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Sample records for haemophilus ducreyi treponema

  1. Chancroid and Haemophilus ducreyi.

    PubMed Central

    Morse, S A

    1989-01-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi is the causative agent of chancroid, one of the genital ulcerative diseases. H. ducreyi is the major cause of genital ulcer disease in Africa and Southeast Asia and is of increasing concern in the United States. Definitive diagnosis of chancroid requires the isolation and identification of H. ducreyi, but isolation of this organism is difficult and the available medium is not optimal for all strains. Fluorescent antibody and serologic tests are of limited value. In general, our knowledge of this organism is rather limited, and indeed, recent studies have questioned the placement of H. ducreyi in the genus Haemophilus. H. ducreyi has relatively few biochemical activities, and epidemiologic studies are limited because there are limited phenotypic markers available for strain typing. Specific virulence factors of H. ducreyi have yet to be identified. Antimicrobial resistance in H. ducreyi is of special concern, as this organism has acquired both gram-negative and gram-positive resistance determinants. In addition, some of these determinants can be mobilized and transferred to other Haemophilus species or to Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Images PMID:2650859

  2. Epidemiology of Haemophilus ducreyi Infections.

    PubMed

    González-Beiras, Camila; Marks, Michael; Chen, Cheng Y; Roberts, Sally; Mitjà, Oriol

    2016-01-01

    The global epidemiology of Haemophilus ducreyi infections is poorly documented because of difficulties in confirming microbiological diagnoses. We evaluated published data on the proportion of genital and nongenital skin ulcers caused by H. ducreyi before and after introduction of syndromic management for genital ulcer disease (GUD). Before 2000, the proportion of GUD caused by H. ducreyi ranged from 0.0% to 69.0% (35 studies in 25 countries). After 2000, the proportion ranged from 0.0% to 15.0% (14 studies in 13 countries). In contrast, H. ducreyi has been recently identified as a causative agent of skin ulcers in children in the tropical regions; proportions ranged from 9.0% to 60.0% (6 studies in 4 countries). We conclude that, although there has been a sustained reduction in the proportion of GUD caused by H. ducreyi, this bacterium is increasingly recognized as a major cause of nongenital cutaneous ulcers.

  3. Epidemiology of Haemophilus ducreyi Infections

    PubMed Central

    González-Beiras, Camila; Marks, Michael; Chen, Cheng Y.; Roberts, Sally

    2016-01-01

    The global epidemiology of Haemophilus ducreyi infections is poorly documented because of difficulties in confirming microbiological diagnoses. We evaluated published data on the proportion of genital and nongenital skin ulcers caused by H. ducreyi before and after introduction of syndromic management for genital ulcer disease (GUD). Before 2000, the proportion of GUD caused by H. ducreyi ranged from 0.0% to 69.0% (35 studies in 25 countries). After 2000, the proportion ranged from 0.0% to 15.0% (14 studies in 13 countries). In contrast, H. ducreyi has been recently identified as a causative agent of skin ulcers in children in the tropical regions; proportions ranged from 9.0% to 60.0% (6 studies in 4 countries). We conclude that, although there has been a sustained reduction in the proportion of GUD caused by H. ducreyi, this bacterium is increasingly recognized as a major cause of nongenital cutaneous ulcers. PMID:26694983

  4. A multicenter prospective trial to asses a new real-time polymerase chain reaction for detection of Treponema pallidum, herpes simplex-1/2 and Haemophilus ducreyi in genital, anal and oropharyngeal ulcers.

    PubMed

    Glatz, M; Juricevic, N; Altwegg, M; Bruisten, S; Komericki, P; Lautenschlager, S; Weber, R; Bosshard, P P

    2014-12-01

    Treponema pallidum, herpes simplex virus types 1 or 2 (HSV-1/2) and Haemophilus ducreyi are sexually transmitted pathogens that can cause genital, anal and oropharyngeal ulcers. Laboratory evaluation of these pathogens in ulcers requires different types of specimens and tests, increasing the risk of improper specimen handling and time lapse until analysis. We sought to develop a new real-time PCR (TP-HD-HSV1/2 PCR) to facilitate the detection of T. pallidum, HSV-1/2 and H. ducreyi in ulcers. The TP-HD-HSV1/2 PCR was tested (i) in a retrospective study on 193 specimens of various clinical origin and (ii) in a prospective study on 36 patients with genital, anal or oropharyngeal ulcers (ClinicalTrials.gov # NCT01688258). The results of the TP-HD-HSV1/2 PCR were compared with standard diagnostic methods (T. pallidum: serology, dark field microscopy; HSV-1/2: PCR; H. ducreyi: cultivation). Sensitivity and specificity of the TP-HD-HSV1/2 PCR for T. pallidum were both 100%, for HSV-1 100% and 98%, and for HSV-2 100% and 98%, respectively. T. pallidum and HSV-1/2 were detected in 53% and 22% of patients in the prospective study; H. ducreyi was not detected. In the prospective study, 5/19 (26%) specimens were true positive for T. pallidum in the TP-HD-HSV1/2 PCR but non-reactive in the VDRL. The TP-HD-HSV1/2 PCR is sensitive and specific for the detection of T. pallidum and HSV-1/2 in routine clinical practice and it appears superior to serology in early T. pallidum infections.

  5. Haemophilus ducreyi infections--time for reappraisal.

    PubMed Central

    McEntegart, M. G.; Hafiz, S.; Kinghorn, G. R.

    1982-01-01

    As the literature on Haemophilus ducreyi and clinical chancroid is reviewed, it becomes obvious that many significant findings have been forgotten over the years. As a result, from the time of Ducrey's original description of the organism in 1890 until about 1977, both clinical and laboratory experts in the United Kingdom believed that H. ducreyi infections were rare, generally acquired abroad, and almost impossible to confirm in the routine laboratory! In consequence it was a common view that it was not worth looking for H. ducreyi until all other possible causes of genital ulceration had been excluded. Moreover, the search for such an infection stopped as soon as any other cause for the patient's lesions had been found. A decision to ignore this 'rule' in Sheffield led to our looking for H. ducreyi in specimens from an unselected series of patients with genital ulceration including a number with herpes genitalis infections. The surprise finding of H. ducreyi in circumstances suggesting that it was a secondary invader made us re-examine the whole question of H. ducreyi infections and chancroid and wonder if the same organism can act as a primary pathogen and as a secondary invader. An account of the media and methods we used and of the characteristics of the organism is presented. In an attempt to find out more about the characteristic coherent colonies of H. ducreyi we studied them with the scanning electron microscope. It is clear that the whole subject of H. ducreyi infections has been neglected in the United Kingdom, but we believe that interest has now been aroused and progress will surely follow. Some areas for further investigation are suggested. Images Plate 1 PMID:7153512

  6. Haemophilus ducreyi causing chronic skin ulceration in children visiting Samoa.

    PubMed

    Ussher, James E; Wilson, Elizabeth; Campanella, Silvana; Taylor, Susan L; Roberts, Sally A

    2007-05-15

    Chancroid is a sexually transmitted infection associated with genital ulceration and lymphadenopathy caused by Haemophilus ducreyi. Localized skin infections, in the absence of genital lesions, have not been previously reported. We report 3 cases of lower limb ulceration in children caused by H. ducreyi and postulate that H. ducreyi may be a previously unrecognized cause of chronic skin ulceration.

  7. Haemophilus ducreyi is resistant to human antimicrobial peptides.

    PubMed

    Mount, Kristy L B; Townsend, Carisa A; Bauer, Margaret E

    2007-09-01

    We examined the susceptibility of Haemophilus ducreyi to antimicrobial peptides likely to be encountered in vivo during human infection. H. ducreyi was significantly more resistant than Escherichia coli to the bactericidal effects of all peptides tested. Class I and II H. ducreyi strains exhibited similar levels of resistance to antimicrobial peptides.

  8. Haemophilus ducreyi associated with skin ulcers among children, Solomon Islands.

    PubMed

    Marks, Michael; Chi, Kai-Hua; Vahi, Ventis; Pillay, Allan; Sokana, Oliver; Pavluck, Alex; Mabey, David C; Chen, Cheng Y; Solomon, Anthony W

    2014-10-01

    During a survey of yaws prevalence in the Solomon Islands, we collected samples from skin ulcers of 41 children. Using PCR, we identified Haemophilus ducreyi infection in 13 (32%) children. PCR-positive and PCR-negative ulcers were phenotypically indistinguishable. Emergence of H. ducreyi as a cause of nongenital ulcers may affect the World Health Organization's yaws eradication program.

  9. Chronic cutaneous ulcers secondary to Haemophilus ducreyi infection.

    PubMed

    Peel, Trisha N; Bhatti, Deepak; De Boer, Jim C; Stratov, Ivan; Spelman, Denis W

    2010-03-15

    Haemophilus ducreyi is a well recognised causative agent of genital ulcers and chancroid. We report two unusual cases of non-sexually transmitted H. ducreyi infection leading to chronic lower limb ulcers. Both patients were Australian expatriates visiting Australia from the Pacific Islands--one from Papua New Guinea and the other from Vanuatu.

  10. Resveratrol is cidal to both classes of Haemophilus ducreyi.

    PubMed

    Nawrocki, Erin M; Bedell, Hillary W; Humphreys, Tricia L

    2013-05-01

    Resveratrol, a polyphenolic phytoalexin, is produced by plants in response to infection and has antibacterial activity. Haemophilus ducreyi is a Gram-negative bacterium that is the causative agent of the sexually transmitted disease chancroid. This study employed minimum cidal concentration (MCC) assays to evaluate the potential of resveratrol as a microbicide against H. ducreyi. Five class I and four class II strains of H. ducreyi tested had MCCs ≤500 μg/mL. Resveratrol was also tested against Lactobacillus spp., part of the natural vaginal flora. Representative strains of Lactobacillus were co-cultured with H. ducreyi and 500 μg/mL resveratrol; in all cases, Lactobacillus was recovered in greater numbers than H. ducreyi. These results show that resveratrol is not only bacteriostatic but is bactericidal to H. ducreyi, confirming the compound's potential for use as a topical microbicide to prevent chancroid.

  11. Localization of Haemophilus ducreyi in naturally acquired chancroidal ulcers.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Margaret E; Townsend, Carisa A; Ronald, Allan R; Spinola, Stanley M

    2006-08-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi causes the sexually transmitted genital ulcer disease chancroid. In human inoculation experiments, bacteria colocalize with neutrophils and macrophages but remain extracellular. The organism also colocalizes with collagen and fibrin but not with keratinocytes, fibroblasts, laminin, or fibronectin. These relationships are established by 48 h postinoculation and persist through the pustular stage of disease. To extend these observations to the ulcerative stage of disease, and to compare results in the human model with those of natural disease, we obtained biopsies from patients with naturally acquired chancroid. All ulcers were culture positive for H. ducreyi and histologically very similar to pustules from the human model. Staining with H. ducreyi-specific monoclonal antibodies demonstrated H. ducreyi within 5 biopsies. The organism was chiefly found within the granulocytic infiltrate of the ulcer. Dual staining for H. ducreyi and eukaryotic tissue components showed that H. ducreyi colocalized with neutrophils and fibrin at the ulcerative stage of disease. No bacteria were associated with keratinocytes, fibroblasts, or collagen. Overall, these findings are consistent with results from the human model. This is the first reported study to localize bacteria specifically identified as H. ducreyi within naturally acquired chancroid.

  12. Development of a Rapid Immunodiagnostic Test for Haemophilus ducreyi

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Kristine; Olsen, Bonnie; Thomas, Christopher; Norn, Dora; Tam, Milton; Elkins, Christopher

    2002-01-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi is the etiologic agent of chancroid, a sexually transmitted disease that increases the rate of transmission of human immunodeficiency virus. Chancroid ulcerations are difficult to distinguish from those produced by syphilis and herpes. Diagnosis based solely on clinical grounds is inaccurate, and culture is insensitive. Highly sensitive PCR has largely superseded culture as the preferred method of laboratory diagnosis; however, neither culture nor PCR is feasible where chancroid is endemic. We developed a rapid (15-min) diagnostic test based on monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to the hemoglobin receptor of H. ducreyi, HgbA. This outer membrane protein is conserved in all strains of H. ducreyi tested and is required for the establishment of experimental human infection. MAbs to HgbA were generated and tested for cross-reactivity against a panel of geographically diverse strains. Three MAbs were found to be unique and noncompetitive and bound to all strains of H. ducreyi tested. Using an immunochromatography format, we evaluated the sensitivity and specificity of the test using geographically diverse strains of H. ducreyi, other Haemophilus strains, and other bacteria known to superinfect genital ulcers. All H. ducreyi strains were positive, and all other bacteria were negative, resulting in a specificity of 100%. The minimum number of CFU of H. ducreyi detected was 2 × 106 CFU, and the minimum amount of purified HgbA protein detected was 8.5 ng. Although this level of sensitivity may not be sufficient to detect H. ducreyi in all clinical specimens, further work to increase the sensitivity could potentially make this a valuable bedside tool in areas where chancroid is endemic. PMID:12354868

  13. Characterization of the CpxRA regulon in Haemophilus ducreyi.

    PubMed

    Labandeira-Rey, Maria; Brautigam, Chad A; Hansen, Eric J

    2010-11-01

    The Haemophilus ducreyi 35000HP genome encodes a homolog of the CpxRA two-component cell envelope stress response system originally characterized in Escherichia coli. CpxR, the cytoplasmic response regulator, was shown previously to be involved in repression of the expression of the lspB-lspA2 operon (M. Labandeira-Rey, J. R. Mock, and E. J. Hansen, Infect. Immun. 77:3402-3411, 2009). In the present study, the H. ducreyi CpxR and CpxA proteins were shown to closely resemble those of other well-studied bacterial species. A cpxA deletion mutant and a CpxR-overexpressing strain were used to explore the extent of the CpxRA regulon. DNA microarray and real-time reverse transcriptase (RT) PCR analyses indicated several potential regulatory targets for the H. ducreyi CpxRA two-component regulatory system. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs) were used to prove that H. ducreyi CpxR interacted with the promoter regions of genes encoding both known and putative virulence factors of H. ducreyi, including the lspB-lspA2 operon, the flp operon, and dsrA. Interestingly, the use of EMSAs also indicated that H. ducreyi CpxR did not bind to the promoter regions of several genes predicted to encode factors involved in the cell envelope stress response. Taken together, these data suggest that the CpxRA system in H. ducreyi, in contrast to that in E. coli, may be involved primarily in controlling expression of genes not involved in the cell envelope stress response.

  14. Assessing the antibiotic potential of essential oils against Haemophilus ducreyi.

    PubMed

    Lindeman, Zachary; Waggoner, Molly; Batdorff, Audra; Humphreys, Tricia L

    2014-05-27

    Haemophilus ducreyi is the bacterium responsible for the genital ulcer disease chancroid, a cofactor for the transmission of HIV, and it is resistant to many antibiotics. With the goal of exploring possible alternative treatments, we tested essential oils (EOs) for their efficacy as antimicrobial agents against H. ducreyi. We determine the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of Cinnamomum verum (cinnamon), Eugenia caryophyllus (clove) and Thymus satureioides (thyme) oil against 9 strains of H. ducreyi using the agar dilution method. We also determined the minimum lethal concentration for each oil by subculturing from the MIC plates onto fresh agar without essential oil. For both tests, we used a 2-way ANOVA to evaluate whether antibiotic-resistant strains had a different sensitivity to the oils relative to non-resistant strains. All 3 oils demonstrated excellent activity against H. ducreyi, with MICs of 0.05 to 0.52 mg/mL and MLCs of 0.1-0.5 mg/mL. Antibiotic-resistant strains of H. ducreyi were equally susceptible to these 3 essential oils relative to non-resistant strains (p=0.409). E. caryophyllus, C. verum and T. satureioides oils are promising alternatives to antibiotic treatment for chancroid.

  15. Assessing the antibiotic potential of essential oils against Haemophilus ducreyi

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Haemophilus ducreyi is the bacterium responsible for the genital ulcer disease chancroid, a cofactor for the transmission of HIV, and it is resistant to many antibiotics. With the goal of exploring possible alternative treatments, we tested essential oils (EOs) for their efficacy as antimicrobial agents against H. ducreyi. Methods We determine the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of Cinnamomum verum (cinnamon), Eugenia caryophyllus (clove) and Thymus satureioides (thyme) oil against 9 strains of H. ducreyi using the agar dilution method. We also determined the minimum lethal concentration for each oil by subculturing from the MIC plates onto fresh agar without essential oil. For both tests, we used a 2-way ANOVA to evaluate whether antibiotic-resistant strains had a different sensitivity to the oils relative to non-resistant strains. Results All 3 oils demonstrated excellent activity against H. ducreyi, with MICs of 0.05 to 0.52 mg/mL and MLCs of 0.1-0.5 mg/mL. Antibiotic-resistant strains of H. ducreyi were equally susceptible to these 3 essential oils relative to non-resistant strains (p = 0.409). Conclusion E. caryophyllus, C. verum and T. satureioides oils are promising alternatives to antibiotic treatment for chancroid. PMID:24885682

  16. Mechanism of human natural killer cell activation by Haemophilus ducreyi.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Janowicz, Diane M; Fortney, Kate R; Katz, Barry P; Spinola, Stanley M

    2009-08-15

    The role of natural killer (NK) cells in the host response to Haemophilus ducreyi infection is unclear. In pustules obtained from infected human volunteers, there was an enrichment of CD56bright NK cells bearing the activation markers CD69 and HLA-DR, compared with peripheral blood. To study the mechanism by which H. ducreyi activated NK cells, we used peripheral blood mononuclear cells from uninfected volunteers. H. ducreyi activated NK cells only in the presence of antigen-presenting cells. H. ducreyi-infected monocytes and monocyte-derived macrophages activated NK cells in a contact- and interleukin-18 (IL-18)-dependent manner, whereas monocyte-derived dendritic cells induced NK activation through soluble IL-12. More lesional NK cells than peripheral blood NK cells produced IFN-gamma in response to IL-12 and IL-18. We conclude that NK cells are recruited to experimental lesions and likely are activated by infected macrophages and dendritic cells. IFN-gamma produced by lesional NK cells may facilitate phagocytosis of H. ducreyi.

  17. Haemophilus ducreyi partially activates human myeloid dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Banks, Keith E; Humphreys, Tricia L; Li, Wei; Katz, Barry P; Wilkes, David S; Spinola, Stanley M

    2007-12-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) orchestrate innate and adaptive immune responses to bacteria. How Haemophilus ducreyi, which causes genital ulcers and regional lymphadenitis, interacts with DC is unknown. H. ducreyi evades uptake by polymorphonuclear leukocyte and macrophage-like cell lines by secreting LspA1 and LspA2. Many H. ducreyi strains express cytolethal distending toxin (CDT), and recombinant CDT causes apoptosis of DC in vitro. Here, we examined interactions between DC and H. ducreyi 35000HP, which produces LspA1, LspA2, and CDT. In human volunteers infected with 35000HP, the ratio of myeloid DC to plasmacytoid DC was 2.8:1 in lesions, compared to a ratio of 1:1 in peripheral blood. Using myeloid DC derived from monocytes as surrogates for lesional DC, we found that DC infected with 35000HP remained as viable as uninfected DC for up to 48 h. Gentamicin protection and confocal microscopy assays demonstrated that DC ingested and killed 35000HP, but killing was incomplete at 48 h. The expression of LspA1 and LspA2 did not inhibit the uptake of H. ducreyi, despite inactivating Src kinases. Infection of DC with live 35000HP caused less cell surface marker activation than infection with heat-killed 35000HP and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and inhibited maturation by LPS. However, infection of DC with live bacteria caused the secretion of significantly higher levels of interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor alpha than infection with heat-killed bacteria and LPS. The survival of H. ducreyi in DC may provide a mechanism by which the organism traffics to lymph nodes. Partial activation of DC may abrogate the establishment of a full Th1 response and an environment that promotes phagocytosis.

  18. Haemophilus ducreyi Cutaneous Ulcer Strains Are Nearly Identical to Class I Genital Ulcer Strains

    PubMed Central

    Gangaiah, Dharanesh; Webb, Kristen M.; Humphreys, Tricia L.; Fortney, Kate R.; Toh, Evelyn; Tai, Albert; Katz, Samantha S.; Pillay, Allan; Chen, Cheng-Yen; Roberts, Sally A.; Munson, Robert S.; Spinola, Stanley M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Although cutaneous ulcers (CU) in the tropics is frequently attributed to Treponema pallidum subspecies pertenue, the causative agent of yaws, Haemophilus ducreyi has emerged as a major cause of CU in yaws-endemic regions of the South Pacific islands and Africa. H. ducreyi is generally susceptible to macrolides, but CU strains persist after mass drug administration of azithromycin for yaws or trachoma. H. ducreyi also causes genital ulcers (GU) and was thought to be exclusively transmitted by microabrasions that occur during sex. In human volunteers, the GU strain 35000HP does not infect intact skin; wounds are required to initiate infection. These data led to several questions: Are CU strains a new variant of H. ducreyi or did they evolve from GU strains? Do CU strains contain additional genes that could allow them to infect intact skin? Are CU strains susceptible to azithromycin? Methodology/Principal Findings To address these questions, we performed whole-genome sequencing and antibiotic susceptibility testing of 5 CU strains obtained from Samoa and Vanuatu and 9 archived class I and class II GU strains. Except for single nucleotide polymorphisms, the CU strains were genetically almost identical to the class I strain 35000HP and had no additional genetic content. Phylogenetic analysis showed that class I and class II strains formed two separate clusters and CU strains evolved from class I strains. Class I strains diverged from class II strains ~1.95 million years ago (mya) and CU strains diverged from the class I strain 35000HP ~0.18 mya. CU and GU strains evolved under similar selection pressures. Like 35000HP, the CU strains were highly susceptible to antibiotics, including azithromycin. Conclusions/Significance These data suggest that CU strains are derivatives of class I strains that were not recognized until recently. These findings require confirmation by analysis of CU strains from other regions. PMID:26147869

  19. A serosurvey of Haemophilus ducreyi, syphilis, and herpes simplex virus type 2 and their association with human immunodeficiency virus among female sex workers in Lagos, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Dada, A J; Ajayi, A O; Diamondstone, L; Quinn, T C; Blattner, W A; Biggar, R J

    1998-05-01

    Cross-sectional standard serologic assays were used to determine the prevalence of Haemophilus ducreyi, Treponema pallidum, and herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) antibodies among 796 female commercial sex workers from Lagos, Nigeria, and their association with HIV antibody status. The seroprevalence rates were 86% for anti-H. ducreyi IgG and 69% for anti-H. ducreyi IgA, 4% for rapid plasma reagin and Treponema palladium hemagglutination assay confirmed syphilis, 59% for HSV-2, 12% for HIV-1, and 2% for HIV-2. Lower-class sex workers were significantly more likely than upper-class sex workers to be H. ducreyi-positive and to have current or past syphilis infection. The presence of syphilis increased significantly with older age. Non-Nigerian sex workers had significantly higher reactivity to chancroid and borderline reactivity to syphilis. A history of sex with non-Nigerian Africans was significantly associated with chancroid reactivity and borderline significant with syphilis serostatus. H. ducreyi seropositivity was significantly more likely in female sex workers with HSV-2 and syphilis. Chancroid and HSV-2 antibodies were also more common in HIV-infected sex workers. The high prevalence of H. ducreyi antibodies detected in this study underscores the importance of an effective program to control genital ulcerative disease as part of the strategy to prevent the spread of HIV in Nigeria.

  20. Rapid divergence of two classes of Haemophilus ducreyi.

    PubMed

    Ricotta, Emily E; Wang, Nan; Cutler, Robin; Lawrence, Jeffrey G; Humphreys, Tricia L

    2011-06-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi, the etiologic agent of chancroid, expresses variants of several key virulence factors. While previous reports suggested that H. ducreyi strains formed two clonal populations, the differences between, and diversity within, these populations were unclear. To assess their variability, we examined sequence diversity at 11 H. ducreyi loci, including virulence and housekeeping genes, augmenting published data sets with PCR-amplified genes to acquire data for at least 10 strains at each locus. While sequences from all 11 loci place strains into two distinct groups, there was very little variation within each group. The difference between alleles of the two groups was variable and large at 3 loci encoding surface-exposed proteins (0.4 < K(S) < 1.3, where K(S) is divergence at synonymous sites) but consistently small at genes encoding cytoplasmic or periplasmic proteins (K(S) < 0.09). The data suggest that the two classes have recently diverged, that recombination has introduced variant alleles into at least 3 distinct loci, and that these alleles have been confined to one of the two classes. In addition, recombination is evident among alleles within, but not between, classes. Rather than clones of the same species, these properties indicate that the two classes may form distinct species.

  1. Identification of a novel sialic acid transporter in Haemophilus ducreyi.

    PubMed

    Post, Deborah M B; Mungur, Rachna; Gibson, Bradford W; Munson, Robert S

    2005-10-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi, the causative agent of chancroid, produces a lipooligosaccharide (LOS) which terminates in N-acetyllactosamine. This glycoform can be further extended by the addition of a single sialic acid residue to the terminal galactose moiety. H. ducreyi does not synthesize sialic acid, which must be acquired from the host during infection or from the culture medium when the bacteria are grown in vitro. However, H. ducreyi does not have genes that are highly homologous to the genes encoding known bacterial sialic acid transporters. In this study, we identified the sialic acid transporter by screening strains in a library of random transposon mutants for those mutants that were unable to add sialic acid to N-acetyllactosamine-containing LOS. Mutants that reacted with the monoclonal antibody 3F11, which recognizes the terminal lactosamine structure, and lacked reactivity with the lectin Maackia amurensis agglutinin, which recognizes alpha2,3-linked sialic acid, were further characterized to demonstrate that they produced a N-acetyllactosamine-containing LOS by silver-stained sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometric analyses. The genes interrupted in these mutants were mapped to a four-gene cluster with similarity to genes encoding bacterial ABC transporters. Uptake assays using radiolabeled sialic acid confirmed that the mutants were unable to transport sialic acid. This study is the first report of bacteria using an ABC transporter for sialic acid uptake.

  2. Identification of Haemophilus ducreyi genes expressed during human infection.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Margaret E; Fortney, Kate R; Harrison, Alistair; Janowicz, Diane M; Munson, Robert S; Spinola, Stanley M

    2008-04-01

    To identify Haemophilus ducreyi transcripts that are expressed during human infection, we used selective capture of transcribed sequences (SCOTS) with RNA isolated from pustules obtained from three volunteers infected with H. ducreyi, and with RNA isolated from broth-grown bacteria used to infect volunteers. With SCOTS, competitive hybridization of tissue-derived and broth-derived sequences identifies genes that may be preferentially expressed in vivo. Among the three tissue specimens, we identified 531 genes expressed in vivo. Southern blot analysis of 60 genes from each tissue showed that 87 % of the identified genes hybridized better with cDNA derived from tissue specimens than with cDNA derived from broth-grown bacteria. RT-PCR on nine additional pustules confirmed in vivo expression of 10 of 11 selected genes in other volunteers. Of the 531 genes, 139 were identified in at least two volunteers. These 139 genes fell into several functional categories, including biosynthesis and metabolism, regulation, and cellular processes, such as transcription, translation, cell division, DNA replication and repair, and transport. Detection of genes involved in anaerobic and aerobic respiration indicated that H. ducreyi likely encounters both microenvironments within the pustule. Other genes detected suggest an increase in DNA damage and stress in vivo. Genes involved in virulence in other bacterial pathogens and 32 genes encoding hypothetical proteins were identified, and may represent novel virulence factors. We identified three genes, lspA1, lspA2 and tadA, known to be required for virulence in humans. This is the first study to broadly define transcripts expressed by H. ducreyi in humans.

  3. Molecular characterization of Haemophilus ducreyi isolates from different geographical locations.

    PubMed

    Mbwana, J; Bölin, I; Lyamuya, E; Mhalu, F; Lagergård, T

    2006-01-01

    The technique of random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) was adapted and optimized to study Haemophilus ducreyi isolates. A panel of 43 strains isolated from chancroid patients from different countries in Africa, Europe, North America, and Asia were characterized. The strains were also studied with respect to lipooligosaccharide (LOS) migration and immunoblotting patterns and the presence of cytolethal distending toxin genes. The RAPD method with the OPJ20 primer generated nine banding patterns (1 to 9). The majority of the isolates were clustered into two major profiles, 14 and 13 strains into profiles 1 and 2, respectively, and just a few strains revealed patterns 3 and 4. The isolates from Thailand were exceptional in that they showed greater diversity and were represented by six different RAPD patterns, i.e., patterns 3 and 5 to 9. The LOS migration and immunoblotting analyses revealed two different patterns, which indicated long and short forms of LOS; the former was found in 20/23 tested strains. Two strains that expressed the short form of LOS were grouped into RAPD pattern 4. The absence of cdtABC genes was observed in only 4/23 strains, and three of these isolates were assigned to RAPD pattern 4. Our results showed limited genotypic and phenotypic variations among H. ducreyi strains, as supported by the conserved RAPD and LOS profiles shared by the majority of the studied strains. However, the RAPD method identified differences between strains, including those from different geographic areas, which indicate the potential of RAPD as an epidemiological tool for the typing of H. ducreyi isolates in countries where chancroid is endemic.

  4. Immunogenic and adjuvant properties of Haemophilus ducreyi lipooligosaccharides.

    PubMed

    Lundqvist, Annika; Kubler-Kielb, Joanna; Teneberg, Susann; Ahlman, Karin; Lagergård, Teresa

    2009-03-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi, the chancroid-causing bacterium, produces lipooligosaccharides (HdLOS) that comprise 5-11 partially sialylated monosaccharides. Subcutaneous immunisation of mice with 5 microg of HdLOS purified from H. ducreyi strains 4438 and 7470 induced high levels of anti-HdLOS IgG. The antibody responses displayed T-cell-independent features, and were dependent upon Toll-like receptor 4/MyD88 signalling pathways as demonstrated using knockout mice. The immunogenicity of HdLOS was found to require the intact lipid A moiety. The specificity studies of the anti-HdLOS antibodies, as revealed by absorption studies, antibody detection in ELISA, and immune thin-layer chromatography, indicated that the majority of the anti-LOS antibodies were specific for the inner core of the HdLOS. Antibodies to HdLOS failed to inhibit LOS induction of TNF-alpha release from human mononuclear cells. The adjuvanticity of HdLOS7470 was assessed in BALB/c mice that were immunised with bovine serum albumin (BSA) with or without the addition of HdLOS. The addition of 5 microg HdLOS resulted in a 10-fold increase in the total anti-BSA IgG antibody level as estimated by ELISA. The highest increase was noted for IgG2b, which contrasted with the predominantly IgG1 subclass response to immunisation with BSA alone, indicating an immunomodulatory activity of the HdLOS.

  5. Involvement of the Haemophilus ducreyi gmhA Gene Product in Lipooligosaccharide Expression and Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Beth A.; Stevens, Marla K.; Hansen, Eric J.

    1998-01-01

    The lipooligosaccharide (LOS) present in the outer membrane of Haemophilus ducreyi is likely a virulence factor for this sexually transmitted pathogen. An open reading frame in H. ducreyi 35000 was found to encode a predicted protein that had 87% identity with the protein product of the gmhA (isn) gene of Haemophilus influenzae. In H. influenzae type b, inactivation of the gmhA gene caused the synthesis of a significantly truncated LOS which possessed only lipid A and a single 2-keto-3-deoxyoctulosonic acid molecule (A. Preston, D. J. Maskell, A. Johnson, and E. R. Moxon, J. Bacteriol. 178:396–402, 1996). The H. ducreyi gmhA gene was able to complement a gmhA-deficient Escherichia coli strain, a result which confirmed the identity of this gene. When the gmhA gene of H. ducreyi was inactivated by insertion of a cat cartridge, the resultant H. ducreyi gmhA mutant, 35000.252, expressed a LOS that migrated much faster than wild-type LOS in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. When the wild-type H. ducreyi strain and its isogenic gmhA mutant were used in the temperature-dependent rabbit model for dermal lesion production by H. ducreyi, the gmhA mutant was found to be substantially less virulent than the wild-type parent strain. The H. ducreyi gmhA gene was amplified by PCR from the H. ducreyi chromosome and cloned into the pLS88 vector. When the H. ducreyi gmhA gene was present in trans in gmhA mutant 35000.252, expression of the gmhA gene product restored the virulence of this mutant to wild-type levels. These results indicate that the gmhA gene product of H. ducreyi is essential for the expression of wild-type LOS by this pathogen. PMID:9712780

  6. Complete Genome Sequences of 11 Haemophilus ducreyi Isolates from Children with Cutaneous Lesions in Vanuatu and Ghana.

    PubMed

    Pillay, Allan; Katz, Samantha S; Abrams, A Jeanine; Ballard, Ronald C; Simpson, Shirley V; Taleo, Fasihah; Lahra, Monica M; Batra, Dhwani; Rowe, Lori; Trees, David L; Asiedu, Kingsley; Chen, Cheng-Yen

    2016-07-07

    Haemophilus ducreyi causes chancroid and has recently been shown to be a significant cause of cutaneous lesions in tropical or subtropical regions where yaws is endemic. Here, we report the draft genome assemblies for 11 cutaneous strains of Haemophilus ducreyi, isolated from children in Vanuatu and Ghana.

  7. Complete Genome Sequences of 11 Haemophilus ducreyi Isolates from Children with Cutaneous Lesions in Vanuatu and Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Samantha S.; Abrams, A. Jeanine; Ballard, Ronald C.; Simpson, Shirley V.; Taleo, Fasihah; Lahra, Monica M.; Batra, Dhwani; Rowe, Lori; Trees, David L.; Asiedu, Kingsley; Chen, Cheng-Yen

    2016-01-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi causes chancroid and has recently been shown to be a significant cause of cutaneous lesions in tropical or subtropical regions where yaws is endemic. Here, we report the draft genome assemblies for 11 cutaneous strains of Haemophilus ducreyi, isolated from children in Vanuatu and Ghana. PMID:27389258

  8. The Hd0053 gene of Haemophilus ducreyi encodes an alpha2,3-sialyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanhong; Sun, Mingchi; Huang, Shengshu; Yu, Hai; Chokhawala, Harshal A; Thon, Vireak; Chen, Xi

    2007-09-21

    Haemophilus ducreyi is a Gram-negative bacterium that causes chancroid, a sexually transmitted genital ulcer disease. Different lipooligosaccharide (LOS) structures have been identified from H. ducreyi strain 35000, including those sialylated glycoforms. Surface LOS of H. ducreyi is considered an important virulence factor that is involved in ulcer formation, cell adhesion, and invasion of host tissue. Gene Hd0686 of H. ducreyi, designated lst (for lipooligosaccharide sialyltransferase), was identified to encode an alpha2,3-sialyltransferase that is important for the formation of sialylated LOS. Here, we show that Hd0053 of H. ducreyi genomic strain 35000HP, the third member of the glycosyltransferase family 80 (GT80), also encodes an alpha2,3-sialyltransferase that may be important for LOS sialylation.

  9. Molecular phylogenetic analysis of non-sexually transmitted strains of Haemophilus ducreyi.

    PubMed

    Gaston, Jordan R; Roberts, Sally A; Humphreys, Tricia L

    2015-01-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi, the etiologic agent of chancroid, has been previously reported to show genetic variance in several key virulence factors, placing strains of the bacterium into two genetically distinct classes. Recent studies done in yaws-endemic areas of the South Pacific have shown that H. ducreyi is also a major cause of cutaneous limb ulcers (CLU) that are not sexually transmitted. To genetically assess CLU strains relative to the previously described class I, class II phylogenetic hierarchy, we examined nucleotide sequence diversity at 11 H. ducreyi loci, including virulence and housekeeping genes, which encompass approximately 1% of the H. ducreyi genome. Sequences for all 11 loci indicated that strains collected from leg ulcers exhibit DNA sequences homologous to class I strains of H. ducreyi. However, sequences for 3 loci, including a hemoglobin receptor (hgbA), serum resistance protein (dsrA), and a collagen adhesin (ncaA) contained informative amounts of variation. Phylogenetic analyses suggest that these non-sexually transmitted strains of H. ducreyi comprise a sub-clonal population within class I strains of H. ducreyi. Molecular dating suggests that CLU strains are the most recently developed, having diverged approximately 0.355 million years ago, fourteen times more recently than the class I/class II divergence. The CLU strains' divergence falls after the divergence of humans from chimpanzees, making it the first known H. ducreyi divergence event directly influenced by the selective pressures accompanying human hosts.

  10. Outer membrane protein DsrA is the major fibronectin-binding determinant of Haemophilus ducreyi.

    PubMed

    Leduc, Isabelle; White, C Dinitra; Nepluev, Igor; Throm, Robert E; Spinola, Stanley M; Elkins, Christopher

    2008-04-01

    The ability to bind extracellular matrix proteins is a critical virulence determinant for skin pathogens. Haemophilus ducreyi, the etiological agent of the genital ulcer disease chancroid, binds extracellular matrix components, including fibronectin (FN). We investigated H. ducreyi FN binding and report several important findings about this interaction. First, FN binding by H. ducreyi was greatly increased in bacteria grown on heme and almost completely inhibited by hemoglobin. Second, wild-type strain 35000HP bound significantly more FN than did a dsrA mutant in two different FN binding assays. Third, the expression of dsrA in the dsrA mutant restored FN binding and conferred the ability to bind FN to a non-FN-binding Haemophilus influenzae strain. Fourth, an anti-DsrA monoclonal antibody partially blocked FN binding by H. ducreyi. The hemoglobin receptor, the collagen-binding protein, the H. ducreyi lectin, the fine-tangle pili, and the outer membrane protein OmpA2 were not involved in H. ducreyi FN binding, since single mutants bound FN as well as the parent strain did. However, the major outer membrane protein may have a minor role in FN binding by H. ducreyi, since a double dsrA momp mutant bound less FN than did the single dsrA mutant. Finally, despite major sequence differences, DsrA proteins from both class I and class II H. ducreyi strains mediated FN and vitronectin binding. We concluded that DsrA is the major factor involved in FN binding by both classes of H. ducreyi strains.

  11. Characterization of a WaaF (RfaF) Homolog Expressed by Haemophilus ducreyi

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Beth A.; Lumbley, Sheryl R.; Hansen, Eric J.

    1999-01-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi lipooligosaccharide (LOS) is capable of inducing an inflammatory response in skin (A. A. Campagnari, L. M. Wild, G. Griffiths, R. J. Karalus, M. A. Wirth, and S. M. Spinola, Infect. Immun. 59:2601–2608, 1991) and likely contributes to the virulence of this sexually transmitted pathogen (B. A. Bauer, M. K. Stevens, and E. J. Hansen, Infect. Immun. 68:4290–4298, 1998). An open reading frame in H. ducreyi 35000 was found to encode a predicted protein that was 59% identical to the protein product of the rfaF (waaF) gene of Salmonella typhimurium. The H. ducreyi waaF gene was able to complement an S. typhimurium rfaF (waaF) mutant, a result which confirmed the identity of this gene. In contrast to the rfaF (waaF) gene of enteric bacteria, the H. ducreyi waaF gene was not located adjacent to other genes involved in lipopolysaccharide expression. Inactivation of the H. ducreyi waaF gene by insertion mutagenesis resulted in expression of a LOS that migrated much faster than wild-type LOS in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The LOS of this mutant also did not bind a monoclonal antibody directed against a cell surface-exposed epitope of wild-type H. ducreyi LOS. Testing of the wild-type H. ducreyi strain and its isogenic waaF mutant in the temperature-dependent rabbit model for dermal lesion production by H. ducreyi revealed that this waaF mutant was less virulent than the wild-type parent strain. Complementation of the H. ducreyi waaF mutant with the wild-type H. ducreyi waaF gene resulted in expression of both wild-type LOS and wild-type virulence by this mutant. PMID:9916106

  12. Trimeric Autotransporter DsrA Is a Major Mediator of Fibrinogen Binding in Haemophilus ducreyi

    PubMed Central

    Fusco, William G.; Elkins, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi is the etiologic agent of the sexually transmitted genital ulcer disease chancroid. In both natural and experimental chancroid, H. ducreyi colocalizes with fibrin at the base of the ulcer. Fibrin is obtained by cleavage of the serum glycoprotein fibrinogen (Fg) by thrombin to initiate formation of the blood clot. Fg binding proteins are critical virulence factors in medically important Gram-positive bacteria. H. ducreyi has previously been shown to bind Fg in an agglutination assay, and the H. ducreyi Fg binding protein FgbA was identified in ligand blotting with denatured proteins. To better characterize the interaction of H. ducreyi with Fg, we examined Fg binding to intact, viable H. ducreyi bacteria and identified a novel Fg binding protein. H. ducreyi bound unlabeled Fg in a dose-dependent manner, as measured by two different methods. In ligand blotting with total denatured cellular proteins, digoxigenin (DIG)-Fg bound only two H. ducreyi proteins, the trimeric autotransporter DsrA and the lectin DltA; however, only the isogenic dsrA mutant had significantly less cell-associated Fg than parental strains in Fg binding assays with intact bacteria. Furthermore, expression of DsrA, but not DltA or an empty vector, rendered the non-Fg-binding H. influenzae strain Rd capable of binding Fg. A 13-amino-acid sequence in the C-terminal section of the passenger domain of DsrA appears to be involved in Fg binding by H. ducreyi. Taken together, these data suggest that the trimeric autotransporter DsrA is a major determinant of Fg binding at the surface of H. ducreyi. PMID:24042118

  13. Trimeric autotransporter DsrA is a major mediator of fibrinogen binding in Haemophilus ducreyi.

    PubMed

    Fusco, William G; Elkins, Christopher; Leduc, Isabelle

    2013-12-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi is the etiologic agent of the sexually transmitted genital ulcer disease chancroid. In both natural and experimental chancroid, H. ducreyi colocalizes with fibrin at the base of the ulcer. Fibrin is obtained by cleavage of the serum glycoprotein fibrinogen (Fg) by thrombin to initiate formation of the blood clot. Fg binding proteins are critical virulence factors in medically important Gram-positive bacteria. H. ducreyi has previously been shown to bind Fg in an agglutination assay, and the H. ducreyi Fg binding protein FgbA was identified in ligand blotting with denatured proteins. To better characterize the interaction of H. ducreyi with Fg, we examined Fg binding to intact, viable H. ducreyi bacteria and identified a novel Fg binding protein. H. ducreyi bound unlabeled Fg in a dose-dependent manner, as measured by two different methods. In ligand blotting with total denatured cellular proteins, digoxigenin (DIG)-Fg bound only two H. ducreyi proteins, the trimeric autotransporter DsrA and the lectin DltA; however, only the isogenic dsrA mutant had significantly less cell-associated Fg than parental strains in Fg binding assays with intact bacteria. Furthermore, expression of DsrA, but not DltA or an empty vector, rendered the non-Fg-binding H. influenzae strain Rd capable of binding Fg. A 13-amino-acid sequence in the C-terminal section of the passenger domain of DsrA appears to be involved in Fg binding by H. ducreyi. Taken together, these data suggest that the trimeric autotransporter DsrA is a major determinant of Fg binding at the surface of H. ducreyi.

  14. Haemophilus ducreyi detection by polymerase chain reaction in oesophageal lesions of HIV patients.

    PubMed

    Borges, M C; Colares, J K B; Lima, D M; Fonseca, B A L

    2009-04-01

    HIV patients frequently have opportunistic oesophageal infections. We report Haemophilus ducreyi genetic material detected by polymerase chain reaction in biopsies of oesophageal lesions in three HIV-1-infected patients. This finding may be an indication of its aetiopathological role in oesophageal lesions of HIV patients.

  15. Identification of the znuA-Encoded Periplasmic Zinc Transport Protein of Haemophilus ducreyi

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, David A.; Klesney-Tait, Julia; Lumbley, Sheryl R.; Ward, Christine K.; Latimer, Jo L.; Ison, Catherine A.; Hansen, Eric J.

    1999-01-01

    The znuA gene of Haemophilus ducreyi encodes a 32-kDa (mature) protein that has homology to both the ZnuA protein of Escherichia coli and the Pzp1 protein of H. influenzae; both of these latter proteins are members of a growing family of prokaryotic zinc transporters. Inactivation of the H. ducreyi 35000 znuA gene by insertional mutagenesis resulted in a mutant that grew more slowly than the wild-type parent strain in vitro unless ZnCl2 was provided at a final concentration of 100 μM. Other cations tested did not restore growth of this H. ducreyi mutant to wild-type levels. The H. ducreyi ZnuA protein was localized to the periplasm, where it is believed to function as the binding component of a zinc transport system. Complementation of the znuA mutation with the wild-type H. ducreyi znuA gene provided in trans restored the ability of this H. ducreyi mutant to grow normally in the absence of exogenously added ZnCl2. The wild-type H. ducreyi znuA gene was also able to complement a H. influenzae pzp1 mutation. The H. ducreyi znuA isogenic mutant exhibited significantly decreased virulence (P = 0.0001) when tested in the temperature-dependent rabbit model for experimental chancroid. This decreased virulence was not observed when the znuA mutant was complemented with the wild-type H. ducreyi znuA gene provided in trans. PMID:10496878

  16. Haemophilus ducreyi SapA contributes to cathelicidin resistance and virulence in humans.

    PubMed

    Mount, Kristy L B; Townsend, Carisa A; Rinker, Sherri D; Gu, Xiaoping; Fortney, Kate R; Zwickl, Beth W; Janowicz, Diane M; Spinola, Stanley M; Katz, Barry P; Bauer, Margaret E

    2010-03-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi is an extracellular pathogen of human epithelial surfaces that resists human antimicrobial peptides (APs). The organism's genome contains homologs of genes sensitive to antimicrobial peptides (sap operon) in nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae. In this study, we characterized the sap-containing loci of H. ducreyi 35000HP and demonstrated that sapA is expressed in broth cultures and H. ducreyi-infected tissue; sapA is also conserved among both class I and class II H. ducreyi strains. We constructed a nonpolar sapA mutant of H. ducreyi 35000HP, designated 35000HPsapA, and compared the percent survival of wild-type 35000HP and 35000HPsapA exposed to several human APs, including alpha-defensins, beta-defensins, and the cathelicidin LL-37. Unlike an H. influenzae sapA mutant, strain 35000HPsapA was not more susceptible to defensins than strain 35000HP was. However, we observed a significant decrease in the survival of strain 35000HPsapA after exposure to LL-37, which was complemented by introducing sapA in trans. Thus, the Sap transporter plays a role in resistance of H. ducreyi to LL-37. We next compared mutant strain 35000HPsapA with strain 35000HP for their ability to cause disease in human volunteers. Although both strains caused papules to form at similar rates, the pustule formation rate at sites inoculated with 35000HPsapA was significantly lower than that of sites inoculated with 35000HP (33.3% versus 66.7%; P = 0.007). Together, these data establish that SapA acts as a virulence factor and as one mechanism for H. ducreyi to resist killing by antimicrobial peptides. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration that an antimicrobial peptide resistance mechanism contributes to bacterial virulence in humans.

  17. Haemophilus ducreyi targets Src family protein tyrosine kinases to inhibit phagocytic signaling.

    PubMed

    Mock, Jason R; Vakevainen, Merja; Deng, Kaiping; Latimer, Jo L; Young, Jennifer A; van Oers, Nicolai S C; Greenberg, Steven; Hansen, Eric J

    2005-12-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi, the etiologic agent of the sexually transmitted disease chancroid, has been shown to inhibit phagocytosis of both itself and secondary targets in vitro. Immunodepletion of LspA proteins from H. ducreyi culture supernatant fluid abolished this inhibitory effect, indicating that the LspA proteins are necessary for the inhibition of phagocytosis by H. ducreyi. Fluorescence microscopy revealed that macrophages incubated with wild-type H. ducreyi, but not with a lspA1 lspA2 mutant, were unable to complete development of the phagocytic cup around immunoglobulin G-opsonized targets. Examination of the phosphotyrosine protein profiles of these two sets of macrophages showed that those incubated with wild-type H. ducreyi had greatly reduced phosphorylation levels of proteins in the 50-to-60-kDa range. Subsequent experiments revealed reductions in the catalytic activities of both Lyn and Hck, two members of the Src family of protein tyrosine kinases that are known to be involved in the proximal signaling steps of Fcgamma receptor-mediated phagocytosis. Additional experiments confirmed reductions in the levels of both active Lyn and active Hck in three different immune cell lines, but not in HeLa cells, exposed to wild-type H. ducreyi. This is the first example of a bacterial pathogen that suppresses Src family protein tyrosine kinase activity to subvert phagocytic signaling in hostcells.

  18. Defining Potential Vaccine Targets of Haemophilus ducreyi Trimeric Autotransporter Adhesin DsrA.

    PubMed

    Fusco, William G; Choudhary, Neelima R; Stewart, Shelley M; Alam, S Munir; Sempowski, Gregory D; Elkins, Christopher; Leduc, Isabelle

    2015-04-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi is the causative agent of the sexually transmitted genital ulcer disease chancroid. Strains of H. ducreyi are grouped in two classes (I and II) based on genotypic and phenotypic differences, including those found in DsrA, an outer membrane protein belonging to the family of multifunctional trimeric autotransporter adhesins. DsrA is a key serum resistance factor of H. ducreyi that prevents binding of natural IgM at the bacterial surface and functions as an adhesin to fibronectin, fibrinogen, vitronectin, and human keratinocytes. Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) were developed to recombinant DsrA (DsrA(I)) from prototypical class I strain 35000HP to define targets for vaccine and/or therapeutics. Two anti-DsrAI MAbs bound monomers and multimers of DsrA from genital and non-genital/cutaneous H. ducreyi strains in a Western blot and reacted to the surface of the genital strains; however, these MAbs did not recognize denatured or native DsrA from class II strains. In a modified extracellular matrix protein binding assay using viable H. ducreyi, one of the MAbs partially inhibited binding of fibronectin, fibrinogen, and vitronectin to class I H. ducreyi strain 35000HP, suggesting a role for anti-DsrA antibodies in preventing binding of H. ducreyi to extracellular matrix proteins. Standard ELISA and surface plasmon resonance using a peptide library representing full-length, mature DsrAI revealed the smallest nominal epitope bound by one of the MAbs to be MEQNTHNINKLS. Taken together, our findings suggest that this epitope is a potential target for an H. ducreyi vaccine.

  19. Haemophilus ducreyi Requires the flp Gene Cluster for Microcolony Formation In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Nika, Joseph R.; Latimer, Jo L.; Ward, Christine K.; Blick, Robert J.; Wagner, Nikki J.; Cope, Leslie D.; Mahairas, Gregory G.; Munson, Robert S.; Hansen, Eric J.

    2002-01-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi, the etiologic agent of chancroid, has been shown to form microcolonies when cultured in the presence of human foreskin fibroblasts. We identified a 15-gene cluster in H. ducreyi that encoded predicted protein products with significant homology to those encoded by the tad (for tight adhesion) locus in Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans that is involved in the production of fimbriae by this periodontal pathogen. The first three open reading frames in this H. ducreyi gene cluster encoded predicted proteins with a high degree of identity to the Flp (fimbria-like protein) encoded by the first open reading frame of the tad locus; this 15-gene cluster in H. ducreyi was designated flp. RT-PCR analysis indicated that the H. ducreyi flp gene cluster was likely to be a polycistronic operon. Mutations within the flp gene cluster resulted in an inability to form microcolonies in the presence of human foreskin fibroblasts. In addition, the same mutants were defective in the ability to attach to both plastic and human foreskin fibroblasts in vitro. An H. ducreyi mutant with an inactivated tadA gene exhibited a small decrease in virulence in the temperature-dependent rabbit model for experimental chancroid, whereas another H. ducreyi mutant with inactivated flp-1 and flp-2 genes was as virulent as the wild-type parent strain. These results indicate that the flp gene cluster is essential for microcolony formation by H. ducreyi, whereas this phenotypic trait is not linked to the virulence potential of the pathogen, at least in this animal model of infection. PMID:12010986

  20. Epidemiology, clinical features, diagnosis and treatment of Haemophilus ducreyi - a disappearing pathogen?

    PubMed

    Lewis, David A

    2014-06-01

    Chancroid, caused by Haemophilus ducreyi, has declined in importance as a sexually transmitted pathogen in most countries where it was previously endemic. The global prevalence of chancroid is unknown as most countries lack the required laboratory diagnostic capacity and surveillance systems to determine this. H. ducreyi has recently emerged as a cause of chronic skin ulceration in some South Pacific islands. Although no antimicrobial susceptibility data for H. ducreyi have been published for two decades, it is still assumed that the infection will respond successfully to treatment with recommended cephalosporin, macrolide or fluoroquinolone-based regimens. HIV-1-infected patients require careful follow-up due to reports of treatment failure with single dose regimens. Buboes may need additional treatment with either aspiration or excision and drainage.

  1. A role for Haemophilus ducreyi Cu,ZnSOD in resistance to heme toxicity.

    PubMed

    Negari, Shahin; Sulpher, Jeff; Pacello, Francesca; Ingrey, Keely; Battistoni, Andrea; Lee, B Craig

    2008-06-01

    The Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase (Cu,ZnSOD) from Haemophilus ducreyi is the only enzyme of this class which binds a heme molecule at its dimer interface. To explore the role of the enzyme in this heme-obligate bacterium, a sodC mutant was created by insertional inactivation. No difference in growth rate was observed during heme limitation. In contrast, under heme rich conditions growth of the sodC mutant was impaired compared to the wild type strain. This growth defect was abolished by supplementation of exogenous catalase. Genetic complementation of the sodC mutant in trans demonstrated that the enzymatic property or the heme-binding activity of the protein could repair the growth defect of the sodC mutant. These results indicate that Cu,ZnSOD protects Haemophilus ducreyi from heme toxicity.

  2. On the evolution of the sexually transmitted bacteria Haemophilus ducreyi and Klebsiella granulomatis.

    PubMed

    Lagergård, Teresa; Bölin, Ingrid; Lindholm, Leif

    2011-08-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi and Klebsiella (Calymmatobacterium) granulomatis are sexually transmitted bacteria that cause characteristic, persisting ulceration on external genitals called chancroid and granuloma inguinale, respectively. Those ulcers are endemic in developing countries or exist, as does granuloma inguinale, only in some geographic "hot spots."H. ducreyi is placed in the genus Haemophilus (family Pasteurellacae); however, this phylogenetic position is not obvious. The multiple ways in which the bacterium may be adapted to its econiche through specialized nutrient acquisitions; defenses against the immune system; and virulence factors that increase attachment, fitness, and persistence within genital tissue are discussed below. The analysis of K. granulomatis phylogeny demonstrated a high degree of identity with other Klebsiella species, and the name K. granulomatis comb. nov. was proposed. Because of the difficulty in growing this bacterium on artificial media, its characteristics have not been sufficiently defined. More studies are needed to understand bacterial genetics related to the pathogenesis and evolution of K. granulomatis.

  3. A fibrinogen-binding lipoprotein contributes to the virulence of Haemophilus ducreyi in humans.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Margaret E; Townsend, Carisa A; Doster, Ryan S; Fortney, Kate R; Zwickl, Beth W; Katz, Barry P; Spinola, Stanley M; Janowicz, Diane M

    2009-03-01

    A gene expression study of Haemophilus ducreyi identified the hypothetical lipoprotein HD0192, renamed here "fibrinogen binder A" (FgbA), as being preferentially expressed in vivo. To test the role played by fgbA in virulence, an isogenic fgbA mutant (35000HPfgbA) was constructed using H. ducreyi 35000HP, and 6 volunteers were experimentally infected with 35000HP or 35000HPfgbA. The overall pustule-formation rate was 61.1% at parent sites and 22.2% at mutant sites (P = .019). Papules were significantly smaller at mutant sites than at parent sites (13.3 vs. 37.9 mm(2); P = .002) 24 h after inoculation. Thus, fgbA contributed significantly to the virulence of H. ducreyi in humans. In vitro experiments demonstrated that fgbA encodes a fibrinogen-binding protein; no other fibrinogen-binding proteins were identified in 35000HP. fgbA was conserved among clinical isolates of both class I and II H. ducreyi strains, supporting the finding that fgbA is important for H. ducreyi infection.

  4. Identification and characterization of a heme periplasmic-binding protein in Haemophilus ducreyi.

    PubMed

    St Denis, Melissa; Sonier, Brigitte; Robinson, Renée; Scott, Fraser W; Cameron, D William; Lee, B Craig

    2011-08-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi, a gram-negative and heme-dependent bacterium, is the causative agent of chancroid, a genital ulcer sexually transmitted infection. Heme acquisition in H. ducreyi proceeds via a receptor mediated process in which the initial event involves binding of hemoglobin and heme to their cognate outer membrane proteins, HgbA and TdhA, respectively. Following this specific interaction, the fate of the periplasmic deposited heme is unclear. Using protein expression profiling of the H. ducreyi periplasmic proteome, a periplasmic-binding protein, termed hHbp, was identified whose expression was enhanced under heme-limited conditions. The gene encoding this protein was situated in a locus displaying genetic characteristics of an ABC transporter. The purified protein bound heme in a dose-dependent and saturable manner and this binding was specifically competitively inhibited by heme. The hhbp gene functionally complemented an Escherichia coli heme uptake mutant. Expression of the heme periplasmic-binding protein was detected in a limited survey of H. ducreyi and H. influenzae clinical strains. These results indicate that the passage of heme into the cytoplasm of H. ducreyi involves a heme dedicated ABC transporter.

  5. A Haemophilus ducreyi CpxR deletion mutant is virulent in human volunteers.

    PubMed

    Labandeira-Rey, Maria; Dodd, Dana; Fortney, Kate R; Zwickl, Beth; Katz, Barry P; Janowicz, Diane M; Spinola, Stanley M; Hansen, Eric J

    2011-06-15

    Haemophilus ducreyi 35000HP contains a homolog of the CpxRA 2-component signal transduction system, which controls the cell envelope stress response system in other gram-negative bacteria and regulates some important H. ducreyi virulence factors. A H. ducreyi cpxR mutant was compared with its parent for virulence in the human challenge model of experimental chancroid. The pustule formation rate in 5 volunteers was 33% (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.3%-65.3%) at 15 parent sites and 40% (95% CI, 18.1%-61.9%) at 15 mutant sites (P = .35). Thus, the cpxR mutant was not attenuated for virulence. Inactivation of the H. ducreyi cpxR gene did not reduce the ability of this mutant to express certain proven virulence factors, including the DsrA serum resistance protein and the LspA2 protein, which inhibits phagocytosis. These results expand our understanding of the involvement of the CpxRA system in regulating virulence expression in H. ducreyi.

  6. Virtual screening of phytochemicals to novel targets in Haemophilus ducreyi towards the treatment of Chancroid.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Pranav; Chaudhary, Ritu; Singh, Ajeet

    2014-01-01

    Conventionally, drugs are discovered by testing chemically synthesized compounds against a battery of in vivo biological screens. Information technology and Omic science enabled us for high throughput screening of compound libraries against biological targets and hits are then tested for efficacy in cells or animals. Chancroid, caused by Haemophilus ducreyi is a public health problem and has been recognized as a cofactor for Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) transmission. It facilitates HIV transmission by providing an accessible portal entry, promoting viral shedding, and recruiting macrophages as well as CD4 cells to the skin. So, there is a requirement to develop an efficient drug to combat Chancroid that can also diminish HIV infection. In-silico screening of potential inhibitors against the target may facilitate in detection of the novel lead compounds for developing an effective chemo preventive strategy against Haemophilus ducreyi. The present study has investigated the effects of approximately 1100 natural compounds that inhibit three vital enzymes viz. Phosphoenolpyruvate phosphotransferase, Acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase and Fructose 1, 6-bisphosphatase of Haemophilus ducreyi in reference to a commercial drug Rifabutin. Results reveal that the lead compound uses less energy to bind to target. The lead compound parillin has also been predicted as less immunogenic in comparison to Rifabutin. Further, better molecular dynamics, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and ADME-T properties establish it as an efficient chancroid preventer.

  7. Sialylation of lipooligosaccharides is dispensable for the virulence of Haemophilus ducreyi in humans.

    PubMed

    Spinola, Stanley M; Li, Wei; Fortney, Kate R; Janowicz, Diane M; Zwickl, Beth; Katz, Barry P; Munson, Robert S

    2012-02-01

    Sialylated glycoconjugates on the surfaces of mammalian cells play important roles in intercellular communication and self-recognition. The sialic acid preferentially expressed in human tissues is N-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac). In a process called molecular mimicry, many bacterial pathogens decorate their cell surface glycolipids with Neu5Ac. Incorporation of Neu5Ac into bacterial glycolipids promotes bacterial interactions with host cell receptors called Siglecs. These interactions affect bacterial adherence, resistance to serum killing and phagocytosis, and innate immune responses. Haemophilus ducreyi, the etiologic agent of chancroid, expresses lipooligosaccharides (LOS) that are highly sialylated. However, an H. ducreyi sialyltransferase (lst) mutant, whose LOS contain reduced levels of Neu5Ac, is fully virulent in human volunteers. Recently, a second sialyltransferase gene (Hd0053) was discovered in H. ducreyi, raising the possibility that Hd0053 compensated for the loss of lst during human infection. CMP-Neu5Ac is the obligate nucleotide sugar donor for all bacterial sialyltransferases; LOS derived from an H. ducreyi CMP-Neu5Ac synthetase (neuA) mutant has no detectable Neu5Ac. Here, we compared an H. ducreyi neuA mutant to its wild-type parent in several models of pathogenesis. In human inoculation experiments, the neuA mutant formed papules and pustules at rates that were no different than those of its parent. When grown in media with and without Neu5Ac supplementation, the neuA mutant and its parent had similar phenotypes in bactericidal, macrophage uptake, and dendritic cell activation assays. Although we cannot preclude a contribution of LOS sialylation to ulcerative disease, these data strongly suggest that sialylation of LOS is dispensable for H. ducreyi pathogenesis in humans.

  8. Carbon Storage Regulator A Contributes to the Virulence of Haemophilus ducreyi in Humans by Multiple Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Gangaiah, Dharanesh; Li, Wei; Fortney, Kate R.; Janowicz, Diane M.; Ellinger, Sheila; Zwickl, Beth; Katz, Barry P.

    2013-01-01

    The carbon storage regulator A (CsrA) controls a wide variety of bacterial processes, including metabolism, adherence, stress responses, and virulence. Haemophilus ducreyi, the causative agent of chancroid, harbors a homolog of csrA. Here, we generated an unmarked, in-frame deletion mutant of csrA to assess its contribution to H. ducreyi pathogenesis. In human inoculation experiments, the csrA mutant was partially attenuated for pustule formation compared to its parent. Deletion of csrA resulted in decreased adherence of H. ducreyi to human foreskin fibroblasts (HFF); Flp1 and Flp2, the determinants of H. ducreyi adherence to HFF cells, were downregulated in the csrA mutant. Compared to its parent, the csrA mutant had a significantly reduced ability to tolerate oxidative stress and heat shock. The enhanced sensitivity of the mutant to oxidative stress was more pronounced in bacteria grown to stationary phase compared to that in bacteria grown to mid-log phase. The csrA mutant also had a significant survival defect within human macrophages when the bacteria were grown to stationary phase but not to mid-log phase. Complementation in trans partially or fully restored the mutant phenotypes. These data suggest that CsrA contributes to virulence by multiple mechanisms and that these contributions may be more profound in bacterial cell populations that are not rapidly dividing in the human host. PMID:23230298

  9. Experimental infection of human volunteers with Haemophilus ducreyi: fifteen years of clinical data and experience.

    PubMed

    Janowicz, Diane M; Ofner, Susan; Katz, Barry P; Spinola, Stanley M

    2009-06-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi causes chancroid, which facilitates transmission of human immunodeficiency virus type 1. To better understand the biology of H. ducreyi, we developed a human inoculation model. In the present article, we describe clinical outcomes for 267 volunteers who were infected with H. ducreyi. There was a relationship between papule formation and estimated delivered dose. The outcome (either pustule formation or resolution) of infected sites for a given subject was not independent; the most important determinants of pustule formation were sex and host effects. When 41 subjects were infected a second time, their outcomes segregated toward their initial outcome, confirming the host effect. Subjects with pustules developed local symptoms that required withdrawal from the study after a mean of 8.6 days. There were 191 volunteers who had tissue biopsy performed, 173 of whom were available for follow-up analysis; 28 (16.2%) of these developed hypertrophic scars, but the model was otherwise safe. Mutant-parent trials confirmed key features in H. ducreyi pathogenesis, and the model has provided an opportunity to study differential human susceptibility to a bacterial infection.

  10. Carbon storage regulator A contributes to the virulence of Haemophilus ducreyi in humans by multiple mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Gangaiah, Dharanesh; Li, Wei; Fortney, Kate R; Janowicz, Diane M; Ellinger, Sheila; Zwickl, Beth; Katz, Barry P; Spinola, Stanley M

    2013-02-01

    The carbon storage regulator A (CsrA) controls a wide variety of bacterial processes, including metabolism, adherence, stress responses, and virulence. Haemophilus ducreyi, the causative agent of chancroid, harbors a homolog of csrA. Here, we generated an unmarked, in-frame deletion mutant of csrA to assess its contribution to H. ducreyi pathogenesis. In human inoculation experiments, the csrA mutant was partially attenuated for pustule formation compared to its parent. Deletion of csrA resulted in decreased adherence of H. ducreyi to human foreskin fibroblasts (HFF); Flp1 and Flp2, the determinants of H. ducreyi adherence to HFF cells, were downregulated in the csrA mutant. Compared to its parent, the csrA mutant had a significantly reduced ability to tolerate oxidative stress and heat shock. The enhanced sensitivity of the mutant to oxidative stress was more pronounced in bacteria grown to stationary phase compared to that in bacteria grown to mid-log phase. The csrA mutant also had a significant survival defect within human macrophages when the bacteria were grown to stationary phase but not to mid-log phase. Complementation in trans partially or fully restored the mutant phenotypes. These data suggest that CsrA contributes to virulence by multiple mechanisms and that these contributions may be more profound in bacterial cell populations that are not rapidly dividing in the human host.

  11. The Haemophilus ducreyi serum resistance antigen DsrA confers attachment to human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Cole, Leah E; Kawula, Thomas H; Toffer, Kristen L; Elkins, Christopher

    2002-11-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi is the etiologic agent of the sexually transmitted genital ulcer disease chancroid. H. ducreyi serum resistance protein A (DsrA) is a member of a family of multifunctional outer membrane proteins that are involved in resistance to killing by human serum complement. The members of this family include YadA of Yersinia species, the UspA proteins of Moraxella catarrhalis, and the Eib proteins of Escherichia coli. The role of YadA, UspA1, and UspA2H as eukaryotic cell adhesins and the function of UspA2 as a vitronectin binder led to our investigation of the cell adhesion and vitronectin binding properties of DsrA. We found that DsrA was a keratinocyte-specific adhesin as it was necessary and sufficient for attachment to HaCaT cells, a keratinocyte cell line, but was not required for attachment to HS27 cells, a fibroblast cell line. We also found that DsrA was specifically responsible for the ability of H. ducreyi to bind vitronectin. We then theorized that DsrA might use vitronectin as a bridge to bind to human cells, but this hypothesis proved to be untrue as eliminating HaCaT cell binding of vitronectin with a monoclonal antibody specific to integrin alpha(v)beta(5) did not affect the attachment of H. ducreyi to HaCaT cells. Finally, we wanted to examine the importance of keratinocyte adhesion in chancroid pathogenesis so we tested the wild-type and dsrA mutant strains of H. ducreyi in our swine models of chancroid pathogenesis. The dsrA mutant was less virulent than the wild type in both the normal and immune cell-depleted swine models of chancroid infection.

  12. Identification of a ROB-1 beta-lactamase in Haemophilus ducreyi.

    PubMed Central

    Maclean, I W; Slaney, L; Juteau, J M; Levesque, R C; Albritton, W L; Ronald, A R

    1992-01-01

    A collection of 100 clinical isolates of Haemophilus ducreyi from Thailand were all found to harbor a 5.4-kb plasmid, designated pTH126, which was shown to contain the bla ROB-1 gene. Restriction enzyme analysis and DNA-DNA hybridization studies confirmed that pTH126 was similar to the ROB-1 beta-lactamase plasmid pVM105 from Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae. In approximately one-half of the isolates, pTH126 was found together with pHD131, which mediates TEM-1 beta-lactamase production. Images PMID:1605612

  13. The Haemophilus ducreyi trimeric autotransporter adhesin DsrA protects against an experimental infection in the swine model of chancroid.

    PubMed

    Fusco, William G; Choudhary, Neelima R; Routh, Patty A; Ventevogel, Melissa S; Smith, Valerie A; Koch, Gary G; Almond, Glen W; Orndorff, Paul E; Sempowski, Gregory D; Leduc, Isabelle

    2014-06-24

    Adherence of pathogens to cellular targets is required to initiate most infections. Defining strategies that interfere with adhesion is therefore important for the development of preventative measures against infectious diseases. As an adhesin to host extracellular matrix proteins and human keratinocytes, the trimeric autotransporter adhesin DsrA, a proven virulence factor of the Gram-negative bacterium Haemophilus ducreyi, is a potential target for vaccine development. A recombinant form of the N-terminal passenger domain of DsrA from H. ducreyi class I strain 35000HP, termed rNT-DsrAI, was tested as a vaccine immunogen in the experimental swine model of H. ducreyi infection. Viable homologous H. ducreyi was not recovered from any animal receiving four doses of rNT-DsrAI administered with Freund's adjuvant at two-week intervals. Control pigs receiving adjuvant only were all infected. All animals receiving the rNT-DsrAI vaccine developed antibody endpoint titers between 3.5 and 5 logs. All rNT-DsrAI antisera bound the surface of the two H. ducreyi strains used to challenge immunized pigs. Purified anti-rNT-DsrAI IgG partially blocked binding of fibrinogen at the surface of viable H. ducreyi. Overall, immunization with the passenger domain of the trimeric autotransporter adhesin DsrA accelerated clearance of H. ducreyi in experimental lesions, possibly by interfering with fibrinogen binding.

  14. The enterobacterial common antigen-like gene cluster of Haemophilus ducreyi contributes to virulence in humans.

    PubMed

    Banks, Keith E; Fortney, Kate R; Baker, Beth; Billings, Steven D; Katz, Barry P; Munson, Robert S; Spinola, Stanley M

    2008-06-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi 35000HP contains a cluster of homologues of genes required for the synthesis of enterobacterial common antigen (ECA), suggesting that H. ducreyi may express a putative ECA-like glycoconjugate. WecA initiates the synthesis of ECA by transferring N-acetylglucosamine to undecaprenyl-P, to form lipid I. A wecA mutant (35000HPwecA) was constructed, and 5 volunteers were inoculated at 3 sites with fixed doses of 35000HP on one arm and at 3 sites with varying doses of 35000HPwecA on the other arm. 35000HPwecA caused pustules to form at 3 sites inoculated with a dose 2.5-fold higher than that of 35000HP. However, at sites inoculated with similar doses of 35000HP and 35000HPwecA, pustules developed at 46.7% (95% confidence interval [CI], 23.3%-70.0%) of 15 parent-strain sites and at 8.3% (95% CI, 0.01%-23.6%) of 12 mutant-strain sites (P = .013). Thus, the expression of wecA contributes to the ability of H. ducreyi to cause pustules in humans.

  15. Complete genome sequence of Haemophilus somnus (Histophilus somni) strain 129Pt and comparison to Haemophilus ducreyi 35000HP and Haemophilus influenzae Rd.

    PubMed

    Challacombe, Jean F; Duncan, A J; Brettin, Thomas S; Bruce, David; Chertkov, Olga; Detter, J Chris; Han, Cliff S; Misra, Monica; Richardson, Paul; Tapia, Roxanne; Thayer, Nina; Xie, Gary; Inzana, Thomas J

    2007-03-01

    Haemophilus somnus can be either a commensal of bovine mucosal surfaces or an opportunistic pathogen. Pathogenic strains of H. somnus are a significant cause of systemic disease in cattle. We report the genome sequence of H. somnus 129Pt, a nonpathogenic commensal preputial isolate, and the results of a genome-wide comparative analysis of H. somnus 129Pt, Haemophilus influenzae Rd, and Haemophilus ducreyi 35000HP. We found unique genes in H. somnus 129Pt involved in lipooligosaccharide biosynthesis, carbohydrate uptake and metabolism, cation transport, amino acid metabolism, ubiquinone and menaquinone biosynthesis, cell surface adhesion, biosynthesis of cofactors, energy metabolism, and electron transport. There were also many genes in common among the three organisms. Our comparative analyses of H. somnus 129Pt, H. influenzae Rd, and H. ducreyi 35000HP revealed similarities and differences in the numbers and compositions of genes involved in metabolism, host colonization, and persistence. These results lay a foundation for research on the host specificities and niche preferences of these organisms. Future comparisons between H. somnus 129Pt and virulent strains will aid in the development of protective strategies and vaccines to protect cattle against H. somnus disease.

  16. Draft Whole-Genome Sequence of Haemophilus ducreyi Strain AUSPNG1, Isolated from a Cutaneous Ulcer of a Child from Papua New Guinea

    PubMed Central

    Gangaiah, Dharanesh; Marinov, Georgi K.; Roberts, Sally A.; Robson, Jenny

    2016-01-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi has recently emerged as a leading cause of cutaneous ulcers in the yaws-endemic areas of Papua New Guinea and other South Pacific islands. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of the H. ducreyi strain AUSPNG1, isolated from a cutaneous ulcer of a child from Papua New Guinea. PMID:26847887

  17. Draft Whole-Genome Sequence of Haemophilus ducreyi Strain AUSPNG1, Isolated from a Cutaneous Ulcer of a Child from Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Gangaiah, Dharanesh; Marinov, Georgi K; Roberts, Sally A; Robson, Jenny; Spinola, Stanley M

    2016-02-04

    Haemophilus ducreyi has recently emerged as a leading cause of cutaneous ulcers in the yaws-endemic areas of Papua New Guinea and other South Pacific islands. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of the H. ducreyi strain AUSPNG1, isolated from a cutaneous ulcer of a child from Papua New Guinea.

  18. Differential expression of porins OmpP2A and OmpP2B of Haemophilus ducreyi.

    PubMed

    Prather, Derrick T; Bains, Manjeet; Hancock, Robert E W; Filiatrault, Melanie J; Campagnari, Anthony A

    2004-11-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi is a strict human pathogen and the causative agent of the sexually transmitted disease chancroid. The genome of the human-passaged strain of H. ducreyi (35000HP) contains two homologous genes whose protein products have estimated molecular masses of 46 and 43 kDa. A comparative analysis of the deduced amino acid sequences revealed that these proteins share 27 to 33% identity to the outer membrane protein P2 (OmpP2), a major porin of Haemophilus influenzae. Therefore, these proteins have been designated OmpP2A and OmpP2B, respectively. The detection of ompP2A and ompP2B transcripts by reverse transcriptase PCR indicated that these genes were independently transcribed in H. ducreyi 35000HP. Western blot analysis of outer membrane proteins isolated from a geographically diverse collection of H. ducreyi clinical isolates revealed that OmpP2A and OmpP2B were differentially expressed among these strains. Although PCR analysis suggested that ompP2A and ompP2B were conserved among the strains tested, the differential expression observed was due to nucleotide additions and partial gene deletions. Purified OmpP2A and OmpP2B were isolated under nondenaturing conditions, and subsequent analysis demonstrated that these two proteins exhibited porin activity. OmpP2A and OmpP2B are the first porins described for H. ducreyi.

  19. Haemophilus ducreyi Seeks Alternative Carbon Sources and Adapts to Nutrient Stress and Anaerobiosis during Experimental Infection of Human Volunteers.

    PubMed

    Gangaiah, Dharanesh; Zhang, Xinjun; Baker, Beth; Fortney, Kate R; Gao, Hongyu; Holley, Concerta L; Munson, Robert S; Liu, Yunlong; Spinola, Stanley M

    2016-05-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi causes the sexually transmitted disease chancroid in adults and cutaneous ulcers in children. In humans, H. ducreyi resides in an abscess and must adapt to a variety of stresses. Previous studies (D. Gangaiah, M. Labandeira-Rey, X. Zhang, K. R. Fortney, S. Ellinger, B. Zwickl, B. Baker, Y. Liu, D. M. Janowicz, B. P. Katz, C. A. Brautigam, R. S. Munson, Jr., E. J. Hansen, and S. M. Spinola, mBio 5:e01081-13, 2014, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/mBio.01081-13) suggested that H. ducreyi encounters growth conditions in human lesions resembling those found in stationary phase. However, how H. ducreyi transcriptionally responds to stress during human infection is unknown. Here, we determined the H. ducreyi transcriptome in biopsy specimens of human lesions and compared it to the transcriptomes of bacteria grown to mid-log, transition, and stationary phases. Multidimensional scaling showed that the in vivo transcriptome is distinct from those of in vitro growth. Compared to the inoculum (mid-log-phase bacteria), H. ducreyi harvested from pustules differentially expressed ∼93 genes, of which 62 were upregulated. The upregulated genes encode homologs of proteins involved in nutrient transport, alternative carbon pathways (l-ascorbate utilization and metabolism), growth arrest response, heat shock response, DNA recombination, and anaerobiosis. H. ducreyi upregulated few genes (hgbA, flp-tad, and lspB-lspA2) encoding virulence determinants required for human infection. Most genes regulated by CpxRA, RpoE, Hfq, (p)ppGpp, and DksA, which control the expression of virulence determinants and adaptation to a variety of stresses, were not differentially expressed in vivo, suggesting that these systems are cycling on and off during infection. Taken together, these data suggest that the in vivo transcriptome is distinct from those of in vitro growth and that adaptation to nutrient stress and anaerobiosis is crucial for H. ducreyi survival in humans.

  20. Haemophilus ducreyi LspA Proteins Are Tyrosine Phosphorylated by Macrophage-Encoded Protein Tyrosine Kinases▿

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Kaiping; Mock, Jason R.; Greenberg, Steven; van Oers, Nicolai S. C.; Hansen, Eric J.

    2008-01-01

    The LspA proteins (LspA1 and LspA2) of Haemophilus ducreyi are necessary for this pathogen to inhibit the phagocytic activity of macrophage cell lines, an event that can be correlated with a reduction in the level of active Src family protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs) in these eukaryotic cells. During studies investigating this inhibitory mechanism, it was discovered that the LspA proteins themselves were tyrosine phosphorylated after wild-type H. ducreyi cells were incubated with macrophages. LspA proteins in cell-free concentrated H. ducreyi culture supernatant fluid could also be tyrosine phosphorylated by macrophages. This ability to tyrosine phosphorylate the LspA proteins was not limited to immune cell lineages but could be accomplished by both HeLa and COS-7 cells. Kinase inhibitor studies with macrophages demonstrated that the Src family PTKs were required for this tyrosine phosphorylation activity. In silico methods and site-directed mutagenesis were used to identify EPIYG and EPVYA motifs in LspA1 that contained tyrosines that were targets for phosphorylation. A total of four tyrosines could be phosphorylated in LspA1, with LspA2 containing eight predicted tyrosine phosphorylation motifs. Purified LspA1 fusion proteins containing either the EPIYG or EPVYA motifs were shown to be phosphorylated by purified Src PTK in vitro. Macrophage lysates could also tyrosine phosphorylate the LspA proteins and an LspA1 fusion protein via a mechanism that was dependent on the presence of both divalent cations and ATP. Several motifs known to interact with or otherwise affect eukaryotic kinases were identified in the LspA proteins. PMID:18678665

  1. Haemophilus ducreyi LspA proteins are tyrosine phosphorylated by macrophage-encoded protein tyrosine kinases.

    PubMed

    Deng, Kaiping; Mock, Jason R; Greenberg, Steven; van Oers, Nicolai S C; Hansen, Eric J

    2008-10-01

    The LspA proteins (LspA1 and LspA2) of Haemophilus ducreyi are necessary for this pathogen to inhibit the phagocytic activity of macrophage cell lines, an event that can be correlated with a reduction in the level of active Src family protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs) in these eukaryotic cells. During studies investigating this inhibitory mechanism, it was discovered that the LspA proteins themselves were tyrosine phosphorylated after wild-type H. ducreyi cells were incubated with macrophages. LspA proteins in cell-free concentrated H. ducreyi culture supernatant fluid could also be tyrosine phosphorylated by macrophages. This ability to tyrosine phosphorylate the LspA proteins was not limited to immune cell lineages but could be accomplished by both HeLa and COS-7 cells. Kinase inhibitor studies with macrophages demonstrated that the Src family PTKs were required for this tyrosine phosphorylation activity. In silico methods and site-directed mutagenesis were used to identify EPIYG and EPVYA motifs in LspA1 that contained tyrosines that were targets for phosphorylation. A total of four tyrosines could be phosphorylated in LspA1, with LspA2 containing eight predicted tyrosine phosphorylation motifs. Purified LspA1 fusion proteins containing either the EPIYG or EPVYA motifs were shown to be phosphorylated by purified Src PTK in vitro. Macrophage lysates could also tyrosine phosphorylate the LspA proteins and an LspA1 fusion protein via a mechanism that was dependent on the presence of both divalent cations and ATP. Several motifs known to interact with or otherwise affect eukaryotic kinases were identified in the LspA proteins.

  2. Use of signature-tagged mutagenesis to identify virulence determinants in Haemophilus ducreyi responsible for ulcer formation.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Angela; Cameron, D William; Desjardins, Marc; Lee, B Craig

    2011-02-01

    Elucidating the molecular mechanisms responsible for chancroid, a genital ulcer disease caused by Haemophilus ducreyi, has been hampered in part by the relative genetic intractability of the organism. A whole genome screen using signature-tagged mutagenesis in the temperature-dependent rabbit model (TDRM) of H. ducreyi infection uncovered 26 mutants with a presumptive attenuated phenotype. Insertions in two previously recognized virulence determinants, hgbA and lspA1, validated this genome scanning technique. Database interrogation allowed assignment of 24 mutants to several functional classes, including transport, metabolism, DNA repair, stress response and gene regulation. The attenuated virulence for a 3 strain with a mutation in hicB was confirmed by individual infection in the TDRM. The results from this preliminary study indicate that this high throughput strategy will further the understanding of the pathogenesis of H. ducreyi infection.

  3. Identification of tandem genes involved in lipooligosaccharide expression by Haemophilus ducreyi.

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, M K; Klesney-Tait, J; Lumbley, S; Walters, K A; Joffe, A M; Radolf, J D; Hansen, E J

    1997-01-01

    A transposon insertion mutant of Haemophilus ducreyi 35000 possessing a truncated lipooligosaccharide (LOS) failed to bind the LOS-specific monoclonal antibody 3E6 (M. K. Stevens, L. D. Cope, J. D. Radolf, and E. J. Hansen, Infect. Immun. 63:2976-2982, 1995). This transposon was found to have inserted into the first of two tandem genes and also caused a deletion of chromosomal DNA upstream of this gene. These two genes, designated lbgA and lbgB, encoded predicted proteins with molecular masses of 25,788 and 40,236 Da which showed homology with proteins which function in lipopolysaccharide biosynthetic in other gram-negative bacteria. The tandem arrangement of the lbgA and lbgB genes was found to be conserved among H. ducreyi strains. Isogenic LOS mutants, constructed by the insertion of a cat cartridge into either the lbgA or the lbgB gene, expressed an LOS phenotype indistinguishable from that of the original transposon-derived LOS mutant. The wild-type LOS phenotype could be restored by complementation with the appropriate wild-type allele. These two LOS mutants proved to be as virulent as the wild-type parent strain in an animal model. A double mutant with a deletion of the lbgA and lbgB genes yielded equivocal results when its virulence was tested in an animal model. PMID:9009327

  4. Proposed second class of Haemophilus ducreyi strains show altered protein and lipooligosaccharide profiles.

    PubMed

    Post, Deborah M B; Gibson, Bradford W

    2007-09-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi is the etiologic agent of chancroid, a sexually transmitted genital ulcer disease. Previously we have shown that the protein profiles and lipooligosaccharide (LOS) structures from various strains of H. ducreyi are generally well conserved. Previous studies have demonstrated that at least one strain, 33921, has a variant protein profile and LOS structure. In this study, both the whole cell lysate and the membrane proteins from strain 33921 were further examined and compared to the prototypical strain 35000HP by 2-DE and by the 16-BAC (benzyldimethyl-n-hexadecylammonium chloride)/SDS-PAGE two-detergent system, respectively. These comparisons demonstrated that a number of the proteins that could be identified from both strains had altered positions on the gels, both in their apparent molecular weight and pI values. Strain 33921 has been suggested to be a member of a second class of strains, termed class II strains. In this study, the proteomic profiles and the LOS structures from the five potential class II strains were examined and found to be similar to strain 33921.

  5. Formaldehyde treatment increases the immunogenicity and decreases the toxicity of Haemophilus ducreyi cytolethal distending toxin.

    PubMed

    Lagergård, Teresa; Lundqvist, Annika; Wising, Catharina; Gabrielsson, Vivianne; Ahlman, Karin

    2007-05-04

    Haemophilus ducreyi cytolethal distending toxin (HdCDT) is a tripartite AB toxin, which causes DNA damage in affected cells. We investigated the effects of formaldehyde on the chemical, biological, and immunological properties of the HdCDT complex, which was purified by immobilizing the glutathione S-transferase (GST)-CdtB fusion protein, followed by binding of the CdtA and CdtC recombinant proteins. The HdCDT was treated with increasing concentrations of formaldehyde in the presence of lysine. The treatment of HdCDT at 1 and 0.1 mg protein/ml with 320 and 80 mM of formaldehyde, respectively, resulted in the complete abrogation of cytotoxic activity, loss of DNase activity, and loss of binding capacity to HeLa cells. The toxoid showed protein bands of 75-150 kDa in SDS-PAGE, composed of the three cross-linked CDT components detected by immunoblotting. Three doses of 10 microg protein/mouse of the formaldehyde-treated HdCDT elicited toxin-neutralizing antibodies at titers about 200 times higher than those elicited by the native toxin. The described methodology may be applied to produce immunogenic toxoids from other CDTs, which might be used as candidate components in vaccines against CDT-producing bacteria, including H. ducreyi.

  6. Inhibition of phagocytosis by Haemophilus ducreyi requires expression of the LspA1 and LspA2 proteins.

    PubMed

    Vakevainen, Merja; Greenberg, Steven; Hansen, Eric J

    2003-10-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi previously has been shown to inhibit the phagocytosis of both secondary targets and itself by certain cells in vitro. Wild-type H. ducreyi strain 35000HP contains two genes, lspA1 and lspA2, whose encoded protein products are predicted to be 456 and 543 kDa, respectively. An isogenic mutant of H. ducreyi 35000HP with inactivated lspA1 and lspA2 genes has been shown to exhibit substantially decreased virulence in the temperature-dependent rabbit model for chancroid. This lspA1 lspA2 mutant was tested for its ability to inhibit phagocytosis of immunoglobulin G-opsonized particles by differentiated HL-60 and U-937 cells and by J774A.1 cells. The wild-type strain H. ducreyi 35000HP readily inhibited phagocytosis, whereas the lspA1 lspA2 mutant was unable to inhibit phagocytosis. Similarly, the wild-type strain was resistant to phagocytosis, whereas the lspA1 lspA2 mutant was readily engulfed by phagocytes. This inhibitory effect of wild-type H. ducreyi on phagocytic activity was primarily associated with live bacterial cells but could also be found, under certain conditions, in concentrated H. ducreyi culture supernatant fluids that lacked detectable outer membrane fragments. Both the wild-type strain and the lspA1 lspA2 mutant attached to phagocytes at similar levels. These results indicate that the LspA1 and LspA2 proteins of H. ducreyi are involved, directly or indirectly, in the antiphagocytic activity of this pathogen, and they provide a possible explanation for the greatly reduced virulence of the lspA1 lspA2 mutant.

  7. Haemophilus ducreyi infection induces activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome in nonpolarized but not in polarized human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Katz, Barry P; Bauer, Margaret E; Spinola, Stanley M

    2013-08-01

    Recognition of microbial infection by certain intracellular pattern recognition receptors leads to the formation of a multiprotein complex termed the inflammasome. Inflammasome assembly activates caspase-1 and leads to cleavage and secretion of the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) and IL-18, which help control many bacterial pathogens. However, excessive inflammation mediated by inflammasome activation can also contribute to immunopathology. Here, we investigated whether Haemophilus ducreyi, a Gram-negative bacterium that causes the genital ulcer disease chancroid, activates inflammasomes in experimentally infected human skin and in monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM). Although H. ducreyi is predominantly extracellular during human infection, several inflammasome-related components were transcriptionally upregulated in H. ducreyi-infected skin. Infection of MDM with live, but not heat-killed, H. ducreyi induced caspase-1- and caspase-5-dependent processing and secretion of IL-1β. Blockage of H. ducreyi uptake by cytochalasin D significantly reduced the amount of secreted IL-1β. Knocking down the expression of the inflammasome components NLRP3 and ASC abolished IL-1β production. Consistent with NLRP3-dependent inflammasome activation, blocking ATP signaling, K(+) efflux, cathepsin B activity, and lysosomal acidification all inhibited IL-1β secretion. However, inhibition of the production and function of reactive oxygen species did not decrease IL-1β production. Polarization of macrophages to classically activated M1 or alternatively activated M2 cells abrogated IL-1β secretion elicited by H. ducreyi. Our study data indicate that H. ducreyi induces NLRP3 inflammasome activation via multiple mechanisms and suggest that the heterogeneity of macrophages within human lesions may modulate inflammasome activation during human infection.

  8. Haemophilus ducreyi-induced interleukin-10 promotes a mixed M1 and M2 activation program in human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Katz, Barry P; Spinola, Stanley M

    2012-12-01

    During microbial infection, macrophages are polarized to classically activated (M1) or alternatively activated (M2) cells in response to microbial components and host immune mediators. Proper polarization of macrophages is critical for bacterial clearance. To study the role of macrophage polarization during Haemophilus ducreyi infection, we analyzed a panel of macrophage surface markers in skin biopsy specimens of pustules obtained from experimentally infected volunteers. Lesional macrophages expressed markers characteristic of both M1 and M2 polarization. Monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) also expressed a mixed M1 and M2 profile of surface markers and cytokines/chemokines upon infection with H. ducreyi in vitro. Endogenous interleukin 10 (IL-10) produced by infected MDM downregulated and enhanced expression of several M1 and M2 markers, respectively. Bacterial uptake, mediated mainly by class A scavenger receptors, and activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase and phosphoinositide 3-kinase signaling pathways were required for H. ducreyi-induced IL-10 production in MDM. Compared to M1 cells, IL-10-polarized M2 cells displayed enhanced phagocytic activity against H. ducreyi and similar bacterial killing. Thus, IL-10-modulated macrophage polarization may contribute to H. ducreyi clearance during human infection.

  9. Structural basis of heme binding in the Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase from Haemophilus ducreyi.

    PubMed

    Töro, Imre; Petrutz, Cristiana; Pacello, Francesca; D'Orazio, Melania; Battistoni, Andrea; Djinović-Carugo, Kristina

    2009-02-20

    The Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase from Haemophilus ducreyi is characterized by the unique ability to bind heme at its dimer interface. Here we report the high-resolution crystal structures of this protein in the heme-loaded (holo) and heme-free (apo) forms. Heme is asymmetrically bound between the two enzyme subunits, where heme iron is coordinated by two histidine residues, His64 and His 124, provided by the two subunits. Moreover, the binding of heme to the protein is ensured by stabilizing contacts between the prosthetic group and a limited number of other residues, most of which are not present in other bacterial enzyme variants. We show that the introduction of only three mutations at the dimer interface of the enzyme from Haemophilus parainfluenzae, a closely related bacterial species, is sufficient to induce heme-binding ability by this enzyme variant. Heme binding does not alter protein activity. Moreover, the binding of the prosthetic group does not induce any significant structural perturbation at the subunit level and requires only limited local structural rearrangements that widen the cleft at the dimer interface and cause a limited shift in the relative orientation between the subunits. The presence of a preformed heme-binding pocket and the significant solvent exposure of the cofactor to the solvent are compatible with the suggested protective role of the enzyme against heme toxicity or with its involvement in heme trafficking in the periplasmic space.

  10. Phosphoethanolamine Transferase LptA in Haemophilus ducreyi Modifies Lipid A and Contributes to Human Defensin Resistance In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Trombley, Michael P.; Post, Deborah M. B.; Rinker, Sherri D.; Reinders, Lorri M.; Fortney, Kate R.; Zwickl, Beth W.; Janowicz, Diane M.; Baye, Fitsum M.; Katz, Barry P.; Spinola, Stanley M.; Bauer, Margaret E.

    2015-01-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi resists the cytotoxic effects of human antimicrobial peptides (APs), including α-defensins, β-defensins, and the cathelicidin LL-37. Resistance to LL-37, mediated by the sensitive to antimicrobial peptide (Sap) transporter, is required for H. ducreyi virulence in humans. Cationic APs are attracted to the negatively charged bacterial cell surface. In other gram-negative bacteria, modification of lipopolysaccharide or lipooligosaccharide (LOS) by the addition of positively charged moieties, such as phosphoethanolamine (PEA), confers AP resistance by means of electrostatic repulsion. H. ducreyi LOS has PEA modifications at two sites, and we identified three genes (lptA, ptdA, and ptdB) in H. ducreyi with homology to a family of bacterial PEA transferases. We generated non-polar, unmarked mutants with deletions in one, two, or all three putative PEA transferase genes. The triple mutant was significantly more susceptible to both α- and β-defensins; complementation of all three genes restored parental levels of AP resistance. Deletion of all three PEA transferase genes also resulted in a significant increase in the negativity of the mutant cell surface. Mass spectrometric analysis revealed that LptA was required for PEA modification of lipid A; PtdA and PtdB did not affect PEA modification of LOS. In human inoculation experiments, the triple mutant was as virulent as its parent strain. While this is the first identified mechanism of resistance to α-defensins in H. ducreyi, our in vivo data suggest that resistance to cathelicidin LL-37 may be more important than defensin resistance to H. ducreyi pathogenesis. PMID:25902140

  11. Phosphoethanolamine Transferase LptA in Haemophilus ducreyi Modifies Lipid A and Contributes to Human Defensin Resistance In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Trombley, Michael P; Post, Deborah M B; Rinker, Sherri D; Reinders, Lorri M; Fortney, Kate R; Zwickl, Beth W; Janowicz, Diane M; Baye, Fitsum M; Katz, Barry P; Spinola, Stanley M; Bauer, Margaret E

    2015-01-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi resists the cytotoxic effects of human antimicrobial peptides (APs), including α-defensins, β-defensins, and the cathelicidin LL-37. Resistance to LL-37, mediated by the sensitive to antimicrobial peptide (Sap) transporter, is required for H. ducreyi virulence in humans. Cationic APs are attracted to the negatively charged bacterial cell surface. In other gram-negative bacteria, modification of lipopolysaccharide or lipooligosaccharide (LOS) by the addition of positively charged moieties, such as phosphoethanolamine (PEA), confers AP resistance by means of electrostatic repulsion. H. ducreyi LOS has PEA modifications at two sites, and we identified three genes (lptA, ptdA, and ptdB) in H. ducreyi with homology to a family of bacterial PEA transferases. We generated non-polar, unmarked mutants with deletions in one, two, or all three putative PEA transferase genes. The triple mutant was significantly more susceptible to both α- and β-defensins; complementation of all three genes restored parental levels of AP resistance. Deletion of all three PEA transferase genes also resulted in a significant increase in the negativity of the mutant cell surface. Mass spectrometric analysis revealed that LptA was required for PEA modification of lipid A; PtdA and PtdB did not affect PEA modification of LOS. In human inoculation experiments, the triple mutant was as virulent as its parent strain. While this is the first identified mechanism of resistance to α-defensins in H. ducreyi, our in vivo data suggest that resistance to cathelicidin LL-37 may be more important than defensin resistance to H. ducreyi pathogenesis.

  12. Regulation of expression of the Haemophilus ducreyi LspB and LspA2 proteins by CpxR.

    PubMed

    Labandeira-Rey, Maria; Mock, Jason R; Hansen, Eric J

    2009-08-01

    The LspA1, LspA2, and LspB proteins of Haemophilus ducreyi comprise a two-partner secretion system that has been shown to be necessary for H. ducreyi to inhibit phagocytosis by immune cells in vitro. Inactivation of lspA1 resulted in increased levels of LspA2, suggesting that these two proteins are differentially controlled (C. J. Ward et al., Infect. Immun. 71:2478-2486, 2003). Expression of LspA2 but not LspA1 was shown to be both growth phase dependent and affected by the presence of fetal calf serum (FCS) in the growth medium. In addition, neither LspA1 nor LspA2 could be detected in culture supernatant fluid in the absence of FCS. DNA microarray analysis revealed that 324 H. ducreyi genes were differentially regulated after growth in the presence of FCS. Among these, the CpxRA two-component sensory transduction system was downregulated by the presence of FCS. Inactivation of cpxR resulted in increased expression of both LspB and LspA2. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed that a recombinant H. ducreyi CpxR protein bound the promoter region of the lspB-lspA2 operon. The cpxR and cpxA genes were shown to be part of an operon containing two additional genes in H. ducreyi 35000HP. This is the first description of a two-component sensory transduction system regulating a proven virulence factor of H. ducreyi.

  13. Binding of Haemophilus ducreyi to carbohydrate receptors is mediated by the 58.5-kDa GroEL heat shock protein.

    PubMed

    Pantzar, Martina; Teneberg, Susann; Lagergård, Teresa

    2006-08-01

    The bacterium Haemophilus ducreyi causes the sexually transmitted disease chancroid, which is characterized by the appearance of mucocutaneous, persistent ulcers on the external genitals. To identify carbohydrate receptors that mediate the attachment of this pathogen to host cells, we investigated the binding of 35S-methionine-labeled H. ducreyi strains to a panel of defined glycosphingolipids that were separated on thin layer chromatography plates. H. ducreyi bound to lactosylceramide, gangliotriaosylceramide, gangliotetraosylceramide, neolactotetraosylceramide, the GM3 ganglioside, and sulfatide. To elucidate the role of the surface-located 58.5-kDa GroEL heat shock protein (HSP) of H. ducreyi in attachment, we investigated the binding of purified HSP to the same panel of glycosphingolipids. Our results suggest that the 58.5-kDa GroEL HSP of H. ducreyi is responsible for the attachment of this bacterium to the majority of the tested glycosphingolipids, and thus represents a potential bacterial adhesin.

  14. Inactivation of the Haemophilus ducreyi luxS gene affects the virulence of this pathogen in human subjects.

    PubMed

    Labandeira-Rey, Maria; Janowicz, Diane M; Blick, Robert J; Fortney, Kate R; Zwickl, Beth; Katz, Barry P; Spinola, Stanley M; Hansen, Eric J

    2009-08-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi 35000HP contains a homologue of the luxS gene, which encodes an enzyme that synthesizes autoinducer 2 (AI-2) in other gram-negative bacteria. H. ducreyi 35000HP produced AI-2 that functioned in a Vibrio harveyi-based reporter system. A H. ducreyi luxS mutant was constructed by insertional inactivation of the luxS gene and lost the ability to produce AI-2. Provision of the H. ducreyi luxS gene in trans partially restored AI-2 production by the mutant. The luxS mutant was compared with its parent for virulence in the human challenge model of experimental chancroid. The pustule-formation rate in 5 volunteers was 93.3% (95% confidence interval, 81.7%-99.9%) at 15 parent sites and 60.0% (95% confidence interval, 48.3%-71.7%) at 15 mutant sites (1-tailed P < .001). Thus, the luxS mutant was partially attenuated for virulence. This is the first report of AI-2 production contributing to the pathogenesis of a genital ulcer disease.

  15. Haemophilus ducreyi Seeks Alternative Carbon Sources and Adapts to Nutrient Stress and Anaerobiosis during Experimental Infection of Human Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Gangaiah, Dharanesh; Zhang, Xinjun; Baker, Beth; Fortney, Kate R.; Gao, Hongyu; Holley, Concerta L.; Munson, Robert S.; Liu, Yunlong

    2016-01-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi causes the sexually transmitted disease chancroid in adults and cutaneous ulcers in children. In humans, H. ducreyi resides in an abscess and must adapt to a variety of stresses. Previous studies (D. Gangaiah, M. Labandeira-Rey, X. Zhang, K. R. Fortney, S. Ellinger, B. Zwickl, B. Baker, Y. Liu, D. M. Janowicz, B. P. Katz, C. A. Brautigam, R. S. Munson, Jr., E. J. Hansen, and S. M. Spinola, mBio 5:e01081-13, 2014, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/mBio.01081-13) suggested that H. ducreyi encounters growth conditions in human lesions resembling those found in stationary phase. However, how H. ducreyi transcriptionally responds to stress during human infection is unknown. Here, we determined the H. ducreyi transcriptome in biopsy specimens of human lesions and compared it to the transcriptomes of bacteria grown to mid-log, transition, and stationary phases. Multidimensional scaling showed that the in vivo transcriptome is distinct from those of in vitro growth. Compared to the inoculum (mid-log-phase bacteria), H. ducreyi harvested from pustules differentially expressed ∼93 genes, of which 62 were upregulated. The upregulated genes encode homologs of proteins involved in nutrient transport, alternative carbon pathways (l-ascorbate utilization and metabolism), growth arrest response, heat shock response, DNA recombination, and anaerobiosis. H. ducreyi upregulated few genes (hgbA, flp-tad, and lspB-lspA2) encoding virulence determinants required for human infection. Most genes regulated by CpxRA, RpoE, Hfq, (p)ppGpp, and DksA, which control the expression of virulence determinants and adaptation to a variety of stresses, were not differentially expressed in vivo, suggesting that these systems are cycling on and off during infection. Taken together, these data suggest that the in vivo transcriptome is distinct from those of in vitro growth and that adaptation to nutrient stress and anaerobiosis is crucial for H. ducreyi survival in humans. PMID:26930707

  16. Detoxified Haemophilus ducreyi cytolethal distending toxin and induction of toxin specific antibodies in the genital tract.

    PubMed

    Lundqvist, Annika; Fernandez-Rodrigues, Julia; Ahlman, Karin; Lagergård, Teresa

    2010-08-16

    Haemophilus ducreyi causes genital ulceration (chancroid), a sexually transmitted infection and still an important factor which contributes to the spread of HIV in developing countries. The bacterium produces a cytolethal distending toxin (HdCDT) causing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis/necrosis of human cells and contributes to the aggravation of ulcers. The aim of the study was to induce toxin-neutralizing antibodies in the genital tract of mice. Repeated subcutaneous (sc) immunisations with 5-10microg active HdCDT induced low levels of serum anti-HdCDT IgG without neutralizing capacity. High levels of specific IgG1 antibodies in serum and genital tract were generated after sc immunisations with 10microg formaldehyde detoxified HdCDT toxoid alone and the addition of aluminium salts or RIBI (based on the lipid A moiety) as adjuvant further increased the level of serum antibodies. A high correlation was found between elevated levels of anti-HdCDT IgG in sera, the level of neutralizing activity and the antibody level in genital tract (r=0.8). Thus, induction of high antibody levels specific to HdCDT in the genital tissue can be achieved by parenteral immunisation with the toxoid. The HdCDT toxoid can be considered as a candidate component in vaccine against chancroid.

  17. A hemoglobin-binding outer membrane protein is involved in virulence expression by Haemophilus ducreyi in an animal model.

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, M K; Porcella, S; Klesney-Tait, J; Lumbley, S; Thomas, S E; Norgard, M V; Radolf, J D; Hansen, E J

    1996-01-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi exhibits a requirement for exogenously supplied heme for aerobic growth in vitro. Nine of ten wild-type isolates of H. ducreyi were shown to contain a readily detectable hemoglobin-binding activity. Spontaneous hemoglobin-binding-negative mutants of two of these wild-type isolates lost the ability to express an outer membrane protein with an apparent molecular mass of approximately 100 kDa. Similarly, the single wild-type isolate that lacked the ability to bind hemoglobin also appeared to lack expression of this same 100-kDa protein. A monoclonal antibody (5A9) to this 100-kDa protein was used to identify a recombinant clone which possessed an H. ducreyi chromosomal fragment containing the gene encoding the 100-kDa protein; this protein was designated hemoglobin utilization protein A (HupA). Nucleotide sequence analysis of the hupA gene revealed that the predicted protein, with a calculated molecular mass of 108 kDa, was similar to TonB-dependent outer membrane proteins of other bacteria. Increasing the concentration of heme in the growth medium resulted in decreased expression of the HupA protein. Mutant analysis was used to prove that the HupA protein was essential for the utilization by H. ducreyi of both hemoglobin and hemoglobin-haptoglobin as sources of heme in vitro. In addition, it was found that an isogenic hupA mutant was less virulent than the wild-type parent strain in the temperature-dependent rabbit model for dermal lesion production by H. ducreyi. PMID:8613384

  18. DksA and (p)ppGpp have unique and overlapping contributions to Haemophilus ducreyi pathogenesis in humans.

    PubMed

    Holley, Concerta L; Zhang, Xinjun; Fortney, Kate R; Ellinger, Sheila; Johnson, Paula; Baker, Beth; Liu, Yunlong; Janowicz, Diane M; Katz, Barry P; Munson, Robert S; Spinola, Stanley M

    2015-08-01

    The (p)ppGpp-mediated stringent response is important for bacterial survival in nutrient limiting conditions. For maximal effect, (p)ppGpp interacts with the cofactor DksA, which stabilizes (p)ppGpp's interaction with RNA polymerase. We previously demonstrated that (p)ppGpp was required for the virulence of Haemophilus ducreyi in humans. Here, we constructed an H. ducreyi dksA mutant and showed it was also partially attenuated for pustule formation in human volunteers. To understand the roles of (p)ppGpp and DksA in gene regulation in H. ducreyi, we defined genes potentially altered by (p)ppGpp and DksA deficiency using transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq). In bacteria collected at stationary phase, lack of (p)ppGpp and DksA altered expression of 28% and 17% of H. ducreyi open reading frames, respectively, including genes involved in transcription, translation, and metabolism. There was significant overlap in genes differentially expressed in the (p)ppGpp mutant relative to the dksA mutant. Loss of (p)ppGpp or DksA resulted in the dysregulation of several known virulence determinants. Deletion of dksA downregulated lspB and rendered the organism less resistant to phagocytosis and increased its sensitivity to oxidative stress. Both mutants had reduced ability to attach to human foreskin fibroblasts; the defect correlated with reduced expression of the Flp adhesin proteins in the (p)ppGpp mutant but not in the dksA mutant, suggesting that DksA regulates the expression of an unknown cofactor(s) required for Flp-mediated adherence. We conclude that both (p)ppGpp and DksA serve as major regulators of H. ducreyi gene expression in stationary phase and have both overlapping and unique contributions to pathogenesis.

  19. Activation of CpxRA in Haemophilus ducreyi primarily inhibits the expression of its targets, including major virulence determinants.

    PubMed

    Gangaiah, Dharanesh; Zhang, Xinjun; Fortney, Kate R; Baker, Beth; Liu, Yunlong; Munson, Robert S; Spinola, Stanley M

    2013-08-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi causes chancroid, a genital ulcer disease that facilitates the transmission of human immunodeficiency virus type 1. In humans, H. ducreyi is surrounded by phagocytes and must adapt to a hostile environment to survive. To sense and respond to environmental cues, bacteria frequently use two-component signal transduction (2CST) systems. The only obvious 2CST system in H. ducreyi is CpxRA; CpxR is a response regulator, and CpxA is a sensor kinase. Previous studies by Hansen and coworkers showed that CpxR directly represses the expression of dsrA, the lspB-lspA2 operon, and the flp operon, which are required for virulence in humans. They further showed that CpxA functions predominantly as a phosphatase in vitro to maintain the expression of virulence determinants. Since a cpxA mutant is avirulent while a cpxR mutant is fully virulent in humans, CpxA also likely functions predominantly as a phosphatase in vivo. To better understand the role of H. ducreyi CpxRA in controlling virulence determinants, here we defined genes potentially regulated by CpxRA by using RNA-Seq. Activation of CpxR by deletion of cpxA repressed nearly 70% of its targets, including seven established virulence determinants. Inactivation of CpxR by deletion of cpxR differentially regulated few genes and increased the expression of one virulence determinant. We identified a CpxR binding motif that was enriched in downregulated but not upregulated targets. These data reinforce the hypothesis that CpxA phosphatase activity plays a critical role in controlling H. ducreyi virulence in vivo. Characterization of the downregulated genes may offer new insights into pathogenesis.

  20. Cellular interactions of the cytolethal distending toxins from Escherichia coli and Haemophilus ducreyi.

    PubMed

    Gargi, Amandeep; Tamilselvam, Batcha; Powers, Brendan; Prouty, Michael G; Lincecum, Tommie; Eshraghi, Aria; Maldonado-Arocho, Francisco J; Wilson, Brenda A; Bradley, Kenneth A; Blanke, Steven R

    2013-03-15

    The cytolethal distending toxins (CDTs) compose a subclass of intracellularly acting genotoxins produced by many Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria that disrupt the normal progression of the eukaryotic cell cycle. Here, the intoxication mechanisms of CDTs from Escherichia coli (Ec-CDT) and Haemophilus ducreyi (Hd-CDT), which share limited amino acid sequence homology, were directly compared. Ec-CDT and Hd-CDT shared comparable in vitro DNase activities of the CdtB subunits, saturable cell surface binding with comparable affinities, and the requirement for an intact Golgi complex to induce cell cycle arrest. In contrast, disruption of endosome acidification blocked Hd-CDT-mediated cell cycle arrest and toxin transport to the endoplasmic reticulum and nucleus, while having no effects on Ec-CDT. Phosphorylation of the histone protein H2AX, as well as nuclear localization, was inhibited for Hd-CdtB, but not Ec-CdtB, in cells expressing dominant negative Rab7 (T22N), suggesting that Hd-CDT, but not Ec-CDT, is trafficked through late endosomal vesicles. In support of this idea, significantly more Hd-CdtB than Ec-CdtB co-localized with Rab9, which is enriched in late endosomal compartments. Competitive binding studies suggested that Ec-CDT and Hd-CDT bind to discrete cell surface determinants. These results suggest that Ec-CDT and Hd-CDT are transported within cells by distinct pathways, possibly mediated by their interaction with different receptors at the cell surface.

  1. A (p)ppGpp-Null Mutant of Haemophilus ducreyi Is Partially Attenuated in Humans Due to Multiple Conflicting Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Holley, Concerta; Gangaiah, Dharanesh; Li, Wei; Fortney, Kate R.; Janowicz, Diane M.; Ellinger, Sheila; Zwickl, Beth; Katz, Barry P.

    2014-01-01

    (p)ppGpp responds to nutrient limitation through a global change in gene regulation patterns to increase survival. The stringent response has been implicated in the virulence of several pathogenic bacterial species. Haemophilus ducreyi, the causative agent of chancroid, has homologs of both relA and spoT, which primarily synthesize and hydrolyze (p)ppGpp in Escherichia coli. We constructed relA and relA spoT deletion mutants to assess the contribution of (p)ppGpp to H. ducreyi pathogenesis. Both the relA single mutant and the relA spoT double mutant failed to synthesize (p)ppGpp, suggesting that relA is the primary synthetase of (p)ppGpp in H. ducreyi. Compared to the parent strain, the double mutant was partially attenuated for pustule formation in human volunteers. The double mutant had several phenotypes that favored attenuation, including increased sensitivity to oxidative stress. The increased sensitivity to oxidative stress could be complemented in trans. However, the double mutant also exhibited phenotypes that favored virulence. When grown to the mid-log phase, the double mutant was significantly more resistant than its parent to being taken up by human macrophages and exhibited increased transcription of lspB, which is involved in resistance to phagocytosis. Additionally, compared to the parent, the double mutant also exhibited prolonged survival in the stationary phase. In E. coli, overexpression of DksA compensates for the loss of (p)ppGpp; the H. ducreyi double mutant expressed higher transcript levels of dksA than the parent strain. These data suggest that the partial attenuation of the double mutant is likely the net result of multiple conflicting phenotypes. PMID:24914217

  2. Identification of genes involved in the expression of atypical lipooligosaccharide structures from a second class of Haemophilus ducreyi.

    PubMed

    Post, Deborah M B; Munson, Robert S; Baker, Beth; Zhong, Huachun; Bozue, Joel A; Gibson, Bradford W

    2007-01-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi is a gram-negative bacterium that is the causative agent of chancroid. Strain 35000HP has been well characterized and is representative of the majority of H. ducreyi strains. Strain 35000HP produces a lipooligosaccharide (LOS) that contains D-glycero-D-manno-heptose in the main oligosaccharide chain extension; the lbgB gene has been shown to encode the DD-heptosyltransferase. The lbgB gene is found in a gene cluster together with the lbgA gene, which encodes for the galactosyltransferase I. These two genes are flanked by two housekeeping genes, rpmE and xthA, encoding the ribosomal protein L31 and the exonuclease III, respectively. Recently, a second group of H. ducreyi strains have been identified. Strain 33921, a representative of the class II strains, produces an LOS that lacks DD-heptose in the oligosaccharide portion of its LOS. To better understand the biosynthesis of the DD-heptose-deficient 33921 LOS, we cloned and sequenced the corresponding lbgAB genomic region from strain 33921. Similar to strain 35000HP, the 33921 genome contains xthA and rpmE. However, between these two genes we identified genes encoding two putative glycosyltransferases that were not highly homologous to the 35000HP lbgAB genes. In this study, we demonstrate that the product of one of these genes encodes a galactosyltransferase. In addition, dot blot hybridization determined that 3 of 35 strains tested had the atypical transferases present, as did 4 strains characterized as class II strains by other criterion. These data indicate that the lbgAB genes can serve as one indicator of the classification of H. ducreyi strains.

  3. A (p)ppGpp-null mutant of Haemophilus ducreyi is partially attenuated in humans due to multiple conflicting phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Holley, Concerta; Gangaiah, Dharanesh; Li, Wei; Fortney, Kate R; Janowicz, Diane M; Ellinger, Sheila; Zwickl, Beth; Katz, Barry P; Spinola, Stanley M

    2014-08-01

    (p)ppGpp responds to nutrient limitation through a global change in gene regulation patterns to increase survival. The stringent response has been implicated in the virulence of several pathogenic bacterial species. Haemophilus ducreyi, the causative agent of chancroid, has homologs of both relA and spoT, which primarily synthesize and hydrolyze (p)ppGpp in Escherichia coli. We constructed relA and relA spoT deletion mutants to assess the contribution of (p)ppGpp to H. ducreyi pathogenesis. Both the relA single mutant and the relA spoT double mutant failed to synthesize (p)ppGpp, suggesting that relA is the primary synthetase of (p)ppGpp in H. ducreyi. Compared to the parent strain, the double mutant was partially attenuated for pustule formation in human volunteers. The double mutant had several phenotypes that favored attenuation, including increased sensitivity to oxidative stress. The increased sensitivity to oxidative stress could be complemented in trans. However, the double mutant also exhibited phenotypes that favored virulence. When grown to the mid-log phase, the double mutant was significantly more resistant than its parent to being taken up by human macrophages and exhibited increased transcription of lspB, which is involved in resistance to phagocytosis. Additionally, compared to the parent, the double mutant also exhibited prolonged survival in the stationary phase. In E. coli, overexpression of DksA compensates for the loss of (p)ppGpp; the H. ducreyi double mutant expressed higher transcript levels of dksA than the parent strain. These data suggest that the partial attenuation of the double mutant is likely the net result of multiple conflicting phenotypes.

  4. The Haemophilus ducreyi Fis protein is involved in controlling expression of the lspB-lspA2 operon and other virulence factors.

    PubMed

    Labandeira-Rey, Maria; Dodd, Dana A; Brautigam, Chad A; Fortney, Kate R; Spinola, Stanley M; Hansen, Eric J

    2013-11-01

    Expression of the lspB-lspA2 operon encoding a virulence-related two-partner secretion system in Haemophilus ducreyi 35000HP is directly regulated by the CpxRA regulatory system (M. Labandeira-Rey, J. R. Mock, and E. J. Hansen, Infect. Immun. 77:3402-3411, 2009). In the present study, we show that this secretion system is also regulated by the small nucleoid-associated protein Fis. Inactivation of the H. ducreyi fis gene resulted in a reduction in expression of both the H. ducreyi LspB and LspA2 proteins. DNA microarray experiments showed that a H. ducreyi fis deletion mutant exhibited altered expression levels of genes encoding other important H. ducreyi virulence factors, including DsrA and Flp1, suggesting a possible global role for Fis in the control of virulence in this obligate human pathogen. While the H. ducreyi Fis protein has a high degree of sequence and structural similarity to the Fis proteins of other bacteria, its temporal pattern of expression was very different from that of enterobacterial Fis proteins. The use of a lacZ-based transcriptional reporter provided evidence which indicated that the H. ducreyi Fis homolog is a positive regulator of gyrB, a gene that is negatively regulated by Fis in enteric bacteria. Taken together, the Fis protein expression data and the observed regulatory effects of Fis in H. ducreyi suggest that this small DNA binding protein has a regulatory role in H. ducreyi which may differ in substantial ways from that of other Fis proteins.

  5. Toxicity and immunogenicity of purified Haemophilus ducreyi cytolethal distending toxin in a rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Wising, Catharina; Svensson, Liselott A; Ahmed, Hinda J; Sundaeus, Vivianne; Ahlman, Karin; Jonsson, Ing-Marie; Mölne, Lena; Lagergård, Teresa

    2002-08-01

    The cytolethal distending toxin of Haemophilus ducreyi (HdCDT) is a three-component toxin that induces the arrest of the mammalian cell cycle in the G2 phase. All of the individual gene products, CdtA, CdtB and CdtC, are required for toxic activity on cultured mammalian cells. The CdtB component alone exerts nuclease activity. The individual HdCDT components were purified by affinity chromatography or ion-exchange chromatography followed by gel-filtration. HdCDT was reconstituted and purified by the immobilization of a GST-CdtB fusion on a GSTrap column and the subsequent addition of cell sonicates from Escherichia coli recombinants that produced CdtA and CdtC. The purified HdCDT preparation contained all three CDT proteins, as detected by immuno-blotting, and had high cytotoxic activity (10(6)CPU/ml). Immunization of rabbits with the HdCDT complex and with the individual CdtA, CdtB and CdtC proteins elicited high titres of antibodies, as detected by ELISA. All of the immune sera had toxin-neutralizing activities. The pathological effects of the HdCDT complex were investigated in rabbits, since the proliferation of two rabbit cell lines, SIRC and RK-13, was inhibited by HdCDT. Intradermal injection of HdCDT (1, 10, 50 and 100microg protein) into naive rabbits resulted in dose-dependent skin reactions (erythema) about 24h after injection. Similar effects were not observed when the individual HdCDT proteins were injected. HdCDT injection into immune rabbits resulted in dose-dependent skin responses that were characterized by both erythema and oedema. Histological evaluation of the 24-h lesions in naive rabbits that were injected with HdCDT, revealed moderate levels of inflammatory cells, which were mainly granulocytes and macrophages, and dilatation of blood vessels. The skin reactions in HdCDT-injected immunized rabbits showed pronounced vascular changes and extensive infiltration of inflammatory cells, including eosinophils. All of the pathological changes healed

  6. Expression of Haemophilus ducreyi collagen binding outer membrane protein NcaA is required for virulence in swine and human challenge models of chancroid.

    PubMed

    Fulcher, Robert A; Cole, Leah E; Janowicz, Diane M; Toffer, Kristen L; Fortney, Kate R; Katz, Barry P; Orndorff, Paul E; Spinola, Stanley M; Kawula, Thomas H

    2006-05-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi, the etiologic agent of the sexually transmitted genital ulcer disease chancroid, has been shown to associate with dermal collagen fibers within infected skin lesions. Here we describe NcaA, a previously uncharacterized outer membrane protein that is important for H. ducreyi collagen binding and host colonization. An H. ducreyi strain lacking the ncaA gene was impaired in adherence to type I collagen but not fibronectin (plasma or cellular form) or heparin. The mutation had no effect on serum resistance or binding to HaCaT keratinocytes or human foreskin fibroblasts in vitro. Escherichia coli expressing H. ducreyi NcaA bound to type I collagen, demonstrating that NcaA is sufficient to confer collagen attachment. The importance of NcaA in H. ducreyi pathogenesis was assessed using both swine and human experimental models of chancroid. In the swine model, 20% of lesions from sites inoculated with the ncaA mutant were culture positive for H. ducreyi 7 days after inoculation, compared to 73% of wild-type-inoculated sites. The average number of CFU recovered from mutant-inoculated lesions was also significantly reduced compared to that recovered from wild-type-inoculated sites at both 2 and 7 days after inoculation. In the human challenge model, 8 of 30 sites inoculated with wild-type H. ducreyi progressed to the pustular stage, compared to 0 of 30 sites inoculated with the ncaA mutant. Together these results demonstrate that the collagen binding protein NcaA is required for H. ducreyi infection.

  7. An immunogenic, surface-exposed domain of Haemophilus ducreyi outer membrane protein HgbA is involved in hemoglobin binding.

    PubMed

    Nepluev, Igor; Afonina, Galyna; Fusco, William G; Leduc, Isabelle; Olsen, Bonnie; Temple, Brenda; Elkins, Christopher

    2009-07-01

    HgbA is the sole TonB-dependent receptor for hemoglobin (Hb) acquisition of Haemophilus ducreyi. Binding of Hb to HgbA is the initial step in heme acquisition from Hb. To better understand this step, we mutagenized hgbA by deletion of each of the 11 putative surface-exposed loops and expressed each of the mutant proteins in trans in host strain H. ducreyi FX547 hgbA. All mutant proteins were expressed, exported, and detected on the surface by anti-HgbA immunoglobulin G (IgG). Deletion of sequences in loops 5 and 7 of HgbA abolished Hb binding in two different formats. In contrast, HgbA proteins containing deletions in the other nine loops retained the ability to bind Hb. None of the clones expressing mutant proteins were able to grow on plates containing low concentrations of Hb. Previously we demonstrated in a swine model of chancroid infection that an HgbA vaccine conferred complete protection from a challenge infection. Using anti-HgbA IgG from this study and the above deletion mutants, we show that loops 4, 5, and 7 of HgbA were immunogenic and surface exposed and that IgG directed against loops 4 and 5 blocked Hb binding. Furthermore, loop 6 was cleaved by protease on intact H. ducreyi, suggesting surface exposure. These data implicate a central domain of HgbA (in respect to the primary amino acid sequence) as important in Hb binding and suggest that this region of the molecule might have potential as a subunit vaccine.

  8. A DltA mutant of Haemophilus ducreyi Is partially attenuated in its ability to cause pustules in human volunteers.

    PubMed

    Janowicz, Diane; Leduc, Isabelle; Fortney, Kate R; Katz, Barry P; Elkins, Christopher; Spinola, Stanley M

    2006-02-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi produces two outer membrane proteins, called DltA (H. ducreyi lectin A) and DsrA (H. ducreyi serum resistance A), that contribute to the ability of the organism to evade complement-mediated serum killing. In contrast to their isogenic parent strain, 35000HP, the DsrA mutant FX517 exhibits 0% survival in 50% normal human serum and the DltA mutant FX533 exhibits 23% survival. Compared to 35000HP, FX517 does not cause pustule formation in human volunteers. To test whether DltA was required for virulence in humans, seven volunteers were experimentally infected with 35000HP and FX533. Four subjects were inoculated with fixed doses of 35000HP (101 CFU or 130 CFU) at three sites on one arm and escalating doses of FX533 (range, 46 CFU to 915 CFU) at three sites on the other arm. Pustules only developed at mutant-injected sites at doses nearly twofold higher than that of the parent, suggesting that FX533 was partially attenuated. Three subjects were inoculated with similar doses of the parent (67 CFU) and mutant (104 CFU) at three sites. Pustules formed at five of nine parent sites and one of nine mutant sites. Overall, the papule and pustule formation rates for 35000HP and FX533 were similar for the trial. However, for the five subjects who received similar doses of the parent and mutant, pustules developed at 7 of 15 sites (46.7%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 16.9% to 76.5%) inoculated with the parent and at 1 of 15 (6.7%; 95% CI, 0.1% to 18.4%) sites inoculated with the mutant (P = 0.043). We concluded that the DltA mutant was attenuated in its ability to cause disease at doses similar to that of the parent.

  9. Fe-heme structure in Cu, Zn superoxide dismutase from Haemophilus ducreyi by X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    D'Angelo, Paola; Zitolo, Andrea; Pacello, Francesca; Mancini, Giordano; Proux, Olivier; Hazemann, Jean Louis; Desideri, Alessandro; Battistoni, Andrea

    2010-06-01

    We have carried out an X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) study of ferric, ferrous, CO- and NO-bound Haemophilus ducreyi Cu,ZnSOD (HdSOD) in solution to investigate the structural modifications induced by the binding of small gaseous ligands to heme in this enzyme. The combined analysis of EXAFS and XANES data has allowed us to characterize the local structure around the Fe-heme with 0.02A accuracy, revealing a heterogeneity in the distances between iron and the two histidine ligands which was not evident in the X-ray crystal structure. In addition, we have shown that the metal oxidation state does not influence the Fe-heme coordination environment, whereas the presence of the CO and NO ligands induces local structural rearrangements in the enzyme which are very similar to those already observed in other hexa-coordinated heme proteins, such as neuroglobin.

  10. Toxic activity of the CdtB component of Haemophilus ducreyi cytolethal distending toxin expressed from an adenovirus 5 vector.

    PubMed

    Wising, Catharina; Magnusson, Maria; Ahlman, Karin; Lindholm, Leif; Lagergård, Teresa

    2010-02-01

    The Haemophilus ducreyi cytolethal distending toxin (HdCDT) catalytic subunit CdtB has DNase-like activity and mediates DNA damage after its delivery into target cells. We constructed a replication-deficient adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) vector expressing CdtB and investigated the toxic properties of this vector on HeLa cells. Ad5CdtB caused loss of cell viability, morphologic changes, and cell cycle arrest, findings similar to HdCDT intoxication. This confirmed that CdtB is responsible for the toxicity of the holotoxin when expressed in cells following transduction by an adenoviral vector, and indicated a possible potential of this novel strategy in studies of activity of intracellular products and in gene therapy of cancer.

  11. Haemophilus ducreyi lipooligosaccharides induce expression of the immunosuppressive enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase via type I interferons and tumor necrosis factor alpha in human dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Katz, Barry P; Spinola, Stanley M

    2011-08-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi causes chancroid, a genital ulcer disease. In human inoculation experiments, most volunteers fail to clear the bacteria despite the infiltration of innate and adaptive immune cells to the infected sites. The immunosuppressive protein indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) is a rate-limiting enzyme in the L-tryptophan-kynurenine metabolic pathway. Tryptophan depletion and tryptophan metabolites contribute to pathogen persistence by inhibiting T cell proliferation, inducing T cell apoptosis, and promoting the expansion of FOXP3(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells. We previously found that FOXP3(+) Treg cells are enriched in experimental lesions and that H. ducreyi induced IDO transcription in dendritic cells (DC) derived from blood of infected volunteers who developed pustules. Here, we showed that enzymatically active IDO was induced in DC by H. ducreyi. Neutralizing antibodies against interferon alpha/beta receptor 2 chain (IFNAR2) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) inhibited IDO induction. Inhibitors of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) p38 and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) also inhibited IDO expression. Neither bacterial contact with nor uptake by DC was required for IDO activation. H. ducreyi culture supernatant and H. ducreyi lipooligosaccharides (LOS) induced IDO expression, which required type I interferons, TNF-α, and the three MAPK (p38, c-Jun N-terminal kinase, and extracellular signal regulated kinase) and NF-κB pathways. In addition, LOS-induced IFN-β activated the JAK-STAT pathway. Blocking the LOS/Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling pathway greatly reduced H. ducreyi-induced IDO production. These findings indicate that H. ducreyi-induced IDO expression in DC is largely mediated by LOS via type I interferon- and TNF-α-dependent mechanisms and the MAPK, NF-κB, and JAK-STAT pathways.

  12. Passive immunization with a polyclonal antiserum to the hemoglobin receptor of Haemophilus ducreyi confers protection against a homologous challenge in the experimental swine model of chancroid.

    PubMed

    Leduc, Isabelle; Fusco, William G; Choudhary, Neelima; Routh, Patty A; Cholon, Deborah M; Hobbs, Marcia M; Almond, Glen W; Orndorff, Paul E; Elkins, Christopher

    2011-08-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi, the etiologic agent of chancroid, has an obligate requirement for heme. Heme is acquired by H. ducreyi from its human host via TonB-dependent transporters expressed at its bacterial surface. Of 3 TonB-dependent transporters encoded in the genome of H. ducreyi, only the hemoglobin receptor, HgbA, is required to establish infection during the early stages of the experimental human model of chancroid. Active immunization with a native preparation of HgbA (nHgbA) confers complete protection in the experimental swine model of chancroid, using either Freund's or monophosphoryl lipid A as adjuvants. To determine if transfer of anti-nHgbA serum is sufficient to confer protection, a passive immunization experiment using pooled nHgbA antiserum was conducted in the experimental swine model of chancroid. Pigs receiving this pooled nHgbA antiserum were protected from a homologous, but not a heterologous, challenge. Passively transferred polyclonal antibodies elicited to nHgbA bound the surface of H. ducreyi and partially blocked hemoglobin binding by nHgbA, but were not bactericidal. Taken together, these data suggest that the humoral immune response to the HgbA vaccine is protective against an H. ducreyi infection, possibly by preventing acquisition of the essential nutrient heme.

  13. Characterization of Haemophilus ducreyi cdtA, cdtB, and cdtC Mutants in In Vitro and In Vivo Systems

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, David A.; Stevens, Marla K.; Latimer, Jo L.; Ward, Christine K.; Deng, Kaiping; Blick, Robert; Lumbley, Sheryl R.; Ison, Catherine A.; Hansen, Eric J.

    2001-01-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi expresses a soluble cytolethal distending toxin (CDT) that is encoded by the cdtABC gene cluster and can be detected in culture supernatant fluid by its ability to kill HeLa cells. The cdtA, cdtB, and cdtC genes of H. ducreyi were cloned independently into plasmid vectors, and their encoded proteins expressed singly or in various combinations in an Escherichia coli background. All three gene products had to be expressed in order for E. coli-derived culture supernatant fluids to demonstrate cytotoxicity for HeLa cells. Isogenic H. ducreyi cdtA and cdtB mutants were constructed and used in combination with the wild-type parent strain and a previously described H. ducreyi cdtC mutant (M. K. Stevens, J. L. Latimer, S. R. Lumbley, C. K. Ward, L. D. Cope, T. Lagergard, and E. J. Hansen, Infect. Immun. 67:3900–3908, 1999) to determine the relative contributions of the CdtA, CdtB, and CdtC proteins to CDT activity. Expression of CdtA, CdtB, and CdtC appeared necessary for H. ducreyi-derived culture supernatant fluid to exhibit cytotoxicity for HeLa cells. Whole-cell sonicates and periplasmic extracts from the cdtB and cdtC mutants had no effect on HeLa cells, whereas these same fractions from a cdtA mutant had a very modest cytotoxic effect on these same human cells. CdtA appeared to be primarily associated with the H. ducreyi cell envelope, whereas both CdtB and CdtC were present primarily in the soluble fraction from sonicated cells. Both the cdtA mutant and the cdtB mutant were found to be fully virulent in the temperature-dependent rabbit model for experimental chancroid. PMID:11500438

  14. Haemophilus ducreyi RpoE and CpxRA appear to play distinct yet complementary roles in regulation of envelope-related functions.

    PubMed

    Gangaiah, Dharanesh; Zhang, Xinjun; Baker, Beth; Fortney, Kate R; Liu, Yunlong; Munson, Robert S; Spinola, Stanley M

    2014-12-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi causes the sexually transmitted disease chancroid and a chronic limb ulceration syndrome in children. In humans, H. ducreyi is found in an abscess and overcomes a hostile environment to establish infection. To sense and respond to membrane stress, bacteria utilize two-component systems (TCSs) and extracytoplasmic function (ECF) sigma factors. We previously showed that activation of CpxRA, the only intact TCS in H. ducreyi, does not regulate homologues of envelope protein folding factors but does downregulate genes encoding envelope-localized proteins, including many virulence determinants. H. ducreyi also harbors a homologue of RpoE, which is the only ECF sigma factor in the organism. To potentially understand how H. ducreyi responds to membrane stress, here we defined RpoE-dependent genes using transcriptome sequencing (RNA-Seq). We identified 180 RpoE-dependent genes, of which 98% were upregulated; a major set of these genes encodes homologues of envelope maintenance and repair factors. We also identified and validated a putative RpoE promoter consensus sequence, which was enriched in the majority of RpoE-dependent targets. Comparison of RpoE-dependent genes to those controlled by CpxR showed that each transcription factor regulated a distinct set of genes. Given that RpoE activated a large number of genes encoding envelope maintenance and repair factors and that CpxRA represses genes encoding envelope-localized proteins, these data suggest that RpoE and CpxRA appear to play distinct yet complementary roles in regulating envelope homeostasis in H. ducreyi.

  15. Deletion of mtrC in Haemophilus ducreyi increases sensitivity to human antimicrobial peptides and activates the CpxRA regulon.

    PubMed

    Rinker, Sherri D; Trombley, Michael P; Gu, Xiaoping; Fortney, Kate R; Bauer, Margaret E

    2011-06-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi resists killing by antimicrobial peptides encountered during human infection, including cathelicidin LL-37, α-defensins, and β-defensins. In this study, we examined the role of the proton motive force-dependent multiple transferable resistance (MTR) transporter in antimicrobial peptide resistance in H. ducreyi. We found a proton motive force-dependent effect on H. ducreyi's resistance to LL-37 and β-defensin HBD-3, but not α-defensin HNP-2. Deletion of the membrane fusion protein MtrC rendered H. ducreyi more sensitive to LL-37 and human β-defensins but had relatively little effect on α-defensin resistance. The mtrC mutant 35000HPmtrC exhibited phenotypic changes in outer membrane protein profiles, colony morphology, and serum sensitivity, which were restored to wild type by trans-complementation with mtrC. Similar phenotypes were reported in a cpxA mutant; activation of the two-component CpxRA regulator was confirmed by showing transcriptional effects on CpxRA-regulated genes in 35000HPmtrC. A cpxR mutant had wild-type levels of antimicrobial peptide resistance; a cpxA mutation had little effect on defensin resistance but led to increased sensitivity to LL-37. 35000HPmtrC was more sensitive than the cpxA mutant to LL-37, indicating that MTR contributed to LL-37 resistance independent of the CpxRA regulon. The CpxRA regulon did not affect proton motive force-dependent antimicrobial peptide resistance; however, 35000HPmtrC had lost proton motive force-dependent peptide resistance, suggesting that the MTR transporter promotes proton motive force-dependent resistance to LL-37 and human β-defensins. This is the first report of a β-defensin resistance mechanism in H. ducreyi and shows that LL-37 resistance in H. ducreyi is multifactorial.

  16. Localization of the Domains of the Haemophilus ducreyi Trimeric Autotransporter DsrA Involved in Serum Resistance and Binding to the Extracellular Matrix Proteins Fibronectin and Vitronectin▿

    PubMed Central

    Leduc, Isabelle; Olsen, Bonnie; Elkins, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    Resisting the bactericidal activity of naturally occurring antibodies and complement of normal human serum is an important element in the evasion of innate immunity by bacteria. In the gram-negative mucosal pathogen Haemophilus ducreyi, serum resistance is mediated primarily by the trimeric autotransporter DsrA. DsrA also functions as an adhesin for the extracellular matrix proteins fibronectin and vitronectin and mediates attachment of H. ducreyi to keratinocytes. We sought to determine the domain(s) of the 236-residue DsrA protein required for serum resistance and extracellular matrix protein binding. A 140-amino-acid truncated protein containing only the C-terminal portion of the passenger domain and the entire translocator domain of DsrA exhibited binding to fibronectin and vitronectin and conferred serum resistance to an H. ducreyi serum-sensitive strain. A shorter DsrA construct consisting of only 128 amino acids was unable to bind to extracellular matrix proteins but was serum resistant. We concluded that neither fibronectin binding nor vitronectin binding is required for high-level serum resistance in H. ducreyi. PMID:19015257

  17. Localization of the domains of the Haemophilus ducreyi trimeric autotransporter DsrA involved in serum resistance and binding to the extracellular matrix proteins fibronectin and vitronectin.

    PubMed

    Leduc, Isabelle; Olsen, Bonnie; Elkins, Christopher

    2009-02-01

    Resisting the bactericidal activity of naturally occurring antibodies and complement of normal human serum is an important element in the evasion of innate immunity by bacteria. In the gram-negative mucosal pathogen Haemophilus ducreyi, serum resistance is mediated primarily by the trimeric autotransporter DsrA. DsrA also functions as an adhesin for the extracellular matrix proteins fibronectin and vitronectin and mediates attachment of H. ducreyi to keratinocytes. We sought to determine the domain(s) of the 236-residue DsrA protein required for serum resistance and extracellular matrix protein binding. A 140-amino-acid truncated protein containing only the C-terminal portion of the passenger domain and the entire translocator domain of DsrA exhibited binding to fibronectin and vitronectin and conferred serum resistance to an H. ducreyi serum-sensitive strain. A shorter DsrA construct consisting of only 128 amino acids was unable to bind to extracellular matrix proteins but was serum resistant. We concluded that neither fibronectin binding nor vitronectin binding is required for high-level serum resistance in H. ducreyi.

  18. Porphyrin-based compounds exert antibacterial action against the sexually transmitted pathogens Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Haemophilus ducreyi.

    PubMed

    Bozja, J; Yi, K; Shafer, W M; Stojiljkovic, I

    2004-12-01

    A series of porphyrin based compounds without (nMP) or with (MP) metals were found to have potent bactericidal action in vitro against the sexually transmitted pathogens Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Haemophilus ducreyi. nMP and MP did not show bactericidal activity against five species of lactobacilli. An MP containing gallium had the capacity to block a gonococcal infection in a murine vaginal model, indicating that its development as a topical microbicide to block sexually transmitted bacterial infections is warranted. In contrast to other bacterial species, loss of the gonococcal haemoglobin uptake system encoded by hpuB or energy supplied through the TonB-ExbB-ExbD system did not significantly affect levels of MP-susceptibility in gonococci. In contrast, mutations in gonococci that inactivate the mtrCDE-encoded efflux pump were found to enhance gonococcal susceptibility to nMPs and MPs while over-production of this efflux pump decreased levels of gonococcal susceptibility to these compounds.

  19. Comparative proteomic analysis of the Haemophilus ducreyi porin-deficient mutant 35000HP::P2AB.

    PubMed

    Davie, Jeremiah J; Campagnari, Anthony A

    2009-04-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi is an obligate human pathogen and the causative agent of the sexually transmitted, genital ulcerative disease chancroid. The genome of strain 35000HP contains two known porin proteins, OmpP2A and OmpP2B. Loss of OmpP2A and OmpP2B expression in the mutant 35000HP::P2AB resulted in no obvious growth defect or phenotype. Comparison of outer membrane profiles indicated increased expression of the 58.5-kDa chaperone, GroEL, in the porin-deficient mutant. A proteomics-based comparison resulted in the identification of 231 proteins present in membrane-associated protein samples, of which a subset of 56 proteins was differentially expressed at a level of 1.5-fold or greater in the porin-deficient strain 35000HP::P2AB relative to that in 35000HP. Twenty of the differentially expressed proteins were selected for real-time PCR, resulting in the validation of 90% of the selected subgroup. Proteins identified in these studies suggested a decreased membrane stability phenotype, which was verified by disk diffusion assay. Loss of OmpP2A and OmpP2B resulted in global protein expression changes which appear to compensate for the absence of porin expression in 35000HP::P2AB.

  20. Immunization with the Haemophilus ducreyi Hemoglobin Receptor HgbA with Adjuvant Monophosphoryl Lipid A Protects Swine from a Homologous but Not a Heterologous Challenge▿

    PubMed Central

    Fusco, William G.; Afonina, Galyna; Nepluev, Igor; Cholon, Deborah M.; Choudhary, Neelima; Routh, Patricia A.; Almond, Glenn W.; Orndorff, Paul E.; Staats, Herman; Hobbs, Marcia M.; Leduc, Isabelle; Elkins, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi, the etiological agent of chancroid, has a strict requirement for heme, which it acquires from its only natural host, humans. Previously, we showed that a vaccine preparation containing the native hemoglobin receptor HgbA purified from H. ducreyi class I strain 35000HP (nHgbAI) and administered with Freund's adjuvant provided complete protection against a homologous challenge. In the current study, we investigated whether nHgbAI dispensed with monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL), an adjuvant approved for use in humans, offered protection against a challenge with H. ducreyi strain 35000HP expressing either class I or class II HgbA (35000HPhgbAI and 35000HPhgbAII, respectively). Pigs immunized with the nHgbAI/MPL vaccine were protected against a challenge from homologous H. ducreyi strain 35000HPhgbAI but not heterologous strain 35000HPhgbAII, as evidenced by the isolation of only strain 35000HPhgbAII from nHgbAI-immunized pigs. Furthermore, histological analysis of the lesions showed striking differences between mock-immunized and nHgbAI-immunized animals challenged with strains 35000HPhgbAI but not those challenged with strain 35000HPhgbAII. Mock-immunized pigs were not protected from a challenge by either strain. The enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) activity of the nHgbAI/MPL antiserum was lower than the activity of antiserum from animals immunized with the nHgbAI/Freund's vaccine; however, anti-nHgbAI from both studies bound whole cells of 35000HPhgbAI better than 35000HPhgbAII and partially blocked hemoglobin binding to nHgbAI. In conclusion, despite eliciting lower antibody ELISA activity than the nHgbAI/Freund's, the nHgbAI/MPL vaccine provided protection against a challenge with homologous but not heterologous H. ducreyi, suggesting that a bivalent HgbA vaccine may be needed. PMID:20584974

  1. Dysregulated immune profiles for skin and dendritic cells are associated with increased host susceptibility to Haemophilus ducreyi infection in human volunteers.

    PubMed

    Humphreys, Tricia L; Li, Lang; Li, Xiaoman; Janowicz, Diane M; Fortney, Kate R; Zhao, Qianqian; Li, Wei; McClintick, Jeanette; Katz, Barry P; Wilkes, David S; Edenberg, Howard J; Spinola, Stanley M

    2007-12-01

    In experimentally infected human volunteers, the cutaneous immune response to Haemophilus ducreyi is orchestrated by serum, polymorphonuclear leukocytes, macrophages, T cells, and myeloid dendritic cells (DC). This response either leads to spontaneous resolution of infection or progresses to pustule formation, which is associated with the failure of phagocytes to ingest the organism and the presence of Th1 and regulatory T cells. In volunteers who are challenged twice, some subjects form at least one pustule twice (PP group), while others have all inoculated sites resolve twice (RR group). Here, we infected PP and RR subjects with H. ducreyi and used microarrays to profile gene expression in infected and wounded skin. The PP and RR groups shared a core response to H. ducreyi. Additional transcripts that signified effective immune function were differentially expressed in RR infected sites, while those that signified a hyperinflammatory, dysregulated response were differentially expressed in PP infected sites. To examine whether DC drove these responses, we profiled gene expression in H. ducreyi-infected and uninfected monocyte-derived DC. Both groups had a common response that was typical of a type 1 DC (DC1) response. RR DC exclusively expressed many additional transcripts indicative of DC1. PP DC exclusively expressed differentially regulated transcripts characteristic of DC1 and regulatory DC. The data suggest that DC from the PP and RR groups respond differentially to H. ducreyi. PP DC may promote a dysregulated T-cell response that contributes to phagocytic failure, while RR DC may promote a Th1 response that facilitates bacterial clearance.

  2. Immunization with the Haemophilus ducreyi hemoglobin receptor HgbA with adjuvant monophosphoryl lipid A protects swine from a homologous but not a heterologous challenge.

    PubMed

    Fusco, William G; Afonina, Galyna; Nepluev, Igor; Cholon, Deborah M; Choudhary, Neelima; Routh, Patricia A; Almond, Glenn W; Orndorff, Paul E; Staats, Herman; Hobbs, Marcia M; Leduc, Isabelle; Elkins, Christopher

    2010-09-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi, the etiological agent of chancroid, has a strict requirement for heme, which it acquires from its only natural host, humans. Previously, we showed that a vaccine preparation containing the native hemoglobin receptor HgbA purified from H. ducreyi class I strain 35000HP (nHgbAI) and administered with Freund's adjuvant provided complete protection against a homologous challenge. In the current study, we investigated whether nHgbAI dispensed with monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL), an adjuvant approved for use in humans, offered protection against a challenge with H. ducreyi strain 35000HP expressing either class I or class II HgbA (35000HPhgbAI and 35000HPhgbAII, respectively). Pigs immunized with the nHgbAI/MPL vaccine were protected against a challenge from homologous H. ducreyi strain 35000HPhgbAI but not heterologous strain 35000HPhgbAII, as evidenced by the isolation of only strain 35000HPhgbAII from nHgbAI-immunized pigs. Furthermore, histological analysis of the lesions showed striking differences between mock-immunized and nHgbAI-immunized animals challenged with strains 35000HPhgbAI but not those challenged with strain 35000HPhgbAII. Mock-immunized pigs were not protected from a challenge by either strain. The enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) activity of the nHgbAI/MPL antiserum was lower than the activity of antiserum from animals immunized with the nHgbAI/Freund's vaccine; however, anti-nHgbAI from both studies bound whole cells of 35000HPhgbAI better than 35000HPhgbAII and partially blocked hemoglobin binding to nHgbAI. In conclusion, despite eliciting lower antibody ELISA activity than the nHgbAI/Freund's, the nHgbAI/MPL vaccine provided protection against a challenge with homologous but not heterologous H. ducreyi, suggesting that a bivalent HgbA vaccine may be needed.

  3. Haemophilus ducreyi Cutaneous Ulcer Strains Diverged from Both Class I and Class II Genital Ulcer Strains: Implications for Epidemiological Studies

    PubMed Central

    Gangaiah, Dharanesh

    2016-01-01

    Background Haemophilus ducreyi has emerged as a major cause of cutaneous ulcers (CU) in yaws-endemic regions of the tropics in the South Pacific, South East Asia and Africa. H. ducreyi was once thought only to cause the genital ulcer (GU) disease chancroid; GU strains belong to 2 distinct classes, class I and class II. Using whole-genome sequencing of 4 CU strains from Samoa, 1 from Vanuatu and 1 from Papua New Guinea, we showed that CU strains diverged from the class I strain 35000HP and that one CU strain expressed β-lactamase. Recently, the Center for Disease Control and Prevention released the genomes of 11 additional CU strains from Vanuatu and Ghana; however, the evolutionary relationship of these CU strains to previously-characterized CU and GU strains is unknown. Methodology/Principal Findings We performed phylogenetic analysis of 17 CU and 10 GU strains. Class I and class II GU strains formed two distinct clades. The class I strains formed two subclades, one containing 35000HP and HD183 and the other containing the remainder of the class I strains. Twelve of the CU strains formed a subclone under the class I 35000HP subclade, while 2 CU strains formed a subclone under the other class I subclade. Unexpectedly, 3 of the CU strains formed a subclone under the class II clade. Phylogenetic analysis of dsrA-hgbA-ncaA sequences yielded a tree similar to that of whole-genome phylogenetic tree. Conclusions/Significance CU strains diverged from multiple lineages within both class I and class II GU strains. Multilocus sequence typing of dsrA-hgbA-ncaA could be reliably used for epidemiological investigation of CU and GU strains. As class II strains grow relatively poorly and are relatively more susceptible to vancomycin than class I strains, these findings have implications for methods to recover CU strains. Comparison of contemporary CU and GU isolates would help clarify the relationship between these entities. PMID:28027326

  4. Role played by CD4+FOXP3+ regulatory T Cells in suppression of host responses to Haemophilus ducreyi during experimental infection of human volunteers.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Tenner-Racz, Klara; Racz, Paul; Janowicz, Diane M; Fortney, Kate R; Katz, Barry P; Spinola, Stanley M

    2010-06-15

    Haemophilus ducreyi causes chancroid, a genital ulcer disease. Among human volunteers, the majority of experimentally infected individuals fail to clear the infection and form pustules. Here, we investigated the role played by CD4(+)FOXP3(+) regulatory T (T(reg)) cells in the formation of pustules. In pustules, there was a significant enrichment of CD4(+)FOXP3(+) T cells, compared with that in peripheral blood. The majority of lesional FOXP3(+) T cells were CD4(+), CD25(+), CD127(lo/-), and CTLA-4(+). FOXP3(+) T cells were found throughout pustules but were most abundant at their base. Significantly fewer lesional CD4(+)FOXP3(+) T cells expressed interferon gamma, compared with lesional CD4(+)FOXP3(-) effector T cells. Depletion of CD4(+)CD25(+) T cells from the peripheral blood of infected and uninfected volunteers significantly enhanced proliferation of H. ducreyi-reactive CD4(+) T cells. Our results indicate that the population of CD4(+)CD25(+)CD127(lo/-)FOXP3(+) T(reg) cells are expanded at H. ducreyi-infected sites and that these cells may play a role in suppressing the host immune response to the bacterium.

  5. The LspB protein is involved in the secretion of the LspA1 and LspA2 proteins by Haemophilus ducreyi.

    PubMed

    Ward, Christine K; Mock, Jason R; Hansen, Eric J

    2004-04-01

    The LspA1 and LspA2 proteins of Haemophilus ducreyi 35000 are two very large macromolecules that can be detected in concentrated culture supernatant fluid. Both of these proteins exhibit homology with the N-terminal region of the Bordetella pertussis filamentous hemagglutinin (FHA), which is involved in secretion of the latter macromolecule. The lspA2 open reading frame is flanked upstream by a gene, lspB, that encodes a predicted protein with homology to the B. pertussis FhaC outer membrane protein that is involved in secretion of FHA across the outer membrane. The H. ducreyi lspB gene encodes a protein with a predicted molecular mass of 66,573 Da. Reverse transcription-PCR analysis suggested that the lspB gene was transcribed together with the lspA2 gene on a single mRNA transcript. Polyclonal H. ducreyi LspB antiserum reacted with a 64-kDa antigen present in the Sarkosyl-insoluble cell envelope fraction of H. ducreyi 35000, which indicated that the LspB protein is likely an outer membrane protein. Concentrated culture supernatant fluids from H. ducreyi lspB and lspA1 lspB mutants did not contain detectable LspA1 and detectable LspA2, respectively. However, complementation of the lspB mutant with the wild-type lspB gene on a plasmid restored LspB protein expression and resulted in release of detectable amounts of the LspA1 protein into culture supernatant fluid. When evaluated in the temperature-dependent rabbit model of infection, the lspB mutant was attenuated in the ability to cause lesions and was never recovered in a viable form from lesions. These results indicated that the H. ducreyi LspB protein is involved in secretion of the LspA1 and LspA2 proteins across the outer membrane.

  6. Construction and Characterization of Haemophilus ducreyi Lipooligosaccharide (LOS) Mutants Defective in Expression of Heptosyltransferase III and β1,4-Glucosyltransferase: Identification of LOS Glycoforms Containing Lactosamine Repeats

    PubMed Central

    Filiatrault, Melanie J.; Gibson, Bradford W.; Schilling, Birgit; Sun, Shuhua; Munson, Robert S.; Campagnari, Anthony A.

    2000-01-01

    To begin to understand the role of the lipooligosaccharide (LOS) molecule in chancroid infections, we constructed mutants defective in expression of glycosyltransferase genes. Pyocin lysis and immunoscreening was used to identify a LOS mutant of Haemophilus ducreyi 35000. This mutant, HD35000R, produced a LOS molecule that lacked the monoclonal antibody 3F11 epitope and migrated with an increased mobility on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Structural studies indicated that the principal LOS glycoform contains lipid A, Kdo, and two of the three core heptose residues. HD35000R was transformed with a plasmid library of H. ducreyi 35000 DNA, and a clone producing the wild-type LOS was identified. Sequence analysis of the plasmid insert revealed one open reading frame (ORF) that encodes a protein with homology to the WaaQ (heptosyltransferase III) of Escherichia coli. A second ORF had homology to the LgtF (glucosyltransferase) of Neisseria meningitidis. Individual isogenic mutants lacking expression of the putative H. ducreyi heptosyltransferase III, the putative glucosyltransferase, and both glycosyltransferases were constructed and characterized. Each mutant was complemented with the representative wild-type genes in trans to restore expression of parental LOS and confirm the function of each enzyme. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry and SDS-PAGE analysis identified several unique LOS glycoforms containing di-, tri-, and poly-N-acetyllactosamine repeats added to the terminal region of the main LOS branch synthesized by the heptosyltransferase III mutant. These novel H. ducreyi mutants provide important tools for studying the regulation of LOS assembly and biosynthesis. PMID:10816485

  7. Activation of the CpxRA system by deletion of cpxA impairs the ability of Haemophilus ducreyi to infect humans.

    PubMed

    Spinola, Stanley M; Fortney, Kate R; Baker, Beth; Janowicz, Diane M; Zwickl, Beth; Katz, Barry P; Blick, Robert J; Munson, Robert S

    2010-09-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi must adapt to the environment of the human host to establish and maintain infection in the skin. Bacteria generally utilize stress response systems, such as the CpxRA two-component system, to adapt to hostile environments. CpxRA is the only obvious two-component system contained in the H. ducreyi genome and negatively regulates the lspB-lspA2 operon, which encodes proteins that enable the organism to resist phagocytosis. We constructed an unmarked, in-frame H. ducreyi cpxA deletion mutant, 35000HPDeltacpxA. In human inoculation experiments, 35000HPDeltacpxA formed papules at a rate and size that were significantly less than its parent and was unable to form pustules compared to the parent. CpxA usually has kinase and phosphatase activities for CpxR, and the deletion of CpxA leads to the accumulation of activated CpxR due to the loss of phosphatase activity and the ability of CpxR to accept phosphate groups from other donors. Using a reporter construct, the lspB-lspA2 promoter was downregulated in 35000HPDeltacpxA, confirming that CpxR was activated. Deletion of cpxA downregulated DsrA, the major determinant of serum resistance in the organism, causing the mutant to become serum susceptible. Complementation in trans restored parental phenotypes. 35000HPDeltacpxA is the first H. ducreyi mutant that is impaired in its ability to form both papules and pustules in humans. Since a major function of CpxRA is to control the flow of protein traffic across the periplasm, uncontrolled activation of this system likely causes dysregulated expression of multiple virulence determinants and cripples the ability of the organism to adapt to the host.

  8. Expression of the LspA1 and LspA2 proteins by Haemophilus ducreyi is required for virulence in human volunteers.

    PubMed

    Janowicz, Diane M; Fortney, Kate R; Katz, Barry P; Latimer, Jo L; Deng, Kaiping; Hansen, Eric J; Spinola, Stanley M

    2004-08-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi colocalizes with polymorphonuclear leukocytes and macrophages and evades phagocytosis during experimental infection of human volunteers. H. ducreyi contains two genes, lspA1 and lspA2, which encode predicted proteins of 456 and 543 kDa, respectively. Compared to its wild-type parent, an lspA1 lspA2 double mutant does not inhibit phagocytosis by macrophage and myelocytic cell lines in vitro and is attenuated in an experimental rabbit model of chancroid. To test whether expression of LspA1 and LspA2 was necessary for virulence in humans, six volunteers were experimentally infected. Each volunteer was inoculated with three doses (ranging from 85 to 112 CFU) of the parent (35000HP) in one arm and three doses (ranging from 60 to 822 CFU) of the mutant (35000HP Omega 12) in the other arm. The papule formation rates were 88% (95% confidence interval [95% CI], 76.8 to 99.9%) at 18 parent sites and 72% (95% CI, 44.4 to 99.9%) at 18 mutant sites (P = 0.19). However, papules were significantly smaller at mutant sites (mean size, 24.8 mm(2)) than at parent sites (mean size, 39.1 mm(2)) 24 h after inoculation (P = 0.0002). The pustule formation rates were 44% (95% CI, 5.8 to 77.6%) at parent sites and 0% (95% CI, 0 to 39.4%) at mutant sites (P = 0.009). With the caveat that biosafety regulations preclude testing of a complemented mutant in human subjects, these results indicate that expression of LspA1 and LspA2 facilitates the ability of H. ducreyi to initiate disease and to progress to pustule formation in humans.

  9. Evaluation of the repertoire of the TonB-dependent receptors of Haemophilus ducreyi for their role in virulence in humans.

    PubMed

    Leduc, Isabelle; Banks, Keith E; Fortney, Kate R; Patterson, Kristine B; Billings, Steve D; Katz, Barry P; Spinola, Stanley M; Elkins, Christopher

    2008-04-15

    Haemophilus ducreyi contains 3 TonB-dependent receptors: the hemoglobin receptor HgbA, which is required for virulence in humans; the heme receptor TdhA; and an uncharacterized conserved hypothetical protein TdX (HD0646). A double tdX/tdhA mutant (FX527) was constructed on the background of a human-passaged variant of strain 35000 (35000HP). Six volunteers were infected with 35000HP at 3 sites on one arm and with FX527 at 3 sites on the other. The pustule formation rate was 55.6% (95% confidence interval [CI], 35.7%-75.4%) at 18 parent-strain sites and 44.4% (95% CI, 15.0%-73.9%) at 18 mutant-strain sites (P = .51). Similar amounts of 35000HP and FX527 were recovered from pustules in semiquantitative culture. Thus, TdX and TdhA are not necessary for virulence, whereas HgbA is both necessary and sufficient for virulence in humans. The data suggest that hemoglobin is the sole source of heme/iron used by H. ducreyi in vivo and has implications for the potential of HgbA as a vaccine.

  10. Copper and zinc binding properties of the N-terminal histidine-rich sequence of Haemophilus ducreyi Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase.

    PubMed

    Paksi, Zoltán; Jancsó, Attila; Pacello, Francesca; Nagy, Nóra; Battistoni, Andrea; Gajda, Tamás

    2008-09-01

    The Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase (Cu,ZnSOD) isolated from Haemophilus ducreyi possesses a His-rich N-terminal metal binding domain, which has been previously proposed to play a copper(II) chaperoning role. To analyze the metal binding ability and selectivity of the histidine-rich domain we have carried out thermodynamic and solution structural analysis of the copper(II) and zinc(II) complexes of a peptide corresponding to the first 11 amino acids of the enzyme (H(2)N-HGDHMHNHDTK-OH, L). This peptide has highly versatile metal binding ability and provides one and three high affinity binding sites for zinc(II) and copper(II), respectively. In equimolar solutions the MHL complexes are dominant in the neutral pH-range with protonated lysine epsilon-amino group. As a consequence of its multidentate nature, L binds zinc and copper with extraordinary high affinity (K(D,Zn)=1.6x10(-9)M and K(D,Cu)=5.0x10(-12)M at pH 7.4) and appears as the strongest zinc(II) and copper(II) chelator between the His-rich peptides so far investigated. These K(D) values support the already proposed role of the N-terminal His-rich region of H. ducreyi Cu,ZnSOD in copper recruitment under metal starvation, and indicate a similar function in the zinc(II) uptake, too. The kinetics of copper(II) transfer from L to the active site of Cu-free N-deleted H. ducreyi Cu,ZnSOD showed significant pH and copper-to-peptide ratio dependence, indicating specific structural requirements during the metal ion transfer to the active site. Interestingly, the complex CuHL has significant superoxide dismutase like activity, which may suggest multifunctional role of the copper(II)-bound N-terminal His-rich domain of H. ducreyi Cu,ZnSOD.

  11. Experimental infection with Haemophilus ducreyi in persons who are infected with HIV does not cause local or augment systemic viral replication.

    PubMed

    Janowicz, Diane M; Tenner-Racz, Klara; Racz, Paul; Humphreys, Tricia L; Schnizlein-Bick, Carol; Fortney, Kate R; Zwickl, Beth; Katz, Barry P; Campbell, James J; Ho, David D; Spinola, Stanley M

    2007-05-15

    We infected 11 HIV-seropositive volunteers whose CD4(+) cell counts were >350 cells/ microL (7 of whom were receiving antiretrovirals) with Haemophilus ducreyi. The papule and pustule formation rates were similar to those observed in HIV-seronegative historical control subjects. No subject experienced a sustained change in CD4(+) cell count or HIV RNA level. The cellular infiltrate in biopsy samples obtained from the HIV-seropositive and HIV-seronegative subjects did not differ with respect to the percentage of leukocytes, neutrophils, macrophages, or T cells. The CD4(+):CD8(+) cell ratio in biopsy samples from the HIV-seropositive subjects was 1:3, the inverse of the ratio seen in the HIV-seronegative subjects (P<.0001). Although CD4(+) cells proliferated in lesions, in situ hybridization and reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction for HIV RNA was negative. We conclude that experimental infection in HIV-seropositive persons is clinically similar to infection in HIV-seronegative persons and does not cause local or augment systemic viral replication. Thus, prompt treatment of chancroid may abrogate increases in viral replication associated with natural disease.

  12. Expression of OmpP2A and OmpP2B is not required for pustule formation by Haemophilus ducreyi in human volunteers.

    PubMed

    Janowicz, Diane; Luke, Nicole R; Fortney, Kate R; Katz, Barry P; Campagnari, Anthony A; Spinola, Stanley M

    2006-03-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi express two porin proteins, termed OmpP2A and OmpP2B. To test whether expression of OmpP2A and OmpP2B was necessary for virulence in humans, eight volunteers were experimentally infected with the parent (35000HP) in one arm and a double OmpP2A OmpP2B mutant (35000HP::P2AB) in the other arm. The pustule formation rates were 58.3% (95% CI, 33.2-83.5%) for the parent and 41.7% (95% CI, 19.3-64.0%) for the mutant (P=0.25). Biopsy of 35000HP and 35000HP::P2AB-infected sites yielded similar amounts of bacteria in quantitative culture. These results indicate that expression of OmpP2A and OmpP2B is not necessary to initiate disease or to progress to pustule formation in humans.

  13. Immunization with the Haemophilus ducreyi trimeric autotransporter adhesin DsrA with alum, CpG or imiquimod generates a persistent humoral immune response that recognizes the bacterial surface.

    PubMed

    Samo, Melissa; Choudhary, Neelima R; Riebe, Kristina J; Shterev, Ivo; Staats, Herman F; Sempowski, Gregory D; Leduc, Isabelle

    2016-02-24

    The Ducreyi serum resistance A (DsrA) protein of Haemophilus ducreyi belongs to a large family of multifunctional outer membrane proteins termed trimeric autotransporter adhesins responsible for resistance to the bactericidal activity of human complement (serum resistance), agglutination and adhesion. The ability of DsrA to confer serum resistance and bind extracellular matrix proteins lies in its N-terminal passenger domain. We have previously reported that immunization with a recombinant form of the passenger domain of DsrA, rNT-DsrA, in complete/incomplete Freund's adjuvant, protects against a homologous challenge in swine. We present herein the results of an immunogenicity study in mice aimed at investigating the persistence, type of immune response, and the effect of immunization route and adjuvants on surrogates of protection. Our results indicate that a 20 μg dose of rNT-DsrA administered with alum elicited antisera with comparable bacterial surface reactivity to that obtained with complete/incomplete Freund's adjuvant. At that dose, high titers and bacterial surface reactivity persisted for 211 days after the first immunization. Administration of rNT-DsrA with CpG or imiquimod as adjuvants elicited a humoral response with similar quantity and quality of antibodies (Abs) as seen with Freund's adjuvant. Furthermore, intramuscular administration of rNT-DsrA elicited high-titer Abs with significantly higher reactivity to the bacterial surface than those obtained with subcutaneous immunization. All rNT-DsrA/adjuvant combinations tested, save CpG, elicited a Th2-type response. Taken together, these findings show that a 20 μg dose of rNT-DsrA administered with the adjuvants alum, CpG or imiquimod elicits high-quality Abs with reactivity to the bacterial surface that could protect against an H. ducreyi infection.

  14. Carbon monoxide binding to the heme group at the dimeric interface modulates structure and copper accessibility in the Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase from Haemophilus ducreyi: in silico and in vitro evidences.

    PubMed

    Chillemi, Giovanni; De Santis, Serena; Falconi, Mattia; Mancini, Giordano; Migliorati, Valentina; Battistoni, Andrea; Pacello, Francesca; Desideri, Alessandro; D'Angelo, Paola

    2012-01-01

    X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been jointly applied to the study of the Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase from Haemophilus ducreyi (HdSOD) in interaction with the carbon monoxide molecule. The configurational flexibility of the Fe(II)-heme group, intercalated between the two subunits, has been sampled by MD simulations and included in the XANES data analysis without optimization in the structural parameter space. Our results provide an interpretation of the observed discrepancy in the Fe-heme distances as detected by extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy and the classical XANES analysis, in which the structural parameters are optimized in a unique structure. Moreover, binding of the CO molecule to the heme induces a long range effect on the Cu,Zn active site, as evidenced by both MD simulations and in vitro experiments. MD simulation of the CO bound system, in fact, highlighted a structural rearrangement of the protein-protein hydrogen bond network in the region of the Cu,Zn active site, correlated with an increase in water accessibility at short distance from the copper atom. In line, in vitro experiments evidenced an increase of copper accessibility to a chelating agent when the CO molecule binds to the heme group, as compared to a heme deprived HdSOD. Altogether, our results support the hypothesis that the HdSOD is a heme-sensor protein, in which binding to small gaseous molecules modulates the enzyme superoxide activity as an adaptive response to the bacterial environment.

  15. New Tests for Syphilis: Rational Design of a PCR Method for Detection of Treponema pallidum in Clinical Specimens Using Unique Regions of the DNA Polymerase I Gene

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hsi; Rodes, Berta; Chen, C.-Y.; Steiner, Bret

    2001-01-01

    A sensitive and specific PCR method to detect Treponema pallidum in clinical specimens was developed. PCR primers were designed based on two unique features of the DNA polymerase I gene (polA). The first distinctive characteristic is that the region codes for a high cysteine content and has low homology with similar regions of DNA polymerase I gene from known microorganisms. The second unique feature is the presence of four insertions in the gene. PCR tests using primers designed on the basis these regions reacted with various pathogenic T. pallidum subspecies but did not react with nonpathogenic treponemal species or other spirochetes. An additional 59 species of bacteria and viruses, including those that cause genital ulcers, tested negative. This PCR method is extremely robust and sensitive. The detection limit is about 10 to 25 organisms when analyzed on gel. However, the analytic sensitivity can be increased by at least 1 log, to a detection limit of a single organism, when the ABI 310 Prism Genetic Analyzer is used to detect fluorescence-labeled amplicons. We further used this test in a clinical setting and compared the results with results from a previously reported multiplex-PCR test (for T. pallidum, Haemophilus ducreyi, and herpes simplex virus). We tested 112 genital ulcer specimens by the polA PCR, obtaining a sensitivity of 95.8% and a specificity of 95.7%. These results suggest that the polA PCR is applicable as a routine clinical diagnostic test for syphilis. PMID:11326018

  16. Stable shuttle vectors for Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Haemophilus spp. and other bacteria based on a single origin of replication.

    PubMed

    Pagotto, F J; Salimnia, H; Totten, P A; Dillon, J R

    2000-02-22

    An origin of replication (ori) was obtained from a naturally occurring beta-lactamase-producing plasmid isolated from Neisseria gonorrhoeae and used to construct shuttle vectors capable of replicating in N. gonorrhoeae, Haemophilus ducreyi, Haemophilus influenzae and Escherichia coli. Using the gonococcal proAB genes, we complemented proline-requiring N. gonorrhoeae F62 and E. coli HB101 in trans. The first demonstration of the expression of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) in either N. gonorrhoeae or H. ducreyi was shown using this vector, indicating that GFP may be a useful tool in the analysis of these organisms. This is the first report of a gonococcal vector based on a broad host range, genetically defined ori, and should facilitate the molecular analysis of gonococcal and Haemophilus genes.

  17. Transfer of plasmid-mediated ampicillin resistance from Haemophilus to Neisseria gonorrhoeae requires an intervening organism.

    PubMed

    McNicol, P J; Albritton, W L; Ronald, A R

    1986-01-01

    Haemophilus species have been implicated as the source of plasmid-mediated ampicillin resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Previous attempts to transfer conjugally the resistance plasmids from Haemophilus species to N. gonorrhoeae have met with limited success. Using both biparental and triparental mating systems, it was found that transfer will occur if the commensal Neisseria species, Neisseria cinerea, is used as a transfer intermediate. This organism stably maintains resistance plasmids of Haemophilus and facilitates transfer of these plasmids to N. gonorrhoeae, in a triparental mating system, at a transfer frequency of 10(-8). Both Haemophilus ducreyi and N. gonorrhoeae carry mobilizing plasmids capable of mediating conjugal transfer of the same resistance plasmids. However, restriction endonuclease mapping and DNA hybridization studies indicate that the mobilizing plasmids are distinctly different molecules. Limited homology is present within the transfer region of these plasmids.

  18. Haemophilus Influenzae Type b

    MedlinePlus

    ... Text Size Email Print Share Haemophilus Influenzae type b Page Content Article Body If you’re like ... may have been unfamiliar with Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) infections until your pediatrician recommended a vaccine ...

  19. About Haemophilus influenzae Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hib Vaccination Hib Vaccination Meningitis Pneumonia Sepsis About Haemophilus influenzae Disease Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir H. ... severe, such as a bloodstream infection. Types of Haemophilus influenzae Infections Infections caused by these bacteria... Causes, How ...

  20. Identification of Seven Treponema Species in Health- and Disease-Associated Dental Plaque by Nested PCR

    PubMed Central

    Willis, S. G.; Smith, K. S.; Dunn, V. L.; Gapter, L. A.; Riviere, K. H.; Riviere, G. R.

    1999-01-01

    Species-specific nested PCR was used to detect Treponema amylovorum, Treponema denticola, Treponema maltophilum, Treponema medium, Treponema pectinovorum, Treponema socranskii, and Treponema vincentii in dental plaque. Subjects with periodontitis harbored all species, but T. pectinovorum and T. vincentii were not found in plaque from disease-free subjects. PMID:9986879

  1. Identification of seven Treponema species in health- and disease-associated dental plaque by nested PCR.

    PubMed

    Willis, S G; Smith, K S; Dunn, V L; Gapter, L A; Riviere, K H; Riviere, G R

    1999-03-01

    Species-specific nested PCR was used to detect Treponema amylovorum, Treponema denticola, Treponema maltophilum, Treponema medium, Treponema pectinovorum, Treponema socranskii, and Treponema vincentii in dental plaque. Subjects with periodontitis harbored all species, but T. pectinovorum and T. vincentii were not found in plaque from disease-free subjects.

  2. Experimental infection in mice with Treponema hyodysenteriae.

    PubMed Central

    Joens, L A; Glock, R D

    1979-01-01

    Nineteen of 22 female mice (CF1 strain) inoculated intragastrically with Treponema hyodysenteriae developed cecal and colonic lesions consisting of catarrhal inflammation, edema, and occasional hemorrhage. Images PMID:489130

  3. Surface Mucopolysaccharides of Treponema pallidum

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, T. J.; Johnson, R. C.

    1979-01-01

    The viscous mucoid fluid that accumulates within syphilitic lesions may be due to breakdown of host tissue during infection, or may be synthesized by Treponema pallidum. Experiments were performed to investigate the acidic mucopolysaccharides that occur at the surface of T. pallidum (Nichols strain). These mucopolysaccharides were demonstrated by reaction with acidified bovine serum albumin and by agglutination with wheat germ agglutinin and soybean agglutinin. The polycations ruthenium red and toluidine blue influenced treponemal survival. Concentrations of both compounds at 200 μg/ml inhibited survival, whereas concentrations at 0.1μg/ml enhanced survival. The mucopolysaccharide concentration within the mucoid fluid that accumulates during intratesticular infection was determined by reaction with acidified bovine serum albumin; it ranged from 10,000 μg/ml to less than 8 μg/ml. The addition of this mucoid fluid to treponemal suspensions resulted in differing effects on T. pallidum survival. Some preparations were inhibitory, and others were stimulatory. Commercial preparations of hyaluronic acid and chondroitin sulfate at 400, 200, 100, and 50 μg/ml were detrimental to treponemal survival. The organisms exhibited pronounced clumping in the presence of the higher concentrations of hyaluronic acid. These clumps of treponemes were comprised of mucopolysaccharides as shown by acidified bovine serum albumin and toluidine blue reactions and by hyaluronidase degradation. Results are discussed in terms of the derivation and potential role of acidic mucopolysaccharides at the surface of T. pallidum. Images PMID:156696

  4. NOTES ON THE CULTIVATION OF TREPONEMA PALLIDUM

    PubMed Central

    Zinsser, Hans; Hopkins, J. G.; Gilbert, Ruth

    1915-01-01

    We consider themost importantcontribution reported in this paper the fact that Treponema pallidum can be cultivated in fluid media, without the addition of agar, together with tissues sterilized by heat. This forms an excellent method of obtaining mass cultures for luetin preparation and immunological experimentation. We may add that while the tissue varieties employed have all stongly favored the growth of the treponemata, we have noticed especially active and motile cultures when lung and suprarenal tissues were employed. PMID:19867864

  5. Genetic relationship between Treponema pallidum and Treponema pertenue, two noncultivable human pathogens.

    PubMed Central

    Miao, R M; Fieldsteel, A H

    1980-01-01

    Genetic relationships among two strains of Treponema pallidum (Nichols and KKJ) and a strain of T. pertenue were determined by measuring the degree of deoxyribonucleic acid sequence homology. The results in indicated that these three virulent, noncultivable treponemes were genetically indistinguishable. Like T. pallidum (Nichols), T. pertenue (Gauthier) had no detectable deoxyribonucleic acid sequence homology with T. phagedenis (biotype Reiter), T. refringens (biotype Noguchi), or with salmon sperm. PMID:6986367

  6. Enteropathogenicity of various isolates of Treponema hyodysenteriae.

    PubMed Central

    Kinyon, J M; Harris, D L; Glock, R D

    1977-01-01

    Isolates of Treponema hyodysenteriae from 25 geographically separated outbreaks of swine dysentery were tested for their ability to produce the disease. Clinical signs and lesions typical of acute swine dysentery were produced in 52 of 68 (75%) susceptible specific pathogen-free pigs that had been orally inoculated with pure cultures of 23 of 25 beta-hemolytic isolates. In addition, 13 weakly beta-hemolytic isolates of nondysentery origin with morphology similar to T. hyodysenteriae did not produce disease when orally inoculated into susceptible specific pathogen-free pigs. Two of these latter isolates, Puppy and B296, and one pathogenic, beta-hemolytic isolate failed to produce disease when orally inoculated into puppies. Images PMID:844908

  7. Types of Haemophilus influenzae Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... Multimedia Related Links Global Hib Vaccination Hib Vaccination Meningitis Pneumonia Sepsis Types of Haemophilus influenzae Infections Recommend ... infection, but can also cause severe illnesses like meningitis (an infection of the covering of the brain ...

  8. Inhibition of Selenium Metabolism in the Oral Pathogen Treponema denticola▿

    PubMed Central

    Jackson-Rosario, Sarah; Self, William T.

    2009-01-01

    In this report we provide evidence that the antimicrobial action of stannous salts and a gold drug, auranofin, against Treponema denticola is mediated through inhibition of the metabolism of selenium for synthesis of selenoproteins. PMID:19363113

  9. Haemophilus paragallinarum secretes metalloproteases.

    PubMed

    Rivero-García, P C; Cruz, C Vázquez; Alonso, P Sánchez; Vaca, S; Negrete-Abascal, E

    2005-10-01

    Haemophilus paragallinarum secretes metalloproteases into different culture media lacking serum. Secreted proteins, concentrated by precipitation with 70% ammonium sulphate ((NH(4))(2)SO(4)) or methanol, displayed proteolytic activity at >100 kDa molecular mass in 10% polyacrylamide gels co-polymerized with porcine gelatin (0.1%). They were active in a broad pH range (4-9); pH 7.5 being the optimum. Protease activity was inhibited by 20 mmol EDTA/L and reactivated by calcium. The proteolytic activity was heat-stable at 40, 50, and 60 degrees C, but its activity diminished at 70 degrees C or higher. Secreted proteins partially degraded chicken immunoglobulin G (IgG) and cross-reacted with a polyclonal serum against a high molecular mass protease secreted by Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae. Extracellular proteases could play a role in infectious coryza caused by H. paragallinarum.

  10. Haemophilus influenzae Disease (Including Hib) Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Haemophilus influenzae Disease (Including Hib) Note: Javascript is disabled or ... and Symptoms Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Haemophilus influenzae , including Hib, disease causes different symptoms depending on ...

  11. Occurrence of Treponema spp. in porcine skin ulcers and gingiva.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Frida; Svartström, Olov; Belák, Katinka; Fellström, Claes; Pringle, Märit

    2013-08-30

    Porcine shoulder ulcers and ear necrosis are a significant animal welfare concern and impair efficient livestock production. Although spirochetes have been detected in both types of lesions the potential role of these bacteria in lesion propagation has received little attention. The objective of this study was to investigate the occurrence of spirochetes of the genus Treponema in shoulder ulcers or ear necrosis in pigs and compare these with treponemes from porcine gingiva. Samples were collected from gingiva and necrotic ulcers in 169 pigs. Presence of spirochetes was observed in silver stained histological sections and by phase contrast microscopy in scrapings from the necrotic lesions. Additionally, PCR of the 16SrRNA-tRNA(Ile) intergenic spacer region (ISR2) was used to detect Treponema spp. in all samples. Combined analysis showed that 73% of the shoulder ulcers and 53% of the ear necroses were positive for spirochetes. Treponema spp. were detected in 9.7% of the gingival samples. Comparative DNA sequence analysis of the ISR2 sequences revealed the presence of three distinct genetic phylotypes of Treponema spp. corresponding to Treponema pedis, and as yet two unnamed phylotypes represented by GenBank sequences C1UD1 (Acc. No. AY342041) and C1BT2-8 (Acc. No. AY342046). Detection of identical ISR2 sequences from gingiva and ulcer samples indicates that oral Treponema spp. are spread from mouth to ulcer. We conclude that Treponema spp. frequently occur in shoulder ulcers and ear necrosis in pigs, and suggest a possible infection route through biting and licking.

  12. Role of Treponema denticola in periodontal diseases.

    PubMed

    Sela, M N

    2001-01-01

    Among periodontal anaerobic pathogens, the oral spirochetes, and especially Treponema denticola, have been associated with periodontal diseases such as early-onset periodontitis, necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis, and acute pericoronitis. Basic research as well as clinical evidence suggest that the prevalence of T denticola, together with other proteolytic gram-negative bacteria in high numbers in periodontal pockets, may play an important role in the progression of periodontal disease. The accumulation of these bacteria and their products in the pocket may render the surface lining periodontal cells highly susceptible to lysis and damage. T. denticola has been shown to adhere to fibroblasts and epithelial cells, as well as to extracellular matrix components present in periodontal tissues, and to produce several deleterious factors that may contribute to the virulence of the bacteria. These bacterial components include outer-sheath-associated peptidases, chymotrypsin-like and trypsin-like proteinases, hemolytic and hemagglutinating activities, adhesins that bind to matrix proteins and cells, and an outer-sheath protein with pore-forming properties. The effects of T. denticola whole cells and their products on a variety of host mucosal and immunological cells has been studied extensively (Fig. 1). The clinical data regarding the presence of T. denticola in periodontal health and disease, together with the basic research results involving the role of T. denticola factors and products in relation to periodontal diseases, are reviewed and discussed in this article.

  13. Neonatal Haemophilus influenzae infections.

    PubMed Central

    Takala, A K; Pekkanen, E; Eskola, J

    1991-01-01

    Nine cases of neonatal Haemophilus influenzae septicaemia were recorded in Finland during 1985-9; incidence was 2.8/100,000 live births, and 1.6% of all cases of neonatal septicaemia. The onset of the disease was early in all cases, ranging from 0-6 hours after delivery. Seven of the infants were preterm and three died (overall mortality 33%). H influenzae was isolated from blood in seven of the cases, and in two neonates with clinical signs of septicaemia it was found on several surface sites and the placenta. One of the eight strains of H influenzae was capsular type b and biotype I, the rest being non-typable--a distribution similar to those previously reported. Four of the uncapsulated strains were of biotype III, and three were of biotype II. None of the strains of H influenzae was of biotype IV, which has been reported to be characteristic of neonatal and genital isolates of H influenzae. All nine mothers had some sign of infection at the time of or shortly after delivery. H influenzae was isolated from five mothers: from the blood (n = 1) or from the placenta or cervix (n = 4). The use of intrauterine devices may be a possible risk factor for neonatal H influenzae infections; two of the mothers had such devices in place during their pregnancies. PMID:2025040

  14. Complete genome sequence of Treponema succinifaciens type strain (6091T)

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Cliff; Gronow, Sabine; Teshima, Hazuki; Lapidus, Alla L.; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Hammon, Nancy; Deshpande, Shweta; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Zeytun, Ahmet; Tapia, Roxanne; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Pagani, Ioanna; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Mikhailova, Natalia; Huntemann, Marcel; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie; Rohde, Manfred; Goker, Markus; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Detter, J. Chris

    2011-01-01

    Treponema succinifaciens Cwyk and Canale-Parola 1981 is of interest because this strictly anaerobic, apathogenic member of the genus Treponema oxidizes carbohydrates and couples the Embden-Meyerhof pathway via activity of a pyruvate-formate lyase to the production of acetyl-coenzyme A and formate. This feature separates this species from most other anaerob- ic spirochetes. The genome of T. succinifaciens 6091T is only the second completed and pub- lished type strain genome from the genus Treponema in the family Spirochaetaceae. The 2,897,425 bp long genome with one plasmid harbors 2,723 protein-coding and 63 RNA genes and is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  15. Distribution of protein D, an immunoglobulin D-binding protein, in Haemophilus strains.

    PubMed Central

    Akkoyunlu, M; Ruan, M; Forsgren, A

    1991-01-01

    Protein D, a novel surface protein of the bacterial species Haemophilus influenzae with specific affinity for human immunoglobulin (Ig) D was detected in all 127 H. influenzae strains studied. All strains representing different serotypes of encapsulated strains and different biotypes of nonencapsulated strains bound 125I-labeled IgD to a high degree (38 to 74%). Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and Western blot (immunoblot) analysis showed that protein D from all H. influenzae strains had the same apparent molecular weight (i.e., 42,000) and reacted with all three different anti-protein D monoclonal antibodies. By Scatchard analysis, the number of protein D residues on a nontypeable H. influenzae strain was estimated to be approximately 2,800 per organism. The equilibrium constant for the reaction between a human IgD myeloma protein and IgD was found to be 5.8 x 10(8) M-1. Also, all strains of H. haemolyticus and H. aegypticus strains tested bound IgD, 21 to 28% and 41 to 48%, respectively. In extracts of those bacteria, a 42,000-molecular-weight protein reactive with IgD and all three anti-protein D monoclonal antibodies was found. In H. parainfluenzae, H. aphrophilus, H. paraphrophilus, and Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, a 42,000-molecular-weight protein that was reactive with one to three of three anti-protein D monoclonal antibodies but not reactive with human IgD was detected with Western blot analysis. Other Haemophilus species (H. ducreyi, H. parasuis, H. parahaemolyticus, H. segnis, and H. haemoglobinophilus) did not react with human monoclonal IgD or anti-protein D antibodies. On the basis of the wide distribution of protein D among H. influenzae strains, we suggest that protein D could be a vaccine candidate. Images PMID:1900807

  16. Haemophilus infection in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Rayner, R J; Hiller, E J; Ispahani, P; Baker, M

    1990-01-01

    Twenty seven patients with cystic fibrosis under the age of 12 years and 27 matched patients with asthma were followed up in a prospective study for one year. The isolation rate of non-capsulated strains of Haemophilus influenzae from cough swabs and sputum specimens taken at routine clinic visits every two months was significantly greater in cystic fibrosis than in asthma. Haemophilus para-influenzae was equally common in both groups. During exacerbations the isolation rate of H influenzae in cystic fibrosis was significantly greater than at other times, whereas in asthma there was no significant difference. The distribution of biotypes of H influenzae and H parainfluenzae was similar in the two groups. In cystic fibrosis, biotype I was associated with exacerbations. Biotype V was more common than in previous studies, but was not associated with exacerbations. PMID:2185699

  17. Haemophilus haemolyticus Isolates Causing Clinical Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xin; Briere, Elizabeth C.; Katz, Lee S.; Cohn, Amanda C.; Clark, Thomas A.; Messonnier, Nancy E.; Mayer, Leonard W.

    2012-01-01

    We report seven cases of Haemophilus haemolyticus invasive disease detected in the United States, which were previously misidentified as nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae. All cases had different symptoms and presentations. Our study suggests that a testing scheme that includes reliable PCR assays and standard microbiological methods should be used in order to improve H. haemolyticus identification. PMID:22573587

  18. Unique lipid composition of Treponema pallidum (Nichols virulent strain).

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, H M; Yang, T K; Jenkin, H M

    1979-01-01

    The lipid composition of Treponema pallidum (Nichols virulent strain) was determined after purification of the organisms from the infected testes of corticosteroid-treated rabbits by differential centrifugation, filtration through Nuclepore membranes, and sedimentation in Hypaque density gradients. The total lipids were comprised of 32.2% neutral lipids, mainly cholesterol, and 67.8% phospholipids consisting of phosphatidylcholine (32.1%), sphingomyelin (14.8%), cardiolipin (13.0%), phosphatidylethanolamine (6.2%), phosphatidylinositol-serine (1.2%), and lysophosphatidylcholine (0.4%). Monoglycosyldiglyceride, a glycolipid comprising 25 to 50% of thetotal lipid of all Treponema previously examined, was not detected. The fatty acid composition was similar but quntitatively distinct from that of the infected testes tissue. Images PMID:381199

  19. A simplified erythromycin resistance cassette for Treponema denticola mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Goetting-Minesky, M. Paula; Fenno, J. Christopher

    2010-01-01

    The primary selectable marker for genetic studies of Treponema denticola is a hybrid gene cassette containing both ermF and ermAM (ermB) genes. ErmB functions in Escherichia coli, while ErmF has been assumed to confer resistance in T. denticola. We demonstrate here that ErmB is sufficient for erythromycin selection in T. denticola and that the native ermB promoter drives ErmB expression. PMID:20691222

  20. In vitro cultivation of Treponema pallidum: a review

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, Thomas

    1981-01-01

    In vitro cultivation of Treponema pallidum would facilitate many different aspects of syphilis research. This review summarizes developments in this field that have been published since 1975. Findings are discussed in terms of treponemes and the oxygen question, treponemal metabolism involving proteins, nucleic acids, and fatty acids, and treponemal interaction with tissue culture cells. Suggested future approaches and potential problem areas pertinent to successful cultivation are discussed. PMID:6172213

  1. The host-interacting proteins Tp0750 and Pallilysin; conservation among treponemes and restriction of proteolytic capacity to Treponema pallidum

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The spirochete Treponema pallidum is the causative agent of syphilis, a chronic, sexually transmitted bacterial infection characterized by multiple symptomatic and asymptomatic stages. Treponema pallidum is significantly more invasive than other treponemal species, being able to cross both the blood...

  2. Meningitis due to Haemophilus influenzae type f.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Marta Pessoa; Pasternak, Jacyr; Giglio, Alfredo Elias; Casagrande, Rejane Rimazza Dalberto; Troster, Eduardo Juan

    2013-12-01

    With the decline in the rate of infections caused by Haemophilus influenzae serotype b since the widespread vaccination, non-b serotypes should be considered as potential pathogenic agents in children with invasive disease younger than 5 years old. We report the case of an immunocompetent 1-year-old boy with Haemophilus influenzae type f meningitis. The agent was identified in cerebrospinal fluid and blood cultures. Serotyping was performed by tests using polyclonal sera and confirmed by polymerase chain reaction. All Haemophilus influenzae isolates associated with invasive disease should be serotyped and notified as a way to evaluate the changes and trends in serotype distribution of this disease.

  3. Molecular Subtyping of Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum in Lisbon, Portugal▿

    PubMed Central

    Castro, R.; Prieto, E.; Águas, M. J.; Manata, M. J.; Botas, J.; Martins Pereira, F.

    2009-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the reproducibility of a molecular method for the subtyping of Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum and to discriminate strains of this microorganism from strains from patients with syphilis. We studied 212 specimens from a total of 82 patients with different stages of syphilis (14 primary, 7 secondary and 61 latent syphilis). The specimens were distributed as follows: genital ulcers (n = 9), skin and mucosal lesions (n = 7), blood (n = 82), plasma (n = 82), and ear lobe scrapings (n = 32). The samples were assayed by a PCR technique to amplify a segment of the polymerase gene I (polA). Positive samples were typed on the basis of the analysis of two variable genes, tpr and arp. Sixty-two of the 90 samples positive for polA yielded typeable Treponema pallidum DNA. All skin lesions in which T. pallidum was identified (six of six [100%]) were found to contain enough DNA for typing of the organism. It was also possible to type DNA from 7/9 (77.7%) genital ulcer samples, 13/22 (59.1%) blood samples, 20/32 (62.5%) plasma samples, and 16/21 (76.2%) ear lobe scrapings. The same subtype was identified in all samples from the same patient. Five molecular subtypes (subtypes 10a, 14a, 14c, 14f, and 14g) were identified, with the most frequently found subtype being subtype 14a and the least frequently found subtype being subtype 10a. In conclusion, the subtyping technique used in this study seems to have good reproducibility. To our knowledge, subtype 10a was identified for the first time. Further studies are needed to explain the presence of this subtype in Portugal, namely, its relationship to the Treponema pallidum strains circulating in the African countries where Portuguese is spoken. PMID:19494073

  4. Multilocus sequence analysis of Treponema denticola strains of diverse origin

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The oral spirochete bacterium Treponema denticola is associated with both the incidence and severity of periodontal disease. Although the biological or phenotypic properties of a significant number of T. denticola isolates have been reported in the literature, their genetic diversity or phylogeny has never been systematically investigated. Here, we describe a multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) of 20 of the most highly studied reference strains and clinical isolates of T. denticola; which were originally isolated from subgingival plaque samples taken from subjects from China, Japan, the Netherlands, Canada and the USA. Results The sequences of the 16S ribosomal RNA gene, and 7 conserved protein-encoding genes (flaA, recA, pyrH, ppnK, dnaN, era and radC) were successfully determined for each strain. Sequence data was analyzed using a variety of bioinformatic and phylogenetic software tools. We found no evidence of positive selection or DNA recombination within the protein-encoding genes, where levels of intraspecific sequence polymorphism varied from 18.8% (flaA) to 8.9% (dnaN). Phylogenetic analysis of the concatenated protein-encoding gene sequence data (ca. 6,513 nucleotides for each strain) using Bayesian and maximum likelihood approaches indicated that the T. denticola strains were monophyletic, and formed 6 well-defined clades. All analyzed T. denticola strains appeared to have a genetic origin distinct from that of ‘Treponema vincentii’ or Treponema pallidum. No specific geographical relationships could be established; but several strains isolated from different continents appear to be closely related at the genetic level. Conclusions Our analyses indicate that previous biological and biophysical investigations have predominantly focused on a subset of T. denticola strains with a relatively narrow range of genetic diversity. Our methodology and results establish a genetic framework for the discrimination and phylogenetic analysis of T

  5. Multilocus sequence analysis of Treponema denticola strains of diverse origin.

    PubMed

    Mo, Sisu; You, Meng; Su, Yvonne C F; Lacap-Bugler, Donnabella C; Huo, Yong-biao; Smith, Gavin J D; Leung, W Keung; Watt, Rory M

    2013-02-04

    The oral spirochete bacterium Treponema denticola is associated with both the incidence and severity of periodontal disease. Although the biological or phenotypic properties of a significant number of T. denticola isolates have been reported in the literature, their genetic diversity or phylogeny has never been systematically investigated. Here, we describe a multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) of 20 of the most highly studied reference strains and clinical isolates of T. denticola; which were originally isolated from subgingival plaque samples taken from subjects from China, Japan, the Netherlands, Canada and the USA. The sequences of the 16S ribosomal RNA gene, and 7 conserved protein-encoding genes (flaA, recA, pyrH, ppnK, dnaN, era and radC) were successfully determined for each strain. Sequence data was analyzed using a variety of bioinformatic and phylogenetic software tools. We found no evidence of positive selection or DNA recombination within the protein-encoding genes, where levels of intraspecific sequence polymorphism varied from 18.8% (flaA) to 8.9% (dnaN). Phylogenetic analysis of the concatenated protein-encoding gene sequence data (ca. 6,513 nucleotides for each strain) using Bayesian and maximum likelihood approaches indicated that the T. denticola strains were monophyletic, and formed 6 well-defined clades. All analyzed T. denticola strains appeared to have a genetic origin distinct from that of 'Treponema vincentii' or Treponema pallidum. No specific geographical relationships could be established; but several strains isolated from different continents appear to be closely related at the genetic level. Our analyses indicate that previous biological and biophysical investigations have predominantly focused on a subset of T. denticola strains with a relatively narrow range of genetic diversity. Our methodology and results establish a genetic framework for the discrimination and phylogenetic analysis of T. denticola isolates, which will greatly

  6. Haemophilus haemolyticus is infrequently misidentified as Haemophilus influenzae in diagnostic specimens in Australia.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bowen; Kunde, Dale; Tristram, Stephen

    2014-12-01

    The commensal Haemophilus haemolyticus is difficult to differentiate from the respiratory pathogen Haemophilus influenzae using phenotypic tests. In a study that used molecular tests to retrospectively identify 447 phenotypically identified H. influenzae isolates from diagnostic specimens in Australia, only 7 (1.5%) H. haemolyticus were identified.

  7. Haemophilus influenzae and oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Alistair; Bakaletz, Lauren O.; Munson, Robert S.

    2012-01-01

    Haemophilus influenzae is a commensal of the human upper respiratory tract. H. influenzae can, however, move out of its commensal niche and cause multiple respiratory tract diseases. Such diseases include otitis media in young children, as well as exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), sinusitis, conjunctivitis, and bronchitis. During the course of colonization and infection, H. influenzae must withstand oxidative stress generated by multiple reactive oxygen species produced endogenously, by other co-pathogens and by host cells. H. influenzae has, therefore, evolved multiple mechanisms that protect the cell against oxygen-generated stresses. In this review, we will describe these systems relative to the well-described systems in Escherichia coli. Moreover, we will compare how H. influenzae combats the effect of oxidative stress as a necessary phenotype for its roles as both a successful commensal and pathogen. PMID:22919631

  8. Isolation of a chymotrypsinlike enzyme from Treponema denticola.

    PubMed Central

    Uitto, V J; Grenier, D; Chan, E C; McBride, B C

    1988-01-01

    A chymotrypsinlike protease with an Mr of 95,000 was extracted from Treponema denticola ATCC 35405 and was partially purified by preparative sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The proteolytic activity was detected in an electrophoretogram containing polyacrylamide that was conjugated to bovine serum albumin. A single band of activity was detected when the T. denticola extract was solubilized and electrophoresed in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate. No activity was found in extracts of Treponema vincentii. The enzyme hydrolyzed transferrin, fibrinogen, alpha 1-antitrypsin, immunoglobulin A, immunoglobulin G, gelatin, bovine serum albumin, and a synthetic peptide containing phenylalanine. It did not degrade collagen or synthetic substrates containing arginine or proline. For the hydrolysis of azocoll, the pH optimum of the enzyme was 7.5. Heating at temperatures above 50 degrees C destroyed the activity. Reducing agents and the chelators EDTA and ethylene glycol-bis(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid increased the enzyme activity, while phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride, L-1-tosylamide-2-phenylethyl chloromethyl ketone, sulfhydryl reagents, and human serum reduced activity. The ability of the enzyme to hydrolyze a number of humoral proteins suggests that it may be involved in spirochete invasiveness and tissue destruction. Images PMID:3166451

  9. Treponema pallidum Invades Intercellular Junctions of Endothelial Cell Monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, D. Denee; Navab, Mahamad; Haake, David A.; Fogelman, Alan M.; Miller, James N.; Lovett, Michael A.

    1988-05-01

    The pathogenesis of syphilis reflects invasive properties of Treponema pallidum, but the actual mode of tissue invasion is unknown. We have found two in vitro parallels of treponemal invasiveness. We tested whether motile T. pallidum could invade host cells by determining the fate of radiolabeled motile organisms added to a HeLa cell monolayer; 26% of treponemes associated with the monolayer in a trypsin-resistant niche, presumably between the monolayer and the surface to which it adhered, but did not attain intracellularity. Attachment of T. pallidum to cultured human and rabbit aortic and human umbilical vein endothelial cells was 2-fold greater than to HeLa cells. We added T. pallidum to aortic endothelial cells grown on membrane filters under conditions in which tight intercellular junctions had formed. T. pallidum was able to pass through the endothelial cell monolayers without altering tight junctions, as measured by electrical resistance. In contrast, heat-killed T. pallidum and the nonpathogen Treponema phagedenis biotype Reiter failed to penetrate the monolayer. Transmission electron micrographs of sections of the monolayer showed T. pallidum in intercellular junctions. Our in vitro observations suggest that these highly motile spirochetes may leave the circulation by invading the junctions between endothelial cells.

  10. Experimental infection with Treponema hyodysenteriae in guinea pigs.

    PubMed Central

    Joens, L A; Songer, J G; Harris, D L; Glock, R D

    1978-01-01

    Outbred and inbred (Hartley strain) guinea pigs (GP) were inoculated intragastrically with pathogenic and nonpathogenic Treponema hyodysenteriae. GP 3 to 16 weeks old received T. hyodysenteriae after a fasting period of 36 to 72 h. Infected GP with pathogenic T. hyodysenteriae developed a diarrheal and/or depressive condition, with mucus but not blood in the feces. Of 88 GP, 40 had gross lesions resembling those of swine dysentery. Lesions were limited mainly to the large intestine. TP used as controls or inoculated with nonpathogenic T. hyodysenteriae did not develop these lesions in the large intestine. These studies suggest that the GP may be used as an animal model for swine dysentery. PMID:730345

  11. Effect of glucose on Treponema denticola cell behavior.

    PubMed

    Ruby, J D; Lux, R; Shi, W; Charon, N W; Dasanayake, A

    2008-06-01

    Treponema denticola inhabits the oral subgingival environment and is part of a proteolytic benzoyl-dl-arginine-naphthylamide-positive 'red complex' associated with active periodontal disease. Spirochetes have a unique form of chemotactic motility that may contribute to their virulence. Chemotaxis is essential for efficient nutrient-directed translocation. We examined the effect of glucose on T. denticola cell velocity, expression of periplasmic flagella proteins, and chemotaxis, e.g. translocation into capillary tubes. The presence of glucose did not significantly effect T. denticola cell velocity in high viscosity conditions nor did it alter periplasmic flagella protein expression. The addition of glucose to capillary tubes resulted in greater numbers of T. denticola cells in tubes containing glucose. A non-motile mutant did not migrate into capillary tubes containing glucose. These results are consistent with a chemotactic response to glucose that is motility dependent.

  12. Description of Treponema azotonutricium sp. nov. and Treponema primitia sp. nov., the first spirochetes isolated from termite guts.

    PubMed

    Graber, Joseph R; Leadbetter, Jared R; Breznak, John A

    2004-03-01

    Long after their original discovery, termite gut spirochetes were recently isolated in pure culture for the first time. They revealed metabolic capabilities hitherto unknown in the Spirochaetes division of the Bacteria, i.e., H(2) plus CO(2) acetogenesis (J. R. Leadbetter, T. M. Schmidt, J. R. Graber, and J. A. Breznak, Science 283:686-689, 1999) and dinitrogen fixation (T. G. Lilburn, K. S. Kim, N. E. Ostrom, K. R. Byzek, J. R. Leadbetter, and J. A. Breznak, Science 292:2495-2498, 2001). However, application of specific epithets to the strains isolated (Treponema strains ZAS-1, ZAS-2, and ZAS-9) was postponed pending a more complete characterization of their phenotypic properties. Here we describe the major properties of strain ZAS-9, which is readily distinguished from strains ZAS-1 and ZAS-2 by its shorter mean cell wavelength or body pitch (1.1 versus 2.3 micro m), by its nonhomoacetogenic fermentation of carbohydrates to acetate, ethanol, H(2), and CO(2), and by 7 to 8% dissimilarity between its 16S rRNA sequence and those of ZAS-1 and ZAS-2. Strain ZAS-9 is proposed as the type strain of the new species, Treponema azotonutricium. Strains ZAS-1 and ZAS-2, which are H(2)-consuming, CO(2)-reducing homoacetogens, are proposed here to be two strains of the new species Treponema primitia. Apart from the salient differences mentioned above, the genomes of all three strains were similar in size (3,461 to 3,901 kb), in G+C content (50.0 to 51.0 mol%), and in possession of 2 copies of the gene encoding 16S rRNA (rrs). For comparison, the genome of the free-living spirochete Spirochaeta aurantia strain J1 was analyzed by the same methods and found to have a size of 3,719 kb, to contain 65.6 mol% G+C, and also to possess 2 copies of the rrs gene.

  13. Haemophilus Infections - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... español) Tagalog (Tagalog) Vietnamese (Tiếng Việt) Arabic (العربية) Haemophilus Influenzae Type b (Hib) Vaccine English (Arabic) لقاح المستدمية ... Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Armenian (Հայերեն) Haemophilus Influenzae Type b (Hib) Vaccine English Hib պատվաստանյութ - Հայերեն ( ...

  14. Culture and PCR detection of Haemophilus influenzae and Haemophilus haemolyticus in Australian Indigenous children with bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Hare, K M; Binks, M J; Grimwood, K; Chang, A B; Leach, A J; Smith-Vaughan, H

    2012-07-01

    A PCR for protein D (hpd#3) was used to differentiate nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHI) from Haemophilus haemolyticus. While 90% of nasopharyngeal specimens and 100% of lower-airway specimens from 84 Indigenous Australian children with bronchiectasis had phenotypic NTHI isolates confirmed as H. influenzae, only 39% of oropharyngeal specimens with phenotypic NTHI had H. influenzae. The nasopharynx is therefore the preferred site for NTHI colonization studies, and NTHI is confirmed as an important lower-airway pathogen.

  15. Culture and PCR Detection of Haemophilus influenzae and Haemophilus haemolyticus in Australian Indigenous Children with Bronchiectasis

    PubMed Central

    Binks, M. J.; Grimwood, K.; Chang, A. B.; Leach, A. J.; Smith-Vaughan, H.

    2012-01-01

    A PCR for protein D (hpd#3) was used to differentiate nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHI) from Haemophilus haemolyticus. While 90% of nasopharyngeal specimens and 100% of lower-airway specimens from 84 Indigenous Australian children with bronchiectasis had phenotypic NTHI isolates confirmed as H. influenzae, only 39% of oropharyngeal specimens with phenotypic NTHI had H. influenzae. The nasopharynx is therefore the preferred site for NTHI colonization studies, and NTHI is confirmed as an important lower-airway pathogen. PMID:22553240

  16. Morphological, biochemical, antigenic, and cytochemical relationships among Haemophilus somnus, Haemophilus agni, Haemophilus haemoglobinophilus, Histophilus ovis, and Actinobacillus seminis.

    PubMed Central

    Stephens, L R; Humphrey, J D; Little, P B; Barnum, D A

    1983-01-01

    Morphology, biochemical reactions, pigmentation, antigens, and cell envelope proteins were examined in 12 strains of Haemophilus somnus, Haemophilus agni, Histophilus ovis, and Actinobacillus seminis. All of the strains except A. seminis are related and are considered as a single Haemophilus-Histophilus (HH) group. In immunodiffusion tests, HH group bacteria had at least two antigens common to all members of the group, and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed that they have similar cell envelope protein profiles. A quantitatively variable yellow pigment with absorption maxima of 430 to 435 nm was present in strains of H. somnus and H. agni. The HH group did not produce catalase and grew only in air containing 10% CO2. Of 10 HH group bacteria, 9 required thiamine monophosphate for growth. A. seminis was distinguished from the HH group by its lack of yellow pigment, production of catalase, growth in air, lack of a thiamine monophosphate requirement, and different cell envelope protein profile. In gel immunodiffusion tests, A. seminis antigens produced two lines of partial identity with the HH group when antiserum against H. somnus was used. Reference strains of Haemophilus influenzae, Actinobacillus lignieresii, and Haemophilus haemoglobinophilus were compared with the test strains. In immunodiffusion tests, a single antigen was found to be common to H. haemoglobinophilus, A. seminis, and the HH group. No similarities between any of the test strains and H. influenzae or A. lignieresii were noted. The close relationship of H. somnus, H. agni, and Histophilus ovis suggests that these unofficially named bacteria may belong to a single taxon. Images PMID:6408118

  17. Genome sequence of Haemophilus parasuis strain 29755

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Haemophilus parasuis is a member of the family Pasteurellaceae and is the etiologic agent of Glasser's disease in pigs, a systemic syndrome associated with only a subset of isolates. The genetic basis for virulence and systemic spread of particular H. parasuis isolates is currently unknown. Strain 2...

  18. Nicotinamide ribosyl uptake mutants in Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed

    Herbert, Mark; Sauer, Elizabeta; Smethurst, Graeme; Kraiss, Anita; Hilpert, Anna-Karina; Reidl, Joachim

    2003-09-01

    The gene for the nicotinamide riboside (NR) transporter (pnuC) was identified in Haemophilus influenzae. A pnuC mutant had only residual NR uptake and could survive in vitro with high concentrations of NR, but could not survive in vivo. PnuC may represent a target for the development of inhibitors for preventing H. influenzae disease.

  19. Septic Arthritis Caused by Noncapsulated Haemophilus influenzae

    PubMed Central

    Le Quellec, Sandra; Gaillot, Olivier; Chotel, Franck; Freydière, Anne-Marie; Laurent, Frédéric; Vandenesch, François

    2013-01-01

    Since the introduction of type b Haemophilus influenzae vaccination, noncapsulated H. influenzae has become responsible for most cases of invasive H. influenzae diseases. In our two cases of septic arthritis, we isolated strains with β-lactamase-positive amoxicillin-clavulanate resistance (BLPACR). Thus, the increasing prevalence of BLPACR should be taken into account when empirical therapy is chosen for septic arthritis. PMID:23515545

  20. Use of Monoclonal Antibodies to Enumerate Spirochetes and Identify Treponema denticola in Dental Plaque of Children, Adolescents and Young Adults,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-01-01

    ANTIBODIES TO ENUMERATE SPIROCHETES AND IDENTIFY TREPONEMA DENTICOLA IN DENTAL PLAQUE OF CHILDREN, ADOLESCENTS AND YOUNG ADULTS S. L. BARRON G. R...TREPONEMA DENTICOLA IN DENTAL PLAQUE OF CHILDREN, ADOLESCENTS AND YOUNG ADULTS S. L. BARRON G. R. RIVIERE L. G. SIMONSON S. A. LUKEHART D. E. TIRA D. W...enumerate spirochetes and identify Treponema denticola o . in dental plaque of children, adolescents and young adults. ’................. Oral Microbiol

  1. Phenotypic and Genotypic Heterogeneity among Cultivable Pathogen-Related Oral Spirochetes and Treponema vincentii

    PubMed Central

    Riviere, G. R.; Smith, K. S.; Willis, S. G.; Riviere, K. H.

    1999-01-01

    Recent findings challenge the assumption that pathogen-related oral spirochetes (PROS) are related to Treponema pallidum. Treponema vincentii, grown in OMIZ-Pat media, cross-reacted with monoclonal antibody H9-2 against T. pallidum, and cultivable PROS had 16S rRNA gene sequences similar to those of T. vincentii (C.-B. Choi, C. Wyss, and U. B. Göbel. J. Clin. Microbiol. 34:1922–1925, 1996). Aims of the present study were to determine whether antigen phenotypes of oral treponemas were influenced by growth conditions and to evaluate the genetic relatedness of cultivable PROS to T. pallidum and T. vincentii. Results show that three T. pallidum monoclonal antibodies (H9-1, H9-2, and F5) cross-reacted with whole cells from four Treponema species grown in modified OMIZ-Pat medium, but not with treponemas grown in NOS medium. Only H9-2 reacted in immunoblots with reduced proteins from cultivable PROS and T. vincentii. Three of five PROS isolates were amplified by T. vincentii-specific PCR, and one was amplified by Treponema medium-specific PCR. None were amplified by T. pallidum-specific PCR. Three of five PROS isolates had 16S ribosomal DNA restriction fragment length polymorphism patterns identical to that of T. vincentii, and the patterns of two isolates resembled that of T. medium. Arbitrarily primed-PCR profiles from whole genomic DNA were distinct among five PROS isolates and two T. vincentii strains. Thus, PROS isolates represent a heterogeneous group of treponemas that share some 16S rRNA gene sequences with T. vincentii and T. medium, but not with T. pallidum. It is proposed that the PROS nomenclature be dropped. PMID:10523573

  2. Identification of a fliG homologue in Treponema denticola.

    PubMed

    Heinzerling, H F; Penders, J E; Burne, R A

    1995-08-08

    Using a bacteriophage lambda library of Treponema denticola (Td) ATCC 35405 DNA, and, as a reagent, sera derived from individuals with advanced adult periodontal disease, a variety of recombinant clones producing antigens of this oral spirochete have been isolated. Nucleotide sequence analysis of a clone expressing three immunoreactive antigens has revealed the presence of an open reading frame highly homologous to the flagellar switch/motor protein, FliG, which is known to be essential for flagellar assembly and rotation, and chemotaxis in enteric bacteria. The deduced amino-acid sequence of the treponemal FliG protein had 73% similarity (55% identity) to the Bacillus subtilis FliG protein, and showed significant, but lesser homologies to Gram- FliG proteins. Sequence analysis of regions flanking fliG indicated that this gene is immediately preceded by a fliF homologue, further supporting that the cloned DNA encodes FliG of Td. The findings imply that although the signals for control of chemotaxis may be distinctly different in spirochetes, at least some of the molecules involved in torque generation, control of flagellar rotation and signal transduction are highly conserved with other bacteria. The stronger homology of the spirochete FliG with those of Gram+ bacteria is also consistent with recent analyses of other spirochetal genes.

  3. Novel ultrastructures of Treponema primitia and their implications for motility

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Gavin E.; Matson, Eric G.; Leadbetter, Jared R.; Berg, Howard C.; Jensen, Grant J.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Members of the bacterial phylum Spirochaetes are generally helical cells propelled by periplasmic flagella. The spirochete Treponema primitia is interesting because of its mutualistic role in the termite gut, where it is believed to cooperate with protozoa that break down cellulose and produce H2 as a by-product. Here we report the ultrastructure of T. primitia as obtained by electron cryotomography of intact, frozen-hydrated cells. Several previously unrecognized external structures were revealed, including bowl-like objects decorating the outer membrane, arcades of hook-shaped proteins winding along the exterior and tufts of fibrils extending from the cell tips. Inside the periplasm, cone-like structures were found at each pole. Instead of the single peptidoglycan layer typical of other Gram-negative bacteria, two distinct periplasmic layers were observed. These layers formed a central open space that contained two flagella situated adjacent to each other. In some areas, the inner membrane formed flattened invaginations that protruded into the cytoplasm. High-speed light microscopic images of swimming T. primitia cells showed that cell bodies remained rigid and moved in a helical rather than planar motion. Together, these findings support the ‘rolling cylinder’ model for T. primitia motility that posits rotation of the protoplasmic cylinder within the outer sheath. PMID:18248579

  4. Improved selective medium for the isolation of Treponema hyodysenteriae.

    PubMed Central

    Kunkle, R A; Kinyon, J M

    1988-01-01

    An agar medium with improved selection for Treponema hyodysenteriae was developed. Cultures of T. hyodysenteriae and T. innocens, feces from 11 clinically normal pigs, and colonic contents from 6 pigs with gross lesions consistent with swine dysentery were diluted in phosphate-buffered saline and plated on Trypticase soy agar (BBL Microbiology Systems, Cockeysville, Md.) with 5% citrated bovine blood (TSA), TSA with 400 micrograms of spectinomycin per ml (TSA-S400), TSA-S400 with 25 micrograms each of colistin and vancomycin per ml, and TSA with 5% pig feces extract and five antimicrobial agents (spiramycin, rifampin, vancomycin, colistin, and spectinomycin) (BJ). Viable numbers of T. hydodysenteriae grown on BJ were virtually identical to those for TSA, TSA-S400, and TSA-S400 with colistin and vancomycin. Pure cultures of four isolates of T. hyodysenteriae and three isolates of T. innocens were sustained through six subcultures on BJ. Fecal floras were completely inhibited on BJ for 14 of 17 fecal samples from both groups of pigs. A total of 461 colonic specimens from naturally occurring cases of porcine intestinal disease were plated on TSA-S400 and BJ. T. hyodysenteriae was isolated on both TSA-S400 and BJ for 69 specimens and on BJ alone for an additional 19 specimens. PMID:3235663

  5. Killing of Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Streptococcus agalactiae (group B streptococcus), Haemophilus ducreyi, and vaginal Lactobacillus by 3-O-octyl-sn-glycerol.

    PubMed

    Moncla, B J; Pryke, K; Isaacs, Charles E

    2008-04-01

    The microbicide candidate octylglycerol inactivates sexually transmitted bacterial pathogens at concentrations which spare normal vaginal flora (lactobacillus). Standard minimum microbicidal concentration assays and time-kill assays revealed the drug concentrations and times required for inactivation. Octylglycerol concentrations must exceed the binding capacity of any human serum albumin to be effective.

  6. Molecular tools for differentiation of non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae from Haemophilus haemolyticus

    PubMed Central

    Pickering, Janessa; Richmond, Peter C.; Kirkham, Lea-Ann S.

    2014-01-01

    Non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) and Haemophilus haemolyticus are closely related bacteria that reside in the upper respiratory tract. NTHi is associated with respiratory tract infections that frequently result in antibiotic prescription whilst H. haemolyticus is rarely associated with disease. NTHi and H. haemolyticus can be indistinguishable by traditional culture methods and molecular differentiation has proven difficult. This current review chronologically summarizes the molecular approaches that have been developed for differentiation of NTHi from H. haemolyticus, highlighting the advantages and disadvantages of each target and/or technique. We also provide suggestions for the development of new tools that would be suitable for clinical and research laboratories. PMID:25520712

  7. Porphyromonas gingivalis and Treponema denticola Exhibit Metabolic Symbioses

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Helen L.; Pyke, James S.; Meuric, Vincent; Slakeski, Nada; Cleal, Steven M.; Chambers, Jenny L.; McConville, Malcolm J.; Reynolds, Eric C.

    2014-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis and Treponema denticola are strongly associated with chronic periodontitis. These bacteria have been co-localized in subgingival plaque and demonstrated to exhibit symbiosis in growth in vitro and synergistic virulence upon co-infection in animal models of disease. Here we show that during continuous co-culture a P. gingivalis:T. denticola cell ratio of 6∶1 was maintained with a respective increase of 54% and 30% in cell numbers when compared with mono-culture. Co-culture caused significant changes in global gene expression in both species with altered expression of 184 T. denticola and 134 P. gingivalis genes. P. gingivalis genes encoding a predicted thiamine biosynthesis pathway were up-regulated whilst genes involved in fatty acid biosynthesis were down-regulated. T. denticola genes encoding virulence factors including dentilisin and glycine catabolic pathways were significantly up-regulated during co-culture. Metabolic labeling using 13C-glycine showed that T. denticola rapidly metabolized this amino acid resulting in the production of acetate and lactate. P. gingivalis may be an important source of free glycine for T. denticola as mono-cultures of P. gingivalis and T. denticola were found to produce and consume free glycine, respectively; free glycine production by P. gingivalis was stimulated by T. denticola conditioned medium and glycine supplementation of T. denticola medium increased final cell density 1.7-fold. Collectively these data show P. gingivalis and T. denticola respond metabolically to the presence of each other with T. denticola displaying responses that help explain enhanced virulence of co-infections. PMID:24603978

  8. Transcriptional Responses of Treponema denticola to Other Oral Bacterial Species

    PubMed Central

    Simanian, Emil J.; Shi, Wenyuan; Lux, Renate

    2014-01-01

    The classic organization by Socransky and coworkers categorized the oral bacteria of the subgingival plaque into different complexes. Treponema denticola, Porphyromonas gingivalis and Tannerella forsythia are grouped into the red complex that is highly correlated with periodontal disease. Socransky's work closely associates red with orange complex species such as Fusobacterium nucleatum and Prevotella intermedia but not with members of the other complexes. While the relationship between species contained by these complexes is in part supported by their ability to physically attach to each other, the physiological consequences of these interactions and associations are less clear. In this study, we employed T. denticola as a model organism to analyze contact-dependent responses to interactions with species belonging to the same complex (P. gingivalis and T. forsythia), the closely associated orange complex (using F. nucleatum and P. intermedia as representatives) and the unconnected yellow complex (using Streptococcus sanguinis and S. gordonii as representatives). RNA was extracted from T. denticola alone as well as after pairwise co-incubation for 5 hrs with representatives of the different complexes, and the respective gene expression profiles were determined using microarrays. Numerous genes related to motility, metabolism, transport, outer membrane and hypothetical proteins were differentially regulated in T. denticola in the presence of the tested partner species. Further analysis revealed a significant overlap in the affected genes and we identified a general response to the presence of other species, those specific to two of the three complexes as well as individual complexes. Most interestingly, many predicted major antigens (e.g. flagella, Msp, CTLP) were suppressed in responses that included red complex species indicating that the presence of the most closely associated species induces immune-evasive strategies. In summary, the data presented here provide

  9. Dentilisin involvement in coaggregation between Treponema denticola and Tannerella forsythia.

    PubMed

    Sano, Yumiko; Okamoto-Shibayama, Kazuko; Tanaka, Kimiko; Ito, Rieko; Shintani, Seikou; Yakushiji, Masashi; Ishihara, Kazuyuki

    2014-12-01

    Periodontitis arises from a biofilm consisting of gram-negative anaerobic rods and spirochetes. Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, and Tannerella forsythia, termed the Red complex, have been co-isolated with high frequency from chronic periodontitis lesions, and these microorganisms are thought to be major pathogens of the disease. Coaggregation is an important strategy in the colonization of dental plaque biofilm by these bacteria. In the present study, we investigated the coaggregation of T. denticola strains with T. forsythia ATCC 43037 by use of visual grading or spectrophotometry. T. denticola ATCC 35405 coaggregated with T. forsythia, reaching a plateau at approximately 60 min. This coaggregation was inhibited by heat treatment of T. denticola ATCC 35405, but not of T. forsythia. Disaccharides such as sucrose, maltose, and lactose inhibited coaggregation by approximately 50%. The coaggregation reaction varied among T. denticola strains. There was somewhat less coaggregation between T. denticola ATCC 33520 and T. forsythia than between T. denticola ATCC 35405 and T. forsythia, although this difference was not statistically significant; T. denticola ATCC 33521 showed a trace level of coaggregation with T. forsythia. The magnitude of coaggregation among the three T. denticola strains was proportional to their dentilisin activities. Inactivation of dentilisin abolished coaggregation activity, but inactivation of the major outer sheath protein did not. In addition, phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride did not affect coaggregation. These results indicate that dentilisin is involved indirectly in the coaggregation between T. denticola and T. forsythia, because its proteolytic activity is not required, possibly via ligand maturation.

  10. Kanamycin Resistance Cassette for Genetic Manipulation of Treponema denticola.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuebin; Ruby, John; Wu, Hui

    2015-07-01

    Treponema denticola has been recognized as an important oral pathogen of the "red complex" bacterial consortium that is associated with the pathogenesis of endodontal and periodontal diseases. However, little is known about the virulence of T. denticola due to its recalcitrant genetic system. The difficulty in genetically manipulating oral spirochetes is partially due to the lack of antibiotic resistance cassettes that are useful for gene complementation following allelic replacement mutagenesis. In this study, a kanamycin resistance cassette was identified and developed for the genetic manipulation of T. denticola ATCC 35405. Compared to the widely used ermF-ermAM cassette, the kanamycin cassette used in the transformation experiments gave rise to additional antibiotic-resistant T. denticola colonies. The kanamycin cassette is effective for allelic replacement mutagenesis as demonstrated by inactivation of two open reading frames of T. denticola, TDE1430 and TDE0911. In addition, the cassette is also functional in trans-chromosomal complementation. This was determined by functional rescue of a periplasmic flagellum (PF)-deficient mutant that had the flgE gene coding for PF hook protein inactivated. The integration of the full-length flgE gene into the genome of the flgE mutant rescued all of the defects associated with the flgE mutant that included the lack of PF filament and spirochetal motility. Taken together, we demonstrate that the kanamycin resistance gene is a suitable cassette for the genetic manipulation of T. denticola that will facilitate the characterization of virulence factors attributed to this important oral pathogen.

  11. Necrotizing Fasciitis Caused by Haemophilus influenzae Serotype f

    PubMed Central

    Garrigues, Grant; St. Geme, Joseph W.; Sexton, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    Haemophilus influenzae is a rare cause of soft tissue infection. In this report, we present a case of multifocal necrotizing fasciitis in a healthy adult patient, secondary to Haemophilus influenzae serotype f infection, and we review literature on this rare cause of necrotizing fasciitis. PMID:24989609

  12. Evaluation of New Biomarker Genes for Differentiating Haemophilus influenzae from Haemophilus haemolyticus

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Raydel D.; Wang, Xin; Katz, Lee S.; Vuong, Jeni T.; Bell, Melissa E.; Juni, Billie A.; Lowther, Sara A.; Lynfield, Ruth; MacNeil, Jessica R.; Mayer, Leonard W.

    2012-01-01

    PCR detecting the protein D (hpd) and fuculose kinase (fucK) genes showed high sensitivity and specificity for identifying Haemophilus influenzae and differentiating it from H. haemolyticus. Phylogenetic analysis using the 16S rRNA gene demonstrated two distinct groups for H. influenzae and H. haemolyticus. PMID:22301020

  13. Evaluation of new biomarker genes for differentiating Haemophilus influenzae from Haemophilus haemolyticus.

    PubMed

    Theodore, M Jordan; Anderson, Raydel D; Wang, Xin; Katz, Lee S; Vuong, Jeni T; Bell, Melissa E; Juni, Billie A; Lowther, Sara A; Lynfield, Ruth; MacNeil, Jessica R; Mayer, Leonard W

    2012-04-01

    PCR detecting the protein D (hpd) and fuculose kinase (fucK) genes showed high sensitivity and specificity for identifying Haemophilus influenzae and differentiating it from H. haemolyticus. Phylogenetic analysis using the 16S rRNA gene demonstrated two distinct groups for H. influenzae and H. haemolyticus.

  14. Identifying Haemophilus haemolyticus and Haemophilus influenzae by SYBR Green real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Latham, Roger; Zhang, Bowen; Tristram, Stephen

    2015-05-01

    SYBR Green real time PCR assays for protein D (hpd), fuculose kinase (fucK) and [Cu, Zn]-superoxide dismutase (sodC) were designed for use in an algorithm for the identification of Haemophilus influenzae and H. haemolyticus. When tested on 127 H. influenzae and 60 H. haemolyticus all isolates were identified correctly.

  15. A PCR-high-resolution melt assay for rapid differentiation of nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae and Haemophilus haemolyticus.

    PubMed

    Pickering, Janessa; Binks, Michael J; Beissbarth, Jemima; Hare, Kim M; Kirkham, Lea-Ann S; Smith-Vaughan, Heidi

    2014-02-01

    We have developed a PCR-high-resolution melt (PCR-HRM) assay to discriminate nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) colonies from Haemophilus haemolyticus. This method is rapid and robust, with 96% sensitivity and 92% specificity compared to the hpd#3 assay. PCR-HRM is ideal for high-throughput screening for NTHi surveillance and clinical trials.

  16. A PCR–High-Resolution Melt Assay for Rapid Differentiation of Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae and Haemophilus haemolyticus

    PubMed Central

    Binks, Michael J.; Beissbarth, Jemima; Hare, Kim M.; Kirkham, Lea-Ann S.; Smith-Vaughan, Heidi

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a PCR–high-resolution melt (PCR-HRM) assay to discriminate nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) colonies from Haemophilus haemolyticus. This method is rapid and robust, with 96% sensitivity and 92% specificity compared to the hpd#3 assay. PCR-HRM is ideal for high-throughput screening for NTHi surveillance and clinical trials. PMID:24478508

  17. Genome-wide relatedness of Treponema pedis, from gingiva and necrotic skin lesions of pigs, with the human oral pathogen Treponema denticola.

    PubMed

    Svartström, Olov; Mushtaq, Memoona; Pringle, Märit; Segerman, Bo

    2013-01-01

    Treponema pedis and T. denticola are two genetically related species with different origins of isolation. Treponema denticola is part of the human oral microbiota and is associated with periodontitis while T. pedis has been isolated from skin lesions in animals, e.g., digital dermatitis in cattle and necrotic ulcers in pigs. Although multiple Treponema phylotypes may exist in ulcerative lesions in pigs, T. pedis appears to be a predominant spirochete in these lesions. Treponema pedis can also be present in pig gingiva. In this study, we determined the complete genome sequence of T. pedis strain T A4, isolated from a porcine necrotic ear lesion, and compared its genome with that of T. denticola. Most genes in T. pedis were homologous to those in T. denticola and the two species were similar in general genomic features such as size, G+C content, and number of genes. In addition, many homologues of specific virulence-related genes in T. denticola were found in T. pedis. Comparing a selected pair of strains will usually not give a complete picture of the relatedness between two species. We therefore complemented the analysis with draft genomes from six T. pedis isolates, originating from gingiva and necrotic ulcers in pigs, and from twelve T. denticola strains. Each strain carried a considerable amount of accessory genetic material, of which a large part was strain specific. There was also extensive sequence variability in putative virulence-related genes between strains belonging to the same species. Signs of lateral gene-transfer events from bacteria known to colonize oral environments were found. This suggests that the oral cavity is an important habitat for T. pedis. In summary, we found extensive genomic similarities between T. pedis and T. denticola but also large variability within each species.

  18. Genome sequence of the thermophilic fresh-water bacterium Spirochaeta caldaria type strain (H1T), reclassification of Spirochaeta caldaria, Spirochaeta stenostrepta, and Spirochaeta zuelzerae in the genus Treponema as Treponema caldaria comb. nov., Treponema stenostrepta comb. nov., and Treponema zuelzerae comb. nov., and emendation of the genus Treponema

    PubMed Central

    Abt, Birte; Göker, Markus; Scheuner, Carmen; Han, Cliff; Lu, Megan; Misra, Monica; Lapidus, Alla; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Hammon, Nancy; Deshpande, Shweta; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Tapia, Roxanne; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Pagani, Ioanna; Ivanova, Natalia; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Mikhailova, Natalia; Huntemann, Marcel; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Jeffries, Cynthia D.; Rohde, Manfred; Spring, Stefan; Gronow, Sabine; Detter, John C.; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Woyke, Tanja; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2013-01-01

    Spirochaeta caldaria Pohlschroeder et al. 1995 is an obligately anaerobic, spiral-shaped bacterium that is motile via periplasmic flagella. The type strain, H1T, was isolated in 1990 from cyanobacterial mat samples collected at a freshwater hot spring in Oregon, USA, and is of interest because it enhances the degradation of cellulose when grown in co-culture with Clostridium thermocellum. Here we provide a taxonomic re-evaluation for S. caldaria based on phylogenetic analyses of 16S rRNA sequences and whole genomes, and propose the reclassification of S. caldaria and two other Spirochaeta species as members of the emended genus Treponema. Whereas genera such as Borrelia and Sphaerochaeta possess well-distinguished genomic features related to their divergent lifestyles, the physiological and functional genomic characteristics of Spirochaeta and Treponema appear to be intermixed and are of little taxonomic value. The 3,239,340 bp long genome of strain H1T with its 2,869 protein-coding and 59 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project. PMID:23961314

  19. Characterization of Treponema spp. isolates from pigs with ear necrosis and shoulder ulcers.

    PubMed

    Svartström, Olov; Karlsson, Frida; Fellström, Claes; Pringle, Märit

    2013-10-25

    Ear necrosis and shoulder ulcers in pigs are animal welfare problems and ethical issues that can cause economic losses for producers. Spirochetes have been observed microscopically in scrapings from pig ulcers since the early 1900s, but have until recently not been cultured and therefore not characterized. In this study, 12 Treponema spp. isolates were acquired from porcine ear necrosis, shoulder ulcers and gingiva. DNA analysis of the 16S rRNA-tRNA(Ile) intergenic spacer region (ISR2) or the 16S rRNA gene revealed relatedness to oral treponemes found in dogs and humans. All isolates except one aligned into two clusters, Treponema pedis and Treponema sp. OMZ 840-like. The 16S rRNA gene of the remaining isolate shared 99% nucleotide identity with Treponema parvum. Genetic fingerprinting of the isolates was performed through random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD). In addition, the isolates were characterized by biochemical tests, including api(®)ZYM, tryptophanase and hippuricase activity, and by testing the antimicrobial susceptibility to tiamulin, valnemulin, tylosin, tylvalosin, lincomycin and doxycycline using broth dilution. All isolates except two showed unique RAPD fingerprints, whereas metabolic activity tests could not differentiate between the isolates. The MICs of all antimicrobial agents tested were low.

  20. Tools for opening new chapters in the book of Treponema pallidum evolutionary history.

    PubMed

    Gogarten, J F; Düx, A; Schuenemann, V J; Nowak, K; Boesch, C; Wittig, R M; Krause, J; Calvignac-Spencer, S; Leendertz, F H

    2016-11-01

    Treponema pallidum infections causing yaws disease and venereal syphilis are globally widespread in human populations, infecting hundreds of thousands and millions annually respectively; endemic syphilis is much less common, and pinta has not been observed in decades. We discuss controversy surrounding the origin, evolution and history of these pathogens in light of available molecular and anthropological evidence. These bacteria (or close relatives) seem to affect many wild African nonhuman primate (NHP) species, though to date only a single NHP Treponema pallidum genome has been published, hindering detection of spillover events and our understanding of potential wildlife reservoirs. Similarly, only ten genomes of Treponema pallidum infecting humans have been published, impeding a full understanding of their diversity and evolutionary history. Research efforts have been hampered by the difficulty of culturing and propagating Treponema pallidum. Here we highlight avenues of research recently opened by the coupling of hybridization capture and next-generation sequencing. We present data generated with such an approach suggesting that asymptomatic bones from NHP occasionally contain enough treponemal DNA to recover large fractions of their genomes. We expect that these methods, which naturally can be applied to modern biopsy samples and ancient human bones, will soon considerably improve our understanding of these enigmatic pathogens and lay rest to old yet unresolved controversies. Copyright © 2016 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. 21 CFR 866.3820 - Treponema pallidum non-treponemal test reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Treponema pallidum non-treponemal test reagents. 866.3820 Section 866.3820 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3820...

  2. 21 CFR 866.3820 - Treponema pallidum non-treponemal test reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Treponema pallidum non-treponemal test reagents. 866.3820 Section 866.3820 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3820...

  3. 21 CFR 866.3830 - Treponema pallidum tre-ponemal test reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Treponema pallidum tre-ponemal test reagents. 866.3830 Section 866.3830 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3830...

  4. 21 CFR 866.3830 - Treponema pallidum tre-ponemal test reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Treponema pallidum tre-ponemal test reagents. 866.3830 Section 866.3830 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3830...

  5. 21 CFR 866.3820 - Treponema pallidum non-treponemal test reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Treponema pallidum non-treponemal test reagents. 866.3820 Section 866.3820 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3820...

  6. 21 CFR 866.3830 - Treponema pallidum tre-ponemal test reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Treponema pallidum tre-ponemal test reagents. 866.3830 Section 866.3830 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3830...

  7. Production of lesions in gnotobiotic mice by inoculation with Treponema hyodysenteriae.

    PubMed Central

    Joens, L A; Robinson, I M; Glock, R D; Matthews, P J

    1981-01-01

    Treponema hyodysenteriae was established in the ceca of gnotobiotic mice in the absence of other organisms. Superficial mucosal lesions characteristic of swine dysentery were present in the ceca of mice inoculated with T. hyodysenteriae in combination with viable Bacteroides vulgatus. Deep crypt necrosis was detected in the ceca of mice inoculated with T. hyodysenteriae alone. PMID:7216455

  8. Use of Treponema pallidum PCR in Testing of Ulcers for Diagnosis of Primary Syphilis1

    PubMed Central

    Sednaoui, Patrice; Lautenschlager, Stephan; Ferry, Tristan; Toutous-Trellu, Laurence; Cavassini, Matthias; Yassir, Fatima; Martinez de Tejada, Begoña; Emonet, Stéphane; Combescure, Christophe; Schrenzel, Jacques; Perneger, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Treponema pallidum PCR (Tp-PCR) has been noted as a valid method for diagnosing syphilis. We compared Tp-PCR to a combination of darkfield microscopy (DFM), the reference method, and serologic testing in a cohort of 273 patients from France and Switzerland and found the diagnostic accuracy of Tp-PCR was higher than that for DFM. PMID:25531672

  9. Intracellular Location of Treponema pallidum (Nichols Strain) in the Rabbit Testis

    PubMed Central

    Sykes, John A.; Miller, James N.

    1971-01-01

    During investigations designed to obtain purified suspensions of virulent Treponema pallidum (Nichols strain), infected rabbit testicular tissue was routinely examined in the electron microscope. Morphologically typical T. pallidum were found intracellularly within the cytoplasmic substance of fibroblasts, interstitial and Leydig cells, and of spermatocytes. The importance of these observations to latency and treatment is discussed. Images PMID:4949494

  10. Prevalence of Treponema spp. in endodontic retreatment-resistant periapical lesions.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Tiago Pereira; Signoretti, Fernanda Graziela Corrêa; Montagner, Francisco; Gomes, Brenda Paula Figueiredo de Almeida; Jacinto, Rogério Castilho

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the presence of the Treponema species in longstanding endodontic retreatment-resistant lesions of teeth with apical periodontitis, the association of this species with clinical/radiographic features, and the association among the different target species. Microbial samples of apical lesions were collected from twenty-five adult patients referred to endodontic surgery after unsuccessful root canal retreatment. Nested-PCR and conventional PCR were used for Treponema detection. Twenty-three periradicular tissue samples showed detectable levels of bacterial DNA. Treponema species were detected in 28% (7/25) of the cases. The most frequently detected species were T. socranskii (6/25), followed by T. maltophilum (3/25), T. amylovorum (3/25), T. lecithinolyticum (3/25), T. denticola (3/25), T. pectinovorum (2/25) and T. medium (2/25). T. vicentii was not detected in any sample. Positive statistical association was found between T. socranskii and T. denticola, and between T. maltophilum and T. lecithinolyticum . No association was detected between the presence of any target microorganism and the clinical or radiographic features. Treponema spp. are present, in a low percentage, in longstanding apical lesions from teeth with endodontic retreatment failure.

  11. 21 CFR 866.3820 - Treponema pallidum non-treponemal test reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Treponema pallidum non-treponemal test reagents. 866.3820 Section 866.3820 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3820...

  12. 21 CFR 866.3830 - Treponema pallidum tre-ponemal test reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Treponema pallidum tre-ponemal test reagents. 866.3830 Section 866.3830 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3830...

  13. 21 CFR 866.3820 - Treponema pallidum non-treponemal test reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Treponema pallidum non-treponemal test reagents. 866.3820 Section 866.3820 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3820...

  14. 21 CFR 866.3830 - Treponema pallidum tre-ponemal test reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Treponema pallidum tre-ponemal test reagents. 866.3830 Section 866.3830 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3830...

  15. Epidemiology of Haemophilus somnus in young rams.

    PubMed Central

    Lees, V W; Meek, A H; Rosendal, S

    1990-01-01

    The prevalence of Haemophilus somnus in the prepuce of young rams was examined. Of 473 rams entering Record of Performance (ROP) stations at 50 days of age, 43 (9.1%) were positive. Average daily gain was not affected by Haemophilus status, but was influenced by breed of ram. Suffolks were predicted to gain 0.515 kg daily compared to 0.427 kg for a group combining all other breeds. Using logistic regression to identify risk factors for individual H. somnus infection, rams in 1989 were 0.382 times as likely to be infected as rams in 1988, and Suffolks were 0.314 times as likely to be infected as the other breeds group, but these factors were not significant at the flock level. Of 80 eligible flocks of origin, 22 (27.5%) were classified as infected with H. somnus, based on rams submitted to the ROP station. Infected flocks contributed 133 rams, 43 (32.3%) of which were positive. There was no association between H. somnus status and lambing percent of the percent of abortions and stillbirths, but there was a statistically significant association with the percent of ewes which failed to lamb. In the model developed, 6% of the bred ewes in noninfected flocks failed to lamb, compared to a rate of 12% in infected flocks. These results suggest H. somnus may influence ewe fertility earlier, rather than later in gestation. Purchasing replacement animals and having cattle on the farm were risk factors for Haemophilus infection in the flock. Where replacements had been purchased within the previous year, the risk of flock infection rose 8.5 times, and on farms having cattle as well as sheep, the risk rose 13.2 times.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2379113

  16. Screening for antibodies against Treponema pallidum with chemiluminescent microparticle immunoassay: analysis of discordant serology results and clinical characterization.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhiyan; Feng, Zhenru; Liu, Ping; Yan, Cunling

    2016-09-01

    Traditionally, testing for syphilis has consisted of initial screening with a non-treponemal test, then retesting reactive specimens with a treponemal test. Recent availability of a chemiluminescent microparticle immunoassay for detecting antibodies against Treponema pallidum has led several laboratories in China to adopt chemiluminescent microparticle immunoassay for screening of syphilis, with subsequent testing of reactive serum samples with non-treponemal tests. We evaluated the utility of chemiluminescent microparticle immunoassay for routine screening of syphilis. Antibodies against Treponema pallidum were screened in 20,550 serum samples using chemiluminescent microparticle immunoassay. Chemiluminescent microparticle immunoassay-positive samples were reflexively tested with rapid plasma reagin tests and Treponema pallidum particle agglutination assays. Dot-immunoblot assays were used to confirm results of chemiluminescent microparticle immunoassay-positive and Treponema pallidum particle agglutination-negative serum samples. Overall, 267 samples (1.3%) were chemiluminescent microparticle immunoassay-positive, and 185 (69.3%) of those chemiluminescent microparticle immunoassay-positive serum samples were also Treponema pallidum particle agglutination-positive. Samples' signal to cut-off ratio for chemiluminescent microparticle immunoassay correlated with diagnostic reliability, as greater samples' signal to cut-off ratio corresponded with greater concordance between chemiluminescent microparticle immunoassay and Treponema pallidum particle agglutination results. Dot-immunoblot testing of 82 chemiluminescent microparticle immunoassay-positive and Treponema pallidum particle agglutination-negative serum samples showed that 16 samples (19.5%) were Dot-immunoblot-positive, 28 (34.2%) were indeterminate and 38 (46.3%) were negative. Because there is a certain percentage of false-positive results using chemiluminescent microparticle immunoassay for routine

  17. Synthesis of histamine by Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed

    Sheinman, B D; Devalia, J L; Davies, R J; Crook, S J; Tabaqchali, S

    1986-03-29

    Recent findings suggest that bacteria might contribute to histamine concentrations in the sputum of patients with infective lung disease. Ten isolates of Haemophilus influenzae from patients with acute exacerbation of chronic bronchitis and emphysema, together with two reference strains, were incubated at 37 degrees C for 72 hours. Serial estimations of histamine concentrations by high pressure liquid chromatography showed significant increases at 24 and 48 hours; no increases were evident in the control samples. These findings suggest that H influenzae might contribute to inflammation and limited airflow in infective lung disease by producing histamine.

  18. Synthesis of histamine by Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed Central

    Sheinman, B D; Devalia, J L; Davies, R J; Crook, S J; Tabaqchali, S

    1986-01-01

    Recent findings suggest that bacteria might contribute to histamine concentrations in the sputum of patients with infective lung disease. Ten isolates of Haemophilus influenzae from patients with acute exacerbation of chronic bronchitis and emphysema, together with two reference strains, were incubated at 37 degrees C for 72 hours. Serial estimations of histamine concentrations by high pressure liquid chromatography showed significant increases at 24 and 48 hours; no increases were evident in the control samples. These findings suggest that H influenzae might contribute to inflammation and limited airflow in infective lung disease by producing histamine. PMID:3083910

  19. Transformation of Haemophilus influenzae by recombinant molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Setlow, J.K.; McCarthy, D.R.; Clayton, N.L.

    1981-01-01

    A gene library of Haemophilus influenzae DNA has been constructed by ligating chromosomal DNA from cells resistant to a number of antibiotics, together with DNA of the H. influenzae plasmid RSF0885. Before ligation both DNAs were cut with the enzyme PvuII. The ligated DNA was allowed to enter competent H. influenzae sensitive to the antibiotics and selection was made for resistance to ampicillin, conferred by the plasmid RSF0885 DNA. Plasmids conferring resistance to various other antibiotics, as well as to ampicillin, have been obtained by this procedure and subsequent selection for chromosomal markers.

  20. Polypeptides of Treponema pallidum: progress toward understanding their structural, functional, and immunologic roles. Treponema Pallidum Polypeptide Research Group.

    PubMed Central

    Norris, S J

    1993-01-01

    Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum, the spirochete that causes syphilis, is unusual in a number of respects, including its small genome size, inability to grow under standard in vitro culture conditions, microaerophilism, apparent paucity of outer membrane proteins, structurally complex periplasmic flagella, and ability to evade the host immune responses and cause disease over a period of years to decades. Many of these attributes are related ultimately to its protein content. Our knowledge of the activities, structure, and immunogenicity of its proteins has been expanded by the application of recombinant DNA, hybridoma, and structural fractionation techniques. The purpose of this monograph is to summarize and correlate this new information by using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, monoclonal antibody reactivity, sequence data, and other properties as the bases of polypeptide identification. The protein profiles of the T. pallidum subspecies causing syphilis, yaws, and endemic syphilis are virtually indistinguishable but differ considerably from those of other treponemal species. Among the most abundant polypeptides are a group of lipoproteins of unknown function that appear to be important in the immune response during syphilitic infection. The periplasmic flagella of T. pallidum and other spirochetes are unique with regard to their protein content and ultrastructure, as well as their periplasmic location. They are composed of three core proteins (homologous to the other members of the eubacterial flagellin family) and a single, unrelated sheath protein; the functional significance of this arrangement is not understood at present. Although the bacterium contains the chaperonins GroEL and DnaK, these proteins are not under the control of the heat shock regulon as they are in most organisms. Studies of the immunogenicity of T. pallidum proteins indicate that many may be useful for immunodiagnosis and immunoprotection. Future goals in T. pallidum polypeptide

  1. Polypeptides of Treponema pallidum: progress toward understanding their structural, functional, and immunologic roles. Treponema Pallidum Polypeptide Research Group.

    PubMed

    Norris, S J

    1993-09-01

    Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum, the spirochete that causes syphilis, is unusual in a number of respects, including its small genome size, inability to grow under standard in vitro culture conditions, microaerophilism, apparent paucity of outer membrane proteins, structurally complex periplasmic flagella, and ability to evade the host immune responses and cause disease over a period of years to decades. Many of these attributes are related ultimately to its protein content. Our knowledge of the activities, structure, and immunogenicity of its proteins has been expanded by the application of recombinant DNA, hybridoma, and structural fractionation techniques. The purpose of this monograph is to summarize and correlate this new information by using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, monoclonal antibody reactivity, sequence data, and other properties as the bases of polypeptide identification. The protein profiles of the T. pallidum subspecies causing syphilis, yaws, and endemic syphilis are virtually indistinguishable but differ considerably from those of other treponemal species. Among the most abundant polypeptides are a group of lipoproteins of unknown function that appear to be important in the immune response during syphilitic infection. The periplasmic flagella of T. pallidum and other spirochetes are unique with regard to their protein content and ultrastructure, as well as their periplasmic location. They are composed of three core proteins (homologous to the other members of the eubacterial flagellin family) and a single, unrelated sheath protein; the functional significance of this arrangement is not understood at present. Although the bacterium contains the chaperonins GroEL and DnaK, these proteins are not under the control of the heat shock regulon as they are in most organisms. Studies of the immunogenicity of T. pallidum proteins indicate that many may be useful for immunodiagnosis and immunoprotection. Future goals in T. pallidum polypeptide

  2. [Haemophilus influenzae type B meningitis: typical and atypical presentation].

    PubMed

    Sánchez, J M; Zurro, F J; Ferreiro, D; Llana, R; Uría, D F

    1998-02-01

    We present 2 cases of Haemophilus influenzae meningitis. The first is a patient with atypical simptomatology: abdominal pain, fever and two days later pain in the back of his legs. Abdominal pathology was not found. The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) showed polymorphonuclear cells, hyperproteinorachia and lowered glucose. CSF culture revealed Haemophilus influenzae, blood culture was sterile. The second had suffered surgery at maxilar and ethmoid sinuses four years before, and unknown germ meningitis 6 months before. Haemophilus influenzae was isolated from CSF cultures and CSF rhinorrhea was detected by isotopic cisternography.

  3. Development of Competence of Haemophilus influenzae

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Hugh T.; Herriott, Roger M.

    1965-01-01

    Spencer, Hugh T. (The Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health, Baltimore, Md.), and Roger M. Herriott. Development of competence of Haemophilus influenzae. J. Bacteriol. 90:911–920. 1965.—A chemically defined nongrowth medium was developed for the induction of competence of Haemophilus influenzae by a stepdown procedure. Cells grown logarithmically in Heart Infusion Broth became competent after being transferred to a medium which consisted of amino acids, sodium fumarate, and inorganic salts. Chloramphenicol (2 μg/ml) or l-valine (1 μg/ml) in the nongrowth medium inhibited development of competence. The inhibitory action of l-valine was reversed by comparable concentrations of l-isoleucine. Kinetic studies of the development of competence showed a variable capacity of competent cells to take up deoxyribonucleic acid and reaffirmed earlier findings that competence was not transmissible in H. influenzae. Addition of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, thiamine, calcium pantothenate, uracil, and hypoxanthine to the medium for competence resulted in a minimal growth medium in which reduced levels of competence were developed. PMID:5294817

  4. Lipoproteins of Treponema denticola: their effect on human polymorphonuclear neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Sela, M N; Bolotin, A; Naor, R; Weinberg, A; Rosen, G

    1997-07-01

    The presence of lipoproteins and lipooligosaccharides in Treponema denticola, an oral spirochaete associated with periodontal diseases, was investigated. T. denticola ATCC 35404 and the clinical isolate GM-1 were metabolically labeled with [3H]-cis-9-octadecenoic acid and extracted with the non-ionic detergent Triton X-114. The extract was phase separated, precipitated with acetone and delipidated to remove non-covalently bound lipid (dLPP). In T. denticola ATCC 35404, sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide electrophoretic separation followed by autoradiography showed [3H]-cis-9-octadecenoic acid incorporation in bands with apparent molecular masses of 14, 20, 26, 31, 38, 72 and 85 kDa and a broad band running from 113 kDa to the top of the gel. This last band resolved into a 53 kDa [3H]-cis-9-octadecenoic acid band upon heating for 10 min, at 100 degrees C. The structural relationship of the outer sheath major oligomeric polypeptide of strain ATCC 35404 and the 53 kDa protein was demonstrated immunologically. Antibodies against the 113 kDa component of the oligomer cross-reacted with the 53 kDa protein. Proteinase K degraded the [3H]-cis-9-octadecenoic acid bands with the exception of the 14 kDa. The 14 kDa was also the major [3H]-fatty acid labeled compound found in the water phase following phenol-water extraction of whole T. denticola ATCC 35404 cells. This compound was purified from the water phase by gel filtration followed by hydrophobic chromatography. Chemical analysis showed that hexadecanoic acid was the predominant fatty acid bound to T. denticola lipoproteins. In the GM-1 strain [3H]-cis-9-octadecenoic acid incorporation was observed in the 116 kDa and 14 kDa bands. dLPP from strain ATCC 35404 caused an enhanced (0.8-8 micrograms/ml) luminol dependent chemiluminiscence (LDCL) effect in human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) which could be related to protein concentration. The addition of dLPP to PMN together with FMLP at submaximal concentration (1

  5. Haemophilus influenzae resistance in a community hospital.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, N F; Jerris, R C

    1991-06-01

    We prospectively tabulated all isolates of Haemophilus influenzae at DeKalb Medical Center from 1987 through 1989 to assess the occurrence of antibiotic resistance in patients of different ages. Of 325 total strains isolated, 24% produced beta-lactamase, rendering them resistant to ampicillin and amoxicillin. Antibiotic resistance was as common in patients older than age 60 (24%) as in younger patients (23%). Sensitivity testing by disk diffusion and microdilution techniques on 71 isolates (37 beta-lactamase-positive) showed uniform susceptibility to cefuroxime, cefotaxime, amoxicillin/clavulanate, cefaclor, and chloramphenicol, but three beta-lactamase-positive isolates were resistant to trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole. The high rate of ampicillin resistance noted in elderly patients has implications for the choice of antimicrobial therapy for these infections.

  6. Swine dysentery: inoculation of gnotobiotic pigs with Treponema hyodysenteriae and Vibrio coli and a Peptostreptococcus.

    PubMed Central

    Brandenburg, A C; Miniats, O P; Geissinger, H D; Ewert, E

    1977-01-01

    Pure cultures of Treponema hyodysenteriae given orally to conventional pigs resulted in the development of swine dysentery, whereas identical cultures given to gnotobiotic pigs did not produce the disease. Oral inoculation of gnotobiotic pigs with Vibrio coli and/or a peptostreptococcus in addition to T. hyodysenteriae did not result in dysentery. Neutralization of gastric secretions with NaHCO3 immediately prior to inoculation with T. hyodysenteriae increased the period during which treponemes were evident in the feces, as did the inoculation of this organism via the intracecal route. None of the gnotobiotic pigs with a persistent fecal Treponema population developed signs of dysentery. Factors other than those investigated in this work must play a part in the etiology of swine dysentery. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:907906

  7. Haemophilus influenzae Type b (Hib) vaccine - what you need to know

    MedlinePlus

    ... entirety from the CDC Hib (Haemophilus Influenzae Type b) Vaccine Information Statement (VIS): www.cdc.gov/vaccines/ ... CDC review information for Hib (Haemophilus Influenzae Type b) VIS: Page last reviewed: April 2, 2015 Page ...

  8. Haemophilus Influenzae Type b (Hib) Vaccine: What You Need to Know

    MedlinePlus

    VACCINE INFORMATION STATEMENT Hib Vaccine ( Haemophilus Influenzae Type b) What You Need to Know Many Vaccine Information ... vis 1 Why get vaccinated? Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) disease is a serious disease caused by ...

  9. MALDI-TOF MS distinctly differentiates nontypable Haemophilus influenzae from Haemophilus haemolyticus.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Bingqing; Xiao, Di; Zhang, Huifang; Zhang, Yongchan; Gao, Yuan; Xu, Li; Lv, Jing; Wang, Yingtong; Zhang, Jianzhong; Shao, Zhujun

    2013-01-01

    Nontypable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) and Haemophilus haemolyticus exhibit different pathogenicities, but to date, there remains no definitive and reliable strategy for differentiating these strains. In this study, we evaluated matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) as a potential method for differentiating NTHi and H. haemolyticus. The phylogenetic analysis of concatenated 16S rRNA and recombinase A (recA) gene sequences, outer membrane protein P6 gene sequencing and single-gene PCR were used as reference methods. The original reference database (ORD, provided with the Biotyper software) and new reference database (NRD, extended with Chinese strains) were compared for the evaluation of MALDI-TOF MS. Through a search of the ORD, 76.9% of the NTHi (40/52) and none of the H. haemolyticus (0/20) strains were identified at the species level. However, all NTHi and H. haemolyticus strains used for identification were accurately recognized at the species level when searching the NRD. From the dendrogram clustering of the main spectra projections, the Chinese and foreign H. influenzae reference strains were categorized into two distinct groups, and H. influenzae and H. haemolyticus were also separated into two categories. Compared to the existing methods, MALDI-TOF MS has the advantage of integrating high throughput, accuracy and speed. In conclusion, MALDI-TOF MS is an excellent method for differentiating NTHi and H. haemolyticus. This method can be recommended for use in appropriately equipped laboratories.

  10. MALDI-TOF MS Distinctly Differentiates Nontypable Haemophilus influenzae from Haemophilus haemolyticus

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Huifang; Zhang, Yongchan; Gao, Yuan; Xu, Li; Lv, Jing; Wang, Yingtong; Zhang, Jianzhong; Shao, Zhujun

    2013-01-01

    Nontypable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) and Haemophilus haemolyticus exhibit different pathogenicities, but to date, there remains no definitive and reliable strategy for differentiating these strains. In this study, we evaluated matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) as a potential method for differentiating NTHi and H. haemolyticus. The phylogenetic analysis of concatenated 16S rRNA and recombinase A (recA) gene sequences, outer membrane protein P6 gene sequencing and single-gene PCR were used as reference methods. The original reference database (ORD, provided with the Biotyper software) and new reference database (NRD, extended with Chinese strains) were compared for the evaluation of MALDI-TOF MS. Through a search of the ORD, 76.9% of the NTHi (40/52) and none of the H. haemolyticus (0/20) strains were identified at the species level. However, all NTHi and H. haemolyticus strains used for identification were accurately recognized at the species level when searching the NRD. From the dendrogram clustering of the main spectra projections, the Chinese and foreign H. influenzae reference strains were categorized into two distinct groups, and H. influenzae and H. haemolyticus were also separated into two categories. Compared to the existing methods, MALDI-TOF MS has the advantage of integrating high throughput, accuracy and speed. In conclusion, MALDI-TOF MS is an excellent method for differentiating NTHi and H. haemolyticus. This method can be recommended for use in appropriately equipped laboratories. PMID:23457514

  11. [Severe infections by Haemophilus influenzae in children].

    PubMed

    Herrera Labarca, P; Prenzel Leupolt, I; García Henríquez, I

    1977-01-01

    Severity and increasing incidence of serious infections due to Haemophilus influenzae in children have been stressed in recent publications. An analysis of the clinical records of the Department of Pediatrics, Hospital Roberto del Río (Santiago, Chile) was made in order to gather information about frequency and clinical feature of this kind of infections in our environement. 120 children under 3 years of age in whom H. influenzae was isolated in samples of one or more of the following sources: CSF, blood, bone marrow, pleural and synovial fluids, were admitted from January 1970 to March 1976. Among the different syndromes observed, bacterial meningitis (83.3%) was associated with other localizations in 27%. Empyema (12.5%) was often (46.6%) associated with meningitis. Both clinical entities were the most common and with a definite tendency to increase their frequency in last years. Cultures of CSF, blood and bone marrow were considered effective tests for diagnosis in severe infections due to H. influenzae. Although precise incidence figures may not be obtained from the present data, this kind of diseases may be considered frequent and severe (mortality: 26.6% in this study).

  12. Acute Haemophilus parainfluenzae endocarditis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Numerous pathogens can cause infective endocarditis, including Haemophilus parainfluenzae. H. parainfluenzae is part of the H. aphrophilus, Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, Cardiobacterium hominis, Eikenella corrodens, and Kingella kingae group that may cause about 3% of the total endocarditis cases, and is characterized by a subacute course and large vegetations. Case presentation Acute H. parainfluenzae endocarditis developed in a 54-year-old woman, with no underlying predisposing factors. The patient presented with fever of 3 days duration and a severe headache. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain revealed multiple cerebral emboli with hemorrhagic foci. Upon suspicion of endocarditis, cardiac transesophageal ultrasonography was performed and revealed massive vegetations. The patient underwent emergency mitral valve replacement, and was further treated with ceftriaxone. Blood cultures grew H. parainfluenzae only after valve replacement, and a 6-week course of ceftriaxone was prescribed. Conclusion We underline the typical presentation of large vegetations in H. parainfluenzae endocarditis, which are associated with embolic phenomena and resulting severity. Although the majority of the few cases reported in the literature are subacute in progress, our case further underlines the possibility that H. parainfluenzae endocarditis may develop rapidly. Thus, awareness of the imaging characteristics of the pathogen may enhance early appropriate diagnosis and therapeutic response. PMID:19830211

  13. Population Structure in Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae

    PubMed Central

    LaCross, Nathan C.; Marrs, Carl F.; Gilsdorf, Janet R.

    2013-01-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) frequently colonize the human pharynx asymptomatically, and are an important cause of otitis media in children. Past studies have identified typeable H. influenzae as being clonal, but the population structure of NTHi has not been extensively characterized. The research presented here investigated the diversity and population structure in a well-characterized collection of NTHi isolated from the middle ears of children with otitis media or the pharynges of healthy children in three disparate geographic regions. Multilocus sequence typing identified 109 unique sequence types among 170 commensal and otitis media-associated NTHi isolates from Finland, Israel, and the US. The largest clonal complex contained only five sequence types, indicating a high level of genetic diversity. The eBURST v3, ClonalFrame 1.1, and structure 2.3.3 programs were used to further characterize diversity and population structure from the sequence typing data. Little clustering was apparent by either disease state (otitis media or commensalism) or geography in the ClonalFrame phylogeny. Population structure was clearly evident, with support for eight populations when all 170 isolates were analyzed. Interestingly, one population contained only commensal isolates, while two others consisted solely of otitis media isolates, suggesting associations between population structure and disease. PMID:23266487

  14. Haemophilus parasuis: infection, immunity and enrofloxacin.

    PubMed

    Macedo, Nubia; Rovira, Albert; Torremorell, Montserrat

    2015-10-28

    Haemophilus parasuis is an early colonizer of the porcine upper respiratory tract and is the etiological agent of Glasser's disease. The factors responsible for H. parasuis colonization and systemic infection are not yet well understood, while prevention and control of Glasser's disease continues to be challenging. Recent studies on innate immunity to H. parasuis have demonstrated that porcine alveolar macrophages (PAMs) are able to differentially up-regulate several genes related to inflammation and phagocytosis, and several pro-inflammatory cytokines are produced by porcine cells upon exposure to H. parasuis. The susceptibility of H. parasuis strains to phagocytosis by PAMs and the bactericidal effect of complement are influenced by the virulent phenotype of the strains. While non-virulent strains are susceptible to phagocytosis and complement, virulent strains are resistant to both. However, in the presence of specific antibodies against H. parasuis, virulent strains become susceptible to phagocytosis. More information is still needed, though, in order to better understand the host immune responses to H. parasuis. Antimicrobials are commonly used in the swine industry to help treat and control Glasser's disease. Some of the common antimicrobials have been shown to reduce colonization by H. parasuis, which may have implications for disease dynamics, development of effective immune responses and immunomodulation. Here, we provide the current state of research on innate and adaptive immune responses to H. parasuis and discuss the potential effect of enrofloxacin on the development of a protective immune response against H. parasuis infection.

  15. Pseudomonas biofilm formation after Haemophilus infection.

    PubMed

    Ojano-Dirain, Carolyn; Antonelli, Patrick J

    2011-09-01

    Tympanostomy tube (TT) biofilm formation may lead to refractory otorrhea and occlusion. Biofilms are commonly composed of multiple microbial species. One species may promote or inhibit biofilm formation by other species.The aim of this study was to determine if Haemophilus influenzae(HI) promotes the development of Pseudomonas aeruginosa(PA) biofilm on TTs. Controlled, in vitro. Academic research laboratory. Fluoroplastic TTs (20 per group) were exposed to plasma, allowed to dry, and cultured with HI for 7 days. TTs were either gas sterilized or treated for 24 hours with 10 or 3000 μg/mL ciprofloxacin. Half of the TTs from each treatment group underwent bacterial counts or scanning electron microscopy. The remainder, as well as TTs not exposed to HI, were cultured with PA for 4 days and treated with gentamicin to kill planktonic PA. Biofilm formation was quantified with bacterial counts. TTs treated with ciprofloxacin 3000 μg/mL had lower HI counts than TTs treated with 10 μg/mL (P = .0001), but viable HI persisted. PA biofilm formation on TTs with prior HI biofilm and treated with ciprofloxacin 10 μg/mL or gas sterilization was not different than TTs without HI. Less PA biofilm formed on TTs with HI treated with 3 mg/mL ciprofloxacin(P = .002). HI biofilm does not promote PA biofilm formation on TTs. Use of high-dose ototopical therapy to clear HI may reduce subsequent PA biofilm formation.

  16. Acquired macrolide resistance genes in Haemophilus influenzae?

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Christopher T; Kunde, Dale A; Tristram, Stephen G

    2015-08-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of specific acquired macrolide resistance genes previously reported as present in clinical isolates of Haemophilus influenzae. A collection of 172 clinical respiratory isolates of H. influenzae, including 59 isolates from cystic fibrosis patients and 27 from non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis patients with significant prior macrolide use, was established. This collection was tested for azithromycin susceptibility using Etest and screened for the presence of erm(A), erm(B), erm(C), erm(F), mef(A) and mef(E) using locked nucleic acid dual-labelled hydrolysis probes. The azithromycin MICs ranged from 0.09 to >256 mg/L, with 2 (1.2%) isolates susceptible, 163 (94.8%) intermediate and 7 (4%) resistant according to EUCAST breakpoints (susceptible, ≤0.12 mg/L; resistant, >4 mg/L). None of the acquired macrolide resistance genes erm(A), erm(B), erm(C), erm(F), mef(A) or mef(E) was detected in any of the isolates. The specific acquired macrolide resistance genes are not widespread in H. influenzae and the high prevalence of these genes previously reported might be unique to the specific circumstances of that study. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. PCR for capsular typing of Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed Central

    Falla, T J; Crook, D W; Brophy, L N; Maskell, D; Kroll, J S; Moxon, E R

    1994-01-01

    A PCR method for the unequivocal assignment of Haemophilus influenzae capsular type (types a to f) was developed. PCR primers were designed from capsule type-specific DNA sequences cloned from the capsular gene cluster of each of the six capsular types. PCR product was amplified only from the capsular type for which the primers were designed. Product was confirmed by using either an internal oligonucleotide or restriction endonuclease digestion. A total of 172 H. influenzae strains of known capsular type (determined genetically) comprising all capsular types and noncapsulate strains were tested by PCR capsular typing. In all cases the PCR capsular type corresponded to the capsular genotype determined by restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of the cap region. When used in conjunction with PCR primers derived from the capsular gene bexA, capsulate, noncapsulate, and capsule-deficient type b mutant strains could be differentiated. PCR capsular typing overcomes the problems of cross-reaction and autoagglutination associated with the serotyping of H. influenzae strains. The rapid and unequivocal capsular typing method that is described will be particularly important for typing invasive H. influenzae strains isolated from recipients of H. influenzae type b vaccine. Images PMID:7814470

  18. Proteolytic activity among various oral Treponema species and cloning of a prtP-like gene of Treponema socranskii subsp. socranskii.

    PubMed

    Heuner, K; Bergmann, I; Heckenbach, K; Göbel, U B

    2001-07-24

    The proteolytic activity of 11 treponemal strains representing different phylogenetic groups was investigated by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis with copolymerised casein, gelatin and fibrinogen as substrates. The activity was specified to be trypsin- and chymotrypsin-like by the cleavage of synthetic substrates BAPNA and SAAPFNA, respectively. Nine strains degrade casein and the synthetic substrate BAPNA. Chymotrypsin-like activity specifically inhibited by phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride was found in four treponemes. Southern blot analysis using a Treponema socranskii subsp. socranskii-specific prtP probe confirmed the presence of prtP homologous genes in these four strains. The internal fragments of the chymotrypsin-like protease genes were cloned and sequenced after PCR amplification. Here we report the cloning of the complete prtP-like gene of T. socranskii subsp. socranskii, an organism shown to possess epidemiologic relevance in periodontitis.

  19. Cellular fatty acid composition of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans and Haemophilus aphrophilus.

    PubMed Central

    Braunthal, S D; Holt, S C; Tanner, A C; Socransky, S S

    1980-01-01

    Strains of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans isolated from deep pockets of patients with juvenile periodontitis were analyzed for their content of cellular fatty acids. Oral Haemophilus strains, morphologically and biochemically similar to Haemophilus aphrophilus, were also examined for their content of cellular fatty acids. The extractable lipids of the actinobacilli represented approximately 10% of the cell dry weight, with the bound lipids representing 2 to 5%. The major fatty acids consisted of myristic (C14:0) and palmitic (C16:0) acids and a C16:1 acid, possibly palmitoleic acid, accounting for 21, 35, and 31% of the total extractable fatty acids, respectively. Haemophilus strains had a similar cellular fatty acid content. PMID:7430333

  20. Cloning and expression of two novel hemin binding protein genes from Treponema denticola.

    PubMed

    Xu, X; Holt, S C; Kolodrubetz, D

    2001-07-01

    Treponema denticola does not appear to produce siderophores, so it must acquire iron by other pathways. Indeed, T. denticola has been shown to have an iron-regulated 44-kDa outer membrane protein (HbpA) with hemin binding ability. To characterize the HbpA protein, its gene was cloned from genomic DNA libraries of T. denticola. Sequence analysis of the hbpA open reading frame indicated that it encoded a 42.8-kDa protein with a 23-amino-acid signal peptide. HbpA has no significant homology to any proteins in the databases. Southern blot analysis demonstrated that hbpA is present in several T. denticola ATCC strains and clinical isolates, but not in Treponema pectinovorum, Treponema socranskii, or Escherichia coli. HbpA, expressed as a recombinant protein in E. coli and purified by antibody affinity chromatography, has hemin binding activity as determined by lithium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis with tetramethylbenzidine staining. Northern blot analysis showed that there were two hbpA-containing transcripts, of approximately 1.3 and 2.6 kb, and that the RNA levels were low-iron induced. Interestingly, the 2.6-kb mRNA also encoded a second protein with significant homology to hbpA. This downstream gene, called hbpB, was cloned and sequenced and its product was expressed as a fusion protein in E. coli. The hbpB gene product is 49% identical to HbpA and binds hemin. Thus, T. denticola has two novel hemin binding proteins which may be part of a previously unrecognized iron acquisition pathway.

  1. Antenatal screening for Toxoplasma gondii, Cytomegalovirus, rubella and Treponema pallidum infections in northern Benin.

    PubMed

    De Paschale, Massimo; Ceriani, Cristina; Cerulli, Teresa; Cagnin, Debora; Cavallari, Serena; Cianflone, Annalisa; Diombo, Kouma; Ndayaké, Joseph; Aouanou, Guy; Zaongo, Dieudonné; Priuli, Gianbattista; Viganò, Paolo; Clerici, Pierangelo

    2014-06-01

    Toxoplasma gondii, cytomegalovirus (HCMV) and rubella virus infections are among the most serious of those contracted during pregnancy in terms of foetal consequences. Toxoplasma, HCMV and rubella antibody screening is unusual in Africa, and there are few published data. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of these markers among pregnant women in northern Benin on the occasion of routine syphilis screening. Toxoplasma, HCMV and rubella IgG and IgM antibodies were determined in the serum of 283 women attending Saint Jean de Dieu de Tanguiéta hospital, using an enzyme immunoassay, and IgM were confirmed using an enzyme-linked fluorescent assay (ELFA). In the case of IgM positivity, the avidity of anti-HCMV and anti-Toxoplasma IgG was measured. Total anti-Treponema pallidum antibodies were determined using an enzyme immunoassay and confirmed by immunoblotting. In the case of positivity, the Venereal Disease Research Laboratory (VDRL) test was used. The prevalence of anti-Toxoplasma, anti-HCMV, anti-rubella IgG and total anti-Treponema antibodies was, respectively, 30.0%, 100%, 94% and 2.5%. The VDRL test was positive in 62.5% of the anti-Treponema-positive samples. The prevalence of anti-Toxoplasma, anti-HCMV and anti-rubella IgM was, respectively, 0.4%, 1.4% and 0%. There were no statistically significant differences in terms of age class or trimester of pregnancy. Anti-Toxoplasma and anti-HCMV IgG avidity was always high. The prevalence of HCMV and rubella antibodies is high in northern Benin, whereas that of Toxoplasma antibodies is lower. As nearly two-thirds of the pregnant women were anti-Toxoplasma seronegative, antibody screening should be introduced. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Haemophilus influenzae type b conjugate vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Dominic F; Moxon, E Richard; Pollard, Andrew J

    2004-01-01

    Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) is one of the leading causes of invasive bacterial infection in young children worldwide. During childhood, acquisition of antibody directed against the polysaccharide capsule of the organism, presumably as a result of asymptomatic carriage, confers protection and disease is much less common after the age of 4 years. Like other polysaccharides, the polyribosyl ribitol phosphate (PRP) of the Hib capsule is a T-independent antigen and not immunogenic when administered as a vaccine in infancy. Because the highest rates of disease occur in the first 2 years of life, efficacious Hib vaccines have been designed by covalently linking the PRP capsule to a carrier protein that recruits T-cell help for the polysaccharide immune response and induces anti-PRP antibody production even in the first 6 months of life. Introduction of Hib protein–polysaccharide conjugate vaccines into many industrialized countries over the past 15 years has resulted in the virtual elimination of invasive Hib disease. However, despite the success of the vaccine programme several factors may interfere with the effectiveness of the vaccine in the routine programme, as observed in the UK recently. Such factors may include interference with other concomitant vaccines, waning immunity in the absence of booster doses of vaccine, and reduced natural boosting as a result of decreased transmission of the organism. However, the burden of disease remains highest in resource-poor countries and urgent efforts are needed to provide the benefits of this vaccine for children living in regions where it cannot be used for economic and logistical reasons. PMID:15379976

  3. Haemophilus somnus (Histophilus somni) in bighorn sheep.

    PubMed

    Ward, Alton C S; Weiser, Glen C; Anderson, Bruce C; Cummings, Patrick J; Arnold, Karen F; Corbeil, Lynette B

    2006-01-01

    Respiratory disease and poor lamb recruitment have been identified as limiting factors for bighorn-sheep populations. Haemophilus somnus (recently reclassified as Histophilus somni) is associated with respiratory disease in American bison, domestic sheep, and cattle. It is also harbored in their reproductive tracts and has been associated with reproductive failure in domestic sheep and cattle. Therefore, reproductive tract and lung samples from bighorn sheep were evaluated for the presence of this organism. Organisms identified as H. somnus were isolated from 6 of 62 vaginal but none of 12 preputial swab samples. Antigen specific to H. somnus was detected by immunohistochemical study in 4 of 12 formalin-fixed lung tissue samples of bighorn sheep that died with evidence of pneumonia. Notably, H. somnus was found in alveolar debris in areas of inflammation. The 6 vaginal isolates and 2 H. somnus isolates previously cultured from pneumonic lungs of bighorn sheep were compared with 3 representative isolates from domestic sheep and 2 from cattle. The profiles of major outer membrane proteins and antigens for all of the isolates were predominantly similar, although differences that may be associated with the host-parasite relationship and virulence were detected. The DNA restriction fragment length profiles of the bighorn-sheep isolates had similarities not shared with the other isolates, suggesting distinct phylogenetic lines. All of the isolates had similar antimicrobial profiles, but the isolates from the bighorn sheep produced less pigment than those from the domestic livestock, and growth of the former was not enhanced by CO2. Wildlife biologists and diagnosticians should be aware of the potential of these organisms to cause disease in bighorn sheep and of growth characteristics that may hinder laboratory detection.

  4. Haemophilus somnus (Histophilus somni) in bighorn sheep

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Respiratory disease and poor lamb recruitment have been identified as limiting factors for bighorn-sheep populations. Haemophilus somnus (recently reclassified as Histophilus somni) is associated with respiratory disease in American bison, domestic sheep, and cattle. It is also harbored in their reproductive tracts and has been associated with reproductive failure in domestic sheep and cattle. Therefore, reproductive tract and lung samples from bighorn sheep were evaluated for the presence of this organism. Organisms identified as H. somnus were isolated from 6 of 62 vaginal but none of 12 preputial swab samples. Antigen specific to H. somnus was detected by immunohistochemical study in 4 of 12 formalin-fixed lung tissue samples of bighorn sheep that died with evidence of pneumonia. Notably, H. somnus was found in alveolar debris in areas of inflammation. The 6 vaginal isolates and 2 H. somnus isolates previously cultured from pneumonic lungs of bighorn sheep were compared with 3 representative isolates from domestic sheep and 2 from cattle. The profiles of major outer membrane proteins and antigens for all of the isolates were predominantly similar, although differences that may be associated with the host–parasite relationship and virulence were detected. The DNA restriction fragment length profiles of the bighorn-sheep isolates had similarities not shared with the other isolates, suggesting distinct phylogenetic lines. All of the isolates had similar antimicrobial profiles, but the isolates from the bighorn sheep produced less pigment than those from the domestic livestock, and growth of the former was not enhanced by CO2. Wildlife biologists and diagnosticians should be aware of the potential of these organisms to cause disease in bighorn sheep and of growth characteristics that may hinder laboratory detection. PMID:16548330

  5. TEM-1-encoding small plasmids impose dissimilar fitness costs on Haemophilus influenzae and Haemophilus parainfluenzae.

    PubMed

    Søndergaard, Annette; Lund, Marianne; Nørskov-Lauritsen, Niels

    2015-12-01

    Only two beta-lactamases, TEM-1 and ROB-1, have been observed in Haemophilus influenzae, while four different TEM but no ROB enzymes have been found in Haemophilus parainfluenzae. In order to investigate the mechanisms behind the dissemination of small beta-lactamase-encoding plasmids in H. influenzae and H. parainfluenzae, we assessed the fitness cost of three TEM-1- (pPN223, pA1209, pA1606), one TEM-15- (pSF3) and one ROB-1-bearing (pB1000) plasmid when expressed in either bacterial species. All plasmids were stable in H. influenzae and H. parainfluenzae except pB1000, which showed on average (sample mean) 76% curing in H. parainfluenzae after 5  days of subculture. Competition assays between isogenic strains with and without plasmid showed no competitive disadvantage of pPN223 and pA1606 in H. influenzae, or of pA1209 in H. parainfluenzae. In contrast, pSF3 and pB1000 were associated with significant competitive disadvantages in both species. Some of the competitive disadvantages may be related to differences in plasmid copy number and mRNA expression of the beta-lactamase genes, as revealed by quantitative PCR analysis. In conclusion, plasmids encoding TEM beta-lactamases isolated from H. influenzae and H. parainfluenzae can be stably transferred between species. The fast curing of pB1000 in H. parainfluenzae observed in this study correlates to the fact that ROB-1 has never been reported for this species. TEM-1-encoding plasmids are associated with the lowest level of fitness cost, but different TEM-1 plasmids confer different levels of fitness cost on the two hosts.

  6. Invasive Type e Haemophilus influenzae Disease in Italy

    PubMed Central

    degli Atti, Marta Luisa Ciofi; Cardines, Rita; Salmaso, Stefania; Renna, Giovanna; Mastrantonio, Paola

    2003-01-01

    We describe the first reported cases of invasive type e Haemophilus influenzae disease in Italy. All five cases occurred in adults. The isolates were susceptible to ampicillin and eight other antimicrobial agents. Molecular analysis showed two distinct type e strains circulating in Italy, both containing a single copy of the capsulation locus. PMID:12604001

  7. 21 CFR 866.3300 - Haemophilus spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Haemophilus spp. serological reagents. 866.3300 Section 866.3300 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... consist of antigens and antisera, including antisera conjugated with a fluorescent dye, that are used...

  8. 21 CFR 866.3300 - Haemophilus spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Haemophilus spp. serological reagents. 866.3300 Section 866.3300 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... consist of antigens and antisera, including antisera conjugated with a fluorescent dye, that are used...

  9. 21 CFR 866.3300 - Haemophilus spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Haemophilus spp. serological reagents. 866.3300 Section 866.3300 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... consist of antigens and antisera, including antisera conjugated with a fluorescent dye, that are used...

  10. 21 CFR 866.3300 - Haemophilus spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Haemophilus spp. serological reagents. 866.3300 Section 866.3300 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... consist of antigens and antisera, including antisera conjugated with a fluorescent dye, that are used...

  11. 21 CFR 866.3300 - Haemophilus spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Haemophilus spp. serological reagents. 866.3300 Section 866.3300 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... consist of antigens and antisera, including antisera conjugated with a fluorescent dye, that are used...

  12. Isolation and characterization of outer membrane vesicles from Haemophilus parasuis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Haemophilus parasuis is a small, pleomorphic Gram-negative bacterium that colonizes the upper respiratory tract of swine. Numerous strains of this organism are capable of causing systemic disease, resulting in high morbidity and mortality in the host. H. parasuis isolates display a wide range of vir...

  13. Levofloxacin-resistant haemophilus influenzae, Taiwan, 2004-2010.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Shu-Chen; Chen, Pei-Chen; Shiau, Yih-Ru; Wang, Hui-Ying; Lai, Jui-Fen; Huang, Wen; Lauderdale, Tsai-Ling Yang

    2014-08-01

    Levofloxacin resistance in Haemophilus influenzae has increased significantly in Taiwan, from 2.0% in 2004 to 24.3% in 2010 (p<0.001). Clinical and molecular investigations of 182 levofloxacin-resistant isolates revealed that the increase was mainly the result of the spread of several clones in the elderly population in different regions.

  14. First Complete Genome Sequence of Haemophilus influenzae Serotype a

    PubMed Central

    Hayden, Kristy

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Haemophilus influenzae is an important human pathogen that primarily infects small children. In recent years, H. influenzae serotype a has emerged as a significant cause of invasive disease among indigenous populations. Here, we present the first complete whole-genome sequence of H. influenzae serotype a. PMID:28104664

  15. Investigating the porcine immune reponse to Haemophilus parasuis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Haemophilus parasuis is the causative agent of Glässers disease in swine, which is characterized by systemic invasion of the bacteria to serosal surfaces, resulting in inflammation and induction of pleuritis, peritonitis, and arthritis. In addition, certain strains of H. parasuis cause pneumonia wh...

  16. Comparison of the genome of the oral pathogen Treponema denticola with other spirochete genomes

    PubMed Central

    Seshadri, Rekha; Myers, Garry S. A.; Tettelin, Hervé; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Heidelberg, John F.; Dodson, Robert J.; Davidsen, Tanja M.; DeBoy, Robert T.; Fouts, Derrick E.; Haft, Dan H.; Selengut, Jeremy; Ren, Qinghu; Brinkac, Lauren M.; Madupu, Ramana; Kolonay, Jamie; Durkin, Scott A.; Daugherty, Sean C.; Shetty, Jyoti; Shvartsbeyn, Alla; Gebregeorgis, Elizabeth; Geer, Keita; Tsegaye, Getahun; Malek, Joel; Ayodeji, Bola; Shatsman, Sofiya; McLeod, Michael P.; Šmajs, David; Howell, Jerrilyn K.; Pal, Sangita; Amin, Anita; Vashisth, Pankaj; McNeill, Thomas Z.; Xiang, Qin; Sodergren, Erica; Baca, Ernesto; Weinstock, George M.; Norris, Steven J.; Fraser, Claire M.; Paulsen, Ian T.

    2004-01-01

    We present the complete 2,843,201-bp genome sequence of Treponema denticola (ATCC 35405) an oral spirochete associated with periodontal disease. Analysis of the T. denticola genome reveals factors mediating coaggregation, cell signaling, stress protection, and other competitive and cooperative measures, consistent with its pathogenic nature and lifestyle within the mixed-species environment of subgingival dental plaque. Comparisons with previously sequenced spirochete genomes revealed specific factors contributing to differences and similarities in spirochete physiology as well as pathogenic potential. The T. denticola genome is considerably larger in size than the genome of the related syphilis-causing spirochete Treponema pallidum. The differences in gene content appear to be attributable to a combination of three phenomena: genome reduction, lineage-specific expansions, and horizontal gene transfer. Genes lost due to reductive evolution appear to be largely involved in metabolism and transport, whereas some of the genes that have arisen due to lineage-specific expansions are implicated in various pathogenic interactions, and genes acquired via horizontal gene transfer are largely phage-related or of unknown function. PMID:15064399

  17. Genome sequence of the thermophilic fresh-water bacterium Spirochaeta caldaria type strain (H1T), reclassification of Spirochaeta caldaria, Spirochaeta stenostrepta, and Spirochaeta zuelzerae in the genus Treponema as Treponema caldaria comb. nov., Treponema stenostrepta comb. nov., and Treponema zuelzerae comb. nov., and emendation of the genus Tr

    SciTech Connect

    Abt, Birte; Goker, Markus; Scheuner, Carmen; Han, Cliff; Lu, Megan; Misra, Monica; Lapidus, Alla L.; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Hammon, Nancy; Deshpande, Shweta; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Tapia, Roxanne; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Pagani, Ioanna; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Mikhailova, Natalia; Huntemann, Marcel; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Jeffries, Cynthia; Rohde, Manfred; Spring, Stefan; Gronow, Sabine; Detter, J. Chris; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Woyke, Tanja; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2013-01-01

    Spirochaeta caldaria Pohlschroeder et al. 1995 is an obligately anaerobic, spiral-shaped bac- terium that is motile via periplasmic flagella. The type strain, H1T, was isolated in 1990 from cyanobacterial mat samples collected at a freshwater hot spring in Oregon, USA, and is of in- terest because it enhances the degradation of cellulose when grown in co-culture with Clos- tridium thermocellum. Here we provide a taxonomic re-evaluation for S. caldaria based on phylogenetic analyses of 16S rRNA sequences and whole genomes, and propose the reclassi- fication of S. caldaria and two other Spirochaeta species as members of the emended genus Treponema. Whereas genera such as Borrelia and Sphaerochaeta possess well-distinguished genomic features related to their divergent lifestyles, the physiological and functional ge- nomic characteristics of Spirochaeta and Treponema appear to be intermixed and are of little taxonomic value. The 3,239,340 bp long genome of strain H1T with its 2,869 protein-coding and 59 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  18. It is time to use treponema-specific antibody screening tests for diagnosis of syphilis.

    PubMed

    Loeffelholz, Michael J; Binnicker, Matthew J

    2012-01-01

    Assays that detect treponema-specific antibodies, which are either automated or can be done as point-of-care tests, have been developed, some of which are FDA approved. These assays have the advantage of being easily performed and demonstrate high sensitivity, both key features of an infectious disease screening test. As a result, many high-volume clinical laboratories have begun to offer a reverse syphilis testing algorithm where a treponema-specific test is used for screening, followed by a nontreponemal test (i.e., rapid plasma reagin [RPR]) to assess disease activity and treatment status. Concerns about physicians being able to understand and apply this new testing algorithm have been expressed (8). In this point-counterpoint, Michael Loeffelholz of the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston explains why his laboratory has adopted this reverse algorithmic approach. Matthew Binnicker of the Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, explains why the reverse algorithm may not be suitable for all clinical laboratories and every clinical situation.

  19. The Treponema denticola Major Sheath Protein Is Predominantly Periplasmic and Has Only Limited Surface Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Caimano, Melissa J.; Bourell, Kenneth W.; Bannister, Teresa D.; Cox, David L.; Radolf, Justin D.

    1999-01-01

    The recent discovery that the Treponema pallidum genome encodes 12 orthologs of the Treponema denticola major sheath protein (Msp) prompted us to reexamine the cellular location and topology of the T. denticola polypeptide. Experiments initially were conducted to ascertain whether Msp forms an array on or within the T. denticola outer membrane. Transmission electron microscopy (EM) of negatively stained and ultrathin-sectioned organisms failed to identify a typical surface layer, whereas freeze-fracture EM revealed that the T. denticola outer membrane contains heterogeneous transmembrane proteins but no array. In contrast, a lattice-like structure was observed in vesicles released from mildly sonicated treponemes; combined EM and biochemical analyses demonstrated that this structure was the peptidoglycan sacculus. Immunoelectron microscopy (IEM) subsequently was performed to localize Msp in T. denticola. Examination of negatively stained whole mounts identified substantial amounts of Msp in sonicated organisms. IEM of ultrathin-sectioned, intact treponemes also demonstrated that the preponderance of antigen was unassociated with the outer membrane. Lastly, immunofluorescence analysis of treponemes embedded in agarose gel microdroplets revealed that only minor portions of Msp are surface exposed. Taken as a whole, our findings challenge the widely held belief that Msp forms an array within the T. denticola outer membrane and demonstrate, instead, that it is predominantly periplasmic with only limited surface exposure. These findings also have implications for our evolving understanding of the contribution(s) of Msp/Tpr orthologs to treponemal physiology and disease pathogenesis. PMID:10417176

  20. Treponema denticola TroR is a manganese- and iron-dependent transcriptional repressor

    PubMed Central

    Brett, Paul J; Burtnick, Mary N; Fenno, J Christopher; Gherardini, Frank C

    2008-01-01

    Treponema denticola harbours a genetic locus with significant homology to most of the previously characterized Treponema pallidum tro operon. Within this locus are five genes (troABCDR) encoding for the components of an ATP-binding cassette cation-transport system (troABCD) and a DtxR-like transcriptional regulator (troR). In addition, a σ70-like promoter and an 18 bp region of dyad symmetry were identified upstream of the troA start codon. This putative operator sequence demonstrated similarity to the T. pallidum TroR (TroRTp) binding sequence; however, the position of this motif with respect to the predicted tro promoters differed. Interestingly, unlike the T. pallidum orthologue, T. denticola TroR (TroRTd) possesses a C-terminal Src homology 3-like domain commonly associated with DtxR family members. In the present study, we show that TroRTd is a manganese- and iron-dependent transcriptional repressor using Escherichia coli reporter constructs and in T. denticola. In addition, we demonstrate that although TroRTd possessing various C-terminal deletions maintain metal-sensing capacities, these truncated proteins exhibit reduced repressor activities in comparison with full-length TroRTd. Based upon these findings, we propose that TroRTd represents a novel member of the DtxR family of transcriptional regulators and is likely to play an important role in regulating both manganese and iron homeostases in this spirochaete. PMID:18761626

  1. Treponema denticola TroR is a manganese- and iron-dependent transcriptional repressor.

    PubMed

    Brett, Paul J; Burtnick, Mary N; Fenno, J Christopher; Gherardini, Frank C

    2008-10-01

    Treponema denticola harbours a genetic locus with significant homology to most of the previously characterized Treponema pallidum tro operon. Within this locus are five genes (troABCDR) encoding for the components of an ATP-binding cassette cation-transport system (troABCD) and a DtxR-like transcriptional regulator (troR). In addition, a sigma(70)-like promoter and an 18 bp region of dyad symmetry were identified upstream of the troA start codon. This putative operator sequence demonstrated similarity to the T. pallidum TroR (TroR(Tp)) binding sequence; however, the position of this motif with respect to the predicted tro promoters differed. Interestingly, unlike the T. pallidum orthologue, T. denticola TroR (TroR(Td)) possesses a C-terminal Src homology 3-like domain commonly associated with DtxR family members. In the present study, we show that TroR(Td) is a manganese- and iron-dependent transcriptional repressor using Escherichia coli reporter constructs and in T. denticola. In addition, we demonstrate that although TroR(Td) possessing various C-terminal deletions maintain metal-sensing capacities, these truncated proteins exhibit reduced repressor activities in comparison with full-length TroR(Td). Based upon these findings, we propose that TroR(Td) represents a novel member of the DtxR family of transcriptional regulators and is likely to play an important role in regulating both manganese and iron homeostases in this spirochaete.

  2. Complete Genome Sequence of Treponema paraluiscuniculi, Strain Cuniculi A: The Loss of Infectivity to Humans Is Associated with Genome Decay

    PubMed Central

    Šmajs, David; Zobaníková, Marie; Strouhal, Michal; Čejková, Darina; Dugan-Rocha, Shannon; Pospíšilová, Petra; Norris, Steven J.; Albert, Tom; Qin, Xiang; Hallsworth-Pepin, Kym; Buhay, Christian; Muzny, Donna M.; Chen, Lei; Gibbs, Richard A.; Weinstock, George M.

    2011-01-01

    Treponema paraluiscuniculi is the causative agent of rabbit venereal spirochetosis. It is not infectious to humans, although its genome structure is very closely related to other pathogenic Treponema species including Treponema pallidum subspecies pallidum, the etiological agent of syphilis. In this study, the genome sequence of Treponema paraluiscuniculi, strain Cuniculi A, was determined by a combination of several high-throughput sequencing strategies. Whereas the overall size (1,133,390 bp), arrangement, and gene content of the Cuniculi A genome closely resembled those of the T. pallidum genome, the T. paraluiscuniculi genome contained a markedly higher number of pseudogenes and gene fragments (51). In addition to pseudogenes, 33 divergent genes were also found in the T. paraluiscuniculi genome. A set of 32 (out of 84) affected genes encoded proteins of known or predicted function in the Nichols genome. These proteins included virulence factors, gene regulators and components of DNA repair and recombination. The majority (52 or 61.9%) of the Cuniculi A pseudogenes and divergent genes were of unknown function. Our results indicate that T. paraluiscuniculi has evolved from a T. pallidum-like ancestor and adapted to a specialized host-associated niche (rabbits) during loss of infectivity to humans. The genes that are inactivated or altered in T. paraluiscuniculi are candidates for virulence factors important in the infectivity and pathogenesis of T. pallidum subspecies. PMID:21655244

  3. Serotype-Specific Protection Against Treponema hyodysenteriae Infection in Ligated Colonic Loops of Pigs Recovered from Swine Dysentery

    PubMed Central

    Joens, L. A.; Whipp, S. C.; Glock, R. D.; Neussen, Mary E.

    1983-01-01

    Resistance to Treponema hyodysenteriae (serotypes 1, 2, 3, and 4) infection was evaluated in ligated colonic loops in pigs recovered from swine dysentery. Lesions were present in most loops from recovered swine inoculated with heterologous serotypes; however, lesions were not present in loops of recovered swine inoculated with homologous serotypes. PMID:6822429

  4. PCR-based identification of Treponema maltophilum, T amylovorum, T medium, and T lecithinolyticum in primary root canal infections.

    PubMed

    Siqueira, José F; Rôças, Isabela N

    2003-07-01

    Molecular genetic methods have significantly contributed to the knowledge about the microbiota associated with infected root canals. Albeit spirochetes have been commonly observed in primary root canal infections, only recently they have been identified. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the occurrence of four treponemes-Treponema maltophilum, Treponema lecithinolyticum, Treponema amylovorum, and Treponema medium-in cases of primary endodontic infections associated with different forms of periradicular diseases through a 16S rDNA-based nested PCR assay. Samples were taken from thirty-one infected root canals associated with either asymptomatic or symptomatic apical periodontitis. DNA extracted from the samples was initially amplified using universal 16S rDNA primers, followed by a second round of amplification using the first PCR products to detect a specific fragment of the 16S rDNA of each target Treponema species. All cases were positive for the universal bacterial primers, indicating that samples contained bacterial DNA. Of the four target species, T. maltophilum was the most prevalent, being detected in 39% of the cases (33% of the asymptomatic cases and 50% of the symptomatic cases). T. lecithinolyticum was the next more prevalent among the species tested, being found in 26% of the samples (33% of asymptomatic cases and 10% of the symptomatic cases). T. amylovorum was found in 7% of the cases (5% of the asymptomatic cases and 10% of the symptomatic cases), while T. medium was in 13% of the cases (14% of the asymptomatic cases and 10% of the symptomatic cases). None of the species tested was significantly associated with clinical symptoms. This was possibly the hitherto first study to report the occurrence of T. lecithinolyticum, T. amylovorum, and T. medium in infections of endodontic origin. Overall, findings suggested that these oral treponemes, particularly T. maltophilum and T. lecithinolyticum, can be involved in the pathogenesis of

  5. Molecular basis of antimicrobial resistance in non-typable Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, L; Leranoz, S; Puig, M; Lorén, J G; Nikaido, H; Viñas, M

    1997-09-01

    Strains of the facultative anaerobe Haemophilus influenzae, both type b and non typable strains, are frequently multiresistant. The measurement of the antibiotic permeability of Haemophilus influenzae outer membrane (OM) shows that antibiotics can cross through the OM easily. Thus, enzymatic activity or efflux pumps could be responsible for multiresistance. An efflux system closely related to AcrAB of Escherichia coli is present in Haemophilus influenzae. However, their role in multiresistance seems irrelevant. Classical mechanisms such as plasmid exchange seems to be playing a major role in the multidrug resistance in Haemophilus influenzae.

  6. Seroprevalence and incidence of sexually transmitted diseases in a rural Ugandan population.

    PubMed

    Wagner, H U; Van Dyck, E; Roggen, E; Nunn, A J; Kamali, A; Schmid, D S; Dobbins, J G; Mulder, D W

    1994-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine in a rural population the age- and sex-specific prevalence and incidence rates of serological reactivity of 5 common sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) and their association with HIV-1 antibody status. Of the adult population of two villages (529 adults aged 15 years or more) 294 provided an adequate blood specimen both on enrollment and at 12 months. The sera were tested at 3 collaborating laboratories for antibodies against HIV-1, Treponema pallidum, Haemophilus ducreyi, Chlamydia trachomatis and herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and type 2 (HSV-2). A sample of 45 children were tested for HSV-1 and HSV-2. Seroprevalence rates in adults on enrollment were 7.8% for HIV-1, 10.8% for active syphilis, 10.4% for H. ducreyi, 66.0% for C. trachomatis, 91.2% for HSV-1 and 67.9% for HSV-2. Males were significantly more likely than females to be seropositive for H. ducreyi (15.6% versus 6.6%), but less likely to be HSV-2 antibody positive (57.0% versus 74.4%). Reactivity to H. ducreyi, C. trachomatis and HSV-2 rose with increasing age. In contrast, active syphilis showed no age trend. All STDs tended to be more common in those HIV-1 seropositive. Incidence rates over the 12 months were nil for HIV-1, 0.5% for syphilis, 1.2% for H. ducreyi, 11.3% for C. trachomatis, and 16.7% for HSV-2. The results of this exploratory study indicate that all STDs included are common in this rural population. The high HSV-2 prevalence rate among adolescents suggests that HSV-2 may be an important risk factor for HIV-1 infection.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. A defined syphilis vaccine candidate inhibits dissemination of Treponema pallidum subspecies pallidum

    PubMed Central

    Lithgow, Karen V.; Hof, Rebecca; Wetherell, Charmaine; Phillips, Drew; Houston, Simon; Cameron, Caroline E.

    2017-01-01

    Syphilis is a prominent disease in low- and middle-income countries, and a re-emerging public health threat in high-income countries. Syphilis elimination will require development of an effective vaccine that has thus far remained elusive. Here we assess the vaccine potential of Tp0751, a vascular adhesin from the causative agent of syphilis, Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum. Tp0751-immunized animals exhibit a significantly reduced bacterial organ burden upon T. pallidum challenge compared with unimmunized animals. Introduction of lymph nodes from Tp0751-immunized, T. pallidum-challenged animals to naive animals fails to induce infection, confirming sterile protection. These findings provide evidence that Tp0751 is a promising syphilis vaccine candidate. PMID:28145405

  8. Monoclonal antibodies that recognize a specific surface antigen of Treponema denticola.

    PubMed Central

    Simonson, L G; Rouse, R F; Bockowski, S W

    1988-01-01

    Spirochetes have been implicated as potential etiologic agents of periodontitis in humans. Murine monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) specific for a serogroup of Treponema denticola, an oral spirochete, were developed and characterized in this study. Antibodies secreted by clone IAA11 were judged to be the most useful, since they were able to detect 8 of 15 T. denticola strains. This MAb consisted of an immunoglobulin G3 heavy chain and a kappa light chain. MAb IAA11 was found to react with an epitope target located on the outer sheath of the cell wall. This MAb should be of diagnostic and scientific value in the study of T. denticola populations in human periodontitis. Images PMID:2447020

  9. Selenium-dependent growth of Treponema denticola: evidence for a clostridial-type glycine reductase.

    PubMed

    Rother, M; Böck, A; Wyss, C

    2001-12-01

    Assessment of the nutritional requirements of Treponema denticola disclosed a strict growth dependence on selenium. In vivo labeling of cells of this organism with (75)Se and electrophoretic analysis revealed three labeled bands, two of which were selenoproteins correlating in size with subunits A and B of glycine reductase. Antibodies directed against glycine- or betaine-reductase subunits of Eubacterium acidaminophilum specifically also reacted with proteins from cell lysates of T. denticola. Moreover, ORFs within the T. denticola genome sequence were found whose products display high sequence similarity to glycine-reductase subunits. These findings strongly support the notion that T. denticola ferments amino acids via the activity of glycine reductase, an enzyme previously thought to be restricted to gram-positive bacteria.

  10. Novel Treponema pallidum Recombinant Antigens for Syphilis Diagnostics: Current Status and Future Prospects

    PubMed Central

    Kubanov, Aleksey; Runina, Anastassia

    2017-01-01

    The recombinant protein technology considerably promoted the development of rapid and accurate treponema-specific laboratory diagnostics of syphilis infection. For the last ten years, the immunodominant recombinant inner membrane lipoproteins are proved to be sensitive and specific antigens for syphilis screening. However, the development of an enlarged T. pallidum antigen panel for diagnostics of early and late syphilis and differentiation of syphilis stages or cured syphilis remains as actual goal of multidisciplinary expertise. Current review revealed novel recombinant antigens: surface-exposed proteins, adhesins, and periplasmic and flagellar proteins, which are promising candidates for the improved syphilis serological diagnostics. The opportunities and limitations of diagnostic usage of these antigens are discussed and the criteria for selection of optimal antigens panel summarized. PMID:28523273

  11. Polymerase chain reaction of Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, and Tannerella forsythia in primary endodontic infections.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Brenda P F A; Montagner, Francisco; Jacinto, Rogério Castilho; Zaia, Alexandre A; Ferraz, Caio Cezar Randi; Souza-Filho, Francisco J

    2007-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the correlation between endodontic clinical signs and symptoms and the presence of Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, and Tannerella forsythia or their association by nested polymerase chain reaction assay. Microbial samples were taken from 50 cases with necrotic pulp tissues in primary infections. DNA was extracted from the samples, which were analyzed for the presence of three endodontic pathogens by using species-specific primers. P gingivalis, T denticola, and T forsythia were detected in 46%, 38%, and 22% of the symptomatic cases, respectively. The bacterial complex composed by T forsythia, P gingivalis, and T denticola was found in 14% of the cases with spontaneous pain, tenderness to percussion, swelling, and pain on palpation. The high prevalence of P gingivalis, T denticola, and T forsythia in the samples examined suggests that these bacteria are related to the etiology of symptomatic periradicular diseases.

  12. Pathogenic synergism between Treponema hyodysenteriae and other selected anaerobes in gnotobiotic pigs.

    PubMed Central

    Whipp, S C; Robinson, I M; Harris, D L; Glock, R D; Matthews, P J; Alexander, T J

    1979-01-01

    Gnotobiotic pigs were orally exposed to various anaerobes at 6 to 9 days of age and similarly inoculated with Treponema hyodysenteriae B204 3 to 6 days later. Watery diarrhea and fecal excretion of large quantities of mucus and some fibrin clots were observed 4 to 20 days after inoculation with B204 if other anaerobes were present. Colonic lesions characteristic of swine dysentery were observed when B204 was present with Fusobacterium necrophorum, three strains of Bacteroides vulgatus, a Clostridium species, and Listeria denitrificans individually and when some of these microbes were present in various combinations, but not when B204 was present alone. These results are consistent with the conclusion that T. hyodysenteriae is the primary pathogen in the etiology of swine dysentery and that the presence of one or more other anaerobes is a prerequisite for expression of pathogenicity of T. hyodysenteriae. This prerequisite can be met by a variety of anaerobes. PMID:528047

  13. Localization of Spirochetes with the Structural Characteristics of Treponema hyodysenteriae in the Lesions of Swine Dysentery

    PubMed Central

    Glock, R. D.; Harris, D. L.; Kluge, J. P.

    1974-01-01

    The large intestines of pigs with swine dysentery were examined by phase, light, and electron microscopy at intervals up to 11 days after oral inoculation with mucosal scrapings from infected pigs. Large spirochetes with the structural characteristics of Treponema hyodysenteriae were found only in infected pigs and were first observed in small numbers in the lumen of the large intestine 2 days after inoculation. Numerous large spirochetes were present on the luminal surface and in mucosal crypts as lesions developed. Degenerative changes were first observed in the apical portion of epithelial cells in close contact with large spirochetes. These large spirochetes were found intact in goblet cells and epithelial cells in the early stages of the disease and were numerous within degenerating epithelial cells as lesions became more advanced. Invasion beyond the lamina propria was not detected. These observations demonstrated the relationship between pathogenic large spirochetes and the mucosa of the large intestine in a specific disease, swine dysentery. Images PMID:4587383

  14. Bipartite Topology of Treponema pallidum Repeat Proteins C/D and I

    PubMed Central

    Anand, Arvind; LeDoyt, Morgan; Karanian, Carson; Luthra, Amit; Koszelak-Rosenblum, Mary; Malkowski, Michael G.; Puthenveetil, Robbins; Vinogradova, Olga; Radolf, Justin D.

    2015-01-01

    We previously identified Treponema pallidum repeat proteins TprC/D, TprF, and TprI as candidate outer membrane proteins (OMPs) and subsequently demonstrated that TprC is not only a rare OMP but also forms trimers and has porin activity. We also reported that TprC contains N- and C-terminal domains (TprCN and TprCC) orthologous to regions in the major outer sheath protein (MOSPN and MOSPC) of Treponema denticola and that TprCC is solely responsible for β-barrel formation, trimerization, and porin function by the full-length protein. Herein, we show that TprI also possesses bipartite architecture, trimeric structure, and porin function and that the MOSPC-like domains of native TprC and TprI are surface-exposed in T. pallidum, whereas their MOSPN-like domains are tethered within the periplasm. TprF, which does not contain a MOSPC-like domain, lacks amphiphilicity and porin activity, adopts an extended inflexible structure, and, in T. pallidum, is tightly bound to the protoplasmic cylinder. By thermal denaturation, the MOSPN and MOSPC-like domains of TprC and TprI are highly thermostable, endowing the full-length proteins with impressive conformational stability. When expressed in Escherichia coli with PelB signal sequences, TprC and TprI localize to the outer membrane, adopting bipartite topologies, whereas TprF is periplasmic. We propose that the MOSPN-like domains enhance the structural integrity of the cell envelope by anchoring the β-barrels within the periplasm. In addition to being bona fide T. pallidum rare outer membrane proteins, TprC/D and TprI represent a new class of dual function, bipartite bacterial OMP. PMID:25805501

  15. Molecular characterization of a chemotaxis operon in the oral spirochete, Treponema denticola.

    PubMed

    Greene, S R; Stamm, L V

    1999-05-17

    A chemotaxis gene cluster from Treponema denticola (Td), a pathogenic spirochete associated with human periodontal diseases, was cloned, sequenced, and analyzed. The gene cluster contained three chemotaxis (che) genes (cheA, cheW, and cheY) and an open reading frame (cheX) that is homologous with Treponema pallidum (Tp) and Borrelia burgdorferi (Bb) cheX. The Td che genes have the same transcriptional orientation with a sigma 70-like promoter located upstream of cheA and a stem-loop structure characteristic of a Rho-independent transcriptional terminator downstream of cheY. Primer extension analysis identified a transcriptional start point six nucleotides (nt) downstream of the -10 (TAAAAA) promoter sequence. Reverse-transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) data indicated that cheA through cheY are co-transcribed and suggested that transcription is terminated after cheY. The gene organization of the Td che operon is identical to that of the Tp che operon. Southern blot analysis indicated the presence of one copy of each che gene on the Td genome. The cheA, cheW, cheX, and cheY genes are 2403, 1332, 462, and 438nt long, respectively, and encode proteins with predicted molecular masses of 88.2, 49.7, 16.8, and 16. 0kDa, respectively. Functional domains of the T. denticola CheA and CheY proteins are highly conserved with those of the Escherichia coli (Ec) CheA and CheY proteins. Phylogenetic analysis of Td CheY indicated that it is closely related to Tp CheY and Bb CheY3.

  16. Relationships of Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae Strains to Hemolytic and Nonhemolytic Haemophilus haemolyticus Strains▿

    PubMed Central

    McCrea, Kirk W.; Xie, Jingping; LaCross, Nathan; Patel, Mayurika; Mukundan, Deepa; Murphy, Timothy F.; Marrs, Carl F.; Gilsdorf, Janet R.

    2008-01-01

    Haemophilus influenzae is both a human respiratory pathogen and pharyngeal commensal, while H. haemolyticus, the closest phylogenetic relative of H. influenzae, is arguably a strict pharyngeal commensal. A hemolytic phenotype has historically differentiated H. haemolyticus from H. influenzae, but the recent recognition of significant nonhemolytic H. haemolyticus colonization has decreased this trait's resolvability. Given this and the potential of recombination between the species, we examined the distribution of microbiologic and molecular traits between collections of H. influenzae and H. haemolyticus strains separated within a dendrogram obtained by multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA). All strains hybridizing with a probe to iga, a gene encoding an immunoglobulin A protease of H. influenzae, clustered apart from strains that did not hybridize with the probe. Other traits also segregated significantly along this division, suggesting a separation of the species. Of note, the LOS genes licA, lic2A, and lgtC of H. influenzae were approximately 2, 6, and 54 times, respectively, more prevalent in H. influenzae than in H. haemolyticus. In contrast to species separation, interspecies recombination was evidenced by the inability of single gene sequences to phylogenetically separate the species and by the “fuzzy” distribution of some species-specific traits across the species dividing line. Together, these data support the historically accurate and pragmatic division of these species while recognizing their potential for recombination. Future comparative genomic studies identifying common and distinctive genes could be useful in evaluating their role in the commensal or virulent growth, respectively, of H. influenzae. PMID:18039799

  17. Ovine Haemophilus somnus: experimental intracisternal infection and antigenic comparison with bovine Haemophilus somnus.

    PubMed Central

    Lees, V W; Yates, W D; Corbeil, L B

    1994-01-01

    Experimental infection was produced by two of four isolates of ovine Haemophilus somnus given by intracisternal inoculation into two to three-month-old lambs. Isolate 2041 (originally obtained from a septicemic lamb in Alberta) caused lethal infection in eight of nine lambs, isolate 67p from the prepuce of a normal lamb produced less acute disease in four of nine lambs, and the other two isolates (93p and 1190) caused no detectable disease. Significant lesions were limited to the brain and spinal cord. Purulent meningitis was characteristic but vasculitis or septicemia were not detected, perhaps due to the route of inoculation. Since a difference in virulence was noted among strains, we analyzed surface proteins thought to be virulence factors of bovine H. somnus. Protein profiles of bovine and ovine H. somnus done by sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed similar patterns for virulent bovine isolates and ovine septicemic isolates. Preputial isolates showed a lower molecular mass major outer membrane protein than septicemic isolates. Antigenic analysis revealed that outer membrane proteins p270, p78, p76, p40, and p39 were detected in both ovine and bovine isolates except for 1190, which was probably not a true H. somnus isolate. Thus the preputial and septicemic isolates of ovine H. somnus were similar to bovine H. somnus in pathogenicity and in surface antigens. Images Fig. 1a. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. PMID:7954123

  18. Haemophilus influenzae triggers autophagy in HEp-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Espinoza-Mellado, María del Rosario; Reyes-Picaso, Carolina; Garcés-Pérez, Miriam S; Jardón-Serrano, Cynthia V; López-Villegas, Edgar O; Giono-Cerezo, Silvia

    2016-03-01

    The MAP-LC3 system regulates the intracellular formation of autophagy-associated vacuoles. These vacuoles contain the LC3 protein; thus it has been utilized as a marker to identify autophagosomes. The aim of our study was to investigate whether Haemophilus influenzae strains and their supernatants could activate autophagy in human larynx carcinoma cell line (HEp-2). We demonstrate that higher expression of the LC3B-II protein was induced, particularly by nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) 49766 and by supernatants, containing <50 kDa proteins, of both strains. Ultrastructural studies demonstrate vacuoles with a double membrane and/or membrane material inside, showing similar features to those of autophagic vacuoles. Together, our findings demonstrate that H. influenzae strains and their supernatants trigger an autophagic process.

  19. Antimicrobial susceptibility of 51 strains of Haemophilus pleuropneumoniae.

    PubMed Central

    Gilbride, K A; Rosendal, S

    1984-01-01

    Fifty-one strains of Haemophilus pleuropneumoniae were tested for susceptibility to 27 antimicrobial agents using agar disc diffusion, broth-tube dilution and microdilution methods. There was generally good agreement between the interpretation of the disc diffusion inhibition zones and the actual minimal inhibitory concentrations obtained with the dilution methods. The agreement between the results obtained with the broth-tube dilution method and the microdilution method was very good. Three strains were resistant to penicillin, ampicillin, carbenicillin, methicillin and tetracycline. One of those was also resistant to chloramphenicol. Forty strains were resistant to streptomycin, 23 strains were resistant to novobiocin and seven were resistant to triple sulfa. It is thus necessary to consider resistance development against antimicrobial agents chosen for the treatment of pleuro-pneumonia in pigs caused by Haemophilus pleuropneumoniae. PMID:6713256

  20. Molecular basis of the efficacy of cefaclor against Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed Central

    Picard, M; Malouin, F

    1992-01-01

    Cefaclor sustained its inhibitory activity against a beta-lactamase-producing strain of Haemophilus influenzae. Although a relatively high permeability coefficient was calculated for ampicillin compared with that calculated for cefaclor, the resulting periplasmic concentration of cefaclor was 5.7 times that of ampicillin. The efficacy of cefaclor may be due to its higher beta-lactamase resistance, which allows it to achieve a greater periplasmic concentration and adequate binding to crucial penicillin-binding proteins. Images PMID:1489208

  1. Isolation of Haemophilus influenzae and Haemophilus parainfluenzae in urethral exudates from men with acute urethritis: a descriptive study of 52 cases.

    PubMed

    Deza, Gustavo; Martin-Ezquerra, Gemma; Gómez, Julià; Villar-García, Judit; Supervia, August; Pujol, Ramon M

    2016-02-01

    To describe the clinical characteristics and therapeutic outcomes from male patients diagnosed of Haemophilus spp urethritis. A chart review of patients who presented to our hospital from January 2013 to December 2014 with symptoms of acute urethritis in which Haemophilus spp was isolated in their urethral samples was performed. Haemophilus spp was isolated in 52 out of 413 urethral samples (12.6%) received in our laboratory from patients with symptoms of acute urethritis during the study period. Seven cases corresponded to Haemophilus influenzae and 45 cases to Haemophilus parainfluenzae. The most common clinical presentation was mucopurulent urethral discharge (71%). Eight per cent were HIV-infected patients, and 60% were men who have sex with men. Haemophilus spp was isolated as a single pathogen in 6.8% (28 of 413) of cases. Seventeen per cent of Haemophilus spp were β-lactamase producers. All patients reported having practiced unprotected insertive oral sex the month before consultation, and five of them denied having had another sexual contact apart from this exposure. In all cases in which follow-up was available, empirical treatment achieved a complete clinical resolution. Haemophilus spp was considered a pathogen in at least 6.8% of the patients from the evaluated area. It affected men regardless their sexual orientation or HIV status. Unprotected oral sex could play a role in its transmission. The limitations of the study (small sample size and lack of a representative control group) do not allow to prove the true pathogenic role of Haemophilus spp in acute urethritis. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  2. Identification of Haemophilus influenzae and Haemophilus haemolyticus by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bruin, J P; Kostrzewa, M; van der Ende, A; Badoux, P; Jansen, R; Boers, S A; Diederen, B M W

    2014-02-01

    Generally accepted laboratory methods that have been used for decades do not reliably distinguish between H. influenzae and H. haemolyticus isolates. H. haemolyticus strains are often incorrectly identified as nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi). To distinguish H. influenzae from H. haemolyticus we have created a new database on the matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) bio-typer 2 and compared the results with routine determination of Haemophilus (growth requirement for X and V factor), and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). In total we have tested 277 isolates, 244 H. influenzae and 33 H. haemolyticus. Using MLST as the gold standard, the agreement of MALDI-TOF MS was 99.6 %. MALDI-TOF MS allows reliable and rapid discrimination between H. influenzae and H. haemolyticus.

  3. Comparison of laboratory-based and phylogenetic methods to distinguish between Haemophilus influenzae and H. haemolyticus

    PubMed Central

    Sandstedt, Sara A.; Zhang, Lixin; Patel, Mayurika; McCrea, Kirk W.; Qin, Zhaohui; Marrs, Carl F.; Gilsdorf, Janet R.

    2008-01-01

    Summary New methods to distinguish between nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae and nonhemolytic Haemophilus haemolyticus were compared. The results of iga variable region hybridization to dotblots and library-on-a-slide microarrays were more similar to a “gold standard” multigene phylogenetic tree than iga conserved region hybridization or P6 7F3 epitope immunoblots. PMID:18652852

  4. Haemophilus influenzae Pyomyositis in a Patient with Diabetic Ketoacidosis: A Unique Case and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    George, Gemlyn; Climaco, Antoinette

    2017-01-01

    Haemophilus influenzae is a Gram-negative bacillus commonly known to cause upper respiratory tract infections. Skin and soft tissue infections are very uncommon. Of these, the majority were associated with necrotizing fasciitis requiring emergent debridement. We report a case of pyomyositis caused by Haemophilus influenzae in an adult with diabetes. PMID:28352482

  5. [Haemophilus influenzae purulent meningitis in adults: looking for a predisposing factor].

    PubMed

    Boukadida, Jalel; Hannachi, Neila

    2002-05-01

    We bring back an adult case of purulent meningitis to Haemophilus influenzae. We insist on the particular aspects of the host of this meningitis type at the adult. These aspects must be searched every time that Haemophilus influenzae is isolated in cerebrospinal fluid in adult's meningitis.

  6. Isolation and characterization of Treponema phagedenis-like spirochetes from digital dermatitis lesions in Swedish dairy cattle.

    PubMed

    Pringle, Märit; Bergsten, Christer; Fernström, Lise-Lotte; Höök, Helena; Johansson, Karl-Erik

    2008-10-20

    Digital dermatitis in cattle is an emerging infectious disease. Ulcerative lesions are typically located on the plantar skin between the heel bulbs and adjacent to the coronet. Spirochetes of the genus Treponema are found in high numbers in the lesions and are likely to be involved in the pathogenesis. The aim of this study was to obtain pure cultures of spirochetes from cattle with digital dermatitis and to describe them further. Tissue samples and swabs from active digital dermatitis lesions were used for culturing. Pure isolates were subjected to, molecular typing through 16S rRNA gene sequencing, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and an intergenic spacer PCR developed for Treponema spp. as well as API-ZYM and antimicrobial susceptibility tests. The antimicrobial agents used were tiamulin, valnemulin, tylosin, aivlosin, lincomycin and doxycycline. Seven spirochete isolates from five herds were obtained. Both 16S rRNA gene sequences, which were identical except for three polymorphic nucleotide positions, and the intergenic spacer PCR indicated that all isolates were of one yet unnamed species, most closely related to Treponema phagedenis. The enzymatic profile and antimicrobial susceptibility pattern were also similar for all isolates. However it was possible to separate the isolates through their PFGE and RAPD banding pattern. This is the first report on isolation of a Treponema sp. from cattle with digital dermatitis in Scandinavia. The phylotype isolated has previously been cultured from samples from cattle in the USA and the UK and is closely related to T. phagedenis. While very similar, the isolates in this study were possible to differentiate through PFGE and RAPD indicating that these methods are suitable for subtyping of this phylotype. No antimicrobial resistance could be detected among the tested isolates.

  7. Isolation and characterization of Treponema phagedenis-like spirochetes from digital dermatitis lesions in Swedish dairy cattle

    PubMed Central

    Pringle, Märit; Bergsten, Christer; Fernström, Lise-Lotte; Höök, Helena; Johansson, Karl-Erik

    2008-01-01

    Background Digital dermatitis in cattle is an emerging infectious disease. Ulcerative lesions are typically located on the plantar skin between the heel bulbs and adjacent to the coronet. Spirochetes of the genus Treponema are found in high numbers in the lesions and are likely to be involved in the pathogenesis. The aim of this study was to obtain pure cultures of spirochetes from cattle with digital dermatitis and to describe them further. Methods Tissue samples and swabs from active digital dermatitis lesions were used for culturing. Pure isolates were subjected to, molecular typing through 16S rRNA gene sequencing, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and an intergenic spacer PCR developed for Treponema spp. as well as API-ZYM and antimicrobial susceptibility tests. The antimicrobial agents used were tiamulin, valnemulin, tylosin, aivlosin, lincomycin and doxycycline. Results Seven spirochete isolates from five herds were obtained. Both 16S rRNA gene sequences, which were identical except for three polymorphic nucleotide positions, and the intergenic spacer PCR indicated that all isolates were of one yet unnamed species, most closely related to Treponema phagedenis. The enzymatic profile and antimicrobial susceptibility pattern were also similar for all isolates. However it was possible to separate the isolates through their PFGE and RAPD banding pattern. Conclusion This is the first report on isolation of a Treponema sp. from cattle with digital dermatitis in Scandinavia. The phylotype isolated has previously been cultured from samples from cattle in the USA and the UK and is closely related to T. phagedenis. While very similar, the isolates in this study were possible to differentiate through PFGE and RAPD indicating that these methods are suitable for subtyping of this phylotype. No antimicrobial resistance could be detected among the tested isolates. PMID:18937826

  8. Short communication: minimum bactericidal concentration of disinfectants evaluated for bovine digital dermatitis-associated Treponema phagedenis-like spirochetes.

    PubMed

    Hartshorn, R E; Thomas, E C; Anklam, K; Lopez-Benavides, M G; Buchalova, M; Hemling, T C; Döpfer, D

    2013-05-01

    The bacterial spirochetes, Treponema spp., are thought to be a major contributor to the etiology of bovine digital dermatitis (DD), a skin disease with worldwide economic impact. Hoofbath strategies are commonly used in an attempt to control and prevent the development of DD and continuing research has been done to develop an optimal hoofbath strategy for this purpose. The aim of this study was to develop a protocol that can be used as part of the screening process for candidate hoofbath disinfectants. This protocol allows an accurate determination of the in vitro minimum inhibitory concentration and minimum bactericidal concentration of a series of disinfectants for Treponema microorganisms. Assays were performed in triplicate for each of the disinfectants at 30-s and 10-min exposure times and exposed to 10 and 20% manure (vol/vol). The results of this study can be used to categorize disinfectants based on the effect of exposure and manure concentration regarding their ability to inhibit Treponema growth. This information can then aid in optimizing strategies for hoofbath-based control of DD development and spread. Copyright © 2013 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Classification, Identification, and Clinical Significance of Haemophilus and Aggregatibacter Species with Host Specificity for Humans

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The aim of this review is to provide a comprehensive update on the current classification and identification of Haemophilus and Aggregatibacter species with exclusive or predominant host specificity for humans. Haemophilus influenzae and some of the other Haemophilus species are commonly encountered in the clinical microbiology laboratory and demonstrate a wide range of pathogenicity, from life-threatening invasive disease to respiratory infections to a nonpathogenic, commensal lifestyle. New species of Haemophilus have been described (Haemophilus pittmaniae and Haemophilus sputorum), and the new genus Aggregatibacter was created to accommodate some former Haemophilus and Actinobacillus species (Aggregatibacter aphrophilus, Aggregatibacter segnis, and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans). Aggregatibacter species are now a dominant etiology of infective endocarditis caused by fastidious organisms (HACEK endocarditis), and A. aphrophilus has emerged as an important cause of brain abscesses. Correct identification of Haemophilus and Aggregatibacter species based on phenotypic characterization can be challenging. It has become clear that 15 to 20% of presumptive H. influenzae isolates from the respiratory tracts of healthy individuals do not belong to this species but represent nonhemolytic variants of Haemophilus haemolyticus. Due to the limited pathogenicity of H. haemolyticus, the proportion of misidentified strains may be lower in clinical samples, but even among invasive strains, a misidentification rate of 0.5 to 2% can be found. Several methods have been investigated for differentiation of H. influenzae from its less pathogenic relatives, but a simple method for reliable discrimination is not available. With the implementation of identification by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry, the more rarely encountered species of Haemophilus and Aggregatibacter will increasingly be identified in clinical microbiology

  10. Evidence of Multiple Treponema Phylotypes Involved in Bovine Digital Dermatitis as Shown by 16S rRNA Gene Analysis and Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization▿

    PubMed Central

    Klitgaard, Kirstine; Boye, Mette; Capion, Nynne; Jensen, Tim K.

    2008-01-01

    The etiopathogenesis of the skin disease digital dermatitis (DD), an important cause of lameness in cattle, remains uncertain. Microscopically, the disease appears to be polymicrobial, with spirochetes as the predominant bacteria. The objective of this study was to identify the main part of the bacteria involved in DD lesions of cattle by using culture-independent molecular methods. Ten different phylotypes of Treponema were identified either by 16S rRNA gene sequencing of bacteria from DD lesions or by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis using phylotype-specific 16S rRNA-directed oligonucleotide probes. Two phylotypes, phylotype 1 (PT1) and PT2, were not closely related to any characterized treponemal species. PT7 was 99.3% identical to Treponema denticola, while PT9 resembled T. vincentii by 96%. The remaining phylotypes, PT3, PT4, PT5, PT6, and PT8, and Treponema brennaborense had previously been isolated from DD lesions. Forty DD biopsy specimens were examined for Treponema by FISH. With one exception, all of the biopsy specimens revealed epidermotropic, intermingled infection with three or more different phylotypes (mean, 4.7). The most prevalent species were PT1 (95%), PT6 (93%), and PT3 (85%). While colonization by PT3 was confined to the surface of the epidermis, both PT1 and PT6 invaded deep into the stratum spinosum and were seen in ulcerated dermal papillae. In two cases, all 10 phylotypes were demonstrated. Furthermore, FISH with a Treponema group-specific probe showed that Treponema accounted for more than 90% of the total bacterial population in the biopsy specimens. These data strongly suggest that a group of apparently symbiotic Treponema species are involved as primary bacterial pathogens in DD. PMID:18562583

  11. Haemophilus influenzae: a forgotten cause of neonatal sepsis?

    PubMed

    Dobbelaere, A; Jeannin, P; Bovyn, T; Ide, L

    2015-06-01

    Due to the introduction of the conjugate vaccine against serotype b, neonatal sepsis caused by Haemophilus influenzae became very rare. There is little data in Belgium concerning the prevalence of H. influenzae early onset neonatal sepsis and articles about neonatal sepsis and H. influenzae published in the last decade are scarce. We report two invasive infections with a non-typeable H. influenzae. These cases show that neonatal sepsis caused by non-typeable H. influenzae may be underestimated and we believe that there is need for a better registration of this kind of infection.

  12. Interleukin-1-like activity in capsular material from Haemophilus actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, W; Kamin, S; Meghji, S; Wilson, M

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes the activity of a bacterial surface component (capsular material, CM) in biological assays for interleukin-1 (IL-1). CM from the periodontal pathogen Haemophilus actinomycetemcomitans was tested in the following in vitro assays: mouse thymocyte proliferation (LAF assay), stimulation of collagenase and prostaglandin (PG) E2 synthesis by articular chondrocytes, and stimulation of PGE2 synthesis by fibroblasts. In all these assays, CM gave a response similar to an IL-1 preparation. This ability to mimic IL-1 suggests an important role for CM in both cell-mediated immunity and connective tissue destruction in localized juvenile periodontitis (LJP). PMID:3032779

  13. Inducible repair system in Haemophilus influenzae unaccompanied by mutation. [uv

    SciTech Connect

    Notani, N.K.; Setlow, J.K.

    1980-07-01

    Weigle reactivation of ultraviolet-irradiated HPlc1 phage was observed after ultraviolet or mitomycin C treatment of Haemophilus influenzae cells. The amount of reactivation was considerably increased when the treated cells were incubated in growth medium before infection. The presence of chloramphenicol during this incubation abolished the reactivation. No mutation of this phage accompanied the reactivation. When cells were treated so as to produce a maximal reactivation of phage, neither reactivation nor mutation of cells was observed. It is concluded that H. influenzae has an inducible repair system that is not accompanied by mutation.

  14. Susceptibility of Ampicillin-Resistant Haemophilus influenzae to Seven Penicillins

    PubMed Central

    Thornsberry, C.; Baker, C. N.; Kirven, L. A.; Swenson, J. M.

    1976-01-01

    Sixty-seven clinical isolates of Haemophilus influenzae from various sections of the United States, England, and Germany were tested for susceptibility to penicillin, ampicillin, amoxicillin, epicillin, carbenicillin, ticarcillin, and methicillin. Fifty-three of the strains had previously been judged to be ampicillin resistant and 14 had been determined to be ampicillin susceptible. Fifty-two of the 53 resistant strains produced β-lactamase, but none of the susceptible strains produced it. On the basis of minimal inhibitory concentrations, the most active compounds were ticarcillin and carbenicillin. Whether this greater activity is useful clinically has not been established. PMID:1083202

  15. Major Membrane Protein TDE2508 Regulates Adhesive Potency in Treponema denticola

    PubMed Central

    Abiko, Yuki; Nagano, Keiji; Yoshida, Yasuo; Yoshimura, Fuminobu

    2014-01-01

    The cultivation and genetic manipulation of Treponema denticola, a Gram-negative oral spirochaeta associated with periodontal diseases, is still challenging. In this study, we formulated a simple medium based on a commercially available one, and established a transformation method with high efficiency. We then analyzed proteins in a membrane fraction in T. denticola and identified 16 major membrane-associated proteins, and characterized one of them, TDE2508, whose biological function was not yet known. Although this protein, which exhibited a complex conformation, was presumably localized in the outer membrane, we did not find conclusive evidence that it was exposed on the cell surface. Intriguingly, a TDE2508-deficient mutant exhibited significantly increased biofilm formation and adherent activity on human gingival epithelial cells. However, the protein deficiency did not alter autoaggregation, coaggregation with Porphyromonas gingivalis, hemagglutination, cell surface hydrophobicity, motility, or expression of Msp which was reported to be an adherent molecule in this bacteria. In conclusion, the major membrane protein TDE2508 regulates biofilm formation and the adhesive potency of T. denticola, although the underlying mechanism remains unclear. PMID:24586498

  16. Purification and characterization of an enzyme produced by Treponema denticola capable of hydrolyzing synthetic trypsin substrates.

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, K; Makinen, K K; Loesche, W J

    1986-01-01

    An enzyme from Treponema denticola that hydrolyzes a synthetic trypsin substrate, N-alpha-benzoyl-L-arginine-p-nitroanilide (BAPNA), was purified to near homogeneity, as judged by gel electrophoresis. The molecular weight of the enzyme was estimated to be ca. 69,000 by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and ca. 50,000 by gel filtration on Sephadex G-100. The pH optimum for the hydrolysis of BAPNA was around 8.5. The enzyme was heat labile and irreversibly inactivated at low pH values. Enzyme activity was enhanced by Ca2+, Mg2+, and Ba2+ but inhibited by Mn2+, Hg2+, Co2+, and Zn2+. Metal chelators and sulfhydryl reagents had no effect on this activity. The enzyme was inhibited by certain protease inhibitors such as diisopropyl fluorophosphate, N-alpha-p-tosyl-L-lysine chloromethyl ketone, phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride, L-1-tosylamide-2-phenylethylchloromethyl ketone, alpha-1-antitrypsin, and soybean trypsin inhibitor. The Km values for BAPNA and N-alpha-benzoyl-L-arginine ethyl ester were 0.05 and 0.12 mM, respectively, and the Vmax values were higher than those observed with trypsin. Although the purified enzyme hydrolyzed some low-molecular-weight synthetic trypsin substrates, it did not hydrolyze casein, hemoglobin, azocasein, azocoll, bovine serum albumin, or gelatin. Thus, this enzyme is probably not a protease but is capable of hydrolyzing ester, amide, and peptide bonds involving the carboxyl group of arginine and lysine. Images PMID:3013780

  17. Porphyromonas gingivalis and Treponema denticola Mixed Microbial Infection in a Rat Model of Periodontal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Raj K.; Rajapakse, Sunethra; Meka, Archana; Hamrick, Clayton; Pola, Sheela; Bhattacharyya, Indraneel; Nair, Madhu; Wallet, Shannon M.; Aukhil, Ikramuddin; Kesavalu, Lakshmyya

    2010-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis and Treponema denticola are periodontal pathogens that express virulence factors associated with the pathogenesis of periodontitis. In this paper we tested the hypothesis that P. gingivalis and T. denticola are synergistic in terms of virulence; using a model of mixed microbial infection in rats. Groups of rats were orally infected with either P. gingivalis or T. denticola or mixed microbial infections for 7 and 12 weeks. P. gingivalis genomic DNA was detected more frequently by PCR than T. denticola. Both bacteria induced significantly high IgG, IgG2b, IgG1, IgG2a antibody levels indicating a stimulation of Th1 and Th2 immune response. Radiographic and morphometric measurements demonstrated that rats infected with the mixed infection exhibited significantly more alveolar bone loss than shaminfected control rats. Histology revealed apical migration of junctional epithelium, rete ridge elongation, and crestal alveolar bone resorption; resembling periodontal disease lesion. These results showed that P. gingivalis and T. denticola exhibit no synergistic virulence in a rat model of periodontal disease. PMID:20592756

  18. Metagenomic analysis reveals presence of Treponema denticola in a tissue biopsy of the Iceman.

    PubMed

    Maixner, Frank; Thomma, Anton; Cipollini, Giovanna; Widder, Stefanie; Rattei, Thomas; Zink, Albert

    2014-01-01

    Ancient hominoid genome studies can be regarded by definition as metagenomic analyses since they represent a mixture of both hominoid and microbial sequences in an environment. Here, we report the molecular detection of the oral spirochete Treponema denticola in ancient human tissue biopsies of the Iceman, a 5,300-year-old Copper Age natural ice mummy. Initially, the metagenomic data of the Iceman's genomic survey was screened for bacterial ribosomal RNA (rRNA) specific reads. Through ranking the reads by abundance a relatively high number of rRNA reads most similar to T. denticola was detected. Mapping of the metagenome sequences against the T. denticola genome revealed additional reads most similar to this opportunistic pathogen. The DNA damage pattern of specifically mapped reads suggests an ancient origin of these sequences. The haematogenous spread of bacteria of the oral microbiome often reported in the recent literature could already explain the presence of metagenomic reads specific for T. denticola in the Iceman's bone biopsy. We extended, however, our survey to an Iceman gingival tissue sample and a mouth swab sample and could thereby detect T. denticola and Porphyrimonas gingivalis, another important member of the human commensal oral microflora. Taken together, this study clearly underlines the opportunity to detect disease-associated microorganisms when applying metagenomics-enabled approaches on datasets of ancient human remains.

  19. Unsustained multiplication of treponema pallidum (nichols virulent strain) in vitro in the presence of oxygen.

    PubMed Central

    Sandok, P L; Jenkin, H M; Matthews, H M; Roberts, M S

    1978-01-01

    Treponema pallidum (Nichols virulent strain) was incubated with or without oxygen using a modified medium supplemented with reduced glutathione and a variety of nutrients (PRNF10-B). Two- to fourfold increases in treponemal numbers were observed in cultures without mammalian cells within 96 h of incubation under 5 to 6% oxygen. Treponemal motility and multiplication were maintained more satisfactorily in cultures that were diluted and transferred daily, using an equal volume of fresh medium. Treponemes incubated without oxygen did not significantly increase in number. Virulent microorganisms were detected for at least 96 h in the cell-free system. In the presence of 3 to 4% oxygen, two- to fivefold increases in treponemal numbers were observed in the supernatant fluids of cultures containing human prepuce cells after 48 to 120 h at 35 degrees C. Without oxygen, treponemal numbers rarely approached a threefold increase. Virulent treponemes were detected by the rabbit skin lesion test after at least 120 h in vitro. Regardless of the system of incubation, increases in treponemal numbers could not be sustained for longer than 120 h, and treponemal virulence decreased as a function of time in vitro. PMID:344209

  20. Dermal inflammation elicited by synthetic analogs of Treponema pallidum and Borrelia burgdorferi lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Norgard, M V; Riley, B S; Richardson, J A; Radolf, J D

    1995-04-01

    The membrane lipoproteins of Treponema pallidum and Borrelia burgdorferi have potent immunostimulatory properties in vitro, implicating them as major inflammatory mediators in syphilis and Lyme disease. Recently, we reported that synthetic lipohexapeptide analogs (lipopeptides) of the lipoproteins could be used as surrogates for native spirochetal lipoproteins in immune cell activation studies in vitro. The present study was designed to evaluate the inflammatory properties of the lipopeptides in vivo and to correlate the cellular responses to these synthetic analogs with the histopathology of syphilis and Lyme disease. Lipopeptides corresponding to the 47-kDa major membrane lipoprotein of T. pallidum and the outer surface protein A of B. burgdorferi injected intradermally induced dose-dependent dermal inflammation in mice; the initial predominantly neutrophilic (mice) or heterophilic (rabbits) cellular infiltrates were followed by infiltrates consisting predominantly of mononuclear cells. The intradermal response of rabbits to the 47-kDa lipopeptide was strikingly similar to that observed for animals infected intradermally with T. pallidum. In all cases, lipopolysaccharide was substantially more potent as an inflammatory mediator than the spirochetal lipopeptides. In contrast to the lipopeptides, nonacylated hexapeptides elicited minimal or no dermal lesions in mice or rabbits, underscoring the importance of acyl modification to the inflammatory properties of the lipopeptides. This study provides the first in vivo evidence that the spirochetal lipoproteins/lipopeptides contribute to the immunopathogenesis of syphilis and Lyme disease.

  1. Structural, bioinformatic, and in vivo analyses of two Treponema pallidum lipoproteins reveal a unique TRAP transporter

    PubMed Central

    Deka, Ranjit K.; Brautigam, Chad A.; Goldberg, Martin; Schuck, Peter; Tomchick, Diana R.; Norgard, Michael V.

    2012-01-01

    Treponema pallidum, the bacterial agent of syphilis, is predicted to encode one tripartite ATP- independent periplasmic transporter (TRAP-T). TRAP-Ts typically employ a periplasmic substrate-binding protein (SBP) to deliver the cognate ligand to the transmembrane symporter. Herein, we demonstrate that the genes encoding the putative TRAP-T components from T. pallidum, tp0957 (the SBP) and tp0958 (the symporter) are in an operon with an uncharacterized third gene, tp0956. We determined the crystal structure of recombinant Tp0956; the protein is trimeric and perforated by a pore. Part of Tp0956 forms an assembly similar to those of “tetratricopeptide repeat” (TPR) motifs. The crystal structure of recombinant Tp0957 was also determined; like the SBPs of other TRAP-Ts, there are two lobes separated by a cleft. In these other SBPs, the cleft binds a negatively charged ligand. However, the cleft of Tp0957 has a strikingly hydrophobic chemical composition, indicating that its ligand may be substantially different and likely hydrophobic. Analytical ultracentrifugation of the recombinant versions of Tp0956 and Tp0957 established that these proteins associate avidly. This unprecedented interaction was confirmed for the native molecules using in vivo cross-linking experiments. Finally, bioinformatic analyses suggested that this transporter exemplifies a new subfamily of TPR-protein associated TRAP transporters (TPATs) that require the action of a TPR-containing accessory protein for the periplasmic transport of a potentially hydrophobic ligand(s). PMID:22306465

  2. Structural, Bioinformatic, and In Vivo Analyses of Two Treponema pallidum Lipoproteins Reveal a Unique TRAP Transporter

    SciTech Connect

    Deka, Ranjit K.; Brautigam, Chad A.; Goldberg, Martin; Schuck, Peter; Tomchick, Diana R.; Norgard, Michael V.

    2012-05-25

    Treponema pallidum, the bacterial agent of syphilis, is predicted to encode one tripartite ATP-independent periplasmic transporter (TRAP-T). TRAP-Ts typically employ a periplasmic substrate-binding protein (SBP) to deliver the cognate ligand to the transmembrane symporter. Herein, we demonstrate that the genes encoding the putative TRAP-T components from T. pallidum, tp0957 (the SBP), and tp0958 (the symporter), are in an operon with an uncharacterized third gene, tp0956. We determined the crystal structure of recombinant Tp0956; the protein is trimeric and perforated by a pore. Part of Tp0956 forms an assembly similar to those of 'tetratricopeptide repeat' (TPR) motifs. The crystal structure of recombinant Tp0957 was also determined; like the SBPs of other TRAP-Ts, there are two lobes separated by a cleft. In these other SBPs, the cleft binds a negatively charged ligand. However, the cleft of Tp0957 has a strikingly hydrophobic chemical composition, indicating that its ligand may be substantially different and likely hydrophobic. Analytical ultracentrifugation of the recombinant versions of Tp0956 and Tp0957 established that these proteins associate avidly. This unprecedented interaction was confirmed for the native molecules using in vivo cross-linking experiments. Finally, bioinformatic analyses suggested that this transporter exemplifies a new subfamily of TPATs (TPR-protein-associated TRAP-Ts) that require the action of a TPR-containing accessory protein for the periplasmic transport of a potentially hydrophobic ligand(s).

  3. Treponema denticola biofilm-induced expression of a bacteriophage, toxin-antitoxin systems and transposases.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Helen L; Dashper, Stuart G; Catmull, Deanne V; Paolini, Rita A; Cleal, Steven M; Slakeski, Nada; Tan, Kheng H; Reynolds, Eric C

    2010-03-01

    Treponema denticola is an oral spirochaete that has been strongly associated with chronic periodontitis. The bacterium exists as part of a dense biofilm (subgingival dental plaque) accreted to the tooth. To determine T. denticola gene products important for persistence as a biofilm we developed a continuous-culture biofilm model and conducted a genome-wide transcriptomic analysis of biofilm and planktonic cells. A total of 126 genes were differentially expressed with a fold change of 1.5 or greater. This analysis identified the upregulation of putative prophage genes in the T. denticola 35405 genome. Intact bacteriophage particles were isolated from T. denticola and circular phage DNA was detected by PCR analysis. This represents the first, to our knowledge, functional bacteriophage isolated from T. denticola, which we have designated varphitd1. In biofilm cells there was also an upregulation of genes encoding several virulence factors, toxin-antitoxin systems and a family of putative transposases. Together, these data indicate that there is a higher potential for genetic mobility in T. denticola when growing as a biofilm and that these systems are important for the biofilm persistence and therefore virulence of this bacterium.

  4. Treponema denticola chymotrypsin-like proteinase (CTLP) integrates spirochaetes within oral microbial communities.

    PubMed

    Cogoni, Valentina; Morgan-Smith, Alex; Fenno, J Christopher; Jenkinson, Howard F; Dymock, David

    2012-03-01

    Treponema denticola is found ubiquitously in the human oral cavity and is mainly associated with bacterial communities implicated in the establishment and development of periodontal disease. The ability to become integrated within biofilm communities is crucial to the growth and survival of oral bacteria, and involves inter-bacterial coaggregation, metabolic cooperation, and synergy against host defences. In this article we show that the chymotrypsin-like proteinase (CTLP), found within a high-molecular-mass complex on the cell surface, mediates adherence of T. denticola to other potential periodontal pathogens, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Prevotella intermedia and Parvimonas micra. Proteolytic activity per se did not appear to be required for the interactions, and expression of the major outer-sheath protein (Msp) was not necessary, except for binding Parv. micra. Biofilms of densely packed cells and matrix, up to 40 µm in depth, were formed between T. denticola and P. gingivalis on salivary pellicle, with T. denticola cells enriched in the upper layers. Expression of CTLP, but not Msp, was critical for dual-species biofilm formation with P. gingivalis. T. denticola did not form dual-species biofilms with any of the other three periodontal bacterial species under various conditions. Synergy between T. denticola and P. gingivalis was also shown by increased inhibition of blood clotting, which was CTLP-dependent. The results demonstrate the critical role of CTLP in interactions of T. denticola with other oral micro-organisms, leading to synergy in microbial community development and host tissue pathogenesis.

  5. The riboswitch regulates a thiamine pyrophosphate ABC transporter of the oral spirochete Treponema denticola.

    PubMed

    Bian, Jiang; Shen, Hongwu; Tu, Youbin; Yu, Aiming; Li, Chunhao

    2011-08-01

    Thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP), a biologically active form of thiamine (vitamin B₁), is an essential cofactor in all living systems. Microorganisms either synthesize TPP via de novo biosynthesis pathways or uptake exogenous thiamine from the environment via specific transporters. The oral spirochete Treponema denticola is an important pathogen that is associated with human periodontal diseases. It lacks a de novo TPP biosynthesis pathway and needs exogenous TPP for growth, suggesting that it may obtain exogenous TPP via a thiamine transporter. In this study, we identified a gene cluster that encodes a TPP ABC transporter which consists of a TPP-binding protein (TDE0143), a transmembrane permease (TDE0144), and a cytosolic ATPase (TDE0145). Transcriptional and translational analyses showed that the genes encoding these three proteins are cotranscribed and form an operon (tbpABC(Td)) that is initiated by a σ⁷⁰-like promoter. The expression level of this operon is negatively regulated by exogenous TPP and is mediated by a TPP-sensing riboswitch (Td(thi-)(box)). Genetic and biochemical studies revealed that the TDE0143 deletion mutant (T. denticola ΔtbpA) had a decreased ability to transport exogenous TPP, and the mutant failed to grow when exogenous TPP was insufficient. These results taken together indicate that the tbpABC(Td) operon encodes an ABC transporter that is required for the uptake of exogenous TPP and that the expression of this operon is regulated by a TPP-binding riboswitch via a feedback inhibition mechanism.

  6. Systematic Cloning of Treponema pallidum Open Reading Frames for Protein Expression and Antigen Discovery

    PubMed Central

    McKevitt, Matthew; Patel, Krupa; Smajs, David; Marsh, Michael; McLoughlin, Melanie; Norris, Steven J.; Weinstock, George M.; Palzkill, Timothy

    2003-01-01

    A topoisomerase-based method was used to clone PCR products encoding 991 of the 1041 open reading frames identified in the genome sequence of the bacterium that causes syphilis, Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum. Cloning the open reading frames into the univector plasmid system permitted the rapid conversion of the original clone set to other functional vectors containing a variety of promoters or tag sequences. A computational prediction of signal sequences identified 248 T. pallidum proteins that are potentially secreted from the cell. These clones were systematically converted into vectors designed to express the encoded proteins as glutathione-S-transferase fusion proteins. To test the potential of the clone set for novel antigen discovery, 85 of these fusion proteins were expressed from Escherichia coli, partially purified, and tested for antigenicity by using sera from rabbits infected with T. pallidum. Twelve of the 85 proteins bound significant levels of antibody. Of these 12 proteins, seven had previously been identified as T. pallidum antigens, and the remaining five represent novel antigens. These results demonstrate the potential of the T. pallidum clone set for antigen discovery and, more generally, for advancing the biology of this enigmatic spirochete. PMID:12805273

  7. Treponema pallidum specific IgM haemagglutination test for serodiagnosis of syphilis.

    PubMed Central

    Sato, T; Kubo, E; Yokota, M; Kayashima, T; Tomizawa, T

    1984-01-01

    The Treponema pallidum specific IgM haemagglutination (TP-IgM-HA) test uses erythrocytes sensitised with antiserum to human IgM to separate IgM from IgG in serum. Specific antitreponemal IgM captured in this way is detected by adding a second reagent comprising erythrocytes sensitised with T pallidum antigen. Eighty two serum samples from 82 patients with untreated syphilis, 521 samples from 73 patients with treated syphilis, and 1872 samples from people who did not have syphilis were examined by the 19S(IgM)-TPHA (T pallidum haemagglutination), IgM-FTA-ABS (fluorescent treponemal antibody absorbed), TP-IgM-ELISA (enzyme linked immunosorbent assay), and TP-IgM-HA tests for the presence of 19S(IgM) antibodies specific to treponemes. The sensitivity of the TP-IgM-HA test was 97.6% and the specificity was 99.7%. We also traced IgM specific to treponemes in untreated patients with primary syphilis by four different tests. The TP-IgM-HA test results clearly reflected the effect of the treatment. PMID:6394097

  8. Evaluation of a PCR Test for Detection of Treponema pallidum in Swabs and Blood

    PubMed Central

    Grange, P. A.; Gressier, L.; Dion, P. L.; Farhi, D.; Benhaddou, N.; Gerhardt, P.; Morini, J. P.; Deleuze, J.; Pantoja, C.; Bianchi, A.; Lassau, F.; Avril, M. F.; Janier, M.

    2012-01-01

    Syphilis diagnosis is based on clinical observation, serological analysis, and dark-field microscopy (DFM) detection of Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum, the etiological agent of syphilis, in skin ulcers. We performed a nested PCR (nPCR) assay specifically amplifying the tpp47 gene of T. pallidum from swab and blood specimens. We studied a cohort of 294 patients with suspected syphilis and 35 healthy volunteers. Eighty-seven of the 294 patients had primary syphilis, 103 had secondary syphilis, 40 had latent syphilis, and 64 were found not to have syphilis. The T. pallidum nPCR results for swab specimens were highly concordant with syphilis diagnosis, with a sensitivity of 82% and a specificity of 95%. Reasonable agreement was observed between the results obtained with the nPCR and DFM methods (kappa = 0.53). No agreement was found between the nPCR detection of T. pallidum in blood and the diagnosis of syphilis, with sensitivities of 29, 18, 14.7, and 24% and specificities of 96, 92, 93, and 97% for peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC), plasma, serum, and whole-blood fractions, respectively. HIV status did not affect the frequency of T. pallidum detection in any of the specimens tested. Swab specimens from mucosal or skin lesions seemed to be more useful than blood for the efficient detection of the T. pallidum genome and, thus, for the diagnosis of syphilis. PMID:22219306

  9. Cytokine gene expression in skin of susceptible guinea-pig infected with Treponema pallidum.

    PubMed Central

    Wicher, V; Scarozza, A M; Ramsingh, A I; Wicher, K

    1998-01-01

    Using a semi-quantitative multiplex reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction assay, we examined cytokine mRNA expression for interleukin-1alpha (IL-1alpha), IL-2, IL-10, IL-12p40, tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) in skin samples obtained from C4-deficient (C4D) guinea-pigs inoculated intradermally with virulent Treponema pallidum (VTP). Controls included unmanipulated animals, guinea-pigs injected with T. pallidum-free rabbit inflammatory testicular fluid (ITF) alone, or mixed with heat-killed organisms (HKTP). The expression of IL-1alpha, IL-12p40, and TNF-alpha mRNA [T helper type 1 (Th1)] remained within the normal range in both infected and control animals throughout the experimental period. However, a significant increase (P<0.05) in IL-10 mRNA (Th2) was found exclusively in the VTP-inoculated animals from 3 to 30 days post-infection. Another unique characteristic of the inflammatory response in infected guinea-pigs was the appearance, between 11 and 30 days post-inoculation, of a substantial number of eosinophils in addition to infiltrating mononuclear cells. The results showed a local Th2 response which is consistent with an inadequate immune response. This is reflected by the lengthy and incomplete clearance of the pathogen from the local site of entry and the chronic infection of distant organs. Images Figure 1 Figure 4 PMID:9824482

  10. Effects of cefetamet (Ro 15-8074) on Treponema pallidum and experimental syphilis.

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, T J

    1992-01-01

    Cefetamet pivoxil (Ro 15-8075) is a newly developed, expanded-spectrum cephalosporin that is orally active. In vitro, the active form, cefetamet (Ro 15-8074), at a concentration of 0.05 micrograms/ml killed and lysed Treponema pallidum. Rabbit serum did not diminish its effectiveness. The antibiotic rapidly entered the circulation following intramuscular injection into rabbits, attaining its highest levels of 24 to 37 micrograms/ml within 10 to 30 min. Animals were infected intradermally with T. pallidum and then treated with different doses of cefetamet. Accelerated healing was detected following treatment with 15 and 30 mg/kg of body weight. The antibiotic was also effective in killing organisms that had disseminated to distant tissues. In three separate sets of experiments, rabbits were infected with treponemes and then treated with cefetamet intramuscularly at 1, 15, or 30 mg/kg as follows: (i) after lesions had just become clinically apparent, (ii) after lesions were enlarged and well developed, or (iii) prior to the appearance of clinical lesions. Antibiotic effectiveness was determined by sacrificing the animals 1 week after antibiotic treatment and examining splenic tissue for residual, disseminated treponemes. Cefetamet was treponemicidal in all three situations. Maximum effects occurred when the antibiotic was injected before lesions had become clinically apparent (incubation period). These results suggest that cefetamet pivoxil might be useful for treating syphilitic infections. PMID:1622168

  11. Origin of modern syphilis and emergence of a pandemic Treponema pallidum cluster.

    PubMed

    Arora, Natasha; Schuenemann, Verena J; Jäger, Günter; Peltzer, Alexander; Seitz, Alexander; Herbig, Alexander; Strouhal, Michal; Grillová, Linda; Sánchez-Busó, Leonor; Kühnert, Denise; Bos, Kirsten I; Davis, Leyla Rivero; Mikalová, Lenka; Bruisten, Sylvia; Komericki, Peter; French, Patrick; Grant, Paul R; Pando, María A; Vaulet, Lucía Gallo; Fermepin, Marcelo Rodríguez; Martinez, Antonio; Centurion Lara, Arturo; Giacani, Lorenzo; Norris, Steven J; Šmajs, David; Bosshard, Philipp P; González-Candelas, Fernando; Nieselt, Kay; Krause, Johannes; Bagheri, Homayoun C

    2016-12-05

    The abrupt onslaught of the syphilis pandemic that started in the late fifteenth century established this devastating infectious disease as one of the most feared in human history(1). Surprisingly, despite the availability of effective antibiotic treatment since the mid-twentieth century, this bacterial infection, which is caused by Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum (TPA), has been re-emerging globally in the last few decades with an estimated 10.6 million cases in 2008 (ref. 2). Although resistance to penicillin has not yet been identified, an increasing number of strains fail to respond to the second-line antibiotic azithromycin(3). Little is known about the genetic patterns in current infections or the evolutionary origins of the disease due to the low quantities of treponemal DNA in clinical samples and difficulties in cultivating the pathogen(4). Here, we used DNA capture and whole-genome sequencing to successfully interrogate genome-wide variation from syphilis patient specimens, combined with laboratory samples of TPA and two other subspecies. Phylogenetic comparisons based on the sequenced genomes indicate that the TPA strains examined share a common ancestor after the fifteenth century, within the early modern era. Moreover, most contemporary strains are azithromycin-resistant and are members of a globally dominant cluster, named here as SS14-Ω. The cluster diversified from a common ancestor in the mid-twentieth century subsequent to the discovery of antibiotics. Its recent phylogenetic divergence and global presence point to the emergence of a pandemic strain cluster.

  12. Treponema denticola activates mitogen-activated protein kinase signal pathways through Toll-like receptor 2.

    PubMed

    Ruby, John; Rehani, Kunal; Martin, Michael

    2007-12-01

    Treponema denticola, a spirochete indigenous to the oral cavity, is associated with host inflammatory responses to anaerobic polymicrobial infections of the root canal, periodontium, and alveolar bone. However, the cellular mechanisms responsible for the recognition of T. denticola by the innate immune system and the underlying cell signaling pathways that regulate the inflammatory response to T. denticola are currently unresolved. In this study, we demonstrate that T. denticola induces innate immune responses via the utilization of Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) but not TLR4. Assessment of TLR2/1 and TLR2/6 heterodimers revealed that T. denticola predominantly utilizes TLR2/6 for the induction of cellular responses. Analysis of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway in T. denticola-stimulated monocytes identified a prolonged up-regulation of the MAPK extracellular signal-related kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) and p38, while no discernible increase in phospho-c-Jun N-terminal kinase 1/2 (JNK1/2) levels was observed. With the aid of pharmacological inhibitors selectively targeting ERK1/2 via the mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-related kinase 1/2 kinase and p38, we further demonstrate that ERK1/2 and p38 play a major role in T. denticola-mediated pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine production.

  13. Treponema socranskii in primary endodontic infections as detected by nested PCR.

    PubMed

    Siqueira, José F; Rôças, Isabela N

    2003-04-01

    Spirochetes have been frequently observed in root canal infections, but they were rarely identified. The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence of Treponema socranskii in primary endodontic infections using a species-specific nested polymerase chain reaction assay. Samples were collected from 60 teeth having carious lesions, necrotic pulps, and different forms of periradicular diseases. DNA extracted from the samples was initially amplified using universal 16S rDNA primers. A second round of amplification used the first polymerase chain reaction products to detect a specific fragment of T. socranskii 16S rDNA. T. socranskii was detected in 11 of 28 asymptomatic cases (39.3%), five of 12 root canals associated with acute apical periodontitis (41.7%), and five of 20 cases diagnosed as acute periradicular abscesses (25%). There was no relationship between the presence of T. socranskii and the occurrence of symptoms. In general, this spirochete was detected in 21 of 60 samples of endodontic infections (35%). Findings suggest that T. socranskii can be involved in the pathogenesis of different forms of periradicular lesions.

  14. Induction of swine dysentery in swine by the intravenous injection of filtered Treponema hyodysenteriae.

    PubMed Central

    Olson, L D

    1981-01-01

    Swine dysentery was induced in 18 swine exposed by intravenous injection of a filtrate which contained Treponema hyodysenteriae and was obtained from macerated colonic scrapings of swine dysentery. However, swine dysentery did not develop in swine injected intravenously with a pure culture of T. hyodysenteriae or when combined with a colonic filtrate from normal swine. Diarrheal feces from the swine injected intravenously with the filtered T. hyodysenteriae contained more mucus, and fecal smears contained more T. hyodysenteriae and fewer other bacteria than did swine exposed orally to colon infected with swine dysentery or filtered T. hyodysenteriae. In the colons of the 12 swine injected intravenously with filtered T. hyodysenteriae that died, there was a minimum amount of croupous membrane and, microscopically, the T. hyodysenteriae were located deep in the colonic crypts. Five of the six surviving swine injected intravenously with filtered T. hyodysenteriae developed serum anti-T. hyodysenteriae antibodies using the indirect fluorescent antibody test and four of these swine developed diarrhea when reexposed with swine dysentery infected colon six weeks after initial exposure. None of the swine injected intravenously with cultured T. hyodysenteriae developed serum anti-T. hyodysenteriae antibodies and all were highly susceptible to swine dysentery. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. PMID:7337868

  15. Tracing the origin of Treponema pallidum in China using next-generation sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Kaiqi; Liu, Biao; Zhang, Sufang; Liu, Yudan; Wang, Yuezhu; Zheng, Huajun; Huang, Jian; Zhou, Pingyu

    2016-01-01

    Syphilis is a systemic sexually transmitted disease caused by Treponema pallidum ssp. pallidum (TPA). The origin and genetic background of Chinese TPA strains remain unclear. We identified a total of 329 single-nucleotide variants (SNVs) in eight Chinese TPA strains using next-generation sequencing. All of the TPA strains were clustered into three lineages, and Chinese TPA strains were grouped in Lineage 2 based on phylogenetic analysis. The phylogeographical data showed that TPA strains originated earlier than did T. pallidum ssp. pertenue (TPE) and T. pallidum ssp. endemicum (TPN) strains and that Chinese TPA strains might be derived from recombination between Lineage 1 and Lineage 3. Moreover, we found through a homology modeling analysis that a nonsynonymous substitution (I415F) in the PBP3 protein might affect the structural flexibility of PBP3 and the binding constant for substrates based on its possible association with penicillin resistance in T. pallidum. Our findings provide new insight into the molecular foundation of the evolutionary origin of TPA and support the development of novel diagnostic/therapeutic technology for syphilis. PMID:27344187

  16. Double-conjugate enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for immunoglobulins G and M against Treponema pallidum.

    PubMed Central

    Farshy, C E; Hunter, E F; Larsen, S A; Cerny, E H

    1984-01-01

    An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the simultaneous measurement of immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgM was developed to detect antibodies to Treponema pallidum. Wells of polystyrene microtiter plates were coated with T. pallidum antigen, diluted patient serum was added, and IgG and IgM which bound to the T. pallidum antigen were measured by the simultaneous addition of alkaline phosphatase-labeled anti-human IgG and horseradish peroxidase-labeled anti-human IgM. Bound IgG was detected first, followed by bound IgM. After development of the procedure, 145 categorized sera were evaluated: 60 from individuals without syphilis; 62 from patients with syphilis, including 22 with primary, 20 with secondary, and 20 with latent phases of syphilis; and 23 from patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Of the 60 sera from individuals without syphilis, 100% were nonreactive for IgG antibody and 16% were reactive for IgM. Of the 23 sera from patients with rheumatoid arthritis, 3 were reactive for IgG and 3 were nonreactive for IgM. Of the 62 sera from patients with syphilis, 61 (98%) were reactive for IgG antibody with increased titers as the stage of syphilis increased, whereas IgM reactivity decreased. This enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay appears to be a simple method for the simultaneous measurement of antibodies under equal assay conditions. PMID:6394613

  17. Activities of HMR 3787 and RU 64399 Compared with Those of Four Other Agents against Haemophilus influenzae and Haemophilus parainfluenzae

    PubMed Central

    Bozdogan, Bülent; Clark, Catherine; Bryskier, Andre; Jacobs, Michael R.; Appelbaum, Peter C.

    2003-01-01

    Activities of HMR 3787, a new 2-fluoroketolide, and its (des)-fluor derivative, RU 64399, were tested against 111 Haemophilus influenzae and 26 H. parainfluenzae strains and compared with those of telithromycin, erythromycin, azithromycin, and clarithromycin. HMR 3787 and RU 64399 MICs were comparable with those of azithromycin but were less affected by incubation in CO2. Time-kill studies of 12 strains showed that HMR 3787, RU 64399, and telithromycin were bactericidal against all strains after 24 h at two times the MIC. PMID:12499225

  18. Efficient construction of Haemophilus parasuis mutants based on natural transformation.

    PubMed

    Li, Junxing; Yuan, Xiufang; Xu, Lihua; Kang, Lei; Jiang, Jun; Wang, Yicheng

    2016-10-01

    Studies on virulence factors and pathogenecity of Haemophilus parasuis have long been hindered by a lack of a consistent system for genetic manipulation. In this study, competence was induced by transferring H. parasuis from rich medium to starvation medium media-IV (M-IV) and iscR gene deficient mutants of H. parasuis were generated efficiently. Transformation frequency varied from 4.1 × 10(-5) to 1.1 × 10(-8) when using circular plasmid, and increased to about 2- to 31-fold when transformed using linearized plasmid. Allele replacement occurred efficiently in 6 strains, which are transformable using both circular and linearized pTRU, but not in another 2 strains which could only be transformed using linearized plasmid. The iscR mutants were stable for at least 20 passages in vitro. Haemophilus parasuis strains vary extensively in natural transformation efficiency and the method established here allows for transformation of a larger spectrum of strains with an easily accessed plasmid. This provides important tools for genetic manipulation of H. parasuis.

  19. Computer-based analysis of Haemophilus parasuis protein fingerprints

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Abstract The present study aimed to compare the whole-cell protein profiles of Haemophilus parasuis field isolates by using a computer-based analysis, and evaluate the relationship between polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) type and virulence potential based on isolation site. A dendrogram clustering isolates with similar protein profiles was generated. Haemophilus parasuis isolates were grouped into 2 major PAGE type groups. The PAGE type II isolates were characterized by the presence of major proteins with molecular weights varying from between 36 and 38 kDa and included 90.7% of the isolates recovered from systemic sites, such as pleura, pericardium, peritoneum, lymph nodes, joints, and brain. Isolates classified as PAGE type I were characterized by the absence of this group of proteins and included 83.4% of the isolates recovered from the upper respiratory tract of healthy animals. The present study further corroborates the existence of a unique group of major proteins in potentially virulent H. parasuis isolates. PMID:14979439

  20. Glycerophosphorylcholine regulates Haemophilus influenzae glpQ gene expression.

    PubMed

    Alrousan, Enas; Fan, Xin

    2015-05-01

    An important virulence strategy adopted by Haemophilus influenzae to establish a niche on the mucosal surface of the host is the phosphorylcholine (ChoP) decoration of its lipopolysaccharides, which promotes adherence to the host cells. Haemophilus influenzae is able to use glycerophosphorylcholine (GPC) from host for ChoP synthesis. Utilization of GPC requires glpQ, which encodes a glycerophosphodiester phosphodiesterase enzyme. In this study, we investigate the transcriptional regulation of glpQ gene using real-time PCR and transcriptional fusion of H. influenzae glpQ promoter to the Escherichia coli lacZ reporter gene. The glpQ promoter activities were examined under environmental conditions including changes in temperature, oxygen, high salt and minimal growth medium. Our data showed that under room temperature and anaerobic conditions, the glpQ gene expression levels were significantly higher than under other growth conditions. In addition, the glpQ gene expression levels were upregulated in the presence of GPC. These results suggest that H. influenzae may upregulate glpQ expression in response to different environments it encounters during infection, from the airway surfaces (room temperature) to deep tissues (anaerobic). Upregulation of glpQ by GPC may allow efficient use of abundant GPC from mammalian cells by H. influenzae as a source of nutrient and for ChoP decoration of lipopolysaccharide that facilitates bacterial adhesion to host cells and growth during infection.

  1. Invasive Haemophilus influenzae Infection in Patients With Cancer.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vivek; Nanjappa, Sowmya; Pabbathi, Smitha; Greene, John N

    2017-01-01

    A major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with cancer is infection. Since the introduction of the Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) vaccine in the United States in the 1990s, invasive H influenzae infection has become less common. We report on 5 patients with cancer and invasive H influenzae infection. A literature review was also performed of the dominant Haemophilus subtype and the clinical features associated with the infection and concomitant cancer. Of the 17 cases found in the literature, had hematological malignancies and 1 case each had thymoma, schwannoma, teratoma, and pancreatic, Merkel cell, pharyngeal, laryngeal, and rectal carcinomas. Two cases occurred with AIDS and Kaposi sarcoma. Pneumonia with bacteremia was seen in 8 cases, whereas pleuritis, neck cellulitis, septic arthritis, meningitis, and mediastinitis were diagnosed in the others. No focus of infection was identified in 2 cases. Nontypable H influenzae (NTHi) occurred in 4 cases, and Hib was isolated in 2 cases; serotyping was not reported in the others. Leukocytosis occurred in 7 cases and lymphopenia in 3; no cases presented with neutropenia. Four isolates were positive for beta-lactamase. Susceptibility data were unavailable in 5 case patients. Among serotyped cases, 67% were of the NTHi strain - a finding consistent with the change in the epidemiology of H influenzae since the introduction of the Hib vaccine.

  2. Improved medium for antimicrobial susceptibility testing of Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed Central

    Jorgensen, J H; Redding, J S; Maher, L A; Howell, A W

    1987-01-01

    The need for complex growth media has complicated routine susceptibility testing of Haemophilus influenzae because of antagonism of certain antimicrobial agents by the medium or because of difficulties in interpretation of growth endpoints. Haemophilus test medium (HTM) is a simple, transparent medium for broth- or agar-based tests with H. influenzae. HTM incorporates Mueller-Hinton medium with additions of 15 micrograms of hematin per ml, 15 micrograms of NAD per ml, and 5 mg of yeast extract per ml as growth-promoting additives. Agar or broth microdilution MICs of 10 antimicrobial agents for a collection of 179 H. influenzae isolates determined by using HTM compared favorably with MICs determined by the conventional agar or broth dilution methods recommended by the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards. Disk diffusion tests performed with HTM allowed accurate categorization of susceptible and resistant strains and were easier to interpret than tests performed with Mueller-Hinton chocolate agar. A particular advantage of HTM was the reliability of broth- or agar-based test results with trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. The results of the study suggest modification of current National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards MIC-interpretive criteria for H. influenzae with amoxicillin-clavulanate, chloramphenicol, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. Error rate-bounded analysis of MICs and disk diffusion zone sizes also suggest modified zone-interpretive criteria for ampicillin, amoxicillin-clavulanate, chloramphenicol, and tetracycline with HTM or conventional media. Interpretive zone sizes are newly proposed for cefaclor and rifampin disk diffusion tests. PMID:3500965

  3. Airway dysbiosis: Haemophilus influenzae and Tropheryma in poorly controlled asthma.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Jodie L; Daly, Joshua; Baines, Katherine J; Yang, Ian A; Upham, John W; Reynolds, Paul N; Hodge, Sandra; James, Alan L; Hugenholtz, Philip; Willner, Dana; Gibson, Peter G

    2016-03-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the airways where bacteria may act as protagonists of chronic inflammation. Little is known about the relation of airway inflammation to the presence of specific bacterial taxa. We sought to describe the sputum microbiome in adults with poorly controlled asthma.DNA was extracted from induced sputum and microbial communities were profiled using 16S rRNA pyrosequencing. Bacterial species were characterised, and the relationship between microbial populations, asthma inflammatory subtypes and other covariates was explored. Real-time PCR was used to identify Tropheryma whipplei and Haemophilus influenzae in sputum.Adults with neutrophilic asthma had reduced bacterial diversity and species richness. Tropheryma was identified and confirmed with real-time PCR in 12 (40%) participants. Haemophilus occurred most often in a group of younger atopic males with an increased proportion of neutrophils. PCR confirmed the presence of H. influenzae in 35 (76%) participants with poorly controlled asthma.There are phenotype-specific alterations to the airway microbiome in asthma. Reduced bacterial diversity combined with a high prevalence of H. influenzae was observed in neutrophilic asthma, whereas eosinophilic asthma had abundant T. whipplei.

  4. Comparative Analyses of the Lipooligosaccharides from Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae and Haemophilus haemolyticus Show Differences in Sialic Acid and Phosphorylcholine Modifications.

    PubMed

    Post, Deborah M B; Ketterer, Margaret R; Coffin, Jeremy E; Reinders, Lorri M; Munson, Robert S; Bair, Thomas; Murphy, Timothy F; Foster, Eric D; Gibson, Bradford W; Apicella, Michael A

    2016-01-04

    Haemophilus haemolyticus and nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) are closely related upper airway commensal bacteria that are difficult to distinguish phenotypically. NTHi causes upper and lower airway tract infections in individuals with compromised airways, while H. haemolyticus rarely causes such infections. The lipooligosaccharide (LOS) is an outer membrane component of both species and plays a role in NTHi pathogenesis. In this study, comparative analyses of the LOS structures and corresponding biosynthesis genes were performed. Mass spectrometric and immunochemical analyses showed that NTHi LOS contained terminal sialic acid more frequently and to a higher extent than H. haemolyticus LOS did. Genomic analyses of 10 strains demonstrated that H. haemolyticus lacked the sialyltransferase genes lic3A and lic3B (9/10) and siaA (10/10), but all strains contained the sialic acid uptake genes siaP and siaT (10/10). However, isothermal titration calorimetry analyses of SiaP from two H. haemolyticus strains showed a 3.4- to 7.3-fold lower affinity for sialic acid compared to that of NTHi SiaP. Additionally, mass spectrometric and immunochemical analyses showed that the LOS from H. haemolyticus contained phosphorylcholine (ChoP) less frequently than the LOS from NTHi strains. These differences observed in the levels of sialic acid and ChoP incorporation in the LOS structures from H. haemolyticus and NTHi may explain some of the differences in their propensities to cause disease.

  5. Comparative Genomic Analysis of Haemophilus haemolyticus and Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae and a New Testing Scheme for Their Discrimination

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Fang; Rishishwar, Lavanya; Sivadas, Ambily; Mitchell, Gabriel J.; Jordan, I. King; Murphy, Timothy F.; Gilsdorf, Janet R.; Mayer, Leonard W.

    2016-01-01

    Haemophilus haemolyticus has been recently discovered to have the potential to cause invasive disease. It is closely related to nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NT H. influenzae). NT H. influenzae and H. haemolyticus are often misidentified because none of the existing tests targeting the known phenotypes of H. haemolyticus are able to specifically identify H. haemolyticus. Through comparative genomic analysis of H. haemolyticus and NT H. influenzae, we identified genes unique to H. haemolyticus that can be used as targets for the identification of H. haemolyticus. A real-time PCR targeting purT (encoding phosphoribosylglycinamide formyltransferase 2 in the purine synthesis pathway) was developed and evaluated. The lower limit of detection was 40 genomes/PCR; the sensitivity and specificity in detecting H. haemolyticus were 98.9% and 97%, respectively. To improve the discrimination of H. haemolyticus and NT H. influenzae, a testing scheme combining two targets (H. haemolyticus purT and H. influenzae hpd, encoding protein D lipoprotein) was also evaluated and showed 96.7% sensitivity and 98.2% specificity for the identification of H. haemolyticus and 92.8% sensitivity and 100% specificity for the identification of H. influenzae, respectively. The dual-target testing scheme can be used for the diagnosis and surveillance of infection and disease caused by H. haemolyticus and NT H. influenzae. PMID:27707939

  6. Comparative Analyses of the Lipooligosaccharides from Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae and Haemophilus haemolyticus Show Differences in Sialic Acid and Phosphorylcholine Modifications

    PubMed Central

    Post, Deborah M. B.; Ketterer, Margaret R.; Coffin, Jeremy E.; Reinders, Lorri M.; Munson, Robert S.; Bair, Thomas; Murphy, Timothy F.; Foster, Eric D.; Gibson, Bradford W.

    2016-01-01

    Haemophilus haemolyticus and nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) are closely related upper airway commensal bacteria that are difficult to distinguish phenotypically. NTHi causes upper and lower airway tract infections in individuals with compromised airways, while H. haemolyticus rarely causes such infections. The lipooligosaccharide (LOS) is an outer membrane component of both species and plays a role in NTHi pathogenesis. In this study, comparative analyses of the LOS structures and corresponding biosynthesis genes were performed. Mass spectrometric and immunochemical analyses showed that NTHi LOS contained terminal sialic acid more frequently and to a higher extent than H. haemolyticus LOS did. Genomic analyses of 10 strains demonstrated that H. haemolyticus lacked the sialyltransferase genes lic3A and lic3B (9/10) and siaA (10/10), but all strains contained the sialic acid uptake genes siaP and siaT (10/10). However, isothermal titration calorimetry analyses of SiaP from two H. haemolyticus strains showed a 3.4- to 7.3-fold lower affinity for sialic acid compared to that of NTHi SiaP. Additionally, mass spectrometric and immunochemical analyses showed that the LOS from H. haemolyticus contained phosphorylcholine (ChoP) less frequently than the LOS from NTHi strains. These differences observed in the levels of sialic acid and ChoP incorporation in the LOS structures from H. haemolyticus and NTHi may explain some of the differences in their propensities to cause disease. PMID:26729761

  7. Sequence analysis of the 47-kilodalton major integral membrane immunogen of Treponema pallidum.

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, P L; Chamberlain, N R; Orth, K; Moomaw, C R; Zhang, L Q; Slaughter, C A; Radolf, J D; Sell, S; Norgard, M V

    1989-01-01

    The complete primary amino acid sequence for the 47-kilodalton (kDa) major integral membrane immunogen of Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum was obtained by using a combined strategy of DNA sequencing (of the cloned gene in Escherichia coli) and N-terminal amino acid sequencing of the native (T. pallidum subsp. pallidum-derived) antigen. An open reading frame believed to encode the 47-kDa antigen comprised 367 amino acid codons, which gave rise to a calculated molecular weight for the corresponding antigen of 40,701. Of the 367 amino acids, 113 (31%) were sequenced by N-terminal amino acid sequencing of trypsin and hydroxylamine cleavage fragments of the native molecule isolated from T. pallidum subsp. pallidum; amino acid sequence data had a 100% correlation with that of the amino acid sequence predicted from DNA sequencing of the cloned gene in E. coli. Although no consensus sequences for the initiation of transcription or translation were readily identifiable immediately 5' to the putative methionine start codon, a 63-base-pair PstI fragment located 159 nucleotides upstream was required for expression of the 47-kDa antigen in E. coli. The 47-kDa antigen sequence did not reveal a typical leader sequence. The overall G+C content for the DNA corresponding to the structural gene was 53%. Hydrophilicity analysis identified at least one major hydrophilic domain of the protein near the N terminus of the molecule which potentially represents an immunodominant epitope. No repetitive primary sequence epitopes were found. The combined data provide the molecular basis for further structural and functional studies regarding the role of the antigen in the immunopathogenesis of treponemal disease. PMID:2642466

  8. Characterization of a manganese-dependent regulatory protein, TroR, from Treponema pallidum

    PubMed Central

    Posey, James E.; Hardham, John M.; Norris, Steven J.; Gherardini, Frank C.

    1999-01-01

    Genome sequence analysis of Treponema pallidum, the causative agent of syphilis, suggests that this bacterium has a limited iron requirement with few, if any, proteins that require iron. Instead, T. pallidum may use manganese-dependent enzymes for metabolic pathways. This strategy apparently alleviates the necessity of T. pallidum to acquire iron from the host, thus overcoming iron limitation, which is a primary host defense. Interestingly, a putative metal-dependent regulatory protein, TroR, which has homology with the diphtheria toxin regulatory protein, DtxR, from Corynebacterium diphtheriae was identified from T. pallidum. We describe here the characterization of TroR, a regulatory protein. Mobility-shift DNA binding and DNase I footprint assays indicated that purified TroR bound to a 22-nt region of dyad symmetry that overlaps the −10 region of the promoter of the tro operon, which contains the genes for a putative metal transport system, the glycolytic enzyme phosphoglycerate mutase, and TroR. Unlike other metal-dependent regulatory proteins like diphtheria toxin regulatory protein and the ferric ion uptake regulator, Fur, which can be activated by divalent metals such as Fe2+, Mn2+, Co2+, Ni2+, and Zn2+, TroR is activated only by Mn2+. The TroR-Mn2+ complex binds its target sequence and blocks transcription of the troPO/lacZ fusion, suggesting that TroR acts as a metal-dependent repressor in vivo. In addition, TroR exists as a dimer in both its inactive (metal free) and active states as indicated by chemical crosslinking experiments. Based on these data, we propose that TroR represents a unique regulatory system for controlling gene expression in T. pallidum in response to Mn2+. PMID:10485921

  9. Physiology and nutrition of Treponema primitia, an H2/CO2-acetogenic spirochete from termite hindguts.

    PubMed

    Graber, Joseph R; Breznak, John A

    2004-03-01

    Treponema primitia strains ZAS-1 and ZAS-2, the first spirochetes to be isolated from termite hindguts (J. R. Leadbetter, T. M. Schmidt, J. R. Graber, and J. A. Breznak, Science 283:686-689, 1999), were examined for nutritional, physiological, and biochemical properties relevant to growth and survival in their natural habitat. In addition to using H(2) plus CO(2) as substrates, these strains were capable of homoacetogenic growth on mono- and disaccharides and (in the case of ZAS-2) methoxylated benzenoids. Cells were also capable of mixotrophic growth (i.e., simultaneous utilization of H(2) and organic substrates). Cell extracts of T. primitia possessed enzyme activities of the Wood/Ljungdahl (acetyl coenzyme A) pathway of acetogenesis, including tetrahydrofolate-dependent enzymes of the methyl group-forming branch. However, a folate compound was required in the medium for growth. ZAS-1 and ZAS-2 growing on H(2) plus CO(2) displayed H(2) thresholds of 650 and 490 ppmv, respectively. Anoxic cultures of ZAS-1 and ZAS-2 maintained growth after the addition of as much as 0.5% (vol/vol) O(2) to the headspace atmosphere. Cell extracts exhibited NADH and NADPH peroxidase and NADH oxidase activities but neither catalase nor superoxide dismutase activity. Results indicate that (i) T. primitia is able to exploit a variety of substrates derived from the food of its termite hosts and in so doing contributes to termite nutrition via acetogenesis, (ii) in situ growth of T. primitia is likely dependent on secretion of a folate compound(s) by other members of the gut microbiota, and (iii) cells possess enzymatic adaptations to oxidative stress, which is likely to be encountered in peripheral regions of the termite hindgut.

  10. Structural and Biochemical Basis for Polyamine Binding to the Tp0655 Lipoprotein of Treponema pallidum

    PubMed Central

    Machius, Mischa; Brautigam, Chad A.; Tomchick, Diana R.; Ward, Patrick; Otwinowski, Zbyszek; Blevins, Jon S.; Deka, Ranjit K.; Norgard, Michael V.

    2007-01-01

    Tp0655 of Treponema pallidum, the causative agent of syphilis, is predicted to be a 40-kDa membrane lipoprotein. Previous sequence analysis of Tp0655 noted its homology to polyamine-binding proteins of the bacterial PotD family, which serve as periplasmic ligand-binding proteins of ATP-binding-cassette (ABC) transport systems. In the current study, the 1.8-Å crystal structure of Tp0655 demonstrated structural homology to E. coli PotD and PotF. The latter two proteins preferentially bind spermidine and putrescine, respectively. All of these proteins contain two domains that sandwich the ligand between them. The ligand-binding site of Tp0655 can be occupied by 2-(N-morpholino)ethanesulfanoic acid, a component of the crystallization medium. To discern the polyamine binding preferences of Tp0655, the protein was subjected to isothermal titration calorimetric experiments. The titrations established that Tp0655 binds polyamines avidly, with a marked preference for putrescine (Kd = 10 nM) over spermidine (Kd = 430 nM), but the related compounds cadaverine and spermine did not bind. Structural comparisons and structure-based sequence analyses provide insights into how polyamine-binding proteins recognize their ligands. In particular, these comparisons allow the derivation of rules that may be used to predict the function of other members of the PotD family. The sequential, structural, and functional homology of Tp0655 to PotD and PotF prompt the conclusion that the former likely is the polyamine-binding component of an ABC-type polyamine transport system in T. pallidum. We thus rename Tp0655 as TpPotD. The ramifications of TpPotD as a polyamine-binding protein to the parasitic strategy of T. pallidum are discussed. PMID:17868688

  11. Validation of Serological Tests for the Detection of Antibodies Against Treponema pallidum in Nonhuman Primates

    PubMed Central

    Knauf, Sascha; Dahlmann, Franziska; Batamuzi, Emmanuel K.; Frischmann, Sieghard; Liu, Hsi

    2015-01-01

    There is evidence to suggest that the yaws bacterium (Treponema pallidum ssp. pertenue) may exist in non-human primate populations residing in regions where yaws is endemic in humans. Especially in light of the fact that the World Health Organizaiton (WHO) recently launched its second yaws eradication campaign, there is a considerable need for reliable tools to identify treponemal infection in our closest relatives, African monkeys and great apes. It was hypothesized that commercially available serological tests detect simian anti-T. pallidum antibody in serum samples of baboons, with comparable sensitivity and specificity to their results on human sera. Test performances of five different treponemal tests (TTs) and two non-treponemal tests (NTTs) were evaluated using serum samples of 57 naturally T. pallidum-infected olive baboons (Papio anubis) from Lake Manyara National Park in Tanzania. The T. pallidum particle agglutination assay (TP-PA) was used as a gold standard for comparison. In addition, the overall infection status of the animals was used to further validate test performances. For most accurate results, only samples that originated from baboons of known infection status, as verified in a previous study by clinical inspection, PCR and immunohistochemistry, were included. All tests, TTs and NTTs, used in this study were able to reliably detect antibodies against T. pallidum in serum samples of infected baboons. The sensitivity of TTs ranged from 97.7-100%, while specificity was between 88.0-100.0%. The two NTTs detected anti-lipoidal antibodies in serum samples of infected baboons with a sensitivity of 83.3% whereas specificity was 100%. For screening purposes, the TT Espline TP provided the highest sensitivity and specificity and at the same time provided the most suitable format for use in the field. The enzyme immune assay Mastblot TP (IgG), however, could be considered as a confirmatory test. PMID:25803295

  12. Identification of the primary mechanism of complement evasion by the periodontal pathogen, Treponema denticola

    PubMed Central

    McDowell, John V.; Frederick, Jesse; Miller, Daniel P.; Goetting-Minesky, M. Paula; Goodman, Heather; Fenno, J. Christopher; Marconi, Richard T.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Treponema denticola, a periodontal pathogen, binds the complement regulatory protein, Factor H (FH). FhbB (FH binding protein B) is the sole FH binding protein produced by T.denticola. The interaction of FhbB with FH is unique in that FH is bound to the cell and then cleaved by the T.denticola protease, dentilisin. A ~50kDa product generated by dentilisin cleavage is retained at the cell surface. Until this study, a direct role for the FhbB-FH interaction in complement evasion and serum sensitivity has not been demonstrated. Here we assess the serum resistance of T.denticola strain 35405 (Td35405wt) and isogeneic mutants deficient in dentilisin (Td35405-CCE) and FhbB production (Td35405)fhbB), respectively. Both dentilisin and FhbB have been postulated to be key virulence factors that mediate complement evasion. Consistent with conditions in the sub-gingival crevice, an environment with a significant concentration of complement, Td35405wt was resistant to serum concentrations as high as 25%. Deletion of fhbB (Td35405)fhbB), which resulted in the complete loss of FH binding ability, but not inactivation of dentilisin activity (Td35405-CCE), rendered T.denticola highly sensitive to 25% human serum with 80% of the cells being disrupted after 4 hours of incubation. Heat treatment of the serum to inactivate complement confirmed that killing was mediated by complement. These results indicate that the FH-FhbB interaction is required for serum resistance while dentilisin is not. This report provides new insight into the novel complement evasion mechanisms of T. denticola. PMID:21375704

  13. Validation of serological tests for the detection of antibodies against Treponema pallidum in nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Knauf, Sascha; Dahlmann, Franziska; Batamuzi, Emmanuel K; Frischmann, Sieghard; Liu, Hsi

    2015-03-01

    There is evidence to suggest that the yaws bacterium (Treponema pallidum ssp. pertenue) may exist in non-human primate populations residing in regions where yaws is endemic in humans. Especially in light of the fact that the World Health Organizaiton (WHO) recently launched its second yaws eradication campaign, there is a considerable need for reliable tools to identify treponemal infection in our closest relatives, African monkeys and great apes. It was hypothesized that commercially available serological tests detect simian anti-T. pallidum antibody in serum samples of baboons, with comparable sensitivity and specificity to their results on human sera. Test performances of five different treponemal tests (TTs) and two non-treponemal tests (NTTs) were evaluated using serum samples of 57 naturally T. pallidum-infected olive baboons (Papio anubis) from Lake Manyara National Park in Tanzania. The T. pallidum particle agglutination assay (TP-PA) was used as a gold standard for comparison. In addition, the overall infection status of the animals was used to further validate test performances. For most accurate results, only samples that originated from baboons of known infection status, as verified in a previous study by clinical inspection, PCR and immunohistochemistry, were included. All tests, TTs and NTTs, used in this study were able to reliably detect antibodies against T. pallidum in serum samples of infected baboons. The sensitivity of TTs ranged from 97.7-100%, while specificity was between 88.0-100.0%. The two NTTs detected anti-lipoidal antibodies in serum samples of infected baboons with a sensitivity of 83.3% whereas specificity was 100%. For screening purposes, the TT Espline TP provided the highest sensitivity and specificity and at the same time provided the most suitable format for use in the field. The enzyme immune assay Mastblot TP (IgG), however, could be considered as a confirmatory test.

  14. High Prevalence of Antibodies against the Bacterium Treponema pallidum in Senegalese Guinea Baboons (Papio papio).

    PubMed

    Knauf, Sascha; Barnett, Ulrike; Maciej, Peter; Klapproth, Matthias; Ndao, Ibrahima; Frischmann, Sieghard; Fischer, Julia; Zinner, Dietmar; Liu, Hsi

    2015-01-01

    The bacterium Treponema pallidum is known to cause syphilis (ssp. pallidum), yaws (ssp. pertenue), and endemic syphilis (ssp. endemicum) in humans. Nonhuman primates have also been reported to be infected with the bacterium with equally versatile clinical manifestations, from severe skin ulcerations to asymptomatic. At present all simian strains are closely related to human yaws-causing strains, an important consideration for yaws eradication. We tested clinically healthy Guinea baboons (Papio papio) at Parc National Niokolo Koba in south eastern Senegal for the presence of anti-T. pallidum antibodies. Since T. pallidum infection in this species was identified 50 years ago, and there has been no attempt to treat non-human primates for infection, it was hypothesized that a large number of West African baboons are still infected with simian strains of the yaws-bacterium. All animals were without clinical signs of treponematoses, but 18 of 20 (90%) baboons tested positive for antibodies against T. pallidum based on treponemal tests. Yet, Guinea baboons seem to develop no clinical symptoms, though it must be assumed that infection is chronic or comparable to the latent stage in human yaws infection. The non-active character is supported by the low anti-T. pallidum serum titers in Guinea baboons (median = 1:2,560) versus serum titers that are found in genital-ulcerated olive baboons with active infection in Tanzania (range of medians among the groups of initial, moderate, and severe infected animals = 1:15,360 to 1:2.097e+7). Our findings provide evidence for simian infection with T. pallidum in wild Senegalese baboons. Potentially, Guinea baboons in West Africa serve as a natural reservoir for human infection, as the West African simian strain has been shown to cause sustainable yaws infection when inoculated into humans. The present study pinpoints an area where further research is needed to support the currently on-going second WHO led yaws eradication campaign with

  15. Genomic and Metagenomic Analysis of Diversity-Generating Retroelements Associated with Treponema denticola.

    PubMed

    Nimkulrat, Sutichot; Lee, Heewook; Doak, Thomas G; Ye, Yuzhen

    2016-01-01

    Diversity-generating retroelements (DGRs) are genetic cassettes that can produce massive protein sequence variation in prokaryotes. Presumably DGRs confer selective advantages to their hosts (bacteria or viruses) by generating variants of target genes-typically resulting in target proteins with altered ligand-binding specificity-through a specialized error-prone reverse transcription process. The only extensively studied DGR system is from the Bordetella phage BPP-1, although DGRs are predicted to exist in other species. Using bioinformatics analysis, we discovered that the DGR system associated with the Treponema denticola species (a human oral-associated periopathogen) is dynamic (with gains/losses of the system found in the isolates) and diverse (with multiple types found in isolated genomes and the human microbiota). The T. denticola DGR is found in only nine of the 17 sequenced T. denticola strains. Analysis of the DGR-associated template regions and reverse transcriptase gene sequences revealed two types of DGR systems in T. denticola: the ATCC35405-type shared by seven isolates including ATCC35405; and the SP32-type shared by two isolates (SP32 and SP33), suggesting multiple DGR acquisitions. We detected additional variants of the T. denticola DGR systems in the human microbiomes, and found that the SP32-type DGR is more abundant than the ATCC35405-type in the healthy human oral microbiome, although the latter is found in more sequenced isolates. This is the first comprehensive study to characterize the DGRs associated with T. denticola in individual genomes as well as human microbiomes, demonstrating the importance of utilizing both individual genomes and metagenomes for characterizing the elements, and for analyzing their diversity and distribution in human populations.

  16. Neelaredoxin, an iron-binding protein from the syphilis spirochete, Treponema pallidum, is a superoxide reductase.

    PubMed

    Jovanović, T; Ascenso, C; Hazlett, K R; Sikkink, R; Krebs, C; Litwiller, R; Benson, L M; Moura, I; Moura, J J; Radolf, J D; Huynh, B H; Naylor, S; Rusnak, F

    2000-09-15

    Treponema pallidum, the causative agent of venereal syphilis, is a microaerophilic obligate pathogen of humans. As it disseminates hematogenously and invades a wide range of tissues, T. pallidum presumably must tolerate substantial oxidative stress. Analysis of the T. pallidum genome indicates that the syphilis spirochete lacks most of the iron-binding proteins present in many other bacterial pathogens, including the oxidative defense enzymes superoxide dismutase, catalase, and peroxidase, but does possess an orthologue (TP0823) for neelaredoxin, an enzyme of hyperthermophilic and sulfate-reducing anaerobes shown to possess superoxide reductase activity. To analyze the potential role of neelaredoxin in treponemal oxidative defense, we examined the biochemical, spectroscopic, and antioxidant properties of recombinant T. pallidum neelaredoxin. Neelaredoxin was shown to be expressed in T. pallidum by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis. Recombinant neelaredoxin is a 26-kDa alpha(2) homodimer containing, on average, 0.7 iron atoms/subunit. Mössbauer and EPR analysis of the purified protein indicates that the iron atom exists as a mononuclear center in a mixture of high spin ferrous and ferric oxidation states. The fully oxidized form, obtained by the addition of K(3)(Fe(CN)(6)), exhibits an optical spectrum with absorbances at 280, 320, and 656 nm; the last feature is responsible for the protein's blue color, which disappears upon ascorbate reduction. The fully oxidized protein has a A(280)/A(656) ratio of 10.3. Enzymatic studies revealed that T. pallidum neelaredoxin is able to catalyze a redox equilibrium between superoxide and hydrogen peroxide, a result consistent with it being a superoxide reductase. This finding, the first description of a T. pallidum iron-binding protein, indicates that the syphilis spirochete copes with oxidative stress via a primitive mechanism, which, thus far, has not been described in pathogenic

  17. Molecular characterization and analysis of a gene encoding the acidic repeat protein (Arp) of Treponema pallidum.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hsi; Rodes, Berta; George, Robert; Steiner, Bret

    2007-06-01

    The acidic repeat protein (arp) genes from three subspecies of the treponeme Treponema pallidum (T. pallidum subsp. pallidum, Nichols strain; T. pallidum subsp. pertenue, CDC-1 and CDC-2 strains; and T. pallidum subsp. endemicum, Bosnia A strain) were cloned and sequenced. The predicted protein sequence contained a high percentage of glutamic acid, hence the name acidic repeat protein, or Arp. The protein had a potential membrane-spanning domain and a signal peptidase I site. The gene from the Nichols strain of T. pallidum subsp. pallidum contained a set of 14 nearly identical repeats of a 60 bp sequence, which occupied approximately 51 % of the length of the gene. Analyses of arp from laboratory strains showed that the 5' and 3' ends of the genes were conserved, but there was considerable heterogeneity in the number of repeats of this 60 bp sequence. Based on amino acid variations, the 14 sequence repeats could be classified into three types, which were named type I, type II and type III repeats. The type II repeat was the most common in the strains examined. The arp gene of the Nichols strain was subsequently cloned into the expression vector pBAD/TOPO ThioFusion. The expressed protein was detected in a Western blot assay using rabbit immune sera produced against T. pallidum, or synthetic peptides derived from the repeat sequences. Using an ELISA, rapid plasma reagin (RPR) test-positive sera reacted with synthetic peptides derived from the repeat region but not with peptides derived from N and C termini of the Arp protein. These results show that the Arp protein is immunogenic and could prove to be a useful target for serological diagnosis of T. pallidum infection.

  18. Glucose metabolism and NADH recycling by Treponema hyodysenteriae, the agent of swine dysentery.

    PubMed Central

    Stanton, T B

    1989-01-01

    Glucose metabolism and the mechanisms of NADH oxidation by Treponema hyodysenteriae were studied. Under an N2 atmosphere, washed cell suspensions of the spirochete consumed glucose and produced acetate, butyrate, H2, and CO2. Approximately twice as much H2 as CO2 was produced. Determinations of radioactivity in products of [14C]glucose and [14C]pyruvate metabolism and analyses of enzyme activities in cell lysates revealed that glucose was catabolized to pyruvate via the Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas pathway. The results of pyruvate exchange reactions with NaH14CO3 and Na14COOH demonstrated that pyruvate was converted to acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA), H2, and CO2 by a clostridium-type phosphoroclastic mechanism. NADH:ferredoxin oxidoreductase and hydrogenase activities were present in cell lysates and produced H2 from NADH oxidation. Phosphotransacetylase and acetate kinase catalyzed the formation of acetate from acetyl-CoA. Butyrate was formed from acetyl-CoA via a pathway that involved 3-hydroxybutyryl-coenzyme A (CoA) dehydrogenase, butyryl-CoA dehydrogenase, and butyryl-CoA transferase. T. hyodysenteriae cell suspensions generated less H2 and butyrate under 10% O2-90% N2 than under 100% N2. Cell lysates contained NADH oxidase, NADH peroxidase, and superoxide dismutase activities. These findings indicated there are three major mechanisms that T. hyodysenteriae cells use to recycle NADH generated from the Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas pathway--enzymes in the pathway from acetyl-CoA to butyrate, NADH:ferredoxin oxidoreductase, and NADH oxidase. Versatility in methods of NADH oxidation and an ability to metabolize oxygen could benefit T. hyodysenteriae cells in the colonization of tissues of the swine large bowel. PMID:2802610

  19. Virulence, transmission, and heterologous protection of four isolates of Haemophilus parasuis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Haemophilus parasuis causes Glässer's disease, a syndrome of polyserositis, meningitis, and arthritis in swine. Previous studies with H. parasuis have revealed virulence disparity among isolates and inconsistent heterologous protection. In this study, virulence, direct transmission, and heterologous...

  20. Draft Genome Sequences of Eight Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae Strains Previously Characterized Using an Electrophoretic Typing Scheme.

    PubMed

    Mussa, Huda J; VanWagoner, Timothy M; Morton, Daniel J; Seale, Thomas W; Whitby, Paul W; Stull, Terrence L

    2015-11-25

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae is an important cause of human disease. Strains were selected for genome sequencing to represent the breadth of nontypeable strains within the species, as previously defined by the electrophoretic mobility of 16 metabolic enzymes.

  1. Draft Genome Sequences of Eight Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae Strains Previously Characterized Using an Electrophoretic Typing Scheme

    PubMed Central

    Mussa, Huda J.; VanWagoner, Timothy M.; Seale, Thomas W.; Whitby, Paul W.; Stull, Terrence L.

    2015-01-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae is an important cause of human disease. Strains were selected for genome sequencing to represent the breadth of nontypeable strains within the species, as previously defined by the electrophoretic mobility of 16 metabolic enzymes. PMID:26607889

  2. Vaccine development for protection against systemic infections with Streptococcus suis and Haemophilus parasuis in swine

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Both Streptococcus suis and Haemophilus parasuis are important invasive bacterial pathogens of swine, commonly causing meningitis, arthritis, polyserositis, and septicemia. Due to the presence of many serotypes and high genotypic variability, efficacious vaccines are not readily available. We are us...

  3. Correlates of Bacterial Ulcers and Acute HSV-2 Infection among Men with Genital Ulcer Disease in South Africa: Age, Recent Sexual Behaviors, and HIV

    PubMed Central

    Leichliter, Jami S.; Lewis, David A.; Paz-Bailey, Gabriela

    2017-01-01

    Data from baseline surveys and STI/HIV laboratory tests (n=615 men) were used to examine correlates of bacterial ulcers (Treponema pallidum, Haemophilus ducreyi, or Chlamydia trachomatis L1–L3 detected in ulcer) and acute HSV-2 ulcers (HSV-2 positive ulcer specimen, HSV-2 sero-negative, and negative for bacterial pathogens) vs. recurrent HSV-2 ulcers (sero-positive), separately. Compared to men with recurrent HSV-2 ulcers, men with bacterial ulcers had larger ulcers but were less likely to be HIV-positive whereas men with acute HSV-2 ulcers were younger with fewer partners. Acute HIV was higher among men with bacterial and acute HSV-2 ulcers; the difference was not statistically significant. PMID:28217702

  4. Sexually transmitted diseases: epidemiological and clinical aspects in adults.

    PubMed

    Siracusano, Salvatore; Silvestri, Tommaso; Casotto, Daniela

    2014-01-01

    Sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) are the first 10 causes of unpleased diseases in young adult women in the world. The concept of STDs includes a series of syndromes caused by pathogens that can be acquired by sexual intercourse or sexual activity.Adolescents and young adults are responsible for only 25% of the sexually active population and they represent almost 50% of all newly acquired STDs.In this way, we evaluated the epidemiological and clinical aspects of most relevant pathogens as Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Chlamydia trachomatis, Treponema pallidum, Haemophilus Ducreyi, Trichomonas vaginalis, herpes simplex virus, human papilloma virus (HPV) with the exception of hepatitis, and HIV infections for which we suggest specific guidelines.To attain this objective, we analyzed the results of epidemiological and clinical aspects of STDs through a review of the literature using MEDLINE and PubMed database for original articles published using the terms "sexual transmitted disease, epidemiology, diagnosis and therapy" from 2005 to 2014.

  5. Correlates of Bacterial Ulcers and Acute HSV-2 Infection among Men with Genital Ulcer Disease in South Africa: Age, Recent Sexual Behaviors, and HIV.

    PubMed

    Leichliter, Jami S; Lewis, David A; Paz-Bailey, Gabriela

    2016-01-01

    Data from baseline surveys and STI/HIV laboratory tests (n=615 men) were used to examine correlates of bacterial ulcers (Treponema pallidum, Haemophilus ducreyi, or Chlamydia trachomatis L1-L3 detected in ulcer) and acute HSV-2 ulcers (HSV-2 positive ulcer specimen, HSV-2 sero-negative, and negative for bacterial pathogens) vs. recurrent HSV-2 ulcers (sero-positive), separately. Compared to men with recurrent HSV-2 ulcers, men with bacterial ulcers had larger ulcers but were less likely to be HIV-positive whereas men with acute HSV-2 ulcers were younger with fewer partners. Acute HIV was higher among men with bacterial and acute HSV-2 ulcers; the difference was not statistically significant.

  6. Diagnosing Genital Ulcer Disease in a Clinic for Sexually Transmitted Diseases in Amsterdam, The Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    Bruisten, S. M.; Cairo, I.; Fennema, H.; Pijl, A.; Buimer, M.; Peerbooms, P. G. H.; Van Dyck, E.; Meijer, A.; Ossewaarde, J. M.; van Doornum, G. J. J.

    2001-01-01

    The most common etiologic agents of genital ulcer disease (GUD) are herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), HSV-2, Treponema pallidum, and Haemophilus ducreyi. In an outpatient clinic for sexually transmitted diseases in Amsterdam, The Netherlands, specimens from 372 patients with GUD were collected from February to November 1996. Sera were collected at the time of the symptoms and, for most patients, also during follow-up visits. Swabs in viral transport medium were used for HSV culture and for detection of DNA. The most prevalent pathogen found was HSV-2, which was detected by culture in 35% of the patients and by PCR in 48% of the patients. Also, HSV-1 infection was more often detected by PCR (7.8%) than by culture (5.6%). Evidence for an active infection with T. pallidum was found in 1.9% of the patients, using serological tests. A multiplex PCR for simultaneous T. pallidum and H. ducreyi DNA detection was positive for T. pallidum in 3.3% of the samples and for H. ducreyi in only 0.9% (3 out of 368) of the samples. The sensitivity of the PCR was superior to that of culture for HSV detection and to that of serology for T. pallidum detection. Specific H. ducreyi immunoglobulin G antibodies were detected in sera of 5.2% of the patients, with no concordance between serology and PCR. In 37% of the cases, none of the tested microorganisms was detected. Performance of PCR in addition to conventional techniques significantly improved the diagnosis of GUD. PMID:11158114

  7. Low occurrence of 'non-haemolytic Haemophilus haemolyticus' misidentified as Haemophilus influenzae in cystic fibrosis respiratory specimens, and frequent recurrence of persistent H. influenzae clones despite antimicrobial treatment.

    PubMed

    Fenger, Mette G; Ridderberg, Winnie; Olesen, Hanne V; Nørskov-Lauritsen, Niels

    2012-12-01

    Non-influenzae commensal Haemophilus species of low pathogenicity may be difficult to discriminate from Haemophilus influenzae. We investigated the level of misidentifications in respiratory specimens from cystic fibrosis patients and evaluated the colonisation dynamics of genuine H. influenzae isolates. One hundred and ninety-two presumptive H. influenzae isolates were re-examined by assessment of marker genes sodC and fucK, and isolates with aberrant genotypes were subjected to multilocus sequence typing. Misidentifications (3%) were mainly caused by failure to identify porphyrin-synthesising strains, and only a single strain (0.5%) could be classified as 'non-haemolytic Haemophilus haemolyticus'. Sequential isolates of confirmed H. influenzae isolates from individual patients were typed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Despite the routine prescription of antimicrobial therapy, the majority of H. influenzae isolates were identical with at least one of the strains cultured from the two preceding positive samples from the same patient.

  8. [Pathology of Haemophilus infections: current situation in pediatrics].

    PubMed

    Kurkdjian, P M; Bourrillon, A; Holvoet-Vermau, L; Bingen, E

    2000-06-01

    Haemophilus influenzae is the main pathogen in community-acquired infections in children. Prior to the introduction of H. influenzae type b immunization (Hib), capsular type b H. influenzae was the most invasive type of H. influenzae, and was the major cause of meningitis in children in France and many developing countries. The introduction of a Hib vaccine program results in rapid and dramatic decline in the incidence of Hib infections in children. The resistance rate to beta-lactam antibiotics is slowly increasing with beta-lactamase production. Third generation cephalosporins are used for the treatment of invasive infection (meningitis etc.). The empiric treatment of otitis and respiratory tract infections in children is the combination of clavulanic acid and amoxicillin or third generation cephalosporins.

  9. Emergence of Extensively Drug-Resistant Haemophilus parainfluenzae in Switzerland

    PubMed Central

    Tinguely, Regula; Seiffert, Salome N.; Furrer, Hansjakob; Perreten, Vincent; Droz, Sara

    2013-01-01

    Two homosexual men were colonized in the urethra with Haemophilus parainfluenzae nonsusceptible to ampicillin (MIC, 8 μg/ml), amoxicillin-clavulanate (MIC, 4 μg/ml), cefotaxime (MIC, 1.5 μg/ml), cefepime (MIC, 3 μg/ml), meropenem (MIC, 0.5 μg/ml), cefuroxime, azithromycin, ciprofloxacin, tetracycline, and chloramphenicol (all MICs, ≥32 μg/ml). Repetitive extragenic palindromic PCR (rep-PCR) showed that the strains were indistinguishable. The isolates had amino acid substitutions in PBP3, L4, GyrA, and ParC and possessed Mef(A), Tet(M), and CatS resistance mechanisms. This is the first report of extensively drug-resistant (XDR) H. parainfluenzae. PMID:23545526

  10. Transformation of Haemophilus influenzae by plasmid RSF0885

    SciTech Connect

    Notani, N.K.; Setlow, J.K.; McCarthy, D.; Clayton, N.L.

    1981-12-01

    Plasmid RSF0885, which conferred ampicillin resistance, transformed competent Haemophilus influenzae cells with low efficiency (maximun, less than 0.01%). As judged by competition experiments and uptake of radioactivity, plasmid RSF0885 deoxyribonucleic acid was taken up into competent H. influenzae cells several orders of magnitude less efficiently than H. influenzae chromosomal deoxyribonucleic acid. Plasmid RSF0885 transformed cells with even lower efficiency than could be accounted for by the low uptake. Transformation was not affected by rec-1 and rec-2 mutations in the recipient, and strains cured of the plasmid did not show increased transformation. Plasmid molecules cut once with a restriction enzyme that made blunt ends did not transform. Transformation was favored by the closed circular form of the plasmid.

  11. Beta-Lactamase Activity in Ampicillin-Resistant Haemophilus influenzae

    PubMed Central

    Farrar, W. Edmund; O'Dell, Noel M.

    1974-01-01

    The specific activity, substrate profile, response to inhibitors, inducibility, and cellular localization of the beta-lactamase produced by an ampicillin-resistant strain of Haemophilus influenzae type B were investigated. In these properties the enzyme resembles β-lactamases produced by other gram-negative bacilli more closely than those produced by gram-positive organisms. It is quite similar to an enzyme found in strains of Klebsiella pneumoniae, and differs significantly from those described in other gram-negative bacilli. Comparison of the substrate profile with the minimal inhibitory concentrations of various β-lactamase antibiotics suggests that the β-lactamase plays an important role in the antibiotic resistance of this organism. PMID:15825317

  12. Haemophilus haemolyticus Interaction with Host Cells Is Different to Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae and Prevents NTHi Association with Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pickering, Janessa L.; Prosser, Amy; Corscadden, Karli J.; de Gier, Camilla; Richmond, Peter C.; Zhang, Guicheng; Thornton, Ruth B.; Kirkham, Lea-Ann S.

    2016-01-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) is an opportunistic pathogen that resides in the upper respiratory tract and contributes to a significant burden of respiratory related diseases in children and adults. Haemophilus haemolyticus is a respiratory tract commensal that can be misidentified as NTHi due to high levels of genetic relatedness. There are reports of invasive disease from H. haemolyticus, which further blurs the species boundary with NTHi. To investigate differences in pathogenicity between these species, we optimized an in vitro epithelial cell model to compare the interaction of 10 H. haemolyticus strains with 4 NTHi and 4 H. influenzae-like haemophili. There was inter- and intra-species variability but overall, H. haemolyticus had reduced capacity to attach to and invade nasopharyngeal and bronchoalveolar epithelial cell lines (D562 and A549) within 3 h when compared with NTHi. H. haemolyticus was cytotoxic to both cell lines at 24 h, whereas NTHi was not. Nasopharyngeal epithelium challenged with some H. haemolyticus strains released high levels of inflammatory mediators IL-6 and IL-8, whereas NTHi did not elicit an inflammatory response despite higher levels of cell association and invasion. Furthermore, peripheral blood mononuclear cells stimulated with H. haemolyticus or NTHi released similar and high levels of IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-1β, and TNFα when compared with unstimulated cells but only NTHi elicited an IFNγ response. Due to the relatedness of H. haemolyticus and NTHi, we hypothesized that H. haemolyticus may compete with NTHi for colonization of the respiratory tract. We observed that in vitro pre-treatment of epithelial cells with H. haemolyticus significantly reduced NTHi attachment, suggesting interference or competition between the two species is possible and warrants further investigation. In conclusion, H. haemolyticus interacts differently with host cells compared to NTHi, with different immunostimulatory and cytotoxic

  13. Development of a PCR test to diagnose Haemophilus parasuis infections.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, S; Galina, L; Pijoan, C

    2001-11-01

    A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test was developed in order to improve the accuracy and speed of diagnosis of Haemophilus parasuis, an economically important respiratory pathogen that affects swine. The gene sequence of the 16S small subunit ribosomal RNA of H. parasuis (GenBank M75065) was compared with 56 16S sequences of related bacteria, including those frequently isolated from pig tissues. Two species-specific primers were designed: HPS forward and HPS reverse. The predicted size of the amplified PCR product was 821 bp. The PCR test could detect a minimum of 102 bacteria and 0.69 pg of DNA. Thirty-one H. parasuis isolates, including 12 different serovars and 19 field isolates, were positive using the PCR test. No amplification was observed when the test was run using DNA from 15 other bacterial species commonly isolated from swine tissues. A weak band was observed when the PCR test was performed using Actinobacillus indolicus DNA as template. Clinical samples tested by PCR included tissues and swabs from 5 animals naturally infected with H. parasuis and 1 experimentally infected animal. The PCR was positive in 26 of 30 clinical samples. Four samples showed weak bands, and these results were not considered positive. Haemophilus parasuis was isolated from 18 of 30 of these samples. Tissues from specific pathogen-free (SPF) pigs and from unrelated species were negative for H. parasuis isolation and PCR. The developed PCR was successfully used in the diagnosis of H. parasuis infection, especially when compared with traditional microbiology techniques.

  14. An In Silico Identification of Common Putative Vaccine Candidates against Treponema pallidum: A Reverse Vaccinology and Subtractive Genomics Based Approach

    PubMed Central

    Kumar Jaiswal, Arun; Tiwari, Sandeep; Jamal, Syed Babar; Barh, Debmalya; Azevedo, Vasco; Soares, Siomar C.

    2017-01-01

    Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) are caused by a wide variety of bacteria, viruses, and parasites that are transmitted from one person to another primarily by vaginal, anal, or oral sexual contact. Syphilis is a serious disease caused by a sexually transmitted infection. Syphilis is caused by the bacterium Treponema pallidum subspecies pallidum. Treponema pallidum (T. pallidum) is a motile, gram-negative spirochete, which can be transmitted both sexually and from mother to child, and can invade virtually any organ or structure in the human body. The current worldwide prevalence of syphilis emphasizes the need for continued preventive measures and strategies. Unfortunately, effective measures are limited. In this study, we focus on the identification of vaccine targets and putative drugs against syphilis disease using reverse vaccinology and subtractive genomics. We compared 13 strains of T. pallidum using T. pallidum Nichols as the reference genome. Using an in silicoapproach, four pathogenic islands were detected in the genome of T. pallidum Nichols. We identified 15 putative antigenic proteins and sixdrug targets through reverse vaccinology and subtractive genomics, respectively, which can be used as candidate therapeutic targets in the future. PMID:28216574

  15. A Modified Shuttle Plasmid Facilitates Expression of a Flavin Mononucleotide-Based Fluorescent Protein in Treponema denticola ATCC 35405.

    PubMed

    Godovikova, Valentina; Goetting-Minesky, M Paula; Shin, Jae M; Kapila, Yvonne L; Rickard, Alexander H; Fenno, J Christopher

    2015-09-01

    Oral pathogens, including Treponema denticola, initiate the dysregulation of tissue homeostasis that characterizes periodontitis. However, progress of research on the roles of T. denticola in microbe-host interactions and signaling, microbial communities, microbial physiology, and molecular evolution has been hampered by limitations in genetic methodologies. This is typified by an extremely low transformation efficiency and inability to transform the most widely studied T. denticola strain with shuttle plasmids. Previous studies have suggested that robust restriction-modification (R-M) systems in T. denticola contributed to these problems. To facilitate further molecular genetic analysis of T. denticola behavior, we optimized existing protocols such that shuttle plasmid transformation efficiency was increased by >100-fold over prior reports. Here, we report routine transformation of T. denticola ATCC 35405 with shuttle plasmids, independently of both plasmid methylation status and activity of the type II restriction endonuclease encoded by TDE0911. To validate the utility of this methodological advance, we demonstrated expression and activity in T. denticola of a flavin mononucleotide-based fluorescent protein (FbFP) that is active under anoxic conditions. Addition of routine plasmid-based fluorescence labeling to the Treponema toolset will enable more-rigorous and -detailed studies of the behavior of this organism.

  16. Diarrhea induced by Treponema hyodysenteriae: a young chick cecal model for swine dysentery.

    PubMed Central

    Sueyoshi, M; Adachi, Y

    1990-01-01

    The experimental infection of 25 young chicks with Treponema hyodysenteriae was carried out. Treponemes were isolated from 21 of 25 chicks on day 21 after inoculation. The ceca of chicks infected with treponemes were atrophied. The lumen was filled with a white watery fluid instead of digested feed. In some infected chicks, a cecal core was observed with the fluid in the cecum. The cecal core was grayish, hard, and rod shaped. It consisted of eroded cells and debris of treponemes and resembled the pseudomembrane. Bloody mucus was also observed in one chick. The thickness of the mucosae in 17 of 25 chicks were markedly increased. The histological changes were classified into two types. In the case of regressive changes of epithelial cells which mean severe erosion, the laminae propriae were exposed. Hemorrhage, edema, and heterophil infiltration in the laminae propriae were also confirmed. Numerous treponemes were observed within the edematous area under the remaining epithelia and also invaded the epithelial cells and laminae propriae. In the other case, progressive changes, that is, hyperplasia of mucosal epithelial cells and elongation of the crypt, were observed. The epithelia consisted mainly of cuboidal basophilic cells, mitotic cells, and goblet cells. The mitotic cells increased in number and were also observed near the superficial luminal surface of the ceca. Mucous goblet cells were also considerably increased in number. The erosion of superficial luminal epithelial cells was not so severe, but edema in laminae propriae was frequently observed. Electron-microscopic observation demonstrated that the basophilic epithelial cells were polyribosome rich, mitochondria poor, and lipid droplet poor. Furthermore, tonofibril-like structures under the terminal web in cytoplasms were lost, and numerous membrane-bound vesicles at the terminal web with free ribosomes were observed. In places, a number of vesicles were observed between microvilli, and some vesicles were

  17. Identification and preliminary characterization of Treponema pallidum protein antigens expressed in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Stamm, L V; Kerner, T C; Bankaitis, V A; Bassford, P J

    1983-01-01

    We have previously described the construction in Escherichia coli K-12 of a hybrid plasmid colony bank of Treponema pallidum (Nichols strain) genomic DNA. By screening a portion of this bank with an in situ immunoassay, we identified six E. coli clones that express T. pallidum antigens. In this study, the recombinant plasmids from each of these clones have been analyzed in E. coli maxicells and have been found to encode a number of proteins that are not of vector pBR322 origin and are, therefore, of treponemal origin. In each case, several of these proteins can be specifically precipitated from solubilized maxicell extracts by high-titer experimental rabbit syphilitic serum. Certain of these proteins are also precipitated by high-titer latent human syphilitic sera (HSS). The T. pallidum DNA inserts in these plasmids range in size from 6.2 to 14 kilobase pairs, and from the restriction patterns of the inserts and the protein profiles generated by each plasmid in maxicells, it is apparent that we have recovered a total of four unique clones from our colony bank. Recombinant plasmids pLVS3 and pLVS5 were of particular interest. Plasmid pLVS3 encodes three major protein antigens with molecular weights of 39,000, 35,000, and 25,000. These three proteins, which were not recognized by pooled normal human sera, were efficiently precipitated by most secondary HSS, latent HSS, and late HSS tested. These proteins were also precipitated, although somewhat inefficiently, by most primary HSS tested. Plasmid pLVS5 encodes a major protein antigen with a molecular weight of 32,000 and several minor protein antigens that, although efficiently precipitated by experimental rabbit syphilitic serum, were generally not recognized by the various HSS tested. Evidence is presented indicating that the protein antigens encoded by plasmids pLVS3 and pLVS5 are specific for pathogenic treponemal species. We have also demonstrated that immunoglobulin G antibodies directed against these protein

  18. Antimicrobial activity of rabbit leukocyte defensins against Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum.

    PubMed Central

    Borenstein, L A; Selsted, M E; Lehrer, R I; Miller, J N

    1991-01-01

    Defensins, which are peptides with broad antimicrobial activity, are major constituents of rabbit neutrophils and certain macrophages. We tested six rabbit defensins, NP-1, NP-2, NP-3a, NP-3b, NP-4, and NP-5, for activity against Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum. Mixtures of T. pallidum and defensin in 10% normal rabbit serum (NRS) or heat-inactivated NRS (HI-NRS) were incubated anaerobically for various time periods ranging between 0 and 16 h and then examined by dark-field microscopy for treponemal motility or inoculated intradermally into rabbits to assess treponemal virulence. Immobilization of T. pallidum by NP-1 (400 micrograms/ml) occurred after 4 and 8 h of coincubation in mixtures containing NRS and HI-NRS, respectively. Similarly, neutralization of T. pallidum by NP-1 occurred more rapidly and was complete when incubations were performed in NRS as compared with that in HI-NRS. Endpoint titration confirmed the augmentation of NP-1 antitreponemal activity by heat-labile serum factors; NP-1 showed neutralizing activity at 4 micrograms/ml (about 1 microM) in NRS and at 40 micrograms/ml in HI-NRS. When NP-1 was tested in serum that was deficient in C6, the T. pallidum neutralizing activity of NP-1 was reduced to levels slightly greater than that observed in HI-NRS. NP-1 that had been reduced and alkylated was inactive against T. pallidum. When NP-2, NP-3a, NP-3b, NP-4, and NP-5 were tested at 400 micrograms/ml, all exerted potent treponemicidal activity, manifested by abrogation or delayed development of cutaneous lesions relative to that of controls. These data suggest that defensins may equip certain macrophages and neutrophils to participate in host defense against T. pallidum, that the direct activity of defensins against T. pallidum is enhanced by heat-labile serum factors (presumably complement), and that conformational factors influence the biological activity of the defensin molecule. Images PMID:2004816

  19. Western Immunoblotting with Five Treponema pallidum Recombinant Antigens for Serologic Diagnosis of Syphilis

    PubMed Central

    Sambri, Vittorio; Marangoni, Antonella; Eyer, Christina; Reichhuber, Christine; Soutschek, Erwin; Negosanti, Massimo; D'Antuono, Antonietta; Cevenini, Roberto

    2001-01-01

    Five immunodominant Treponema pallidum recombinant polypeptides (rTpN47, rTmpA, rTpN37, rTpN17, and rTpN15) were blotted onto strips, and 450 sera (200 from blood donors, 200 from syphilis patients, and 50 potentially cross-reactive) were tested to evaluate the diagnostic performance of recombinant Western blotting (recWB) in comparison with in-house whole-cell lysate antigen-based immunoblotting (wclWB) and T. pallidum hemagglutination (MHA-TP) for the laboratory diagnosis of syphilis. None of the serum specimens from blood donors or from potential cross-reactors gave a positive result when evaluated by recWB, wclWB, or MHA-TP. The evaluation of the immunoglobulin G immune response by recWB in sera from patients with different stages of syphilis showed that rTmpA was the most frequently identified antigen (95%), whereas only 41% of the specimens were reactive to rTpN37. The remaining recombinant polypeptides were recognized as follows: rTpN47, 92.5%; rTpN17, 89.5%; and rTpN15, 67.5%. The agreement between recWB and MHA-TP was 95.0% (100% with sera from patients with latent and late disease), and the concordance between wclWB and MHA-TP was 92.0%. The overall concordance between recWB and wclWB was 97.5% (100% with sera from patients with secondary and late syphilis and 94.6 and 98.6% with sera from patients with primary and latent syphilis, respectively). The overall sensitivity of recWB was 98.8% and the specificity was 97.1% with MHA-TP as the reference method. These values for sensitivity and specificity were slightly superior to those calculated for wclWB (sensitivity, 97.1%, and specificity, 96.1%). With wclWB as the standard test, the sensitivity and specificity of recWB were 98.9 and 99.3%, respectively. These findings suggest that the five recombinant polypeptides used in this study could be used as substitutes for the whole-cell lysate T. pallidum antigens and that this newly developed recWB test is a good, easy-to-use confirmatory method for the

  20. High Prevalence of Antibodies against the Bacterium Treponema pallidum in Senegalese Guinea Baboons (Papio papio)

    PubMed Central

    Knauf, Sascha; Barnett, Ulrike; Maciej, Peter; Klapproth, Matthias; Ndao, Ibrahima; Frischmann, Sieghard; Fischer, Julia; Zinner, Dietmar; Liu, Hsi

    2015-01-01

    The bacterium Treponema pallidum is known to cause syphilis (ssp. pallidum), yaws (ssp. pertenue), and endemic syphilis (ssp. endemicum) in humans. Nonhuman primates have also been reported to be infected with the bacterium with equally versatile clinical manifestations, from severe skin ulcerations to asymptomatic. At present all simian strains are closely related to human yaws-causing strains, an important consideration for yaws eradication. We tested clinically healthy Guinea baboons (Papio papio) at Parc National Niokolo Koba in south eastern Senegal for the presence of anti-T. pallidum antibodies. Since T. pallidum infection in this species was identified 50 years ago, and there has been no attempt to treat non-human primates for infection, it was hypothesized that a large number of West African baboons are still infected with simian strains of the yaws-bacterium. All animals were without clinical signs of treponematoses, but 18 of 20 (90%) baboons tested positive for antibodies against T. pallidum based on treponemal tests. Yet, Guinea baboons seem to develop no clinical symptoms, though it must be assumed that infection is chronic or comparable to the latent stage in human yaws infection. The non-active character is supported by the low anti-T. pallidum serum titers in Guinea baboons (median = 1:2,560) versus serum titers that are found in genital-ulcerated olive baboons with active infection in Tanzania (range of medians among the groups of initial, moderate, and severe infected animals = 1:15,360 to 1:2.097e+7). Our findings provide evidence for simian infection with T. pallidum in wild Senegalese baboons. Potentially, Guinea baboons in West Africa serve as a natural reservoir for human infection, as the West African simian strain has been shown to cause sustainable yaws infection when inoculated into humans. The present study pinpoints an area where further research is needed to support the currently on-going second WHO led yaws eradication campaign with

  1. Characterizing the Syphilis-Causing Treponema pallidum ssp. pallidum Proteome Using Complementary Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Houston, Simon; Lithgow, Karen V.; Meehan, Conor J.; Strouhal, Michal; Šmajs, David; Cameron, Caroline E.; Van Ostade, Xaveer; Kenyon, Chris R.; Van Raemdonck, Geert A.

    2016-01-01

    Background The spirochete bacterium Treponema pallidum ssp. pallidum is the etiological agent of syphilis, a chronic multistage disease. Little is known about the global T. pallidum proteome, therefore mass spectrometry studies are needed to bring insights into pathogenicity and protein expression profiles during infection. Methodology/Principal Findings To better understand the T. pallidum proteome profile during infection, we studied T. pallidum ssp. pallidum DAL-1 strain bacteria isolated from rabbits using complementary mass spectrometry techniques, including multidimensional peptide separation and protein identification via matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF/TOF) and electrospray ionization (ESI-LTQ-Orbitrap) tandem mass spectrometry. A total of 6033 peptides were detected, corresponding to 557 unique T. pallidum proteins at a high level of confidence, representing 54% of the predicted proteome. A previous gel-based T. pallidum MS proteome study detected 58 of these proteins. One hundred fourteen of the detected proteins were previously annotated as hypothetical or uncharacterized proteins; this is the first account of 106 of these proteins at the protein level. Detected proteins were characterized according to their predicted biological function and localization; half were allocated into a wide range of functional categories. Proteins annotated as potential membrane proteins and proteins with unclear functional annotations were subjected to an additional bioinformatics pipeline analysis to facilitate further characterization. A total of 116 potential membrane proteins were identified, of which 16 have evidence supporting outer membrane localization. We found 8/12 proteins related to the paralogous tpr gene family: TprB, TprC/D, TprE, TprG, TprH, TprI and TprJ. Protein abundance was semi-quantified using label-free spectral counting methods. A low correlation (r = 0.26) was found between previous microarray signal data and

  2. Sequence analysis, expression, and binding activity of recombinant major outer sheath protein (Msp) of Treponema denticola.

    PubMed Central

    Fenno, J C; Müller, K H; McBride, B C

    1996-01-01

    The gene encoding the major outer sheath protein (Msp) of the oral spirochete Treponema denticola ATCC 35405 was cloned, sequenced, and expressed in Escherichia coli. Preliminary sequence analysis showed that the 5' end of the msp gene was not present on the 5.5-kb cloned fragment described in a recent study (M. Haapasalo, K. H. Müller, V. J. Uitto, W. K. Leung, and B. C. McBride, Infect. Immun. 60:2058-2065,1992). The 5' end of msp was obtained by PCR amplification from a T. denticola genomic library, and an open reading frame of 1,629 bp was identified as the coding region for Msp by combining overlapping sequences. The deduced peptide consisted of 543 amino acids and had a molecular mass of 58,233 Da. The peptide had a typical prokaryotic signal sequence with a potential cleavage site for signal peptidase 1. Northern (RNA) blot analysis showing the msp transcript to be approximately 1.7 kb was consistent with the identification of a promoter consensus sequence located optimally upstream of msp and a transcription termination signal found downstream of the stop codon. The entire msp sequence was amplified from T. denticola genomic DNA and cloned in E. coli by using a tightly regulated T7 RNA polymerase vector system. Expression of Msp was toxic to E. coli when the entire msp gene was present. High levels of Msp were produced as inclusion bodies when the putative signal peptide sequence was deleted and replaced by a vector-encoded T7 peptide sequence. Recombinant Msp purified to homogeneity from a clone containing the full-length msp gene adhered to immobilized laminin and fibronectin but not to bovine serum albumin. Attachment of recombinant Msp was decreased in the presence of soluble substrate. Attachment of T. denticola to immobilized laminin and fibronectin was increased by pretreatment of the substrate with recombinant Msp. These studies lend further support to the hypothesis that Msp mediates the extracellular matrix binding activity of T. denticola. PMID

  3. Antibody and T Cell Responses to Fusobacterium nucleatum and Treponema denticola in Health and Chronic Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jieun; Kho, Sang-A; Choi, Yun S.; Kim, Yong C.; Rhyu, In-Chul; Choi, Youngnim

    2013-01-01

    The characteristics of the T cell response to the members of oral flora are poorly understood. We characterized the antibody and T cell responses to FadA and Td92, adhesins from Fusobacterium nucleatum, an oral commensal, and Treponema denticola, a periodontal pathogen, respectively. Peripheral blood and saliva were obtained from healthy individuals and patients with untreated chronic periodontitis (CP, n = 11 paris) and after successful treatment of the disease (n = 9). The levels of antigen-specific antibody were measured by ELISA. In plasma, IgG1 was the most abundant isotype of Ab for both Ags, followed by IgA and then IgG4. The levels of FadA-specific salivary IgA (sIgA) were higher than Td92-specific sIgA and the FadA-specific IgA levels observed in plasma. However, the periodontal health status of the individuals did not affect the levels of FadA- or Td92-specific antibody. Even healthy individuals contained FadA- and Td92-specific CD4+ T cells, as determined by the detection of intracytoplasmic CD154 after short-term in vitro stimulation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) with the antigens. Patients with CP tended to possess increased numbers of FadA- and Td92-specific CD4+ T cells but reduced numbers of Td92-specific Foxp3+CD4+ Tregs than the healthy subjects. Both FadA and Td92 induced the production of IFNγ and IL-10 but inhibited the secretion of IL-4 by PBMCs. In conclusion, F. nucleatum induced Th3 (sIgA)- and Th1 (IFNγ and IgG1)-dominant immune responses, whereas T. denticola induced a Th1 (IFNγ and IgG1)-dominant response. This IFNγ-dominant cytokine response was impaired in CP patients, and the Td92-induced IFNγ levels were negatively associated with periodontal destruction in patients. These findings may provide new insights into the homeostatic interaction between the immune system and oral bacteria and the pathogenesis of periodontitis. PMID:23335969

  4. Comparative Profile of Heme Acquisition Genes in Disease-Causing and Colonizing Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae and Haemophilus haemolyticus

    PubMed Central

    Hariadi, Nurul I.; Zhang, Lixin; Patel, Mayuri; Sandstedt, Sara A.; Davis, Gregg S.; Marrs, Carl F.

    2015-01-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHI) are Gram-negative bacteria that colonize the human pharynx and can cause respiratory tract infections, such as acute otitis media (AOM). Since NTHI require iron from their hosts for aerobic growth, the heme acquisition genes may play a significant role in avoiding host nutritional immunity and determining virulence. Therefore, we employed a hybridization-based technique to compare the prevalence of five heme acquisition genes (hxuA, hxuB, hxuC, hemR, and hup) between 514 middle ear strains from children with AOM and 235 throat strains from healthy children. We also investigated their prevalences in 148 Haemophilus haemolyticus strains, a closely related species that colonizes the human pharynx and is considered to be nonpathogenic. Four out of five genes (hxuA, hxuB, hxuC, and hemR) were significantly more prevalent in the middle ear strains (96%, 100%, 100%, and 97%, respectively) than in throat strains (80%, 92%, 93%, and 85%, respectively) of NTHI, suggesting that strains possessing these genes have a virulence advantage over those lacking them. All five genes were dramatically more prevalent in NTHI strains than in H. haemolyticus, with 91% versus 9% hxuA, 98% versus 11% hxuB, 98% versus 11% hxuC, 93% versus 20% hemR, and 97% versus 34% hup, supporting their potential role in virulence and highlighting their possibility to serve as biomarkers to distinguish H. influenzae from H. haemolyticus. In summary, this study demonstrates that heme acquisition genes are more prevalent in disease-causing NTHI strains isolated from the middle ear than in colonizing NTHI strains and H. haemolyticus isolated from the pharynx. PMID:25903577

  5. Comparative Profile of Heme Acquisition Genes in Disease-Causing and Colonizing Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae and Haemophilus haemolyticus.

    PubMed

    Hariadi, Nurul I; Zhang, Lixin; Patel, Mayuri; Sandstedt, Sara A; Davis, Gregg S; Marrs, Carl F; Gilsdorf, Janet R

    2015-07-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHI) are Gram-negative bacteria that colonize the human pharynx and can cause respiratory tract infections, such as acute otitis media (AOM). Since NTHI require iron from their hosts for aerobic growth, the heme acquisition genes may play a significant role in avoiding host nutritional immunity and determining virulence. Therefore, we employed a hybridization-based technique to compare the prevalence of five heme acquisition genes (hxuA, hxuB, hxuC, hemR, and hup) between 514 middle ear strains from children with AOM and 235 throat strains from healthy children. We also investigated their prevalences in 148 Haemophilus haemolyticus strains, a closely related species that colonizes the human pharynx and is considered to be nonpathogenic. Four out of five genes (hxuA, hxuB, hxuC, and hemR) were significantly more prevalent in the middle ear strains (96%, 100%, 100%, and 97%, respectively) than in throat strains (80%, 92%, 93%, and 85%, respectively) of NTHI, suggesting that strains possessing these genes have a virulence advantage over those lacking them. All five genes were dramatically more prevalent in NTHI strains than in H. haemolyticus, with 91% versus 9% hxuA, 98% versus 11% hxuB, 98% versus 11% hxuC, 93% versus 20% hemR, and 97% versus 34% hup, supporting their potential role in virulence and highlighting their possibility to serve as biomarkers to distinguish H. influenzae from H. haemolyticus. In summary, this study demonstrates that heme acquisition genes are more prevalent in disease-causing NTHI strains isolated from the middle ear than in colonizing NTHI strains and H. haemolyticus isolated from the pharynx.

  6. Prevalence of the sodC gene in nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae and Haemophilus haemolyticus by microarray-based hybridization.

    PubMed

    McCrea, Kirk W; Wang, Myron L; Xie, Jingping; Sandstedt, Sara A; Davis, Gregg S; Lee, Joseph H; Marrs, Carl F; Gilsdorf, Janet R

    2010-03-01

    The sodC gene has been reported to be a useful marker for differentiating nontypeable (NT) Haemophilus influenzae from Haemophilus haemolyticus in respiratory-tract samples, but discrepancies exist as to the prevalence of sodC in NT H. influenzae. Therefore, we used a microarray-based, "library-on-a-slide" method to differentiate the species and found that 21 of 169 (12.4%) NT H. influenzae strains and all 110 (100%) H. haemolyticus strains possessed the sodC gene. Multilocus sequence analysis confirmed that the 21 NT H. influenzae strains were H. influenzae and not H. haemolyticus. An inactive sodC gene has been reported in encapsulated H. influenzae strains belonging to phylogenetic division II. Capsule-specific Southern hybridization and PCR and a lack of copper/zinc-cofactored superoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD) expression indicated that 6 of the 21 sodC-containing NT H. influenzae strains in our study were likely capsule-deficient mutants belonging to phylogenetic division II. DNA sequence comparisons of the 21 H. influenzae sodC genes with sodC from H. haemolyticus or encapsulated H. influenzae demonstrated that the sodC genes of the six H. influenzae capsule-deficient mutants were, on average, 99% identical to sodC from encapsulated H. influenzae but only 85% identical to sodC from H. haemolyticus. The sodC genes from 2/15 NT H. influenzae strains were similarly more closely related to sodC from encapsulated strains, while sodC genes from 13 NT H. influenzae strains were almost 95% identical to sodC genes from H. haemolyticus, suggesting the possibility of interspecies recombination in these strains. In summary, this study demonstrates that sodC is not completely absent (9.2%) in true NT H. influenzae strains.

  7. Identification of the Gene Encoding the FhbB Protein of Treponema denticola, a Highly Unique Factor H-Like Protein 1 Binding Protein▿

    PubMed Central

    McDowell, John V.; Frederick, Jesse; Stamm, Lola; Marconi, Richard T.

    2007-01-01

    The gene encoding the Treponema denticola factor H-like protein 1 (FHL-1) binding protein, FhbB, was recovered and characterized. Sequence conservation, expression, and properties of FhbB were analyzed. The identification of FhbB represents an important step in understanding the contribution of FHL-1 binding in T. denticola pathogenesis and in development of periodontal disease. PMID:17101650

  8. Distribution of oral Haemophilus species in dental plaque from a large adult population.

    PubMed Central

    Liljemark, W F; Bloomquist, C G; Uhl, L A; Schaffer, E M; Wolff, L F; Pihlstrom, B L; Bandt, C L

    1984-01-01

    The periodontal status of maxillary first molars in 284 young adults demonstrating near-health to early disease was evaluated, and supragingival and subgingival plaque samples were collected. Plaque samples were processed anaerobically, enumerated microscopically for bacterial morphotypes, and cultivated on various media to enumerate the microflora. Although haemophili were ubiquitous (recovered in 98.5 and 96.2% of the supragingival and subgingival plaque samples, respectively), 50% of the respective samples had proportions of less than or equal to 1.5% and less than or equal to 0.33% total Haemophilus spp. based on total cultivable microflora. To study the distribution of Haemophilus spp., 377 colonies were identified from modified chocolate agar (selective for oral haemophili) from 14 supragingival and corresponding subgingival samples from 14 subjects. The most prevalent species, Haemophilus parainfluenzae, was found in significantly higher proportions, based on total haemophili on modified chocolate agar, in supragingival and subgingival samples from teeth with shallower probing depths (less than or equal to 3.0 mm) versus deeper probing depths (greater than or equal to 3.0 mm). Additional statistically significant findings included Haemophilus segnis in higher proportions in supragingival samples from deeper sites, Haemophilus aphrophilus in higher proportions in subgingival samples from deeper sites, and Haemophilus paraphrophilus in higher proportions in subgingival samples from shallower sites. Scatter diagrams illustrating the bivariate distributions of proportions of haemophili with proportions of dark-pigmented Bacteroides spp., spirochetes, and streptococci demonstrated that high proportions of haemophili were never recovered from sites with high proportions of Bacteroides spp. or spirochetes. All levels of haemophili, however, were recovered from sites with all levels of streptococci. Two potential systems for interpreting haemophili data were

  9. Haemophilus parasuis exhibits IgA protease activity but lacks homologs of the IgA protease genes of Haemophilus influenzae

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Haemophilus parasuis, the bacterium responsible for Glasser's disease, is a pathogen of significant concern in modern high-health swine production systems but there is little information regarding the identity or function of its virulence factors. Several important human mucosal pathogens, including...

  10. Identification and Comparative Analysis of Genes Encoding Outer Membrane Proteins P2 and P5 in Haemophilus parsuis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Haemophilus parasuis is a serious swine pathogen but little is known about how it causes disease. A related human pathogen, Haemophilus influenzae, has been better studied and many of its virulence factors have been identified. Two of these, outer membrane proteins P2 and P5, have been shown to ha...

  11. Absence of an important vaccine and diagnostic target in carriage- and disease-related nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed

    Smith-Vaughan, Heidi C; Chang, Anne B; Sarovich, Derek S; Marsh, Robyn L; Grimwood, Keith; Leach, Amanda J; Morris, Peter S; Price, Erin P

    2014-02-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi)-associated disease is a major health problem globally. Whole-genome sequence analysis identified the absence of hpd genes encoding Haemophilus protein D in 3 of 16 phylogenetically distinct NTHi isolates. This novel finding is of potential clinical significance, as protein D and hpd represent important NTHi vaccine antigen and diagnostic targets, respectively.

  12. Haemophilus influenzae Outer Membrane Protein P6 Molecular Characterization May Not Differentiate All Strains of H. Influenzae from H. haemolyticus▿

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Arthur; Adlowitz, Diana G.; Yellamatty, Edna; Pichichero, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Distinguishing nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae and Haemophilus haemolyticus isolates by outer membrane protein (OMP) P6 gene sequencing is complicated by sequence variants in isolates. Further testing using RapID NH and multilocus sequence analysis may not help identify some isolates. Translated OMP P6 gene sequences are not conserved among all isolates presumed to be H. influenzae. PMID:20686092

  13. Syphilis and HIV co-infection. Epidemiology, treatment and molecular typing of Treponema pallidum.

    PubMed

    Salado-Rasmussen, Kirsten

    2015-12-01

    The studies included in this PhD thesis examined the interactions of syphilis, which is caused by Treponema pallidum, and HIV. Syphilis reemerged worldwide in the late 1990s and hereafter increasing rates of early syphilis were also reported in Denmark. The proportion of patients with concurrent HIV has been substantial, ranging from one third to almost two thirds of patients diagnosed with syphilis some years. Given that syphilis facilitates transmission and acquisition of HIV the two sexually transmitted diseases are of major public health concern. Further, syphilis has a negative impact on HIV infection, resulting in increasing viral loads and decreasing CD4 cell counts during syphilis infection. Likewise, HIV has an impact on the clinical course of syphilis; patients with concurrent HIV are thought to be at increased risk of neurological complications and treatment failure. Almost ten per cent of Danish men with syphilis acquired HIV infection within five years after they were diagnosed with syphilis during an 11-year study period. Interestingly, the risk of HIV declined during the later part of the period. Moreover, HIV-infected men had a substantial increased risk of re-infection with syphilis compared to HIV-uninfected men. As one third of the HIV-infected patients had viral loads >1,000 copies/ml, our conclusion supported the initiation of cART in more HIV-infected MSM to reduce HIV transmission. During a five-year study period, including the majority of HIV-infected patients from the Copenhagen area, we observed that syphilis was diagnosed in the primary, secondary, early and late latent stage. These patients were treated with either doxycycline or penicillin and the rate of treatment failure was similar in the two groups, indicating that doxycycline can be used as a treatment alternative - at least in an HIV-infected population. During a four-year study period, the T. pallidum strain type distribution was investigated among patients diagnosed by PCR

  14. Examination of various cell culture techniques for co-incubation of virulent Treponema pallidum (Nichols I strain) under anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed Central

    Sandok, P L; Knight, S T; Jenkin, H M

    1976-01-01

    Treponema pallidum (Nichols virulent) was incubated with and without cells in cell culture medium reduced to -275 mV Ecal, pH 7.3, under deoxygenated conditions. Five to ten percent of the treponemes attached to cells and remained motile for at least 120 h in cell-treponeme systems of co-incubation. Virulent treponemes could be detected after 120 to 144 h in the supernatant fluids of cell-treponeme co-incubation cultures and in cell-free tubes containing medium harvested from aerobically cultivated mammalian cells. Medium supplemented with ox serum ultrafiltrate, pyruvate, and sodium thioglycolate and gas mixtures containing H2 and CO2 enhanced treponemal survival. Increases in treponemal numbers were observed using dark-field microscopy but were not substantiated using the rabbit lesion test. Continuous passage of the treponeme was not achieved in vitro. PMID:789395

  15. Native surface association of a recombinant 38-kilodalton Treponema pallidum antigen isolated from the Escherichia coli outer membrane.

    PubMed Central

    Fehniger, T E; Radolf, J D; Walfield, A M; Cunningham, T M; Miller, J N; Lovett, M A

    1986-01-01

    A recombinant plasmid designated pAW305, containing a 6-kilobase insert of Treponema pallidum DNA, directed the expression of a 38-kilodalton (kDa) treponemal antigen in Escherichia coli. The 38-kDa antigen copurified with the outer membrane fraction of the E. coli cell envelope after treatment with nonionic detergents or sucrose density gradient centrifugation. Rabbits immunized with the recombinant 38-kDa antigen developed antibodies which reacted specifically with a 38-kDa T. pallidum antigen on immunoblots, and 38-kDa antisera specifically immobilized T. pallidum in a complement-dependent manner in the T. pallidum immobilization test. Antisera to the 38-kDa recombinant antigen were also used to demonstrate its native surface association on T. pallidum by immunoelectron microscopy. Images PMID:3516880

  16. Health care importance of Treponema pallidum, Chagas' disease and Human immunodeficiency virus 1 among Amerindians of Argentina: an observational study.

    PubMed

    Eirin, María E; Delfino, Cecilia M; Pedrozo, Williams R; Malan, Richard; Puca, Alberto; De Rissio, Ana M; Espejo, Rogelio D; Gallo Vaulet, María L; Rodríguez Fermepin, Marcelo; Biglione, Mirna M; Berini, Carolina A

    2017-07-13

    The objective of this study was to estimate the prevalence of Treponema pallidum, Trypanosoma cruzi and Human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) in five Amerindian populations of Argentina. A retrospective study was conducted among 857 Amerindian populations (112 Kollas, 298 Mbyá-guaraníes, 79 Sagua Huarpes, 368 Wichis) from 2007 to 2010. Screening and confirmation of T. pallidum, T. cruzi and HIV-1 were performed. T. pallidum and T. cruzi infections were detected in all communities with an overall prevalence rate of 4.2% and 16.8%, respectively. Although HIV was not detected, syphilis and Chagas' disease represent a challenge for the health care system and the reinforcement of public health strategies is necessary considering the socioeconomic isolation of these populations. Copyright © 2017 Asociación Argentina de Microbiología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. [Pathogenic potential of Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola and Tannerella forsythia, the red bacterial complex associated with periodontitis].

    PubMed

    Bodet, C; Chandad, F; Grenier, D

    2007-01-01

    Periodontitis are mixed bacterial infections leading to destruction of tooth-supporting tissues, including periodontal ligament and alveolar bone. Among over 500 bacterial species living in the oral cavity, a bacterial complex named "red complex" and made of Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola and Tannerella forsythia has been strongly related to advanced periodontal lesions. While periodontopathogenic bacteria are the primary etiologic factor of periodontitis, tissue destruction essentially results from the host immune response to the bacterial challenge. Members of the red complex are Gram negative anaerobic bacteria expressing numerous virulence factors allowing bacteria to colonize the subgingival sites, to disturb the host defense system, to invade and destroy periodontal tissue as well as to promote the immunodestructive host response. This article reviews current knowledge of the pathogenic mechanisms of bacteria of the red complex leading to tissue and alveolar bone destruction observed during periodontitis.

  18. Whole genome sequence of Treponema pallidum ssp. pallidum, strain Mexico A, suggests recombination between yaws and syphilis strains.

    PubMed

    Pětrošová, Helena; Zobaníková, Marie; Čejková, Darina; Mikalová, Lenka; Pospíšilová, Petra; Strouhal, Michal; Chen, Lei; Qin, Xiang; Muzny, Donna M; Weinstock, George M; Šmajs, David

    2012-01-01

    Treponema pallidum ssp. pallidum (TPA), the causative agent of syphilis, and Treponema pallidum ssp. pertenue (TPE), the causative agent of yaws, are closely related spirochetes causing diseases with distinct clinical manifestations. The TPA Mexico A strain was isolated in 1953 from male, with primary syphilis, living in Mexico. Attempts to cultivate TPA Mexico A strain under in vitro conditions have revealed lower growth potential compared to other tested TPA strains. The complete genome sequence of the TPA Mexico A strain was determined using the Illumina sequencing technique. The genome sequence assembly was verified using the whole genome fingerprinting technique and the final sequence was annotated. The genome size of the Mexico A strain was determined to be 1,140,038 bp with 1,035 predicted ORFs. The Mexico A genome sequence was compared to the whole genome sequences of three TPA (Nichols, SS14 and Chicago) and three TPE (CDC-2, Samoa D and Gauthier) strains. No large rearrangements in the Mexico A genome were found and the identified nucleotide changes occurred most frequently in genes encoding putative virulence factors. Nevertheless, the genome of the Mexico A strain, revealed two genes (TPAMA_0326 (tp92) and TPAMA_0488 (mcp2-1)) which combine TPA- and TPE- specific nucleotide sequences. Both genes were found to be under positive selection within TPA strains and also between TPA and TPE strains. The observed mosaic character of the TPAMA_0326 and TPAMA_0488 loci is likely a result of inter-strain recombination between TPA and TPE strains during simultaneous infection of a single host suggesting horizontal gene transfer between treponemal subspecies.

  19. The Structure of Treponema pallidum Tp0624 Reveals a Modular Assembly of Divergently Functionalized and Previously Uncharacterized Domains

    PubMed Central

    Wetherell, Charmaine; Cameron, Caroline E.

    2016-01-01

    Treponema pallidum subspecies pallidum is the causative agent of syphilis, a chronic, multistage, systemic infection that remains a major global health concern. The molecular mechanisms underlying T. pallidum pathogenesis are incompletely understood, partially due to the phylogenetic divergence of T. pallidum. One aspect of T. pallidum that differentiates it from conventional Gram-negative bacteria, and is believed to play an important role in pathogenesis, is its unusual cell envelope ultrastructure; in particular, the T. pallidum peptidoglycan layer is chemically distinct, thinner and more distal to the outer membrane. Established functional roles for peptidoglycan include contributing to the structural integrity of the cell envelope and stabilization of the flagellar motor complex, which are typically mediated by the OmpA domain-containing family of proteins. To gain insight into the molecular mechanisms that govern peptidoglycan binding and cell envelope biogenesis in T. pallidum we report here the structural characterization of the putative OmpA-like domain-containing protein, Tp0624. Analysis of the 1.70 Å resolution Tp0624 crystal structure reveals a multi-modular architecture comprised of three distinct domains including a C-terminal divergent OmpA-like domain, which we show is unable to bind the conventional peptidoglycan component diaminopimelic acid, and a previously uncharacterized tandem domain unit. Intriguingly, bioinformatic analysis indicates that the three domains together are found in all orthologs from pathogenic treponemes, but are not observed together in genera outside Treponema. These findings provide the first structural insight into a multi-modular treponemal protein containing an OmpA-like domain and its potential role in peptidoglycan coordination and stabilization of the T. pallidum cell envelope. PMID:27832149

  20. Evaluation of a new recombinant antigen-based Virotech Treponema pallidum screen ELISA for diagnosis of syphilis.

    PubMed

    Busse, Clemens; Navid, Mojdeh Heidary; Strubel, Andreas; Schnitzler, Paul

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic performance of the new Sekisui Virotech Treponema pallidum Screen ELISA in comparison with the currently used treponemal tests, TPPA and FTA-abs, and to compare this new ELISA to the FDA approved Phoenix Trep-Sure ELISA. To establish the sensitivity and specificity of the Virotech Screen, 421 serum samples from different panels of infected and noninfected patients, sera from seronegative pregnant women as well as international syphilis standard sera and panels were tested. In comparison to combined TPPA/FTA-abs, Phoenix Trep-Sure and Virotech Screen demonstrated a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 93.9% and 98.3%, respectively. All samples of a well defined syphilis serum panel were correctly identified by the Virotech test, whereas the Phoenix test identified two Treponema negative samples as equivocal. Results of both ELISAs highly correlated with TPPA negative and positive samples. The analytical sensitivity of the Virotech Screen with international standards 05/122 and 05/132 was determined at 0.02 IU/mL and 0.03 IU/mL, respectively, and was slightly superior to the Phoenix Trep-Sure. The Virotech Screen ELISA demonstrated good diagnostic sensitivity and specificity when evaluated as a screening test for syphilis among various patient populations, including samples with increased rates of false-positive nontreponemal test results. Thus, the new Virotech ELISA may be used in automatic analysers as an alternative to the manual TPPA. However, the use of a confirmatory test remains a must in order to avoid false-positive results.

  1. Characterization of isolates of Haemophilus paragallinarum from Argentina.

    PubMed

    Terzolo, H R; Paolicchi, F A; Sandoval, V E; Blackall, P J; Yamaguchi, T; Iritani, Y

    1993-01-01

    The biochemical and serological properties of Haemophilus paragallinarum isolates recovered from 11 recent outbreaks of infectious coryza in layer hens and one case of swollen-head syndrome in broilers in Argentina are described. Twenty-four isolates had the typical biochemical properties of H. paragallinarum. All isolates were serotyped according to the Page scheme. Ten of the isolates were serovar A, 11 were serovar B, one was serovar C, and two isolates could not be serotyped. The isolates were also examined using a panel of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) for Page serovars A (one MAb available) and C (three MAbs available). The serovar B isolates all failed to react with any MAb. The serovar C isolate reacted with all three serovar C MAbs but not with the serovar A MAb. Only six of the 10 serovar A isolates reacted with the serovar A MAb. These results indicate that H. paragallinarum isolates from Argentina are antigenically distinct from those examined in other countries, and it is suggested that coryza vaccines intended for use in Argentina may be more effective if based on local strains.

  2. Biotypes of Haemophilus influenzae that are associated with noninvasive infections.

    PubMed

    Harper, J J; Tilse, M H

    1991-11-01

    In this study, we examined the biotypes of Haemophilus influenzae strains associated with noninvasive infections in hospitalized patients. Over an 18-month period, a total of 388 strains were isolated from patients of various ages (neonates to the elderly), and the biotypes of the strains were determined. Strains of biotype II accounted for 48% of the isolates; this was followed by strains of biotypes III and I (26 and 16%, respectively). The remaining 10% of the isolates were made up of strains of biotypes IV, V, VI, and VII. A total of 6% of strains were capsulated. The distribution of biotypes in specimens from the respiratory tract and associated sites was comparable to that obtained in similar investigations, but examination of isolates from neonatal and genital specimens did not support the concept that H. influenzae biotype IV is a major urogenital pathogen. Conflicting results regarding the incidence of certain biotypes in specimens, particularly those from the urogenital tract, may be due to the selection of different subpopulations of patients. Data relating to the specimens were used to evaluate the association between biotype and clinical diagnosis, the presence of other potential bacterial pathogens in the specimens, and the presence of viruses in the specimens. None of the differences in the distribution of biotypes which were examined was statistically significant.

  3. Enrichment and purification of proteins of Haemophilus influenzae by chromatofocusing.

    PubMed

    Fountoulakis, M; Langen, H; Gray, C; Takács, B

    1998-05-15

    Haemophilus influenzae is a bacterium of pharmaceutical interest of which the entire genome has been sequenced. Identification of low-abundance proteins in a two-dimensional map is important for the detection of new drug targets. We applied chromatography on Polybuffer Exchanger (chromatofocusing) in order to fractionate and enrich H. influenzae proteins, possibly low-copy-number gene products, from larger volumes. Two proteins, major ferric iron-binding protein (HI0097) and 5'-nucleotidase (HI0206) were obtained in pure form and hypothetical protein HI0052 was purified to near homogeneity by this single purification step. Four other proteins, aspartate ammonia lyase (HI0534), peptidase D (HI0675), elongation factor Ts (HI0914) and 5-methyltetrahydropteroyltriglutamate methyltransferase (HI1702), were strongly enriched so that chromatography on Polybuffer Exchanger can be used as an initial step for their isolation. Approximately 125 proteins were identified in the fractions collected from the column. Seventy of these were for the first time identified after chromatography on Polybuffer Exchanger. The proteins enriched by the chromatofocusing step include both low-abundance as well as high-copy-number gene products. They do not belong to a single protein class and the majority of them are enzymes with various functions. The results include a list and a two-dimensional map of the proteins enriched by chromatofocusing. They may be useful in the search of drug targets and in the design of purification protocols for the isolation of homologous proteins from related microorganisms.

  4. Crystallization of recombinant Haemophilus influenzaee (P4) acid phosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    Ou, Zhonghui; Felts, Richard L.; Reilly, Thomas J.; Nix, Jay C.; Tanner, John J.

    2006-05-01

    Lipoprotein e (P4) is a class C acid phosphatase and a potential vaccine candidate for nontypeable H. influenzae infections. This paper reports the crystallization of recombinant e (P4) and the acquisition of a 1.7 Å resolution native X-ray diffraction data set. Haemophilus influenzae infects the upper respiratory tract of humans and can cause infections of the middle ear, sinuses and bronchi. The virulence of the pathogen is thought to involve a group of surface-localized macromolecular components that mediate interactions at the host–pathogen interface. One of these components is lipoprotein e (P4), which is a class C acid phosphatase and a potential vaccine candidate for nontypeable H. influenzae infections. This paper reports the crystallization of recombinant e (P4) and the acquisition of a 1.7 Å resolution native X-ray diffraction data set. The space group is P4{sub 2}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = 65.6, c = 101.4 Å, one protein molecule per asymmetric unit and 37% solvent content. This is the first report of the crystallization of a class C acid phosphatase.

  5. Haemophilus influenzae stores and distributes hemin by using protein E.

    PubMed

    Al Jubair, Tamim; Singh, Birendra; Fleury, Christophe; Blom, Anna M; Mörgelin, Matthias; Thunnissen, Marjolein M; Riesbeck, Kristian

    2014-07-01

    The human pathogen Haemophilus influenzae causes mainly respiratory tract infections such as acute otitis media in children and exacerbations in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. We recently revealed the crystal structure of H. influenzeae protein E (PE), a multifunctional adhesin that is involved in direct interactions with lung epithelial cells and host proteins. Based upon the PE structure we here suggest a hypothetical binding pocket that is compatible in size with a hemin molecule. An H. influenzae mutant devoid of PE bound significantly less hemin in comparison to the PE-expressing wild type counterpart. In addition, E. coli expressing PE at the surface resulted in a hemin-binding phenotype. An interaction between hemin and recombinant soluble PE was also demonstrated by native-PAGE and UV-visible spectrophotometry. Surface plasmon resonance revealed an affinity (Kd) of 1.6 × 10(-6)M for the hemin-PE interaction. Importantly, hemin that was bound to PE at the H. influenzae surface, was donated to co-cultured luciferase-expressing H. influenzae that were starved of hemin. When hemin is bound to PE it thus may serve as a storage pool for H. influenzae. To our knowledge this is the first report showing that H. influenzae can share hemin via a surface-located outer membrane protein.

  6. Non-Typeable Haemophilus influenzae Infection of the Junbo Mouse.

    PubMed

    Cheeseman, Michael T; Hood, Derek W

    2017-03-02

    Acute otitis media, inflammation of the middle ear bulla, is the most common bacterial infection in children. For one of the principal otopathogens, non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi), animal models allow us to investigate host-microbial interactions relevant to the onset and progression of infection and to study treatment of middle ear disease. We have established a robust model of NTHi middle ear infection in the Junbo mouse. Intranasal inoculation with NTHi produces high rates of bulla infection and high bacterial titers in bulla fluids; bacteria can also spread down the respiratory tract to the mouse lung. An innate immune response is detected in the bulla of Junbo mice following NTHi infection, and bacteria are maintained in some ears at least up to day 56 post-inoculation. The Junbo/NTHi infection model facilitates studies on bacterial pathogenesis and antimicrobial intervention regimens and vaccines for better treatment and prevention of NTHi middle ear infection. © 2017 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  7. The relationship between biofilm formations and capsule in Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed

    Qin, Liang; Kida, Yutaka; Ishiwada, Naruhiko; Ohkusu, Kiyofumi; Kaji, Chiharu; Sakai, Yoshiro; Watanabe, Kiwao; Furumoto, Akitsugu; Ichinose, Akitoyo; Watanabe, Hiroshi

    2014-03-01

    To evaluate the biofilm formation of non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) and H. influenzae type b (Hib) clinical isolates, we conducted the following study. Serotyping and polymerase chain reaction were performed to identify β-lactamase-negative ampicillin (ABPC)-susceptible (BLNAS), β-lactamase-negative ABPC-resistant (BLNAR), TEM-1 type β-lactamase-producing ABPC-resistant (BLPAR)-NTHi, and Hib. Biofilm formation was investigated by microtiter biofilm assay, as well as visually observation with a scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) in a continuous-flow chamber. As a result, totally 99 strains were investigated, and were classified into 4 groups which were 26 gBLNAS, 22 gBLNAR, 28 gBLPAR-NTHi and 23 Hib strains. The mean OD600 in the microtiter biofilm assay of gBLNAS, gBLNAR, gBLPAR-NTHi, and Hib strains were 0.57, 0.50, 0.34, and 0.08, respectively. NTHi strains were similar in terms of biofilm formations, which were observed by SEM and CLSM. Five Hib strains with the alternated type b cap loci showed significantly increased biofilm production than the other Hib strains. In conclusion, gBLNAS, gBLNAR, and gBLPAR-NTHi strains were more capable to produce biofilms compared to Hib strains. Our data suggested that resistant status may not be a key factor but capsule seemed to play an important role in H. influenzae biofilm formation.

  8. Transformation of natural genetic variation into Haemophilus influenzae genomes.

    PubMed

    Mell, Joshua Chang; Shumilina, Svetlana; Hall, Ira M; Redfield, Rosemary J

    2011-07-01

    Many bacteria are able to efficiently bind and take up double-stranded DNA fragments, and the resulting natural transformation shapes bacterial genomes, transmits antibiotic resistance, and allows escape from immune surveillance. The genomes of many competent pathogens show evidence of extensive historical recombination between lineages, but the actual recombination events have not been well characterized. We used DNA from a clinical isolate of Haemophilus influenzae to transform competent cells of a laboratory strain. To identify which of the ~40,000 polymorphic differences had recombined into the genomes of four transformed clones, their genomes and their donor and recipient parents were deep sequenced to high coverage. Each clone was found to contain ~1000 donor polymorphisms in 3-6 contiguous runs (8.1±4.5 kb in length) that collectively comprised ~1-3% of each transformed chromosome. Seven donor-specific insertions and deletions were also acquired as parts of larger donor segments, but the presence of other structural variation flanking 12 of 32 recombination breakpoints suggested that these often disrupt the progress of recombination events. This is the first genome-wide analysis of chromosomes directly transformed with DNA from a divergent genotype, connecting experimental studies of transformation with the high levels of natural genetic variation found in isolates of the same species.

  9. Bovine plasma proteins increase virulence of Haemophilus somnus in mice.

    PubMed

    Geertsema, Roger S; Kimball, Richard A; Corbeil, Lynette B

    2007-01-01

    The role of bovine serum or plasma proteins in Haemophilus somnus virulence was investigated in a mouse model of septicemia. An increase in virulence was detected when the organism was pre-incubated for 5 min and inoculated with fetal calf serum. When purified bovine serum or plasma proteins were pre-incubated with H. somnus before inoculating into mice, transferrin was found to increase virulence. Bovine lactoferrin was also noted to increase virulence, but to a lesser extent and had a delayed time course when compared with transferrin. Using an ELISA assay, an increased amount of H. somnus whole cells and culture supernatant bound to bovine transferrin when the organism was grown in iron-restricted media. Lactoferrin also bound to H. somnus, but binding was not affected by growth in iron-restricted media and it was eliminated with 2M NaCl, which reversed charge mediated binding. Transferrin, but not lactoferrin, supported growth of H. somnus on iron-depleted agar based media using a disk assay. Therefore, lactoferrin increased virulence by an undetermined mechanism whereas transferrin increased virulence of H. somnus by binding to iron-regulated outer-membrane proteins (IROMPs) and providing iron to the pathogen.

  10. Architecture and adhesive activity of the Haemophilus influenzae Hsf adhesin.

    PubMed

    Cotter, Shane E; Yeo, Hye-Jeong; Juehne, Twyla; St Geme, Joseph W

    2005-07-01

    Haemophilus influenzae type b is an important cause of meningitis and other serious invasive diseases and initiates infection by colonizing the upper respiratory tract. Among the major adhesins in H. influenzae type b is a nonpilus protein called Hsf, a large protein that forms fiber-like structures on the bacterial surface and shares significant sequence similarity with the nontypeable H. influenzae Hia autotransporter. In the present study, we characterized the structure and adhesive activity of Hsf. Analysis of the predicted amino acid sequence of Hsf revealed three regions with high-level homology to the HiaBD1 and HiaBD2 binding domains in Hia. Based on examination of glutathione S-transferase fusion proteins corresponding to these regions, two of the three had adhesive activity and one was nonadhesive in assays with cultured epithelial cells. Structural modeling demonstrated that only the two regions with adhesive activity harbored an acidic binding pocket like the binding pocket identified in the crystal structure of HiaBD1. Consistent with these results, disruption of the acidic binding pockets in the adhesive regions eliminated adhesive activity. These studies advance our understanding of the architecture of Hsf and the family of trimeric autotransporters and provide insight into the structural determinants of H. influenzae type b adherence.

  11. Vaccines for Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae: the Future Is Now.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Timothy F

    2015-05-01

    Infections due to nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae result in enormous global morbidity in two clinical settings: otitis media in children and respiratory tract infections in adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Recurrent otitis media affects up to 20% of children and results in hearing loss, delays in speech and language development and, in developing countries, chronic suppurative otitis media. Infections in people with COPD result in clinic and emergency room visits, hospital admissions, and respiratory failure. An effective vaccine would prevent morbidity, help control health care costs, and reduce antibiotic use, a major contributor to the global crisis in bacterial antibiotic resistance. The widespread use of the pneumococcal conjugate vaccines is causing a relative increase in H. influenzae otitis media. The partial protection against H. influenzae otitis media induced by the pneumococcal H. influenzae protein D conjugate vaccine represents a proof of principle of the feasibility of a vaccine for nontypeable H. influenzae. An ideal vaccine antigen should be conserved among strains, have abundant epitopes on the bacterial surface, be immunogenic, and induce protective immune responses. Several surface proteins of H. influenzae have been identified as potential vaccine candidates and are in various stages of development. With continued research, progress toward a broadly effective vaccine to prevent infections caused by nontypeable H. influenzae is expected over the next several years.

  12. Autophagy Is Associated with Pathogenesis of Haemophilus parasuis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yaning; Li, Yufeng; Yuan, Wentao; Xia, Yuting; Shen, Yijuan

    2016-01-01

    Haemophilus parasuis (H. parasuis) is a common commensal Gram-negative extracellular bacterium in the upper respiratory tract of swine, which can cause Glässer's disease in stress conditions. Research on the pathogenicity of H. parasuis has mainly focused on immune evasion and bacterial virulence factors, while few studies have examined the interactions of H. parasuis and its host. Autophagy is associated with the replication and proliferation of many pathogenic bacteria, but whether it plays a role during infection by H. parasuis is unknown. In this study, an adenovirus construct expressing GFP, RFP, and LC3 was used to infect H. parasuis. Western blotting, laser confocal microscopy, and electron microscopy showed that Hps5 infection induced obvious autophagy in PK-15 cells. In cells infected with strains of H. parasuis differing in invasiveness, the levels of autophagy were positively correlated with the presence of alive bacteria in PK-15 cells. In addition, autophagy inhibited the invasion of Hps5 in PK-15 cells. Autophagy related genes Beclin, Atg5 and Atg7 were silenced with RNA interference, the results showed that autophagy induced by H. parasuis infection is a classical pathway. Our observations demonstrate that H. parasuis can induce autophagy and that the levels of autophagy are associated with the presence of alive bacteria in cells, which opened novel avenues to further our understanding of H. parasuis-host interplay and pathogenesis. PMID:27703447

  13. Lineage-specific Virulence Determinants of Haemophilus influenzae Biogroup aegyptius

    PubMed Central

    Strouts, Fiona R.; Power, Peter; Croucher, Nicholas J.; Corton, Nicola; van Tonder, Andries; Quail, Michael A.; Langford, Paul R.; Hudson, Michael J.; Parkhill, Julian; Bentley, Stephen D.

    2012-01-01

    An emergent clone of Haemophilus influenzae biogroup aegyptius (Hae) is responsible for outbreaks of Brazilian purpuric fever (BPF). First recorded in Brazil in 1984, the so-called BPF clone of Hae caused a fulminant disease that started with conjunctivitis but developed into septicemic shock; mortality rates were as high as 70%. To identify virulence determinants, we conducted a pan-genomic analysis. Sequencing of the genomes of the BPF clone strain F3031 and a noninvasive conjunctivitis strain, F3047, and comparison of these sequences with 5 other complete H. influenzae genomes showed that >77% of the F3031 genome is shared among all H. influenzae strains. Delineation of the Hae accessory genome enabled characterization of 163 predicted protein-coding genes; identified differences in established autotransporter adhesins; and revealed a suite of novel adhesins unique to Hae, including novel trimeric autotransporter adhesins and 4 new fimbrial operons. These novel adhesins might play a critical role in host–pathogen interactions. PMID:22377449

  14. Biofilm-specific extracellular matrix proteins of nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed

    Wu, Siva; Baum, Marc M; Kerwin, James; Guerrero, Debbie; Webster, Simon; Schaudinn, Christoph; VanderVelde, David; Webster, Paul

    2014-12-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi), a human respiratory tract pathogen, can form colony biofilms in vitro. Bacterial cells and the amorphous extracellular matrix (ECM) constituting the biofilm can be separated using sonication. The ECM from 24- and 96-h NTHi biofilms contained polysaccharides and proteinaceous components as detected by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) spectroscopy. More conventional chemical assays on the biofilm ECM confirmed the presence of these components and also DNA. Proteomics revealed eighteen proteins present in biofilm ECM that were not detected in planktonic bacteria. One ECM protein was unique to 24-h biofilms, two were found only in 96-h biofilms, and fifteen were present in the ECM of both 24- and 96-h NTHi biofilms. All proteins identified were either associated with bacterial membranes or cytoplasmic proteins. Immunocytochemistry showed two of the identified proteins, a DNA-directed RNA polymerase and the outer membrane protein OMP P2, associated with bacteria and biofilm ECM. Identification of biofilm-specific proteins present in immature biofilms is an important step in understanding the in vitro process of NTHi biofilm formation. The presence of a cytoplasmic protein and a membrane protein in the biofilm ECM of immature NTHi biofilms suggests that bacterial cell lysis may be a feature of early biofilm formation.

  15. In vitro evaluation of nicotinamide riboside analogs against Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed

    Godek, C P; Cynamon, M H

    1990-08-01

    Exogenous NAD, nicotinamide mononucleotide, or nicotinamide riboside is required for the growth of Haemophilus influenzae. These compounds have been defined as the V-factor growth requirement. We have previously shown that the internalization of nicotinamide riboside is energy dependent and carrier mediated with saturation kinetics. Thionicotinamide riboside, 3-pyridinealdehyde riboside, 3-acetylpyridine riboside, and 3-aminopyridine riboside were prepared from their corresponding NAD analogs. These compounds and several other nicotinamide riboside analogs were evaluated for their ability to support the growth of H. influenzae and for their ability to block the uptake of [carbonyl-14C]nicotinamide riboside by H. influenzae. 3-Aminopyridine riboside blocked the uptake of [carbonyl-14C]nicotinamide riboside and inhibited the growth of H. influenzae when NAD, nicotinamide mononucleotide, or nicotinamide riboside served as the V factor. The antibacterial activity of 3-aminopyridine riboside was found to be specific for H. influenzae but had no effect on the growth of Staphylococcus aureus or Escherichia coli. In additional experiments by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography, it was determined that whole cells of H. influenzae degrade 3-aminopyridine adenine dinucleotide to 3-aminopyridine riboside, which is then internalized. Inside the cell, 3-aminopyridine riboside has the ability to interfere with the growth of H. influenzae by an undetermined mechanism.

  16. Vaccines for Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae: the Future Is Now

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Infections due to nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae result in enormous global morbidity in two clinical settings: otitis media in children and respiratory tract infections in adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Recurrent otitis media affects up to 20% of children and results in hearing loss, delays in speech and language development and, in developing countries, chronic suppurative otitis media. Infections in people with COPD result in clinic and emergency room visits, hospital admissions, and respiratory failure. An effective vaccine would prevent morbidity, help control health care costs, and reduce antibiotic use, a major contributor to the global crisis in bacterial antibiotic resistance. The widespread use of the pneumococcal conjugate vaccines is causing a relative increase in H. influenzae otitis media. The partial protection against H. influenzae otitis media induced by the pneumococcal H. influenzae protein D conjugate vaccine represents a proof of principle of the feasibility of a vaccine for nontypeable H. influenzae. An ideal vaccine antigen should be conserved among strains, have abundant epitopes on the bacterial surface, be immunogenic, and induce protective immune responses. Several surface proteins of H. influenzae have been identified as potential vaccine candidates and are in various stages of development. With continued research, progress toward a broadly effective vaccine to prevent infections caused by nontypeable H. influenzae is expected over the next several years. PMID:25787137

  17. Systems properties of the Haemophilus influenzae Rd metabolic genotype.

    PubMed

    Edwards, J S; Palsson, B O

    1999-06-18

    Haemophilus influenzae Rd was the first free-living organism for which the complete genomic sequence was established. The annotated sequence and known biochemical information was used to define the H. influenzae Rd metabolic genotype. This genotype contains 488 metabolic reactions operating on 343 metabolites. The stoichiometric matrix was used to determine the systems characteristics of the metabolic genotype and to assess the metabolic capabilities of H. influenzae. The need to balance cofactor and biosynthetic precursor production during growth on mixed substrates led to the definition of six different optimal metabolic phenotypes arising from the same metabolic genotype, each with different constraining features. The effects of variations in the metabolic genotype were also studied, and it was shown that the H. influenzae Rd metabolic genotype contains redundant functions under defined conditions. We thus show that the synthesis of in silico metabolic genotypes from annotated genome sequences is possible and that systems analysis methods are available that can be used to analyze and interpret phenotypic behavior of such genotypes.

  18. Epidemiology of Invasive Haemophilus influenzae Disease, Europe, 2007–2014

    PubMed Central

    Economopoulou, Assimoula; Dias, Joana Gomes; Bancroft, Elizabeth; Ramliden, Miriam; Celentano, Lucia Pastore

    2017-01-01

    We describe the epidemiology of invasive Haemophilus influenzae disease during 2007–2014 in 12 European countries and assess overall H. influenzae disease trends by serotype and patient age. Mean annual notification rate was 0.6 cases/100,000 population, with an increasing annual trend of 3.3% (95% CI 2.3% to 4.3%). The notification rate was highest for patients <1 month of age (23.4 cases/100,000 population). Nontypeable H. influenzae (NTHi) caused 78% of all cases and showed increasing trends among persons <1 month and >20 years of age. Serotype f cases showed an increasing trend among persons >60 years of age. Serotype b cases showed decreasing trends among persons 1–5 months, 1–4 years, and >40 years of age. Sustained success of routine H. influenzae serotype b vaccination is evident. Surveillance systems must adopt a broad focus for invasive H. influenzae disease. Increasing reports of NTHi, particularly among neonates, highlight the potential benefit of a vaccine against NTHi. PMID:28220749

  19. Tolerance of Haemophilus influenzae to beta-lactam antibiotics.

    PubMed Central

    Bergeron, M G; Lavoie, G Y

    1985-01-01

    Two hundred clinical isolates of Haemophilus influenzae were tested for tolerance (MBC/MIC greater than or equal to 32) to ampicillin and cefotaxime by broth dilution tests. Of 200 strains, 9 were tolerant to ampicillin, and 10 were tolerant to cefotaxime. Tolerant organisms were identified in both systemic and nonsystemic infections and among different biotypes and serotypes of H. influenzae. These tolerant isolates were compared with nontolerant isolates by broth dilution and killing curves with log-phase and stationary-phase inocula. Both tolerant and nontolerant bacteria in log phase were killed more rapidly by antibiotics than bacteria in stationary-phase growth. When tested against 11 different beta-lactams, several patterns of tolerance were observed. Six of the ten strains were tolerant to aztreonam, four were tolerant to cefuroxime, three were tolerant to cefamandole, and two were tolerant to cefoxitin. Strain H130 was tolerant to all beta-lactam antibiotics studied. None of the 10 tolerant H. influenzae isolates were tolerant to chloramphenicol, rifampin, tobramycin, ciprofloxacin, enoxacin, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. Although the clinical significance of tolerance is not determined, this study suggests that the bactericidal activity (MBC) of beta-lactam antibiotics against H. influenzae should be determined in cases of severe infections in which clinical response is slow or unsatisfactory. PMID:3879660

  20. Lethal and mutagenic action of hydrogen peroxide on Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Rincón, D A; Cabrera-Juárez, E

    1991-01-01

    The lethal and mutagenic effects of H2O2 on wild-type Haemophilus influenzae Rd and on uvr1, uvr2, rec1, and rec2 mutant strains were studied. The first two mutants are sensitive to UV, and the second two are defective in recombination. Rd, urv1, and rec1 strains were more sensitive to the killing effect of H2O2 treatment than were uvr2 and rec2 strains. There were peaks of mutagenesis at two H2O2 concentrations over a range of 30 to 275 mM. Our results suggest a specific repair of H2O2 damage that is independent of the Uvr2 and Rec2 gene products. Sensitivity to the killing effect of H2O2 and to the lethal action of near-UV light were similar for Rd and uvr1 strains. This finding suggests that the mechanisms of killing by and repair of H2O2 damage may have some overlap with those of near-UV radiation. PMID:1917884

  1. Protein E of Haemophilus influenzae is a ubiquitous highly conserved adhesin.

    PubMed

    Singh, Birendra; Brant, Marta; Kilian, Mogens; Hallström, Björn; Riesbeck, Kristian

    2010-02-01

    Protein E (PE) of nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) is involved in adhesion and activation of epithelial cells. A total of 186 clinical NTHi isolates, encapsulated H. influenzae, and culture collection strains were analyzed. PE was highly conserved in both NTHi and encapsulated H. influenzae (96.9%-100% identity without the signal peptide). PE also existed in other members of the genus Pasteurellaceae. The epithelial cell binding region (amino acids 84-108) was completely conserved. Phylogenetic analysis of the pe sequence separated Haemophilus species into 2 separate clusters. Importantly, PE was expressed in 98.4% of all NTHi (126 isolates) independently of the growth phase.

  2. A Cross-Sectional Study of ‘Yaws’ in Districts of Ghana Which Have Previously Undertaken Azithromycin Mass Drug Administration for Trachoma Control

    PubMed Central

    Ghinai, Rosanna; El-Duah, Philip; Chi, Kai-Hua; Pillay, Allan; Solomon, Anthony W.; Bailey, Robin L.; Agana, Nsiire; Mabey, David C. W.; Chen, Cheng-Yen

    2015-01-01

    Yaws, caused by Treponema pallidum ssp. pertenue, is reportedly endemic in Ghana. Mass distribution of azithromycin is now the cornerstone of the WHO yaws eradication campaign. Mass distribution of azithromycin at a lower target dose was previously undertaken in two regions of Ghana for the control of trachoma. Ongoing reporting of yaws raises the possibility that resistance may have emerged in T. pallidum pertenue, or that alternative infections may be responsible for some of the reported cases. We conducted a cross-sectional survey in thirty communities in two districts of Ghana where MDA for trachoma had previously been conducted. Children aged 5–17 years with ulcerative lesions compatible with yaws were enrolled. Samples for treponemal serology and lesion PCR were collected from all children. 90 children with 98 lesions were enrolled. Syphilis serology was negative in all of them. PCR for T. pallidum ssp pertenue was negative in all children, but Haemophilus ducreyi DNA was detected in 9 lesions. In these communities, previously treated for trachoma, we found no evidence of ongoing transmission of yaws. H. ducreyi was associated with a proportion of skin lesions, but the majority of lesions remain unexplained. Integration of diagnostic testing into both pre and post-MDA surveillance systems is required to better inform yaws control programmes. PMID:25632942

  3. A cross-sectional study of 'yaws' in districts of Ghana which have previously undertaken azithromycin mass drug administration for trachoma control.

    PubMed

    Ghinai, Rosanna; El-Duah, Philip; Chi, Kai-Hua; Pillay, Allan; Solomon, Anthony W; Bailey, Robin L; Agana, Nsiire; Mabey, David C W; Chen, Cheng-Yen; Adu-Sarkodie, Yaw; Marks, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Yaws, caused by Treponema pallidum ssp. pertenue, is reportedly endemic in Ghana. Mass distribution of azithromycin is now the cornerstone of the WHO yaws eradication campaign. Mass distribution of azithromycin at a lower target dose was previously undertaken in two regions of Ghana for the control of trachoma. Ongoing reporting of yaws raises the possibility that resistance may have emerged in T. pallidum pertenue, or that alternative infections may be responsible for some of the reported cases. We conducted a cross-sectional survey in thirty communities in two districts of Ghana where MDA for trachoma had previously been conducted. Children aged 5-17 years with ulcerative lesions compatible with yaws were enrolled. Samples for treponemal serology and lesion PCR were collected from all children. 90 children with 98 lesions were enrolled. Syphilis serology was negative in all of them. PCR for T. pallidum ssp pertenue was negative in all children, but Haemophilus ducreyi DNA was detected in 9 lesions. In these communities, previously treated for trachoma, we found no evidence of ongoing transmission of yaws. H. ducreyi was associated with a proportion of skin lesions, but the majority of lesions remain unexplained. Integration of diagnostic testing into both pre and post-MDA surveillance systems is required to better inform yaws control programmes.

  4. Pediatric endogenous Haemophilus influenzae endophthalmitis with presumed hyposplenism

    PubMed Central

    Haruta, Masatoshi; Yoshida, Yumiko; Yamakawa, Ryoji

    2017-01-01

    Background Endogenous bacterial endophthalmitis is a rare but potentially devastating intraocular infection that can have severe sight-threatening complications. Most patients with endogenous bacterial endophthalmitis have underlying infectious conditions, such as diabetes or malignancy, which predispose them to infection. Case report A 1-year-old girl presented with cloudiness of the right eye. Ocular examination showed a cloudy cornea in the right eye with conjunctival injection and hypopyon. The intraocular pressure was 43 mmHg, and the fundus could not be visualized. She had an 8-day history of fever, and cerebrospinal fluid analysis showed typical findings of bacterial meningitis. She was clinically diagnosed with bacterial meningitis and endophthalmitis in the right eye and was treated with intravenous, topical, and intravitreal antibiotics and vitrectomy. Haemophilus influenzae was isolated from the blood and cerebrospinal fluid cultures, but not from the aqueous and vitreous cultures. Four months later, her pediatrician diagnosed Streptococcus pneumoniae meningitis, but she had no clinical signs of endophthalmitis. Seven years after the initial presentation, the best-corrected visual acuity was 20/40 in the right eye. Discussion Endophthalmitis caused by H. influenzae is generally associated with poor visual outcomes; however, the patient in the current case responded well to the treatment. The patient had recurrent bacterial meningitis caused by H. influenzae and S. pneumoniae within a 4-month period. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed to search for underlying infectious causes and revealed that the patient had an extremely small spleen for her age. Because the spleen is critical for clearing encapsulated bacteria such as H. influenzae or S. pneumoniae, we speculated that hyposplenism led to the bloodstream infection of H. influenza and then endogenous endophthalmitis in the right eye. PMID:28115875

  5. Immunologic memory in Haemophilus influenzae type b conjugate vaccine failure

    PubMed Central

    McVernon, J; Johnson, P; Pollard, A; Slack, M; Moxon, E

    2003-01-01

    Aims: To compare the convalescent antibody response to invasive Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) disease between conjugate vaccine immunised and unimmunised children, to look for evidence of priming for immunologic memory. Methods: Unmatched case-control study in the UK and Eire 1992–2001 and Victoria, Australia 1988–1990. A total of 93 children were identified as having invasive Hib disease following three doses of conjugate vaccine in infancy through post licensure surveillance throughout the UK and Eire; 92 unvaccinated children admitted to an Australian paediatric hospital with invasive Hib disease were used as historical controls. Convalescent serum was taken for measurement of Hib antibody concentration, and clinical information relating to potential disease risk factors was collected. The geometric mean concentrations of convalescent Hib antibodies were compared between immunised and unimmunised children, using raw and adjusted data. Results: Hib conjugate vaccine immunised children had higher serum Hib antibody responses to disease (geometric mean concentration (GMC) 10.81 µg/ml (95% CI 6.62 to 17.66) than unimmunised children (1.06 µg/ml (0.61 to 1.84)) (p < 0.0001). However, following adjustment for the significant confounding influences of age at presentation and timing of serum collection, a difference persisted only in children presenting with meningitis (vaccinated GMC 3.78 µg/ml (2.78 to 5.15); unvaccinated GMC 1.48 µg/ml (0.90 to 2.21); p = 0.003). Conclusions: Higher antibody responses to invasive Hib disease in vaccinated children with meningitis reflect priming for immunologic memory by the vaccine. Although a majority of children in the UK are protected from Hib disease by immunisation, the relative roles of immunologic memory and other immune mechanisms in conferring protection remain unclear. PMID:12716702

  6. Immunologic memory in Haemophilus influenzae type b conjugate vaccine failure.

    PubMed

    McVernon, J; Johnson, P D R; Pollard, A J; Slack, M P E; Moxon, E R

    2003-05-01

    To compare the convalescent antibody response to invasive Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) disease between conjugate vaccine immunised and unimmunised children, to look for evidence of priming for immunologic memory. Unmatched case-control study in the UK and Eire 1992-2001 and Victoria, Australia 1988-1990. A total of 93 children were identified as having invasive Hib disease following three doses of conjugate vaccine in infancy through post licensure surveillance throughout the UK and Eire; 92 unvaccinated children admitted to an Australian paediatric hospital with invasive Hib disease were used as historical controls. Convalescent serum was taken for measurement of Hib antibody concentration, and clinical information relating to potential disease risk factors was collected. The geometric mean concentrations of convalescent Hib antibodies were compared between immunised and unimmunised children, using raw and adjusted data. Hib conjugate vaccine immunised children had higher serum Hib antibody responses to disease (geometric mean concentration (GMC) 10.81 microg/ml (95% CI 6.62 to 17.66) than unimmunised children (1.06 microg/ml (0.61 to 1.84)) (p < 0.0001). However, following adjustment for the significant confounding influences of age at presentation and timing of serum collection, a difference persisted only in children presenting with meningitis (vaccinated GMC 3.78 microg/ml (2.78 to 5.15); unvaccinated GMC 1.48 microg/ml (0.90 to 2.21); p = 0.003). Higher antibody responses to invasive Hib disease in vaccinated children with meningitis reflect priming for immunologic memory by the vaccine. Although a majority of children in the UK are protected from Hib disease by immunisation, the relative roles of immunologic memory and other immune mechanisms in conferring protection remain unclear.

  7. Occult polymicrobial endocarditis with Haemophilus parainfluenzae in intravenous drug abusers.

    PubMed

    Raucher, B; Dobkin, J; Mandel, L; Edberg, S; Levi, M; Miller, M

    1989-02-01

    Fewer than 8 percent of intravenous drug abusers are found to have polymicrobial endocarditis. We report on cases of occult polymicrobial infective endocarditis with Haemophilus parainfluenzae in 10 intravenous drug abusers. Clinical and laboratory data on all 10 patients were obtained from hospital charts, and information on illicit drug use methods was given by five patients. Blood cultures were performed, as well as susceptibility testing to antibiotics. Subsequent molecular epidemiologic studies were performed on selected Staphylococcus aureus and H. parainfluenzae strains. Phage typing of S. aureus and biotyping of H. parainfluenzae strains were also done. Results of the initial blood cultures were positive on the second to fifth days (mean, 2.6 days), demonstrating a gram-positive pathogen in nine patients and Bacteroides asaccharolyticus in one. Significantly, in each case, H. parainfluenzae alone was subsequently identified from additional blood cultures, with a mean delay of 20.4 days (range, five to 57 days) to the isolation of this organism. Epidemiologic data indicated that our cases did not represent a point-source outbreak. Antibiotic therapy uniformly failed until an agent active against H. parainfluenzae was added. The constellation of clinical, microbiologic, and epidemiologic findings was similar, and permitted prospective diagnosis and therapy in three patients. Despite the absence of S. aureus bacteremia in four, all 10 patients had right-sided endocarditis with septic pulmonary emboli. Five patients had initial blood cultures that were positive for two facultative gram-positive cocci (S. aureus and commensal oral streptococcal species). Our findings suggest that polymicrobial endocarditis with H. parainfluenzae in intravenous drug abusers is a distinct clinical syndrome, and should be considered in all patients if the response to appropriate antibiotics is atypical or if pulmonary emboli continue with therapy.

  8. Cloning and expression of genes encoding Haemophilus somnus antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Corbeil, L B; Chikami, G; Yarnall, M; Smith, J; Guiney, D G

    1988-01-01

    A genomic library of Haemophilus somnus 2336, a virulent isolate from a calf with pneumonia (later used to reproduce H. somnus experimental pneumonia), was constructed in the cosmid vector pHC79. The gene bank in Escherichia coli DH1 was screened by filter immunoassay with convalescent-phase serum, which reacted with several outer membrane antigens of H. somnus. On Western blotting (immunoblotting) of immunoreactive colonies, five clones were found to express proteins which comigrated with H. somnus surface antigens. Three clones (DH1 pHS1, pHS3, and pHS4) expressed both a 120-kilodalton (kDa) antigen and a 76-kDa antigen, one clone (DH1 pHS2) expressed only the 76-kDa antigen, and the fifth clone (DH1 pHS5) expressed a 60-kDa antigen. The 120-kDa and 76-kDa antigens were found internally, whereas the 60-kDa protein was detected in the DH1 pHS5 culture supernatant as membrane blebs or insoluble protein. Both the H. somnus 120-kDa antigen and the recombinant 120-kDa antigen had immunoglobulin Fc-binding activity. Restriction endonuclease mapping demonstrated that the genomic DNA inserts of clones expressing the 76-kDa antigen shared a common 28.4-kilobase-pair region, and the three clones also expressing the 120-kDa antigen shared an additional 7.0-kilobase-pair region. The restriction endonuclease map of pHS5, which expressed the 60-kDa antigen, was not similar to the maps of the other four plasmids. Since these three H. somnus antigens reacted with protective convalescent-phase serum, the recombinants which express these proteins should be useful in further studies of protective immunity in bovine H. somnus disease. Images PMID:2843469

  9. Molecular epidemiology of Haemophilus influenzae type b in the Gambia.

    PubMed Central

    Bijlmer, H A; van Alphen, L; Geelen-van den Broek, L; Greenwood, B M; Valkenburg, H A; Dankert, J

    1992-01-01

    One hundred two invasive and 64 noninvasive isolates of Haemophilus influenzae were collected in the course of a 2-year prospective field study on the epidemiology of H. influenzae meningitis in The Gambia. The isolates were serotyped, biotyped, and subtyped by outer membrane protein (OMP) profile analysis (OMP subtyping). H. influenzae meningitis was found to be caused by serotype b (95%). In invasive disease, serotype a, although present in the throat of healthy children, caused only occasionally (5.9%) disease. The distribution of biotypes of H. influenzae appeared to be very similar to that found outside The Gambia. A distinct pattern of OMP subtypes, different from other parts of the world, is prevalent in H. influenzae type b (Hib) in The Gambia. OMP subtypes 2, 4, 5, 8, and 9 were observed to be predominant. These subtypes, except subtype 2, have not been described. L subtypes (subtypes 2, 4, and 8) were associated with invasive disease, whereas non-L subtypes (subtypes 5 and 9) were found more often in healthy carriers (P less than 0.001). A significant difference in geographical distribution was found in subtypes of noninvasive Hib strains (P less than 0.05). We conclude that in The Gambia H. influenzae invasive disease is caused mainly by type b strains with a limited number of OMP subtypes, which are different from the subtypes found elsewhere in the world. These data are important for the surveillance of Hib disease in developing countries and are baseline data for a Hib polyribosyl-ribitolphosphate-conjugated vaccine trial in The Gambia. Alternative Hib OMP vaccines should include a set of representative OMPs. Images PMID:1537907

  10. Characterisation of isolates of Haemophilus paragallinarum from Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Poernomo, S; Sutarma; Rafiee, M; Blackall, P J

    2000-11-01

    To characterise 18 isolates of Haemophilus paragallinarum isolated from chickens in Indonesia. The isolates were identified to species level by traditional phenotypic methods. Six of the isolates were also identified by a species-specific polymerase chain reaction. Fourteen of the isolates were examined for resistance to a panel of seven antimicrobial agents using a disc diffusion method. All 18 isolates were serotyped according to the Page scheme using reference antisera in a haemagglutination inhibition test. Four of the 18 isolates were obtained from indigenous (kampung) chickens, with the remainder being from typical intensive poultry production systems. The 18 isolates were obtained from 11 outbreaks that showed the typical clinical signs of infectious coryza and 11 of the isolates were obtained from chickens that had been vaccinated with infectious coryza vaccines. All 18 isolates were confirmed as H paragallinarum by biochemical testing and six isolates were also identified as H paragallinarum by the polymerase chain reaction test. Eleven isolates were resistant to erythromycin and streptomycin, 10 to neomycin, eight to oxytetracycline, five isolates to doxycycline, three to sulphamethoxazoltrimethoprim but only one to ampicillin. Seven isolates were Page serovar A, four were Page serovar B and seven were Page serovar C. The presence of all three Page serovars (A, B and C) has been confirmed for the first time in Indonesian chickens. As the majority of the infectious coryza vaccines in use in Indonesia contain only serovar A and C, the presence of serovar B in chickens indicates that the protection by these bivalent vaccines would be reduced. The use of trivalent infectious coryza vaccines that contain serovars A, B and C is recommended for use in Indonesia.

  11. A comparative study of bovine and ovine Haemophilus somnus isolates.

    PubMed Central

    Ward, A C; Jaworski, M D; Eddow, J M; Corbeil, L B

    1995-01-01

    Bacterial isolates (including 17 Haemophilus somnus isolates and an H. somnus-like isolate) from asymptomatic or diseased cattle and sheep, were evaluated for markers associated with virulence and host predilection. The isolates were separated into 6 distinct biovariants, 3 for sheep and 3 for cattle, based on reactions in a battery of 21 test media. Three bovine isolates associated with disease caused hemolysis of bovine blood. The rest of the isolates did not hemolyze either bovine or ovine erythrocytes. Protein profiles of all H. somnus isolates were similar with the exception of the major outer membrane proteins (MOMPs). The MOMPs of isolates associated with disease in cattle had a relative molecular weight of approximately 41 kDa compared with 33 kDa for the MOMPs of isolates from asymptomatic cattle. The MOMPs from sheep isolates were either slightly higher or lower than the 41 kDa MOMPs of bovine isolates. Major antigens detected by Western blotting were similar in all isolates except the H. somnus-like isolate. An immunodominant 40 kDa antigen was conserved in all H. somnus isolates. Antibodies to this antigen have previously been found to be protective in cattle and may also be protective for sheep. Marked differences between cattle and sheep isolates were revealed by use of restriction enzyme analysis, which separated the isolates into 12 ribotypes and 15 unique DNA profiles. Thus, cattle and sheep isolates in this collection had distinctive differences in biochemical reactions, MOMP profiles, and DNA analyses. Such differences have potential value for epidemiological studies and may also be used to evaluate host specificity of H. somnus isolates. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:8521348

  12. Susceptibility of Pneumococci and Haemophilus influenzae to Antibacterial Agents

    PubMed Central

    Finland, Maxwell; Garner, Carol; Wilcox, Clare; Sabath, Leon D.

    1976-01-01

    Strains of Diplococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae were tested for susceptibility to numerous antibiotics by a twofold agar dilution method using an inocula replicator. Undiluted, fully grown broth cultures were used as inocula for both species, and cultures of pneumococci diluted 1:1,000 were also tested. The antibiotics included most of those in common use in the United States as well as some chemical modifications recently approved and others that are under investigation. The most striking aspect of the results was the marked susceptibility of the pneumococci to all the antibiotics tested except the polymyxins and most of the aminoglycoside antibiotics, although some new aminoglycosides were active in quite low concentrations. Some of the strains of pneumococci were of decreased susceptibility to penicillin G (minimal inhibitory concentrations, 0.2 to 0.4 μg/ml), but none were tetracycline resistant, although such strains had been reported previously from this laboratory. The strains of H. influenzae, which were all serologically nontypable, exhibited different patterns of susceptibility to the groups of antibiotics and to the individual chemically related ones. None of these strains (isolated early in 1972) were ampicillin resistant. The most active agents against H. influenzae were: carbenicillin and ampicillin, analogues related to each of them, rifampin, chloramphenicol, and the polymyxins. However, the tetracycline analogues other than tetracycline, some aminoglycosides, notably tobramycin, kanamycin, gentamicin, and verdamicin, erythromycin, and some new lincomycin analogues were also active in low concentrations. Trimethoprim alone was highly active, and in combination with sulfamethoxazole it was even more active and synergistic against strains of both D. pneumoniae and H. influenzae. PMID:5052

  13. Involvement of lipopolysaccharide binding protein, CD14, and Toll-like receptors in the initiation of innate immune responses by Treponema glycolipids.

    PubMed

    Schröder, N W; Opitz, B; Lamping, N; Michelsen, K S; Zähringer, U; Göbel, U B; Schumann, R R

    2000-09-01

    Culture supernatants from Treponema maltophilum associated with periodontitis in humans and Treponema brennaborense found in a bovine cattle disease accompanied with cachexia caused a dose-dependent TNF-alpha synthesis in human monocytes increasing with culture time. This activity could be reduced significantly by blocking the CD14-part of the LPS receptor using the My 4 mAb and by polymyxin B. In the murine macrophage cell line RAW 264.7, Treponema culture supernatants induced TNF-alpha secretion in a LPS binding protein (LBP)-dependent fashion. To enrich for active compounds, supernatants were extracted with butanol, while whole cells were extracted using a phenol/water method resulting in recovery of material exhibiting a similar activity profile. An LPS-LBP binding competition assay revealed an interaction of the treponeme phenol/water extracts with LBP, while precipitation studies implied an affinity to polymyxin B and endotoxin neutralizing protein. Macrophages obtained from C3H/HeJ mice carrying a Toll-like receptor (TLR)-4 mutation were stimulated with treponeme extracts for NO release to assess the role of TLRs in cell activation. Furthermore, NF-kappaB translocation in TLR-2-negative Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells was studied. We found that phenol/water-extracts of the two strains use TLRs differently with T. brennaborense-stimulating cells in a TLR-4-dependent fashion, while T. maltophilum-mediated activation apparently involved TLR-2. These results indicate the presence of a novel class of glycolipids in Treponema initiating inflammatory responses involving LBP, CD14, and TLRs.

  14. Discovery of Bovine Digital Dermatitis-Associated Treponema spp. in the Dairy Herd Environment by a Targeted Deep-Sequencing Approach

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Martin W.; Ingerslev, Hans-Christian; Boye, Mette; Jensen, Tim K.

    2014-01-01

    The bacteria associated with the infectious claw disease bovine digital dermatitis (DD) are spirochetes of the genus Treponema; however, their environmental reservoir remains unknown. To our knowledge, the current study is the first report of the discovery and phylogenetic characterization of rRNA gene sequences from DD-associated treponemes in the dairy herd environment. Although the spread of DD appears to be facilitated by wet floors covered with slurry, no DD-associated treponemes have been isolated from this environment previously. Consequently, there is a lack of knowledge about the spread of this disease among cows within a herd as well as between herds. To address the issue of DD infection reservoirs, we searched for evidence of DD-associated treponemes in fresh feces, in slurry, and in hoof lesions by deep sequencing of the V3 and V4 hypervariable regions of the 16S rRNA gene coupled with identification at the operational-taxonomic-unit level. Using treponeme-specific primers in this high-throughput approach, we identified small amounts of DNA (on average 0.6% of the total amount of sequence reads) from DD-associated treponemes in 43 of 64 samples from slurry and cow feces collected from six geographically dispersed dairy herds. Species belonging to the Treponema denticola/Treponema pedis-like and Treponema phagedenis-like phylogenetic clusters were among the most prevalent treponemes in both the dairy herd environment and the DD lesions. By the high-throughput approach presented here, we have demonstrated that cow feces and environmental slurry are possible reservoirs of DD-associated treponemes. This method should enable further clarification of the etiopathogenesis of DD. PMID:24814794

  15. Mutagenesis of a novel gene in the prcA-prtP protease locus affects expression of Treponema denticola membrane complexes.

    PubMed

    Bian, Xue-Lin; Wang, Hong-Tao; Ning, Yu; Lee, Si Young; Fenno, J Christopher

    2005-02-01

    A novel gene was identified in the Treponema denticola prcA-prtP protease operon. Strains with mutations in either the prcA-prtP or the msp region showed altered expression of a product(s) of the other locus. Together, these results provide information on the assembly of outer membrane complexes involved in T. denticola interaction with host cells and tissue.

  16. Mutagenesis of a Novel Gene in the prcA-prtP Protease Locus Affects Expression of Treponema denticola Membrane Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Bian, Xue-lin; Wang, Hong-tao; Ning, Yu; Lee, Si Young; Fenno, J. Christopher

    2005-01-01

    A novel gene was identified in the Treponema denticola prcA-prtP protease operon. Strains with mutations in either the prcA-prtP or the msp region showed altered expression of a product(s) of the other locus. Together, these results provide information on the assembly of outer membrane complexes involved in T. denticola interaction with host cells and tissue. PMID:15664975

  17. Upregulation of Intercellular Adhesion Molecule 1 and Proinflammatory Cytokines by the Major Surface Proteins of Treponema maltophilum and Treponema lecithinolyticum, the Phylogenetic Group IV Oral Spirochetes Associated with Periodontitis and Endodontic Infections

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sung-Hoon; Kim, Kack-Kyun; Choi, Bong-Kyu

    2005-01-01

    Treponema maltophilum and Treponema lecithinolyticum belong to the group IV oral spirochetes and are associated with endodontic infections, as well as periodontitis. Recently, the genes encoding the major surface proteins (Msps) of these bacteria (MspA and MspTL, respectively) were cloned and sequenced. The amino acid sequences of these proteins showed significant similarity. In this study we analyzed the functional role of these homologous proteins in human monocytic THP-1 cells and primary cultured periodontal ligament (PDL) cells using recombinant proteins. The complete genes encoding MspA and MspTL without the signal sequence were cloned into Escherichia coli by using the expression vector pQE-30. Fusion proteins tagged with N-terminal hexahistidine (recombinant MspA [rMspA] and rMspTL) were obtained, and any possible contamination of the recombinant proteins with E. coli endotoxin was removed by using polymyxin B-agarose. Flow cytometry showed that rMspA and rMspTL upregulated the expression of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) in both THP-1 and PDL cells. Expression of proinflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin-6 (IL-6) and IL-8, was also induced significantly in both cell types by the Msps, as determined by reverse transcription-PCR and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, whereas IL-1β synthesis could be detected only in the THP-1 cells. The upregulation of ICAM-1, IL-6, and IL-8 was completely inhibited by pretreating the cells with an NF-κB activation inhibitor, l-1-tosylamido-2-phenylethyl chloromethyl ketone. This suggests involvement of NF-κB activation. The increased ICAM-1 and IL-8 expression in the THP-1 cells obtained with rMsps was not inhibited in the presence of the IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra), a natural inhibitor of IL-1. Our results show that the Msps of the group IV oral spirochetes may play an important role in amplifying the local immune response by continuous inflammatory cell recruitment and retention at an

  18. Comparative genomic and transcriptional analysis of virulent and non-virulent Haemophilus parasuis isolates

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Haemophilus parasuis is a respiratory pathogen of swine and the etiological agent of Glässer's disease, a systemic infection resulting in polyserositis, meningitis, and arthritis. H. parasuis isolates can exhibit different virulence capabilities ranging from lethal systemic disease to subclinical ca...

  19. Successful protection against heterologous strains of Haemophilus parasuis: the quest for cross protective factors

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Haemophilus parasuis (H. parasuis) infection in swine causes polyserositis, arthritis, and meningitis. Within the 15 serovars, there is a combination of virulent and nonvirulent strains, which has left the pathogenicity and subsequent protection from H. parasuis disease unclear. Here we used bacteri...

  20. Comparative studies of the genome, virulence, and protection of 10 Haemophilus parasuis strains

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Haemophilus parasuis is the cause of Glässer’s disease in swine, which is characterized by systemic infection resulting in polyserositis, meningitis, and arthritis. An enormous difference exists in the severity of disease caused by H. parasuis strains, ranging from lethal systemic disease to asympto...

  1. Draft genome sequences for ten isolates of the swine respiratory pathogen Haemophilus Parasuis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Haemophilus parasuis is a swine pathogen that causes pneumonia and Glässer’s disease, a systemic syndrome of polyserositis, arthritis, and meningitis. We report here the draft genomes of ten geographically diverse isolates collectively representing the full virulence spectrum of H. parasuis. These...

  2. Comparative virulence and genomic analysis of 10 strains of Haemophilus parasuis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Haemophilus parasuis is the cause of Glasser's disease in swine, which is characterized by systemic infection resulting in polyserositis, meningitis, and arthritis. An enormous difference exists in the severity of disease caused by H. parasuis strains, ranging from lethal systemic disease to asympto...

  3. Virulence and draft genome sequence overview of multiple strains of the swine pathogen Haemophilus parasuis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Haemophilus parasuis is the cause of Glässer’s disease in swine, which is characterized by systemic infection resulting in polyserositis, meningitis, and arthritis. Characterization of this animal disease is complicated by the enormous differences in the severity of disease caused by H. parasuis str...

  4. Ischemic Stroke and Septic Shock After Subacute Endocarditis Caused by Haemophilus parainfluenzae: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Menegueti, Mayra Goncalves; Machado-Viana, Jaciara; Gaspar, Gilberto Gambero; Nicolini, Edson Antonio; Basile-Filho, Anibal; Auxiliadora-Martins, Maria

    2017-01-01

    Haemophilus parainfluenzae, which belongs to the HACEK (Haemophilus ssp, Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, Cardiobacterium hominis, Eikenella corrodens, and Kingella kingae) group, is a rare cause of subacute endocarditis and may lead to ischemic stroke. A 65-year-old female patient previously diagnosed with rheumatic valve disease was submitted to surgical mitral valve repair in 1996. Physical examination did not reveal any murmurs; physical examination of the lungs and abdomen was normal. The patient was admitted to hospital with progressive dyspnea, dry cough, and fever. Transesophageal echocardiogram revealed an approximately 8-mm filamentous image with chaotic motion in the ventricular face of the anterior mitral valve leaflet compatible with vegetation. Treatment with ceftriaxone and gentamicin was initiated. Haemophilus parainfluenzae grew in five blood culture samples. Along the hospital stay, the patient’s level of consciousness decreased, and she was diagnosed with ischemic stroke of cardioembolic etiology. The patient developed septic shock refractory to the prescribed treatment and died 12 days after admission. Even though the patient started being treated for endocarditis before the infectious agent was identified, the prompt use of antimicrobials hindered the growth of Haemophilus parainfluenzae and made its isolation difficult. PMID:27924179

  5. Occurrence of "Haemophilus somnus" in bovine semen and in the prepuce of bulls and steers.

    PubMed Central

    Humphrey, J D; Little, P B; Barnum, D A; Doig, P A; Stephens, L R; Thorsen, J

    1982-01-01

    Haemophilus somnus was isolated from 40 of 79 unprocessed bovine semen samples, 14 of 23 preputial washings of bulls and three of eight preputial washings of steers. The results indicate nonvenereal colonization of the male urogenital tract. It is suggested that dissemination of H. somnus from the urogenital tract may be of significance in the epizootiology of H. somnus associated diseases. PMID:7093816

  6. The quest for cross protective factors of Haemophilus parasuis using 2-D gel electrophoresis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In swine, Haemophilus parasuis (H. parasuis) infection causes polyserositis, arthritis, and meningitis. A range of virulent to nonvirulent strains exists between and within the 15 serovars. Because of this, the pathogenicity and subsequent protection from H. parasuis disease has yet to be elucidated...

  7. [Effect of ambroxol on biofilm of Haemophilus influenzae and bactericidal action].

    PubMed

    Gao, Xue; Zhang, Yutuo; Lin, Yantao; Li, Haifeng; Xin, Yunchao; Zhang, Xiaolei; Xu, Yunpeng; Shang, Xiaoling

    2014-05-01

    To establish a biofilm model of Haemophilus influenzae and observe the effect of ambroxol on biofilm of Haemophilus influenzae and bactericidal action. Thirty strains of Haemophilus influenzae were isolated from adenoids of children with adenoidal hypertrophy. Two strains which could build stronger biofilms was selected in a 96-well plate. The effect of ambroxol on biofilms were determined by crystal violet, and the structure of biofilms were observed by scanning electron microscope (SEM). The numbers of viable bacterial in biofilm after ambroxol treatmented determined by plate culture count. Through crystal violet assay, significant difference (P < 0.01) between the two group after treatment was found when ambroxol concentration reached at 0.25 mg/ml and 0.49 mg/ml. The biofilms was destroyed by SEM. Ambroxol had the positive effect on bacterial killing by plate culture count,and the effect was in a dose dependent. Ambroxol could destroy the biofilm of Haemophilus influenzae, and had bactericidal function in vitro.

  8. Culture of non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae from the nasopharynx: Not all media are equal.

    PubMed

    Harris, Tegan M; Rumaseb, Angela; Beissbarth, Jemima; Barzi, Federica; Leach, Amanda J; Smith-Vaughan, Heidi C

    2017-03-22

    The efficacy of chocolate agar, versus bacitracin, vancomycin, clindamycin, chocolate agar (BVCCA) for the isolation of non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) from nasopharyngeal swabs was determined. BVCCA cultured NTHi from 97.3% of NTHi-positive swabs, compared to 87.1% for chocolate agar. To maximise culture sensitivity, the use of both media is recommended.

  9. Isolation of an ampicillin-resistant, non-beta-lactamase-producing strain of Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed Central

    Markowitz, S M

    1980-01-01

    A 79-year-old female developed endocarditis and meningitis due to an ampicillin-resistant, non-beta-lactamase-producing strain of Haemophilus influenzae. Carbenicillin and gentamicin therapy resulted in bacteriological and clinical cure. The mechanism of resistance of ampicillin-resistant, non-beta-lactamase-producing strains of H. influenzae is unknown. PMID:6965443

  10. A curated multi-locus sequence typing (MLST) database for Haemophilus parasuis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Background. Haemophilus parasuis is the etiologic agent of Glasser's disease and pneumonia in swine. Serotyping has traditionally been used for classification of strains but results are subjective and not highly reproducible and the required reagents are expensive to produce, not widely available, a...

  11. Characterization and vaccine potential of outer membrane vesicles produced by Haemophilus parasuis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Haemophilus parasuis is a Gram-negative bacterium that colonizes the upper respiratory tract of swine and is capable of causing a systemic infection, resulting in high morbidity and mortality. H. parasuis isolates display a wide range of virulence and virulence factors are largely unknown. A commerc...

  12. Predicted configurations of oligosaccharide extensions in the lipooligosaccharide of nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae isolates.

    PubMed

    McCrea, Kirk W; Xie, Jingping; Daniel, Deborah; Ulrich-Lewis, Justin Theophilus; Zhang, Lixin

    2014-07-01

    Lipooligosaccharide configurations were predicted in nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae isolates based on the presence of seven oligosaccharide extension-initiating genes (or alleles). Predicted configurations with 2 to 3 oligosaccharide extensions were more prevalent among middle ear than throat strains. In addition, strains with these configurations averaged higher levels of serum resistance than strains with other configurations.

  13. Haemophilus influenzae serotype a septic arthritis in an immunized central Australian indigenous child.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Nicholas J

    2014-04-01

    This article describes a notable case of Haemophilus influenzae serotype a (Hia) septic arthritis in an immunized central Australian indigenous child. Since the widespread immunization for H. influenzae serotype b (Hib) in many indigenous peoples worldwide, there has been an increase in reported cases of Hia, postulating that this serotype is taking over the niche that Hib once occupied in indigenous populations.

  14. A Modified Multi-Locus Sequence Typing (MLST) Scheme for Haemophilus parasuis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Introduction. Haemophilus parasuis is the etiologic agent of Glässer’s disease and pneumonia in swine. Phenotypic classification systems are of assistance in epidemiologic studies but molecular methods provide numerous distinct advantages. An MLST scheme proposed by others appears promising (4). How...

  15. Potential use of outer membrane proteins as subunit vaccines against Haemophilus parasuis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Haemophilus parasuis is a Gram-negative bacterium belonging to the Pasteurellaceae family that causes Glässer's disease in pigs, a disease characterized by polyserositis, meningitis and arthritis. There are at least 15 serotypes of H. parasuis and vaccines are largely limited to bacterins that provi...

  16. Haemophilus influenzae Type b Invasive Disease in Amish Children, Missouri, USA, 2014

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Mary Anne; Zhang, Lixin; Swanson, Douglas S.; Gilsdorf, Janet R.

    2017-01-01

    During 5 months in 2014, three Amish children in Missouri, USA, were diagnosed with invasive Haemophilus influenzae type b infection. Two were rural neighbors infected with a genetically similar rare strain, sequence type 45. One child had recently traveled, raising the possibility of maintenance of this strain among unvaccinated carriers in Amish communities. PMID:27983486

  17. Conservation and Recombination in the Genome Sequence of Haemophilus influenzae Type f WAPHL1.

    PubMed

    Bateman, Allen C; Perez-Osorio, Ailyn C; Li, Zhen; Tran, Michael; Greninger, Alexander L

    2017-09-21

    We report here the second draft genome sequence of a bloodstream isolate of Haemophilus influenzae serotype f. Three discrete 3.1- to 7.8-kb sites contained 80% of the variability in the genome, consistent with recombination in known virulence factors. Copyright © 2017 Bateman et al.

  18. Vaccine-induced waning of Haemophilus influenzae empyema and meningitis, Angola.

    PubMed

    Peltola, Heikki; Pelkonen, Tuula; Bernardino, Luis; Monteiro, Lurdes; Silvestre, Silvia da Conceição; Anjos, Elizabete; Cruzeiro, Manuel Leite; Pitkäranta, Anne; Roine, Irmeli

    2014-11-01

    In Angola during 2003-2012, we detected Haemophilus influenzae in 18% of 2,634 and 26% of 2,996 bacteriologically positive pleural or cerebrospinal fluid samples, respectively, from children. After vaccination launch in 2006, H. influenzae empyema declined by 83% and meningitis by 86%. Severe H. influenzae pneumonia and meningitis are preventable by vaccination.

  19. Isolation of Haemophilus agni from Six Alberta Ram Lambs with Septicemia

    PubMed Central

    Lundberg, M. Sharon

    1986-01-01

    Six ram lambs were submitted to a veterinary diagnostic laboratory for necropsy. Clinical signs included sudden illness or death with or without observed depression, reluctance to move, scours or fever. Gross findings and histopathology revealed evidence of bacterial septicemia. Haemophilus agni was isolated from brain, spleen, lung and lymph node. PMID:17422727

  20. In vitro capability of faropenem to select for resistant mutants of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed

    Kosowska-Shick, Klaudia; Clark, Catherine; Credito, Kim; Dewasse, Bonifacio; Beachel, Linda; Ednie, Lois; Appelbaum, Peter C

    2008-02-01

    When tested against nine strains of pneumococci and six of Haemophilus influenzae of various resistotypes, faropenem failed to select for resistant mutants after 50 days of consecutive subculture in subinhibitory concentrations. Faropenem also yielded low rates of spontaneous mutations against all organisms of both species. By comparison, resistant clones were obtained with macrolides, ketolides, and quinolones.

  1. High Genetic Diversity of Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae Isolates from Two Children Attending a Day Care Center▿

    PubMed Central

    LaCross, Nathan C.; Marrs, Carl F.; Patel, Mayuri; Sandstedt, Sara A.; Gilsdorf, Janet R.

    2008-01-01

    Twenty-one nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) isolates from the throats of two healthy children were genotyped by multilocus sequence typing. Nine unique sequence types (STs) were identified. These STs were scattered throughout the phylogenetic tree of reported NTHi STs, demonstrating the high level of NTHi diversity found in colonized children. PMID:18845825

  2. Microbiological Evaluation of the New VITEK 2 Neisseria-Haemophilus Identification Card▿

    PubMed Central

    Valenza, Giuseppe; Ruoff, Claudia; Vogel, Ulrich; Frosch, Matthias; Abele-Horn, Marianne

    2007-01-01

    VITEK 2 is an automated identification system for diverse bacterial and fungal species. A new card (the Neisseria-Haemophilus [NH] card) for the identification of Neisseria spp., Haemophilus spp., and other fastidious gram-negative or gram-variable microorganisms has been developed, but its performance in a routine clinical laboratory has not yet been evaluated. In this study, a total of 188 bacterial strains belonging to the genera Actinobacillus, Campylobacter, Capnocytophaga, Cardiobacterium, Eikenella, Gardnerella, Haemophilus, Kingella, Moraxella, and Neisseria were investigated. The NH card was able to identify 171 strains (91%) correctly without the need for extra tests; one strain (0.5%) was misidentified, and five strains (2.7%) could not be classified. Eleven strains (5.8%) were identified with a low level of discrimination, and simple additional tests were required to increase the correct-identification rate to 96.8%. The results were available within 6 h. Based on these results, the new VITEK 2 NH card appears to be a good method for the identification of diverse groups of fastidious organisms, which would otherwise require testing with multiple systems. However, more work is needed to evaluate the performance of VITEK 2 with regard to Haemophilus, Actinobacillus, Cardiobacterium, Eikenella, and Kingella bacteria because of the insufficient number of strains tested in this study. Moreover, further reduction of the detection time would be desirable. PMID:17728469

  3. Effect of cefotaxime or ceftriaxone treatment on nasopharyngeal Haemophilus influenzae type b colonization in children.

    PubMed Central

    Goldwater, P N

    1995-01-01

    The effects of cefotaxime and ceftriaxone treatment on nasopharyngeal carriage of Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) were prospectively studied with 53 children with invasive Hib disease. Nasopharyngeal aspirates were monitored during therapy. Hib was eliminated within 2 days in 92% of patients and was eliminated in all patients after the third day of antibiotic treatment. PMID:8540735

  4. [Surveillance of Haemophilus influenzae serotypes in Argentina from 2005 to 2010 during the Haemophilus influenzae type b conjugate vaccine era].

    PubMed

    Efron, Adriana M; Moscoloni, María A; Reijtman, Vanesa R; Regueira, Mabel

    2013-01-01

    The introduction of the Haemophilus influenzae type b vaccine in the immunization programs of many countries has greatly reduced this invasive disease and the carriage caused by this serotype, also increasing other capsular types and non-capsular isolations. There were 313 isolations of H. influenzae under study, which were recovered from a sterile site coming from pediatric and adult patients carrying the invasive disease. Patients were treated at 90 different hospitals belonging to the Red Nacional de Laboratorios para Meningitis e Infecciones Respiratorias Agudas Bacterianas (National Lab Network for Meningitis and Acute Bacterial Respiratory Infections) from 2005 to 2010 for the following disorders: pneumonia, 40.3% (n=126), meningitis, 30.0% (n=94) and bacteremia, 26.5% (n=83). In pediatric patients (n=279), the highest frequency of isolations corresponded to children under the age of 2 years, 74.5% (n=208). Regarding type distribution, 61.3% corresponded to non-capsular H. influenzae (n=192), 20.1% to type b (n=63), 11.2% to type a (n=35), 4.8% to type f, and 2.6% to other types. Capsular H. influenzae was predominant in meningitis whereas non-capsular H. influenzae in pneumonia and bacteremia. The biotype was determined in 306 isolations. The totality (100%) of type a (n=35) was biotype II whereas 66.7% of type b (n=63) was biotype I. Slide agglutination and PCR tests were used in 220 isolations. There was a match of 0.982 (IC: 0.92-1.00) between them. During the last year, there was a great increase in type b, showing the importance of clinical and laboratory-based surveillance of the invasive disease caused by H. influenzae.

  5. Biochemical and molecular characterization of Treponema phagedenis-like spirochetes isolated from a bovine digital dermatitis lesion

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Bovine papillomatous digital dermatitis (DD) is the leading cause of lameness in dairy cattle and represents a serious welfare and economic burden. Found primarily in high production dairy cattle worldwide, DD is characterized by the development of an often painful red, raw ulcerative or papillomatous lesion frequently located near the interdigital cleft and above the bulbs of the heel. While the exact etiology is unknown, several spirochete species have been isolated from lesion material. Four isolates of Treponema phagedenis-like spirochetes were isolated from dairy cows in Iowa. Given the distinct differences in host, environmental niche, and disease association, a closer analysis of phenotypic characteristics, growth characteristics, and genomic sequences of T. phagedenis, a human genitalia commensal, and the Iowa DD isolates was undertaken. Results Phenotypically, these isolates range from 8.0 to 9.7 μm in length with 6–8 flagella on each end. These isolates, like T. phagedenis, are strictly anaerobic, require serum and volatile fatty acids for growth, and are capable of fermenting fructose, mannitol, pectin, mannose, ribose, maltose, and glucose. Major glucose fermentation products produced are formate, acetate, and butyrate. Further study was conducted with a single isolate, 4A, showing an optimal growth pH of 7.0 (range of 6–8.5) and an optimal growth temperature of 40°C (range of 29°C-43°C). Comparison of partial genomic contigs of isolate 4A and contigs of T. phagedenis F0421 revealed > 95% amino acid sequence identity with amino acid sequence of 4A. In silico DNA-DNA whole genome hybridization and BLAT analysis indicated a DDH estimate of >80% between isolate 4A and T. phagedenis F0421, and estimates of 52.5% or less when compared to the fully sequenced genomes of other treponeme species. Conclusion Using both physiological, biochemical and genomic analysis, there is a lack of evidence for difference between T. phagedenis and

  6. Haemophilus influenzae: using comparative genomics to accurately identify a highly recombinogenic human pathogen.

    PubMed

    Price, Erin P; Sarovich, Derek S; Nosworthy, Elizabeth; Beissbarth, Jemima; Marsh, Robyn L; Pickering, Janessa; Kirkham, Lea-Ann S; Keil, Anthony D; Chang, Anne B; Smith-Vaughan, Heidi C

    2015-08-27

    Haemophilus influenzae is an opportunistic bacterial pathogen that exclusively colonises humans and is associated with both acute and chronic disease. Despite its clinical significance, accurate identification of H. influenzae is a non-trivial endeavour. H. haemolyticus can be misidentified as H. influenzae from clinical specimens using selective culturing methods, reflecting both the shared environmental niche and phenotypic similarities of these species. On the molecular level, frequent genetic exchange amongst Haemophilus spp. has confounded accurate identification of H. influenzae, leading to both false-positive and false-negative results with existing speciation assays. Whole-genome single-nucleotide polymorphism data from 246 closely related global Haemophilus isolates, including 107 Australian isolate genomes generated in this study, were used to construct a whole-genome phylogeny. Based on this phylogeny, H. influenzae could be differentiated from closely related species. Next, a H. influenzae-specific locus, fucP, was identified, and a novel TaqMan real-time PCR assay targeting fucP was designed. PCR specificity screening across a panel of clinically relevant species, coupled with in silico analysis of all species within the order Pasteurellales, demonstrated that the fucP assay was 100 % specific for H. influenzae; all other examined species failed to amplify. This study is the first of its kind to use large-scale comparative genomic analysis of Haemophilus spp. to accurately delineate H. influenzae and to identify a species-specific molecular signature for this species. The fucP assay outperforms existing H. influenzae targets, most of which were identified prior to the next-generation genomics era and thus lack validation across a large number of Haemophilus spp. We recommend use of the fucP assay in clinical and research laboratories for the most accurate detection and diagnosis of H. influenzae infection and colonisation.

  7. Length of guanosine homopolymeric repeats modulates promoter activity of subfamily II tpr genes of Treponema pallidum ssp. pallidum.

    PubMed

    Giacani, Lorenzo; Lukehart, Sheila; Centurion-Lara, Arturo

    2007-11-01

    In Treponema pallidum, homopolymeric guanosine repeats of varying length are present upstream of both Subfamily I (tprC, D, F and I) and II (tprE, G and J) tpr genes, a group of potential virulence factors, immediately upstream of the +1 nucleotide. To investigate the influence of these poly-G sequences on promoter activity, tprE, G, J, F and I promoter regions containing homopolymeric tracts with different numbers of Gs, the ribosomal binding site and start codon were cloned in frame with the green fluorescent protein reporter gene (GFP), and promoter activity was measured both as fluorescence emission from Escherichia coli cultures transformed with the different plasmid constructs and using quantitative RT-PCR. For tprJ, G and E-derived clones, fluorescence was significantly higher with constructs containing eight Gs or fewer, while plasmids containing the same promoters with none or more Gs gave modest or no signal above the background. In contrast, tprF/I-derived clones induced similar levels of fluorescence regardless of the number of Gs within the promoter. GFP mRNA quantification showed that all of the promoters induced measurable transcription of the GFP gene; however, only for Subfamily II promoters was message synthesis inversely correlated to the number of Gs in the construct.

  8. Treponema pallidum putative novel drug target identification and validation: rethinking syphilis therapeutics with plant-derived terpenoids.

    PubMed

    Dwivedi, Upendra N; Tiwari, Sameeksha; Singh, Priyanka; Singh, Swati; Awasthi, Manika; Pandey, Veda P

    2015-02-01

    Syphilis, a slow progressive and the third most common sexually transmitted disease found worldwide, is caused by a spirochete gram negative bacteria Treponema pallidum. Emergence of antibiotic resistant T. pallidum has led to a search for novel drugs and their targets. Subtractive genomics analyses of pathogen T. pallidum and host Homo sapiens resulted in identification of 126 proteins essential for survival and viability of the pathogen. Metabolic pathway analyses of these essential proteins led to discovery of nineteen proteins distributed among six metabolic pathways unique to T. pallidum. One hundred plant-derived terpenoids, as potential therapeutic molecules against T. pallidum, were screened for their drug likeness and ADMET (absorption, distribution, metabolism, and toxicity) properties. Subsequently the resulting nine terpenoids were docked with five unique T. pallidum targets through molecular modeling approaches. Out of five targets analyzed, D-alanine:D-alanine ligase was found to be the most promising target, while terpenoid salvicine was the most potent inhibitor. A comparison of the inhibitory potential of the best docked readily available natural compound, namely pomiferin (flavonoid) with that of the best docked terpenoid salvicine, revealed that salvicine was a more potent inhibitor than that of pomiferin. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a terpenoid as a potential therapeutic molecule against T. pallidum with D-alanine:D-alanine ligase as a novel target. Further studies are warranted to evaluate and explore the potential clinical ramifications of these findings in relation to syphilis that has public health importance worldwide.

  9. Prevalence of antibodies against Treponema pallidum among HIV-positive patients in a tertiary care hospital in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Mata-Marín, José Antonio; Sandoval-Sánchez, Juan Joel; Huerta-García, Gloria; Arroyo-Anduiza, Carla Ileana; Alcalá-Martínez, Enrique; Mata-Marín, Luis Alberto; Sandoval-Ramirez, Jorge Luis; Gaytán-Martínez, Jesús

    2015-02-01

    Our objective was to determine the seroprevalence of syphilis among HIV-infected patients in a tertiary care hospital in Mexico City. A cross-sectional study was developed, and 318 HIV-positive patients were evaluated from January to February 2013 at Hospital de Infectología, National Medical Center 'La Raza' (a tertiary care hospital specialising in infectious diseases in Mexico City). Laboratory data were screened for the detection of antibodies against Treponema pallidum. Patients completed a questionnaire relating to socio-demographic data and factors associated with syphilis. Of the 318 patients, 83% were men. The mean age ± SD was 36 ± 11 years; 52% were men who have sex with men and 47% had undertaken higher education. The overall seroprevalence of syphilis among these patients was 25% (95% confidence interval 21%, 30%). Men who have sex with men had a significantly higher seroprevalence (30% vs. 15%, p = 0.009). We conclude that, in Mexico, there is a high seroprevalence of syphilis antibodies in HIV-infected patients and that men who have sex with men are the group most affected.

  10. Conservation of the C-type lectin fold for massive sequence variation in a Treponema diversity-generating retroelement

    SciTech Connect

    Le Coq, Johanne; Ghosh, Partho

    2012-06-19

    Anticipatory ligand binding through massive protein sequence variation is rare in biological systems, having been observed only in the vertebrate adaptive immune response and in a phage diversity-generating retroelement (DGR). Earlier work has demonstrated that the prototypical DGR variable protein, major tropism determinant (Mtd), meets the demands of anticipatory ligand binding by novel means through the C-type lectin (CLec) fold. However, because of the low sequence identity among DGR variable proteins, it has remained unclear whether the CLec fold is a general solution for DGRs. We have addressed this problem by determining the structure of a second DGR variable protein, TvpA, from the pathogenic oral spirochete Treponema denticola. Despite its weak sequence identity to Mtd ({approx}16%), TvpA was found to also have a CLec fold, with predicted variable residues exposed in a ligand-binding site. However, this site in TvpA was markedly more variable than the one in Mtd, reflecting the unprecedented approximate 10{sup 20} potential variability of TvpA. In addition, similarity between TvpA and Mtd with formylglycine-generating enzymes was detected. These results provide strong evidence for the conservation of the formylglycine-generating enzyme-type CLec fold among DGRs as a means of accommodating massive sequence variation.

  11. Biophysical and Bioinformatic Analyses Implicate the Treponema pallidum Tp34 Lipoprotein (Tp0971) in Transition Metal Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Brautigam, Chad A.; Deka, Ranjit K.; Ouyang, Zhiming; Machius, Mischa; Knutsen, Gregory; Tomchick, Diana R.

    2012-01-01

    Metal ion homeostasis is a critical function of many integral and peripheral membrane proteins. The genome of the etiologic agent of syphilis, Treponema pallidum, is compact and devoid of many metabolic enzyme genes. Nevertheless, it harbors genes coding for homologs of several enzymes that typically require either iron or zinc. The product of the tp0971 gene of T. pallidum, designated Tp34, is a periplasmic lipoprotein that is thought to be tethered to the inner membrane of this organism. Previous work on a water-soluble (nonacylated) recombinant version of Tp34 established that this protein binds to Zn2+, which, like other transition metal ions, stabilizes the dimeric form of the protein. In this study, we employed analytical ultracentrifugation to establish that four transition metal ions (Ni2+, Co2+, Cu2+, and Zn2+) readily induce the dimerization of Tp34; Cu2+ (50% effective concentration [EC50] = 1.7 μM) and Zn2+ (EC50 = 6.2 μM) were the most efficacious of these ions. Mutations of the crystallographically identified metal-binding residues hindered the ability of Tp34 to dimerize. X-ray crystallography performed on crystals of Tp34 that had been incubated with metal ions indicated that the binding site could accommodate the metals examined. The findings presented herein, coupled with bioinformatic analyses of related proteins, point to Tp34's likely role in metal ion homeostasis in T. pallidum. PMID:23042995

  12. Detection of Porphyromonas gingivalis and Treponema denticola in chronic and aggressive periodontitis patients: A comparative polymerase chain reaction study

    PubMed Central

    Kumawat, Ramniwas M.; Ganvir, Sindhu M.; Hazarey, Vinay K.; Qureshi, Asifa; Purohit, Hemant J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The detection frequency of Porphyromonas gingivalis and Treponema denticola in chronic periodontitis (CP) and aggressive periodontitis (AgP) is not explored well in Indian population. Aim: The study was undertaken to detect P. gingivalis and T. denticola in CP as well as in AgP patients using polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and to determine the relationship between the frequency of these two microorganisms and the severity of clinical periodontal parameters. Materials and Methods: Subgingival plaque samples were collected from ninety participants (thirty CP patients, thirty AgP patients, and thirty healthy participants) and the aforementioned two microorganisms were detected using PCR. Results: However, when CP and AgP were compared for the detection frequency of two microorganisms, no statistically significant difference was noted. A statistically significant increase in the number of bacteria-positive sites increased as the score of plaque index (PI), gingival index (GI), and clinical attachment level of CP and AgP patients increased. Coexistence of P. gingivalis and T. denticola was frequently observed in deep periodontal pockets. Conclusions: Study findings suggest that P. gingivalis and T. denticola are significantly associated with the severity of periodontal tissue destruction. Statistically significant association exists between clinical periodontal parameters such as PI, GI, periodontal pocket depth (PPD), and clinical attachment loss and presence of both the microorganisms. PMID:27994415

  13. Macrolide Resistance in the Syphilis Spirochete, Treponema pallidum ssp. pallidum: Can We Also Expect Macrolide-Resistant Yaws Strains?

    PubMed Central

    Šmajs, David; Paštěková, Lenka; Grillová, Linda

    2015-01-01

    Treponema pallidum ssp. pallidum (TPA) causes over 10 million new cases of syphilis worldwide whereas T. pallidum ssp. pertenue (TPE), the causative agent of yaws, affects about 2.5 million people. Although penicillin remains the drug of choice in the treatment of syphilis, in penicillin-allergic patients, macrolides have been used in this indication since the 1950s. Failures of macrolides in syphilis treatment have been well documented in the literature and since 2000, there has been a dramatic increase in a number of clinical samples with macrolide-resistant TPA. Scarce data regarding the genetics of macrolide-resistant mutations in TPA suggest that although macrolide-resistance mutations have emerged independently several times, the increase in the proportion of TPA strains resistant to macrolides is mainly due to the spread of resistant strains, especially in developed countries. The emergence of macrolide resistance in TPA appears to require a two-step process including either A2058G or A2059G mutation in one copy of the 23S rRNA gene and a subsequent gene conversion unification of both rRNA genes. Given the enormous genetic similarity that was recently revealed between TPA and TPE strains, there is a low but reasonable risk of emergence and spread of macrolide-resistant yaws strains following azithromycin treatment. PMID:26217043

  14. Genetic heterogeneity among strains of Treponema phagedenis-like spirochetes isolated from dairy cattle with papillomatous digital dermatitis in Japan.

    PubMed

    Yano, Takahisa; Yamagami, Ryoko; Misumi, Kazuhiro; Kubota, Chikara; Moe, Kyaw Kyaw; Hayashi, Tetsuya; Yoshitani, Kazunori; Ohtake, Osamu; Misawa, Naoaki

    2009-03-01

    Papillomatous digital dermatitis (PDD) is an infectious foot disease of cattle that is prevalent throughout the world. Although it has been prevalent in Japan since the first case was reported in 1992, full epidemiological and bacteriological examinations have not been conducted. We collected 91 lesions of PDD from 80 dairy cattle on 12 farms in eight regions of Japan to isolate the spirochetes that are frequently detected in lesions. We isolated 40 strains of spirochetes from 24 cattle (30.0%) by a simple two-step culture technique, in which the biopsy samples were incubated at 4 degrees C for 48 to 72 h in an enrichment broth supplemented with antibiotics, which improved the rate of isolation, and then inoculated on selective agar plates. All spirochetes examined were catalase positive and oxidase negative and showed weak beta-hemolytic activity. Enzyme activities were identical to those of Treponema phagedenis ATCC 27087. Sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene showed that all strains isolated had >99% identity to those of the T. phagedenis type strain and of T. phagedenis-like strains isolated from PDD lesions in the United States and Europe. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and PCR-based random amplified polymorphism DNA methods revealed considerable diversity among strains isolated not only from different cattle but also from the same individuals. These findings may provide further evidence for the role of these treponemes in the pathogenesis of persistent PDD.

  15. TP0326, a Treponema pallidum β-Barrel Assembly Machinery A (BamA) Ortholog and Rare Outer Membrane Protein

    PubMed Central

    Desrosiers, Daniel C.; Anand, Arvind; Luthra, Amit; Dunham-Ems, Star M; LeDoyt, Morgan; Cummings, Michael A. D.; Eshghi, Azad; Cameron, Caroline E.; Cruz, Adriana R.; Salazar, Juan C.; Caimano, Melissa J.; Radolf, Justin D.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Definitive identification of Treponema pallidum (Tp) rare outer membrane proteins (OMPs) has long eluded researchers. TP0326, the sole protein in Tp with sequence homology to a Gram-negative OMP, belongs to the BamA family of proteins essential for OM biogenesis. Structural modeling predicted that five polypeptide transport-associated (POTRA) domains comprise the N-terminus of TP0326, while the C-terminus forms an 18-stranded amphipathic β-barrel. Circular dichroism, heat-modifiability by SDS-PAGE, Triton X-114 phase partitioning and liposome incorporation supported these topological predictions and confirmed that the β-barrel is responsible for the native protein's amphiphilicity. Expression analyses revealed that native TP0326 is expressed at low abundance, while a protease-surface accessibility assay confirmed surface exposure. Size-exclusion chromatography and blue native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed a modular Bam complex in Tp considerably larger than that of E. coli. Non-orthologous ancillary factors and self-association of TP0326 via its β-barrel may both contribute to the Bam complex. Tp-infected rabbits mount a vigorous antibody response to both POTRA and β-barrel portions of TP0326, whereas humans with secondary syphilis respond predominantly to POTRA. The syphilis spirochete appears to have devised a stratagem for harnessing the Bam pathway while satisfying its need to limit surface antigenicity. PMID:21488980

  16. Comparison of a recombinant-antigen enzyme immunoassay with Treponema pallidum hemagglutination test for serological confirmation of syphilis.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Islay; Alvarez, Elvio L; Fernández, Carmen; Miranda, Alina

    2002-04-01

    A recombinant-antigen enzyme immunoassay (EIA), BioSCREEN anti-Treponema pallidum, was compared favorably with the T. pallidum hemagglutination test, in the detection of specific antibodies in different groups of sera from patients with primary (n = 38), secondary (n = 10), early latent (n = 28) and congenital syphilis (n = 2), patients with leptospirosis ( n= 8), infectious mononucleosis (n = 7), hepatitis (n = 9), diabetes mellitus (n = 11), rheumatoid arthritis (n = 13), leprosy (n = 11), tuberculosis (n = 9), HIV/Aids ( n= 12), systemic lupus erythematosus (n = 4), rheumatic fever (n = 3), old-persons (n = 9), pregnant women (n = 29) and blood donors (n = 164). The coincidence between them was 95.1%. The sensitivity and specificity of the EIA were 93.3% and 95.5%, respectively. Fifteen serum specimens belonging to old-persons, pregnant women, blood donors, and patients with human leptospirosis, hepatitis, diabetes mellitus, tuberculosis and rheumatic fever gave false-positive results by Venereal Disease Research Laboratory and/or Rapid Plasma Reagin. The EIA can be used as alternative method for the serological confirmation of syphilis.

  17. Genome-Wide Effects of Selenium and Translational Uncoupling on Transcription in the Termite Gut Symbiont Treponema primitia

    PubMed Central

    Matson, Eric G.; Rosenthal, Adam Z.; Zhang, Xinning; Leadbetter, Jared R.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT When prokaryotic cells acquire mutations, encounter translation-inhibiting substances, or experience adverse environmental conditions that limit their ability to synthesize proteins, transcription can become uncoupled from translation. Such uncoupling is known to suppress transcription of protein-encoding genes in bacteria. Here we show that the trace element selenium controls transcription of the gene for the selenocysteine-utilizing enzyme formate dehydrogenase (fdhFSec) through a translation-coupled mechanism in the termite gut symbiont Treponema primitia, a member of the bacterial phylum Spirochaetes. We also evaluated changes in genome-wide transcriptional patterns caused by selenium limitation and by generally uncoupling translation from transcription via antibiotic-mediated inhibition of protein synthesis. We observed that inhibiting protein synthesis in T. primitia influences transcriptional patterns in unexpected ways. In addition to suppressing transcription of certain genes, the expected consequence of inhibiting protein synthesis, we found numerous examples in which transcription of genes and operons is truncated far downstream from putative promoters, is unchanged, or is even stimulated overall. These results indicate that gene regulation in bacteria allows for specific post-initiation transcriptional responses during periods of limited protein synthesis, which may depend both on translational coupling and on unclassified intrinsic elements of protein-encoding genes. PMID:24222491

  18. TP0262 is a modulator of promoter activity of tpr Subfamily II genes of Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum

    PubMed Central

    Giacani, Lorenzo; Godornes, Charmie; Puray-Chavez, Maritza; Guerra-Giraldez, Cristina; Tompa, Martin; Lukehart, Sheila A.; Centurion-Lara, Arturo

    2009-01-01

    Transcriptional regulation in Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum is poorly understood, primarily because this organism cannot be cultivated in vitro or genetically manipulated. We have recently shown a phase variation mechanism controlling transcription initiation of Subfamily II tpr (T. pallidum repeat) genes (tprE, tprG, and tprJ), a group of virulence factor candidates. Furthermore, the same study suggested that additional mechanisms might influence the level of transcription of these tprs. The T. pallidum genome sequence has revealed a few open reading frames (ORFs) with similarity to known bacterial transcription factors (TFs), including four catabolite activator protein (CAP) homologs. In this work, sequences matching the E. coli cAMP receptor protein (CRP) binding motif were identified in silico upstream of tprE, tprG, and tprJ. Using elecrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) and DNaseI footprinting assay, recombinant TP0262, a T. pallidum CRP homolog, was shown to bind specifically to amplicons obtained from the tpr promoters containing putative CRP binding motifs. Using a heterologous reporter system, binding of TP0262 to these promoters was shown to either increase (tprE and tprJ) or decrease (tprG) tpr promoter activity. This is the first characterization of a T. pallidum transcriptional modulator which influences tpr promoter activity. PMID:19432808

  19. Epitope mapping of B-cell determinants on the 15-kilodalton lipoprotein of Treponema pallidum (Tpp15) with synthetic peptides.

    PubMed Central

    Baughn, R E; Demecs, M; Taber, L H; Musher, D M

    1996-01-01

    The antigenicity of the 15-kDa lipoprotein of Treponema pallidum (Tpp15 or TpN15) was comprehensively evaluated in epitope-scanning studies with overlapping deca- and octapeptides and polygonal rabbit and human infant immunoglobulins (Igs) and antisera. This approach enabled us to identify potentially important regions and to determine the optimal dilutions of Igs or antisera for use in further studies. IgM and IgG from both species were capable of recognizing multiple, continuous epitopes. A total of 13 peptides, principally clustered in the central regions of the protein, were recognized by all syphilitic sera and Ig fractions. On the basis of window analyses, frequency profiles, and alanine substitution studies, five heptapeptides were selected for mimetic studies. Two of these five immunodominant, continuous epitopes initially appeared to be species specific; however, antisera elicited against mimetics of all five epitopes were polyspecific, recognizing similar motifs on several other treponemal proteins, including those of avirulent organisms. The only mimetic which yielded positive reactions with infant IgM and syphilitic sera in the absence of cross-reactions with rabbit antisera to avirulent treponemes was the variant of the VMYASSG motif. These findings are relevant to the development of simple, inexpensive assays for the serodiagnosis of active syphilis. PMID:8698467

  20. [Laboratory diagnosis of Treponema pallidum infection in patients with early syphilis and neurosyphilis through a PCR-based test].

    PubMed

    García, Patricia; Grassi, Bruno; Fich, Félix; Salvo, Aurelio; Araya, Luis; Abarzúa, Fernando; Soto, Julia; Poggi, Helena; Lagos, Marcela; Vásquez, Patricia; León, Eugenia P; Pérez, Carlos; Wozniak, Aniela

    2011-08-01

    Syphilis is a sexually transmitted disease caused by Treponema pallidum. The diagnosis is based mainly in clinical presentation and non-specific assays. PCR-based diagnosis has been suggested as an attractive alternative method. The aim of this study was the validation of a PCR-based test for the diagnosis of early syphilis (ES) and neurosyphilis (NS). Clinical samples of mucocutaneous lesions and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) specimens from patients previously diagnosed for ES and NS respectively using an enlarged gold standard, were tested by PCR. The reaction was done using primers targeting the tpN47 gene. Twenty out of 21 mucocutaneous samples from patients diagnosed with ES were positive by PCR, with a clinical sensitivity of 95%. Four out of 8 CSF samples from patients previously diagnosed with NS were positive by PCR, with a clinical sensitivity of 50%. The clinical specificity for both ES and NS was 100%. The PCR sensitivity and specificity for mucocutaneous samples allowed us to implement this assay in our laboratory for routine diagnosis. Although the sensitivity of the PCR in CSF was low, it may be useful to support clinical diagnosis.

  1. Biophysical and bioinformatic analyses implicate the Treponema pallidum Tp34 lipoprotein (Tp0971) in transition metal homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Brautigam, Chad A; Deka, Ranjit K; Ouyang, Zhiming; Machius, Mischa; Knutsen, Gregory; Tomchick, Diana R; Norgard, Michael V

    2012-12-01

    Metal ion homeostasis is a critical function of many integral and peripheral membrane proteins. The genome of the etiologic agent of syphilis, Treponema pallidum, is compact and devoid of many metabolic enzyme genes. Nevertheless, it harbors genes coding for homologs of several enzymes that typically require either iron or zinc. The product of the tp0971 gene of T. pallidum, designated Tp34, is a periplasmic lipoprotein that is thought to be tethered to the inner membrane of this organism. Previous work on a water-soluble (nonacylated) recombinant version of Tp34 established that this protein binds to Zn(2+), which, like other transition metal ions, stabilizes the dimeric form of the protein. In this study, we employed analytical ultracentrifugation to establish that four transition metal ions (Ni(2+), Co(2+), Cu(2+), and Zn(2+)) readily induce the dimerization of Tp34; Cu(2+) (50% effective concentration [EC(50)] = 1.7 μM) and Zn(2+) (EC(50) = 6.2 μM) were the most efficacious of these ions. Mutations of the crystallographically identified metal-binding residues hindered the ability of Tp34 to dimerize. X-ray crystallography performed on crystals of Tp34 that had been incubated with metal ions indicated that the binding site could accommodate the metals examined. The findings presented herein, coupled with bioinformatic analyses of related proteins, point to Tp34's likely role in metal ion homeostasis in T. pallidum.

  2. Treponema pallidum (syphilis) antigen TpF1 induces angiogenesis through the activation of the IL-8 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Pozzobon, Tommaso; Facchinello, Nicola; Bossi, Fleur; Capitani, Nagaja; Benagiano, Marisa; Di Benedetto, Giulietta; Zennaro, Cristina; West, Nicole; Codolo, Gaia; Bernardini, Marialina; Baldari, Cosima Tatiana; D’Elios, Mario Milco; Pellegrini, Luca; Argenton, Francesco; de Bernard, Marina

    2016-01-01

    Over 10 million people every year become infected by Treponema pallidum and develop syphilis, a disease with broad symptomatology that, due to the difficulty to eradicate the pathogen from the highly vascularized secondary sites of infection, is still treated with injections of penicillin. Unlike most other bacterial pathogens, T. pallidum infection produces indeed a strong angiogenic response whose mechanism of activation, however, remains unknown. Here, we report that one of the major antigen of T. pallidum, the TpF1 protein, has growth factor-like activity on primary cultures of human endothelial cells and activates specific T cells able to promote tissue factor production. The growth factor-like activity is mediated by the secretion of IL-8 but not of VEGF, two known angiogenic factors. The pathogen’s factor signals IL-8 secretion through the activation of the CREB/NF-κB signalling pathway. These findings are recapitulated in an animal model, zebrafish, where we observed that TpF1 injection stimulates angiogenesis and IL-8, but not VEGF, secretion. This study suggests that the angiogenic response observed during secondary syphilis is triggered by TpF1 and that pharmacological therapies directed to inhibit IL-8 response in patients should be explored to treat this disease. PMID:26728351

  3. Characterization of antigens from nontypable Haemophilus influenzae recognized by human bactericidal antibodies. Role of Haemophilus outer membrane proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Gnehm, H E; Pelton, S I; Gulati, S; Rice, P A

    1985-01-01

    Major outer membrane antigens, proteins, and lipopolysaccharides (LPSs), from nontypable Haemophilus influenzae were characterized and examined as targets for complement-dependent human bactericidal antibodies. Outer membranes from two nontypable H. influenzae isolates that caused otitis media and pneumonia (middle ear and transtracheal aspirates) were prepared by shearing organisms in EDTA. These membranes were compared with membranes prepared independently by spheroplasting and lysozyme treatment of whole cells and found to have: similar sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) patterns of the proteins; identical densities (rho = 1.22 g/cm3); and minimal d-lactose dehydrogenase activity indicating purity from cytoplasmic membranes. Outer membranes were solubilized in an LPS-disaggregating buffer and proteins were separated from LPS by molecular sieve chromatography. The SDS-PAGE patterns of outer membrane proteins (OMPs) from the two strains differed in the major band although other prominent bands appeared similar in molecular weight. LPS prepared by hot phenol water extraction of each of the strains contained 45% (pneumonia isolate) and 60% (otitis isolate) lipid (wt/wt), 49% and 50% carbohydrate (wt/wt), respectively, and less than 1%, 3-deoxy-manno octulosonic acid. Immunoglobulin M (IgM) purified from normal human serum (NHS) plus complement was bactericidal for both strains. Purified immunoglobulin G (IgG) from NHS killed the middle ear isolate and immune convalescent IgM from the serum of the patient with pneumonia killed his isolate. NHS or convalescent serum were absorbed with OMPs and LPS (0.6-110 micrograms) from each of the strains and immune specific inhibition of bactericidal antibody activity by each antigen was determined. OMPs from the pulmonary isolate inhibited bactericidal antibody activity directed against the isolate in both NHS (1.5 microgram of antigen) and immune serum (0.75 microgram of antigen). OMPs (60

  4. Inhibitory effect of 1,2,4-triazole-ciprofloxacin hybrids on Haemophilus parainfluenzae and Haemophilus influenzae biofilm formation in vitro under stationary conditions.

    PubMed

    Kosikowska, Urszula; Andrzejczuk, Sylwia; Plech, Tomasz; Malm, Anna

    2016-10-01

    Haemophilus parainfluenzae and Haemophilus influenzae, upper respiratory tract microbiota representatives, are able to colonize natural and artificial surfaces as biofilm. The aim of the present study was to assay the effect of ten 1,2,4-triazole-ciprofloxacin hybrids on planktonic or biofilm-forming haemophili cells in vitro under stationary conditions on the basis of MICs (minimal inhibitory concentrations) and MBICs (minimal biofilm inhibitory concentrations). In addition, anti-adhesive properties of these compounds were examined. The reference strains of H. parainfluenzae and H. influenzae were included. The broth microdilution microtiter plate (MTP) method with twofold dilution of the compounds, or ciprofloxacin (reference agent) in 96-well polystyrene microplates, was used. The optical density (OD) reading was made spectrophotometrically at a wavelength of 570 nm (OD570) both to measure bacterial growth and to detect biofilm-forming cells under the same conditions with 0.1% crystal violet. The following values of parameters were estimated for 1,2,4-triazole-ciprofloxacin hybrids - MIC = 0.03-15.63 mg/L, MBIC = 0.03-15.63 mg/L, MBIC/MIC = 0.125-8, depending on the compound, and for ciprofloxacin - MIC = 0.03-0.06 mg/L, MBIC = 0.03-0.12 mg/L, MBIC/MIC = 1-2. The observed strong anti-adhesive properties (95-100% inhibition) of the tested compounds were reversible during long-term incubation at subinhibitory concentrations. Thus, 1,2,4-triazole-ciprofloxacin hybrids may be considered as starting compounds for designing improved agents not only against planktonic but also against biofilm-forming Haemophilus spp. cells.

  5. Identification of Neisseria spp., Haemophilus spp., and other fastidious gram-negative bacteria with the MicroScan Haemophilus-Neisseria identification panel.

    PubMed

    Janda, W M; Bradna, J J; Ruther, P

    1989-05-01

    The Haemophilus-Neisseria identification (HNID) panel (American MicroScan, Sacramento, Calif.) is a 4-h microdilution format system for identification of Haemophilus and Neisseria spp., Branhamella (Moraxella) catarrhalis, and Gardnerella vaginalis. The HNID panel was evaluated by using 423 clinical isolates and stock strains of these organisms, and HNID identifications were compared with those obtained by conventional methods. In addition, 32 isolates representing six genera not included in the HNID data base were tested to determine whether these organisms would produce unique biotype numbers for possible inclusion in the data base. The HNID panel correctly identified 95.3% of 86 Neisseria gonorrhoeae strains, 96% of 25 G. vaginalis strains, and 100% of 28 Neisseria lactamica strains and 48 B. catarrhalis strains. Only 64.7% of 68 Neisseria meningitidis isolates were identified correctly owing to false-negative or equivocal carbohydrate and/or aminopeptidase reactions. Among the Haemophilus spp., 98.8% of 83 H. influenzae strains, 97.1% of 34 H. parainfluenzae strains, and 80% of 15 H. aphrophilus and H. paraphrophilus strains were correctly identified. Eight strains of Neisseria cinerea, a species not included in the data base, produced profiles identical with those for B. catarrhalis and N. gonorrhoeae. Isolates of other species not included in the data base, including Eikenella corrodens, Kingella spp., and Cardiobacterium hominis, produced unique biochemical reaction patterns on the panel. Modification of interpretative criteria for certain tests, expansion of the data base to include other species, and suggestions for additional confirmatory tests will increase the accuracy and utility of the HNID panel.

  6. Nasopharyngeal and Adenoid Colonization by Haemophilus influenzae and Haemophilus parainfluenzae in Children Undergoing Adenoidectomy and the Ability of Bacterial Isolates to Biofilm Production.

    PubMed

    Kosikowska, Urszula; Korona-Głowniak, Izabela; Niedzielski, Artur; Malm, Anna

    2015-05-01

    Haemophili are pathogenic or opportunistic bacteria often colonizing the upper respiratory tract mucosa. The prevalence of Haemophilus influenzae (with serotypes distribution), and H. parainfluenzae in the nasopharynx and/or the adenoid core in children with recurrent pharyngotonsillitis undergoing adenoidectomy was assessed. Haemophili isolates were investigated for their ability to biofilm production.Nasopharyngeal swabs and the adenoid core were collected from 164 children who underwent adenoidectomy (2-5 years old). Bacteria were identified by the standard methods. Serotyping of H. influenzae was performed using polyclonal and monoclonal antisera. Biofilm formation was detected spectrophotometrically using 96-well microplates and 0.1% crystal violet.Ninety seven percent (159/164) children who underwent adenoidectomy were colonized by Haemophilus spp. The adenoid core was colonized in 99.4% (158/159) children, whereas the nasopharynx in 47.2% (75/159) children (P < 0.0001). In 32% (51/159) children only encapsulated (typeable) isolates of H. influenzae were identified, in 22.6% (36/159) children only (nonencapsulated) H. influenzae NTHi (nonencapsulated) isolates were present, whereas 7.5% (12/159) children were colonized by both types. 14.5% (23/159) children were colonized by untypeable (rough) H. influenzae. In 22% (35/159) children H. influenzae serotype d was isolated. Totally, 192 isolates of H. influenzae, 96 isolates of H. parainfluenzae and 14 isolates of other Haemophilus spp. were selected. In 20.1% (32/159) children 2 or 3 phenotypically different isolates of the same species (H. influenzae or H. parainfluenzae) or serotypes (H. influenzae) were identified in 1 child. 67.2% (129/192) isolates of H. influenzae, 56.3% (54/96) isolates of H. parainfluenzae and 85.7% (12/14) isolates of other Haemophilus spp. were positive for biofilm production. Statistically significant differences (P = 0.0029) among H. parainfluenzae biofilm producers and

  7. Nasopharyngeal and Adenoid Colonization by Haemophilus influenzae and Haemophilus parainfluenzae in Children Undergoing Adenoidectomy and the Ability of Bacterial Isolates to Biofilm Production

    PubMed Central

    Kosikowska, Urszula; Korona-Głowniak, Izabela; Niedzielski, Artur; Malm, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Haemophili are pathogenic or opportunistic bacteria often colonizing the upper respiratory tract mucosa. The prevalence of Haemophilus influenzae (with serotypes distribution), and H. parainfluenzae in the nasopharynx and/or the adenoid core in children with recurrent pharyngotonsillitis undergoing adenoidectomy was assessed. Haemophili isolates were investigated for their ability to biofilm production. Nasopharyngeal swabs and the adenoid core were collected from 164 children who underwent adenoidectomy (2–5 years old). Bacteria were identified by the standard methods. Serotyping of H. influenzae was performed using polyclonal and monoclonal antisera. Biofilm formation was detected spectrophotometrically using 96-well microplates and 0.1% crystal violet. Ninety seven percent (159/164) children who underwent adenoidectomy were colonized by Haemophilus spp. The adenoid core was colonized in 99.4% (158/159) children, whereas the nasopharynx in 47.2% (75/159) children (P < 0.0001). In 32% (51/159) children only encapsulated (typeable) isolates of H. influenzae were identified, in 22.6% (36/159) children only (nonencapsulated) H. influenzae NTHi (nonencapsulated) isolates were present, whereas 7.5% (12/159) children were colonized by both types. 14.5% (23/159) children were colonized by untypeable (rough) H. influenzae. In 22% (35/159) children H. influenzae serotype d was isolated. Totally, 192 isolates of H. influenzae, 96 isolates of H. parainfluenzae and 14 isolates of other Haemophilus spp. were selected. In 20.1% (32/159) children 2 or 3 phenotypically different isolates of the same species (H. influenzae or H. parainfluenzae) or serotypes (H. influenzae) were identified in 1 child. 67.2% (129/192) isolates of H. influenzae, 56.3% (54/96) isolates of H. parainfluenzae and 85.7% (12/14) isolates of other Haemophilus spp. were positive for biofilm production. Statistically significant differences (P = 0.0029) among H. parainfluenzae

  8. Characterization of a Haemophilus paracuniculus isolated from gastrointestinal tracts of rabbits with mucoid enteritis.

    PubMed Central

    Targowski, S; Targowski, H

    1979-01-01

    The isolation, characterization, and identification of a microorganism isolated from gastrointestinal tracts of rabbits with mucoid enteritis are described. The isolated organism did not grow on standard media. This organism grew around colonies of Staphylococcus aureus and Lactobacillus desidiosus and around disks saturated with diphosphopyridin nucleotide (factor V) on brain heart infusion agar. The growth of this organism was also observed on media supplemented with beta-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide. The organism appeared as gram-negative, pleomorphic rods or coccobacilli. It was positive for urease, oxidase, catalase, glycosidases, porphyrin, and indole, and it fermented glucose and sucrose. All of these characteristics suggest that the organism is a member of the genus Haemophilus. Because of its isolation from rabbits and differences in some characteristics from other species of this genus, the name Haemophilus paracuniculus is proposed for this organism. PMID:429539

  9. Genomic fingerprinting of "Haemophilus somnus" isolates by using a random-amplified polymorphic DNA assay.

    PubMed Central

    Myers, L E; Silva, S V; Procunier, J D; Little, P B

    1993-01-01

    The random-amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) assay was used to generate DNA fingerprints for 16 isolates of "Haemophilus somnus," and one isolate each of "Haemophilus agni," "Histophilus ovis," "Actinobacillus seminis," Pasteurella haemolytica, and Escherichia coli. The RAPD assay differentiated among "H. somnus" isolates, which shared similarity coefficients of 0.46 to 1.00 on the basis of pairwise comparisons of RAPD markers produced with nine random decamer primers. Three virulent encephalitic "H. somnus" isolates exhibited identical banding patterns, suggesting a common clonal ancestry. The RAPD assay clearly distinguished between the "H. somnus"-"H. agni"-"H. ovis" group and the other bacterial species tested. The results of the present study suggest that DNA fingerprinting of "H. somnus" isolates by the RAPD assay could be valuable in revealing subspecific divisions within this largely unexplored species. Images PMID:8458944

  10. Construction of a novel shuttle vector for use in Haemophilus influenzae and H. parainfluenzae

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Esther; Juhas, Mario; Hood, Derek; Crook, Derrick

    2010-01-01

    Haemophilus influenzae is an important human pathogen. A number of complete genome sequences of various haemophili are available; however, functional studies have been limited by the lack of an effective shuttle vector which functions in all strains. Here, we have constructed a shuttle vector, pEJ6, which transfers genes between Escherichia coli and H. influenzae and H. parainfluenzae. The vector contains an origin of replication from pLS88 which is functional in E. coli and H. influenzae. In addition it contains an RP4 mobilisation region. The vector can be introduced by electroporation and conjugation into capsulate and non-typeable H. influenzae and is functional for allelic replacement and mutant complementation. The vector will be useful for investigating gene function in Haemophilus spp. PMID:20849885

  11. Haemophilus parainfluenzae bacteremia associated with a pacemaker wire localized by gallium scan

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenbaum, G.S.; Calubiran, O.; Cunha, B.A. )

    1990-05-01

    A young woman with a history of sick sinus syndrome and placement of a permanent pacemaker 6 months before admission had fever and Haemophilus parainfluenzae bacteremia. A gallium scan localized the infection to the site of the pacemaker wire. Echocardiograms were negative for any vegetations. The patient responded to cefotaxime and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole therapy. We believe that this is the first case of H. parainfluenzae bacteremia associated with a pacemaker wire and localized by gallium scan.

  12. Haemophilus influenzae type b vaccine formulation and risk of childhood leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Groves, F; Sinha, D; Auvinen, A

    2002-08-27

    Incidence of childhood leukaemia was studied among subjects of a vaccine trial in Finland comparing the polysaccharide-diptheria toxoid conjugate and oligosaccharide-CRM197 conjugate Haemophilus influenzae type b conjugate vaccine formulations. Eighty cases of childhood leukaemia were detected: 35 among children on the polysaccharide-diptheria toxoid conjugate arm, and 45 among children on the oligosaccharide-CRM197 conjugate arm, which was not statistically significant.

  13. The in-vitro activity of pristinamycin against Haemophilus influenzae and Neisseria meningitidis.

    PubMed

    Lafaix, C; Bouvet, E; Dublanchet, A; Dabernat, H; Carrere, C; Picq, J J; Etienne, J

    1985-07-01

    The in-vitro activity of erythromycin, oleandomycin, spiramycin, josamycin and pristinamycin was tested by a plate-dilution method against strains of Haemophilus influenzae and Neisseria meningitidis. Pristinamycin was the most active product tested with minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) ranging between 0.5 and 4 mg/l for H. influenzae (modal value 1 mg/l) and between 0.03 and 0.12 mg/l for N. meningitidis (modal value 0.06 mg/l).

  14. Complete Genome Sequence of Highly Virulent Haemophilus parasuis Serotype 11 Strain SC1401

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Ke; Jin, Jin; Wen, Xintian; He, Lvqin; Cao, Sanjie; Huang, Xiaobo; Wu, Rui; Zhao, Qin

    2016-01-01

    Haemophilus parasuis, a normal Gram-negative bacterium, may cause Glässer’s disease and pneumonia in pigs. This study aims to identify the genes related to natural competence of the serotype 11 strain SC1401, which frequently shows competence and high pathogenicity. SC1401 shows many differences from strains without natural competence within the molecular basis. We performed complete genome sequencing together with restriction modification system analysis to lay the foundation for later study. PMID:27445368

  15. The general transition metal (Tro) and Zn2+ (Znu) transporters in Treponema pallidum: analysis of metal specificities and expression profiles.

    PubMed

    Desrosiers, Daniel C; Sun, Yong Cheng; Zaidi, Akbar A; Eggers, Christian H; Cox, David L; Radolf, Justin D

    2007-07-01

    Acquisition of transition metals is central to the struggle between a bacterial pathogen and its mammalian host. Previous studies demonstrated that Treponema pallidum encodes a cluster-9 (C9) ABC transporter (troABCD) whose solute-binding protein component (TroA) ligands Zn(2+) and Mn(2+) with essentially equal affinities. Bioinformatic analysis revealed that T. pallidum encodes an additional C9 transporter (tp0034-36) orthologous to Zn(2+)-uptake (Znu) systems in other bacteria; the binding protein component, ZnuA, contains a His-rich tract characteristic of C9 Zn(2+)-binding proteins. Metal analysis and metal-reconstitution studies demonstrated that ZnuA is a Zn(2+)-binding protein; parallel studies confirmed that TroA binds Zn(2+), Mn(2+) and Fe. Circular dichroism showed that ZnuA, but not TroA, undergoes conformational changes in the presence of Zn(2+). Using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), we demonstrated that TroA binds Zn(2+) and Mn(2+) with affinities approximately 100-fold greater than those previously reported. ITC analysis revealed that ZnuA contains multiple Zn(2+)-binding sites, two of which are high-affinity and presumed to be located within the binding pocket and His-rich loop. Quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction of tro and znu transcripts combined with immunoblot analysis of TroA and ZnuA confirmed that both transporters are simultaneously expressed in T. pallidum and that TroA is expressed at much greater levels than ZnuA. Collectively, our findings indicate that T. pallidum procures transition metals via the concerted utilization of its general metal (Tro) and Zn(2+) (Znu) transporters. Sequestration of periplasmic Zn(2+) by ZnuA may free up TroA binding capacity for the importation of Fe and Mn(2+).

  16. Treponema pallidum Putative Novel Drug Target Identification and Validation: Rethinking Syphilis Therapeutics with Plant-Derived Terpenoids

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Sameeksha; Singh, Priyanka; Singh, Swati; Awasthi, Manika; Pandey, Veda P.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Syphilis, a slow progressive and the third most common sexually transmitted disease found worldwide, is caused by a spirochete gram negative bacteria Treponema pallidum. Emergence of antibiotic resistant T. pallidum has led to a search for novel drugs and their targets. Subtractive genomics analyses of pathogen T. pallidum and host Homo sapiens resulted in identification of 126 proteins essential for survival and viability of the pathogen. Metabolic pathway analyses of these essential proteins led to discovery of nineteen proteins distributed among six metabolic pathways unique to T. pallidum. One hundred plant-derived terpenoids, as potential therapeutic molecules against T. pallidum, were screened for their drug likeness and ADMET (absorption, distribution, metabolism, and toxicity) properties. Subsequently the resulting nine terpenoids were docked with five unique T. pallidum targets through molecular modeling approaches. Out of five targets analyzed, D-alanine:D-alanine ligase was found to be the most promising target, while terpenoid salvicine was the most potent inhibitor. A comparison of the inhibitory potential of the best docked readily available natural compound, namely pomiferin (flavonoid) with that of the best docked terpenoid salvicine, revealed that salvicine was a more potent inhibitor than that of pomiferin. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a terpenoid as a potential therapeutic molecule against T. pallidum with D-alanine:D-alanine ligase as a novel target. Further studies are warranted to evaluate and explore the potential clinical ramifications of these findings in relation to syphilis that has public health importance worldwide. PMID:25683888

  17. Macrolide Resistance in Treponema pallidum Correlates With 23S rDNA Mutations in Recently Isolated Clinical Strains

    PubMed Central

    Molini, Barbara J.; Tantalo, Lauren C.; Sahi, Sharon K.; Rodriguez, Veronica I.; Brandt, Stephanie L.; Fernandez, Mark C.; Godornes, Charmie B.; Marra, Christina M.; Lukehart, Sheila A.

    2016-01-01

    Background High rates of 23S rDNA mutations implicated in macrolide resistance have been identified in Treponema pallidum samples from syphilis patients in many countries. Nonetheless, some clinicians have been reluctant to abandon azithromycin as a treatment for syphilis, citing the lack of a causal association between these mutations and clinical evidence of drug resistance. Although azithromycin resistance has been demonstrated in vivo for the historical Street 14 strain, no recent T. pallidum isolates have been tested. We used the well-established rabbit model of syphilis to determine the in vivo efficacy of azithromycin against 23S rDNA mutant strains collected in 2004 to 2005 from patients with syphilis in Seattle, Wash. Methods Groups of 9 rabbits were each infected with a strain containing 23S rDNA mutation A2058G (strains UW074B, UW189B, UW391B) or A2059G (strains UW228B, UW254B, and UW330B), or with 1 wild type strain (Chicago, Bal 3, and Mexico A). After documentation of infection, 3 animals per strain were treated with azithromycin, 3 were treated with benzathine penicillin G, and 3 served as untreated control groups. Treatment efficacy was documented by darkfield microscopic evidence of T. pallidum, serological response, and rabbit infectivity test. Results Azithromycin uniformly failed to cure rabbits infected with strains harboring either 23S rDNA mutation, although benzathine penicillin G was effective. Infections caused by wild type strains were successfully treated by either azithromycin or benzathine penicillin G. Conclusions A macrolide resistant phenotype was demonstrated for all strains harboring a 23S rDNA mutation, demonstrating that either A2058G or A2059G mutation confers in vivo drug resistance. PMID:27513385

  18. Molecular analysis of Filifactor alocis, Tannerella forsythia, and treponema denticola associated with primary endodontic infections and failed endodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Brenda P F A; Jacinto, Rogério C; Pinheiro, Ericka T; Sousa, Ezilmara L R; Zaia, Alexandre A; Ferraz, Caio C R; Souza-Filho, Francisco J

    2006-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of strict anaerobes such as Filifactor alocis, Tannerella forsythia, and Treponema denticola in primary and secondary root-infected canals with periapical lesions by molecular analysis and the association of these species with specific endodontic signs and symptoms. Microbial samples were taken from 100 root canals, 50 with necrotic pulp tissues (NPT, primary infection), and 50 with failed endodontic treatment (FET, secondary infection). DNA was extracted from the samples, which were analyzed for the presence of three endodontic pathogens using species-specific primers and PCR. F. alocis were isolated from 23 canals with NPT and 12 canals with FET; T. forsythia from 12 canals with NPT and three canals with FET; T. denticola from 19 canals with NPT and 12 canals with TEP. Suggested associations were found between primary infection and the presence of F. alocis and T. forsythia (both p < 0.05). In particular, associations were found between: pain and F. alocis; swelling and F. alocis; tenderness to percussion and T. forsythia; mobility and T. forsythia and T. denticola; wet canals and F. alocis, T. forsythia, and T. denticola; purulent exsudate and F. alocis, T. forsythia and T. denticola; abscess and F. alocis, T. forsythia, and T. denticola (all p < 0.05). The findings of this study indicated that F. alocis, T. forsythia, and T. denticola seem to be associated with endodontic signs and symptoms. Additionally, F. alocis and T. forsythia were detected more frequently in teeth with necrotic pulp than in teeth with failing endodontic treatment.

  19. Treponema denticola PrcB Is Required for Expression and Activity of the PrcA-PrtP (Dentilisin) Complex▿

    PubMed Central

    Godovikova, Valentina; Wang, Hong-Tao; Goetting-Minesky, M. Paula; Ning, Yu; Capone, Ricardo F.; Slater, Claudia K.; Fenno, J. Christopher

    2010-01-01

    The Treponema denticola surface protease complex, consisting of PrtP protease (dentilisin) and two auxiliary polypeptides (PrcA1 and PrcA2), is believed to contribute to periodontal disease by degrading extracellular matrix components and disrupting host intercellular signaling. Previously, we showed that transcription of the protease operon initiates upstream of TDE0760 (herein designated prcB), the open reading frame immediately 5′ of prcA-prtP. The prcB gene is conserved in T. denticola strains. PrcB localizes to the detergent phase of Triton X-114 cell surface extracts and migrates as a 22-kDa polypeptide, in contrast to the predicted 17-kDa cytoplasmic protein encoded in the annotated T. denticola genome. Consistent with this observation, the PrcB N terminus is unavailable for Edman sequencing, suggesting that it is acylated. Nonpolar deletion of prcB in T. denticola showed that PrcB is required for production of PrtP protease activity, including native PrtP cleavage of PrcA to PrcA1 and PrcA2. A 6×His-tagged PrcB protein coimmunoprecipitates with native PrtP, using either anti-PrtP or anti-His-tag antibodies, and recombinant PrtP copurifies with PrcB-6×His in nickel affinity chromatography. Taken together, these data are consistent with identification of PrcB as a PrtP-binding lipoprotein that likely stabilizes the PrtP polypeptide during localization to the outer membrane. PMID:20435733

  20. Treponema denticola PrcB is required for expression and activity of the PrcA-PrtP (dentilisin) complex.

    PubMed

    Godovikova, Valentina; Wang, Hong-Tao; Goetting-Minesky, M Paula; Ning, Yu; Capone, Ricardo F; Slater, Claudia K; Fenno, J Christopher

    2010-07-01

    The Treponema denticola surface protease complex, consisting of PrtP protease (dentilisin) and two auxiliary polypeptides (PrcA1 and PrcA2), is believed to contribute to periodontal disease by degrading extracellular matrix components and disrupting host intercellular signaling. Previously, we showed that transcription of the protease operon initiates upstream of TDE0760 (herein designated prcB), the open reading frame immediately 5' of prcA-prtP. The prcB gene is conserved in T. denticola strains. PrcB localizes to the detergent phase of Triton X-114 cell surface extracts and migrates as a 22-kDa polypeptide, in contrast to the predicted 17-kDa cytoplasmic protein encoded in the annotated T. denticola genome. Consistent with this observation, the PrcB N terminus is unavailable for Edman sequencing, suggesting that it is acylated. Nonpolar deletion of prcB in T. denticola showed that PrcB is required for production of PrtP protease activity, including native PrtP cleavage of PrcA to PrcA1 and PrcA2. A 6xHis-tagged PrcB protein coimmunoprecipitates with native PrtP, using either anti-PrtP or anti-His-tag antibodies, and recombinant PrtP copurifies with PrcB-6xHis in nickel affinity chromatography. Taken together, these data are consistent with identification of PrcB as a PrtP-binding lipoprotein that likely stabilizes the PrtP polypeptide during localization to the outer membrane.

  1. Maternal/child seroprevalence of antibodies against Treponema pallidum at four general hospitals in the state of Morelos, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Yáñez-Alvarez, Irais; Conde-González, Carlos J; Uribe-Salas, Felipe J; Olamendi-Portugal, Ma L; García-Cisneros, Santa; Sánchez-Alemán, Miguel A

    2012-10-01

    Treponema pallidum can cause syphilis in pregnant women and congenital syphilis in the newborn. In Latin America, 330,000 pregnant women are diagnosed with syphilis every year. Adequate prenatal care to detect syphilis reduces maternal morbidity and fetal and neonatal mortality and morbidity. We undertook this study to determine T. pallidum seroprevalence among pregnant and puerperal women from Morelos, Mexico, as well as to evaluate the sexual behavior, demographic and clinical variables associated with the infection. A cross-sectional study was carried out among pregnant and puerperal women from four general hospitals from Morelos, Mexico during 2005-2009. Women answered a questionnaire and provided a blood sample to detect antibodies against T. pallidum. A total of 2331 women were analyzed with 0.26% of T. pallidum seroprevalence. There were four cases with active syphilis and two cases with latent syphilis, as well as two cases of congenital syphilis. Illiterate women had 6.7 times higher risk of being infected. Women who did not undergo a urine test had a 5.3 times higher risk for infection and women who do not have piped water inside their household had a 5.0-fold higher risk of having anti-T. pallidum antibodies. All seropositive cases were from the same hospital (Cuautla General Hospital) with demographic, sexual behavior and medical care characteristics different from the other three hospitals. Syphilis during pregnancy and congenital syphilis are still present in Mexico. It may be that the more urban a population the higher the chance of the prevalence of maternal syphilis. It would be beneficial to reinforce the observance of the Official Mexican Norm and to implement rapid diagnostics tests to contend with this public health problem. Copyright © 2012 IMSS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Clinical Evaluation of Fully Automated Elecsys(®) Syphilis Assay for the Detection of Antibodies of Treponema pallidum.

    PubMed

    Li, Dongdong; An, Jingna; Wang, Tingting; Tao, Chuanmin; Wang, Lanlan

    2016-11-01

    The resurgence of syphilis in recent years has become a serious threat to the public health worldwide, and the serological detection of specific antibodies against Treponema pallidum (TP) remains the most reliable method for laboratory diagnosis of syphilis. The performance of the Elecsys(®) Syphilis assay, a brand new electrochemiluminescene immunoassay (ECLIA), was assessed by large amounts of samples in this study. In comparison with InTec assay, the Elecsys(®) Syphilis assay was evaluated in 146 preselected samples from patients with syphilis, 1803 clinical routine samples, and 175 preselected samples from specific populations with reportedly increased rates of false-positive syphilis test results. Discrepancy samples must be investigated by Mikrogen Syphilis recomline assay. There was an overall agreement of 99.58% between two assays (Kappa = 0.975). The sensitivity and specificity of the Elecsys(®) Syphilis assay were 100.0% (95% CI, 96.8-100.0%) and 99.8% (95% CI, 99.5-100.0%), respectively. The Elecsys syphilis assay displays better sensitivity (100%), specificity (99.8%), PPV (98.7%), and NPV (100%) in 2124 samples enrolled, compared with the InTec assay. Considering the excellent ease of use and automation, high throughput, and its superior sensitivity, especially in primary syphilis, the Elecsys(®) Syphilis assay could represent an outstanding choice for screening of syphilis in high-volume laboratories. However, more attention was still needed, or the results must be confirmed by other treponemal immunoassays. The new Elecsys(®) Syphilis assay is applied to patients with malignant neoplasm or HIV infection. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Inactivation of cyclic Di-GMP binding protein TDE0214 affects the motility, biofilm formation, and virulence of Treponema denticola.

    PubMed

    Bian, Jiang; Liu, Xiangyang; Cheng, Yi-Qiang; Li, Chunhao

    2013-09-01

    As a ubiquitous second messenger, cyclic dimeric GMP (c-di-GMP) has been studied in numerous bacteria. The oral spirochete Treponema denticola, a periodontal pathogen associated with human periodontitis, has a complex c-di-GMP signaling network. However, its function remains unexplored. In this report, a PilZ-like c-di-GMP binding protein (TDE0214) was studied to investigate the role of c-di-GMP in the spirochete. TDE0214 harbors a PilZ domain with two signature motifs: RXXXR and DXSXXG. Biochemical studies showed that TDE0214 binds c-di-GMP in a specific manner, with a dissociation constant (Kd) value of 1.73 μM, which is in the low range compared to those of other reported c-di-GMP binding proteins. To reveal the role of c-di-GMP in T. denticola, a TDE0214 deletion mutant (TdΔ214) was constructed and analyzed in detail. First, swim plate and single-cell tracking analyses showed that TdΔ214 had abnormal swimming behaviors: the mutant was less motile and reversed more frequently than the wild type. Second, we found that biofilm formation of TdΔ214 was substantially repressed (∼6.0-fold reduction). Finally, in vivo studies using a mouse skin abscess model revealed that the invasiveness and ability to induce skin abscesses and host humoral immune responses were significantly attenuated in TdΔ214, indicative of the impact that TDE0214 has on the virulence of T. denticola. Collectively, the results reported here indicate that TDE0214 plays important roles in motility, biofilm formation, and virulence of the spirochete. This report also paves a way to further unveil the roles of the c-di-GMP signaling network in the biology and pathogenicity of T. denticola.

  4. Rapid Treponema pallidum clearance from blood and ulcer samples following single dose benzathine penicillin treatment of early syphilis.

    PubMed

    Tipple, Craig; Jones, Rachael; McClure, Myra; Taylor, Graham

    2015-02-01

    Currently, the efficacy of syphilis treatment is measured with anti-lipid antibody tests. These can take months to indicate cure and, as a result, syphilis treatment trials require long periods of follow-up. The causative organism, Treponema pallidum (T. pallidum), is detectable in the infectious lesions of early syphilis using DNA amplification. Bacteraemia can likewise be identified, typically in more active disease. We hypothesise that bacterial clearance from blood and ulcers will predict early the standard serology-measured treatment response and have developed a qPCR assay that could monitor this clearance directly in patients with infectious syphilis. Patients with early syphilis were given an intramuscular dose of benzathine penicillin. To investigate the appropriate sampling timeframe samples of blood and ulcer exudate were collected intensively for T. pallidum DNA (tpp047 gene) and RNA (16S rRNA) quantification. Sampling ended when two consecutive PCRs were negative. Four males were recruited. The mean peak level of T. pallidum DNA was 1626 copies/ml whole blood and the mean clearance half-life was 5.7 hours (std. dev. 0.53). The mean peak of 16S rRNA was 8879 copies/ml whole blood with a clearance half-life of 3.9 hours (std. dev. 0.84). From an ulcer, pre-treatment, 67,400 T. pallidum DNA copies and 7.08 x 107 16S rRNA copies were detected per absorbance strip and the clearance half-lives were 3.2 and 4.1 hours, respectively. Overall, T. pallidum nucleic acids were not detected in any sample collected more than 56 hours (range 20-56) after treatment. All patients achieved serologic cure. In patients with active early syphilis, measuring T. pallidum levels in blood and ulcer exudate may be a useful measure of treatment success in therapeutic trials. These laboratory findings need confirmation on a larger scale and in patients receiving different therapies.

  5. Molecular cloning of a gene (poIA) coding for an unusual DNA polymerase I from Treponema pallidum.

    PubMed

    Rodes, B; Liu, H; Johnson, S; George, R; Steiner, B

    2000-07-01

    The gene coding for the DNA polymerase I from Treponema pallidum, Nichols strain, was cloned and sequenced. Depending on which of the two alternative initiation codons was used, the protein was either 997 or 1015 amino acids long and the predicted protein had a molecular mass of either 112 or 114 kDa. Sequence comparisons with other polA genes showed that all three domains expected in the DNA polymerase I class of enzymes were present in the protein (5'-3' exonuclease, 3'-5' exonuclease and polymerase domains). Additionally, there were four unique insertions of 20-30 amino acids each, not seen in other DNA polymerase I enzymes. Two of the inserts were near the boundary of the two exonuclease domains and the other two interrupted the 3'-5' exonuclease domain which is involved in proofreading. The predicted amino-acid sequence had an exceptionally high content of cysteine (2.4% compared with <0.05% for most other sequenced DNA polymerase I enzymes). The polA gene was further cloned into pProEXHTa for expression and purification. The transformants expressed a protein of 115 kDa. Antibodies raised against synthetic peptide fragments of the putative DNA polymerase I recognised the 115-kda band in Western blot analysis. No DNA synthesis activity could be demonstrated on a primed single-stranded template. Although significant quantities of the protein were produced in the host Escherichia coli carrying the plasmid, it was not capable of complementing a polA(-) mutant in the replication of a polA-dependent plasmid.

  6. The Tp0684 (MglB-2) Lipoprotein of Treponema pallidum: A Glucose-Binding Protein with Divergent Topology

    PubMed Central

    Brautigam, Chad A.; Deka, Ranjit K.; Liu, Wei Z.; Norgard, Michael V.

    2016-01-01

    Treponema pallidum, the bacterium that causes syphilis, is an obligate human parasite. As such, it must acquire energy, in the form of carbon sources, from the host. There is ample evidence that the principal source of energy for this spirochete is D-glucose acquired from its environment, likely via an ABC transporter. Further, there is genetic evidence of a D-glucose chemotaxis system in T. pallidum. Both of these processes may be dependent on a single lipidated chemoreceptor: Tp0684, also called TpMglB-2 for its sequence homology to MglB of Escherichia coli. To broaden our understanding of this potentially vital protein, we determined a 2.05-Å X-ray crystal structure of a soluble form of the recombinant protein. Like its namesake, TpMglB-2 adopts a bilobed fold that is similar to that of the ligand-binding proteins (LBPs) of other ABC transporters. However, the protein has an unusual, circularly permuted topology. This feature prompted a series of biophysical studies that examined whether the protein’s topological distinctiveness affected its putative chemoreceptor functions. Differential scanning fluorimetry and isothermal titration calorimetry were used to confirm that the protein bound D-glucose in a cleft between its two lobes. Additionally, analytical ultracentrifugation was employed to reveal that D-glucose binding is accompanied by a significant conformational change. TpMglB-2 thus appears to be fully functional in vitro, and given the probable central importance of the protein to T. pallidum’s physiology, our results have implications for the viability and pathogenicity of this obligate human pathogen. PMID:27536942

  7. The C- terminal region of the Major Outer Sheath Protein (Msp) of Treponema denticola inhibits neutrophil chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Jones, Megan M; Vanyo, Stephen T; Visser, Michelle B

    2017-03-13

    Treponema denticola is an oral spirochete strongly associated with severe periodontal disease. A prominent virulence factor, the major outer sheath protein (Msp), disorients neutrophil chemotaxis by altering the cellular phosphoinositide balance, leading to impairment of downstream chemotactic events including actin rearrangement, Rac1 activation and Akt activation in response to chemoattractant stimulation. The specific regions of Msp responsible for interactions with neutrophils remain unknown. In this study, we investigated the inhibitory effect of truncated Msp regions on neutrophil chemotaxis and associated signaling pathways. Murine neutrophils were treated with recombinant protein truncations followed by assessment of chemotaxis and associated signal pathway activation. Chemotaxis assays indicate sequences within the C-terminal region; particularly the first 130 amino acids, have the strongest inhibitory effect on neutrophil chemotaxis. Neutrophils incubated with the C-terminal region protein also demonstrated the greatest inhibition of Rac1 activation, increased phosphoinositide phosphatase activity, and decreased Akt activation; orchestrating impairment of chemotaxis. Furthermore, incubation with antibodies specific to only the C-terminal region blocked the Msp induced inhibition of chemotaxis and denaturing the protein restored Rac1 activation. Msp from the strain OTK, with numerous amino acid substitutions throughout the polypeptide, including the C-terminal region compared to strain 35405, showed increased ability to impair neutrophil chemotaxis. Collectively, these results indicate the C-terminal region of Msp is the most potent region to modulate neutrophil chemotactic signaling and that specific sequences and structure is likely required. Knowledge of how spirochetes dampen neutrophil response is limited and Msp may represent a novel therapeutic target for periodontal disease. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  8. A glutathione-based system for defense against carbonyl stress in Haemophilus influenzae

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background adhC from Haemophilus influenzae encodes a glutathione-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase that has previously been shown to be required for protection against killing by S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO). This group of enzymes is known in other systems to be able to utilize substrates that form adducts with glutathione, such as aldehydes. Results Here, we show that expression of adhC is maximally induced under conditions of high oxygen tension as well as specifically with glucose as a carbon source. adhC could also be induced in response to formaldehyde but not GSNO. An adhC mutant was more susceptible than wild-type Haemophilus influenzae Rd KW20 to killing by various short chain aliphatic aldehydes, all of which can be generated endogenously during cell metabolism but are also produced by the host as part of the innate immune response. Conclusions These results indicate that AdhC plays a role in defense against endogenously generated reactive carbonyl electrophiles in Haemophilus influenzae and may also play a role in defense against the host innate immune system. PMID:22849540

  9. Pneumopathie postoperatoire à association Haemophilus Influenzae et Neisseria meningitidis chez un enfant diabetique

    PubMed Central

    Chemsi, Hicham; Frikh, Mohamed; Lemnouer, Abdelhay; Belfkih, Bouchra; Sekhsokh, Yassine; Chadli, Maryama; Elouennass, Mustapha

    2016-01-01

    Haemophilus influenzae est un hôte saprophyte du rhinopharynx chez près des deux tiers des enfants et les adultes. Neisseria meningitidis est une bactérie strictement humaine qui vit dans le rhinopharynx, pouvant provoquer une rhinopharyngite bénigne ou un état de portage asymptomatique. Nous rapportons le cas d'une pneumopathie postopératoire à association Haemophilus influenzae et Neisseria meningitidis chez un enfant diabétique. Patient âgé de 3 ans, diabétique admis au service de chirurgie cardio-vasculaire pour prise en charge chirurgicale tardive. L'évolution postopératoire a été marquée par une aggravation de l'état respiratoire, devenu encombré avec des secrétions abondantes nécessitant une hospitalisation en réanimation. Un bilan infectieux a été réalisé, notamment un prélèvement distal protégé qui a révélé une association de Neisseria meningitides et Haemophilus influenzae. A travers ce cas, nous discutons les associations bactériennes dans certaines situations à risque. Chacune de ces deux espèces est responsable d'infections diverses. Cependant l'association au même site est rare. PMID:28292047

  10. What the pediatrician should know about non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed

    Gilsdorf, Janet R

    2015-06-01

    Non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) live exclusively in the pharynges of humans and are increasingly recognized as pathogens that cause both localized infections of the respiratory tract (middle ear spaces, sinuses, and bronchi) and systemic infections such as bacteraemia and pneumonia. Only one vaccine antigen of NTHi, Protein D, has been extensively studied in humans and its efficacy in preventing NTHi otitis media is modest. Recent genetic analyses reveal that NTHi are closely related to Haemophilus haemolyticus (Hh), previously thought to be a non-pathogenic commensal of the pharynx. This review discusses the differences between the pathogenic potential of encapsulated and non-typeable Hi. In addition, information on the lifestyles and bacterial characteristics of NTHi and Hh as they pertain to their pathogenic capacities and the value of the Haemophilus taxonomy to clinicians are presented. Further, the epidemiology and mechanisms of NTHi antibiotic resistance, which include production of β-lactamase and alterations of penicillin-binding protein 3, are reviewed, as are the challenges of vaccine antigen discovery in NTHi.

  11. Haemophilus influenzae P4 Interacts With Extracellular Matrix Proteins Promoting Adhesion and Serum Resistance.

    PubMed

    Su, Yu-Ching; Mukherjee, Oindrilla; Singh, Birendra; Hallgren, Oskar; Westergren-Thorsson, Gunilla; Hood, Derek; Riesbeck, Kristian

    2016-01-15

    Interaction with the extracellular matrix (ECM) is one of the successful colonization strategies employed by nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi). Here we identified Haemophilus lipoprotein e (P4) as a receptor for ECM proteins. Purified recombinant P4 displayed a high binding affinity for laminin (Kd = 9.26 nM) and fibronectin (Kd = 10.19 nM), but slightly less to vitronectin (Kd = 16.51 nM). A P4-deficient NTHi mutant showed a significantly decreased binding to these ECM components. Vitronectin acquisition conferred serum resistance to both P4-expressing NTHi and Escherichia coli transformants. P4-mediated bacterial adherence to pharynx, type II alveolar, and bronchial epithelial cells was mainly attributed to fibronectin. Importantly, a significantly reduced bacterial infection was observed in the middle ear of the Junbo mouse model when NTHi was devoid of P4. In conclusion, our data provide new insight into the role of P4 as an important factor for Haemophilus colonization and subsequent respiratory tract infection.

  12. Seroprevalence of the Hepatitis B, Hepatitis C, and Human Immunodeficiency Viruses and Treponema pallidum at the Beijing General Hospital from 2010 to 2014: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shaoxia; Wang, Qiaofeng; Zhang, Weihong; Qiu, Zhifeng; Cui, Jingtao; Yan, Wenjuan; Ni, Anping

    2015-01-01

    The hepatitis B, hepatitis C, human immunodeficiency viruses and Treponema pallidum are important causes of infectious diseases concern to public health. Between 2010 and 2014, we used an automated chemiluminescence microparticle immunoassay to detect the hepatitis B, hepatitis C, and human immunodeficiency viruses as well as Treponema pallidum (the rapid plasma regain test was used in 2010-2011). Positive human immunodeficiency virus tests were confirmed via western blotting. Among 416,130 subjects, the seroprevalences for hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus, human immunodeficiency virus, and Treponema pallidum were 5.72%, 1.23%, 0.196%, and 0.76%, respectively. Among 671 patients with positive human immunodeficiency virus results, 392 cases were confirmed via western blotting. Hepatitis B and human immunodeficiency virus infections were more frequent in men (7.78% and 0.26%, respectively) than in women (4.45% and 0.021%, respectively). The hepatitis B and C virus seroprevalences decreased from 6.21% and 1.58%, respectively, in 2010, to 5.37% and 0.988%, respectively, in 2014. The human immunodeficiency virus seroprevalence increased from 0.04% in 2010 to 0.17% in 2014, and was elevated in the Infectious Disease (2.65%), Emergency (1.71%), and Dermatology and Sexually Transmitted Diseases (1.12%) departments. The specificity of the human immunodeficiency virus screening was 71.4%. The false positive rates for the Treponema pallidum screening tests increased in patients who were 60-70 years old. The co-infection rates for the hepatitis C and human immunodeficiency viruses were 0.47% in hepatitis C virus-positive patients and 7.33% in human immunodeficiency virus-positive patients. During 2010-2014, hepatitis B virus and human immunodeficiency virus infections were more frequent among men at our institution. Although the seroprevalences of hepatitis B and C viruses decreased, the seroprevalence of human immunodeficiency virus infection increased (with higher

  13. Contribution of PBP3 Substitutions and TEM-1, TEM-15, and ROB-1 Beta-Lactamases to Cefotaxime Resistance in Haemophilus influenzae and Haemophilus parainfluenzae.

    PubMed

    Søndergaard, Annette; Nørskov-Lauritsen, Niels

    2016-06-01

    To investigate the relative contributions of naturally occurring penicillin-binding protein 3 (PBP3) substitutions, and TEM-1, TEM-15, and ROB-1 beta-lactamases on resistance to a third-generation cephalosporin in Haemophilus influenzae and Haemophilus parainfluenzae. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of cefotaxime (CTX) was assessed after transformation with PCR-amplified ftsI genes expressing altered PBP3 and/or small plasmids encoding beta-lactamases into an isogenic environment of H. influenzae and H. parainfluenzae. Group III PBP3, comprising substitutions N526K, S385T, and L389F, conferred CTX resistance to H. influenzae according to EUCAST interpretative criteria. Group III-like PBP3, comprising substitutions N526H and S385T, increased the CTX MIC of H. parainfluenzae ninefold, but the level did not transgress the resistance breakpoint. Production of TEM-15 beta-lactamase conferred CTX resistance on both H. influenzae and H. parainfluenzae. A nitrocefin hydrolysis assay showed TEM-15 to be a less efficient enzyme compared to TEM-1. TEM-15 and PBP3 substitutions impose an additive effect on resistance to third-generation cephalosporins in both H. influenzae and H. parainfluenzae. The effect of PBP3 substitutions on beta-lactam resistance in H. parainfluenzae can be addressed by transfer of ftsI genes in vitro.

  14. Detection of cryptic genospecies misidentified as Haemophilus influenzae in routine clinical samples by assessment of marker genes fucK, hap, and sodC.

    PubMed

    Nørskov-Lauritsen, Niels

    2009-08-01

    Clinical isolates of Haemophilus influenzae were assessed for the presence of fucK, hap, and sodC by hybridization with gene-specific probes, and isolates diverging from the expected H. influenzae genotype were characterized by phenotype and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Two of 480 isolates were finally classified as variant strains ("nonhemolytic Haemophilus haemolyticus").

  15. Detection of Cryptic Genospecies Misidentified as Haemophilus influenzae in Routine Clinical Samples by Assessment of Marker Genes fucK, hap, and sodC▿

    PubMed Central

    Nørskov-Lauritsen, Niels

    2009-01-01

    Clinical isolates of Haemophilus influenzae were assessed for the presence of fucK, hap, and sodC by hybridization with gene-specific probes, and isolates diverging from the expected H. influenzae genotype were characterized by phenotype and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Two of 480 isolates were finally classified as variant strains (“nonhemolytic Haemophilus haemolyticus”). PMID:19535530

  16. Phylogenomic and Molecular Demarcation of the Core Members of the Polyphyletic Pasteurellaceae Genera Actinobacillus, Haemophilus, and Pasteurella

    PubMed Central

    Naushad, Sohail; Adeolu, Mobolaji; Goel, Nisha; Khadka, Bijendra; Al-Dahwi, Aqeel; Gupta, Radhey S.

    2015-01-01

    The genera Actinobacillus, Haemophilus, and Pasteurella exhibit extensive polyphyletic branching in phylogenetic trees and do not represent coherent clusters of species. In this study, we have utilized molecular signatures identified through comparative genomic analyses in conjunction with genome based and multilocus sequence based phylogenetic analyses to clarify the phylogenetic and taxonomic boundary of these genera. We have identified large clusters of Actinobacillus, Haemophilus, and Pasteurella species which represent the “sensu stricto” members of these genera. We have identified 3, 7, and 6 conserved signature indels (CSIs), which are specifically shared by sensu stricto members of Actinobacillus, Haemophilus, and Pasteurella, respectively. We have also identified two different sets of CSIs that are unique characteristics of the pathogen containing genera Aggregatibacter and Mannheimia, respectively. It is now possible to demarcate the genera Actinobacillus sensu stricto, Haemophilus sensu stricto, and Pasteurella sensu stricto on the basis of discrete molecular signatures. The other members of the genera Actinobacillus, Haemophilus, and Pasteurella that do not fall within the “sensu stricto” clades and do not contain these molecular signatures should be reclassified as other genera. The CSIs identified here also provide useful diagnostic targets for the identification of current and novel members of the indicated genera. PMID:25821780

  17. Phylogenomic and molecular demarcation of the core members of the polyphyletic pasteurellaceae genera actinobacillus, haemophilus, and pasteurella.

    PubMed

    Naushad, Sohail; Adeolu, Mobolaji; Goel, Nisha; Khadka, Bijendra; Al-Dahwi, Aqeel; Gupta, Radhey S

    2015-01-01

    The genera Actinobacillus, Haemophilus, and Pasteurella exhibit extensive polyphyletic branching in phylogenetic trees and do not represent coherent clusters of species. In this study, we have utilized molecular signatures identified through comparative genomic analyses in conjunction with genome based and multilocus sequence based phylogenetic analyses to clarify the phylogenetic and taxonomic boundary of these genera. We have identified large clusters of Actinobacillus, Haemophilus, and Pasteurella species which represent the "sensu stricto" members of these genera. We have identified 3, 7, and 6 conserved signature indels (CSIs), which are specifically shared by sensu stricto members of Actinobacillus, Haemophilus, and Pasteurella, respectively. We have also identified two different sets of CSIs that are unique characteristics of the pathogen containing genera Aggregatibacter and Mannheimia, respectively. It is now possible to demarcate the genera Actinobacillus sensu stricto, Haemophilus sensu stricto, and Pasteurella sensu stricto on the basis of discrete molecular signatures. The other members of the genera Actinobacillus, Haemophilus, and Pasteurella that do not fall within the "sensu stricto" clades and do not contain these molecular signatures should be reclassified as other genera. The CSIs identified here also provide useful diagnostic targets for the identification of current and novel members of the indicated genera.

  18. The TP0796 Lipoprotein of Treponema pallidum Is a Bimetal-dependent FAD Pyrophosphatase with a Potential Role in Flavin Homeostasis*

    PubMed Central

    Deka, Ranjit K.; Brautigam, Chad A.; Liu, Wei Z.; Tomchick, Diana R.; Norgard, Michael V.

    2013-01-01

    Treponema pallidum, an obligate parasite of humans and the causative agent of syphilis, has evolved the capacity to exploit host-derived metabolites for its survival. Flavin-containing compounds are essential cofactors that are required for metabolic processes in all living organisms, and riboflavin is a direct precursor of the cofactors FMN and FAD. Unlike many pathogenic bacteria, Treponema pallidum cannot synthesize riboflavin; we recently described a flavin-uptake mechanism composed of an ABC-type transporter. However, there is a paucity of information about flavin utilization in bacterial periplasms. Using a discovery-driven approach, we have identified the TP0796 lipoprotein as a previously uncharacterized Mg2+-dependent FAD pyrophosphatase within the ApbE superfamily. TP0796 probably plays a central role in flavin turnover by hydrolyzing exogenously acquired FAD, yielding AMP and FMN. Biochemical and structural investigations revealed that the enzyme has a unique bimetal Mg2+ catalytic center. Furthermore, the pyrophosphatase activity is product-inhibited by AMP, indicating a possible role for this molecule in modulating FMN and FAD levels in the treponemal periplasm. The ApbE superfamily was previously thought to be involved in thiamine biosynthesis, but our characterization of TP0796 prompts a renaming of this superfamily as a periplasmic flavin-trafficking protein (Ftp). TP0796 is the first structurally and biochemically characterized FAD pyrophosphate enzyme in bacteria. This new paradigm for a bacterial flavin utilization pathway may prove to be useful for future inhibitor design. PMID:23447540

  19. Genome-wide effects of selenium and translational uncoupling on transcription in the termite gut symbiont Treponema primitia.

    PubMed

    Matson, Eric G; Rosenthal, Adam Z; Zhang, Xinning; Leadbetter, Jared R

    2013-11-12

    When prokaryotic cells acquire mutations, encounter translation-inhibiting substances, or experience adverse environmental conditions that limit their ability to synthesize proteins, transcription can become uncoupled from translation. Such uncoupling is known to suppress transcription of protein-encoding genes in bacteria. Here we show that the trace element selenium controls transcription of the gene for the selenocysteine-utilizing enzyme formate dehydrogenase (fdhFSec) through a translation-coupled mechanism in the termite gut symbiont Treponema primitia, a member of the bacterial phylum Spirochaetes. We also evaluated changes in genome-wide transcriptional patterns caused by selenium limitation and by generally uncoupling translation from transcription via antibiotic-mediated inhibition of protein synthesis. We observed that inhibiting protein synthesis in T. primitia influences transcriptional patterns in unexpected ways. In addition to suppressing transcription of certain genes, the expected consequence of inhibiting protein synthesis, we found numerous examples in which transcription of genes and operons is truncated far downstream from putative promoters, is unchanged, or is even stimulated overall. These results indicate that gene regulation in bacteria allows for specific post-initiation transcriptional responses during periods of limited protein synthesis, which may depend both on translational coupling and on unclassified intrinsic elements of protein-encoding genes. A large body of literature demonstrates that the coupling of transcription and translation is a general and essential method by which bacteria regulate gene expression levels. However, the potential role of noncanonical amino acids in regulating transcriptional output via translational control remains, for the most part, undefined. Furthermore, the genome-wide transcriptional state in response to translational decoupling is not well quantified. The results presented here suggest that the

  20. An endo-acting proline-specific oligopeptidase from Treponema denticola ATCC 35405: evidence of hydrolysis of human bioactive peptides.

    PubMed

    Mäkinen, P L; Mäkinen, K K; Syed, S A

    1994-11-01

    An endo-acting proline-specific oligopeptidase (prolyl oligopeptidase [POPase], EC 3.4.21.26) was purified to homogeneity from the Triton X-100 extracts of cells of Treponema denticola ATCC 35405 (a human oral spirochete) by a procedure that comprised five successive fast protein liquid chromatography steps. The POPase is a cell-associated 75- to 77-kDa protein with an isoelectric point of ca. 6.5. The enzyme hydrolyzed (optimum pH 6.5) the Pro-pNA bond in carbobenzoxy-Gly-Pro-p-nitroanilide (Z-Gly-Pro-pNA) and bonds at the carboxyl side of proline in several human bioactive peptides, such as bradykinin, substance P, neurotensin, angiotensins, oxytocin, vasopressin, and human endothelin fragment 22-38. The minimum hydrolyzable peptide size was tetrapeptide P3P2P1P'1, while the maximum substrate size was ca. 3 kDa. An imino acid residue in position P1 was absolutely necessary. The hydrolysis of Z-Gly-Pro-pNA was potently inhibited by the following, with the Ki(app) (in micromolar) in parentheses: insulin B-chain (0.7), human endothelin-1 (0.5), neuropeptide Y (1.7), substance P (32.0), T-kinin (4.0), neurotensin (5.0), and bradykinin (16.0). Chemical modification and inhibition studies suggest that the POPase is a serine endopeptidase whose activity depends on the catalytic triad of COOH ... Ser ... His but not on a metal. The amino acid sequence around the putative active-site serine is Gly-Gly-Ser-Asn-Pro-Gly. The enzyme is suggested to contain a reactive cysteinyl residue near the active site. Amino acid residues 4 to 24 of the first 24 N-terminal residues showed a homology of 71% with the POPase precursor from Flavobacterium meningosepticum and considerable homology with the Aeromonas hydrophila POPase. The ready hydrolysis of human bioactive peptides at bonds involving an imino acid residue suggests that enzymes like POPase may contribute to the chronicity of periodontal infections by participating in the peptidolytic processing of those peptides.

  1. Superoxide reductase from the syphilis spirochete Treponema pallidum: crystallization and structure determination using soft X-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Santos-Silva, Teresa; Trincão, José; Carvalho, Ana L.; Bonifácio, Cecília; Auchère, Françoise; Moura, Isabel; Moura, José J. G.; Romão, Maria J.

    2005-11-01

    Superoxide reductase is a non-haem iron-containing protein involved in resistance to oxidative stress. The oxidized form of the protein has been crystallized and its three-dimensional structure solved. A highly redundant X-ray diffraction data set was collected on a rotating-anode generator using Cu Kα X-ray radiation. Four Fe atoms were located in the asymmetric unit corresponding to four protein molecules arranged as a dimer of homodimers. Superoxide reductase is a 14 kDa metalloprotein containing a catalytic non-haem iron centre [Fe(His){sub 4}Cys]. It is involved in defence mechanisms against oxygen toxicity, scavenging superoxide radicals from the cell. The oxidized form of Treponema pallidum superoxide reductase was crystallized in the presence of polyethylene glycol and magnesium chloride. Two crystal forms were obtained depending on the oxidizing agents used after purification: crystals grown in the presence of K{sub 3}Fe(CN){sub 6} belonged to space group P2{sub 1} (unit-cell parameters a = 60.3, b = 59.9, c = 64.8 Å, β = 106.9°) and diffracted beyond 1.60 Å resolution, while crystals grown in the presence of Na{sub 2}IrCl{sub 6} belonged to space group C2 (a = 119.4, b = 60.1, c = 65.6 Å, β = 104.9°) and diffracted beyond 1.55 Å. A highly redundant X-ray diffraction data set from the C2 crystal form collected on a copper rotating-anode generator (λ = 1.542 Å) clearly defined the positions of the four Fe atoms present in the asymmetric unit by SAD methods. A MAD experiment at the iron absorption edge confirmed the positions of the previously determined iron sites and provided better phases for model building and refinement. Molecular replacement using the P2{sub 1} data set was successful using a preliminary trace as a search model. A similar arrangement of the four protein molecules could be observed.

  2. Fibronectin Binding to the Treponema pallidum Adhesin Protein Fragment rTp0483 on Functionalized Self-Assembled Monolayers

    PubMed Central

    Dickerson, Matthew T.; Abney, Morgan B.; Cameron, Caroline E.; Knecht, Marc; Bachas, Leonidas G.; Anderson, Kimberly W.

    2012-01-01

    Past work has shown that Treponema pallidum, the causative agent of syphilis, binds host fibronectin (FN). FN and other host proteins are believed to bind to rare outer membrane proteins (OMPs) of T. pallidum, and it is postulated that this interaction may facilitate cell attachment and mask antigenic targets on the surface. This research seeks to prepare a surface capable of mimicking the FN binding ability of T. pallidum in order to investigate the impact of FN binding with adsorbed Tp0483 on the host response to the surface. By understanding this interaction it may be possible to develop more effective treatments for infection and possibly mimic the stealth properties of the bacteria. Functionalized self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on0 gold were used to investigate rTp0483 and FN adsorption. Using a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) rTp0483 adsorption and subsequent FN adsorption onto rTp0483 was determined to be higher on negatively charged carboxylate-terminated self-assembled monolayers (−COO− SAMs) compared to the other surfaces analyzed. Kinetic analysis of rTp0483 adsorption using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) supported this finding. Kinetic analysis of FN adsorption using SPR revealed a multi-step event, where the concentration of immobilized rTp0483 plays a role in FN binding. An examination of relative QCM dissipation energy compared to the shift in frequency showed a correlation between the physical properties of adsorbed rTp0483 and SAM surface chemistry. In addition, AFM images of rTp0483 on selected SAMs illustrated a preference of rTp0483 to bind as aggregates. Adsorption on −COO− SAMs was more uniform across the surface, which may help further explain why FN bound more strongly. rTp0483 antibody studies suggested the involvement of amino acids 274–289 and 316–333 in binding between rTp0483 to FN, while a peptide blocking study only showed inhibition of binding with amino acids 316–333. Finally, surface adsorbed rTp0483 with FN

  3. A double-edged sword: does highly active antiretroviral therapy contribute to syphilis incidence by impairing immunity to Treponema pallidum?

    PubMed

    Rekart, Michael L; Ndifon, Wilfred; Brunham, Robert C; Dushoff, Jonathan; Park, Sang Woo; Rawat, Sanjana; Cameron, Caroline E

    2017-08-01

    Recently, the world has experienced a rapidly escalating outbreak of infectious syphilis primarily affecting men who have sex with men (MSM); many are taking highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) for HIV-1 infection. The prevailing hypothesis is that HAART availability and effectiveness have led to the perception among both individuals who are HIV-1 infected and those who are uninfected that HIV-1 transmission has become much less likely, and the effects of HIV-1 infection less deadly. This is expected to result in increased sexual risk-taking, especially unprotected anal intercourse, leading to more non-HIV-1 STDs, including gonorrhoea, chlamydia and syphilis. However, syphilis incidence has increased more rapidly than other STDs. We hypothesise that HAART downregulates the innate and acquired immune responses to Treponema pallidum and that this biological explanation plays an important role in the syphilis epidemic. We performed a literature search and developed a mathematical model of HIV-1 and T. pallidum confection in a population with two risk groups with assortative mixing to explore the consequence on syphilis prevalence of HAART-induced changes in behaviour versus HAART-induced biological effects. Since rising syphilis incidence appears to have outpaced gonorrhoea and chlamydia, predominantly affecting HIV-1 positive MSM, behavioural factors alone may be insufficient to explain the unique, sharp increase in syphilis incidence. HAART agents have the potential to alter the innate and acquired immune responses in ways that may enhance susceptibility to T. pallidum. This raises the possibility that therapeutic and preventative HAART may inadvertently increase the incidence of syphilis, a situation that would have significant and global public health implications. We propose that additional studies investigating the interplay between HAART and enhanced T. pallidum susceptibility are needed. If our hypothesis is correct, HAART should be combined with

  4. Interspecies transfer of the penicillin-binding protein 3-encoding gene ftsI between Haemophilus influenzae and Haemophilus haemolyticus can confer reduced susceptibility to β-lactam antimicrobial agents.

    PubMed

    Søndergaard, Annette; Witherden, Elizabeth A; Nørskov-Lauritsen, Niels; Tristram, Stephen G

    2015-07-01

    Mutations in ftsI, encoding penicillin-binding protein 3, can cause decreased β-lactam susceptibility in Haemophilus influenzae. Sequencing of ftsI from clinical strains has indicated interspecies recombination of ftsI between H. influenzae and Haemophilus haemolyticus. This study documented apparently unrestricted homologous recombination of ftsI between H. influenzae and H. haemolyticus in vitro. Transfer of ftsI from resistant isolates conferred similar but not identical increases in the MICs of susceptible strains of H. influenzae and H. haemolyticus.

  5. Duplex Quantitative PCR Assay for Detection of Haemophilus influenzae That Distinguishes Fucose- and Protein D-Negative Strains

    PubMed Central

    de Gier, Camilla; Pickering, Janessa L.; Richmond, Peter C.; Thornton, Ruth B.

    2016-01-01

    We have developed a specific Haemophilus influenzae quantitative PCR (qPCR) that also identifies fucose-negative and protein D-negative strains. Analysis of 100 H. influenzae isolates, 28 Haemophilus haemolyticus isolates, and 14 other bacterial species revealed 100% sensitivity (95% confidence interval [CI], 96% to 100%) and 100% specificity (95% CI, 92% to 100%) for this assay. The evaluation of 80 clinical specimens demonstrated a strong correlation between semiquantitative culture and the qPCR (P < 0.001). PMID:27335148

  6. Changes in the prevalence and biofilm formation of Haemophilus influenzae and Haemophilus parainfluenzae from the respiratory microbiota of patients with sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Kosikowska, Urszula; Rybojad, Paweł; Stępień-Pyśniak, Dagmara; Żbikowska, Anna; Malm, Anna

    2016-08-26

    Healthy condition and chronic diseases may be associated with microbiota composition and its properties. The prevalence of respiratory haemophili with respect to their phenotypes including the ability to biofilm formation in patients with sarcoidosis was assayed. Nasopharynx and sputum specimens were taken in 31 patients with sarcoidosis (average age 42.6 ± 13), and nasopharynx specimens were taken in 37 healthy people (average age 44.6 ± 11.6). Haemophili were identified by API-NH microtest and by the matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) system. Biofilm was visualised by crystal violet staining and confocal scanning laser microscopy (CSLM). The statistical analysis was performed with Statgraphics Plus for Windows. In total, 30/31 patients with sarcoidosis and 31/37 healthy people were colonized by Haemophilus influenzae (6/30 vs. 1/31) and Haemophilus parainfluenzae (28/30 vs. 31/31) in the nasopharynx. The overall number of nasopharyngeal haemophili isolates was 59 in patients with sarcoidosis and 67 in healthy volunteers (H. influenzae 6/59 vs. 1/67, P = 0.05; H. parainfluenzae 47/59 vs. 65/67, P = 0.0032). Moreover, the decreased number of H. parainfluenzae biofilm-producing isolates was shown in nasopharyngeal samples in patients with sarcoidosis as compared to healthy people (19/31 vs. 57/65, P = 0.006), especially with respect to isolates classified as strong and very strong biofilm-producers (8/31 vs. 39/65, P = 0.002). The obtained data suggest that the qualitative and quantitative changes within the respiratory microbiota concerning the overall prevalence of H. influenzae together with the decreased number of H. parainfluenzae strains and the decreased rate of H. parainfluenzae biofilm-producing isolates as compared to healthy people may be associated with sarcoidosis.

  7. [Peritonitis in the course of peritoneal dialisis caused by Haemophilus influenzae with BLNAR phenotype].

    PubMed

    Miklaszewska, Monika; Klepacka, Joanna; Drozdz, Dorota; Zachwieja, Katarzyna; Pietrzyk, Jacek A; Kadłubowski, Marcin; Hryniewicz, Waleria

    2009-04-01

    Most common bacterial species causing peritonitis in the course of peritoneal dialysis (PDP) are coagulase-negative staphylococci, Staphylococcus aureus and streptococci. Haemophilus influenzae is rarely associated with PDP. Hereby we present the first known case of APD-associated peritonitis caused by non-type able H. influenzae (NTHi) presenting the beta-lactamase negative, ampicillin-resistant (BLNAR) phenotype. An 18 year old boy who had been treated with the APD for 12 months due to SLE was admitted in good general condition with diagnosis of PDP. Standard diagnostic and therapeutical procedures were initiated. Dialysis fluid was turbid with cytosis of 435 WBC/ml. From dialysis fluid pure culture of Gram-negative coccobacillus was isolated. The isolate was identified as a BLNAR phenotype. The same bacterium was isolated from nasal swab. Blood cultures were negative. After evaluation of antimicrobial susceptibility the treatment was changed for the oral ciprofloxacin. The treatment was successful. Control tests 2 days later revealed cytosis of 15 WBC/mm3 and control cultures of peritoneal fluid were negative. After two weeks of treatment the patient was discharged in a good condition. Haemophilus influenzae is a bacterium frequently colonizing the nasopharyngeal cavity. A PCR-based method allowed to classify isolates as NTHi. Infection was probably of the respiratory origin as the isolates (from peritoneal fluid and nasal swab) were undistinguishable. There are only few reports describing this species as an ethiologic agent of peritonitis. This case prove that Haemophilus species should be taken into account as a possible aethiologic agent of PDP, especially in patients on immunosupression with carrier state of H. influenzae in the upper respiratory tract. This kind of microorganism requires specific conditions during its growing in vitro. Identification of its sensitivity to antibiotics is essential in order to detect strains of BLNAR phenotype, as it is a

  8. Molecular surveillance of true nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae: an evaluation of PCR screening assays.

    PubMed

    Binks, Michael J; Temple, Beth; Kirkham, Lea-Ann; Wiertsema, Selma P; Dunne, Eileen M; Richmond, Peter C; Marsh, Robyn L; Leach, Amanda J; Smith-Vaughan, Heidi C

    2012-01-01

    Unambiguous identification of nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) is not possible by conventional microbiology. Molecular characterisation of phenotypically defined NTHi isolates suggests that up to 40% are Haemophilus haemolyticus (Hh); however, the genetic similarity of NTHi and Hh limits the power of simple molecular techniques such as PCR for species discrimination. Here we assess the ability of previously published and novel PCR-based assays to identify true NTHi. Sixty phenotypic NTHi isolates, classified by a dual 16S rRNA gene PCR algorithm as NTHi (n = 22), Hh (n = 27) or equivocal (n = 11), were further characterised by sequencing of the 16S rRNA and recA genes then interrogated by PCR-based assays targeting the omp P2, omp P6, lgtC, hpd, 16S rRNA, fucK and iga genes. The sequencing data and PCR results were used to define NTHi for this study. Two hpd real time PCR assays (hpd#1 and hpd#3) and the conventional iga PCR assay were equally efficient at differentiating study-defined NTHi from Hh, each with a receiver operator characteristic curve area of 0.90 [0.83; 0.98]. The hpd#1 and hpd#3 assays were completely specific against a panel of common respiratory bacteria, unlike the iga PCR, and the hpd#3 assay was able to detect below 10 copies per reaction. Our data suggest an evolutionary continuum between NTHi and Hh and therefore no single gene target could completely differentiate NTHi from Hh. The hpd#3 real time PCR assay proved to be the superior method for discrimination of NTHi from closely related Haemophilus species with the added potential for quantification of H. influenzae directly from specimens. We suggest the hpd#3 assay would be suitable for routine NTHi surveillance and to assess the impact of antibiotics and vaccines, on H. influenzae carriage rates, carriage density, and disease.

  9. Population genetics of Haemophilus influenzae serotype a in three Canadian provinces.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Raymond S W; Shuel, Michelle; Wylie, John; Lefebvre, Brigitte; Hoang, Linda; Law, Dennis K S

    2013-05-01

    Haemophilus influenzae serotype a (Hia) is an important pathogen since the introduction of vaccines for control of disease due to serotype b strains. Using a sodC-based polymerase chain reaction, Hia can be divided into 2 phylogenetic divisions, each with their own unique multilocus sequence types. Most Canadian Hia belongs to clonal division I and the ST-23 clonal complex. The recently described hypervirulent clone of ST-4 was found in a single Canadian isolate. Therefore, surveillance of invasive H. influenzae disease should include serotyping to detect Hia and multilocus sequence typing to detect hypervirulent clones.

  10. Effect of Haemophilus influenzae infection and moxalactam on platelet function in children.

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, S L; Courtney, J T; Kenal, K A

    1987-01-01

    In a prospective randomized study, children with Haemophilus influenzae type b meningitis received moxalactam or ampicillin or chloramphenicol. Of 41 children, 6 had prolonged bleeding times (greater than 6 min), and 7 of 9 tested had abnormal platelet aggregation at hospital admission. At the end of therapy, no children in the ampicillin-chloramphenicol group, compared with 5 of 22 moxalactam-treated children (23%) (P = 0.08), had prolonged bleeding times (6.5 to 7.5 min). Our data suggest that H. influenzae meningitis and treatment with moxalactam may each have an effect on platelet function in children. PMID:3579263

  11. Diversity of the P2 protein among nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae isolates.

    PubMed Central

    Bell, J; Grass, S; Jeanteur, D; Munson, R S

    1994-01-01

    The genes for outer membrane protein P2 of four nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae strains were cloned and sequenced. The derived amino acid sequences were compared with the outer membrane protein P2 sequence from H. influenzae type b MinnA and the sequences of P2 from three additional nontypeable H. influenzae strains. The sequences were 76 to 94% identical. The sequences had regions with considerable variability separated by regions which were highly conserved. The variable regions mapped to putative surface-exposed loops of the protein. PMID:8188390

  12. Photodynamic Action on Native and Denatured Transforming Deoxyribonucleic Acid from Haemophilus influenzae

    PubMed Central

    León, Manuel Ponce-De; Cabrera-Juárez, Emiliano

    1970-01-01

    The photodynamic inactivation of native or denatured transforming deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) from Haemophilus influenzae is described. The inactivation at the same pH was higher for denatured than native DNA. At acidic pH, the inactivation both for native and denatured DNA was faster than at alkaline pH. The guanine content of photoinactivated native DNA at neutral pH was less than untreated DNA. The inactivation of biological activity was more extensive than the alteration of guanine. The absorption spectrum of photoinactivated native or denatured DNA was only slightly different than the control DNA at the different experimental conditions. PMID:5309576

  13. [Isolation of Haemophilus influenzae serotypes from deep sites in sick children].

    PubMed

    Gatti, B M; Ramirez Gronda, G A; Etchevarría, M; Vescina, C M; Varea, A M; González Ayala, S E

    2004-01-01

    Haemophilus influenzae (Hi) is the causative agent of several human diseases such as sepsis, meningitis, celulitis, and osteoarthritis. We investigated the isolation of Hi serotypes from sterile sites in sick children. One hundred and seventy nine strains from 146 patients were studied, period 1996-2002, at the Microbiology Laboratory, Hospital de Niños Superiora Sor María Ludovica, Argentina. The serotype distribution was:1 a, 112 b,1 c,1 d, 4 e, 3 f y 24 no typable. Since the beginning of universal Hi b vaccination in 1998, we have observed the fast decrease of serotype b and a relative increase of other serotypes.

  14. Phylogenetic relationship of non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae isolated in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Mohd-Zain, Zaini; Kamsani, Nurul H; Ahmad, Norazah; Clarke, Stuart C

    2015-12-01

    The epidemiology of non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) remains poorly understood. We therefore sought to determine the genetic relationship of 25 NTHi isolated from various states in Malaysia using multilocus sequence typing (MLST). The majority of isolates were obtained from sputum. There were 24 novel sequence types (STs). Eight isolates were single-locus variants, the remainder being singletons. Clustering was not based on clinical site of isolation or geographical origin. Despite the limited number of isolates examined in this study, we demonstrate that NTHi isolates in Malaysia are diverse and warrant further investigation.

  15. Analysis of non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae in invasive disease reveals lack of the capsule locus.

    PubMed

    Lâm, T-T; Claus, H; Frosch, M; Vogel, U

    2016-01-01

    Among invasive Haemophilus influenzae, unencapsulated strains have largely surpassed the previously predominant serotype b (Hib) because of Hib vaccination. Isolates without the genomic capsule (cap) locus are designated non-typeable H. influenzae (NTHi). They are different from capsule-deficient variants that show deletion of the capsule transport gene bexA within the cap locus. The frequency of capsule-deficient variants in invasive disease is unknown. We analysed 783 unencapsulated invasive isolates collected over 5 years in Germany and found no single capsule-deficient isolate. Invasive unencapsulated strains in Germany were exclusively NTHi. A negative serotyping result by slide agglutination was therefore highly predictive for NTHi.

  16. Prevalence of Haemophilus parasuis serovars isolated in Spain from 1993 to 1997.

    PubMed

    Rúbies, X; Kielstein, P; Costa, L; Riera, P; Artigas, C; Espuña, E

    1999-04-19

    From 1993 to 1997, 327 strains of Haemophilus parasuis were isolated from spanish swine in our Diagnostic Laboratory and 174 strains (53.2%) were serotyped. Four serotypes, sv. 5 (18.4%), sv 4 (16%), sv. 2 (9.2%) and sv. 13 (8%) were the most frequently isolated and 29.3% of the studied strains were classified as non typable. The results obtained indicate that the distribution of the serotypes in Spain is very similar to that found by other researchers in Germany, Australia, Canada and alike to that found in the United States.

  17. Impact of the Haemophilus influenzae type b vaccination program on HIB meningitis in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Miranzi, Sybelle de Souza Castro; de Moraes, Suzana Alves; de Freitas, Isabel Cristina Martins

    2007-07-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the impact of vaccination against Haemophilus influenzae type b (HIB) in Brazil on the morbidity, mortality, and case fatality of HIB meningitis, using the Ministry of Health database and population data from the Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics (Instituto Brasileiro de Geografia e Estatística--IBGE). Impact was evaluated through a time series analysis (1983-2002), using regression forecasting (RF) by dividing the time series into two periods: (a) historical (1983-1998) and (b) validation (1999-2002). Impact of the vaccination was positive, although more significant for incidence and mortality than for case fatality rates.

  18. Bone and Joint Infections due to Haemophilus parainfluenzae: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Evan; Missaghi, Bayan

    2016-01-01

    Haemophilus parainfluenzae is a normal inhabitant of the human respiratory tract. However it is an increasingly recognized pathogen in invasive infections, particularly in the immunocompromised host and where there is disruption of the normal skin or mucosal barriers. We present a case of a 56-year-old female with a history of asplenia who developed H. parainfluenzae septic arthritis of the hip following an intra-articular steroid injection. We also summarize previously reported cases of bone and joint infections caused by H. parainfluenzae. PMID:27516778

  19. Similarity in properties and mapping of three Rec mutants of Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed Central

    Kooistra, J; Setlow, J K

    1976-01-01

    Three Rec- mutants of Haemophilus influenzae have been studied with respect to their transformability, ultraviolet and mitomycin C sensitivities, spontaneous and ultraviolet-induced deoxyribonucleic acid breakdown, inducibility of lysogens, and the linkage of the three mutations to a streptomycin resistance marker. The data indicate that the three mutations cause the same phenotypic changes, and that they are all on the same gene. Transformability of the mutants is different when two different media are used for competence development, although transformability with the two competence methods is not different in a Rec- strain that is mutant at another gene. PMID:1084339

  20. Clinical comparison of the Treponema pallidum CAPTIA syphilis-G enzyme immunoassay with the fluorescent treponemal antibody absorption immunoglobulin G assay for syphilis testing.

    PubMed

    Halling, V W; Jones, M F; Bestrom, J E; Wold, A D; Rosenblatt, J E; Smith, T F; Cockerill, F R

    1999-10-01

    Recently, a treponema-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) enzyme immunoassay (EIA), the CAPTIA Syphilis-G (Trinity Biotech, Jamestown, N.Y.), has become available as a diagnostic test for syphilis. A total of 89 stored sera previously tested by the fluorescent treponemal antibody absorption (FTA-ABS) IgG assay were evaluated by the CAPTIA EIA. The FTA-ABS IgG procedure was performed by technologists unblinded to results of rapid plasmid reagin (RPR) testing of the same specimens. Borderline CAPTIA-positive samples (antibody indices of >/=0.650 and 0.900, the sample was considered positive. Thirteen of 89 (15%) samples had discrepant results. Compared to the FTA-ABS assay, the CAPTIA EIA had a sensitivity and specificity and positive and negative predictive values of 70.7, 97.9, 96.7, and 79.7%, respectively. In another analysis, discrepancies between results were resolved by repeated FTA-ABS testing (technologists were blinded to previous RPR results) and patient chart reviews. Seven CAPTIA-negative samples which were previously interpreted (unblinded) as minimally reactive by the FTA method were subsequently interpreted (blinded) as nonreactive. One other discrepant sample (CAPTIA negative and FTA-ABS positive [at an intensity of 3+], unblinded) was FTA negative with repeated testing (blinded). For the five remaining discrepant samples, chart reviews indicated that one patient (CAPTIA negative and FTA-ABS positive [minimally reactive], blinded) had possible syphilis. These five samples were also evaluated and found to be negative by another treponema-specific test, the Treponema pallidum microhemagglutination assay. Therefore, after repeated testing and chart reviews, 2 of the 89 (2%) samples had discrepant results; the adjusted sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values were 96.7, 98.3, 96.7, and 98.3%, respectively. This study demonstrates that the CAPTIA IgG EIA is a