium necrophorum. Spirochete culture was also attempted on CODD lesions. “Treponema medium/Treponema vincentii-like,” “Treponema phagedenis-like,” and Treponema pedis spirochetes were identified in 39/58 (67%), 49/58 (85%), and 41/58 (71%) of CODD lesions, respectively. One or more BDD-associated Treponema phylogroups were detected in 100% of CODD lesions. Healthy foot tissues did not amplify BDD-associated Treponema phylogroup DNA. D. nodosus and F. necrophorum were present in 34/58 (59%) and 41/58 (71%) of CODD lesions and 22/56 (39%) and 5/56 (9%) of healthy foot tissues, respectively. Thirty-two spirochetes were isolated from CODD lesions, with representatives clustering with, and indistinguishable from, each of the three BDD-associated Treponema phylogroups based on 16S rRNA gene comparisons. This study for the first time demonstrates a high-level association for BDD treponeme phylogroups in CODD and their absence from healthy tissues, supporting the hypothesis that BDD treponemes play a primary causative role in CODD and confirming that the specific PCR assays are an effective differential diagnostic tool for CODD. PMID:25740778

  15. Haemophilus influenzae triggers autophagy in HEp-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Espinoza-Mellado, María del Rosario; Reyes-Picaso, Carolina; Garcés-Pérez, Miriam S; Jardón-Serrano, Cynthia V; López-Villegas, Edgar O; Giono-Cerezo, Silvia

    2016-03-01

    The MAP-LC3 system regulates the intracellular formation of autophagy-associated vacuoles. These vacuoles contain the LC3 protein; thus it has been utilized as a marker to identify autophagosomes. The aim of our study was to investigate whether Haemophilus influenzae strains and their supernatants could activate autophagy in human larynx carcinoma cell line (HEp-2). We demonstrate that higher expression of the LC3B-II protein was induced, particularly by nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) 49766 and by supernatants, containing <50 kDa proteins, of both strains. Ultrastructural studies demonstrate vacuoles with a double membrane and/or membrane material inside, showing similar features to those of autophagic vacuoles. Together, our findings demonstrate that H. influenzae strains and their supernatants trigger an autophagic process.

  16. Haemophilus influenzae triggers autophagy in HEp-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Espinoza-Mellado, María del Rosario; Reyes-Picaso, Carolina; Garcés-Pérez, Miriam S; Jardón-Serrano, Cynthia V; López-Villegas, Edgar O; Giono-Cerezo, Silvia

    2016-03-01

    The MAP-LC3 system regulates the intracellular formation of autophagy-associated vacuoles. These vacuoles contain the LC3 protein; thus it has been utilized as a marker to identify autophagosomes. The aim of our study was to investigate whether Haemophilus influenzae strains and their supernatants could activate autophagy in human larynx carcinoma cell line (HEp-2). We demonstrate that higher expression of the LC3B-II protein was induced, particularly by nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) 49766 and by supernatants, containing <50 kDa proteins, of both strains. Ultrastructural studies demonstrate vacuoles with a double membrane and/or membrane material inside, showing similar features to those of autophagic vacuoles. Together, our findings demonstrate that H. influenzae strains and their supernatants trigger an autophagic process. PMID:26537814

  17. Clinical evaluation of the Vitek Neisseria-Haemophilus Identification card.

    PubMed

    Janda, W M; Malloy, P J; Schreckenberger, P C

    1987-01-01

    A clinical evaluation of the Vitek Neisseria-Haemophilus Identification (NHI) card (Vitek Systems, Inc., Hazelwood, Mo.) was performed with 480 clinical isolates and stock strains of Neisseria spp., Haemophilus spp., and other fastidious microorganisms included in the data base of the system. Identifications obtained with the NHI card were compared with those determined by conventional methods. The card identified 83.2% of 244 Neisseria spp. and Branhamella catarrhalis, 54.9% of 164 Haemophilus spp., and 84.7% of 72 fastidious gram-negative species with no further testing required. Some isolates produced good confidence-marginal separation identifications, in which the correct identification was listed with one or two other possible identifications and extra tests were required and suggested. When isolates producing good confidence-marginal separation identifications were included, correct identifications of these organism groups increased to 97.1, 92.7, and 94.4%, respectively. Among the commonly isolated microorganisms, the NHI card identified 99.1% of 110 N. gonorrhoeae, 98.5% of 68 N. meningitidis, 93.9% of 98 H. influenzae, and 95.6% of 46 H. parainfluenzae strains. All of these organisms produced excellent to very good confidence level identifications except for H. influenzae biotypes II, III, and VII, for which hemolytic reactions were required for differentiation from H. haemolyticus. The NHI card reliably identified other fastidious gram-negative species, including H. aphrophilus, Eikenella corrodens, Gardnerella vaginalis, and Kingella denitrificans.

  18. Clinical evaluation of the Vitek Neisseria-Haemophilus Identification card.

    PubMed Central

    Janda, W M; Malloy, P J; Schreckenberger, P C

    1987-01-01

    A clinical evaluation of the Vitek Neisseria-Haemophilus Identification (NHI) card (Vitek Systems, Inc., Hazelwood, Mo.) was performed with 480 clinical isolates and stock strains of Neisseria spp., Haemophilus spp., and other fastidious microorganisms included in the data base of the system. Identifications obtained with the NHI card were compared with those determined by conventional methods. The card identified 83.2% of 244 Neisseria spp. and Branhamella catarrhalis, 54.9% of 164 Haemophilus spp., and 84.7% of 72 fastidious gram-negative species with no further testing required. Some isolates produced good confidence-marginal separation identifications, in which the correct identification was listed with one or two other possible identifications and extra tests were required and suggested. When isolates producing good confidence-marginal separation identifications were included, correct identifications of these organism groups increased to 97.1, 92.7, and 94.4%, respectively. Among the commonly isolated microorganisms, the NHI card identified 99.1% of 110 N. gonorrhoeae, 98.5% of 68 N. meningitidis, 93.9% of 98 H. influenzae, and 95.6% of 46 H. parainfluenzae strains. All of these organisms produced excellent to very good confidence level identifications except for H. influenzae biotypes II, III, and VII, for which hemolytic reactions were required for differentiation from H. haemolyticus. The NHI card reliably identified other fastidious gram-negative species, including H. aphrophilus, Eikenella corrodens, Gardnerella vaginalis, and Kingella denitrificans. PMID:3539996

  19. Pathogen specificity of Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum integral membrane proteins identified by phase partitioning with Triton X-114.

    PubMed

    Radolf, J D; Norgard, M V

    1988-07-01

    The antigenically conserved proteins of Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum and four nonpathogenic cultivatable treponemes were investigated by phase partitioning with the nonionic detergent Triton X-114 and immunoblot analysis. None of the T. pallidum integral membrane proteins identified by phase partitioning (detergent-phase proteins) appeared to be antigenically related to proteins of the nonpathogens. Protease-resistant material similar to lipopolysaccharide was identified in the detergent phase from T. phagedenis biotype Reiter but was not detected in T. pallidum.

  20. Isolation and characterization of Treponema phagedenis-like spirochetes from digital dermatitis lesions in Swedish dairy cattle

    PubMed Central

    Pringle, Märit; Bergsten, Christer; Fernström, Lise-Lotte; Höök, Helena; Johansson, Karl-Erik

    2008-01-01

    Background Digital dermatitis in cattle is an emerging infectious disease. Ulcerative lesions are typically located on the plantar skin between the heel bulbs and adjacent to the coronet. Spirochetes of the genus Treponema are found in high numbers in the lesions and are likely to be involved in the pathogenesis. The aim of this study was to obtain pure cultures of spirochetes from cattle with digital dermatitis and to describe them further. Methods Tissue samples and swabs from active digital dermatitis lesions were used for culturing. Pure isolates were subjected to, molecular typing through 16S rRNA gene sequencing, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and an intergenic spacer PCR developed for Treponema spp. as well as API-ZYM and antimicrobial susceptibility tests. The antimicrobial agents used were tiamulin, valnemulin, tylosin, aivlosin, lincomycin and doxycycline. Results Seven spirochete isolates from five herds were obtained. Both 16S rRNA gene sequences, which were identical except for three polymorphic nucleotide positions, and the intergenic spacer PCR indicated that all isolates were of one yet unnamed species, most closely related to Treponema phagedenis. The enzymatic profile and antimicrobial susceptibility pattern were also similar for all isolates. However it was possible to separate the isolates through their PFGE and RAPD banding pattern. Conclusion This is the first report on isolation of a Treponema sp. from cattle with digital dermatitis in Scandinavia. The phylotype isolated has previously been cultured from samples from cattle in the USA and the UK and is closely related to T. phagedenis. While very similar, the isolates in this study were possible to differentiate through PFGE and RAPD indicating that these methods are suitable for subtyping of this phylotype. No antimicrobial resistance could be detected among the tested isolates. PMID:18937826

  1. [Genital ulcers caused by sexually transmitted diseases: current therapies, diagnosis and their relevance in HIV pandemy].

    PubMed

    Da Costa, João Borges; Domingues, Dulce; Castro, R; Exposto, Filomena

    2006-01-01

    The sexual transmitted pathogens associated with genital ulcers are Treponema pallidum, Haemophilus ducreyi, Calymmatobacterium granulomatis, Chlamydia trachomatis and Herpes simplex virus type 1 or 2. Although geographic differences still exist, herpetic infections prevalence is growing worldwide as the most frequent ulcerative sexual transmitted disease. The failure of the many different used guidelines in achieving a sustained reduction in the number of new cases, in particular the WHO syndromic management, leads into an over treatment of bacterial agents and missing of viral agents. This situation is also associated with poor efficacy and wasting of economical resources. Ulcerative and non-ulcerative sexual transmitted diseases are important in the world HIV pandemy because they promote HIV transmission and are also associated with the disease evolution. Portugal had until recently the highest incidence of HIV infection in Europe and that points out to importance of treating and control of both ulcerative and non-ulcerative sexual transmitted diseases in order.

  2. Short communication: minimum bactericidal concentration of disinfectants evaluated for bovine digital dermatitis-associated Treponema phagedenis-like spirochetes.

    PubMed

    Hartshorn, R E; Thomas, E C; Anklam, K; Lopez-Benavides, M G; Buchalova, M; Hemling, T C; Döpfer, D

    2013-05-01

    The bacterial spirochetes, Treponema spp., are thought to be a major contributor to the etiology of bovine digital dermatitis (DD), a skin disease with worldwide economic impact. Hoofbath strategies are commonly used in an attempt to control and prevent the development of DD and continuing research has been done to develop an optimal hoofbath strategy for this purpose. The aim of this study was to develop a protocol that can be used as part of the screening process for candidate hoofbath disinfectants. This protocol allows an accurate determination of the in vitro minimum inhibitory concentration and minimum bactericidal concentration of a series of disinfectants for Treponema microorganisms. Assays were performed in triplicate for each of the disinfectants at 30-s and 10-min exposure times and exposed to 10 and 20% manure (vol/vol). The results of this study can be used to categorize disinfectants based on the effect of exposure and manure concentration regarding their ability to inhibit Treponema growth. This information can then aid in optimizing strategies for hoofbath-based control of DD development and spread.

  3. Genetic and biochemical analysis of the flagellar hook of Treponema phagedenis.

    PubMed Central

    Limberger, R J; Slivienski, L L; Samsonoff, W A

    1994-01-01

    The periplasmic flagellum of Treponema phagedenis consists of the flagellar filament and hook-basal body. We report here a characterization of the hook gene and flagellar hook of T. phagedenis, and in the process of this analysis we found evidence that the hook polypeptide is likely cross-linked in situ. A T. phagedenis genomic library was screened with a Treponema pallidum antiserum, and the DNA segments from several positive plaques were subcloned and sequenced. DNA sequencing of two overlapping segments revealed a 1,389-nucleotide (nt) open reading frame (ORF) with a deduced amino acid sequence that was 36% identical to that of FlgE, the hook polypeptide of Salmonella typhimurium. This gene was designated T. phagedenis flgE. Beginning at 312 nt downstream from flgE was a partial ORF of 486 nt with a deduced amino acid sequence that was 33% identical to that of MotA of Bacillus subtilis, a polypeptide that enables flagellar rotation. Upstream of flgE, separated by 39 nt, was a partial (291-nt) ORF with a deduced amino acid sequence that was homologous to that of ORF8, a polypeptide of unknown function located in an operon encoding polypeptides involved in motility of B. subtilis. The T. phagedenis flgE gene was cloned into an Escherichia coli protein expression plasmid, and the purified recombinant protein was used to prepare a FlgE antiserum. Western blots (immunoblots) of whole-cell lysates probed with this antiserum revealed a 55-kDa polypeptide and a ladder of polypeptide bands with increasing molecular masses. T. phagedenis hooks were then isolated and purified, and electron microscopic analysis revealed that the morphology of the hooks resembled that in other bacteria. The hooks were slightly curved and had an average length of 69 +/- 8 nm and a diameter of 23 +/- 1 nm. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and Western blots of purified hook preparations using the FlgE antiserum also revealed a polypeptide ladder, suggesting that the

  4. A STUDY OF THE RELATION OF TREPONEMA PALLIDUM TO LYMPHOID TISSUES IN EXPERIMENTAL SYPHILIS

    PubMed Central

    Pearce, Louise; Brown, Wade H.

    1922-01-01

    A widespread dissemination of Treponema pallidum from a local focus of inoculation in the rabbit constantly occurs by way of the lymphatics. Spirochetes were regularly recovered from the satellite lymph nodes by animal inoculation after scrotal inoculation; they were present as early as 2 days, when no specific primary reaction was detected, and at later periods of from 5 to 61 days after inoculation. Other superficial nodes at remote sites such as the popliteals and with no syphilitic lesions in the drainage area have also been shown to harbor active organisms. Although spirochetes were found in relatively few of the lymph node emulsions, the orchitis resulting from their injection was of a rapidly progressive type with an incubation period but slightly longer than that produced by a testicular or skin nodule emulsion rich in spirochetes. It has further been shown that a syphilitic infection is sufficiently established in the rabbit body within 48 hours after scrotal inoculation so that the primary lesion is no longer essential for its maintenance. Active treponemata survive in the popliteal lymph nodes for long periods of time and have been regularly recovered from them in cases of true latency. The lymph nodes, therefore, function as reservoirs of the organisms. The ability to recover the spirochetes from lymphoid tissue through successive generations is seen in the serial passage of lymph node emulsion to testicle during an 18 months period. The persistence of spirochetes in lymphoid tissue irrespective of the presence or absence of syphilitic lesions is a characteristic and fundamental feature of syphilis of the rabbit. The existence of infection, therefore, may be demonstrated at any time by the recovery of spirochetes from the popliteal lymph nodes by animal inoculation. This fact is of great practical importance in the therapy of the infection and may be profitably utilized in determining the ultimate effect of a therapeutic agent. These experiments

  5. Classification, Identification, and Clinical Significance of Haemophilus and Aggregatibacter Species with Host Specificity for Humans

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The aim of this review is to provide a comprehensive update on the current classification and identification of Haemophilus and Aggregatibacter species with exclusive or predominant host specificity for humans. Haemophilus influenzae and some of the other Haemophilus species are commonly encountered in the clinical microbiology laboratory and demonstrate a wide range of pathogenicity, from life-threatening invasive disease to respiratory infections to a nonpathogenic, commensal lifestyle. New species of Haemophilus have been described (Haemophilus pittmaniae and Haemophilus sputorum), and the new genus Aggregatibacter was created to accommodate some former Haemophilus and Actinobacillus species (Aggregatibacter aphrophilus, Aggregatibacter segnis, and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans). Aggregatibacter species are now a dominant etiology of infective endocarditis caused by fastidious organisms (HACEK endocarditis), and A. aphrophilus has emerged as an important cause of brain abscesses. Correct identification of Haemophilus and Aggregatibacter species based on phenotypic characterization can be challenging. It has become clear that 15 to 20% of presumptive H. influenzae isolates from the respiratory tracts of healthy individuals do not belong to this species but represent nonhemolytic variants of Haemophilus haemolyticus. Due to the limited pathogenicity of H. haemolyticus, the proportion of misidentified strains may be lower in clinical samples, but even among invasive strains, a misidentification rate of 0.5 to 2% can be found. Several methods have been investigated for differentiation of H. influenzae from its less pathogenic relatives, but a simple method for reliable discrimination is not available. With the implementation of identification by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry, the more rarely encountered species of Haemophilus and Aggregatibacter will increasingly be identified in clinical microbiology

  6. Recommendations for use of Haemophilus b conjugate vaccines and a combined diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, and Haemophilus b vaccine. Recommendations of the advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP).

    PubMed

    1993-09-17

    These recommendations include information on two vaccines recently licensed for use among infants: Haemophilus b Conjugate Vaccine (PRP-T [ActHIB, OmniHIB]), manufactured by Pasteur Mérieux Vaccins, and TETRAMUNE, manufactured by Lederle Laboratories/Praxis Biologics. This statement also updates recommendations for use of other available Haemophilus b vaccines (PRP-D [ProHIBiT]; HbOC [HibTITER]; and PRP-OMP [PedvaxHIB]) for infants and children.

  7. Treponema phagedenis has at least two proteins residing together on its periplasmic flagella.

    PubMed Central

    Limberger, R J; Charon, N W

    1986-01-01

    Treponema phagedenis is an anaerobic, motile spirochete with several periplasmic flagella (PFs) at each cell end. This study provides the first genetic evidence that multiple protein species are associated with the PFs. In addition, these proteins were found to reside together on a given PF. Nonmotile mutants which lacked the PFs were isolated, and spontaneous revertants to motility regained the PFs. These results suggest that the PFs are involved in the motility of T. phagedenis. Isolated PFs had two major protein bands with molecular weights of 33,000 and 39,800, as revealed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Western blots with monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies indicated that both proteins were absent in the PF mutants but present in the revertants. Immunoelectron microscopy revealed that the 39,800-molecular-weight protein was distributed along the entire PF. Immunoprecipitation analysis suggested that the 39,800- and 33,000-molecular-weight proteins were closely associated in situ. Images PMID:3957864

  8. Structural, bioinformatic, and in vivo analyses of two Treponema pallidum lipoproteins reveal a unique TRAP transporter

    PubMed Central

    Deka, Ranjit K.; Brautigam, Chad A.; Goldberg, Martin; Schuck, Peter; Tomchick, Diana R.; Norgard, Michael V.

    2012-01-01

    Treponema pallidum, the bacterial agent of syphilis, is predicted to encode one tripartite ATP- independent periplasmic transporter (TRAP-T). TRAP-Ts typically employ a periplasmic substrate-binding protein (SBP) to deliver the cognate ligand to the transmembrane symporter. Herein, we demonstrate that the genes encoding the putative TRAP-T components from T. pallidum, tp0957 (the SBP) and tp0958 (the symporter) are in an operon with an uncharacterized third gene, tp0956. We determined the crystal structure of recombinant Tp0956; the protein is trimeric and perforated by a pore. Part of Tp0956 forms an assembly similar to those of “tetratricopeptide repeat” (TPR) motifs. The crystal structure of recombinant Tp0957 was also determined; like the SBPs of other TRAP-Ts, there are two lobes separated by a cleft. In these other SBPs, the cleft binds a negatively charged ligand. However, the cleft of Tp0957 has a strikingly hydrophobic chemical composition, indicating that its ligand may be substantially different and likely hydrophobic. Analytical ultracentrifugation of the recombinant versions of Tp0956 and Tp0957 established that these proteins associate avidly. This unprecedented interaction was confirmed for the native molecules using in vivo cross-linking experiments. Finally, bioinformatic analyses suggested that this transporter exemplifies a new subfamily of TPR-protein associated TRAP transporters (TPATs) that require the action of a TPR-containing accessory protein for the periplasmic transport of a potentially hydrophobic ligand(s). PMID:22306465

  9. Serological characterization and gene localization of an Escherichia coli-expressed 37-kilodalton Treponema pallidum antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Rodgers, G C; Laird, W J; Coates, S R; Mack, D H; Huston, M; Sninsky, J J

    1986-01-01

    A recombinant plasmid containing a 5.6-kilobase-pair DNA fragment of the Treponema pallidum genome was characterized by endonuclease mapping, and the encoded proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli and analyzed by use of in vitro transcription and translation. One of the proteins, identified as having a molecular weight of 37,000 (37K protein), was selected for further study. Initially, the seroreactivity of the partially purified 37K antigen was demonstrated by immunoblotting. After its purification to near homogeneity, the cloned T. pallidum protein was assessed for diagnostic significance by radioimmunoassay. Although first identified as seroreactive by screening with secondary syphilitic sera (T. E. Fehniger, A. M. Walfield, T. M. Cunningham, J. D. Radolf, J. N. Miller, and M. A. Lovett, Abstr. Annu. Meet. Am. Soc. Microbiol. 1985, B156, p. 44), the antigen was shown to be serologically reactive with antibodies in serum from all stages of syphilis but was not recognized by serum from controls by both immunoblotting and radioimmune assay. Further, a monospecific polyclonal rabbit antiserum generated to the 37K antigen recognized a polypeptide of the same molecular weight from T. pallidum but did not efficiently recognize proteins from five nonpathogenic treponemes tested. Therefore, because of reactivity with and specificity for T. pallidum antibodies, the 37K antigen may be of serodiagnostic value in the detection of syphilis. Images PMID:3522427

  10. Structural, Bioinformatic, and In Vivo Analyses of Two Treponema pallidum Lipoproteins Reveal a Unique TRAP Transporter

    SciTech Connect

    Deka, Ranjit K.; Brautigam, Chad A.; Goldberg, Martin; Schuck, Peter; Tomchick, Diana R.; Norgard, Michael V.

    2012-05-25

    Treponema pallidum, the bacterial agent of syphilis, is predicted to encode one tripartite ATP-independent periplasmic transporter (TRAP-T). TRAP-Ts typically employ a periplasmic substrate-binding protein (SBP) to deliver the cognate ligand to the transmembrane symporter. Herein, we demonstrate that the genes encoding the putative TRAP-T components from T. pallidum, tp0957 (the SBP), and tp0958 (the symporter), are in an operon with an uncharacterized third gene, tp0956. We determined the crystal structure of recombinant Tp0956; the protein is trimeric and perforated by a pore. Part of Tp0956 forms an assembly similar to those of 'tetratricopeptide repeat' (TPR) motifs. The crystal structure of recombinant Tp0957 was also determined; like the SBPs of other TRAP-Ts, there are two lobes separated by a cleft. In these other SBPs, the cleft binds a negatively charged ligand. However, the cleft of Tp0957 has a strikingly hydrophobic chemical composition, indicating that its ligand may be substantially different and likely hydrophobic. Analytical ultracentrifugation of the recombinant versions of Tp0956 and Tp0957 established that these proteins associate avidly. This unprecedented interaction was confirmed for the native molecules using in vivo cross-linking experiments. Finally, bioinformatic analyses suggested that this transporter exemplifies a new subfamily of TPATs (TPR-protein-associated TRAP-Ts) that require the action of a TPR-containing accessory protein for the periplasmic transport of a potentially hydrophobic ligand(s).

  11. Fluorescence in situ hybridization for the identification of Treponema pallidum in tissue sections.

    PubMed

    Petrich, Annett; Rojas, Pablo; Schulze, Julia; Loddenkemper, Christoph; Giacani, Lorenzo; Schneider, Thomas; Hertel, Moritz; Kikhney, Judith; Moter, Annette

    2015-10-01

    Syphilis is often called the great imitator because of its frequent atypical clinical manifestations that make the disease difficult to recognize. Because Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum, the infectious agent of syphilis, is yet uncultivated in vitro, diagnosis is usually made using serology; however, in cases where serology is inconclusive or in patients with immunosuppression where these tests may be difficult to interpret, the availability of a molecular tool for direct diagnosis may be of pivotal importance. Here we present a fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) assay that simultaneously identifies and analyzes spatial distribution of T. pallidum in histological tissue sections. For this assay the species-specific FISH probe TPALL targeting the 16S rRNA of T. pallidum was designed in silico and evaluated using T. pallidum infected rabbit testicular tissue and a panel of non-syphilis spirochetes as positive and negative controls, respectively, before application to samples from four syphilis-patients. In a HIV positive patient, FISH showed the presence of T. pallidum in inguinal lymph node tissue. In a patient not suspected to suffer from syphilis but underwent surgery for phimosis, numerous T. pallidum cells were found in preputial tissue. In two cases with oral involvement, FISH was able to differentiate T. pallidum from oral treponemes and showed infection of the oral mucosa and tonsils, respectively. The TPALL FISH probe is now readily available for in situ identification of T. pallidum in selected clinical samples as well as T. pallidum research applications and animal models. PMID:26365167

  12. Identification of Functional Candidates amongst Hypothetical Proteins of Treponema pallidum ssp. pallidum

    PubMed Central

    Naqvi, Ahmad Abu Turab; Shahbaaz, Mohd; Ahmad, Faizan; Hassan, Md. Imtaiyaz

    2015-01-01

    Syphilis is a globally occurring venereal disease, and its infection is propagated through sexual contact. The causative agent of syphilis, Treponema pallidum ssp. pallidum, a Gram-negative sphirochaete, is an obligate human parasite. Genome of T. pallidum ssp. pallidum SS14 strain (RefSeq NC_010741.1) encodes 1,027 proteins, of which 444 proteins are known as hypothetical proteins (HPs), i.e., proteins of unknown functions. Here, we performed functional annotation of HPs of T. pallidum ssp. pallidum using various database, domain architecture predictors, protein function annotators and clustering tools. We have analyzed the sequences of 444 HPs of T. pallidum ssp. pallidum and subsequently predicted the function of 207 HPs with a high level of confidence. However, functions of 237 HPs are predicted with less accuracy. We found various enzymes, transporters, binding proteins in the annotated group of HPs that may be possible molecular targets, facilitating for the survival of pathogen. Our comprehensive analysis helps to understand the mechanism of pathogenesis to provide many novel potential therapeutic interventions. PMID:25894582

  13. Metagenomic analysis reveals presence of Treponema denticola in a tissue biopsy of the Iceman.

    PubMed

    Maixner, Frank; Thomma, Anton; Cipollini, Giovanna; Widder, Stefanie; Rattei, Thomas; Zink, Albert

    2014-01-01

    Ancient hominoid genome studies can be regarded by definition as metagenomic analyses since they represent a mixture of both hominoid and microbial sequences in an environment. Here, we report the molecular detection of the oral spirochete Treponema denticola in ancient human tissue biopsies of the Iceman, a 5,300-year-old Copper Age natural ice mummy. Initially, the metagenomic data of the Iceman's genomic survey was screened for bacterial ribosomal RNA (rRNA) specific reads. Through ranking the reads by abundance a relatively high number of rRNA reads most similar to T. denticola was detected. Mapping of the metagenome sequences against the T. denticola genome revealed additional reads most similar to this opportunistic pathogen. The DNA damage pattern of specifically mapped reads suggests an ancient origin of these sequences. The haematogenous spread of bacteria of the oral microbiome often reported in the recent literature could already explain the presence of metagenomic reads specific for T. denticola in the Iceman's bone biopsy. We extended, however, our survey to an Iceman gingival tissue sample and a mouth swab sample and could thereby detect T. denticola and Porphyrimonas gingivalis, another important member of the human commensal oral microflora. Taken together, this study clearly underlines the opportunity to detect disease-associated microorganisms when applying metagenomics-enabled approaches on datasets of ancient human remains. PMID:24941044

  14. Metagenomic analysis reveals presence of Treponema denticola in a tissue biopsy of the Iceman.

    PubMed

    Maixner, Frank; Thomma, Anton; Cipollini, Giovanna; Widder, Stefanie; Rattei, Thomas; Zink, Albert

    2014-01-01

    Ancient hominoid genome studies can be regarded by definition as metagenomic analyses since they represent a mixture of both hominoid and microbial sequences in an environment. Here, we report the molecular detection of the oral spirochete Treponema denticola in ancient human tissue biopsies of the Iceman, a 5,300-year-old Copper Age natural ice mummy. Initially, the metagenomic data of the Iceman's genomic survey was screened for bacterial ribosomal RNA (rRNA) specific reads. Through ranking the reads by abundance a relatively high number of rRNA reads most similar to T. denticola was detected. Mapping of the metagenome sequences against the T. denticola genome revealed additional reads most similar to this opportunistic pathogen. The DNA damage pattern of specifically mapped reads suggests an ancient origin of these sequences. The haematogenous spread of bacteria of the oral microbiome often reported in the recent literature could already explain the presence of metagenomic reads specific for T. denticola in the Iceman's bone biopsy. We extended, however, our survey to an Iceman gingival tissue sample and a mouth swab sample and could thereby detect T. denticola and Porphyrimonas gingivalis, another important member of the human commensal oral microflora. Taken together, this study clearly underlines the opportunity to detect disease-associated microorganisms when applying metagenomics-enabled approaches on datasets of ancient human remains.

  15. Metagenomic Analysis Reveals Presence of Treponema denticola in a Tissue Biopsy of the Iceman

    PubMed Central

    Cipollini, Giovanna; Widder, Stefanie

    2014-01-01

    Ancient hominoid genome studies can be regarded by definition as metagenomic analyses since they represent a mixture of both hominoid and microbial sequences in an environment. Here, we report the molecular detection of the oral spirochete Treponema denticola in ancient human tissue biopsies of the Iceman, a 5,300-year-old Copper Age natural ice mummy. Initially, the metagenomic data of the Iceman’s genomic survey was screened for bacterial ribosomal RNA (rRNA) specific reads. Through ranking the reads by abundance a relatively high number of rRNA reads most similar to T. denticola was detected. Mapping of the metagenome sequences against the T. denticola genome revealed additional reads most similar to this opportunistic pathogen. The DNA damage pattern of specifically mapped reads suggests an ancient origin of these sequences. The haematogenous spread of bacteria of the oral microbiome often reported in the recent literature could already explain the presence of metagenomic reads specific for T. denticola in the Iceman’s bone biopsy. We extended, however, our survey to an Iceman gingival tissue sample and a mouth swab sample and could thereby detect T. denticola and Porphyrimonas gingivalis, another important member of the human commensal oral microflora. Taken together, this study clearly underlines the opportunity to detect disease-associated microorganisms when applying metagenomics- enabled approaches on datasets of ancient human remains. PMID:24941044

  16. Comparison of performance of two Treponema pallidum automated chemiluminescent immunoassays in blood donors.

    PubMed

    Sommese, Linda; Sabia, Chiara; Esposito, Antonella; Iannone, Carmela; Montesano, Maria Lourdes; Napoli, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    The recrudescence of syphilis is leading to the development of new serological tests. The goal of this study was to compare the performance of the more recent Elecsys Syphilis assay, the Electro Chemiluminescence Immunoassay (ECLIA), with the former Architect Syphilis TP assay, the Chemiluminescent Microparticle Immunoassay (CMIA), for the detection of antibodies against Treponema pallidum in blood donors. Serum samples of 5543 voluntary blood donors were screened in parallel with two tests. All repeatedly reactive (RR) samples by one or both assays were further analysed for confirmation by immmunoblot INNO-LIA and TPHA. Of 32 RR samples by CMIA, 21 were confirmed positive; of 21 RR samples by ECLIA, 20 were confirmed positive. The sensitivities of CMIA and ECLIA were 100% and 95.24% (95% CI = 85.71-100), respectively, not significant (p > 0.05). The specificity and predictive positive value (PPV) of CMIA were 99.86% (95% CI = 99.74-99.94) and 72.41%, respectively, while the specificity and PPV of ECLIA were both 100%, being statistically significant (p = 0.01 for both). The overall agreement was 99.80% and the Cohen's kappa coefficients was 0.79. In conclusion, the recent Elecsys Syphilis assay could represent another reliable assay for blood donor screening. PMID:27030921

  17. Viability and growth of clinical isolates of Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed

    Flournoy, D J; Jones, J B

    1985-08-01

    Studies were done on clinical isolates of Haemophilus influenzae to investigate viability and determine the effects of disc-agar diffusion (DAD) medium modification on antimicrobial susceptibility results. Most isolates were viable for two days in distilled water, up to a week on chocolate agar and months when frozen in skim milk at -70 degrees C. Differences in viability were not related to biotype, serotype, beta-lactamase production or site of isolation of isolates. Several medium modifications resulted in better growth of isolates for antimicrobial susceptibility testing by DAD, but the zone sizes of inhibition differed from those of the recommended medium.

  18. Global use of Haemophilus influenzae type b conjugate vaccine.

    PubMed

    Ojo, Linda R; O'Loughlin, Rosalyn E; Cohen, Adam L; Loo, Jennifer D; Edmond, Karen M; Shetty, Sharmila S; Bear, Allyson P; Privor-Dumm, Lois; Griffiths, Ulla K; Hajjeh, Rana

    2010-10-01

    Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) conjugate vaccines have been underutilized globally. We report progress in global use of Hib vaccines included in national immunization schedules. The number of countries using Hib vaccine increased from 89/193 (46%) in 2004 to 158/193 (82%) by the end of 2009. The increase was greatest among low-income countries eligible for financial support from the GAVI Alliance [13/75 (17%) in 2004, 60/72 (83%) by the end of 2009], and can be attributed to various factors. Additional efforts are still needed to increase vaccine adoption in lower middle income countries [20/31 (65%) by the end of 2009].

  19. The Haemophilus somnus disease complex (Hemophilosis): A review

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Frederick W.; Janzen, Eugene D.

    1989-01-01

    Haemophilus somnus has long been associated with thrombotic meningoencephalomyelitis but has also been identified as the agent responsible for other clinical diseases including respiratory disease, reproductive problems, myocarditis, otitis, conjunctivitis, mastitis, and polyarthritis. Exposure to the bacteria is widespread and infection may occur via the respiratory tract from urogenital excretions and secretions. Diagnosis and treatment of hemophilosis may be easy or difficult depending on the manifestation presented, and special procedures must be taken to facilitate isolation of the organism. Satisfactory control measures are not available; vaccination is the only preventive measure demonstrating a beneficial effect. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6.Figure 7. PMID:17423440

  20. Haemophilus haemolyticus Interaction with Host Cells Is Different to Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae and Prevents NTHi Association with Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Pickering, Janessa L; Prosser, Amy; Corscadden, Karli J; de Gier, Camilla; Richmond, Peter C; Zhang, Guicheng; Thornton, Ruth B; Kirkham, Lea-Ann S

    2016-01-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) is an opportunistic pathogen that resides in the upper respiratory tract and contributes to a significant burden of respiratory related diseases in children and adults. Haemophilus haemolyticus is a respiratory tract commensal that can be misidentified as NTHi due to high levels of genetic relatedness. There are reports of invasive disease from H. haemolyticus, which further blurs the species boundary with NTHi. To investigate differences in pathogenicity between these species, we optimized an in vitro epithelial cell model to compare the interaction of 10 H. haemolyticus strains with 4 NTHi and 4 H. influenzae-like haemophili. There was inter- and intra-species variability but overall, H. haemolyticus had reduced capacity to attach to and invade nasopharyngeal and bronchoalveolar epithelial cell lines (D562 and A549) within 3 h when compared with NTHi. H. haemolyticus was cytotoxic to both cell lines at 24 h, whereas NTHi was not. Nasopharyngeal epithelium challenged with some H. haemolyticus strains released high levels of inflammatory mediators IL-6 and IL-8, whereas NTHi did not elicit an inflammatory response despite higher levels of cell association and invasion. Furthermore, peripheral blood mononuclear cells stimulated with H. haemolyticus or NTHi released similar and high levels of IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-1β, and TNFα when compared with unstimulated cells but only NTHi elicited an IFNγ response. Due to the relatedness of H. haemolyticus and NTHi, we hypothesized that H. haemolyticus may compete with NTHi for colonization of the respiratory tract. We observed that in vitro pre-treatment of epithelial cells with H. haemolyticus significantly reduced NTHi attachment, suggesting interference or competition between the two species is possible and warrants further investigation. In conclusion, H. haemolyticus interacts differently with host cells compared to NTHi, with different immunostimulatory and cytotoxic

  1. Activities of HMR 3787 and RU 64399 Compared with Those of Four Other Agents against Haemophilus influenzae and Haemophilus parainfluenzae

    PubMed Central

    Bozdogan, Bülent; Clark, Catherine; Bryskier, Andre; Jacobs, Michael R.; Appelbaum, Peter C.

    2003-01-01

    Activities of HMR 3787, a new 2-fluoroketolide, and its (des)-fluor derivative, RU 64399, were tested against 111 Haemophilus influenzae and 26 H. parainfluenzae strains and compared with those of telithromycin, erythromycin, azithromycin, and clarithromycin. HMR 3787 and RU 64399 MICs were comparable with those of azithromycin but were less affected by incubation in CO2. Time-kill studies of 12 strains showed that HMR 3787, RU 64399, and telithromycin were bactericidal against all strains after 24 h at two times the MIC. PMID:12499225

  2. Genomic and Metagenomic Analysis of Diversity-Generating Retroelements Associated with Treponema denticola.

    PubMed

    Nimkulrat, Sutichot; Lee, Heewook; Doak, Thomas G; Ye, Yuzhen

    2016-01-01

    Diversity-generating retroelements (DGRs) are genetic cassettes that can produce massive protein sequence variation in prokaryotes. Presumably DGRs confer selective advantages to their hosts (bacteria or viruses) by generating variants of target genes-typically resulting in target proteins with altered ligand-binding specificity-through a specialized error-prone reverse transcription process. The only extensively studied DGR system is from the Bordetella phage BPP-1, although DGRs are predicted to exist in other species. Using bioinformatics analysis, we discovered that the DGR system associated with the Treponema denticola species (a human oral-associated periopathogen) is dynamic (with gains/losses of the system found in the isolates) and diverse (with multiple types found in isolated genomes and the human microbiota). The T. denticola DGR is found in only nine of the 17 sequenced T. denticola strains. Analysis of the DGR-associated template regions and reverse transcriptase gene sequences revealed two types of DGR systems in T. denticola: the ATCC35405-type shared by seven isolates including ATCC35405; and the SP32-type shared by two isolates (SP32 and SP33), suggesting multiple DGR acquisitions. We detected additional variants of the T. denticola DGR systems in the human microbiomes, and found that the SP32-type DGR is more abundant than the ATCC35405-type in the healthy human oral microbiome, although the latter is found in more sequenced isolates. This is the first comprehensive study to characterize the DGRs associated with T. denticola in individual genomes as well as human microbiomes, demonstrating the importance of utilizing both individual genomes and metagenomes for characterizing the elements, and for analyzing their diversity and distribution in human populations.

  3. Genomic and Metagenomic Analysis of Diversity-Generating Retroelements Associated with Treponema denticola

    PubMed Central

    Nimkulrat, Sutichot; Lee, Heewook; Doak, Thomas G.; Ye, Yuzhen

    2016-01-01

    Diversity-generating retroelements (DGRs) are genetic cassettes that can produce massive protein sequence variation in prokaryotes. Presumably DGRs confer selective advantages to their hosts (bacteria or viruses) by generating variants of target genes—typically resulting in target proteins with altered ligand-binding specificity—through a specialized error-prone reverse transcription process. The only extensively studied DGR system is from the Bordetella phage BPP-1, although DGRs are predicted to exist in other species. Using bioinformatics analysis, we discovered that the DGR system associated with the Treponema denticola species (a human oral-associated periopathogen) is dynamic (with gains/losses of the system found in the isolates) and diverse (with multiple types found in isolated genomes and the human microbiota). The T. denticola DGR is found in only nine of the 17 sequenced T. denticola strains. Analysis of the DGR-associated template regions and reverse transcriptase gene sequences revealed two types of DGR systems in T. denticola: the ATCC35405-type shared by seven isolates including ATCC35405; and the SP32-type shared by two isolates (SP32 and SP33), suggesting multiple DGR acquisitions. We detected additional variants of the T. denticola DGR systems in the human microbiomes, and found that the SP32-type DGR is more abundant than the ATCC35405-type in the healthy human oral microbiome, although the latter is found in more sequenced isolates. This is the first comprehensive study to characterize the DGRs associated with T. denticola in individual genomes as well as human microbiomes, demonstrating the importance of utilizing both individual genomes and metagenomes for characterizing the elements, and for analyzing their diversity and distribution in human populations. PMID:27375574

  4. Selective release of the Treponema pallidum outer membrane and associated polypeptides with Triton X-114.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, T M; Walker, E M; Miller, J N; Lovett, M A

    1988-12-01

    The effects of the nonionic detergent Triton X-114 on the ultrastructure of Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum are presented in this study. Treatment of Percoll-purified motile T. pallidum with a 1% concentration of Triton X-114 resulted in cell surface blebbing followed by lysis of blebs and a decrease in diameter from 0.25-0.35 micron to 0.1-0.15 micron. Examination of thin sections of untreated Percoll-purified T. pallidum showed integrity of outer and cytoplasmic membranes. In contrast, thin sections of Triton X-114-treated treponemes showed integrity of the cytoplasmic membrane but loss of the outer membrane. The cytoplasmic cylinders generated by detergent treatment retained their periplasmic flagella, as judged by electron microscopy and immunoblotting. Recently identified T. pallidum penicillin-binding proteins also remained associated with the cytoplasmic cylinders. Proteins released by Triton X-114 at 4 degrees C were divided into aqueous and hydrophobic phases after incubation at 37 degrees C. The hydrophobic phase had major polypeptide constituents of 57, 47, 38, 33-35, 23, 16, and 14 kilodaltons (kDa) which were reactive with syphilitic serum. The 47-kDa polypeptide was reactive with a monoclonal antibody which has been previously shown to identify a surface-associated T. pallidum antigen. The aqueous phase contained the 190-kDa ordered ring molecule, 4D, which has been associated with the surface of the organisms. Full release of the 47- and 190-kDa molecules was dependent on the presence of a reducing agent. These results indicate that 1% Triton X-114 selectively solubilizes the T. pallidum outer membrane and associated proteins of likely outer membrane location.

  5. Validation of Serological Tests for the Detection of Antibodies Against Treponema pallidum in Nonhuman Primates

    PubMed Central

    Knauf, Sascha; Dahlmann, Franziska; Batamuzi, Emmanuel K.; Frischmann, Sieghard; Liu, Hsi

    2015-01-01

    There is evidence to suggest that the yaws bacterium (Treponema pallidum ssp. pertenue) may exist in non-human primate populations residing in regions where yaws is endemic in humans. Especially in light of the fact that the World Health Organizaiton (WHO) recently launched its second yaws eradication campaign, there is a considerable need for reliable tools to identify treponemal infection in our closest relatives, African monkeys and great apes. It was hypothesized that commercially available serological tests detect simian anti-T. pallidum antibody in serum samples of baboons, with comparable sensitivity and specificity to their results on human sera. Test performances of five different treponemal tests (TTs) and two non-treponemal tests (NTTs) were evaluated using serum samples of 57 naturally T. pallidum-infected olive baboons (Papio anubis) from Lake Manyara National Park in Tanzania. The T. pallidum particle agglutination assay (TP-PA) was used as a gold standard for comparison. In addition, the overall infection status of the animals was used to further validate test performances. For most accurate results, only samples that originated from baboons of known infection status, as verified in a previous study by clinical inspection, PCR and immunohistochemistry, were included. All tests, TTs and NTTs, used in this study were able to reliably detect antibodies against T. pallidum in serum samples of infected baboons. The sensitivity of TTs ranged from 97.7-100%, while specificity was between 88.0-100.0%. The two NTTs detected anti-lipoidal antibodies in serum samples of infected baboons with a sensitivity of 83.3% whereas specificity was 100%. For screening purposes, the TT Espline TP provided the highest sensitivity and specificity and at the same time provided the most suitable format for use in the field. The enzyme immune assay Mastblot TP (IgG), however, could be considered as a confirmatory test. PMID:25803295

  6. gamma-Glutamyltransferase from the outer cell envelope of Treponema denticola ATCC 35405.

    PubMed Central

    Mäkinen, P L; Mäkinen, K K

    1997-01-01

    The human oral spirochete Treponema denticola ATCC 35405 was shown to exhibit relatively high enzyme activity toward the gamma-glutamyl amide bond present in N-gamma-L-glutamyl-4-nitroaniline. The enzyme responsible for this catalysis (gamma-glutamyltransferase [GGT]; EC 2.3.2.2) was purified by means of fast protein liquid chromatography to two sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE)-pure forms from a mild (0.1%) Triton X-100 extract of washed cells. The GGT was studied primarily with regard to its hydrolytic activity by using N-gamma-L-glutamyl-4-nitroaniline as a substrate, although the GGT was shown to catalyze transpeptidation reactions. The high-molecular-mass form of the GGT gave a value of about 213 kDa by SDS-PAGE when heat treatment was omitted and one of 26 kDa after heat treatment; mass spectrometry gave a value of 26.877. The larger form may represent an aggregate with nonprotein structures (possibly of a carbohydrate nature). The preliminary N-terminal sequence of the GGT is MKKPLIGITGSXLYETSQXXF. The enzyme was highly active on glutathione, transferring its Glu residue either to a water molecule or to the Gly-L-Leu dipeptide. The GGT stability was absolutely dependent on the presence of free thiol(s), while no evidence of metalloenzyme nature was obtained. The proposed location of the GGT in the outer cell envelope and its high activity on glutathione, a major nonprotein thiol present in virtually all cells, suggest that the GGT may play a role in the propagation of T. denticola within inflamed periodontal tissues. PMID:9009331

  7. High Prevalence of Antibodies against the Bacterium Treponema pallidum in Senegalese Guinea Baboons (Papio papio).

    PubMed

    Knauf, Sascha; Barnett, Ulrike; Maciej, Peter; Klapproth, Matthias; Ndao, Ibrahima; Frischmann, Sieghard; Fischer, Julia; Zinner, Dietmar; Liu, Hsi

    2015-01-01

    The bacterium Treponema pallidum is known to cause syphilis (ssp. pallidum), yaws (ssp. pertenue), and endemic syphilis (ssp. endemicum) in humans. Nonhuman primates have also been reported to be infected with the bacterium with equally versatile clinical manifestations, from severe skin ulcerations to asymptomatic. At present all simian strains are closely related to human yaws-causing strains, an important consideration for yaws eradication. We tested clinically healthy Guinea baboons (Papio papio) at Parc National Niokolo Koba in south eastern Senegal for the presence of anti-T. pallidum antibodies. Since T. pallidum infection in this species was identified 50 years ago, and there has been no attempt to treat non-human primates for infection, it was hypothesized that a large number of West African baboons are still infected with simian strains of the yaws-bacterium. All animals were without clinical signs of treponematoses, but 18 of 20 (90%) baboons tested positive for antibodies against T. pallidum based on treponemal tests. Yet, Guinea baboons seem to develop no clinical symptoms, though it must be assumed that infection is chronic or comparable to the latent stage in human yaws infection. The non-active character is supported by the low anti-T. pallidum serum titers in Guinea baboons (median = 1:2,560) versus serum titers that are found in genital-ulcerated olive baboons with active infection in Tanzania (range of medians among the groups of initial, moderate, and severe infected animals = 1:15,360 to 1:2.097e+7). Our findings provide evidence for simian infection with T. pallidum in wild Senegalese baboons. Potentially, Guinea baboons in West Africa serve as a natural reservoir for human infection, as the West African simian strain has been shown to cause sustainable yaws infection when inoculated into humans. The present study pinpoints an area where further research is needed to support the currently on-going second WHO led yaws eradication campaign with

  8. Evaluation of the recombinant protein TpF1 of Treponema pallidum for serodiagnosis of syphilis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Chuanhao; Zhao, Feijun; Xiao, Jinhong; Zeng, Tiebing; Yu, Jian; Ma, Xiaohua; Wu, Haiying; Wu, Yimou

    2013-10-01

    Syphilis is a chronic infection caused by Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum, and diagnosis with sensitive and specific methods is a challenging process that is important for its prevention and treatment. In the present study, we established a recombinant protein TpF1-based indirect immunoglobulin G (IgG) enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and a Western blot assay for human and rabbit sera. The 20-kDa recombinant protein TpF1 was detected by Western blotting performed with sera from rabbits immunized with recombinant TpF1 and infected with the T. pallidum Nichols strain and T. pallidum clinical isolates but was not detected by Western blotting with sera from uninfected rabbits. The sensitivity of the recombinant protein was determined by screening sera from individuals with primary, secondary, latent, and congenital syphilis (n = 82). The specificity of the recombinant protein was determined by screening sera from uninfected controls (n = 30) and individuals with potentially cross-reactive infections, including Lyme disease (n = 30) and leptospirosis (n = 5). The sensitivities of TpF1-based ELISAs were 93.3%, 100%, 100%, and 100% for primary, secondary, latent, and congenital syphilis, respectively, and the specificities were all 100% for sera from uninfected controls and individuals with potentially cross-reactive infections. In Western blot assays, the sensitivities and specificities of TpF1 for human sera were all 100%. The reactivities of TpF1 with syphilitic sera were proportional to the titers of the T. pallidum particle agglutination (TPPA) assay. These data indicate that the recombinant protein TpF1 is a highly immunogenic protein in human and rabbit infections and a promising marker for the screening of syphilis. PMID:23945159

  9. Evaluation of a Treponema pallidum western immunoblot assay as a confirmatory test for syphilis.

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, R E; Laska, S; Bell, M; Larson, D; Phillips, J; Todd, J

    1992-01-01

    Tests for the detection of antibodies to Treponema pallidum are recommended for the confirmation of reactive nontreponemal test results and the accurate diagnosis of syphilis. The present-day use of Western blot (immunoblot) technology for the diagnosis of retroviruses prompted the development and evaluation of a Western blot assay with whole-cell T. pallidum as the antigen. The assay detected antibodies in syphilitic serum or plasma from dilutions of specimens incubated overnight with test strips. A test was considered positive when at least three of four major antigens having molecular masses of 15.5, 17, 44.5, and 47 kDa were detected. The Western blot assay had 93.8% sensitivity and 100% specificity for clinically defined samples. The Western blot assay was compared with double-staining fluorescent treponemal antibody absorption [FTA-ABS (DS)], which had a sensitivity and a specificity of 91.7 and 92.0%, respectively. Dilution series studies of syphilis-positive specimens indicated that the Western blot assay has an endpoint of reactivity at least 3 to 4 serial dilutions greater than that for FTA-ABS (DS). Overall, the greater than 95% agreement between the Western blot assay and FTA-ABS (DS) for clinically defined specimens indicates that the sensitivity of the Western blot assay is equal to or greater than that of FTA-ABS (DS). The Western blot assay demonstrated no false-positive or equivocal reactivities for nonsyphilitic specimens, including normal specimens (both plasma and serum), biological false-positives, and specimens with elevated gamma globulin or antinuclear antibody. We conclude that the high sensitivity and specificity of the T. pallidum Western blot assay, together with its simplicity and objectivity, make it a good confirmatory test for syphilis. Images PMID:1734042

  10. Cystalysin, a 46-kilodalton cysteine desulfhydrase from Treponema denticola, with hemolytic and hemoxidative activities.

    PubMed Central

    Chu, L; Ebersole, J L; Kurzban, G P; Holt, S C

    1997-01-01

    A 46-kDa hemolytic protein, referred to as cystalysin, from Treponema denticola ATCC 35404 was overexpressed in Escherichia coli LC-67. Both the native and recombinant 46-kDa proteins were purified to homogeneity. Both proteins expressed identical biological and functional characteristics. In addition to its biological function of lysing erythrocytes and hemoxidizing the hemoglobin to methemoglobin, cystalysin was also capable of removing the sulfhydryl and amino groups from selected S-containing compounds (e.g., cysteine) producing H2S, NH3, and pyruvate. This cysteine desulfhydrase resulted in the following Michaelis-Menten kinetics: Km = 3.6 mM and k(cat) = 12 s(-1). Cystathionine and S-aminoethyl-L-cysteine were also substrates for the protein. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and high-performance liquid chromatography analysis of the end products revealed NH3, pyruvate, homocysteine (from cystathionine), and cysteamine (from S-aminoethyl-L-cysteine). The enzyme was active over a broad pH range, with highest activity at pH 7.8 to 8.0. The enzymatic activity was increased by beta-mercaptoethanol. It was not inhibited by the proteinase inhibitor TLCK (N alpha-p-tosyl-L-lysine chloromethyl ketone), pronase, or proteinase K, suggesting that the functional site was physically protected or located in a small fragment of the polypeptide. We hypothesize that cystalysin is a pyridoxal-5-phosphate-containing enzyme, with activity of an alphaC-N and betaC-S lyase (cystathionase) type. Since large amounts of H2S have been reported in deep periodontal pockets, cystalysin may also function in vivo as an important virulence molecule. PMID:9234780

  11. pyrF as a Counterselectable Marker for Unmarked Genetic Manipulations in Treponema denticola

    PubMed Central

    Kurniyati, Kurni

    2015-01-01

    The pathophysiology of Treponema denticola, an oral pathogen associated with both periodontal and endodontic infections, is poorly understood due to its fastidious growth and recalcitrance to genetic manipulations. Counterselectable markers are instrumental in constructing clean and unmarked mutations in bacteria. Here, we demonstrate that pyrF, a gene encoding orotidine-5′-monophosphate decarboxylase, can be used as a counterselectable marker in T. denticola to construct marker-free mutants. T. denticola is susceptible to 5-fluoroorotic acid (5-FOA). To establish a pyrF-based counterselectable knockout system in T. denticola, the pyrF gene was deleted. The deletion conferred resistance to 5-FOA in T. denticola. Next, a single-crossover mutant was constructed by reintroducing pyrF along with a gentamicin resistance gene (aacC1) back into the chromosome of the pyrF mutant at the locus of choice. In this study, we chose flgE, a flagellar hook gene that is located within a large polycistronic motility gene operon, as our target gene. The obtained single-crossover mutant (named FlgEin) regained the susceptibility to 5-FOA. Finally, FlgEin was plated on solid agar containing 5-FOA. Numerous colonies of the 5-FOA-resistant mutant (named FlgEout) were obtained and characterized by PCR and Southern blotting analyses. The results showed that the flgE gene was deleted and FlgEout was free of selection markers (i.e., pyrF and aacC1). Compared to previously constructed flgE mutants that contain an antibiotic selection marker, the deletion of flgE in FlgEout has no polar effect on its downstream gene expression. The system developed here will provide us with a new tool for investigating the genetics and pathogenicity of T. denticola. PMID:26682856

  12. Physiology and nutrition of Treponema primitia, an H2/CO2-acetogenic spirochete from termite hindguts.

    PubMed

    Graber, Joseph R; Breznak, John A

    2004-03-01

    Treponema primitia strains ZAS-1 and ZAS-2, the first spirochetes to be isolated from termite hindguts (J. R. Leadbetter, T. M. Schmidt, J. R. Graber, and J. A. Breznak, Science 283:686-689, 1999), were examined for nutritional, physiological, and biochemical properties relevant to growth and survival in their natural habitat. In addition to using H(2) plus CO(2) as substrates, these strains were capable of homoacetogenic growth on mono- and disaccharides and (in the case of ZAS-2) methoxylated benzenoids. Cells were also capable of mixotrophic growth (i.e., simultaneous utilization of H(2) and organic substrates). Cell extracts of T. primitia possessed enzyme activities of the Wood/Ljungdahl (acetyl coenzyme A) pathway of acetogenesis, including tetrahydrofolate-dependent enzymes of the methyl group-forming branch. However, a folate compound was required in the medium for growth. ZAS-1 and ZAS-2 growing on H(2) plus CO(2) displayed H(2) thresholds of 650 and 490 ppmv, respectively. Anoxic cultures of ZAS-1 and ZAS-2 maintained growth after the addition of as much as 0.5% (vol/vol) O(2) to the headspace atmosphere. Cell extracts exhibited NADH and NADPH peroxidase and NADH oxidase activities but neither catalase nor superoxide dismutase activity. Results indicate that (i) T. primitia is able to exploit a variety of substrates derived from the food of its termite hosts and in so doing contributes to termite nutrition via acetogenesis, (ii) in situ growth of T. primitia is likely dependent on secretion of a folate compound(s) by other members of the gut microbiota, and (iii) cells possess enzymatic adaptations to oxidative stress, which is likely to be encountered in peripheral regions of the termite hindgut. PMID:15006747

  13. Characterisation of Dichelobacter nodosus and detection of Fusobacterium necrophorum and Treponema spp. in sheep with different clinical manifestations of footrot.

    PubMed

    Frosth, Sara; König, Ulrika; Nyman, Ann-Kristin; Pringle, Märit; Aspán, Anna

    2015-08-31

    The aim of this study was to determine the proportion of Dichelobacter nodosus, Fusobacterium necrophorum and Treponema spp. in sheep with different clinical manifestations of footrot compared to healthy sheep both at flock and individual level. The second aim was to characterise D. nodosus with respect to virulence, presence of intA gene and the serogroups. Swab samples (n=1000) from footrot-affected (n=10) and healthy flocks (n=10) were analysed for the presence of D. nodosus, F. necrophorum and Treponema spp. by real-time PCR and culturing (D. nodosus only). Dichelobacter nodosus isolates (n=78) and positive swabs (n=474) were analysed by real-time PCR for the aprV2/B2 and the intA genes and by PCR for the fimA gene (isolates only). D. nodosus was more commonly found in flocks affected with footrot than in clinically healthy flocks. A significant association was found between feet with severe footrot lesions and the aprV2 gene and between feet with moderate or no lesions and the aprB2 gene, respectively. F. necrophorum was more commonly found in flocks with footrot lesions than in flocks without lesions. No significant association was found between sheep flocks affected with footrot and findings of Treponema spp. or the intA gene. Benign D. nodosus of six different serogroups was detected in twelve flocks and virulent D. nodosus of serogroup G in one. In conclusion, D. nodosus and F. necrophorum were more commonly found in feet with footrot than in healthy feet. The majority of D. nodosus detected was benign, while virulent D. nodosus was only detected in a single flock.

  14. Airway dysbiosis: Haemophilus influenzae and Tropheryma in poorly controlled asthma.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Jodie L; Daly, Joshua; Baines, Katherine J; Yang, Ian A; Upham, John W; Reynolds, Paul N; Hodge, Sandra; James, Alan L; Hugenholtz, Philip; Willner, Dana; Gibson, Peter G

    2016-03-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the airways where bacteria may act as protagonists of chronic inflammation. Little is known about the relation of airway inflammation to the presence of specific bacterial taxa. We sought to describe the sputum microbiome in adults with poorly controlled asthma.DNA was extracted from induced sputum and microbial communities were profiled using 16S rRNA pyrosequencing. Bacterial species were characterised, and the relationship between microbial populations, asthma inflammatory subtypes and other covariates was explored. Real-time PCR was used to identify Tropheryma whipplei and Haemophilus influenzae in sputum.Adults with neutrophilic asthma had reduced bacterial diversity and species richness. Tropheryma was identified and confirmed with real-time PCR in 12 (40%) participants. Haemophilus occurred most often in a group of younger atopic males with an increased proportion of neutrophils. PCR confirmed the presence of H. influenzae in 35 (76%) participants with poorly controlled asthma.There are phenotype-specific alterations to the airway microbiome in asthma. Reduced bacterial diversity combined with a high prevalence of H. influenzae was observed in neutrophilic asthma, whereas eosinophilic asthma had abundant T. whipplei.

  15. Comparative Analyses of the Lipooligosaccharides from Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae and Haemophilus haemolyticus Show Differences in Sialic Acid and Phosphorylcholine Modifications

    PubMed Central

    Post, Deborah M. B.; Ketterer, Margaret R.; Coffin, Jeremy E.; Reinders, Lorri M.; Munson, Robert S.; Bair, Thomas; Murphy, Timothy F.; Foster, Eric D.; Gibson, Bradford W.

    2016-01-01

    Haemophilus haemolyticus and nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) are closely related upper airway commensal bacteria that are difficult to distinguish phenotypically. NTHi causes upper and lower airway tract infections in individuals with compromised airways, while H. haemolyticus rarely causes such infections. The lipooligosaccharide (LOS) is an outer membrane component of both species and plays a role in NTHi pathogenesis. In this study, comparative analyses of the LOS structures and corresponding biosynthesis genes were performed. Mass spectrometric and immunochemical analyses showed that NTHi LOS contained terminal sialic acid more frequently and to a higher extent than H. haemolyticus LOS did. Genomic analyses of 10 strains demonstrated that H. haemolyticus lacked the sialyltransferase genes lic3A and lic3B (9/10) and siaA (10/10), but all strains contained the sialic acid uptake genes siaP and siaT (10/10). However, isothermal titration calorimetry analyses of SiaP from two H. haemolyticus strains showed a 3.4- to 7.3-fold lower affinity for sialic acid compared to that of NTHi SiaP. Additionally, mass spectrometric and immunochemical analyses showed that the LOS from H. haemolyticus contained phosphorylcholine (ChoP) less frequently than the LOS from NTHi strains. These differences observed in the levels of sialic acid and ChoP incorporation in the LOS structures from H. haemolyticus and NTHi may explain some of the differences in their propensities to cause disease. PMID:26729761

  16. Development of a test system for rapid differentiation of Neisseria and Haemophilus spp.

    PubMed Central

    Eriquez, L A; Hodinka, N E

    1983-01-01

    A qualitative micromethod (IDS Rapid NH system) employing conventional and single-substrate enzyme tests was developed for the biochemical characterization of Neisseria spp., Haemophilus spp., and other gram-negative species. A total of over 140 dehydrated, miniaturized biochemical tests were investigated for their ability to distinguish species. Computer-assisted test selection and pair separation analysis of the data allowed the selection of 11 4-h tests that would identify Haemophilus and Neisseria spp. implicated as etiological agents as well as differentiate them from other Neisseria spp., Moraxella spp., Branhamella catarrhalis, Centers for Disease Control M groups, and Kingella spp. The final test configuration included modified glucose, sucrose, galactosidase, nitrate, phosphatase, resazurin reduction, and two arylamidase tests. In addition, indole, urea, and ornithine decarboxylase tests were included to biochemically type strains of Haemophilus influenzae and Haemophilus parainfluenzae. PMID:6358247

  17. Draft Genome Sequences of Eight Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae Strains Previously Characterized Using an Electrophoretic Typing Scheme

    PubMed Central

    Mussa, Huda J.; VanWagoner, Timothy M.; Seale, Thomas W.; Whitby, Paul W.; Stull, Terrence L.

    2015-01-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae is an important cause of human disease. Strains were selected for genome sequencing to represent the breadth of nontypeable strains within the species, as previously defined by the electrophoretic mobility of 16 metabolic enzymes. PMID:26607889

  18. Virulence, transmission, and heterologous protection of four isolates of Haemophilus parasuis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Haemophilus parasuis causes Glässer's disease, a syndrome of polyserositis, meningitis, and arthritis in swine. Previous studies with H. parasuis have revealed virulence disparity among isolates and inconsistent heterologous protection. In this study, virulence, direct transmission, and heterologous...

  19. Low occurrence of 'non-haemolytic Haemophilus haemolyticus' misidentified as Haemophilus influenzae in cystic fibrosis respiratory specimens, and frequent recurrence of persistent H. influenzae clones despite antimicrobial treatment.

    PubMed

    Fenger, Mette G; Ridderberg, Winnie; Olesen, Hanne V; Nørskov-Lauritsen, Niels

    2012-12-01

    Non-influenzae commensal Haemophilus species of low pathogenicity may be difficult to discriminate from Haemophilus influenzae. We investigated the level of misidentifications in respiratory specimens from cystic fibrosis patients and evaluated the colonisation dynamics of genuine H. influenzae isolates. One hundred and ninety-two presumptive H. influenzae isolates were re-examined by assessment of marker genes sodC and fucK, and isolates with aberrant genotypes were subjected to multilocus sequence typing. Misidentifications (3%) were mainly caused by failure to identify porphyrin-synthesising strains, and only a single strain (0.5%) could be classified as 'non-haemolytic Haemophilus haemolyticus'. Sequential isolates of confirmed H. influenzae isolates from individual patients were typed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Despite the routine prescription of antimicrobial therapy, the majority of H. influenzae isolates were identical with at least one of the strains cultured from the two preceding positive samples from the same patient.

  20. Low occurrence of 'non-haemolytic Haemophilus haemolyticus' misidentified as Haemophilus influenzae in cystic fibrosis respiratory specimens, and frequent recurrence of persistent H. influenzae clones despite antimicrobial treatment.

    PubMed

    Fenger, Mette G; Ridderberg, Winnie; Olesen, Hanne V; Nørskov-Lauritsen, Niels

    2012-12-01

    Non-influenzae commensal Haemophilus species of low pathogenicity may be difficult to discriminate from Haemophilus influenzae. We investigated the level of misidentifications in respiratory specimens from cystic fibrosis patients and evaluated the colonisation dynamics of genuine H. influenzae isolates. One hundred and ninety-two presumptive H. influenzae isolates were re-examined by assessment of marker genes sodC and fucK, and isolates with aberrant genotypes were subjected to multilocus sequence typing. Misidentifications (3%) were mainly caused by failure to identify porphyrin-synthesising strains, and only a single strain (0.5%) could be classified as 'non-haemolytic Haemophilus haemolyticus'. Sequential isolates of confirmed H. influenzae isolates from individual patients were typed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Despite the routine prescription of antimicrobial therapy, the majority of H. influenzae isolates were identical with at least one of the strains cultured from the two preceding positive samples from the same patient. PMID:23177564

  1. Proline iminopeptidase from the outer cell envelope of the human oral spirochete Treponema denticola ATCC 35405.

    PubMed Central

    Mäkinen, K K; Chen, C Y; Mäkinen, P L

    1996-01-01

    Certain periodontopathic organisms have been shown to exhibit high activity of proline iminopeptidase (PIPase). The human oral spirochete Treponema denticola ATCC 35405 was found to contain an easily extractable, novel PIPase (EC 3.4.11.5), which was purified to a sodium dodecyl sulfate- polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis-pure form by means of fast protein liquid chromatographic procedures. The range of the minimum monomeric molecular mass (280 amino acid residues) of the PIPase, based on amino acid analysis, was 30.35 to 30.39 kDa, but the likely in vivo form of the enzyme is a tetramer (minimum mass, 120.2 to 120.4 kDa). The molecular masses based on laser desorption mass spectrometry were 36.058 kDa for the monomer and 72.596 kDa for a dimer. The PIPase cleaves specifically the Pro-Y bond in dipeptides where Y is preferably Arg or Lys. Pro-Gln, Pro-Asn, and Pro-Ala were also good substrates, while Pro-Glu was hydrolyzed slowly and Pro-Asp was not hydrolyzed at all. Tripeptides were poor substrates or were not hydrolyzed (an exception was Pro-Gly-Gly, which cleaved at a moderate rate). Larger molecules, such as poly-L-Pro, were not hydrolyzed. The T. denticola enzyme can be regarded as a true PIPase, since replacing Pro in Pro-Y with other amino acid residues resulted in no hydrolysis. The activity of the PIPase may depend on an active carboxyl group and on an active seryl residue but not on metal cations. Diethylpyrocarbonate inactivated the enzyme in a reaction that was not reversible upon addition of NH2OH. The enzyme contains a relatively large percentage (ca. 15%) of proline residues. The dominance of the PIPase activity among aminopeptidase activities present in T. denticola and the proposed location of the enzyme in the outer cell envelope suggest that it has a vital function in the propagation of the cells within their biological niche (inflamed human periodontal tissues). The biologic role of the PIPase may be envisaged as in the termination of the

  2. Sulfhydryl-dependent attachment of Treponema denticola to laminin and other proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Haapasalo, M; Singh, U; McBride, B C; Uitto, V J

    1991-01-01

    Attachment of Treponema denticola ATCC 35405 to laminin, a major basement membrane protein, and to other proteins was studied. Microdilution plates were coated with the proteins, and the attachment of T. denticola was measured by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay technique. Compared with bovine serum albumin (BSA), T. denticola had a high affinity to laminin, fibronectin, fibrinogen, and gelatin, as well as to type I and type IV collagens. Attachment to RGD peptide (Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser, the integrin recognition sequence) was only about 30% of that to laminin and was comparable to attachment to BSA. Tests with laminin fragments obtained through elastase digestion showed that the spirochetes attached well to an A-chain 140-kDa fragment involved in eukaryote cell attachment but did not attach to a 50-kDa fragment that includes the heparin binding site. Pretreatment of T. denticola with soluble laminin, fibronectin, gelatin, BSA, or fibrinogen had no effect on the attachment of the bacteria to laminin or fibronectin. A wide variety of compounds were tested for their possible inhibitory actions on the attachment. While most treatments of T. denticola ATCC 35405 had little or no effect on the attachment to proteins, sulfhydryl reagents p-chloromercuribenzoic acid (pCMBA) and oxidized glutathione inhibited the attachment by 70 to 99%, depending on the protein. When T. denticola was first allowed to attach to proteins, addition of pCMBA or oxidized glutathione could no longer reverse the attachment. Heat treatment of the spirochetes also markedly reduced the attachment to laminin, gelatin, and fibrinogen but not to BSA. Mixed glycosidase treatment of the spirochetes inhibited the attachment by 20 to 80%. None of the above treatments of the substrate proteins had any marked effect on the spirochete attachment. The results indicate that T. denticola has the capacity to bind to many different kinds of proteins by utilizing specific attachment mechanisms. The binding

  3. Treponema denticola cystalysin exhibits significant alanine racemase activity accompanied by transamination: mechanistic implications.

    PubMed Central

    Bertoldi, Mariarita; Cellini, Barbara; Paiardini, Alessandro; Di Salvo, Martino; Borri Voltattorni, Carla

    2003-01-01

    To obtain information on the reaction specificity of cystalysin from the spirochaete bacterium Treponema denticola, the interaction with L- and D-alanine has been investigated. Binding of both alanine enantiomers leads to the appearance of an external aldimine absorbing at 429 nm and of a band absorbing at 498 nm, indicative of a quinonoid species. Racemization and transamination reactions were observed to occur with both alanine isomers as substrates. The steady-state kinetic parameters for racemization, k (cat) and K (m), for L-alanine are 1.05+/-0.03 s(-1) and 10+/-1 mM respectively, whereas those for D-alanine are 1.4+/-0.1 s(-1) and 10+/-1 mM. During the reaction of cystalysin with L- or D-alanine, a time-dependent loss of beta-elimination activity occurs concomitantly with the conversion of the pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) coenzyme into pyridoxamine 5'-phosphate (PMP). The catalytic efficiency of the half-transamination of L-alanine is found to be 5.3x10(-5) mM(-1) x s(-1), 5-fold higher when compared with that of D-alanine. The partition ratio between racemization and half-transamination reactions is 2.3x10(3) for L-alanine and 1.4x10(4) for D-alanine. The pH dependence of the kinetic parameters for both the reactions shows that the enzyme possesses a single ionizing residue with p K values of 6.5-6.6, which must be unprotonated for catalysis. Addition of pyruvate converts the PMP form of the enzyme back into the PLP form and causes the concomitant recovery of beta-elimination activity. In contrast with other PLP enzymes studied so far, but similar to alanine racemases, the apoform of the enzyme abstracted tritium from C4' of both (4' S)- and (4' R)-[4'-(3)H]PMP in the presence of pyruvate. Together with molecular modelling of the putative binding sites of L- and D-alanine at the active site of the enzyme, the implications of these studies for the mechanisms of the side reactions catalysed by cystalysin are discussed. PMID:12519070

  4. High Prevalence of Antibodies against the Bacterium Treponema pallidum in Senegalese Guinea Baboons (Papio papio)

    PubMed Central

    Knauf, Sascha; Barnett, Ulrike; Maciej, Peter; Klapproth, Matthias; Ndao, Ibrahima; Frischmann, Sieghard; Fischer, Julia; Zinner, Dietmar; Liu, Hsi

    2015-01-01

    The bacterium Treponema pallidum is known to cause syphilis (ssp. pallidum), yaws (ssp. pertenue), and endemic syphilis (ssp. endemicum) in humans. Nonhuman primates have also been reported to be infected with the bacterium with equally versatile clinical manifestations, from severe skin ulcerations to asymptomatic. At present all simian strains are closely related to human yaws-causing strains, an important consideration for yaws eradication. We tested clinically healthy Guinea baboons (Papio papio) at Parc National Niokolo Koba in south eastern Senegal for the presence of anti-T. pallidum antibodies. Since T. pallidum infection in this species was identified 50 years ago, and there has been no attempt to treat non-human primates for infection, it was hypothesized that a large number of West African baboons are still infected with simian strains of the yaws-bacterium. All animals were without clinical signs of treponematoses, but 18 of 20 (90%) baboons tested positive for antibodies against T. pallidum based on treponemal tests. Yet, Guinea baboons seem to develop no clinical symptoms, though it must be assumed that infection is chronic or comparable to the latent stage in human yaws infection. The non-active character is supported by the low anti-T. pallidum serum titers in Guinea baboons (median = 1:2,560) versus serum titers that are found in genital-ulcerated olive baboons with active infection in Tanzania (range of medians among the groups of initial, moderate, and severe infected animals = 1:15,360 to 1:2.097e+7). Our findings provide evidence for simian infection with T. pallidum in wild Senegalese baboons. Potentially, Guinea baboons in West Africa serve as a natural reservoir for human infection, as the West African simian strain has been shown to cause sustainable yaws infection when inoculated into humans. The present study pinpoints an area where further research is needed to support the currently on-going second WHO led yaws eradication campaign with

  5. Characterizing the Syphilis-Causing Treponema pallidum ssp. pallidum Proteome Using Complementary Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Houston, Simon; Lithgow, Karen V.; Meehan, Conor J.; Strouhal, Michal; Šmajs, David; Cameron, Caroline E.; Van Ostade, Xaveer; Kenyon, Chris R.; Van Raemdonck, Geert A.

    2016-01-01

    Background The spirochete bacterium Treponema pallidum ssp. pallidum is the etiological agent of syphilis, a chronic multistage disease. Little is known about the global T. pallidum proteome, therefore mass spectrometry studies are needed to bring insights into pathogenicity and protein expression profiles during infection. Methodology/Principal Findings To better understand the T. pallidum proteome profile during infection, we studied T. pallidum ssp. pallidum DAL-1 strain bacteria isolated from rabbits using complementary mass spectrometry techniques, including multidimensional peptide separation and protein identification via matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF/TOF) and electrospray ionization (ESI-LTQ-Orbitrap) tandem mass spectrometry. A total of 6033 peptides were detected, corresponding to 557 unique T. pallidum proteins at a high level of confidence, representing 54% of the predicted proteome. A previous gel-based T. pallidum MS proteome study detected 58 of these proteins. One hundred fourteen of the detected proteins were previously annotated as hypothetical or uncharacterized proteins; this is the first account of 106 of these proteins at the protein level. Detected proteins were characterized according to their predicted biological function and localization; half were allocated into a wide range of functional categories. Proteins annotated as potential membrane proteins and proteins with unclear functional annotations were subjected to an additional bioinformatics pipeline analysis to facilitate further characterization. A total of 116 potential membrane proteins were identified, of which 16 have evidence supporting outer membrane localization. We found 8/12 proteins related to the paralogous tpr gene family: TprB, TprC/D, TprE, TprG, TprH, TprI and TprJ. Protein abundance was semi-quantified using label-free spectral counting methods. A low correlation (r = 0.26) was found between previous microarray signal data and

  6. Antigenic diversity of lipooligosaccharides of nontypable Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed Central

    Campagnari, A A; Gupta, M R; Dudas, K C; Murphy, T F; Apicella, M A

    1987-01-01

    The lipooligosaccharides (LOS) of nontypable Haemophilus influenzae are an antigenically heterogeneous group of macromolecules. Immunodiffusion and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay inhibition studies with phenol-water-extracted LOS and absorbed antisera specific for the oligosaccharide portion of the LOS identified six LOS strain-specific antigens. To facilitate screening large numbers of strains to search for LOS antigenic heterogeneity, a system utilizing proteinase K whole cell digests in Western blots was developed. Seventy-two nontypable H. influenzae LOS extracts were analyzed in this Western blot assay. Thirty-seven of these extracts could be segregated into 10 antigenically distinct LOS groups based on immunologic recognition by one or more of the rabbit antisera. Thirty-five of the strains did not contain these LOS antigens. These results demonstrate that antigenic differences exist among the LOS of nontypable H. influenzae strains, and this heterogeneity has the potential to be used to establish an LOS-based serogrouping system. Images PMID:3549563

  7. Clonality of multidrug-resistant nontypeable strains of Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed Central

    Fusté, M C; Pineda, M A; Palomar, J; Viñas, M; Lorén, J G

    1996-01-01

    The genetic structure of a population of multidrug-resistant nontypeable (unencapsulated) Haemophilus influenzae strains isolated at a hospital in Barcelona, Spain, was investigated by using multilocus enzyme electrophoresis to determine the allelic variation in 15 structural loci. In our study we have also included some antimicrobial agent-susceptible strains isolated at the same hospital. All enzymes were polymorphic for two to eight electromorphs, and the analysis revealed 43 distinct electrophoretic types among the 44 isolates. The mean genetic diversity of the entire population was 0.55. Multilocus linkage disequilibrium analysis of the isolates revealed a strong association between alleles, suggesting little possibility of recombination. Furthermore, the dendrogram and the allele mismatch distribution are typical of a population with no extensive genetic mixing. PMID:8897179

  8. Virulence of the nine serovar reference strains of Haemophilus paragallinarum.

    PubMed

    Soriano, V E; Longinos, G M; Fernández, R P; Velásquez, Q E; Ciprián, C A; Salazar-García, F; Blackall, P J

    2004-12-01

    The virulence of the reference strains of the nine currently recognized Kume serovars of Haemophilus paragallinarum was investigated. The capacity of the H. paragallinarum strains to cause the typical clinical signs of upper respiratory tract disease associated with infectious coryza in unvaccinated, nasal-challenged chickens was assessed. Differences in virulence were assessed by means of a standardized scoring system for clinical signs. All nine strains were pathogenic to chickens, producing typical clinical signs of infectious coryza. The highest clinical signs score was obtained for serovar C-1 (1.72), while the lowest clinical signs score was obtained for serovar C-4 (0.32). Our results indicate that virulence differences exist among the serovars of H. paragallinarum. PMID:15666870

  9. Haemophilus haemolyticus Interaction with Host Cells Is Different to Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae and Prevents NTHi Association with Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pickering, Janessa L.; Prosser, Amy; Corscadden, Karli J.; de Gier, Camilla; Richmond, Peter C.; Zhang, Guicheng; Thornton, Ruth B.; Kirkham, Lea-Ann S.

    2016-01-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) is an opportunistic pathogen that resides in the upper respiratory tract and contributes to a significant burden of respiratory related diseases in children and adults. Haemophilus haemolyticus is a respiratory tract commensal that can be misidentified as NTHi due to high levels of genetic relatedness. There are reports of invasive disease from H. haemolyticus, which further blurs the species boundary with NTHi. To investigate differences in pathogenicity between these species, we optimized an in vitro epithelial cell model to compare the interaction of 10 H. haemolyticus strains with 4 NTHi and 4 H. influenzae-like haemophili. There was inter- and intra-species variability but overall, H. haemolyticus had reduced capacity to attach to and invade nasopharyngeal and bronchoalveolar epithelial cell lines (D562 and A549) within 3 h when compared with NTHi. H. haemolyticus was cytotoxic to both cell lines at 24 h, whereas NTHi was not. Nasopharyngeal epithelium challenged with some H. haemolyticus strains released high levels of inflammatory mediators IL-6 and IL-8, whereas NTHi did not elicit an inflammatory response despite higher levels of cell association and invasion. Furthermore, peripheral blood mononuclear cells stimulated with H. haemolyticus or NTHi released similar and high levels of IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-1β, and TNFα when compared with unstimulated cells but only NTHi elicited an IFNγ response. Due to the relatedness of H. haemolyticus and NTHi, we hypothesized that H. haemolyticus may compete with NTHi for colonization of the respiratory tract. We observed that in vitro pre-treatment of epithelial cells with H. haemolyticus significantly reduced NTHi attachment, suggesting interference or competition between the two species is possible and warrants further investigation. In conclusion, H. haemolyticus interacts differently with host cells compared to NTHi, with different immunostimulatory and cytotoxic

  10. Action of restriction endonucleases on transforming DNA of Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed Central

    Beattie, K L; Wakil, A E; Driggers, P H

    1982-01-01

    Cleavage of DNA from Haemophilus influenzae with restriction endonucleases caused inactivation of transforming ability to an extent that depended on the genetic marker and the enzyme. The rate of inactivation, but not the final level of survival, depended on the concentration of enzyme in the restriction digest. In general, the greatest extent of inactivation of transforming activity was obtained with endonucleases that are known to produce the shortest fragments. We electrophoresed restriction digests of H. influenzae DNA in agarose gels and assayed transforming activity of DNA extracted from gel slices. In this way, we determined the lengths of restriction fragments that contain genetic markers of H. influenzae. For the marker that we studied most thoroughly (nov), the shortest restriction fragment that possessed detectable transforming activity was a 0.9-kilobase pair fragment produced by endonuclease R . PstI. The shortest marker-bearing restriction fragment that retained substantial transforming activity (50% of value for undigested DNA) was a 2.1-kilobase pair EcoRI fragment bearing the kan marker. Among marker-bearing restriction fragments 1 to 4 kilobase pairs in length, survival of transforming activity varied 10,000-fold. We relate these observations to the recent findings by Sisco and Smith (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 76:972-976, 1979) that efficient entry of DNA into competent H. influenzae cells appears to require the presence of a recognition sequence that is scattered throughout the Haemophilus genome in many more copies than in unrelated genomes. Images PMID:6288662

  11. Comparative Profile of Heme Acquisition Genes in Disease-Causing and Colonizing Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae and Haemophilus haemolyticus

    PubMed Central

    Hariadi, Nurul I.; Zhang, Lixin; Patel, Mayuri; Sandstedt, Sara A.; Davis, Gregg S.; Marrs, Carl F.

    2015-01-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHI) are Gram-negative bacteria that colonize the human pharynx and can cause respiratory tract infections, such as acute otitis media (AOM). Since NTHI require iron from their hosts for aerobic growth, the heme acquisition genes may play a significant role in avoiding host nutritional immunity and determining virulence. Therefore, we employed a hybridization-based technique to compare the prevalence of five heme acquisition genes (hxuA, hxuB, hxuC, hemR, and hup) between 514 middle ear strains from children with AOM and 235 throat strains from healthy children. We also investigated their prevalences in 148 Haemophilus haemolyticus strains, a closely related species that colonizes the human pharynx and is considered to be nonpathogenic. Four out of five genes (hxuA, hxuB, hxuC, and hemR) were significantly more prevalent in the middle ear strains (96%, 100%, 100%, and 97%, respectively) than in throat strains (80%, 92%, 93%, and 85%, respectively) of NTHI, suggesting that strains possessing these genes have a virulence advantage over those lacking them. All five genes were dramatically more prevalent in NTHI strains than in H. haemolyticus, with 91% versus 9% hxuA, 98% versus 11% hxuB, 98% versus 11% hxuC, 93% versus 20% hemR, and 97% versus 34% hup, supporting their potential role in virulence and highlighting their possibility to serve as biomarkers to distinguish H. influenzae from H. haemolyticus. In summary, this study demonstrates that heme acquisition genes are more prevalent in disease-causing NTHI strains isolated from the middle ear than in colonizing NTHI strains and H. haemolyticus isolated from the pharynx. PMID:25903577

  12. Conservation of the Host-Interacting Proteins Tp0750 and Pallilysin among Treponemes and Restriction of Proteolytic Capacity to Treponema pallidum

    PubMed Central

    Houston, Simon; Taylor, John S.; Denchev, Yavor; Hof, Rebecca; Zuerner, Richard L.

    2015-01-01

    The spirochete Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum is the causative agent of syphilis, a chronic, sexually transmitted infection characterized by multiple symptomatic and asymptomatic stages. Although several other species in the genus are able to cause or contribute to disease, T. pallidum differs in that it is able to rapidly disseminate via the bloodstream to tissue sites distant from the site of initial infection. It is also the only Treponema species able to cross both the blood-brain and placental barriers. Previously, the T. pallidum proteins, Tp0750 and Tp0751 (also called pallilysin), were shown to degrade host proteins central to blood coagulation and basement membrane integrity, suggesting a role for these proteins in T. pallidum dissemination and tissue invasion. In the present study, we characterized Tp0750 and Tp0751 sequence variation in a diversity of pathogenic and nonpathogenic treponemes. We also determined the proteolytic potential of the orthologs from the less invasive species Treponema denticola and Treponema phagedenis. These analyses showed high levels of sequence similarity among Tp0750 orthologs from pathogenic species. For pallilysin, lower levels of sequence conservation were observed between this protein and orthologs from other treponemes, except for the ortholog from the highly invasive rabbit venereal syphilis-causing Treponema paraluiscuniculi. In vitro host component binding and degradation assays demonstrated that pallilysin and Tp0750 orthologs from the less invasive treponemes tested were not capable of binding or degrading host proteins. The results show that pallilysin and Tp0750 host protein binding and degradative capability is positively correlated with treponemal invasiveness. PMID:26283341

  13. Genital carriage of the genus Haemophilus in pregnancy: species distribution and antibiotic susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Cardines, Rita; Daprai, Laura; Giufrè, Maria; Torresani, Erminio; Garlaschi, Maria Laura; Cerquetti, Marina

    2015-07-01

    Recent reports have hypothesized that colonization of the maternal genital tract with non-capsulated Haemophilus influenzae could result in neonatal invasive disease. In this study, genital carriage of the genus Haemophilus was investigated in 510 pregnant women attending an Italian hospital for routine controls. Overall, vaginal carriage of the genus Haemophilus was 9.0 % (46/510). A high colonization rate with Haemophilus parainfluenzae (37/510, 7.3 %) was found; other species, such as Haemophilus pittmaniae (7/510, 1.4 %) and Haemophilus haemolyticus (2/510, 0.4 %), were detected for the first time in the genital flora by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Notably, no H. influenzae was identified, in agreement with previous investigations indicating that this species is rarely isolated from the genito-urinary tract of pregnant women. No antibiotic resistance was detected in H. pittmaniae and H. haemolyticus, but quite a high degree of ampicillin (10/37, 27 %) and ciprofloxacin (3/37, 8.1 %) resistance was observed in H. parainfluenzae. Five ampicillin-resistant isolates were β-lactamase producers, whereas five isolates exhibited a β-lactamase-negative ampicillin-resistant (BLNAR) phenotype. Sequencing of penicillin-binding protein 3 revealed that Val511Ala, Asn526Ser, Ala530Ser and Thr574Ala changes were associated with BLNAR phenotypes. Two ciprofloxacin-resistant isolates carried substitutions in both GyrA (Ser84Phe and Asp88Tyr) and ParC (Ser84Tyr and Met198Leu); the other ciprofloxacin-resistant isolate had substitutions in ParC, only (Ser138Thr and Met198Leu). In conclusion, ∼10 % of pregnant women carried a species of Haemophilus in their genital tract. The emergence of non-β-lactamase-mediated resistance in genital H. parainfluenzae is a matter of concern because of the risk of mother-to-baby transmission. PMID:25976004

  14. Syphilis and HIV co-infection. Epidemiology, treatment and molecular typing of Treponema pallidum.

    PubMed

    Salado-Rasmussen, Kirsten

    2015-12-01

    The studies included in this PhD thesis examined the interactions of syphilis, which is caused by Treponema pallidum, and HIV. Syphilis reemerged worldwide in the late 1990s and hereafter increasing rates of early syphilis were also reported in Denmark. The proportion of patients with concurrent HIV has been substantial, ranging from one third to almost two thirds of patients diagnosed with syphilis some years. Given that syphilis facilitates transmission and acquisition of HIV the two sexually transmitted diseases are of major public health concern. Further, syphilis has a negative impact on HIV infection, resulting in increasing viral loads and decreasing CD4 cell counts during syphilis infection. Likewise, HIV has an impact on the clinical course of syphilis; patients with concurrent HIV are thought to be at increased risk of neurological complications and treatment failure. Almost ten per cent of Danish men with syphilis acquired HIV infection within five years after they were diagnosed with syphilis during an 11-year study period. Interestingly, the risk of HIV declined during the later part of the period. Moreover, HIV-infected men had a substantial increased risk of re-infection with syphilis compared to HIV-uninfected men. As one third of the HIV-infected patients had viral loads >1,000 copies/ml, our conclusion supported the initiation of cART in more HIV-infected MSM to reduce HIV transmission. During a five-year study period, including the majority of HIV-infected patients from the Copenhagen area, we observed that syphilis was diagnosed in the primary, secondary, early and late latent stage. These patients were treated with either doxycycline or penicillin and the rate of treatment failure was similar in the two groups, indicating that doxycycline can be used as a treatment alternative - at least in an HIV-infected population. During a four-year study period, the T. pallidum strain type distribution was investigated among patients diagnosed by PCR

  15. Syphilis and HIV co-infection. Epidemiology, treatment and molecular typing of Treponema pallidum.

    PubMed

    Salado-Rasmussen, Kirsten

    2015-12-01

    The studies included in this PhD thesis examined the interactions of syphilis, which is caused by Treponema pallidum, and HIV. Syphilis reemerged worldwide in the late 1990s and hereafter increasing rates of early syphilis were also reported in Denmark. The proportion of patients with concurrent HIV has been substantial, ranging from one third to almost two thirds of patients diagnosed with syphilis some years. Given that syphilis facilitates transmission and acquisition of HIV the two sexually transmitted diseases are of major public health concern. Further, syphilis has a negative impact on HIV infection, resulting in increasing viral loads and decreasing CD4 cell counts during syphilis infection. Likewise, HIV has an impact on the clinical course of syphilis; patients with concurrent HIV are thought to be at increased risk of neurological complications and treatment failure. Almost ten per cent of Danish men with syphilis acquired HIV infection within five years after they were diagnosed with syphilis during an 11-year study period. Interestingly, the risk of HIV declined during the later part of the period. Moreover, HIV-infected men had a substantial increased risk of re-infection with syphilis compared to HIV-uninfected men. As one third of the HIV-infected patients had viral loads >1,000 copies/ml, our conclusion supported the initiation of cART in more HIV-infected MSM to reduce HIV transmission. During a five-year study period, including the majority of HIV-infected patients from the Copenhagen area, we observed that syphilis was diagnosed in the primary, secondary, early and late latent stage. These patients were treated with either doxycycline or penicillin and the rate of treatment failure was similar in the two groups, indicating that doxycycline can be used as a treatment alternative - at least in an HIV-infected population. During a four-year study period, the T. pallidum strain type distribution was investigated among patients diagnosed by PCR

  16. Haemophilus parasuis exhibits IgA protease activity but lacks homologs of the IgA protease genes of Haemophilus influenzae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Haemophilus parasuis, the bacterium responsible for Glasser's disease, is a pathogen of significant concern in modern high-health swine production systems but there is little information regarding the identity or function of its virulence factors. Several important human mucosal pathogens, including...

  17. Native surface association of a recombinant 38-kilodalton Treponema pallidum antigen isolated from the Escherichia coli outer membrane.

    PubMed Central

    Fehniger, T E; Radolf, J D; Walfield, A M; Cunningham, T M; Miller, J N; Lovett, M A

    1986-01-01

    A recombinant plasmid designated pAW305, containing a 6-kilobase insert of Treponema pallidum DNA, directed the expression of a 38-kilodalton (kDa) treponemal antigen in Escherichia coli. The 38-kDa antigen copurified with the outer membrane fraction of the E. coli cell envelope after treatment with nonionic detergents or sucrose density gradient centrifugation. Rabbits immunized with the recombinant 38-kDa antigen developed antibodies which reacted specifically with a 38-kDa T. pallidum antigen on immunoblots, and 38-kDa antisera specifically immobilized T. pallidum in a complement-dependent manner in the T. pallidum immobilization test. Antisera to the 38-kDa recombinant antigen were also used to demonstrate its native surface association on T. pallidum by immunoelectron microscopy. Images PMID:3516880

  18. Draft Whole-Genome Sequence of a Haemophilus quentini Strain Isolated from an Infant in the United Kingdom

    PubMed Central

    Baxter, Laura; Thompson, Sarah; Collery, Mark M.; Hand, Daniel C.; Fink, Colin G.

    2016-01-01

    Haemophilus quentini is a rare and distinct genospecies of Haemophilus that has been suggested as a cause of neonatal bacteremia and urinary tract infections in men. We present the draft whole-genome sequence of H. quentini MP1 isolated from an infant in the United Kingdom, aiding future identification and detection of this pathogen.

  19. Identification and Comparative Analysis of Genes Encoding Outer Membrane Proteins P2 and P5 in Haemophilus parsuis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Haemophilus parasuis is a serious swine pathogen but little is known about how it causes disease. A related human pathogen, Haemophilus influenzae, has been better studied and many of its virulence factors have been identified. Two of these, outer membrane proteins P2 and P5, have been shown to ha...

  20. Absence of an important vaccine and diagnostic target in carriage- and disease-related nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed

    Smith-Vaughan, Heidi C; Chang, Anne B; Sarovich, Derek S; Marsh, Robyn L; Grimwood, Keith; Leach, Amanda J; Morris, Peter S; Price, Erin P

    2014-02-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi)-associated disease is a major health problem globally. Whole-genome sequence analysis identified the absence of hpd genes encoding Haemophilus protein D in 3 of 16 phylogenetically distinct NTHi isolates. This novel finding is of potential clinical significance, as protein D and hpd represent important NTHi vaccine antigen and diagnostic targets, respectively.

  1. Morphology and ultrastructure of oral strains of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans and Haemophilus aphrophilus.

    PubMed Central

    Holt, S C; Tanner, A C; Socransky, S S

    1980-01-01

    Selected human oral and nonoral strains of the genera Actinobacillus and Haemophilus were examined by transmission and scanning electron microscopy. The strains examined were morphologically identical to recognized Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, Haemophilus aphrophilus, and Haemophilus paraphrophilus. By transmission electron microscopy, the cells were typically gram negative in morphology, with several strains possessing some extracellular ruthenium red-staining polymeric material. Numerous vesicular structures, morphologically identical to lipopolysaccharide vesicles, were seen to originate from and be continuous with the surface of the outer membrane. Large numbers of these vesicles were also found in the external environment. Scanning electron microscopic observations revealed that both actinobacilli and haemophili possessed surface projections and an amorphous surface material which connected and covered adjacent cells. Images Fig. 6 Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 7 PMID:7439996

  2. Vaccines for Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae: the Future Is Now.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Timothy F

    2015-05-01

    Infections due to nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae result in enormous global morbidity in two clinical settings: otitis media in children and respiratory tract infections in adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Recurrent otitis media affects up to 20% of children and results in hearing loss, delays in speech and language development and, in developing countries, chronic suppurative otitis media. Infections in people with COPD result in clinic and emergency room visits, hospital admissions, and respiratory failure. An effective vaccine would prevent morbidity, help control health care costs, and reduce antibiotic use, a major contributor to the global crisis in bacterial antibiotic resistance. The widespread use of the pneumococcal conjugate vaccines is causing a relative increase in H. influenzae otitis media. The partial protection against H. influenzae otitis media induced by the pneumococcal H. influenzae protein D conjugate vaccine represents a proof of principle of the feasibility of a vaccine for nontypeable H. influenzae. An ideal vaccine antigen should be conserved among strains, have abundant epitopes on the bacterial surface, be immunogenic, and induce protective immune responses. Several surface proteins of H. influenzae have been identified as potential vaccine candidates and are in various stages of development. With continued research, progress toward a broadly effective vaccine to prevent infections caused by nontypeable H. influenzae is expected over the next several years. PMID:25787137

  3. Systems properties of the Haemophilus influenzae Rd metabolic genotype.

    PubMed

    Edwards, J S; Palsson, B O

    1999-06-18

    Haemophilus influenzae Rd was the first free-living organism for which the complete genomic sequence was established. The annotated sequence and known biochemical information was used to define the H. influenzae Rd metabolic genotype. This genotype contains 488 metabolic reactions operating on 343 metabolites. The stoichiometric matrix was used to determine the systems characteristics of the metabolic genotype and to assess the metabolic capabilities of H. influenzae. The need to balance cofactor and biosynthetic precursor production during growth on mixed substrates led to the definition of six different optimal metabolic phenotypes arising from the same metabolic genotype, each with different constraining features. The effects of variations in the metabolic genotype were also studied, and it was shown that the H. influenzae Rd metabolic genotype contains redundant functions under defined conditions. We thus show that the synthesis of in silico metabolic genotypes from annotated genome sequences is possible and that systems analysis methods are available that can be used to analyze and interpret phenotypic behavior of such genotypes. PMID:10364169

  4. Immune enhancement of pulmonary clearance of nontypable Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, E J; Hart, D A; McGehee, J L; Toews, G B

    1988-01-01

    BALB/c mice systemically immunized by intraperitoneal injection with whole, viable cells of two different strains of nontypable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHI) exhibited a markedly enhanced ability to clear the homologous strain of NTHI from the lower respiratory tract. Immunization did not influence the number of phagocytic cells recovered by bronchoalveolar lavage from mice before or after intrapulmonary challenge with NTHI. Immunization also induced the synthesis of relatively large quantities of NTHI-directed antibodies which were detectable in both the bloodstream and the alveolar spaces of the lung. Radioimmunoprecipitation and Western blot (immunoblot) analyses indicated that these antibodies were directed against both the proteins and lipooligosaccharide (LOS) in the NTHI outer membrane. Bactericidal and opsonophagocytic assays determined that the NTHI-directed antibodies in the serum were functional and able to kill or opsonize the homologous NTHI strain. Mice immunized with an NTHI major outer membrane protein-LOS complex also had an increased ability to effect pulmonary clearance of NTHI. Serum and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid collected from these animals immunized with the outer membrane protein-LOS complex contained relatively high levels of antibodies to both of these antigens. The serum from these animals also possessed bactericidal and opsonic activity against the homologous NTHI strain. These results indicate that systemic immunization can enhance the ability of experimental animals to clear NTHI from the lower respiratory tract and suggest that immunoprophylaxis of NTHI pulmonary disease may be feasible. Images PMID:3257203

  5. Autophagy Is Associated with Pathogenesis of Haemophilus parasuis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yaning; Li, Yufeng; Yuan, Wentao; Xia, Yuting; Shen, Yijuan

    2016-01-01

    Haemophilus parasuis (H. parasuis) is a common commensal Gram-negative extracellular bacterium in the upper respiratory tract of swine, which can cause Glässer's disease in stress conditions. Research on the pathogenicity of H. parasuis has mainly focused on immune evasion and bacterial virulence factors, while few studies have examined the interactions of H. parasuis and its host. Autophagy is associated with the replication and proliferation of many pathogenic bacteria, but whether it plays a role during infection by H. parasuis is unknown. In this study, an adenovirus construct expressing GFP, RFP, and LC3 was used to infect H. parasuis. Western blotting, laser confocal microscopy, and electron microscopy showed that Hps5 infection induced obvious autophagy in PK-15 cells. In cells infected with strains of H. parasuis differing in invasiveness, the levels of autophagy were positively correlated with the presence of alive bacteria in PK-15 cells. In addition, autophagy inhibited the invasion of Hps5 in PK-15 cells. Autophagy related genes Beclin, Atg5 and Atg7 were silenced with RNA interference, the results showed that autophagy induced by H. parasuis infection is a classical pathway. Our observations demonstrate that H. parasuis can induce autophagy and that the levels of autophagy are associated with the presence of alive bacteria in cells, which opened novel avenues to further our understanding of H. parasuis-host interplay and pathogenesis. PMID:27703447

  6. Crystallization of recombinant Haemophilus influenzaee (P4) acid phosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    Ou, Zhonghui; Felts, Richard L.; Reilly, Thomas J.; Nix, Jay C.; Tanner, John J.

    2006-05-01

    Lipoprotein e (P4) is a class C acid phosphatase and a potential vaccine candidate for nontypeable H. influenzae infections. This paper reports the crystallization of recombinant e (P4) and the acquisition of a 1.7 Å resolution native X-ray diffraction data set. Haemophilus influenzae infects the upper respiratory tract of humans and can cause infections of the middle ear, sinuses and bronchi. The virulence of the pathogen is thought to involve a group of surface-localized macromolecular components that mediate interactions at the host–pathogen interface. One of these components is lipoprotein e (P4), which is a class C acid phosphatase and a potential vaccine candidate for nontypeable H. influenzae infections. This paper reports the crystallization of recombinant e (P4) and the acquisition of a 1.7 Å resolution native X-ray diffraction data set. The space group is P4{sub 2}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = 65.6, c = 101.4 Å, one protein molecule per asymmetric unit and 37% solvent content. This is the first report of the crystallization of a class C acid phosphatase.

  7. Vaccines for Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae: the Future Is Now

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Infections due to nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae result in enormous global morbidity in two clinical settings: otitis media in children and respiratory tract infections in adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Recurrent otitis media affects up to 20% of children and results in hearing loss, delays in speech and language development and, in developing countries, chronic suppurative otitis media. Infections in people with COPD result in clinic and emergency room visits, hospital admissions, and respiratory failure. An effective vaccine would prevent morbidity, help control health care costs, and reduce antibiotic use, a major contributor to the global crisis in bacterial antibiotic resistance. The widespread use of the pneumococcal conjugate vaccines is causing a relative increase in H. influenzae otitis media. The partial protection against H. influenzae otitis media induced by the pneumococcal H. influenzae protein D conjugate vaccine represents a proof of principle of the feasibility of a vaccine for nontypeable H. influenzae. An ideal vaccine antigen should be conserved among strains, have abundant epitopes on the bacterial surface, be immunogenic, and induce protective immune responses. Several surface proteins of H. influenzae have been identified as potential vaccine candidates and are in various stages of development. With continued research, progress toward a broadly effective vaccine to prevent infections caused by nontypeable H. influenzae is expected over the next several years. PMID:25787137

  8. Biofilm-specific extracellular matrix proteins of nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed

    Wu, Siva; Baum, Marc M; Kerwin, James; Guerrero, Debbie; Webster, Simon; Schaudinn, Christoph; VanderVelde, David; Webster, Paul

    2014-12-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi), a human respiratory tract pathogen, can form colony biofilms in vitro. Bacterial cells and the amorphous extracellular matrix (ECM) constituting the biofilm can be separated using sonication. The ECM from 24- and 96-h NTHi biofilms contained polysaccharides and proteinaceous components as detected by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) spectroscopy. More conventional chemical assays on the biofilm ECM confirmed the presence of these components and also DNA. Proteomics revealed eighteen proteins present in biofilm ECM that were not detected in planktonic bacteria. One ECM protein was unique to 24-h biofilms, two were found only in 96-h biofilms, and fifteen were present in the ECM of both 24- and 96-h NTHi biofilms. All proteins identified were either associated with bacterial membranes or cytoplasmic proteins. Immunocytochemistry showed two of the identified proteins, a DNA-directed RNA polymerase and the outer membrane protein OMP P2, associated with bacteria and biofilm ECM. Identification of biofilm-specific proteins present in immature biofilms is an important step in understanding the in vitro process of NTHi biofilm formation. The presence of a cytoplasmic protein and a membrane protein in the biofilm ECM of immature NTHi biofilms suggests that bacterial cell lysis may be a feature of early biofilm formation.

  9. Effect of marbofloxacin on Haemophilus parasuis nasal carriage.

    PubMed

    Vilalta, Carles; Galofré, Nuria; Aragon, Virginia; Pérez de Rozas, Ana María; Fraile, Lorenzo

    2012-09-14

    Haemophilus parasuis is a colonizer of the upper respiratory tract and the causative agent of Glässer's disease in swine. This study focused on the nasal carriage of H. parasuis after treatment with marbofloxacin. Three marbofloxacin treatments (three doses of 2mg/kg body weight [bw] every 24h, two doses of 4 mg/kg bw every 48 h and 8 mg/kg bw in one single shot) were used and all of them reduce significantly (p<0.05) the nasal carriage of H. parasuis as compared to control animals. Moreover, H. parasuis was not detected in the nasal cavities of piglets after administering the highest dose. The effect of a dose of 8 mg marbofloxacin/kg bw in one shot was further studied in a farm with clinical cases of Glässer's disease using a longitudinal study. Statistically significant reduction of nasal carriage of H. parasuis was detected during the first week after treatment in comparison with the control group. However, a clear relationship between the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the different strains, their putative virulence or the treatment group (antibiotic or control) from which they were isolated was not detected. Finally, the effect induced by the antibiotic treatment on the bacterial strains seemed to be transitory, since diverse H. parasuis strains (with high and low marbofloxacin MICs) were observed 7 days after finishing the treatment.

  10. Transcriptional profiling of Haemophilus parasuis SH0165 response to tilmicosin.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yingyu; Chen, Pin; Wang, Yang; Li, Wentao; Cheng, Shuang; Wang, Chunmei; Zhang, Anding; He, Qigai

    2012-12-01

    The Haemophilus parasuis respiratory tract pathogen poses a severe threat to the swine industry despite available antimicrobial therapies. To gain a more detailed understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying H. parasuis response to tilmicosin treatment, microarray technology was applied to analyze the variation in gene expression of isolated H. parasuis SH0165 treated in vitro with subinhibitory (0.25 μg/ml) and inhibitory (8 μg/ml) concentrations. Tilmicosin treatment induced differential expression of 405 genes, the encoded products of which are mainly involved in the heat shock response, protein synthesis, and intracellular transportation. The subinhibitory and inhibitory concentrations of tilmicosin induced distinctive gene expression profiles of shared and unique changes, respectively. These changes included 302 genes mainly involved in protein export and the phosphotransferase system to sustain cell growth, and 198 genes mainly related to RNA polymerase, recombination, and repair to inhibit cell growth. In silico analysis of functions related to the differentially expressed genes suggested that adaptation of H. parasuis SH0165 to tilmicosin involves modulation of protein synthesis and membrane transport. Collectively, the genes comprising each transcriptional profile of H. parasuis response to tilmicosin provide novel insights into the physiological functions of this economically significant bacterium and may represent targets of future molecular therapeutic strategies.

  11. Prevalence of Treponema pallidum DNA among blood donors with two different serologic tests profiles for syphilis in São Paulo, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, S C; de Almeida-Neto, C; Nishiya, A S; Di-Lorenzo-Oliveira, C; Ferreira, J E; Alencar, C S; Levi, J E; Salles, N A; Mendrone-Junior, A; Sabino, E C

    2014-05-01

    The presence of Treponema pallidum DNA was assessed by real-time PCR in samples of blood donors with reactive serologic tests for syphilis. Treponema pallidum DNA was detected in two (1·02%) of 197 samples of VDRL>8, EIA+ and FTA-ABS+ donors, and in no sample from 80 VDRL−, EIA+ and FTA-ABS+ donors. Donors VDRL−, EIA+ and FTA-ABS+ lack demonstrable T. pallidum DNA in their blood and are unlike to transmit syphilis. Donors VDRL>8, EIA+ and FTA-ABS+ carry the risk of syphilis infectivity even in concomitance to antibodies detection. Serologic screening for syphilis may still play a role to prevent its transfusion transmission. PMID:24877236

  12. Discovery of Bovine Digital Dermatitis-Associated Treponema spp. in the Dairy Herd Environment by a Targeted Deep-Sequencing Approach

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Martin W.; Ingerslev, Hans-Christian; Boye, Mette; Jensen, Tim K.

    2014-01-01

    The bacteria associated with the infectious claw disease bovine digital dermatitis (DD) are spirochetes of the genus Treponema; however, their environmental reservoir remains unknown. To our knowledge, the current study is the first report of the discovery and phylogenetic characterization of rRNA gene sequences from DD-associated treponemes in the dairy herd environment. Although the spread of DD appears to be facilitated by wet floors covered with slurry, no DD-associated treponemes have been isolated from this environment previously. Consequently, there is a lack of knowledge about the spread of this disease among cows within a herd as well as between herds. To address the issue of DD infection reservoirs, we searched for evidence of DD-associated treponemes in fresh feces, in slurry, and in hoof lesions by deep sequencing of the V3 and V4 hypervariable regions of the 16S rRNA gene coupled with identification at the operational-taxonomic-unit level. Using treponeme-specific primers in this high-throughput approach, we identified small amounts of DNA (on average 0.6% of the total amount of sequence reads) from DD-associated treponemes in 43 of 64 samples from slurry and cow feces collected from six geographically dispersed dairy herds. Species belonging to the Treponema denticola/Treponema pedis-like and Treponema phagedenis-like phylogenetic clusters were among the most prevalent treponemes in both the dairy herd environment and the DD lesions. By the high-throughput approach presented here, we have demonstrated that cow feces and environmental slurry are possible reservoirs of DD-associated treponemes. This method should enable further clarification of the etiopathogenesis of DD. PMID:24814794

  13. Performance of the 47-kilodalton membrane protein versus DNA polymerase I genes for detection of Treponema pallidum by PCR in ulcers.

    PubMed

    Gayet-Ageron, Angèle; Laurent, Frédéric; Schrenzel, Jacques; Charton, Béatrice; Jimenez-Getaz, Gisela; Tangomo, Manuela; Ferry, Tristan; Sednaoui, Patrice; Lautenschlager, Stephan; Toutous-Trellu, Laurence; Martinez de Tejada, Begoña; Cavassini, Matthias; Emonet, Stéphane; Perneger, Thomas; Salord, Hélène

    2015-03-01

    Treponema pallidum PCR (Tp-PCR) is a direct diagnostic method for primary and secondary syphilis, but there is no recommendation regarding the best choice of target gene. In this study, we sequentially tested 272 specimens from patients with sexually transmitted ulcers using Tp-PCR targeting the tpp47 and then polA genes. The two methods showed similar accuracies and an almost-perfect agreement. PMID:25520453

  14. Performance of the 47-Kilodalton Membrane Protein versus DNA Polymerase I Genes for Detection of Treponema pallidum by PCR in Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Laurent, Frédéric; Schrenzel, Jacques; Charton, Béatrice; Jimenez-Getaz, Gisela; Tangomo, Manuela; Ferry, Tristan; Sednaoui, Patrice; Lautenschlager, Stephan; Toutous-Trellu, Laurence; Martinez de Tejada, Begoña; Cavassini, Matthias; Emonet, Stéphane; Perneger, Thomas; Salord, Hélène

    2014-01-01

    Treponema pallidum PCR (Tp-PCR) is a direct diagnostic method for primary and secondary syphilis, but there is no recommendation regarding the best choice of target gene. In this study, we sequentially tested 272 specimens from patients with sexually transmitted ulcers using Tp-PCR targeting the tpp47 and then polA genes. The two methods showed similar accuracies and an almost-perfect agreement. PMID:25520453

  15. Upregulation of Intercellular Adhesion Molecule 1 and Proinflammatory Cytokines by the Major Surface Proteins of Treponema maltophilum and Treponema lecithinolyticum, the Phylogenetic Group IV Oral Spirochetes Associated with Periodontitis and Endodontic Infections

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sung-Hoon; Kim, Kack-Kyun; Choi, Bong-Kyu

    2005-01-01

    Treponema maltophilum and Treponema lecithinolyticum belong to the group IV oral spirochetes and are associated with endodontic infections, as well as periodontitis. Recently, the genes encoding the major surface proteins (Msps) of these bacteria (MspA and MspTL, respectively) were cloned and sequenced. The amino acid sequences of these proteins showed significant similarity. In this study we analyzed the functional role of these homologous proteins in human monocytic THP-1 cells and primary cultured periodontal ligament (PDL) cells using recombinant proteins. The complete genes encoding MspA and MspTL without the signal sequence were cloned into Escherichia coli by using the expression vector pQE-30. Fusion proteins tagged with N-terminal hexahistidine (recombinant MspA [rMspA] and rMspTL) were obtained, and any possible contamination of the recombinant proteins with E. coli endotoxin was removed by using polymyxin B-agarose. Flow cytometry showed that rMspA and rMspTL upregulated the expression of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) in both THP-1 and PDL cells. Expression of proinflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin-6 (IL-6) and IL-8, was also induced significantly in both cell types by the Msps, as determined by reverse transcription-PCR and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, whereas IL-1β synthesis could be detected only in the THP-1 cells. The upregulation of ICAM-1, IL-6, and IL-8 was completely inhibited by pretreating the cells with an NF-κB activation inhibitor, l-1-tosylamido-2-phenylethyl chloromethyl ketone. This suggests involvement of NF-κB activation. The increased ICAM-1 and IL-8 expression in the THP-1 cells obtained with rMsps was not inhibited in the presence of the IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra), a natural inhibitor of IL-1. Our results show that the Msps of the group IV oral spirochetes may play an important role in amplifying the local immune response by continuous inflammatory cell recruitment and retention at an

  16. Molecular epidemiology of Haemophilus influenzae type b in the Gambia.

    PubMed Central

    Bijlmer, H A; van Alphen, L; Geelen-van den Broek, L; Greenwood, B M; Valkenburg, H A; Dankert, J

    1992-01-01

    One hundred two invasive and 64 noninvasive isolates of Haemophilus influenzae were collected in the course of a 2-year prospective field study on the epidemiology of H. influenzae meningitis in The Gambia. The isolates were serotyped, biotyped, and subtyped by outer membrane protein (OMP) profile analysis (OMP subtyping). H. influenzae meningitis was found to be caused by serotype b (95%). In invasive disease, serotype a, although present in the throat of healthy children, caused only occasionally (5.9%) disease. The distribution of biotypes of H. influenzae appeared to be very similar to that found outside The Gambia. A distinct pattern of OMP subtypes, different from other parts of the world, is prevalent in H. influenzae type b (Hib) in The Gambia. OMP subtypes 2, 4, 5, 8, and 9 were observed to be predominant. These subtypes, except subtype 2, have not been described. L subtypes (subtypes 2, 4, and 8) were associated with invasive disease, whereas non-L subtypes (subtypes 5 and 9) were found more often in healthy carriers (P less than 0.001). A significant difference in geographical distribution was found in subtypes of noninvasive Hib strains (P less than 0.05). We conclude that in The Gambia H. influenzae invasive disease is caused mainly by type b strains with a limited number of OMP subtypes, which are different from the subtypes found elsewhere in the world. These data are important for the surveillance of Hib disease in developing countries and are baseline data for a Hib polyribosyl-ribitolphosphate-conjugated vaccine trial in The Gambia. Alternative Hib OMP vaccines should include a set of representative OMPs. Images PMID:1537907

  17. Differential Complement Resistance Mediates Virulence of Haemophilus influenzae Type b

    PubMed Central

    Sutton, Ann; Schneerson, Rachel; Kendall-Morris, Saundra; Robbins, John B.

    1982-01-01

    Studies were undertaken to gain insight into the virulence of type b in contrast to the other Haemophilus influenzae capsular types. A relationship was found between the comparative virulence of H. influenzae types in humans and their resistance to the bactericidal effect of antibody-free complement. Type b was most resistant to the bactericidal effect of complement. The other types could be divided into three groups based upon their susceptibility to complement; this grouping was also related to their structural similarities. No association between virulence and either the biotype, source of isolate, in vitro association with peripheral polymorphonuclear leukocytes, or the total amount of capsular polysaccharide was found. However, among the type b strains, higher levels of cell-associated polysaccharide were associated with increased resistance to complement. The relative virulence of the six H. influenzae types in the infant rat model was generally similar to that in humans. After intraperitoneal challenge, type b and type a strains had the lowest 50% effective doses for bacteremia, removed by several logs from the values of the other types. By intranasal challenge, type b strains produced higher rates and levels of bacteremia than did type a strains. High levels of natural bactericidal antibodies to types c and e were found in adult female rats; this finding alone could not account for the differences in virulence among the H. influenzae types in the infant rat model. We propose that the virulence of type b strains is due to their greater resistance to the bactericidal activity of serum complement alone. Resistance to type b disease requires serum antibody to induce the complement-mediated reaction. PMID:6976328

  18. Serum Resistance in an Invasive, Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae Strain

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Bryan J.; Morlin, Gregory; Valentine, Nathan; Smith, Arnold L.

    2001-01-01

    A common feature of many different organisms causing bacteremia is the ability to avoid the bactericidal effects of normal human serum. In Haemophilus influenzae encapsulated strains are particularly serum resistant; however, we found that a nonencapsulated strain (R2866) isolated from the blood of an immunocompetent child with meningitis who had been successfully immunized with H. influenzae type b conjugate vaccine was serum resistant. Since serum resistance usually involves circumventing the action of the complement system, we defined the deposition of various complement components on the surfaces of this H. influenzae strain (R2866), a nonencapsulated avirulent laboratory strain (Rd), and a virulent type b encapsulated strain (Eagan). Membrane attack complex (MAC) accumulation correlated with the loss of bacterial viability; correspondingly, the rates of MAC deposition on the serum-sensitive strain Rd and the serum-resistant strains differed. Analysis of cell-associated immunoglobulin G (IgG), C1q, C3b, and C5b indicated that serum-resistant H. influenzae prevents MAC accumulation by delaying the synthesis of C3b through the classical pathway. Among the initiators of the classical pathway, IgG deposition contributes most of the C3 convertase activity necessary to start the cascade ending with MAC deposition. Despite similar IgG binding, strain R2866 delays C3 convertase activity compared to strain Rd. We conclude that strain R2866 can persist in the bloodstream, in part by inhibiting or delaying C3 deposition on the cell surface, escaping complement mediated killing. PMID:11159957

  19. Metabolic versatility in Haemophilus influenzae: a metabolomic and genomic analysis

    PubMed Central

    Othman, Dk Seti Maimonah Pg; Schirra, Horst; McEwan, Alastair G.; Kappler, Ulrike

    2014-01-01

    Haemophilus influenzae is a host adapted human pathogen known to contribute to a variety of acute and chronic diseases of the upper and lower respiratory tract as well as the middle ear. At the sites of infection as well as during growth as a commensal the environmental conditions encountered by H. influenzae will vary significantly, especially in terms of oxygen availability, however, the mechanisms by which the bacteria can adapt their metabolism to cope with such changes have not been studied in detail. Using targeted metabolomics the spectrum of metabolites produced during growth of H. influenzae on glucose in RPMI-based medium was found to change from acetate as the main product during aerobic growth to formate as the major product during anaerobic growth. This change in end-product is likely caused by a switch in the major route of pyruvate degradation. Neither lactate nor succinate or fumarate were major products of H. influenzae growth under any condition studied. Gene expression studies and enzyme activity data revealed that despite an identical genetic makeup and very similar metabolite production profiles, H. influenzae strain Rd appeared to favor glucose degradation via the pentose phosphate pathway, while strain 2019, a clinical isolate, showed higher expression of enzymes involved in glycolysis. Components of the respiratory chain were most highly expressed during microaerophilic and anaerobic growth in both strains, but again clear differences existed in the expression of genes associated e.g., with NADH oxidation, nitrate and nitrite reduction in the two strains studied. Together our results indicate that H. influenzae uses a specialized type of metabolism that could be termed “respiration assisted fermentation” where the respiratory chain likely serves to alleviate redox imbalances caused by incomplete glucose oxidation, and at the same time provides a means of converting a variety of compounds including nitrite and nitrate that arise as part

  20. Cloning and expression of genes encoding Haemophilus somnus antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Corbeil, L B; Chikami, G; Yarnall, M; Smith, J; Guiney, D G

    1988-01-01

    A genomic library of Haemophilus somnus 2336, a virulent isolate from a calf with pneumonia (later used to reproduce H. somnus experimental pneumonia), was constructed in the cosmid vector pHC79. The gene bank in Escherichia coli DH1 was screened by filter immunoassay with convalescent-phase serum, which reacted with several outer membrane antigens of H. somnus. On Western blotting (immunoblotting) of immunoreactive colonies, five clones were found to express proteins which comigrated with H. somnus surface antigens. Three clones (DH1 pHS1, pHS3, and pHS4) expressed both a 120-kilodalton (kDa) antigen and a 76-kDa antigen, one clone (DH1 pHS2) expressed only the 76-kDa antigen, and the fifth clone (DH1 pHS5) expressed a 60-kDa antigen. The 120-kDa and 76-kDa antigens were found internally, whereas the 60-kDa protein was detected in the DH1 pHS5 culture supernatant as membrane blebs or insoluble protein. Both the H. somnus 120-kDa antigen and the recombinant 120-kDa antigen had immunoglobulin Fc-binding activity. Restriction endonuclease mapping demonstrated that the genomic DNA inserts of clones expressing the 76-kDa antigen shared a common 28.4-kilobase-pair region, and the three clones also expressing the 120-kDa antigen shared an additional 7.0-kilobase-pair region. The restriction endonuclease map of pHS5, which expressed the 60-kDa antigen, was not similar to the maps of the other four plasmids. Since these three H. somnus antigens reacted with protective convalescent-phase serum, the recombinants which express these proteins should be useful in further studies of protective immunity in bovine H. somnus disease. Images PMID:2843469

  1. Metabolic versatility in Haemophilus influenzae: a metabolomic and genomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Othman, Dk Seti Maimonah Pg; Schirra, Horst; McEwan, Alastair G; Kappler, Ulrike

    2014-01-01

    Haemophilus influenzae is a host adapted human pathogen known to contribute to a variety of acute and chronic diseases of the upper and lower respiratory tract as well as the middle ear. At the sites of infection as well as during growth as a commensal the environmental conditions encountered by H. influenzae will vary significantly, especially in terms of oxygen availability, however, the mechanisms by which the bacteria can adapt their metabolism to cope with such changes have not been studied in detail. Using targeted metabolomics the spectrum of metabolites produced during growth of H. influenzae on glucose in RPMI-based medium was found to change from acetate as the main product during aerobic growth to formate as the major product during anaerobic growth. This change in end-product is likely caused by a switch in the major route of pyruvate degradation. Neither lactate nor succinate or fumarate were major products of H. influenzae growth under any condition studied. Gene expression studies and enzyme activity data revealed that despite an identical genetic makeup and very similar metabolite production profiles, H. influenzae strain Rd appeared to favor glucose degradation via the pentose phosphate pathway, while strain 2019, a clinical isolate, showed higher expression of enzymes involved in glycolysis. Components of the respiratory chain were most highly expressed during microaerophilic and anaerobic growth in both strains, but again clear differences existed in the expression of genes associated e.g., with NADH oxidation, nitrate and nitrite reduction in the two strains studied. Together our results indicate that H. influenzae uses a specialized type of metabolism that could be termed "respiration assisted fermentation" where the respiratory chain likely serves to alleviate redox imbalances caused by incomplete glucose oxidation, and at the same time provides a means of converting a variety of compounds including nitrite and nitrate that arise as part of

  2. Vaccine-induced waning of Haemophilus influenzae empyema and meningitis, Angola.

    PubMed

    Peltola, Heikki; Pelkonen, Tuula; Bernardino, Luis; Monteiro, Lurdes; Silvestre, Silvia da Conceição; Anjos, Elizabete; Cruzeiro, Manuel Leite; Pitkäranta, Anne; Roine, Irmeli

    2014-11-01

    In Angola during 2003-2012, we detected Haemophilus influenzae in 18% of 2,634 and 26% of 2,996 bacteriologically positive pleural or cerebrospinal fluid samples, respectively, from children. After vaccination launch in 2006, H. influenzae empyema declined by 83% and meningitis by 86%. Severe H. influenzae pneumonia and meningitis are preventable by vaccination.

  3. In vitro capability of faropenem to select for resistant mutants of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed

    Kosowska-Shick, Klaudia; Clark, Catherine; Credito, Kim; Dewasse, Bonifacio; Beachel, Linda; Ednie, Lois; Appelbaum, Peter C

    2008-02-01

    When tested against nine strains of pneumococci and six of Haemophilus influenzae of various resistotypes, faropenem failed to select for resistant mutants after 50 days of consecutive subculture in subinhibitory concentrations. Faropenem also yielded low rates of spontaneous mutations against all organisms of both species. By comparison, resistant clones were obtained with macrolides, ketolides, and quinolones. PMID:18086853

  4. Whole-Genome Sequences of Nonencapsulated Haemophilus influenzae Strains Isolated in Italy

    PubMed Central

    Giufrè, Maria; De Chiara, Matteo; Censini, Stefano; Guidotti, Silvia; Torricelli, Giulia; De Angelis, Gabriella; Cardines, Rita; Pizza, Mariagrazia; Muzzi, Alessandro; Soriani, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Haemophilus influenzae is an important human pathogen involved in invasive disease. Here, we report the whole-genome sequences of 11 nonencapsulated H. influenzae (ncHi) strains isolated from both invasive disease and healthy carriers in Italy. This genomic information will enrich our understanding of the molecular basis of ncHi pathogenesis. PMID:25814593

  5. Predicted Configurations of Oligosaccharide Extensions in the Lipooligosaccharide of Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae Isolates

    PubMed Central

    McCrea, Kirk W.; Xie, Jingping; Daniel, Deborah; Ulrich-Lewis, Justin Theophilus

    2014-01-01

    Lipooligosaccharide configurations were predicted in nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae isolates based on the presence of seven oligosaccharide extension-initiating genes (or alleles). Predicted configurations with 2 to 3 oligosaccharide extensions were more prevalent among middle ear than throat strains. In addition, strains with these configurations averaged higher levels of serum resistance than strains with other configurations. PMID:24789190

  6. Characterization and vaccine potential of outer membrane vesicles produced by Haemophilus parasuis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Haemophilus parasuis is a Gram-negative bacterium that colonizes the upper respiratory tract of swine and is capable of causing a systemic infection, resulting in high morbidity and mortality. H. parasuis isolates display a wide range of virulence and virulence factors are largely unknown. A commerc...

  7. Whole-Genome Sequences of Nonencapsulated Haemophilus influenzae Strains Isolated in Italy.

    PubMed

    Giufrè, Maria; De Chiara, Matteo; Censini, Stefano; Guidotti, Silvia; Torricelli, Giulia; De Angelis, Gabriella; Cardines, Rita; Pizza, Mariagrazia; Muzzi, Alessandro; Cerquetti, Marina; Soriani, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Haemophilus influenzae is an important human pathogen involved in invasive disease. Here, we report the whole-genome sequences of 11 nonencapsulated H. influenzae (ncHi) strains isolated from both invasive disease and healthy carriers in Italy. This genomic information will enrich our understanding of the molecular basis of ncHi pathogenesis.

  8. Comparative virulence and genomic analysis of 10 strains of Haemophilus parasuis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Haemophilus parasuis is the cause of Glasser's disease in swine, which is characterized by systemic infection resulting in polyserositis, meningitis, and arthritis. An enormous difference exists in the severity of disease caused by H. parasuis strains, ranging from lethal systemic disease to asympto...

  9. Virulence and draft genome sequence overview of multiple strains of the swine pathogen Haemophilus parasuis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Haemophilus parasuis is the cause of Glässer’s disease in swine, which is characterized by systemic infection resulting in polyserositis, meningitis, and arthritis. Characterization of this animal disease is complicated by the enormous differences in the severity of disease caused by H. parasuis str...

  10. Comparative studies of the genome, virulence, and protection of 10 Haemophilus parasuis strains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Haemophilus parasuis is the cause of Glässer’s disease in swine, which is characterized by systemic infection resulting in polyserositis, meningitis, and arthritis. An enormous difference exists in the severity of disease caused by H. parasuis strains, ranging from lethal systemic disease to asympto...

  11. Draft genome sequences for ten isolates of the swine respiratory pathogen Haemophilus Parasuis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Haemophilus parasuis is a swine pathogen that causes pneumonia and Glässer’s disease, a systemic syndrome of polyserositis, arthritis, and meningitis. We report here the draft genomes of ten geographically diverse isolates collectively representing the full virulence spectrum of H. parasuis. These...

  12. Cellular Architecture of Treponema pallidum: Novel Flagellum, Periplasmic Cone, and Cell Envelope as Revealed by Cryo-Electron Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jun; Howell, Jerrilyn K.; Bradley, Sherille D.; Zheng, Yesha; Zhou, Z. Hong; Norris, Steven J.

    2010-01-01

    High resolution cryo-electron tomography (cryo-ET) was utilized to visualize Treponema pallidum, the causative agent of syphilis, at the molecular level. Three-dimensional (3-D) reconstructions from 304 infectious organisms revealed unprecedented cellular structures of this unusual member in the spirochetal family. High resolution cryo-ET reconstructions provided the detailed structures of the cell envelope, which is significantly different from that of gram-negative bacteria. The 4 nm lipid bilayer of both outer and cytoplasmic membranes resolved in 3-D reconstructions, providing an important marker for interpreting membrane-associated structures. Abundant lipoproteins cover the outer leaflet of the cytoplasmic membrane, in contrast to the rare outer membrane proteins visible by scanning probe microscopy. High resolution cryo-ET images also provided the first observation of T. pallidum chemoreceptor arrays, as well as structural details of the periplasmically located, cone-shaped structure at both ends of bacterium. Furthermore, 3-D subvolume averages of the periplasmic flagellar motors and filaments from living organisms revealed the novel flagellar architectures that may facilitate their rotation within the confining periplasmic space. Together, our findings provide the most detailed structural understanding of the periplasmic flagella and the surrounding cell envelope, which enable this enigmatic bacterium to efficiently penetrate tissue and escape host immune responses. PMID:20850455

  13. Recombinant Treponema pallidum Protein Tp0965 Activates Endothelial Cells and Increases the Permeability of Endothelial Cell Monolayer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rui-Li; Zhang, Jing-Ping; Wang, Qian-Qiu

    2014-01-01

    The recombinant Treponema pallidum protein Tp0965 (rTp0965), one of the many proteins derived from the genome of T. pallidum subsp. pallidum, shows strong immunogenicity and immunoreactivity. In this study, we investigated the effects of rTp0965 on the endothelial barrier. Treatment of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) with rTp0965 resulted in increased levels of ICAM-1, E-selectin, and MCP-1 mRNA and protein expression. These increases contributed to the adhesion and chemataxis of monocytes (THP-1 cells) to HUVECs preincubated with rTp0965. In addition, rTp0965 induced reorganization of F-actin and decreased expression of claudin-1 in HUVECs. Interestingly, inhibition of the RhoA/ROCK signal pathway protected against rTp0965-induced higher endothelial permeability as well as transendothelial migration of monocytes. These data indicate that Tp0965 protein may play an important role in the immunopathogenesis of syphilis. PMID:25514584

  14. Conservation of the C-type lectin fold for massive sequence variation in a Treponema diversity-generating retroelement.

    PubMed

    Le Coq, Johanne; Ghosh, Partho

    2011-08-30

    Anticipatory ligand binding through massive protein sequence variation is rare in biological systems, having been observed only in the vertebrate adaptive immune response and in a phage diversity-generating retroelement (DGR). Earlier work has demonstrated that the prototypical DGR variable protein, major tropism determinant (Mtd), meets the demands of anticipatory ligand binding by novel means through the C-type lectin (CLec) fold. However, because of the low sequence identity among DGR variable proteins, it has remained unclear whether the CLec fold is a general solution for DGRs. We have addressed this problem by determining the structure of a second DGR variable protein, TvpA, from the pathogenic oral spirochete Treponema denticola. Despite its weak sequence identity to Mtd (∼16%), TvpA was found to also have a CLec fold, with predicted variable residues exposed in a ligand-binding site. However, this site in TvpA was markedly more variable than the one in Mtd, reflecting the unprecedented approximate 10(20) potential variability of TvpA. In addition, similarity between TvpA and Mtd with formylglycine-generating enzymes was detected. These results provide strong evidence for the conservation of the formylglycine-generating enzyme-type CLec fold among DGRs as a means of accommodating massive sequence variation.

  15. Conservation of the C-type lectin fold for massive sequence variation in a Treponema diversity-generating retroelement

    SciTech Connect

    Le Coq, Johanne; Ghosh, Partho

    2012-06-19

    Anticipatory ligand binding through massive protein sequence variation is rare in biological systems, having been observed only in the vertebrate adaptive immune response and in a phage diversity-generating retroelement (DGR). Earlier work has demonstrated that the prototypical DGR variable protein, major tropism determinant (Mtd), meets the demands of anticipatory ligand binding by novel means through the C-type lectin (CLec) fold. However, because of the low sequence identity among DGR variable proteins, it has remained unclear whether the CLec fold is a general solution for DGRs. We have addressed this problem by determining the structure of a second DGR variable protein, TvpA, from the pathogenic oral spirochete Treponema denticola. Despite its weak sequence identity to Mtd ({approx}16%), TvpA was found to also have a CLec fold, with predicted variable residues exposed in a ligand-binding site. However, this site in TvpA was markedly more variable than the one in Mtd, reflecting the unprecedented approximate 10{sup 20} potential variability of TvpA. In addition, similarity between TvpA and Mtd with formylglycine-generating enzymes was detected. These results provide strong evidence for the conservation of the formylglycine-generating enzyme-type CLec fold among DGRs as a means of accommodating massive sequence variation.

  16. Conservation of the C-type lectin fold for massive sequence variation in a Treponema diversity-generating retroelement

    PubMed Central

    Le Coq, Johanne; Ghosh, Partho

    2011-01-01

    Anticipatory ligand binding through massive protein sequence variation is rare in biological systems, having been observed only in the vertebrate adaptive immune response and in a phage diversity-generating retroelement (DGR). Earlier work has demonstrated that the prototypical DGR variable protein, major tropism determinant (Mtd), meets the demands of anticipatory ligand binding by novel means through the C-type lectin (CLec) fold. However, because of the low sequence identity among DGR variable proteins, it has remained unclear whether the CLec fold is a general solution for DGRs. We have addressed this problem by determining the structure of a second DGR variable protein, TvpA, from the pathogenic oral spirochete Treponema denticola. Despite its weak sequence identity to Mtd (∼16%), TvpA was found to also have a CLec fold, with predicted variable residues exposed in a ligand-binding site. However, this site in TvpA was markedly more variable than the one in Mtd, reflecting the unprecedented approximate 1020 potential variability of TvpA. In addition, similarity between TvpA and Mtd with formylglycine-generating enzymes was detected. These results provide strong evidence for the conservation of the formylglycine-generating enzyme-type CLec fold among DGRs as a means of accommodating massive sequence variation. PMID:21873231

  17. Characterization of the Treponema denticola prtP gene encoding a prolyl-phenylalanine-specific protease (dentilisin).

    PubMed Central

    Ishihara, K; Miura, T; Kuramitsu, H K; Okuda, K

    1996-01-01

    A chymotrypsin-like protease from Treponema denticola ATCC 35405 was purified by chromatographic techniques. The purified enzyme consisted of three polypeptides (38, 43, and 72 kDa). The protease exhibited specificity for peptide bonds containing phenylalanine and proline at the P1 and P2 positions, respectively, and was classified as a serine protease on the basis of inhibition studies. Naturally occurring protease inhibitors such as alpha1-antitrypsin and alpha1-antichymotrypsin had no effect on enzymatic activity. The enzyme degraded fibronectin, alpha1-antitrypsin, and gelatin while weakly degrading the immunoglobulin G heavy chain and type IV collagen. N-terminal amino acid sequences were determined for the 43- and 72-kDa proteins. On the basis of these sequences, the genes coding for the 43- and 72-kDa proteins were isolated and sequenced. The open reading frame which codes for the 72-kDa protein was designated prtP. This gene consists of 2,169 bp and codes for a protein with an Mr of 77,471. The protein appeared to be composed of a signal peptide region followed by a prosequence and the mature protein domain. The deduced amino acid sequence exhibited similarity with that of the Bacillus subtilis serine protease subtilisin. The deduced properties of the sequence suggest that the 72-kDa protein is a chymotrypsin-like protease. However, the nature and function of the 43-kDa protein have not yet been determined. PMID:8945563

  18. TP0262 is a modulator of promoter activity of tpr Subfamily II genes of Treponema pallidum ssp. pallidum.

    PubMed

    Giacani, Lorenzo; Godornes, Charmie; Puray-Chavez, Maritza; Guerra-Giraldez, Cristina; Tompa, Martin; Lukehart, Sheila A; Centurion-Lara, Arturo

    2009-06-01

    Transcriptional regulation in Treponema pallidum ssp. pallidum is poorly understood, primarily because this organism cannot be cultivated in vitro or genetically manipulated. We have recently shown a phase variation mechanism controlling transcription initiation of Subfamily II tpr (T. pallidumrepeat) genes (tprE, tprG and tprJ), a group of virulence factor candidates. Furthermore, the same study suggested that additional mechanisms might influence the level of transcription of these tprs. The T. pallidum genome sequence has revealed a few open reading frames with similarity to known bacterial transcription factors, including four catabolite activator protein homologues. In this work, sequences matching the Escherichia coli cAMP receptor protein (CRP) binding motif were identified in silico upstream of tprE, tprG and tprJ. Using elecrophoretic mobility shift assay and DNaseI footprinting assay, recombinant TP0262, a T. pallidum CRP homologue, was shown to bind specifically to amplicons obtained from the tpr promoters containing putative CRP binding motifs. Using a heterologous reporter system, binding of TP0262 to these promoters was shown to either increase (tprE and tprJ) or decrease (tprG) tpr promoter activity. This is the first characterization of a T. pallidum transcriptional modulator that influences tpr promoter activity.

  19. Length of guanosine homopolymeric repeats modulates promoter activity of subfamily II tpr genes of Treponema pallidum ssp. pallidum.

    PubMed

    Giacani, Lorenzo; Lukehart, Sheila; Centurion-Lara, Arturo

    2007-11-01

    In Treponema pallidum, homopolymeric guanosine repeats of varying length are present upstream of both Subfamily I (tprC, D, F and I) and II (tprE, G and J) tpr genes, a group of potential virulence factors, immediately upstream of the +1 nucleotide. To investigate the influence of these poly-G sequences on promoter activity, tprE, G, J, F and I promoter regions containing homopolymeric tracts with different numbers of Gs, the ribosomal binding site and start codon were cloned in frame with the green fluorescent protein reporter gene (GFP), and promoter activity was measured both as fluorescence emission from Escherichia coli cultures transformed with the different plasmid constructs and using quantitative RT-PCR. For tprJ, G and E-derived clones, fluorescence was significantly higher with constructs containing eight Gs or fewer, while plasmids containing the same promoters with none or more Gs gave modest or no signal above the background. In contrast, tprF/I-derived clones induced similar levels of fluorescence regardless of the number of Gs within the promoter. GFP mRNA quantification showed that all of the promoters induced measurable transcription of the GFP gene; however, only for Subfamily II promoters was message synthesis inversely correlated to the number of Gs in the construct.

  20. Length of guanosine homopolymeric repeats modulates promoter activity of subfamily II tpr genes of Treponema pallidum ssp. pallidum

    PubMed Central

    Giacani, Lorenzo; Lukehart, Sheila; Centurion-Lara, Arturo

    2010-01-01

    In Treponema pallidum, homopolymeric guanosine repeats of varying length are present upstream of both Subfamily I (tprC, D, F and I) and II (tprE, G and J) tpr genes, a group of potential virulence factors, immediately upstream of the +1 nucleotide. To investigate the influence of these poly-G sequences on promoter activity, tprE, G, J, F and I promoter regions containing homopolymeric tracts with different numbers of Gs, the ribosomal binding site and start codon were cloned in frame with the green fluorescent protein reporter gene (GFP), and promoter activity was measured both as fluorescence emission from Escherichia coli cultures transformed with the different plasmid constructs and using quantitative RT-PCR. For tprJ, G and E-derived clones, fluorescence was significantly higher with constructs containing eight Gs or fewer, while plasmids containing the same promoters with none or more Gs gave modest or no signal above the background. In contrast, tprF/I-derived clones induced similar levels of fluorescence regardless of the number of Gs within the promoter. GFP mRNA quantification showed that all of the promoters induced measurable transcription of the GFP gene; however, only for Subfamily II promoters was message synthesis inversely correlated to the number of Gs in the construct. PMID:17683506

  1. TP0326, a Treponema pallidum β-barrel assembly machinery A (BamA) orthologue and rare outer membrane protein.

    PubMed

    Desrosiers, Daniel C; Anand, Arvind; Luthra, Amit; Dunham-Ems, Star M; LeDoyt, Morgan; Cummings, Michael A D; Eshghi, Azad; Cameron, Caroline E; Cruz, Adriana R; Salazar, Juan C; Caimano, Melissa J; Radolf, Justin D

    2011-06-01

    Definitive identification of Treponema pallidum rare outer membrane proteins (OMPs) has long eluded researchers. TP0326, the sole protein in T. pallidum with sequence homology to a Gram-negative OMP, belongs to the BamA family of proteins essential for OM biogenesis. Structural modelling predicted that five polypeptide transport-associated (POTRA) domains comprise the N-terminus of TP0326, while the C-terminus forms an 18-stranded amphipathic β-barrel. Circular dichroism, heat modifiability by SDS-PAGE, Triton X-114 phase partitioning and liposome incorporation supported these topological predictions and confirmed that the β-barrel is responsible for the native protein's amphiphilicity. Expression analyses revealed that native TP0326 is expressed at low abundance, while a protease-surface accessibility assay confirmed surface exposure. Size-exclusion chromatography and blue native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed a modular Bam complex in T. pallidum larger than that of Escherichia coli. Non-orthologous ancillary factors and self-association of TP0326 via its β-barrel may both contribute to the Bam complex. T. pallidum-infected rabbits mount a vigorous antibody response to both POTRA and β-barrel portions of TP0326, whereas humans with secondary syphilis respond predominantly to POTRA. The syphilis spirochaete appears to have devised a stratagem for harnessing the Bam pathway while satisfying its need to limit surface antigenicity. PMID:21488980

  2. Prevalence of antibodies against Treponema pallidum among HIV-positive patients in a tertiary care hospital in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Mata-Marín, José Antonio; Sandoval-Sánchez, Juan Joel; Huerta-García, Gloria; Arroyo-Anduiza, Carla Ileana; Alcalá-Martínez, Enrique; Mata-Marín, Luis Alberto; Sandoval-Ramirez, Jorge Luis; Gaytán-Martínez, Jesús

    2015-02-01

    Our objective was to determine the seroprevalence of syphilis among HIV-infected patients in a tertiary care hospital in Mexico City. A cross-sectional study was developed, and 318 HIV-positive patients were evaluated from January to February 2013 at Hospital de Infectología, National Medical Center 'La Raza' (a tertiary care hospital specialising in infectious diseases in Mexico City). Laboratory data were screened for the detection of antibodies against Treponema pallidum. Patients completed a questionnaire relating to socio-demographic data and factors associated with syphilis. Of the 318 patients, 83% were men. The mean age ± SD was 36 ± 11 years; 52% were men who have sex with men and 47% had undertaken higher education. The overall seroprevalence of syphilis among these patients was 25% (95% confidence interval 21%, 30%). Men who have sex with men had a significantly higher seroprevalence (30% vs. 15%, p = 0.009). We conclude that, in Mexico, there is a high seroprevalence of syphilis antibodies in HIV-infected patients and that men who have sex with men are the group most affected.

  3. Treponema pallidum Lipoprotein TP0435 Expressed in Borrelia burgdorferi Produces Multiple Surface/Periplasmic Isoforms and mediates Adherence

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Kamfai; Nasereddin, Thayer; Alter, Laura; Centurion-Lara, Arturo; Giacani, Lorenzo; Parveen, Nikhat

    2016-01-01

    The ability of Treponema pallidum, the syphilis spirochete to colonize various tissues requires the presence of surface-exposed adhesins that have been difficult to identify due to the inability to culture and genetically manipulate T. pallidum. Using a Borrelia burgdorferi-based heterologous system and gain-in-function approach, we show for the first time that a highly immunogenic lipoprotein TP0435 can be differentially processed into multiple isoforms with one variant stochastically displayed on the spirochete surface. TP0435 was previously believed to be exclusively located in T. pallidum periplasm. Furthermore, non-adherent B. burgdorferi strain expressing TP0435 acquires the ability to bind to a variety of host cells including placental cells and exhibits slow opsonophagocytosis in vitro similar to poor ex vivo phagocytosis of T. pallidum by host macrophages reported previously. This phenomenon of production of both surface and periplasmic immunogenic lipoprotein isoforms has possible implications in immune evasion of the obligate pathogen T. pallidum during infection. PMID:27161310

  4. Cellular architecture of Treponema pallidum: novel flagellum, periplasmic cone, and cell envelope as revealed by cryo electron tomography.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Howell, Jerrilyn K; Bradley, Sherille D; Zheng, Yesha; Zhou, Z Hong; Norris, Steven J

    2010-11-01

    High-resolution cryo electron tomography (cryo-ET) was utilized to visualize Treponema pallidum, the causative agent of syphilis, at the molecular level. Three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions from 304 infectious organisms revealed unprecedented cellular structures of this unusual member of the spirochetal family. High-resolution cryo-ET reconstructions provided detailed structures of the cell envelope, which is significantly different from that of Gram-negative bacteria. The 4-nm lipid bilayer of both outer membrane and cytoplasmic membrane resolved in 3D reconstructions, providing an important marker for interpreting membrane-associated structures. Abundant lipoproteins cover the outer leaflet of the cytoplasmic membrane, in contrast to the rare outer membrane proteins visible by scanning probe microscopy. High-resolution cryo-ET images also provided the first observation of T. pallidum chemoreceptor arrays, as well as structural details of the periplasmically located cone-shaped structure at both ends of the bacterium. Furthermore, 3D subvolume averages of periplasmic flagellar motors and flagellar filaments from living organisms revealed the novel flagellar architectures that may facilitate their rotation within the confining periplasmic space. Our findings provide the most detailed structural understanding of periplasmic flagella and the surrounding cell envelope, which enable this enigmatic bacterium to efficiently penetrate tissue and to escape host immune responses.

  5. Factors Affecting Isolation and Identification of Haemophilus vaginalis (Corynebacterium vaginale)

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Robert K.; Voss, Jack L.; Smith, Rodney F.

    1979-01-01

    The rate of isolation of organisms resembling Haemophilus vaginalis (Corynebacterium vaginale) from vaginal specimens was not significantly affected by anaerobic versus carbon dioxide incubation atmospheres or whether specimens were inoculated on isolation media immediately after collection or after a delay of 6 h. Forty-one clinically isolated strains were provisionally divided into 30 H. vaginalis strains and 11 H. vaginalis-like (HVL) strains based on morphological and growth characteristics. The H. vaginalis strains were less reactive in API-20A identification test strips, (Analytab Products, Inc.) using Lombard-Dowell broth, than in a modified basal medium that contained proteose peptone no. 3 (Difco). The numbers and kinds of substrates fermented by 30 clinical and 2 reference strains of H. vaginalis varied among conventional, API, Minitek (Baltimore Biological Laboratory), and rapid buffered substrate fermentation systems. A greater number and variety of carbohydrates were fermented by the 11 HVL strains more consistently in all four test systems. Analysis of volatile and nonvolatile fermentation end products by gas-liquid chromatography did not reveal significant differences between the H. vaginalis and HVL strains. However, the latter group grew in peptone-yeast extract-glucose broth, whereas the H. vaginalis strains did not grow without the addition of starch to peptone-yeast extract-glucose. All of the reference and clinical strains were similar in their susceptibilities to a variety of antimicrobial compounds except sulfonamides, which inhibited the HVL strains and bifidobacteria but not the H. vaginalis strains. Sulfonamide susceptibility or resistance corresponded in part to the H. vaginalis and HVL-bifidobacteria strain reactions on selected conventional fermentation substrates. Susceptibility or resistance to sulfonamides and metronidazole in conjunction with fermentation tests is described to aid in the separation of H. vaginalis from other

  6. Factors affecting isolation and identification of Haemophilus vaginalis (Corynebacterium vaginale).

    PubMed

    Bailey, R K; Voss, J L; Smith, R F

    1979-01-01

    The rate of isolation of organisms resembling Haemophilus vaginalis (Corynebacterium vaginale) from vaginal specimens was not significantly affected by anaerobic versus carbon dioxide incubation atmospheres or whether specimens were inoculated on isolation media immediately after collection or after a delay of 6 h. Forty-one clinically isolated strains were provisionally divided into 30 H. vaginalis strains and 11 H. vaginalis-like (HVL) strains based on morphological and growth characteristics. The H. vaginalis strains were less reactive in API-20A identification test strips, (Analytab Products, Inc.) using Lombard-Dowell broth, than in a modified basal medium that contained proteose peptone no. 3 (Difco). The numbers and kinds of substrates fermented by 30 clinical and 2 reference strains of H. vaginalis varied among conventional, API, Minitek (Baltimore Biological Laboratory), and rapid buffered substrate fermentation systems. A greater number and variety of carbohydrates were fermented by the 11 HVL strains more consistently in all four test systems. Analysis of volatile and nonvolatile fermentation end products by gas-liquid chromatography did not reveal significant differences between the H. vaginalis and HVL strains. However, the latter group grew in peptone-yeast extract-glucose broth, whereas the H. vaginalis strains did not grow without the addition of starch to peptone-yeast extract-glucose. All of the reference and clinical strains were similar in their susceptibilities to a variety of antimicrobial compounds except sulfonamides, which inhibited the HVL strains and bifidobacteria but not the H. vaginalis strains. Sulfonamide susceptibility or resistance corresponded in part to the H. vaginalis and HVL-bifidobacteria strain reactions on selected conventional fermentation substrates. Susceptibility or resistance to sulfonamides and metronidazole in conjunction with fermentation tests is described to aid in the separation of H. vaginalis from other

  7. It could only happen to a doctor—Haemophilus aphrophilus septicaemia complicated by a prevertebral infection after dental work

    PubMed Central

    Poullis, A; Gould, S; Lim, A

    2001-01-01

    A 53 year old man presented with severe neck pain and a flu-like illness; he had recently returned from Sri Lanka and had had dental treatment six days before illness onset. Blood culture showed infection by Haemophilus aphrophilus. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed and exploratory surgery undertaken. The prevertebral cervical fascia was inflamed but no abscess identified. He was treated with antibiotics and made an uneventful recovery.


Keywords: Haemophilus aphrophilus; prevertebral infection PMID:11264493

  8. Duplex Quantitative PCR Assay for Detection of Haemophilus influenzae That Distinguishes Fucose- and Protein D-Negative Strains.

    PubMed

    de Gier, Camilla; Pickering, Janessa L; Richmond, Peter C; Thornton, Ruth B; Kirkham, Lea-Ann S

    2016-09-01

    We have developed a specific Haemophilus influenzae quantitative PCR (qPCR) that also identifies fucose-negative and protein D-negative strains. Analysis of 100 H. influenzae isolates, 28 Haemophilus haemolyticus isolates, and 14 other bacterial species revealed 100% sensitivity (95% confidence interval [CI], 96% to 100%) and 100% specificity (95% CI, 92% to 100%) for this assay. The evaluation of 80 clinical specimens demonstrated a strong correlation between semiquantitative culture and the qPCR (P < 0.001).

  9. The Tp0684 (MglB-2) Lipoprotein of Treponema pallidum: A Glucose-Binding Protein with Divergent Topology.

    PubMed

    Brautigam, Chad A; Deka, Ranjit K; Liu, Wei Z; Norgard, Michael V

    2016-01-01

    Treponema pallidum, the bacterium that causes syphilis, is an obligate human parasite. As such, it must acquire energy, in the form of carbon sources, from the host. There is ample evidence that the principal source of energy for this spirochete is D-glucose acquired from its environment, likely via an ABC transporter. Further, there is genetic evidence of a D-glucose chemotaxis system in T. pallidum. Both of these processes may be dependent on a single lipidated chemoreceptor: Tp0684, also called TpMglB-2 for its sequence homology to MglB of Escherichia coli. To broaden our understanding of this potentially vital protein, we determined a 2.05-Å X-ray crystal structure of a soluble form of the recombinant protein. Like its namesake, TpMglB-2 adopts a bilobed fold that is similar to that of the ligand-binding proteins (LBPs) of other ABC transporters. However, the protein has an unusual, circularly permuted topology. This feature prompted a series of biophysical studies that examined whether the protein's topological distinctiveness affected its putative chemoreceptor functions. Differential scanning fluorimetry and isothermal titration calorimetry were used to confirm that the protein bound D-glucose in a cleft between its two lobes. Additionally, analytical ultracentrifugation was employed to reveal that D-glucose binding is accompanied by a significant conformational change. TpMglB-2 thus appears to be fully functional in vitro, and given the probable central importance of the protein to T. pallidum's physiology, our results have implications for the viability and pathogenicity of this obligate human pathogen. PMID:27536942

  10. Inactivation of Cyclic Di-GMP Binding Protein TDE0214 Affects the Motility, Biofilm Formation, and Virulence of Treponema denticola

    PubMed Central

    Bian, Jiang; Liu, Xiangyang; Cheng, Yi-Qiang

    2013-01-01

    As a ubiquitous second messenger, cyclic dimeric GMP (c-di-GMP) has been studied in numerous bacteria. The oral spirochete Treponema denticola, a periodontal pathogen associated with human periodontitis, has a complex c-di-GMP signaling network. However, its function remains unexplored. In this report, a PilZ-like c-di-GMP binding protein (TDE0214) was studied to investigate the role of c-di-GMP in the spirochete. TDE0214 harbors a PilZ domain with two signature motifs: RXXXR and DXSXXG. Biochemical studies showed that TDE0214 binds c-di-GMP in a specific manner, with a dissociation constant (Kd) value of 1.73 μM, which is in the low range compared to those of other reported c-di-GMP binding proteins. To reveal the role of c-di-GMP in T. denticola, a TDE0214 deletion mutant (TdΔ214) was constructed and analyzed in detail. First, swim plate and single-cell tracking analyses showed that TdΔ214 had abnormal swimming behaviors: the mutant was less motile and reversed more frequently than the wild type. Second, we found that biofilm formation of TdΔ214 was substantially repressed (∼6.0-fold reduction). Finally, in vivo studies using a mouse skin abscess model revealed that the invasiveness and ability to induce skin abscesses and host humoral immune responses were significantly attenuated in TdΔ214, indicative of the impact that TDE0214 has on the virulence of T. denticola. Collectively, the results reported here indicate that TDE0214 plays important roles in motility, biofilm formation, and virulence of the spirochete. This report also paves a way to further unveil the roles of the c-di-GMP signaling network in the biology and pathogenicity of T. denticola. PMID:23794624

  11. Macrolide Resistance in Treponema pallidum Correlates With 23S rDNA Mutations in Recently Isolated Clinical Strains

    PubMed Central

    Molini, Barbara J.; Tantalo, Lauren C.; Sahi, Sharon K.; Rodriguez, Veronica I.; Brandt, Stephanie L.; Fernandez, Mark C.; Godornes, Charmie B.; Marra, Christina M.; Lukehart, Sheila A.

    2016-01-01

    Background High rates of 23S rDNA mutations implicated in macrolide resistance have been identified in Treponema pallidum samples from syphilis patients in many countries. Nonetheless, some clinicians have been reluctant to abandon azithromycin as a treatment for syphilis, citing the lack of a causal association between these mutations and clinical evidence of drug resistance. Although azithromycin resistance has been demonstrated in vivo for the historical Street 14 strain, no recent T. pallidum isolates have been tested. We used the well-established rabbit model of syphilis to determine the in vivo efficacy of azithromycin against 23S rDNA mutant strains collected in 2004 to 2005 from patients with syphilis in Seattle, Wash. Methods Groups of 9 rabbits were each infected with a strain containing 23S rDNA mutation A2058G (strains UW074B, UW189B, UW391B) or A2059G (strains UW228B, UW254B, and UW330B), or with 1 wild type strain (Chicago, Bal 3, and Mexico A). After documentation of infection, 3 animals per strain were treated with azithromycin, 3 were treated with benzathine penicillin G, and 3 served as untreated control groups. Treatment efficacy was documented by darkfield microscopic evidence of T. pallidum, serological response, and rabbit infectivity test. Results Azithromycin uniformly failed to cure rabbits infected with strains harboring either 23S rDNA mutation, although benzathine penicillin G was effective. Infections caused by wild type strains were successfully treated by either azithromycin or benzathine penicillin G. Conclusions A macrolide resistant phenotype was demonstrated for all strains harboring a 23S rDNA mutation, demonstrating that either A2058G or A2059G mutation confers in vivo drug resistance. PMID:27513385

  12. Rapid Treponema pallidum clearance from blood and ulcer samples following single dose benzathine penicillin treatment of early syphilis.

    PubMed

    Tipple, Craig; Jones, Rachael; McClure, Myra; Taylor, Graham

    2015-02-01

    Currently, the efficacy of syphilis treatment is measured with anti-lipid antibody tests. These can take months to indicate cure and, as a result, syphilis treatment trials require long periods of follow-up. The causative organism, Treponema pallidum (T. pallidum), is detectable in the infectious lesions of early syphilis using DNA amplification. Bacteraemia can likewise be identified, typically in more active disease. We hypothesise that bacterial clearance from blood and ulcers will predict early the standard serology-measured treatment response and have developed a qPCR assay that could monitor this clearance directly in patients with infectious syphilis. Patients with early syphilis were given an intramuscular dose of benzathine penicillin. To investigate the appropriate sampling timeframe samples of blood and ulcer exudate were collected intensively for T. pallidum DNA (tpp047 gene) and RNA (16S rRNA) quantification. Sampling ended when two consecutive PCRs were negative. Four males were recruited. The mean peak level of T. pallidum DNA was 1626 copies/ml whole blood and the mean clearance half-life was 5.7 hours (std. dev. 0.53). The mean peak of 16S rRNA was 8879 copies/ml whole blood with a clearance half-life of 3.9 hours (std. dev. 0.84). From an ulcer, pre-treatment, 67,400 T. pallidum DNA copies and 7.08 x 107 16S rRNA copies were detected per absorbance strip and the clearance half-lives were 3.2 and 4.1 hours, respectively. Overall, T. pallidum nucleic acids were not detected in any sample collected more than 56 hours (range 20-56) after treatment. All patients achieved serologic cure. In patients with active early syphilis, measuring T. pallidum levels in blood and ulcer exudate may be a useful measure of treatment success in therapeutic trials. These laboratory findings need confirmation on a larger scale and in patients receiving different therapies.

  13. Site-directed mutagenesis provides insight into racemization and transamination of alanine catalyzed by Treponema denticola cystalysin.

    PubMed

    Cellini, Barbara; Bertoldi, Mariarita; Paiardini, Alessandro; D'Aguanno, Simona; Voltattorni, Carla Borri

    2004-08-27

    In addition to alpha, beta-elimination of L-cysteine, Treponema denticola cystalysin catalyzes the racemization of both enantiomers of alanine accompanied by an overall transamination. Lys-238 and Tyr-123 or a water molecule located on the si and re face of the cofactor, respectively, have been proposed to act as the acid/base catalysts in the proton abstraction/donation at Calpha/C4' of the external aldimine. In this investigation, two site-directed mutants, K238A and Y123F, have been characterized. The Lys --> Ala mutation results in the complete loss of either lyase activity or racemase activity in both directions or transaminase activity toward L-alanine. However, the K238A mutant is able to catalyze the overall transamination of D-alanine, and only D-alanine is the product of the reverse transamination. For Y123F the k(cat)/K(m) is reduced 3.5-fold for alpha, beta-elimination, whereas it is reduced 300-400-fold for racemization. Y123F has approximately 18% of wild type transaminase activity with L-alanine and an extremely low transaminase activity with D-alanine. Moreover, the catalytic properties of the Y124F and Y123F/Y124F mutants rule out the possibility that the residual racemase and transaminase activities displayed by Y123F are due to Tyr-124. All these data, together with computational results, indicate a two-base racemization mechanism for cystalysin in which Lys-238 has been unequivocally identified as the catalyst acting on the si face of the cofactor. Moreover, this study highlights the importance of the interaction of Tyr-123 with water molecules for efficient proton abstraction/donation function on the re face. PMID:15210695

  14. The Tp0684 (MglB-2) Lipoprotein of Treponema pallidum: A Glucose-Binding Protein with Divergent Topology.

    PubMed

    Brautigam, Chad A; Deka, Ranjit K; Liu, Wei Z; Norgard, Michael V

    2016-01-01

    Treponema pallidum, the bacterium that causes syphilis, is an obligate human parasite. As such, it must acquire energy, in the form of carbon sources, from the host. There is ample evidence that the principal source of energy for this spirochete is D-glucose acquired from its environment, likely via an ABC transporter. Further, there is genetic evidence of a D-glucose chemotaxis system in T. pallidum. Both of these processes may be dependent on a single lipidated chemoreceptor: Tp0684, also called TpMglB-2 for its sequence homology to MglB of Escherichia coli. To broaden our understanding of this potentially vital protein, we determined a 2.05-Å X-ray crystal structure of a soluble form of the recombinant protein. Like its namesake, TpMglB-2 adopts a bilobed fold that is similar to that of the ligand-binding proteins (LBPs) of other ABC transporters. However, the protein has an unusual, circularly permuted topology. This feature prompted a series of biophysical studies that examined whether the protein's topological distinctiveness affected its putative chemoreceptor functions. Differential scanning fluorimetry and isothermal titration calorimetry were used to confirm that the protein bound D-glucose in a cleft between its two lobes. Additionally, analytical ultracentrifugation was employed to reveal that D-glucose binding is accompanied by a significant conformational change. TpMglB-2 thus appears to be fully functional in vitro, and given the probable central importance of the protein to T. pallidum's physiology, our results have implications for the viability and pathogenicity of this obligate human pathogen.

  15. Development of a Multiplex Real-Time PCR Assay for the Detection of Treponema pallidum, HCV, HIV-1, and HBV.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Li; Gong, Rui; Lu, Xuan; Zhang, Yi; Tang, Jingfeng

    2015-01-01

    Treponema pallidum, hepatitis C virus (HCV), human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1, and hepatitis B virus (HBV) are major causes of sexually transmitted diseases passed through blood contact. The development of a sensitive and efficient method for detection is critical for early diagnosis and for large-scale screening of blood specimens in China. This study aims to establish an assay to detect these pathogens in clinical serum specimens. We established a TaqMan-locked nucleic acid (LNA) real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay for rapid, sensitive, specific, quantitative, and simultaneous detection and identification. The copy numbers of standards of these 4 pathogens were quantified. Standard curves were generated by determining the mean cycle threshold values versus 10-fold serial dilutions of standards over a range of 10(6) to 10(1) copies/μL, with the lowest detection limit of the assay being 10(1) copies/μL. The assay was applied to 328 clinical specimens and compared with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and commercial nucleic acid testing (NAT) methods. The assay identified 39 T. pallidum-, 96 HCV-, 13 HIV-1-, 123 HBV-, 5 HBV/HCV-, 1 T. pallidum/HBV-, 1 HIV-1/HCV-, and 1 HIV-1/T. pallidum-positive specimens. The high sensitivity of the assay confers strong potential for its use as a highly reliable, cost-effective, and useful molecular diagnostic tool for large-scale screening of clinical specimens. This assay will assist in the study of the pathogenesis and epidemiology of sexually transmitted blood diseases. PMID:25866106

  16. The Tp0684 (MglB-2) Lipoprotein of Treponema pallidum: A Glucose-Binding Protein with Divergent Topology

    PubMed Central

    Brautigam, Chad A.; Deka, Ranjit K.; Liu, Wei Z.; Norgard, Michael V.

    2016-01-01

    Treponema pallidum, the bacterium that causes syphilis, is an obligate human parasite. As such, it must acquire energy, in the form of carbon sources, from the host. There is ample evidence that the principal source of energy for this spirochete is D-glucose acquired from its environment, likely via an ABC transporter. Further, there is genetic evidence of a D-glucose chemotaxis system in T. pallidum. Both of these processes may be dependent on a single lipidated chemoreceptor: Tp0684, also called TpMglB-2 for its sequence homology to MglB of Escherichia coli. To broaden our understanding of this potentially vital protein, we determined a 2.05-Å X-ray crystal structure of a soluble form of the recombinant protein. Like its namesake, TpMglB-2 adopts a bilobed fold that is similar to that of the ligand-binding proteins (LBPs) of other ABC transporters. However, the protein has an unusual, circularly permuted topology. This feature prompted a series of biophysical studies that examined whether the protein’s topological distinctiveness affected its putative chemoreceptor functions. Differential scanning fluorimetry and isothermal titration calorimetry were used to confirm that the protein bound D-glucose in a cleft between its two lobes. Additionally, analytical ultracentrifugation was employed to reveal that D-glucose binding is accompanied by a significant conformational change. TpMglB-2 thus appears to be fully functional in vitro, and given the probable central importance of the protein to T. pallidum’s physiology, our results have implications for the viability and pathogenicity of this obligate human pathogen. PMID:27536942

  17. Identification of Neisseria spp., Haemophilus spp., and other fastidious gram-negative bacteria with the MicroScan Haemophilus-Neisseria identification panel.

    PubMed Central

    Janda, W M; Bradna, J J; Ruther, P

    1989-01-01

    The Haemophilus-Neisseria identification (HNID) panel (American MicroScan, Sacramento, Calif.) is a 4-h microdilution format system for identification of Haemophilus and Neisseria spp., Branhamella (Moraxella) catarrhalis, and Gardnerella vaginalis. The HNID panel was evaluated by using 423 clinical isolates and stock strains of these organisms, and HNID identifications were compared with those obtained by conventional methods. In addition, 32 isolates representing six genera not included in the HNID data base were tested to determine whether these organisms would produce unique biotype numbers for possible inclusion in the data base. The HNID panel correctly identified 95.3% of 86 Neisseria gonorrhoeae strains, 96% of 25 G. vaginalis strains, and 100% of 28 Neisseria lactamica strains and 48 B. catarrhalis strains. Only 64.7% of 68 Neisseria meningitidis isolates were identified correctly owing to false-negative or equivocal carbohydrate and/or aminopeptidase reactions. Among the Haemophilus spp., 98.8% of 83 H. influenzae strains, 97.1% of 34 H. parainfluenzae strains, and 80% of 15 H. aphrophilus and H. paraphrophilus strains were correctly identified. Eight strains of Neisseria cinerea, a species not included in the data base, produced profiles identical with those for B. catarrhalis and N. gonorrhoeae. Isolates of other species not included in the data base, including Eikenella corrodens, Kingella spp., and Cardiobacterium hominis, produced unique biochemical reaction patterns on the panel. Modification of interpretative criteria for certain tests, expansion of the data base to include other species, and suggestions for additional confirmatory tests will increase the accuracy and utility of the HNID panel. PMID:2501351

  18. Inhibitory effect of 1,2,4-triazole-ciprofloxacin hybrids on Haemophilus parainfluenzae and Haemophilus influenzae biofilm formation in vitro under stationary conditions.

    PubMed

    Kosikowska, Urszula; Andrzejczuk, Sylwia; Plech, Tomasz; Malm, Anna

    2016-10-01

    Haemophilus parainfluenzae and Haemophilus influenzae, upper respiratory tract microbiota representatives, are able to colonize natural and artificial surfaces as biofilm. The aim of the present study was to assay the effect of ten 1,2,4-triazole-ciprofloxacin hybrids on planktonic or biofilm-forming haemophili cells in vitro under stationary conditions on the basis of MICs (minimal inhibitory concentrations) and MBICs (minimal biofilm inhibitory concentrations). In addition, anti-adhesive properties of these compounds were examined. The reference strains of H. parainfluenzae and H. influenzae were included. The broth microdilution microtiter plate (MTP) method with twofold dilution of the compounds, or ciprofloxacin (reference agent) in 96-well polystyrene microplates, was used. The optical density (OD) reading was made spectrophotometrically at a wavelength of 570 nm (OD570) both to measure bacterial growth and to detect biofilm-forming cells under the same conditions with 0.1% crystal violet. The following values of parameters were estimated for 1,2,4-triazole-ciprofloxacin hybrids - MIC = 0.03-15.63 mg/L, MBIC = 0.03-15.63 mg/L, MBIC/MIC = 0.125-8, depending on the compound, and for ciprofloxacin - MIC = 0.03-0.06 mg/L, MBIC = 0.03-0.12 mg/L, MBIC/MIC = 1-2. The observed strong anti-adhesive properties (95-100% inhibition) of the tested compounds were reversible during long-term incubation at subinhibitory concentrations. Thus, 1,2,4-triazole-ciprofloxacin hybrids may be considered as starting compounds for designing improved agents not only against planktonic but also against biofilm-forming Haemophilus spp. cells.

  19. Seroprevalence of the Hepatitis B, Hepatitis C, and Human Immunodeficiency Viruses and Treponema pallidum at the Beijing General Hospital from 2010 to 2014: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Shaoxia; Wang, Qiaofeng; Zhang, Weihong; Qiu, Zhifeng; Cui, Jingtao; Yan, Wenjuan; Ni, Anping

    2015-01-01

    Background The hepatitis B, hepatitis C, human immunodeficiency viruses and Treponema pallidum are important causes of infectious diseases concern to public health. Methods Between 2010 and 2014, we used an automated chemiluminescence microparticle immunoassay to detect the hepatitis B, hepatitis C, and human immunodeficiency viruses as well as Treponema pallidum (the rapid plasma regain test was used in 2010–2011). Positive human immunodeficiency virus tests were confirmed via western blotting. Results Among 416,130 subjects, the seroprevalences for hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus, human immunodeficiency virus, and Treponema pallidum were 5.72%, 1.23%, 0.196%, and 0.76%, respectively. Among 671 patients with positive human immunodeficiency virus results, 392 cases were confirmed via western blotting. Hepatitis B and human immunodeficiency virus infections were more frequent in men (7.78% and 0.26%, respectively) than in women (4.45% and 0.021%, respectively). The hepatitis B and C virus seroprevalences decreased from 6.21% and 1.58%, respectively, in 2010, to 5.37% and 0.988%, respectively, in 2014. The human immunodeficiency virus seroprevalence increased from 0.04% in 2010 to 0.17% in 2014, and was elevated in the Infectious Disease (2.65%), Emergency (1.71%), and Dermatology and Sexually Transmitted Diseases (1.12%) departments. The specificity of the human immunodeficiency virus screening was 71.4%. The false positive rates for the Treponema pallidum screening tests increased in patients who were 60–70 years old. The co-infection rates for the hepatitis C and human immunodeficiency viruses were 0.47% in hepatitis C virus-positive patients and 7.33% in human immunodeficiency virus-positive patients. Conclusions During 2010–2014, hepatitis B virus and human immunodeficiency virus infections were more frequent among men at our institution. Although the seroprevalences of hepatitis B and C viruses decreased, the seroprevalence of human immunodeficiency

  20. Treponema pallidum pallidum Genotypes and Macrolide Resistance Status in Syphilitic Lesions among Patients at 2 Sexually Transmitted Infection Clinics in Lima, Peru.

    PubMed

    Flores, Juan Antonio; Vargas, Silver Keith; Leon, Segundo Ramos; Perez, Danny Giancarlo; Ramos, Lourdes Beatriz; Chow, Jeremy; Konda, Kelika Anne; Calvo, Gino Mauricio; Salvatierra, Hector J; Klaussner, Jeffrey D; Caceres, Carlos Fernando

    2016-07-01

    We report the circulating genotypes and the frequency of macrolide-resistance patterns among Treponema pallidum pallidum DNA isolated from syphilitic lesions from patients who attended 2 sexual health clinics in Lima, Peru. We implemented and used a molecular typing scheme to describe local T. pallidum pallidum strains. Among 14 specimens, subtype 14d/f was the most prevalent strain in 7 fully typed T. pallidum DNA specimens obtained from men who have sex with men and transgender women presenting with chancre-like lesions. No macrolide-resistance mutations were found in T. pallidum DNA from 10 lesions. PMID:27322050

  1. Treponema pallidum pallidum Genotypes and Macrolide Resistance Status in Syphilitic Lesions among Patients at 2 Sexually Transmitted Infection Clinics in Lima, Peru.

    PubMed

    Flores, Juan Antonio; Vargas, Silver Keith; Leon, Segundo Ramos; Perez, Danny Giancarlo; Ramos, Lourdes Beatriz; Chow, Jeremy; Konda, Kelika Anne; Calvo, Gino Mauricio; Salvatierra, Hector J; Klaussner, Jeffrey D; Caceres, Carlos Fernando

    2016-07-01

    We report the circulating genotypes and the frequency of macrolide-resistance patterns among Treponema pallidum pallidum DNA isolated from syphilitic lesions from patients who attended 2 sexual health clinics in Lima, Peru. We implemented and used a molecular typing scheme to describe local T. pallidum pallidum strains. Among 14 specimens, subtype 14d/f was the most prevalent strain in 7 fully typed T. pallidum DNA specimens obtained from men who have sex with men and transgender women presenting with chancre-like lesions. No macrolide-resistance mutations were found in T. pallidum DNA from 10 lesions.

  2. Nasopharyngeal and Adenoid Colonization by Haemophilus influenzae and Haemophilus parainfluenzae in Children Undergoing Adenoidectomy and the Ability of Bacterial Isolates to Biofilm Production

    PubMed Central

    Kosikowska, Urszula; Korona-Głowniak, Izabela; Niedzielski, Artur; Malm, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Haemophili are pathogenic or opportunistic bacteria often colonizing the upper respiratory tract mucosa. The prevalence of Haemophilus influenzae (with serotypes distribution), and H. parainfluenzae in the nasopharynx and/or the adenoid core in children with recurrent pharyngotonsillitis undergoing adenoidectomy was assessed. Haemophili isolates were investigated for their ability to biofilm production. Nasopharyngeal swabs and the adenoid core were collected from 164 children who underwent adenoidectomy (2–5 years old). Bacteria were identified by the standard methods. Serotyping of H. influenzae was performed using polyclonal and monoclonal antisera. Biofilm formation was detected spectrophotometrically using 96-well microplates and 0.1% crystal violet. Ninety seven percent (159/164) children who underwent adenoidectomy were colonized by Haemophilus spp. The adenoid core was colonized in 99.4% (158/159) children, whereas the nasopharynx in 47.2% (75/159) children (P < 0.0001). In 32% (51/159) children only encapsulated (typeable) isolates of H. influenzae were identified, in 22.6% (36/159) children only (nonencapsulated) H. influenzae NTHi (nonencapsulated) isolates were present, whereas 7.5% (12/159) children were colonized by both types. 14.5% (23/159) children were colonized by untypeable (rough) H. influenzae. In 22% (35/159) children H. influenzae serotype d was isolated. Totally, 192 isolates of H. influenzae, 96 isolates of H. parainfluenzae and 14 isolates of other Haemophilus spp. were selected. In 20.1% (32/159) children 2 or 3 phenotypically different isolates of the same species (H. influenzae or H. parainfluenzae) or serotypes (H. influenzae) were identified in 1 child. 67.2% (129/192) isolates of H. influenzae, 56.3% (54/96) isolates of H. parainfluenzae and 85.7% (12/14) isolates of other Haemophilus spp. were positive for biofilm production. Statistically significant differences (P = 0.0029) among H. parainfluenzae

  3. Distribution and Diversity of hmw1A Among Invasive Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae Isolates in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Shahini Shams Abadi, Milad; Siadat, Seyed Davar; Vaziri, Farzam; Davari, Mehdi; Fateh, Abolfazl; Pourazar, Shahin; Abdolrahimi, Farid; Ghazanfari, Morteza

    2016-01-01

    Background: The pathogenesis of nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) begins with adhesion to the rhinopharyngeal mucosa. Almost 38–80% of NTHi clinical isolates produce proteins that belong to the High Molecular Weight (HMW) family of adhesins, which are believed to facilitate colonization. Methods: In the present study, the prevalence of hmwA, which encodes the HMW adhesin, was determined for a collection of 32 NTHi isolates. Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (RFLP) was performed to advance our understanding of hmwA binding sequence diversity. Results: The results demonstrated that hmwA was detected in 61% of NTHi isolates. According to RFLP, isolates were divided into three groups. Conclusion: Based on these observations, it is hypothesized that some strains of nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae infect some specific areas more than other parts. PMID:27141269

  4. OpsX from Haemophilus influenzae Represents a Novel Type of Heptosyltransferase I in Lipopolysaccharide Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Gronow, Sabine; Brabetz, Werner; Lindner, Buko; Brade, Helmut

    2005-01-01

    The inner core region of the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of Haemophilus influenzae is characterized by the presence of a phosphorylated 3-deoxy-α-d-manno-octulosonic acid (Kdo). In this study, we show that the heptosyltransferase I adding the first l-glycero-d-manno-heptose residue to this acceptor is encoded by the gene opsX, which differs in substrate specificity from the other heptosyltransferase I, known as WaaC. PMID:16109967

  5. Septic Arthritis and Hemarthroses Caused by Haemophilus Influenzae Serotype A in Children

    PubMed Central

    Samraj, Ravi S.; Fergie, Jaime

    2016-01-01

    Invasive disease caused by Haemophilus influenzae serotype A (Hia) is rare in children. Clinical syndromes caused by Hia include meningitis, sepsis and respiratory tract infections. Septic arthritis is rare in children with invasive Hia infection and hemarthrosis has not been described in the published literature. We report a case of septic arthritis and hemarthrosis caused by Hia infection in a 2.5 year-old-boy and review invasive Hia infection in children.

  6. Haemophilus parainfluenzae bacteremia associated with a pacemaker wire localized by gallium scan

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenbaum, G.S.; Calubiran, O.; Cunha, B.A. )

    1990-05-01

    A young woman with a history of sick sinus syndrome and placement of a permanent pacemaker 6 months before admission had fever and Haemophilus parainfluenzae bacteremia. A gallium scan localized the infection to the site of the pacemaker wire. Echocardiograms were negative for any vegetations. The patient responded to cefotaxime and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole therapy. We believe that this is the first case of H. parainfluenzae bacteremia associated with a pacemaker wire and localized by gallium scan.

  7. Haemophilus influenzae serotype f as a rare cause of septic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ungprasert, Patompong; Prasidthrathsint, Kunatum; Permpalung, Nitipong; Srivali, Narat; Kaewpoowat, Quanhathai

    2013-07-01

    Non-type B Haemophilus influenzae emerges as a new pathogen in the post H. influenzae serotype b vaccine era. We describe a case of polyarticular septic arthritis caused by H. influenzae serotype f in an adult. The patient was successfully treated with surgical debridement and antibiotic. To the best of our knowledge, this is the fourth reported case of H. influenzae serotype f septic arthritis in adults.

  8. Detection of Haemophilus influenzae and Streptococcus pneumoniae DNA in blood culture by a single PCR assay.

    PubMed Central

    Hassan-King, M; Baldeh, I; Adegbola, R; Omosigho, C; Usen, S O; Oparaugo, A; Greenwood, B M

    1996-01-01

    A multiplex PCR assay was developed to screen blood cultures from children in The Gambia with suspected pneumonia for the simultaneous detection of Haemophilus influenzae type b and Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates. Analysis of 295 blood cultures showed that PCR detected the organisms in all samples positive by culture in two samples infected with H. influenzae type b and four samples infected with S. pneumoniae that were culture negative, indicating that this method is sensitive for detecting these organisms in blood cultures. PMID:8818907

  9. Complete Genome Sequence of Highly Virulent Haemophilus parasuis Serotype 11 Strain SC1401

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Ke; Jin, Jin; Wen, Xintian; He, Lvqin; Cao, Sanjie; Huang, Xiaobo; Wu, Rui; Zhao, Qin

    2016-01-01

    Haemophilus parasuis, a normal Gram-negative bacterium, may cause Glässer’s disease and pneumonia in pigs. This study aims to identify the genes related to natural competence of the serotype 11 strain SC1401, which frequently shows competence and high pathogenicity. SC1401 shows many differences from strains without natural competence within the molecular basis. We performed complete genome sequencing together with restriction modification system analysis to lay the foundation for later study. PMID:27445368

  10. Haemophilus influenzae as a cause of Brodie's abscess in an infant.

    PubMed

    Kurlandsky, L E; Quinn, P H; Sills, E M

    1979-01-01

    Brodie's abscess is a form of subacute osteomyelitis which is defined by a particular constellation of clinical, radiological and pathological features. Its occurrence in infants is extremely rare. This case documents just such an occurrence. To our knowledge, the pathogen Haemophilus influenzae has not been previously recognized as a cause of Brodie's abscess in particular or subacute osteomyelitis in general. The clinical presentation and diagnostic pitfalls which may be encountered in this age group are discussed.

  11. Haemophilus influenzae P4 Interacts With Extracellular Matrix Proteins Promoting Adhesion and Serum Resistance.

    PubMed

    Su, Yu-Ching; Mukherjee, Oindrilla; Singh, Birendra; Hallgren, Oskar; Westergren-Thorsson, Gunilla; Hood, Derek; Riesbeck, Kristian

    2016-01-15

    Interaction with the extracellular matrix (ECM) is one of the successful colonization strategies employed by nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi). Here we identified Haemophilus lipoprotein e (P4) as a receptor for ECM proteins. Purified recombinant P4 displayed a high binding affinity for laminin (Kd = 9.26 nM) and fibronectin (Kd = 10.19 nM), but slightly less to vitronectin (Kd = 16.51 nM). A P4-deficient NTHi mutant showed a significantly decreased binding to these ECM components. Vitronectin acquisition conferred serum resistance to both P4-expressing NTHi and Escherichia coli transformants. P4-mediated bacterial adherence to pharynx, type II alveolar, and bronchial epithelial cells was mainly attributed to fibronectin. Importantly, a significantly reduced bacterial infection was observed in the middle ear of the Junbo mouse model when NTHi was devoid of P4. In conclusion, our data provide new insight into the role of P4 as an important factor for Haemophilus colonization and subsequent respiratory tract infection.

  12. Haemophilus parainfluenzae Mural Endocarditis: Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Giurgea, Luca T; Lahey, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Haemophilus parainfluenzae, which uncommonly causes endocarditis, has never been documented to cause mural involvement. A 62-year-old immunocompetent female without predisposing risk factors for endocarditis except for poor dentition presented with fever, emesis, and dysmetria. Echocardiography found a mass attached to the left ventricular wall with finger-like projections. Computed tomography showed evidence of embolic phenomena to the brain, kidneys, spleen, and colon. Cardiac MRI revealed involvement of the chordae tendineae of the anterior papillary muscles. Blood cultures grew Haemophilus parainfluenzae. The patient was treated successfully with ceftriaxone with resolution of symptoms, including neurologic deficits. After eleven days of antibiotics a worsening holosystolic murmur was discovered. Worsening mitral regurgitation on echocardiography was only found three weeks later. Nine weeks after presentation, intraoperative evaluation revealed chord rupture but no residual vegetation and mitral repair was performed. Four weeks after surgery, the patient was back to her baseline. This case illustrates the ability of Haemophilus parainfluenzae to form large mural vegetations with high propensity of embolization in otherwise normal cardiac tissue among patients with dental risk factors. It also underscores the importance of physical examination in establishing a diagnosis of endocarditis and monitoring for progression of disease.

  13. Genetic and phenotypic comparison of three new avian Haemophilus-like taxa and of Haemophilus paragallinarum Biberstein and White 1969 with other members of the family Pasteurellaceae Pohl 1981.

    PubMed

    Piechulla, K; Hinz, K H; Mannheim, W

    1985-01-01

    In the course of post-mortem bacteriological examinations, several previously unreported bacterial strains were isolated from budgerigars, pigeons, kestrels, and a goose. They have been separated into three distinct collectives according to their cultural, morphological, and biochemical characteristics. Since they require V factors, they were tentatively assigned to the genus Haemophilus Winslow et al. 1917. This preliminary classification was checked by determination of guanine + cytosine contents and genome sizes and by DNA:DNA hybridization tests among reference strains of the three new avian taxa and recognized species of the family Pasteurellaceae Pohl 1981. With the same methods, the genetic relationships of Haemophilus paragallinarum Biberstein and White 1969 within the family were determined. It could be shown that the three avian Haemophilus-like taxa have to be regarded as new species within the family Pasteurellaceae not affiliated with the recognized genera Actinobacillus, Haemophilus and Pasteurella. H. paragallinarum must be excluded from the genus Haemophilus because of its closer relationship to the actinobacilli. All strains investigated can be differentiated from each other and from recognized species of Pasteurellaceae using an appropriate set of biochemical tests.

  14. Sexual practices and prevalence of HIV, HTLV-I/II, and Treponema pallidum among clandestine female sex workers in Lima, Peru.

    PubMed

    Trujillo, L; Muñoz, D; Gotuzzo, E; Yi, A; Watts, D M

    1999-02-01

    A survey was conducted to determine the prevalence of HIV-I, human T cell leukemia virus I and II (HTLV-I/II), and Treponema pallidum infection and the associated risk factors for the transmission of these sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) among unlicensed female sex workers (FSWs) in Lima, Peru, to further define their role as a potential source of infection. Unlicensed FSWs from 15 brothels were enrolled in this study from March to June 1994. Serum samples were collected and tested for antibodies to HIV-I, HTLV-I, HTLV-II, and Treponema pallidum. Results revealed that of the 158 FSWs studied, all were negative for HIV-I; 6 were positive for HTLV-I, and 5 had T. pallidum antibodies. Of their male clients, 75% had used condoms for the past 6 months, whereas only 3% reported condom use with their steady partners. Among the workers who stated that condoms were always used, the frequency of a history of STDs, including genital ulcers and inguinal adenopathies, was lower compared to occasional users. Similarly, the prevalence of HTLV-I infection and syphilis was lower among these workers. In conclusion, the study results suggested that the low rate of STDs among FSWs reflected a high rate of condom use.

  15. Detection of cryptic genospecies misidentified as Haemophilus influenzae in routine clinical samples by assessment of marker genes fucK, hap, and sodC.

    PubMed

    Nørskov-Lauritsen, Niels

    2009-08-01

    Clinical isolates of Haemophilus influenzae were assessed for the presence of fucK, hap, and sodC by hybridization with gene-specific probes, and isolates diverging from the expected H. influenzae genotype were characterized by phenotype and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Two of 480 isolates were finally classified as variant strains ("nonhemolytic Haemophilus haemolyticus"). PMID:19535530

  16. Role of the chymotrypsin-like membrane-associated proteinase from Treponema denticola ATCC 35405 in inactivation of bioactive peptides.

    PubMed

    Mäkinen, P L; Mäkinen, K K; Syed, S A

    1995-09-01

    The ability of washed whole cells of Treponema denticola ATCC 35405 to hydrolyze (inactivate) substance P, bradykinin, and angiotensin I was studied. Substance P was attacked primarily at the Phe-8-Gly-9 bond by a chymotrypsin-like proteinase (CTLP), at Pro-4-Gln-5 by an endo-acting prolyl oligopeptidase (POPase), and at Gln-5-Gln-6 by an endopeptidase (FALGPA-peptidase). Bradykinin was cleaved at Phe-5-Ser-6 by the FALGPA-peptidase and at Pro-7-Phe-8 by the POPase. Angiotensin I was rapidly converted to angiotensin II by the CTLP, and both angiotensin I and angiotensin II were further hydrolyzed at Pro-7-Phe-8 by the POPase. All these enzymes were assumed to be cell associated and were easily extracted with a mild (0.05 to 0.1%) Triton X-100 treatment. Because it was conceivable that the hydrolysis of substance P at the Phe-8-Gly-9 bond was catalyzed by a CTLP described earlier (V.-J. Uitto, D. Grenier, E. C. S. Chan, and B. C. McBride, Infect. Immun. 56:2717-2722, 1988), the enzyme was purified to homogeneity by means of conventional fast protein liquid chromatography procedures. For kinetic studies, Phe-8(4-nitro)-substance P (NSP) (absorption maximum at 309.2 nm, epsilon = 545 M-1 cm-1) was synthesized to replace substance P as a substrate in kinetic studies. In reversed-phase chromatography, both NSP and substance P gave identical results with both whole cells and the purified enzyme. The CTLP has a mass of 95 kDa, and its activity is suggested to be based on an active seryl residue, on an active imidazole group, and on an active carboxyl group but not on metal cations. The enzyme hydrolyzes N-succinyl-L-Ala-L-Ala-L-Pro-L-Phe-p-nitroaniline (SAAPFNA, a typical chymotrypsin substrate) at a high rate and several proteins, such as calf thymus histone, human plasma fibrinogen, milk caseins, and gelatin. Among the substrates tested, substance P showed the highest affinity (Km = 0.22 mM) for the purified enzyme. Depending on conditions, clinically applicable

  17. Superoxide reductase from the syphilis spirochete Treponema pallidum: crystallization and structure determination using soft X-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Santos-Silva, Teresa; Trincão, José; Carvalho, Ana L.; Bonifácio, Cecília; Auchère, Françoise; Moura, Isabel; Moura, José J. G.; Romão, Maria J.

    2005-11-01

    Superoxide reductase is a non-haem iron-containing protein involved in resistance to oxidative stress. The oxidized form of the protein has been crystallized and its three-dimensional structure solved. A highly redundant X-ray diffraction data set was collected on a rotating-anode generator using Cu Kα X-ray radiation. Four Fe atoms were located in the asymmetric unit corresponding to four protein molecules arranged as a dimer of homodimers. Superoxide reductase is a 14 kDa metalloprotein containing a catalytic non-haem iron centre [Fe(His){sub 4}Cys]. It is involved in defence mechanisms against oxygen toxicity, scavenging superoxide radicals from the cell. The oxidized form of Treponema pallidum superoxide reductase was crystallized in the presence of polyethylene glycol and magnesium chloride. Two crystal forms were obtained depending on the oxidizing agents used after purification: crystals grown in the presence of K{sub 3}Fe(CN){sub 6} belonged to space group P2{sub 1} (unit-cell parameters a = 60.3, b = 59.9, c = 64.8 Å, β = 106.9°) and diffracted beyond 1.60 Å resolution, while crystals grown in the presence of Na{sub 2}IrCl{sub 6} belonged to space group C2 (a = 119.4, b = 60.1, c = 65.6 Å, β = 104.9°) and diffracted beyond 1.55 Å. A highly redundant X-ray diffraction data set from the C2 crystal form collected on a copper rotating-anode generator (λ = 1.542 Å) clearly defined the positions of the four Fe atoms present in the asymmetric unit by SAD methods. A MAD experiment at the iron absorption edge confirmed the positions of the previously determined iron sites and provided better phases for model building and refinement. Molecular replacement using the P2{sub 1} data set was successful using a preliminary trace as a search model. A similar arrangement of the four protein molecules could be observed.

  18. Interspecies Transfer of the Penicillin-Binding Protein 3-Encoding Gene ftsI between Haemophilus influenzae and Haemophilus haemolyticus Can Confer Reduced Susceptibility to β-Lactam Antimicrobial Agents

    PubMed Central

    Søndergaard, Annette; Witherden, Elizabeth A.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in ftsI, encoding penicillin-binding protein 3, can cause decreased β-lactam susceptibility in Haemophilus influenzae. Sequencing of ftsI from clinical strains has indicated interspecies recombination of ftsI between H. influenzae and Haemophilus haemolyticus. This study documented apparently unrestricted homologous recombination of ftsI between H. influenzae and H. haemolyticus in vitro. Transfer of ftsI from resistant isolates conferred similar but not identical increases in the MICs of susceptible strains of H. influenzae and H. haemolyticus. PMID:25918135

  19. Duplex Quantitative PCR Assay for Detection of Haemophilus influenzae That Distinguishes Fucose- and Protein D-Negative Strains.

    PubMed

    de Gier, Camilla; Pickering, Janessa L; Richmond, Peter C; Thornton, Ruth B; Kirkham, Lea-Ann S

    2016-09-01

    We have developed a specific Haemophilus influenzae quantitative PCR (qPCR) that also identifies fucose-negative and protein D-negative strains. Analysis of 100 H. influenzae isolates, 28 Haemophilus haemolyticus isolates, and 14 other bacterial species revealed 100% sensitivity (95% confidence interval [CI], 96% to 100%) and 100% specificity (95% CI, 92% to 100%) for this assay. The evaluation of 80 clinical specimens demonstrated a strong correlation between semiquantitative culture and the qPCR (P < 0.001). PMID:27335148

  20. Localization of high-molecular-weight adhesion proteins of nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae by immunoelectron microscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Bakaletz, L O; Barenkamp, S J

    1994-01-01

    A family of high-molecular-weight (HMW) surface-exposed proteins important in the attachment of nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) to human epithelial cells was previously identified (J. W. St. Geme III, S. Falkow, and S. J. Barenkamp, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 90:2875-2879, 1993). In the present investigation, indirect immunogold labeling and electron microscopy were used to localize these proteins on three clinical isolates of NTHi, mutants deficient in expression of one or both HMW proteins, and embedded sections of human oropharyngeal cells after incubation with NTHi strain 12. The filamentous material comprising the proteins was labeled with monoclonal antibodies directed against two prototype HMW proteins (HMW1 and HMW2) of prototype NTHi strain 12. Gold labeling was observed as a cap or discrete aggregate off one pole or centrally along one long axis of the bacterial cell. Heavily labeled, non-bacterial-cell-associated, disk-like aggregates of the HMW proteins were frequently noted in both bacterial preparations as well as in association with the oropharyngeal cell surface and intracellularly. Mutants demonstrated diminished labeling or an absence thereof, respectively, which correlated well with their previously demonstrated reduced ability or inability to adhere to Chang conjunctival epithelial cells in vitro. The Haemophilus HMW proteins share antigenic determinants with and demonstrate amino acid sequence similarity to the filamentous hemagglutinin protein of Bordetella pertussis, a critical adhesin of that organism. The studies presented here demonstrate that the Haemophilus proteins and B. pertussis filamentous hemagglutinin show impressive morphologic and perhaps additional functional similarity. Images PMID:7927710

  1. Prevalence of Haemophilus parasuis serovars isolated in Spain from 1993 to 1997.

    PubMed

    Rúbies, X; Kielstein, P; Costa, L; Riera, P; Artigas, C; Espuña, E

    1999-04-19

    From 1993 to 1997, 327 strains of Haemophilus parasuis were isolated from spanish swine in our Diagnostic Laboratory and 174 strains (53.2%) were serotyped. Four serotypes, sv. 5 (18.4%), sv 4 (16%), sv. 2 (9.2%) and sv. 13 (8%) were the most frequently isolated and 29.3% of the studied strains were classified as non typable. The results obtained indicate that the distribution of the serotypes in Spain is very similar to that found by other researchers in Germany, Australia, Canada and alike to that found in the United States.

  2. [Isolation of Haemophilus influenzae serotypes from deep sites in sick children].

    PubMed

    Gatti, B M; Ramirez Gronda, G A; Etchevarría, M; Vescina, C M; Varea, A M; González Ayala, S E

    2004-01-01

    Haemophilus influenzae (Hi) is the causative agent of several human diseases such as sepsis, meningitis, celulitis, and osteoarthritis. We investigated the isolation of Hi serotypes from sterile sites in sick children. One hundred and seventy nine strains from 146 patients were studied, period 1996-2002, at the Microbiology Laboratory, Hospital de Niños Superiora Sor María Ludovica, Argentina. The serotype distribution was:1 a, 112 b,1 c,1 d, 4 e, 3 f y 24 no typable. Since the beginning of universal Hi b vaccination in 1998, we have observed the fast decrease of serotype b and a relative increase of other serotypes.

  3. The influence of protein binding on the antibacterial activity of faropenem against Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed

    Gustafsson, I; Cars, O

    2004-10-01

    The effects of albumin and human serum on the pharmacodynamics of faropenem were studied. The protein binding of faropenem was 91-95%, corresponding to the increase in MICs for Haemophilus influenzae in broth supplemented with albumin. Time-kill experiments in albumin-containing medium and in inactivated human serum 50% v/v showed that much higher drug concentrations were needed to achieve a bactericidal effect than were needed in broth. Active human serum alone exerted a strain-dependent bactericidal effect. It was concluded that it is the free fraction of faropenem in serum that has antibacterial activity against H. influenzae. PMID:15373892

  4. Bone and Joint Infections due to Haemophilus parainfluenzae: Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    O'Neil, Conar R; Wilson, Evan; Missaghi, Bayan

    2016-01-01

    Haemophilus parainfluenzae is a normal inhabitant of the human respiratory tract. However it is an increasingly recognized pathogen in invasive infections, particularly in the immunocompromised host and where there is disruption of the normal skin or mucosal barriers. We present a case of a 56-year-old female with a history of asplenia who developed H. parainfluenzae septic arthritis of the hip following an intra-articular steroid injection. We also summarize previously reported cases of bone and joint infections caused by H. parainfluenzae. PMID:27516778

  5. Intra-tracheal Administration of Haemophilus influenzae in Mouse Models to Study Airway Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Venuprasad, K; Theivanthiran, Balamayooran; Cantarel, Brandi

    2016-03-02

    Here, we describe a detailed procedure to efficiently and directly deliver Haemophilus influenzae into the lower respiratory tracts of mice. We demonstrate the procedure for preparing H. influenzae inoculum, intra-tracheal instillation of H. influenzae into the lung, collection of broncho-alveolar lavage fluid (BALF), analysis of immune cells in the BALF, and RNA isolation for differential gene expression analysis. This procedure can be used to study the lung inflammatory response to any bacteria, virus or fungi. Direct tracheal instillation is mostly preferred over intranasal or aerosol inhalation procedures because it more efficiently delivers the bacterial inoculum into the lower respiratory tract with less ambiguity.

  6. In Vitro Activity of Delafloxacin Tested against Isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and Moraxella catarrhalis.

    PubMed

    Flamm, Robert K; Rhomberg, Paul R; Huband, Michael D; Farrell, David J

    2016-10-01

    Delafloxacin, an investigational anionic fluoroquinolone, is active against a broad range of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. In this study, 200 Streptococcus pneumoniae (plus 30 levofloxacin-resistant isolates), 200 Haemophilus influenzae, and 100 Moraxella catarrhalis isolates selected primarily from the United States (2014) were tested against delafloxacin and comparator agents. Delafloxacin was the most potent agent tested. MIC50 and MIC90 values against all S. pneumoniae isolates were 0.008 and 0.015 μg/ml. Delafloxacin susceptibility was not affected by β-lactamase status against H. influenzae and M. catarrhalis.

  7. Non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae purulent pericarditis in a child with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Downes, Kevin J; Abulebda, Kamal; Siracusa, Christopher; Moore, Ryan; Staat, Mary A; Poynter, Sue E

    2016-07-01

    Early airway colonization and infection with Haemophilus influenzae in children with cystic fibrosis (CF) is common. Although the pathogenicity of non-typeable H. influenzae (NTHi) in patients with CF is controversial, this organism can cause both upper and lower respiratory tract infections. Extra-pulmonary disease, however, is rare. Purulent pericarditis is a suppurative complication of bacterial infection of the pericardial space that can arise as a result of direct extension from an adjacent infection. We describe a case of purulent pericarditis due to NTHi in a young child with CF that developed as a complication of inadequately treated bronchopneumonia.

  8. Prevalence of Haemophilus parasuis serovars isolated in Spain from 1993 to 1997.

    PubMed

    Rúbies, X; Kielstein, P; Costa, L; Riera, P; Artigas, C; Espuña, E

    1999-04-19

    From 1993 to 1997, 327 strains of Haemophilus parasuis were isolated from spanish swine in our Diagnostic Laboratory and 174 strains (53.2%) were serotyped. Four serotypes, sv. 5 (18.4%), sv 4 (16%), sv. 2 (9.2%) and sv. 13 (8%) were the most frequently isolated and 29.3% of the studied strains were classified as non typable. The results obtained indicate that the distribution of the serotypes in Spain is very similar to that found by other researchers in Germany, Australia, Canada and alike to that found in the United States. PMID:10227126

  9. Effect of Haemophilus influenzae infection and moxalactam on platelet function in children.

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, S L; Courtney, J T; Kenal, K A

    1987-01-01

    In a prospective randomized study, children with Haemophilus influenzae type b meningitis received moxalactam or ampicillin or chloramphenicol. Of 41 children, 6 had prolonged bleeding times (greater than 6 min), and 7 of 9 tested had abnormal platelet aggregation at hospital admission. At the end of therapy, no children in the ampicillin-chloramphenicol group, compared with 5 of 22 moxalactam-treated children (23%) (P = 0.08), had prolonged bleeding times (6.5 to 7.5 min). Our data suggest that H. influenzae meningitis and treatment with moxalactam may each have an effect on platelet function in children. PMID:3579263

  10. Diversity of the P2 protein among nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae isolates.

    PubMed Central

    Bell, J; Grass, S; Jeanteur, D; Munson, R S

    1994-01-01

    The genes for outer membrane protein P2 of four nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae strains were cloned and sequenced. The derived amino acid sequences were compared with the outer membrane protein P2 sequence from H. influenzae type b MinnA and the sequences of P2 from three additional nontypeable H. influenzae strains. The sequences were 76 to 94% identical. The sequences had regions with considerable variability separated by regions which were highly conserved. The variable regions mapped to putative surface-exposed loops of the protein. PMID:8188390

  11. Non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae purulent pericarditis in a child with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Downes, Kevin J; Abulebda, Kamal; Siracusa, Christopher; Moore, Ryan; Staat, Mary A; Poynter, Sue E

    2016-07-01

    Early airway colonization and infection with Haemophilus influenzae in children with cystic fibrosis (CF) is common. Although the pathogenicity of non-typeable H. influenzae (NTHi) in patients with CF is controversial, this organism can cause both upper and lower respiratory tract infections. Extra-pulmonary disease, however, is rare. Purulent pericarditis is a suppurative complication of bacterial infection of the pericardial space that can arise as a result of direct extension from an adjacent infection. We describe a case of purulent pericarditis due to NTHi in a young child with CF that developed as a complication of inadequately treated bronchopneumonia. PMID:26842501

  12. Phylogenetic relationship of non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae isolated in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Mohd-Zain, Zaini; Kamsani, Nurul H; Ahmad, Norazah; Clarke, Stuart C

    2015-12-01

    The epidemiology of non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) remains poorly understood. We therefore sought to determine the genetic relationship of 25 NTHi isolated from various states in Malaysia using multilocus sequence typing (MLST). The majority of isolates were obtained from sputum. There were 24 novel sequence types (STs). Eight isolates were single-locus variants, the remainder being singletons. Clustering was not based on clinical site of isolation or geographical origin. Despite the limited number of isolates examined in this study, we demonstrate that NTHi isolates in Malaysia are diverse and warrant further investigation.

  13. Impact of the Haemophilus influenzae type b vaccination program on HIB meningitis in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Miranzi, Sybelle de Souza Castro; de Moraes, Suzana Alves; de Freitas, Isabel Cristina Martins

    2007-07-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the impact of vaccination against Haemophilus influenzae type b (HIB) in Brazil on the morbidity, mortality, and case fatality of HIB meningitis, using the Ministry of Health database and population data from the Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics (Instituto Brasileiro de Geografia e Estatística--IBGE). Impact was evaluated through a time series analysis (1983-2002), using regression forecasting (RF) by dividing the time series into two periods: (a) historical (1983-1998) and (b) validation (1999-2002). Impact of the vaccination was positive, although more significant for incidence and mortality than for case fatality rates.

  14. Evaluation of Serum Bactericidal Antibody Assays for Haemophilus influenzae Serotype a ▿

    PubMed Central

    Rouphael, Nadine G.; Satola, Sarah; Farley, Monica M.; Rudolph, Karen; Schmidt, Daniel S.; Gomez-de-León, Patricia; Robbins, John B.; Schneerson, Rachel; Carlone, George M.; Romero-Steiner, Sandra

    2011-01-01

    Haemophilus influenzae type a (Hia) is an important pathogen for some American Indian, Alaskan native, and Northern Canada aboriginal populations. Assays to measure serum bactericidal activity (SBA) to Hia have not been developed or validated. Here, we describe two methods for the measurement of SBA: SBA with a viability endpoint (CFU counts) and SBA with a fluorometric endpoint using alamarBlue as the metabolic indicator. Both SBA assays measure Hia-specific functional antibody and correlate with anti-Hia IgG enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) concentration of naturally acquired antibodies. PMID:21177919

  15. Bone and Joint Infections due to Haemophilus parainfluenzae: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Evan; Missaghi, Bayan

    2016-01-01

    Haemophilus parainfluenzae is a normal inhabitant of the human respiratory tract. However it is an increasingly recognized pathogen in invasive infections, particularly in the immunocompromised host and where there is disruption of the normal skin or mucosal barriers. We present a case of a 56-year-old female with a history of asplenia who developed H. parainfluenzae septic arthritis of the hip following an intra-articular steroid injection. We also summarize previously reported cases of bone and joint infections caused by H. parainfluenzae. PMID:27516778

  16. Spirochetemia due to Treponema pallidum using polymerase-chain-reaction assays in patients with early syphilis: prevalence, associated factors and treatment response.

    PubMed

    Wu, B-R; Tsai, M-S; Yang, C-J; Sun, H-Y; Liu, W-C; Yang, S-P; Wu, P-Y; Su, Y-C; Chang, S-Y; Hung, C-C

    2014-08-01

    Between 2009 and 2013, polymerase-chain-reaction assay was used to detect Treponema pallidum in the blood samples collected from 296 patients with early syphilis (241 being HIV infected) and 102 patients (34.5%) had spirochetemia. The presence of spirochetemia was associated with lower CD4 counts (per 10-cell/mm(3) decrease, adjusted odds ratio (AOR), 1.020; 95% CI, 1.006-1.036) and secondary syphilis (AOR, 4.967; 95% CI, 2.016-12.238). Patients with early latent syphilis were less likely to achieve serological response compared with those with primary or secondary syphilis (AOR, 0.317; 95% CI, 0.142-0.708). However, serological response was not affected by presence of spirochetemia or antibiotic regimens.

  17. Treponema parvum sp. nov., a small, glucoronic or galacturonic acid-dependent oral spirochaete from lesions of human periodontitis and acute necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis.

    PubMed

    Wyss, C; Dewhirst, F E; Gmür, R; Thurnheer, T; Xue, Y; Schüpbach, P; Guggenheim, B; Paster, B J

    2001-05-01

    Small oral spirochaetes with a strict dependence on either glucuronic acid (GluA) or galacturonic acid (GalA) were isolated from European patients with periodontitis and from Chinese patients with either gingivitis or acute necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis (ANUG). Thirteen such isolates were similar phenotypically to Treponema pectinovorum ATCC 33768T and this classification was confirmed by 16S rRNA sequencing. However, four isolates differed from T. pectinovorum by their small cell size, by a prominent beta-glucuronidase activity, by a distinct protein and antigen profile, by an inability to grow on pectin as sole source of carbohydrate and by a markedly enhanced growth rate when supplied with a second carbohydrate (L-arabinose, D-galactose, D-glucose, D-fructose, D-mannitol, D-mannose, pectin, D-ribose or D-xylose) in addition to the essential GluA/GalA. By 16S rRNA sequencing these four isolates clustered in the recently described phylotype 'Smibert-2'. T. pectinovorum (14 strains) and 'Smibert-2' (four isolates with beta-glucuronidase activity) could each be subdivided into two serotypes based on immunoblot reactivity with two mAbs. Representatives of the two groups, including T. pectinovorum ATCC 33768T, showed a 1:2:1-type periplasmic flagellar arrangement. 'Smibert-2' is described as a novel species, Treponema parvum sp. nov., with isolate OMZ 833T (= ATCC 700770T) proposed as the type strain and OMZ 842 (= ATCC 700773) as reference strain for a second serotype.

  18. Bipartite Topology of Treponema pallidum Repeat Proteins C/D and I: OUTER MEMBRANE INSERTION, TRIMERIZATION, AND PORIN FUNCTION REQUIRE A C-TERMINAL β-BARREL DOMAIN.

    PubMed

    Anand, Arvind; LeDoyt, Morgan; Karanian, Carson; Luthra, Amit; Koszelak-Rosenblum, Mary; Malkowski, Michael G; Puthenveetil, Robbins; Vinogradova, Olga; Radolf, Justin D

    2015-05-01

    We previously identified Treponema pallidum repeat proteins TprC/D, TprF, and TprI as candidate outer membrane proteins (OMPs) and subsequently demonstrated that TprC is not only a rare OMP but also forms trimers and has porin activity. We also reported that TprC contains N- and C-terminal domains (TprC(N) and TprC(C)) orthologous to regions in the major outer sheath protein (MOSP(N) and MOSP(C)) of Treponema denticola and that TprC(C) is solely responsible for β-barrel formation, trimerization, and porin function by the full-length protein. Herein, we show that TprI also possesses bipartite architecture, trimeric structure, and porin function and that the MOSP(C)-like domains of native TprC and TprI are surface-exposed in T. pallidum, whereas their MOSP(N)-like domains are tethered within the periplasm. TprF, which does not contain a MOSP(C)-like domain, lacks amphiphilicity and porin activity, adopts an extended inflexible structure, and, in T. pallidum, is tightly bound to the protoplasmic cylinder. By thermal denaturation, the MOSP(N) and MOSP(C)-like domains of TprC and TprI are highly thermostable, endowing the full-length proteins with impressive conformational stability. When expressed in Escherichia coli with PelB signal sequences, TprC and TprI localize to the outer membrane, adopting bipartite topologies, whereas TprF is periplasmic. We propose that the MOSP(N)-like domains enhance the structural integrity of the cell envelope by anchoring the β-barrels within the periplasm. In addition to being bona fide T. pallidum rare outer membrane proteins, TprC/D and TprI represent a new class of dual function, bipartite bacterial OMP.

  19. The Structure of Treponema pallidum Tp0751 (Pallilysin) Reveals a Non-canonical Lipocalin Fold That Mediates Adhesion to Extracellular Matrix Components and Interactions with Host Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pětrošová, Helena; Lithgow, Karen V.; Hof, Rebecca; Wetherell, Charmaine; Kao, Wei-Chien; Lin, Yi-Pin; Ebady, Rhodaba; Cameron, Caroline E.

    2016-01-01

    Syphilis is a chronic disease caused by the bacterium Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum. Treponema pallidum disseminates widely throughout the host and extravasates from the vasculature, a process that is at least partially dependent upon the ability of T. pallidum to interact with host extracellular matrix (ECM) components. Defining the molecular basis for the interaction between T. pallidum and the host is complicated by the intractability of T. pallidum to in vitro culturing and genetic manipulation. Correspondingly, few T. pallidum proteins have been identified that interact directly with host components. Of these, Tp0751 (also known as pallilysin) displays a propensity to interact with the ECM, although the underlying mechanism of these interactions remains unknown. Towards establishing the molecular mechanism of Tp0751-host ECM attachment, we first determined the crystal structure of Tp0751 to a resolution of 2.15 Å using selenomethionine phasing. Structural analysis revealed an eight-stranded beta-barrel with a profile of short conserved regions consistent with a non-canonical lipocalin fold. Using a library of native and scrambled peptides representing the full Tp0751 sequence, we next identified a subset of peptides that showed statistically significant and dose-dependent interactions with the ECM components fibrinogen, fibronectin, collagen I, and collagen IV. Intriguingly, each ECM-interacting peptide mapped to the lipocalin domain. To assess the potential of these ECM-coordinating peptides to inhibit adhesion of bacteria to host cells, we engineered an adherence-deficient strain of the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi to heterologously express Tp0751. This engineered strain displayed Tp0751 on its surface and exhibited a Tp0751-dependent gain-of-function in adhering to human umbilical vein endothelial cells that was inhibited in the presence of one of the ECM-interacting peptides (p10). Overall, these data provide the first structural insight into the

  20. In Vitro Capability of Faropenem To Select for Resistant Mutants of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Kosowska-Shick, Klaudia; Clark, Catherine; Credito, Kim; Dewasse, Bonifacio; Beachel, Linda; Ednie, Lois; Appelbaum, Peter C.

    2008-01-01

    When tested against nine strains of pneumococci and six of Haemophilus influenzae of various resistotypes, faropenem failed to select for resistant mutants after 50 days of consecutive subculture in subinhibitory concentrations. Faropenem also yielded low rates of spontaneous mutations against all organisms of both species. By comparison, resistant clones were obtained with macrolides, ketolides, and quinolones. PMID:18086853

  1. Identification of a group of Haemophilus influenzae penicillin-binding proteins that may have complementary physiological roles

    SciTech Connect

    Malouin, F.; Parr, T.R. Jr.; Bryan, L.E. )

    1990-02-01

    (35S)penicillin bound to different Haemophilus influenzae proteins in assays performed at 20, 37, or 42{degrees}C. Penicillin-binding proteins 3a, 3b, 4, and 4' formed a group characterized by their affinity for moxalactam, cefotaxime, and piperacillin. Penicillin-binding protein 4' showed specific properties that may reflect its complementary role in septation.

  2. Draft Genome Sequences of Six Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae Strains That Establish Bacteremia in the Infant Rat Model of Invasive Disease

    PubMed Central

    VanWagoner, Timothy M.; Seale, Thomas W.; Mussa, Huda J.; Cole, Brett K.; Whitby, Paul W.; Stull, Terrence L.

    2015-01-01

    Haemophilus influenzae is an important cause of invasive disease. The infant rat is the accepted model of invasive H. influenzae disease. Here, we report the genome sequences of six nontypeable H. influenzae strains that establish bacteremia in the infant rat. PMID:26404588

  3. Genotyping of Haemophilus influenzae type b strains and their incidence in the clinical samples isolated from Iranian patients

    PubMed Central

    Bagherzadeh Khodashahri, Somayeh; Siadat, Seyed Davar; Rahbar, Mohammad; Abdollahpour-Alitappeh, Meghdad; Vaziri, Farzam; Rahnamaye-Farzami, Mrjan; Mohammadzadeh, Mona; Davari, Mehdi; Fateh, Abolfazl; Masoumi, Morteza

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objective: Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) is divided into two distinct genotypes, type I and type II, based on the structure of capsular polysaccharides. The capsulation locus of Haemophilus influenzae type b consists of three functionally distinct regions, designated regions 1 to 3. Region III contains hcsA and hcsB genes; however, notable sequence variation in this region can be used to recognize different Hib genotypes. The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence and genotype of the Hib strains isolated from patients with invasive disease in Iran. Materials and Methods: In the present study, 8 pairs of primers were used for identification and serotyping of encapsulated Haemophilus influenzae strains, as well as confirmation of species identification. Additionally, in order to identify the capsular genotypes of Haemophilus influenzae type b (type I and II), two additional primer pairs were used to amplify the hcsA gene. Results: Out of 50 isolates of H. influenzae, four were found to be type b. Interestingly, among these 4 Hib isolates, 2 strains belonged to the type-II category. Conclusion: Our study shows that the prevalence of both Hib types I and II seems to be high in Iran. PMID:26668700

  4. Biotypes and serotypes of Haemophilus influenzae from patients with meningitis in the city of São Paulo, Brazil.

    PubMed Central

    Landgraf, I M; Vieira, M F

    1993-01-01

    A total of 1,094 Haemophilus influenzae isolates from cerebrospinal fluid were examined by biochemical and serological means. Most of them belonged to biotype I (70.9%) and to serotype b (99.4%). The relationship of biotypes I and II to the ages of the patients was shown to be significant (P < 0.001). PMID:8458978

  5. First report of neonatal bacteremia caused by "Haemophilus quentini" diagnosed by 16S rRNA gene sequencing, Italy.

    PubMed

    Giufrè, Maria; Cardines, Rita; Degl'Innocenti, Roberto; Cerquetti, Marina

    2015-10-01

    We report the first case of neonatal bacteremia caused by a "Haemophilus quentini" isolate in Italy. The isolate was differentiated from H. influenzae by 16S rRNA sequencing and was characterized by comparison with the wild-type "H. quentini" CCUG 36167. Both isolates carried substitutions in penicillin-binding protein 3 but were susceptible to aminopenicillins.

  6. Partial heterologous protection against Glässer’s disease in pigs colonized with an avirulent isolate of Haemophilus parasuis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Haemophilus parasuis is a Gram-negative bacterium belonging to the Pasteurellaceae family. This bacterium can exist as a commensal in the upper respiratory tract in swine, but can also cause pneumonia and can systemically invade causing Glässer’s disease, which is characterized by polyserositis, men...

  7. Analysis of major antigens of Haemophilus (Actinobacillus) pleuropneumoniae and related organisms.

    PubMed Central

    MacInnes, J I; Rosendal, S

    1987-01-01

    Outer membrane protein (OMP)-enriched extracts and whole-cell protein preparations of Haemophilus (Actinobacillus) pleuropneumoniae and related organisms were examined by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and immunoblotting. Both the OMP-enriched and whole-cell protein profiles of Actinobacillus suis, A. pleuropneumoniae (NAD-independent biovar), A. lignieresii, and Pasteurella haemolytica were very similar to those of H. pleuropneumoniae serotypes 1 to 8. Antisera prepared against H. pleuropneumoniae typically recognized three major OMP antigens with approximate molecular weights of 17,000 (17K), 32K, and 42K in immunoblots of H. pleuropneumoniae serotypes 1 to 8, Actinobacillus spp., and P. haemolytica. Antisera prepared against Actinobacillus spp. and Haemophilus sp. "minor group" also recognized these 17K, 32K, and 42K antigens. Using absorbed sera, we demonstrated that the 17K antigen had an epitope (or epitopes) common to all the gram-negative organisms examined, including Escherichia coli. The 32K and 42K antigens had epitopes common to members of the family Pasteurellaceae but, in the case of the 32K antigen, also contained unique epitopes. These results provide a basis for understanding the lack of specificity of serodiagnostic tests for H. pleuropneumoniae infection and provide another line of evidence for the association of H. pleuropneumoniae with the genus Actinobacillus. Images PMID:3298061

  8. Impact of conjugate Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) vaccine introduction in South Africa.

    PubMed Central

    von Gottberg, A.; de Gouveia, L.; Madhi, S. A.; du Plessis, M.; Quan, V.; Soma, K.; Huebner, R.; Flannery, B.; Schuchat, A.; Klugman, Kp

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To analyse trends in reported invasive Haemophilus influenzae disease in South Africa within the first five years of introduction of conjugate Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) vaccine in the routine child immunization schedule. METHODS: We used national laboratory-based surveillance data to identify cases of invasive H. influenzae disease between July 1999 and June 2004, and submitted isolates for serotyping and antimicrobial susceptibility testing. FINDINGS: The absolute number of Hib cases (reported to the national surveillance system) among children below one year of age decreased by 65%, from 55 cases in 1999-2000 to 19 cases in 2003-04. Enhanced surveillance initiated in 2003, identified human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infection and incomplete vaccination as contributing factors for Hib transmission. The total number of laboratory-confirmed cases of H. influenzae remained unchanged because non-type b disease was being increasingly reported to the surveillance system concomitant with system enhancements. Children with non-typable disease were more likely to be HIV-positive (32 of 34, 94%) than children with Hib disease (10 of 14, 71%), P = 0.051. Recent Hib isolates were more likely to be multidrug resistant (2% in 1999-2000 versus 19% in 2003-04, P = 0.001). CONCLUSION: Data from a newly established national laboratory-based surveillance system showed a decrease in Hib disease burden among South African children following conjugate vaccine introduction and identified cases of non-typable disease associated with HIV infection. PMID:17128361

  9. Loss of activity of transforming deoxyribonucleic acid after uptake by Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed

    Voll, M J; Goodgal, S H

    1965-10-01

    Voll, Mary Jane (University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia), and Sol H. Goodgal. Loss of activity of transforming deoxyribonucleic acid after uptake by Haemophilus influenzae. J. Bacteriol. 90:873-883. 1965.-Transforming deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) which has been irreversibly removed from solution by competent cells undergoes a progressive loss in marker activity when tested by lysis of the cells and exposure to new recipient cells. The loss of activity is limited and marker-specific, with greater inactivation of those markers with lower efficiencies of transformation. Recipient factors or donor factors which have undergone recombination, as measured by the appearance of linked markers, do not undergo inactivation. The efficiency of transformation can be correlated with the sensitivity of a marker to inactivation after DNA uptake. A mutation which affects the efficiency of transformation is found to increase sensitivity to postuptake inactivation. The rate of inactivation is temperature-dependent. At temperatures of 20 and 45 C, marker inactivation can occur without concomitant recombination. During the uptake process, DNA is retained in an acid-insoluble form, indicating that the fate of Haemophilus influenzae DNA differs from the fate of transforming DNA in pneumococcus.

  10. The Lung Immune Response to Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (Lung Immunity to NTHi)

    PubMed Central

    King, Paul T.; Sharma, Roleen

    2015-01-01

    Haemophilus influenzae is divided into typeable or nontypeable strains based on the presence or absence of a polysaccharide capsule. The typeable strains (such as type b) are an important cause of systemic infection, whilst the nontypeable strains (designated as NTHi) are predominantly respiratory mucosal pathogens. NTHi is present as part of the normal microbiome in the nasopharynx, from where it may spread down to the lower respiratory tract. In this context it is no longer a commensal and becomes an important respiratory pathogen associated with a range of common conditions including bronchitis, bronchiectasis, pneumonia, and particularly chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. NTHi induces a strong inflammatory response in the respiratory tract with activation of immune responses, which often fail to clear the bacteria from the lung. This results in recurrent/persistent infection and chronic inflammation with consequent lung pathology. This review will summarise the current literature about the lung immune response to nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae, a topic that has important implications for patient management. PMID:26114124

  11. Mechanism of Inactivation of Haemophilus influenzae Transforming Deoxyribonucleic Acid by Sonic Radiation1

    PubMed Central

    Randolph, M. L.; Setlow, Jane K.

    1972-01-01

    Transforming deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) from Haemophilus influenzae was exposed to sonic radiation of various durations. Reductions in transforming ability of the DNA, cellular DNA uptake, and integration into the genome, and single- and double-stranded molecular weights of the transforming DNA were measured and compared. We conclude that (i) sonic radiation causes DNA strand breaks (almost always double-strand breaks with relatively few alkaline-labile bonds), the number increasing with exposure until the double-stranded molecular weight is reduced to less than 106 daltons; and (ii) since transformation is reduced about as much as integration and much more than uptake, inactivation of transforming DNA by sonic radiation appears to be caused mostly by failure of Haemophilus cells to integrate the transforming DNA that is taken into the cells. These results are similar to those for inactivation by X radiation but differ from those for ultraviolet radiation. A strand break caused by sonic radiation, however, does not necessarily inactivate the transforming DNA, whereas in the case of ionizing radiation it may. The results may be fit by the model proposed by Cato and Guild. From our data and the equation of Lacks, the minimum active site of DNA necessary for transformation and the frequency of exchanges between donor and recipient strands upon integration of transforming DNA were estimated as 0.35 × 106 to 0.7 × 106 daltons and 0.15 to 0.4 switches per 106 daltons, respectively. PMID:4544285

  12. Immunoglobulin A1 protease production by Haemophilus influenzae and Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed Central

    Male, C J

    1979-01-01

    Bacterial strains of Haemophilus species and Streptococcus pneumoniae were examined for synthesis of the enzyme immunoglobulin A1 (IgA1) protease. Of 36 H. influenzae strains examined, 35 produced IgA1 protease; strains included all six capsular types, unencapsulated variants of types b and d, and untypable H. influenzae. Eight Haemophilus strains (non-H. influenzae) were studied, and two produced IgA1 protease. All 10 strains of S. pneumoniae produced IgA1 protease; these strains included 9 different capsular polysaccharide types and 1 untypable strain. Both IgA1 proteases cleaved myeloma IgA1 and secretory IgA but not myeloma IgA2, IgM, or IgG as determined by immunoelectrophoresis. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed that both enzymes cleaved IgA1 myeloma sera, but not IgA2, into two fragments. The apparent molecular weight of the cleaved fragments was dependent both on the apparent molecular weight of the cleaved fragments was dependent both on the specific IgA1 protease assayed and the specific IgA1 substrate utilized. It is postulated that both carbohydrate variation between the IgA1 substrates studied and the ability of S. pneumoniae glycosidases to cleave carbohydrates from glycoprotein offer an explanation for the different fragment sizes observed. Images PMID:40880

  13. An investigation of genital ulcers in Jackson, Mississippi, with use of a multiplex polymerase chain reaction assay: high prevalence of chancroid and human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed

    Mertz, K J; Weiss, J B; Webb, R M; Levine, W C; Lewis, J S; Orle, K A; Totten, P A; Overbaugh, J; Morse, S A; Currier, M M; Fishbein, M; St Louis, M E

    1998-10-01

    In 1994, an apparent outbreak of atypical genital ulcers was noted by clinicians at the sexually transmitted disease clinic in Jackson, Mississippi. Of 143 patients with ulcers tested with a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay, 56 (39%) were positive for Haemophilus ducreyi, 44 (31%) for herpes simplex virus, and 27 (19%) for Treponema pallidum; 12 (8%) were positive for > 1 organism. Of 136 patients tested for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) by serology, 14 (10%) were HIV-seropositive, compared with none of 200 patients without ulcers (P < .001). HIV-1 DNA was detected by PCR in ulcers of 6 (50%) of 12 HIV-positive patients. Multivariate analysis indicated that men with chancroid were significantly more likely than male patients without ulcers to report sex with a crack cocaine user, exchange of money or drugs for sex, and multiple sex partners. The strong association between genital ulcers and HIV infection in this population highlights the urgency of preventing genital ulcers in the southern United States.

  14. Genital ulcers: etiology, clinical diagnosis, and associated human immunodeficiency virus infection in Kingston, Jamaica.

    PubMed

    Behets, F M; Brathwaite, A R; Hylton-Kong, T; Chen, C Y; Hoffman, I; Weiss, J B; Morse, S A; Dallabetta, G; Cohen, M S; Figueroa, J P

    1999-05-01

    Individuals presenting consecutively with genital ulcers in Kingston, Jamaica, underwent serological testing for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, chlamydial infection, and syphilis. Ulcer material was analyzed by multiplex polymerase chain reaction (M-PCR) analysis. DNA from herpes simplex virus (HSV), Haemophilus ducreyi, and Treponema pallidum was detected in 158 (52.0%), 72 (23.7%), and 31 (10.2%) of 304 ulcer specimens. Of the 304 subjects, 67 (22%) were HIV-seropositive and 64 (21%) were T. pallidum-seroreactive. Granuloma inguinale was clinically diagnosed in nine (13.4%) of 67 ulcers negative by M-PCR analysis and in 12 (5.1%) of 237 ulcers positive by M-PCR analysis (P = .03). Lymphogranuloma venereum was clinically diagnosed in eight patients. Compared with M-PCR analysis, the sensitivity and specificity of a clinical diagnosis of syphilis, herpes, and chancroid were 67.7%, 53.8%, and 75% and 91.2%, 83.6%, and 75.4%, respectively. Reactive syphilis serology was 74% sensitive and 85% specific compared with M-PCR analysis. Reported contact with a prostitute in the preceding 3 months was associated with chancroid (P = .009), reactive syphilis serology (P = .011), and HIV infection (P = .007). The relatively poor accuracy of clinical and locally available laboratory diagnoses pleads for syndromic management of genital ulcers in Jamaica. Prevention efforts should be intensified.

  15. Diagnosis and management of genital ulcers.

    PubMed

    Roett, Michelle A; Mayor, Mejebi T; Uduhiri, Kelechi A

    2012-02-01

    Herpes simplex virus infection and syphilis are the most common causes of genital ulcers in the United States. Other infectious causes include chancroid, lymphogranuloma venereum, granuloma inguinale (donovanosis), secondary bacterial infections, and fungi. Noninfectious etiologies, including sexual trauma, psoriasis, Behçet syndrome, and fixed drug eruptions, can also lead to genital ulcers. Although initial treatment of genital ulcers is generally based on clinical presentation, the following tests should be considered in all patients: serologic tests for syphilis and darkfield microscopy or direct fluorescent antibody testing for Treponema pallidum, culture or polymerase chain reaction test for herpes simplex virus, and culture for Haemophilus ducreyi in settings with a high prevalence of chancroid. No pathogen is identified in up to 25 percent of patients with genital ulcers. The first episode of herpes simplex virus infection is usually treated with seven to 10 days of oral acyclovir (five days for recurrent episodes). Famciclovir and valacyclovir are alternative therapies. One dose of intramuscular penicillin G benzathine is recommended to treat genital ulcers caused by primary syphilis. Treatment options for chancroid include a single dose of intramuscular ceftriaxone or oral azithromycin, ciprofloxacin, or erythromycin. Lymphogranuloma venereum and donovanosis are treated with 21 days of oral doxycycline. Treatment of noninfectious causes of genital ulcers varies by etiology, and ranges from topical wound care for ulcers caused by sexual trauma to consideration of subcutaneous pegylated interferon alfa-2a for ulcers caused by Behçet syndrome.

  16. When co-colonizing the nasopharynx haemophilus influenzae predominates over Streptococcus pneumoniae except serotype 19A strains to cause acute otitis media.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qingfu; Casey, Janet R; Chang, Arthur; Pichichero, Michael E

    2012-06-01

    Of 368 acute otitis media (AOM) cases among 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate-vaccinated children, 43.5% were colonized by multiple otopathogens in the nasopharynx but only 7.1% experienced polymicrobial AOM. When co-colonization occurred, Haemophilus influenzae predominated over all Streptococcus pneumoniae strains except 19A strains to cause AOM. Haemophilus influenzae and Streptococcus pneumoniae both predominated over Moraxella catarrhalis to cause AOM.

  17. A Homology Model Reveals Novel Structural Features and an Immunodominant Surface Loop/Opsonic Target in the Treponema pallidum BamA Ortholog TP_0326

    PubMed Central

    Luthra, Amit; Anand, Arvind; Hawley, Kelly L.; LeDoyt, Morgan; La Vake, Carson J.; Caimano, Melissa J.; Cruz, Adriana R.; Salazar, Juan C.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT We recently demonstrated that TP_0326 is a bona fide rare outer membrane protein (OMP) in Treponema pallidum and that it possesses characteristic BamA bipartite topology. Herein, we used immunofluorescence analysis (IFA) to show that only the β-barrel domain of TP_0326 contains surface-exposed epitopes in intact T. pallidum. Using the solved structure of Neisseria gonorrhoeae BamA, we generated a homology model of full-length TP_0326. Although the model predicts a typical BamA fold, the β-barrel harbors features not described in other BamAs. Structural modeling predicted that a dome comprised of three large extracellular loops, loop 4 (L4), L6, and L7, covers the barrel's extracellular opening. L4, the dome's major surface-accessible loop, contains mainly charged residues, while L7 is largely neutral and contains a polyserine tract in a two-tiered conformation. L6 projects into the β-barrel but lacks the VRGF/Y motif that anchors L6 within other BamAs. IFA and opsonophagocytosis assay revealed that L4 is surface exposed and an opsonic target. Consistent with B cell epitope predictions, immunoblotting and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) confirmed that L4 is an immunodominant loop in T. pallidum-infected rabbits and humans with secondary syphilis. Antibody capture experiments using Escherichia coli expressing OM-localized TP_0326 as a T. pallidum surrogate further established the surface accessibility of L4. Lastly, we found that a naturally occurring substitution (Leu593 → Gln593) in the L4 sequences of T. pallidum strains affects antibody binding in sera from syphilitic patients. Ours is the first study to employ a “structure-to-pathogenesis” approach to map the surface topology of a T. pallidum OMP within the context of syphilitic infection. IMPORTANCE Previously, we reported that TP_0326 is a bona fide rare outer membrane protein (OMP) in Treponema pallidum and that it possesses the bipartite topology characteristic of a BamA ortholog

  18. [Haemophilus influenzae b: a review on the determinants of pathogenicity and immune response to the infection].

    PubMed

    Gómez de León, P; Cabrera-Contreras, R; Cravioto, A

    1991-01-01

    Haemophilus influenzae is still one of the main causes of diverse invasive diseases in children in México. Epidemiologic data indicate that these processes affect primarily the central nervous system and the respiratory tract. Several factors are involved in the expression of infectious disease by this organism, among them the pathogenic determinants of the parasite and those related with resistance in the host. Occurrence of disease is usually the result of the interaction between these determinants. Knowledge of these pathogenic determinants of the parasite and of factors involved in the immune response of the host have allowed an understanding of the infectious process and have directed research in a least three areas: 1) identification of bacterial membrane fractions related with diagnosis of the disease, 2) screening for immunogenic components in the bacterias as vaccine candidates to be used in the prevention of the disease and, 3) the planning of appropriate alternatives for specific antimicrobial therapy.

  19. Comparison of two commercial kits for identifying and biotyping Haemophilus parainfluenzae.

    PubMed Central

    Warren, M; Ahmet, Z; Houang, E

    1991-01-01

    The Minitek system and the more recently introduced Micro Scan HNID panels for the identification and biotyping of 98 V dependent Haemophilus isolates were compared. Identical results were obtained for 77 isolates. The discrepancy in the results of ornithine and urease was accounted for mainly by the mismatching of the identification by the two kits. When 13 isolates of H parainfluenzae with mismatched biotypes were re-examined, the results from Micro Scan correlated with 92% of those obtained by Christensen's urea broth and 100% by the ornithine test (Lab M); the corresponding figures for Minitek were 61% and 30%, respectively. Micro Scan was easy to handle on the bench and results were ready on the same day. These results suggest that further work is required to assess these two systems for the biotyping of H parainfluenzae. PMID:1997542

  20. Biotypes, serotypes, and susceptibility to antibiotics of 60 Haemophilus influenzae strains from genitourinary tracts.

    PubMed Central

    Casin, I; Sanson-Le Pors, M J; Felten, A; Perol, Y

    1988-01-01

    Sixty strains of Haemophilus influenzae were isolated from the genitourinary tracts of adults: 19 from cervicovaginal secretions, one from a woman with bartholinitis, 37 from urethral exudates, and three from urine. Non-capsulated strains were recovered predominantly, and biotype III accounted for 28 isolates and biotype IV for 25. Many of the H influenzae strains were found to be resistant to one or more of the antibiotics commonly used against sexually transmitted diseases. Resistance to tetracycline was prevalent and was found in 17 of the strains. Ten strains were ampicillin resistant and beta lactamase producing. Kanamycin resistance was less common (two strains). Trospectomycin (U-63366), a new spectinomycin analogue, was eight to 16 times more active than spectinomycin. All the quinolones tested were very active against all strains and may provide an effective alternative for the treatment of resistant H influenzae in genitourinary infections. PMID:2970427

  1. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing of Haemophilus parainfluenzae by a kinetic killing-curve method.

    PubMed

    Jemsek, J G; Martin, R R; Greenberg, S B; Gentry, L O

    1980-03-01

    A kinetic killing-curve method, designed to mimic several aspects of clinical therapy in endocarditis, was used to test 10 strains of Haemophilus parainfluenzae against 28 antibiotic regimens. In an effort to simulate changing in vivo levels of antibiotic in serum, concentrations of three penicillins, three cephalosporins, gentamicin, and chloramphenicol were sequentially adjusted over a 12-hr period. Against six beta-lactamase-negative strains, gentamicin in combination with penicillin or cephalosporin invariably resulted in an additive or synergistic effect. Chloramphenicol and a penicillin or cephalosporin usually displayed an indifferent effect, but chloramphenicol was often antagonistic when combined with gentamicin. With four beta-lactamase-positive strains, variable responses were noted to penicillin-aminoglycoside combinations; cephalosporin-aminoglycoside combinations were usually synergistic. This dynamic approach to killing-curve studies may be more appropriate than a static system for in vitro examination of the effect of antimicrobial combinations against selected organisms.

  2. Inflammatory response of Haemophilus influenzae biotype aegyptius causing Brazilian Purpuric Fever

    PubMed Central

    Cury, Gisele Cristiane Gentile; Pereira, Rafaella Fabiana Carneiro; de Hollanda, Luciana Maria; Lancellotti, Marcelo

    2014-01-01

    The Brazilian Purpuric Fever (BPF) is a systemic disease with many clinical features of meningococcal sepsis and is usually preceded by purulent conjunctivitis. The illness is caused by Haemophilus influenza biogroup aegyptius, which was associated exclusively with conjunctivitis. In this work construction of the las gene, hypothetically responsible for this virulence, were fusioned with ermAM cassette in Neisseria meningitidis virulent strains and had its DNA transfer to non BPF H. influenzae strains. The effect of the las transfer was capable to increase the cytokines TNFα and IL10 expression in Hec-1B cells line infected with these transformed mutants (in eight log scale of folding change RNA expression). This is the first molecular study involving the las transfer to search an elucidation of the pathogenic factors by horizontal intergeneric transfer from meningococci to H. influenzae. PMID:25763053

  3. Developing a vaccine to prevent otitis media caused by nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed

    Khan, M Nadeem; Ren, Dabin; Kaur, Ravinder; Basha, Saleem; Zagursky, Robert; Pichichero, Michael E

    2016-07-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) is a predominant organism of the upper respiratory nasopharyngeal microbiota. Its disease spectrum includes otitis media, sinusitis, non-bacteremic pneumonia and invasive infections. Protein-based vaccines to prevent NTHi infections are needed to alleviate these infections in children and vulnerable populations such as the elderly and those with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). One NTHi protein is included in a pneumococcal conjugate vaccine and has been shown to provide efficacy. Our lab has been interested in understanding the immunogenicity of NTHi vaccine candidates P6, protein D and OMP26 for preventing acute otitis media in young children. We expect that continued investigation and progress in the development of an efficacious protein based vaccine against NTHi infections is achievable in the near future.

  4. Induction of L Forms of Haemophilus influenzae in Culture and Their Demonstration in Human Bronchial Secretions

    PubMed Central

    Lapinski, Elsie M.; Flakas, E. Delle

    1967-01-01

    Transitional forms and round bodies of Haemophilus influenzae were identified in sputa from patients with chronic bronchitis who were receiving penicillin therapy for H. influenzae infections. In vitro growth of L forms of this organism was induced by penicillin and glycine and was studied for comparison with development in vivo. Variant forms demonstrated in sputum were similar to variant forms observed in penicillin-induced L colonies. Recurrence of infection after cessation of therapy was related to reversion of persisting L forms to bacillary forms. That these forms were derived from H. influenzae was established by direct staining with fluoresceinlabeled specific antibody. This demonstration that transitional forms and round bodies of H. influenzae occurred in vivo suggests that L forms of bacteria may be significant in chronic or recurrent infections. Images PMID:5340311

  5. Map-based comparative genomic analysis of virulent haemophilus parasuis serovars 4 and 5.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Paulraj; Bey, Russell

    2015-01-01

    Haemophilus parasuis is a commensal bacterium of the upper respiratory tract of healthy pigs. However, in conjunction with viral infections in immunocompromised animals H. parasuis can transform into a pathogen that is responsible for causing Glasser's disease which is typically characterized by fibrinous polyserositis, polyarthritis, meningitis and sometimes acute pneumonia and septicemia in pigs. Haemophilus parasuis serovar 5 is highly virulent and more frequently isolated from respiratory and systemic infection in pigs. Recently a highly virulent H. parasuis serovar 4 was isolated from the tissues of diseased pigs. To understand the differences in virulence and virulence-associated genes between H. parasuis serovar 5 and highly virulent H. parasuis serovar 4 strains, a genomic library was generated by TruSeq preparation and sequenced on Illumina HiSeq 2000 obtaining 50 bp PE reads. A three-way comparative genomic analysis was conducted between two highly virulent H. parasuis serovar 4 strains and H. parasuis serovar 5. Haemophilus parasuis serovar 5 GenBank isolate SH0165 (GenBank accession number CP001321.1) was used as reference strain for assembly. Results of these analysis revealed the highly virulent H. parasuis serovar 4 lacks genes encoding for, glycosyl transferases, polysaccharide biosynthesis protein capD, spore coat polysaccharide biosynthesis protein C, polysaccharide export protein and sialyltransferase which can modify the lipopolysaccharide forming a short-chain LPS lacking O-specific polysaccharide chains often referred to as lipooligosaccharide (LOS). In addition, it can modify the outer membrane protein (OMP) structure. The lack of sialyltransferase significantly reduced the amount of sialic acid incorporated into LOS, a major and essential component of the cell wall and an important virulence determinant. These molecules may be involved in various stages of pathogenesis through molecular mimicry and by causing host cell cytotoxicity, reduced

  6. Cross-protection study of the nine serovars of Haemophilus paragallinarum in the Kume haemagglutinin scheme.

    PubMed

    Soriano, Edgardo V; Garduño, Manuel Longinos; Téllez, Guillermo; Rosas, Pomposo Fernández; Suárez-Güemes, Francisco; Blackall, Patrick J

    2004-10-01

    The cross-protection and haemagglutination-inhibition antibodies present in chickens vaccinated with one of the nine currently recognized Kume haemagglutinin serovars of Haemophilus paragallinarum were investigated. The results confirmed the widely accepted dogma that serogroups A, B, and C represent three distinct immunovars. Within Kume serogroup A, there was generally good cross-protection among all four serovars. However, within Kume serogroup C, there was evidence of a reduced level of cross-protection between some of the four serovars. The haemagglutination-inhibition antibody levels generally showed the same trend as with the cross-protection results. This study suggests that some apparent field failures of infectious coryza vaccines may be due to a lack of cross-protection between the vaccine strains and the field strains. Our results will help guide the selection of strains for inclusion in infectious coryza vaccines.

  7. Cell vacuolation induced by Haemophilus influenzae supernatants in HEp-2 cells

    PubMed Central

    Espinoza-Mellado, María del Rosario; López-Villegas, Edgar Oliver; Arteaga-Garibay, Ramón I; Giono-Cerezo, Silvia

    2013-01-01

    Haemophilus influenzae belongs to respiratory tract microbiota. We observed vacuoles formation in previous studies with H. influenzae culture supernatants, so in this work we characterised that cytotoxic effect. We observed an abundant production of acidic cytoplasmic vacuoles due to the presence of a “vacuolating factor” in H. influenzae supernatants which was characterised as thermolabile. Greatest vacuolating activity was observed when utilizing the fraction > 50 kDa. The presence of a large number of vacuoles in HEp-2 cells was verified by transmission electron microscopy and some vacuoles were identified with a double membrane and/or being surrounded by ribosomes. These results suggest similar behaviour to that of vacuolating effects described by autotransporter proteins an undescribed cytotoxic effect induced by H. influenzae . PMID:24402145

  8. Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Moghaddam, Seyed Javad; Ochoa, Cesar E; Sethi, Sanjay; Dickey, Burton F

    2011-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is predicted to become the third leading cause of death in the world by 2020. It is characterized by airflow limitation that is not fully reversible. The airflow limitation is usually progressive and associated with an abnormal inflammatory response of the lungs to noxious particles and gases, most commonly cigarette smoke. Among smokers with COPD, even following withdrawal of cigarette smoke, inflammation persists and lung function continues to deteriorate. One possible explanation is that bacterial colonization of smoke-damaged airways, most commonly with nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi), perpetuates airway injury and inflammation. Furthermore, COPD has also been identified as an independent risk factor for lung cancer irrespective of concomitant cigarette smoke exposure. In this article, we review the role of NTHi in airway inflammation that may lead to COPD progression and lung cancer promotion.

  9. Polymerase chain reaction-based strain characterization of noncapsulate Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed Central

    Jordens, J Z; Leaves, N I; Anderson, E C; Slack, M P

    1993-01-01

    A polymerase chain reaction-based typing method for noncapsulate Haemophilus influenzae was developed. Randomly amplified polymorphic DNA fingerprints were generated from boiled supernatants prepared directly from bacterial colonies without the need for DNA extraction. The technique was applied to isolates obtained during putative outbreaks of chest infection and validated by comparison with sodium dodecyl sulfatepolyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis of outer membrane protein-enriched preparations and rRNA gene restriction analysis. There was complete concordance between the three techniques. The results show that randomly amplified polymorphic DNA analysis provides a highly discriminatory method of characterizing strains of noncapsulate H. influenzae which is eminently suitable as an epidemiological tool for the rapid investigation of outbreaks of infection. Images PMID:8263183

  10. Invasive Disease Due to Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae among Children in Arkansas

    PubMed Central

    O'Neill, Joshua M.; St. Geme III, Joseph W.; Cutter, David; Adderson, Elisabeth E.; Anyanwu, Juliana; Jacobs, Richard F.; Schutze, Gordon E.

    2003-01-01

    In this study, we reviewed cases of invasive disease due to nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae among children hospitalized at Arkansas Children's Hospital from 1993 to 2001. A total of 28 cases were examined, including 21 associated with bacteremia and 4 associated with meningitis. Of the patients examined, 86% were ≤4 years of age, and 68% had underlying medical conditions. Characterization of the bacterial isolates by multilocus sequence type genotyping revealed significant overall genetic diversity, similar to the diversity in the general population structure for nontypeable H. influenzae. However, four separate pairs of isolates were closely related genetically, a relationship confirmed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and Southern hybridization studies using probes for the major H. influenzae adhesin genes. These results suggest that selected strains of nontypeable H. influenzae may have more invasive potential, especially in young children and patients with underlying medical conditions. At this point, the specific factors that contribute to enhanced virulence remain unclear. PMID:12843045

  11. Epidemiology of Haemophilus pleuropneumoniae infection in pigs: a survey of Ontario Pork Producers, 1981.

    PubMed Central

    Rosendal, S; Mitchell, W R

    1983-01-01

    Information about factors associated with the spread and the effect of pleuropneumonia was obtained from 418 pork producers in Ontario, who returned a mailed questionnaire. The overall herd prevalence of pleuropneumonia was 23.2%. The prevalence among herds with feeder pigs only was 34.3% and 16% among sow herds. The chance of pleuropneumonia breaking out in a herd was increased with increased traffic of pigs into the herd. The source of supplementary stock had an important effect on the chance of pleuropneumonia occurring. The highest risk resulted from introducing stock from salesbarns and the lowest from stock of health status known to the purchaser and supplied by one breeder only. Mortality, primarily among feeder pigs, and unthriftiness were the major effects of Haemophilus pleuropneumoniae infection. Stress, such as crowding or inclement climatic conditions, was associated with outbreaks of pleuropneumonia. This would suggest that the infection with H. pleuropneumoniae can be subclinical until stress precipitates the disease. PMID:6831302

  12. Expression and Purification of Haemophilus influenzae Rhomboid Intramembrane Protease GlpG for Structural Studies.

    PubMed

    Panwar, Pankaj; Lemieux, M Joanne

    2014-01-01

    Rhomboid proteases are membrane-embedded proteases that cleave peptide bonds of transmembrane proteins. They play a variety of roles in cell signaling events. The rhomboid protease GlpG from Haemophilus influenzae (hiGlpG) is a canonical form of rhomboid protease having six transmembrane segments. In this unit, detailed protocols are presented for optimization of hiGlpG expression using the araBAD promotor system in the pBAD vector. The parameters for optimization include concentration of inducing agent, induction temperature, and time. Optimization of these key factors led to the development of a protocol yielding 1.6 to 2.5 mg/liter protein purified after ion metal affinity chromatography (IMAC). Further purification can include size exclusion chromatography (SEC). PMID:24692018

  13. Acute septic arthritis of the acromioclavicular joint caused by Haemophilus parainfluenzae: a rare causative origin.

    PubMed

    Hong, Myong-Joo; Kim, Yeon-Dong; Ham, Hyang-Do

    2015-04-01

    Septic arthritis of the acromioclavicular (AC) joint is a rare entity with symptoms that include erythema, swelling, and tenderness over the AC joint, fever, and limitation of shoulder motion with pain. In previous reports, Staphylococcus and Streptococcus species have been mentioned as common causative organisms. Haemophilus parainfluenzae is a normal inhabitant of the oral cavity, respiratory tract, gastrointestinal tract, and urogenital tract. However, it sometimes causes opportunistic infections leading to septic arthritis and osteomyelitis. AC joint infection associated with H.parainfluenzae is very rare, and only one case has been reported in the literature. Moreover, septic arthritis in immunocompetent patients is also very rare. Here, we report the case of a healthy patient with H. parainfluenzae-related septic arthritis of the AC joint.

  14. Map-Based Comparative Genomic Analysis of Virulent Haemophilus Parasuis Serovars 4 and 5

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, Paulraj; Bey, Russell

    2015-01-01

    Haemophilus parasuis is a commensal bacterium of the upper respiratory tract of healthy pigs. However, in conjunction with viral infections in immunocompromised animals H. parasuis can transform into a pathogen that is responsible for causing Glasser's disease which is typically characterized by fibrinous polyserositis, polyarthritis, meningitis and sometimes acute pneumonia and septicemia in pigs. Haemophilus parasuis serovar 5 is highly virulent and more frequently isolated from respiratory and systemic infection in pigs. Recently a highly virulent H. parasuis serovar 4 was isolated from the tissues of diseased pigs. To understand the differences in virulence and virulence-associated genes between H. parasuis serovar 5 and highly virulent H. parasuis serovar 4 strains, a genomic library was generated by TruSeq preparation and sequenced on Illumina HiSeq 2000 obtaining 50 bp PE reads. A three-way comparative genomic analysis was conducted between two highly virulent H. parasuis serovar 4 strains and H. parasuis serovar 5. Haemophilus parasuis serovar 5 GenBank isolate SH0165 (GenBank accession number CP001321.1) was used as reference strain for assembly. Results of these analysis revealed the highly virulent H. parasuis serovar 4 lacks genes encoding for, glycosyl transferases, polysaccharide biosynthesis protein capD, spore coat polysaccharide biosynthesis protein C, polysaccharide export protein and sialyltransferase which can modify the lipopolysaccharide forming a short-chain LPS lacking O-specific polysaccharide chains often referred to as lipooligosaccharide (LOS). In addition, it can modify the outer membrane protein (OMP) structure. The lack of sialyltransferase significantly reduced the amount of sialic acid incorporated into LOS, a major and essential component of the cell wall and an important virulence determinant. These molecules may be involved in various stages of pathogenesis through molecular mimicry and by causing host cell cytotoxicity, reduced

  15. Characteristics of the molecular diversity of the outer membrane protein A gene of Haemophilus parasuis

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Cheng; Zhang, Bin; Yue, Hua; Yang, Falong; Shao, Guoqing; Hai, Quan; Chen, Xiaofei; Guo, Dingqian

    2010-01-01

    The molecular diversity of the gene encoding the outer membrane protein A (OmpA) of Haemophilus parasuis has been unclear. In this study, the structural characteristics, sequence types, and genetic diversity of ompA were investigated in 15 H. parasuis reference strains of different serovars and 20 field isolates. Three nucleotide lengths of the complete open reading frame (ORF) of ompA were found: 1098 base pairs (bp), 1104 bp, and 1110 bp. The OmpA contained 4 hypervariable domains, mainly encoding the 4 putative surface-exposed loops, which makes it a potential molecular marker for genotyping. Western blot analysis showed that the recombinant OmpAs of serovars 4 and 5 could cross-react with antiserum to all 15 serovars. Hence, although ompA of H. parasuis exhibited high variation among serovars, this variation did not seem to affect the strong antigenic characteristics of OmpA. PMID:20885850

  16. Haemophilus influenzae Porin Contributes to Signaling of the Inflammatory Cascade in Rat Brain

    PubMed Central

    Galdiero, Massimiliano; D'Amico, Michele; Gorga, Fernanda; Di Filippo, Clara; D'Isanto, Marina; Vitiello, Mariateresa; Longanella, Anna; Tortora, Annalisa

    2001-01-01

    In the present study we observed that the Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) porin, among the different surface bacterial components, is involved in the pathophysiology of bacterial meningitis. This study demonstrates that inoculation of Hib porin into the fourth cerebral ventricle causes the simultaneous expression of interleukin-1α (IL-1α), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), and macrophage inflammatory protein 2 (MIP-2) at 6 h after inoculation. At 24 h, the expression of MIP-2 decreases while the expression of IL-1α and TNF-α increases. The mRNA expression of IL-1α, TNF-α, and MIP-2 is correlated with injury to the blood-brain barrier as demonstrated by the appearance of serum proteins and leukocytes in cerebrospinal fluid and by the increase in brain water content. PMID:11119509

  17. Haemophilus influenzae type B in an immunocompetent, fully vaccinated ALL survivor.

    PubMed

    Nevin, John; Kanter Washko, Julie; Arnold, John

    2013-05-01

    A 7-year-old boy with a history of recurrent acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), in remission, presented to primary care clinic after 2 days of progressive right hip pain with weight-bearing activities. He was otherwise asymptomatic at the time of presentation. Blood cultures revealed Gram-negative diplococci, which prompted an MRI that was significant for a hip joint effusion and femoral head bone marrow edema. The patient had no sick contacts and no significant past medical history other than ALL. The patient had been given all recommended childhood vaccinations. Arthrocentesis and needle biopsy of the femoral neck were not diagnostic for malignancy and revealed only mild hip joint inflammation, leading to a diagnosis of osteomyelitis. The organism in the original blood culture was identified as Haemophilus influenzae type b, β-lactamase negative. Review of the patient's medical records showed a history of complete immunization to Haemophilus influenzae type b. An immunologic evaluation was made to determine if the patient retained immunity from his other vaccinations. Pathogen-specific antibody testing revealed detectable antibodies to polio but not measles, mumps, rubella, varicella-zoster virus, tetanus, diphtheria, pertussis, or hepatitis B. This loss of immunologic memory appears to be a rarely described side effect of ALL chemotherapy. There is currently no protocol to evaluate the immunologic memory of patients who underwent chemotherapy for ALL or to revaccinate them after their treatment. It is unclear whether the loss of immunologic memory is genuinely rare or is underdiagnosed because affected patients are protected by herd immunity.

  18. Identification and localization of integral membrane proteins of virulent Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum by phase partitioning with the nonionic detergent triton X-114.

    PubMed

    Radolf, J D; Chamberlain, N R; Clausell, A; Norgard, M V

    1988-02-01

    Integral membrane proteins of Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum (T. pallidum) were identified by phase partitioning with the nonionic detergent Triton X-114; antigens with apparent molecular masses of 47, 38, 36, 34, 32, 17, and 15 kilodaltons (kDa) were identified in the detergent phase. Immunoblotting with murine monoclonal antibodies directed against pathogen-specific 47- and 34-kDa T. pallidum antigens confirmed their presence in the detergent phase. Endoflagellar proteins of T. pallidum were not detected in immunoblots of detergent-phase proteins when monospecific antisera directed against endoflagella of the nonpathogenic T. phagedenis biotype Reiter were used. At detergent concentrations (0.02 and 0.1%) which appeared to solubilize selectively the outer membranes of treponemes radiolabeled with 35S in vitro, limited amounts of detergent-phase proteins were immunoprecipitated. Greater amounts of detergent-phase proteins were extracted at higher detergent concentrations (0.5 and 2.0%) which resulted in both outer membrane solubilization and ultrastructural derangements of the residual cytoplasmic bodies. Furthermore, Triton X-114 extraction of both intact treponemes and organisms without outer membranes yielded detergent phases with similar protein profiles. The results of these experiments indicate that the hydrophobic proteins identified by Triton X-114 are not located exclusively in the T. pallidum outer membrane. The results are also consistent with the hypothesis that the T. pallidum outer membrane is a protein-deficient lipid bilayer.

  19. Structural and thermodynamic characterization of the interaction between two periplasmic Treponema pallidum lipoproteins that are components of a TPR-protein-associated TRAP transporter (TPAT)

    PubMed Central

    Brautigam, Chad A.; Deka, Ranjit K.; Schuck, Peter; Tomchick, Diana R.; Norgard, Michael V.

    2012-01-01

    Tripartite ATP-independent periplasmic transporters (TRAP-Ts) are bacterial transport systems that have been implicated in the import of small molecules into the cytoplasm. A newly discovered subfamily of TRAP-Ts (TPATs) has four components. Three are common to both TRAP-Ts and TPATs: the P component, a ligand-binding protein, and a transmembrane symporter apparatus comprising the M and Q components (M and Q are sometimes fused to form a single polypeptide). TPATs are distinguished from TRAP-Ts by the presence of a unique protein called the “T component”. In Treponema pallidum, this protein (TatT) is a water-soluble trimer whose protomers are each perforated by a pore. Its respective P component (TatPT) interacts with the TatT in vitro and in vivo. In this work, we further characterized this interaction. Co-crystal structures of two complexes between the two proteins confirm that up to three monomers of TatPT can bind to the TatT trimer. A putative ligand-binding cleft of TatPT aligns with the pore of TatT, strongly suggesting ligand transfer between T and PT. We used a combination of site-directed mutagenesis and analytical ultracentrifugation to derive thermodynamic parameters for the interactions. These observations confirm that the observed crystallographic interface is recapitulated in solution. These results prompt a hypothesis of the molecular mechanism(s) of hydrophobic ligand transport by the TPATs. PMID:22504226

  20. Syphilis epidemiology in 1994-2013, molecular epidemiological strain typing and determination of macrolide resistance in Treponema pallidum in 2013-2014 in Tuva Republic, Russia.

    PubMed

    Khairullin, Rafil; Vorobyev, Denis; Obukhov, Andrey; Kuular, Ural-Herel; Kubanova, Anna; Kubanov, Alexey; Unemo, Magnus

    2016-07-01

    The incidence of syphilis in the Tuva Republic (geographical centre of Asia), Russia has been exceedingly high historically. No detailed examinations and no molecular investigations of Treponema pallidum strains transmitted in the Tuva Republic, or in general, in Russia, were published internationally. We examined the syphilis epidemiology in 1994-2013, and the molecular epidemiology and macrolide resistance in T. pallidum strains in 2013-2014 in the Tuva Republic. Among 95 mainly primary or secondary syphilis patients, the arp, tpr, tp0548 and 23S rRNA genes in 85 polA gene-positive genital ulcer specimens were characterized. The syphilis incidence in Tuva Republic peaked in 1998 (1562), however declined to 177 in 2013. Among the 70 (82%) completely genotyped specimens, six molecular strain types were found. Strain type 14d/f accounted for 91%, but also 14c/f, 14d/g, 14b/f, 14i/f, 9d/f, and 4d/f were identified. Two (2.4%) specimens contained the 23S rRNA A2058G macrolide resistance mutation. This is the first internationally published typing study regarding T. pallidum in Russia, performed in the Tuva Republic with the highest syphilis incidence in Russia. The two molecular strain types 4d/f and 9d/f have previously been described only in Eastern and Northern China and for the first time, macrolide-resistant syphilis was described in Russia.

  1. Syphilis epidemiology in 1994-2013, molecular epidemiological strain typing and determination of macrolide resistance in Treponema pallidum in 2013-2014 in Tuva Republic, Russia.

    PubMed

    Khairullin, Rafil; Vorobyev, Denis; Obukhov, Andrey; Kuular, Ural-Herel; Kubanova, Anna; Kubanov, Alexey; Unemo, Magnus

    2016-07-01

    The incidence of syphilis in the Tuva Republic (geographical centre of Asia), Russia has been exceedingly high historically. No detailed examinations and no molecular investigations of Treponema pallidum strains transmitted in the Tuva Republic, or in general, in Russia, were published internationally. We examined the syphilis epidemiology in 1994-2013, and the molecular epidemiology and macrolide resistance in T. pallidum strains in 2013-2014 in the Tuva Republic. Among 95 mainly primary or secondary syphilis patients, the arp, tpr, tp0548 and 23S rRNA genes in 85 polA gene-positive genital ulcer specimens were characterized. The syphilis incidence in Tuva Republic peaked in 1998 (1562), however declined to 177 in 2013. Among the 70 (82%) completely genotyped specimens, six molecular strain types were found. Strain type 14d/f accounted for 91%, but also 14c/f, 14d/g, 14b/f, 14i/f, 9d/f, and 4d/f were identified. Two (2.4%) specimens contained the 23S rRNA A2058G macrolide resistance mutation. This is the first internationally published typing study regarding T. pallidum in Russia, performed in the Tuva Republic with the highest syphilis incidence in Russia. The two molecular strain types 4d/f and 9d/f have previously been described only in Eastern and Northern China and for the first time, macrolide-resistant syphilis was described in Russia. PMID:27102715

  2. Molecular differentiation of Treponema pallidum subspecies in skin ulceration clinically suspected as yaws in Vanuatu using real-time multiplex PCR and serological methods.

    PubMed

    Chi, Kai-Hua; Danavall, Damien; Taleo, Fasihah; Pillay, Allan; Ye, Tun; Nachamkin, Eli; Kool, Jacob L; Fegan, David; Asiedu, Kingsley; Vestergaard, Lasse S; Ballard, Ronald C; Chen, Cheng-Yen

    2015-01-01

    We developed a TaqMan-based real-time quadriplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to simultaneously detect Treponema pallidum subspecies pallidum, T. pallidum subsp. pertenue, and T. pallidum subsp. endemicum, the causative agents of venereal syphilis, yaws, and bejel, respectively. The PCR assay was applied to samples from skin ulcerations of clinically presumptive yaws cases among children on Tanna Island, Vanuatu. Another real-time triplex PCR was used to screen for the point mutations in the 23S rRNA genes that have previously been associated with azithromycin resistance in T. pallidum subsp. pallidum strains. Seropositivity by the classical syphilis serological tests was 35.5% among children with skin ulcerations clinically suspected with yaws, whereas the presence of T. pallidum subsp. pertenue DNA was only found in lesions from 15.5% of children. No evidence of T. pallidum subsp. pertenue infection, by either PCR or serology was found in ∼59% of cases indicating alternative causes of yaws-like lesions in this endemic area.

  3. Laboratory Evaluation of a Point-of-Care Downward-Flow Assay for Simultaneous Detection of Antibodies to Treponema pallidum and Human Immunodeficiency Virus.

    PubMed

    Herbst de Cortina, S; Bristow, C C; Vargas, S K; Perez, D G; Konda, K A; Caceres, C F; Klausner, J D

    2016-07-01

    Combining the detection of syphilis and HIV antibodies into one point-of-care test integrates syphilis screening into already existing HIV screening programs, which may be particularly beneficial in settings such as antenatal care. Using the INSTI Multiplex downward-flow immunoassay, we tested 200 stored serum samples from high-risk patients enrolled in a longitudinal study on HIV infection and syphilis in Peruvian men who have sex with men and transgender women. This rapid assay detected HIV and Treponema pallidum serum antibodies with sensitivities of 100% (95% confidence interval [CI], 95.9% to 100%) and 87.4% (95% CI, 81.4% to 92.0%), respectively, and specificities of 95.5% (95% CI, 89.9% to 98.5%) and 97.0% (95% CI, 84.2% to 99.9%), respectively (n = 200). The sensitivity for syphilis antibody detection was higher in patients with a rapid plasma reagin titer of ≥1:8 (97.3%) than in those with a titer of ≤1:4 (90%) or a nonreactive titer (66.7%). PMID:27147725

  4. An evaluation of the API ZYM system as a means of identifying Haemophilus somnus and related taxa.

    PubMed Central

    Groom, S C; Hazlett, M J; Little, P B

    1986-01-01

    The commercially available API ZYM microbiological identification system was evaluated for the rapid identification of Haemophilus somnus. Eighty-seven isolates of the organism had API ZYM profiles which were characteristic. The API ZYM profiles demonstrate clear differences between H. somnus and other genera but suggest a close association to three related organisms. Enzyme activity of H. somnus isolates were similar to organisms identified as Histophilus ovis, Haemophilus agni and strains UQV of Actinobacillus actinoides and Actinobacillus seminis but was clearly different from isolates of Pasteurella haemolytica, Pasteurella multocida, Bordetella bronchiseptica and group EF4. The API ZYM system allowed more rapid identification of H. somnus than conventional biochemical tests and may be a useful adjunct to conventional methods used for identification of H. somnus isolates. The test did not reveal obvious differences between isolates from various anatomic locations. PMID:3530416

  5. Two or three primary dose regime for Haemophilus influenzae type b conjugate vaccine: meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Thumburu, Kiran K.; Das, Rashmi Ranjan; Jaiswal, Nishant; Agarwal, Amit; Kumar, Ajay; Kaur, Harpreet

    2015-01-01

    Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) is an important cause of meningitis and pneumonia in children. Despite the availability of Hib conjugate vaccine, many countries are still to implement it in their immunization schedule. Before introducing the vaccine in routine immunization programs, it is important to know not only the cumulative efficacy but also the efficacy of each vaccine dose. The primary objective of this review is to find whether two primary dose schedule of Hib vaccine is equally efficacious as the standard three primary dose schedule. A highly sensitive online search was run using the terms ‘Haemophilus Vaccines’ or ‘Haemophilus influenzae type b’ and ‘conjugate vaccine’, and Medline (Ovid), PubMed, Embase, CENTRAL and Scopus were explored for prospective randomized controlled studies. Data were extracted in a predesigned proforma and analyzed using RevMan software. Nine randomized studies were included in the analysis. Pooled vaccine efficacy using a fixed effects model against confirmed invasive Hib disease following the 3, 2 and 1 primary dose schedule were 82% [95% confidence interval (CI) 73-87], 79% (95% CI 54–90) and 65% (95% CI 23–84), respectively, and the overall efficacy was 80% (95% CI 72–85). To conclude, we found that Hib conjugate vaccine is highly efficacious and that the two dose regime is as good as the three dose regime. [The protocol was registered with PROSPERO (CRD42013004490)]. PMID:25984342

  6. Difficult identification of Haemophilus influenzae, a typical cause of upper respiratory tract infections, in the microbiological diagnostic routine.

    PubMed

    Hinz, Rebecca; Zautner, Andreas Erich; Hagen, Ralf Matthias; Frickmann, Hagen

    2015-03-01

    Haemophilus influenzae is a key pathogen of upper respiratory tract infections. Its reliable discrimination from nonpathogenic Haemophilus spp. is necessary because merely colonizing bacteria are frequent at primarily unsterile sites. Due to close phylogenetic relationship, it is not easy to discriminate H. influenzae from the colonizer Haemophilus haemolyticus. The frequency of H. haemolyticus isolations depends on factors like sampling site, patient condition, and geographic region. Biochemical discrimination has been shown to be nonreliable. Multiplex PCR including marker genes like sodC, fucK, and hpd or sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene, the P6 gene, or multilocus-sequence-typing is more promising. For the diagnostic routine, such techniques are too expensive and laborious. If available, matrix-assisted laser-desorption-ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry is a routine-compatible option and should be used in the first line. However, the used database should contain well-defined reference spectra, and the spectral difference between H. influenzae and H. haemolyticus is small. Fluorescence in-situ hybridization is an option for less well-equipped laboratories, but the available protocol will not lead to conclusive results in all instances. It can be used as a second line approach. Occasional ambiguous results have to be resolved by alternative molecular methods like 16S rRNA gene sequencing. PMID:25883794

  7. Difficult identification of Haemophilus influenzae, a typical cause of upper respiratory tract infections, in the microbiological diagnostic routine

    PubMed Central

    Hinz, Rebecca; Zautner, Andreas Erich; Hagen, Ralf Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Haemophilus influenzae is a key pathogen of upper respiratory tract infections. Its reliable discrimination from nonpathogenic Haemophilus spp. is necessary because merely colonizing bacteria are frequent at primarily unsterile sites. Due to close phylogenetic relationship, it is not easy to discriminate H. influenzae from the colonizer Haemophilus haemolyticus. The frequency of H. haemolyticus isolations depends on factors like sampling site, patient condition, and geographic region. Biochemical discrimination has been shown to be nonreliable. Multiplex PCR including marker genes like sodC, fucK, and hpd or sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene, the P6 gene, or multilocus-sequence-typing is more promising. For the diagnostic routine, such techniques are too expensive and laborious. If available, matrix-assisted laser-desorption–ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry is a routine-compatible option and should be used in the first line. However, the used database should contain well-defined reference spectra, and the spectral difference between H. influenzae and H. haemolyticus is small. Fluorescence in-situ hybridization is an option for less well-equipped laboratories, but the available protocol will not lead to conclusive results in all instances. It can be used as a second line approach. Occasional ambiguous results have to be resolved by alternative molecular methods like 16S rRNA gene sequencing. PMID:25883794

  8. The Association of Chronic Hepatitis C with Respiratory Microbiota Disturbance on the Basis of Decreased Haemophilus Spp. Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Kosikowska, Urszula; Biernasiuk, Anna; Korona-Głowniak, Izabela; Kiciak, Sławomir; Tomasiewicz, Krzysztof; Malm, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Background Haemophilus species are the most common microbiota in humans. The aim of this paper was to investigate Haemophilus spp., mainly H. parainfluenzae prevalence, in the upper respiratory tract of chronic hepatitis C (CHC-positive) patients with or without therapy using pegylated interferon alfa and ribavirin. Material/Methods We collected 462 samples from 54 healthy people and 100 CHC-positive patients at various stages: before (group A), during (group B), and after (group C) antiviral therapy. Identification of bacterial isolates including biotypes and antimicrobials susceptibility was accomplished by means of standard microbiological methods. Results In 70.4% of healthy people (control group) and in 27.0% of CHC-positive patients, the presence of haemophili, mainly H. parainfluenzae was observed, and those differences were statistically significant (p<0.0001). Statistically significant differences in Haemophilus spp. colonization were also observed among healthy people and CHC-positive patients from group A (p=0.0012) and from B or C groups (p<0.0001). Resistance to ampicillin in beta-lactamase-positive isolates and multidrug resistance (MDR) of H. parainfluenzae was detected mainly in group A. Conclusions The obtained data suggest that chronic hepatitis C, together with antiviral therapy, may influence the respiratory tract microbiota composition as found using haemophili, mainly H. parainfluenzae. PMID:26912163

  9. The Association of Chronic Hepatitis C with Respiratory Microbiota Disturbance on the Basis of Decreased Haemophilus Spp. Colonization.

    PubMed

    Kosikowska, Urszula; Biernasiuk, Anna; Korona-Głowniak, Izabela; Kiciak, Sławomir; Tomasiewicz, Krzysztof; Malm, Anna

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Haemophilus species are the most common microbiota in humans. The aim of this paper was to investigate Haemophilus spp., mainly H. parainfluenzae prevalence, in the upper respiratory tract of chronic hepatitis C (CHC-positive) patients with or without therapy using pegylated interferon alfa and ribavirin. MATERIAL AND METHODS We collected 462 samples from 54 healthy people and 100 CHC-positive patients at various stages: before (group A), during (group B), and after (group C) antiviral therapy. Identification of bacterial isolates including biotypes and antimicrobials susceptibility was accomplished by means of standard microbiological methods. RESULTS In 70.4% of healthy people (control group) and in 27.0% of CHC-positive patients, the presence of haemophili, mainly H. parainfluenzae was observed, and those differences were statistically significant (p<0.0001). Statistically significant differences in Haemophilus spp. colonization were also observed among healthy people and CHC-positive patients from group A (p=0.0012) and from B or C groups (p<0.0001). Resistance to ampicillin in beta-lactamase-positive isolates and multidrug resistance (MDR) of H. parainfluenzae was detected mainly in group A. CONCLUSIONS The obtained data suggest that chronic hepatitis C, together with antiviral therapy, may influence the respiratory tract microbiota composition as found using haemophili, mainly H. parainfluenzae. PMID:26912163

  10. Comparison of naturally acquired and vaccine-induced antibodies to Haemophilus influenzae type b capsular polysaccharide.

    PubMed Central

    Jelonek, M T; Chang, S J; Chiu, C Y; Park, M K; Nahm, M H; Ward, J I

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess qualitative differences in the types of Haemophilus influenzae type B (Hib) capsular polysaccharide (polyribosylribitol phosphate [PRP]) antibodies induced in children 15 to 27 months of age by (i) natural exposure, (ii) PRP vaccine, and by (iii) PRP-diphtheria toxoid conjugate vaccine, (iv) PRP-group B Neisseria meningitidis outer membrane vesicle conjugate vaccine, and (v) Haemophilus type B oligosaccharide conjugate vaccine (HbOC). The highest levels of total Hib-PRP antibody measured by radioimmunoassay and immunoglobulin G (IgG) measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay were seen after HbOC immunization. IgG1 Hib-PRP antibodies predominated in all groups, and there were no differences between the groups in the proportion of IgG and IgA Hib-PRP antibodies. However, the proportions of IgM differed significantly by group. The highest proportions of IgM occurred in naturally acquired antibody and after PRP vaccine, and the lowest proportion occurred after HbOC vaccine. IgG light-chain V kappa type alpha PRP antibody was present in all groups, and the level correlated with the total IgG Hib-PRP antibody level. Therefore, HbOC induced the highest concentrations of V kappa II type alpha PRP antibody, and the naturally acquired antibody group had the lowest levels. IgG light-chain V kappa III antibody levels were also highest in the HbOC group, but there was no correlation between V kappa III antibody levels and total amount of IgG Hib-PRP antibody. These data demonstrate qualitative differences in the antibody repertoires induced by natural exposure, the Hib-PRP vaccine, and each of the different Hib conjugate vaccines. We doubt that there are major differences in the protection afforded by these different antibody repertoires, because these differences do not appear to correlate with differences in protective efficacy in older children. PMID:8225608

  11. Evidence for posttranslational protein flavinylation in the syphilis spirochete Treponema pallidum: Structural and biochemical insights from the catalytic core of a periplasmic flavin-trafficking protein

    DOE PAGES

    Deka, Ranjit K.; Brautigam, Chad A.; Liu, Wei Z.; Tomchick, Diana R.; Norgard, Michael V.

    2015-05-05

    The syphilis spirochete Treponema pallidum is an important human pathogen but a highly enigmatic bacterium that cannot be cultivated in vitro. T. pallidum lacks many biosynthetic pathways and therefore has evolved the capability to exploit host-derived metabolites via its periplasmic lipoprotein repertoire. We recently reported a flavin-trafficking protein in T. pallidum (Ftp_Tp; TP0796) as the first bacterial metal-dependent flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) pyrophosphatase that hydrolyzes FAD into AMP and flavin mononucleotide (FMN) in the spirochete’s periplasm. However, orthologs of Ftp_Tp from other bacteria appear to lack this hydrolytic activity; rather, they bind and flavinylate subunits of a cytoplasmic membrane redoxmore » system (Nqr/Rnf). To further explore this dichotomy, biochemical analyses, protein crystallography, and structure-based mutagenesis were used to show that a single amino acid change (N55Y) in Ftp_Tp converts it from an Mg²⁺-dependent FAD pyrophosphatase to an FAD-binding protein. We also demonstrated that Ftp_Tp has a second enzymatic activity (Mg²⁺-FMN transferase); it flavinylates protein(s) covalently with FMN on a threonine side chain of an appropriate sequence motif using FAD as the substrate. Moreover, mutation of a metal-binding residue (D284A) eliminates Ftp_Tp’s dual activities, thereby underscoring the role of Mg²⁺ in the enzyme-catalyzed reactions. The posttranslational flavinylation activity that can target a periplasmic lipoprotein (TP0171) has not previously been described. The observed activities reveal the catalytic flexibility of a treponemal protein to perform multiple functions. Together, these findings imply mechanisms by which a dynamic pool of flavin cofactor is maintained and how flavoproteins are generated by Ftp_Tp locally in the T. pallidum periplasm.« less

  12. Evidence for Posttranslational Protein Flavinylation in the Syphilis Spirochete Treponema pallidum: Structural and Biochemical Insights from the Catalytic Core of a Periplasmic Flavin-Trafficking Protein

    PubMed Central

    Deka, Ranjit K.; Brautigam, Chad A.; Liu, Wei Z.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The syphilis spirochete Treponema pallidum is an important human pathogen but a highly enigmatic bacterium that cannot be cultivated in vitro. T. pallidum lacks many biosynthetic pathways and therefore has evolved the capability to exploit host-derived metabolites via its periplasmic lipoprotein repertoire. We recently reported a flavin-trafficking protein in T. pallidum (Ftp_Tp; TP0796) as the first bacterial metal-dependent flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) pyrophosphatase that hydrolyzes FAD into AMP and flavin mononucleotide (FMN) in the spirochete’s periplasm. However, orthologs of Ftp_Tp from other bacteria appear to lack this hydrolytic activity; rather, they bind and flavinylate subunits of a cytoplasmic membrane redox system (Nqr/Rnf). To further explore this dichotomy, biochemical analyses, protein crystallography, and structure-based mutagenesis were used to show that a single amino acid change (N55Y) in Ftp_Tp converts it from an Mg2+-dependent FAD pyrophosphatase to an FAD-binding protein. We also demonstrated that Ftp_Tp has a second enzymatic activity (Mg2+-FMN transferase); it flavinylates protein(s) covalently with FMN on a threonine side chain of an appropriate sequence motif using FAD as the substrate. Moreover, mutation of a metal-binding residue (D284A) eliminates Ftp_Tp’s dual activities, thereby underscoring the role of Mg2+ in the enzyme-catalyzed reactions. The posttranslational flavinylation activity that can target a periplasmic lipoprotein (TP0171) has not previously been described. The observed activities reveal the catalytic flexibility of a treponemal protein to perform multiple functions. Together, these findings imply mechanisms by which a dynamic pool of flavin cofactor is maintained and how flavoproteins are generated by Ftp_Tp locally in the T. pallidum periplasm. PMID:25944861

  13. Quantitative analysis of tpr gene expression in Treponema pallidum isolates: Differences among isolates and correlation with T-cell responsiveness in experimental syphilis.

    PubMed

    Giacani, Lorenzo; Molini, Barbara; Godornes, Charmie; Barrett, Lynn; Van Voorhis, Wesley; Centurion-Lara, Arturo; Lukehart, Sheila A

    2007-01-01

    Transcriptional analysis of the tpr genes in Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum (referred to here as simply T. pallidum) has been limited to date, and yet the expression of members of this gene family is likely relevant to the pathogenesis of syphilis. Recently, immunological studies and semiquantitative mRNA analysis led to the hypothesis of the modulation of tpr gene transcription during infection and suggested that various strains of T. pallidum might differentially express these genes. In this study we developed a real-time amplification assay to quantify the tpr mRNAs with respect to the 47-kDa lipoprotein message and to compare transcript levels among four different strains of T. pallidum. In addition, we analyzed the lymphocyte responsiveness pattern toward the Tpr antigens in late experimental syphilis to identify tpr genes that had been expressed during the course of infection. The T-cell response has been implicated in clearance of treponemes from early lesions, and some of the Tprs were identified as strong targets of the cellular immune response. We show that message for many of the tpr genes can be detected in treponemes harvested at the peak of early infection. Interestingly, tprK seems to be preferentially expressed in almost every strain, and it is uniformly the target of the strongest cellular immune response. These studies demonstrate the differential expression of certain tpr genes among strains of T. pallidum, and further studies are needed to explore the relationship between tpr gene expression and the clinical course of syphilis in infected individuals.

  14. Structural and thermodynamic characterization of the interaction between two periplasmic Treponema pallidum lipoproteins that are components of a TPR-protein-associated TRAP transporter (TPAT).

    PubMed

    Brautigam, Chad A; Deka, Ranjit K; Schuck, Peter; Tomchick, Diana R; Norgard, Michael V

    2012-06-29

    Tripartite ATP-independent periplasmic transporters (TRAP-Ts) are bacterial transport systems that have been implicated in the import of small molecules into the cytoplasm. A newly discovered subfamily of TRAP-Ts [tetratricopeptide repeat-protein associated TRAP transporters (TPATs)] has four components. Three are common to both TRAP-Ts and TPATs: the P component, a ligand-binding protein, and a transmembrane symporter apparatus comprising the M and Q components (M and Q are sometimes fused to form a single polypeptide). TPATs are distinguished from TRAP-Ts by the presence of a unique protein called the "T component". In Treponema pallidum, this protein (TatT) is a water-soluble trimer whose protomers are each perforated by a pore. Its respective P component (TatP(T)) interacts with the TatT in vitro and in vivo. In this work, we further characterized this interaction. Co-crystal structures of two complexes between the two proteins confirm that up to three monomers of TatP(T) can bind to the TatT trimer. A putative ligand-binding cleft of TatP(T) aligns with the pore of TatT, strongly suggesting ligand transfer between T and P(T). We used a combination of site-directed mutagenesis and analytical ultracentrifugation to derive thermodynamic parameters for the interactions. These observations confirm that the observed crystallographic interface is recapitulated in solution. These results prompt a hypothesis of the molecular mechanism(s) of hydrophobic ligand transport by the TPATs. PMID:22504226

  15. Unexpectedly high prevalence of Treponema pallidum infection in the oral cavity of human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients with early syphilis who had engaged in unprotected sex practices.

    PubMed

    Yang, C-J; Chang, S-Y; Wu, B-R; Yang, S-P; Liu, W-C; Wu, P-Y; Zhang, J-Y; Luo, Y-Z; Hung, C-C; Chang, S-C

    2015-08-01

    Between 2010 and 2014, we obtained swab specimens to detect Treponema pallidum, with PCR assays, from the oral cavities of 240 patients with 267 episodes of syphilis who reported engaging in unprotected sex practices. The detected treponemal DNA was subjected to genotyping. All of the syphilis cases occurred in men who have sex with men (MSM), and 242 (90.6%) occurred in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients. The stages of syphilis included 38 cases (14.2%) of primary syphilis of the genital region, 76 (28.5%) of secondary syphilis, 21 (7.9%) of primary and secondary syphilis, 125 (46.8%) of early latent syphilis, and seven (2.6%) others. Concurrent oral ulcers were identified in 22 cases (8.2%). Treponemal DNA was identified from the swabs of 113 patients (42.2%), including 15 (68.2%) with oral ulcers. The most common genotype of T. pallidum was 14f/f. The presence of oral ulcers was associated with identification of T. pallidum in the swab specimens (15/22 (68.2%) vs. 98/245 (40.0%)) (p = 0.01). In multivariate analysis, secondary syphilis (adjusted OR 6.79; 95% CI 1.97-23.28) and rapid plasma reagin (RPR) titres of ≥1: 32 (adjusted OR 2.23; 95% CI 1.02-4.89) were independently associated with the presence of treponemal DNA in patients without oral ulcers. We conclude that detection of treponemal DNA in the oral cavity with PCR assays is not uncommon in MSM, most of whom reported having unprotected oral sex. Although the presence of oral ulcers is significantly associated with detection of treponemal DNA, treponemal DNA is more likely to be identified in patients without oral ulcers who present with secondary syphilis and RPR titres of ≥1: 32.

  16. Evaluation of FlaB1, FlaB2, FlaB3, and Tp0463 of Treponema pallidum for serodiagnosis of syphilis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Chuanhao; Xiao, Jinhong; Xie, Yafeng; Xiao, Yongjian; Wang, Chuan; Kuang, Xingxing; Xu, Man; Li, Ranhui; Zeng, Tiebing; Liu, Shuanquan; Yu, Jian; Zhao, Feijun; Wu, Yimou

    2016-02-01

    Syphilis is a multistage disease caused by the invasive spirochete Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum, and accurate diagnosis is important for the prevention and treatment of syphilis. Here, to identify appropriate diagnostic antigens for serodiagnosis of syphilis, 6 recombinant proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli and purified, including flagellins (FlaB1 [Tp0868], FlaB2 [Tp0792], and FlaB3 [Tp0870]), Tp0463, Tp0751, and Tp1038. The sensitivities were determined by screening sera from individuals with primary (n=82), secondary (n=115), latent (n=105), and congenital (n=65) syphilis. The specificities were determined by screening sera from uninfected controls (n=30) and potentially cross-reactive infections including Lyme disease (n=30), leptospirosis (n=5), and hepatitis B (n=30). Our data showed that FlaB1, FlaB2, FlaB3, Tp0463, and Tp1038 exhibited higher overall sensitivities and specificities for detecting IgG antibody, with 95.4% and 98.9%, 92.6% and 95.8%, 95.1% and 95.8%, 92.6% and 97.9%, and 95.9% and 98.9%, respectively. In contrast, Tp0751 demonstrated only an overall sensitivity of 39.2%. For comparison, the sensitivity and specificity of Architect Syphilis TP were determined to be 98.1% and 93.7%, respectively. In addition, FlaB1, FlaB2, FlaB3, and Tp0463 demonstrated excellent performance for detecting IgM antibody in primary and congenital syphilis, with sensitivities of 76.8% and 83.1%, 72.0% and 87.7%, 74.4% and 89.2%, and 64.6% and 75.3%, respectively. These results indicate that FlaB1, FlaB2, FlaB3, and Tp0463 could be as novel diagnostic candidates for serodiagnosis of syphilis.

  17. Seroprevalence of Human Immunodeficiency Virus, Hepatitis B Virus, Hepatitis C Virus, and Treponema pallidum Infections among Blood Donors on Bioko Island, Equatorial Guinea

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jiang-Tao; Eyi, Urbano Monsuy; Matesa, Rocio Apicante; Obono, Maximo Miko Ondo; Ehapo, Carlos Sala; Yang, Li-Ye; Yang, Hui; Yang, Hui-Tian; Lin, Min

    2015-01-01

    Background Regular screening of transfusion-transmissible infections (TTIs), such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B and hepatitis C virus (HBV and HCV, respectively), and Treponema pallidum, in blood donors is essential to guaranteeing clinical transfusion safety. This study aimed to determine the seroprevalence of four TTIs among blood donors on Bioko Island, Equatorial Guinea (EG). Methods A retrospective survey of blood donors from January 2011 to April 2013 was conducted to assess the presence of HIV, HBV, HCV and T. pallidum. The medical records were analyzed to verify the seroprevalence of these TTIs among blood donations stratified by gender, age and geographical region. Results Of the total 2937 consecutive blood donors, 1098 (37.39%) had a minimum of one TTI and 185 (6.29%) harbored co-infections. The general seroprevalence of HIV, HBV, HCV and T. pallidum were 7.83%, 10.01%, 3.71% and 21.51%, respectively. The most frequent TTI co-infections were HBV-T. pallidum 60 (2.04%) and HIV-T. pallidum 46 (1.57%). The seroprevalence of HIV, HBV, HCV and T. pallidum were highest among blood donors 38 to 47 years, 18 to 27 years and ≥ 48 years age, respectively (P<0.05). The seroprevalence of TTIs varied according to the population from which the blood was collected on Bioko Island. Conclusions Our results firstly provide a comprehensive overview of TTIs among blood donors on Bioko Island. Strict screening of blood donors and improved hematological examinations using standard operating procedures are recommended. PMID:26448460

  18. TprC/D (Tp0117/131), a trimeric, pore-forming rare outer membrane protein of Treponema pallidum, has a bipartite domain structure.

    PubMed

    Anand, Arvind; Luthra, Amit; Dunham-Ems, Star; Caimano, Melissa J; Karanian, Carson; LeDoyt, Morgan; Cruz, Adriana R; Salazar, Juan C; Radolf, Justin D

    2012-05-01

    Identification of Treponema pallidum rare outer membrane proteins (OMPs) has been a longstanding objective of syphilis researchers. We recently developed a consensus computational framework that employs a battery of cellular localization and topological prediction tools to generate ranked clusters of candidate rare OMPs (D. L. Cox et al., Infect. Immun. 78:5178-5194, 2010). TP0117/TP0131 (TprC/D), a member of the T. pallidum repeat (Tpr) family, was a highly ranked candidate. Circular dichroism, heat modifiability by SDS-PAGE, Triton X-114 phase partitioning, and liposome incorporation confirmed that full-length, recombinant TprC (TprC(Fl)) forms a β-barrel capable of integrating into lipid bilayers. Moreover, TprC(Fl) increased efflux of terbium-dipicolinic acid complex from large unilamellar vesicles and migrated as a trimer by blue-native PAGE. We found that in T. pallidum, TprC is heat modifiable, trimeric, expressed in low abundance, and, based on proteinase K accessibility and opsonophagocytosis assays, surface exposed. From these collective data, we conclude that TprC is a bona fide rare OMP as well as a functional ortholog of Escherichia coli OmpF. We also discovered that TprC has a bipartite architecture consisting of a soluble N-terminal portion (TprC(N)), presumably periplasmic and bound directly or indirectly to peptidoglycan, and a C-terminal β-barrel (TprC(C)). Syphilitic rabbits generate antibodies exclusively against TprC(C), while secondary syphilis patients fail to mount a detectable antibody response against either domain. The syphilis spirochete appears to have resolved a fundamental dilemma arising from its extracellular lifestyle, namely, how to enhance OM permeability without increasing its vulnerability to the antibody-mediated defenses of its natural human host.

  19. Invasion of oral and aortic tissues by oral spirochete Treponema denticola in ApoE(-/-) mice causally links periodontal disease and atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Chukkapalli, Sasanka S; Rivera, Mercedes F; Velsko, Irina M; Lee, Ju-Youn; Chen, Hao; Zheng, Donghang; Bhattacharyya, Indraneel; Gangula, Pandu R; Lucas, Alexandra R; Kesavalu, Lakshmyya

    2014-05-01

    Treponema denticola is a predominantly subgingival oral spirochete closely associated with periodontal disease and has been detected in atherosclerosis. This study was designed to evaluate causative links between periodontal disease induced by chronic oral T. denticola infection and atherosclerosis in hyperlipidemic ApoE(-/-) mice. ApoE(-/-) mice (n = 24) were orally infected with T. denticola ATCC 35404 and were euthanized after 12 and 24 weeks. T. denticola genomic DNA was detected in oral plaque samples, indicating colonization of the oral cavity. Infection elicited significantly (P = 0.0172) higher IgG antibody levels and enhanced intrabony defects than sham infection. T. denticola-infected mice had higher levels of horizontal alveolar bone resorption than sham-infected mice and an associated significant increase in aortic plaque area (P ≤ 0.05). Increased atherosclerotic plaque correlated with reduced serum nitric oxide (NO) levels and increased serum-oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LDL) levels compared to those of sham-infected mice. T. denticola infection altered the expression of genes known to be involved in atherosclerotic development, including the leukocyte/endothelial cell adhesion gene (Thbs4), the connective tissue growth factor gene (Ctgf), and the selectin-E gene (Sele). Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) revealed T. denticola clusters in both gingival and aortic tissue of infected mice. This is the first study examining the potential causative role of chronic T. denticola periodontal infection and vascular atherosclerosis in vivo in hyperlipidemic ApoE(-/-) mice. T. denticola is closely associated with periodontal disease and the rapid progression of atheroma in ApoE(-/-) mice. These studies confirm a causal link for active oral T. denticola infection with both atheroma and periodontal disease. PMID:24566627

  20. Cost-Benefit Analysis of Haemophilus Influenzae Type B Immunization in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Sangjin; Ki, Moran

    2008-01-01

    An economic evaluation of Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) immunization was conducted to examine whether Hib immunization should be included in the Korea's national immunization program. The costs and benefits included direct and indirect values and an estimation of the economic efficiency. We determined that a universal Hib immunization program in Korea would prevent 17 deaths and 280 invasive Hib cases. When we assumed the one Hib immunization cost as 26,000 won, the national Hib immunization would cost 34.6 billion won. Costs for various Hib diseases were estimated at 26.8 billion won (11.8 billion won from direct costs and 14.9 billion won from indirect costs). A benefit-cost ratio of 0.77 showed that the economic efficiency of the integration of Hib immunization in Korea is low because of the low incidence rate of Hib disease and high price of vaccine. However, if the Hib immunization cost decrease to less than 20,000 won, a benefit-cost ratio increase to 1.0 and above, integrating Hib immunization into the national immunization program with economic efficiency can be considered. PMID:18436997

  1. HtrA Is Important for Stress Resistance and Virulence in Haemophilus parasuis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Luhua; Li, Ying; Wen, Yiping; Lau, Gee W; Huang, Xiaobo; Wu, Rui; Yan, Qigui; Huang, Yong; Zhao, Qin; Ma, Xiaoping; Wen, Xintian; Cao, Sanjie

    2016-08-01

    Haemophilus parasuis is an opportunistic pathogen that causes Glässer's disease in swine, with polyserositis, meningitis, and arthritis. The high-temperature requirement A (HtrA)-like protease, which is involved in protein quality control, has been reported to be a virulence factor in many pathogens. In this study, we showed that HtrA of H. parasuis (HpHtrA) exhibited both chaperone and protease activities. Finally, nickel import ATP-binding protein (NikE), periplasmic dipeptide transport protein (DppA), and outer membrane protein A (OmpA) were identified as proteolytic substrates for HpHtrA. The protease activity reached its maximum at 40°C in a time-dependent manner. Disruption of the htrA gene from strain SC1401 affected tolerance to temperature stress and resistance to complement-mediated killing. Furthermore, increased autoagglutination and biofilm formation were detected in the htrA mutant. In addition, the htrA mutant was significantly attenuated in virulence in the murine model of infection. Together, these data demonstrate that HpHtrA plays an important role in the virulence of H. parasuis. PMID:27217419

  2. Biofilm-specific extracellular matrix proteins of non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Siva; Baum, Marc M.; Kerwin, James; Guerrero-Given, Debbie; Webster, Simon; Schaudinn, Christoph; VanderVelde, David; Webster, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi), a human respiratory tract pathogen can form colony biofilms in vitro. Bacterial cells and the amorphous extracellular matrix (ECM) constituting the biofilm can be separated using sonication. The ECM from 24 hr and 96 hr NTHi biofilms contained polysaccharides and proteinaceous components as detected by NMR and FTIR spectroscopy. More conventional chemical assays on the biofilm ECM confirmed the presence of these components and also DNA. Proteomics revealed eighteen proteins present in biofilm ECM that were not detected in planktonic bacteria. One ECM protein was unique to 24 hr biofilms, two were found only in 96 hr biofilms, and fifteen were present in the ECM of both 24 hr and 96 hr NTHi biofilms. All proteins identified were either associated with bacterial membranes or were cytoplasmic proteins. Immunocytochemistry showed two of the identified proteins, a DNA-directed RNA polymerase and the outer membrane protein OMP P2, associated with bacteria and biofilm ECM. Identification of biofilm-specific proteins present in immature biofilms is an important step in understanding the in vitro process of NTHi biofilm formation. The presence of a cytoplasmic protein and a membrane protein in the biofilm ECM of immature NTHi biofilms suggests that bacterial cell lysis may be a feature of early biofilm formation. PMID:24942343

  3. A biphasic epigenetic switch controls immunoevasion, virulence and niche adaptation in non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae

    PubMed Central

    Atack, John M.; Srikhanta, Yogitha N.; Fox, Kate L.; Jurcisek, Joseph A.; Brockman, Kenneth L.; Clark, Tyson A.; Boitano, Matthew; Power, Peter M.; Jen, Freda E.-C.; McEwan, Alastair G.; Grimmond, Sean M.; Smith, Arnold L.; Barenkamp, Stephen J.; Korlach, Jonas; Bakaletz, Lauren O.; Jennings, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae contains an N6-adenine DNA-methyltransferase (ModA) that is subject to phase-variable expression (random ON/OFF switching). Five modA alleles, modA2, modA4, modA5, modA9 and modA10, account for over two-thirds of clinical otitis media isolates surveyed. Here, we use single molecule, real-time (SMRT) methylome analysis to identify the DNA-recognition motifs for all five of these modA alleles. Phase variation of these alleles regulates multiple proteins including vaccine candidates, and key virulence phenotypes such as antibiotic resistance (modA2, modA5, modA10), biofilm formation (modA2) and immunoevasion (modA4). Analyses of a modA2 strain in the chinchilla model of otitis media show a clear selection for ON switching of modA2 in the middle ear. Our results indicate that a biphasic epigenetic switch can control bacterial virulence, immunoevasion and niche adaptation in an animal model system. PMID:26215614

  4. Modelling the impact of vaccination on curtailing Haemophilus influenzae serotype 'a'.

    PubMed

    Konini, Angjelina; Moghadas, Seyed M

    2015-12-21

    Haemophilus influenzae serotype a (Hia) is a human-restricted bacterial pathogen transmitted via direct contacts with an infectious individual. Currently, there is no vaccine available for prevention of Hia, and the disease is treated with antibiotics upon diagnosis. With ongoing efforts for the development of an anti-Hia protein-polysaccharide conjugated vaccine, we sought to investigate the effect of vaccination on curtailing Hia infection. We present the first stochastic model of Hia transmission and control dynamics, and parameterize it using available estimates in the literature. Since both naturally acquired and vaccine-induced immunity wane with time, model simulations show three important results. First, vaccination of only newborns cannot eliminate the pathogen from the population, even when a booster program is implemented with a high coverage. Second, achieving and maintaining a sufficiently high level of herd immunity for pathogen elimination requires vaccination of susceptible individuals in addition to a high vaccination coverage of newborns. Third, for a low vaccination rate of susceptible individuals, a high coverage of booster dose may be needed to raise the level of herd immunity for Hia eradication. Our findings highlight the importance of vaccination and timely boosting of the individual׳s immunity within the expected duration of vaccine-induced protection against Hia. When an anti-Hia vaccine becomes available, enhanced surveillance of Hia incidence and herd immunity could help determine vaccination rates and timelines for booster doses necessary to eliminate Hia from affected populations.

  5. Characterization and vaccine potential of outer membrane vesicles produced by Haemophilus parasuis

    DOE PAGES

    McCaig, William D.; Loving, Crystal L.; Hughes, Holly R.; Brockmeier, Susan L.; Charbit, Alain

    2016-03-01

    Haemophilus parasuis is a Gram-negative bacterium that colonizes the upper respiratory tract of swine and is capable of causing a systemic infection, resulting in high morbidity and mortality. H. parasuis isolates display a wide range of virulence and virulence factors are largely unknown. Commercial bacterins are often used to vaccinate swine against H. parasuis, though strain variability and lack of cross-reactivity can make this an ineffective means of protection. Outer membrane vesicles (OMV) are spherical structures naturally released from the membrane of bacteria and OMV are often enriched in toxins, signaling molecules and other bacterial components. Examination of OMV structuresmore » has led to identification of virulence factors in a number of bacteria and they have been successfully used as subunit vaccines. We have isolated OMV from both virulent and avirulent strains of H. parasuis, have examined their protein content and assessed their ability to induce an immune response in the host. Lastly, vaccination with purified OMV derived from the virulent H. parasuis Nagasaki strain provided protection against challenge with a lethal dose of the bacteria.« less

  6. Molecular basis for the transformation defects in mutants of Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed

    Notani, N K; Setlow, J K; Joshi, V R; Allison, D P

    1972-06-01

    To determine the molecular basis of transformation defects in Haemophilus influenzae, the fate of genetically marked, (32)P-labeled, heavy deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) was examined in three mutant strains (rec(1) (-), rec(2) (-), and KB6) and in wild type having (3)H-labeled DNA and a second genetic marker. Transforming cells upon lysis with digitonin followed by low-speed centrifugation are separable into the supernatant fraction, containing mainly the unintegrated donor DNA, and the pellet, containing most of the resident DNA along with integrated donor DNA. Electron micrographs of digitonin-treated cells also indicate that the resident DNA is trapped inside a cellular structure but that cytoplasmic elements such as ribosomes are extensively released. DNA synthesis in digitonin-treated cells is immediately blocked, as is any further integration of donor DNA into the resident genome. Isopycnic and sedimentation analysis of supernatant fluids and pellets revealed that in strains rec(2) (-) and KB6 there is little or no association between donor and resident DNA, and thus there is negligible transfer of donor DNA genetic information. In these strains, the donor DNA is not broken into pieces of lower molecular weight as it is in strain rec(1) (-) and in the wild type, both of which show association between donor and recipient DNA. In strain rec(1) (-), although some donor DNA atoms become covalently linked to resident DNA, the incorporated material does not have the donor DNA transforming activity. PMID:4537421

  7. Some antigenic properties of Haemophilus parasuis and a proposal for serological classification.

    PubMed Central

    Morozumi, T; Nicolet, J

    1986-01-01

    We propose a serological classification of Haemophilus parasuis into at least five serovars, using an agar-gel-precipitation test with extracts from autoclaved cells. Thirty-two strains were examined, and it was possible to classify 26 of them. The specific antigens were thermostable and soluble and were not affected by pronase treatment but could be extracted by phenol, suggesting a polysaccharide. This polysaccharide seemed to be identical with the capsular substance of serovars 1, 2, and 3. In the presumably uncapsulated strains of serovars 4 and 5, the specific antigen was probably located in the outer membrane. The diversity of the specific substance within the different serotypes was shown by the differences in their electrophoretic migration patterns. Other extraction procedures showed that the washing supernatant and extracts at 60 and 100 degrees C were identical with the 121 degrees C extracts for serovars 1, 2, and 3. In serovars 4 and 5, washing antigens, if present, were different from 100 and 121 degrees C extracts. Other common antigens, presumably proteinaceous antigens, were detected after extraction at 60 and 100 degrees C. The slide and tube agglutination tests allowed classification only for the capsulated strains of serovars 1, 2, and 3. The specific agglutinogens were very sensitive to incubation temperature, and the absorption test showed them to be identical with the 121 degrees C precipitinogens. Images PMID:3086374

  8. Variable number of tandem repeats in clinical strains of Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed Central

    van Belkum, A; Scherer, S; van Leeuwen, W; Willemse, D; van Alphen, L; Verbrugh, H

    1997-01-01

    An algorithm capable of identifying short repeat motifs was developed and used to screen the whole genome sequence available for Haemophilus influenzae, since some of these repeats have been shown to affect bacterial virulence. Various di- to hexanucleotide repeats were identified, confirming and extending previous findings on the existence of variable-number-of-tandem-repeat loci (VNTRs). Repeats with units of 7 or 8 nucleotides were not encountered. For all of the 3- to 6-nucleotide repeats in the H. influenzae chromosome, PCR tests capable of detecting allelic polymorphisms were designed. Fourteen of 18 of the potential VNTRs were indeed highly polymorphic when different strains were screened. Two of the potential VNTRs appeared to be short and homogeneous in length; another one may be specific for the H. influenzae Rd strain only. One of the primer sets generated fingerprint-type DNA banding patterns. The various repeat types differed with respect to intrinsic stability as well. It was noted for separate colonies derived from a single clinical specimen or strains passaged for several weeks on chocolate agar plates that the lengths of the VNTRs did not change. When several strains from different patients infected during an outbreak of lung disease were analyzed, increased but limited variation was encountered in all VNTR sites analyzed. One of the 5-nucleotide VNTRs proved to be hypervariable. This variability may reflect the molecular basis of a mechanism used by H. influenzae bacteria to successfully colonize and infect different human individuals. PMID:9393791

  9. Differences in Haemophilus parasuis adherence to and invasion of AOC-45 porcine aorta endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The pathogenesis of Haemophilus parasuis depends on the bacterium’s ability to interact with endothelial cells and invade adjacent tissues. In this study, we investigated the abilities of eight H. parasuis reference strains belonging to serovars 1, 2, 4, 5, 7, 9, 10 and 13 to adhere to and invade porcine aortic endothelial cells (AOC-45 cell line). Results The strains belonging to serovars 1, 2 and 5 were able to attach at high rates between 60 and 240 min of incubation, and serovars 4, 7 and 13 had moderate attachment rates; however, the strains belonging to serovars 9 and 10 had low adherence at all time points. Strong adherence was observed by scanning electron microscopy for the strains of serovars 5 and 4, which had high and moderate numbers, respectively, of H. parasuis cells attached to AOC-45 cells after 240 min of incubation. The highest invasiveness was reached at 180 min by the serovar 4 strain, followed by the serovar 5 strain at 240 min. The invasion results differed substantially depending on the strain. Conclusion The reference strains of H. parasuis serovars 1, 2, 4 and 5 exhibited high adhesion and invasion levels to AOC-45 porcine aorta endothelial cells, and these findings could aid to better explain the pathogenesis of the disease caused by these serovars. PMID:24119995

  10. Virulence of South African isolates of Haemophilus paragallinarum. Part 1: NAD-dependent field isolates.

    PubMed

    Bragg, R R

    2002-06-01

    The virulence of four South African field isolates of NAD-dependent Haemophilus paragallinarum, representing the four serovars known to occur in that country, was investigated. During this study an alternative challenge model for infectious coryza was used, in which the infectivity as well the virulence of different isolates could be evaluated. The challenge model consisted of the direct challenge, via intrasinus injection of one chicken in a row of interconnected layer cages, containing 10 chickens, which are subsequently infected by natural routes. A scoring system of the clinical signs was established in which a score is given to the ability of the isolate to produce clinical signs in the challenge birds. The mean daily disease score for the flock can be calculated and plotted on a graph to give a graphic representation of the disease profile. A mean disease score, calculated over a 20-day examination period can be calculated. Isolates can then be compared to each other, either graphically or by a comparison of the mean disease scores. It has been demonstrated using this scoring system that the South African serogroup C isolates appear to be more virulent than the South African serogroup A or B isolates. It was further established that the serovar C-3 isolate appeared to be the most virulent.

  11. A biphasic epigenetic switch controls immunoevasion, virulence and niche adaptation in non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed

    Atack, John M; Srikhanta, Yogitha N; Fox, Kate L; Jurcisek, Joseph A; Brockman, Kenneth L; Clark, Tyson A; Boitano, Matthew; Power, Peter M; Jen, Freda E-C; McEwan, Alastair G; Grimmond, Sean M; Smith, Arnold L; Barenkamp, Stephen J; Korlach, Jonas; Bakaletz, Lauren O; Jennings, Michael P

    2015-01-01

    Non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae contains an N(6)-adenine DNA-methyltransferase (ModA) that is subject to phase-variable expression (random ON/OFF switching). Five modA alleles, modA2, modA4, modA5, modA9 and modA10, account for over two-thirds of clinical otitis media isolates surveyed. Here, we use single molecule, real-time (SMRT) methylome analysis to identify the DNA-recognition motifs for all five of these modA alleles. Phase variation of these alleles regulates multiple proteins including vaccine candidates, and key virulence phenotypes such as antibiotic resistance (modA2, modA5, modA10), biofilm formation (modA2) and immunoevasion (modA4). Analyses of a modA2 strain in the chinchilla model of otitis media show a clear selection for ON switching of modA2 in the middle ear. Our results indicate that a biphasic epigenetic switch can control bacterial virulence, immunoevasion and niche adaptation in an animal model system.

  12. HtrA Is Important for Stress Resistance and Virulence in Haemophilus parasuis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Luhua; Li, Ying; Wen, Yiping; Lau, Gee W.; Huang, Xiaobo; Wu, Rui; Yan, Qigui; Huang, Yong; Zhao, Qin; Ma, Xiaoping

    2016-01-01

    Haemophilus parasuis is an opportunistic pathogen that causes Glässer's disease in swine, with polyserositis, meningitis, and arthritis. The high-temperature requirement A (HtrA)-like protease, which is involved in protein quality control, has been reported to be a virulence factor in many pathogens. In this study, we showed that HtrA of H. parasuis (HpHtrA) exhibited both chaperone and protease activities. Finally, nickel import ATP-binding protein (NikE), periplasmic dipeptide transport protein (DppA), and outer membrane protein A (OmpA) were identified as proteolytic substrates for HpHtrA. The protease activity reached its maximum at 40°C in a time-dependent manner. Disruption of the htrA gene from strain SC1401 affected tolerance to temperature stress and resistance to complement-mediated killing. Furthermore, increased autoagglutination and biofilm formation were detected in the htrA mutant. In addition, the htrA mutant was significantly attenuated in virulence in the murine model of infection. Together, these data demonstrate that HpHtrA plays an important role in the virulence of H. parasuis. PMID:27217419

  13. Overlapping and complementary oxidative stress defense mechanisms in nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Alistair; Baker, Beth D; Munson, Robert S

    2015-01-01

    The Gram-negative commensal bacterium nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHI) can cause respiratory tract diseases that include otitis media, sinusitis, exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and bronchitis. During colonization and infection, NTHI withstands oxidative stress generated by reactive oxygen species produced endogenously, by the host, and by other copathogens and flora. These reactive oxygen species include superoxide, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and hydroxyl radicals, whose killing is amplified by iron via the Fenton reaction. We previously identified genes that encode proteins with putative roles in protection of the NTHI isolate strain 86-028NP against oxidative stress. These include catalase (HktE), peroxiredoxin/glutaredoxin (PgdX), and a ferritin-like protein (Dps). Strains were generated with mutations in hktE, pgdX, and dps. The hktE mutant and a pgdX hktE double mutant were more sensitive than the parent to killing by H2O2. Conversely, the pgdX mutant was more resistant to H2O2 due to increased catalase activity. Supporting the role of killing via the Fenton reaction, binding of iron by Dps significantly mitigated the effect of H2O2-mediated killing. NTHI thus utilizes several effectors to resist oxidative stress, and regulation of free iron is critical to this protection. These mechanisms will be important for successful colonization and infection by this opportunistic human pathogen. PMID:25368297

  14. [Relationship between protein binding and antimicrobial activities of antibiotics against Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae].

    PubMed

    Sakata, Hiroshi

    2006-10-01

    Fifty isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae and 42 isolates of Haemophilus influenzae were isolated from the blood of children admitted to pediatric wards of hospitals in subprefucture between January 1998 and December 2005. The susceptibilities were measured by a microbroth dilution method using a standard broth and a broth containing 4.5% albumin. Against S. pneumoniae, penicillin G, ampicillin, cefotaxime, ceftriaxone, panipenem, meropenem, vancomycin, cefditoren, cefcapene, cefteram, faropenem and tebipenem were used and against H. influenzae, ampicillin, piperacillin, cefotaxime, ceftriaxone, panipenem, meropenem, clavulanic acid/ amoxicillin, cefditoren, cefcapene, cefteram, faropenem and tebipenem were used. Against S. pneumoniae, tebipenem was the highest antimicrobial activity in oral antibiotics (MIC90; < or = 0.06 microg/ml) and panipenem showed the highest activity for intravenous antibiotics (MIC90; < or = 0.12 microg/ml). Against H. influenzae, cefditoren was the highest activity for oral antibiotics (MIC90; < or = 0.06 microg/ml) and meropenem showed the highest activity for intravenous antibiotics (MIC90; < or = 50.06 microg/ml). The MIC90s measured by albumin containing broth were higher than those measured by standard broth. Protein binding rates of ceftriaxone, cefditoren, and faropenem were greater than 90%, and the MIC90 of these antibiotics measured by albumin addition methods were over 4-fold higher than those measured by standard methods. PMID:17180806

  15. Molecular Epidemiology of Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae Causing Community-Acquired Pneumonia in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Puig, Carmen; Calatayud, Laura; Martí, Sara; Tubau, Fe; Garcia-Vidal, Carolina; Carratalà, Jordi; Liñares, Josefina; Ardanuy, Carmen

    2013-01-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) is an opportunistic pathogen which causes a variety of respiratory infections. The objectives of the study were to determine its antimicrobial susceptibility, to characterize the β-lactam resistance, and to establish a genetic characterization of NTHi isolates. Ninety-five NTHi isolates were analyzed by pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multi locus sequence typing (MLST). Antimicrobial susceptibility was determined by microdilution, and the ftsI gene (encoding penicillin-binding protein 3, PBP3) was PCR amplified and sequenced. Thirty (31.6%) isolates were non-susceptible to ampicillin (MIC≥2 mg/L), with 10 of them producing β-lactamase type TEM-1 as a resistance mechanism. After ftsI sequencing, 39 (41.1%) isolates showed amino acid substitutions in PBP3, with Asn526→ Lys being the most common (69.2%). Eighty-four patients were successfully treated with amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, ceftriaxone and levofloxacin. Eight patients died due either to aspiration or complication of their comorbidities. In conclusion, NTHi causing CAP in adults shows high genetic diversity and is associated with a high rate of reduced susceptibility to ampicillin due to alterations in PBP3. The analysis of treatment and outcomes demonstrated that NTHi strains with mutations in the ftsI gene could be successfully treated with ceftriaxone or fluoroquinolones. PMID:24349303

  16. Nontypable Haemophilus influenzae Displays a Prevalent Surface Structure Molecular Pattern in Clinical Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Mauro, Silvia; Hood, Derek W.; Viadas, Cristina; Calatayud, Laura; Morey, Pau; Servin, Alain; Liñares, Josefina; Oliver, Antonio; Bengoechea, José Antonio; Garmendia, Junkal

    2011-01-01

    Non-typable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) is a Gram negative pathogen that causes acute respiratory infections and is associated with the progression of chronic respiratory diseases. Previous studies have established the existence of a remarkable genetic variability among NTHi strains. In this study we show that, in spite of a high level of genetic heterogeneity, NTHi clinical isolates display a prevalent molecular feature, which could confer fitness during infectious processes. A total of 111 non-isogenic NTHi strains from an identical number of patients, isolated in two distinct geographical locations in the same period of time, were used to analyse nine genes encoding bacterial surface molecules, and revealed the existence of one highly prevalent molecular pattern (lgtF+, lic2A+, lic1D+, lic3A+, lic3B+, siaA−, lic2C+, ompP5+, oapA+) displayed by 94.6% of isolates. Such a genetic profile was associated with a higher bacterial resistance to serum mediated killing and enhanced adherence to human respiratory epithelial cells. PMID:21698169

  17. Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae Induces Sustained Lung Oxidative Stress and Protease Expression

    PubMed Central

    King, Paul T.; Sharma, Roleen; O’Sullivan, Kim; Selemidis, Stavros; Lim, Steven; Radhakrishna, Naghmeh; Lo, Camden; Prasad, Jyotika; Callaghan, Judy; McLaughlin, Peter; Farmer, Michael; Steinfort, Daniel; Jennings, Barton; Ngui, James; Broughton, Bradley R. S.; Thomas, Belinda; Essilfie, Ama-Tawiah; Hickey, Michael; Holmes, Peter W.; Hansbro, Philip; Bardin, Philip G.; Holdsworth, Stephen R.

    2015-01-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) is a prevalent bacterium found in a variety of chronic respiratory diseases. The role of this bacterium in the pathogenesis of lung inflammation is not well defined. In this study we examined the effect of NTHi on two important lung inflammatory processes 1), oxidative stress and 2), protease expression. Bronchoalveolar macrophages were obtained from 121 human subjects, blood neutrophils from 15 subjects, and human-lung fibroblast and epithelial cell lines from 16 subjects. Cells were stimulated with NTHi to measure the effect on reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and extracellular trap formation. We also measured the production of the oxidant, 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT) in the lungs of mice infected with this bacterium. NTHi induced widespread production of 3-NT in mouse lungs. This bacterium induced significantly increased ROS production in human fibroblasts, epithelial cells, macrophages and neutrophils; with the highest levels in the phagocytic cells. In human macrophages NTHi caused a sustained, extracellular production of ROS that increased over time. The production of ROS was associated with the formation of macrophage extracellular trap-like structures which co-expressed the protease metalloproteinase-12. The formation of the macrophage extracellular trap-like structures was markedly inhibited by the addition of DNase. In this study we have demonstrated that NTHi induces lung oxidative stress with macrophage extracellular trap formation and associated protease expression. DNase inhibited the formation of extracellular traps. PMID:25793977

  18. Shp2 Deficiency Impairs the Inflammatory Response Against Haemophilus influenzae by Regulating Macrophage Polarization.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lifang; Xia, Jingyan; Li, Tiantian; Zhou, Hui; Ouyang, Wei; Hong, Zhuping; Ke, Yuehai; Qian, Jing; Xu, Feng

    2016-08-15

    Macrophages can polarize and differentiate to regulate initiation, development, and cessation of inflammation during pulmonary infection with nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi). However, the underlying molecular mechanisms driving macrophage phenotypic differentiation are largely unclear. Our study investigated the role of Shp2, a Src homology 2 domain-containing phosphatase, in the regulation of pulmonary inflammation and bacterial clearance. Shp2 levels were increased upon NTHi stimulation. Selective inhibition of Shp2 in mice led to an attenuated inflammatory response by skewing macrophages toward alternatively activated macrophage (M2) polarization. Upon pulmonary NTHi infection, Shp2(-/-) mice, in which the gene encoding Shp2 in monocytes/macrophages was deleted, showed an impaired inflammatory response and decreased antibacterial ability, compared with wild-type controls. In vitro data demonstrated that Shp2 regulated activated macrophage (M1) gene expression via activation of p65-nuclear factor-κB signaling, independent of p38 and extracellular regulated kinase-mitogen-activated proteins kinase signaling pathways. Taken together, our study indicates that Shp2 is required to orchestrate macrophage function and regulate host innate immunity against pulmonary bacterial infection.

  19. Naturally Acquired Antibodies against Haemophilus influenzae Type a in Aboriginal Adults, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Nix, Eli B.; Williams, Kylie; Cox, Andrew D.; St. Michael, Frank; Romero-Steiner, Sandra; Schmidt, Daniel S.; McCready, William G.

    2015-01-01

    In the post-Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) vaccine era that began in the 1980's, H. influenzae type a (Hia) emerged as a prominent cause of invasive disease in North American Aboriginal populations. To test whether a lack of naturally acquired antibodies may underlie increased rates of invasive Hia disease, we compared serum bactericidal activity against Hia and Hib and IgG and IgM against capsular polysaccharide between Canadian Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal healthy and immunocompromised adults. Both healthy and immunocompromised Aboriginal adults exhibited significantly higher bactericidal antibody titers against Hia than did non-Aboriginal adults (p = 0.042 and 0.045 respectively), with no difference in functional antibody activity against Hib. IgM concentrations against Hia were higher than IgG in most study groups; the inverse was true for antibody concentrations against Hib. Our results indicate that Aboriginal adults possess substantial serum bactericidal activity against Hia that is mostly due to IgM antibodies. The presence of sustained IgM against Hia suggests recent Hia exposure. PMID:25626129

  20. Invasive Haemophilus influenzae Serotype f Case Reports in Mazovia Province, Poland.

    PubMed

    Golebiewska, Anna; Kuch, Alicja; Gawrońska, Agnieszka; Albrecht, Piotr; Skoczyńska, Anna; Radzikowski, Andrzej; Kutylowska, Ewa; Feleszko, Wojciech

    2016-02-01

    After successful introduction of anti-Haemophilus influenzae (Hi) serotype b vaccination program in Poland, invasive non-b or nontypeable H. influenzae infections have been reported more frequently alike in other countries all over the world. In this paper, we report 2 cases of H. influenzae serotype f (Hif) meningitis with severe clinical presentations which are rarely seen in previously healthy children.The first case is a 6-year-old girl who was admitted to pediatric ward with signs of meningitis. Laboratory tests confirmed bacteremic meningitis caused by Hif. The girl responded very well to administered treatment and recovered without any further complications. No underlying comorbidities were found. The second patient was a 4-year-old boy who, in course of Hif bacteremic meningitis, developed rapid septicemia and, despite aggressive treatment, died within a few hours of hospitalization. The child's past history was unremarkable.By presenting these cases, we would like to remind clinicians that invasive non-b Hi infections can become fatal not only in the group of the youngest children or children with coexisting comorbidities, as most commonly reported in the worldwide literature. At the same time, we want to emphasize the legitimacy of constant monitoring Hi epidemiology in order to take accurate actions if necessary.

  1. Structural Analysis of Substrate, Reaction Intermediate, and Product Binding in Haemophilus influenzae Biotin Carboxylase

    PubMed Central

    Broussard, Tyler C.; Pakhomova, Svetlana; Neau, David B.; Bonnot, Ross; Waldrop, Grover L.

    2015-01-01

    Acetyl-CoA carboxylase catalyzes the first and regulated step in fatty acid synthesis. In most Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, the enzyme is composed of three proteins: biotin carboxylase, a biotin carboxyl carrier protein (BCCP), and carboxyltransferase. The reaction mechanism involves two half-reactions with biotin carboxylase catalyzing the ATP-dependent carboxylation of biotin-BCCP in the first reaction. In the second reaction, carboxyltransferase catalyzes the transfer of the carboxyl group from biotin-BCCP to acetyl-CoA to form malonyl-CoA. In this report, high-resolution crystal structures of biotin carboxylase from Haemophilus influenzae were determined with bicarbonate, the ATP analogue AMPPCP; the carboxyphosphate intermediate analogues, phosphonoacetamide and phosphonoformate; the products ADP and phosphate; and the carboxybiotin analogue N1′-methoxycarbonyl biotin methyl ester. The structures have a common theme in that bicarbonate, phosphate, and the methyl ester of the carboxyl group of N1′-methoxycarbonyl biotin methyl ester all bound in the same pocket in the active site of biotin carboxylase and as such utilize the same set of amino acids for binding. This finding suggests a catalytic mechanism for biotin carboxylase in which the binding pocket that binds tetrahedral phosphate also accommodates and stabilizes a tetrahedral dianionic transition state resulting from direct transfer of CO2 from the carboxyphosphate intermediate to biotin. PMID:26020841

  2. Structural basis for haem piracy from host haemopexin by Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed

    Zambolin, Silvia; Clantin, Bernard; Chami, Mohamed; Hoos, Sylviane; Haouz, Ahmed; Villeret, Vincent; Delepelaire, Philippe

    2016-05-18

    Haemophilus influenzae is an obligate human commensal/pathogen that requires haem for survival and can acquire it from several host haemoproteins, including haemopexin. The haem transport system from haem-haemopexin consists of HxuC, a haem receptor, and the two-partner-secretion system HxuB/HxuA. HxuA, which is exposed at the cell surface, is strictly required for haem acquisition from haemopexin. HxuA forms complexes with haem-haemopexin, leading to haem release and its capture by HxuC. The key question is how HxuA liberates haem from haemopexin. Here, we solve crystal structures of HxuA alone, and HxuA in complex with the N-terminal domain of haemopexin. A rational basis for the release of haem from haem-haemopexin is derived from both in vivo and in vitro studies. HxuA acts as a wedge that destabilizes the two-domains structure of haemopexin with a mobile loop on HxuA that favours haem ejection by redirecting key residues in the haem-binding pocket of haemopexin.

  3. Antisera Against Certain Conserved Surface-Exposed Peptides of Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae Are Protective

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) cause significant disease, including otitis media in children, exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and invasive disease in susceptible populations. No vaccine is currently available to prevent NTHi disease. The interactions of NTHi and the human host are primarily mediated by lipooligosaccharide and a complex array of surface-exposed proteins (SEPs) that act as receptors, sensors and secretion systems. We hypothesized that certain SEPs are present in all NTHi strains and that a subset of these may be antibody accessible and represent protective epitopes. Initially we used 15 genomic sequences available in the GenBank database along with an additional 11 genomic sequences generated by ourselves to identify the core set of putative SEPs present in all strains. Using bioinformatics, 56 core SEPs were identified. Molecular modeling generated putative structures of the SEPs from which potential surface exposed regions were defined. Synthetic peptides corresponding to ten of these highly conserved surface-exposed regions were used to raise antisera in rats. These antisera were used to assess passive protection in the infant rat model of invasive NTHi infection. Five of the antisera were protective, thus demonstrating their in vivo antibody accessibility. These five peptide regions represent potential targets for peptide vaccine candidates to protect against NTHi infection. PMID:26390432

  4. Why we need a vaccine for non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed

    Cerquetti, Marina; Giufrè, Maria

    2016-09-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) is increasingly recognized as emerging pathogen. The routine immunization of infants with conjugated vaccines against H. influenzae type b (Hib) has greatly reduced the incidence of invasive Hib disease; however a marked change in the predominant invasive serotype from Hib to NTHi has occurred. Localized infections where the role of H. influenzae is important, such as otitis media in children and acute exacerbations in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in adults, are almost exclusively associated with NTHi isolates. The implementation of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines has resulted in changes in frequency of nasopharynx colonizing pathogens with an increase of NTHi, although this data is yet under debate. An effective vaccine against NTHi is not currently available. The major challenge in developing a successful vaccine is the intrinsic heterogeneity of NTHi. H. influenzae protein D is used as carrier protein in the licensed 10-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (Synflorix, GlaxoSmithKline), but no robust evidences for protective efficacy against NTHi otitis have been until now obtained. Several other vaccine candidates are under investigations and we hope that significant advancements in vaccine development will be achieved in the next future. Genome-based vaccine strategy might provide an additional useful tool for discovering further vaccine antigens.

  5. Lipopolysaccharide subtypes of Haemophilus influenzae type b from an outbreak of invasive disease.

    PubMed Central

    Inzana, T J; Pichichero, M E

    1984-01-01

    Thirty isolates of Haemophilus influenzae type b were obtained during an outbreak of invasive H. influenzae type b disease and were classified by the electrophoretic profile of their lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The LPS was extracted by a rapid micromethod and analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and silver staining. The isolates could be divided into 1 of 14 subtypes based on the profile of two to four bands. No subtype was predominant. However, all isolates obtained from duplicate sites of the same individual were of the same subtype. Isolates obtained from two patients (6 weeks apart) who attended the same day-care center differed in LPS subtype but were identical in their major outer membrane protein electrophoretic profile. Nasopharyngeal cultures were obtained from healthy children, their immediate families, and employees of the day-care center. Of 13 H. influenzae isolates examined from these contacts, only 1 was type b, which was obtained from a day-care worker and had the same LPS subtype and major outer membrane protein electrophoretic profile as one of the disease isolates. The remaining nasopharyngeal isolates were untypable, and most, but not all, were different in LPS pattern. Thus, LPS subtyping of H. influenzae type b may be useful in examining the predominance or transmission of a strain during an outbreak and may distinguish some strains not differentiated by outer membrane protein pattern. Images PMID:6333433

  6. Recognition of Nucleoside Monophosphate Substrates by Haemophilus influenzae Class C Acid Phosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Harkewal; Schuermann, Jonathan P.; Reilly, Thomas J.; Calcutt, Michael J.; Tanner, John J.

    2010-12-08

    The e (P4) phosphatase from Haemophilus influenzae functions in a vestigial NAD{sup +} utilization pathway by dephosphorylating nicotinamide mononucleotide to nicotinamide riboside. P4 is also the prototype of class C acid phosphatases (CCAPs), which are nonspecific 5{prime},3{prime}-nucleotidases localized to the bacterial outer membrane. To understand substrate recognition by P4 and other class C phosphatases, we have determined the crystal structures of a substrate-trapping mutant P4 enzyme complexed with nicotinamide mononucleotide, 5{prime}-AMP, 3{prime}-AMP, and 2{prime}-AMP. The structures reveal an anchor-shaped substrate-binding cavity comprising a conserved hydrophobic box that clamps the nucleotide base, a buried phosphoryl binding site, and three solvent-filled pockets that contact the ribose and the hydrogen-bonding edge of the base. The span between the hydrophobic box and the phosphoryl site is optimal for recognizing nucleoside monophosphates, explaining the general preference for this class of substrate. The base makes no hydrogen bonds with the enzyme, consistent with an observed lack of base specificity. Two solvent-filled pockets flanking the ribose are key to the dual recognition of 5{prime}-nucleotides and 3{prime}-nucleotides. These pockets minimize the enzyme's direct interactions with the ribose and provide sufficient space to accommodate 5{prime} substrates in an anti conformation and 3{prime} substrates in a syn conformation. Finally, the structures suggest that class B acid phosphatases and CCAPs share a common strategy for nucleotide recognition.

  7. Recognition of nucleoside monophosphate substrates by Haemophilus influenzae class C acid phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Singh, Harkewal; Schuermann, Jonathan P; Reilly, Thomas J; Calcutt, Michael J; Tanner, John J

    2010-12-10

    The e (P4) phosphatase from Haemophilus influenzae functions in a vestigial NAD(+) utilization pathway by dephosphorylating nicotinamide mononucleotide to nicotinamide riboside. P4 is also the prototype of class C acid phosphatases (CCAPs), which are nonspecific 5',3'-nucleotidases localized to the bacterial outer membrane. To understand substrate recognition by P4 and other class C phosphatases, we have determined the crystal structures of a substrate-trapping mutant P4 enzyme complexed with nicotinamide mononucleotide, 5'-AMP, 3'-AMP, and 2'-AMP. The structures reveal an anchor-shaped substrate-binding cavity comprising a conserved hydrophobic box that clamps the nucleotide base, a buried phosphoryl binding site, and three solvent-filled pockets that contact the ribose and the hydrogen-bonding edge of the base. The span between the hydrophobic box and the phosphoryl site is optimal for recognizing nucleoside monophosphates, explaining the general preference for this class of substrate. The base makes no hydrogen bonds with the enzyme, consistent with an observed lack of base specificity. Two solvent-filled pockets flanking the ribose are key to the dual recognition of 5'-nucleotides and 3'-nucleotides. These pockets minimize the enzyme's direct interactions with the ribose and provide sufficient space to accommodate 5' substrates in an anti conformation and 3' substrates in a syn conformation. Finally, the structures suggest that class B acid phosphatases and CCAPs share a common strategy for nucleotide recognition. PMID:20934434

  8. Antigenicity and immunogenicity of a synthetic oligosaccharide-protein conjugate vaccine against Haemophilus influenzae type b.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Santana, V; Cardoso, Félix; Rodriguez, Arlene; Carmenate, Tania; Peña, Luis; Valdés, Yuri; Hardy, Eugenio; Mawas, Fatme; Heynngnezz, Lazaro; Rodríguez, Maria C; Figueroa, Ignacio; Chang, Janoi; Toledo, Maria E; Musacchio, Alexis; Hernández, Ibis; Izquierdo, Mabel; Cosme, Karelia; Roy, Rene; Verez-Bencomo, V

    2004-12-01

    Polysaccharide-protein conjugates as vaccines have proven to be very effective in preventing Haemophilus influenzae type b infections in industrialized countries. However, cost-effective technologies need to be developed for increasing the availability of anti-H. influenzae type b vaccines in countries from the developing world. Consequently, vaccine production with partially synthetic antigens is a desirable goal for many reasons. They may be rigidly controlled for purity and effectiveness while at the same time being cheap enough that they may be made universally available. We describe here the antigenicity and immunogenicity of several H. influenzae type b synthetic oligosaccharide-protein conjugates in laboratory animals. The serum of H. influenzae type b-immunized animals recognized our synthetic H. influenzae type b antigens to the same extent as the native bacterial capsular polysaccharide. Compared to the anti-H. influenzae type b vaccine employed, these synthetic versions induced similar antibody response patterns in terms of titer, specificity, and functional capacity. The further development of synthetic vaccines will meet urgent needs in the less prosperous parts of the world and remains our major goal.

  9. Spectrum and burden of severe Haemophilus influenzae type b diseases in Asia.

    PubMed Central

    Peltola, H.

    1999-01-01

    The validity of the commonly held view that Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) diseases are rare in Asia is challenged in this article by a thorough analysis of the data available, often in languages other than English. The entire spectrum of Hib disease, not only meningitis, was taken into account, and over 100 reports from 25 countries were explored. Hib was the leading agent among nontuberculous childhood meningitis cases in two-thirds of 48 studies from 22 countries. Data from six countries showed that all the classical manifestations of invasive Hib diseases are also found in Asia, except epiglottitis, which was nearly absent. In Hong Kong Special Administrative Region of China Hib disease is rare, but otherwise the incidences seemed not to deviate much from those in Europe until recently, around 25 per 100,000 for meningitis and at least 40 per 100,000 per year for the classical Hib manifestations combined at age 0-4 years. In total, more than 200,000 cases of Hib disease are estimated to occur annually in Asia. Because nonbacteraemic Hib pneumonia remains mostly undetected, the total burden is probably significantly greater. The issue will be fully elucidated only by prospective epidemiological and clinical studies, but awaiting them should not delay large-scale vaccinations against Hib throughout Asia. PMID:10612883

  10. Development and technology transfer of Haemophilus influenzae type b conjugate vaccines for developing countries.

    PubMed

    Beurret, Michel; Hamidi, Ahd; Kreeftenberg, Hans

    2012-07-13

    This paper describes the development of a Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) conjugate vaccine at the National Institute for Public Health and the Environment/Netherlands Vaccine Institute (RIVM/NVI, Bilthoven, The Netherlands), and the subsequent transfer of its production process to manufacturers in developing countries. In 1998, at the outset of the project, the majority of the world's children were not immunized against Hib because of the high price and limited supply of the conjugate vaccines, due partly to the fact that local manufacturers in developing countries did not master the Hib conjugate production technology. To address this problem, the RIVM/NVI has developed a robust Hib conjugate vaccine production process based on a proven model, and transferred this technology to several partners in India, Indonesia, Korea and China. As a result, emerging manufacturers in developing countries acquired modern technologies previously unavailable to them. This has in turn facilitated their approach to producing other conjugate vaccines. As an additional spin-off from the project, a World Health Organization (WHO) Hib quality control (QC) course was designed and conducted at the RIVM/NVI, resulting in an increased regulatory capacity for conjugate vaccines in developing countries at the National Regulatory Authority (NRA) level. For the local populations, this has translated into an increased and sustainable supply of affordable Hib conjugate-containing combination vaccines. During the course of this project, developing countries have demonstrated their ability to produce large quantities of high-quality modern vaccines after a successful transfer of the technology.

  11. A biphasic epigenetic switch controls immunoevasion, virulence and niche adaptation in non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed

    Atack, John M; Srikhanta, Yogitha N; Fox, Kate L; Jurcisek, Joseph A; Brockman, Kenneth L; Clark, Tyson A; Boitano, Matthew; Power, Peter M; Jen, Freda E-C; McEwan, Alastair G; Grimmond, Sean M; Smith, Arnold L; Barenkamp, Stephen J; Korlach, Jonas; Bakaletz, Lauren O; Jennings, Michael P

    2015-01-01

    Non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae contains an N(6)-adenine DNA-methyltransferase (ModA) that is subject to phase-variable expression (random ON/OFF switching). Five modA alleles, modA2, modA4, modA5, modA9 and modA10, account for over two-thirds of clinical otitis media isolates surveyed. Here, we use single molecule, real-time (SMRT) methylome analysis to identify the DNA-recognition motifs for all five of these modA alleles. Phase variation of these alleles regulates multiple proteins including vaccine candidates, and key virulence phenotypes such as antibiotic resistance (modA2, modA5, modA10), biofilm formation (modA2) and immunoevasion (modA4). Analyses of a modA2 strain in the chinchilla model of otitis media show a clear selection for ON switching of modA2 in the middle ear. Our results indicate that a biphasic epigenetic switch can control bacterial virulence, immunoevasion and niche adaptation in an animal model system. PMID:26215614

  12. Major subtypes of invasive Haemophilus influenzae from 1983 to 1985 in Atlanta, Ga.

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, J A; Pigott, N; Cochi, S L; Facklam, R R

    1990-01-01

    We compared outer membrane protein (OMP) patterns of Haemophilus influenzae isolated in metropolitan Atlanta, Ga., from July 1983 to June 1985. Of 74 randomly selected H. influenzae serotype b, biotype I, isolates (24% of the total number of H. influenzae, and 32% of the total number of H. influenzae serotype b, biotype I, isolates), 66 (89.2%) had the same OMP pattern. Of the remaining eight, five (6.7%) had an identical OMP pattern. The other three isolates had separate and distinct patterns. A greater diversity of OMP patterns was found with H. influenzae serotype b, biotype II, and nonserotypeable H. influenzae. Of the 18 H. influenzae serotype b, biotype II, isolates (5.8% of the total number of H. influenzae isolates), 1 had an OMP pattern similar to that of the predominate biotype I OMP type, 6 (33% of the biotype II) had the same pattern, and 11 had heterogeneous patterns. Of the 19 recoverable, nonserotypeable biotype II isolates (6.8% of the total number of H. influenzae), 18 had different OMP patterns, and no pattern was similar to those observed with serotype b. These findings indicate that most H. influenzae strains isolated during this 2-year period were indistinguishable by serotype, biotype, or OMP patterns. Images PMID:2191007

  13. Molecular cloning, expression, and sequence of the pilin gene from nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae M37.

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, T; Grass, S; Munson, R

    1991-01-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae M37 adheres to human buccal epithelial cells and exhibits mannose-resistant hemagglutination of human erythrocytes. An isogenic variant of this strain which was deficient in hemagglutination was isolated. A protein with an apparent molecular weight of 22,000 was present in the sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel profile of sarcosyl-insoluble proteins from the hemagglutination-proficient strain but was absent from the profile of the isogenic hemagglutination-deficient variant. A monoclonal antibody which reacts with the hemagglutination-proficient isolate but not with the hemagglutination-deficient isolate has been characterized. This monoclonal antibody was employed in an affinity column for purification of the protein as well as to screen a genomic library for recombinant clones expressing the gene. Several clones which contained overlapping genomic fragments were identified by reaction with the monoclonal antibody. The gene for the 22-kDa protein was subcloned and sequenced. The gene for the type b pilin from H. influenzae type b strain MinnA was also cloned and sequenced. The DNA sequence of the strain MinnA gene was identical to that reported previously for two other type b strains. The DNA sequence of the strain M37 gene is 77% identical to that of the type b pilin gene, and the derived amino acid sequence is 68% identical to that of the type b pilin. Images PMID:1673447

  14. Lower airway colonization and inflammatory response in COPD: a focus on Haemophilus influenzae

    PubMed Central

    Finney, Lydia J; Ritchie, Andrew; Pollard, Elizabeth; Johnston, Sebastian L; Mallia, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial infection of the lower respiratory tract in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients is common both in stable patients and during acute exacerbations. The most frequent bacteria detected in COPD patients is Haemophilus influenzae, and it appears this organism is uniquely adapted to exploit immune deficiencies associated with COPD and to establish persistent infection in the lower respiratory tract. The presence of bacteria in the lower respiratory tract in stable COPD is termed colonization; however, there is increasing evidence that this is not an innocuous phenomenon but is associated with airway inflammation, increased symptoms, and increased risk for exacerbations. In this review, we discuss host immunity that offers protection against H. influenzae and how disturbance of these mechanisms, combined with pathogen mechanisms of immune evasion, promote persistence of H. influenzae in the lower airways in COPD. In addition, we examine the role of H. influenzae in COPD exacerbations, as well as interactions between H. influenzae and respiratory virus infections, and review the role of treatments and their effect on COPD outcomes. This review focuses predominantly on data derived from human studies but will refer to animal studies where they contribute to understanding the disease in humans. PMID:25342897

  15. Overlapping and complementary oxidative stress defense mechanisms in nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Alistair; Baker, Beth D; Munson, Robert S

    2015-01-01

    The Gram-negative commensal bacterium nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHI) can cause respiratory tract diseases that include otitis media, sinusitis, exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and bronchitis. During colonization and infection, NTHI withstands oxidative stress generated by reactive oxygen species produced endogenously, by the host, and by other copathogens and flora. These reactive oxygen species include superoxide, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and hydroxyl radicals, whose killing is amplified by iron via the Fenton reaction. We previously identified genes that encode proteins with putative roles in protection of the NTHI isolate strain 86-028NP against oxidative stress. These include catalase (HktE), peroxiredoxin/glutaredoxin (PgdX), and a ferritin-like protein (Dps). Strains were generated with mutations in hktE, pgdX, and dps. The hktE mutant and a pgdX hktE double mutant were more sensitive than the parent to killing by H2O2. Conversely, the pgdX mutant was more resistant to H2O2 due to increased catalase activity. Supporting the role of killing via the Fenton reaction, binding of iron by Dps significantly mitigated the effect of H2O2-mediated killing. NTHI thus utilizes several effectors to resist oxidative stress, and regulation of free iron is critical to this protection. These mechanisms will be important for successful colonization and infection by this opportunistic human pathogen.

  16. Characterization and Vaccine Potential of Outer Membrane Vesicles Produced by Haemophilus parasuis

    PubMed Central

    McCaig, William D.; Loving, Crystal L.; Hughes, Holly R.; Brockmeier, Susan L.

    2016-01-01

    Haemophilus parasuis is a Gram-negative bacterium that colonizes the upper respiratory tract of swine and is capable of causing a systemic infection, resulting in high morbidity and mortality. H. parasuis isolates display a wide range of virulence and virulence factors are largely unknown. Commercial bacterins are often used to vaccinate swine against H. parasuis, though strain variability and lack of cross-reactivity can make this an ineffective means of protection. Outer membrane vesicles (OMV) are spherical structures naturally released from the membrane of bacteria and OMV are often enriched in toxins, signaling molecules and other bacterial components. Examination of OMV structures has led to identification of virulence factors in a number of bacteria and they have been successfully used as subunit vaccines. We have isolated OMV from both virulent and avirulent strains of H. parasuis, have examined their protein content and assessed their ability to induce an immune response in the host. Vaccination with purified OMV derived from the virulent H. parasuis Nagasaki strain provided protection against challenge with a lethal dose of the bacteria. PMID:26930282

  17. Clinical and Molecular Epidemiology of Haemophilus influenzae Causing Invasive Disease in Adult Patients

    PubMed Central

    Puig, Carmen; Grau, Imma; Tubau, Fe; Calatayud, Laura; Pallares, Roman; Liñares, Josefina

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The epidemiology of invasive Haemophilus influenzae (Hi) has changed since the introduction of the Hi type b (Hib) vaccine. The aim of this study was to analyze the clinical and molecular epidemiology of Hi invasive disease in adults. Methods Clinical data of the 82 patients with Hi invasive infections were analyzed. Antimicrobial susceptibility, serotyping, and genotyping were studied (2008–2013). Results Men accounted for 63.4% of patients (whose mean age was 64.3 years). The most frequent comorbidities were immunosuppressive therapy (34.1%), malignancy (31.7%), diabetes, and COPD (both 22%). The 30-day mortality rate was 20.7%. The majority of the strains (84.3%) were nontypeable (NTHi) and serotype f was the most prevalent serotype in the capsulated strains. The highest antimicrobial resistance was for cotrimoxazole (27.1%) and ampicillin (14.3%). Twenty-three isolates (32.9%) had amino acid changes in the PBP3 involved in resistance. Capsulated strains were clonal and belonged to clonal complexes 6 (serotype b), 124 (serotype f), and 18 (serotype e), whereas NTHi were genetically diverse. Conclusions Invasive Hi disease occurred mainly in elderly and those with underlying conditions, and it was associated with a high mortality rate. NTHi were the most common cause of invasive disease and showed high genetic diversity. PMID:25379704

  18. [Influenza outbreak in weaners with involvement of Mycoplasma hyorhinis and Haemophilus parasuis. A case report].

    PubMed

    Unterweger, Christine; Wöchtl, Bettina; Spergser, Joachim; Brunthaler, Rene; Untersperger, Matthias; Lillie-Jaschniski, Kathrin; Dürrwald, Ralf; Hennig-Pauka, Isabel

    2016-08-17

    In a closed farrow-to-finish piglet producing farm 80% of 7-week-old piglets displayed respiratory disease with a 5% mortality rate. In addition to purulent bronchopneumonia in combination with interstitial pneumonia predominantly in the apical and middle lobes, fibrinous serositis was present in the thoracic and abdominal cavities. Further investigations succeeded in confirming the non-pandemic strain of porcine influenza A virus (FLUAVsw) subtype H1avN1. The molecular genetic studies on Mycoplasma (M.) hyopneumoniae and porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus were negative, whereas M. hyorhinis and Haemophilus parasuis were isolated from serous membranes. The possible importance of the underrated M. hyorhinis as a cofactor for viral infections should be emphasized and we demonstrated that the cause of apical lobe pneumonia is not restricted to M. hyopneumoniae. Mother pigs had been vaccinated with an influenza vaccine covering the subtype H1avN1. Only 33% of the examined piglets had maternal antibodies in the 7th week of life. The difficulty of prophylaxis of infections by FLUAVsw in weaners due to lack of vaccine authorization for piglets before their 56th day is reflected by this observation. PMID:27273027

  19. Structural basis for haem piracy from host haemopexin by Haemophilus influenzae

    PubMed Central

    Zambolin, Silvia; Clantin, Bernard; Chami, Mohamed; Hoos, Sylviane; Haouz, Ahmed; Villeret, Vincent; Delepelaire, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Haemophilus influenzae is an obligate human commensal/pathogen that requires haem for survival and can acquire it from several host haemoproteins, including haemopexin. The haem transport system from haem-haemopexin consists of HxuC, a haem receptor, and the two-partner-secretion system HxuB/HxuA. HxuA, which is exposed at the cell surface, is strictly required for haem acquisition from haemopexin. HxuA forms complexes with haem-haemopexin, leading to haem release and its capture by HxuC. The key question is how HxuA liberates haem from haemopexin. Here, we solve crystal structures of HxuA alone, and HxuA in complex with the N-terminal domain of haemopexin. A rational basis for the release of haem from haem-haemopexin is derived from both in vivo and in vitro studies. HxuA acts as a wedge that destabilizes the two-domains structure of haemopexin with a mobile loop on HxuA that favours haem ejection by redirecting key residues in the haem-binding pocket of haemopexin. PMID:27188378

  20. Development and evaluation of loop-mediated isothermal amplification for rapid detection of Haemophilus parasuis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wang; Ying, Fang; Yingyu, Liu; Pin, Chen; Wentao, Li; Shuqing, Liu; Haoyong, Zou; Qigai, He

    2010-12-01

    Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) is a novel nucleic acid amplification method performed under isothermal conditions and has a high specificity and efficiency. We developed a LAMP assay targeting the 16S rRNA gene for rapid detection of Haemophilus parasuis. The results obtained from testing 31 H. parasuis strains and 28 other bacterial species strains showed that LAMP was as specific as, and more sensitive than, nested PCR. Fifty-five lung samples were collected from 55 healthy pigs. All the samples were negative for H. parasuis by bacterial isolation, nested PCR and LAMP, respectively. In addition, 122 lung samples were collected from 122 pigs with apparent respiratory problems. Sixty-five were positive by bacterial isolation. All the samples that were positive by bacterial isolation were also positive by nested PCR and LAMP. The LAMP assay demonstrated higher sensitivity than nested PCR, picking up 16 additional cases. The LAMP assay also gave a same result compared with the nested PCR when the two assays were used, respectively, to detect H. parasuis from samples obtained from experimentally infected pigs. We concluded that LAMP is a highly sensitive and reliable method for detection of H. parasuis infection.

  1. Molecular Epidemiological Study of Haemophilus influenzae Serotype b Strains Obtained from Children with Meningitis in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Mitsuda, Toshihiro; Kuroki, Haruo; Ishikawa, Nobuyasu; Imagawa, Tomoyuki; Ito, Schuichi; Miyamae, Takako; Mori, Masaaki; Uehara, Suzuko; Yokota, Shumpei

    1999-01-01

    We report an epidemiological study of 30 Haemophilus influenzae serotype b (Hib) strains derived from the cerebrospinal fluid of children with meningitis. The Hib strains were biotyped, tested for β-lactamase production, and genotyped by long PCR-ribotyping, random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis, and genomic DNA restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). The phenotypic study characterized 22 of the strains (73%) as biotype I. A genotypic study using long PCR-ribotyping with HaeIII restriction digestion showed no polymorphisms among these 30 Hib strains, but RAPD analysis with two sets of primers demonstrated two distinctive subtypes: one typical of the strains of biotype group II and the second characteristic of the strains of biotype groups I and IV. Each RAPD group was subtyped into several genotypic groups by PFGE-RFLP with SmaI digestion. The genotyping of clinically isolated Hib strains may help to elucidate transmission routes in community infections, endemicity, and the reasons for vaccine failure. PMID:10405399

  2. Multilocus sequence typing and virulence analysis of Haemophilus parasuis strains isolated in five provinces of China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liyan; Ma, Lina; Liu, Yongan; Gao, Pengcheng; Li, Youquan; Li, Xuerui; Liu, Yongsheng

    2016-10-01

    Haemophilus parasuis is the etiological agent of Glässers disease, which causes high morbidity and mortality in swine herds. Although H. parasuis strains can be classified into 15 serovars with the Kielstein-Rapp-Gabrielson serotyping scheme, a large number of isolates cannot be classified and have been designated 'nontypeable' strains. In this study, multilocus sequence typing (MLST) of H. parasuis was used to analyze 48 H. parasuis field strains isolated in China and two strains from Australia. Twenty-six new alleles and 29 new sequence types (STs) were detected, enriching the H. parasuis MLST databases. A BURST analysis indicated that H. parasuis lacks stable population structure and is highly heterogeneous, and that there is no association between STs and geographic area. When an UPGMA dendrogram was constructed, two major clades, clade A and clade B, were defined. Animal experiments, in which guinea pigs were challenged intraperitoneally with the bacterial isolates, supported the hypothesis that the H. parasuis STs in clade A are generally avirulent or weakly virulent, whereas the STs in clade B tend to be virulent. PMID:27431332

  3. Analysis of Haemophilus influenzae serotype f isolated from three Japanese children with invasive H. influenzae infection.

    PubMed

    Hoshino, Tadashi; Hachisu, Yushi; Kikuchi, Takashi; Tokutake, Shoko; Okui, Hideyuki; Kutsuna, Satoru; Fukasawa, Chie; Murayama, Kei; Oohara, Asami; Shimizu, Hiroyuki; Ito, Midori; Takahashi, Yoshiko; Ishiwada, Naruhiko

    2015-04-01

    In Japan, publicly subsidized Haemophilus influenzae serotype b vaccines became available in 2011; consequently, the incidence of invasive H. influenzae infection in paediatric patients of less than 5 years of age decreased dramatically. In 2013, the first case of H. influenzae serotype f (Hif) meningitis in a Japanese infant was reported, and another case of Hif meningitis in a Japanese infant was observed in 2013. We experienced a fatal paediatric case of Hif bacteraemia in 2004; therefore, we conducted an analysis of the three Hif strains isolated from these three Japanese children with invasive Hif infections. All three strains were β-lactamase-non-producing, ampicillin-sensitive strains, with MICs of 1 µg ml(-1) or less. However, one of the three strains showed slightly elevated MICs for ampicillin (1 µg ml(-1)), cefotaxime (0.25 µg ml(-1)) and meropenem (0.13 µg ml(-1)). A molecular analysis by multilocus sequence typing identified all three strains as sequence type (ST) 124, which is a predominant invasive Hif strain in many countries. SmaI-digested PFGE showed variable DNA fragmentation patterns among the strains, suggesting that some highly virulent strains have originated from a single ST124 clone and caused invasive Hif infections in Japan. Additional studies are needed to determine the factors that have led to the clonal expansion of virulent ST124 strains.

  4. Antigenicity and Immunogenicity of a Synthetic Oligosaccharide-Protein Conjugate Vaccine against Haemophilus influenzae Type b

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Santana, V.; Cardoso, Félix; Rodriguez, Arlene; Carmenate, Tania; Peña, Luis; Valdés, Yuri; Hardy, Eugenio; Mawas, Fatme; Heynngnezz, Lazaro; Rodríguez, Maria C.; Figueroa, Ignacio; Chang, Janoi; Toledo, Maria E.; Musacchio, Alexis; Hernández, Ibis; Izquierdo, Mabel; Cosme, Karelia; Roy, Rene; Verez-Bencomo, V.

    2004-01-01

    Polysaccharide-protein conjugates as vaccines have proven to be very effective in preventing Haemophilus influenzae type b infections in industrialized countries. However, cost-effective technologies need to be developed for increasing the availability of anti-H. influenzae type b vaccines in countries from the developing world. Consequently, vaccine production with partially synthetic antigens is a desirable goal for many reasons. They may be rigidly controlled for purity and effectiveness while at the same time being cheap enough that they may be made universally available. We describe here the antigenicity and immunogenicity of several H. influenzae type b synthetic oligosaccharide-protein conjugates in laboratory animals. The serum of H. influenzae type b-immunized animals recognized our synthetic H. influenzae type b antigens to the same extent as the native bacterial capsular polysaccharide. Compared to the anti-H. influenzae type b vaccine employed, these synthetic versions induced similar antibody response patterns in terms of titer, specificity, and functional capacity. The further development of synthetic vaccines will meet urgent needs in the less prosperous parts of the world and remains our major goal. PMID:15557635

  5. Invasive Haemophilus influenzae Serotype f Case Reports in Mazovia Province, Poland

    PubMed Central

    Golebiewska, Anna; Kuch, Alicja; Gawrońska, Agnieszka; Albrecht, Piotr; Skoczyńska, Anna; Radzikowski, Andrzej; Kutylowska, Ewa; Feleszko, Wojciech

    2016-01-01

    Abstract After successful introduction of anti-Haemophilus influenzae (Hi) serotype b vaccination program in Poland, invasive non-b or nontypeable H. influenzae infections have been reported more frequently alike in other countries all over the world. In this paper, we report 2 cases of H. influenzae serotype f (Hif) meningitis with severe clinical presentations which are rarely seen in previously healthy children. The first case is a 6-year-old girl who was admitted to pediatric ward with signs of meningitis. Laboratory tests confirmed bacteremic meningitis caused by Hif. The girl responded very well to administered treatment and recovered without any further complications. No underlying comorbidities were found. The second patient was a 4-year-old boy who, in course of Hif bacteremic meningitis, developed rapid septicemia and, despite aggressive treatment, died within a few hours of hospitalization. The child's past history was unremarkable. By presenting these cases, we would like to remind clinicians that invasive non-b Hi infections can become fatal not only in the group of the youngest children or children with coexisting comorbidities, as most commonly reported in the worldwide literature. At the same time, we want to emphasize the legitimacy of constant monitoring Hi epidemiology in order to take accurate actions if necessary. PMID:26844500

  6. Transcriptome signature in young children with acute otitis media due to non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed

    Liu, Keyi; Chen, Linlin; Kaur, Ravinder; Pichichero, Michael E

    2013-06-01

    Non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) causes acute otitis media (AOM) in young children. In our recent paper in Microbes and Infection we described the transcriptome signature elicited from PBMCs at onset of AOM caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae. In the current study we found very different results with NTHi AOM infections; 5.1% of 29 187 genes were differentially regulated by more than 2-fold at the onset of AOM compared with the pre-infection healthy state in the same children. Among the 1487 transcripts, 100 genes associated with the immune defense response were specifically analyzed. About half of the differentially regulated genes associated with antibacterial activity and the cell-mediated immune response were activated and half were suppressed. The important signatures for NTHi in children suggested that the balance of the immune response was toward suppression. Moreover, 90% of the genes associated with a pro-inflammatory cytokine response were down-regulated. The genes associated with the classic complement pathway were down-regulated, although the alternative complement pathway genes were up-regulated. These results provide the first human transcriptome data identifying gene expression in the immune response to be predominantly down-regulated at the onset of AOM due to NTHi.

  7. Induction of active immunity with membrane fractions from Haemophilus influenzae type b.

    PubMed Central

    Burans, J P; Lynn, M; Solotorovsky, M

    1983-01-01

    Using Escherichia coli strain E-1 as a model, we developed procedures for the preparation of outer- and inner-membrane-enriched fractions as structural units. These procedures could be used to prepare relatively pure inner and outer membrane fractions as determined by succinate dehydrogenase activity, ketodeoxyoctonate levels, and polyacrylamide gradient gel electrophoresis. The use of these procedures to fractionate membrane components from Haemophilus influenzae type b strains H-2 and H-E led to good separation of outer- and inner-membrane-enriched fractions as determined by succinate dehydrogenase and ketodeoxyoctonate levels but incomplete separation as determined by polyacrylamide gradient gel electrophoresis. Although there were differences between the electrophoresis profiles of outer membrane fractions of strains H-2 and H-E, immunization with outer membrane of either strain led to the induction of a high degree of immunoprotection against challenge with the H-2 strain. Protection could also be elicited with inner membrane preparations, but such protection may be due to contamination with outer membrane. Extracted membrane protein induced levels of protection that were comparable to those induced by whole membrane fractions. Images PMID:6602769

  8. Antisera Against Certain Conserved Surface-Exposed Peptides of Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae Are Protective.

    PubMed

    Whitby, Paul W; Seale, Thomas W; Morton, Daniel J; Stull, Terrence L

    2015-01-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) cause significant disease, including otitis media in children, exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and invasive disease in susceptible populations. No vaccine is currently available to prevent NTHi disease. The interactions of NTHi and the human host are primarily mediated by lipooligosaccharide and a complex array of surface-exposed proteins (SEPs) that act as receptors, sensors and secretion systems. We hypothesized that certain SEPs are present in all NTHi strains and that a subset of these may be antibody accessible and represent protective epitopes. Initially we used 15 genomic sequences available in the GenBank database along with an additional 11 genomic sequences generated by ourselves to identify the core set of putative SEPs present in all strains. Using bioinformatics, 56 core SEPs were identified. Molecular modeling generated putative structures of the SEPs from which potential surface exposed regions were defined. Synthetic peptides corresponding to ten of these highly conserved surface-exposed regions were used to raise antisera in rats. These antisera were used to assess passive protection in the infant rat model of invasive NTHi infection. Five of the antisera were protective, thus demonstrating their in vivo antibody accessibility. These five peptide regions represent potential targets for peptide vaccine candidates to protect against NTHi infection. PMID:26390432

  9. A review of invasive Haemophilus influenzae disease in the Indigenous populations of North America.

    PubMed

    Tsang, R S W; Bruce, M G; Lem, M; Barreto, L; Ulanova, M

    2014-07-01

    Historically, the highest incidence rates of invasive Haemophilus influenzae disease in the world were found in North American and Australian Indigenous children. Although immunization against H. influenzae type b (Hib) led to a marked decrease in invasive Hib disease in countries where it was implemented, this disease has not been eliminated and its rates in Indigenous communities remain higher than in the general North American population. In this literature review, we examined the epidemiology of invasive H. influenzae disease in the pre-Hib vaccine era, effect of carriage on disease epidemiology, immune response to H. influenzae infection and Hib vaccination in Indigenous and Caucasian children, and the changing epidemiology after Hib conjugate vaccine has been in use for more than two decades in North America. We also explored reasons behind the continued high rates of invasive H. influenzae disease in Indigenous populations in North America. H. influenzae type a (Hia) has emerged as a significant cause of severe disease in North American Indigenous communities. More research is needed to define the genotypic diversity of Hia and the disease burden that it causes in order to determine if a Hia vaccine is required to protect the vulnerable populations.

  10. Relative Contributions of Lipooligosaccharide Inner and Outer Core Modifications to Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Morey, Pau; Viadas, Cristina; Euba, Begoña; Hood, Derek W.; Barberán, Montserrat; Gil, Carmen; Grilló, María Jesús; Bengoechea, José Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) is a frequent commensal of the human nasopharynx that causes opportunistic infection in immunocompromised individuals. Existing evidence associates lipooligosaccharide (LOS) with disease, but the specific and relative contributions of NTHi LOS modifications to virulence properties of the bacterium have not been comprehensively addressed. Using NTHi strain 375, an isolate for which the detailed LOS structure has been determined, we compared systematically a set of isogenic mutant strains expressing sequentially truncated LOS. The relative contributions of 2-keto-3-deoxyoctulosonic acid, the triheptose inner core, oligosaccharide extensions on heptoses I and III, phosphorylcholine, digalactose, and sialic acid to NTHi resistance to antimicrobial peptides (AMP), self-aggregation, biofilm formation, cultured human respiratory epithelial infection, and murine pulmonary infection were assessed. We show that opsX, lgtF, lpsA, lic1, and lic2A contribute to bacterial resistance to AMP; lic1 is related to NTHi self-aggregation; lgtF, lic1, and siaB are involved in biofilm growth; opsX and lgtF participate in epithelial infection; and opsX, lgtF, and lpsA contribute to lung infection. Depending on the phenotype, the involvement of these LOS modifications occurs at different extents, independently or having an additive effect in combination. We discuss the relative contribution of LOS epitopes to NTHi virulence and frame a range of pathogenic traits in the context of infection. PMID:23980106

  11. Genetics and complementation of Haemophilus influenzae mutants deficient in adenosine 5'-triphosphate-dependent nuclease.

    PubMed Central

    Kooistra, J; Small, G D; Setlow, J K; Shapanka, R

    1976-01-01

    Eight different mutations in Haemophilus influenzae leading to deficiency in adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP)-dependent nuclease have been investigated in strains in which the mutations of the originally mutagenized strains have been transferred into the wild type. Sensitivity to mitomycin C and deoxycholate and complementation between extracts and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA)-dependent ATPase activity have been measured. Genetic crosses have provided information on the relative position of the mutations on the genome. There are three complementation groups, corresponding to three genetic groups. The strains most sensitive to mitomycin and deoxycholate, derived from mutants originally selected on the basis of sensitivity to mitomycin C or methyl methanesulfonate, are in one group. Apparently all these sensitive strains lack DNA-dependent ATPase activity, as does a strain intermediate in sensitivity to deoxycholate, which is the sole representative of another group. There are four strains that are relatively resistant to deoxycholate and mitomycin C, and all of these contain the ATPase activity. Three of these are in the same genetic and complementation group, whereas the other incongruously belongs in the same group as the sensitive strains. It is postulated that there are three cistrons in H. influenzae that code for the three known subunits of the ATP-dependent nuclease. PMID:177397

  12. Outer Membrane Lipoprotein e (P4) of Haemophilus influenzae Is a Novel Phosphomonoesterase

    PubMed Central

    Reilly, Thomas J.; Chance, Deborah L.; Smith, Arnold L.

    1999-01-01

    Haemophilus influenzae exists as a commensal of the upper respiratory tract of humans but also causes infections of contiguous structures. We describe the identification, localization, purification, and characterization of a novel, surface-localized phosphomonoesterase from a nontypeable H. influenzae strain, R2866. Sequences obtained from two CNBr-derived fragments of this protein matched lipoprotein e (P4) within the H. influenzae sequence database. Escherichia coli DH5α transformed with plasmids containing the H. influenzae hel gene, which encodes lipoprotein e (P4), produced high levels of a membrane-associated phosphomonoesterase. The isolated ∼28-kDa enzyme was tartrate resistant and displayed narrow substrate specificity with the highest activity for arylphosphates, excluding 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolylphosphate. Optimum enzymatic activity was observed at pH 5.0 and only in the presence of divalent copper. The enzyme was inhibited by vanadate, molybdate, and EDTA but was resistant to inorganic phosphate. The association of phosphomonoesterase activity with a protein that has also been recognized as a heme transporter suggests a unique role for this unusual phosphohydrolase. PMID:10542183

  13. Population subdivision and the detection of recombination in non-typable Haemophilus influenzae

    PubMed Central

    Connor, Thomas Richard; Corander, Jukka

    2012-01-01

    The disparity in diversity between unencapsulated (non-typable; NT) and encapsulated, serotypable Haemophilus influenzae (Hi) has been recognized for some time. It has previously been suggested that the wider diversity evidenced within NTHi compared with typable lineages may be due to different rates of recombination within the encapsulated and NT populations. To examine whether there is evidence for different levels of recombination within typable and NT lineages of Hi, we performed a statistical genetic analysis of 819 distinct genotypes of Hi to explore the congruence of serotype with population genetic clustering, and to identify patterns of recombination within the Hi population. We find that a significantly larger proportion of NT isolates show evidence of recombination, compared with typable isolates, and also that when admixture is present, the total amount of recombination per strain is greater within NT isolates, compared with the typable population. Furthermore, we demonstrate significant heterogeneity in the number of admixed individuals between NT lineages themselves, while such variation was not observed in typable lineages. This variability suggests that factors other than the presence of capsule are important determinants of recombination rate in the Hi population. PMID:23038806

  14. Defining the DNA uptake specificity of naturally competent Haemophilus influenzae cells

    PubMed Central

    Mell, Joshua Chang; Hall, Ira M.; Redfield, Rosemary J.

    2012-01-01

    Some naturally competent bacteria exhibit both a strong preference for DNA fragments containing specific ‘uptake sequences’ and dramatic overrepresentation of these sequences in their genomes. Uptake sequences are often assumed to directly reflect the specificity of the DNA uptake machinery, but the actual specificity has not been well characterized for any bacterium. We produced a detailed analysis of Haemophilus influenzae’s uptake specificity, using Illumina sequencing of degenerate uptake sequences in fragments recovered from competent cells. This identified an uptake motif with the same consensus as the motif overrepresented in the genome, with a 9 bp core (AAGTGCGGT) and two short flanking T-rich tracts. Only four core bases (GCGG) were critical for uptake, suggesting that these make strong specific contacts with the uptake machinery. Other core bases had weaker roles when considered individually, as did the T-tracts, but interaction effects between these were also determinants of uptake. The properties of genomic uptake sequences are also constrained by mutational biases and selective forces acting on USSs with coding and termination functions. Our findings define constraints on gene transfer by natural transformation and suggest how the DNA uptake machinery overcomes the physical constraints imposed by stiff highly charged DNA molecules. PMID:22753031

  15. Analysis of Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae Phase-Variable Genes During Experimental Human Nasopharyngeal Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Poole, Jessica; Foster, Eric; Chaloner, Kathryn; Hunt, Jason; Jennings, Michael P.; Bair, Thomas; Knudtson, Kevin; Christensen, Erik; Munson, Robert S.; Winokur, Patricia L.; Apicella, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Studies of nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) have demonstrated that a number of genes associated with infectivity have long repeat regions associated with phase variation in expression of the respective gene. The purpose of this study was to determine the genes that underwent phase variation during a 6-day period of experimental human nasopharyngeal colonization. Methods. Strain NTHi 2019StrR1 was used to colonize the nasopharynx of human subjects in a study of experimental colonization. Thirteen phase-variable genes were analyzed in NTHi 2019StrR1. Samples of NTHi 2019StrR1 were cultured from subjects during the 6-day colonization period. We used capillary electrophoresis and Roche 454 pyrosequencing to determine the number of repeats in each gene from each sample. Results. A significant number of samples switched licA and igaB from phase off in the inoculated strain to phase on during the 4-day period of observation. lex2A also showed variability as compared to baseline, but the differences were not significant. The remaining genes showed no evidence of phase variation. Conclusions. Our studies suggest that the phase-on genotypes of licA and igaB are important for early human nasopharynx colonization. lex2A showed a trend from phase off to phase on, suggesting a potentially important role in the colonization process. PMID:23715658

  16. The antibacterial activity and action mechanism of emodin from Polygonum cuspidatum against Haemophilus parasuis in vitro.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Song, Xu; Yin, Zhongqiong; Jia, Renyong; Li, Zhengwen; Zhou, Xun; Zou, Yuanfeng; Li, Lixia; Yin, Lizi; Yue, Guizhou; Ye, Gang; Lv, Cheng; Shi, Wenjing; Fu, Yuping

    2016-01-01

    Haemophilus parasuis is the causative agent of Glässer's disease, which leads to serious economic loss to the swine industry. Although antibiotics are widely used to control infections, outbreaks of this disease repeatedly happen. In this study, emodin from Polygonum cuspidatum showed potent inhibitory effect against H. parasuis. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimal bactericidal concentration (MBC) values of emodin were 32 and 64μg/mL, respectively. The antibacterial kinetic curves indicated the antibacterial activity of emodin was in a concentration-dependent manner. Cell membrane permeability and flow cytometry assays proved that emodin could destroy cell membrane integrity and increase membrane permeability, and fluorescence spectra assay indicated emodin has influenced conformation of membrane protein. Under transmission electron microscopy, serious lesions of H. parasuis exposed to emodin (64μg/mL) were found, including irregular cell shape, plasmolysis, ruptured cell wall and membrane and cytoplasmic vacuolation. These results suggested that emodin could be used as candidate for treating Glässer's disease. PMID:27242151

  17. Decreasing Prevalence of β-Lactamase Production among Respiratory Tract Isolates of Haemophilus influenzae in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Heilmann, Kris P.; Rice, Cassie L.; Miller, Ashley L.; Miller, Norma J.; Beekmann, Susan E.; Pfaller, Michael A.; Richter, Sandra S.; Doern, Gary V.

    2005-01-01

    A total of 986 isolates of Haemophilus influenzae from patients with respiratory tract infections in 45 United States medical centers were characterized during the winter of 2002-2003. β-Lactamase production was noted with 26.2% of isolates; 14.6% were resistant to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. Resistance to other relevant antimicrobial agents was extremely uncommon. In comparison to the results of four previous national surveys conducted since 1994, the prevalence of β-lactamase production with this pathogen appears to be decreasing. PMID:15917574

  18. Clarithromycin Resistance Mechanisms of Epidemic β-Lactamase-Nonproducing Ampicillin-Resistant Haemophilus influenzae Strains in Japan.

    PubMed

    Seyama, Shoji; Wajima, Takeaki; Nakaminami, Hidemasa; Noguchi, Norihisa

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to clarify the clarithromycin resistance mechanisms of β-lactamase-nonproducing ampicillin-resistant Haemophilus influenzae strains. In all clarithromycin-resistant strains, the transcript level of acrB was significantly elevated, and these strains had a frameshift mutation in acrR Introduction of the acrR mutation into H. influenzae Rd generated a clarithromycin-resistant transformant with the same MIC as the donor strain. Our results indicate that the acrR mutation confers clarithromycin resistance by the increasing the transcription of acrB.

  19. Porphyromonas gingivalis, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, and Treponema denticola / Prevotella intermedia Co-Infection Are Associated with Severe Periodontitis in a Thai Population.

    PubMed

    Torrungruang, Kitti; Jitpakdeebordin, Supawadee; Charatkulangkun, Orawan; Gleebbua, Yingampa

    2015-01-01

    Periodontitis is a polymicrobial infection of tooth-supporting tissues. This cross-sectional study aimed to examine the associations between five target species and severe periodontitis in a Thai population. Using the CDC/AAP case definition, individuals diagnosed with no/mild and severe periodontitis were included. Quantitative analyses of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa), Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg), Tannerella forsythia (Tf), Treponema denticola (Td), and Prevotella intermedia (Pi) in subgingival plaque were performed using real-time polymerase chain reaction. The association between target species and severe periodontitis was examined using logistic regression analysis. The study subjects comprised 479 individuals with no/mild periodontitis and 883 with severe periodontitis. Bacterial prevalence and quantity were higher in subjects with severe periodontitis than in those with no/mild disease. In the fully adjusted model, all species except Tf showed a dose-dependent relationship with periodontitis. The mere presence of Pg, even in low amount, was significantly associated with severe periodontitis, while the amount of Aa, Td, and Pi had to reach the critical thresholds to be significantly associated with disease. Compared to individuals with low levels of both Td and Pi, high colonization by either Td or Pi alone significantly increased the odds of having severe periodontitis by 2.5 (95%CI 1.7-3.5) folds. The odds ratio was further increased to 14.8 (95%CI 9.2-23.8) in individuals who were highly colonized by both species. Moreover, the presence of Pg and high colonization by Aa were independently associated with severe periodontitis with odds ratios of 5.6 (95%CI 3.4-9.1) and 2.2 (95%CI 1.5-3.3), respectively. Our findings suggest that the presence of Pg and high colonization by Aa, Td, and Pi play an important role in severe periodontitis in this study population. We also demonstrate for the first time that individuals co-infected with Td and Pi

  20. Porphyromonas gingivalis, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, and Treponema denticola / Prevotella intermedia Co-Infection Are Associated with Severe Periodontitis in a Thai Population

    PubMed Central

    Torrungruang, Kitti; Jitpakdeebordin, Supawadee; Charatkulangkun, Orawan; Gleebbua, Yingampa

    2015-01-01

    Periodontitis is a polymicrobial infection of tooth-supporting tissues. This cross-sectional study aimed to examine the associations between five target species and severe periodontitis in a Thai population. Using the CDC/AAP case definition, individuals diagnosed with no/mild and severe periodontitis were included. Quantitative analyses of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa), Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg), Tannerella forsythia (Tf), Treponema denticola (Td), and Prevotella intermedia (Pi) in subgingival plaque were performed using real-time polymerase chain reaction. The association between target species and severe periodontitis was examined using logistic regression analysis. The study subjects comprised 479 individuals with no/mild periodontitis and 883 with severe periodontitis. Bacterial prevalence and quantity were higher in subjects with severe periodontitis than in those with no/mild disease. In the fully adjusted model, all species except Tf showed a dose-dependent relationship with periodontitis. The mere presence of Pg, even in low amount, was significantly associated with severe periodontitis, while the amount of Aa, Td, and Pi had to reach the critical thresholds to be significantly associated with disease. Compared to individuals with low levels of both Td and Pi, high colonization by either Td or Pi alone significantly increased the odds of having severe periodontitis by 2.5 (95%CI 1.7–3.5) folds. The odds ratio was further increased to 14.8 (95%CI 9.2–23.8) in individuals who were highly colonized by both species. Moreover, the presence of Pg and high colonization by Aa were independently associated with severe periodontitis with odds ratios of 5.6 (95%CI 3.4–9.1) and 2.2 (95%CI 1.5–3.3), respectively. Our findings suggest that the presence of Pg and high colonization by Aa, Td, and Pi play an important role in severe periodontitis in this study population. We also demonstrate for the first time that individuals co-infected with Td

  1. Development of a Multiplex PCR Assay for Rapid Molecular Serotyping of Haemophilus parasuis

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Sarah E.; Wang, Jinhong; Hernandez-Garcia, Juan; Weinert, Lucy A.; Luan, Shi-Lu; Chaudhuri, Roy R.; Angen, Øystein; Aragon, Virginia; Williamson, Susanna M.; Langford, Paul R.; Rycroft, Andrew N.; Wren, Brendan W.; Maskell, Duncan J.; Tucker, Alexander W.

    2015-01-01

    Haemophilus parasuis causes Glässer's disease and pneumonia in pigs. Indirect hemagglutination (IHA) is typically used to serotype this bacterium, distinguishing 15 serovars with some nontypeable isolates. The capsule loci of the 15 reference strains have been annotated, and significant genetic variation was identified between serovars, with the exception of serovars 5 and 12. A capsule locus and in silico serovar were identified for all but two nontypeable isolates in our collection of >200 isolates. Here, we describe the development of a multiplex PCR, based on variation within the capsule loci of the 15 serovars of H. parasuis, for rapid molecular serotyping. The multiplex PCR (mPCR) distinguished between all previously described serovars except 5 and 12, which were detected by the same pair of primers. The detection limit of the mPCR was 4.29 × 105 ng/μl bacterial genomic DNA, and high specificity was indicated by the absence of reactivity against closely related commensal Pasteurellaceae and other bacterial pathogens of pigs. A subset of 150 isolates from a previously sequenced H. parasuis collection was used to validate the mPCR with 100% accuracy compared to the in silico results. In addition, the two in silico-nontypeable isolates were typeable using the mPCR. A further 84 isolates were analyzed by mPCR and compared to the IHA serotyping results with 90% concordance (excluding those that were nontypeable by IHA). The mPCR was faster, more sensitive, and more specific than IHA, enabling the differentiation of 14 of the 15 serovars of H. parasuis. PMID:26424843

  2. Dual orientation of the outer membrane lipoprotein P6 of nontypeable haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed

    Michel, Lea Vacca; Snyder, Joy; Schmidt, Rachel; Milillo, Jennifer; Grimaldi, Kyle; Kalmeta, Breanna; Khan, M Nadeem; Sharma, Sharad; Wright, Leslie Kate; Pichichero, Michael E

    2013-07-01

    The majority of outer membrane (OM) lipoproteins in Gram-negative bacteria are tethered to the membrane via an attached lipid moiety and oriented facing in toward the periplasmic space; a few lipoproteins have been shown to be surface exposed. The outer membrane lipoprotein P6 from the Gram-negative pathogenic bacterium nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) is surface exposed and a leading vaccine candidate for prevention of NTHi infections. However, we recently found that P6 is not a transmembrane protein as previously thought (L. V. Michel, B. Kalmeta, M. McCreary, J. Snyder, P. Craig, M. E. Pichichero, Vaccine 29:1624-1627, 2011). Here we pursued studies to show that P6 has a dual orientation, existing infrequently as surface exposed and predominantly as internally oriented toward the periplasmic space. Flow cytometry using three monoclonal antibodies with specificity for P6 showed surface staining of whole NTHi cells. Confocal microscopy imaging confirmed that antibodies targeted surface-exposed P6 of intact NTHi cells and not internal P6 in membrane-compromised or dead cells. Western blots of two wild-type NTHi strains and a mutant NTHi strain that does not express P6 showed that P6 antibodies do not detect a promiscuous epitope on NTHi. Depletion of targets to nonlipidated P6 significantly decreased bactericidal activity of human serum. Protease digestion of surface-exposed P6 demonstrated that P6 is predominantly internally localized in a manner similar to its homologue Pal in Escherichia coli. We conclude that P6 of NTHi is likely inserted into the OM in two distinct orientations, with the predominant orientation facing in toward the periplasm.

  3. Preclinical evaluation of a Haemophilus influenzae type b conjugate vaccine process intended for technology transfer

    PubMed Central

    Hamidi, Ahd; Verdijk, Pauline; Kreeftenberg, Hans

    2014-01-01

    Introduction of Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) vaccine in low- and middle-income countries has been limited by cost and availability of Hib conjugate vaccines for a long time. It was previously recognized by the Institute for Translational Vaccinology (Intravacc, originating from the former Vaccinology Unit of the National Institute of Public Health [RIVM] and the Netherlands Vaccine Institute [NVI]) that local production of a Hib conjugate vaccine would increase the affordability and sustainability of the vaccine and thereby help to speed up Hib introduction in these countries. A new affordable and a non-infringing production process for a Hib conjugate vaccine was developed, including relevant quality control tests, and the technology was transferred to a number of vaccine manufacturers in India, Indonesia, and China. As part of the Hib technology transfer project managed by Intravacc, a preclinical toxicity study was conducted in the Netherlands to test the safety and immunogenicity of this new Hib conjugate vaccine. The data generated by this study were used by the technology transfer partners to accelerate the clinical development of the new Hib conjugate vaccine. A repeated dose toxicity and local tolerance study in rats was performed to assess the reactogenicity and immunogenicity of a new Hib conjugate vaccine compared to a licensed vaccine. The results showed that the vaccine was well tolerated and immunogenic in rats, no major differences in both safety and immunogenicity in rats were found between the vaccine produced according to the production process developed by Intravacc and the licensed one. Rats may be useful to verify the immunogenicity of Hib conjugate vaccines and for preclinical evaluation. In general, nonclinical evaluation of the new Hib conjugate vaccine, including this proof of concept (safety and immunogenicity study in rats), made it possible for technology transfer partners, having implemented the original process with no changes

  4. Serotype specificity and immunogenicity of the capsular polymer of Haemophilus pleuropneumoniae serotype 5.

    PubMed Central

    Inzana, T J; Mathison, B

    1987-01-01

    Serotyping of Haemophilus pleuropneumoniae and serologic assays for detection of serotype-specific antibody are problematic due to the potential cross-reactivity of the crude antigens used for raising immune serum or for serology. The capsular polymer (CP) of H. pleuropneumoniae serotype 5 was investigated for serotype-specific activity with antiserum to whole cells or with antiserum made monospecific to CP by adsorption with a capsule-deficient mutant. When antiserum to whole cells or monospecific antiserum to CP was tested against purified CP from serotypes 1 to 7 by immunodiffusion or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, only capsules of serotype 5 were reactive. In addition, only encapsulated serotype 5 cells reacted with serum monospecific to CP in an indirect immunofluorescent-antibody assay. Serotype-specific antibody was completely inhibited in each assay by preincubation of purified CP with the serum. Antiserum to whole cells of H. pleuropneumoniae serotype 5 contained antibodies to proteins and lipopolysaccharide; these antibodies cross-reacted with antigens of heterologous serotypes by dot-blot enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunoblotting. The antigenic activity of CP was stable after heating for at least 30 min at 100 degrees C. High titers of antibody to CP were present in the sera of rabbits immunized intravenously with whole log-phase cells or in the convalescent sera of pigs experimentally infected with H. pleuropneumoniae serotype 5. However, the purified CP was poorly immunogenic in rabbits and swine. Our results indicate that the capsule is the serotype-specific antigen of H. pleuropneumoniae and that a monospecific antiserum to capsule or purified capsule should be used for serotyping or serologic assays, respectively. Images PMID:3110066

  5. Characterization of a heat-modifiable outer membrane protein of Haemophilus somnus.

    PubMed Central

    Tagawa, Y; Haritani, M; Ishikawa, H; Yuasa, N

    1993-01-01

    In immunoblot analysis, a murine monoclonal antibody (MAb), 27-1, which was produced to an outer membrane protein (OMP) of Haemophilus somnus, showed that a major OMP is heat modifiable, having a molecular mass of 28 kDa when the N-lauroylsarcosine-insoluble OMP preparation was solubilized at 60 degrees C and a mass of 37 kDa when the OMP preparation was solubilized at 100 degrees C. The heat-modifiable OMP reacted intensely with convalescent sera obtained from calves with experimental H. somnus pneumonia in immunoblot analysis. Immunoelectron microscopic and antibody absorption studies revealed that the MAb 27-1 epitope was not surface exposed on the intact bacterium. However, a decrease in antibody reactivity to the heat-modifiable OMP in immunoblot analysis after absorption of convalescent serum with intact bacterial cells of H. somnus suggests that a surface-exposed portion of the heat-modifiable OMP is expressed on the intact bacterium. MAb 27-1 reacted with 45 of 45 strains of H. somnus tested in immunoblot analysis. The apparent molecular mass of the antigen varied among strains, and five reactivity patterns demonstrated by MAb 27-1 were observed. MAb 27-1 also reacted with six species in the family Pasteurellaceae, Escherichia coli, and Salmonella dublin, but not with the other eight species of gram-negative bacteria. The heat-modifiable OMP of H. somnus showed immunological cross-reactivity with the OmpA protein of E. coli K-12 and significant N-terminal amino acid sequence homology with the OmpA proteins of gram-negative bacteria. We conclude that a major, 37-kDa heat-modifiable OMP of H. somnus, which elicits an antibody response in H. somnus-infected animals, is a common antigen among H. somnus strains tested and is structurally related to the OmpA protein of E. coli. Images PMID:8478064

  6. A novel nickel responsive MerR-like regulator, NimR, from Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed

    Kidd, Stephen P; Djoko, Karrera Y; Ng, JiaQi; Argente, M Pilar; Jennings, Michael P; McEwan, Alastair G

    2011-10-01

    We have identified a novel regulator from the MerR family of transcription factors in the bacterial pathogen Haemophilus influenzae (HI1623; nickel-associated merR-like Regulator--NimR). NimR regulates the expression of a Ni(2+) uptake transporter (NikKLMQO). The promoters for nimR and the nik operon are divergent and overlapping and NimR binds at a site between the promoter elements for nikKLMQO. Expression of this operon requires NimR and depends on Ni(2+). Growth rates of the H. influenzae nimR and nikQ mutants were reduced in chemically defined media compared to the wild type and the mutants were unable to grow in the presence of EDTA. The mutant strains were less tolerant of acidic pH and the wild type Rd KW20 could not tolerate low pH in the presence of fluoramide, a urease specific inhibitor, confirming that both nickel transport and urea hydrolysis are a central process in pH control. H. influenzae nimR and nikQ strains were deficient in urease activity, but this could be specifically restored by the addition of excess Ni(2+). NimR did not directly regulate the expression of urease genes but the activity of urease requires both nimR and nikQ. Purified NimR is a dimer that binds 1 Ni(2+)ion. NimR is the first example of a Ni-dependent regulator from the MerR family and targeting a metal ion uptake system; it is distinct from NikR the Ni-responsive regulators of the ribbon-helix-helix family. PMID:21952667

  7. Prospective safety monitoring of Haemophilus influenzae type b and heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccines in Kagoshima, Japan.

    PubMed

    Nishi, Junichiro; Tokuda, Koichi; Imuta, Naoko; Minami, Taketsugu; Kawano, Yoshifumi

    2013-01-01

    Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) conjugate vaccine (PRP-T) and heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) were introduced in Japan in December 2008 and February 2010, respectively. The concurrent administration of these vaccines is routinely performed worldwide. However, the safety of the simultaneous administration of these vaccines has not been fully evaluated in Japan, because it has rarely been performed thus far. We conducted a 2-year prospective, observational, multicenter study on PRP-T and PCV7 safety from February 2009 through January 2011 in 29 facilities located in Kagoshima Prefecture, Japan. Objective severe adverse events included anaphylactoid reaction, encephalitis/encephalopathy, neurological events, severe focal reactions, systemic eruption/urticaria, fever above 39℃ within 2 days after inoculation, and other complications requiring hospitalization. The incidences of these events for PRP-T and PCV7 administration were 0.68% (76/11,197) and 0.92% (28/3,049), respectively. No deaths or subsequent complications were reported during the course of the study. There was no significant difference in the incidence of severe adverse events between the single and co-administration groups for both vaccines: PRP-T, 0.55% (31/5,662) versus 0.81% (45/5,535; P = 0.11); PCV7, 0.88% (11/1,247) versus 0.94% (17/1,802; P = 0.86). These results suggest that the simultaneous administration of vaccines including PRP-T and/or PCV7 does not increase the incidence of severe adverse events in Japanese children.

  8. Virulence and Draft Genome Sequence Overview of Multiple Strains of the Swine Pathogen Haemophilus parasuis

    PubMed Central

    Brockmeier, Susan L.; Register, Karen B.; Kuehn, Joanna S.; Nicholson, Tracy L.; Loving, Crystal L.; Bayles, Darrell O.; Shore, Sarah M.; Phillips, Gregory J.

    2014-01-01

    Haemophilus parasuis is the cause of Glässer's disease in swine, which is characterized by systemic infection resulting in polyserositis, meningitis, and arthritis. Investigation of this animal disease is complicated by the enormous differences in the severity of disease caused by H. parasuis strains, ranging from lethal systemic disease to subclinical carriage. To identify differences in genotype that could account for virulence phenotypes, we established the virulence of, and performed whole genome sequence analysis on, 11 H. parasuis strains. Virulence was assessed by evaluating morbidity and mortality following intranasal challenge of Caesarean-derived, colostrum-deprived (CDCD) pigs. Genomic DNA from strains Nagasaki (serotype 5), 12939 (serotype 1), SW140 (serotype 2), 29755 (serotype 5), MN-H (serotype 13), 84-15995 (serotype 15), SW114 (serotype 3), H465 (serotype 11), D74 (serotype 9), and 174 (serotype 7) was used to generate Illumina paired-end libraries for genomic sequencing and de novo assembly. H. parasuis strains Nagasaki, 12939, SH0165 (serotype 5), SW140, 29755, and MN-H exhibited a high level of virulence. Despite minor differences in expression of disease among these groups, all pigs challenged with these strains developed clinical signs consistent with Glässer's disease between 1–7 days post-challenge. H. parasuis strains 84-15995 and SW114 were moderately virulent, in that approximately half of the pigs infected with each developed Glässer's disease. H. parasuis strains H465, D74, and 174 were minimally virulent or avirulent in the CDCD pig model. Comparative genomic analysis among strains identified several noteworthy differences in coding regions. These coding regions include predicted outer membrane, metabolism, and pilin or adhesin related genes, some of which likely contributed to the differences in virulence and systemic disease observed following challenge. These data will be useful for identifying H. parasuis virulence factors and

  9. Study on Haemophilus influenzae type b diseases in China: the past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Yang, Y; Shen, X; Jiang, Z; Liu, X; Leng, Z; Lu, D; Rao, J; Liu, J; Chang, L

    1998-09-01

    Meningitis caused by Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) is a common and serious disease for which there now are WHO-certified vaccines that are recommended for universal infant immunization in North America and European countries. If these vaccines are to be recommended in Asia, it is necessary to know the incidence, age distribution and clinical outcome of Hib meningitis and other systemic infections in this region. Data on Hib disease in China are scanty. Hib meningitis was common during the 1950s in China, accounting for up to 16% of all of pyogenic meningitis (up to 38% of cases were caused by unknown pathogens), despite severe epidemics of meningococcal meningitis during that period. Since 1989 we have conducted hospital- and community-based etiologic and epidemiologic studies of bacterial meningitis. Hib accounts for 30 to 50% of bacterial meningitis in China. The incidence of Hib meningitis in Hefei City was 10.4 per 100000 children <5 years, a result relatively lower than in the West but higher than the rate of 2.7 found in a retrospective study in Hong Kong. Pneumonia is the primary cause of death for Chinese children. From 1991 to 1993 the average mortality of children<5 years because of pneumonia was 1563.2 per 100000. To achieve the goal of reducing the death rate of children by one-third by the year 2000, greater efforts should be made to reduce the mortality of children with pneumonia. Our preliminary study showed that about one-fourth to one-third of cases of pneumonia in Chinese children might be caused by Hib. Therefore Hib vaccination for infants and children in China might be an effective and valuable procedure to achieve the goal.

  10. Biofilm formation by virulent and non-virulent strains of Haemophilus parasuis.

    PubMed

    Bello-Ortí, Bernardo; Deslandes, Vincent; Tremblay, Yannick D N; Labrie, Josée; Howell, Kate J; Tucker, Alexander W; Maskell, Duncan J; Aragon, Virginia; Jacques, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Haemophilus parasuis is a commensal bacterium of the upper respiratory tract of healthy pigs. It is also the etiological agent of Glässer's disease, a systemic disease characterized by polyarthritis, fibrinous polyserositis and meningitis, which causes high morbidity and mortality in piglets. The aim of this study was to evaluate biofilm formation by well-characterized virulent and non-virulent strains of H. parasuis. We observed that non-virulent strains isolated from the nasal cavities of healthy pigs formed significantly (p < 0.05) more biofilms than virulent strains isolated from lesions of pigs with Glässer's disease. These differences were observed when biofilms were formed in microtiter plates under static conditions or formed in the presence of shear force in a drip-flow apparatus or a microfluidic system. Confocal laser scanning microscopy using different fluorescent probes on a representative subset of strains indicated that the biofilm matrix contains poly-N-acetylglucosamine, proteins and eDNA. The biofilm matrix was highly sensitive to degradation by proteinase K. Comparison of transcriptional profiles of biofilm and planktonic cells of the non-virulent H. parasuis F9 strain revealed a significant number of up-regulated membrane-related genes in biofilms, and genes previously identified in Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae biofilms. Our data indicate that non-virulent strains of H. parasuis have the ability to form robust biofilms in contrast to virulent, systemic strains. Biofilm formation might therefore allow the non-virulent strains to colonize and persist in the upper respiratory tract of pigs. Conversely, the planktonic state of the virulent strains might allow them to disseminate within the host. PMID:25428823

  11. Synthesis, characterization, and immunologic properties of detoxified lipooligosaccharide from nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae conjugated to proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Gu, X X; Tsai, C M; Ueyama, T; Barenkamp, S J; Robbins, J B; Lim, D J

    1996-01-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) is an important cause of otitis media in children and of pneumonitis in adults with depressed resistance. Lipooligosaccharide (LOS) is a major surface antigen of NTHi and elicits bactericidal and opsonic antibodies. We prepared detoxified LOS (dLOS) protein conjugates from NTHi for use as experimental vaccines. LOS from NTHi 9274 was treated with anhydrous hydrazine and had its toxicity reduced to clinically acceptable levels. dLOS was bound to tetanus toxoid (TT) or high- molecular-weight proteins (HMPs) from NTHi through a linker of adipic acid dihydrazide to form dLOS-TT or dLOS-HMP. The molar ratio of the dLOS to protein carriers ranged from 26:1 to 50:1. The antigenicity of the conjugates was similar to that of the LOS alone as determined by double immunodiffusion. Subcutaneous or intramuscular injection of the conjugates elicited a 28- to 486-fold rise in the level of immunoglobulin G antibodies in mice to the homologous LOS after two or three injections and a 169- to 243-fold rise in the level of immunoglobulin G antibodies in rabbits after two injections. The immunogenicity of the conjugates in mice and rabbits was enhanced by formulation with monophosphoryl lipid A plus trehalose dimycolate. In rabbits, conjugate-induced LOS antibodies induced complement-mediated bactericidal activity against the homologous strain 9274 and prototype strain 3189. These results indicate that a detoxified LOS-protein conjugate is a candidate vaccine for otitis media and pneumonitis caused by NTHi. PMID:8926067

  12. Contribution of a 28-kilodalton membrane protein to the virulence of Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed Central

    Chanyangam, M; Smith, A L; Moseley, S L; Kuehn, M; Jenny, P

    1991-01-01

    A Haemophilus influenzae b (Hib) membrane protein with a molecular mass of 28 kDa bound polyclonal antisera raised against a highly purified Hib fimbrial subunit. We cloned the gene encoding this protein and found that the gene was expressed in Escherichia coli. DNA sequence analysis identified an 843-bp open reading frame which predicted a 26.78-kDa protein with an amino-terminal signal sequence and a mature protein with 70% similarity to the 28-kDa lipoprotein of E. coli (F. Yu, S. Inouye, and M. Inouye, J. Biol. Chem. 261:2284, 1986). Colony blot hybridization analysis with an intergenic probe of the cloned gene demonstrated that 29 of 32 H. influenzae strains hybridize with this gene. Insertion of a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene into the open reading frame inactivated expression of the 28-kDa protein in E. coli. Isogenic Hib strains were derived by marker exchange mutagenesis to generate mutants which no longer expressed the 28-kDa protein as recognized with Western immunoblot analysis. There was no difference in the rate of nasopharyngeal colonization of infant rats or monkeys by the isogenic mutants which lacked the 28-kDa protein compared with colonization by the wild-type strain. In contrast, the frequency of invasion and density of bacteremia in infant rats caused by the isogenic mutants were reduced relative to those caused by the wild-type Hib strain. We conclude that this 28-kDa outer membrane protein aids transepithelial invasion of type b strains but is not essential. Images PMID:1987077

  13. Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae Clearance by Alveolar Macrophages Is Impaired by Exposure to Cigarette Smoke ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Martí-Lliteras, Pau; Regueiro, Verónica; Morey, Pau; Hood, Derek W.; Saus, Carles; Sauleda, Jaume; Agustí, Alvar G. N.; Bengoechea, José Antonio; Garmendia, Junkal

    2009-01-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHI) is an opportunistic gram-negative pathogen that causes respiratory infections and is associated with progression of respiratory diseases. Cigarette smoke is a main risk factor for development of respiratory infections and chronic respiratory diseases. Glucocorticoids, which are anti-inflammatory drugs, are still the most common therapy for these diseases. Alveolar macrophages are professional phagocytes that reside in the lung and are responsible for clearing infections by the action of their phagolysosomal machinery and promotion of local inflammation. In this study, we dissected the interaction between NTHI and alveolar macrophages and the effect of cigarette smoke on this interaction. We showed that alveolar macrophages clear NTHI infections by adhesion, phagocytosis, and phagolysosomal processing of the pathogen. Bacterial uptake requires host actin polymerization, the integrity of plasma membrane lipid rafts, and activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) signaling cascade. Parallel to bacterial clearance, macrophages secrete tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) upon NTHI infection. In contrast, exposure to cigarette smoke extract (CSE) impaired alveolar macrophage phagocytosis, although NTHI-induced TNF-α secretion was not abrogated. Mechanistically, our data showed that CSE reduced PI3K signaling activation triggered by NTHI. Treatment of CSE-exposed cells with the glucocorticoid dexamethasone reduced the amount of TNF-α secreted upon NTHI infection but did not compensate for CSE-dependent phagocytic impairment. The deleterious effect of cigarette smoke was observed in macrophage cell lines and in human alveolar macrophages obtained from smokers and from patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. PMID:19620348

  14. Molecular Cloning, Expression and Purification of Truncated hpd Fragment of Haemophilus influenzae in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Behrouzi, Ava; Bouzari, Saeid; Siadat, Seyed Davar; Jafari, Anis; Irani, Shiva

    2015-01-01

    Background: Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) is a significant pathogen in children, causing otitis media, sinusitis, conjunctivitis, pneumonia, and occasionally invasive infections. Protein D (PD) belongs to the minor outer-membrane proteins of H. influenza. Moreover, it has been shown that this protein is one of the most potent vaccine candidates against the NTHi strain. Objectives: In the present study, a new truncated form of PD was designed based on conserved areas, and recombinant truncated PD was expressed. Materials and Methods: Truncated PD was designed using bioinformatics tools, and a 345 bp fragment of the truncated hpd gene was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) from H. influenzae and subsequently cloned into the prokaryotic expression vector pBAD-gIIIA. In addition, for the expression of the recombinant protein, the pBAD-truncated PD plasmid was transformed into competent TOP10 cells. The recombinant protein was expressed with Arabinose. The expressed protein was purified by affinity chromatography using Ni-NTA resin. Results: The cloning of PD was confirmed by colony-PCR and enzymatic digestion. Arabinose 0.2% was able to efficiently induce protein expression. The SDS-PAGE analysis showed that our constructed pBAD-PD-TOP10 efficiently produced a target recombinant protein with a molecular weight of 16 kDa. A high concentration of the recombinant protein was obtained via the purification process by affinity chromatography. The recombinant PD was reacted with peroxidase-conjugated rabbit anti-mouse immunoglobulins. Conclusions: Our results showed that the recombinant protein produced by the pBAD vector in the Escherichia coli system was very efficient. PMID:26464772

  15. Identification and Characterization of msf, a Novel Virulence Factor in Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed

    Kress-Bennett, Jennifer M; Hiller, N Luisa; Eutsey, Rory A; Powell, Evan; Longwell, Mark J; Hillman, Todd; Blackwell, Tenisha; Byers, Barbara; Mell, Joshua C; Post, J Christopher; Hu, Fen Z; Ehrlich, Garth D; Janto, Benjamin A

    2016-01-01

    Haemophilus influenzae is an opportunistic pathogen. The emergence of virulent, non-typeable strains (NTHi) emphasizes the importance of developing new interventional targets. We screened the NTHi supragenome for genes encoding surface-exposed proteins suggestive of immune evasion, identifying a large family containing Sel1-like repeats (SLRs). Clustering identified ten SLR-containing gene subfamilies, each with various numbers of SLRs per gene. Individual strains also had varying numbers of SLR-containing genes from one or more of the subfamilies. Statistical genetic analyses of gene possession among 210 NTHi strains typed as either disease or carriage found a significant association between possession of the SlrVA subfamily (which we have termed, macrophage survival factor, msf) and the disease isolates. The PittII strain contains four chromosomally contiguous msf genes. Deleting all four of these genes (msfA1-4) (KO) resulted in a highly significant decrease in phagocytosis and survival in macrophages; which was fully complemented by a single copy of the msfA1 gene. Using the chinchilla model of otitis media and invasive disease, the KO strain displayed a significant decrease in fitness compared to the WT in co-infections; and in single infections, the KO lost its ability to invade the brain. The singly complemented strain showed only a partial ability to compete with the WT suggesting gene dosage is important in vivo. The transcriptional profiles of the KO and WT in planktonic growth were compared using the NTHi supragenome array, which revealed highly significant changes in the expression of operons involved in virulence and anaerobiosis. These findings demonstrate that the msfA1-4 genes are virulence factors for phagocytosis, persistence, and trafficking to non-mucosal sites.

  16. Prokaryotic High-Level Expression System in Producing Adhesin Recombinant Protein E of Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae

    PubMed Central

    Tavakoli, Minoo; Bouzari, Saeed; Siadat, Seyed Davar; Najar Peerayeh, Shahin; Jafari, Anis

    2015-01-01

    Background: Adhesion protein E (PE) of Haemophilus influenzae is a 16 - 18 kDa protein with 160 amino acids which causes adhesion to epithelial cells and acts as a major factor in pathogenesis. Objectives: In this study, we performed cloning, expression and purification of PE as a candidate antigen for vaccine design upon further study. Materials and Methods: At first, the pe gene of NTHi ATCC 49766 strain (483 bp) was amplified by PCR. Then, to sequence the resulted amplicon, it was cloned into TA vector (pTZ57R/T). In the next step, the sequenced gene was sub-cloned in pBAD/gIII A vector and transformed into competent Escherichia coli TOP10. For overexpression, the recombinant bacteria were grown in broth medium containing arabinose and the recombinant protein was purified using metal affinity chromatography (Ni-nitrilotriacetic acid) (Ni-NTA agarose). Finally, the protein was detected using sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophores (SDS-PAG) and confirmed by western blotting. Results: The cloned gene was confirmed by PCR, restriction digestion and sequencing. The sequenced gene was searched for homology in GenBank and 99% similarity was found to the already deposited genes in GenBank. Then we obtained PE using Ni-NTA agarose with up to 7 mg/mL concentration. Conclusions: The pe gene was successfully cloned and confirmed by sequencing. Finally, PE was obtained with high concentration. Due to high homology and similarity among the pe gene from NTHi ATCC 49766 and other NTHi strains in GenBank, we believe that the protein is a universal antigen to be used as a vaccine design candidate and further studies to evaluate its immunogenicity is underway. PMID:26034537

  17. Resolvin D1 Dampens Pulmonary Inflammation and Promotes Clearance of Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed

    Croasdell, Amanda; Lacy, Shannon H; Thatcher, Thomas H; Sime, Patricia J; Phipps, Richard P

    2016-03-15

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) is a Gram-negative, opportunistic pathogen that frequently causes ear infections, bronchitis, pneumonia, and exacerbations in patients with underlying inflammatory diseases, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. In mice, NTHi is rapidly cleared, but a strong inflammatory response persists, underscoring the concept that NTHi induces dysregulation of normal inflammatory responses and causes a failure to resolve. Lipid-derived specialized proresolving mediators (SPMs) play a critical role in the active resolution of inflammation by both suppressing proinflammatory actions and promoting resolution pathways. Importantly, SPMs lack the immunosuppressive properties of classical anti-inflammatory therapies. On the basis of these characteristics, we hypothesized that aspirin-triggered resolvin D1 (AT-RvD1) would dampen NTHi-induced inflammation while still enhancing bacterial clearance. C57BL/6 mice were treated with AT-RvD1 and infected with live NTHi. AT-RvD1-treated mice had lower total cell counts and neutrophils in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and had earlier influx of macrophages. In addition, AT-RvD1-treated mice showed changes in temporal regulation of inflammatory cytokines and enzymes, with decreased KC at 6 h and decreased IL-6, TNF-α, and cyclooxygenase-2 expression at 24 h post infection. Despite reduced inflammation, AT-RvD1-treated mice had reduced NTHi bacterial load, mediated by enhanced clearance by macrophages and a skewing toward an M2 phenotype. Finally, AT-RvD1 protected NTHi-infected mice from weight loss, hypothermia, hypoxemia, and respiratory compromise. This research highlights the beneficial role of SPMs in pulmonary bacterial infections and provides the groundwork for further investigation into SPMs as alternatives to immunosuppressive therapies like steroids.

  18. Maturation of molybdoenzymes and its influence on the pathogenesis of non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae

    PubMed Central

    Dhouib, Rabeb; Pg Othman, Dk S. M.; Essilfie, Ama-Tawiah; Hansbro, Phil M.; Hanson, Jeffrey O.; McEwan, Alastair G.; Kappler, Ulrike

    2015-01-01

    Mononuclear molybdenum enzymes of the dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) reductase family occur exclusively in prokaryotes, and a loss of some these enzymes has been linked to a loss of bacterial virulence in several cases. The MobA protein catalyzes the final step in the synthesis of the molybdenum guanine dinucleotide (MGD) cofactor that is exclusive to enzymes of the DMSO reductase family. MobA has been proposed as a potential target for control of virulence since its inhibition would affect the activities of all molybdoenzymes dependent upon MGD. Here, we have studied the phenotype of a mobA mutant of the host-adapted human pathogen Haemophilus influenzae. H. influenzae causes and contributes to a variety of acute and chronic diseases of the respiratory tract, and several enzymes of the DMSO reductase family are conserved and highly expressed in this bacterium. The mobA mutation caused a significant decrease in the activities of all Mo-enzymes present, and also resulted in a small defect in anaerobic growth. However, we did not detect a defect in in vitro biofilm formation nor in invasion and adherence to human epithelial cells in tissue culture compared to the wild-type. In a murine in vivo model, the mobA mutant showed only a mild attenuation compared to the wild-type. In summary, our data show that MobA is essential for the activities of molybdenum enzymes, but does not appear to affect the fitness of H. influenzae. These results suggest that MobA is unlikely to be a useful target for antimicrobials, at least for the purpose of treating H. influenzae infections. PMID:26594204

  19. Effect of epithelial cell type on in vitro invasion of non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed

    Singh, Neeraj Kumar; Kunde, Dale A; Tristram, Stephen G

    2016-10-01

    Non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) have been shown to have variable ability for in vitro invasion with a range of epithelial cells, and increased invasion of BEAS-2B cells has been associated with altered penicillin binding protein3 (PBP3), which is concerning as these strains are increasing worldwide. The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of respiratory cell type and the presence of altered PBP3 on the in vitro invasion of NTHi. A collection of 16 clinical NTHi isolates was established, 7 had normal PBP3, and 9 had altered PBP3 as defined by an N526K substitution. The isolates were tested for invasion of BEAS-2B, NHBE, A549 and NCI-H292 respiratory epithelial cells in vitro using a gentamicin survival assay, with invasion measured as the percentage of intracellular organisms relative to the initial inoculum. The overall median invasion for the 16 NTHi isolates for cell types BEAS-2B, NHBE, A549 and NCI-H292 cells were 3.17, 2.31, 0.11 and 1.52 respectively. The differences were statistically significant for BEAS-2B compared to A549 (P=0.015) and A549 compared to NCI-H292 (P=0.015), and there were also very marked differences in invasion for some individual isolates depending on the cell type used. There was a consistent bias for invasion of isolates with normal versus abnormal PBP3: and this was statistically significant for BEAS-2B (0.07 to 9.90, P=0.031) and A549 cells (0.02 to 1.68, P=0.037). These results show that NTHi invasion of respiratory epithelial cells in vitro is both strain dependant and influenced significantly by the cell line used, and that the association between altered PBP3 and increased invasion is conserved across multiple cell lines.

  20. DNA aptamers for the detection of Haemophilus influenzae type b by cell SELEX.

    PubMed

    Bitaraf, F S; Rasooli, I; Mousavi Gargari, S L

    2016-03-01

    Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) causes acute bacterial meningitis (ABM) in children, with a mortality rate of about 3-6 % of the affected patients. ABM can lead to death during a period of hours to several days and, hence, rapid and early detection of the infection is crucial. Aptamers, the short single-stranded DNA or RNA with high affinity to target molecules, are selected by a high-flux screening technique known as in vitro screening and systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment technology (SELEX). In this study, whole-cell SELEX was applied for the selection of target-specific aptamers with high affinity to Hib. ssDNA aptamers prepared by lambda exonuclease were incubated with the target cells (Hib). The aptameric binding rate to Hib was characterized for binding affinity after seven SELEX rounds by flow cytometry. The aptamers with higher binding affinity were cloned. Four of 68 aptamer clones were selected for sequencing. The dissociation constant (Kd) of the high-affinity aptamer clones 45 and 63 were 47.10 and 28.46 pM, respectively. These aptamers did not bind to other bacterial species, including the seven meningitis-causing bacteria. They showed distinct affinity to various H. influenzae strains only. These aptamers showed the highest affinity to Hib and the lowest affinity to H. influenzae type c and to other meningitis-causing bacteria. Clone 63 could detect Hib in patients' cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples at 60 colony-forming units (CFU)/mL. The results indicate applicability of the aptamers for rapid and early detection of infections brought about by Hib.

  1. Early-Life Intranasal Colonization with Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae Exacerbates Juvenile Airway Disease in Mice.

    PubMed

    McCann, Jessica R; Mason, Stanley N; Auten, Richard L; St Geme, Joseph W; Seed, Patrick C

    2016-07-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests a connection between asthma development and colonization with nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi). Specifically, nasopharyngeal colonization of human infants with NTHi within 4 weeks of birth is associated with an increased risk of asthma development later in childhood. Monocytes derived from these infants have aberrant inflammatory responses to common upper respiratory bacterial antigens compared to those of cells derived from infants who were not colonized and do not go on to develop asthma symptoms in childhood. In this study, we hypothesized that early-life colonization with NTHi promotes immune system reprogramming and the development of atypical inflammatory responses. To address this hypothesis in a highly controlled model, we tested whether colonization of mice with NTHi on day of life 3 induced or exacerbated juvenile airway disease using an ovalbumin (OVA) allergy model of asthma. We found that animals that were colonized on day of life 3 and subjected to induction of allergy had exacerbated airway disease as juveniles, in which exacerbated airway disease was defined as increased cellular infiltration into the lung, increased amounts of inflammatory cytokines interleukin-5 (IL-5) and IL-13 in lung lavage fluid, decreased regulatory T cell-associated FOXP3 gene expression, and increased mucus production. We also found that colonization with NTHi amplified airway resistance in response to increasing doses of a bronchoconstrictor following OVA immunization and challenge. Together, the murine model provides evidence for early-life immune programming that precedes the development of juvenile airway disease and corroborates observations that have been made in human children.

  2. Immunologic and Structural Relationships of the Minor Pilus Subunits among Haemophilus influenzae Isolates

    PubMed Central

    McCrea, Kirk W.; St. Sauver, Jennifer L.; Marrs, Carl F.; Clemans, Daniel; Gilsdorf, Janet R.

    1998-01-01

    Two proteins, HifD and HifE, have been identified as structural components of Haemophilus influenzae pili. Both are localized at the pilus tip, and HifE appears to mediate pilus adherence to host cells. In this study we examined the immunologic and structural diversity of these pilus subunits among type b H. influenzae (Hib) and nontypeable H. influenzae (NTHI) strains. Western immunoblot analysis revealed that antibodies directed against the C terminus of HifD and HifE from Hib strain Eagan bound to HifD and HifE proteins, respectively, of all piliated Hib and NTHI strains tested. Whole-cell enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays showed that antibodies specific for native HifD or HifE of strain Eagan also bound to all piliated Hib strains but did not bind to the piliated NTHI strains. Antibodies against HifE of strain Eagan inhibited the binding of Hib to human erythrocytes but did not inhibit the binding of NTHI strains. Restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis was used to determine strain-to-strain structural differences within hifD and hifE genes, either by PCR or by nucleotide sequence analysis. DNA and derived amino acid sequence analyses of HifD and HifE confirmed the uniqueness of the RFLP types. The hifD and hifE genes of all type b strains showed identical restriction patterns. Analysis of hifD and hifE genes from the NTHI strains, however, revealed seven unique RFLP patterns, suggesting that these genes encode proteins with diverse primary structures. These results indicate that HifD and HifE are immunologically and structurally similar among the Hib strains but vary among the NTHI strains. PMID:9746580

  3. Identification and Characterization of msf, a Novel Virulence Factor in Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed

    Kress-Bennett, Jennifer M; Hiller, N Luisa; Eutsey, Rory A; Powell, Evan; Longwell, Mark J; Hillman, Todd; Blackwell, Tenisha; Byers, Barbara; Mell, Joshua C; Post, J Christopher; Hu, Fen Z; Ehrlich, Garth D; Janto, Benjamin A

    2016-01-01

    Haemophilus influenzae is an opportunistic pathogen. The emergence of virulent, non-typeable strains (NTHi) emphasizes the importance of developing new interventional targets. We screened the NTHi supragenome for genes encoding surface-exposed proteins suggestive of immune evasion, identifying a large family containing Sel1-like repeats (SLRs). Clustering identified ten SLR-containing gene subfamilies, each with various numbers of SLRs per gene. Individual strains also had varying numbers of SLR-containing genes from one or more of the subfamilies. Statistical genetic analyses of gene possession among 210 NTHi strains typed as either disease or carriage found a significant association between possession of the SlrVA subfamily (which we have termed, macrophage survival factor, msf) and the disease isolates. The PittII strain contains four chromosomally contiguous msf genes. Deleting all four of these genes (msfA1-4) (KO) resulted in a highly significant decrease in phagocytosis and survival in macrophages; which was fully complemented by a single copy of the msfA1 gene. Using the chinchilla model of otitis media and invasive disease, the KO strain displayed a significant decrease in fitness compared to the WT in co-infections; and in single infections, the KO lost its ability to invade the brain. The singly complemented strain showed only a partial ability to compete with the WT suggesting gene dosage is important in vivo. The transcriptional profiles of the KO and WT in planktonic growth were compared using the NTHi supragenome array, which revealed highly significant changes in the expression of operons involved in virulence and anaerobiosis. These findings demonstrate that the msfA1-4 genes are virulence factors for phagocytosis, persistence, and trafficking to non-mucosal sites. PMID:26977929

  4. Protein D of Haemophilus influenzae is not a universal immunoglobulin D-binding protein.

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, K; Munson, R S

    1993-01-01

    Haemophilus influenzae type b and nontypeable H. influenzae have been reported to bind human immunoglobulin D (IgD). IgD myeloma sera from five patients were tested for the ability of IgD to bind to H. influenzae. Serotype b strains bound human IgD in four of the five sera tested. IgD in the fifth serum bound strongly to type b strain MinnA but poorly to other type b strains. Additionally, IgD binding was not observed when nontypeable strains were tested. The gene for protein D, the putative IgD-binding protein, was cloned from the IgD-binding H. influenzae type b strain MinnA and expressed in Escherichia coli. IgD binding to E. coli expressing protein D was not demonstrable. Recombinant protein D was purified, and antisera were generated in rabbits. Using these rabbit sera, we detected protein D in nontypeable as well as serotype b strains by Western blotting (immunoblotting). In contrast, IgD myeloma protein 4490, which was previously reported to bind to protein D by Ruan and coworkers (M. Ruan, M. Akkoyunlu, A. Grubb, and A. Forsgren, J. Immunol. 145:3379-3384), bound strongly to both type b and nontypeable H. influenzae as well as to E. coli expressing protein D. Thus, IgD binding is a general property of H. influenzae type b strains but not a general property of nontypeable strains, although both type b and nontypeable strains produce protein D. With the exception of IgD myeloma protein 4490 binding, we have no evidence for a role of protein D in IgD binding to H. influenzae. Images PMID:8514409

  5. Molecular Characterization of Fluoroquinolone Resistance in Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae Clinical Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Puig, Carmen; Tirado-Vélez, José Manuel; Calatayud, Laura; Tubau, Fe; Garmendia, Junkal; Ardanuy, Carmen; Marti, Sara

    2014-01-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) is a common cause of respiratory infections in adults, who are frequently treated with fluoroquinolones. The aims of this study were to characterize the genotypes of fluoroquinolone-resistant NTHi isolates and their mechanisms of resistance. Among 7,267 H. influenzae isolates collected from adult patients from 2000 to 2013, 28 (0.39%) were ciprofloxacin resistant according to Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) criteria. In addition, a nalidixic acid screening during 2010 to 2013 detected five (0.23%) isolates that were ciprofloxacin susceptible but nalidixic acid resistant. Sequencing of their quinolone resistance-determining regions and genotyping by pulse-field gel electrophoresis and multilocus sequence typing of the 25 ciprofloxacin-resistant isolates available and all 5 nalidixic acid-resistant isolates were performed. In the NTHi isolates studied, two mutations producing changes in two GyrA residues (Ser84, Asp88) and/or two ParC residues (Ser84, Glu88) were associated with increased fluoroquinolone MICs. Strains with one or two mutations (n = 15) had ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin MICs of 0.12 to 2 μg/ml, while those with three or more mutations (n = 15) had MICs of 4 to 16 μg/ml. Long persistence of fluoroquinolone-resistant strains was observed in three chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients. High genetic diversity was observed among fluoroquinolone-resistant NTHi isolates. Although fluoroquinolones are commonly used to treat respiratory infections, the proportion of resistant NTHi isolates remains low. The nalidixic acid disk test is useful for detecting the first changes in GyrA or in GyrA plus ParC among fluoroquinolone-susceptible strains that are at a potential risk for the development of resistance under selective pressure by fluoroquinolone treatment. PMID:25385097

  6. Maturation of molybdoenzymes and its influence on the pathogenesis of non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed

    Dhouib, Rabeb; Pg Othman, Dk S M; Essilfie, Ama-Tawiah; Hansbro, Phil M; Hanson, Jeffrey O; McEwan, Alastair G; Kappler, Ulrike

    2015-01-01

    Mononuclear molybdenum enzymes of the dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) reductase family occur exclusively in prokaryotes, and a loss of some these enzymes has been linked to a loss of bacterial virulence in several cases. The MobA protein catalyzes the final step in the synthesis of the molybdenum guanine dinucleotide (MGD) cofactor that is exclusive to enzymes of the DMSO reductase family. MobA has been proposed as a potential target for control of virulence since its inhibition would affect the activities of all molybdoenzymes dependent upon MGD. Here, we have studied the phenotype of a mobA mutant of the host-adapted human pathogen Haemophilus influenzae. H. influenzae causes and contributes to a variety of acute and chronic diseases of the respiratory tract, and several enzymes of the DMSO reductase family are conserved and highly expressed in this bacterium. The mobA mutation caused a significant decrease in the activities of all Mo-enzymes present, and also resulted in a small defect in anaerobic growth. However, we did not detect a defect in in vitro biofilm formation nor in invasion and adherence to human epithelial cells in tissue culture compared to the wild-type. In a murine in vivo model, the mobA mutant showed only a mild attenuation compared to the wild-type. In summary, our data show that MobA is essential for the activities of molybdenum enzymes, but does not appear to affect the fitness of H. influenzae. These results suggest that MobA is unlikely to be a useful target for antimicrobials, at least for the purpose of treating H. influenzae infections. PMID:26594204

  7. Cellular immunity to the P6 outer membrane protein of nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed Central

    Kodama, H; Faden, H

    1995-01-01

    Cellular immunity to nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae in a population of 10 healthy, immune adults was determined by measuring lymphocyte blast transformation and antibody secretion in response to the P6 outer membrane protein. P6 (200 microliters/ml) induced lymphocyte blast transformation that peaked on day 10 of incubation. The peak induction of antibody-secreting cells occurred on day 8 of incubation. In comparison with the response to tetanus toxoid stimulation, the peak lymphocyte blast transformation response to P6 was reduced (mean counts per minute +/- standard error of the mean [SEM], 3,457 +/- 503 versus 9,414 +/- 1,464; P = 0.0051) and delayed (mean days +/- SEM, 10.3 +/- 0.4 versus 8.4 +/- 0.5; P = 0.0169); however, P6 was a better stimulus of antibody secretion from lymphocytes, particularly antibody of the immunoglobulin M (IgM) class (mean peak numbers of antibody-secreting cells per 10(5) peripheral blood mononuclear cells +/- SEM: IgG, 85 +/- 29 versus 42 +/- 16 [P = 0.0469]; IgM, 81 +/- 20 versus 25 +/- 7 [P = 0.0125]; IgA, 24 +/- 8 versus 16 +/- 6 [P = 0.0526]). Thus, lymphocytes from immune individuals recognize P6 of nontypeable H. influenzae as an immunogen. These data provide a basis for future studies with otitis-prone children who fail to develop a normal antibody response to P6 antigen (N. Yamanaka and H. Faden, J. Pediatr. 122:212-218, 1993). PMID:7790058

  8. Transcription of genes encoding iron and heme acquisition proteins of Haemophilus influenzae during acute otitis media.

    PubMed Central

    Whitby, P W; Sim, K E; Morton, D J; Patel, J A; Stull, T L

    1997-01-01

    Unencapsulated Haemophilus influenzae is the second most common etiologic agent of otitis media in children. H. influenzae requires heme for aerobic growth in vitro and is able to utilize hemoglobin and complexes of heme-hemopexin, heme-albumin, and hemoglobin-haptoglobin and ferritransferrin as sources of iron and heme in vitro. Several of the acquisition mechanisms have been characterized and been shown to be heme repressible in vitro. However, little is known about the expression of heme and/or iron acquisition mechanisms during infections in the middle ear. This study was performed to determine if the genes encoding heme and iron acquisition proteins are transcribed during in vivo growth and to compare these findings with those for samples grown in vitro. Reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) was used to analyze total RNA fractions derived from in vitro- and in vivo-grown H. influenzae. Genes encoding the transferrin-binding proteins TbpA and TbpB, the 100-kDa hemopexin-binding protein HxuA, and the hemoglobin-binding protein HgpA were transcribed during otitis media. Twelve middle ear fluid samples were analyzed by blind RT-PCR to determine the transcriptional status of these genes in H. influenzae during otitis media. Five isolates had transcripts corresponding to tbpA, tbpB, and hxuA. The presence of hgpA transcripts was variable, depending on the presence of hgpA in the genome of the H. influenzae isolate. Samples without H. influenzae gene transcripts contained other etiologic agents commonly causing otitis media. These data demonstrate that H. influenzae iron and/or heme acquisition genes are transcribed during otitis media and suggest that the microenvironment during acute otitis media starves H. influenzae of heme. PMID:9353052

  9. Quantitation and biological properties of released and cell-bound lipooligosaccharides from nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed Central

    Gu, X X; Tsai, C M; Apicella, M A; Lim, D J

    1995-01-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) is a major pathogen causing otitis media in children. NTHi releases lipooligosaccharide (LOS) as outer membrane fragments during its growth. The release of LOS may play an important role in the pathogenicity of otitis media caused by this organism. The amounts of LOS in bacterial cells and growth media for five NTHi strains were determined by quantitative silver staining after sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. These strains were estimated to have 1.6 x 10(6) to 4.8 x 10(6) LOS molecules per bacterium. During a 3-day growth period, these NTHi strains released variable but significant amounts of LOS into the growth medium. Cells started to release detectable amounts of LOS into the medium at 2 to 5 h and continued to do so for up to 48 or 72 h. The concentrations of LOS in the culture supernatants released by these five strains were 10 to 55 micrograms/ml at 24 h and 40 to 100 micrograms/ml at 72 h, which was 34 to 189% of the cell-bound LOS concentration. The biological properties of released and cell-bound LOSs from two representative strains were compared. Released LOS showed an approximately 10-fold increase in inducing human monocytes to produce tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin 1 beta, and interleukin 6, a 13- to 28-fold increase in mouse lethal toxicity, and a 16- to 37-fold increase in the clotting of Limulus amebocyte lysate. These results suggested that released LOS or its inflammatory mediators play a more important role than the LOS in bacteria in the pathogenicity of otitis media caused by this organism. PMID:7558327

  10. Preparation and testing of a Haemophilus influenzae Type b/Hepatitis B surface antigen conjugate vaccine.

    PubMed

    An, So Jung; Woo, Joo Sung; Chae, Myung Hwa; Kothari, Sudeep; Carbis, Rodney

    2015-03-24

    The majority of conjugate vaccines focus on inducing an antibody response to the polysaccharide antigen and the carrier protein is present primarily to induce a T-cell dependent response. In this study conjugates consisting of poly(ribosylribitolphosphate) (PRP) purified from Haemophilus influenzae Type b bound to Hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg) virus like particles were prepared with the aim of inducing an antibody response to not only the PRP but also the HBsAg. A conjugate consisting of PRP bound to HBsAg via an adipic acid dihydrazide (ADH) spacer induced strong IgG antibodies to both the PRP and HBsAg. When conjugation was performed without the ADH spacer the induction of an anti-PRP response was equivalent to that seen by conjugate with the ADH spacer, however, a negligible anti-HBsAg response was induced. For comparison, PRP was conjugated to diphtheria toxoid (DT) and Vi polysaccharide purified from Salmonella Typhi conjugated to HBsAg both using an ADH spacer. The PRPAH-DT conjugate induced strong anti-PRP and anti-DT responses, the Vi-AHHBsAg conjugate induced a good anti-HBsAg response but not as strong as that induced by the PRPAH-HBsAg conjugate. This study demonstrated that in mice it was possible to induce robust antibody responses to both polysaccharide and carrier protein provided the conjugate has certain physico-chemical properties. A PRPAH-HBsAg conjugate with the capacity to induce anti-PRP and anti-HBsAg responses could be incorporated into a multivalent pediatric vaccine and simplify formulation of such a vaccine. PMID:25659268

  11. Transformed Recombinant Enrichment Profiling Rapidly Identifies HMW1 as an Intracellular Invasion Locus in Haemophilus influenza.

    PubMed

    Mell, Joshua Chang; Viadas, Cristina; Moleres, Javier; Sinha, Sunita; Fernández-Calvet, Ariadna; Porsch, Eric A; St Geme, Joseph W; Nislow, Corey; Redfield, Rosemary J; Garmendia, Junkal

    2016-04-01

    Many bacterial species actively take up and recombine homologous DNA into their genomes, called natural competence, a trait that offers a means to identify the genetic basis of naturally occurring phenotypic variation. Here, we describe "transformed recombinant enrichment profiling" (TREP), in which natural transformation is used to generate complex pools of recombinants, phenotypic selection is used to enrich for specific recombinants, and deep sequencing is used to survey for the genetic variation responsible. We applied TREP to investigate the genetic architecture of intracellular invasion by the human pathogen Haemophilus influenzae, a trait implicated in persistence during chronic infection. TREP identified the HMW1 adhesin as a crucial factor. Natural transformation of the hmw1 operon from a clinical isolate (86-028NP) into a laboratory isolate that lacks it (Rd KW20) resulted in ~1,000-fold increased invasion into airway epithelial cells. When a distinct recipient (Hi375, already possessing hmw1 and its paralog hmw2) was transformed by the same donor, allelic replacement of hmw2AHi375 by hmw1A86-028NP resulted in a ~100-fold increased intracellular invasion rate. The specific role of hmw1A86-028NP was confirmed by mutant and western blot analyses. Bacterial self-aggregation and adherence to airway cells were also increased in recombinants, suggesting that the high invasiveness induced by hmw1A86-028NP might be a consequence of these phenotypes. However, immunofluorescence results found that intracellular hmw1A86-028NP bacteria likely invaded as groups, instead of as individual bacterial cells, indicating an emergent invasion-specific consequence of hmw1A-mediated self-aggregation. PMID:27124727

  12. Relationship between Azithromycin Susceptibility and Administration Efficacy for Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae Respiratory Infection

    PubMed Central

    Euba, Begoña; Moleres, Javier; Viadas, Cristina; Barberán, Montserrat; Caballero, Lucía; Grilló, María-Jesús; Bengoechea, José Antonio; de-Torres, Juan Pablo; Liñares, Josefina; Leiva, José

    2015-01-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHI) is an opportunistic pathogen that is an important cause of acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD). COPD is an inflammatory disease of the airways, and exacerbations are acute inflammatory events superimposed on this background of chronic inflammation. Azithromycin (AZM) is a macrolide antibiotic with antibacterial and anti-inflammatory properties and a clinically proven potential for AECOPD prevention and management. Relationships between AZM efficacy and resistance by NTHI and between bactericidal and immunomodulatory effects on NTHI respiratory infection have not been addressed. In this study, we employed two pathogenic NTHI strains with different AZM susceptibilities (NTHI 375 [AZM susceptible] and NTHI 353 [AZM resistant]) to evaluate the prophylactic and therapeutic effects of AZM on the NTHI-host interplay. At the cellular level, AZM was bactericidal toward intracellular NTHI inside alveolar and bronchial epithelia and alveolar macrophages, and it enhanced NTHI phagocytosis by the latter cell type. These effects correlated with the strain MIC of AZM and the antibiotic dose. Additionally, the effect of AZM on NTHI infection was assessed in a mouse model of pulmonary infection. AZM showed both preventive and therapeutic efficacies by lowering NTHI 375 bacterial counts in lungs and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and by reducing histopathological inflammatory lesions in the upper and lower airways of mice. Conversely, AZM did not reduce bacterial loads in animals infected with NTHI 353, in which case a milder anti-inflammatory effect was also observed. Together, the results of this work link the bactericidal and anti-inflammatory effects of AZM and frame the efficacy of this antibiotic against NTHI respiratory infection. PMID:25712355

  13. Identification and Characterization of msf, a Novel Virulence Factor in Haemophilus influenzae

    PubMed Central

    Kress-Bennett, Jennifer M.; Hiller, N. Luisa; Eutsey, Rory A.; Powell, Evan; Longwell, Mark J.; Hillman, Todd; Blackwell, Tenisha; Byers, Barbara; Mell, Joshua C.; Post, J. Christopher; Hu, Fen Z.; Ehrlich, Garth D.; Janto, Benjamin A.

    2016-01-01

    Haemophilus influenzae is an opportunistic pathogen. The emergence of virulent, non-typeable strains (NTHi) emphasizes the importance of developing new interventional targets. We screened the NTHi supragenome for genes encoding surface-exposed proteins suggestive of immune evasion, identifying a large family containing Sel1-like repeats (SLRs). Clustering identified ten SLR-containing gene subfamilies, each with various numbers of SLRs per gene. Individual strains also had varying numbers of SLR-containing genes from one or more of the subfamilies. Statistical genetic analyses of gene possession among 210 NTHi strains typed as either disease or carriage found a significant association between possession of the SlrVA subfamily (which we have termed, macrophage survival factor, msf) and the disease isolates. The PittII strain contains four chromosomally contiguous msf genes. Deleting all four of these genes (msfA1-4) (KO) resulted in a highly significant decrease in phagocytosis and survival in macrophages; which was fully complemented by a single copy of the msfA1 gene. Using the chinchilla model of otitis media and invasive disease, the KO strain displayed a significant decrease in fitness compared to the WT in co-infections; and in single infections, the KO lost its ability to invade the brain. The singly complemented strain showed only a partial ability to compete with the WT suggesting gene dosage is important in vivo. The transcriptional profiles of the KO and WT in planktonic growth were compared using the NTHi supragenome array, which revealed highly significant changes in the expression of operons involved in virulence and anaerobiosis. These findings demonstrate that the msfA1-4 genes are virulence factors for phagocytosis, persistence, and trafficking to non-mucosal sites. PMID:26977929

  14. Characterization of lactate utilization and its implication on the physiology of Haemophilus influenzae

    PubMed Central

    Lichtenegger, Sabine; Bina, Isabelle; Roier, Sandro; Bauernfeind, Stilla; Keidel, Kristina; Schild, Stefan; Anthony, Mark; Reidl, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    Haemophilus influenzae is a Gram-negative bacillus and a frequent commensal of the human nasopharynx. Earlier work demonstrated that in H. influenzae type b, l-lactate metabolism is associated with serum resistance and in vivo survival of the organism. To further gain insight into lactate utilization of the non-typeable (NTHi) isolate 2019 and laboratory prototype strain Rd KW20, deletion mutants of the l-lactate dehydrogenase (lctD) and permease (lctP) were generated and characterized. It is shown, that the apparent KM of l-lactate uptake is 20.1 μM as determined for strain Rd KW20. Comparison of the COPD isolate NTHi 2019-R with the corresponding lctP knockout strain for survival in human serum revealed no lactate dependent serum resistance. In contrast, we observed a 4-fold attenuation of the mutant strain in a murine model of nasopharyngeal colonization. Characterization of lctP transcriptional control shows that the lactate utilization system in H. influenzae is not an inductor inducible system. Rather negative feedback regulation was observed in the presence of l-lactate and this is dependent on the ArcAB regulatory system. Additionally, for 2019 it was found that lactate may have signaling function leading to increased cell growth in late log phase under conditions where no l-lactate is metabolized. This effect seems to be ArcA independent and was not observed in strain Rd KW20. We conclude that l-lactate is an important carbon-source and may act as host specific signal substrate which fine tunes the globally acting ArcAB regulon and may additionally affect a yet unknown signaling system and thus may contribute to enhanced in vivo survival. PMID:24674911

  15. The Epidemiologic and Pharmacodynamic Cutoff Values of Tilmicosin against Haemophilus parasuis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Peng; Hao, Haihong; Li, Jun; Ahmad, Ijaz; Cheng, Guyue; Chen, Dongmei; Tao, Yanfei; Huang, Lingli; Wang, Yulian; Dai, Menghong; Liu, Zhenli; Yuan, Zonghui

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to establish antimicrobial susceptibility breakpoints for tilmicosin against Haemophilus parasuis, which is an important pathogen of respiratory tract infections. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of 103 H. parasuis isolates were determined by the agar dilution method. The wild type (WT) distribution and epidemiologic cutoff value (ECV) were evaluated by statistical analysis. The new bronchoaveolar lavage was used to establish intrapulmonary pharmacokinetic (PK) model in swine. The pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters of tilmicosin, both in pulmonary epithelial lining fluid (PELF) and in plasma, were determined using high performance liquid chromatography method and WinNonlin software. The pharmacodynamic cutoff (COPD) was calculated using Monte Carlo simulation. Our results showed that 100% of WT isolates were covered when the ECV was set at 16 μg/mL. The tilmicosin had concentration-dependent activity against H. parasuis. The PK data indicated that tilmicosin concentrations in PELF was rapidly increased to high levels at 4 h and kept stable until 48 h after drug administration, while the tilmicosin concentration in plasma reached maximum levels at 4 h and continued to decrease during 4–72 h. Using Monte Carlo simulation, COPD was defined as 1 μg/mL. Conclusively, the ECV and COPD of tilmicosin against H. parasuis were established for the first time based on the MIC distribution and PK-PD analysis in the target tissue, respectively. These values are of great importance for detection of tilmicosin-resistant H. parasuis and for effective treatment of clinical intrapulmonary infection caused by H. parasuis. PMID:27047487

  16. The Epidemiologic and Pharmacodynamic Cutoff Values of Tilmicosin against Haemophilus parasuis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Hao, Haihong; Li, Jun; Ahmad, Ijaz; Cheng, Guyue; Chen, Dongmei; Tao, Yanfei; Huang, Lingli; Wang, Yulian; Dai, Menghong; Liu, Zhenli; Yuan, Zonghui

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to establish antimicrobial susceptibility breakpoints for tilmicosin against Haemophilus parasuis, which is an important pathogen of respiratory tract infections. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of 103 H. parasuis isolates were determined by the agar dilution method. The wild type (WT) distribution and epidemiologic cutoff value (ECV) were evaluated by statistical analysis. The new bronchoaveolar lavage was used to establish intrapulmonary pharmacokinetic (PK) model in swine. The pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters of tilmicosin, both in pulmonary epithelial lining fluid (PELF) and in plasma, were determined using high performance liquid chromatography method and WinNonlin software. The pharmacodynamic cutoff (COPD) was calculated using Monte Carlo simulation. Our results showed that 100% of WT isolates were covered when the ECV was set at 16 μg/mL. The tilmicosin had concentration-dependent activity against H. parasuis. The PK data indicated that tilmicosin concentrations in PELF was rapidly increased to high levels at 4 h and kept stable until 48 h after drug administration, while the tilmicosin concentration in plasma reached maximum levels at 4 h and continued to decrease during 4-72 h. Using Monte Carlo simulation, COPD was defined as 1 μg/mL. Conclusively, the ECV and COPD of tilmicosin against H. parasuis were established for the first time based on the MIC distribution and PK-PD analysis in the target tissue, respectively. These values are of great importance for detection of tilmicosin-resistant H. parasuis and for effective treatment of clinical intrapulmonary infection caused by H. parasuis.

  17. Preclinical evaluation of a Haemophilus influenzae type b conjugate vaccine process intended for technology transfer.

    PubMed

    Hamidi, Ahd; Verdijk, Pauline; Kreeftenberg, Hans

    2014-01-01

    Introduction of Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) vaccine in low- and middle-income countries has been limited by cost and availability of Hib conjugate vaccines for a long time. It was previously recognized by the Institute for Translational Vaccinology (Intravacc, originating from the former Vaccinology Unit of the National Institute of Public Health [RIVM] and the Netherlands Vaccine Institute [NVI]) that local production of a Hib conjugate vaccine would increase the affordability and sustainability of the vaccine and thereby help to speed up Hib introduction in these countries. A new affordable and a non-infringing production process for a Hib conjugate vaccine was developed, including relevant quality control tests, and the technology was transferred to a number of vaccine manufacturers in India, Indonesia, and China. As part of the Hib technology transfer project managed by Intravacc, a preclinical toxicity study was conducted in the Netherlands to test the safety and immunogenicity of this new Hib conjugate vaccine. The data generated by this study were used by the technology transfer partners to accelerate the clinical development of the new Hib conjugate vaccine. A repeated dose toxicity and local tolerance study in rats was performed to assess the reactogenicity and immunogenicity of a new Hib conjugate vaccine compared to a licensed vaccine. The results showed that the vaccine was well tolerated and immunogenic in rats, no major differences in both safety and immunogenicity in rats were found between the vaccine produced according to the production process developed by Intravacc and the licensed one. Rats may be useful to verify the immunogenicity of Hib conjugate vaccines and for preclinical evaluation. In general, nonclinical evaluation of the new Hib conjugate vaccine, including this proof of concept (safety and immunogenicity study in rats), made it possible for technology transfer partners, having implemented the original process with no changes

  18. Prospects for prevention of Haemophilus influenzae type b disease by immunization.

    PubMed

    Granoff, D M; Munson, R S

    1986-03-01

    A vaccine consisting of the polysaccharide (PS) capsule of Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) has recently been licensed in the United States. This vaccine is safe and effective in preventing invasive Hib disease in children two years of age and older, but it is ineffective in younger children, the group at greatest risk of disease. The PS vaccine also may be ineffective in preventing disease in certain subgroups of the population that are genetically at increased risk of disease and show impaired antibody responses to immunization. Thus, new strategies need to be considered. Currently, several new Hib PS-protein conjugate vaccines are being evaluated. These vaccines differ in their method of preparation, carrier protein, and PS size. In contrast to the plain Hib PS vaccine, conjugate vaccines are immunogenic in infants and elicit boostable increases in antibody to PS upon reinjection of vaccine. However, some infants less than six months of age do not respond. To confer protection on all infants, it may be necessary to modify further the conjugate vaccines. One approach is to use outer membrane proteins (OMPs) as vaccine components. Five major OMPs have been purified from Hib, and three, P1 (50 kilodalton [kDa]), P2 (37 kDa), and P6 (16 kDa), contain antigens capable of eliciting strain-specific protective antibodies in experimental animals. In summary, PS-protein conjugate vaccines hold enormous promise for the prevention of Hib disease in infants, but further work is needed to define the optimal carrier protein, PS size, and method of coupling. Information is also needed on whether genetic factors influence responses to these vaccines. PMID:3485160

  19. Preparation and testing of a Haemophilus influenzae Type b/Hepatitis B surface antigen conjugate vaccine.

    PubMed

    An, So Jung; Woo, Joo Sung; Chae, Myung Hwa; Kothari, Sudeep; Carbis, Rodney

    2015-03-24

    The majority of conjugate vaccines focus on inducing an antibody response to the polysaccharide antigen and the carrier protein is present primarily to induce a T-cell dependent response. In this study conjugates consisting of poly(ribosylribitolphosphate) (PRP) purified from Haemophilus influenzae Type b bound to Hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg) virus like particles were prepared with the aim of inducing an antibody response to not only the PRP but also the HBsAg. A conjugate consisting of PRP bound to HBsAg via an adipic acid dihydrazide (ADH) spacer induced strong IgG antibodies to both the PRP and HBsAg. When conjugation was performed without the ADH spacer the induction of an anti-PRP response was equivalent to that seen by conjugate with the ADH spacer, however, a negligible anti-HBsAg response was induced. For comparison, PRP was conjugated to diphtheria toxoid (DT) and Vi polysaccharide purified from Salmonella Typhi conjugated to HBsAg both using an ADH spacer. The PRPAH-DT conjugate induced strong anti-PRP and anti-DT responses, the Vi-AHHBsAg conjugate induced a good anti-HBsAg response but not as strong as that induced by the PRPAH-HBsAg conjugate. This study demonstrated that in mice it was possible to induce robust antibody responses to both polysaccharide and carrier protein provided the conjugate has certain physico-chemical properties. A PRPAH-HBsAg conjugate with the capacity to induce anti-PRP and anti-HBsAg responses could be incorporated into a multivalent pediatric vaccine and simplify formulation of such a vaccine.

  20. Transformed Recombinant Enrichment Profiling Rapidly Identifies HMW1 as an Intracellular Invasion Locus in Haemophilus influenza

    PubMed Central

    Moleres, Javier; Sinha, Sunita; Fernández-Calvet, Ariadna; Porsch, Eric A.; St. Geme, Joseph W.; Nislow, Corey; Redfield, Rosemary J.; Garmendia, Junkal

    2016-01-01

    Many bacterial species actively take up and recombine homologous DNA into their genomes, called natural competence, a trait that offers a means to identify the genetic basis of naturally occurring phenotypic variation. Here, we describe “transformed recombinant enrichment profiling” (TREP), in which natural transformation is used to generate complex pools of recombinants, phenotypic selection is used to enrich for specific recombinants, and deep sequencing is used to survey for the genetic variation responsible. We applied TREP to investigate the genetic architecture of intracellular invasion by the human pathogen Haemophilus influenzae, a trait implicated in persistence during chronic infection. TREP identified the HMW1 adhesin as a crucial factor. Natural transformation of the hmw1 operon from a clinical isolate (86-028NP) into a laboratory isolate that lacks it (Rd KW20) resulted in ~1,000-fold increased invasion into airway epithelial cells. When a distinct recipient (Hi375, already possessing hmw1 and its paralog hmw2) was transformed by the same donor, allelic replacement of hmw2AHi375 by hmw1A86-028NP resulted in a ~100-fold increased intracellular invasion rate. The specific role of hmw1A86-028NP was confirmed by mutant and western blot analyses. Bacterial self-aggregation and adherence to airway cells were also increased in recombinants, suggesting that the high invasiveness induced by hmw1A86-028NP might be a consequence of these phenotypes. However, immunofluorescence results found that intracellular hmw1A86-028NP bacteria likely invaded as groups, instead of as individual bacterial cells, indicating an emergent invasion-specific consequence of hmw1A-mediated self-aggregation. PMID:27124727

  1. The capsule biosynthesis locus of Haemophilus influenzae shows conspicuous similarity to the corresponding locus in Haemophilus sputorum and may have been recruited from this species by horizontal gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Signe M; de Gier, Camilla; Dimopoulou, Chrysoula; Gupta, Vikas; Hansen, Lars H; Nørskov-Lauritsen, Niels

    2015-06-01

    The newly described species Haemophilus sputorum has been cultured from the upper respiratory tract of humans and appears to have little pathogenic potential. The species encodes a capsular biosynthesis locus of approximately 12  kb composed of three distinct regions. Region I and III genes, involved in export and processing of the capsular material, show high similarity to the corresponding genes in capsulate lineages of the pathogenic species Haemophilus influenzae; indeed, standard bexA and bexB PCRs for detection of capsulated strains of H. influenzae give positive results with strains of H. sputorum. Three ORFs are present in region II of the sequenced strain of H. sputorum, of which a putative phosphotransferase showed homology with corresponding genes from H. influenzae serotype c and f. Phylogenetic analysis of housekeeping genes from 24 Pasteurellaceae species showed that H. sputorum was only distantly related to H. influenzae. In contrast to H. influenzae, the capsule locus in H. sputorum is not associated with transposases or other transposable elements. Our data suggest that the capsule locus of capsulate lineages of H. influenzae may have been recruited relatively recently from the commensal species H. sputorum by horizontal gene transfer.

  2. Complete Deletion of the Fucose Operon in Haemophilus influenzae Is Associated with a Cluster in Multilocus Sequence Analysis-Based Phylogenetic Group II Related to Haemophilus haemolyticus: Implications for Identification and Typing

    PubMed Central

    de Gier, Camilla; Kirkham, Lea-Ann S.

    2015-01-01

    Nonhemolytic variants of Haemophilus haemolyticus are difficult to differentiate from Haemophilus influenzae despite a wide difference in pathogenic potential. A previous investigation characterized a challenging set of 60 clinical strains using multiple PCRs for marker genes and described strains that could not be unequivocally identified as either species. We have analyzed the same set of strains by multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) and near-full-length 16S rRNA gene sequencing. MLSA unambiguously allocated all study strains to either of the two species, while identification by 16S rRNA sequence was inconclusive for three strains. Notably, the two methods yielded conflicting identifications for two strains. Most of the “fuzzy species” strains were identified as H. influenzae that had undergone complete deletion of the fucose operon. Such strains, which are untypeable by the H. influenzae multilocus sequence type (MLST) scheme, have sporadically been reported and predominantly belong to a single branch of H. influenzae MLSA phylogenetic group II. We also found evidence of interspecies recombination between H. influenzae and H. haemolyticus within the 16S rRNA genes. Establishing an accurate method for rapid and inexpensive identification of H. influenzae is important for disease surveillance and treatment. PMID:26378279

  3. Complete Deletion of the Fucose Operon in Haemophilus influenzae Is Associated with a Cluster in Multilocus Sequence Analysis-Based Phylogenetic Group II Related to Haemophilus haemolyticus: Implications for Identification and Typing.

    PubMed

    de Gier, Camilla; Kirkham, Lea-Ann S; Nørskov-Lauritsen, Niels

    2015-12-01

    Nonhemolytic variants of Haemophilus haemolyticus are difficult to differentiate from Haemophilus influenzae despite a wide difference in pathogenic potential. A previous investigation characterized a challenging set of 60 clinical strains using multiple PCRs for marker genes and described strains that could not be unequivocally identified as either species. We have analyzed the same set of strains by multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) and near-full-length 16S rRNA gene sequencing. MLSA unambiguously allocated all study strains to either of the two species, while identification by 16S rRNA sequence was inconclusive for three strains. Notably, the two methods yielded conflicting identifications for two strains. Most of the "fuzzy species" strains were identified as H. influenzae that had undergone complete deletion of the fucose operon. Such strains, which are untypeable by the H. influenzae multilocus sequence type (MLST) scheme, have sporadically been reported and predominantly belong to a single branch of H. influenzae MLSA phylogenetic group II. We also found evidence of interspecies recombination between H. influenzae and H. haemolyticus within the 16S rRNA genes. Establishing an accurate method for rapid and inexpensive identification of H. influenzae is important for disease surveillance and treatment.

  4. Haemophilus influenzae Type b Carriage among Young Children in Metropolitan Atlanta in the Context of Vaccine Shortage and Booster Dose Deferral ▿

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Jennifer Dolan; Jackson, Michael L.; Sharma, Dolly; Mair, Raydel; Bach, Michelle C.; Castillo, Dana; Ejigiri, O. Grace; Satola, Sarah; Cohn, Amanda C.; Jerris, Robert; Jain, Shabnam; Farley, Monica M.; Mayer, Leonard W.; Messonnier, Nancy E.

    2011-01-01

    Short-term deferral of the Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) vaccine booster dose during a recent U.S. Hib vaccine shortage did not result in widespread Hib carriage in Atlanta, as the Hib carriage rate was found to be 0.3% (1/342). Hib colonization was significantly more common among males and day care attendees. PMID:22012977

  5. Quantitative PCR confirms culture as the gold standard for detection of lower airway infection by nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae in Australian Indigenous children with bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Hare, Kim M; Marsh, Robyn L; Binks, Michael J; Grimwood, Keith; Pizzutto, Susan J; Leach, Amanda J; Chang, Anne B; Smith-Vaughan, Heidi C

    2013-03-01

    Correlation was observed between quantitative PCR and semi-quantitative culture for definition of Haemophilus influenzae infection in bronchoalveolar lavage specimens from 81 children with bronchiectasis. However, qPCR data correlated less well with airway neutrophilia, and supports continued use of culture as the gold standard for defining H. influenzae lower airway infection. PMID:23266579

  6. Quantitative PCR confirms culture as the gold standard for detection of lower airway infection by nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae in Australian Indigenous children with bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Hare, Kim M; Marsh, Robyn L; Binks, Michael J; Grimwood, Keith; Pizzutto, Susan J; Leach, Amanda J; Chang, Anne B; Smith-Vaughan, Heidi C

    2013-03-01

    Correlation was observed between quantitative PCR and semi-quantitative culture for definition of Haemophilus influenzae infection in bronchoalveolar lavage specimens from 81 children with bronchiectasis. However, qPCR data correlated less well with airway neutrophilia, and supports continued use of culture as the gold standard for defining H. influenzae lower airway infection.

  7. Relationship between clinical site of isolation and ability to form biofilms in vitro in nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed

    Obaid, Najla A; Jacobson, Glenn A; Tristram, Stephen

    2015-03-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) is an opportunistic pathogen associated with a range of infections, including various lower respiratory infections, otitis media, and conjunctivitis. There is some debate as to whether or not NTHi produces biofilms and, if so, whether or not this is relevant to pathogenesis. Although many studies have examined the association between in vitro biofilm formation and isolates from a specific infection type, few have made comparisons from isolates from a broad range of isolates grouped by clinical source. In our study 50 NTHi from different clinical sources, otitis media, conjunctivitis, lower respiratory tract infections in both cystic fibrosis and non-cystic fibrosis patients, and nasopharyngeal carriage, plus 10 nasopharyngeal isolates of the commensal Haemophilus haemolyticus were tested for the ability to form biofilm by using a static microtitre plate crystal violet assay. A high degree of variation in biofilm forming ability was observed across all isolates, with no statistically significant differences observed between the groups, with the exception of the isolates from conjunctivitis. These isolates had uniformly lower biofilm forming ability compared with isolates from the other groups (p < 0.005). PMID:25706230

  8. Haemophilus parainfluenzae expresses diverse lipopolysaccharide O-antigens using ABC transporter and Wzy polymerase-dependent mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Young, Rosanna E.B.; Twelkmeyer, Brigitte; Vitiazeva, Varvara; Power, Peter M.; Schweda, Elke K.H.; Hood, Derek W.

    2013-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide O-antigens are the basis of serotyping schemes for Gram negative bacteria and help to determine the nature of host–bacterial interactions. Haemophilus parainfluenzae is a normal commensal of humans but is also an occasional pathogen. The prevalence, diversity and biosynthesis of O-antigens were investigated in this species for the first time. 18/18 commensal H. parainfluenzae isolates contain a O-antigen biosynthesis gene cluster flanked by glnA and pepB, the same position as the hmg locus for tetrasaccharide biosynthesis in Haemophilus influenzae. The O-antigen loci show diverse restriction digest patterns but fall into two main groups: (1) those encoding enzymes for the synthesis and transfer of FucNAc4N in addition to the Wzy-dependent mechanism of O-antigen synthesis and transport and (2) those encoding galactofuranose synthesis/transfer enzymes and an ABC transporter. The other glycosyltransferase genes differ between isolates. Three H. parainfluenzae isolates fell outside these groups and are predicted to synthesise O-antigens containing ribitol phosphate or deoxytalose. Isolates using the ABC transporter system encode a putative O-antigen ligase, required for the synthesis of O-antigen-containing LPS glycoforms, at a separate genomic location. The presence of an O-antigen contributes significantly to H. parainfluenzae resistance to the killing effect of human serum in vitro. The discovery of O-antigens in H. parainfluenzae is striking, as its close relative H. influenzae lacks this cell surface component. PMID:24035104

  9. Detection of Haemophilus influenzae in respiratory secretions from pneumonia patients by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Abdeldaim, Guma M K; Strålin, Kristoffer; Kirsebom, Leif A; Olcén, Per; Blomberg, Jonas; Herrmann, Björn

    2009-08-01

    A quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based on the omp P6 gene was developed to detect Haemophilus influenzae. Its specificity was determined by analysis of 29 strains of 11 different Haemophilus spp. and was compared with PCR assays having other target genes: rnpB, 16S rRNA, and bexA. The method was evaluated on nasopharyngeal aspirates from 166 adult patients with community-acquired pneumonia. When 10(4) DNA copies/mL was used as cutoff limit for the method, P6 PCR had a sensitivity of 97.5% and a specificity of 96.0% compared with the culture. Of 20 culture-negative but P6 PCR-positive cases, 18 were confirmed by fucK PCR as H. influenzae. Five (5.9%) of 84 nasopharyngeal aspirates from adult controls tested PCR positive. We conclude that the P6 real-time PCR is both sensitive and specific for identification of H. influenzae in respiratory secretions. Quantification facilitates discrimination between disease-causing H. influenzae strains and commensal colonization. PMID:19446978

  10. Haemophilus influenzae clinical isolates with plasmid pB1000 bearing blaROB-1: fitness cost and interspecies dissemination.

    PubMed

    San Millan, Alvaro; Garcia-Cobos, Silvia; Escudero, Jose Antonio; Hidalgo, Laura; Gutierrez, Belen; Carrilero, Laura; Campos, Jose; Gonzalez-Zorn, Bruno

    2010-04-01

    Plasmid pB1000 is a mobilizable replicon bearing the bla(ROB-1) beta-lactamase gene that we have recently described in Haemophilus parasuis and Pasteurella multocida animal isolates. Here we report the presence of pB1000 and a derivative plasmid, pB1000', in four Haemophilus influenzae clinical isolates of human origin. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis showed unrelated patterns in all strains, indicating that the existence of pB1000 in H. influenzae isolates is not the consequence of clonal dissemination. The replicon can be transferred both by transformation and by conjugation into H. influenzae, giving rise to recipients resistant to ampicillin and cefaclor (MICs, > or =64 microg/ml). Stability experiments showed that pB1000 is stable in H. influenzae without antimicrobial pressure for at least 60 generations. Competition experiments between isogenic H. influenzae strains with and without pB1000 revealed a competitive disadvantage of 9% per 10 generations for the transformant versus the recipient. The complete nucleotide sequences of nine pB1000 plasmids from human and animal isolates, as well as the epidemiological data, suggest that animal isolates belonging to the Pasteurellaceae act as an antimicrobial resistance reservoir for H. influenzae. Further, since P. multocida is the only member of this family that can colonize both humans and animals, we propose that P. multocida is the vehicle for the transport of pB1000 between animal- and human-adapted members of the Pasteurellaceae.

  11. The structure of Haemophilus influenzae prephenate dehydrogenase suggests unique features of bifunctional TyrA enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Abdubek, Polat; Astakhova, Tamara; Axelrod, Herbert L.; Carlton, Dennis; Clayton, Thomas; Das, Debanu; Deller, Marc C.; Duan, Lian; Feuerhelm, Julie; Grant, Joanna C.; Grzechnik, Anna; Han, Gye Won; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Jin, Kevin K.; Klock, Heath E.; Knuth, Mark W.; Kozbial, Piotr; Krishna, S. Sri; Kumar, Abhinav; Marciano, David; McMullan, Daniel; Miller, Mitchell D.; Morse, Andrew T.; Nigoghossian, Edward; Okach, Linda; Reyes, Ron; Tien, Henry J.; Trame, Christine B.; van den Bedem, Henry; Weekes, Dana; Xu, Qingping; Hodgson, Keith O.; Wooley, John; Elsliger, Marc-André; Deacon, Ashley M.; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2010-01-01

    Chorismate mutase/prephenate dehydrogenase from Haemophilus influenzae Rd KW20 is a bifunctional enzyme that catalyzes the rearrangement of chorismate to prephenate and the NAD(P)+-dependent oxidative decarboxyl­ation of prephenate to 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate in tyrosine biosynthesis. The crystal structure of the prephenate dehydrogenase component (HinfPDH) of the TyrA protein from H. influenzae Rd KW20 in complex with the inhibitor tyrosine and cofactor NAD+ has been determined to 2.0 Å resolution. HinfPDH is a dimeric enzyme, with each monomer consisting of an N-terminal α/β dinucleotide-binding domain and a C-terminal α-helical dimerization domain. The structure reveals key active-site residues at the domain interface, including His200, Arg297 and Ser179 that are involved in catalysis and/or ligand binding and are highly conserved in TyrA proteins from all three kingdoms of life. Tyrosine is bound directly at the catalytic site, suggesting that it is a competitive inhibitor of HinfPDH. Comparisons with its structural homologues reveal important differences around the active site, including the absence of an α–β motif in HinfPDH that is present in other TyrA proteins, such as Synechocystis sp. arogenate dehydrogenase. Residues from this motif are involved in discrimination between NADP+ and NAD+. The loop between β5 and β6 in the N-terminal domain is much shorter in HinfPDH and an extra helix is present at the C-terminus. Furthermore, HinfPDH adopts a more closed conformation compared with TyrA proteins that do not have tyrosine bound. This conformational change brings the substrate, cofactor and active-site residues into close proximity for catalysis. An ionic network consisting of Arg297 (a key residue for tyrosine binding), a water molecule, Asp206 (from the loop between β5 and β6) and Arg365′ (from the additional C-terminal helix of the adjacent monomer) is observed that might be involved in gating the active site. PMID:20944228

  12. N-Nitrosocarbaryl-induced mutagenesis in Haemophilus influenzae strains deficient in repair and recombination.

    PubMed

    Beattie, K L

    1975-02-01

    Mutagenesis was studied in repair- and recombination-deficient strains of Haemophilus influenzae after treatment with N-nitrosocarbaryl (NC). Three different strains of H. influenzae carrying mutations affecting excision-repair of UV-induced pyrimidine dimers exhibited normal repair of premutational lesions (as detected by decreased mutation yield resulting from post-treatment DNA synthesis delay) and normal nonreplicative mutation fixation. This indicated that neither of these phenomena are caused by the smae repair mechanism that removes UV-induced pyrimidine dimers from the DNA. The recombination-deficient mutant recI is apparently deficient in the replication-dependent mode of NC-induced mutation fixation. This conclusion is based on the following results: (I) NC-induced mutagenesis is lower in the recI strain than in rec+ cells. (2) Repair of premutational lesions (which depends on the existence of replication-dependent mutation fixation for its detection) was not detected in the recI strain. (3) When nonreplicative mutation fixation and final mutation frequency were measured in the same experiment, about I/4 to I/3 of the final mutation yield could be accounted for by nonreplicative mutation fixation in the rec+ strain, whereas all of the mutation could be accounted for in the recI strain by the nonreplicative mutation fixation. (4) When mutation fixation in strain dna9 recI was followed at the permissive (36 degrees) and nonpermissive (41 degrees) temperatures, it became apparent that in the recI strain replication-dependent mutation fixation occurs at early times, but these newly fixed mutations are unstable and disappear at later times, leaving only the mutations fixed by the nonreplicative process. The recI strain exhibits normal repair of NC-induced single-strand breaks or alkali-labile bonds in the DNA labeled before treatment, but is slow in joining discontinuties present in DNA synthesized after treatment. The results are consistent with the idea that

  13. Antibody response of swine to outer membrane components of Haemophilus pleuropneumoniae during infection.

    PubMed Central

    Rapp, V J; Ross, R F

    1986-01-01

    Sera from pigs infected with Haemophilus (Actinobacillus) pleuropneumoniae were tested for antibodies to outer membrane proteins (OMPs) of the organism by immunoblotting. Convalescent sera were produced in naturally born, colostrum-fed pigs and in cesarean-derived, colostrum-deprived pigs given H. pleuropneumoniae serotype 5 intranasally twice at 5-week intervals. Sera, collected at weekly intervals, were reacted with Sarkosyl-insoluble, OMP-enriched preparations of H. pleuropneumoniae which had been separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and electrophoretically transferred to nitrocellulose. Antibodies were detected to OMPs with an apparent molecular weight of 16,500 (16.5K OMP); to 29K, 38.5K, 43.5K, 45K, 49.5K, and 66.5K OMPs; and to several high-molecular-weight (greater than or equal to 94,000) OMPs, but not to the major 42K OMP. Antibodies to the heat-modifiable OMP (29K/43.5K) and the 38.5K OMP were detected in sera from noninfected pigs. Antibodies were also detected to two broad 54,000- and 95,000-molecular-weight bands which did not stain with Coomassie blue, stained with silver nitrate, resisted proteinase K digestion, and were eliminated by oxidation with sodium metaperiodate. This indicates that the 54,000- and 95,000-molecular-weight bands represent polysaccharide, possibly capsular or lipopolysaccharide immunogens. Adsorption of sera with cells from the homologous serotype 5 strain removed antibodies to the 45K, 49.5K, 66.5K, and greater than or equal to 94K OMPs and to the two polysaccharide bands, indicating that these antibodies were directed primarily to surface-exposed epitopes. When tested with OMP preparations from other serotype 5 strains, heterogeneity was apparent, both in the reactions with OMPs and with the polysaccharide bands. Silver staining of proteinase K-treated, whole-cell lysates from serotype 5 strains also indicated variable expression of the polysaccharide bands. Sera also reacted with OMPs from

  14. Structural organization, nucleotide sequence, and regulation of the Haemophilus influenzae rec-1+ gene.

    PubMed Central

    Zulty, J J; Barcak, G J

    1993-01-01

    The Haemophilus influenzae rec-1+ protein plays a central role in DNA metabolism, participating in general homologous recombination, recombinational (postreplication) DNA repair, and prophage induction. Although many H. influenzae rec-1 mutants have been phenotypically characterized, little is known about the rec-1+ gene at the molecular level. In this study, we present the genetic organization of the rec-1+ locus, the DNA sequence of rec-1+, and studies of the transcriptional regulation of rec-1+ during cellular assault by DNA-damaging agents and during the induction of competence for genetic transformation. Although little is known about promoter structure in H. influenzae, we identified a potential rec-1+ promoter that is identical in 11 of 12 positions to the bacterial sigma 70-dependent promoter consensus sequence. Results from a primer extension analysis revealed that the start site of rec-1+ transcription is centered 6 nucleotides downstream of this promoter. We identified potential DNA binding sites in the rec-1+ gene for LexA, integration host factor, and cyclic AMP receptor protein. We obtained evidence that at least one of the proposed cyclic AMP receptor protein binding sites is active in modulating rec-1+ transcription. This finding makes rec-1+ control circuitry novel among recA+ homologs. Two H. influenzae DNA uptake sequences that may function as a transcription termination signal were identified in inverted orientations at the end of the rec-1+ coding sequence. In addition, we report the first use of the Escherichia coli lacZ operon fusion technique in H. influenzae to study the transcriptional control of rec-1+. Our results indicate that rec-1+ is transcriptionally induced about threefold during DNA-damaging events. Furthermore, we show that rec-1+ can substitute for recA+ in E. coli to modulate SOS induction of dinB1 expression. Surprisingly, although 5% of the H. influenzae genome is in the form of single-stranded DNA during competence for

  15. Cost-effectiveness of Haemophilus influenzae type b vaccine in Vietnam

    PubMed Central

    Le, Phuc; Griffiths, Ulla K.; Anh, Dang Duc; Franzini, Luisa; Chan, Wenyaw; Swint, J. Michael

    2015-01-01

    Background With GAVI support, Vietnam introduced Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) vaccine in 2010 without evidence on cost-effectiveness. We aimed to analyze the cost-effectiveness of Hib vaccine from societal and governmental perspectives. Method We constructed a decision-tree cohort model to estimate the costs and effectiveness of Hib vaccine versus no Hib vaccine for the 2011 birth cohort. The disease burden was estimated from local epidemiologic data and literature. Vaccine delivery costs were calculated from governmental reports and 2013 vaccine prices. A prospective cost-of-illness study was conducted to estimate treatment costs. The human capital approach was employed to estimate productivity loss. The incremental costs of Hib vaccine were divided by cases, deaths, and disability-adjusted life years (DALY) averted. We used the WHO recommended cost-effectiveness thresholds of an intervention being highly cost-effective if incremental costs per DALY were below GDP per capita. Result From the societal perspective, incremental costs per discounted case, death and DALY averted were US$ 6,252, US$ 26,476 and US$ 1,231, respectively; the break-even vaccine price was US$ 0.69/dose. From the governmental perspective, the results were US$ 6,954, US$ 29,449, and US$ 1,373, respectively; the break-even vaccine price was US$ 0.48/dose. Vietnam's GDP per capita was US$ 1,911 in 2013. In deterministic sensitivity analysis, morbidity and mortality parameters were among the most influential factors. In probabilistic sensitivity analysis, Hib vaccine had an 84% and 78% probability to be highly cost-effective from the societal and governmental perspectives, respectively. Conclusion Hib vaccine was highly cost-effective from both societal and governmental perspectives. However, with GAVI support ending in 2016, the government will face a six-fold increase in its vaccine budget at the 2013 vaccine price. The variability of vaccine market prices adds an element of uncertainty

  16. Laboratory characterization of invasive Haemophilus influenzae isolates from Nunavut, Canada, 2000–2012

    PubMed Central

    Tsang, Raymond S. W.; Li, Y. Anita; Mullen, Angie; Baikie, Maureen; Whyte, Kathleen; Shuel, Michelle; Tyrrell, Gregory; Rotondo, Jenny A. L.; Desai, Shalini; Spika, John

    2016-01-01

    Background With invasive Haemophilus influenzae serotype b (Hib) disease controlled by vaccination with conjugate Hib vaccines, there is concern that invasive disease due to non-serotype b strains may emerge. Objective This study characterized invasive H. influenzae (Hi) isolates from Nunavut, Canada, in the post-Hib vaccine era. Methods Invasive H. influenzae isolates were identified by conventional methods at local hospitals; and further characterized at the provincial and federal public health laboratories, including detection of serotype antigens and genes, multi-locus sequence typing and antibiotic susceptibility. Results Of the 89 invasive H. influenzae cases identified from 2000 to 2012, 71 case isolates were available for study. There were 43 serotype a (Hia), 12 Hib, 2 Hic, 1 Hid, 1 Hie, 2 Hif and 10 were non-typeable (NT). All 43 Hia were biotype II, sequence type (ST)-23. Three related STs were found among the Hib isolates: ST-95 (n=9), ST-635 (n=2) and ST-44 (n=1). Both Hif belonged to ST-124 and the 2 Hic were typed as ST-9. The remaining Hid (ST-1288) and Hie (ST-18) belonged to 2 separate clones. Of the 10 NT strains, 3 were typed as ST-23 and the remaining 7 isolates each belonged to a unique ST. Eight Hib and 1 NT-Hi were found to be resistant to ampicillin due to β-lactamase production. No resistance to other antibiotics was detected. Conclusion During the period of 2000–2012, Hia was the predominant serotype causing invasive disease in Nunavut. This presents a public health concern due to an emerging clone of Hia as a cause of invasive H. influenzae disease and the lack of published guidelines for the prophylaxis of contacts. The clonal nature of Hia could be the result of spread within an isolated population, and/or unique characteristics of this strain to cause invasive disease. Further study of Hia in other populations may provide important information on this emerging pathogen. No antibiotic resistance was detected among Hia isolates; a

  17. [Recombinant expression of the fusion antigen based on Treponema pallidum TpN17 and TpN47 epitope peptides and establishment and application of the associated ELISA].

    PubMed

    Sun, Aihua; Fan, Xingli; Shen, Xiangdi; Tang, Renxian; Yan, Jie

    2009-08-01

    Using recombinant TpNs proteins of Treponema pallidum as antigens, ELISAs are proved to be of higher sensitivity and specificity. However, they can be further increased by using multiple TpNs antigens. According to the epitope analysis, we firstly used linking primers PCRs to obtain an artificial fusion gene segment tpE17-47 containing epitopes of both TpN17 and TpN47. Subsequently, we conducted the prokaryotic expression systems of entire tpN17 and tpN47 genes and tpE17-47 fusion gene. SDS-PAGE analysis and BioRad Gel Image Analysis System showed that the recombinant proteins rTpN17, rTpN47 and rTpE17-47 expressed stably, with 36%, 20% and 28% yields of total bacterial protein, respectively. After purified by Ni-NTA affinity chromatography, all the three recombinant proteins could be recognized by T. pallidum antibody positive sera from syphilis patients. The positive rate of rTpE17-47-ELISA for detecting serum specimens in clinically 630 cases with syphilis was 98.6%. This rate was slightly higher than that by Treponema pallidum particle agglutination (TPPA) (97.9%) (P > 0.05), but significantly higher than those by rTpN17-ELISA (83.8%), rTpN47-ELISA (83.3%) and rapid plasma reagin (RPR) (72.1%) (P < 0.01). Furthermore, both ELISAs and TPPA for detecting the serum specimens in 25 cases with SLE, 36 cases with RA and 250 healthy cases were all negative. RPR showed positive in 1 case with SLE, 2 cases with RA and 2 healthy cases. This could be a novel serological screening or diagnostic method of syphilis with advantages of quickness, convenience, safety, sensitivity and specificity. PMID:19938456

  18. Comparison of Diagnostic Accuracy of PCR Targeting the 47-Kilodalton Protein Membrane Gene of Treponema pallidum and PCR Targeting the DNA Polymerase I Gene: Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Gayet-Ageron, Angèle; Combescure, Christophe; Lautenschlager, Stephan; Ninet, Béatrice; Perneger, Thomas V

    2015-11-01

    Treponema pallidum PCR (Tp-PCR) testing now is recommended as a valid tool for the diagnosis of primary or secondary syphilis. The objectives were to systematically review and determine the optimal specific target gene to be used for Tp-PCR. Comparisons of the performance of the two main targets are tpp47 and polA genes were done using meta-analysis. Three electronic bibliographic databases, representing abstract books from five conferences specialized in infectious diseases from January 1990 to March 2015, were searched. Search keywords included ("syphilis" OR "Treponema pallidum" OR "neurosyphilis") AND ("PCR" OR "PCR" OR "molecular amplification"). We included diagnostic studies assessing the performance of Tp-PCR targeting tpp47 (tpp47-Tp-PCR) or the polA gene (polA-Tp-PCR) in ulcers from early syphilis. All studies were assessed against quality criteria using the QUADAS-2 tool. Of 37 studies identified, 62.2% were judged at low risk of bias or applicability. Most used the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) case definitions for primary or secondary (early) syphilis (89.2%; n = 33); 15 (40.5%) used darkfield microscopy (DFM). We did not find differences in sensitivity and specificity between the two Tp-PCR methods in the subgroup of studies using adequate reference tests. Among studies using DFM as the reference test, sensitivities were 79.8% (95% confidence intervals [CI], 72.7 to 85.4%) and 71.4% (46.0 to 88.0%) for tpp47-Tp-PCR and polA-Tp-PCR (P = 0.217), respectively; respective specificities were 95.3% (93.5 to 96.6%) and 93.7% (91.8 to 95.2%) (P = 0.304). Our findings suggest that the two Tp-PCR methods have similar accuracy and could be used interchangeably. PMID:26311859

  19. High frequency of the 23S rRNA A2058G mutation of Treponema pallidum in Shanghai is associated with a current strategy for the treatment of syphilis.

    PubMed

    Lu, Haikong; Li, Kang; Gong, Weimin; Yan, Limeng; Gu, Xin; Chai, Ze; Guan, Zhifang; Zhou, Pingyu

    2015-02-01

    The preferred drugs for the treatment of syphilis, benzathine and procaine penicillin, have not been available in Shanghai for many years, and currently, the incidence of syphilis is increasing. Alternative antibiotics for patients with syphilis during the benzathine and procaine penicillin shortage include macrolides. The failure of macrolide treatment in syphilis patients has been reported in Shanghai, but the reason for this treatment failure remains unclear. We used polymerase chain reaction technology to detect a 23S rRNA A2058G mutation in Treponema pallidum in 109 specimens from syphilis patients. The use of azithromycin/erythromycin in the syphilis patients and the physicians' prescription habits were also assessed based on two questionnaires regarding the use of macrolides. A total of 104 specimens (95.4%) were positive for the A2058G mutation in both copies of the 23S rRNA gene, indicating macrolide resistance. A questionnaire provided to 122 dermatologists showed that during the penicillin shortage, they prescribed erythromycin and azithromycin for 8.24±13.95% and 3.21±6.37% of their patients, respectively, and in the case of penicillin allergy, erythromycin and azithromycin were prescribed 15.24±22.89% and 7.23±16.60% of the time, respectively. A second questionnaire provided to the syphilis patients showed that 150 (33.7%), 106 (23.8%) and 34 (7.6%) individuals had used azithromycin, erythromycin or both, respectively, although the majority did not use the drugs for syphilis treatment. Our findings suggest that macrolide resistance in Treponema pallidum is widespread in Shanghai. More than half of the syphilis patients had a history of macrolide use for other treatment purposes, which may have led to the high prevalence of macrolide resistance. Physicians in China are advised to not use azithromycin for early syphilis.

  20. High frequency of the 23S rRNA A2058G mutation of Treponema pallidum in Shanghai is associated with a current strategy for the treatment of syphilis.

    PubMed

    Lu, Haikong; Li, Kang; Gong, Weimin; Yan, Limeng; Gu, Xin; Chai, Ze; Guan, Zhifang; Zhou, Pingyu

    2015-02-01

    The preferred drugs for the treatment of syphilis, benzathine and procaine penicillin, have not been available in Shanghai for many years, and currently, the incidence of syphilis is increasing. Alternative antibiotics for patients with syphilis during the benzathine and procaine penicillin shortage include macrolides. The failure of macrolide treatment in syphilis patients has been reported in Shanghai, but the reason for this treatment failure remains unclear. We used polymerase chain reaction technology to detect a 23S rRNA A2058G mutation in Treponema pallidum in 109 specimens from syphilis patients. The use of azithromycin/erythromycin in the syphilis patients and the physicians' prescription habits were also assessed based on two questionnaires regarding the use of macrolides. A total of 104 specimens (95.4%) were positive for the A2058G mutation in both copies of the 23S rRNA gene, indicating macrolide resistance. A questionnaire provided to 122 dermatologists showed that during the penicillin shortage, they prescribed erythromycin and azithromycin for 8.24±13.95% and 3.21±6.37% of their patients, respectively, and in the case of penicillin allergy, erythromycin and azithromycin were prescribed 15.24±22.89% and 7.23±16.60% of the time, respectively. A second questionnaire provided to the syphilis patients showed that 150 (33.7%), 106 (23.8%) and 34 (7.6%) individuals had used azithromycin, erythromycin or both, respectively, although the majority did not use the drugs for syphilis treatment. Our findings suggest that macrolide resistance in Treponema pallidum is widespread in Shanghai. More than half of the syphilis patients had a history of macrolide use for other treatment purposes, which may have led to the high prevalence of macrolide resistance. Physicians in China are advised to not use azithromycin for early syphilis. PMID:26038763

  1. Vaccine Candidate P6 of Nontypable Haemophilus influenzae is Not a Transmembrane Protein Based on Protein Structural Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Michel, Lea Vacca; Kalmeta, Breanna; McCreary, Mark; Snyder, Joy; Craig, Paul; Pichichero, Michael E.

    2011-01-01

    P6 has been a vaccine candidate for nontypable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) based on its location on the outer membrane and immunogenicity. Because P6 is attached to the inner peptidoglycan layer of NTHi, and is putatively surface exposed, it must be a transmembrane protein. We examined the P6 structure using computational modeling, a P6 modified by site-directed mutagenesis to study monoclonal antibody attachment to P6, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. We found that P6 cannot be a transmembrane protein, and therefore may not be surface exposed. We conclude that there may be another protein on the surface of NTHi that has epitopes similar if not identical to P6. PMID:21215345

  2. Relationships between virulence and morphological or serological properties of variants dissociated from serotype 1 Haemophilus paragallinarum strains.

    PubMed

    Sawata, A; Kume, K

    1983-07-01

    Relationships between morphological or serological properties and virulence were investigated in seven Haemophilus paragallinarum variants. The variants, originated from five serotype 1 strains, were classified into seven types on the basis of colony morphology and iridescence and the presence of variant-specific antigens. Smooth (S) and encapsulated organisms having variant-specific antigens and forming highly iridescent (ir+) colonies were highly virulent in vivo; slightly encapsulated organisms having variant-specific antigens and forming slightly iridescent (ir +/-) colonies were moderately virulent; and nonencapsulated or slightly encapsulated organisms with or without variant-specific antigens and forming noniridescent (ir-) or ir +/- colonies were avirulent. Virulence was well correlated with the amount of capsule substance containing hyaluronic acid. The evidence suggests that the presence of variant-specific agglutinogen L and hemagglutinin HA-L seem to be responsible for adherence or colonization, but not for virulence, of the organisms in chickens. PMID:6885991

  3. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, using an EDTA-extracted antigen for the serology of Haemophilus pleuropneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Nicolet, J; Paroz, P; Krawinkler, M; Baumgartner, A

    1981-12-01

    An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was proposed as an alternative to the complement-fixation test (CF) for the detection of antibodies of Haemophilus pleuropneumoniae, agent of the pleuropneumonia in pigs. In tests done with different antigen-extraction procedures (including Tween 20, sodium dodecyl sulfate, aqueous phenol, sonification, and heat treatment at 120 C), ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) provided a satisfactorily reactive antigen. Chromatography purification on Sephacryl S200 improved the specificity of this antigen. Using hyperimmune rabbit sera, we investigated the specificity and the sensitivity of the ELISA with the EDTA-purified antigen of the different serotypes of H pleuropneumoniae on selected swine sera in herds with confirmed H pleuropneumoniae infection, from specific-pathogen-free animals showing doubtful CF reactions. The ELISA proved to be highly specific and more sensitive than the CF test. Furthermore, evidence of cross-reactions with H parasuis, a common bacteria isolated in swine populations, was not found.

  4. Protection conferred by bivalent and trivalent infectious coryza bacterins against prevalent serovars of Avibacterium (Haemophilus) paragallinarum in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Fernández, R P; Colíndres, H L; Velásquez, Q E; Soriano, V E; Blackall, P J

    2005-12-01

    The protection and level of hemagglutination-inhibition (HI) antibodies conferred in infectious coryza bivalent- and trivalent-immunized chickens against Avibacterium (Haemophilus) paragallinarum field isolates of the prevalent serovars in Mexico (A-1, A-2, B-1, and C-2) were investigated. The bivalent bacterin (A-1 and C-1) conferred significant protection and increased HI antibodies against isolates of serovars A-1, A-2, and C-2, but not against a serovar B-1 isolate. The trivalent bacterin (A-1, B-1, and C-2) conferred protection and increased HI antibodies against all four of the isolates. The results confirmed that in poultry areas where serovar B-1 is prevalent, the inclusion of this serovar in bacterins is needed to confer protection against infectious coryza caused by A. (H.) paragallinarum isolates of serovar B-1. PMID:16405004

  5. ModA2 Phasevarion Switching in Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae Increases the Severity of Experimental Otitis Media.

    PubMed

    Brockman, Kenneth L; Jurcisek, Joseph A; Atack, John M; Srikhanta, Yogitha N; Jennings, Michael P; Bakaletz, Lauren O

    2016-09-01

    Several human-adapted bacterial pathogens use a phasevarion (ie, a phase-variable regulon) to rapidly and reversibly regulate the expression of many genes, which include known virulence factors, yet the influence of phasevarion-mediated regulation in pathogenesis remains poorly understood. Here we examine the impact of the nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHI) ModA2 phasevarion on pathogenesis and disease severity in a chinchilla model of experimental otitis media. Chinchillas were challenged with NTHI variant populations that were either inoculated ON and remained ON, inoculated OFF and shifted ON, or inoculated OFF and remained OFF, within the middle ear. We show that populations that shift from OFF to ON within the middle ear induce significantly greater disease severity than populations that are unable to shift. These observations support the importance of phasevarion switching in NTHI pathogenesis and the necessity to considered phasevarion regulation when developing methods to treat and prevent infection.

  6. Antibacterial FabH Inhibitors with Mode of Action Validated in Haemophilus influenzae by in Vitro Resistance Mutation Mapping.

    PubMed

    McKinney, David C; Eyermann, Charles J; Gu, Rong-Fang; Hu, Jun; Kazmirski, Steven L; Lahiri, Sushmita D; McKenzie, Andrew R; Shapiro, Adam B; Breault, Gloria

    2016-07-01

    Fatty acid biosynthesis is essential to bacterial growth in Gram-negative pathogens. Several small molecules identified through a combination of high-throughput and fragment screening were cocrystallized with FabH (β-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein synthase III) from Escherichia coli and Streptococcus pneumoniae. Structure-based drug design was used to merge several scaffolds to provide a new class of inhibitors. After optimization for Gram-negative enzyme inhibitory potency, several compounds demonstrated antimicrobial activity against an efflux-negative strain of Haemophilus influenzae. Mutants resistant to these compounds had mutations in the FabH gene near the catalytic triad, validating FabH as a target for antimicrobial drug discovery.

  7. ModA2 Phasevarion Switching in Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae Increases the Severity of Experimental Otitis Media.

    PubMed

    Brockman, Kenneth L; Jurcisek, Joseph A; Atack, John M; Srikhanta, Yogitha N; Jennings, Michael P; Bakaletz, Lauren O

    2016-09-01

    Several human-adapted bacterial pathogens use a phasevarion (ie, a phase-variable regulon) to rapidly and reversibly regulate the expression of many genes, which include known virulence factors, yet the influence of phasevarion-mediated regulation in pathogenesis remains poorly understood. Here we examine the impact of the nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHI) ModA2 phasevarion on pathogenesis and disease severity in a chinchilla model of experimental otitis media. Chinchillas were challenged with NTHI variant populations that were either inoculated ON and remained ON, inoculated OFF and shifted ON, or inoculated OFF and remained OFF, within the middle ear. We show that populations that shift from OFF to ON within the middle ear induce significantly greater disease severity than populations that are unable to shift. These observations support the importance of phasevarion switching in NTHI pathogenesis and the necessity to considered phasevarion regulation when developing methods to treat and prevent infection. PMID:27288538

  8. Hospital Surveillance of Childhood Bacterial Meningitis in Senegal and the Introduction of Haemophilus influenzae Type b Conjugate Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Ba, Osseynou; Fleming, Jessica A.; Dieye, Yakou; Mutombo wa Mutombo, Boniface; Ba, Mamadou; Cisse, Moussa Fafa; Diallo, Aissatou Gaye; Sow, Iyane; Slack, Mary P. E.; Faye, Pape Coumba; Ba, Mady; Diallo, Ndiouga; Weiss, Noel S.

    2010-01-01

    Bacterial meningitis is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in children living in low-resource settings. Pediatric bacterial meningitis cases < 5 years of age were identified through a regional hospital surveillance system for 3 years after introduction of routine immunization with Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) conjugate vaccine in Senegal in July 2005. Cases from the national pediatric hospital were also tracked from 2002 to 2008. The regional surveillance system recorded 1,711 suspected pediatric bacterial meningitis cases. Of 214 laboratory-confirmed cases, 108 (50%) were caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae, 42 (20%) to Hib, and 13 (6%) to Neisseria meningitidis. There was a 98% reduction in the number of hospitalized Hib meningitis cases from Dakar Region in 2008 compared with 2002. The surveillance system provides important information to the Ministry of Health as they consider self-funding Hib vaccine and introducing pneumococcal vaccine. PMID:21118944

  9. Identification of surface-exposed B-cell epitopes recognized by Haemophilus influenzae type b P1-specific monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Panezutti, H; James, O; Hansen, E J; Choi, Y; Harkness, R E; Klein, M H; Chong, P

    1993-05-01

    A panel of P1 synthetic peptides was synthesized to map the surface-exposed epitopes of Haemophilus influenzae type b outer membrane protein P1 recognized by three murine monoclonal antibodies (MAbs 7C8, 3E12, and 6B1). By using peptide-specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, MAbs 6B1, 7C8, and 3E12 were shown to recognize distinct epitopes localized within residues 60 to 88, 165 to 193, and 400 to 437 of mature P1, respectively. Since MAb 7C8 was shown previously to be protective against certain H. influenzae type b subtypes in the infant rat model of bacteremia, its cognate epitope was further characterized by using truncated peptide analogs. Fine mapping of the 7C8 epitope by competitive inhibition studies revealed that it was localized within residues 184 and 193.

  10. Antibacterial FabH Inhibitors with Mode of Action Validated in Haemophilus influenzae by in Vitro Resistance Mutation Mapping.

    PubMed

    McKinney, David C; Eyermann, Charles J; Gu, Rong-Fang; Hu, Jun; Kazmirski, Steven L; Lahiri, Sushmita D; McKenzie, Andrew R; Shapiro, Adam B; Breault, Gloria

    2016-07-01

    Fatty acid biosynthesis is essential to bacterial growth in Gram-negative pathogens. Several small molecules identified through a combination of high-throughput and fragment screening were cocrystallized with FabH (β-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein synthase III) from Escherichia coli and Streptococcus pneumoniae. Structure-based drug design was used to merge several scaffolds to provide a new class of inhibitors. After optimization for Gram-negative enzyme inhibitory potency, several compounds demonstrated antimicrobial activity against an efflux-negative strain of Haemophilus influenzae. Mutants resistant to these compounds had mutations in the FabH gene near the catalytic triad, validating FabH as a target for antimicrobial drug discovery. PMID:27626097

  11. Erythromycin and azithromycin transport into Haemophilus influenzae ATCC 19418 under conditions of depressed proton motive force (delta mu H)

    SciTech Connect

    Capobianco, J.O.; Goldman, R.C. )

    1990-09-01

    The effect of collapsing the electrochemical proton gradient (delta mu H) on ({sup 3}H)erythromycin and ({sup 14}C)azithromycin transport in Haemophilus influenzae ATCC 19418 was studied. The proton gradient and membrane potential were determined from the distribution of (2-{sup 14}C)dimethadione and rubidium-86, respectively. delta mu H was reduced from 124 to 3 mV in EDTA-valinomycin-treated cells at 22{degrees}C with 150 mM KCl and 0.1 mM carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone. During the collapse of delta mu H, macrolide uptake increased. Erythromycin efflux studies strongly suggested that this increase was not due to an energy-dependent efflux pump but was likely due to increased outer membrane permeability. These data indicated that macrolide entry was not a delta mu H-driven active transport process but rather a passive diffusion process.

  12. The continuing role of Haemophilus influenzae type b carriage surveillance as a mechanism for early detection of invasive disease activity.

    PubMed

    Jacups, Susan P

    2011-12-01

    Prior to the introduction of Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) conjugate vaccines, Hib was the leading cause of bacterial meningitis in children under five years of age worldwide. In countries that have adopted Hib vaccination schedules, invasive disease has reduced markedly. Oro-naso pharyngeal carriage is recognized as the most significant source of infection. Hib carriage is significantly associated with poverty, such as overcrowding, poor ventilation in houses, lack of running water, and high smoking rates. Additionally, many Indigenous minority groups report high rates of Hib carriage. A resurgence of Hib disease among Alaskan children in the 1990s, lead to a change in approach to eliminate Hib disease and carriage in high-risk populations. This new approach identifies strategies for eliminating Hib disease focusing on the reservoirs of colonization within families and communities. Monitoring Hib carriage continues to offer an early warning system, whereby intervention could prevent invasive disease resurgence.

  13. [Real-time PCR detection of Neisseria meningitidis, Haemophilus influenzae, and Streptococcus pneumoniae DNA in clinical specimens].

    PubMed

    Vacková, Z; Lžičařová, D; Stock, N K; Kozáková, J

    2015-10-01

    The study aim was to implement a molecular real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay recommended by the CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) for the detection of Neisseria meningitidis, Haemophilus influenzae, and Streptococcus pneumoniae in clinical (culture negative) specimens from patients with suspected invasive bacterial disease. Clinical specimens are referred to the National Reference Laboratory (NRL) for Meningococcal Infections, Unit for Airborne Bacterial Infections, Centre for Epidemiology and Microbiology, National Institute of Public Health from various regions of the Czech Republic. Clinical specimens are, in particular, cerebrospinal fluid, anti-coagulated blood or serum and, exceptionally, post-mortem specimens. The NRL has implemented molecular diagnosis of these bacterial pathogens involved in meningitis and sepsis from clinical specimens since 1999. The first diagnostic method was semi-nested PCR followed by electrophoretic analysis. In 2014, a molecular qualitative real-time PCR assay was implemented.

  14. Haemophilus influenzae with Non-Beta-Lactamase-Mediated Beta-Lactam Resistance: Easy To Find but Hard To Categorize

    PubMed Central

    Lia, Astrid; Hannisdal, Anja; Tveten, Yngvar; Matuschek, Erika; Kahlmeter, Gunnar; Kristiansen, Bjørn-Erik

    2015-01-01

    Haemophilus influenzae is a major pathogen, and beta-lactams are first-line drugs. Resistance due to altered penicillin-binding protein 3 (rPBP3) is frequent, and susceptibility testing of such strains is challenging. A collection of 154 beta-lactamase-negative isolates with a large proportion of rPBP3 (67.5%) was used to evaluate and compare Etest (Haemophilus test medium [HTM]) and disk diffusion (EUCAST method) for categorization of susceptibility to aminopenicillins and cefuroxime, using MICs generated with broth (HTM) microdilution and clinical breakpoints from CLSI and EUCAST as the gold standards. In addition, the proficiency of nine disks in screening for the rPBP3 genotype (N526K positive) was evaluated. By Etest, both essential and categorical agreement were generally poor (<70%), with high very major errors (VME) (CLSI, 13.0%; EUCAST, 34.3%) and falsely susceptible rates (FSR) (CLSI, 87.0%; EUCAST, 88.3%) for ampicillin. Ampicillin (2 μg) with adjusted (+2 mm) zone breakpoints was superior to Etest for categorization of susceptibility to ampicillin (agreement, 74.0%; VME, 11.0%; FSR, 28.3%). Conversely, Etest was superior to 30 μg cefuroxime for categorization of susceptibility to cefuroxime (agreement, 57.1% versus 60.4%; VME, 2.6% versus 9.7%; FSR, 7.1% versus 26.8%). Benzylpenicillin (1 unit) (EUCAST screening disk) and cefuroxime (5 μg) identified rPBP3 isolates with highest accuracies (95.5% and 92.2%, respectively). In conclusion, disk screening reliably detects rPBP3 H. influenzae, but false ampicillin susceptibility is frequent with routine methods. We suggest adding a comment recommending high-dose aminopenicillin therapy or the use of other agents for severe infections with screening-positive isolates that are susceptible to aminopenicillins by gradient or disk diffusion. PMID:26354813

  15. Haemophilus influenzae with Non-Beta-Lactamase-Mediated Beta-Lactam Resistance: Easy To Find but Hard To Categorize.

    PubMed

    Skaare, Dagfinn; Lia, Astrid; Hannisdal, Anja; Tveten, Yngvar; Matuschek, Erika; Kahlmeter, Gunnar; Kristiansen, Bjørn-Erik

    2015-11-01

    Haemophilus influenzae is a major pathogen, and beta-lactams are first-line drugs. Resistance due to altered penicillin-binding protein 3 (rPBP3) is frequent, and susceptibility testing of such strains is challenging. A collection of 154 beta-lactamase-negative isolates with a large proportion of rPBP3 (67.5%) was used to evaluate and compare Etest (Haemophilus test medium [HTM]) and disk diffusion (EUCAST method) for categorization of susceptibility to aminopenicillins and cefuroxime, using MICs generated with broth (HTM) microdilution and clinical breakpoints from CLSI and EUCAST as the gold standards. In addition, the proficiency of nine disks in screening for the rPBP3 genotype (N526K positive) was evaluated. By Etest, both essential and categorical agreement were generally poor (<70%), with high very major errors (VME) (CLSI, 13.0%; EUCAST, 34.3%) and falsely susceptible rates (FSR) (CLSI, 87.0%; EUCAST, 88.3%) for ampicillin. Ampicillin (2 μg) with adjusted (+2 mm) zone breakpoints was superior to Etest for categorization of susceptibility to ampicillin (agreement, 74.0%; VME, 11.0%; FSR, 28.3%). Conversely, Etest was superior to 30 μg cefuroxime for categorization of susceptibility to cefuroxime (agreement, 57.1% versus 60.4%; VME, 2.6% versus 9.7%; FSR, 7.1% versus 26.8%). Benzylpenicillin (1 unit) (EUCAST screening disk) and cefuroxime (5 μg) identified rPBP3 isolates with highest accuracies (95.5% and 92.2%, respectively). In conclusion, disk screening reliably detects rPBP3 H. influenzae, but false ampicillin susceptibility is frequent with routine methods. We suggest adding a comment recommending high-dose aminopenicillin therapy or the use of other agents for severe infections with screening-positive isolates that are susceptible to aminopenicillins by gradient or disk diffusion. PMID:26354813

  16. Male circumcision and risk of syphilis, chancroid, and genital herpes: a systematic review and meta‐analysis

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, H A; Thomas, S L; Munabi, S K; Hayes, R J

    2006-01-01

    Objectives Male circumcision is associated with reduced risk of HIV infection. This may be partly because of a protective effect of circumcision on other sexually transmitted infections (STI), especially those causing genital ulcers, but evidence for such protection is unclear. Our objective was to conduct a systematic review and meta‐analyses of the associations between male circumcision and infection with herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV‐2), Treponema pallidum, or Haemophilus ducreyi. Methods Electronic databases (1950–2004) were searched using keywords and text terms for herpes simplex, syphilis, chancroid, ulcerative sexually transmitted diseases, or their causative agents, in conjunction with terms to identify epidemiological studies. References of key articles were hand searched, and data were extracted using standardised forms. Random effects models were used to summarise relative risk (RR) where appropriate. Results 26 articles met the inclusion criteria. Most syphilis studies reported a substantially reduced risk among circumcised men (summary RR = 0.67, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.54 to 0.83), although there was significant between study heterogeneity (p = 0.01). The reduced risk of HSV‐2 infection was of borderline statistical significance (summary RR = 0.88, 95% CI 0.77 to 1.01). Circumcised men were at lower risk of chancroid in six of seven studies (individual study RRs: 0.12 to 1.11). Conclusions This first systematic review of male circumcision and ulcerative STI strongly indicates that circumcised men are at lower risk of chancroid and syphilis. There is less association with HSV‐2. Potential male circumcision interventions to reduce HIV in high risk populations may provide additional benefit by protecting against other STI. PMID:16581731

  17. Leaning in to the power of the possible: the crucial role of women scientists on preventing Haemophilus influenzae type b disease.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Katherine L; Anderson, Porter W

    2014-03-01

    Beginning in an era when female scientists were a lonely minority, women have made major contributions to our understanding of Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) as a pathogen, its treatment and its prevention. The individual scientific and public health contributions, and their collective impact, are reviewed in the context of the development and successful implementation of highly efficacious Hib vaccines that are now being deployed to nearly every country worldwide for the prevention of life-threatening pediatric Hib disease.

  18. Comparison of Diagnostic Accuracy of PCR Targeting the 47-Kilodalton Protein Membrane Gene of Treponema pallidum and PCR Targeting the DNA Polymerase I Gene: Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Combescure, Christophe; Lautenschlager, Stephan; Ninet, Béatrice; Perneger, Thomas V.

    2015-01-01

    Treponema pallidum PCR (Tp-PCR) testing now is recommended as a valid tool for the diagnosis of primary or secondary syphilis. The objectives were to systematically review and determine the optimal specific target gene to be used for Tp-PCR. Comparisons of the performance of the two main targets are tpp47 and polA genes were done using meta-analysis. Three electronic bibliographic databases, representing abstract books from five conferences specialized in infectious diseases from January 1990 to March 2015, were searched. Search keywords included (“syphilis” OR “Treponema pallidum” OR “neurosyphilis”) AND (“PCR” OR “PCR” OR “molecular amplification”). We included diagnostic studies assessing the performance of Tp-PCR targeting tpp47 (tpp47-Tp-PCR) or the polA gene (polA-Tp-PCR) in ulcers from early syphilis. All studies were assessed against quality criteria using the QUADAS-2 tool. Of 37 studies identified, 62.2% were judged at low risk of bias or applicability. Most used the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) case definitions for primary or secondary (early) syphilis (89.2%; n = 33); 15 (40.5%) used darkfield microscopy (DFM). We did not find differences in sensitivity and specificity between the two Tp-PCR methods in the subgroup of studies using adequate reference tests. Among studies using DFM as the reference test, sensitivities were 79.8% (95% confidence intervals [CI], 72.7 to 85.4%) and 71.4% (46.0 to 88.0%) for tpp47-Tp-PCR and polA-Tp-PCR (P = 0.217), respectively; respective specificities were 95.3% (93.5 to 96.6%) and 93.7% (91.8 to 95.2%) (P = 0.304). Our findings suggest that the two Tp-PCR methods have similar accuracy and could be used interchangeably. PMID:26311859

  19. The structural heterogeneity of the lipooligosaccharide (LOS) expressed by pathogenic non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae strain NTHi 9274.

    PubMed

    Rahman, M M; Gu, X X; Tsai, C M; Kolli, V S; Carlson, R W

    1999-12-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) is an important pathogen responsible for otitis media in children and of pneumonitis in adults with depressed resistance. NTHi is acapsular and, therefore, capsular polysaccharide-based vaccines are ineffective for preventing infections by this pathogen. Recently it was found that a detoxified lipooligo-saccharide (LOS) conjugate from NTHi 9274 induced bactericidal antibodies effective against a large number of NTHi isolates, and conferred protection against NTHi otitis media in chinchillas (X.-X.Gu et al., 1996, Infect. Immun.,64, 4047-4053; X. -X.Gu et al., 1997., Infect. Immun.,65, 4488-4493). In this paper we report the chemical character-ization of the LOS from NTHi 9274 LOS. NTHi is capable of expressing a heterogenous population of LOS exhibited by multiple oligosaccharide (OS) epitopes. OSs released from the LOS of NTHi 9274 by mild acid hydrolysis were purified using Bio-Gel P4 gel permeation chromatography. The OSs were characterized by glycosyl composition analysis, glycosyl linkage analysis, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR), fast atom bombardment mass spectro-metry (FAB-MS), matrix-assisted laser desorption time of flight mass spectro-metry (MALDITOF-MS), and tandem MS/MS. At least 17 different OS molecules were observed. These contained variable glycosyl residues, phosphate (P), and phospho-ethanolamine (PEA) substituents. These molecules contained either three, four, or five hexoses, and all contained four heptosyl residues. The four heptosyl residues consisted of one D,D-Hep and three L,D-Hep. Dephosphorylation of the OSs with aqueous 48% hydrofluoric acid (HF) reduced the number of molecules to about to seven; Hex(1)-(7)Hep(4)Kdo(1). Of these seven, Hex(2)Hep(4)Kdo(1), Hex(3)Hep(4)Kdo(1), and Hex(4)Hep(4)Kdo(1)were the major constituents. Thus, this NTHi LOS preparation is very heterogeneous, and contains structures different from those previously published for Haemophilus influenzae. The tandem

  20. The channel-tunnel HI1462 of Haemophilus influenzae reveals differences to Escherichia coli TolC.

    PubMed

    Polleichtner, Georg; Andersen, Christian

    2006-06-01

    Efflux pumps play a major role in multidrug resistance of pathogenic bacteria. The TolC homologue HI1462 was identified as the single channel-tunnel in Haemophilus influenzae required to form a functional multidrug efflux pump. The outer-membrane protein was expressed in Escherichia coli, purified and reconstituted in black lipid membranes. It exhibited a comparatively small single-channel conductance of 43 pS in 1 M KCl and is the first known TolC homologue which is anion-selective. The HI1462 structure was modelled and an arginine residue lining the tunnel entrance was identified. The channel-tunnel of a mutant with the arginine substituted by an alanine residue was cation-selective and had a sevenfold higher single-channel conductance compared to wild-type. These results confirm that the arginine is responsible for anion selectivity and forms a salt bridge with a glutamate residue of the adjacent monomer, establishing a circular network, which keeps the tunnel entrance in a tightly closed conformation. In in vivo experiments, both the wild-type HI1462 and the mutant were able to substitute for E. coli TolC in the haemolysin secretion system, but not in the AcrAB/TolC multidrug efflux pump. The structure-function relationship of HI1462 is discussed in the context of the well-studied TolC channel-tunnel of E. coli.

  1. A practical method for preparation of pneumococcal and nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae inocula that preserves viability and immunostimulatory activity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Convenience is a major reason for using killed preparations of bacteria to investigate host-pathogen interactions, however, host responses to such preparations can result in different outcomes when compared to live bacterial stimulation. We investigated whether cryopreservation of Streptococcus pneumoniae and nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) permitted investigation of host responses to infection without the complications of working with freshly prepared live bacteria on the day of experimental challenge. Findings S. pneumoniae and NTHi retained >90% viability following cryopreservation in fetal calf serum for at least 8 weeks. Host responses to live, cryopreserved (1 week and 4 weeks), heat-killed or ethanol-killed S. pneumoniae and NTHi were assessed by measuring cytokine release from stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). We found that cryopreserved bacteria, in contrast to heat-killed and ethanol-killed preparations, resulted in comparable levels of inflammatory cytokine release from PBMCs when compared with fresh live bacterial cultures. Conclusion Cryopreservation of S. pneumoniae and NTHi does not alter the immunostimulatory properties of these species thereby enabling reproducible and biologically relevant analysis of host responses to infection. This method also facilitates the analysis of multiple strains on the same day and allows predetermination of culture purity and challenge dose. PMID:24321049

  2. [Activity of cefpodoxime and other oral beta-lactams against Haemophilus influenzae and Streptococcus pneumoniae with different susceptibilities to penicillin].

    PubMed

    Fenoll, A; Robledo, O; Lerma, M; Giménez, M J; Cebrián, L; Casal, J; Aguilar, L; Gómez-Lus, M L

    2006-03-01

    This study explores the influence on the intrinsic activity of different oral beta-lactams of beta-lactamase production in Haemophilus influenzae and penicillin resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae. Three substudies were performed: a) a general susceptibility study, analyzing 550 strains received by the Spanish Laboratorio de Referencia de Neumococos throughout February and March 2005; b) a study on the influence of penicillin resistance on the activity of beta-lactams, analyzing 251 penicillin-susceptible strains (MICor=2 mg/l) randomly chosen among those received by the Spanish Laboratorio de Referencia de Neumococos throughout 2005; and c) an H. influenzae susceptibility study analyzing 150 strains received by Instituto Valenciano de Microbiologia throughout 2005. A total of 71% of S. pneumoniae strains were susceptible to penicillin, 21% exhibited intermediate resistance and 8% strains presented full resistance. H. influenzae beta-lactamase production rate was 18.6%. Of the non-beta-lactamase-producing strains, 3% were not susceptible to ampicillin. Cefpodoxime and cefixime exhibited the highest intrinsic activity against H. influenzae, while amoxicillin and cefpodoxime were the most active compounds against S. pneumoniae. All H. influenzae strains were susceptible to oral cephalosporins and amoxicillin/clavulanic acid. The increase in penicillin resistance in S. pneumoniae influenced cefixime, cefaclor and cefuroxime to a higher degree than amoxicillin and cefpodoxime.

  3. Designation of 15 serovars of Haemophilus parasuis on the basis of immunodiffusion using heat-stable antigen extracts.

    PubMed Central

    Kielstein, P; Rapp-Gabrielson, V J

    1992-01-01

    Previous independent investigations of the serotyping of Haemophilus parasuis strains have led to the designation of serovars A to D, 1 to 7, Jena 6 to Jena 12, and ND1 to ND5. Heat-stable antigen preparations from the reference strains for these serovars were tested by immunodiffusion with rabbit hyperimmune antisera. The existence of 15 distinct serologic groups was apparent, for which we propose the designations serovars 1 to 15. Examination of 290 field isolates from swine in the former German Democratic Republic indicated a prevalence of serovars 4 and 5, which together accounted for 41% of the isolates examined. However, 26.2% of the isolates were nontypeable with this test procedure and available antisera. Intraperitoneal inoculation of specific-pathogen-free pigs with cells representing the 15 serovars indicated differences in virulence which may be serovar related. Cells of strains representing serovars 1, 5, 10, 12, 13, and 14 were the most virulent, causing death or moribundity in inoculated pigs. Cells of serovars 2, 4, 8, and 15 caused polyserositis, but not death, in inoculated pigs. However, inoculation of cells of strains representing serovars 3, 6, 7, 9, and 11 resulted in no clinical symptoms or lesions indicative of H. parasuis infection. PMID:1572971

  4. Two Glycosyltransferase Genes of Haemophilus parasuis SC096 Implicated in Lipooligosaccharide Biosynthesis, Serum Resistance, Adherence, and Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Qi; Feng, Saixiang; Zhang, Jianmin; Jia, Aiqing; Yang, Kaijie; Xing, Kaixiang; Liao, Ming; Fan, Huiying

    2016-01-01

    Haemophilus parasuis is a common opportunistic pathogen known for its ability to colonize healthy piglets and causes Glässer's disease. The lipooligosaccharide (LOS) of H. parasuis is a potential virulence-associated factor. In this study, two putative glycosyltransferases that might be involved in LOS synthesis in H. parasuis SC096 were identified (lgtB and lex-1). Mutants were constructed to investigate the roles of the lgtB and lex-1 genes. The LOS from the ΔlgtB or Δlex-1 mutant showed truncated structure on silver-stained SDS-PAGE gel compared to the wild-type strain. The ΔlgtB and Δlex-1 mutants were significantly more sensitive to 50% porcine serum, displaying 15.0 and 54.46% survival rates, respectively. Complementation of the lex-1 mutant restored the serum-resistant phenotype. Additionally, the ΔlgtB and Δlex-1 strains showed impaired ability to adhere to and invade porcine kidney epithelial cells (PK-15). The above results suggested that the lgtB and lex-1 genes of the H. parasuis SC096 strain participated in LOS synthesis and were involved in serum resistance, adhesion and invasion. PMID:27672622

  5. Interlaboratory study evaluating quantitation of antibodies to Haemophilus influenzae type b polysaccharide by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    PubMed Central

    Madore, D V; Anderson, P; Baxter, B D; Carlone, G M; Edwards, K M; Hamilton, R G; Holder, P; Käyhty, H; Phipps, D C; Peeters, C C; Schneerson, R; Siber, G R; Ward, J I; Frasch, C E

    1996-01-01

    An interlaboratory study was conducted to determine whether an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) with an antigen preparation composed of various-sized fragments of Haemophilus influenzae type b polysaccharide conjugated to human serum albumin could be standardized across laboratories and whether the ELISA-derived results from different laboratories are equivalent to those obtained by the standard radioactive antigen binding assay (RABA) for quantitation of anti-H, influenzae type b polysaccharide antibodies. Twenty coded human serum samples were quantitated by ELISA in 11 laboratories and by RABA in 5 laboratories. The mean RABA-derived values served as the basis for all comparisons. While the overall correspondence of antibody values between the two methods was good, significant differences were found among some of the 11 ELISA data sets and among the mean RABA values. Seven laboratories generated higher ELISA antibody values for low-titered sera. Four laboratories generated antibody concentrations that were not statistically different between the two assay methods. The results therefore indicate that the ELISA can tolerate substantial variations in protocol, such as the use of different plates and different antibody reagents, without affecting the quantitation of serum antibodies. However, attention should be focused on low-titered sera, as some assay conditions may yield spurious results. This ELISA is a serologic assay which can serve as an alternative to the RABA for quantitation of antibodies to H. influenzae type h polysaccharide. PMID:8770509

  6. Experimental otitis media in gerbils and chinchillas with Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and other aerobic and anaerobic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Fulghum, R S; Brinn, J E; Smith, A M; Daniel, H J; Loesche, P J

    1982-05-01

    To ascertain the usefulness of Mongolian gerbils as an inbred model for otitis media, 52 Mongolian gerbils (Meriones unguiculatus, strain MONT/Tum) were compared with 26 chinchillas (Chinchilla laniger) for susceptibility to Streptococcus pneumoniae type 3. Haemophilus influenzae type b, and a polymicrobic culture including anaerobes (Streptococcus intermedius, Propionibacterium acnes, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and Corynebacterium sp.). Organisms were inoculated percutaneously into the superior chamber of the middle ear bulla. The gerbils and chinchillas shared similar susceptibilities and responses to the inoculated organisms as determined by X-ray, otoscopic, histopathological, and microbiological determinations at 5 to 7 days. Koch's postulate studies proved the role of S. pneumoniae and H. influenzae in the pathology found in both animal models. The animals were also susceptible to the polymicrobic culture, although the relative virulence of the individual members of this mixture was low, suggesting that these species potentiated as a polymicrobic mixture. The Corynebacterium sp. appeared to elicit the greatest histopathological response in chronic (8-week) studies in gerbils. The gerbils were found to be useful as an alternative animal model for the study of otitis media of bacterial etiology.

  7. Molecular cloning, expression, and primary sequence of outer membrane protein P2 of Haemophilus influenzae type b.

    PubMed Central

    Munson, R; Tolan, R W

    1989-01-01

    The structural gene for the porin of Haemophilus influenzae type b, designated outer membrane protein P2, was cloned, and the DNA sequence was determined. An oligonucleotide probe generated by reverse translation of N-terminal amino acid sequence data from the purified protein was used to screen genomic DNA. The probe detected a single EcoRI fragment of approximately 1,700 base pairs which was cloned to lambda gt11 and then into M13 and partially sequenced. The derived amino acid sequence indicated that we had cloned the N-terminal portion of the P2 gene. An overlapping approximately 1,600-base-pair PvuII genomic fragment was cloned into M13, and the sequence of the remainder of the P2 gene was determined. The gene for P2 was then reconstructed under the control of the T7 promoter and expressed in Escherichia coli. The N-terminal sequence of the purified protein corresponds to residues 21 through 34 of the derived amino acid sequence. Thus, the protein is synthesized with a 20-amino-acid leader peptide. The Mr of the processed protein is 37,782, in good agreement with the estimate of 37,000 from sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Images PMID:2535836

  8. Haemophilus influenzae responds to glucocorticoids used in asthma therapy by modulation of biofilm formation and antibiotic resistance

    PubMed Central

    Earl, Chris S; Keong, Teh Wooi; An, Shi-qi; Murdoch, Sarah; McCarthy, Yvonne; Garmendia, Junkal; Ward, Joseph; Dow, J Maxwell; Yang, Liang; O’Toole, George A; Ryan, Robert P

    2015-01-01

    Glucocorticosteroids are used as a main treatment to reduce airway inflammation in people with asthma who suffer from neutrophilic airway inflammation, a condition frequently associated with Haemophilus influenzae colonization. Here we show that glucocorticosteroids have a direct influence on the behavior of H. influenzae that may account for associated difficulties with therapy. Using a mouse model of infection, we show that corticosteroid treatment promotes H. influenzae persistence. Transcriptomic analysis of bacteria either isolated from infected mouse airway or grown in laboratory medium identified a number of genes encoding regulatory factors whose expression responded to the presence of glucocorticosteroids. Importantly, a number of these corticosteroid-responsive genes also showed elevated expression in H. influenzae within sputum from asthma patients undergoing steroid treatment. Addition of corticosteroid to H. influenzae led to alteration in biofilm formation and enhanced resistance to azithromycin, and promoted azithromycin resistance in an animal model of respiratory infection. Taken together, these data strongly suggest that H. influenzae can respond directly to corticosteroid treatment in the airway potentially influencing biofilm formation, persistence and the efficacy of antibiotic treatment. PMID:25995336

  9. Post-GAVI sustainability of the Haemophilus influenzae type b vaccine program: The potential role of economic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Le, Phuc; Nghiem, Van T; Swint, J Michael

    2016-09-01

    Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) can cause severe invasive diseases which are, however, preventable by vaccination. To increase access to Hib vaccine, GAVI - the Vaccine Alliance - has provided financial support for 73 lower income countries worldwide. At the same time, GAVI has been implementing its co-financing policy, requiring recipient countries to pay a portion of vaccine costs and to increase this amount over time. Starting in 2016, 5 countries will stop receiving GAVI funding and procure the vaccine themselves. Although the graduating countries have access to the UNICEF/GAVI tendered vaccine price for 5 more years, the uncertainty in market vaccine price may hamper the post-GAVI program sustainability. A possible increase in vaccine price would cause a significant burden on governmental budgets, discouraging countries to continue the program. As a special tool, economic evaluation (EE) can assist decision makers by identifying the maximum affordable vaccine price for countries to pay. Given that only 6 GAVI-eligible countries have such analyses published, more EEs are necessary to strengthen countries' commitment during this transition period. The information will also be useful for manufacturers to determine their pricing policy.

  10. Non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae protects human airway epithelial cells from a subsequent respiratory syncytial virus challenge.

    PubMed

    Hartwig, Stacey M; Ketterer, Margaret; Apicella, Michael A; Varga, Steven M

    2016-11-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and the common commensal and opportunistic pathogen, non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) both serve as a frequent cause of respiratory infection in children. Although it is well established that some respiratory viruses can increase host susceptibility to secondary bacterial infections, few studies have examined how commensal bacteria could influence a secondary viral response. Here, we examined the impact of NTHi exposure on a subsequent RSV infection of human bronchial epithelial cells (16HBE14o-). Co-culture of 16HBE14o- cells with NTHi resulted in inhibition of viral gene expression following RSV infection. 16HBE14o- cells co-cultured with heat-killed NTHi failed to protect against an RSV infection, indicating that protection requires live bacteria. However, NTHi did not inhibit influenza A virus replication, indicating that NTHi-mediated protection was RSV-specific. Our data demonstrates that prior exposure to a commensal bacterium such as NTHi can elicit protection against a subsequent RSV infection.

  11. Development and Optimization of a Homemade ELISA Kit for Detection of Antibodies Against Haemophilus influenzae Type b

    PubMed Central

    Mousavi, Seyed Fazlolah; Fatemi, Sara; Siadat, Seyed Davar; Zahraei, Seyed Mohsen; Nikanpour, Elnaz; Malekan, Mohamad Ali; Khabiri, Ali Reza; Janani, Ali Reza

    2016-01-01

    Background: Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) infection has high morbidity and mortality rate, especially in children under 5 years of age. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) technique is the most used method to detect antibodies against H. influenzae. Available commercial ELISA kits are expensive and not always readily available, particularly for epidemiological studies. Objectives: This study was performed to develop and optimize a homemade ELISA kit for the detection of Hib anti-polyribosylribitol phosphate (PRP) antibodies in children. Materials and Methods: To develop and optimize an indirect ELISA method, pure PRP was prepared. The PRP was coupled to bovine serum albumin, using sodium periodate. Then optimal conditions for ELISA, including coating antigen concentration and peroxidase labeled conjugate concentrations, incubation temperature and incubation time, were determined. To confirm the efficacy of optimized kit, 83 serum samples from non-vaccinated children, aged less than 6 years were collected and analyzed, using homemade and commercial ELISA. Results: The optimal conditions were considered to perform ELISA. Comparison between results obtained from optimized ELISA kit and commercial ELISA kit showed a good agreement. Conclusions: Taking into account these data, we elaborated a homemade ELISA kit that is an efficacious and cost-effective substitute for commercial kit, in disease control and diagnosis. PMID:27540453

  12. Cigarette Smoke-Induced Lung Disease Predisposes to More Severe Infection with Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae: Protective Effects of Andrographolide.

    PubMed

    Tan, W S Daniel; Peh, Hong Yong; Liao, Wupeng; Pang, Chu Hui; Chan, Tze Khee; Lau, Suk Hiang; Chow, Vincent T; Wong, W S Fred

    2016-05-27

    Cigarette smoke (CS) is associated with many maladies, one of which is chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). As the disease progresses, patients are more prone to develop COPD exacerbation episodes by bacterial infection, particularly to nontypeable Haemophilus influenza (NTHi) infection. The present study aimed to develop a CS-exposed mouse model that increases inflammation induced by NTHi challenge and investigate the protective effects of andrographolide, a bioactive molecule with anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties isolated from the plant Andrographis paniculata. Female BALB/c mice exposed to 2 weeks of CS followed by a single intratracheal instillation of NTHi developed increased macrophage and neutrophil pulmonary infiltration, augmented cytokine levels, and heightened oxidative damage. Andrographolide effectively reduced lung cellular infiltrates and decreased lung levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, CXCL1/KC, 8-OHdG, matrix metalloproteinase-8 (MMP-8), and MMP-9. The protective actions of andrographolide on CS-predisposed NTHi inflammation might be attributable to increased nuclear factor erythroid-2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) activation and decreased Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1) repressor function, resulting in enhanced gene expression of antioxidant enzymes including heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione peroxidase-2 (GPx-2), glutamate-cysteine ligase modifier (GCLM), and NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1). Taken together, these findings strongly support a therapeutic potential for andrographolide in preventing lung inflammation caused by NTHi in cigarette smokers.

  13. A glycoconjugate of Haemophilus influenzae Type b capsular polysaccharide with tetanus toxoid protein: hydrodynamic properties mainly influenced by the carbohydrate.

    PubMed

    Abdelhameed, Ali Saber; Adams, Gary G; Morris, Gordon A; Almutairi, Fahad M; Duvivier, Pierre; Conrath, Karel; Harding, Stephen E

    2016-02-26

    Three important physical properties which may affect the performance of glycoconjugate vaccines against serious disease are molar mass (molecular weight), heterogeneity (polydispersity), and conformational flexibility in solution. The dilute solution behaviour of native and activated capsular polyribosylribitol (PRP) polysaccharides extracted from Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib), and the corresponding glycoconjugate made by conjugating this with the tetanus toxoid (TT) protein have been characterized and compared using a combination of sedimentation equilibrium and sedimentation velocity in the analytical ultracentrifuge with viscometry. The weight average molar mass of the activated material was considerably reduced (Mw ~ 0.24 × 10(6) g.mol(-1)) compared to the native (Mw ~ 1.2 × 10(6) g.mol(-1)). Conjugation with the TT protein yielded large polydisperse structures (of Mw ~ 7.4 × 10(6) g.mol(-1)), but which retained the high degree of flexibility of the native and activated polysaccharide, with frictional ratio, intrinsic viscosity, sedimentation conformation zoning behaviour and persistence length all commensurate with highly flexible coil behaviour and unlike the previously characterised tetanus toxoid protein (slightly extended and hydrodynamically compact structure with an aspect ratio of ~3). This non-protein like behaviour clearly indicates that it is the carbohydrate component which mainly influences the physical behaviour of the glycoconjugate in solution.

  14. Combined Bacteria Microarray and Quartz Crystal Microbalance Approach for Exploring Glycosignatures of Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae and Recognition by Host Lectins.

    PubMed

    Kalograiaki, Ioanna; Euba, Begoña; Proverbio, Davide; Campanero-Rhodes, María A; Aastrup, Teodor; Garmendia, Junkal; Solís, Dolores

    2016-06-01

    Recognition of bacterial surface epitopes by host receptors plays an important role in the infectious process and is intimately associated with bacterial virulence. Delineation of bacteria-host interactions commonly relies on the detection of binding events between purified bacteria- and host-target molecules. In this work, we describe a combined microarray and quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) approach for the analysis of carbohydrate-mediated interactions directly on the bacterial surface, thus preserving the native environment of the bacterial targets. Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) was selected as a model pathogenic species not displaying a polysaccharide capsule or O-antigen-containing lipopolysaccharide, a trait commonly found in several important respiratory pathogens. Here, we demonstrate the usefulness of NTHi microarrays for exploring the presence of carbohydrate structures on the bacterial surface. Furthermore, the microarray approach is shown to be efficient for detecting strain-selective binding of three innate immune lectins, namely, surfactant protein D, human galectin-8, and Siglec-14, to different NTHi clinical isolates. In parallel, QCM bacteria-chips were developed for the analysis of lectin-binding kinetics and affinity. This novel QCM approach involves capture of NTHi on lectin-derivatized chips followed by formaldehyde fixation, rendering the bacteria an integrated part of the sensor chip, and subsequent binding assays with label-free lectins. The binding parameters obtained for selected NTHi-lectin pairs provide further insights into the interactions occurring at the bacterial surface.

  15. Intercellular adhesion molecule 1 serves as a primary cognate receptor for the Type IV pilus of nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed

    Novotny, Laura A; Bakaletz, Lauren O

    2016-08-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHI) utilizes the Type IV pilus (Tfp) to adhere to respiratory tract epithelial cells thus colonizing its human host; however, the host cell receptor to which this adhesive protein binds is unknown. From a panel of receptors engaged by Tfp expressed by other bacterial species, we showed that the majority subunit of NTHI Tfp, PilA, bound to intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM1) and that this interaction was both specific and of high affinity. Further, Tfp-expressing NTHI inoculated on to polarized respiratory tract epithelial cells that expressed ICAM1 were significantly more adherent compared to Tfp-deficient NTHI or NTHI inoculated on to epithelial cells to which ICAM1 gene expression was silenced. Moreover, pre-incubation of epithelial cells with recombinant soluble PilA (rsPilA) blocked adherence of NTHI, an outcome that was abrogated by admixing rsPilA with ICAM1 prior to application on to the target cells. Epithelial cells infected with adenovirus or respiratory syncytial virus showed increased expression of ICAM1; this outcome supported augmented adherence of Tfp-expressing NTHI. Collectively, these data revealed the cognate receptor for NTHI Tfp as ICAM1 and promote continued development of a Tfp-targeted vaccine for NTHI-induced diseases of the airway wherein upper respiratory tract viruses play a key predisposing role.

  16. A glycoconjugate of Haemophilus influenzae Type b capsular polysaccharide with tetanus toxoid protein: hydrodynamic properties mainly influenced by the carbohydrate

    PubMed Central

    Abdelhameed, Ali Saber; Adams, Gary G.; Morris, Gordon A.; Almutairi, Fahad M.; Duvivier, Pierre; Conrath, Karel; Harding, Stephen E.

    2016-01-01

    Three important physical properties which may affect the performance of glycoconjugate vaccines against serious disease are molar mass (molecular weight), heterogeneity (polydispersity), and conformational flexibility in solution. The dilute solution behaviour of native and activated capsular polyribosylribitol (PRP) polysaccharides extracted from Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib), and the corresponding glycoconjugate made by conjugating this with the tetanus toxoid (TT) protein have been characterized and compared using a combination of sedimentation equilibrium and sedimentation velocity in the analytical ultracentrifuge with viscometry. The weight average molar mass of the activated material was considerably reduced (Mw ~ 0.24 × 106 g.mol−1) compared to the native (Mw ~ 1.2 × 106 g.mol−1). Conjugation with the TT protein yielded large polydisperse structures (of Mw ~ 7.4 × 106 g.mol−1), but which retained the high degree of flexibility of the native and activated polysaccharide, with frictional ratio, intrinsic viscosity, sedimentation conformation zoning behaviour and persistence length all commensurate with highly flexible coil behaviour and unlike the previously characterised tetanus toxoid protein (slightly extended and hydrodynamically compact structure with an aspect ratio of ~3). This non-protein like behaviour clearly indicates that it is the carbohydrate component which mainly influences the physical behaviour of the glycoconjugate in solution. PMID:26915577

  17. Structure of a small-molecule inhibitor complexed with GlmU from Haemophilus influenzae reveals an allosteric binding site

    SciTech Connect

    Mochalkin, Igor; Lightle, Sandra; Narasimhan, Lakshmi; Bornemeier, Dirk; Melnick, Michael; VanderRoest, Steven; McDowell, Laura

    2008-04-02

    N-Acetylglucosamine-1-phosphate uridyltransferase (GlmU) is an essential enzyme in aminosugars metabolism and an attractive target for antibiotic drug discovery. GlmU catalyzes the formation of uridine-diphospho-N-acetylglucosamine (UDP-GlcNAc), an important precursor in the peptidoglycan and lipopolisaccharide biosynthesis in both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. Here we disclose a 1.9 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of a synthetic small-molecule inhibitor of GlmU from Haemophilus influenzae (hiGlmU). The compound was identified through a high-throughput screening (HTS) configured to detect inhibitors that target the uridyltransferase active site of hiGlmU. The original HTS hit exhibited a modest micromolar potency (IC{sub 50} - 18 {mu}M in a racemic mixture) against hiGlmU and no activity against Staphylococcus aureus GlmU (saGlmU). The determined crystal structure indicated that the inhibitor occupies an allosteric site adjacent to the GlcNAc-1-P substrate-binding region. Analysis of the mechanistic model of the uridyltransferase reaction suggests that the binding of this allosteric inhibitor prevents structural rearrangements that are required for the enzymatic reaction, thus providing a basis for structure-guided design of a new class of mechanism-based inhibitors of GlmU.

  18. An innovative method for quality control of conjugated Haemophilus influenzae vaccines: A short review of two-dimensional nanoparticle electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Tietz, Dietmar

    2009-12-25

    This article provides an overview of a 2D agarose electrophoretic procedure for the characterization of semi-synthetic Haemophilus influenzae type b meningitis vaccines that were prepared for the immunization of small children. The analysis of such vaccines has been particularly challenging because the vaccine particles (i) are highly negatively charged, (ii) are as large as or even larger than intact viruses, and (iii) have a continuous (polydisperse) size distribution because of randomizing steps in the vaccine production (sonification and crosslinking). As a result of these characteristics, 1D electrophoresis of the vaccines produced smears without discernable peaks, but with a second dimension of separation a characteristic vaccine fingerprint was obtained. Whereas O'Farrell gels can accomplish a 2D separation according to size and charge for samples with protein-sized particles, nondenaturing 2D agarose electrophoresis achieves a similar result for much larger virus-sized particles. The separation principle, however, is different. Even though the 2D electrophoretic method was developed from 1983 to 1995, it remains a promising tool for vaccine quality control and for predicting vaccine effectiveness. Modern technology makes the analysis significantly more practical and affordable than it was more than 10 years ago, and the method is applicable to a variety of conjugated vaccines and complex mixtures of virus-sized particles.

  19. Nonencapsulated Streptococcus pneumoniae causes otitis media during single-species infection and during polymicrobial infection with nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed

    Murrah, Kyle A; Pang, Bing; Richardson, Stephen; Perez, Antonia; Reimche, Jennifer; King, Lauren; Wren, John; Swords, W Edward

    2015-07-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae strains lacking capsular polysaccharide have been increasingly reported in carriage and disease contexts. Since most cases of otitis media involve more than one bacterial species, we aimed to determine the capacity of a nonencapsulated S. pneumoniae clinical isolate to induce disease in the context of a single-species infection and as a polymicrobial infection with nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae. Using the chinchilla model of otitis media, we found that nonencapsulated S. pneumoniae colonizes the nasopharynx following intranasal inoculation, but does not readily ascend into the middle ear. However, when we inoculated nonencapsulated S. pneumoniae directly into the middle ear, the bacteria persisted for two weeks post-inoculation and induced symptoms consistent with chronic otitis media. During coinfection with nontypeable H. influenzae, both species persisted for one week and induced polymicrobial otitis media. We also observed that nontypeable H. influenzae conferred passive protection from killing by amoxicillin upon S. pneumoniae from within polymicrobial biofilms in vitro. Therefore, based on these results, we conclude that nonencapsulated pneumococci are a potential causative agent of chronic/recurrent otitis media, and can also cause mutualistic infection with other opportunists, which could complicate treatment outcomes. PMID:26014114

  20. Cloning, expression, and sequence analysis of the Haemophilus influenzae type b strain M43p+ pilin gene.

    PubMed Central

    Gilsdorf, J R; Marrs, C F; McCrea, K W; Forney, L J

    1990-01-01

    By using antiserum against Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) strain M43p+ denatured pilin, we screened a genomic library of Hib strain M43p+ and identified a clone that expressed pilin, but not assembled pili, on its surface. Southern blot analysis revealed the presence of one structural gene, which was also present in strain M42p-, a nonpiliated variant. Five exonuclease III deletion mutants, two of which had deletions that extended into the structural gene and failed to express pilin, were used to obtain the nucleotide sequence of the structural gene. The amino acid sequence of the open reading frame agrees with 38 of 40 amino acids from the published sequence of purified Hib M43p+ pilin. The pilin gene coded for a mature protein of 193 amino acids, with a calculated molecular mass of 21,101 daltons. Comparison of the Hib M43p+ pilin amino acid sequence with those of pilins of other bacteria revealed strong conservation of amino- and carboxy-terminal regions in M43p+ and Escherichia coli F17, type 1C, and several members of the P pili family, as well as Klebsiella pneumoniae type 3 MR/K, Bordetella pertussis serotype 2, and Serratia marcescens US46 fimbriae. Images PMID:1969389